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Sample records for pancreatitis autoinmune pseudotumor

  1. Inflammatory pseudotumor of the liver and peripheral eosinophilia in autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Sasahira, Naoki; Kawabe, Takao; Nakamura, Akira; Shimura, Kenji; Shimura, Haruhisa; Itobayashi, Ei; Asada, Manabu; Shiratori, Yasushi; Omata, Masao

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT) of the liver is a rare benign lesion, the etiology of which remains obscure. It is not associated with any particular diseases apart from phlebitis and Crohn’s disease. METHODS: A middle-aged male with hepatic IPT and peripheral eosinophilia associated with autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) was selected for this study and review of literature. RESULTS: A 59-year-old male was admitted with obstructive jaundice, marked eosinophilia (1343/mm3) and hypergammaglobulinemia (4145 mg/dL). Imaging techniques revealed dilatation of the intrahepatic bile duct, stenosis of the common bile duct with diffuse wall thickening, gallbladder wall thickening, irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, and swelling of the pancreatic parenchyma. Multiple liver masses were also demonstrated and diagnosed as IPT by biopsy specimens. Six months later, the abnormal features of the biliary tree remarkably improved by the oral administration of prednisolone, and the liver masses disappeared. The swelling of the pancreatic head also improved. The peripheral eosinophil count normalized. IPT associated with AIP, as we know, has not been reported in the literature. The clinical features of the present case mimicked those of pancreatic cancer with liver metastasis. This case deserves to be documented to prevent misdiagnosis of similar cases. PMID:15682495

  2. Pseudotumor cerebri

    MedlinePlus

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension; Benign intracranial hypertension ... Ferri FF. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension. In: Ferri FF. Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2015 . Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2015:640-641. Pless ML. Pseudotumor cerebri. In: Kliegman ...

  3. Pseudotumor Cerebri

    MedlinePlus

    ... the skull caused by the buildup or poor absorption of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The disorder is most common in women between the ages of 20 and 50. Symptoms of pseudotumor cerebri, which include headache, nausea, vomiting, and pulsating sounds within the head, closely mimic symptoms of large ...

  4. [Hemophilic pelvic pseudotumor].

    PubMed

    Castro-Boix, Sandra; Pradell-Teigell, Jordi; Boqué-Genovard, Ramón; Zanón-Navarro, Vicente; Nadal-Guinard, Antoni; Altisent-Roca, Carme; Armengol-Carrasco, Manel

    2007-02-01

    Surgery in hemophilic patients is a challenge for the general surgeon. Hemophilic pseudotumor is a rare complication occurring in 1-2% of hemophiliacs and affecting mainly patients with severe disease or those who have developed antibodies to factor VIII or IX. A number of alternatives are available for the management of these tumors, including conservative treatment, surgical removal, percutaneous drainage, embolization, and external radiation. The only definitive treatment is surgical excision. We report a case of hemophilic pseudotumor of the pelvic bone. Treatment consisted of surgical resection after arterial embolization using factor replacement to achieve hemostasis.

  5. Paratesticular Fibrous Pseudotumors

    PubMed Central

    Turkan, Sadi; Kalkan, Mehmet; Ekmekcioglu, Ozan; Haltas, Hacer; Sahin, Coskun

    2016-01-01

    Paratesticular fibrous pseudotumors (PFPs) are rare pathologies with quite wide and variable topographic-morphological features. It is difficult to distinguish PFPs from malignant masses. Treatment can be done by resection of the mass. We reported a young patient’s findings about this rare pathology. PMID:27441080

  6. Equine conjunctival pseudotumors.

    PubMed

    Moore, C.P.; Grevan, V.L.; Champagne, E.S.; Collins, B.K.; Collier, L.L.

    2000-01-01

    Five horses presented with unilateral pink, smooth, nonulcerated conjunctival masses with histologic features characteristic of inflammatory pseudotumors, i.e. proliferative inflammatory lesions clinically resembling true neoplasia. Although causes for the inflammatory lesions were not determined, based on the presence histologically of mononuclear (predominantly lymphocytic) inflammatory cell infiltrates and the absence of infectious agents, parasites or foreign bodies, an immune-mediated pathogenesis was suspected. Affected horses ranged from 5 to 8 years of age with no apparent breed or sex predilection. Conjunctival lesions were nodular in two cases and relatively flat and more diffuse in three cases. Third eyelid lesions were present in three cases and two affected eyes had corneal involvement. Based on findings from these five cases, the prognosis for equine conjunctival pseudotumors appears to be good when lesions are treated by partial or complete surgical excision, local administration of anti-inflammatory agents, or a combination of surgery and anti-inflammatory therapy.

  7. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri) En Español Read in Chinese What is idiopathic intracranial hypertension? Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a disorder that ...

  8. [Pseudotumors caused by hip prostheses].

    PubMed

    Helkamaa, Teemu; Lohman, Martina; Alberty, Anne

    2015-01-01

    More than 100000 hip replacements have been performed in Finland. In the hip replacement operations performed due to osteoarthritis, the artificial joint surfaces are made of metal, plastic or ceramics. Pseudotumors associated with metal-on-metal (MoM) sliding surfaces have received worldwide attention. Soft issue lesions, not always symptomatic, may develop around the joint replacements. These may even require joint revision surgery. PMID:26237883

  9. Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, R M S; Byrne, M F; Baillie, J

    2003-04-26

    In the past decade, our understanding of the genetic basis, pathogenesis, and natural history of pancreatitis has grown strikingly. In severe acute pancreatitis, intensive medical support and non-surgical intervention for complications keeps patients alive; surgical drainage (necrosectomy) is reserved for patients with infected necrosis for whom supportive measures have failed. Enteral feeding has largely replaced the parenteral route; controversy remains with respect to use of prophylactic antibiotics. Although gene therapy for chronic pancreatitis is years away, our understanding of the roles of gene mutations in hereditary and sporadic pancreatitis offers tantalising clues about the disorder's pathogenesis. The division between acute and chronic pancreatitis has always been blurred: now, genetics of the disorder suggest a continuous range of disease rather than two separate entities. With recognition of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia, we see that chronic pancreatitis is a premalignant disorder in some patients. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasound are destined to replace endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography for many diagnostic indications in pancreatic disease.

  10. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. It happens when digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself. Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic. Either form is ...

  11. Inflammatory pseudotumor of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Rosado, Elsa; Pereira, José; Corbusier, Florence; Demeter, Pieter; Bali, Maria Antonietta

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of an inflammatory pseudotumor of the urinary bladder in a 31 year-old woman. She presented at the emergency room with low abdominal pain and urinary symptoms. Abdominal ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were performed and revealed asymmetric thickening of the urinary bladder wall. Cystoscopy with urinary cytology revealed a benign nature of the process. The patient underwent partial cystectomy and the pathologic examination of the specimen revealed an inflammatory pseudotumor. We reviewed the clinical, imaging and pathological features of the inflammatory pseudotumor of the urinary bladder and discussed its differential diagnosis.

  12. Inflammatory Pseudotumor of the Urinary Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Rosado, Elsa; Pereira, José; Corbusier, Florence; Demeter, Pieter; Bali, Maria Antonietta

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of an inflammatory pseudotumor of the urinary bladder in a 31 year-old woman. She presented at the emergency room with low abdominal pain and urinary symptoms. Abdominal ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were performed and revealed asymmetric thickening of the urinary bladder wall. Cystoscopy with urinary cytology revealed a benign nature of the process. The patient underwent partial cystectomy and the pathologic examination of the specimen revealed an inflammatory pseudotumor. We reviewed the clinical, imaging and pathological features of the inflammatory pseudotumor of the urinary bladder and discussed its differential diagnosis. PMID:25926919

  13. [Inflammatory pseudotumor of the parotid gland].

    PubMed

    Hellín Meseguer, D; Merino Gälvez, E; Gil Vélez, M; Pastor Mas, A; Ruíz Macía, J A; Hernández, J E

    1996-01-01

    An inflammatory pseudotumor is a rare clinicopathologic condition of unknown etiology and benign course, mimicking sometimes other malignant entities under the clinic and pathologic viewpoint. Our case sitting inside the left parotid salivary gland in an 70-year-old male, was at first diagnosed as epidermoid carcinoma and consequently operated. The biopsy disclose in the mass removed a pseudotumor measuring 3 cm diameter not malignant, lodging inside a microscopic growth of Warthin type. Revue of the literature, of diagnostic findings and mode of management, suggering besides its possible etiopathogenic relation with the inflammatory pseudotumor.

  14. A Presentation of Lyme Disease: Pseudotumor Cerebri.

    PubMed

    Şahin, Burcu; İncecik, Faruk; Hergüner, Özlem M; Alabaz, Derya; Beşen, Şeyda

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease is caused by a tick-transmitted spirochete, B. burgdorferi. It can present with both central and peripheral nervous system manifestations, including aseptic meningitis, meningoencephalitis, Bell's palsy and other cranial neuropathies, radiculoneuritis, and myelitis. However, pseudotumor cerebri associated with Lyme disease is rare. Here, we report a eight-year-old girl with the unusual manifestation of pseudotumor cerebri associated Lyme disease. PMID:27411423

  15. Another Look at Pseudotumor Cerebri

    PubMed Central

    Odelowo, Ezekiel O. O.; Barber, Jesse B.

    1977-01-01

    Thirteen black patients with diagnoses of pseudotumor cerebri (benign intracranial hypertension) were treated in Howard University (Freedmen's Hospital) between 1962 and 1974. These patients presented features similar to others reported with this syndrome as regards age, sex, habitus, menstrual irregularities, treatment, and prognosis. There was no suggestion of higher incidence of the syndrome in blacks. This paper emphasizes the unknown etiology. Only a complete patient work-up, including hemoglobin genotype, endocrine study, pulmonary function tests, blood and cerebrospinal fluid gases and, where applicable, brain Po2, Pco2 and pH can serve as a reasonable prelude to an experimental model for studying the pathophysiology of this poorly understood syndrome and a more rational basis for therapy. A review of the literature dealing with suspected etiology, diagnosis, and therapy is also presented. PMID:875079

  16. Orbital Pseudotumor: Distinct Diagnostic Features and Management

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Imtiaz A; Shamsi, Farrukh A; Arat, Yonca O; Riley, Fenwick C

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To provide an overview of the spectrum of diseases known as ‘idiopathic orbital inflammatory syndrome’ also known as orbital pseudotumor, with emphasis on specific diagnostic challenges in the evaluation and management of patients with this disorder. Methods: Review of the relevant literature and summarize recent findings regarding the epidemiology, diagnosis, pathophysiology and treatment of orbital pseudotumor. Results: Orbital pseudotumor is a benign intraorbital process confined to the orbit but extra orbital involvement can occur. It is among the 3rd most common orbital diseases along with thyroid orbitopathy and lymphoproliferative disorder and accounts for 5-10% of orbital processes. Clinically, orbital pseudotumor has been categorized as myositis, dacryoadenitis, anterior, apical and diffuse process. Patients may present with diplopia, conjunctival chemosis, proptosis or abnormal computed tomography scan (CT-scan) findings. Patients may also have associated optic neuropathy. Diagnosis is based on careful history, ultrasonography (U/S), CT-scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies which may also provide prognostic information. Treatment consists of systemic corticosteroids in the form of oral or intravenous administration. Confirmation is made by orbital biopsy. In addition to radiation, cytotoxic agents, immunosuppressant, IV immunoglobulin, biological therapy, TNF-alpha inhibitor monoclonal antibody and Mycophenolate Moftil have been found to be useful in the management of refractory orbital pseudotumor. Conclusion: Understanding of the clinical features of patients with orbital pseudotumor, differentiating it from other orbital processes by use of imaging techniques and timely implementation of available treatment strategies may help prevent visual loss and associated morbidity from this condition. PMID:20379424

  17. [A new case of pseudotumoral renal tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Sarf, I; Dahami, Z; Dakir, M; Aboutaeib, R; el Moussaoui, A; Joual, A; El Mrini, M; Meziane, F; Benjelloun, S

    2001-01-01

    The incidence of urogenital tuberculosis is still frequent and constitutes a current public health problem in Morocco, a country in which tuberculosis is endemic. The clinical presentation of this form of the disease may be misleading. The pseudotumoral type of renal tuberculosis is extremely uncommon, and in this study this disease has been described in a young patient. The radiological findings suggested the possibility of this lesion being renal cancer. The preliminary diagnosis was corrected and a definitive diagnosis of pseudotumor was made following pathological examination of the surgically-removed kidney.

  18. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the abdomen. In 1 out of 4 childhood cases, a cause is never found. What are the symptoms of pancreatitis? Inflammation of the pancreas is often associated with pain in the upper abdomen and/or the back which may develop slowly, ...

  19. Hip Arthroplasty Pseudotumors: Pathogenesis, Imaging, and Clinical Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Derik L; Morrison, James J

    2016-01-01

    Pseudotumors are a complication of hip arthroplasty. The goal of this article is to review the clinical presentation, pathogenesis, histology, and the role of diagnostic imaging in clinical decision making for treatment, and surveillance of pseudotumors. We will discuss the multimodal imaging appearances, differential diagnosis, associated complications, treatment, and prognosis of pseudotumors, as an aid to the assessment of orthopedic prostheses at the hip. PMID:27195183

  20. Pseudotumor cerebri: An update on treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Sarita B; Subramanian, Prem S

    2014-01-01

    Aims: The aim was to identify Pseudotumor cerebri treatment options and assess their efficacy. Setting and Design: Review article. Materials and Methods: Existing literature and the authors’ experience were reviewed. Results: Treatment options range from observation to surgical intervention. Weight loss and medical treatment may be utilized in cases without vision loss or in combination with surgical treatment. Cerebrospinal fluid shunting procedures and/or optic nerve sheath decompression is indicated for severe vision loss or headache unresponsive to medical management. The recent use of endovascular stenting of transverse sinus stenoses has also demonstrated benefit in patients with pseudotumor cerebri. Conclusion: While each treatment form may be successful individually, a multimodal approach is typically utilized with treatments selected on a case-by-case basis. PMID:25449933

  1. Inflammatory pseudotumor of the parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Barrios-Sánchez, Gracia M; Dean-Ferrer, Alicia; Alamillos-Granados, Francisco J; Ruiz-Masera, Juan José; Zafra-Camacho, Francisco M; García de Marcos, José A; Calderón-Bohórquez, José M

    2005-01-01

    Inflammatory pseudotumor is a term that refers to a reactive pseudoneoplastic disorder that can appear in different locations of the human body. The lung is the most frequently affected organ. The etiology is still unknown. It affects individuals of both sexes and of a wide range of ages. The diagnosis is still difficult and it is based on the histological examination of the lesions composed of four cell-types: histiocytes, myofibroblasts, plasma cells and lymphocytes. With regard to the treatment regimes there is no agreement. Treatment ranges from surgical excision to radiotherapy, chemotherapy or steroids. The purpose of this article is to report one case of inflammatory pseudotumor located in the parotid gland and to make a special point of the difficulty in arriving at a correct diagnosis in order to achieve the most adequate treatment.

  2. Cerebral venous sinus stenting for pseudotumor cerebri: A review

    PubMed Central

    Kanagalingam, Sivashakthi; Subramanian, Prem S.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudotumor cerebri is characterized by headaches, visual field changes, papilledema and an elevated cerebrospinal fluid opening pressure without evidence of an intracranial mass. In the setting of failed medical therapy, surgical options such as ventriculoperitoneal shunts and optic nerve sheath fenestrations are considered. Recently, venous sinus stenting has emerged as a new treatment option for patients with pseudotumor cerebri. We review the role of cerebral venous sinus stenting in the management of patients with medically refractory pseudotumor cerebri. Although long- term studies are needed in this field, the current reports indicate a favorable outcome for preventing vision loss and symptom control. PMID:25859134

  3. Inflammatory pseudotumor of kidney masquerading as renal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Babu, Prakash; Kalpana Kumari, M K; Nagaraj, H K; Mysorekar, Vijaya V

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory pseudotumor also known as inflammatory fibroblastic tumor is a rare benign tumor, which commonly affects the lung. It is very rarely seen in the genitourinary tract. As the preoperative diagnosis, clinically and radiologically is inconclusive, it is imperative to surgically remove and confirm it on histopathologic examination. We report a case of inflammatory pseudotumor in a 51-year-old male who presented with flank pain and was treated with nephrectomy. PMID:26458713

  4. Microscopic Posterior Transdural Resection of Cervical Retro-Odontoid Pseudotumors.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yasushi; Manabe, Hideki; Sumida, Tadayoshi; Tanaka, Nobuhiro; Hamasaki, Takahiko

    2015-12-01

    Retro-odontoid pseudotumors are noninflammatory masses formed posterior to the odontoid process. Because of their anatomy, the optimal surgical approach for resecting pseudotumors is controversial. Conventionally, 3 approaches are used: the anterior transoral approach, the lateral approach, and the posterior extradural approach; however, each approach has its limitations. The posterior extradural approach is the most common; however, it remains challenging due to severe epidural veins. Although regression of pseudotumors after fusion surgery has been reported, direct decompression and a pathologic diagnosis are ideal when the pseudotumor is large. We therefore developed a new microscopic surgical technique; transdural resection. After C1 laminectomy, the dorsal and ventral dura was incised while preserving the arachnoid. Removal of the pseudotumor was performed and both of the dura were repaired. The patient's clinical symptoms subsequently improved and the pathologic findings showed degenerative fibrocartilaginous tissue. In addition, no neurological deterioration, central spinal fluid leakage, or arachnoiditis was observed. Currently, the usefulness of the transdural approach has been reported for cervical and thoracic disk herniation. According to our results, the transdural approach is recommended for resection of retro-odontoid pseudotumors because it enables direct decompression of the spinal cord and a pathologic diagnosis. PMID:26544168

  5. Microscopic Posterior Transdural Resection of Cervical Retro-Odontoid Pseudotumors

    PubMed Central

    Manabe, Hideki; Sumida, Tadayoshi; Tanaka, Nobuhiro; Hamasaki, Takahiko

    2015-01-01

    Retro-odontoid pseudotumors are noninflammatory masses formed posterior to the odontoid process. Because of their anatomy, the optimal surgical approach for resecting pseudotumors is controversial. Conventionally, 3 approaches are used: the anterior transoral approach, the lateral approach, and the posterior extradural approach; however, each approach has its limitations. The posterior extradural approach is the most common; however, it remains challenging due to severe epidural veins. Although regression of pseudotumors after fusion surgery has been reported, direct decompression and a pathologic diagnosis are ideal when the pseudotumor is large. We therefore developed a new microscopic surgical technique; transdural resection. After C1 laminectomy, the dorsal and ventral dura was incised while preserving the arachnoid. Removal of the pseudotumor was performed and both of the dura were repaired. The patient’s clinical symptoms subsequently improved and the pathologic findings showed degenerative fibrocartilaginous tissue. In addition, no neurological deterioration, central spinal fluid leakage, or arachnoiditis was observed. Currently, the usefulness of the transdural approach has been reported for cervical and thoracic disk herniation. According to our results, the transdural approach is recommended for resection of retro-odontoid pseudotumors because it enables direct decompression of the spinal cord and a pathologic diagnosis. PMID:26544168

  6. Inflammatory pseudotumors of the spleen: CT and MRI findings

    SciTech Connect

    Irie, Hiroyuki; Honda, Hiroshi; Kaneko, Kuniyuki; Kuroiwa, Toshiro

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to etucidate the CT and MRI findings of inflammatory pseudotumors of the spleen. The CT and MRI findings of three patients with inflammatory pseudotumors of the spleen were reviewed and compared with the pathologic findings. On the early phase of CT, the masses were hypodense to the normal spleen, and on the delayed phase, they demonstrated delayed enhancement. On T1-weighted MR images, the masses were isointense to the normal spleen, and on T2-weighted images, the masses had heterogeneous low signal intensities. After administration of Gd-DTPA, the masses showed delayed enhancement. Inflammatory pseudotumors of the spleen were characterized by low signal intensity on T2-weighted MR images and delayed enhancement after contrast material administration on CT and MRI. The fibrous stroma may contribute to these unusual findings. 23 refs., 3 figs.

  7. An update on the management of pseudotumor cerebri.

    PubMed

    Galgano, Michael A; Deshaies, Eric M

    2013-03-01

    Pseudotumor cerebri, or benign intracranial hypertension, is characterized by intracranial hypertension of unknown etiology typically in obese women <45 years of age, and can be disabling secondary to headaches and visual disturbances. Medical management includes pharmaceuticals that reduce cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) production and lumbar punctures that reduce the CSF volume, both aimed at reducing intracranial pressure. When medical management fails, surgical CSF diverting procedures are indicated. Recently it has been demonstrated that dural sinus stenosis or thrombosis can be responsible for this disease and treated with endovascular venous stent placement. The intent of this educational manuscript is to review the clinical presentation of pseudotumor cerebri patients and discuss the medical, surgical, and endovascular treatment options for this disease. After reading this paper, the reader should be able to: (1) understand the pathophysiological basis of pseudotumor cerebri, (2) describe its presenting signs and symptoms, and (3) discuss the medical, surgical, and endovascular treatment options. PMID:23265564

  8. Pseudotumors and tumors of the temporomandibular joint. A review

    PubMed Central

    Bagán, José V.; Sanchis, José M.; Margaix, María

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To review the pseudotumors and tumors of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) published in journals included in Journal Citation Reports (JCR), and to evaluate whether there are clinical and radiological signs capable of differentiating between pseudotumors and tumors and between malignant and benign tumors. Material and Methods: A systematic Medline search was made of clinical cases of tumors and pseudotumors of the TMJ covering a 20-year period and published in journals included in JCR. Only cases with histological confirmation were included. A description is provided of the general characteristics of TMJ tumors, with comparison of the clinical, diagnostic, therapeutic and evolutive variables referred to pseudotumors, benign tumors and malignant tumors. Results: We identified 285 TMJ tumors published in 181 articles of 15 journals. The most frequent lesions were pseudotumors (synovial chondromatosis, pigmented villonodular synovitis, eosinophilic granuloma and osteochondroma). The mean age was 42 years and one month ± 16 years and two months. Tumors were more common in females. The mean time from symptoms onset to consultation was 30 months and 8 days ± 41 months and 9 days, and almost 19.6% of the cases initially had been diagnosed and treated as TMJ dysfunction. The most frequent clinical manifestations were pain, swelling and the limitation of joint movements. The most common radiological findings in the case of benign and malignant lesions were radiopacities and radiotransparencies, respectively. No panoramic X-ray alterations were observed in 14.6% of the benign tumors and in 7.7% of the malignant lesions. Surgery was the usual form of treatment. Sequelae were recorded in 18.2% of the cases, with tumor relapse in 9.1%. The four-year survival rate in the case of malignant tumors was 72.2%. Key words:Tumor, temporomandibular joint, metaplasia, pseudotumor, condyle. PMID:23385515

  9. An unusual presentation of hemophilia B: pseudotumor of proximal tibia.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Saurav; Arora, Sumit; Khanna, Shilpa; Maini, Lalit; Gautam, V K

    2011-07-01

    Hemophilia is one of the most common genetically inherited causes of bleeding disorders. The usual presentation is continuous bleeding from a wound. Very seldom, it presents as a pseudotumor of bone. When left untreated, it may induce compression and pressure necrosis of adjacent structures. Careful evaluation and a high index of suspicion are usually required to arrive at the correct diagnosis. In this article, we report the case of a 10-year-old boy with hemophilia B (Christmas disease) that presented as a pseudotumor producing a large defect in the proximal tibia.

  10. Recurrence of inflammatory pseudotumor in the distal bile duct: Lessons learned from a single case and reported cases

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, EM López-Tomassetti; Luis, H Díaz; Malagón, A Martín; González, I Arteaga; Pallarés, A Carrillo

    2006-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors (IMTs) or inflammatory pseudotumors (IPs) have been extensively discussed in the literature. They are usually found in the lung and upper respiratory tract. However, reporting of cases involving the biliopancreatic region has increased over recent years. Immunohistochemical study of these lesions limited to the pancreatic head or distal bile duct seems to be compatible with those observed in a new entity called autoimmune pancreatitis, but usually intense fibrotic reaction (zonation) predominates producing a mass. When this condition is limited to the pancreatic head, the common bile duct might be involved by the inflammatory process and jaundice may occur often resembling adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. We have previously reported a case of IMT arising from the bile duct associated with autoimmune pancreatitis which is an extremely rare entity. Four years after Kaush-Whipple resection, radiological examination on routine follow-up revealed a tumor mass, suggesting local recurrence. Ultrasound-guided FNA confirmed our suspicious diagnosis. This present case, as others, suggests that persistent follow-up is necessary in order to prevent irreversible liver damage at this specific location. PMID:16804988

  11. Chronic pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can lead to chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be ...

  12. Regression of inflammatory pseudotumor of the bladder in a child with medical management.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Sophie G; Galgano, Mary T; Michalsky, Marc P; Roth, Jonathan A

    2007-05-01

    Inflammatory pseudotumor of the bladder is a benign proliferative lesion of the submucosal stroma that cannot be distinguished from malignant tumors of the bladder either endoscopically or radiographically. Although benign, the proliferative nature of the inflammatory pseudotumor histopathology has led others to recommend open surgical removal or complete transurethral resection for definitive treatment. A limited number of case reports have described inflammatory pseudotumor of the bladder in either adults or children. This is a case of biopsy-proven inflammatory pseudotumor in the bladder of a child that regressed after medical management alone.

  13. Plasma cell granuloma of the lung (inflammatory pseudotumor).

    PubMed

    Fassina, A S; Rugge, M; Scapinello, A; Viale, G; Dell'Orto, P; Ninfo, V

    1986-10-31

    A case of plasma cell granuloma (PCG) of the lung in a 54-year old man is reported. PCG is a rare benign lesion that usually presents as a solitary nodule in the lung (coin lesion) at routine X-ray examination. Microscopically it consists of a granulomatous tissue where the major components are mature plasma cells. The immunohistochemical demonstration of polyclonality of plasma cells, excluding the diagnosis of plasmacytoma, confirms the inflammatory pseudotumoral nature of this lesion, although the etiology remains obscure. The presence of lymphocytes, histiocytes, macrophages, blood vessels with prominent endothelial cells and peripheral sclero-hyalinized connective tissue may pose problems in the differential diagnosis with sclerosing hemangioma, pseudolymphoma, nodular amyloidosis, pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma, chronic abscess and neoplasms of true histiocytic origin. The term inflammatory pseudotumor is preferable in describing this type of lesion. PMID:3798575

  14. Unusual sclerosing orbital pseudotumor infiltrating orbits and maxillofacial regions.

    PubMed

    Toprak, Huseyin; Aralaşmak, Ayşe; Yılmaz, Temel Fatih; Ozdemir, Huseyin

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic orbital pseudotumor (IOP) is a benign inflammatory condition of the orbit without identifiable local or systemic causes. Bilateral massive orbital involvement and extraorbital extension of the IOP is very rare. We present an unusual case of IOP with bilateral massive orbital infiltration extending into maxillofacial regions and discuss its distinctive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features that help to exclude other entities during differential diagnoses.

  15. Unusual Sclerosing Orbital Pseudotumor Infiltrating Orbits and Maxillofacial Regions

    PubMed Central

    Toprak, Huseyin; Aralaşmak, Ayşe; Yılmaz, Temel Fatih; Ozdemir, Huseyin

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic orbital pseudotumor (IOP) is a benign inflammatory condition of the orbit without identifiable local or systemic causes. Bilateral massive orbital involvement and extraorbital extension of the IOP is very rare. We present an unusual case of IOP with bilateral massive orbital infiltration extending into maxillofacial regions and discuss its distinctive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features that help to exclude other entities during differential diagnoses. PMID:24991481

  16. Pseudotumor Caused by Titanium Particles From a Total Hip Prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Masaaki; Watanabe, Hitoshi; Higashi, Hidetaka; Kubosawa, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    A 77-year-old woman underwent metal-on-polyethylene total hip arthroplasty for osteoarthritis of the right hip at another institution. During surgery, the greater trochanter was broken and internal fixation was performed with a trochanteric cable grip reattachment. Although postoperative recovery was uneventful, approximately 6 years later, the patient had severe right hip pain with apparent swelling, and she was referred to the authors' institution. Plain radiographs showed evidence of severe osteolysis in the proximal femur and cable breakage; however, preoperative aspiration culture findings were negative for bacterial growth. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a well-circumscribed mass, presumed to be a pseudotumor. Serum cobalt and chromium levels were within normal limits, and the serum titanium level was high. During surgery, the mass was excised and removal of the cable system revealed a sharp deficit in the bare femoral stem. Gross surgical findings showed no obvious evidence of infection and no corrosion at the head-neck junction; therefore, all components were retained besides the cable system, which resulted in clinical recovery. All of the cultures from specimens were negative for bacterial growth, and histologic findings were compatible with a pseudotumor, such as histiocytes containing metal particles, abundant plasma cells, and CD8-positive cells. Quantitative analysis by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry showed that the main source of metal debris in the pseudotumor was the femoral stem, which was made of titanium alloy, not the broken cable, which was made of cobalt-chromium alloy. The findings suggest that titanium particles can form symptomatic solid pseudotumors.

  17. The Efficacy of Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Orbital Pseudotumor

    SciTech Connect

    Matthiesen, Chance; Bogardus, Carl; Thompson, J. Spencer; Farris, Bradley; Hildebrand, Lloyd; Wilkes, Byron; Syzek, Elizabeth; Algan, Ozer; Ahmad, Salahuddin; Herman, Terence

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To review institutional outcomes for patients treated with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for orbital pseudotumor. Methods and Materials: This is a single-institution retrospective review of 20 orbits in 16 patients diagnosed with orbital pseudotumor that received EBRT at the University of Oklahoma, Department of Radiation Oncology. Treated patients had a median follow-up of 16.5 months. Results: Fifteen patients (93.7%) were initially treated with corticosteroids. Eight had recurrence after steroid cessation, six were unable to taper corticosteroids completely or partially, and one experienced progression of symptoms despite corticosteroid therapy. Fourteen patients (87.5%) initially responded to radiotherapy indicated by clinical improvement of preradiation symptoms and/or tapering of corticosteroid dose. Mean EBRT dose was 20 Gy (range, 14-30 Gy). Thirteen patients (81.2%) continued to improve after radiation therapy. Patient outcomes were complete cessation of corticosteroid therapy in nine patients (56.3%) and reduced corticosteroid dose in four patients (25%). Radiotherapy did not achieve long-term control for three patients (18.7%), who still required preradiation corticosteroid dosages. Three patients received retreatment(s) of four orbits, of which two patients achieved long-term symptom control without corticosteroid dependence. One patient received retreatment to an orbit three times, achieving long-term control without corticosteroid dependence. No significant late effects have been observed in retreated patients. Conclusions: Radiotherapy is an effective treatment for acute symptomatic improvement and long-term control of orbital pseudotumor. Orbital retreatment can be of clinical benefit, without apparent increase in morbidity, when initial irradiation fails to achieve complete response.

  18. [IgG4-related kidney disease: a long-term follow up case of pseudotumor of the renal pelvis].

    PubMed

    Tsuzaka, Yasuo; Ookubo, Kazuki; Sugiyama, Kazutaka; Morimoto, Hirohiko; Amano, Hiroyuki; Oota, Nobutaka; Kuriki, Ken; Homma, Yukio

    2014-04-01

    A 69-year-old man had undergone left ureteronephrectomy because of a left renal pelvic tumor, however the pathological diagnosis was inflammatory pseudotumor. About 1 year later, computed tomography showed a mass at the right kidney near the hilar. Ureterorenoscopy and urine cytology were performed, and their results showed no evidence of malignancy. He had been followed closely without therapy. The mass increased in size during follow-up, and we reviewed the surgical specimen of the left ureteronephrectomy. Immunohistochemical studies revealed diffuse infiltration by IgG4 positive plasma cell. His serum IgG4 was high. We diagnosed him as IgG4-related kidney disease. In response to treatment with corticosteroid, the size of the tumor and serum IgG4 levels decreased. Most reported cases of IgG4-related disease involving kidney have a history of prior pancreatic involvement. We report a rare long term follow-up case of IgG4-related kidney disease without pancreatic involvement. PMID:24908817

  19. Prevalence of Pseudotumor in Patients After Metal-On-Metal Hip Arthroplasty Evaluated with Metal Ion Analysis and MARS-MRI.

    PubMed

    Sutphen, Sean A; MacLaughlin, Lewis H; Madsen, Adam A; Russell, Jackie H; McShane, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to quantify the prevalence of pseudotumors in patients with well-functioning and painful metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty, to characterize the pseudotumor with the use of MARS-MRI, and to assess the relationship between pseudotumors and metal ions. We retrospectively reviewed 102 single surgeon patients. The results showed that 68.6% developed pseudotumor with 60.9% of the asymptomatic group developing pseudotumor. The symptomatic group had a higher proportion of patients with elevated serum cobalt levels (P=0.035). There was no difference found with elevated metal ions and prevalence of pseudotumor, but elevated cobalt levels were associated with larger pseudotumor size (P=0.001). The available evidence indicated that most patients that develop pseudotumors are asymptomatic, and that elevated serum cobalt levels may be associated with symptoms and pseudotumor size. PMID:26253484

  20. Prevalence of Pseudotumor in Patients After Metal-On-Metal Hip Arthroplasty Evaluated with Metal Ion Analysis and MARS-MRI.

    PubMed

    Sutphen, Sean A; MacLaughlin, Lewis H; Madsen, Adam A; Russell, Jackie H; McShane, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to quantify the prevalence of pseudotumors in patients with well-functioning and painful metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty, to characterize the pseudotumor with the use of MARS-MRI, and to assess the relationship between pseudotumors and metal ions. We retrospectively reviewed 102 single surgeon patients. The results showed that 68.6% developed pseudotumor with 60.9% of the asymptomatic group developing pseudotumor. The symptomatic group had a higher proportion of patients with elevated serum cobalt levels (P=0.035). There was no difference found with elevated metal ions and prevalence of pseudotumor, but elevated cobalt levels were associated with larger pseudotumor size (P=0.001). The available evidence indicated that most patients that develop pseudotumors are asymptomatic, and that elevated serum cobalt levels may be associated with symptoms and pseudotumor size.

  1. Pancreatitis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - discharge; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - discharge; Acute pancreatitis - discharge ... fluids through an intravenous (IV) tube in your vein and nutrition through a feeding tube or IV. ...

  2. Radiotherapy for idiopathic inflammatory orbital pseudotumor. Indications and results

    SciTech Connect

    Sergott, R.C.; Glaser, J.S.; Charyulu, K.

    1981-05-01

    Supervoltage radiotherapy was used in 21 orbits of 19 patients with idiopathic inflammatory orbital pseudotumor. Seventeen orbits (15 patients) were initially treated with systemic corticosteroids, but recurrence of orbital inflammation during dosage tapering was the most frequent indication for radiotherapy. Fifteen orbits (14 patients) responded favorably, as judged by reduced proptosis, decreased lid edema and conjunctival injection, improved ocular motility, and increased visual acuity. Six orbits (five patients) did not improve with radiotherapy. Patients who were successfully treated with radiotherapy have been free of recurrence for a mean follow-up period of 25.05 months; these patients have not required further corticosteroid treatment or additional radiotherapy. Low-dose (1,000 to 2,000 rad) supervoltage radiotherapy seems to have a definite role in the management of idiopathic orbital pseudotumor in the following instances: (1) when corticosteroids fail or systemic complications are unacceptable (2) when signs and symptoms recur during decreasing corticosteroid dosage, and (3) when systemic corticosteroids are medically contraindicated.

  3. Glucocorticosteroid-sensitive inflammatory eosinophilic pseudotumor of the bladder in an adolescent: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Inflammatory eosinophilic pseudotumor of the bladder is a rare inflammatory bladder disease. The etiology and pathophysiology of this condition are still unclear. Few case reports have described inflammatory eosinophilic pseudotumor of the bladder in adults or children. Although benign, this disease is occasionally clinically aggressive and locally invasive, thus open surgical removal or complete transurethral resection is recommended. Case presentation We present the case of a biopsy-proven inflammatory eosinophilic pseudotumor of the bladder in a previously healthy 16-year-old male adolescent with 2-month history of frequent micturition and dysuria with no significant apparent causative factors. The tumor regressed after a 6-week course of glucocorticosteroids. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, our case is a rare case of inflammatory eosinophilic pseudotumor of the bladder treated with complete conservative management. Due to its glucocorticosteroid-sensitive nature, we postulate that this disease belongs to a subgroup of eosinophilic disorders. PMID:20062774

  4. Xanthogranulomatous pseudotumor of stomach induced by perforated peptic ulcer mimicking a stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Lai, Hsin-Yi; Chen, Jeon-Hor; Chen, Chi-Kuan; Chen, Yung-Fang; Ho, Yung-Jen; Yang, Mei-Due; Shen, Wu-Chung

    2006-10-01

    Perforation is a serious complication of peptic ulcer disease occurring in 5% of such patients. Occasionally, the perforation may be sealed off by the omentum or the adjacent organs. Sealed perforated ulcer with pseudotumor formation is very rarely encountered. Here we present a case of gastric pseudotumor induced by perforation of a peptic ulcer. The imaging features in a barium sulfate study and computed tomography mimic an intramural tumor of the stomach.

  5. Inflammatory pseudo-tumor of the liver: a rare pathological entity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory pseudo-tumor (IPT) of the liver is a rare benign neoplasm and is often mistaken as a malignant entity. Few cases have been reported in the literature and the precise etiology of inflammatory pseudotumor remains unknown. Patients usually present with fever, abdominal pain and jaundice. The proliferation of spindled myofibroblast cells mixed with variable amounts of reactive inflammatory cells is characteristics of IPT. We reviewed the literature regarding possible etiology for IPT with a possible suggested etiology. PMID:21255461

  6. Infective endocarditis caused by Listeria monocytogenes forming a pseudotumor.

    PubMed

    Uehara Yonekawa, Akiko; Iwasaka, Sho; Nakamura, Hisataka; Fukata, Mitsuhiro; Kadowaki, Masako; Uchida, Yujiro; Odashiro, Keita; Shimoda, Shinji; Shimono, Nobuyuki; Akashi, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    A 73-year-old woman with breast cancer and metastasis under chemotherapy suffered from fever, pleural effusion and pericardial effusion. Despite the administration of treatment with cefozopran and prednisolone, the patient's fever relapsed. An electrocardiogram identified a new complete atrioventricular block and an echocardiogram revealed vegetation with an unusual pseudotumoral mass in the right atrium. Blood cultures grew Listeria monocytogenes. The patient was eventually diagnosed with right-sided infective endocarditis, which improved following the six-week administration of ampicillin and gentamicin. Homemade yoghurt was suspected to be the cause of infection in this case. Listeria endocarditis is rare; however, physicians should pay more attention to preventing this fatal disease in immunocompromised patients.

  7. Autoimmune pancreatitis--recent advances.

    PubMed

    Novotný, I; Díte, P; Lata, J; Nechutová, H; Kianicka, B

    2010-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is recognized as a distinct clinical entity, identified as a chronic inflammatory process of the pancreas in which the autoimmune mechanism is involved. Clinically and histologically, AIP has two subsets: type 1--lymphoplasmatic sclerosing pancreatitis with abundant infiltration of the pancreas and other affected organs with immunoglobulin G4-positive plasma cells, and type 2--duct centric fibrosis, characterized by granulocyte epithelial lesions in the pancreas without systemic involvement. In the diagnosis of AIP, two diagnostic criterions are used--the HISORt criteria and Asian Diagnostic Criteria. In the differential diagnosis, the pancreatic cancer must be excluded by endosonographically guided pancreatic biopsy. Typical signs of AIP are concomitant disorders in other organs (kidney, liver, biliary tract, salivary glands, colon, retroperitoneum, prostate). Novel clinicopathological entity was proposed as an 'IgG4-related sclerosing disease' (IgG4-RSC). Extensive IgG4-positive plasma cells and T lymphocyte infiltration is a common characteristics of this disease. Recently, IgG4-RSC syndrome was extended to a new entity, characterized by IgG4 hypergammaglobulinemia and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration, this being considered an expression of a lymphoproliferative disease, 'IgG4-positive multiorgan lymphoproliferative syndrome'. This syndrome includes Mikulicz's disease, mediastinal fibrosis, autoimmune hypophysitis, and inflammatory pseudotumor--lung, liver, breast. In the therapy of AIP, steroids constitute first-choice treatment. High response to the corticosteroid therapy is an important diagnostic criterion. In the literature, there are no case-control studies that determine if AIP predisposes to pancreatic cancer. Undoubtedly, AIP is currently a hot topic in pancreatology.

  8. [An IgG4-related pancreatitis mimicking an adenocarcinoma: A case report].

    PubMed

    Courcet, Emilie; Beltjens, Françoise; Charon-Barra, Céline; Guy, France; Orry, David; Ghiringhelli, François; Arnould, Laurent

    2015-12-01

    Type 1 auto-immune pancreatitis (type 1 AIP) is the pancreatic manifestation of IgG4-related systemic disease (IgG4-RD). This disease has recently been individualized and is characterized by elevated serum IgG4 levels and extrapancreatic lesions with common histologic characteristic: dense infiltration of lymphocytes, IgG4-positive plasma cells and storiforme fibrosis. Obliterative phlebitis is frequently detected. The pancreas is frequently involved in this disease. As approach to the pancreas for histological examination is generally difficult, AIP is diagnosed using a combination of clinical, serological, morphological and histopathological features. In pseudotumoral cases, AIP can be misdiagnosed as pancreatic cancer. Since AIP responds dramatically to steroid therapy, accurate diagnosis of AIP can avoid unnecessary laparotomy or pancreatic resection. We report here a case of a patient who underwent surgery for presumed pancreatic cancer. The final diagnosis was type 1 AIP.

  9. Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  10. Inflammatory pseudotumor of the inner ear: are computed tomography changes pathognomonic?

    PubMed

    Curry, Joseph M; King, Nancy; O'Reilly, Robert C; Corao, Diana

    2010-06-01

    This case study presents a report of inflammatory pseudotumor of the inner ear in a child, discusses radiographic findings and clinical management, and reviews the current literature on this rare disease. A 2.5-year-old presented with otalgia, transient vertigo, and fluctuating facial palsy partially responsive to myringotomy with tube. Work-up for infectious and neoplastic processes was negative. Computed tomography (CT) of the temporal bone showed a very unusual, expansile, erosive appearance to the otic capsule, and magnetic resonance imaging of the temporal bone revealed soft tissue enhancement of the middle ear, mastoid, and inner ear. The patient's symptoms were transiently responsive to tympanomastoidectomy. Inner ear histopathology after labyrinthectomy revealed changes consistent with pseudotumor. Inflammatory pseudotumor of the inner ear is extremely rare but needs to be considered in cases of refractory otitis media with facial palsy, particularly when certain changes appear on CT of the temporal bone.

  11. Inflammatory pseudotumor of the infratemporal fossa leading to orbital apex syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Naoki; Fujimoto, Yasushi; Nakashima, Tsutomu

    2014-07-01

    An inflammatory pseudotumor is a rare benign disease presenting with non-specific chronic inflammation, and reported occurrences involving the skull base are relatively rare. A 65-year-old man became aware of pain around the right temporomandibular joint and mild trismus, and palsies of the cranial nerves III, IV, V, and VI were observed. A biopsy was performed under general anesthesia with an infratemporal fossa approach, and he was diagnosed with inflammatory pseudotumor of the infratemporal fossa. There was a rapid improvement in symptoms after the start of steroid administration, and 29 months after the initial consultation, the patient remained under strict observation. The 3 criteria in our department for confirming progression of the disease are (1) clinical symptoms, (2) C-reactive protein levels in blood tests, and (3) contrast effect of the tumor on magnetic resonance imaging. This is a rare case report to demonstrate the inflammatory pseudotumor of the infratemporal fossa leading to orbital apex syndrome.

  12. Pseudotumoral and Multiple Retinal Pigment Epithelium Proliferation in Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada Disease.

    PubMed

    Yepez, Juan B; Murati, Felipe; Petitto, Michele; Arevalo, J Fernando

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of pseudotumoral retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) proliferation in Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH) disease, in a 50-year-old female who presented with a juxtapapillary and peripheral subretinal hyperpigmented lesions in the left eye and "sunset glow fundus," hyperpigmented striae, and multiple atrophic chorioretinal spots in the periphery. The darkly pigmented exuberant larger subretinal mass extended to the periphery with associated subretinal fibrosis. This patient demonstrated the entire clinical presentation of VKH disease, which tends to course with a chronic, bilateral, granulomatous panuveitis and exudative retinal detachment associated with poliosis, vitiligo, alopecia, and central nervous system and auditory signs. Our case is unique for the presence of exuberant, pseudotumoral RPE proliferation at the juxtapapillary region and peripheral area. Although this complication has rarely been reported, a high index of suspicion is warranted for early diagnosis and avoids unnecessary treatments of a pseudotumor. PMID:26509089

  13. [Pseudotumor cerebri secondary to consumption of minocycline in a pediatric patient].

    PubMed

    González Gili, Lucas O; Buffone, Ignacio R; Carrara, Laura E; Coto, María B; Fortunatti, Eliana A; Dejtera, Mabel; García Elliot, María F; Giacone, Alejandra; Luncio, Anabella C; Masnicoff, Sebastián D; Oviedo Crosta, María B; Parroua, Marianela; Romano, Mariana

    2016-04-01

    Pseudotumor cerebri is a syndrome characterized by an elevated intracranial pressure greater than 20 cmH2O with ventricles and cerebrospinal fluid of normal characteristics. Consumption of minocycline have been described among the causes associated with this syndrome. We present a 13-year old female patient with a history of acne treated with minocycline who began with severe headache, diplopia and blurred vision. The diagnosis of pseudotumor cerebri was made, indicating the immediate antibiotic suspension and the beginning of the treatment with acetazolamide. Although the pathogenesis of pseudotumor cerebri is not fully known, an association with minocycline has been observed. This antibiotic is often used by health professionals for the management of acne, so it is important to consider its complications before being prescribed.

  14. Management of the hemophilic pseudotumor of the abdomen: A rare pathological entity

    PubMed Central

    López-Gómez, Javier; Contreras, Juan S.; Figueroa-Ruiz, Marco; Servín-Torres, Erick; Velázquez-García, José; Bevia-Pérez, Francisco; Delgadillo-Teyer, Germán

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Hemophilic pseudotumor is a rare complication that occurs in patients with severe hemophilia. Results from multiple episodes of bleeding into the bones and soft tissues. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 31 years old male patient, with severe hemophilia A. Diagnosed with an abdominal tumor 10 years ago during routine screening, that progressively grew to encompass the entire abdominal area, with symptoms of intestinal obstruction. DISCUSSION Hemophilic pseudotumor appears as a painless tumor of slow growth that can compress vital organs producing bone destruction, muscle and skin necrosis. The tumor may have fistulas or break spontaneously. CONCLUSION The abdominal hemophilic pseudotumor is a rare pathological entity, with few reports worldwide, but must be considered in hemophilic patients with a well documented abdominal tumor. PMID:25290383

  15. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Chari, S T; DiMagno, E P

    2000-09-01

    In the past year, there has been at least one important clinical paper that sheds light on the character and natural history of painful chronic pancreatitis, which has important clinical implications. In addition, several novel mutations have been described in the cationic trypsinogen gene in patients with hereditary pancreatitis. The mechanism by which these mutations cause pancreatic disease remains speculative. The diagnosis of early chronic pancreatitis is controversial. A novel noninvasive pancreatic function test (measurement of postprandial APOB-48) was reported but is unlikely to be a sensitive test of pancreatic function. Pancreatic fibrosis is frequently seen in alcoholics without chronic pancreatitis, and this makes it difficult to interpret the findings on endoscopic ultrasonogram. Recent studies highlight the difficulty in abolishing pancreatic steatorrhea. Recently fibrosing colonopathy in adult patients has been reported. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy combined with endoscopic therapy failed to benefit patients with calcific chronic pancreatitis.

  16. Cryptococcosis, silicosis, and tuberculous pseudotumor in the same pulmonary lobe*

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Geruza Alves; Brandão, Daniel Ferracioli; Vianna, Elcio Oliveira; de Sá, João Batista Carlos; Baddini-Martinez, José

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis and cryptococcosis are infectious diseases that can result in the formation of single or multiple nodules in immunocompetent patients. Exposure to silica is known to raise the risk of infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We report the case of an elderly man with no history of opportunistic infections and no clinical evidence of immunodeficiency but with a six-month history of dry cough and nocturnal wheezing. A chest X-ray revealed a mass measuring 5.0 × 3.5 cm in the right upper lobe. The diagnostic approach of the mass revealed tuberculosis. The histopathological analysis of the surrounding parenchyma reveled silicosis and cryptococcosis. Cryptococcosis was also found in masses identified in the mediastinal lymph nodes. The surgical approach was indicated because of the degree of pleuropulmonary involvement, the inconclusive results obtained with the invasive and noninvasive methods applied, and the possibility of malignancy. This case illustrates the difficulty inherent to the assessment of infectious or inflammatory pulmonary pseudotumors, the differential diagnosis of which occasionally requires a radical surgical approach. Despite the presence of respiratory symptoms for six months, the first chest X-ray was performed only at the end of that period. We discuss the possible pathogenic mechanisms that might have led to the combination of three types of granulomatous lesions in the same lobe, and we emphasize the need for greater awareness of atypical presentations of pulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:24310636

  17. Pseudotumoral encapsulated fat necrosis with diffuse pseudomembranous degeneration.

    PubMed

    Felipo, F; Vaquero, M; del Agua, C

    2004-09-01

    An extraordinary case of encapsulated fat necrosis characterized by its large size, diffuse formation of pseudomembranes, and tendency to recur after excision is reported. A 67-year-old Caucasian woman suffering from morbid obesity was admitted for diagnosis and surgical treatment of a soft tissue mass showing a longest diameter of 14 cm and lying adjacently to the scar from previous appendicectomy. Histopathologic features were consistent with a nodular-cystic encapsulated fat necrosis with diffuse pseudomembranous transformation. Eight months after surgery, a new larger mass (longest diameter of 18 cm) sharing identical histopathologic features appeared in the same location. Encapsulated fat necrosis is a well-defined entity even though several names have been proposed for this condition, including mobile encapsulated lipoma, encapsulated necrosis, or nodular-cystic fat necrosis. Its pathogenesis seems to be related to ischemic changes secondary to previous trauma. It may occasionally show degenerative changes, including dystrophic calcifications and presence of pseudomembranes. To our knowledge, these are the first reported cases of encapsulated fat necrosis presenting as lesions of such size and showing diffuse formation of pseudomembranes; these particular features made diagnosis difficult and led to consideration of a wide range of potential diagnostic possibilities. This case expands the clinico-pathologic spectrum of membranocystic fat necrosis, including the potential ability of this subcutaneous fatty tissue abnormality to recur after surgical excision. Felipo F, Vaquero M, del Agua C. Pseudotumoral encapsulated fat necrosis with diffuse pseudomembranous degeneration.

  18. Inflammatory Pseudotumor of the Spleen Masquerading as Splenic Malignancy.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mohammad; Pujani, Mukta; Jairajpuri, Zeeba Shamim; Rana, Safia; Goel, Amit; Jetley, Sujata

    2016-03-01

    Inflammatory pseudotumors (IPTs) of the spleen are extremely rare, benign tumors of unknown etiology, and are most frequently detected incidentally. We report a case of IPT of the spleen in a 19-year-old male, who presented to the Hamdard Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, New Delhi, with a history of pain and heaviness in the left hypochondrium. On clinical examination, splenomegaly was detected. Ultrasonography and contrast-enhanced computed tomography of the abdomen revealed an enlarged spleen with a mass lesion completely occupying the lower pole of the spleen. Therefore, a diagnosis of splenomegaly with a malignant splenic lesion was suggested. Open splenectomy was performed. On gross examination, a well-circumscribed nodular growth measuring 9 × 8 × 5 cm in diameter was seen on the lower pole of the spleen, which on cut section appeared tan white with foci of yellowish discoloration. Microscopic examination of the nodular growth revealed spindle cells in a hyalinized stroma with inflammatory infiltration of predominantly plasma cells and lymphocytes. On immunohistochemistry, the spindle cells were positive for smooth muscle actin. A diagnosis of IPT of the spleen was rendered following histopathology testing. Splenectomy is both diagnostic and curative for this rare entity, and prognosis is usually favorable following the procedure. PMID:27168929

  19. Inflammatory pseudotumor of the hip: a complication of arthroplasty to be recognized by the radiologist*

    PubMed Central

    Boas, Raquel de Melo Santos Vilas; Madeira, Ivana Andrade; Lopes, Alexia Abuhid; Paiva, Edson Barreto; Rodrigues, André Soares

    2015-01-01

    Soft tissue complications following hip arthroplasty may occur either in cases of total hip arthroplasty or in hip resurfacing, a technique that has become popular in cases involving young patients. Both orthopedic and radiological literatures are now calling attention to these symptomatic periprosthetic soft tissue masses called inflammatory pseudotumors or aseptic lymphocytic vasculites-associated lesions. Pseudotumors are associated with pain, instability, neuropathy, and premature loosening of prosthetic components, frequently requiring early and difficult reoperation. Magnetic resonance imaging plays a relevant role in the evaluation of soft tissue changes in the painful hip after arthroplasty, ranging from early periprosthetic fluid collections to necrosis and more extensive tissue damage. PMID:26543283

  20. Inflammatory Pseudotumor of the Liver with Escherichia coli in the Sputum

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Sreenath; Nayak, Ashwini; King, Chris L.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory pseudotumor is a nonmalignant lesion that mimics malignant lesions and has been reported to occur at various sites throughout the body. Though it has been reported as a reaction to infection, the true etiology of the lesion is unknown. In this report, we present the case of a patient with a liver lesion of unknown origin. Through a series of imaging studies, we were able to observe the locally aggressive nature of this lesion as it rapidly eroded into the lung. Sputum cultures showed growth of E. coli, indicating E. coli infection as a possible etiology of this lesion. Pathology was consistent with inflammatory pseudotumor. PMID:26347780

  1. [Pancreatic Diseases].

    PubMed

    Schöfl, Rainer

    2016-06-22

    The author presents his personal choice of practical relevant papers of pancreatic diseases from 2014 to 2015. Nutritional factors and hypertriglycidemia are discussed as causes of acute pancreatitis. Tools to avoid post-ERCP(endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography) pancreatitis are described and the natural course of fluid collections and pseudocysts is demonstrated. The value of secretin-MRCP(magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography) for diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis is illustrated. Data help to choose the minimally effective prednisolone dose in autoimmune pancreatitis. The increased prevalence of fractures in patients with chronic pancreatitis highlights the necessity of screening for bone density loss. The association of vitamin D intake with pancreatic cancer is described. The probability of cancer in IPNM is shown and innovative surgical concepts to reduce the loss of pancreatic function are presented. Finally neoadjuvant concepts for the treatment of pancreatic cancer are highlighted. PMID:27329710

  2. Neuro-Behçet, pseudotumor cerebri and ocular signs: a rare association

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Maria Inês; Loureiro, Cláudia; Geraldo Couceiro, Ana; Reis Ferreira, Cidalina; Monteiro-Grillo, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The central nervous system involvement in Behçet’s disease occurs in 5–30% of cases. The diagnosis of pseudotumor cerebri is even rarer (only 22 cases reported worldwide). Purpose: To emphasize the importance of differential diagnosis in a case of pseudotumor cerebri in the context of ocular inflammation. Methods: V.A.V.R., a 31 year old female, was diagnosed with pan-uveitis on the left eye associated with recurrent bipolar aphthosis. During the etiological investigation, there was an onset of a left hemiparesis and facial palsy. Results: The central nervous system (CNS) neuroradiological investigation revealed a space-occupying lesion within the right hemisphere with intense signal enhancement with gadolinium. It globally reached the nucleo-basal structures and induced deviation of the middle structures (including homolateral ventricle). Cytochemical analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was negative for atypical cells. The ophthalmological features regressed with the corticosteroid and immunosuppressive therapy instituted. The final diagnosis was of pseudotumor cerebri in the context of Behçet’s disease. Conclusion: In Behçet’s disease, a cerebral space-occupying lesion should lead to a diagnosis of pseudotumor cerebri. The correct diagnosis will determine an appropriate therapy and may prevent an inappropriate neurosurgical approach. The cortico and immunotherapy allowed a substantial regression of the lesion. PMID:27625934

  3. Neuro-Behçet, pseudotumor cerebri and ocular signs: a rare association

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Maria Inês; Loureiro, Cláudia; Geraldo Couceiro, Ana; Reis Ferreira, Cidalina; Monteiro-Grillo, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The central nervous system involvement in Behçet’s disease occurs in 5–30% of cases. The diagnosis of pseudotumor cerebri is even rarer (only 22 cases reported worldwide). Purpose: To emphasize the importance of differential diagnosis in a case of pseudotumor cerebri in the context of ocular inflammation. Methods: V.A.V.R., a 31 year old female, was diagnosed with pan-uveitis on the left eye associated with recurrent bipolar aphthosis. During the etiological investigation, there was an onset of a left hemiparesis and facial palsy. Results: The central nervous system (CNS) neuroradiological investigation revealed a space-occupying lesion within the right hemisphere with intense signal enhancement with gadolinium. It globally reached the nucleo-basal structures and induced deviation of the middle structures (including homolateral ventricle). Cytochemical analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was negative for atypical cells. The ophthalmological features regressed with the corticosteroid and immunosuppressive therapy instituted. The final diagnosis was of pseudotumor cerebri in the context of Behçet’s disease. Conclusion: In Behçet’s disease, a cerebral space-occupying lesion should lead to a diagnosis of pseudotumor cerebri. The correct diagnosis will determine an appropriate therapy and may prevent an inappropriate neurosurgical approach. The cortico and immunotherapy allowed a substantial regression of the lesion.

  4. [Adrenal myelolipoma and Castleman's pseudotumor. A case of association in a retroperitoneal tumor].

    PubMed

    Seniuta, P; Cazenave-Mahe, J P; Le Treut, A; Trojani, M

    1989-01-01

    The authors report a case of a voluminous retroperitoneal tumor as an incidental finding in a patient with acute urine retention induced by an ovarian compressive cyst. Radiological findings supported the hypothesis of a malignant tumor. The histological examination of the surgical specimen only permitted the diagnosis and showed the association of an adrenal myelolipoma with a Castleman's pseudo-tumor.

  5. Childhood pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Uretsky, G; Goldschmiedt, M; James, K

    1999-05-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a rare finding in childhood but probably more common than is generally realized. This condition should be considered in the evaluation of children with vomiting and abdominal pain, because it can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Clinical suspicion is required to make the diagnosis, especially when the serum amylase concentration is normal. Recurrent pancreatitis may be familial as a result of inherited biochemical or anatomic abnormalities. Patients with hereditary pancreatitis are at high risk for pancreatic cancer.

  6. PEDIATRIC PANCREATITIS

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, John F.; Uc, Aliye

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review The purpose of this review is to describe recent developments in pediatric pancreatitis and to discuss etiologies and current management. Recent Findings Although recent studies have estimated the annual incidence of pediatric acute pancreatitis approaching that of adults, there are no established guidelines about its diagnosis and treatment in children. Genetic and structural/congenital abnormalities are emerging as the primary risk factors for pediatric acute recurrent and chronic pancreatitis. Specifically, chronic pancreatitis is associated with a significant socioeconomic burden in children. Both medical and surgical therapies are proposed for pediatric chronic pancreatitis, but there is little evidence that they are beneficial. Summary Acute, acute recurrent and chronic pancreatitis create significant health issues in the pediatric population. Medical and surgical therapies exist to potentially treat these conditions, but the pediatric data is limited and the cohorts are small. A multidisciplinary and multicenter approach is necessary to better determine pancreatic disease processes and treatment options in children. PMID:26181572

  7. Pentoxifylline Treatment in Acute Pancreatitis (AP)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-14

    Acute Pancreatitis (AP); Gallstone Pancreatitis; Alcoholic Pancreatitis; Post-ERCP/Post-procedural Pancreatitis; Trauma Acute Pancreatitis; Hypertriglyceridemia Acute Pancreatitis; Idiopathic (Unknown) Acute Pancreatitis; Medication Induced Acute Pancreatitis; Cancer Acute Pancreatitis; Miscellaneous (i.e. Acute on Chronic Pancreatitis)

  8. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Shounak; Chari, Suresh T

    2016-05-01

    Chronic pancreatitis describes a wide spectrum of fibro-inflammatory disorders of the exocrine pancreas that includes calcifying, obstructive, and steroid-responsive forms. Use of the term chronic pancreatitis without qualification generally refers to calcifying chronic pancreatitis. Epidemiology is poorly defined, but incidence worldwide seems to be on the rise. Smoking, drinking alcohol, and genetic predisposition are the major risk factors for chronic calcifying pancreatitis. In this Seminar, we discuss the clinical features, diagnosis, and management of chronic calcifying pancreatitis, focusing on pain management, the role of endoscopic and surgical intervention, and the use of pancreatic enzyme-replacement therapy. Management of patients is often challenging and necessitates a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:26948434

  9. Huge inflammatory pseudotumor of the spleen with postoperative portal vein thrombosis: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Norifumi; Kawanaka, Hirofumi; Yamaguchi, Shohei; Sakai, Masahiro; Momosaki, Seiya; Endo, Kazuya; Ikejiri, Koji

    2012-04-01

    We report the rare case of a splenic inflammatory pseudotumor associated with massive splenomegaly, diagnosed after surgery. A 51-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for investigation of anemia. Physical examination revealed a palpable left upper quadrant mass. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed a splenic mass, 20 cm in diameter. We performed splenectomy for both diagnosis and treatment. The spleen weighed 2400 g, and histologic examination of the mass confirmed an inflammatory pseudotumor. Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) developed the day after surgery, but resolved with anticoagulation therapy. This case highlights that there is a risk of PVT after splenectomy in patients with massive splenomegaly, and that anticoagulant therapy should be initiated promptly.

  10. Human cytomegalovirus induced pseudotumor of upper gastrointestinal tract mucosa: effects of long-term chronic disease?

    PubMed

    Reggiani Bonetti, Luca; Barresi, Valeria; Bertani, Angela; Maccio, Livia; Palmiere, Cristian

    2015-06-01

    Human cytomegalovirus-induced lesions resembling malignancies have been described in the gastrointestinal tract and include ulcerated or exophytic large masses. The aim of this study was to review the cases registered in the databases of two academic hospitals and formulate a hypothesis concerning the pathogenic mechanisms responsible for cytomegalovirus-induced pseudotumor development. All the diagnoses of human cytomegalovirus infections of the upper gastrointestinal tract recorded from 1991 to 2013 were reviewed. Cases of mucosal alterations misdiagnosed endoscopically as malignancies were selected. Large ulcers occurring in the stomach (three cases) and an irregular exophytic mass at the gastro-jejunal anastomosis were misdiagnosed endoscopically as malignancies (4 cases out of 53). Histologically, all lesions reflected hyperplastic mucosal changes with a prevalence of epithelial and stroma infected cells, without signs of cell atypia. The hypothesis presented is that the development of human cytomegalovirus-induced pseudotumors may be the morphological expression of chronic mucosa damage underlying long-term infection.

  11. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Chari, S T; DiMagno, E P

    2001-09-01

    An increasing number of novel mutations are associated with chronic pancreatitis. Some cause a high-penetrance, autosomal dominant type of clinical picture (eg, mutations at codons 29 and 122 of the cationic trypsinogen gene), whereas others have a low penetrance or are frequent in the general population (eg, mutations in Kazal type 1 [SPINK1] and in codons 16, 22, and 23 of the cationic trypsinogen gene) and act as disease modifiers. The results of recent studies indicate that smoking adversely affects the course and complications of chronic pancreatitis (more frequent and faster rate of calcification and higher risk of development of pancreatic cancer). Thus, regardless of the cause of chronic pancreatis, patients with this condition should not smoke. Using current diagnostic criteria, the accuracy of endoscopic ultrasound for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis is not good. For example, 39% of dyspeptic persons without any other evidence of chronic pancreatitis fulfilled the endoscopic ultrasound criteria for chronic pancreatitis. Diabetes frequently occurs in chronic pancreatitis, but it is not prevented or increased by pancreatic surgery. Islet cell autotransplantation holds promise for the prevention of diabetes in patients requiring total pancreatectomy if the pancreas is not extensively fibrotic. Splenic vein occlusion is present in 7% of patients undergoing surgery for chronic pancreatitis, but fewer than one fifth of these patients have variceal bleeding before or after surgery.

  12. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary α-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  13. [Hereditary pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Dyrla, Przemysław; Nowak, Tomasz; Gil, Jerzy; Adamiec, Cezary; Bobula, Mariusz; Saracyn, Marek

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is a rare, heterogeneous familial disease and should be suspected in any patient who has suffered at least two attacks of acute pancreatitis for which there is no underlying cause and unexplained chronic pancreatitis with a family history in a first- or second degree relative. with an early onset, mostly during childhood. Genetic factors have been implied in cases of familial chronic pancreatitis. The most common are mutations of the PRSS1 gene on the long arm of the chromosome 7, encoding for the cationic trypsinogen. The inheritance pattern is autosomal dominant with an incomplete penetrance (80%). The inflammation results in repeated DNA damage, error-prone repair mechanisms and the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations. Risk of pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a major concern of many patients with hereditary chronic pancreatitis, but the individual risk is poorly defined. Better risk models of pancreatic cancer in individual patients based on etiology of pancreatitis, family history, genetics, smoking, alcohol, diabetes and the patient's age are needed. PMID:27000817

  14. Pancreatic injury.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nasim; Vernick, Jerome J

    2009-12-01

    Injury to the pancreas, because of its retroperitoneal location, is a rare occurrence, most commonly seen with penetrating injuries (gun shot or stab wounds). Blunt trauma to the pancreas accounts for only 25% of the cases. Pancreatic injuries are associated with high morbidity and mortality due to accompanying vascular and duodenal injuries. Pancreatic injuries are not always easy to diagnose resulting in life threatening complications. Physical examination as well as serum amylase is not diagnostic following blunt trauma. Computed tomography (CT) scan can delineate the injury or transaction of the pancreas. Endoscopic retrograde pancreaticography (ERCP) is the main diagnostic modality for evaluation of the main pancreatic duct. Unrecognized ductal injury leads to pancreatic pseudocyst, fistula, abscess, and other complications. Management depends upon the severity of the pancreatic injury as well as associated injuries. Damage control surgery in hemodynamic unstable patients reduces morbidity and mortality.

  15. Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    DiMagno, Matthew J.; DiMagno, Eugene P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review We review important new clinical observations in chronic pancreatitis (CP) reported in 2011. Recent findings Smoking increases the risk of non-gallstone acute pancreatitis (AP) and the progression of AP to CP. Binge drinking during Oktoberfest did not associate with increased hospital admissions for AP. The unfolded protein response is an adaptive mechanism to maintain pancreatic health in response to noxious stimuli such as alcohol. Onset of diabetes mellitus in CP is likely due to progressive disease rather than individual variables. Insufficient pancreatic enzyme dosing is common for treatment of pancreatic steatorrhea; 90,000 USP U of lipase should be given with meals. Surgical drainage provides sustained, superior pain relief compared to endoscopic treatment in patients advanced CP with a dilated main duct +/− pancreatic stones. The central acting gabapentoid pregabalin affords a modest 12% pain reduction in patients with CP but ~30% of patients have significant side effects. Summary Patients with non-gallstone related AP or CP of any etiology should cease smoking. Results of this year’s investigations further elucidated the pancreatic pathobiology due to alcohol, onset of diabetes mellitus in CP, and the mechanisms and treatment of neuropathic pain in CP. PMID:22782018

  16. High pseudotumor cerebri incidence in tretinoin and arsenic treated acute promyelocytic leukemia and the role of topiramate after acetazolamide failure

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Morgan B.; Griffiths, Elizabeth A.; Thompson, James E.; Wang, Eunice S.; Wetzler, Meir; Freyer, Craig W.

    2014-01-01

    Dual differentiation therapy with arsenic trioxide and tretinoin (all-trans-retinoic acid; ATRA) for the management of low and intermediate risk acute promyelocytic leukemia has recently been recommended by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. Some less common toxicities of the combination may have yet to be fully realized. Of ten patients we have treated thus far, five (50%) have developed pseudotumor cerebri. In one patient, temporary discontinuation of ATRA and initiation of acetazolamide controlled symptoms. In four patients, topiramate was substituted for acetazolamide to relieve symptoms and allow ATRA dose re-escalation. We conclude that providers should monitor for pseudotumor cerebri and consider topiramate if acetazolamide fails. PMID:25180154

  17. Acute pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... rate Lab tests that show the release of pancreatic enzymes will be done. These include: Increased blood amylase level Increased serum blood lipase level Increased urine amylase ... swelling of the pancreas include: CT scan of the abdomen MRI of ...

  18. Pancreatitis - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... perform lab tests to check the release of pancreatic enzymes. These include tests to check the: Blood amylase level Blood lipase level Urine amylase level Other blood tests ... the pancreas include: Ultrasound of the abdomen (most common) CT ...

  19. Pancreatic abscess.

    PubMed Central

    Gartell, P C

    1982-01-01

    Three cases of pancreatic abscess are described to show the difficulties in diagnosis and that inadequate treatment is invariably fatal. Early recognition and prompt surgical drainage, together with biliary decompression if indicated, are advised. PMID:7069670

  20. Hereditary Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Rivera Rivera, Edgardo D; Chugh, Ankur; Cordova, Jonathon; Young, Sona

    2016-02-01

    A 13-year-old boy with a strong family history of hereditary pancreatitis was found to have a PRSS1 mutation after being tested at age 5 years during his first documented incident of pancreatitis. Since then, a multidisciplinary team has been treating him for the diagnosis of hereditary pancreatitis. His pain episodes increased in severity over the past several months such that the pain began to severely interfere with his daily life. After extensive discussion, a total pancreatectomy with auto islet cell transplant was performed. He is now pain free and does not require any insulin. This leads us to the questions of what is hereditary pancreatitis and how is it diagnosed? What are the management and follow-up strategies needed for these patients? This article addresses these questions and informs the reader about this diagnosis and the importance of having a high index of clinical suspicion. PMID:26878183

  1. Chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Maisonneuve, Patrick; Lowenfels, Albert B

    2002-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the USA in both sexes. Early diagnosis is difficult and the overall mortality rate is high. Individuals at high risk for pancreatic cancer include smokers, and persons with all forms of chronic alcoholic, metabolic, tropical or hereditary pancreatitis. The duration of exposure to inflammation seems to be the major factor involved in the transition from benign to malignant condition. Smoking, which appears to further accelerate the carcinogenic transformation, remains the strongest risk factor amenable to preventive intervention.

  2. Autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Omiyale, Ayodeji Oluwarotimi

    2016-06-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare, distinct and increasingly recognized form of pancreatitis which has autoimmune features. The international consensus diagnostic criteria (ICDC) for AIP recently described two subtypes; type 1[lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP)] and type 2 [idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) or AIP with granulocytic epithelial lesion (GEL)]. Type 1 is the more common form of the disease worldwide and current understanding suggests that it is a pancreatic manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). In contrast, type 2 AIP is a pancreas-specific disease not associated with IgG4 and mostly without the overt extra-pancreatic organ involvement seen in type 1. The pathogenesis of AIP is not completely understood and its clinical presentation is non-specific. It shares overlapping features with more sinister pathologies such as cancer of the pancreas, which continues to pose a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. The diagnostic criteria requires a variable combination of histopathological, imaging and serological features in the presence of typical extrapancreatic lesions and a predictable response to steroids. PMID:27294040

  3. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare, distinct and increasingly recognized form of pancreatitis which has autoimmune features. The international consensus diagnostic criteria (ICDC) for AIP recently described two subtypes; type 1[lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP)] and type 2 [idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) or AIP with granulocytic epithelial lesion (GEL)]. Type 1 is the more common form of the disease worldwide and current understanding suggests that it is a pancreatic manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). In contrast, type 2 AIP is a pancreas-specific disease not associated with IgG4 and mostly without the overt extra-pancreatic organ involvement seen in type 1. The pathogenesis of AIP is not completely understood and its clinical presentation is non-specific. It shares overlapping features with more sinister pathologies such as cancer of the pancreas, which continues to pose a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. The diagnostic criteria requires a variable combination of histopathological, imaging and serological features in the presence of typical extrapancreatic lesions and a predictable response to steroids. PMID:27294040

  4. Pancreatic Cancer Early Detection Program

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-30

    Pancreatic Cancer; Pancreas Cancer; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Familial Pancreatic Cancer; BRCA 1/2; HNPCC; Lynch Syndrome; Hereditary Pancreatitis; FAMMM; Familial Atypical Multiple Mole Melanoma; Peutz Jeghers Syndrome

  5. Pseudotumor presentation of renal tuberculosis mimicking renal cell carcinoma: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Panwar, Anubhav; Ranjan, Raju; Drall, Nityasha; Mishra, Neha

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis can involve any part of the body. Urogenital tuberculosis is a fairly common extra-pulmonary manifestation of tuberculosis and renal tuberculosis is the most common form of urogenital tuberculosis. Renal tuberculosis seldom presents as a mass, usually due to hydronephrosis of the involved kidney. However in extremely rare cases it may present as an inflammatory pseudotumor which may mimic renal cell carcinoma. We present a case of a 65- year- old male who was provisionally diagnosed as renal cell carcinoma based on clinical and radiological findings and managed accordingly but was finally diagnosed as renal tuberculosis based on histopathological examination of surgical specimen. PMID:27635298

  6. Pseudotumor presentation of renal tuberculosis mimicking renal cell carcinoma: A rare entity.

    PubMed

    Panwar, Anubhav; Ranjan, Raju; Drall, Nityasha; Mishra, Neha

    2016-09-01

    Tuberculosis can involve any part of the body. Urogenital tuberculosis is a fairly common extra-pulmonary manifestation of tuberculosis and renal tuberculosis is the most common form of urogenital tuberculosis. Renal tuberculosis seldom presents as a mass, usually due to hydronephrosis of the involved kidney. However in extremely rare cases it may present as an inflammatory pseudotumor which may mimic renal cell carcinoma. We present a case of a 65- year- old male who was provisionally diagnosed as renal cell carcinoma based on clinical and radiological findings and managed accordingly but was finally diagnosed as renal tuberculosis based on histopathological examination of surgical specimen. PMID:27635298

  7. Inflammatory Pseudotumor of the Infraorbital Nerve: A Rare Diagnosis to Be Aware of.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Andrea; Bergonzani, Michela; Varazzani, Andrea; Sesenna, Enrico

    2016-09-01

    Inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT) is a rare benign mass-forming disease that can arise anywhere throughout the body, mimicking a wide spectrum of other conditions. Its diagnosis can be challenging, especially when it involves uncommon sites. The authors report a patient of an atypical localization of IPT, occurred as an enlarging bulk in the infraorbital nerve channel in a patient who presented with facial numbness. Clinical and radiological aspects similar to schwannoma led to misdiagnosis and over-treatment. The differential diagnosis of an infraorbital mass should include IPT and the least invasive treatment should be preferred, as steroid therapy being the first-line treatment for IPT. PMID:27438435

  8. [Pseudo-tumoral suprarénal-renal dysgenesis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Weisgerber, G; Douvin, D; Krulik, M; Huguet, C

    1975-06-01

    Intimate fusion of the renal and suprarenal parenchyma, associated with cystic lesions in the zone of tissue juxtaposition, constitutes a form of suprarenal-renal dysgenesis for which the name "dystopia" has been suggested. The distinction must be made from suprarenal-renal adhesions in which a connective tissue barrier between the two parenchymas persists. In this present case, the malformation gave rise to a pseudo-tumoral syndrome of rapid appearance in association with a haemorrhage. Removal of the kidney cannot be avoided in view of the absence of any plane of cleavage with the suprarenal when the suprarenal tumour is removed.

  9. Cavitating lung lesion as a manifestation of inflammatory tumor (pseudotumor) of the lung: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Michaelides, Stylianos A.; Passalidou, Elisabeth; Bablekos, George D.; Aza, Evlambia; Goulas, George; Chorti, Maria; Nicolaou, Irene N.; Lioulias, Achilleas G.

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Female, 60 Final Diagnosis: Inflammatory pseudotumor of the lung Symptoms: Cough dry • fever Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: — Objective: Rare disease Background: Inflammatory pseudotumor of the lung involves a benign, non-neoplastic lung lesion of unknown etiology. Case Report: We present a case of a 60-year-old female smoker who had been under intermittent immunosuppressive medication for discoid lupus, who was admitted to hospital with fever of 39.5°C of 10-day duration, not responding to an oral cephalosporin. Chest CT examination showed a cavitating opacity in the upper zone of the left lung. It was not feasible to establish a diagnosis based on clinical and laboratory testing nor based on CT scanning and bronchoscopy. Thus, the patient underwent left thoracotomy and sphenoid resection of the lesion, which was sent for biopsy. The histopathologic features aided by immunohistochemical staining proved the lesion to be an inflammatory pseudotumor of the lung. Conclusions: The case is reported because of the extremely rare radiologic presentation of the development of a lung pseudotumor emerging as a cavitated lesion, which relapsed during the follow-up period while the patient was still under immunosuppressive medication. PMID:24971159

  10. Granulomatosis with polyangiitis presenting as an orbital inflammatory pseudotumor: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Granulomatosis with polyangiitis is a systemic inflammatory disease that often presents with necrosis, granuloma formation and vasculitis of small- to medium-sized vessels. Affected patients usually present with disease of the upper respiratory tract, lungs and kidneys, but this disease has been reported to involve almost any organ. We report the case of a patient with ocular manifestations of granulomatosis with polyangiitis after the remission of renal and auditory manifestations. Case presentation An 81-year-old Japanese woman had a four-year history of biopsy-proven antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-related glomerulonephritis that had been treated with oral prednisolone and was in serological remission. She had also recovered from a one-year history of complete hearing loss immediately following the steroid treatment for glomerulonephritis. She gradually experienced right eye visual disturbance and exophthalmos over a two-month period. Radiographic and histopathological findings revealed an orbital inflammatory pseudotumor. The administration of prednisolone completely restored her right eye visual acuity and eye movement after two weeks. Considering this case retrospectively, our patient had an orbital inflammatory pseudotumor caused by granulomatosis with polyangiitis including a medical history of reversible hearing loss, although her glomerulonephritis had remitted with an undetectable level of specific antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody. Conclusions In this patient, hearing loss and visual loss occurred at different times during the course of treatment of granulomatosis with polyangiitis. Clinicians should consider a differential diagnosis of granulomatosis with polyangiitis in patients with treatable hearing and visual loss. PMID:23617946

  11. Formation of a pseudotumor in total hip arthroplasty using a tribological metal-polyethylene pair.

    PubMed

    Fagotti, Lorenzo; Vicente, José Ricardo Negreiros; Miyahara, Helder Souza; de Oliveira, Pedro Vitoriano; Bernabé, Antônio Carlos; Croci, Alberto Tesconi

    2015-01-01

    The aim here was to report a case of a young adult patient who evolved with tumor formation in the left thigh, 14 years after revision surgery on hip arthroplasty. Davies in 2005 made the first description of this disease in patients undergoing metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty. Over the last decade, however, pseudotumors around metal-on-polyethylene surfaces have become more prevalent. Our patient presented with increased volume of the left thigh 8 years after hip arthroplasty revision surgery. Two years before the arising of the tumor in the thigh, a nodule in the inguinal region was investigated to rule out a malignant neoplastic process, but the results were inconclusive. The main preoperative complaints were pain, functional limitation and marked reduction in the range of motion of the left hip. Plain radiographs showed loosening of acetabular and femoral, and a large mass between the muscle planes was revealed through magnetic resonance imaging of the left thigh. The surgical procedure consisted of resection of the lesion and removal of the components through lateral approach. In respect of total hip arthroplasty, pseudotumors are benign neoplasms in which the bearing surface consists of metal-on-metal, but they can also occur in different tribological pairs, as presented in this case.

  12. Open-ring enhancement in pseudotumoral multiple sclerosis: important radiological aspect.

    PubMed

    de Medeiros, Frederico Carvalho; de Albuquerque, Lucas Alverne Freitas; Pittella, Jose Eymard Homem; de Souza, Renata Brant; Gomes Neto, Antonio Pereira; Christo, Paulo Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Observation of open-ring enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered a specificity marker for diagnosing pseudotumoral multiple sclerosis (MS). This finding is of great value in the differential diagnosis of tumefactive lesions. Case Report. We describe a 55-year-old white woman, with previous history of ovarian cancer and recent history of fatigue and bilateral retroorbital pain. Important bilateral visual impairment evolved over one month. Physical examination detected the presence of right homonymous hemianopia. Cranial MRI showed an expanding lesion with open-ring enhancement. Given the range of diagnostic possibilities, a stereotactic biopsy was performed, and histopathological examination was consistent with an active demyelinating disease. The patient was treated with 1 g of methylprednisolone and symptoms improved following a significant reduction in the lesion. Conclusions. We highlight the MRI results suggestive of pseudotumoral MS, especially open-ring enhancement, which is an important radiologic aspect to diagnosis and can assist in avoiding unnecessary biopsies. PMID:24839572

  13. Formation of a pseudotumor in total hip arthroplasty using a tribological metal–polyethylene pair☆

    PubMed Central

    Fagotti, Lorenzo; Vicente, José Ricardo Negreiros; Miyahara, Helder Souza; de Oliveira, Pedro Vitoriano; Bernabé, Antônio Carlos; Croci, Alberto Tesconi

    2015-01-01

    The aim here was to report a case of a young adult patient who evolved with tumor formation in the left thigh, 14 years after revision surgery on hip arthroplasty. Davies in 2005 made the first description of this disease in patients undergoing metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty. Over the last decade, however, pseudotumors around metal-on-polyethylene surfaces have become more prevalent. Our patient presented with increased volume of the left thigh 8 years after hip arthroplasty revision surgery. Two years before the arising of the tumor in the thigh, a nodule in the inguinal region was investigated to rule out a malignant neoplastic process, but the results were inconclusive. The main preoperative complaints were pain, functional limitation and marked reduction in the range of motion of the left hip. Plain radiographs showed loosening of acetabular and femoral, and a large mass between the muscle planes was revealed through magnetic resonance imaging of the left thigh. The surgical procedure consisted of resection of the lesion and removal of the components through lateral approach. In respect of total hip arthroplasty, pseudotumors are benign neoplasms in which the bearing surface consists of metal-on-metal, but they can also occur in different tribological pairs, as presented in this case. PMID:27218090

  14. [Pancreatic ultrasonography].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Rodríguez, T; Segura-Grau, A; Rodríguez-Lorenzo, A; Segura-Cabral, J M

    2015-04-01

    Despite the recent technological advances in imaging, abdominal ultrasonography continues to be the first diagnostic test indicated in patients with a suspicion of pancreatic disease, due to its safety, accessibility and low cost. It is an essential technique in the study of inflammatory processes, since it not only assesses changes in pancreatic parenchyma, but also gives an indication of the origin (bile or alcoholic). It is also essential in the detection and tracing of possible complications as well as being used as a guide in diagnostic and therapeutic punctures. It is also the first technique used in the study of pancreatic tumors, detecting them with a sensitivity of around 70% and a specificity of 90%.

  15. [Pancreatic pseudocysts].

    PubMed

    Stăncescu, M; Ciurea, S

    1989-01-01

    Clinical, evolutive and therapeutical aspects were studied, of 66 cases of patients with pancreatic pseudocysts hospitalized in the clinic over a period of 27 years. Particular modalities of onset were, those of patients with duodenal stenosis, mechanical jaundice, ascites and pleurisy, those in whom symptomatology suggested kidney or cholecystic disease. The intraoperative diagnosis raises the problem of differentiating a retroperitoneal tumor, identifying the possible association with a pancreatic cancer, and the condition when the pseudocysts are found at a certain distance from the pancreas itself. The therapeutical methods are codified, but recidives are possible. Cholecystectomy removes the biliary cause of pancreatitis which can determine the development of pseudocysts. The death rate of these cases was 6.3%.

  16. Computed Tomography of Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Furlow, Bryant

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic disease often is asymptomatic until tissue damage and complications occur or until malignancies have reached advanced stages and have metastasized. Contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography plays a central role in diagnosing, staging, and treatment planning for pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. This article introduces the functional anatomy of the pancreas and common bile duct and the epidemiology, pathobiology, and computed tomography imaging of pancreatitis, calculi, and pancreatic cancer.

  17. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3

    MedlinePlus

    ... historical Searches are case-insensitive Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3 Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 720x576 ... Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3 Description: Stage III pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer ...

  18. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy during pancreatic insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Berry, Amy J

    2014-06-01

    Pancreatic stimulation and therefore digestion is a tightly controlled and hormonally mediated process. Any alterations affecting any of the systematic steps for successful digestion and absorption to occur will impair appropriate pancreatic enzymatic secretion, entry into the bowel lumen, functionality once inside the lumen, and thus appropriate mixing with foods and nutrients. Many causes of pancreatic insufficiency may require the initiation of pancreatic enzyme therapy, including but not limited to cystic fibrosis, pancreatic cancer, acute and chronic pancreatitis, and pancreatic surgery. This purpose of this article is to help clarify the conditions that cause pancreatic insufficiency, how to determine if the patient is malabsorbing, and the best use of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy for treatment in these conditions. The first step in determining if pancreatic enzyme therapy is appropriate is to determine if the patient is malabsorbing specifically due to pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. An overview of the methods used to determine pancreatic insufficiency is provided, as well as appropriate treatment methods. Recent Food and Drug Administration regulations require a more thorough process, including randomized controlled trials to prove the safety and efficacy of pancreatic enzymes, to approve them for use. The studies used to verify efficacy also are examined. Last, dosing guidelines and some unconventional ways to administer pancreatic enzymes, such as during enteral feedings, are reviewed.

  19. Lumboatrial shunt in a patient with Crouzon syndrome complicated by pseudotumor cerebri.

    PubMed

    Sankey, Eric W; Khattab, Mohamed H; Elder, Benjamin D; Goodwin, C Rory; Rekate, Harold L; Rigamonti, Daniele

    2015-09-01

    A 25-year-old man with Crouzon syndrome complicated by pseudotumor cerebri and multiple shunt failures presented with progressive back and neck pain, intermittent headaches, and associated vomiting secondary to shunt infection. Due to his previous history of repeated failure of both ventriculoperitoneal and lumboperitoneal (LP) shunting procedures, the decision was made to place a lumboatrial (LA) shunt via an approach through the internal jugular vein. The procedure was uncomplicated and the man's symptoms were relieved. Despite significant improvement, the LA shunt limited his exercise tolerance, and as an avid runner and weight lifter, he requested reconversion back to an LP shunt. At a follow-up of 20months, he continued to do well both clinically and radiographically. This case report summarizes the successful placement and use of an LA shunt for the treatment of intracranial hypertension in the setting of Crouzon syndrome. PMID:26021731

  20. A Supraglottic Pseudotumor in an Immunocompromised Patient with Nephrotic Syndrome, Herpes Zoster, and a Cytomegalovirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Tetsu; Yamazaki, Tomoyuki; Saito, Osamu; Muto, Shigeaki; Kusano, Eiji; Nagata, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Several viral infections may occasionally induce supraglottic mass lesions, resulting in an obstructive airway emergency. We herein report one such case in a 63-year-old male immunocompromised patient with nephrotic syndrome due to membranous nephropathy who also had ophthalmic herpes zoster with a laryngeal mass, which required urgent intubation and mechanical ventilation. The patient was initially treated with acyclovir; however, because a serological analysis revealed a concurrent cytomegalovirus infection, we discontinued the administration of acyclovir and gave priority to the simultaneous treatment of the cytomegalovirus and varicella-zoster virus infections with ganciclovir. The clinical course was favorable, and he was weaned from the ventilator 10 days later when a serial imaging analysis revealed no signs of the supraglottic mass, leading us to conclude that these two viral infections could have additively or synergistically contributed to the development of the local pseudotumor. The diagnostic and therapeutic concerns arising in the current case are also discussed. PMID:27547043

  1. A Supraglottic Pseudotumor in an Immunocompromised Patient with Nephrotic Syndrome, Herpes Zoster, and a Cytomegalovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Akimoto, Tetsu; Yamazaki, Tomoyuki; Saito, Osamu; Muto, Shigeaki; Kusano, Eiji; Nagata, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Several viral infections may occasionally induce supraglottic mass lesions, resulting in an obstructive airway emergency. We herein report one such case in a 63-year-old male immunocompromised patient with nephrotic syndrome due to membranous nephropathy who also had ophthalmic herpes zoster with a laryngeal mass, which required urgent intubation and mechanical ventilation. The patient was initially treated with acyclovir; however, because a serological analysis revealed a concurrent cytomegalovirus infection, we discontinued the administration of acyclovir and gave priority to the simultaneous treatment of the cytomegalovirus and varicella-zoster virus infections with ganciclovir. The clinical course was favorable, and he was weaned from the ventilator 10 days later when a serial imaging analysis revealed no signs of the supraglottic mass, leading us to conclude that these two viral infections could have additively or synergistically contributed to the development of the local pseudotumor. The diagnostic and therapeutic concerns arising in the current case are also discussed. PMID:27547043

  2. Autoimmune pancreatitis can develop into chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been recognized as a distinct type of pancreatitis that is possibly caused by autoimmune mechanisms. AIP is characterized by high serum IgG4 and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in affected pancreatic tissue. Acute phase AIP responds favorably to corticosteroid therapy and results in the amelioration of clinical findings. However, the long-term prognosis and outcome of AIP remain unclear. We have proposed a working hypothesis that AIP can develop into ordinary chronic pancreatitis resembling alcoholic pancreatitis over a long-term course based on several clinical findings, most notably frequent pancreatic stone formation. In this review article, we describe a series of study results to confirm our hypothesis and clarify that: 1) pancreatic calcification in AIP is closely associated with disease recurrence; 2) advanced stage AIP might have earlier been included in ordinary chronic pancreatitis; 3) approximately 40% of AIP patients experience pancreatic stone formation over a long-term course, for which a primary risk factor is narrowing of both Wirsung’s and Santorini’s ducts; and 4) nearly 20% of AIP patients progress to confirmed chronic pancreatitis according to the revised Japanese Clinical Diagnostic Criteria, with independent risk factors being pancreatic head swelling and non-narrowing of the pancreatic body duct. PMID:24884922

  3. The Epidemiology of Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Dhiraj; Lowenfels, Albert B.

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the most frequent gastrointestinal causes for hospital admission in the US. Chronic pancreatitis, although lower in incidence, significantly reduces patients’ quality of life. Pancreatic cancer has high mortality and is 1 of the top 5 causes of death from cancer. The burden of pancreatic disorders is expected to increase over time. The risk and etiology of pancreatitis differ with age and sex, and all pancreatic disorders affect Blacks more than any other race. Gallstones are the most common cause of acute pancreatitis, and early cholecystectomy eliminates the risk of future attacks. Alcohol continues to be the single most important risk factor for chronic pancreatitis. Smoking is an independent risk factor for acute and chronic pancreatitis, and its effects could synergize with those of alcohol. Significant risk factors for pancreatic cancer include smoking and non-O blood groups. Alcohol abstinence and smoking cessation can alter progression of pancreatitis and reduce recurrence; smoking cessation is the most effective strategy to reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer. PMID:23622135

  4. [Pulmonar pseudotumor in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA). Pulmonary cancer and/or GPA? Diagnostic implications of pulmonary nodules].

    PubMed

    Horta-Baas, Gabriel; Meza-Zempoaltecatl, Esteban; Pérez-Cristóbal, Mario; Barile-Fabris, Leonor Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), formerly known as Wegener's granulomatosis, is a systemic necrotizing vasculitis, which affects small and medium sized blood vessels and is often associated with cytoplasmic anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA). Inflammatory pseudotumor is a rare condition characterized by the appearance of a mass lesion that mimics a malignant tumor both clinically and on imaging studies, but that is thought to have an inflammatory/reactive pathogenesis. We report a patient with a GPA which was originally diagnosed as malignancy.

  5. Radiographic and computed tomographic demonstration of pseudotumor cerebri due to rapid weight gain in a child with pelvic rhabdomyosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Berdon, W.E.; Barker, D.H.; Barash, F.S.

    1982-06-01

    Rapid weight gain in a malnourished child can be associated with suture diastasis in the pattern of pseudotumor cerebri; this has been previously reported in deprivational dwarfism and cystic fibrosis. In a child with pelvic rhabdomyosarcoma, skull radiographs and cranial computed tomographic (CT) scans were available prior to a period of rapid weight gain induced by hyperalimentation. Suture diastasis developed and repeat CT scans showed this to be accompanied by smaller ventricles.

  6. Clinicoradiological appraisal of ‘paraduodenal pancreatitis’: Pancreatitis outside the pancreas!

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Ankur; Rajesh, S; Mukund, Amar; Patidar, Yashwant; Thapar, Shalini; Arora, Asit; Bhatia, Vikram

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Paraduodenal pancreatitis (PP) is a unique form of focal chronic pancreatitis that selectively involves the duodenum and aberrant pancreatic tissue located near the minor papilla (beyond the pancreas proper). The pseudotumoral nature of the disease often generates considerable clinical quandary and patient apprehension, and therefore merits a better understanding. The present study appraises the clinicoradiological manifestations of PP in 33 patients. Materials and Methods: Clinical, laboratory, and radiological manifestations of 33 patients of PP treated in gastroenterology/hepatology and hepato-pancreatico-biliary surgery units during June 2010-August 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Results: All patients were young to middle-aged men (100%) with history of alcohol abuse (93.9%) and/or smoking (42.4%), who presented either with acute or gradually worsening abdominal pain (90.9%). Pancreatic enzymes and serum tumor markers remained normal or were mildly/transiently elevated. Cystic variant was detected in 57.6% (solid in 42.4%); the disease remained confined to the groove/duodenum (pure form) in 45.4%. Medial duodenal wall thickening with increased enhancement was seen in 87.87 and 81.81%, respectively, and duodenal/paraduodenal cysts were seen in 78.78%. Pancreatic calcifications and biliary stricture were seen 27.3% patients. Peripancreatic arteries were neither infiltrated nor encased. Conclusion: PP has a discrete predilection for middle-aged men with history of longstanding alcohol abuse and/or smoking. Distinguishing imaging findings include thickening of the pancreatic side of duodenum exhibiting increased enhancement with intramural/paraduodenal cysts. This may be accompanied by plate-like scar tissue in the groove region, which may simulate groove pancreatic carcinoma. However, as opposed to carcinoma, the peripancreatic arteries are neither infiltrated nor encased, rather are medially displaced. PMID:26288527

  7. Combined Vascular and Orthopaedic Approach for a Pseudotumor Causing Deep Vein Thrombosis after Metal-on-Metal Hip Resurfacing Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Hamid, Hossam; Miles, Jonathan; Carrington, Richard W. J.; Hart, Alister; Loh, Alex; Skinner, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Metal-on-metal (MoM) hip resurfacings have been associated with a variety of complications resulting from adverse reaction to metal debris. Pseudotumors have rarely been reported to cause deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Study Design. A case report and a review of the literature. Case Presentation. A 75-year-old female who had left metal-on-metal hip resurfacing 6 years ago presented with left groin pain associated with unilateral lower limb edema and swelling. By duplex and MRI studies, our patient had an extensive soft tissue necrosis associated with a large pelvic mass causing extensive DVT of the lower limb secondary to mechanical compression of the left iliac vein. Results. Our case was initially treated for DVT followed by dual surgical approach. The pseudotumor was excised through a separate iliofemoral approach and revision of the hip implant was undertaken through a posterior approach in the same setting. An inferior vena cava (IVC) filter was inserted to minimise the perioperative risks of handling the iliac veins. Conclusion. A combined approach with vascular surgeons is required. Combined resection of the pseudotumor and revision of the metal bearing surfaces is essential, in order to achieve a good surgical outcome in this rare complication. PMID:26457216

  8. Calcifying fibrous pseudotumor of pleura. A report of three cases of a newly described entity involving the pleura.

    PubMed

    Pinkard, N B; Wilson, R W; Lawless, N; Dodd, L G; McAdams, H P; Koss, M N; Travis, W D

    1996-02-01

    A newly recognized distinctive fibrous soft tissue lesion called "calcifying fibrous pseudotumor" (CFPT) was recently described in the soft tissues of the extremities, trunk, scrotum, groin, neck, or axilla. To date, CFPT has not been described in the pleura. The authors reviewed the clinical, radiologic, and pathologic features of three cases. A 23-year old woman and 34-year old man who presented with chest pain, and a 28-year old woman without chest symptoms were found to have a pleural mass on chest radiographs. Computed tomography (CT) scans of each patient revealed pleural-based nodular masses with central areas of increased attenuation due to calcifications. Each lesions consisted of circumscribed, but unencapsulated masses of hyalinized collagenous fibrotic tissue interspersed with lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates and calcifications, many of which had psammomatous features. The lesions were limited to the pleura and did not involve the underlying lung parenchyma. Electron microscopy in one case showed fibroblasts scattered in dense collagenous tissue. Calcifying fibrous pseudotumor is distinct from other pleural lesions such as fibrous tumor of pleura, calcified granulomas, calcified pleural plaques, and chronic fibrous pleuritis as well as intrapulmonary lesions such as hyalinizing granuloma, inflammatory pseudotumor, and amyloid. As in the soft tissues, local excision appears adequate therapy for CFPT of the pleura. If these lesions behave in a similar fashion to CFPT of soft tissues, one might expect a low frequency of local recurrence. PMID:8607443

  9. Orbital pseudotumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2013 ed. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2013:vol 2, chap 14. Karesh JW, On AV, Hirschbein MJ. ... 2013 ed. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2013:vol 2, chap 35. Yanoff M, Cameron D. Diseases of ...

  10. Pancreatic panniculitis associated with pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guannan; Cao, Zhe; Yang, Gang; Wu, Wenming; Zhang, Taiping; Zhao, Yupei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Pancreatic panniculitis is a very rare complication of pancreatic cancer, most often accompanying rare acinar cell carcinoma. We herein report a case of pancreatic panniculitis that was associated with pancreatic mucinous adenocarcinoma. Patient information: A 57-year-old male was referred to our hospital for weight loss. A physical examination revealed subcutaneous nodules on his lower extremities. The blood test showed abnormal increases in amylase, lipase, and carbohydrate antigen 19–9 levels. A computed tomography scan detected a hypodense 2 × 1.5 cm solid mass with an unclear margin in the head of the pancreas. The biopsy of subcutaneous nodules on the lower extremities was conducted and revealed lobular panniculitis. Pancreatic cancer and pancreatic panniculitis were strongly suspected. After the administration of octreotide acetate and the Whipple procedure, the serous amylase and lipase levels returned to normal, and the pancreatic panniculitis had almost resolved by 4 weeks later. Conclusion: Pancreatic panniculitis is a rare complication of pancreatic cancer. However, in the presence of a pancreatic mass, as in this case, clinicians should be aware that panniculitis may be the sentinel of pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:27495045

  11. Imaging of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Thoeni, Ruedi F

    2015-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammation of the pancreas. Several classification systems have been used in the past but were considered unsatisfactory. A revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis was published that assessed the clinical course and severity of disease; divided acute pancreatitis into interstitial edematous pancreatitis and necrotizing pancreatitis; discerned an early phase (first week) from a late phase (after the first week); and focused on systemic inflammatory response syndrome and organ failure. This article focuses on the revised classification of acute pancreatitis, with emphasis on imaging features, particularly on newly-termed fluid collections and implications for the radiologist.

  12. Small-intestine pneumocystis jiroveci pseudotumor as an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-presenting illness: report of a case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yi; Shetty, Jayarama; Pins, Michael R

    2012-09-01

    A Pneumocystis jiroveci infection-associated mass clinically mimicking a malignancy (ie, pseudotumor) is rare and usually occurs in the lung in association with Pneumocystis pneumonia. Pneumocystis jiroveci pseudotumors of the small intestine are extremely rare and represent an unusual form of disseminated P jiroveci infection. We present a case of small-intestine P jiroveci pseudotumor as an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-presenting illness in a patient with coinfection with cytomegalovirus, no pulmonary symptoms, and no known risk factors for human immunodeficiency virus infection. This case reinforces the potential importance of cytomegalovirus coinfection in the disseminated form of Pneumocystis infection and illustrates the importance of an expanded differential diagnosis when confronted with a clinically atypical mass lesion.

  13. Pancreatic-pleural fistula in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Elkaoui, Hakim; Atoini, Fouad; Bouchentouf, Sidi Mohamed; El Omari, Fatima; Mahi, Mohamed; Ait Ali, Abdelmounaim; Bounaim, Ahmed; Sair, Khalid; Zentar, Aziz

    2012-03-01

    Pancreatic-pleural fistula is a rare condition and few data related to its diagnosis and treatment are available. A fistulous connection linking the pancreas with the pleura via the diaphragm or mediastinum through the retroperitoneal area is formed. We report on a case with pancreatic-pleural fistula at its early stages in an alcoholic male patient aged 45 years with known chronic pancreatitis. The operation by Roux-en-Y jejuno-pseudocystostomy was followed by chest tube drainage. PMID:22560825

  14. Spontaneous regression of hepatic inflammatory pseudotumor with primary biliary cirrhosis: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Koide, Hiroshi; Sato, Ken; Fukusato, Toshio; Kashiwabara, Kenji; Sunaga, Noriaki; Tsuchiya, Takafumi; Morino, Saeko; Sohara, Naondo; Kakizaki, Satoru; Takagi, Hitoshi; Mori, Masatomo

    2006-01-01

    Hepatic inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT) is a rare benign non-neoplastic lesion characterized by proliferating fibrous tissue infiltrated by inflammatory cells. The exact etiology of IPT remains unclear. Although the association of IPT with systemic inflammatory disorders has been well established, a specific relationship with cholangitis is distinctly rare. We report a case of spontaneous regression of hepatic IPT with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). To date, only two cases of IPT with PBC have been reported. In our case, however, IPT developed during the course of improvement of cholangitis of PBC induced by effective treatment, differing from two previously reported cases. Our case indicates that the development of IPT does not also relate to the activity of cholangitis and/or hyper gamma-globulinemia, since our case was confirmed radiologically to be free of IPT when biliary enzymes and immunoglobulins were much higher than the corresponding values on admission. Comparison of our case with the two previously reported cases suggests that IPT occurring with PBC does not represent the same disease entity or be a bystander for PBC. PMID:16570364

  15. Mid common bile duct inflammatory pseudotumor mimicking cholangiocarcinoma. A case report and literature review☆

    PubMed Central

    Vasiliadis, K.; Fortounis, K.; Papavasiliou, C.; Kokarhidas, A.; Al Nimer, A.; Fachiridis, D.; Pervana, S.; Makridis, C.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Biliary inflammatory pseudotumors (IPTs) represent an exceptional benign cause of obstructive jaundice. These lesions are often mistaken for cholangiocarcinomas and are treated with major resections, because their final diagnosis can be achieved only after formal pathological examination of the resected specimen. Consequently, biliary IPTs are usually managed with unnecessary major resections. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 71-year-old female patient underwent an extra-hepatic bile duct resection en-bloc with the gallbladder and regional lymph nodes for an obstructing intraluminal growing tumor of the mid common bile duct (CBD). Limited resection was decided intraoperatively because of negative for malignancy fast frozen sections analysis in addition to the benign macroscopic features of the lesion. Histologically the tumor proved an IPT, arising from the bile duct epithelium, composed of inflammatory cells and reactive mesenchymal tissues. DISCUSSION The present case underlines the value of intraoperative reassessment of patients undergoing surgical resection for histopathologically undiagnosed biliary occupying lesions, in order to optimize their surgical management. CONCLUSION The probability of benign lesions mimicking cholangiocarcinoma should always be considered to avoid unnecessary major surgical resections, especially in fragile and/or elderly patients. PMID:24394855

  16. Inflammatory pseudotumor containing necrotizing granulomatous lesions of kidney: a hitherto undescribed entity.

    PubMed

    Terada, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    Herein reported is a case of inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT) of kidney. It is not described in WHO, AFIP, and other books. A review of the literature revealed about 35 cases. A 76-year-old man underwent nephrectomy under clinical diagnosis of renal pelvic carcinoma. Grossly, a solid tumor was seen in renal parenchyma. Microscopically, it was composed of spindle cell tissue with inflammation and many necrotizing granulomas. Epithelioid histiocytes were abundant but giant cells were few. Lymphocytes and plasma cells were also seen. The features suggested tuberculosis (TB), but Ziehl-Neelsen stains and PCR revealed no TB bacillus. Immunohistochemistry showed that the tumor spindle cells were positive for vimentin, CD68, CD45, and Ki-67 (labeling = 18%), α-smooth muscle antigen, and NSE. Focal staining of KIT (mast cells), S100 protein (Langerhans cells), and CD10 (spindle cells) was present. IgG4 was negative. The tumor spindle cells were negative for other antigens examined. PMID:25379319

  17. Pancreatic blood flow in experimental acute pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, A.R.; Millar, A.M.; Taylor, T.V.

    1982-05-01

    The etiology and pathogenesis of acute necrotizing hemorrhagic pancreatitis remain controversial. Recent work has suggested that an early fall in pancreatic blood flow, causing ischemia, may be the initiating factor. Using an established rat model of hemorrhagic pancreatitis and the fractional indicator distribution technique with /sup 86/RbCl, pancreatic blood flow and tissue perfusion have been measured at various times in the condition. Six groups of ten rats were studied: control sham operation and pancreatitis groups were sacrificed at 1, 6, and 24 hr. Pancreatic blood flow (% of cardiac output) and perfusion (blood flow/g tissue) were measured. Blood flow was increased by a maximum of 53% at 1 hr (P less than 0.001) and remained elevated for 24 hr, and perfusion was increased by a maximum of 70% (P less than 0.001) at 1 hr and remained elevated at 6 hr. Pancreatic perfusion declines after 6 hr due to increasing gland edema. The results demonstrate a significant increase in pancreatic blood flow and perfusion in experimentally induced acute pancreatitis, suggesting a primary inflammatory response, and refute the ischemic etiological theory.

  18. Pancreatitis - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... common bile duct and block the flow of pancreatic enzymes out of the pancreas into the intestine. Pancreatitis ... three to five days, to prevent secretion of enzymes by the pancreas. He will also receive pain medication to control ...

  19. Preoperative Folfirinox for Resectable Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma - A Phase II Study

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-16

    Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Poorly Differentiated Malignant Neoplasm; Resectable Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Undifferentiated Pancreatic Carcinoma

  20. [Pulmonar pseudotumor in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA). Pulmonary cancer and/or GPA? Diagnostic implications of pulmonary nodules].

    PubMed

    Horta-Baas, Gabriel; Meza-Zempoaltecatl, Esteban; Pérez-Cristóbal, Mario; Barile-Fabris, Leonor Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), formerly known as Wegener's granulomatosis, is a systemic necrotizing vasculitis, which affects small and medium sized blood vessels and is often associated with cytoplasmic anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA). Inflammatory pseudotumor is a rare condition characterized by the appearance of a mass lesion that mimics a malignant tumor both clinically and on imaging studies, but that is thought to have an inflammatory/reactive pathogenesis. We report a patient with a GPA which was originally diagnosed as malignancy. PMID:27595257

  1. Pancreatic Cancer Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Amundadottir, Laufey T.

    2016-01-01

    Although relatively rare, pancreatic tumors are highly lethal [1]. In the United States, an estimated 48,960 individuals will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and 40,560 will die from this disease in 2015 [1]. Globally, 337,872 new pancreatic cancer cases and 330,391 deaths were estimated in 2012 [2]. In contrast to most other cancers, mortality rates for pancreatic cancer are not improving; in the US, it is predicted to become the second leading cause of cancer related deaths by 2030 [3, 4]. The vast majority of tumors arise in the exocrine pancreas, with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) accounting for approximately 95% of tumors. Tumors arising in the endocrine pancreas (pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors) represent less than 5% of all pancreatic tumors [5]. Smoking, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), obesity and pancreatitis are the most consistent epidemiological risk factors for pancreatic cancer [5]. Family history is also a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer with odds ratios (OR) ranging from 1.7-2.3 for first-degree relatives in most studies, indicating that shared genetic factors may play a role in the etiology of this disease [6-9]. This review summarizes the current knowledge of germline pancreatic cancer risk variants with a special emphasis on common susceptibility alleles identified through Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS). PMID:26929738

  2. Pancreatitis in children.

    PubMed

    Winchester, M

    1992-12-01

    The pathophysiology of pancreatic autodigestion is poorly understood. Pancreatitis affects all age groups, and the diagnosis is sometimes missed when serum amylase and lipase activities are not measured in the child with abdominal pain. Acute pancreatitis in children has become a more commonly seen condition and the causes have varied. Laboratory and radiological studies play an important role in determining the diagnosis and prognosis. Family history is important in the diagnosis of idiopathic hereditary pancreatitis. Most acute episodes resolve with supportive care, but the mortality in acute pancreatitis is currently about 15% (Hadorn et al., 1980). Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography or an endoscopic retrograde pancreatogram may be necessary to investigate relapses of pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis can be a life-threatening condition requiring lifetime medical management.

  3. Orbital Pseudotumor as a Rare Extrahepatic Manifestation of Hepatitis C Infection.

    PubMed

    Misselwitz, Benjamin; Epprecht, Jana; Mertens, Joachim; Biedermann, Luc; Scharl, Michael; Haralambieva, Eugenia; Lutterotti, Andreas; Weber, Konrad P; Müllhaupt, Beat; Chaloupka, Karla

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C is frequently accompanied by immune-related extrahepatic manifestations affecting the skin, kidneys, central and peripheral nervous system and exocrine glands. We present the case of a 40-year-old man with left-sided ptosis, exophthalmos and headache. MRI demonstrated left-sided orbital pseudotumor with lacrimal and retro-orbital contrast enhancement extending to the cavernous sinus and the vestibulocochlear nerve. Immunological tests of serum and cerebrospinal fluid identified hepatitis C virus (HCV) as a potential causative agent but did not indicate any additional infectious, malignant or immunological disorder. Hepatological evaluation revealed no signs of advanced liver disease. After initial spontaneous improvement, the patient subsequently developed vestibulocochlear failure with gait disorder, tinnitus and transient left-parietal sensory loss. Lacrimal biopsy demonstrated lymphocytic infiltrate, prompting steroid treatment. After initial improvement, steroids could not be tapered below 40 mg daily for several months due to recurrent symptoms. Twelve months after the initial presentation, the patient's chronic HCV infection was successfully treated with sofosbuvir, simeprevir and ribavirin and he remains now free of symptoms without steroids. In patients with chronic hepatitis C, lymphocytic infiltrate of the salivary and lacrimal glands is a frequent phenomenon. However, the extent of the lymphocytic infiltrate beyond the lacrimal gland to the tip of the orbit, cavernous sinus and vestibulocochlear nerve as in our patient is highly unusual. For all symptomatic extrahepatic manifestations of hepatitis C infection, treatment of HCV as the underlying immune stimulus is recommended, and it helped to control the symptoms in our patient. In addition, long-term follow-up for recurrent lymphocyte infiltrate and development of lymphoma is warranted. PMID:27403111

  4. Tenosynovitis with psammomatous calcification: a poorly recognized pseudotumor related to repetitive tendinous injury.

    PubMed

    Shon, Wonwoo; Folpe, Andrew L

    2010-06-01

    Tenosynovitis with psammomatous calcification, described in 1983 by Gravanis and Gaffney, is a distinctive clinicopathologic variant of "idiopathic calcifying tenosynovitis" or "calcific tendonitis." However, tenosynovitis with psammomatous calcification is poorly recognized by pathologists and for this reason has not been adopted widely as a distinct entity. We present the clinicopathologic features of 6 cases of tenosynovitis with psammomatous calcification. Cases involved the tendons, peritendinous soft tissues, and adjacent synovium of the distal extremities (3 fingers, 2 feet, and 1 carpal tendon) of women who ranged in age from 16 to 83 years (mean 48 y). The lesions presented a painful mass. A history of occupational or sports-related repetitive motion and/or persistent mild trauma was noted in all patients. No patient had a history of hyperphosphatemia. All lesions were treated by surgical excision and described clinically as variably cystic nodules composed of amorphous "cheese-like" debris. Histologically, the lesions were centered in the tendon or peritendinous soft tissue and composed of a mixed (myo) fibroblastic and histiocytic proliferation in association with a degenerating tendinous tissue, which was undergoing dystrophic calcification, with the formation of distinctive psammoma body-like spheroidal bodies. The clinical and morphologic characteristics of tenosynovitis with psammomatous calcification (distal location, absent hyperphosphatemia, and psammomatous calcifications) differ from those of typical idiopathic calcifying tenosynovitis/calcific tendinitis (proximal location and dystrophic tendinous calcification) and tumoral calcinosis (hyperphosphatemia and amorphous soft tissue calcification), and it should be recognized as a distinct clinicopathologic entity. Improved recognition of these unique features by pathologists should allow ready diagnosis of this unusual pseudotumor in most instances.

  5. Orbital Pseudotumor as a Rare Extrahepatic Manifestation of Hepatitis C Infection

    PubMed Central

    Misselwitz, Benjamin; Epprecht, Jana; Mertens, Joachim; Biedermann, Luc; Scharl, Michael; Haralambieva, Eugenia; Lutterotti, Andreas; Weber, Konrad P.; Müllhaupt, Beat; Chaloupka, Karla

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C is frequently accompanied by immune-related extrahepatic manifestations affecting the skin, kidneys, central and peripheral nervous system and exocrine glands. We present the case of a 40-year-old man with left-sided ptosis, exophthalmos and headache. MRI demonstrated left-sided orbital pseudotumor with lacrimal and retro-orbital contrast enhancement extending to the cavernous sinus and the vestibulocochlear nerve. Immunological tests of serum and cerebrospinal fluid identified hepatitis C virus (HCV) as a potential causative agent but did not indicate any additional infectious, malignant or immunological disorder. Hepatological evaluation revealed no signs of advanced liver disease. After initial spontaneous improvement, the patient subsequently developed vestibulocochlear failure with gait disorder, tinnitus and transient left-parietal sensory loss. Lacrimal biopsy demonstrated lymphocytic infiltrate, prompting steroid treatment. After initial improvement, steroids could not be tapered below 40 mg daily for several months due to recurrent symptoms. Twelve months after the initial presentation, the patient's chronic HCV infection was successfully treated with sofosbuvir, simeprevir and ribavirin and he remains now free of symptoms without steroids. In patients with chronic hepatitis C, lymphocytic infiltrate of the salivary and lacrimal glands is a frequent phenomenon. However, the extent of the lymphocytic infiltrate beyond the lacrimal gland to the tip of the orbit, cavernous sinus and vestibulocochlear nerve as in our patient is highly unusual. For all symptomatic extrahepatic manifestations of hepatitis C infection, treatment of HCV as the underlying immune stimulus is recommended, and it helped to control the symptoms in our patient. In addition, long-term follow-up for recurrent lymphocyte infiltrate and development of lymphoma is warranted. PMID:27403111

  6. Clinicopathologic characteristics of inflammatory pseudotumor-like follicular dendritic cell sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Rong; Liu, Chuangfeng; Yin, Xiangang; Chen, Jinping; Zhou, Xincheng; Huang, Chunxin; Yu, Wenying; Shen, Xiaohan

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT)-like follicular dendritic cell (FDC) sarcoma is a recently described rare tumor and considered a unique entity, with different histologic appearances and behavior from those of the classical FDC sarcoma. This study analyzed the clinical and pathological findings of two such cases that the authors encountered and 36 previously reported cases identified in the literature. Assessment of all 38 cases showed a slight female predominance (2.2:1) with a median age of 56.5 years. Seventeen patients complained of abdominal discomfort or pain, while fifteen patients had no clinical symptom. Almost all cases occurred in liver (n = 20) or spleen (n = 17). Except in one case, all patients underwent surgical resection of the tumor alone. Histologic features showed a mixture of chronic inflammatory cells and variable amounts of spindle cells with vesicular nuclei and distinct nucleoli. The tumor cells expressed conventional FDC markers such as CD21 (75%), CD35 (92%), CD23 (62%), clusterin (75%), and CNA.42 (100%). EBV was detected in thirty-five cases (92.1%) by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded RNA in situ hybridization, and EBV-latent membrane protein-1 was expressed in 90% of the cases. With a median follow-up of 21 months, 29 patients (85.3%) were alive and well, 4 (11.8%) were alive with disease, one patient (2.9%) died of disease. Only four patients with hepatic tumors underwent recurrence or metastasis after initial treatment. Epstein-Barr virus is thought to play a role in the development of the tumor; however, the pathogenesis of the disease and the origin of tumor cells remain unclear. PMID:24966952

  7. Morphogenesis and pathogenesis of chronic lung diseases. X. An anatomoclinical and pathogenetic study of 48 pseudotumoral chronic pneumonites.

    PubMed

    Eskenasy, A; Diaconită, G

    1976-01-01

    Forty-eight cases of operated pseudotumoral chronic pneumonites were anatomoclinically and histogenetically studied. Two groups of cases can be established. The first one (21 cases), in which the histogenetic mechanism is related to previous bronchopulmonary infections, suppurations, and immune processes of the immediate type, is characterized by numerous granulocytic foci, granulomatous structure, Arthus type vasculites and fibrous evolution. The unefficient therapy could be one of the determining factors of this evolution, by maintenance of active germs and released antigens. The second group (27 cases) is characterized by hypertrophic bronchites reflecting the prolonged penetration of airborne antigens, by a step by step involvement of peribronchial and parenchymatous structures. A multiphasic development is comparatively demonstrated in the different cases, and dominated by various proportions of plasmocytes and fibroblasts interfering with a restorative granulomatous process involving the intra- and interlobular areas and evolving to a fibrogranulomatous state. Obstructive pneumonitic phenomena and reactive endoalveolitis obliterans interfere, too. Correlations between the dynamics of this picture and the experimental data assert an immune mechanism with repeated immediate and delayed hypersensitivity reactions and auto-aggressive phenomena, determined by released antigens and inductors of cell proliferation and differentiation, as the main processes conducing to the building up of the pseudotumoral chronic pneumonites. PMID:130543

  8. A Case of Inflammatory Pseudotumor of the Liver Mimicking Hepatocellular Carcinoma on EOB-MRI and PET

    PubMed Central

    Iguchi, Hiroyoshi; Yamazaki, Hitoshi; Tsunoda, Hidekazu; Takahashi, Yoshihito; Yokomori, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    A 71-year-old man was referred to us for investigation of a liver mass and adenomyomatosis of gallbladder. Findings on ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine-enhanced MRI (EOB-MRI) led to a presumptive diagnosis of a 1.5 cm hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the right posterior lobe of the liver. Transcatheter arterial chemoembolization and radiofrequency ablation of the tumor were attempted. After 2 months, CT scan and EOB-MRI showed that the tumor had enlarged to 3 cm. Positron emission tomography (PET) confirmed abnormal metabolic activity with a high standardized uptake value of 7.3 in the lesion. These findings could indicate malignancy such as well-differentiated HCC or cholangiocarcinoma or a benign lesion such as hepatic abscess. Histopathological examination of a liver biopsy revealed a granuloma with many inflammatory cells, leading to a diagnosis of inflammatory pseudotumor of the liver. We report a rare case of hepatic inflammatory pseudotumor with enhancement on EOB-MRI and increased uptake on PET, mimicking HCC. PMID:23781250

  9. Orbital pseudotumor can be a localized form of granulomatosis with polyangiitis as revealed by gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, James T; Choi, Dongseok; Wilson, David J; Grossniklaus, Hans E; Harrington, Christina A; Sibley, Cailin H; Dailey, Roger A; Ng, John D; Steele, Eric A; Czyz, Craig N; Foster, Jill A; Tse, David; Alabiad, Chris; Dubovy, Sander; Parekh, Prashant K; Harris, Gerald J; Kazim, Michael; Patel, Payal J; White, Valerie A; Dolman, Peter J; Korn, Bobby S; Kikkawa, Don O; Edward, Deepak P; Alkatan, Hind M; al-Hussain, Hailah; Yeatts, R Patrick; Selva, Dinesh; Stauffer, Patrick; Planck, Stephen R

    2015-10-01

    Biopsies and ANCA testing for limited forms of granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) are frequently non-diagnostic. We characterized gene expression in GPA and other causes of orbital inflammation. We tested the hypothesis that a sub-set of patients with non-specific orbital inflammation (NSOI, also known as pseudotumor) mimics a limited form of GPA. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded orbital biopsies were obtained from controls (n=20) and patients with GPA (n=6), NSOI (n=25), sarcoidosis (n=7), or thyroid eye disease (TED) (n=20) and were divided into discovery and validation sets. Transcripts in the tissues were quantified using Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 microarrays. Distinct gene expression profiles for controls and subjects with GPA, TED, or sarcoidosis were evident by principal coordinate analyses. Compared with healthy controls, 285 probe sets had elevated signals in subjects with GPA and 1472 were decreased (>1.5-fold difference, false discovery rate adjusted p<0.05). The immunoglobulin family of genes had the most dramatic increase in expression. Although gene expression in GPA could be readily distinguished from gene expression in TED, sarcoidosis, or controls, a comparison of gene expression in GPA versus NSOI found no statistically significant differences. Thus, forms of orbital inflammation can be distinguished based on gene expression. NSOI/pseudotumor is heterogeneous but often may be an unrecognized, localized form of GPA. PMID:26163757

  10. Fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes.

    PubMed

    Goundan, Poorani; Junqueira, Ana; Kelleher-Yassen, Donna; Steenkamp, Devin

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to review the relevant literature related to the epidemiology, pathophysiology, natural history, clinical features and treatment of fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes (FCPD). We review the English-language literature on this topic published between 1956 and 2014. FCPD is a form of diabetes usually associated with chronic calcific pancreatitis. It has been predominantly, though not exclusively, described in lean, young adults living in tropical developing countries. Historically linked to malnutrition, the etiology of this phenotype has not been clearly elucidated, nor has there been a clear consensus on specific diagnostic criteria or clinical features. Affected individuals usually present with a long-standing history of abdominal pain, which may begin as early as childhood. Progressive pancreatic endocrine and exocrine dysfunction, consistent with chronic pancreatitis is expected. Common causes of chronic pancreatitis, such as alcohol abuse, are usually absent. Typical radiographic and pathological features include coarse pancreatic calcifications, main pancreatic duct dilation, pancreatic fibrosis and atrophy. Progressive microvascular complications are common, but diabetic ketoacidosis is remarkably unusual. Pancreatic carcinoma is an infrequently described long term complication. FCPD is an uncommon diabetes phenotype characterized by early onset non-alcoholic chronic pancreatitis with hyperglycemia, insulin deficiency and a striking resistance to ketosis. PMID:26472503

  11. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer This page lists cancer ... in pancreatic cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer Abraxane (Paclitaxel Albumin-stabilized ...

  12. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2B Description: Stage IIB pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas and in nearby lymph nodes. Also shown are the bile duct, pancreatic duct, and duodenum. Stage IIB pancreatic cancer. Cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes and ...

  13. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2A

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2A Description: Stage IIA pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas and duodenum. The bile duct and pancreatic duct are also shown. Stage IIA pancreatic cancer. Cancer has spread to nearby tissue and organs ...

  14. Nutrition in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Nompleggi, D J

    1999-08-01

    Pancreatitis is a common disorder. Numerous factors have been implicated in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic pancreatitis, but the exact mechanisms of these conditions are still poorly understood. Depending on the cause of the disorder, patients who have pancreatitis are usually not malnourished and are able to eat within 5 to 7 days of disease onset. In these patients, nutritional support is unnecessary. However, severe disease induces a catabolic state similar to that seen in trauma and sepsis, resulting in rapid weight loss and increased morbidity and mortality. Thus, vigorous nutritional support may be useful in the treatment of severe pancreatitis. Studies have shown that parenteral and enteral nutritional support are well tolerated and can maintain or improve nutritional status in patients with pancreatitis. This article reviews nutritional assessment and therapy in pancreatitis.

  15. Smoking and Pancreatic Disease.

    PubMed

    Edderkaoui, Mouad; Thrower, Edwin

    2013-11-01

    Smoking is a major risk factor for chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. However, the mechanisms through which it causes the diseases remain unknown. In the present manuscript we reviewed the latest knowledge gained on the effect of cigarette smoke and smoking compounds on cell signaling pathways mediating both diseases. We also reviewed the effect of smoking on the pancreatic cell microenvironment including inflammatory cells and stellate cells.

  16. Hereditary pancreatitis for the endoscopist.

    PubMed

    Patel, Milan R; Eppolito, Amanda L; Willingham, Field F

    2013-03-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis shares a majority of clinical and morphologic features with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis, but may present at an earlier age. The term hereditary pancreatitis has primarily been associated with mutations in the serine protease 1 gene (PRSS1) which encodes for cationic trypsinogen. PRSS1 mutations account for approximately 68-81% of hereditary pancreatitis. Mutations in other genes, primarily serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK1) and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) are also associated with hereditary pancreatitis. While chronic alcoholic pancreatitis may develop in the fourth or fifth decades, patients with hereditary pancreatitis may develop symptoms in the first or second decades of life. Hereditary pancreatitis is diagnosed either by detecting a causative gene mutation or by the presence of chronic pancreatitis in two first-degree or three second-degree relatives, in two or more generations, without precipitating factors and with a negative workup for known causes. Patients with hereditary pancreatitis may have recurrent acute pancreatitis and may develop pancreatic exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Hereditary pancreatitis may involve premature trypsinogen activation or decreased control of trypsin. Recurrent inflammation can lead to acute pancreatitis and subsequently to chronic pancreatitis with parenchymal calcification. There is a markedly increased risk of pancreatic carcinoma compared with the general population. Patients are often referred for evaluation of pancreatitis, biliary or pancreatic ductal dilatation, jaundice, biliary obstruction, pancreatic duct stone or stricture, pancreatic pseudocysts, and for evaluation for malignancy. Medical treatment includes pancreatic enzyme supplementation, nutritional supplementation, diabetes management, and palliation of pain. Patients should avoid tobacco use and alcohol exposure. Hereditary pancreatitis is reviewed and recommendations for

  17. IgG4-related inflammatory pseudotumor of the kidney mimicking renal cell carcinoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    CAI, YI; LI, HAN-ZHONG; ZHANG, YU-SHI

    2016-01-01

    IgG4-related disease is a recently recognized clinical entity. It is characterized by diffuse organ swelling or mass formation, a dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate rich in IgG4-positive plasma cells with fibrosis and typically an increased serum IgG4 concentration, which may affect various organs. An 80-year-old woman with an otherwise unremarkable previous medical history was revealed to have a renal mass that was indicative of renal malignant carcinoma, for which a radical nephrectomy was performed. The mass was diagnosed as an IgG4-related inflammatory pseudotumor, which was histopathologically confirmed. The patient is currently well without evidence of IgG4-related disease at 3 months post-surgery, and did not require any additional therapy. PMID:27123131

  18. Pseudotumoral hemicerebellitis as a mimicker of Lhermitte-Duclos disease in children: does neuroimaging help to differentiate them?

    PubMed

    Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Steinlin, Maja; Toelle, Sandra P; Beck, Jürgen; Boltshauser, Eugen; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Poretti, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    The clinical presentation and neuroimaging findings of children with pseudotumoral hemicerebellitis (PTHC) and Lhermitte-Duclos disease (LDD) may be very similar. The differentiation between these entities, however, is important because their management and prognosis are different. We report on three children with PTHC. For all three children, in the acute situation, the differentiation between PTHC and LDD was challenging. A review of the literature shows that a detailed evaluation of conventional and neuroimaging data may help to differentiate between these two entities. A striated folial pattern, brainstem involvement, and prominent veins surrounding the thickened cerebellar foliae on susceptibility weighted imaging favor LDD, while post-contrast enhancement and an increased choline peak on (1)H-Magnetic resonance spectroscopy suggest PTHC.

  19. Pseudotumoral hemicerebellitis as a mimicker of Lhermitte-Duclos disease in children: does neuroimaging help to differentiate them?

    PubMed

    Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Steinlin, Maja; Toelle, Sandra P; Beck, Jürgen; Boltshauser, Eugen; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Poretti, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    The clinical presentation and neuroimaging findings of children with pseudotumoral hemicerebellitis (PTHC) and Lhermitte-Duclos disease (LDD) may be very similar. The differentiation between these entities, however, is important because their management and prognosis are different. We report on three children with PTHC. For all three children, in the acute situation, the differentiation between PTHC and LDD was challenging. A review of the literature shows that a detailed evaluation of conventional and neuroimaging data may help to differentiate between these two entities. A striated folial pattern, brainstem involvement, and prominent veins surrounding the thickened cerebellar foliae on susceptibility weighted imaging favor LDD, while post-contrast enhancement and an increased choline peak on (1)H-Magnetic resonance spectroscopy suggest PTHC. PMID:26649682

  20. Epstein-Barr virus positive inflammatory pseudotumor of the liver: report of a challenging case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    You, Yan; Shao, Haipeng; Bui, Katherine; Bui, Marilyn; Klapman, Jason; Cui, Quancai; Coppola, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT) is an uncommon, benign lesion of unclear etiology, which is sometimes associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). In this study, we discuss a case of hepatic EBV positive IPT and discuss mimickers, prognosis, and treatment. The case we describe was located in the liver and composed of a mixture of spindle cells and polymorphic inflammatory cells with areas of necrosis. The spindle cells were negative for CAM5.2, ALK1, CD21, CD23, CD35, actin, S-100, and CD34. EBV-encoded small RNA in situ hybridization showed a large number of EBV positive cells. The diagnosis of hepatic EBV positive IPT with uncertain biological behavior was issued, presenting numerous difficulties with diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. PMID:25361938

  1. Inflammatory pseudotumor of the urinary bladder: A case series among more than 2,000 urinary bladder tumor cases.

    PubMed

    Elawdy, Mohamed M; Harraz, Ahmed M; Zahran, Mohamed H; Abdelraheem; El-Baz, Mahmoud; El-Hefnawy, Ahmed S

    2016-01-01

    "Inflammatory pseudotumor" (IPT) has infrequently been reported in the medical journals. A retrospective analysis was conducted among more than 2,000 bladder tumor cases from January 1999 to December 2012 looking for patients with IPT in the final diagnosis. Six patients were found with median tumor size of 3.5 cm (range: 3-8 cm); computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging was used to diagnose the tumor. All patients had complete resection of the tumors. On a median follow-up of 6 years (range: 2-10 years), no recurrences for IPT have been observed in all patients. We concluded that IPT is a rare disease of the urinary bladder and should be regarded with a high degree of suspicion. Although an extensive workup may be needed for definite diagnosis, it is worth to avoid unnecessary chemoradiotherapy or radical surgeries. PMID:26834412

  2. Palliation in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kruse, E James

    2010-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer is rarely curable, and because of its location causes significant symptoms for patients in need of palliation. The common problems of incurable pancreatic cancer are biliary obstruction, duodenal obstruction, and pain. Approaches include surgical, endoscopic and radiologic interventions. This article discusses the palliative options and controversies related to these symptoms.

  3. Pancreatitis in cats.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, P Jane; Williams, David A

    2012-08-01

    Pancreatitis was considered a rare disease in the cat until a couple of decades ago when several retrospective studies of severe acute pancreatitis were published. It was apparent that few of the diagnostic tests of value in the dog were helpful in cats. With increasing clinical suspicion, availability of abdominal ultrasonography, and introduction of pancreas-specific blood tests of increasing utility, it is now accepted that acute pancreatitis is probably almost as common in cats as it is in dogs, although the etiology(s) remain more obscure. Pancreatitis in cats often co-exists with inflammatory bowel disease, less commonly with cholangitis, and sometimes with both. Additionally, pancreatitis may trigger hepatic lipidosis, while other diseases, such as diabetes mellitus, may be complicated by pancreatitis. Therapy is similar to that used in dogs, with added emphasis on early nutritional support to prevent hepatic lipidosis. Less is known about chronic pancreatitis than the acute form, but chronic pancreatitis is more common in cats than it is in dogs and may respond positively to treatment with corticosteroids.

  4. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma: Outstanding problems

    PubMed Central

    Zakharova, Olga P; Karmazanovsky, Grigory G; Egorov, Viacheslav I

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death and is one of the most aggressive malignant tumors with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 4%. Surgical resection remains the only potentially curative treatment but is only possible for 15%-20% of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. About 40% of patients have locally advanced nonresectable disease. In the past, determination of pancreatic cancer resectability was made at surgical exploration. The development of modern imaging techniques has allowed preoperative staging of patients. Institutions disagree about the criteria used to classify patients. Vascular invasion in pancreatic cancers plays a very important role in determining treatment and prognosis. There is no evidence-based consensus on the optimal preoperative imaging assessment of patients with suspected pancreatic cancer and a unified definition of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer is also lacking. Thus, there is much room for improvement in all aspects of treatment for pancreatic cancer. Multi-detector computed tomography has been widely accepted as the imaging technique of choice for diagnosing and staging pancreatic cancer. With improved surgical techniques and advanced perioperative management, vascular resection and reconstruction are performed more frequently; patients thought once to be unresectable are undergoing radical surgery. However, when attempting heroic surgery, a realistic approach concerning the patient’s age and health status, probability of recovery after surgery, perioperative morbidity and mortality and life quality after tumor resection is necessary. PMID:22655124

  5. Association of Clinical Response and Long-term Outcome Among Patients With Biopsied Orbital Pseudotumor Receiving Modern Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhu, Roshan S.; Kandula, Shravan; Liebman, Lang; Wojno, Ted H.; Hayek, Brent; Hall, William A.; Shu, Hui-Kuo; Crocker, Ian

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate institutional outcomes for patients treated with modern radiation therapy (RT) for biopsied orbital pseudotumor (OP). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients (26 affected orbits) with OP were treated with RT between January 2002 and December 2011. All patients underwent biopsy with histopathologic exclusion of other disease processes. Sixteen patients (80%) were treated with intensity modulated RT, 3 (15%) with opposed lateral beams, and 1 (5%) with electrons. Median RT dose was 27 Gy (range 25.2-30.6 Gy). Response to RT was evaluated at 4 months post-RT. Partial response (PR) was defined as improvement in orbital symptoms without an increase in steroid dose. Complete response (CR) 1 and CR 2 were defined as complete resolution of orbital symptoms with reduction in steroid dose (CR 1) or complete tapering of steroids (CR 2). The median follow-up period was 18.6 months (range 4-81.6 months). Results: Seventeen patients (85%) demonstrated response to RT, with 7 (35%), 1 (5%), and 9 (45%) achieving a PR, CR 1, and CR 2, respectively. Of the 17 patients who had ≥PR at 4 months post-RT, 6 (35%) experienced recurrence of symptoms. Age (>46 years vs ≤46 years, P=.04) and clinical response to RT (CR 2 vs CR 1/PR, P=.05) were significantly associated with pseudotumor recurrence. Long-term complications were seen in 7 patients (35%), including 4 with cataract formation, 1 with chronic dry eye, 1 with enophthalmos, and 1 with keratopathy. Conclusions: RT is an effective treatment for improving symptoms and tapering steroids in patients with a biopsy supported diagnosis of OP. Older age and complete response to RT were associated with a significantly reduced probability of symptom recurrence. The observed late complications may be related to RT, chronic use of steroids/immunosuppressants, medical comorbidities, or combination of factors.

  6. Natural course of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Beger, H G; Rau, B; Mayer, J; Pralle, U

    1997-02-01

    Acute pancreatitis comprises, in terms of clinical, pathologic, biochemical, and bacteriologic data, four entities. Interstitial edematous pancreatitis and necrotizing pancreatitis are the most frequent clinical manifestations; pancreatic pseudocyst and pancreatic abscess are late complications after necrotizing pancreatitis, developing after 3 to 5 weeks. Determinants of the natural course of acute pancreatitis are pancreatic parenchymal necrosis, extrapancreatic retroperitoneal fatty tissue necrosis, biologically active compounds in pancreatic ascites, and infection of necrosis. Early in the course of acute pancreatitis multiple organ failure is the consequence of various inflammatory mediators that are released from the inflammatory process and from activated leukocytes attracted by pancreatic injury. During the late course, starting the second week, local and systemic septic complications are dominant. Around 80% of deaths in acute pancreatitis are caused by septic complications. The infection of pancreatic necrosis occurs in 8% to 12% of acute pancreatitis and in 30% to 40% of patients with necrotizing pancreatitis. Bacteriologic analysis of intraoperative smears and aspirates reveals predominantly gram-negative germs deriving from the intestine, most frequently Escherichia coli. It has been confirmed that after necrotizing pancreatitis a considerable large group of patients suffer long-lasting exocrine and endocrine insufficiency.

  7. Review of idiopathic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jason Kihyuk; Enns, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in understanding of pancreatitis and advances in technology have uncovered the veils of idiopathic pancreatitis to a point where a thorough history and judicious use of diagnostic techniques elucidate the cause in over 80% of cases. This review examines the multitude of etiologies of what were once labeled idiopathic pancreatitis and provides the current evidence on each. This review begins with a background review of the current epidemiology of idiopathic pancreatitis prior to discussion of various etiologies. Etiologies of medications, infections, toxins, autoimmune disorders, vascular causes, and anatomic and functional causes are explored in detail. We conclude with management of true idiopathic pancreatitis and a summary of the various etiologic agents. Throughout this review, areas of controversies are highlighted. PMID:18081217

  8. Clinical nutrition in pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    McClave, S A; Snider, H; Owens, N; Sexton, L K

    1997-10-01

    In patients with acute pancreatitis or an acute flare of chronic pancreatitis, a discrepancy exists between increased protein/calorie requirements induced by a hypermetabolic stress state and reduced ingestion/assimilation of exogenous nutrients, which promotes progressive nutritional deterioration. Patients with severe pancreatitis (defined by > or =3 Ranson criteria, an APACHE II score of > or =10, development of major organ failure, and/or presence of pancreatic necrosis) are more likely to require aggressive nutritional support than patients with mild disease. The type of formula and level of the gastrointestinal tract into which nutrients are infused determine the degree to which pancreatic exocrine secretion is stimulated. Animal studies and early prospective randomized controlled trials in humans suggest that total enteral nutrition via jejunal feeding may be the preferred route to parenteral alimentation in this disease setting.

  9. Acute Obstructive Suppurative Pancreatic Ductitis

    PubMed Central

    Palakodeti, Sandeep; Munroe, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Acute obstructive suppurative pancreatic ductitis (AOSPD) is a rare clinical entity defined as suppuration from the pancreatic duct without concomitant pancreatic cyst, abscess, or necrosis. We describe a case of AOSPD in a woman with a past medical history of type 2 diabetes and chronic pancreatitis who presented with abdominal sepsis, which resolved only after therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Our case highlights the importance of considering AOSPD as a cause of abdominal sepsis particularly in patients with chronic pancreatitis or any recent pancreatic duct instrumentation and demonstrates that treatment requires prompt drainage and decompression of the pancreatic duct.

  10. A 17-year-old male with pseudotumor cerebri secondary to performance-enhancing steroids triggering venous thrombosis in the brain.

    PubMed

    DeSena, Allen D; Weimer, Stephen

    2009-03-01

    This article is a case report of a 17-year-old male who presented with a headache and blurry vision. He subsequently was noted to have papilledema on a fundoscopic examination and an initial normal magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography of his head; his condition was, therefore, diagnosed as pseudotumor cerebri. A subsequent magnetic resonance venography of his head revealed venous thrombosis, and other investigations revealed an elevated factor VIII level as well as a mutation at the MTHFR locus, consistent with an elevated risk for hypercoagulability. In addition, he admitted to steroid usage for purposes of performance enhancement in baseball. The patient's condition eventually improved with acetazolamide and serial lumbar punctures. Steroids have been linked to predisposition to hypercoagulable states, but there are no reports identified by these authors that link performance-enhancing steroids with pseudotumor cerebri as a result of a coagulation dyscrasia.

  11. [Etiological factors of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Spicák, J

    2002-09-01

    Acute pancreatitis develops immediately after the causative impulse, while chronic pancreatitis develops after the long-term action of the noxious agent. A typical representative of acute pancreatitis is biliary pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis develops in alcoholism and has a long latency. As alcoholic pancreatitis is manifested at first as a rule by a potent attack, it is classified in this stage as acute pancreatitis. The most frequent etiological factors in our civilization are thus cholelithiasis and alcoholism (both account for 20-50% in different studies). The assumed pathogenetic principles in acute biliary pancreatitis are the common canal of both efferent ducts above the obturated papilla, duodenopancreatic reflux and intrapancreatic hypertension. A detailed interpretation is however lacking. The pathogenesis of alcoholic pancreatitis is more complicated. Among others some part is played by changes in the calcium concentration and fusion of cellular membranes. Idiopathic pancreatitis occurs in up to 10%, part of the are due to undiagnosed alcoholism and cholelithiasis. Other etiologies are exceptional. Similarly as in cholelithiasis pancreatitis develops also during other pathological processes in the area of the papilla of Vater such as dysfunction of the sphincter of Oddi, ampulloma and juxtapapillary diverticulum, it is however usually mild. The incidence of postoperative pancreatitis is declining. Its lethality is 30% and the diagnosis is difficult. In the pathogenesis changes of the ion concentration are involved, hypoxia and mechanical disorders of the integrity of the gland. Pancreatitis develops in association with other infections--frequently in mumps, rarely in hepatitis, tuberculosis, typhoid and mycoses. Viral pancreatitis is usually mild. In parasitoses pancreatitis develops due to a block of the papilla Vateri. In hyperparathyroidism chronic pancreatitis is more likely to develop, recent data are lacking. As to dyslipoproteinaemias

  12. Diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Matsubayashi, Hiroyuki; Kakushima, Naomi; Takizawa, Kohei; Tanaka, Masaki; Imai, Kenichiro; Hotta, Kinichi; Ono, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a distinct form of chronic pancreatitis that is increasingly being reported. The presentation and clinical image findings of AIP sometimes resemble those of several pancreatic malignancies, but the therapeutic strategy differs appreciably. Therefore, accurate diagnosis is necessary for cases of AIP. To date, AIP is classified into two distinct subtypes from the viewpoints of etiology, serum markers, histology, other organ involvements, and frequency of relapse: type 1 is related to IgG4 (lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis) and type 2 is related to a granulocytic epithelial lesion (idiopathic duct-centric chronic pancreatitis). Both types of AIP are characterized by focal or diffuse pancreatic enlargement accompanied with a narrowing of the main pancreatic duct, and both show dramatic responses to corticosteroid. Unlike type 2, type 1 is characteristically associated with increasing levels of serum IgG4 and positive serum autoantibodies, abundant infiltration of IgG4-positive plasmacytes, frequent extrapancreatic lesions, and relapse. These findings have led several countries to propose diagnostic criteria for AIP, which consist of essentially similar diagnostic items; however, several differences exist for each country, mainly due to differences in the definition of AIP and the modalities used to diagnose this disease. An attempt to unite the diagnostic criteria worldwide was made with the publication in 2011 of the international consensus diagnostic criteria for AIP, established at the 2010 Congress of the International Association of Pancreatology (IAP). PMID:25469024

  13. Pleuropulmonary complications of pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Michael D.

    1968-01-01

    Pancreatitis, in common with many other upper abdominal diseases, often leads to pleuropulmonary complications. Radiological evidence of pleuropulmonary abnormality was found in 55% of 58 cases examined retrospectively. The majority of such abnormalities are not specific for pancreatitis; but a particular category of pleural effusions, rich in pancreatic enzymes, is a notable exception. A patient with this type of effusion, complicated by a spontaneous bronchopleural fistula and then by an empyema, is reported. The literature relating to pancreatic enzyme-rich pleural effusions (pathognomonic of pancreatitis) is reviewed. Of several possible mechanisms involved in pathogenesis, transdiaphragmatic lymphatic transfer of pancreatic enzymes, intrapleural rupture of mediastinal extensions of pseudocysts, and diaphragmatic perforation are the most important. The measurement of pleural fluid amylase, at present little employed in this country, has considerable diagnostic value. Enzyme-rich effusions are more commonly left-sided, are often blood-stained, are frequently associated with pancreatic pseudocysts, and—if long standing—may be complicated by a bronchopleural fistula. Images PMID:4872925

  14. Autoimmune pancreatitis and cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Jani, Niraj; Buxbaum, James

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is part of a systemic fibrosclerotic process characterized by lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate with immunoglobulin G subtype-4 (IgG4) positive cells. It characteristically presents with biliary obstruction due to mass-like swelling of the pancreas. Frequently AIP is accompanied by extra-pancreatic manifestations including retroperitoneal fibrosis, thyroid disease, and salivary gland involvement. Auto-antibodies, hypergammaglobulemia, and prompt resolution of pancreatic and extrapancreatic findings with steroids signify its autoimmune nature. Refractory cases are responsive to immunomodulators and rituximab. Involvement of the biliary tree, termed IgG4 associated cholangiopathy, mimics primary sclerosing cholangitis and is challenging to manage. High IgG4 levels and swelling of the pancreas with a diminutive pancreatic duct are suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis. Given similarities in presentation but radical differences in management and outcome, differentiation from pancreatic malignancy is of paramount importance. There is controversy regarding the optimal diagnostic criterion and steroid trials to make the diagnosis. Additionally, the retroperitoneal location of the pancreas and requirement for histologic sampling, makes tissue acquisition challenging. Recently, a second type of autoimmune pancreatitis has been recognized with similar clinical presentation and steroid response though different histology, serologic, and extrapancreatic findings. PMID:26558153

  15. Fatal Pancreatic Panniculitis Associated with Acute Pancreatitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woo Sun; Kim, Mi Yeon; Kim, Sang Woo; Paik, Chang Nyol; Kim, Hyung Ok

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic panniculitis is a rare disease in which necrosis of fat in the panniculus and other distant foci occurs in the setting of pancreatic diseases; these diseases include acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic carcinoma, pseudocyst, and other pancreatic diseases. This malady is manifested as tender erythematous nodules on the legs, buttock, or trunk. Histopathologically, it shows the pathognomonic findings of focal subcutaneous fat necrosis and ghost-like anucleated cells with a thick shadowy wall. We herein report a case of fatal pancreatic panniculitis that was associated with acute pancreatitis in a 50-yr-old man. He presented with a 3-week history of multiple tender skin nodules, abdominal pain and distension. Laboratory and radiologic findings revealed acute pancreatitis, and skin biopsy showed pancreatic panniculitis. Despite intensive medical care, he died of multi-organ failure 3 weeks after presentation. PMID:17982246

  16. Familial pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Klein, A P; Hruban, R H; Brune, K A; Petersen, G M; Goggins, M

    2001-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States and will be responsible for an estimated 28,900 deaths in 2001. Relatively little is known of its etiology, and the only well-established risk factor is cigarette smoking. Studies over the past 3 decades have shown that 4%-16% of patients with pancreatic cancer have a family history of the disease. A small fraction of this aggregation can be accounted for in inherited cancer syndromes, including familial atypical multiple-mole melanoma, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, hereditary breast-ovarian cancer, hereditary pancreatitis, and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer. These syndromes arise as a result of germline mutations in the BRCA2, pl6 (familial atypical multiple-mole melanoma), mismatch repair (hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer), and STK11 (Peutz-Jeghers syndrome) genes. In addition, hereditary plays a role in predisposing certain patients with apparently sporadic pancreatic cancer. Many patients with pancreatic cancers caused by a germline mutation in a cancer-causing gene do not have a pedigree that is suggestive of a familial cancer syndrome. A recent prospective analysis of the pedigrees in the National Familial Pancreatic Tumor Registry found that individuals with a family history of pancreatic cancer in multiple first-degree relatives have a high risk of pancreatic cancer themselves. The identification of such high-risk individuals will help clinicians target screening programs and develop preventive interventions with the hope of reducing the mortality of pancreatic cancer in these families.

  17. [Primary pancreatic plasmacytoma].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Acevedo, Z; Pomares Rey, B; Alpera Tenza, M R; Andrada Becerra, E

    2014-01-01

    Extramedullary plasmacytomas are uncommon malignant plasma cell tumors that present outside the bone marrow; 80% of extramedullary plasmacytomas are located in the upper respiratory tract, and gastrointestinal plasmacytomas are rare. We present the case of an asymptomatic 65-year-old man in whom a pancreatic mass was found incidentally. The lesion was determined to be a pancreatic plasmacytoma after fine-needle aspiration cytology and surgical resection. No clinical, laboratory, or imaging findings indicative of multiple myeloma or association with other plasmacytomas were found, so the tumor was considered to be a primary pancreatic plasmacytoma. PMID:22738942

  18. Surgical Approaches to Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Daniel; Friess, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease resulting in permanent structural damage of the pancreas. It is mainly characterized by recurring epigastric pain and pancreatic insufficiency. In addition, progression of the disease might lead to additional complications, such as pseudocyst formation or development of pancreatic cancer. The medical and surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis has changed significantly in the past decades. With regard to surgical management, pancreatic head resection has been shown to be a mainstay in the treatment of severe chronic pancreatitis because the pancreatic head mass is known to trigger the chronic inflammatory process. Over the years, organ-preserving procedures, such as the duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection and the pylorus-preserving Whipple, have become the surgical standard and have led to major improvements in pain relief, preservation of pancreatic function, and quality of life of patients. PMID:26681935

  19. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Domínguez Muñoz, J Enrique

    2015-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the early diagnosis of the disease, the treatment of symptoms and complications, mainly pain and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, and the diagnosis and therapy of autoimmune pancreatitis. The multimodal dynamic endoscopic ultrasound-guided secretin-stimulated evaluation of the pancreas provides relevant morphological and functional information for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis at early stages. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in patients with calcifying pancreatitis and endoscopic pancreatic stent placement are effective alternatives for pain therapy in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Presence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in patients with chronic pancreatitis is associated with a significantly increase of mortality rate. Despite that, pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is not prescribed in the majority of patients with pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, or it is prescribed at a low dose. The newly developed and commercialized needles for endoscopic ultrasound-guided pancreatic biopsy are effective in retrieving appropriate tissue samples for the histological diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis. Maintenance therapy with azathioprine is effective and safe to prevent relapses in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis. PMID:26520201

  20. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Domínguez Muñoz, J Enrique

    2015-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the early diagnosis of the disease, the treatment of symptoms and complications, mainly pain and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, and the diagnosis and therapy of autoimmune pancreatitis. The multimodal dynamic endoscopic ultrasound-guided secretin-stimulated evaluation of the pancreas provides relevant morphological and functional information for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis at early stages. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in patients with calcifying pancreatitis and endoscopic pancreatic stent placement are effective alternatives for pain therapy in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Presence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in patients with chronic pancreatitis is associated with a significantly increase of mortality rate. Despite that, pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is not prescribed in the majority of patients with pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, or it is prescribed at a low dose. The newly developed and commercialized needles for endoscopic ultrasound-guided pancreatic biopsy are effective in retrieving appropriate tissue samples for the histological diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis. Maintenance therapy with azathioprine is effective and safe to prevent relapses in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis.

  1. Pancreatic Cancer Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... age at the time of diagnosis is 71. Gender Men are slightly more likely to develop pancreatic ... of these syndromes can be found by genetic testing. For more information on genetic testing, see Can ...

  2. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... sudden inflammation of the pancreas manifested clinically by abdominal pain, nausea and dehydration that is usually self-limiting ... room for evaluation should they develop any abnormal abdominal pain symptoms. Conclusions While a rare event, acute pancreatitis ...

  3. Acute Pancreatitis in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... are the symptoms of pancreatitis? Common symptoms include abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. However, not every patient with ... help the pancreas to recover. Patients who have abdominal pain can be treated with pain medications. Some patients ...

  4. What Is Pancreatic Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... very important to distinguish between exocrine and endocrine cancers of the pancreas. They have distinct risk factors and causes, have ... are by far the most common type of pancreas cancer. If you are told you have pancreatic cancer, ...

  5. Nutrition support in pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Marulendra, S; Kirby, D F

    1995-04-01

    Nutrition support in patients with pancreatitis has created a challenge for clinicians. Because the pancreas is normally stimulated by the ingestion of food, particularly fat, patients are often denied oral nutrition. This reduction in the ingestion of food, together with the increased metabolic demands of this disease, often results in a negative energy balance and occasionally undernutrition or malnutrition. This review summarizes the etiologies and methods for staging pancreatitis, the physiology of pancreatic exocrine secretion and the response of the pancreas to different methods of nutrition support. The results of clinical trials, which examine both parenteral and enteral nutrition in animals and humans with this disease, are reviewed. Recommendations for nutrition management of patients with acute and chronic pancreatitis and areas for future research are discussed.

  6. Management of necrotizing pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Slavin, John; Ghaneh, Paula; Sutton, Robert; Hartley, Mark; Rowlands, Peter; Garvey, Conall; Hughes, Mark; Neoptolemos, John

    2001-01-01

    Infection complicating pancreatic necrosis leads to persisting sepsis, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome and accounts for about half the deaths that occur following acute pancreatitis. Severe cases due to gallstones require urgent endoscopic sphincterotomy. Patients with pancreatic necrosis should be followed with serial contrast enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) and if infection is suspected fine needle aspiration of the necrotic area for bacteriology (FNAB) should be undertaken. Treatment of sterile necrosis should initially be non-operative. In the presence of infection necrosectomy is indicated. Although traditionally this has been by open surgery, minimally invasive procedures are a promising new alternative. There are many unresolved issues in the management of pancreatic necrosis. These include, the use of antibiotic prophylaxis, the precise indications for and frequency of repeat CE-CT and FNAB, and the role of enteral feeding. PMID:11819813

  7. Surgery for Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the abdomen. The surgeon can look at the pancreas and other organs for tumors and take biopsy ... pancreatic cancers appear to be confined to the pancreas at the time they are found. Even then, ...

  8. Pancreatic enzyme pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ferrone, Marcus; Raimondo, Massimo; Scolapio, James S

    2007-06-01

    Supplemental pancreatic enzyme preparations are provided to patients with conditions of pancreatic exocrine deficiency such as chronic pancreatitis and cystic fibrosis. These patients frequently experience steatorrhea, which occurs from inadequate fat absorption. The delivery of sufficient enzyme concentrations into the duodenal lumen simultaneously with meals can reduce nutrient malabsorption, improve the symptoms of steatorrhea, and in some cases alleviate the pain associated with chronic pancreatitis. Current clinical practices dictate administration of lipase 25,000-40,000 units/meal by using pH-sensitive pancrelipase microspheres, along with dosage increases, compliance checks, and differential diagnosis in cases of treatment failure. Despite the large number of specialty enzyme replacements available commercially, many patients remain dissatisfied with standard therapy, and future developments are needed to optimize treatment in these individuals.

  9. Pancreatic Islet Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... allo-transplantation?" For each pancreatic islet allo-transplant infusion, researchers use specialized enzymes to remove islets from ... in a lab. Transplant patients typically receive two infusions with an average of 400,000 to 500, ...

  10. Cytokines and acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Brady, M; Christmas, S; Sutton, R; Neoptolemos, J; Slavin, J

    1999-07-01

    Cytokines have been shown to play a pivotal role in multiple organ dysfunction, a major cause of death in severe acute pancreatitis. Moreover, the two-hit hypothesis of the cytokine-induced systemic inflammatory response syndrome explains the variable individual response to severe acute pancreatitis and the impact of secondary events such as sepsis or therapeutic intervention. Many experimental anti-cytokine therapies have been administered following induction of experimental pancreatitis, and have proved to be therapeutic. Patients with severe pancreatitis present early because of pain. Clearly then a window for therapeutic intervention is available between onset of symptoms and peak pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. It is this fundamental observation that convinces many in the field that the treatment of AP will be one of the first clinical successes for novel drugs or therapy that seek to modulate the inflammatory response.

  11. Perspectives in Pancreatic Pain

    PubMed Central

    1997-01-01

    This review describes some of the mechanisms which are thought to be important in the causation of pain in chronic pancreatitis. Both medical and surgical techniques for treating this pain are described. PMID:9298380

  12. [Hereditary aspects of pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Bak, Daniel; Sobczyńska-Tomaszewska, Agnieszka; Bal, Jerzy

    2003-01-01

    Pancreatitis presents clinically as acute and chronic form. A common characteristic of these two forms is enzymatic autodigestion of pancreas in the course of the disease. It results from premature activation of pancreatic digestive enzymes and disturbance of subtle balance between proteolytic enzymes and their inhibitors. The way to understand the character of mechanisms leading to development of pancreatitis has been simplified by discovery of genetic factors, which are able to initiate pathological changes at tissue level. Mutations in the PRSS1 gene (first of all R122H and N29I mutations), which encodes for cationic trypsin, cause trypsin to be protected from autodegradation. These mutations also cause precursor of trypsin - trypsinogen, to be activated easier. On the other hand mutations in the SPINK1 gene have been identified. SPINK1 gene encodes for the most important protease inhibitor of the pancreatic fluid. The most frequent mutation, namely N34S, decrease SPINK1 protein in its activity. The link between the genotype and phenotype is not clear in every case. It is probable that pancreatitis will be recognized as poligenic with many genes engaged in the disease development. Pancreatic cancer is a frequent consequence of pancreatitis. It is a very invasive cancer with high mortality. In the course of pancreatic inflammation intensive cell proliferation takes place for regeneration of pancreas damage. It is the chance for amplification of pathological changes in DNA, which have arisen as a ROS's (Reactive Oxygen Species) and RNOS's (Reactive Nitrogen Oxide Species) action effect. ROS and RNOS are generated in the course of pancreas inflammation.

  13. Tropical chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Barman, K; Premalatha, G; Mohan, V

    2003-01-01

    Tropical chronic pancreatitis (TCP) is a juvenile form of chronic calcific non-alcoholic pancreatitis, seen almost exclusively in the developing countries of the tropical world. The classical triad of TCP consists of abdominal pain, steatorrhoea, and diabetes. When diabetes is present, the condition is called fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes (FCPD) which is thus a later stage of TCP. Some of the distinctive features of TCP are younger age at onset, presence of large intraductal calculi, more aggressive course of the disease, and a high susceptibility to pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic calculi are the hallmark for the diagnosis of TCP and in non-calcific cases ductal dilation on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, computed tomography, or ultrasound helps to identify the disease. Diabetes is usually quite severe and of the insulin requiring type, but ketosis is rare. Microvascular complications of diabetes occur as frequently as in type 2 diabetes but macrovascular complications are uncommon. Pancreatic enzyme supplements are used for relief of abdominal pain and reducing the symptoms related to steatorrhoea. Early diagnosis and better control of the endocrine and exocrine dysfunction could help to ensure better survival and improve the prognosis and quality of life of TCP patients. PMID:14654569

  14. Hereditary pancreatitis: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Raphael, Kara L; Willingham, Field F

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is a rare cause of acute, recurrent acute, and chronic pancreatitis. It may present similarly to other causes of acute and chronic pancreatitis, and often there has been a protracted evaluation prior to the diagnosis of HP. Since it was first described in 1952, multiple genetic defects that affect the action of digestive enzymes in the pancreas have been implicated. The most common mutations involve the PRSS1, CFTR, SPINK1, and CTRC genes. New mutations in these genes and previously unrecognized mutations in other genes are being discovered due to the increasing use of next-generation genomic sequencing. While the inheritance pathways of these genetic mutations may be variable and complex, sometimes involving coinheritance of other mutations, the clinical presentation of patients tends to be similar. Interactions with environmental triggers often play a role. Patients tend to present at an early age (prior to the second decade of life) and have a significantly increased risk for the development of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients with HP may develop sequelae of chronic pancreatitis such as strictures and fluid collections as well as exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Management of patients with HP involves avoidance of environmental triggers, surveillance for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, medical therapy for endocrine and exocrine insufficiency, pain management, and endoscopic or surgical treatment for complications. Care for affected patients should be individualized, with an emphasis on early diagnosis and multidisciplinary involvement to develop a comprehensive treatment strategy. PMID:27555793

  15. Hereditary pancreatitis: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Raphael, Kara L; Willingham, Field F

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is a rare cause of acute, recurrent acute, and chronic pancreatitis. It may present similarly to other causes of acute and chronic pancreatitis, and often there has been a protracted evaluation prior to the diagnosis of HP. Since it was first described in 1952, multiple genetic defects that affect the action of digestive enzymes in the pancreas have been implicated. The most common mutations involve the PRSS1, CFTR, SPINK1, and CTRC genes. New mutations in these genes and previously unrecognized mutations in other genes are being discovered due to the increasing use of next-generation genomic sequencing. While the inheritance pathways of these genetic mutations may be variable and complex, sometimes involving coinheritance of other mutations, the clinical presentation of patients tends to be similar. Interactions with environmental triggers often play a role. Patients tend to present at an early age (prior to the second decade of life) and have a significantly increased risk for the development of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients with HP may develop sequelae of chronic pancreatitis such as strictures and fluid collections as well as exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Management of patients with HP involves avoidance of environmental triggers, surveillance for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, medical therapy for endocrine and exocrine insufficiency, pain management, and endoscopic or surgical treatment for complications. Care for affected patients should be individualized, with an emphasis on early diagnosis and multidisciplinary involvement to develop a comprehensive treatment strategy. PMID:27555793

  16. Nutrition in pancreatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Meier, Rémy F; Beglinger, Christoph

    2006-01-01

    The pancreas plays a major role in nutrient digestion. Therefore, in both acute and chronic pancreatitis, exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency can develop, impairing digestive and absorptive processes. These changes can lead to malnutrition over time. In parallel to these changes, decreased caloric intake and increased metabolic activity are often present. Nutritional deficiencies negatively affect outcome if they are not treated. Nutritional assessment and the clinical severity of the disease are important for planning any nutritional intervention. In severe acute pancreatitis, enteral nutrition with a naso-jejunal feeding tube and a low molecular diet displays clear advantages compared to parenteral nutrition. Infectious complications, length of hospital stay and the need for surgery are reduced. Furthermore, enteral nutrition is less costly than parenteral nutrition. Parenteral nutrition is reserved for patients who do not tolerate enteral nutrition. Abstinence from alcohol, dietary modifications and pancreatic enzyme supplementation is sufficient in over 80% of patients with chronic pancreatitis. In addition, oral supplements are helpful. Enteral nutrition can be necessary if weight loss continues. Parenteral nutrition is very seldom used in patients with chronic pancreatitis.

  17. Hereditary pancreatitis: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Raphael, Kara L; Willingham, Field F

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is a rare cause of acute, recurrent acute, and chronic pancreatitis. It may present similarly to other causes of acute and chronic pancreatitis, and often there has been a protracted evaluation prior to the diagnosis of HP. Since it was first described in 1952, multiple genetic defects that affect the action of digestive enzymes in the pancreas have been implicated. The most common mutations involve the PRSS1, CFTR, SPINK1, and CTRC genes. New mutations in these genes and previously unrecognized mutations in other genes are being discovered due to the increasing use of next-generation genomic sequencing. While the inheritance pathways of these genetic mutations may be variable and complex, sometimes involving coinheritance of other mutations, the clinical presentation of patients tends to be similar. Interactions with environmental triggers often play a role. Patients tend to present at an early age (prior to the second decade of life) and have a significantly increased risk for the development of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients with HP may develop sequelae of chronic pancreatitis such as strictures and fluid collections as well as exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Management of patients with HP involves avoidance of environmental triggers, surveillance for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, medical therapy for endocrine and exocrine insufficiency, pain management, and endoscopic or surgical treatment for complications. Care for affected patients should be individualized, with an emphasis on early diagnosis and multidisciplinary involvement to develop a comprehensive treatment strategy.

  18. Hereditary pancreatitis and secondary screening for early pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Vitone, L J; Greenhalf, W; Howes, N R; Neoptolemos, J P

    2005-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis is an autosomal dominant disease with incomplete penetrance (80%), accounting for approximately 1% of all cases of pancreatitis. It is characterized by the onset of recurrent attacks of acute pancreatitis in childhood and frequent progression to chronic pancreatitis. Whitcomb et al. identified the cationic trypsinogen gene (PRSS1) on chromosome 7q35 as the site of the mutation that causes hereditary pancreatitis. The European registry of hereditary pancreatitis and familial pancreatic cancer (EUROPAC) aims to identify and make provisions for those affected by hereditary pancreatitis and familial pancreatic cancer. The most common mutations in hereditary pancreatitis are R122H, N29I and A16V but many families have been described with clinically defined hereditary pancreatitis where there is no PRSS1 mutation. It is known that the cumulative lifetime risk (to age 70 years) of pancreatic cancer is 40% in individuals with hereditary pancreatitis. This subset of individuals form an ideal group for the development of a screening programme aimed at detecting pancreatic cancer at an early stage in an attempt to improve the presently poor long-term survival. Current screening strategies involve multimodality imaging (computed tomography, endoluminal ultrasound) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography for pancreatic juice collection followed by molecular analysis of the DNA extracted from the juice. The potential benefit of screening (curative resection) must be balanced against the associated morbidity and mortality of surgery. Philosophically, the individual's best interest must be sought in light of the latest advances in medicine and science following discussions with a multidisciplinary team in specialist pancreatic centres.

  19. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Zen, Yoh; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2011-12-07

    Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP) has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney) and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of regulatory T-cells are assumed

  20. Pain in chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Fasanella, Kenneth E; Davis, Brian; Lyons, John; Chen, Zongfu; Lee, Kenneth K; Slivka, Adam; Whitcomb, David C

    2007-06-01

    Chronic, debilitating abdominal pain is arguably the most important component of chronic pancreatitis, leading to significant morbidity and disability. Attempting to treat this pain, which is too often unsuccessful, is a frustrating experience for physician and patient. Multiple studies to improve understanding of the pathophysiology that causes pain in some patients but not in others have been performed since the most recent reviews on this topic. In addition, new treatment modalities have been developed and evaluated in this population. This review discusses new advances in neuroscience and the study of visceral pain mechanisms, as well as genetic factors that may play a role. Updates of established therapies, as well as new techniques used in addressing pain from chronic pancreatitis, are reviewed. Lastly, outcome measures, which have been highly variable in this field over the years, are addressed. PMID:17533083

  1. [The epidemiology of pancreatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Lakatos, Gábor; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2010-10-31

    Pancreatic cancer is a relatively uncommon tumor, but even with early diagnosis, mortality rates are high, explaining why this form of cancer has now become a common cause of cancer mortality. There are no screening tests for early detection of pancreatic cancer. It is more common in men than women and is predominantly a disease of elderly people. There is wide variation in the incidence of pancreatic cancer around the world, suggesting that environmental factors are important in the pathogenesis. Smoking is the major known risk factor for pancreatic cancer, while dietary factors seem to be less important. Other possible risk factors include chronic pancreatitis, obesity and type 2 diabetes. Numerous inherited germ line mutations are associated with pancreatic cancer. Of these, hereditary pancreatitis confers the greatest risk, while BRCA2 mutations are the commonest inherited disorder. Polymorphisms in genes that control detoxification of environmental carcinogens and metabolic pathways may alter the risk of pancreatic cancer.

  2. General Information about Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Pancreatic Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Pancreatic Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  3. Metabolic pancreatitis: Etiopathogenesis and management

    PubMed Central

    Kota, Sunil Kumar; Krishna, S.V.S.; Lakhtakia, Sandeep; Modi, Kirtikumar D.

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a medical emergency. Alcohol and gallstones are the most common etiologies accounting for 60%-75% cases. Other important causes include postendoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedure, abdominal trauma, drug toxicity, various infections, autoimmune, ischemia, and hereditary causes. In about 15% of cases the cause remains unknown (idiopathic pancreatitis). Metabolic conditions giving rise to pancreatitis are less common, accounting for 5%-10% cases. The causes include hypertriglyceridemia, hypercalcemia, diabetes mellitus, porphyria, and Wilson's disease. The episodes of pancreatitis tend to be more severe. In cases of metabolic pancreatitis, over and above the standard routine management of pancreatitis, careful management of the underlying metabolic abnormalities is of paramount importance. If not treated properly, it leads to recurrent life-threatening bouts of acute pancreatitis. We hereby review the pathogenesis and management of various causes of metabolic pancreatitis. PMID:24083160

  4. Pancreatic trauma: A concise review

    PubMed Central

    Debi, Uma; Kaur, Ravinder; Prasad, Kaushal Kishor; Sinha, Saroj Kant; Sinha, Anindita; Singh, Kartar

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic injury to the pancreas is rare and difficult to diagnose. In contrast, traumatic injuries to the liver, spleen and kidney are common and are usually identified with ease by imaging modalities. Pancreatic injuries are usually subtle to identify by different diagnostic imaging modalities, and these injuries are often overlooked in cases with extensive multiorgan trauma. The most evident findings of pancreatic injury are post-traumatic pancreatitis with blood, edema, and soft tissue infiltration of the anterior pararenal space. The alterations of post-traumatic pancreatitis may not be visualized within several hours following trauma as they are time dependent. Delayed diagnoses of traumatic pancreatic injuries are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Imaging plays an important role in diagnosis of pancreatic injuries because early recognition of the disruption of the main pancreatic duct is important. We reviewed our experience with the use of various imaging modalities for diagnosis of blunt pancreatic trauma. PMID:24379625

  5. Pathophysiology of autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Pezzilli, Raffaele; Pagano, Nico

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a recently discovered form of pancreatitis and represents one of the diseases of the pancreas which can be cured and healed medically. International consensus diagnostic criteria have been developed, and the clinical phenotypes associated with the histopathologic patterns of lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis and idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis should be referred to as type 1 and type 2 AIP, respectively. Most importantly, in type 1 AIP, the pancreatic manifestations are associated with other extrapancreatic disorders, resembling an immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related disease. In addition, the pancreas of a patient with AIP is often infiltrated by various types of immune cells; the cluster of differentiation (CD) 4 or CD8 T lymphocytes and IgG4-bearing plasma cells have been found in the pancreatic parenchyma and other involved organs in AIP and factors regulating T-cell function may influence the development of AIP. From a genetic point of view, it has also been reported that DRB1*0405 and DQB1*0401 mutations are significantly more frequent in patients with AIP when compared to those with chronic calcifying pancreatitis, and that only DQB1*0302 had a significant association with the relapse of AIP. Finally, it has been found that the polymorphic genes encoding cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4, a key negative regulator of the T-cell immune response, are associated with AIP in a Chinese population. Even if these data are not concordant, it is possible that physiological IgG4 responses are induced by prolonged antigen exposure and controlled by type 2 helper T cells. We reviewed the current concepts regarding the pathophysiology of this intriguing disease, focusing on the importance of the humoral and cellular immune responses. PMID:24891971

  6. Nutrition, Inflammation, and Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Max

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas. Nutrition has a number of anti-inflammatory effects that could affect outcomes of patients with pancreatitis. Further, it is the most promising nonspecific treatment modality in acute pancreatitis to date. This paper summarizes the best available evidence regarding the use of nutrition with a view of optimising clinical management of patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:24490104

  7. Clinical pancreatic disorder I: Acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Andrén-Sandberg, Ake

    2011-07-01

    The Annual American Pancreas Club is an important event for communicating around clinical pancreatic disorders, just as the European, Japanese, Indian, and the International Pancreatic association. Even though the meeting is only 1½ day there were 169 different abstracts and a "How do I do it session." Among all these abstracts on the pancreas there are some real pearls, but they are almost always well hidden, never highlighted - all abstracts are similarly presented - and will too soon be forgotten. The present filing of the abstracts is one way (not the way) to get the pancreatic abstracts a little more read and a little more remembered - and perhaps a little more cited. It should also be understood that most of the abstracts are short summaries of hundreds of working hours (evenings, nights, weekends, holidays, you name them …) in the laboratory or in the clinic, often combined with blood, sweat and tears. The authors should be shown at least some respect, and their abstracts should not only be thought of as "just another little abstract" - and the best respect they can be shown are that they will be remembered to be another brick in our scientific wall.Now the pancreatic abstracts of American Pancreas Club 2011 are gathered and filed with the aim to give them a larger audience than they have had in their original abstract book. However, it is obvious that most of clinical fellows do not have time to read all the abstracts. For them I have made a "clinical highlight section" of 10 percent of all the pancreatic abstracts. If someone else should have done some collection of abstract, there should probably have been other selections, but as this is not the case, the editor's choices are the highlighted ones.The article as series I of clinical highlight section is present, and more series will be present in the following issues. If readers will remember some of the abstracts better after reading this "abstract of abstracts", it was worth the efforts - and without

  8. An integrated mechanism of pediatric pseudotumor cerebri syndrome: evidence of bioenergetic and hormonal regulation of cerebrospinal fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sheldon, Claire A.; Kwon, Young Joon; Liu, Grant T.; McCormack, Shana E.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudotumor cerebri syndrome (PTCS) is defined by the presence of elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) in the setting of normal brain parenchyma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Headache, vision changes, and papilledema are common presenting features. Up to 10% of appropriately treated patients may experience permanent visual loss. The mechanism(s) underlying PTCS is unknown. PTCS occurs in association with a variety of conditions, including kidney disease, obesity, and adrenal insufficiency, suggesting endocrine and/or metabolic derangements may occur. Recent studies suggest that fluid and electrolyte balance in renal epithelia is regulated by a complex interaction of metabolic and hormonal factors; these cells share many of the same features as the choroid plexus cells in the central nervous system (CNS) responsible for regulation of CSF dynamics. Thus, we posit that similar factors may influence CSF dynamics in both types of fluid-sensitive tissues. Specifically, we hypothesize that, in patients with PTCS, mitochondrial metabolites (glutamate, succinate) and steroid hormones (cortisol, aldosterone) regulate CSF production and/or absorption. In this integrated mechanism review, we consider the clinical and molecular evidence for each metabolite and hormone in turn. We illustrate how related intracellular signaling cascades may converge in the choroid plexus, drawing on evidence from functionally similar tissues. PMID:25420176

  9. Clinical Features, Image Findings, and Prognosis of Inflammatory Pseudotumor of the Liver: A Multicenter Experience of 45 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jun Young; Lim, Young-Suk; Park, Jang Won; Kim, Seung Up; Min, Yang Won; Gwak, Geum-Youn; Paik, Yong-Han; Lee, Joon Hyoek; Koh, Kwang Cheol; Paik, Seung Woon; Yoo, Byung Chul

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT) of the liver is a rare disease characterized by chronic infiltration of inflammatory cells. However, the clinical characteristics and outcomes of IPT remain uncertain. Methods Clinical features, image findings, and outcomes of 55 patients with histologically proven IPT were evaluated. Results They consisted of 26 men and 19 women with median age of 65 years. Serum carcinoembryonal antigen and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 levels were normal in 42 patients (93.3%). Enhanced CT scans indicated poorly defined peripheral enhancement (82.5%) at the arterial phase and poorly defined hyperattenuating lesions with internal hypoattenuating areas at the equilibrium phase (77.0%). Gadolinium-enhancement MRI revealed poorly defined peripheral rim-like enhancement (77.8%). Ten patients underwent surgical resection and 35 were treated conservatively with or without antibiotics. No recurrence was noted after surgical resection during follow-up (1 to 48 months). In all patients who received conservative treatment, complete resolution or size reduction was noted during follow-up (1 to 192 months). Conclusions CT and MRI provide clues to the diagnosis of IPT in patients with liver masses and normal tumor markers. However, due to the lack of pathognomonic findings, the clinician's suspicion and histological diagnosis are necessary to make an accurate diagnosis of IPT. PMID:24516702

  10. Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis

    PubMed Central

    Khuroo, Mohammad S; Rather, Ajaz A; Khuroo, Naira S; Khuroo, Mehnaaz S

    2016-01-01

    Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis (HPA) was described as a clinical entity from Kashmir, India in 1985. HPA is caused by invasion and migration of nematode, Ascaris lumbricoides, in to the biliary tract and pancreatic duct. Patients present with biliary colic, cholangitis, cholecystitis, hepatic abscesses and acute pancreatitis. Ascarides traverse the ducts repeatedly, get trapped and die, leading to formation of hepatolithiasis. HPA is ubiquitous in endemic regions and in Kashmir, one such region, HPA is the etiological factor for 36.7%, 23%, 14.5% and 12.5% of all biliary diseases, acute pancreatitis, liver abscesses and biliary lithiasis respectively. Ultrasonography is an excellent diagnostic tool in visualizing worms in gut lumen and ductal system. The rational treatment for HPA is to give appropriate treatment for clinical syndromes along with effective anthelmintic therapy. Endotherapy in HPA is indicated if patients continue to have symptoms on medical therapy or when worms do not move out of ductal lumen by 3 wk or die within the ducts. The worms can be removed from the ductal system in most of the patients and such patients get regression of symptoms of hepatobiliary and pancreatic disease. PMID:27672273

  11. Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis.

    PubMed

    Khuroo, Mohammad S; Rather, Ajaz A; Khuroo, Naira S; Khuroo, Mehnaaz S

    2016-09-01

    Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis (HPA) was described as a clinical entity from Kashmir, India in 1985. HPA is caused by invasion and migration of nematode, Ascaris lumbricoides, in to the biliary tract and pancreatic duct. Patients present with biliary colic, cholangitis, cholecystitis, hepatic abscesses and acute pancreatitis. Ascarides traverse the ducts repeatedly, get trapped and die, leading to formation of hepatolithiasis. HPA is ubiquitous in endemic regions and in Kashmir, one such region, HPA is the etiological factor for 36.7%, 23%, 14.5% and 12.5% of all biliary diseases, acute pancreatitis, liver abscesses and biliary lithiasis respectively. Ultrasonography is an excellent diagnostic tool in visualizing worms in gut lumen and ductal system. The rational treatment for HPA is to give appropriate treatment for clinical syndromes along with effective anthelmintic therapy. Endotherapy in HPA is indicated if patients continue to have symptoms on medical therapy or when worms do not move out of ductal lumen by 3 wk or die within the ducts. The worms can be removed from the ductal system in most of the patients and such patients get regression of symptoms of hepatobiliary and pancreatic disease. PMID:27672273

  12. Pharmacogenetics in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Tourkantonis, Ioannis S; Peponi, Evangelia; Syrigos, Konstantinos N; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2014-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy with a poor overall survival rate. Given advances in pharmacogenomics, numerous gene mutations have been identified that could be potential targets for drug development. Therefore, future research strategies may identify prognostic and predictive markers aiming to improve outcome by maximizing efficacy whilst lowering toxicity. In this commentary, we summarize several interesting results regarding pancreatic cancer pharmacogenetics that have been presented in the 2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting. In particular, we focus on Abstract #4124, which investigated the potential predictive role of human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1) in patients treated with adjuvant gemcitabine for pancreatic cancer, on Abstract #4125, which examined the tolerability of a modified FOLFORINOX study based on UGT1A1*28 genotype guided dosing of IRI in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer, and on Abstract #4130, which confirmed the predictive role of circulating tumor and invasive cells (CTICs) from patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer in second-line chemotherapy treatment setting. PMID:25076337

  13. Borderline resectable pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Hackert, Thilo; Ulrich, Alexis; Büchler, Markus W

    2016-06-01

    Surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy remains the only treatment option for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) with the chance of long-term survival. If a radical tumor resection is possible, 5-year survival rates of 20-25% can be achieved. Pancreatic surgery has significantly changed during the past years and resection approaches have been extended beyond standard procedures, including vascular and multivisceral resections. Consequently, borderline resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (BR-PDAC), which has recently been defined by the International Study Group for Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS), has become a controversial issue with regard to its management in terms of upfront resection vs. neoadjuvant treatment and sequential resection. Preoperative diagnostic accuracy to define resectability of PDAC is a keypoint in this context as well as the surgical and interdisciplinary expertise to perform advanced pancreatic surgery and manage complications. The present mini-review summarizes the current state of definition, management and outcome of BR-PDAC. Furthermore, the topic of ongoing and future studies on neoadjuvant treatment which is closely related to borderline resectability in PDAC is discussed. PMID:26970276

  14. Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis

    PubMed Central

    Khuroo, Mohammad S; Rather, Ajaz A; Khuroo, Naira S; Khuroo, Mehnaaz S

    2016-01-01

    Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis (HPA) was described as a clinical entity from Kashmir, India in 1985. HPA is caused by invasion and migration of nematode, Ascaris lumbricoides, in to the biliary tract and pancreatic duct. Patients present with biliary colic, cholangitis, cholecystitis, hepatic abscesses and acute pancreatitis. Ascarides traverse the ducts repeatedly, get trapped and die, leading to formation of hepatolithiasis. HPA is ubiquitous in endemic regions and in Kashmir, one such region, HPA is the etiological factor for 36.7%, 23%, 14.5% and 12.5% of all biliary diseases, acute pancreatitis, liver abscesses and biliary lithiasis respectively. Ultrasonography is an excellent diagnostic tool in visualizing worms in gut lumen and ductal system. The rational treatment for HPA is to give appropriate treatment for clinical syndromes along with effective anthelmintic therapy. Endotherapy in HPA is indicated if patients continue to have symptoms on medical therapy or when worms do not move out of ductal lumen by 3 wk or die within the ducts. The worms can be removed from the ductal system in most of the patients and such patients get regression of symptoms of hepatobiliary and pancreatic disease.

  15. Histopathologically Proven Autoimmune Pancreatitis Mimicking Neuroendocrine Tumor or Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Onda, Shinji; Okamoto, Tomoyoshi; Kanehira, Masaru; Fujioka, Shuichi; Harada, Tohru; Hano, Hiroshi; Fukunaga, Masaharu; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) can be difficult to distinguish from pancreatic cancer. We report a case of histopathologically proven AIP mimicking neuroendocrine tumor (NET) or pancreatic cancer in a 53-year-old man. He was referred to our hospital for further evaluation of a pancreatic mass detected on ultrasonography at a medical check-up. Abdominal ultrasonography showed a 15-mm hypoechoic mass located in the pancreatic body. Computed tomography revealed a tumor without any contrast enhancement, and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated the mass to be hyperintense on diffusion-weighted image. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography revealed slight dilatation of a branch of the pancreatic duct without stricture of the main pancreatic duct. The common bile duct seemed intact. Under suspicion of a non-functioning NET or malignant neoplasm, laparotomy was performed. At laparotomy, an elastic firm and well-circumscribed mass was found suggestive of a non-functioning NET, thus enucleation was performed. Histopathologically, the lesion corresponded to AIP. PMID:22423237

  16. Primary Pancreatic Head Tuberculosis: Great Masquerader of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Dhaval; Patel, Jatin; Rathi, Chetan; Ingle, Meghraj; Sawant, Prabha

    2015-01-01

    Isolated pancreatic tuberculosis (TB) is considered an extremely rare condition, even in the developing countries. Most reported cases of pancreatic TB are diagnosed after exploratory laparotomy or autopsy. Pancreatic TB is a potential mimic of invasive pancreatic malignancy and the presence of vascular invasion does not distinguish one condition from the other. Every effort should be made for the earliest diagnosis of this condition as TB is a treatable condition and it avoids unnecessary management of pancreatic carcinoma. Here we report a rare case of primary pancreatic head TB in a 58-year-old male who presented with hypodense lesion in head of pancreas with double duct sign and portal vein invasion mimicking non-resectable pancreatic carcinoma.

  17. Pancreatic metastasis from mycosis fungoides mimicking primary pancreatic tumor.

    PubMed

    Ceriolo, Paola; Fausti, Valentina; Cinotti, Elisa; Bonadio, Silvia; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Bianchi, Giovanna; Orcioni, Giulio Fraternali; Fiocca, Roberto; Rongioletti, Franco; Pistoia, Vito; Borgonovo, Giacomo

    2016-03-28

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) is a cutaneous T-cell lymphoma that can undergo local progression with possible systemic dissemination. We report a case of a patient affected by MF with a pancreatic mass that was a diagnostic challenge between primitive tumor and pancreatic metastasis from MF. Clinical setting findings and imaging studies raised the suspicion of a pancreatic primary neoplasm. A diagnostic clue was provided by the combined histomorphologic/immunohistochemical study of pancreatic and cutaneous biopsies, which revealed a pancreatic localization of MF. Considering the rarity of metastatic localization of MF to the pancreas, we next investigated whether chemokine-chemokine receptor interactions could be involved in the phenomenon to provide new insight into the possible mechanisms underlying metastatic localization of MF to the pancreas. Histological analyses of archival pancreatic tissue demonstrated that glucagon-secreting cells of the pancreatic islets expressed the CCL27 chemokine, which may have attracted in our case metastatic MF cells expressing the complementary receptor CCR10.

  18. Pancreatic calculi superimposed upon slow growing pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Noda, A; Takeuchi, K; Ibuki, E; Murayama, H; Kobayashi, T; Nonogaki, T

    1996-01-01

    We report on a 59 year old male patient with cancer of the head of the pancreas, upon which pancreatic calculi were superimposed during the 3 year clinical course. Pancreatic calculi were noted in the main pancreatic duct (MPD) on both computed tomographic scans and ultrasonographs of the abdomen approximately 10 months after the recognizable dilatation of the MPD. Existence of the calculi was confirmed by autopsy. Elemental analysis and infrared spectrophotometry of the calculi demonstrated that the main constituent of the calculi was calcium carbonate. Histopathological examination showed that the pancreatic cancer was moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that pancreatic stone protein (lithostathine) was present in the cytoplasm of tumour cells. In this case, pancreatic cancer progressed to obstruct the MPD unusually slowly, resulting in stagnation of pancreatic secretion and subsequent formation of the calculi.

  19. [Acute pancreatitis in children].

    PubMed

    Rottier, B L; Holl, R A; Draaisma, J M

    1998-02-21

    Acute pancreatitis is probably commoner in children than was previously thought. In children it is most commonly associated with trauma or viral infection. The presentation may be subtler than in adults, requiring a high index of suspicion in the clinician. In three children, two boys aged 4 and 10 and a girl of 15 years, acute pancreatitis was suspected because of the findings at ultrasonography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography performed when the disease recurred (the boy aged 4), apathy and immobility without dehydration or other obvious causes (the boy aged 10), and severe abdominal pain in combination with vomiting (the girl). All three patients had severely increased (urinary) amylase levels. Most often, acute pancreatitis in children tends to be a self-limiting disease which responds well to conservative treatment.

  20. Nutrition support in pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Caitlin S; Kudsk, Kenneth A

    2007-12-01

    Nutrition support is especially important in patients who have pancreatitis, as these patients have high metabolic needs and are usually unable to ingest sufficient calories from an oral diet because of pain or intestinal dysfunction. Clinicians must assess severity of the disease carefully, as initiation and timing of nutrition support are crucial. Depending on the severity, early nutrition support may be unnecessary, while late support ultimately may lead to worse outcomes. Route of nutrition support also plays an important role in treatment. The clinician has many alternatives from which to choose, including enteral nutrition given nasogastrically or nasojejunally, or parenteral nutrition given through a central line. This article explores the role of nutrition support in the outcome of pancreatitis and provides guidelines to aid the clinician in caring for patients who have acute and chronic pancreatitis.

  1. [Acute pancreatitis and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Laraki, M; Harti, A; Bouderka, M A; Barrou, H; Matar, N; Benaguida, M

    1993-10-01

    Acute pancreatitis during pregnancy is a serious condition and diagnosis is often difficult. The authors report the case of a 32-year-old woman in the 32nd week of her fifth pregnancy, in which the outcome was fatal for both mother and child. The cause of pancreatitis during pregnancy has been attributed to many factors, chiefly cholelithiasis. A number of recent studies have shown the relationship existing between the role played by pregnancy in predisposing to gallbladder disease with lithiasis. Many diagnosis errors are made in this condition. Thus modern treatment methods have improved the prognosis in acute pancreatitis but, when it occurs during pregnancy, diagnostic delays often lead to a gloomy outlook. PMID:8248696

  2. Incidental isolated pancreatic hydatid cyst.

    PubMed

    Kısaoğlu, Abdullah; Özoğul, Bünyami; Atamanalp, Sabri Selçuk; Pirimoğlu, Berhan; Aydınlı, Bülent; Korkut, Ercan

    2015-03-01

    Isolated pancreatic hydatid cysts are a rare parasitic disease even in endemic areas. It is difficult to discriminate primary pancreatic hydatid cysts from other cystic and solid lesions of the pancreas. This is a case report of an incidental isolated pancreatic hydatid cyst. A heterogeneous cystic lesion in the body of the pancreas was identified on magnetic resonance imaging of a patient previously diagnosed patient with cholelithiasis, and because of the malignant possibility of the lesion, splenectomy with distal pancreatectomy and cholecystectomy was performed. The histopathologic diagnosis was reported as a hydatid cyst. Pancreatic hydatid cysts should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic pseudocysts and cystic malignancies.

  3. [Pancreatic abscess and infected pseudocyst].

    PubMed

    Trinidad, E E; Ramírez-Ronda, C H

    1994-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a sterile inflammatory process caused by a chemical auto digestion of the pancreas. The pancreatic abscess and infected pseudocyst are complications of acute pancreatitis of a high mortality rate that require a prompt diagnosis. The pseudocyst is defined as a localized collection of pancreatic juices confine to a retroperitoneal area by a fibrous membrane without epithelium; an abscess is a collection of pus and necrotic tissue. This illnesses should be suspected when patients with acute pancreatitis develop fever, tachycardia, abdominal distention or mass after 14-22 days after the initial attack. These entities require different treatment. The definite treatment is surgical intervention.

  4. Endotherapy in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Tandan, Manu; Nageshwar Reddy, D

    2013-10-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a progressive disease with irreversible changes in the pancreas. Patients commonly present with pain and with exocrine or endocrine insufficiency. All therapeutic efforts in CP are directed towards relief of pain as well as the management of associated complications. Endoscopic therapy offers many advantages in patients with CP who present with ductal calculi, strictures, ductal leaks, pseudocyst or associated biliary strictures. Endotherapy offers a high rate of success with low morbidity in properly selected patients. The procedure can be repeated and failed endotherapy is not a hindrance to subsequent surgery. Endoscopic pancreatic sphincterotomy is helpful in patients with CP with minimal ductal changes while minor papilla sphincterotomy provides relief in patients with pancreas divisum and chronic pancreatitis. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy is the standard of care in patients with large pancreatic ductal calculi. Long term follow up has shown pain relief in over 60% of patients. A transpapillary stent placed across the disruption provides relief in over 90% of patients with ductal leaks. Pancreatic ductal strictures are managed by single large bore stents. Multiple stents are placed for refractory strictures. CP associated benign biliary strictures (BBS) are best treated with multiple plastic stents, as the response to a single plastic stent is poor. Covered self expanding metal stents are increasingly being used in the management of BBS though further long term studies are needed. Pseudocysts are best drained endoscopically with a success rate of 80%-95% at most centers. Endosonography (EUS) has added to the therapeutic armamentarium in the management of patients with CP. Drainage of pseudcysts, cannulation of inaccessible pancreatic ducts and celiac ganglion block in patients with intractable pain are all performed using EUS. Endotherapy should be offered as the first line of therapy in properly selected patients with CP

  5. Gluteal muscle fatty atrophy is not associated with elevated blood metal ions or pseudotumors in patients with a unilateral metal-on-metal hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Reito, Aleksi; Elo, Petra; Nieminen, Jyrki; Puolakka, Timo; Eskelinen, Antti

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose There are no international guidelines to define adverse reaction to metal debris (ARMD). Muscle fatty atrophy has been reported to be common in patients with failing metal-on-metal (MoM) hip replacements. We assessed whether gluteal muscle fatty atrophy is associated with elevated blood metal ion levels and pseudotumors. Patients and methods 263 consecutive patients with unilateral ASR XL total hip replacement using a posterior approach and with an unoperated contralateral hip were included in the study. All patients had undergone a standard screening program at our institution, including MRI and blood metal ion measurement. Muscle fatty atrophy was graded as being absent, mild, moderate, or severe in each of the gluteal muscles. Results The prevalance of moderate-to-severe gluteal muscle atrophy was low (12% for gluteus minimus, 10% for gluteus medius, and 2% for gluteus maximus). Muscle atrophy was neither associated with elevated blood metal ion levels (> 5 ppb) nor with the presence of a clear (solid- or mixed-type) pseudotumor seen in MRI. A combination of moderate-to-severe atrophy in MRI, elevated blood metal ion levels, and MRI-confirmed mixed or solid pseudotumor was rare. Multivariable regression revealed that “preoperative diagnosis other than osteoarthrosis” was the strongest predictor of the presence of fatty atrophy. Interpretation Gluteal muscle atrophy may be a clinically significant finding with influence on hip muscle strength in patients with MoM hip replacement. However, our results suggest that gluteal muscle atrophy seen in MRI is not associated with either the presence or severity of ARMD, at least not in patients who have been operated on using the posterior approach. PMID:26427902

  6. [Infectious complications in necrotizing pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Werner, J; Büchler, M W

    2007-10-01

    Patients with CT evidence of more than 50 % necrosis, or an increased CRP or procalcitonin are at risk of developing severe pancreatitis and septic complications and should be monitored in an intensive care unit. ERCP and sphincterotomy are indicated in patients with biliary pancreatitis and impacted gall stones, biliary sepsis, or obstructive jaundice. In septic patients with necrotizing pancreatitis, a FNA should be performed for differentiation of sterile and infected pancreatic necrosis. Adequate volume resuscitation and analgesic treatment are the most important treatment of acute pancreatitis. Antibiotic prophylaxis reduces septic complications in severe necrotizing pancreatitis and should be started early. Surgical therapy is indicated in patients with infected pancreatic necrosis. The surgical technique of choice is open necrosectomy with postoperative closed lavage of the lesser sac.

  7. Medical treatment of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Mayerle, Julia; Simon, Peter; Lerch, Markus M

    2004-12-01

    Eighty percent of all cases of acute pancreatitis are linked etiologically to gallstone disease or caused by immoderate alcohol consumption. No specific causal treatment for acute pancreatitis exists. Early prognostic factors that indicate severe disease are three or more signs on organ failure scores according to Ranson, Imrie, or Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) 11, extrapancreatic complications of the disease, or the detection of pancreatic necrosis on CT scans. Elevated CRP levels above 130 mg/L can also predict a severe course of acute pancreatitis. The essential medical treatment for acute pancreatitis is the correction of hypovolemia. Moreover, relief of often severe visceral pain is a high priority. Prophylactic antibiotics should be restricted to patients with necrotizing pancreatitis, infected necrosis, or other infectious complications. Enteral nutrition has no adverse effect compared with parenteral nutrition during the course of acute pancreatitis, and is probably beneficial in regard to outcome.

  8. Pancreatic disorders in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Antonini, Filippo; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Angelelli, Lucia; Macarri, Giampiero

    2016-01-01

    An increased incidence of pancreatic disorders either acute pancreatitis or chronic pancreatitis has been recorded in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) compared to the general population. Although most of the pancreatitis in patients with IBD seem to be related to biliary lithiasis or drug induced, in some cases pancreatitis were defined as idiopathic, suggesting a direct pancreatic damage in IBD. Pancreatitis and IBD may have similar presentation therefore a pancreatic disease could not be recognized in patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. This review will discuss the most common pancreatic diseases seen in patients with IBD. PMID:27574565

  9. Pancreatic disorders in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Antonini, Filippo; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Angelelli, Lucia; Macarri, Giampiero

    2016-08-15

    An increased incidence of pancreatic disorders either acute pancreatitis or chronic pancreatitis has been recorded in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) compared to the general population. Although most of the pancreatitis in patients with IBD seem to be related to biliary lithiasis or drug induced, in some cases pancreatitis were defined as idiopathic, suggesting a direct pancreatic damage in IBD. Pancreatitis and IBD may have similar presentation therefore a pancreatic disease could not be recognized in patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. This review will discuss the most common pancreatic diseases seen in patients with IBD. PMID:27574565

  10. Mycobacterium avium-Intracellulare Complex (MAC) Producing a Periportal Pseudotumor in a Patient With HIV and a Normal CD4 Count

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jessica; Driscoll, Meghan; Cohen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex (MAC) is an opportunistic infection typically associated with profound immunosuppression, such as AIDS. The presentation of disseminated MAC can be subtle and mimic systemic symptoms associated with lymphoma; abdominal pseudotumor is an exceptionally rare presentation. In the era of highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART), opportunistic infections are increasingly rare, and secondary prophylaxis for MAC may be discontinued after adequate therapy and immune reconstitution. Recurrence of disseminated MAC after adequate therapy may be due to macrolide resistance, but with an adequate CD4 T-cell count and undetectable HIV viral load, recurrence raises questions of more subtle immune dysregulation. PMID:27807554

  11. Self healing hemophilic pseudotumor of the mandible in a 5-year-old boy, an interesting and rare finding: Case report and review.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Ruchika Keshaw; Siva, B; Rajpal, Jaisika; Singh, Ankur

    2016-01-01

    Hemophilic pseudotumor (PT) is a very rare complication of hemophilia consisting of a chronic, encapsulated, hemorrhagic fluid collection occurring both in the soft tissues and/or bone. Radiological features of osseous hemophilic PT are nonspecific and mimic several other benign or malignant bone tumors or infectious processes. Although the diagnosis is usually made on the location of the lesion and by the knowledge of the underlying disease, the radiologist should be aware of the imaging characteristics, in order to avoid misinterpretation as a malignant tumor, as biopsy of these lesions is contraindicated. PMID:26838154

  12. Environmental risk factors for chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Nitsche, Claudia; Simon, Peter; Weiss, F Ulrich; Fluhr, Gabriele; Weber, Eckhard; Gärtner, Simone; Behn, Claas O; Kraft, Matthias; Ringel, Jörg; Aghdassi, Ali; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis has long been thought to be mainly associated with immoderate alcohol consumption. The observation that only ∼10% of heavy drinkers develop chronic pancreatitis not only suggests that other environmental factors, such as tobacco smoke, are potent additional risk factors, but also that the genetic component of pancreatitis is more common than previously presumed. Either disease-causing or protective traits have been indentified for mutations in different trypsinogen genes, the gene for the trypsin inhibitor SPINK1, chymotrypsinogen C, and the cystic fibrosis transmembane conductance regulator (CFTR). Other factors that have been proposed to contribute to pancreatitis are obesity, diets high in animal protein and fat, as well as antioxidant deficiencies. For the development of pancreatic cancer, preexisting chronic pancreatitis, more prominently hereditary pancreatitis, is a risk factor. The data on environmental risk factors for pancreatic cancer are, with the notable exception of tobacco smoke, either sparse, unconfirmed or controversial. Obesity appears to increase the risk of pancreatic cancer in the West but not in Japan. Diets high in processed or red meat, diets low in fruits and vegetables, phytochemicals such as lycopene and flavonols, have been proposed and refuted as risk or protective factors in different trials. The best established and single most important risk factor for cancer as well as pancreatitis and the one to clearly avoid is tobacco smoke.

  13. Octreotide acetate decreases pancreatic complications after pancreatic trauma.

    PubMed

    Amirata, E; Livingston, D H; Elcavage, J

    1994-10-01

    Octreotide acetate (Sandostatin) has been reported to decrease pancreatic related morbidity after pancreatic resections. This study examined the use of octreotide after pancreatic trauma. The charts of all patients treated for pancreatic injuries from June 1988 to February 1992 were reviewed (n = 28). The mean age of the patients was 29 years (range 16 to 61). The mechanism of injury was motor vehicle accident in 7 patients, gunshot wounds in 14, and stab wounds in 7. The mean (+/- SD) abdominal trauma index (ATI) was 33 +/- 14 and injury severity score (ISS) was 22 +/- 12. Pancreatic injuries were graded as grade I (contusion) in 6 patients, grade II (parenchymal injury) in 18, and grade III (ductal injury) in 4. Seven patients (6 grade II and 1 grade III) were treated with prophylactic octreotide acetate, 150 micrograms to 300 micrograms per day, beginning on day 1. There were no pancreatic complications in this group. Of the remaining 21 patients, 6 (29%) developed 9 pancreatic complications: fluid collections in 3, fistula in 4, pseudocyst in 1, and pancreatitis in 1. Three patients had grade III, 1 had grade II, and 2 had grade I injuries. There were no differences in ATI, ISS, or grade of pancreatic injury between patients who were treated with octreotide and those who were not. No complications were associated with the use of octreotide. In conclusion, pancreatic complications occurred frequently (21%) following pancreatic trauma and resulted in significant morbidity. In this nonrandomized series of patients with equivalent ATI, ISS, and pancreatic grade injuries, the prophylactic use of octreotide was associated with no pancreatic complications and no negative sequelae.

  14. Chronic Pancreatitis in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... fewer than 10 grams of fat. About 20 potato chips contain 10 grams of fat, so it takes discipline to make sure to stay within this range. Patients who have lost the ability to digest food will be prescribed pills containing pancreatic enzymes to help with digestion. They may also be ...

  15. Pancreatic Cancer: A Review.

    PubMed

    Yabar, Cinthya S; Winter, Jordan M

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer is now the third leading cause of cancer related deaths in the United States, yet advances in treatment options have been minimal over the past decade. In this review, we summarize the evaluation and treatments for this disease. We highlight molecular advances that hopefully will soon translate into improved outcomes. PMID:27546841

  16. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 4

    MedlinePlus

    ... lung, liver, and peritoneal cavity. An inset shows cancer cells spreading from the pancreas, through the blood and lymph system, to another ... abdomen that contains the intestines, stomach, and liver). Cancer may also have spread to ... pancreas or to lymph nodes. Stage IV pancreatic cancer. ...

  17. Pancreatic Cystic Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Limaiem, Faten; Khalfallah, Tahar; Farhat, Leila Ben; Bouraoui, Saâdia; Lahmar, Ahlem; Mzabi, Sabeh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are rare and constitute approximately 0.5% of all pancreatic neoplasms. Aims: The study was to describe clinicopathological features of pancreatic cystic tumors. Patients and Methods: In our retrospective study, we reviewed 10 cases of pancreatic cystic neoplasms that were diagnosed at the pathology department of Mongi Slim hospital over a 14-year period (2000-2013). We adopted the latest World Health Organization (WHO) classification (2010) in grouping all tumors. Results: There were one male and nine female patients (sex ratio M/F = 1:9) aged between 21 and 68 years (mean = 37.5 years). The most common clinical presentation was epigastric and abdominal pain (n = 6) followed by vomiting (n = 3). Abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan disclosed a cystic lesion of the pancreas ranging in size between 2 and 10 cm (mean = 6.75 cm). All patients underwent surgical treatment. Histopathological examination of the surgical specimen established the diagnosis of solid pseudopapillary neoplasm (n = 2), serous cystic neoplasm (n = 2), mucinous cystadenoma (n = 4), mucinous cystadenocarcinoma (n = 1), and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm with invasive carcinoma (n = 1). Conclusion: Better understanding of pancreatic cystic neoplasms is essential for clinicians to make accurate diagnosis and to provide the best management for patients. PMID:25210676

  18. Acute and chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Vlodov, J; Tenner, S M

    2001-09-01

    Acute pancreatitis has multiple causes, an unpredictable course, and myriad complications. The diagnosis relies on a combination of history, physical examination, serologic markers, and radiologic findings. The mainstay of therapy includes aggressive hydration, maintenance of NPO, and adequate analgesia with narcotics. Antibiotic and nutritional support with total parenteral nutrition should be used when appropriate.

  19. Nutrition in chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Henrik Højgaard; Irtun, Øivind; Olesen, Søren Schou; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Holst, Mette

    2013-01-01

    The pancreas is a major player in nutrient digestion. In chronic pancreatitis both exocrine and endocrine insufficiency may develop leading to malnutrition over time. Maldigestion is often a late complication of chronic pancreatic and depends on the severity of the underlying disease. The severity of malnutrition is correlated with two major factors: (1) malabsorption and depletion of nutrients (e.g., alcoholism and pain) causes impaired nutritional status; and (2) increased metabolic activity due to the severity of the disease. Nutritional deficiencies negatively affect outcome if they are not treated. Nutritional assessment and the clinical severity of the disease are important for planning any nutritional intervention. Good nutritional practice includes screening to identify patients at risk, followed by a thoroughly nutritional assessment and nutrition plan for risk patients. Treatment should be multidisciplinary and the mainstay of treatment is abstinence from alcohol, pain treatment, dietary modifications and pancreatic enzyme supplementation. To achieve energy-end protein requirements, oral supplementation might be beneficial. Enteral nutrition may be used when patients do not have sufficient calorie intake as in pylero-duodenal-stenosis, inflammation or prior to surgery and can be necessary if weight loss continues. Parenteral nutrition is very seldom used in patients with chronic pancreatitis and should only be used in case of GI-tract obstruction or as a supplement to enteral nutrition. PMID:24259957

  20. Minimally invasive pancreatic surgery.

    PubMed

    Yiannakopoulou, E

    2015-12-01

    Minimally invasive pancreatic surgery is feasible and safe. Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy should be widely adopted for benign lesions of the pancreas. Laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy, although technically demanding, in the setting of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma has a number of advantages including shorter hospital stay, faster recovery, allowing patients to recover in a timelier manner and pursue adjuvant treatment options. Furthermore, it seems that progression-free survival is longer in patients undergoing laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy in comparison with those undergoing open pancreaticoduodenectomy. Minimally invasive middle pancreatectomy seems appropriate for benign or borderline tumors of the neck of the pancreas. Technological advances including intraoperative ultrasound and intraoperative fluorescence imaging systems are expected to facilitate the wide adoption of minimally invasive pancreatic surgery. Although, the oncological outcome seems similar with that of open surgery, there are still concerns, as the majority of relevant evidence comes from retrospective studies. Large multicenter randomized studies comparing laparoscopic with open pancreatectomy as well as robotic assisted with both open and laparoscopic approaches are needed. Robotic approach could be possibly shown to be less invasive than conventional laparoscopic approach through the less traumatic intra-abdominal handling of tissues. In addition, robotic approach could enable the wide adoption of the technique by surgeon who is not that trained in advanced laparoscopic surgery. A putative clinical benefit of minimally invasive pancreatic surgery could be the attenuated surgical stress response leading to reduced morbidity and mortality as well as lack of the detrimental immunosuppressive effect especially for the oncological patients. PMID:26530291

  1. Patient Derived Cancer Cell Lines in Identifying Molecular Changes in Patients With Previously Untreated Pancreatic Cancer Receiving Gemcitabine Hydrochloride-Based Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-18

    Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  2. Laparoscopic pancreatic surgery.

    PubMed

    Mori, Toshiyuki; Abe, Nobutsugu; Sugiyama, Masanori; Atomi, Yutaka

    2005-01-01

    In the past, in the pancreas, a minimally invasive technique was only used for diagnostic laparoscopy in evaluating periampullary malignancy. Recent advances in operative techniques and instrumentation have empowered surgeons to perform virtually all procedures in the pancreas, including the Whipple procedure. Some of these procedures represent the most sophisticated application of minimally invasive surgery, and their outcomes are reportedly better than those of conventional open approaches. In addition to the evaluation of resectability in periampullary malignancy, palliative procedures, including biliary bypasses and gastrojejunostomy, can be performed laparoscopically. Although it is reportedly feasible to perform a Whipple procedure laparescopically, no benefit of the laparoscopic approach over the conventional open approach has been documented. Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy, with or without preserving the spleen, is technically easier than the Whipple procedure, and is more widely accepted. Indications for laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy include cystic neoplasms and islet-cell tumors located in the pancreatic body or tail. Complications of acute and chronic pancreatitis may be treated with the use of surgical laparoscopy. When infected necrotizing pancreatitis is identified, surgical intervention for drainage and debridement is required. According to the type and location of infected necrotizing pancreatitis, three laparoscopic operative approaches have been reported: infracolic debridement, retroperitoneal debridement, and laparoscopic transgastric pancreatic necrosectomy. When internal drainage is indicated for a pseudocyst, a minimally invasive technique is a promising option. Laparoscopic pseudocyst gastrostomy, cyst jejunostomy, or cyst duodenostomy can be performed, depending on the size and location of the pseudocyst. Especially when a pseudocyst is located in close contact with the posterior wall of the stomach, it is best drained by a

  3. Externalized decondensed neutrophil chromatin occludes pancreatic ducts and drives pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Leppkes, Moritz; Maueröder, Christian; Hirth, Sebastian; Nowecki, Stefanie; Günther, Claudia; Billmeier, Ulrike; Paulus, Susanne; Biermann, Mona; Munoz, Luis E; Hoffmann, Markus; Wildner, Dane; Croxford, Andrew L; Waisman, Ari; Mowen, Kerri; Jenne, Dieter E; Krenn, Veit; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M; Schett, Georg; Wirtz, Stefan; Neurath, Markus F; Herrmann, Martin; Becker, Christoph

    2016-03-11

    Ductal occlusion has been postulated to precipitate focal pancreatic inflammation, while the nature of the primary occluding agents has remained elusive. Neutrophils make use of histone citrullination by peptidyl arginine deiminase-4 (PADI4) in contact to particulate agents to extrude decondensed chromatin as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). In high cellular density, NETs form macroscopically visible aggregates. Here we show that such aggregates form inside pancreatic ducts in humans and mice occluding pancreatic ducts and thereby driving pancreatic inflammation. Experimental models indicate that PADI4 is critical for intraductal aggregate formation and that PADI4-deficiency abrogates disease progression. Mechanistically, we identify the pancreatic juice as a strong instigator of neutrophil chromatin extrusion. Characteristic single components of pancreatic juice, such as bicarbonate ions and calcium carbonate crystals, induce aggregated NET formation. Ductal occlusion by aggregated NETs emerges as a pathomechanism with relevance in a plethora of inflammatory conditions involving secretory ducts.

  4. Externalized decondensed neutrophil chromatin occludes pancreatic ducts and drives pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Leppkes, Moritz; Maueröder, Christian; Hirth, Sebastian; Nowecki, Stefanie; Günther, Claudia; Billmeier, Ulrike; Paulus, Susanne; Biermann, Mona; Munoz, Luis E.; Hoffmann, Markus; Wildner, Dane; Croxford, Andrew L.; Waisman, Ari; Mowen, Kerri; Jenne, Dieter E.; Krenn, Veit; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M.; Schett, Georg; Wirtz, Stefan; Neurath, Markus F.; Herrmann, Martin; Becker, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Ductal occlusion has been postulated to precipitate focal pancreatic inflammation, while the nature of the primary occluding agents has remained elusive. Neutrophils make use of histone citrullination by peptidyl arginine deiminase-4 (PADI4) in contact to particulate agents to extrude decondensed chromatin as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). In high cellular density, NETs form macroscopically visible aggregates. Here we show that such aggregates form inside pancreatic ducts in humans and mice occluding pancreatic ducts and thereby driving pancreatic inflammation. Experimental models indicate that PADI4 is critical for intraductal aggregate formation and that PADI4-deficiency abrogates disease progression. Mechanistically, we identify the pancreatic juice as a strong instigator of neutrophil chromatin extrusion. Characteristic single components of pancreatic juice, such as bicarbonate ions and calcium carbonate crystals, induce aggregated NET formation. Ductal occlusion by aggregated NETs emerges as a pathomechanism with relevance in a plethora of inflammatory conditions involving secretory ducts. PMID:26964500

  5. Acute pancreatitis: clinical vs. CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, M.C.; Barkin, J.; Isikoff, M.B.; Silver stein, W.; Kalser, M.

    1982-08-01

    In a prospective study of 91 patients with acute pancreatitis, computed tomographic (CT) findings were correlated with the clinical type of acute pancreatitis. In acute edematous pancreatitis (63 patients; 16 with repeat CT), CT was normal (28%) or showed inflammation limited to the pancreas (61%). Phlegmonous changes were present in 11%, including one patient with focal pancreatic hemorrhage, indicating that clinically unsuspected hemorrhagic pancreatitis can occur. In acute necrotizing (hemorrhagic, suppurative) pancreatitis (nine patients; eight with repeat CT), no patient had a normal CT scan and 89% had phlegmonous changes. One patient had hemorrhagic pancreatitis and three had abscesses. In acute exacerbation of chronic pancreatitis (10 patients; three with repeat CT), there were pancreatic calcifications (70%), a focal mass (40%), and pancreatic ductal dilation (30%). On follow-up CT, the findings of acute pancreatitis did not always disappear with resolution of the clinical symptons. This was especialy true of phlegmonous pancreatitis, where the CT findings could persist for months.

  6. Inflammatory pancreatic masses: problems in differentiating focal pancreatitis from carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Neff, C.C.; Simeone, J.F.; Wittenberg, J.; Mueller, P.R.; Ferrucci, J.T. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The authors studied 19 patients with focal inflammatory masses of the pancreas over an 18-month period. In 13 cases, transhepatic cholangiography and/or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography were unsuccessful in differentiating pancreatitis from carcinoma. Eighteen patients had a history of alcohol abuse, and 12 had had pancreatitis previously. Pre-existing glandular injury appears to be a prerequisite to formation of focal inflammatory pancreatic masses.

  7. Dendritic Cells Promote Pancreatic Viability in Mice with Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Bedrosian, Andrea S.; Nguyen, Andrew H.; Hackman, Michael; Connolly, Michael K.; Malhotra, Ashim; Ibrahim, Junaid; Cieza-Rubio, Napoleon E.; Henning, Justin R.; Barilla, Rocky; Rehman, Adeel; Pachter, H. Leon; Medina-Zea, Marco V.; Cohen, Steven M.; Frey, Alan B.; Acehan, Devrim; Miller, George

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims Acute pancreatitis increases morbidity and mortality from organ necrosis by mechanisms that are incompletely understood. Dendritic cells (DCs) can promote or suppress inflammation, depending on their subtype and context. We investigated the roles of DC in development of acute pancreatitis. Methods Acute pancreatitis was induced in CD11c.DTR mice using caerulein or L-arginine; DCs were depleted by administration of diphtheria toxin. Survival was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results Numbers of MHC II+CD11c+DC increased 100-fold in pancreas of mice with acute pancreatitis, to account for nearly 15% of intra-pancreatic leukocytes. Intra-pancreatic DC acquired an immune phenotype in mice with acute pancreatitis; they expressed higher levels of MHC II and CD86 and increased production of interleukin-6, membrane cofactor protein (MCP)-1, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. However, rather than inducing an organ-destructive inflammatory process, DC were required for pancreatic viability; the exocrine pancreas died in mice that were depleted of DC and challenged with caerulein or L-arginine. All mice with pancreatitis that were depleted of DC died from acinar cell death within 4 days. Depletion of DC from mice with pancreatitis resulted in neutrophil infiltration and increased levels of systemic markers of inflammation. However, the organ necrosis associated with depletion of DC did not require infiltrating neutrophils, activation of NF-κB, or signaling by mitogen-activated protein kinase or TNF-α. Conclusions DC are required for pancreatic viability in mice with acute pancreatitis and might protect organs against cell stress. PMID:21801698

  8. Endoscopic Treatment of Recurrent Acute Pancreatitis and Smoldering Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Das, Rohit; Yadav, Dhiraj; Papachristou, Georgios I

    2015-10-01

    Recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP) is a challenging condition that can lead to chronic pancreatitis and long-term morbidity. Etiology-based treatment can potentially have an impact on the natural history of RAP and its progression to chronic pancreatitis. In cases of divisum-associated RAP and idiopathic RAP, several studies have been performed to evaluate the efficacy of endoscopic therapy in alleviation of symptoms and frequency of AP events. This review discusses the literature available on these topic as well as touching on the role of endoscopic therapy in smoldering acute pancreatitis.

  9. A Rare presentation of neurobrucellosis in a child with Recurrent transient ischemic attacks and pseudotumor cerebri (A case report and review of literature).

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    Brucellosis is a multi-system infectious disease that presents with various manifestations and complications. Neurobrucellosis is an uncommon but serious presentation of brucellosis that can be seen in all stages of the disease. High index of suspicion, especially in endemic areas is essential to prevent morbidity from this disease. The case was an 11- year -old female patient who was admitted with a severe headache that was worsening over a period of 2 months. The day after each attack, she experienced transient right hemiparesia that was lasting less than one hour (TIA) as well as blurred vision and bilateral papilledema. Laboratory findings revealed serum agglutination Wright test positive at 1/320 and 2ME test positive at 1/160. A lumbar puncture showed a clear CSF with increased opening pressure (32 cmH2O), CSF examination was within normal range (pseudotumor cerebri).To our knowledge, there has been no report for recurrent TIA in pediatric neurobrucellosis in the base of pseudotumor cerebri. In endemic areas like Iran, unexplained neurological signs or symptoms should be evaluated for brucellosis. PMID:24949055

  10. A Rare presentation of neurobrucellosis in a child with Recurrent transient ischemic attacks and pseudotumor cerebri (A case report and review of literature)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Brucellosis is a multi-system infectious disease that presents with various manifestations and complications. Neurobrucellosis is an uncommon but serious presentation of brucellosis that can be seen in all stages of the disease. High index of suspicion, especially in endemic areas is essential to prevent morbidity from this disease. The case was an 11- year -old female patient who was admitted with a severe headache that was worsening over a period of 2 months. The day after each attack, she experienced transient right hemiparesia that was lasting less than one hour (TIA) as well as blurred vision and bilateral papilledema. Laboratory findings revealed serum agglutination Wright test positive at 1/320 and 2ME test positive at 1/160. A lumbar puncture showed a clear CSF with increased opening pressure (32 cmH2O), CSF examination was within normal range (pseudotumor cerebri).To our knowledge, there has been no report for recurrent TIA in pediatric neurobrucellosis in the base of pseudotumor cerebri. In endemic areas like Iran, unexplained neurological signs or symptoms should be evaluated for brucellosis. PMID:24949055

  11. A Rare presentation of neurobrucellosis in a child with Recurrent transient ischemic attacks and pseudotumor cerebri (A case report and review of literature).

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    Brucellosis is a multi-system infectious disease that presents with various manifestations and complications. Neurobrucellosis is an uncommon but serious presentation of brucellosis that can be seen in all stages of the disease. High index of suspicion, especially in endemic areas is essential to prevent morbidity from this disease. The case was an 11- year -old female patient who was admitted with a severe headache that was worsening over a period of 2 months. The day after each attack, she experienced transient right hemiparesia that was lasting less than one hour (TIA) as well as blurred vision and bilateral papilledema. Laboratory findings revealed serum agglutination Wright test positive at 1/320 and 2ME test positive at 1/160. A lumbar puncture showed a clear CSF with increased opening pressure (32 cmH2O), CSF examination was within normal range (pseudotumor cerebri).To our knowledge, there has been no report for recurrent TIA in pediatric neurobrucellosis in the base of pseudotumor cerebri. In endemic areas like Iran, unexplained neurological signs or symptoms should be evaluated for brucellosis.

  12. Current Knowledge on Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Iovanna, Juan; Mallmann, Maria Cecilia; Gonçalves, Anthony; Turrini, Olivier; Dagorn, Jean-Charles

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death with a median survival of 6 months and a dismal 5-year survival rate of 3–5%. The development and progression of pancreatic cancer are caused by the activation of oncogenes, the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, and the deregulation of many signaling pathways. Therefore, the strategies targeting these molecules as well as their downstream signaling could be promising for the prevention and treatment of pancreatic cancer. However, although targeted therapies for pancreatic cancer have yielded encouraging results in vitro and in animal models, these findings have not been translated into improved outcomes in clinical trials. This failure is due to an incomplete understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer and to the selection of poorly efficient or imperfectly targeted agents. In this review, we will critically present the current knowledge regarding the molecular, biochemical, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of pancreatic cancer. PMID:22655256

  13. Severe acute pancreatitis and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Robertson, K W; Stewart, I S; Imrie, C W

    2006-01-01

    For most patients with pregnancy-associated pancreatitis there is little maternal survival threat and only occasionally are there foetal deaths. We describe 4 young women with pregnancy-associated severe acute pancreatitis who each had gallstones. Their ages were 17, 18, 20 and 24 years. Each was a tertiary referral to our unit in Glasgow and each pursued a life-threatening course with hospital stays ranging from 37 to 90 days. One patient required pancreatic necrosectomy for infected necrosis, another had percutaneous management of a pancreatic abscess and 2 had cystogastrostomy as treatment for pancreatic pseudocyst. All underwent early endoscopic sphincterotomy and later cholecystectomy. It is important to be aware that pregnancy-associated acute pancreatitis may be severe, posing a survival threat even in the youngest patients. Gallstones, as we reported almost 20 years ago, are the most common aetiological factor in such patients.

  14. Biliary scintigraphy in acute pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Serafini, A.N.; Al-Sheikh, W.; Barkin, J.S.; Hourani, M.; Sfakiankis, G.; Clarke, L.P.; Ashkar, F.S.

    1982-08-01

    A prospective study was carried out in 60 patients to determine the efficacy of /sup 99m/Tc-PIPIDA scintigraphy in differentiating biliary pancreatitis from nonbiliary pancreatitis. Forty patients were classified as having biliary pancreatitis and 20 patients as having the nonbiliary type. Scintigraphic scans were divided into five main types according to the time to visualization of the gallbladder and the time to excretion of /sup 99m/Tc-PIPIDA into the intestinal tract. Normal scans were obtained on 95% of patients (19/20) with nonbiliary pancreatitis; 22.5% of patients (9/40) with biliary pancreatitis had normal scans. It is concluded that elevated amylase levels together with an abnormal biliary scan, as defined by the criteria presented here, indicate biliary pancreatitis, while a normal scan largely excludes such diagnosis.

  15. Computed tomography of pancreatic trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey, R.B. Jr.; Federle, M.P.; Crass, R.A.

    1983-05-01

    In a review of over 300 CT scans of abdominal trauma, we encountered 13 patients with surgically proved pancreatic injuries. CT correctly diagnosed pancreatic fractures, contusions, or posttraumatic pseudocysts in 11 of these patients. There were two false positive and two false negative diagnoses. The CT diagnosis of pancreatic trauma may be difficult in selected patients who are scanned soon after injury. Acutely, the actual plane of a pancreatic fracture may be difficult to identify with CT, and the peripancreatic soft-tissue changes of traumatic pancreatitis are often subtle. Eight of 11 correctly diagnosed pancreatic injuries showed thickening of the left anterior renal fascia on CT scans. This sign should prompt a critical evaluation of the pancreas of the traumatized patient.

  16. Biliary scintigraphy in acute pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Serafini, A.N.; Al-Sheikh, W.; Barkin, J.S.; Hourani, M.; Sfakiankis, G.; Clarke, L.P.; Ashkar, F.S.

    1982-08-01

    A prospective study was carried out in 60 patients to determine the efficacy of /sup 99//sup m/Tc-PIPIDA scintigraphy in differentiating biliary pancreatitis from nonbiliary pancreatitis. Forty patients were classified as having biliary pancreatitis and 20 patients as having the nonbiliary type. Scintigraphic scans were divided into five main types according to the time to visualization of the gallbladder and the time to excretion of /sup 99//sup m/Tc-PIPIDA into the intestinal tract. Normal scans were obtained in 95% of patients (19/20) with nonbiliary pancreatitis; 22.5% of patients (9/40) with biliary pancreatitis had normal scans. It is concluded that elevated amylase levels together with an abnormal biliary scan, as defined by the criteria presented here, indicate biliary pancreatitis, while a normal scan largely excludes such diagnosis.

  17. Diagnostic Management of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dabizzi, Emanuele; Assef, Mauricio Saab; Raimondo, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most deadly solid tumors, with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Due to a non-specific clinical presentation, it is often diagnosed at an advanced stage and is rarely amenable for curative treatment. Therefore early diagnosis and appropriate staging are still essential to define the best care and to improve patient survival. Several imaging modalities are currently available for the evaluation of pancreatic cancer. This review focuses on different techniques and discusses the diagnostic management of patients with pancreatic cancer. This review was conducted utilizing Pubmed and was limited to papers published within the last 5 years. The search key words pancreatic cancer, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, pancreatic tumors, diagnosis, radiology, imaging, nuclear imaging, endoscopy, endoscopic ultrasound and biochemical markers were used. PMID:24212626

  18. Early detection of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Nita

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a low-incident but highly mortal disease. It accounts for only 3% of estimated new cancer cases each year but is currently the fourth common cause of cancer mortality. By 2030, it is expected to be the 2nd leading cause of cancer death. There is a clear need to diagnose and classify pancreatic cancer at earlier stages in order to give patients the best chance at a definitive cure through surgery. Three precursor lesions that distinctly lead to pancreatic adenocarcinoma have been identified, and we have increasing understanding the non-genetic and genetic risk factors for the disease. With increased understanding about the risk factors, the familial patters, and associated accumulation of genetic mutations involved in pancreatic cancer, we know that there are mutations that occur early in the development of pancreatic cancer and that improved genetic risk-based strategies in screening for pancreatic cancer may be possible and successful at saving or prolonging lives. The remaining challenge is that current standards for diagnosing pancreatic cancer remain too invasive and too costly for widespread screening for pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, the promises of noninvasive methods of detection such as blood, saliva, and stool remain underdeveloped or lack robust testing. However, significant progress has been made, and we are drawing closer to a strategy for the screening and early detection of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26361402

  19. An overview of hereditary pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Rebours, Vinciane; Lévy, Philippe; Ruszniewski, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis is a rare cause of chronic pancreatitis. The prevalence was evaluated to 0.3/100000 in Western Countries. Genetic disorders are due to mutations of the PRSS1 gene on the long arm of the chromosome 7, encoding for the cationic trypsinogen. The inheritance pattern is autosomal dominant with an incomplete penetrance (80%). Since 1996, more than 30 mutations were found. The three more common mutations are R122H, N29I and A16V. First symptoms begin since childhood, mainly before 10 years old. Main symptoms are pancreatic pain and acute pancreatitis (>70%). CP morphological changes as pancreatic calcifications are diagnosed at a median age of 22-25 years. Exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency occurred in 34% and 26% at a median age of 29 and 38 years. No clinical differences exist according to the mutation type. No excess of mortality in hereditary pancreatitis population compared to general population was found, despite a real risk of cancer. The cumulative risks of pancreatic cancer at 50, 60 and, 75 years are 10%, 18.7% and, 53.5%, respectively. The relative risk of cancer increases in smokers and is evaluated to 8.55. Hereditary pancreatitis diagnosis permits to propose an adapted management in expert centres.

  20. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Muñoz, J Enrique

    2014-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the early diagnosis of the disease, the prediction of the fibrosis degree of the gland, the evaluation of patients with asymptomatic hyperenzimemia, the medical and surgical treatment of abdominal pain and the knowledge of the natural history of the autoimmune pancreatitis. In patients with indetermined EUS findings of chronic pancreatitis, a new endoscopic ultrasound examination in the follow-up is of help to confirm or to exclude the disease. Smoking, number of relapses, results of pancreatic function tests and EUS findings allow predicting the degree of pancreatic fibrosis in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Antioxidant therapy has shown to be effective in reducing pain secondary to chronic pancreatitis, although the type and optimal dose of antioxidants remains to be elucidated. Development of intestinal bacterial overgrowth is frequent in patients with chronic pancreatitis, but its impact on symptoms is unknown and deserves further investigations. Finally, autoimmune pancreatitis relapses in about half of the patients with either type 1 or type 2 disease; relapses frequently occur within the first two years of follow-up.

  1. Early management of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Schepers, Nicolien J; Besselink, Marc G H; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Bakker, Olaf J; Bruno, Marco J

    2013-10-01

    Acute pancreatitis is the most common gastro-intestinal indication for acute hospitalization and its incidence continues to rise. In severe pancreatitis, morbidity and mortality remains high and is mainly driven by organ failure and infectious complications. Early management strategies should aim to prevent or treat organ failure and to reduce infectious complications. This review addresses the management of acute pancreatitis in the first hours to days after onset of symptoms, including fluid therapy, nutrition and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography. This review also discusses the recently revised Atlanta classification which provides new uniform terminology, thereby facilitating communication regarding severity and complications of pancreatitis.

  2. [Latest advances in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    The present article analyses the main presentations on acute pancreatitis at Digestive Disease Week 2015. Arterial pseudoaneurysm is an uncommon complication of acute pancreatitis (incidence 0.7%) and mortality from this cause is currently anecdotal. Diabetes mellitus has little impact on the clinical course of acute pancreatitis, unlike cirrhosis, which doubles the risk of mortality. Intake of unsaturated fat could be associated with an increased severity of acute pancreatitis and is a confounding factor in studies evaluating the relationship between obesity and morbidity and mortality. PET-CT (positron emission tomography-computed tomography) could be a non-invasive tool to detect infection of collections in acute pancreatitis. Peripancreatic fat necrosis is less frequent than pancreatic fat necrosis and is associated with a better clinical course. If the clinical course is poor, increasing the calibre of the percutaneous drains used in the treatment of infected necrosis can avoid surgery in 20% of patients. The use of low molecular-weight heparin in moderate or severe pancreatitis could be associated with a better clinical course, specifically with a lower incidence of necrosis. In acute recurrent pancreatitis, simvastatin is a promising drug for prophylaxis of new episodes of acute pancreatitis. Nutritional support through a nasogastric tube does not improve clinical course compared with oral nutrition.

  3. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Muñoz, J Enrique

    2013-10-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern knowledge of the etiopathogenesis of the disease, the pharmacological treatment of pain, and knowledge of the natural history of autoimmune pancreatitis. New evidence supports the relatively low prevalence of chronic alcoholic pancreatitis, and the role of tobacco in triggering the etiopathogenic mechanisms of chronic pancreatitis is better understood. Some studies have identified certain factors that are associated with having a positive genetic test in adults with chronic idiopathic pancreatitis, which should help to select those patients who should undergo genetic studies. Antioxidant therapy has been shown to be effective in reducing pain secondary to chronic pancreatitis, although the type and optimal dose of antioxidants remains to be elucidated. Finally, the development of exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency is a very common finding during the long-term follow-up of patients with autoimmune pancreatitis. Smoking also seems to play a role in this type of pancreatitis.

  4. Histochemical studies of pancreatic calculi.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, W; Matsushiro, T; Suzuki, N; Sato, T

    1975-05-01

    Fourteen pancreatic calculi from the corresponding number of pancreatic lithiasis patients were examined mineralogically and histochemically. The following results were obtained. The main components of calculi were calcium carbonate in 13 of the 14 cases, and calcium phosphate in the remaining one. Calcium carbonate calculi were all so-called intraductal calculi, with acidic glycoprotein apparently enwrapping the component particles. Acidic glycoproteins acted to bridge calcium carbonate particles, as in the cases of gallstone and urinary stone. The calcium phosphate calculus had a histochemical feature of pathologic calcification with degenerated collagen fibrils as the matrix, suggesting the calcification of the fibrotic pancreatic parenchyma after pancreatitis.

  5. Pancreatic cancer genomics.

    PubMed

    Chang, David K; Grimmond, Sean M; Biankin, Andrew V

    2014-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies. The overall median survival even with treatment is only 6-9 months, with almost 90% succumbing to the disease within a year of diagnosis. It is characterised by an intense desmoplastic stroma that may contribute to therapeutic resistance, and poses significant challenges for genomic sequencing studies. It is recalcitrant to almost all therapies and consequently remains the fourth leading cause of cancer death in Western societies. Genomic studies are unveiling a vast heterogeneity of mutated genes, and this diversity may explain why conventional clinical trial designs have mostly failed to demonstrate efficacy in unselected patients. Those that are available offer only marginal benefits overall, but are associated with clinically significant responses in as yet undefined subgroups. This chapter describes our current understanding of the genomics of pancreatic cancer and the potential impact of these findings on our approaches to treatment.

  6. Review of pancreatic trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Glancy, K E

    1989-01-01

    In reviewing the literature on pancreatic trauma (1,984 cases), I found that it resulted from penetrating trauma in 73% and blunt trauma in 27% of cases. Associated injuries were common (average 3.0 per patient). Increased mortality was associated with shotgun wounds, an increasing number of associated injuries, the proximity of the injury to the head of the pancreas, preoperative shock, and massive hemorrhage. High mortality was found for total pancreatectomy, duct reanastomosis, and lack of surgical treatment, with lower mortality for Roux-en-Y anastomoses, suture and drainage, distal pancreatectomy, and duodenal exclusion and diverticulization techniques. Most patients required drainage only. The preoperative diagnosis of pancreatic trauma is difficult, with the diagnosis usually made during surgical repair for associated injuries. Blood studies such as amylase levels, diagnostic peritoneal lavage, and plain radiographs are not reliable. Computed tomographic scanning may be superior, but data are limited. PMID:2669347

  7. [Acute pancreatitis and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Scollo, P; Licitra, G

    1993-12-01

    Aetiologic factors (gallstones, hyperlipidemia I-IV, hypertriglyceridaemia) make their occurrence, mainly, in the third trimester of gestation. Two cases of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy are described; in both cases patients referred healthy diet, no habit to smoke and no previous episode of pancreatitis. An obstructive pathology of biliary tract was the aetiologic factor. Vomiting, upper abdominal pain are aspecific symptoms that impose a differential diagnosis with acute appendicitis, cholecystitis and obstructive intestinal pathology. Laboratory data (elevated serum amylase and lipase levels) and ultrasonography carry out an accurate diagnosis. The management of acute pancreatitis is based on the use of symptomatic drugs, a low fat diet alternated to the parenteral nutrition when triglycerides levels are more than 28 mmol/L. Surgical therapy, used only in case of obstructive pathology of biliary tract, is optimally collected in the third trimester or immediately after postpartum. Our patients, treated only medically, delivered respectively at 38th and 40th week of gestation. Tempestivity of diagnosis and appropriate therapy permit to improve prognosis of a pathology that, although really associated with pregnancy, presents high maternal mortality (37%) cause of complications (shock, coagulopathy, acute respiratory insufficiency) and fetal (37.9%) by occurrence of preterm delivery.

  8. Immunohistochemistry of Pancreatic Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Sukhwinder; Shimizu, Tomohiro; Baine, Michael J.; Kumar, Sushil; Batra, Surinder K.

    2013-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a valuable tool to visualize the distribution and localization of specific cellular components within morphologically preserved tissue sections or cell preparations. It combines the histologic morphology of tissues for detecting the actual antigen distribution, specificity of antibody–antigen interaction for optimal detection, and sensitivity of immunochemical methods for assessing the amount of antigen in tissues. It is routinely used clinically to diagnose type (benign or malignant), stage, and grade of cancer using specific tumor markers. The application of IHC ranges from disease diagnosis and prognosis to drug development and analysis of the pathobiological roles of various molecular players during disease development. Due to better availability of highly specific antibodies and optimal methodologies for performing immunohistochemical studies, IHC is being used at an expanding rate to understand pancreatic tumor biology as well as to study the fate of various molecular markers during the initiation, progression, and metastasis of pancreatic neoplasia. Herein, we describe the detailed protocol for IHC analyses of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia in tissues and fine needle aspirates from both human and mouse samples. PMID:23359148

  9. Traumatic pancreatic pseudocysts.

    PubMed

    Popoola, D; Lou, M A; Sims, E H

    1983-05-01

    At the Martin Luther King, Jr, General Hospital in Los Angeles, during the period from June 1972 to April 1981, seven patients underwent surgery for traumatic pancreatic pseudocysts. The overall average age was 28 and the average hospital stay was 31 days. Ultrasound was the most useful test for diagnosis and follow-up. Preoperatively, serum amylases were not consistently elevated. Overall recurrences and complications totaled 57 percent. There were no deaths. The authors consider a large cystogastrostomy the treatment of choice for mature cysts that are satisfactorily adherent to the stomach. The second preference is a Roux-en-Y cystojejunostomy. External drainage was employed for acute cysts that required drainage. A distal pancreatectomy was performed for patients with small pancreatic tail pseudocysts. Patients who underwent acute drainage were usually drained externally and had a poorer outcome than patients who were operated on later with internal drainage. When compared with another group of 15 alcoholic patients who were operated on for pancreatic pseudocysts, patients with traumatic pseudocysts had a poorer outcome.

  10. Pancreatic Cancer Database: an integrative resource for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Joji Kurian; Kim, Min-Sik; Balakrishnan, Lavanya; Nanjappa, Vishalakshi; Raju, Rajesh; Marimuthu, Arivusudar; Radhakrishnan, Aneesha; Muthusamy, Babylakshmi; Khan, Aafaque Ahmad; Sakamuri, Sruthi; Tankala, Shantal Gupta; Singal, Mukul; Nair, Bipin; Sirdeshmukh, Ravi; Chatterjee, Aditi; Prasad, T S Keshava; Maitra, Anirban; Gowda, Harsha; Hruban, Ralph H; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2014-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. The etiology of pancreatic cancer is heterogeneous with a wide range of alterations that have already been reported at the level of the genome, transcriptome, and proteome. The past decade has witnessed a large number of experimental studies using high-throughput technology platforms to identify genes whose expression at the transcript or protein levels is altered in pancreatic cancer. Based on expression studies, a number of molecules have also been proposed as potential biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of this deadly cancer. Currently, there are no repositories which provide an integrative view of multiple Omics data sets from published research on pancreatic cancer. Here, we describe the development of a web-based resource, Pancreatic Cancer Database (http://www.pancreaticcancerdatabase.org), as a unified platform for pancreatic cancer research. PCD contains manually curated information pertaining to quantitative alterations in miRNA, mRNA, and proteins obtained from small-scale as well as high-throughput studies of pancreatic cancer tissues and cell lines. We believe that PCD will serve as an integrative platform for scientific community involved in pancreatic cancer research.

  11. Pancreatic polypepetide inhibits pancreatic enzyme secretion via a cholinergic pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, G.; Louie, D.S.; Owyang, C. )

    1987-11-01

    In rat pancreatic slices, rat pancreatic polypeptide (PP) or C-terminal hexapeptide of PP (PP-(31-36)) inhibited potassium-stimulated amylase release in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition was unaffected by addition of hexamethonium but blocked by atropine. In contrast, PP-(31-36) did not have any effect on acetylcholine- or cholecystokinin octapeptide-stimulated amylase release. In addition, when pancreatic slices were incubated with ({sup 3}H)choline, PP-(31-36) inhibited the potassium-evoked release of synthesized ({sup 3}H)acetylcholine in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory action of PP was unaffected by adrenergic, dopaminergic, or opioid receptor antagonists. Thus PP inhibits pancreatic enzyme secretion via presynaptic modulation of acetylcholine release. This newly identified pathway provides a novel mechanism for hormonal inhibition of pancreatic enzyme secretion via modulation of the classic neurotransmitter function.

  12. Groove Pancreatitis: A Rare form of Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Jani, Bharivi; Rzouq, Fadi; Saligram, Shreyas; Nawabi, Atta; Nicola, Marian; Dennis, Katie; Ernst, Carly; Abbaszadeh, Ali; Bonino, John; Olyaee, Mojtaba

    2015-01-01

    Context: Groove pancreatitis is a rare form of chronic pancreatitis affecting the “groove” of the pancreas among the pancreatic head, duodenum, and common bile duct. The exact cause is unknown, although there are associations with long-term alcohol abuse, smoking, peptic ulcer disease, heterotopic pancreas, gastric resection, biliary disease, and anatomical or functional obstruction of the minor papilla. The diagnosis can be challenging. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography are the preferred imaging modalities. The treatment of choice is conservative although surgical intervention can sometimes be required. Case Report: A 57-year-old male with a history of human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis B presented with 4 days of epigastric pain. Abdominal exam revealed absent bowel sounds and epigastric tenderness. He had a creatinine of 1.72 mg/dL, potassium of 2.9 mmol/L, and a normal lipase level of 86 U/L. Liver enzymes and total bilirubin were normal. Computed tomography abdomen showed high-grade obstruction of the second portion of the duodenum without any obvious mass. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed a mass at the duodenal bulb causing luminal narrowing, with biopsies negative for malignancy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass in the region of the pancreatic head and descending duodenum. EUS revealed a 3 cm mass in the region of pancreatic head with irregular borders and no vascular invasion. Fine needle aspiration (FNA) was nondiagnostic. The patient then underwent a Whipple's procedure. Pathology of these specimens was negative for malignancy but was consistent with para-duodenal or groove pancreatitis. Conclusion: The low incidence of groove pancreatitis is partly due to lack of familiarity with the disease. Groove pancreatitis should be considered in the differential for patients presenting with pancreatic head lesions and no cholestatic jaundice, especially when a duodenal obstruction is present, and

  13. Surgery for pancreatic cancer -- discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... enable JavaScript. Pancreatic surgery is done to treat cancer of the pancreas gland. When You Are in the Hospital All ... Claudius C, Lillemoe KD. Palliative Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer. In: Cameron ... Vickers SM. Exocrine Pancreas. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, ...

  14. Diet and Pancreatic Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Casari, Ilaria; Falasca, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is without any doubt the malignancy with the poorest prognosis and the lowest survival rate. This highly aggressive disease is rarely diagnosed at an early stage and difficult to treat due to its resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Therefore, there is an urgent need to clarify the causes responsible for pancreatic cancer and to identify preventive strategies to reduce its incidence in the population. Some circumstances, such as smoking habits, being overweight and diabetes, have been identified as potentially predisposing factors to pancreatic cancer, suggesting that diet might play a role. A diet low in fat and sugars, together with a healthy lifestyle, regular exercise, weight reduction and not smoking, may contribute to prevent pancreatic cancer and many other cancer types. In addition, increasing evidence suggests that some food may have chemo preventive properties. Indeed, a high dietary intake of fresh fruit and vegetables has been shown to reduce the risk of developing pancreatic cancer, and recent epidemiological studies have associated nut consumption with a protective effect against it. Therefore, diet could have an impact on the development of pancreatic cancer and further investigations are needed to assess the potential chemo preventive role of specific foods against this disease. This review summarizes the key evidence for the role of dietary habits and their effect on pancreatic cancer and focuses on possible mechanisms for the association between diet and risk of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26610570

  15. Pancreatic cancer: chemotherapy and radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Andrén-Sandberg, Åke

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer in many cases appears in a non-curatively resectable stage when the diagnosis is made. Palliative treatment become an option in the patients with advanced stage. The present article reviewed chemotherapy and radiotherapy in various advanced stage of pancreatic cancer. PMID:22540056

  16. [Tomodensitometry of severe acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Frija, J; Abanou, A; Viandier, A; Laval-Jeantet, M

    1983-01-01

    90 computed tomographic examinations were performed to 57 patients referred at Hospital Saint-Louis for an acute pancreatitis. 32 patients were operated or autopsied. Among these 32 patients, 19 patients had 21 examinations before surgery or autopsy; the other 13 patients had their computed tomographic examinations after one or more surgical procedures. During a severe acute pancreatitis the pancreas is always large either locally or diffusely. A pancreatic reaction is visible around and possibly at distance of the pancreas. When extraluminal gas is visible (3/5) it signifies gangrenous pancreatitis but it is necessary to eliminate a digestive fistulous tract and/or a communication between a pseudocyst and the digestive tract. Except gangrenous it is not possible to precise the nature of pancreatic reaction. The diagnosis of pseudocyst was easy 9/10, difficult 1/10; we did a false positive diagnosis of pseudocyst. Computed tomography and ultrasounds were compared in ten patients for the search of gallbladder lithiasis. Computed tomography can show large and small (2/4) biliary calculus in the gallbladder that cannot be shown by ultrasounds. A normal pancreas in a normal retroperitoneal space exclude the diagnosis of a severe acute pancreatitis. CT aspects of acute pancreatitis must be considered as a good diagnostic test of an acute pancreatitis.

  17. Diet and Pancreatic Cancer Prevention.

    PubMed

    Casari, Ilaria; Falasca, Marco

    2015-11-23

    Pancreatic cancer is without any doubt the malignancy with the poorest prognosis and the lowest survival rate. This highly aggressive disease is rarely diagnosed at an early stage and difficult to treat due to its resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Therefore, there is an urgent need to clarify the causes responsible for pancreatic cancer and to identify preventive strategies to reduce its incidence in the population. Some circumstances, such as smoking habits, being overweight and diabetes, have been identified as potentially predisposing factors to pancreatic cancer, suggesting that diet might play a role. A diet low in fat and sugars, together with a healthy lifestyle, regular exercise, weight reduction and not smoking, may contribute to prevent pancreatic cancer and many other cancer types. In addition, increasing evidence suggests that some food may have chemo preventive properties. Indeed, a high dietary intake of fresh fruit and vegetables has been shown to reduce the risk of developing pancreatic cancer, and recent epidemiological studies have associated nut consumption with a protective effect against it. Therefore, diet could have an impact on the development of pancreatic cancer and further investigations are needed to assess the potential chemo preventive role of specific foods against this disease. This review summarizes the key evidence for the role of dietary habits and their effect on pancreatic cancer and focuses on possible mechanisms for the association between diet and risk of pancreatic cancer.

  18. Blood tests for acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Basnayake, Chamara; Ratnam, Dilip

    2015-01-01

    Summary The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis requires the presence of at least two of the three diagnostic criteria – characteristic abdominal pain, elevated serum amylase or lipase, and radiological evidence of pancreatitis. Serum concentrations of amylase and lipase rise within hours of the pancreatic injury. A threshold concentration 2–4 times the upper limit of normal is recommended for diagnosis. Serum lipase is now the preferred test due to its improved sensitivity, particularly in alcohol-induced pancreatitis. Its prolonged elevation creates a wider diagnostic window than amylase. Neither enzyme is useful in monitoring or predicting the severity of an episode of pancreatitis in adults. New biomarkers including trypsinogen and elastase have no significant advantage over amylase or lipase. PMID:26648641

  19. Chronic inflammation and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    McKay, Colin J; Glen, Paul; McMillan, Donald C

    2008-01-01

    There is a proven association between carcinoma of the pancreas and both the sporadic and hereditary forms of chronic pancreatitis. In chronic pancreatitis the standardised incidence ratio for development of pancreatic cancer is 14-18 and is further increased by cigarette smoking. Underlying mechanisms are unclear but current theories point to the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations as a consequence of repeated DNA damage and cell regeneration in an environment favouring proliferation and neovascularisation. In patients who develop pancreatic cancer, there is interest in the role of the inflammatory response in the development of cancer cachexia and in determining prognosis. Furthermore, markers of a systemic inflammatory response have prognostic significance in both advanced, inoperable pancreatic cancer and in patients undergoing resection. Further understanding of the details of the relationship between inflammation, carcinogenesis and cancer prognosis may lead to new therapeutic possibilities as part of multi-modality management of this difficult disease.

  20. Autoimmune pancreatitis: a surgical dilemma.

    PubMed

    Saavedra-Perez, David; Vaquero, Eva C; Ayuso, Juan R; Fernandez-Cruz, Laureano

    2014-12-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is defined as a particular form of pancreatitis that often manifests as obstructive jaundice associated with a pancreatic mass or an obstructive bile duct lesion, and that has an excellent response to corticosteroid treatment. The prevalence of AIP worldwide is unknown, and it is considered as a rare entity. The clinical and radiological presentation of AIP can mimic bilio-pancreatic cancer, presenting difficulties for diagnosis and obliging the surgeon to balance decision-making between the potential risk presented by the misdiagnosis of a deadly disease against the desire to avoid unnecessary major surgery for a disease that responds effectively to corticosteroid treatment. In this review we detail the current and critical points for the diagnosis, classification and treatment for AIP, with a special emphasis on surgical series and the methods to differentiate between this pathology and bilio-pancreatic cancer.

  1. [Prolonged acute pancreatitis after bone marrow transplantation].

    PubMed

    De Singly, B; Simon, M; Bennani, J; Wittnebel, S; Zagadanski, A-M; Pacault, V; Gornet, J-M; Allez, M; Lémann, M

    2008-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis is not infrequent after allogenic marrow transplantation. Several causes can predispose to pancreatitis, including Graft-Versus-Host Disease (GVHD), a condition which is probably underestimated. In the literature, few description of pancreatic GVHD can be found. Pancreatic GVHD diagnosis can be difficult if pancreatic involvement occurs without other typical manifestations of GVHD. We report the case of a woman, 54 years old, suffering from prolonged, painful pancreatitis two months after allogenic bone marrow transplantation for acute myeloid leucemia. Pancreatic GVHD diagnosis was performed after five weeks on duodenal biopsies despite the absence of diarrheoa. The patient dramatically improved within few days on corticosteroids.

  2. Individual susceptibility to alcoholic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Apte, Minoti V; Pirola, Romano C; Wilson, Jeremy S

    2008-03-01

    The observation that only a minority of heavy drinkers develop pancreatitis has prompted an intensive search for a trigger factor/cofactor/susceptibility factor that may precipitate a clinical attack. Putative susceptibility factors examined so far include diet, smoking, amount and type of alcohol consumed, the pattern of drinking and lipid intolerance. In addition, a range of inherited factors have been assessed including blood group antigens, human leukocyte antigen serotypes, alpha-1-antitrypsin phenotypes and several genotypes. The latter group comprises mutations/polymorphisms in genes related to alcohol-metabolizing enzymes, detoxifying enzymes, pancreatic digestive enzymes, pancreatic enzyme inhibitors, cystic fibrosis and cytokines. Disappointingly, despite this concerted research effort, no clear association has been established between the above factors and alcoholic pancreatitis. Experimentally, the secretagogue cholecystokinin (CCK) has been investigated as a candidate 'trigger' for alcoholic pancreatitis. However, the clinical relevance of CCK as a trigger factor has to be questioned, as it is difficult to envisage a situation in humans where abnormally high levels of CCK would be released into the circulation to trigger pancreatitis in alcoholics. In contrast, bacterial endotoxemia is a candidate cofactor that does have relevance to the clinical situation. Plasma lipopolysaccharide (LPS, an endotoxin) levels are significantly higher in drinkers (either after chronic alcohol intake or a single binge) compared to non-drinkers. We have recently shown that alcohol-fed animals challenged with otherwise innocuous doses of LPS exhibit significant pancreatic injury. Moreover, repeated LPS exposure in alcohol-fed rats leads to progressive injury to the gland characterized by significant pancreatic fibrosis. These studies support the concept that endotoxin may be an important factor in the initiation and progression of alcoholic pancreatitis. Scope remains for

  3. Alcohol consumption on pancreatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Hijona, Elizabeth; Bañales, Jesus Maria; Cosme, Angel; Bujanda, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Although the association between alcohol and pancreatic diseases has been recognized for a long time, the impact of alcohol consumption on pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer (PC) remains poorly defined. Nowadays there is not consensus about the epidemiology and the beverage type, dose and duration of alcohol consumption causing these diseases. The objective of this study was to review the epidemiology described in the literature for pancreatic diseases as a consequence of alcoholic behavior trying to understand the association between dose, type and frequency of alcohol consumption and risk of pancreatitis and PC. The majority of the studies conclude that high alcohol intake was associated with a higher risk of pancreatitis (around 2.5%-3% between heavy drinkers and 1.3% between non drinkers). About 70% of pancreatitis are due to chronic heavy alcohol consumption. Although this incidence rate differs between countries, it is clear that the risk of developing pancreatitis increases with increasing doses of alcohol and the average of alcohol consumption vary since 80 to 150 g/d for 10-15 years. With regard to PC, the role of alcohol consumption remains less clear, and low to moderate alcohol consumption do not appear to be associated with PC risk, and only chronic heavy drinking increase the risk compared with lightly drinkers. In a population of 10%-15% of heavy drinkers, 2%-5% of all PC cases could be attributed to alcohol consumption. However, as only a minority (less than 10% for pancreatitis and 5% for PC) of heavily drinkers develops these pancreatic diseases, there are other predisposing factors besides alcohol involved. Genetic variability and environmental exposures such as smoking and diet modify the risk and should be considered for further investigations. PMID:23429423

  4. Pancreatic metastasis from mycosis fungoides mimicking primary pancreatic tumor

    PubMed Central

    Ceriolo, Paola; Fausti, Valentina; Cinotti, Elisa; Bonadio, Silvia; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Bianchi, Giovanna; Orcioni, Giulio Fraternali; Fiocca, Roberto; Rongioletti, Franco; Pistoia, Vito; Borgonovo, Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) is a cutaneous T-cell lymphoma that can undergo local progression with possible systemic dissemination. We report a case of a patient affected by MF with a pancreatic mass that was a diagnostic challenge between primitive tumor and pancreatic metastasis from MF. Clinical setting findings and imaging studies raised the suspicion of a pancreatic primary neoplasm. A diagnostic clue was provided by the combined histomorphologic/immunohistochemical study of pancreatic and cutaneous biopsies, which revealed a pancreatic localization of MF. Considering the rarity of metastatic localization of MF to the pancreas, we next investigated whether chemokine-chemokine receptor interactions could be involved in the phenomenon to provide new insight into the possible mechanisms underlying metastatic localization of MF to the pancreas. Histological analyses of archival pancreatic tissue demonstrated that glucagon-secreting cells of the pancreatic islets expressed the CCL27 chemokine, which may have attracted in our case metastatic MF cells expressing the complementary receptor CCR10. PMID:27022231

  5. Minimally invasive treatment of infected pancreatic necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Cebulski, Włodzimierz; Słodkowski, Maciej; Krasnodębski, Ireneusz W.

    2014-01-01

    Infected pancreatic necrosis is a challenging complication that worsens prognosis in acute pancreatitis. For years, open necrosectomy has been the mainstay treatment option in infected pancreatic necrosis, although surgical debridement still results in high morbidity and mortality rates. Recently, many reports on minimally invasive treatment in infected pancreatic necrosis have been published. This paper presents a review of minimally invasive techniques and attempts to define their role in the management of infected pancreatic necrosis. PMID:25653725

  6. Screening for Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wada, Keita; Takaori, Kyoichi; Traverso, L William

    2015-10-01

    Neither extended surgery nor extended indication for surgery has improved survival in patients with pancreatic cancer. According to autopsy studies, presumably 90% are metastatic. The only cure is complete removal of the tumor at an early stage before it becomes a systemic disease or becomes invasive. Early detection and screening of individuals at risk is currently under way. This article reviews the evidence and methods for screening, either familial or sporadic. Indication for early-stage surgery and precursors are discussed. Surgeons should be familiar with screening because it may provide patients with a chance for cure by surgical resection.

  7. Segmental pancreatic autotransplantation for chronic pancreatitis. A preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, R.L.; Braasch, J.W.; O'Bryan, E.M.; Watkins, E. Jr.

    1983-03-01

    A patient who underwent 95% pancreatectomy with autotransplantation of the body and tail of the gland to the femoral area for chronic pancreatitis is presented. The pain resolved, and the patient's blood glucose level remained within normal limits. High levels of insulin were found in the iliac vein on the transplanted side. Patency of the graft was demonstrated by technetium scan and arteriography and followed by a color-coded Doppler imaging system. Segmental pancreatic autotransplantation offers a method of relieving pain with preservation of endocrine function in selected patients with chronic pancreatitis.

  8. Molecular biology of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Zavoral, Miroslav; Minarikova, Petra; Zavada, Filip; Salek, Cyril; Minarik, Marek

    2011-06-28

    In spite of continuous research efforts directed at early detection and treatment of pancreatic cancer, the outlook for patients affected by the disease remains dismal. With most cases still being diagnosed at advanced stages, no improvement in survival prognosis is achieved with current diagnostic imaging approaches. In the absence of a dominant precancerous condition, several risk factors have been identified including family history, chronic pancreatitis, smoking, diabetes mellitus, as well as certain genetic disorders such as hereditary pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, familial atypical multiple mole melanoma, and Peutz-Jeghers and Lynch syndromes. Most pancreatic carcinomas, however, remain sporadic. Current progress in experimental molecular techniques has enabled detailed understanding of the molecular processes of pancreatic cancer development. According to the latest information, malignant pancreatic transformation involves multiple oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes that are involved in a variety of signaling pathways. The most characteristic aberrations (somatic point mutations and allelic losses) affect oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes within RAS, AKT and Wnt signaling, and have a key role in transcription and proliferation, as well as systems that regulate the cell cycle (SMAD/DPC, CDKN2A/p16) and apoptosis (TP53). Understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms should promote development of new methodology for early diagnosis and facilitate improvement in current approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment.

  9. Hereditary Pancreatic and Hepatobiliary Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Ashraf; Kowdley, Gopal C.; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Cunningham, Steven C.

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary etiologies of pancreatic and hepatobiliary cancers are increasingly recognized. An estimated >10% of pancreatic and increasing number of hepatobiliary cancers are hereditary. The cumulative risk of hereditary pancreatic cancer ranges from measurable but negligible in cystic fibrosis to a sobering 70% in cases of hereditary pancreatitis. Candidates for pancreatic cancer surveillance are those with a risk pancreatic cancer estimated to be >10-fold that of the normal population. Screening for pancreatic cancer in high-risk individuals is typically performed by endoscopic ultrasound and should begin at least 10 years prior to the age of the youngest affected relative. Disease states known to be associated with increased risk of hepatocellular cancer include hereditary hemochromatosis, autoimmune hepatitis, porphyria, and α1-antitrypsin deficiency, with relative risks as high as 36-fold. Although much less is known about hereditary bile-duct cancers, Muir-Torre syndrome and bile salt export pump deficiency are diseases whose association with hereditary carcinogenesis is under investigation. PMID:22312493

  10. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

    2015-08-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF-VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis.

  11. Immunotherapy of pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Märten, Angela

    2008-05-01

    Patients with carcinoma of the exocrine pancreas have especially poor prognosis with a five-year survival rate of <1% and a median survival of 4-6 months. Pancreatic carcinoma is a systemic disease, insensitive to radiotherapy and mostly to chemotherapy. Accordingly, new treatment modalities are worth being investigated. One of the promising approaches is immunotherapy. Several phase I/II trials that have been published show interesting results, whereupon antibody-based strategies seem to fail and unspecific stimulation or vaccination with peptides look encouraging. Furthermore, phase II trials dealing with combination therapies are highly promising. One of them, a combination of chemoradiotherapy plus interferon-alpha is currently tested in a randomized phase III trial. As most of the trials had enrolled only limited numbers of patients and most of the trials were not conducted and/or reported according to the new standards it is difficult to draw final conclusions from the discussed trials. Immuno-monitoring was performed only in 40% of the discussed publications. In all cases immune responses were observed and correlation with the clinical outcome is discussed. Immunotherapy of pancreatic adenocarcinoma and especially combination therapies including immunotherapy is an up-and-coming approach and needs to be investigated in well conducted phase III randomized controlled trials accompanied by appropriate immuno-monitoring.

  12. Chronic pancreatitis: A diagnostic dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Duggan, Sinead N; Ní Chonchubhair, Hazel M; Lawal, Oladapo; O’Connor, Donal B; Conlon, Kevin C

    2016-01-01

    Typical clinical symptoms of chronic pancreatitis are vague and non-specific and therefore diagnostic tests are required, none of which provide absolute diagnostic certainly, especially in the early stages of disease. Recently-published guidelines bring much needed structure to the diagnostic work-up of patients with suspected chronic pancreatitis. In addition, novel diagnostic modalities bring promise for the future. The assessment and diagnosis of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency remains challenging and this review contests the accepted perspective that steatorrhea only occurs with > 90% destruction of the gland. PMID:26900292

  13. How Grim is Pancreatic Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Weledji, Elroy Patrick; Enoworock, George; Mokake, Martin; Sinju, Motaze

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal carcinoma continues to be the most lethal malignancy with rising incidence. It is the fourth most common cause of cancer death in the western world due to its low treatment success rate. In addition, because of its rapid growth and silent course, diagnosis is often only established in the advanced stages. As one of the most aggressive malignancies, the treatment of this disease is a great challenge to clinicians. This paper reviewed the natural history of pancreatic cancer, the current clinical practice and the future in pancreatic cancer management. PMID:27471581

  14. Endoscopic therapy for chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Dumonceau, Jean-Marc

    2013-10-01

    Endoscopic therapy is recommended as the first-line therapy for painful chronic pancreatitis with an obstacle on the main pancreatic duct (MPD). The clinical response should be evaluated at 6 to 8 weeks. Calcified stones that obstruct the MPD are first treated by extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy; dominant MPD strictures are optimally treated with a single, large, plastic stent that should be exchanged within 1 year even in asymptomatic patients. Pancreatic pseudocysts for which therapy is indicated and are within endoscopic reach should be treated by endoscopy.

  15. Recent Progress in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Herman, Joseph M.; Laheru, Daniel A.; Klein, Alison P.; Erdek, Michael A.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is currently one of the deadliest of the solid malignancies. However, surgery to resect neoplasms of the pancreas is safer and less invasive than ever, novel drug combinations have been shown to improve survival, advances in radiation therapy have resulted in less toxicity, and enormous strides have been made in our understanding of the fundamental genetics of pancreatic cancer. These advances provide hope but they also increase the complexity of caring for patients. It is clear that multidisciplinary care that provides comprehensive and coordinated evaluation and treatment is the most effective way to manage patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:23856911

  16. Nutrition support in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    McClave, Stephen A

    2007-03-01

    The benefit of early enteral nutrition (EN) for the disease process and for patient outcome in severe acute pancreatitis is dramatic. A narrow window of opportunity exists during which there is potential for EN to decrease disease severity and reduce overall complications. Most patients with severe pancreatitis tolerate enteral feeds. Any signs of symptom exacerbation or increasing inflammation in response to EN may be ameliorated by subtle adjustments in the feeding strategy. In this manner, provision of EN represents primary therapy in the management of the patient with acute pancreatitis and is emerging as the gold standard of therapy in nutrition support for this disease process.

  17. How Grim is Pancreatic Cancer?

    PubMed

    Weledji, Elroy Patrick; Enoworock, George; Mokake, Martin; Sinju, Motaze

    2016-04-15

    Pancreatic ductal carcinoma continues to be the most lethal malignancy with rising incidence. It is the fourth most common cause of cancer death in the western world due to its low treatment success rate. In addition, because of its rapid growth and silent course, diagnosis is often only established in the advanced stages. As one of the most aggressive malignancies, the treatment of this disease is a great challenge to clinicians. This paper reviewed the natural history of pancreatic cancer, the current clinical practice and the future in pancreatic cancer management. PMID:27471581

  18. Acute haemorrhage associated with pancreatic pseudocyst and chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kiviluoto, T; Schröder, T; Kivilaakso, E; Lempinen, M

    1984-01-01

    The present study reports 18 patients operated on for chronic pancreatitis complicated by bleeding in the upper gastrointestinal tract, the peritoneal cavity or the retroperitoneal space. Damage to the splenic artery by a pancreatic pseudocyst was the most common reason for the bleeding (10 patients, 56%) and the most common site was the duodenum (10 patients, 56%). Eleven patients were treated by transcystic multiple suture ligations combined with external drainage of the pseudocyst, and seven by pancreatic resection or total pancreatectomy. Hospital mortality was 33% (6 patients); two patients had undergone transcystic suture ligation, and four pancreatic resection. Five patients needed a reoperation because of further bleeding, four of them having been treated initially by transcystic suture ligation. Our results suggest that haemostasis by suture ligation is a method to be recommended if the patient's condition has been exacerbated by severe haemorrhage.

  19. Computerized tomography in acute and chronic pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Kalmar, J.A.; Matthews, C.C.; Bishop, L.A.

    1984-11-01

    Modern imaging techniques have revolutionized the diagnostic evaluation of pancreatitis, primarily demonstrating its complications. Computerized tomography (CT) is a more sensitive method than ultrasonography and pancreatic ductography. A chart review revealed 214 patients at our hospital with a discharge diagnosis of pancreatitis. Sixty patients had CT for evaluation of possible complications. Only five scans were normal. Of 37 cases of acute pancreatitis, 92% demonstrated localized or diffuse enlargement, and 65% showed loss of pancreatic outline. Other frequent findings included thickening of perirenal fascia (49%), ileus (43%), edema of mesentery (35%), and inflammatory exudate (32%). Abscess and pseudocyst were each detected in 8% of cases. In chronic pancreatitis 65% of patients showed localized or diffuse pancreatic enlargement. Atrophy of the gland (30%), calcification (30%), pseudocyst (26%), and dilated pancreatic ducts (17%) were also seen. CT is effective in evaluating pancreatitis and its complications. 14 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  20. Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Pancreatic Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-07

    Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of the Pancreas; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer

  1. Isolated lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis involving the pancreatic tail.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tad; Grobmyer, Stephen R; Dixon, Lisa R; Hochwald, Steven N

    2008-07-01

    We present an interesting case of a 62-year-old woman with a 3-month history of vague, left-sided abdominal pain. CT imaging revealed a hypodense lesion in the tail of the pancreas. The patient had no history of pancreatitis or autoimmune diseases. Laboratory testing revealed a normal CA19-9 (33 U/mL) and an elevated IgG4 (133 mg/dL). Due to concerns of pancreatic malignancy, she underwent operation. We found a dense, inflammatory mass in the tail of the pancreas, which was removed via an open distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy. Histologic analysis revealed a pancreas with sclerotic ducts and surrounding lymphoplasmacytic inflammation most consistent with lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP). LPSP, also termed autoimmune pancreatitis, is a benign disease of the pancreas, which can mimic pancreatic adenocarcinoma. It is the most common benign finding diagnosed on pathology after pancreatic resection for presumed malignancy. LPSP most commonly involves the head and, more uncommonly, the tail of the pancreas. It can be successfully treated with steroids obviating the need for resection. IgG4 levels may assist in recognition of this disease. As our experience with utilization of IgG4 testing and knowledge of the systemic nature of LPSP increase, patients with this disease may be spared unnecessary resection.

  2. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for pancreatic cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms of this condition usually begin in late childhood with an episode of acute pancreatitis. A sudden (acute) attack can cause abdominal pain, fever, nausea, or vomiting. An episode typically lasts ...

  4. Chronic pancreatitis and cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Witt, H

    2003-01-01

    Recent discoveries of trypsinogen and trypsin inhibitor mutations in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) support the hypothesis that an inappropriate activation of pancreatic zymogens to active enzymes within the pancreatic parenchyma starts the inflammatory process. Current data suggest that CP may be inherited dominant, recessive, or complex as a result of mutations in the above mentioned or yet unidentified genes. Evaluation of patients with CP should include genetic testing. Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene and is characterised by pancreatic insufficiency and chronic bronchopulmonary infection. The progression and severity of pulmonary disease differs considerably between people with identical CFTR mutations and does not seem to correlate with the type or class of the CFTR mutation. The identification of further disease modifying genetic factors will increase the pathophysiological understanding and may help to identify new therapeutic targets. PMID:12651880

  5. Valsartan-induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Can, Burak; Sali, Mursel; Batman, Adnan; Yilmaz, Hasan; Korkmaz, Ugur; Celebi, Altay; Senturk, Omer; Hulagu, Sadettin

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal toxicity is uncommon among patients treated with angiotensin II receptor antagonists. A 58-year-old man presented with nausea, vomiting and constant pain in the epigastrium that radiated to the flanks. He received treatment with valsartan (160 mg daily) for hypertension. The clinical, biochemical and radiological findings were compatible with a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. After the patient achieved a clinical and biochemical recovery, the valsartan therapy was started again. Six weeks later, he returned to the hospital with an attack of pancreatitis. Subsequently, he returned with repeated attacks of pancreatitis twice, and the valsartan was discontinued. Ten months after the treatment, the patient had no complaints. When severe abdominal symptoms occur for no apparent reason during treatment with valsartan, a diagnosis of pancreatitis should be considered.

  6. Treating acute pancreatitis: what's new?

    PubMed

    Singh, Vikesh K; Moran, Robert A; Afghani, Elham; de-Madaria, Enrique

    2015-07-01

    The medical treatment of acute pancreatitis continues to focus on supportive care, including fluid therapy, nutrition, and antibiotics, all of which will be critically reviewed. Pharmacologic agents that were previously studied were found to be ineffective likely due to a combination of their targets and flaws in trial design. Potential future pharmacologic agents, particularly those that target intracellular calcium signaling, as well as considerations for trial design will be discussed. As the incidence of acute pancreatitis continues to increase, greater efforts will be needed to prevent hospitalization, readmission and excessive imaging in order to reduce overall healthcare costs. Primary prevention continues to focus on post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) pancreatitis and secondary prevention on cholecystectomy for biliary pancreatitis as well as alcohol and smoking abstinence.

  7. Inflammatory mediators in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, M; Brady, M; Shokuhi, S; Christmas, S; Neoptolemos, J P; Slavin, J

    2000-02-01

    Inflammatory mediators play a key role in acute pancreatitis and the resultant multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, which is the primary cause of death in this condition. Recent studies have confirmed the critical role played by inflammatory mediators such as TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, PAF, IL-10, C5a, ICAM-1, and substance P. The systemic effects of acute pancreatitis have many similarities to those of other conditions such as septicaemia, severe burns, and trauma. The delay between the onset of inflammation in the pancreas and the development of the systemic response makes acute pancreatitis an ideal experimental and clinical model with which to study the role of inflammatory mediators and to test novel therapies. Elucidation of the key mediators involved in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis will facilitate the development of clinically effective anti-inflammatory therapy.

  8. Chronic Pancreatitis and Neoplasia: Correlation or Coincidence

    PubMed Central

    Bean, A. G.; Bowles, M.; Williamson, R. C. N.

    1997-01-01

    Any link between pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis could reflect the malignant potential of a chronic inflammatory process. Four patients with ductal adenocarcinomas had a long history of pancreatic pain (median duration 5 years) and showed clearcut evidence of chronic pancreatitis “downstream” of the tumour. Four were alcoholics and two heavy smokers. These four cases arose within a surgical series of approximately 250 patients with chronic pancreatitis, giving an incidence of 1.6 per cent. The incidence and anatomical distribution of carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis could possibly be consistent with a casual relationship. PMID:9184877

  9. Molecular mechanisms of pancreatic carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Toru; Sunamura, Makoto; Horii, Akira

    2006-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is one of the most fatal malignancies. Intensive investigation of molecular pathogenesis might lead to identifying useful molecules for diagnosis and treatment of the disease. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma harbors complicated aberrations of alleles including losses of 1p, 6q, 9p, 12q, 17p, 18q, and 21q, and gains of 8q and 20q. Pancreatic cancer is usually initiated by mutation of KRAS and aberrant expression of SHH. Overexpression of AURKA mapping on 20q13.2 may significantly enhance overt tumorigenesity. Aberrations of tumor suppressor genes synergistically accelerate progression of the carcinogenic pathway through pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) to invasive ductal adenocarcinoma. Abrogation of CDKN2A occurs in low-grade/early PanIN, whereas aberrations of TP53 and SMAD4 occur in high-grade/late PanIN. SMAD4 may play suppressive roles in tumorigenesis by inhibition of angiogenesis. Loss of 18q precedes SMAD4 inactivation, and restoration of chromosome 18 in pancreatic cancer cells results in tumor suppressive phenotypes regardless of SMAD4 status, indicating the possible existence of a tumor suppressor gene(s) other than SMAD4 on 18q. DUSP6 at 12q21-q22 is frequently abrogated by loss of expression in invasive ductal adenocarcinomas despite fairly preserved expression in PanIN, which suggests that DUSP6 works as a tumor suppressor in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Restoration of chromosome 12 also suppresses growths of pancreatic cancer cells despite the recovery of expression of DUSP6; the existence of yet another tumor suppressor gene on 12q is strongly suggested. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of pancreatic carcinogenesis will likely provide novel clues for preventing, detecting, and ultimately curing this life-threatening disease. PMID:16367914

  10. Walled-off pancreatic necrosis.

    PubMed

    Ramia, J M; de la Plaza, R; Quiñones-Sampedro, J E; Ramiro, C; Veguillas, P; García-Parreño, J

    2012-05-01

    Acute severe pancreatitits may be complicated by the development of 'walled-off pancreatic necrosis' (WOPN), which is characterised by a mixture of solid components and fluids on imaging studies as a consequence of organised pancreatic tissue necrosis. We present here an overview of the definition, clinical features, and diagnostic and therapeutic management of this clinical condition, which is mostly based on consensus as adequate clinical trials are lacking. PMID:22641624

  11. Pancreatic carcinogenesis: apoptosis and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Onizuka, Shinya; Kawakami, Shunsuke; Taniguchi, Ken; Fujioka, Hikaru; Miyashita, Kosei

    2004-04-01

    Apoptosis and angiogenesis are critical biologic processes that are altered during carcinogenesis. Both apoptosis and angiogenesis may play an important role in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Despite numerous advances in the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer, its prognosis remains dismal and a new therapeutic approach is much needed. Recent research has revealed that apoptosis and angiogenesis are closely interrelated. Several reports show that a tumor suppresser gene that is expressed in pancreatic carcinoma and related to malignant potential can induce apoptosis and also inhibit angiogenesis. At present, it is generally accepted that tumor growth in cancers, including pancreatic cancer, depends on angiogenesis. We have identified 2 new angiogenesis inhibitors from a conditioned medium of human pancreatic carcinoma cell line (BxPC-3): antiangiogenic antithrombin III (aaAT-III) and vitamin D binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-maf). These molecules were able to regress tumors in severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) mice, demonstrating potent inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation. Moreover, the angiogenesis inhibitors induced tumor dormancy in the animal model. These results suggest that antiangiogenic therapy using angiogenesis inhibitors may become a new strategy for treatment of pancreatic cancer in the near future. PMID:15084979

  12. Pancreatic cancer chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Thomas B; Seufferlein, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the most lethal gastrointestinal tumour. Chemotherapy is the mainstay of therapy in the majority of the patients whereas resection is the only chance of cure but only possible in 15-20% of all patients. The integration of radiotherapy into multimodal treatment concepts is heavily investigated. It is now commonly accepted that induction chemotherapy should precede radiotherapy. When fractionated conventionally it should be given as chemoradiotherapy. Recently, stereotactic body radiotherapy emerged as an alternative, but will have to be carefully investigated in clinical trials. This review aims to give an overview of radiotherapeutic strategies with a focus on the latest developments in the field in the context of chemotherapy and surgery. PMID:27644909

  13. Pancreatic cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ya-Yun; Yuan, Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Studies are emerging in support of the cancer stem cells (CSCs) theory which considers that a tiny subset of cancer cells is exclusively responsible for the initiation and malignant behavior of a cancer. This cell population, also termed CSCs, possesses the capacity both to self-renew, producing progeny that have the identical tumorigenic potential, and to differentiate into the bulk of cancer cells, helping serve the formation of the tumor entities, which, altogether, build the hierarchically organized structure of a cancer. In this review, we try to articulate the complicated signaling pathways regulating the retention of the characteristics of pancreatic CSCs, and in the wake of which, we seek to offer insights into the CSCs-relevant targeted therapeutics which are, in the meantime, confronted with bigger challenges than ever. PMID:26045976

  14. [Pseudotumoral allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis].

    PubMed

    Otero González, I; Montero Martínez, C; Blanco Aparicio, M; Valiño López, P; Verea Hernando, H

    2000-06-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) develops as the result of a hypersensitivity reaction to fungi of the genus Aspergillus. Clinical and radiological presentation can be atypical, requiring a high degree of suspicion on the part of the physician who treats such patients. We report the cases of two patients with APBA in whom the form of presentation--with few asthma symptoms, images showing lobar atelectasia and hilar adenopathy--led to an initial suspicion of lung cancer. PMID:10932345

  15. Capecitabine, Temozolomide and Bevacizumab for Metastatic or Unresectable Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-21

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  16. ESPGHAN and NASPGHAN Report on the Assessment of Exocrine Pancreatic Function and Pancreatitis in Children.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Christopher J; Chen, Kathy; Horvath, Karoly; Hughes, David; Lowe, Mark E; Mehta, Devendra; Orabi, Abrahim I; Screws, Jeremy; Thomson, Mike; Van Biervliet, Stephanie; Verkade, Henkjan J; Husain, Sohail Z; Wilschanski, Michael

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this clinical report is to discuss several recent advances in assessing exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) and pancreatitis in children, to review the array of pancreatic function tests, to provide an update on the inherited causes of EPI, with special emphasis on newly available genetic testing, and to review newer methods for evaluating pancreatitis.

  17. Loss of Periostin Results in Impaired Regeneration and Pancreatic Atrophy after Cerulein-Induced Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hausmann, Simone; Regel, Ivonne; Steiger, Katja; Wagner, Nadine; Thorwirth, Manja; Schlitter, Anna M; Esposito, Irene; Michalski, Christoph W; Friess, Helmut; Kleeff, Jörg; Erkan, Mert

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix molecule periostin (POSTN, encoded by POSTN), which is secreted by activated pancreatic stellate cells, has important functions in chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. However, the role of POSTN in acute pancreatitis and subsequent regeneration processes has not been addressed so far. We analyzed the function of POSTN in pancreatic exocrine regeneration after the induction of a severe acute pancreatitis. Postn-deficient mice and wild-type control animals received repetitive cerulein injections, and a detailed histologic analysis of pancreatic tissues was performed. Although there was no difference in pancreatitis severity in the acute inflammatory phase, the recovery of the exocrine pancreas was massively impaired in Postn-deficient mice. Loss of Postn expression was accompanied by strong pancreatic atrophy and acinar-to-adipocyte differentiation, which was also reflected in gene expression patterns. Our data suggest that POSTN is a crucial factor for proper exocrine lineage-specific regeneration after severe acute pancreatitis. PMID:26632158

  18. Loss of Periostin Results in Impaired Regeneration and Pancreatic Atrophy after Cerulein-Induced Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hausmann, Simone; Regel, Ivonne; Steiger, Katja; Wagner, Nadine; Thorwirth, Manja; Schlitter, Anna M; Esposito, Irene; Michalski, Christoph W; Friess, Helmut; Kleeff, Jörg; Erkan, Mert

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix molecule periostin (POSTN, encoded by POSTN), which is secreted by activated pancreatic stellate cells, has important functions in chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. However, the role of POSTN in acute pancreatitis and subsequent regeneration processes has not been addressed so far. We analyzed the function of POSTN in pancreatic exocrine regeneration after the induction of a severe acute pancreatitis. Postn-deficient mice and wild-type control animals received repetitive cerulein injections, and a detailed histologic analysis of pancreatic tissues was performed. Although there was no difference in pancreatitis severity in the acute inflammatory phase, the recovery of the exocrine pancreas was massively impaired in Postn-deficient mice. Loss of Postn expression was accompanied by strong pancreatic atrophy and acinar-to-adipocyte differentiation, which was also reflected in gene expression patterns. Our data suggest that POSTN is a crucial factor for proper exocrine lineage-specific regeneration after severe acute pancreatitis.

  19. Lipolysis of visceral adipocyte triglyceride by pancreatic lipases converts mild acute pancreatitis to severe pancreatitis independent of necrosis and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Krutika; Trivedi, Ram N; Durgampudi, Chandra; Noel, Pawan; Cline, Rachel A; DeLany, James P; Navina, Sarah; Singh, Vijay P

    2015-03-01

    Visceral fat necrosis has been associated with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) for over 100 years; however, its pathogenesis and role in SAP outcomes are poorly understood. Based on recent work suggesting that pancreatic fat lipolysis plays an important role in SAP, we evaluated the role of pancreatic lipases in SAP-associated visceral fat necrosis, the inflammatory response, local injury, and outcomes of acute pancreatitis (AP). For this, cerulein pancreatitis was induced in lean and obese mice, alone or with the lipase inhibitor orlistat and parameters of AP induction (serum amylase and lipase), fat necrosis, pancreatic necrosis, and multisystem organ failure, and inflammatory response were assessed. Pancreatic lipases were measured in fat necrosis and were overexpressed in 3T3-L1 cells. We noted obesity to convert mild cerulein AP to SAP with greater cytokines, unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs), and multisystem organ failure, and 100% mortality without affecting AP induction or pancreatic necrosis. Increased pancreatic lipase amounts and activity were noted in the extensive visceral fat necrosis of dying obese mice. Lipase inhibition reduced fat necrosis, UFAs, organ failure, and mortality but not the parameters of AP induction. Pancreatic lipase expression increased lipolysis in 3T3-L1 cells. We conclude that UFAs generated via lipolysis of visceral fat by pancreatic lipases convert mild AP to SAP independent of pancreatic necrosis and the inflammatory response. PMID:25579844

  20. Percutaneous drainage of a pancreatic pseudocyst.

    PubMed

    Hermans, P; Hubens, A

    1992-12-01

    We present a patient who developed a pancreatic pseudocyst after surgery for a retroperitoneal fibrous histiocytoma invading the pancreatic tail. The diagnosis was made on the basis of CT and the tail pseudocyst resolved with percutaneous drainage only.

  1. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in biliary pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Graham, L D; Burrus, R G; Burns, R P; Chandler, K E; Barker, D E

    1994-01-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy has emerged as the treatment of choice for uncomplicated cholelithiasis. Despite early concerns, many surgeons have applied this new technique to more complicated biliary tract disease states, including biliary pancreatitis. To evaluate the safety of laparoscopic cholecystectomy in this setting, we retrospectively reviewed 29 patients with clinical and laboratory evidence of biliary pancreatitis who underwent this procedure between March 1990 and December 1992. The severity of pancreatitis was determined by Ranson's criteria. Two patients had a Ranson's score of 6, one of 5, one of 4, five scored 3, nine scored 2, nine also scored 1, and two patients scored 0. The mean serum amylase level on admission was 1,610 (range 148 to 7680). All patients underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy during the same hospital admission for biliary pancreatitis, with the mean time of operation being 5.5 days from admission. Operative time averaged 123 minutes (range 60-220 minutes). Intraoperative cholangiography was obtained in 76 per cent of patients. Three patients had choledocholithiasis on intraoperative cholangiography and were treated with choledochoscopy, laparoscopic common bile duct exploration, and saline flushing of the duct. The mean length of hospital stay was 11 days (range 5-32 days). There were seven postoperative complications requiring prolonged hospitalization with all but one treated non-operatively. One patient with a preoperative Ranson score of 6 developed necrotizing pancreatitis and subsequently required operative pancreatic debridement and drainage. There were no deaths in this series and no postoperative wound infections. The average recovery period for return to work was 2 weeks. These statistics compare favorably with literature reports for open cholecystectomy in biliary pancreatitis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Disintegration of a pancreatic duct stone with extracorporeal shock waves in a patient with chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Sauerbruch, T; Holl, J; Sackmann, M; Werner, R; Wotzka, R; Paumgartner, G

    1987-09-01

    We report the case of a 33-year-old woman with chronic calcifying pancreatitis in whom an intraductal pancreatic stone with a diameter of 8 mm was successfully disintegrated with extracorporeal shock waves, permitting subsequent endoscopic extraction of the fragments. The patient had a mild attack of pancreatitis after the treatment. We conclude that shockwave lithotripsy of a pancreatic duct stone in patients with chronic pancreatitis is possible. It should, however, be viewed with reservation until further experience has been gained.

  3. Pathophysiology of alcoholic pancreatitis: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Parimal; Gupta, Priya

    2006-01-01

    Use of alcohol is a worldwide habit regardless of socio-economic background. Heavy alcohol consumption is a potential risk factor for induction of pancreatitis. The current review cites the updated literature on the alcohol metabolism, its effects on gastrointestinal and pancreatic function and in causing pancreatic injury, genetic predisposition of alcohol induced pancreatitis. Reports describing prospective mechanisms of action of alcohol activating the signal transduction pathways, induction of oxidative stress parameters through the development of animal models are being presented. PMID:17167828

  4. Enteral feeding in acute and chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Makola, Diklar; Krenitsky, Joe; Parrish, Carol Rees

    2007-10-01

    Nutrition support is an essential part of the management of acute and chronic pancreatitis. In the past, parenteral nutrition has been used to allow pancreatic rest while providing nutrition support to patients who have acute pancreatitis. Evidence from randomized, controlled trials, however, suggests that enteral nutrition is as effective as and is safer and cheaper than parenteral nutrition. Observational studies also have demonstrated a benefit in patients who have chronic pancreatitis.

  5. Total parenteral nutrition in pancreatic disease.

    PubMed

    Grant, J P; James, S; Grabowski, V; Trexler, K M

    1984-11-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) was given to 121 patients admitted with severe pancreatitis (73), chronic pancreatitis (23), or pancreatic malignancy (25) over 104 months. No adverse effects on the pancreas were detected from the TPN, including the provision of intravenous (IV) fat. Nutritional status was maintained or improved in all groups, including patients undergoing surgical procedures and those experiencing marked stress. No significant impact on the clinical course of pancreatitis was observed, although the death rate in acute pancreatitis (15.2%) and complicated pancreatitis (18.5%) compares favorably with other published series where early surgical intervention was undertaken. There was an increased risk of catheter-related sepsis in patients with complicated pancreatitis (14.8%) and with chronic pancreatitis (17.4%). No increase septic risk was seen in patients with acute pancreatitis or pancreatic malignancy. Eighty-two per cent of patients with acute pancreatitis required an average of 87 units of insulin per day while 78% of patients with chronic pancreatitis required an average of 54 units per day. In summary, TPN proved to be safe, effective, and well-tolerated in those patients with disorders of the pancreas.

  6. Blunt pancreatic trauma: A persistent diagnostic conundrum?

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Atin; Panda, Ananya; Gamanagatti, Shivanand

    2016-01-01

    Blunt pancreatic trauma is an uncommon injury but has high morbidity and mortality. In modern era of trauma care, pancreatic trauma remains a persistent challenge to radiologists and surgeons alike. Early detection of pancreatic trauma is essential to prevent subsequent complications. However early pancreatic injury is often subtle on computed tomography (CT) and can be missed unless specifically looked for. Signs of pancreatic injury on CT include laceration, transection, bulky pancreas, heterogeneous enhancement, peripancreatic fluid and signs of pancreatitis. Pan-creatic ductal injury is a vital decision-making parameter as ductal injury is an indication for laparotomy. While lacerations involving more than half of pancreatic parenchyma are suggestive of ductal injury on CT, ductal injuries can be directly assessed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or encoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography. Pancreatic trauma also shows temporal evolution with increase in extent of injury with time. Hence early CT scans may underestimate the extent of injures and sequential imaging with CT or MRI is important in pancreatic trauma. Sequential imaging is also needed for successful non-operative management of pancreatic injury. Accurate early detection on initial CT and adopting a multimodality and sequential imaging strategy can improve outcome in pancreatic trauma. PMID:26981225

  7. Management of acute pancreatitis (AP) – Polish Pancreatic Club recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Rosołowski, Mariusz; Lipiński, Michał; Dobosz, Marek; Durlik, Marek; Głuszek, Stanisław; Kuśnierz, Katarzyna; Lampe, Paweł; Małecka-Panas, Ewa; Nowakowska-Duława, Ewa; Nowak-Niezgoda, Magdalena; Radomańska, Barbara; Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata; Wereszczyńska-Siemiątkowska, Urszula

    2016-01-01

    The presented recommendations concern the current management of acute pancreatitis. The recommendations relate to the diagnostics and treatment of early and late phases of acute pancreatitis and complications of the disease taking into consideration surgical and endoscopic methods. All the recommendations were subjected to voting by the members of the Working Group of the Polish Pancreatic Club, who evaluated them every single time on a five-point scale, where A means full acceptance, B means acceptance with a certain reservation, C means acceptance with a serious reservation, D means rejection with a certain reservation and E means full rejection. The results of the vote, together with commentary, are provided for each recommendation. PMID:27350832

  8. Cystic Lesions in Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Gompertz, Macarena; Morales, Claudia; Aldana, Hernán; Castillo, Jaime; Berger, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) can be chronic or recurrent, but frequently completely reversible after steroid treatment. A cystic lesion in AIP is a rare finding, and it can mimic a pancreatic cystic neoplasm. Difficulties in an exact diagnosis interfere with treatment, and surgery cannot be avoided in some cases. We report the history of a 63-year-old male presenting with jaundice and pruritus. AIP was confirmed by imaging and elevated IgG4 blood levels, and the patient completely recovered after corticosteroid therapy. One year later, he presented with a recurrent episode of AIP with elevated IgG4 levels, accompanied by the appearance of multiple intrapancreatic cystic lesions. All but 1 of these cysts disappeared after steroid treatment, but the remaining cyst in the pancreatic head was even somewhat larger 1 year later. Pancreatoduodenectomy was finally performed. Histology showed the wall of the cystic lesion to be fibrotic; the surrounding pancreatic tissue presented fibrosis, atrophy and lymphoplasmacytic infiltration by IgG4-positive cells, without malignant elements. Our case illustrates the rare possibility that cystic lesions can be part of AIP. These pseudocysts appear in the pancreatic segments involved in the autoimmune disease and can be a consequence of the local inflammation or related to ductal strictures. Steroid treatment should be initiated, after which these cysts can completely disappear with recovery from AIP. Surgical intervention may be necessary in some exceptional cases.

  9. Pharmacologic therapy for acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kambhampati, Swetha; Park, Walter; Habtezion, Aida

    2014-01-01

    While conservative management such as fluid, bowel rest, and antibiotics is the mainstay of current acute pancreatitis management, there is a lot of promise in pharmacologic therapies that target various aspects of the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. Extensive review of preclinical studies, which include assessment of therapies such as anti-secretory agents, protease inhibitors, anti-inflammatory agents, and anti-oxidants are discussed. Many of these studies have shown therapeutic benefit and improved survival in experimental models. Based on available preclinical studies, we discuss potential novel targeted pharmacologic approaches that may offer promise in the treatment of acute pancreatitis. To date a variety of clinical studies have assessed the translational potential of animal model effective experimental therapies and have shown either failure or mixed results in human studies. Despite these discouraging clinical studies, there is a great clinical need and there exist several preclinical effective therapies that await investigation in patients. Better understanding of acute pancreatitis pathophysiology and lessons learned from past clinical studies are likely to offer a great foundation upon which to expand future therapies in acute pancreatitis. PMID:25493000

  10. Pharmacological Ascorbate Radiosensitizes Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Du, Juan; Cieslak, John A.; Welsh, Jessemae L.; Sibenaller, Zita A.; Allen, Bryan G.; Wagner, Brett A.; Kalen, Amanda L.; Doskey, Claire M.; Strother, Robert K.; Button, Anna M.; Mott, Sarah L.; Smith, Brian; Tsai, Susan; Mezhir, James; Goswami, Prabhat C.; Spitz, Douglas R.; Buettner, Garry R.; Cullen, Joseph J.

    2015-01-01

    The toxicity of pharmacological ascorbate is mediated by the generation of H2O2 via the oxidation of ascorbate. Since pancreatic cancer cells are sensitive to H2O2 generated by ascorbate they would also be expected to become sensitized to agents that increase oxidative damage such as ionizing radiation. The current study demonstrates that pharmacological ascorbate enhances the cytotoxic effects of ionizing radiation as seen by decreased cell viability and clonogenic survival in all pancreatic cancer cell lines examined, but not in non-tumorigenic pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. Ascorbate radiosensitization was associated with an increase in oxidative stress-induced DNA damage, which was reversed by catalase. In mice with established heterotopic and orthotopic pancreatic tumor xenografts, pharmacological ascorbate combined with ionizing radiation decreased tumor growth and increased survival, without damaging the gastrointestinal tract or increasing systemic changes in parameters indicative of oxidative stress. Our results demonstrate the potential clinical utility of pharmacological ascorbate as a radiosensitizer in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26081808

  11. PCMdb: Pancreatic Cancer Methylation Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagpal, Gandharva; Sharma, Minakshi; Kumar, Shailesh; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Gupta, Sudheer; Gautam, Ankur; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2014-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fifth most aggressive malignancy and urgently requires new biomarkers to facilitate early detection. For providing impetus to the biomarker discovery, we have developed Pancreatic Cancer Methylation Database (PCMDB, http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/pcmdb/), a comprehensive resource dedicated to methylation of genes in pancreatic cancer. Data was collected and compiled manually from published literature. PCMdb has 65907 entries for methylation status of 4342 unique genes. In PCMdb, data was compiled for both cancer cell lines (53565 entries for 88 cell lines) and cancer tissues (12342 entries for 3078 tissue samples). Among these entries, 47.22% entries reported a high level of methylation for the corresponding genes while 10.87% entries reported low level of methylation. PCMdb covers five major subtypes of pancreatic cancer; however, most of the entries were compiled for adenocarcinomas (88.38%) and mucinous neoplasms (5.76%). A user-friendly interface has been developed for data browsing, searching and analysis. We anticipate that PCMdb will be helpful for pancreatic cancer biomarker discovery.

  12. Hemorrhagic complications of severe pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Stroud, W H; Cullom, J W; Anderson, M C

    1981-10-01

    Massive hemorrhage associated with pancreatitis is a rare but frequently lethal complication. Fifteen patients with this complication are presented. Bleeding occurred in four patients with necrotizing pancreatitis, in three patients with pancreatic abscesses, in seven patients with pseudocysts, and in one patient with chronic relapsing pancreatitis following longitudinal pancreaticojejunostomy. The initial presentation of hemorrhage was gastrointestinal in eight patients and retroperitoneal or intraperitoneal in seven. Abdominal pain with associated nausea and vomiting was present in all patients on admission. Duration of symptoms prior to hospitalization averaged 6 days. During hospitalization the 15 patients received a total of 512 units of blood for transfusions ranging from 8 to 177 units. Admission amylase values were of no benefit in assessing severity of the disease, but application of Ranson's criteria accurately predicted both severity and prognosis. The common denominator in all cases of bleeding appeared to be the presence of an overwhelming or continuing inflammatory process with necrosis and erosion of adjacent vascular and visceral structures. The overall mortality rate in the series was 53.3%. Those patients with hemorrhage associated with pseudocyst formation had the highest survival rates, whereas those with necrotizing pancreatitis and hemorrhage had an extremely poor response to aggressive medical and/or surgical management.

  13. ErbB2 oncogene expression supports the acute pancreatitis-chronic pancreatitis sequence.

    PubMed

    Standop, Jens; Standop, Silke; Itami, Atsushi; Nozawa, Fumiaki; Brand, Randall E; Büchler, Markus W; Pour, Parviz M

    2002-10-01

    The pathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis remains controversial. According to the general opinion, chronic pancreatitis is a de novo disease with a silent but progressive restructure of the pancreas in response to environmental, nutritional or genetic factors. The necrosis-fibrosis sequence hypothesis, on the other hand, postulates that relapsing attacks of acute pancreatitis with subsequent development of fibrosis leads to chronic pancreatitis. Since in our previous studies the expression of two anti-ErbB2 growth factor receptor (ErbB2) antibodies was shown to discriminate between primary chronic pancreatitis, normal tissue, and secondary chronic pancreatitis caused by pancreatic cancer, we studied the ErbB2 expression in tissues obtained from acute, recurrent acute, and chronic pancreatitis to investigate a possible evolution of the ErbB2 expression pattern during the course of the disease. We subjected 14 normal pancreas, 15 chronic pancreatitis, and 12 acute pancreatitis (three with recurrent acute pancreatitis) specimens to immunohistochemical studies using polyclonal anti-ErbB2 antibodies from Santa Cruz and Dako. The immunoreactivity of islet cells in acute pancreatitis cases with the Santa Cruz antibody was less than that in normal pancreas in relation to the degree of tissue damage and fibrosis, and was negative in recurrent acute and chronic pancreatitis tissues. The Dako antibody, on the other hand, revealed a membrane staining of ductal and ductular cells only in chronic pancreatitis specimens and in some areas of recurrent acute pancreatitis. In conclusion, the similarities in the immunoreactivity of anti-ErbB2 antibodies in recurrent acute pancreatitis and chronic pancreatitis support the hypothesis that acute pancreatitis can be a forerunner of chronic pancreatitis.

  14. Gastrostomy tube dislodgment acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous gastrostomy is well established root for long term feeding of patients who cannot be fed orally. The risks of percutanous gastrostomy insertion are low. Tube related complications often resolved by placing a Foley catheter or other balloon gastrostomy tube as a temporary solution. Gastrostomy tube related gastric, duodenal and billiary obstruction were reported. Gastrostomy tube related pancreatitis is scarcely described. We described a patient who suffered a pancreatitis related to Foley catheter gastrostomy dislodgment. Reviewing all reported cases of gastrostomy related pancreatitis revealed higher incidence in patient with Foley catheter used as gastrostomy and revealed questionable trends in conducting tube replacement. We suggest a proper manner for tube replacement and concluded that should a Foley catheter used as a temporary solution a replacement should be schedule in a timely manner to avoid life threatening complications. PMID:24674106

  15. Biochemical markers of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Matull, W R; Pereira, S P; O'Donohue, J W

    2006-04-01

    Serum amylase remains the most commonly used biochemical marker for the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis, but its sensitivity can be reduced by late presentation, hypertriglyceridaemia, and chronic alcoholism. Urinary trypsinogen-2 is convenient, of comparable diagnostic accuracy, and provides greater (99%) negative predictive value. Early prediction of the severity of acute pancreatitis can be made by well validated scoring systems at 48 hours, but the novel serum markers procalcitonin and interleukin 6 allow earlier prediction (12 to 24 hours after admission). Serum alanine transaminase >150 IU/l and jaundice suggest a gallstone aetiology, requiring endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. For obscure aetiologies, serum calcium and triglycerides should be measured. Genetic polymorphisms may play an important role in "idiopathic" acute recurrent pancreatitis.

  16. Update on Pancreatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Hruban, Ralph H; Maitra, Anirban; Goggins, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) is a histologically well-defined precursor to invasive ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. PanINs are remarkably common lesions, particularly in the elderly population. Molecular studies have helped establish the progression of PanIN to invasive cancer, and recently genetically engineered mouse models have been generated that recapitulate the entire spectrum of lesions from precursor to invasive pancreatic cancer. Some PanIN lesions produce lobulocentric atrophy of the pancreatic parenchyma, and, when multifocal, this lobulocentric atrophy may be detectable using currently available imaging techniques such as endoscopic ultrasound. The association of acinar-ductal metaplasia with PanIN lesions has led some to hypothesize that PanINs develop from acinar cells that undergo acinar-ductal metaplasia. PMID:18787611

  17. Transpapillary drainage of pancreatic parenchymal necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Smoczyński, Marian; Adrych, Krystian

    2015-01-01

    In the last two decades the strategy of treatment of necrotizing pancreatitis has changed. Endoscopic therapy of patients with symptomatic walled-off pancreatic necrosis has a high rate of efficiency. Here we present a description of a patient with parenchymal limited necrosis of the pancreas and a disruption of the main pancreatic duct. In the treatment, active transpapillary drainage of the pancreatic necrosis (through the major duodenal papilla) was performed and insertion of an endoprosthesis into the main pancreatic duct (through the minor duodenal papilla) was applied, which enabled a bypass over the infiltration and resulted in complete resolution. PMID:26649102

  18. Pancreatic enzyme secretion during intravenous fat infusion.

    PubMed

    Burns, G P; Stein, T A

    1987-01-01

    The nutritional support of patients with pancreatic and high gastrointestinal fistulas and severe pancreatitis frequently involves intravenous fat infusion. There are conflicting reports on the effect of intravenous fat on pancreatic exocrine secretion. In 10 dogs with chronic pancreatic fistulas, pancreatic juice was collected during secretin (n = 10) or secretin + cholecystokinin (n = 4) stimulation, with and without intravenous fat infusion (5 g/hr). The hormonal-stimulated secretion of lipase, amylase, trypsin, total protein, bicarbonate, and water was unchanged during fat infusion. This study supports the use of intravenous fat as a nutritional source when it is desirable to avoid stimulation of the pancreas.

  19. A Rare Case of Isolated Pancreatic Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Waintraub, Daniel J.; D’Souza, Lionel S.; Madrigal, Emilio; Harshan, Manju; Ascunce, Gil I.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic tuberculosis (TB) is a rare but important entity to consider when evaluating a pancreatic mass, especially in patients from endemic areas. Its clinical and radiologic features may mimic those of a pancreatic neoplasm, making it a difficult clinical diagnosis. We present a case of a 31-year-old Indian man who presented with fevers, night sweats, weight loss, and epigastric pain. Abdominal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a pancreatic head mass. Biopsy of the mass was consistent with pancreatic tuberculosis. PMID:27807553

  20. [Endoscopic therapy of acute and chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Veltzke-Schlieker, W; Adler, A; Abou-Rebyeh, H; Wiedenmann, B; Rösch, T

    2005-02-01

    Endoscopic therapy is valuable for both acute and chronic pancreatitis. Early endoscopic papillotomy appears, in the case of a severe course of acute biliary pancreatitis, to be advantageous. Endoscopic drainage can be considered in cases of acute fluid retention and necrosis as well as subacute, non-healing pancreatitis or cyst development. By acute chronic pancreatitis with strictures or bile duct stones, papillotomy, dilation and stent insertion can lead to an improvement in pain symptoms. An improvement in endo- or exocrine function, however, is not expected. Studies on the endoscopic therapy of pancreatitis are still very limited, and recommendations can usually only be made based on retrospective case series. PMID:15657718

  1. Inflammasomes in pancreatic physiology and disease

    PubMed Central

    Hoque, Rafaz

    2015-01-01

    In this review we summarize the role of inflammasomes in pancreatic physiology and disease with a focus on acute pancreatitis where much recent progress has been made. New findings have identified inducers of and cell specificity of inflammasome component expression in the pancreas, the contribution of inflammasome-regulated effectors to pancreatitis, and metabolic regulation of inflammasome activation, which are strong determinants of injury in pancreatitis. New areas of pancreatic biology will be highlighted in the context of our evolving understanding of gut microbiome- and injury-induced inflammasome priming, pyroptosis, and innate immune-mediated regulation of cell metabolism. PMID:25700081

  2. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma pathology: changing “landscape”

    PubMed Central

    Brosens, Lodewijk A. A.; Hackeng, Wenzel M.; Offerhaus, G. Johan; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease. At time of diagnosis the disease is usually advanced and only a minority of patients are eligible for surgical resection. The overall 5-year survival is 6%. However, survival of patients with early stage pancreatic cancer is significantly better. To improve the prognosis of patients with pancreatic cancer, it is essential to diagnose and treat pancreatic cancer in the earliest stage. Prevention of pancreatic cancer by treating noninvasive precursor lesions just before they invade tissues can potentially lead to even better outcomes. Pancreatic carcinogenesis results from a stepwise progression in which accumulating genetic alterations drive neoplastic progression in well-defined precursor lesions, ultimately giving rise to an invasive adenocarcinoma. A thorough understanding of the genetic changes that drive pancreatic carcinogenesis can lead to identification of biomarkers for early detection and targets for therapy. Recent next-generation sequencing (NGS) studies have shed new light on our understanding of the natural history of pancreatic cancer and the precursor lesions that give rise to these cancers. Importantly, there is a significant window of opportunity for early detection and treatment between the first genetic alteration in a cell in the pancreas and development of full-blown pancreatic cancer. The current views on the pathology and genetics of pancreatic carcinogenesis that evolved from studies of pancreatic cancer and its precursor lesions are discussed in this review. PMID:26261723

  3. Management of pancreatic ductal leaks and fistulae.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Michael; Kozarek, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic duct leaks can occur as a result of both acute and chronic pancreatitis or in the setting of pancreatic trauma. Manifestations of leaks include pseudocysts, pancreatic ascites, high amylase pleural effusions, disconnected duct syndrome, and internal and external pancreatic fistulas. Patient presentations are highly variable and range from asymptomatic pancreatic cysts to patients with severe abdominal pain and sepsis from infected fluid collections. The diagnosis can often be made by high-quality cross-sectional imaging or during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Because of their complexity, pancreatic leak patients are best managed by a multidisciplinary team comprised of therapeutic endoscopists, interventional radiologists, and surgeons in the field of pancreatic interventions. Minor leaks will often resolve with conservative management while severe leaks will frequently require interventions. Endoscopic treatments for pancreatic duct leaks have replaced surgical interventions in many situations. Interventional radiologists also have the ability to offer therapeutic interventions for many leak patients. The mainstay of endotherapy for pancreatic leaks is transpapillary pancreatic duct stenting with a stent that bridges the leak if possible, but varies based on the manifestation and clinical presentation. Fluid collections that result from leaks, such as pseudocysts, can often be treated by endoscopic transluminal drainage with or without endoscopic ultrasound or by percutaneous drainage. Endoscopic interventions have been shown to be effective and have an acceptable complication rate.

  4. Novel therapeutic targets for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shing-Chun; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has become the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the last two decades. Only 3%-15% of patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer had 5 year survival rate. Drug resistance, high metastasis, poor prognosis and tumour relapse contributed to the malignancies and difficulties in treating pancreatic cancer. The current standard chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer is gemcitabine, however its efficacy is far from satisfactory, one of the reasons is due to the complex tumour microenvironment which decreases effective drug delivery to target cancer cell. Studies of the molecular pathology of pancreatic cancer have revealed that activation of KRAS, overexpression of cyclooxygenase-2, inactivation of p16INK4A and loss of p53 activities occurred in pancreatic cancer. Co-administration of gemcitabine and targeting the molecular pathological events happened in pancreatic cancer has brought an enhanced therapeutic effectiveness of gemcitabine. Therefore, studies looking for novel targets in hindering pancreatic tumour growth are emerging rapidly. In order to give a better understanding of the current findings and to seek the direction in future pancreatic cancer research; in this review we will focus on targets suppressing tumour metastatsis and progression, KRAS activated downstream effectors, the relationship of Notch signaling and Nodal/Activin signaling with pancreatic cancer cells, the current findings of non-coding RNAs in inhibiting pancreatic cancer cell proliferation, brief discussion in transcription remodeling by epigenetic modifiers (e.g., HDAC, BMI1, EZH2) and the plausible therapeutic applications of cancer stem cell and hyaluronan in tumour environment. PMID:25152585

  5. Notch Signaling in Pancreatic Development

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xu-Yan; Zhai, Wen-Jun; Teng, Chun-Bo

    2015-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway plays a significant role in embryonic cell fate determination and adult tissue homeostasis. Various studies have demonstrated the deep involvement of Notch signaling in the development of the pancreas and the lateral inhibition of Notch signaling in pancreatic progenitor differentiation and maintenance. The targeted inactivation of the Notch pathway components promotes premature differentiation of the endocrine pancreas. However, there is still the contrary opinion that Notch signaling specifies the endocrine lineage. Here, we review the current knowledge of the Notch signaling pathway in pancreatic development and its crosstalk with the Wingless and INT-1 (Wnt) and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) pathways. PMID:26729103

  6. Biliary emergencies: pancreatitis, cholangitis, and more.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Robert M S; Byrne, Michael F

    2003-04-01

    The most common cause of acute pancreatitis is gallstones, although many other etiological factors have been identified. The management of the initial episode depends on the severity of the attack and the etiology. In most patients, acute pancreatitis has a benign, self-limited course. However, in the minority who develop infected pancreatic necrosis the mortality can reach 25%. The early assessment of severity and aggressive management of these patients is critical. The roles of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, surgical intervention, enteral feeding and use of antibiotics in acute pancreatitis are discussed in this article. Finally, the origin of recurrent acute pancreatitis is discussed, with particular reference to conditions such as pancreas divisum and sphincter of Oddi dysfunction whose role in the development of acute pancreatitis is controversial, and to hereditary or familial pancreatitis.

  7. Epidemiologic and etiologic factors of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Lowenfels, Albert B; Maisonneuve, Patrick

    2002-02-01

    Ranking fourth as a cause of death from cancer for men and women in the United States, pancreatic cancer represents a significant challenge for physicians and surgeons. In addition to the elderly, high-risk groups include blacks, men, smokers, and patients with certain preexisting diseases such as pancreatitis and long-standing diabetes. Various inherited genetic disorders cause approximately 5% to 10% of the total cases of pancreatic cancer. Smoking doubles the risk of pancreatic cancer. Control of smoking offers the best available strategy for reducing the incidence of this disease. Dietary measures to reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer include maintenance of normal body weight and consumption of a well balanced diet with adequate amounts of fruits and vegetables. Chronic pancreatitis caused by heavy alcohol consumption or, rarely, by an underlying inherited disorder is another strong risk factor, but because this benign disease is uncommon, elimination of this underlying cause would have minimal impact on the frequency of pancreatic cancer.

  8. Three cases of mediastinal pancreatic pseudocysts

    PubMed Central

    Fujihara, Yoshio; Maeda, Kazunori; Okamoto, Masaru; Yanagitani, Atsushi; Tanaka, Kiwamu; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Ogawa, Toshihide

    2016-01-01

    A rare complication of acute or chronic pancreatitis is the formation of a mediastinal pancreatic pseudocyst (MPP), which is caused by tracking of pancreatic fluids through anatomical openings of the diaphragm into the mediastinum. Herein, we report the imaging characteristics of three cases of this condition. Our results revealed three features in common: (i) the connection between the mediastinum and the pancreatic cystic lesion; (ii) the presence of pleural effusions; and (iii) imaging findings consistent with chronic pancreatitis, such as pancreatic atrophy and calcifications and dilatation and/or stricture of main pancreatic duct (MPD). Serial diameter changes of the MPD and of the adjacent pseudocysts were necessary for the determination of the therapeutic strategy used in each case. PMID:27330827

  9. Pancreatographic investigation of pancreatic duct system and pancreaticobiliary malformation

    PubMed Central

    Kamisawa, Terumi; Okamoto, Atsutake

    2008-01-01

    To clarify the anatomy of the pancreatic duct system and to investigate its embryology, we reviewed 256 pancreatograms with normal pancreatic head, 81 with pancreas divisum and 74 with pancreaticobiliary maljunction. Accessory pancreatograms were divided into two patterns. The long-type accessory pancreatic duct forms a straight line and joins the main pancreatic duct at the neck portion of the pancreas. The short-type accessory pancreatic duct joins the main pancreatic duct near its first inferior branch. The short-type accessory pancreatic duct is less likely to have a long inferior branch arising from the accessory pancreatic duct. The length of the accessory pancreatic duct from the orifice to the first long inferior branch was similar in the short- and long-type accessory pancreatic ducts. The first long inferior branch from the long-type accessory pancreatic duct passes though the main pancreatic duct near the origin of the inferior branch from the main pancreatic duct. Immunohistochemically, in the short-type accessory pancreatic duct, the main pancreatic duct between the junction with the short-type accessory pancreatic duct and the neck portion was located in the ventral pancreas. The long-type accessory pancreatic duct represents a continuation of the main duct of the dorsal pancreatic bud. The short-type accessory pancreatic duct is probably formed by the proximal main duct of the dorsal pancreatic bud and its long inferior branch. PMID:18194203

  10. Epidemiology of pancreatic cancer: an update.

    PubMed

    Maisonneuve, Patrick; Lowenfels, Albert B

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer, although infrequent, has a very poor prognosis, making it one of the 4 or 5 most common causes of cancer mortality in developed countries. Its incidence varies greatly across regions, which suggests that lifestyle factors such as diet, and environmental factors, such as vitamin D exposure, play a role. Because pancreatic cancer is strongly age-dependent, increasing population longevity and ageing will lead to an increase of the global burden of pancreatic cancer in the coming decades. Smoking is the most common known risk factor, causing 20-25% of all pancreatic tumors. Although a common cause of pancreatitis, heavy alcohol intake is associated only with a modest increased risk of pancreatic cancer. While viruses do not represent a major risk factor, people infected with Helicobacter pylori appeared to be at high risk of pancreatic cancer. Many factors associated with the metabolic syndrome, including overweight and obesity, impaired glucose tolerance, and long-standing diabetes also increase the risk disease, while atopic allergy and use of metformin as a treatment for diabetes have been associated with a reduced risk of pancreatic cancer. A family history of pancreatic cancer is associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer and it is estimated that 5-10% of patients with pancreatic cancer have an underlying germline disorder. Having a non-O blood group, another inherited characteristic, has also been steadily associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer. While many risk factors for pancreatic cancer are not modifiable, adopting a healthy lifestyle could substantially reduce pancreatic cancer risk. PMID:21088417

  11. The effect of pancreatic polypeptide and peptide YY on pancreatic blood flow and pancreatic exocrine secretion in the anesthetized dog

    SciTech Connect

    DeMar, A.R.; Lake, R.; Fink, A.S. )

    1991-01-01

    Pancreatic polypeptide (PP) and peptide YY (PYY) are inhibitors of pancreatic exocrine secretion in vivo but not in vitro, which suggests intermediate mechanisms of action. To examine the role of pancreatic blood flow in these inhibitory effects, xenon-133 gas clearance was used to measure pancreatic blood flow while simultaneously measuring pancreatic exocrine secretion. PP or PYY (400 pmol/kg/h) was administered during the intermediate hour of a 3-h secretin (125 ng/kg/h)/cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8) (50 ng/kg/h) infusion. Exocrine secretion and pancreatic blood flow during the PP or PYY hours were compared with that observed in the first and third hours of the secretin/CCK-8 infusion. PP and PYY significantly inhibited secretin/CCK-8-induced pancreatic exocrine secretion. In addition, PYY (but not PP) significantly reduced pancreatic blood flow during secretin/CCK-8 stimulation. Nevertheless, there was no correlation between pancreatic blood flow and bicarbonate or protein outputs. It is concluded that changes in pancreatic blood flow do not mediate the inhibitory effects of PP or PYY on the exocrine pancreas.

  12. Serum Protein Signatures Differentiating Autoimmune Pancreatitis versus Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Stefan; Hinz, Ulf; Schnölzer, Martina; Kempf, Tore; Warnken, Uwe; Michel, Angelika; Pawlita, Michael; Werner, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is defined by characteristic lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, ductal strictures and a pancreatic enlargement or mass that can mimic pancreatic cancer (PaCa). The distinction between this benign disease and pancreatic cancer can be challenging. However, an accurate diagnosis may pre-empt the misdiagnosis of cancer, allowing the appropriate medical treatment of AIP and, consequently, decreasing the number of unnecessary pancreatic resections. Mass spectrometry (MS) and two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) have been applied to analyse serum protein alterations associated with AIP and PaCa, and to identify protein signatures indicative of the diseases. Patients' sera were immunodepleted from the 20 most prominent serum proteins prior to further 2D-DIGE and image analysis. The identity of the most-discriminatory proteins detected, was performed by MS and ELISAs were applied to confirm their expression. Serum profiling data analysis with 2D-DIGE revealed 39 protein peaks able to discriminate between AIP and PaCa. Proteins were purified and further analysed by MALDI-TOF-MS. Peptide mass fingerprinting led to identification of eleven proteins. Among them apolipoprotein A-I, apolipoprotein A-II, transthyretin, and tetranectin were identified and found as 3.0-, 3.5-, 2-, and 1.6-fold decreased in PaCa sera, respectively, whereas haptoglobin and apolipoprotein E were found to be 3.8- and 1.6-fold elevated in PaCa sera. With the exception of haptoglobin the ELISA results of the identified proteins confirmed the 2D-DIGE image analysis characteristics. Integration of the identified serum proteins as AIP markers may have considerable potential to provide additional information for the diagnosis of AIP to choose the appropriate treatment. PMID:24349355

  13. Endoscopic treatment of pancreatic calculi.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Hoon; Jang, Sung Ill; Rhee, Kwangwon; Lee, Dong Ki

    2014-05-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease that destroys pancreatic parenchyma and alters ductal stricture, leading to ductal destruction and abdominal pain. Pancreatic duct stones (PDSs) are a common complication of chronic pancreatitis that requires treatment to relieve abdominal pain and improve pancreas function. Endoscopic therapy, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), and surgery are treatment modalities of PDSs, although lingering controversies have hindered a consensus recommendation. Many comparative studies have reported that surgery is the superior treatment because of reduced duration and frequency of hospitalization, cost, pain relief, and reintervention, while endoscopic therapy is effective and less invasive but cannot be used in all patients. Surgery is the treatment of choice when endoscopic therapy has failed, malignancy is suspected, or duodenal stricture is present. However, in patients with the appropriate indications or at high-risk for surgery, endoscopic therapy in combination with ESWL can be considered a first-line treatment. We expect that the development of advanced endoscopic techniques and equipment will expand the role of endoscopic treatment in PDS removal.

  14. Pancreatic Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing pancreatic cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  15. Pancreatic torsion in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Brabson, Tamera L.; Maki, Lynn C.; Newell, Susan M.; Ralphs, S. Christopher

    2015-01-01

    A 6-month-old male intact Cane Corso mastiff dog was presented for a recent history of vomiting, abdominal pain, and lethargy. A diagnosis of pancreatic torsion was made during abdominal exploratory surgery and was confirmed with histopathology. The dog underwent partial pancreatectomy and recovered with no complications. PMID:25969579

  16. [Hepatic and pancreatic laparoscopic surgery].

    PubMed

    Pardo, F; Rotellar, F; Valentí, V; Pastor, C; Poveda, I; Martí-Cruchaga, P; Zozaya, G

    2005-01-01

    The development of laparoscopic surgery also includes the more complex procedures of abdominal surgery such as those that affect the liver and the pancreas. From diagnostic laparoscopy, accompanied by laparoscopic echography, to major hepatic or pancreatic resections, the laparoscopic approach has spread and today encompasses practically all of the surgical procedures in hepatopancreatic pathology. Without forgetting that the aim of minimally invasive surgery is not a better aesthetic result but the reduction of postoperative complications, it is undeniable that the laparoscopic approach has brought great benefits for the patient in every type of surgery except, for the time being, in the case of big resections such as left or right hepatectomy or resections of segments VII and VIII. Pancreatic surgery has undergone a great development with laparoscopy, especially in the field of distal pancreatectomy due to cystic and neuroendocrine tumours where the approach of choice is laparoscopic. Laparoscopy similarly plays an important role, together with echolaparoscopy, in staging pancreatic tumours, prior to open surgery or for indicating suitable treatment. In coming years, it is to be hoped that it will continue to undergo an exponential development and, together with the advances in robotics, it will be possible to witness a greater impact of the laparoscopic approach on the field of hepatic and pancreatic surgery. PMID:16511579

  17. Progression of alcoholic acute to chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Ammann, R W; Muellhaupt, B

    1994-01-01

    Alcoholic chronic pancreatitis usually progresses from acute attacks to chronic pancreatitis within one to 19 years. The factors responsible for the appreciable variability in progression are unclear. In this study the relation between progression and the incidence and severity of acute episodes in a large cohort of patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis was analysed. All patients with at least one documented episode of acute pancreatitis have been studied prospectively over the past 30 years according to our protocol. Patients were classified according to their long term course into (a) calcific (n = 185), (b) non-calcific (n = 30), and (c) non-progressive (n = 39) chronic pancreatitis groups. The yearly incidence of acute attacks of pancreatitis was significantly higher in groups (a) and (b) than in group (c). Furthermore, the progression rate to advanced chronic pancreatitis (groups (a) and (b)) correlated with the incidence of severe pancreatitis (associated with pseudocysts in more than 55%). Pseudocysts were located primarily in the cephalic pancreas in groups (a) and (b) (58-71%) and in the pancreatic tail in group (c) (61%). In conclusion, these data suggest that the progression of acute to chronic pancreatitis is closely related to the incidence and severity of acute attacks. This finding and the primary location of pseudocysts in the cephalic pancreas (groups (a) plus (b)) are compatible with the 'necrosis-fibrosis' pathogenetic hypothesis. PMID:8174996

  18. Acute pancreatitis in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Mitsuyoshi; Sai, Jin Kan; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    In this Topic Highlight, the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of acute pancreatitis in children are discussed. Acute pancreatitis should be considered during the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain in children and requires prompt treatment because it may become life-threatening. The etiology, clinical manifestations, and course of acute pancreatitis in children are often different than in adults. Therefore, the specific features of acute pancreatitis in children must be considered. The etiology of acute pancreatitis in children is often drugs, infections, trauma, or anatomic abnormalities. Diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms (such as abdominal pain and vomiting), serum pancreatic enzyme levels, and imaging studies. Several scoring systems have been proposed for the assessment of severity, which is useful for selecting treatments and predicting prognosis. The basic pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis does not greatly differ between adults and children, and the treatments for adults and children are similar. In large part, our understanding of the pathology, optimal treatment, assessment of severity, and outcome of acute pancreatitis in children is taken from the adult literature. However, we often find that the common management of adult pancreatitis is difficult to apply to children. With advances in diagnostic techniques and treatment methods, severe acute pancreatitis in children is becoming better understood and more controllable. PMID:25400985

  19. Pseudotumors due to IgG4 immune-complex tubulointerstitial nephritis associated with autoimmune pancreatocentric disease.

    PubMed

    Cornell, Lynn D; Chicano, Sonia L; Deshpande, Vikram; Collins, A Bernard; Selig, Martin K; Lauwers, Gregory Y; Barisoni, Laura; Colvin, Robert B

    2007-10-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a mass-forming chronic fibroinflammatory condition centered on the pancreatobiliary system and characterized by predominant immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-positive plasma cells. Recent reports have brought to light the multiorgan involvement of this disease. We describe a series of 5 cases of tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN) associated with AIP and characterize the clinical, pathologic, ultrastructural, and immunopathologic features of TIN. The specimens consisted of 4 biopsies and 1 nephrectomy. The average patient age was 64 years (range 45 to 78) and the male to female ratio was 4:1. All had histologic and/or clinical and radiographic evidence of AIP, mass-forming sclerosing cholangitis, or both. The clinical impression in 4 patients was a renal mass or vasculitis. Two patients had renal insufficiency. Histologic preparations revealed a dense tubulointerstitial lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate. Eosinophils were often numerous. Tubulitis and tubular injury were present, along with tubular atrophy with focally thickened tubular basement membranes (TBMs). The histologic appearance ranged from a cellular, inflammatory pattern without tubular atrophy to a striking expansive interstitial fibrosis with tubular destruction. The nephrectomy specimen demonstrated a masslike nodular pattern of inflammation with normal renal tissue elsewhere. Glomeruli were uninvolved. By immunohistochemistry or immunofluorescence, numerous plasma cells in the infiltrate were positive for IgG4. TBM granular IgG deposits, predominantly of the IgG4 subclass, were detected in 4 of 5 cases by either immunofluorescence or immunohistochemistry. By electron microscopy, corresponding amorphous electron-dense deposits were present in the TBM in these cases. This type of TIN, typically characterized by a masslike lesion consisting of a lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate with eosinophils and prominent IgG4-positive plasma cells and immune-complex deposits in the TBM, may be part of

  20. Pseudotumors due to IgG4 immune-complex tubulointerstitial nephritis associated with autoimmune pancreatocentric disease.

    PubMed

    Cornell, Lynn D; Chicano, Sonia L; Deshpande, Vikram; Collins, A Bernard; Selig, Martin K; Lauwers, Gregory Y; Barisoni, Laura; Colvin, Robert B

    2007-10-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a mass-forming chronic fibroinflammatory condition centered on the pancreatobiliary system and characterized by predominant immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-positive plasma cells. Recent reports have brought to light the multiorgan involvement of this disease. We describe a series of 5 cases of tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN) associated with AIP and characterize the clinical, pathologic, ultrastructural, and immunopathologic features of TIN. The specimens consisted of 4 biopsies and 1 nephrectomy. The average patient age was 64 years (range 45 to 78) and the male to female ratio was 4:1. All had histologic and/or clinical and radiographic evidence of AIP, mass-forming sclerosing cholangitis, or both. The clinical impression in 4 patients was a renal mass or vasculitis. Two patients had renal insufficiency. Histologic preparations revealed a dense tubulointerstitial lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate. Eosinophils were often numerous. Tubulitis and tubular injury were present, along with tubular atrophy with focally thickened tubular basement membranes (TBMs). The histologic appearance ranged from a cellular, inflammatory pattern without tubular atrophy to a striking expansive interstitial fibrosis with tubular destruction. The nephrectomy specimen demonstrated a masslike nodular pattern of inflammation with normal renal tissue elsewhere. Glomeruli were uninvolved. By immunohistochemistry or immunofluorescence, numerous plasma cells in the infiltrate were positive for IgG4. TBM granular IgG deposits, predominantly of the IgG4 subclass, were detected in 4 of 5 cases by either immunofluorescence or immunohistochemistry. By electron microscopy, corresponding amorphous electron-dense deposits were present in the TBM in these cases. This type of TIN, typically characterized by a masslike lesion consisting of a lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate with eosinophils and prominent IgG4-positive plasma cells and immune-complex deposits in the TBM, may be part of

  1. Recent Advances in Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hart, Phil A; Zen, Yoh; Chari, Suresh T

    2015-07-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a form of chronic pancreatitis that is characterized clinically by frequent presentation with obstructive jaundice, histologically by a dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate with fibrosis, and therapeutically by a dramatic response to corticosteroid therapy. Two distinct diseases, type 1 and type 2 AIP, share these features. However, these 2 diseases have unique pancreatic histopathologic patterns and differ significantly in their demographic profiles, clinical presentation, and natural history. Recognizing the popular and long-standing association of the term "AIP" with what is now called "type 1 AIP," we suggest using "AIP" solely for type 1 AIP and to acknowledge its own distinct disease status by using "idiopathic duct-centric chronic pancreatitis" (IDCP) for type 2 AIP. AIP is the pancreatic manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). The etiopathogenesis of AIP and IgG4-RD is largely unknown. However, the remarkable effectiveness of B-cell depletion therapy with rituximab in patients with AIP and IgG4-RD highlights the crucial role of B cells in its pathogenesis. IDCP is less commonly recognized, and little is known about its pathogenesis. IDCP has no biomarker but is associated with inflammatory bowel disease in ~25% of patients. Recently, the international consensus diagnostic criteria for AIP identified combinations of features that are diagnostic of both diseases. Both AIP and IDCP are corticosteroid responsive; however, relapses are common in AIP and rare in IDCP. Therefore, maintenance therapy with either an immunomodulator (eg, azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine, or mycophenolate mofetil) or rituximab is often necessary for patients with AIP. Long-term survival is excellent for both patients with AIP and patients with IDCP. PMID:25770706

  2. Dasatinib and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride or Gemcitabine Hydrochloride Alone in Treating Patients With Pancreatic Cancer Previously Treated With Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-29

    Acinar Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Duct Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer

  3. A practical approach to the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Frulloni, Luca; Amodio, Antonio; Katsotourchi, Anna Maria; Vantini, Italo

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis is a disease characterized by specific pathological features, different from those of other forms of pancreatitis, that responds dramatically to steroid therapy. The pancreatic parenchyma may be diffusely or focally involved with the possibility of a low-density mass being present at imaging, mimicking pancreatic cancer. Clinically, the most relevant problems lie in the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis and in distinguishing autoimmune pancreatitis from pancreatic cancer. Since in the presence of a pancreatic mass the probability of tumour is much higher than that of pancreatitis, the physician should be aware that in focal autoimmune pancreatitis the first step before using steroids is to exclude pancreatic adenocarcinoma. In this review, we briefly analyse the strategies to be followed for a correct diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis. PMID:21547125

  4. Imaging of miscellaneous pancreatic pathology (trauma, transplant, infections, and deposition).

    PubMed

    Holalkere, Nagaraj-Setty; Soto, Jorge

    2012-05-01

    In this article's coverage of miscellaneous pancreatic topics, a brief review of pancreatic trauma; pancreatic transplantation; rare infections, such as tuberculosis; deposition disorders, including fatty replacement and hemochromatosis; cystic fibrosis; and others are discussed with pertinent case examples.

  5. Dilemmas in autoimmune pancreatitis. Surgical resection or not?

    PubMed

    Hoffmanova, I; Gurlich, R; Janik, V; Szabo, A; Vernerova, Z

    2016-01-01

    Surgical treatment is not commonly recommended in the management of autoimmune pancreatitis. The article describes a dilemma in diagnostics and treatment of a 68-year old man with the mass in the head of the pancreas that mimicked pancreatic cancer and that was diagnosed as a type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis (IgG4-related pancreatitis) after a surgical resection. Diagnosis of the autoimmune pancreatitis is a real clinical challenge, as in the current diagnostic criteria exists some degree of overlap in the findings between autoimmune pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer (indicated by the similarity in radiologic findings, elevation of IgG4, sampling errors in pancreatic biopsy, and the possibility of synchronous autoimmune pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer). Despite the generally accepted corticosteroids as the primary treatment modality in autoimmune pancreatitis, we believe that surgical resection remains necessary in a specific subgroup of patients with autoimmune pancreatitis (Fig. 4, Ref. 37). PMID:27546699

  6. Gemcitabine Hydrochloride and Cisplatin With or Without Veliparib or Veliparib Alone in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-10

    BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; PALB2 Gene Mutation; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  7. PanScan, the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium, and the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    The Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium consists of more than a dozen prospective epidemiologic cohort studies within the NCI Cohort Consortium, whose leaders work together to investigate the etiology and natural history of pancreatic cancer.

  8. Conservation of pancreatic tissue by combined gastric, biliary, and pancreatic duct drainage for pain from chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Warshaw, A L

    1985-04-01

    In patients with chronic pancreatitis, the sclerosing process of the pancreas may constrict not only the pancreatic duct for also the bile duct and duodenum. This study analyzes the prevalence of these obstructive lesions in 58 consecutive patients with chronic pancreatitis requiring surgery for either pain (57 patients) or for painless jaundice (1 patient). There was significant biliary obstruction in 21, 4 of whom also had symptomatic duodenal obstruction. All 21 patients with biliary and duodenal obstruction were among the 38 with a dilated pancreatic duct suitable for pancreaticojejunostomy (modified Puestow procedure). None of the 20 patients with small duct pancreatitis had biliary or duodenal obstruction. Pseudocysts were distributed evenly between the two groups (9 of 38 patients with a dilated duct versus 4 of 20 patients with small duct pancreatitis). Pancreaticojejunostomy combined with choledochoenterostomy and gastrojejunostomy in appropriately selected patients provided good to excellent long-term (mean 3.6 years) relief of pain in 30 of 36 patients (83 percent). There was no correlation between successful relief of pain and development of pancreatic exocrine or endocrine insufficiency or calcification. Stenosis of the bile duct developed some years subsequent to pancreaticojejunostomy in four patients and required a second operation for choledochoenterostomy in three. Three other patients required secondary pancreatic resections due to failure of the pancreaticojejunostomy to relieve pain. It is often possible to effect excellent relief of symptoms with maximal conservation of remaining pancreatic functions despite sclerotic obstruction of multiple organ systems.

  9. Simultaneous characterization of pancreatic stellate cells and other pancreatic components within three-dimensional tissue environment during chronic pancreatitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wenyan; Fu, Ling

    2013-05-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) and other pancreatic components that play a critical role in exocrine pancreatic diseases are generally identified separately by conventional studies, which provide indirect links between these components. Here, nonlinear optical microscopy was evaluated for simultaneous characterization of these components within a three-dimensional (3-D) tissue environment, primarily based on multichannel detection of intrinsic optical emissions and cell morphology. Fresh rat pancreatic tissues harvested at 1 day, 7 days, and 28 days after induction of chronic pancreatitis were imaged, respectively. PSCs, inflammatory cells, blood vessels, and collagen fibers were identified simultaneously. The PSCs at day 1 of chronic pancreatitis showed significant enlargement compared with those in normal pancreas (p<0.001, analysis of variance linear contrast; n=8 for each group). Pathological events relating to these components were observed, including presence of inflammatory cells, deposited collagen, and phenotype conversion of PSCs. We demonstrate that label-free nonlinear optical microscopy is an efficient tool for dissecting PSCs and other pancreatic components coincidently within 3-D pancreatic tissues. It is a prospect for intravital observation of dynamic events under natural physiological conditions, and might help uncover the key mechanisms of exocrine pancreatic diseases, leading to more effective treatments.

  10. Current status of endotherapy for chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kwek, Andrew Boon Eu; Ang, Tiing Leong; Maydeo, Amit

    2014-12-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is associated with varied morphological complications, including intraductal stones, main pancreatic ductal strictures, distal biliary strictures and pseudocysts. Endoscopic therapy provides a less invasive alternative to surgery. In addition, extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy improves the success rate of endoscopic clearance of intraductal stones. However, recent data from randomised trials have shown better long-term outcomes with surgical drainage for obstructive pancreatic ductal disease. In patients with distal biliary strictures, stent insertion leads to good immediate drainage, but after stent removal, recurrent narrowing is common. Endoscopic drainage of pancreatic pseudocysts has excellent outcome and should be accompanied by pancreatic ductal stenting when a ductal communication is evident. In those who remain symptomatic, endoscopic ultrasonography-guided coeliac plexus block may provide effective but short-term pain relief. In this review, we present the current evidence for the role of endotherapy in the management of patients with chronic pancreatitis.

  11. Transcatheter Embolization of Pseudoaneurysms Complicating Pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Golzarian, Jafar; Nicaise, Nicole; Deviere, Jacques; Ghysels, Marc; Wery, Didier; Dussaussois, Luc; Gansbeke, Daniel van; Struyven, Julien

    1997-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the therapeutic role of angiography in patients with pseudoaneurysms complicating pancreatitis. Methods: Thirteen symptomatic pseudoaneurysms were treated in nine patients with pancreatitis. Eight patients had chronic pancreatitis and pseudocyst and one had acute pancreatitis. Clinical presentation included gastrointestinal bleeding in seven patients and epigastric pain without bleeding in two. All patients underwent transcatheter embolization. Results: Transcatheter embolization resulted in symptomatic resolution in all patients. Rebleeding occurred in two patients, 18 and 28 days after embolization respectively, and was successfully treated by repeated emnbolization. One patient with severe pancreatitis died from sepsis 28 days after embolization. Follow-up was then available for eight patients with no relapse of bleeding after a mean follow-up of 32 months (range 9-48 months). Conclusion: Transcatheter embolization is safe and effective in the management of pseudoaneurysms complicating pancreatitis.

  12. Pancreatic cancer: Pathogenesis, prevention and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Fazlul H. Banerjee, Sanjeev; Li, Yiwei

    2007-11-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States with a very low survival rate of 5 years. To better design new preventive and/or therapeutic strategies for the fight against pancreatic cancer, the knowledge of the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer at the molecular level is very important. It has been known that the development and the progression of pancreatic cancer are caused by the activation of oncogenes, the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, and the deregulation of many signaling pathways among which the EGFR, Akt, and NF-{kappa}B pathways appear to be most relevant. Therefore, the strategies targeting EGFR, Akt, NF-{kappa}B, and their downstream signaling could be promising for the prevention and/or treatment of pancreatic cancer. In this brief review, we will summarize the current knowledge regarding the pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  13. [Prediction and monitoring of severe acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Gürlich, R; Maruna, P; Spicák, J

    2006-01-01

    Twenty to thirty percent patients with acute pancreatitis develop severe acute pancreatitis with high mortality and morbidity rate. Markers of severity of acute pancreatitis are clinically important for the early diagnosis of complications. We reviewed the literature for markers of acute pancreatitis. On their relevance for prediction of severe pancreatitis are given. Several markers can predict severe cases of acute pancreatitis with a different positive and negative predictive value. Useful predictors of severity may include serum procalcitonin and urinary trypsinogen activation peptide at the admission, serum interleukins-6 and -8 at 24 h, and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) in 48 hours interval. The valuable marker for daily monitoring appears to be serum procalcitonin.

  14. [Treatment with somatostatin of pancreatic ascites].

    PubMed

    Gómez, J; Gallego, P; Cobo, J; Medraño, J C; Molina, F

    1992-04-01

    Pancreatic ascites is an entity defined as amylase levels up to 1.000 U/l in ascitic liquid. Frequently, it is secondary to a rupture of pancreatic ductus or pseudocyst and foreward communication to peritoneal space. We present a male diagnosed of calcified alcoholic chronic pancreatitis with pancreatic ascites secondary to a pseudocyst. Combination of parenteral nutrition and sintetic cyclic somatostatin was efficient. It would act by reducing pancreatic secretion in a long-term manner, which is the final purpose of the treatment. This association would be considered as a former tool in ascitic pancreatic patients, evacuatory punction or delayed surgery been relegated to a conservatory treatment failure or when primary pathology indicate it.

  15. Hematogenous Gastric Metastasis of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sasajima, Junpei; Okamoto, Kotaro; Taniguchi, Masato

    2016-01-01

    While the gastric involvement of pancreatic cancer is occasionally observed as the result of direct invasion, hematogenous gastric metastasis is rare. A 72-year-old Japanese male presented with general fatigue, pollakiuria, and thirst. Computed tomography revealed a 4.6-cm solid mass in the pancreatic tail and a 4.2-cm multilocular cystic mass in the pancreatic head with multiple liver and lymphatic metastasis. Notably, two solid masses were detected in the gastric wall of the upper body and the antrum; both were separated from the primary pancreatic cancer and seemed to be located in the submucosal layer. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a submucosal tumor with a normal mucosa in the posterior wall of the upper body of the stomach, suggesting the gastric hematogenous metastasis of pancreatic cancer. The suspected diagnosis was unresectable pancreatic cancer with multiple metastases that was concomitant with the intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas. PMID:27403106

  16. Hematogenous Gastric Metastasis of Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sasajima, Junpei; Okamoto, Kotaro; Taniguchi, Masato

    2016-01-01

    While the gastric involvement of pancreatic cancer is occasionally observed as the result of direct invasion, hematogenous gastric metastasis is rare. A 72-year-old Japanese male presented with general fatigue, pollakiuria, and thirst. Computed tomography revealed a 4.6-cm solid mass in the pancreatic tail and a 4.2-cm multilocular cystic mass in the pancreatic head with multiple liver and lymphatic metastasis. Notably, two solid masses were detected in the gastric wall of the upper body and the antrum; both were separated from the primary pancreatic cancer and seemed to be located in the submucosal layer. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a submucosal tumor with a normal mucosa in the posterior wall of the upper body of the stomach, suggesting the gastric hematogenous metastasis of pancreatic cancer. The suspected diagnosis was unresectable pancreatic cancer with multiple metastases that was concomitant with the intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas. PMID:27403106

  17. Biologic therapies for advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    He, Aiwu Ruth; Lindenberg, Andreas Peter; Marshall, John Lindsay

    2008-08-01

    Patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer have poor prognosis and short survival due to lack of effective therapy and aggressiveness of the disease. Pancreatic cancer has widespread chromosomal instability, including a high rate of translocations and deletions. Upregulated EGF signaling and mutation of K-RAS are found in most pancreatic cancers. Therefore, inhibitors that target EGF receptor, K-RAS, RAF, MEK, mTOR, VEGF and PDGF, for example, have been evaluated in patients with pancreatic cancer. Although significant activities of these inhibitors have not been observed in the majority of pancreatic cancer patients, an enormous amount of experience and knowledge has been obtained from recent clinical trials. With a better inhibitor or combination of inhibitors, and improvement in the selection of patients for available inhibitors, better therapy for pancreatic cancer is on the horizon.

  18. Valproic Acid Limits Pancreatic Recovery after Pancreatitis by Inhibiting Histone Deacetylases and Preventing Acinar Redifferentiation Programs.

    PubMed

    Eisses, John F; Criscimanna, Angela; Dionise, Zachary R; Orabi, Abrahim I; Javed, Tanveer A; Sarwar, Sheharyar; Jin, Shunqian; Zhou, Lili; Singh, Sucha; Poddar, Minakshi; Davis, Amy W; Tosun, Akif Burak; Ozolek, John A; Lowe, Mark E; Monga, Satdarshan P; Rohde, Gustavo K; Esni, Farzad; Husain, Sohail Z

    2015-12-01

    The mechanisms by which drugs induce pancreatitis are unknown. A definite cause of pancreatitis is due to the antiepileptic drug valproic acid (VPA). On the basis of three crucial observations-that VPA inhibits histone deacetylases (HDACs), HDACs mediate pancreas development, and aspects of pancreas development are recapitulated during recovery of the pancreas after injury-we hypothesized that VPA does not cause injury on its own, but it predisposes patients to pancreatitis by inhibiting HDACs and provoking an imbalance in pancreatic recovery. In an experimental model of pancreatic injury, we found that VPA delayed recovery of the pancreas and reduced acinar cell proliferation. In addition, pancreatic expression of class I HDACs (which are the primary VPA targets) increased in the midphase of pancreatic recovery. VPA administration inhibited pancreatic HDAC activity and led to the persistence of acinar-to-ductal metaplastic complexes, with prolonged Sox9 expression and sustained β-catenin nuclear activation, findings that characterize a delay in regenerative reprogramming. These effects were not observed with valpromide, an analog of VPA that lacks HDAC inhibition. This is the first report, to our knowledge, that VPA shifts the balance toward pancreatic injury and pancreatitis through HDAC inhibition. The work also identifies a new paradigm for therapies that could exploit epigenetic reprogramming to enhance pancreatic recovery and disorders of pancreatic injury.

  19. Effects of ORP150 on appearance and function of pancreatic beta cells following acute necrotizing pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wen-Hong; Chen, Chen; Wang, Wei-Xing; Yu, Jia; Li, Jin-You; Liu, Lei

    2011-06-15

    Pancreatic beta cells produce and release insulin, which decreases the blood glucose level. Endoplasmic reticulum stress caused pancreatic beta cell dysfunction and death in acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP). The 150kD oxygen-regulated protein (ORP150) took part in the process of endoplasmic reticulum stress. This study investigated the effect of ORP150 on appearance and function of pancreatic beta cells in ANP. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis relied on retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the bile-pancreatic duct. The severity of ANP was estimated by serum amylase, secretory phospholipase A(2,) and pancreatic histopathology. The changes in appearance and function of pancreatic beta cells were detected by light and electron microscopy and the levels of serum glucose, insulin, and C-peptide. ORP150 expression was studied using western blot and immunohistochemisty assay. The expression of ORP150 mainly appeared on pancreatic beta cells and decreased gradually during the pathogenesis of ANP. The results of light and electron microscopy indicated pancreatic beta cell dysfunction and death, concomitant with elevation of serum glucose, insulin, and C-peptide in ANP. These results imply a probable role of ORP150 in the changes in appearance and function of pancreatic beta cells following acute necrotizing pancreatitis, through the pathway of endoplasmic reticulum stress.

  20. Small pancreatic cancer with pancreas divisum preoperatively diagnosed by pancreatic juice cytology.

    PubMed

    Obana, Takashi; Fujita, Naotaka; Noda, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Go; Ito, Kei; Horaguchi, Jun; Takasawa, Osamu; Tsuchiya, Takashi; Sawai, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    We present a case of small pancreatic head cancer with pancreas divisum preoperatively diagnosed by pancreatic juice cytology. A 60-year-old woman was referred to our hospital for evaluation of a dilated main pancreatic duct (MPD). A small and poorly reproducible low-echoic lesion in the pancreas was suspected by ultrasonography (US) and endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS). Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) failed to visualize the ventral pancreatic duct, and the upstream dorsal pancreatic duct was dilated. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) was indicative of pancreas divisum, and complete obstruction of the MPD in the pancreatic head was seen. Cytology of pancreatic juice obtained from the dorsal pancreas after minor papilla sphincterotomy revealed the presence of adenocarcinoma cells. Pancreatoduodenectomy was performed under the diagnosis of pancreatic head cancer with pancreas divisum. Histological examination revealed moderately-differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma 20 mm in diameter, located in the pancreatic head. Dilatation of the dorsal pancreatic duct is sometimes observed in cases with pancreas divisum without the presence of tumors. When pancreatic duct stenosis also exists in such cases, even if a tumor is not clearly visualized by diagnostic imaging, vigorous examinations such as pancreatic juice cytology are recommended to establish an accurate diagnosis.

  1. Valproic Acid Limits Pancreatic Recovery after Pancreatitis by Inhibiting Histone Deacetylases and Preventing Acinar Redifferentiation Programs.

    PubMed

    Eisses, John F; Criscimanna, Angela; Dionise, Zachary R; Orabi, Abrahim I; Javed, Tanveer A; Sarwar, Sheharyar; Jin, Shunqian; Zhou, Lili; Singh, Sucha; Poddar, Minakshi; Davis, Amy W; Tosun, Akif Burak; Ozolek, John A; Lowe, Mark E; Monga, Satdarshan P; Rohde, Gustavo K; Esni, Farzad; Husain, Sohail Z

    2015-12-01

    The mechanisms by which drugs induce pancreatitis are unknown. A definite cause of pancreatitis is due to the antiepileptic drug valproic acid (VPA). On the basis of three crucial observations-that VPA inhibits histone deacetylases (HDACs), HDACs mediate pancreas development, and aspects of pancreas development are recapitulated during recovery of the pancreas after injury-we hypothesized that VPA does not cause injury on its own, but it predisposes patients to pancreatitis by inhibiting HDACs and provoking an imbalance in pancreatic recovery. In an experimental model of pancreatic injury, we found that VPA delayed recovery of the pancreas and reduced acinar cell proliferation. In addition, pancreatic expression of class I HDACs (which are the primary VPA targets) increased in the midphase of pancreatic recovery. VPA administration inhibited pancreatic HDAC activity and led to the persistence of acinar-to-ductal metaplastic complexes, with prolonged Sox9 expression and sustained β-catenin nuclear activation, findings that characterize a delay in regenerative reprogramming. These effects were not observed with valpromide, an analog of VPA that lacks HDAC inhibition. This is the first report, to our knowledge, that VPA shifts the balance toward pancreatic injury and pancreatitis through HDAC inhibition. The work also identifies a new paradigm for therapies that could exploit epigenetic reprogramming to enhance pancreatic recovery and disorders of pancreatic injury. PMID:26476347

  2. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of pancreatic calculi].

    PubMed

    Sauerbruch, T

    1990-05-01

    Using extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) pancreatic stones may be disintegrated. Acute adverse effects directly attributably to shock wave lithotripsy are rare. More than half of the patients will exhibit complete clearance of the pancreatic duct system after ESWL, endoscopic sphincterotomy and extraction of fragments. Most of the patients in whom the ducts could be cleared from the stones also showed improvement of chronic pancreatic pain. These findings, however, have to be substantiated by larger clinical studies with longer follow-up periods.

  3. Non-focal enlargement in pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wittenberg, J.; Simeone, J.F.; Ferrucci, J.T. Jr.; Mueller, P.R.; van Sonnenberg, E.; Neff, C.C.

    1982-07-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma can appear radiographically as enlargement of the major part of the pancreas. In this series, part or all of three or more pancreatic segments (head, neck, body, and tail) were involved in 27% of patients with adenocarcinoma who had computed tomography. Differentiation from pure pancreatitis may require additional radiographic studies. The varied tissue composition of a pancreas enlarged by adenocarcinoma will often require biopsy of multiple sites for confirmation.

  4. Drug induced acute pancreatitis: Does it exist?

    PubMed Central

    Tenner, Scott

    2014-01-01

    As the incidence of acute pancreatitis continues to rise, establishing the etiology in order to prevent recurrence is important. Although the etiology of acute pancreatitis is not difficult in the majority of patients, almost a quarter of patients are initially labeled as having idiopathic acute pancreatitis. When confronted with a patient with acute pancreatitis and no clear etiology defined as an absence alcoholism, gallstones (ultrasound and/or MRI), a normal triglyceride level, and absence of tumor, it often appears reasonable to consider a drug as the cause of acute pancreatitis. Over 100 drugs have been implicated by case reports as causing acute pancreatitis. While some of these case reports are well written, many case reports represent poorly written experiences of the clinician simply implicating a drug without a careful evaluation. Over-reliance on case reports while ignoring randomized clinical trials and large pharmacoepidemiologic surveys has led to confusion about drug induced acute pancreatitis. This review will explain that drug induced acute pancreatitis does occur, but it is rare, and over diagnosis leads to misconceptions about the disease resulting in inappropriate patient care, increased litigation and a failure to address the true entity: idiopathic acute pancreatitis. PMID:25469020

  5. [Acute pancreatitis: an overview of the management].

    PubMed

    Rebours, V

    2014-10-01

    Over the past decades, the incidence and the number of hospital admissions for acute pancreatitis have increased in the Western countries. The two most common etiological factors of acute pancreatitis are gallstones (including small gallstones or microlithiasis) and alcohol abuse. Acute pancreatitis is associated with a significant mortality (4-10%) and 25% in case of pancreatic necrosis, especially. Edematous pancreatitis is benign and oral feeding can be restarted once abdominal pain is decreasing and inflammatory markers are improving. Enteral tube feeding should be the primary therapy in patients with predicted severe acute pancreatitis who require nutritional support. Enteral nutrition in acute pancreatitis can be administered via either the nasojejunal or nasogastric route. In case of necrosis, preventive antibiotics are not recommended. The single indication is infected necrosis confirmed by fine needle aspiration. The incidence trends of acute pancreatitis possibly reflect a change in the prevalence of main etiological factors (e.g. gallstones and alcohol consumption) and cofactors such as tobacco, obesity and genetic susceptibility. Priority is to search for associated causes, especially in cases with atypical symptoms. In case of first acute pancreatitis in patients older than 50 years, the presence of a tumor (benign or malignant) has to be specifically ruled out, using CT-scan, MRI and endoscopic ultrasound.

  6. Advances in cryoablation for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiao-Mei; Niu, Li-Zhi; Chen, Ji-Bing; Xu, Ke-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic carcinoma is a common cancer of the digestive system with a poor prognosis. It is characterized by insidious onset, rapid progression, a high degree of malignancy and early metastasis. At present, radical surgery is considered the only curative option for treatment, however, the majority of patients with pancreatic cancer are diagnosed too late to undergo surgery. The sensitivity of pancreatic cancer to chemotherapy or radiotherapy is also poor. As a result, there is no standard treatment for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Cryoablation is generally considered to be an effective palliative treatment for pancreatic cancer. It has the advantages of minimal invasion and improved targeting, and is potentially safe with less pain to the patients. It is especially suitable in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer. However, our initial findings suggest that cryotherapy combined with 125-iodine seed implantation, immunotherapy or various other treatments for advanced pancreatic cancer can improve survival in patients with unresectable or metastatic pancreatic cancer. Although these findings require further in-depth study, the initial results are encouraging. This paper reviews the safety and efficacy of cryoablation, including combined approaches, in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26811625

  7. Drug induced acute pancreatitis: incidence and severity.

    PubMed Central

    Lankisch, P G; Dröge, M; Gottesleben, F

    1995-01-01

    To determine the incidence and severity of drug induced acute pancreatitis, data from 45 German centres of gastroenterology were evaluated. Among 1613 patients treated for acute pancreatitis in 1993, drug induced acute pancreatitis was diagnosed in 22 patients (incidence 1.4%). Drugs held responsible were azathioprine, mesalazine/sulfasalazine, 2',3'-dideoxyinosine (ddI), oestrogens, frusemide, hydrochlorothiazide, and rifampicin. Pancreatic necrosis not exceeding 33% of the organ was found on ultrasonography or computed tomography, or both, in three patients (14%). Pancreatic pseudocysts did not occur. A decrease of arterial PO2 reflecting respiratory insufficiency, and an increase of serum creatinine, reflecting renal insufficiency as complications of acute pancreatitis were seen in two (9%) and four (18%) patients, respectively. Artificial ventilation was not needed, and dialysis was necessary in only one (5%) case. Two patients (9%) died of AIDS and tuberculosis, respectively; pancreatitis did not seem to have contributed materially to their death. In conclusion, drugs rarely cause acute pancreatitis, and drug induced acute pancreatitis usually runs a benign course. PMID:7489946

  8. Extraperitoneal Fluid Collection due to Chronic Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Takeo; Kamei, Keiko; Araki, Mariko; Nakata, Yasuyuki; Ishikawa, Hajime; Yamazaki, Mitsuo; Sakamoto, Hiroki; Kitano, Masayuki; Nakai, Takuya; Takeyama, Yoshifumi

    2013-01-01

    A 39-year-old man was referred to our hospital for the investigation of abdominal fluid collection. He was pointed out to have alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. Laboratory data showed inflammation and slightly elevated serum direct bilirubin and amylase. An abdominal computed tomography demonstrated huge fluid collection, multiple pancreatic pseudocysts and pancreatic calcification. The fluid showed a high level of amylase at 4,490 IU/l. Under the diagnosis of pancreatic ascites, endoscopic pancreatic stent insertion was attempted but was unsuccessful, so surgical treatment (Frey procedure and cystojejunostomy) was performed. During the operation, a huge amount of fluid containing bile acid (amylase at 1,474 IU/l and bilirubin at 13.5 mg/dl) was found to exist in the extraperitoneal space (over the peritoneum), but no ascites was found. His postoperative course was uneventful and he shows no recurrence of the fluid. Pancreatic ascites is thought to result from the disruption of the main pancreatic duct, the rupture of a pancreatic pseudocyst, or possibly leakage from an unknown site. In our extremely rare case, the pancreatic pseudocyst penetrated into the hepatoduodenal ligament with communication to the common bile duct, and the fluid flowed into the round ligament of the liver and next into the extraperitoneal space.

  9. Circumportal pancreas with retroportal main pancreatic duct.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Yasushi; Ross, Andrew S; Traverso, L William

    2009-08-01

    There have been 6 cases of circumportal pancreas reported, and 2 of them had the main pancreatic duct in a retroportal dorsal portion. This extremely uncommon anomaly is asymptomatic and therefore incidentally discovered. For the surgeon, it is important to discover this during pancreatic resection so the pancreatic duct can be closed and fistula is avoided. We describe the third case where a circumportal pancreas had its main pancreatic duct passing under the portal vein. The duct was identified and ligated. A fistula did not occur.

  10. Acute pancreatitis: international classification and nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Bollen, T L

    2016-02-01

    The incidence of acute pancreatitis (AP) is increasing and it is associated with a major healthcare concern. New insights in the pathophysiology, better imaging techniques, and novel treatment options for complicated AP prompted the update of the 1992 Atlanta Classification. Updated nomenclature for pancreatic collections based on imaging criteria is proposed. Adoption of the newly Revised Classification of Acute Pancreatitis 2012 by radiologists should help standardise reports and facilitate accurate conveyance of relevant findings to referring physicians involved in the care of patients with AP. This review will clarify the nomenclature of pancreatic collections in the setting of AP. PMID:26602933

  11. Nutritional management of acute and chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Latifi, R; McIntosh, J K; Dudrick, S J

    1991-06-01

    Acute pancreatitis often results in a catabolic state characterized by profound hemodynamic, metabolic, cardiovascular, pulmonary, hematologic, and renal aberrations. Parenteral nutrition and metabolic support are essential if morbidity and mortality are to be minimized. In chronic pancreatitis, nutritional management ranges from fundamental dietary manipulation with or without administration of appropriate digestive enzymes to enteral supplementation with modular chemically defined diets to total parenteral nutrition, depending on the stage, severity, and manifestations of the disease. In prescribing nutrient substrates in both acute and chronic pancreatitis, consideration must be given to their effects on pancreatic enzyme secretion if optimal results are to be achieved.

  12. Somatostatin, somatostatin receptors, and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Fisher, William E; Kim, Hee Joon; Wang, Xiaoping; Brunicardi, Charles F; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi

    2005-03-01

    Somatostatin may play an important role in the regulation of cancer growth including pancreatic cancer by interaction with somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) on the cell surface. Five SSTRs were cloned, and the function of these SSTRs is addressed in this review. SSTR-2, SSTR-5, and SSTR-1 are thought to play major roles in inhibiting pancreatic cancer growth both in vitro and in vivo. SSTR-3 may be involved in mediating apoptosis, but the role of SSTR-4 is not clear. In most pancreatic cancers, functional SSTRs are absent. Reintroduction of SSTR genes has been shown to inhibit pancreatic cancer growth in cell cultures and animal models.

  13. Finasteride use and acute pancreatitis in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lai, Shih-Wei; Lai, Hsueh-Chou; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liao, Kuan-Fu

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether there is an association between finasteride use and the risk of acute pancreatitis. This population-based case-control study used the database of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program. There were 2,530 male subjects aged 40-84 years with a first-attack of acute pancreatitis during the period of 1998-2011 as the case group and 10,119 randomly selected subjects without acute pancreatitis as the control group. Both groups were matched by age and index year of diagnosing acute pancreatitis. Subjects who never had finasteride prescription were defined as "never use." Subjects who at least received 1 prescription for finasteride before the date of diagnosing acute pancreatitis were defined as "ever use." The association of acute pancreatitis with finasteride use was examined by the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) using the multivariable unconditional logistic regression model. The crude OR of acute pancreatitis was 1.78 (95%CI 1.33, 2.39) for subjects with ever use of finasteride, when compared with subjects with never use of finasteride. After adjusting for potential confounders, the adjusted OR of acute pancreatitis decreased to 1.25 (95%CI 0.90, 1.73) for subjects with ever use of finasteride, but no statistical significance was seen. No association can be detected between finasteride use and the risk of acute pancreatitis.

  14. Biomarkers and Targeted Therapy in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Karandish, Fataneh; Mallik, Sanku

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) constitutes 90% of pancreatic cancers. PDAC is a complex and devastating disease with only 1%–3% survival rate in five years after the second stage. Treatment of PDAC is complicated due to the tumor microenvironment, changing cell behaviors to the mesenchymal type, altered drug delivery, and drug resistance. Considering that pancreatic cancer shows early invasion and metastasis, critical research is needed to explore different aspects of the disease, such as elaboration of biomarkers, specific signaling pathways, and gene aberration. In this review, we highlight the biomarkers, the fundamental signaling pathways, and their importance in targeted drug delivery for pancreatic cancers. PMID:27147897

  15. Lipase turbidimetric assay and acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Orda, R; Orda, S; Baron, J; Wiznitzer, T

    1984-04-01

    The simplified turbidimetric assay for lipase activity was used for the differential diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Serum lipase levels were found to be increased in a group of 17 patients in whom acute pancreatitis was clinically suspected and confirmed by a high ACCR and decreased uptake of the radionuclide in the pancreas scan. The lipase levels were within normal limits in a control group of 14 patients suffering from diseases other than acute pancreatitis. The turbidimetric test was helpful for rapid quantitative determination of serum lipase and thus for the early and accurate diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. PMID:6200277

  16. [Current strategy to cure pancreatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masao

    2002-03-01

    For more than a decade extensive retroperitoneal dissection, chemotherapy, or radiotherapy has not prolonged the survival of patients with pancreatic cancer. Two prospective randomized studies addressing the clinical significance of extensive dissection or pancreatic resection for advanced cancer are now in progress. Nonetheless, at present, resection offers the patient the only possibility of cure. Although the diagnosis of curable pancreatic cancer is difficult, recent evidences have given a few hints. The first is pancreatic duct dilatation caused by cancerous stricture. The second is diabetes as a sign of pancreatic cancer. Our prospective pancreatographic screening of diabetic patients selected by our criteria(Table 1) revealed 7 cancers in 98 patients(7.1%). Within 3 years from diagnosis, the prevalence was 15%. Although the 7 cancers were advanced, this suggests that earlier examinations in diabetic patients may possibly lead to earlier diagnosis. The third is a small cystic lesion as a sentinel of pancreatic cancer. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography with cytology of the pancreatic juice may show the presence of in situ cancer in patients with a pancreatic cyst. At the moment, careful checks for the presence of these hints seem to be the only strategy to offer a chance for cure to patients with pancreatic cancer.

  17. Exocrine Pancreatic Carcinogenesis and Autotaxin Expression

    PubMed Central

    Kadekar, Sandeep; Silins, Ilona; Korhonen, Anna; Dreij, Kristian; Al-Anati, Lauy; Högberg, Johan; Stenius, Ulla

    2012-01-01

    Exocrine pancreatic cancer is an aggressive disease with an exceptionally high mortality rate. Genetic analysis suggests a causative role for environmental factors, but consistent epidemiological support is scarce and no biomarkers for monitoring the effects of chemical pancreatic carcinogens are available. With the objective to identify common traits for chemicals inducing pancreatic tumors we studied the National Toxicology Program (NTP) bioassay database. We found that male rats were affected more often than female rats and identified eight chemicals that induced exocrine pancreatic tumors in males only. For a hypothesis generating process we used a text mining tool to analyse published literature for suggested mode of actions (MOA). The resulting MOA analysis suggested inflammatory responses as common feature. In cell studies we found that all the chemicals increased protein levels of the inflammatory protein autotaxin (ATX) in Panc-1, MIA PaCa-2 or Capan-2 cells. Induction of MMP-9 and increased invasive migration were also frequent effects, consistent with ATX activation. Testosterone has previously been implicated in pancreatic carcinogenesis and we found that it increased ATX levels. Our data show that ATX is a target for chemicals inducing pancreatic tumors in rats. Several lines of evidence implicate ATX and its product lysophosphatidic acid in human pancreatic cancer. Mechanisms of action may include stimulated invasive growth and metastasis. ATX may interact with hormones or onco- or suppressor-genes often deregulated in exocrine pancreatic cancer. Our data suggest that ATX is a target for chemicals promoting pancreatic tumor development. PMID:22952646

  18. Inflammatory pseudotumor of the liver occurring during the course of hepatitis C virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma treatment: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Honmyo, Naruhiko; Kobayashi, Tsuyoshi; Tashiro, Hirotaka; Ishiyama, Kohei; Ide, Kentaro; Tahara, Hiroyuki; Ohira, Masahiro; Kuroda, Shintaro; Arihiro, Koji; Ohdan, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT) of the liver is a rare and benign disease that has a good prognosis. It is often difficult to distinguish IPT from hepatic malignancies, such as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), because specific clinical symptoms are absent and the diseases’ radiological findings can be similar. IPT is particularly difficult to distinguish from HCC in livers with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related cirrhosis. We report a case of IPT of the liver that mimicked HCV-related HCC recurrence. Presentation of case A 78-year-old asymptomatic Japanese man who had undergone hepatectomy for HCV-related HCCs (moderately differentiated type) in segments 7 and 5 four and a half years previously was referred to our hospital for treatment of a 30-mm enhanced tumor in segment 5 (a typical HCC pattern). The tumor was identified via abdominal dynamic computed tomography (CT) and CT with hepatic arteriography and arterial portography. Thereafter, liver segmentectomy 5 was performed, and the histopathological diagnosis was a 10-mm IPT of the liver. After 1.5 years, magnetic resonance imaging revealed two new enhanced lesions in segment 8, which showed the typical pattern of HCC. Because these lesions grew in size for 3 months, liver segmentectomy 8 was performed for HCC recurrence. Histopathological examination showed that both lesions were HCCs. Conclusion HCV-related HCC has a high rate of multicentric recurrence. Our experience suggests that, when a hepatic lesion is suspected to be HCC, surgical resection should be considered for curative treatment and to rule out malignancy, even if the lesion may be an IPT. PMID:26826935

  19. Proton therapy for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Romaine C; Huh, Soon; Li, Zuofeng; Rutenberg, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is commonly offered to patients with pancreatic malignancies although its ultimate utility is compromised since the pancreas is surrounded by exquisitely radiosensitive normal tissues, such as the duodenum, stomach, jejunum, liver, and kidneys. Proton radiotherapy can be used to create dose distributions that conform to tumor targets with significant normal tissue sparing. Because of this, protons appear to represent a superior modality for radiotherapy delivery to patients with unresectable tumors and those receiving postoperative radiotherapy. A particularly exciting opportunity for protons also exists for patients with resectable and marginally resectable disease. In this paper, we review the current literature on proton therapy for pancreatic cancer and discuss scenarios wherein the improvement in the therapeutic index with protons may have the potential to change the management paradigm for this malignancy. PMID:26380057

  20. Update on pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, Logan R.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) are relatively rare tumors comprising 1-2% of all pancreas neoplasms. In the last 10 years our understanding of this disease has increased dramatically allowing for advancements in the treatment of pNETs. Surgical excision remains the primary therapy for localized tumors and only potential for cure. New surgical techniques using laparoscopic approaches to complex pancreatic resections are a major advancement in surgical therapy and increasingly possible. With early detection being less common, most patients present with metastatic disease. Management of these patients requires multidisciplinary care combining the best of surgery, chemotherapy and other targeted therapies. In addition to surgical advances, recently, there have been significant advances in systemic therapy and targeted molecular therapy. PMID:25493258

  1. Current management of pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Lillemoe, K D

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The author seeks to provide an update on the current management of pancreatic carcinoma, including diagnosis and staging, surgical resection and adjuvant therapy for curative intent, and palliation. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: During the 1960s and 1970s, the operative mortality and long-term survival after pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic carcinoma was so poor that some authors advocated abandoning the procedure. Several recent series have reported a marked improvement in perioperative results with 5-year survival in excess of 20%. Significant advances also have been made in areas of preoperative evaluation and palliation for advanced disease. CONCLUSION: Although carcinoma of the pancreas remains a disease with a poor prognosis, advances in the last decade have led to improvements in the overall management of this disease. Resection for curative intent currently should be accomplished with minimal perioperative mortality. Surgical palliation also may provide the optimal management of selected patients. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 7. PMID:7531966

  2. Enteric duplication cyst of the pancreas associated with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Alexander S; Bluhm, David; Xiao, Shu-Yan; Waxman, Irving; Matthews, Jeffrey B

    2014-05-01

    Pancreas-associated enteric duplication cysts are rare developmental anomalies that communicate with the main pancreatic duct and may be associated with recurrent acute and chronic abdominal pain in children. In adults, these lesions may masquerade as pancreatic pseudocysts or pancreatic cystic neoplasms. An adult patient with a pancreas-associated enteric duplication is described which represents the first reported instance of association with both chronic calcific pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. The clinical spectrum of pancreas-associated enteric duplication cyst, including diagnostic and therapeutic options, is reviewed.

  3. Recent advances in autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kamisawa, Terumi; Tabata, Taku; Hara, Seiichi; Kuruma, Sawako; Chiba, Kazuro; Kanno, Atsushi; Masamune, Atsushi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2012-01-01

    It is now clear that are two histological types (Type-1 and Type-2) of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). The histological pattern of Type-1 AIP, or traditional AIP, is called lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP). The histological pattern of Type-2 AIP is characterized by neutrophilic infiltration in the epithelium of the pancreatic duct. In general, Type-2 AIP patients are younger, may not have a male preponderance, and rarely show elevation of serum IgG4 compared with Type-1 AIP patients. Unlike Type-1 AIP patients, Type-2 AIP patients rarely have associated sclerosing diseases, but they are more likely to have acute pancreatitis and ulcerative colitis. Although Type-2 AIP is sometimes observed in the USA and Europe, most AIP cases in Japan and Korea are Type-1. The international consensus diagnostic criteria for AIP comprise 5 cardinal features, and combinations of one or more of these features provide the basis for diagnoses of both Type-1 and Type-2 AIP. Due to the fact that steroid therapy is clinically, morphologically, and serologically effective in AIP patients, it is the standard therapy for AIP. The indications for steroid therapy in AIP include symptoms such as obstructive jaundice and the presence of symptomatic extrapancreatic lesions. Oral prednisolone (0.6 mg/kg/day) is administered for 2–4 weeks and gradually tapered to a maintenance dose of 2.5–5 mg/day over a period of 2–3 months. Maintenance therapy by low-dose prednisolone is usually performed for 1–3 years to prevent relapse of AIP. PMID:23060806

  4. Maldigestion from pancreatic exocrine insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Pongprasobchai, Supot

    2013-12-01

    Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) is one of the long-term consequences of chronic pancreatitis (CP). Majority of patients with PEI were undiagnosed or undertreated. Inadequately treated or subclinical severe PEI causes malnutrition and may pose the patients at risk of premature atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events. Indication of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT) is patients with severe PEI, as indicated by the presence of steatorrhea, diarrhea, weight loss, fecal fat > 7 g/day, (13) C-mixed triglyceride breath test < 29%, fecal elastase < 100 ug/g stool, imaging or endoscopic findings of pancreatic ductal dilatation or calculi, and eight endosonographic criteria of CP. The mainstay treatment of PEI is PERT. Dietary fat restriction is unnecessary. PERT with lipase > 40,000 U per meal is recommended. Enteric-coating may be preferred to conventional enzymes because of the availability of high-dose preparations and no need of acid suppression co-therapy. Administration of enzymes with meals is proven to be the most effective regimen. Response to PERT should be measured by the improvement of patients' symptoms, nutritional status, and, in selected cases, by fecal fat or (13) C-mixed triglyceride breath test. Patients unresponsive to PERT should be checked for compliance, increase the dose of lipase to 90,000 units/meal or co-therapy with proton pump inhibitor. In patient with previous gastrointestinal surgery that may interfere enzyme-food mixing, opening the capsules and administering the enzyme granules with meals. Finally, search for small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome and other causes of small bowel malabsorption. PMID:24251713

  5. Chyle leak following biliary pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lippey, Jocelyn F.; Yong, Tuck L.

    2014-01-01

    Chylous ascites is a rare clinical entity that historically has been accompanied by high mortality due to the association with malignancy. Here we present a case of chylous ascites as a complication of mild pancreatitis in a young woman. We review the literature of similar cases, which revealed four similar cases with a range of outcomes. Treatment options vary from dietary restriction of medium chain fatty acids, total parental nutrition, radiological intervention and surgery. PMID:25056377

  6. Localized Pancreatic Cancer: Multidisciplinary Management.

    PubMed

    Coveler, Andrew L; Herman, Joseph M; Simeone, Diane M; Chiorean, E Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive cancer that continues to have single-digit 5-year mortality rates despite advancements in the field. Surgery remains the only curative treatment; however, most patients present with late-stage disease deemed unresectable, either due to extensive local vascular involvement or the presence of distant metastasis. Resection guidelines that include a borderline resectable group, as well as advancements in neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation that improve resectability of locally advanced disease, may improve outcomes for patients with more invasive disease. Multi-agent chemotherapy regimens fluorouracil, leucovorin, irinotecan, and oxaliplatin (FOLFIRINOX) and nab-paclitaxel with gemcitabine improved response rates and survival in metastatic pancreatic cancer and are now being used in earlier stages for patients with localized potentially resectable and unresectable disease, with goals of downstaging tumors to allow margin-negative resection and reducing systemic recurrence. Chemoradiotherapy, although still controversial for both resectable and unresectable pancreatic cancer, is being used in the context of contemporary chemotherapy backbone regimens, and novel radiation techniques such as stereotactic body frame radiation therapy (SBRT) are studied on the premise of maintaining or improving efficacy and reducing treatment duration. Patient selection for optimal treatment designation is currently provided by multidisciplinary tumor boards, but biomarker discovery, in blood, tumors, or through novel imaging, is an area of intense research. Results to date suggest that some patients with unresectable disease at the outset have survival rates as good as those with initially resectable disease if able to undergo surgical resection. Long-term follow-up and improved clinical trials options are needed to determine optimal treatment modalities for patients with localized pancreatic cancer. PMID:27249726

  7. Communicating bronchopulmonary pancreatic foregut malformation.

    PubMed

    Rahman, G F; Bhardwaj, N; Suster, B; Arliss, J J; Connery, C P

    1999-12-01

    Bronchopulmonary foregut malformations include intralobar and extralobar pulmonary sequestrations, bronchogenic cysts, and communicating bronchopulmonary foregut malformations (CBPFM). These malformations, formes frustes, originate as developmental abnormalities of ventral foregut budding of the tracheobronchial tree or the gastrointestinal tract. The communication's patency with the parent viscus determines if a contained malformation occurs, or if an abnormal communication persists as a CBPFM. This case demonstrates a unique example of a CBPFM in which the main pancreatic duct communicated with pulmonary parenchyma through a retroperitoneal fistula.

  8. Predicting severity of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Rau, Bettina M

    2007-04-01

    Severity stratification is a critical issue in acute pancreatitis that strongly influences diagnostic and therapeutic decision making. According to the widely used Atlanta classification, "severe" disease comprises various local and systemic complications that are associated with an increased risk of mortality. However, results from recent clinical studies indicate that these complications vary in their effect on outcome, and many are not necessarily life threatening on their own. Therefore, "severe," as defined by Atlanta, must be distinguished from "prognostic," aiming at nonsurvival. In the first week after disease onset, pancreatitis-related organ failure is the preferred variable for predicting severity and prognosis because it outweighs morphologic complications. Contrast-enhanced CT and MRI allow for accurate stratification of local severity beyond the first week after symptom onset. Among the biochemical markers, C-reactive protein is still the parameter of choice to assess attack severity, although prognostic estimation is not possible. Other markers, including pancreatic protease activation peptides, interleukins-6 and -8, and polymorphonuclear elastase are useful early indicators of severity. Procalcitonin is one of the most promising single markers for assessment of major complications and prognosis throughout the disease course.

  9. Management of pain in chronic pancreatitis with emphasis on exogenous pancreatic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Paul M; Johnson, William G; Graham, David Y

    2016-08-01

    One of the most challenging issues arising in patients with chronic pancreatitis is the management of abdominal pain. Many competing theories exist to explain pancreatic pain including ductal hypertension from strictures and stones, increased interstitial pressure from glandular fibrosis, pancreatic neuritis, and ischemia. This clinical problem is superimposed on a background of reduced enzyme secretion and altered feedback mechanisms. Throughout history, investigators have used these theories to devise methods to combat chronic pancreatic pain including: Lifestyle measures, antioxidants, analgesics, administration of exogenous pancreatic enzymes, endoscopic drainage procedures, and surgical drainage and resection procedures. While the value of each modality has been debated over the years, pancreatic enzyme therapy remains a viable option. Enzyme therapy restores active enzymes to the small bowel and targets the altered feedback mechanism that lead to increased pancreatic ductal and tissue pressures, ischemia, and pain. Here, we review the mechanisms and treatments for chronic pancreatic pain with a specific focus on pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy. We also discuss different approaches to overcoming a lack of clinical response update ideas for studies needed to improve the clinical use of pancreatic enzymes to ameliorate pancreatic pain.

  10. Management of pain in chronic pancreatitis with emphasis on exogenous pancreatic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Paul M; Johnson, William G; Graham, David Y

    2016-01-01

    One of the most challenging issues arising in patients with chronic pancreatitis is the management of abdominal pain. Many competing theories exist to explain pancreatic pain including ductal hypertension from strictures and stones, increased interstitial pressure from glandular fibrosis, pancreatic neuritis, and ischemia. This clinical problem is superimposed on a background of reduced enzyme secretion and altered feedback mechanisms. Throughout history, investigators have used these theories to devise methods to combat chronic pancreatic pain including: Lifestyle measures, antioxidants, analgesics, administration of exogenous pancreatic enzymes, endoscopic drainage procedures, and surgical drainage and resection procedures. While the value of each modality has been debated over the years, pancreatic enzyme therapy remains a viable option. Enzyme therapy restores active enzymes to the small bowel and targets the altered feedback mechanism that lead to increased pancreatic ductal and tissue pressures, ischemia, and pain. Here, we review the mechanisms and treatments for chronic pancreatic pain with a specific focus on pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy. We also discuss different approaches to overcoming a lack of clinical response update ideas for studies needed to improve the clinical use of pancreatic enzymes to ameliorate pancreatic pain. PMID:27602238

  11. Management of pain in chronic pancreatitis with emphasis on exogenous pancreatic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Paul M; Johnson, William G; Graham, David Y

    2016-01-01

    One of the most challenging issues arising in patients with chronic pancreatitis is the management of abdominal pain. Many competing theories exist to explain pancreatic pain including ductal hypertension from strictures and stones, increased interstitial pressure from glandular fibrosis, pancreatic neuritis, and ischemia. This clinical problem is superimposed on a background of reduced enzyme secretion and altered feedback mechanisms. Throughout history, investigators have used these theories to devise methods to combat chronic pancreatic pain including: Lifestyle measures, antioxidants, analgesics, administration of exogenous pancreatic enzymes, endoscopic drainage procedures, and surgical drainage and resection procedures. While the value of each modality has been debated over the years, pancreatic enzyme therapy remains a viable option. Enzyme therapy restores active enzymes to the small bowel and targets the altered feedback mechanism that lead to increased pancreatic ductal and tissue pressures, ischemia, and pain. Here, we review the mechanisms and treatments for chronic pancreatic pain with a specific focus on pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy. We also discuss different approaches to overcoming a lack of clinical response update ideas for studies needed to improve the clinical use of pancreatic enzymes to ameliorate pancreatic pain.

  12. [Pediatric pancreatitis. Evidence based management guidelines of the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group].

    PubMed

    Párniczky, Andrea; Czakó, László; Dubravcsik, Zsolt; Farkas, Gyula; Hegyi, Péter; Hritz, István; Kelemen, Dezső; Morvay, Zita; Oláh, Attila; Pap, Ákos; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Szabó, Flóra; Szentkereszti, Zsolt; Szmola, Richárd; Takács, Tamás; Tiszlavicz, László; Veres, Gábor; Szücs, Ákos; Lásztity, Natália

    2015-02-22

    Pediatric pancreatitis is a rare disease with variable etiology. In the past 10-15 years the incidence of pediatric pancreatitis has been increased. The management of pediatric pancreatitis requires up-to-date and evidence based management guidelines. The Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group proposed to prepare an evidence based guideline based on the available international guidelines and evidences. The preparatory and consultation task force appointed by the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group translated and complemented and/or modified the international guidelines if it was necessary. In 8 clinical topics (diagnosis; etiology; prognosis; imaging; therapy; biliary tract management; complications; chronic pancreatitis) 50 relevant questions were defined. Evidence was classified according to the UpToDate(®) grading system. The draft of the guidelines was presented and discussed at the consensus meeting on September 12, 2014. All clinical statements were accepted with total (more than 95%) agreement. The present Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group guideline is the first evidence based pediatric pancreatitis guideline in Hungary. The present guideline is the first evidence-based pancreatic cancer guideline in Hungary that provides a solid ground for teaching purposes, offers quick reference for daily patient care in pediatric pancreatitis and guides financing options. The authors strongly believe that these guidelines will become a standard reference for pancreatic cancer treatment in Hungary.

  13. Management of pain in chronic pancreatitis with emphasis on exogenous pancreatic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Paul M; Johnson, William G; Graham, David Y

    2016-08-01

    One of the most challenging issues arising in patients with chronic pancreatitis is the management of abdominal pain. Many competing theories exist to explain pancreatic pain including ductal hypertension from strictures and stones, increased interstitial pressure from glandular fibrosis, pancreatic neuritis, and ischemia. This clinical problem is superimposed on a background of reduced enzyme secretion and altered feedback mechanisms. Throughout history, investigators have used these theories to devise methods to combat chronic pancreatic pain including: Lifestyle measures, antioxidants, analgesics, administration of exogenous pancreatic enzymes, endoscopic drainage procedures, and surgical drainage and resection procedures. While the value of each modality has been debated over the years, pancreatic enzyme therapy remains a viable option. Enzyme therapy restores active enzymes to the small bowel and targets the altered feedback mechanism that lead to increased pancreatic ductal and tissue pressures, ischemia, and pain. Here, we review the mechanisms and treatments for chronic pancreatic pain with a specific focus on pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy. We also discuss different approaches to overcoming a lack of clinical response update ideas for studies needed to improve the clinical use of pancreatic enzymes to ameliorate pancreatic pain. PMID:27602238

  14. Etiology and oncogenesis of pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dobrila-Dintinjana, Renata; Vanis, Nenad; Dintinjana, Marijan; Radić, Mladen

    2012-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death overall. The factors that favor the development of pancreatic cancer can be divided into hereditary and acquired. Cancerogenesis is best explained by a "multi-hit" hypothesis, charcterized with the developmental sequence of cellular mutatitions, forcing mutant cell to inappropriate proliferation and preventing its repair and programmed cell death (apoptosis). The most common mutations involve K-ras gene, epidermal growth factor (EGF-R) and HER2 gene. Continuous stimulation and secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) enhances the permeability of blood vessels provides nutrient supply to tumor site through newly formed vascular channels. This phenomena is known as vasculogenic mimicry. Loss of function of tumor-suppressor genes has been documented in pancreatic cancer, especially in CDKN2a, p53, DPC4 and BRCA2 genes. SDKN2A gene inactivation occurs in 95% of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. As regards acquired factors, smoking is only confirmed risk factor that increases the risk of pancreatic cancer. Diabetes, alcohol consumption, central obesity in men, infection with Helicobacter pylori and chronic pancreatitis are suspected, but not proven risk factors. Consumption of fruits and vegetables does not protect, while the consumption of meat processed at high temperatures increases the risk of pancreatic cancer. According to some studies, lykopene and folate levels are reduced in pancreatic carcinoma patients, reduced folate intake increases the risk of pancreatic carcinoma (48%), and this risk can be diminished by introducing folate-rich foods to diet, not by using pharmaceutical products. Occupational exposure to chlorinated hydrocarbons, vinyl chloride, nickel, chromium, insecticides and acrylic amide minimally increases the risk for pancreatic cancer. Exposure to cadmium (metal industry) associated with smoking result in the accumulation of cadmium in pancreatic tissue and the possible impact

  15. Atorvastatin Use Associated With Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Shih-Wei; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liao, Kuan-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Few data are present in the literature on the relationship between atorvastatin use and acute pancreatitis. The aim of this study was to explore this issue in Taiwan. Using representative claims data established from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program, this case–control study consisted of 5810 cases aged 20 to 84 years with a first-time diagnosis of acute pancreatitis during the period 1998 to 2011and 5733 randomly selected controls without acute pancreatitis. Both cases and controls were matched by sex, age, comorbidities, and index year of diagnosing acute pancreatitis. Subjects who at least received 1 prescription for other statins or nonstatin lipid-lowering drugs were excluded from the study. If subjects never had 1 prescription for atorvastatin, they were defined as never use of atorvastatin. Current use of atorvastatin was defined as subjects whose last remaining 1 tablet of atorvastatin was noted ≤7 days before the date of diagnosing acute pancreatitis. Late use of atorvastatin was defined as subjects whose last remaining 1 tablet of atorvastatin was noted >7 days before the date of diagnosing acute pancreatitis. The odds ratio with 95% confidence interval of acute pancreatitis associated with atorvastatin use was calculated by using the logistic regression analysis. The logistic regression analysis revealed that the odds ratio of acute pancreatitis was 1.67 for subjects with current use of atorvastatin (95% confidence interval 1.18, 2.38), when compared with subjects with never use of atorvastatin. The odds ratio decreased to 1.15 for those with late use of atorvastatin (95% confidence interval 0.87, 1.52), but without statistical significance. Current use of atorvastatin is associated with the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Clinically, clinicians should consider the possibility of atorvastatin-associated acute pancreatitis when patients present with a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis without a definite etiology but are taking

  16. Etiology and oncogenesis of pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dobrila-Dintinjana, Renata; Vanis, Nenad; Dintinjana, Marijan; Radić, Mladen

    2012-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death overall. The factors that favor the development of pancreatic cancer can be divided into hereditary and acquired. Cancerogenesis is best explained by a "multi-hit" hypothesis, charcterized with the developmental sequence of cellular mutatitions, forcing mutant cell to inappropriate proliferation and preventing its repair and programmed cell death (apoptosis). The most common mutations involve K-ras gene, epidermal growth factor (EGF-R) and HER2 gene. Continuous stimulation and secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) enhances the permeability of blood vessels provides nutrient supply to tumor site through newly formed vascular channels. This phenomena is known as vasculogenic mimicry. Loss of function of tumor-suppressor genes has been documented in pancreatic cancer, especially in CDKN2a, p53, DPC4 and BRCA2 genes. SDKN2A gene inactivation occurs in 95% of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. As regards acquired factors, smoking is only confirmed risk factor that increases the risk of pancreatic cancer. Diabetes, alcohol consumption, central obesity in men, infection with Helicobacter pylori and chronic pancreatitis are suspected, but not proven risk factors. Consumption of fruits and vegetables does not protect, while the consumption of meat processed at high temperatures increases the risk of pancreatic cancer. According to some studies, lykopene and folate levels are reduced in pancreatic carcinoma patients, reduced folate intake increases the risk of pancreatic carcinoma (48%), and this risk can be diminished by introducing folate-rich foods to diet, not by using pharmaceutical products. Occupational exposure to chlorinated hydrocarbons, vinyl chloride, nickel, chromium, insecticides and acrylic amide minimally increases the risk for pancreatic cancer. Exposure to cadmium (metal industry) associated with smoking result in the accumulation of cadmium in pancreatic tissue and the possible impact

  17. Clinical significance of serum pancreatic enzymes in the quiescent phase of chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Lesi, C; Melzi D'Eril, G V; Pavesi, F; Scandellari, A; Faccenda, F; Grazia Casertano, M; Savoia, M; Zoni, L; Peppi, M

    1985-08-01

    The most commonly used serum enzymes in pancreatic diseases are total amylase, pancreatic isoamylase, lipase and trypsin. To determine which of these enzymes is the most useful in the diagnosis of clinically quiescent chronic pancreatitis and which enzyme best reflects exocrine functional reserve, we studied 22 healthy control subjects, 44 patients with gastrointestinal, liver and biliary tract diseases, and 25 patients with chronic pancreatitis. On the basis of duodenal intubation, the latter were divided into two subgroups: one group of 13 patients with slight to moderate secretion deficiency and another of 12 patients with severe exocrine insufficiency. Of the enzymes studied, lipase, trypsin and pancreatic isoamylase are equally suitable for the evaluation of function in severe chronic pancreatitis, but not for the early diagnosis of the disease. Results for total amylase are not reliable so that its use in the study of chronic pancreatitis is not advisable.

  18. Imaging of acute pancreatitis and its complications. Part 2: complications of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Türkvatan, A; Erden, A; Türkoğlu, M A; Seçil, M; Yüce, G

    2015-02-01

    The Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis was introduced in 1992 and divides patients into mild and severe groups based on clinical and biochemical criteria. Recently, the terminology and classification scheme proposed at the initial Atlanta Symposium have been reviewed and a new consensus statement has been proposed by the Acute Pancreatitis Classification Working Group. Major changes include subdividing acute fluid collections into "acute peripancreatic fluid collection" and "acute post-necrotic pancreatic/peripancreatic fluid collection (acute necrotic collection)" based on the presence of necrotic debris. Delayed fluid collections have been similarly subdivided into "pseudocyst" and "walled of pancreatic necrosis". Appropriate use of the new terms describing the fluid collections is important for management decision-making in patients with acute pancreatitis. The purpose of this review article is to present an overview of complications of the acute pancreatitis with emphasis on their prognostic significance and impact on clinical management and to clarify confusing terminology for pancreatic fluid collections.

  19. Pancreatitis-induced Inflammation Contributes to Pancreatic Cancer by Inhibiting Oncogene-Induced Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Carmen; Collado, Manuel; Navas, Carolina; Schuhmacher, Alberto J; Hernández-Porras, Isabel; Cañamero, Marta; Rodriguez-Justo, Manuel; Serrano, Manuel; Barbacid, Mariano

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar cells of adult mice (≥P60) are resistant to transformation by some of the most robust oncogenic insults including expression of K-Ras oncogenes and loss of p16Ink4a/p19Arf or Trp53 tumor suppressors. Yet, these acinar cells yield pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias (mPanIN) and ductal adenocarcinomas (mPDAC) if exposed to limited bouts of non-acute pancreatitis, providing they harbor K-Ras oncogenes. Pancreatitis contributes to tumor progression by abrogating the senescence barrier characteristic of low-grade mPanINs. Attenuation of pancreatitis-induced inflammation also accelerates tissue repair and thwarts mPanIN expansion. Patients with chronic pancreatitis display senescent PanINs, if they have received anti-inflammatory drugs. These results put forward the concept that anti-inflammatory treatment of people diagnosed with pancreatitis may reduce their risk of developing PDAC. PMID:21665147

  20. -Pancreatitis after blunt injuries to the abdomen-.

    PubMed

    Bleichner, J P; Guillou, Y M; Martin, L; Seguin, P; Mallédant, Y

    1998-01-01

    Three cases of pancreatitis occurring after a trauma to the pancrease are reported. They emphasize the difficulty of diagnosis at the initial phase of the condition. In all cases, computerized tomography (CT) scan was the main diagnostic method. Applying the same therapeutic strategy for pancreatitis as for other aetiologies facilitated a favourable outcome. PMID:9750738

  1. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of pancreatic duct stones.

    PubMed

    Rawat, B; Fache, J S; Burhenne, H J

    1992-01-01

    Encouraging results with extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) for pancreatic duct stones have been reported from Europe. We present our experience with the first two North American patients, treated with excellent results in one and limited clinical improvement in the other patient at 1 year follow-up. Targeting of pancreatic duct stones was achieved with either fluoroscopy or ultrasound.

  2. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of pancreatic calculi].

    PubMed

    Neuhaus, H; Hagenmüller, F; Classen, M

    1990-08-01

    Extracorporeal shock-wave fragmentation of pancreatic stones is a complementary non-surgical treatment in selected patients with chronic pancreatitis. The procedure has proven to be safe and technically effective. Preliminary clinical results indicate therapeutic success rates in terms of pain disappearance or reduction in more than 90% of the patients. The indication should be taken into consideration before surgical intervention.

  3. Epidemiology and prevention of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Lowenfels, Albert B; Maisonneuve, Patrick

    2004-05-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an uncommon tumor, but because the mortality rate approaches 100%, this form of cancer has now become a common cause of cancer mortality. In the United States it is the fourth most frequent cause of cancer mortality; in Japan it ranks as the fifth commonest cause of death from cancer. Smoking is the major known risk factor for pancreatic cancer, accounting for approximately 25-30% of all cases. Some of the time-dependent changes in the frequency of pancreatic cancer can be explained by smoking trends. Aggressive public health measures to control smoking would substantially reduce the burden of pancreatic cancer. Dietary factors are less important for pancreatic cancer than for other digestive tract tumors, but consumption of a diet with adequate quantities of fruits and vegetables, plus control of calories either by dietary measures or by exercise will help to prevent this lethal tumor. There are more than a dozen inherited germline mutations that increase the risk of pancreatic cancer. Of these, hereditary pancreatitis confers the greatest risk, while BRCA2 mutations are the commonest inherited disorder. In addition to germline defects, there are several common polymorphisms in genes that control detoxification of environmental carcinogens that may alter the risk of pancreatic cancer. More research will be needed in this area, to explain and to clarify the interaction between genes and environmental factors.

  4. Management of blunt pancreatic trauma: what's new?

    PubMed

    Potoka, D A; Gaines, B A; Leppäniemi, A; Peitzman, A B

    2015-06-01

    Pancreatic injuries are relatively uncommon but present a major challenge to the surgeon in terms of both diagnosis and management. Pancreatic injuries are associated with significant mortality, primarily due to associated injuries, and pancreas-specific morbidity, especially in cases of delayed diagnosis. Early diagnosis of pancreatic trauma is a key for optimal management, but remains a challenge even with more advanced imaging modalities. For both penetrating and blunt pancreatic injuries, the presence of main pancreatic ductal injury is the major determinant of morbidity and the major factor guiding management decisions. For main pancreatic ductal injury, surgery remains the preferred approach with distal pancreatectomy for most injuries and more conservative surgical management for proximal ductal injuries involving the head of the pancreas. More recently, nonoperative management has been utilized, especially in the pediatric population, with the potential for increased rates of pseudocyst and pancreatic fistulae and the potential for the need for further intervention and increased hospital stay. This review presents recent data focusing on the diagnosis, management, and outcomes of blunt pancreatic injury.

  5. Pancreatic necrosis in progressive systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, A A; Joos, A

    1980-01-01

    Fatal pancreatic necrosis, secondary to extensive acute arteritic changes, is reported in a case of progressive systemic sclerosis. The patient presented first with hypertension and renal involvement, with active vascular lesions demonstrated by biopsy. The renal lesion at necropsy was inactive, showing the characteristic concentric fibrosis only, while the pancreatic vascular lesions were both chronic proliferative and acute in type. Images PMID:7436566

  6. Hispanics and Pancreatic Cancer: Things to Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... These include: • What You Need to Know About Cancer of the Pancreas – an online publication about exocrine pancreatic cancer – at www. cancer. gov/ cancertopics/ wyntk/ pancreas • NCI’s summary page about pancreatic cancer – including links ...

  7. [Indications of enteral nutrition in pancreatic disorders].

    PubMed

    Botta, D; Gauthier, A P

    1988-11-01

    In the treatment of disorders of the pancreas, artificial nutrition must satisfy nutritional requirements while avoiding stimulation of exocrine pancreatic juice observed during oral feeding. Although total parenteral nutrition (PN) induces pancreatic hyposecretion or weak pancreatic stimulation, enteral nutrition (EN) whether elementary or semi-elementary type stimulates pancreatic secretion and the release of CCK, with weaker stimulation in case of intrajejunal feeding. In acute pancreatitis, semi-elemental EN by jejunal feeding has successfully been used in the treatment of moderately serious cases, once the acute phase of the disease has been passed. Although PN remains the best indication for the treatment of pancreatic fistula, several studies have reported the closure of pancreatic fistulas during elementary enteral feeding administered by jejunal route. In the treatment of chronic pancreatitis, EN especially provides nutritional support for very undernourished patients, most often in the preoperative context. Finally, in children suffering from cystic fibrosis of the pancreas, prolonged sessions of EN provide marked improvement in the nutritional and respiratory status of these patients.

  8. Classifying pancreatic cancer using gene expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    Ayars, Michael; Goggins, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Despite some advances in our understanding of the molecular characteristics of pancreatic cancer, much more progress is needed. In a new study, RNA profiling of pancreatic cancers was used to identify gene signatures of tumour cells and stromal cells to help predict patient outcomes. PMID:26484444

  9. Hyperlipidaemia and outcome in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Balachandra, S; Virlos, I T; King, N K K; Siriwardana, H P P; France, M W; Siriwardena, A K

    2006-02-01

    There is a well-recognised association between hyperlipidaemia and acute pancreatitis. However, the role of hyperlipidaemia in modulating disease course is not clear. The aim of the study was to conduct a prospective study in acute pancreatitis to assess the relation between hyperlipidaemia and disease severity using current disease descriptors. The study population constituted 43 patients with acute pancreatitis, admitted during the calendar year 2001. There were 19 (44%) males. The median (range) age was 50 (21-86) years. Serum triglycerides, cholesterol and high-density lipids were measured on admission. Patients were followed-up for at least 6 months after discharge. Principal outcomes were relation between hyperlipidaemia and peri-pancreatic complications and end-of-episode disease severity. The results showed that hypertriglyceridaemia was present in 14 patients (33%). There was a significant difference in mean (SEM) serum triglyceride levels between patients with alcohol-induced pancreatitis compared with pancreatitis of other aetiologies [3.07 (1.0) mmol/l vs. 1.26 (0.11) mmol/l; p = 0.03, Fisher's exact test]. There was no correlation between admission hypertriglyceridaemia and admission APACHE II score (r(2) = 0.0015). Similarly, there was no correlation between triglyceride level and either pancreatic inflammatory complications or final outcome. In conclusion, this study has demonstrated that there was no significant correlation between hypertriglyceridaemia and either complications of disease or overall end-of-episode severity in this population of patients with acute pancreatitis.

  10. [Acute pancreatitis in the sequestration phase].

    PubMed

    Filin, V I; Spassakaia, M G; Chumak, P Ia

    1975-07-01

    Pathoanatomical, pathogenetic and clinical characteristics of acute pancreatitis in a sequestration phase are given. Under observation were 95 patients with purulentputrid sequestration of the pancreas and retroperitoneal cellular tissue and 20 patients with postnecrotic pancreatic cysts. Some features of the operative treatment in different kinds of sequestration are described.

  11. CT of fluid collections associated with pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Siegelman, S S; Copeland, B E; Saba, G P; Cameron, J L; Sanders, R C; Zerhouni, E A

    1980-06-01

    Fluid collections are an important component of severe pancreatitis because they may produce a detectable mass and may be responsible for prolongation of fever and pain. Among 59 cases of clinically verified pancreatitis, 32 were shown by CT to be complicated by pancreatic and/or extrapancreatic fluid collections. Pancreatic fluid collections, diagnosed in 16 patients, were typically on the anterior or anterolateral surface of the gland and were covered only by a thin layer of fibrous connective tissue. Extrapancreatic fluid collections were detected in the lesser sac (19 cases), anterior pararenal space (15), posterior pararenal space (six), in or around the left lobe of the liver (five), in the spleen (three), and in the mediastinum (one). The potential undesirable consequences of escape of pancreatic juice are necrosis, abscess formation, or prolonged inflammation of the peripancreatic tissues. Relative preservation of pancreatic integrity as observed by CT was regularly found in patients with large extrapancreatic fluid collections, suggesting that escape of pancreatic juice produces a beneficial decompression of the pancreatic duct system.

  12. Animal models for investigating chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is defined as a continuous or recurrent inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterized by progressive and irreversible morphological changes. It typically causes pain and permanent impairment of pancreatic function. In chronic pancreatitis areas of focal necrosis are followed by perilobular and intralobular fibrosis of the parenchyma, by stone formation in the pancreatic duct, calcifications in the parenchyma as well as the formation of pseudocysts. Late in the course of the disease a progressive loss of endocrine and exocrine function occurs. Despite advances in understanding the pathogenesis no causal treatment for chronic pancreatitis is presently available. Thus, there is a need for well characterized animal models for further investigations that allow translation to the human situation. This review summarizes existing experimental models and distinguishes them according to the type of pathological stimulus used for induction of pancreatitis. There is a special focus on pancreatic duct ligation, repetitive overstimulation with caerulein and chronic alcohol feeding. Secondly, attention is drawn to genetic models that have recently been generated and which mimic features of chronic pancreatitis in man. Each technique will be supplemented with data on the pathophysiological background of the model and their limitations will be discussed. PMID:22133269

  13. Pancreatic cancer screening: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Gemmel, Christian; Eickhoff, Axel; Helmstädter, Lars; Riemann, Jürgen F

    2009-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease with a median survival of approximately 6 months after diagnosis. Many factors are associated with a worse outcome; examples include late diagnosis, low resection rate, aggressive tumor behavior and a lack of an effective chemotherapy regimen. Owing to the low prevalence of pancreatic cancer relative to the diagnostic accuracy of present detection methods and the absence of promising treatment modalities, even in early stages, it is currently neither advisable nor cost effective to screen the general population. Efforts are focused on early screening of selected high-risk-cohorts, who account for approximately 10% of patients with pancreatic cancer. These include patients with chronic pancreatitis, individuals with a family history of pancreatic cancer, patients with hereditary pancreatitis, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, cystic fibrosis or familial atypical multiple mole melanoma. At present, a multimodal-screening approach of endoscopic ultrasound, computed tomography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography appears to be the most effective method to screen for pancreatic cancer in high-risk patients. Continued efforts are needed to elucidate effective testing to identify patients with nonhereditary risk factors who will benefit from screening protocols. A combined approach of serum markers, genetic markers and specific imaging studies may prove to be the future of pancreatic screening. PMID:19210116

  14. [Severe acute pancreatitis associated with gallbladder gangrene].

    PubMed

    Arroyo-Sánchez, Abel S; Aguirre-Mejía, Rosa Y; Echenique-Martínez, Sergio E

    2014-01-01

    We present a diabetic patient who developed severe acute pancreatitis associated to gallbladder gangrene, in this case we assessed the applicability of classification criteria and management of the pathways for acute pancreatitis and also we suggest some topics that could be investigated in the future.

  15. Computed tomographic appearance of resectable pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Itai, Y.; Araki, T.; Tasaka, A.; Maruyama, M.

    1982-06-01

    Thirteen patients with resectable pancreatic carcinoma were examined by computed tomography (CT). Nine had a mass, 2 had dilatation of the main pancreatic duct, 1 appeared to have ductal dilatation, and 1 had no sign of abnormality. Resectable carcinoma was diagnosed retrospectively in 8 cases, based on the following criteria: a mass with a distinct contour, frequently containing a tiny or irregular low-density area and accompanied by dilatation of the caudal portion of the main pancreatic duct without involvement of the large vessels, liver, or lymph nodes. Including unresectable cancer, chronic pancreatitis, and obstructive jaundice from causes other than cancer, the false-positive rate was less than 6%. However, a small cancer without change in pancreatic contour is difficult to detect with CT.

  16. Burkitt lymphoma with unusual presentation: Acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Koca, Tugba; Aslan, Nagehan; Dereci, Selim; Akcam, Mustafa

    2015-08-01

    Pancreatitis due to malignant infiltration is an uncommon condition in childhood. Pancreatic lymphomas constitute <2% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Only six reported cases with various clinical presentation have been documented in the literature. Described herein is the case of a nine-year-old boy with abdominal pain, jaundice, emesis, weight loss, diarrhea, who developed hyperlipidemia and cholestasis. Pancreatitis was suspected due to high amylase and lipase. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography showed diffuse enlargement of the pancreas. This sausage pancreas imaging was suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis, but the patient was diagnosed with Burkitt lymphoma on bone marrow aspiration, and rapidly improved with chemotherapy. Burkitt lymphoma should be kept in mind when patients present with pancreatitis, especially with diffuse enlarged pancreas. PMID:26031558

  17. [Invasive endoscopy or surgery for pancreatic disorders?].

    PubMed

    Pap, Akos

    2008-12-01

    Endoscopic double papillotomy occupied the place of surgical transduodenal double sphincteroplasty for disorders of papilla of Vater or chronic pancreatitis several years ago. Endoscopic cystoenterostomy and cystogastrostomy can also replace surgery in the treatment of pseudocysts and walled-of necrosis even in cases of severe acute pancreatitis with/or without sepsis. In chronic pancreatitis endotherapy may be the treatment of choice at first, although surgical techniques give somewhat better long-term results for pain relief. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, stone resolution or extraction and multiple pancreatic stents without aggressive balloon dilatation can progressively calibrate dominant stricture of the main pancreatic duct without further damage, ischemia or obstruction of side branches. Relapse-free period becomes longer (also after stents removal) if alcohol consumption and smoking are stopped definitively. Well-controlled, randomised studies are still needed to demonstrate clinical advantage of multiple endoscopic stent placement in comparison to surgery.

  18. Aberrant pancreatic ductal organisation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Goel, Shivi; Rustagi, Shaifaly Madan; Saha, Susmita; Mehta, Vandana; Suri, Rajesh Kumar; Rath, Gayatri

    2015-07-01

    Anomalous pancreatic ductal system has always enthralled the anatomists, surgeons, gastroenterologists and radiologists alike. With the growing use of MRCP, ERCP and endoscopic and surgical procedures, the knowledge of anatomical aberrations of pancreaticobiliary tract becomes extremely important. Moreover, the anomalous pancreatic duct morphology may be responsible for atypical gastrointestinal complains. We report an exceptionally rare case of two accessory ventral pancreatic ducts opening separately into the common bile duct proximal to the hepato pancreatic ampulla. Concomitant occurrence of an ectopic major duodenal papilla, 3.8 cm distal to the pyloric end of stomach was also seen. Moreover, the accessory pancreatic duct and the minor duodenal papilla were absent. Clinical implications and embryological description of these rare anomalies are discussed. Awareness of such rare morphological variants can go a long way in assisting effective patient management.

  19. Pancreatic cancer: epidemiology and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Krejs, Guenter J

    2010-01-01

    Ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas has an incidence of approximately 10 per 100,000 population per year. This number pertains to Europe, North America and parts of South America (Argentina). Men are more often afflicted than women (female:male ratio of about 1:1.5, though reports vary). There has been a very small but steady increase in the incidence over the last 50 years. Unfortunately, numbers for incidence and mortality are still practically identical for this cancer. The peak of incidence is between 60 and 80 years of age. In absolute numbers, there are 8,000 cases diagnosed annually in Germany, and 33,000 in the US. Pancreatic cancer at <40 years of age is extremely rare (2 cases per million per year), but among 80-year-olds, the incidence is about 200 new cases per 100,000 population per year. In men, carcinoma of the pancreas is the fourth most common cause of cancer death after lung, prostate and colorectal cancer. In women, it is the fifth most common cause of cancer death. Risk factors for pancreatic cancer include high-fat diet, smoking, chronic pancreatitis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, hereditary pancreatitis, family history of pancreatic cancer and diabetes mellitus. In chronic pancreatitis, the risk for pancreatic cancer is increased 20-fold, in hereditary pancreatitis it is 60-fold higher than in the general population. In a kindred with 2 first-degree relatives with pancreatic cancer, the risk for pancreatic cancer for other members of that kindred is 7-fold higher.

  20. Does pancreatic ductal anatomy play a role in determining outcomes of pancreatic anastomoses?

    PubMed

    Shukla, P J; Sakpal, S V; Maharaj, R

    2011-02-01

    Pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) is the surgical procedure performed for cancers of the head of the pancreas. Despite a substantial reduction in mortality rates following PD, morbidity remains high secondary to major post-operative complications. Post-operative pancreatic fistula (POPF), the commonest major complication following PD, results from the failure of the pancreato-enteric anastomosis. There appears to be a correlation between intrinsic pancreatic features like the texture of the gland and duct size and the outcome of the pancreatic anastomosis. Based on current clinical research data, we propose a new hypothesis called the "pancreatic ductal anatomy" concept. We hypothesize that morphological variations, anomalies or aberrations of the main pancreatic duct play a role in the outcome of the pancreatic anastomosis, irrespective of its type. The consequence of aberrant ductal anatomy is that certain areas of the remnant pancreas remain either undrained or partially drained, or have blocked ductules/ducts. This results in localized obstructive pancreatitis causing an inflammatory reaction which jeopardizes the anastomosis. We also propose two maneuvers which could possibly play a role in predicting potential problems and also planning the surgical resection and reconstruction in order to reduce the incidence of POPF. The first modality is the use of pre-operative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the pancreatic duct, and the second maneuver is the gentle cannulation test of the pancreatic duct with a soft, narrow tube following transection of the pancreatic neck. These factors would alert the surgeon about potential ductal variations and could facilitate the surgical approach.

  1. Morphohistological Features of Pancreatic Stump Are the Main Determinant of Pancreatic Fistula after Pancreatoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ridolfi, Cristina; Angiolini, Maria Rachele; Gavazzi, Francesca; Spaggiari, Paola; Tinti, Maria Carla; Uccelli, Fara; Madonini, Marco; Montorsi, Marco; Zerbi, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Pancreatic surgery is challenging and associated with high morbidity, mainly represented by postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) and its further consequences. Identification of risk factors for POPF is essential for proper postoperative management. Aim of the Study. Evaluation of the role of morphological and histological features of pancreatic stump, other than main pancreatic duct diameter and glandular texture, in POPF occurrence after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Patients and Methods. Between March 2011 and April 2013, we performed 145 consecutive pancreaticoduodenectomies. We intraoperatively recorded morphological features of pancreatic stump and collected data about postoperative morbidity. Our dedicated pathologist designed a score to quantify fibrosis and inflammation of pancreatic tissue. Results. Overall morbidity was 59,3%. Mortality was 4,1%. POPF rate was 28,3%, while clinically significant POPF were 15,8%. Male sex (P = 0.009), BMI ≥ 25 (P = 0.002), prolonged surgery (P = 0.001), soft pancreatic texture (P < 0.001), small pancreatic duct (P < 0.001), pancreatic duct decentralization on stump anteroposterior axis, especially if close to the posterior margin (P = 0.031), large stump area (P = 0.001), and extended stump mobilization (P = 0.001) were related to higher POPF rate. Our fibrosis-and-inflammation score is strongly associated with POPF (P = 0.001). Discussion and Conclusions. Pancreatic stump features evaluation, including histology, can help the surgeon in fitting postoperative management to patient individual risk after pancreaticoduodenectomy. PMID:24900974

  2. β-Cell regeneration through the transdifferentiation of pancreatic cells: Pancreatic progenitor cells in the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo-Sup; Lee, Moon-Kyu

    2016-05-01

    Pancreatic progenitor cell research has been in the spotlight, as these cells have the potential to replace pancreatic β-cells for the treatment of type 1 and 2 diabetic patients with the absence or reduction of pancreatic β-cells. During the past few decades, the successful treatment of diabetes through transplantation of the whole pancreas or isolated islets has nearly been achieved. However, novel sources of pancreatic islets or insulin-producing cells are required to provide sufficient amounts of donor tissues. To overcome this limitation, the use of pancreatic progenitor cells is gaining more attention. In particular, pancreatic exocrine cells, such as duct epithelial cells and acinar cells, are attractive candidates for β-cell regeneration because of their differentiation potential and pancreatic lineage characteristics. It has been assumed that β-cell neogenesis from pancreatic progenitor cells could occur in pancreatic ducts in the postnatal stage. Several studies have shown that insulin-producing cells can arise in the duct tissue of the adult pancreas. Acinar cells also might have the potential to differentiate into insulin-producing cells. The present review summarizes recent progress in research on the transdifferentiation of pancreatic exocrine cells into insulin-producing cells, especially duct and acinar cells. PMID:27330712

  3. Distinctive heavy metal composition of pancreatic juice in patients with pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Carrigan, Patricia E; Hentz, Joseph G; Gordon, Gwyneth; Morgan, Jennifer L; Raimondo, Massimo; Anbar, Ariel D; Miller, Laurence J

    2007-12-01

    Epidemiologic studies have shown the health risks of exposure to cigarette smoke and air pollution, with heavy metal composition implicated as contributing to both. Environmental exposure to cigarette smoke has been epidemiologically associated with pancreatic cancer, but the pathophysiologic basis for this is not yet clear. In the current work, we have used inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to quantify the metal composition of pancreatic juice collected in response to secretin stimulation in successive patients evaluated for abdominal pain (35 with pancreatic cancer, 30 with chronic pancreatitis, and 35 with normal pancreas). Indeed, metal composition of pancreatic juice was distinctive in patients with pancreatic cancer relative to those without such a cancer. The metal concentrations that were found to have the strongest association with pancreatic cancer were chromium, selenium, and molybdenum, with 1 SD increases in the concentrations of each associated with substantial increases in the odds of having pancreatic cancer relative to those in patients with normal pancreas (210%, 160%, and 76%, respectively). Of note, elevations in concentrations of chromium and selenium did not correlate in individuals, whereas those having a 1 SD increase in the sum of the concentrations of these two metals in their pancreatic juice had a 480% increase in the odds of having pancreatic cancer. Elevations of nickel and zinc correlated with elevated chromium in individuals, with each of these metals known to be present in cigarette smoke, whereas other recognized metal components of cigarette smoke were not elevated. An understanding of why these metals are elevated in pancreatic juice and what effects they might have on pancreatic cells may have important implications for the diagnosis, treatment, and even prevention of pancreatic cancer.

  4. Clinical Impact of the KL-6 Concentration of Pancreatic Juice for Diagnosing Pancreatic Masses

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Kazuya; Takeda, Yohei; Harada, Kenichi; Onoyama, Takumi; Kawata, Soichiro; Horie, Yasushi; Sakamoto, Teruhisa; Ueki, Masaru; Miura, Norimasa; Murawaki, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim. Pancreatic juice cytology (PJC) is considered optimal for differentially diagnosing pancreatic masses, but the accuracy of PJC ranges from 46.7% to 93.0%. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical impact of measuring the KL-6 concentration of pancreatic juice for diagnosing pancreatic masses. Methods. PJC and the KL-6 concentration measurements of pancreatic juice were performed for 70 consecutive patients with pancreatic masses (39 malignancies and 31 benign). Results. The average KL-6 concentration of pancreatic juice was significantly higher for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs) (167.7 ± 396.1 U/mL) and intraductal papillary mucinous carcinomas (IPMCs) (86.9 ± 21.1 U/mL) than for pancreatic inflammatory lesions (17.5 ± 15.7 U/mL, P = 0.034) and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (14.4 ± 2.0 U/mL, P = 0.026), respectively. When the cut-off level of the KL-6 concentration of pancreatic juice was 16 U/mL, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the KL-6 concentration of pancreatic juice alone were 79.5%, 64.5%, and 72.9%, respectively. Adding the KL-6 concentration of pancreatic juice to PJC when making a diagnosis caused the values of sensitivity and accuracy of PJC to increase by 15.3% (P = 0.025) and 8.5% (P = 0.048), respectively. Conclusions. The KL-6 concentration of pancreatic juice may be as useful as PJC for diagnosing PDACs. PMID:26451373

  5. New DNA Methylation Markers for Pancreatic Cancer: Discovery, Tissue Validation, and Pilot Testing in Pancreatic Juice

    PubMed Central

    Kisiel, John B.; Raimondo, Massimo; Taylor, William R.; Yab, Tracy C.; Mahoney, Douglas W.; Sun, Zhifu; Middha, Sumit; Baheti, Saurabh; Zou, Hongzhi; Smyrk, Thomas C.; Boardman, Lisa A.; Petersen, Gloria M.; Ahlquist, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Discriminant markers for pancreatic cancer detection are needed. We sought to identify and validate methylated DNA markers for pancreatic cancer using next-generation sequencing unbiased by known targets. Experimental Design At a referral center, we conducted four sequential case-control studies: discovery, technical validation, biological validation, and clinical piloting. Candidate markers were identified using variance inflated logistic regression on reduced-representation bisulfite DNA sequencing results from matched pancreatic cancers, benign pancreas, and normal colon tissues. Markers were validated technically on replicate discovery study DNA and biologically on independent, matched, blinded tissues by methylation specific PCR. Clinical testing of 6 methylation candidates and mutant KRAS was performed on secretin-stimulated pancreatic juice samples from 61 pancreatic cancer patients, 22 with chronic pancreatitis and 19 with normal pancreas on endoscopic ultrasound. Areas under receiver operating characteristics curves (AUC) for markers were calculated. Results Sequencing identified >500 differentially hyper-methylated regions. On independent tissues, AUC on 19 selected markers ranged between 0.73 – 0.97. Pancreatic juice AUC values for CD1D, KCNK12, CLEC11A, NDRG4, IKZF1, PKRCB and KRAS were 0.92*, 0.88, 0.85, 0.85, 0.84, 0.83 and 0.75, respectively, for pancreatic cancer compared to normal pancreas and 0.92*, 0.73, 0.76, 0.85*, 0.73, 0.77 and 0.62 for pancreatic cancer compared to chronic pancreatitis (*p=0.001 vs KRAS). Conclusion We identified and validated novel DNA methylation markers strongly associated with pancreatic cancer. On pilot testing in pancreatic juice, best markers (especially CD1D) highly discriminated pancreatic cases from controls. PMID:26023084

  6. Pancreatic endocrine tumors: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Jensen, R T

    1999-01-01

    Pancreatic endocrine tumors (PET's) can be divided on a clinical and pathologic basis into ten classes [insulinomas, gastrinomas (Zollinger-Ellison syndrome), VIPomas (Verner-Morrison syndrome, WDHA, pancreatic cholera), glucagonomas, somatostatinomas, ACTH-releasing tumors (ACTHomas), growth hormone-releasing factor secreting tumors (GRFomas), nonfunctioning or pancreatic polypeptide secreting tumors (non-functioning PET), PET's causing carcinoid syndrome and PET's causing hypercalcemia)]. Recent reports suggest calcitonin-secreting PET's also rarely occur but whether they cause a distinct clinical syndrome is unclear. PET's resemble carcinoid tumors histologically; in their ability to synthesize and frequently secrete multiple peptides such as neuroendocrine cell markers (chromogranins); their biologic behavior and their tumor growth patterns. Both groups of tumors are highly vascular, have high densities of somatostatin receptors and similar tumor localization studies including somatostatin receptor scintigraphy are used for both. PET's, similar to carcinoids causing the carcinoid syndrome, require two separate treatment options be considered: treatment directed against the hormone-excess state and treatment directed against the tumor per se because of their malignant nature. In the last few years there have been advances in tumor diagnosis, localization methods, treatment approaches particularly related to the use of synthetic somatostatin analogues, and the definition of the role of surgical procedures in these diseases. Important other advances include insights into the long-term natural history of PET's particularly from studies of gastrinomas, which allow prognostic factors to be identified and the timing of treatment options to better planned, as well as insights into the molecular basis of these disorders. The latter includes both a description of the molecular basis of the genetic inherited syndromes associated with PET's or carcinoid tumors, as well as

  7. Dietary antioxidants and chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Rose, P; Fraine, E; Hunt, L P; Acheson, D W; Braganza, J M

    1986-03-01

    Fifteen patients with idiopathic chronic pancreatitis (aged 17-78 years), who had not altered their diet since their first symptoms, completed 7-d weighed dietary records at home. The computed information was compared with that from 15 age- and sex-matched volunteers. Attention was focussed on the intakes of antioxidants and unsaturated fatty acids. The patients ingested less selenium, vitamin E, vitamin C and riboflavin than did controls (P less than 0.001, P less than 0.02, P less than 0.001 and P less than 0.05 respectively, using paired t-tests): selenium was by far the best discriminator on step-wise analysis. When the selenium intakes were examined alongside the results of theophylline tests--which reflect cytochromes P450 activities and, thereby, provide an index of antioxidant demand--a line of discrimination separated the majority of patients (with faster drug clearances and lower selenium intakes) and controls. There were no differences in the intakes of individual unsaturated fatty acids, C14:1 through to C24:6, between the two groups. However, amongst six subjects in the overlap zone, three with chronic pancreatitis habitually ate greater amounts of highly unsaturated fatty acids C20:4 to C24:6 inclusive (1970, 1049, 750 mg/d) than did three controls (329, 320, 82 mg/d). Animal experiments show that suboptimal intakes of dietary antioxidants and/or excessive intakes of highly unsaturated fatty acids and/or induction of cytochromes P450 facilitate peroxidation of cellular lipid membranes by free radicals. Our dietary data, taken in conjunction with pharmacokinetic data, thus suggest that a similar situation--favouring lipid peroxidation--may underlie human chronic pancreatitis.

  8. PCCR: Pancreatic Cancer Collaborative Registry.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Simon; Shats, Oleg; Ketcham, Marsha A; Anderson, Michelle A; Whitcomb, David C; Lynch, Henry T; Ghiorzo, Paola; Rubinstein, Wendy S; Sasson, Aaron R; Grizzle, William E; Haynatzki, Gleb; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Kinarsky, Leo; Brand, Randall E

    2011-01-01

    The Pancreatic Cancer Collaborative Registry (PCCR) is a multi-institutional web-based system aimed to collect a variety of data on pancreatic cancer patients and high-risk subjects in a standard and efficient way. The PCCR was initiated by a group of experts in medical oncology, gastroenterology, genetics, pathology, epidemiology, nutrition, and computer science with the goal of facilitating rapid and uniform collection of critical information and biological samples to be used in developing diagnostic, prevention and treatment strategies against pancreatic cancer. The PCCR is a multi-tier web application that utilizes Java/JSP technology and has Oracle 10 g database as a back-end. The PCCR uses a "confederation model" that encourages participation of any interested center, irrespective of its size or location. The PCCR utilizes a standardized approach to data collection and reporting, and uses extensive validation procedures to prevent entering erroneous data. The PCCR controlled vocabulary is harmonized with the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) or Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED-CT). The PCCR questionnaire has accommodated standards accepted in cancer research and healthcare. Currently, seven cancer centers in the USA, as well as one center in Italy are participating in the PCCR. At present, the PCCR database contains data on more than 2,700 subjects (PC patients and individuals at high risk of getting this disease). The PCCR has been certified by the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology as a cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG(®)) Bronze Compatible product. The PCCR provides a foundation for collaborative PC research. It has all the necessary prerequisites for subsequent evolution of the developed infrastructure from simply gathering PC-related data into a biomedical computing platform vital for successful PC studies, care and treatment. Studies utilizing data collected in the PCCR may engender new approaches

  9. Molecular therapy of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Plentz, R R; Manns, M P; Greten, T F

    2010-03-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity. The 5-year survival rate remains less than 5% and in contrast to other solid tumors, survial has changed only little in the last decade. Overall PDAC treatment shows only limited response to conventional chemotherapeutic agents. Several trials on therapy are ongoing and new targeted agents are in development to improve the treatment outcome of this deadly disease. However, our review presents the current developments of molecular therapies, supports the translational PDAC research and encourage you to take part in further clinical studies. PMID:20386525

  10. Novel Therapeutics for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lowery, Maeve A; O'Reilly, Eileen M

    2015-08-01

    The last decade has seen significant developments in the use of combination systemic therapy for advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), with median survival approaching 1 year for select patients treated with FOLFIRINOX in the metastatic setting. However, it is sobering that these developments have been achieved with the use of traditional cytotoxics rather than from successes in the more modern fields of molecularly targeted therapies or immunotherapy. This article highlights several promising therapeutic approaches to PDAC currently under clinical evaluation, including immune therapies, molecularly targeted therapies, strategies for stromal depletion, and targeted therapy for genetically selected patients.

  11. Histamine regulation of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer: a review of recent findings

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Taylor; Graf, Allyson; Hodges, Kyle; Kennedy, Lindsey; Hargrove, Laura; Price, Mattie; Kearney, Kate

    2013-01-01

    The pancreas is a dynamic organ that performs a multitude of functions within the body. Diseases that target the pancreas, like pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, are devastating and often fatal to the suffering patient. Histamine and histamine receptors (H1-H4HRs) have been found to play a critical role in biliary diseases. Accordingly, the biliary tract and the pancreas share similarities with regards to morphological, phenotypical and functional features and disease progression, studies related the role of H1-H4HRs in pancreatic diseases are important. In this review, we have highlighted the role that histamine, histidine decarboxylase (HDC), histamine receptors and mast cells (the main source of histamine in the body) play during both pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. The objective of the review is to demonstrate that histamine and histamine signaling may be a potential therapeutic avenue towards treatment strategies for pancreatic diseases. PMID:24570946

  12. Autoimmune pancreatitis: an illustrated guide to diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Proctor, R D; Rofe, C J; Bryant, T J C; Hacking, C N; Stedman, B

    2013-04-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) remains one of the rarer forms of pancreatitis but has become increasingly well recognized and widely diagnosed as it is an important differential, particularly due to the dramatic response to appropriate therapy. It is now best considered as part of a multisystem disease and the notion of "IgG4-related systemic sclerosing disease" has become widely recognized as the number of extra-pancreatic associations of AIP grows. More recently AIP has been classified into two subtypes: lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP) and idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) with distinct geographical, age and sex distributions for the two subtypes, in addition to different pathological characteristics. The role of imaging is crucial in AIP and should be considered in conjunction with clinical, serological, and histopathological findings to make the diagnosis. Radiologists are uniquely placed to raise the possibility of AIP and aid the exclusion of significant differentials to allow the initiation of appropriate management and avoidance of unnecessary intervention. Radiological investigation may reveal a number of characteristic imaging findings in AIP but appearances can vary considerably and the focal form of AIP may appear as a pancreatic mass, imitating pancreatic carcinoma. This review will illustrate typical and atypical appearances of AIP on all imaging modes. Emphasis will be placed on the imaging features that are likely to prove useful in discriminating AIP from other causes prior to histopathological confirmation. In addition, examples of relevant differential diagnoses are discussed and illustrated. PMID:23177083

  13. Diagnostic criteria for autoimmune pancreatitis in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Kamisawa, Terumi; Okazaki, Kazuichi; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a particular type of pancreatitis of presumed autoimmune etiology. Currently, AIP should be diagnosed based on combination of clinical, serological, morphological, and histopathological features. When diagnosing AIP, it is most important to differentiate it from pancreatic cancer. Diagnostic criteria for AIP, proposed by the Japan Pancreas Society in 2002 first in the world, were revised in 2006. The criteria are based on the minimum consensus of AIP and aim to avoid misdiagnosing pancreatic cancer as far as possible, but not for screening AIP. The criteria consist of the following radiological, serological, and histopathological items: (1) radiological imaging showing narrowing of the main pancreatic duct and enlargement of the pancreas, which are characteristic of the disease; (2) laboratory data showing abnormally elevated levels of serum γ-globulin, IgG or IgG4, or the presence of autoantibodies; (3) histopathological examination of the pancreas demonstrating marked fibrosis and prominent infiltration of lymphocytes and plasma cells, which is called lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP). For a diagnosis of AIP, criterion 1 must be present, together with criterion 2 and/or criterion 3. However, it is necessary to exclude malignant diseases such as pancreatic or biliary cancer. PMID:18763279

  14. Pathogenesis of pain in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Di Sebastiano, Pierluigi; di Mola, Fabio F; Buchler, Markus W; Friess, Helmut

    2004-01-01

    The pathophysiology of pain in chronic pancreatitis (CP) is incompletely understood. Several hypotheses have been advanced, including pancreatic and extrapancreatic causes. The existence of different hypotheses to explain the genesis of pain in CP also reflects the different therapeutic approaches to pain in these patients. Increased intraductal pressure as a result of single or multiple strictures and/or calculi is believed to be a common cause of pain in CP patients with a dilated main pancreatic duct. Other suggested causes include pancreatic fibrosis, interstitial hypertension and pancreatic ischemia. Additionally, extrapancreatic causes like duodenal and common bile duct stenosis with scarring due to pancreatic inflammation are suggested as factors causing pain in CP. The 'neurogenic inflammation' hypothesis is a fascinating theory which is supported by different studies. Immunohistological reports have shown that the amount of neurotransmitters, such as substance P and its receptor, calcitonin gene-related peptide and other neurotransmitters, are increased in afferent pancreatic nerves and a correlation between pain and immune cell infiltration of the nerves has been reported in CP. In this review we will discuss the different pain hypotheses and will present the perspective that neuroimmune interaction is an important factor for pain generation in CP.

  15. Current progress in immunotherapy for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Foley, Kelly; Kim, Victoria; Jaffee, Elizabeth; Zheng, Lei

    2016-10-10

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most lethal cancers with few treatment options. Immune-based strategies to treat pancreatic cancer, such as immune checkpoint inhibitors, therapeutic vaccines, and combination immunotherapies, are showing promise where other approaches have failed. Immune checkpoint inhibitors, including anti-CTLA4, anti-PD-1, and anti-PD-L1 antibodies, are effective as single agents in immune sensitive cancers like melanoma, but lack efficacy in immune insensitive cancers including pancreatic cancer. However, these inhibitors are showing clinical activity, even in traditionally non-immunogenic cancers, when combined with other interventions, including chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and therapeutic vaccines. Therapeutic vaccines given together with immune modulating agents are of particular interest because vaccines are the most efficient way to induce effective anti-tumor T cell responses, which is required for immunotherapies to be effective. In pancreatic cancer, early studies suggest that vaccines can induce T cells that have the potential to recognize and kill pancreatic cancer cells, but the tumor microenvironment inhibits effective T cell trafficking and function. While progress has been made in the development of immunotherapies for pancreatic cancer over the last several years, additional trials are needed to better understand the signals within the tumor microenvironment that are formidable barriers to T cell infiltration and function. Additionally, as more pancreatic specific antigens are identified, immunotherapies will continue to be refined to provide the most significant clinical benefit.

  16. Pancreatic cancer: Open or minimally invasive surgery?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Hua; Zhang, Cheng-Wu; Hu, Zhi-Ming; Hong, De-Fei

    2016-08-28

    Pancreatic duct adenocarcinoma is one of the most fatal malignancies, with R0 resection remaining the most important part of treatment of this malignancy. However, pancreatectomy is believed to be one of the most challenging procedures and R0 resection remains the only chance for patients with pancreatic cancer to have a good prognosis. Some surgeons have tried minimally invasive pancreatic surgery, but the short- and long-term outcomes of pancreatic malignancy remain controversial between open and minimally invasive procedures. We collected comparative data about minimally invasive and open pancreatic surgery. The available evidence suggests that minimally invasive pancreaticoduodenectomy (MIPD) is as safe and feasible as open PD (OPD), and shows some benefit, such as less intraoperative blood loss and shorter postoperative hospital stay. Despite the limited evidence for MIPD in pancreatic cancer, most of the available data show that the short-term oncological adequacy is similar between MIPD and OPD. Some surgical techniques, including superior mesenteric artery-first approach and laparoscopic pancreatoduodenectomy with major vein resection, are believed to improve the rate of R0 resection. Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy is less technically demanding and is accepted in more pancreatic centers. It is technically safe and feasible and has similar short-term oncological prognosis compared with open distal pancreatectomy. PMID:27621576

  17. Issues in Hypertriglyceridemic Pancreatitis - An Update

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, John; Singh, Vijay; Pitchumoni, C. S; Yadav, Dhiraj

    2014-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) is a well established but underestimated cause of acute (AP) and recurrent AP (RAP). The clinical presentation of HTG-induced pancreatitis (HTG pancreatitis) is similar to other causes. Pancreatitis secondary to HTG is typically seen in the presence of one or more secondary factors (uncontrolled diabetes, alcoholism, medications, pregnancy) in a patient with an underlying common genetic abnormality of lipoprotein metabolism (Familial combined hyperlipidemia or Familial HTG). Less commonly, a patient with rare genetic abnormality (Familial chylomicronemic syndrome) with or without an additional secondary factor is encountered. The risk of AP in patients with serum triglycerides >1000 mg/dl and >2000 mg/dl is ∼5% and 10-20% respectively. It is not clear whether HTG pancreatitis is more severe than when it is due to other causes. Clinical management of HTG pancreatitis is similar to that of other causes. Insulin infusion in diabetic patients with HTG can rapidly reduce triglyceride levels. Use of apheresis is still experimental and better designed studies are needed to clarify its role in management of HTG pancreatitis. Diet, lifestyle changes, control of secondary factors are key to the treatment and medications are useful adjuncts to long term management of triglyceride levels. Control of triglyceride levels to well below 500 mg/dl can effectively prevent recurrences of pancreatitis. PMID:24172179

  18. Pancreatic cancer: Open or minimally invasive surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-Hua; Zhang, Cheng-Wu; Hu, Zhi-Ming; Hong, De-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic duct adenocarcinoma is one of the most fatal malignancies, with R0 resection remaining the most important part of treatment of this malignancy. However, pancreatectomy is believed to be one of the most challenging procedures and R0 resection remains the only chance for patients with pancreatic cancer to have a good prognosis. Some surgeons have tried minimally invasive pancreatic surgery, but the short- and long-term outcomes of pancreatic malignancy remain controversial between open and minimally invasive procedures. We collected comparative data about minimally invasive and open pancreatic surgery. The available evidence suggests that minimally invasive pancreaticoduodenectomy (MIPD) is as safe and feasible as open PD (OPD), and shows some benefit, such as less intraoperative blood loss and shorter postoperative hospital stay. Despite the limited evidence for MIPD in pancreatic cancer, most of the available data show that the short-term oncological adequacy is similar between MIPD and OPD. Some surgical techniques, including superior mesenteric artery-first approach and laparoscopic pancreatoduodenectomy with major vein resection, are believed to improve the rate of R0 resection. Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy is less technically demanding and is accepted in more pancreatic centers. It is technically safe and feasible and has similar short-term oncological prognosis compared with open distal pancreatectomy. PMID:27621576

  19. Pancreatic cancer: Open or minimally invasive surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-Hua; Zhang, Cheng-Wu; Hu, Zhi-Ming; Hong, De-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic duct adenocarcinoma is one of the most fatal malignancies, with R0 resection remaining the most important part of treatment of this malignancy. However, pancreatectomy is believed to be one of the most challenging procedures and R0 resection remains the only chance for patients with pancreatic cancer to have a good prognosis. Some surgeons have tried minimally invasive pancreatic surgery, but the short- and long-term outcomes of pancreatic malignancy remain controversial between open and minimally invasive procedures. We collected comparative data about minimally invasive and open pancreatic surgery. The available evidence suggests that minimally invasive pancreaticoduodenectomy (MIPD) is as safe and feasible as open PD (OPD), and shows some benefit, such as less intraoperative blood loss and shorter postoperative hospital stay. Despite the limited evidence for MIPD in pancreatic cancer, most of the available data show that the short-term oncological adequacy is similar between MIPD and OPD. Some surgical techniques, including superior mesenteric artery-first approach and laparoscopic pancreatoduodenectomy with major vein resection, are believed to improve the rate of R0 resection. Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy is less technically demanding and is accepted in more pancreatic centers. It is technically safe and feasible and has similar short-term oncological prognosis compared with open distal pancreatectomy.

  20. Transcatheter embolization of pancreatic arteriovenous malformation associated with recurrent acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh, S; Mukund, Amar; Bhatia, Vikram; Arora, Ankur

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic arteriovenous malformation (PAVM) is extremely rare; even rarer is its association with pancreatitis. The authors report a case of PAVM causing recurrent episodes of acute pancreatitis in a 46-year-old male. Patient refused surgery and was treated with transcatheter arterial embolization using liquid embolic agent (mixture of n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate glue and lipiodol), which resulted in a significant decrease in the size of the PAVM. PMID:27081231

  1. [Latest advances in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2013-10-01

    The present article analyzes the main presentations on acute pancreatitis (AP) in Digestive Disease Week 2013. Perfusion computed tomography allows early diagnosis of pancreatic necrosis. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin predicts the development of acute renal failure, severe AP and death. Factors associated with greater fluid sequestration in AP are alcoholic etiology, an elevated hematocrit, and the presence of criteria of systemic inflammatory response syndrome; fluid sequestration is associated with a worse outcome. True pseudocysts (fluid collections without necrosis for more than 4 weeks) are a highly infrequent complication in AP. Patients with necrotic collections have a poor prognosis, especially if associated with infection. A meta-analysis on fluid therapy suggests that early aggressive fluid administration is associated with higher mortality and more frequent respiratory complications. According to a meta-analysis, enteral nutrition initiated within 24 hours of admission improves the outcome of AP compared with later initiation of enteral nutrition. Pentoxifylline could be a promising alternative in AP; a double-blind randomized study showed that this drug reduced the length of hospital and intensive care unit stay, as well as the need for intensive care unit admission. The association of octreotide and celecoxib seems to reduce the frequency of organ damage compared with octreotide alone. Mild AP can be managed in the ambulatory setting through hospital-at-home units after a short, 24-hour admission.

  2. [Surgery for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors].

    PubMed

    Shibata, Chikashi; Egawa, Shin-Ichi; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Morikawa, Takanori; Naitoh, Takeshi; Unno, Michiaki; Sasaki, Iwao

    2012-11-01

    Approximately half of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) are nonfunctioning, and insulinoma and gastrinoma are frequent forms of functioning tumors. The treatment of patients with PNETs should be based on the consideration that more than half are malignant except for insulinomas. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is often complicated with gastrinoma. Endoscopic ultrasound and somatostain receptor scintigraphy are useful in diagnosing PNETs, and the selective arterial secretagogue injection test is performed if necessary. WHO2010 is available as a histopathologic grading system of malignancy. Although surgical resection should first be considered as a treatment for PNETs, liver metastasis is a major factor hindering resection. In Japan, the choices of drugs to treat liver metastases are too few. In patients with MEN1 in whom PNETS are frequently multiple, we should perform procedures that preserve pancreatic function, although some patients may require total pancreatectomy for the complete resection of tumors. The indications for total pancreatectomy should be determined individually based on the tumor status and patient age. PMID:23330458

  3. Noncoding RNAs and pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Juan-Fei; Zhuang, Yan-Yan; Huang, Feng-Ting; Zhang, Shi-Neng

    2016-01-01

    Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) represent a class of RNA molecules that typically do not code for proteins. Emerging data suggest that ncRNAs play an important role in several physiological and pathological conditions such as cancer. The best-characterized ncRNAs are the microRNAs (miRNAs), which are short, approximately 22-nucleotide sequences of RNA of approximately 22-nucleotide in length that regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level, through transcript degradation or translational repression. MiRNAs can function as master gene regulators, impacting a variety of cellular pathways important to normal cellular functions as well as cancer development and progression. In addition to miRNAs, long ncRNAs, which are transcripts longer than 200 nucleotides, have recently emerged as novel drivers of tumorigenesis. However, the molecular mechanisms of their regulation and function, and the significance of other ncRNAs such as piwi-interacting RNAs in pancreas carcinogenesis are largely unknown. This review summarizes the growing body of evidence supporting the vital roles of ncRNAs in pancreatic cancer, focusing on their dysregulation through both genetic and epigenetic mechanisms, and highlighting the promise of ncRNAs in diagnostic and therapeutic applications of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26811626

  4. Blood microcirculation of ischemic pancreatitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrieva, Irina V.; Arakelian, Sergei M.; Antonov, Olga V.

    1998-06-01

    Blood Microcirculation includes many of different components, which are joined by unique multiple system. Capillaries are one of the main link in this morpho-functional chain. Changes in any components of blood microcirculation are revealed by many of pathological processes in different organs and systems of the whole organism. We investigated 250 patients from 30 to 77 ages. Men included 149, women -- 101. The main diagnosis of all patients was the ischaemic pancreatitis. For verification of this diagnosis we used the whole spectrum of clinical, laboratorial and instrumental methods. These were the following: the definition of amylase of blood and urine, sonography and computer's tomography of pancreas, angiography of vessels of pancreas and Doppler's sonography of abdominal aorta and her branches: arteria mesenterica superior (AMS), truncus coeliacus (TC), arteria hepatica communis (AHC) and arteria lienalis (AL). We investigated the blood microcirculation of the mucous of the inferior lip, using Laser Dopplerography. The equipment for this research was LACC-01 with modified computer's program. The normal levels of blood microcirculation were from 120 to 180 Units. But patients with ischaemic pancreatitis had more lower level than in normal situation. This method are suggested as express diagnostic in the cases of abdominal ischaemic pathology. It can used as singel method or in combined with ultrasound Dopplerography.

  5. TARGETED THERAPIES FOR PANCREATIC CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Danovi, S A; Wong, H H; Lemoine, N R

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Pancreatic cancer is a devastating malignancy and a leading cause of cancer mortality. Furthermore, early diagnosis represents a serious hurdle for clinicians as symptoms are non-specific and usually manifest in advanced, treatment-resistant stages of the disease. Sources of data Here, we review the rationale and progress of targeted therapies currently under investigation. Areas of agreement At present, chemoradiation regimes are administered palliatively, and produce only marginal survival benefits, underscoring a desperate need for more effective treatment modalities. Areas of controversy Questions have been raised as to whether erlotinib, the only targeted therapy to attain a statistically significant increase in median survival, is cost-effective. Growing points The last decade of research has provided us with a wealth of information regarding the molecular nature of pancreatic cancer, leading to the identification of signalling pathways and their respective components which are critical for the maintenance of the malignant phenotype. Areas timely for developing research These proteins thus represent ideal targets for novel molecular therapies which embody an urgently needed novel treatment strategy. PMID:18753179

  6. New modalities for treating chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Grimm, H; Meyer, W H; Nam, V C; Soehendra, N

    1989-03-01

    Over the last few years, a new method, neither medical nor surgical, has been developed for treating often difficult-to-treat chronic pancreatitis. In the case of obstructive pancreatitis, endoscopy permits both drainage and calculus extraction. Even encrusted concrements and calcifications can be removed from the pancreatic duct with the aid of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy. The first aim is to relieve pain by restoring a free flow of secretion. Perhaps the use of endoscopic treatment in the early stages will break the vicious circle of chronic inflammation and ultimate gland destruction.

  7. Pancreatic cancer: does octreotide offer any promise?

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, L

    2001-01-01

    The incidence of adenocarcinoma of the pancreas has risen steadily over the past 4 decades. Since pancreatic cancer is diagnosed at an advanced stage, and because of the lack of effective therapies the prognosis of such patients is extremely poor. Despite advances in our understanding of the molecular biology of pancreatic cancer, the systemic treatment of this disease remains unsatisfactory. Systemic chemotherapy and the administration of biologically active molecules such as tumor necrosis factor or interferons have not resulted in significant improvements in response rates or patient survival. New treatment strategies are obviously needed. This paper will discuss current advances in the use of somatostatin analogs in the management of pancreatic cancer.

  8. Demographics and epidemiology of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Theresa Pluth; Lowenfels, Albert B

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer affects 44,000 Americans and at least 250,000 individuals worldwide annually. The incidence is slowly increasing after a recent period of decline. Cases are predicted to increase globally because of increased longevity and the widespread adoption of cancer-causing behaviors, such as cigarette smoking, dietary indiscretion, and a global increase in diabetes. Well-known risk factors for pancreatic cancer are advancing age, tobacco smoking, obesity, certain inherited familial disorders, second-hand smoke exposure, chronic pancreatitis, and diabetes. Associations with human immunodeficiency virus, ABO blood group, hepatitis B virus, human immunodeficiency virus, and Helicobacter pylori have also been identified.

  9. Post-pancreatitis Fat Necrosis Mimicking Carcinomatosis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Joshua P; Arnoletti, J Pablo; Varadarajulu, Shyam; Morgan, Desiree E

    2008-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis can result in retroperitoneal fat necrosis, typically occurring in the peripancreatic region, with extension into the transverse mesocolon, omentum and mesenteric root. When evaluated with contrast enhanced computed tomography (CECT), acute peripancreatic post necrotic collections typically become lower in attenuation over time, and often appear as homogeneous fluid collections. Saponification as a complication of fat necrosis in patients with acute pancreatitis is a well recognized clinical entity. While retroperitonal fat necrosis is commonly seen on CECT, saponification is not a prominent imaging feature. We present a case of acute pancreatitis complicated by extensive saponification of fat throughout the retroperitoneum and peritoneal lining, mimicking carcinomatosis.

  10. Advances in Management of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Janisch, Nigeen H; Gardner, Timothy B

    2016-03-01

    This article reviews advances in the management of acute pancreatitis. Medical treatment has been primarily supportive for this diagnosis, and despite extensive research efforts, there are no pharmacologic therapies that improve prognosis. The current mainstay of management, notwithstanding the ongoing debate regarding the volume, fluid type, and rate of administration, is aggressive intravenous fluid resuscitation. Although antibiotics were used consistently for prophylaxis in severe acute pancreatitis to prevent infection, they are no longer used unless infection is documented. Enteral nutrition, especially in patients with severe acute pancreatitis, is considered a cornerstone in management of this disease.

  11. Endotherapy for chronic pancreatitis with intracanalar stones.

    PubMed

    Maydeo, A; Soehendra, N; Reddy, N; Bhandari, S

    2007-07-01

    Endotherapy for pancreatic stone is an emerging specialty. The judicious application of extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in selected groups of patients has increased the success rates of endotherapy, with excellent long-term results. In this review the authors share their vast experience of treating patients with pancreatic stones. The article will focus on the basic principles of pancreatic endotherapy, the instrumentation required, details of the ESWL technique and its applications, as well as the limitations, success rate, and complications of endotherapy in selected patients.

  12. A Case of Pancreatic Cancer in the Setting of Autoimmune Pancreatitis with Nondiagnostic Serum Markers

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasegaram, Manju D.; Chiam, Su C.; Nguyen, Nam Q.; Neo, Eu L.; Chen, John W.; Worthley, Christopher S.; Brooke-Smith, Mark E.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) often mimics pancreatic cancer. The diagnosis of both conditions is difficult preoperatively let alone when they coexist. Several reports have been published describing pancreatic cancer in the setting of AIP. Case Report. The case of a 53-year-old man who presented with abdominal pain, jaundice, and radiological features of autoimmune pancreatitis, with a “sausage-shaped” pancreas and bulky pancreatic head with portal vein impingement, is presented. He had a normal serum IgG4 and only mildly elevated Ca-19.9. Initial endoscopic ultrasound-(EUS-) guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) of the pancreas revealed an inflammatory sclerosing process only. A repeat EUS guided biopsy following biliary decompression demonstrated both malignancy and features of autoimmune pancreatitis. At laparotomy, a uniformly hard, bulky pancreas was found with no sonographically definable mass. A total pancreatectomy with portal vein resection and reconstruction was performed. Histology revealed adenosquamous carcinoma of the pancreatic head and autoimmune pancreatitis and squamous metaplasia in the remaining pancreas. Conclusion. This case highlights the diagnostic and management difficulties in a patient with pancreatic cancer in the setting of serum IgG4-negative, Type 2 AIP. PMID:23781378

  13. Pancreatic stellate cells promote epithelial-mesenchymal transition in pancreatic cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Masamune, Atsushi; Watanabe, Takashi; Ariga, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Hiromichi; Hamada, Shin; Satoh, Kennichi; Egawa, Shinichi; Unno, Michiaki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} Recent studies have shown that pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promote the progression of pancreatic cancer. {yields} Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed loose cell contacts and scattered, fibroblast-like appearance. {yields} PSCs decreased the expression of epithelial markers but increased that of mesenchymal markers, along with increased migration. {yields} This study suggests epithelial-mesenchymal transition as a novel mechanism by which PSCs contribute to the aggressive behavior of pancreatic cancer cells. -- Abstract: The interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), a major profibrogenic cell type in the pancreas, is receiving increasing attention. There is accumulating evidence that PSCs promote the progression of pancreatic cancer by increasing cancer cell proliferation and invasion as well as by protecting them from radiation- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. Because epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a critical role in the progression of pancreatic cancer, we hypothesized that PSCs promote EMT in pancreatic cancer cells. Panc-1 and SUIT-2 pancreatic cancer cells were indirectly co-cultured with human PSCs isolated from patients undergoing operation for pancreatic cancer. The expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers was examined by real-time PCR and immunofluorescent staining. The migration of pancreatic cancer cells was examined by scratch and two-chamber assays. Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed loose cell contacts and a scattered, fibroblast-like appearance. The expression of E-cadherin, cytokeratin 19, and membrane-associated {beta}-catenin was decreased, whereas vimentin and Snail (Snai-1) expression was increased more in cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs than in mono-cultured cells. The migration of pancreatic cancer cells was increased by co-culture with PSCs. The PSC-induced decrease of E-cadherin expression was not altered

  14. Imaging of acute pancreatitis and its complications. Part 1: acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Türkvatan, A; Erden, A; Türkoğlu, M A; Seçil, M; Yener, Ö

    2015-02-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas that may also involve surrounding tissues or remote organs. The Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis was introduced in 1992 and divides patients into mild and severe groups based on clinical and biochemical criteria. Recently, the terminology and classification scheme proposed at the initial Atlanta Symposium have been reviewed and a new consensus statement has been proposed by the Acute Pancreatitis Classification Working Group. Generally, imaging is recommended to confirm the clinical diagnosis, investigate the etiology, and grade the extend and severity of the acute pancreatitis. Ultrasound is the first-line imaging modality in most centers for the confirmation of the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis and the ruling out of other causes of acute abdomen, but it has limitations in the acute clinical setting. Computed tomography not only establishes the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis, but also enables to stage severity of the disease. Magnetic resonance imaging has earned an ever more important role in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. It is especially useful for imaging of patients with iodine allergies, characterizing collections and assessment of an abnormal or disconnected pancreatic duct. The purpose of this review article is to present an overview of the acute pancreatitis, clarify confusing terminology, underline the role of ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging according to the proper clinical context and compare the advantages and limitations of each modality.

  15. Extension of pancreatic pseudocyst into psoas muscle in a setting of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Aswani, Yashant; Anandpara, Karan Manoj; Hira, Priya

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic pseudocysts are known to extend beyond the confines of the pancreatic bed due to the digestive nature of enzyme rich pancreatic fluid. Extension of a pseudocyst beyond the retroperitoneum, along the retrofascial plane within the psoas muscle is, however, unusual, with only a handful of cases described in the literature. We report a case of a 28-year-old man who presented with right lumbar pain and painful ipsilateral hip extension. Imaging findings revealed extension of the pseudocyst into psoas along with features of acute pancreatitis. The pseudocyst was drained percutaneously under image guidance, which led to resolution of symptoms. PMID:25628323

  16. Hiatus Hernia: A Rare Cause of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Shruti; Jawairia, Mahreema; Subramani, Krishnaiyer; Mustacchia, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Hiatal hernia (HH) is the herniation of elements of the abdominal cavity through the esophageal hiatus of the diaphragm. A giant HH with pancreatic prolapse is very rare and its causing pancreatitis is an even more extraordinary condition. We describe a case of a 65-year-old man diagnosed with acute pancreatitis secondary to pancreatic herniation. In these cases, acute pancreatitis may be caused by the diaphragmatic crura impinging upon the pancreas and leading to repetitive trauma as it crosses the hernia; intermittent folding of the main pancreatic duct; ischemia associated with stretching at its vascular pedicle; or total pancreatic incarceration. Asymptomatic hernia may not require any treatment, while multiple studies have supported the recommendation of early elective repair as a safer route in symptomatic patients. In summary, though rare, pancreatic herniation should be considered as a cause of acute pancreatitis. A high index of suspicion for complications is warranted in cases like these. PMID:27066077

  17. [Three cases of childhood-onset autoimmune pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Murata, Shinya; Yoden, Atsushi; Aomatsu, Tomoki; Inoue, Keisuke; Tamai, Hiroshi

    2014-08-01

    Here we present 3 cases of childhood-onset autoimmune pancreatitis: 2 cases in boys aged 4 and 16 years, diagnosed with ulcerative colitis; 1 case in a previously healthy 10-year-old boy. All 3 boys presented with abdominal pain associated with elevated pancreatic enzyme levels. Immunoglobulin G4 levels were elevated only in the 16-year-old boy. However, pancreatic enlargement together with narrowing of the main pancreatic duct was evident on computed tomography in all 3 cases. Autoimmune pancreatitis is an uncommon disease in childhood, and only 3 cases affecting patients under 17 years of age have previously been reported in Japan. Autoimmune pancreatitis may be latent in children with pancreatitis who have chronic or intermittent abdominal symptoms. In addition, it is necessary to recognize autoimmune pancreatitis as a complication of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease. The clinical features of pediatric autoimmune pancreatitis remain unclear, and an accumulation of cases is necessary. PMID:25100354

  18. Hiatus Hernia: A Rare Cause of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shruti; Shahzad, Ghulamullah; Jawairia, Mahreema; Subramani, Krishnaiyer; Viswanathan, Prakash; Mustacchia, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Hiatal hernia (HH) is the herniation of elements of the abdominal cavity through the esophageal hiatus of the diaphragm. A giant HH with pancreatic prolapse is very rare and its causing pancreatitis is an even more extraordinary condition. We describe a case of a 65-year-old man diagnosed with acute pancreatitis secondary to pancreatic herniation. In these cases, acute pancreatitis may be caused by the diaphragmatic crura impinging upon the pancreas and leading to repetitive trauma as it crosses the hernia; intermittent folding of the main pancreatic duct; ischemia associated with stretching at its vascular pedicle; or total pancreatic incarceration. Asymptomatic hernia may not require any treatment, while multiple studies have supported the recommendation of early elective repair as a safer route in symptomatic patients. In summary, though rare, pancreatic herniation should be considered as a cause of acute pancreatitis. A high index of suspicion for complications is warranted in cases like these. PMID:27066077

  19. The role of surgery in the management of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Ranson, J H

    1990-01-01

    Surgical intervention in acute pancreatitis may have varied goals. Early laparotomy may be required for diagnostic purposes. There is, however, no convincing evidence that attempts to reduce the morbidity of severe pancreatitis by early operative pancreatic drainage, early formal pancreatic resection, or early biliary procedures have been effective. In fact, they may be harmful. Peritoneal lavage by catheter induced under local anesthesia may ameliorate early cardiovascular and respiratory complications in some patients. Preliminary experience suggests that early operative debridement of devitalized pancreatic tissue with postoperative lavage may be helpful in selected patients. Patients with infections of devitalized pancreatic or peripancreatic tissue require operative debridement and drainage or packing. Other complications such as colonic necrosis or pseudocysts also require operative treatment. Rarely do patients require operation to relieve protracted pancreatitis. Patients with gallstone-associated pancreatitis should usually undergo surgical correction of their cholelithiasis as soon as their pancreatitis has subsided. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. PMID:2181949

  20. Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Complicated by Sinistral Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kaley, Kristin; Lamb, Lynne

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is known for vague symptoms that lead to a delay in diagnosis, and hence most cases are found at an advanced stage. Many complications can happen secondary to pancreatic cancer including diabetes, malabsorption, and deep venous thrombosis. Sinistral (segmental or left-sided) portal hypertension (SPH) refers to portal hypertension confined to the left-sided segment of the portal venous system namely the splenic side, and the most common etiology is splenic vein thrombosis (SVT). We present here a case of a 66-year-old male with advanced pancreatic cancer who died due to bleeding secondary to SVT. We advise physicians caring for these patients to be aware of this complication, which may also be the manifestation of an undiagnosed pancreatic cancer. PMID:27555987

  1. Severe Hypertriglyceridemia Induced Pancreatitis in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Seema; Shaffer, Lemuel; Cavens, Paula; Blankstein, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis caused by severe gestational hypertriglyceridemia is a rare complication of pregnancy. Acute pancreatitis has been well associated with gallstone disease, alcoholism, or drug abuse but rarely seen in association with severe hypertriglyceridemia. Hypertriglyceridemia may occur in pregnancy due to normal physiological changes leading to abnormalities in lipid metabolism. We report a case of severe gestational hypertriglyceridemia that caused acute pancreatitis at full term and was successfully treated with postpartum therapeutic plasma exchange. Patient also developed several other complications related to her substantial hypertriglyceridemia including preeclampsia, chylous ascites, retinal detachment, pleural effusion, and chronic pericarditis. This patient had no previous family or personal history of lipid abnormality and had four successful prior pregnancies without developing gestational hypertriglyceridemia. Such a severe hypertriglyceridemia is usually seen in patients with familial chylomicronemia syndromes where hypertriglyceridemia is exacerbated by the pregnancy, leading to fatal complications such as acute pancreatitis. PMID:24995138

  2. An unusual case of pancreatic fistula.

    PubMed

    Johnston, M J; Prew, C L; Fraser, I

    2013-03-21

    We report an unusual case of a pancreatic fistula communicating with an appendicectomy wound. This occurred following an episode of acute haemorrhagic pancreatitis. The patient was initially admitted with signs and symptoms indicating appendicitis and went to theatre for an open appendicectomy. However, this did not resolve his symptoms and a laparotomy was performed the next day revealing haemorrhagic pancreatitis. He endured a stormy post-operative course, the cause of which was found to be an external pancreatic fistula with discharge of amylase-rich fluid from the Lanz incision. A trial of conservative management failed despite multiple percutaneous drainage procedures and treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics. After a second opinion was sought, it was decided to fit a roux loop anastomosis between the head of the pancreas and the duodenum to divert the fistulous fluid. This procedure was a success and the patient remains well 2 years later.

  3. [Organ saving intervention for pancreatic trauma].

    PubMed

    Chanis, William; Pataki, István; Mohos, György; Soultan, Thabet Ghayth; Al-Hamadi, Mohamed

    2016-09-01

    We report the case of a 25 year old male patient who suffered a traffic accident. He was admitted to the ICU of our hospital and underwent a two step intervention for main pancreatic duct transection. PMID:27644927

  4. Hedgehog Signaling in Pancreatic Fibrosis and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yongyu; Bai, Yongheng; Dong, Jiaojiao; Li, Qiang; Jin, Yuepeng; Chen, Bicheng; Zhou, Mengtao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The hedgehog signaling pathway was first discovered in the 1980s. It is a stem cell-related pathway that plays a crucial role in embryonic development, tissue regeneration, and organogenesis. Aberrant activation of hedgehog signaling leads to pathological consequences, including a variety of human tumors such as pancreatic cancer. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that blockade of this pathway with several small-molecule inhibitors can inhibit the development of pancreatic neoplasm. In addition, activated hedgehog signaling has been reported to be involved in fibrogenesis in many tissues, including the pancreas. Therefore, new therapeutic targets based on hedgehog signaling have attracted a great deal of attention to alleviate pancreatic diseases. In this review, we briefly discuss the recent advances in hedgehog signaling in pancreatic fibrogenesis and carcinogenesis and highlight new insights on their potential relationship with respect to the development of novel targeted therapies. PMID:26962810

  5. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Soehendra, N; Grimm, H; Meyer, H W; Schreiber, H W

    1989-09-15

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy was performed on eight patients (six men, two women; mean age 46.3 years, range 36-58) with predominantly stone-induced obstructive pancreatitis. Stones in the pancreatic duct were smashed in one session to such an extent that the fragments were eliminated spontaneously via the ostium which had previously been split endoscopically. Repeat lithotripsy to achieve complete removal was necessary in only two patients. In one there were multiple concrements along the entire length of the main pancreatic duct; the other had a cherry-sized stone near the bifurcation of the accessory pancreatic duct. There were no serious complications. After successful removal of the stones all patients were free of pain which before had required strong analgesics to control. Six patients remained pain-free during a follow-up period of two eight months. Pain again occurred in the other two, but it was less frequent and milder.

  6. Researchers Identify Early Sign of Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... development of pancreatic cancer – an upsurge in certain amino acids that occurs before the disease is diagnosed and ... We found that higher levels of branched chain amino acids were present in people who went on to ...

  7. Optimizing Adjuvant Therapy for Resected Pancreatic Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this clinical trial, patients with resected pancreatic head cancer will be randomly assigned to receive either gemcitabine with or without erlotinib for 5 treatment cycles. Patients who do not experience disease progression or recurrence will then be r

  8. Role of taxanes in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Belli, Carmen; Cereda, Stefano; Reni, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most deadly cancers and is characterized by a poor prognosis. Single agent gemcitabine, despite its limited activity and modest impact on disease outcome, is considered as the standard therapy in pancreatic cancer. Most of the combination regimens used in the treatment of this disease, also including the targeted agents, did not improve the outcome of patients. Also, taxanes have been tested as single agent and in combination chemotherapy, both in first line and as salvage chemotherapy, as another possible option for treating pancreatic cancer. The inclusion of taxanes in combination with gemcitabine as upfront therapy obtained promising results. Accordingly, taxanes, and above all, new generation taxanes, appear to be suitable candidates for further testing to assess their role against pancreatic cancer in various clinical settings. PMID:22969215

  9. Hypertriglyceridemia-Induced Pancreatitis: Choice of Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Rafay; Jehangir, Waqas; Regeti, Kalyani; Yousif, Abdalla

    2015-01-01

    Severe hypertriglyceridemia is one of the many yet rare risk factors associated with acute pancreatitis. The level of triglycerides plays a crucial role in determining the method and duration of treatment. As with the treatment of other causes of acute pancreatitis, bowel rest, intravenous fluids, and supportive care play a crucial role. However, depending on the degree of hypertriglyceridemia, the role of other treatment options may need to be implemented. There are no set established guidelines for the management of hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis, but the role of insulin, heparin, and plasmapheresis has been studied and successfully used in its management. We report the case a 44-year-old female with clinical acute pancreatitis secondary to hypertriglyceridemia who was successfully managed with the addition of intravenous insulin.

  10. Inflammation in Acute and Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Habtezion, Aida

    2015-01-01

    Summary Immune cell contribution to the pathogenesis of acute and chronic pancreatitis is gaining more appreciation and further understanding in immune signaling presents potential therapeutic targets that can alter disease progression. PMID:26107390

  11. Hedgehog Signaling in Pancreatic Fibrosis and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yongyu; Bai, Yongheng; Dong, Jiaojiao; Li, Qiang; Jin, Yuepeng; Chen, Bicheng; Zhou, Mengtao

    2016-03-01

    The hedgehog signaling pathway was first discovered in the 1980s. It is a stem cell-related pathway that plays a crucial role in embryonic development, tissue regeneration, and organogenesis. Aberrant activation of hedgehog signaling leads to pathological consequences, including a variety of human tumors such as pancreatic cancer. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that blockade of this pathway with several small-molecule inhibitors can inhibit the development of pancreatic neoplasm. In addition, activated hedgehog signaling has been reported to be involved in fibrogenesis in many tissues, including the pancreas. Therefore, new therapeutic targets based on hedgehog signaling have attracted a great deal of attention to alleviate pancreatic diseases. In this review, we briefly discuss the recent advances in hedgehog signaling in pancreatic fibrogenesis and carcinogenesis and highlight new insights on their potential relationship with respect to the development of novel targeted therapies. PMID:26962810

  12. Familial pancreatic carcinoma in Jews.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Henry T; Deters, Carolyn A; Lynch, Jane F; Brand, Randall E

    2004-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the most fatal of all gastrointestinal cancers, wherein its mortality compares strikingly with its incidence. Unfortunately, 80-90% of PCs are diagnosed in the nonresectable stage. While the lifetime risk of PC in developed countries is approximately 1-3%, it is the fifth most common cause of cancer deaths among both males and females in Western countries. It occurs in excess in Jews. Approximately 5-10% of PC shows familial clustering. Examination of such familial clusters must take into consideration cancers of diverse anatomic sites, such as malignant melanoma in the familial atypical multiple melanoma (FAMMM) syndrome due to the CDKN2A (p16) germline mutation, and combinations of colorectal and endometrial carcinoma, ovarian carcinoma, and several other cancers in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), which are due to mismatch repair germline mutations, the most common of which are MSH2 and MLH1 . Other hereditary disorders predisposing to PC include Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, due to the STK11 mutation, familial pancreatitis due to the cationic trypsinogen gene, site-specific familial pancreatic cancer which may be due to the 4q32-34 mutation, hereditary breast-ovarian cancer (HBOC) syndrome that is due to BRCA2 and possibly some families with HBOC that is due to BRCA1 , familial adenomatous polyposis due to the ATP gene, and ataxia telangiectasia due to the ATM germline mutation. This extant heterogeneity mandates that the physician be knowledgeable about these PC-prone syndromes which play such an important role when considering the differential diagnosis of hereditary PC. Unfortunately, there are no PC screening programs with acceptable sensitivity and specificity. However, the gold standard for screening at this time is endoscopic ultrasound. Clearly, there is a great need for the development of novel screening approaches with acceptable sensitivity and specificity. Further research is needed to elucidate those etiologic

  13. Surgical treatment of the pancreatic stump: preventive strategies of pancreatic fistula after pancreatoduodenectomy for cancer

    PubMed Central

    TERSIGNI, R.; CAPALDI, M.; IALONGO, P.; GRILLO, L.R.; ANSELMO, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The institutions with high volume of pancreatic surgery report morbidity rate from 30% to 50% and mortality less than 5% after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). At the present, the most significant cause of morbidity and mortality is pancreatic fistula (PF). Aim The purpose of the study is to identify the most important clinical factors which may predict PF development and eventually suggest alternative approaches to the pancreatic stump management. Patients and methods A retrospective analysis of a clinical data base of a tertiary care Hospital was performed. From 2002 to 2012 a single Surgeon prospectively performed 150 pancreaticoduodenectomies for cancer. Four different techniques were used: end to end pancreaticojejunostomy, end to side pancreaticojejunostomy, pancreatic duct occlusion and duct to mucosa anastomosis. The intraoperative gland texture was classified as soft, firm and hard. The duct size was preoperatively (CT scan) and intraoperatively recorded and classified: < 3 mm small, 3–6 mm medium, > 6 mm large. The histopathological characteristic of the gland fibrosis was graduate as low 1, moderate 2, high 3. Conclusion Relationships between pre and intraoperative duct size measurement, pancreatic texture and pancreatic fibrosis grading were highly significant. Small duct and soft pancreas with low grade fibrosis are the most important risk factors for pancreatic fistula development. The proper selection of pancreatic stump management or the decision to refer the high risk patients to high volume Center can be suggested by the elevated correspondence of pre and intraoperative duct diameter with the related pancreatic fibrosis grade and gland consistency. Preoperative assessment of the pancreatic duct makes possible to predict the risk of pancreatic fistula. PMID:25419587

  14. Effect of inhibition of prostaglandin E2 production on pancreatic infection in experimental acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Ana Maria M.; Sampietre, Sandra; Patzina, Rosely; Jukemura, Jose; Cunha, Jose Eduardo M.; Machado, Marcel C.C.

    2007-01-01

    Objective. Acute pancreatitis is one the important causes of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). SIRS results in gut barrier dysfunction that allows bacterial translocation and pancreatic infection to occur. Indomethacin has been used to reduce inflammatory process and bacterial translocation in experimental models. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of inhibition of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production on pancreatic infection. Materials and methods. An experimental model of severe acute pancreatitis (AP) was utilized. The animals were divided into three groups: sham (surgical procedure without AP induction); pancreatitis (AP induction); and indomethacin (AP induction plus administration of 3 mg/kg of indomethacin). Serum levels of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10, PGE2, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were measured 2 h after the induction of AP. We analyzed the occurrence of pancreatic infection with bacterial cultures performed 24 h after the induction of AP. The occurrence of pancreatic infection (considered positive when the CFU/g was >105), pancreatic histologic analysis, and mortality rate were studied. Results. In spite of the reduction of IL-6, IL-10, and PGE2 levels in the indomethacin group, TNF-α level, bacterial translocation, and pancreatic infection were not influenced by administration of indomethacin. The inhibition of PGE2 production did not reduce pancreatic infection, histologic score, or mortality rate. Conclusion. The inhibition of PGE2 production was not able to reduce the occurrence of pancreatic infection and does not have any beneficial effect in this experimental model. Further investigations will be necessary to discover a specific inhibitor that would make it possible to develop an anti-inflammatory therapy. PMID:18345325

  15. [Pathology and clinical course of pancreatic pseudocyst].

    PubMed

    Giacomelli, L; Brescia, A; Miglietta, A M; Pulcini, A; Finizio, A; Porcelli, C; Manno, A

    1993-01-01

    According to the literature and the personal experience of the authors there seem to exist many controversies on the treatment of pancreatic pseudocysts, partly due to the lack of definitions and to the fact that prognosis is different based upon the pathophysiology of the lesions. We report 4 cases of pancreatic pseudocysts successfully treated with a multidisciplinary approach, stressing the role of pharmacology and of artificial nutrition and endoscopy on the outcome of these lesions.

  16. Pancreatic cancer in 1988. Possibilities and probabilities.

    PubMed Central

    Warshaw, A L; Swanson, R S

    1988-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is increasing in frequency, generally grows without symptoms until late in its natural history, and presents many discouraging unresolved problems in management. This review analyzes the status of current modalities of diagnosis, staging, and treatment. The limitations of those methods are defined, and possible improvements and new directions are suggested. A strategy for a rational and humane approach to pancreatic cancer is developed with the goal of maximizing quality as well as quantity of life. PMID:2461172

  17. Acute pancreatitis in infants and children.

    PubMed Central

    Hillemeier, C.; Gryboski, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is being encountered more often in children due to antimetabolite therapy, accidental injury, and traumatic battering. Pancreatitis may occur in the absence of traditionally elevated serum amylase and lipase, and initial diagnosis may depend upon ultrasonography. Traditional therapy of enteric rest with nasogastric suction has been supported by the use of parenteral nutrition. Newer pharmaceutical agents have been ineffective in altering the course of the illness or in preventing complications of pseudocyst or abscess. PMID:6382834

  18. Novel agents for advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Akinleye, Akintunde; Iragavarapu, Chaitanya; Furqan, Muhammad; Cang, Shundong; Liu, Delong

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is relatively insensitive to conventional chemotherapy. Therefore, novel agents targeting dysregulated pathways (MAPK/ERK, EGFR, TGF-β, HEDGEHOG, NOTCH, IGF, PARP, PI3K/AKT, RAS, and Src) are being explored in clinical trials as monotherapy or in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy. This review summarizes the most recent advances with the targeted therapies in the treatment of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:26369833

  19. Minimally invasive surgical approach to pancreatic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Bencini, Lapo; Annecchiarico, Mario; Farsi, Marco; Bartolini, Ilenia; Mirasolo, Vita; Guerra, Francesco; Coratti, Andrea

    2015-12-15

    Pancreatic surgery for malignancy is recognized as challenging for the surgeons and risky for the patients due to consistent perioperative morbidity and mortality. Furthermore, the oncological long-term results are largely disappointing, even for those patients who experience an uneventfully hospital stay. Nevertheless, surgery still remains the cornerstone of a multidisciplinary treatment for pancreatic cancer. In order to maximize the benefits of surgery, the advent of both laparoscopy and robotics has led many surgeons to treat pancreatic cancers with these new methodologies. The reduction of postoperative complications, length of hospital stay and pain, together with a shorter interval between surgery and the beginning of adjuvant chemotherapy, represent the potential advantages over conventional surgery. Lastly, a better cosmetic result, although not crucial in any cancerous patient, could also play a role by improving overall well-being and patient self-perception. The laparoscopic approach to pancreatic surgery is, however, difficult in inexperienced hands and requires a dedicated training in both advanced laparoscopy and pancreatic surgery. The recent large diffusion of the da Vinci(®) robotic platform seems to facilitate many of the technical maneuvers, such as anastomotic biliary and pancreatic reconstructions, accurate lymphadenectomy, and vascular sutures. The two main pancreatic operations, distal pancreatectomy and pancreaticoduodenectomy, are approachable by a minimally invasive path, but more limited interventions such as enucleation are also feasible. Nevertheless, a word of caution should be taken into account when considering the increasing costs of these newest technologies because the main concerns regarding these are the maintenance of all oncological standards and the lack of long-term follow-up. The purpose of this review is to examine the evidence for the use of minimally invasive surgery in pancreatic cancer (and less aggressive tumors

  20. Nutritional support in acute and chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Grant, John P

    2011-08-01

    Nutritional support can have a significant beneficial impact on the course of moderate to severe acute pancreatitis. Enteral nutrition is preferred, with emphasis on establishment of jejunal access; however, parenteral nutrition can also be of value if intestinal failure is present. Early initiation of nutritional support is critical, with benefits decreasing rapidly if begun after 48 hours from admission. Severe malnutrition in chronic pancreatitis can be avoided or treated with dietary modifications or enteral nutrition.

  1. [Correlation between hyperamylasemia and acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Monaco, R; Durante, E; Pampolini, M; Tioli, P

    1981-05-31

    It is often difficult to differentiate acute pancreatitis (A.P.) from some other acute abdominal diseases, when there is an elevated serum amylase. In contrast, the renal clearance of amylase, expressed as a percentage of creatinine clearance, can separate patients with A.P. from patients with acute colecistitis, common duct stone without pancreatitis, hyperamylasemia after biliary surgery, acute peptic ulcer and acute salivary diseases.

  2. Pancreatic carcinoma: results with fast neutron therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, R.; Cohen, L.; Hendrickson, F.; Awschalom, M.; Hrejsa, A.F.; Rosenberg, I.

    1981-02-01

    Results of therapy in 31 of 50 patients who were treated for advanced pancreatic carcinoma at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory are presented here. To date, six patients are alive and four are free of disease. Since the main reason for failure was lack of control of primary tumor, the tumor dose has been increased by 15%. Based on our results, a nationwide study has been launched to assess the effectiveness of neutrons vs photons in the treatment of locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma.

  3. Lymphatic drainage and CTV in pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Morganti, Alessio G; Cellini, Numa; Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; Macchia, Gabriella; Smaniotto, Daniela; Luzi, Stefano; Balducci, Mario; Deodato, Francesco; Valentini, Vincenzo; Trodella, Lucio

    2003-01-01

    CTV definition in exclusive or adjuvant radiation therapy of pancreatic carcinoma is essentially based on the opinion of "expert" authors and on the knowledge of lymphatic pathways. The subject has been widely debated. Radiotherapy treatments of the entire upper abdomen (liver and pancreatic region), pancreas and lymph node stations, to volumes focused on macroscopic tumor only, have been proposed. Carcinoma of exocrine pancreas is characterized by the frequent, early appearance of metastasis via the lymphatic route. Most commonly involved lymph node stations include those of the celiac trunk, superior mesenteric, peripancreatic, lumboaortic lymph nodes, those of the hepatic portal (the latter in particular for pancreatic head tumors) and of the hilum of spleen (the latter in particular for pancreatic tail tumors). The possible multicentricity of pancreatic carcinoma, most likely due to intraductal spread, should lead to the inclusion in the CTV of the entire pancreatic parenchyma. This should be considered also for the frequent perineural intra- or extrapancreatic spread of pancreatic carcinoma present also in small tumors (T1). In extrapancreatic spread the retropancreatic adipose tissue should be included in the CTV at least at the GTV level. At the present state of knowledge, in the absence of pattern of failure analysis and of comparison of different treatment approaches, in terms of the definition of volumes of interest, CTV definitions which include lymphatic drainage stations, most part of pancreatic parenchyma and retropancreatic adipose tissue seem justified especially in treatments for cure. In palliation, the CTV may be limited to the GTV and the adipose tissue behind it. PMID:15018319

  4. Pancreatic cancer: any prospects for prevention?

    PubMed Central

    Hart, A.

    1999-01-01

    Primary prevention of pancreatic cancer and public health measures to reduce its incidence are dependent on data from epidemiological studies. Currently, the only definite risk factor is smoking, although a diet rich in fruit and vegetables may be protective. The K-ras mutation may have a role in diagnosis and screening.


Keywords: pancreatic cancer; epidemiology; risk factors; smoking; diet; alcohol PMID:10616684

  5. Acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Georgios K; Harissis, Haralampos; Mitsis, Michalis; Batsis, Haralampos; Fatouros, Michalis

    2012-04-28

    We report a case of acute chylous ascites formation presenting as peritonitis (acute chylous peritonitis) in a patient suffering from acute pancreatitis due to hypertriglyceridemia and alcohol abuse. The development of chylous ascites is usually a chronic process mostly involving malignancy, trauma or surgery, and symptoms arise as a result of progressive abdominal distention. However, when accumulation of "chyle" occurs rapidly, the patient may present with signs of peritonitis. Preoperative diagnosis is difficult since the clinical picture usually suggests hollow organ perforation, appendicitis or visceral ischemia. Less than 100 cases of acute chylous peritonitis have been reported. Pancreatitis is a rare cause of chyloperitoneum and in almost all of the cases chylous ascites is discovered some days (or even weeks) after the onset of symptoms of pancreatitis. This is the second case in the literature where the patient presented with acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis, and the presence of chyle within the abdominal cavity was discovered simultaneously with the establishment of the diagnosis of pancreatitis. The patient underwent an exploratory laparotomy for suspected perforated duodenal ulcer, since, due to hypertriglyceridemia, serum amylase values appeared within the normal range. Moreover, abdominal computed tomography imaging was not diagnostic for pancreatitis. Following abdominal lavage and drainage, the patient was successfully treated with total parenteral nutrition and octreotide.

  6. Molecular and genetic bases of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Vaccaro, Vanja; Gelibter, Alain; Bria, Emilio; Iapicca, Pierluigi; Cappello, Paola; Di Modugno, Francesca; Pino, Maria Simona; Nuzzo, Carmen; Cognetti, Francesco; Novelli, Francesco; Nistico, Paola; Milella, Michele

    2012-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains a formidable challenge for oncologists and patients alike. Despite intensive efforts, attempts at improving survival in the past 15 years, particularly in advanced disease, have failed. This is true even with the introduction of molecularly targeted agents, chosen on the basis of their action on pathways that were supposedly important in pancreatic cancer development and progression: indeed, with the notable exception of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor erlotinib, that has provided a minimal survival improvement when added to gemcitabine, other agents targeting EGFR, matrix metallo-proteases, farnesyl transferase, or vascular endothelial growth factor have not succeeded in improving outcomes over standard gemcitabine monotherapy for a variety of different reasons. However, recent developments in the molecular epidemiology of pancreatic cancer and an ever evolving understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying pancreatic cancer initiation and progression raise renewed hope to find novel, relevant therapeutic targets that could be pursued in the clinical setting. In this review we focus on molecular epidemiology of pancreatic cancer, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and its influence on sensitivity to EGFR-targeted approaches, apoptotic pathways, hypoxia-related pathways, developmental pathways (such as the hedgehog and Notch pathways), and proteomic analysis as keys to a better understanding of pancreatic cancer biology and, most importantly, as a source of novel molecular targets to be exploited therapeutically.

  7. Acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Georgiou, Georgios K; Harissis, Haralampos; Mitsis, Michalis; Batsis, Haralampos; Fatouros, Michalis

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of acute chylous ascites formation presenting as peritonitis (acute chylous peritonitis) in a patient suffering from acute pancreatitis due to hypertriglyceridemia and alcohol abuse. The development of chylous ascites is usually a chronic process mostly involving malignancy, trauma or surgery, and symptoms arise as a result of progressive abdominal distention. However, when accumulation of “chyle” occurs rapidly, the patient may present with signs of peritonitis. Preoperative diagnosis is difficult since the clinical picture usually suggests hollow organ perforation, appendicitis or visceral ischemia. Less than 100 cases of acute chylous peritonitis have been reported. Pancreatitis is a rare cause of chyloperitoneum and in almost all of the cases chylous ascites is discovered some days (or even weeks) after the onset of symptoms of pancreatitis. This is the second case in the literature where the patient presented with acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis, and the presence of chyle within the abdominal cavity was discovered simultaneously with the establishment of the diagnosis of pancreatitis. The patient underwent an exploratory laparotomy for suspected perforated duodenal ulcer, since, due to hypertriglyceridemia, serum amylase values appeared within the normal range. Moreover, abdominal computed tomography imaging was not diagnostic for pancreatitis. Following abdominal lavage and drainage, the patient was successfully treated with total parenteral nutrition and octreotide. PMID:22563182

  8. Management of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mahipal, Amit; Frakes, Jessica; Hoffe, Sarah; Kim, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer death in the United States. Surgery remains the only curative option; however only 20% of the patients have resectable disease at the time of initial presentation. The definition of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer is not uniform but generally denotes to regional vessel involvement that makes it unlikely to have negative surgical margins. The accurate staging of pancreatic cancer requires triple phase computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging of the pancreas. Management of patients with borderline resectable pancreatic cancer remains unclear. The data for treatment of these patients is primarily derived from retrospective single institution experience. The prospective trials have been plagued by small numbers and poor accrual. Neoadjuvant therapy is recommended and typically consists of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The chemotherapeutic regimens continue to evolve along with type and dose of radiation therapy. Gemcitabine or 5-fluorouracil based chemotherapeutic combinations are administered. The type and dose of radiation vary among different institutions. With neoadjuvant treatment, approximately 50% of the patients are able to undergo surgical resections with negative margins obtained in greater than 80% of the patients. Newer trials are attempting to standardize the definition of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer and treatment regimens. In this review, we outline the definition, imaging requirements and management of patients with borderline resectable pancreatic cancer. PMID:26483878

  9. [Pain in chronic pancreatitis: recent pathogenetic findings].

    PubMed

    Manes, G; Pieramico, O; Uomo, G

    1992-01-01

    Pain is the major symptom in chronic pancreatitis. Its intensity frequently necessitates partial or complete pancreatectomy. The mechanisms of pain are not yet fully understood and, thereby, the therapeutic management is still controversial. Possible causes of pain include outflow obstruction with increased ductal and parenchymal pressure within the pancreas, and inflammatory involvement of intrapancreatic nerve fibres. Possible extrapancreatic causes are common bile duct and duodenal stenosis. The first theory has recently been substantiated by the demonstration of a definite relationship between intrapancreatic pressure, as measured intraoperatively, and intensity of pain. Infiltration of inflammatory cells around the nerves together with an increase in the number of nerve fibres in the fibrotic pancreatic tissue has been proposed as a possible cause of pain in chronic pancreatitis. Moreover, immunohistological studies have shown that the amount of neurotransmitters, such as substance P, is increased in afferent pancreatic nerves. Stenosis of the common bile duct and duodenum has been reported to be associated with severe abdominal pain. Common bile duct and duodenal stenosis in chronic pancreatitis may be caused by extension of fibrosis and active inflammation of the pancreas within the wall of duodenum and bile duct. This article updates the different pathogenetic mechanisms in pancreatic pain and the current therapeutic possibilities with their advantages and shortcomings.

  10. Pancreatic Cancer Chemoprevention Translational Workshop: Meeting Report.

    PubMed

    Miller, Mark Steven; Allen, Peter; Brentnall, Teresa A; Goggins, Michael; Hruban, Ralph H; Petersen, Gloria M; Rao, Chinthalapally V; Whitcomb, David C; Brand, Randall E; Chari, Suresh T; Klein, Alison P; Lubman, David M; Rhim, Andrew D; Simeone, Diane M; Wolpin, Brian M; Umar, Asad; Srivastava, Sudhir; Steele, Vernon E; Rinaudo, Jo Ann S

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths in the United States with a 5-year survival rate of less than 10%. The Division of Cancer Prevention of the National Cancer Institute sponsored the Pancreatic Cancer Chemoprevention Translational Workshop on September 10 to 11, 2015. The goal of the workshop was to obtain information regarding the current state of the science and future scientific areas that should be prioritized for pancreatic cancer prevention research, including early detection and intervention for high-risk precancerous lesions. The workshop addressed the molecular/genetic landscape of pancreatic cancer and precursor lesions, high-risk populations and criteria to identify a high-risk population for potential chemoprevention trials, identification of chemopreventative/immunopreventative agents, and use of potential biomarkers and imaging for assessing short-term efficacy of a preventative agent. The field of chemoprevention for pancreatic cancer is emerging, and this workshop was organized to begin to address these important issues and promote multi-institutional efforts in this area. The meeting participants recommended the development of an National Cancer Institute working group to coordinate efforts, provide a framework, and identify opportunities for chemoprevention of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27518363

  11. Elemental diet and bile induced pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kerstein, M D; Tonkens, R M

    1976-08-01

    The effectiveness of an elemental diet was investigated as both a prophylactic and therapeutic agent in experimental canine pancreatitis. Pancreatitis was induced by operative injection of a bile -saline solution mixture under pressure retrograde into the main pancreatic duct. In addition to a preinjection control sample, serial biopsies were obtained at 30 minute intervals for 90 minutes after injection and fixed for light and electron microscopic examinations. In addition, preoperative and postoperative blood samples were drawn and analyzed for amylase. After operation, half of the dogs from each original group were fed Vivonex-100, the other half from each group, regular laboratory chow, yielding four ultimate groups based on preoperative and postoperative diets. Successful induction of pancreatitis was evaluated by the difference between preoperative and postoperative amylase values, all of which were significant by group at the p less than 0.01 level. No ultrastructural evidence was found for the modification of zymogen granules with the pretreatment elemental diet nor were differences evident, histologically or ultrastructurally, in the severity of pancreatitis between the pretreated and nonpretreated groups. Finally, gross mortality figures demonstrated no efficacy of elemental diet for pretreatment prophylaxis of acute pancreatitis.

  12. Preclinical fluorescent mouse models of pancreatic cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvet, Michael; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2007-02-01

    Here we describe our cumulative experience with the development and preclinical application of several highly fluorescent, clinically-relevant, metastatic orthotopic mouse models of pancreatic cancer. These models utilize the human pancreatic cancer cell lines which have been genetically engineered to selectively express high levels of the bioluminescent green fluorescent (GFP) or red fluorescent protein (RFP). Fluorescent tumors are established subcutaneously in nude mice, and tumor fragments are then surgically transplanted onto the pancreas. Locoregional tumor growth and distant metastasis of these orthotopic implants occurs spontaneously and rapidly throughout the abdomen in a manner consistent with clinical human disease. Highly specific, high-resolution, real-time visualization of tumor growth and metastasis may be achieved in vivo without the need for contrast agents, invasive techniques, or expensive imaging equipment. We have shown a high correlation between florescent optical imaging and magnetic resonance imaging in these models. Alternatively, transplantation of RFP-expressing tumor fragments onto the pancreas of GFP-expressing transgenic mice may be used to facilitate visualization of tumor-host interaction between the pancreatic tumor fragments and host-derived stroma and vasculature. Such in vivo models have enabled us to serially visualize and acquire images of the progression of pancreatic cancer in the live animal, and to demonstrate the real-time antitumor and antimetastatic effects of several novel therapeutic strategies on pancreatic malignancy. These fluorescent models are therefore powerful and reliable tools with which to investigate human pancreatic cancer and therapeutic strategies directed against it.

  13. Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer with Pharmacological Ascorbate

    PubMed Central

    Cieslak, John A.; Cullen, Joseph J.

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis for patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer remains dismal, with less than 3% survival at 5 years. Recent studies have demonstrated that high-dose, intravenous pharmacological ascorbate (ascorbic acid, vitamin C) induces cytotoxicity and oxidative stress selectively in pancreatic cancer cells vs. normal cells, suggesting a promising new role of ascorbate as a therapeutic agent. At physiologic concentrations, ascorbate functions as a reducing agent and antioxidant. However, when pharmacological ascorbate is given intravenously, it is possible to achieve millimolar plasma concentration. At these pharmacological levels, and in the presence of catalytic metal ions, ascorbate can induce oxidative stress through the generation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Recent in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated ascorbate oxidation occurs extracellularly, generating H2O2 flux into cells resulting in oxidative stress. Pharmacologic ascorbate also inhibits the growth of pancreatic tumor xenografts and displays synergistic cytotoxic effects when combined with gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer. Phase I trials of pharmacological ascorbate in pancreatic cancer patients have demonstrated safety and potential efficacy. In this chapter, we will review the mechanism of ascorbate-induced cytotoxicity, examine the use of pharmacological ascorbate in treatment and assess the current data supporting its potential as an adjuvant in pancreatic cancer. PMID:26201606

  14. Quantitative proteomics investigation of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Sheng; Chen, Ru; Reimel, Beth Ann; Crispin, David A.; Mirzaei, Hamid; Cooke, Kelly; Coleman, Joshua F.; Lane, Zhaoli; Bronner, Mary P.; Goodlett, David R.; McIntosh, Martin; Traverso, William; Aebersold, Ruedi; Brentnall, Teresa A.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with pancreatic cancer are usually diagnosed at late stages, when the disease is incurable. Pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) 3, is believed to be the immediate precursor lesion of pancreatic adenocarcinoma, and would be an ideal stage to diagnose patients, when intervention and cure are possible and patients are curable. In this study, we used quantitative proteomics to identify dysregulated proteins in PanIN 3 lesions. Altogether, over 200 dysregulated proteins were identified in the PanIN 3 tissues, with a minimum of a 1.75 fold change compared to the proteins in normal pancreas. These dysregulated PanIN 3 proteins play roles in cell motility, the inflammatory response, the blood clotting cascade, the cell cycle and its regulation, and protein degradation. Further network analysis of the proteins identified c-MYC as an important regulatory protein in PanIN 3 lesions. Finally, three of the overexpressed proteins, laminin beta-1, galectin-1, and actinin-4 were validated by IHC analysis. All three of these proteins were overexpressed in the stroma or ductal epithelial cells of advanced PanIN lesions, as well as in pancreatic cancer tissue. Our findings suggest that these three proteins may be useful as biomarkers for advanced PanIN and pancreatic cancer if further validated. The dysregulated proteins identified in this study may assist in the selection of candidates for future development of biomarkers for detecting early and curable pancreatic neoplasia. PMID:19373808

  15. Immune cell functions in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Plate, J M; Harris, J E

    2000-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer kills nearly 29,000 people in the United States annually-as many people as are diagnosed with the disease. Chemotherapeutic treatment is ineffective in halting progression of the disease. Yet, specific immunity to pancreatic tumor cells in subjects with pancreatic cancer has been demonstrated repeatedly during the last 24 years. Attempts to expand and enhance tumor-specific immunity with biotherapy, however, have not met with success. The question remains, "Why can't specific immunity regulate pancreatic cancer growth?" The idea that tumor cells have evolved protective mechanisms against immunity was raised years ago and has recently been revisited by a number of research laboratories. In pancreatic cancer, soluble factors produced by and for the protection of the tumor environment have been detected and are often distributed to the victim's circulatory system where they may effect a more generalized immunosuppression. Yet the nature of these soluble factors remains controversial, since some also serve as tumor antigens that are recognized by the same T cells that may become inactivated by them. Unless the problem of tumor-derived immunosuppressive products is addressed directly through basic and translational research studies, successful biotherapeutic treatment for pancreatic cancer may not be forthcoming.

  16. Diagnostic strategies for early pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Hanada, Keiji; Okazaki, Akihito; Hirano, Naomichi; Izumi, Yoshihiro; Teraoka, Yuji; Ikemoto, Juri; Kanemitsu, Kozue; Hino, Fumiaki; Fukuda, Toshikatsu; Yonehara, Shuji

    2015-02-01

    Diagnosis of pancreatic cancer (PC) at an early stage with curative surgery is the approach with the potential to significantly improve long-term patient outcome. Recently, some reports showed that patients with pancreatic tumors smaller than 10 mm showed a favorable prognosis. However, the rate of tumor detection on computed tomography in patients with small pancreatic tumors is low. For the diagnoses of PC with tumors smaller than 10 mm, the rate of tumor detection was higher on endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) than on computed tomography or other modalities, and histologic diagnosis using EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration was helpful in confirming the diagnosis. For the diagnosis of PC in situ, EUS and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography may play important roles in detecting the local irregular stenosis of the pancreatic duct. Endoscopic retrograde pancreatography and sequential cytodiagnosis using pancreatic juice obtained by endoscopic nasopancreatic drainage multiple times was useful in the final diagnosis of PC in situ. At present, improving survival lies in identifying those individuals with high-risk factors or precursor lesions through an effective screening method. For example, these should include ultrasonography, various biological markers, or national familial pancreatic cancer registration. Additionally, the relationship between specialists in PC from medical centers and practicing physicians plays an important role in the early diagnosis of PC. PMID:25501287

  17. [Fluid therapy in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2013-12-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (AP) is associated with an increased need for fluids due to fluid sequestration and, in the most severe cases, with decreased peripheral vascular tone. For several decades, clinical practice guidelines have recommended aggressive fluid therapy to improve the prognosis of AP. This recommendation is based on theoretical models, animal studies, and retrospective studies in humans. Recent studies suggest that aggressive fluid administration in all patients with AP could have a neutral or harmful effect. Fluid therapy based on Ringer's lactate could improve the course of the disease, although further studies are needed to confirm this possibility. Most patients with AP do not require invasive monitoring of hemodynamic parameters to guide fluid therapy administration. Moreover, the ability of these parameters to improve prognosis has not been demonstrated.

  18. [Radiation therapy of pancreatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Huguet, F; Mornex, F; Orthuon, A

    2016-09-01

    Currently, the use of radiation therapy for patients with pancreatic cancer is subject to discussion. In adjuvant setting, the standard treatment is 6 months of chemotherapy with gemcitabine and capecitabine. Chemoradiation (CRT) may improve the survival of patients with incompletely resected tumors (R1). This should be confirmed by a prospective trial. Neoadjuvant CRT is a promising treatment especially for patients with borderline resectable tumors. For patients with locally advanced tumors, there is no a standard. An induction chemotherapy followed by CRT for non-progressive patients reduces the rate of local relapse. Whereas in the first trials of CRT large fields were used, the treated volumes have been reduced to improve tolerance. Tumor movements induced by breathing should be taken in account. Intensity modulated radiation therapy allows a reduction of doses to the organs at risk. Whereas widely used, this technique is not recommended. PMID:27523418

  19. Occupational factors and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Norell, S; Ahlbom, A; Olin, R; Erwald, R; Jacobson, G; Lindberg-Navier, I; Wiechel, K L

    1986-11-01

    The relation between occupational factors and pancreatic cancer has been studied by two different approaches: a population based case-control study with two series of controls and a retrospective cohort study based on register data. With both approaches, some support was found for an association with occupational exposure to petroleum products. Associations were also indicated with exposure to paint thinner (case-control study) and work in painting and in paint and varnish factories (cohort study), for exposure to detergents, floor cleaning agents, or polish (case-control study) and with floor polishing or window cleaning (cohort study), and for exposure to refuse (case-control study) and work in refuse disposal plants (cohort study). PMID:3790458

  20. [Radiation therapy of pancreatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Huguet, F; Mornex, F; Orthuon, A

    2016-09-01

    Currently, the use of radiation therapy for patients with pancreatic cancer is subject to discussion. In adjuvant setting, the standard treatment is 6 months of chemotherapy with gemcitabine and capecitabine. Chemoradiation (CRT) may improve the survival of patients with incompletely resected tumors (R1). This should be confirmed by a prospective trial. Neoadjuvant CRT is a promising treatment especially for patients with borderline resectable tumors. For patients with locally advanced tumors, there is no a standard. An induction chemotherapy followed by CRT for non-progressive patients reduces the rate of local relapse. Whereas in the first trials of CRT large fields were used, the treated volumes have been reduced to improve tolerance. Tumor movements induced by breathing should be taken in account. Intensity modulated radiation therapy allows a reduction of doses to the organs at risk. Whereas widely used, this technique is not recommended.