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Sample records for pandas ailuropoda melanoleuca

  1. Cranial shape transformation in the evolution of the giant panda ( Ailuropoda melanoleuca)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueirido, Borja; Palmqvist, Paul; Pérez-Claros, Juan A.; Dong, Wei

    2011-02-01

    In this study, landmark-based methods of geometric morphometrics are used for investigating the main aspects of cranial shape transformation in the evolution of the giant panda, Ailuropoda melanoleuca. Specifically, we explore if the highly derived cranial adaptations for bamboo feeding of the living panda were developed early in the panda's lineage. Results obtained show that the overall cranial morphologies of the oldest known panda, the "pygmy" Ailuropoda microta, and the late Pleistocene Ailuropoda baconi are both very similar to that of their closest living relative, A. melanoleuca, which agrees with a previous proposal based on qualitative criteria. However, we also describe several differences between the crania of A. microta, A. baconi, and A. melanoleuca, including the development of the postorbital process, the orientation of the occipital region, and the expansion of the braincase. As a result, the cranial morphology of A. microta shows a less specialized morphology toward a fibrous and durophagous diet compared to the giant panda. These results are confirmed by a comparative analysis of the dimensions of the upper teeth in bears, which has revealed differences in relative tooth size between A. microta and A. melanoleuca, most probably as a result of mosaic evolution. Therefore, we conclude that cranial shape did not remain essentially uniform in the Ailuropoda lineage, as previously thought, but underwent a number of changes during more than 2 Myr.

  2. Cranial shape transformation in the evolution of the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Figueirido, Borja; Palmqvist, Paul; Pérez-Claros, Juan A; Dong, Wei

    2011-02-01

    In this study, landmark-based methods of geometric morphometrics are used for investigating the main aspects of cranial shape transformation in the evolution of the giant panda, Ailuropoda melanoleuca. Specifically, we explore if the highly derived cranial adaptations for bamboo feeding of the living panda were developed early in the panda's lineage. Results obtained show that the overall cranial morphologies of the oldest known panda, the "pygmy" Ailuropoda microta, and the late Pleistocene Ailuropoda baconi are both very similar to that of their closest living relative, A. melanoleuca, which agrees with a previous proposal based on qualitative criteria. However, we also describe several differences between the crania of A. microta, A. baconi, and A. melanoleuca, including the development of the postorbital process, the orientation of the occipital region, and the expansion of the braincase. As a result, the cranial morphology of A. microta shows a less specialized morphology toward a fibrous and durophagous diet compared to the giant panda. These results are confirmed by a comparative analysis of the dimensions of the upper teeth in bears, which has revealed differences in relative tooth size between A. microta and A. melanoleuca, most probably as a result of mosaic evolution. Therefore, we conclude that cranial shape did not remain essentially uniform in the Ailuropoda lineage, as previously thought, but underwent a number of changes during more than 2 Myr.

  3. Isolation and identification of a canine coronavirus strain from giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng-Shan; Hu, Gui-Xue; Xia, Xian-zhu; Gao, Yu-Wei; Bai, Ya-Duo; Zou, Xiao-Huan

    2009-09-01

    Two giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) died of unknown causes in a Chinese zoo. The clinical disease profile suggested that the pandas may have suffered a viral infection. Therefore, a series of detection including virus isolation, electron microscopy, cytobiological assay, serum neutralization and RT-PCR were used to identify the virus. It was determined that the isolated virus was a canine coronavirus (CCV), on the basis of coronavirus, neutralization by canine anti-CCV serum, and 84.3% to 100% amino acid sequence similarity with CCV. The results suggest that the affected pandas had been infected with CCV.

  4. Phaeohyphomycotic dermatitis in a giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) caused by Cladosporium cladosporioides.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaoping; Gu, Yu; Liu, Xiaomin; Li, Desheng; Ling, Shanshan; Hou, Jiafa; Wang, Chengdong; Cao, Sanjie; Huang, Xiaobo; Wen, Xintian; Ruan, Jiaxue; Dong, Cao; Li, Changcheng; Tong, Yufei

    2013-06-06

    We report here a clinical case of phaeohyphomycosis in an 18-year-old male giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). Skin lesions on the giant panda disappeared following 2 months of treatment with ketoconazole. Three months after discontinuing the treatment, there was a clinical and mycological relapse. The disease progression was no longer responsive to ketoconazole. Microscopy and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis revealed that the infection was caused by Cladosporium cladosporioides. A 4-month treatment regime with Itraconazole oral solution (700 mg per day) successfully terminated the infection.

  5. Phaeohyphomycotic dermatitis in a giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) caused by Cladosporium cladosporioides☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaoping; Gu, Yu; Liu, Xiaomin; Li, Desheng; Ling, Shanshan; Hou, Jiafa; Wang, Chengdong; Cao, Sanjie; Huang, Xiaobo; Wen, Xintian; Ruan, Jiaxue; Dong, Cao; Li, Changcheng; Tong, Yufei

    2013-01-01

    We report here a clinical case of phaeohyphomycosis in an 18-year-old male giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). Skin lesions on the giant panda disappeared following 2 months of treatment with ketoconazole. Three months after discontinuing the treatment, there was a clinical and mycological relapse. The disease progression was no longer responsive to ketoconazole. Microscopy and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis revealed that the infection was caused by Cladosporium cladosporioides. A 4-month treatment regime with Itraconazole oral solution (700 mg per day) successfully terminated the infection. PMID:24432233

  6. DENTAL ABNORMALITIES OF EIGHT WILD QINLING GIANT PANDAS (AILUROPODA MELANOLEUCA QINLINGENSIS), SHAANXI PROVINCE, CHINA.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yipeng; Chen, Si; Chao, Yanqiao; Pu, Tianchun; Xu, Hongqian; Liu, Xiaobin; Zhao, Kaihui; Nie, Yonggang; Wei, Wei; Lin, Degui

    2015-10-01

    Eight adult (six male and two female) wild Qinling giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca qinlingensis) from China National Foping Nature Reserve were tracked, and their dental data collected and recorded from October 2010 to April 2014. Each panda had dental abnormalities of varying severity. Dental wear and fracture were the most common conditions. Absent teeth were common, with premolars missing most often. Mild caries were present in five molar teeth between two animals. Different degrees of dental plaque and calculus occurred in all animals but without severe periodontal disease. Two animals with severe dental abnormalities died due to intestinal problems. Large segments of bamboo were found in their intestinal tracts, and intestinal perforation and ulcers were evident, indicating dental abnormalities can be an important factor in the health of wild giant pandas and may lead to death. Further research with larger sample sizes of wild and captive giant pandas will be required to substantiate the relationship between dental abnormalities and mortality in giant pandas.

  7. Dental abnormalities in eight captive giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) in China.

    PubMed

    Jin, Y; Lin, W; Huang, S; Zhang, C; Pu, T; Ma, W; Lin, D

    2012-05-01

    Dental data from eight adult giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) (four females and four males) were collected at the Beijing Zoo from February 2009 to July 2010. Examination findings were recorded in dental charts. All the pandas had different degrees of tooth wear. Incisors, canines and second premolars had the most abnormalities. Five animals had caries; molars were the most affected. Chip fractures were found in seven teeth (incisor, canine and premolar) of five pandas; two had complicated fractures of their canines. Premolars and other teeth were missing in three pandas. Different degrees of dental plaque and calculus were found in all animals. Two pandas had mild gingivitis; the depth of periodontal pockets in all pandas was normal (0-2 mm). Five pandas had abnormal tooth mobility. Samples of dental plaque were collected for microbial culture. Two hundred and fifty-three bacterial strains belonging to 48 species of 23 genera were isolated. Streptococcus, Moraxella, Peptostreptococcus and Porphyromonas were the dominant genera. Further research with larger sample sizes of free-ranging and captive giant pandas will be required in order to demonstrate the absence of the premolar tooth, tooth fractures and the relatively low prevalence of periodontal disease in captive giant pandas. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Carpal bone movements in gripping action of the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Endo, H; Sasaki, M; Hayashi, Y; Koie, H; Yamaya, Y; Kimura, J

    2001-02-01

    The movement of the carpal bones in gripping was clarified in the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) by means of macroscopic anatomy, computed tomography (CT) and related 3-dimensional (3-D) volume rendering techniques. In the gripping action, 3-D CT images demonstrated that the radial and 4th carpal bones largely rotate or flex to the radial and ulnar sides respectively. This indicates that these carpal bones on both sides enable the panda to flex the palm from the forearm and to grasp objects by the manipulation mechanism that includes the radial sesamoid. In the macroscopic observations, we found that the smooth articulation surfaces are enlarged between the radial carpal and the radius on the radial side, and between the 4th and ulnar carpals on the ulnar side. The panda skilfully grasps using a double pincer-like apparatus with the huge radial sesamoid and accessory carpal.

  9. Carpal bone movements in gripping action of the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca)

    PubMed Central

    ENDO, HIDEKI; SASAKI, MOTOKI; HAYASHI, YOSHIHIRO; KOIE, HIROSHI; YAMAYA, YOSHIKI; KIMURA, JUNPEI

    2001-01-01

    The movement of the carpal bones in gripping was clarified in the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) by means of macroscopic anatomy, computed tomography (CT) and related 3-dimensional (3-D) volume rendering techniques. In the gripping action, 3-D CT images demonstrated that the radial and 4th carpal bones largely rotate or flex to the radial and ulnar sides respectively. This indicates that these carpal bones on both sides enable the panda to flex the palm from the forearm and to grasp objects by the manipulation mechanism that includes the radial sesamoid. In the macroscopic observations, we found that the smooth articulation surfaces are enlarged between the radial carpal and the radius on the radial side, and between the 4th and ulnar carpals on the ulnar side. The panda skilfully grasps using a double pincer-like apparatus with the huge radial sesamoid and accessory carpal. PMID:11273049

  10. MOLECULAR CLONING, SEQUENCING, EXPRESSION AND BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY OF GIANT PANDA (AILUROPODA MELANOLEUCA) INTERFERON-GAMMA.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hui; Wang, Wen-Xiu; Wang, Bao-Qin; Zhu, Xiao-Fu; Wu, Xu-Jin; Ma, Qing-Yi; Chen, De-Kun

    2012-06-29

    The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is an endangered species and indigenous to China. Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) is the only member of type □ IFN and is vital for the regulation of host adapted immunity and inflammatory response. Little is known aboutthe FN-γ gene and its roles in giant panda.In this study, IFN-γ gene of Qinling giant panda was amplified from total blood RNA by RT-CPR, cloned, sequenced and analysed. The open reading frame (ORF) of Qinling giant panda IFN-γ encodes 152 amino acidsand is highly similar to Sichuan giant panda with an identity of 99.3% in cDNA sequence. The IFN-γ cDNA sequence was ligated to the pET32a vector and transformed into E. coli BL21 competent cells. Expression of recombinant IFN-γ protein of Qinling giant panda in E. coli was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis. Biological activity assay indicated that the recombinant IFN-γ protein at the concentration of 4-10 µg/ml activated the giant panda peripheral blood lymphocytes,while at 12 µg/mlinhibited. the activation of the lymphocytes.These findings provide insights into the evolution of giant panda IFN-γ and information regarding amino acid residues essential for their biological activity.

  11. Baylisascaris schroederi Infection in Giant Pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) in Foping National Nature Reserve, China.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhiwei; Zhang, Changsheng; Shen, Meiying; Bao, Heng; Hou, Zhijun; He, Shaowen; Hua, Yuping

    2017-07-12

    The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is the most iconic endangered species in the world, but there is little information about the spatial and temporal distribution of parasites in the wild giant panda population. In total, 193 fecal samples from giant pandas in the Foping National Nature Reserve, People's Republic of China, were analyzed for parasite eggs using a modification of the McMaster technique. The morphology and size of Baylisascaris schroederi eggs were observed under an optical microscope. The prevalence and intensity of B. schroederi infection during the sampling year 2012 were 52.3% (101/193) and 89 eggs/g of feces, respectively, among giant pandas in this population. The prevalence of B. schroederi in the pandas varied during different months of the year, from 7% to 100%, and the prevalences in spring, summer, autumn, and winter were 71%, 77%, 23%, and 18%, respectively. The prevalence was not significantly different between giant pandas that ate two different types of bamboo, but the intensity of infection was higher in the group eating Arundinaria fargesii (P=0.043). Altitude, temperature, and dew point were correlated with the infection intensity (r=-0.224, P<0.001; r=0.328, P<0.001; r=0.328, P=0.028, respectively). There was no correlation between infection intensity and distance to rivers. This study provides a better understanding of B. schroederi prevalence among the wild giant pandas in Foping National Nature, China.

  12. Serosurvey of ex situ giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and red pandas (Ailurus fulgens) in China with implications for species conservation.

    PubMed

    Loeffler, I Kati; Howard, JoGayle; Montali, Richard J; Hayek, Lee-Ann; Dubovi, Edward; Zhang, Zhihe; Yan, Qigui; Guo, Wanzhu; Wildt, David E

    2007-12-01

    Conservation strategies for the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) include the development of a self-sustaining ex situ population. This study examined the potential significance of infectious pathogens in giant pandas ex situ. Serologic antibody titers against canine distemper virus (CDV), canine parvovirus (CPV), canine adenovirus (CAV), canine coronavirus (CCV), canine herpesvirus, canine parainfluenza virus (CPIV), Toxoplasma gondii, Neospora caninum, and Leptospira interrogans were measured in 44 samples taken from 19 giant pandas between 1998 and 2003 at the Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding in Sichuan, China. Seroassays also included samples obtained in 2003 from eight red pandas (Ailurus fulgens) housed at the same institution. All individuals had been vaccinated with a Chinese canine vaccine that included modified live CDV, CPV, CAV, CCV, and CPIV. Positive antibody titers were found only against CDV, CPV, and T. gondii. Sera were negative for antibodies against the other six pathogens. Results indicate that the quality of the vaccine may not be reliable and that it should not be considered protective or safe in giant pandas and red pandas. Positive antibody titers against T. gondii were found in seven of the 19 giant pandas. The clinical, subclinical, or epidemiologic significance of infection with these pathogens via natural exposure or from modified live vaccines in giant pandas is unknown. Research in this area is imperative to sustaining a viable population of giant pandas and other endangered species.

  13. Molecular diagnosis of Baylisascaris schroederi infections in giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) feces using PCR.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuan; Yu, Hua; Wang, Ning; Xie, Yue; Liang, Yi-nan; Li, De-sheng; Wang, Cheng-dong; Chen, Si-jie; Yan, Yu-bo; Gu, Xiao-bin; Wang, Shu-xian; Peng, Xue-rong; Yang, Guang-you

    2013-10-01

    The helminth Baylisascaris schroederi is one of the most harmful parasites infecting giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). It is therefore important to develop an exact diagnostic technique to detect this parasite. Using a known number (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100) of feces-isolated B. schroederi egg and adult DNA, we developed a PCR to detect a portion of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA and applied it to giant panda fecal samples. The method was sufficiently sensitive to detect B. schroederi DNA from isolated eggs in a fecal sample with a detection threshold of one egg. We detected B. schroederi in 88% of fecal samples, 30% higher than the conventional flotation technique. No cross-reactivity with other common nematode DNA was detected. Our PCR assay may constitute a valuable alternative for the diagnosis of B. schroederi infections.

  14. A new genotype of Cryptosporidium from giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuehan; He, Tingmei; Zhong, Zhijun; Zhang, Hemin; Wang, Rongjun; Dong, Haiju; Wang, Chengdong; Li, Desheng; Deng, Jiabo; Peng, Guangneng; Zhang, Longxian

    2013-10-01

    Fifty-seven fecal samples were collected from giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) in the China Conservation and Research Centre for the Giant Panda (CCRCGP) in Sichuan and examined for Cryptosporidium oocysts by Sheather's sugar flotation technique. An 18-year-old male giant panda was Cryptosporidium positive, with oocysts of an average size of 4.60×3.99 μm (n=50). The isolate was genetically analyzed using the partial 18S rRNA, 70 kDa heat shock protein (HSP70), Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein (COWP) and actin genes. Multi-locus genetic characterization indicated that the present isolate was different from known Cryptosporidium species and genotypes. The closest relative was the Cryptosporidium bear genotype, with 11, 10, and 6 nucleotide differences in the 18S rRNA, HSP70, and actin genes, respectively. Significant differences were also observed in the COWP gene compared to Cryptosporidium mongoose genotype. The homology to the bear genotype at the 18S rRNA locus was 98.6%, which is comparable to that between Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis (99.2%), or between Cryptosporidium muris and Cryptosporidium andersoni (99.4%). Therefore, the Cryptosporidium in giant pandas in this study is considered as a new genotype: the Cryptosporidium giant panda genotype. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Interferon-gamma of the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca): complementary DNA cloning, expression, and phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yaqiong; Zeng, Bo; Xu, Liu; Yue, Bisong; Yang, Dong; Zou, Fangdong

    2010-01-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) is the only member of type II IFN and is vital in the regulation of immune and inflammatory responses. Herein we report the cloning, expression, and sequence analysis of IFN-gamma from the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). The open reading frame of this gene is 501 base pair in length and encodes a polypeptide consisting of 166 amino acids. All conserved N-linked glycosylation sites and cysteine residues among carnivores were found in the predicted amino acid sequence of the giant panda. Recombinant giant panda IFN-gamma with a V5 epitope and polyhistidine tag was expressed in HEK293 host cells and confirmed by Western blotting. Phylogenetic analysis of mammalian IFN-gamma-coding sequences indicated that the giant panda IFN-gamma was closest to that of carnivores, then to ungulates and dolphin, and shared a distant relationship with mouse and human. These results represent a first step into the study of IFN-gamma in giant panda.

  16. A novel endogenous betaretrovirus group characterized from polar bears (Ursus maritimus) and giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Mayer, Jens; Tsangaras, Kyriakos; Heeger, Felix; Avila-Arcos, María; Stenglein, Mark D; Chen, Wei; Sun, Wei; Mazzoni, Camila J; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Greenwood, Alex D

    2013-08-15

    Transcriptome analysis of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) yielded sequences with highest similarity to the human endogenous retrovirus group HERV-K(HML-2). Further analysis of the polar bear draft genome identified an endogenous betaretrovirus group comprising 26 proviral copies and 231 solo LTRs. Molecular dating indicates the group originated before the divergence of bears from a common ancestor but is not present in all carnivores. Closely related sequences were identified in the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and characterized from its genome. We have designated the polar bear and giant panda sequences U. maritimus endogenous retrovirus (UmaERV) and A. melanoleuca endogenous retrovirus (AmeERV), respectively. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the bear virus group is nested within the HERV-K supergroup among bovine and bat endogenous retroviruses suggesting a complex evolutionary history within the HERV-K group. All individual remnants of proviral sequences contain numerous frameshifts and stop codons and thus, the virus is likely non-infectious. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cloning and characterization of giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) IL-18 binding protein.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yue; Deng, Jiabo; Niu, Lili; Wang, Qiang; Yu, Jianqiu; Shao, Huanhuan; Cao, Qinghua; Zhang, Yizheng; Tan, Xuemei

    2016-06-01

    The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is an endangered species. Interleukin-18 (IL-18) plays an important role in the innate and adaptive immune responses by inducing IFN-γ. IL-18 has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various diseases. IL-18 binding protein (IL-18BP) is an intrinsic inhibitor of IL-18 that possesses higher affinity to IL-18. In this study, we cloned and characterized IL-18BP in giant panda (AmIL-18BP) from the spleen. The amino acid sequence of giant panda IL-18BP ORF shared about 65% identities with other species. To evaluate the effects of AmIL-18BP on the immune responses, we expressed the recombinant AmIL-18BP in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3).The fusing protein PET-AmIL-18BP was purified by nickel affinity column chromatography. The biological function of purified PET-AmIL-18BP was determined on mice splenocyte by qRT-PCR. The results showed that AmIL-18BP was functional and could significantly reduce IFN-γ production in murine splenocytes. These results will facilitate the study of protecting giant panda on etiology and immunology.

  18. Analysis of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COX2) gene in giant panda, Ailuropoda melanoleuca.

    PubMed

    Ling, S S; Zhu, Y; Lan, D; Li, D S; Pang, H Z; Wang, Y; Li, D Y; Wei, R P; Zhang, H M; Wang, C D; Hu, Y D

    2017-01-23

    The giant panda, Ailuropoda melanoleuca (Ursidae), has a unique bamboo-based diet; however, this low-energy intake has been sufficient to maintain the metabolic processes of this species since the fourth ice age. As mitochondria are the main sites for energy metabolism in animals, the protein-coding genes involved in mitochondrial respiratory chains, particularly cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COX2), which is the rate-limiting enzyme in electron transfer, could play an important role in giant panda metabolism. Therefore, the present study aimed to isolate, sequence, and analyze the COX2 DNA from individuals kept at the Giant Panda Protection and Research Center, China, and compare these sequences with those of the other Ursidae family members. Multiple sequence alignment showed that the COX2 gene had three point mutations that defined three haplotypes, with 60% of the sequences corresponding to haplotype I. The neutrality tests revealed that the COX2 gene was conserved throughout evolution, and the maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis, using homologous sequences from other Ursidae species, showed clustering of the COX2 sequences of giant pandas, suggesting that this gene evolved differently in them.

  19. Dietary Shifts May Trigger Dysbiosis and Mucous Stools in Giant Pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Williams, Candace L; Dill-McFarland, Kimberly A; Vandewege, Michael W; Sparks, Darrell L; Willard, Scott T; Kouba, Andrew J; Suen, Garret; Brown, Ashli E

    2016-01-01

    Dietary shifts can result in changes to the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) microbiota, leading to negative outcomes for the host, including inflammation. Giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) are physiologically classified as carnivores; however, they consume an herbivorous diet with dramatic seasonal dietary shifts and episodes of chronic GIT distress with symptoms including abdominal pain, loss of appetite and the excretion of mucous stools (mucoids). These episodes adversely affect the overall nutritional and health status of giant pandas. Here, we examined the fecal microbiota of two giant pandas' non-mucoid and mucoid stools and compared these to samples from a previous winter season that had historically few mucoid episodes. To identify the microbiota present, we isolated and sequenced the 16S rRNA using next-generation sequencing. Mucoids occurred following a seasonal feeding switch from predominately bamboo culm (stalk) to leaves. All fecal samples displayed low diversity and were dominated by bacteria in the phyla Firmicutes and to a lesser extent, Proteobacteria. Fecal samples immediately prior to mucoid episodes had lower microbial diversity as compared to mucoids. Mucoids were mostly comprised of common mucosal-associated taxa including Streptococcus and Leuconostoc species, and exhibited increased abundance for bacteria in the family Pasteurellaceae. Taken together, these findings indicate that mucoids may represent an expulsion of the mucosal lining that is driven by changes in diet. We suggest that these occurrences serve to reset their GIT microbiota following changes in bamboo part preference, as giant pandas have retained a carnivorous GIT anatomy while shifting to an herbivorous diet.

  20. Cloning and sequence analysis of FSH and LH in the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Liao, Ming-Juan; Zhu, Mu-Yuan; Zhang, Zhi-He; Zhang, An-Ju; Li, Guang-Han; Sheng, Fu-Jun

    2003-05-15

    The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is an endangered species and indigenous to China. It has been proposed that it has a highly specialized reproductive pattern with low fecundity, but little is known about its basic reproductive biology at the molecular level. In this report the genes encoding gonadotropin subunits alpha, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) beta and luteinizing hormone (LH) beta of the giant panda were amplified for the first time by RT-PCR from pituitary total RNA, and were cloned, sequenced and analyzed. The results revealed that the open reading region (ORF) of gonadotropin subunits alpha, FSH beta and LH beta are 363, 390 and 426 bp long, respectively. They displayed a reasonably high degree (74-94, 85-93, 75-91%, for alpha, FSH beta and LH beta subunits, respectively) of identity when deduced amino acids were compared with homologous sequences from partial available mammals including human, cattle, sheep, pig, rat, mouse. Three distinct differences were found at the site of 59 aa of the alpha subunit and 55 aa, 68 aa of FSH beta subunit. Our results provide an insight into understanding the mechanism of reproduction regulation and genetic characteristics of giant panda which will make an actual contribution to its conservation. In addition they lay a foundation for a further study towards producing recombinant panda FSH and LH which can be used in artificial breeding aimed to increase its captive reproductive efficiency.

  1. Giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) sperm morphometry and function after repeated freezing and thawing.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Moreno, J; Esteso, M C; Pradiee, J; Castaño, C; Toledano-Díaz, A; O'Brien, E; Lopez-Sebastián, A; Martínez-Nevado, E; Delclaux, M; Fernández-Morán, J; Zhihe, Z

    2016-05-01

    This work examines the effects of subsequent cycles of freezing-thawing on giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) sperm morphometry and function, and assesses whether density-gradient centrifugation (DGC) can increase the number of freezing-thawing cycles this sperm can withstand. A sperm sample was collected by electroejaculation from a mature giant panda and subjected to five freezing-thawing cycles. Although repeated freezing-thawing negatively affected (P < 0.05) sperm motility and membrane integrity, in both nonselected and DCG-selected sperm samples, >60% of the sperm cells in both treatments showed acrosome integrity even after the fifth freezing cycle. In fresh semen, the sperm head length was 4.7 μm, the head width 3.6 μm, area 14.3 μm(2) and perimeter length 14.1 μm. The present results suggest that giant panda sperm trends to be resistant to repeated freezing-thawing, even without DGC selection.

  2. A Diet Diverse in Bamboo Parts is Important for Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) Metabolism and Health.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hairui; Zhong, Heju; Hou, Rong; Ayala, James; Liu, Guangmang; Yuan, Shibin; Yan, Zheng; Zhang, Wenping; Liu, Yuliang; Cai, Kailai; Cai, Zhigang; Huang, He; Zhang, Zhihe; Wu, De

    2017-06-13

    The aim of this study was to determine the metabolic response in giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) to the consumption of certain parts of bamboo above ground growth. Giant pandas were provisioned with three species of bamboo: Phyllostachys bissetii, of which they only consume the culm (culm group); Bashania fargesii, of which they only consume the leaves (leaf group); and Qiongzhuea opienensis, of which they only consume the shoots (shoot group). The "culm" group absorbed the highest amount of calories and fiber, but was in short energy supply (depressed tricarboxylic acid cycle activity), and high fiber level diet might reduce the digestibility of protein. The "culm" and "leaf" groups absorbed less protein, and had a lower rate of body mass growth than the "shoot" group. Digestion of fiber requires energy input and yields low caloric extraction from the culm and leaf, and protein intake is important for increasing body mass. However, long-term consumption of shoots may have a potentially negative effect on the health because of high protein composition. Therefore, a balanced diet consisting of diverse plant parts of bamboo is important for the overall metabolic function and health of captive giant pandas.

  3. Transcriptome-Derived Tetranucleotide Microsatellites and Their Associated Genes from the Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Song, Xuhao; Shen, Fujun; Huang, Jie; Huang, Yan; Du, Lianming; Wang, Chengdong; Fan, Zhenxin; Hou, Rong; Yue, Bisong; Zhang, Xiuyue

    2016-09-01

    Recently, an increasing number of microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) have been found and characterized from transcriptomes. Such SSRs can be employed as putative functional markers to easily tag corresponding genes, which play an important role in biomedical studies and genetic analysis. However, the transcriptome-derived SSRs for giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) are not yet available. In this work, we identified and characterized 20 tetranucleotide microsatellite loci from a transcript database generated from the blood of giant panda. Furthermore, we assigned their predicted transcriptome locations: 16 loci were assigned to untranslated regions (UTRs) and 4 loci were assigned to coding regions (CDSs). Gene identities of 14 transcripts contained corresponding microsatellites were determined, which provide useful information to study the potential contribution of SSRs to gene regulation in giant panda. The polymorphic information content (PIC) values ranged from 0.293 to 0.789 with an average of 0.603 for the 16 UTRs-derived SSRs. Interestingly, 4 CDS-derived microsatellites developed in our study were also polymorphic, and the instability of these 4 CDS-derived SSRs was further validated by re-genotyping and sequencing. The genes containing these 4 CDS-derived SSRs were embedded with various types of repeat motifs. The interaction of all the length-changing SSRs might provide a way against coding region frameshift caused by microsatellite instability. We hope these newly gene-associated biomarkers will pave the way for genetic and biomedical studies for giant panda in the future. In sum, this set of transcriptome-derived markers complements the genetic resources available for giant panda.

  4. Low major histocompatibility complex class II DQA diversity in the Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca)

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Liang; Ruan, Xiang-Dong; Ge, Yun-Fa; Wan, Qiu-Hong; Fang, Sheng-Guo

    2007-01-01

    Background The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is one of the most endangered animals due to habitat fragmentation and loss. Although the captive breeding program for this species is now nearly two decades old, researches on the genetic background of such captive populations, especially on adaptive molecular polymorphism of major histocompatibility complex (MHC), are still limited. In this study, we characterized adaptive variation of the giant panda's MHC DQA gene by PCR amplification of its antigen-recognizing region (i.e. the exon 2) and subsequent single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) and sequence analyses. Results The results revealed a low level of DQA exon 2 diversity in this rare animal, presenting 6 alleles from 61 giant panda individuals. The observed polymorphism was restricted to 9 amino acid substitutions, all of which occurred at and adjacent to positions forming the functionally important antigen-binding sites. All the samples were in Hardy-Weinberg proportions. A significantly higher rate of non-synonymous than synonymous substitutions at the antigen-binding sites indicated positive selection for diversity in the locus. Conclusion The DQA allelic diversity of giant pandas was low relative to other vertebrates. Nonetheless, the pandas exhibited more alleles in DQA than those in DRB, suggesting the alpha chain genes would play a leading role when coping with certain pathogens and thus should be included in conservation genetic investigation. The microsatellite and MHC loci might predict long-term persistence potential and short-term survival ability, respectively. Consequently, it is recommended to utilize multiple suites of microsatellite markers and multiple MHC loci to detect overall genetic variation in order to design unbiased conservation strategies. PMID:17555583

  5. First report of Enterocytozoon bieneusi from giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and red pandas (Ailurus fulgens) in China.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ge-Ru; Zhao, Guang-Hui; Du, Shuai-Zhi; Hu, Xiong-Feng; Wang, Hui-Bao; Zhang, Long-Xian; Yu, San-Ke

    2015-08-01

    Enterocytozoon bieneusi is an emerging and opportunistic enteric pathogen triggering diarrhea and enteric disease in humans and animals. Despite extensive research on this pathogen, the prevalence and genotypes of E. bieneusi infection in precious wild animals of giant and red pandas have not been reported. In the present study, 82 faecal specimens were collected from 46 giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and 36 red pandas (Ailurus fulgens) in the northwest of China. By PCR and sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene of E. bieneusi, an overall infection rate of 10.98% (9/82) was observed in pandas, with 8.70% (4/46) for giant pandas, and 13.89% (5/36) for red pandas. Two ITS genotypes were identified: the novel genotype I-like (n=4) and genotype EbpC (n=5). Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) employing three microsatellites (MS1, MS3 and MS7) and one minisatellite (MS4) showed that nine, six, six and nine positive products were amplified and sequenced successfully at four respective loci. A phylogenetic analysis based on a neighbor-joining tree of the ITS gene sequences of E. bieneusi indicated that the genotype EbpC fell into 1d of group 1 of zoonotic potential, and the novel genotype I-like was clustered into group 2. The present study firstly indicated the presence of E. bieneusi in giant and red pandas, and these results suggested that integrated strategies should be implemented to effectively protect pandas and humans from infecting E. bieneusi in China. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Greater taxol yield of fungus Pestalotiopsis hainanensis from dermatitic scurf of the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Gu, Yu; Wang, Yanlin; Ma, Xiaoping; Wang, Chengdong; Yue, Guizhou; Zhang, Yuetian; Zhang, Yunyan; Li, Shanshan; Ling, Shanshan; Liu, Xiaomin; Wen, Xintian; Cao, Sanjie; Huang, Xiaobo; Deng, Junliang; Zuo, Zhicai; Yu, Shumin; Shen, Liuhong; Wu, Rui

    2015-01-01

    While taxol yields of fungi from non-animal sources are still low, whether Pestalotiopsis hainanensis isolated from the scurf of a dermatitic giant panda, Ailuropoda melanoleuca, provides a greater taxol yield remains unknown. The objective of the study was to determine the corresponding taxol yield. The structure of the taxol produced by the fungus was evaluated by thin layer chromatography (TLC), ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-NMR and (13)C-NMR), and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS), with standard taxol as a control. The results demonstrated that the P. hainanensis fungus produced taxol, which had the same structure as the standard taxol and yield of 1,466.87 μg/L. This fungal taxol yield from the dermatitic giant panda was significantly greater than those of fungus from non-animal sources. The taxol-producing fungus may be a potential candidate for the production of taxol on an industrial scale.

  7. Molecular cloning, characterization, and bioactivity analysis of interleukin 18 in giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Yan, Y; Wang, Q; Niu, L L; Deng, J B; Yu, J Q; Zhang J X Wang, Y Z; Yin, M M; Tan, X M

    2014-11-19

    Interleukin 18 (IL-18), as a member of IL-1 superfamily, is an important pleiotropic cytokine that modulates Th1 immune responses. In this report, we cloned and identified a homolog of IL-18 in giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) (designated as AmIL-18) from peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide. The open readin g frame of AmIL-18 cDNA is 579 bp encoding a deduced protein of 192 amino acids. AmIL-18 gDNA fragments contained 5 exons and 4 introns. The amino acid sequence of AmIL-18 shared 23.9 to 87.0% identity with other species. To evaluate the effects of AmIL-18 on the immune response, we expressed the recombinant AmIL-18 in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The fusion protein PET-AmIL-18 was purified by nickel affinity column chromatography and verified by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot analysis. The biological function of purified PET-AmIL-18 was determined on mouse splenocytes by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. INF-γ and other cytokines were increased when stimulated by PET-AmIL-18, particularly when combined with recombinant human interleukin 12, while a Th2-type cytokine, interleukin-4, was strikingly suppressed. These results will provide information for the potential use of recombinant proteins to manipulate the immune response in giant pandas and facilitate the study to protect this treasured species.

  8. Immobilization of wild giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) with dexmedetomidine-tiletamine-zolazepam.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yipeng; Qiao, Yanchao; Liu, Xiaobin; Pu, Tianchun; Xu, Hongqian; Lin, Degui

    2016-05-01

    To assess the effects and utility of dexmedetomidine combined with tiletamine and zolazepam (dexMTZ) to immobilize the wild giant panda. Prospective clinical study. Seven giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), five males and two females, aged 7-20 years and weighing 69.2-132.9 kg. Once an animal was located, prior data on the individual was reviewed and the panda's previously estimated body weight was used to calculate the volumes of drugs to administer: dexmedetomidine (dexM; 8 μg kg(-1) ; 0.5 mg mL(-1) ) and tiletamine-zolazepam (TZ; 2 mg kg(-1) ; 50 mg mL(-1) ). The mixture was injected intramuscularly (IM) using the Dan-Inject pistol system. When the panda was immobilized, it was weighed, a physical examination was performed and a blood sample collected. Every 5 minutes, the heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (fR ), rectal temperature (T), noninvasive systolic arterial pressure (SAP), capillary refill time (CRT), mucous membrane color and pulse quality were recorded. After all procedures had been completed, atipamezole (40 μg kg(-1) ) was injected IM. A single injection of dexMTZ resulted in the immobilization of all seven giant pandas. The median (range) of anesthetic agents administered was dexM 8.4 μg kg(-1) (7.3-10.5 μg kg(-1) ) and TZ 2.0 mg kg(-1) (1.8-2.5 mg kg(-1) ). The palpebral reflex was lost 8 (7-12) minutes after the injection. Most of the physiological variables remained in the acceptable range. All procedures were completed in approximately 1 hour. Six out of the seven (85.7%) giant pandas recovered smoothly; one panda had a rough recovery. DexMTZ produced a satisfactory immobilization and a smooth recovery for wild giant pandas while allowing approximately 55 minutes for planned noninvasive procedures. © 2015 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  9. Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) Buccal Mucosa Tissue as a Source of Multipotent Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Hilary M A; Manning, Craig; Gardner, Aaron; Ritchie, William A; Pizzi, Romain; Girling, Simon; Valentine, Iain; Wang, Chengdong; Jahoda, Colin A B

    2015-01-01

    Since the first mammal was cloned, the idea of using this technique to help endangered species has aroused considerable interest. However, several issues limit this possibility, including the relatively low success rate at every stage of the cloning process, and the dearth of usable tissues from these rare animals. iPS cells have been produced from cells from a number of rare mammalian species and this is the method of choice for strategies to improve cloning efficiency and create new gametes by directed differentiation. Nevertheless information about other stem cell/progenitor capabilities of cells from endangered species could prove important for future conservation approaches and adds to the knowledge base about cellular material that can be extremely limited. Multipotent progenitor cells, termed skin-derived precursor (SKP) cells, can be isolated directly from mammalian skin dermis, and human cheek tissue has also been shown to be a good source of SKP-like cells. Recently we showed that structures identical to SKPs termed m-SKPs could be obtained from monolayer/ two dimensional (2D) skin fibroblast cultures. Here we aimed to isolate m-SKPs from cultured cells of three endangered species; giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca); red panda (Ailurus fulgens); and Asiatic lion (Panthera leo persica). m-SKP-like spheres were formed from the giant panda buccal mucosa fibroblasts; whereas dermal fibroblast (DF) cells cultured from abdominal skin of the other two species were unable to generate spheres. Under specific differentiation culture conditions giant panda spheres expressed neural, Schwann, adipogenic and osteogenic cell markers. Furthermore, these buccal mucosa derived spheres were shown to maintain expression of SKP markers: nestin, versican, fibronectin, and P75 and switch on expression of the stem cell marker ABCG2. These results demonstrate that giant panda cheek skin can be a useful source of m-SKP multipotent progenitors. At present lack of sample numbers

  10. Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) Buccal Mucosa Tissue as a Source of Multipotent Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, Hilary M. A.; Manning, Craig; Gardner, Aaron; Ritchie, William A.; Pizzi, Romain; Girling, Simon; Valentine, Iain; Wang, Chengdong; Jahoda, Colin A. B.

    2015-01-01

    Since the first mammal was cloned, the idea of using this technique to help endangered species has aroused considerable interest. However, several issues limit this possibility, including the relatively low success rate at every stage of the cloning process, and the dearth of usable tissues from these rare animals. iPS cells have been produced from cells from a number of rare mammalian species and this is the method of choice for strategies to improve cloning efficiency and create new gametes by directed differentiation. Nevertheless information about other stem cell/progenitor capabilities of cells from endangered species could prove important for future conservation approaches and adds to the knowledge base about cellular material that can be extremely limited. Multipotent progenitor cells, termed skin-derived precursor (SKP) cells, can be isolated directly from mammalian skin dermis, and human cheek tissue has also been shown to be a good source of SKP-like cells. Recently we showed that structures identical to SKPs termed m-SKPs could be obtained from monolayer/ two dimensional (2D) skin fibroblast cultures. Here we aimed to isolate m-SKPs from cultured cells of three endangered species; giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca); red panda (Ailurus fulgens); and Asiatic lion (Panthera leo persica). m-SKP-like spheres were formed from the giant panda buccal mucosa fibroblasts; whereas dermal fibroblast (DF) cells cultured from abdominal skin of the other two species were unable to generate spheres. Under specific differentiation culture conditions giant panda spheres expressed neural, Schwann, adipogenic and osteogenic cell markers. Furthermore, these buccal mucosa derived spheres were shown to maintain expression of SKP markers: nestin, versican, fibronectin, and P75 and switch on expression of the stem cell marker ABCG2. These results demonstrate that giant panda cheek skin can be a useful source of m-SKP multipotent progenitors. At present lack of sample numbers

  11. Dietary Shifts May Trigger Dysbiosis and Mucous Stools in Giant Pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca)

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Candace L.; Dill-McFarland, Kimberly A.; Vandewege, Michael W.; Sparks, Darrell L.; Willard, Scott T.; Kouba, Andrew J.; Suen, Garret; Brown, Ashli E.

    2016-01-01

    Dietary shifts can result in changes to the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) microbiota, leading to negative outcomes for the host, including inflammation. Giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) are physiologically classified as carnivores; however, they consume an herbivorous diet with dramatic seasonal dietary shifts and episodes of chronic GIT distress with symptoms including abdominal pain, loss of appetite and the excretion of mucous stools (mucoids). These episodes adversely affect the overall nutritional and health status of giant pandas. Here, we examined the fecal microbiota of two giant pandas’ non-mucoid and mucoid stools and compared these to samples from a previous winter season that had historically few mucoid episodes. To identify the microbiota present, we isolated and sequenced the 16S rRNA using next-generation sequencing. Mucoids occurred following a seasonal feeding switch from predominately bamboo culm (stalk) to leaves. All fecal samples displayed low diversity and were dominated by bacteria in the phyla Firmicutes and to a lesser extent, Proteobacteria. Fecal samples immediately prior to mucoid episodes had lower microbial diversity as compared to mucoids. Mucoids were mostly comprised of common mucosal-associated taxa including Streptococcus and Leuconostoc species, and exhibited increased abundance for bacteria in the family Pasteurellaceae. Taken together, these findings indicate that mucoids may represent an expulsion of the mucosal lining that is driven by changes in diet. We suggest that these occurrences serve to reset their GIT microbiota following changes in bamboo part preference, as giant pandas have retained a carnivorous GIT anatomy while shifting to an herbivorous diet. PMID:27199976

  12. Can science save the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca)? Unifying science and policy in an adaptive management paradigm.

    PubMed

    Swaisgood, Ronald R; Wei, Fuwen; McShea, William J; Wildt, David E; Kouba, Andrew J; Zhang, Zejun

    2011-09-01

    The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca David, 1869) is an iconic species for global conservation, yet field research has only recently advanced to the point where adaptive management is possible. Here, we review recent developments in giant panda conservation science and propose a strategic plan for moving panda conservation forward. Because of scientific, funding, political, and logistical hurdles, few endangered species management programs have embraced adaptive management, wherein management decisions are shaped iteratively by targeted scientific research. Specific threats, such as habitat destruction, anthropogenic disturbance and fragmented nonviable populations, need to be addressed simultaneously by researchers, managers and policy-makers working in concert to understand and overcome these obstacles to species recovery. With the backing of the Chinese Government and the conservation community, the giant panda can become a high-profile test species for this much touted, but rarely implemented, approach to conservation management.

  13. Molecular cloning, overexpression, purification, and sequence analysis of the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) ferritin light polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Fu, L; Hou, Y L; Ding, X; Du, Y J; Zhu, H Q; Zhang, N; Hou, W R

    2016-08-30

    The complementary DNA (cDNA) of the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) ferritin light polypeptide (FTL) gene was successfully cloned using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction technology. We constructed a recombinant expression vector containing FTL cDNA and overexpressed it in Escherichia coli using pET28a plasmids. The expressed protein was then purified by nickel chelate affinity chromatography. The cloned cDNA fragment was 580 bp long and contained an open reading frame of 525 bp. The deduced protein sequence was composed of 175 amino acids and had an estimated molecular weight of 19.90 kDa, with an isoelectric point of 5.53. Topology prediction revealed one N-glycosylation site, two casein kinase II phosphorylation sites, one N-myristoylation site, two protein kinase C phosphorylation sites, and one cell attachment sequence. Alignment indicated that the nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences are highly conserved across several mammals, including Homo sapiens, Cavia porcellus, Equus caballus, and Felis catus, among others. The FTL gene was readily expressed in E. coli, which gave rise to the accumulation of a polypeptide of the expected size (25.50 kDa, including an N-terminal polyhistidine tag).

  14. Functional anatomy of the radial sesamoid bone in the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed Central

    Endo, H; Sasaki, N; Yamagiwa, D; Uetake, Y; Kurohmaru, M; Hayashi, Y

    1996-01-01

    The function of the radial sesamoid bone (RS) in the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) was examined by macroscopic study of RS-related bones and muscles. The RS was observed to be connected to the scapholunar and the 1st metacarpal bones. A joint cavity was present between the proximal surface of the RS and the distal area of the scapholunar bone but the RS possessed a fibrous joint connecting it to the proximal radial surface of the 1st metacarpal bone. It is suggested that the RS possesses no substantial abductor-adductor function as the articulation between the RS and the 1st metacarpal bone (FM) seems not to permit flexible movement of the RS. The RS may be a supporting process opposite the digits in the palm when the animal flexes its 5 digits to grip objects, but it is not an active grasping apparatus. In the muscular system, abductor pollicis longus provided strong tendons to the RS as an RS-abductor, whereas the abductor pollicis brevis, opponens pollicis and aponeurosis palmaris were well developed as an RS-adductor muscle group. Observation of RS articulations, however, showed that the muscles do not provide appreciable abduction-adduction actions for the RS. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 PMID:8982834

  15. Molecular cloning and pharmacological characterization of giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) melanocortin-4 receptor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Wei; Shi, Lin; Chai, Ji-Tian; Zhang, Xin-Jun; Tao, Ya-Xiong

    2016-04-01

    The melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) is critical in regulating mammalian food intake and energy expenditure. Giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), famous as the living fossil, is an endangered species endemic to China. We are interested in exploring the functions of the giant panda MC4R (amMC4R) in regulating energy homeostasis and report herein the molecular cloning and pharmacology of the amMC4R. Sequence analysis revealed that amMC4R was highly homologous (>88%) at nucleotide and amino acid sequences to several mammalian MC4Rs. Western blot revealed that the expression construct myc-amMC4R in pcDNA3.1 was successfully constructed and expressed in HEK293T cells. With human MC4R (hMC4R) as a control, pharmacological characteristics of amMC4R were analyzed with binding and signaling assays. Four agonists, including [Nle(4), D-Phe(7)]-α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (NDP-MSH), α- and β-MSH, and a small molecule agonist, THIQ, were used in binding and signaling assays. We showed that amMC4R bound NDP-MSH with the highest affinity followed by THIQ, α-MSH, and β-MSH, with the same ranking order as hMC4R. Treatment of HEK293T cells expressing amMC4R with different concentrations of agonists resulted in dose-dependent increase of intracellular cAMP levels, with similar EC50s for the four agonists. The results suggested that the cloned amMC4R encoded a functional MC4R. The availability of amMC4R and its binding and signaling properties will facilitate the investigation of amMC4R in regulating food intake and energy homeostasis.

  16. MANAGEMENT OF OSTEOARTHRITIS IN A GIANT PANDA (AILUROPODA MELANOLEUCA) WITH MULTIMODAL THERAPY INCLUDING AMANTADINE SULPHATE.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Nimal; Wu, Elke; Kou, Cissy; Martelli, Paolo; Khong, Lee Foo; Larson, Kathy

    2016-03-01

    In 2002 a 23-yr-old female giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) presented with left hind limb lameness presumably due to osteoarthritis. For the next five years, arthritic episodes were managed with the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) carprofen at 2 mg/kg p.o. s.i.d., then reduced to 1 mg/kg p.o. s.i.d. and withdrawn. Radiographs revealed osteoarthritis in various joints and lumbar spondylosis. In 2007 glucosamine and chondroitin at 1.65 g p.o. b.i.d. and a polyunsaturated fatty acid at 1 capsule p.o. s.i.d. By 2008, arthritic episodes were becoming more difficult to successfully manage and higher doses and longer durations of treatment with carprofen were needed (2 mg/kg p.o. b.i.d.) and by August 2009 episodic treatment was no longer successful so the carprofen was continued indefinitely at 1 mg/kg p.o. s.i.d. In November 2009 carprofen was increased to 2 mg/kg p.o. b.i.d. An NMDA antagonist amantadine sulphate was trialed and after 10 days at 200 mg p.o. s.i.d. the clinical signs resolved. Since then it has been maintained on carprofen at 1 mg/kg p.o. b.i.d., amantadine sulphate 200 mg p.o. s.i.d. and the neutraceuticals as above with no further relapses of arthritic pain.

  17. Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Stimulates the Proliferation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun-Jie; Liu, Yu-Liang; Sun, Yuan-Chao; Ge, Wei; Wang, Yong-Yong; Dyce, Paul W; Hou, Rong; Shen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    It has been widely known that the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is one of the most endangered species in the world. An optimized platform for maintaining the proliferation of giant panda mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is very necessary for current giant panda protection strategies. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), a member of the FGF family, is widely considered as a growth factor and differentiation inducer within the stem cell research field. However, the role of bFGF on promoting the proliferation of MSCs derived from giant panda bone marrow (BM) has not been reported. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of bFGF on the proliferation of BM-MSCs derived from giant panda. MSCs were cultured for cell proliferation analysis at 24, 48 and 72 hrs following the addition of bFGF. With increasing concentrations of bFGF, cell numbers gradually increased. This was further demonstrated by performing 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) cell proliferation assay, 5-Bromo-2-deoxyUridine (BrdU) labeling and cell cycle testing. Furthermore, the percentage of MSCs that were OCT4 positive increased slightly following treatment with 5 ng/ml bFGF. Moreover, we demonstrated that the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway may play an important role in the proliferation of panda MSCs stimulated by bFGF. In conclusion, this study suggests that giant panda BM-MSCs have a high proliferative capacity with the addition of 5 ng/ml bFGF in vitro.

  18. Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Stimulates the Proliferation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun-Jie; Liu, Yu-Liang; Sun, Yuan-Chao; Ge, Wei; Wang, Yong-Yong; Dyce, Paul W.; Hou, Rong; Shen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    It has been widely known that the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is one of the most endangered species in the world. An optimized platform for maintaining the proliferation of giant panda mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is very necessary for current giant panda protection strategies. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), a member of the FGF family, is widely considered as a growth factor and differentiation inducer within the stem cell research field. However, the role of bFGF on promoting the proliferation of MSCs derived from giant panda bone marrow (BM) has not been reported. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of bFGF on the proliferation of BM-MSCs derived from giant panda. MSCs were cultured for cell proliferation analysis at 24, 48 and 72 hrs following the addition of bFGF. With increasing concentrations of bFGF, cell numbers gradually increased. This was further demonstrated by performing 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) cell proliferation assay, 5-Bromo-2-deoxyUridine (BrdU) labeling and cell cycle testing. Furthermore, the percentage of MSCs that were OCT4 positive increased slightly following treatment with 5 ng/ml bFGF. Moreover, we demonstrated that the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway may play an important role in the proliferation of panda MSCs stimulated by bFGF. In conclusion, this study suggests that giant panda BM-MSCs have a high proliferative capacity with the addition of 5 ng/ml bFGF in vitro. PMID:26375397

  19. NORMAL VAGINAL BACTERIAL FLORA OF GIANT PANDAS (AILUROPODA MELANOLEUCA) AND THE ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY PATTERNS OF THE ISOLATES.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Yang, Jiang; Wang, Hongning; Li, Caiwu; He, Yongguo; Jin, SenYan; Zhang, Hemin; Li, Desheng; Wang, Pengyan; Xu, Yuesong; Xu, Changwen; Fan, Chengyun; Xu, Lulai; Huang, Shan; Qu, Chunmao; Li, Guo

    2016-06-01

    To study the typical vaginal bacterial flora of giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), we took vaginal swabs for the sake of bacterial isolation, from 24 healthy female giant pandas. A total of 203 isolates were identified, representing a total of 17 bacterial species. The most common bacteria isolated were Lactobacillus spp. (54.2%, 13/24), followed by Staphylococcus epidermidis (41.7%, 10/24) and Escherichia coli (33.3%, 8/24). Some opportunistic pathogenic bacteria, such as Peptostreptococcus spp., Klebsiella pneumoniae , and Proteus mirabilis , were also isolated but showed no pathology. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of aerobic bacterial isolates was performed with the disk diffusion method. Of the 152 isolates, resistance was most frequently observed with chloramphenicol (17.8%), followed by tetracycline (14.5%), ciprofloxacin (12.5%), streptomycin (11.8%), and florfenicol (11.8%), whereas 7.2% were multidrug resistant. This is the first report of the normal culturable vaginal bacterial flora of giant pandas and the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of the isolates.

  20. NORMAL VAGINAL BACTERIAL FLORA OF GIANT PANDAS (AILUROPODA MELANOLEUCA) AND THE ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY PATTERNS OF THE ISOLATES.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Yang, Jiang; Wang, Hongning; Li, Caiwu; He, Yongguo; Jin, SenYan; Zhang, Hemin; Li, Desheng; Wang, Pengyan; Xu, Yuesong; Xu, Changwen; Fan, Chengyun; Xu, Lulai; Huang, Shan; Qu, Chunmao; Li, Guo

    2016-03-01

    In order to study the typical vaginal bacterial flora of giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), we took vaginal swabs for the sake of bacterial isolation, from 24 healthy female giant pandas. A total of 203 isolates were identified, representing a total of 17 bacterial species. The most common bacteria isolated were Lactobacillus spp. (54.2%, 13 of 24), followed by Staphylococcus epidermidis (41.7%, 10 of 24) and Escherichia coli (33.3%, 8 of 24). Some opportunistic pathogenic bacteria, such as Peptostreptococcus spp., Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Proteus mirabilis, were also isolated but showed no pathology. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of aerobic bacterial isolates was performed with disk diffusion method. Of the 152 isolates, resistance was most frequently observed with chloramphenicol (17.8%), followed by tetracycline (14.5%), ciprofloxacin (12.5%), streptomycin (11.8%), and florfenicol (11.8%), while 7.2% were multidrug resistant. This is the first report of the normal vaginal culturable bacterial flora of giant pandas, followed by the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of the isolates.

  1. CT examination of the manipulation system in the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca)

    PubMed Central

    ENDO, HIDEKI; HAYASHI, YOSHIHIRO; YAMAGIWA, DAISHIRO; KUROHMARU, MASAMICHI; KOIE, HIROSHI; YAMAYA, YOSHIKI; KIMURA, JUNPEI

    1999-01-01

    The manipulation mechanism of the giant panda (Ailuropida melanoleuca) was examined by means of CT (computed tomography) and 3-dimensional (3-D) Volume Rendering techniques. In the 3-D images of the giant panda hand, not only the bones but also the muscular system was visualised. Sections of the articulated skeleton were obtained. It was demonstrated that the hand of the panda is equipped with separately moulded manipulation units as follows: (1) the radial sesamoid (RS), the radial carpal, and the first metacarpal (R–R–M) complex; and (2) the accessory carpal (AC) and the ulnar (A–U) complex. When the giant panda grasps anything, the R–R–M complex strongly flexes at the wrist joint, the RS becomes parallel with the AC, and the phalanges bend and hold the object. It is shown that the well-developed opponens pollicis and abductor pollicis brevis muscles envelop and fix the objects between the R–R–M complex and the phalanges during grasping. PMID:10529064

  2. Giant pandas (Carnivora: Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and living hominoids converge on lumbar vertebral adaptations to orthograde trunk posture.

    PubMed

    Russo, Gabrielle A; Williams, Scott A

    2015-11-01

    Living hominoids share a common body plan characterized by a gradient of derived postcranial features that distinguish them from their closest living relatives, cercopithecoid monkeys. However, the evolutionary scenario(s) that led to the derived postcranial features of hominoids are uncertain. Explanations are complicated by the fact that living hominoids vary considerably in positional behaviors, and some Miocene hominoids are morphologically, and therefore probably behaviorally, distinct from modern hominoids. Comparative studies that aim to identify morphologies associated with specific components of positional behavioral repertoires are an important avenue of research that can improve our understanding of the evolution and adaptive significance of the hominoid postcranium. Here, we employ a comparative approach to offer additional insight into the evolution of the hominoid lumbar vertebral column. Specifically, we tested whether giant pandas (Carnivora: Ailuropoda melanoleuca) converge with living hominoids on lumbar vertebral adaptations to the single component of their respective positional behavioral repertoires that they share--orthograde (i.e., upright) trunk posture. We compare lumbar vertebral morphologies of Ailuropoda to those of other living ursids and caniform outgroups (northern raccoons and gray wolves). Mirroring known differences between living hominoids and cercopithecoids, Ailuropoda generally exhibits fewer, craniocaudally shorter lumbar vertebrae with more dorsally positioned transverse processes that are more dorsally oriented and laterally directed, and taller, more caudally directed spinous processes than other caniforms in the sample. Our comparative evidence lends support to a potential evolutionary scenario in which the acquisition of hominoid-like lumbar vertebral morphologies may have evolved for generalized orthograde behaviors and could have been exapted for suspensory behavior in crown hominoids and for other locomotor

  3. Adjuvant effects of recombinant giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) IL-18 on the canine distemper disease vaccine in mice

    PubMed Central

    YAN, Yue; NIU, Lili; DENG, Jiabo; WANG, Qiang; YU, Jianqiu; ZHANG, Yizheng; WANG, Jianxi; CHEN, Jiao; WEI, Changhe; TAN, Xuemei

    2014-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is a morbillivirus known to cause morbidity and mortality in a broad range of animals. Giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), especially captive ones, are susceptible to natural infection with CDV. Interleukin-18 (IL-18) is a powerful adjuvant molecule that can enhance the development of antigen-specific immunity and vaccine efficacy. In this study, a giant panda IL-18 gene eukaryotic expression plasmid (pcAmIL-18) was constructed. Female BALB/c mice were muscularly inoculated with the plasmids pcAmIL-18, pcDNA3.1 and PBS, respectively. They were subsequently injected with an attenuated CDV vaccine for dogs, and the induced humoral and cellular responses were evaluated. The results showed that pcAmIL-18 remarkably improved the level of specific antibody, IFN-γ and IL-2 in mice sera, the T lymphocyte proliferation index and the percentage of CD4+ and CD8+ cells. These data indicated that pcAmIL-18 is a potential adjuvant that promotes specific immunity. PMID:25399820

  4. Adjuvant effects of recombinant giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) IL-18 on the canine distemper disease vaccine in mice.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yue; Niu, Lili; Deng, Jiabo; Wang, Qiang; Yu, Jianqiu; Zhang, Yizheng; Wang, Jianxi; Chen, Jiao; Wei, Changhe; Tan, Xuemei

    2015-02-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is a morbillivirus known to cause morbidity and mortality in a broad range of animals. Giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), especially captive ones, are susceptible to natural infection with CDV. Interleukin-18 (IL-18) is a powerful adjuvant molecule that can enhance the development of antigen-specific immunity and vaccine efficacy. In this study, a giant panda IL-18 gene eukaryotic expression plasmid (pcAmIL-18) was constructed. Female BALB/c mice were muscularly inoculated with the plasmids pcAmIL-18, pcDNA3.1 and PBS, respectively. They were subsequently injected with an attenuated CDV vaccine for dogs, and the induced humoral and cellular responses were evaluated. The results showed that pcAmIL-18 remarkably improved the level of specific antibody, IFN-γ and IL-2 in mice sera, the T lymphocyte proliferation index and the percentage of CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells. These data indicated that pcAmIL-18 is a potential adjuvant that promotes specific immunity.

  5. First insights into the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) blood transcriptome: a resource for novel gene loci and immunogenetics.

    PubMed

    Du, Lianming; Li, Wujiao; Fan, Zhenxin; Shen, Fujun; Yang, Mingyu; Wang, Zili; Jian, Zuoyi; Hou, Rong; Yue, Bisong; Zhang, Xiuyue

    2015-07-01

    The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is one of the most famous flagship species for conservation, and its draft genome has recently been assembled. However, the transcriptome is not yet available. In this study, the blood transcriptomes of three pandas were characterized and about 160 million sequencing reads were generated using Illumina HiSeq 2000 paired-end sequencing technology. The assembly yielded 92 598 transcripts with an average length of 1626 bp and N50 length of 2842 bp. Based on a sequence similarity search against nonredundant (nr) protein database, a total of 38 522 (41.6%) transcripts were annotated. Of these annotated transcripts, 25 142 and 8272 transcripts were assigned to gene ontology terms and clusters of orthologous group, respectively. A search against the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Pathway database (KEGG) indicated that 9098 (9.83%) transcripts mapped to 324 KEGG pathways, and the best represented functional categories of pathways were signal transduction and immune system. We have also identified 23 460 microsatellites, 43 560 SNPs as well as 21 456 alternative splicing events in the assembly. Additionally, a total of 24 341 complete open reading frames (ORFs) were detected from the assembly where 1492 ORFs were found to be novel gene loci as these have not been annotated so far in any public database. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. cDNA, genomic sequence cloning and overexpression of giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) mitochondrial ATP synthase ATP5G1.

    PubMed

    Hou, W-R; Hou, Y-L; Ding, X; Wang, T

    2012-09-03

    The ATP5G1 gene is one of the three genes that encode mitochondrial ATP synthase subunit c of the proton channel. We cloned the cDNA and determined the genomic sequence of the ATP5G1 gene from the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) using RT-PCR technology and touchdown-PCR, respectively. The cloned cDNA fragment contains an open reading frame of 411 bp encoding 136 amino acids; the length of the genomic sequence is of 1838 bp, containing three exons and two introns. Alignment analysis revealed that the nucleotide sequence and the deduced protein sequence are highly conserved compared to Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Bos taurus, and Sus scrofa. The homologies for nucleotide sequences of the giant panda ATP5G1 to those of these species are 93.92, 92.21, 92.46, 93.67, and 92.46%, respectively, and the homologies for amino acid sequences are 90.44, 95.59, 93.38, 94.12, and 91.91%, respectively. Topology prediction showed that there is one protein kinase C phosphorylation site, one casein kinase II phosphorylation site, five N-myristoylation sites, and one ATP synthase c subunit signature in the ATP5G1 protein of the giant panda. The cDNA of ATP5G1 was transfected into Escherichia coli, and the ATP5G1 fused with the N-terminally GST-tagged protein gave rise to accumulation of an expected 40-kDa polypeptide, which had the characteristics of the predicted protein.

  7. Giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) population dynamics and bamboo (subfamily Bambusoideae) life history: a structured population approach to examining carrying capacity when the prey are semelparous

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, J.; Ackleh, A.S.; Leonard, B.P.; Wang, Hongfang

    1999-01-01

    The giant panda, Ailuropoda melanoleuca, is a highly specialized Ursid whose diet consists almost entirely of various species of bamboo. Bamboo (Bambusoideae) is a grass subfamily whose species often exhibit a synchronous semelparity. Synchronous semelparity can create local drops in carrying capacity for the panda. We modeled the interaction of pandas and their bamboo food resources with an age structured panda population model linked to a natural history model of bamboo biomass dynamics based on literature values of bamboo biomass, and giant panda life history dynamics. This paper reports the results of our examination of the interaction between pandas and their bamboo food resource and its implications for panda conservation. In the model all panda populations were well below the carrying capacity of the habitat. The giant panda populations growth was most sensitive to changes in birth rates and removal of reproductive aged individuals. Periodic starvation that has been documented in conjunction with bamboo die-offs is probably related to the inability to move to other areas within the region where bamboo is still available. Based on the results of this model, giant panda conservation should concentrate on keeping breeding individuals in the wild, keep corridors to different bamboo species open to pandas, and to concentrate research on bamboo life history.

  8. Dietary resources shape the adaptive changes of cyanide detoxification function in giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Huang, He; Yie, Shangmian; Liu, Yuliang; Wang, Chengdong; Cai, Zhigang; Zhang, Wenping; Lan, Jingchao; Huang, Xiangming; Luo, Li; Cai, Kailai; Hou, Rong; Zhang, Zhihe

    2016-10-05

    The functional adaptive changes in cyanide detoxification in giant panda appear to be response to dietary transition from typical carnivore to herbivorous bear. We tested the absorption of cyanide contained in bamboo/bamboo shoots with a feeding trial in 20 adult giant pandas. We determined total cyanide content in bamboo shoots and giant panda's feces, levels of urinary thiocyanate and tissue rhodanese activity using color reactions with a spectrophotometer. Rhodanese expression in liver and kidney at transcription and translation levels were measured using real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. We compared differences of rhodanese activity and gene expressions among giant panda, rabbit (herbivore) and cat (carnivore), and between newborn and adult giant pandas. Bamboo shoots contained 3.2 mg/kg of cyanide and giant pandas absorbed more than 65% of cyanide. However, approximately 80% of absorbed cyanide was metabolized to less toxic thiocyanate that was discharged in urine. Rhodanese expression and activity in liver and kidney of giant panda were significantly higher than in cat, but lower than in rabbit (all P < 0.05). Levels in adult pandas were higher than that in newborn cub. Phylogenetic analysis of both nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the rhodanese gene supported a closer relationship of giant panda with carnivores than with herbivores.

  9. Genome-wide survey and analysis of microsatellites in giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), with a focus on the applications of a novel microsatellite marker system.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jie; Li, Yu-Zhi; Du, Lian-Ming; Yang, Bo; Shen, Fu-Jun; Zhang, He-Min; Zhang, Zhi-He; Zhang, Xiu-Yue; Yue, Bi-Song

    2015-02-07

    The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is a critically endangered species endemic to China. Microsatellites have been preferred as the most popular molecular markers and proven effective in estimating population size, paternity test, genetic diversity for the critically endangered species. The availability of the giant panda complete genome sequences provided the opportunity to carry out genome-wide scans for all types of microsatellites markers, which now opens the way for the analysis and development of microsatellites in giant panda. By screening the whole genome sequence of giant panda in silico mining, we identified microsatellites in the genome of giant panda and analyzed their frequency and distribution in different genomic regions. Based on our search criteria, a repertoire of 855,058 SSRs was detected, with mono-nucleotides being the most abundant. SSRs were found in all genomic regions and were more abundant in non-coding regions than coding regions. A total of 160 primer pairs were designed to screen for polymorphic microsatellites using the selected tetranucleotide microsatellite sequences. The 51 novel polymorphic tetranucleotide microsatellite loci were discovered based on genotyping blood DNA from 22 captive giant pandas in this study. Finally, a total of 15 markers, which showed good polymorphism, stability, and repetition in faecal samples, were used to establish the novel microsatellite marker system for giant panda. Meanwhile, a genotyping database for Chengdu captive giant pandas (n = 57) were set up using this standardized system. What's more, a universal individual identification method was established and the genetic diversity were analysed in this study as the applications of this marker system. The microsatellite abundance and diversity were characterized in giant panda genomes. A total of 154,677 tetranucleotide microsatellites were identified and 15 of them were discovered as the polymorphic and stable loci. The individual

  10. Factors affecting the outcome of artificial insemination using cryopreserved spermatozoa in the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Li, Desheng; Zhou, Yingmin; Zhou, Qiang; Li, Rengui; Wang, Chengdong; Huang, Zhi; Hull, Vanessa; Zhang, Hemin

    2012-01-01

    Artificial insemination (AI) is an important component of captive breeding programs for endangered species, such as the giant panda. The panda has been the subject of increasingly successful captive breeding programs involving a compilation of assisted breeding techniques, including AI using cryopreserved spermatozoa. AI implementation is currently hampered by a lack of understanding of the factors that may cause failure. We investigated factors influencing the probability of success of AI for 14 giant panda females housed at the China Center for Research and Conservation of the Giant Panda (CCRCGP) inseminated in a total of 20 instances using cryopreserved spermatozoa from 11 males currently residing in 6 different captive breeding institutions. One of the pandas was the oldest giant panda female to ever successfully conceive from AI (20.5 years old). The success of AI was significantly affected by the timing of AI in relationship to both timing of peak urinary estrogen of the female and percent decline in urinary estrogen between the peak level and the first AI attempt. Our results suggest that the window for successful AI in giant pandas may be narrower than previously suspected, although individual differences in rates of decline in urinary estrogen may reflect some degree of variation in this crucial window across females. Our results are consistent with recent research on pandas and other species that demonstrates the efficacy of cryopreserved spermatozoa for AI and highlights the need for more in-depth analysis of factors related to female physiology that may influence its success.

  11. Dietary resources shape the adaptive changes of cyanide detoxification function in giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca)

    PubMed Central

    Huang, He; Yie, Shangmian; Liu, Yuliang; Wang, Chengdong; Cai, Zhigang; Zhang, Wenping; Lan, Jingchao; Huang, Xiangming; Luo, Li; Cai, Kailai; Hou, Rong; Zhang, Zhihe

    2016-01-01

    The functional adaptive changes in cyanide detoxification in giant panda appear to be response to dietary transition from typical carnivore to herbivorous bear. We tested the absorption of cyanide contained in bamboo/bamboo shoots with a feeding trial in 20 adult giant pandas. We determined total cyanide content in bamboo shoots and giant panda’s feces, levels of urinary thiocyanate and tissue rhodanese activity using color reactions with a spectrophotometer. Rhodanese expression in liver and kidney at transcription and translation levels were measured using real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. We compared differences of rhodanese activity and gene expressions among giant panda, rabbit (herbivore) and cat (carnivore), and between newborn and adult giant pandas. Bamboo shoots contained 3.2 mg/kg of cyanide and giant pandas absorbed more than 65% of cyanide. However, approximately 80% of absorbed cyanide was metabolized to less toxic thiocyanate that was discharged in urine. Rhodanese expression and activity in liver and kidney of giant panda were significantly higher than in cat, but lower than in rabbit (all P < 0.05). Levels in adult pandas were higher than that in newborn cub. Phylogenetic analysis of both nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the rhodanese gene supported a closer relationship of giant panda with carnivores than with herbivores. PMID:27703267

  12. Prevalence and molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium in giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) in Sichuan province, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Chen, Zuqin; Xie, Yue; Hou, Rong; Wu, Qidun; Gu, Xiaobing; Lai, Weiming; Peng, Xuerong; Yang, Guangyou

    2015-06-25

    Cryptosporidium spp. have been extensively reported to cause significant diarrheal disease in humans and domestic animals. On the contrary, little information is available on the prevalence and characterization of Cryptosporidium in wild animals in China, especially in giant pandas. The aim of the present study was to detect Cryptosporidium infections and identify Cryptosporidium species at the molecular level in both captive and wild giant pandas in Sichuan province, China. Using a PCR approach, we amplified and sequenced the 18S rRNA gene from 322 giant pandas fecal samples (122 from 122 captive individuals and 200 collected from four habitats) in Sichuan province, China. The Cryptosporidium species/genotypes were identified via a BLAST comparison against published Cryptosporidium sequences available in GenBank followed by phylogenetic analysis. The results revealed that both captive and wild giant pandas were infected with a single Cryptosporidium species, C. andersoni, at a prevalence of 15.6% (19/122) and 0.5% (1/200) in captive and wild giant pandas, respectively. The present study revealed the existence of C. andersoni in both captive and wild giant panda fecal samples for the first time, and also provided useful fundamental data for further research on the molecular epidemiology and control of Cryptosporidium infection in giant pandas.

  13. Dietary shifts affect the gastrointestinal microflora of the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Williams, C L; Willard, S; Kouba, A; Sparks, D; Holmes, W; Falcone, J; Williams, C H; Brown, A

    2013-06-01

    Giant pandas exhibit seasonal changes in bamboo plant part preference. The influences on the gastrointestinal tracts (GIT) microbial populations were evaluated during a 14-month period for a pair of adult male and female giant pandas housed at the Memphis Zoo using traditional culturing methods to enumerate eight bacterial groups (total anaerobes, total aerobes (TAR), streptococci (STR), total enterics, Escherichia coli, Bacteroides spp., lactobacilli and Clostridium spp.). Both the male and female pandas altered bamboo consumption behaviours, with a sharp decrease in leaf preference in April 2010 and returning to high levels of leaf preference from June to October, corresponding to significant shifts in the densities of TAR, STR, and lactobacilli and Bacteroides spp. These findings indicate seasonal changes in food preference affect the assemblages of microbial populations within the GIT of the giant panda and contribute to a better understanding of the importance of bamboo in this species' foraging strategy.

  14. Sequencing, annotation and comparative analysis of nine BACs of giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yang; Cai, Jing; Li, JianWen; Li, Bo; Lin, RunMao; Tian, Feng; Wang, XiaoLing; Wang, Jun

    2010-01-01

    A 10-fold BAC library for giant panda was constructed and nine BACs were selected to generate finish sequences. These BACs could be used as a validation resource for the de novo assembly accuracy of the whole genome shotgun sequencing reads of giant panda newly generated by the Illumina GA sequencing technology. Complete sanger sequencing, assembly, annotation and comparative analysis were carried out on the selected BACs of a joint length 878 kb. Homologue search and de novo prediction methods were used to annotate genes and repeats. Twelve protein coding genes were predicted, seven of which could be functionally annotated. The seven genes have an average gene size of about 41 kb, an average coding size of about 1.2 kb and an average exon number of 6 per gene. Besides, seven tRNA genes were found. About 27 percent of the BAC sequence is composed of repeats. A phylogenetic tree was constructed using neighbor-join algorithm across five species, including giant panda, human, dog, cat and mouse, which reconfirms dog as the most related species to giant panda. Our results provide detailed sequence and structure information for new genes and repeats of giant panda, which will be helpful for further studies on the giant panda.

  15. Serosurvey of selected viruses in captive giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) in China.

    PubMed

    Qin, Qin; Li, Desheng; Zhang, Hemin; Hou, Rong; Zhang, Zhihe; Zhang, Chenglin; Zhang, Jinguo; Wei, Fuwen

    2010-05-19

    Serum samples from 92 giant pandas in three captive facilities were tested for antibodies against five viruses of carnivores. Antibody titers against canine distemper virus (CDV) in two facilities in which giant pandas were vaccinated were variable. The canine adenovirus (CAV-1) and canine parvovirus (CPV) titers in vaccinated group were both positive, but titers were not high and varied among individual except one vaccinated panda had extremely high CAV-1 titer, indicating infection with the field virus following vaccination. Our results suggest that the vaccines used for these giant pandas do not elicit consistent antibody titers. Antibody titers against CDV, CPV and CAV-1 in unvaccinated giant pandas were highly variable, especially CPV titer. Almost half of sera were CPV antibody positive, and CPV titers were high enough to suggest infection with the virus. Canine coronavirus (CCV) and canine parainfluenza virus (CPIV) titers were not detected in all serum samples. The results of this study emphasize the need for research on infectious diseases of giant pandas and development of suitable vaccines for the species. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Overexpression, purification, and pharmacologic evaluation of anticancer activity of ribosomal protein L24 from the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Hou, Y L; Ding, X; Hou, W; Song, B; Wang, T; Wang, F; Li, J; Zhong, J; Xu, T; Ma, B X; Zhu, H Q; Li, J H; Zhong, J C

    2013-10-18

    The ribosomal protein L24 (RPL24) belongs to the L24E family of ribosomal proteins and is located in the cytoplasm. The purpose of this study was to investigate the structure and anti-cancer function of RPL24 of the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). The complementary DNA of RPL24 was cloned successfully using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction technology. We constructed a recombinant expression vector containing RPL24 complementary DNA and overexpressed it in Escherichia coli using pET28a plasmids. The expression product obtained was purified using Ni-chelating affinity chromatography. The results indicated that the length of the fragment cloned is 509 bp, and it contains an open-reading frame of 474 bp encoding 157 amino acids. Primary structure analysis revealed that the molecular weight of the putative RPL24 protein is 17.78 kDa with a theoretical isoelectric point of 11.86. The RPL24 gene is readily expressed in E. coli, and the RPL24 fused with the N-terminal histidine-tagged protein to give rise to the accumulation of an expected 23.51-kDa polypeptide. The inhibitory rate in mice treated with 0.1 mg/mL RPL24, the highest of 3 doses administered, can reach 67.662%, which may be comparable to the response to mannatide. The histology of organs with tumors showed that the tissues in the RPL24 group displayed a looser arrangement compared with that in the control group. Furthermore, no obvious damage was apparent in other organs, such as heart, lung, and kidney. The data showed that the recombinant RPL24 had time and dose dependency on the cell growth inhibition rate. Human laryngeal carcinoma Hep-2 cells treated with 0.3125-10 µg/mL RPL24 for 24 h displayed significant cell growth inhibition (P < 0.05; N = 6) in assays using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol- 2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide compared with that in control (untreated) cells. By contrast, human hepatoma Hep G-2 cells displayed no significant change (P > 0.05; N = 6) from control

  17. Female giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) chirps advertise the caller's fertile phase.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Benjamin D; Keating, Jennifer L; Rengui, Li; Huang, Yan; Swaisgood, Ronald R

    2010-04-07

    Although female mammal vocal behaviour is known to advertise fertility, to date, no non-human mammal study has shown that the acoustic structure of female calls varies significantly around their fertile period. Here, we used a combination of hormone measurements and acoustic analyses to determine whether female giant panda chirps have the potential to signal the caller's precise oestrous stage (fertile versus pre-fertile). We then used playback experiments to examine the response of male giant pandas to female chirps produced during fertile versus pre-fertile phases of the caller's reproductive cycle. Our results show that the acoustic structure of female giant panda chirps differs between fertile and pre-fertile callers and that male giant pandas can perceive differences in female chirps that allow them to determine the exact timing of the female's fertile phase. These findings indicate that male giant pandas could use vocal cues to preferentially associate and copulate with females at the optimum time for insemination and reveal the likely importance of female vocal signals for coordinating reproductive efforts in this critically endangered species.

  18. Female giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) chirps advertise the caller's fertile phase

    PubMed Central

    Charlton, Benjamin D.; Keating, Jennifer L.; Rengui, Li; Huang, Yan; Swaisgood, Ronald R.

    2010-01-01

    Although female mammal vocal behaviour is known to advertise fertility, to date, no non-human mammal study has shown that the acoustic structure of female calls varies significantly around their fertile period. Here, we used a combination of hormone measurements and acoustic analyses to determine whether female giant panda chirps have the potential to signal the caller's precise oestrous stage (fertile versus pre-fertile). We then used playback experiments to examine the response of male giant pandas to female chirps produced during fertile versus pre-fertile phases of the caller's reproductive cycle. Our results show that the acoustic structure of female giant panda chirps differs between fertile and pre-fertile callers and that male giant pandas can perceive differences in female chirps that allow them to determine the exact timing of the female's fertile phase. These findings indicate that male giant pandas could use vocal cues to preferentially associate and copulate with females at the optimum time for insemination and reveal the likely importance of female vocal signals for coordinating reproductive efforts in this critically endangered species. PMID:19955154

  19. Decreased microbial diversity and Lactobacillus group in the intestine of geriatric giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhirong; Zeng, Dong; Wang, Qiang; Niu, Lili; Ni, Xueqin; Zou, Fuqin; Yang, Mingyue; Sun, Hao; Zhou, Yi; Liu, Qian; Yin, Zhongqiong; Pan, Kangcheng; Jing, Bo

    2016-05-01

    It has been established beyond doubt that giant panda genome lacks lignin-degrading related enzyme, gastrointestinal microbes may play a vital role in digestion of highly fibrous bamboo diet. However, there is not much information available about the intestinal bacteria composition in captive giant pandas with different ages. In this study, we compared the intestinal bacterial community of 12 captive giant pandas from three different age groups (subadults, adults, and geriatrics) through PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and real-time PCR analysis. Results indicated that microbial diversity in the intestine of adults was significantly higher than that of the geriatrics (p < 0.05), but not significant compared to the subadults (p > 0.05). The predominant bands in DGGE patterns shared by the twelve pandas were related to Firmicutes and Proteobacteria. Additionally, in comparison to healthy individuals, antibiotic-treated animals showed partial microbial dysbiosis. Real-time PCR analyses confirmed a significantly higher abundance of the Lactobacillus in the fecal microbiota of adults (p < 0.05), while other bacterial groups and species detected did not significantly differ among the three age groups (p > 0.05). This study revealed that captive giant pandas with different ages showed different intestinal bacteria composition.

  20. Analysis of the breast milk of giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and the preparation of substitutes

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, Zhihe; HOU, Rong; LAN, Jingchao; WANG, Hairui; KUROKAWA, Hiroyuki; TAKATSU, Zenta; KOBAYASHI, Toyokazu; KOIE, Hiroshi; KAMATA, Hiroshi; KANAYAMA, Kiichi; WATANABE, Toshi

    2016-01-01

    The first milk substitute for giant panda cubs was developed in 1988 based on limited data about giant panda breast milk and that of certain types of bear. Mixtures of other formulas have also been fed to cubs at some facilities. However, they are not of sufficient nutritional quality for promoting growth in panda cubs. Here, we report analysis of giant panda breast milk and propose new milk substitutes for cubs, which were developed based on the results of our analysis. The Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding obtained breast milk samples from three giant pandas. Up to 30 ml of breast milk were collected from each mother by hand. Then, the milk samples were frozen and sent to Nihon University. The levels of protein, fat, carbohydrates, ash, moisture, vitamins, minerals, total amino acids, fatty acids, lactose and other carbohydrates in the milk were analyzed. The breast milk samples exhibited the following nutritional values: protein: 6.6–8.5%, fat: 6.9–16.4%, carbohydrates: 2.5–9.1%, ash: 0.9–1.0% and moisture: 67–83%. We designed two kinds of milk substitutes based on the data obtained and the nutritional requirements of dogs, cats and rodents. The nutritional composition of the milk substitutes for the first and second stages was as follows: protein: 38 and 26%, fat: 40 and 40%, carbohydrates: 13 and 25%, ash: 6 and 6% and moisture: 3 and 3%, respectively. In addition, the substitutes contained vitamins, minerals, taurine, docosahexaenoic acid, lactoferrin, nucleotides and other nutrients. PMID:26781707

  1. Analysis of the breast milk of giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and the preparation of substitutes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhihe; Hou, Rong; Lan, Jingchao; Wang, Hairui; Kurokawa, Hiroyuki; Takatsu, Zenta; Kobayashi, Toyokazu; Koie, Hiroshi; Kamata, Hiroshi; Kanayama, Kiichi; Watanabe, Toshi

    2016-06-01

    The first milk substitute for giant panda cubs was developed in 1988 based on limited data about giant panda breast milk and that of certain types of bear. Mixtures of other formulas have also been fed to cubs at some facilities. However, they are not of sufficient nutritional quality for promoting growth in panda cubs. Here, we report analysis of giant panda breast milk and propose new milk substitutes for cubs, which were developed based on the results of our analysis. The Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding obtained breast milk samples from three giant pandas. Up to 30 ml of breast milk were collected from each mother by hand. Then, the milk samples were frozen and sent to Nihon University. The levels of protein, fat, carbohydrates, ash, moisture, vitamins, minerals, total amino acids, fatty acids, lactose and other carbohydrates in the milk were analyzed. The breast milk samples exhibited the following nutritional values: protein: 6.6-8.5%, fat: 6.9-16.4%, carbohydrates: 2.5-9.1%, ash: 0.9-1.0% and moisture: 67-83%. We designed two kinds of milk substitutes based on the data obtained and the nutritional requirements of dogs, cats and rodents. The nutritional composition of the milk substitutes for the first and second stages was as follows: protein: 38 and 26%, fat: 40 and 40%, carbohydrates: 13 and 25%, ash: 6 and 6% and moisture: 3 and 3%, respectively. In addition, the substitutes contained vitamins, minerals, taurine, docosahexaenoic acid, lactoferrin, nucleotides and other nutrients.

  2. Prolonged transition time between colostrum and mature milk in a bear, the giant panda, Ailuropoda melanoleuca.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Kate; Hou, Rong; Wang, Hairui; Zhang, Zhihe; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Tong; Watson, David G; Burchmore, Richard J S; Loeffler, I Kati; Kennedy, Malcolm W

    2015-10-01

    Bears produce the most altricial neonates of any placental mammal. We hypothesized that the transition from colostrum to mature milk in bears reflects a temporal and biochemical adaptation for altricial development and immune protection. Comparison of bear milks with milks of other eutherians yielded distinctive protein profiles. Proteomic and metabolomic analysis of serial milk samples collected from six giant pandas showed a prolonged transition from colostrum to main-phase lactation over approximately 30 days. Particularly striking are the persistence or sequential appearance of adaptive and innate immune factors. The endurance of immunoglobulin G suggests an unusual duration of trans-intestinal absorption of maternal antibodies, and is potentially relevant to the underdeveloped lymphoid system of giant panda neonates. Levels of certain milk oligosaccharides known to exert anti-microbial activities and/or that are conducive to the development of neonatal gut microbiomes underwent an almost complete changeover around days 20-30 postpartum, coincident with the maturation of the protein profile. A potential metabolic marker of starvation was detected, the prominence of which may reflect the natural postpartum period of anorexia in giant panda mothers. Early lactation in giant pandas, and possibly in other ursids, appears to be adapted for the unique requirements of unusually altricial eutherian neonates.

  3. Prolonged transition time between colostrum and mature milk in a bear, the giant panda, Ailuropoda melanoleuca

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Kate; Hou, Rong; Wang, Hairui; Zhang, Zhihe; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Tong; Watson, David G.; Burchmore, Richard J. S.; Loeffler, I. Kati; Kennedy, Malcolm W.

    2015-01-01

    Bears produce the most altricial neonates of any placental mammal. We hypothesized that the transition from colostrum to mature milk in bears reflects a temporal and biochemical adaptation for altricial development and immune protection. Comparison of bear milks with milks of other eutherians yielded distinctive protein profiles. Proteomic and metabolomic analysis of serial milk samples collected from six giant pandas showed a prolonged transition from colostrum to main-phase lactation over approximately 30 days. Particularly striking are the persistence or sequential appearance of adaptive and innate immune factors. The endurance of immunoglobulin G suggests an unusual duration of trans-intestinal absorption of maternal antibodies, and is potentially relevant to the underdeveloped lymphoid system of giant panda neonates. Levels of certain milk oligosaccharides known to exert anti-microbial activities and/or that are conducive to the development of neonatal gut microbiomes underwent an almost complete changeover around days 20–30 postpartum, coincident with the maturation of the protein profile. A potential metabolic marker of starvation was detected, the prominence of which may reflect the natural postpartum period of anorexia in giant panda mothers. Early lactation in giant pandas, and possibly in other ursids, appears to be adapted for the unique requirements of unusually altricial eutherian neonates. PMID:26587250

  4. Giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) spermatozoon decondensation in vitro is not compromised by cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Spindler, Rebecca E; Huang, Yan; Howard, Jo Gayle; Wang, Peng Yan; Zhang, Hemin; Zhang, Guiquan; Wildt, David E

    2006-01-01

    Natural breeding of giant pandas in captivity is compromised, making artificial insemination and spermatozoa cryopreservation essential for genetic management. This study examined the influence of freeze-thawing on traditional parameters such as motility and spermatozoon functionality, specifically decondensation in vitro. Giant panda spermatozoa were assessed before and after rapid cryopreservation (4 degrees C to -130 degrees C over 2 min) in liquid nitrogen vapour. Spermatozoa pre-incubated in medium for 6 h were co-incubated with cat zonae (2 zonae microL(-1)) for 30 min to effect capacitation and an acrosome reaction. Spermatozoa were then mixed with mature cat oocyte cytoplasm (2 cytoplasm microL(-1)) for 4 h and evaluated for decondensation. Frozen spermatozoa were less motile (P < 0.05) than fresh counterparts immediately post-thawing, but not after 6 h incubation. There were more (P < 0.05) spermatozoa with completely diffused chromatin post-thaw (10.4 +/- 1.3%; mean +/- s.e.m.) compared to fresh counterparts (5.1 +/- 1.0%). However, there was no overall difference (P > 0.05) in the incidence of decondensation between fresh (4 h, 69.8 +/- 5.9%) and thawed (4 h, 71.5 +/- 4.9%) spermatozoa after exposure to cat oocyte cytoplasm. It is concluded that the 'rapid' method now used to cryopreserve giant panda spermatozoa has little impact on spermatozoon decondensation.

  5. The normal vaginal and uterine bacterial microbiome in giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Cheng, Guangyang; Li, Caiwu; Yang, Jiang; Li, Jianan; Chen, Danyu; Zou, Wencheng; Jin, SenYan; Zhang, Hemin; Li, Desheng; He, Yongguo; Wang, Chengdong; Wang, Min; Wang, Hongning

    2017-06-01

    While the health effects of the colonization of the reproductive tracts of mammals by bacterial communities are widely known, there is a dearth of knowledge specifically in relation to giant panda microbiomes. In order to investigate the vaginal and uterine bacterial diversity of healthy giant pandas, we used high-throughput sequence analysis of portions of the 16S rRNA gene, based on samples taken from the vaginas (GPV group) and uteri (GPU group) of these animals. Results showed that the four most abundant phyla, which contained in excess of 98% of the total sequences, were Proteobacteria (59.2% for GPV and 51.4% for GPU), Firmicutes (34.4% for GPV and 23.3% for GPU), Actinobacteria (5.2% for GPV and 14.0% for GPU) and Bacteroidetes (0.3% for GPV and 10.3% for GPU). At the genus level, Escherichia was most abundant (11.0%) in the GPV, followed by Leuconostoc (8.7%), Pseudomonas (8.0%), Acinetobacter (7.3%), Streptococcus (6.3%) and Lactococcus (6.0%). In relation to the uterine samples, Janthinobacterium had the highest prevalence rate (20.2%), followed by Corynebacterium (13.2%), Streptococcus (19.6%), Psychrobacter (9.3%), Escherichia (7.5%) and Bacteroides (6.2%). Moreover, both Chao1 and abundance-based coverage estimator (ACE) species richness indices, which were operating at the same sequencing depth for each sample, demonstrated that GPV had more species richness than GPU, while Simpson and Shannon indices of diversity indicated that GPV had the higher bacterial diversity. These findings contribute to our understanding of the potential influence abnormal reproductive tract microbial communities have on negative pregnancy outcomes in giant pandas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Electroejaculation and semen analysis and freezing in the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Platz, C C; Wildt, D E; Howard, J G; Bush, M

    1983-01-01

    Semen was collected by a standardized electroejaculation procedure from a giant panda on 4 occasions. Ejaculate volume, sperm count and % sperm motility were 2.3-3.6 ml, 62-562 x 10(6) spermatozoa/ml and 45-85%, respectively. The results, although limited to a single male, suggested a seasonal influence on ejaculate and gonadal parameters with improved ejaculate volume, sperm motility and increased testicular size in the season proximate to the female's oestrous period. Frozen-thawed spermatozoa were motile with no apparent abnormalities induced by the freezing procedure.

  7. Morphological study of the lingual papillae of the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) by scanning electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pastor, J F; Barbosa, M; De Paz, F J

    2008-01-01

    Due to the scarcity of giant pandas, there are few descriptions of their morphology and even fewer of their microscopic anatomy and the ultrastructure of their organs. In this study of the complete tongue of an adult male giant panda, we describe the morphology of its lingual surface, the different types of papillae, their characteristics and topographic distribution. It was seen that there are four main types of lingual papillae: filiform, conical, fungiform and vallate. There was no sign of foliate papillae, tuberculum intermolare or sublingua. Papilla distribution was not limited to the dorsum of the tongue, but was also seen on the anterior and ventral surfaces of the tongue. In the anterior third of the midline there is a smooth area with no papillae at all. Morphology of the microgrooves and pores is similar to that observed in other mammals. The papillae share characteristics encountered in Carnivora and herbivorous species of mammals. A narrow bamboo-based diet and specialized manner of eating have together resulted in modification of the tongue of a carnivoran, giving it some characteristics typical of an herbivore. PMID:18254792

  8. cDNA, genomic sequence cloning, and overexpression of EIF1 from the giant panda (Ailuropoda Melanoleuca) and the black bear (Ursus Thibetanus Mupinensis).

    PubMed

    Hou, Wan-ru; Tang, Yun; Hou, Yi-ling; Song, Yan; Zhang, Tian; Wu, Guang-fu

    2010-07-01

    Eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) EIF1 is a universally conserved translation factor that is involved in translation initiation site selection. The cDNA and the genomic sequences of EIF1 were cloned successfully from the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and the black bear (Ursus thibetanus mupinensis) using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technology and touchdown-polymerase chain reaction, respectively. The cDNAs of the EIF1 cloned from the giant panda and the black bear are 418 bp in size, containing an open reading frame (ORF) of 342 bp encoding 113 amino acids. The length of the genomic sequence of the giant panda is 1909 bp, which contains four exons and three introns. The length of the genomic sequence of the black bear is 1897 bp, which also contains four exons and three introns. Sequence alignment indicates a high degree of homology to those of Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, and Bos Taurus at both amino acid and DNA levels. Topology prediction shows there are one N-glycosylation site, two Casein kinase II phosphorylation sites, and a Amidation site in the EIF1 protein of the giant panda and black bear. In addition, there is a protein kinase C phosphorylation site in EIF1 of the giant panda. The giant panda and the black bear EIF1 genes were overexpressed in E. coli BL21. The results indicated that the both EIF1 fusion proteins with the N-terminally His-tagged form gave rise to the accumulation of two expected 19 kDa polypeptide. The expression products obtained could be used to purify the proteins and study their function further.

  9. Effects of Ambient Environmental Factors on the Stereotypic Behaviors of Giant Pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, He; Duan, Hejun; Wang, Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Stereotypies are commonly observed in zoo animals, and it is necessary to better understand whether ambient environmental factors contribute to stereotypy and how to affect animal welfare in zoo settings. This study investigated the relationships between stereotypic behaviors and environmental factors including ambient temperatures, humidity, light intensity, sound intensity and number of visitors. Seven giant pandas were observed in three indoor enclosures and three outdoor enclosures. Environmental factors were measured for both indoor and outdoor enclosures and the effect they had on stereotypical behaviors was investigated. Our research found that light intensity significantly correlated with all stereotypies behaviors. Higher environmental temperature reduced the duration of pacing but increased the frequency of pacing, the duration and frequency of door-directed, meanwhile the duration of head-toss. However, we found no noticeable effect of humidity on stereotypic behaviors except for the frequency of head-toss. We also found that sound intensity was not correlated with stereotypies. Finally, the growth of visitors was negatively associated with the duration of door-directed. These results demonstrated that various environmental factors can have significant effects on stereotypic behaviors causing the expression of various stereotypies. Thus, stereotypies in zoo animals may not simply represent suboptimal welfare, but rather might be adopted as a means of coping with an aversive environment. PMID:28107477

  10. Effects of Ambient Environmental Factors on the Stereotypic Behaviors of Giant Pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Liu, He; Duan, Hejun; Wang, Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Stereotypies are commonly observed in zoo animals, and it is necessary to better understand whether ambient environmental factors contribute to stereotypy and how to affect animal welfare in zoo settings. This study investigated the relationships between stereotypic behaviors and environmental factors including ambient temperatures, humidity, light intensity, sound intensity and number of visitors. Seven giant pandas were observed in three indoor enclosures and three outdoor enclosures. Environmental factors were measured for both indoor and outdoor enclosures and the effect they had on stereotypical behaviors was investigated. Our research found that light intensity significantly correlated with all stereotypies behaviors. Higher environmental temperature reduced the duration of pacing but increased the frequency of pacing, the duration and frequency of door-directed, meanwhile the duration of head-toss. However, we found no noticeable effect of humidity on stereotypic behaviors except for the frequency of head-toss. We also found that sound intensity was not correlated with stereotypies. Finally, the growth of visitors was negatively associated with the duration of door-directed. These results demonstrated that various environmental factors can have significant effects on stereotypic behaviors causing the expression of various stereotypies. Thus, stereotypies in zoo animals may not simply represent suboptimal welfare, but rather might be adopted as a means of coping with an aversive environment.

  11. Molecular characterization of a gene POLR2H encoded an essential subunit for RNA polymerase II from the Giant Panda (Ailuropoda Melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Du, Yu-Jie; Hou, Yi-Ling; Hou, Wan-Ru

    2013-02-01

    The Giant Panda is an endangered and valuable gene pool in genetic, its important functional gene POLR2H encodes an essential shared peptide H of RNA polymerases. The genomic DNA and cDNA sequences were cloned successfully for the first time from the Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) adopting touchdown-PCR and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), respectively. The length of the genomic sequence of the Giant Panda is 3,285 bp, including five exons and four introns. The cDNA fragment cloned is 509 bp in length, containing an open reading frame of 453 bp encoding 150 amino acids. Alignment analysis indicated that both the cDNA and its deduced amino acid sequence were highly conserved. Protein structure prediction showed that there was one protein kinase C phosphorylation site, four casein kinase II phosphorylation sites and one amidation site in the POLR2H protein, further shaping advanced protein structure. The cDNA cloned was expressed in Escherichia coli, which indicated that POLR2H fusion with the N-terminally His-tagged form brought about the accumulation of an expected 20.5 kDa polypeptide in line with the predicted protein. On the basis of what has already been achieved in this study, further deep-in research will be conducted, which has great value in theory and practical significance.

  12. Rising fecal glucocorticoid concentrations track reproductive activity in the female giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Kersey, David C; Wildt, David E; Brown, Janine L; Snyder, Rebecca J; Huang, Yan; Monfort, Steven L

    2011-09-01

    To better understand the adaptive significance of adrenal glucocorticoid (GC) variation in the giant panda, we assessed patterns of fecal GC excretion over time as well as during estrus, parturient and non-parturient luteal phases, lactation and acyclicity in 17 adult females. Fecal estrogen and GC patterns were positively correlated (P<0.05) in four of five periestrual females (r = 0.57-0.92). Among all reproductive states, fecal GC was highest (P<0.05) during periestrus (non-parturient, 495.9 ± 100.7 ng/g [mean ± SE]; parturient, 654.1 ± 10 6.5 ng/g; P>0.05). Concentrations of GC metabolites were lower (P<0.05) during the later stage of the luteal phase in non-parturient (334.8 ± 24.8 ng/g) compared to parturient (470.4 ± 54.0 ng/g) females. Although fecal GC concentrations in cyclic, non-parturient females did not differ (P>0.05) across all seasons, there were seasonal variations (P<0.05) in females that were acyclic and non-lactational. However, the overall lack of difference (P>0.05) in GC values between reproductively cyclic and acyclic females did not support the hypothesis that ovarian acyclicity is due to increased adrenal activity (related or unrelated to physiological stress). Furthermore, GCs may play an important role in the normal endocrine milieu associated with sexual receptivity and late pregnancy. These data demonstrate that both reproductive status and seasonal factors are important modulators of adrenal function in this endangered species.

  13. The bamboo-eating giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) has a sweet tooth: behavioral and molecular responses to compounds that taste sweet to humans.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Peihua; Josue-Almqvist, Jesusa; Jin, Xuelin; Li, Xia; Brand, Joseph G; Margolskee, Robert F; Reed, Danielle R; Beauchamp, Gary K

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of behavioral and genetic information indicates that taste perception and food sources are highly coordinated across many animal species. For example, sweet taste perception is thought to serve to detect and motivate consumption of simple sugars in plants that provide calories. Supporting this is the observation that most plant-eating mammals examined exhibit functional sweet perception, whereas many obligate carnivores have independently lost function of their sweet taste receptors and exhibit no avidity for simple sugars that humans describe as tasting sweet. As part of a larger effort to compare taste structure/function among species, we examined both the behavioral and the molecular nature of sweet taste in a plant-eating animal that does not consume plants with abundant simple sugars, the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). We evaluated two competing hypotheses: as plant-eating mammals, they should have a well-developed sweet taste system; however, as animals that do not normally consume plants with simple sugars, they may have lost sweet taste function, as has occurred in strict carnivores. In behavioral tests, giant pandas avidly consumed most natural sugars and some but not all artificial sweeteners. Cell-based assays revealed similar patterns of sweet receptor responses toward many of the sweeteners. Using mixed pairs of human and giant panda sweet taste receptor units (hT1R2+gpT1R3 and gpT1R2+hT1R3) we identified regions of the sweet receptor that may account for behavioral differences in giant pandas versus humans toward various sugars and artificial sweeteners. Thus, despite the fact that the giant panda's main food, bamboo, is very low in simple sugars, the species has a marked preference for several compounds that taste sweet to humans. We consider possible explanations for retained sweet perception in this species, including the potential extra-oral functions of sweet taste receptors that may be required for animals that consume

  14. cDNA, genomic sequence cloning and overexpression of ribosomal protein gene L9 (rpL9) of the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Hou, W R; Hou, Y L; Wu, G F; Song, Y; Su, X L; Sun, B; Li, J

    2011-01-01

    The ribosomal protein L9 (RPL9), a component of the large subunit of the ribosome, has an unusual structure, comprising two compact globular domains connected by an α-helix; it interacts with 23 S rRNA. To obtain information about rpL9 of Ailuropoda melanoleuca (the giant panda) we designed primers based on the known mammalian nucleotide sequence. RT-PCR and PCR strategies were employed to isolate cDNA and the rpL9 gene from A. melanoleuca; these were sequenced and analyzed. We overexpressed cDNA of the rpL9 gene in Escherichia coli BL21. The cloned cDNA fragment was 627 bp in length, containing an open reading frame of 579 bp. The deduced protein is composed of 192 amino acids, with an estimated molecular mass of 21.86 kDa and an isoelectric point of 10.36. The length of the genomic sequence is 3807 bp, including six exons and five introns. Based on alignment analysis, rpL9 has high similarity among species; we found 85% agreement of DNA and amino acid sequences with the other species that have been analyzed. Based on topology predictions, there are two N-glycosylation sites, five protein kinase C phosphorylation sites, one casein kinase II phosphorylation site, two tyrosine kinase phosphorylation sites, three N-myristoylation sites, one amidation site, and one ribosomal protein L6 signature 2 in the L9 protein of A. melanoleuca. The rpL9 gene can be readily expressed in E. coli; it fuses with the N-terminal GST-tagged protein, giving rise to the accumulation of an expected 26.51-kDa polypeptide, which is in good agreement with the predicted molecular weight. This expression product could be used for purification and further study of its function.

  15. Enhancing captive breeding in giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca): maintaining lactation when cubs are rejected, and understanding variation in milk collection and associated factors.

    PubMed

    Wei, Rongping; Zhang, Guiquan; Yin, Feng; Zhang, Hemin; Liu, Dingzhen

    2009-07-01

    From 1997 to 2002, a female giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) was artificially stimulated and lactation was maintained, after her neonates were removed due to the female's inability to provide maternal care. Milk samples were collected and the amount of milk collected was quantified. The lactation curve of this animal was estimated based on the Gamma function: Y(t)=at(b)e(-ct). The amount of milk collected showed significant, positive relationships with the number of days after parturition both in 1999 and in the whole study period from 1998 to 2002. This female's lactation curves fit the type I pattern of a typical mammalian lactation curve. Daily milk collection (g) during the first 30 days after parturition, and from 31 to 60 days after parturition, showed a consistent pattern with one peak at around 8:00 hr. More milk was collected during the latter period than during the former period. The amount of milk (g) collected on mucus excretion days was significantly less than that on days after mucus excretion had ended, yet no significant difference was found between milk collected one day before mucus days and on mucus days, or between milk collected one day before and one day after mucus days. Mucus excretion from the gastrointestinal tract significantly impacted the amount of milk collected. The results from this study may aid the captive propagation and conservation of giant pandas and other endangered and rare captive mammal species.

  16. Cloning and overexpression of an important functional gene ATP6V1F encoding a component of vacuolar ATPase from the Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Du, Yu-Jie; Hou, Yi-Ling; Hou, Wan-Ru

    2012-05-01

    ATP6V1F encodes a component of vacuolar ATPase mediating acidification. The cDNA and the genomic sequences of ATP6V1F were cloned successfully for the first time from the Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and touchdown-polymerase chain reaction, respectively. The cDNA fragment cloned is 364 bp in size, containing an open reading frame of 360 bp encoding 119 amino acids. Alignment analysis indicated that both ORF and the deduced amino acid sequence are highly conserved. The length of the genomic sequence of the Giant Panda is 2225 bp, including two exons and one intron. Topology prediction showed that there is one protein kinase C phosphorylation site, two Casein kinase II phosphorylation sites, and one N-myristoylation site in the ATP6V1F protein. The ATP6V1F gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli indicating that ATP6V1F fusion with the N-terminally His-tagged form gave rise to the accumulation of an expected 17 kDa polypeptide, which was according with the predicted protein and also could be used to purify the protein and study its function.

  17. Characterization of Haemaphysalis flava (Acari: Ixodidae) from Qingling subspecies of giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca qinlingensis) in Qinling Mountains (Central China) by morphology and molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wen-yu; Zhao, Guang-hui; Jia, Yan-qing; Bian, Qing-qing; Du, Shuai-zhi; Fang, Yan-qing; Qi, Mao-zhen; Yu, San-ke

    2013-01-01

    Tick is one of important ectoparasites capable of causing direct damage to their hosts and also acts as vectors of relevant infectious agents. In the present study, the taxa of 10 ticks, collected from Qinling giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca qinlingensis) in Qinling Mountains of China in April 2010, were determined using morphology and molecular markers (nucleotide ITS2 rDNA and mitochondrial 16S). Microscopic observation demonstrated that the morphological features of these ticks were similar to Haemaphysalis flava. Compared with other Haemaphysalis species, genetic variations between Haemaphysalis collected from A. m. qinlingensis and H. flava were the lowest in ITS2 rDNA and mitochondrial 16S, with sequence differences of 2.06%-2.40% and 1.30%-4.70%, respectively. Phylogenetic relationships showed that all the Haemaphysalis collected from A. m. qinlingensis were grouped with H. flava, further confirmed that the Haemaphysalis sp. is H. flava. This is the first report of ticks in giant panda by combining with morphology and molecular markers. This study also provided evidence that combining morphology and molecular tools provide a valuable and efficient tool for tick identification.

  18. Relationship of the estrogen surge and multiple mates to cub paternity in the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca): implications for optimal timing of copulation or artificial insemination.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Zhang, Hemin; Li, Desheng; Zhang, Guiquan; Wei, Rongping; Huang, Zhi; Zhou, Yingmin; Zhou, Qiang; Liu, Yang; Wildt, David E; Hull, Vanessa

    2012-11-01

    The effectiveness of ex situ breeding programs for endangered species can be limited by challenges in mimicking mating competitions that naturally occur among multiple mates in the wild. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of timed natural matings and/or artificial inseminations in the context of the urinary estrogen surge on cub production in the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). We used a large cohort of giant pandas, including 12 females and 17 males. DNA paternity exclusion was used to pinpoint accurately the interval during the estrogen surge that coincided with the ideal sperm deposition time to produce offspring. Of the 31 cubs (in 19 pregnancies), 22 (71.0%; 15 pregnancies) were produced from matings occurring on the day of or the day after the maximal urinary estrogen peak. Sixteen of the 19 pregnancies (84.2%) produced at least one offspring sired by the first male mating with the dam. There was a preponderance of twins (12 of 19; 63.2%), and dual paternities were discovered in 3 of 12 twin sets (25%). These findings indicate a strong relationship between the excreted estrogen surge and sperm deposition to achieve pregnancy in the giant panda. To ensure the production of the most genetically diverse young, it is imperative that the most appropriate male mate first and on the day of or the day after the highest detected estrogen value. There is no advantage to increasing the number of copulations or mating partners within 1 day of the estrogen peak on the incidence of twinning, although this practice may increase the prevalence of dual paternity in cases of multiple births.

  19. Protracted reproductive seasonality in the male giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) reflected by patterns in androgen profiles, ejaculate characteristics, and selected behaviors.

    PubMed

    Aitken-Palmer, Copper; Hou, Rong; Burrell, Caitlin; Zhang, Zhihe; Wang, Chengdong; Spindler, Rebecca; Wildt, David E; Ottinger, Mary Ann; Howard, JoGayle

    2012-06-01

    The female giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) experiences a brief (24-72 h) seasonal estrus, occurring once annually in spring (February-May). Our aim was to determine the existence and temporal profile of reproductive seasonality in the male of this species. The study was facilitated by 3 yr of access to eight giant panda males living in a large breeding center in China. Seasonal periods for the male were defined on the basis of female reproductive activity as prebreeding, breeding (early, peak, late), and nonbreeding seasons. Testes size, fecal androgen excretion, ejaculated sperm density, and frequency of reproductive behaviors (i.e., locomotion, scent marking, vocalizations) increased (P < 0.05) from the prebreeding period (October 1-January 31) to the early breeding season (February 1-March 21). Testes volume and sperm concentration were maximal from March 22 through April 15, a period coinciding with maximal female breeding activity. The occurrence of male reproductive behaviors and fecal androgen concentrations began declining during peak breeding and continued from April 16 through May 31 (late breeding period), returning to nadir throughout the nonbreeding interval (June 1-September 30). Reproductive quiescence throughout the latter period was associated with basal testes size/volume and aspermic ejaculates. Our results reveal that testes morphometry, fecal androgen excretion, seminal quality, and certain behaviors integrated together clearly demonstrate reproductive seasonality in the male giant panda. The coordinated increases in testes size, androgen production, sperm density, and sexual behaviors occur over a protracted interval, likely to prepare for and then accommodate a brief, unpredictable female estrus.

  20. Expression, purification, and evaluation for anticancer activity of ribosomal protein L31 gene (RPL31) from the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Su, Xiu-Lan; Hou, Yi-Ling; Yan, Xiang-Hui; Ding, Xiang; Hou, Wan-Ru; Sun, Bing; Zhang, Si-Nan

    2012-09-01

    Ribosomal protein L31 gene is a component of the 60S large ribosomal subunit encoded by RPL31 gene, while ribosomal protein L31 (RPL31) is an important constituent of peptidyltransferase center. In our research, the cDNA and the genomic sequence of RPL31 were cloned successfully from the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) using RT-PCR technology respectively, following sequencing and analyzing preliminarily. We constructed a recombinant expression vector contained RPL31 cDNA and over-expressed it in Escherichia coli using pET28a plasmids. The expression product was purified to obtain recombinant protein of RPL31 from the giant panda. Recombinant protein of RPL31 obtained from the experiment acted on human laryngeal carcinoma Hep-2 and human hepatoma HepG-2 cells for study of its anti-cancer activity by MTT [3-(4, 5-dimehyl-2-thiazolyl)-2, 5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide] method. Then observe these cells growth depressive effect. The result indicated that the cDNA fragment of the RPL31 cloned from the giant panda is 419 bp in size, containing an open reading frame of 378 bp, and deduced protein was composed of 125 amino acids with an estimated molecular weight of 14.46-kDa and PI of 11.21. The length of the genomic sequence is 8,091 bp, which was found to possess four exons and three introns. The RPL31 gene can be readily expressed in E.coli, expecting 18-kDa polypeptide that formed inclusion bodies. Recombinant protein RPL31 from the giant panda consists of 157 amino acids with an estimated molecular weight of 17.86 kDa and PI of 10.77. The outcomes showed that the cell growth inhibition rate in a time- and dose-dependent on recombinant protein RPL31. And also indicated that the effect at low concentrations was better than high concentrations on Hep-2 cells, and the concentration of 0.33 μg/mL had the best rate of growth inhibition, 44 %. Consequently, our study aimed at revealing the recombinant protein RPL31 anti-cancer function from the giant panda

  1. The Bamboo-Eating Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) Has a Sweet Tooth: Behavioral and Molecular Responses to Compounds That Taste Sweet to Humans

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Peihua; Li, Xia; Brand, Joseph G.; Margolskee, Robert F.; Reed, Danielle R.; Beauchamp, Gary K.

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of behavioral and genetic information indicates that taste perception and food sources are highly coordinated across many animal species. For example, sweet taste perception is thought to serve to detect and motivate consumption of simple sugars in plants that provide calories. Supporting this is the observation that most plant-eating mammals examined exhibit functional sweet perception, whereas many obligate carnivores have independently lost function of their sweet taste receptors and exhibit no avidity for simple sugars that humans describe as tasting sweet. As part of a larger effort to compare taste structure/function among species, we examined both the behavioral and the molecular nature of sweet taste in a plant-eating animal that does not consume plants with abundant simple sugars, the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). We evaluated two competing hypotheses: as plant-eating mammals, they should have a well-developed sweet taste system; however, as animals that do not normally consume plants with simple sugars, they may have lost sweet taste function, as has occurred in strict carnivores. In behavioral tests, giant pandas avidly consumed most natural sugars and some but not all artificial sweeteners. Cell-based assays revealed similar patterns of sweet receptor responses toward many of the sweeteners. Using mixed pairs of human and giant panda sweet taste receptor units (hT1R2+gpT1R3 and gpT1R2+hT1R3) we identified regions of the sweet receptor that may account for behavioral differences in giant pandas versus humans toward various sugars and artificial sweeteners. Thus, despite the fact that the giant panda's main food, bamboo, is very low in simple sugars, the species has a marked preference for several compounds that taste sweet to humans. We consider possible explanations for retained sweet perception in this species, including the potential extra-oral functions of sweet taste receptors that may be required for animals that consume

  2. Comparative analysis and molecular characterization of genomic sequences and proteins of FABP4 and FABP5 from the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Song, B; Hou, Y L; Ding, X; Wang, T; Wang, F; Zhong, J C; Xu, T; Zhong, J; Hou, W R; Shuai, S R

    2014-02-20

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) are a family of small, highly conserved cytoplasmic proteins that bind long-chain fatty acids and other hydrophobic ligands. In this study, cDNA and genomic sequences of FABP4 and FABP5 were cloned successfully from the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technology and touchdown-PCR. The cDNAs of FABP4 and FABP5 cloned from the giant panda were 400 and 413 bp in length, containing an open reading frame of 399 and 408 bp, encoding 132 and 135 amino acids, respectively. The genomic sequences of FABP4 and FABP5 were 3976 and 3962 bp, respectively, which each contained four exons and three introns. Sequence alignment indicated a high degree of homology with reported FABP sequences of other mammals at both the amino acid and DNA levels. Topology prediction revealed seven protein kinase C phosphorylation sites, two casein kinase II phosphorylation sites, two N-myristoylation sites, and one cytosolic fatty acid-binding protein signature in the FABP4 protein, and three N-glycosylation sites, three protein kinase C phosphorylation sites, one casein kinase II phosphorylation site, one N-myristoylation site, one amidation site, and one cytosolic fatty acid-binding protein signature in the FABP5 protein. The FABP4 and FABP5 genes were overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 and they produced the expected 16.8- and 17.0-kDa polypeptides. The results obtained in this study provide information for further in-depth research of this system, which has great value of both theoretical and practical significance.

  3. Overexpression, purification, molecular characterization and pharmacological evaluation for anticancer activity of ribosomal protein S23 from the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Hou, Yiling; Ding, Xiang; Song, Bo; Wang, Fang; Hou, Wanru

    2013-06-01

    Ribosomal protein S23 (RPS23) is a component of the 40S small ribosomal subunit encoded by the RPS23 gene, which is specific to eukaryotes. The cDNA and genomic sequence of RPS23 were cloned from Ailuropoda melanoleuca (A. melanoleuca) using reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technology and touchdown PCR, respectively. The two sequences were analyzed preliminarily and the cDNA of the RPS23 gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) BL21. The cDNA of RPS23 cloned from giant panda was 472 bp, and it contained an open reading frame (ORF) of 432 bp encoding 142 amino acids. The nucleotide sequence of the coding sequence showed a high degree of homology to some mammals as determined by BLAST analysis, similar to the amino acid sequence. The genomic sequence was 2,105 bp in length, with 4 exons and 3 introns. The primary structure analysis revealed that the molecular weight of the putative RPS23 protein was 15.80 kDa with a theoretical isoelectric point (pI) of 11.23. The molecular weight of the recombinant protein RPS23 was 21.5 kDa with a theoretical pI of 10.57. Topology prediction showed that there are seven different patterns of functional sites in the RPS23 protein of giant panda. RPS23 was successfully expressed in E. coli and its protein fused with the N‑terminal His‑tagged protein triggered the accumulation of an expected 21.5‑kDa polypeptide. The inhibitory rate of tumor growth in mice treated with 0.1 µg/ml RPS23 protein was 49.45%, the highest in the three doses used, which may be comparable to mannatide treatment. Histology of immune organs showed that the tissues were characterized by a regular and tight arrangement, while tumor tissues of the mice in the RPS23 group exhibited a loose arrangement compared to the control group. However, there was no obvious damage to other organs, such as the heart, lung and kidney. Investigations are currently being conducted to determine the bioactive principles of the recombinant

  4. Microbial Diversity and Evidence of Novel Homoacetogens in the Gut of Both Geriatric and Adult Giant Pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca)

    PubMed Central

    Tun, Hein Min; Mauroo, Nathalie France; Yuen, Chan San; Ho, John Chi Wang; Wong, Mabel Ting; Leung, Frederick Chi-Ching

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have described the bacterial community residing in the guts of giant pandas, together with the presence of lignocellulolytic enzymes. However, a more comprehensive understanding of the intestinal microbial composition and its functional capacity in giant pandas remains a major goal. Here, we conducted a comparison of bacterial, fungal and homoacetogenic microbial communities from fecal samples taken from two geriatric and two adult captive giant pandas. 16S rDNA amplicon pyrosequencing revealed that Firmicutes and Proteobacteria are the most abundant microbiota in both geriatric and adult giant pandas. However, members of phylum Actinobacteria found in adult giant pandas were absent in their geriatric counterparts. Similarly, ITS1 amplicon pyrosequencing identified developmental changes in the most abundant fungal classes from Sordariomycetes in adult pandas to Saccharomycetes in geriatric pandas. Geriatric pandas exhibited significantly higher abundance of a potential probiotic fungus (Candida tropicalis) as compared to adult pandas, indicating their importance in the normal digestive physiology of aged pandas. Our study also reported the presence of a lignocellulolytic white-rot fungus, Perenniporia medulla-panis, and the evidence of novel homoacetogens residing in the guts of giant pandas. PMID:24475017

  5. Microbial diversity and evidence of novel homoacetogens in the gut of both geriatric and adult giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Tun, Hein Min; Mauroo, Nathalie France; Yuen, Chan San; Ho, John Chi Wang; Wong, Mabel Ting; Leung, Frederick Chi-Ching

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have described the bacterial community residing in the guts of giant pandas, together with the presence of lignocellulolytic enzymes. However, a more comprehensive understanding of the intestinal microbial composition and its functional capacity in giant pandas remains a major goal. Here, we conducted a comparison of bacterial, fungal and homoacetogenic microbial communities from fecal samples taken from two geriatric and two adult captive giant pandas. 16S rDNA amplicon pyrosequencing revealed that Firmicutes and Proteobacteria are the most abundant microbiota in both geriatric and adult giant pandas. However, members of phylum Actinobacteria found in adult giant pandas were absent in their geriatric counterparts. Similarly, ITS1 amplicon pyrosequencing identified developmental changes in the most abundant fungal classes from Sordariomycetes in adult pandas to Saccharomycetes in geriatric pandas. Geriatric pandas exhibited significantly higher abundance of a potential probiotic fungus (Candida tropicalis) as compared to adult pandas, indicating their importance in the normal digestive physiology of aged pandas. Our study also reported the presence of a lignocellulolytic white-rot fungus, Perenniporia medulla-panis, and the evidence of novel homoacetogens residing in the guts of giant pandas.

  6. Overexpression, purification, molecular characterization and the effect on tumor growth of ribosomal protein L22 from the Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Hou, Yiling; Ding, Xiang; Hou, Wanru; Song, Bo; Zeng, Yichun

    2014-05-01

    The ribosomal protein L22 (RPL22) protein belongs to the L22E family of ribosomal proteins. It is located in the cytoplasm. The purpose of this paper was to explore the structure and anti-cancer function of RPL22 of the Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). The cDNA of RPL22 was cloned successfully from the Giant Panda using RT-PCR technology. We constructed a recombinant expression vector containing RPL22 cDNA and over-expressed it in Escherichia coli using pET28a plasmids. The expression product obtained was purified by using Ni chelating affinity chromatography. The result indicated that the length of the fragment cloned is 414 bp, and it contains an open-reading frame of 387 bp encoding 128 amino acids. Primary structure analysis revealed that the molecular weight of the putative RPL22 protein is 14.74 kDa with a theoretical pI 9.21. The RPL22 gene can be really expressed in E. coli and the RPL22 protein, fusioned with the N-terminally His-tagged protein, gave rise to the accumulation of an expected 20.1 kDa polypeptide. The data showed that the recombinant protein RPL22 had a time- and dose-dependency on the cell growth inhibition rate. The human laryngeal carcinoma Hep-2 cells treated with 0.05-6 μg/ml of RPL22 for 24 h displayed significant cell growth inhibition (p<0.05, n=8) in assayed using MTT compared to the control (untreated) cells. The data indicate that the effect at low concentrations is better than high concentrations, and the concentration of 1.5 μg/ml has the best rate of growth inhibition of 47.70%. The inhibitory rate in mice treated with 1.5 μg/ml RPL22 protein can reach 43.75%. Histology of tumor organs shows that the tissues arranged looser in RPL22 group than those in control group. Meanwhile, there is no obvious damage to other organs, such as heart, lung and kidney. Further research is on going to determine the bioactive principle(s) of recombinant protein RPL22 responsible for its anticancer activity.

  7. Microsatellite variability reveals the necessity for genetic input from wild giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) into the captive population.

    PubMed

    Shen, Fujun; Zhang, Zhihe; He, Wei; Yue, Bisong; Zhang, Anju; Zhang, Liang; Hou, Rong; Wang, Chengdong; Watanabe, Toshi

    2009-03-01

    Recent success in breeding giant pandas in captivity has encouraged panda conservationists to believe that the ex situ population is ready to serve as a source for supporting the wild population. In this study, we used 11 microsatellite DNA markers to assess the amount and distribution of genetic variability present in the two largest captive populations (Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding, Sichuan Province and the China Research and Conservation Center for the Giant Panda at Wolong, Sichuan Province). The data were compared with those samples from wild pandas living in two key giant panda nature reserves (Baoxing Nature Reserve and Wanglang Nature Reserve). The results show that the captive populations have retained lower levels of allelic diversity and heterozygosity compared to isolated wild populations. However, low inbreeding coefficients indicate that captive populations are under careful genetic management. Excessive heterozygosity suggests that the two captive populations have experienced a genetic bottleneck, presumably caused by founder effects. Moreover, evidence of increased genetic divergence demonstrates restricted breeding options within facilities. Based on these results, we conclude that the genetic diversity in the captive populations is not optimal. Introduction of genetic materials from wild pandas and improved exchange of genetic materials among institutions will be necessary for the captive pandas to be representative of the wild populations.

  8. Estimation of the growth curve and heritability of the growth rate for giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) cubs.

    PubMed

    Che, T D; Wang, C D; Jin, L; Wei, M; Wu, K; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, H M; Li, D S

    2015-03-27

    Giant panda cubs have a low survival rate during the newborn and early growth stages. However, the growth and developmental parameters of giant panda cubs during the early lactation stage (from birth to 6 months) are not well known. We examined the growth and development of giant panda cubs by the Chapman growth curve model and estimated the heritability of the maximum growth rate at the early lactation stage. We found that 83 giant panda cubs reached their maximum growth rate at approximately 75-120 days after birth. The body weight of cubs at 75 days was 4285.99 g. Furthermore, we estimated that the heritability of the maximum growth rate was moderate (h(2) = 0.38). Our study describes the growth and development of giant panda cubs at the early lactation stage and provides valuable growth benchmarks. We anticipate that our results will be a starting point for more detailed research on increasing the survival rate of giant panda cubs. Feeding programs for giant panda cubs need further improvement.

  9. Construction of a 7-fold BAC library and cytogenetic mapping of 10 genes in the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Zhao, Yonghui; Liu, Zhaoliang; Zhang, Ying; Lian, Zhengxing; Li, Ning

    2006-01-01

    Background The giant panda, one of the most primitive carnivores, is an endangered animal. Although it has been the subject of many interesting studies during recent years, little is known about its genome. In order to promote research on this genome, a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library of the giant panda was constructed in this study. Results This BAC library contains 198,844 clones with an average insert size of 108 kb, which represents approximately seven equivalents of the giant panda haploid genome. Screening the library with 15 genes and 8 microsatellite markers demonstrates that it is representative and has good genome coverage. Furthermore, ten BAC clones harbouring AGXT, GHR, FSHR, IRBP, SOX14, TTR, BDNF, NT-4, LH and ZFX1 were mapped to 8 pairs of giant panda chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Conclusion This is the first large-insert genomic DNA library for the giant panda, and will contribute to understanding this endangered species in the areas of genome sequencing, physical mapping, gene cloning and comparative genomic studies. We also identified the physical locations of ten genes on their relative chromosomes by FISH, providing a preliminary framework for further development of a high resolution cytogenetic map of the giant panda. PMID:17109760

  10. Exosomal microRNAs in giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) breast milk: potential maternal regulators for the development of newborn cubs.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jideng; Wang, Chengdong; Long, Keren; Zhang, Hemin; Zhang, Jinwei; Jin, Long; Tang, Qianzi; Jiang, Anan; Wang, Xun; Tian, Shilin; Chen, Li; He, Dafang; Li, Desheng; Huang, Shan; Jiang, Zhi; Li, Mingzhou

    2017-06-14

    The physiological role of miRNAs is widely understood to include fine-tuning the post-transcriptional regulation of a wide array of biological processes. Extensive studies have indicated that exosomal miRNAs in the bodily fluids of various organisms can be transferred between living cells for the delivery of gene silencing signals. Here, we illustrated the expression characteristics of exosomal miRNAs in giant panda breast milk during distinct lactation periods and highlighted the enrichment of immune- and development-related endogenous miRNAs in colostral and mature giant panda milk. These miRNAs are stable, even under certain harsh conditions, via the protection of extracellular vesicles. These findings indicate that breast milk may facilitate the dietary intake of maternal miRNAs by infants for the regulation of postnatal development. We also detected exogenous plant miRNAs from the primary food source of the giant panda (bamboo) in the exosomes of giant panda breast milk that were associated with regulatory roles in basic metabolism and neuron development. This result suggested that dietary plant miRNAs are absorbed by host cells and subsequently secreted into bodily fluids as potential cross-kingdom regulators. In conclusion, exosomal miRNAs in giant panda breast milk may be crucial maternal regulators for the development of intrinsic 'slink' newborn cubs.

  11. Development of an enzyme immunoassay for urinary pregnanediol-3-glucuronide in a female giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Hama, Natsuki; Kanemitsu, Hideyasu; Tanikawa, Michiyo; Shibaya, Masami; Sakamoto, Kensuke; Oyama, Yujiro; Acosta, Tomas J; Ishikawa, Osamu; Pengyan, Wang; Okuda, Kiyoshi

    2009-07-01

    In order to enable monitoring of the reproductive status of the female giant panda after observation of estrus behavior, we developed an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) system for urinary pregnanediol-3-glucuronide (PdG), a progesterone metabolite, using commercial reagents and examined the changes in the urinary concentration of PdG in a female giant panda that showed pseudopregnancy and suspicious pseudopregnancy in 6 consecutive years. The developed EIA system had good reproducibility (intra- and interassay CVs 6.1% and 16.3%, respectively), good parallelism between the standard curve and the dose response curve of serial diluted samples and positive correlation (r=0.836) with the data for PdG in the same samples measured by gas chromatography. Urinary PdG in the female panda showed two phases of increase. The first elevation was observed immediately after estrus with the levels of PdG below 100 ng/Crmg, while the second phase was characterized by a drastic elevation above 100 ng/Crmg until the level began to decrease at the end of pseudopregnancy or suspicious pseudopregnancy. The length of the second phase had wider range than that of the first phase. In the present study, a new EIA assay system for urinary PdG in the female giant panda was developed, and we found that the length of the second phase is unstable in the pseudopregnant and suspicious pseudopregnant giant panda, in contrast with the unstable length of the first phase caused by delayed implantation in the pregnant giant panda.

  12. Phenological changes in bamboo carbohydrates explain the preference for culm over leaves by giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) during spring.

    PubMed

    Knott, Katrina K; Christian, Amelia L; Falcone, Josephine F; Vance, Carrie K; Bauer, Laura L; Fahey, George C; Kouba, Andrew J

    2017-01-01

    Seasonal changes in the foodscape force herbivores to select different plant species or plant parts to meet nutritional requirements. We examined whether the search for calorie-rich carbohydrates explained giant panda's selection for bamboo culm over leaves during spring. Leaves and culms were collected from four Phyllostachys bamboos (P. aurea, P. aureosulcata, P. glauca, and P. nuda) once per month over 18-27 months. Monthly changes in annual plant part nutrients were examined, and compared to seasonal foraging behaviors of captive giant pandas. Although total fiber was greater (p<0.0001) in culm (85.6 ± 0.5%) than leaves (55.3 ± 0.4%) throughout the year, culm fiber was at its lowest in spring (79-85%) when culm selection by giant pandas exceeded 70% of their overall diet. Culm starch also was greatest (p = 0.044) during spring (5.5 ± 1.1%) and 2.5-fold the percentage of starch in leaves (2.2 ± 0.6%). The free sugars in spring culm consisted of a high proportion of glucose (35%) and fructose (47%), whereas sucrose made up 42% of the total free sugar content of spring leaves. Bound sugars in culm consisted of 60% glucose and 38% xylose likely representative of hemicellulose. The concentrations of bound sugars (hemicelluloses) in spring culms (543.7 ± 13.0 mg/g) was greater (p<0.001) than in leaves (373.0 ± 14.8 mg/g). These data help explain a long-standing question in giant panda foraging ecology: why consume the plant part with the lowest protein and fat during the energetically intensive spring breeding season? Giant pandas likely prefer spring culm that contains abundant mono- and polysaccharides made more bioavailable as a result of reduced fiber content. These data suggest that phenological changes in bamboo plant part nutrition drive foraging decisions by giant pandas.

  13. Phenological changes in bamboo carbohydrates explain the preference for culm over leaves by giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) during spring

    PubMed Central

    Knott, Katrina K.; Christian, Amelia L.; Falcone, Josephine F.; Vance, Carrie K.; Bauer, Laura L.; Fahey, George C.; Kouba, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    Seasonal changes in the foodscape force herbivores to select different plant species or plant parts to meet nutritional requirements. We examined whether the search for calorie-rich carbohydrates explained giant panda’s selection for bamboo culm over leaves during spring. Leaves and culms were collected from four Phyllostachys bamboos (P. aurea, P. aureosulcata, P. glauca, and P. nuda) once per month over 18–27 months. Monthly changes in annual plant part nutrients were examined, and compared to seasonal foraging behaviors of captive giant pandas. Although total fiber was greater (p<0.0001) in culm (85.6 ± 0.5%) than leaves (55.3 ± 0.4%) throughout the year, culm fiber was at its lowest in spring (79–85%) when culm selection by giant pandas exceeded 70% of their overall diet. Culm starch also was greatest (p = 0.044) during spring (5.5 ± 1.1%) and 2.5-fold the percentage of starch in leaves (2.2 ± 0.6%). The free sugars in spring culm consisted of a high proportion of glucose (35%) and fructose (47%), whereas sucrose made up 42% of the total free sugar content of spring leaves. Bound sugars in culm consisted of 60% glucose and 38% xylose likely representative of hemicellulose. The concentrations of bound sugars (hemicelluloses) in spring culms (543.7 ± 13.0 mg/g) was greater (p<0.001) than in leaves (373.0 ± 14.8 mg/g). These data help explain a long-standing question in giant panda foraging ecology: why consume the plant part with the lowest protein and fat during the energetically intensive spring breeding season? Giant pandas likely prefer spring culm that contains abundant mono- and polysaccharides made more bioavailable as a result of reduced fiber content. These data suggest that phenological changes in bamboo plant part nutrition drive foraging decisions by giant pandas. PMID:28614359

  14. What determines selection and abandonment of a foraging patch by wild giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) in winter?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zejun; Zhan, Xiangjiang; Yan, Li; Li, Ming; Hu, Jinchu; Wei, Fuwen

    2009-01-01

    Foraging patches can be described as a nested hierarchy of aggregated resources, implying that study of foraging by wild animals should be directed across different spatial scales. However, almost all previous research on habitat selection by the giant panda has concentrated upon one scale. In this research, we carried out a field study to understand foraging patch selection by giant pandas in winter at both microhabitat and feeding site scales and, for the first time, attempted to understand how long it would stay at the feeding sites before moving on. The field survey was conducted from November 2002 to March 2003 at Fengtongzhai Nature Reserve (102 degrees 48'-103 degrees 00' E, 30 degrees 19'-30 degrees 47' N), Baoxing County of Sichuan Province, China, to collect data in both microhabitat and control plots. The microhabitat plots were located by fresh feces or foraging traces left by giant pandas, and the control plots were established to reflect the environment. Within each microhabitat plot, one 1x1 m2 plot was centralized at the center of each feeding site, in which numbers of old bamboos and old shoots, including eaten and uneaten, were counted, respectively. The results showed that winter microhabitats selected by this species were characteristic of gentle slopes and high old-shoot proportions and that the latter was even higher at feeding sites. Two selection processes, namely, from the environment to microhabitats and from the latter to feeding sites, were found during this species' foraging patch utilization. Giant pandas preferred to eat old shoots to old bamboo at feeding sites in winter and did not leave unless old-shoot density fell to lower than the average in the environment. Both microhabitats and feeding sites selected by giant pandas were characteristic of high old-shoot density, indicating that the preferred food item had a significant influence upon its foraging patch selection. The preference for gentle slopes by giant pandas was presumed

  15. Endocrine milieu of perioestrus in the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), as determined by non-invasive hormone measures.

    PubMed

    Kersey, David C; Wildt, David E; Brown, Janine L; Snyder, Rebecca J; Huang, Yan; Monfort, Steven L

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the efficacy of faecal hormonal measures for evaluating ovarian activity in a significant sized cohort of giant pandas during the perioestrual period. Faecal excretion of oestrogen and progestagen metabolites corresponded with urinary patterns and receptive behaviours. Longitudinal assessment of 10 females revealed that, on average, faecal oestrogen concentrations started to rise (P < 0.05) above baseline (baseline mean +/- s.e.m.; 64.7 +/- 6.6 ng g(-1)) 5 days before the preovulatory oestrogen peak (484.6 +/- 126.8 ng g(-1)), which was followed by a gradual descent over 4 days to nadir. Mean faecal progestagen metabolite concentrations increased approximately twofold above baseline (from 186.2 +/- 37.7 to 347.2 +/- 75.7 ng g(-1); P < 0.05) during the 20-day interval after the preovulatory oestrogen surge. Variability within and among females precluded the use of a threshold of oestrogen or progestagen metabolites to predict reproductive status, yet faeces collected 2-3 days per week provided sufficient data to recognise that an individual was in the perioestrual period. Finally, in females that were examined for at least 3 consecutive years, there was an 18-53 day variation in the onset and an 8-13 day variation in the duration of perioestrual behaviour from year to year. In summary, these findings indicate that gonadal hormone profiles associated with the period immediately before, during and after oestrus are accurately revealed by analysis of the fibrous faeces of the giant panda. This approach has potential value for providing point-in-time information on the reproductive status of free-living individuals.

  16. Brominated flame retardants, polychlorinated biphenyls, and organochlorine pesticides in captive giant panda (ailuropoda melanoleuca) and red panda (Ailurus fulgens) from China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guo-Cheng; Luo, Xiao-Jun; Dai, Jia-Yin; Zhang, Xiu-Lan; Wu, Hua; Zhang, Cheng-Lin; Guo, Wei; Xu, Mu-Qi; Mai, Bi-Xian; Weit, Fu-Wen

    2008-07-01

    Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and brominated flame retardants (BFRs) were investigated in captive giant and red panda tissues from China. The total concentrations of OCPs, PCBs, and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in tissues ranged from 16.3 to 888 ng/g lipid weight (lw), 24.8 to 854 ng/g lw, and 16.4 to 2158 ng/g lw, respectively. p,p'-DDE and beta-HCH were major OCP contaminants. PCBs 99, 118, 153/132, 170, 180, and 209 were the major contributing congeners determined. Among PBDEs, congener BDE-209 was the most frequent and abundant, followed by BDE-206, BDE-208, BDE-207, BDE-203, BDE-47, and BDE-153. Decabromodiphenyl ethane (DeBDethane) was detected in 87 and 71% of the giant and red panda samples with concentrations up to 863 ng/g lw, respectively. The remarkable levels and dominance of BDE-209 and DeBDethane may relate to significant production, usage, or disposal of BFRs in China. The positive significant correlation between concentrations of PBDEs and PCBs in captive pandas may suggest that the exposure routes of PBDEs and PCBs to panda are similar. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the occurrence of DeBDethane in captive wildlife samples. Therefore, further studies are warranted to better understand DeBDethane production, transport, uptake, and toxicological effect.

  17. Changes in the Milk Metabolome of the Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) with Time after Birth--Three Phases in Early Lactation and Progressive Individual Differences.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tong; Zhang, Rong; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Zhihe; Hou, Rong; Wang, Hairui; Loeffler, I Kati; Watson, David G; Kennedy, Malcolm W

    2015-01-01

    Ursids (bears) in general, and giant pandas in particular, are highly altricial at birth. The components of bear milks and their changes with time may be uniquely adapted to nourish relatively immature neonates, protect them from pathogens, and support the maturation of neonatal digestive physiology. Serial milk samples collected from three giant pandas in early lactation were subjected to untargeted metabolite profiling and multivariate analysis. Changes in milk metabolites with time after birth were analysed by Principal Component Analysis, Hierarchical Cluster Analysis and further supported by Orthogonal Partial Least Square-Discriminant Analysis, revealing three phases of milk maturation: days 1-6 (Phase 1), days 7-20 (Phase 2), and beyond day 20 (Phase 3). While the compositions of Phase 1 milks were essentially indistinguishable among individuals, divergences emerged during the second week of lactation. OPLS regression analysis positioned against the growth rate of one cub tentatively inferred a correlation with changes in the abundance of a trisaccharide, isoglobotriose, previously observed to be a major oligosaccharide in ursid milks. Three artificial milk formulae used to feed giant panda cubs were also analysed, and were found to differ markedly in component content from natural panda milk. These findings have implications for the dependence of the ontogeny of all species of bears, and potentially other members of the Carnivora and beyond, on the complexity and sequential changes in maternal provision of micrometabolites in the immediate period after birth.

  18. Changes in the Milk Metabolome of the Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) with Time after Birth – Three Phases in Early Lactation and Progressive Individual Differences

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tong; Zhang, Rong; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Zhihe; Hou, Rong; Wang, Hairui; Loeffler, I. Kati; Watson, David G.; Kennedy, Malcolm W.

    2015-01-01

    Ursids (bears) in general, and giant pandas in particular, are highly altricial at birth. The components of bear milks and their changes with time may be uniquely adapted to nourish relatively immature neonates, protect them from pathogens, and support the maturation of neonatal digestive physiology. Serial milk samples collected from three giant pandas in early lactation were subjected to untargeted metabolite profiling and multivariate analysis. Changes in milk metabolites with time after birth were analysed by Principal Component Analysis, Hierarchical Cluster Analysis and further supported by Orthogonal Partial Least Square-Discriminant Analysis, revealing three phases of milk maturation: days 1–6 (Phase 1), days 7–20 (Phase 2), and beyond day 20 (Phase 3). While the compositions of Phase 1 milks were essentially indistinguishable among individuals, divergences emerged during the second week of lactation. OPLS regression analysis positioned against the growth rate of one cub tentatively inferred a correlation with changes in the abundance of a trisaccharide, isoglobotriose, previously observed to be a major oligosaccharide in ursid milks. Three artificial milk formulae used to feed giant panda cubs were also analysed, and were found to differ markedly in component content from natural panda milk. These findings have implications for the dependence of the ontogeny of all species of bears, and potentially other members of the Carnivora and beyond, on the complexity and sequential changes in maternal provision of micrometabolites in the immediate period after birth. PMID:26630345

  19. Development and evaluation of a rapid enzyme-immunoassay system for measurement of the urinary concentration of estrone-3-glucuronide in a female giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Hama, Natsuki; Kanemitsu, Hideyasu; Sakamoto, Kensuke; Oyama, Yujiro; Acosta, Tomas J; Ishikawa, Osamu; Pengyan, Wang; Okuda, Kiyoshi

    2008-08-01

    To detect estrus for reproductive management, and to determine the relationship between urinary estrogen and estrous behavior, in a female giant panda, we developed and evaluated a rapid enzyme immunoassay (EIA) system for urinary Estrone-3-glucuronide (E1G) using commercial reagents. The developed EIA system took only around 3 hours, including all procedures to obtain a result. It indicated good reproducibility (intra-assay CV of 5.16%, interassay CV of 15.4%) and sensitivity (lowest standard concentration was 0.0156 ng/ml) for measurement of the urinary concentrations of E1G in the giant panda. There was a positive correlation (r=0.934) with the data for estrone (E1) in the same samples, as measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA) performed in a commercial laboratory. The changes in the E1G concentrations were almost synchronous with the changes in E1 assayed by RIA in urine collected during 4 consecutive estrous seasons. The dynamics of urinary E1G measured by this system highly correlated with the occurrence of the presenting estrous behavior in the giant panda. The above results indicate that this assay system may be normally, rapidly and practically used for measurement of the urinary concentration of E1G in the giant panda.

  20. Changeover from signalling to energy-provisioning lipids during transition from colostrum to mature milk in the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tong; Watson, David G.; Zhang, Rong; Hou, Rong; Loeffler, I. Kati; Kennedy, Malcolm W.

    2016-01-01

    Among the large placental mammals, ursids give birth to the most altricial neonates with the lowest neonatal:maternal body mass ratios. This is particularly exemplified by giant pandas. To examine whether there is compensation for the provision of developmentally important nutrients that other species groups may provide in utero, we examined changes in the lipids of colostrum and milk with time after birth in giant pandas. Lipids that are developmental signals or signal precursors, and those that are fundamental to nervous system construction, such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and phosphatidylserines, appear early and then fall dramatically in concentration to a baseline at 20–30 days. The dynamics of lysophosphatidic acid and eicosanoids display similar patterns, but with progressive differences between mothers. Triglycerides occur at relatively low levels initially and increase in concentration until a plateau is reached at about 30 days. These patterns indicate an early provision of signalling lipids and their precursors, particularly lipids crucial to brain, retinal and central nervous system development, followed by a changeover to lipids for energy metabolism. Thus, in giant pandas, and possibly in all bears, lactation is adapted to provisioning a highly altricial neonate to a degree that suggests equivalence to an extension of gestation. PMID:27808224

  1. Changeover from signalling to energy-provisioning lipids during transition from colostrum to mature milk in the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tong; Watson, David G; Zhang, Rong; Hou, Rong; Loeffler, I Kati; Kennedy, Malcolm W

    2016-11-03

    Among the large placental mammals, ursids give birth to the most altricial neonates with the lowest neonatal:maternal body mass ratios. This is particularly exemplified by giant pandas. To examine whether there is compensation for the provision of developmentally important nutrients that other species groups may provide in utero, we examined changes in the lipids of colostrum and milk with time after birth in giant pandas. Lipids that are developmental signals or signal precursors, and those that are fundamental to nervous system construction, such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and phosphatidylserines, appear early and then fall dramatically in concentration to a baseline at 20-30 days. The dynamics of lysophosphatidic acid and eicosanoids display similar patterns, but with progressive differences between mothers. Triglycerides occur at relatively low levels initially and increase in concentration until a plateau is reached at about 30 days. These patterns indicate an early provision of signalling lipids and their precursors, particularly lipids crucial to brain, retinal and central nervous system development, followed by a changeover to lipids for energy metabolism. Thus, in giant pandas, and possibly in all bears, lactation is adapted to provisioning a highly altricial neonate to a degree that suggests equivalence to an extension of gestation.

  2. Changes in urinary androgen concentration indicate that male giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) respond to impending female oestrus during and outside the typical spring breeding season.

    PubMed

    Gocinski, Barbara L; Knott, Katrina K; Roberts, Beth M; Brown, Janine L; Vance, Carrie K; Kouba, Andrew J

    2017-08-03

    Giant pandas have been described as mono-oestrus spring breeders, yet males exposed to aseasonal oestrous females in the autumn or winter exhibit breeding behaviours and interest in mating. In the present study, urinary androgens and sperm parameters were quantified for males exposed to females expressing oestrus during spring, autumn or winter to examine plasticity of reproductive seasonality in giant pandas. Monthly average androgen concentrations for two males exposed to females in either seasonal or aseasonal oestrus were greater (P<0.001) than baseline concentrations. Evaluation of daily androgen concentrations revealed a peak that was three- to fivefold greater than baseline, occurring an average of 5 days before ovulation for both seasonal and aseasonal cycles. There were no significant differences in testes volume, sperm motility, forward progression or sperm concentration in males between female seasonal and aseasonal cycle years. Male gonadal activity was more variable without a clear pattern in years when the female was anovulatory than when she was ovulatory (seasonal or aseasonal). These data show the flexible reproductive capacity of male giant pandas as demonstrated by a rapid physiological readiness to mate in response to female oestrous cues within or outside the normal breeding season and may suggest a facultative seasonal reproduction with a 'female-induced rut'.

  3. Virtual cranial endocast of the oldest giant panda ( Ailuropoda microta) reveals great similarity to that of its extant relative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Wei

    2008-11-01

    Recent development of computed tomography and three-dimensional visualization techniques has enabled the non-destructive inspection of the endocast morphology of fossil neurocranium, the basic material for paleoneurological study. A virtual cranial endocast was reconstructed based on the first skull of the oldest giant panda, Ailuropoda microta, discovered recently and dated at more than 2 Myr (million years) ago. It was compared with that of the extant giant panda ( A. melanoleuca) and that of the polar bear ( Ursus maritimus), as well as CT slices of the late Pleistocene A. baconi. The overall endocast morphology of A. microta is more similar to that of A. baconi and A. melanoleuca than to that of U. maritimus. The absolute endocast size is the smallest in A. microta, largest in A. baconi, and intermediate in A. melanoleuca. However, the proportion of cerebral volume to total endocast size is very close to each other between the oldest and extant giant panda, as well as the sulcal length per unit area of cerebral endocast surface.

  4. Important population viability analysis parameters for giant pandas (Aliuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Gong, Minghao; Song, Yanling; Yang, Zhisong; Lin, Chen

    2012-06-01

    Population viability analysis (PVA) is a tool to evaluate the risk of extinction for endangered species and aid conservation decision-making. The quality of PVA output is dependent on parameters related to population dynamics and life-history; however, it has been difficult to collect this information for the giant panda (Aliuropoda melanoleuca), a rare and endangered mammal native to China, confined to some 30 fragmented habitat patches. Since giant pandas are long-lived, mature late, have lower reproductive rates, and show little sexual dimorphism, obtaining data to perform adequate PVA has been difficult. Here, we develop a parameter sensitivity index by modeling the dynamics of six giant panda populations in the Minshan Mountains, in order to determine the parameters most influential to giant panda populations. Our data shows that the giant panda populations are most sensitive to changes in four female parameters: initial breeding age, reproductive rate, mortality rate between age 0 and 1, and mortality rate of adults. The parameter sensitivity index strongly correlated with initial population size, as smaller populations were more sensitive to changes in these four variables. This model suggests that demographic parameters of females have more influence on the results of PVA, indicating that females may play a more important role in giant panda population dynamics than males. Consequently, reintroduction of female individuals to a small giant panda population should be a high priority for conservation efforts. Our findings form a technical basis for the coming program of giant panda reintroduction, and inform which parameters are crucial to successfully and feasibly monitoring wild giant panda populations.

  5. The giant panda gut microbiome.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fuwen; Wang, Xiao; Wu, Qi

    2015-08-01

    Giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) are bamboo specialists that evolved from carnivores. Their gut microbiota probably aids in the digestion of cellulose and this is considered an example of gut microbiota adaptation to a bamboo diet. However, this issue remains unresolved and further functional and compositional studies are needed.

  6. The first skull of the earliest giant panda

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Changzhu; Ciochon, Russell L.; Dong, Wei; Hunt, Robert M.; Liu, Jinyi; Jaeger, Marc; Zhu, Qizhi

    2007-01-01

    Fossils of the giant panda Ailuropoda (Order Carnivora, Family Ursidae) are largely isolated teeth, mandibles, and a few rare skulls, known from the late Pliocene to late Pleistocene in China and Southeast Asia. Much of this material represents a Pleistocene chronospecies, Ailuropoda baconi, an animal larger than the living giant panda, Ailuropoda melanoleuca. The earliest certain record of Ailuropoda is the late Pliocene chronospecies, Ailuropoda microta, smaller than either A. baconi or A. melanoleuca, and previously known only from teeth and a few mandibles from karst caves in south China. Here, we report the discovery of the first skull of A. microta, establishing its cranial anatomy and demonstrating that the specialized cranial and dental adaptations of Ailuropoda for durophagous feeding behavior centered on bamboo were already evident in this late Pliocene species. The skull from Jinyin cave (Guangxi) and dental remains from other karst localities in southeastern China show that Ailuropoda microta occupied south China from ≈2 to 2.4 Myr ago after a marked global climatic deterioration. Dental and basicranial anatomy indicate a less specialized morphology early in the history of the lineage and support derivation of the giant panda from the Miocene Asian ursid Ailurarctos PMID:17578912

  7. Giant pandas can discriminate the emotions of human facial pictures.

    PubMed

    Li, Youxu; Dai, Qiang; Hou, Rong; Zhang, Zhihe; Chen, Peng; Xue, Rui; Feng, Feifei; Chen, Chao; Liu, Jiabin; Gu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Zejun; Qi, Dunwu

    2017-08-16

    Previous studies have shown that giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) can discriminate face-like shapes, but little is known about their cognitive ability with respect to the emotional expressions of humans. We tested whether adult giant pandas can discriminate expressions from pictures of half of a face and found that pandas can learn to discriminate between angry and happy expressions based on global information from the whole face. Young adult pandas (5-7 years old) learned to discriminate expressions more quickly than older individuals (8-16 years old), but no significant differences were found between females and males. These results suggest that young adult giant pandas are better at discriminating emotional expressions of humans. We showed for the first time that the giant panda, can discriminate the facial expressions of humans. Our results can also be valuable for the daily care and management of captive giant pandas.

  8. Whole-genome sequencing of giant pandas provides insights into demographic history and local adaptation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shancen; Zheng, Pingping; Dong, Shanshan; Zhan, Xiangjiang; Wu, Qi; Guo, Xiaosen; Hu, Yibo; He, Weiming; Zhang, Shanning; Fan, Wei; Zhu, Lifeng; Li, Dong; Zhang, Xuemei; Chen, Quan; Zhang, Hemin; Zhang, Zhihe; Jin, Xuelin; Zhang, Jinguo; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jian; Wang, Jun; Wei, Fuwen

    2013-01-01

    The panda lineage dates back to the late Miocene and ultimately leads to only one extant species, the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). Although global climate change and anthropogenic disturbances are recognized to shape animal population demography their contribution to panda population dynamics remains largely unknown. We sequenced the whole genomes of 34 pandas at an average 4.7-fold coverage and used this data set together with the previously deep-sequenced panda genome to reconstruct a continuous demographic history of pandas from their origin to the present. We identify two population expansions, two bottlenecks and two divergences. Evidence indicated that, whereas global changes in climate were the primary drivers of population fluctuation for millions of years, human activities likely underlie recent population divergence and serious decline. We identified three distinct panda populations that show genetic adaptation to their environments. However, in all three populations, anthropogenic activities have negatively affected pandas for 3,000 years.

  9. Ancylostoma ailuropodae n. sp. (Nematoda: Ancylostomatidae), a new hookworm parasite isolated from wild giant pandas in Southwest China.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yue; Hoberg, Eric P; Yang, Zijiang; Urban, Joseph F; Yang, Guangyou

    2017-06-02

    Hookworms belonging to the genus Ancylostoma (Dubini, 1843) cause ancylostomiasis, a disease of considerable concern in humans and domestic and wild animals. Molecular and epidemiological data support evidence for the zoonotic potential among species of Ancylostoma where transmission to humans is facilitated by rapid urbanization and increased human-wildlife interactions. It is important to assess and describe these potential zoonotic parasite species in wildlife, especially in hosts that have physiological similarities to humans and share their habitat. Moreover, defining species diversity within parasite groups that can circulate among free-ranging host species and humans also provides a pathway to understanding the distribution of infection and disease. In this study, we describe a previously unrecognized species of hookworm in the genus Ancylostoma in the giant panda, including criteria for morphological and molecular characterization. The hookworm specimens were obtained from a wild giant panda that died in the Fengtongzai Natural Reserve in Sichuan Province of China in November 2013. They were microscopically examined and then genetically analyzed by sequencing the nuclear internal transcribed spacer (ITS, ITS1-5.8S-ITS2) and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) genes in two representative specimens (one female and one male, FTZ1 and FTZ2, respectively). Ancylostoma ailuropodae n. sp. is proposed for these hookworms. Morphologically the hookworm specimens differ from other congeneric species primarily based on the structure of the buccal capsule in males and females, characterized by 2 pairs of ventrolateral and 2 pairs of dorsolateral teeth; males differ in the structure and shape of the copulatory bursa, where the dorsal ray possesses 2 digitations. Pairwise nuclear and mitochondrial DNA comparisons, genetic distance analysis, and phylogenetic data strongly indicate that A. ailuropodae from giant pandas is a separate species which shared a

  10. Innate predator recognition in giant pandas.

    PubMed

    Du, Yiping; Huang, Yan; Zhang, Hemin; Li, Desheng; Yang, Bo; Wei, Ming; Zhou, Yingmin; Liu, Yang

    2012-02-01

    Innate predator recognition confers a survival advantage to prey animals. We investigate whether giant pandas exhibit innate predator recognition. We analyzed behavioral responses of 56 naive adult captive giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), to urine from predators and non-predators and water control. Giant pandas performed more chemosensory investigation and displayed flehmen behaviors more frequently in response to predator urine compared to both non-predator urine and water control. Subjects also displayed certain defensive behaviors, as indicated by vigilance, and in certain cases, fleeing behaviors. Our results suggest that there is an innate component to predator recognition in captive giant pandas, although such recognition was only slight to moderate. These results have implications that may be applicable to the conservation and reintroduction of this endangered species.

  11. [Habitat assessment of giant panda in Qingmuchuan Nature Reserve, Shaanxi Province of Northwest China].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Zhao, Peng-Xiang

    2012-01-01

    Based on field survey and data collection, this paper studied the characteristics of habitat selection of giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) in Qingmuchuan National Nature Reserve, and assessed the core and buffer zones of habitats from the aspects of topography, vegetation, food, and human disturbance, with the assistance of hierarchy analysis and Geographic Information System software (ArcMap and ArcView). In the study area, the suitable and secondary suitable habitats for Ailuropoda melanoleuca covered 62.1% and 31.0%, respectively, and the unsuitable habitats covered 6.9%. The suitable habitats were mainly distributed in the west and north parts with high altitudes, while the unsuitable habitats were mainly affected by vegetation coverage, bamboo distribution, and human disturbance. To reduce the unsuitable habitats, management mechanism should be further improved, e. g., controlling human disturbances, especially the grazing, bamboo-cutting, and firewood collection in the regions with altitude 900-1600 m.

  12. Three-dimensional computer simulations of feeding behaviour in red and giant pandas relate skull biomechanics with dietary niche partitioning

    PubMed Central

    Figueirido, Borja; Tseng, Zhijie Jack; Serrano-Alarcón, Francisco J.; Martín-Serra, Alberto; Pastor, Juan F.

    2014-01-01

    The red (Ailurus fulgens) and giant (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) pandas are mammalian carnivores convergently adapted to a bamboo feeding diet. However, whereas Ailurus forages almost entirely on younger leaves, fruits and tender trunks, Ailuropoda relies more on trunks and stems. Such difference in foraging mode is considered a strategy for resource partitioning where they are sympatric. Here, we use finite-element analysis to test for mechanical differences and similarities in skull performance between Ailurus and Ailuropoda related to diet. Feeding simulations suggest that the two panda species have similar ranges of mechanical efficiency and strain energy profiles across the dentition, reflecting their durophagous diet. However, the stress distributions and peaks in the skulls of Ailurus and Ailuropoda are remarkably different for biting at all tooth locations. Although the skull of Ailuropoda is capable of resisting higher stresses than the skull of Ailurus, the latter is able to distribute stresses more evenly throughout the skull. These differences in skull biomechanics reflect their distinct bamboo feeding preferences. Ailurus uses repetitive chewing in an extended mastication to feed on soft leaves, and Ailuropoda exhibits shorter and more discrete periods of chomp-and-swallow feeding to break down hard bamboo trunks. PMID:24718096

  13. Three-dimensional computer simulations of feeding behaviour in red and giant pandas relate skull biomechanics with dietary niche partitioning.

    PubMed

    Figueirido, Borja; Tseng, Zhijie Jack; Serrano-Alarcón, Francisco J; Martín-Serra, Alberto; Pastor, Juan F

    2014-01-01

    The red (Ailurus fulgens) and giant (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) pandas are mammalian carnivores convergently adapted to a bamboo feeding diet. However, whereas Ailurus forages almost entirely on younger leaves, fruits and tender trunks, Ailuropoda relies more on trunks and stems. Such difference in foraging mode is considered a strategy for resource partitioning where they are sympatric. Here, we use finite-element analysis to test for mechanical differences and similarities in skull performance between Ailurus and Ailuropoda related to diet. Feeding simulations suggest that the two panda species have similar ranges of mechanical efficiency and strain energy profiles across the dentition, reflecting their durophagous diet. However, the stress distributions and peaks in the skulls of Ailurus and Ailuropoda are remarkably different for biting at all tooth locations. Although the skull of Ailuropoda is capable of resisting higher stresses than the skull of Ailurus, the latter is able to distribute stresses more evenly throughout the skull. These differences in skull biomechanics reflect their distinct bamboo feeding preferences. Ailurus uses repetitive chewing in an extended mastication to feed on soft leaves, and Ailuropoda exhibits shorter and more discrete periods of chomp-and-swallow feeding to break down hard bamboo trunks.

  14. Habitat use by giant panda in relation to man-made forest in Wanglang Nature Reserve of China.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dongwei; Wang, Xiaorong; Yang, Hongwei; Duan, Lijuan; Li, Junqing

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of human restoration in species conservation, in this study, we undertook a field survey of giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) habitat and man-made forest habitat in Wanglang Nature Reserve of China. Our results revealed that giant panda did not use the man-made forest in this area so far, and that there were significant differences between the giant panda habitat and the man-made forest habitat. Compared with giant panda habitat, the man-made forest habitat was characterized by lower shrub coverage, thinner trees and lower bamboo density. To improve the effectiveness of human restoration, the habitat requirement of giant panda should be fully consider in the whole process of habitat restoration.

  15. Evidence of a false thumb in a fossil carnivore clarifies the evolution of pandas

    PubMed Central

    Salesa, Manuel J.; Antón, Mauricio; Peigné, Stéphane; Morales, Jorge

    2006-01-01

    The “false thumb” of pandas is a carpal bone, the radial sesamoid, which has been enlarged and functions as an opposable thumb. If the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and the red panda (Ailurus fulgens) are not closely related, their sharing of this adaptation implies a remarkable convergence. The discovery of previously unknown postcranial remains of a Miocene red panda relative, Simocyon batalleri, from the Spanish site of Batallones-1 (Madrid), now shows that this animal had a false thumb. The radial sesamoid of S. batalleri shows similarities with that of the red panda, which supports a sister-group relationship and indicates independent evolution in both pandas. The fossils from Batallones-1 reveal S. batalleri as a puma-sized, semiarboreal carnivore with a moderately hypercarnivore diet. These data suggest that the false thumbs of S. batalleri and Ailurus fulgens were probably inherited from a primitive member of the red panda family (Ailuridae), which lacked the red panda's specializations for herbivory but shared its arboreal adaptations. Thus, it seems that, whereas the false thumb of the giant panda probably evolved for manipulating bamboo, the false thumbs of the red panda and of S. batalleri more likely evolved as an aid for arboreal locomotion, with the red panda secondarily developing its ability for item manipulation and thus producing one of the most dramatic cases of convergence among vertebrates. PMID:16387860

  16. Evidence of a false thumb in a fossil carnivore clarifies the evolution of pandas.

    PubMed

    Salesa, Manuel J; Antón, Mauricio; Peigné, Stéphane; Morales, Jorge

    2006-01-10

    The "false thumb" of pandas is a carpal bone, the radial sesamoid, which has been enlarged and functions as an opposable thumb. If the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and the red panda (Ailurus fulgens) are not closely related, their sharing of this adaptation implies a remarkable convergence. The discovery of previously unknown postcranial remains of a Miocene red panda relative, Simocyon batalleri, from the Spanish site of Batallones-1 (Madrid), now shows that this animal had a false thumb. The radial sesamoid of S. batalleri shows similarities with that of the red panda, which supports a sister-group relationship and indicates independent evolution in both pandas. The fossils from Batallones-1 reveal S. batalleri as a puma-sized, semiarboreal carnivore with a moderately hypercarnivore diet. These data suggest that the false thumbs of S. batalleri and Ailurus fulgens were probably inherited from a primitive member of the red panda family (Ailuridae), which lacked the red panda's specializations for herbivory but shared its arboreal adaptations. Thus, it seems that, whereas the false thumb of the giant panda probably evolved for manipulating bamboo, the false thumbs of the red panda and of S. batalleri more likely evolved as an aid for arboreal locomotion, with the red panda secondarily developing its ability for item manipulation and thus producing one of the most dramatic cases of convergence among vertebrates.

  17. Fatal Toxoplasma gondii infection in the giant panda.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongyu; Wang, Zedong; Wang, Chengdong; Li, Caiwu; Wei, Feng; Liu, Quan

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii can infect nearly all warm-blooded animals. We report an acute fatal T. gondii infection in the endangered giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) in a zoo in China, characterized by acute gastroenteritis and respiratory symptoms. T. gondii infection was confirmed by immunological and molecular methods. Multilocus nested PCR-RFLP revealed clonal type I at the SAG1 and c29-2 loci, clonal type II at the SAG2, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, and L358 loci, and clonal type III at the alternative SAG2 and SAG3 loci, thus, a potential new genotype of T. gondii in the giant panda. Other possible pathogens were not detected. To our knowledge, this is the first report of clinical toxoplasmosis in a giant panda.

  18. Fatal Toxoplasma gondii infection in the giant panda

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hongyu; Wang, Zedong; Wang, Chengdong; Li, Caiwu; Wei, Feng; Liu, Quan

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii can infect nearly all warm-blooded animals. We report an acute fatal T. gondii infection in the endangered giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) in a zoo in China, characterized by acute gastroenteritis and respiratory symptoms. T. gondii infection was confirmed by immunological and molecular methods. Multilocus nested PCR-RFLP revealed clonal type I at the SAG1 and c29-2 loci, clonal type II at the SAG2, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, and L358 loci, and clonal type III at the alternative SAG2 and SAG3 loci, thus, a potential new genotype of T. gondii in the giant panda. Other possible pathogens were not detected. To our knowledge, this is the first report of clinical toxoplasmosis in a giant panda. PMID:26514595

  19. Free mate choice enhances conservation breeding in the endangered giant panda.

    PubMed

    Martin-Wintle, Meghan S; Shepherdson, David; Zhang, Guiquan; Zhang, Hemin; Li, Desheng; Zhou, Xiaoping; Li, Rengui; Swaisgood, Ronald R

    2015-12-15

    Conservation breeding programmes have become an increasingly important tool to save endangered species, yet despite the allocation of significant resources, efforts to create self-sustaining populations have met with limited success. The iconic giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) embodies the struggles associated with ex situ species conservation. Here we show that behavioural mate preferences in giant pandas predict reproductive outcomes. Giant pandas paired with preferred partners have significantly higher copulation and birth rates. Reproductive rates increase further when both partners show mutual preference for one another. If managers were to incorporate mate preferences more fully into breeding management, the production of giant panda offspring for China's reintroduction programme might be greatly expedited. When extended to the increasing numbers of species dependent on ex situ conservation breeding to avoid extinction, our findings highlight that mate preference and other aspects of informed behavioural management could make the difference between success and failure of these programmes.

  20. Black and white and read all over: the past, present and future of giant panda genetics.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fuwen; Hu, Yibo; Zhu, Lifeng; Bruford, Michael W; Zhan, Xiangjiang; Zhang, Lei

    2012-12-01

    Few species attract much more attention from the public and scientists than the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), a popular, enigmatic but highly endangered species. The application of molecular genetics to its biology and conservation has facilitated surprising insights into the biology of giant pandas as well as the effectiveness of conservation efforts during the past decades. Here, we review the history of genetic advances in this species, from phylogeny, demographical history, genetic variation, population structure, noninvasive population census and adaptive evolution to reveal to what extent the current status of the giant panda is a reflection of its evolutionary legacy, as opposed to the influence of anthropogenic factors that have negatively impacted this species. In addition, we summarize the conservation implications of these genetic findings applied for the management of this high-profile species. Finally, on the basis of these advances and predictable future changes in genetic technology, we discuss future research directions that seem promising for giant panda biology and conservation.

  1. Free mate choice enhances conservation breeding in the endangered giant panda

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Wintle, Meghan S.; Shepherdson, David; Zhang, Guiquan; Zhang, Hemin; Li, Desheng; Zhou, Xiaoping; Li, Rengui; Swaisgood, Ronald R.

    2015-01-01

    Conservation breeding programmes have become an increasingly important tool to save endangered species, yet despite the allocation of significant resources, efforts to create self-sustaining populations have met with limited success. The iconic giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) embodies the struggles associated with ex situ species conservation. Here we show that behavioural mate preferences in giant pandas predict reproductive outcomes. Giant pandas paired with preferred partners have significantly higher copulation and birth rates. Reproductive rates increase further when both partners show mutual preference for one another. If managers were to incorporate mate preferences more fully into breeding management, the production of giant panda offspring for China's reintroduction programme might be greatly expedited. When extended to the increasing numbers of species dependent on ex situ conservation breeding to avoid extinction, our findings highlight that mate preference and other aspects of informed behavioural management could make the difference between success and failure of these programmes. PMID:26670381

  2. Fatal canine distemper virus infection of giant pandas in China

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Na; Yu, Yicong; Wang, Tiecheng; Wilker, Peter; Wang, Jianzhong; Li, Yuanguo; Sun, Zhe; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-01-01

    We report an outbreak of canine distemper virus (CDV) infection among endangered giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). Five of six CDV infected giant pandas died. The surviving giant panda was previously vaccinated against CDV. Genomic sequencing of CDV isolated from one of the infected pandas (giant panda/SX/2014) suggests it belongs to the Asia-1 cluster. The hemagglutinin protein of the isolated virus and virus sequenced from lung samples originating from deceased giant pandas all possessed the substitutions V26M, T213A, K281R, S300N, P340Q, and Y549H. The presence of the Y549H substitution is notable as it is found at the signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) receptor-binding site and has been implicated in the emergence of highly pathogenic CDV and host switching. These findings demonstrate that giant pandas are susceptible to CDV and suggest that surveillance and vaccination among all captive giant pandas are warranted to support conservation efforts for this endangered species. PMID:27310722

  3. Fatal canine distemper virus infection of giant pandas in China.

    PubMed

    Feng, Na; Yu, Yicong; Wang, Tiecheng; Wilker, Peter; Wang, Jianzhong; Li, Yuanguo; Sun, Zhe; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-06-16

    We report an outbreak of canine distemper virus (CDV) infection among endangered giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). Five of six CDV infected giant pandas died. The surviving giant panda was previously vaccinated against CDV. Genomic sequencing of CDV isolated from one of the infected pandas (giant panda/SX/2014) suggests it belongs to the Asia-1 cluster. The hemagglutinin protein of the isolated virus and virus sequenced from lung samples originating from deceased giant pandas all possessed the substitutions V26M, T213A, K281R, S300N, P340Q, and Y549H. The presence of the Y549H substitution is notable as it is found at the signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) receptor-binding site and has been implicated in the emergence of highly pathogenic CDV and host switching. These findings demonstrate that giant pandas are susceptible to CDV and suggest that surveillance and vaccination among all captive giant pandas are warranted to support conservation efforts for this endangered species.

  4. Molecular phylogeny of the red panda (Ailurus fulgens).

    PubMed

    Slattery, J P; O'Brien, S J

    1995-01-01

    The phylogenetic placement of the red panda (Ailurus fulgens) and the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) has been an evolutionary enigma since their original descriptions in the nineteenth century. A series of recent molecular analyses led to a consensus that the giant panda's ancestors were derived from early bears (Ursidae), but left unsettled the phylogenetic relationship of the red panda. Previous molecular and morphological phylogenies were inconclusive and varied among placement of the red panda within the raccoon family (Procyonidae), within the bear family (Ursidae), or in a separate family of carnivores equidistant between the two. To examine a relatively ancient (circa 20-30 million years before the present, MYBP) phylogenetic divergence, we used two slowly evolving genetic markers: mitochondrial 12S rRNA sequence and 592 fibroblast proteins resolved by two dimensional gel electrophoresis. Four different carnivore outgroup species, including dog (Canidae: Canis familiaris), cat (Felidae: Felis catus), fanaloka (Viverridae: Fossa fossa), and mongoose (Herpestidae: Galidia elegans), were selected to identify the root of the phylogenetic topologies. Phylogenetic reconstruction by distance-based methods, maximum parsimony, and maximum likelihood clearly indicate a distinct bifurcation forming the Ursidae and the Procyonidae. Further, our data consistently place the red panda as an early divergence within the Procyonidae radiation and confirm the inclusion of giant panda in the Ursidae lineage.

  5. A comparison of the primary structures of lactate dehydrogenase isozymes M4 from giant panda, red panda, black bear and dog.

    PubMed

    Liang, S P; Zhang, L X

    1987-03-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase isozymes M4 have been isolated and purified from red panda (Ailurus fulgens), black bear (Selenarctos thibetanus) and dog (Canis familiars) by affinity chromatography and compared with that from giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). Experimental results have shown that the N-termini, C-termini and the molecular weights of LDH-M subunits of red panda, black bear and dog are the same as those of the LDH-M subunit of giant panda. Analysis and comparison of HPLC peptide maps from the tryptic digests of the isozymes of red panda, black bear and dog have shown that most of their peptide fragments had the same retention time and amino acid composition as the corresponding peptide fragments from giant panda. Fragments with different retention times and/or amino acid compositions were sequenced. Careful examination of those variant amino acid residues demonstrated clearly that the primary structure of giant panda LDH-M subunit is unique and it appears that the giant panda might be classified as an independent family.

  6. Energy digestibility of giant pandas on bamboo-only and on supplemented diets.

    PubMed

    Finley, Tommy G; Sikes, Robert S; Parsons, Jennifer L; Rude, Brian J; Bissell, Heidi A; Ouellette, John R

    2011-01-01

    Endangered giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) are bears (Family Ursidae), within the order Carnivora. They specialize on an herbivorous diet of bamboo yet retain a gastrointestinal tract typical of their carnivorous ancestry. The evolutionary constraints of their digestive tract result in a low extraction efficiency from bamboo (<40% in reported studies). The goal of this study was to determine the energy digestibility of bamboo by giant pandas used in digestibility trials and through subsequent analyses with bomb calorimetry. Seven digestibility trials were conducted (three with bamboo-only diets and four with supplemental diets). Energy digestibilities ranged from 7.5-38.9% for mixed diets and 9.2-34.0% for bamboo-only diets. The bamboo-only trials summarized here represent, to our knowledge, the first empirical data available for energy digestibility on a bamboo diet for giant pandas. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Telemetry research on elusive wildlife: A synthesis of studies on giant pandas.

    PubMed

    Connor, Thomas; Hull, Vanessa; Liu, Jianguo

    2016-07-01

    Telemetry studies that track animals through space and time can lead to advances in scientific understanding that are vital in conservation efforts. For example, telemetry studies of the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) have shed light on many aspects of panda biology, but small sample sizes in each separate study make it difficult to draw broad conclusions. To overcome this problem we conducted the first synthesis of all 5 panda telemetry studies conducted to date. Using these data we investigated patterns in 6 main topics: home range, space-use interactions, core areas, movement patterns, seasonal migration and natal dispersal. We found that panda home range sizes do not vary between 2 main mountain ranges (Qionglai and Qinling), as was previously believed. Our results also suggest that female pandas increase their movement in the mating season: a behavior typically attributed only to males. We found and summarized telemetry and genetic evidence for female natal dispersal in the giant panda. Our synthesis highlights the need for additional research relating panda behavior to human disturbance factors, and can aid future studies on giant pandas as well as other species. © 2016 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. Assessing vulnerability of giant pandas to climate change in the Qinling Mountains of China.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Liu, Fang; Xue, Yadong; Zhang, Yu; Li, Diqiang

    2017-06-01

    Climate change might pose an additional threat to the already vulnerable giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). Effective conservation efforts require projections of vulnerability of the giant panda in facing climate change and proactive strategies to reduce emerging climate-related threats. We used the maximum entropy model to assess the vulnerability of giant panda to climate change in the Qinling Mountains of China. The results of modeling included the following findings: (1) the area of suitable habitat for giant pandas was projected to decrease by 281 km(2) from climate change by the 2050s; (2) the mean elevation of suitable habitat of giant panda was predicted to shift 30 m higher due to climate change over this period; (3) the network of nature reserves protect 61.73% of current suitable habitat for the species, and 59.23% of future suitable habitat; (4) current suitable habitat mainly located in Chenggu, Taibai, and Yangxian counties (with a total area of 987 km(2)) was predicted to be vulnerable. Assessing the vulnerability of giant panda provided adaptive strategies for conservation programs and national park construction. We proposed adaptation strategies to ameliorate the predicted impacts of climate change on giant panda, including establishing and adjusting reserves, establishing habitat corridors, improving adaptive capacity to climate change, and strengthening monitoring of giant panda.

  9. Proposed conservation landscape for giant pandas in the Minshan Mountains, China.

    PubMed

    Shen, Guozhen; Feng, Chaoyang; Xie, Zongqiang; Ouyang, Zhiyun; Li, Junqing; Pascal, Marty

    2008-10-01

    The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), is one of the world's most endangered species. Habitat loss and fragmentation have reduced its numbers, shrunk its distribution, and separated the population into isolated subpopulations. Such isolated, small populations are in danger of extinction due to random demographic factors and inbreeding. We used least-cost modeling as a systematic approach to incorporate satellite imagery and data on ecological and behavioral parameters of the giant panda collected during more than 10 years of field research to design a conservation landscape for giant pandas in the Minshan Mountains. We identified 8 core habitats and 4 potential linkages that would link core habitats CH3, CH4, and CH5 with core habitats CH6, CH7, and CH8. Establishing and integrating the identified habitats with existing reserves would create an efficient reserve network for giant panda conservation. The core habitats had an average density of 4.9 pandas/100 km(2) and contained approximately 76.6% of the giant panda population. About 45% of the core habitat (3245.4 km(2)) existed outside the current nature reserves network. Total estimated core habitat decreased between 30.4 and 44.5% with the addition of residential areas and road networks factored into the model. A conservation area for giant panda in the Minshan Mountains should aim to ensure habitat retention and connectivity, improve dispersal potential of corridors, and maintain the evolutionary potential of giant pandas in the face of future environmental changes.

  10. Giant pandas are not an evolutionary cul-de-sac: evidence from multidisciplinary research.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fuwen; Hu, Yibo; Yan, Li; Nie, Yonggang; Wu, Qi; Zhang, Zejun

    2015-01-01

    The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is one of the world's most endangered mammals and remains threatened by environmental and anthropogenic pressure. It is commonly argued that giant pandas are an evolutionary cul-de-sac because of their specialized bamboo diet, phylogenetic changes in body size, small population, low genetic diversity, and low reproductive rate. This notion is incorrect, arose from a poor understanding or appreciation of giant panda biology, and is in need of correction. In this review, we summarize research across morphology, ecology, and genetics to dispel the idea, once and for all, that giant pandas are evolutionary dead-end. The latest and most advanced research shows that giant pandas are successful animals highly adapted to a specialized bamboo diet via morphological, ecological, and genetic adaptations and coadaptation of gut microbiota. We also debunk misconceptions around population size, population growth rate, and genetic variation. During their evolutionary history spanning 8 My, giant pandas have survived diet specialization, massive bamboo flowering and die off, and rapid climate oscillations. Now, they are suffering from enormous human interference. Fortunately, continued conservation effort is greatly reducing impacts from anthropogenic interference and allowing giant panda populations and habitat to recover. Previous ideas of a giant panda evolutionary cul-de-sac resulted from an unsystematic and unsophisticated understanding of their biology and it is time to shed this baggage and focus on the survival and maintenance of this high-profile species.

  11. PBDEs (polybrominated diphenyl ethers) pose a risk to captive giant pandas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Ping; Zheng, Ying-Juan; Liu, Qiang; Ellison, Aaron M; Zhao, Yan; Ma, Qing-Yi

    2017-07-01

    The Qinling subspecies of giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca qinlingensis), is highly endangered; fewer than 350 individuals still inhabit Qinling Mountains. Previous research revealed captive pandas were exposed to bromine, so we hypothesized that captive pandas were exposed to and affected by polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). To test this hypothesis, we tested blood and feces of captive and wild pandas, their drinking water, food (bamboo leaves) from SWARC (Shaanxi Wild Animal Research Center)and FNNR (Foping National Nature Reserve) and supplemental feedstuff given to captive panda at SWARC. We found 13 congeners of PBDEs in fecal samples, of which BDE47, BDE66, BDE71, BDE99, and BDE154 were the dominant, total PBDE concentration in feces of captive pandas was 255% higher than in wild pandas. We found nine PBDEs congeners in blood samples: BDE153 and BDE183 were the predominant congers. PBDEs in blood from captive pandas were significantly higher than in wild pandas. The total concentration of PBDEs were 5473 and 4835 (pg.g) in Fargesia qinlingensis, were 2192 and 1414 (pg.g) in Bashannia fargesii (2192, 1414 pg g), 0.066, 0.038 (pg/ml) in drinking water, and 28.8 (pg.g) in supplemental feedstuff for captive and wild pandas, which indicate that the PBDEs came from its bamboo feed, especially from Bashannia fargesii. Our results demonstrate that BDE99 and BDE47 could be threatening the pandas' health especially for captive panda and there are potential health risks from PBDEs for pandas. In the short term, this risk may be ameliorated by strict control of food quality. In the long term, however, reducing air, water and soil contamination so as to improve environmental quality can best reduce these risks to meet the international standard such as Stockholm Convention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Urinary profiles of luteinizing hormone, estrogen and progestagen during the estrous and gestational periods in giant pandas (Ailuropda melanoleuca)

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Kailai; Yie, Shangmian; Zhang, Zhihe; Wang, Juan; Cai, Zhigang; Luo, Li; Liu, Yuliang; Wang, Hairui; Huang, He; Wang, Chengdong; Huang, Xiangming; Lan, Jingchao; Hou, Rong

    2017-01-01

    Luteinizing hormone (LH) is one of the main pituitary hormones that regulate ovulation, however its role has not been studied in giant panda. In this study, we developed an ELISA method for the detection of panda urinary LH. We analyzed urinary hormones of 24 female pandas during 36 breeding periods, we found females could easily be impregnated if the first mating occurred within 10 hours after LH peak. We also found the patterns of the ratios of urinary LH and progestagen in pandas that bred and successfully gave birth were significantly different from those that bred but failed to give birth. These data was the first to provide the urinary LH profiles during the estrous and gestational periods in pandas, and demonstrated that the appearance of the urinary LH peak indicated the timing of ovulation. The LH detection together with estrogen analysis makes the window for successful mating narrower than previously reported. Moreover, detection of urinary LH and progestagen can be used to discriminate between pregnancies and pseudopregnancies/miscarriages in the species. Thus, our findings suggest that LH not only plays a critical role in regulating ovulation but also plays an important role in maintaining pregnancy in the giant panda. PMID:28091600

  13. Urinary profiles of luteinizing hormone, estrogen and progestagen during the estrous and gestational periods in giant pandas (Ailuropda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Cai, Kailai; Yie, Shangmian; Zhang, Zhihe; Wang, Juan; Cai, Zhigang; Luo, Li; Liu, Yuliang; Wang, Hairui; Huang, He; Wang, Chengdong; Huang, Xiangming; Lan, Jingchao; Hou, Rong

    2017-01-16

    Luteinizing hormone (LH) is one of the main pituitary hormones that regulate ovulation, however its role has not been studied in giant panda. In this study, we developed an ELISA method for the detection of panda urinary LH. We analyzed urinary hormones of 24 female pandas during 36 breeding periods, we found females could easily be impregnated if the first mating occurred within 10 hours after LH peak. We also found the patterns of the ratios of urinary LH and progestagen in pandas that bred and successfully gave birth were significantly different from those that bred but failed to give birth. These data was the first to provide the urinary LH profiles during the estrous and gestational periods in pandas, and demonstrated that the appearance of the urinary LH peak indicated the timing of ovulation. The LH detection together with estrogen analysis makes the window for successful mating narrower than previously reported. Moreover, detection of urinary LH and progestagen can be used to discriminate between pregnancies and pseudopregnancies/miscarriages in the species. Thus, our findings suggest that LH not only plays a critical role in regulating ovulation but also plays an important role in maintaining pregnancy in the giant panda.

  14. Habitat Use and Selection by Giant Pandas.

    PubMed

    Hull, Vanessa; Zhang, Jindong; Huang, Jinyan; Zhou, Shiqiang; Viña, Andrés; Shortridge, Ashton; Li, Rengui; Liu, Dian; Xu, Weihua; Ouyang, Zhiyun; Zhang, Hemin; Liu, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    Animals make choices about where to spend their time in complex and dynamic landscapes, choices that reveal information about their biology that in turn can be used to guide their conservation. Using GPS collars, we conducted a novel individual-based analysis of habitat use and selection by the elusive and endangered giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). We constructed spatial autoregressive resource utilization functions (RUF) to model the relationship between the pandas' utilization distributions and various habitat characteristics over a continuous space across seasons. Results reveal several new insights, including use of a broader range of habitat characteristics than previously understood for the species, particularly steep slopes and non-forest areas. We also used compositional analysis to analyze habitat selection (use with respect to availability of habitat types) at two selection levels. Pandas selected against low terrain position and against the highest clumped forest at the at-home range level, but no significant factors were identified at the within-home range level. Our results have implications for modeling and managing the habitat of this endangered species by illustrating how individual pandas relate to habitat and make choices that differ from assumptions made in broad scale models. Our study also highlights the value of using a spatial autoregressive RUF approach on animal species for which a complete picture of individual-level habitat use and selection across space is otherwise lacking.

  15. Habitat Use and Selection by Giant Pandas

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Vanessa; Zhang, Jindong; Huang, Jinyan; Zhou, Shiqiang; Viña, Andrés; Shortridge, Ashton; Li, Rengui; Liu, Dian; Xu, Weihua; Ouyang, Zhiyun; Zhang, Hemin; Liu, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    Animals make choices about where to spend their time in complex and dynamic landscapes, choices that reveal information about their biology that in turn can be used to guide their conservation. Using GPS collars, we conducted a novel individual-based analysis of habitat use and selection by the elusive and endangered giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). We constructed spatial autoregressive resource utilization functions (RUF) to model the relationship between the pandas' utilization distributions and various habitat characteristics over a continuous space across seasons. Results reveal several new insights, including use of a broader range of habitat characteristics than previously understood for the species, particularly steep slopes and non-forest areas. We also used compositional analysis to analyze habitat selection (use with respect to availability of habitat types) at two selection levels. Pandas selected against low terrain position and against the highest clumped forest at the at-home range level, but no significant factors were identified at the within-home range level. Our results have implications for modeling and managing the habitat of this endangered species by illustrating how individual pandas relate to habitat and make choices that differ from assumptions made in broad scale models. Our study also highlights the value of using a spatial autoregressive RUF approach on animal species for which a complete picture of individual-level habitat use and selection across space is otherwise lacking. PMID:27627805

  16. Establishment and cryopreservation of a giant panda skeletal muscle-derived cell line.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fang-Jian; Zeng, Chang-Jun; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Cheng-Dong; Xiong, Tie-Yi; Fang, Sheng-Guo; Zhang, He-Min

    2015-06-01

    The giant panda Ailuropoda melanoleuca is an endangered species and is a symbol for wildlife conservation. Although efforts have been made to protect this rare and endangered species through breeding and conservative biology, the long-term preservation of giant panda genome resources (gametes, tissues, organs, genomic libraries, etc.) is still a practical option. In this study, the giant panda skeletal muscle-derived cell line was successfully established via primary explants culture and cryopreservation techniques. The population doubling time of giant panda skeletal cells was approximately 33.8 h, and this population maintained a high cell viability before and after cryopreservation (95.6% and 90.7%, respectively). The two skeletal muscle-specific genes SMYD1 and MYF6 were expressed and detected by RT-PCR in the giant panda skeletal muscle-derived cell line. Karyotyping analysis revealed that the frequencies of giant panda skeletal muscle cells showing a chromosome number of 2n=42 ranged from 90.6∼94.2%. Thus, the giant panda skeletal muscle-derived cell line provides a vital resource and material platform for further studies and is likely to be useful for the protection of this rare and endangered species.

  17. Habitat assessment for giant pandas in the Qinling Mountain region of China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feng, Tian-Tian; Van Manen, Frank T.; Zhao, Na-Xun; Li, Ming; Wei, Fu-Wen

    2009-01-01

    Because habitat loss and fragmentation threaten giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), habitat protection and restoration are important conservation measures for this endangered species. However, distribution and value of potential habitat to giant pandas on a regional scale are not fully known. Therefore, we identified and ranked giant panda habitat in Foping Nature Reserve, Guanyinshan Nature Reserve, and adjacent areas in the Qinling Mountains of China. We used Mahalanobis distance and 11 digital habitat layers to develop a multivariate habitat signature associated with 247 surveyed giant panda locations, which we then applied to the study region. We identified approximately 128 km2 of giant panda habitat in Foping Nature Reserve (43.6% of the reserve) and 49 km2 in Guanyinshan Nature Reserve (33.6% of the reserve). We defined core habitat areas by incorporating a minimum patch-size criterion (5.5 km2) based on home-range size. Percentage of core habitat area was higher in Foping Nature Reserve (41.8% of the reserve) than Guanyinshan Nature Reserve (26.3% of the reserve). Within the larger analysis region, Foping Nature Reserve contained 32.7% of all core habitat areas we identified, indicating regional importance of the reserve. We observed a negative relationship between distribution of core areas and presence of roads and small villages. Protection of giant panda habitat at lower elevations and improvement of habitat linkages among core habitat areas are important in a regional approach to giant panda conservation.

  18. Progress in the ecology and conservation of giant pandas.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fuwen; Swaisgood, Ronald; Hu, Yibo; Nie, Yonggang; Yan, Li; Zhang, Zejun; Qi, Dunwu; Zhu, Lifeng

    2015-12-01

    Giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) conservation is a possible success story in the making. If extinction of this iconic endangered species can be avoided, the species will become a showcase program for the Chinese government and its collaborators. We reviewed the major advancements in ecological science for the giant panda, examining how these advancements have contributed to panda conservation. Pandas' morphological and behavioral adaptations to a diet of bamboo, which bear strong influence on movement ecology, have been well studied, providing knowledge to guide management actions ranging from reserve design to climate change mitigation. Foraging ecology has also provided essential information used in the creation of landscape models of panda habitat. Because habitat loss and fragmentation are major drivers of the panda population decline, efforts have been made to help identify core habitat areas, establish where habitat corridors are needed, and prioritize areas for protection and restoration. Thus, habitat models have provided guidance for the Chinese governments' creation of 67 protected areas. Behavioral research has revealed a complex and efficient communication system and documented the need for protection of habitat that serves as a communication platform for bringing the sexes together for mating. Further research shows that den sites in old-growth forests may be a limiting resource, indicating potential value in providing alternative den sites for rearing offspring. Advancements in molecular ecology have been revolutionary and have been applied to population census, determining population structure and genetic diversity, evaluating connectivity following habitat fragmentation, and understanding dispersal patterns. These advancements form a foundation for increasing the application of adaptive management approaches to move panda conservation forward more rapidly. Although the Chinese government has made great progress in setting aside protected areas

  19. Profile of microRNA in Giant Panda Blood: A Resource for Immune-Related and Novel microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingyu; Du, Lianming; Li, Wujiao; Shen, Fujun; Fan, Zhenxin; Jian, Zuoyi; Hou, Rong; Shen, Yongmei; Yue, Bisong; Zhang, Xiuyue

    2015-01-01

    The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is one of the world's most beloved endangered mammals. Although the draft genome of this species had been assembled, little was known about the composition of its microRNAs (miRNAs) or their functional profiles. Recent studies demonstrated that changes in the expression of miRNAs are associated with immunity. In this study, miRNAs were extracted from the blood of four healthy giant pandas and sequenced by Illumina next generation sequencing technology. As determined by miRNA screening, a total of 276 conserved miRNAs and 51 novel putative miRNAs candidates were detected. After differential expression analysis, we noticed that the expressions of 7 miRNAs were significantly up-regulated in young giant pandas compared with that of adults. Moreover, 2 miRNAs were up-regulated in female giant pandas and 1 in the male individuals. Target gene prediction suggested that the miRNAs of giant panda might be relevant to the expressions of 4,602 downstream genes. Subseuqently, the predicted target genes were conducted to KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) pathway analysis and we found that these genes were mainly involved in host immunity, including the Ras signaling pathway, the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, and the MAPK signaling pathway. In conclusion, our results provide the first miRNA profiles of giant panda blood, and the predicted functional analyses may open an avenue for further study of giant panda immunity.

  20. Seasonal shifts in giant panda feeding behavior: relationships to bamboo plant part consumption.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Rachel L; Carr, Meghan M; Apanavicius, Carolyn J; Jiang, Pingping; Bissell, Heidi A; Gocinski, Barbara L; Maury, Frances; Himmelreich, Marian; Beard, Sara; Ouellette, John R; Kouba, Andy J

    2010-01-01

    The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is classified as a carnivore, yet subsists on a diet comprised almost exclusively of bamboo. Wild and captive giant pandas use highly selective foraging behaviors for processing and consuming bamboo. These behaviors are for the first time quantified in captive giant pandas over a 5-year period of time showing highly specific seasonal trends. Giant panda feeding behavior was recorded using live video observations of two giant pandas housed at the Memphis Zoo from November 2003 to June 2008. Leaf was the primary plant part consumed from June to December, whereas culm was consumed primarily from February to May, with both bears displaying similar seasonal shifts in plant part consumption. From May to June, leaf consumption increased significantly (P-values<0.001); from June to August, leaf consumption remained high and stable. From December to March, leaf consumption decreased significantly (P-values<0.001). Specific behaviors for bamboo leaf and culm consumption were also observed. Both bears formed wads of leaves before ingestion while feeding on leaf, but the male employed this feeding behavior more often than the female (54 and 33%, respectively). Both bears used similar culm-stripping behavior (26 and 25%), used to remove the outer layer and isolate the pith for consumption. This study indicates that unique seasonal foraging behaviors observed in wild pandas are also apparent in captive animals in relation to plant part selectivity and feeding behaviors.

  1. Metabolic rate of the red panda, Ailurus fulgens, a dietary bamboo specialist.

    PubMed

    Fei, Yuxiang; Hou, Rong; Spotila, James R; Paladino, Frank V; Qi, Dunwu; Zhang, Zhihe

    2017-01-01

    The red panda (Ailurus fulgens) has a similar diet, primarily bamboo, and shares the same habitat as the giant panda, Ailuropoda melanoleuca. There are considerable efforts underway to understand the ecology of the red panda and to increase its populations in natural reserves. Yet it is difficult to design an effective strategy for red panda reintroduction if we do not understand its basic biology. Here we report the resting metabolic rate of the red panda and find that it is higher than previously measured on animals from a zoo. The resting metabolic rate was 0.290 ml/g/h (range 0.204-0.342) in summer and 0.361 ml/g/h in winter (range 0.331-0.406), with a statistically significant difference due to season and test temperature. Temperatures in summer were probably within the thermal neutral zone for metabolism but winter temperatures were below the thermal neutral zone. There was no difference in metabolic rate between male and female red pandas and no difference due to mass. Our values for metabolic rate were much higher than those measured by McNab for 2 red pandas from a zoo. The larger sample size (17), more natural conditions at the Panda Base and improved accuracy of the metabolic instruments provided more accurate metabolism measurements. Contrary to our expectations based on their low quality bamboo diet, the metabolic rates of red pandas were similar to mammals of the same size. Based on their metabolic rates red pandas would not be limited by their food supply in natural reserves.

  2. Metabolic rate of the red panda, Ailurus fulgens, a dietary bamboo specialist

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Yuxiang; Hou, Rong; Paladino, Frank V.; Qi, Dunwu; Zhang, Zhihe

    2017-01-01

    The red panda (Ailurus fulgens) has a similar diet, primarily bamboo, and shares the same habitat as the giant panda, Ailuropoda melanoleuca. There are considerable efforts underway to understand the ecology of the red panda and to increase its populations in natural reserves. Yet it is difficult to design an effective strategy for red panda reintroduction if we do not understand its basic biology. Here we report the resting metabolic rate of the red panda and find that it is higher than previously measured on animals from a zoo. The resting metabolic rate was 0.290 ml/g/h (range 0.204–0.342) in summer and 0.361 ml/g/h in winter (range 0.331–0.406), with a statistically significant difference due to season and test temperature. Temperatures in summer were probably within the thermal neutral zone for metabolism but winter temperatures were below the thermal neutral zone. There was no difference in metabolic rate between male and female red pandas and no difference due to mass. Our values for metabolic rate were much higher than those measured by McNab for 2 red pandas from a zoo. The larger sample size (17), more natural conditions at the Panda Base and improved accuracy of the metabolic instruments provided more accurate metabolism measurements. Contrary to our expectations based on their low quality bamboo diet, the metabolic rates of red pandas were similar to mammals of the same size. Based on their metabolic rates red pandas would not be limited by their food supply in natural reserves. PMID:28306740

  3. Virome comparisons in wild-diseased and healthy captive giant pandas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Yang, Shixing; Shan, Tongling; Hou, Rong; Liu, Zhijian; Li, Wang; Guo, Lianghua; Wang, Yan; Chen, Peng; Wang, Xiaochun; Feng, Feifei; Wang, Hua; Chen, Chao; Shen, Quan; Zhou, Chenglin; Hua, Xiuguo; Cui, Li; Deng, Xutao; Zhang, Zhihe; Qi, Dunwu; Delwart, Eric

    2017-08-07

    The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is a vulnerable mammal herbivore living wild in central China. Viral infections have become a potential threat to the health of these endangered animals, but limited information related to these infections is available. Using a viral metagenomic approach, we surveyed viruses in the feces, nasopharyngeal secretions, blood, and different tissues from a wild giant panda that died from an unknown disease, a healthy wild giant panda, and 46 healthy captive animals. The previously uncharacterized complete or near complete genomes of four viruses from three genera in Papillomaviridae family, six viruses in a proposed new Picornaviridae genus (Aimelvirus), two unclassified viruses related to posaviruses in Picornavirales order, 19 anelloviruses in four different clades of Anelloviridae family, four putative circoviruses, and 15 viruses belonging to the recently described Genomoviridae family were sequenced. Reflecting the diet of giant pandas, numerous insect virus sequences related to the families Iflaviridae, Dicistroviridae, Iridoviridae, Baculoviridae, Polydnaviridae, and subfamily Densovirinae and plant viruses sequences related to the families Tombusviridae, Partitiviridae, Secoviridae, Geminiviridae, Luteoviridae, Virgaviridae, and Rhabdoviridae; genus Umbravirus, Alphaflexiviridae, and Phycodnaviridae were also detected in fecal samples. A small number of insect virus sequences were also detected in the nasopharyngeal secretions of healthy giant pandas and lung tissues from the dead wild giant panda. Although the viral families present in the sick giant panda were also detected in the healthy ones, a higher proportion of papillomaviruses, picornaviruses, and anelloviruses reads were detected in the diseased panda. This viral survey increases our understanding of eukaryotic viruses in giant pandas and provides a baseline for comparison to viruses detected in future infectious disease outbreaks. The similar viral families

  4. Ecological scale and seasonal heterogeneity in the spatial behaviors of giant pandas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zejun; Sheppard, James K; Swaisgood, Ronald R; Wang, Guan; Nie, Yonggang; Wei, Wei; Zhao, Naxun; Wei, Fuwen

    2014-01-01

    We report on the first study to track the spatial behaviors of wild giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) using high-resolution global positioning system (GPS) telemetry. Between 2008 and 2009, 4 pandas (2 male and 2 female) were tracked in Foping Reserve, China for an average of 305 days (± 54.8 SE). Panda home ranges were larger than those of previous very high frequency tracking studies, with a bimodal distribution of space-use and distinct winter and summer centers of activity. Home range sizes were larger in winter than in summer, although there was considerable individual variability. All tracked pandas exhibited individualistic, unoriented and multiphasic movement paths, with a high level of tortuosity within seasonal core habitats and directed, linear, large-scale movements between habitats. Pandas moved from low elevation winter habitats to high elevation (>2000 m) summer habitats in May, when temperatures averaged 17.5 °C (± 0.3 SE), and these large-scale movements took <1 month to complete. The peak in panda mean elevation occurred in Jul, after which they began slow, large-scale movements back to winter habitats that were completed in Nov. An adult female panda made 2 longdistance movements during the mating season. Pandas remain close to rivers and streams during winter, possibly reflecting the elevated water requirements to digest their high-fiber food. Panda movement path tortuosity and first-passage-time as a function of spatial scale indicated a mean peak in habitat search effort and patch use of approximately 700 m. Despite a high degree of spatial overlap between panda home ranges, particularly in winter, we detected neither avoidance nor attraction behavior between conspecifics.

  5. Atmospheric deposition exposes Qinling pandas to toxic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Ping; Zheng, Ying-Juan; Liu, Qiang; Song, Yi; An, Zhi-Sheng; Ma, Qing-Yi; Ellison, Aaron M

    2016-12-31

    The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is one of the most endangered animals in the world, and it is recognized worldwide as a symbol for conservation. A previous study showed that wild and captive pandas, especially those of the Qinling subspecies, were exposed to toxicants in their diet of bamboo; the ultimate origin of these toxicants is unknown. Here we show that atmospheric deposition is the most likely origin of heavy metals and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the diets of captive and wild Qinling pandas. Average atmospheric deposition was 199, 115 and 49 g∙m(-2) ∙yr(-1) in the center of Xi'an city, at China's Shaanxi Wild Animal Research Center (SWARC), and at Foping National Nature Reserve (FNNR), respectively. Atmospheric deposition of heavy metals (As, Cd, Cr, Pb, Hg, Co, Cu, Zn, Mn and Ni) and POPs was highest at Xi'an city, intermediate at SWARC, and lowest at FNNR. Soil concentrations of the aforementioned heavy metals other than As and Zn also were significantly higher at SWARC than at FNNR. Efforts to conserve Qinling pandas may be compromised by air pollution attendant to China's economic development. Improvement of air quality and reductions of toxic emissions are urgently required to protect China's iconic species. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. The birth of a giant panda: Tracking the biological factors that successfully contribute to conception through to postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Kersey, David C; Aitken-Palmer, Copper; Rivera, Sam; Willis, Erin L; Liang, Liu Yu; Snyder, Rebecca J

    2016-03-01

    Reproducing giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) remains the most challenging aspect of managed care of this species. However, advancement in knowledge stemming from basic science research on the giant panda has facilitated a growth in the population. Here, we report the successful application of reproductive technologies, including noninvasive hormone monitoring, behavioral/morphometric observations, ultrasonographic evaluations, and acute phase protein assessment, in an individual female. By applying these approaches to one female, we report the practicality and usefulness of a multidisciplinary approach to reproductive care of the species. In addition, the utilization of various technologies across multiple physiological states also provided us an opportunity to record previously understudied events, such as maternal response to weaning and growth of a conceptus.

  7. Development of microsatellite markers for Fargesia denudata (Poaceae), the staple-food bamboo of the giant panda.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yan; Yu, Tao; Lu, Sihai; Tian, Cheng; Li, Junqing; Du, Fang K

    2016-06-01

    There is a need for microsatellite primers to analyze genetic parameters of Fargesia denudata (Poaceae), the staple-food bamboo of the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). Using next-generation sequencing technology, we obtained a 75-Mb assembled sequence of F. denudata and identified 182 microsatellites. Primer pairs for 70 candidate microsatellite markers were selected and validated in four individuals, and 42 primer pairs generated reliable amplicons. Fourteen of 16 tested markers were found to be polymorphic in 72 individuals from four F. denudata populations. The number of alleles ranged from two to 19 per locus; the observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0 to 1 and from 0 to 0.87, respectively. The transferability of these 16 novel microsatellite markers was validated in five related species. These markers will be useful for examining the genetic diversity, genetic structure, and cloning of F. denudata, the staple-food bamboo of the giant panda, and related bamboo species.

  8. Implications of the functional anatomy of the hand and forearm of Ailurus fulgens (Carnivora, Ailuridae) for the evolution of the 'false-thumb' in pandas.

    PubMed

    Antón, Mauricio; Salesa, Manuel J; Pastor, Juan F; Peigné, Stéphane; Morales, Jorge

    2006-12-01

    Both the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and the red panda (Ailurus fulgens) possess a 'false-thumb', actually an enlarged radial sesamoid bone, which contributes to the gripping action of the hand. These species are not closely related, however, as one is an ursid and the other an ailurid, so the fact that they share this adaptation implies a remarkable convergence. We studied the functional anatomy of this structure in the red panda, comparing it with existing descriptions of the grasping mechanism in both pandas. Previous interpretations of the radial sesamoid in Ailurus as a rod-like structure without direct articulation to the wrist bones are inaccurate. There are various important differences between the red panda and the giant panda. In the former, the lesser development of the radial sesamoid, its connection with the flexor retinaculum, the presence of an insertion of the muscle abductor pollicis longus in the first metacarpal, which enhances its supinatory action, and the presence of a muscle flexor brevis digitorum manus point to thin-branch climbing features serving as an exaptation to the more recent role of the red panda hand in the manipulation of bamboo.

  9. Implications of the functional anatomy of the hand and forearm of Ailurus fulgens (Carnivora, Ailuridae) for the evolution of the ‘false-thumb’ in pandas

    PubMed Central

    Antón, Mauricio; Salesa, Manuel J; Pastor, Juan F; Peigné, Stéphane; Morales, Jorge

    2006-01-01

    Both the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and the red panda (Ailurus fulgens) possess a ‘false-thumb’, actually an enlarged radial sesamoid bone, which contributes to the gripping action of the hand. These species are not closely related, however, as one is an ursid and the other an ailurid, so the fact that they share this adaptation implies a remarkable convergence. We studied the functional anatomy of this structure in the red panda, comparing it with existing descriptions of the grasping mechanism in both pandas. Previous interpretations of the radial sesamoid in Ailurus as a rod-like structure without direct articulation to the wrist bones are inaccurate. There are various important differences between the red panda and the giant panda. In the former, the lesser development of the radial sesamoid, its connection with the flexor retinaculum, the presence of an insertion of the muscle abductor pollicis longus in the first metacarpal, which enhances its supinatory action, and the presence of a muscle flexor brevis digitorum manus point to thin-branch climbing features serving as an exaptation to the more recent role of the red panda hand in the manipulation of bamboo. PMID:17118063

  10. Analysis of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COX1) gene reveals the unique evolution of the giant panda.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yao-Dong; Pang, Hui-Zhong; Li, De-Sheng; Ling, Shan-Shan; Lan, Dan; Wang, Ye; Zhu, Yun; Li, Di-Yan; Wei, Rong-Ping; Zhang, He-Min; Wang, Cheng-Dong

    2016-11-05

    As the rate-limiting enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, cytochrome c oxidase (COX) plays a crucial role in biological metabolism. "Living fossil" giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is well-known for its special bamboo diet. In an effort to explore functional variation of COX1 in the energy metabolism behind giant panda's low-energy bamboo diet, we looked at genetic variation of COX1 gene in giant panda, and tested for its selection effect. In 1545 base pairs of the gene from 15 samples, 9 positions were variable and 1 mutation leaded to an amino acid sequence change. COX1 gene produces six haplotypes, nucleotide (pi), haplotype diversity (Hd). In addition, the average number of nucleotide differences (k) is 0.001629±0.001036, 0.8083±0.0694 and 2.517, respectively. Also, dN/dS ratio is significantly below 1. These results indicated that giant panda had a low population genetic diversity, and an obvious purifying selection of the COX1 gene which reduces synthesis of ATP determines giant panda's low-energy bamboo diet. Phylogenetic trees based on the COX1 gene were constructed to demonstrate that giant panda is the sister group of other Ursidae.

  11. Kretzoiarctos gen. nov., the oldest member of the giant panda clade.

    PubMed

    Abella, Juan; Alba, David M; Robles, Josep M; Valenciano, Alberto; Rotgers, Cheyenn; Carmona, Raül; Montoya, Plinio; Morales, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    The phylogenetic position of the giant panda, Ailuropoda melanoleuca (Carnivora: Ursidae: Ailuropodinae), has been one of the most hotly debated topics by mammalian biologists and paleontologists during the last century. Based on molecular data, it is currently recognized as a true ursid, sister-taxon of the remaining extant bears, from which it would have diverged by the Early Miocene. However, from a paleobiogeographic and chronological perspective, the origin of the giant panda lineage has remained elusive due to the scarcity of the available Miocene fossil record. Until recently, the genus Ailurarctos from the Late Miocene of China (ca. 8-7 mya) was recognized as the oldest undoubted member of the Ailuropodinae, suggesting that the panda lineage might have originated from an Ursavus ancestor. The role of the purported ailuropodine Agriarctos, from the Miocene of Europe, in the origins of this clade has been generally dismissed due to the paucity of the available material. Here, we describe a new ailuropodine genus, Kretzoiarctos gen. nov., based on remains from two Middle Miocene (ca. 12-11 Ma) Spanish localities. A cladistic analysis of fossil and extant members of the Ursoidea confirms the inclusion of the new genus into the Ailuropodinae. Moreover, Kretzoiarctos precedes in time the previously-known, Late Miocene members of the giant panda clade from Eurasia (Agriarctos and Ailurarctos). The former can be therefore considered the oldest recorded member of the giant panda lineage, which has significant implications for understanding the origins of this clade from a paleobiogeographic viewpoint.

  12. A genome-wide survey on basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors in giant panda.

    PubMed

    Dang, Chunwang; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Debao; Yao, Qin; Chen, Keping

    2011-01-01

    The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is a critically endangered mammalian species. Studies on functions of regulatory proteins involved in developmental processes would facilitate understanding of specific behavior in giant panda. The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins play essential roles in a wide range of developmental processes in higher organisms. bHLH family members have been identified in over 20 organisms, including fruit fly, zebrafish, mouse and human. Our present study identified 107 bHLH family members being encoded in giant panda genome. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that they belong to 44 bHLH families with 46, 25, 15, 4, 11 and 3 members in group A, B, C, D, E and F, respectively, while the remaining 3 members were assigned into "orphan". Compared to mouse, the giant panda does not encode seven bHLH proteins namely Beta3a, Mesp2, Sclerax, S-Myc, Hes5 (or Hes6), EBF4 and Orphan 1. These results provide useful background information for future studies on structure and function of bHLH proteins in the regulation of giant panda development.

  13. Kretzoiarctos gen. nov., the Oldest Member of the Giant Panda Clade

    PubMed Central

    Abella, Juan; Alba, David M.; Robles, Josep M.; Valenciano, Alberto; Rotgers, Cheyenn; Carmona, Raül; Montoya, Plinio; Morales, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    The phylogenetic position of the giant panda, Ailuropoda melanoleuca (Carnivora: Ursidae: Ailuropodinae), has been one of the most hotly debated topics by mammalian biologists and paleontologists during the last century. Based on molecular data, it is currently recognized as a true ursid, sister-taxon of the remaining extant bears, from which it would have diverged by the Early Miocene. However, from a paleobiogeographic and chronological perspective, the origin of the giant panda lineage has remained elusive due to the scarcity of the available Miocene fossil record. Until recently, the genus Ailurarctos from the Late Miocene of China (ca. 8–7 mya) was recognized as the oldest undoubted member of the Ailuropodinae, suggesting that the panda lineage might have originated from an Ursavus ancestor. The role of the purported ailuropodine Agriarctos, from the Miocene of Europe, in the origins of this clade has been generally dismissed due to the paucity of the available material. Here, we describe a new ailuropodine genus, Kretzoiarctos gen. nov., based on remains from two Middle Miocene (ca. 12–11 Ma) Spanish localities. A cladistic analysis of fossil and extant members of the Ursoidea confirms the inclusion of the new genus into the Ailuropodinae. Moreover, Kretzoiarctos precedes in time the previously-known, Late Miocene members of the giant panda clade from Eurasia (Agriarctos and Ailurarctos). The former can be therefore considered the oldest recorded member of the giant panda lineage, which has significant implications for understanding the origins of this clade from a paleobiogeographic viewpoint. PMID:23155439

  14. Comparative genomics reveals convergent evolution between the bamboo-eating giant and red pandas.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yibo; Wu, Qi; Ma, Shuai; Ma, Tianxiao; Shan, Lei; Wang, Xiao; Nie, Yonggang; Ning, Zemin; Yan, Li; Xiu, Yunfang; Wei, Fuwen

    2017-01-31

    Phenotypic convergence between distantly related taxa often mirrors adaptation to similar selective pressures and may be driven by genetic convergence. The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and red panda (Ailurus fulgens) belong to different families in the order Carnivora, but both have evolved a specialized bamboo diet and adaptive pseudothumb, representing a classic model of convergent evolution. However, the genetic bases of these morphological and physiological convergences remain unknown. Through de novo sequencing the red panda genome and improving the giant panda genome assembly with added data, we identified genomic signatures of convergent evolution. Limb development genes DYNC2H1 and PCNT have undergone adaptive convergence and may be important candidate genes for pseudothumb development. As evolutionary responses to a bamboo diet, adaptive convergence has occurred in genes involved in the digestion and utilization of bamboo nutrients such as essential amino acids, fatty acids, and vitamins. Similarly, the umami taste receptor gene TAS1R1 has been pseudogenized in both pandas. These findings offer insights into genetic convergence mechanisms underlying phenotypic convergence and adaptation to a specialized bamboo diet.

  15. Comparative genomics reveals convergent evolution between the bamboo-eating giant and red pandas

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yibo; Wu, Qi; Ma, Shuai; Ma, Tianxiao; Shan, Lei; Wang, Xiao; Nie, Yonggang; Ning, Zemin; Yan, Li; Xiu, Yunfang; Wei, Fuwen

    2017-01-01

    Phenotypic convergence between distantly related taxa often mirrors adaptation to similar selective pressures and may be driven by genetic convergence. The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and red panda (Ailurus fulgens) belong to different families in the order Carnivora, but both have evolved a specialized bamboo diet and adaptive pseudothumb, representing a classic model of convergent evolution. However, the genetic bases of these morphological and physiological convergences remain unknown. Through de novo sequencing the red panda genome and improving the giant panda genome assembly with added data, we identified genomic signatures of convergent evolution. Limb development genes DYNC2H1 and PCNT have undergone adaptive convergence and may be important candidate genes for pseudothumb development. As evolutionary responses to a bamboo diet, adaptive convergence has occurred in genes involved in the digestion and utilization of bamboo nutrients such as essential amino acids, fatty acids, and vitamins. Similarly, the umami taste receptor gene TAS1R1 has been pseudogenized in both pandas. These findings offer insights into genetic convergence mechanisms underlying phenotypic convergence and adaptation to a specialized bamboo diet. PMID:28096377

  16. Impact of China's May 12 earthquake on Giant Panda habitat in Wenchuan County

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Weihua; Dong, Rencai; Wang, Xuezhi; Ouyang, Zhiyun; Li, Zhiqi; Xiao, Yi; Zhang, Jindong

    2009-05-01

    The Minshan and Qionglai mountains, the major distribution range of the Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), was struck by the Wenchuan earthquake. In this study, we evaluated the impact of the earthquake and subsequent geo-disasters on the Giant Panda and its habitat using Wenchuan county (where the epicenter was located) as a case study. Habitat characteristics before and after the earthquake were analyzed based on TM images taken pre and post-earthquake and previous research in this region. Results showed that about 252.0 km2 of panda habitat was lost in Wenchuan County after the earthquake, which accounted for 13.9% of the total habitat in this county. Regions with high earthquake intensity, low elevation, steep slope, and near river had a higher proportion of habitat loss than in other regions. In addition to habitat loss, the earthquake and its resulting geo-disasters also caused habitat fragmentation. After the earthquake, the number of habitat patches increased by a factor of 2 and mean patch size was only 28.3% of pre-earthquake conditions. Habitat restoration and corridor reparation along Road 303 are necessary for facilitating panda's migration between isolated patches. It is necessary to take some measures including relocation of residents and earthquake compensation to decrease the impact of reconstruction on the Giant Panda and its habitat.

  17. Highway increases concentrations of toxic metals in giant panda habitat.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ying-Juan; Chen, Yi-Ping; Maltby, Lorraine; Jin, Xue-Lin

    2016-11-01

    The Qinling panda subspecies (Ailuropoda melanoleuca qinlingensis) is highly endangered with fewer than 350 individuals inhabiting the Qinling Mountains. Previous studies have indicated that giant pandas are exposed to heavy metals, and a possible source is vehicle emission. The concentrations of Cu, Zn, Mn, Pb, Cr, Ni, Cd, Hg, and As in soil samples collected from sites along a major highway bisecting the panda's habitat were analyzed to investigate whether the highway was an important source of metal contamination. There were 11 sites along a 30-km stretch of the 108th National Highway, and at each site, soil samples were taken at four distances from the highway (0, 50, 100, and 300 m) and at three soil depths (0, 5, 10 cm). Concentrations of all metals except As exceeded background levels, and concentrations of Cu, Zn, Mn, Pb, and Cd decreased significantly with increasing distance from the highway. Geo-accumulation index indicated that topsoil next to the highway was moderately contaminated with Pb and Zn, whereas topsoil up to 300 m away from the highway was extremely contaminated with Cd. The potential ecological risk index demonstrated that this area was in a high degree of ecological hazards, which were also due to serious Cd contamination. And, the hazard quotient indicated that Cd, Pb, and Mn especially Cd could pose the health risk to giant pandas. Multivariate analyses demonstrated that the highway was the main source of Cd, Pb, and Zn and also put some influence on Mn. The study has confirmed that traffic does contaminate roadside soils and poses a potential threat to the health of pandas. This should not be ignored when the conservation and management of pandas is considered.

  18. cDNA Cloning and Overexpression of Acidic Ribosomal Phosphoprotein P1 Gene (RPLP1) from the Giant Panda

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yu-Jie; Luo, Xiao-Yan; Hao, Yan-Zhe; Zhang, Tian; Hou, Wan-Ru

    2007-01-01

    RPLP1 is one of acidic ribosomal phosphoproteins encoded by RPLP1 gene, which plays an important role in the elongation step of protein synthesis. The cDNA of RPLP1 was cloned successfully for the first time from the Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) using RT-PCR technology, which was also sequenced, analyzed preliminarily and expressed in E.coli. The cDNA fragment cloned is 449bp in size, containing an open reading frame of 344bp encoding 114 amino acids. Alignment analysis indicated that the nucleotide sequence and the deduced amino acid sequence are highly conserved to other five species studied, including Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Bos Taurus and Sus scrofa. The homologies for nucleotide sequences of Giant Panda PPLP1 to that of these species are 92.4%, 89.8%, 89.0%, 91.3% and 87.5%, while the homologies for amino acid sequences are 96.5%, 94.7%, 95.6%, 96.5% and 88.6%. Topology prediction showed there are three Casein kinase II phosphorylation sites and two N-myristoylation sites in the RPLP1 protein of the Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). The RPLP1 gene was overexpressed in E. coli and the result indicated that RPLP1 fusion with the N-terminally His-tagged form gave rise to the accumulation of an expected 18kDa polypeptide, which was in accordance with the predicted protein and could also be used to purify the protein and study its function. PMID:18071584

  19. cDNA cloning and overexpression of acidic ribosomal phosphoprotein P1 gene (RPLP1) from the giant panda.

    PubMed

    Du, Yu-Jie; Luo, Xiao-Yan; Hao, Yan-Zhe; Zhang, Tian; Hou, Wan-Ru

    2007-10-26

    RPLP1 is one of acidic ribosomal phosphoproteins encoded by RPLP1 gene, which plays an important role in the elongation step of protein synthesis. The cDNA of RPLP1 was cloned successfully for the first time from the Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) using RT-PCR technology, which was also sequenced, analyzed preliminarily and expressed in E.coli. The cDNA fragment cloned is 449bp in size, containing an open reading frame of 344bp encoding 114 amino acids. Alignment analysis indicated that the nucleotide sequence and the deduced amino acid sequence are highly conserved to other five species studied, including Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Bos Taurus and Sus scrofa. The homologies for nucleotide sequences of Giant Panda PPLP1 to that of these species are 92.4%, 89.8%, 89.0%, 91.3% and 87.5%, while the homologies for amino acid sequences are 96.5%, 94.7%, 95.6%, 96.5% and 88.6%. Topology prediction showed there are three Casein kinase II phosphorylation sites and two N-myristoylation sites in the RPLP1 protein of the Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). The RPLP1 gene was overexpressed in E. coli and the result indicated that RPLP1 fusion with the N-terminally His-tagged form gave rise to the accumulation of an expected 18kDa polypeptide, which was in accordance with the predicted protein and could also be used to purify the protein and study its function.

  20. Spatiotemporal dynamics of giant panda habitat: Implications for panda conservation under a changing environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuan Mu, Mao-Ning

    Under the current rapidly changing environment, effective and efficient actions for biodiversity conservation rely on detailed knowledge on the spatiotemporal dynamics of species distribution and habitat. However, inadequate spatiotemporal information on species habitat has compromised conservation effectiveness, even for one of the most endangered species on Earth, the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). To address this information gap, the objectives of this dissertation were to: (1) develop an approach for remotely detecting the distribution of understory bamboo, the panda's staple food, across large geographic regions; (2) develop a modeling approach for monitoring panda habitat changes across space and time; (3) evaluate the effects of current conservation efforts on short-term panda habitat changes; and (4) assess the potential impacts of climate change on long-term panda habitat dynamics. Using two dominant bamboo species in Wolong Nature Reserve, China, I showed that an integration of species distribution modeling with land surface phenology obtained from high temporal resolution remotely sensed data is a promising approach for providing detailed information on understory bamboo distribution across large geographic regions. Derived from time series data acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), eleven land surface phenology metrics successfully captured the phenological characteristics of vegetation caused by understory bamboo. In addition, a species distribution model (SDM) built using the maximum entropy modeling approach (Maxent) accurately captured the distribution of understory bamboo species across the reserve based on their phenological characteristics. I further demonstrated the usefulness of the phenology-based model for not only characterizing panda habitat across space, but also monitoring its dynamics over time. By quantitatively examining the effects of different predictor variables portraying land surface

  1. Withered on the stem: is bamboo a seasonally limiting resource for giant pandas?

    PubMed

    Li, Youxu; Swaisgood, Ronald R; Wei, Wei; Nie, Yonggang; Hu, Yibo; Yang, Xuyu; Gu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Zejun

    2017-04-01

    In response to seasonal variation in quality and quantity of available plant biomass, herbivorous foragers may alternate among different plant resources to meet nutritional requirements. Giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) are reliant almost exclusively on bamboo which appears omnipresent in most occupied habitat, but subtle temporal variation in bamboo quality may still govern foraging strategies, with population-level effects. In this paper, we investigated the possibility that temporal variation in the quality of this resource is involved in population regulation and examined pandas' adaptive foraging strategies in response to temporal variation in bamboo quality. Giant pandas in late winter and early spring consumed a less optimal diet in Foping Nature Reserve, as the availability of the most nutritious and preferred components and age classes of Bashania fargesii declined, suggesting that bamboo may be a seasonally limiting resource. Most panda mortalities and rescues occurred during the same period of seasonal food limitation. Our findings raised the possibility that while total bamboo biomass may not be a limiting factor, carrying capacity may be influenced by subtle seasonal variation in bamboo quality. We recommend that managers and policy-makers should consider more than just the quantity of bamboo in the understory and that carrying capacity estimates should be revised downward to reflect the fact that all bamboos are not equal.

  2. [Daily and weekly variations in the yeast-digestive flora of a female of giant panda (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Saëz, H

    1979-12-28

    Since its arrival at the Paris's zoological Park, the yeasts of the flora digestive tract of a young female of Giant Panda, Ailuropoda melanoleuca, was daily, then weekly studied. Were noted: the diet in captivity, the number of isolates in primary-cultures, the morpho-physiological differences between strains of a same species and the maximal temperature for growth of all the fungi. Were also approached, for the analysis, some data on the yeast-flora of other captive mammals and on the yeast species of the habitat. Short time colonization recorded seems the result of a difficulty of adaptation, even for C. albicans, to the digestive tract of that animal. The majority of the yeasts identified are transient microorganisms of alimentary, aquatic or aerial origin.

  3. Profile of microRNA in Giant Panda Blood: A Resource for Immune-Related and Novel microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mingyu; Du, Lianming; Li, Wujiao; Shen, Fujun; Fan, Zhenxin; Jian, Zuoyi; Hou, Rong; Shen, Yongmei; Yue, Bisong; Zhang, Xiuyue

    2015-01-01

    The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is one of the world’s most beloved endangered mammals. Although the draft genome of this species had been assembled, little was known about the composition of its microRNAs (miRNAs) or their functional profiles. Recent studies demonstrated that changes in the expression of miRNAs are associated with immunity. In this study, miRNAs were extracted from the blood of four healthy giant pandas and sequenced by Illumina next generation sequencing technology. As determined by miRNA screening, a total of 276 conserved miRNAs and 51 novel putative miRNAs candidates were detected. After differential expression analysis, we noticed that the expressions of 7 miRNAs were significantly up-regulated in young giant pandas compared with that of adults. Moreover, 2 miRNAs were up-regulated in female giant pandas and 1 in the male individuals. Target gene prediction suggested that the miRNAs of giant panda might be relevant to the expressions of 4,602 downstream genes. Subseuqently, the predicted target genes were conducted to KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) pathway analysis and we found that these genes were mainly involved in host immunity, including the Ras signaling pathway, the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, and the MAPK signaling pathway. In conclusion, our results provide the first miRNA profiles of giant panda blood, and the predicted functional analyses may open an avenue for further study of giant panda immunity. PMID:26599861

  4. Distinctive diet-tissue isotopic discrimination factors derived from the exclusive bamboo-eating giant panda.

    PubMed

    Han, Han; Wei, Wei; Nie, Yonggang; Zhou, Wenliang; Hu, Yibo; Wu, Qi; Wei, Fuwen

    2016-11-01

    Stable isotope analysis is very useful in animal ecology, especially in diet reconstruction and trophic studies. Differences in isotope ratios between consumers and their diet, termed discrimination factors, are essential for studies of stable isotope ecology and are species-specific and tissue-specific. Given the specialized bamboo diet and clear foraging behavior, here, we calculated discrimination factors for carbon and nitrogen isotopes from diet to tissues (tooth enamel, hair keratin and bone collagen) for the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), a species derived from meat-eating ancestors. Our results showed that carbon discrimination factor obtained from giant panda tooth enamel (ε (13) Cdiet-enamel = 10.0‰) and nitrogen discrimination factors from hair keratin (Δ(15) Ndiet-hair = 2.2‰) and bone collagen (Δ(15) Ndiet-collagen = 2.3‰) were lower, and carbon discrimination factors from hair keratin (Δ(13) Cdiet-hair = 5.0‰) and bone collagen (Δ(13) Cdiet-collagen = 6.1‰) were higher than those of other mammalian carnivores, omnivores and herbivores. Such distinctive values are likely the result of a low-nutrient and specialized bamboo diet, carnivore-like digestive system and exceptionally low metabolism in giant pandas.

  5. Climate-change impacts on understorey bamboo species and giant pandas in China's Qinling Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuanmu, Mao-Ning; Viña, Andrés; Winkler, Julie A.; Li, Yu; Xu, Weihua; Ouyang, Zhiyun; Liu, Jianguo

    2013-03-01

    Climate change is threatening global ecosystems through its impact on the survival of individual species and their ecological functions. Despite the important role of understorey plants in forest ecosystems, climate impact assessments on understorey plants and their role in supporting wildlife habitat are scarce in the literature. Here we assess climate-change impacts on understorey bamboo species with an emphasis on their ecological function as a food resource for endangered giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). An ensemble of bamboo distribution projections associated with multiple climate-change projections and bamboo dispersal scenarios indicates a substantial reduction in the distributional ranges of three dominant bamboo species in the Qinling Mountains, China during the twenty-first century. As these three species comprise almost the entire diet of the panda population in the region, the projected changes in bamboo distribution suggest a potential shortage of food for this population, unless alternative food sources become available. Although the projections were developed under unavoidable simplifying assumptions and uncertainties, they indicate potential challenges for panda conservation and underscore the importance of incorporating interspecific interactions into climate-change impact assessments and associated conservation planning.

  6. Fecal Near Infrared Spectroscopy to Discriminate Physiological Status in Giant Pandas

    PubMed Central

    Wiedower, Erin E.; Kouba, Andrew J.; Vance, Carrie K.; Hansen, Rachel L.; Tolleson, Douglas R.

    2012-01-01

    Giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) monitoring and research often require accurate estimates of population size and density. However, obtaining these estimates has been challenging. Innovative technologies, such as fecal near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (FNIRS), may be used to differentiate between sex, age class, and reproductive status as has been shown for several other species. The objective of this study was to determine if FNIRS could be similarly used for giant panda physiological discriminations. Based on samples from captive animals in four U.S. zoos, FNIRS calibrations correctly identified 78% of samples from adult males, 81% from adult females, 85% from adults, 89% from juveniles, 75% from pregnant and 70% from non-pregnant females. However, diet had an impact on the success of the calibrations. When diet was controlled for plant part such that “leaf only” feces were evaluated, FNIRS calibrations correctly identified 93% of samples from adult males and 95% from adult females. These data show that FNIRS has the potential to differentiate between the sex, age class, and reproductive status in the giant panda and may be applicable for surveying wild populations. PMID:22719982

  7. Fecal near infrared spectroscopy to discriminate physiological status in giant pandas.

    PubMed

    Wiedower, Erin E; Kouba, Andrew J; Vance, Carrie K; Hansen, Rachel L; Stuth, Jerry W; Tolleson, Douglas R

    2012-01-01

    Giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) monitoring and research often require accurate estimates of population size and density. However, obtaining these estimates has been challenging. Innovative technologies, such as fecal near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (FNIRS), may be used to differentiate between sex, age class, and reproductive status as has been shown for several other species. The objective of this study was to determine if FNIRS could be similarly used for giant panda physiological discriminations. Based on samples from captive animals in four U.S. zoos, FNIRS calibrations correctly identified 78% of samples from adult males, 81% from adult females, 85% from adults, 89% from juveniles, 75% from pregnant and 70% from non-pregnant females. However, diet had an impact on the success of the calibrations. When diet was controlled for plant part such that "leaf only" feces were evaluated, FNIRS calibrations correctly identified 93% of samples from adult males and 95% from adult females. These data show that FNIRS has the potential to differentiate between the sex, age class, and reproductive status in the giant panda and may be applicable for surveying wild populations.

  8. Genetic consequences of historical anthropogenic and ecological events on giant pandas.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lifeng; Hu, Yibo; Qi, Dunwu; Wu, Hua; Zhan, Xiangjiang; Zhang, Zhejun; Bruford, Michael W; Wang, Jinliang; Yang, Xuyu; Gu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Baowei; Zhang, Shanning; Wei, Fuwen

    2013-10-01

    The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) was taken to the brink of extinction in the 1980s through a combination of deforestation, large-scale loss of bamboo in the core of its range, poaching, and zoo collection, causing over 1000 deaths from the 1950s. It was thought that the drastic population decline was likely to impose a severe impact on population viability. Here, based on temporal genotyping of individuals, we show that this rapid decline did not significantly reduce the overall effective population size and genetic variation of this species, or of the two focal populations (Minshan and Qionglai) that declined the most. These results are contrary to previously assumptions, probably because the population decline has not produced the expected negative impact due to the short time scale involved (at most 10 generations), or because previous surveys underestimated the population size at the time of decline. However, if present-day habitat fragmentation and limited migration of giant pandas remains, we predict a loss of genetic diversity across the giant pandas' range in the near future. Thus, our findings highlight the substantial resilience of this species when facing demographic and environmental stochasticity, but key conservation strategies, such as enhancing habitat connectivity and habitat restoration should be immediately implemented to retain the extant genetic variation and maintain long-term evolutionary potential of this endangered species.

  9. Conservation implications of drastic reductions in the smallest and most isolated populations of giant pandas.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lifeng; Zhan, Xiangjiang; Wu, Hua; Zhang, Shanning; Meng, Tao; Bruford, Michael W; Wei, Fuwen

    2010-10-01

    In conservation biology, understanding the causes of endangerment is a key step to devising effective conservation strategies. We used molecular evidence (coalescent simulations of population changes from microsatellite data) and historical information (habitat and human population changes) to investigate how the most-isolated populations of giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) in the Xiaoxiangling Mountains became highly endangered. These populations experienced a strong, recent demographic reduction (60-fold), starting approximately 250 years BP. Explosion of the human population and use of non-native crop species at the peak of the Qing Empire resulted in land-use changes, deforestation, and habitat fragmentation, which are likely to have led to the drastic reduction of the most-isolated populations of giant pandas. We predict that demographic, genetic, and environmental factors will lead to extinction of giant pandas in the Xiaoxiangling Mountains in the future if the population remains isolated. Therefore, a targeted conservation action--translocation--has been proposed and is being implemented by the Chinese government.

  10. Genetic evidence of recent population contraction in the southernmost population of giant pandas.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yibo; Qi, Dunwu; Wang, Hongjia; Wei, Fuwen

    2010-12-01

    Anthropogenic habitat loss and fragmentation have been implicated in the endangerment and extinction of many species. Here we assess genetic variation and demographic history in the southernmost population of giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) that continues to be threatened by habitat degradation and fragmentation, using noninvasive genetic sampling, mitochondrial control region sequence and 12 microsatellite loci. Compared to other giant panda populations, this population has medium-level genetic diversity based on the measure of both mitochondrial and nuclear markers. Mitochondrial DNA-based demographic analyses revealed that no historical population expansion or contraction has occurred, indicating a relatively stable population size. However, a Bayesian-coalescent method based on the observed allele distribution and allele frequencies of microsatellite clearly did detect, quantify and date a recent decrease in population size. Overall, the results indicate that a population contraction in the order of 95-96% has taken place over the last 910-999 years and is most likely due to anthropogenic habitat loss. These findings highlight the need for a greater focus on habitat protection and restoration for the long-term survival of this giant panda population.

  11. Measuring and modeling the spatial pattern of understory bamboo across landscapes: Implications for giant panda habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linderman, Marc Alan

    We examined an approach to classifying understory bamboo, the staple food of the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), from remote sensing imagery in the Wolong Nature Reserve, China. We also used these data to estimate the landscape-scale distribution of giant panda habitat, and model the human effects on forest cover and the spatio-temporal dynamics of bamboo and the resulting implications for giant panda habitat. The spatial distribution of understory bamboo was mapped using an artificial neural network and leaf-on remote sensing data. Training on a limited set of ground truth data and using widely available Landsat TM data as input, a non-linear artificial neural network achieved a classification accuracy of 80% despite the presence of co-occurring mid-story and understory vegetation. Using information on the spatial distribution of bamboo in Wolong, we compared the results of giant panda habitat analyses with and without bamboo information. Total amount of habitat decreased by 29--56% and overall habitat patch size decreased by 16--48% after bamboo information was incorporated into the analyses. The decreases in the quantity of panda habitat and increases in habitat fragmentation resulted in decreases of 41--60% in carrying capacity. Using a spatio-temporal model of bamboo dynamics and human activities, we found that local fuelwood collection and household creation will likely reduce secondary habitat relied upon by pandas. Human impacts would likely contribute up to an additional 16% loss of habitat. Furthermore, these impacts primarily occur in the habitat relied upon by giant pandas during past bamboo die-offs. Decreased total area of habitat and increased fragmentation from human activities will likely make giant pandas increasingly sensitive to natural disturbances such as cyclical bamboo die-offs. Our studies suggest that it is necessary to further examine approaches to monitor understory vegetation and incorporate understory information into wildlife

  12. Deciphering and dating the red panda's ancestry and early adaptive radiation of Musteloidea.

    PubMed

    Sato, Jun J; Wolsan, Mieczyslaw; Minami, Shinji; Hosoda, Tetsuji; Sinaga, Martua H; Hiyama, Kozue; Yamaguchi, Yasunori; Suzuki, Hitoshi

    2009-12-01

    Few species have been of more disputed affinities than the red or lesser panda (Ailurus fulgens), an endangered endemic Southeast Asian vegetarian member of the placental mammalian order Carnivora. This peculiar carnivoran has mostly been classified with raccoons (Procyonidae) or bears (Ursidae), grouped with the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) in their own family, or considered a separate lineage of equivocal ancestry. Recent molecular studies have indicated a close affinity of the red panda to a clade of procyonids and mustelids (weasels, otters, martens, badgers, and allies), but have failed to unambiguously resolve the position of this species relative to mephitids (skunks and stink badgers). We examined the relationship of the red panda to other extant species of the carnivoran suborder Caniformia using a set of concatenated approximately 5.5-kb sequences from protein-coding exons of five nuclear genes. Bayesian, maximum likelihood, and parsimony phylogenetic analyses strongly supported the red panda as the closest living relative of a clade containing Procyonidae and Mustelidae to the exclusion of Mephitidae. These three families together with the red panda (which is classified here as a single extant species of a distinct family, Ailuridae) compose the superfamily Musteloidea, a clade strongly supported by all our phylogenetic analyses as sister to the monophyletic Pinnipedia (seals, sea lions, walruses). The approximately unbiased, Kishino-Hasegawa, and Templeton topology tests rejected (P<0.05) each of all possible alternative hypotheses about the relationships among the red panda and mephitids, procyonids, and mustelids. We also estimated divergence times for the red panda's lineage and ones of other caniform taxa, as well as the ages of the first appearance datums for the crown and total clades of musteloids and the total clades of the red panda, mephitids, procyonids, and mustelids. Bayesian relaxed molecular-clock analysis using combined

  13. Improvement of genome assembly completeness and identification of novel full-length protein-coding genes by RNA-seq in the giant panda genome.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meili; Hu, Yibo; Liu, Jingxing; Wu, Qi; Zhang, Chenglin; Yu, Jun; Xiao, Jingfa; Wei, Fuwen; Wu, Jiayan

    2015-12-11

    High-quality and complete gene models are the basis of whole genome analyses. The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) genome was the first genome sequenced on the basis of solely short reads, but the genome annotation had lacked the support of transcriptomic evidence. In this study, we applied RNA-seq to globally improve the genome assembly completeness and to detect novel expressed transcripts in 12 tissues from giant pandas, by using a transcriptome reconstruction strategy that combined reference-based and de novo methods. Several aspects of genome assembly completeness in the transcribed regions were effectively improved by the de novo assembled transcripts, including genome scaffolding, the detection of small-size assembly errors, the extension of scaffold/contig boundaries, and gap closure. Through expression and homology validation, we detected three groups of novel full-length protein-coding genes. A total of 12.62% of the novel protein-coding genes were validated by proteomic data. GO annotation analysis showed that some of the novel protein-coding genes were involved in pigmentation, anatomical structure formation and reproduction, which might be related to the development and evolution of the black-white pelage, pseudo-thumb and delayed embryonic implantation of giant pandas. The updated genome annotation will help further giant panda studies from both structural and functional perspectives.

  14. Improvement of genome assembly completeness and identification of novel full-length protein-coding genes by RNA-seq in the giant panda genome

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Meili; Hu, Yibo; Liu, Jingxing; Wu, Qi; Zhang, Chenglin; Yu, Jun; Xiao, Jingfa; Wei, Fuwen; Wu, Jiayan

    2015-01-01

    High-quality and complete gene models are the basis of whole genome analyses. The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) genome was the first genome sequenced on the basis of solely short reads, but the genome annotation had lacked the support of transcriptomic evidence. In this study, we applied RNA-seq to globally improve the genome assembly completeness and to detect novel expressed transcripts in 12 tissues from giant pandas, by using a transcriptome reconstruction strategy that combined reference-based and de novo methods. Several aspects of genome assembly completeness in the transcribed regions were effectively improved by the de novo assembled transcripts, including genome scaffolding, the detection of small-size assembly errors, the extension of scaffold/contig boundaries, and gap closure. Through expression and homology validation, we detected three groups of novel full-length protein-coding genes. A total of 12.62% of the novel protein-coding genes were validated by proteomic data. GO annotation analysis showed that some of the novel protein-coding genes were involved in pigmentation, anatomical structure formation and reproduction, which might be related to the development and evolution of the black-white pelage, pseudo-thumb and delayed embryonic implantation of giant pandas. The updated genome annotation will help further giant panda studies from both structural and functional perspectives. PMID:26658305

  15. Patterns of genetic differentiation at MHC class I genes and microsatellites identify conservation units in the giant panda.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Wan, Qiu-Hong; Yu, Bin; Ge, Yun-Fa; Fang, Sheng-Guo

    2013-10-22

    Evaluating patterns of genetic variation is important to identify conservation units (i.e., evolutionarily significant units [ESUs], management units [MUs], and adaptive units [AUs]) in endangered species. While neutral markers could be used to infer population history, their application in the estimation of adaptive variation is limited. The capacity to adapt to various environments is vital for the long-term survival of endangered species. Hence, analysis of adaptive loci, such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes, is critical for conservation genetics studies. Here, we investigated 4 classical MHC class I genes (Aime-C, Aime-F, Aime-I, and Aime-L) and 8 microsatellites to infer patterns of genetic variation in the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and to further define conservation units. Overall, we identified 24 haplotypes (9 for Aime-C, 1 for Aime-F, 7 for Aime-I, and 7 for Aime-L) from 218 individuals obtained from 6 populations of giant panda. We found that the Xiaoxiangling population had the highest genetic variation at microsatellites among the 6 giant panda populations and higher genetic variation at Aime-MHC class I genes than other larger populations (Qinling, Qionglai, and Minshan populations). Differentiation index (FST)-based phylogenetic and Bayesian clustering analyses for Aime-MHC-I and microsatellite loci both supported that most populations were highly differentiated. The Qinling population was the most genetically differentiated. The giant panda showed a relatively higher level of genetic diversity at MHC class I genes compared with endangered felids. Using all of the loci, we found that the 6 giant panda populations fell into 2 ESUs: Qinling and non-Qinling populations. We defined 3 MUs based on microsatellites: Qinling, Minshan-Qionglai, and Daxiangling-Xiaoxiangling-Liangshan. We also recommended 3 possible AUs based on MHC loci: Qinling, Minshan-Qionglai, and Daxiangling-Xiaoxiangling-Liangshan. Furthermore, we recommend

  16. cDNA, genomic sequence and overexpression of crystallin alpha-B Gene (CRYAB) of the Giant Panda

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yi-ling; Hou, Wan-ru; Ren, Zheng-long; Hao, Yan-zhe; Zhang, Tian

    2008-01-01

    αB-crystallin, a small heat-shock protein, has been shown to prevent the aggregation of other proteins under various stress conditions. Here we have cloned the cDNA and the genomic sequence of CRYAB gene from the Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) using RT-PCR technology and Touchdown-PCR, respectively. The length of cDNA fragment cloned contains an open reading frame of 528bp encoding 175 amino acids and the length of the genomic sequence is 3189bp, containing three exons and two introns. Alignment analysis indicated that the nucleotide sequence and the deduced amino acid sequence are highly conserved to other four species studied, including Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus and Bos taurus. The homologies for nucleotide sequences of Giant Panda CRYAB to that of these species are 93.9%, 91.5%, 91.5% and 95.3%, respectively, and the homologies for amino acid sequences are 98.3%, 97.1%,97.7% and 99.4%, respectively. Topology prediction shows that there are only four Casein kinase II phosphorylation sites in the CRYAB protein of the Giant Panda. The cDNA of CRYAB was transfected into E. coli, and the CRYAB fused with the N-terminally His-tagged protein gave rise to the accumulation of an expected 24KDa polypeptide, which accorded with the predicted protein. The expression product obtained could be used for purification and study of its function further. PMID:19043608

  17. Large-scale genetic survey provides insights into the captive management and reintroduction of giant pandas.

    PubMed

    Shan, Lei; Hu, Yibo; Zhu, Lifeng; Yan, Li; Wang, Chengdong; Li, Desheng; Jin, Xuelin; Zhang, Chenglin; Wei, Fuwen

    2014-10-01

    The captive genetic management of threatened species strives to preserve genetic diversity and avoid inbreeding to ensure populations remain available, healthy, and viable for future reintroduction. Determining and responding to the genetic status of captive populations is therefore paramount to these programs. Here, we genotyped 19 microsatellite loci for 240 captive giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) (∼64% of the captive population) from four breeding centers, Wolong (WL), Chengdu (CD), Louguantai (LGT), and Beijing (BJ), and analyzed 655 bp of mitochondrial DNA control region sequence for 220 of these animals. High levels of genetic diversity and low levels of inbreeding were estimated in the breeding centers, indicating that the captive population is genetically healthy and deliberate further genetic input from wild animals is unnecessary. However, the LGT population faces a higher risk of inbreeding, and significant genetic structure was detected among breeding centers, with LGT-CD and WL-BJ clustering separately. Based on these findings, we highlight that: 1) the LGT population should be managed as an independent captive population to resemble the genetic distinctness of their Qinling Mountain origins; 2) exchange between CD and WL should be encouraged because of similar wild founder sources; 3) the selection of captive individuals for reintroduction should consider their geographic origin, genetic background, and genetic contribution to wild populations; and 4) combining our molecular genetic data with existing pedigree data will better guide giant panda breeding and further reduce inbreeding into the future.

  18. Exposure to odors of rivals enhances sexual motivation in male giant pandas.

    PubMed

    Bian, Xiaoxing; Liu, Dingzhen; Zeng, Hua; Zhang, Guiquan; Wei, Rongping; Hou, Rong

    2013-01-01

    Males will alter their mating behavior to cope with the presence of their competitors. Even exposure to odors from potential competitors can greatly increase male ejaculate expenditure in a variety of animals including insects, fishes, birds and rodents. Major efforts have been made to examine males' plastic responses to sperm competition and its fitness benefits. However, the effects of competitor absence on male's sexual motivation and behaviors remain unclear, which has been proposed to be one of the causes for the poor sexual performance of some captive mammals. This study revealed that sexual motivation can be greatly enhanced in captive male giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) by exposure to chemosensory cues from either one or three conspecifics males. It had been shown that potential rivals' odors increased males' chemosensory investigation behavior, as well as their observing, following and sniffing behaviors towards estrous females. Behaviors changed regardless of the number of rivals (one or three). Our results demonstrate the effects of potential competition on male giant pandas' sexual motivation and behavioral coping strategy. We anticipate that our research will provide a fresh insight into the mechanisms underlying poor sexual performance in male captive mammals, and valuable information for the practical management and ex situ conservation of endangered species.

  19. Exposure to Odors of Rivals Enhances Sexual Motivation in Male Giant Pandas

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Xiaoxing; Liu, Dingzhen; Zeng, Hua; Zhang, Guiquan; Wei, Rongping; Hou, Rong

    2013-01-01

    Males will alter their mating behavior to cope with the presence of their competitors. Even exposure to odors from potential competitors can greatly increase male ejaculate expenditure in a variety of animals including insects, fishes, birds and rodents. Major efforts have been made to examine males' plastic responses to sperm competition and its fitness benefits. However, the effects of competitor absence on male's sexual motivation and behaviors remain unclear, which has been proposed to be one of the causes for the poor sexual performance of some captive mammals. This study revealed that sexual motivation can be greatly enhanced in captive male giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) by exposure to chemosensory cues from either one or three conspecifics males. It had been shown that potential rivals' odors increased males' chemosensory investigation behavior, as well as their observing, following and sniffing behaviors towards estrous females. Behaviors changed regardless of the number of rivals (one or three). Our results demonstrate the effects of potential competition on male giant pandas' sexual motivation and behavioral coping strategy. We anticipate that our research will provide a fresh insight into the mechanisms underlying poor sexual performance in male captive mammals, and valuable information for the practical management and ex situ conservation of endangered species. PMID:23940532

  20. An Investigation of Cellulose Digesting Bacteria in the Panda Gut Microbiome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, M.; Leung, F. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) diet consists primarily of bamboo leaves, stems and shoots. However, the Giant Panda lacks genes for the enzymes needed to digest cellulose, the core component of bamboo. Thus, it is hypothesized that the cellulolytic digestion necessary for maintaining the Giant Panda diet is carried out by microbial symbionts in the panda gut microbiota. Fecal microbiota is used as surrogate index for gut microbiota since the Giant Panda is listed by the World Conservation Union as a Threatened Species. Two bacterial isolates with potential cellulolytic activity were isolated from Giant Panda fecal samples and cultured on selective media CMC (carboxymethyl cellulose) agar and CMC-Congo Red agar using various methods of inoculation. After incubation, clearance zones around colonies were observed and used as qualitative assays for cellulose digestion. Polymerase chain reaction amplification of the 16S rRNA gene was completed and species identification was done based on the BLAST result of 16S rRNA sequence obtained using Sanger sequencing. Once the cellulase activity is confirmed, genomic DNA of the bacteria will be extracted and used for whole genome shotgun sequencing. Illumina next generation sequencing platform will be adopted as it yields high-throughput information, providing a better understanding of cellulose digestion and the molecular genetic pathways to renewable sources of biofuels. Researchers have identified multiple cellulose-digesting microbes in the Giant Panda gut, but few have applied such bacteria in converting cellulose into glucose to create biofuel. Cellulosic ethanol, a biofuel, is produced through the fermentation of lignocellulosic biomasses. This anaerobic process is aided by cellulose-digesting enzymes. Certain microbes, such as those present in the Giant Panda gut, can produce enzymes that cleave the glycosidic bonds of cellulose (C6H10O5) into glucose molecules (C6H12O6), which can then be fermented into ethanol

  1. Giant panda ribosomal protein S14: cDNA, genomic sequence cloning, sequence analysis, and overexpression.

    PubMed

    Wu, G-F; Hou, Y-L; Hou, W-R; Song, Y; Zhang, T

    2010-10-13

    RPS14 is a component of the 40S ribosomal subunit encoded by the RPS14 gene and is required for its maturation. The cDNA and the genomic sequence of RPS14 were cloned successfully from the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) using RT-PCR technology and touchdown-PCR, respectively; they were both sequenced and analyzed. The length of the cloned cDNA fragment was 492 bp; it contained an open-reading frame of 456 bp, encoding 151 amino acids. The length of the genomic sequence is 3421 bp; it contains four exons and three introns. Alignment analysis indicates that the nucleotide sequence shares a high degree of homology with those of Homo sapiens, Bos taurus, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Gallus gallus, Xenopus laevis, and Danio rerio (93.64, 83.37, 92.54, 91.89, 87.28, 84.21, and 84.87%, respectively). Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences of the giant panda with those of these other species revealed that the RPS14 of giant panda is highly homologous with those of B. taurus, R. norvegicus and D. rerio (85.99, 99.34 and 99.34%, respectively), and is 100% identical with the others. This degree of conservation of RPS14 suggests evolutionary selection. Topology prediction shows that there are two N-glycosylation sites, three protein kinase C phosphorylation sites, two casein kinase II phosphorylation sites, four N-myristoylation sites, two amidation sites, and one ribosomal protein S11 signature in the RPS14 protein of the giant panda. The RPS14 gene can be readily expressed in Escherichia coli. When it was fused with the N-terminally His-tagged protein, it gave rise to accumulation of an expected 22-kDa polypeptide, in good agreement with the predicted molecular weight. The expression product obtained can be purified for studies of its function.

  2. Temporal changes in giant panda habitat connectivity across boundaries of Wolong Nature Reserve, China.

    PubMed

    Viña, Andrés; Bearer, Scott; Chen, Xiaodong; He, Guangming; Linderman, Marc; An, Li; Zhang, Hemin; Ouyang, Zhiyun; Liu, Jianguo

    2007-06-01

    Global biodiversity loss is largely driven by human activities such as the conversion of natural to human-dominated landscapes. A popular approach to mitigating land cover change is the designation of protected areas (e.g., nature reserves). Nature reserves are traditionally perceived as strongholds of biodiversity conservation. However, many reserves are affected by land cover changes not only within their boundaries, but also in their surrounding areas. This study analyzed the changes in habitat for the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) inside Wolong Nature Reserve, Sichuan, China, and in a 3-km buffer area outside its boundaries, through a time series of classified satellite imagery and field observations. Habitat connectivity between the inside and the outside of the reserve diminished between 1965 and 2001 because panda habitat was steadily lost both inside and outside the reserve. However, habitat connectivity slightly increased between 1997 and 2001 due to the stabilization of some panda habitat inside and outside the reserve. This stabilization most likely occurred as a response to changes in socioeconomic activities (e.g., shifts from agricultural to nonagricultural economies). Recently implemented government policies could further mitigate the impacts of land cover change on panda habitat. The results suggest that Wolong Nature Reserve, and perhaps other nature reserves in other parts of the world, cannot be managed as an isolated entity because habitat connectivity declines with land cover changes outside the reserve even if the area inside the reserve is well protected. The findings and approaches presented in this paper may also have important implications for the management of other nature reserves across the world.

  3. Landscape features influence gene flow as measured by cost-distance and genetic analyses: a case study for giant pandas in the Daxiangling and Xiaoxiangling Mountains

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Gene flow maintains genetic diversity within a species and is influenced by individual behavior and the geographical features of the species' habitat. Here, we have characterized the geographical distribution of genetic patterns in giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) living in four isolated patches of the Xiaoxiangling and Daxiangling Mountains. Three geographic distance definitions were used with the "isolation by distance theory": Euclidean distance (EUD), least-cost path distance (LCD) defined by food resources, and LCD defined by habitat suitability. Results A total of 136 genotypes were obtained from 192 fecal samples and one blood sample, corresponding to 53 unique genotypes. Geographical maps plotted at high resolution using smaller neighborhood radius definitions produced large cost distances, because smaller radii include a finer level of detail in considering each pixel. Mantel tests showed that most correlation indices, particularly bamboo resources defined for different sizes of raster cell, were slightly larger than the correlations calculated for the Euclidean distance, with the exception of Patch C. We found that natural barriers might have decreased gene flow between the Xiaoxiangling and Daxiangling regions. Conclusions Landscape features were found to partially influence gene flow in the giant panda population. This result is closely linked to the biological character and behavior of giant pandas because, as bamboo feeders, individuals spend most of their lives eating bamboo or moving within the bamboo forest. Landscape-based genetic analysis suggests that gene flow will be enhanced if the connectivity between currently fragmented bamboo forests is increased. PMID:20653932

  4. Antimicrobial and disinfectant resistance of Escherichia coli isolated from giant pandas.

    PubMed

    Guo, L; Long, M; Huang, Y; Wu, G; Deng, W; Yang, X; Li, B; Meng, Y; Cheng, L; Fan, L; Zhang, H; Zou, L

    2015-07-01

    The study aims to demonstrate the antimicrobial and disinfectant resistance phenotypes and genotypes of Escherichia coli isolates obtained from giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). Antimicrobial testing was performed according to the standard disk diffusion method. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of disinfectants were determined using the agar dilution method. All isolates were screened for the presence of antimicrobial and disinfectant resistance genes and further analysed for genetic relatedness by pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Results showed that 46·6% of the isolates were resistant to at least one antimicrobial. Escherichia coli isolates showed resistance to fewer antimicrobials as panda age increased. Among antimicrobial-resistant E. coli isolates, the antimicrobial resistance genes blaCTX-M (88·2%) and sul1 (92·3%) were most prevalent. The disinfectant resistance genes emrE, ydgE/ydgF, mdfA and sugE(c) were commonly present (68·2-98·9%), whereas qac and sugE(p) were relatively less prevalent (0-21·3%). The frequencies of resistance genes tended to be higher in E. coli isolated in December than in July, and PFGE profiles were also more diverse in isolates in December. The qacEΔ1 and sugE(p) genes were higher in adolescent pandas than in any other age groups. PFGE revealed that antimicrobial resistance correlated well with sampling time and habitat. This study demonstrated that antimicrobial and disinfectant resistance was common in giant panda-derived E. coli, and the antimicrobial resistance was associated with sampling time and habitat. Escherichia coli could serve as a critical vector in spreading disinfectant and antimicrobial resistance. This is the first study that demonstrated the phenotypic and genetic characterizations of antimicrobial and disinfectant resistance in E. coli isolates from more than 60 giant pandas. Frequent transfer of pandas to other cages may lead to the dissemination of antimicrobial resistance. The

  5. Phylogenetic analysis of the haemagglutinin gene of canine distemper virus strains detected from giant panda and raccoon dogs in China

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Canine distemper virus (CDV) infects a variety of carnivores, including wild and domestic Canidae. In this study, we sequenced and phylogenetic analyses of the hemagglutinin (H) genes from eight canine distemper virus (CDV) isolates obtained from seven raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides) and a giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) in China. Results Phylogenetic analysis of the partial hemagglutinin gene sequences showed close clustering for geographic lineages, clearly distinct from vaccine strains and other wild-type foreign CDV strains, all the CDV strains were characterized as Asia-1 genotype and were highly similar to each other (91.5-99.8% nt and 94.4-99.8% aa). The giant panda and raccoon dogs all were 549Y on the HA protein in this study, irrespective of the host species. Conclusions These findings enhance our knowledge of the genetic characteristics of Chinese CDV isolates, and may facilitate the development of effective strategies for monitoring and controlling CDV for wild canids and non-cainds in China. PMID:23566727

  6. Coexpression of interleukin-6 and -2 from giant panda in Escherichia coli and the biological activity of the fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Yi, Y; Nian, Y-Y; Ji, H-W; Zhang, H; Zhu, L; Xu, Z-W

    2013-06-14

    To construct a fusion cytokine protein with more and stronger bioactivities to enhance the immunity of the cytokine alone, we expressed interleukin (IL)-6/(IL)-2 from giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) in Escherichia coli as a 59.4-kDa fusion protein. Subsequently, the inclusion bodies were solubilized with 8 M urea and applied onto a Ni-nitrilotriacetic acid column. The final production of IL-6/IL-2 reached 6 mg/L in soluble form, and the purified final product was >96% pure. In Western blot assays, the recombinant IL-6/IL-2 was recognized by polyclonal antibodies against IL-6 and IL-2 of giant panda. The results demonstrated that the protein mixture contained correctly folded IL-2 and IL-6 proteins. A 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl) 2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay demonstrated that IL-6/IL-2 can promote lymphocyte proliferation and differentiation. These data suggest that the fusion protein could be used to develop a novel immunoadjuvant to enhance the immunity of animals against infectious diseases.

  7. Genetic viability and population history of the giant panda, putting an end to the "evolutionary dead end"?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baowei; Li, Ming; Zhang, Zejun; Goossens, Benoît; Zhu, Lifeng; Zhang, Shanning; Hu, Jinchu; Bruford, Michael W; Wei, Fuwen

    2007-08-01

    The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is currently threatened by habitat loss, fragmentation, and human persecution. Its dietary specialization, habitat isolation, and reproductive constraints have led to a perception that this is a species at an "evolutionary dead end," destined for deterministic extinction in the modern world. Here we examine this perception by a comprehensive investigation of its genetic diversity, population structure, and demographic history across its geographic range. We present analysis of 655 base pairs of mitochondrial (mt) control region (CR) DNA and 10 microsatellite loci for samples from its 5 extant mountain populations (Qinling, Minshan, Qionglai, Liangshan, and Lesser Xiangling). Surprisingly, extant populations display average to high levels of CR and microsatellite diversity compared with other bear species. Genetic differentiation among populations was significant in most cases but was markedly higher between Qinling and the other mountain ranges, suggesting, minimally, that the Qinling population should comprise a separate management unit for conservation purposes. Recent demographic inference using microsatellite markers demonstrated a clear genetic signature for population decline starting several thousands years ago or even further back in the past, and being accelerated and enhanced by the expansion of human populations. Importantly, these data suggest that the panda is not a species at an evolutionary "dead end," but in common with other large carnivores, has suffered demographically at the hands of human pressure. Conservation strategies should therefore focus on the restoration and protection of wild habitat and the maintenance of the currently substantial regional genetic diversity, through active management of disconnected populations.

  8. Development of microsatellite markers for Fargesia denudata (Poaceae), the staple-food bamboo of the giant panda1

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Yan; Yu, Tao; Lu, Sihai; Tian, Cheng; Li, Junqing; Du, Fang K.

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: There is a need for microsatellite primers to analyze genetic parameters of Fargesia denudata (Poaceae), the staple-food bamboo of the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). Methods and Results: Using next-generation sequencing technology, we obtained a 75-Mb assembled sequence of F. denudata and identified 182 microsatellites. Primer pairs for 70 candidate microsatellite markers were selected and validated in four individuals, and 42 primer pairs generated reliable amplicons. Fourteen of 16 tested markers were found to be polymorphic in 72 individuals from four F. denudata populations. The number of alleles ranged from two to 19 per locus; the observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0 to 1 and from 0 to 0.87, respectively. The transferability of these 16 novel microsatellite markers was validated in five related species. Conclusions: These markers will be useful for examining the genetic diversity, genetic structure, and cloning of F. denudata, the staple-food bamboo of the giant panda, and related bamboo species. PMID:27347452

  9. Patterns of adaptive and neutral diversity identify the Xiaoxiangling mountains as a refuge for the giant panda.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Yan; Zhu, Ying; Wan, Qiu-Hong; Lou, Ji-Kang; Li, Wen-Jing; Ge, Yun-Fa; Fang, Sheng-Guo

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variation plays a significant role in maintaining the evolutionary potential of a species. Comparing the patterns of adaptive and neutral diversity in extant populations is useful for understanding the local adaptations of a species. In this study, we determined the fine-scale genetic structure of 6 extant populations of the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) using mtDNA and DNA fingerprints, and then overlaid adaptive variations in 6 functional Aime-MHC class II genes (DRA, DRB3, DQA1, DQA2, DQB1, and DQB2) on this framework. We found that: (1) analysis of the mtDNA and DNA fingerprint-based networks of the 6 populations identified the independent evolutionary histories of the 2 panda subspecies; (2) the basal (ancestral) branches of the fingerprint-based Sichuan-derived network all originated from the smallest Xiaoxiangling (XXL) population, suggesting the status of a glacial refuge in XXL; (3) the MHC variations among the tested populations showed that the XXL population exhibited extraordinary high levels of MHC diversity in allelic richness, which is consistent with the diversity characteristics of a glacial refuge; (4) the phylogenetic tree showed that the basal clades of giant panda DQB sequences were all occupied by XXL-specific sequences, providing evidence for the ancestor-resembling traits of XXL. Finally, we found that the giant panda had many more DQ alleles than DR alleles (33∶13), contrary to other mammals, and that the XXL refuge showed special characteristics in the DQB loci, with 7 DQB members of 9 XXL-unique alleles. Thus, this study identified XXL as a glacial refuge, specifically harboring the most number of primitive DQB alleles.

  10. cDNA, genomic sequence cloning and overexpression of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (GAPDH) from the Giant Panda.

    PubMed

    Hou, Wan-Ru; Hou, Yi-Ling; Du, Yu-Jie; Zhang, Tian; Hao, Yan-Zhe

    2010-01-01

    GAPDH (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) is a key enzyme of the glycolytic pathway and it is related to the occurrence of some diseases. The cDNA and the genomic sequence of GAPDH were cloned successfully from the Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) using the RT-PCR technology and Touchdown-PCR, respectively. Both sequences were analyzed preliminarily. The cDNA of GAPDH cloned from the Giant Panda is 1191 bp in size, contains an open reading frame of 1002 bp encoding 333 amino acids. The genomic sequence is 3941 bp in length and was found to possess 10 exons and 9 introns. Alignment analysis indicates that the nucleotide sequence and the deduced amino acid sequence are highly conserved in some mammalian species, including Homo sapiens, Mu musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Canis lupus familiaris and Bos taurus. The homologies for the nucleotide sequences of the Giant Panda GAPDH to that of these species are 90.67, 90.92, 90.62, 95.01 and 92.32% respectively, while the homologies for the amino acid sequences are 94.93, 95.5, 95.8, 98.8 and 97.0%. Primary structure analysis revealed that the molecular weight of the putative GAPDH protein is 35.7899 kDa with a theoretical pI of 8.21. Topology prediction showed that there is one Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase active site, two N-glycosylation sites, four Casein kinase II phosphorylation sites, seven Protein kinase C phosphorylation sites and eight N-myristoylation sites in the GAPDH protein of the Giant Panda. The GAPDH gene was overexpressed in E. coli BL21. The results indicated that the fusion of GAPDH with the N-terminally His-tagged form gave rise to the accumulation of an expected 43 kDa polypeptide. The SDS-PAGE analysis also showed that the recombinant GAPDH was soluble and thus could be used for further functional studies.

  11. Patterns of Adaptive and Neutral Diversity Identify the Xiaoxiangling Mountains as a Refuge for the Giant Panda

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Qiu-Hong; Lou, Ji-Kang; Li, Wen-Jing; Ge, Yun-Fa; Fang, Sheng-Guo

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variation plays a significant role in maintaining the evolutionary potential of a species. Comparing the patterns of adaptive and neutral diversity in extant populations is useful for understanding the local adaptations of a species. In this study, we determined the fine-scale genetic structure of 6 extant populations of the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) using mtDNA and DNA fingerprints, and then overlaid adaptive variations in 6 functional Aime-MHC class II genes (DRA, DRB3, DQA1, DQA2, DQB1, and DQB2) on this framework. We found that: (1) analysis of the mtDNA and DNA fingerprint-based networks of the 6 populations identified the independent evolutionary histories of the 2 panda subspecies; (2) the basal (ancestral) branches of the fingerprint-based Sichuan-derived network all originated from the smallest Xiaoxiangling (XXL) population, suggesting the status of a glacial refuge in XXL; (3) the MHC variations among the tested populations showed that the XXL population exhibited extraordinary high levels of MHC diversity in allelic richness, which is consistent with the diversity characteristics of a glacial refuge; (4) the phylogenetic tree showed that the basal clades of giant panda DQB sequences were all occupied by XXL-specific sequences, providing evidence for the ancestor-resembling traits of XXL. Finally, we found that the giant panda had many more DQ alleles than DR alleles (33∶13), contrary to other mammals, and that the XXL refuge showed special characteristics in the DQB loci, with 7 DQB members of 9 XXL-unique alleles. Thus, this study identified XXL as a glacial refuge, specifically harboring the most number of primitive DQB alleles. PMID:23894623

  12. Role of New Nature Reserve in Assisting Endangered Species Conservation - Case Study of Giant Pandas in the Northern Qionglai Mountains, China.

    PubMed

    Guan, Tian-Pei; Owens, Jacob R; Gong, Ming-Hao; Liu, Gang; Ouyang, Zhi-Yun; Song, Yan-Ling

    2016-01-01

    The creation of nature reserves is the most direct way to save endangered species populations and their habitat. Development of the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) nature reserve network in China was initiated in the 1960s, though the effort to create new reserves boomed considerably after the year 2000. Given this rapid development of protected areas in panda habitats, and the potential conflicting interests between conservation administrations and local economic development, it is essential to assess the role of new nature reserves in the overall giant panda conservation effort and reserve network. We utilized data from national giant panda surveys conducted in 2000 and 2012 to compare the size, spatial use, and distribution of panda populations, as well as the habitat suitability and connectivity in the Northern Qionglai Mountains between the two survey years. Our results show that although the total giant panda population in the study area did not change remarkably, local changes did occur. Most notably, the population in Wolong Nature Reserve declined by 27.3% (N = 39) and the population in Caopo Nature Reserve increased by 71.4% (N = 29) over the 12-year study period. We also found habitat suitability and availability decreased in both Wolong (12.4%) and Caopo (7.4%), but that the relative density of giant pandas declined (19.2%) and increased (84.6%) at each site, respectively. The distance between centers of high IUA were more distant in 2012 (14.1±1.9km) than that in 2000 (6.1±0.9km; t = -7.4, df = 5, p = 0.001), showing a scattered spatial pattern. Habitat availability decreased by 42% within the corridor between the two reserves, however panda occurrences in the corridor increased 24.6%. Compared to the total number of encounters, the proportion of the corridor increased 45.76%. Our results show the importance and success of the newly established Caopo to the conservation of giant pandas, and how crucial it is to identify and repair reserve

  13. Role of New Nature Reserve in Assisting Endangered Species Conservation - Case Study of Giant Pandas in the Northern Qionglai Mountains, China

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Tian-Pei; Owens, Jacob R.; Gong, Ming-Hao; Liu, Gang; Ouyang, Zhi-Yun; Song, Yan-Ling

    2016-01-01

    The creation of nature reserves is the most direct way to save endangered species populations and their habitat. Development of the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) nature reserve network in China was initiated in the 1960s, though the effort to create new reserves boomed considerably after the year 2000. Given this rapid development of protected areas in panda habitats, and the potential conflicting interests between conservation administrations and local economic development, it is essential to assess the role of new nature reserves in the overall giant panda conservation effort and reserve network. We utilized data from national giant panda surveys conducted in 2000 and 2012 to compare the size, spatial use, and distribution of panda populations, as well as the habitat suitability and connectivity in the Northern Qionglai Mountains between the two survey years. Our results show that although the total giant panda population in the study area did not change remarkably, local changes did occur. Most notably, the population in Wolong Nature Reserve declined by 27.3% (N = 39) and the population in Caopo Nature Reserve increased by 71.4% (N = 29) over the 12-year study period. We also found habitat suitability and availability decreased in both Wolong (12.4%) and Caopo (7.4%), but that the relative density of giant pandas declined (19.2%) and increased (84.6%) at each site, respectively. The distance between centers of high IUA were more distant in 2012 (14.1±1.9km) than that in 2000 (6.1±0.9km; t = -7.4, df = 5, p = 0.001), showing a scattered spatial pattern. Habitat availability decreased by 42% within the corridor between the two reserves, however panda occurrences in the corridor increased 24.6%. Compared to the total number of encounters, the proportion of the corridor increased 45.76%. Our results show the importance and success of the newly established Caopo to the conservation of giant pandas, and how crucial it is to identify and repair reserve

  14. cDNA, genomic sequence cloning and overexpression of ribosomal protein S25 gene (RPS25) from the Giant Panda.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yan-Zhe; Hou, Wan-Ru; Hou, Yi-Ling; Du, Yu-Jie; Zhang, Tian; Peng, Zheng-Song

    2009-11-01

    RPS25 is a component of the 40S small ribosomal subunit encoded by RPS25 gene, which is specific to eukaryotes. Studies in reference to RPS25 gene from animals were handful. The Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), known as a "living fossil", are increasingly concerned by the world community. Studies on RPS25 of the Giant Panda could provide scientific data for inquiring into the hereditary traits of the gene and formulating the protective strategy for the Giant Panda. The cDNA of the RPS25 cloned from Giant Panda is 436 bp in size, containing an open reading frame of 378 bp encoding 125 amino acids. The length of the genomic sequence is 1,992 bp, which was found to possess four exons and three introns. Alignment analysis indicated that the nucleotide sequence of the coding sequence shows a high homology to those of Homo sapiens, Bos taurus, Mus musculus and Rattus norvegicus as determined by Blast analysis, 92.6, 94.4, 89.2 and 91.5%, respectively. Primary structure analysis revealed that the molecular weight of the putative RPS25 protein is 13.7421 kDa with a theoretical pI 10.12. Topology prediction showed there is one N-glycosylation site, one cAMP and cGMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation site, two Protein kinase C phosphorylation sites and one Tyrosine kinase phosphorylation site in the RPS25 protein of the Giant Panda. The RPS25 gene was overexpressed in E. coli BL21 and Western Blotting of the RPS25 protein was also done. The results indicated that the RPS25 gene can be really expressed in E. coli and the RPS25 protein fusioned with the N-terminally his-tagged form gave rise to the accumulation of an expected 17.4 kDa polypeptide. The cDNA and the genomic sequence of RPS25 were cloned successfully for the first time from the Giant Panda using RT-PCR technology and Touchdown-PCR, respectively, which were both sequenced and analyzed preliminarily; then the cDNA of the RPS25 gene was overexpressed in E. coli BL21 and immunoblotted, which is the first

  15. Comparative analysis and molecular characterization of a gene BANF1 encoded a DNA-binding protein during mitosis from the Giant Panda and Black Bear.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yichun; Hou, Yi-Ling; Ding, Xiang; Hou, Wan-Ru; Li, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Barrier to autointegration factor 1 (BANF1) is a DNA-binding protein found in the nucleus and cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells that functions to establish nuclear architecture during mitosis. The cDNA and the genomic sequence of BANF1 were cloned from the Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and Black Bear (Ursus thibetanus mupinensis) using RT-PCR technology and Touchdown-PCR, respectively. The cDNA of the BANF1 cloned from Giant Panda and Black Bear is 297 bp in size, containing an open reading frame of 270 bp encoding 89 amino acids. The length of the genomic sequence from Giant Panda is 521 bp, from Black Bear is 536 bp, which were found both to possess 2 exons. Alignment analysis indicated that the nucleotide sequence and the deduced amino acid sequence are highly conserved to some mammalian species studied. Topology prediction showed there is one Protein kinase C phosphorylation site, one Casein kinase II phosphorylation site, one Tyrosine kinase phosphorylation site, one N-myristoylation site, and one Amidation site in the BANF1 protein of the Giant Panda, and there is one Protein kinase C phosphorylation site, one Tyrosine kinase phosphorylation site, one N-myristoylation site, and one Amidation site in the BANF1 protein of the Black Bear. The BANF1 gene can be readily expressed in E. coli. Results showed that the protein BANF1 fusion with the N-terminally His-tagged form gave rise to the accumulation of an expected 14 kD polypeptide that formed inclusion bodies. The expression products obtained could be used to purify the proteins and study their function further.

  16. The parasites of giant pandas: individual-based measurement in wild animals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Yang, Xuyu; Wu, Hua; Gu, Xiaodong; Hu, Yibo; Wei, Fuwen

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing recognition of parasites as a significant factor in the successful conservation of endangered species. Determining parasite infection and load in free-ranging populations traditionally is done via necropsy or coproscopy. For studies of wild animals, fecal sample collection can result in bias because the individual identity of animals is unknown and multiple samples may be collected from the same individual, yet treated as unrelated samples. We studied parasite load in wild giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) across six mountain ranges in China. Genetic identification was used to determine the exact number of individuals sampled. The parasite fauna consisted of five species, dominated by Baylisascaris shroederi. The pattern of statistical difference between mountains was artificially inflated when animal identity was not included in the model. Our results suggest that caution should be exercised in inferring patterns from comparative parasitologic studies when samples cannot be attributed to specific individuals. Using noninvasive genetic sampling to avoid such bias should form a standard tool in the management of endangered species and their parasites.

  17. Patterns of genetic differentiation at MHC class I genes and microsatellites identify conservation units in the giant panda

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Evaluating patterns of genetic variation is important to identify conservation units (i.e., evolutionarily significant units [ESUs], management units [MUs], and adaptive units [AUs]) in endangered species. While neutral markers could be used to infer population history, their application in the estimation of adaptive variation is limited. The capacity to adapt to various environments is vital for the long-term survival of endangered species. Hence, analysis of adaptive loci, such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes, is critical for conservation genetics studies. Here, we investigated 4 classical MHC class I genes (Aime-C, Aime-F, Aime-I, and Aime-L) and 8 microsatellites to infer patterns of genetic variation in the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and to further define conservation units. Results Overall, we identified 24 haplotypes (9 for Aime-C, 1 for Aime-F, 7 for Aime-I, and 7 for Aime-L) from 218 individuals obtained from 6 populations of giant panda. We found that the Xiaoxiangling population had the highest genetic variation at microsatellites among the 6 giant panda populations and higher genetic variation at Aime-MHC class I genes than other larger populations (Qinling, Qionglai, and Minshan populations). Differentiation index (FST)-based phylogenetic and Bayesian clustering analyses for Aime-MHC-I and microsatellite loci both supported that most populations were highly differentiated. The Qinling population was the most genetically differentiated. Conclusions The giant panda showed a relatively higher level of genetic diversity at MHC class I genes compared with endangered felids. Using all of the loci, we found that the 6 giant panda populations fell into 2 ESUs: Qinling and non-Qinling populations. We defined 3 MUs based on microsatellites: Qinling, Minshan-Qionglai, and Daxiangling-Xiaoxiangling-Liangshan. We also recommended 3 possible AUs based on MHC loci: Qinling, Minshan-Qionglai, and Daxiangling

  18. Identification of conserved microRNAs in peripheral blood from giant panda: expression of mammary gland-related microRNAs during late pregnancy and early lactation.

    PubMed

    Wang, C D; Long, K; Jin, L; Huang, S; Li, D H; Ma, X P; Wei, M; Gu, Y; Ma, J D; Zhang, H

    2015-11-13

    The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is one of the world's most endangered mammals, and it has evolved several unusual biological and behavioral traits. During puberty, pregnancy, lactation, and involution, the mammary gland undergoes profound morphological and functional changes. A large number of microRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified to be involved in mammary gland development and lactation. In this study, we identified 202 conserved mature miRNAs, corresponding to 147 pre-miRNAs, in giant panda peripheral blood using a small RNA-sequencing approach. In addition, 27 miRNA families and 29 miRNA clusters were identified. We analyzed the arm selection preference of pre-miRNAs and found that: 1) most giant panda pre-miRNAs generated one-strand miRNAs, and the 5p-arm only miRNAs have a higher expression level than 3p-arm only miRNAs; 2) there were more 5p-arm dominant miRNAs than 3p-arm dominant miRNAs; and 3) 5p-arm dominant miRNAs have a larger fold change within miRNA pairs than 3p-arm dominant miRNAs. Expression of 12 lactation-related miRNAs was detected across late pregnancy and early lactation stages by qPCR, and seven miRNAs were identified as clustered in one significant model. Most of these clustered miRNAs exhibited inhibitory roles in proliferation and differentiation of mammary epithelial cells. Functional analysis highlighted important roles of the seven as signed miRNAs in mammary development and metabolic changes, including blood vessel morphogenesis, macromolecule biosynthesis, cell cycle regulation, and protein transport.

  19. Characterization of Baylisascaris schroederi from Qinling subspecies of giant panda in China by the first internal transcribed spacer (ITS-1) of nuclear ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Lin, Q; Li, H M; Gao, M; Wang, X Y; Ren, W X; Cong, M M; Tan, X C; Chen, C X; Yu, S K; Zhao, G H

    2012-03-01

    In the present study, a total of 20 nematode isolates, (including 10 male and 10 female worms) representing Baylisascaris schroederi from 5 Qinling subspecies of giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) in Shaanxi Province of China, were characterized and grouped genetically by the first internal transcribed spacer (ITS-1) of nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA). The rDNA fragment spanning 3' end of 18S rDNA, complete ITS-1 rDNA, and 5' end of 5.8S rDNA were amplified and sequenced. The sequence variability in ITS-1 rDNA was examined within B. schroederi and among parasites in order Ascaridata available in GenBank™, and their phylogenetic relationships were also reconstructed. The sequences of ITS-1 rDNA for all the B. schroederi isolates were 427 bp in length, with no genetic variation detected among these isolates. Phylogenetic analyses based on the ITS-1 rDNA sequences revealed that all the male and female B. schroederi isolates sequenced in the present study were posited into the clade of genus Baylisascaris, sistered to zoonotic nematodes in genus Ascaris, and the ITS-1 rDNA sequence could distinguish different species in order Ascaridata. These results showed that the ITS-1 rDNA provides a suitable molecular marker for the inter-species phylogenetic analysis and differential identification of nematodes in order Ascaridata.

  20. 75 FR 34766 - Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-18

    ..., San Diego, CA; PRT-13802A The applicant requests a permit to export one female captive bred giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) born at the zoo in 2007and owned by the Government of China, to...

  1. 75 FR 27814 - Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-18

    ... permit to export one female captive bred giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) born at the zoo in 2005 and...-year period and the import of any potential progeny born while overseas. Applicant: University...

  2. cDNA cloning, overexpression, purification and pharmacologic evaluation for anticancer activity of ribosomal protein L23A gene (RPL23A) from the Giant Panda.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bing; Hou, Yi-Ling; Hou, Wan-Ru; Zhang, Si-Nan; Ding, Xiang; Su, Xiu-Lan

    2012-01-01

    RPL23A gene encodes a ribosomal protein that is a component of the 60S subunit. The protein belongs to the L23P family of ribosomal proteins, which is located in the cytoplasm. The purpose of this paper was to explore the structure and anti-cancer function of ribosomal protein L23A (RPL23A) gene of the Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). The cDNA of RPL23A was cloned successfully from the Giant Panda using RT-PCR technology. We constructed a recombinant expression vector containing RPL23A cDNA and over-expressed it in Escherichia coli using pET28a plasmids. The expression product obtained was purified by using Ni chelating affinity chromatography. Recombinant protein of RPL23A obtained from the experiment acted on Hep-2 cells and human HepG-2 cells, then the growth inhibitory effect of these cells was observed by MTT (3-[4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl]-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide) assay. The result indicated that the length of the fragment cloned is 506 bp, and it contains an open-reading frame (ORF) of 471 bp encoding 156 amino acids. Primary structure analysis revealed that the molecular weight of the putative RPL23A protein is 17.719 kDa with a theoretical pI 11.16. The molecular weight of the recombinant protein RPL23A is 21.265 kDa with a theoretical pI 10.57. The RPL23A gene can be really expressed in E. coli and the RPL23A protein, fusioned with the N-terminally His-tagged protein, gave rise to the accumulation of an expected 22 KDa polypeptide. The data showed that the recombinant protein RPL23A had a time- and dose-dependency on the cell growth inhibition rate. The data also indicated that the effect at low concentrations was better than at high concentrations on Hep-2 cells, and that the concentration of 0.185 μg/mL had the best rate of growth inhibition of 36.31%. All results of the experiment revealed that the recombinant protein RPL23A exhibited anti-cancer function on the Hep-2 cells. The study provides a scientific basis and aids orientation for

  3. The phylogeny of the red panda (Ailurus fulgens): evidence from the forelimb.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Rebecca E; Adrian, Brent; Barton, Michael; Holmgren, Jennifer; Tang, Samuel Y

    2009-12-01

    Within the order Carnivora, the phylogeny of the red panda (Ailurus fulgens) is contentious, with morphological and molecular studies supporting a wide range of possible relationships, including close ties to procyonids, ursids, mustelids and mephitids. This study provides additional morphological data, including muscle maps, for the forelimb of Ailurus, based on the dissection of four cadavers from the National Zoological Park, Washington, DC, USA. The red panda forelimb is characterized by a number of primitive features, including the lack of m. rhomboideus profundus, a humeral insertion for m. cleidobrachialis, the presence of mm. brachioradialis, articularis humeri and coracobrachialis, a single muscle belly for m. extensor digitorum lateralis with tendons to digits III-V, four mm. lumbricales, and the presence of mm. flexor digitorum brevis manus, adductores digiti I, II and V, and abductor digiti I and V. Red pandas resemble Ailuropoda, mustelids and some procyonids in possessing a soft tissue origin of m. flexor digitorum superficialis. In addition, red pandas are similar to ursids and procyonids in having a variable presence of m. biceps brachii caput breve. Furthermore, Ailurus and some ursids lack m. rhomboideus capitis. The forelimb muscle maps from this study represent a valuable resource for analyzing the functional anatomy of fossil ailurids and some notes on the Miocene ailurid, Simocyon batalleri, are presented.

  4. The phylogeny of the red panda (Ailurus fulgens): evidence from the forelimb

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Rebecca E; Adrian, Brent; Barton, Michael; Holmgren, Jennifer; Tang, Samuel Y

    2009-01-01

    Within the order Carnivora, the phylogeny of the red panda (Ailurus fulgens) is contentious, with morphological and molecular studies supporting a wide range of possible relationships, including close ties to procyonids, ursids, mustelids and mephitids. This study provides additional morphological data, including muscle maps, for the forelimb of Ailurus, based on the dissection of four cadavers from the National Zoological Park, Washington, DC, USA. The red panda forelimb is characterized by a number of primitive features, including the lack of m. rhomboideus profundus, a humeral insertion for m. cleidobrachialis, the presence of mm. brachioradialis, articularis humeri and coracobrachialis, a single muscle belly for m. extensor digitorum lateralis with tendons to digits III–V, four mm. lumbricales, and the presence of mm. flexor digitorum brevis manus, adductores digiti I, II and V, and abductor digiti I and V. Red pandas resemble Ailuropoda, mustelids and some procyonids in possessing a soft tissue origin of m. flexor digitorum superficialis. In addition, red pandas are similar to ursids and procyonids in having a variable presence of m. biceps brachii caput breve. Furthermore, Ailurus and some ursids lack m. rhomboideus capitis. The forelimb muscle maps from this study represent a valuable resource for analyzing the functional anatomy of fossil ailurids and some notes on the Miocene ailurid, Simocyon batalleri, are presented. PMID:19930516

  5. The first PANDA tests

    SciTech Connect

    Dreier, J.; Huggenberger, M.; Aubert, C.

    1996-08-01

    The PANDA test facility at PSI in Switzerland is used to study the long-term Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS) performance. The PANDA tests demonstrate performance on a larger scale than previous tests and examine the effects of any non-uniform spatial distributions of steam and non-condensables in the system. The PANDA facility has a 1:1 vertical scale, and 1:25 ``system`` scale (volume, power, etc.). Steady-state PCCS condenser performance tests and extensive facility characterization tests have been completed. Transient system behavior tests were conducted late in 1995; results from the first three transient tests (M3 series) are reviewed. The first PANDA tests showed that the overall global behavior of the SBWR containment was globally repeatable and very favorable; the system exhibited great ``robustness.``

  6. Whence the red panda?

    PubMed

    Flynn, J J; Nedbal, M A; Dragoo, J W; Honeycutt, R L

    2000-11-01

    The evolutionary history of the red panda (Ailurus fulgens) plays a pivotal role in the higher-level phylogeny of the "bear-like" arctoid carnivoran mammals. Characters from morphology and molecules have provided inconsistent evidence for placement of the red panda. Whereas it certainly is an arctoid, there has been major controversy about whether it should be placed with the bears (ursids), ursids plus pinnipeds (seals, sea lions, walrus), raccoons (procyonids), musteloids (raccoons plus weasels, skunks, otters, and badgers [mustelids]), or as a monotypic lineage of uncertain phylogenetic affinities. Nucleotide sequence data from three mitochondrial genes and one nuclear intron were analyzed, with more complete taxonomic sampling of relevant taxa (arctoids) than previously available in analyses of primary molecular data, to clarify the phylogenetic relationships of the red panda to other arctoid carnivorans. This study provides detailed phylogenetic analyses (both parsimony and maximum-likelihood) of primary character data for arctoid carnivorans, including bootstrap and decay indices for all arctoid nodes, and three statistical tests of alternative phylogenetic hypotheses for the placement of the red panda. Combined phylogenetic analyses reject the hypotheses that the red panda is most closely related to the bears (ursids) or to the raccoons (procyonids). Rather, evidence from nucleotide sequences strongly support placement of the red panda within a broad Musteloidea (sensu lato) clade, including three major lineages (the red panda, the skunks [mephitids], and a clearly monophyletic clade of procyonids plus mustelids [sensu stricto, excluding skunks]). Within the Musteloidea, interrelationships of the three major lineages are unclear and probably are best considered an unresolved trichotomy. These data provide compelling evidence for the relationships of the red panda and demonstrate that small taxonomic sample sizes can result in misleading or possibly erroneous

  7. Parasite threat to panda conservation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-Shuo; Daszak, Peter; Huang, Hua-Li; Yang, Guang-You; Kilpatrick, A Marm; Zhang, Shuyi

    2008-03-01

    The giant panda is a global symbol of wildlife conservation that is threatened by historic and current habitat loss. Despite a great deal of research on the physiology, reproductive biology, and diet of pandas in the wild and in captivity, there is little information on wild panda mortality. Here we integrate previously unavailable data on the mortality of wild pandas. We report on three recent phases of panda mortality: deaths due to bamboo flowering in the 1970s and 1980s, surprisingly extensive poaching in the 1980s and 1990s, and a parasitic infection over the past few years. Our analyses suggest that the current most significant threat to wild panda survival is disease due to extraintestinal migration (visceral larval migrans) by an ascarid nematode. We demonstrate that the probability of death of wild pandas being caused by this disease increased significantly between 1971 and 2005 and discuss the possible factors leading to the emergence of this disease.

  8. [Tonsillectomy for PANDAS?].

    PubMed

    Windfuhr, J P

    2016-04-01

    Pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS) is a disease attributed to children with obsessive compulsive or tic disorders associated with streptococcal infections. Because otolaryngologists evaluate a large number of pediatric patients with recurrent streptococcal infections, tonsillectomy (TE) is a common option of therapy. This study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of tonsillectomy in patients presenting with a verified PANDAS. A PubMed research was performed using search terms "tonsillectomy" and "PANDAS", "OCD", "compulsive", "pediatric autoimmune", "Chorea" and "Tic" limited by publication date January 1, 1995 to July 31, 2015. Reviews without patients were not included in the review. Nine papers matched our search terms, including 6 case reports with 8 patients and 3 case series. Most case reports were in favor for TE, but this was by far not supported by the findings in the case series. The follow-up ranged form 2-36 months (case reports) and 24-36 months (case series). establishing the diagnosis of PANDAS is complicated by underlying co-morbidities in the field of neurology-psychiatry and the lack of a reliable biomarker. The positive outcome after TE as reported in case studies may be influenced by the postoperative medication and is not supported by the results of large-scale studies. In the light of the considerable postoperative morbidity and unavoidable mortality rate it appears wise to indicate TE only in clinical studies with standardized inclusion criteria. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. The PANDA project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katinka Petersen, Anna; Brasseur, Guy; Granier, Claire; Bouarar, Idir; Wang, Xuemei

    2014-05-01

    The PANDA project Even though air quality in many urbanized and industrialized areas of the world has improved as a result of mitigation actions, it has declined in other regions. This is specifically the case in many emerging countries where emissions have been increasing as a result of rapidly expanding motor vehicle fleets, growing industrial and power generation activities, and domestic and biomass burning. The situation is particularly acute in China and the Western Pacific Region with rapid industrialization and urbanization, where, in spite of efforts to reduce surface emissions of reactive gases, 360,000 people die prematurely from air pollution each year, according to the World Health Organization. The EU-funded PANDA project will offer scientific knowledge that will help China and other nations to use space and in-situ observations together with a modelling system to address improve air quality and human heath at the regional and global scales. Through the proposed cooperation between Europe and China, the following objectives will be reached before the completion of the Project: 1. Improvement of methods for monitoring air quality from combined space and in-situ observations 2. Elaboration of indicators for air quality, in support of European and Chinese policies 3. Development of toolboxes for air quality and emissions monitoring 4. Dissemination of information and educational activities, specifically in China. We would like to introduce the EU-funded project PANDA, and present the first results obtained through the project.

  10. Clinical Factors Associated with PANDAS

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Tanya K.; Storch, Eric A.; Lewin, Adam B.; Edge, Paula J.; Goodman, Wayne K.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore associated clinical factors in children with pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcus (PANDAS). Study design Children with tics and/or OCD (n = 109) were examined by personal and family history, diagnostic interview, physical examination, medical record review, and measurement of baseline levels of streptococcal antibodies. Results Significant group differences were found on several variables, such that those diagnosed with PANDAS (versus without PANDAS) were more likely to have had dramatic onset; definite remissions; remission of neuropsychiatric symptoms during antibiotic therapy; a history of tonsillectomies/adenoidectomies; evidence of GAS infection, and clumsiness. Conclusion The identification of clinical features associated with PANDAS should assist in delineating risks for this subtype of OCD/tics. PMID:21868033

  11. Antibacterial Compounds from Propolis of Tetragonula laeviceps and Tetrigona melanoleuca (Hymenoptera: Apidae) from Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Sanpa, Sirikarn; Popova, Milena; Bankova, Vassya; Tunkasiri, Tawee; Eitssayeam, Sukum; Chantawannakul, Panuwan

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of propolis collected from two stingless bee species Tetragonula laeviceps and Tetrigona melanoleuca (Hymenoptera: Apidae). Six xanthones, one triterpene and one lignane were isolated from Tetragonula laeviceps propolis. Triterpenes were the main constituents in T. melanoleuca propolis. The ethanol extract and isolated compounds from T. laeviceps propolis showed a higher antibacterial activity than those of T. melanoleuca propolis as the constituent α-mangostin exhibited the strongest activity. Xanthones were found in propolis for the first time; Garcinia mangostana (Mangosteen) was the most probable plant source. In addition, this is the first report on the chemical composition and bioactivity of propolis from T. melanoleuca. PMID:25992582

  12. The Detector Control of the PANDA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldbauer, F.

    2014-08-01

    The PANDA experiment will be built at the antiproton storage ring HESR, a part of the new accelerator facility FAIR in Darmstadt, Germany. PANDA aims amongst other topics for high precision measurements in hadron spectroscopy and search for exotic matter. To guarantee the high resolution of the different components a detector control system (DCS) monitoring temperatures, humidity, pressure, and controlling chillers and power supplies is needed. The DCS of PANDA is built using the open-source software package EPICS (Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System) with a PANDA specific version of Control-System Studio. In this document the general concepts of the PANDA DCS will be discussed.

  13. The PANDA Barrel DIRC detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoek, M.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Hohler, R.; Kalicy, G.; Kumawat, H.; Lehmann, D.; Lewandowski, B.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Zühlsdorf, M.; Dodokhov, V. Kh.; Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A.; Uhlig, F.; Düren, M.; Föhl, K.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Kröck, B.; Merle, O.; Rieke, J.; Cowie, E.; Keri, T.; Montgomery, R.; Rosner, G.; Achenbach, P.; Cardinali, M.; Lauth, W.; Sfienti, C.; Thiel, M.; Bühler, P.; Gruber, L.; Marton, J.; Suzuki, K.

    2014-12-01

    The PANDA experiment at the new Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe (FAIR) at GSI, Darmstadt, will study fundamental questions of hadron physics and QCD using high-intensity cooled antiproton beams with momenta between 1.5 and 15 GeV/c. Efficient Particle Identification for a wide momentum range and the full solid angle is required for reconstructing the various physics channels of the PANDA program. Hadronic Particle Identification in the barrel region of the detector will be provided by a DIRC counter. The design is based on the successful BABAR DIRC with important improvements, such as focusing optics and fast photon timing. Several of these improvements, including different radiator geometries and optics, were tested in particle beams at GSI and at CERN. The evolution of the conceptual design of the PANDA Barrel DIRC and the performance of complex prototypes in test beam campaigns will be discussed.

  14. The PANDA experiment at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Destefanis, M.

    2013-12-01

    The PANDA (antiProton ANnihilation at DArmstadt) experiment is one of the major projects in preparation at the upcoming FAIR facility in Darmstadt, Germany. It will study interactions between antiprotons and protons or nuclei in the momentum range from 1.5 GeV/c to 15 GeV/c. The PANDA scientific program will address a wide range of topics, all aiming at improving our understanding of the strong interaction and hadron structure. The PANDA detector is a general-purpose spectrometer that will collect high quality and high statistics data in the fields of meson spectroscopy, baryon-antibaryon production, baryon spectroscopy, hypernuclear physics, hadron properties in the nuclear medium, and nucleon structure. This paper reviews some of the main physics topics of the experiment, together with a presentation of the detector.

  15. The PANDA Barrel DIRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhygadlo, R.; Schwarz, C.; Belias, A.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Kalicy, G.; Krebs, M.; Lehmann, D.; Nerling, F.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Zühlsdorf, M.; Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A.; Pfaffinger, M.; Uhlig, F.; Düren, M.; Etzelmüller, E.; Föhl, K.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Kröck, B.; Merle, O.; Rieke, J.; Schmidt, M.; Cowie, E.; Keri, T.; Achenbach, P.; Cardinali, M.; Hoek, M.; Lauth, W.; Schlimme, S.; Sfienti, C.; Thiel, M.

    2016-05-01

    The PANDA detector at the international accelerator Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe (FAIR) addresses fundamental questions of hadron physics. Experiments concerning charmonium spectroscopy, the search for hybrids and glueballs and the interaction of hidden and open charm particles with nucleons and nuclei will be performed with antiproton beams impinging on hydrogen or nuclear targets. Cooled beams allow the precision scan of resonances in formation experiments. The momentum range of the antiproton beam between 1.5 GeV/c and 15 GeV/c tests predictions by perturbation theory and will reveal deviations originating from strong QCD . An excellent hadronic particle identification will be accomplished by DIRC (Detection of Internally Reflected Cherenkov light) counters. The design for the barrel region is based on the successful BaBar DIRC with several key improvements, such as fast photon timing and a compact imaging region. DIRC designs based on different radiator geometries with several focusing options were studied in simulation. The performance of each design was characterized in terms of photon yield and single photon Cherenkov angle resolution. Selected design options were implemented in prototypes and tested with hadronic particle beams at GSI and CERN.

  16. Three cases giant panda attack on human at Beijing Zoo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peixun; Wang, Tianbing; Xiong, Jian; Xue, Feng; Xu, Hailin; Chen, Jianhai; Zhang, Dianying; Fu, Zhongguo; Jiang, Baoguo

    2014-01-01

    Panda is regarded as Chinese national treasure. Most people always thought they were cute and just ate bamboo and had never imagined a panda could be vicious. Giant panda attacks on human are rare. There, we present three cases of giant panda attacks on humans at the Panda House at Beijing Zoo from September 2006 to June 2009 to warn people of the giant panda's potentially dangerous behavior.

  17. 76 FR 54468 - Petra Pet, Inc. (a/k/a Petrapport) v. Panda Logistics Limited; Panda Logistics Co., Ltd. (f/k/a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-01

    ... Petra Pet, Inc. (a/k/a Petrapport) v. Panda Logistics Limited; Panda Logistics Co., Ltd. (f/k/a panda... Petra Pet, Inc. (a/k/a Petrapport), hereinafter ``Complainant,'' against Respondents Panda Logistics Limited, Panda Logistics Co., Ltd. (f/k/a Panda Int'l Transportation Co., Ltd), and RDM Solutions...

  18. Ancylostoma ailuropodae sp. n. (Nematoda: Ancylostomatidae), a new hookworm parasite isolated from wild giant pandas in Southwest China

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Hookworms belonging to the genus Ancylostoma cause ancylostomiasis, a disease of considerable concern in humans and domestic and wild animals. Molecular and epidemiological data support evidence for the zoonotic potential among species of Ancylostoma where transmission to humans is facilitated by ra...

  19. Perfluorooctanesulfonate and periluorooctanoate in red panda and giant panda from China.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jiayin; Li, Ming; Jin, Yihe; Saito, Norimitsu; Xu, Muqi; Wei, Fuwen

    2006-09-15

    Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) are important perfluorochemicals (PFCs) in various applications. Recently, it has been shown that these compounds are widespread in the environment, wildlife, and humans. The giant panda and the red panda belong to the order Carnivora, but are highly specialized as bamboo feeders. Both species are considered rare and endangered. In this study, we report for the first time on levels of PFOS and PFOA in serum of the giant panda and the red panda captured in zoos and animal parks from six provinces in China. PFOS was the predominant compound in all panda samples measured (ranging from 0.80 to 73.80 microg/L for red panda and from 0.76 to 19.00 microg/L for giant panda). The PFOA level ranged from 0.33 to 8.20 microg/L for red panda, and from 0.32 to 1.56 microg/L for giant panda. There was a positive significant correlation between concentrations of PFOS and PFOA in the serum obtained from pandas. No age- or sex- related differences were observed in concentrations of the fluorochemicals in panda sera. Greater concentrations of the fluorochemicals were found for those individuals collected from zoos near urbanized or industrialized areas than for other areas. These data combined with other reported data suggest that there are large differences in distribution of perfluorinated compounds in terrestrial animals.

  20. The ̅PANDA Detector at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikegami Andersson, W.; ̅PANDA Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    The future ̅PANDA detector at FAIR is a state-of-the-art internal target detector designed for strong interaction studies. By utilizing an antiproton beam, a rich and unique physics programme is planned. The ̅PANDA experiment, as well as feasibility studies for hyperon and charmonium physics, are discussed.

  1. Three cases giant panda attack on human at Beijing Zoo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peixun; Wang, Tianbing; Xiong, Jian; Xue, Feng; Xu, Hailin; Chen, Jianhai; Zhang, Dianying; Fu, Zhongguo; Jiang, Baoguo

    2014-01-01

    Panda is regarded as Chinese national treasure. Most people always thought they were cute and just ate bamboo and had never imagined a panda could be vicious. Giant panda attacks on human are rare. There, we present three cases of giant panda attacks on humans at the Panda House at Beijing Zoo from September 2006 to June 2009 to warn people of the giant panda’s potentially dangerous behavior. PMID:25550978

  2. PANDAS: Frequently Asked Questions about Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal ....

    MedlinePlus

    ... with PANDAS? What about treating PANDAS with plasma exchange or immunoglobulin (IVIG)? Should an elevated strep titer ... on PANDAS . What about treating PANDAS with plasma exchange or immunoglobulin (IVIG)? Plasma exchange or immunoglobulin (IVIG) ...

  3. PANDA: A distributed multiprocessor operating system

    SciTech Connect

    Chubb, P.

    1989-01-01

    PANDA is a design for a distributed multiprocessor and an operating system. PANDA is designed to allow easy expansion of both hardware and software. As such, the PANDA kernel provides only message passing and memory and process management. The other features needed for the system (device drivers, secondary storage management, etc.) are provided as replaceable user tasks. The thesis presents PANDA's design and implementation, both hardware and software. PANDA uses multiple 68010 processors sharing memory on a VME bus, each such node potentially connected to others via a high speed network. The machine is completely homogeneous: there are no differences between processors that are detectable by programs running on the machine. A single two-processor node has been constructed. Each processor contains memory management circuits designed to allow processors to share page tables safely. PANDA presents a programmers' model similar to the hardware model: a job is divided into multiple tasks, each having its own address space. Within each task, multiple processes share code and data. Tasks can send messages to each other, and set up virtual circuits between themselves. Peripheral devices such as disc drives are represented within PANDA by tasks. PANDA divides secondary storage into volumes, each volume being accessed by a volume access task, or VAT. All knowledge about the way that data is stored on a disc is kept in its volume's VAT. The design is such that PANDA should provide a useful testbed for file systems and device drivers, as these can be installed without recompiling PANDA itself, and without rebooting the machine.

  4. From Paresis to PANDAS and PANS

    MedlinePlus

    ... years later led to the virtual eradication of neuro-syphilis, as the disorder came to be called, ... MRI scans of a PANDAS patient, showing reduced inflammation in the caudate nucleus(area circled just to ...

  5. The Tracking System in the Panda Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wintz, P.

    2012-08-01

    The bar {P}ANDA experiment at the new FAIR facility at Darmstadt (Germany) will investigate antiproton collisions on proton and nuclear targets in the charm quark mass regime. The wide-range physics program requires a universal detector concept, combining state-of-the-art and novel techniques in particle measurements and data readout. This paper gives an overview of the detector setup and summarizes the status, in particular of the charged particle tracking detectors in the bar {P}ANDA spectrometer.

  6. Giant panda׳s tooth enamel: Structure, mechanical behavior and toughening mechanisms under indentation.

    PubMed

    Weng, Z Y; Liu, Z Q; Ritchie, R O; Jiao, D; Li, D S; Wu, H L; Deng, L H; Zhang, Z F

    2016-12-01

    The giant panda׳s teeth possess remarkable load-bearing capacity and damage resistance for masticating bamboos. In this study, the hierarchical structure and mechanical behavior of the giant panda׳s tooth enamel were investigated under indentation. The effects of loading orientation and location on mechanical properties of the enamel were clarified and the evolution of damage in the enamel under increasing load evaluated. The nature of the damage, both at and beneath the indentation surfaces, and the underlying toughening mechanisms were explored. Indentation cracks invariably were seen to propagate along the internal interfaces, specifically the sheaths between enamel rods, and multiple extrinsic toughening mechanisms, e.g., crack deflection/twisting and uncracked-ligament bridging, were active to shield the tips of cracks from the applied stress. The giant panda׳s tooth enamel is analogous to human enamel in its mechanical properties, yet it has superior hardness and Young׳s modulus but inferior toughness as compared to the bamboo that pandas primarily feed on, highlighting the critical roles of the integration of underlying tissues in the entire tooth and the highly hydrated state of bamboo foods. Our objective is that this study can aid the understanding of the structure-mechanical property relations in the tooth enamel of mammals and further provide some insight on the food habits of the giant pandas.

  7. Genetic composition of captive panda population.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiandong; Shen, Fujun; Hou, Rong; Da, Yang

    2016-10-03

    A major function of the captive panda population is to preserve the genetic diversity of wild panda populations in their natural habitats. Understanding the genetic composition of the captive panda population in terms of genetic contributions from the wild panda populations provides necessary knowledge for breeding plans to preserve the genetic diversity of the wild panda populations. The genetic contributions from different wild populations to the captive panda population were highly unbalanced, with Qionglai accounting for 52.2 % of the captive panda gene pool, followed by Minshan with 21.5 %, Qinling with 10.6 %, Liangshan with 8.2 %, and Xiaoxiangling with 3.6 %, whereas Daxiangling, which had similar population size as Xiaoxiangling, had no genetic representation in the captive population. The current breeding recommendations may increase the contribution of some small wild populations at the expense of decreasing the contributions of other small wild populations, i.e., increasing the Xiaoxiangling contribution while decreasing the contribution of Liangshan, or sharply increasing the Qinling contribution while decreasing the contributions of Xiaoxiangling and Liangshan, which were two of the three smallest wild populations and were already severely under-represented in the captive population. We developed three habitat-controlled breeding plans that could increase the genetic contributions from the smallest wild populations to 6.7-11.2 % for Xiaoxiangling, 11.5-12.3 % for Liangshan and 12.9-20.0 % for Qinling among the offspring of one breeding season while reducing the risk of hidden inbreeding due to related founders from the same habitat undetectable by pedigree data. The three smallest wild panda populations of Daxiangling, Xiaoxiangling and Liangshan either had no representation or were severely unrepresented in the current captive panda population. By incorporating the breeding goal of increasing the genetic contributions from the smallest wild

  8. Prototyping the PANDA Barrel DIRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, C.; Kalicy, G.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Hohler, R.; Kumawat, H.; Lehmann, D.; Lewandowski, B.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Zühlsdorf, M.; Dodokhov, V. Kh.; Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A.; Uhlig, F.; Düren, M.; Föhl, K.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Kröck, B.; Merle, O.; Rieke, J.; Cowie, E.; Keri, T.; Montgomery, R.; Rosner, G.; Achenbach, P.; Cardinali, M.; Hoek, M.; Lauth, W.; Sfienti, C.; Thiel, M.; Bühler, P.; Gruber, L.; Marton, J.; Suzuki, K.

    2014-12-01

    The design of the Barrel DIRC detector for the future PANDA experiment at FAIR contains several important improvements compared to the successful BABAR DIRC, such as focusing and fast timing. To test those improvements as well as other design options a prototype was build and successfully tested in 2012 with particle beams at CERN. The prototype comprises a radiator bar, focusing lens, mirror, and a prism shaped expansion volume made of synthetic fused silica. An array of micro-channel plate photomultiplier tubes measures the location and arrival time of the Cherenkov photons with sub-nanosecond resolution. The development of a fast reconstruction algorithm allowed to tune construction details of the detector setup with test beam data and Monte-Carlo simulations.

  9. Exploring the venom of the forest cobra snake: Toxicovenomics and antivenom profiling of Naja melanoleuca.

    PubMed

    Lauridsen, Line P; Laustsen, Andreas H; Lomonte, Bruno; Gutiérrez, José María

    2017-01-06

    A toxicovenomic analysis of the venom of the forest cobra, N. melanoleuca, was performed, revealing the presence of a total of 52 proteins by proteomics analysis. The most abundant proteins belong to the three-finger toxins (3FTx) (57.1wt%), which includes post-synaptically acting α-neurotoxins. Phospholipases A2 (PLA2) were the second most abundant group of proteins (12.9wt%), followed by metalloproteinases (SVMPs) (9.7wt%), cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs) (7.6wt%), and Kunitz-type serine proteinase inhibitors (3.8wt%). A number of additional protein families comprised each <3wt% of venom proteins. A toxicity screening of the fractions, using the mouse lethality test, identified toxicity in RP-HPLC peaks 3, 4, 5 and 8, all of them containing α-neurotoxins of the 3FTx family, whereas the rest of the fractions did not show toxicity at a dose of 0.53mg/kg. Three polyspecific antivenoms manufactured in South Africa and India were tested for their immunoreactivity against crude venom and fractions of N. melanoleuca. Overall, antivenoms immunorecognized all fractions in the venom, the South African antivenom showing a higher titer against the neurotoxin-containing fractions. This toxicovenomic study identified the 3FTx group of α-neurotoxins in the venom of N. melanoleuca as the relevant targets to be neutralized.

  10. Genomic Inbreeding and Relatedness in Wild Panda Populations.

    PubMed

    Garbe, John R; Prakapenka, Dzianis; Tan, Cheng; Da, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Inbreeding and relatedness in wild panda populations are important parameters for panda conservation. Habitat loss and fragmentation are expected to increase inbreeding but the actual inbreeding levels in natural panda habitats were unknown. Using 150,025 SNPs and 14,926 SNPs selected from published whole-genome sequences, we estimated genomic inbreeding coefficients and relatedness of 49 pandas including 34 wild pandas sampled from six habitats. Qinling and Liangshan pandas had the highest levels of inbreeding and relatedness measured by genomic inbreeding and coancestry coefficients, whereas the inbreeding levels in Qionglai and Minshan were 28-45% of those in Qinling and Liangshan. Genomic coancestry coefficients between pandas from different habitats showed that panda populations from the four largest habitats, Minshan, Qionglai, Qinling and Liangshan, were genetically unrelated. Pandas between these four habitats on average shared 66.0-69.1% common alleles and 45.6-48.6% common genotypes, whereas pandas within each habitat shared 71.8-77.0% common alleles and 51.7-60.4% common genotypes. Pandas in the smaller populations of Qinling and Liangshan were more similarly to each other than pandas in the larger populations of Qionglai and Minshan according to three genomic similarity measures. Panda genetic differentiation between these habitats was positively related to their geographical distances. Most pandas separated by 200 kilometers or more shared no common ancestral alleles. The results provided a genomic quantification of the actual levels of inbreeding and relatedness among pandas in their natural habitats, provided genomic confirmation of the relationship between genetic diversity and geographical distances, and provided genomic evidence to the urgency of habitat protection.

  11. Genomic Inbreeding and Relatedness in Wild Panda Populations

    PubMed Central

    Da, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Inbreeding and relatedness in wild panda populations are important parameters for panda conservation. Habitat loss and fragmentation are expected to increase inbreeding but the actual inbreeding levels in natural panda habitats were unknown. Using 150,025 SNPs and 14,926 SNPs selected from published whole-genome sequences, we estimated genomic inbreeding coefficients and relatedness of 49 pandas including 34 wild pandas sampled from six habitats. Qinling and Liangshan pandas had the highest levels of inbreeding and relatedness measured by genomic inbreeding and coancestry coefficients, whereas the inbreeding levels in Qionglai and Minshan were 28–45% of those in Qinling and Liangshan. Genomic coancestry coefficients between pandas from different habitats showed that panda populations from the four largest habitats, Minshan, Qionglai, Qinling and Liangshan, were genetically unrelated. Pandas between these four habitats on average shared 66.0–69.1% common alleles and 45.6–48.6% common genotypes, whereas pandas within each habitat shared 71.8–77.0% common alleles and 51.7–60.4% common genotypes. Pandas in the smaller populations of Qinling and Liangshan were more similarly to each other than pandas in the larger populations of Qionglai and Minshan according to three genomic similarity measures. Panda genetic differentiation between these habitats was positively related to their geographical distances. Most pandas separated by 200 kilometers or more shared no common ancestral alleles. The results provided a genomic quantification of the actual levels of inbreeding and relatedness among pandas in their natural habitats, provided genomic confirmation of the relationship between genetic diversity and geographical distances, and provided genomic evidence to the urgency of habitat protection. PMID:27494031

  12. Estimating Gene Regulatory Networks with pandaR.

    PubMed

    Schlauch, Daniel; Paulson, Joseph N; Young, Albert; Glass, Kimberly; Quackenbush, John

    2017-03-11

    PANDA (Passing Attributes betweenNetworks forData Assimilation) is a gene regulatory network inference method that begins with amodel of transcription factor-target gene interactions and usesmessage passing to update the network model given available transcriptomic and protein-protein interaction data. PANDA is used to estimate networks for each experimental group and the network models are then compared between groups to explore transcriptional processes that distinguish the groups. We present pandaR (bioconductor.org/packages/pandaR), a Bioconductor package that implements PANDA and provides a framework for exploratory data analysis on gene regulatory networks.

  13. Tracing the origin of the panda's thumb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abella, Juan; Pérez-Ramos, Alejandro; Valenciano, Alberto; Alba, David M.; Ercoli, Marcos D.; Hontecillas, Daniel; Montoya, Plinio; Morales, Jorge

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the relative development of the carnivoran radial sesamoids to untangle the evolution of this iconic structure. In the pandas (both giant and red), this `false thumb' is known to perform a grasping role during bamboo feeding in both the red and giant pandas. An original locomotor role has been inferred for ailurids, but this remains to be ascertained for ursids. A large sample of radial sesamoids of Indarctos arctoides from the Miocene of Batallones-3 (Spain) indicates that this early ailuropodine bear displayed a relatively hypertrophied radial sesamoid, with a configuration more similar to that of the red panda and other carnivorans than to that of giant pandas. This false thumb is the first evidence of this feature in the Ursidae, which can be linked to a more herbivorous diet. Moreover, in the two extant pandas, the false thumb should not be interpreted as an anatomical convergence, but as an exaptive convergence regarding its use during the bamboo feeding, which changes the evolutionary view of this singular structure.

  14. Tracing the origin of the panda's thumb.

    PubMed

    Abella, Juan; Pérez-Ramos, Alejandro; Valenciano, Alberto; Alba, David M; Ercoli, Marcos D; Hontecillas, Daniel; Montoya, Plinio; Morales, Jorge

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the relative development of the carnivoran radial sesamoids to untangle the evolution of this iconic structure. In the pandas (both giant and red), this 'false thumb' is known to perform a grasping role during bamboo feeding in both the red and giant pandas. An original locomotor role has been inferred for ailurids, but this remains to be ascertained for ursids. A large sample of radial sesamoids of Indarctos arctoides from the Miocene of Batallones-3 (Spain) indicates that this early ailuropodine bear displayed a relatively hypertrophied radial sesamoid, with a configuration more similar to that of the red panda and other carnivorans than to that of giant pandas. This false thumb is the first evidence of this feature in the Ursidae, which can be linked to a more herbivorous diet. Moreover, in the two extant pandas, the false thumb should not be interpreted as an anatomical convergence, but as an exaptive convergence regarding its use during the bamboo feeding, which changes the evolutionary view of this singular structure.

  15. The "double panda" sign in Leigh disease.

    PubMed

    Sonam, Kothari; Bindu, P S; Gayathri, Narayanappa; Khan, Nahid Akhtar; Govindaraju, C; Arvinda, Hanumanthapura R; Nagappa, Madhu; Sinha, Sanjib; Thangaraj, K; Taly, Arun B

    2014-07-01

    Although the "face of the giant panda" sign on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is traditionally considered to be characteristic of Wilson disease, it has also been reported in other metabolic disorders. This study describes the characteristic "giant panda" sign on MRI in a child with Leigh disease. The diagnosis was based on the history of neurological regression; examination findings of oculomotor abnormalities, hypotonia, and dystonia; raised serum lactate levels; and characteristic brain stem and basal ganglia signal changes on MRI. The midbrain and pontine tegmental signal changes were consistent with the "face of the giant panda and her cub" sign. In addition to Wilson disease, metabolic disorders such as Leigh disease should also be considered in the differential diagnosis of this rare imaging finding.

  16. The PANDA tests for SBWR certification

    SciTech Connect

    Varadi, G.; Dreier, J.; Bandurski, Th.

    1996-03-01

    The ALPHA project is centered around the experimental and analytical investigation of the long-term decay heat removal from the containments of the next generation of {open_quotes}passive{close_quotes} ALWRs. The project includes integral system tests in the large-scale (1:25 in volume) PANDA facility as well as several other series of tests and supporting analytical work. The first series of experiments to be conducted in PANDA have become a required experimental element in the certification process for the General Electric Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR). The PANDA general experimental philosophy, facility design, scaling, and instrumentation are described. Steady-state PCCS condenser performance tests and extensive facility characterization tests were already conducted. The transient system behavior tests are underway; preliminary results from the first transient test M3 are reviewed.

  17. Strong Interaction Studies with PANDA at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönning, Karin

    2016-10-01

    The Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt, Germany, provides unique possibilities for a new generation of nuclear-, hadron- and atomic physics experiments. The future PANDA experiment at FAIR will offer a broad physics programme with emphasis on different aspects of hadron physics. Understanding the strong interaction in the perturbative regime remains one of the greatest challenges in contemporary physics and hadrons provide several important keys. In these proceedings, PANDA will be presented along with some high-lights of the planned physics programme.

  18. Offline Software for the PANDA Luminosity Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karavdina, A.; Denig, A.; Feldbauer, F.; Jasinski, P.; Leithoff, H.; Michel, M.; Motzko, C.; Pflüger, S.; Weber, T.; Fritsch, M.

    2014-06-01

    In 2018 data taking for hadronphysics facility PANDA is planned to commence. It will be build at the antiproton accelerator HESR, which itself is a part of the FAIR complex (GSI, Darmstadt, Germany). The luminosity at PANDA will be measured by a dedicated sub-detector, which will register scattered antiproton tracks from pp elastic scattering. From a software point of view, the Luminosity Detector is a tracking system. Therefore the most of its offline software parts are typical for a track reconstruction. The basic concept and Monte Carlo based performance studies of each reconstruction step is presented in this paper.

  19. [Habitat selection attributes of giant panda].

    PubMed

    Kang, Dong-Wei; Zhao, Zhi-Jiang; Guo, Wen-Xia; Tan, Liu-Yi; Kang, Wen; Li, Jun-Qing

    2011-02-01

    Based on the 1997-2009 inventory data of Wanglang Nature Reserve, the habitat selection attributes of giant panda were studied from the aspects of topography, forest community structure, and main feeding bamboo by the methods of frequency distribution and Bailey. The giant panda had obvious habitat preferences. Topographically, the preferred microhabitat was on the even or convex slopes at the ridge, top, or middle part of mountain body at an elevation 2500-3000 m, with southwest aspect, 6 degrees-30 degrees, and the distance to the nearest water source > 300 m. As for the forest community structure, the giant panda preferred the microhabitat with the bamboo succeeded from secondary forest or mixed conifer and broad-leaved forest, and with the average tree height being 20-29 m and the shrub coverage being 0-24%. The preferred main feeding bamboo by the giant panda was the growing well Fargesia denudate with an average height of 2-5 m and the coverage of > 50%.

  20. Online and Offline Pattern Recognition in PANDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boca, Gianluigi

    2016-11-01

    PANDA is one of the four experiments that will run at the new facility FAIR that is being built in Darmstadt, Germany. It is a fixed target experiment: a beam of antiprotons collides on a jet proton target (the maximum center of mass energy is 5.46 GeV). The interaction rate at the startup will be 2MHz with the goal of reaching 20MHz at full luminosity. The beam of antiprotons will be essentially continuous. PANDA will have NO hardware trigger but only a software trigger, to allow for maximum flexibility in the physics program. All those characteristics are severe challenges for the reconstruction code that 1) must be fast, since it has to be validated up to 20MHz interaction rate; 2) must be able to reject fake tracks caused by the remnant hits, belonging to previous or later events in some slow detectors, for example the straw tubes in the central region. The Pattern Recognition (PR) of PANDA will have to run both online to achieve a first fast selection, and offline, at lower rate, for a more refined selection. In PANDA the PR code is continuously evolving; this contribution shows the present status. I will give an overview of three examples of PR following different strategies and/or implemented on different hardware (FPGA, GPUs, CPUs) and, when available, I will report the performances.

  1. Streptococcal infections of skin and PANDAS.

    PubMed

    Carelli, Rosanna; Pallanti, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Group A streptococcal infections are associated with a variety of infections and a subset of obsessive-compulsive disorder and/or tic disorders. Screening of obsessive-compulsive symptoms and tics in patient with streptococcal infection of skin must be effective in identifying subjects who met published criteria for pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS). © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Gastric dilatation and volvulus in a red panda (Ailurus fulgens).

    PubMed

    Neilsen, Colleen; Mans, Christoph; Colopy, Sara A

    2014-11-01

    To describe the successful management of gastric dilatation and volvulus (GDV) in a red panda. Clinical report. Red panda diagnosed with GDV. A 12-year-old male red panda (Ailurus fulgens) was evaluated for acute onset inappetence, staggering, collapse, and tachypnea. Gastric dilatation and volvulus (GDV) was diagnosed by radiography, abdominal ultrasonography, and exploratory celiotomy. Torsion of the stomach was corrected and an incisional gastropexy performed to prevent recurrence. No organs were devitalized, no other abnormalities detected, and the red panda recovered fully within 72 hours. GDV should be considered as a differential diagnosis for red pandas presenting with acute onset of unspecific signs such as collapse, inappetence, and abdominal distension. GDV in red pandas can be diagnosed and successfully treated as described in dogs. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  3. Recent development of PANDA software in GNSS data processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chuang; Zhao, Qile; Geng, Jianghui; Lou, Yidong; Ge, Maorong; Liu, Jingnan

    2008-12-01

    Under the financial support of several Chinese national scientific projects, PANDA (Positioning And Navigation Data Analyst) software developed originally by Wuhan University has achieved the advanced level in the world. PANDA is currently recognized as a main research tool in several famous institutes in the GNSS community. In this paper, the recent development of PANDA software is introduced, including the COSMIC orbit determination in low Earth orbits, the real-time GPS satellite orbit and clock determination and precise point positioning with ambiguity resolution. It is concluded that PANDA is of great improvement in the past five years, and more advancement will be made in its pragmatic aspect especially in engineering applications.

  4. Autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infection: Sydenham chorea, PANDAS, and PANDAS variants.

    PubMed

    Pavone, Piero; Parano, Enrico; Rizzo, Renata; Trifiletti, Rosario R

    2006-09-01

    Streptococcal infection in children is usually benign and self-limited. In a small percentage of children, prominent neurologic and/or psychiatric sequelae can occur. Sydenham chorea is the best defined and best recognized. PANDAS (pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infection) is a well-defined syndrome in which tics (motor and/or vocal) and/or obsessive-compulsive disorder consistently exacerbate in temporal correlation to a group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infection. PANDAS constitutes a subset of children with tics, Tourette syndrome, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. In addition to strictly defined PANDAS, we and others have recognized several PANDAS variants, including adult-onset variant, a dystonic variant, a myoclonic variant, and a "chronic" PANDAS variant. The nosology and classification of these entities are rapidly evolving. The recognition that some pediatric neurobehavioral syndromes have infectious and/or immunologic triggers points to important new avenues of disease treatment. In this review, we summarize this complex and rapidly evolving area of clinical research.

  5. 78 FR 38800 - Panda Power LLC, Denial of Petition for Decision of Inconsequential Noncompliance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-27

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Panda Power LLC, Denial of Petition for Decision of... Petition. SUMMARY: Panda Power LLC (Panda Power) \\1\\, has determined that High Intensity Discharge (HID... Associated Equipment. Panda Power has filed an appropriate report pursuant to 49 CFR Part 573, Defect and...

  6. PanDA for COMPASS at JINR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosyan, A. Sh.

    2016-09-01

    PanDA (Production and Distributed Analysis System) is a workload management system, widely used for data processing at experiments on Large Hadron Collider and others. COMPASS is a high-energy physics experiment at the Super Proton Synchrotron. Data processing for COMPASS runs locally at CERN, on lxbatch, the data itself stored in CASTOR. In 2014 an idea to start running COMPASS production through PanDA arose. Such transformation in experiment's data processing will allow COMPASS community to use not only CERN resources, but also Grid resources worldwide. During the spring and summer of 2015 installation, validation and migration work is being performed at JINR. Details and results of this process are presented in this paper.

  7. The PANDA DIRC detectors at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, C.; Ali, A.; Belias, A.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Kalicy, G.; Krebs, M.; Lehmann, D.; Nerling, F.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Zühlsdorf, M.; Böhm, M.; Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A.; Pfaffinger, M.; Uhlig, F.; Düren, M.; Etzelmüller, E.; Föhl, K.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Kreutzfeld, K.; Kröck, B.; Merle, O.; Rieke, J.; Schmidt, M.; Wasem, T.; Achenbach, P.; Cardinali, M.; Hoek, M.; Lauth, W.; Schlimme, S.; Sfienti, C.; Thiel, M.; Allison, L.; Hyde, C.

    2017-07-01

    The PANDA detector at the international accelerator Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe (FAIR) addresses fundamental questions of hadron physics. An excellent hadronic particle identification (PID) will be accomplished by two DIRC (Detection of Internally Reflected Cherenkov light) counters in the target spectrometer. The design for the barrel region covering polar angles between 22o to 140o is based on the successful BABAR DIRC with several key improvements, such as fast photon timing and a compact imaging region. The novel Endcap Disc DIRC will cover the smaller forward angles between 5o (10o) to 22o in the vertical (horizontal) direction. Both DIRC counters will use lifetime-enhanced microchannel plate PMTs for photon detection in combination with fast readout electronics. Geant4 simulations and tests with several prototypes at various beam facilities have been used to evaluate the designs and validate the expected PID performance of both PANDA DIRC counters.

  8. Development of an Endcap DIRC for PANDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merle, O.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Hohler, R.; Kalicy, G.; Kumawat, H.; Lehmann, D.; Lewandowski, B.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Zühlsdorf, M.; Dodokhov, V. Kh.; Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A.; Uhlig, F.; Düren, M.; Etzelmüller, E.; Föhl, K.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Kröck, B.; Mühlheim, D.; Rieke, J.; Cowie, E.; Keri, T.; Montgomery, R.; Rosner, G.; Achenbach, P.; Cardinali, M.; Hoek, M.; Lauth, W.; Sfienti, C.; Thiel, M.; Bühler, P.; Gruber, L.; Marton, J.; Suzuki, K.

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this research is to develop a planar DIRC detector showing advantages and performance similar to a classical, barrel shaped DIRC, but at smaller polar angles which cannot be accessed using a cylindrical geometry. The device will complement the PANDA Barrel DIRC by covering polar angles from 5° to 22°. The envisaged π/K-separation is ≥ 3 σ up to 4 GeV/c. A major challenge is the adaption of the device to the PANDA environment including a magnetic field of 1-2 T, high rates and radiation, limited space for optics and sensors as well as the lack of a common first-level trigger. This paper discusses a detector design which forms a compromise between these constraints and available hardware, a specific analytic reconstruction method, a performance estimation based on Geant4 simulations and finally the successful particle identification using a recent R&D prototype.

  9. Hadron Physics with PANDA at FAIR

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedner, Ulrich

    2011-10-21

    The recently established FAIR facility in Darmstadt has a broad program in the field of hadron and nuclear physics utilizing ion beams with unprecedented intensity and accuracy. The PANDA experiment, which is integrated in the HESR storage ring for antiprotons is at the center of the hadron physics program. It includes among others topics like hadron spectroscopy in the charmonium mass region and below, hyperon physics and electromagnetic processes.

  10. Non-conventional mesons at PANDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacosa, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    Non-conventional mesons, such as glueballs and tetraquarks, will be in the focus of the PANDA experiment at the FAIR facility. In this lecture we recall the basic properties of QCD and describe some features of unconventional states. We focus on the search of the not-yet discovered glueballs and the use of the extended Linear Sigma Model for this purpose, and on the already discovered but not-yet understood X, Y, Z states.

  11. The PANDA physics program: Strangeness and more

    SciTech Connect

    Iazzi, Felice; Collaboration: PANDA Collaboration

    2016-06-21

    The physics program of the PANDA experiment at FAIR is illustrated, with a particular attention to the planned activity in the field of the doubly strange systems. The investigation of these systems can help, among others, to shed light on the role of the hyperons in the composition of the neutron stars. The great advantages that can be reached in the field of the charmed systems and nucleon structure by using high quality and intense antiproton beams are also recalled.

  12. Status of the PANDA Barrel DIRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalicy, G.; Kumawat, H.; Schwiening, J.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Gerhardt, A.; Hohler, R.; Lehmann, D.; Lewandowski, B.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwarz, C.; Traxler, M.; Zühlsdorf, M.; Dodokhov, V. Kh; Vodopianov, A.; Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A.; Uhlig, F.; Düren, M.; Föhl, K.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Koch, P.; Kröck, B.; Merle, O.; Cowie, E.; Keri, T.; Montgomery, R.; Rosner, G.; Seitz, B.; Achenbach, P.; Cardinali, M.; Hoek, M.; Sfienti, C.; Thiel, M.; Ugur, C.; Bühler, P.; Gruber, L.; Marton, J.; Suzuki, K.; Widmann, E.; The PANDA Cherenkov Group

    2014-05-01

    The PANDA experiment at the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe GmbH (FAIR) at GSI, Darmstadt will study fundamental questions of hadron physics and QCD using high-intensity cooled antiproton beams with momenta between 1.5 and 15 GeV/c. Hadronic PID in the barrel region of the PANDA detector will be provided by a DIRC (Detection of Internally Reflected Cherenkov light) counter. The design is based on the successful BABAR DIRC with several key improvements, such as fast photon timing and a compact imaging region. Detailed Monte Carlo simulation studies were performed for DIRC designs based on narrow bars or wide plates with a variety of focusing solutions. The performance of each design was characterized in terms of photon yield and single photon Cherenkov angle resolution and a maximum likelihood approach was used to determine the π/K separation. Selected design options were implemented in prototypes and tested with hadronic particle beams at GSI and CERN. This article describes the status of the design and R&D for the PANDA Barrel DIRC detector, with a focus on the performance of different DIRC designs in simulation and particle beams.

  13. PANDAS: A systematic review of treatment options.

    PubMed

    Farhood, Zachary; Ong, Adrian A; Discolo, Christopher M

    2016-10-01

    Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorder Associated with Streptococcus (PANDAS) is a rare but important condition for pediatric otolaryngologists to recognize. Several treatment options exist including tonsillectomy, antibiotic treatment/prophylaxis, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), and psychiatric medications/therapy. A systematic review of the PubMed, EMBASE, and Scopus databases was performed searching for articles that focused exclusively on the aforementioned treatment modalities in the PANDAS population. Review articles, single patient case reports, and studies examining the natural history or diagnostic strategies were excluded. Five articles regarding tonsillectomy treatments with level of evidence (LOE) 4 were found but no clear benefit could be determined. Three articles were selected involving the use of antibiotic therapy. One prospective study and one double-blind randomized control trial (DB RCT) supported the use of antibiotics but a separate DB RCT showed no benefit. Two selected articles described the use of IVIG: one unblinded RCT and one retrospective study. One prospective study on cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) showed benefit in PANDAS. There is a paucity of high-level studies regarding this rare disorder and no hard treatment recommendations can be made. Tonsillectomy should only be performed in those who are surgical candidates based on current published guidelines. Antibiotics are an option but provide uncertain benefit. CBT remains a low-risk option. Studies support the use of IVIG, however more investigation is needed prior to widespread adoption of this treatment given its potential risks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Spin observables in antihyperon-hyperon production with PANDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönning, K.; Thomé, E.; Panda Collaboration

    2014-11-01

    Spin observables provide a powerful tool in understanding the physics. Seven polarisation parameters of the Ω baryon can be extracted from the angular distributions of the hyperon decay and studied with the future PANDA experiment at FAIR. Simulation studies show that strange and single charmed hyperon channels have great prospects with PANDA.

  15. Metabolic rates of giant pandas inform conservation strategies.

    PubMed

    Fei, Yuxiang; Hou, Rong; Spotila, James R; Paladino, Frank V; Qi, Dunwu; Zhang, Zhihe

    2016-06-06

    The giant panda is an icon of conservation and survived a large-scale bamboo die off in the 1980s in China. Captive breeding programs have produced a large population in zoos and efforts continue to reintroduce those animals into the wild. However, we lack sufficient knowledge of their physiological ecology to determine requirements for survival now and in the face of climate change. We measured resting and active metabolic rates of giant pandas in order to determine if current bamboo resources were sufficient for adding additional animals to populations in natural reserves. Resting metabolic rates were somewhat below average for a panda sized mammal and active metabolic rates were in the normal range. Pandas do not have exceptionally low metabolic rates. Nevertheless, there is enough bamboo in natural reserves to support both natural populations and large numbers of reintroduced pandas. Bamboo will not be the limiting factor in successful reintroduction.

  16. Metabolic rates of giant pandas inform conservation strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Yuxiang; Hou, Rong; Spotila, James R.; Paladino, Frank V.; Qi, Dunwu; Zhang, Zhihe

    2016-06-01

    The giant panda is an icon of conservation and survived a large-scale bamboo die off in the 1980s in China. Captive breeding programs have produced a large population in zoos and efforts continue to reintroduce those animals into the wild. However, we lack sufficient knowledge of their physiological ecology to determine requirements for survival now and in the face of climate change. We measured resting and active metabolic rates of giant pandas in order to determine if current bamboo resources were sufficient for adding additional animals to populations in natural reserves. Resting metabolic rates were somewhat below average for a panda sized mammal and active metabolic rates were in the normal range. Pandas do not have exceptionally low metabolic rates. Nevertheless, there is enough bamboo in natural reserves to support both natural populations and large numbers of reintroduced pandas. Bamboo will not be the limiting factor in successful reintroduction.

  17. Metabolic rates of giant pandas inform conservation strategies

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Yuxiang; Hou, Rong; Spotila, James R.; Paladino, Frank V.; Qi, Dunwu; Zhang, Zhihe

    2016-01-01

    The giant panda is an icon of conservation and survived a large-scale bamboo die off in the 1980s in China. Captive breeding programs have produced a large population in zoos and efforts continue to reintroduce those animals into the wild. However, we lack sufficient knowledge of their physiological ecology to determine requirements for survival now and in the face of climate change. We measured resting and active metabolic rates of giant pandas in order to determine if current bamboo resources were sufficient for adding additional animals to populations in natural reserves. Resting metabolic rates were somewhat below average for a panda sized mammal and active metabolic rates were in the normal range. Pandas do not have exceptionally low metabolic rates. Nevertheless, there is enough bamboo in natural reserves to support both natural populations and large numbers of reintroduced pandas. Bamboo will not be the limiting factor in successful reintroduction. PMID:27264109

  18. Long Noncoding RNA PANDA Positively Regulates Proliferation of Osteosarcoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Kotake, Yojiro; Goto, Taiki; Naemura, Madoka; Inoue, Yasutoshi; Okamoto, Haruna; Tahara, Keiichiro

    2017-01-01

    A long noncoding RNA, p21-associated ncRNA DNA damage-activated (PANDA), associates with nuclear transcription factor Y subunit alpha (NF-YA) and inhibits its binding to promoters of apoptosis-related genes, thereby repressing apoptosis in normal human fibroblasts. Here, we show that PANDA is involved in regulating proliferation in the U2OS human osteosarcoma cell line. U2OS cells were transfected with siRNAs against PANDA 72 h later and they were subjected to reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), quantitative RT-PCR and cell-cycle analysis. PANDA was highly expressed in U2OS cells, and its expression was induced by DNA damage. Silencing PANDA caused arrest at the G1 phase of the cell cycle, leading to inhibition of cell proliferation. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that silencing PANDA increased mRNA levels of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p18, which caused G1 phase arrest. These results suggest that PANDA promotes G1-S transition by repressing p18 transcription, and thus promotes U2OS cell proliferation. Copyright© 2017 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  19. Results from the PandaX-II Commissioning Run

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xiang; PandaX Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The PandaX dark matter experiment searches WIMP-nucleon scattering signals in the China JinPing Underground Laboratory (CJPL) with a rock burden of 2400 m, employing dual-phase xenon time projection chamber technology. After the completion of PandaX-I, the upgraded experiment, PandaX-II, has been equipped with a 580 kg active xenon target. A commissioning run was carried out in CJPL late in 2015. In this talk, I will present the results from the commissioning run, as well as give an update of the current status of the experiment.

  20. PANDA straw tube detectors and readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strzempek, P.

    2016-07-01

    PANDA is a detector under construction dedicated to studies of production and interaction of particles in the charmonium mass range using antiproton beams in the momentum range of 1.5 - 15 GeV/c at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt. PANDA consists of two spectrometers: a Target Spectrometer with a superconducting solenoid and a Forward Spectrometer using a large dipole magnet and covering the most forward angles (Θ < 10 °). In both spectrometers, the particle's trajectories in the magnetic field are measured using self-supporting straw tube detectors. The expected high count rates, reaching up to 1 MHz/straw, are one of the main challenges for the detectors and associated readout electronics. The paper presents the readout chain of the tracking system and the results of tests performed with realistic prototype setups. The readout chain consists of a newly developed ASIC chip (PASTTREC < PANDASTTReadoutChip >) with amplification, signal shaping, tail cancellation, discriminator stages and Time Readout Boards as digitizer boards.

  1. Production of X(3872) at PANDA

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G. Y.; Ma, J. P.

    2008-05-01

    The recently discovered X(3872) has many possible interpretations. We study the production of X(3872) with PANDA at GSI for the antiproton-proton collision with two possible interpretations of X(3872). One is as a loosely bound molecule of D mesons, while another is a 2P charmonium state {chi}{sub c1(2P)}. Using effective couplings we are able to give numerical predictions for the production near the threshold and the production associated with {pi}{sup 0}. We also study the possible background near the threshold production for X(3872){yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. With the designed luminosity 1.5 fb{sup -1} per year of PANDA we find that the event number of pp{yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} near the threshold is at the order of 10{sup 6}-10{sup 8}. Our study shows that two interpretations are distinguishable from the line shape of the production.

  2. Unusual arsenic metabolism in Giant Pandas.

    PubMed

    Braeuer, Simone; Dungl, Eveline; Hoffmann, Wiebke; Li, Desheng; Wang, Chengdong; Zhang, Hemin; Goessler, Walter

    2017-09-18

    The total arsenic concentration and the arsenic speciation in urine and feces samples of the two Giant Pandas living at Vienna zoo and of their feed, bamboo, were determined with ICPMS and HPLC-ICPMS. Urine was the main excretion route and accounted for around 90% of the ingested arsenic. The urinary arsenic concentrations were very high, namely up to 179 μg/L. Dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) was the dominating arsenic compound in the urine samples and ranged from 73 to 92% of the total arsenic, which is unusually high for a terrestrial mammal. The feces samples contained around 70% inorganic arsenic and 30% DMA. The arsenic concentrations in the bamboo samples were between 16 and 920 μg/kg dry mass. The main arsenic species in the bamboo extracts was inorganic arsenic. This indicates that the Giant Panda possesses a unique way of very efficiently methylating and excreting the provided inorganic arsenic. This could be essential for the survival of the animal in its natural habitat, because parts of this area are contaminated with arsenic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. PANDAS: The Need to Use Definitive Diagnostic Criteria.

    PubMed

    Singer, Harvey S

    2015-01-01

    In Response to: Helm CE, Blackwood RA. Pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorder associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS): Experience at a tertiary referral center. Tremor Other Hyperkinet Mov. 2015; 5. doi: 10.7916/D8348JCX.

  4. Evidence of cellulose metabolism by the giant panda gut microbiome.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lifeng; Wu, Qi; Dai, Jiayin; Zhang, Shanning; Wei, Fuwen

    2011-10-25

    The giant panda genome codes for all necessary enzymes associated with a carnivorous digestive system but lacks genes for enzymes needed to digest cellulose, the principal component of their bamboo diet. It has been posited that this iconic species must therefore possess microbial symbionts capable of metabolizing cellulose, but these symbionts have remained undetected. Here we examined 5,522 prokaryotic ribosomal RNA gene sequences in wild and captive giant panda fecal samples. We found lower species richness of the panda microbiome than of mammalian microbiomes for herbivores and nonherbivorous carnivores. We detected 13 operational taxonomic units closely related to Clostridium groups I and XIVa, both of which contain taxa known to digest cellulose. Seven of these 13 operational taxonomic units were unique to pandas compared with other mammals. Metagenomic analysis using ~37-Mbp contig sequences from gut microbes recovered putative genes coding two cellulose-digesting enzymes and one hemicellulose-digesting enzyme, cellulase, β-glucosidase, and xylan 1,4-β-xylosidase, in Clostridium group I. Comparing glycoside hydrolase profiles of pandas with those of herbivores and omnivores, we found a moderate abundance of oligosaccharide-degrading enzymes for pandas (36%), close to that for humans (37%), and the lowest abundance of cellulases and endohemicellulases (2%), which may reflect low digestibility of cellulose and hemicellulose in the panda's unique bamboo diet. The presence of putative cellulose-digesting microbes, in combination with adaptations related to feeding, physiology, and morphology, show that giant pandas have evolved a number of traits to overcome the anatomical and physiological challenge of digesting a diet high in fibrous matter.

  5. Gastric Dilatation and Volvulus in a Red Panda (Ailurus fulgens)

    PubMed Central

    Neilsen, Colleen; Mans, Christoph; Colopy, Sara A.

    2014-01-01

    A 12-year-old male red panda (Ailurus fulgens) was evaluated for acute onset inappetance, staggering, collapse, and tachypnea. Gastric dilatation and volvulus (GDV) was diagnosed by radiography, abdominal ultrasonography, and exploratory celiotomy. Torsion of the stomach was corrected and an incisional gastropexy performed to prevent recurrence. No organs were devitalized, no other abnormalities detected, and the red panda recovered fully within 72 hours. PMID:24467661

  6. The Lushan earthquake and the giant panda: impacts and conservation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zejun; Yuan, Shibin; Qi, Dunwu; Zhang, Mingchun

    2014-06-01

    Earthquakes not only result in a great loss of human life and property, but also have profound effects on the Earth's biodiversity. The Lushan earthquake occurred on 20 Apr 2013, with a magnitude of 7.0 and an intensity of 9.0 degrees. A distance of 17.0 km from its epicenter to the nearest distribution site of giant pandas recorded in the Third National Survey was determined. Making use of research on the Wenchuan earthquake (with a magnitude of 8.0), which occurred approximately 5 years ago, we briefly analyze the impacts of the Lushan earthquake on giant pandas and their habitat. An earthquake may interrupt ongoing behaviors of giant pandas and may also cause injury or death. In addition, an earthquake can damage conservation facilities for pandas, and result in further habitat fragmentation and degradation. However, from a historical point of view, the impacts of human activities on giant pandas and their habitat may, in fact, far outweigh those of natural disasters such as earthquakes. Measures taken to promote habitat restoration and conservation network reconstruction in earthquake-affected areas should be based on requirements of giant pandas, not those of humans. © 2013 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Migration of ATLAS PanDA to CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Graeme Andrew; Klimentov, Alexei; Koblitz, Birger; Lamanna, Massimo; Maeno, Tadashi; Nevski, Pavel; Nowak, Marcin; Emanuel De Castro Faria Salgado, Pedro; Wenaus, Torre

    2010-04-01

    The ATLAS Production and Distributed Analysis System (PanDA) is a key component of the ATLAS distributed computing infrastructure. All ATLAS production jobs, and a substantial amount of user and group analysis jobs, pass through the PanDA system, which manages their execution on the grid. PanDA also plays a key role in production task definition and the data set replication request system. PanDA has recently been migrated from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), a process we describe here. We discuss how the new infrastructure for PanDA, which relies heavily on services provided by CERN IT, was introduced in order to make the service as reliable as possible and to allow it to be scaled to ATLAS's increasing need for distributed computing. The migration involved changing the backend database for PanDA from MySQL to Oracle, which impacted upon the database schemas. The process by which the client code was optimised for the new database backend is discussed. We describe the procedure by which the new database infrastructure was tested and commissioned for production use. Operations during the migration had to be planned carefully to minimise disruption to ongoing ATLAS offline computing. All parts of the migration were fully tested before commissioning the new infrastructure and the gradual migration of computing resources to the new system allowed any problems of scaling to be addressed.

  8. Executive and attention functioning among children in the PANDAS subgroup.

    PubMed

    Hirschtritt, Matthew E; Hammond, Christopher J; Luckenbaugh, David; Buhle, Jason; Thurm, Audrey E; Casey, B J; Swedo, Susan E

    2009-03-01

    Evidence from past studies indicates that adults and children with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and Tourette syndrome (TS) experience subtle neuropsychological deficits. Less is known about neuropsychological functioning of children and adolescents with a symptom course consistent with the PANDAS (Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal infection) subgroup of OCD and tics. To provide such information, we administered three tests of attention control and two of executive function to 67 children and adolescents (ages 5-16) diagnosed with OCD and/or tics and a symptom course consistent with the PANDAS subgroup and 98 healthy volunteers (HV) matched by age, sex, and IQ. In a paired comparison of the two groups, the PANDAS subjects were less accurate than HV in a test of response suppression. Further, in a two-step linear regression analysis of the PANDAS group in which clinical variables were added stepwise into the model and in the second step matching variables (age, sex, and IQ) were added, IQ emerged as a predictor of performance on this task. In the same analysis, ADHD diagnosis and age emerged as predictors of response time in a continuous performance task. Subdividing the PANDAS group by primary psychiatric diagnosis revealed that subjects with TS or OCD with tics exhibited a longer response time compared to controls than subjects with OCD only, replicating previous findings within TS and OCD. This study demonstrates that children with PANDAS exhibit neuropsychological profiles similar to those of their primary psychiatric diagnosis.

  9. Executive and Attention Functioning Among Children in the Pandas Subgroup

    PubMed Central

    Hirschtritt, Matthew E.; Hammond, Christopher J.; Luckenbaugh, David; Buhle, Jason; Thurm, Audrey E.; Casey, B. J.; Swedo, Susan E.

    2009-01-01

    Evidence from past studies indicates that adults and children with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and Tourette syndrome (TS) experience subtle neuropsychological deficits. Less is known about neuropsychological functioning of children and adolescents with a symptom course consistent with the PANDAS (Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal infection) subgroup of OCD and tics. To provide such information, we administered three tests of attention control and two of executive function to 67 children and adolescents (ages 5–16) diagnosed with OCD and/or tics and a symptom course consistent with the PANDAS subgroup and 98 healthy volunteers (HV) matched by age, sex, and IQ. In a paired comparison of the two groups, the PANDAS subjects were less accurate than HV in a test of response suppression. Further, in a two-step linear regression analysis of the PANDAS group in which clinical variables were added stepwise into the model and in the second step matching variables (age, sex, and IQ) were added, IQ emerged as a predictor of performance on this task. In the same analysis, ADHD diagnosis and age emerged as predictors of response time in a continuous performance task. Subdividing the PANDAS group by primary psychiatric diagnosis revealed that subjects with TS or OCD with tics exhibited a longer response time compared to controls than subjects with OCD only, replicating previous findings within TS and OCD. This study demonstrates that children with PANDAS exhibit neuropsychological profiles similar to those of their primary psychiatric diagnosis. PMID:18622810

  10. Event Reconstruction in the PandaRoot framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spataro, Stefano

    2012-12-01

    The PANDA experiment will study the collisions of beams of anti-protons, with momenta ranging from 2-15 GeV/c, with fixed proton and nuclear targets in the charm energy range, and will be built at the FAIR facility. In preparation for the experiment, the PandaRoot software framework is under development for detector simulation, reconstruction and data analysis, running on an Alien2-based grid. The basic features are handled by the FairRoot framework, based on ROOT and Virtual Monte Carlo, while the PANDA detector specifics and reconstruction code are implemented inside PandaRoot. The realization of Technical Design Reports for the tracking detectors has pushed the finalization of the tracking reconstruction code, which is complete for the Target Spectrometer, and of the analysis tools. Particle Identification algorithms are currently implemented using Bayesian approach and compared to Multivariate Analysis methods. Moreover, the PANDA data acquisition foresees a triggerless operation in which events are not defined by a hardware 1st level trigger decision, but all the signals are stored with time stamps requiring a deconvolution by the software. This has led to a redesign of the software from an event basis to a time-ordered structure. In this contribution, the reconstruction capabilities of the Panda spectrometer will be reported, focusing on the performances of the tracking system and the results for the analysis of physics benchmark channels, as well as the new (and challenging) concept of time-based simulation and its implementation.

  11. Simulation studies for the PANDA experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kopf, B.

    2005-10-26

    One main component of the planned Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) is the High Energy Storage Ring (HESR) at GSI, Darmstadt, which will provide cooled antiprotons with momenta between 1.5 and 15 GeV/c. The PANDA experiment will investigate p-barannihilations with internal hydrogen and nuclear targets. Due to the planned extensive physics program a multipurpose detector with nearly complete solid angle coverage, proper particle identification over a large momentum range, and high resolution calorimetry for neutral particles is required. For the optimization of the detector design simulation studies of several benchmark channels are in progress which are covering the most relevant physics topics. Some important simulation results are discussed here.

  12. Functional annotation from the genome sequence of the giant panda.

    PubMed

    Huo, Tong; Zhang, Yinjie; Lin, Jianping

    2012-08-01

    The giant panda is one of the most critically endangered species due to the fragmentation and loss of its habitat. Studying the functions of proteins in this animal, especially specific trait-related proteins, is therefore necessary to protect the species. In this work, the functions of these proteins were investigated using the genome sequence of the giant panda. Data on 21,001 proteins and their functions were stored in the Giant Panda Protein Database, in which the proteins were divided into two groups: 20,179 proteins whose functions can be predicted by GeneScan formed the known-function group, whereas 822 proteins whose functions cannot be predicted by GeneScan comprised the unknown-function group. For the known-function group, we further classified the proteins by molecular function, biological process, cellular component, and tissue specificity. For the unknown-function group, we developed a strategy in which the proteins were filtered by cross-Blast to identify panda-specific proteins under the assumption that proteins related to the panda-specific traits in the unknown-function group exist. After this filtering procedure, we identified 32 proteins (2 of which are membrane proteins) specific to the giant panda genome as compared against the dog and horse genomes. Based on their amino acid sequences, these 32 proteins were further analyzed by functional classification using SVM-Prot, motif prediction using MyHits, and interacting protein prediction using the Database of Interacting Proteins. Nineteen proteins were predicted to be zinc-binding proteins, thus affecting the activities of nucleic acids. The 32 panda-specific proteins will be further investigated by structural and functional analysis.

  13. PANDA: a pipeline toolbox for analyzing brain diffusion images.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zaixu; Zhong, Suyu; Xu, Pengfei; He, Yong; Gong, Gaolang

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) is widely used in both scientific research and clinical practice in in-vivo studies of the human brain. While a number of post-processing packages have been developed, fully automated processing of dMRI datasets remains challenging. Here, we developed a MATLAB toolbox named "Pipeline for Analyzing braiN Diffusion imAges" (PANDA) for fully automated processing of brain diffusion images. The processing modules of a few established packages, including FMRIB Software Library (FSL), Pipeline System for Octave and Matlab (PSOM), Diffusion Toolkit and MRIcron, were employed in PANDA. Using any number of raw dMRI datasets from different subjects, in either DICOM or NIfTI format, PANDA can automatically perform a series of steps to process DICOM/NIfTI to diffusion metrics [e.g., fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD)] that are ready for statistical analysis at the voxel-level, the atlas-level and the Tract-Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS)-level and can finish the construction of anatomical brain networks for all subjects. In particular, PANDA can process different subjects in parallel, using multiple cores either in a single computer or in a distributed computing environment, thus greatly reducing the time cost when dealing with a large number of datasets. In addition, PANDA has a friendly graphical user interface (GUI), allowing the user to be interactive and to adjust the input/output settings, as well as the processing parameters. As an open-source package, PANDA is freely available at http://www.nitrc.org/projects/panda/. This novel toolbox is expected to substantially simplify the image processing of dMRI datasets and facilitate human structural connectome studies.

  14. Reassessing the conservation status of the giant panda using remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weihua; Viña, Andrés; Kong, Lingqiao; Pimm, Stuart L; Zhang, Jingjing; Yang, Wu; Xiao, Yi; Zhang, Lu; Chen, Xiaodong; Liu, Jianguo; Ouyang, Zhiyun

    2017-09-25

    The conservation status of the iconic giant panda is a barometer of global conservation efforts. The IUCN Red List has downgraded the panda's extinction risk from "endangered" to "vulnerable". Newly obtained, detailed GIS and remotely sensed data applied consistently over the last four decades show that panda habitat covered less area and was more fragmented in 2013 than in 1988 when the species was listed as endangered.Despite recent IUCN downgrading of the giant panda's conservation status from 'endangered' to 'vulnerable', new GIS and remote sensing data reveal panda habitats to cover less area and be more fragmented than previously.

  15. Adaptation of the hindlimbs for climbing in bears.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Motoki; Endo, Hideki; Wiig, Oystein; Derocher, Andrew E; Tsubota, Toshio; Taru, Hajime; Yamamoto, Masako; Arishima, Kazuyoshi; Hayashi, Yoshihiro; Kitamura, Nobuo; Yamada, Junzo

    2005-04-01

    The hindlimbs of the Malayan sun bear (Helarctos malayanus), the polar bear (Ursus maritimus), the brown bear (Ursus arctos) and the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) have been anatomically and osteometrically studied. The Musculus tibialis cranialis of the Malayan sun bear and the giant panda possessed a well-developed rich fleshy portion until the distal end of the tibia. In the polar bear and the brown bear, however, the fleshy portion of the M. tibialis cranialis was not developed until the distal end of the tibia. The tendon of the M. tibialis cranialis inserting on the proximal end of the Ossa metatarsalia was shorter in the Malayan sun bear and the giant panda than in the polar bear and the brown bear. In the Malayan sun bear and the giant panda, moreover, the M. popliteus was attached more distally to the tibia than in the polar bear and the brown bear. The stable dorsiflexion and supination of the foot and the efficient pronation of the crus are important for skillful tree climbing. The present study suggests that the Malayan sun bear and the giant panda have hindlimbs especially adapted to tree climbing by the well-developed fleshy portion of the M. tibialis cranialis reaching the distal end of the tibia, its short tendon, and the M. popliteus inserting near the distal end of the tibia.

  16. PandaEPL: a library for programming spatial navigation experiments.

    PubMed

    Solway, Alec; Miller, Jonathan F; Kahana, Michael J

    2013-12-01

    Recent advances in neuroimaging and neural recording techniques have enabled researchers to make significant progress in understanding the neural mechanisms underlying human spatial navigation. Because these techniques generally require participants to remain stationary, computer-generated virtual environments are used. We introduce PandaEPL, a programming library for the Python language designed to simplify the creation of computer-controlled spatial-navigation experiments. PandaEPL is built on top of Panda3D, a modern open-source game engine. It allows users to construct three-dimensional environments that participants can navigate from a first-person perspective. Sound playback and recording and also joystick support are provided through the use of additional optional libraries. PandaEPL also handles many tasks common to all cognitive experiments, including managing configuration files, logging all internal and participant-generated events, and keeping track of the experiment state. We describe how PandaEPL compares with other software for building spatial-navigation experiments and walk the reader through the process of creating a fully functional experiment.

  17. Overview of ATLAS PanDA Workload Management

    SciTech Connect

    Maeno T.; De K.; Wenaus T.; Nilsson P.; Stewart G. A.; Walker R.; Stradling A.; Caballero J.; Potekhin M.; Smith D.

    2011-01-01

    The Production and Distributed Analysis System (PanDA) plays a key role in the ATLAS distributed computing infrastructure. All ATLAS Monte-Carlo simulation and data reprocessing jobs pass through the PanDA system. We will describe how PanDA manages job execution on the grid using dynamic resource estimation and data replication together with intelligent brokerage in order to meet the scaling and automation requirements of ATLAS distributed computing. PanDA is also the primary ATLAS system for processing user and group analysis jobs, bringing further requirements for quick, flexible adaptation to the rapidly evolving analysis use cases of the early datataking phase, in addition to the high reliability, robustness and usability needed to provide efficient and transparent utilization of the grid for analysis users. We will describe how PanDA meets ATLAS requirements, the evolution of the system in light of operational experience, how the system has performed during the first LHC data-taking phase and plans for the future.

  18. The PandaRoot framework for simulation, reconstruction and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spataro, Stefano; PANDA Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    The PANDA experiment at the future facility FAIR will study anti-proton proton and anti-proton nucleus collisions in a beam momentum range from 2 GeV/c up to 15 GeV/c. The PandaRoot framework is part of the FairRoot project, a common software framework for the future FAIR experiments, and is currently used to simulate detector performances and to evaluate different detector concepts. It is based on the packages ROOT and Virtual MonteCarlo with Geant3 and Geant4. Different reconstruction algorithms for tracking and particle identification are under development and optimization, in order to achieve the performance requirements of the experiment. In the central tracker a first track fit is performed using a conformal map transformation based on a helix assumption, then the track is used as input for a Kalman Filter (package genfit), using GEANE as track follower. The track is then correlated to the pid detectors (e.g. Cerenkov detectors, EM Calorimeter or Muon Chambers) to evaluate a global particle identification probability, using a Bayesian approach or multivariate methods. Further implemented packages in PandaRoot are: the analysis tools framework Rho, the kinematic fitter package for vertex and mass constraint fits, and a fast simulation code based upon parametrized detector responses. PandaRoot was also tested on an Alien-based GRID infrastructure. The contribution will report about the status of PandaRoot and show some example results for analysis of physics benchmark channels.

  19. PandaEPL: A library for programming spatial navigation experiments

    PubMed Central

    Solway, Alec; Miller, Jonathan F.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroimaging and neural recording techniques have enabled researchers to make significant progress in understanding the neural mechanisms underlying human spatial navigation. Because these techniques generally require participants to remain stationary, computer-generated virtual environments are used. We introduce PandaEPL, a programming library for the Python language designed to simplify the creation of computer-controlled spatial-navigation experiments. PandaEPL is built on top of Panda3D, a modern open-source game engine. It allows users to construct three-dimensional environments that participants can navigate from a first-person perspective. Sound playback and recording and also joystick support are provided through the use of additional optional libraries. PandaEPL also handles many tasks common to all cognitive experiments, including managing configuration files, logging all internal and participant-generated events, and keeping track of the experiment state. We describe how PandaEPL compares with other software for building spatial-navigation experiments and walk the reader through the process of creating a fully functional experiment. PMID:23549683

  20. Overview of ATLAS PanDA Workload Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeno, T.; De, K.; Wenaus, T.; Nilsson, P.; Stewart, G. A.; Walker, R.; Stradling, A.; Caballero, J.; Potekhin, M.; Smith, D.; ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    The Production and Distributed Analysis System (PanDA) plays a key role in the ATLAS distributed computing infrastructure. All ATLAS Monte-Carlo simulation and data reprocessing jobs pass through the PanDA system. We will describe how PanDA manages job execution on the grid using dynamic resource estimation and data replication together with intelligent brokerage in order to meet the scaling and automation requirements of ATLAS distributed computing. PanDA is also the primary ATLAS system for processing user and group analysis jobs, bringing further requirements for quick, flexible adaptation to the rapidly evolving analysis use cases of the early datataking phase, in addition to the high reliability, robustness and usability needed to provide efficient and transparent utilization of the grid for analysis users. We will describe how PanDA meets ATLAS requirements, the evolution of the system in light of operational experience, how the system has performed during the first LHC data-taking phase and plans for the future.

  1. The ATLAS PanDA Monitoring System and its Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimentov, A.; Nevski, P.; Potekhin, M.; Wenaus, T.

    2011-12-01

    The PanDA (Production and Distributed Analysis) Workload Management System is used for ATLAS distributed production and analysis worldwide. The needs of ATLAS global computing imposed challenging requirements on the design of PanDA in areas such as scalability, robustness, automation, diagnostics, and usability for both production shifters and analysis users. Through a system-wide job database, the PanDA monitor provides a comprehensive and coherent view of the system and job execution, from high level summaries to detailed drill-down job diagnostics. It is (like the rest of PanDA) an Apache-based Python application backed by Oracle. The presentation layer is HTML code generated on the fly in the Python application which is also responsible for managing database queries. However, this approach is lacking in user interface flexibility, simplicity of communication with external systems, and ease of maintenance. A decision was therefore made to migrate the PanDA monitor server to Django Web Application Framework and apply JSON/AJAX technology in the browser front end. This allows us to greatly reduce the amount of application code, separate data preparation from presentation, leverage open source for tools such as authentication and authorization mechanisms, and provide a richer and more dynamic user experience. We describe our approach, design and initial experience with the migration process.

  2. Pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococci (PANDAS): update.

    PubMed

    Shulman, Stanford T

    2009-02-01

    To review recent developments related to the proposed entity Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococci (so-called 'PANDAS'). The relationship between obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) or tics/Tourette's syndrome in childhood to antecedent group A streptococci (GAS) is unclear. One recent prospective cohort study found that more than 85% of clinical exacerbations in OCD/tic behavior in patients who met criteria for PANDAS had no relationship to GAS infection. Another study found no correlation between clinical exacerbations and changes in a variety of markers of brain autoimmunity, the proposed pathogenesis of PANDAS. A third recent study concluded that, compared with specialty clinic diagnoses, patients diagnosed with tics or Tourette's by physicians in the community were significantly more likely to be diagnosed with PANDAS without meeting the proposed criteria, most lacked supporting laboratory evidence of GAS infection, and they were more likely to be treated with unjustified short-term to chronic antibiotic and/or immunomodulatory therapy. Despite continued research in the field, the relationship between GAS and specific neuropsychiatric disorders (PANDAS) remains elusive. It is possible that GAS infection may be but one of the many stressors that can exacerbate tic/Tourette's or OCD in a subset of such patients.

  3. Characterization of the gut microbiota in the red panda (Ailurus fulgens).

    PubMed

    Kong, Fanli; Zhao, Jiangchao; Han, Shushu; Zeng, Bo; Yang, Jiandong; Si, Xiaohui; Yang, Benqing; Yang, Mingyao; Xu, Huailiang; Li, Ying

    2014-01-01

    The red panda is the only living species of the genus Ailurus. Like giant pandas, red pandas are also highly specialized to feed mainly on highly fibrous bamboo. Although several studies have focused on the gut microbiota in the giant panda, little is known about the gut microbiota of the red panda. In this study, we characterized the fecal microbiota from both wild (n = 16) and captive (n = 6) red pandas using a pyrosequecing based approach targeting the V1-V3 hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA gene. Distinct bacterial communities were observed between the two groups based on both membership and structure. Wild red pandas maintained significantly higher community diversity, richness and evenness than captive red pandas, the communities of which were skewed and dominated by taxa associated with Firmicutes. Phylogenetic analysis of the top 50 OTUs revealed that 10 of them were related to known cellulose degraders. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study of the gut microbiota of the red panda. Our data suggest that, similar to the giant panda, the gut microbiota in the red panda might also play important roles in the digestion of bamboo.

  4. Characterization of the Gut Microbiota in the Red Panda (Ailurus fulgens)

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shushu; Zeng, Bo; Yang, Jiandong; Si, Xiaohui; Yang, Benqing; Yang, Mingyao; Xu, Huailiang; Li, Ying

    2014-01-01

    The red panda is the only living species of the genus Ailurus. Like giant pandas, red pandas are also highly specialized to feed mainly on highly fibrous bamboo. Although several studies have focused on the gut microbiota in the giant panda, little is known about the gut microbiota of the red panda. In this study, we characterized the fecal microbiota from both wild (n = 16) and captive (n = 6) red pandas using a pyrosequecing based approach targeting the V1-V3 hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA gene. Distinct bacterial communities were observed between the two groups based on both membership and structure. Wild red pandas maintained significantly higher community diversity, richness and evenness than captive red pandas, the communities of which were skewed and dominated by taxa associated with Firmicutes. Phylogenetic analysis of the top 50 OTUs revealed that 10 of them were related to known cellulose degraders. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study of the gut microbiota of the red panda. Our data suggest that, similar to the giant panda, the gut microbiota in the red panda might also play important roles in the digestion of bamboo. PMID:24498390

  5. Gastric dilitation-volvulus in a Red Panda (Ailurus fulgens).

    PubMed

    Schlanser, Justin R; Agnew, Dalen; Paperd, Deborah W; Harrison, Tara M

    2014-06-01

    A 10-year-old male red panda presented acutely with symptoms of shock due to acute abdominal distress and respiratory compromise. Abdominal ultrasound confirmed a severely distended stomach for which passage of an orogastric tube for relief was unsuccessful. Intra-operatively, the stomach was found to be distended and torsed around its long axis supporting the diagnosis of Gastric dilitation-volvulus (GDV). The animal arrested and died intra-operatively and was submitted for necropsy with lesions supportive of the diagnosis of GDV. No risk factors for GDV were found to correlate between the panda and those described in domestic dogs. This case suggests that red pandas can be susceptible to this condition in captive settings.

  6. Feasibility studies for nucleon structure measurements with PANDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atomssa, Ermias; Ma, Binsong

    2014-11-01

    The study of nucleon structure is one of the main physics goals of PANDA to be built at the FAIR accelerator complex. The excellent particle identification performance of the PANDA detector will enable measurements of exclusive channels p¯ p → e+e- and p¯ p → π0 J/ψ → π0e+e- to extract the electromagnetic form factors of protons and π-nucleon Transition Distribution Amplitudes (π-N TDAs). After a brief description of the PANDA apparatus and a method to handle momentum resolution degradation due to Bremsstrahlung, the physics of π-N TDAs is discussed. An estimate for the expected signal to background ratio for p¯ p → π0 J/ψ → π0e+e- that takes into account the main background source is given.

  7. Gastric Dilitation-Volvulus in a Red Panda (Ailurus fulgens)

    PubMed Central

    SCHLANSER, Justin R.; AGNEW, Dalen; PAPERD, Deborah W.; HARRISON, Tara M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT A 10-year-old male red panda presented acutely with symptoms of shock due to acute abdominal distress and respiratory compromise. Abdominal ultrasound confirmed a severely distended stomach for which passage of an orogastric tube for relief was unsuccessful. Intra-operatively, the stomach was found to be distended and torsed around its long axis supporting the diagnosis of Gastric dilitation-volvulus (GDV). The animal arrested and died intra-operatively and was submitted for necropsy with lesions supportive of the diagnosis of GDV. No risk factors for GDV were found to correlate between the panda and those described in domestic dogs. This case suggests that red pandas can be susceptible to this condition in captive settings. PMID:24521795

  8. Tyzzer's disease in a red panda (Ailurus fulgens fulgens).

    PubMed

    Langan, J; Bemis, D; Harbo, S; Pollock, C; Schumacher, J

    2000-12-01

    A debilitated 9-yr-old female red panda (Ailurus fulgens fulgens) with a recent history of corticosteroid administration displayed anorexia, depression, and diarrhea for 2 days. Blood work revealed a moderate nonregenerative anemia, leukocytosis, hypokalemia, hyperbilirubinemia, and mildly elevated alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase. Serology was negative for occult heartworm, Toxoplasma gondii, feline leukemia virus, feline infectious peritonitis, feline immunodeficiency virus, and canine distemper virus. Electron microscopy of the feces demonstrated corona-like virus particles. The panda died 3 days after initial presentation. Histologic findings included multifocal, acute, hepatic necrosis and diffuse, necrotizing colitis. Liver and colon lesions contained intracellular, curved, spore-forming, gram-negative, silver-positive rods morphologically consistent with Clostridium piliforme. This panda most likely contracted Tyzzer's disease subsequent to having a compromised immune system after corticosteroid administration and concurrent disease.

  9. Equations of state for explosive detonation products: The PANDA model

    SciTech Connect

    Kerley, G.I.

    1994-05-01

    This paper discusses a thermochemical model for calculating equations of state (EOS) for the detonation products of explosives. This model, which was first presented at the Eighth Detonation Symposium, is available in the PANDA code and is referred to here as ``the Panda model``. The basic features of the PANDA model are as follows. (1) Statistical-mechanical theories are used to construct EOS tables for each of the chemical species that are to be allowed in the detonation products. (2) The ideal mixing model is used to compute the thermodynamic functions for a mixture of these species, and the composition of the system is determined from assumption of chemical equilibrium. (3) For hydrocode calculations, the detonation product EOS are used in tabular form, together with a reactive burn model that allows description of shock-induced initiation and growth or failure as well as ideal detonation wave propagation. This model has been implemented in the three-dimensional Eulerian code, CTH.

  10. The future of PanDA in ATLAS distributed computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De, K.; Klimentov, A.; Maeno, T.; Nilsson, P.; Oleynik, D.; Panitkin, S.; Petrosyan, A.; Schovancova, J.; Vaniachine, A.; Wenaus, T.

    2015-12-01

    Experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) face unprecedented computing challenges. Heterogeneous resources are distributed worldwide at hundreds of sites, thousands of physicists analyse the data remotely, the volume of processed data is beyond the exabyte scale, while data processing requires more than a few billion hours of computing usage per year. The PanDA (Production and Distributed Analysis) system was developed to meet the scale and complexity of LHC distributed computing for the ATLAS experiment. In the process, the old batch job paradigm of locally managed computing in HEP was discarded in favour of a far more automated, flexible and scalable model. The success of PanDA in ATLAS is leading to widespread adoption and testing by other experiments. PanDA is the first exascale workload management system in HEP, already operating at more than a million computing jobs per day, and processing over an exabyte of data in 2013. There are many new challenges that PanDA will face in the near future, in addition to new challenges of scale, heterogeneity and increasing user base. PanDA will need to handle rapidly changing computing infrastructure, will require factorization of code for easier deployment, will need to incorporate additional information sources including network metrics in decision making, be able to control network circuits, handle dynamically sized workload processing, provide improved visualization, and face many other challenges. In this talk we will focus on the new features, planned or recently implemented, that are relevant to the next decade of distributed computing workload management using PanDA.

  11. RADIOGRAPHIC THORACIC ANATOMY OF THE RED PANDA (AILURUS FULGENS).

    PubMed

    Makungu, Modesta; du Plessis, Wencke M; Barrows, Michelle; Groenewald, Hermanus B; Koeppel, Katja N

    2016-09-01

    The red panda ( Ailurus fulgens ) is classified as an endangered species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources. The natural distribution of the red panda is in the Himalayas and southern China. Thoracic diseases such as dirofilariasis, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, tracheal obstruction, lung worm infestation, and pneumonia have been reported in the red panda. The aim of this study was to describe the normal radiographic thoracic anatomy of captive red pandas as a species-specific reference for routine health examinations and clinical cases. Right lateral (RL) and dorsoventral (DV) inspiratory phase views of the thorax were obtained in 11 adult captive red pandas. Measurements were made and ratios calculated to establish reference ranges for the mean vertebral heart score on the RL (8.34 ± 0.25) and DV (8.78 ± 0.34) views and the mean ratios of the caudal vena cava diameter to the vertebral body length above tracheal bifurcation (0.67 ± 0.05) and tracheal diameter to the width of the third rib (2.75 ± 0.24). The majority of animals (10/11) had 14 thoracic vertebrae, except for one animal that had 15 thoracic vertebrae. Rudimentary clavicles were seen in 3/11 animals. The ovoid, oblique cardiac silhouette was more horizontally positioned and elongated in older animals. A redundant aortic arch was seen in the oldest animal. The trachea was seen with mineralized cartilage rings in all animals. The carina was clearly seen in the majority of animals (10/11). Variations exist in the normal radiographic thoracic anatomy of different species. Knowledge of the normal radiographic thoracic anatomy of the red panda should prove useful for routine health examinations and in the diagnosis of thoracic diseases.

  12. PANDA asymmetric-configuration passive decay heat removal test results

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, O.; Dreier, J.; Aubert, C.

    1997-12-01

    PANDA is a large-scale, low-pressure test facility for investigating passive decay heat removal systems for the next generation of LWRs. In the first series of experiments, PANDA was used to examine the long-term LOCA response of the Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS) for the General Electric (GE) Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR). The test objectives include concept demonstration and extension of the database available for qualification of containment codes. Also included is the study of the effects of nonuniform distributions of steam and noncondensable gases in the Dry-well (DW) and in the Suppression Chamber (SC). 3 refs., 9 figs.

  13. [Enrichment of giant panda microsatellite markers using dynal magnet beads].

    PubMed

    Shen, Fu-Jun; Watts, Phill; Zhang, Zhi-He; Zhang, An-Ju; Sanderson, Stephanie; Kemp, Steve J; Yue, Bi-Song

    2005-05-01

    The 400 -600 bp DNA fractions of giant panda containing STR sequences were captured by hybridization with the oligonucleotide probes attached to streptavadin coated magnetic beads (Dynal). The enriched DNA were ligated into pGEM-T and then transformed into E. coil JM109 competent cells. In total 260 positive clones were identified from 2 880 transformants in the libraries which were screened by gamma-32 P radiolabelled probes. Finally, we got 54 sequences and successfully designed 37 pairs of STR primers for giant panda. The results showed that this method is very efficient to isolate microsatellite markers.

  14. What Next After GAS and PANDA?

    PubMed

    Ing, Caleb; Rauh, Virginia A; Warner, David O; Sun, Lena S

    2016-08-25

    On April 16 and 17, 2016, the Fifth biennial Pediatric Anesthesia & Neurodevelopment Assessment (PANDA) symposium was convened at the Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital of New York at Columbia University Medical Center. During the symposium, experts in the fields of anesthesiology, neuropsychology, and epidemiology were convened in a small group session to determine the level of confidence in the current clinical evidence and the next steps in anesthetic neurotoxicity clinical research. Among the participants in the discussion, there remained a lack of consensus on whether anesthetic exposure causes long-term neurodevelopmental deficits in children based on the current evidence. This causal relationship between anesthesia exposure and neurodevelopmental deficit is difficult to establish using observational data, and current and future clinical trials are critical for answering this question. It was, however, recognized that the continuum of data that is seen in studies of other toxic environmental exposures, such as lead poisoning, has not been established in the anesthetic neurotoxicity literature, specifically regarding the timing of the exposure, the dose effects, contributing perioperative conditions, or vulnerable populations. As a result, these questions may need to be addressed in observational studies to guide future clinical trials.

  15. [Comparative chromosome painting shows the red panda (Ailurus fulgens) has a highly conserved karyotype].

    PubMed

    Tian, Ying; Nie, Wen-Hui; Wang, Jin-Huan; Yang, Yun-Fei; Yang, Feng-Tang

    2002-02-01

    We have established a comparative chromosome map between red panda (Ailurus fulgens, 2n = 36) and dog by chromosome painting with biotin-labelled chromosome-specific probes of the dog. Dog probes specific for the 38 automates delineated 71 homologous segments in the metaphase chromosomes of red panda. Of the 38 autosomal paints, 18 probes each delineated one homologous segment in red panda genome, while the other 20 ones each detected two to five homologous segments. The dog X chromosome-specific paint delineated the whole X chromosome of the red panda. The results indicate that at least 28 fissions (breaks), 49 fusions and 4 inversions were needed to "convert" the dog karyotype to that of the red panda, suggesting that extensive chromosome rearrangements differentiate the karyotypes of red panda and dog. Based on the established comparative chromosome homologies of dog and domestic cat, we could infer that there were 26 segments of conserved synteny between red panda and domestic cat. Comparative analysis of the distribution patterns of conserved segments defined by dog paints in red panda and domestic cat genomes revealed at least 2 cryptic inversions in two large chromosomal regions of conserved synteny between red panda and domestic cat. The karyotype of red panda shows high degree of homology with that of domestic cat.

  16. Mapping Understory Bamboo Across Large Spatial Extents Using Phenological Characteristics Derived From MODIS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuanmu, M.; Vina, A.; Xu, W.; Li, Y.; Ouyang, Z.; Liu, J.

    2008-12-01

    Understory vegetation plays an important role in forest ecosystems and supports many wildlife species. This is the case of bamboo species living under the temperate forests of southwestern China, which provide essential food for the endangered giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and thus their distribution determines panda habitat quality. However, because detailed information on the distribution of understory bamboo across large spatial areas is usually unavailable, due to the interference of the overstory canopy on the remote estimation of understory bamboo, most large-scaled evaluations of panda habitat have not incorporated information on bamboo distribution. These previous evaluations have thus assumed a linear relationship between the occurrence of forest and bamboo, which overestimates the amount and quality of panda habitat as forests without understory bamboo occur in many places. Therefore, developing approaches to map understory bamboo species across large spatial extents is important and necessary for the conservation of the giant panda and many other wildlife species that also depend on understory vegetation. In this study, we developed an approach for mapping understory bamboo species by using time series of vegetation biophysical features (i.e., green biomass, chlorophyll content, vegetation fraction and moisture content) derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data. This approach was used to map with high accuracy the spatial distribution of understory bamboo across the entire geographic range of the giant panda by utilizing the difference in phenological characteristics of forests with and without understory bamboo. The results of the study not only provide important information for panda habitat evaluations, but also allow monitoring the spatio-temporal dynamics of bamboo distribution and panda habitat quality. Furthermore, this study shows that time-series of remotely sensed data can be used to generate detailed

  17. Panda-Monium at the Library: 1995 Arizona Reading Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Dept. of Library, Archives and Public Records, Phoenix.

    Panda bears are the theme of this guide which includes many reading-related activities, crafts, and programs on a broad range of topics, and which can be expanded to other theme approaches such as endangered species, bears in general, and the concept of black and white. The program begins with a general definition and discussion of goals,…

  18. Annotation: PANDAS--A Model for Human Autoimmune Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swedo, Susan E.; Grant, Paul J.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcus infections (PANDAS) is a recently recognized syndrome in which pre-adolescent children have abrupt onsets of tics and/or obsessive-compulsive symptoms, a recurring and remitting course of illness temporally related to streptococcal infections, and associated…

  19. Genetic assessment of captive red panda (Ailurus fulgens) population.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arun; Rai, Upashna; Roka, Bhupen; Jha, Alankar K; Reddy, P Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    Red panda (Ailurus fulgens) is threatened across its range by detrimental human activities and rapid habitat changes necessitating captive breeding programs in various zoos globally to save this flagship species from extinction. One of the ultimate aims of ex situ conservation is reintroduction of endangered animals into their natural habitats while maintaining 90 % of the founder genetic diversity. Advances in molecular genetics and microsatellite genotyping techniques make it possible to accurately estimate genetic diversity of captive animals of unknown ancestry. Here we assess genetic diversity of the red panda population in Padmaja Naidu Himalayan Zoological Park, Darjeeling, which plays a pivotal role in ex situ conservation of red panda in India. We generated microsatellite genotypes of fifteen red pandas with a set of fourteen loci. This population is genetically diverse with 68 % observed heterozygosity (HO) and mean inbreeding (FIS) coefficient of 0.05. However population viability analysis reveals that this population has a very low survival probability (<2 %) and will rapidly loose its genetic diversity to 37 % mainly due to small population size and skewed male-biased sex ratio. Regular supplementation with a pair of adult individuals every five years will increase survival probability and genetic diversity to 99 and 61 % respectively and will also support future harvesting of individuals for reintroduction into the wild and exchange with other zoos.

  20. Simulation and event reconstruction inside the PandaRoot framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spataro, S.

    2008-07-01

    The PANDA detector will be located at the future GSI accelerator FAIR. Its primary objective is the investigation of strong interaction with anti-proton beams, in the range up to 15 GeV/c as momentum of the incoming anti-proton. The PANDA offline simulation framework is called 'PandaRoot', as it is based upon the ROOT 5.14 package. It is characterized by a high versatility; it allows to perform simulation and analysis, to run different event generators (EvtGen, Pluto, UrQmd), different transport models (Geant3, Geant4, Fluka) with the same code, thus to compare the results simply by changing few macro lines without recompiling at all. Moreover auto-configuration scripts allow installing the full framework easily in different Linux distributions and with different compilers (the framework was installed and tested in more than 10 Linux platforms) without further manipulation. The final data are in a tree format, easily accessible and readable through simple clicks on the root browsers. The presentation will report on the actual status of the computing development inside the PandaRoot framework, in terms of detector implementation and event reconstruction.

  1. Annotation: PANDAS--A Model for Human Autoimmune Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swedo, Susan E.; Grant, Paul J.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcus infections (PANDAS) is a recently recognized syndrome in which pre-adolescent children have abrupt onsets of tics and/or obsessive-compulsive symptoms, a recurring and remitting course of illness temporally related to streptococcal infections, and associated…

  2. Giant panda conservation science: how far we have come

    PubMed Central

    Swaisgood, Ronald R.; Wei, Fuwen; Wildt, David E.; Kouba, Andrew J.; Zhang, Zejun

    2010-01-01

    The giant panda is a conservation icon, but science has been slow to take up its cause in earnest. In the past decade, researchers have been making up for lost time, as reflected in the flurry of activity reported at the symposium Conservation Science for Giant Pandas and Their Habitat at the 2009 International Congress for Conservation Biology (ICCB) in Beijing. In reports addressing topics ranging from spatial ecology to molecular censusing, from habitat recovery in newly established reserves to earthquake-induced habitat loss, from new insights into factors limiting carrying capacity to the uncertain effects of climate change, this symposium displayed the vibrant and blossoming application of science to giant panda conservation. Collectively, we find that we have come a long way, but we also reach an all-too-familiar conclusion: the more we know, the more challenges are revealed. While many earlier findings are supported, many of our assumptions are debatable. Here we discuss recent advancements in conservation science for giant pandas and suggest that the way forward is more direct application of emerging science to management and policy. PMID:19864275

  3. Full Genome Sequence of Giant Panda Rotavirus Strain CH-1

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ling; Yang, Shaolin; Wang, Chengdong; Chen, Shijie; Yang, Xiaonong; Hou, Rong; Quan, Zifang; Hao, Zhongxiang

    2013-01-01

    We report here the complete genomic sequence of the giant panda rotavirus strain CH-1. This work is the first to document the complete genomic sequence (segments 1 to 11) of the CH-1 strain, which offers an effective platform for providing authentic research experiences to novice scientists. PMID:23469354

  4. Triplet based online track finding in the PANDA-STT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, Marius C.; Brinkmann, Kai-Thomas; Ritman, James; Wintz, Peter

    2014-05-01

    We present a method for online track finding in the PANDA-STT which requires only knowledge of the time and straw position of the hits. Therefore, it does not depend on any additional information such as the drift-time or radius drift-time calibration which may not be present ab-initio.

  5. Inbreeding and inbreeding avoidance in wild giant pandas.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yibo; Nie, Yonggang; Wei, Wei; Ma, Tianxiao; Van Horn, Russell; Zheng, Xiaoguang; Swaisgood, Ronald R; Zhou, Zhixin; Zhou, Wenliang; Yan, Li; Zhang, Zejun; Wei, Fuwen

    2017-08-09

    Inbreeding can have negative consequences on population and individual fitness, which could be counteracted by inbreeding avoidance mechanisms. However, the inbreeding risk and inbreeding avoidance mechanisms in endangered species are less studied. The giant panda, a solitary and threatened species, lives in many small populations and suffers from habitat fragmentation, which may aggravate the risk of inbreeding. Here, we performed long-term observations of reproductive behaviour, sampling of mother-cub pairs and large-scale genetic analyses on wild giant pandas. Moderate levels of inbreeding were found in 21.1% of mating pairs, 9.1% of parent pairs and 7.7% of panda cubs, but no high-level inbreeding occurred. More significant levels of inbreeding may be avoided passively by female-biased natal dispersal rather than by breeding dispersal or active relatedness-based mate choice mechanisms. The level of inbreeding in giant pandas is greater than expected for a solitary mammal and thus warrants concern for potential inbreeding depression, particularly in small populations isolated by continuing habitat fragmentation, which will reduce female dispersal and increase the risk of inbreeding. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. [PANDAS: a possible model for adult OCD pathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Marconi, Daniela; Limpido, Lucilla; Bersani, Iliana; Giordano, Annalisa; Bersani, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder is a disabling disorder. Genetic predisposing factors may have an important role in the onset of the symptoms, but is not been individualized any specific gene yet. In the last years it has been demonstrated that obsessive-compulsive disease and/or tic syndromes may be triggered by an antecedent infection especially with group A beta-hemolytic streptococci. On the basis of recent studies has been postulated that in genetically predisposed individuals, certain streptococcal antigens trigger antibodies which, through a process of molecular mimicry, cross-react with epitopes on the basal ganglia. According to such hypothesis, the acronym PANDAS has been used to describe a subset of children with abrupt onset or exacerbations of OCD or tics, or both, following streptococcal infections. Neuroimaging studies reveal increased basal ganglia volumes, and the proposed cause involves the cross-reaction of streptococcal antibodies with basal ganglia tissue. The hypothesis of a possible involvement of the immunitary system seems justified from quantitative alterations of TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-1 in the patients' serum with such syndrome. Echotomographic studies on cardiac valves have not yet demonstrated the parallels between PANDAS and Sydenham's chorea. The use of treatment strategies, such as therapeutic plasmapheresis or intravenous immunoglobulin, has been proposed to explain the autoimmune process responsible for the pathogenesis of PANDAS. Further research is still necessary in order to understand the role of streptococcal infection in the pathogenesis of PANDAS.

  7. An expert opinion on PANDAS/PANS: highlights and controversies.

    PubMed

    Chiarello, Francesca; Spitoni, Silvia; Hollander, Eric; Matucci Cerinic, Marco; Pallanti, Stefano

    2017-06-01

    'Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal Infections' (PANDAS) identified a unique subgroup of patients with abrupt onset of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) symptoms clinically related to Streptococcus infection and accompanied by neuropsychological and motor symptoms. After almost 20 years, PANDAS has not been accepted as distinct disorder and new criteria for paediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndrome (PANS) have been replaced it, highlighting the fact that several agents rather than only Streptococcus might be involved. Extensive review of the PANDAS/PANS literature was performed on PubMed. Although antibiotics have been reported to be effective for acute and prophylactic phases in several uncontrolled studies and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) are used during exacerbations, clinical multicenter trials are still missing. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) are still the first line of recommendation for acute onset OCD spectrum. Immunological therapies should be restricted to a few cases. While PANDAS has found no confirmation as a distinct syndrome, and it is not presented in DSM-5, patients with acute onset OCD spectrum, neurocognitive and motor symptoms should be evaluated for inflammatory, infective, immunological and metabolic abnormalities with a comprehensive diagnostic algorithm.

  8. Giant panda conservation science: how far we have come.

    PubMed

    Swaisgood, Ronald R; Wei, Fuwen; Wildt, David E; Kouba, Andrew J; Zhang, Zejun

    2010-04-23

    The giant panda is a conservation icon, but science has been slow to take up its cause in earnest. In the past decade, researchers have been making up for lost time, as reflected in the flurry of activity reported at the symposium Conservation Science for Giant Pandas and Their Habitat at the 2009 International Congress for Conservation Biology (ICCB) in Beijing. In reports addressing topics ranging from spatial ecology to molecular censusing, from habitat recovery in newly established reserves to earthquake-induced habitat loss, from new insights into factors limiting carrying capacity to the uncertain effects of climate change, this symposium displayed the vibrant and blossoming application of science to giant panda conservation. Collectively, we find that we have come a long way, but we also reach an all-too-familiar conclusion: the more we know, the more challenges are revealed. While many earlier findings are supported, many of our assumptions are debatable. Here we discuss recent advancements in conservation science for giant pandas and suggest that the way forward is more direct application of emerging science to management and policy.

  9. INTEGRATION OF PANDA WORKLOAD MANAGEMENT SYSTEM WITH SUPERCOMPUTERS

    SciTech Connect

    De, K; Jha, S; Maeno, T; Mashinistov, R.; Nilsson, P; Novikov, A.; Oleynik, D; Panitkin, S; Poyda, A.; Ryabinkin, E.; Teslyuk, A.; Tsulaia, V.; Velikhov, V.; Wen, G.; Wells, Jack C; Wenaus, T

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), operating at the international CERN Laboratory in Geneva, Switzerland, is leading Big Data driven scientific explorations. Experiments at the LHC explore the funda- mental nature of matter and the basic forces that shape our universe, and were recently credited for the dis- covery of a Higgs boson. ATLAS, one of the largest collaborations ever assembled in the sciences, is at the forefront of research at the LHC. To address an unprecedented multi-petabyte data processing challenge, the ATLAS experiment is relying on a heterogeneous distributed computational infrastructure. The ATLAS experiment uses PanDA (Production and Data Analysis) Workload Management System for managing the workflow for all data processing on over 140 data centers. Through PanDA, ATLAS physicists see a single computing facility that enables rapid scientific breakthroughs for the experiment, even though the data cen- ters are physically scattered all over the world. While PanDA currently uses more than 250000 cores with a peak performance of 0.3+ petaFLOPS, next LHC data taking runs will require more resources than Grid computing can possibly provide. To alleviate these challenges, LHC experiments are engaged in an ambitious program to expand the current computing model to include additional resources such as the opportunistic use of supercomputers. We will describe a project aimed at integration of PanDA WMS with supercomputers in United States, Europe and Russia (in particular with Titan supercomputer at Oak Ridge Leadership Com- puting Facility (OLCF), Supercomputer at the National Research Center Kurchatov Institute , IT4 in Ostrava, and others). The current approach utilizes a modified PanDA pilot framework for job submission to the supercomputers batch queues and local data management, with light-weight MPI wrappers to run single- threaded workloads in parallel on Titan s multi-core worker nodes. This implementation was tested with a variety of

  10. Integration of Panda Workload Management System with supercomputers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De, K.; Jha, S.; Klimentov, A.; Maeno, T.; Mashinistov, R.; Nilsson, P.; Novikov, A.; Oleynik, D.; Panitkin, S.; Poyda, A.; Read, K. F.; Ryabinkin, E.; Teslyuk, A.; Velikhov, V.; Wells, J. C.; Wenaus, T.

    2016-09-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), operating at the international CERN Laboratory in Geneva, Switzerland, is leading Big Data driven scientific explorations. Experiments at the LHC explore the fundamental nature of matter and the basic forces that shape our universe, and were recently credited for the discovery of a Higgs boson. ATLAS, one of the largest collaborations ever assembled in the sciences, is at the forefront of research at the LHC. To address an unprecedented multi-petabyte data processing challenge, the ATLAS experiment is relying on a heterogeneous distributed computational infrastructure. The ATLAS experiment uses PanDA (Production and Data Analysis) Workload Management System for managing the workflow for all data processing on over 140 data centers. Through PanDA, ATLAS physicists see a single computing facility that enables rapid scientific breakthroughs for the experiment, even though the data centers are physically scattered all over the world. While PanDA currently uses more than 250000 cores with a peak performance of 0.3+ petaFLOPS, next LHC data taking runs will require more resources than Grid computing can possibly provide. To alleviate these challenges, LHC experiments are engaged in an ambitious program to expand the current computing model to include additional resources such as the opportunistic use of supercomputers. We will describe a project aimed at integration of PanDA WMS with supercomputers in United States, Europe and Russia (in particular with Titan supercomputer at Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF), Supercomputer at the National Research Center "Kurchatov Institute", IT4 in Ostrava, and others). The current approach utilizes a modified PanDA pilot framework for job submission to the supercomputers batch queues and local data management, with light-weight MPI wrappers to run singlethreaded workloads in parallel on Titan's multi-core worker nodes. This implementation was tested with a variety of Monte-Carlo workloads

  11. [Distribution patterns of giant panda in Guanyinshan and Foping nature reserves].

    PubMed

    Cao, Qing; Zhu, Yun; Ruan, Ying-qin; Yong, Li-jun; Wang, Xiao-hong; Zhang, Wen-hui

    2009-09-01

    By using line transect method, the distribution patterns of giant panda population and its sympatric companion wildlife species in Foping and Guanyinshan nature reserves were investigated in October 2007 and April 2008, and the environmental factors affecting the spatial distribution of giant panda activity were analyzed. The giant panda population and its sympatric companion wildlife species in the two reserves had the similar distribution patterns, and the density and distribution range of giant panda were smaller in Guanyinshan than in Foping. Giant panda had two high-density distribution areas in Foping, but no activity trace in most parts of Guanyinshan. The activity trace of Budorcas taxicolor, Naemorhedus goral and Sus scrofa was more in Guanyinshan than in Foping. Anthropogenic interference might affect the distribution pattern of giant panda.

  12. Evidence for lignin oxidation by the giant panda fecal microbiome.

    PubMed

    Fang, Wei; Fang, Zemin; Zhou, Peng; Chang, Fei; Hong, Yuzhi; Zhang, Xuecheng; Peng, Hui; Xiao, Yazhong

    2012-01-01

    The digestion of lignin and lignin-related phenolic compounds from bamboo by giant pandas has puzzled scientists because of the lack of lignin-degrading genes in the genome of the bamboo-feeding animals. We constructed a 16S rRNA gene library from the microorganisms derived from the giant panda feces to identify the possibility for the presence of potential lignin-degrading bacteria. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the phylotypes of the intestinal bacteria were affiliated with the phyla Proteobacteria (53%) and Firmicutes (47%). Two phylotypes were affiliated with the known lignin-degrading bacterium Pseudomonas putida and the mangrove forest bacteria. To test the hypothesis that microbes in the giant panda gut help degrade lignin, a metagenomic library of the intestinal bacteria was constructed and screened for clones that contained genes encoding laccase, a lignin-degrading related enzyme. A multicopper oxidase gene, designated as lac51, was identified from a metagenomic clone. Sequence analysis and copper content determination indicated that Lac51 is a laccase rather than a metallo-oxidase and may work outside its original host cell because it has a TAT-type signal peptide and a transmembrane segment at its N-terminus. Lac51 oxidizes a variety of lignin-related phenolic compounds, including syringaldazine, 2,6-dimethoxyphenol, ferulic acid, veratryl alcohol, guaiacol, and sinapinic acid at conditions that simulate the physiologic environment in giant panda intestines. Furthermore, in the presence of 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS), syringic acid, or ferulic acid as mediators, the oxidative ability of Lac51 on lignin was promoted. The absorbance of lignin at 445 nm decreased to 36% for ABTS, 51% for syringic acid, and 51% for ferulic acid after incubation for 10 h. Our findings demonstrate that the intestinal bacteria of giant pandas may facilitate the oxidation of lignin moieties, thereby clarifying the digestion of bamboo lignin

  13. Evaluating landscape options for corridor restoration between giant panda reserves.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; McShea, William J; Wang, Dajun; Li, Sheng; Zhao, Qing; Wang, Hao; Lu, Zhi

    2014-01-01

    The establishment of corridors can offset the negative effects of habitat fragmentation by connecting isolated habitat patches. However, the practical value of corridor planning is minimal if corridor identification is not based on reliable quantitative information about species-environment relationships. An example of this need for quantitative information is planning for giant panda conservation. Although the species has been the focus of intense conservation efforts for decades, most corridor projects remain hypothetical due to the lack of reliable quantitative researches at an appropriate spatial scale. In this paper, we evaluated a framework for giant panda forest corridor planning. We linked our field survey data with satellite imagery, and conducted species occupancy modelling to examine the habitat use of giant panda within the potential corridor area. We then conducted least-cost and circuit models to identify potential paths of dispersal across the landscape, and compared the predicted cost under current conditions and alternative conservation management options considered during corridor planning. We found that due to giant panda's association with areas of low elevation and flat terrain, human infrastructures in the same area have resulted in corridor fragmentation. We then identified areas with high potential to function as movement corridors, and our analysis of alternative conservation scenarios showed that both forest/bamboo restoration and automobile tunnel construction would significantly improve the effectiveness of corridor, while residence relocation would not significantly improve corridor effectiveness in comparison with the current condition. The framework has general value in any conservation activities that anticipate improving habitat connectivity in human modified landscapes. Specifically, our study suggested that, in this landscape, automobile tunnels are the best means to remove current barriers to giant panda movements caused by

  14. The experiment PANDA: physics with antiprotons at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boca, Gianluigi

    2015-05-01

    PANDA is an experiment that will run at the future facility FAIR, Darmstadt, Germany. A high intensity and cooled antiproton beam will collide on a fixed hydrogen or nuclear target covering center-of-mass energies between 2.2 and 5.5 GeV. PANDA addresses various physics aspects from the low energy non-perturbative region towards the perturbative regime of QCD. With the impressive theoretical developments in this field, e.g. lattice QCD, the predictions are becoming more accurate in the course of time. The data harvest with PANDA will, therefore, be an ideal test bench with the aim to provide a deeper understanding of hadronic phenomena such as confinement and the generation of hadron masses. A variety of physics topics will be covered with PANDA, for example: the formation or production of exotic non-qqbar charm meson states connected to the recently observed XYZ spectrum; the study of gluon-rich matter, such as glueballs and hybrids; the spectroscopy of the excited states of strange and charm baryons, their production cross section and their spin correlations; the behaviour of hadrons in nuclear matter; the hypernuclear physics; the electromagnetic proton form factors in the timelike region. The PANDA experiment is designed to achieve the above mentioned physics goals with a setup with the following characteristics: an almost full solid angle acceptance; excellent tracking capabilities with high resolution (1-2 % at 1 GeV/c in the central region); secondary vertex detection with resolution ≈ 100 microns or better; electromagnetic calorimetry for detections of gammas and electrons up to 10 GeV; good particle identification of charge tracks (electrons, muons, pions, kaons, protons); a dedicated interchangeable central apparatus for the hypernuclear physics; detector and data acquisition system capable of working at 20 MHz interaction rate with an intelligent software trigger that can provide maximum flexibility.

  15. Evidence for Lignin Oxidation by the Giant Panda Fecal Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Peng; Chang, Fei; Hong, Yuzhi; Zhang, Xuecheng; Peng, Hui; Xiao, Yazhong

    2012-01-01

    The digestion of lignin and lignin-related phenolic compounds from bamboo by giant pandas has puzzled scientists because of the lack of lignin-degrading genes in the genome of the bamboo-feeding animals. We constructed a 16S rRNA gene library from the microorganisms derived from the giant panda feces to identify the possibility for the presence of potential lignin-degrading bacteria. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the phylotypes of the intestinal bacteria were affiliated with the phyla Proteobacteria (53%) and Firmicutes (47%). Two phylotypes were affiliated with the known lignin-degrading bacterium Pseudomonas putida and the mangrove forest bacteria. To test the hypothesis that microbes in the giant panda gut help degrade lignin, a metagenomic library of the intestinal bacteria was constructed and screened for clones that contained genes encoding laccase, a lignin-degrading related enzyme. A multicopper oxidase gene, designated as lac51, was identified from a metagenomic clone. Sequence analysis and copper content determination indicated that Lac51 is a laccase rather than a metallo-oxidase and may work outside its original host cell because it has a TAT-type signal peptide and a transmembrane segment at its N-terminus. Lac51 oxidizes a variety of lignin-related phenolic compounds, including syringaldazine, 2,6-dimethoxyphenol, ferulic acid, veratryl alcohol, guaiacol, and sinapinic acid at conditions that simulate the physiologic environment in giant panda intestines. Furthermore, in the presence of 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS), syringic acid, or ferulic acid as mediators, the oxidative ability of Lac51 on lignin was promoted. The absorbance of lignin at 445 nm decreased to 36% for ABTS, 51% for syringic acid, and 51% for ferulic acid after incubation for 10 h. Our findings demonstrate that the intestinal bacteria of giant pandas may facilitate the oxidation of lignin moieties, thereby clarifying the digestion of bamboo

  16. Status of gastrointestinal parasites in Red Panda of Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Saroj; Kunwar, Ajaya Jang; Acharya, Sakshi; Jnawali, Shant Raj; Acharya, Krishna Prasad

    2017-01-01

    Red pandas are known to be highly susceptible to endoparasites, which can have a prominent impact on the population dynamics of this endangered species. There are very limited published reports on prevalence and risk of parasites in wild populations of red panda, especially localized reports. This study attempts to provide an in-depth insight of the status of endoparasites in red pandas, which is critical for strengthening conservation efforts. A total of 272 fecal samples were collected through systematic sampling across the red panda distribution range in Nepal and coprological examination was completed using standard techniques. It was followed by an estimation of prevalence and mean intensity of parasites, as well as statistical analysis, which was carried out using R statistical software. Parasite prevalence was documented in 90.80% (n = 247) out of 272 samples examined which includes seven different species along with three genera of parasites belonging to Protozoans (3 species), Cestodes (1 genus, 1 species) and Nematodes (2 genera, 3 species). Nematodes predominated in all infected samples (87.62%). Prevalence of Ancyclostoma duodenale (n = 227, 70.06%), having a mean intensity of 3.45 ± 2.88 individuals per sample, was observed, followed by Ascaris lumbricoides (n = 19, 5.86%) and Entamoeba histolytica (n = 24, 7.41%). Eight variables for assessing the determinants of infestation were tested: protected areas; non-protected areas; aspect; elevation; slope; and distance to water sources, herding stations, and settlements. Only the settlement displayed significant association (β = −1534e−04, t =  − 2.192, p = 0.0293) though each parasite species displayed dissimilar association with different variables. This study indicates the urgent need of improving existing herding practice through habitat zonation, rotational grazing, medication of livestock, and prohibition of open defecation within and around red panda habitat. PMID:28894643

  17. Factors affecting genotyping success in giant panda fecal samples

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ying; Liu, Hong-Yi; Yang, Hai-Qiong; Li, Yu-Dong

    2017-01-01

    Fecal samples play an important role in giant panda conservation studies. Optimal preservation conditions and choice of microsatellites for giant panda fecal samples have not been established. In this study, we evaluated the effect of four factors (namely, storage type (ethanol (EtOH), EtOH −20 °C, 2-step storage medium, DMSO/EDTA/Tris/salt buffer (DETs) and frozen at −20 °C), storage time (one, three and six months), fragment length, and repeat motif of microsatellite loci) on the success rate of microsatellite amplification, allelic dropout (ADO) and false allele (FA) rates from giant panda fecal samples. Amplification success and ADO rates differed between the storage types. Freezing was inferior to the other four storage methods based on the lowest average amplification success and the highest ADO rates (P < 0.05). The highest microsatellite amplification success was obtained from either EtOH or the 2-step storage medium at three storage time points. Storage time had a negative effect on the average amplification of microsatellites and samples stored in EtOH and the 2-step storage medium were more stable than the other three storage types. We only detected the effect of repeat motif on ADO and FA rates. The lower ADO and FA rates were obtained from tri- and tetra-nucleotide loci. We suggest that freezing should not be used for giant panda fecal preservation in microsatellite studies, and EtOH and the 2-step storage medium should be chosen on priority for long-term storage. We recommend candidate microsatellite loci with longer repeat motif to ensure greater genotyping success for giant panda fecal studies. PMID:28560107

  18. Factors affecting genotyping success in giant panda fecal samples.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Liu, Hong-Yi; Yang, Hai-Qiong; Li, Yu-Dong; Zhang, He-Min

    2017-01-01

    Fecal samples play an important role in giant panda conservation studies. Optimal preservation conditions and choice of microsatellites for giant panda fecal samples have not been established. In this study, we evaluated the effect of four factors (namely, storage type (ethanol (EtOH), EtOH -20 °C, 2-step storage medium, DMSO/EDTA/Tris/salt buffer (DETs) and frozen at -20 °C), storage time (one, three and six months), fragment length, and repeat motif of microsatellite loci) on the success rate of microsatellite amplification, allelic dropout (ADO) and false allele (FA) rates from giant panda fecal samples. Amplification success and ADO rates differed between the storage types. Freezing was inferior to the other four storage methods based on the lowest average amplification success and the highest ADO rates (P < 0.05). The highest microsatellite amplification success was obtained from either EtOH or the 2-step storage medium at three storage time points. Storage time had a negative effect on the average amplification of microsatellites and samples stored in EtOH and the 2-step storage medium were more stable than the other three storage types. We only detected the effect of repeat motif on ADO and FA rates. The lower ADO and FA rates were obtained from tri- and tetra-nucleotide loci. We suggest that freezing should not be used for giant panda fecal preservation in microsatellite studies, and EtOH and the 2-step storage medium should be chosen on priority for long-term storage. We recommend candidate microsatellite loci with longer repeat motif to ensure greater genotyping success for giant panda fecal studies.

  19. Status of gastrointestinal parasites in Red Panda of Nepal.

    PubMed

    Bista, Damber; Shrestha, Saroj; Kunwar, Ajaya Jang; Acharya, Sakshi; Jnawali, Shant Raj; Acharya, Krishna Prasad

    2017-01-01

    Red pandas are known to be highly susceptible to endoparasites, which can have a prominent impact on the population dynamics of this endangered species. There are very limited published reports on prevalence and risk of parasites in wild populations of red panda, especially localized reports. This study attempts to provide an in-depth insight of the status of endoparasites in red pandas, which is critical for strengthening conservation efforts. A total of 272 fecal samples were collected through systematic sampling across the red panda distribution range in Nepal and coprological examination was completed using standard techniques. It was followed by an estimation of prevalence and mean intensity of parasites, as well as statistical analysis, which was carried out using R statistical software. Parasite prevalence was documented in 90.80% (n = 247) out of 272 samples examined which includes seven different species along with three genera of parasites belonging to Protozoans (3 species), Cestodes (1 genus, 1 species) and Nematodes (2 genera, 3 species). Nematodes predominated in all infected samples (87.62%). Prevalence of Ancyclostoma duodenale (n = 227, 70.06%), having a mean intensity of 3.45 ± 2.88 individuals per sample, was observed, followed by Ascaris lumbricoides (n = 19, 5.86%) and Entamoeba histolytica (n = 24, 7.41%). Eight variables for assessing the determinants of infestation were tested: protected areas; non-protected areas; aspect; elevation; slope; and distance to water sources, herding stations, and settlements. Only the settlement displayed significant association (β = -1534e-04, t =  - 2.192, p = 0.0293) though each parasite species displayed dissimilar association with different variables. This study indicates the urgent need of improving existing herding practice through habitat zonation, rotational grazing, medication of livestock, and prohibition of open defecation within and around red panda habitat.

  20. Corridor connecting giant panda habitats from north to south in the Min Mountains, Sichuan, China.

    PubMed

    Yin, Kaipu; Xie, Yan; Wu, Ning

    2006-12-01

    The giant panda faces severe threats from habitat fragmentation and isolation. Currently, giant panda populations have been fragmented into 30 habitat patches. The disappearance of isolated small populations and studies on the genetic diversity of various populations have shown that small isolated panda populations are at a high risk of dying out completely. Habitat fragmentation has seriously impaired the ability of the giant panda to resist climate changes and other natural disasters, such as large-scale, synchronous bamboo blooming. The Min Mountains have the largest population of pandas in China, numbering 581 individuals and accounting for 52% of the total (1114) in China. Geographic isolation means that giant pandas in the Min Mountains are divided into two populations (population A in the north and population B in the south). Population B, which had only 42 individuals in 1989, is severely threatened by high-density human populations and the loss of genetic diversity. However, we have identified an important corridor connecting the two populations. This paper explains the importance and the feasibility of reestablishing this corridor. Due to the special geographic locations of these two populations (two rivers block the migration of giant pandas between south and north), the corridor is the only passage for giant pandas in the region. Recent studies have also shown an increase of giant panda activity in the area of the corridor. However, vegetation in the corridor has been severely degraded. Bamboo forest must be restored in this area to provide food for the pandas during migration. The effects of human activities must be reduced in order to maintain panda habitat. We believe that a restored corridor will be of great benefit to the survival of giant pandas in the Min Mountains, especially for population B. Successful re-establishment of a corridor will be a valuable model for corridor construction in the future.

  1. PANDA2: Program for Minimum Weight Design of Stiffened, Composite, Locally Buckled Panels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    EQUILIBRIUM OF IMPERFECT, LOCALLY DEFORMED. STRINGER-STIFFENED PANELS UNDER COMBINED IN-PLANE LOADS APPENDIX B: BOSOR4 THEORY APPENDIX C: PANDA THEORY ix...calculated from the model shown in the previous figure is included in the nonlinear equilibrium analysis. Fig. 57 PANDA2 and STAGS predictions of the normal... EQUILIBRIUM : a. PANDA2 obtains bowing of the panel due to curing. b. It obtains static response of the panel to uniform normal pressure, using nonlinear

  2. Evolution of the ATLAS PanDA workload management system for exascale computational science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeno, T.; De, K.; Klimentov, A.; Nilsson, P.; Oleynik, D.; Panitkin, S.; Petrosyan, A.; Schovancova, J.; Vaniachine, A.; Wenaus, T.; Yu, D.; Atlas Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    An important foundation underlying the impressive success of data processing and analysis in the ATLAS experiment [1] at the LHC [2] is the Production and Distributed Analysis (PanDA) workload management system [3]. PanDA was designed specifically for ATLAS and proved to be highly successful in meeting all the distributed computing needs of the experiment. However, the core design of PanDA is not experiment specific. The PanDA workload management system is capable of meeting the needs of other data intensive scientific applications. Alpha-Magnetic Spectrometer [4], an astro-particle experiment on the International Space Station, and the Compact Muon Solenoid [5], an LHC experiment, have successfully evaluated PanDA and are pursuing its adoption. In this paper, a description of the new program of work to develop a generic version of PanDA will be given, as well as the progress in extending PanDA's capabilities to support supercomputers and clouds and to leverage intelligent networking. PanDA has demonstrated at a very large scale the value of automated dynamic brokering of diverse workloads across distributed computing resources. The next generation of PanDA will allow other data-intensive sciences and a wider exascale community employing a variety of computing platforms to benefit from ATLAS' experience and proven tools.

  3. Interspecies implantation and mitochondria fate of panda-rabbit cloned embryos.

    PubMed

    Chen, Da-Yuan; Wen, Duan-Cheng; Zhang, Ya-Ping; Sun, Qing-Yuan; Han, Zhi-Ming; Liu, Zhong-Hua; Shi, Peng; Li, Jin-Song; Xiangyu, Jing-Gong; Lian, Li; Kou, Zhao-Hui; Wu, Yu-Qi; Chen, Yu-Cun; Wang, Peng-Yan; Zhang, He-Min

    2002-08-01

    Somatic cell nuclei of giant pandas can dedifferentiate in enucleated rabbit ooplasm, and the reconstructed eggs can develop to blastocysts. In order to observe whether these interspecies cloned embryos can implant in the uterus of an animal other than the panda, we transferred approximately 2300 panda-rabbit cloned embryos into 100 synchronized rabbit recipients, and none became pregnant. In another approach, we cotransferred both panda-rabbit and cat-rabbit interspecies cloned embryos into the oviducts of 21 cat recipients. Fourteen recipients exhibited estrus within 35 days; five recipients exhibited estrus 43-48 days after embryo transfer; and the other two recipients died of pneumonia, one of which was found to be pregnant with six early fetuses when an autopsy was performed. Microsatellite DNA analysis of these early fetuses confirmed that two were from giant panda-rabbit cloned embryos. The results demonstrated that panda-rabbit cloned embryos can implant in the uterus of a third species, the domestic cat. By using mitochondrial-specific probes of panda and rabbit, we found that mitochondria from both panda somatic cells and rabbit ooplasm coexisted in early blastocysts, but mitochondria from rabbit ooplasm decreased, and those from panda donor cells dominated in early fetuses after implantation. Our results reveal that mitochondria from donor cells may substitute those from recipient oocytes in postimplanted, interspecies cloned embryos.

  4. Molecular cloning of giant panda pituitary prolactin cDNA and its expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-He; Zheng, Xu; Hu, Xi-lian; Zhu, Mu-Yuan; Hou, Rong; Shen, Fu-Jun; Zhang, Liang; Liao, Ming-Juan; Lv, Xiao-Ping

    2005-01-01

    cDNA encoding pituitary (PRL) of giant panda was obtained using RT-PCR and expressed in E. coli. The results revealed that panda PRL cDNA encodes a precursor protein of 229 amino acids including a putative signal peptide of 30 amino acids and a mature protein of 199 residues with one potential N-glycosylation site. Sequence comparison indicated that panda PRL shares a high degree of identity to other known PRL sequences ranging from 98% with mink PRL to about 50% with rodent PRL. Six cysteine residues and 29 conserved residues distributed in four domains (PD1, PD2, PD3, and PD4) of PRL were observed. through multiple sequence alignment. Fourteen key residues of binding sites 1 and 2 involved in receptor binding are conserved in panda PRL. GST fused recombinant panda PRL protein was efficiently expressed with the form of insoluble inclusion bodies in E. coli BL21 transformed with a pGEX-4T-1 expression vector containing the DNA sequence encoding mature panda PRL. Western blot analysis indicated that GST-panda PRL recombinant protein could be recognized by antibody against human PRL. Our results would contribute to further elucidating the structural and functional characteristics of pituitary PRL and provide a basis for the production of recombinant panda prolactin for future use in the breeding of giant panda.

  5. Comparative endocrine investigations in three bear species based on urinary steroid metabolites and volatiles.

    PubMed

    Dehnhard, M; Hildebrandt, T B; Knauf, T; Jewgenow, K; Kolter, L; Göritz, F

    2006-10-01

    In order to improve breeding of in situ populations of bears, a comprehensive study of reproductive physiology in Brown (Ursus arctos), Spectacled (Tremarctos ornatus) and Giant panda bears (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) was performed. The objective was to perform non-invasive analyses of urinary and fecal steroid metabolites. In addition, we investigated the presence of reproduction-related urinary volatile substances of these bears that might trigger the reproductive behavior. Urinary estrogen concentrations, routinely used to monitor follicular activity in Giant panda, were inappropriate for monitoring follicular activity in Spectacled bear. In addition, no estrogen peak related to mating activity was observed in Brown bear. Further contrasting Giant panda, although urinary pregnanediol analyses failed to indicate luteal activity in either Spectacled or Brown bears, urinary (Spectacled bear) and fecal (Brown bear) concentrations of progesterone were an appropriate indicator of luteal activity. The Giant panda had volatile components (medium-chain fatty acids) in their urine that increased simultaneously with the seasonal increase of estrogens. These fatty acids were also detected in the Brown during estrus and Spectacled bear. Further studies on the behavioral relevance of these fatty acids are required to determine if they are pheromones.

  6. Food preference, keeper ratings, and reinforcer effectiveness in exotic animals: the value of systematic testing.

    PubMed

    Gaalema, Diann E; Perdue, Bonnie M; Kelling, Angela S

    2011-01-01

    Food preference describes the behavior of selecting between items for consumption; reinforcer effectiveness is the functional effect of that item in controlling behavior. Food preference and reinforcer effectiveness were examined in giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and African elephants (Loxodonta africana). A pairwise comparison between food items was used to assess food preference. High-, moderate-, and low-preference items were selected and tested for reinforcer effectiveness. High-preference items controlled behavior more effectively than less-preferred items. Caregiver ratings of food preferences were also collected for each subject, but these reports did not necessarily coincide with actual subject preferences. Caregiver ratings correlated with the food preferences of only 1 individual of each species; thus, preferences of 1 nonhuman animal may be falsely generalized to all animals of that species. Results suggest that food choice and reinforcer effectiveness should be investigated empirically and not rely on anecdotal reports.

  7. Impacts of temperature on giant panda habitat in the north Minshan Mountains.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Guan, Tianpei; Dai, Qiang; Li, Huixin; Gong, Minghao

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the impacts of meteorological factors on giant pandas is necessary for future conservation measures in response to global climate change. We integrated temperature data with three main habitat parameters (elevation, vegetation type, and bamboo species) to evaluate the influence of climate change on giant panda habitat in the northern Minshan Mountains using a habitat assessment model. Our study shows that temperature (relative importance = 25.1%) was the second most important variable influencing giant panda habitat excepting the elevation. There was a significant negative correlation between temperature and panda presence (ρ = -0.133, P < 0.05), and the temperature range preferred by giant pandas within the study area was 18-21°C, followed by 15-17°C and 22-24°C. The overall suitability of giant panda habitats will increase by 2.7%, however, it showed a opposite variation patterns between the eastern and northwestern region of the study area. Suitable and subsuitable habitats in the northwestern region of the study area, which is characterized by higher elevation and latitude, will increase by 18007.8 hm(2) (9.8% habitat suitability), while the eastern region will suffer a decrease of 9543.5 hm(2) (7.1% habitat suitability). Our results suggest that increasing areas of suitable giant panda habitat will support future giant panda expansion, and food shortage and insufficient living space will not arise as problems in the northwest Minshan Mountains, which means that giant pandas can adapt to climate change, and therefore may be resilient to climate change. Thus, for the safety and survival of giant pandas in the Baishuijiang Reserve, we propose strengthening the giant panda monitoring program in the west and improving the integrity of habitats to promote population dispersal with adjacent populations in the east.

  8. Tests and developments of the PANDA Endcap Disc DIRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etzelmüller, E.; Belias, A.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Kalicy, G.; Krebs, M.; Lehmann, D.; Nerling, F.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Zühlsdorf, M.; Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A.; Pfaffinger, M.; Uhlig, F.; Düren, M.; Föhl, K.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Kröck, B.; Merle, O.; Rieke, J.; Schmidt, M.; Cowie, E.; Keri, T.; Achenbach, P.; Cardinali, M.; Hoek, M.; Lauth, W.; Schlimme, S.; Sfienti, C.; Thiel, M.

    2016-04-01

    The PANDA experiment at the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) requires excellent particle identification. Two different DIRC detectors will utilize internally reflected Cherenkov light of charged particles to enable the separation of pions and kaons up to momenta of 4 GeV/c. The Endcap Disc DIRC will be placed in the forward endcap of PANDA's central spectrometer covering polar angles between 5° and 22°. Its final design is based on MCP-PMTs for the photon detection and an optical system made of fused silica. A new prototype has been investigated during a test beam at CERN in May 2015 and first results will be presented. In addition a new synthetic fused silica material by Nikon has been tested and was found to be radiation hard.

  9. Current husbandry of red pandas (Ailurus fulgens) in zoos.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, P; Zidar, J; White, D; Westander, J; Andersson, M

    2010-01-01

    The endangered red panda (Ailurus fulgens) is held in zoos worldwide. The aim of this study was to examine how red pandas are kept and managed in captivity and to compare it with the management guidelines. Sixty-nine zoos, mainly from Europe but also from North America and Australia/New Zealand, responded to our survey. The results revealed that in general zoos follow the management guidelines for most of the investigated issues. The average enclosure is almost four times larger than the minimum size recommended by the management guidelines, although seven zoos have smaller enclosures. About half the zoos do not follow the guidelines concerning visitor access and number of nest boxes. Other issues that may compromise animal welfare include proximity of neighboring carnivore species and placement of nest boxes.

  10. Sarcocystis spp. Infection in two Red Panda Cubs (Ailurus fulgens).

    PubMed

    Zoll, W M; Needle, D B; French, S J; Lim, A; Bolin, S; Langohr, I; Agnew, D

    2015-01-01

    Two neonatal male red panda (Ailurus fulgens) littermates were submitted for necropsy examination. One animal was found dead with no prior signs of illness; the other had a brief history of laboured breathing. Post-mortem examination revealed disseminated protozoal infection. To further characterize the causative agent, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), immunohistochemistry (IHC), polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and amplification and nucleic acid sequencing were performed. IHC was negative for Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum, but was positive for a Sarcocystis spp. TEM of cardiac muscle and lung revealed numerous intracellular apicomplexan protozoa within parasitophorous vacuoles. PCR and nucleic acid sequencing of partial 18S rRNA and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS)-1 region confirmed a Sarcocystis spp. that shared 99% sequence homology to Sarcocystis neurona and Sarcocystis dasypi. This represents the first report of sarcocystosis in red pandas. The histopathological, immunohistochemical, molecular and ultrastructural findings are supportive of vertical transmission resulting in fatal disseminated disease.

  11. Supplemental iodine as a key to reproduction in pandas?

    PubMed

    Milewski, Antoni V; Dierenfeld, Ellen S

    2012-06-01

    Pandas are endemic to iodine-poor environments and appear to be specialized for a goitrogenic staple diet. In particular, the importance of thiocyanate in bamboos might possibly have been overlooked in captive breeding programs. Although excreted in urine, thiocyanate first antagonizes absorption of iodine by the thyroid (of parent, fetus and suckling juveniles) and the mammary glands. In livestock and humans, subclinical deficiency of iodine is known to result in reproductive problems (including retardation of the fetus and suckling infant) even where the mother appears to be unaffected beyond slight hyperplasia of the thyroid and subtle hypothyroidism as reflected by levels of thyroid hormones. We suggest that the possibilities of iodine deficiency or excess should be carefully considered wherever the reproductive rates of pandas are unsatisfactory. © 2012 ISZS, Blackwell Publishing and IOZ/CAS.

  12. FPGA based compute nodes for high level triggering in PANDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühn, W.; Gilardi, C.; Kirschner, D.; Lang, J.; Lange, S.; Liu, M.; Perez, T.; Yang, S.; Schmitt, L.; Jin, D.; Li, L.; Liu, Z.; Lu, Y.; Wang, Q.; Wei, S.; Xu, H.; Zhao, D.; Korcyl, K.; Otwinowski, J. T.; Salabura, P.; Konorov, I.; Mann, A.

    2008-07-01

    PANDA is a new universal detector for antiproton physics at the HESR facility at FAIR/GSI. The PANDA data acquisition system has to handle interaction rates of the order of 107/s and data rates of several 100 Gb/s. FPGA based compute nodes with multi-Gb/s bandwidth capability using the ATCA architecture are designed to handle tasks such as event building, feature extraction and high level trigger processing. Data connectivity is provided via optical links as well as multiple Gb Ethernet ports. The boards will support trigger algorithms such us pattern recognition for RICH detectors, EM shower analysis, fast tracking algorithms and global event characterization. Besides VHDL, high level C-like hardware description languages will be considered to implement the firmware.

  13. Doubly Strange Hypernuclei Physics with antiprotons at PANDA

    SciTech Connect

    Szymanska, K.; Iazzi, F.

    2010-04-26

    The study of the double hypernuclei will be possible inside the future facility FAIR. A new technique for their production was recently proposed, based on high intensity antiproton beams in connection with a two-target set-up, for the future PANDA experiment at HESR. In particular, the production technique and optimized parameters for the primary target where the hyperon XI{sup -} is produced as well as the expected rates for the stoped XI{sup -} will be discussed.

  14. Giant pandas failed to show mirror self-recognition.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaozan; Jin, Yuan; Luo, Bo; Zhang, Guiquan; Wei, Rongping; Liu, Dingzhen

    2015-05-01

    Mirror self-recognition (MSR), i.e., the ability to recognize oneself in a mirror, is considered a potential index of self-recognition and the foundation of individual development. A wealth of literature on MSR is available for social animals, such as chimpanzees, Asian elephants and dolphins, yet little is known about MSR in solitary mammalian species. We aimed to evaluate whether the giant panda can recognize itself in the mirror, and whether this capacity varies with age. Thirty-four captive giant pandas (F:M = 18:16; juveniles, sub-adults and adults) were subjected to four mirror tests: covered mirror tests, open mirror tests, water mark control tests, and mark tests. The results showed that, though adult, sub-adult and juvenile pandas exposed to mirrors spent similar amounts of time in social mirror-directed behaviors (χ(2) = 0.719, P = 0.698), none of them used the mirror to touch the mark on their head, a self-directed behavior suggesting MSR. Individuals of all age groups initially displayed attacking, threatening, foot scraping and backwards walking behaviors when exposed to their self-images in the mirror. Our data indicate that, regardless of age, the giant pandas did not recognize their self-image in the mirror, but instead considered the image to be a conspecific. Our results add to the available information on mirror self-recognition in large mammals, provide new information on a solitary species, and will be useful for enclosure design and captive animal management.

  15. Improving Security in the ATLAS PanDA System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, J.; Maeno, T.; Nilsson, P.; Stewart, G.; Potekhin, M.; Wenaus, T.

    2011-12-01

    The security challenges faced by users of the grid are considerably different to those faced in previous environments. The adoption of pilot jobs systems by LHC experiments has mitigated many of the problems associated with the inhomogeneities found on the grid and has greatly improved job reliability; however, pilot jobs systems themselves must then address many security issues, including the execution of multiple users' code under a common 'grid' identity. In this paper we describe the improvements and evolution of the security model in the ATLAS PanDA (Production and Distributed Analysis) system. We describe the security in the PanDA server which is in place to ensure that only authorized members of the VO are allowed to submit work into the system and that jobs are properly audited and monitored. We discuss the security in place between the pilot code itself and the PanDA server, ensuring that only properly authenticated workload is delivered to the pilot for execution. When the code to be executed is from a 'normal' ATLAS user, as opposed to the production system or other privileged actor, then the pilot may use an EGEE developed identity switching tool called gLExec. This changes the grid proxy available to the job and also switches the UNIX user identity to protect the privileges of the pilot code proxy. We describe the problems in using this system and how they are overcome. Finally, we discuss security drills which have been run using PanDA and show how these improved our operational security procedures.

  16. BAMBUS: a new inelastic multiplexed neutron spectrometer for PANDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, J. A.; Siemensmeyer, K.; Čermák, P.; Lake, B.; Schneidewind, A.; Inosov, D. S.

    2015-03-01

    We report on plans for a multiplexed neutron analyser option for the PANDA spectrometer. The key design concept is to have many analysers positioned to give a large coverage in the scattering plane, and multiple arcs of these analysers to measure different energy transfers simultaneously. The main goal is to bring intensity gains and improved reciprocal-space and energy mapping capabilities to the existing cold triple-axis spectrometer.

  17. The ATLAS PanDA Pilot in Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, P.; Caballero, J.; De, K.; Maeno, T.; Stradling, A.; Wenaus, T.; ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    The Production and Distributed Analysis system (PanDA) [1-2] was designed to meet ATLAS [3] requirements for a data-driven workload management system capable of operating at LHC data processing scale. Submitted jobs are executed on worker nodes by pilot jobs sent to the grid sites by pilot factories. This paper provides an overview of the PanDA pilot [4] system and presents major features added in light of recent operational experience, including multi-job processing, advanced job recovery for jobs with output storage failures, gLExec [5-6] based identity switching from the generic pilot to the actual user, and other security measures. The PanDA system serves all ATLAS distributed processing and is the primary system for distributed analysis; it is currently used at over 100 sites worldwide. We analyze the performance of the pilot system in processing real LHC data on the OSG [7], EGI [8] and Nordugrid [9-10] infrastructures used by ATLAS, and describe plans for its evolution.

  18. Diet and nutrient balance of red panda in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Panthi, Saroj; Coogan, Sean C P; Aryal, Achyut; Raubenheimer, David

    2015-10-01

    We identified the winter plant species consumed by red panda in the Dhorpatan Hunting Reserve of eastern Nepal and compared this to the early-summer diet which was determined previously by Panthi et al. (2012). In addition, we estimated the proximate nutritional content of the leaves identified in red panda diet for both seasons, and we used nutritional geometry to explore macronutrient balance of leaves from the two different sampling periods. We identified six different plants in winter scats, which were the same as found in the previously determined early-summer diet. Arundinaria spp. bamboos were the main species found (82.1 % relative frequency), followed by Acer spp. (6.3 %), Betula utilis (4.6 %), Quercus semicarpifolia (3.7 %), Berberis spp. (1.3 %), and lichens (1.0 %), leaving 2.0 % unidentified. Geometric analysis suggested that the macronutrient balance of seasonal diets were similar in nutrient balance to the most frequently consumed Arundinaria spp. Differences in macronutrient balance may indicate seasonal nutrient preferences, such as increased carbohydrate intake in winter for thermogenesis, and increased protein and lipid intake in early summer to support reproduction and lactation; however, these differences may also indicate differences in resource availability. Habitat conserved for red panda in the region should include sufficient Arundinaria spp. as well as lesser consumed plants which may serve as complimentary foods.

  19. Diet and nutrient balance of red panda in Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panthi, Saroj; Coogan, Sean C. P.; Aryal, Achyut; Raubenheimer, David

    2015-10-01

    We identified the winter plant species consumed by red panda in the Dhorpatan Hunting Reserve of eastern Nepal and compared this to the early-summer diet which was determined previously by Panthi et al. (2012). In addition, we estimated the proximate nutritional content of the leaves identified in red panda diet for both seasons, and we used nutritional geometry to explore macronutrient balance of leaves from the two different sampling periods. We identified six different plants in winter scats, which were the same as found in the previously determined early-summer diet. Arundinaria spp. bamboos were the main species found (82.1 % relative frequency), followed by Acer spp. (6.3 %), Betula utilis (4.6 %), Quercus semicarpifolia (3.7 %), Berberis spp. (1.3 %), and lichens (1.0 %), leaving 2.0 % unidentified. Geometric analysis suggested that the macronutrient balance of seasonal diets were similar in nutrient balance to the most frequently consumed Arundinaria spp. Differences in macronutrient balance may indicate seasonal nutrient preferences, such as increased carbohydrate intake in winter for thermogenesis, and increased protein and lipid intake in early summer to support reproduction and lactation; however, these differences may also indicate differences in resource availability. Habitat conserved for red panda in the region should include sufficient Arundinaria spp. as well as lesser consumed plants which may serve as complimentary foods.

  20. Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infection in giant pandas, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Desheng; Zhu, Ling; Cui, Hengmin; Ling, Shanshan; Fan, Shengtao; Yu, Zhijun; Zhou, Yuancheng; Wang, Tiecheng; Qian, Jun; Xia, Xianzhu; Xu, Zhiwen; Gao, Yuwei; Wang, Chengdong

    2014-03-01

    We confirmed infection with influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in giant pandas in China during 2009 by using virus isolation and serologic analysis methods. This finding extends the host range of influenza viruses and indicates a need for increased surveillance for and control of influenza viruses among giant pandas.

  1. Panda-Huggers and Dragon-Slayers: How to View Modern China Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gifford, Rob

    2010-01-01

    Panda-hugger and dragon-slayer are phrases used to describe two different kinds of China-watchers, and increasingly, two different types of people in the general public. A panda-hugger is someone who says that almost everything going on in China is good, that China's progress is a great thing for the world, and that any problems are peripheral. A…

  2. Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Virus Infection in Giant Pandas, China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Desheng; Zhu, Ling; Cui, Hengmin; Ling, Shanshan; Fan, Shengtao; Yu, Zhijun; Zhou, Yuancheng; Wang, Tiecheng; Qian, Jun; Xia, Xianzhu; Xu, Zhiwen; Wang, Chengdong

    2014-01-01

    We confirmed infection with influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in giant pandas in China during 2009 by using virus isolation and serologic analysis methods. This finding extends the host range of influenza viruses and indicates a need for increased surveillance for and control of influenza viruses among giant pandas. PMID:24565026

  3. The evolution of the gut microbiota in the giant and the red pandas

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Guo, Wei; Han, Shushu; Kong, Fanli; Wang, Chengdong; Li, Desheng; Zhang, Heming; Yang, Mingyao; Xu, Huailiang; Zeng, Bo; Zhao, Jiangchao

    2015-01-01

    The independent dietary shift from carnivore to herbivore with over 90% being bamboo in the giant and the red pandas is of great interests to biologists. Although previous studies have shown convergent evolution of the giant and the red pandas at both morphological and molecular level, the evolution of the gut microbiota in these pandas remains largely unknown. The goal of this study was to determine whether the gut microbiota of the pandas converged due to the same diet, or diverged. We characterized the fecal microbiota from these two species by pyrosequencing the 16S V1–V3 hypervariable regions using the 454 GS FLX Titanium platform. We also included fecal samples from Asian black bears, a species phylogenetically closer to the giant panda, in our analyses. By analyzing the microbiota from these 3 species and those from other carnivores reported previously, we found the gut microbiotas of the giant pandas are distinct from those of the red pandas and clustered closer to those of the black bears. Our data suggests the divergent evolution of the gut microbiota in the pandas. PMID:25985413

  4. Panda-Huggers and Dragon-Slayers: How to View Modern China Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gifford, Rob

    2010-01-01

    Panda-hugger and dragon-slayer are phrases used to describe two different kinds of China-watchers, and increasingly, two different types of people in the general public. A panda-hugger is someone who says that almost everything going on in China is good, that China's progress is a great thing for the world, and that any problems are peripheral. A…

  5. Long Non-coding RNA, PANDA, Contributes to the Stabilization of p53 Tumor Suppressor Protein.

    PubMed

    Kotake, Yojiro; Kitagawa, Kyoko; Ohhata, Tatsuya; Sakai, Satoshi; Uchida, Chiharu; Niida, Hiroyuki; Naemura, Madoka; Kitagawa, Masatoshi

    2016-04-01

    P21-associated noncoding RNA DNA damage-activated (PANDA) is induced in response to DNA damage and represses apoptosis by inhibiting the function of nuclear transcription factor Y subunit alpha (NF-YA) transcription factor. Herein, we report that PANDA affects regulation of p53 tumor-suppressor protein. U2OS cells were transfected with PANDA siRNAs. At 72 h post-transfection, cells were subjected to immunoblotting and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Depletion of PANDA was associated with decreased levels of p53 protein, but not p53 mRNA. The stability of p53 protein was markedly reduced by PANDA silencing. Degradation of p53 protein by silencing PANDA was prevented by treatment of MG132, a proteasome inhibitor. Moreover, depletion of PANDA prevented accumulation of p53 protein, as a result of DNA damage, induced by the genotoxic agent etoposide. These results suggest that PANDA stabilizes p53 protein in response to DNA damage, and provide new insight into the regulatory mechanisms of p53. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  6. Changes of foraging patch selection and utilization by a giant panda after bamboo flowering.

    PubMed

    Li, Guochun; Song, Huadong; Altigani, Latifa A A; Zheng, Xueli; Bu, Shuhai

    2017-07-01

    The bamboo flowering leads to the habitat fragmentation and food quality decline of a giant panda. Few empirical research has been conducted about the giant panda's response to the bamboo flowering. Here, we investigated the characteristics of bamboo stands, giant panda's activity, and selection and utilization of bamboo stands by giant panda in Taibaishan National Nature Reserve, China, over a 3-year period (September 2013-May 2016) during the Fargesia qinlingensis flowering period. Our results indicated that the proportion of whole bamboo stands flowering has gradually expanded from 26.7% in 2013 and 33.9% in 2014 to 52.3% in 2015. Although the flowering bamboo has lower crude protein and higher crude fiber than a non-flowering bamboo, the giant panda still fed on flowering bamboo from the evidence of droppings. The giant panda left its feeding sites and moved to the high elevation along river when the proportion of flowering reached 69.2% at elevation of 2350-2450 m in the third year. With the decline of the quality of bamboo stand of Fargesia qinlingensis, the giant panda abandoned its feeding sites when the threshold value of bamboo flowering reached 56.9-69.2%. Flexibility in foraging strategy and spatial behavior can help the giant panda to better adapt to the environment.

  7. The evolution of the gut microbiota in the giant and the red pandas.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Guo, Wei; Han, Shushu; Kong, Fanli; Wang, Chengdong; Li, Desheng; Zhang, Heming; Yang, Mingyao; Xu, Huailiang; Zeng, Bo; Zhao, Jiangchao

    2015-05-18

    The independent dietary shift from carnivore to herbivore with over 90% being bamboo in the giant and the red pandas is of great interests to biologists. Although previous studies have shown convergent evolution of the giant and the red pandas at both morphological and molecular level, the evolution of the gut microbiota in these pandas remains largely unknown. The goal of this study was to determine whether the gut microbiota of the pandas converged due to the same diet, or diverged. We characterized the fecal microbiota from these two species by pyrosequencing the 16S V1-V3 hypervariable regions using the 454 GS FLX Titanium platform. We also included fecal samples from Asian black bears, a species phylogenetically closer to the giant panda, in our analyses. By analyzing the microbiota from these 3 species and those from other carnivores reported previously, we found the gut microbiotas of the giant pandas are distinct from those of the red pandas and clustered closer to those of the black bears. Our data suggests the divergent evolution of the gut microbiota in the pandas.

  8. Habitat Correlates of the Red Panda in the Temperate Forests of Bhutan

    PubMed Central

    Dorji, Sangay; Vernes, Karl; Rajaratnam, Rajanathan

    2011-01-01

    Anthropogenic activities and associated global climate change are threatening the biodiversity in the Himalayas against a backdrop of poor knowledge of the region's threatened species. The red panda (Ailurus fulgens) is a threatened mammal confined to the eastern Himalayas, and because of Bhutan's central location in the distributional range of red pandas, its forests are integral to the long-term viability of wild populations. Detailed habitat requirements of the red panda are largely speculative, and there is virtually no ecological information available on this species in Bhutan. Between 2007 and 2009, we established 615 presence/absence plots in a systematic sampling of resident habitat types within Jigme Dorji and Thrumshingla National Parks, Bhutan, to investigate broad and fine-scale red panda habitat associations. Additional locality records of red pandas were obtained from interviewing 664 park residents. Red pandas were generally confined to cool broadleaf and conifer forests from 2,110–4,389 m above sea level (asl), with the majority of records between 2,400–3,700 m asl on south and east-facing slopes. At a finer scale, multivariate analysis revealed that red pandas were strongly associated with old growth Bhutan Fir (Abies densa) forest dominated by a dense cover of Yushania and Arundanaria bamboo with a high density of fallen logs and tree stumps at ground level; a high density of trees, dead snags, and rhododendron shrubs in the mid-storey; and locations that were close to water. Because Bhutan's temperate forests that encompass prime red panda habitat are also integral to human subsistence and socio-economic development, there exists an inadvertent conflict between the needs of people and red pandas. As such, careful sustainable management of Bhutan's temperate forests is necessary if a balance is to be met between the socioeconomic needs of people and the conservation goals for red pandas. PMID:22039497

  9. Habitat correlates of the red panda in the temperate forests of Bhutan.

    PubMed

    Dorji, Sangay; Vernes, Karl; Rajaratnam, Rajanathan

    2011-01-01

    Anthropogenic activities and associated global climate change are threatening the biodiversity in the Himalayas against a backdrop of poor knowledge of the region's threatened species. The red panda (Ailurus fulgens) is a threatened mammal confined to the eastern Himalayas, and because of Bhutan's central location in the distributional range of red pandas, its forests are integral to the long-term viability of wild populations. Detailed habitat requirements of the red panda are largely speculative, and there is virtually no ecological information available on this species in Bhutan. Between 2007 and 2009, we established 615 presence/absence plots in a systematic sampling of resident habitat types within Jigme Dorji and Thrumshingla National Parks, Bhutan, to investigate broad and fine-scale red panda habitat associations. Additional locality records of red pandas were obtained from interviewing 664 park residents. Red pandas were generally confined to cool broadleaf and conifer forests from 2,110-4,389 m above sea level (asl), with the majority of records between 2,400-3,700 m asl on south and east-facing slopes. At a finer scale, multivariate analysis revealed that red pandas were strongly associated with old growth Bhutan Fir (Abies densa) forest dominated by a dense cover of Yushania and Arundanaria bamboo with a high density of fallen logs and tree stumps at ground level; a high density of trees, dead snags, and rhododendron shrubs in the mid-storey; and locations that were close to water. Because Bhutan's temperate forests that encompass prime red panda habitat are also integral to human subsistence and socio-economic development, there exists an inadvertent conflict between the needs of people and red pandas. As such, careful sustainable management of Bhutan's temperate forests is necessary if a balance is to be met between the socioeconomic needs of people and the conservation goals for red pandas.

  10. Paraspecific neutralization of the venom of African species of cobra by an equine antiserum against Naja melanoleuca: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Casasola, Andrea; Ramos-Cerrillo, Blanca; de Roodt, Adolfo R; Carbajal Saucedo, Alejandro; Chippaux, Jean-Philippe; Alagón, Alejandro; Stock, Roberto P

    2009-05-01

    Venoms of snakes belonging to the same Genera tend to share biochemical, toxinological and antigenic characteristics. Accordingly, paraspecific neutralization of venom lethality by experimental antisera and commercial antivenoms has been reported. We studied the spectrum of neutralization of lethality of an experimental monovalent equine antiserum against the strongly neurotoxic African forest cobra (Naja melanoleuca) when tested against venoms of most species of African Naja, both neuro and cytotoxic as described by some authors. We report a comparison of the median lethal doses (LD50) of the venoms and the paraspecific median effective doses (ED50) of the antiserum calculated using three methods: Spearman-Kärber and Probit (currently recommended by the World Health Organization), and non-linear regression. An ample--but not complete--spectrum of paraspecific neutralization of lethality was observed against both spitting and non-spitting species of African Naja with a clearly more efficient neutralization of the more potent venoms, the implications of which are discussed. The median lethal and effective doses calculated by the three methods are remarkably consistent and may warrant consideration of non-linear regression methods for the calculation of venom lethality and antivenom potency by venom/antivenom researchers and producers.

  11. The minimum area requirements (MAR) for giant panda: an empirical study.

    PubMed

    Qing, Jing; Yang, Zhisong; He, Ke; Zhang, Zejun; Gu, Xiaodong; Yang, Xuyu; Zhang, Wen; Yang, Biao; Qi, Dunwu; Dai, Qiang

    2016-12-08

    Habitat fragmentation can reduce population viability, especially for area-sensitive species. The Minimum Area Requirements (MAR) of a population is the area required for the population's long-term persistence. In this study, the response of occupancy probability of giant pandas against habitat patch size was studied in five of the six mountain ranges inhabited by giant panda, which cover over 78% of the global distribution of giant panda habitat. The probability of giant panda occurrence was positively associated with habitat patch area, and the observed increase in occupancy probability with patch size was higher than that due to passive sampling alone. These results suggest that the giant panda is an area-sensitive species. The MAR for giant panda was estimated to be 114.7 km(2) based on analysis of its occupancy probability. Giant panda habitats appear more fragmented in the three southern mountain ranges, while they are large and more continuous in the other two. Establishing corridors among habitat patches can mitigate habitat fragmentation, but expanding habitat patch sizes is necessary in mountain ranges where fragmentation is most intensive.

  12. PANDA: pathway and annotation explorer for visualizing and interpreting gene-centric data.

    PubMed

    Hart, Steven N; Moore, Raymond M; Zimmermann, Michael T; Oliver, Gavin R; Egan, Jan B; Bryce, Alan H; Kocher, Jean-Pierre A

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Bringing together genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and other -omics technologies is an important step towards developing highly personalized medicine. However, instrumentation has advances far beyond expectations and now we are able to generate data faster than it can be interpreted. Materials and Methods. We have developed PANDA (Pathway AND Annotation) Explorer, a visualization tool that integrates gene-level annotation in the context of biological pathways to help interpret complex data from disparate sources. PANDA is a web-based application that displays data in the context of well-studied pathways like KEGG, BioCarta, and PharmGKB. PANDA represents data/annotations as icons in the graph while maintaining the other data elements (i.e., other columns for the table of annotations). Custom pathways from underrepresented diseases can be imported when existing data sources are inadequate. PANDA also allows sharing annotations among collaborators. Results. In our first use case, we show how easy it is to view supplemental data from a manuscript in the context of a user's own data. Another use-case is provided describing how PANDA was leveraged to design a treatment strategy from the somatic variants found in the tumor of a patient with metastatic sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma. Conclusion. PANDA facilitates the interpretation of gene-centric annotations by visually integrating this information with context of biological pathways. The application can be downloaded or used directly from our website: http://bioinformaticstools.mayo.edu/research/panda-viewer/.

  13. Long noncoding RNA PANDA and scaffold-attachment-factor SAFA control senescence entry and exit.

    PubMed

    Puvvula, Pavan Kumar; Desetty, Rohini Devi; Pineau, Pascal; Marchio, Agnés; Moon, Anne; Dejean, Anne; Bischof, Oliver

    2014-11-19

    Cellular senescence is a stable cell cycle arrest that limits the proliferation of pre-cancerous cells. Here we demonstrate that scaffold-attachment-factor A (SAFA) and the long noncoding RNA PANDA differentially interact with polycomb repressive complexes (PRC1 and PRC2) and the transcription factor NF-YA to either promote or suppress senescence. In proliferating cells, SAFA and PANDA recruit PRC complexes to repress the transcription of senescence-promoting genes. Conversely, the loss of SAFA-PANDA-PRC interactions allows expression of the senescence programme. Accordingly, we find that depleting either SAFA or PANDA in proliferating cells induces senescence. However, in senescent cells where PANDA sequesters transcription factor NF-YA and limits the expression of NF-YA-E2F-coregulated proliferation-promoting genes, PANDA depletion leads to an exit from senescence. Together, our results demonstrate that PANDA confines cells to their existing proliferative state and that modulating its level of expression can cause entry or exit from senescence.

  14. The minimum area requirements (MAR) for giant panda: an empirical study

    PubMed Central

    Qing, Jing; Yang, Zhisong; He, Ke; Zhang, Zejun; Gu, Xiaodong; Yang, Xuyu; Zhang, Wen; Yang, Biao; Qi, Dunwu; Dai, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation can reduce population viability, especially for area-sensitive species. The Minimum Area Requirements (MAR) of a population is the area required for the population’s long-term persistence. In this study, the response of occupancy probability of giant pandas against habitat patch size was studied in five of the six mountain ranges inhabited by giant panda, which cover over 78% of the global distribution of giant panda habitat. The probability of giant panda occurrence was positively associated with habitat patch area, and the observed increase in occupancy probability with patch size was higher than that due to passive sampling alone. These results suggest that the giant panda is an area-sensitive species. The MAR for giant panda was estimated to be 114.7 km2 based on analysis of its occupancy probability. Giant panda habitats appear more fragmented in the three southern mountain ranges, while they are large and more continuous in the other two. Establishing corridors among habitat patches can mitigate habitat fragmentation, but expanding habitat patch sizes is necessary in mountain ranges where fragmentation is most intensive. PMID:27929520

  15. Comparing the plant diversity between artificial forest and nature growth forest in a giant panda habitat.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dongwei; Wang, Xiaorong; Li, Shuang; Li, Junqing

    2017-06-15

    Artificial restoration is an important way to restore forests, but little is known about its effect on the habitat restoration of the giant panda. In the present study, we investigated the characteristics of artificial forest in the Wanglang Nature Reserve to determine whether through succession it has formed a suitable habitat for the giant panda. We compared artificial forest characteristics with those of natural habitat used by the giant panda. We found that the dominant tree species in artificial forest differed from those in the natural habitat. The artificial forest had lower plant species richness and diversity in the tree and shrub layers than did the latter, and its community structure was characterized by smaller tree and bamboo sizes, and fewer and lower bamboo clumps, but more trees and larger shrub sizes. The typical community collocation of artificial forest was a "Picea asperata + no-bamboo" model, which differs starkly from the giant panda's natural habitat. After several years of restoration, the artificial forest has failed to become a suitable habitat for the giant panda. Therefore, a simple way of planting individual trees cannot restore giant panda habitat; instead, habitat restoration should be based on the habitat requirements of the giant panda.

  16. Fibroblast cell line establishment, cryopreservation and interspecies embryos reconstruction in red panda ( Ailurus fulgens).

    PubMed

    Tao, Yong; Liu, Jianming; Zhang, Yunhai; Zhang, Meiling; Fang, Junshun; Han, Wei; Zhang, Zhizhong; Liu, Ya; Ding, Jianping; Zhang, Xiaorong

    2009-05-01

    In evolution, the red panda (Ailurus fulgens) plays a pivotal role in the higher level phylogeny of arctoides carnivore mammals. The red panda inhabits certain Asian countries only and its numbers are decreasing. Therefore, the development of feasible ways to preserve this species is necessary. Genetic resource cryopreservation and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) have been used extensively to rescue this endangered species. The present study describes the establishment, for the first time, of a red panda ear fibroblast cell line, which was then cryopreserved, thawed and cultured. Through micromanipulation, interspecies embryos were reconstructed using the cryopreserved-thawed fibroblasts of the red panda as the donor and rabbit oocytes as recipients. A total of 194 enucleated rabbit oocytes were reconstructed with red panda ear fibroblasts; enucleated oocytes were activated without fusion as the control. The results show that the fibroblast cell line was established successfully by tissue culture and then cryopreserved in liquid nitrogen. Supplementation with 20% fetal bovine serum and 8% dimethyl sulphoxide in basic medium facilitated the cryopreservation. The interspecies embryos were successfully reconstructed. The cleavage, morulae and blastocyst rates after in vitro culture were 71, 47 and 23% (31/194), respectively. This study indicated that a somatic cell line could be established and cryopreserved from red panda and that rabbit cytoplast supports mitotic cleavage of the red panda karyoplasts and is capable of reprogramming the nucleus to achieve blastocysts.

  17. The Electromagnetic Calorimeter of the future PANDA Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Novotny, Rainer

    2006-10-27

    Experiments with a cooled antiproton beam at the future accelerator facility FAIR at GSI, Darmstadt, will be performed with the 4{pi} detector PANDA comprising a high resolution, compact and fast homogeneous electromagnetic calorimeter to detect photons between 10MeV and 10GeV energy inside a superconducting solenoid (2T). The target calorimeter comprises more than 20,000 PbWO4 crystals of significantly enhanced quality read-out with large area avalanche photodiodes at an operating temperature of -25 degree sign C. The paper describes the quality of PWO-II and illustrates the future performance based on response measurements with high-energy photons.

  18. Polycystic kidneys in the red panda (Ailurus fulgens).

    PubMed

    Makungu, Modesta; du Plessis, Wencke M; Barrows, Michelle; Koeppel, Katja N; Groenewald, Hermanus B

    2013-09-01

    An intact adult male 14.3-yr-old red panda (Ailurus fulgens) presented for health examination with a history of slowly progressing loss of body condition. Abdominal radiographs revealed a truncated abdomen with poor serosal abdominal detail and multiple areas of spondylosis with some collapsed intervertebral disc spaces. On computed tomography, multiple ovoid hypoattenuating lesions were seen in the left and right kidneys. Gross pathology and histopathology revealed multiple cystic lesions in the kidneys concurrent with pancreatic cysts on histopathology. To the best of the authors' knowledge, polycystic kidneys have not been reported in this species.

  19. Chromobacteriosis in a Chinese red panda (Ailurus fulgens styani).

    PubMed

    Dyer, N W; Krogh, D F; DeVold, R; Wilson, S L; White, D G

    2000-03-01

    An adult Chinese red panda (Ailurus fulgens styani) transported by airplane from Florida to a North Dakota zoo died 1 week after arrival. Grossly, an interscapular abscess, subcutaneous inflammation, lymphadenitis, and pulmonary abscesses were observed. Microscopic findings included necrotizing inflammation in liver, lung, lymph node, and spleen. Chromobacterium violaceum was cultured from the interscapular abscess, liver, lung, and spleen and was injected into Swiss Webster mice. These mice died 18 hours postinoculation, and C. violaceum was cultured from liver, lung, and spleen. Chromobacterium violaceum is a sporadically reported but highly virulent pathogenic bacterium of both animals and humans typically found as a soil and water inhabitant of tropical and subtropical regions.

  20. PD2P: PanDA Dynamic Data Placement for ATLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Maeno, T.; De, K.; Panitkin, S.

    2012-12-13

    The PanDA (Production and Distributed Analysis) system plays a key role in the ATLAS distributed computing infrastructure. PanDA is the ATLAS workload management system for processing all Monte-Carlo (MC) simulation and data reprocessing jobs in addition to user and group analysis jobs. The PanDA Dynamic Data Placement (PD2P) system has been developed to cope with difficulties of data placement for ATLAS. We will describe the design of the new system, its performance during the past year of data taking, dramatic improvements it has brought about in the efficient use of storage and processing resources, and plans for the future.

  1. PD2P: PanDA Dynamic Data Placement for ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeno, T.; De, K.; Panitkin, S.

    2012-12-01

    The PanDA (Production and Distributed Analysis) system plays a key role in the ATLAS distributed computing infrastructure. PanDA is the ATLAS workload management system for processing all Monte-Carlo (MC) simulation and data reprocessing jobs in addition to user and group analysis jobs. The PanDA Dynamic Data Placement (PD2P) system has been developed to cope with difficulties of data placement for ATLAS. We will describe the design of the new system, its performance during the past year of data taking, dramatic improvements it has brought about in the efficient use of storage and processing resources, and plans for the future.

  2. An ARMS-based technique for sex determination of red panda (Ailurus fulgens).

    PubMed

    Li, Yuzhi; Xu, Xiao; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Zhihe; Shen, Fujun; Zhang, Wenping; Yue, Bisong

    2011-03-01

    Molecular sexing is a key component in the investigation of wild populations. In this study, we developed a fast, accurate and reliable amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) technique for sex determination of red panda based on the exon 4 of the ZFX/ZFY gene. The amplicons were distinguished simply by agarose gel electrophoresis, exhibiting one fragment in females (X: 300 bp) and two in males (X: 300 bp, Y: 166 bp). Robustness of this ARMS system was confirmed by testing both 43 captive red pandas using DNA samples with known-sex and 10 wild red pandas using faecal DNA samples with unknown sex.

  3. ComPWA: A common amplitude analysis framework for PANDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, M.; Feldbauer, F.; Götzen, K.; Jasinski, P.; Karavdina, A.; Peters, K.; Fritsch, M.

    2014-06-01

    A large part of the physics program of the PANDA experiment at FAIR deals with the search for new conventional and exotic hadronic states like e.g. hybrids and glueballs. For many analyses PANDA will need an amplitude analysis, e.g. a partial wave analysis (PWA), to identify possible candidates and for the classification of known states. Therefore, a new, agile and efficient amplitude analysis framework ComPWA is under development. It is modularized to provide easy extension with models and formalisms as well as fitting of multiple datasets, even from different experiments. Experience from existing PWA programs was used to fix the requirements of the framework and to prevent it from restrictions. It will provide the standard estimation and optimization routines like Minuit2 and the Geneva library and be open to insert additional ones. The challenges involve parallelization, fitting with a high number of free parameters, managing complex meta-fits and quality assurance / comparability of fits. To test and develop the software, it will be used with data from running experiments like BaBar or BESIII. These proceedings show the status of the framework implementation as well as first test results.

  4. Modeling air quality over China: Results from the Panda project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katinka Petersen, Anna; Bouarar, Idir; Brasseur, Guy; Granier, Claire; Xie, Ying; Wang, Lili; Wang, Xuemei

    2015-04-01

    China faces strong air pollution problems related to rapid economic development in the past decade and increasing demand for energy. Air quality monitoring stations often report high levels of particle matter and ozone all over the country. Knowing its long-term health impacts, air pollution became then a pressing problem not only in China but also in other Asian countries. The PANDA project is a result of cooperation between scientists from Europe and China who joined their efforts for a better understanding of the processes controlling air pollution in China, improve methods for monitoring air quality and elaborate indicators in support of European and Chinese policies. A modeling system of air pollution is being setup within the PANDA project and include advanced global (MACC, EMEP) and regional (WRF-Chem, EMEP) meteorological and chemical models to analyze and monitor air quality in China. The poster describes the accomplishments obtained within the first year of the project. Model simulations for January and July 2010 are evaluated with satellite measurements (SCIAMACHY NO2 and MOPITT CO) and in-situ data (O3, CO, NOx, PM10 and PM2.5) observed at several surface stations in China. Using the WRF-Chem model, we investigate the sensitivity of the model performance to emissions (MACCity, HTAPv2), horizontal resolution (60km, 20km) and choice of initial and boundary conditions.

  5. Physics with charmonium - Highlights of BESIII and PANDA

    SciTech Connect

    Messchendorp, Johan

    2014-11-11

    The physics of the strong interaction is undoubtedly one of the most challenging areas of modern science. Quantum ChromoDynamics (QCD) is reproducing successfully the physics phenomena at distances much shorter than the size of the nucleon, where perturbation theory can be used yielding results of high precision and predictive power. At larger distance scales, however, perturbative methods cannot be applied anymore, although spectacular phenomena, such as the generation of hadron masses and quark confinement, occur. Studies using charmed quarks and gluon-rich matter have the potential to connect the perturbative and the non-perturbative QCD region. The annihilation of matter with antimatter in the mass regime of charmonium is an ideal environment to discover new states or transitions that could reveal the secrets of the strong interaction. Hadronic and electromagnetic transitions between charmonium states and their decays have been measured with a world-record in precision with the BESIII spectrometer at the electron-positron collider at IHEP Beijing, China. Moreover, unconventional narrow charmonium-rich states have been discovered recently in an energy regime above the open-charm threshold, thereby, possibly initiating a new era in charmonium spectroscopy. The near future experiment, PANDA, at the research facility FAIR in Germany, Darmstadt, will exploit the annihilation of cooled anti-protons with protons to perform charmonium spectroscopy with an incredible precision. I will present the most promising results that have been recently obtained with BESIII together with the future perspectives of PANDA in the field of charmonium spectroscopy.

  6. Triplet based online track finding in the PANDA-STT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, M. C.; Panda Collaboration

    2014-04-01

    The PANDA-Experiment at the future FAIR facility in Darmstadt will study antiproton-proton collisions in a fixed-target setup with a phase-space cooled antiproton beam with a momentum from 1.5 to 15 GeV/c at a nominal interaction rate of 2 · 107 s-1. The data acquisition of the detectors has to run in a triggerless mode and the physics events of interest are identified by an online event filter. Tracking information is a key input for the event filter to distinguish signal events from background. A variety of tracking algorithms is foreseen to process the different track topologies. The so-called Triplet Finder, which is presented here, is a track finding algorithm based on the central straw tube tracker (STT) of PANDA. The algorithm focuses on mathematical simplicity and robustness to allow an online processing of the incoming detector hits. The algorithm and results of a proof-of-concept implementation are presented.

  7. Performance of prototypes for the PANDA barrel EMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremer, D. A.; Eissner, T.; Drexler, P.; Moritz, M.; Novotny, R. W.; PANDA Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    The PANDA experiment will be part of the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) and aims for the study of strong interaction within the charm sector via antiproton proton collisions up to antiproton momenta of 15 GeV/c. Reflecting the variety of the physics program the PANDA detector is designed as a multi-purpose detector able to perform tracking, calorimetry and particle identification with nearly complete coverage of the solid angle. The Electromagnetic Calorimeter (EMC) contained inside its Target Spectrometer is based on cooled PbWO4 scintillator crystals. In order to ensure an excellent performance throughout the large dynamic range of photon/electron energies ranging from a few MeV up to 15 GeV an extensive prototyping phase is mandatory. This contribution describes the measured response of the EMC barrel part prototype PROTO60 at the largest design energy to secondary beams provided by the SPS at CERN. In addition to PROTO60 a tracking station was deployed, providing precise position information of the 15 GeV/c positrons. For calibration purposes a 150 GeV/c muon beam and cosmic radiation, in combination with estimations from GEANT4 simulations were used. The obtained performance concerning energy, position and time information is presented.

  8. The backward end-cap for the PANDA electromagnetic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozza, L.; Maas, F. E.; Noll, O.; Rodriguez Pineiro, D.; Valente, R.

    2015-02-01

    The PANDA experiment at the new FAIR facility will cover a broad experimental programme in hadron structure and spectroscopy. As a multipurpose detector, the PANDA spectrometer needs to ensure almost 4π coverage of the scattering solid angle, full and accurate multiple-particle event reconstruction and very good particle identification capabilities. The electromagnetic calorimeter (EMC) will be a key item for many of these aspects. Particle energies ranging from some MeVs to several GeVs have to be measured with a relative resolution of 1% ⊕ 2%/√E/GeV . It will be a homogeneous calorimeter made of PbWO4 crystals and will be operated at -25°C, in order to improve the scintillation light yield. With the exception of the very forward section, the light will be detected by large area avalanche photodiodes (APDs). The current pulses from the APDs will be integrated, amplified and shaped by ASIC chips which were developed for this purpose. The whole calorimeter has been designed in three sections: a forward end-cap, a central barrel and a backward end-cap (BWEC). In this contribution, a status report on the development of the BWEC is presented.

  9. SciTil Detector for the PANDA experiment at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Ken; Gruber, Lukas; Brunner, Stefan; Marton, Johann; Orth, Herbert; Schwarz, Carsten; Scitil/Panda Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The PANDA experiment at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) is a fixed-target experiment installed in a antiproton storage ring (HESR) in the energy range of 1 GeV to 15 GeV. FAIR is being build on the area of the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt, Germany. The universal PANDA detector together with the HESR enables to study fundamental questions of hadron and nuclear physics, e.g. gluonic excitations, the physics of strange and charm quarks and nucleon structure. The SciTil detector is a barrel time-of-flight detector and is a relatively new subcomponent to the system. The demand arose in order to provide a securer event tagging at the event rates of 20-100 MHz instantaneous event rate, to improve a particle identification capability of relatively low momentum particles, and to allow a faster track finding with pattern recognition. The beam test of the SciTil prototype detector in January 2014 showed a promising result. We report the status and outlook of the project.

  10. Physics with charmonium - Highlights of BESIII and PANDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messchendorp, Johan

    2014-11-01

    The physics of the strong interaction is undoubtedly one of the most challenging areas of modern science. Quantum ChromoDynamics (QCD) is reproducing successfully the physics phenomena at distances much shorter than the size of the nucleon, where perturbation theory can be used yielding results of high precision and predictive power. At larger distance scales, however, perturbative methods cannot be applied anymore, although spectacular phenomena, such as the generation of hadron masses and quark confinement, occur. Studies using charmed quarks and gluon-rich matter have the potential to connect the perturbative and the non-perturbative QCD region. The annihilation of matter with antimatter in the mass regime of charmonium is an ideal environment to discover new states or transitions that could reveal the secrets of the strong interaction. Hadronic and electromagnetic transitions between charmonium states and their decays have been measured with a world-record in precision with the BESIII spectrometer at the electron-positron collider at IHEP Beijing, China. Moreover, unconventional narrow charmonium-rich states have been discovered recently in an energy regime above the open-charm threshold, thereby, possibly initiating a new era in charmonium spectroscopy. The near future experiment, PANDA, at the research facility FAIR in Germany, Darmstadt, will exploit the annihilation of cooled anti-protons with protons to perform charmonium spectroscopy with an incredible precision. I will present the most promising results that have been recently obtained with BESIII together with the future perspectives of PANDA in the field of charmonium spectroscopy.

  11. Microglial Dysregulation in OCD, Tourette Syndrome, and PANDAS

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that immune dysregulation contributes to the pathophysiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), Tourette syndrome, and Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal Infections (PANDAS). The mechanistic details of this pathophysiology, however, remain unclear. Here we focus on one particular component of the immune system: microglia, the brain's resident immune cells. The role of microglia in neurodegenerative diseases has been understood in terms of classic, inflammatory activation, which may be both a consequence and a cause of neuronal damage. In OCD and Tourette syndrome, which are not characterized by frank neural degeneration, the potential role of microglial dysregulation is much less clear. Here we review the evidence for a neuroinflammatory etiology and microglial dysregulation in OCD, Tourette syndrome, and PANDAS. We also explore new hypotheses as to the potential contributions of microglial abnormalities to pathophysiology, beyond neuroinflammation, including failures in neuroprotection, lack of support for neuronal survival, and abnormalities in synaptic pruning. Recent advances in neuroimaging and animal model work are creating new opportunities to elucidate these issues. PMID:28053994

  12. Post-infectious autoimmune disorders: Sydenham's chorea, PANDAS and beyond.

    PubMed

    Williams, Kyle A; Swedo, Susan E

    2015-08-18

    Infections, and the resulting immune response to these infections, have recently received increased recognition as pathogenic mechanisms for neuropsychiatric disorders. Sydenham's chorea (SC), a widely recognized post-streptococcal autoimmune disorder, represents a model for this proposed pathogenesis. In SC, a dysregulated immune response to a streptococcal infection is hypothesized to result in inflammation of neuronal networks, particularly the basal ganglia nuclei. The resulting dysfunction in the basal ganglia nuclei are hypothesized to lead to a constellation of adventitious movements and psychiatric symptoms, which investigations have shown are amenable to immunomodulatory therapies. PANDAS (Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorder Associated with Streptococcal infections) has been proposed as a variant of SC, and is hypothesized to share a pathogenic mechanism, despite a unique symptom profile of predominantly psychiatric symptoms. In this review, we present the clinical aspects of both disorders, the data for potential shared etiopathogenesis between them, and the evidence for the therapeutic use of immunomodulatory therapies for the symptoms of SC and PANDAS. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Neuroimmunology in Health And Disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Microglial Dysregulation in OCD, Tourette Syndrome, and PANDAS.

    PubMed

    Frick, Luciana; Pittenger, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that immune dysregulation contributes to the pathophysiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), Tourette syndrome, and Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal Infections (PANDAS). The mechanistic details of this pathophysiology, however, remain unclear. Here we focus on one particular component of the immune system: microglia, the brain's resident immune cells. The role of microglia in neurodegenerative diseases has been understood in terms of classic, inflammatory activation, which may be both a consequence and a cause of neuronal damage. In OCD and Tourette syndrome, which are not characterized by frank neural degeneration, the potential role of microglial dysregulation is much less clear. Here we review the evidence for a neuroinflammatory etiology and microglial dysregulation in OCD, Tourette syndrome, and PANDAS. We also explore new hypotheses as to the potential contributions of microglial abnormalities to pathophysiology, beyond neuroinflammation, including failures in neuroprotection, lack of support for neuronal survival, and abnormalities in synaptic pruning. Recent advances in neuroimaging and animal model work are creating new opportunities to elucidate these issues.

  14. Over Expression of Long Non-Coding RNA PANDA Promotes Hepatocellular Carcinoma by Inhibiting Senescence Associated Inflammatory Factor IL8.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chuanhui; Hu, Wendi; Weng, Xiaoyu; Tong, Rongliang; Cheng, Shaobing; Ding, Chaofeng; Xiao, Heng; Lv, Zhen; Xie, Haiyang; Zhou, Lin; Wu, Jian; Zheng, Shusen

    2017-06-23

    It has been reported that long non-coding RNA PANDA was disregulated in varieties types of tumor, but its expression level and biological role in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains contradictory. We detected PANDA expression in two independent cohorts (48 HCC patients following liver transplantation and 84 HCC patients following liver resection), and found that PANDA was down-regulated in HCC. Thereafter we explored its function in cancer biology by inversing its low expression. Surprisingly, overexpression of PANDA promoted HCC proliferation and carcinogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, PANDA repressed transcriptional activity of senescence associated inflammatory factor IL8, which leaded to inhibition of cellular senescence. Therefore, our research help to better understand the complex role of PANDA in HCC, and suggest more thoughtful strategies should be applied before it can be treated as a potential therapeutic target.

  15. Environmental review of the Panda-Brandywine cogeneration project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, G.; Keating, R.; Huggins, A.; Mountain, D.; Corio, L.

    1997-02-01

    The Maryland Public Service Commission (PSC) granted a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity (CPCN) to Panda-Brandywine, L.P., to construct and operate a 248-megawatt (electric) generating station near Brandywine, Prince George`s County, Maryland. This report describes PPRP`s evaluation of the environmental and socioeconomic impacts of the Panda-Brandywine facility, summarizes the results of that evaluation, and presents recommendations for license conditions which have been incorporated into Panda`s CPCN. The document includes description of the proposed facility, host facility, and associated linear facilities (transmission line, pipelines); discussion of existing environmental and socioeconomic conditions at the site and in the vicinity; analysis of the potential air quality, surface water, biological, ground water, socioeconomic, cultural, and noise impacts from the proposed facility; and discussion of critical engineering issues associated with operation of the facility, including water supply, water discharge, and fuel handling.

  16. Acceptance Studies of an Additional Lambda Disk Detector for the PANDA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ajay; Roy, Ankhi; PANDA Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The PANDA detector, which studies proton antiproton annihilations, will be installed at the future facility for antiproton and ion research in Darmstadt, Germany. PANDA has a wide physics program including the study of excited hyperon states. One very specific feature of most hyperon ground states are long decay lengths of several centimeters. The innermost tracking detector of PANDA, the Micro Vertex Detector, is not optimized for these long decay lengths. Therefore, an upgrade option is proposed adding two additional disks in the forward region called Lambda Disk Detector. For this new detector acceptance studies have been performed using the decay channel p ‾ p → Λ ‾ Λ → p ‾ pπ+π-. Simulations were carried out using the PandaRoot framework based on FairRoot.

  17. How do two giant panda populations adapt to their habitats in the Qinling and Qionglai Mountains, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuehua; Wang, Tiejun; Wang, Ting; Skidmore, Andrew K; Songer, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    The spatial separation of the Qinling Mountains from the western mountains has caused morphological and genetic distinctions of giant pandas. Could this separation also cause the pandas' behavior change? In this research, we focused on the pandas' movement pattern and selected two wild panda groups in Foping and Wolong Nature Reserves (NR) to represent the populations in the Qinling and Qionglai Mountains, respectively. We hypothesized that the Qinling pandas have developed a different seasonal movement pattern compared with the pandas in the western mountains. We analyzed the radio tracking data from two NRs by using GIS. Our results showed the following significant differences: (1) The Foping pandas live most of the year in the low elevation areas and move higher during June and remain through August while the Wolong pandas live most of the year in the high elevation areas and move lower in April and stay through June; (2) Comparing their low and high elevational areas shows the distinct spatial patterns between reserves, forming two obviously separated clusters in Foping but a single-compact cluster in Wolong; (3) Foping pandas move an average of 425 m ± 147 s.d. daily, while Wolong pandas move an average of 550 m ± 343 s.d. daily; and (4) Three habitat factors (i.e., terrain, temperature, and bamboo nutrient) were taken as the driving forces and analyzed, and they showed a strong support explanation to these different movement behaviors of pandas in two NRs. Our findings have important implications for management, for instance, it needs to be careful considering the behavior difference of the pandas when reintroducing them to the wild.

  18. Antihyperon-Hyperon production in antiproton-proton annihilations with PANDA at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papenbrock, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Hyperon production is an excellent probe of QCD in the confinement domain, and spin observables are a powerful tool in understanding the underlying physics. For the Ω hyperon, seven polarisation parameters can be extracted from the angular distributions of its decay products with the future PANDA experiment at FAIR. Simulation studies reveal great prospects for strange and single charmed hyperon channels with PANDA. Software tools supporting these investigations are currently under development.

  19. PAN-DA and beyond: Data acquisition for the next generation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pordes, R.; Anderson, J.; Berg, D.; Berman, E.; Brown, D.; Dorries, T.; Mackinnon, B.; Meadows, J.; Moore, C.; Nicinski, T.; Oleynik, G.; Petravick, D.; Rechenmacher, R.; Sergey, G.; Slimmer, D.; Streets, J.; Vittone, M.; Votava, M.; Wilcer, N.; White, V.

    1991-06-01

    We report on the status of the PAN-DA data acquisition system presented at the last Real Time Conference. Since that time, PAN-DA has been successfully used in the fixed target program at Fermilab. We also report on the plans and strategies for development of a new data acquisition system for the next generation of fixed target experiments at Fermilab. 10 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Serosurvey of infectious disease agents of carnivores in captive red pandas (Ailurus fulgens) in China.

    PubMed

    Qin, Qin; Wei, Fuwen; Li, Ming; Dubovi, Edward J; Loeffler, I Kati

    2007-03-01

    The future of the endangered red panda (Ailurusfulgens) depends in part on the development of protective measures against infectious diseases. The present study is a first step toward improved understanding of infectious diseases in the species' home regions. Serum samples obtained from 73 red pandas in 10 captive facilities in southwest, east, and northeast China from October to December 2004 were tested for antibodies against nine common infectious pathogens of carnivores. Antibody titers against canine distemper virus (CDV), canine parvovirus (CPV), and canine adenovirus (CAV) in the three facilities in which red pandas were vaccinated were highly variable. The CAV titer in one vaccinated red panda was high enough to suggest infection with the field virus following vaccination. Together with anecdotal reports of vaccine-associated morbidity and mortality, our results suggest that the Chinese vaccine is not suitable for this species. In the seven unvaccinated groups, CDV titers were low and occurred in 20-100% of the animals; antibody titers against CPV were found in seven of eight areas. Only one of 61 and two of 61 unvaccinated red pandas had CAV and canine coronavirus titers, respectively, and these titers were all low. Positive titers to Toxoplasma gondii were found in four locations (33-94% seropositive); the titers in 52% of seropositive individuals were of a magnitude consistent with active disease in other species (1:1,024 to > or = 1:4,096). One red panda in each of three locations was seropositive for Neospora caninum. Antibodies against canine herpesvirus and Brucella canis were not detected in any of the samples. Only one of the 73 red pandas had a weak positive influenza A titer. The results of this study emphasize the need for research on and protection against infectious diseases of red pandas and other endangered species in China.

  1. Red pandas (Mammalia, Carnivora: Parailurus) in the biomes of North Eurasia and North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matishov, G. G.; Kalmykov, N. P.

    2011-05-01

    The discovery of the Pliocene red panda ( Parailurus) in the West Transbaikal area, as well as Asian raccoons in North Eurasia and North America, indicates that forested areas with bamboo bushes were wide-spread in the Holarctic during the Neogene. During the Late Pliocene, due to a gradual cooling of the climate, altiplanation, and other factors, their habitat started disintegrating, and red pandas began dying out, surviving only in China.

  2. [Evaluation of a Neuropsychiatric Disorder: From PANDAS to PANS and CANS].

    PubMed

    Baytunca, Muharrem Burak; Donuk, Tuğba; Erermiş, Serpil

    2016-01-01

    PANDAS (Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal infections) syndrome is a disorder seen before adolescence that possesses an abrupt onset of obsessive-compulsive disorder symptoms and/or tics. Swedo and colleagues defined this disorder in 1998 as a syndrome related to Group A streptoccoccus (GAS) infection with neurological issues, such as motor hyperactivation and choreiform movements. The progress of the disorder may be described as wax-and-waning, apart from abrupt onset, and this relapse and remission course is associated with exacerbating infections, according to the creators of PANDAS syndrome. Ruling out of Rheumatoid Fever and Sydenham's Chorea was a necessity for making a proper diagnosis. Since the recognition of this syndrome, clinicians encountered many children who could not fulfill all 5 criteria, which must be met for PANDAS diagnosis. In addition, due to literature showing failure and lack of strong evidence of a major role of GAS, the newly-defined categories PANS (Pediatric Acute-onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome) and CANS (Childhood Acute Neuropsychiatric Syndrome) were created to encompass those of "almost met" non-PANDAS cases. PANS and CANS include concurrent significant psychiatric symptoms with abrupt onset of OCD symptoms and/or tics but do not require identification of any infection agent, immune dysfunction, or enviromental precipitants. In this paper, we aimed to discuss PANS/ CANS, alterations of PANDAS, and diagnoses in which "almost met" PANDAS patients should be classified on the basis of a case who developed an abrupt onset of anxiety, obsessions, and vocal tics.

  3. ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY. Exceptionally low daily energy expenditure in the bamboo-eating giant panda.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yonggang; Speakman, John R; Wu, Qi; Zhang, Chenglin; Hu, Yibo; Xia, Maohua; Yan, Li; Hambly, Catherine; Wang, Lu; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Jinguo; Wei, Fuwen

    2015-07-10

    The carnivoran giant panda has a specialized bamboo diet, to which its alimentary tract is poorly adapted. Measurements of daily energy expenditure across five captive and three wild pandas averaged 5.2 megajoules (MJ)/day, only 37.7% of the predicted value (13.8 MJ/day). For the wild pandas, the mean was 6.2 MJ/day, or 45% of the mammalian expectation. Pandas achieve this exceptionally low expenditure in part by reduced sizes of several vital organs and low physical activity. In addition, circulating levels of thyroid hormones thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) averaged 46.9 and 64%, respectively, of the levels expected for a eutherian mammal of comparable size. A giant panda-unique mutation in the DUOX2 gene, critical for thyroid hormone synthesis, might explain these low thyroid hormone levels. A combination of morphological, behavioral, physiological, and genetic adaptations, leading to low energy expenditure, likely enables giant pandas to survive on a bamboo diet.

  4. Ultrafast all-optical switching using signal flow graph for PANDA resonator.

    PubMed

    Bahadoran, Mahdi; Ali, Jalil; Yupapin, Preecha P

    2013-04-20

    In this paper, the bifurcation behavior of light in the PANDA ring resonator is investigated using the signal flow graph (SFG) method, where the optical transfer function for the through and drop ports of the PANDA Vernier system are derived. The optical nonlinear phenomena, such as bistability, Ikeda instability, and dynamics of light in the silicon-on-insulator (SOI) PANDA ring resonator with four couplers are studied. The transmission curves for bistability and instability as a function of the resonant mode numbers and coupling coefficients for the coupler are derived by the SFG method and simulated. The proposed system has an advantage as no optical pumping component is required. Simulated results show that closed-loop bistable switching can be generated and achieved by varying mode resonant numbers in the SOI-PANDA Vernier resonator, where a smooth and closed-loop bistable switching with low relative output/input power can be obtained and realized. The minimum through-port switching time of 1.1 ps for resonant mode numbers of 5;4;4 and minimum drop port switching time of 1.96 ps for resonant mode numbers of 9;7;7 of the PANDA Vernier resonator are achieved, which makes the PANDA Vernier resonator an operative component for optical applications, such as optical signal processing and a fast switching key in photonics integrated circuits.

  5. Slab-coupled optical sensor fabrication using side-polished Panda fibers.

    PubMed

    King, Rex; Seng, Frederick; Stan, Nikola; Cuzner, Kevin; Josephson, Chad; Selfridge, Richard; Schultz, Stephen

    2016-11-01

    A new device structure used for slab-coupled optical sensor (SCOS) technology was developed to fabricate electric field sensors. This new device structure replaces the D-fiber used in traditional SCOS technology with a side-polished Panda fiber. Unlike the D-fiber SCOS, the Panda fiber SCOS is made from commercially available materials and is simpler to fabricate. The Panda SCOS interfaces easier with lab equipment and exhibits ∼3  dB less loss at link points than the D-fiber SCOS. The optical system for the D-fiber is bandwidth limited by a transimpedance amplifier (TIA) used to amplify to the electric signal. The Panda SCOS exhibits less loss than the D-fiber and, as a result, does not require as high a gain setting on the TIA, which results in an overall higher bandwidth range. Results show that the Panda sensor also achieves comparable sensitivity results to the D-fiber SCOS. Although the Panda SCOS is not as sensitive as other side-polished fiber electric field sensors, it can be fabricated much easier because the fabrication process does not require special alignment techniques, and it is made from commercially available materials.

  6. PANDAS and anorexia nervosa--a spotters' guide: suggestions for medical assessment.

    PubMed

    Vincenzi, Brenda; O'Toole, Julie; Lask, Bryan

    2010-03-01

    Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal infection (PANDAS) should be considered in sudden onset, prepubertal Anorexia Nervosa (AN), arising shortly after an apparent streptococcal infection. However, the absence of a specific biological marker of PANDAS renders the diagnosis difficult. This paper critically reviews available tests for PANDAS and recommends a standardized approach to its investigation. Medline database review between 1990 and 2008. Existing tests may be categorized as: (i) Non-specific markers of inflammation or immune response (Erythrocyte sedimentation rate, ESR; C-reactive protein, CRP; Neopterin), (ii) specific markers of streptococcal infection (throat swab and anti-streptococcal antibodies, Anti-streptolysin, ASO; Antideoxyribonuclease B, antiDNaseB), (iii) non-specific markers of auto-immune reaction (Antineuronal antibodies, AnAb; D8/17). No one test reliably identifies PANDAS. The lack of specificity and methodological problems may lead to errors of diagnosis. When PANDAS-Anorexia Nervosa (PANDAS-AN) is suspected clinically we recommend conducting all the above investigations. The more positive results there are the more likely is the diagnosis, but particular weighting should be given to AnAb and D8/17. Copyright (c) 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., and Eating Disorders Association.

  7. The PANDAS subgroup of tic disorders and childhood-onset obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Martino, Davide; Defazio, Giovanni; Giovannoni, Gavin

    2009-12-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of the PANDAS (pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections) variant of Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) and childhood-onset obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) are still controversial issues. Most cross-sectional studies confirm a significant association between GTS and the development of an immune response against group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus (GABHS). Moreover, longitudinal retrospective studies suggest that a recent exposure to GABHS might be a risk factor for the onset of tics and obsessive-compulsive symptoms. However, further evidence from longitudinal prospective research is needed to verify whether a temporal association between GABHS infections and symptom exacerbations is a useful and reliable criterion for the diagnosis of PANDAS. In addition, preliminary results suggest that the PANDAS spectrum might be enlarged to include attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Although a number of immunological biomarkers have been proposed as markers of the PANDAS variant, at present, none of these has been conclusively proved useful to diagnose and monitor disease course in children with a suspicion of PANDAS. Finally, despite their empirical use in community settings, we still lack conclusive, evidence-based data regarding the usefulness of antibiotic and immunomodulatory treatments in children with PANDAS. Given the relevance of this topic for general pediatric health, additional research efforts to solve all the pending issues and the hottest points of debate are warranted.

  8. Why Does the Giant Panda Eat Bamboo? A Comparative Analysis of Appetite-Reward-Related Genes among Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ke; Xue, Chenyi; Wu, Xiaoli; Qian, Jinyi; Zhu, Yong; Yang, Zhen; Yonezawa, Takahiro; Crabbe, M. James C.; Cao, Ying; Hasegawa, Masami; Zhong, Yang; Zheng, Yufang

    2011-01-01

    Background The giant panda has an interesting bamboo diet unlike the other species in the order of Carnivora. The umami taste receptor gene T1R1 has been identified as a pseudogene during its genome sequencing project and confirmed using a different giant panda sample. The estimated mutation time for this gene is about 4.2 Myr. Such mutation coincided with the giant panda's dietary change and also reinforced its herbivorous life style. However, as this gene is preserved in herbivores such as cow and horse, we need to look for other reasons behind the giant panda's diet switch. Methodology/Principal Findings Since taste is part of the reward properties of food related to its energy and nutrition contents, we did a systematic analysis on those genes involved in the appetite-reward system for the giant panda. We extracted the giant panda sequence information for those genes and compared with the human sequence first and then with seven other species including chimpanzee, mouse, rat, dog, cat, horse, and cow. Orthologs in panda were further analyzed based on the coding region, Kozak consensus sequence, and potential microRNA binding of those genes. Conclusions/Significance Our results revealed an interesting dopamine metabolic involvement in the panda's food choice. This finding suggests a new direction for molecular evolution studies behind the panda's dietary switch. PMID:21818345

  9. Why does the giant panda eat bamboo? A comparative analysis of appetite-reward-related genes among mammals.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ke; Xue, Chenyi; Wu, Xiaoli; Qian, Jinyi; Zhu, Yong; Yang, Zhen; Yonezawa, Takahiro; Crabbe, M James C; Cao, Ying; Hasegawa, Masami; Zhong, Yang; Zheng, Yufang

    2011-01-01

    The giant panda has an interesting bamboo diet unlike the other species in the order of Carnivora. The umami taste receptor gene T1R1 has been identified as a pseudogene during its genome sequencing project and confirmed using a different giant panda sample. The estimated mutation time for this gene is about 4.2 Myr. Such mutation coincided with the giant panda's dietary change and also reinforced its herbivorous life style. However, as this gene is preserved in herbivores such as cow and horse, we need to look for other reasons behind the giant panda's diet switch. Since taste is part of the reward properties of food related to its energy and nutrition contents, we did a systematic analysis on those genes involved in the appetite-reward system for the giant panda. We extracted the giant panda sequence information for those genes and compared with the human sequence first and then with seven other species including chimpanzee, mouse, rat, dog, cat, horse, and cow. Orthologs in panda were further analyzed based on the coding region, Kozak consensus sequence, and potential microRNA binding of those genes. Our results revealed an interesting dopamine metabolic involvement in the panda's food choice. This finding suggests a new direction for molecular evolution studies behind the panda's dietary switch.

  10. Hypernuclear physics studies of the PANDA experiment at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez Lorente, Alicia

    2014-09-01

    Hypernuclear research will be one of the main topics addressed by the PANDA experiment at the planned Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research FAIR at Darmstadt (Germany). http://www. gsi.de, http://www.gsi.de/fair/. Thanks to the use of stored overline {p} beams, copious production of double Λ hypernuclei is expected at the PANDA experiment, which will enable high precision γ spectroscopy of such nuclei for the first time, and consequently a unique chance to explore the hyperon-hyperon interaction. In particular, ambiguities of past experiments in determining the strength of the ΛΛ interaction will be avoided thanks to the excellent energy precision of a few keV (FWHM) achieved by germanium detectors. Such a resolution capability is particularly needed to resolve the small energy spacing of the order of (10-100) keV, which is characteristic from the spin doublet in hypernuclei the so -called "hypernuclear fine structure". In comparison to previous experiments, PANDA will benefit from a novel technique to assign the various observable γ-transitions in a unique way to specific double hypernuclei by exploring various light targets. Nevertheless, the ability to carry out unique assignments requires a devoted hypernuclear detector setup. This consists of a primary nuclear target for the production of {Ξ }-+overline {Ξ } pairs, a secondary active target for the hypernuclei formation and the identification of associated decay products and a germanium array detector to perform γ spectroscopy. Moreover, one of the most challenging issues of this project is the fact that all detector systems need to operate in the presence of a high magnetic field and a large hadronic background. Accordingly, the need of an innovative detector concept will require dramatic improvements to fulfil these conditions and that will likely lead to a new generation of detectors. In the present talk details concerning the current status of the activities related to the detector developments

  11. A Triggerless readout system for the bar PANDA electromagnetic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiemens, M.; PANDA Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    One of the physics goals of the future bar PANDA experiment at FAIR is to research newly discovered exotic states. Because the detector response created by these particles is very similar to the background channels, a new type of data readout had to be developed, called "triggerless" readout. In this concept, each detector subsystem preprocesses the signal, so that in a later stage, high-level phyiscs constraints can be applied to select events of interest. A dedicated clock source using a protocol called SODANET over optical fibers ensures proper synchronisation between the components. For this new type of readout, a new way of simulating the detector response also needed to be developed, taking into account the effects of pile-up caused by the 20 MHz interaction rate.

  12. Simulation and reconstruction of the PANDA Barrel DIRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhygadlo, R.; Gerhardt, A.; Go¨tzen, K.; Hohler, R.; Kalicy, G.; Kumawat, H.; Lehmann, D.; Lewandowski, B.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Zühlsdorf, M.; Dodokhov, V. Kh.; Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A.; Uhlig, F.; Düren, M.; Fo¨hl, K.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Kro¨ck, B.; Merle, O.; Rieke, J.; Cowie, E.; Keri, T.; Montgomery, R.; Rosner, G.; Achenbach, P.; Cardinali, M.; Hoek, M.; Lauth, W.; Sfienti, C.; Thiel, M.; Bühler, P.; Gruber, L.; Marton, J.; Suzuki, K.

    2014-12-01

    Hadronic particle identification (PID) in the barrel region of the PANDA experiment at the new Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe (FAIR) at GSI, Darmstadt will be provided by a DIRC (Detection of Internally Reflected Cherenkov light) counter. To optimize the performance and reduce the detector cost, detailed simulations of different design elements, such as the width of the radiators, the shape of the expansion volume, and the type of focusing system, were performed using Geant. Custom reconstruction algorithms were developed to match the detector geometry. We will discuss the single photon resolution and photon yield as well as the PID performance for the Barrel DIRC baseline design and several detector design options.

  13. Parallelization of PANDA discrete ordinates code using spatial decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Humbert, P.

    2006-07-01

    We present the parallel method, based on spatial domain decomposition, implemented in the 2D and 3D versions of the discrete Ordinates code PANDA. The spatial mesh is orthogonal and the spatial domain decomposition is Cartesian. For 3D problems a 3D Cartesian domain topology is created and the parallel method is based on a domain diagonal plane ordered sweep algorithm. The parallel efficiency of the method is improved by directions and octants pipelining. The implementation of the algorithm is straightforward using MPI blocking point to point communications. The efficiency of the method is illustrated by an application to the 3D-Ext C5G7 benchmark of the OECD/NEA. (authors)

  14. FPGA Online Tracking Algorithm for the PANDA Straw Tube Tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yutie; Ye, Hua; Galuska, Martin J.; Gessler, Thomas; Kuhn, Wolfgang; Lange, Jens Soren; Wagner, Milan N.; Liu, Zhen'an; Zhao, Jingzhou

    2017-06-01

    A novel FPGA based online tracking algorithm for helix track reconstruction in a solenoidal field, developed for the PANDA spectrometer, is described. Employing the Straw Tube Tracker detector with 4636 straw tubes, the algorithm includes a complex track finder, and a track fitter. Implemented in VHDL, the algorithm is tested on a Xilinx Virtex-4 FX60 FPGA chip with different types of events, at different event rates. A processing time of 7 $\\mu$s per event for an average of 6 charged tracks is obtained. The momentum resolution is about 3\\% (4\\%) for $p_t$ ($p_z$) at 1 GeV/c. Comparing to the algorithm running on a CPU chip (single core Intel Xeon E5520 at 2.26 GHz), an improvement of 3 orders of magnitude in processing time is obtained. The algorithm can handle severe overlapping of events which are typical for interaction rates above 10 MHz.

  15. The bar PANDA Barrel-TOF Detector at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, S.; Suzuki, K.; Steinschaden, D.; Chirita, M.; Ahmed, G.; Dutta, K.; Kalita, K.; Lehmann, A.; Böhm, M.; Schwarz, K.; Orth, H.; Brinkmann, K.-Th.

    2017-08-01

    The barrel-Time-of-Flight subdetector is one of the outer layers of the multi-layer design of the \\panda target spectrometer. It is designed with a minimal material budget in mind mainly consisting of 90×30×5 mm3 thin plastic scintillator tiles read out on each end by a serial connection of 4 SiPMs. 120 such tiles are placed on 16 2460 × 180 mm2 PCB boards forming a barrel covering an azimuthal angle from 22.5o to 150o. The detector is designed to achieve a time resolution below σ< 100 ps which allows to distinguish events in the constant stream of hits, as well as particle identification below the Cherenkov threshold via the time-of-flight; simultaneously providing the interaction times of events. The current prototype achieved a time resolution of ~54 ps, well below the design goal.

  16. [Cloning of four members of giant panda Dmrt genes].

    PubMed

    Shui, Yi; Yu, Hong-Shi; Xia, Lai-Xin; Guo, Yi-Qing; Cheng, Han-Hua; Zhou, Rong-Jia

    2004-05-01

    Sex determining genes Mab-3 of C. elegans and Doublesex of Drosophila contain a common DNA binding motif called DM (Doublesex and Mab-3) domain, both of which regulate similar aspects of sexual development. Human Doublesex-related gene DMRT1 has been identified, which also contains the conserved DM-related DNA-binding domain and plays an essential role in gonadal differentiation. We amplified genomic DNA of the giant panda using the DM degenerate primers and detected two bands, approximately 140 bp and 250 bp. After cloned into T-easy vector and sequenced, four sequences showed high homology with the DM domain. Amino acid sequence of the first clone is 100% identical with the Dmrt1 of human, mouse and pig, hence we named it as pDmrt1. The second clone is 96% identical with human DMRTB1, and the third one 100% with the Dmrt3 of mouse and medaka, which were named as pDmrtb1 and pDmrt3 respectively. The last sequence contains an intron of 116 bp within the DM domain, which encodes an amino acid sequence 100% identical with human DMRTC2, accordingly we named it as pDmrtc2. Based on similarities of amino acid sequences of the DM domain, Dmrt protein sequences from human, mouse and giant panda were included in a phylogenetic tree. They revealed seven distinct subgroups: Dmrt1, Dmrt2, Dmrt3, Dmrt4 (DMRTA1), Dmrt5 (DMRTA2), Dmrt6 (DMRTB1) and Dmrt7 (DMRTC2). Our results further reveal the unexpected complexity and the evolutionary conservation of the DM domain gene family in both invertebrates and vertebrates.

  17. Major histocompatibility complex alleles associated with parasite susceptibility in wild giant pandas

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L; Wu, Q; Hu, Y; Wu, H; Wei, F

    2015-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) polymorphism is thought to be driven by antagonistic coevolution between pathogens and hosts, mediated through either overdominance or frequency-dependent selection. However, investigations under natural conditions are still rare for endangered mammals which often exhibit depleted variation, and the mechanism of selection underlying the maintenance of characteristics remains a considerable debate. In this study, 87 wild giant pandas were used to investigate MHC variation associated with parasite load. With the knowledge of the MHC profile provided by the genomic data of the giant panda, seven DRB1, seven DQA1 and eight DQA2 alleles were identified at each single locus. Positive selection evidenced by a significantly higher number of non-synonymous substitutions per non-synonymous codon site relative to synonymous substitutions per synonymous codon site could only be detected at the DRB1 locus, which leads to the speculation that DRB1 may have a more important role in dealing with parasite infection for pandas. Coprological analyses revealed that 55.17% of individuals exhibited infection with 1–2 helminthes and 95.3% of infected pandas carried Baylisascaris shroederi. Using a generalized linear model, we found that Aime-DRB1*10 was significantly associated with parasite infection, but no resistant alleles could be detected. MHC heterozygosity of the pandas was found to be uncorrelated with the infection status or the infection intensity. These results suggested that the possible selection mechanisms in extant wild pandas may be frequency dependent rather than being determined by overdominance selection. Our findings could guide the candidate selection for the ongoing reintroduction or translocation of pandas. PMID:25248466

  18. China's endemic vertebrates sheltering under the protective umbrella of the giant panda.

    PubMed

    Li, Binbin V; Pimm, Stuart L

    2016-04-01

    The giant panda attracts disproportionate conservation resources. How well does this emphasis protect other endemic species? Detailed data on geographical ranges are not available for plants or invertebrates, so we restrict our analyses to 3 vertebrate taxa: birds, mammals, and amphibians. There are gaps in their protection, and we recommend practical actions to fill them. We identified patterns of species richness, then identified which species are endemic to China, and then which, like the panda, live in forests. After refining each species' range by its known elevational range and remaining forest habitats as determined from remote sensing, we identified the top 5% richest areas as the centers of endemism. Southern mountains, especially the eastern Hengduan Mountains, were centers for all 3 taxa. Over 96% of the panda habitat overlapped the endemic centers. Thus, investing in almost any panda habitat will benefit many other endemics. Existing panda national nature reserves cover all but one of the endemic species that overlap with the panda's distribution. Of particular interest are 14 mammal, 20 bird, and 82 amphibian species that are inadequately protected. Most of these species the International Union for Conservation of Nature currently deems threatened. But 7 mammal, 3 bird, and 20 amphibian species are currently nonthreatened, yet their geographical ranges are <20,000 km(2) after accounting for elevational restriction and remaining habitats. These species concentrate mainly in Sichuan, Yunnan, Nan Mountains, and Hainan. There is a high concentration in the east Daxiang and Xiaoxiang Mountains of Sichuan, where pandas are absent and where there are no national nature reserves. The others concentrate in Yunnan, Nan Mountains, and Hainan. Here, 10 prefectures might establish new protected areas or upgrade local nature reserves to national status.

  19. Major histocompatibility complex alleles associated with parasite susceptibility in wild giant pandas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Wu, Q; Hu, Y; Wu, H; Wei, F

    2015-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) polymorphism is thought to be driven by antagonistic coevolution between pathogens and hosts, mediated through either overdominance or frequency-dependent selection. However, investigations under natural conditions are still rare for endangered mammals which often exhibit depleted variation, and the mechanism of selection underlying the maintenance of characteristics remains a considerable debate. In this study, 87 wild giant pandas were used to investigate MHC variation associated with parasite load. With the knowledge of the MHC profile provided by the genomic data of the giant panda, seven DRB1, seven DQA1 and eight DQA2 alleles were identified at each single locus. Positive selection evidenced by a significantly higher number of non-synonymous substitutions per non-synonymous codon site relative to synonymous substitutions per synonymous codon site could only be detected at the DRB1 locus, which leads to the speculation that DRB1 may have a more important role in dealing with parasite infection for pandas. Coprological analyses revealed that 55.17% of individuals exhibited infection with 1-2 helminthes and 95.3% of infected pandas carried Baylisascaris shroederi. Using a generalized linear model, we found that Aime-DRB1*10 was significantly associated with parasite infection, but no resistant alleles could be detected. MHC heterozygosity of the pandas was found to be uncorrelated with the infection status or the infection intensity. These results suggested that the possible selection mechanisms in extant wild pandas may be frequency dependent rather than being determined by overdominance selection. Our findings could guide the candidate selection for the ongoing reintroduction or translocation of pandas.

  20. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for PANDAS-Related Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Findings From A Preliminary Waitlist Controlled Open Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storch, Eric A.; Murphy, Tanya K.; Geffken, Gary R.; Mann, Giselle; Adkins, Jennifer; Merlo, Lisa J.; Duke, Danny; Munson, Melissa; Swaine, Zoe; Goodman, Wayne K.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To provide preliminary estimates of the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in treating pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) of the pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcus (PANDAS) subtype. Method: Seven children with OCD of the PANDAS subtype (range 9-13 years) were treated…

  1. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for PANDAS-Related Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Findings From A Preliminary Waitlist Controlled Open Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storch, Eric A.; Murphy, Tanya K.; Geffken, Gary R.; Mann, Giselle; Adkins, Jennifer; Merlo, Lisa J.; Duke, Danny; Munson, Melissa; Swaine, Zoe; Goodman, Wayne K.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To provide preliminary estimates of the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in treating pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) of the pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcus (PANDAS) subtype. Method: Seven children with OCD of the PANDAS subtype (range 9-13 years) were treated…

  2. Evaluation of autoimmune phenomena in patients with pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS).

    PubMed

    Stagi, Stefano; Rigante, Donato; Lepri, Gemma; Bertini, Federico; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Falcini, Fernanda

    2014-12-01

    The pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS) are basically characterized by obsessive-compulsive symptoms and/or tics triggered by group-A beta-hemolytic Streptococcus infections. Poor data are available about the clear definition of PANDAS's autoimmune origin. The aim of our study was to evaluate the prevalence of autoimmune phenomena, including thyroid function abnormalities, specific celiac disease antibodies, and positivity of organ- or nonorgan-specific autoantibodies in a large cohort of Caucasian children and adolescents with PANDAS. Seventy-seven consecutive patients (59 males, 18 females; mean age 6.3±2.5 years, range 2.0-14.5 years) strictly fulfilling the clinical criteria for PANDAS diagnosis were recruited. In all subjects we evaluated serum concentrations of free-T3, free-T4, thyrotropin, and the following auto-antibodies: anti-thyroperoxidase, anti-thyroglobulin, anti-thyrotropin receptor, anti-gliadin, anti-endomysium, anti-tissue transglutaminase, anti-nuclear, anti-smooth muscle, anti-extractable nuclear antigens, anti-phospholipid, plus lupus-like anticoagulant. The results were compared with those obtained from 197 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (130 males, 67 females; mean age 6.8±2.9 years, range 2.3-14.8 years). The frequencies of subclinical (3.8% vs 3.6%) and overt hypothyroidism (1.2% vs 0%), autoimmune thyroiditis (2.46% vs 1.14%), celiac disease (1.2% vs 0.05%), and positivity of organ- and nonorgan-specific autoantibodies (5.1% vs 4.8%) were not statistically significant between patients with PANDAS and controls. Evaluating the overall disease duration, we did not observe any significant difference between patients with (3.4±2.15 years) and without (3.4±2.89 years) autoimmune abnormalities. However, PANDAS patients with autoimmune diseases or positivity for any organ- and nonorgan-specific antibodies showed significantly higher anti-streptolysin O and anti-DNAse B

  3. A new clinical feature associated with familial early-onset of dystonic-guttural tics: An unusual diagnosis of PANDAS.

    PubMed

    Vitaliti, Giovanna; Trifiletti, Rosario R; Falsaperla, Raffaele; Parano, Enrico; Spalice, Alberto; Pavone, Piero

    2014-01-01

    Until today there is a large debate about the existence of PANDAS (pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections) or PANS (pediatric acute onset neuropsychiatric syndrome). These children usually have dramatic, "overnight" onset of symptoms, including motor or vocal tics, obsessions, and/or compulsions. In addition to these symptoms, children may also have comorbid features of associated disorders. Herein, we report a family with an early onset of tics, with exclusively dystonic and guttural tics. All patients had a particularly strong excitement trigger. Two of the patients were shown to have signs suggestive of PANDAS and all family members were Group A beta-hemolytic Streptococcus (GABHS) carriers. The PANDAS spectrum is probably a group of disorders. We have described a PANDAS variant, in which the family seems to share common autoimmune pattern and may be viewed in the large spectrum of PANDAS.

  4. Quantifying landscape linkages among giant panda subpopulations in regional scale conservation.

    PubMed

    Qi, Dunwu; Hu, Yibo; Gu, Xiaodong; Yang, Xuyi; Yang, Guang; Wei, Fuwen

    2012-06-01

    Understanding habitat requirements and identifying landscape linkages are essential for the survival of isolated populations of endangered species. Currently, some of the giant panda populations are isolated, which threatens their long-term survival, particularly in the Xiaoxiangling mountains. In the present study, we quantified niche requirements and then identified potential linkages of giant panda subpopulations in the most isolated region, using ecological niche factor analysis and a least-cost path model. Giant pandas preferred habitat with conifer forest and gentle slopes (>20 to ≤30°). Based on spatial distribution of suitable habitat, linkages were identified for the Yele subpopulation to 4 other subpopulations (Liziping, Matou, Xinmin and Wanba). Their lengths ranged from 15 to 54 km. The accumulated cost ranged from 693 to 3166 and conifer forest covered over 31%. However, a variety of features (e.g. major roads, human settlements and large unforested areas) might act as barriers along the linkages for giant panda dispersal. Our analysis quantified giant panda subpopulation connectivity to ensure long-term survival.

  5. [Expression of neuropeptide Y and long leptin receptor in gastrointestinal tract of giant panda].

    PubMed

    Luo, Qihui; Tang, Xiuying; Chen, Zhengli; Wang, Kaiyu; Wang, Chengdong; Li, Desheng; Li, Caiwu

    2015-08-01

    To study the expression and distribution of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and long leptin receptor (OB-Rb) in the gastrointestinal tract of giant panda, samples of three animals were collected from the key laboratory for reproduction and conservation genetics of endangered wildlife of Sichuan province, China conservation and research center for the giant panda. Paraffin sections of giant panda gastrointestinal tissue samples were observed using hematoxylin-eosin staining (HE) and strept actividin-biotin complex immunohistochemical staining (IHC). The results show that the intestinal histology of three pandas was normal and no pathological changes, and there were rich single-cell and multi-cell mucous glands, long intestinal villi and thick muscularis mucosa and muscle layer. Positive cells expressing NPY and OB-Rb were widely detected in the gastrointestinal tract by IHC methods. NPY positive nerve fibers and neuronal cell were widely distributed in submucosal plexus and myenteric plexus, especially in the former. They were arranged beaded or point-like shape. NPY positive cells were observed in the shape of ellipse and polygon and mainly located in the mucous layer and intestinal glands. OB-Rb positive cells were mainly distributed in the mucous layer and the laminae propria, especially the latter. These results confirmed that NPY and OB-Rb are widely distributed in the gut of the giant panda, which provide strong reference for the research between growth and development, digestion and absorption, and immune function.

  6. New PANDA Tests to Investigate Effects of Light Gases on Passive Safety Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Paladino, D.; Auban, O.; Candreia, P.; Huggenberger, M.; Strassberger, H.J.

    2002-07-01

    The large- scale thermal-hydraulic PANDA facility (located at PSI in Switzerland), has been used over the last few years for investigating different passive decay- heat removal systems and containment phenomena for the next generation of light water reactors (Simplified Boiling Water Reactor: SBWR; European Simplified Boiling Water Reactor: ESBWR; Siedewasserreaktor: SWR-1000). Currently, as part of the European Commission 5. EURATOM Framework Programme project 'Testing and Enhanced Modelling of Passive Evolutionary Systems Technology for Containment Cooling' (TEMPEST), a new series of tests is being planned in the PANDA facility to experimentally investigate the distribution of non-condensable gases inside the containment and their effect on the performance of the 'Passive Containment Cooling System' (PCCS). Hydrogen release caused by the metal-water reaction in the case of a postulated severe accident will be simulated in PANDA by injecting helium into the reactor pressure vessel. In order to provide suitable data for Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) code assessment and improvement, the instrumentation in PANDA has been upgraded for the new tests. In the present paper, a detailed discussion is given of the new PANDA tests to be performed to investigate the effects of light gas on passive safety systems. The tests are scheduled for the first half of the year 2002. (authors)

  7. PanDA: Exascale Federation of Resources for the ATLAS Experiment at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreiro Megino, Fernando; Caballero Bejar, Jose; De, Kaushik; Hover, John; Klimentov, Alexei; Maeno, Tadashi; Nilsson, Paul; Oleynik, Danila; Padolski, Siarhei; Panitkin, Sergey; Petrosyan, Artem; Wenaus, Torre

    2016-02-01

    After a scheduled maintenance and upgrade period, the world's largest and most powerful machine - the Large Hadron Collider(LHC) - is about to enter its second run at unprecedented energies. In order to exploit the scientific potential of the machine, the experiments at the LHC face computational challenges with enormous data volumes that need to be analysed by thousand of physics users and compared to simulated data. Given diverse funding constraints, the computational resources for the LHC have been deployed in a worldwide mesh of data centres, connected to each other through Grid technologies. The PanDA (Production and Distributed Analysis) system was developed in 2005 for the ATLAS experiment on top of this heterogeneous infrastructure to seamlessly integrate the computational resources and give the users the feeling of a unique system. Since its origins, PanDA has evolved together with upcoming computing paradigms in and outside HEP, such as changes in the networking model, Cloud Computing and HPC. It is currently running steadily up to 200 thousand simultaneous cores (limited by the available resources for ATLAS), up to two million aggregated jobs per day and processes over an exabyte of data per year. The success of PanDA in ATLAS is triggering the widespread adoption and testing by other experiments. In this contribution we will give an overview of the PanDA components and focus on the new features and upcoming challenges that are relevant to the next decade of distributed computing workload management using PanDA.

  8. Antibody binding to neuronal surface in Sydenham chorea, but not in PANDAS or Tourette syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Merheb, V.; Ding, A.; Murphy, T.; Dale, R.C.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To test the hypothesis that Sydenham chorea (SC) immunoglobulin G (IgG) autoantibodies bind to specific neuronal surface proteins, whereas IgG from patients with pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infection (PANDAS) or Tourette syndrome (TS) do not bind to neuronal surface proteins. Methods: We used live differentiated SH-SY5Y cells, which have neuronal and dopaminergic characteristics. Using flow cytometry, we measured serum IgG cell surface binding in patients with SC (n = 11), PANDAS (n = 12), and TS (n = 11), and compared the findings to healthy controls (n = 11) and other neurologic controls (n = 11). In order to determine the specificity of binding to neuronal antigens, we also used a non-neuronal cell line, HEK 293. Results: The mean IgG cell surface binding was significantly higher in the SC group compared to all other groups (p < 0.001). By contrast, there was no difference between the PANDAS or TS groups and the controls. Using the non-neuronal HEK-293 cells, there was no significant difference in IgG cell surface binding between any groups. Conclusions: Serum autoantibodies that bind to neuronal cell surface antigens are present in SC, but not in PANDAS or TS. These findings strengthen the hypothesis that SC is due to a pathogenic autoantibody, but weaken the autoantibody hypothesis in PANDAS and TS. PMID:21411742

  9. Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorder Associated with Streptococcal Infections (PANDAS): Experience at a Tertiary Referral Center

    PubMed Central

    Helm, Caitlin E.; Blackwood, R. Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Background Pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorder associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS) is an autoimmune disorder presenting with obsessive compulsive disorder and/or tics. Like Sydenham’s chorea, its presumed pathogenesis consists of autoantibodies cross-reacting with neurons in response to a group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infection (GASI). There are currently no diagnostic laboratory findings and management ranges from antibiotic prophylaxis to intravenous immunoglobulin to plasmapheresis. The diagnosis remains controversial, resulting in inconsistent referrals and significant patient anxiety. Methods A retrospective study was performed on all patients referred to the Pediatric Infectious Disease Division with a pre-referral diagnosis of PANDAS. Patients were analyzed by demographics, medical history, co-morbidities, symptoms, prior treatment, laboratory tests, management strategies, and treatment outcomes. Results From 2003 to 2013, there were 21 patients with a pre-referral diagnosis of PANDAS. Only five met the diagnostic criteria. No patient at referral had an objective scale to monitor symptoms. Eight referrals had a major psychiatric disorder, and none fulfilled diagnostic criteria (p<0.01). Discussion The majority of the patients referred with a pre-diagnosis of PANDAS do not fulfill diagnostic criteria nor do they have objective criteria for symptom monitoring. Major psychiatric disorders do not seem to be associated with PANDAS, and better physician education may prevent misdiagnoses. Multidisciplinary management is recommended. PMID:26196024

  10. Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorder Associated with Streptococcal Infections (PANDAS): Experience at a Tertiary Referral Center.

    PubMed

    Helm, Caitlin E; Blackwood, R Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorder associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS) is an autoimmune disorder presenting with obsessive compulsive disorder and/or tics. Like Sydenham's chorea, its presumed pathogenesis consists of autoantibodies cross-reacting with neurons in response to a group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infection (GASI). There are currently no diagnostic laboratory findings and management ranges from antibiotic prophylaxis to intravenous immunoglobulin to plasmapheresis. The diagnosis remains controversial, resulting in inconsistent referrals and significant patient anxiety. A retrospective study was performed on all patients referred to the Pediatric Infectious Disease Division with a pre-referral diagnosis of PANDAS. Patients were analyzed by demographics, medical history, co-morbidities, symptoms, prior treatment, laboratory tests, management strategies, and treatment outcomes. From 2003 to 2013, there were 21 patients with a pre-referral diagnosis of PANDAS. Only five met the diagnostic criteria. No patient at referral had an objective scale to monitor symptoms. Eight referrals had a major psychiatric disorder, and none fulfilled diagnostic criteria (p<0.01). The majority of the patients referred with a pre-diagnosis of PANDAS do not fulfill diagnostic criteria nor do they have objective criteria for symptom monitoring. Major psychiatric disorders do not seem to be associated with PANDAS, and better physician education may prevent misdiagnoses. Multidisciplinary management is recommended.

  11. Tonsillectomy remains a questionable option for pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS).

    PubMed

    Windfuhr, Jochen P

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS) is a disease attributed to children with obsessive compulsive disorders (OCD) or tic disorders associated with streptococcal infections. Because otolaryngologists examine a large number of pediatric patients with recurrent streptococcal infections, tonsillectomy (TE) is a common option of therapy. This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of TE in patients presenting with verified PANDAS. Material and methods: A PubMed review was performed using search terms "tonsillectomy" and "PANDAS", "OCD", "compulsive" "pediatric autoimmune", "chorea" and "tic" limited by publication date of January 1, 1995, to July 31, 2015. Reviews without patients were not included in the review. Results: Nine papers matched our search criteria, including 6 case reports with 8 patients and 3 case series. Most case reports were in favor of TE, but this was by far not supported by the findings in the case series. The follow-up ranged from 2 to 36 months in case reports and from 24 to 36 in case series. Conclusion: Establishing the diagnosis of PANDAS is complicated because of underlying comorbidities in the field of neurology-psychiatry and the lack of a reliable biomarker. The positive outcome after TE as reported in case studies may be influenced by the postoperative medication and is not supported by the results of large-scale studies. In the light of the considerable postoperative morbidity rate, it appears wise to indicate TE for PANDAS only in supervised clinical studies.

  12. Antibody binding to neuronal surface in Sydenham chorea, but not in PANDAS or Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Brilot, F; Merheb, V; Ding, A; Murphy, T; Dale, R C

    2011-04-26

    To test the hypothesis that Sydenham chorea (SC) immunoglobulin G (IgG) autoantibodies bind to specific neuronal surface proteins, whereas IgG from patients with pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infection (PANDAS) or Tourette syndrome (TS) do not bind to neuronal surface proteins. We used live differentiated SH-SY5Y cells, which have neuronal and dopaminergic characteristics. Using flow cytometry, we measured serum IgG cell surface binding in patients with SC (n = 11), PANDAS (n = 12), and TS (n = 11), and compared the findings to healthy controls (n = 11) and other neurologic controls (n = 11). In order to determine the specificity of binding to neuronal antigens, we also used a non-neuronal cell line, HEK 293. The mean IgG cell surface binding was significantly higher in the SC group compared to all other groups (p < 0.001). By contrast, there was no difference between the PANDAS or TS groups and the controls. Using the non-neuronal HEK-293 cells, there was no significant difference in IgG cell surface binding between any groups. Serum autoantibodies that bind to neuronal cell surface antigens are present in SC, but not in PANDAS or TS. These findings strengthen the hypothesis that SC is due to a pathogenic autoantibody, but weaken the autoantibody hypothesis in PANDAS and TS.

  13. Feasibility studies of time-like proton electromagnetic form factors at overlinePANDA at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, B.; Erni, W.; Krusche, B.; Steinacher, M.; Walford, N.; Liu, B.; Liu, H.; Liu, Z.; Shen, X.; Wang, C.; Zhao, J.; Albrecht, M.; Erlen, T.; Fink, M.; Heinsius, F.; Held, T.; Holtmann, T.; Jasper, S.; Keshk, I.; Koch, H.; Kopf, B.; Kuhlmann, M.; Kümmel, M.; Leiber, S.; Mikirtychyants, M.; Musiol, P.; Mustafa, A.; Pelizäus, M.; Pychy, J.; Richter, M.; Schnier, C.; Schröder, T.; Sowa, C.; Steinke, M.; Triffterer, T.; Wiedner, U.; Ball, M.; Beck, R.; Hammann, C.; Ketzer, B.; Kube, M.; Mahlberg, P.; Rossbach, M.; Schmidt, C.; Schmitz, R.; Thoma, U.; Urban, M.; Walther, D.; Wendel, C.; Wilson, A.; Bianconi, A.; Bragadireanu, M.; Caprini, M.; Pantea, D.; Patel, B.; Czyzycki, W.; Domagala, M.; Filo, G.; Jaworowski, J.; Krawczyk, M.; Lisowski, F.; Lisowski, E.; Michałek, M.; Poznański, P.; Płażek, J.; Korcyl, K.; Kozela, A.; Kulessa, P.; Lebiedowicz, P.; Pysz, K.; Schäfer, W.; Szczurek, A.; Fiutowski, T.; Idzik, M.; Mindur, B.; Przyborowski, D.; Swientek, K.; Biernat, J.; Kamys, B.; Kistryn, S.; Korcyl, G.; Krzemien, W.; Magiera, A.; Moskal, P.; Pyszniak, A.; Rudy, Z.; Salabura, P.; Smyrski, J.; Strzempek, P.; Wronska, A.; Augustin, I.; Böhm, R.; Lehmann, I.; Nicmorus Marinescu, D.; Schmitt, L.; Varentsov, V.; Al-Turany, M.; Belias, A.; Deppe, H.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Ehret, A.; Flemming, H.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Gromliuk, A.; Gruber, L.; Karabowicz, R.; Kliemt, R.; Krebs, M.; Kurilla, U.; Lehmann, D.; Löchner, S.; Lühning, J.; Lynen, U.; Orth, H.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Saito, T.; Schepers, G.; Schmidt, C. J.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Täschner, A.; Traxler, M.; Ugur, C.; Voss, B.; Wieczorek, P.; Wilms, A.; Zühlsdorf, M.; Abazov, V.; Alexeev, G.; Arefiev, V. A.; Astakhov, V.; Barabanov, M. Yu.; Batyunya, B. V.; Davydov, Y.; Dodokhov, V. Kh.; Efremov, A.; Fechtchenko, A.; Fedunov, A. G.; Galoyan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Koshurnikov, E. K.; Lobanov, Y. Yu.; Lobanov, V. I.; Makarov, A. F.; Malinina, L. V.; Malyshev, V.; Olshevskiy, A. G.; Perevalova, E.; Piskun, A. A.; Pocheptsov, T.; Pontecorvo, G.; Rodionov, V.; Rogov, Y.; Salmin, R.; Samartsev, A.; Sapozhnikov, M. G.; Shabratova, G.; Skachkov, N. B.; Skachkova, A. N.; Strokovsky, E. A.; Suleimanov, M.; Teshev, R.; Tokmenin, V.; Uzhinsky, V.; Vodopianov, A.; Zaporozhets, S. A.; Zhuravlev, N. I.; Zorin, A. G.; Branford, D.; Glazier, D.; Watts, D.; Böhm, M.; Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A.; Pfaffinger, M.; Uhlig, F.; Dobbs, S.; Seth, K.; Tomaradze, A.; Xiao, T.; Bettoni, D.; Carassiti, V.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Dalpiaz, P.; Drago, A.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Savrie, M.; Akishina, V.; Kisel, I.; Kozlov, G.; Pugach, M.; Zyzak, M.; Gianotti, P.; Guaraldo, C.; Lucherini, V.; Bersani, A.; Bracco, G.; Macri, M.; Parodi, R. F.; Biguenko, K.; Brinkmann, K.; Di Pietro, V.; Diehl, S.; Dormenev, V.; Drexler, P.; Düren, M.; Etzelmüller, E.; Galuska, M.; Gutz, E.; Hahn, C.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Kesselkaul, M.; Kühn, W.; Kuske, T.; Lange, J. S.; Liang, Y.; Metag, V.; Nanova, M.; Nazarenko, S.; Novotny, R.; Quagli, T.; Reiter, S.; Rieke, J.; Rosenbaum, C.; Schmidt, M.; Schnell, R.; Stenzel, H.; Thöring, U.; Ullrich, M.; Wagner, M. N.; Wasem, T.; Wohlfahrt, B.; Zaunick, H.; Ireland, D.; Rosner, G.; Seitz, B.; Deepak, P. N.; Kulkarni, A.; Apostolou, A.; Babai, M.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Lemmens, P. J.; Lindemulder, M.; Loehner, H.; Messchendorp, J.; Schakel, P.; Smit, H.; Tiemens, M.; van der Weele, J. C.; Veenstra, R.; Vejdani, S.; Dutta, K.; Kalita, K.; Kumar, A.; Roy, A.; Sohlbach, H.; Bai, M.; Bianchi, L.; Büscher, M.; Cao, L.; Cebulla, A.; Dosdall, R.; Gillitzer, A.; Goldenbaum, F.; Grunwald, D.; Herten, A.; Hu, Q.; Kemmerling, G.; Kleines, H.; Lehrach, A.; Nellen, R.; Ohm, H.; Orfanitski, S.; Prasuhn, D.; Prencipe, E.; Pütz, J.; Ritman, J.; Schadmand, S.; Sefzick, T.; Serdyuk, V.; Sterzenbach, G.; Stockmanns, T.; Wintz, P.; Wüstner, P.; Xu, H.; Zambanini, A.; Li, S.; Li, Z.; Sun, Z.; Xu, H.; Rigato, V.; Isaksson, L.; Achenbach, P.; Corell, O.; Denig, A.; Distler, M.; Hoek, M.; Karavdina, A.; Lauth, W.; Liu, Z.; Merkel, H.; Müller, U.; Pochodzalla, J.; Sanchez, S.; Schlimme, S.; Sfienti, C.; Thiel, M.; Ahmadi, H.; Ahmed, S.; Bleser, S.; Capozza, L.; Cardinali, M.; Dbeyssi, A.; Deiseroth, M.; Feldbauer, F.; Fritsch, M.; Fröhlich, B.; Jasinski, P.; Kang, D.; Khaneft, D.; Klasen, R.; Leithoff, H. H.; Lin, D.; Maas, F.; Maldaner, S.; Martínez, M.; Michel, M.; Mora Espí, M. C.; Morales Morales, C.; Motzko, C.; Nerling, F.; Noll, O.; Pflüger, S.; Pitka, A.; Rodríguez Piñeiro, D.; Sanchez-Lorente, A.; Steinen, M.; Valente, R.; Weber, T.; Zambrana, M.; Zimmermann, I.; Fedorov, A.; Korjik, M.; Missevitch, O.; Boukharov, A.; Malyshev, O.; Marishev, I.; Balanutsa, V.; Balanutsa, P.; Chernetsky, V.; Demekhin, A.; Dolgolenko, A.; Fedorets, P.; Gerasimov, A.; Goryachev, V.; Chandratre, V.; Datar, V.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumawat, H.; Mohanty, A. K.; Parmar, A.; Roy, B.; Sonika, G.; Fritzsch, C.; Grieser, S.; Hergemöller, A.; Hetz, B.; Hüsken, N.; Khoukaz, A.; Wessels, J. P.; Khosonthongkee, K.; Kobdaj, C.; Limphirat, A.; Srisawad, P.; Yan, Y.; Barnyakov, M.; Barnyakov, A. Yu.; Beloborodov, K.; Blinov, A. E.; Blinov, V. E.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Kononov, S.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Kuyanov, I. A.; Martin, K.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S.; Sokolov, A.; Tikhonov, Y.; Atomssa, E.; Kunne, R.; Marchand, D.; Ramstein, B.; van de Wiele, J.; Wang, Y.; Boca, G.; Costanza, S.; Genova, P.; Montagna, P.; Rotondi, A.; Abramov, V.; Belikov, N.; Bukreeva, S.; Davidenko, A.; Derevschikov, A.; Goncharenko, Y.; Grishin, V.; Kachanov, V.; Kormilitsin, V.; Levin, A.; Melnik, Y.; Minaev, N.; Mochalov, V.; Morozov, D.; Nogach, L.; Poslavskiy, S.; Ryazantsev, A.; Ryzhikov, S.; Semenov, P.; Shein, I.; Uzunian, A.; Vasiliev, A.; Yakutin, A.; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E.; Roy, U.; Yabsley, B.; Belostotski, S.; Gavrilov, G.; Izotov, A.; Manaenkov, S.; Miklukho, O.; Veretennikov, D.; Zhdanov, A.; Makonyi, K.; Preston, M.; Tegner, P.; Wölbing, D.; Bäck, T.; Cederwall, B.; Rai, A. K.; Godre, S.; Calvo, D.; Coli, S.; De Remigis, P.; Filippi, A.; Giraudo, G.; Lusso, S.; Mazza, G.; Mignone, M.; Rivetti, A.; Wheadon, R.; Balestra, F.; Iazzi, F.; Introzzi, R.; Lavagno, A.; Olave, J.; Amoroso, A.; Bussa, M. P.; Busso, L.; De Mori, F.; Destefanis, M.; Fava, L.; Ferrero, L.; Greco, M.; Hu, J.; Lavezzi, L.; Maggiora, M.; Maniscalco, G.; Marcello, S.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Birsa, R.; Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A.; Martin, A.; Calen, H.; Ikegami Andersson, W.; Johansson, T.; Kupsc, A.; Marciniewski, P.; Papenbrock, M.; Pettersson, J.; Schönning, K.; Wolke, M.; Galnander, B.; Diaz, J.; Pothodi Chackara, V.; Chlopik, A.; Kesik, G.; Melnychuk, D.; Slowinski, B.; Trzcinski, A.; Wojciechowski, M.; Wronka, S.; Zwieglinski, B.; Bühler, P.; Marton, J.; Steinschaden, D.; Suzuki, K.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.

    2016-10-01

    Simulation results for future measurements of electromagnetic proton form factors at overlinePANDA (FAIR) within the PandaRoot software framework are reported. The statistical precision with which the proton form factors can be determined is estimated. The signal channel bar{p}p→ e+e- is studied on the basis of two different but consistent procedures. The suppression of the main background channel, i.e. bar{p}p→ π+π-, is studied. Furthermore, the background versus signal efficiency, statistical and systematical uncertainties on the extracted proton form factors are evaluated using two different procedures. The results are consistent with those of a previous simulation study using an older, simplified framework. However, a slightly better precision is achieved in the PandaRoot study in a large range of momentum transfer, assuming the nominal beam conditions and detector performance.

  14. gLExec Integration with the ATLAS PanDA Workload Management System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karavakis, E.; Barreiro, F.; Campana, S.; De, K.; Di Girolamo, A.; Litmaath, M.; Maeno, T.; Medrano, R.; Nilsson, P.; Wenaus, T.

    2015-12-01

    ATLAS user jobs are executed on Worker Nodes (WNs) by pilots sent to sites by pilot factories. This paradigm serves to allow a high job reliability and although it has clear advantages, such as making the working environment homogeneous, the approach presents security and traceability challenges. To address these challenges, gLExec can be used to let the payloads for each user be executed under a different UNIX user id that uniquely identifies the ATLAS user. This paper describes the recent improvements and evolution of the security model within the ATLAS PanDA system, including improvements in the PanDA pilot, in the PanDA server and their integration with MyProxy, a credential caching system that entitles a person or a service to act in the name of the issuer of the credential. Finally, it presents results from ATLAS user jobs running with gLExec and describes the deployment campaign within ATLAS.

  15. The sequence and de novo assembly of the giant panda genome.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruiqiang; Fan, Wei; Tian, Geng; Zhu, Hongmei; He, Lin; Cai, Jing; Huang, Quanfei; Cai, Qingle; Li, Bo; Bai, Yinqi; Zhang, Zhihe; Zhang, Yaping; Wang, Wen; Li, Jun; Wei, Fuwen; Li, Heng; Jian, Min; Li, Jianwen; Zhang, Zhaolei; Nielsen, Rasmus; Li, Dawei; Gu, Wanjun; Yang, Zhentao; Xuan, Zhaoling; Ryder, Oliver A; Leung, Frederick Chi-Ching; Zhou, Yan; Cao, Jianjun; Sun, Xiao; Fu, Yonggui; Fang, Xiaodong; Guo, Xiaosen; Wang, Bo; Hou, Rong; Shen, Fujun; Mu, Bo; Ni, Peixiang; Lin, Runmao; Qian, Wubin; Wang, Guodong; Yu, Chang; Nie, Wenhui; Wang, Jinhuan; Wu, Zhigang; Liang, Huiqing; Min, Jiumeng; Wu, Qi; Cheng, Shifeng; Ruan, Jue; Wang, Mingwei; Shi, Zhongbin; Wen, Ming; Liu, Binghang; Ren, Xiaoli; Zheng, Huisong; Dong, Dong; Cook, Kathleen; Shan, Gao; Zhang, Hao; Kosiol, Carolin; Xie, Xueying; Lu, Zuhong; Zheng, Hancheng; Li, Yingrui; Steiner, Cynthia C; Lam, Tommy Tsan-Yuk; Lin, Siyuan; Zhang, Qinghui; Li, Guoqing; Tian, Jing; Gong, Timing; Liu, Hongde; Zhang, Dejin; Fang, Lin; Ye, Chen; Zhang, Juanbin; Hu, Wenbo; Xu, Anlong; Ren, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Guojie; Bruford, Michael W; Li, Qibin; Ma, Lijia; Guo, Yiran; An, Na; Hu, Yujie; Zheng, Yang; Shi, Yongyong; Li, Zhiqiang; Liu, Qing; Chen, Yanling; Zhao, Jing; Qu, Ning; Zhao, Shancen; Tian, Feng; Wang, Xiaoling; Wang, Haiyin; Xu, Lizhi; Liu, Xiao; Vinar, Tomas; Wang, Yajun; Lam, Tak-Wah; Yiu, Siu-Ming; Liu, Shiping; Zhang, Hemin; Li, Desheng; Huang, Yan; Wang, Xia; Yang, Guohua; Jiang, Zhi; Wang, Junyi; Qin, Nan; Li, Li; Li, Jingxiang; Bolund, Lars; Kristiansen, Karsten; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Olson, Maynard; Zhang, Xiuqing; Li, Songgang; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jian; Wang, Jun

    2010-01-21

    Using next-generation sequencing technology alone, we have successfully generated and assembled a draft sequence of the giant panda genome. The assembled contigs (2.25 gigabases (Gb)) cover approximately 94% of the whole genome, and the remaining gaps (0.05 Gb) seem to contain carnivore-specific repeats and tandem repeats. Comparisons with the dog and human showed that the panda genome has a lower divergence rate. The assessment of panda genes potentially underlying some of its unique traits indicated that its bamboo diet might be more dependent on its gut microbiome than its own genetic composition. We also identified more than 2.7 million heterozygous single nucleotide polymorphisms in the diploid genome. Our data and analyses provide a foundation for promoting mammalian genetic research, and demonstrate the feasibility for using next-generation sequencing technologies for accurate, cost-effective and rapid de novo assembly of large eukaryotic genomes.

  16. Evolution of the ATLAS PanDA Production and Distributed Analysis System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeno, T.; De, K.; Wenaus, T.; Nilsson, P.; Walker, R.; Stradling, A.; Fine, V.; Potekhin, M.; Panitkin, S.; Compostella, G.

    2012-12-01

    The PanDA (Production and Distributed Analysis) system has been developed to meet ATLAS production and analysis requirements for a data-driven workload management system capable of operating at LHC data processing scale. PanDA has performed well with high reliability and robustness during the two years of LHC data-taking, while being actively evolved to meet the rapidly changing requirements for analysis use cases. We will present an overview of system evolution including automatic rebrokerage and reattempt for analysis jobs, adaptation for the CernVM File System, support for the multi-cloud model through which Tier-2 sites act as members of multiple clouds, pledged resource management and preferential brokerage, and monitoring improvements. We will also describe results from the analysis of two years of PanDA usage statistics, current issues, and plans for the future.

  17. Sequence analysis of a canine parvovirus isolated from a red panda (Ailurus fulgens) in China.

    PubMed

    Qin, Qin; Loeffler, I Kati; Li, Ming; Tian, Kegong; Wei, Fuwen

    2007-06-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) was first recognized in the late 1970 s in dogs and has mutated and spread throughout the world in canid and felid species since then. In this study, a novel CPV was isolated from the endangered red panda (Ailurus fulgens) in China. Nucleotide and phylogenetic analysis of the capsid protein VP2 gene classified the red panda parvovirus (RPPV) as a CPV-2a type. Substitution of Val for Gly at the conserved 300 residue in RPPV presents an unusual variation in the CPV-2a amino acid sequence and is further evidence for the continuing evolution of the virus. The 300 residue is important in distinguishing the antigenicity and host range of CPVs. The clinical significance and population impact of RPPV infection in captive red pandas in China is unknown and is an important topic for future research.

  18. Clinical implications of infection with a novel metastrongyloid species in the red panda (Ailurus fulgens).

    PubMed

    Willesen, Jakob L; Meyland-Smith, Frederik; Wiinberg, Bo; Monrad, Jesper; Bertelsen, Mads F

    2012-06-01

    In a recent survey, 30% of the European red panda (Ailurus fulgens) population was found to be infected with a newly discovered metastrongyloid nematode. In a following prospective study, four naturally infected captive-bred red pandas infected with this parasite were examined and compared with two uninfected control animals. On clinical examination, no abnormalities were detected with respect to vital parameters and cardiovascular system in all six examined animals. Similarly, few and nonspecific changes were recorded on serum biochemistry. No changes on pulmonary pattern were noted on thoracic radiographs. Vertebral heart scores were between 7.2 to 8.6, and no difference was noted between infected and control animals. Two animals had slightly prolonged clotting time and reaction time on thromboelastography but not likely to be of clinical relevance. In conclusion, infection with the newly identified metastrongyloid nematode in the red pandas seems to have little or no clinical importance.

  19. The sequence and de novo assembly of the giant panda genome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruiqiang; Fan, Wei; Tian, Geng; Zhu, Hongmei; He, Lin; Cai, Jing; Huang, Quanfei; Cai, Qingle; Li, Bo; Bai, Yinqi; Zhang, Zhihe; Zhang, Yaping; Wang, Wen; Li, Jun; Wei, Fuwen; Li, Heng; Jian, Min; Li, Jianwen; Zhang, Zhaolei; Nielsen, Rasmus; Li, Dawei; Gu, Wanjun; Yang, Zhentao; Xuan, Zhaoling; Ryder, Oliver A.; Leung, Frederick Chi-Ching; Zhou, Yan; Cao, Jianjun; Sun, Xiao; Fu, Yonggui; Fang, Xiaodong; Guo, Xiaosen; Wang, Bo; Hou, Rong; Shen, Fujun; Mu, Bo; Ni, Peixiang; Lin, Runmao; Qian, Wubin; Wang, Guodong; Yu, Chang; Nie, Wenhui; Wang, Jinhuan; Wu, Zhigang; Liang, Huiqing; Min, Jiumeng; Wu, Qi; Cheng, Shifeng; Ruan, Jue; Wang, Mingwei; Shi, Zhongbin; Wen, Ming; Liu, Binghang; Ren, Xiaoli; Zheng, Huisong; Dong, Dong; Cook, Kathleen; Shan, Gao; Zhang, Hao; Kosiol, Carolin; Xie, Xueying; Lu, Zuhong; Zheng, Hancheng; Li, Yingrui; Steiner, Cynthia C.; Lam, Tommy Tsan-Yuk; Lin, Siyuan; Zhang, Qinghui; Li, Guoqing; Tian, Jing; Gong, Timing; Liu, Hongde; Zhang, Dejin; Fang, Lin; Ye, Chen; Zhang, Juanbin; Hu, Wenbo; Xu, Anlong; Ren, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Guojie; Bruford, Michael W.; Li, Qibin; Ma, Lijia; Guo, Yiran; An, Na; Hu, Yujie; Zheng, Yang; Shi, Yongyong; Li, Zhiqiang; Liu, Qing; Chen, Yanling; Zhao, Jing; Qu, Ning; Zhao, Shancen; Tian, Feng; Wang, Xiaoling; Wang, Haiyin; Xu, Lizhi; Liu, Xiao; Vinar, Tomas; Wang, Yajun; Lam, Tak-Wah; Yiu, Siu-Ming; Liu, Shiping; Zhang, Hemin; Li, Desheng; Huang, Yan; Wang, Xia; Yang, Guohua; Jiang, Zhi; Wang, Junyi; Qin, Nan; Li, Li; Li, Jingxiang; Bolund, Lars; Kristiansen, Karsten; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Olson, Maynard; Zhang, Xiuqing; Li, Songgang; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jian; Wang, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Using next-generation sequencing technology alone, we have successfully generated and assembled a draft sequence of the giant panda genome. The assembled contigs (2.25 gigabases (Gb)) cover approximately 94% of the whole genome, and the remaining gaps (0.05 Gb) seem to contain carnivore-specific repeats and tandem repeats. Comparisons with the dog and human showed that the panda genome has a lower divergence rate. The assessment of panda genes potentially underlying some of its unique traits indicated that its bamboo diet might be more dependent on its gut microbiome than its own genetic composition. We also identified more than 2.7 million heterozygous single nucleotide polymorphisms in the diploid genome. Our data and analyses provide a foundation for promoting mammalian genetic research, and demonstrate the feasibility for using next-generation sequencing technologies for accurate, cost-effective and rapid de novo assembly of large eukaryotic genomes. PMID:20010809

  20. First complete genome sequence of parainfluenza virus 5 isolated from lesser panda.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Jun-Qiong; Zhai, Shao-Lun; Lin, Tao; Liu, Jian-Kui; Wang, He-Xing; Li, Bing; Zhang, He; Zou, Shu-Zhan; Zhou, Xia; Wu, Meng-Fan; Chen, Wu; Luo, Man-Lin

    2017-05-01

    Parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) is widespread in mammals and humans. Up to now, there is little information about PIV5 infection in lesser pandas. In this study, a PIV5 variant (named ZJQ-221) was isolated from a lesser panda with respiratory disease in Guangzhou zoo in Guangdong province, southern China. The full-length genome of ZJQ-221 was found to be 15,246 nucleotides and consisted of seven non-overlapping genes encoding eight proteins (i.e., NP, V, P, M, F, SH, HN and L). Sequence alignment and genetic analysis revealed that ZJQ-221 shared a close relationship with a PIV5 strain of canine-origin (1168-1) from South Korea. The findings of this study confirm the presence of PIV5 in lesser panda and indicate this mammal as a possible natural reservoir. Furthermore they highlight the urgent need to strengthen viral surveillance and control of PIV5 in zoo animals.

  1. Paediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infection (PANDAS).

    PubMed

    Leonard, H L; Swedo, S E

    2001-06-01

    The evidence to date, both published and unpublished, which addresses the validity of the proposed unique subgroup of children with early and abrupt onset of obsessive--compulsive disorder (OCD) and/or tic disorders subsequent to streptococcal infections was reviewed. The aetiology of OCD and tic disorders is unknown, although it appears that both disorders may arise from a variety of genetic and environmental factors. Post-streptococcal autoimmunity has been postulated as one possible mechanism for some. The acronym PANDAS (for paediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections) has been given to a subgroup of paediatric patients who meet five inclusionary criteria: presence of OCD and/or tic disorder, pre-pubertal symptom onset, sudden onset or episodic course of symptoms, temporal association between streptococcal infections and neuropsychiatric symptom exacerbations, and associated neurological abnormalities. The proposed model of pathophysiology provides for several unique treatment strategies, including the use of antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent streptococcal-triggered exacerbations, and the use of immunomodulatory interventions (such as intravenous immunoglobulin or therapeutic plasma exchange) in the treatment severe neuropsychiatric symptoms. For the latter study group, long-term (2--5 yr) follow-up revealed continued symptom improvement for the majority of patients, particularly when antibiotic prophylaxis had been effective in preventing recurrent streptococcal infections. In addition, the episodic nature of the subgroup's illness provides for opportunities to study brain structure and function during health and disease, as well as allowing for investigations of the aetiologic role of anti-neuronal antibodies and neuroimmune dysfunction in both OCD and tic disorders. Although much research remains to be done, an increasing body of evidence provides support for the postulate that OCD and tic disorders may arise

  2. Giant panda BAC library construction and assembly of a 650-kb contig spanning major histocompatibility complex class II region

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Chang-Jun; Pan, Hui-Juan; Gong, Shao-Bin; Yu, Jian-Qiu; Wan, Qiu-Hong; Fang, Sheng-Guo

    2007-01-01

    Background Giant panda is rare and endangered species endemic to China. The low rates of reproductive success and infectious disease resistance have severely hampered the development of captive and wild populations of the giant panda. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) plays important roles in immune response and reproductive system such as mate choice and mother-fetus bio-compatibility. It is thus essential to understand genetic details of the giant panda MHC. Construction of a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library will provide a new tool for panda genome physical mapping and thus facilitate understanding of panda MHC genes. Results A giant panda BAC library consisting of 205,800 clones has been constructed. The average insert size was calculated to be 97 kb based on the examination of 174 randomly selected clones, indicating that the giant panda library contained 6.8-fold genome equivalents. Screening of the library with 16 giant panda PCR primer pairs revealed 6.4 positive clones per locus, in good agreement with an expected 6.8-fold genomic coverage of the library. Based on this BAC library, we constructed a contig map of the giant panda MHC class II region from BTNL2 to DAXX spanning about 650 kb by a three-step method: (1) PCR-based screening of the BAC library with primers from homologous MHC class II gene loci, end sequences and BAC clone shotgun sequences, (2) DNA sequencing validation of positive clones, and (3) restriction digest fingerprinting verification of inter-clone overlapping. Conclusion The identifications of genes and genomic regions of interest are greatly favored by the availability of this giant panda BAC library. The giant panda BAC library thus provides a useful platform for physical mapping, genome sequencing or complex analysis of targeted genomic regions. The 650 kb sequence-ready BAC contig map of the giant panda MHC class II region from BTNL2 to DAXX, verified by the three-step method, offers a powerful tool for

  3. Integration of PanDA workload management system with Titan supercomputer at OLCF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De, K.; Klimentov, A.; Oleynik, D.; Panitkin, S.; Petrosyan, A.; Schovancova, J.; Vaniachine, A.; Wenaus, T.

    2015-12-01

    The PanDA (Production and Distributed Analysis) workload management system (WMS) was developed to meet the scale and complexity of LHC distributed computing for the ATLAS experiment. While PanDA currently distributes jobs to more than 100,000 cores at well over 100 Grid sites, the future LHC data taking runs will require more resources than Grid computing can possibly provide. To alleviate these challenges, ATLAS is engaged in an ambitious program to expand the current computing model to include additional resources such as the opportunistic use of supercomputers. We will describe a project aimed at integration of PanDA WMS with Titan supercomputer at Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF). The current approach utilizes a modified PanDA pilot framework for job submission to Titan's batch queues and local data management, with light-weight MPI wrappers to run single threaded workloads in parallel on Titan's multicore worker nodes. It also gives PanDA new capability to collect, in real time, information about unused worker nodes on Titan, which allows precise definition of the size and duration of jobs submitted to Titan according to available free resources. This capability significantly reduces PanDA job wait time while improving Titan's utilization efficiency. This implementation was tested with a variety of Monte-Carlo workloads on Titan and is being tested on several other supercomputing platforms. Notice: This manuscript has been authored, by employees of Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The publisher by accepting the manuscript for publication acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes.

  4. Hopes and challenges for giant panda conservation under climate change in the Qinling Mountains of China.

    PubMed

    Gong, Minghao; Guan, Tianpei; Hou, Meng; Liu, Gang; Zhou, Tianyuan

    2017-01-01

    One way that climate change will impact animal distributions is by altering habitat suitability and habitat fragmentation. Understanding the impacts of climate change on currently threatened species is of immediate importance because complex conservation planning will be required. Here, we mapped changes to the distribution, suitability, and fragmentation of giant panda habitat under climate change and quantified the direction and elevation of habitat shift and fragmentation patterns. These data were used to develop a series of new conservation strategies for the giant panda. Qinling Mountains, Shaanxi, China. Data from the most recent giant panda census, habitat factors, anthropogenic disturbance, climate variables, and climate predictions for the year 2050 (averaged across four general circulation models) were used to project giant panda habitat in Maxent. Differences in habitat patches were compared between now and 2050. While climate change will cause a 9.1% increase in suitable habitat and 9% reduction in subsuitable habitat by 2050, no significant net variation in the proportion of suitable and subsuitable habitat was found. However, a distinct climate change-induced habitat shift of 11 km eastward by 2050 is predicted firstly. Climate change will reduce the fragmentation of suitable habitat at high elevations and exacerbate the fragmentation of subsuitable habitat below 1,900 m above sea level. Reduced fragmentation at higher elevations and worsening fragmentation at lower elevations have the potential to cause overcrowding of giant pandas at higher altitudes, further exacerbating habitat shortage in the central Qinling Mountains. The habitat shift to the east due to climate change may provide new areas for giant pandas but poses severe challenges for future conservation.

  5. The phylogeny of the red panda (Ailurus fulgens): evidence from the hindlimb.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Rebecca E; Adrian, Brent; Elrod, Clay; Hicks, Michelle

    2008-11-01

    The red panda (Ailurus fulgens) is an endangered carnivore living in the temperate forests of the Himalayas and southern China. The phylogeny of the red panda has been the subject of much debate. Morphological and molecular studies have supported a wide range of possible relationships, including close ties to procyonids, ursids, mustelids, and mephitids. This study provides additional morphological data, including muscle maps, for Ailurus. The hindlimbs of four cadavers from the National Zoological Park were dissected. Red pandas retain a number of muscles lost in other carnivore groups, including muscles and tendons related to their robust and weight-bearing hallux. Three features, including a single-bellied m. sartorius, a proximal insertion for m. abductor digiti V, and an absent m. articularis coxae, are found in all terrestrial arctoids, including Ailurus. In addition, red pandas are similar to ursids and canids in lacking a caudal belly of m. semitendinosus, while they resemble procyonids and mustelids in the degree of fusion observed between mm. gluteus medius and piriformis. Furthermore, Ailurus and procyonids are characterized by numerous subdivisions within the adductor compartment, while red pandas and raccoons share a variable m. semimembranosus, composed of one, two, or three bellies. Lastly, a deep plantar muscle inserting onto the metatarsophalangeal joint of the hallux is described for Ailurus. This muscle has not been previously described and is given the name m. flexor hallucis profundus. Additional dissections of the forelimb and axial musculature of red pandas may shed further light on the phylogeny of this species. In addition, the muscle maps presented here offer a valuable resource for interpreting the functional anatomy of fossil ailurids.

  6. The phylogeny of the red panda (Ailurus fulgens): evidence from the hindlimb

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Rebecca E; Adrian, Brent; Elrod, Clay; Hicks, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    The red panda (Ailurus fulgens) is an endangered carnivore living in the temperate forests of the Himalayas and southern China. The phylogeny of the red panda has been the subject of much debate. Morphological and molecular studies have supported a wide range of possible relationships, including close ties to procyonids, ursids, mustelids, and mephitids. This study provides additional morphological data, including muscle maps, for Ailurus. The hindlimbs of four cadavers from the National Zoological Park were dissected. Red pandas retain a number of muscles lost in other carnivore groups, including muscles and tendons related to their robust and weight-bearing hallux. Three features, including a single-bellied m. sartorius, a proximal insertion for m. abductor digiti V, and an absent m. articularis coxae, are found in all terrestrial arctoids, including Ailurus. In addition, red pandas are similar to ursids and canids in lacking a caudal belly of m. semitendinosus, while they resemble procyonids and mustelids in the degree of fusion observed between mm. gluteus medius and piriformis. Furthermore, Ailurus and procyonids are characterized by numerous subdivisions within the adductor compartment, while red pandas and raccoons share a variable m. semimembranosus, composed of one, two, or three bellies. Lastly, a deep plantar muscle inserting onto the metatarsophalangeal joint of the hallux is described for Ailurus. This muscle has not been previously described and is given the name m. flexor hallucis profundus. Additional dissections of the forelimb and axial musculature of red pandas may shed further light on the phylogeny of this species. In addition, the muscle maps presented here offer a valuable resource for interpreting the functional anatomy of fossil ailurids. PMID:19014366

  7. Analysis of trace elements in the giant panda and arrow bamboo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nengming; Chen, Suqing; Chen, Jianxuan; Zhang, Dazhong; Feng, Wenhe

    1987-04-01

    Trace elements from the giant panda including hair, liver, kidney, ovary and testis, were determined by PIXE. Comparative studies of the elemental contents in hair, liver and kidney from epileptic and normal giant pandas were performed respectively. The differences in the elemental contents of leaf, stalk, and bamboo shoots from normal and withered arrows were determined. For this research work a Van de Graaff electrostatic accelerator and a Si(Li) semiconductor spectrometer at the Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology of Sichuan University were employed.

  8. Non-tuberculous Mycobacteriosis with T-cell Lymphoma in a Red Panda (Ailurus fulgens).

    PubMed

    Fuke, N; Hirai, T; Makimura, N; Goto, Y; Habibi, W A; Ito, S; Trang, N T; Koshino, K; Takeda, M; Yamaguchi, R

    2016-01-01

    A 9-year-old male red panda (Ailurus fulgens) became emaciated and died. Necropsy examination revealed systemic lymphadenomegaly. The liver, lungs and left kidney contained multifocal yellow nodules. Microscopical examination revealed granulomatous inflammation in the liver, lungs, kidney, spleen and lymph nodes, with numerous acid-fast bacilli. Sequencing of genetic material isolated from the tissues classified the pathogen as Mycobacterium gastri. Lymphoma was found in the liver, lungs, kidney and lymph nodes. The neoplastic cells were strongly labelled for expression of CD3, Ki67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen by immunohistochemistry. This is the first report of M. gastri infection with T-cell lymphoma in a red panda.

  9. A link between perianal strep and pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorder associated with streptococcal infection (PANDAS).

    PubMed

    Toufexis, Megan; Deoleo, Caroline; Elia, Josephine; Murphy, Tanya K

    2014-04-01

    Perianal streptococcal dermatitis is an infection caused by group A streptococcus (GAS). Children with a pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorder associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS) phenotype may have tics or obsessive compulsive symptoms secondary to a systemic immune activation by GAS infecting perianal areas. In this retrospective case series, the authors describe three children with symptoms consistent with PANDAS and a confirmed perianal streptococcal dermatitis as the likely infectious trigger. Concomitant perianal dermatitis and new-onset obsessive-compulsive symptoms and/or tics are strong indications for perianal culture and rapid antigen detection test in young children.

  10. Update of the trigger system of the PandaX-II experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Q.; Ren, X.; Chen, X.; Ji, X.; Liu, J.; Lei, S.; Wang, M.; Xiao, M.; Xie, P.; Yan, B.; Yang, Y.

    2017-08-01

    PandaX-II experiment is a dark matter direct detection experiment using about half-ton of liquid xenon as the sensitive target. The electrical pulses detected by photomultiplier tubes from scintillation photons of xenon are recorded by waveform digitizers. The data acquisition of PandaX-II relies on a trigger system that generates common trigger signals for all waveform digitizers. Previously an analog device-based trigger system was used for the data acquisition system. In this paper we present a new FPGA-based trigger system. The design of this system and trigger algorithms are described. The performance of this system on real data is presented.

  11. Phylogeny of the caniform carnivora: evidence from multiple genes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li; Zhang, Ya-ping

    2006-05-01

    The monophyletic group Caniformia in the order Carnivora currently comprises seven families whose relationships remain contentious. The phylogenetic positions of the two panda species within the Caniformia have also been evolutionary puzzles over the past decades, especially for Ailurus fulgens (the red panda). Here, new nuclear sequences from two introns of the beta-fibrinogen gene (beta-fibrinogen introns 4 and 7) and a complete mitochondrial (mt) gene (ND2) from 17 caniform representatives were explored for their utilities in resolving higher-level relationships in the Caniformia. In addition, two previously available nuclear (IRBP exon 1 and TTR intron 1) data sets were also combined and analyzed simultaneously with the newly obtained sequence data in this study. Combined analyses of four nuclear and one mt genes (4417 bp) recover a branching order in which almost all nodes were strongly supported. The present analyses provide evidence in favor of Ailurus fulgens as the closest taxon to the procyonid-mustelid (i.e., Musteloidea sensu stricto) clade, followed by pinnipeds (i.e., Otariidae and Phocidae), Ursidae (including Ailuropoda melanoleuca), and Canidae, the most basal lineage in the Caniformia. The potential utilities of different genes in the context of caniform phylogeny were also evaluated, with special attention to the previously unexplored beta-fibrinogen intron 4 and 7 genes.

  12. Predictions of Chemical Weather in Asia: The EU Panda Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasseur, G. P.; Petersen, A. K.; Wang, X.; Granier, C.; Bouarar, I.

    2014-12-01

    Air quality has become a pressing problem in Asia and specifically in China due to rapid economic development (i.e., rapidly expanding motor vehicle fleets, growing industrial and power generation activities, domestic and biomass burning). In spite of efforts to reduce chemical emissions, high levels of particle matter and ozone are observed and lead to severe health problems with a large number of premature deaths. To support efforts to reduce air pollution, the European Union is supporting the PANDA project whose objective is to use space and surface observations of chemical species as well as advanced meteorological and chemical models to analyze and predict air quality in China. The Project involves 7 European and 7 Chinese groups. The paper will describe the objectives of the project and present some first accomplishments. The project focuses on the improvement of methods for monitoring air quality from combined space and in-situ observations, the development of a comprehensive prediction system that makes use of these observations, the elaboration of indicators for air quality in support of policies, and the development of toolboxes for the dissemination of information.

  13. Spin studies via Drell-Yan processes at PANDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Destefanis, M.

    2014-06-01

    The nucleon structure is still not completely understood. A transverse momentum dependent description of the nucleon structure is a crucial milestone for several forthcoming studies in a wide range of experimental scenarios. By means of antiproton beams, possibly polarized in a later stage of the project, with a beam momentum up to 15 GeV/c, which will be available at the future FAIR facility, the nonperturbative region of QCD is planned to be investigated. One of the main goals of the forthcoming experiments at FAIR is the study of Drell-Yan lepton pairs by means of proton-antiproton annihilations, taking also advantage of the expected high luminosity. The Drell-Yan production is a unique tool to access the spin dependent properties of the nucleon, and in particular its transverse degrees of freedom. Transverse Momentum Dependent (TMD) Parton Distribution Functions (PDFs), i.e. the Boer-Mulders function, the Sivers function, and the Transversity, could be deeply investigated by means of experimental angular asymmetries. In later stages of FAIR, single- and double-spin asymmetries could be investigated as well. The Drell-Yan physics program which could be accessed at FAIR with the PANDA experiment will be discussed in details, in the light of existing results in the field.

  14. Search for Λ-Λ hyperuclei using antiprotons in PANDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Introzzi, R.; Balestra, F.; Iazzi, F.; Lavagno, A.; Rigato, V.; Younis, H.

    2014-06-01

    The Double Hypernuclei are the only systems that allow to study the hyperon-hyperon interaction because the hyperon-hyperon scattering experiments are at present impossible. Experimental data are still very scarce, due to the difficulty of producing the doubly strange hyperon Ξ-, from which a double hypernucleus is formed. The formation of such a hypernucleus proceeds through a multiple-step process and the measurement of the relevant parameters (e.g. energy separation and decay branching ratios) requires high statistics. The PANDA Collaboration planned to exploit the intense beam of the HESR machine at the future facility FAIR to produce Ξ- hyperons from antiproton annihilation in nuclei. A 12C target will be inserted inside the ring: the sizes of the target and the beam spot overlap play a crucial role to avoid serious damage of beam and detectors. The status of the art of the present data, the design of the optimized target and the tests on the prototype will be presented.

  15. Evaluating vacuum phototriodes designed for the PANDA electromagnetic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makónyi, K.; Marcks von Würtemberg, K.; Tegnér, P.-E.; Hansen, K.; Isaksson, L.; Lundin, M.; Schröder, B.; Balkeståhl, L.; Fransson, K.; Johansson, T.; Rosenbaum, C.; Wolke, M.; Erni, W.; Keshelashvili, I.; Krushe, B.

    2014-11-01

    In this work properties of a vacuum phototriode (VPT) and preamplifier unit designed for the electromagnetic calorimeter of the PANDA experiment being built at FAIR are investigated. With the use of lead tungstate and lanthanium bromide scintillators the VPT properties are studied at low photon energies, from tens of keV in the lanthanium bromide measurements and between 10 MeV and 60 MeV in the lead tungstate measurements. At these energies the noise of the VPT unit can be expected to influence its performance significantly. It is shown that the noise contribution to the measured energy resolution, under optimal conditions, is consistent with a fluctuation of (one standard deviation) approximately 200 electrons at the VPT anode. For a lead tungstate crystal this is equivalent to a noise of 1.2 MeV. For lanthanium bromide this makes it possible to use VPTs for gamma ray spectroscopy above a few hundreds of keV without noticeable effects on the energy resolution compared to measurements with a standard photomultiplier.

  16. The readout chain for the bar PANDA MVD strip detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnell, R.; Brinkmann, K.-Th.; Di Pietro, V.; Kleines, H.; Goerres, A.; Riccardi, A.; Rivetti, A.; Rolo, M. D.; Sohlbach, H.; Zaunick, H.-G.

    2015-02-01

    The bar PANDA (antiProton ANnihilation at DArmstadt) experiment will study the strong interaction in annihilation reactions between an antiproton beam and a stationary gas jet target. The detector will comprise different sub-detectors for tracking, particle identification and calorimetry. The Micro-Vertex Detector (MVD) as the innermost part of the tracking system will allow precise tracking and detection of secondary vertices. For the readout of the double-sided silicon strip sensors a custom-made ASIC is being developed, employing the Time-over-Threshold (ToT) technique for digitization and utilize time-to-digital converters (TDC) to provide a high-precision time stamp of the hit. A custom-made Module Data Concentrator ASIC (MDC) will multiplex the data of all front-ends of one sensor towards the CERN-developed GBT chip set (GigaBit Transceiver). The MicroTCA-based MVD Multiplexer Board (MMB) at the off-detector site will receive and concentrate the data from the GBT links and transfer it to FPGA-based compute nodes for global event building.

  17. The Electromagnetic Calorimetry of the PANDA Detector at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novotny, R. W.; PANDA Collaboration

    2012-12-01

    The PANDA collaboration at FAIR, Germany, will focus on undiscovered charm-meson states and glueballs in antiproton annihilations to study QCD phenomena in the non-perturbative regime. For fixed target experiments at the storage ring HESR a 4π-detector for tracking, particle ID and calorimetry is under development and construction to operate at high annihilation rates up to 20 MHz. The electromagnetic calorimeters are composed of a target spectrometer (EMC) based on PbWO4 crystals and a shashlyk-type sampling calorimeter at the most forward region. The EMC, comprising more than 15,000 crystals, is operated at a temperature of -25°C and read-out via large-area avalanche photo-diodes or vacuum phototriodes/tetrodes. The photo sensor signals are continuously digitized by sampling ADCs. More than 50% of the high quality PWO-II crystals are delivered and tested. The excellent performance with respect to energy, time and position information was determined over a shower energy range from 10 MeV up to 15 GeV by operating several prototype detectors. In addition, the concept of stimulated recovery has been investigated to recover radiation damage on- and off-line during the calorimeter operation. Besides the overall concept of the target spectrometer the response function of the shashlyk spectrometer down to photon energies even below 100 MeV is presented.

  18. Cognitive screening in Parkinson's disease: Comparison of the Parkinson Neuropsychometric Dementia Assessment (PANDA) with 3 other short scales.

    PubMed

    Gasser, A-I; Calabrese, P; Kalbe, E; Kessler, J; Rossier, P

    2016-02-01

    Cognitive screening is crucial in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, there is still a lack of short tools in French. In this study, we aimed to compare the Parkinson Neuropsychometric Dementia Assessment (PANDA) with the Mini Mental Parkinson (MMP), the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and the Clock Test in French-speaking patients. We also aimed to propose cut-off scores for cognitive impairment and dementia for the French language version of the PANDA. Fifty-one patients with PD took the PANDA, the MMSE, the MMP, and the Clock Test. They also underwent extensive neuropsychological testing by a neuropsychologist who was blinded to the above-mentioned screening test results. Patients were classified as either having normal cognition (n=15), mild cognitive impairment (n=20) or dementia (n=16). When compared with the three other screening tools, the PANDA exhibited the highest area under the curve (AUC) for both cognitive disorders and dementia. Using the cut-off scores proposed for the German version, the PANDA had 94% specificity and 100% sensitivity for dementia and 100% and 72%, respectively for cognitive disorders. In our study, the PANDA exhibited a higher discriminative power than the three other tests in detecting cognitive disorders and dementia. In PD patients, the PANDA should thus be considered for the detection of cognitive impairment in routine clinical practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Serotypes, virulence factors, and antimicrobial susceptibilities of vaginal and fecal isolates of Escherichia coli from giant pandas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Yan, Qigui; Xia, Xiaodong; Zhang, Yanming; Li, Desheng; Wang, Chengdong; Chen, Shijie; Hou, Rong

    2013-09-01

    Although Escherichia coli typically colonizes the intestinal tract and vagina of giant pandas, it has caused enteric and systemic disease in giant pandas and greatly impacts the health and survival of this endangered species. In order to understand the distribution and characteristics of E. coli from giant pandas, 67 fecal and 30 vaginal E. coli isolates from 21 giant pandas were characterized for O serogroups, phylogenetic groups, antimicrobial susceptibilities, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiles. In addition, these isolates were tested for the presence of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) and diarrheagenic E. coli (DEC) by multiplex PCR detection of specific virulence genes. The most prevalent serogroups for all E. coli isolates were O88, O18, O167, O4, and O158. ExPEC isolates were detected mostly in vaginal samples, and DEC isolates were detected only in fecal samples. Phylogenetic group B1 predominated in fecal isolates, while groups B2 and D were frequently detected in vaginal isolates. Resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was most frequently observed, followed by resistance to nalidixic acid and tetracycline. All except five isolates were typeable by using XbaI and were categorized into 74 PFGE patterns. Our findings indicate that panda E. coli isolates exhibited antimicrobial resistance, and potentially pathogenic E. coli isolates were present in giant pandas. In addition, these E. coli isolates were genetically diverse. This study may provide helpful information for developing strategies in the future to control E. coli infections of giant pandas.

  20. Serotypes, Virulence Factors, and Antimicrobial Susceptibilities of Vaginal and Fecal Isolates of Escherichia coli from Giant Pandas

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Xia, Xiaodong; Li, Desheng; Wang, Chengdong; Chen, Shijie; Hou, Rong

    2013-01-01

    Although Escherichia coli typically colonizes the intestinal tract and vagina of giant pandas, it has caused enteric and systemic disease in giant pandas and greatly impacts the health and survival of this endangered species. In order to understand the distribution and characteristics of E. coli from giant pandas, 67 fecal and 30 vaginal E. coli isolates from 21 giant pandas were characterized for O serogroups, phylogenetic groups, antimicrobial susceptibilities, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiles. In addition, these isolates were tested for the presence of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) and diarrheagenic E. coli (DEC) by multiplex PCR detection of specific virulence genes. The most prevalent serogroups for all E. coli isolates were O88, O18, O167, O4, and O158. ExPEC isolates were detected mostly in vaginal samples, and DEC isolates were detected only in fecal samples. Phylogenetic group B1 predominated in fecal isolates, while groups B2 and D were frequently detected in vaginal isolates. Resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was most frequently observed, followed by resistance to nalidixic acid and tetracycline. All except five isolates were typeable by using XbaI and were categorized into 74 PFGE patterns. Our findings indicate that panda E. coli isolates exhibited antimicrobial resistance, and potentially pathogenic E. coli isolates were present in giant pandas. In addition, these E. coli isolates were genetically diverse. This study may provide helpful information for developing strategies in the future to control E. coli infections of giant pandas. PMID:23793635

  1. A mathematical model with pulse effect for three populations of the giant panda and two kinds of bamboo.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiang-yun; Song, Guo-hua

    2013-01-01

    A mathematical model for the relationship between the populations of giant pandas and two kinds of bamboo is established. We use the impulsive perturbations to take into account the effect of a sudden collapse of bamboo as a food source. We show that this system is uniformly bounded. Using the Floquet theory and comparison techniques of impulsive equations, we find conditions for the local and global stabilities of the giant panda-free periodic solution. Moreover, we obtain sufficient conditions for the system to be permanent. The results provide a theoretical basis for giant panda habitat protection.

  2. Impact of Wenchuan earthquake on the giant panda habitat in Wolong National Nature Reserve, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Cheng; Xu, Yu-Yue; Ke, Chang-Qing; He, Yu-Ting

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring the change of the giant panda habitat is essential to protect this endangered species. The Wolong National Nature Reserve (WNNR) of China, the giant panda habitat, was struck by the Wenchuan earthquake (M=8.0) on May 12, 2008, and was seriously damaged. Landsat images covering the WNNR on four dates, one before and three after the earthquake, are classified using support vector machines to generate land cover maps (with an overall accuracy of ˜90% and Kappa coefficients of ˜0.86). The habitat suitability index and weighted usable area (WUA) are calculated to evaluate the changes of the habitat suitability of the WNNR. The results indicate that the forest area dropped by ˜10% due to the earthquake. The forest located in the east of Wolong town, the home of numerous giant pandas, suffered the most. The WUA decreased significantly after the earthquake, and was showing improvement in 2013, although still not fully recovered to the level of priori earthquake. The habitat between 1200 and 1300 m above sea level (m a.s.l.) was particularly vulnerable and was slowly recovering. Further effective management is necessary to restore and protect the giant panda habitat.

  3. Feasibility studies on time-like proton electromagnetic form factors at PANDA-FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Iris; Dbeyssi, Alaa; Khaneft, Dmitry

    2016-05-01

    This contribution reports on the latest status of the feasibility studies for the measurement of time-like proton electromagnetic form factors (FF's) at the PANDA experiment [1] at FAIR (Germany). Electromagnetic FF's are fundamental quantities parameterizing the electric and magnetic structure of hadrons. In the time-like region proton FF's can be accessed experimentally through the annihilation processes p ¯p → l+l- (l = e, μ), assuming that the interaction takes place through the exchange of one virtual photon. Due to the low luminosity available at colliders in the past, an individual determination of the time-like electric and magnetic proton FF's was not feasible. The statistical precision, at which the proton FF's will be determined at PANDA, is estimated for both signal processes p ¯p → l+l- (l = e, μ) using the PandaRoot software, which encompasses full detector simulation and event reconstruction. The signal identification and suppression of the main background process (p ¯p → π+π-) is studied. Different methods have been used to generate and analyze the processes of interest. The results from the different analyses show that time-like electromagnetic FF's can be measured at PANDA with unprecedented statistical accuracy.

  4. Evolution of the ATLAS PanDA Production and Distributed Analysis System

    SciTech Connect

    Maeno, T.; De, K.; Wenaus, T.; Nilsson, P.; Walker, R.; Stradling, A.; Fine, V.; Potekhin, M.; Panitkin, S.; Compostella, G.

    2012-12-13

    Evolution of the ATLAS PanDA Production and Distributed Analysis System T Maeno1,5, K De2, T Wenaus1, P Nilsson2, R Walker3, A Stradling2, V Fine1, M Potekhin1, S Panitkin1 and G Compostella4 Published under licence by IOP Publishing Ltd Journal of Physics: Conference Series, Volume 396, Part 3 Article PDF References Citations Metrics 101 Total downloads Cited by 8 articles Turn on MathJax Share this article Article information Abstract The PanDA (Production and Distributed Analysis) system has been developed to meet ATLAS production and analysis requirements for a data-driven workload management system capable of operating at LHC data processing scale. PanDA has performed well with high reliability and robustness during the two years of LHC data-taking, while being actively evolved to meet the rapidly changing requirements for analysis use cases. We will present an overview of system evolution including automatic rebrokerage and reattempt for analysis jobs, adaptation for the CernVM File System, support for the multi-cloud model through which Tier-2 sites act as members of multiple clouds, pledged resource management and preferential brokerage, and monitoring improvements. We will also describe results from the analysis of two years of PanDA usage statistics, current issues, and plans for the future.

  5. Ice Velocity Estimation Using SAR Data in PANDA Section, East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, F.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Ice-flow velocity is a significant parameter in dynamic models of the Antarctic ice sheet, indicating how ice is transported from the interior to the ocean and how ice mass evolves. PANDA (Prydz Bay - Amery Ice shelf - Dome A) section is the key area of Chinese expedition in the Antarctic, and many scientific studies have been conducted here. In this research, SAR images including ERS-1/2, Envisat and ALOS were applied to estimate the ice velocity of PANDA Section using DInSAR and offset-tracking methods. Compared to MEaSUREs velocity (ice velocity map of the Antarctic released by National Snow and Ice Data Center) of 450 m resolution, our result with 200 m resolution achieved similar accuracy. Ice mass of PANDA section flows into the ocean mainly through Amery Ice Shelf and Polar Record Glacier. The ice velocity at the front edge of Amery Ice shelf is almost 1500 m/a, and the ice velocity of Polar Record Glacier can reach as high as 800 m/a. At most inner area of PANDA section, ice velocity is below 40 m/a. Due to the blocking of rocks and nunataks, ice flow feature in Grove Mountains area is quite complicated, which can help to demonstrate the meteorite concentration mechanism in this area.

  6. In silico Pathway Activation Network Decomposition Analysis (iPANDA) as a method for biomarker development

    PubMed Central

    Ozerov, Ivan V.; Lezhnina, Ksenia V.; Izumchenko, Evgeny; Artemov, Artem V.; Medintsev, Sergey; Vanhaelen, Quentin; Aliper, Alexander; Vijg, Jan; Osipov, Andreyan N.; Labat, Ivan; West, Michael D.; Buzdin, Anton; Cantor, Charles R.; Nikolsky, Yuri; Borisov, Nikolay; Irincheeva, Irina; Khokhlovich, Edward; Sidransky, David; Camargo, Miguel Luiz; Zhavoronkov, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Signalling pathway activation analysis is a powerful approach for extracting biologically relevant features from large-scale transcriptomic and proteomic data. However, modern pathway-based methods often fail to provide stable pathway signatures of a specific phenotype or reliable disease biomarkers. In the present study, we introduce the in silico Pathway Activation Network Decomposition Analysis (iPANDA) as a scalable robust method for biomarker identification using gene expression data. The iPANDA method combines precalculated gene coexpression data with gene importance factors based on the degree of differential gene expression and pathway topology decomposition for obtaining pathway activation scores. Using Microarray Analysis Quality Control (MAQC) data sets and pretreatment data on Taxol-based neoadjuvant breast cancer therapy from multiple sources, we demonstrate that iPANDA provides significant noise reduction in transcriptomic data and identifies highly robust sets of biologically relevant pathway signatures. We successfully apply iPANDA for stratifying breast cancer patients according to their sensitivity to neoadjuvant therapy. PMID:27848968

  7. Next Generation PanDA Pilot for ATLAS and Other Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, P.; Barreiro Megino, F.; Caballero Bejar, J.; De, K.; Hover, J.; Love, P.; Maeno, T.; Medrano Llamas, R.; Walker, R.; Wenaus, T.; Atlas Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    The Production and Distributed Analysis system (PanDA) has been in use in the ATLAS Experiment since 2005. It uses a sophisticated pilot system to execute submitted jobs on the worker nodes. While originally designed for ATLAS, the PanDA Pilot has recently been refactored to facilitate use outside of ATLAS. Experiments are now handled as plug-ins such that a new PanDA Pilot user only has to implement a set of prototyped methods in the plug-in classes, and provide a script that configures and runs the experiment-specific payload. We will give an overview of the Next Generation PanDA Pilot system and will present major features and recent improvements including live user payload debugging, data access via the Federated XRootD system, stage-out to alternative storage elements, support for the new ATLAS DDM system (Rucio), and an improved integration with glExec, as well as a description of the experiment-specific plug-in classes. The performance of the pilot system in processing LHC data on the OSG, LCG and Nordugrid infrastructures used by ATLAS will also be presented. We will describe plans for future development on the time scale of the next few years.

  8. Prospects for Future Studies of the XYZ: BESIII, GlueX, Panda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Ryan

    2013-04-01

    The unexpected XYZ states of charmonium are still yet to be fully explained. Further progress will require additional experimental input. This talk will review the prospects for future studies of the XYZ states at BESIII (in Beijing, China), GlueX (in Newport News, USA), and Panda (in Darmstadt, Germany).

  9. Thoracic limb morphology of the red panda (Ailurus fulgens) evidenced by osteology and radiography.

    PubMed

    Makungu, Modesta; Groenewald, Hermanus B; du Plessis, Wencke M; Barrows, Michelle; Koeppel, Katja N

    2015-07-15

    The red panda (Ailurus fulgens) is distributed primarily in the Himalayas and southern China. It is classified as a vulnerable species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. The aim of this study was to describe the normal osteology and radiographic anatomy of the thoracic limb of the red panda. Radiography of the right thoracic limb was performed in seven captive adult red pandas. Radiographic findings were correlated with bone specimens from three adult animals. The scapula was wide craniocaudally and presented with a large area for the origin of the teres major muscle. The square-shaped major tubercle did not extend proximal to the head of the humerus. The medial epicondyle was prominent. A supracondylar foramen was present. The radial tuberosity and sesamoid bone for the abductor digiti I longus were prominent. The accessory carpal bone was directed palmarolaterally. Metacarpal bones were widely spread. The thoracic limb morphology of the red panda evidenced by osteology and radiography indicated flexibility of the thoracic limb joints and well-developed flexor and supinator muscles, which are important in arboreal quadrupedal locomotion. Knowledge gained during this study may prove useful in identifying skeletal material or remains and diagnosing musculoskeletal diseases and injuries of the thoracic limb.

  10. Outbreak and genotyping of canine distemper virus in captive Siberian tigers and red pandas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, He; Shan, Fen; Zhou, Xia; Li, Bing; Zhai, Jun-Qiong; Zou, Shu-Zhan; Wu, Meng-Fan; Chen, Wu; Zhai, Shao-Lun; Luo, Man-Lin

    2017-08-15

    In this study, four canine distemper virus (CDV) strains were isolated from captive Siberian tigers (Panthera tigris altaica) and red pandas (Ailurus fulgens) during two separate CDV outbreaks in a zoo in Guangdong province, China. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses based on the full-length hemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) genes showed that they were closely identical to genotype Asia-1. Prior to confirmation of CDV in Siberian tigers, to control spread of the disease, a live attenuated combination CDV vaccine was used among almost all carnivore animals except for red pandas in which another recombinant combination CDV vaccine was used. However, about two months later, CDV re-emerged and caused the death among red pandas. Based on the vaccination records, the live combination vaccine could be considered an ideal weapon against CDV in zoo carnivore animals. Although the recombinant combination CDV vaccine was safe for red pandas, its protection effectiveness remains to be further investigated. Moreover, according to the outbreak interval time and sequence characterization, we suspected that stray cats circulating in the zoo were the intermediate host, which contributed to CDV spread from stray dogs to zoo animals. This study revealed the importance of vaccination and biosecurity for zoo animals.

  11. Krypton and radon background in the PandaX-I dark matter experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Chen, X.; Cui, X.; Fu, C.; Ji, X.; Lin, Q.; Liu, J.; Liu, X.; Tan, A.; Wang, X.; Xiao, M.; Xie, P.

    2017-02-01

    We discuss an in-situ evaluation of the 85Kr, 222Rn, and 220Rn background in PandaX-I, a 120-kg liquid xenon dark matter direct detection experiment. Combining with a simulation, their contributions to the low energy electron-recoil background in the dark matter search region are obtained.

  12. [Assessment of giant panda habitat based on integration of expert system and neural network].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuehua; Skidmore, Andrew K; Bronsveld, M C

    2006-03-01

    To conserve giant panda effectively, it is important to understand the spatial pattern and temporal change of its habitat. Mapping is an effective approach for wildlife habitat evaluation and monitoring. The application of recently developed artificial intelligence tools, including expert systems and neural networks, could integrate qualitative and quantitative information for modeling complex systems, and built the information into a GIS, which could be helpful for giant panda habitat mapping. This study built a mapping approach for giant panda habitat mapping, which integrated expert system and neural network classifiers (ESNNC), and used multi-type data within GIS. The giant panda habitat types and their suitability were mapped by ESNNC. The results showed that the habitat types and their suitability in Foping Nature Reserve were assessed with a higher accuracy (> 80 %) by ESNNC, compared with non-integrated classifiers, i. e., expert system, neural network, and maximum likelihood. Z-statistic test showed that ESNNC was significantly better than the other three non-integrated classifiers. It was recommended that the integrated approach could be widely applied into wildlife habitat assessment.

  13. In silico Pathway Activation Network Decomposition Analysis (iPANDA) as a method for biomarker development.

    PubMed

    Ozerov, Ivan V; Lezhnina, Ksenia V; Izumchenko, Evgeny; Artemov, Artem V; Medintsev, Sergey; Vanhaelen, Quentin; Aliper, Alexander; Vijg, Jan; Osipov, Andreyan N; Labat, Ivan; West, Michael D; Buzdin, Anton; Cantor, Charles R; Nikolsky, Yuri; Borisov, Nikolay; Irincheeva, Irina; Khokhlovich, Edward; Sidransky, David; Camargo, Miguel Luiz; Zhavoronkov, Alex

    2016-11-16

    Signalling pathway activation analysis is a powerful approach for extracting biologically relevant features from large-scale transcriptomic and proteomic data. However, modern pathway-based methods often fail to provide stable pathway signatures of a specific phenotype or reliable disease biomarkers. In the present study, we introduce the in silico Pathway Activation Network Decomposition Analysis (iPANDA) as a scalable robust method for biomarker identification using gene expression data. The iPANDA method combines precalculated gene coexpression data with gene importance factors based on the degree of differential gene expression and pathway topology decomposition for obtaining pathway activation scores. Using Microarray Analysis Quality Control (MAQC) data sets and pretreatment data on Taxol-based neoadjuvant breast cancer therapy from multiple sources, we demonstrate that iPANDA provides significant noise reduction in transcriptomic data and identifies highly robust sets of biologically relevant pathway signatures. We successfully apply iPANDA for stratifying breast cancer patients according to their sensitivity to neoadjuvant therapy.

  14. Integration Of PanDA Workload Management System With Supercomputers for ATLAS and Data Intensive Science

    SciTech Connect

    De, K; Jha, S; Klimentov, A; Maeno, T; Nilsson, P; Oleynik, D; Panitkin, S; Wells, Jack C; Wenaus, T

    2016-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), operating at the international CERN Laboratory in Geneva, Switzerland, is leading Big Data driven scientific explorations. Experiments at the LHC explore the fundamental nature of matter and the basic forces that shape our universe, and were recently credited for the discovery of a Higgs boson. ATLAS, one of the largest collaborations ever assembled in the sciences, is at the forefront of research at the LHC. To address an unprecedented multi-petabyte data processing challenge, the ATLAS experiment is relying on a heterogeneous distributed computational infrastructure. The ATLAS experiment uses PanDA (Production and Data Analysis) Workload Management System for managing the workflow for all data processing on over 150 data centers. Through PanDA, ATLAS physicists see a single computing facility that enables rapid scientific breakthroughs for the experiment, even though the data centers are physically scattered all over the world. While PanDA currently uses more than 250,000 cores with a peak performance of 0.3 petaFLOPS, LHC data taking runs require more resources than Grid computing can possibly provide. To alleviate these challenges, LHC experiments are engaged in an ambitious program to expand the current computing model to include additional resources such as the opportunistic use of supercomputers. We will describe a project aimed at integration of PanDA WMS with supercomputers in United States, Europe and Russia (in particular with Titan supercomputer at Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF), MIRA supercomputer at Argonne Leadership Computing Facilities (ALCF), Supercomputer at the National Research Center Kurchatov Institute , IT4 in Ostrava and others). Current approach utilizes modified PanDA pilot framework for job submission to the supercomputers batch queues and local data management, with light-weight MPI wrappers to run single threaded workloads in parallel on LCFs multi-core worker nodes. This implementation

  15. Integration Of PanDA Workload Management System With Supercomputers for ATLAS and Data Intensive Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimentov, A.; De, K.; Jha, S.; Maeno, T.; Nilsson, P.; Oleynik, D.; Panitkin, S.; Wells, J.; Wenaus, T.

    2016-10-01

    The.LHC, operating at CERN, is leading Big Data driven scientific explorations. Experiments at the LHC explore the fundamental nature of matter and the basic forces that shape our universe. ATLAS, one of the largest collaborations ever assembled in the sciences, is at the forefront of research at the LHC. To address an unprecedented multi-petabyte data processing challenge, the ATLAS experiment is relying on a heterogeneous distributed computational infrastructure. The ATLAS experiment uses PanDA (Production and Data Analysis) Workload Management System for managing the workflow for all data processing on over 150 data centers. Through PanDA, ATLAS physicists see a single computing facility that enables rapid scientific breakthroughs for the experiment, even though the data centers are physically scattered all over the world. While PanDA currently uses more than 250,000 cores with a peak performance of 0.3 petaFLOPS, LHC data taking runs require more resources than grid can possibly provide. To alleviate these challenges, LHC experiments are engaged in an ambitious program to expand the current computing model to include additional resources such as the opportunistic use of supercomputers. We will describe a project aimed at integration of PanDA WMS with supercomputers in United States, in particular with Titan supercomputer at Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility. Current approach utilizes modified PanDA pilot framework for job submission to the supercomputers batch queues and local data management, with light-weight MPI wrappers to run single threaded workloads in parallel on LCFs multi-core worker nodes. This implementation was tested with a variety of Monte-Carlo workloads on several supercomputing platforms for ALICE and ATLAS experiments and it is in full pro duction for the ATLAS since September 2015. We will present our current accomplishments with running PanDA at supercomputers and demonstrate our ability to use PanDA as a portal independent of the

  16. Fast SiPM Readout of the PANDA TOF Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhm, M.; Lehmann, A.; Motz, S.; Uhlig, F.

    2016-05-01

    For the identification of low momentum charged particles and for event timing purposes a barrel Time-of-Flight (TOF) detector surrounding the interaction point is planned for the PANDA experiment at FAIR . Since the boundary conditions in terms of available radial space and radiation length are quite strict the favored layout is a hodoscope composed of several thousand small scintillating tiles (SciTils) read out by silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs). A time resolution of well below 100 ps is aimed for. With the originally proposed 30 × 30 × 5 mm3 SciTils read out by two single 3 × 3 mm2 SiPMs at the rims of the scintillator the targeted time resolution can be just reached, but with a considerable position dependence across the scintillator surface. In this paper we discuss other design options to further improve the time resolution and its homogeneity. It will be shown that wide scintillating rods (SciRods) with a size of, e.g., 50 × 30 × 5 mm3 or longer and read out at opposite sides by a chain of four serially connected SiPMs a time resolution down to 50 ps can be reached without problems. In addition, the position dependence of the time resolution is negligible. These SciRods were tested in the laboratory with electrons of a 90Sr source and under real experimental conditions in a particle beam at CERN. The measured time resolutions using fast BC418 or BC420 plastic scintillators wrapped in aluminum foil were consistently between 45 and 75 ps dependent on the SciRod design. This is a significant improvement compared to the original SciTil layout.

  17. PanDA Pilot Submission using Condor-G: Experience and Improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao X.; Hover John; Wlodek Tomasz; Wenaus Torre; Frey Jaime; Tannenbaum Todd; Livny Miron

    2011-01-01

    PanDA (Production and Distributed Analysis) is the workload management system of the ATLAS experiment, used to run managed production and user analysis jobs on the grid. As a late-binding, pilot-based system, the maintenance of a smooth and steady stream of pilot jobs to all grid sites is critical for PanDA operation. The ATLAS Computing Facility (ACF) at BNL, as the ATLAS Tier1 center in the US, operates the pilot submission systems for the US. This is done using the PanDA 'AutoPilot' scheduler component which submits pilot jobs via Condor-G, a grid job scheduling system developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In this paper, we discuss the operation and performance of the Condor-G pilot submission at BNL, with emphasis on the challenges and issues encountered in the real grid production environment. With the close collaboration of Condor and PanDA teams, the scalability and stability of the overall system has been greatly improved over the last year. We review improvements made to Condor-G resulting from this collaboration, including isolation of site-based issues by running a separate Gridmanager for each remote site, introduction of the 'Nonessential' job attribute to allow Condor to optimize its behavior for the specific character of pilot jobs, better understanding and handling of the Gridmonitor process, as well as better scheduling in the PanDA pilot scheduler component. We will also cover the monitoring of the health of the system.

  18. PanDA Pilot Submission using Condor-G: Experience and Improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xin; Hover, John; Wlodek, Tomasz; Wenaus, Torre; Frey, Jaime; Tannenbaum, Todd; Livny, Miron; ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    PanDA (Production and Distributed Analysis) is the workload management system of the ATLAS experiment, used to run managed production and user analysis jobs on the grid. As a late-binding, pilot-based system, the maintenance of a smooth and steady stream of pilot jobs to all grid sites is critical for PanDA operation. The ATLAS Computing Facility (ACF) at BNL, as the ATLAS Tier1 center in the US, operates the pilot submission systems for the US. This is done using the PanDA "AutoPilot" scheduler component which submits pilot jobs via Condor-G, a grid job scheduling system developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In this paper, we discuss the operation and performance of the Condor-G pilot submission at BNL, with emphasis on the challenges and issues encountered in the real grid production environment. With the close collaboration of Condor and PanDA teams, the scalability and stability of the overall system has been greatly improved over the last year. We review improvements made to Condor-G resulting from this collaboration, including isolation of site-based issues by running a separate Gridmanager for each remote site, introduction of the 'Nonessential' job attribute to allow Condor to optimize its behavior for the specific character of pilot jobs, better understanding and handling of the Gridmonitor process, as well as better scheduling in the PanDA pilot scheduler component. We will also cover the monitoring of the health of the system.

  19. Diversity and prevalence of metastrongyloid nematodes infecting the red panda (Ailurus fulgens) in European zoos.

    PubMed

    Bertelsen, Mads F; Meyland-Smith, Frederik; Willesen, Jakob L; Jefferies, Ryan; Morgan, Eric R; Monrad, Jesper

    2010-09-20

    Metastrongyloid induced pneumonia has been described sporadically in the red panda (Ailurus fulgens). Early descriptions in pandas recently imported to the USA from China involved parasites morphologically similar to Angiostrongylus spp. and Crenosomatidae. More recently, four cases of severe verminous pneumonia associated with Angiostrongylus vasorum have been reported from European zoos. A coprological survey of the red panda population within European zoos was conducted in 2008. Faecal samples from 115 pandas originating from 54 zoos were collected on 3 consecutive days. Using Baermann technique, 40 animals (35%) from 20 zoos (37%) were found to shed metastrongyloid first stage larvae (L(1)). Based on their morphology and size, the L(1) observed could be divided into three morphologically distinct types: (1) a Crenosoma sp. type (n=5, overall prevalence: 4.3%), (2) an A. vasorum type (n=3, 2.6%), and (3) an unidentified metastrongyloid species, similar to, but morphologically distinct from A. vasorum (n=32, 27.8%). Further confirmation of species identification was provided by PCR amplification and sequencing of the 18S rRNA gene, which confirmed three different species. The novel Crenosoma species was most genetically analogous to Crenosoma mephitidis and the unidentified metastrongyloid species was most similar to Stenurus minor and Torynurus convulutus. Routine and quarantine health care of red pandas in captivity should take account of the risk of Angiostrongylus and Crenosoma infection in endemic areas, but should also be cognisant of the widespread presence of an apparently less pathogenic species of lungworm. The identity of the two potentially novel species is subject to further work.

  20. The use of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog deslorelin for short-term contraception in red pandas (Ailurus fulgens).

    PubMed

    Koeppel, Katja N; Barrows, Michelle; Visser, Katherine

    2014-01-15

    Red pandas (Ailurus fulgens) are threatened with extinction owing to habitat loss, exacerbated by their unique ecology and low fecundity. Regional breeding programs manage captive red panda populations. Recommendations not to breed may be made for various reasons, including genetic overrepresentation of certain individuals. No recommendations have been published on the use of contraception for red pandas. This article discusses the use of the GnRH analog deslorelin as a reversible method of contraception in both male and female pandas. The mean time from last contraception to conception was 3 years with a 4.6-mg deslorelin implant. The average dose of GnRH implant received was 1.09 mg/kg (range, 0.88-1.32). Males returned to breeding sooner than females. No reproductive side effects were noted with up to three consecutive annual GnRH implants.

  1. Treatment and prevention of natural heartworm (Dirofilaria immitis) infections in red pandas (Ailurus fulgens) with selamectin and ivermectin.

    PubMed

    Lan, Jingchao; Fu, Yan; Yang, Zhi; Zhang, Zhihe; Wang, Chengdong; Luo, Li; Liu, Li; Gu, Xiaobin; Wang, Shuxian; Peng, Xuerong; Yang, Guangyou

    2012-06-01

    Ten of the 48 red pandas in the Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding, Sichuan province, China, died in 2006 after prolonged periods of depression, weight loss, and mucocutaneous membrane xanthochromia. During postmortem examination, live heartworms were found in the right cardiac ventricles and pulmonary arteries of all 10 animals. Selamectin and ivermectin were used for clinical prophylaxis in the remaining red pandas between December 2006 and November 2010. We observed a gradual decrease in morbidity and mortality during this period. As a consequence of our prophylaxis program, dirofilariosis did not occur in the remaining red pandas at Chengdu Research Base during 2010. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Hybrid embryos produced by transferring panda or cat somatic nuclei into rabbit MII oocytes can develop to blastocyst in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wen, Duan-Cheng; Bi, Chun-Ming; Xu, Ying; Yang, Cai-Xia; Zhu, Zi-Yu; Sun, Qing-Yuan; Chen, Da-Yuan

    2005-08-01

    The developmental potential of hybrid embryos produced by transferring panda or cat fibroblasts into nucleated rabbit oocytes was assessed. Both the panda-rabbit and the cat-rabbit hybrid embryos were able to form blastocysts in vitro. However, the rates of attaining the two-cell, four-cell, eight-cell, morula, or blastocyst stages for panda-rabbit hybrids were significantly greater than those of cat-rabbit hybrids (P<0.05). Transferring the rabbit fibroblasts into nucleated rabbit oocytes, 31.0% of the blastocyst rate was obtained, which was significantly higher than that of both the panda-rabbit and the cat-rabbit hybrid embryos (P<0.05). Whether or not the second polar body (PB2) was extruded from the one-cell hybrid embryos (both panda-rabbit and cat-rabbit hybrids) significantly affected their developmental capacity. Embryos without an extruded PB2 showed a higher capacity to develop into blastocysts (panda-rabbit: 19.2%; cat-rabbit: 4.3%), while embryos with extruded PB2 could only develop to the morula stage. The hybrid embryos formed pronucleus-like structures (PN) in 2-4 hr after activation, and the number of PN in one-cell embryos varied from one to five. Tracking of the nucleus in the egg after fusion revealed that the somatic nucleus could approach and aggregate with the oocyte nucleus spontaneously. Chromosome analysis of the panda-rabbit blastocysts showed that the karyotype of the hybrid embryos (2n=86) consisted of chromosomes from both the panda (2n=42) and the rabbit (2n=44). The results demonstrate that (1) it is possible to produce genetic hybrid embryos by interspecies nuclear transfer; (2) the developmental potential of the hybrid embryos is highly correlated to the donor nucleus species; and (3) the hybrid genome is able to support the complete preimplantation embryonic development of the hybrids.

  3. Italian version of the Parkinson Neuropsychometric Dementia Assessment (PANDA): a useful instrument to detect cognitive impairments in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Pignatti, Riccardo; Bertella, Laura; Scarpina, Federica; Mauro, Alessandro; Portolani, Elisa; Calabrese, Pasquale

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is frequently characterized by cognitive and affective dysfunctions. The "Parkinson Neuropsychometric Dementia Assessment" (PANDA) is a screening tool designed for the early detection of mild cognitive impairment as well as dementia in PD. The PANDA is already validated in German and in French. The aim of the present work was to provide normative data for the Italian-speaking population, Swiss regions included; moreover, the effectiveness of the PANDA compared to the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) was tested. One-hundred and eleven PD patients with and without cognitive impairment and one-hundred and three matched healthy subjects participated at this study; all patients underwent an extensive neuropsychological evaluation. A PANDA total score of 13 appeared to be the most fitting cut-off with a sensitivity of 96.6% and a specificity of 82.2%; with the MMSE, the same value of sensitivity but with a specificity of 72,4% was reached only by adopting a cut-off of 28. Moreover, a PANDA range of 13-17 appeared to be suggestive for possible cognitive disturbance. The present work provides evidence for the effectiveness of the PANDA in evaluating cognitive deficits also in PD Italian-speaking patients, even when their pathological degree is still initial or very mild.

  4. Comparison of microhabitats and foraging strategies between the captive-born Zhangxiang and wild giant pandas: implications for future reintroduction.

    PubMed

    Lei, Miaowen; Yuan, Shibin; Yang, Zisong; Hong, Mingsheng; Yang, Xuyu; Gu, Xiaodong; Huang, Feng; Zhang, Zejun

    2015-10-01

    The female giant panda Zhangxiang (pedigree number 826) was born on August 20, 2011 in Wolong Nature Reserve, China. On November 6, 2013, Zhangxiang was transported into the acclimatization enclosure in the Liziping Nature Reserve. Before Zhangxiang left the enclosure into the wild, we conducted the first study to compare microhabitats and foraging strategies between Zhangxiang in the enclosure and giant pandas in the wild. Compared with the latter, microhabitats of Zhangxiang in the enclosure are characteristic of gentler slope, more trees, higher canopy, smaller tree DBH, and lower density of living bamboos. Diet composition and foraging behaviors significantly differed between Zhangxiang and wild giant pandas, perhaps reflecting the combined consequence of environmental conditions (e.g., bamboo species) and individual status (e.g., age, mastication ability, etc.). The difference in microhabitats and foraging strategies between Zhangxiang and wild giant pandas implied that after being released into the natural habitat in the reserve, Zhangxiang will have to adapt to the environmental conditions once again. For future reintroduction, the enclosure can be extended to the Bashania spanostachya forest in the reserve, and captive giant pandas for release can thus normally transit into the wild without human intervention during acclimatization period. For other acclimatization enclosures to be constructed in the future, ecological environment inside, including topography, forests, and bamboos as well, should as possible as can match the habitat that the giant panda to-be-reinforced populations inhabit.

  5. Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal Infections (PANDAS): An Evolving Concept

    PubMed Central

    Macerollo, Antonella; Martino, Davide

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcus infections (PANDAS) originated from the observational work of Swedo and collaborators, who formalized their definition in 1998 in a set of operational criteria. The application of these criteria, which focuses on tics and obsessive-compulsive symptoms as core symptoms, has encountered difficulties, eventually leading to a high rate of misdiagnosis. In particular, the core feature represented by the association between newly diagnosed infections and neuropsychiatric symptom relapses in youths with this diagnosis could not be demonstrated by longitudinal studies. Exploratory studies aiming to identify clinical or cognitive features that could discriminate PANDAS from other pediatric obsessive-compulsive and tic disorders present methodological limitations, and therefore are not conclusive. Other behavioral features, in addition to obsessive-compulsive symptoms and tics, have been included in pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndromes (PANS) and childhood acute neuropsychiatric syndromes (CANS), two new concepts recently proposed in order to define a much broader clinical spectrum encompassing etiologically diverse entities. Given the uncertainties on the clinical definition of PANDAS, it is not surprising that evidence in support of a post-infectious, immune-mediated pathophysiology is also insufficient. Anti-dopamine receptor antibodies might be relevant to both Sydenham’s chorea (SC)—the prototypical post-streptococcal neuropsychiatric disorder—and some rare forms of encephalitis targeting the basal ganglia specifically, but studies exploring their association with children fulfilling Swedo’s criteria for PANDAS have been inconclusive. Moreover, we lack evidence in favor of the efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis or tonsillectomy in patients fulfilling Swedo’s criteria for PANDAS, whereas a response to immune-mediated treatments like intravenous immunoglobulins has been

  6. Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal Infections (PANDAS): An Evolving Concept.

    PubMed

    Macerollo, Antonella; Martino, Davide

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcus infections (PANDAS) originated from the observational work of Swedo and collaborators, who formalized their definition in 1998 in a set of operational criteria. The application of these criteria, which focuses on tics and obsessive-compulsive symptoms as core symptoms, has encountered difficulties, eventually leading to a high rate of misdiagnosis. In particular, the core feature represented by the association between newly diagnosed infections and neuropsychiatric symptom relapses in youths with this diagnosis could not be demonstrated by longitudinal studies. Exploratory studies aiming to identify clinical or cognitive features that could discriminate PANDAS from other pediatric obsessive-compulsive and tic disorders present methodological limitations, and therefore are not conclusive. Other behavioral features, in addition to obsessive-compulsive symptoms and tics, have been included in pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndromes (PANS) and childhood acute neuropsychiatric syndromes (CANS), two new concepts recently proposed in order to define a much broader clinical spectrum encompassing etiologically diverse entities. Given the uncertainties on the clinical definition of PANDAS, it is not surprising that evidence in support of a post-infectious, immune-mediated pathophysiology is also insufficient. Anti-dopamine receptor antibodies might be relevant to both Sydenham's chorea (SC)-the prototypical post-streptococcal neuropsychiatric disorder-and some rare forms of encephalitis targeting the basal ganglia specifically, but studies exploring their association with children fulfilling Swedo's criteria for PANDAS have been inconclusive. Moreover, we lack evidence in favor of the efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis or tonsillectomy in patients fulfilling Swedo's criteria for PANDAS, whereas a response to immune-mediated treatments like intravenous immunoglobulins has been documented by

  7. The bamboo-eating giant panda harbors a carnivore-like gut microbiota, with excessive seasonal variations.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zhengsheng; Zhang, Wenping; Wang, Linghua; Hou, Rong; Zhang, Menghui; Fei, Lisong; Zhang, Xiaojun; Huang, He; Bridgewater, Laura C; Jiang, Yi; Jiang, Chenglin; Zhao, Liping; Pang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Zhihe

    2015-05-19

    The giant panda evolved from omnivorous bears. It lives on a bamboo-dominated diet at present, but it still retains a typical carnivorous digestive system and is genetically deficient in cellulose-digesting enzymes. To find out whether this endangered mammalian species, like other herbivores, has successfully developed a gut microbiota adapted to its fiber-rich diet, we conducted a 16S rRNA gene-based large-scale structural profiling of the giant panda fecal microbiota. Forty-five captive individuals were sampled in spring, summer, and late autumn within 1 year. Significant intraindividual variations in the diversity and structure of gut microbiota across seasons were observed in this population, which were even greater than the variations between individuals. Compared with published data sets involving 124 gut microbiota profiles from 54 mammalian species, these giant pandas, together with 9 captive and 7 wild individuals investigated previously, showed extremely low gut microbiota diversity and an overall structure that diverged from those of nonpanda herbivores but converged with those of carnivorous and omnivorous bears. The giant panda did not harbor putative cellulose-degrading phylotypes such as Ruminococcaceae and Bacteroides bacteria that are typically enriched in other herbivores, but instead, its microbiota was dominated by Escherichia/Shigella and Streptococcus bacteria. Members of the class Clostridia were common and abundant in the giant panda gut microbiota, but most of the members present were absent in other herbivores and were not phylogenetically related with known cellulolytic lineages. Therefore, the giant panda appears not to have evolved a gut microbiota compatible with its newly adopted diet, which may adversely influence the coevolutionary fitness of this herbivore. The giant panda, an endangered mammalian species endemic to western China, is well known for its unique bamboo diet. Unlike other herbivores that have successfully evolved

  8. First results of the front-end ASIC for the strip detector of the PANDA MVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quagli, T.; Brinkmann, K.-T.; Calvo, D.; Di Pietro, V.; Lai, A.; Riccardi, A.; Ritman, J.; Rivetti, A.; Rolo, M. D.; Stockmanns, T.; Wheadon, R.; Zambanini, A.

    2017-03-01

    PANDA is a key experiment of the future FAIR facility and the Micro Vertex Detector (MVD) is the innermost part of its tracking system. PASTA (PAnda STrip ASIC) is the readout chip for the strip part of the MVD. The chip is designed to provide high resolution timestamp and charge information with the Time over Threshold (ToT) technique. Its architecture is based on Time to Digital Converters with analog interpolators, with a time bin width of 50 ps. The chip implements Single Event Upset (SEU) protection techniques for its digital parts. A first full-size prototype with 64 channels was produced in a commercial 110 nm CMOS technology and the first characterizations of the prototype were performed.

  9. Feasibility study for the measurement of πN transition distribution amplitudes with PANDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atomssa, Ermias

    2016-05-01

    Transition Distribution Amplitudes (TDA) are parametrizations of the hadronic matrix elements that occur in the perturbative Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD) calculations of a certain family of reactions within the framework of collinear factorization. We propose a complete feasibility study of the measurement of one of the reactions covered by the TDA models p ¯p →π0J /ψ (J /ψ →e+e-) at PANDA (AntiProton ANnihilation at DArmstadt) experiment currently under construction at the future FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research). We show that PANDA will be ideally suited to access the relevant observables, in particular the pion-to-nucleon TDAs (πN TDAs) which are important for the understanding of the pion cloud contribution in the nucleon wave function.

  10. Material screening with HPGe counting station for PandaX experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Chen, X.; Fu, C.; Ji, X.; Liu, X.; Mao, Y.; Wang, H.; Wang, S.; Xie, P.; Zhang, T.

    2016-12-01

    A gamma counting station based on high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector was set up for the material screening of the PandaX dark matter experiments in the China Jinping Underground Laboratory. Low background gamma rate of 2.6 counts/min within the energy range of 20 to 2700 keV is achieved due to the well-designed passive shield. The sentivities of the HPGe detetector reach mBq/kg level for isotopes like K, U, Th, and even better for Co and Cs, resulted from the low-background rate and the high rel