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Sample records for pancreatitis alcoholic

  1. Sequential changes from minimal pancreatic inflammation to advanced alcoholic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Noronha, M; Dreiling, D A; Bordalo, O

    1983-11-01

    A correlation of several clinical parameters and pancreatitis morphological alterations observed in chronic alcoholics with and without pancreatic is presented. Three groups of patients were studied: asymptomatic chronic alcoholics (24); non-alcoholic controls (10); and cases with advanced chronic pancreatitis (6). Clinical, biochemical and functional studies were performed. Morphological studies were made on surgical biopsy specimens in light and electron microscopy. The results of this study showed: 1) fat accumulates within pancreatic acinar cells in alcoholics drinking more than 80 g of ethanol per day; 2) ultrastructural changes found in acinar cells of the alcoholics are similar to those described for liver cells; 3) the alterations found in alcoholics without pancreatitis are also observed in those with advanced chronic pancreatitis. An attempt to correlate the sequential changes in the histopathology of alcoholic pancreatic disease with the clinical picture and secretory patterns was made. According to these observations, admitting the ultrastructural similarities between the liver and the pancreas and the recently demonstrated abnormalities of lipid metabolism in pancreatic cells in experimental animal research, the authors postulate a toxic-metabolic mechanism as a likely hypothesis for the pathogenesis of chronic alcoholic inflammation of the pancreas.

  2. Alcohol consumption and pancreatitis mortality in Russia.

    PubMed

    Razvodovsky, Yury E

    2014-07-28

    Pancreatitis is a major public health problem with high associated economic costs. The incidence of pancreatitis has increased in many European countries in recent decade. Accumulated research and empirical evidence suggests that excessive alcohol consumption is a major risk factor for both acute and chronic pancreatitis. The aim of this study was to examine the aggregate-level relation between the alcohol consumption and pancreatitis mortality rates in Russia. Age-standardized sex-specific male and female pancreatitis mortality data for the period 1970-2005 and data on overall alcohol consumption were analyzed by means ARIMA (autoregressive integrated moving average) time series analysis. Alcohol consumption was significantly associated with both male and female pancreatitis mortality rates: a 1 liter increase in overall alcohol consumption would result in a 7.0% increase in the male pancreatitis mortality rate and in 2.3% increase in the female mortality rate. The results of the analysis suggest that 63.1% of all male pancreatitis deaths and 26.8% female deaths in Russia could be attributed to alcohol. Conclusions The outcomes of this study provide indirect support for the hypothesis that unfavorable mixture of higher overall level of alcohol consumption and binge drinking pattern is an important contributor to the pancreatitis mortality rate in Russian Federation.

  3. [Capillaroscopy in patients with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Teixeira, G P; de Alencar, R; Fonseca, M de O; Bernardini, E M

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was verify frequency and morphological presentations of microangiopathy in patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis, using nailfold capillaroscopy. All patients showed morphological and functional capillary abnormalities. None of them had a normal capillaroscopy. Our findings may suggest an important role of microcirculation in Alcoholic Chronic Pancreatitis pathogenesis and/or its course.

  4. Betaine Attenuates Alcohol-Induced Pancreatic Steatosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenjuan; Gao, Jinhang; Tai, Yang; Chen, Meng; Huang, Luming; Wen, Shilei; Huang, Zhiyin; Liu, Rui; Li, Jing; Tang, Chengwei

    2016-07-01

    To explore the effect of betaine on alcoholic pancreatic steatosis and its mechanism. Rats were randomly assigned to control, ethanol, or ethanol + betaine groups. Changes in pancreatic morphology; serum lipid levels; and pancreatic lipid, amylase and lipase levels were determined. The serum and adipose tissue adiponectin level was measured by an enzyme-linked immunoassay. Adiponectin receptor-1 (AdipoR1), AdipoR2, sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), SREBP-2, and fatty acid synthetase expression levels were quantified. The SREBP-1c expression in SW1990 cells treated with various concentrations of ethanol or ethanol plus betaine and/or adiponectin was assessed. Alcohol-induced changes in pancreatic morphology were attenuated by betaine. Pancreatic triglyceride, free fatty acid and expression levels of SREBP-1c and fatty acid synthetase were elevated after ethanol feeding but remained at control levels after betaine supplementation. Alcohol-induced decreases in serum and adipose tissue adiponectin, pancreatic AdipoR1, amylase, and lipase were attenuated by betaine. Serum triglyceride and free fatty acid levels were elevated after alcohol consumption and remained higher after betaine supplementation compared with controls. Betaine and/or adiponectin suppressed alcohol-induced SREBP-1c upregulation in vitro. Betaine attenuated alcoholic-induced pancreatic steatosis most likely by suppressing pancreatic SREBP-1c both directly and through the restoration of adiponectin signaling.

  5. Alcoholic pancreatitis: Lessons from the liver

    PubMed Central

    Clemens, Dahn L; Mahan, Katrina J

    2010-01-01

    The association between alcohol consumption and pancreatitis has been recognized for over 100 years. Despite the fact that this association is well recognized, the mechanisms by which alcohol abuse leads to pancreatic tissue damage are not entirely clear. Alcohol abuse is the major factor associated with pancreatitis in the Western world. Interestingly, although most cases of chronic pancreatitis and many cases of acute pancreatitis are associated with alcohol abuse, only a small percentage of individuals who abuse alcohol develop this disease. This situation is reminiscent of the association between alcohol abuse and the incidence of alcoholic liver disease. The liver and the pancreas are developmentally very closely related. Even though these two organs are quite different, they exhibit a number of general structural and functional similarities. Furthermore, the diseases mediated by alcohol abuse in these organs exhibit some striking similarities. The diseases in both organs are characterized by parenchymal cell damage, activation of stellate cells, aberrant wound healing, and fibrosis. Because of the similarities between the liver and the pancreas, and the alcohol-associated diseases of these organs, we may be able to apply much of the knowledge that we have gained regarding the effects of alcohol on the liver to the pancreas. PMID:20238397

  6. Alcohol and the pancreas. II. Pancreatic morphology of advanced alcoholic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Noronha, M; Bordalo, O; Dreiling, D A

    1981-08-01

    The histopathology of advanced chronic alcoholic pancreatitis is dominated by cellular degeneration, atrophy and fibrosis. Sequential changes in the histopathology of alcoholic pancreatic disease has been defined and traced from initial injury to end-stage disease. These sequential histopathologies have been correlated with clinical syndrome and secretory patterns. The data are more consistent with a toxic-metabolic pathogenesis of alcoholic pancreatitis than the previous Big Duct and Small Duct hypotheses.

  7. Role of Alcohol Metabolism in Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Vonlaufen, Alain; Wilson, Jeremy S.; Pirola, Romano C.; Apte, Minoti V.

    2007-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is the major cause of chronic inflammation of the pancreas (i.e., chronic pancreatitis). Although it has long been thought that alcoholic pancreatitis is a chronic disease from the outset, evidence is accumulating to indicate that chronic damage in the pancreas may result from repeated attacks of acute tissue inflammation and death (i.e., necroinflammation). Initially, research into the pathogenesis of alcoholic pancreatitis was related to ductular and sphincteric abnormalities. In recent years, the focus has shifted to the type of pancreas cell that produces digestive juices (i.e., acinar cell). Alcohol now is known to exert a number of toxic effects on acinar cells. Notably, acinar cells have been shown to metabolize alcohol (i.e., ethanol) via both oxidative (i.e., involving oxygen) and nonoxidative pathways. The isolation and study of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs)—the key effectors in the development of connective tissue fibers (i.e., fibrogenesis) in the pancreas—has greatly enhanced our understanding of the pathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatic stellate cells become activated in response to ethanol and acetaldehyde, a toxic byproduct of alcohol metabolism. In addition, PSCs have the capacity to metabolize alcohol via alcohol dehydrogenase (the major oxidizing enzyme for ethanol). The fact that only a small percentage of heavy alcoholics develop chronic pancreatitis has led to the search for precipitating factors of the disease. Several studies have investigated whether variations in ethanol-metabolizing enzymes may be a trigger factor for chronic pancreatitis, but no definite relationship has been established so far. PMID:17718401

  8. Chronic alcohol drinking: Liver and pancreatic cancer?

    PubMed

    Zakhari, Samir

    2015-09-01

    Cancer is a multifactorial disease that results from complex interactions of numerous risk factors - genetic and environmental - over time, eventually leading to the diseased phenotypes. Thus, while epidemiological studies can point to risk factors, they cannot determine cause and effect relationships, and are unable to give biological and clinical insights into carcinogenesis. The link between any risk factor and carcinogenesis needs to be validated in experimental models. This is particularly true in epidemiological studies on alcohol consumption and its consequences. While there is no doubt that heavy alcohol consumption has devastating health effects, the inconsistencies in alcohol-related epidemiological studies and cancer suffer from possible sources of the variability in outcomes, ranging from inaccuracy of self-report of consumption to the problem of correlating cancer that started decades earlier to current or recent alcohol consumption. To further study the interactions between alcohol and cancer, the use of "Molecular Pathological Epidemiology" (MPE) advocated by Ogino et al. for dissecting the interplay between etiological factors, cellular and molecular characteristics, and disease progression in cancer is appropriate. MPE does not consider cancer as a single entity, rather it integrates analyses of epidemiological studies with the macroenvironment and molecular and microenvironment. This approach allows investigating the relationships between potential etiological agents and cancer based on molecular signatures. More research is needed to fully elucidate the link between heavy alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer, and to further investigate the roles of acetaldehyde and FAEEs in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Alcohol and smoking as risk factors in chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Talamini, G; Bassi, C; Falconi, M; Sartori, N; Salvia, R; Rigo, L; Castagnini, A; Di Francesco, V; Frulloni, L; Bovo, P; Vaona, B; Angelini, G; Vantini, I; Cavallini, G; Pederzoli, P

    1999-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare alcohol and smoking as risk factors in the development of chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. We considered only male subjects: (1) 630 patients with chronic pancreatitis who developed 12 pancreatic and 47 extrapancreatic cancers; (2) 69 patients with histologically well documented pancreatic cancer and no clinical history of chronic pancreatitis; and (3) 700 random controls taken from the Verona polling list and submitted to a complete medical check-up. Chronic pancreatitis subjects drink more than control subjects and more than subjects with pancreatic cancer without chronic pancreatitis (P<0.001). The percentage of smokers in the group with chronic pancreatitis is significantly higher than that in the control group [odds ratio (OR) 17.3; 95% CI 12.6-23.8; P<0.001] and in the group with pancreatic carcinomas but with no history of chronic pancreatitis (OR 5.3; 95% CI 3.0-9.4; P<0.001). In conclusion, our study shows that: (1) the risk of chronic pancreatitis correlates both with alcohol intake and with cigarette smoking with a trend indicating that the risk increases with increased alcohol intake and cigarette consumption; (2) alcohol and smoking are statistically independent risk factors for chronic pancreatitis; and (3) the risk of pancreatic cancer correlates positively with cigarette smoking but not with drinking.

  10. Animal model of alcoholic pancreatitis: role of viral infections.

    PubMed

    Jerrells, Thomas R; Chapman, Nora; Clemens, Dahn L

    2003-11-01

    Pancreatitis is clearly associated with alcohol abuse, but only a relatively small percentage of people who abuse alcohol develops obvious pancreatitis. These observations have led to the concept that the development of alcoholic pancreatitis requires cofactors. Although diet and smoking have been studied, a clear cofactor has not been identified. The study results presented in this paper were obtained to determine whether viral infection of the pancreas would be a cofactor for alcoholic pancreatitis similar to the role of hepatitis virus infections in the development of alcoholic liver disease. To test this hypothesis, mice were fed ethanol with a liquid diet protocol and infected with coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3). It was found that consumption of alcohol alone did not result in pancreatitis as determined by serum levels of amylase or histologic changes in the pancreas. Two strains of CVB3 that are tropic for the pancreas were used; a virulent and an avirulent strain. Infection of alcohol-fed animals with the virulent CVB3 strain 28 resulted in a more severe pancreatitis than the pancreatitis noted in control animals. Alcohol-fed mice infected with the avirulent strain (GA) showed severe pancreatitis, whereas the infection of control mice did not result in obvious pathologic effects in the pancreas. This model allows mechanistic studies to define the role of viral infection as a cofactor for alcoholic pancreatitis.

  11. Alcohol and acute pancreatitis. An experimental study in the rat.

    PubMed

    Jalovaara, P; Apaja, M

    1978-01-01

    The effect of chronic alcohol pretreatment and various pancreatobiliary secretions on the severity of experimental pancreatitis was studied in the rat. 95 rats were pretreated with ethanol (20% w/v, 1.1 ml/100 g body weight) five times weekly for 10 to 12 weeks by gastric intubation. 88 rats served as controls. Pancreatic lesions were produced by retograde injection of different pancreatobiliary secretions into the pancreatic ducts. The secretions were collected from both normal and chronically alcohol-fed rats, and each was used for induction of experimental pancreatitis in the control and alcohol pretreated rats. Bile obtained from normal rats was no more toxic to the pancreas than 0.9% saline solution, while bile obtained from the chronically alcohol-fed rats caused significantly more serious lesions to the pancreas than did normal rat bile. Bile-pancreatic juice (mixture of secretions at papilla of Vater) of normal and chronically alcohol-fed rats was as toxic as the bile of the alcohol-fed rats. Alcohol pretreatment had no significant effect on the severity of pancreatitis when control and alcohol-fed groups separately or the whole material according to pretreatment was examined. These results suggest that the metabolic effects of ethanol on the pancreas as such do not sensitize the pancreas to acute pancreatitis. An exogenous mechanism is required. The reflux of toxic alcoholic bile into the pancreas might act as an induction factor in acute alcohol pancreatitis.

  12. Increased plasma pancreatic polypeptide in chronic alcohol abuse.

    PubMed

    Fink, R S; Adrian, T E; Margot, D H; Bloom, S R

    1983-04-01

    Post-prandial plasma gastrointestinal hormone profiles were measured in nine chronic alcoholics, one and fourteen days after complete alcohol withdrawal. Basal plasma pancreatic polypeptide concentration (PP--mean +/- SE mean) was significantly greater in alcoholics (control, 28 +/- 5 pmol/l; alcoholics, post-withdrawal day 1, 62 +/- 14 pmol/l, P less than 0.05; and post-withdrawal day 14, 89 +/- 17 pmol/1, P less than 0.005). The total integrated (TIR) PP response following a test breakfast was similarly elevated (control, 442 +/- 63 units; alcoholics, day 1, 1310 +/- 231 units, P less than 0.005; day 14,1066 +/- 66, P less than 0.005). Basal and TIR values for gastrin, gastric inhibitory peptide, insulin and glucagon were similar in alcoholics and controls. As PP has been shown to inhibit pancreatic exocrine enzyme secretion, these findings may help explain the abnormal pancreatic function seen frequently in alcoholics.

  13. Characterization of Mouse Models of Early Pancreatic Lesions Induced by Alcohol and Chronic Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shiping; Chheda, Chintan; Ouhaddi, Yassine; Benhaddou, Hajar; Bourhim, Mouloud; Grippo, Paul J; Principe, Daniel R; Mascariñas, Emman; DeCant, Brian; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu; Pandol, Stephen J; Edderkaoui, Mouad

    2015-08-01

    We describe the first mouse model of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) lesions induced by alcohol in the presence and absence of chronic pancreatitis. Pdx1-Cre;LSL-K-ras mice were exposed to Lieber-DeCarli alcohol diet for 6 weeks with cerulein injections. The PanIN lesions and markers of fibrosis, inflammation, histone deacetylation, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and cancer stemness were measured by immunohistochemistry and Western. Exposure of Pdx1-Cre;LSL-K-ras mice to an alcohol diet significantly stimulated fibrosis and slightly but not significantly increased the level of PanIN lesions associated with an increase in tumor-promoting M2 macrophages. Importantly, the alcohol diet did not increase activation of stellate cells. Alcohol diet and cerulein injections resulted in synergistic and additive effects on PanIN lesion and M2 macrophage phenotype induction, respectively. Cerulein pancreatitis caused stellate cell activation, EMT, and cancer stemness in the pancreas. Pancreatitis caused histone deacetylation, which was promoted by the alcohol diet. Pancreatitis increased EMT and cancer stemness markers, which were not further affected by the alcohol diet. The results suggest that alcohol has independent effects on promotion of PDAC associated with fibrosis formed through a stellate cell-independent mechanism and that it further promotes early PDAC and M2 macrophage induction in the context of chronic pancreatitis.

  14. Alcoholic liver disease and pancreatitis: global health problems being addressed by the US National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Warren, Kenneth R; Murray, Margaret M

    2013-08-01

    The review article summarizes the mission of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) with focus on the NIAAA's current and future research version for alcoholic liver disease and alcoholic pancreatitis. © 2013 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Genetic susceptibility factors for alcohol-induced chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Aghdassi, Ali A; Weiss, F Ulrich; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M; Simon, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease of the pancreas and frequently associated with immoderate alcohol consumption. Since only a small proportion of alcoholics eventually develop chronic pancreatitis genetic susceptibility factors have long been suspected to contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease. Smaller studies in ethnically defined populations have found that not only polymorphism in proteins involved in the metabolism of ethanol, such as Alcohol Dehydrogenase and Aldehyde Dehydrogenase, can confer a risk for developing chronic pancreatitis but also mutations that had previously been reported in association with idiopathic pancreatitis, such as SPINK1 mutations. In a much broader approach employing genome wide search strategies the NAPS study found that polymorphisms in the Trypsin locus (PRSS1 rs10273639), and the Claudin 2 locus (CLDN2-RIPPLY1-MORC4 locus rs7057398 and rs12688220) confer an increased risk of developing alcohol-induced pancreatitis. These results from North America have now been confirmed by a European consortium. In another genome wide approach polymorphisms in the genes encoding Fucosyltransferase 2 (FUT2) non-secretor status and blood group B were not only found in association with higher serum lipase levels in healthy volunteers but also to more than double the risk for developing alcohol-associated chronic pancreatitis. These novel genetic associations will allow to investigate the pathophysiological and biochemical basis of alcohol-induced chronic pancreatitis on a cellular level and in much more detail than previously possible. Copyright © 2015 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The Alcohol Dehydrogenase Isoenzyme as a Potential Marker of Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Jelski, Wojciech; Piechota, Joanna; Orywal, Karolina; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2018-05-01

    Human pancreas parenchyma contains various alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoenzymes and also possesses aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity. The altered activities of ADH and ALDH in damaged pancreatic tissue in the course of pancreatitis are reflected in the human serum. The aim of this study was to investigate a potential role of ADH and ALDH as markers for acute (AP) and chronic pancreatitis (CP). Serum samples were collected for routine biochemical investigations from 75 patients suffering from acute pancreatitis and 70 patients with chronic pancreatitis. Fluorometric methods were used to measure the activity of class I and II ADH and ALDH activity. The total ADH activity and activity of class III and IV isoenzymes were measured by a photometric method. There was a significant increase in the activity of ADH III isoenzyme (15.06 mU/l and 14.62 mU/l vs. 11.82 mU/l; p<0.001) and total ADH activity (764 mU/l and 735 mU/l vs. 568 mU/l) in the sera of patients with acute pancreatitis or chronic pancreatitis compared to the control. The diagnostic sensitivity for ADH III was about 84%, specificity was 92 %, positive and negative predictive values were 93% and 87% respectively in acute pancreatitis. Area under the Receiver Operating Curve (ROC) curve for ADH III in AP and CP was 0.88 and 0.86 respectively. ADH III has a potential role as a marker of acute and chronic pancreatitis. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  17. Purtscher-like retinopathy in acute alcoholic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Nema, Nitin; Ishrat, Saba; Verma, Abha; Kela, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    A 23-year-old man with a history of alcoholism presented with vomiting, fever, and sharp epigastric pain radiating to the back and flanks. He was diagnosed as a case of acute alcoholic pancreatitis on the basis of clinical findings and investigations. On the next day of presentation, he developed sudden bilateral visual loss. His best-corrected visual acuity was finger counting at one-foot distance in both eyes. He had diffuse whitening in the circumpapillary area, haloes around the retinal vessels (Purtscher flecken) and intra-retinal hemorrhages on ophthalmoscopic examination. Optical coherence tomography revealed bilateral macular edema. These findings were characteristic of Purtscher-like retinopathy. The patient showed systemic and visual improvement at 8 weeks follow-up after receiving the conventional treatment for acute alcoholic pancreatitis. This case emphasizes the importance of fundus examination by an ophthalmologist in the diagnosis of this rare under-diagnosed entity. PMID:27433040

  18. Purtscher-like retinopathy in acute alcoholic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Nema, Nitin; Ishrat, Saba; Verma, Abha; Kela, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    A 23-year-old man with a history of alcoholism presented with vomiting, fever, and sharp epigastric pain radiating to the back and flanks. He was diagnosed as a case of acute alcoholic pancreatitis on the basis of clinical findings and investigations. On the next day of presentation, he developed sudden bilateral visual loss. His best-corrected visual acuity was finger counting at one-foot distance in both eyes. He had diffuse whitening in the circumpapillary area, haloes around the retinal vessels (Purtscher flecken) and intra-retinal hemorrhages on ophthalmoscopic examination. Optical coherence tomography revealed bilateral macular edema. These findings were characteristic of Purtscher-like retinopathy. The patient showed systemic and visual improvement at 8 weeks follow-up after receiving the conventional treatment for acute alcoholic pancreatitis. This case emphasizes the importance of fundus examination by an ophthalmologist in the diagnosis of this rare under-diagnosed entity.

  19. Pentoxifylline Treatment in Acute Pancreatitis (AP)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-02-21

    Acute Pancreatitis (AP); Gallstone Pancreatitis; Alcoholic Pancreatitis; Post-ERCP/Post-procedural Pancreatitis; Trauma Acute Pancreatitis; Hypertriglyceridemia Acute Pancreatitis; Idiopathic (Unknown) Acute Pancreatitis; Medication Induced Acute Pancreatitis; Cancer Acute Pancreatitis; Miscellaneous (i.e. Acute on Chronic Pancreatitis)

  20. Differences in Severity and Outcomes Between Hypertriglyceridemia and Alcohol-Induced Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Hemant; Smith, Betsy; Bayer, Chelsey; Rutherford, Carla; Shelnut, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    Background: Alcohol and hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) are among the most common causes of acute pancreatitis (AP) after gallstones. However, differences in severity at the time of presentation and outcomes have not been well-studied. Objective: The aim of this study is to assess the differences between severity at presentation and outcomes of AP of hypertriglyceridemic and alcoholic origins. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of 177 patients who were discharged with diagnosis of AP was performed. Severity at presentation was identified by the presence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome, bedside index for severity in AP (BISAP) score, and Balthazar index. Outcomes were measured by the length of stay, intensive care unit care, surgical intervention, and mortality. Results: We found 147 patients with alcoholic pancreatitis and 30 patients with hypertriglyceridemic pancreatitis. A larger percentage of hypertriglyceridemic pancreatitis patients (23.33%) had a BISAP score of ≥2 compared to the alcoholic group (12.24%). Only 32.65% of the patients with alcoholic pancreatitis but 60% of the patients with hypertriglyceridemic pancreatitis had the presence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) at admission (P = 0.0067). There were 73.34% hypertriglyceridemic pancreatits patients and only 40.28% alcoholic pancreatitis patients with Balthazar index C or greater, suggesting a higher disease burden at admission for hypertriglyceridemic pancreatitis patients (P = 0.0047). There was a statistically significant difference in the relative number of hypertriglyceridemic and alcoholic pancreatitis patients receiving intensive care (P = 0.00030) and in receiving surgical interventions related to pancreatitis (P = 0.016). Conclusion: Our study found that patients with hypertriglyceridemic pancreatitis have a greater severity of disease and they experience less favorable outcomes than patients with alcoholic pancreatitis. PMID:27042605

  1. Pancreatic injury in hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase-deficient deer mice after subchronic exposure to ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Kaphalia, Bhupendra S., E-mail: bkaphali@utmb.ed; Bhopale, Kamlesh K.; Kondraganti, Shakuntala

    2010-08-01

    Pancreatitis caused by activation of digestive zymogens in the exocrine pancreas is a serious chronic health problem in alcoholic patients. However, mechanism of alcoholic pancreatitis remains obscure due to lack of a suitable animal model. Earlier, we reported pancreatic injury and substantial increases in endogenous formation of fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in the pancreas of hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-deficient (ADH{sup -}) deer mice fed 4% ethanol. To understand the mechanism of alcoholic pancreatitis, we evaluated dose-dependent metabolism of ethanol and related pancreatic injury in ADH{sup -} and hepatic ADH-normal (ADH{sup +}) deer mice fed 1%, 2% or 3.5% ethanolmore » via Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet daily for 2 months. Blood alcohol concentration (BAC) was remarkably increased and the concentration was {approx} 1.5-fold greater in ADH{sup -} vs. ADH{sup +} deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol. At the end of the experiment, remarkable increases in pancreatic FAEEs and significant pancreatic injury indicated by the presence of prominent perinuclear space, pyknotic nuclei, apoptotic bodies and dilation of glandular ER were found only in ADH{sup -} deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol. This pancreatic injury was further supported by increased plasma lipase and pancreatic cathepsin B (a lysosomal hydrolase capable of activating trypsinogen), trypsinogen activation peptide (by-product of trypsinogen activation process) and glucose-regulated protein 78 (endoplasmic reticulum stress marker). These findings suggest that ADH-deficiency and high alcohol levels in the body are the key factors in ethanol-induced pancreatic injury. Therefore, determining how this early stage of pancreatic injury advances to inflammation stage could be important for understanding the mechanism(s) of alcoholic pancreatitis.« less

  2. Alcohol-induced chronic pancreatitis in rats after temporary occlusion of biliopancreatic ducts with Ethibloc.

    PubMed

    Pap, A; Boros, L

    1989-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pancreatitis-like histological and biochemical alterations were provoked in male Wistar rats with Ethibloc occlusion of the common bile duct and the main pancreatic ducts. After the disappearance of the glue from the ducts, a gradual and almost total recovery was demonstrated during a 2-month observation period. About 12 g/kg of alcohol (20% vol/vol) given daily by gastric intubation and ad libitum intake inhibited the recovery of pancreatic weight and enzyme contents in the occluded rats, and within a 2-month period chronic calcifying-type pancreatitis became evident with some signs of remaining obstructive pancreatitis-like lesions. Cessation of alcohol administration after 2 months resulted in a recovery of pancreatic weight and enzyme contents, although morphological regeneration was less pronounced and calcification remained visible in some rats. A 50% raw soy flour diet provoked some further changes in the proportion of enzymes without any supplementary increases of pancreatic weight and protein content. This animal model of chronic pancreatitis demonstrates that chronic obstructive and calcifying pancreatitis can appear together and earlier if the etiological factors act in combination. Suppression of pancreatic regeneration by alcohol seems to be necessary to maintain chronic pancreatitis-like lesions and to develop calcification.

  3. Course of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis: a prospective clinicomorphological long-term study.

    PubMed

    Ammann, R W; Heitz, P U; Klöppel, G

    1996-07-01

    The pathogenesis of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis and its relationship to alcoholic acute pancreatitis are debated. According to our recent clinical long-term study, alcoholic chronic pancreatitis seems to evolve from severe acute pancreatits. The aim of this study was to correlate clinical findings to the pancreatic histopathology at early and advanced stages of the disease. Morphological changes (pseudocysts, autodigestive necrosis, calcification, and perilobular and intralobular fibrosis) were recorded in 37 surgical and 46 postmortem pancreas specimens of 73 patients from our long-term series, who progressed from clinically acute to chronic pancreatitis (mean follow-up, 12 years). Pancreatic function was monitored at yearly intervals. Surgical interventions were performed at a mean of 4.1 years from onset. Histologically, focal necrosis (49%) and mild perilobular fibrosis (54%) predominated, Pseudocysts (n = 41, mostly postnecrotic) occurred in 88% within 6 years from onset. Autopsy specimens were obtained at a mean of 12 years. These pancreata often showed severe perilobular and intralobular fibrosis (85%) and calcifications (74%), but rarely necrosis (4%). Fibrosis correlated with progressive pancreatic dysfunction (P < 0.001), particularly in the 10 patients with two histological assessments (mean interval between biopsy and autopsy, 8 years). The data support an evolution from severe alcoholic acute pancreatitis to chronic pancreatitis.

  4. Pharmacological attenuation of chronic alcoholic pancreatitis induced hypersensitivity in rats.

    PubMed

    McIlwrath, Sabrina L; Westlund, Karin N

    2015-01-21

    To characterize an alcohol and high fat diet induced chronic pancreatitis rat model that mimics poor human dietary choices. Experimental rats were fed a modified Lieber-DeCarli alcohol (6%) and high-fat (65%) diet (AHF) for 10 wk while control animals received a regular rodent chow diet. Weekly behavioral tests determined mechanical and heat sensitivity. In week 10 a fasting glucose tolerance test was performed, measuring blood glucose levels before and after a 2 g/kg bodyweight intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of glucose. Post mortem histological analysis was performed by staining pancreas and liver tissue sections with hematoxylin and eosin. Pancreas sections were also stained with Sirius red and fast green to quantify collagen content. Insulin-expressing cells were identified immunohistochemically in separate sections. Tissue staining density was quantified using Image J software. After mechanical and heat sensitivity became stable (weeks 6-10) in the AHF-fed animals, three different drugs were tested for their efficacy in attenuating pancreatitis associated hypersensitivity: a Group II metabotropic glutamate receptor specific agonist (2R,4R)-4-Aminopyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylate (APDC, 3 mg/kg, ip; Tocris, Bristol, United Kingdom), nociceptin (20, 60, 200 nmol/kg, ip; Tocris), and morphine sulfate (3 mg/kg, μ-opioid receptor agonist; Baxter Healthcare, Deerfield, IL, United States). Histological analysis of pancreas and liver determined that unlike control rats, AHF fed animals had pancreatic fibrosis, acinar and beta cell atrophy, with steatosis in both organs. Fat vacuolization was significantly increased in AHF fed rats (6.4% ± 1.1% in controls vs 23.8% ± 4.2%, P < 0.05). Rats fed the AHF diet had reduced fasting glucose tolerance in week 10 when peak blood glucose levels reached significantly higher concentrations than controls (127.4 ± 9.2 mg/dL in controls vs 161.0 ± 8.6 mg/dL, P < 0.05). This concurred with a 3.5 fold higher incidence of single and

  5. Pharmacological attenuation of chronic alcoholic pancreatitis induced hypersensitivity in rats

    PubMed Central

    McIlwrath, Sabrina L; Westlund, Karin N

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To characterize an alcohol and high fat diet induced chronic pancreatitis rat model that mimics poor human dietary choices. METHODS: Experimental rats were fed a modified Lieber-DeCarli alcohol (6%) and high-fat (65%) diet (AHF) for 10 wk while control animals received a regular rodent chow diet. Weekly behavioral tests determined mechanical and heat sensitivity. In week 10 a fasting glucose tolerance test was performed, measuring blood glucose levels before and after a 2 g/kg bodyweight intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of glucose. Post mortem histological analysis was performed by staining pancreas and liver tissue sections with hematoxylin and eosin. Pancreas sections were also stained with Sirius red and fast green to quantify collagen content. Insulin-expressing cells were identified immunohistochemically in separate sections. Tissue staining density was quantified using Image J software. After mechanical and heat sensitivity became stable (weeks 6-10) in the AHF-fed animals, three different drugs were tested for their efficacy in attenuating pancreatitis associated hypersensitivity: a Group II metabotropic glutamate receptor specific agonist (2R,4R)-4-Aminopyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylate (APDC, 3 mg/kg, ip; Tocris, Bristol, United Kingdom), nociceptin (20, 60, 200 nmol/kg, ip; Tocris), and morphine sulfate (3 mg/kg, μ-opioid receptor agonist; Baxter Healthcare, Deerfield, IL, United States). RESULTS: Histological analysis of pancreas and liver determined that unlike control rats, AHF fed animals had pancreatic fibrosis, acinar and beta cell atrophy, with steatosis in both organs. Fat vacuolization was significantly increased in AHF fed rats (6.4% ± 1.1% in controls vs 23.8% ± 4.2%, P < 0.05). Rats fed the AHF diet had reduced fasting glucose tolerance in week 10 when peak blood glucose levels reached significantly higher concentrations than controls (127.4 ± 9.2 mg/dL in controls vs 161.0 ± 8.6 mg/dL, P < 0.05). This concurred with a 3.5 fold higher

  6. Biliary versus alcohol-related infected pancreatic necrosis: similarities and differences in the follow-up.

    PubMed

    Reszetow, Jacek; Hać, Stanisław; Dobrowolski, Sebastian; Stefaniak, Tomasz; Wajda, Zdzisław; Gruca, Zbigniew; Sledziński, Zbigniew; Studniarek, Michał

    2007-10-01

    Infected pancreatic necrosis (IPN) is a serious complication of acute pancreatitis. Data concerning survivors' quality of life and pancreatic functions are scarce. Follow-up of the patients with alcohol and biliary etiology of IPN treated with open necrosectomy was performed. Twenty-eight survivors after operative treatment (Bradley procedure) of IPN were followed up 24 to 96 months after discharge from the hospital (10 biliary and 18 alcohol patients). Their exocrine and endocrine pancreatic functions and quality of life (Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy scale) were evaluated. Pancreatic tissue remaining after necrosectomy was visualized by use of contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT). In 44.4% of alcohol-induced IPN patients, the presence of the whole pancreas was shown on the follow-up CT, contrary to the biliary group, where the partial lack of the pancreas was observed in all cases. Pancreatic tissue calcifications were present on CT in 8 patients of alcohol-induced acute pancreatitis group only. Median stool elastase 1 concentrations were 318.1 U/mL in the biliary group and 238.3 U/mL in the alcohol-induced group (not significant). The Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy scale showed significantly higher social/family and emotional well-being in patients with biliary acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Patients after alcohol-induced IPN had lower quality of life compared with biliary etiology. Biliary and alcohol-induced IPN patients after surgical treatment have nonsignificant differences of endocrine and exocrine pancreatic functions.

  7. Alcohol Consumption and the Risk for Developing Pancreatitis: A Case-Control Study in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kume, Kiyoshi; Masamune, Atsushi; Ariga, Hiroyuki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to estimate the association of alcohol consumption and pancreatitis in Japan. We performed a nationwide case-control study, which included 982 patients (574 patients with acute pancreatitis and 408 patients with chronic pancreatitis) and 1015 controls who were individually matched for sex, age, hospital, and time of their first hospital visit. Conditional logistic regression was used to assess the association of alcohol consumption and smoking with pancreatitis. The patients had a mean (SD) age of 57.6 (17.0) years; 71.8% were male. Compared with nondrinkers, alcohol consumption of less than 20 g/d was not associated with the risk for total pancreatitis (odds ratio [OR], 1.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.7-1.4). In patients with acute pancreatitis, the ORs (95% CI) for alcohol consumption of 20 ≤ ∼ < 40 g/d, 40 ≤ ∼ < 60 g/d, 60 ≤ ∼ < 80 g/d, 80 ≤ ∼ < 100 g/d, and 100 g/d or greater were 1.7 (0.9-3.0), 3.1 (1.6-5.9), 4.2 (2.1-8.2), 5.3 (2.4-12.0), and 6.4 (3.4-12.4), respectively. In patients with chronic pancreatitis, the ORs (95% CI) for alcohol consumption of 20 ≤ ∼ < 40 g/d, 40 ≤ ∼ < 60 g/d, 60 ≤ ∼ < 80 g/d, 80 ≤ ∼ < 100 g/d, and 100 g/d or greater were 2.6 (1.2-5.5), 3.2 (1.5-7.1), 9.2 (4.1-20.3), 13.0 (5.3-31.6), and 19.6 (8.2-46.8), respectively. Our study precisely measured the quantitative effect of alcohol on the risk for developing pancreatitis.

  8. Prospective Study of Alcohol Drinking, Smoking, and Pancreatitis: The Multiethnic Cohort.

    PubMed

    Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Pandol, Stephen J; Porcel, Jacqueline; Wilkens, Lynne R; Le Marchand, Loïc; Pike, Malcolm C; Monroe, Kristine R

    2016-07-01

    We conducted a prospective analysis of 145,886 participants in the multiethnic cohort to examine the relationship of alcohol drinking and smoking with pancreatitis. Pancreatitis cases were categorized as gallstone-related acute pancreatitis (GSAP) (N = 1,065), non-GSAP (N = 1,222), and recurrent acute (RAP)/chronic pancreatitis (CP) (N = 523). We used the baseline questionnaire to identify alcohol intake and smoking history. Associations were estimated by hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using Cox models. Cigarette smoking was associated with non-GSAP and RAP/CP. Moderate alcohol intake was inversely associated with all types of pancreatitis in women (HRs, 0.66 to 0.81 for <1 drink per day), and with RAP/CP in men (HR, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.41-0.79 for <2 drinks per day). The risk of non-GS pancreatitis associated with current smoking was highest among men who consumed more than 4 drinks per day (HR, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.28-3.30), whereas among never smokers, moderate drinking was associated with a reduced risk (HR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.51-0.96). In women, drinking less than 2 drinks per day was associated with a reduced risk of GSAP among never smokers (HR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.46-0.80). Smoking is a risk factor for non-GS pancreatitis. Moderate alcohol intake is protective against all types of pancreatitis in women and against RAP/CP in men.

  9. A case of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome associated with acute pancreatitis and chronic alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Baek, Hyun Seok; Lee, Se-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is known to be caused by a variety of clinical disorders. The authors encountered a case of PRES associated with acute pancreatitis and chronic alcoholism. A 49-year-old man presented with altered mental status. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) displayed vasogenic edema at the bilateral posterior temporal and parieto-occipital lobes and cerebellum. Laboratory tests and abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed acute pancreatitis. The patient recovered completely, and follow-up brain MRI and abdominal CT exhibited resolution of the previous lesions. We suggest that acute pancreatitis might be an etiology of PRES. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Pancreatic Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... enzymes become prematurely active and irritate the pancreas (pancreatitis). Pseudocysts can also result from injury to the ... alcohol use and gallstones are risk factors for pancreatitis, and pancreatitis is a risk factor for pseudocysts. ...

  11. Alcohols enhance caerulein-induced zymogen activation in pancreatic acinar cells

    PubMed Central

    LU, ZHAO; KARNE, SURESH; KOLODECIK, THOMAS; GORELICK, FRED S.

    2010-01-01

    Activation of zymogens within the pancreatic acinar cell is an early feature of acute pancreatitis. Supraphysiological concentrations of cholecystokinin (CCK) cause zymogen activation and pancreatitis. The effects of the CCK analog, caerulein, and alcohol on trypsin and chymotrypsin activation in isolated pancreatic acini were examined. Caerulein increased markers of zymogen activation in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Notably, trypsin activity reached a peak value within 30 min, then diminished with time, whereas chymotrypsin activity increased with time. Ethanol (35 mM) sensitized the acinar cells to the effects of caerulein (10−10 to 10−7 M) on zymogen activation but had no effect alone. The effects of ethanol were concentration dependent. Alcohols with a chain length of ≥2 also sensitized the acinar cell to caerulein; the most potent was butanol. Branched alcohols (2-propanol and 2-butanol) were less potent than aliphatic alcohols (1-propanol and 1-butanol). The structure of an alcohol is related to its ability to sensitize acinar cells to the effects of caerulein on zymogen activation. PMID:11842000

  12. Alcohol and high fat induced chronic pancreatitis: TRPV4 antagonist reduces hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L P; Kline, R H; Deevska, G; Ma, F; Nikolova-Karakashian, M; Westlund, K N

    2015-12-17

    The pathogenesis of pain in chronic pancreatitis is poorly understood, and its treatment can be a major clinical challenge. Surgical and other invasive methods have variable outcomes that can be unsatisfactory. Therefore, there is a great need for further discovery of the pathogenesis of pancreatitis pain and new therapeutic targets. Human and animal studies indicate a critical role for oxidative stress and activation of transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channel subfamily members TRPV1 and TRPA1 on pancreatic nociceptors in sensitization mechanisms that result in pain. However, the in vivo role of transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 4 (TRPV4) in chronic pancreatitis needs further evaluation. The present study characterized a rat alcohol/high fat diet (AHF)-induced chronic pancreatitis model with hypersensitivity, fibrotic pathology, and fat vacuolization consistent with the clinical syndrome. The rats with AHF-induced pancreatitis develop referred visceral pain-like behaviors, i.e. decreased hindpaw mechanical thresholds and shortened abdominal and hindpaw withdrawal latency to heat. In this study, oxidative stress was characterized as well as the role of TRPV4 in chronic visceral hypersensitivity. Lipid peroxidase and oxidative stress were indicated by increased plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and diminished pancreatic manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). The secondary sensitization associated with AHF-induced pancreatitis was effectively alleviated by the TRPV4 antagonist, HC 067047. Similarity of the results to those with the peripherally restricted μ-opiate receptor agonist, loperamide, suggested TRPV4 channel activated peripheral sensitization. This study using a reliable model that provides pre-clinical correlates of human chronic pancreatitis provides further evidence that TRPV4 channel is a potential therapeutic target for treatment of pancreatitis pain. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by

  13. Chronic Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Stram, Michelle; Liu, Shu; Singhi, Aatur D

    2016-12-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a debilitating condition often associated with severe abdominal pain and exocrine and endocrine dysfunction. The underlying cause is multifactorial and involves complex interaction of environmental, genetic, and/or other risk factors. The pathology is dependent on the underlying pathogenesis of the disease. This review describes the clinical, gross, and microscopic findings of the main subtypes of chronic pancreatitis: alcoholic chronic pancreatitis, obstructive chronic pancreatitis, paraduodenal ("groove") pancreatitis, pancreatic divisum, autoimmune pancreatitis, and genetic factors associated with chronic pancreatitis. As pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma may be confused with chronic pancreatitis, the main distinguishing features between these 2 diseases are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Patients With Sentinel Acute Pancreatitis of Alcoholic Etiology are at Risk for Organ Failure and Pancreatic Necrosis: A Dual-Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Easler, Jeffrey J.; de-Madaria, Enrique; Nawaz, Haq; Moya-Hoyo, Neftalí; Koutroumpakis, Efstratios; Rey-Riveiro, Mónica; Singh, Vijay P.; Acevedo-Piedra, Nelly G.; Whitcomb, David C.; Yadav, Dhiraj; Papachristou, Georgios I.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Assess the relationship between alcoholic etiology, tobacco use and severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). Methods Smoking and alcohol exposure were recorded upon admission in a cohort of acute pancreatitis patients within the United States (U.S.). Patients with first, “sentinel” attack of acute pancreatitis (AP) were identified for analysis. Associations between alcohol, smoking and SAP were validated in an independent cohort of patients from Spain. Results U.S. cohort (n=222): Thirty-five% developed organ failure (OF), 35% Pancreatic Necrosis (PNec), and 7% died. OF (54% vs. 33%, p=0.03), PNec (62% vs. 31%, p=0.006), intensive care (ICU) admission (58% vs. 36%, p=0.03) and length of stay (LOS) (20 vs. 8 days, p= 0.007) were greater in alcoholic when compared to other etiologies. Spanish cohort (n=366): Similar differences in outcomes were also found with between alcoholic and non-alcoholic etiologies: OF (24% vs. 8%, p=0.001), PNec (38% vs. 14%, p<0.001), ICU admission (20% vs. 3%, p<0.001), and LOS (17 vs. 11 days, p=0.04). Multivariable analysis confirmed alcoholic etiology to be independently associated with OF and PNec in both cohorts. Conclusions Alcoholic etiology is independently associated with OF and PNec in patients with sentinel AP and is important when evaluating risk for severe disease in AP. PMID:27101573

  15. Alcohol and smoking as risk factors in an epidemiology study of patients with chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Coté, Gregory A.; Yadav, Dhiraj; Slivka, Adam; Hawes, Robert H; Anderson, Michelle A.; Burton, Frank R.; Brand, Randall E; Banks, Peter A.; Lewis, Michele D; DiSario, James A.; Gardner, Timothy B; Gelrud, Andres; Amann, Stephen T.; Baillie, John; Money, Mary E.; O'Connell, Michael; Whitcomb, David C.; Sherman, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Alcohol has been implicated in the development of chronic pancreatitis (CP) in 60%–90% patients, although percentages in the United States are not known. We investigated the frequency of alcohol-related CP at tertiary U.S. referral centers. Methods We studied data from patients with CP (n=539) and controls (n=695) enrolled in the North American Pancreatitis Study-2 from 2000 to 2006 at 20 U.S. referral centers. CP was defined by definitive evidence in imaging or histologic analyses. Subjects and physicians each completed a detailed study questionnaire. Using physician-assigned diagnoses, patients were assigned to the following etiology groups: alcohol (with/without other diagnoses), non-alcohol (any etiology of CP from other than alcohol), or idiopathic (no etiology identified). Results The distribution of patients among etiology groups were: alcohol (44.5%), non-alcohol (26.9%), and idiopathic (28.6%). Physicians identified alcohol as the etiology more frequently in men (59.4% in men vs 28.1% in women), but non-alcohol (18% in men vs 36.7% in women) and idiopathic etiologies (22.6% in men vs 35.2% in women) more often in women (P<0.01 for all comparisons). Non-alcohol etiologies were equally divided among obstructive, genetic, and other causes. Compared with controls, patients with idiopathic CP were more likely to have ever smoked (58.6% vs 49.7%, P<0.05) or have a history of chronic renal disease or failure (5.2% vs 1.2%, P<0.01). In multivariate analyses, smoking (ever, current, and amount) was independently associated with idiopathic CP. Conclusions The frequency of alcohol-related CP at tertiary U.S. referral centers is lower than expected. Idiopathic CP and non-alcohol etiologies represent a large subgroup, particularly among women. Smoking is an independent risk factor for idiopathic CP. PMID:21029787

  16. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. It happens when digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself. Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic. Either form is ...

  17. Low Alcohol and Cigarette Use Is Associated to the Risk of Developing Chronic Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Di Leo, Milena; Leandro, Gioacchino; Singh, Satish K; Mariani, Alberto; Bianco, Margherita; Zuppardo, Raffaella Alessia; Goni, Elisabetta; Rogger, Teresa Marzia; Di Mario, Francesco; Guslandi, Mario; De Cobelli, Francesco; Del Maschio, Alessandro; Testoni, Pier Alberto; Cavestro, Giulia Martina

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of smoking and alcohol intake and pancreas divisum on the risk of developing chronic pancreatitis (CP). Consecutive patients with CP who underwent secretin-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography were compared with consecutive patients without pancreatic disease who underwent secretin-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography for irritable bowel syndrome. We enrolled 145 consecutive CP patients and 103 irritable bowel syndrome patients from 2010 to 2014. In a univariate analysis, statistically significant differences in sex, mean age, and the duration and amount of cigarette and alcohol use were found. Per a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, thresholds for cigarette and alcohol consumption were, respectively, 5.5 cigarettes and 13.5 g daily. In a multivariate analysis, independent risk factors for CP were male sex (odds ratio [OR], 2.05), smoking more than 5.5 cigarettes per day (OR, 2.72), and drinking more than 13.5 g/d (OR, 6.35). In an Italian population, we confirmed smoking and alcohol as cofactors in the development of CP. This study shows that alcohol intake and smoking habits are 2 of the most important risk factors for the development of CP.

  18. Genetic Contribution to Alcohol Dependence: Investigation of a Heterogeneous German Sample of Individuals with Alcohol Dependence, Chronic Alcoholic Pancreatitis, and Alcohol-Related Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Treutlein, Jens; Streit, Fabian; Juraeva, Dilafruz; Degenhardt, Franziska; Rietschel, Liz; Forstner, Andreas J.; Ridinger, Monika; Dukal, Helene; Foo, Jerome C.; Soyka, Michael; Maier, Wolfgang; Gaebel, Wolfgang; Dahmen, Norbert; Scherbaum, Norbert; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Lucae, Susanne; Ising, Marcus; Stickel, Felix; Berg, Thomas; Roggenbuck, Ulla; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Scholz, Henrike; Zimmermann, Ulrich S.; Buch, Stephan; Sommer, Wolfgang H.; Spanagel, Rainer; Brors, Benedikt; Cichon, Sven; Mann, Karl; Kiefer, Falk; Hampe, Jochen; Rosendahl, Jonas; Nöthen, Markus M.; Rietschel, Marcella

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated the genetic contribution to alcohol dependence (AD) using genome-wide association data from three German samples. These comprised patients with: (i) AD; (ii) chronic alcoholic pancreatitis (ACP); and (iii) alcohol-related liver cirrhosis (ALC). Single marker, gene-based, and pathway analyses were conducted. A significant association was detected for the ADH1B locus in a gene-based approach (puncorrected = 1.2 × 10−6; pcorrected = 0.020). This was driven by the AD subsample. No association with ADH1B was found in the combined ACP + ALC sample. On first inspection, this seems surprising, since ADH1B is a robustly replicated risk gene for AD and may therefore be expected to be associated also with subgroups of AD patients. The negative finding in the ACP + ALC sample, however, may reflect genetic stratification as well as random fluctuation of allele frequencies in the cases and controls, demonstrating the importance of large samples in which the phenotype is well assessed. PMID:28714907

  19. Genetic Contribution to Alcohol Dependence: Investigation of a Heterogeneous German Sample of Individuals with Alcohol Dependence, Chronic Alcoholic Pancreatitis, and Alcohol-Related Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Treutlein, Jens; Frank, Josef; Streit, Fabian; Reinbold, Céline S; Juraeva, Dilafruz; Degenhardt, Franziska; Rietschel, Liz; Witt, Stephanie H; Forstner, Andreas J; Ridinger, Monika; Strohmaier, Jana; Wodarz, Norbert; Dukal, Helene; Foo, Jerome C; Hoffmann, Per; Herms, Stefan; Heilmann-Heimbach, Stefanie; Soyka, Michael; Maier, Wolfgang; Gaebel, Wolfgang; Dahmen, Norbert; Scherbaum, Norbert; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Lucae, Susanne; Ising, Marcus; Stickel, Felix; Berg, Thomas; Roggenbuck, Ulla; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Scholz, Henrike; Zimmermann, Ulrich S; Buch, Stephan; Sommer, Wolfgang H; Spanagel, Rainer; Brors, Benedikt; Cichon, Sven; Mann, Karl; Kiefer, Falk; Hampe, Jochen; Rosendahl, Jonas; Nöthen, Markus M; Rietschel, Marcella

    2017-07-17

    The present study investigated the genetic contribution to alcohol dependence (AD) using genome-wide association data from three German samples. These comprised patients with: (i) AD; (ii) chronic alcoholic pancreatitis (ACP); and (iii) alcohol-related liver cirrhosis (ALC). Single marker, gene-based, and pathway analyses were conducted. A significant association was detected for the ADH1B locus in a gene-based approach ( p uncorrected = 1.2 × 10 -6 ; p corrected = 0.020). This was driven by the AD subsample. No association with ADH1B was found in the combined ACP + ALC sample. On first inspection, this seems surprising, since ADH1B is a robustly replicated risk gene for AD and may therefore be expected to be associated also with subgroups of AD patients. The negative finding in the ACP + ALC sample, however, may reflect genetic stratification as well as random fluctuation of allele frequencies in the cases and controls, demonstrating the importance of large samples in which the phenotype is well assessed.

  20. Alcohol and smoking as risk factors in an epidemiology study of patients with chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Coté, Gregory A; Yadav, Dhiraj; Slivka, Adam; Hawes, Robert H; Anderson, Michelle A; Burton, Frank R; Brand, Randall E; Banks, Peter A; Lewis, Michele D; Disario, James A; Gardner, Timothy B; Gelrud, Andres; Amann, Stephen T; Baillie, John; Money, Mary E; O'Connell, Michael; Whitcomb, David C; Sherman, Stuart

    2011-03-01

    Alcohol has been implicated in the development of chronic pancreatitis (CP) in 60%-90% of patients, although percentages in the United States are unknown. We investigated the epidemiology of alcohol-related CP at tertiary US referral centers. We studied data from CP patients (n = 539) and controls (n = 695) enrolled in the North American Pancreatitis Study-2 from 2000 to 2006 at 20 US referral centers. CP was defined by definitive evidence from imaging or histologic analyses. Subjects and physicians each completed a study questionnaire. Using physician-assigned diagnoses, patients were assigned to an etiology group: alcohol (with/without other diagnoses), nonalcohol (any etiology of CP from other than alcohol), or idiopathic (no etiology identified). The distribution of patients among etiology groups was: alcohol (44.5%), nonalcohol (26.9%), and idiopathic (28.6%). Physicians identified alcohol as the etiology more frequently in men (59.4% men vs 28.1% women), but nonalcohol (18% men vs 36.7% women) and idiopathic etiologies (22.6% men vs 35.2% women) more often in women (P < .01 for all comparisons). Nonalcohol etiologies were equally divided among obstructive, genetic, and other causes. Compared with controls, patients with idiopathic CP were more likely to have ever smoked (58.6% vs 49.7%, P < .05) or have a history of chronic renal disease or failure (5.2% vs 1.2%, P < .01). In multivariate analyses, smoking (ever, current, and amount) was independently associated with idiopathic CP. The frequency of alcohol-related CP at tertiary US referral centers is lower than expected. Idiopathic CP and nonalcohol etiologies represent a large subgroup, particularly among women. Smoking is an independent risk factor for idiopathic CP. Copyright © 2011 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    DiMagno, Matthew J; DiMagno, Eugene P

    2012-09-01

    We review important new clinical observations in chronic pancreatitis reported in 2011. Smoking increases the risk of nongallstone acute pancreatitis and the progression of acute pancreatitis to chronic pancreatitis. Binge drinking during Oktoberfest did not associate with increased hospital admissions for acute pancreatitis. The unfolded protein response is an adaptive mechanism to maintain pancreatic health in response to noxious stimuli such as alcohol. Onset of diabetes mellitus in chronic pancreatitis is likely due to progressive disease rather than individual variables. Insufficient pancreatic enzyme dosing is common for treatment of pancreatic steatorrhea; 90 000 United States Pharmacopeia units of lipase should be given with meals. Surgical drainage provides sustained, superior pain relief compared with endoscopic treatment in patients advanced chronic pancreatitis with a dilated main duct ± pancreatic stones. The central acting gabapentoid pregabalin affords a modest 12% pain reduction in patients with chronic pancreatitis but approximately 30% of patients have significant side effects. Patients with nongallstone-related acute pancreatitis or chronic pancreatitis of any cause should cease smoking. Results of this year's investigations further elucidated the pancreatic pathobiology due to alcohol, onset of diabetes mellitus in chronic pancreatitis, and the mechanisms and treatment of neuropathic pain in chronic pancreatitis.

  2. Association between alcohol dehydrogenase 1C gene *1/*2 polymorphism and pancreatitis risk: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Fang, F; Pan, J; Su, G H; Xu, L X; Li, G; Li, Z H; Zhao, H; Wang, J

    2015-11-30

    Numerous studies have focused on the relationship be-tween alcohol dehydrogenase 1C gene (ADH1C) *1/*2 polymorphism (Ile350Val, rs698, also known as ADH1C *1/*2) and pancreatitis risk, but the results have been inconsistent. Thus, we conducted a meta-anal-ysis to more precisely estimate this association. Relevant publications were searched in several widely used databases and 9 eligible studies were included in the meta-analysis. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to evaluate the strength of the association. Significant associations between ADH1C *1/*2 poly-morphism and pancreatitis risk were observed in both overall meta-analysis for 12 vs 22 (OR = 1.53, 95%CI = 1.12-2.10) and 11 + 12 vs 22 (OR = 1.44, 95%CI = 1.07-1.95), and the chronic alcoholic pancre-atitis subgroup for 12 vs 22 (OR = 1.64, 95%CI = 1.17-2.29) and 11 + 12 vs 22 (OR = 1.53, 95%CI = 1.11-2.11). Significant pancreatitis risk variation was also detected in Caucasians for 11 + 12 vs 22 (OR = 1.45, 95%CI = 1.07-1.98). In conclusion, the ADH1C *1/*2 polymorphism is likely associated with pancreatitis risk, particularly chronic alcoholic pancreatitis risk, with the *1 allele functioning as a risk factor.

  3. Rat pancreatic B-cells after chronic alcohol feeding. A morphometric and fine structural study.

    PubMed

    Koko, V; Todorović, V; Nikolić, J A; Glisić, R; Cakić, M; Lacković, V; Petronijević, L; Stojković, M; Varagić, J; Janić, B

    1995-04-01

    Quantitative analysis of the light microscopic and fine structure of rat islet B-cells was carried out in chronic alcoholism. Absolute pancreatic weight and volume were similar in groups C (control) and E (ethanol), but relative pancreatic weight in group E rat was decreased. The results for fasting blood glucose and insulin levels were similar in the two groups of animals. There was a significantly reduced total pancreatic islet volume in E rats. The total number of endocrine cells both per islet and per microns2 of islet was similar in the two groups of animals. The volume density and number of B-cells per islet and per microns2 of islet were not changed in ethanol-treated rats as compared with the control. On the other hand, diameter, surface area and volume of the B-cells and their nuclei were found to be statistically significantly decreased. Histological examination revealed that islet blood vessels were dilated in alcoholic rats. Over the 4-month period of ethanol intake a significant decrease in cell profile area, nuclear profile area and volume density of cytoplasmic granules and an increase in the profile area and volume density of endoplasmic reticulum occurred. The gross histological alteration seen in most B-cells of the ethanol-treated rats was irregularity of the nuclear envelope with deep invagination and with margination of heterochromatin and many empty granules or granules without clear electron dense crystals of insulin. The present results indicate some optical and structural abnormalities of B-cells in chronic alcoholism that may be related to cell dysfunction and may contribute, at least in part, to the endocrine pancreas functional disturbance.

  4. Pancreatic Arteriovenous Malformation Involving the Duodenum Embolized with Ethylene-Vinyl Alcohol Copolymer (Onyx)

    SciTech Connect

    Grasso, Rosario Francesco, E-mail: r.grasso@unicampus.it; Cazzato, Roberto Luigi; Luppi, Giacomo

    Arteriovenous malformation (AVM) of the pancreas is a rare condition. Most patients are asymptomatic or alternatively may present with a wide spectrum of symptoms. Traditionally, surgery has been considered the treatment of choice; however, alternative approaches, such as transcatheter embolization (TAE), may be proposed. We report a case of a 48-year-old man with a pancreatic head AVM, presenting with upper abdominal pain and slight anemia. The patient refused surgery and underwent TAE by means of ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymer (EVOH). At 3 months follow-up, the patient was able to eat regularly, with no residual pain and no signs of anemia.

  5. Alcohol Consumption as a Risk Factor for Acute and Chronic Pancreatitis: A Systematic Review and a Series of Meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Samokhvalov, Andriy V; Rehm, Jürgen; Roerecke, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Pancreatitis is a highly prevalent medical condition associated with a spectrum of endocrine and exocrine pancreatic insufficiencies. While high alcohol consumption is an established risk factor for pancreatitis, its relationship with specific types of pancreatitis and a potential threshold have not been systematically examined. We conducted a systematic literature search for studies on the association between alcohol consumption and pancreatitis based on PRISMA guidelines. Non-linear and linear random-effect dose-response meta-analyses using restricted cubic spline meta-regressions and categorical meta-analyses in relation to abstainers were conducted. Seven studies with 157,026 participants and 3618 cases of pancreatitis were included into analyses. The dose-response relationship between average volume of alcohol consumption and risk of pancreatitis was monotonic with no evidence of non-linearity for chronic pancreatitis (CP) for both sexes (p = 0.091) and acute pancreatitis (AP) in men (p = 0.396); it was non-linear for AP in women (p = 0.008). Compared to abstention, there was a significant decrease in risk (RR = 0.76, 95%CI: 0.60-0.97) of AP in women below the threshold of 40 g/day. No such association was found in men (RR = 1.1, 95%CI: 0.69-1.74). The RR for CP at 100 g/day was 6.29 (95%CI: 3.04-13.02). The dose-response relationships between alcohol consumption and risk of pancreatitis were monotonic for CP and AP in men, and non-linear for AP in women. Alcohol consumption below 40 g/day was associated with reduced risk of AP in women. Alcohol consumption beyond this level was increasingly detrimental for any type of pancreatitis. The work was financially supported by a grant from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (R21AA023521) to the last author.

  6. Experimental acute alcohol pancreatitis-related liver damage and endotoxemia: synbiotics but not metronidazole have a protective effect.

    PubMed

    Marotta, F; Barreto, R; Wu, C C; Naito, Y; Gelosa, F; Lorenzetti, A; Yoshioka, M; Fesce, E

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the effect of gut manipulation by either novel synbiotics or by metronidazole on either endotoxemia or the severity of liver damage in the course of acute pancreatitis from alcohol ingestion. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed for 1 week through an intragastric tube a liquid diet with either: (i) 1 mL t.i.d. of a mixture of synbiotics (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus helveticus and Bifidobacterium in an enriched medium); (ii) 20 mg/kg t.i.d. metronidazole; or (iii) standard diet. Then, acute pancreatitis was induced by caerulein and when the disease was full-blown, rats were fed an alcohol-rich diet. Synbiotic and metronidazole treatment was given for a further 2 weeks. Transaminase and endotoxemia levels were measured before treatment, after 6 h, after 24 h and 2 weeks later, at the time the rats were killed. Liver samples were obtained for histological analysis. Synbiotics but not metronidazole improved the acute pancreatitis-induced increase in endotoxemia and transaminase levels. The addition of alcohol worsened these variables to a limited extent in the synbiotic-treated group, while metronidazole had a negative effect on liver damage. Gut flora pretreatment with synbiotics was able to effectively protect against endotoxin/bacterial translocation, as well as liver damage in the course of acute pancreatitis and concomitant heavy alcohol consumption. The beneficial effect of synbiotics on liver histology seems to be correlated with endotoxemia. Metronidazole did not produce such a beneficial effect; in fact, it further worsened liver damage when alcohol was added to the background of ongoing acute pancreatic inflammation.

  7. [Alcohol].

    PubMed

    Zima, T

    1996-07-14

    Alcohol is one of the most widely used addictive substances. It can be assumed that everybody encounters alcohol--ethanol in various forms and concentrations in the course of their lives. A global and social problem of our civilization is alcohol consumption which has a rising trend. Since 1989 the consumption of alcoholic beverages is rising and the mean annual consumption of concentrated ethanol per head is cea 10 litres. In ethanol abuse the organism is damaged not only by ethanol alone but in particular by substances formed during its metabolism. Its detailed knowledge is essential for the knowledge and investigations of the metabolic and toxic effect of ethanol on the organism. Ingested alcohol is in 90-98% eliminated from the organism by three known metabolic pathways: 1-alcohol dehydrogenase, 2-the microsomal ethanol oxidizing system and 3-catalase. Alcohol is a frequent important risk factor of serious "diseases of civilization" such as IHD, hypertension, osteoporosis, neoplastic diseases. Cirrhosis of the liver and chronic pancreatitis are the well known diseases associated with alcohol ingestion and also their most frequent cause. It is impossible to list all organs and diseases which develop as a result of alcohol consumption. It is important to realize that regular and "relatively" small amounts in the long run damage the organism and may be even fatal.

  8. Alcohol Consumption as a Risk Factor for Acute and Chronic Pancreatitis: A Systematic Review and a Series of Meta-analyses

    PubMed Central

    Samokhvalov, Andriy V.; Rehm, Jürgen; Roerecke, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Pancreatitis is a highly prevalent medical condition associated with a spectrum of endocrine and exocrine pancreatic insufficiencies. While high alcohol consumption is an established risk factor for pancreatitis, its relationship with specific types of pancreatitis and a potential threshold have not been systematically examined. Methods We conducted a systematic literature search for studies on the association between alcohol consumption and pancreatitis based on PRISMA guidelines. Non-linear and linear random-effect dose–response meta-analyses using restricted cubic spline meta-regressions and categorical meta-analyses in relation to abstainers were conducted. Findings Seven studies with 157,026 participants and 3618 cases of pancreatitis were included into analyses. The dose–response relationship between average volume of alcohol consumption and risk of pancreatitis was monotonic with no evidence of non-linearity for chronic pancreatitis (CP) for both sexes (p = 0.091) and acute pancreatitis (AP) in men (p = 0.396); it was non-linear for AP in women (p = 0.008). Compared to abstention, there was a significant decrease in risk (RR = 0.76, 95%CI: 0.60–0.97) of AP in women below the threshold of 40 g/day. No such association was found in men (RR = 1.1, 95%CI: 0.69–1.74). The RR for CP at 100 g/day was 6.29 (95%CI: 3.04–13.02). Interpretation The dose–response relationships between alcohol consumption and risk of pancreatitis were monotonic for CP and AP in men, and non-linear for AP in women. Alcohol consumption below 40 g/day was associated with reduced risk of AP in women. Alcohol consumption beyond this level was increasingly detrimental for any type of pancreatitis. Funding The work was financially supported by a grant from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (R21AA023521) to the last author. PMID:26844279

  9. Extrahepatic portal venous system thrombosis in recurrent acute and chronic alcoholic pancreatitis is caused by local inflammation and not thrombophilia.

    PubMed

    Rebours, Vinciane; Boudaoud, Larbi; Vullierme, Marie-Pierre; Vidaud, Dominique; Condat, Bertrand; Hentic, Olivia; Maire, Frédérique; Hammel, Pascal; Ruszniewski, Philippe; Lévy, Philippe

    2012-10-01

    Extrahepatic portal venous system thrombosis (EPVST) occurs in 13% of patients with either recurrent acute (AP) or chronic (CP) alcoholic pancreatitis. The role of thrombophilia has never been assessed in this entity. All consecutive patients with alcoholic AP or CP were included in a prospective study. All patients underwent a computerized tomography (CT) scan of the pancreas to evaluate EPVST as well as thorough testing for thrombophilia (protein C, S, and antithrombin deficiency, factor II, factor V, and JAK2 gene mutations, homocystein, biological antiphospholipid syndrome). A total of 119 patients (male, n=100 (84%); smokers, n=110 (92%)) were included. EPVST was found in 41 patients (35%). The portal, superior mesenteric, or splenic veins were involved in 34%, 24%, and 93% of patients, respectively. Thrombophilia was identified in 18% (n=22), including the biological antiphospholipid syndrome, factor V Leiden mutation, and factor II G20210A gene mutation in 21 (17.6%), 2 (1.6%), and 1 patient (0.8%), respectively. On univariate analysis, the factors associated with EPVST were smoking (RR=1.6 (1.38-1.85), P=0.03), pseudocysts (RR=2.91 (1.29-6.56), P=0.008), a pseudocyst in the pancreatic tail (P=0.03), a high CT severity index for AP (P=0.007), and pancreatic parenchymal necrosis (P=0.02). The presence of hemostatic risk factors was not associated with an increased risk of EPVST. On multivariate analysis, only pseudocysts were associated with EPVST (hazard ratio: 6.402; 95% confidence interval (1.59-26.54), P=0.009). EPVST is found in 35% of patients with acute/chronic alcoholic pancreatitis. Local inflammation appears to be the major predisposing condition. The presence of some form of thrombophilia does not increase the risk of EPVST and should not be systematically searched for in case of EPVST.

  10. Lifetime and baseline alcohol intakes and risk of pancreatic cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study.

    PubMed

    Naudin, Sabine; Li, Kuanrong; Jaouen, Tristan; Assi, Nada; Kyrø, Cecilie; Tjønneland, Anne; Overvad, Kim; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Rebours, Vinciane; Védié, Anne-Laure; Boeing, Heiner; Kaaks, Rudolf; Katzke, Verena; Bamia, Christina; Naska, Androniki; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Berrino, Franco; Tagliabue, Giovanna; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Peeters, Petra H; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Gram, Inger Torhild; Skeie, Guri; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Rodríguez-Barranco, Miguel; Barricarte, Aurelio; Quirós, Jose Ramón; Dorronsoro, Miren; Johansson, Ingegerd; Sund, Malin; Sternby, Hanna; Bradbury, Kathryn E; Wareham, Nick; Riboli, Elio; Gunter, Marc; Brennan, Paul; Duell, Eric J; Ferrari, Pietro

    2018-03-09

    Recent evidence suggested a weak relationship between alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer (PC) risk. In our study, the association between lifetime and baseline alcohol intakes and the risk of PC was evaluated, including the type of alcoholic beverages and potential interaction with smoking. Within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study, 1,283 incident PC (57% women) were diagnosed from 476,106 cancer-free participants, followed up for 14 years. Amounts of lifetime and baseline alcohol were estimated through lifestyle and dietary questionnaires, respectively. Cox proportional hazard models with age as primary time variable were used to estimate PC hazard ratios (HR) and their 95% confidence interval (CI). Alcohol intake was positively associated with PC risk in men. Associations were mainly driven by extreme alcohol levels, with HRs comparing heavy drinkers (>60 g/day) to the reference category (0.1-4.9 g/day) equal to 1.77 (95% CI: 1.06, 2.95) and 1.63 (95% CI: 1.16, 2.29) for lifetime and baseline alcohol, respectively. Baseline alcohol intakes from beer (>40 g/day) and spirits/liquors (>10 g/day) showed HRs equal to 1.58 (95% CI: 1.07, 2.34) and 1.41 (95% CI: 1.03, 1.94), respectively, compared to the reference category (0.1-2.9 g/day). In women, HR estimates did not reach statistically significance. The alcohol and PC risk association was not modified by smoking status. Findings from a large prospective study suggest that baseline and lifetime alcohol intakes were positively associated with PC risk, with more apparent risk estimates for beer and spirits/liquors than wine intake. © 2018 IARC/WHO.

  11. Cannabinoid receptor 2 agonist attenuates pain related behavior in rats with chronic alcohol/high fat diet induced pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liping; Kline, Robert H; McNearney, Terry A; Johnson, Michael P; Westlund, Karin N

    2014-11-17

    Chronic Pancreatitis (CP) is a complex and multifactorial syndrome. Many contributing factors result in development of dysfunctional pain in a significant number of patients. Drugs developed to treat a variety of pain states fall short of providing effective analgesia for patients with chronic pancreatitis, often providing minimal to partial pain relief over time with significant side effects. Recently, availability of selective pharmacological tools has enabled great advances in our knowledge of the role of the cannabinoid receptors in pathophysiology. In particular, cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) has emerged as an attractive target for management of chronic pain, as demonstrated in several studies with inflammatory and neuropathic preclinical pain models. In this study, the analgesic efficacy of a novel, highly selective CB2 receptor agonist, LY3038404 HCl, is investigated in a chronic pancreatitis pain model, induced with an alcohol/high fat (AHF) diet. Rats fed the AHF diet developed visceral pain-like behaviors detectable by week 3 and reached a maximum at week 5 that persists as long as the diet is maintained. Rats with AHF induced chronic pancreatitis were treated with LY3038404 HCl (10 mg/kg, orally, twice a day for 9 days). The treated animals demonstrated significantly alleviated pain related behaviors after 3 days of dosing, including increased paw withdrawal thresholds (PWT), prolonged abdominal withdrawal latencies (ABWL), and decreased nocifensive responses to noxious 44°C hotplate stimuli. Terminal histological analysis of pancreatic tissue sections from the AHF chronic pancreatitis animals demonstrated extensive injury, including a global pancreatic gland degeneration (cellular atrophy), vacuolization (fat deposition), and fibrosis. After the LY3038404 HCl treatment, pancreatic tissue was significantly protected from severe damage and fibrosis. LY3038404 HCl affected neither open field exploratory behaviors nor dark/light box preferences as measures

  12. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Shounak; Chari, Suresh T

    2016-05-07

    Chronic pancreatitis describes a wide spectrum of fibro-inflammatory disorders of the exocrine pancreas that includes calcifying, obstructive, and steroid-responsive forms. Use of the term chronic pancreatitis without qualification generally refers to calcifying chronic pancreatitis. Epidemiology is poorly defined, but incidence worldwide seems to be on the rise. Smoking, drinking alcohol, and genetic predisposition are the major risk factors for chronic calcifying pancreatitis. In this Seminar, we discuss the clinical features, diagnosis, and management of chronic calcifying pancreatitis, focusing on pain management, the role of endoscopic and surgical intervention, and the use of pancreatic enzyme-replacement therapy. Management of patients is often challenging and necessitates a multidisciplinary approach. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dennis; Forsmark, Chris E

    2017-09-01

    Summarize key clinical advances in chronic pancreatitis reported in 2016. Early diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis remains elusive. Recent studies suggest that endoscopic ultrasound may be less accurate than previously thought and new MRI techniques may be helpful. Genetic predisposition may independently affect the clinical course of chronic pancreatitis and the risk for pancreatic cancer. Cigarette smoking may have a greater negative impact on chronic pancreatitis than previously thought and moderate alcohol consumption may be protective. A multidisciplinary approach is necessary for the treatment of type 3 diabetes and nutritional deficiencies in chronic pancreatitis. Although endoscopic therapy remains a reasonable first-line option in treating chronic pancreatitis and its complications, early surgical intervention may be indicated for pain in select patients. Newer endoscopic ultrasound and MRI techniques are being evaluated to help with the early diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis. Both genetic predisposition and cigarette smoking are increasingly recognized as having a major impact in the course of the disease and the risk for pancreatic cancer. Endoscopic therapy is well tolerated and effective for the treatment of chronic pancreatitis and its complications although an early surgical approach for pain may be associated with improved clinical outcomes.

  14. [Mediastinal Pancreatic Pseudocyst with Pancreatic Pleural Effusion].

    PubMed

    Sasajima, Motoko; Kawai, Hideki; Suzuki, Yohei; Saito, Yoshitaro; Eto, Takeshi

    2017-06-01

    A 72-year-old man with chronic alcohol related pancreatitis was admitted for dyspnea and pain at the upper body. Chest X-ray showed right massive pleural effusion. Chest and abdominal contrast enhanced thin slice computed tomography revealed the route from the pancreatic head reaching the right thoracic cavity via the esophagus hiatus and the communication between the cystic lesion and main pancreatic duct. We drained the pleural effusion that showed abnormally high amylase activity. We diagnosed his illness as mediastinal pancreatic pseudocyst with pancreatic pleural effusion. Endoscopic Nasopancreatic Drainage catheter was placed in the main pancreatic duct, and the pleural effusion disappeared.

  15. Polymorphisms at PRSS1-PRSS2 and CLDN2-MORC4 loci associate with alcoholic and non-alcoholic chronic pancreatitis in a European replication study.

    PubMed

    Derikx, Monique H; Kovacs, Peter; Scholz, Markus; Masson, Emmanuelle; Chen, Jian-Min; Ruffert, Claudia; Lichtner, Peter; Te Morsche, Rene H M; Cavestro, Giulia Martina; Férec, Claude; Drenth, Joost P H; Witt, Heiko; Rosendahl, Jonas

    2015-09-01

    Several genetic risk factors have been identified for non-alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (NACP). A genome-wide association study reported an association of chronic pancreatitis (CP) with variants in PRSS1-PRSS2 (rs10273639; near the gene encoding cationic trypsinogen) and CLDN2-MORC4 loci (rs7057398 in RIPPLY1 and rs12688220 in MORC4). We aimed to refine these findings in a large European cohort. We studied 3062 patients with alcohol-related CP (ACP) or NACP and 5107 controls. Also, 1559 German patients with alcohol-associated cirrhosis or alcohol dependence were included for comparison. We performed several meta-analyses to examine genotype-phenotype relationships. Association with ACP was found for rs10273639 (OR, 0.63; 95% CI 0.55 to 0.72). ACP was also associated with variants rs7057398 and rs12688220 in men (OR, 2.26; 95% CI 1.94 to 2.63 and OR, 2.66; 95% CI 2.21 to 3.21, respectively) and in women (OR, 1.57; 95% CI 1.14 to 2.18 and OR 1.71; 95% CI 1.41 to 2.07, respectively). Similar results were obtained when German patients with ACP were compared with those with alcohol-associated cirrhosis or alcohol dependence. In the overall population of patients with NACP, association with rs10273639 was absent (OR, 0.93; 95% CI 0.79 to 1.01), whereas rs7057398 of the X chromosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms was associated with NACP in women only (OR, 1.32; 95% CI 1.15 to 1.51). The single-nucleotide polymorphisms rs10273639 at the PRSS1-PRSS2 locus and rs7057398 and rs12688220 at the CLDN2-MORC4 locus are associated with CP and strongly associate with ACP, but only rs7057398 with NACP in female patients. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. The enteroinsular axis and endocrine pancreatic function in chronic alcohol consumers: evidence for early beta-cell hypofunction.

    PubMed

    Patto, R J; Russo, E K; Borges, D R; Neves, M M

    1993-09-01

    Chronic alcohol consumers may have, as judged by functional criteria, exocrine as well as endocrine pancreatic dysfunction, the latter represented by a decreased insulin response to an oral glucose load. To investigate whether this decreased insulin response was due to an ethanol-induced beta-cell dysfunction or to an ethanol-induced dysfunction of the enteroinsular axis, we determined glucose, insulin, and C-peptide plasma concentrations following an oral and an intravenous glucose load in 16 healthy volunteer nonalcohol consumers and in 10 chronic alcohol consumers. In each group, total integrated response for glucose did not significantly change whether glucose was given orally or intravenously, indicating isoglycemic glucose loads. The total integrated response values for insulin in the alcoholic group following both glucose loads as well as C-peptide plasma concentrations were significantly lower than in the control group. Moreover, in both groups the insulin TIR values following the oral glucose load were significantly greater than the values obtained following the intravenous glucose load, indicating an incretin effect. These results indicate that the decreased insulin response observed in alcoholics was not caused by a dysfunction of the enteroinsular axis because it also occurred following an intravenous glucose load, but by an ethanol-induced beta-cell dysfunction because C-peptide and insulin were proportionally decreased in this group.

  17. The epidemiology of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Dhiraj; Lowenfels, Albert B

    2013-06-01

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the most frequent gastrointestinal causes of hospital admission in the United States. Chronic pancreatitis, although lower in incidence, significantly reduces patients' quality of life. Pancreatic cancer is associated with a high mortality rate and is one of the top 5 causes of death from cancer. The burden of pancreatic disorders is expected to increase over time. The risk and etiology of pancreatitis differ with age and sex, and all pancreatic disorders affect the black population more than any other race. Gallstones are the most common cause of acute pancreatitis, and early cholecystectomy eliminates the risk of future attacks. Alcohol continues to be the single most important risk factor for chronic pancreatitis. Smoking is an independent risk factor for acute and chronic pancreatitis, and its effects could synergize with those of alcohol. Significant risk factors for pancreatic cancer include smoking and non-O blood groups. Alcohol abstinence and smoking cessation can alter the progression of pancreatitis and reduce recurrence; smoking cessation is the most effective strategy to reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The Epidemiology of Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Dhiraj; Lowenfels, Albert B.

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the most frequent gastrointestinal causes for hospital admission in the US. Chronic pancreatitis, although lower in incidence, significantly reduces patients’ quality of life. Pancreatic cancer has high mortality and is 1 of the top 5 causes of death from cancer. The burden of pancreatic disorders is expected to increase over time. The risk and etiology of pancreatitis differ with age and sex, and all pancreatic disorders affect Blacks more than any other race. Gallstones are the most common cause of acute pancreatitis, and early cholecystectomy eliminates the risk of future attacks. Alcohol continues to be the single most important risk factor for chronic pancreatitis. Smoking is an independent risk factor for acute and chronic pancreatitis, and its effects could synergize with those of alcohol. Significant risk factors for pancreatic cancer include smoking and non-O blood groups. Alcohol abstinence and smoking cessation can alter progression of pancreatitis and reduce recurrence; smoking cessation is the most effective strategy to reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer. PMID:23622135

  19. Acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Talukdar, Rupjyoti; Vege, Santhi S

    2015-09-01

    To summarize recent data on classification systems, cause, risk factors, severity prediction, nutrition, and drug treatment of acute pancreatitis. Comparison of the Revised Atlanta Classification and Determinant Based Classification has shown heterogeneous results. Simvastatin has a protective effect against acute pancreatitis. Young black male, alcohol, smoldering symptoms, and subsequent diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis are risk factors associated with readmissions after acute pancreatitis. A reliable clinical or laboratory marker or a scoring system to predict severity is lacking. The PYTHON trial has shown that oral feeding with on demand nasoenteric tube feeding after 72 h is as good as nasoenteric tube feeding within 24 h in preventing infections in predicted severe acute pancreatitis. Male sex, multiple organ failure, extent of pancreatic necrosis, and heterogeneous collection are factors associated with failure of percutaneous drainage of pancreatic collections. The newly proposed classification systems of acute pancreatitis need to be evaluated more critically. New biomarkers are needed for severity prediction. Further well designed studies are required to assess the type of enteral nutritional formulations for acute pancreatitis. The optimal minimally invasive method or combination to debride the necrotic collections is evolving. There is a great need for a drug to treat the disease early on to prevent morbidity and mortality.

  20. Common genetic variants in the CLDN2 and PRSS1-PRSS2 loci alter risk for alcohol-related and sporadic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Whitcomb, David C.; LaRusch, Jessica; Krasinskas, Alyssa M.; Klei, Lambertus; Smith, Jill P.; Brand, Randall E.; Neoptolemos, John P.; Lerch, Markus M.; Tector, Matt; Sandhu, Bimaljit S.; Guda, Nalini M.; Orlichenko, Lidiya; Alkaade, Samer; Amann, Stephen T.; Anderson, Michelle A.; Baillie, John; Banks, Peter A.; Conwell, Darwin; Coté, Gregory A.; Cotton, Peter B.; DiSario, James; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Forsmark, Chris E.; Johnstone, Marianne; Gardner, Timothy B.; Gelrud, Andres; Greenhalf, William; Haines, Jonathan L.; Hartman, Douglas J.; Hawes, Robert A.; Lawrence, Christopher; Lewis, Michele; Mayerle, Julia; Mayeux, Richard; Melhem, Nadine M.; Money, Mary E.; Muniraj, Thiruvengadam; Papachristou, Georgios I.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Sherman, Stuart; Simon, Peter; Singh, Vijay K.; Slivka, Adam; Stolz, Donna; Sutton, Robert; Weiss, Frank Ulrich; Wilcox, C. Mel; Zarnescu, Narcis Octavian; Wisniewski, Stephen R.; O'Connell, Michael R.; Kienholz, Michelle L.; Roeder, Kathryn; Barmada, M. Michael; Yadav, Dhiraj; Devlin, Bernie; Albert, Marilyn S.; Albin, Roger L.; Apostolova, Liana G.; Arnold, Steven E.; Baldwin, Clinton T.; Barber, Robert; Barnes, Lisa L.; Beach, Thomas G.; Beecham, Gary W.; Beekly, Duane; Bennett, David A.; Bigio, Eileen H.; Bird, Thomas D.; Blacker, Deborah; Boxer, Adam; Burke, James R.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Cairns, Nigel J.; Cantwell, Laura B.; Cao, Chuanhai; Carney, Regina M.; Carroll, Steven L.; Chui, Helena C.; Clark, David G.; Cribbs, David H.; Crocco, Elizabeth A.; Cruchaga, Carlos; DeCarli, Charles; Demirci, F. Yesim; Dick, Malcolm; Dickson, Dennis W.; Duara, Ranjan; Ertekin-Taner, Nilufer; Faber, Kelley M.; Fallon, Kenneth B.; Farlow, Martin R.; Ferris, Steven; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Frosch, Matthew P.; Galasko, Douglas R.; Ganguli, Mary; Gearing, Marla; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Gilbert, John R.; Gilman, Sid; Glass, Jonathan D.; Goate, Alison M.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Green, Robert C.; Growdon, John H.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hamilton-Nelson, Kara L.; Hamilton, Ronald L.; Harrell, Lindy E.; Head, Elizabeth; Honig, Lawrence S.; Hulette, Christine M.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Jicha, Gregory A.; Jin, Lee-Way; Jun, Gyungah; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; Karydas, Anna; Kaye, Jeffrey A.; Kim, Ronald; Koo, Edward H.; Kowall, Neil W.; Kramer, Joel H.; Kramer, Patricia; Kukull, Walter A.; LaFerla, Frank M.; Lah, James J.; Leverenz, James B.; Levey, Allan I.; Li, Ge; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Lieberman, Andrew P.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Lyketsos, Constantine G.; Mack, Wendy J.; Marson, Daniel C.; Martin, Eden R.; Martiniuk, Frank; Mash, Deborah C.; Masliah, Eliezer; McKee, Ann C.; Mesulam, Marsel; Miller, Bruce L.; Miller, Carol A.; Miller, Joshua W.; Montine, Thomas J.; Morris, John C.; Murrell, Jill R.; Naj, Adam C.; Olichney, John M.; Parisi, Joseph E.; Peskind, Elaine; Petersen, Ronald C.; Pierce, Aimee; Poon, Wayne W.; Potter, Huntington; Quinn, Joseph F.; Raj, Ashok; Raskind, Murray; Reiman, Eric M.; Reisberg, Barry; Reitz, Christiane; Ringman, John M.; Roberson, Erik D.; Rosen, Howard J.; Rosenberg, Roger N.; Sano, Mary; Saykin, Andrew J.; Schneider, Julie A.; Schneider, Lon S.; Seeley, William W.; Smith, Amanda G.; Sonnen, Joshua A.; Spina, Salvatore; Stern, Robert A.; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Troncoso, Juan C.; Tsuang, Debby W.; Valladares, Otto; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Van Eldik, Linda J.; Vardarajan, Badri N.; Vinters, Harry V.; Vonsattel, Jean Paul; Wang, Li-San; Weintraub, Sandra; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A.; Williamson, Jennifer; Woltjer, Randall L.; Wright, Clinton B.; Younkin, Steven G.; Yu, Chang-En; Yu, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatitis is a complex, progressively destructive inflammatory disorder. Alcohol was long thought to be the primary causative agent, but genetic contributions have been of interest since the discovery that rare PRSS1, CFTR, and SPINK1 variants were associated with pancreatitis risk. We now report two significant genome-wide associations identified and replicated at PRSS1-PRSS2 (1×10-12) and x-linked CLDN2 (p < 1×10-21) through a two-stage genome-wide study (Stage 1, 676 cases and 4507 controls; Stage 2, 910 cases and 4170 controls). The PRSS1 variant affects susceptibility by altering expression of the primary trypsinogen gene. The CLDN2 risk allele is associated with atypical localization of claudin-2 in pancreatic acinar cells. The homozygous (or hemizygous male) CLDN2 genotype confers the greatest risk, and its alleles interact with alcohol consumption to amplify risk. These results could partially explain the high frequency of alcohol-related pancreatitis in men – male hemizygous frequency is 0.26, female homozygote is 0.07. PMID:23143602

  1. [Chronic pancreatitis diagnosed after the first attack of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Bojková, Martina; Dítě, Petr; Uvírová, Magdalena; Dvořáčková, Nina; Kianička, Bohuslav; Kupka, Tomáš; Svoboda, Pavel; Klvaňa, Pavel; Martínek, Arnošt

    2016-02-01

    One of the diseases involving a potential risk of developing chronic pancreatitis is acute pancreatitis. Of the overall number of 231 individuals followed with a diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis, 56 patients were initially treated for acute pancreatitis (24.2 %). Within an interval of 12- 24 months from the first attack of acute pancreatitis, their condition gradually progressed to reached the picture of chronic pancreatitis. The individuals included in the study abstained (from alcohol) following the first attack of acute pancreatitis and no relapse of acute pancreatitis was proven during the period of their monitoring. The etiology of acute pancreatitis identified alcohol as the predominant cause (55.3 %), biliary etiology was proven in 35.7 %. According to the revised Atlanta classification, severe pancreatitis was established in 69.6 % of the patients, the others met the criterion for intermediate form, those with the light form were not included. Significant risk factors present among the patients were smoking, obesity and 18 %, resp. 25.8 % had pancreatogenous diabetes mellitus identified. 88.1 % of the patients with acute pancreatitis were smokers. The majority of individuals with chronic pancreatitis following an attack of acute pancreatitis were of a productive age from 25 to 50 years. It is not only acute alcoholic pancreatitis which evolves into chronic pancreatitis, we have also identified this transition for pancreatitis of biliary etiology.

  2. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kleeff, Jorg; Whitcomb, David C; Shimosegawa, Tooru; Esposito, Irene; Lerch, Markus M; Gress, Thomas; Mayerle, Julia; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Rebours, Vinciane; Akisik, Fatih; Muñoz, J Enrique Domínguez; Neoptolemos, John P

    2017-09-07

    Chronic pancreatitis is defined as a pathological fibro-inflammatory syndrome of the pancreas in individuals with genetic, environmental and/or other risk factors who develop persistent pathological responses to parenchymal injury or stress. Potential causes can include toxic factors (such as alcohol or smoking), metabolic abnormalities, idiopathic mechanisms, genetics, autoimmune responses and obstructive mechanisms. The pathophysiology of chronic pancreatitis is fairly complex and includes acinar cell injury, acinar stress responses, duct dysfunction, persistent or altered inflammation, and/or neuro-immune crosstalk, but these mechanisms are not completely understood. Chronic pancreatitis is characterized by ongoing inflammation of the pancreas that results in progressive loss of the endocrine and exocrine compartment owing to atrophy and/or replacement with fibrotic tissue. Functional consequences include recurrent or constant abdominal pain, diabetes mellitus (endocrine insufficiency) and maldigestion (exocrine insufficiency). Diagnosing early-stage chronic pancreatitis is challenging as changes are subtle, ill-defined and overlap those of other disorders. Later stages are characterized by variable fibrosis and calcification of the pancreatic parenchyma; dilatation, distortion and stricturing of the pancreatic ducts; pseudocysts; intrapancreatic bile duct stricturing; narrowing of the duodenum; and superior mesenteric, portal and/or splenic vein thrombosis. Treatment options comprise medical, radiological, endoscopic and surgical interventions, but evidence-based approaches are limited. This Primer highlights the major progress that has been made in understanding the pathophysiology, presentation, prevalence and management of chronic pancreatitis and its complications.

  3. Targeting Trysin-Inflammation Axis for Pancreatitis Therapy in a Humanized Pancreatitis Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-10-01

    pancreatitis especially due to alcohol and smoking goes onto chronic pancreatitis which, in turn, is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer . Because only a...proportional risk for pancreatic cancer of any known environmental risk factor. Because only a relatively small portion of patients with alcohol...progression to pancreatic cancer . Targeting the ER stress and inflammatory cascade will be beneficial for pancreatitis prevention and therapy. We expect that

  4. Incidence of and risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer in patients with chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Yujin; Kamisawa, Terumi; Anjiki, Hajime; Takuma, Kensuke; Egawa, Naoto

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer sometimes occurs during the course of chronic pancreatitis. This study aimed to identify risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer associated with chronic pancreatitis. The incidence of pancreatic cancer developing in 218 patients with chronic pancreatitis and clinical features of the chronic pancreatitis patients who developed pancreatic cancer were studied. Nine patients developed pancreatic cancer. Average period from the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis to the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer was 9.6 years. All pancreatic cancers were diagnosed at an advanced stage. Only 2 patients had been followed-up periodically. There were no significant differences between chronic pancreatitis patients who developed pancreatic cancer and those who did not in male/female ratio (3.5 vs. 8), average age on diagnosis (65.0 vs. 56.5), alcoholic/non-alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (1.6 vs. 2.6), smoking habits (62.5% vs. 70.7%), diabetes mellitus (77.8% vs. 54.4%), and continued alcohol drinking (37.5% vs. 53.1%). Over the period examined, 4% of chronic pancreatitis patients developed pancreatic cancer. Sex ratio, onset age, etiology, smoking habits, diabetes mellitus, and continued alcohol drinking were not significant risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer in chronic pancreatitis patients. Periodic follow-up due to the possibility of pancreatic cancer is necessary in chronic pancreatitis patients.

  5. Autoimmune pancreatitis can develop into chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been recognized as a distinct type of pancreatitis that is possibly caused by autoimmune mechanisms. AIP is characterized by high serum IgG4 and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in affected pancreatic tissue. Acute phase AIP responds favorably to corticosteroid therapy and results in the amelioration of clinical findings. However, the long-term prognosis and outcome of AIP remain unclear. We have proposed a working hypothesis that AIP can develop into ordinary chronic pancreatitis resembling alcoholic pancreatitis over a long-term course based on several clinical findings, most notably frequent pancreatic stone formation. In this review article, we describe a series of study results to confirm our hypothesis and clarify that: 1) pancreatic calcification in AIP is closely associated with disease recurrence; 2) advanced stage AIP might have earlier been included in ordinary chronic pancreatitis; 3) approximately 40% of AIP patients experience pancreatic stone formation over a long-term course, for which a primary risk factor is narrowing of both Wirsung’s and Santorini’s ducts; and 4) nearly 20% of AIP patients progress to confirmed chronic pancreatitis according to the revised Japanese Clinical Diagnostic Criteria, with independent risk factors being pancreatic head swelling and non-narrowing of the pancreatic body duct. PMID:24884922

  6. Autoimmune pancreatitis can develop into chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Masahiro; Watanabe, Takayuki; Kanai, Keita; Oguchi, Takaya; Asano, Jumpei; Ito, Tetsuya; Ozaki, Yayoi; Muraki, Takashi; Hamano, Hideaki; Arakura, Norikazu; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2014-05-21

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been recognized as a distinct type of pancreatitis that is possibly caused by autoimmune mechanisms. AIP is characterized by high serum IgG4 and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in affected pancreatic tissue. Acute phase AIP responds favorably to corticosteroid therapy and results in the amelioration of clinical findings. However, the long-term prognosis and outcome of AIP remain unclear. We have proposed a working hypothesis that AIP can develop into ordinary chronic pancreatitis resembling alcoholic pancreatitis over a long-term course based on several clinical findings, most notably frequent pancreatic stone formation. In this review article, we describe a series of study results to confirm our hypothesis and clarify that: 1) pancreatic calcification in AIP is closely associated with disease recurrence; 2) advanced stage AIP might have earlier been included in ordinary chronic pancreatitis; 3) approximately 40% of AIP patients experience pancreatic stone formation over a long-term course, for which a primary risk factor is narrowing of both Wirsung's and Santorini's ducts; and 4) nearly 20% of AIP patients progress to confirmed chronic pancreatitis according to the revised Japanese Clinical Diagnostic Criteria, with independent risk factors being pancreatic head swelling and non-narrowing of the pancreatic body duct.

  7. Genetic polymorphisms of alcohol dehydrogenase-1B and aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 and liver cirrhosis, chronic calcific pancreatitis, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension among Japanese alcoholic men.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Akira; Mizukami, Takeshi; Matsui, Toshifumi; Yokoyama, Tetsuji; Kimura, Mitsuru; Matsushita, Sachio; Higuchi, Susumu; Maruyama, Katsuya

    2013-08-01

    The presence of the less-active form of alcohol dehydrogenase-1B encoded by ADH1B*1/*1 (vs. *2 allele) and active form of aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) encoded by ALDH2*1/*1 (vs. *2 allele) increases the risk of alcoholism in East Asians. The subjects in this cross-sectional survey were 1,902 Japanese alcoholic men (≥40 years) who underwent ADH1B/ALDH2 genotyping. Age-adjusted daily alcohol consumption did not differ according to the ADH1B/ALDH2 genotypes. The age-adjusted odds ratios (AORs; 95% confidence interval) for liver cirrhosis (LC; n = 359, 1.58 [1.19 to 2.09]), chronic calcific pancreatitis (CP; n = 80, 2.24 [1.20 to 4.20]), and diabetes mellitus (DM; n = 383, 1.51 [1.15 to 1.99]) were higher in the ADH1B*2 allele carriers than in the ADH1B*1/*1 carriers. The AORs for LC (1.43 [1.01 to 2.02]), CP (1.68 [0.80 to 3.53]), DM (1.63 [1.15 to 2.30]), and hypertension (HT; n = 495, 1.52 [1.11 to 2.07]) were higher in the ALDH2*1/*1 carriers than in the ALDH2*1/*2 carriers. The ADH1B*2-associated AOR for LC was 2.08 (1.46 to 2.94) among those aged 40 to 59 years, but 0.89 (0.56 to 1.43) among those aged 60 years or over, and the interaction between ADH1B genotype and age on the LC risk was significant (p = 0.009). When the group with non-LC and no/mild fibrosis was used as controls, the ADH1B*2-associated AORs increased according to the severity of their liver disease: 1.67 (1.32 to 2.11) for the group with non-LC and serum type IV collagen values ≥200 ng/ml, 1.81 (1.24 to 2.63) for the group of Child-Pugh class A LC, and 3.17 (1.98 to 5.07) for the group with Child-Pugh class B/C LC. Anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody was positive in 103 patients, and the groups with a high anti-HCV antibody titer and either the ADH1B*2/*2 genotype or the ALDH2*1/*1 genotype had the highest AORs (8.83 and 4.90, respectively). The population attributable fraction (PAF) due to the ADH1B*2 allele was 29% for LC, 47% for CP, and 27% for DM, and the PAF due to the ALDH2

  8. Chronic pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can lead to chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be ...

  9. [Pancreatic ultrasonography].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Rodríguez, T; Segura-Grau, A; Rodríguez-Lorenzo, A; Segura-Cabral, J M

    2015-04-01

    Despite the recent technological advances in imaging, abdominal ultrasonography continues to be the first diagnostic test indicated in patients with a suspicion of pancreatic disease, due to its safety, accessibility and low cost. It is an essential technique in the study of inflammatory processes, since it not only assesses changes in pancreatic parenchyma, but also gives an indication of the origin (bile or alcoholic). It is also essential in the detection and tracing of possible complications as well as being used as a guide in diagnostic and therapeutic punctures. It is also the first technique used in the study of pancreatic tumors, detecting them with a sensitivity of around 70% and a specificity of 90%. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  10. Chemoprevention gene therapy (CGT) of pancreatic cancer using perillyl alcohol and a novel chimeric serotype cancer terminator virus.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, S; Azab, B; Quinn, B A; Shen, X; Dent, P; Klibanov, A L; Emdad, L; Das, S K; Sarkar, D; Fisher, P B

    2014-01-01

    Conditionally replication competent adenoviruses (Ads) that selectively replicate in cancer cells and simultaneously express a therapeutic cytokine, such as melanoma differentiation associated gene- 7/Interleukin-24 (mda-7/IL-24), a Cancer Terminator Virus (CTV-M7), hold potential for treating human cancers. To enhance the efficacy of the CTV-M7, we generated a chimeric Ad.5 and Ad.3 modified fiber bipartite CTV (Ad.5/3-CTV-M7) that can infect tumor cells in a Coxsackie Adenovirus receptor (CAR) independent manner, while retaining high infectivity in cancer cells containing high CAR. Although mda-7/IL-24 displays broad-spectrum anticancer properties, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells display an intrinsic resistance to mda-7/IL-24-mediated killing due to an mda-7/IL-24 mRNA translational block. However, using a chemoprevention gene therapy (CGT) approach with perillyl alcohol (POH) and a replication incompetent Ad to deliver mda-7/IL-24 (Ad.mda-7) there is enhanced conversion of mda-7/IL-24 mRNA into protein resulting in pancreatic cancer cell death in vitro and in vivo in nude mice containing human PDAC xenografts. This combination synergistically induces mda-7/IL-24-mediated cancer-specific apoptosis by inhibiting anti-apoptotic Bcl-xL and Bcl-2 protein expression and inducing an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response through induction of BiP/GRP-78, which is most evident in chimeric-modified non-replicating Ad.5/3- mda-7- and CTV-M7-infected PDAC cells. Moreover, Ad.5/3-CTV-M7 in combination with POH sensitizes therapy-resistant MIA PaCa-2 cell lines over-expressing either Bcl-2 or Bcl-xL to mda-7/IL-24-mediated apoptosis. Ad.5/3-CTV-M7 plus POH also exerts a significant antitumor 'bystander' effect in vivo suppressing both primary and distant site tumor growth, confirming therapeutic utility of Ad.5/3-CTV-M7 plus POH in PDAC treatment, where all other current treatment strategies in clinical settings show minimal efficacy.

  11. Pathogenic mechanisms of pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Manohar, Murli; Verma, Alok Kumar; Venkateshaiah, Sathisha Upparahalli; Sanders, Nathan L; Mishra, Anil

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatitis is inflammation of pancreas and caused by a number of factors including pancreatic duct obstruction, alcoholism, and mutation in the cationic trypsinogen gene. Pancreatitis is represented as acute pancreatitis with acute inflammatory responses and; chronic pancreatitis characterized by marked stroma formation with a high number of infiltrating granulocytes (such as neutrophils, eosinophils), monocytes, macrophages and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). These inflammatory cells are known to play a central role in initiating and promoting inflammation including pancreatic fibrosis, i.e., a major risk factor for pancreatic cancer. A number of inflammatory cytokines are known to involve in promoting pancreatic pathogenesis that lead pancreatic fibrosis. Pancreatic fibrosis is a dynamic phenomenon that requires an intricate network of several autocrine and paracrine signaling pathways. In this review, we have provided the details of various cytokines and molecular mechanistic pathways (i.e., Transforming growth factor-β/SMAD, mitogen-activated protein kinases, Rho kinase, Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators, and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase) that have a critical role in the activation of PSCs to promote chronic pancreatitis and trigger the phenomenon of pancreatic fibrogenesis. In this review of literature, we discuss the involvement of several pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as in interleukin (IL)-1, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 IL-10, IL-18, IL-33 and tumor necrosis factor-α, in the pathogenesis of disease. Our review also highlights the significance of several experimental animal models that have an important role in dissecting the mechanistic pathways operating in the development of chronic pancreatitis, including pancreatic fibrosis. Additionally, we provided several intermediary molecules that are involved in major signaling pathways that might provide target molecules for future therapeutic treatment strategies for

  12. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... because that's how many accidents occur. What Is Alcoholism? What can be confusing about alcohol is that ... develop a problem with it. Sometimes, that's called alcoholism (say: al-kuh-HOL - ism) or being an ...

  13. Laparoscopic pancreatic cystogastrostomy.

    PubMed

    Obermeyer, Robert J; Fisher, William E; Salameh, Jihad R; Jeyapalan, Manjula; Sweeney, John F; Brunicardi, F Charles

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of the review was to evaluate the feasibility and outcome of laparoscopic pancreatic cystogastrostomy for operative drainage of symptomatic pancreatic pseudocysts. A retrospective review of all patients who underwent laparoscopic pancreatic cystogastrostomy between June 1997 and July 2001 was performed. Data regarding etiology of pancreatitis, size of pseudocyst, operative time, complications, and pseudocyst recurrence were collected and reported as median values with ranges. Laparoscopic pancreatic cystogastrostomy was attempted in 6 patients. Pseudocyst etiology included gallstone pancreatitis (3), alcohol-induced pancreatitis (2), and post-ERCP pancreatitis (1). The cystogastrostomy was successfully performed laparoscopically in 5 of 6 patients. However, the procedure was converted to open after creation of the cystgastrostomy in 1 of these patients. There were no complications in the cases completed laparoscopically and no deaths in the entire group. No pseudocyst recurrences were observed with a median followup of 44 months (range 4-59 months). Laparoscopic pancreatic cystgastrostomy is a feasible surgical treatment of pancreatic pseudocysts with a resultant low pseudocyst recurrence rate, length of stay, and low morbidity and mortality.

  14. TRO40303 Ameliorates Alcohol-Induced Pancreatitis Through Reduction of Fatty Acid Ethyl Ester–Induced Mitochondrial Injury and Necrotic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Javed, Muhammad Ahsan; Wen, Li; Awais, Muhammad; Latawiec, Diane; Huang, Wei; Chvanov, Michael; Schaller, Sophie; Bordet, Thierry; Michaud, Magali; Pruss, Rebecca; Tepikin, Alexei; Criddle, David; Sutton, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Objectives Mitochondrial permeability transition pore inhibition is a promising approach to treat acute pancreatitis (AP). We sought to determine (i) the effects of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore inhibitor 3,5-seco-4-nor-cholestan-5-one oxime-3-ol (TRO40303) on murine and human pancreatic acinar cell (PAC) injury induced by fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) or taurolithocholic acid-3-sulfate and (ii) TRO40303 pharmacokinetics and efficacy in experimental alcoholic AP (FAEE-AP). Methods Changes in mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm), cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]c), and cell fate were examined in freshly isolated murine or human PACs by confocal microscopy. TRO40303 pharmacokinetics were assessed in cerulein-induced AP and therapeutic efficacy in FAEE-AP induced with palmitoleic acid and ethanol. Severity of AP was assessed by standard biomarkers and blinded histopathology. Results TRO40303 prevented loss of Δψm and necrosis induced by 100 μM palmitoleic acid ethyl ester or 500 μM taurolithocholic acid-3-sulfate in murine and human PACs. Pharmacokinetic analysis found TRO40303 accumulated in the pancreas. A single dose of 3 mg/kg TRO40303 significantly reduced serum amylase (P = 0.043), pancreatic trypsin (P = 0.018), and histopathology scores (P = 0.0058) in FAEE-AP. Conclusions TRO40303 protects mitochondria and prevents necrotic cell death pathway activation in murine and human PACs, ameliorates the severity of FAEE-AP, and is a candidate drug for human AP. PMID:29200128

  15. Acute Pancreatitis: Etiology, Pathology, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Majidi, Shirin; Golembioski, Adam; Wilson, Stephen L; Thompson, Errington C

    2017-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a fascinating disease. In the United States, the two most common etiologies of acute pancreatitis are gallstones and excessive alcohol consumption. The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis is made with a combination of history, physical examination, computed tomography scan, and laboratory evaluation. Differentiating patients who will have a benign course of their pancreatitis from patients who will have severe pancreatitis is challenging to the clinician. C-reactive protein, pro-calcitonin, and the Bedside Index for Severity of Acute Pancreatitis appeared to be the best tools for the early and accurate diagnosis of severe pancreatitis. Early laparoscopic cholecystectomy is indicated for patients with mild gallstone pancreatitis. For patients who are going to have a prolonged hospitalization, enteral nutrition is preferred. Total parenteral nutrition should be reserved for patients who cannot tolerate enteral nutrition. Prophylactic antibiotics are not indicated for patients with pancreatic necrosis. Surgical intervention for infected pancreatic necrosis should be delayed as long as possible to improve patient outcomes.

  16. Chronic pancreatitis. Some important historical aspects.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Salvador

    2018-06-08

    Since ancient times the increase of size and hardness sometimes presented by the abdominal structure known as the pancreas has attracted attention. Portal was the first to describe the clinical signs of chronic pancreatitis in 1803. In 1815, Fleischman speculated about the potential role of excessive alcohol consumption. Comfort coined the term "chronic relapsing pancreatitis" in 1946 and described hereditary pancreatitis 6 years later. Zuidema defined tropical pancreatitis in 1959 and 2 years later Sarles described another form of pancreatitis to which Yoshida gave the name autoimmune pancreatitis in 1995. Groove pancreatitis was described by Potet in 1970. Obstructive pancreatitis was defined in 1984 and Ammann identified idiopathic pancreatitis 3 years later. This article gives a historical account of the pioneers who developed the knowledge of how to assess the characteristics that allowed the different forms of chronic pancreatitis to be defined. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Smoking, alcohol, and diet in relation to risk of pancreatic cancer in China: a prospective study of 0.5 million people.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yuanjie; Holmes, Michael V; Guo, Yu; Yang, Ling; Bian, Zheng; Chen, Yiping; Iona, Andri; Millwood, Iona Y; Bragg, Fiona; Chen, Junshi; Li, Liming; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Chen, Zhengming

    2018-01-01

    In China, the incidence of pancreatic cancer (PC) has increased in recent decades. However, little is known about the relevance to PC risk of lifestyle and behavioral factors such as smoking, alcohol drinking, and diet. The China Kadoorie Biobank prospective study recruited 512,891 adults (210,222 men, 302,669 women) aged 30-79 (mean 52) years from 10 diverse areas during 2004-08. During ~9 years of follow-up, 688 incident cases of PC were recorded among those who had no prior history of cancer at baseline. Cox regression yielded adjusted hazard ratios (HR) for PC associated with smoking, alcohol and selected dietary factors. Overall, 74% of men were ever-regular smokers and 33% of men drank at least weekly, compared with only 3% and 2% of women, respectively. Among men, current regular smoking was associated with an adjusted HR of 1.25 (95% CI 1.08-1.44) for PC, with greater excess risk in urban than rural areas (1.46 [1.19-1.79] vs 1.04 [0.86-1.26]). Heavy, but not light to moderate, alcohol drinking (i.e. ≥420 g/week) was associated with significant excess risk (1.69 [1.21-2.37]), again more extreme in urban than rural areas (1.93 [1.29-2.87] vs 1.35 [0.74-2.48]). Overall, regular consumption of certain foodstuffs was associated with PC risk, with adjusted daily vs never/rare consumption HRs of 0.66 (0.56-0.79) for fresh fruit and 1.16 (1.01-1.33) for red meat. In China, smoking and heavy alcohol drinking were independent risk factors for PC in men. Lower fresh fruit and higher red meat consumption were also associated with higher risk of PC. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Hereditary chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Rosendahl, Jonas; Bödeker, Hans; Mössner, Joachim; Teich, Niels

    2007-01-01

    Hereditary chronic pancreatitis (HCP) is a very rare form of early onset chronic pancreatitis. With the exception of the young age at diagnosis and a slower progression, the clinical course, morphological features and laboratory findings of HCP do not differ from those of patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. As well, diagnostic criteria and treatment of HCP resemble that of chronic pancreatitis of other causes. The clinical presentation is highly variable and includes chronic abdominal pain, impairment of endocrine and exocrine pancreatic function, nausea and vomiting, maldigestion, diabetes, pseudocysts, bile duct and duodenal obstruction, and rarely pancreatic cancer. Fortunately, most patients have a mild disease. Mutations in the PRSS1 gene, encoding cationic trypsinogen, play a causative role in chronic pancreatitis. It has been shown that the PRSS1 mutations increase autocatalytic conversion of trypsinogen to active trypsin, and thus probably cause premature, intrapancreatic trypsinogen activation disturbing the intrapancreatic balance of proteases and their inhibitors. Other genes, such as the anionic trypsinogen (PRSS2), the serine protease inhibitor, Kazal type 1 (SPINK1) and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) have been found to be associated with chronic pancreatitis (idiopathic and hereditary) as well. Genetic testing should only be performed in carefully selected patients by direct DNA sequencing and antenatal diagnosis should not be encouraged. Treatment focuses on enzyme and nutritional supplementation, pain management, pancreatic diabetes, and local organ complications, such as pseudocysts, bile duct or duodenal obstruction. The disease course and prognosis of patients with HCP is unpredictable. Pancreatic cancer risk is elevated. Therefore, HCP patients should strongly avoid environmental risk factors for pancreatic cancer. PMID:17204147

  19. Risk of Recurrent Pancreatitis and Progression to Chronic Pancreatitis After a First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed Ali, Usama; Issa, Yama; Hagenaars, Julia C; Bakker, Olaf J; van Goor, Harry; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B; Bollen, Thomas L; van Ramshorst, Bert; Witteman, Ben J; Brink, Menno A; Schaapherder, Alexander F; Dejong, Cornelis H; Spanier, B W Marcel; Heisterkamp, Joos; van der Harst, Erwin; van Eijck, Casper H; Besselink, Marc G; Gooszen, Hein G; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Boermeester, Marja A

    2016-05-01

    Patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis can develop recurrent or chronic pancreatitis (CP). However, little is known about the incidence or risk factors for these events. We performed a cross-sectional study of 669 patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis admitted to 15 Dutch hospitals from December 2003 through March 2007. We collected information on disease course, outpatient visits, and hospital readmissions, as well as results from imaging, laboratory, and histology studies. Standardized follow-up questionnaires were sent to all available patients to collect information on hospitalizations and interventions for pancreatic disease, abdominal pain, steatorrhea, diabetes mellitus, medications, and alcohol and tobacco use. Patients were followed up for a median time period of 57 months. Primary end points were recurrent pancreatitis and CP. Risk factors were evaluated using regression analysis. The cumulative risk was assessed using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Recurrent pancreatitis developed in 117 patients (17%), and CP occurred in 51 patients (7.6%). Recurrent pancreatitis developed in 12% of patients with biliary disease, 24% of patients with alcoholic etiology, and 25% of patients with disease of idiopathic or other etiologies; CP occurred in 3%, 16%, and 10% of these patients, respectively. Etiology, smoking, and necrotizing pancreatitis were independent risk factors for recurrent pancreatitis and CP. Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II scores at admission also were associated independently with recurrent pancreatitis. The cumulative risk for recurrent pancreatitis over 5 years was highest among smokers at 40% (compared with 13% for nonsmokers). For alcohol abusers and current smokers, the cumulative risks for CP were similar-approximately 18%. In contrast, the cumulative risk of CP increased to 30% in patients who smoked and abused alcohol. Based on a retrospective analysis of patients admitted to Dutch hospitals, a first

  20. Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  1. Surgery for chronic pancreatitis decreases the risk for pancreatic cancer: a multicenter retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Junji; Tanaka, Masao; Ohtsuka, Takao; Tokunaga, Shoji; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2013-03-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is suggested to be one of the risk factors for the development of pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to confirm the high incidence of pancreatic cancer in patients with chronic pancreatitis in Japan and to determine the factors associated with the risk for pancreatic cancer in patients with chronic pancreatitis. The working group of the Research Committee of Intractable Disease supported by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan carried out a nationwide survey to investigate the relationship between chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. This retrospective study included patients diagnosed with chronic pancreatitis who had had at least 2 years of follow-up. They were contacted through 22 Japanese referral centers experienced in the management of chronic pancreatitis. The standardized incidence ratio (95 CI) of pancreatic cancer was 11.8 (7.1-18.4). The incidence of pancreatic cancer was significantly lower in patients who had received surgery for chronic pancreatitis than in those who had not undergone surgery (hazard ratio estimated by Cox regression 0.11; 95% CI, 0.0014-0.80; P = .03). Patients who continued to drink alcohol after diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis showed a significantly higher incidence of pancreatic cancer than those who stopped drinking after diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis (hazard ratio, 5.07; 95% CI, 1.13-22.73; P = .03). This study confirmed that chronic pancreatitis is an important risk factor for the development of pancreatic cancer in Japan. Patients who underwent surgery for the treatment of chronic pancreatitis had significantly lower incidences of pancreatic cancer. Surgery for chronic pancreatitis may inhibit the development of pancreatic cancer in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Alcohol and the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Schenker, S; Montalvo, R

    1998-01-01

    Alcoholic pancreatitis may be one of the most serious adverse consequences of alcohol abuse. Its diagnosis, as it has for many years, depends primarily on clinical acumen in interpreting properly the symptoms and signs of abdominal distress, buttressed by elevated pancreatic enzymes (amylase and lipase). More recently, the use of computerized tomography (CT) in selected situations has been both of confirmatory and prognostic value. Severity of abnormality by CT correlates reasonably well with a variety of clinical-laboratory clusters (APACHE system, Ranson's criteria, etc.) and aids in therapy. The pathogenesis of alcoholic pancreatitis is not fully defined. The ultimate picture is one of tissue autolysis by activated proteolytic enzymes. The triggers for such activation, however, are still not known. They are represented by three main theories: (1) large duct obstruction and/or increased permeability relative to pancreatic secretion, (2) small duct obstruction due to proteinaceous precipitates, and (3) a direct toxic-metabolic effect of ethanol on pancreatic acinar cells. While not mutually exclusive, we favor the last hypothesis as being most consistent with the effects of ethanol on other organ systems. The direct effects of ethanol and/or its metabolites may be mediated, at least in part, via oxidative stress or the generation of fatty acid ethyl esters. Autolysis (regardless of proximate mechanism(s)) leads to inflammation likely mediated via release of various cytokines. It also should be appreciated that "acute" pancreatitis (the topic of this chapter) likely represents an acute process within a chronic pancreatic exposure and injury from alcoholic abuse. The key question of why pancreatitis develops in only a small number of alcohol abusers is not resolved. Therapy depends on the severity of alcoholic pancreatitis, which is defined by clinical-laboratory and often CT criteria. Mild pancreatitis usually resolves acutely with alcohol abstention and supportive

  3. Alcohol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schibeci, Renato

    1996-01-01

    Describes the manufacturing of ethanol, the effects of ethanol on the body, the composition of alcoholic drinks, and some properties of ethanol. Presents some classroom experiments using ethanol. (JRH)

  4. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... created when grains, fruits, or vegetables are fermented . Fermentation is a process that uses yeast or bacteria ... change the sugars in the food into alcohol. Fermentation is used to produce many necessary items — everything ...

  5. [Chronic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer - Tumor Risk and Screening].

    PubMed

    Beyer, Georg; D'Haese, Jan G; Ormanns, Steffen; Mayerle, Julia

    2018-06-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a fibroinflammatory syndrome of the exocrine pancreas, which is characterized by an increasing incidence, high morbidity and lethality. Common etiologies besides alcohol and nicotine consumption include genetic causes and risk factors. The life time risk for the development of pancreatic cancer is elevated 13- to 45-fold depending on the underlying etiology. In patients with chronic pancreatitis clinical, laboratory and imaging surveillance for early detection of complications, including pancreatic cancer, is recommended, although the available methods lack the desired sensitivity and specificity. In this article we review the epidemiology, etiologies and risk factors for chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer and discuss current recommendations for screening and management of patients at risk for tumor development. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. An update on pancreatic pathophysiology (do we have to rewrite pancreatic pathophysiology?).

    PubMed

    Hammer, Heinz F

    2014-02-01

    This review focuses on seven aspects of physiology and pathophysiology of the exocrine pancreas that have been intensively discussed and studied within the past few years: (1) the role of neurohormonal mechanisms like melatonin, leptin, or ghrelin in the stimulation of pancreatic enzyme secretion; (2) the initiation processes of acute pancreatitis, like fusion of zymogen granules with lysosomes leading to intracellular activation of trypsinogen by the lysosomal enzyme cathepsin B, or autoactivation of trypsinogen; (3) the role of genes in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis; (4) the role of alcohol and constituents of alcoholic beverages in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis; (5) the role of pancreatic hypertension, neuropathy, and central mechanisms for the pathogenesis of pain in chronic pancreatitis; (6) the relation between exocrine pancreatic function and diabetes mellitus; and (7) pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic steatorrhea.

  7. Environmental risk factors for chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Nitsche, Claudia; Simon, Peter; Weiss, F Ulrich; Fluhr, Gabriele; Weber, Eckhard; Gärtner, Simone; Behn, Claas O; Kraft, Matthias; Ringel, Jörg; Aghdassi, Ali; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis has long been thought to be mainly associated with immoderate alcohol consumption. The observation that only ∼10% of heavy drinkers develop chronic pancreatitis not only suggests that other environmental factors, such as tobacco smoke, are potent additional risk factors, but also that the genetic component of pancreatitis is more common than previously presumed. Either disease-causing or protective traits have been indentified for mutations in different trypsinogen genes, the gene for the trypsin inhibitor SPINK1, chymotrypsinogen C, and the cystic fibrosis transmembane conductance regulator (CFTR). Other factors that have been proposed to contribute to pancreatitis are obesity, diets high in animal protein and fat, as well as antioxidant deficiencies. For the development of pancreatic cancer, preexisting chronic pancreatitis, more prominently hereditary pancreatitis, is a risk factor. The data on environmental risk factors for pancreatic cancer are, with the notable exception of tobacco smoke, either sparse, unconfirmed or controversial. Obesity appears to increase the risk of pancreatic cancer in the West but not in Japan. Diets high in processed or red meat, diets low in fruits and vegetables, phytochemicals such as lycopene and flavonols, have been proposed and refuted as risk or protective factors in different trials. The best established and single most important risk factor for cancer as well as pancreatitis and the one to clearly avoid is tobacco smoke. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Ethanol Administration Impairs Pancreatic Repair Following Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mahan Schneider, Katrina J.; Scheer, Marc; Suhr, Mallory; Clemens, Dahn L.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Alcohol abuse is one of the most common factors associated with acute and chronic pancreatitis. Although it is evident that alcohol abuse can have an important role in the development of pancreatitis, it does not appear that alcohol abuse alone is responsible for this disease. We investigated the involvement of ethanol in impairment of pancreatic repair after induction of pancreatitis. Methods A biologically relevant mouse model of alcoholic pancreatitis, combining chronic ethanol consumption and coxsackievirus infection, was used to investigate the effects of ethanol on pancreatic regeneration. Tissues were harvested and analyzed by RT-PCR and immunoblot. Results These studies demonstrate that chronic ethanol consumption impairs the structural repair of the exocrine pancreas. This is accompanied by a delay in the restitution of lipase expression. Additionally, impaired expression of the critical pancreatic transcription factors, PDX1 and PTF1, and the mediator of Notch signaling, HES1, were observed. Conclusions Chronic ethanol consumption impairs the structural repair and functional restitution of the pancreas after severe injury. These impairments may, in part, be explained by impaired expression of factors important in the development and maintenance of the exocrine pancreas. Impaired pancreatic regeneration may have a role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic pancreatitis. PMID:22617711

  9. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... to do. Wondering if adding a glass of wine or beer might help lower your blood glucose if it is high? The effects of alcohol can be unpredictable and it is not recommended as a treatment for high blood glucose. The risks likely outweigh any benefit that may be seen in blood glucose alone. ...

  10. Pancreatic Enzymes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contributions to the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network are tax-deductible to the extent permitted by law. The Pancreatic Cancer Action Network’s tax identification number is #33-0841281. Our 13th Consecutive ...

  11. Acute pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... that lead to high blood levels of triglycerides. Alternative Names Gallstone pancreatitis; Pancreas - inflammation Patient Instructions Pancreatitis - ... any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should ...

  12. Portal Vein Embolization with Radiolabeled Polyvinyl Alcohol Particles in a Swine Model: Hepatic Distribution and Implications for Pancreatic Islet Cell Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Richard J., E-mail: drrichardowen@tbwifi.c; Mercer, John R.; Al-Saif, Faisal

    2009-05-15

    The distribution of radiolabeled polyvinyl alcohol microspheres (PVAMs) when infused into the portal vein of domestic swine was investigated, with the purpose of assessing implications for pancreatic islet cell transplantation. PVAMs measuring 100-300 {mu}m (Contour SE) and labeled with {sup 99m}Tc were infused into the main portal vein of 12 swine, with intermittent portal venous pressure measurements. The infusion catheter was introduced antegradely via direct or indirect cannulation of the portal vein. The liver was subsequently divided into anatomical segments. Radioactivity (decay corrected) was measured for {sup 99m}Tc microsphere synthesis, dose preparation, gross organ activities, tissue samples, and blood. Particulatemore » labeling, catheter positioning, and infusion were successful in all cases. The number of particles used was (185,000 {+-} 24,000) with a volume of 1 ml. Mean portal pressure at 5 min was significantly higher than baseline, but without a significant difference at 15 min. Extrahepatic tissue and serum radioactivity was negligible. A significant difference in number of radioactive particles per gram was detected between segments 6/7 and segments 5/8. Intrasegmental activity was analyzed, and for segments 2/3 a significant difference in the percentage dose per gram across samples was demonstrated (P = 0.001). Effective and stable radiolabeling of PVAMs with {sup 99m}Tc-sulfur colloid was demonstrated. Portal venous infusion of 100- to 300-{mu}m particles showed entrapment in the sinusoidal hepatic system with transient portal pressure elevation. Preferential embolization into the right lateral and posterior segments occurs, suggesting that flow dynamics/catheter tip position plays a role in particle distribution.« less

  13. Pharmacological challenges in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Olesen, Anne Estrup; Brokjaer, Anne; Fisher, Iben Wendelboe; Larsen, Isabelle Myriam

    2013-11-14

    Drug absorption in patients with chronic pancreatitis might be affected by the pathophysiology of the disease. The exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is associated with changes in gastrointestinal intraluminal pH, motility disorder, bacterial overgrowth and changed pancreatic gland secretion. Together these factors can result in malabsorption and may also affect the efficacy of pharmacological intervention. The lifestyle of chronic pancreatitis patients may also contribute to gastrointestinal changes. Many patients limit their food intake because of the pain caused by eating and in some cases food intake is more or less substituted with alcohol, tobacco and coffee. Alcohol and drug interaction are known to influence the pharmacokinetics by altering either drug absorption or by affecting liver metabolism. Since patients suffering from chronic pancreatitis experience severe pain, opioids are often prescribed as pain treatment. Opioids have intrinsic effects on gastrointestinal motility and hence can modify the absorption of other drugs taken at the same time. Furthermore, the increased fluid absorption caused by opioids will decrease water available for drug dissolution and may hereby affect absorption of the drug. As stated above many factors can influence drug absorption and metabolism in patients with chronic pancreatitis. The factors may not have clinical relevance, but may explain inter-individual variations in responses to a given drug, in patients with chronic pancreatitis.

  14. Nutrition in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Henrik Højgaard; Irtun, Oivind; Olesen, Søren Schou; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Holst, Mette

    2013-11-14

    The pancreas is a major player in nutrient digestion. In chronic pancreatitis both exocrine and endocrine insufficiency may develop leading to malnutrition over time. Maldigestion is often a late complication of chronic pancreatic and depends on the severity of the underlying disease. The severity of malnutrition is correlated with two major factors: (1) malabsorption and depletion of nutrients (e.g., alcoholism and pain) causes impaired nutritional status; and (2) increased metabolic activity due to the severity of the disease. Nutritional deficiencies negatively affect outcome if they are not treated. Nutritional assessment and the clinical severity of the disease are important for planning any nutritional intervention. Good nutritional practice includes screening to identify patients at risk, followed by a thoroughly nutritional assessment and nutrition plan for risk patients. Treatment should be multidisciplinary and the mainstay of treatment is abstinence from alcohol, pain treatment, dietary modifications and pancreatic enzyme supplementation. To achieve energy-end protein requirements, oral supplementation might be beneficial. Enteral nutrition may be used when patients do not have sufficient calorie intake as in pylero-duodenal-stenosis, inflammation or prior to surgery and can be necessary if weight loss continues. Parenteral nutrition is very seldom used in patients with chronic pancreatitis and should only be used in case of GI-tract obstruction or as a supplement to enteral nutrition.

  15. Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Anirban; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2009-01-01

    The past two decades have witnessed an explosion in our understanding of pancreatic cancer, and it is now clear that pancreatic cancer is a disease of inherited (germ-line) and somatic gene mutations. The genes mutated in pancreatic cancer include KRAS2, p16/CDKN2A, TP53, and SMAD4/DPC4, and these are accompanied by a substantial compendium of genomic and transcriptomic alterations that facilitate cell cycle deregulation, cell survival, invasion, and metastases. Pancreatic cancers do not arise de novo, and three distinct precursor lesions have been identified. Experimental models of pancreatic cancer have been developed in genetically engineered mice, which recapitulate the multistep progression of the cognate human disease. Although the putative cell of origin for pancreatic cancer remains elusive, minor populations of cells with stem-like properties have been identified that appear responsible for tumor initiation, metastases, and resistance of pancreatic cancer to conventional therapies. PMID:18039136

  16. Surgical Management of Chronic Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Dilip; Natarajan, Sathima

    2015-10-01

    Advances over the past decade have indicated that a complex interplay between environmental factors, genetic predisposition, alcohol abuse, and smoking lead towards the development of chronic pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis is a complex disorder that causes significant and chronic incapacity in patients and a substantial burden on the society. Major advances have been made in the etiology and pathogenesis of this disease and the role of genetic predisposition is increasingly coming to the fore. Advances in noninvasive diagnostic modalities now allow for better diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis at an early stage of the disease. The impact of these advances on surgical treatment is beginning to emerge, for example, patients with certain genetic predispositions may be better treated with total pancreatectomy versus lesser procedures. Considerable controversy remains with respect to the surgical management of chronic pancreatitis. Modern understanding of the neurobiology of pain in chronic pancreatitis suggests that a window of opportunity exists for effective treatment of the intractable pain after which central sensitization can lead to an irreversible pain syndrome in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Effective surgical procedures exist for chronic pancreatitis; however, the timing of surgery is unclear. For optimal treatment of patients with chronic pancreatitis, close collaboration between a multidisciplinary team including gastroenterologists, surgeons, and pain management physicians is needed.

  17. Pancreatic trauma

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, S

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Pancreatic trauma occurs in approximately 4% of all patients sustaining abdominal injuries. The pancreas has an intimate relationship with the major upper abdominal vessels, and there is significant morbidity and mortality associated with severe pancreatic injury. Immediate resuscitation and investigations are essential to delineate the nature of the injury, and to plan further management. If main pancreatic duct injuries are identified, specialised input from a tertiary hepatopancreaticobiliary (HPB) team is advised. Methods A comprehensive online literature search was performed using PubMed. Relevant articles from international journals were selected. The search terms used were: ‘pancreatic trauma’, ‘pancreatic duct injury’, ‘radiology AND pancreas injury’, ‘diagnosis of pancreatic trauma’, and ‘management AND surgery’. Articles that were not published in English were excluded. All articles used were selected on relevance to this review and read by both authors. Results Pancreatic trauma is rare and associated with injury to other upper abdominal viscera. Patients present with non-specific abdominal findings and serum amylase is of little use in diagnosis. Computed tomography is effective in diagnosing pancreatic injury but not duct disruption, which is most easily seen on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography or operative pancreatography. If pancreatic injury is suspected, inspection of the entire pancreas and duodenum is required to ensure full evaluation at laparotomy. The operative management of pancreatic injury depends on the grade of injury found at laparotomy. The most important prognostic factor is main duct disruption and, if found, reconstructive options should be determined by an experienced HPB surgeon. Conclusions The diagnosis of pancreatic trauma requires a high index of suspicion and detailed imaging studies. Grading pancreatic injury is important to guide operative management. The most important

  18. Pancreatic trauma.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, R; Bhattacharya, S

    2013-05-01

    Pancreatic trauma occurs in approximately 4% of all patients sustaining abdominal injuries. The pancreas has an intimate relationship with the major upper abdominal vessels, and there is significant morbidity and mortality associated with severe pancreatic injury. Immediate resuscitation and investigations are essential to delineate the nature of the injury, and to plan further management. If main pancreatic duct injuries are identified, specialised input from a tertiary hepatopancreaticobiliary (HPB) team is advised. A comprehensive online literature search was performed using PubMed. Relevant articles from international journals were selected. The search terms used were: 'pancreatic trauma', 'pancreatic duct injury', 'radiology AND pancreas injury', 'diagnosis of pancreatic trauma', and 'management AND surgery'. Articles that were not published in English were excluded. All articles used were selected on relevance to this review and read by both authors. Pancreatic trauma is rare and associated with injury to other upper abdominal viscera. Patients present with non-specific abdominal findings and serum amylase is of little use in diagnosis. Computed tomography is effective in diagnosing pancreatic injury but not duct disruption, which is most easily seen on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography or operative pancreatography. If pancreatic injury is suspected, inspection of the entire pancreas and duodenum is required to ensure full evaluation at laparotomy. The operative management of pancreatic injury depends on the grade of injury found at laparotomy. The most important prognostic factor is main duct disruption and, if found, reconstructive options should be determined by an experienced HPB surgeon. The diagnosis of pancreatic trauma requires a high index of suspicion and detailed imaging studies. Grading pancreatic injury is important to guide operative management. The most important prognostic factor is pancreatic duct disruption and in these cases

  19. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Gupte, Anand R; Forsmark, Chris E

    2014-09-01

    We review selected important clinical observations in chronic pancreatitis reported in 2013. Early diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis remains difficult, although newer techniques utilizing endoscopic ultrasonography-elastography and MRI hold promise. Patients with chronic pancreatitis are at risk of nutritional deficiencies. Osteoporosis, osteopenia, and bone fracture are particularly common in these patients, and require active intervention and treatment. Diabetes caused by chronic pancreatitis, type 3c diabetes, has specific characteristics and requires careful management. Antioxidants and neuromodulators may decrease pain in some patients with chronic pancreatitis. Endoscopic treatment is effective and can be utilized in patients with painful chronic pancreatitis, although randomized trials demonstrate that surgical therapy is somewhat more durable and effective. Although surgery has typically been a last resort, some advocate early surgical intervention but the optimal time remains unknown. Early diagnosis of pancreatitis may be improved by newer techniques associated with endoscopic ultrasonography imaging. Treatment of nutritional deficiencies and diabetes is an important aspect of treating chronic pancreatitis. Pain relief with adjunct means of pain modulation should be tried before starting narcotics for pain control. Endoscopic therapy is appropriate for treating chronic pancreatitis and its local complications and surgical intervention can be considered early in carefully selected individuals.

  20. TRAUMATIC PANCREATITIS

    PubMed Central

    Berne, Clarence J.; Walters, Robert L.

    1953-01-01

    Traumatic pancreatitis should be considered as a diagnostic possibility when trauma to the epigastrium is followed by phenomena suggestive of intra-abdominal injury. The presence or absence of hyperamylasemia should be established immediately. Even when traumatic pancreatitis is believed to exist, any suggestion of injury to other viscera should indicate laparotomy. Retroperitoneal rupture of the duodenum may simulate traumatic pancreatitis in all respects, including hyperamylasemia. X-ray studies may be of value in differentiation. Non-complicated traumatic pancreatitis is best treated conservatively. Gunshot and knife wounds of the pancreas should be drained. PMID:13094537

  1. [Physical diseases in alcoholism].

    PubMed

    Takase, Kojiro

    2015-09-01

    Rapid excessive alcohol drinking frequently causes disturbance of consciousness due to head trauma, brain edema, hypoglycemia, hyponatremia, hepatic coma and so on, provoked by acute alcohol intoxication. Rapid differential diagnosis and management are extremely important to save a life. On the other hands, the chronic users of alcohol so called alcoholism has many kinds of physical diseases such as liver diseases (i.e., fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis, alcoholic liver cirrhosis and miscellaneous liver disease), diabetes mellitus, injury to happen in drunkenness, pancreas disease (i.e., acute and chronic pancreatitis and deterioration of chronic pancreatitis), gastrontestinal diseases (i.e., gastroduodenal ulcer), and so on. Enough attention should be paid to above mentioned diseases, otherwise they would turn worse more with continuation and increase in quantity of the alcohol. It should be born in its mind that the excessive drinking becomes the weapon threatening life.

  2. Pancreatitis in Children.

    PubMed

    Sathiyasekaran, Malathi; Biradar, Vishnu; Ramaswamy, Ganesh; Srinivas, S; Ashish, B; Sumathi, B; Nirmala, D; Geetha, M

    2016-11-01

    Pancreatic disease in children has a wide clinical spectrum and may present as Acute pancreatitis (AP), Acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP), Chronic pancreatitis (CP) and Pancreatic disease without pancreatitis. This article highlights the etiopathogenesis and management of pancreatitis in children along with clinical data from five tertiary care hospitals in south India [Chennai (3), Cochin and Pune].

  3. [Chronic pancreatitis: new definition and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Conti Bellocchi, Maria Cristina; De Pretis, Nicolò; Amodio, Antonio; Zerbi, Alessandro; Frulloni, Luca

    2018-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis has been considered over the past years as a single disease, alcohol-induced and different from acute pancreatitis, in terms of etiology and prognosis. Actually, the introduction of a new concept of chronic pancreatitis, now considered as a fibroinflammatory process caused by multiple factors (toxic-metabolic, genetic, immunologic, obstructive), allow to better understand the pathogenesis of this complex disease. Furthermore, the discover of peculiar forms of chronic pancreatitis (autoimmune, paraduodenal, associated to gene mutations), different in term of clinical aspects, findings at imaging, prognosis and therapy, radically changed the concept of the disease. In this brief review, we described the impact of this new concept in the comprehension of pathogenesis, in the definition of peculiar forms of chronic pancreatitis, and in the clinical and therapeutic approach of chronic pancreatitis.

  4. Pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Audrey; Herman, Joseph; Schulick, Rich; Hruban, Ralph H; Goggins, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in our understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer, and advances in patients’ management have also taken place. Evidence is beginning to show that screening first-degree relatives of individuals with several family members affected by pancreatic cancer can identify non-invasive precursors of this malignant disease. The incidence of and number of deaths caused by pancreatic tumours have been gradually rising, even as incidence and mortality of other common cancers have been declining. Despite developments in detection and management of pancreatic cancer, only about 4% of patients will live 5 years after diagnosis. Survival is better for those with malignant disease localised to the pancreas, because surgical resection at present offers the only chance of cure. Unfortunately, 80–85% of patients present with advanced unresectable disease. Furthermore, pancreatic cancer responds poorly to most chemotherapeutic agents. Hence, we need to understand the biological mechanisms that contribute to development and progression of pancreatic tumours. In this Seminar we will discuss the most common and deadly form of pancreatic cancer, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. PMID:21620466

  5. Pancreatic surgery.

    PubMed

    Donahue, Timothy R; Reber, Howard A

    2013-09-01

    To summarize published research on pancreatic surgery over the past year. A number of studies aiming to reduce the costs associated with pancreatic surgery were reported. Retrospective analyses confirmed previous findings that neither the routine use of pancreatic duct stents decreases the rate of fistula formation nor does placement of a drain at the time of surgery change the morbidity in patients who develop one. Minimally invasive approaches, both laparoscopic and robot-assisted, are being performed more frequently to remove pancreatic cancers. A randomized trial confirmed that reinforcement of stapled closure during distal pancreatectomy reduces the rate of fistula formation. Controversy remains over whether small pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors need to be surgically resected or can be treated nonoperatively. Patients with chronic pancreatitis should be screened thoroughly before being offered surgical treatment; two studies reported preoperative factors that can be used to identify those most likely to experience pain relief. Studies published on pancreatic surgery last year focused on a wide-range of topics. The morbidity and mortality of patients undergoing pancreatic surgery continues to improve, and we anticipate that incorporation of these new findings will lead to even better outcomes.

  6. Pancreatic injury.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nasim; Vernick, Jerome J

    2009-12-01

    Injury to the pancreas, because of its retroperitoneal location, is a rare occurrence, most commonly seen with penetrating injuries (gun shot or stab wounds). Blunt trauma to the pancreas accounts for only 25% of the cases. Pancreatic injuries are associated with high morbidity and mortality due to accompanying vascular and duodenal injuries. Pancreatic injuries are not always easy to diagnose resulting in life threatening complications. Physical examination as well as serum amylase is not diagnostic following blunt trauma. Computed tomography (CT) scan can delineate the injury or transaction of the pancreas. Endoscopic retrograde pancreaticography (ERCP) is the main diagnostic modality for evaluation of the main pancreatic duct. Unrecognized ductal injury leads to pancreatic pseudocyst, fistula, abscess, and other complications. Management depends upon the severity of the pancreatic injury as well as associated injuries. Damage control surgery in hemodynamic unstable patients reduces morbidity and mortality.

  7. [Surgical treatment of pain in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Stefanović, Dejan; Knezević, Srbislav; Djordjević, Zoran; Kerkez, Mirko; Bulajić, Predrag; Marković, Ljiljana

    2006-01-01

    The principal indication for surgical intervention in chronic pancreatitis is intractable pain. Depending upon the presence of dilated pancreatic ductal system, pancreatic duct drainage procedures and different kinds of pancreatic resections are applied. The objective of the study was to show the most appropriate procedure to gain the most possible benefits in dependence of type of pathohistological process in chronic pancreatitis. Our study included 58 patients with intractable pain caused by chronic pancreatitis of alcoholic genesis. The first group consisted of 30 patients with dilated pancreatic ductal system more than 10 mm. The second group involved 28 patients without dilated pancreatic ductal system. Pain relief, weight gain and glucose tolerance were monitored. All patients of Group I (30) underwent latero-lateral pancreaticojejunal--Puestow operation. 80% of patients had no pain after 6 month, 13.6% had rare pain and 2 patients, i.e. 6.4%, who continued to consume alcohol, had strong pain. Group II consisting of 28 patients was without dilated pancreatic ductal system. This group was subjected to various types of pancreatic resections. Whipple procedure (W) was done in 6 patients, pylorus preserving Whipple (PPW) in 7 cases, and duodenum preserving cephalic pancreatectomy (DPCP) was performed in 15 patients. Generally, 89.2% of patients had no pain 6 month after the operation. An average weight gain was 1.9 kg in W group, 2.8 kg in PPW group and 4.1 kg in DPCP group. Insulin-dependent diabetes was recorded in 66.6% in W group, 57.1% in PPW group and 0% in DPCP group. According to our opinion, DPCP may be considered the procedure of choice for surgical treatment of pain in chronic pancreatitis in patients without dilatation of pancreas ductal system because of no serious postoperative metabolic consequences.

  8. Pancreatic cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... JH, Kastan MB, Tepper JE, eds. Abeloff's Clinical Oncology . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap ... Cancer Network website. NCCN clinical practice guidelines in oncology: pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Version 1.2018. www.nccn.org/ ...

  9. Pancreatitis - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stanton BF, St Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; ... Pancreatic disease. In: Marcdante KJ, Kliegman RM, eds. Nelson Essentials of Pediatrics. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  10. [Pancreatic trauma].

    PubMed

    Arvieux, C; Guillon, F; Létoublon, Ch; Oughriss, M

    2003-10-01

    Early diagnosis of pancreatic trauma has always been challenging because of the lack of correlation between the initial clinical symptomatology, radiologic and laboratory findings, and the severity of the injury. Thanks to the improved performance of spiral CT scanning and magnetic resonance pancreatography, it is now often possible to make an early diagnosis of pancreatic contusion, to localize the site of the injury, and (most importantly) to identify injury to the main pancreatic duct which has major implications for the management of the case. When the trauma victim is unstable, radiologic work-up may be impossible and urgent laparotomy is required. Control of hemorrhage is the primary concern here and a damage control approach with packing may be appropriate; if the pancreatic head has been destroyed, a pancreaticoduodenectomy with delayed reconstruction may be required. If the trauma victim is stable, the treatment strategy will be governed by a variety of parameters--age, clinical condition, associated local anatomic findings (pancreatitis, injury to the duodenum or biliary tract), involvement of the pancreatic duct, and localization of the injury within the gland (to right or left of the mesenteric vessels).

  11. Persistent Salmonellosis Causes Pancreatitis in a Murine Model of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Jason C.; Thotakura, Gangadaar; Crawford, Howard C.; van der Velden, Adrianus W. M.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatitis, a known risk factor for the development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, is a serious, widespread medical condition usually caused by alcohol abuse or gallstone-mediated ductal obstruction. However, many cases of pancreatitis are of an unknown etiology. Pancreatitis has been linked to bacterial infection, but causality has yet to be established. Here, we found that persistent infection of mice with the bacterial pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) was sufficient to induce pancreatitis reminiscent of the human disease. Specifically, we found that pancreatitis induced by persistent S. Typhimurium infection was characterized by a loss of pancreatic acinar cells, acinar-to-ductal metaplasia, fibrosis and accumulation of inflammatory cells, including CD11b+ F4/80+, CD11b+ Ly6Cint Ly6G+ and CD11b+ Ly6Chi Ly6G− cells. Furthermore, we found that S. Typhimurium colonized and persisted in the pancreas, associated with pancreatic acinar cells in vivo, and could invade cultured pancreatic acinar cells in vitro. Thus, persistent infection of mice with S. Typhimurium may serve as a useful model for the study of pancreatitis as it relates to bacterial infection. Increased knowledge of how pathogenic bacteria can cause pancreatitis will provide a more integrated picture of the etiology of the disease and could lead to the development of new therapeutic approaches for treatment and prevention of pancreatitis and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. PMID:24717768

  12. Pancreatic Cancer Early Detection Program

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-12

    Pancreatic Cancer; Pancreas Cancer; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Familial Pancreatic Cancer; BRCA 1/2; HNPCC; Lynch Syndrome; Hereditary Pancreatitis; FAMMM; Familial Atypical Multiple Mole Melanoma; Peutz Jeghers Syndrome

  13. Selective drainage for pancreatic, biliary, and duodenal obstruction secondary to chronic fibrosing pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Sugerman, H J; Barnhart, G R; Newsome, H H

    1986-01-01

    Twenty-eight patients underwent surgery for intractable pain, duodenal or extrahepatic biliary obstruction secondary to chronic pancreatitis. Eleven had pancreatic duct obstruction alone, six biliary obstruction alone, seven combined pancreatic and biliary, two combined biliary and duodenal, one combined pancreatic and duodenal, and one simultaneous pancreatic, biliary, and duodenal obstruction. Pancreatitis was secondary to alcohol in all but one case. The following operations were performed: longitudinal pancreatojejunostomy (20), choledochoduodenostomy (8), choledochojejunostomy (7), cholecystojejunostomy (1), and gastrojejunostomy (4). Of the 20 patients with pancreatic duct drainage, pain relief was complete in 11 and partial in six. Initial incomplete relief of pain, or recurrence, stimulated further diagnostic procedures, leading to improvement or correction of the problem in five patients. A significant (p less than 0.01) fall in alkaline phosphatase (935 +/- 228 to 219 +/- 61 U/L) occurred following surgery. One patient was subsequently found to have pancreatic carcinoma. Two patients were lost to follow-up and four patients died (one perioperative and three late). In conclusion, the possibility of pancreatic, biliary, and duodenal obstruction must be considered in symptomatic patients with chronic pancreatitis. Surgery must be individualized. Drainage procedures, either alone or in combination, are associated with a low morbidity and improved clinical condition and may be preferable to resection in the surgical management of these patients. Images FIG. 1. FIG. 2. FIG. 4. PMID:3707234

  14. Traumatic pancreatic pseudocysts.

    PubMed

    Popoola, D; Lou, M A; Sims, E H

    1983-05-01

    At the Martin Luther King, Jr, General Hospital in Los Angeles, during the period from June 1972 to April 1981, seven patients underwent surgery for traumatic pancreatic pseudocysts. The overall average age was 28 and the average hospital stay was 31 days. Ultrasound was the most useful test for diagnosis and follow-up. Preoperatively, serum amylases were not consistently elevated. Overall recurrences and complications totaled 57 percent. There were no deaths. The authors consider a large cystogastrostomy the treatment of choice for mature cysts that are satisfactorily adherent to the stomach. The second preference is a Roux-en-Y cystojejunostomy. External drainage was employed for acute cysts that required drainage. A distal pancreatectomy was performed for patients with small pancreatic tail pseudocysts. Patients who underwent acute drainage were usually drained externally and had a poorer outcome than patients who were operated on later with internal drainage. When compared with another group of 15 alcoholic patients who were operated on for pancreatic pseudocysts, patients with traumatic pseudocysts had a poorer outcome.

  15. Lateral pancreaticojejunostomy for chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, Stephen J; Aranha, Gerard V

    2003-11-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive fibrosis of the pancreas that leads to loss of endocrine and exocrine function. The most common symptom in this disease is intractable pain. The etiology of pain in chronic pancreatitis is not clearly understood. However, many of these patients have dilated ducts consisting of saccular dilations and intervening constructions referred to as the "chain of lakes" phenomenon. These patients can be diagnosed with either endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) or computed tomography (CT). These patients are best treated by the Partington Rochelle modification of the Puestow Procedure otherwise known as lateral pancreaticojejunostomy. Overall pain relief in published studies occurs in 50-90% of patients. Another proposed advantage of the lateral pancreaticojejunostomy is preservation of endocrine and exocrine pancreatic function as long as the pancreas is not further damaged by alcohol.

  16. Energetic etiologies of acute pancreatitis: A report of five cases

    PubMed Central

    Shmelev, Artem; Abdo, Alain; Sachdev, Sarina; Shah, Urvi; Kowdley, Gopal C; Cunningham, Steven C

    2015-01-01

    There are several common causes of acute pancreatitis, principally excessive alcohol intake and gallstones, and there are many rare causes. However, cases of pancreatitis still occur in the absence of any recognizable factors, and these cases of idiopathic pancreatitis suggest the presence of unrecognized etiologies. Five cases of acute pancreatitis in four patients came to attention due to a strong temporal association with exposure to nerve stimulators and energy drinks. Given that these cases of pancreatitis were otherwise unexplained, and given that these exposures were not clearly known to be associated with pancreatitis, we performed a search for precedent cases and for mechanistic bases. No clear precedent cases were found in PubMed and only scant, weak precedent cases were found in public-health databases. However, there was a coherent body of intriguing literature in support of a mechanistic basis for these exposures playing a role in the etiology of pancreatitis. PMID:26600983

  17. Purtscher's retinopathy that occurred 6 months before acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashish G; Kazim, Nadia A; Eliott, Dean; Houghton, Odette; Abrams, Gary W

    2006-01-01

    To report Purtscher's retinopathy in a patient with chronic pancreatitis 6 months before the development of fulminant acute pancreatitis. Observational case report. Review of clinical chart, photographs, fluorescein angiography, and optical coherence tomography. A 45-year-old man with a history of alcohol abuse with a 3-day history of decreased vision in both eyes was examined. Diffuse retinal whitening and intraretinal hemorrhages that were consistent with Purtscher's retinopathy were present in both eyes. Serum amylase and lipase levels were normal. Six months later, he experienced intractable abdominal pain. Serum amylase and lipase levels were elevated markedly. Abdominal computed tomography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography confirmed acute pancreatitis, with evidence of coexisting chronic pancreatitis. His funduscopic examination after the development of acute pancreatitis was improved, with almost complete resolution of retinal whitening and hemorrhages. Visual acuity remained poor because of retinal ischemia. Purtscher's retinopathy can be associated with chronic pancreatitis and can precede the development of fulminant acute pancreatitis.

  18. Secretin-stimulated MRI characterization of pancreatic morphology and function in patients with chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Madzak, Adnan; Olesen, Søren Schou; Haldorsen, Ingfrid Salvesen; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Frøkjær, Jens Brøndum

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is characterized by abnormal pancreatic morphology and impaired endocrine and exocrine function. However, little is known about the relationship between pancreatic morphology and function, and also the association with the etiology and clinical manifestations of CP. The aim was to explore pancreatic morphology and function with advanced MRI in patients with CP and healthy controls (HC) METHODS: Eighty-two patients with CP and 22 HC were enrolled in the study. Morphological imaging parameters included pancreatic main duct diameter, gland volume, fat signal fraction and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values. Functional secretin-stimulated MRI (s-MRI) parameters included pancreatic secretion (bowel fluid volume) and changes in pancreatic ADC value before and after secretin stimulation. Patients were classified according to the modified Cambridge and M-ANNHEIM classification system and fecal elastase was collected. All imaging parameters differentiated CP patients from HC; however, correlations between morphological and functional parameters in CP were weak. Patients with alcoholic and non-alcoholic etiology had comparable s-MRI findings. Fecal elastase was positively correlated to pancreatic gland volume (r = 0.68, P = 0.0016) and negatively correlated to Cambridge classification (r = -0.35, P < 0.001). Additionally, gland volume was negatively correlated to the duration of CP (r = -0.39, P < 0.001) and baseline ADC (r = -0.35, P = 0.027). When stratified by clinical stage (M-ANNHEIM), the pancreatic gland volume was significantly decreased in the severe stages of CP (P = 0.001). S-MRI provides detailed information about pancreatic morphology and function and represents a promising non-invasive imaging method to characterize pancreatic pathophysiology and may enable monitoring of disease progression in patients with CP. Copyright © 2017 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Animal models for investigating chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is defined as a continuous or recurrent inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterized by progressive and irreversible morphological changes. It typically causes pain and permanent impairment of pancreatic function. In chronic pancreatitis areas of focal necrosis are followed by perilobular and intralobular fibrosis of the parenchyma, by stone formation in the pancreatic duct, calcifications in the parenchyma as well as the formation of pseudocysts. Late in the course of the disease a progressive loss of endocrine and exocrine function occurs. Despite advances in understanding the pathogenesis no causal treatment for chronic pancreatitis is presently available. Thus, there is a need for well characterized animal models for further investigations that allow translation to the human situation. This review summarizes existing experimental models and distinguishes them according to the type of pathological stimulus used for induction of pancreatitis. There is a special focus on pancreatic duct ligation, repetitive overstimulation with caerulein and chronic alcohol feeding. Secondly, attention is drawn to genetic models that have recently been generated and which mimic features of chronic pancreatitis in man. Each technique will be supplemented with data on the pathophysiological background of the model and their limitations will be discussed. PMID:22133269

  20. Surgical management for chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Howell, J G; Johnson, L W; Sehon, J K; Lee, W C

    2001-05-01

    This study reviewed the results of surgery for chronic pancreatitis. We also attempted to identify any factors that may influence outcome. A 10-year retrospective chart review was carried out on all patients undergoing surgery for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis. Twenty-three patients were identified. Alcohol was the most common etiology, but other causes were identified. All but two patients had abnormal ductal anatomy on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. A total of 23 patients underwent six different operations. There were five complications and no perioperative deaths. Only one patient had to be readmitted for pancreatitis during follow-up. The majority of patients reported some improvement with their pain. Patients who continued to use alcohol had the worst results in regard to weight gain and pain control. The results of our study are consistent with the current literature in regard to morbidity and mortality. Surgical treatment had minimal effect on endocrine and exocrine function. Weight loss was avoided in the majority of patients. Addition of biliary bypass to the Puestow procedure did not increase morbidity. Poorest results were obtained in patients who continued to use alcohol. A basic algorithm for management of this disease process is given.

  1. A single-centre prospective, cohort study of the natural history of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Cavestro, Giulia Martina; Leandro, Gioacchino; Di Leo, Milena; Zuppardo, Raffaella Alessia; Morrow, Olivia B; Notaristefano, Chiara; Rossi, Gemma; Testoni, Sabrina Gloria Giulia; Mazzoleni, Giorgia; Alessandri, Matteo; Goni, Elisabetta; Singh, Satish K; Giliberti, Aurore; Bianco, Margherita; Fanti, Lorella; Viale, Edi; Arcidiacono, Paolo Giorgio; Mariani, Alberto; Petrone, Maria Chiara; Testoni, Pier Alberto

    2015-03-01

    The natural history of acute pancreatitis is based on clinical studies that aim to elucidate the course of disease on the basis of predicted risk factors. To evaluate the long-term occurrence of recurrent acute pancreatitis and chronic pancreatitis in a cohort of patients following an initial episode of acute pancreatitis. 196 patients were enrolled consecutively and studied prospectively. Clinical characteristics, exogenously/endogenously-associated factors, and evolution to recurrent acute pancreatitis and chronic pancreatitis were analyzed. 40 patients developed recurrent acute pancreatitis 13 of whom developed chronic pancreatitis. In a univariate analysis, recurrent acute pancreatitis was associated with an idiopathic aetiology (p<0.001), pancreas divisum (p=0.001), and higher usage of cigarettes and alcohol (p<0.001; p=0.023). Chronic pancreatitis was associated with a severe first episode of acute pancreatitis (p=0.048), PD (p=0.03), and cigarette smoking (p=0.038). By multivariate analysis, pancreas divisum was an independent risk factor for recurrent acute pancreatitis (OR 11.5, 95% CI 1.6-83.3). A severe first-episode of acute pancreatitis increased the risk of progressing to chronic pancreatitis by nine-fold. Special attention should be given to patients who experience a severe first attack of acute pancreatitis as there appears to be an increased risk of developing chronic pancreatitis over the long term. Copyright © 2014 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Shounak; Takahashi, Naoki; Chari, Suresh T

    2017-07-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a chronic fibroinflammatory disease of the pancreas that belongs to the spectrum of immunoglobulin G-subclass4-related diseases (IgG4-RD) and typically presents with obstructive jaundice. Idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) is a closely related but distinct disease that mimics AIP radiologically but manifests clinically most commonly as recurrent acute pancreatitis in young individuals with concurrent inflammatory bowel disease. IgG4 levels are often elevated in AIP and normal in IDCP. Histologically, lymphoplasmacytic acinar inflammation and storiform fibrosis are seen in both. In addition, the histologic hallmark of IDCP is the granulocyte epithelial lesion: intraluminal and intraepithelial neutrophils in medium-sized and small ducts with or without granulocytic acinar inflammation often associated with destruction of ductal architecture. Initial treatment of both AIP and IDCP is with oral corticosteroids for duration of 4 weeks followed by a gradual taper. Relapses are common in AIP and relatively uncommon in IDCP, a relatively rare disease for which the natural history is not well understood. For patients with relapsing AIP, treatment with immunomodulators and more recently rituximab has been recommended. Although rare instances of pancreaticobiliary malignancy has been reported in patients with AIP, overall the lifetime risk of developing pancreatic cancer does not appear to be elevated.

  3. Frequency of Tabagism and N34S and P55S Mutations of Serine Peptidase Inhibitor, Kazal Type 1 (SPINK1) and R254W Mutation of Chymotrypsin C (CTRC) in Patients With Chronic Pancreatitis and Controls.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Marianges Zadrozny Gouvêa; Pires, Júlia Glória Lucatelli; Nasser, Paulo Dominguez; Ferreira, Camila da Silva; Teixeira, Ana Cristina de Sá; Paranaguá-Vezozzo, Denise Cerqueira; Guarita, Dulce Reis; Carrilho, Flair José; Ono, Suzane Kioko

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the association between chronic pancreatitis and smoking or genetic mutations. The study sample comprised 148 patients with chronic pancreatitis, 110 chronic alcoholic subjects without pancreatic disease, and 297 volunteer blood donors. Of the patients with chronic pancreatitis, 74% had alcoholic etiology and 26% had idiopathic pancreatitis. The frequency of smoking was 91.4% in patients with alcoholic pancreatitis, higher than 73.3% in alcoholic subjects without pancreatitis (P < 0.01). The difference in smoking frequency was not significant between the patients with idiopathic pancreatitis and blood donors. The N34S mutation of serine peptidase inhibitor, Kazal type 1 (SPINK1) was found in 2.7% of patients with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis, in 5.3% of patients with idiopathic pancreatitis, and in 0.4% of blood donors (P = 0.02). The P55S mutation of SPINK1 was found in 2.7% of patients with alcoholic pancreatitis and in 0.7% of blood donors (P = 0.12). The R254W mutation of chymotrypsin C was found in 0.9% of patients with alcoholic pancreatitis, in 0.9% of chronic alcoholic subjects without pancreatitis, and in 0.4% of blood donors (P = 0.75). In all cases, the mutations were heterozygous. Smoking and the N34S mutation of SPINK1 were positively correlated with chronic pancreatitis.

  4. Is Pancreatic Cancer Hereditary?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Database Supporting Research Raising Awareness Our Blog Patient Education Pancreas News Basics of Pancreatic Cancer FAQs The ... Detection- Goggins Lab Sol Goldman Center Discussion Board Patient Education / Basics of Pancreatic Cancer Is pancreatic cancer hereditary? ...

  5. Management of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency: Australasian Pancreatic Club recommendations.

    PubMed

    Toouli, James; Biankin, Andrew V; Oliver, Mark R; Pearce, Callum B; Wilson, Jeremy S; Wray, Nicholas H

    2010-10-18

    Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) occurs when the amounts of enzymes secreted into the duodenum in response to a meal are insufficient to maintain normal digestive processes. The main clinical consequence of PEI is fat maldigestion and malabsorption, resulting in steatorrhoea. Pancreatic exocrine function is commonly assessed by conducting a 3-day faecal fat test and by measuring levels of faecal elastase-1 and serum trypsinogen. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is the mainstay of treatment for PEI. In adults, the initial recommended dose of pancreatic enzymes is 25,000 units of lipase per meal, titrating up to a maximum of 80,000 units of lipase per meal. In infants and children, the initial recommended dose of pancreatic enzymes is 500 units of lipase per gram of dietary fat; the maximum daily dose should not exceed 10,000 units of lipase per kilogram of bodyweight. Oral pancreatic enzymes should be taken with meals to ensure adequate mixing with the chyme. Adjunct therapy with acid-suppressing agents may be useful in patients who continue to experience symptoms of PEI despite high-dose enzyme therapy. A dietitian experienced in treating PEI should be involved in patient management. Dietary fat restriction is not recommended for patients with PEI. Patients with PEI should be encouraged to consume small, frequent meals and to abstain from alcohol. Medium-chain triglycerides do not provide any clear nutritional advantage over long-chain triglycerides, but can be trialled in patients who fail to gain or to maintain adequate bodyweight in order to increase energy intake.

  6. Acute scrotal pain as sole presentation of acute pancreatities.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Caroline; Abdelrazeq, Ayman

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatitis has a myriad of different presentations although commonly presents with epigastric pain radiating to the back, nausea and vomiting. There are five case reports in the English literature of scrotal pain and swelling in severe alcoholic pancreatitis, two of which underwent surgical exploration. We present the first case of mild pancreatitis presenting with scrotal pain in the absence of any other symptoms or signs. We conclude that in any patient with unexplained scrotal pain, even in the absence of physical signs the possibility of pancreatitis should be considered. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... their drinking causes distress and harm. It includes alcoholism and alcohol abuse. Alcoholism, or alcohol dependence, is a disease that causes ... the liver, brain, and other organs. Drinking during pregnancy can harm your baby. Alcohol also increases the ...

  8. Acute recurrent pancreatitis: Etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Testoni, Pier Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) refers to a clinical entity characterized by episodes of acute pancreatitis which occurs on more than one occasion. Recurrence of pancreatitis generally occurs in a setting of normal morpho-functional gland, however, an established chronic disease may be found either on the occasion of the first episode of pancreatitis or during the follow-up. The aetiology of ARP can be identified in the majority of patients. Most common causes include common bile duct stones or sludge and bile crystals; sphincter of oddi dysfunction; anatomical ductal variants interfering with pancreatic juice outflow; obstruction of the main pancreatic duct or pancreatico-biliary junction; genetic mutations; alcohol consumption. However, despite diagnostic technologies, the aetiology of ARP still remains unknown in up to 30% of cases: in these cases the term “idiopathic” is used. Because occult bile stone disease and sphincter of oddi dysfunction account for the majority of cases, cholecystectomy, and eventually the endoscopic biliary and/or pancreatic sphincterotomy are curative in most of cases. Endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy appeared to be a curative procedure per se in about 80% of patients. Ursodeoxycholic acid oral treatment alone has also been reported effective for treatment of biliary sludge. In uncertain cases toxin botulin injection may help in identifying some sphincter of oddi dysfunction, but this treatment is not widely used. In the last twenty years, pancreatic endotherapy has been proven effective in cases of recurrent pancreatitis depending on pancreatic ductal obstruction, independently from the cause of obstruction, and has been widely used instead of more aggressive approaches. PMID:25493002

  9. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy: an overview.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Efstathios P; Sarigianni, Maria; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Mamopoulos, Apostolos; Karagiannis, Vasilios

    2011-12-01

    Acute pancreatitis is rare in pregnancy but it is associated with increased incidence of maternal and fetal mortality. It should be considered in the differential diagnosis of upper quadrant abdominal pain with or without nausea and vomiting. The commonest identified causes of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy are gallstones, alcohol and hypertriglyceridemia. The main laboratory finding is increased amylase activity. Appropriate investigations include ultrasound of the right upper quadrant and measurement of serum triglycerides and ionized calcium. Management of gallstone pancreatitis is controversial, although laparoscopic cholecystectomy and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) are often used and may be associated with lower complication rates. In hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis ω-3 fatty acids and even therapeutic plasma exchange can be used. We also discuss preventive measures. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Issues in Hypertriglyceridemic Pancreatitis - An Update

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, John; Singh, Vijay; Pitchumoni, C. S; Yadav, Dhiraj

    2014-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) is a well established but underestimated cause of acute (AP) and recurrent AP (RAP). The clinical presentation of HTG-induced pancreatitis (HTG pancreatitis) is similar to other causes. Pancreatitis secondary to HTG is typically seen in the presence of one or more secondary factors (uncontrolled diabetes, alcoholism, medications, pregnancy) in a patient with an underlying common genetic abnormality of lipoprotein metabolism (Familial combined hyperlipidemia or Familial HTG). Less commonly, a patient with rare genetic abnormality (Familial chylomicronemic syndrome) with or without an additional secondary factor is encountered. The risk of AP in patients with serum triglycerides >1000 mg/dl and >2000 mg/dl is ∼5% and 10-20% respectively. It is not clear whether HTG pancreatitis is more severe than when it is due to other causes. Clinical management of HTG pancreatitis is similar to that of other causes. Insulin infusion in diabetic patients with HTG can rapidly reduce triglyceride levels. Use of apheresis is still experimental and better designed studies are needed to clarify its role in management of HTG pancreatitis. Diet, lifestyle changes, control of secondary factors are key to the treatment and medications are useful adjuncts to long term management of triglyceride levels. Control of triglyceride levels to well below 500 mg/dl can effectively prevent recurrences of pancreatitis. PMID:24172179

  11. Pathophysiology of chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Brock, Christina; Nielsen, Lecia Møller; Lelic, Dina; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2013-11-14

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterized by progressive fibrotic destruction of the pancreatic secretory parenchyma. Despite the heterogeneity in pathogenesis and involved risk factors, processes such as necrosis/apoptosis, inflammation or duct obstruction are involved. This fibrosing process ultimately leads to progressive loss of the lobular morphology and structure of the pancreas, deformation of the large ducts and severe changes in the arrangement and composition of the islets. These conditions lead to irreversible morphological and structural changes resulting in impairment of both exocrine and endocrine functions. The prevalence of the disease is largely dependent on culture and geography. The etiological risk-factors associated with CP are multiple and involve both genetic and environmental factors. Throughout this review the M-ANNHEIM classification system will be used, comprising a detailed description of risk factors such as: alcohol-consumption, nicotine-consumption, nutritional factors, hereditary factors, efferent duct factors, immunological factors and miscellaneous and rare metabolic factors. Increased knowledge of the different etiological factors may encourage the use of further advanced diagnostic tools, which potentially will help clinicians to diagnose CP at an earlier stage. However, in view of the multi factorial disease and the complex clinical picture, it is not surprising that treatment of patients with CP is challenging and often unsuccessful.

  12. Pathophysiology of chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Christina; Nielsen, Lecia Møller; Lelic, Dina; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterized by progressive fibrotic destruction of the pancreatic secretory parenchyma. Despite the heterogeneity in pathogenesis and involved risk factors, processes such as necrosis/apoptosis, inflammation or duct obstruction are involved. This fibrosing process ultimately leads to progressive loss of the lobular morphology and structure of the pancreas, deformation of the large ducts and severe changes in the arrangement and composition of the islets. These conditions lead to irreversible morphological and structural changes resulting in impairment of both exocrine and endocrine functions. The prevalence of the disease is largely dependent on culture and geography. The etiological risk-factors associated with CP are multiple and involve both genetic and environmental factors. Throughout this review the M-ANNHEIM classification system will be used, comprising a detailed description of risk factors such as: alcohol-consumption, nicotine-consumption, nutritional factors, hereditary factors, efferent duct factors, immunological factors and miscellaneous and rare metabolic factors. Increased knowledge of the different etiological factors may encourage the use of further advanced diagnostic tools, which potentially will help clinicians to diagnose CP at an earlier stage. However, in view of the multi factorial disease and the complex clinical picture, it is not surprising that treatment of patients with CP is challenging and often unsuccessful. PMID:24259953

  13. [Massive pleural effusion complicating chronic pancreatitis. Treatment by endoscopic closure of a pancreatic-mediastinal fistula].

    PubMed

    Trudzinski, F C; Rädle, J; Treiber, G; Kramm, T; Sybrecht, G W

    2008-11-01

    A 53-year-old man was admitted because of anuria, dyspnea and a septic temperature. The patients' history included chronic alcoholism, chronic pancreatitis, COPD and a right nephrectomy because of nephrolithiasis. Urosepsis was initially suspected. The patients' clinical condition and nutritional state were severely reduced. Laboratory findings revealed severe systemic inflammation (leucocyte count: 22.4/nl, CRP: 324 mg/l). Computed tomography showed a large left-sided pleural effusion, encapsulated abdominal fluid below the diaphragm and alongside the pancreatic tail. After aspiration of the pleural effusion the diagnosis of an exsudate with elevated concentration of lipase (56,000 U/l) was confirmed. Endoscopic ultrasound showed a 3-4 cm pseudocystic mass originating in the region of the pancreatic tail. The ERP depicted chronic pancreatitis with strictures and destruction of the pancreatic duct. Two fistulae were identified, one proximal to a ductal stricture in the pancreatic head and a second one in the pancreatic tail which corresponded to the reported pseudocyst. The patient was admitted to the ICU with symptoms of impending sepsis. The pleural effusion was treated with CT-guided chest drainage. The initial endoscopic attempt at stent closure of the fistula failed because it was possible to pass through the ductal stricture only with a thin hydrophilic wire and small-lumen catheter. However, injection of fibrin glue into the proximal pancreatic duct over a length of 2 cm obliterated the fistula and the pleural effusion was resolved. Pancreatic-pleural or pancreatic-mediastinal fistula is a rare complication of pancreatitis associated with unilateral pleural effusion. Combined internal endoscopic drainage and external chest drainage is the treatment of choice. After failure of routine endoscopic therapy, endoscopic closure of fistulas using fibrin glue might offer an alternative treatment strategy.

  14. Surgical management of failed endoscopic treatment of pancreatic disease.

    PubMed

    Evans, Kimberly A; Clark, Colby W; Vogel, Stephen B; Behrns, Kevin E

    2008-11-01

    Endoscopic therapy of acute and chronic pancreatitis has decreased the need for operative intervention. However, a significant proportion of patients treated endoscopically require definitive surgical management for persistent symptoms. Our aim was to determine which patients are likely to fail with endoscopic therapy, and to assess the clinical outcome of surgical management. Patients were identified using ICD-9 codes for pancreatic disease as well as CPT codes for endoscopic therapy followed by surgery. Patients with documented acute or chronic pancreatitis treated endoscopically prior to surgical therapy were included (N = 88). The majority of patients (65%) exhibited chronic pancreatitis due to alcohol abuse. Common indicators for surgery were: persistent symptoms, anatomy not amenable to endoscopic treatment and unresolved common bile duct or pancreatic duct strictures. Surgical salvage procedures included internal drainage of a pseudocyst or an obstructed pancreatic duct (46%), debridement of peripancreatic fluid collections (25%), and pancreatic resection (31%). Death occurred in 3% of patients. The most common complications were hemorrhage (16%), wound infection (13%), and pulmonary complications (11%). Chronic pancreatitis with persistent symptoms is the most common reason for pancreatic surgery following endoscopic therapy. Surgical salvage therapy can largely be accomplished by drainage procedures, but pancreatic resection is common. These complex procedures can be performed with acceptable mortality but also with significant risk for morbidity.

  15. Mitochondrial function and malfunction in the pathophysiology of pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Gerasimenko, Oleg V; Gerasimenko, Julia V

    2012-07-01

    As a primary energy producer, mitochondria play a fundamental role in pancreatic exocrine physiology and pathology. The most frequent aetiology of acute pancreatitis is either gallstones or heavy alcohol consumption. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can result in the development of chronic pancreatitis and increase the lifetime risk of pancreatic cancer 100-fold. Pancreatic cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer mortality with only about 3-4 % of patients surviving beyond 5 years. It has been shown that acute pancreatitis involves Ca²⁺ overload and overproduction of reactive oxygen species in pancreatic acinar cells. Both factors significantly affect mitochondria and lead to cell death. The pathogenesis of inflammation in acute and chronic pancreatitis is tightly linked to the induction of necrosis and apoptosis. There is currently no specific therapy for pancreatitis, but recent findings of an endogenous protective mechanism against Ca²⁺ overload--and particularly the potential to boost this protection--bring hope of new therapeutic approaches.

  16. Zinc status in chronic pancreatitis and its relationship with exocrine and endocrine insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Girish, Banavara Narasimhamurthy; Rajesh, Gopalakrishna; Vaidyanathan, Kannan; Balakrishnan, Vallath

    2009-11-05

    A major role of the pancreas in zinc homeostasis has been suggested. To assess erythrocyte zinc status in chronic pancreatitis and to correlate it with pancreatic exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. One hundred and one patients with chronic pancreatitis (34 alcoholic chronic pancreatitis, 67 tropical chronic pancreatitis) were prospectively studied. Disease characteristics and imaging features were recorded. Erythrocyte zinc was estimated by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Exocrine insufficiency was assessed using polyclonal antibody ELISA for pancreatic stool elastase1. Endocrine insufficiency was assessed by serum glucose levels and insulin requirement. Erythrocyte zinc was significantly lower in chronic pancreatitis patients than in the controls (26.5+/-9.5 microg/g Hb vs. 38.0+/-6.6 microg/g Hb; P<0.001), and in tropical chronic pancreatitis than in alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (25.0+/-10.4 microg/g Hb vs. 29.6+/-6.5 microg/g Hb, P=0.001). In chronic pancreatitis patients who had exocrine insufficiency, erythrocyte zinc positively correlated with stool elastase1 (r=0.587, P<0.001). Erythrocyte zinc levels were significantly lower in diabetic patients as compared to non-diabetics (P=0.036). This study demonstrates zinc deficiency in chronic pancreatitis patients, and that zinc deficiency correlates with exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Further studies may clarify the possible benefits of zinc supplementation in chronic pancreatitis.

  17. Management of pancreatic pseudocysts—A retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nötzel, Bärbel; Phillip, Veit; Lahmer, Tobias; Schmid, Roland M.; Algül, Hana

    2017-01-01

    Background Pancreatic pseudocysts arise mostly in patients with alcohol induced chronic pancreatitis causing various symptoms and complications. However, data on the optimal management are rare. To address this problem, we analysed patients with pancreatic pseudocysts treated at our clinic retrospectively. Methods We searched our clinical database for the diagnosis pancreatitis from 2004 till 2014, selected patients with pseudocysts larger than 10 mm and entered all relevant information in a database for statistical analysis. Results In total, 129 patients with pancreatic pseudocysts were treated at our institution during the study period. Most patients suffered from alcohol induced chronic pancreatitis (43.4%; 56/129). Pseudocysts were more frequent in female than in male (2:1) and were mainly located in the pancreatic head (47.3%; 61/129). Local complications like obstructive jaundice were associated with the diameter of the cysts (AUC 0.697 in ROC-curve analysis). However, even cysts up to a diameter of 160 mm can regress spontaneously. Besides a lower re-intervention rate in surgically treated patients, endoscopic, percutaneous and surgical drainage are equally effective. Most treatment related complications occur in large pseudocysts located in the pancreatic head. Conclusion Conservative management of large pseudocysts is successful in many patients. Therefore, indication for treatment should be made carefully considering the presence and risk of local complications. Endoscopic and surgical drainage are equally effective. PMID:28877270

  18. [Chronic pancreatitis: Retrospective review of 121 cases].

    PubMed

    Berger F, Zoltán; Mancilla A, Carla

    2016-12-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a rare disease in Chile, without a clear explanation for this low prevalence. To analyze the characteristics of our patients with pancreatitis. Retrospective analysis of a database of patients with pancreatitis of a clinical hospital. Morphological proof of diagnosis (calcifications/calculi, alterations of ducts, local complication or histology) was obtained for every patient. History of acute pancreatitis was recorded and exocrine-endocrine function was assessed. We retrieved information of 121 patients with pancreatitis (86 males) in a period of 20 years. The number of cases increased markedly every five years. The calculated incidence and prevalence was 0.8/100,000/year and 6/100,000, respectively. Pancreatic calcifications were initially observed in 93 patients and became evident during the follow-up in another six patients. Severe pain or local complications occurred in 27 patients, requiring surgery in 10 or endoscopic treatment in 15. During the years of follow-up, 55 patients were free of symptoms. Exocrine and endocrine insufficiency was demonstrated and treated in 81 and 67 patients, respectively. Alcoholic etiology was evident in 40% of patients. In 29% no etiology was identified. Mapuche origin was exceptional. Late diagnosis of CP is common, since most of our patients presented with advanced stages. Even though CP is increasingly diagnosed in our hospitals, the number of cases is still far fewer when compared to other countries. Underdiagnosis alone cannot explain this difference and genetic factors might be of importance.

  19. [External pancreatic fistulas management].

    PubMed

    Stepan, E V; Ermolov, A S; Rogal', M L; Teterin, Yu S

    The main principles of treatment of external postoperative pancreatic fistulas are viewed in the article. Pancreatic trauma was the reason of pancreatic fistula in 38.7% of the cases, operations because of acute pancreatitis - in 25.8%, and pancreatic pseudocyst drainage - in 35.5%. 93 patients recovered after the treatment. Complex conservative treatment of EPF allowed to close fistulas in 74.2% of the patients with normal patency of the main pancreatic duct (MPD). The usage of octreotide 600-900 mcg daily for at least 5 days to decrease pancreatic secretion was an important part of the conservative treatment. Endoscopic papillotomy was performed in patients with major duodenal papilla obstruction and interruption of transporting of pancreatic secretion to duodenum. Stent of the main pancreatic duct was indicated in patients with extended pancreatic duct stenosis to normalize transport of pancreatic secretion to duodenum. Surgical formation of anastomosis between distal part of the main pancreatic duct and gastro-intestinal tract was carried out when it was impossible to fulfill endoscopic stenting of pancreatic duct either because of its interruption and diastasis between its ends, or in the cases of unsuccessful conservative treatment of external pancreatic fistula caused by drainage of pseudocyst.

  20. Incidence, risk factors and clinical course of pancreatic fluid collections in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Mei Lan; Kim, Kook Hyun; Kim, Ho Gak; Han, Jimin; Kim, Hyunsoo; Cho, Kwang Bum; Jung, Min Kyu; Cho, Chang Min; Kim, Tae Nyeun

    2014-05-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammatory process of the pancreas with variable involvement of other regional tissues or remote organ systems. Acute fluid collections and pseudocyst formation are the most frequent complications of acute pancreatitis. The aims of this study were to evaluate the incidence, risk factors, and clinical course of pancreatic fluid collections and pseudocyst formation following acute pancreatitis. A prospective multicenter study was conducted in five participating centers with 302 patients diagnosed with acute pancreatitis from January 2011 to July 2012. The incidence of pancreatic fluid collections and pseudocyst was 42.7 and 6.3 %, respectively. Patients with fluid collections were significantly younger, compared to those without fluid collections (51.5 ± 15.9 vs. 60.4 ± 16.5 years, P = 0.000). The proportion of alcoholic etiology (54.3 %) in patients with fluid collections was significantly higher compared to other etiologies (P = 0.000). C-reactive protein (CRP) (48 h) was significantly higher in patients with fluid collections, compared to patients without fluid collections (39.2 ± 77.4 vs. 15.1 ± 36.2 mg/dL, P = 0.016). LDH (48 h) was significantly higher in patients with pseudocyst formation, compared to patients with complete resolution (1,317.6 ± 706.4 vs. 478.7 ± 190.5 IU/L, P = 0.000). Pancreatic fluid collections showed spontaneous resolution in 69.8 % (90/129) and 84.2 % of the pseudocysts disappeared or decreased in size during follow up. Age, CRP (48 h), and alcohol etiology are risk factors for pancreatic fluid collections. LDH (48 h) appears to be a risk factor for pseudocyst formation. Most pseudocysts showed a decrease in size or spontaneous resolution with conservative management.

  1. How Does Cholecystectomy Influence Recurrence of Idiopathic Acute Pancreatitis?

    PubMed

    Stevens, Claire L; Abbas, Saleh M; Watters, David A K

    2016-12-01

    Idiopathic acute pancreatitis is diagnosed in approximately 10-30 % of cases of acute pancreatitis. While there is evidence to suggest that the cause in many of these patients is microlithiasis, this fact has not been translated into a resource efficient treatment strategy that is proven to reduce recurrence rates. The aim of this study was to examine the value of prophylactic cholecystectomy following an episode of acute pancreatitis in patients with no history of alcohol abuse and no stones found on ultrasound. This was a retrospective study of 2236 patients who presented to a regional Australian hospital. Patients were included when diagnosed with acute pancreatitis with no confirmed cause. Recurrence of acute pancreatitis was compared between those that did and did not undergo cholecystectomy. One hundred ninety-five consecutive patients met the study definition of "idiopathic" acute pancreatitis. 33.8 % (66/195) underwent cholecystectomy. The patients who had cholecystectomy had a recurrence rate of 19.7 % (13/66) whereas, of those managed expectantly, 42.8 % (68/159) had at least one recurrence of acute pancreatitis (P = 0.001). Following an episode of acute pancreatitis with no identifiable cause, in patients fit for surgery, cholecystectomy should be considered to reduce the risk of recurrent episodes of pancreatitis.

  2. ABO blood group and chronic pancreatitis risk in the NAPS2 cohort.

    PubMed

    Greer, Julia B; LaRusch, Jessica; Brand, Randall E; O'Connell, Michael R; Yadav, Dhiraj; Whitcomb, David C

    2011-11-01

    A risk association has been observed between non-O blood groups and pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Chronic pancreatitis also increases risk for pancreatic cancer, raising questions as to whether non-O blood groups are a risk for chronic pancreatitis and whether the pathophysiologic pathways are linked. Our goal was to determine whether ABO blood group may affect the risk of chronic pancreatitis. The study cohort included chronic pancreatitis patients (n = 499) and healthy controls (n = 631) from the North American Pancreatitis Study 2 study. Genotyping was performed using Sequenom assay of rs8176746 A/C and rs505922 C/T to classify participants into ABO blood groups. O blood group was nonsignificantly more common among cases (44.7% vs 42.0%; P = 0.36), particularly among cases with alcohol-related chronic pancreatitis (49.3% vs 42%; P = 0.060). Alcoholic patients without coexisting high-risk PRSS1, CFTR, or SPINK1 variants had a significant overrepresentation of O blood type when compared with controls (odds ratio, 1.54; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-2.17; P = 0.01). A, B, and AB blood groups were not associated with a greater likelihood of having chronic pancreatitis and may decrease the risk of chronic pancreatitis in individuals who are very heavy drinkers. These results suggest that the mechanism linking non-O blood type with pancreatic pathology is specific to carcinogenesis.

  3. Pancreatitis-imaging approach

    PubMed Central

    Busireddy, Kiran K; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Ramalho, Miguel; Kalubowila, Janaka; Baodong, Liu; Santagostino, Ilaria; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatitis is defined as the inflammation of the pancreas and considered the most common pancreatic disease in children and adults. Imaging plays a significant role in the diagnosis, severity assessment, recognition of complications and guiding therapeutic interventions. In the setting of pancreatitis, wider availability and good image quality make multi-detector contrast-enhanced computed tomography (MD-CECT) the most used imaging technique. However, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers diagnostic capabilities similar to those of CT, with additional intrinsic advantages including lack of ionizing radiation and exquisite soft tissue characterization. This article reviews the proposed definitions of revised Atlanta classification for acute pancreatitis, illustrates a wide range of morphologic pancreatic parenchymal and associated peripancreatic changes for different types of acute pancreatitis. It also describes the spectrum of early and late chronic pancreatitis imaging findings and illustrates some of the less common types of chronic pancreatitis, with special emphasis on the role of CT and MRI. PMID:25133027

  4. Saw palmetto-induced pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Jibrin, Ismaila; Erinle, Ayodele; Saidi, Abdulfattah; Aliyu, Zakari Y

    2006-06-01

    Saw palmetto is a frequently used botanical agent in benign prostatic enlargement (BPH). Although it has been reported to cause cholestatic hepatitis and many medical conditions, Saw palmetto has not been implicated in acute pancreatitis. We report a case of a probable Saw palmetto induced acute hepatitis and pancreatitis. A 55-year-old reformed alcoholic, sober for greater than 15 years, presented with severe non-radiating epigastric pain associated with nausea and vomiting. His only significant comorbidity is BPH for which he intermittently took Saw palmetto for about four years. Physical examination revealed normal vital signs, tender epigastrium without guarding or rebound tenderness. Cullen and Gray Turner signs were negative. Complete blood count and basic metabolic profile were normal. Additional laboratory values include a serum amylase: 2,152 mmol/L, lipase: 39,346 mmol/L, serum triglyceride: 38 mmol/L, AST: 1265, ALT: 1232 and alkaline phosphatase was 185. Abdominal ultrasound and magnetic resonance cholangiography revealed sludge without stones. A hepatic indole diacetic acid scan was negative. Patient responded clinically and biochemically to withdrawal of Saw palmetto. Two similar episodes of improvements followed by recurrence were noted with discontinuations and reinstitution of Saw Palmetto. Simultaneous and sustained response of hepatitis and pancreatitis to Saw palmetto abstinence with reoccurrence on reinstitution strongly favors drug effect. "Natural" medicinal preparations are therefore not necessarily safe and the importance of detailed medication history (including "supplements") cannot be over emphasized.

  5. Ansa pancreatica as a predisposing factor for recurrent acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takana Yamakawa; Gonoi, Wataru; Yoshikawa, Takeharu; Hayashi, Naoto; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2016-10-28

    To determine the non-biased prevalence and clinical significance of ansa pancreatica in patients with acute pancreatitis using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Our institutional review board approved this cross-sectional study, which consisted of a community-based cohort of 587 consecutive participants in a whole-body health-check program, and 73 subjects with episode of acute pancreatitis (55 patients with a single episode of acute pancreatitis, and 18 patients with recurrent acute pancreatitis). All of the subjects underwent abdominal MRI including magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, medical examinations, and blood tests. Two board-certified, diagnostic, abdominal radiologists evaluated the images, and ansa pancreatica was diagnosed based on its characteristic anatomy on MRI. Compared with the community group [5/587 (0.85%)], patients with recurrent acute pancreatitis had a significantly higher frequency of ansa pancreatica [2/18 (11.1%)] ( P = 0.016; OR = 14.3; 95%CI: 1.27-96.1), but not compared with patients with single-episode acute pancreatitis [1/55 (1.8%)] ( P = 0.42; OR = 2.1; 95%CI: 0.44-19.7). Multiple logistic regression analysis using age, alcohol intake, presence of ansa pancreatica, and presence of autoimmune disease as independent covariates, revealed a significant relationship between the presence of ansa pancreatica and recurrent acute pancreatitis. The presence of autoimmune disease was also significantly associated with the onset of recurrent acute pancreatitis. On the other hand, neither age nor alcohol intake were significantly related to the onset of recurrent acute pancreatitis. The present study is the first to provide robust evidence that the presence of ansa pancreatica is significantly associated with recurrent acute pancreatitis.

  6. Unraveling Pancreatic Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Renard, Yohann; de Mestier, Louis; Perez, Manuela; Avisse, Claude; Lévy, Philippe; Kianmanesh, Reza

    2018-04-01

    Limited pancreatic resections are increasingly performed, but the rate of postoperative fistula is higher than after classical resections. Pancreatic segmentation, anatomically and radiologically identifiable, may theoretically help the surgeon removing selected anatomical portions with their own segmental pancreatic duct and thus might decrease the postoperative fistula rate. We aimed at systematically and comprehensively reviewing the previously proposed pancreatic segmentations and discuss their relevance and limitations. PubMed database was searched for articles investigating pancreatic segmentation, including human or animal anatomy, and cadaveric or surgical studies. Overall, 47/99 articles were selected and grouped into 4 main hypotheses of pancreatic segmentation methodology: anatomic, vascular, embryologic and lymphatic. The head, body and tail segments are gross description without distinct borders. The arterial territories defined vascular segments and isolate an isthmic paucivascular area. The embryological theory relied on the fusion plans of the embryological buds. The lymphatic drainage pathways defined the lymphatic segmentation. These theories had differences, but converged toward separating the head and body/tail parts, and the anterior from posterior and inferior parts of the pancreatic head. The rate of postoperative fistula was not decreased when surgical resection was performed following any of these segmentation theories; hence, none of them appeared relevant enough to guide pancreatic transections. Current pancreatic segmentation theories do not enable defining anatomical-surgical pancreatic segments. Other approaches should be explored, in particular focusing on pancreatic ducts, through pancreatic ducts reconstructions and embryologic 3D modelization.

  7. Pathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis: a comprehensive update and a look into the future.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Roland; Tingstedt, Bobby; Xia, Jinglin

    2009-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a relatively frequent condition usually caused by alcoholic abuse but also due to recurrent gallstone disease, metabolic endocrine disorders and haemochromatosis, among others. Specific types such as hereditary and autoimmune pancreatitis should be particularly kept in mind and emphasized, as they require specific treatment and attention. The possibility to identify gene mutations has also increased and this is likely to decrease the overall total number of "idiopathic" chronic pancreatitis cases. Pancreatic stellate cells have been identified as potential key players in the progression of chronic pancreatitis and the development of fibrogenesis, which are activated either during repeated attacks of necro-inflammation or directly by toxic factors. The inhibition or modulation of pancreatic stellate cells could represent a way of potential intervention in patients with chronic pancreatitis in the future.

  8. CFTR: A new horizon in the pathomechanism and treatment of pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Hegyi, Péter; Wilschanski, Michael; Muallem, Shmuel; Lukacs, Gergely; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Uc, Aliye; Gray, Michael A.; Rakonczay, Zoltán; Maléth, József

    2017-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an ion channel that conducts chloride and bicarbonate ions across epithelial cell membranes. Mutations in the CFTR gene diminish the ion channel function and lead to impaired epithelial fluid transport in multiple organs such as the lung and the pancreas resulting in cystic fibrosis. Heterozygous carriers of CFTR mutations do not develop cystic fibrosis but exhibit increased risk for pancreatitis and associated pancreatic damage characterized by elevated mucus levels, fibrosis and cyst formation. Importantly, recent studies demonstrated that pancreatitis causing insults, such as alcohol, smoking or bile acids strongly inhibit CFTR function. Furthermore, human studies showed reduced levels of CFTR expression and function in all forms of pancreatitis. These findings indicate that impairment of CFTR is critical in the development of pancreatitis; therefore, correcting CFTR function could be the first specific therapy in pancreatitis. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the field and discuss new possibilities for the treatment of pancreatitis. PMID:26856995

  9. Variation in the γ-glutamyltransferase 1 gene and risk of chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Brand, Harrison; Diergaarde, Brenda; O'Connell, Michael R; Whitcomb, David C; Brand, Randall E

    2013-07-01

    Individuals with chronic pancreatitis are at increased risk for pancreatic cancer. We hypothesized that genetic variation in the γ-glutamyltransferase 1 (GGT1) gene, which was recently reported associated with pancreatic cancer risk in a genome-wide association study, is also associated with risk of chronic pancreatitis. Associations between common polymorphisms in GGT1 and chronic pancreatitis were evaluated using data and samples from the North American Pancreatitis Study 2. Patients (n = 496) and control subjects (n = 465) were genotyped for 4 single-nucleotide polymorphisms: rs4820599, rs2017869, rs8135987, and rs5751901. Odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for chronic pancreatitis risk were calculated using multiple logistic regression models. Interactions with cigarette smoking and alcohol use were explored. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms rs8135987 and rs4820599 were both statistically significantly associated with risk of chronic pancreatitis; compared with common allele homozygotes, individuals with at least 1 minor allele were at increased risk (rs8135987: OR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.03-1.80 [P(trend) = 0.01]; rs4820599: OR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.04-1.84 [P(trend) = 0.0]; adjusted for age, sex, race, smoking status, and alcohol use). No significant interactions with cigarette smoking and alcohol use were observed. Our results suggest that common variation in the GGT1 gene may also affect risk of chronic pancreatitis.

  10. Cannabis: a rare cause of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Fatma, Houissa; Mouna, Bouraoui; Leila, Mouelhi; Radhouane, Debbeche; Taoufik, Najjar

    2013-02-01

    Drugs of all types are related to the etiology of pancreatitis in approximately 2% of cases. However, there have been very few reports of acute pancreatitis associated with cannabis use in the general population. This report is the first such case in our country, and involves a 22-year-old North African man who presented to our emergency department with transfixiant epigastric abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. The patient denied any past or familial medical history, was taking no medications chronically and had no history of trauma. The patient admitted to smoking one pack of cigarettes a day and occasional cannabis use, and no alcohol consumption. Biological and morphological explorations found Balthazar grade-A acute pancreatitis with no biliary dilatation or obstruction. The etiological workup was normal and, on repeat questioning, the patient admitted to being a regular and excessive user of cannabis, and to having done so 2 days before the abdominal pain. The use of cannabis is frequently seen worldwide and even in North Africa, and regular users, especially young adults, should be informed of the risk of this possible cannabis-induced pancreatic disease. This case should also be borne in mind, although the association of cannabis with pancreatitis is problematic because of the difficulty in monitoring cannabinoids in the body and the illegality of cannabis use and, consequently, getting patients to admit to using it. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Spanish multicenter study to estimate the incidence of chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Domínguez Muñoz, J Enrique; Lucendo Villarín, Alfredo José; Carballo Álvarez, L Fernando; Tenías, Jose María; Iglesias García, Julio

    2016-07-01

    To estimate the incidence of chronic pancreatitis in Spain as diagnosed with endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), and to assess the risk factors and complications detected. A descriptive, observational study of chronic pancreatitis cases diagnosed in Spanish health care centers with an EUS unit. A structured questionnaire was used to evaluate the incidence of the disease (cases identified over 18 months: from January 2011 to June 2012), risk factors, EUS criteria, Rosemont classification, and frequency of local complications. Twenty-three centers were selected serving a total reference area of 14,752,704 population. During the study period 1,031 chronic pancreatitis cases were diagnosed, with an incidence of 4.66 cases per 105 inhabitants/year (95% CI: 4.65-4.67). Tobacco and alcohol use appear as risk factors in 63.8% and 66.7% of cases, respectively. Of these, 53.3% met > 5 EUS criteria for chronic pancreatitis, and 69% had findings suggestive of or consistent with chronic pancreatitis according to the Rosemont classification. Most prevalent complications included calcifications (34.7%), pseudocysts (16%), and presence of an inflammatory pancreatic tumor (10.4%). The incidence of chronic pancreatitis in Spain is similar to that of other European countries. Given the widespread use of the technique, EUS units are key in detecting the disease, and their activity and results allow to estimate the incidence of chronic pancreatitis over wide, representative population areas.

  12. Contemporary review of drug-induced pancreatitis: A different perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Whitney Y; Abreu Lanfranco, Odaliz

    2014-01-01

    Although gallstone and alcohol use have been considered the most common causes of acute pancreatitis, hundreds of frequently prescribed medications are associated with this disease state. The true incidence is unknown since there are few population based studies available. The knowledge of drug induced acute pancreatitis is limited by the availability and the quality of the evidence as the majority of data is extrapolated from case reports. Establishing a definitive causal relationship between a drug and acute pancreatitis poses a challenge to clinicians. Several causative agent classification systems are often used to identify the suspected agents. They require regular updates since new drug induced acute pancreatitis cases are reported continuously. In addition, infrequently prescribed medications and herbal medications are often omitted. Furthermore, identification of drug induced acute pancreatitis with new medications often requires accumulation of post market case reports. The unrealistic expectation for a comprehensive list of medications and the multifactorial nature of acute pancreatitis call for a different approach. In this article, we review the potential mechanisms of drug induced acute pancreatitis and provide the perspective of deductive reasoning in order to allow clinicians to identify potential drug induced acute pancreatitis with limited data. PMID:25400984

  13. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: Risk factors, screening, and early detection

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Andrew E; Hernandez, Yasmin G; Frucht, Harold; Lucas, Aimee L

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States, with over 38000 deaths in 2013. The opportunity to detect pancreatic cancer while it is still curable is dependent on our ability to identify and screen high-risk populations before their symptoms arise. Risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include multiple genetic syndromes as well as modifiable risk factors. Genetic conditions include hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome, Lynch Syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome, familial atypical multiple mole melanoma syndrome, hereditary pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, and ataxia-telangiectasia; having a genetic predisposition can raise the risk of developing pancreatic cancer up to 132-fold over the general population. Modifiable risk factors, which include tobacco exposure, alcohol use, chronic pancreatitis, diet, obesity, diabetes mellitus, as well as certain abdominal surgeries and infections, have also been shown to increase the risk of pancreatic cancer development. Several large-volume centers have initiated such screening protocols, and consensus-based guidelines for screening high-risk groups have recently been published. The focus of this review will be both the genetic and modifiable risk factors implicated in pancreatic cancer, as well as a review of screening strategies and their diagnostic yields. PMID:25170203

  14. Toxic-Metabolic Risk Factors in Pediatric Pancreatitis: Recommendations for Diagnosis, Management and Future Research

    PubMed Central

    Husain, Sohail Z.; Morinville, Veronique; Pohl, John; Abu-El-Haija, Maisam; Bellin, Melena D.; Freedman, Steve; Hegyi, Peter; Heyman, Melvin B; Himes, Ryan; Ooi, Chee Y.; Schwarzenberg, Sarah Jane; Usatin, Danielle; Uc, Aliye

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Pancreatitis in children can result from metabolic and toxic risk factors, but the evidence linking these factors is sparse. We review the evidence for association or causality of these risk factors in pancreatitis, discuss management strategies and their rationale. Methods We conducted a review of the pediatric pancreatitis literature with respect to the following risk factors: (a) hyperlipidemia, (b) hypercalcemia, (c) chronic renal failure, (d) smoking exposure, (e) alcohol, and (f) medications. Areas of additional research were identified. Results Hypertriglyceridemia of 1000 mg/dl or greater poses an absolute risk for pancreatitis; persistent elevations of calcium are predisposing. Further research is necessary to determine whether end stage renal disease leads to increased pancreatitis in children similar to adults. It is unknown whether cigarette smoking exposure, which clearly increases risk in adults, also increases risk in children. The role of alcohol in pediatric pancreatitis, whether direct or modifying, needs to be elucidated. The evidence supporting most cases of medication-induced pancreatitis is poor. Drug structure, improper handling of drug by host, and by-stander status may be implicated. Other pancreatitis risk factors must be sought in all cases. Conclusions The quality of evidence supporting causative role of various toxic and metabolic factors in pediatric pancreatitis is variable. Careful phenotyping is essential, including search for other etiologic risk factors. Directed therapy includes correction/ removal of any agent identified, and general supportive measures. Further research is necessary to improve our understanding of these pancreatitis risk factors in children. PMID:26594832

  15. Toxic-metabolic Risk Factors in Pediatric Pancreatitis: Recommendations for Diagnosis, Management, and Future Research.

    PubMed

    Husain, Sohail Z; Morinville, Veronique; Pohl, John; Abu-El-Haija, Maisam; Bellin, Melena D; Freedman, Steve; Hegyi, Peter; Heyman, Melvin B; Himes, Ryan; Ooi, Chee Y; Schwarzenberg, Sarah J; Usatin, Danielle; Uc, Aliye

    2016-04-01

    Pancreatitis in children can result from metabolic and toxic risk factors, but the evidence linking these factors is sparse. We review the evidence for association or causality of these risk factors in pancreatitis, discuss management strategies, and their rationale. We conducted a review of the pediatric pancreatitis literature with respect to the following risk factors: hyperlipidemia, hypercalcemia, chronic renal failure, smoking exposure, alcohol, and medications. Areas of additional research were identified. Hypertriglyceridemia of 1000 mg/dL or greater poses an absolute risk for pancreatitis; persistent elevations of calcium are predisposing. Further research is necessary to determine whether end-stage renal disease leads to increased pancreatitis in children similar to adults. It is unknown whether cigarette smoking exposure, which clearly increases risk in adults, also increases risk in children. The role of alcohol in pediatric pancreatitis, whether direct or modifying, needs to be elucidated. The evidence supporting most cases of medication-induced pancreatitis is poor. Drug structure, improper handling of drug by host, and bystander status may be implicated. Other pancreatitis risk factors must be sought in all cases. The quality of evidence supporting causative role of various toxic and metabolic factors in pediatric pancreatitis is variable. Careful phenotyping is essential, including search for other etiologic risk factors. Directed therapy includes correction/removal of any agent identified, and general supportive measures. Further research is necessary to improve our understanding of these pancreatitis risk factors in children.

  16. Endocrine pancreatic function changes after acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Deqing; Xu, Yaping; Zeng, Yue; Wang, Xingpeng

    2011-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the impairment of pancreatic endocrine function and the associated risk factors after acute pancreatitis (AP). Fifty-nine patients were subjected to tests of pancreatic function after an attack of pancreatitis. The mean time after the event was 3.5 years. Pancreatic endocrine function was evaluated by fasting blood glucose (FBG), glycosylated hemoglobin, fasting blood insulin, and C-peptide. Homeostasis model assessment was used to evaluate insulin resistance and islet β-cell function. Pancreatic exocrine function was evaluated by fecal elastase 1. Factors that could influence endocrine function were also investigated. Nineteen patients (32%) were found to have elevated FBG, whereas 5 (8%) had abnormal glycosylated hemoglobin levels. The levels of FBG, fasting blood insulin, and C-peptide were higher in patients than in controls (P < 0.01). The islet β-cell function of patients was lower than that of controls (P < 0.01), whereas insulin resistance index was higher among patients (P < 0.01). Obesity, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes-related symptoms were found to be associated with endocrine insufficiency. Pancreatic exocrine functional impairment was found at the same time. Endocrine functional impairment with insulin resistance was found in patients after AP. Obesity, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes-related symptoms increased the likelihood of developing functional impairment after AP.

  17. Pancreatic Cancer: Multicenter Prospective Data Collection and Analysis by the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group.

    PubMed

    Lakatos, Gábor; Balázs, Anita; Kui, Balázs; Gódi, Szilárd; Szücs, Ákos; Szentesi, Andrea; Szentkereszty, Zsolt; Szmola, Richárd; Kelemen, Dezső; Papp, Róbert; Vincze, Áron; Czimmer, József; Pár, Gabriella; Bajor, Judit; Szabó, Imre; Izbéki, Ferenc; Halász, Adrienn; Leindler, László; Farkas, Gyula; Takács, Tamás; Czakó, László; Szepes, Zoltán; Hegyi, Péter; Kahán, Zsuzsanna

    2016-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease with poor prognosis. There is very limited information available regarding the epidemiology and treatment strategies of pancreatic cancer in Central Europe. The purpose of the study was to prospectively collect and analyze data of pancreatic cancer in the Hungarian population. The Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group (HPSG) organized prospective, uniform data collection. Altogether 354 patients were enrolled from 14 Hungarian centers. Chronic pancreatitis was present in 3.7% of the cases, while 33.7% of the patients had diabetes. Family history for pancreatic cancer was positive in 4.8%. The most frequent presenting symptoms included pain (63.8%), weight loss (63%) and jaundice (52.5%). The reported frequency of smoking and alcohol consumption was lower than expected (28.5% and 27.4%, respectively). The majority of patients (75.6%) were diagnosed with advanced disease. Most patients (83.6%) had a primary tumor located in the pancreatic head. The histological diagnosis was ductal adenocarcinoma in 90.7% of the cases, while neuroendocrine tumor was present in 5.3%. Biliary stent implantation was performed in 166 patients, 59.2% of them received metal stents. Primary tumor resection was performed in 60 (16.9%) patients. Enteral or biliary bypass was done in 35 and 49 patients, respectively. In a multivariate Cox-regression model, smoking status and presence of gemcitabine-based chemotherapy were identified as independent predictors for overall survival. We report the first data from a large cohort of Hungarian pancreatic cancer patients. We identified smoking status and chemotherapy as independent predictors in this cohort.

  18. Impact of diabetes duration and chronic pancreatitis on the association between type 2 diabetes and pancreatic cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Brodovicz, K G; Kou, T D; Alexander, C M; O'Neill, E A; Engel, S S; Girman, C J; Goldstein, B J

    2012-12-01

    To examine the impact of diabetes duration, chronic pancreatitis and other factors on pancreatic cancer risk. This retrospective cohort study using the UK General Practice Research Database compared pancreatic cancer incidence and risk in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) versus patients without diabetes. Multivariate Cox regression adjusting for age, sex, history of chronic pancreatitis, gallbladder disease, obesity, smoking and alcohol use and Charlson comorbidity index was used to estimate hazard ratio (HR) [95% confidence interval, CI]. Analyses were repeated using various time windows for diabetes duration. A total of 1903 incident pancreatic cancers were identified, 436 in patients with T2DM (78.76 per 100 000 person-years [95% CI: 71.54, 86.51]) and 1467 in patients without diabetes (11.46 per 100 000 person-years [10.88, 12.06]). Pancreatic cancer risk was significant for T2DM (adjusted HR 1.80 [1.52, 2.14]), increasing age, history of chronic pancreatitis and tobacco use. For patients with chronic pancreatitis and T2DM, the adjusted HR was 12.12 [6.02, 24.40]. Incidence was highest in patients with ≥5 year duration of T2DM. In patient populations with duration of T2DM ranging from ≥1 to ≥5 years, adjusted HRs remained significant but point estimates attenuated slightly with longer duration of T2DM. Patients with T2DM had an 80% increased risk of pancreatic cancer versus patients without diabetes. Patients with T2DM and chronic pancreatitis were 12 times more likely to develop pancreatic cancer. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Followed by Radiation Therapy and Gemcitabine/Sorafenib/Vorinostat in Pancreatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-11-29

    Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma

  20. Involvement of inflammatory factors in pancreatic carcinogenesis and preventive effects of anti-inflammatory agents.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Mami; Mutoh, Michihiro; Ishigamori, Rikako; Fujii, Gen; Imai, Toshio

    2013-03-01

    Chronic inflammation is known to be a risk for many cancers, including pancreatic cancer. Heavy alcohol drinking and cigarette smoking are major causes of pancreatitis, and epidemiological studies have shown that smoking and chronic pancreatitis are risk factors for pancreatic cancer. Meanwhile, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) are elevated in pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer tissues in humans and in animal models. Selective inhibitors of iNOS and COX-2 suppress pancreatic cancer development in a chemical carcinogenesis model of hamsters treated with N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropyl)amine (BOP). In addition, hyperlipidemia, obesity, and type II diabetes are also suggested to be associated with chronic inflammation in the pancreas and involved in pancreatic cancer development. We have shown that a high-fat diet increased pancreatic cancer development in BOP-treated hamsters, along with aggravation of hyperlipidemia, severe fatty infiltration, and increased expression of adipokines and inflammatory factors in the pancreas. Of note, fatty pancreas has been observed in obese and/or diabetic cases in humans. Preventive effects of anti-hyperlipidemic/anti-diabetic agents on pancreatic cancer have also been shown in humans and animals. Taking this evidence into consideration, modulation of inflammatory factors by anti-inflammatory agents will provide useful data for prevention of pancreatic cancer.

  1. The incidence and aetiology of acute pancreatitis across Europe.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Stephen E; Morrison-Rees, Sian; John, Ann; Williams, John G; Brown, Tim H; Samuel, David G

    Acute pancreatitis is increasingly one of the most important acute gastrointestinal conditions throughout much of the world, although incidence and aetiology varies across countries and regions. This study investigated regional and national patterns in the incidence and aetiology of acute pancreatitis, demographic patterns in incidence and trends over time in incidence across Europe. A structured review of acute pancreatitis incidence and aetiology from studies of hospitalised patient case series, cohort studies or other population based studies from 1989 to 2015 and a review of trends in incidence from 1970 to 2015 across all 51 European states. The incidence of acute pancreatitis was reported from 17 countries across Europe and ranged from 4.6 to 100 per 100 000 population. Incidence was usually highest in eastern or northern Europe, although reported rates often varied according to case ascertainment criteria. Of 20 studies that reported on trends in incidence, all but three show percentage increases over time (overall median increase = 3.4% per annum; range = -0.4%-73%). The highest ratios of gallstone to alcohol aetiologies were identified in southern Europe (Greece, Turkey, Italy and Croatia) with lowest ratios mainly in eastern Europe (Latvia, Finland, Romania, Hungary, Russia and Lithuania). The incidence of acute pancreatitis varies across Europe. Gallstone is the dominant aetiology in southern Europe and alcohol in eastern Europe with intermediate ratios in northern and western Europe. Acute pancreatitis continues to increase throughout most of Europe. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Pancreatitis in the Setting of Vaso-occlusive Sickle Cell Crisis: A Rare Encounter.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Badar; Asif, Talal; Braun, Cody; Bahaj, Waled; Dosokey, Eslam; Pauly, Rebecca R

    2017-04-25

    Acute pancreatitis is a common cause of acute abdominal pain. Gallstones and alcohol abuse account for the majority of the cases. Pancreatic ischemia is an uncommon but established cause of pancreatitis associated with connective tissue diseases, vasculitis, and shock. Our case highlights a rare case of vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC) in a patient with sickle cell (SC) disease leading to pancreatitis. Treatment remains largely conservative but exchange transfusion may be the therapy of choice in severely hypoxic patients or in patients with high pre-treatment hemoglobin S levels.

  3. Acute pancreatitis at the beginning of the 21st century: The state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Tonsi, Alfredo F; Bacchion, Matilde; Crippa, Stefano; Malleo, Giuseppe; Bassi, Claudio

    2009-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas which can lead to a systemic inflammatory response syndrome with significant morbidity and mortality in 20% of patients. Gallstones and alcohol consumption are the most frequent causes of pancreatitis in adults. The treatment of mild acute pancreatitis is conservative and supportive; however severe episodes characterized by necrosis of the pancreatic tissue may require surgical intervention. Advanced understanding of the pathology, and increased interest in assessment of disease severity are the cornerstones of future management strategies of this complex and heterogeneous disease in the 21st century. PMID:19554647

  4. [Classification and choice of surgical procedures for chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yin-Mo; Wan, Yuan-Lian; Zhuang, Yan; Wang, Wei-Min; Yan, Zhong-Yu; Huang, Yan-Ting

    2005-02-01

    To explore the classification, choice of surgical procedures and the clinical outcome of surgical management for chronic pancreatitis. 54 patients with chronic pancreatitis undergoing operation in our hospital from 1983 to 2004 were analyzed retrospectively, who were divided into chronic calcifying pancreatitis and chronic obstructive pancreatitis according to the clinical manifestations. There were 41 men (76%) and 13 women (24%) with a mean age of 54 years. The cause of chronic pancreatitis was alcohol related in 25 cases (46%), cholelithiasis in 21 (39%), and previous episodes of acute pancreatitis in 18 (33%). Clinical manifestations included abdominal pain in 38 cases (70%), obstructive jaundice in 27 cases (50%). There existed a significant difference in some clinical materials between the two groups of chronic calcifying pancreatitis and chronic obstructive pancreatitis, which might mean the different pathologic basis in the two kinds of chronic pancreatitis. A total of 34 patients underwent nine different operations without perioperative deaths. Both the Puestow procedure and the pancreatoduodenectomy was safe and achieved pain relief in a large percentage of patients, which could also improve the exocrine function whereas the endocrine function remained unchanged. Addition of biliary bypass to the Puestow procedure was suitable for the patients with stenosis of common bile duct. Jaundice was the main manifestation in the patients with the inflammatory mass in the head of the pancreas and Whipple's procedure or other resectional procedures should be performed for them. Only drainage of bile duct had a better outcome for the relief of jaundice, but its effect to pancreas need to be further evaluated. The clinicopathologic characteristics of obstructive chronic pancreatitis was more variable and the surgical management should be also different for individuals.

  5. Screening for Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Randall E.

    2007-01-01

    Despite improvements in the clinical and surgical management of pancreatic cancer, limited strides have been made in the early detection of this highly lethal malignancy. The majority of localized pancreatic tumors are asymptomatic, and the recognized presenting symptoms of pancreatic adenocarcinoma are often vague and heterogeneous in nature. These factors, coupled with the lack of a sensitive and noninvasive screening method, have made population-based screening for pancreatic cancer impossible. Nevertheless, at least two large institutions have performed multimodality-screening protocols for individuals with high risk of pancreatic cancer based on genetic predisposition and strong family history. Abnormalities noted during these screening protocols prompted further investigation or surgery that resulted in the discovery of benign, potentially malignant, and malignant pancreatic lesions. In addition to ductal epithelial pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia, greater sensitivity has recently been achieved in the identification and characterization of precancerous mucinous pancreatic tumors. Advancements in proteomics and DNA microarray technology may confirm serum-based biomarkers that could be incorporated into future screening algorithms for pancreatic cancer. PMID:21960811

  6. Acute pancreatitis caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae: an unusual etiology.

    PubMed

    Valdés Lacasa, Teresa; Duarte Borges, María Alejandra; García Marín, Alicia; Gómez Cuervo, Covadonga

    2017-06-01

    It is well known that the most important etiologies of acute pancreatitis are gallstones and alcohol consumption. Once these causes have been ruled out, especially in young adults, it is important to consider less frequent etiologic factors such as drugs, trauma, malformations, autoimmunity or systemic diseases. Other rare and less well studied causes of this pathology are infections, among which Mycoplasma pneumoniae has been reported to cause acute pancreatitis as an unusual extrapulmonary manifestation. Here, we report the case of a 21-year-old patient who had acute idiopathic pancreatitis associated with an upper respiratory tract infection. After an in-depth study, all other causes of pancreatitis were ruled out and Mycoplasma was established as the clinical etiology.

  7. The pain of chronic pancreatitis: a persistent clinical challenge

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The pain of chronic pancreatitis represents a major challenge to those working in the field, including pain specialists, gastroenterologists and surgeons. This article describes the different aetiologies of chronic pancreatitis and lists the models for the pathogenesis of pain, including novel ideas such as the role of the immune system in the modulation of pain. The patient profile in chronic pancreatitis is discussed along with the social impact of the disease in relation to alcohol misuse. The range of treatment strategies including medical, endoscopic and surgical approaches are evaluated. Common analgesic regimes and their limitations are reviewed. The pain of chronic pancreatitis remains refractory to effective treatment in many cases and further study and understanding of the underlying pathophysiology are required. PMID:26516493

  8. Impaired lipid clearance in patients with previous acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán, S; Nervi, F; Llanos, O; León, P; Valdivieso, V

    1985-01-01

    Fasting serum triglycerides were measured in 52 patients who had sustained an attack of pancreatitis (gall stone related 33, alcoholism six) at least six months earlier. Several patients (23%) had raised fasting serum triglycerides, with a type IV phenotype in all but one patient. The 40 patients with normal fasting serum triglycerides received an oral load of 100 g sunflower oil to compare their clearance of dietary triglycerides with that of a control group of 54 subjects. The clearance of ingested triglycerides was significantly impaired in the patients - irrespective of the presumed aetiological factor, or clinical condition associated with pancreatitis - compared with the clearance in controls. A triglyceride tolerance test is the only way to detect those patients in whom a future attack of pancreatitis may be precipitated by a diet rich in fat, or endogenous over production of triglycerides as after an alcoholic debauch. PMID:4029716

  9. Pancreatitis in pregnancy: etiology, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mali, Padmavathi

    2016-08-01

    Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is a rare and dangerous disease. This study aimed to examine the etiology, treatment, and outcomes of pancreatitis in pregnancy. A total of 25 pregnant patients diagnosed with pancreatitis during the period of 1994 and 2014 was analyzed retrospectively. The pregnant patients were diagnosed with pancreatitis during a period of 21 years. Most (60%) of the patients were diagnosed with pancreatitis in the third trimester. The mean age of the patients at presentation was 25.7 years, with a mean gestational age of 24.4 weeks. Abdominal pain occurred in most patients and vomiting in one patient was associated hyperemesis gravidarum. The common cause of the disease was gallstone-related (56%), followed by alcohol-related (16%), post-ERCP (4%), hereditary (4%) and undetermined conditions (20%). The level of triglycerides was minimally high in three patients. ERCP and wire-guided sphincterotomy were performed in 6 (43%) of 14 patients with gallstone-related pancreatitis and elevated liver enzymes with no complications. Most (84%) of the patients underwent a full-term, vaginal delivery. There was no difference in either maternal or fetal outcomes after ERCP. Acute pancreatitis is rare in pregnancy, occurring most commonly in the third trimester, and gallstones are the most common cause. When laparoscopic cholecystectomy is not feasible and a common bile duct stone is highly suspected on imaging, endoscopic sphincterotomy or stenting may help to prevent recurrence and postpone cholecystectomy until after delivery.

  10. [Latest advances in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2013-10-01

    The present article analyzes the main presentations on acute pancreatitis (AP) in Digestive Disease Week 2013. Perfusion computed tomography allows early diagnosis of pancreatic necrosis. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin predicts the development of acute renal failure, severe AP and death. Factors associated with greater fluid sequestration in AP are alcoholic etiology, an elevated hematocrit, and the presence of criteria of systemic inflammatory response syndrome; fluid sequestration is associated with a worse outcome. True pseudocysts (fluid collections without necrosis for more than 4 weeks) are a highly infrequent complication in AP. Patients with necrotic collections have a poor prognosis, especially if associated with infection. A meta-analysis on fluid therapy suggests that early aggressive fluid administration is associated with higher mortality and more frequent respiratory complications. According to a meta-analysis, enteral nutrition initiated within 24 hours of admission improves the outcome of AP compared with later initiation of enteral nutrition. Pentoxifylline could be a promising alternative in AP; a double-blind randomized study showed that this drug reduced the length of hospital and intensive care unit stay, as well as the need for intensive care unit admission. The association of octreotide and celecoxib seems to reduce the frequency of organ damage compared with octreotide alone. Mild AP can be managed in the ambulatory setting through hospital-at-home units after a short, 24-hour admission. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  11. Pancreatic fibrosis correlates with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency after pancreatoduodenectomy.

    PubMed

    Tran, T C K; van 't Hof, G; Kazemier, G; Hop, W C; Pek, C; van Toorenenbergen, A W; van Dekken, H; van Eijck, C H J

    2008-01-01

    Obstruction of the pancreatic duct can lead to pancreatic fibrosis. We investigated the correlation between the extent of pancreatic fibrosis and the postoperative exocrine and endocrine pancreatic function. Fifty-five patients who were treated for pancreatic and periampullary carcinoma and 19 patients with chronic pancreatitis were evaluated. Exocrine pancreatic function was evaluated by fecal elastase-1 test, while endocrine pancreatic function was assessed by plasma glucose level. The extent of fibrosis, duct dilation and endocrine tissue loss was examined histopathologically. A strong correlation was found between pancreatic fibrosis and elastase-1 level less than 100 microg/g (p < 0.0001), reflecting severe exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. A strong correlation was found between pancreatic fibrosis and endocrine tissue loss (p < 0.0001). Neither pancreatic fibrosis nor endocrine tissue loss were correlated with the development of postoperative diabetes mellitus. Duct dilation alone was neither correlated with exocrine nor with endocrine function loss. The majority of patients develop severe exocrine pancreatic insufficiency after pancreatoduodenectomy. The extent of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is strongly correlated with preoperative fibrosis. The loss of endocrine tissue does not correlate with postoperative diabetes mellitus. Preoperative dilation of the pancreatic duct per se does not predict exocrine or endocrine pancreatic insufficiency postoperatively. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Systematic review of pancreatic cancer epidemiology in Asia-Pacific Region: major patterns in GLOBACON 2012

    PubMed Central

    Pourhoseingholi, Mohamad Amin; Ashtari, Sara; Hajizadeh, Nastaran; Fazeli, Zeinab; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest cancers with short-term survival rates. Trends for pancreatic cancer incidence and mortality varied considerably in the world. To date, the causes of pancreatic cancer are not known sufficiently, although certain risk factors have been identified such as, smoking, obesity, life style, diabetes mellitus, alcohol, dietary factors and chronic pancreatitis. Since there are no current screening recommendations for pancreatic cancer, primary prevention is very important. Therefore, up-to-date statistics on pancreatic cancer occurrence and outcome are essential for the primary prevention of this disease. Due to the lack of information on epidemiology of pancreatic cancer in most Asian countries, and limited of statistics and registration system in this area, we conducted a systematic review study to evaluate the most recent data concerning epidemiology of pancreatic cancer in Asia-Pacific region. In this review we focused on collected recent data on incidence, mortality, survival and risk factors of pancreatic cancer in this region. In addition, we reviewed and used the data of GLOBOCAN 2012 in this paper to complete the information as a source of compiling pancreatic cancer incidence and mortality rate. PMID:29379588

  13. [Update on chronic pancreatitis: review article].

    PubMed

    Czul, Frank; Coronel, Emmanuel; Donet, Jean A

    2017-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive fibro-inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterized by irreversible fibrosis of the gland with eventual failure of exocrine and endocrine functions and hallmark features of abdominal pain, malabsorption, malnutrition, diabetes mellitus and pancreatic calcifications. In many patients this disease results from a complex mix of environmental (eg, alcohol, cigarettes, and occupational chemicals), genetic factors and a few patients with hereditary or autoimmune disease. The management includes medical, endoscopic and surgical approaches with the need for interaction between various specialties, calling for a concerted multidisciplinary approach. This review provides the reader with a comprehensive overview of the studies summarizing the epidemiology, etiology, physiopatology, clinical manifestation, diagnosis and treatments of the disease.

  14. Alcoholism - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - alcoholism ... The following organizations are good resources for information on alcoholism : Alcoholics Anonymous -- www.aa.org Al-Anon Family Groups www.al-anon.org National Institute on Alcohol ...

  15. Alcoholic neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - alcoholic; Alcoholic polyneuropathy ... The exact cause of alcoholic neuropathy is unknown. It likely includes both a direct poisoning of the nerve by the alcohol and the effect of poor nutrition ...

  16. Role of bedside pancreatic scores and C-reactive protein in predicting pancreatic fluid collections and necrosis.

    PubMed

    Vinish, Doraiswami Babu; Abishek, Vishnu; Sujatha, K; Arulprakash, S; Solomon, Rajkumar; Ganesh, P

    2017-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a disease with variable outcome; the course of the disease can be modified by early aggressive management in patients with severe pancreatitis. Easily calculable pancreatic scores and investigations can help to triage these patients. We aimed to determine the role of bedside index for severity in acute pancreatitis (BISAP), harmless acute pancreatitis score (HAPS), and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) scores on day of admission and C-reactive protein (CRP) at 48 h for predicting the presence of pancreatic fluid collection (PFC) and necrosis on CT scans done at 72 h. Of a total of 114 consecutively seen patients of pancreatitis, 64 with acute pancreatitis were enrolled in the study. All individuals had the pancreatitis predicting scores calculated at the time of admission, CRP at 48 h, and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) abdomen at 72 h from admission. The study population of 64 (55 male) had a mean (+SD) age of 37.7 ± 13 years. Alcohol was the most common (68.8%) etiology in these patients. Based on CECT, patients were divided into 2 groups; group 1 with 41 patients who had mild pancreatitis and group 2 with 23 patients who had pancreatic fluid collection with or without necrosis (PFCN). PFCN were seen in 19 (29.7%) of patients with 2 or more SIRS criteria, 17 (26.6%) of patients with BISAP score ≥3, and 16 patients (25.0%) with HAPS >0 respectively. All three scores were able to predict PFCN significantly. CRP >150 mg/L was noted in 23 patients and was able to predict the presence of fluid collections (p=0.0002) and pancreatic necrosis (p = 0.0004) on CT. BISAP, HAPS, and SIRS scores and CRP of 150 mg/L all correlated significantly with the occurrence of fluid collections and pancreatic necrosis on CT at 72 h. None of the scores was superior to the other in this respect.

  17. Surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis with pancreatic main duct dilatation: Long term results after head resection and duct drainage

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, A.; Beger, H. G.

    2005-01-01

    Tissue and duct hypertension is considered as a major factor in the etiology of pain in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP). Duct dilatation is a consequence of duct obstruction due to scars or duct stones. Nevertheless, the procedure of choice, drainage or resection, is still under discussion. We present long-term results of patients operated with duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection (DPPHR) combined with a Partington-Rochelle duct drainage in cases of chronic pancreatitis with multiple stenosis and dilatation of the side ducts. Methods and patients. From April 1982 to September 2001, in 55 out of 538 patients with chronic pancreatitis, a DPPHR with additionally Partington-Rochelle duct drainage was performed (44 male, 11 female, mean age 45.8 years). Ninety-two percent of the patients suffered from alcoholic pancreatitis. Medical respective pain treatment for chronic pancreatitis was in median 64.5 months prior to surgery. The indications for surgery were in 87% pain, 59% of the patients had an inflammatory mass in the head of the pancreas, 36% a common bile duct stenosis and 5% a severe stenosis of the duodenum. The endocrine function (OGGT) was impaired in 79% of the patients preoperatively. Results. Hospital mortality was 0%, postoperative complications occurred in 11 patients. Follow-up: All except 2 patients were followed up in the outpatient clinic with the mean follow-up time of 69.7 months (8–105 months), the late mortality was 9%. Sixty-eight percent of the patients were completely free of pain, 29% had occasional pain, 3% suffered from a further attack of pancreatitis. Body weight increased in 79%, 58% were professionally rehabilitated. Late postoperative endocrine function was unchanged in 85% (improved in 5%, deteriorated in 10%). Conclusion. The pain control in patients with multiple duct stenosis after duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection with duct drainage leads to long-standing absence of pain and low recurrence rate of

  18. Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Enrique Domínguez-Muñoz, J

    2016-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the definition of the disease, the etiological diagnosis of idiopathic disease, the correlation between fibrosis degree and pancreatic secretion in the early stages of chronic pancreatitis, the treatment of the disease and of pain, the clinical relevance of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, and the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis. A new mechanistic definition of chronic pancreatitis has been proposed. Genetic testing is mainly of help in patients with relapsing idiopathic pancreatitis. A significant correlation has been shown between the degree of pancreatic fibrosis as evaluated by elastography and pancreatic secretion of bicarbonate. New data supports the efficacy of antioxidants and simvastatin for the therapy of chronic pancreatitis. The pancreatoscopy-guided intraductal lithotripsy is an effective alternative to extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in patients with chronic calcifying pancreatitis. The presence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in patients with chronic pancreatitis is associated with a significant risk of cardiovascular events. Fine needle biopsy and contrast enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasonography are of help for the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis and its differential diagnosis with pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Acute Pancreatitis in Children.

    PubMed

    Werlin, Steven L.

    2001-10-01

    There are no drugs that cure or abate pancreatitis. The treatment of patients with mild and moderate episodes of pancreatitis (85%) is supportive and expectant. Central issues include the removal of the initiating process (if possible), relief of pain, and maintenance of fluid and electrolyte balance. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography may be required for stone extraction in patients with biliary pancreatitis. Surgery is rarely required. The aims of treatment for patients with severe disease includes treatment of local, systemic, and septic complications in addition to those for mild and moderate disease. Homeostasis is maintained by the correction of hypocalcemia, anemia, hypoalbuminemia, electrolyte imbalances, and hypoxemia. A large number of medications have been used unsuccessfully in an attempt to halt the progression of the autodigestive process within the pancreas and to reduce pancreatic secretions. Nutritional support with either enteral or parenteral feeding is given. Intravenous antibiotics or selective bowel decontamination decrease mortality in patients with severe episodes of pancreatitis. The treatment for these individuals is often prolonged. Surgical treatment of traumatic pancreatitis with ductal rupture includes repair or resection. At times, simple drainage is performed and definitive surgery is deferred until later. Surgical treatment of severe pancreatitis includes debridement of necrotic and infected tissue. The emerging consensus appears to be that necrosectomy and local lavage or open management with planned re-exploration offers better survival than the conventional therapy of resection plus drainage alone.

  20. PKD signaling and pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jingzhen; Pandol, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute pancreatitis is a serious medical disorder with no current therapies directed to the molecular pathogenesis of the disorder. Inflammation, inappropriate intracellular activation of digestive enzymes, and parenchymal acinar cell death by necrosis are the critical pathophysiologic processes of acute pancreatitis. Thus, it is necessary to elucidate the key molecular signals that mediate these pathobiologic processes and develop new therapeutic strategies to attenuate the appropriate signaling pathways in order to improve outcomes for this disease. A novel serine/threonine protein kinase D (PKD) family has emerged as key participants in signal transduction, and this family is increasingly being implicated in the regulation of multiple cellular functions and diseases. Methods This review summarizes recent findings of our group and others regarding the signaling pathway and the biological roles of the PKD family in pancreatic acinar cells. In particular, we highlight our studies of the functions of PKD in several key pathobiologic processes associated with acute pancreatitis in experimental models. Results Our findings reveal that PKD signaling is required for NF-κB activation/inflammation, intracellular zymogen activation, and acinar cell necrosis in rodent experimental pancreatitis. Novel small-molecule PKD inhibitors attenuate the severity of pancreatitis in both in vitro and in vivo experimental models. Further, this review emphasizes our latest advances in the therapeutic application of PKD inhibitors to experimental pancreatitis after the initiation of pancreatitis. Conclusions These novel findings suggest that PKD signaling is a necessary modulator in key initiating pathobiologic processes of pancreatitis, and that it constitutes a novel therapeutic target for treatments of this disorder. PMID:26879861

  1. Hospital discharges and patient activity associated with chronic pancreatitis in Ireland 2009-2013.

    PubMed

    Ní Chonchubhair, Hazel M; Bashir, Yasir; McNaughton, David; Barry, Joseph M; Duggan, Sinead N; Conlon, Kevin C

    To investigate trends in acute public hospital patient discharges in Ireland, to analyse hospital discharge activity for geographical variations, aetiological differences, and to estimate a national prevalence for chronic pancreatitis. We performed a nationwide retrospective study of all in-patient discharges from acute public hospitals in Ireland, participating in the Hospital In-Patient Enquiry (HIPE) reporting system. We searched for International Classification of Disease, Tenth Revision, Australian Modification (ICD-10-AM) codes K86.0 alcohol-induced chronic pancreatitis, and K86.1 other chronic pancreatitis, and data were extracted for the years 2009-2013. There were 4098 emergency admissions for any aetiology chronic pancreatitis during the 5 year study period. Total discharges ranged from 753 in 2009 to 999 in 2013. Total patients ranged from 530 in 2009 to 601 in 2013. Prevalence of chronic pancreatitis is estimated at 11.6 per 100,000 to 13.0 per 100,000 over the five years. 'Other aetiology chronic pancreatitis' discharges were almost double that of 'alcohol chronic pancreatitis'. We found notable geographical variation in hospital discharge activity for chronic pancreatitis. We report a prevalence which is similar to those worldwide studies who adopted a similar methodology utilising exact counts of patients. Our data are an underestimated as they are based on in-patient discharges only, excluding those attending primary care, outpatient or emergency room visits without admission. Despite studying this disease in a population with high per capita alcohol consumption, we report almost twice as many discharges for non-alcohol aetiology chronic pancreatitis. Copyright © 2016 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical signs of pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Penny, Steven M

    2012-01-01

    The pancreas consists of complex structures that perform vital functions. Radiologic technologists must comprehend its normal structure and function to perform functional imaging procedures in their daily practice, as well as to know how any deviation from normalcy can disrupt homeostasis. Because pancreatitis is a potentially life-threatening disease, a thorough understanding of the clinical manifestation and imaging characteristics of the various forms of the disease is crucial. This article reviews distinctive pancreatic function and discusses basic pancreas imaging. In addition, acute and chronic pancreatitis is explored, including the role of medical imaging in its diagnosis, complications, and prognosis.

  3. A modern review of the operative management of chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    King, Jonathan C; Abeywardina, Shannon; Farrell, James J; Reber, Howard A; Hines, O Joe

    2010-10-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a debilitating disease resulting in pain, intestinal malabsorption, endocrine dysfunction, and poor quality of life (QoL). Our aim was to analyze surgical outcomes for patients with chronic pancreatitis. Data for patients undergoing operations for chronic pancreatitis between 1990 and 2009 were reviewed. Demographics, operative and perioperative data, and survival were catalogued. QoL was determined (Short Form 36 and European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire + PAN-26) and compared with historical controls. The mean age was 51 +/- 2 years, 38 patients were male (53%), the most common indication was pain (71%), the etiology of pancreatitis often was alcohol, and most patients underwent a Whipple procedure (56%). Operative time was 316 +/- 17 minutes and blood loss was 363 +/- 75 mL. There were 34 complications in 30 patients (42%) and one death. QoL surveys were administered for 25 of 55 (45%) surviving patients at a mean follow-up of 72 +/- 16 months. Mean survival was 99 +/- 9 months, whereas 5- and 10-year survival were 86 and 75 per cent. QoL scores were uniformly better than historical controls. Our data demonstrate that operations for chronic pancreatitis can be performed with acceptable morbidity and mortality. Patients have excellent survival and improved QoL compared with historical controls. Surgery is an effective and durable treatment option for patients with chronic pancreatitis.

  4. Hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis: A case-based review

    PubMed Central

    Gan, S Ian; Edwards, Alun L; Symonds, Christopher J; Beck, Paul L

    2006-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia is an established cause of pancreatitis. In a case-based approach, we present a review of hypertriglyceridemia and how it can cause pancreatitis. We outline how to investigate and manage such patients. A 35 year old man presented to the emergency department with abdominal pain and biochemical evidence of acute pancreatitis. There was no history of alcohol consumption and biliary imaging was normal. The only relevant past medical history was that of mild hyperlipidemia, treated with diet alone. Physical exam revealed epigastric tenderness, right lateral rectus palsy, lipemia retinalis, bitemporal hemianopsia and a delay in the relaxation phase of his ankle reflexes. Subsequent laboratory investigation revealed marked hypertriglyceridemia and panhypopituarism. An enhanced CT scan of the head revealed a large suprasellar mass impinging on the optic chiasm and hypothalamus. The patient was treated supportively; thyroid replacement and lipid lowering agents were started. He underwent a successful resection of a craniopharyngioma. Post-operatively, the patient did well on hormone replacement therapy. He has had no further attacks of pancreatitis. This case highlights many of the factors involved in the regulation of triglyceride metabolism. We review the common causes of hypertriglyceridemia and the proposed mechanisms resulting in pancreatitis. The incidence and management of hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis are also discussed. PMID:17131487

  5. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Domínguez Muñoz, J Enrique

    2015-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the early diagnosis of the disease, the treatment of symptoms and complications, mainly pain and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, and the diagnosis and therapy of autoimmune pancreatitis. The multimodal dynamic endoscopic ultrasound-guided secretin-stimulated evaluation of the pancreas provides relevant morphological and functional information for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis at early stages. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in patients with calcifying pancreatitis and endoscopic pancreatic stent placement are effective alternatives for pain therapy in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Presence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in patients with chronic pancreatitis is associated with a significantly increase of mortality rate. Despite that, pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is not prescribed in the majority of patients with pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, or it is prescribed at a low dose. The newly developed and commercialized needles for endoscopic ultrasound-guided pancreatic biopsy are effective in retrieving appropriate tissue samples for the histological diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis. Maintenance therapy with azathioprine is effective and safe to prevent relapses in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Pancreatic islet cell tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... JH, Kastan MB, Tepper JE, eds. Abeloff's Clinical Oncology . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap ... Cancer Network website. NCCN clinical practice guidelines in oncology (NCCN guidelines): pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Version 3.2017. www. ...

  7. Hypermutation In Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Humphris, Jeremy L; Patch, Ann-Marie; Nones, Katia; Bailey, Peter J; Johns, Amber L; McKay, Skye; Chang, David K; Miller, David K; Pajic, Marina; Kassahn, Karin S; Quinn, Michael C J; Bruxner, Timothy J C; Christ, Angelika N; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Manning, Suzanne; Nourse, Craig; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Stone, Andrew; Wilson, Peter J; Anderson, Matthew; Fink, J Lynn; Holmes, Oliver; Kazakoff, Stephen; Leonard, Conrad; Newell, Felicity; Waddell, Nick; Wood, Scott; Mead, Ronald S; Xu, Qinying; Wu, Jianmin; Pinese, Mark; Cowley, Mark J; Jones, Marc D; Nagrial, Adnan M; Chin, Venessa T; Chantrill, Lorraine A; Mawson, Amanda; Chou, Angela; Scarlett, Christopher J; Pinho, Andreia V; Rooman, Ilse; Giry-Laterriere, Marc; Samra, Jaswinder S; Kench, James G; Merrett, Neil D; Toon, Christopher W; Epari, Krishna; Nguyen, Nam Q; Barbour, Andrew; Zeps, Nikolajs; Jamieson, Nigel B; McKay, Colin J; Carter, C Ross; Dickson, Euan J; Graham, Janet S; Duthie, Fraser; Oien, Karin; Hair, Jane; Morton, Jennifer P; Sansom, Owen J; Grützmann, Robert; Hruban, Ralph H; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Schulick, Richard D; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Morgan, Richard A; Lawlor, Rita T; Rusev, Borislav; Corbo, Vincenzo; Salvia, Roberto; Cataldo, Ivana; Tortora, Giampaolo; Tempero, Margaret A; Hofmann, Oliver; Eshleman, James R; Pilarsky, Christian; Scarpa, Aldo; Musgrove, Elizabeth A; Gill, Anthony J; Pearson, John V; Grimmond, Sean M; Waddell, Nicola; Biankin, Andrew V

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is molecularly diverse, with few effective therapies. Increased mutation burden and defective DNA repair are associated with response to immune checkpoint inhibitors in several other cancer types. We interrogated 385 pancreatic cancer genomes to define hypermutation and its causes. Mutational signatures inferring defects in DNA repair were enriched in those with the highest mutation burdens. Mismatch repair deficiency was identified in 1% of tumors harboring different mechanisms of somatic inactivation of MLH1 and MSH2. Defining mutation load in individual pancreatic cancers and the optimal assay for patient selection may inform clinical trial design for immunotherapy in pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Bacteriological profile of pancreatic juice in patients with chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Parida, Salil Kumar; Pottakkat, Biju; Raja, Kalayarasan; Vijayahari, Ranjit; Lakshmi, Chandrasekharan Padma

    2014-09-28

    Information regarding the association of bacteria in the pancreatic fluid in patients with chronic pancreatitis is limited. This study was designed to analyze the prevalence of bacteria in pancreatic juice in patients with chronic pancreatitis and the association of positive pancreatic fluid culture with pre-operative and post-operative parameters. All patients with chronic pancreatitis who underwent operation from November 2011 to October 2013 were prospectively included in the study. Intra-operatively pancreatic duct fluid was collected and sent for culture sensitivity in all patients. The bacteriology of the fluid was analyzed and was correlated with preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative parameters. A total of 26 patients were analyzed. Two patients underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP) preoperatively. Bacteria was present in pancreatic duct fluid in 11 (42%) patients. Both patients who underwent ERCP had positive cultures. Most common organism observed was Escherichia coli (6/11, 55%) followed by Klebsiella pneumonia (3/11, 27%). Five patients with positive culture developed wound infection. Bacteria isolated from the wound were similar to pancreatic fluid. Bacteria is commonly present in the pancreatic juice in patients with chronic pancreatitis and its presence may have an effect on the post-operative infections following operations. Based on the pancreatic fluid culture results appropriate antibiotic can be given to the patients who will develop septic complications following surgery. Role of bacteria in the pathogenesis of the chronic calcific pancreatitis needs to be investigated in future studies.

  9. Endoscopic pancreatic necrosectomy.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Evan L

    2011-07-01

    Traditionally, patients with symptomatic sterile pancreatic necrosis or infected necrosis have been managed by open surgical debridement and removal of necrotic tissue. Within the last decade, however, reports of endoscopic pancreatic necrosectomy, an alternative minimally invasive approach, have demonstrated high success rates and low mortality rates. This report describes the indications, technique, and study outcome data of the procedure. While our experience with this technique has recently increased, better selection criteria are needed to identify patients who are most suitable for endoscopic therapy.

  10. Management of pancreatic trauma.

    PubMed

    Girard, E; Abba, J; Arvieux, C; Trilling, B; Sage, P Y; Mougin, N; Perou, S; Lavagne, P; Létoublon, C

    2016-08-01

    Pancreatic trauma (PT) is associated with high morbidity and mortality; the therapeutic options remain debated. Retrospective study of PT treated in the University Hospital of Grenoble over a 22-year span. The decision for initial laparotomy depended on hemodynamic status as well as on associated lesions. Main pancreatic duct lesions were always searched for. PT lesions were graded according to the AAST classification. Of a total of 46 PT, 34 were grades II or I. Hemodynamic instability led to immediate laparotomy in 18 patients, for whom treatment was always drainage of the pancreatic bed; morbidity was 30%. Eight patients had grade III injuries, six of whom underwent immediate operation: three underwent splenopancreatectomy without any major complications while the other three who had simple drainage required re-operation for peritonitis, with one death related to pancreatic complications. Four patients had grades IV or V PT: two pancreatoduodenectomies were performed, with no major complication, while one patient underwent duodenal reconstruction with pancreatic drainage, complicated by pancreatic and duodenal fistula requiring a hospital stay of two months. The post-trauma course was complicated for all patients with main pancreatic duct involvement. Our outcomes were similar to those found in the literature. In patients with distal PT and main pancreatic duct involvement, simple drainage is associated with high morbidity and mortality. For proximal PT, the therapeutic options of drainage versus pancreatoduodenectomy must be weighed; pancreatoduodenectomy may be unavoidable when the duodenum is injured as well. Two-stage (resection first, reconstruction later) could be an effective alternative in the emergency setting when there are other associated traumatic lesions. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  11. The Impact of Risk Factors of Chronic Pancreatitis on Secretin Pancreatic Function Testing: Results of a 20-Year Study.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Darshan; Ketwaroo, Gyanprakash; Freedman, Steven D; Sheth, Sunil G

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of established risk factors on the outcome of secretin pancreatic function testing (sPFT) in patients undergoing work-up for suspected chronic pancreatitis. We completed a retrospective review of patients who underwent sPFT for suspected chronic pancreatitis over 20 years. We compared peak bicarbonate concentrations between groups and completed univariate and multivariate analyses to determine associations between risk factors and positive sPFT results (peak bicarbonate <80 mEq/L). Forty-three of 162 patients had positive sPFT results. There were significant differences in peak bicarbonate concentrations in patients with and without recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP) and with local complications from acute pancreatitis (AP) (P ≤ 0.05). The bicarbonate concentration in patients with and without other risk factors such as tobacco use, alcohol use, and family history of pancreatitis was not significantly different. Female sex, a history of AP, and a history of RAP were associated with positive sPFT results on univariate analysis (P ≤ 0.05). On multivariate analysis, sex and RAP remained significant. Our study demonstrates that female sex, history of AP and RAP, and AP with local complications are associated with positive sPFT results or lower peak bicarbonate concentration. However, other risk factors do not impact the results of sPFT.

  12. Hepatitis viruses causing pancreatitis and hepatitis: a case series and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Bhagat, Sandeep; Wadhawan, Manav; Sud, Randhir; Arora, Anil

    2008-05-01

    Association between acute pancreatitis and acute viral hepatitis (AVH) is more frequent than previously thought. Most cases are hepatitis A or B virus related. Only 6 cases of acute pancreatitis with acute hepatitis E virus (HEV)-related hepatitis has been reported so far. We analyzed the hospital records of 334 patients of acute pancreatitis admitted from December 2004 to March 2006. Seven patients had an associated AVH. Of these, 4 had HEV-related and 3 had hepatitis A virus-related AVH. All but one were young males who presented with abdominal pain during the second to third week of hepatitis illness. None had a history of biliary colic, alcoholism, abdominal trauma, or intake of drugs causing pancreatitis or a family history of pancreatitis. Mean bilirubin was 10.74 mg/dL; alanine aminotransferase levels, 482.85 IU/L; and serum amylase, 1263.57 IU/L. All patients had an imaging evidence of pancreatitis. Two patients with HEV-related disease had grades D to E pancreatitis. All were managed conservatively and recovered completely. Association between acute pancreatitis and nonfulminant viral hepatitis is now more frequently recognized. Seen more commonly in young males during the second and third week of hepatitis illness, HEV might be associated with severe pancreatitis.

  13. Biliopancreatic duct injection of ethanol as an experimental model of acute and chronic pancreatitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Unal, Ethem; Atalay, Suleyman; Tolan, Huseyin Kerem; Yuksekdag, Sema; Yucel, Metin; Acar, Aylin; Basak, Fatih; Gunes, Pembegul; Bas, Gurhan

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we described an easily reproducable experimental pancreatits model induced by biliopancreatic duct injection of ethyl alcohol. Seventy Wistar albino rats were divided equally into seven groups randomly: the control group (group 1), acute pancreatitis groups; induced by 20% ethanol (group 2), 48% ethanol (group 3), 80% ethanol (group 4), chronic pancreatitis groups; induced by 20% ethanol (group 5), 48% ethanol (group 6) and by 80% ethanol (group 7). Acute pancreatitis groups were sacrified on postoperative day 3, while the control group and chronic pancreatitis groups were killed on postoperative day 7. Histopathologic evaluation was done, and P < 0.05 was accepted as statistically significant. All rats in group 3 developed acute pancreatitis (100%). Inflammatory infiltration of neutrophils and mononuclear cells, interstitial edema, and focal necrotic areas were seen in the pancreatic tissues. Similarly, all rats in group 6 developed chronic pancreatitis (100%). Interstitial fibrosis, lymphotic infiltration, ductal dilatation, acinar cell atrophy, periductal hyperplasia were seen in the pancreatic tissues. Mortality was seen only in group 7. The biliopancreatic ductal injection of 48% ethanol induced acute and chronic pancreatitis has 100% success rate. PMID:25785001

  14. Prevalence of chronic pancreatitis: Results of a primary care physician-based population study.

    PubMed

    Capurso, Gabriele; Archibugi, Livia; Pasquali, Piera; Aceti, Alessandro; Balducci, Paolo; Bianchi, Patrizia; Buono, Francesco; Camerucci, Stefano; Cantarini, Rosanna; Centofanti, Sergio; Colantonio, Patrizia; Cremaschi, Riccarda; Crescenzi, Sergio; Di Mauro, Caterina; Di Renzi, Davide; Filabozzi, Andrea; Fiorillo, Alfonso; Giancaspro, Giuseppe; Giovannetti, Paola; Lanna, Giuseppe; Medori, Claudio; Merletti, Emilio; Nunnari, Enzo; Paris, Francesca; Pavone, Marco; Piacenti, Angela; Rossi, Almerindo; Scamuffa, Maria Cristina; Spinelli, Giovanni; Taborchi, Marco; Valente, Biagio; Villanova, Antonella; Chiriatti, Alberto; Delle Fave, Gianfranco

    2017-05-01

    Data on chronic pancreatitis prevalence are scanty and usually limited to hospital-based studies. Investigating chronic pancreatitis prevalence in primary care. Participating primary care physicians reported the prevalence of chronic pancreatitis among their registered patients, environmental factors and disease characteristics. The data were centrally reviewed and chronic pancreatitis cases defined according to M-ANNHEIM criteria for diagnosis and severity and TIGAR-O classification for etiology. Twenty-three primary care physicians participated in the study. According to their judgment, 51 of 36.401 patients had chronic pancreatitis. After reviewing each patient data, 11 turned out to have definite, 5 probable, 19 borderline and 16 uncertain disease. Prevalence was 30.2/100.000 for definite cases and 44.0/100.000 for definite plus probable cases. Of the 16 patients with definite/probable diagnosis, 8 were male, with mean age of 55.6 (±16.7). Four patients had alcoholic etiology, 5 post-acute/recurrent pancreatitis, 6 were deemed to be idiopathic. Four had pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, 10 were receiving pancreatic enzymes, and six had pain. Most patients had initial stage and non-severe disease. This is the first study investigating the prevalence of chronic pancreatitis in primary care. Results suggest that the prevalence in this context is higher than in hospital-based studies, with specific features, possibly representing an earlier disease stage. Copyright © 2016 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Secretion of pancreatic polypeptide in patients with pancreatic endocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Adrian, T E; Uttenthal, L O; Williams, S J; Bloom, S R

    1986-07-31

    Pancreatic polypeptide is often secreted by pancreatic endocrine tumors and is considered a marker for such tumors. To investigate the diagnostic value of this marker, we studied 323 patients with proved pancreatic endocrine tumors. We found plasma concentrations of pancreatic polypeptide to be elevated (more than 300 pmol per liter) in 144 patients (diagnostic sensitivity, 45 percent). However, plasma levels of pancreatic polypeptide can also be elevated in the absence of a pancreatic tumor. To ascertain whether the administration of atropine could distinguish between normal and tumor-associated polypeptide secretion, we studied 30 patients with pancreatic tumors and high plasma levels of pancreatic polypeptide, 18 patients without tumors who had elevated levels of pancreatic polypeptide, and eight normal controls. Polypeptide levels in the 18 patients without tumors were substantially lower than in the 30 patients with tumors. Atropine (1 mg intramuscularly) did not suppress polypeptide levels in patients with tumors, but did suppress plasma levels by more than 50 percent in all subjects without tumors. Thus, although its diagnostic sensitivity is low, pancreatic polypeptide appears to be a useful adjunctive marker of many pancreatic endocrine tumors, and the atropine suppression test can be used to distinguish normal from tumor-related secretion of the polypeptide. Identification of the type of pancreatic endocrine tumor still requires measurement of the hormone that is specific for the tumor.

  16. Potential New Pharmacological Agents Derived From Medicinal Plants for the Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Azimi, Haniye; Khakshur, Ali Asghar; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Rahimi, Roja

    2015-01-01

    In the present article, we reviewed plants and phytochemical compounds demonstrating beneficial effects in pancreatic cancer to find new sources of pharmaceutical agents. For this purpose, Scopus, PubMed, Web of Science, and Google scholar were searched for plants or herbal components with beneficial effects in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Data were collected up to January 2013. The search terms were "plant," "herb," "herbal therapy," or "phytotherapy" and "pancreatic cancer" or "pancreas." All of the human in vivo and in vitro studies were included. According to studies, among diverse plants and phytochemicals, 12 compounds including apigenin, genistein, quercetin, resveratrol, epigallocatechin gallate, benzyl isothiocyanate, sulforaphane, curcumin, thymoquinone, dihydroartemisinin, cucurbitacin B, and perillyl alcohol have beneficial action against pancreatic cancer cells through 4 or more mechanisms. Applying their plausible synergistic effects can be an imperative approach for finding new efficient pharmacological agents in the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  17. General Information about Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Pancreatic Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Pancreatic Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  18. Pancreatic trauma: A concise review

    PubMed Central

    Debi, Uma; Kaur, Ravinder; Prasad, Kaushal Kishor; Sinha, Saroj Kant; Sinha, Anindita; Singh, Kartar

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic injury to the pancreas is rare and difficult to diagnose. In contrast, traumatic injuries to the liver, spleen and kidney are common and are usually identified with ease by imaging modalities. Pancreatic injuries are usually subtle to identify by different diagnostic imaging modalities, and these injuries are often overlooked in cases with extensive multiorgan trauma. The most evident findings of pancreatic injury are post-traumatic pancreatitis with blood, edema, and soft tissue infiltration of the anterior pararenal space. The alterations of post-traumatic pancreatitis may not be visualized within several hours following trauma as they are time dependent. Delayed diagnoses of traumatic pancreatic injuries are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Imaging plays an important role in diagnosis of pancreatic injuries because early recognition of the disruption of the main pancreatic duct is important. We reviewed our experience with the use of various imaging modalities for diagnosis of blunt pancreatic trauma. PMID:24379625

  19. Candida in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Arunaloke; Rao, Pooja; Tarai, Bansidhar; Shivaprakash, Mandya Rudramurthy; Wig, Jaidev

    2007-01-01

    A Candida infection of the pancreas, which previously was considered extremely unusual, has been increasingly reported in recent years. The present study was conducted with the aim of performing a cohort analysis of our patients with acute pancreatitis to find out the incidence, sites, and species of Candida involvement; and to evaluate the risk factors, severity, and course of illness of such patients. A total of 335 patients with acute pancreatitis were investigated for a possible Candida infection of the pancreas from January 2000 to May 2003. The clinical records of all those patients who were positive for Candida spp. isolation from pancreatic tissue were analyzed. The clinical records of 32 more cases, randomly selected from the patients who were investigated for candidal pancreatitis but were negative for Candida spp., were also analyzed in order to compare their findings with those patients with a true Candida infection of the pancreas. A true or possible Candida infection was observed in 41 (12.2%) of those 335 patients and Candida tropicalis was the most common isolate (43.9%). Candida spp. were isolated from pancreatic necrotic tissue in 22 (6.6%) patients (true infection). A possible Candida infection (positive drain fluid effluents at least twice, without any Candida isolation from pre/per operative samples from pancreas) was seen in 19 (5.7%) patients. Candida was also isolated exclusively from the blood in another 19 patients with a clinical diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. A risk factor analysis showed that patients with severe injury to the pancreas, on prophylactic fluconazole, and after surgical intervention were significantly more prone to develop a Candida infection. Patients with a Candida superinfection also had a significantly increased hospital stay and higher mortality. This study thus emphasizes the important role of Candida infection in patients with acute pancreatitis and demonstrates the need for early attention.

  20. Molecular Targeted Intervention for Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Altaf; Janakiram, Naveena B.; Pant, Shubham; Rao, Chinthalapally V.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) remains one of the worst cancers, with almost uniform lethality. PC risk is associated with westernized diet, tobacco, alcohol, obesity, chronic pancreatitis, and family history of pancreatic cancer. New targeted agents and the use of various therapeutic combinations have yet to provide adequate treatments for patients with advanced cancer. To design better preventive and/or treatment strategies against PC, knowledge of PC pathogenesis at the molecular level is vital. With the advent of genetically modified animals, significant advances have been made in understanding the molecular biology and pathogenesis of PC. Currently, several clinical trials and preclinical evaluations are underway to investigate novel agents that target signaling defects in PC. An important consideration in evaluating novel drugs is determining whether an agent can reach the target in concentrations effective to treat the disease. Recently, we have reported evidence for chemoprevention of PC. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of current updates on molecularly targeted interventions, as well as dietary, phytochemical, immunoregulatory, and microenvironment-based approaches for the development of novel therapeutic and preventive regimens. Special attention is given to prevention and treatment in preclinical genetically engineered mouse studies and human clinical studies. PMID:26266422

  1. Endoscopic Therapies for Chronic Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Adler, Jeffrey M; Gardner, Timothy B

    2017-07-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a fibroinflammatory disease of the pancreas leading to varying degrees of endocrine and exocrine dysfunction. Treatment options are generally designed to control the pain of chronic pancreatitis, and endoscopic therapy is one of the main treatment modalities. Herein, we describe the endoscopic management of pancreatic duct calculi and strictures, entrapment of the intrapancreatic bile duct, celiac plexus interventions, and drainage of pancreatic pseudocysts.

  2. Early diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis: understanding the factors associated with the development of chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yamabe, Akane; Irisawa, Atsushi; Shibukawa, Goro; Sato, Ai; Fujisawa, Mariko; Arakawa, Noriyuki; Yoshida, Yoshitsugu; Abe, Yoko; Igarashi, Ryo; Maki, Takumi; Yamamoto, Shogo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The prognosis of advanced chronic pancreatitis (CP) is poor with the mortality rate approximately two-fold higher than the general population according to a survey of the prognosis of CP. From this standpoint, the concept of early CP was propagated in Japan in 2009 to encourage the medical treatment for the earlier stages of CP. That is, picking up the patients suspicious for early CP and then providing medical treatment for them are very important not only for patients, but also for health care economics. In this review, we described some potential factors associated with the development of CP (alcohol, smoking, past history of acute pancreatitis, aging, gallstone, and gender) that are extremely important to discover patients with early-stage CP. PMID:28450665

  3. Early diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis: understanding the factors associated with the development of chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Yamabe, Akane; Irisawa, Atsushi; Shibukawa, Goro; Sato, Ai; Fujisawa, Mariko; Arakawa, Noriyuki; Yoshida, Yoshitsugu; Abe, Yoko; Igarashi, Ryo; Maki, Takumi; Yamamoto, Shogo

    2017-04-28

    The prognosis of advanced chronic pancreatitis (CP) is poor with the mortality rate approximately two-fold higher than the general population according to a survey of the prognosis of CP. From this standpoint, the concept of early CP was propagated in Japan in 2009 to encourage the medical treatment for the earlier stages of CP. That is, picking up the patients suspicious for early CP and then providing medical treatment for them are very important not only for patients, but also for health care economics. In this review, we described some potential factors associated with the development of CP (alcohol, smoking, past history of acute pancreatitis, aging, gallstone, and gender) that are extremely important to discover patients with early-stage CP.

  4. Demographic and clinicopathological profile of patients with chronic pancreatitis in a tertiary referral teaching hospital of West Bengal: Personal experience.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Prosanta Kumar; Mukerjee, Aishik; Adhikary, Chandranath

    2015-09-01

    There is a paucity of data on the demographic and clinicopathological profiles of patients with chronic pancreatitis from the eastern part of India. This study documents the demographic and clinicopathological profiles of patients with chronic pancreatitis presenting to a general surgery unit of a tertiary referral hospital of Kolkata. The records of 145 patients presenting with chronic pancreatitis over a 5-year period were scrutinized and their demographics, clinical profile, and complications and morphological changes of the pancreas are described. Of the 145 patients, more than 50% were under the age of 30 years. Males were affected more frequently than females (M/F = 3.8:1). While idiopathic pancreatitis was the most common form of chronic pancreatitis (41.4%), alcohol was found to be the most common etiology (37.9%). Pain was the most common presenting symptom (n = 143; 98.6%). Sixty-five subjects (45%) had diabetes of which 32 subjects were insulin-dependent. On contrast-enhanced computed tomography, ductal dilatation was seen in 80 (55.17%) subjects, while ductal calculi and ductal dilatation in 54 cases (37.2%). Parenchymal calcification was seen in 45 patients of whom 40 patients (89%) were under the age of 30 years. Pseudocyst was the most common complication (n = 16) followed by biliary obstruction (n = 8) and portal hypertension (n = 4). Patients with alcoholic pancreatitis had significantly higher frequency of severe abdominal pain, diabetes, and local complications as compared to the other forms of pancreatitis in our study. Idiopathic pancreatitis was the most common form of chronic pancreatitis in this study, followed by alcoholic pancreatitis and then tropical pancreatitis.

  5. Hypocalcemia in acute pancreatitis revisited

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Armin; Azim, Afzal; Gurjar, Mohan; Baronia, Arvind Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Hypocalcemia is a frequent finding in acute pancreatitis. Severe hypocalcemia can present with neurological as well as cardiovascular manifestations. Correction of hypocalcemia by parenteral calcium infusion remains a controversial topic as intracellular calcium overload is the central mechanism of acinar cell injury in pancreatitis. The current article deals with the art and science of calcium correction in pancreatitis patients. PMID:27076730

  6. Pancreatic Cancer—Patient Version

    Cancer.gov

    Pancreatic cancer can form in exocrine cells and neuroendocrine cells. The exocrine type is more common and is usually found at an advanced stage. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors are less common but have a better prognosis. Start here to find information on pancreatic cancer treatment, research, and statistics.

  7. The management of pancreatic trauma.

    PubMed

    Khan, M A; Cameron, I

    2010-12-01

    Pancreatic trauma is an uncommon occurrence and so a consensus about optimal management is not readily available. Isolated pancreatic injury occurs only occasionally, as in the majority of cases there is concurrent visceral or vascular injury. Morbidity and mortality are related to delay in diagnosis, concurrent organ injury or the presence and extent of pancreatic duct injury.

  8. Investigating the Association Between Periodontal Disease and Risk of Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jeffrey S; Tsai, Chia-Rung; Chen, Li-Tzong; Shan, Yan-Shen

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) is increasingly recognized as an emerging risk factor for various systemic diseases, including diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer. The current study examined the association between PD (periodontitis, gingivitis, and others) and pancreatic cancer. A total of 139,805 subjects with PD and 75,085 subjects without PD were identified from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan. Cox proportional hazards regression was performed to compare the incidence of pancreatic cancer between the 2 groups. Periodontal disease was positively associated with pancreatic cancer risk (hazard ratio [HR], 1.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02-2.33). This positive association occurred predominantly among those aged 65 years or older (HR, 2.17; 95% CI, 1.03-4.57) and was not observed among those aged younger than 65 years (HR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.52-1.34). Further analysis showed that PD is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer independent of diabetes, hyperlipidemia, allergies, viral hepatitis, peptic ulcer, pancreatitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (as a proxy for cigarette smoking), and alcoholic-related conditions (as a proxy for alcohol drinking). Our results indicated a significantly positive association between PD and risk of pancreatic cancer. The underlying biological mechanisms for the positive association between PD and pancreatic cancer require further investigation.

  9. Protective effect of Tribulus terrestris fruit extract on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Borran, Mina; Minaiyan, Mohsen; Zolfaghari, Behzad; Mahzouni, Parvin

    2017-01-01

    Antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antimicrobial activities of Tribulus terrestris ( T. terrestris ) could be helpful in the treatment of acute pancreatitis; thus, this study was designed to investigate the effects of T. terrestris on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice. Three doses (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) of T. terrestris hydro-alcoholic extract were administered both orally (60 minutes before pancreatitis induction, p.o.) and intra-peritoneally (30 minutes before pancreatitis induction, i.p.) to different groups of mice (n=6). Pancreatitis was induced by five injections (i.p.) of cerulein 50μg/kg body weight with 1 hr intervals. Animals were euthanized 5 hr after the last injection of cerulein and tissue injures were assessed biochemically and pathologically. T. terrestris extract 200 and 400mg/kg (p.o.) and T. terrestris extract 400 mg/kg (i.p.) reduced pancreatic tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and serum amylase and lipase levels and alleviated histological parameters. These data suggest that T. terrestris hydro-alcoholic extract was effective in protecting against experimental acute pancreatitis and possibly the efficacy depends on dose and route of administration.

  10. Protective effect of Tribulus terrestris fruit extract on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Borran, Mina; Minaiyan, Mohsen; Zolfaghari, Behzad; Mahzouni, Parvin

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antimicrobial activities of Tribulus terrestris (T. terrestris) could be helpful in the treatment of acute pancreatitis; thus, this study was designed to investigate the effects of T. terrestris on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice. Materials and Methods: Three doses (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) of T. terrestris hydro-alcoholic extract were administered both orally (60 minutes before pancreatitis induction, p.o.) and intra-peritoneally (30 minutes before pancreatitis induction, i.p.) to different groups of mice (n=6). Pancreatitis was induced by five injections (i.p.) of cerulein 50μg/kg body weight with 1 hr intervals. Animals were euthanized 5 hr after the last injection of cerulein and tissue injures were assessed biochemically and pathologically. Results: T. terrestris extract 200 and 400mg/kg (p.o.) and T. terrestris extract 400 mg/kg (i.p.) reduced pancreatic tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and serum amylase and lipase levels and alleviated histological parameters. Conclusion: These data suggest that T. terrestris hydro-alcoholic extract was effective in protecting against experimental acute pancreatitis and possibly the efficacy depends on dose and route of administration. PMID:28748172

  11. Association between Smoking and the Progression of Computed Tomography Findings in Chronic Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Woo; Kim, Ho Gak; Lee, Dong Wook; Han, Jimin; Kwon, Hyuk Yong; Seo, Chang Jin; Oh, Ji Hye; Lee, Joo Hyoung; Jung, Jin Tae; Kwon, Joong Goo; Kim, Eun Young

    2016-05-23

    Smoking and alcohol intake are two wellknown risk factors for chronic pancreatitis. However, there are few studies examining the association between smoking and changes in computed tomography (CT) findings in chronic pancreatitis. The authors evaluated associations between smoking, drinking and the progression of calcification on CT in chronic pancreatitis. In this retrospective study, 59 patients with chronic pancreatitis who had undergone initial and follow-up CT between January 2002 and September 2010 were included. Progression of calcification among CT findings was compared according to the amount of alcohol intake and smoking. The median duration of followup was 51.6 months (range, 17.1 to 112.7 months). At initial CT findings, there was pancreatic calcification in 35 patients (59.3%). In the follow-up CT, progression of calcification was observed in 37 patients (62.7%). Progression of calcification was more common in smokers according to the multivariate analysis (odds ratio [OR], 9.987; p=0.006). The amount of smoking was a significant predictor for progression of calcification in the multivariate analysis (OR, 6.051 in less than 1 pack per day smokers; OR, 36.562 in more than 1 pack per day smokers; p=0.008). Continued smoking accelerates pancreatic calcification, and the amount of smoking is associated with the progression of calcification in chronic pancreatitis.

  12. Diagnosis of Chronic Pancreatitis Incorporating Endosonographic Features, Demographics, and Behavioral Risk.

    PubMed

    Lee, Linda S; Tabak, Ying P; Kadiyala, Vivek; Sun, Xiaowu; Suleiman, Shadeah; Johannes, Richard S; Banks, Peter A; Conwell, Darwin L

    2017-03-01

    Diagnosing chronic pancreatitis remains challenging. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is utilized to evaluate pancreatic disease. Abnormal pancreas function test is considered the "nonhistologic" criterion standard for chronic pancreatitis. We derived a prediction model for abnormal endoscopic pancreatic function test (ePFT) by enriching EUS findings with patient demographic and pancreatitis behavioral risk characteristics. Demographics, behavioral risk characteristics, EUS findings, and peak bicarbonate results were collected from patients evaluated for pancreatic disease. Abnormal ePFT was defined as peak bicarbonate of less than 75 mEq/L. We fit a logistic regression model and converted it to a risk score system. The risk score was validated using 1000 bootstrap simulations. A total of 176 patients were included; 61% were female with median age of 48 years (interquartile range, 38-57 years). Abnormal ePFT rate was 39.2% (69/176). Four variables formulated the risk score: alcohol or smoking status, number of parenchymal abnormalities, number of ductal abnormalities, and calcifications. Abnormal ePFT occurred in 10.7% with scores 4 or less versus 92.0% scoring 20 or greater. The model C-statistic was 0.78 (95% confidence interval, 0.71-0.85). Number of EUS pancreatic duct and parenchymal abnormalities, presence of calcification, and smoking/alcohol status were predictive of abnormal ePFT. This simple model has good discrimination for ePFT results.

  13. Association between Smoking and the Progression of Computed Tomography Findings in Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Woo; Kim, Ho Gak; Lee, Dong Wook; Han, Jimin; Kwon, Hyuk Yong; Seo, Chang Jin; Oh, Ji Hye; Lee, Joo Hyoung; Jung, Jin Tae; Kwon, Joong Goo; Kim, Eun Young

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Smoking and alcohol intake are two well-known risk factors for chronic pancreatitis. However, there are few studies examining the association between smoking and changes in computed tomography (CT) findings in chronic pancreatitis. The authors evaluated associations between smoking, drinking and the progression of calcification on CT in chronic pancreatitis. Methods In this retrospective study, 59 patients with chronic pancreatitis who had undergone initial and follow-up CT between January 2002 and September 2010 were included. Progression of calcification among CT findings was compared according to the amount of alcohol intake and smoking. Results The median duration of follow-up was 51.6 months (range, 17.1 to 112.7 months). At initial CT findings, there was pancreatic calcification in 35 patients (59.3%). In the follow-up CT, progression of calcification was observed in 37 patients (62.7%). Progression of calcification was more common in smokers according to the multivariate analysis (odds ratio [OR], 9.987; p=0.006). The amount of smoking was a significant predictor for progression of calcification in the multivariate analysis (OR, 6.051 in less than 1 pack per day smokers; OR, 36.562 in more than 1 pack per day smokers; p=0.008). Conclusions Continued smoking accelerates pancreatic calcification, and the amount of smoking is associated with the progression of calcification in chronic pancreatitis. PMID:26601825

  14. Robotic transgastric cystgastrostomy and pancreatic debridement in the management of pancreatic fluid collections following acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kirks, Russell C; Sola, Richard; Iannitti, David A; Martinie, John B; Vrochides, Dionisios

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic and peripancreatic fluid collections may develop after severe acute pancreatitis. Organized fluid collections such as pancreatic pseudocyst and walled-off pancreatic necrosis (WOPN) that mature over time may require intervention to treat obstructive or constitutional symptoms related to the size and location of the collection as well as possible infection. Endoscopic, open surgical and minimally invasive techniques are described to treat post-inflammatory pancreatic fluid collections. Surgical intervention may be required to treat collections containing necrotic pancreatic parenchyma or in locations not immediately apposed to the stomach or duodenum. Comprising a blend of the surgical approach and the clinical benefits of minimally invasive surgery, the robot-assisted technique of pancreatic cystgastrostomy with pancreatic debridement is described.

  15. Primary Pancreatic Head Tuberculosis: Great Masquerader of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Dhaval; Patel, Jatin; Rathi, Chetan; Ingle, Meghraj; Sawant, Prabha

    2015-01-01

    Isolated pancreatic tuberculosis (TB) is considered an extremely rare condition, even in the developing countries. Most reported cases of pancreatic TB are diagnosed after exploratory laparotomy or autopsy. Pancreatic TB is a potential mimic of invasive pancreatic malignancy and the presence of vascular invasion does not distinguish one condition from the other. Every effort should be made for the earliest diagnosis of this condition as TB is a treatable condition and it avoids unnecessary management of pancreatic carcinoma. Here we report a rare case of primary pancreatic head TB in a 58-year-old male who presented with hypodense lesion in head of pancreas with double duct sign and portal vein invasion mimicking non-resectable pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:27785295

  16. [Duodenal and pancreatic injuries].

    PubMed

    De Angelis, P; Bergaminelli, C; Pastore, S; Giardiello, C; Salzano, A; Vecchio, G

    2000-04-01

    Pancreatic and duodenal injuries occur rather infrequently and the incidence ranges between 1% and 12% of all abdominal injuries. The high rate of mortality and morbidity (10-40%) depends on associated complication rate of all intra-abdominal organs (90%). Twenty-five cases of pancreatic and duodenal injuries observed between 1987 and 1997, with an incidence of 0.7% of all abdominal injuries, are reported. In 16 cases the cause was penetrating injury (gunshot) and in 9 cases it was blunt abdominal trauma. Only two patients presented an isolated pancreatic lesion, all the others had at least an associated lesion. In all the cases the patients were male and they were submitted to emergency laparotomy. The mortality rate was 20%, the morbidity was 24%. The relatively low incidence of these injuries and the high rate of associated lesions cause a difficult diagnostic and therapeutic approach, the absence of a unified method to follow and the unsatisfactory results observed.

  17. [Severe hypertriglyceridemia--an important cause of pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Graesdal, Asgeir

    2008-05-01

    Moderate hypertriglyceridaemia is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and serious hypertriglyceridaemia, with triglyceride values above 10 mmol/L, increases the risk of pancreatitis. Gallstones and alcohol abuse are regarded as the two most important causes of acute pancreatitis, but the considerable risk posed by hypertriglyceridaemia has probably been underrated. It is therefore crucial to acquire updated knowledge and awareness of the fact that high levels of triglycerides can cause pancreatitis. This article is based on current literature retrieved though a search on the topic and clinical experience. Serious hypertriglyceridaemia is a relatively rare condition and its usual cause is genetic predisposition combined with obesity, diabetes or alcohol abuse. Certain types of medication, as well as pregnancy, are also well known causes. Current literature suggests that hypertriglyceridaemia is the cause of pancreatitis in 1-38% of the cases--a substantial variation. The condition is often accompanied by low amylase values and may therefore be underrated as a cause. Our case reports illustrate that the etiology is complex. Plasmapheresis or LDL-apheresis may be indicated when conservative treatment proves insufficient.

  18. Chronic pancreatitis associated with the p.G208A variant of PRSS1 gene in a European patient.

    PubMed

    Hegyi, Eszter; Cierna, Iveta; Vavrova, Ludmila; Ilencikova, Denisa; Konecny, Michal; Kovacs, Laszlo

    2014-01-10

    The major etiologic factor of chronic pancreatitis in adults is excessive alcohol consumption, whereas among children structural anomalies, systemic and metabolic disorders, and genetic factors are prevalent. Mutations in the cationic trypsinogen gene (PRSS1) cause hereditary pancreatitis, while mutations in serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK1), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and chymotrypsin C (CTRC) genes have been shown to associate with chronic pancreatitis as independent risk factors. We present a case of 13-year-old boy with idiopathic chronic pancreatitis. Given the unexplained attacks of pancreatitis since early childhood and despite the negative family history, molecular-genetic analysis of four pancreatitis susceptibility genes (PRSS1, SPINK1, CTRC and CFTR) was performed. The boy was found to carry the c.623G>C (p.G208A) mutation of the PRSS1 gene and the c.180C>T (p.G60G) mutation of the CTRC gene, both in heterozygous state. These mutations are considered as contributing risk factors for chronic pancreatitis. In children with idiopathic chronic pancreatitis genetic causes should be considered, even in absence of positive family history. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of a European patient with chronic pancreatitis associated with the p.G208A mutation of PRSS1 gene. This mutation was previously reported only in Asian subjects and is thought to be a unique genetic cause of pancreatitis in Asia.

  19. Rate of recurrence in Indian patients presenting with acute pancreatitis and identification of chronicity on follow up: Possible risk factors for progression.

    PubMed

    Kalaria, Rishikesh; Abraham, Philip; Desai, Devendra C; Joshi, Anand; Gupta, Tarun

    2018-03-01

    To study the profile and long-term outcome of Indian patients presenting with acute pancreatitis and the possible risk factors for progression. Consecutive patients with acute or recurrent acute pancreatitis seen in our department during July 2013 to December 2014 were included. Details of past episodes were collected and patients were followed up till March 2015. In the 97 patients included (mean age 47.2 [SD 16.9] years; 74 men), gallstones (37 [38.1%]) and alcohol (19 [19.6%]) were the major identified etiologies; the idiopathic (31 [32%]) group constituted a third of patients. Recurrences were more common with idiopathic etiology (14 patients out of 30 had recurrences [46.7%]) as compared to alcoholic (5 out of 19 [26.3%]) and biliary (4 out of 37 [10.8%]) pancreatitis and with mild index episode. Following the episode of acute pancreatitis, identification of chronic pancreatitis was more common with alcoholic (6 out of 18 [33%]) and idiopathic (9 out of 30 [30%]) etiology as compared to other etiologies. Longer duration of follow up, but not number of recurrent episodes, was associated with identification of chronicity in patients presenting as acute pancreatitis. Out of 97 patients with acute pancreatitis, 27 (27.8%) developed recurrences with risk factors being idiopathic etiology and mild index episode. Eighteen of 97 (18.6%) patients had evidence of chronic pancreatitis on follow up, risk factors being the alcoholic and idiopathic varieties, and longer duration of follow up.

  20. Factors that affect risk for pancreatic disease in the general population: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Alsamarrai, Ammar; Das, Stephanie L M; Windsor, John A; Petrov, Maxim S

    2014-10-01

    Pancreatic diseases place significant burdens on health care systems worldwide. However, there is lack of agreement about which factors increase or reduce risk for pancreatic disease. We reviewed high-quality studies of factors that affect risk for pancreatic diseases in the general population. We searched 3 databases (Medline, Embase, and Scopus) for prospective cohort studies of modifiable risk and/or protective factors for acute pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis, and pancreatic cancer in adult populations. Factors that were investigated in 2 or more studies were assessed by meta-analysis if the required data were available. Subgroup analyses were performed when appropriate. Outcome measures were relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). Our analysis included 51 population-based studies with more than 3 million individuals and nearly 11,000 patients with pancreatic diseases. A total of 31 different factors were investigated. Current tobacco use was the single most important risk factor for pancreatic diseases (RR, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.54-2.27), followed by obesity (RR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.15-1.92) and heavy use of alcohol (RR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.19-1.58). Tobacco and heavy use of alcohol had bigger effects on risk of acute pancreatitis and chronic pancreatitis than pancreatic cancer. Vegetable consumption (RR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.57-0.88) and fruit consumption (RR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.60-0.90) provided the greatest degree of protection against pancreatic diseases on the basis of meta-analyses. Vegetable consumption had stronger association with protection against acute pancreatitis and fruit consumption with protection against pancreatic cancer. On the basis of systematic review and meta-analysis, current tobacco use, obesity, and heavy use of alcohol are associated with significant increases in risk for pancreatic diseases. Vegetables and fruit consumption are associated with reduced risk for pancreatic diseases. Prevention strategies for acute pancreatitis, chronic

  1. Hypertriglyceridaemia-induced pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Weston, Natasha; Fernando, Upul; Baskar, Varadarajan

    2013-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridaemia is the third most common cause of acute pancreatitis but is relatively rare and therefore requires a high level of clinical suspicion to be diagnosed. We discuss the case of a 46-year-old man who initially presented to the accident and emergency department with suspected first presentation of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and a normal amylase but who did not respond to DKA treatment. Further history revealed significant cardiovascular risk factors, examination showed an evidence of hyperlipidaemia and investigations revealed acute pancreatitis secondary to hypertriglyceridaemia. We discuss the causes of hypertriglyceridaemia, the difficulty in differentiating primary versus secondary hypertriglyceridaemia, possible pathogenesis and current evidence-based treatments. PMID:23446049

  2. Pathophysiology of chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Behrman, Stephen W; Fowler, Eric S

    2007-12-01

    Although the most common causes of chronic pancreatitis have not changed, it has become clear that a host of modifying biochemical, inflammatory, neural, and genetic deviations allows the disease to progress. Alterations in biochemical composition allow calcific stone formation, whereas various toxins, cytokines, and neuropeptides contribute to the progression of fibrosis and pain production. The basic cellular structure contributing to fibrosis of the pancreas has been elucidated and factors responsible for its activation delineated. Of most importance is the recent recognition of a set of genetic mutations that results in several aberrations of normal pancreatic physiology, which, in conjunction with other inciting insults or by themselves, allow the disease to begin and progress.

  3. Selected medical conditions and risk of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Olson, Sara H

    2012-01-01

    We review the current evidence for associations of several medical conditions with risk of pancreatic cancer, including allergies, pancreatitis, gall bladder disease, cholecystectomy, ulcers, gastrectomy, appendectomy, and tonsillectomy. There are consistent findings of reduced risk associated with presence of self-reported allergies, particularly hay fever but not asthma; data on other allergies are limited and inconclusive. Several studies provide evidence that patients with pancreatic cancer are more likely than comparison groups to report pancreatitis. Those studies that investigated the time between onset of pancreatitis and diagnosis of pancreatic cancer found that risk estimates declined with longer periods of time; however, increased risks were noted for long-term pancreatitis, indicating that this condition is both a risk factor and a sign of early disease. Increased risk was reported in association with cholelithiasis, but the few studies that considered time before diagnosis of cancer did not find increased risk for cholelithiasis diagnosed in the more distant past. There is weak evidence that cholecystectomy 2 or more years before cancer diagnosis is related to risk, but this is based on only a few studies. There is no consistent association between ulcers and risk, while gastrectomy may increase risk. Overall, study of these conditions, particularly those that are rare, presents methodologic challenges. Time between diagnoses is likely to be important but is not considered in most studies. Lack of adequate control in several studies for risk factors such as smoking and heavy alcohol use also makes it difficult to draw firm conclusions about these results. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Acute pancreatitis with saw palmetto use: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bruminhent, Jackrapong; Carrera, Perliveh; Li, Zhongzhen; Amankona, Raymond; Roberts, Ingram M

    2011-08-25

    Saw palmetto is a phytotherapeutic agent commercially marketed for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Evidence suggests that saw palmetto is a safe product, and mild gastrointestinal adverse effects have been reported with its use. We report a case of acute pancreatitis, possibly secondary to the use of saw palmetto. A 61-year-old Caucasian man with a history of benign prostatic hyperplasia and gastroesophageal reflux disease developed epigastric pain associated with nausea 36 hours prior to presentation. He denied drinking alcohol prior to the development of his symptoms. His home medications included saw palmetto, lansoprazole and multivitamins. Laboratory results revealed elevated lipase and amylase levels. An abdominal ultrasound demonstrated a nondilated common bile duct, without choledocholithiasis. Computed tomography of his abdomen showed the pancreatic tail with peripancreatic inflammatory changes, consistent with acute pancreatitis. Our patient's condition improved with intravenous fluids and pain management. On the fourth day of hospitalization his pancreatic enzymes were within normal limits: he was discharged home and advised to avoid taking saw palmetto. It is our opinion that a relationship between saw palmetto and the onset of acute pancreatitis is plausible, and prescribers and users of saw palmetto should be alert to the possibility of such adverse reactions.

  5. Acute pancreatitis with saw palmetto use: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Saw palmetto is a phytotherapeutic agent commercially marketed for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Evidence suggests that saw palmetto is a safe product, and mild gastrointestinal adverse effects have been reported with its use. We report a case of acute pancreatitis, possibly secondary to the use of saw palmetto. Case presentation A 61-year-old Caucasian man with a history of benign prostatic hyperplasia and gastroesophageal reflux disease developed epigastric pain associated with nausea 36 hours prior to presentation. He denied drinking alcohol prior to the development of his symptoms. His home medications included saw palmetto, lansoprazole and multivitamins. Laboratory results revealed elevated lipase and amylase levels. An abdominal ultrasound demonstrated a nondilated common bile duct, without choledocholithiasis. Computed tomography of his abdomen showed the pancreatic tail with peripancreatic inflammatory changes, consistent with acute pancreatitis. Our patient's condition improved with intravenous fluids and pain management. On the fourth day of hospitalization his pancreatic enzymes were within normal limits: he was discharged home and advised to avoid taking saw palmetto. Conclusion It is our opinion that a relationship between saw palmetto and the onset of acute pancreatitis is plausible, and prescribers and users of saw palmetto should be alert to the possibility of such adverse reactions. PMID:21867545

  6. Relationship between Plasma Triglyceride Level and Severity of Hypertriglyceridemic Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng-Huei; Chou, Yu-Ching; Shangkuan, Wei-Chuan; Wei, Kuang-Yu; Pan, Yu-Han; Lin, Hung-Che

    2016-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia is the third most common cause of acute pancreatitis, but whether the level of triglyceride (TG) is related to severity of pancreatitis is unclear. To evaluate the effect of TG level on the severity of hypertriglyceridemic pancreatitis (HTGP). Retrospective cohort study. We reviewed the records of 144 patients with HTGP from 1999 to 2013 at Tri-Service General Hospital. Patients with possible etiology of pancreatitis, such as gallstones, those consuming alcohol or drugs, or those with infections were excluded. The classification of severity of pancreatitis was based on the revised Atlanta classification. We allocated the patients into high-TG and low-TG groups based on the optimal cut-off value (2648 mg/dL), which was derived from the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve between TG level and severity of HTGP. We then compared the clinical characteristics, pancreatitis severity, and mortality rates of the groups. There were 66 patients in the low-TG group and 78 patients in the high-TG group. There was no significant difference in the age, sex ratio, body mass index, and comorbidity between the 2 groups. The high-TG group had significantly higher levels of glucose (P = 0.022), total cholesterol (P = 0.002), and blood urea nitrogen (P = 0.037), and lower levels of sodium (P = 0.003) and bicarbonate (P = 0.002) than the low-TG group. The incidences of local complication (P = 0.002) and severe and moderate form of pancreatitis (P = 0.004) were significantly higher in the high-TG group than in the low-TG group. The mortality rate was higher in the high-TG group than in the low-TG group (P = 0.07). Higher TG level in patients with HTGP may be associated with adverse prognosis, but randomized and prospective studies are needed in the future verify this relationship.

  7. [Pancreatic serous cystadenoma associated with pancreatic heterotopia].

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Hedfi; Dorra, Belghachem; Hela, Bouhafa; Cherif, Abdelhedi; Azza, Sridi; Karim, Sassi; Khadija, Bellil; Adnen, Chouchene

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic heterotopias (HP) are rare. They can occur at any age with a slight male predominance. These lesions are usually asymptomatic and they are often found incidentally during upper or lower GI endoscopy or during the anatomo-pathological examination of an organ which was resected for other reasons; they can be isolated or associated with a digestive pathology. We report, through observation, the association of HP with serous cystadenoma of the pancreas discovered during examinations to identify the etiology of isolated abdominal pain. The aim of this study is to analyse clinical and histological features of this rare pathology.

  8. CIP2A down regulation enhances the sensitivity of pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peng; Yao, Jie; He, Jin; Zhao, Long; Wang, Xiaodong; Li, Zhennan; Qian, Jianjun

    2016-03-22

    Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) is an oncoprotein which participates in inhibiting tumor apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells. Using immunohistochemical staining, we investigated the expression of CIP2A protein in 72 cases of human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) tissue and 27 cases of adjacent normal pancreatic tissue. The positive rate of CIP2A protein expression in pancreatic cancer tissue was70.83 %, which was significantly higher than that in adjacent non- cancerous pancreatic tissue (11.11%). The expression of CIP2A was found to be correlated with TNM stage, but not correlated with age, gender, tumor location, smoking status, alcohol consumption, diabetes, high blood pressure, BMI, tumor size, lymph node metastasis or distant metastases. Kaplan- Meier survival analysis showed that patients with positive CIP2A protein expression had a lower overall survival rate than patients without CIP2A expression. COX regression analysis indicated that expression of CIP2A was an independent prognostic factor for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. In addition, down-regulation of CIP2A inhibited cell proliferation and increased sensitivity to gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer cells by decreasing AKT signaling pathway. Our results indicated that down-regulation of CIP2A could be a novel therapeutic strategy for pancreatic cancer.

  9. Morphological and functional alterations of small intestine in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Gubergrits, Natalya B; Linevskiy, Yuri V; Lukashevich, Galina M; Fomenko, Pavel G; Moroz, Tatyana V; Mishra, Tapan

    2012-09-10

    The small intestine in chronic pancreatitis has not been investigated yet thoroughly. It would be important to understand fat metabolism in the course of this disease and could be explained if the small intestine has some pathological conditions and, due to this reason, pancreatic enzyme substitution does not work in all patients. To investigate the pathophysiology of small intestine in chronic pancreatitis and to show the reason why in some cases pancreatic enzyme substitution does not work properly. In the process of the study 33 chronic pancreatitis patients have been examined. The control group includes 30 subjects without chronic pancreatitis similar for age, sex and alcohol consumption to the patients with chronic pancreatitis patients. Aspiration biopsy of jejunum mucosa followed by histological examination and investigation of intestinal enzymes by aspiration has been performed. Metabolism at membranic level has been studied by enzymatic activity of amylase and lipase in the small intestine. Production of enzymes (monoglyceride lipase, lactase, saccharase, maltase, glycyl-l-leucine dipeptidase) promoting metabolism in enterocytes has been estimated as to their activity in homogenates of jejunum mucosa samples. Participation of mucosa in intestinal digestion has been assessed by alkaline phosphatase activity in a secretory chyme from proximal portion of jejunum. Absorptive capacity of jejunum was evaluated by D-xylose test results. DNA, lysozyme, immunoglobulin contents of chyme have also been calculated and bacteriological study of chyme has been also performed. Secondary enteritis, accompanied by moderate dystrophic changes of mucous membrane, thinning of limbus, and decrease of Paneth cell mitotic index, was found to occur in chronic pancreatitis patients. Enteritis is followed by changes in enzymatic processes in the sphere of membrane and intestinal digestion, decrease of absorption, accelerated desquamation of epithelium, fall in local immunity and

  10. The prevalence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in non-surgical patients with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI).

    PubMed

    Ní Chonchubhair, Hazel M; Bashir, Yasir; Dobson, Mark; Ryan, Barbara M; Duggan, Sinead N; Conlon, Kevin C

    2018-02-24

    Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is a condition characterised by symptoms similar to pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) in chronic pancreatitis patients. SIBO is thought to complicate chronic pancreatitis in up to 92% of cases; however, studies are heterogeneous and protocols non-standardised. SIBO may be determined by measuring lung air-expiration of either hydrogen or methane which are by-products of small bowel bacterial fermentation of intraluminal substrates such as carbohydrates. We evaluated the prevalence of SIBO among a defined cohort of non-surgical chronic pancreatitics with mild to severe PEI compared with matched healthy controls. Thirty-five patients and 31 age-, gender- and smoking status-matched healthy controls were evaluated for SIBO by means of a fasting glucose hydrogen breath test (GHBT). The relationship between SIBO and clinical symptoms in chronic pancreatitis was evaluated. SIBO was present in 15% of chronic pancreatitis patients, while no healthy controls tested positive (P = 0.029). SIBO was more prevalent in those taking pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT) (P = 0.016), with proton pump inhibitor use (PPI) (P = 0.022) and in those with alcohol aetiology (P = 0.023). Patients with concurrent diabetes were more often SIBO-positive and this was statistically significant (P = 0.009). There were no statistically significant differences in reported symptoms between patients with and without SIBO, with the exception of 'weight loss', with patients reporting weight loss more likely to have SIBO (P = 0.047). The prevalence of SIBO in this study was almost 15% and consistent with other studies of SIBO in non-surgical chronic pancreatitis patients. These data support the testing of patients with clinically-relevant PEI unresolved by adequate doses of PERT, particularly in those patients with concurrent diabetes. SIBO can be easily diagnosed therefore allowing more specific and more targeted symptom

  11. A prospective study of the Bedside Index for Severity in Acute Pancreatitis (BISAP) score in acute pancreatitis: an Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Senapati, Debadutta; Debata, Prasanna Kumar; Jenasamant, Saumya Sekhar; Nayak, Anil Kumar; Gowda S, Manoj; Swain, Narendra Nath

    2014-01-01

    A simple and easily applicable system for stratifying patients with acute pancreatitis is lacking. The aim of our study was to evaluate the ability of BISAP score to predict mortality in acute pancreatitis patients from our institution and to predict which patients are at risk for development of organ failure, persistent organ failure and pancreatic necrosis. All patients with acute pancreatitis were included in the study. BISAP score was calculated within 24 h of admission. A Contrast CT was used to differentiate interstitial from necrotizing pancreatitis within seven days of hospitalization whereas Marshall Scoring System was used to characterize organ failure. Among 246 patients M:F = 153:93, most common aetiology among men was alcoholism and among women was gallstone disease. 207 patients had no organ failure and remaining 39 developed organ failure. 17 patients had persistent organ failure, 16 of those with BISAP score ≥3. 13 patients in our study died, out of which 12 patients had BISAP score ≥3. We also found that a BISAP score of ≥3 had a sensitivity of 92%, specificity of 76%, a positive predictive value of 17%, and a negative predictive value of 99% for mortality. The BISAP score is a simple and accurate method for the early identification of patients at increased risk for in hospital mortality and morbidity. Copyright © 2014 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Cytosolic Double-Stranded DNA as a Damage-Associated Molecular Pattern Induces the Inflammatory Response in Rat Pancreatic Stellate Cells: A Plausible Mechanism for Tissue Injury-Associated Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Taichi; Ito, Tetsuhide; Igarashi, Hisato; Uchida, Masahiko; Hijioka, Masayuki; Oono, Takamasa; Fujimori, Nao; Niina, Yusuke; Suzuki, Koichi; Jensen, Robert T.; Takayanagi, Ryoichi

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of unknown causes. There are many triggers causing pancreatitis, such as alcohol, common bile duct stone, virus and congenital or acquired stenosis of main pancreatic duct, which often involve tissue injuries. Pancreatitis often occurs in sterile condition, where the dead/dying pancreatic parenchymal cells and the necrotic tissues derived from self-digested-pancreas were observed. However, the causal relationship between tissue injury and pancreatitis and how tissue injury could induce the inflammation of the pancreas were not elucidated fully until now. This study demonstrates that cytosolic double-stranded DNA increases the expression of several inflammatory genes (cytokines, chemokines, type I interferon, and major histocompatibility complex) in rat pancreatic stellate cells. Furthermore, these increase accompanied the multiple signal molecules genes, such as interferon regulatory factors, nuclear factor-kappa B, low-molecular-weight protein 2, and transporter associated with antigen processing 1. We suggest that this phenomenon is a plausible mechanism that might explain how cell damage of the pancreas or tissue injury triggers acute, chronic, and autoimmune pancreatitis; it is potentially relevant to host immune responses induced during alcohol consumption or other causes. PMID:22550608

  13. Black Alcoholism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Thomas D.; Wright, Roosevelt

    1988-01-01

    Examines some aspects of the problem of alcoholism among Blacks, asserting that Black alcoholism can best be considered in an ecological, environmental, sociocultural, and public health context. Notes need for further research on alcoholism among Blacks and for action to reduce the problem of Black alcoholism. (NB)

  14. Pancreatic Ribonucleases Superfamily Dynamics

    DOE Data Explorer

    Agarwal, Pratul

    2016-01-01

    This data set consists of molecular dynamics simulations based flexibility/dynamics derived for family members of pancreatic ribonucleases. The results are based on two independent 0.5 microsecond trajectories for each of the 23 members. The flexibility is computed at aggregation of first ten quasi-harmonic modes, and indicated in the temperature factor column of PDB (protein data bank) file format.

  15. Managing Incidental Pancreatic Cysts.

    PubMed

    Phan, Jennifer; Raman Muthusamy, V

    2018-06-09

    The goal of this review is to critically analyze the current literature regarding the management of incidental pancreatic cysts. Given their increased rates of detection due to the frequent use of cross-sectional imaging, correctly identifying the subset of high risk lesions that are appropriate for surgical resection is critical. However, the existing consensus and societal guidelines discussed in this review lack high quality data to create evidence-based recommendations, making achieving this important aim challenging. Several recent studies have focused on the natural history of pancreatic cysts and defining the role of endoscopic ultrasound, which remains unclear. EUS-guided diagnostic tools include molecular analysis of obtained fluid; EUS-guided FNA, FNB, and intracystic forceps biopsy of the cyst wall; and confocal endomicroscopy. While their precise role in diagnosing pancreatic cystic neoplasms remains to be defined, they represent promising innovations that may play a future role in cyst assessment and management. Large, long-term, prospective studies of incidentally identified pancreatic cysts are essential to fully understand their natural history and potential for neoplastic progression. Given the absence of such data at present, an individualized patient approach is recommended.

  16. Pancreatic tumours produce neurotensin.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, A M; Bryant, M G; Adrian, T E; Bloom, S R

    1981-04-01

    Tumour tissue may secrete substances which are not normally secreted by the original tissue. We have found that 6 out of 21 pancreatic tumours producing vasoactive intestinal peptide also produce neurotensin-like peptides. These are sometimes secreted and very high plasma levels of neurotensin-like immunoreactivity may be found in the circulation.

  17. Externalized decondensed neutrophil chromatin occludes pancreatic ducts and drives pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Leppkes, Moritz; Maueröder, Christian; Hirth, Sebastian; Nowecki, Stefanie; Günther, Claudia; Billmeier, Ulrike; Paulus, Susanne; Biermann, Mona; Munoz, Luis E.; Hoffmann, Markus; Wildner, Dane; Croxford, Andrew L.; Waisman, Ari; Mowen, Kerri; Jenne, Dieter E.; Krenn, Veit; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M.; Schett, Georg; Wirtz, Stefan; Neurath, Markus F.; Herrmann, Martin; Becker, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Ductal occlusion has been postulated to precipitate focal pancreatic inflammation, while the nature of the primary occluding agents has remained elusive. Neutrophils make use of histone citrullination by peptidyl arginine deiminase-4 (PADI4) in contact to particulate agents to extrude decondensed chromatin as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). In high cellular density, NETs form macroscopically visible aggregates. Here we show that such aggregates form inside pancreatic ducts in humans and mice occluding pancreatic ducts and thereby driving pancreatic inflammation. Experimental models indicate that PADI4 is critical for intraductal aggregate formation and that PADI4-deficiency abrogates disease progression. Mechanistically, we identify the pancreatic juice as a strong instigator of neutrophil chromatin extrusion. Characteristic single components of pancreatic juice, such as bicarbonate ions and calcium carbonate crystals, induce aggregated NET formation. Ductal occlusion by aggregated NETs emerges as a pathomechanism with relevance in a plethora of inflammatory conditions involving secretory ducts. PMID:26964500

  18. Dendritic Cells Promote Pancreatic Viability in Mice with Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Bedrosian, Andrea S.; Nguyen, Andrew H.; Hackman, Michael; Connolly, Michael K.; Malhotra, Ashim; Ibrahim, Junaid; Cieza-Rubio, Napoleon E.; Henning, Justin R.; Barilla, Rocky; Rehman, Adeel; Pachter, H. Leon; Medina-Zea, Marco V.; Cohen, Steven M.; Frey, Alan B.; Acehan, Devrim; Miller, George

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims Acute pancreatitis increases morbidity and mortality from organ necrosis by mechanisms that are incompletely understood. Dendritic cells (DCs) can promote or suppress inflammation, depending on their subtype and context. We investigated the roles of DC in development of acute pancreatitis. Methods Acute pancreatitis was induced in CD11c.DTR mice using caerulein or L-arginine; DCs were depleted by administration of diphtheria toxin. Survival was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results Numbers of MHC II+CD11c+DC increased 100-fold in pancreas of mice with acute pancreatitis, to account for nearly 15% of intra-pancreatic leukocytes. Intra-pancreatic DC acquired an immune phenotype in mice with acute pancreatitis; they expressed higher levels of MHC II and CD86 and increased production of interleukin-6, membrane cofactor protein (MCP)-1, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. However, rather than inducing an organ-destructive inflammatory process, DC were required for pancreatic viability; the exocrine pancreas died in mice that were depleted of DC and challenged with caerulein or L-arginine. All mice with pancreatitis that were depleted of DC died from acinar cell death within 4 days. Depletion of DC from mice with pancreatitis resulted in neutrophil infiltration and increased levels of systemic markers of inflammation. However, the organ necrosis associated with depletion of DC did not require infiltrating neutrophils, activation of NF-κB, or signaling by mitogen-activated protein kinase or TNF-α. Conclusions DC are required for pancreatic viability in mice with acute pancreatitis and might protect organs against cell stress. PMID:21801698

  19. Patient Derived Cancer Cell Lines in Identifying Molecular Changes in Patients With Previously Untreated Pancreatic Cancer Receiving Gemcitabine Hydrochloride-Based Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-05

    Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  20. Chronic pancreatitis: Multicentre prospective data collection and analysis by the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group.

    PubMed

    Szücs, Ákos; Marjai, Tamás; Szentesi, Andrea; Farkas, Nelli; Párniczky, Andrea; Nagy, György; Kui, Balázs; Takács, Tamás; Czakó, László; Szepes, Zoltán; Németh, Balázs Csaba; Vincze, Áron; Pár, Gabriella; Szabó, Imre; Sarlós, Patrícia; Illés, Anita; Gódi, Szilárd; Izbéki, Ferenc; Gervain, Judit; Halász, Adrienn; Farkas, Gyula; Leindler, László; Kelemen, Dezső; Papp, Róbert; Szmola, Richárd; Varga, Márta; Hamvas, József; Novák, János; Bod, Barnabás; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Hegyi, Péter

    2017-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease associated with structural and functional damage to the pancreas, causing pain, maldigestion and weight loss and thus worsening the quality of life. Our aim was to find correlations from a multicentre database representing the epidemiological traits, diagnosis and treatment of the disease in Hungary. The Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group collected data prospectively from 2012 to 2014 on patients suffering from chronic pancreatitis. Statistical analysis was performed on different questions. Data on 229 patients (74% male and 26% female) were uploaded from 14 centres. Daily alcohol consumption was present in the aetiology of 56% of the patients. 66% of the patients were previously treated for acute exacerbation. One third of the patients had had previous endoscopic or surgical interventions. Pain was present in 69% of the cases, endocrine insufficiency in 33%, diarrhoea in 13% and weight loss in 39%. Diagnosis was confirmed with US (80%), CT scan (52%), MRI-MRCP (6%), ERCP (39%), and EUS (7,4%). A functional test was carried out in 5% of the patients. In 31% of the cases, an endoscopic intervention was performed with the need for re-intervention in 5%. Further elective surgical intervention was necessitated in 44% of endoscopies. 20% of the registered patients were primarily treated with surgery. The biliary complication rate for surgery was significantly smaller (2%) than endoscopy (27%); however, pancreatic complications were higher in the patients treated with surgery. Patients who smoked regularly needed significantly more surgical intervention following endoscopy (66.7% vs. 26.9%, p = 0.002) than non-smokers, and the ratio of surgical intervention alone was also significantly higher (27.3% vs. 10.8%, p = 0.004). The ratio of surgery in patients who smoked and drank was significantly higher (30.09% vs. 12.5%, p = 0.012) than in abstinent and non-smoking patients, similarly to the need for further surgical

  1. Chronic pancreatitis: Multicentre prospective data collection and analysis by the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Szücs, Ákos; Marjai, Tamás; Szentesi, Andrea; Farkas, Nelli; Párniczky, Andrea; Nagy, György; Kui, Balázs; Takács, Tamás; Czakó, László; Szepes, Zoltán; Németh, Balázs Csaba; Vincze, Áron; Pár, Gabriella; Szabó, Imre; Sarlós, Patrícia; Illés, Anita; Gódi, Szilárd; Izbéki, Ferenc; Gervain, Judit; Halász, Adrienn; Farkas, Gyula; Leindler, László; Kelemen, Dezső; Papp, Róbert; Szmola, Richárd; Varga, Márta; Hamvas, József; Novák, János; Bod, Barnabás; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Hegyi, Péter

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Chronic pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease associated with structural and functional damage to the pancreas, causing pain, maldigestion and weight loss and thus worsening the quality of life. Aims and methods Our aim was to find correlations from a multicentre database representing the epidemiological traits, diagnosis and treatment of the disease in Hungary. The Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group collected data prospectively from 2012 to 2014 on patients suffering from chronic pancreatitis. Statistical analysis was performed on different questions. Results Data on 229 patients (74% male and 26% female) were uploaded from 14 centres. Daily alcohol consumption was present in the aetiology of 56% of the patients. 66% of the patients were previously treated for acute exacerbation. One third of the patients had had previous endoscopic or surgical interventions. Pain was present in 69% of the cases, endocrine insufficiency in 33%, diarrhoea in 13% and weight loss in 39%. Diagnosis was confirmed with US (80%), CT scan (52%), MRI-MRCP (6%), ERCP (39%), and EUS (7,4%). A functional test was carried out in 5% of the patients. In 31% of the cases, an endoscopic intervention was performed with the need for re-intervention in 5%. Further elective surgical intervention was necessitated in 44% of endoscopies. 20% of the registered patients were primarily treated with surgery. The biliary complication rate for surgery was significantly smaller (2%) than endoscopy (27%); however, pancreatic complications were higher in the patients treated with surgery. Patients who smoked regularly needed significantly more surgical intervention following endoscopy (66.7% vs. 26.9%, p = 0.002) than non-smokers, and the ratio of surgical intervention alone was also significantly higher (27.3% vs. 10.8%, p = 0.004). The ratio of surgery in patients who smoked and drank was significantly higher (30.09% vs. 12.5%, p = 0.012) than in abstinent and non-smoking patients, similarly to the

  2. Current Knowledge on Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Iovanna, Juan; Mallmann, Maria Cecilia; Gonçalves, Anthony; Turrini, Olivier; Dagorn, Jean-Charles

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death with a median survival of 6 months and a dismal 5-year survival rate of 3–5%. The development and progression of pancreatic cancer are caused by the activation of oncogenes, the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, and the deregulation of many signaling pathways. Therefore, the strategies targeting these molecules as well as their downstream signaling could be promising for the prevention and treatment of pancreatic cancer. However, although targeted therapies for pancreatic cancer have yielded encouraging results in vitro and in animal models, these findings have not been translated into improved outcomes in clinical trials. This failure is due to an incomplete understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer and to the selection of poorly efficient or imperfectly targeted agents. In this review, we will critically present the current knowledge regarding the molecular, biochemical, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of pancreatic cancer. PMID:22655256

  3. Severe acute pancreatitis and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Robertson, K W; Stewart, I S; Imrie, C W

    2006-01-01

    For most patients with pregnancy-associated pancreatitis there is little maternal survival threat and only occasionally are there foetal deaths. We describe 4 young women with pregnancy-associated severe acute pancreatitis who each had gallstones. Their ages were 17, 18, 20 and 24 years. Each was a tertiary referral to our unit in Glasgow and each pursued a life-threatening course with hospital stays ranging from 37 to 90 days. One patient required pancreatic necrosectomy for infected necrosis, another had percutaneous management of a pancreatic abscess and 2 had cystogastrostomy as treatment for pancreatic pseudocyst. All underwent early endoscopic sphincterotomy and later cholecystectomy. It is important to be aware that pregnancy-associated acute pancreatitis may be severe, posing a survival threat even in the youngest patients. Gallstones, as we reported almost 20 years ago, are the most common aetiological factor in such patients. Copyright (c) 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel and IAP.

  4. [Current alternatives in the surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis--a review article].

    PubMed

    Kat'uchová, Jana; Radonak, Jozef

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is characterized as an inflammatory process affecting the pancreas that causes progressive destruction of the gland and fibrosis, with subsequent endocrine and exocrine insufficiency. The most common cause of chronic pancreatitis is alcohol use in combination with nicotine. Manifestations are persistent or recurrent painful attacks. The only parameter of successful treatment of chronic pancreatitis is a relieve from long-lasting pain and improvement of the quality of life. Surgical treatment options include drainage operations on the pancreas, pancreatic resection or a combination of both. With optimal surgical treatment performed and good patient's compliance, operations for chronic pancreatitis have low number of post-operative complications and relatively good long-term results. The continued consumption of alcohol and drugs bring about worse outcomes, sometimes even a complete failure of therapy. Chronic pancreatitis also has considerable socio-economic consequences. Due to the persisting pain and frequent hospitalization it can lead to long-term disability and early retirement predominantly in young patients.

  5. Advances in Pancreatic CT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Renata R; Lo, Grace C; Patino, Manuel; Bizzo, Bernardo; Canellas, Rodrigo; Sahani, Dushyant V

    2018-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the advances in CT acquisition and image postprocessing as they apply to imaging the pancreas and to conceptualize the role of radiogenomics and machine learning in pancreatic imaging. CT is the preferred imaging modality for assessment of pancreatic diseases. Recent advances in CT (dual-energy CT, CT perfusion, CT volumetry, and radiogenomics) and emerging computational algorithms (machine learning) have the potential to further increase the value of CT in pancreatic imaging.

  6. Dairy products and pancreatic cancer risk: a pooled analysis of 14 cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Genkinger, J M; Wang, M; Li, R; Albanes, D; Anderson, K E; Bernstein, L; van den Brandt, P A; English, D R; Freudenheim, J L; Fuchs, C S; Gapstur, S M; Giles, G G; Goldbohm, R A; Håkansson, N; Horn-Ross, P L; Koushik, A; Marshall, J R; McCullough, M L; Miller, A B; Robien, K; Rohan, T E; Schairer, C; Silverman, D T; Stolzenberg-Solomon, R Z; Virtamo, J; Willett, W C; Wolk, A; Ziegler, R G; Smith-Warner, S A

    2014-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer has few early symptoms, is usually diagnosed at late stages, and has a high case-fatality rate. Identifying modifiable risk factors is crucial to reducing pancreatic cancer morbidity and mortality. Prior studies have suggested that specific foods and nutrients, such as dairy products and constituents, may play a role in pancreatic carcinogenesis. In this pooled analysis of the primary data from 14 prospective cohort studies, 2212 incident pancreatic cancer cases were identified during follow-up among 862 680 individuals. Adjusting for smoking habits, personal history of diabetes, alcohol intake, body mass index (BMI), and energy intake, multivariable study-specific hazard ratios (MVHR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using the Cox proportional hazards models and then pooled using a random effects model. There was no association between total milk intake and pancreatic cancer risk (MVHR = 0.98, 95% CI = 0.82-1.18 comparing ≥500 with 1-69.9 g/day). Similarly, intakes of low-fat milk, whole milk, cheese, cottage cheese, yogurt, and ice-cream were not associated with pancreatic cancer risk. No statistically significant association was observed between dietary (MVHR = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.77-1.19) and total calcium (MVHR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.71-1.12) intake and pancreatic cancer risk overall when comparing intakes ≥1300 with <500 mg/day. In addition, null associations were observed for dietary and total vitamin D intake and pancreatic cancer risk. Findings were consistent within sex, smoking status, and BMI strata or when the case definition was limited to pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Overall, these findings do not support the hypothesis that consumption of dairy foods, calcium, or vitamin D during adulthood is associated with pancreatic cancer risk. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Update on endoscopic management of main pancreatic duct stones in chronic calcific pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun Kwang; Lehman, Glen A

    2012-03-01

    Pancreatic duct stones are a common complication during the natural course of chronic pancreatitis and often contribute to additional pain and pancreatitis. Abdominal pain, one of the major symptoms of chronic pancreatitis, is believed to be caused in part by obstruction of the pancreatic duct system (by stones or strictures) resulting in increasing intraductal pressure and parenchymal ischemia. Pancreatic stones can be managed by surgery, endoscopy, or extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. In this review, updated management of pancreatic duct stones is discussed.

  8. Early detection of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Nita

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a low-incident but highly mortal disease. It accounts for only 3% of estimated new cancer cases each year but is currently the fourth common cause of cancer mortality. By 2030, it is expected to be the 2nd leading cause of cancer death. There is a clear need to diagnose and classify pancreatic cancer at earlier stages in order to give patients the best chance at a definitive cure through surgery. Three precursor lesions that distinctly lead to pancreatic adenocarcinoma have been identified, and we have increasing understanding the non-genetic and genetic risk factors for the disease. With increased understanding about the risk factors, the familial patters, and associated accumulation of genetic mutations involved in pancreatic cancer, we know that there are mutations that occur early in the development of pancreatic cancer and that improved genetic risk-based strategies in screening for pancreatic cancer may be possible and successful at saving or prolonging lives. The remaining challenge is that current standards for diagnosing pancreatic cancer remain too invasive and too costly for widespread screening for pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, the promises of noninvasive methods of detection such as blood, saliva, and stool remain underdeveloped or lack robust testing. However, significant progress has been made, and we are drawing closer to a strategy for the screening and early detection of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26361402

  9. [Surgical options for chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Tan, C L; Nuer, Emms; Abulaiti, Aizezi; Zhang, H; Chen, Y H; Liu, X B

    2016-11-01

    Objective: Discuss the surgical options for the chronic pancreatitis on the basis of anatomical morphological changes. Methods: A retrospective review of chronic pancreatitis patients in Department of Pancreatic Surgery, West China Hospital, Sichuan University between January 2010 and December 2014 was performed. The data of medical records, image feature, surgical types and records of follow-up were collected. Total 295 patients including 275 male and 20 female aged from 14 to 74 years with median age of 51 years. The clinical symptoms included abdominal pain in 280 cases, jaundice in 3 cases, single hemorrhage in digestive tract, diarrhea or mellitus in 12 cases. The anatomical morphological changes included pancreatic fibrosis and atrophy of the main pancreatic duct lesions in 44 cases (14.9%), inflammatory mass in the pancreatic head in 69 cases (22.4%), sporadic stones with calcification in the pancreatic head in 165 cases(55.9%), hyperplasia mass of pancreatic head and body in 14 cases (4.8%), sporadic stones with calcification in whole branch ducts accompanied with different degree of hyperplasia in whole pancreas in 3 cases (1.0%). The surgical options included longitudinal pancreaticojejunostomy, duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection, Frey/Frey+ distal pancreatectomy, total and subtotal pancreatectomy. All patients were followed-up for 3 to 6 months in the outpatient. A cross-sectional study was carried out by telephone, letters, questionnaire and outpatient from April to June 2016. Results: Among 295 patients, 267 cases were followed-up for an average time of 40 months(18 to 78 months), 28 cases were lost to followed-up(9.5%). Pain remission rate of pancreatic fibrosis and atrophy of the main pancreatic duct lesions patients was 97.0%, of inflammatory mass in the pancreatic head patients was 96.8%, of sporadic stones with calcification in the pancreatic head patients was 96.6%, of hyperplasia mass of pancreatic head and body patients was 12/13, of

  10. Conservative treatment of chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Löhr, J-Matthias; Haas, Stephen L; Lindgren, Fredrik; Enochsson, Lars; Hedström, Aleksandra; Swahn, Fredrik; Segersvärd, Ralf; Arnelo, Urban

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease giving rise to several complications that need to be treated accordingly. Because pancreatic surgery has significant morbidity and mortality, less invasive therapy seems to be an attractive option. This paper reviews current state-of-the-art strategies to treat chronic pancreatitis without surgery and the current guidelines for the medical therapy of chronic pancreatitis. Endoscopic therapy of complications of chronic pancreatitis such as pain, main pancreatic duct strictures and stones as well as pseudocysts is technically feasible and safe. The long-term outcome, however, is inferior to definitive surgical procedures such as resection or drainage. On the other hand, the medical therapy of pancreatic endocrine and exocrine insufficiency is well established and evidence based. Endoscopic therapy may be an option to bridge for surgery and in children/young adolescents and those unfit for surgery. Pain in chronic pancreatitis as well as treatment of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency follows established guidelines. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Chemoprevention strategies for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stan, Silvia D.; Singh, Shivendra V.; Brand, Randall E.

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has a poor prognosis and it is often diagnosed at advanced stages, which makes it very difficult to treat. The low survival rate of patients with pancreatic cancer points toward an increased need for novel therapeutic and chemopreventive strategies and early detection. Increased consumption of fruits and vegetables has been associated with a reduced risk of pancreatic cancer. Both synthetic as well as natural, diet-derived bioactive compounds have been evaluated as pancreatic cancer chemopreventive agents and have been shown to have various degrees of efficacy in cellular and in vivo animal models. Some chemopreventive agents (for example curcumin, resveratrol, B-DIM) have also been reported to sensitize pancreatic cancer cells to standard chemotherapeutic drugs (for example gemcitabine or erlotinib), which suggests the potential use of chemopreventive agents as potentiators of standard chemotherapy. Very few clinical trials with pancreatic cancer chemopreventive agents have been completed and some are in early phases. Further development of pancreatic cancer chemopreventive agents may prove to be tremendously valuable for individuals at high-risk of developing pancreatic cancer and patients who present with premalignant lesions. This Review discusses the current state of the pancreatic cancer chemoprevention field and highlights the challenges ahead. PMID:20440279

  12. Overview of exocrine pancreatic pathobiology.

    PubMed

    Pandiri, Arun R

    2014-01-01

    Exocrine pancreas is a source of several enzymes that are essential for the digestive process. The exocrine pancreatic secretion is tightly regulated by the neuroendocrine system. The endocrine pancreas is tightly integrated anatomically and physiologically with the exocrine pancreas and modulates its function. Compound-induced pancreatitis is not a common event in toxicology or drug development, but it becomes a significant liability when encountered. Understanding the species-specific differences in physiology is essential to understand the underlying pathobiology of pancreatic disease in animal models and its relevance to human disease. This review will mainly focus on understanding the morphology and physiology of the pancreas, unique islet-exocrine interactions, and pancreatitis.

  13. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Muñoz, J Enrique

    2014-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the early diagnosis of the disease, the prediction of the fibrosis degree of the gland, the evaluation of patients with asymptomatic hyperenzimemia, the medical and surgical treatment of abdominal pain and the knowledge of the natural history of the autoimmune pancreatitis. In patients with indetermined EUS findings of chronic pancreatitis, a new endoscopic ultrasound examination in the follow-up is of help to confirm or to exclude the disease. Smoking, number of relapses, results of pancreatic function tests and EUS findings allow predicting the degree of pancreatic fibrosis in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Antioxidant therapy has shown to be effective in reducing pain secondary to chronic pancreatitis, although the type and optimal dose of antioxidants remains to be elucidated. Development of intestinal bacterial overgrowth is frequent in patients with chronic pancreatitis, but its impact on symptoms is unknown and deserves further investigations. Finally, autoimmune pancreatitis relapses in about half of the patients with either type 1 or type 2 disease; relapses frequently occur within the first two years of follow-up. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Food-Induced Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Manohar, Murli; Verma, Alok K; Upparahalli Venkateshaiah, Sathisha; Goyal, Hemant; Mishra, Anil

    2017-12-01

    Food allergy, a commonly increasing problem worldwide, defined as an adverse immune response to food. A variety of immune-related effector cells such as mast cells, eosinophils, neutrophils, and T cells are involved in food-related allergic responses categorized as IgE mediated, non-IgE mediated, and mixed (IgE and non-IgE) depending upon underlying immunological mechanisms. The dietary antigens mainly target the gastrointestinal tract including pancreas that gets inflamed due to food allergy and leads acute pancreatitis. Reports indicate several food proteins induce pancreatitis; however, detailed underlying mechanism of food-induced pancreatitis is unexplored. The aim of the review is to understand and update the current scenario of food-induced pancreatitis. A comprehensive literature search of relevant research articles has been performed through PubMed, and articles were chosen based on their relevance to food allergen-mediated pancreatitis. Several cases in the literature indicate that acute pancreatitis has been provoked after the consumption of mustard, milk, egg, banana, fish, and kiwi fruits. Food-induced pancreatitis is an ignored and unexplored area of research. The review highlights the significance of food in the development of pancreatitis and draws the attention of physicians and scientists to consider food allergies as a possible cause for initiation of pancreatitis pathogenesis.

  15. [Latest advances in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    The present article analyses the main presentations on acute pancreatitis at Digestive Disease Week 2015. Arterial pseudoaneurysm is an uncommon complication of acute pancreatitis (incidence 0.7%) and mortality from this cause is currently anecdotal. Diabetes mellitus has little impact on the clinical course of acute pancreatitis, unlike cirrhosis, which doubles the risk of mortality. Intake of unsaturated fat could be associated with an increased severity of acute pancreatitis and is a confounding factor in studies evaluating the relationship between obesity and morbidity and mortality. PET-CT (positron emission tomography-computed tomography) could be a non-invasive tool to detect infection of collections in acute pancreatitis. Peripancreatic fat necrosis is less frequent than pancreatic fat necrosis and is associated with a better clinical course. If the clinical course is poor, increasing the calibre of the percutaneous drains used in the treatment of infected necrosis can avoid surgery in 20% of patients. The use of low molecular-weight heparin in moderate or severe pancreatitis could be associated with a better clinical course, specifically with a lower incidence of necrosis. In acute recurrent pancreatitis, simvastatin is a promising drug for prophylaxis of new episodes of acute pancreatitis. Nutritional support through a nasogastric tube does not improve clinical course compared with oral nutrition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. [Acute pancreatitis associated with hypercalcaemia].

    PubMed

    Tun-Abraham, Mauro Enrique; Obregón-Guerrero, Gabriela; Romero-Espinoza, Larry; Valencia-Jiménez, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Hypercalcaemia due to primary hyperparathyroidism is a rare cause of acute pancreatitis, with a reported prevalence of 1.5 to 8%. There is no clear pathophysiological basis, but elevated parathyroid hormone and high serum calcium levels could be responsible for calcium deposit in the pancreatic ducts and activation of pancreatic enzymes, which may be the main risk factor for developing acute pancreatitis. The aim of this report is to describe four cases. Four cases are reported of severe pancreatitis associated with hypercalcaemia secondary to primary hyperparathyroidism; three of them with complications (two pseudocysts and one pancreatic necrosis). Cervical ultrasound, computed tomography, and scintigraphy using 99mTc-Sestambi, studies showed the parathyroid adenoma. Surgical resection was the definitive treatment in all four cases. None of the patients had recurrent acute pancreatitis events during follow-up. Acute pancreatitis secondary to hypercalcaemia of primary hyperparathyroidism is rare; however, when it occurs it is associated with severe pancreatitis. It is suspected in patients with elevated serum calcium and high parathyroid hormone levels. Imaging techniques such as cervical ultrasound, computed tomography, and scintigraphy using 99mTc-Sestambi, should be performed, to confirm clinical suspicion. Surgical resection is the definitive treatment with excellent results. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  17. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, diabetes mellitus and serum nutritional markers after acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Vujasinovic, Miroslav; Tepes, Bojan; Makuc, Jana; Rudolf, Sasa; Zaletel, Jelka; Vidmar, Tjasa; Seruga, Maja; Birsa, Bostjan

    2014-12-28

    To investigate impairment and clinical significance of exocrine and endocrine pancreatic function in patients after acute pancreatitis (AP). Patients with AP were invited to participate in the study. Severity of AP was determined by the Atlanta classification and definitions revised in 2012. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) was diagnosed by the concentration of fecal elastase-1. An additional work-up, including laboratory testing of serum nutritional markers for determination of malnutrition, was offered to all patients with low levels of fecal elastase-1 FE. Hemoglobin A1c or oral glucose tolerance tests were also performed in patients without prior diabetes mellitus, and type 3c diabetes mellitus (T3cDM) was diagnosed according to American Diabetes Association criteria. One hundred patients were included in the study: 75% (75/100) of patients had one attack of AP and 25% (25/100) had two or more attacks. The most common etiology was alcohol. Mild, moderately severe and severe AP were present in 67, 15 and 18% of patients, respectively. The mean time from attack of AP to inclusion in the study was 2.7 years. PEI was diagnosed in 21% (21/100) of patients and T3cDM in 14% (14/100) of patients. In all patients with PEI, at least one serologic nutritional marker was below the lower limit of normal. T3cDM was more frequently present in patients with severe AP (P = 0.031), but was also present in some patients with mild and moderately severe AP. PEI was present in all degrees of severity of AP. There were no statistically significantly differences according to gender, etiology and number of AP attacks. As exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency can develop after AP, routine follow-up of patients is necessary, for which serum nutritional panel measurements can be useful.

  18. Review of pancreatic trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Glancy, K E

    1989-01-01

    In reviewing the literature on pancreatic trauma (1,984 cases), I found that it resulted from penetrating trauma in 73% and blunt trauma in 27% of cases. Associated injuries were common (average 3.0 per patient). Increased mortality was associated with shotgun wounds, an increasing number of associated injuries, the proximity of the injury to the head of the pancreas, preoperative shock, and massive hemorrhage. High mortality was found for total pancreatectomy, duct reanastomosis, and lack of surgical treatment, with lower mortality for Roux-en-Y anastomoses, suture and drainage, distal pancreatectomy, and duodenal exclusion and diverticulization techniques. Most patients required drainage only. The preoperative diagnosis of pancreatic trauma is difficult, with the diagnosis usually made during surgical repair for associated injuries. Blood studies such as amylase levels, diagnostic peritoneal lavage, and plain radiographs are not reliable. Computed tomographic scanning may be superior, but data are limited. PMID:2669347

  19. Etiology, clinical features and management of acute recurrent pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yi Yun; Wang, Rui; Wu, Hao; Tang, Cheng Wei; Chen, Xin Zu

    2014-10-01

    To study the etiology and clinical features of acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) and to determine its optimal management and outcomes. ARP cases among acute pancreatitis patients who were admitted to the West China Hospital, Sichuan University from January 2008 to December 2012 were retrospectively collected. Their etiology, clinical features, treatments and outcomes were analyzed. Of all pancreatitis patients, 8.9% were classified as ARP. The proportions of mild and severe diseases were 85.7% and 14.3%, respectively. The common etiological factors were biliogenic (31.0%), alcohol (26.2%), hyperlipidemia (21.4%) and pancreaticobiliary malformation (15.4%). At first 46 cases were cryptogenic and among them 36 were subsequently confirmed by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Among the hyperlipidemic ARP patients, 72.2% failed to routinely monitor and control serum lipids. ERCP was performed in 88 cases, and 48 also required an endoscopic sphincterotomy or calculus removal. Twenty-two patients underwent cholangiopancreatic duct stent placement, and pancreatic necrosectomy was performed on eight severe cases. The overall outcomes indicate that 8.3% of the cases progressed to chronic pancreatitis and 33.3% of the cases receiving etiological treatment were recurrence-free. There were no deaths in this study. The etiological factors of ARP are similar to those of acute pancreatitis at the first attack. The management of ARP should be fully considered based on etiological investigation. © 2014 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. A possible case of saw palmetto-induced pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Wargo, Kurt A; Allman, Elena; Ibrahim, Farrah

    2010-07-01

    A 65-year-old male with a history of diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, gout, Barrett esophagitis, and chronic gastritis developed acute pancreatitis after taking one week of the herbal medicine, saw palmetto, for symptoms related to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Ultrasound and computed tomography ruled out cholelithiasis and obstruction, triglycerides were normal, and he had no recent infection or trauma. He had a history of occasional alcohol consumption, though there was no recent increased intake. The most likely cause of pancreatitis in this case was saw palmetto. Saw palmetto (Serenoa repens) is an herbal medication used primarily in the treatment of symptoms related to BPH. It has a high content of fatty acids and phytosterols which are thought to exert their effects by inhibiting the enzyme 5-alpha-reductase, thereby preventing the conversion of testosterone into dihydrotestosterone (DHT). It has been postulated that saw palmetto directly stimulates estrogenic receptors and inhibits progesterone receptors in the prostate tissue. A previous report implicated the estrogen/antiandrogen properties of saw palmetto as inducing hepatotoxicity in a patient. Additionally, it has also been postulated that stimulation of the estrogenic receptors may lead to increased triglyceride levels or induction of a hypercoagulable state that leads to pancreatic necrosis. Finally, inhibition of cyclooxygenase, a property of saw palmetto, may be linked to acute pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis, a serious and sometimes fatal disorder may occur secondary to medications. Although the mechanism is not fully known, this is the second case of acute pancreatitis that has been documented secondary to the herbal medication saw palmetto. It is important for clinicians to obtain detailed medication histories, including over-the-counter and herbal medications, in order to prevent further complications from occurring.

  1. Alcoholism (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Alcoholism is a chronic illness marked by dependence on alcohol consumption that interferes with physical or mental health, and social, family or job responsibilities. This addiction can lead to liver, circulatory and neurological problems. Pregnant women who ...

  2. [Severe hypertriglyceridemia induced acute pancreatitis: a case report and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Herrera Del Águila, Dwight Denis; Garavito Rentería, Jorge; Linarez Medina, Karen; Lizarzaburu Rodríguez, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis occurs in about 1-4% of the cases. It is the third leading cause of pancreatitis after biliary and alcoholic etiology. Hypertriglyceridemia can be caused by primary causes, lipid metabolism disorders and secondary causes. A 32 year old man, born in Huancayo, with a history of diabetes mellitus type 2, severe mixed dyslipidemia with primary hypertriglyceridemia, was admitted to emergency with 10 days of abdominal pain with moderate intensity in epigastrium and left hypochondrium spreading to dorsal region after intake of high-fat meal. 24 hours before admission, pain exacerbates increasing intensity and causing nausea and bilious vomits. Therefore, all laboratory examinations are carried out resulting in hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis. For that reason, an adequate clinical history physical examination associated with laboratory and image examinations are important to consider hypertriglyceridemia as part of the etiology of acute pancreatitis.

  3. The second case of a young man with L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Binet, Quentin; Dufour, Inès; Agneessens, Emmanuel; Debongnie, Jean-Claude; Aouattah, Tarik; Covas, Angélique; Coche, Jean-Charles; De Koninck, Xavier

    2018-04-21

    Dietary supplementation of arginine has been used by numerous world-class athletes and professional bodybuilders over the past 30 years. L-Arginine indeed enhances muscular power and general performance via maintaining ATP level. However, L-arginine is also known to induce acute pancreatitis in murine models. We report the case of young man presenting with upper abdominal pain and increased serum lipase levels. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography confirms a mild acute pancreatitis. Common etiologies have been ruled out and toxicological anamnestic screening reveals the intake of protein powder. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the second case in human of arginine-induced acute pancreatitis. This case report suggests that every patient presenting with acute pancreatitis without obvious etiology should be evaluated for the intake of toxics other than alcohol, including L-arginine.

  4. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Layer, P; Keller, J; Lankisch, P G

    2001-04-01

    Malabsorption due to severe pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is one of the most important late features of chronic pancreatitis. Generally, steatorrhea is more severe and occurs several years prior to malabsorption of other nutrients because synthesis and secretion of lipase are impaired more rapidly, its intraluminal survival is shorter, and the lack of pancreatic lipase activity is not compensated for by nonpancreatic mechanisms. Patients suffer not only from nutritional deficiencies but also from increased nutrient delivery to distal intestinal sites, causing symptoms by profound alteration of upper gastrointestinal secretory and motor functions. Adequate nutrient absorption requires delivery of sufficient enzymatic activity into the duodenal lumen simultaneously with meal nutrients. The following recommendations are based on modern therapeutic concepts: 25,000 to 40,000 units of lipase per meal using pH-sensitive pancreatin microspheres, with dosage increases, compliance checks, and differential diagnosis in case of treatment failure. Still, in most patients, lipid digestion cannot be completely normalized by current standard therapy, and future developments are needed to optimize treatment.

  5. Management of pancreatic trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, R C

    1978-01-01

    Since 1950, 300 patients sustaining pancreatic injuries have been managed. Three-fourths of the injuries were due to penetrating trauma with a 20% mortality and one-fourth due to blunt trauma resulting in an 18% mortality. The pancreatic injury was responsible for death in only 3% of patients. Early onset of shock resulted in 38% mortality whereas only 4% of normotensive patients died. No patient died of an isolated pancreatic injury. Sepsis was the second most common cause of death following hemorrhage. Preoperative serum amylase was elevated more frequently following blunt trauma than penetrating trauma, but did not correlate with injury. There has been a tendency toward more frequent use of distal pancreatectomy for simple penetrating injuries without obvious ductal violation which increases operative time, blood loss and possible intra-abdominal abscess since resection usually requires splenectomy. Patients considered for an 80% distal resection are better managed with a Roux-en-Y limb to the distal pancreas since three patients developed diabetes following an 80% or greater resection. A conservative approach consisting of Penrose and sump drainage is adequate for most injuries. PMID:646495

  6. Smoking as a risk factor for complications in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Luaces-Regueira, María; Iglesias-García, Julio; Lindkvist, Björn; Castiñeira-Alvariño, Margarita; Nieto-García, Laura; Lariño-Noia, José; Domínguez-Muñoz, J Enrique

    2014-03-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated the association between smoking and chronic pancreatitis (CP). However, less is known about the role of smoking in the development of CP-related complications. Our aim was to investigate the impact of smoking and alcohol consumption on age of onset and complications at CP diagnosis. A cross-sectional case-case study was performed within a prospectively collected cohort of patients with CP. Alcohol consumption and smoking habits were assessed using a standardized questionnaire. Morphologic severity was defined based on endoscopic ultrasound criteria for CP and classified as mild (3-4 criteria), moderate (5-6 criteria), and severe (≥7 criteria or calcifications). Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) was diagnosed using the C-mixed triglyceride breath test. Odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for CP-related complications were calculated using a case-case design. A total of 241 patients were included. Smoking was associated with PEI (OR [95% CI], 2.4 [1.17-5.16]), calcifications (OR [95% CI], 2.33 [1.10-4.95]), and severe morphologic changes (OR [95% CI], 3.41 [1.31-8.85]) but not with pseudocysts or diabetes. Neither smoking nor alcohol consumption was associated with age of onset. Tobacco, but not alcohol, is associated with PEI, calcifications, and severe morphologic (≥7 criteria or calcifications) CP at diagnosis. Smoking cessation should be encouraged in patients with CP.

  7. Antiretroviral drugs and acute pancreatitis in HIV/AIDS patients: is there any association? A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Natalia Mejias; Ferreira, Felipe Augusto Yamauti; Yonamine, Raquel Yumi; Chehter, Ethel Zimberg

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT In HIV-seropositive individuals, the incidence of acute pancreatitis may achieve 40% per year, higher than the 2% found in the general population. Since 1996, when combined antiretroviral therapy, known as HAART (highly active antiretroviral therapy), was introduced, a broad spectrum of harmful factors to the pancreas, such as opportunistic infections and drugs used for chemoprophylaxis, dropped considerably. Nucleotide analogues and metabolic abnormalities, hepatic steatosis and lactic acidosis have emerged as new conditions that can affect the pancreas. To evaluate the role of antiretroviral drugs to treat HIV/AIDS in a scenario of high incidence of acute pancreatitis in this population, a systematic review was performed, including original articles, case reports and case series studies, whose targets were HIV-seropositive patients that developed acute pancreatitis after exposure to any antiretroviral drugs. This association was confirmed after exclusion of other possible etiologies and/or a recurrent episode of acute pancreatitis after re-exposure to the suspected drug. Zidovudine, efavirenz, and protease inhibitors are thought to lead to acute pancreatitis secondary to hyperlipidemia. Nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors, despite being powerful inhibitors of viral replication, induce a wide spectrum of side effects, including myelotoxicity and acute pancreatitis. Didanosine, zalcitabine and stavudine have been reported as causes of acute and chronic pancreatitis. They pose a high risk with cumulative doses. Didanosine with hydroxyurea, alcohol or pentamidine are additional risk factors, leading to lethal pancreatitis, which is not a frequent event. In addition, other drugs used for prophylaxis of AIDS-related opportunistic diseases, such as sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim and pentamidine, can produce necrotizing pancreatitis. Despite comorbidities that can lead to pancreatic involvement in the HIV/AIDS population, antiretroviral drug

  8. Ultraviolet B Irradiance and Vitamin D Status are Inversely Associated With Incidence Rates of Pancreatic Cancer Worldwide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    exposure of most of the skin to solar irradiance, especially Muslim countries. In these countries, 25(OH)D levels, partic- ularly in women wearing a hijab ...exceptions. Key Words: pancreatic neoplasms, incidence, vitamin D, alcohol, smoking, multiple regression (Pancreas 2010;00: 00Y00) A pproximately...The possibility that vita- min D might play a role in the etiology of pancreatic cancer was raised by studies showing that populations living at

  9. Decrease in the Prevalence of Pancreatitis Associated with Primary Hyperparathyroidism: Experience at a Tertiary Referral Center.

    PubMed

    Janka-Zires, Marcela; Hernández-Calleros, Jorge; Gómez-Pérez, Francisco Javier; Uscanga-Domínguez, Luis Federico; Pelaez-Luna, Mario César; Almeda-Valdés, Paloma

    2015-01-01

    Hypercalcemia is a rare but well recognized cause of acute and chronic pancreatitis. Hypercalcemia-related pancreatitis is mainly caused by primary hyperparathyroidism. The prevalence of pancreatitis in hyperparathyroidism varies worldwide and additional disease-modifying factors may play a role in its development. In 1988 the prevalence of pancreatitis secondary to primary hyperparathyroidism at the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán (INCMNSZ), a referral center in Mexico City, was 12.1% (95% CI: 6.7-21). To describe the current prevalence of pancreatitis secondary to primary hyperparathyroidism at the INCMNSZ. We reviewed 385 cases of primary hyperparathyroidism seen at the hospital between 1987 and 2012. 26 cases with acute or chronic pancreatitis associated with primary hyperparathyroidism were documented, with a prevalence of 6.7% (95% CI: 4.6-9.7), which was lower than the 12.1% previously reported. In the present study, 20% had a history of alcohol consumption, 10% of gallstones, and 20% of ureteral calculi, compared with the previously reported 32.0, 34.6, and 40.0%, respectively. The average calcium levels were 13.1 and 13.8 mg/dl in the previous and current series, respectively. We found a decrease in the prevalence of pancreatitis associated with primary hyperparathyroidism from 12.1% (95% CI: 6.7-21) to 6.7% (95% CI: 4.6-9.7).

  10. Cardiovascular disease and risk of acute pancreatitis in a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Bexelius, Tomas Sjöberg; Ljung, Rickard; Mattsson, Fredrik; Lagergren, Jesper

    2013-08-01

    The low-grade inflammation that characterizes cardiovascular disorders may facilitate the development of pancreatitis; therefore, we investigated the connection between cardiovascular disorders and acute pancreatitis. A nested population-based case-control study was conducted in Sweden in 2006-2008. Cases had a first episode of acute pancreatitis diagnosed in the nationwide Patient Register. Controls were matched on age, sex, and calendar year and randomly selected from all Swedish residents (40-84 years old). Exposure to cardiovascular diseases (hypertension, ischemic heart disease, congestive heart failure, and stroke) was identified in the Patient Register. Relative risk of acute pancreatitis was estimated by odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals using logistic regression adjusting for confounders (matching variables, alcohol disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, type 2 diabetes, number of distinct medications, and other cardiovascular diseases). The study included 6161 cases and 61,637 control subjects. Cardiovascular disorders were positively associated with acute pancreatitis (adjusted odds ratio, 1.35; 95% confidence interval, 1.25-1.45). This population-based study indicates an association between cardiovascular disease and acute pancreatitis. Specifically, ischemic heart disease and hypertension seem to increase the risk of acute pancreatitis. Further research is needed to determine causality.

  11. Total pancreatectomy for recurrent acute and chronic pancreatitis: a critical review of patient selection criteria

    PubMed Central

    Faghih, Mahya; Gonzalez, Francisco Garcia; Makary, Martin A.; Singh, Vikesh K.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose of review Critical review of the indications for total pancreatectomy and highlight limitations in current diagnostic criteria for chronic pancreatitis. Recent findings The diagnosis of noncalcific chronic pancreatitis remains controversial because of an overreliance on nonspecific imaging and laboratories findings. Endoscopic ultrasound, s-magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, and/or endoscopic pancreatic function testing are often used to diagnose noncalcific chronic pancreatitis despite the fact that there is no gold standard for this condition. Abdominal pain is not specific for chronic pancreatitis and is more likely to be encountered in patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders based on the high incidence of these conditions. The duration of pain and opioid analgesic use results in central sensitization that adversely affects pain outcomes after total pancreatectomy. An alcoholic cause is associated with poorer pain outcomes after total pancreatectomy. Summary The lack of a gold standard for noncalcific chronic pancreatitis limits the diagnostic accuracy of imaging and laboratory tests. The pain of chronic pancreatitis is nonspecific and is affected by duration, preoperative opioid use, and cause. These factors will need to be considered in the development of future selection criteria for this morbid surgery. PMID:28700371

  12. Role of bile acids in carcinogenesis of pancreatic cancer: An old topic with new perspective

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Hui-Yi; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2016-01-01

    The role of bile acids in colorectal cancer has been well documented, but their role in pancreatic cancer remains unclear. In this review, we examined the risk factors of pancreatic cancer. We found that bile acids are associated with most of these factors. Alcohol intake, smoking, and a high-fat diet all lead to high secretion of bile acids, and bile acid metabolic dysfunction is a causal factor of gallstones. An increase in secretion of bile acids, in addition to a long common channel, may result in bile acid reflux into the pancreatic duct and to the epithelial cells or acinar cells, from which pancreatic adenocarcinoma is derived. The final pathophysiological process is pancreatitis, which promotes dedifferentiation of acinar cells into progenitor duct-like cells. Interestingly, bile acids act as regulatory molecules in metabolism, affecting adipose tissue distribution, insulin sensitivity and triglyceride metabolism. As a result, bile acids are associated with three risk factors of pancreatic cancer: obesity, diabetes and hypertriglyceridemia. In the second part of this review, we summarize several studies showing that bile acids act as cancer promoters in gastrointestinal cancer. However, more question are raised than have been solved, and further oncological and physiological experiments are needed to confirm the role of bile acids in pancreatic cancer carcinogenesis. PMID:27672269

  13. Gallbladder emptying to endogenous and exogenous stimulation in chronic pancreatitis patients.

    PubMed

    Meguro, T; Shimosegawa, T; Kashimura, J; Kikuchi, Y; Koizumi, M; Toyota, T

    1994-02-01

    The present study was designed to analyze the underlying mechanism of gallbladder motor disturbance in chronic pancreatitis patients. Gallbladder emptying to endogenous (oral test meal, Daiyan 13 g) and exogenous stimulation (iv cerulein, 30 ng/kg for 5 min) was examined by real-time ultrasonography in 12 patients with chronic pancreatitis and 10 normal subjects (controls). Plasma cholecystokinin levels during the endogenous stimulation were measured by bioassay. In chronic pancreatitis patients compared with controls, the fasting gallbladder volume was significantly increased (29.5 +/- 2.2 vs. 21.5 +/- 2.8 ml), whereas the gallbladder emptying (percent change of the basal volume) to oral test meal was significantly decreased. Neither cholecystokinin secretion induced by the test meal, nor the gallbladder emptying response to intravenous cerulein, differed significantly between the two groups. However, when chronic pancreatitis patients were divided according to pathogenesis, it became clear that gallbladder emptying to intravenous cerulein was significantly greater in patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis than in patients with idiopathic pancreatitis. Gallbladder emptying during the intestinal phase is generally reduced in patients with chronic pancreatitis, but gallbladder responsiveness to exogenous stimulation might be heterogeneous according to the pathogenesis.

  14. Alcohol Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Farrell, Timothy J.; Fals-Stewart, William

    2003-01-01

    We received 38 controlled studies of marital and family therapy (MFT) in alcoholism treatment. We conclude that, when the alcoholic is unwilling to seek help, MFT is effective in helping the family cope better and motivating alcoholics to enter treatment. Specifically, (a) Al-Anon facilitation and referral help family members cope better; (b)…

  15. Chronic pancreatitis with multiple pseudocysts and pancreatic panniculitis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yuqing; Qian, Zhuyin

    2018-06-01

    Pancreatic pseudocyst can present single or multiple, inside or outside the pancreas. Pancreatic panniculitis is a rare skin lesion in pancreatic disease patients. The purpose of this study is to report a case of chronic pancreatitis coexisting with multiple pseudocysts and pancreatic panniculitis. A 46-year-old man with chronic pancreatitis presented multiple small cystic lesions inside the head of the pancreas and two large cystic lesions adjacent to the tail of the pancreas. The patient also developed subcutaneous nodules involving upper and lower limbs, hands, and lower abdomen bilaterally. The patient was diagnosed with pancreatic pseudocyst and pancreatic panniculitis resulted from chronic pancreatitis. Bile duct stent and pancreatic duct stent placement was performed endoscopicly. Panniculitis faded three weeks later and the pancreatic pseudocysts disappeared six weeks later. Clinicians should be aware of the manifestation of multiple pancreatic pseudocyst and pancreatic panniculitis, and endoscopic transpapillary drainage may be a effective way in this scenario.

  16. A rare case of thrombotic microangiopathy triggered by acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kevin; Nadeem, Ahmed Jamal; Doratotaj, Behzad

    2017-05-15

    Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) occurring after acute pancreatitis is rarely described. Without prompt intervention, TMA can be, and often is, lethal, so prompt recognition is important. Here, we present a case of a 61-year-old woman with a history of alcohol misuse who presented with epigastric pain, nausea and vomiting after binge drinking. Elevated serum lipase and imaging were suggestive of acute-on-chronic pancreatitis. Although the patient's symptoms of acute pancreatitis subsided, her anaemia, thrombocytopenia and acute kidney injury worsened. A peripheral blood smear revealed schistocytes, prompting suspicion for TMA. Therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) was promptly initiated and she completed 10 TPE sessions that improved her anaemia and serum creatinine and resolved the thrombocytopenia. Since TPE was effective and the ADAMTS13 assay revealed 55% activity in the absence of anti-ADAMTS13 IgG prior to initiation of therapy, a confident diagnosis of TMA caused by acute pancreatitis was made. There was no evidence of relapse 2 years later. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. PANCREATIC TRANSPLANTATIONS IN THE SPLEEN

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, Joseph H.; Murphy, Fred T.

    1913-01-01

    Pancreatic tissue implanted in the spleen and separated from its original vascular and nervous connections can live and functionate for months. A small nodule of pancreatic tissue composed of acini without demonstrable islands of Langerhans prevented the development of diabetes. Death occurred 187 days after the extirpation of the pancreas. PMID:19867642

  18. Splanchnic venous thrombosis and pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Nadkarni, Nikhil A; Khanna, Sahil; Vege, Santhi Swaroop

    2013-08-01

    Pancreatitis is an inflammatory process with local and systemic manifestations. One such local manifestation is thrombosis in splanchnic venous circulation, predominantly of the splenic vein. The literature on this important complication is very sparse. This review offers an overview of mechanism of thrombosis, its pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management in the setting of acute as well as chronic pancreatitis.

  19. [Identifying the severe acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Acevedo Tizón, Anais; Targarona Modena, Javier; Málaga Rodríguez, Germán; Barreda Cevasco, Luis

    2011-01-01

    To compare patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis without any additional complications during their hospital stay (Group A) versus patients with Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis with additional complications during their hospital stay (Group B). Data obtained from a pre-existing base from hospitalized patients with diagnosis of acute necrotizing pancreatitis in the specialized unit of "Unidad de Pancreatitis Aguda Grave del Hospital Nacional Edgardo Rebagliati Martins" between 2000 and 2010. Data included patients with diagnosis of acute necrotizing pancreatitis, of ages 18 and over. Data from 215 patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis was included. Patients from Group A represented 32% (68) and from Group B 68% (147). Group A had a average of 39 hospitalized days and Group B had an average of 56 days (p=0.01). From Group A 22% had more than 50% of necrosis while 43% of Group B had this extension of necrosis (p <0.05, OR 3.4, IC (1.12-10)). Of the 14 deaths of the population, all part of Group B, 12 of them had more than 50% of necrosis. Not every patient classified as severe acute pancreatitis, based on the presence of necrosis, behave likewise. It is an extended necrosis, described as more than 50% of pancreatic necrosis, and not the presence itself which will determine additional complications during the course of disease and a greater mortality.

  20. Alcoholic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Guzzo-Merello, Gonzalo; Cobo-Marcos, Marta; Gallego-Delgado, Maria; Garcia-Pavia, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol is the most frequently consumed toxic substance in the world. Low to moderate daily intake of alcohol has been shown to have beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system. In contrast, exposure to high levels of alcohol for a long period could lead to progressive cardiac dysfunction and heart failure. Cardiac dysfunction associated with chronic and excessive alcohol intake is a specific cardiac disease known as alcoholic cardiomyopathy (ACM). In spite of its clinical importance, data on ACM and how alcohol damages the heart are limited. In this review, we evaluate available evidence linking excessive alcohol consumption with heart failure and dilated cardiomyopathy. Additionally, we discuss the clinical presentation, prognosis and treatment of ACM. PMID:25228956

  1. Chronic plus binge ethanol exposure causes more severe pancreatic injury and inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Zhenhua

    Alcohol abuse increases the risk for pancreatitis. The pattern of alcohol drinking may impact its effect. We tested a hypothesis that chronic ethanol consumption in combination with binge exposure imposes more severe damage to the pancreas. C57BL/6 mice were divided into four groups: control, chronic ethanol exposure, binge ethanol exposure and chronic plus binge ethanol exposure. For the control group, mice were fed with a liquid diet for two weeks. For the chronic ethanol exposure group, mice were fed with a liquid diet containing 5% ethanol for two weeks. In the binge ethanol exposure group, mice were treated with ethanolmore » by gavage (5 g/kg, 25% ethanol w/v) daily for 3 days. For the chronic plus binge exposure group, mice were fed with a liquid diet containing 5% ethanol for two weeks and exposed to ethanol by gavage during the last 3 days. Chronic and binge exposure alone caused minimal pancreatic injury. However, chronic plus binge ethanol exposure induced significant apoptotic cell death. Chronic plus binge ethanol exposure altered the levels of alpha-amylase, glucose and insulin. Chronic plus binge ethanol exposure caused pancreatic inflammation which was shown by the macrophages infiltration and the increase of cytokines and chemokines. Chronic plus binge ethanol exposure increased the expression of ADH1 and CYP2E1. It also induced endoplasmic reticulum stress which was demonstrated by the unfolded protein response. In addition, chronic plus binge ethanol exposure increased protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation, indicating oxidative stress. Therefore, chronic plus binge ethanol exposure is more detrimental to the pancreas. - Highlights: • Chronic plus binge alcohol drinking causes more pancreatic injury. • Chronic plus binge alcohol drinking induces more pancreatic inflammation. • Chronic plus binge alcohol causes more endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress.« less

  2. Management of acute pancreatitis in children.

    PubMed

    Abu-El-Haija, Maisam; Lin, Tom K; Nathan, Jaimie D

    2017-10-01

    Pediatric acute pancreatitis has been on the rise in the last decades, with an incidence close to adult pancreatitis. In the majority of cases acute pancreatitis resolves spontaneously, but in a subset of children the disease progresses to severe acute pancreatitis with attendant morbidity and mortality. Pediatric acute pancreatitis in this era is recognized as a separate entity from adult acute pancreatitis given that the causes and disease outcomes are different. There are slow but important advances made in understanding the best management for acute pancreatitis in children from medical, interventional, and surgical aspects. Supportive care with fluids, pain medications, and nutrition remain the mainstay for acute pancreatitis management. For complicated or severe pancreatitis, specialized interventions may be required with endoscopic or drainage procedures. Surgery has an important but limited role in pediatric acute pancreatitis.

  3. Use of methimazole and risk of acute pancreatitis: A case-control study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lai, Shih-Wei; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liao, Kuan-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Some cases of acute pancreatitis have been reported to be associated with use of methimazole. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between use of methimazole and risk of acute pancreatitis on the basis of a systematic analysis. This was a population-based case-control study analyzing the database of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program. There were 5764 individuals aged 20-84 years with a first attack of acute pancreatitis from 1998 to 2011 as the cases and 23,056 randomly selected sex- and age-matched individuals without acute pancreatitis as the controls. Use of methimazole was categorized as "never use" and "ever use." We estimated the relative risk of acute pancreatitis associated with the use of methimazole by calculating the odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) using a multivariable logistic regression model. After adjustment for confounding factors, the OR of acute pancreatitis was 0.91 in individuals with ever use of methimazole, when compared with individuals with never use of methimazole (95% CI, 0.60-1.38). Unlike methimazole use, alcohol-related disease, biliary stone, cardiovascular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes mellitus, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and hypertriglyceridemia were factors significantly associated with acute pancreatitis. Our study does not detect a substantial association between the use of methimazole and risk of acute pancreatitis on the basis of systematic analysis. There appears to be a discrepancy between case reports and our systematic analysis about the association between the use of methimazole and risk of acute pancreatitis.

  4. Association between pancreatic fat and incidence of metabolic syndrome: a 5-year Japanese cohort study.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Hajime; Tauchi, Shinichi; Kimachi, Miho; Dohke, Mitsuru; Hanawa, Nagisa; Kodama, Yoshihisa; Katanuma, Akio; Yamamoto, Yosuke; Fukuma, Shingo; Fukuhara, Shunichi

    2018-04-26

    Previous cross-sectional studies showed that pancreatic fat was associated with metabolic syndrome. However, no longitudinal study has evaluated whether people with high pancreatic fat are likely to develop future metabolic syndrome. This study investigated the association between baseline pancreatic fat and metabolic syndrome incidence. In 2008-2009, 320 participants without metabolic syndrome underwent health checks, which included unenhanced computed tomography, and were followed up annually for 4-5 years. Baseline pancreatic fat amounts were evaluated using a histologically validated method that measured differences between pancreas and spleen attenuations on computed tomography. The participants were divided into low (reference), intermediate, and high pancreatic fat groups based on pancreas and spleen attenuation tertiles. Metabolic syndrome incidence was evaluated annually over a median follow-up period of 4.99 (interquartile range, 4.88-5.05) years, in accordance with the 2009 harmonized criteria. Risk ratios (RRs) for the association between baseline pancreatic fat amounts and metabolic syndrome incidence were estimated using Poisson regression models adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, liver fat, pre-metabolic syndrome, cigarette use, alcohol use, and physical activity. Metabolic syndrome incidence was 30.6% (98/320). Pancreatic fat was associated with an increased incidence of metabolic syndrome, based on a univariate analysis (RRs [95% confidence interval], 3.14 [1.74-5.67] and 3.96 [2.23-7.03] in the intermediate and high pancreatic fat groups, respectively). The association remained statistically significant in the multivariate analysis (RR [95% confidence interval], 2.04 [1.14-3.64] and 2.30 [1.28-4.14] for the same groups, respectively). Pancreatic fat predicts the future risk of metabolic syndrome. © 2018 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. Safety and efficacy of pancreatic sphincterotomy in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Ell, C; Rabenstein, T; Schneider, H T; Ruppert, T; Nicklas, M; Bulling, D

    1998-09-01

    Endoscopic pancreatic sphincterotomy (EPS) is being performed with increasing frequency as a prerequisite to interventional measures in the pancreatic duct. The aim of this study was to evaluate EPS with regard to technique, success, complications, and mortality in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Between January 1989 and September 1996, the results of all consecutive EPSs in patients with chronic pancreatitis were documented in a standardized form. Patients were followed by clinical investigation and blood sample analysis at 4, 24, and 48 hours after EPS. Complications were classified according to commonly accepted criteria. EPS was performed in 118 patients with chronic pancreatitis (men 75%, women 25%, 48+/-10 years). Ninety-four patients (80%) underwent guidewire-assisted EPS, and 24 patients (20%) underwent needle-knife EPS. Seventy-seven EPS procedures (65%) were primarily successful (guidewire EPS: 60 of 94, 64%; needle-knife EPS: 17 of 24, 71%). Additional endoscopic cutting techniques (needle-knife papillotomy, biliary endoscopic sphincterotomy) were required in 41 patients (35%). In total, EPS was successful in 116 patients (98%). The complication rate was 4.2% (4 cases of moderate pancreatitis, 1 severe bleeding, no deaths). All complications were managed nonoperatively. In patients with chronic pancreatitis, EPS with a standard sphincterotome or with a needle-knife offers an effective and reliable approach to the pancreatic duct system. Additional cutting techniques may be necessary in approximately one third of cases before an EPS can be successfully performed. The complication rate of EPS in patients with chronic pancreatitis appears to be lower than the complication rate of biliary sphincterotomy for other indications.

  6. The Diagnostic Challenges of Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Papp, Kata; Angst, Eliane; Seidel, Stefan; Flury-Frei, Renata; Hetzer, Franc Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis is a rare but important differential diagnosis from pancreatic cancer. This autoimmune disease can mimic pancreatic cancer by its clinical symptoms, including weight loss and jaundice. Furthermore imaging findings may include a mass of the pancreas. Here we present the case of a 67-year-old male patient diagnosed with autoimmune pancreatitis but showing the well-known symptoms of pancreatic cancer. This emphasizes the difficulties of histological findings and the importance of the correct diagnostic process. PMID:25802499

  7. Short- and long-term results of lateral pancreaticojejunostomy for chronic pancreatitis: a retrospective Japanese single-center study.

    PubMed

    Sudo, Takeshi; Murakami, Yoshiaki; Uemura, Kenichiro; Hashimoto, Yasushi; Kondo, Naru; Nakagawa, Naoya; Sueda, Taijiro

    2014-06-01

    The study aim was to determine the short- and long-term results of lateral pancreaticojejunostomy for chronic pancreatitis at a single center in Japan. The records of 64 consecutive patients were retrospectively reviewed. All patients underwent surgery at Hiroshima University Hospital between December 1996 and April 2013. Long-term follow-up was performed in 58 patients (91%) for a median period of 34 months. The 53 men (83%) and 11 women (17%) had a mean age of 55 years. The etiology of pancreatitis was chronic alcohol abuse in 44 patients (69%). The major indication for surgery was acute pancreatitis exacerbation (80%). There was no postoperative mortality. Postoperative morbidity occurred in 21 patients (33%), with severe complications requiring non-surgical intervention in four (6%). The percentage of pain-free patients after surgery was 91%, and further acute exacerbation was prevented in 95%. Four patients (7%) required subsequent surgery for pancreatitis-related complications. Of the patients that completed follow-up, 33 (57%) had diabetes mellitus, including 11 patients (19%) with new-onset diabetes; 30 patients (56%) developed pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. Full-length lateral pancreaticojejunostomy is safe, feasible, and effective for managing chronic pancreatitis. The technique prevents further exacerbations and maintains appropriate pancreatic endocrine and exocrine function. © 2013 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  8. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Oregovomab Followed by Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Nelfinavir Mesylate in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-04-24

    Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Resectable Pancreatic Carcinoma; Stage I Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer

  9. Molecular biology of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Zavoral, Miroslav; Minarikova, Petra; Zavada, Filip; Salek, Cyril; Minarik, Marek

    2011-06-28

    In spite of continuous research efforts directed at early detection and treatment of pancreatic cancer, the outlook for patients affected by the disease remains dismal. With most cases still being diagnosed at advanced stages, no improvement in survival prognosis is achieved with current diagnostic imaging approaches. In the absence of a dominant precancerous condition, several risk factors have been identified including family history, chronic pancreatitis, smoking, diabetes mellitus, as well as certain genetic disorders such as hereditary pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, familial atypical multiple mole melanoma, and Peutz-Jeghers and Lynch syndromes. Most pancreatic carcinomas, however, remain sporadic. Current progress in experimental molecular techniques has enabled detailed understanding of the molecular processes of pancreatic cancer development. According to the latest information, malignant pancreatic transformation involves multiple oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes that are involved in a variety of signaling pathways. The most characteristic aberrations (somatic point mutations and allelic losses) affect oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes within RAS, AKT and Wnt signaling, and have a key role in transcription and proliferation, as well as systems that regulate the cell cycle (SMAD/DPC, CDKN2A/p16) and apoptosis (TP53). Understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms should promote development of new methodology for early diagnosis and facilitate improvement in current approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment.

  10. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF–VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis. PMID:25778551

  11. [Long-term results of the surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Padillo Ruiz, F J; Rufián, S; Varo, E; Solorzano, G; Miño, G; Pera Madrazo, C

    1994-08-01

    We analized the long-term results after surgical treatment in 41 patients with chronic pancreatitis. Twenty one of them underwent resection: 19 pancreaticoduodenectomy (11 Whipple procedure and 8 Traverso Longmire); total pancreatectomy (1) and near-total pancreatectomy (1). In the remaining 20 patients a drainage procedure was carried out: Puestow-Duval (5); Partington (7); double derivation: pancreatic and biliar (5); triple derivation: pancreatic, biliar, gastric (2) and Nardi procedure+quisteduodenostomy in one patient. The following were evaluated: persistent pain; chronic alcoholism; nutrition status; exocrine function (syntomatic steatorrea, use of pancreatic enzyme preparation and fecal determination of glucide, protids and lipids) and endocrine function (glucose and insulin levels and glucose oral test). Surgery failed to relieve pain in 15.6% of the patients; failures were associated chronic alcoholism (p < 0.05); 18 patients (44%) required oral pancreatic enzymes. There weren't significant differences between resection and drainage procedures regarding the exocrine function. However, endocrine function was significantly worse (p < 0.05) after pancreaticoduodenectomy than after drainages procedures. Among the late, the endocrine function was better after Partington operation than after the Puestow-Duval.

  12. Time trends in the etiology of chronic pancreatitis in South India.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, Gopalakrishna; Girish, Banavara Narasimhamurthy; Panicker, Suprabha; Balakrishnan, Vallath

    2014-01-01

    Recent reports indicate a decline in prevalence of classical tropical chronic pancreatitis (TCP). We studied the etiologies and risk factors over a 14-year period at a tertiary care university hospital. We compared the etiology in chronic pancreatitis (CP) patients presenting and followed-up in our Pancreas Clinic over two time periods (2000-06 and 2007-13). Idiopathic chronic pancreatitis (ICP) was the predominant etiology seen over the two time periods. However an increase in prevalence of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (ACP) during the latter time period suggests that it may be emerging as a dominant etiology over recent years. Hypertriglyceridemia and hyperparathyroidism were uncommon causes of non-alcoholic CP. Autoimmune pancreatitis was noted only during 2007-13, but remains a rare cause of CP. There are multiple risk factors for CP in our population. The high prevalence of ICP indicates need closer examination of risk factors and ICP pathogenesis. ACP appears to be emerging as a dominant cause of CP which suggests a need to reorient preventive strategies.

  13. Diagnosing Chronic Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Anaizi, Ahmad; Hart, Phil A; Conwell, Darwin L

    2017-07-01

    Diagnosing CP can range from routine in those with severe disease and obvious calcifications on CT imaging to elusive in those patients with early changes in CP. The workup of suspected CP should follow a progressively noninvasive to more invasive STEP-wise approach in a patient with a suspicious clinical presentation and risk factors that raise their pretest probability of disease. After a thorough history and physical examination, basic laboratories should be obtained such as lipase, amylase, metabolic panel, and indirect PFTs (fecal elastase-1, serum trypsin). Computed tomography remains the best initial imaging modality to obtain as it has good sensitivity for severe CP and may obviate the need for other diagnostic tests. When equivocal, an MRCP should be obtained for a more detailed evaluation of the both the pancreatic parenchyma and ducts. If the diagnosis remains in doubt, EUS should be performed with or without pancreas function testing. ERCP remains a last-line diagnostic test and seldom should be used outside of therapeutic purposes. Future advances should target optimizing current diagnostic tools to more accurately diagnose early CP, as it is in this population where the benefits of delaying progression of CP may have the most profound effect. Likely the best way at establishing a diagnosis in these patients is via pancreatic function testing in the setting of indeterminate EUS results. Biomarker studies of pancreas fluid may supplement diagnosis.

  14. Health risks of alcohol use

    MedlinePlus

    Alcoholism - risks; Alcohol abuse - risks; Alcohol dependence - risks; Risky drinking ... pubmed/23698791 . National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism website. Alcohol use disorder. www.niaaa.nih.gov/ ...

  15. Recent Progress in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Herman, Joseph M.; Laheru, Daniel A.; Klein, Alison P.; Erdek, Michael A.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is currently one of the deadliest of the solid malignancies. However, surgery to resect neoplasms of the pancreas is safer and less invasive than ever, novel drug combinations have been shown to improve survival, advances in radiation therapy have resulted in less toxicity, and enormous strides have been made in our understanding of the fundamental genetics of pancreatic cancer. These advances provide hope but they also increase the complexity of caring for patients. It is clear that multidisciplinary care that provides comprehensive and coordinated evaluation and treatment is the most effective way to manage patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:23856911

  16. Necrotizing pancreatitis: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Bendersky, Victoria A; Mallipeddi, Mohan K; Perez, Alexander; Pappas, Theodore N

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common disease that can progress to gland necrosis, which imposes significant risk of morbidity and mortality. In general, the treatment for pancreatitis is a supportive therapy. However, there are several reasons to escalate to surgery or another intervention. This review discusses the pathophysiology as well as medical and interventional management of necrotizing pancreatitis. Current evidence suggests that patients are best served by delaying interventions for at least 4 weeks, draining as a first resort, and debriding recalcitrant tissue using minimally invasive techniques to promote or enhance postoperative recovery while reducing wound-related complications.

  17. Treatment options for chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Issa, Yama; Bruno, Marco J; Bakker, Olaf J; Besselink, Marc G; Schepers, Nicolien J; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Gooszen, Hein G; Boermeester, Marja A

    2014-09-01

    This Review covers the latest developments in the treatment options for chronic pancreatitis. Pain is the most frequent and dominant symptom in patients with chronic pancreatitis, which ranges from severe disabling continuous pain to mild pain attacks and pain-free periods. Conventional treatment strategies and recent changes in the treatment of pain in patients with chronic pancreatitis are outlined. The different treatment options for pain consist of medical therapy, endoscopy or surgery. Their related merits and drawbacks are discussed. Finally, novel insights in the field of genetics and microbiota are summarized, and future perspectives are discussed.

  18. Chronic pancreatitis: A diagnostic dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Duggan, Sinead N; Ní Chonchubhair, Hazel M; Lawal, Oladapo; O’Connor, Donal B; Conlon, Kevin C

    2016-01-01

    Typical clinical symptoms of chronic pancreatitis are vague and non-specific and therefore diagnostic tests are required, none of which provide absolute diagnostic certainly, especially in the early stages of disease. Recently-published guidelines bring much needed structure to the diagnostic work-up of patients with suspected chronic pancreatitis. In addition, novel diagnostic modalities bring promise for the future. The assessment and diagnosis of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency remains challenging and this review contests the accepted perspective that steatorrhea only occurs with > 90% destruction of the gland. PMID:26900292

  19. Nutritional and Metabolic Derangements in Pancreatic Cancer and Pancreatic Resection.

    PubMed

    Gilliland, Taylor M; Villafane-Ferriol, Nicole; Shah, Kevin P; Shah, Rohan M; Tran Cao, Hop S; Massarweh, Nader N; Silberfein, Eric J; Choi, Eugene A; Hsu, Cary; McElhany, Amy L; Barakat, Omar; Fisher, William; Van Buren, George

    2017-03-07

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy with a poor prognosis. The disease and its treatment can cause significant nutritional impairments that often adversely impact patient quality of life (QOL). The pancreas has both exocrine and endocrine functions and, in the setting of cancer, both systems may be affected. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) manifests as weight loss and steatorrhea, while endocrine insufficiency may result in diabetes mellitus. Surgical resection, a central component of pancreatic cancer treatment, may induce or exacerbate these dysfunctions. Nutritional and metabolic dysfunctions in patients with pancreatic cancer lack characterization, and few guidelines exist for nutritional support in patients after surgical resection. We reviewed publications from the past two decades (1995-2016) addressing the nutritional and metabolic status of patients with pancreatic cancer, grouping them into status at the time of diagnosis, status at the time of resection, and status of nutritional support throughout the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer. Here, we summarize the results of these investigations and evaluate the effectiveness of various types of nutritional support in patients after pancreatectomy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC). We outline the following conservative perioperative strategies to optimize patient outcomes and guide the care of these patients: (1) patients with albumin < 2.5 mg/dL or weight loss > 10% should postpone surgery and begin aggressive nutrition supplementation; (2) patients with albumin < 3 mg/dL or weight loss between 5% and 10% should have nutrition supplementation prior to surgery; (3) enteral nutrition (EN) should be preferred as a nutritional intervention over total parenteral nutrition (TPN) postoperatively; and, (4) a multidisciplinary approach should be used to allow for early detection of symptoms of endocrine and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency alongside implementation of appropriate

  20. Nutritional and Metabolic Derangements in Pancreatic Cancer and Pancreatic Resection

    PubMed Central

    Gilliland, Taylor M.; Villafane-Ferriol, Nicole; Shah, Kevin P.; Shah, Rohan M.; Tran Cao, Hop S.; Massarweh, Nader N.; Silberfein, Eric J.; Choi, Eugene A.; Hsu, Cary; McElhany, Amy L.; Barakat, Omar; Fisher, William; Van Buren, George

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy with a poor prognosis. The disease and its treatment can cause significant nutritional impairments that often adversely impact patient quality of life (QOL). The pancreas has both exocrine and endocrine functions and, in the setting of cancer, both systems may be affected. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) manifests as weight loss and steatorrhea, while endocrine insufficiency may result in diabetes mellitus. Surgical resection, a central component of pancreatic cancer treatment, may induce or exacerbate these dysfunctions. Nutritional and metabolic dysfunctions in patients with pancreatic cancer lack characterization, and few guidelines exist for nutritional support in patients after surgical resection. We reviewed publications from the past two decades (1995–2016) addressing the nutritional and metabolic status of patients with pancreatic cancer, grouping them into status at the time of diagnosis, status at the time of resection, and status of nutritional support throughout the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer. Here, we summarize the results of these investigations and evaluate the effectiveness of various types of nutritional support in patients after pancreatectomy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC). We outline the following conservative perioperative strategies to optimize patient outcomes and guide the care of these patients: (1) patients with albumin < 2.5 mg/dL or weight loss > 10% should postpone surgery and begin aggressive nutrition supplementation; (2) patients with albumin < 3 mg/dL or weight loss between 5% and 10% should have nutrition supplementation prior to surgery; (3) enteral nutrition (EN) should be preferred as a nutritional intervention over total parenteral nutrition (TPN) postoperatively; and, (4) a multidisciplinary approach should be used to allow for early detection of symptoms of endocrine and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency alongside implementation of appropriate

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of pancreatitis: An update

    PubMed Central

    Manikkavasakar, Sriluxayini; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Busireddy, Kiran K; Ramalho, Miguel; Nilmini, Viragi; Alagiyawanna, Madhavi; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and staging of acute and chronic pancreatitis and may represent the best imaging technique in the setting of pancreatitis due to its unmatched soft tissue contrast resolution as well as non-ionizing nature and higher safety profile of intravascular contrast media, making it particularly valuable in radiosensitive populations such as pregnant patients, and patients with recurrent pancreatitis requiring multiple follow-up examinations. Additional advantages include the ability to detect early forms of chronic pancreatitis and to better differentiate adenocarcinoma from focal chronic pancreatitis. This review addresses new trends in clinical pancreatic MR imaging emphasizing its role in imaging all types of acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatitis complications and other important differential diagnoses that mimic pancreatitis. PMID:25356038

  2. Undiagnosed pancreatic exocrine insufficiency and chronic pancreatitis in functional GI disorder patients with diarrhea or abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Talley, Nicholas J; Holtmann, Gerald; Nguyen, Quoc Nam; Gibson, Peter; Bampton, Peter; Veysey, Martin; Wong, James; Philcox, Stephen; Koloski, Natasha; Bunby, Lisa; Jones, Michael

    2017-11-01

    A previous UK study showed that 6.1% of patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) had evidence of severe pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI), but these findings need replication. We aimed to identify the prevalence of PEI based on fecal elastase stool testing in consecutive outpatients presenting with chronic unexplained abdominal pain and/or diarrhea and/or IBS-D. Patients aged over 40 years presenting to hospital outpatient clinics from six sites within Australia with unexplained abdominal pain and/or diarrhea for at least 3 months and/or IBS-D were studied. Patients completed validated questionnaires and donated a stool sample in which elastase concentration was measured by ELISA. A concentration of < 100 mcg/g stool represented severe and < 200 mcg/g mild to moderate PEI. Patients whose fecal elastase was < 200 mcg/g underwent testing for pancreatic pathology with an endoscopic ultrasound or abdominal CT. Two hundred eighteen patients (mean age of 60 years, 29.4% male) were studied. PEI was found in 4.6% (95% CI 2.2-8.3%) (n = 10), with five patients (2.3% (95% CI 0.8-5.3%) having severe PEI. Only male sex and heavy alcohol use were significantly associated with abnormal versus normal pancreatic functioning. Of seven patients who underwent endoscopic ultrasound or CT, two had features indicative of chronic pancreatitis. One in 50 patients with IBS-D or otherwise unexplained abdominal pain or diarrhea have an abnormal fecal elastase, but unexpected pancreatic insufficiency was detected in only a minority of these. This study failed to confirm the high prevalence of PEI among patients with unexplained GI symptoms previously reported. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  3. [Pancreatic anastomosis in operative treatment of chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Bellon, E; Izbicki, J R; Bockhorn, M

    2017-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is an irreversible, inflammatory process, which is characterized by progressive fibrosis of the pancreas and leads to abdominal pain, endocrine and exocrine insufficiency. Surgical therapy is indicated by the absence of pain relief and local complications. The target of the surgical approach is to relieve the pancreatic and bile ducts and resection of the fibrotic and calcified parenchyma. Drainage procedures, such as the Partington-Rochelle method, are used in patients with isolated congestion of the pancreatic duct without further organ complications, such as inflammatory processes of the pancreatic head; however, patients with CP often have an inflammatory swelling of the pancreatic head. In this case classical pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) or organ-sparing duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection (DPPHR) with its various techniques (e.g. Beger, Frey, Bern and V‑shape) can be applied. Due to similar long-term results PD should be carried out in cases of suspicion or detection of malignancies and DPPHR for treatment of CP.

  4. Pancreatic duct stones in patients with chronic pancreatitis: surgical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo-Nan; Zhang, Tai-Ping; Zhao, Yu-Pei; Liao, Quan; Dai, Meng-Hua; Zhan, Han-Xiang

    2010-08-01

    Pancreatic duct stone (PDS) is a common complication of chronic pancreatitis. Surgery is a common therapeutic option for PDS. In this study we assessed the surgical procedures for PDS in patients with chronic pancreatitis at our hospital. Between January 2004 and September 2009, medical records from 35 patients diagnosed with PDS associated with chronic pancreatitis were retrospectively reviewed and the patients were followed up for up to 67 months. The 35 patients underwent ultrasonography, computed tomography, or both, with an overall accuracy rate of 85.7%. Of these patients, 31 underwent the modified Puestow procedure, 2 underwent the Whipple procedure, 1 underwent simple stone removal by duct incision, and 1 underwent pancreatic abscess drainage. Of the 35 patients, 28 were followed up for 4-67 months. There was no postoperative death before discharge or during follow-up. After the modified Puestow procedure, abdominal pain was reduced in patients with complete or incomplete stone clearance (P>0.05). Steatorrhea and diabetes mellitus developed in several patients during a long-term follow-up. Surgery, especially the modified Puestow procedure, is effective and safe for patients with PDS associated with chronic pancreatitis. Decompression of intraductal pressure rather than complete clearance of all stones predicts postoperative outcome.

  5. Pancreatic stellate cell: Pandora's box for pancreatic disease biology.

    PubMed

    Bynigeri, Ratnakar R; Jakkampudi, Aparna; Jangala, Ramaiah; Subramanyam, Chivukula; Sasikala, Mitnala; Rao, G Venkat; Reddy, D Nageshwar; Talukdar, Rupjyoti

    2017-01-21

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) were identified in the early 1980s, but received much attention after 1998 when the methods to isolate and culture them from murine and human sources were developed. PSCs contribute to a small proportion of all pancreatic cells under physiological condition, but are essential for maintaining the normal pancreatic architecture. Quiescent PSCs are characterized by the presence of vitamin A laden lipid droplets. Upon PSC activation, these perinuclear lipid droplets disappear from the cytosol, attain a myofibroblast like phenotype and expresses the activation marker, alpha smooth muscle actin. PSCs maintain their activated phenotype via an autocrine loop involving different cytokines and contribute to progressive fibrosis in chronic pancreatitis (CP) and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Several pathways ( e.g ., JAK-STAT, Smad, Wnt signaling, Hedgehog etc .), transcription factors and miRNAs have been implicated in the inflammatory and profibrogenic function of PSCs. The role of PSCs goes much beyond fibrosis/desmoplasia in PDAC. It is now shown that PSCs are involved in significant crosstalk between the pancreatic cancer cells and the cancer stroma. These interactions result in tumour progression, metastasis, tumour hypoxia, immune evasion and drug resistance. This is the rationale for therapeutic preclinical and clinical trials that have targeted PSCs and the cancer stroma.

  6. Pancreatic stellate cell: Pandora's box for pancreatic disease biology

    PubMed Central

    Bynigeri, Ratnakar R; Jakkampudi, Aparna; Jangala, Ramaiah; Subramanyam, Chivukula; Sasikala, Mitnala; Rao, G Venkat; Reddy, D Nageshwar; Talukdar, Rupjyoti

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) were identified in the early 1980s, but received much attention after 1998 when the methods to isolate and culture them from murine and human sources were developed. PSCs contribute to a small proportion of all pancreatic cells under physiological condition, but are essential for maintaining the normal pancreatic architecture. Quiescent PSCs are characterized by the presence of vitamin A laden lipid droplets. Upon PSC activation, these perinuclear lipid droplets disappear from the cytosol, attain a myofibroblast like phenotype and expresses the activation marker, alpha smooth muscle actin. PSCs maintain their activated phenotype via an autocrine loop involving different cytokines and contribute to progressive fibrosis in chronic pancreatitis (CP) and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Several pathways (e.g., JAK-STAT, Smad, Wnt signaling, Hedgehog etc.), transcription factors and miRNAs have been implicated in the inflammatory and profibrogenic function of PSCs. The role of PSCs goes much beyond fibrosis/desmoplasia in PDAC. It is now shown that PSCs are involved in significant crosstalk between the pancreatic cancer cells and the cancer stroma. These interactions result in tumour progression, metastasis, tumour hypoxia, immune evasion and drug resistance. This is the rationale for therapeutic preclinical and clinical trials that have targeted PSCs and the cancer stroma. PMID:28210075

  7. Risk factors for pancreatitis in older women: the Iowa Women's Health Study.

    PubMed

    Prizment, Anna E; Jensen, Eric H; Hopper, Anne M; Virnig, Beth A; Anderson, Kristin E

    2015-07-01

    Pancreatitis-an inflammation of pancreas-is a severe and costly disease. Although many risk factors for pancreatitis are known, many pancreatitis cases, especially in elderly women, are of unknown etiology. Risk factors for acute pancreatitis (AP) and chronic pancreatitis (CP) were assessed in a prospective cohort (n = 36,436 women, aged ≥ 65 years). Exposures were self-reported at baseline. Pancreatitis was ascertained by linkage to Medicare claims (1986-2004) categorized by a physician as follows: "AP", one AP episode (n = 511) or "CP", 2+ AP or 1+ CP episodes (n = 149). Multivariable odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals for AP and CP were calculated using multinomial logistic regression. Alcohol use was not associated with AP or CP. Heavy smoking (40+ vs. 0 pack-years) was associated with a twofold increased OR for CP. For body mass index greater than or equal to 30 versus less than 25 kg/m(2), the ORs were 1.35 (1.07-1.70) for AP (P trend = .009) and 0.59 (0.37-0.94) for CP (P trend = .01). ORs for AP and CP were increased for hormone replacement therapy use, heart disease, and hypertension. There were positive significant associations between protein and total fat intake for CP and AP. We identified factors associated with AP and CP that may be specific to older women. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Stages of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All Cancer ... also called nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI). Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy : A type of radionuclide scan that may ...

  9. Valsartan-induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Can, Burak; Sali, Mursel; Batman, Adnan; Yilmaz, Hasan; Korkmaz, Ugur; Celebi, Altay; Senturk, Omer; Hulagu, Sadettin

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal toxicity is uncommon among patients treated with angiotensin II receptor antagonists. A 58-year-old man presented with nausea, vomiting and constant pain in the epigastrium that radiated to the flanks. He received treatment with valsartan (160 mg daily) for hypertension. The clinical, biochemical and radiological findings were compatible with a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. After the patient achieved a clinical and biochemical recovery, the valsartan therapy was started again. Six weeks later, he returned to the hospital with an attack of pancreatitis. Subsequently, he returned with repeated attacks of pancreatitis twice, and the valsartan was discontinued. Ten months after the treatment, the patient had no complaints. When severe abdominal symptoms occur for no apparent reason during treatment with valsartan, a diagnosis of pancreatitis should be considered.

  10. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for pancreatic cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  11. Risk factors and nomogram for pancreatic pseudocysts in chronic pancreatitis: A cohort of 1998 patients.

    PubMed

    Hao, Lu; Pan, Jun; Wang, Dan; Bi, Ya-Wei; Ji, Jun-Tao; Xin, Lei; Liao, Zhuan; Du, Ting-Ting; Lin, Jin-Huan; Zhang, Di; Zeng, Xiang-Peng; Ye, Bo; Zou, Wen-Bin; Chen, Hui; Xie, Ting; Li, Bai-Rong; Zheng, Zhao-Hong; Hu, Liang-Hao; Li, Zhao-Shen

    2017-07-01

    Pancreatic pseudocyst is a common complication of chronic pancreatitis. The identification of risk factors and development of a nomogram for pancreatic pseudocysts in chronic pancreatitis patients may contribute to the early diagnosis and intervention of pancreatic pseudocysts. Patients with chronic pancreatitis admitted to our center from January 2000 to December 2013 were enrolled. Cumulative rates of pancreatic pseudocysts after the onset of chronic pancreatitis and after the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis were calculated. Patients were randomly assigned, in a 2:1 ratio, to the training and validation cohort. Based on the training cohort, risk factors were identified through Cox proportional hazards regression model, and nomogram was developed. Internal and external validations were performed based on the training and validation cohort, respectively. With a total of 1998 patients, pancreatic pseudocysts were detected in 228 (11.41%) patients. Age at the onset of chronic pancreatitis, smoking, and severe acute pancreatitis were identified risk factors for pancreatic pseudocysts development while steatorrhea and pancreatic stones were protective factors. Incorporating these five factors, the nomogram achieved good concordance indexes of 0.735 and 0.628 in the training and validation cohorts, respectively, with well-fitted calibration curves. The nomogram achieved an individualized prediction of pancreatic pseudocysts development in chronic pancreatitis. It may help the early diagnosis and management of pancreatic pseudocysts. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. [Morphology and pathogenesis of visceral manifestations of chronic alcoholism].

    PubMed

    Lebedev, S P

    1982-01-01

    Chronic alcoholism is accompanied by systemic involvement of the internal organs. Clinico-morphological forms of chronic alcoholism are distinguished on the basis of the prevailing organ pathology, Morphological data are presented, and pathogenesis of the lesions of the liver, heart, pancreas, and kidneys in patients with chronic alcoholism is analysed. The hepatic form may present alcoholic dystrophy, hepatitis or cirrhosis which are stages of progressing hepatopathy. The toxic and metabolic effect of ethanol is important in the pathogenesis of liver lesion. The cardiac form is characterized by the development of alcoholic myocardiodystrophy. In addition to the toxic influence of ethanol, hormonal and electrolyte changes and microcirculatory disorders play a role in its pathogenesis. Chronic calcifying pancreatitis in chronic alcoholism is associated with the effect of ethanol on the mediatory system. The renal form any present necronephrosis, hepatorenal syndrome, glomerulonephritis or pyelonephritis. Their pathogenesis is determined by toxicity of ethanol, circulation of immune complexes in the blood, or immunosuppression.

  13. Alcohol and the heart: to abstain or not to abstain?

    PubMed

    Movva, Rajesh; Figueredo, Vincent M

    2013-04-15

    Alcohol has been consumed by most societies over the last 7000 years. Abraham Lincoln said "It has long been recognized that the problems with alcohol relate not to the use of a bad thing, but to the abuse of a good thing." Light to moderate alcohol consumption reduces the incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD), ischemic stroke, peripheral arterial disease, CHD mortality, and all-cause mortality, especially in the western populations. However, heavy alcohol consumption is detrimental causing cardiomyopathy, cardiac arrhythmias, hepatic cirrhosis, pancreatitis, and hemorrhagic stroke. In this article, we review the effects of alcohol on CHD, individual cardiovascular risk factors, cardiomyopathy, and cardiac arrhythmias, including the most recent evidence of the effects of alcohol on CHD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Pancreatic Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-07

    Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of the Pancreas; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer

  15. Clinical pancreatic islet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, A M James; Pokrywczynska, Marta; Ricordi, Camillo

    2017-05-01

    Clinical pancreatic islet transplantation can be considered one of the safest and least invasive transplant procedures. Remarkable progress has occurred in both the technical aspects of islet cell processing and the outcomes of clinical islet transplantation. With >1,500 patients treated since 2000, this therapeutic strategy has moved from a curiosity to a realistic treatment option for selected patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (that is, those with hypoglycaemia unawareness, severe hypoglycaemic episodes and glycaemic lability). This Review outlines the techniques required for human islet isolation, in vitro culture before the transplant and clinical islet transplantation, and discusses indications, optimization of recipient immunosuppression and management of adjunctive immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory strategies. The potential risks, long-term outcomes and advances in treatment after the transplant are also discussed to further move this treatment towards becoming a more widely available option for patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and eventually a potential cure.

  16. Pancreatic Cancer, Inflammation and Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Zambirinis, Constantinos P.; Pushalkar, Smruti; Saxena, Deepak; Miller, George

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide. No effective screening methods exist and available treatment modalities do not effectively treat the disease. Inflammatory conditions such as pancreatitis represent a well-known risk for pancreatic cancer development. Yet only in the past two decades has pancreatic cancer been recognized as an inflammation-driven cancer, and the precise mechanisms underlying the pathogenic role of inflammation are beginning to be explored in detail. A substantial amount of preclinical and clinical evidence suggests that bacteria are likely to influence this process by activating immune receptors and perpetuating cancer-associated inflammation. The recent explosion of investigations into the human microbiome have highlighted how perturbations of commensal bacterial populations can promote inflammation and promote disease processes, including carcinogenesis. The elucidation of the interplay between inflammation and microbiome in the context of pancreatic carcinogenesis will provide novel targets for intervention in order to both prevent and treat pancreatic cancer more efficiently. Further studies towards this direction are urgently needed. PMID:24855007

  17. Pancreatic carcinogenesis: apoptosis and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Onizuka, Shinya; Kawakami, Shunsuke; Taniguchi, Ken; Fujioka, Hikaru; Miyashita, Kosei

    2004-04-01

    Apoptosis and angiogenesis are critical biologic processes that are altered during carcinogenesis. Both apoptosis and angiogenesis may play an important role in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Despite numerous advances in the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer, its prognosis remains dismal and a new therapeutic approach is much needed. Recent research has revealed that apoptosis and angiogenesis are closely interrelated. Several reports show that a tumor suppresser gene that is expressed in pancreatic carcinoma and related to malignant potential can induce apoptosis and also inhibit angiogenesis. At present, it is generally accepted that tumor growth in cancers, including pancreatic cancer, depends on angiogenesis. We have identified 2 new angiogenesis inhibitors from a conditioned medium of human pancreatic carcinoma cell line (BxPC-3): antiangiogenic antithrombin III (aaAT-III) and vitamin D binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-maf). These molecules were able to regress tumors in severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) mice, demonstrating potent inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation. Moreover, the angiogenesis inhibitors induced tumor dormancy in the animal model. These results suggest that antiangiogenic therapy using angiogenesis inhibitors may become a new strategy for treatment of pancreatic cancer in the near future.

  18. Pancreatic cancer: Advances in treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Somala; Van Buren II, George; Fisher, William E

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a leading cause of cancer mortality and the incidence of this disease is expected to continue increasing. While patients with pancreatic cancer have traditionally faced a dismal prognosis, over the past several years various advances in diagnosis and treatment have begun to positively impact this disease. Identification of effective combinations of existing chemotherapeutic agents, such as the FOLFIRINOX and the gemcitabine + nab-paclitaxel regimen, has improved survival for selected patients although concerns regarding their toxicity profiles remain. A better understanding of pancreatic carcinogenesis has identified several pre-malignant precursor lesions, such as pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias, intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, and cystic neoplasms. Imaging technology has also evolved dramatically so as to allow early detection of these lesions and thereby facilitate earlier management. Surgery remains a cornerstone of treatment for patients with resectable pancreatic tumors, and advances in surgical technique have allowed patients to undergo resection with decreasing perioperative morbidity and mortality. Surgery has also become feasible in selected patients with borderline resectable tumors as a result of neoadjuvant therapy. Furthermore, pancreatectomy involving vascular reconstruction and pancreatectomy with minimally invasive techniques have demonstrated safety without significantly compromising oncologic outcomes. Lastly, a deeper understanding of molecular aberrations contributing to the development of pancreatic cancer shows promise for future development of more targeted and safe therapeutic agents. PMID:25071330

  19. Pancreatic cancer: advances in treatment.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Somala; Van Buren, George; Fisher, William E

    2014-07-28

    Pancreatic cancer is a leading cause of cancer mortality and the incidence of this disease is expected to continue increasing. While patients with pancreatic cancer have traditionally faced a dismal prognosis, over the past several years various advances in diagnosis and treatment have begun to positively impact this disease. Identification of effective combinations of existing chemotherapeutic agents, such as the FOLFIRINOX and the gemcitabine + nab-paclitaxel regimen, has improved survival for selected patients although concerns regarding their toxicity profiles remain. A better understanding of pancreatic carcinogenesis has identified several pre-malignant precursor lesions, such as pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias, intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, and cystic neoplasms. Imaging technology has also evolved dramatically so as to allow early detection of these lesions and thereby facilitate earlier management. Surgery remains a cornerstone of treatment for patients with resectable pancreatic tumors, and advances in surgical technique have allowed patients to undergo resection with decreasing perioperative morbidity and mortality. Surgery has also become feasible in selected patients with borderline resectable tumors as a result of neoadjuvant therapy. Furthermore, pancreatectomy involving vascular reconstruction and pancreatectomy with minimally invasive techniques have demonstrated safety without significantly compromising oncologic outcomes. Lastly, a deeper understanding of molecular aberrations contributing to the development of pancreatic cancer shows promise for future development of more targeted and safe therapeutic agents.

  20. Etiology, pathology, management and prognosis of chronic pancreatitis in Chinese population: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Camara, Soriba Naby; Ramdany, Sonam; Zhao, Gang; Gou, Shan-Miao; Xiong, Jiong-Xin; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Yin, Tao; Yang, Ming; Balde, Oumar Taibata; Barry, Ahmed Boubacar; Adji, Seid; Li, Xiang; Jin, Yan; Wu, He-Shui; Wang, Chun-You

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the etiology, pathological characteristics, management and prognosis of chronic pancreatitis in the Chinese population. The clinical data of 142 patients with chronic pancreatitis were retrospectively studied. All patients were of Chinese nationality and hospitalized from January 2008 to December 2011. Their ages ranged from 14 to 76 years, with a mean of 43 years. Of 142 patients, there were 72 cases of obstructive chronic pancreatitis (50.70%), 19 cases of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (13.38%), 14 cases of autoimmune pancreatitis (9.86%) and 37 cases of undetermined etiology (26.06%). Pathologically, the average inflammatory mass diameter was 3.8 ± 3.3 cm, biliary obstruction occurred in 36 cases, gall stones in 70 cases, calcification in 88 cases, ductal dilatation in 61 cases, side branch dilatation in 32 cases, ductal irregularity in 10 cases, lymphocytic inflammation in 23 cases, obliterative phlebitis in 14 cases, extra pancreatic lesion in 19 cases and fibrosis in 142 cases. Location of pancreatic lesion in the region of head (n=97), neck (n=16), body (n=12), tail (n=15) and whole pancreas (n=2) influenced the choice of surgical procedures. Ninety-four patients (66.20%) received surgical treatment and 33.80% received other treatments. After operation, 80.85% of 94 patients experienced decreased pain, and 8.51% of 94 showed recovery of endocrine function but with a complication rate of 12.77%. All the operations were performed successfully. According to the pain scale of European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (QLQ-C30) a decrease from 76 ± 22 to 14 ± 18 was observed. Etiology, pathological characteristics, management and prognosis of chronic pancreatitis in the Chinese population vary from others.

  1. Alcohol and pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Drinking alcohol during pregnancy; Fetal alcohol syndrome - pregnancy; FAS - fetal alcohol syndrome ... lead to lifelong damage. DANGERS OF ALCOHOL DURING PREGNANCY Drinking a lot of alcohol during pregnancy can ...

  2. Alcohol Energy Drinks

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home / About Addiction / Alcohol / Alcohol Energy Drinks Alcohol Energy Drinks Read 34001 times font size decrease font size increase font size Print Email Alcohol energy drinks (AEDs) or Caffeinated alcoholic beverages (CABs) are ...

  3. Enteric hyperoxaluria in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Demoulin, Nathalie; Issa, Zaina; Crott, Ralph; Morelle, Johann; Danse, Etienne; Wallemacq, Pierre; Jadoul, Michel; Deprez, Pierre H

    2017-05-01

    Chronic pancreatitis may lead to steatorrhea, enteric hyperoxaluria, and kidney damage. However, the prevalence and determinants of hyperoxaluria in chronic pancreatitis patients as well as its association with renal function decline have not been investigated.We performed an observational study. Urine oxalate to creatinine ratio was assessed on 2 independent random urine samples in consecutive adult patients with chronic pancreatitis followed at the outpatient clinic from March 1 to October 31, 2012. Baseline characteristics and annual estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) change during follow-up were compared between patients with hyper- and normo-oxaluria.A total of 48 patients with chronic pancreatitis were included. The etiology of the disease was toxic (52%), idiopathic (27%), obstructive (11%), autoimmune (6%), or genetic (4%). Hyperoxaluria (defined as urine oxalate to creatinine ratio >32 mg/g) was found in 23% of patients. Multivariate regression analysis identified clinical steatorrhea, high fecal acid steatocrit, and pancreatic atrophy as independent predictors of hyperoxaluria. Taken together, a combination of clinical steatorrhea, steatocrit level >31%, and pancreatic atrophy was associated with a positive predictive value of 100% for hyperoxaluria. On the contrary, none of the patients with a fecal elastase-1 level >100 μg/g had hyperoxaluria. Longitudinal evolution of eGFR was available in 71% of the patients, with a mean follow-up of 904 days. After adjustment for established determinants of renal function decline (gender, diabetes, bicarbonate level, baseline eGFR, and proteinuria), a urine oxalate to creatinine ratio >32 mg/g was associated with a higher risk of eGFR decline.Hyperoxaluria is highly prevalent in patients with chronic pancreatitis and associated with faster decline in renal function. A high urine oxalate to creatinine ratio in patients with chronic pancreatitis is best predicted by clinical steatorrhea, a high acid

  4. VX15/2503 and Immunotherapy in Resectable Pancreatic and Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-12-26

    Colon Carcinoma Metastatic in the Liver; Colorectal Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Resectable Pancreatic Carcinoma; Stage I Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer

  5. Alcohol conversion

    DOEpatents

    Wachs, Israel E.; Cai, Yeping

    2002-01-01

    Preparing an aldehyde from an alcohol by contacting the alcohol in the presence of oxygen with a catalyst prepared by contacting an intimate mixture containing metal oxide support particles and particles of a catalytically active metal oxide from Groups VA, VIA, or VIIA, with a gaseous stream containing an alcohol to cause metal oxide from the discrete catalytically active metal oxide particles to migrate to the metal oxide support particles and to form a monolayer of catalytically active metal oxide on said metal oxide support particles.

  6. Pancreatic Carcinoma: the Disease that Kills.

    PubMed

    Kabashi, Serbeze; Dedushi, Kreshnike; Ramadani, Naser; Mucaj, Sefedin; Hoxhaj, Asrtrit; Jerliu, Naim

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this case report is to demonstrate the clinical symptoms and laboratory changes that have occurred very late and were very few in number even the imaging studies performed at that time showed an intensive local tumor growth associated with the wide infiltration of the both adjacent and distant upper abdominal structures. A 71-year-old male patient who was a chronic alcohol abuser and ex smoker (quit smoking 8 years earlier) presented with symptoms of mild pain on epigastric region that irradiated toward the back and significant weight loss. The initial ultrasonography (US) examination was performed, followed by the lab tests and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) examination. The diagnostic studies confirmed the presence of the pancreatic's body mass. The ordered laparoscopic evaluation established definitive diagnosis. Initial US examination showed heterogeneous pseudo-cystic changes and slight edema of the pancreatic parenchyma associated with the multiple oval hyperechogenic lesions of liver - the signs highly suggestive of secondary metastatic deposits. The other imaging findings that were obtained with the use of the MDCT confirmed the presence of an expansive primary process of the body of the pancreas associated with the secondary metastatic changes in liver. In addition, the consecutive lymphadenopathy was revealed along hepatoduodenal ligament, retropancreatic region and intraperitoneal compartment. Tumor markers resulted with the high values of the AFP of 2.3, CA19-9 of 423.0 U/mL, and CEA of 219.0 ng/mL. The specimen of the tumor tissue taken during laparoscopic biopsy was sent for histologic examination and the final result was "metastatic adenocarcinoma of pancreas". Pancreatic body carcinoma has always been associated with poor prognosis because diagnosis is made at the advanced stage of the disease. Therefore, poor prognosis might be improved if early diagnosis could be made. Recent researches confirmed genetic predisposition for

  7. Lipolysis of Visceral Adipocyte Triglyceride by Pancreatic Lipases Converts Mild Acute Pancreatitis to Severe Pancreatitis Independent of Necrosis and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Krutika; Trivedi, Ram N.; Durgampudi, Chandra; Noel, Pawan; Cline, Rachel A.; DeLany, James P.; Navina, Sarah; Singh, Vijay P.

    2016-01-01

    Visceral fat necrosis has been associated with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) for over 100 years; however, its pathogenesis and role in SAP outcomes are poorly understood. Based on recent work suggesting that pancreatic fat lipolysis plays an important role in SAP, we evaluated the role of pancreatic lipases in SAP-associated visceral fat necrosis, the inflammatory response, local injury, and outcomes of acute pancreatitis (AP). For this, cerulein pancreatitis was induced in lean and obese mice, alone or with the lipase inhibitor orlistat and parameters of AP induction (serum amylase and lipase), fat necrosis, pancreatic necrosis, and multisystem organ failure, and inflammatory response were assessed. Pancreatic lipases were measured in fat necrosis and were overexpressed in 3T3-L1 cells. We noted obesity to convert mild cerulein AP to SAP with greater cytokines, unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs), and multisystem organ failure, and 100% mortality without affecting AP induction or pancreatic necrosis. Increased pancreatic lipase amounts and activity were noted in the extensive visceral fat necrosis of dying obese mice. Lipase inhibition reduced fat necrosis, UFAs, organ failure, and mortality but not the parameters of AP induction. Pancreatic lipase expression increased lipolysis in 3T3-L1 cells. We conclude that UFAs generated via lipolysis of visceral fat by pancreatic lipases convert mild AP to SAP independent of pancreatic necrosis and the inflammatory response. PMID:25579844

  8. Acute and chronic pancreatitis: surgical management.

    PubMed

    Dzakovic, Alexander; Superina, Riccardo

    2012-08-01

    Pancreatitis is becoming increasingly prevalent in children, posing new challenges to pediatric health care providers. Although some general adult treatment paradigms are applicable in the pediatric population, diagnostic workup and surgical management of acute and chronic pancreatitis have to be tailored to anatomic and pathophysiological entities peculiar to children. Nonbiliary causes of acute pancreatitis in children are generally managed nonoperatively with hydration, close biochemical and clinical observation, and early initiation of enteral feeds. Surgical intervention including cholecystectomy or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is often required in acute biliary pancreatitis, whereas infected pancreatic necrosis remains a rare absolute indication for pancreatic debridement and drainage via open, laparoscopic, or interventional radiologic procedure. Chronic pancreatitis is characterized by painful irreversible changes of the parenchyma and ducts, which may result in or be caused by inadequate ductal drainage. A variety of surgical procedures providing drainage, denervation, resection, or a combination thereof are well established to relieve pain and preserve pancreatic function. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Asparaginase-associated pancreatitis in children.

    PubMed

    Raja, Raheel Altaf; Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Frandsen, Thomas Leth

    2012-10-01

    l-asparaginase has been an element in the treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma since the late 1960s and remains an essential component of their combination chemotherapy. Among the major toxicities associated with l-asparaginase therapy are pancreatitis, allergic reactions, thrombotic events, hepatotoxicity and hyperlipidaemia. Acute pancreatitis is one of the most common reasons for stopping treatment with l-asparaginase. Short-term complications of asparaginase-associated pancreatitis include development of pseudocysts and pancreatic necrosis. Long-term complications include chronic pancreatitis and diabetes. The pathophysiology of asparaginase-associated pancreatitis remains to be uncovered. Individual clinical and genetic risk factors have been identified, but they are only weak predictors of pancreatitis. This review explores the definition, possible risk factors, treatment and complications of asparaginase-associated pancreatitis. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Role of pancreatic fat in the outcomes of pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Chathur; Navina, Sarah; Singh, Vijay P

    2014-01-01

    The role of obesity in relation to various disease processes is being increasingly studied, with reports over the last several years increasingly mentioning its association with worse outcomes in acute disease. Obesity has also gained recognition as a risk factor for severe acute pancreatitis (SAP).The mortality in SAP may be as high as 30% and is usually attributable to multi system organ failure (MSOF) earlier in the disease, and complications of necrotizing pancreatitis later [9-11]. To date there is no specific treatment for acute pancreatitis (AP) and the management is largely expectant and supportive. Obesity in general has also been associated with poor outcomes in sepsis and other pathological states including trauma and burns. With the role of unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) as propagators in SAP having recently come to light and with the recognition of acute lipotoxicity, there is now an opportunity to explore different strategies to reduce the mortality and morbidity in SAP and potentially other disease states associated with such a pathophysiology. In this review we will discuss the role of fat and implications of the consequent acute lipotoxicity on the outcomes of acute pancreatitis in lean and obese states and during acute on chronic pancreatitis. Copyright © 2014 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. ROLE OF PANCREATIC FAT IN THE OUTCOMES OF PANCREATITIS

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Chathur; Navina, Sarah; Singh, Vijay P.

    2014-01-01

    The role of obesity in relation to various disease processes is being increasingly studied, with reports over the last several years increasingly mentioning its association with worse outcomes in acute disease. Obesity has also gained recognition as a risk factor for severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) [1–8]. The mortality in SAP may be as high as 30% and is usually attributable to multi system organ failure (MSOF) earlier in the disease, and complications of necrotizing pancreatitis later [9–11]. To date there is no specific treatment for acute pancreatitis (AP) and the management is largely expectant and supportive. Obesity in general has also been associated with poor outcomes in sepsis and other pathological states including trauma and burns [12–14]. With the role of unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) as propagators in SAP having recently come to light [15] and with the recognition of acute lipotoxicity, there is now an opportunity to explore different strategies to reduce the mortality and morbidity in SAP and potentially other disease states associated with such a pathophysiology. In this review we will discuss the role of fat and implications of the consequent acute lipotoxicity on the outcomes of acute pancreatitis in lean and obese states and during acute on chronic pancreatitis. PMID:25278311

  12. Laparoscopic lateral pancreaticojejunostomy and laparoscopic Berne modification of Beger procedure for the treatment of chronic pancreatitis: the first UK experience.

    PubMed

    Khaled, Yazan S; Ammori, Basil J

    2014-10-01

    Pancreatic resection and/or ductal drainage are common surgical options in the management of unremitting abdominal pain of chronic pancreatitis (CP). We describe the results of the largest UK series of laparoscopic approach to pancreatic duct drainage and head resection for CP. Patients with CP and intractable abdominal pain requiring duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection (Berne modification of Beger procedure) or Puestow procedure were offered laparoscopic surgery by a single surgeon. The results shown represent median (range). Six patients (3 males) with CP (alcohol induced, n=4; idiopathic, n=2) underwent surgery between 2009 and 2012. The pancreatic duct diameter was 8.75 (6 to 11) mm. Five patients have had lateral pancreaticojejunostomy and 1 patient underwent Berne modification of Beger procedure, all of which were completed laparoscopically. The operating time was 277.5 (250 to 360) minutes. There were no deaths and 1 patient was readmitted 10 days postoperatively and had laparotomy for pancreatic bleeding after pancreaticojejunostomy (morbidity, 17%). The hospital stay was 5 (5 to 8) days. At a follow-up of 14.2 (10 to 35) months, 4 of the patients were pain free, whereas 2 patients required one third and half of the preoperative oral opioid dose for pain control. The laparoscopic approach to pancreatic duct drainage and duodenum-preserving head resection in carefully selected patients and in experienced hands is feasible and safe with good short-term results and potential advantages. Further expansion of experience and longer follow-up is required.

  13. Environmental risk factors for pancreatic cancer: an update.

    PubMed

    Barone, Elisa; Corrado, Alda; Gemignani, Federica; Landi, Stefano

    2016-11-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is one of the most aggressive diseases. Only 10 % of all PC cases are thought to be due to genetic factors. Here, we analyzed the most recently published case-control association studies, meta-analyses, and cohort studies with the aim to summarize the main environmental factors that could have a role in PC. Among the most dangerous agents involved in the initiation phase, there are the inhalation of cigarette smoke, and the exposure to mutagenic nitrosamines, organ-chlorinated compounds, heavy metals, and ionizing radiations. Moreover, pancreatitis, high doses of alcohol drinking, the body microbial infections, obesity, diabetes, gallstones and/or cholecystectomy, and the accumulation of asbestos fibers seem to play a crucial role in the progression of the disease. However, some of these agents act both as initiators and promoters in pancreatic acinar cells. Protective agents include dietary flavonoids, marine omega-3, vitamin D, fruit, vegetables, and the habit of regular physical activity. The identification of the factors involved in PC initiation and progression could be of help in establishing novel therapeutic approaches by targeting the molecular signaling pathways responsive to these stimuli. Moreover, the identification of these factors could facilitate the development of strategies for an early diagnosis or measures of risk reduction for high-risk people.

  14. Discovering the route from inflammation to pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    MOMI, N.; KAUR, S.; KRISHN, S. R.; BATRA, S. K.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) remains a complex malignancy with the worst prognosis, lack of early diagnostic symptoms and resistance to conventional chemo- and radiotherapies. A better understanding of the etiology and early developmental events of PC requires profound attention. The evolution of fully blown PC from initial pancreatic injury is a multi-factorial phenomenon with a series of sequential events. The initial acute infection or tissue damage triggers inflammation that, in conjunction with innate immunity, establishes a state of homeostasis to limit harm to the body. Recurrent pancreatic injuries due to genetic susceptibility, smoking, unhealthy diet, and alcohol abuse induces a pro-inflammatory milieu, consisting of various types of immune cells, cytokines, chemokines, growth factors and restructured extracellular matrix, leading to prolonged inflammatory/chronic conditions. Cells having sustained DNA damage and/or mutagenic assault take advantage of this prolonged inflammatory response and aid in the initiation and development of neoplastic/fibrotic events. Eventually, many tumor-stromal interactions result in a chaotic environment accompanied by a loss of immune surveillance and repair response, thereby leading to PC. A better understanding of the inflammatory markers defining this “injury-inflammation-cancer” pathway would help to identify novel molecular targets for early screening and therapeutic intervention for this lethal malignancy. PMID:23207606

  15. Diet and pancreatic cancer: many questions with few certainties.

    PubMed

    Cappellani, A; Cavallaro, A; Di Vita, M; Zanghi, A; Piccolo, G; Lo Menzo, E; Cavallaro, V; Malaguarnera, M; Giaquinta, A; Veroux, M; Cimino, L; Berretta, M

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND, OBJECTIVES: Pancreatic cancer ranks fourth for cancer mortality for men and women in the United States. This is a particularly devastating cancer since the case-fatality proportion approaches 90% within 12 months following diagnosis. Therefore, understanding the etiology and identifying the risk factors are essential for the primary prevention of this deadly disease. Of the few potentially modifiable risk factors that have been identified, cigarette smoking, history of diabetes mellitus, and obesity seem to be among the most consistent, but the effect of dietary factors is still unclear. The aim of our study is to review of the literature examining the potential role of carbohydrates, fatty acids, meat, fruit and vegetables, alcohol. Although large prospective cohort studies with questionnaire based analyses will continue to have much to offer in defining predisposing factors for difficult diseases, such as pancreatic cancer, unfortunately dietary questionnaires do not reflect the bioavailability of the nutrients from various foods, the level of absorption from the digestive tract, or individual differences in metabolism. Greater use of participant-derived biological samples, banked plasma, germline DNA, and tumour tissue samples may help to the understanding of pancreatic cancer pathogenesis.

  16. Genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity in tropical calcific pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Paliwal, Sumit; Bhaskar, Seema; Chandak, Giriraj R

    2014-12-14

    Tropical calcific pancreatitis (TCP) is a form of chronic non-alcoholic pancreatitis initially reported in the developing parts of the tropical world. The clinical phenotype of TCP has undergone marked changes since its first description in 1968. The disease is now seen in relatively older people with less severe symptoms. In addition, there are varying reports on the proportion of cases presenting with imaging abnormalities like calcification, ductal dilation, and glandular atrophy. Significant progress has also been made in understanding the etiopathology of TCP. The role of malnutrition and cassava toxicity in its pathogenesis is disproven and few studies have focused on the role of micronutrient deficiency and oxidative stress in the etiopathogenesis of TCP. Emerging evidence support an important role for genetic risk factors in TCP. Several studies have shown that, rather than mutations in trypsinogens, variants in serine protease inhibitor kazal type 1, cathepsin B, chymotrypsin C, cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator, and carboxypeptidase A1, predict risk of TCP. These studies also provided evidence of mutational heterogeneity between TCP and chronic pancreatitis in Western populations. The current review summarizes recent advances that have implications in the understanding of the pathophysiology and thus, heterogeneity in genotype-phenotype correlations in TCP.

  17. Serial computed tomography scanning in acute pancreatitis: a prospective study.

    PubMed Central

    London, N J; Neoptolemos, J P; Lavelle, J; Bailey, I; James, D

    1989-01-01

    One hundred and two patients with acute pancreatitis had abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans within 72 hours of admission, at one week and at six weeks. Twenty eight attacks were clinically severe, 74 clinically mild. Ninety three (91%) admission scans, 85 (84%) one week scans, and 52 (51%) six week scans were abnormal. The aetiology of the pancreatitis could be inferred from 28 (27%) of admission scans, the CT sign of fatty liver having a sensitivity of 21% and specificity of 100% for alcoholic aetiology. The sensitivity of CT for gall stone aetiology was 34%, specificity 100%. The pancreatic size indices (max anteroposterior measurement of head x max anteroposterior measurement of body) of those patients with severe attacks were significantly greater than those with mild attacks on admission, at one week and at six weeks (p less than 0.004). Fourteen pseudocysts were detected by CT, five (36%) of which were clinically apparent. The pseudocyst size indices (max anteroposterior x max transverse measurement) of the pseudocysts which were clinically apparent were significantly greater than those which were not apparent (p less than 0.01) and only those pseudocysts with a size index greater than or equal to 15 cm2 required treatment. PMID:2651228

  18. Alcoholic ketoacidosis

    MedlinePlus

    Tests may include: Arterial blood gases (measures the acid/base balance and oxygen level in blood) Blood alcohol ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 185. Seifter JL. Acid-base disorders. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman- ...

  19. Alcohol Intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    ... ingredients commonly found in alcoholic beverages, especially in beer or wine, can cause intolerance reactions. These include: Sulfites or other preservatives Chemicals, grains or other ingredients Histamine, a byproduct of fermentation or brewing In some cases, reactions can be ...

  20. Alcohol withdrawal

    MedlinePlus

    ... Seeing or feeling things that aren't there (hallucinations) Seizures Severe confusion ... alcohol withdrawal. You will be watched closely for hallucinations and other signs of delirium tremens. Treatment may ...

  1. [Persistence of chronic inflammatory responses, role in the development of chronic pancreatitis, obesity and pancreatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Khristich, T N

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of the review--to analyze the basic data of the role of chronic low-intensity inflammatory response as general biological process in the development and progression of chronic pancreatitis, obesity, and pancreatic cancer. Highlighted evidence from epidemiological studies showing that chronic pancreatitis and obesity are independent risk factors for pancreatic cancer, regardless of diabetes. Studied role of adipokines as Cytokines regulating of immune inflammatory response. Draws attention to the staging of pancreatic cancer in obesity.

  2. Comparative Efficacy of Bilateral Thoracoscopic Splanchnicectomy for Intractable Pain Secondary to Pancreatic Cancer vs Chronic Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Bhutiani, Neal; Cheadle, Gerald A; Bahr, Michael H; Vitale, Gary C

    2017-04-01

    Splanchnicectomy has been evaluated for treatment of chronic pain in both pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis patients, although its efficacy has not been compared in these 2 patient populations. This study aimed to compare bilateral thoracoscopic splanchnicectomy in treatment of abdominal pain secondary with pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis. A University of Louisville database was evaluated from July 1998 to March 2016 for patients undergoing bilateral thoracoscopic splanchnicectomy for intractable pain secondary to pancreatic cancer (n = 48) or chronic pancreatitis (n = 75). Patients were evaluated pre- and postoperatively with regard to abdominal pain and related symptoms, narcotic analgesic requirements, and hospital admissions. Narcotic use was quantified using the Kentucky All Schedule Prescription Electronic Reporting system. After bilateral thoracoscopic splanchnicectomy, 28% of pancreatic cancer patients continued to experience abdominal pain compared with 57% of chronic pancreatitis patients. Daily narcotic dose decreased for 74% of pancreatic cancer compared with 32% of chronic pancreatitis patients (p < 0.001). Sixty-seven percent of pancreatic cancer patients discontinued pain medications completely compared with 14% of chronic pancreatitis patients (p < 0.001). Hospitalizations decreased significantly in both groups (p < 0.001; p = 0.001), although mean number of postoperative hospitalizations was lower for pancreatic cancer (0.5) compared with chronic pancreatitis patients (2.80) (p < 0.001). Mean follow-up was significantly shorter for pancreatic cancer patients than for chronic pancreatitis patients (8 months vs 32 months; p < 0.001). Bilateral thoracoscopic splanchnicectomy safely, effectively, and durably relieves abdominal pain in patients with both pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis. However, it is more effective in providing pain relief and preventing pain-related hospitalizations in patients with pancreatic

  3. Role of bacterial infections in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Michaud, Dominique S.

    2013-01-01

    Established risk factors for pancreatic cancer, including tobacco smoking, chronic pancreatitis, obesity and type 2 diabetes, collectively account for less than half of all pancreatic cancer cases. Inflammation plays a key role in pancreatic carcinogenesis, but it is unclear what causes local inflammation, other than pancreatitis. Epidemiological data suggest that Helicobacter pylori may be a risk factor for pancreatic cancer, and more recently, data suggest that periodontal disease, and Porphyromonas gingivalis, a pathogen for periodontal disease, may also play a role in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Individuals with periodontal disease have elevated markers of systemic inflammation, and oral bacteria can disseminate into the blood, stomach, heart and even reach the brain. These infections may contribute to the progression of pancreatic cancer by acting jointly with other pancreatic cancer risk factors that impact the inflammation and immune response, such as smoking and obesity, and the ABO genetic variant, recently linked to pancreatic cancer through genome-wide association studies. The complex interplay between bacteria, host immune response and environmental factors has been examined closely in relation to gastric cancer, but new research suggests bacteria may be playing a role in other gastrointestinal cancers. This review will summarize the literature on epidemiological studies examining infections that have been linked to pancreatic cancer and propose mechanistic pathways that may tie infections to pancreatic cancer. PMID:23843038

  4. Role of bacterial infections in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Dominique S

    2013-10-01

    Established risk factors for pancreatic cancer, including tobacco smoking, chronic pancreatitis, obesity and type 2 diabetes, collectively account for less than half of all pancreatic cancer cases. Inflammation plays a key role in pancreatic carcinogenesis, but it is unclear what causes local inflammation, other than pancreatitis. Epidemiological data suggest that Helicobacter pylori may be a risk factor for pancreatic cancer, and more recently, data suggest that periodontal disease, and Porphyromonas gingivalis, a pathogen for periodontal disease, may also play a role in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Individuals with periodontal disease have elevated markers of systemic inflammation, and oral bacteria can disseminate into the blood, stomach, heart and even reach the brain. These infections may contribute to the progression of pancreatic cancer by acting jointly with other pancreatic cancer risk factors that impact the inflammation and immune response, such as smoking and obesity, and the ABO genetic variant, recently linked to pancreatic cancer through genome-wide association studies. The complex interplay between bacteria, host immune response and environmental factors has been examined closely in relation to gastric cancer, but new research suggests bacteria may be playing a role in other gastrointestinal cancers. This review will summarize the literature on epidemiological studies examining infections that have been linked to pancreatic cancer and propose mechanistic pathways that may tie infections to pancreatic cancer.

  5. Blunt pancreatic trauma: A persistent diagnostic conundrum?

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Atin; Panda, Ananya; Gamanagatti, Shivanand

    2016-01-01

    Blunt pancreatic trauma is an uncommon injury but has high morbidity and mortality. In modern era of trauma care, pancreatic trauma remains a persistent challenge to radiologists and surgeons alike. Early detection of pancreatic trauma is essential to prevent subsequent complications. However early pancreatic injury is often subtle on computed tomography (CT) and can be missed unless specifically looked for. Signs of pancreatic injury on CT include laceration, transection, bulky pancreas, heterogeneous enhancement, peripancreatic fluid and signs of pancreatitis. Pan-creatic ductal injury is a vital decision-making parameter as ductal injury is an indication for laparotomy. While lacerations involving more than half of pancreatic parenchyma are suggestive of ductal injury on CT, ductal injuries can be directly assessed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or encoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography. Pancreatic trauma also shows temporal evolution with increase in extent of injury with time. Hence early CT scans may underestimate the extent of injures and sequential imaging with CT or MRI is important in pancreatic trauma. Sequential imaging is also needed for successful non-operative management of pancreatic injury. Accurate early detection on initial CT and adopting a multimodality and sequential imaging strategy can improve outcome in pancreatic trauma. PMID:26981225

  6. Pancreatic Cancer—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Exocrine pancreatic cancer is cancer of the exocrine gland of the pancreas, whereas cancer of the endocrine gland usually forms as a collection of tumor cell types referred to as pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Find evidence-based information on pancreatic cancer treatment, research, and statistics.

  7. Risk of Pancreatic Cancer After a Primary Episode of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Rijkers, Anton P; Bakker, Olaf J; Ahmed Ali, Usama; Hagenaars, Julia C J P; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Besselink, Marc G; Bollen, Thomas L; van Eijck, Casper H

    2017-09-01

    Acute pancreatitis may be the first manifestation of pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the risk of pancreatic cancer after a first episode of acute pancreatitis. Between March 2004 and March 2007, all consecutive patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis were prospectively registered. Follow-up was based on hospital records audit, radiological imaging, and patient questionnaires. Outcome was stratified based on the development of chronic pancreatitis. We included 731 patients. The median follow-up time was 55 months. Progression to chronic pancreatitis was diagnosed in 51 patients (7.0%). In this group, the incidence rate per 1000 person-years for developing pancreatic cancer was 9.0 (95% confidence interval, 2.3-35.7). In the group of 680 patients who did not develop chronic pancreatitis, the incidence rate per 1000 person-years for developing pancreatic cancer in this group was 1.1 (95% confidence interval, 0.3-3.3). Hence, the rate ratio of pancreatic cancer was almost 9 times higher in patients who developed chronic pancreatitis compared with those who did not (P = 0.049). Although a first episode of acute pancreatitis may be related to pancreatic cancer, this risk is mainly present in patients who progress to chronic pancreatitis.

  8. Early alterations in glycemic control and pancreatic endocrine function in non-diabetic patients with chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lundberg, Rachel; Beilman, Gregory J.; Dunn, Ty B.; Pruett, Tim L.; Freeman, Martin L.; Ptacek, Peggy E.; Berry, K. Louise; Robertson, R. Paul; Moran, Antoinette; Bellin, Melena D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a frequent consequence of chronic pancreatitis (CP). Little is known about pancreatic endocrine function before the development of DM in CP, particularly in females, or those without calcific and/or alcoholic pancreatitis. Methods Twenty-five non-diabetic adult CP patients (19 female, age 34.2 ± 2.4 yrs) were compared to 25 healthy controls matched for age, gender, and BMI. Subjects underwent frequent sample intravenous glucose tolerance testing (FSIVGTT) and mixed meal tolerance testing (MMTT). Results Mean fasting glucose was higher in CP patients (89.5 ±2.3 mg/dL) than in controls (84.4 ±1.2 mg/dL, p=0.04). On MMTT, CP patients had a higher area under the curve (AUC) glucose and AUC glucagon compared to controls (p≤0.01). AUC C-peptide was equivalent (p=0.6) but stimulated C-peptide at 30 minutes was lower in CP patients (p=0.04). Mean insulin sensitivity index calculated from the FSIVGTT was lower in CP group, indicating reduced insulin sensitivity (p≤0.01). Disposition index (insulin secretion adjusted for insulin sensitivity on FSIVGTT) was lower in CP patients (p=0.01). Conclusions CP patients had higher fasting and MMTT glucose levels, without a compensatory increase in insulin secretion suggesting subtle early islet dysfunction. Our cohort had relative hyperglucagonemia and were less insulin sensitive than controls. PMID:26918872

  9. Pharmacologic therapy for acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kambhampati, Swetha; Park, Walter; Habtezion, Aida

    2014-01-01

    While conservative management such as fluid, bowel rest, and antibiotics is the mainstay of current acute pancreatitis management, there is a lot of promise in pharmacologic therapies that target various aspects of the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. Extensive review of preclinical studies, which include assessment of therapies such as anti-secretory agents, protease inhibitors, anti-inflammatory agents, and anti-oxidants are discussed. Many of these studies have shown therapeutic benefit and improved survival in experimental models. Based on available preclinical studies, we discuss potential novel targeted pharmacologic approaches that may offer promise in the treatment of acute pancreatitis. To date a variety of clinical studies have assessed the translational potential of animal model effective experimental therapies and have shown either failure or mixed results in human studies. Despite these discouraging clinical studies, there is a great clinical need and there exist several preclinical effective therapies that await investigation in patients. Better understanding of acute pancreatitis pathophysiology and lessons learned from past clinical studies are likely to offer a great foundation upon which to expand future therapies in acute pancreatitis. PMID:25493000

  10. Management strategies in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Campen, Christopher J; Dragovich, Tomislav; Baker, Amanda F

    2011-04-01

    Current first-line and adjuvant chemotherapeutic strategies for management of patients with pancreatic cancer are reviewed. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is the 10th most prevalent cancer and the fourth most common cause of cancer deaths in the United States. More than 80% of patients with pancreatic cancer are diagnosed with locally advanced or metastatic disease and are not candidates for surgery; these patients often require multimodal treatment. The most widely used chemotherapy for such patients, as well as patients requiring adjuvant therapy after surgery, is gemcitabine or gemcitabine-based chemotherapy. All current chemotherapies for pancreatic cancer are associated with dose-limiting hematologic toxicity and other adverse effects that require ongoing monitoring and dosage adjustment to balance the benefits and risks of treatment. Pharmacists can play an important role in monitoring and providing drug information and guidance to patients and oncologists. Current investigational strategies include efforts to improve chemotherapy response rates and outcomes through modulation of cell signaling pathways and use of nanotechnology to improve drug delivery. Current management of pancreatic cancer is multifaceted, involving anticancer therapy, supportive care, and toxicity management. Standard systemic therapy with gemcitabine as a single agent or in combination with other cytotoxic agents provides modest benefits in terms of response and symptom control.

  11. PCMdb: Pancreatic Cancer Methylation Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagpal, Gandharva; Sharma, Minakshi; Kumar, Shailesh; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Gupta, Sudheer; Gautam, Ankur; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2014-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fifth most aggressive malignancy and urgently requires new biomarkers to facilitate early detection. For providing impetus to the biomarker discovery, we have developed Pancreatic Cancer Methylation Database (PCMDB, http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/pcmdb/), a comprehensive resource dedicated to methylation of genes in pancreatic cancer. Data was collected and compiled manually from published literature. PCMdb has 65907 entries for methylation status of 4342 unique genes. In PCMdb, data was compiled for both cancer cell lines (53565 entries for 88 cell lines) and cancer tissues (12342 entries for 3078 tissue samples). Among these entries, 47.22% entries reported a high level of methylation for the corresponding genes while 10.87% entries reported low level of methylation. PCMdb covers five major subtypes of pancreatic cancer; however, most of the entries were compiled for adenocarcinomas (88.38%) and mucinous neoplasms (5.76%). A user-friendly interface has been developed for data browsing, searching and analysis. We anticipate that PCMdb will be helpful for pancreatic cancer biomarker discovery.

  12. Predictive factors for and incidence of hospital readmissions of patients with acute and chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Suchsland, Till; Aghdassi, Ali; Kühn, Kristina; Simon, Peter; Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia; Flessa, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Acute and chronic pancreatitis are common gastroenterological disorders that have a fairly unpredictable long-term course often associated with unplanned hospital readmissions. Little is known about the factors that increase or decrease the risk for a hospital readmission. The aim of this study was to identify positive and negative predictive factors for hospital readmissions of patients with acute and chronic pancreatitis after in-hospital treatment. In a retrospective analysis data from the hospital information and reimbursement data system (HIS) were evaluated for 606 hospital stays for either acute or chronic pancreatitis between 2006 and 2011. Additional clinical data were obtained from a questionnaire covering quality of life and socio-economic status. A total of 973 patient variables were assessed by bivariate and multivariate analysis. Between 2006 and 2011, 373 patients were admitted for acute or chronic pancreatitis; 107 patients of them were readmitted and 266 had only one hospitalization. Predictors for readmission were concomitant liver disease, presence of a pseudocyst or a suspected tumor of the pancreas as well as alcohol, tobacco or substance abuse or coexisting mental disorders. Patients who had undergone a CT-scan were more susceptible to readmission. Lower readmissions rates were found in patients with diabetes mellitus or gallstone disease as co-morbidity. While factors like age and severity of the initial disease cannot be influenced to reduce the readmission rate for pancreatitis, variables like alcohol, tobacco and drug abuse can be addressed in outpatient programs to reduce disease recurrence and readmission rates for pancreatitis. Copyright © 2015 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Should we Investigate Gastroenterology Patients for Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency? A Dual Centre UK Study.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jennifer A; Sanders, David S; Francis, Katherine A; Kurien, Matthew; Lee, Sai; Taha, Hatim; Ramadas, Arvind; Joy, Diamond; Hopper, Andrew D

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency may be under recognised in gastroenterological practice. We aimed to identify the prevalence of pancreatic insufficiency in secondary care gastroenterology clinics and determine if co-morbidity or presenting symptoms could predict diagnosis. A secondary aim was to assess response to treatment. A dual centre retrospective analysis was conducted in secondary care gastroenterology clinics. Patients tested for pancreatic exocrine insufficiency with faecal elastase-1 (FEL-1) between 2009 and 2013 were identified in two centres. Demographics, indication and co-morbidities were recorded in addition to dose and response to pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy. Binary logistic regression was used to assess if symptoms or co-morbidities could predict pancreatic insufficiency. 1821 patients were tested, 13.1% had low FEL-1 (<200µg/g). This prevalence was sub-analysed with 5.4% having FEL-1 100-200µg/g (mild insufficiency) and 7.6% having faecal elastase readings <100µg/g. Low FEL-1 was most significantly associated with weight loss or steatorrhoea. Co-morbidity analysis showed that low levels were significantly associated with excess alcohol intake, diabetes mellitus or human immunodeficiency virus; 80.0% treated with enzyme supplements reported symptomatic benefit with no difference in response between high and low dose supplementation (p=0.761). Targeting the use of FEL-1 in individuals with specific symptoms and associated conditions can lead to improved recognition of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in a significant proportion of secondary care patients. Intervening with lifestyle advice such as smoking cessation and minimising alcohol intake could improve outcomes. In addition, up to 80% of patients with low faecal elastase respond to supplementation.

  14. Negotiating the complexities of exocrine and endocrine dysfunction in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Sinead N

    2017-11-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterised by irreversible morphological change and typically causing pain and/or permanent loss of function. This progressive, irreversible disease results in destruction of healthy pancreatic tissue and the development of fibrous scar tissue. Gradual loss of exocrine and endocrine function follows, along with clinical manifestations such as steatorrhoea, abdominal pain and diabetes. Nutrition in chronic pancreatitis has been described as a problem area and, until recently, there was little research on the topic. It is often asserted that >90 % of the pancreas must be damaged before exocrine insufficiency occurs; however, an exploration of the original studies from the 1970s found that the data do not support this assertion. The management of steatorrhoea with pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is the mainstay of nutritional management, and early identification and treatment is a key. The presence of steatorrhoea, coupled with poor dietary intake (due to intractable abdominal pain, gastrointestinal side effects and often alcoholism) renders the chronic pancreatitis patients at considerable risk for undernutrition, muscle depletion and fat-soluble vitamin deficiency. Premature osteoporosis/osteopenia afflicts two-thirds of patients as a consequence of poor dietary intake of calcium and vitamin D, low physical activity, low sunlight exposure, heavy smoking, as well as chronic low-grade inflammation. Bone metabolism studies show increased bone formation as well as bone resorption in chronic pancreatitis, indicating that bone turnover is abnormally high. Loss of the pancreatic islet cells occurs later in the disease process as the endocrine cells are diffusely distributed throughout the pancreatic parenchyma. Patients may develop type 3c (pancreatogenic) diabetes, which is complicated by concurrent decreased glucagon secretion, and hence an increased risk of hypoglycaemia. Diabetes control is

  15. THE FREQUENCY OF RISK FACTORS ON TRENDS OF PANCREATIC CANCER IN KOSOVO.

    PubMed

    Ramadani, Naser; Dedushi, Kreshnike; Muçaj, Sefedin; Kabashi, Serbeze; Jerliu, Naim; Hoxhaj, Astrit

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze different factors that influence the trends of pancreatic cancer mortality and morbidity of patients treated at the UCCK of Kosovo. Within this study, we have evaluated pancreatic cancer risk factors, durability and lethality regarding Kosovan patients who have been diagnosed and treated within Kosovo. The study in question is that of retrospective research traversing the period of 2011-2015. This retrospective research study includes 362 patients recently diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, 2011-2015 at the University Clinical Center of Kosovo in Pristina. The main important factors included in this study are: age, sex and risk factors that altogether have considerable influence in incidence of pancreatic cancer. The imaging diagnostics are performed with the use of 2D ECHO Phillips, MSCT Sensation 64 and 6 and 1.5T MRI Symphony Siemens that are situated in the Radiologic Clinic of UCCK. The statistic data were obtained from NIPH of Kosovo and Agency of Statistics of Kosovo. Out of the total number of the 362 patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, the mortality in all age groups was higher at male patients-61.6 % of cases (n=223) with the highest number found at 51-60 years age group. The 38.4 % (n= 139) were female patients with the highest incidence frequency at F 61-70 years age group. The F/M ratio is 1:1.6. The "plane" nicotine users were found at 34 % (n=123) while the joined, nicotine/alcohol addiction was detected at 26 % (n= 94). The 18.5% (n=67) have had established diagnose of the diabetes mellitus tip II and 9.6 % (n=35) have undergone the medical treatment of the gastroduodenal peptic ulcerations. The total number of deaths is 310 (85.6%) and there are only 52 patients (14.4%) still alive. The mortality rate of the pancreatic cancer in Kosovo was 17.2 in 100.000 residents while the morbidity rate was 2.8 in 100.000 residents. This retrospective research study intends to present the role of the risk factor, that

  16. THE FREQUENCY OF RISK FACTORS ON TRENDS OF PANCREATIC CANCER IN KOSOVO

    PubMed Central

    Ramadani, Naser; Dedushi, Kreshnike; Muçaj, Sefedin; Kabashi, Serbeze; Jerliu, Naim; Hoxhaj, Astrit

    2016-01-01

    The aim: The aim of this paper is to analyze different factors that influence the trends of pancreatic cancer mortality and morbidity of patients treated at the UCCK of Kosovo. Within this study, we have evaluated pancreatic cancer risk factors, durability and lethality regarding Kosovan patients who have been diagnosed and treated within Kosovo. The study in question is that of retrospective research traversing the period of 2011-2015. Materials and methodology: This retrospective research study includes 362 patients recently diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, 2011-2015 at the University Clinical Center of Kosovo in Pristina. The main important factors included in this study are: age, sex and risk factors that altogether have considerable influence in incidence of pancreatic cancer. The imaging diagnostics are performed with the use of 2D ECHO Phillips, MSCT Sensation 64 and 6 and 1.5T MRI Symphony Siemens that are situated in the Radiologic Clinic of UCCK. The statistic data were obtained from NIPH of Kosovo and Agency of Statistics of Kosovo. Results: Out of the total number of the 362 patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, the mortality in all age groups was higher at male patients–61.6 % of cases (n=223) with the highest number found at 51–60 years age group. The 38.4 % (n= 139) were female patients with the highest incidence frequency at F 61–70 years age group. The F/M ratio is 1:1.6. The “plane” nicotine users were found at 34 % (n=123) while the joined, nicotine/alcohol addiction was detected at 26 % (n= 94). The 18.5% (n=67) have had established diagnose of the diabetes mellitus tip II and 9.6 % (n=35) have undergone the medical treatment of the gastroduodenal peptic ulcerations. The total number of deaths is 310 (85.6%) and there are only 52 patients (14.4%) still alive. The mortality rate of the pancreatic cancer in Kosovo was 17.2 in 100.000 residents while the morbidity rate was 2.8 in 100.000 residents. Discussion and conclusion: This

  17. Inhibition of secretin stimulated pancreatic secretion by pancreatic polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Adrian, T E; Besterman, H S; Mallinson, C N; Greenberg, G R; Bloom, S R

    1979-01-01

    The effect of PP on secretin-stimulated pancreatic secretion was assessed in five healthy subjects. During an intravenous infusion of BPP at a dose which produced plasma levels similar to those seen after meals in healthy young adults the volume and bicarbonate content of duodenal juice was reduced by 25% (p less than 0.05) and 24% (p less than 0.05) respectively, while protein and bilirubin concentrations were more markedly reduced by 68% (p less than 0.0005) and 67% (p less than 0.0005) respectively. PP, thus, may be an important inhibitory factor in the control of bilirubin and pancreatic enzyme secretion in man.

  18. Impaired pancreatic polypeptide release in chronic pancreatitis with steatorrhoea.

    PubMed

    Adrian, T E; Besterman, H S; Mallinson, C N; Garalotis, C; Bloom, S R

    1979-02-01

    Pancreatic polypeptide (PP) is a newly discovered hormonal peptide localised in a distinct endocrine cell type in the pancreas. PP circulates in plasma and in normal subjects levels rise substantially on the ingestion of food (mean rise 138 pmol/l). In 10 patients with chronic pancreatitis with exocrine deficiency the PP response to a test breakfast was greatly reduced (mean rise 20 pmol/l, P less than 0.001). PP response to the meal was normal in 10 patients with active coeliac disease and 12 patients with acute tropical sprue with steatorrhoea.

  19. Inhibition of secretin stimulated pancreatic secretion by pancreatic polypeptide.

    PubMed Central

    Adrian, T E; Besterman, H S; Mallinson, C N; Greenberg, G R; Bloom, S R

    1979-01-01

    The effect of PP on secretin-stimulated pancreatic secretion was assessed in five healthy subjects. During an intravenous infusion of BPP at a dose which produced plasma levels similar to those seen after meals in healthy young adults the volume and bicarbonate content of duodenal juice was reduced by 25% (p less than 0.05) and 24% (p less than 0.05) respectively, while protein and bilirubin concentrations were more markedly reduced by 68% (p less than 0.0005) and 67% (p less than 0.0005) respectively. PP, thus, may be an important inhibitory factor in the control of bilirubin and pancreatic enzyme secretion in man. PMID:761835

  20. Impaired pancreatic polypeptide release in chronic pancreatitis with steatorrhoea.

    PubMed Central

    Adrian, T E; Besterman, H S; Mallinson, C N; Garalotis, C; Bloom, S R

    1979-01-01

    Pancreatic polypeptide (PP) is a newly discovered hormonal peptide localised in a distinct endocrine cell type in the pancreas. PP circulates in plasma and in normal subjects levels rise substantially on the ingestion of food (mean rise 138 pmol/l). In 10 patients with chronic pancreatitis with exocrine deficiency the PP response to a test breakfast was greatly reduced (mean rise 20 pmol/l, P less than 0.001). PP response to the meal was normal in 10 patients with active coeliac disease and 12 patients with acute tropical sprue with steatorrhoea. PMID:428832

  1. Smoking is underrecognized as a risk factor for chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Dhiraj; Slivka, Adam; Sherman, Stuart; Hawes, Robert H; Anderson, Michelle A; Burton, Frank R; Brand, Randall E; Lewis, Michele D; Gardner, Timothy B; Gelrud, Andres; Disario, James; Amann, Stephen T; Baillie, John; Lawrence, Christopher; O'Connell, Michael; Lowenfels, Albert B; Banks, Peter A; Whitcomb, David C

    2010-01-01

    Smoking is an established risk factor for chronic pancreatitis (CP). We sought to identify how often and in which CP patients physicians consider smoking to be a risk factor. We analyzed data on CP patients and controls prospectively enrolled from 19 US centers in the North American Pancreatitis Study-2. We noted each subject's self-reported smoking status and quantified the amount and duration of smoking. We noted whether the enrolling physician (gastroenterologist with specific interest in pancreatology) classified alcohol as the etiology for CP and selected smoking as a risk factor. Among 382/535 (71.4%) CP patients who were self-reported ever smokers, physicians cited smoking as a risk factor in only 173/382 (45.3%). Physicians cited smoking as a risk factor more often among current smokers, when classifying alcohol as CP etiology, and with higher amount and duration of smoking. We observed a wide variability in physician decision to cite smoking as a risk factor. Multivariable regression analysis however confirmed that the association of CP with smoking was independent of physician decision to cite smoking as a risk factor. Physicians often underrecognize smoking as a CP risk factor. Efforts are needed to raise awareness of the association between smoking and CP. and IAP. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Takao; Kobayashi, Hisato; Nishikawa, Koji; Iida, Etsushi; Michigami, Yoshihiro; Morimoto, Emiko; Yamashita, Rikiya; Miyagi, Ken; Okamoto, Motozumi

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the usefulness of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI MRI) for the diagnosis and evaluation of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). A total of 4 consecutive patients with AIP, 5 patients with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis (CP), and 13 patients without pancreatic disease (controls) were studied. DWI was performed in the axial plane with spin-echo echo-planar imaging single-shot sequence. Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) were measured in circular regions of interest in the pancreas. In AIP patients, abdominal MRI was performed before, and 2-4 weeks after steroid treatment. Follow-up study was performed chronologically for up to 11 months in two patients. The correlation between ADCs of the pancreas and the immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4) index (serum IgG4 value/serum IgG4 value before steroid treatment) was evaluated. In the AIP patients, DWI of the pancreas showed high signal intensity, and the ADCs of the pancreas (mean +/- SD: 0.97 +/- 0.18 x 10(-3) mm(2)/s) were significantly lower than those in patients with CP (1.45 +/- 0.10 x 10(-3) mm(2)/s) or the controls (1.45 +/- 0.16 x 10(-3) mm(2)/s) (Mann-Whitney U-test, P < 0.05). In one AIP patient with focal swelling of the pancreas head that appeared to be a mass, DWI showed high signal intensity throughout the pancreas, indicating diffuse involvement. The ADCs of the pancreas and IgG4 index were significantly inversely correlated (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, r (s) = -0.80, P < 0.05). Autoimmune pancreatitis showed high signal intensity on DWI, which improved after steroid treatment. ADCs reflected disease activity. Thus, diffusion-weighted MRI might be useful for diagnosing AIP, determining the affected area, and evaluating the effect of treatment.

  3. Percutaneous ablation of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    D’Onofrio, Mirko; Ciaravino, Valentina; De Robertis, Riccardo; Barbi, Emilio; Salvia, Roberto; Girelli, Roberto; Paiella, Salvatore; Gasparini, Camilla; Cardobi, Nicolò; Bassi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a highly aggressive tumor with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Prognosis and treatment depend on whether the tumor is resectable or not, which mostly depends on how quickly the diagnosis is made. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy can be both used in cases of non-resectable pancreatic cancer. In cases of pancreatic neoplasm that is locally advanced, non-resectable, but non-metastatic, it is possible to apply percutaneous treatments that are able to induce tumor cytoreduction. The aim of this article will be to describe the multiple currently available treatment techniques (radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation), their results, and their possible complications, with the aid of a literature review. PMID:27956791

  4. Fluid resuscitation in acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Aakash; Manrai, Manish; Kochhar, Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis remains a clinical challenge, despite an exponential increase in our knowledge of its complex pathophysiological changes. Early fluid therapy is the cornerstone of treatment and is universally recommended; however, there is a lack of consensus regarding the type, rate, amount and end points of fluid replacement. Further confusion is added with the newer studies reporting better results with controlled fluid therapy. This review focuses on the pathophysiology of fluid depletion in acute pancreatitis, as well as the rationale for fluid replacement, the type, optimal amount, rate of infusion and monitoring of such patients. The basic goal of fluid epletion should be to prevent or minimize the systemic response to inflammatory markers. For this review, various studies and reviews were critically evaluated, along with authors’ recommendations, for predicted severe or severe pancreatitis based on the available evidence. PMID:25561779

  5. Alcoholism: A Multi-Systemic Cellular Insult to Organs.

    PubMed

    Dguzeh, Ucee; Haddad, Natasha C; Smith, Kathia T S; Johnson, John O; Doye, Angelia A; Gwathmey, Judith K; Haddad, Georges E

    2018-05-28

    Alcohol abuse can affect more than the heart and the liver. Many observers often do not appreciate the complex and differing aspects of alcohol's effects in pathophysiologies that have been reported in multiple organs. Chronic alcohol abuse is known to be associated with pathophysiological changes that often result in life-threatening clinical outcomes, e.g., breast and colon cancer, pancreatic disease, cirrhosis of the liver, diabetes, osteoporosis, arthritis, kidney disease, immune system dysfunction, hypertension, coronary artery disease, cardiomyopathy, and can be as far-reaching as to cause central nervous system disorders. In this review article, we will discuss the various organs impacted by alcohol abuse. The lack of clear guidelines on the amount and frequency of alcohol intake, complicated by personal demographics, make extrapolations to real-life practices at best difficult for public health policy-makers.

  6. Progression from acute to chronic pancreatitis: prognostic factors, mortality, and natural course.

    PubMed

    Nøjgaard, Camilla; Becker, Ulrik; Matzen, Peter; Andersen, Jens Rikardt; Holst, Claus; Bendtsen, Flemming

    2011-11-01

    Knowledge of the natural course of acute pancreatitis (AP) and risk of progression to chronic pancreatitis (CP) is limited. The aims were to describe: (1) the incidence of progression from AP to CP, (2) prognostic factors for progression, and (3) the natural course and mortality of progressive AP. During 1977 to 1982, patients admitted to hospitals in Copenhagen with a diagnosis of AP or CP were included in a prospective cohort and followed up by the Danish registries in 2008. The subcohort analyses comprised 352 AP patients. Progressive AP was found in 85 patients (24.1%) during follow-up; 48.2% developed from alcoholic AP, 47.0% from idiopathic AP, and 4.8% from other causes. The mortality rate for patients with progressive AP was 2.7 times higher than in patients with nonprogressive acute pancreatitis, and 5.3 to 6.5 times higher than in the background population. In Cox regression analyses corrected for age, only smoking was of significance for the progression from AP to CP. Acute pancreatitis can progress to CP, not only from alcoholic but also from nonalcoholic AP. Smoking was the strongest risk factor associated with progression. The mortality rate for these patients was 5 to 6 times the mortality rate in the population.

  7. Are genetic variants in the platelet-derived growth factor [beta] gene associated with chronic pancreatitis?

    PubMed

    Muddana, Venkata; Park, James; Lamb, Janette; Yadav, Dhiraj; Papachristou, Georgios I; Hawes, Robert H; Brand, Randall; Slivka, Adam; Whitcomb, David C

    2010-11-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor [beta] (PDGF-[beta]) is a major signal in proliferation and matrix synthesis through activated pancreatic stellate cells, leading to fibrosis of the pancreas. Recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP) seems to predispose to chronic pancreatitis (CP) in some patients but not others. We tested the hypothesis that 2 known PDGF-[beta] polymorphisms are associated with progression from RAP to CP. We also tested the hypothesis that PDGF-[beta] polymorphisms in combination with environmental risk factors such as alcohol and smoking are associated with CP. Three hundred eighty-two patients with CP (n = 176) and RAP (n = 206) and 251 controls were evaluated. Platelet-derived growth factor [beta] polymorphisms +286 A/G (rs#1800818) seen in 5'-UTR and +1135 A/C (rs#1800817) in first intron were genotyped using single-nucleotide polymorphism polymerase chain reaction approach and confirmed by DNA sequencing. The genotypic frequencies for PDGF-[beta] polymorphisms in positions +286 and +1135 were found to be similar in controls and patients with RAP and CP. There was no difference in genotypic frequencies among RAP, CP, and controls in subjects in the alcohol and smoking subgroups. Known variations in the PDGF-[beta] gene do not have a significant effect on promoting or preventing fibrogenesis in pancreatitis. Further evaluation of this important pathway is warranted.

  8. Understanding and treatment of chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2013-11-14

    Chronic pancreatitis is characterized by an inflammatory process of the pancreas, which is replaced by fibrosis and progressive destruction. The three major clinical features of chronic pancreatitis are pain, maldigestion, and diabetes. Chronic pancreatitis has a profound impact on social life and employment patterns. In the current issue, different topics highlight experimental models of chronic pancreatitis and bridge findings from recent research to bedside. Although the disease is still difficult to treat the current papers represent useful guidelines on how to approach chronic pancreatitis in the clinical settings with the major aim to improve the patient's suffering and quality of life.

  9. Oxidative stress and NO generation in the rat pancreatitis induced by pancreatic duct ligation.

    PubMed

    Buchwalow, Igor; Schnekenburger, Jürgen; Atiakshin, Dmitri; Samoilova, Vera; Wolf, Eduard; Boecker, Werner; Tiemann, Katharina

    2017-04-01

    The interaction between nitric oxide (NO) and superoxides is critical in the development of an acute pancreatitis. Previously, we reported that the expression of superoxides and of the NO-generating enzyme (NO synthase, NOS) was up-regulated in the human pancreatitis, especially within the exocrine compartment indicating an exceptional susceptibility of the exocrine parenchyma to oxidative stress. The aim of the present study was to compare the regulation of NO signalling pathways in the human pancreatitis and in an animal model of an acute pancreatitis induced by pancreatic duct ligation (PDL) in rats. In the PDL-induced rat pancreatitis, we revealed a similar pattern of oxidative stress and NOS up-regulation in acinar and in ductal compartments, like in the human pancreatitis. This demonstrates that the PDL-induced rat pancreatitis is a proper model for further studies of acute pancreatitis development in humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Drug metabolism and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Flores, John Paul E; Diasio, Robert B; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains a fatal disease in the majority of patients. The era of personalized medicine is upon us: customizing therapy according to each patient's individual cancer. Potentially, therapy can be targeted at individuals who would most likely have a favorable response, making it more efficacious and cost effective. This is particularly relevant for pancreatic cancer, which currently portends a very poor prognosis. However, there is much to be done in this field, and more studies are needed to bring this concept to reality.

  11. New Insights into the Pathogenesis of Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Sah, Raghuwansh P.; Dawra, Rajinder K.; Saluja, Ashok K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review In this article, we review important advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of pancreatitis. Recent Findings The relative contribution of intra-pancreatic trypsinogen activation and NFκB activation, the two major early independent cellular events in the etiology of pancreatitis, have been investigated using novel genetic models. Trypsinogen activation has traditionally held the spotlight for many decades as it is believed to be the central pathogenic event of pancreatitis However, recent experimental evidence points to the role of trypsin activation in early acinar cell damage but not in the inflammatory response of acute pancreatitis through NFκB activation. Further, chronic pancreatitis in the caerulein model develops independently of typsinogen activation. Sustained activation of the NFκB pathway, but not persistent intra-acinar expression of active trypsin, was shown to result in chronic pancreatitis. Calcineurin-NFAT signaling was shown to mediate downstream effects of pathologic rise in intracellular calcium. IL-6 was identified as a key cytokine mediating pancreatitis-associated lung injury. Summary Recent advances challenge the long-believed trypsin-centered understanding of pancreatitis. It is becoming increasingly clear that activation of intense inflammatory signaling mechanisms in acinar cells is crucial to the pathogenesis of pancreatitis, which may explain the strong systemic inflammatory response in pancreatitis. PMID:23892538

  12. Acute pancreatitis in cats with hepatic lipidosis.

    PubMed

    Akol, K G; Washabau, R J; Saunders, H M; Hendrick, M J

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the incidence, clinical features, and prognosis of acute pancreatitis in cats with hepatic lipidosis. Of 13 cats histologically diagnosed with hepatic lipidosis between July 1988, and November 1989, 5(38%) were also histologically diagnosed with acute pancreatitis. In cats with hepatic lipidosis alone, the signalment, history, physical examination, and clinicopathologic findings were generally indistinguishable from those of cats with concurrent acute pancreatitis except that cats with acute pancreatitis were more likely to be cachectic and to have coagulation abnormalities. Hepatomegaly was seen on abdominal radiographs in both groups. Of the 5 cats with concurrent acute pancreatitis, abdominal ultrasonography detected 1 cat with a hypoechoic pancreas and 5 with peritoneal effusion; those abnormalities were not seen in cats without concurrent acute pancreatitis. Cats with concurrent acute pancreatitis had only a 20% recovery rate, compared with a 50% recovery rate in cats with hepatic lipidosis alone. We conclude that cats with hepatic lipidosis should be rigorously evaluated for concurrent acute pancreatitis because of 1) the rate of disease coincidence, 2) the inability of signalment, history, physical examination, and clinicopathologic findings to adequately distinguish between hepatic lipidosis and acute pancreatitis, 3) the worse prognosis associated with concurrent acute pancreatitis, and 4) the opposing nutritional strategies for hepatic lipidosis and acute pancreatitis.

  13. Efficacy of enteral nutrition for the treatment of pancreatitis using standard enteral formula.

    PubMed

    Makola, Diklar; Krenitsky, Joe; Parrish, Carol; Dunston, Emily; Shaffer, Hubert A; Yeaton, Paul; Kahaleh, Michel

    2006-10-01

    Elemental formula delivered distal to the ligament of Treitz has demonstrated efficacy in patients with pancreatitis, presumably by decreasing pancreatic stimulation. Few data exist on the use of standard enteral formula in such patients. This study describes the outcomes of pancreatitis patients managed with long-term standard enteral nutrition (EN). One hundred twenty-six patients managed at the University of Virginia Health System with pancreatitis requiring nutritional support between August 2000 and June 2004 received a standard formula delivered distal to the ligament of Treitz and were followed prospectively to resolution of their disease process. Predictors of improvement in CT Severity Index, duration of EN, and length of hospital stay were identified. Changes in body weight and serum albumin were determined. Mean age was 50.8 +/- 15.2 yr (male, 83). Etiology included alcohol (46), gallstones (49), idiopathic (15), post-ERCP (7), drug (5), hyperlipidemia (3), and pancreas divisum (1). EN lasted a median of 18.9 (2.4 to 111.7) wk. Median CT Severity Index decreased from 4 to 2 (p < 0.001). Underweight patients gained 9.8 lbs; overweight and obese patients lost 7.2 and 28.8 lbs, respectively. Albumin concentration increased from 3 to 3.8 g/dL (p < 0.001). Standard enteral formula is effective in the management of patients with complicated pancreatitis.

  14. Association between serum interleukin-35 levels and severity of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi-Li; Zhou, Xiu-Yun; Guo, Xian-Yang; Tu, Jun-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory cytokines have been reported to be associated with pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. The aim of this study was to measure the serum IL-35 levels in patients with acute pancreatitis and analyze the relationship between IL-35 levels and the disease severity. Thirty-two patients with acute pancreatitis and 32 healthy control subjects were included into the study. The serum levels of IL-35 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay upon admission and the following seven days. The relationships with severity and etiology during the clinical course were analyzed. Serum IL-35 levels in patients with acute pancreatitis at the time of admission (5.25±0.37 ng/mL) were significantly higher than those in healthy controls (1.93±0.16 ng/mL, P<0.001). Moreover, serum IL-35 levels in patients with severe attacks (7.15±0.48 ng/mL) were significantly higher than those with moderately severe attacks (5.14±0.49 ng/mL, P=0.01) and mild attacks (3.69±0.53 ng/mL, P<0.001). However, there was no significant difference of serum IL-35 levels among patients with acute pancreatitis due of alcohol, gallstone and idiopathy. In addition, the peak serum concentrations of IL-35 were on day 1 after admission. Our results demonstrate that increased serum IL-35 levels may be related to the inflammatory response in patients with acute pancreatitis, suggesting that IL-35 may be used for a potential biomarker of acute pancreatitis. PMID:26221286

  15. [Pancreatic pseudocyst. Case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    Guardado-Bermúdez, Fernando; Azuara-Turrubiates, Armando Javier; Ardisson-Zamora, Fernando Josafat; Guerrero-Silva, Luis Alberto; Villanueva-Rodríguez, Estefanie; Gómez-de Leija, Nubia Alondra

    2014-01-01

    The most frequent etiology of pancreatic pseudocyst is acute pancreatitis and exacerbations of chronic pancreatitis, presenting spontaneous resolution in 50% of the cases. Treatment is indicated in symptomatic or complicated persistent pseudocysts. The OBJECTIVE of this article is to present a case and management options of pancreatic pseudocyst defined as a collection of fluid in the omental bursa. We present the case of a 59-year-old female patient with a history of laparoscopic cholecystectomy and necrotizing pancreatitis. She presented abdominal pain, early satiety, and nausea during the previous 2 months. Presence of pancreatic pseudocysts of 92 and 62 mm was demonstrated by computed tomography. The patient was submitted to a laparoscopic cyst-gastric anastomosis. Laparoscopic cyst-gastric anastomosis is the ideal treatment for pancreatic pseudocyst management because it offers continuous drainage, low rate of recurrence and few complications, exceeding the RESULTS of endoscopic management and imaging-guided drainage along with the benefits of a minimally invasive procedure.

  16. Inflammation in acute and chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Habtezion, Aida

    2015-09-01

    This report reviews recent animal model and human studies associated with inflammatory responses in acute and chronic pancreatitis. Animal model and limited human acute and chronic pancreatitis studies unravel the dynamic nature of the inflammatory processes and the ability of the immune cells to sense danger and environmental signals. In acute pancreatitis, such molecules include pathogen-associated molecular pattern recognition receptors such as toll-like receptors, and the more recently appreciated damage-associated molecular pattern molecules or 'alarmin' high mobility group box 1 and IL-33. In chronic pancreatitis, a recent understanding of a critical role for macrophage-pancreatic stellate cell interaction offers a potential targetable pathway that can alter fibrogenesis. Microbiome research in pancreatitis is a new field gaining interest but will require further investigation. Immune cell contribution to the pathogenesis of acute and chronic pancreatitis is gaining more appreciation and further understanding in immune signaling presents potential therapeutic targets that can alter disease progression.

  17. Ultrasonography in diagnosing chronic pancreatitis: New aspects

    PubMed Central

    Dimcevski, Georg; Erchinger, Friedemann G; Havre, Roald; Gilja, Odd Helge

    2013-01-01

    The course and outcome is poor for most patients with pancreatic diseases. Advances in pancreatic imaging are important in the detection of pancreatic diseases at early stages. Ultrasonography as a diagnostic tool has made, virtually speaking a technical revolution in medical imaging in the new millennium. It has not only become the preferred method for first line imaging, but also, increasingly to clarify the interpretation of other imaging modalities to obtain efficient clinical decision. We review ultrasonography modalities, focusing on advanced pancreatic imaging and its potential to substantially improve diagnosis of pancreatic diseases at earlier stages. In the first section, we describe scanning techniques and examination protocols. Their consequences for image quality and the ability to obtain complete and detailed visualization of the pancreas are discussed. In the second section we outline ultrasonographic characteristics of pancreatic diseases with emphasis on chronic pancreatitis. Finally, new developments in ultrasonography of the pancreas such as contrast enhanced ultrasound and elastography are enlightened. PMID:24259955

  18. Pancreatic trauma: demographics, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed

    Stawicki, Stanislaw Peter; Schwab, C William

    2008-12-01

    Pancreatic injuries are rare, with penetrating mechanisms being causative in majority of cases. They can create major diagnostic and therapeutic challenges and require multiple diagnostic modalities, including multislice high-definition computed tomography, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, ultrasonography, and at times, surgery and direct visualization of the pancreas. Pancreatic trauma is frequently associated with duodenal and other severe vascular and visceral injuries. Mortality is high and usually related to the concomitant vascular injury. Surgical management of pancreatic and pancreatic-duodenal trauma is challenging, and multiple surgical approaches and techniques have been described, up to and including pancreatic damage control and later resection and reconstruction. Wide surgical drainage is a key to any surgical trauma technique and access for enteral nutrition, or occasionally parenteral nutrition, are important adjuncts. Morbidity associated with pancreatic trauma is high and can be quite severe. Treatment of pancreatic trauma-related complications often requires a combination of interventional, endoscopic, and surgical approaches.

  19. Chronic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer Risk: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kirkegård, Jakob; Mortensen, Frank Viborg; Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre

    2017-09-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a putative risk factor for pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the magnitude and temporality of this association. We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE for observational studies investigating the association between chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. We computed overall effect estimates (EEs) with associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using a random-effects meta-analytic model. The EEs were stratified by length of follow-up from chronic pancreatitis diagnosis to pancreatic cancer (lag period). Robustness of the results was examined in sensitivity analyses. We identified 13 eligible studies. Pooled EEs for pancreatic cancer in patients with chronic pancreatitis were 16.16 (95% CI: 12.59-20.73) for patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer within 2 years from their chronic pancreatitis diagnosis. The risk of pancreatic cancer in patients with chronic pancreatitis decreased when the lag period was increased to 5 years (EE: 7.90; 95% CI: 4.26-14.66) or a minimum of 9 years (EE: 3.53; 95% CI: 1.69-7.38). In conclusion, chronic pancreatitis increases the risk of pancreatic cancer, but the association diminishes with long-term follow-up. Five years after diagnosis, chronic pancreatitis patients have a nearly eight-fold increased risk of pancreatic cancer. We suggest that common practice on inducing a 2-year lag period in these studies may not be sufficient. We also recommend a close follow-up in the first years following a diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis to avoid overlooking a pancreatic cancer.

  20. Pain in chronic pancreatitis: managing beyond the pancreatic duct.

    PubMed

    Talukdar, Rupjyoti; Reddy, D Nageshwar

    2013-10-14

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) continues to be a clinical challenge. Persistent or recurrent abdominal pain is the most compelling symptom that drives patients to seek medical care. Unfortunately, in spite of using several treatment approaches in the clinical setting, there is no single specific treatment modality that can be earmarked as a cure for this disease. Traditionally, ductal hypertension has been associated with causation of pain in CP; and patients are often subjected to endotherapy and surgery with a goal to decompress the pancreatic duct. Recent studies on humans (clinical and laboratory based) and experimental models have put forward several mechanisms, including neuroimmune alterations, which could be responsible for pain. This might explain the partial or no response to single modality treatment in a significant proportion of patients. The current review discusses the recent concepts of pain generation in CP and evidence based therapeutic approaches (other than ductal decompression) to handle persistent or recurrent pain. We focus primarily on parenchymal and neural components; and discuss the role of antioxidants and the existing controversies, drugs that interfere with neural transmission, pancreatic enzyme supplementation, celiac neurolysis, and pancreatic resection procedures. The review concludes with the treatment approach that we follow at our institute.

  1. Plasma trypsin in chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Adrian, T E; Besterman, H S; Mallinson, C N; Pera, A; Redshaw, M R; Wood, T P; Bloom, S R

    1979-10-01

    We have used a simple and precise radioimmunoassay to measure trypsin in human plasma. Fasting plasma trypsin concentrations were extremely low in patients with chronic pancreatitis with steatorrhoea (5 +/- 2 ng/ml) when compared to healthy controls (86 +/- 7 ng/ml, p less than 0.001). In patients with chronic pancreatitis but no steatorrhoea basal plasma trypsin levels were similar to those of the normal controls (99 +/- 25 ng/ml). A small but significant postprandial rise in plasma trypsin concentrations was observed in normal subjects (mean increment 15 +/- 4%, p less than 0.005, paired t test) but was absent in patients with chronic pancreatitis with steatorrhoea. In contrast to exocrine deficient chronic pancreatitis, other malabsorptive conditions associated with steatorrhoea (active coeliac disease and acute tropical sprue) demonstrated mean fasting trypsin concentrations similar to controls. Patients with adenocarcinoma of the pancreas had basal trypsin concentrations similar to healthy subjects as did patients with adenocarcinoma of the stomach, colon, rectum, brochus, and breast. In some cases measurement of plasma trypsin may be of help in the differential diagnosis of steatorrhoea.

  2. "Puestow modified procedure in the era of advanced endoscopic interventions for the management of chronic lithiasic pancreatitis. A two cases report".

    PubMed

    Fragulidis, Georgios P; Vezakis, Αntonios; Dellaportas, Dionissios; Sotirova, Ira; Koutoulidis, Vassilis; Kontis, Elliseos; Polydorou, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic duct calculi in chronic pancreatitis (CP) patients are the main cause of intractable pain which is their main symptom. Decompression options of for the main pancreatic duct are both surgical and advanced endoscopic procedures. A 64-year-old male with known CP due to alcohol consumption and a 36-year-old female with known idiopathic CP and pancreatic duct calculi were managed recently in our hospital where endoscopic procedures were unsuccessful. A surgical therapy was considered and a longitudinal pancreaticojejunostomy (modified Puestow procedure) in both patients was performed with excellent results. Over the last 30 years, endoscopic procedures are developed to manage pancreatic duct strictures and calculi of the main pancreatic duct in CP patients. In both of our cases endoscopic therapy was first attempted but failed to extract the pancreatic duct stones, due to their size and speculations. Modified Puestow procedure was performed for both and it was successful for long term pain relief. Despite advancement in endoscopic interventions and less invasive therapies for the management of chronic lithiasic pancreatitis we consider that classic surgical management can be appropriate in certain cases. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. “Puestow modified procedure in the era of advanced endoscopic interventions for the management of chronic lithiasic pancreatitis. A two cases report”

    PubMed Central

    Fragulidis, Georgios P.; Vezakis, Αntonios; Dellaportas, Dionissios; Sotirova, Ira; Koutoulidis, Vassilis; Kontis, Elliseos; Polydorou, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pancreatic duct calculi in chronic pancreatitis (CP) patients are the main cause of intractable pain which is their main symptom. Decompression options of for the main pancreatic duct are both surgical and advanced endoscopic procedures. Presentation of cases A 64-year-old male with known CP due to alcohol consumption and a 36-year-old female with known idiopathic CP and pancreatic duct calculi were managed recently in our hospital where endoscopic procedures were unsuccessful. A surgical therapy was considered and a longitudinal pancreaticojejunostomy (modified Puestow procedure) in both patients was performed with excellent results. Discussion Over the last 30 years, endoscopic procedures are developed to manage pancreatic duct strictures and calculi of the main pancreatic duct in CP patients. In both of our cases endoscopic therapy was first attempted but failed to extract the pancreatic duct stones, due to their size and speculations. Modified Puestow procedure was performed for both and it was successful for long term pain relief. Conclusion Despite advancement in endoscopic interventions and less invasive therapies for the management of chronic lithiasic pancreatitis we consider that classic surgical management can be appropriate in certain cases. PMID:26318135

  4. Diagnosing autoimmune pancreatitis with the Unifying-Autoimmune-Pancreatitis-Criteria.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Alexander; Michaely, Henrik; Rückert, Felix; Weiss, Christel; Ströbel, Philipp; Belle, Sebastian; Hirth, Michael; Wilhelm, Torsten J; Haas, Stephan L; Jesenofsky, Ralf; Schönberg, Stefan; Marx, Alexander; Singer, Manfred V; Ebert, Matthias P; Pfützer, Roland H; Löhr, J Matthias

    We had developed the Unifying-Autoimmune-Pancreatitis-Criteria (U-AIP) to diagnose autoimmune pancreatitis (AiP) within the M-ANNHEIM classification of chronic pancreatitis. In 2011, International-Consensus-Diagnostic-Criteria (ICDC) to diagnose AiP have been published. We had applied the U-AIP long before the ICDC were available. The aims of the study were, first, to describe patients with AiP diagnosed by the U-AIP; second, to compare diagnostic accuracies of the U-AIP and other diagnostic systems; third, to evaluate the clinical applicability of the U-AIP. From 1998 until 2008, we identified patients with AiP using U-AIP, Japanese-, Korean-, Asian-, Mayo-HISORt-, Revised-Mayo-HISORt- and Italian-criteria. We retrospectively verified the diagnosis by ICDC and Revised-Japanese-2011-criteria, compared diagnostic accuracies of all systems and evaluated all criteria in consecutive patients with pancreatitis (2009 until 2010, Pancreas-Outpatient-Clinic-Cohort, n = 84). We retrospectively validated our diagnostic approach in consecutive patients with a pancreatic lesion requiring surgery (Surgical-Cohort, n = 98). Overall, we identified 21 patients with AiP. Unifying-Autoimmune-Pancreatitis-Criteria and ICDC presented the highest diagnostic accuracies (each 98.8%), highest Youden indices (each 0.95238), and highest proportions of diagnosed patients (each n = 20/21, U-AIP/ICDC vs. other diagnostic systems, p < 0.05, McNemar test). In the Pancreas-Outpatient-Clinic-Cohort, seven patients were diagnosed with AiP (n = 6 by U-AIP, n = 1 by Asian-criteria). International-Consensus-Diagnostic-Criteria confirmed the diagnosis in these individuals. Based on partial fulfillment of U-AIP, AiP was initially suspected in 13% (n = 10/77) of remaining patients from the Pancreas-Outpatient-Clinic-Cohort. In the Surgical-cohort, we identified one patient with AiP by U-AIP and ICDC. Unifying-Autoimmune-Pancreatitis-Criteria revealed a satisfactory clinical applicability

  5. Pancreatic Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing pancreatic cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  6. Neural invasion in pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Lu, Kui-Yang

    2002-08-01

    Neural invasion is a special metastatic route in pancreatic cancer and responsible for the high recurrence in curatively resected cases. To summarize the characteristics and mechanisms of neural invasion in pancreatic carcinoma for the better treatment of this disease. The international literatures were reviewed about the definition, incidence and mechanisms of neural invasion and its clinicopathology, diagnosis and treatment. Neural invasion is defined when the medial perineurium is involved by cancer cells, accounting for 45%-100% of all cases. It can be divided into different kinds or stages according to its locations and the number of nerve fascicles involved. Invasion along vascularity, lymphatic vessels, perineural space and neurotropism is considered as its primary mechanisms. No clinicopathologic factors are correlated with neural invasion. Intravascular ultrasound, CT scan and immunostaining K-ras gene analysis can be used to diagnose neural invasion pre-, intra- or postoperatively. Neural invasion is an important prognostic factor for the recurrence of pancreatic carcinoma after pancreatectomy. Because of its high incidence, pancreatectomy with extended radical retroperitoneal dissection should be considered as a basic procedure in the treatment of pancreatic carcinoma.

  7. Pancreatic torsion in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Brabson, Tamera L.; Maki, Lynn C.; Newell, Susan M.; Ralphs, S. Christopher

    2015-01-01

    A 6-month-old male intact Cane Corso mastiff dog was presented for a recent history of vomiting, abdominal pain, and lethargy. A diagnosis of pancreatic torsion was made during abdominal exploratory surgery and was confirmed with histopathology. The dog underwent partial pancreatectomy and recovered with no complications. PMID:25969579

  8. Isobutyl alcohol

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Isobutyl alcohol ; CASRN 78 - 83 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  9. Allyl alcohol

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Allyl alcohol ; CASRN 107 - 18 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  10. Propargyl alcohol

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Propargyl alcohol ; CASRN 107 - 19 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  11. Alcoholism and Minority Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Thomas D.; Wright, Roosevelt, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Briefly discusses some aspects of the role of the state and the position of minorities in respect to alcoholism policies and services. Includes case study of a Black alcoholic. Refers readers to studies on Black alcoholism, Native American alcoholism, Hispanic alcoholism, and Asian-American alcoholism. (Author/NB)

  12. Pancreatic stent insertion after an unintentional guidewire cannulation of the pancreatic duct during ERCP.

    PubMed

    García-Cano, Jesús; Viñuelas Chicano, Miriam; Del Moral Martínez, María; Muñiz Muñoz, Marta; Murillo Matamoros, Claudio; Suárez Matías, Miguel; Valiente González, Laura; Martínez Pérez, Teresa; Martínez Fernández, Raquel; Gómez Ruiz, Carmen Julia; Pérez García, José Ignacio; Morillas Ariño, Julia

    2018-04-24

    the guidewire (GW) may enter the pancreatic duct during common bile duct (CBD) cannulation attempts in endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). After GW passage into the pancreas, the most effective maneuver for CBD cannulation and pancreatitis prevention has not been determined. to study CBD cannulation and post-ERCP pancreatitis rates when a pancreatic stent is inserted after an unintentional GW cannulation of the pancreatic duct. a retrospective analysis of patients undergoing ERCP for biliary drainage that were included prospectively into a database. After unintentional GW cannulation of the pancreatic duct, a straight 5-Fr and 4-cm long plastic stent was inserted. The stents had no internal flaps to facilitate expulsion. CBD cannulation attempts were made above the stent. A pancreatic sphincterotomy was performed in patients older than 60 years before stent insertion. a total of 46 pancreatic stents were inserted during 154 ERCP (29.8%) procedures. In the stent group, CBD cannulation was accomplished in 44/46 (95.6%) subjects. A total of 21/46 (45.6%) pancreatic sphincterotomies were performed. Only 1/46 (2.17%) mild pancreatitis cases were observed and most stents were spontaneously expelled. in this study, the CBD was eventually reached with the insertion of a plastic pancreatic stent after an unintentional GW passage into the pancreatic duct while attempting a CBD cannulation. No adverse events were observed following pancreatic stent insertion.

  13. Circumportal Pancreas-a Must Know Pancreatic Anomaly for the Pancreatic Surgeon.

    PubMed

    Luu, Andreas Minh; Braumann, C; Herzog, T; Janot, M; Uhl, W; Chromik, A M

    2017-02-01

    Circumportal pancreas is a rare congenital pancreatic anomaly with encasement of the portal vein and/or the superior mesenteric vein by pancreatic tissue. It is often overlooked on cross-sectional imaging studies and can be encountered during pancreatic surgery. Pancreatic head resection with circumportal pancreas is technically difficult and bears an increased risk of postoperative pancreatic fistula. A retrospective chart review of our data base for all patients who had undergone pancreatic head resection between 2004 and 2015 was performed. We identified six patients out of 1102 patients who had undergone pancreatic head surgery in the study period. CT-scan and MRI were never able to identify circumportal pancreas prior to surgery. The right hepatic an artery derived from the superior mesenteric artery in four cases (67%). Additional resection of the pancreatic body was always performed. Postoperative course was uneventful in all cases without occurrence of pancreatic fistula. Circumportal pancreas is a rare entity every pancreatic surgeon should be aware of. It is difficult to identify on cross-sectional imaging studies. A right hepatic artery arising from the superior mesenteric artery should raise suspicion of circumportal pancreas. Additional pancreatic tissue resection should be performed during pancreatic head resections to avoid pancreatic fistula.

  14. Mediterranean diet and risk of pancreatic cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort.

    PubMed

    Molina-Montes, Esther; Sánchez, María-José; Buckland, Genevieve; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Amiano, Pilar; Wark, Petra A; Kühn, Tilman; Katzke, Verena; Huerta, José María; Ardanaz, Eva; Quirós, José Ramón; Affret, Aurélie; His, Mathilde; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Peeters, Petra H; Ye, Weimin; Sund, Malin; Boeing, Heiner; Iqbal, Khalid; Ohlsson, Bodil; Sonestedt, Emily; Tjønneland, Anne; Petersen, Kristina En; Travis, Ruth C; Skeie, Guri; Agnoli, Claudia; Panico, Salvatore; Palli, Domenico; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Freisling, Heinz; Huybrechts, Inge; Overvad, Kim; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Bamia, Christina; Vasilopoulou, Effie; Wareham, Nick; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Cross, Amanda J; Ward, Heather A; Riboli, Elio; Duell, Eric J

    2017-03-14

    The Mediterranean diet (MD) has been proposed as a means for cancer prevention, but little evidence has been accrued regarding its potential to prevent pancreatic cancer. We investigated the association between the adherence to the MD and pancreatic cancer risk within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. Over half a million participants from 10 European countries were followed up for over 11 years, after which 865 newly diagnosed exocrine pancreatic cancer cases were identified. Adherence to the MD was estimated through an adapted score without the alcohol component (arMED) to discount alcohol-related harmful effects. Cox proportional hazards regression models, stratified by age, sex and centre, and adjusted for energy intake, body mass index, smoking status, alcohol intake and diabetes status at recruitment, were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) associated with pancreatic cancer and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Adherence to the arMED score was not associated with risk of pancreatic cancer (HR high vs low adherence=0.99; 95% CI: 0.77-1.26, and HR per increments of two units in adherence to arMED=1.00; 95% CI: 0.94-1.06). There was no convincing evidence for heterogeneity by smoking status, body mass index, diabetes or European region. There was also no evidence of significant associations in analyses involving microscopically confirmed cases, plausible reporters of energy intake or other definitions of the MD pattern. A high adherence to the MD is not associated with pancreatic cancer risk in the EPIC study.

  15. Pregabalin for decreasing pancreatic pain in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Gurusamy, Kurinchi Selvan; Lusuku, Charnelle; Davidson, Brian R

    2016-02-02

    Chronic abdominal pain is one of the major symptoms in people with chronic pancreatitis. The role of pregabalin in people with chronic pancreatic pain due to chronic pancreatitis is uncertain. To assess the benefits and harms of pregabalin in people with chronic abdominal pain due to chronic pancreatitis. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library 2015, issue 6, and MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded, trials registers until June 2015. We also searched the references of included trials to identify further trials. We considered only randomised controlled trials (RCT) performed in people with chronic pancreatic pain due to chronic pancreatitis, irrespective of language, blinding, or publication status for inclusion in the review. Two review authors independently identified trials and independently extracted data. We calculated the risk ratio (RR) or mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) with RevMan 5, based on intention-to-treat analysis. Only one study, funded by Pfizer, met the inclusion criteria for the review. A total of 64 participants (with chronic pain due to chronic pancreatitis) were randomly assigned to receive escalating doses of pregabalin (150 mg per day to 600 mg per day; 34 participants) or matching placebo (30 participants). Participants received pregabalin or placebo for three weeks on an outpatient basis; the outcomes were measured at the end of the treatment (i.e. three weeks from commencement of treatment). Potential participants taking concomitant analgesic medication and expected to stay on a stable regime during the trial were allowed to enter the study. This trial was at low risk of bias. The overall quality of evidence was low or moderate.Only the short-term outcomes were available in this trial. The medium and long-term outcomes, number of work days lost, and length of hospital stay due to admissions for pain control were not available. This trial found that

  16. Intracellular proteolysis of pancreatic zymogens.

    PubMed Central

    Gorelick, F. S.; Modlin, I. M.; Leach, S. D.; Carangelo, R.; Katz, M.

    1992-01-01

    Activation of pancreatic digestive zymogens within the pancreatic acinar cell may be an early event in the development of pancreatitis. To detect such activation, an immunoblot assay has been developed that measures the relative amounts of inactive zymogens and their respective active enzyme forms. Using this assay, high doses of cholecystokinin or carbachol were found to stimulate the intracellular conversion of at least three zymogens (procarboxypeptidase A1, procarboxypeptidase B, and chymotrypsinogen 2) to their active forms. Thus, this conversion may be a generalized phenomenon of pancreatic zymogens. The conversion is detected within ten minutes of treatment and is not associated with changes in acinar cell morphology; it has been predicted that the lysosomal thiol protease, cathepsin B, may initiate this conversion. Small amounts of cathepsin B are found in the secretory pathway, and cathepsin B can activate trypsinogen in vitro; however, exposure of acini to a thiol protease inhibitor (E64) did not block this conversion. Conversion was inhibited by the serine protease inhibitor, benzamidine, and by raising the intracellular pH, using chloroquine or monensin. This limited proteolytic conversion appears to require a low pH compartment and a serine protease activity. After long periods of treatment (60 minutes), the amounts of the active enzyme forms began to decrease; this observation suggested that the active enzyme forms were being degraded. Treatment of acini with E64 reduced this late decrease in active enzyme forms, suggesting that thiol proteases, including lysosomal hydrolases, may be involved in the degradation of the active enzyme forms. These findings indicate that pathways for zymogen activation as well as degradation of active enzyme forms are present within the pancreatic acinar cell. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 6 PMID:1340058

  17. Quality of life and long-term survival after surgery for chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Sohn, T A; Campbell, K A; Pitt, H A; Sauter, P K; Coleman, J A; Lillemo, K D; Yeo, C J; Cameron, J L

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the short-term and long-term outcome as well as quality of life in patients undergoing surgical management of chronic pancreatitis. Between January 1980 and December 1996, a total of 255 patients underwent surgery for chronic pancreatitis at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. The etiology of the disease, indications for surgery, patient characteristics, and long-term survival were analyzed. A visual analog quality-of-life questionnaire containing 23 items graded on a scale of 0 to 10 (0 = worst and 10 = best) was sent to patients postoperatively. Visual analog responses relating to before and after the chronic pancreatitis surgery were compared using a paired t test. During the17-year review period, 263 operations were performed for chronic pancreatitis in 255 patients. The most common presenting symptoms were abdominal pain (88%), weight loss (36%), nausea/vomiting (30%), jaundice (14%), and diarrhea (12%). The cause of the pancreatitis was resumed to be alcohol in 43%, idiopathic in 38%, pancreas divisum in 5%, ampullary abnormality in 4%, and gallstones in 3%. Pancreaticoduodenectomy was the most common procedure in 96 patients (37%), followed by distal pancreatectomy in 67 (25%), Puestow procedure in 52 (19%), sphincteroplasty in 37 (14%), and Duval procedure in five (2%). The overall mortality and morbidity rates were 1.9% and 35%, respectively. Two hundred twenty-seven (89%) of the 255 patients were alive at last follow-up. For the entire cohort of patients, the 5- and 10-year actuarial survivals were 88% and 82%, respectively. One hundred six (47%) of the 227 living patients responded to the visual analog quality-of-life questionnaire. Patients reported improvements in all aspects of the quality-of-life survey including enjoyment out of life, satisfaction with life, pain, number of hospitalizations, feelings of usefulness, and overall health (P < 0.005). In addition to improved quality of life after surgery, narcotic use

  18. Defining the diagnostic algorithm in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Horwhat, John David; Gress, Frank G

    2004-07-01

    Most patients with pancreatic cancer present with a mass on radiologic studies, however, not every pancreatic mass is cancer. Since radiological studies alone are insufficient to establish the diagnosis of a pancreatic mass and patient management depends on a definitive diagnosis; confirmatory cytology or histology is usually required. As a minimally invasive procedure, EUS and EUS FNA avoid the risk of cutaneous or peritoneal contamination that may occur with CT or US-guided investigations and is less invasive than surgical interventions. As a result, EUS FNA of pancreatic masses is becoming the standard for obtaining cytological diagnosis. This chapter presents an EUS-based diagnostic algorithm for the evaluation of pancreatic lesions and is based upon a review of the pertinent literature in the field of pancreatic endosonography that has been the most influential in helping to guide this evolving field. Realizing there is much overlap among the EUS characteristics of various pancreatic lesions, for the sake of simplicity we have structured our discussion in broad terms of solid versus cystic lesions and discuss various pancreatic lesions within this framework. The additional contributors to this round table discussion have been asked to provide a more dedicated, focused discussion of the various subcategories of pancreatic lesions in greater detail than we could hope to achieve here. We provide this final contribution to the round table as a means of bringing the discussion back to the big picture of pancreatic lesions, rather than trying to hone in on the fine details of any one subclass.

  19. Pancreatic cancer stromal biology and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Dacheng; Xie, Keping

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies. Significant progresses have been made in understanding of pancreatic cancer pathogenesis, including appreciation of precursor lesions or premalignant pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanINs), description of sequential transformation from normal pancreatic tissue to invasive pancreatic cancer and identification of major genetic and epigenetic events and the biological impact of those events on malignant behavior. However, the currently used therapeutic strategies targeting tumor epithelial cells, which are potent in cell culture and animal models, have not been successful in the clinic. Presumably, therapeutic resistance of pancreatic cancer is at least in part due to its drastic desmoplasis, which is a defining hallmark for and circumstantially contributes to pancreatic cancer development and progression. Improved understanding of the dynamic interaction between cancer cells and the stroma is important to better understanding pancreatic cancer biology and to designing effective intervention strategies. This review focuses on the origination, evolution and disruption of stromal molecular and cellular components in pancreatic cancer, and their biological effects on pancreatic cancer pathogenesis. PMID:26114155

  20. Acute pancreatitis in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Mitsuyoshi; Sai, Jin Kan; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    In this Topic Highlight, the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of acute pancreatitis in children are discussed. Acute pancreatitis should be considered during the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain in children and requires prompt treatment because it may become life-threatening. The etiology, clinical manifestations, and course of acute pancreatitis in children are often different than in adults. Therefore, the specific features of acute pancreatitis in children must be considered. The etiology of acute pancreatitis in children is often drugs, infections, trauma, or anatomic abnormalities. Diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms (such as abdominal pain and vomiting), serum pancreatic enzyme levels, and imaging studies. Several scoring systems have been proposed for the assessment of severity, which is useful for selecting treatments and predicting prognosis. The basic pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis does not greatly differ between adults and children, and the treatments for adults and children are similar. In large part, our understanding of the pathology, optimal treatment, assessment of severity, and outcome of acute pancreatitis in children is taken from the adult literature. However, we often find that the common management of adult pancreatitis is difficult to apply to children. With advances in diagnostic techniques and treatment methods, severe acute pancreatitis in children is becoming better understood and more controllable. PMID:25400985

  1. Pleiotrophin promotes perineural invasion in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jun; Hu, Xiu-Feng; Feng, Xiao-Shan; Gao, She-Gan

    2013-10-21

    Perineural invasion (PNI) in pancreatic cancer is an important cause of local recurrence, but little is known about its mechanism. Pleiotrophin (PTN) is an important neurotrophic factor. It is of interest that our recent experimental data showed its involvement in PNI of pancreatic cancer. PTN strongly presents in the cytoplasm of pancreatic cancer cells, and high expression of PTN and its receptor may contribute to the high PNI of pancreatic cancer. Correspondingly, PNI is prone to happen in PTN-positive tumors. We thus hypothesize that, as a neurite growth-promoting factor, PTN may promote PNI in pancreatic cancer. PTN is released at the time of tumor cell necrosis, and binds with its high-affinity receptor, N-syndecan on pancreatic nerves, to promote neural growth in pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, neural destruction leads to a distorted neural homeostasis. Neurons and Schwann cells produce more N-syndecan in an effort to repair the pancreatic nerves. However, the abundance of N-syndecan attracts further PTN-positive cancer cells to the site of injury, creating a vicious cycle. Ultimately, increased PTN and N-syndecan levels, due to the continuous nerve injury, may promote cancer invasion and propagation along the neural structures. Therefore, it is meaningful to discuss the relationship between PTN/N-syndecan signaling and PNI in pancreatic cancer, which may lead to a better understanding of the mechanism of PNI in pancreatic cancer.

  2. Pleiotrophin promotes perineural invasion in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jun; Hu, Xiu-Feng; Feng, Xiao-Shan; Gao, She-Gan

    2013-01-01

    Perineural invasion (PNI) in pancreatic cancer is an important cause of local recurrence, but little is known about its mechanism. Pleiotrophin (PTN) is an important neurotrophic factor. It is of interest that our recent experimental data showed its involvement in PNI of pancreatic cancer. PTN strongly presents in the cytoplasm of pancreatic cancer cells, and high expression of PTN and its receptor may contribute to the high PNI of pancreatic cancer. Correspondingly, PNI is prone to happen in PTN-positive tumors. We thus hypothesize that, as a neurite growth-promoting factor, PTN may promote PNI in pancreatic cancer. PTN is released at the time of tumor cell necrosis, and binds with its high-affinity receptor, N-syndecan on pancreatic nerves, to promote neural growth in pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, neural destruction leads to a distorted neural homeostasis. Neurons and Schwann cells produce more N-syndecan in an effort to repair the pancreatic nerves. However, the abundance of N-syndecan attracts further PTN-positive cancer cells to the site of injury, creating a vicious cycle. Ultimately, increased PTN and N-syndecan levels, due to the continuous nerve injury, may promote cancer invasion and propagation along the neural structures. Therefore, it is meaningful to discuss the relationship between PTN/N-syndecan signaling and PNI in pancreatic cancer, which may lead to a better understanding of the mechanism of PNI in pancreatic cancer. PMID:24151381

  3. Spectrum and outcome of pancreatic trauma.

    PubMed

    Kantharia, Chetan V; Prabhu, R Y; Dalvi, A N; Raut, Abhijit; Bapat, R D; Supe, Avinash N

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic trauma is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Diagnosis is often difficult and surgery poses a formidable challenge. Data from 17 patients of pancreatic trauma gathered from a prospectively maintained database were analysed and the following parameters were considered: mode of injury, diagnostic modalities, associated injury, grade of pancreatic trauma and management. Pancreatic trauma was graded from I through IV, as per Modified Lucas Classification. The median age was 39 years (range 19-61). The aetiology of pancreatic trauma was blunt abdominal trauma in 14 patients and penetrating injury in 3. Associated bowel injury was present in 4 cases (3 penetrating injury and 1 blunt trauma) and 1 case had associated vascular injury. 5 patients had grade I, 3 had grade II, 7 had grade III and 2 had grade IV pancreatic trauma. Contrast enhanced computed tomography scan was used to diagnose pancreatic trauma in all patients with blunt abdominal injury. Immediate diagnosis could be reached in only 4 (28.5%) patients. 7 patients responded to conservative treatment. Of the 10 patients who underwent surgery, 6 required it for the pancreas and the duodenum. (distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy-3, pylorus preserving pancreatoduodenectomy-1, debridement with external drainage-1, associated injuries-duodenum-1). Pancreatic fistula, recurrent pancreatitis and pseudocyst formation were seen in 3 (17.05%), 2 (11.7%) and 1 (5.4%) patient respectively. Death occurred in 4 cases (23.5%), 2 each in grades III and IV pancreatic trauma. Contrast enhanced computed tomography scan is a useful modality for diagnosing, grading and following up patients with pancreatic trauma. Although a majority of cases with pancreatic trauma respond to conservative treatment, patients with penetrating trauma, and associated bowel injury and higher grade pancreatic trauma require surgical intervention and are also associated with higher morbidity and mortality.

  4. Management of hypertriglyceridemia induced acute pancreatitis and therapeutic plasmapheresis : Report of nine cases and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Uyar, S; Harmandar, F; Kök, M; Taș, Z; Dolu, S; Tokuç, A; Köker, G; Görar, S; Çekin, A H

    2017-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia is one of the rare causes of the acute pancreatitis. The prevalance of hypertriglyceridemia has increased recently due to the changing eating habits, sedentary lifestyle, alcohol consumption, obesity and concomitant diabetes mellitus. Therefore, the frequency of the acute pancreatitis due to hypertriglyceridemia may increase in coming years. Diagnosis of the acute pancreatitis by hypertriglyceridemia can be overlooked easily and may be very severe if untreated accurately on time. In addition to the standard management of pancreatitis, specific treatment for hypertriglyceridemia that is insulin, heparin and anti-hypertriglyceridemic drugs are used. Therapeutic plasmapheresis is the last treatment option and seems the most effective one in this subject through developing device and membrane technologies when we review the current literature. Not only triglycerides but also proinflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules that play an active role in pathogenesis are removed by plasmapheresis. So, the effectiveness of treatment appears promising. However, the exact pathophysiology of hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis could not be fully understood and the majority of published experience comes from the case reports and the benefit of randomized clinical trials is not available. Therefore, there are no data about what are the exact indications and when we start therapeutic plasmapheresis in literature. This manuscript describes our hospital experience with treatment options and analyzes reports published recently about plasmapheresis as a treatment modality for hypertriglyceridemia induced acute pancreatitis. © Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica.

  5. ACE inhibitors and the risk of acute pancreatitis-a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Kuoppala, Jaana; Enlund, Hannes; Pulkkinen, Jukka; Kastarinen, Helena; Jyrkkä, Johanna; Happonen, Pertti; Paajanen, Hannu

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the association between angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor use and the risk of acute pancreatitis. Information on all 4966 cases hospitalized in 2008-2010 for acute pancreatitis was retrieved from the Finnish national registers on hospital discharges and prescriptions. A total of 24 788 age and sex-matched population-based controls were randomly selected using density sampling. ACE inhibitor use between 1 January 2003 and the index date were determined by the date of hospitalization for acute pancreatitis among the cases. The incidence rate ratios of acute pancreatitis not diagnosed as biliary or alcohol-induced were modeled by conditional logistic regression and adjusted for comorbidities. A total of 1276 (26%) cases and 3946 (16%) controls had been exposed to ACE inhibitors. The use of ACE inhibitors was associated with an increased incidence rate of acute pancreatitis (odds ratio [OR] 1.76, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.59-1.95). The increase was slightly higher among current new users (OR 1.86, 95%CI 1.65-2.09) and somewhat lower among current prevalent (OR 1.54, 95%CI 1.35-1.75) and former users (OR 1.51, 95%CI 1.31-1.74). Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor use seems to be associated with a moderately increased risk of acute pancreatitis. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Does autoimmune pancreatitis increase the risk of pancreatic carcinoma?: a retrospective analysis of pancreatic resections.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rajib; Khosroshahi, Arezou; Shinagare, Shweta; Fernandez, Carlos; Ferrone, Cristina; Lauwers, Gregory Y; Stone, John H; Deshpande, Vikram

    2013-04-01

    To estimate the risk of malignancy in autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). We examined resected pancreata to compare the prevalence of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) in 28 cases of AIP and 30 cases of chronic pancreatitis not otherwise specified (CP-NOS). We also reviewed a cohort of 84 AIP cases. The mean age of the AIP cohort (57 years) was significantly higher than that of the cohort of CP-NOS (47 years) (P = 0.01). Twenty-three cases (82%) of AIP showed PanIN, and 7 cases (25%) showed grade 2 PanIN. Grade 3 PanIN was identified in one case of AIP. There was no statistically significant difference in the number of cases with high-grade PanIN lesions between the cases of type 1 as opposed to type 2 AIP. In comparison to CP-NOS, a comparable percentage of patients with AIP had PanIN (82% of AIP cases vs 63% of CP-NOS cases) (P = NS) and PanIN 2 (25% AIP vs 20% CP-NOS) (P = NS). Of the 84 AIP cases at our institution (mean follow-up, 49 months), 2 cases of pancreatic carcinoma were identified 6 and 10 years after the diagnoses of AIP. These findings raise concern that AIP is associated with an elevated risk of malignancy and should prompt additional studies.

  7. PanScan, the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium, and the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    The Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium consists of more than a dozen prospective epidemiologic cohort studies within the NCI Cohort Consortium, whose leaders work together to investigate the etiology and natural history of pancreatic cancer.

  8. Alcohol Alert: Genetics of Alcoholism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Reilly, M.T.; et al. Mpdz is a quantitative trait gene for drug withdrawal seizures. Nature Neuroscience 7(7):699–700, 2014. PMID: 15208631 . 12 Hurley, T.D., and Edenberg, H.J. Genes encoding enzymes involved in ethanol metabolism. Alcohol Research & Health 34:339–344, 2012 13 Yokoyama, A.; ...

  9. Fatty acid ethyl ester synthase inhibition ameliorates ethanol-induced Ca2+-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction and acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Booth, David M; Cane, Matthew C; Chvanov, Michael; Javed, Muhammad A; Elliott, Victoria L; Armstrong, Jane A; Dingsdale, Hayley; Cash, Nicole; Li, Yan; Greenhalf, William; Mukherjee, Rajarshi; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S; Jaffar, Mohammed; Petersen, Ole H; Tepikin, Alexei V; Sutton, Robert; Criddle, David N

    2014-01-01

    Objective Non-oxidative metabolism of ethanol (NOME) produces fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) via carboxylester lipase (CEL) and other enzyme action implicated in mitochondrial injury and acute pancreatitis (AP). This study investigated the relative importance of oxidative and non-oxidative pathways in mitochondrial dysfunction, pancreatic damage and development of alcoholic AP, and whether deleterious effects of NOME are preventable. Design Intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]C), NAD(P)H, mitochondrial membrane potential and activation of apoptotic and necrotic cell death pathways were examined in isolated pancreatic acinar cells in response to ethanol and/or palmitoleic acid (POA) in the presence or absence of 4-methylpyrazole (4-MP) to inhibit oxidative metabolism. A novel in vivo model of alcoholic AP induced by intraperitoneal administration of ethanol and POA was developed to assess the effects of manipulating alcohol metabolism. Results Inhibition of OME with 4-MP converted predominantly transient [Ca2+]C rises induced by low ethanol/POA combination to sustained elevations, with concurrent mitochondrial depolarisation, fall of NAD(P)H and cellular necrosis in vitro. All effects were prevented by 3-benzyl-6-chloro-2-pyrone (3-BCP), a CEL inhibitor. 3-BCP also significantly inhibited rises of pancreatic FAEE in vivo and ameliorated acute pancreatic damage and inflammation induced by administration of ethanol and POA to mice. Conclusions A combination of low ethanol and fatty acid that did not exert deleterious effects per se became toxic when oxidative metabolism was inhibited. The in vitro and in vivo damage was markedly inhibited by blockade of CEL, indicating the potential for development of specific therapy for treatment of alcoholic AP via inhibition of FAEE generation. PMID:24162590

  10. Dasatinib and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride or Gemcitabine Hydrochloride Alone in Treating Patients With Pancreatic Cancer Previously Treated With Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-01-05

    Acinar Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Duct Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer

  11. Targeting Trypsin-Inflammation Axis for Pancreatitis Therapy in a Humanized Pancreatitis Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-15-1-0257 TITLE: Targeting Trypsin-Inflammation Axis for Pancreatitis Therapy in a Humanized Pancreatitis Model PRINCIPAL...AND SUBTITLE Targeting Trypsin-Inflammation Axis for Pancreatitis Therapy in a Humanized Pancreatitis Model 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER...remains the same since it is covered under the institutional review. We set up monthly video conferences with our partnership PI to discuss any

  12. Distinct pathophysiological cytokine profiles for discrimination between autoimmune pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis, and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ghassem-Zadeh, Sahar; Gaida, Matthias M; Szanyi, Szilard; Acha-Orbea, Hans; Frossard, Jean-Louis; Hinz, Ulf; Hackert, Thilo; Strobel, Oliver; Felix, Klaus

    2017-06-02

    Discriminating between autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP), chronic pancreatitis (CP), and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) can be challenging. In this retrospective study, levels of serum and tissue cytokines were analyzed as part of the clinical strategy for the preoperative differentiation between AIP and PDAC. The identification of differential cytokine profiles may help to prevent unnecessary surgical resection and allow optimal treatment of these pathologies. To compare the cytokine profiles of AIP, CP, and PDAC patients, serum and pancreatic tissue homogenates were subjected to multiplex analysis of 17 inflammatory mediators. In total, serum from 73 patients, composed of 29 AIP (14 AIP-1 and 15 AIP-2), 17 CP, and 27 PDAC, and pancreatic tissue from 36 patients, including 12 AIP (six AIP-1 and six AIP-2), 12 CP, and 12 PDAC, were analyzed. Comparing AIP and PDAC patients' serum, significantly higher concentrations were found in AIP for interleukins IL-1β, IL-7, IL-13, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). G-CSF also allowed discrimination of AIP from CP. Furthermore, once AIP was divided into subtypes, significantly higher serum levels for IL-7 and G-CSF were measured in both subtypes of AIP and in AIP-2 for IL-1β when compared to PDAC. G-CSF and TNF-α were also significantly differentially expressed in tissue homogenates between AIP-2 and PDAC. The cytokines IL-1β, IL-7, and G-CSF can be routinely measured in patients' serum, providing an elegant and non-invasive approach for differential diagnosis. G-CSF is a good candidate to supplement the currently known serum markers in predictive tests for AIP and represents a basis for a combined blood test to differentiate AIP and particularly AIP-2 from PDAC, enhancing the possibility of appropriate treatment.

  13. Conservation of pancreatic tissue by combined gastric, biliary, and pancreatic duct drainage for pain from chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Warshaw, A L

    1985-04-01

    In patients with chronic pancreatitis, the sclerosing process of the pancreas may constrict not only the pancreatic duct for also the bile duct and duodenum. This study analyzes the prevalence of these obstructive lesions in 58 consecutive patients with chronic pancreatitis requiring surgery for either pain (57 patients) or for painless jaundice (1 patient). There was significant biliary obstruction in 21, 4 of whom also had symptomatic duodenal obstruction. All 21 patients with biliary and duodenal obstruction were among the 38 with a dilated pancreatic duct suitable for pancreaticojejunostomy (modified Puestow procedure). None of the 20 patients with small duct pancreatitis had biliary or duodenal obstruction. Pseudocysts were distributed evenly between the two groups (9 of 38 patients with a dilated duct versus 4 of 20 patients with small duct pancreatitis). Pancreaticojejunostomy combined with choledochoenterostomy and gastrojejunostomy in appropriately selected patients provided good to excellent long-term (mean 3.6 years) relief of pain in 30 of 36 patients (83 percent). There was no correlation between successful relief of pain and development of pancreatic exocrine or endocrine insufficiency or calcification. Stenosis of the bile duct developed some years subsequent to pancreaticojejunostomy in four patients and required a second operation for choledochoenterostomy in three. Three other patients required secondary pancreatic resections due to failure of the pancreaticojejunostomy to relieve pain. It is often possible to effect excellent relief of symptoms with maximal conservation of remaining pancreatic functions despite sclerotic obstruction of multiple organ systems.

  14. Simultaneous characterization of pancreatic stellate cells and other pancreatic components within three-dimensional tissue environment during chronic pancreatitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wenyan; Fu, Ling

    2013-05-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) and other pancreatic components that play a critical role in exocrine pancreatic diseases are generally identified separately by conventional studies, which provide indirect links between these components. Here, nonlinear optical microscopy was evaluated for simultaneous characterization of these components within a three-dimensional (3-D) tissue environment, primarily based on multichannel detection of intrinsic optical emissions and cell morphology. Fresh rat pancreatic tissues harvested at 1 day, 7 days, and 28 days after induction of chronic pancreatitis were imaged, respectively. PSCs, inflammatory cells, blood vessels, and collagen fibers were identified simultaneously. The PSCs at day 1 of chronic pancreatitis showed significant enlargement compared with those in normal pancreas (p<0.001, analysis of variance linear contrast; n=8 for each group). Pathological events relating to these components were observed, including presence of inflammatory cells, deposited collagen, and phenotype conversion of PSCs. We demonstrate that label-free nonlinear optical microscopy is an efficient tool for dissecting PSCs and other pancreatic components coincidently within 3-D pancreatic tissues. It is a prospect for intravital observation of dynamic events under natural physiological conditions, and might help uncover the key mechanisms of exocrine pancreatic diseases, leading to more effective treatments.

  15. Pancreatic Carcinoma: the Disease that Kills

    PubMed Central

    Kabashi, Serbeze; Dedushi, Kreshnike; Ramadani, Naser; Mucaj, Sefedin; Hoxhaj, Asrtrit; Jerliu, Naim

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this case report is to demonstrate the clinical symptoms and laboratory changes that have occurred very late and were very few in number even the imaging studies performed at that time showed an intensive local tumor growth associated with the wide infiltration of the both adjacent and distant upper abdominal structures. A 71-year-old male patient who was a chronic alcohol abuser and ex smoker (quit smoking 8 years earlier) presented with symptoms of mild pain on epigastric region that irradiated toward the back and significant weight loss. The initial ultrasonography (US) examination was performed, followed by the lab tests and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) examination. The diagnostic studies confirmed the presence of the pancreatic’s body mass. The ordered laparoscopic evaluation established definitive diagnosis. Initial US examination showed heterogeneous pseudo-cystic changes and slight edema of the pancreatic parenchyma associated with the multiple oval hyperechogenic lesions of liver - the signs highly suggestive of secondary metastatic deposits. The other imaging findings that were obtained with the use of the MDCT confirmed the presence of an expansive primary process of the body of the pancreas associated with the secondary metastatic changes in liver. In addition, the consecutive lymphadenopathy was revealed along hepatoduodenal ligament, retropancreatic region and intraperitoneal compartment. Tumor markers resulted with the high values of the AFP of 2.3, CA19-9 of 423.0 U/mL, and CEA of 219.0 ng/mL. The specimen of the tumor tissue taken during laparoscopic biopsy was sent for histologic examination and the final result was “metastatic adenocarcinoma of pancreas”. Pancreatic body carcinoma has always been associated with poor prognosis because diagnosis is made at the advanced stage of the disease. Therefore, poor prognosis might be improved if early diagnosis could be made. Recent researches confirmed genetic

  16. Long-term results and quality of life of patients undergoing sequential surgical treatment for severe acute pancreatitis complicated by infected pancreatic necrosis.

    PubMed

    Cinquepalmi, Lorenza; Boni, Luigi; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Rovera, Francesca; Diurni, Mario; Benevento, Angelo; Dionigi, Renzo

    2006-01-01

    required surgical repair. All patients had a Short Form (SF)-36 score>60%, and 20 of the 32 patients (68%) had scores>70-80% (good quality of life). The worst scores were related to alcoholic pancreatitis. The degree of pancreatic failure (exocrine and endocrine function) is not related to the amount of pancreatic necrosis. Even with a need for repeated laparotomy and multiple surgical procedures, the abdominal wall capacity as well as long-term quality of life remain excellent.

  17. Models of acute and chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Lerch, Markus M; Gorelick, Fred S

    2013-06-01

    Animal models of acute and chronic pancreatitis have been created to examine mechanisms of pathogenesis, test therapeutic interventions, and study the influence of inflammation on the development of pancreatic cancer. In vitro models can be used to study early stage, short-term processes that involve acinar cell responses. Rodent models reproducibly develop mild or severe disease. One of the most commonly used pancreatitis models is created by administration of supraphysiologic concentrations of caerulein, an ortholog of cholecystokinin. Induction of chronic pancreatitis with factors thought to have a role in human disease, such as combinations of lipopolysaccharide and chronic ethanol feeding, might be relevant to human disease. Models of autoimmune chronic pancreatitis have also been developed. Most models, particularly of chronic pancreatitis, require further characterization to determine which features of human disease they include. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Correction of indigestion in chronic biliary pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Trukhan, D I; Tarasova, L V

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is one of the most urgent and investigated problems in gastroenterology. Despite the variety of the spectrum of etiologic, pathogenetic and provoking factors for CP, one of the leading causes of disease pathology is pathology of biliary tract. A key element in the treatment of CP is a correction of the digestive system, with biliary pancreatitis feature that distinguishes it from other forms of pancreatitis, is a combination of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency with chronic biliary insufficiency. The variety of biochemical and immunological effects of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) can treat it with biliary pancreatitis as the drug of etiological, pathogenetic and substitution therapy. UDCA (Ursosan) in combination with modern mini-microspheroidal polyfermental drugs significantly improves the clinical efficacy of the correction of the digestive system in biliary pancreatitis.

  19. State-of-the-art pancreatic MRI.

    PubMed

    Sandrasegaran, Kumaresan; Lin, Chen; Akisik, Fatih M; Tann, Mark

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the most current techniques used for pancreatic imaging, highlighting the advantages and disadvantages of state-of-the-art and emerging pulse sequences and their application to pancreatic disease. Given the technologic advances of the past decade, pancreatic MRI protocols have evolved. Most sequences can now be performed in one or a few breath-holds; 3D sequences with thin, contiguous slices offer improved spatial resolution; and better fat and motion suppression allow improved contrast resolution and image quality. The diagnostic potential of MRCP is now almost as good as ERCP, with pancreatic MRI as the main imaging technique to investigate biliopancreatic pain, chronic pancreatitis, and cystic pancreatic tumors at many institutions. In addition, functional information is provided with secretin-enhanced MRCP.

  20. Groove Pancreatitis, a Masquerading Yet Distinct Clinicopathological Entity: Analysis of Risk Factors and Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Oza, Veeral M; Skeans, Jacob M; Muscarella, Peter; Walker, Jon P; Sklaw, Brett C; Cronley, Kevin M; El-Dika, Samer; Swanson, Benjamin; Hinton, Alice; Conwell, Darwin L; Krishna, Somashekar G

    2015-08-01

    Our objective was to delineate predictive factors differentiating groove pancreatitis (GP) from other lesions involving the head of the pancreas (HOP). A case-control study of patients older than 10 years was performed comparing patients with GP to those with other surgically resected HOP lesions. Thirteen patients with GP (mean ± SD age, 51.9 ± 10.5 years; 11 males [84.6%]), all with a history of smoking (mean, 37.54 ± 17.8 pack-years), were identified. Twelve patients (92.3%) had a history of heavy alcohol drinking (heavy alcohol [EtOH]). The mean lesion size was 2.6 ± 1.1 cm, and the CA 19-9 was elevated (>37 IU/mL) in 5 patients (45.5%). The most common histopathologic condition was duodenal wall cyst with myofibroblastic proliferation and changes of chronic pancreatitis in the HOP.Univariate analysis revealed decreasing age, male sex, weight loss, nausea/vomiting, heavy EtOH, smoking, and a history of chronic pancreatitis were predictive of GP. A multivariate analysis among smokers demonstrated that weight loss (P = 0.006; odds ratio, 11.96; 95% confidence interval, 2.1-70.2), and heavy EtOH (P < 0.001; odds ratio, 82.2; 95% confidence interval, 9.16-738.1) were most predictive of GP. Compared to pancreatic adenocarcinoma (n = 183), weight loss and heavy EtOH remained predictive of GP. Groove pancreatitis in the HOP is associated with a history of heavy EtOH and weight loss. In the absence of these symptoms, it is essential to rule out a malignant lesion.

  1. Ethanol exerts dual effects on calcium homeostasis in CCK-8-stimulated mouse pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Sánchez, Marcela; del Castillo-Vaquero, Angel; Salido, Ginés M; González, Antonio

    2009-10-30

    A significant percentage of patients with pancreatitis often presents a history of excessive alcohol consumption. Nevertheless, the patho-physiological effect of ethanol on pancreatitis remains poorly understood. In the present study, we have investigated the early effects of acute ethanol exposure on CCK-8-evoked Ca2+ signals in mouse pancreatic acinar cells. Changes in [Ca2+]i and ROS production were analyzed employing fluorescence techniques after loading cells with fura-2 or CM-H2DCFDA, respectively. Ethanol, in the concentration range from 1 to 50 mM, evoked an oscillatory pattern in [Ca2+]i. In addition, ethanol evoked reactive oxygen species generation (ROS) production. Stimulation of cells with 1 nM or 20 pM CCK-8, respectively led to a transient change and oscillations in [Ca2+]i. In the presence of ethanol a transformation of 20 pM CCK-8-evoked physiological oscillations into a single transient increase in [Ca2+]i in the majority of cells was observed. Whereas, in response to 1 nM CCK-8, the total Ca2+ mobilization was significantly increased by ethanol pre-treatment. Preincubation of cells with 1 mM 4-MP, an inhibitor of alcohol dehydrogenase, or 10 microM of the antioxidant cinnamtannin B-1, reverted the effect of ethanol on total Ca2+ mobilization evoked by 1 nM CCK-8. Cinnamtannin B-1 blocked ethanol-evoked ROS production. ethanol may lead, either directly or through ROS generation, to an over stimulation of pancreatic acinar cells in response to CCK-8, resulting in a higher Ca2+ mobilization compared to normal conditions. The actions of ethanol on CCK-8-stimulation of cells create a situation potentially leading to Ca2+ overload, which is a common pathological precursor that mediates pancreatitis.

  2. Interstellar Alcohols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, S. B.; Kress, M. E.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Millar, T. J.

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the gas-phase chemistry in dense cores where ice mantles containing ethanol and other alcohols have been evaporated. Model calculations show that methanol, ethanol, propanol, and butanol drive a chemistry leading to the formation of several large ethers and esters. Of these molecules, methyl ethyl ether (CH3OC2H5) and diethyl ether (C2H5)2O attain the highest abundances and should be present in detectable quantities within cores rich in ethanol and methanol. Gas-phase reactions act to destroy evaporated ethanol and a low observed abundance of gas-phase C,H,OH does not rule out a high solid-phase abundance. Grain surface formation mechanisms and other possible gas-phase reactions driven by alcohols are discussed, as are observing strategies for the detection of these large interstellar molecules.

  3. Lateral Pancreaticojejunostomy for Chronic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Ductal Dilation in Children.

    PubMed

    Shah, Adil A; Petrosyan, Mikael; Kane, Timothy D

    2018-06-06

    Pancreatic ductal obstruction leading to ductal dilation and recurrent pancreatitis is uncommon in children. Treatment is dependent upon etiology but consists of decompression of the pancreatic duct (PD) proximally, if possible, by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) intervention or surgical decompression with pancreaticojejunal anastomosis. After institutional review board approval, we retrospectively reviewed the records for 2 children who underwent lateral pancreaticojejunostomy for pancreatic ductal dilation. Data, including demographics, diagnostic studies, operative details, complications, outcomes, and follow-up, were analyzed. Case 1 was a 4-year-old female with pancreatic ductal obstruction with multiple episodes of recurrent pancreatitis and failure of ERCP to clear her PD of stones. She underwent a laparoscopic cholecystectomy with a lateral pancreaticojejunostomy (Puestow procedure). She recovered well with no further episodes of pancreatitis and normal pancreatic function 4 years later. Case 2 was a 2-year-old female who developed recurrent pancreatitis and was found to have papillary stenosis and long common bile-PD channel. Despite multiple sphincterotomies, laparoscopic cholecystectomy, and laparoscopic hepaticoduodenostomy, she continued to experience episodes of pancreatitis. She underwent a laparoscopy converted to open lateral pancreaticojejunostomy. Her recovery was also smooth having had no episodes of pancreatitis or hospital admissions for over 2 years following the Puestow. Indication for lateral pancreaticojejunostomy or Puestow procedure is rare in children and even less often performed using laparoscopy. In our small experience, both patients with pancreatic ductal obstruction managed with Puestow's procedure enjoy durable symptom and pain relief in the long term.

  4. Pseudocyst in the pancreatic tail associated with chronic pancreatitis successfully treated by transpapillary cyst drainage.

    PubMed

    Naitoh, Itaru; Ohara, Hirotaka; Okayama, Yasutaka; Nakazawa, Takahiro; Ando, Tomoaki; Hayashi, Kazuki; Okumura, Fumihiro; Kitajima, Yasuhiro; Ban, Tessin; Miyabe, Katsuyuki; Ueno, Koichiro; Joh, Takashi; Sano, Hitoshi

    2008-09-01

    We report a 50-year-old male with pseudocysts in the pancreatic tail associated with chronic pancreatitis successfully treated by transpapillary cyst drainage. He had previously undergone ultrasonography-guided percutaneous cyst drainage for a pancreatic pseudocyst in our hospital. He was readmitted due to abdominal pain and fever. Computed tomography showed recurrence of a pseudocyst in the pancreatic tail measuring 5 cm in diameter. Since conservative treatment failed, endoscopic retrograde pancreatography was performed. There was communication between the pseudocyst and the main pancreatic duct, and pancreatic duct stenosis proximal to the pseudocyst. First, transpapillary pancreatic duct drainage was performed using a plastic stent, but the pseudocyst did not decrease in size and became infected. After removal of the stent, a pigtail type nasocystic catheter was placed in the pseudocyst via the pancreatic duct. The pseudocyst infection immediately disappeared, and the pseudocyst gradually decreased and disappeared. After removal of the nasocystic catheter, no recurrence was observed. As transpapillary drainage of pancreatic pseudocyst, cyst drainage and pancreatic duct drainage have been reported. In our patient with pseudocyst in the pancreatic tail, duct drainage was ineffective and the pseudocyst was infected, whereas cyst drainage was very effective. We considered that cyst drainage by a nasocystic catheter was the first-line therapy as the transpapillary drainage of the pancreatic pseudocyst.

  5. Pseudocyst in the Pancreatic Tail Associated with Chronic Pancreatitis Successfully Treated by Transpapillary Cyst Drainage

    PubMed Central

    Naitoh, Itaru; Ohara, Hirotaka; Okayama, Yasutaka; Nakazawa, Takahiro; Ando, Tomoaki; Hayashi, Kazuki; Okumura, Fumihiro; Kitajima, Yasuhiro; Ban, Tessin; Miyabe, Katsuyuki; Ueno, Koichiro; Joh, Takashi; Sano, Hitoshi

    2008-01-01

    We report a 50-year-old male with pseudocysts in the pancreatic tail associated with chronic pancreatitis successfully treated by transpapillary cyst drainage. He had previously undergone ultrasonography-guided percutaneous cyst drainage for a pancreatic pseudocyst in our hospital. He was readmitted due to abdominal pain and fever. Computed tomography showed recurrence of a pseudocyst in the pancreatic tail measuring 5 cm in diameter. Since conservative treatment failed, endoscopic retrograde pancreatography was performed. There was communication between the pseudocyst and the main pancreatic duct, and pancreatic duct stenosis proximal to the pseudocyst. First, transpapillary pancreatic duct drainage was performed using a plastic stent, but the pseudocyst did not decrease in size and became infected. After removal of the stent, a pigtail type nasocystic catheter was placed in the pseudocyst via the pancreatic duct. The pseudocyst infection immediately disappeared, and the pseudocyst gradually decreased and disappeared. After removal of the nasocystic catheter, no recurrence was observed. As transpapillary drainage of pancreatic pseudocyst, cyst drainage and pancreatic duct drainage have been reported. In our patient with pseudocyst in the pancreatic tail, duct drainage was ineffective and the pseudocyst was infected, whereas cyst drainage was very effective. We considered that cyst drainage by a nasocystic catheter was the first-line therapy as the transpapillary drainage of the pancreatic pseudocyst. PMID:21897788

  6. Gene expression analysis of pancreatic cell lines reveals genes overexpressed in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Alldinger, Ingo; Dittert, Dag; Peiper, Matthias; Fusco, Alberto; Chiappetta, Gennaro; Staub, Eike; Lohr, Matthias; Jesnowski, Ralf; Baretton, Gustavo; Ockert, Detlef; Saeger, Hans-Detlev; Grützmann, Robert; Pilarsky, Christian

    2005-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death. Using DNA gene expression analysis based on a custom made Affymetrix cancer array, we investigated the expression pattern of both primary and established pancreatic carcinoma cell lines. We analyzed the gene expression of 5 established pancreatic cancer cell lines (AsPC-1, BxPC-3, Capan-1, Capan-2 and HPAF II) and 5 primary isolates, 1 of them derived from benign pancreatic duct cells. Out of 1,540 genes which were expressed in at least 3 experiments, we found 122 genes upregulated and 18 downregulated in tumor cell lines compared to benign cells with a fold change >3. Several of the upregulated genes (like Prefoldin 5, ADAM9 and E-cadherin) have been associated with pancreatic cancer before. The other differentially regulated genes, however, play a so far unknown role in the course of human pancreatic carcinoma. By means of immunohistochemistry we could show that thymosin beta-10 (TMSB10), upregulated in tumor cell lines, is expressed in human pancreatic carcinoma, but not in non-neoplastic pancreatic tissue, suggesting a role for TMSB10 in the carcinogenesis of pancreatic carcinoma. Using gene expression profiling of pancreatic cell lines we were able to identify genes differentially expressed in pancreatic adenocarcinoma, which might contribute to pancreatic cancer development. Copyright 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Surgical therapy in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Neal, C P; Dennison, A R; Garcea, G

    2012-12-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas which causes chronic pain, as well as exocrine and endocrine failure in the majority of patients, together producing social and domestic upheaval and a very poor quality of life. At least half of patients will require surgical intervention at some stage in their disease, primarily for the treatment of persistent pain. Available data have now confirmed that surgical intervention may produce superior results to conservative and endoscopic treatment. Comprehensive individual patient assessment is crucial to optimal surgical management, however, in order to determine which morphological disease variant (large duct disease, distal stricture with focal disease, expanded head or small duct/minimal change disease) is present in the individual patient, as a wide and differing range of surgical approaches are possible depending upon the specific abnormality within the gland. This review comprehensively assesses the evidence for these differing approaches to surgical intervention in chronic pancreatitis. Surgical drainage procedures should be limited to a small number of patients with a dilated duct and no pancreatic head mass. Similarly, a small population presenting with a focal stricture and tail only disease may be successfully treated by distal pancreatectomy. Long-term results of both of these procedure types are poor, however. More impressive results have been yielded for the surgical treatment of the expanded head, for which a range of surgical options now exist. Evidence from level I studies and a recent meta-analysis suggests that duodenum-preserving resections offer benefits compared to pancreaticoduodenectomy, though the results of the ongoing, multicentre ChroPac trial are awaited to confirm this. Further data are also needed to determine which of the duodenum-preserving procedures provides optimal results. In relation to small duct/minimal change disease total pancreatectomy represents the only

  8. Pancreatic cystic tumors.

    PubMed

    Salvia, R; Festa, L; Butturini, G; Tonsi, A; Sartori, N; Biasutti, C; Capelli, P; Pederzoli, P

    2004-04-01

    Cystic tumors of the pancreas are less frequent than other tumors in neoplastic pancreatic pathology, but in recent years the literature has reported an increasing number. After the first report by Becourt in 1830, cystic tumors were classified into 2 different types by Compagno and Oertel in 1978: benign tumors with glycogen-rich cells and mucinous cystic neoplasms with overt and latent malignancy. The WHO classification of exocrine tumors of the pancreas, published in 1996, is based on the histopathological features of the epithelial wall, which are the main factor in differential diagnosis with cystic lesions of the pancreas. Thanks to the knowledge acquired up to now, a surgical procedure is not always required because the therapeutic choice is conditioned by the correct classification of this heterogeneous group of tumors. Clinical signs are not really useful in the clinical work up, most patients have no symptoms and when clinical signs are present, they may help us to pinpoint the organ of origin but never to identify the type of pathology. In the last few years, the great improvement in imaging has enabled us not only to discriminate cystic from solid lesions, but also to identify the features of the lesions and label them preoperatively. More invasive diagnostic procedures such as fine needle aspiration and intracystic fluid tumor marker level are not really useful because they are not sensitive and the cystic wall can show different degrees of dysplasia and de-epithelialization. These are the reasons for sending the entire specimen to pathology. Good cooperation between surgeons, pathologists, radiologists and gastroenterologists is mandatory to increase the chances of making a proper diagnosis. Therefore, we must analyze all the information we have, such as age, sex, clinical history, location of the tumor and radiological features, in order to avoid the mistake of treating a cystic neoplasm as a benign lesion or as a pseudocyst, as described in the

  9. Quantifying alcohol-related emergency admissions in a UK tertiary referral hospital: a cross-sectional study of chronic alcohol dependency and acute alcohol intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Vardy, J; Keliher, T; Fisher, J; Ritchie, F; Bell, C; Chekroud, M; Clarey, F; Blackwood, L; Barry, L; Paton, E; Clark, A; Connelly, R

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Alcohol is responsible for a proportion of emergency admissions to hospital, with acute alcohol intoxication and chronic alcohol dependency (CAD) implicated. This study aims to quantify the proportion of hospital admissions through our emergency department (ED) which were thought by the admitting doctor to be (largely or partially) a result of alcohol consumption. Setting ED of a UK tertiary referral hospital. Participants All ED admissions occurring over 14 weeks from 1 September to 8 December 2012. Data obtained for 5497 of 5746 admissions (95.67%). Primary outcome measures Proportion of emergency admissions related to alcohol as defined by the admitting ED clinician. Secondary outcome measures Proportion of emergency admissions due to alcohol diagnosed with acute alcohol intoxication or CAD according to ICD-10 criteria. Results 1152 (21.0%, 95% CI 19.9% to 22.0%) of emergency admissions were thought to be due to alcohol. 74.6% of patients admitted due to alcohol had CAD, and significantly greater than the 26.4% with ‘Severe’ or ‘Very Severe’ acute alcohol intoxication (p<0.001). Admissions due to alcohol differed to admissions not due to alcohol being on average younger (45 vs 56 years, p<0.001) more often male (73.4% vs 45.1% males, p<0.001) and more likely to have a diagnosis synonymous with alcohol or related to recreational drug use, pancreatitis, deliberate self-harm, head injury, gastritis, suicidal ideation, upper gastrointestinal bleeds or seizures (p<0.001). An increase in admissions due to alcohol on Saturdays reflects a surge in admissions with acute alcohol intoxication above the weekly average (p=0.003). Conclusions Alcohol was thought to be implicated in 21% of emergency admissions in this cohort. CAD is responsible for a significantly greater proportion of admissions due to alcohol than acute intoxication. Interventions designed to reduce alcohol-related admissions must incorporate measures to tackle CAD. PMID:27324707

  10. Quantifying alcohol-related emergency admissions in a UK tertiary referral hospital: a cross-sectional study of chronic alcohol dependency and acute alcohol intoxication.

    PubMed

    Vardy, J; Keliher, T; Fisher, J; Ritchie, F; Bell, C; Chekroud, M; Clarey, F; Blackwood, L; Barry, L; Paton, E; Clark, A; Connelly, R

    2016-06-20

    Alcohol is responsible for a proportion of emergency admissions to hospital, with acute alcohol intoxication and chronic alcohol dependency (CAD) implicated. This study aims to quantify the proportion of hospital admissions through our emergency department (ED) which were thought by the admitting doctor to be (largely or partially) a result of alcohol consumption. ED of a UK tertiary referral hospital. All ED admissions occurring over 14 weeks from 1 September to 8 December 2012. Data obtained for 5497 of 5746 admissions (95.67%). Proportion of emergency admissions related to alcohol as defined by the admitting ED clinician. Proportion of emergency admissions due to alcohol diagnosed with acute alcohol intoxication or CAD according to ICD-10 criteria. 1152 (21.0%, 95% CI 19.9% to 22.0%) of emergency admissions were thought to be due to alcohol. 74.6% of patients admitted due to alcohol had CAD, and significantly greater than the 26.4% with 'Severe' or 'Very Severe' acute alcohol intoxication (p<0.001). Admissions due to alcohol differed to admissions not due to alcohol being on average younger (45 vs 56 years, p<0.001) more often male (73.4% vs 45.1% males, p<0.001) and more likely to have a diagnosis synonymous with alcohol or related to recreational drug use, pancreatitis, deliberate self-harm, head injury, gastritis, suicidal ideation, upper gastrointestinal bleeds or seizures (p<0.001). An increase in admissions due to alcohol on Saturdays reflects a surge in admissions with acute alcohol intoxication above the weekly average (p=0.003). Alcohol was thought to be implicated in 21% of emergency admissions in this cohort. CAD is responsible for a significantly greater proportion of admissions due to alcohol than acute intoxication. Interventions designed to reduce alcohol-related admissions must incorporate measures to tackle CAD. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. New insights into pancreatic cancer biology.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, M

    2012-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains a devastating disease. Over the last few years, there have been important advances in the molecular and biological understanding of pancreatic cancer. This included understanding of the genomic complexity of the disease, the role of pancreatic cancer stem cells, the relevance of the tumor microenvironment, and the unique metabolic adaptation of pancreas cancer cells to obtain nutrients under hypoxic environment. In this paper, we review the most salient developments in these few areas.

  12. Diagnosis and management of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Nikfarjam, Mehrdad; Wilson, Jeremy S; Smith, Ross C

    2017-08-21

    In 2015, the Australasian Pancreatic Club (APC) published the Australasian guidelines for the management of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (http://pancreas.org.au/2016/01/pancreatic-exocrine-insufficiency-guidelines). Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) occurs when normal digestion cannot be sustained due to insufficient pancreatic digestive enzyme activity. This may be related to a breakdown, at any point, in the pancreatic digestive chain: pancreatic stimulation; synthesis, release or transportation of pancreatic enzymes; or synchronisation of secretions to mix with ingested food. Main recommendations: The guidelines provide advice on diagnosis and management of PEI, noting the following: A high prevalence of PEI is seen in certain diseases and conditions, such as cystic fibrosis, acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer and pancreatic surgery. The main symptoms of PEI are steatorrhoea or diarrhoea, abdominal pain, bloating and weight loss. These symptoms are non-specific and often go undetected and untreated. PEI diagnosis is predominantly based on clinical findings and the presence of underlying disease. The likelihood of PEI in suspected patients has been categorised into three groups: definite, possible and unlikely. If left untreated, PEI may lead to complications related to fat malabsorption and malnutrition, and have an impact on quality of life. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT) remains the mainstay of PEI treatment with the recommended adult initial enzyme dose being 25 000-40 000 units of lipase per meal, titrating up to a maximum of 75 000-80 000 units of lipase per meal. Adjunct acid-suppressing therapy may be useful when patients still experience symptoms of PEI on high dose PERT. Nutritional management by an experienced dietitian is essential. Changes in management as a result of these guidelines: These are the first guidelines to classify PEI as being definite, possible or unlikely, and provide a diagnostic algorithm to

  13. [Fatal acute pancreatitis caused by severe hypertriglyceridaemia].

    PubMed

    Abed, Osama Karim; Lindberg, Mats; Andos, Shadi

    2014-04-14

    We report a case of fatal acute pancreatitis caused by severe hypertriglyceridaemia in a 27-year-old male who was treated with quetiapine. The blood samples were milk-like with markedly elevated triglycerides (> 55 mmol/l). Computer tomography revealed a severe pancreatitis without bile stones or cholestasis. In spite of treatment the patient's condition rapidly worsened and he died 48 hours after admission. We discuss the option of treating hypertriglyceridaemia-induced pancreatitis with apheresis.

  14. The role of pancreatic islets in experimental pancreatic carcinogenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, O.; Ohigashi, H.; Imaoka, S.; Nakai, I.; Mitsuo, M.; Weide, L.; Pour, P. M.

    1995-01-01

    Our previous studies have suggested that the presence of intact islets is essential for the induction of pancreatic exocrine tumors in the Syrian hamster model. To validate this, we investigated the effect of the carcinogen, N-nitrosobis(2-oxo-propyl)amine (BOP) in hamsters, in which homologous isolated intact islets were transplanted into the submandibular gland (SMG). Freshly isolated pure islets from hamster donors were transplanted into the left SMG of 20 female host hamsters. Ten of these hamsters (group 1) received BOP (40 mg/kg) weekly for 3 weeks. Another 10 hamsters (group 2) were kept untreated. In groups 3 and 4 (10 hamsters each) the salt solution or isolated pancreatic ductal cells, respectively, was injected into the gland. In other groups (10 hamsters each) islets were transplanted into the peri-SMG connective tissue (group 5) or into the renal subcapsular space (group 6). Hamsters of group 1 (40 mg/kg, weekly for 3 weeks) as were group 7 hamsters, which served as BOP-treated controls. All BOP-treated hamsters developed pancreatic lesions. Similar hyperplastic and atypical ductal/ductular proliferation and in situ carcinoma were found in the SMG of many group 1 hamsters. No such lesions were found in the SMG, peri-SMG, or renal subcapsular space of the other groups. Islets appear to be involved in carcinogenicity of BOP. The mechanism is obscure. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7485408

  15. Pharmacological interventions for acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Moggia, Elisabetta; Koti, Rahul; Belgaumkar, Ajay P; Fazio, Federico; Pereira, Stephen P; Davidson, Brian R; Gurusamy, Kurinchi Selvan

    2017-04-21

    In people with acute pancreatitis, it is unclear what the role should be for medical treatment as an addition to supportive care such as fluid and electrolyte balance and organ support in people with organ failure. To assess the effects of different pharmacological interventions in people with acute pancreatitis. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, 2016, Issue 9), MEDLINE, Embase, Science Citation Index Expanded, and trial registers to October 2016 to identify randomised controlled trials (RCTs). We also searched the references of included trials to identify further trials. We considered only RCTs performed in people with acute pancreatitis, irrespective of aetiology, severity, presence of infection, language, blinding, or publication status for inclusion in the review. Two review authors independently identified trials and extracted data. We did not perform a network meta-analysis as planned because of the lack of information on potential effect modifiers and differences of type of participants included in the different comparisons, when information was available. We calculated the odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the binary outcomes and rate ratios with 95% CIs for count outcomes using a fixed-effect model and random-effects model. We included 84 RCTs with 8234 participants in this review. Six trials (N = 658) did not report any of the outcomes of interest for this review. The remaining 78 trials excluded 210 participants after randomisation. Thus, a total of 7366 participants in 78 trials contributed to one or more outcomes for this review. The treatments assessed in these 78 trials included antibiotics, antioxidants, aprotinin, atropine, calcitonin, cimetidine, EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid), gabexate, glucagon, iniprol, lexipafant, NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), octreotide, oxyphenonium, probiotics, activated protein C, somatostatin, somatostatin plus omeprazole, somatostatin

  16. Biomarkers and Targeted Therapy in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Karandish, Fataneh; Mallik, Sanku

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) constitutes 90% of pancreatic cancers. PDAC is a complex and devastating disease with only 1%–3% survival rate in five years after the second stage. Treatment of PDAC is complicated due to the tumor microenvironment, changing cell behaviors to the mesenchymal type, altered drug delivery, and drug resistance. Considering that pancreatic cancer shows early invasion and metastasis, critical research is needed to explore different aspects of the disease, such as elaboration of biomarkers, specific signaling pathways, and gene aberration. In this review, we highlight the biomarkers, the fundamental signaling pathways, and their importance in targeted drug delivery for pancreatic cancers. PMID:27147897

  17. Biomarkers and Targeted Therapy in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Karandish, Fataneh; Mallik, Sanku

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) constitutes 90% of pancreatic cancers. PDAC is a complex and devastating disease with only 1%-3% survival rate in five years after the second stage. Treatment of PDAC is complicated due to the tumor microenvironment, changing cell behaviors to the mesenchymal type, altered drug delivery, and drug resistance. Considering that pancreatic cancer shows early invasion and metastasis, critical research is needed to explore different aspects of the disease, such as elaboration of biomarkers, specific signaling pathways, and gene aberration. In this review, we highlight the biomarkers, the fundamental signaling pathways, and their importance in targeted drug delivery for pancreatic cancers.

  18. Hipertriglyceridemia induced acute pancreatitis in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mañas García, María Dolores; Marchán Carranza, Enrique; Galiana Gómez Del Pulgar, Jesús; Fernández de Bobadilla Pascual, Belén

    Hypertrigliceridemia is the third most common cause of acute pancreatitis. The risk of developing acute pancreatitis is 5% in healthy patients and 4% during pregnancy with triglyceride levels >1,000mg/dl. During pregnancy there are changes in the lipid profile that increase between two and four times triglyceride levels. Its increase in excessive form produces an oxidative environment with injury of the endothelium and appearance of complications such as preeclampsia or pancreatitis. We present the case of a pregnant woman with pancreatitis secondary to hypertriglyceridemia. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. [Pancreatic acinar neoplasms : Comparative molecular characterization].

    PubMed

    Bergmann, F

    2016-11-01

    Pancreatic acinar cell carcinomas are biologically aggressive neoplasms for which treatment options are very limited. The molecular mechanisms of tumor initiation and progression are largely not understood and precursor lesions have not yet been identified. In this study, pancreatic acinar cell carcinomas were cytogenetically characterized as well as by molecular and immunohistochemical analyses. Corresponding investigations were carried out on pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas and pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms augmented by functional analyses. We show that pancreatic acinar cell carcinomas display a microsatellite stable, chromosomal unstable genotype, characterized by recurrent chromosomal imbalances that clearly discriminate them from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas and neuroendocrine neoplasms. Based on findings obtained from comparative genomic hybridization, candidate genes could be identified, such as deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC) and c-MYC. Furthermore, several therapeutic targets were identified in acinar cell carcinomas and other pancreatic neoplasms, including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) and heat shock protein 90 (HSP90). Moreover, L1CAM was shown to play a significant role in the tumorigenesis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Functional analyses in cell lines derived from pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms revealed promising anti-tumorigenic effects using EGFR and HSP90 inhibitors affecting the cell cycle and in the case of HSP90, regulating several other oncogenes. Finally, based on mutational analyses of mitochondrial DNA, molecular evidence is provided that acinar cell cystadenomas (or better cystic acinar transformation) represent non-clonal lesions, suggesting an inflammatory reactive non-neoplastic nature.

  20. Legumain is activated in macrophages during pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wartmann, Thomas; Fleming, Alicia K.; Gocheva, Vasilena; van der Linden, Wouter A.; Withana, Nimali P.; Verdoes, Martijn; Aurelio, Luigi; Edgington-Mitchell, Daniel; Lieu, TinaMarie; Parker, Belinda S.; Graham, Bim; Reinheckel, Thomas; Furness, John B.; Joyce, Johanna A.; Storz, Peter; Halangk, Walter; Bogyo, Matthew; Bunnett, Nigel W.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterized by dysregulated activity of digestive enzymes, necrosis, immune infiltration, and pain. Repeated incidence of pancreatitis is an important risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Legumain, a lysosomal cysteine protease, has been linked to inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis, stroke, and cancer. Until now, legumain activation has not been studied during pancreatitis. We used a fluorescently quenched activity-based probe to assess legumain activation during caerulein-induced pancreatitis in mice. We detected activated legumain by ex vivo imaging, confocal microscopy, and gel electrophoresis. Compared with healthy controls, legumain activity in the pancreas of caerulein-treated mice was increased in a time-dependent manner. Legumain was localized to CD68+ macrophages and was not active in pancreatic acinar cells. Using a small-molecule inhibitor of legumain, we found that this protease is not essential for the initiation of pancreatitis. However, it may serve as a biomarker of disease, since patients with chronic pancreatitis show strongly increased legumain expression in macrophages. Moreover, the occurrence of legumain-expressing macrophages in regions of acinar-to-ductal metaplasia suggests that this protease may influence reprogramming events that lead to inflammation-induced pancreatic cancer. PMID:27514475

  1. Drug induced acute pancreatitis: incidence and severity.

    PubMed Central

    Lankisch, P G; Dröge, M; Gottesleben, F

    1995-01-01

    To determine the incidence and severity of drug induced acute pancreatitis, data from 45 German centres of gastroenterology were evaluated. Among 1613 patients treated for acute pancreatitis in 1993, drug induced acute pancreatitis was diagnosed in 22 patients (incidence 1.4%). Drugs held responsible were azathioprine, mesalazine/sulfasalazine, 2',3'-dideoxyinosine (ddI), oestrogens, frusemide, hydrochlorothiazide, and rifampicin. Pancreatic necrosis not exceeding 33% of the organ was found on ultrasonography or computed tomography, or both, in three patients (14%). Pancreatic pseudocysts did not occur. A decrease of arterial PO2 reflecting respiratory insufficiency, and an increase of serum creatinine, reflecting renal insufficiency as complications of acute pancreatitis were seen in two (9%) and four (18%) patients, respectively. Artificial ventilation was not needed, and dialysis was necessary in only one (5%) case. Two patients (9%) died of AIDS and tuberculosis, respectively; pancreatitis did not seem to have contributed materially to their death. In conclusion, drugs rarely cause acute pancreatitis, and drug induced acute pancreatitis usually runs a benign course. PMID:7489946

  2. Imaging of Pancreatic and Duodenal Trauma.

    PubMed

    Melamud, Kira; LeBedis, Christina A; Soto, Jorge A

    2015-07-01

    Pancreatic and duodenal injuries are rare but life-threatening occurrences, often occurring in association with other solid organ injuries. Findings of pancreatic and duodenal trauma on computed tomography and MR imaging are often nonspecific, and high levels of clinical suspicion and understanding of mechanism of injury are imperative. Familiarity with the grading schemes of pancreatic and duodenal injury is important because they help in assessing for key imaging findings that directly influence management. This article presents an overview of imaging of blunt and penetrating pancreatic and duodenal injuries, including pathophysiology, available imaging techniques, and variety of imaging features. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Advances in cryoablation for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiao-Mei; Niu, Li-Zhi; Chen, Ji-Bing; Xu, Ke-Cheng

    2016-01-14

    Pancreatic carcinoma is a common cancer of the digestive system with a poor prognosis. It is characterized by insidious onset, rapid progression, a high degree of malignancy and early metastasis. At present, radical surgery is considered the only curative option for treatment, however, the majority of patients with pancreatic cancer are diagnosed too late to undergo surgery. The sensitivity of pancreatic cancer to chemotherapy or radiotherapy is also poor. As a result, there is no standard treatment for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Cryoablation is generally considered to be an effective palliative treatment for pancreatic cancer. It has the advantages of minimal invasion and improved targeting, and is potentially safe with less pain to the patients. It is especially suitable in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer. However, our initial findings suggest that cryotherapy combined with 125-iodine seed implantation, immunotherapy or various other treatments for advanced pancreatic cancer can improve survival in patients with unresectable or metastatic pancreatic cancer. Although these findings require further in-depth study, the initial results are encouraging. This paper reviews the safety and efficacy of cryoablation, including combined approaches, in the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  4. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Pancreatitis: An Uncommon Presentation of a Common Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Eduardo A.; Sussman, Daniel A.; Rodriguez, Vanessa R.

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Female, 21 Final Diagnosis: Systemic lupus erythematosus pancreatitis Symptoms: Abdominal pain Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Challenging differential diagnosis Background: Acute pancreatitis is uncommon in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). When recognized early and properly treated with IV steroids and hydration, the course may be benign, as exemplified in the following report. Case Report: A 21-year-old woman with history of SLE and stage IV lupus nephritis, was admitted to the Sergio Bernales Hospital ICU (Lima, Peru), complaining of worsening epigastric pain radiating to the back, and nausea and vomiting for 1 week. She denied prior cholelithiasis, alcohol use, or recent medication changes. On examination, she was tachycardic and normotensive, with a slightly distended abdomen and epigastric tenderness on deep palpation, without signs of peritoneal irritation. Laboratory results demonstrated leukocytosis without left shift, creatinine of 2.26 mg/dL, amylase of 750 U/L, and lipase of 1038 U/L. Liver chemistries, calcium, lactic acid, triglycerides, and IgG4 were normal and alcohol level was undetectable. Ultrasound did not show cholelithiasis, biliary sludge, or common bile duct dilation. CT of the abdomen showed pancreas head (parenchyma) stranding with uniform enhancement consistent with interstitial pancreatitis. Despite receiving IV fluids, opiates, anti-emetics, and nothing by mouth, her clinical condition deteriorated, prompting the use of IV methylprednisolone. After completing 1 week of IV steroids, she was transferred to the medical floor clinically improved. The patient was discharged with an oral steroid taper and complete resolution of symptoms. Conclusions: After ruling out common causes, such as hepatobiliary pathology or toxin-related insults like alcohol, hypercalcemia, hypertriglyceridemia or medications, steroids may be used in SLE pancreatitis because they might improve

  5. Troxacitabine prodrugs for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Adema, A D; Radi, M; Daft, J; Narayanasamy, J; Hoebe, E K; Alexander, L E; Chu, C K; Peters, G J

    2007-01-01

    Troxacitabine is a cytotoxic deoxycytidine analogue with an unnatural L-configuration, which is activated by deoxycytidine kinase (dCK). The configuration is responsible for differences in the uptake and metabolism of troxacitabine compared to other deoxynucleoside analogues. The main drawback in the use of most nucleoside anticancer agents originates from their hydrophilic nature, which property requires a high and frequent dosage for an intravenous administration. To overcome this problem several troxacitabine prodrugs modified in the aminogroup with a linear aliphatic chain with a higher lipophilicity were developed. To determine whether these prodrugs have an advantage over Troxacitabine pancreatic cancer cell lines were exposed to Troxacitabine and the lipophilic prodrugs. The addition of linear aliphatic chains to troxacitabine increased sensitivity of pancreatic cancer cell lines to the drug > 100-fold, possibly due to a better uptake and retention of the drug.

  6. Specifying pancreatic endocrine cell fates.

    PubMed

    Collombat, Patrick; Hecksher-Sørensen, Jacob; Serup, Palle; Mansouri, Ahmed

    2006-07-01

    Cell replacement therapy could represent an attractive alternative to insulin injections for the treatment of diabetes. However, this approach requires a thorough understanding of the molecular switches controlling the specification of the different pancreatic cell-types in vivo. These are derived from an apparently identical pool of cells originating from the early gut endoderm, which are successively specified towards the pancreatic, endocrine, and hormone-expressing cell lineages. Numerous studies have outlined the crucial roles exerted by transcription factors in promoting the cell destiny, defining the cell identity and maintaining a particular cell fate. This review focuses on the mechanisms regulating the morphogenesis of the pancreas with particular emphasis on recent findings concerning the transcription factor hierarchy orchestrating endocrine cell fate allocation.

  7. Pancreatic injury: accidental or nonaccidental.

    PubMed

    Waseem, Muhammad; Perales, Orlando

    2008-10-01

    The diagnosis of abuse in a child with occult abdominal injuries is difficult. Not many patients with nonaccidental trauma present with a clear history of the injury. The absence of a reliable history in patients with nonaccidental trauma makes determination of an exact mechanism difficult. In most cases, patients present to the emergency department with inaccurate or misleading histories; some give no history of trauma, which may delay recognition of serious abdominal injuries. In addition, the child may have other injuries, such as neurologic or musculoskeletal, which divert attention from occult abdominal injuries. Pancreatic and duodenal injuries are considered specific for abuse. We report a child with pancreatic injury without an appropriate history of trauma, determined to be caused by nonaccidental trauma.

  8. Lysosome associated membrane proteins maintain pancreatic acinar cell homeostasis: LAMP-2 deficient mice develop pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Mareninova, Olga A; Sendler, Matthias; Malla, Sudarshan Ravi; Yakubov, Iskandar; French, Samuel W; Tokhtaeva, Elmira; Vagin, Olga; Oorschot, Viola; Lüllmann-Rauch, Renate; Blanz, Judith; Dawson, David; Klumperman, Judith; Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia; Gukovsky, Ilya; Gukovskaya, Anna S

    2015-11-01

    The pathogenic mechanism of pancreatitis is poorly understood. Recent evidence implicates defective autophagy in pancreatitis responses; however, the pathways mediating impaired autophagy in pancreas remain largely unknown. Here, we investigate the role of lysosome associated membrane proteins (LAMPs) in pancreatitis. We analyzed changes in LAMPs in experimental models and human pancreatitis, and the underlying mechanisms: LAMP de-glycosylation and degradation. LAMP cleavage by cathepsin B (CatB) was analyzed by mass spectrometry. We used mice deficient in LAMP-2 to assess its role in pancreatitis. Pancreatic levels of LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 greatly decrease across various pancreatitis models and in human disease. Pancreatitis does not trigger LAMPs' bulk de-glycosylation, but induces their degradation via CatB-mediated cleavage of LAMP molecule close to the boundary between luminal and transmembrane domains. LAMP-2 null mice spontaneously develop pancreatitis that begins with acinar cell vacuolization due to impaired autophagic flux, and progresses to severe pancreas damage characterized by trypsinogen activation, macrophage-driven inflammation, and acinar cell death. LAMP-2 deficiency causes a decrease in pancreatic digestive enzymes content, stimulates the basal and inhibits CCK-induced amylase secretion by acinar cells. The effects of LAMP-2 knockout and acute cerulein pancreatitis overlap, which corroborates the pathogenic role of LAMP decrease in experimental pancreatitis models. The results indicate a critical role for LAMPs, particularly LAMP-2, in maintaining pancreatic acinar cell homeostasis, and provide evidence that defective lysosomal function, resulting in impaired autophagy, leads to pancreatitis. Mice with LAMP-2 deficiency present a novel genetic model of human pancreatitis caused by lysosomal/autophagic dysfunction.

  9. Long-term outcome of patients with chronic pancreatitis treated with micronutrient antioxidant therapy.

    PubMed

    Rupasinghe, Sukitha Namal; Siriwardena, Ajith K

    2017-04-01

    Micronutrient antioxidant therapy did not relieve pain in a European randomized trial of patients with chronic pancreatitis without malnutrition. However, intervention was undertaken only for 6 months leaving unanswered the question of whether long-term antioxidant therapy may modulate chronic pancreatitis. The aim of this study is to assess the outcome of long-term use of micronutrient antioxidant therapy in patients with chronic pancreatitis. This is a single center clinical cohort report of patients with chronic pancreatitis prescribed micronutrient antioxidant therapy and followed for up to 10 years. Data were collected on demographic detail, clinic pain assessment, insulin requirements, interventions and outcome. A group of 30 patients with a diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis constitute the study population. Median age at time of diagnosis was 40 years (range 14-66); 19 (63%) were male and the median duration of symptoms was 2 years (range 0-18). Alcohol was the dominant cause in 22 (73%) patients and 16 (53%) patients were Cambridge stage 1. Twenty-four (80%) patients had pain at presentation. During antioxidant treatment of 4 years (range 1-10), pain decreased but the proportion with abdominal pain compared to those who were pain-free remained constant (P=0.16; two-way ANOVA with Bonferroni correction). There was a significant increase in requirement for insulin (P=0.028) with time together with use of both endoscopic and surgical interventions. This is the first study to report long-term disease-specific outcome in patients with chronic pancreatitis prescribed micronutrient antioxidant therapy. There appears to be no effect of intervention on outcome.

  10. Demographic characteristics of chronic pancreatitis patients in the era of endosonography: Experience of a single tertiary referral center in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Şişman, Gürhan; Köroğlu, Emine; Erzin, Yusuf; Hatemi, İbrahim; Tuncer, Murat; Şentürk, Hakan

    2016-05-01

    There are no clinical data available about chronic pancreatitis (CP) on a series of patients of sufficient number in Turkey. In this study, the etiology and clinical features of CP were evaluated in one center, which is a tertiary referral hospital. The files of 168 patients who had been diagnosed with CP in our Medical Faculty between October 2007 and May 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. The etiological factors, symptoms, complications, and treatment methods were analyzed. The most common etiological factor was alcohol abuse (39%). The average age±SD was 46±15.2 years, and the male:female ratio was 4.2:1 (it was 2.6:1 for other etiologies except alcohol abuse and 15.5:1 in alcoholic CP patients, p<0.05). The most frequent complication was diabetes mellitus (44%). The smoking rate was significantly higher in CP patients with pancreatic calcification (p<0.05). One-third of the patients received various types of endoscopic treatment. During a mean follow-up period of 42±13 months (range, 6-55), pancreatic cancer was detected in four patients (2.3%). In majority of the CP patients, the etiology is alcohol abuse in Turkey. The development of diabetes is the most frequent complication of CP, which is independent of the etiology.

  11. Proteins Differentially Expressed in the Pancreas of Hepatic Alcohol Dehydrogenase-Deficient Deer Mice Fed Ethanol For 3 Months.

    PubMed

    Bhopale, Kamlesh K; Amer, Samir M; Kaphalia, Lata; Soman, Kizhake V; Wiktorowicz, John E; Shakeel Ansari, Ghulam A; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to identify differentially expressed proteins in the pancreatic tissue of hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase-deficient deer mice fed ethanol to understand metabolic basis and mechanism of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. Mice were fed liquid diet containing 3.5 g% ethanol daily for 3 months, and differentially expressed pancreatic proteins were identified by protein separation using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis and identification by mass spectrometry. Nineteen differentially expressed proteins were identified by applying criteria established for protein identification in proteomics. An increased abundance was found for ribosome-binding protein 1, 60S ribosomal protein L31-like isoform 1, histone 4, calcium, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding proteins and the proteins involved in antiapoptotic processes and endoplasmic reticulum function, stress, and/or homeostasis. Low abundance was found for endoA cytokeratin, 40S ribosomal protein SA, amylase 2b isoform precursor, serum albumin, and ATP synthase subunit β and the proteins involved in cell motility, structure, and conformation. Chronic ethanol feeding in alcohol dehydrogenase-deficient deer mice differentially expresses pancreatic functional and structural proteins, which can be used to develop biomarker(s) of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis, particularly amylase 2b precursor, and 60 kDa heat shock protein and those involved in ATP synthesis and blood osmotic pressure.

  12. Alcoholism and Suicide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Alec; Linnoila, Markku

    1986-01-01

    Reviews knowledge about suicide in alcoholism: how commonly suicide among alcoholics occurs; which alcoholics commit suicide and why; suicide among alcoholic women and alcoholic physicians; possible predisposing biological factors; possible linkages with depression, adverse life events, and personality disorder; and future research and directions.…

  13. Peripancreatic fat necrosis worsens acute pancreatitis independent of pancreatic necrosis via unsaturated fatty acids increased in human pancreatic necrosis collections

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Pawan; Patel, Krutika; Durgampudi, Chandra; Trivedi, Ram N; de Oliveira, Cristiane; Crowell, Michael D; Pannala, Rahul; Lee, Kenneth; Brand, Randall; Chennat, Jennifer; Slivka, Adam; Papachristou, Georgios I; Khalid, Asif; Whitcomb, David C; DeLany, James P; Cline, Rachel A; Acharya, Chathur; Jaligama, Deepthi; Murad, Faris M; Yadav, Dhiraj; Navina, Sarah; Singh, Vijay P

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Peripancreatic fat necrosis occurs frequently in necrotising pancreatitis. Distinguishing markers from mediators of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is important since targeting mediators may improve outcomes. We evaluated potential agents in human pancreatic necrotic collections (NCs), pseudocysts (PCs) and pancreatic cystic neoplasms and used pancreatic acini, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and an acute pancreatitis (AP) model to determine SAP mediators. Methods We measured acinar and PBMC injury induced by agents increased in NCs and PCs. Outcomes of caerulein pancreatitis were studied in lean rats coadministered interleukin (IL)-1β and keratinocyte chemoattractant/growth-regulated oncogene, triolein alone or with the lipase inhibitor orlistat. Results NCs had higher fatty acids, IL-8 and IL-1β versus other fluids. Lipolysis of unsaturated triglyceride and resulting unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) oleic and linoleic acids induced necro-apoptosis at less than half the concentration in NCs but other agents did not do so at more than two times these concentrations. Cytokine coadministration resulted in higher pancreatic and lung inflammation than caerulein alone, but only triolein coadministration caused peripancreatic fat stranding, higher cytokines, UFAs, multisystem organ failure (MSOF) and mortality in 97% animals, which were prevented by orlistat. Conclusions UFAs, IL-1β and IL-8 are elevated in NCs. However, UFAs generated via peripancreatic fat lipolysis causes worse inflammation and MSOF, converting mild AP to SAP. PMID:25500204

  14. Atorvastatin Use Associated With Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Shih-Wei; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liao, Kuan-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Few data are present in the literature on the relationship between atorvastatin use and acute pancreatitis. The aim of this study was to explore this issue in Taiwan. Using representative claims data established from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program, this case–control study consisted of 5810 cases aged 20 to 84 years with a first-time diagnosis of acute pancreatitis during the period 1998 to 2011and 5733 randomly selected controls without acute pancreatitis. Both cases and controls were matched by sex, age, comorbidities, and index year of diagnosing acute pancreatitis. Subjects who at least received 1 prescription for other statins or nonstatin lipid-lowering drugs were excluded from the study. If subjects never had 1 prescription for atorvastatin, they were defined as never use of atorvastatin. Current use of atorvastatin was defined as subjects whose last remaining 1 tablet of atorvastatin was noted ≤7 days before the date of diagnosing acute pancreatitis. Late use of atorvastatin was defined as subjects whose last remaining 1 tablet of atorvastatin was noted >7 days before the date of diagnosing acute pancreatitis. The odds ratio with 95% confidence interval of acute pancreatitis associated with atorvastatin use was calculated by using the logistic regression analysis. The logistic regression analysis revealed that the odds ratio of acute pancreatitis was 1.67 for subjects with current use of atorvastatin (95% confidence interval 1.18, 2.38), when compared with subjects with never use of atorvastatin. The odds ratio decreased to 1.15 for those with late use of atorvastatin (95% confidence interval 0.87, 1.52), but without statistical significance. Current use of atorvastatin is associated with the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Clinically, clinicians should consider the possibility of atorvastatin-associated acute pancreatitis when patients present with a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis without a definite etiology but are taking

  15. Prophylactic antibiotics in acute pancreatitis: endless debate.

    PubMed

    Mourad, M M; Evans, Rpt; Kalidindi, V; Navaratnam, R; Dvorkin, L; Bramhall, S R

    2017-02-01

    INTRODUCTION The development of pancreatic infection is associated with the development of a deteriorating disease with subsequent high morbidity and mortality. There is agreement that in mild pancreatitis there is no need to use antibiotics; in severe pancreatitis it would appear to be a logical choice to use antibiotics to prevent secondary pancreatic infection and decrease associated mortality. MATERIALS AND METHODS A non-systematic review of current evidence, meta-analyses and randomized controlled trials was conducted to assess the role of prophylactic antibiotics in acute pancreatitis and whether it might improve morbidity and mortality in pancreatitis. RESULTS Mixed evidence was found to support and refute the role of prophylactic antibiotics in acute pancreatitis. Most studies have failed to demonstrate much benefit from its routine use. Data from our unit suggested little benefit of their routine use, and showed that the mortality of those treated with antibiotics was significantly higher compared with those not treated with antibiotics (9% vs 0%, respectively, P = 0.043). In addition, the antibiotic group had significantly higher morbidity (36% vs 5%, respectively, P = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS Antibiotics should be used in patients who develop sepsis, infected necrosis-related systemic inflammatory response syndrome, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome or pancreatic and extra-pancreatic infection. Despite the many other factors that should be considered, prompt antibiotic therapy is recommended once inflammatory markers are raised, to prevent secondary pancreatic infection. Unfortunately, there remain many unanswered questions regarding the indications for antibiotic administration and the patients who benefit from antibiotic treatment in acute pancreatitis.

  16. Management of pain in chronic pancreatitis with emphasis on exogenous pancreatic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Paul M; Johnson, William G; Graham, David Y

    2016-08-06

    One of the most challenging issues arising in patients with chronic pancreatitis is the management of abdominal pain. Many competing theories exist to explain pancreatic pain including ductal hypertension from strictures and stones, increased interstitial pressure from glandular fibrosis, pancreatic neuritis, and ischemia. This clinical problem is superimposed on a background of reduced enzyme secretion and altered feedback mechanisms. Throughout history, investigators have used these theories to devise methods to combat chronic pancreatic pain including: Lifestyle measures, antioxidants, analgesics, administration of exogenous pancreatic enzymes, endoscopic drainage procedures, and surgical drainage and resection procedures. While the value of each modality has been debated over the years, pancreatic enzyme therapy remains a viable option. Enzyme therapy restores active enzymes to the small bowel and targets the altered feedback mechanism that lead to increased pancreatic ductal and tissue pressures, ischemia, and pain. Here, we review the mechanisms and treatments for chronic pancreatic pain with a specific focus on pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy. We also discuss different approaches to overcoming a lack of clinical response update ideas for studies needed to improve the clinical use of pancreatic enzymes to ameliorate pancreatic pain.

  17. Management of pain in chronic pancreatitis with emphasis on exogenous pancreatic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Paul M; Johnson, William G; Graham, David Y

    2016-01-01

    One of the most challenging issues arising in patients with chronic pancreatitis is the management of abdominal pain. Many competing theories exist to explain pancreatic pain including ductal hypertension from strictures and stones, increased interstitial pressure from glandular fibrosis, pancreatic neuritis, and ischemia. This clinical problem is superimposed on a background of reduced enzyme secretion and altered feedback mechanisms. Throughout history, investigators have used these theories to devise methods to combat chronic pancreatic pain including: Lifestyle measures, antioxidants, analgesics, administration of exogenous pancreatic enzymes, endoscopic drainage procedures, and surgical drainage and resection procedures. While the value of each modality has been debated over the years, pancreatic enzyme therapy remains a viable option. Enzyme therapy restores active enzymes to the small bowel and targets the altered feedback mechanism that lead to increased pancreatic ductal and tissue pressures, ischemia, and pain. Here, we review the mechanisms and treatments for chronic pancreatic pain with a specific focus on pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy. We also discuss different approaches to overcoming a lack of clinical response update ideas for studies needed to improve the clinical use of pancreatic enzymes to ameliorate pancreatic pain. PMID:27602238

  18. Long-term patency, pancreatic function, and pain relief after lateral pancreaticojejunostomy for chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Warshaw, A L; Popp, J W; Schapiro, R H

    1980-08-01

    Ten patients, all with intractable pain due to chronic pancreatitis, were selected for treatment by lateral pancreaticojejunostomy (modified Puestow procedure) after preoperative endoscopic pancreatography in each had revealed dilatation of the main pancreatic duct. Follow-up endoscopic pancreatograms performed 1 yr after surgery show a patent anastomosis in all 10 patients. Eight of these 10 are largely or completely pain-free, but 2 continiue to have pain without improvement after the operation. Surgical success in relieving pain was accompanied neither by improvement in pancreatic function, nor by protection against its further deterioration: Whereas 2 patients had malabsorption and 3 were diabetic preoperatively, 6 had malabsorption and 5 had diabetes postoperatively. This progression of exocrine or endorine pancreatic insufficiency indicates that decompression of the dilated pancreatic duct, although an effective means for relief of pain in chronic pancreatitis, does not prevent continuing destruction of pancreatic glandular tissue.

  19. Multicenter Approach to Recurrent Acute and Chronic Pancreatitis in the United States: The North American Pancreatitis Study 2 (NAPS2)

    PubMed Central

    Whitcomb, David C.; Yadav, Dhiraj; Adam, Slivka; Hawes, Robert H.; Brand, Randall E.; Anderson, Michelle A.; Money, Mary E.; Banks, Peter A.; Bishop, Michele D.; Baillie, John; Sherman, Stuart; DiSario, James; Burton, Frank R.; Gardner, Timothy B.; Amann, Stephen T.; Gelrud, Andres; Lo, Simon K.; DeMeo, Mark T.; Steinberg, William M.; Kochman, Michael L.; Etemad, Babak; Forsmark, Christopher E.; Elinoff, Beth; Greer, Julia B.; O’Connell, Michael; Lamb, Janette; Barmada, M. Michael

    2008-01-01

    Background Recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP) and chronic pancreatitis (CP) are complex syndromes associated with numerous etiologies, clinical variables and complications. We developed the North American Pancreatitis Study 2 (NAPS2) to be sufficiently powered to understand the complex environmental, metabolic and genetic mechanisms underlying RAP and CP. Methods Between August 2000 and September 2006, a consortium of 20 expert academic and private sites prospectively ascertained 1,000 human subjects with RAP or CP, plus 695 controls (spouse, family, friend or unrelated). Standardized questionnaires were completed by both the physicians and study subjects and blood was drawn for genomic DNA and biomarker studies. All data were double-entered into a database and systematically reviewed to minimize errors and include missing data. Results A total of 1,000 subjects (460 RAP, 540 CP) and 695 controls who completed consent forms and questionnaires and donated blood samples comprised the final dataset. Data were organized according to diagnosis, supporting documentation, etiological classification, clinical signs and symptoms (including pain patterns and duration, and quality of life), past medical history, family history, environmental exposures (including alcohol and tobacco use), medication use and therapeutic interventions. Upon achieving the target enrollment, data were organized and classified to facilitate future analysis. The approaches, rationale and datasets are described, along with final demographic results. Conclusion The NAPS2 consortium has successfully completed a prospective ascertainment of 1,000 subjects with RAP and CP from the USA. These data will be useful in elucidating the environmental, metabolic and genetic conditions, and to investigate the complex interactions that underlie RAP and CP. PMID:18765957

  20. Mutations in the pancreatic secretory enzymes CPA1 and CPB1 are associated with pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Koji; Yu, Jun; Hata, Tatsuo; Suenaga, Masaya; Shindo, Koji; Abe, Toshiya; MacGregor-Das, Anne; Borges, Michael; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Weiss, Matthew J; He, Jin; Canto, Marcia Irene; Petersen, Gloria M; Gallinger, Steven; Syngal, Sapna; Brand, Randall E; Rustgi, Anil; Olson, Sara H; Stoffel, Elena; Cote, Michele L; Zogopoulos, George; Potash, James B; Goes, Fernando S; McCombie, Richard W; Zandi, Peter P; Pirooznia, Mehdi; Kramer, Melissa; Parla, Jennifer; Eshleman, James R; Roberts, Nicholas J; Hruban, Ralph H; Klein, Alison Patricia; Goggins, Michael

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate whether germline variants in genes encoding pancreatic secretory enzymes contribute to pancreatic cancer susceptibility, we sequenced the coding regions of CPB1 and other genes encoding pancreatic secretory enzymes and known pancreatitis susceptibility genes ( PRSS1 , CPA1 , CTRC , and SPINK1 ) in a hospital series of pancreatic cancer cases and controls. Variants in CPB1 , CPA1 (encoding carboxypeptidase B1 and A1), and CTRC were evaluated in a second set of cases with familial pancreatic cancer and controls. More deleterious CPB1 variants, defined as having impaired protein secretion and induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in transfected HEK 293T cells, were found in the hospital series of pancreatic cancer cases (5/986, 0.5%) than in controls (0/1,045, P = 0.027). Among familial pancreatic cancer cases, ER stress-inducing CPB1 variants were found in 4 of 593 (0.67%) vs. 0 of 967 additional controls ( P = 0.020), with a combined prevalence in pancreatic cancer cases of 9/1,579 vs. 0/2,012 controls ( P < 0.01). More ER stress-inducing CPA1 variants were also found in the combined set of hospital and familial cases with pancreatic cancer than in controls [7/1,546 vs. 1/2,012; P = 0.025; odds ratio, 9.36 (95% CI, 1.15-76.02)]. Overall, 16 (1%) of 1,579 pancreatic cancer cases had an ER stress-inducing CPA1 or CPB1 variant, compared with 1 of 2,068 controls ( P < 0.00001). No other candidate genes had statistically significant differences in variant prevalence between cases and controls. Our study indicates ER stress-inducing variants in CPB1 and CPA1 are associated with pancreatic cancer susceptibility and implicate ER stress in pancreatic acinar cells in pancreatic cancer development.

  1. A population-based study of severity in patients with acute on chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Akshintala, Venkata S; Hutfless, Susan M; Yadav, Dhiraj; Khashab, Mouen A; Lennon, Anne Marie; Makary, Martin A; Hirose, Kenzo; Andersen, Dana K; Kalloo, Anthony N; Singh, Vikesh K

    2013-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the severity of patients with acute pancreatitis (AP) on chronic pancreatitis (CP) and compare this to patients with AP without CP. The Maryland Health Services database was queried for all adult inpatient discharges with a primary diagnosis of AP from 1994 to 2010. Acute pancreatitis on CP and AP without CP were defined by the presence of the associated diagnosis code for CP. Severity was defined as organ failure, intensive care unit stay, or mortality. Acute pancreatitis on CP accounted for 13.7% of all AP discharges (9747/70,944). The proportion of AP-on-CP discharges doubled during the study period (8.8% to 17.6%; P < 0.0001). When compared with patients with AP without CP, AP-on-CP patients were younger, were more likely to be male and black, had higher rates of alcohol and drug abuse, and had less severe disease with lower rates of mortality, organ failure, need for mechanical ventilation, and intensive care unit stay. Among AP-on-CP patients, significant predictors of severity included advanced age, weight loss, and 2 or more comorbidities. Patients with AP on CP have less severe disease than do those with AP without CP. Weight loss, advanced age, and comorbidity increase the risk of severity in patients with AP on CP.

  2. Risk Factors for Pancreatitis in Older Women: The Iowa Women’s Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Prizment, Anna E.; Jensen, Eric H.; Hopper, Anne M; Virnig, Beth A.; Anderson, Kristin E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Pancreatitis – an inflammation of pancreas – is a severe and costly disease. While many risk factors for pancreatitis are known, many cases, especially in elderly, are of unknown etiology. Methods Risk factors for acute (AP) and chronic pancreatitis (CP) were assessed in a prospective cohort (n=36,436 women, aged ≥65 years). Exposures were self-reported at baseline. Pancreatitis was ascertained by linkage to Medicare claims (1986–2004) categorized by a physician as: “AP”, 1 AP episode (n=511); or “CP”, 2+ AP or 1+ CP episodes (n=149). Results Multivariable odds ratios (OR) and 95% CI for AP and CP were calculated using multinomial logistic regression. Alcohol use was not associated with AP or CP. Heavy smoking (40+ versus 0 pack-years) was associated with a 2-fold increased OR for CP. For BMI ≥30 versus <25 kg/m2, the ORs were 1.35 (1.07–1.70) for AP (p-trend=0.009) and 0.59 (0.37–0.94) for CP (p-trend=0.01). ORs for AP and CP were increased for HRT use, heart disease, and hypertension. There were positive significant associations between protein and total fat intake for CP and AP. Conclusions We identified factors associated with AP and CP that may be specific to older women. PMID:25656921

  3. Chronic prenatal ethanol exposure increases adiposity and disrupts pancreatic morphology in adult guinea pig offspring.

    PubMed

    Dobson, C C; Mongillo, D L; Brien, D C; Stepita, R; Poklewska-Koziell, M; Winterborn, A; Holloway, A C; Brien, J F; Reynolds, J N

    2012-12-17

    Ethanol consumption during pregnancy can lead to a range of adverse developmental outcomes in children, termed fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). Central nervous system injury is a debilitating and widely studied manifestation of chronic prenatal ethanol exposure (CPEE). However, CPEE can also cause structural and functional deficits in metabolic pathways in offspring. This study tested the hypothesis that CPEE increases whole-body adiposity and disrupts pancreatic structure in guinea pig offspring. Pregnant guinea pigs received ethanol (4 g kg(-1) maternal body weight per day) or isocaloric-sucrose/pair-feeding (control) for 5 days per week throughout gestation. Male and female CPEE offspring demonstrated growth restriction at birth, followed by a rapid period of catch-up growth before weaning (postnatal day (PD) 1-7). Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in young adult offspring (PD100-140) revealed increased visceral and subcutaneous adiposity produced by CPEE. At the time of killing (PD150-200), CPEE offspring also had increased pancreatic adipocyte area and decreased β-cell insulin-like immunopositive area, suggesting reduced insulin production and/or secretion from pancreatic islets. CPEE causes increased adiposity and pancreatic dysmorphology in offspring, which may signify increased risk for the development of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  4. Treatment of pancreatic insufficiency using pancreatic extract in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer: a pilot study (PICNIC).

    PubMed

    Zdenkowski, Nicholas; Radvan, George; Pugliese, Leanna; Charlton, Julie; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Fraser, Allison; Bonaventura, Antonino

    2017-06-01

    Survival with advanced pancreatic cancer is less than 12 months. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency may contribute to pancreatic cancer-related cachexia, via nutrient malabsorption. We aimed to determine the feasibility of prescribing pancreatic extract (Creon®) for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Patients with advanced pancreatic cancer, without frank malabsorption, were randomised in this feasibility study to pancreatic extract 50,000 units with meals and 25,000 units with snacks, or placebo. Standardised dietary advice was given. Anti-cancer and supportive care treatments were permitted. Outcomes included weight, body mass index (BMI), quality of life (QLQC30, PAN26), survival and nutritional assessment (PG-SGA). Eighteen patients were randomised before study closure due to slow recruitment. Baseline characteristics were well matched. Weight loss prior to randomisation was numerically greater in the pancreatic extract group (mean 0.7 vs 2.2 kg). Weight loss was numerically greater in the placebo group, however not significantly. No differences in BMI or nutrition score were seen. Quality of life did not differ between study groups. Median overall survival was 17 (95% CI 8.1-48.7) weeks in the control group, and 67.6 (95% CI 14.1-98.4) weeks in the pancreatic extract group (p = 0.1063). Only 17% (18/106) of potentially eligible patients were recruited, related to patient/family reluctance, rapid clinical deterioration and patients already prescribed pancreatic extract. A moderate pill burden was noted. Despite intriguing survival results, this study was not sufficiently feasible to proceed to a fully powered comparative study. A multi-centre study would be required to exclude a significant difference in outcomes.

  5. Ethanol suppresses carbamylcholine-induced intracellular calcium oscillation in mouse pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Mi Na; Kim, Min Jae; Koong, Hwa Soo; Kim, Dong Kwan; Kim, Se Hoon; Park, Hyung Seo

    2017-09-01

    Oscillation of intracellular calcium levels is closely linked to initiating secretion of digestive enzymes from pancreatic acinar cells. Excessive alcohol consumption is known to relate to a variety of disorders in the digestive system, including the exocrine pancreas. In this study, we have investigated the role and mechanism of ethanol on carbamylcholine (CCh)-induced intracellular calcium oscillation in murine pancreatic acinar cells. Ethanol at concentrations of 30 and 100 mM reversibly suppressed CCh-induced Ca 2+ oscillation in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment of ethanol has no effect on the store-operated calcium entry induced by 10 μM of CCh. Ethanol significantly reduced the initial calcium peak induced by low concentrations of CCh and therefore, the CCh-induced dose-response curve of the initial calcium peak was shifted to the right by ethanol pretreatment. Furthermore, ethanol significantly dose-dependently reduced inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-induced calcium release from the internal stores in permeabilized acinar cells. These results provide evidence that excessive alcohol intake could impair cytosolic calcium oscillation through inhibiting calcium release from intracellular stores in mouse pancreatic acinar cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Chronic pancreatitis in Eastern India: Experience from a tertiary care center.

    PubMed

    Jha, Ashish Kumar; Goenka, Mahesh Kumar; Goenka, Usha

    2017-03-01

    There is a wide variation in the clinical presentation of chronic pancreatitis (CP) in the different parts of India. Data regarding the clinical profile of CP from eastern India are scarce. We describe the clinical and demographic profiles of patients with CP in eastern India. Consecutive patients were evaluated for the clinical presentation, etiology and complication of CP. One hundred and thirty-nine patients with CP (mean age 39.57±14.88 years; M/F 3.48:1) were included. Idiopathic CP (50.35%) was the most common etiology followed by alcohol (33.81%); 68.34% had calcific CP and 31.65% had noncalcific CP. The median duration of symptoms was 24 (1-240) months. Pain was the most common symptom, being present in 93.52% of the patients. Diabetes, steatorrhea and pseudocyst were present in 45.32%, 14.38% and 7.19% of the cases, respectively. Moderate to severe anemia was revealed in 16.53% of the patients. Benign biliary stricture was diagnosed in 19.42% of the cases (symptomatic in 6.47%). The common radiological findings were the following: pancreatic calculi (68.34%), dilated pancreatic duct (PD) (58.99%), parenchymal atrophy (25.89%) and PD stricture (23.74%). In our center, idiopathic CP followed by alcoholic CP was the most frequent form of CP. Tropical CP was distinctly uncommon.

  7. Surgical treatment of childhood recurrent pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Matthew S; Pelayo, Juan C; Cortes, Raul A; Grethel, Erich J; Wagner, Amy J; Lee, Hanmin; Harrison, Michael R; Farmer, Diana L; Nobuhara, Kerilyn K

    2007-07-01

    Surgical intervention that improves pancreatic ductal drainage is a reasonable treatment strategy for recurrent pancreatitis in children. This study was approved by the Committee on Human Research (San Francisco, CA). A retrospective chart review was performed on children aged 0 to 17 years given the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision coding diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis who underwent surgical intervention from 1981 to 2005. From 1981 to 2005, 32 children were treated for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis. The etiologies were obstructive (n = 13), idiopathic (n = 10), hereditary (n = 6), medications (n = 2), and infection (n = 1). Fifteen patients underwent 17 operations for chronic pancreatitis, including Puestow (n = 9), cystenterostomy (n = 2), Whipple (n = 1), distal pancreatectomy (n = 1), Frey (n = 1), DuVal (n = 1), excision of enteric duplication cyst (n = 1), and pancreatic ductal dilation (n = 1). The mean age at presentation of patients undergoing surgery was 6.0 +/- 4.1 years (mean +/- SD). The mean time from presentation to operation was 3.3 +/- 3.3 years. There were no deaths after surgical intervention. Of 15 patients, 2 (13%) required rehospitalization within 90 days of surgery, one for bowel obstruction, the other for splenic infarction. The median length of stay postoperatively was 8 days (range, 5-66 days). Chronic pancreatitis in children differs markedly in etiology when compared with adults. In most cases seen in our institution, chronic pancreatitis resulted from ineffective ductal drainage. These disorders are amenable to surgical decompression, which, ultimately, can prevent disease recurrence.

  8. [Severe acute pancreatitis associated with gallbladder gangrene].

    PubMed

    Arroyo-Sánchez, Abel S; Aguirre-Mejía, Rosa Y; Echenique-Martínez, Sergio E

    2014-01-01

    We present a diabetic patient who developed severe acute pancreatitis associated to gallbladder gangrene, in this case we assessed the applicability of classification criteria and management of the pathways for acute pancreatit