Science.gov

Sample records for panel products progress

  1. Low VOC drying of lumber and wood panel products. Progress report No. 5

    SciTech Connect

    Wild, P.; Yan, Hui; Banerjee, S.

    1997-10-01

    This progress report summarizes three accomplishments in a study of low volatile organic compound (VOC) drying of lumber and wood panel products. A mathematical model for predicting moisture emissions from particle was constructed and is being extended to VOCs. VOCs emissions from drying boards show that VOCs appear to be evenly released from all surfaces. Preliminary results from monthly analyses of loblolly pines indicate that resin acids appear to decrease between March to August, and that no consistent trends are apparent for terpenes. 3 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Low VOC drying of lumber and wood panel products: Progress report No. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Boerner, J.; Su, Wei; Banerjee, Sujit; Shmulsky, Rubin; Thompson, Ashlie; Ingram, Leonard; Conners, Terry

    1997-03-01

    Studies on the removal of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from wood or wood products were conducted. Steam-induced extraction of VOC from oriented strand board (OSB) was studied using a tube furnace at 130 C which resulted in over 50% removal in 30 minutes. RF treatment of softwood lumber removed up to 68% of VOC in 20 minutes. Studies on the transport of moisture in wood confirmed that transport is greatest in the transverse surface, followed by the tangential and radial faces.

  3. Low VOC drying of lumber and wood panel products. Progress report No. 7

    SciTech Connect

    Hui Yan; Hooda, Usha; Banerjee, Sujit

    1998-03-01

    Green pine blocks (2x1x 1) were dried to different moisture levels at 120 degrees C. They were immersed in D{sub 2}O (greater than 99% isotopic Content) for different periods at room temperature, and were then cut in halves. One piece from each set was then wrapped in plastic, and microwaved at 110 W, for 30 minutes, with the field being cycled to keep the wood surface at 90-100 degrees C. Fibers taken from just inside the wet surface from five regions along the length of the piece were then analysed by mass spectrometry with a direct insertion probe. The m/e profiles of the three isotopic forms of water, namely H{sub 2}O, HOD, and D{sub 2}O, remained unchanged as the wood was heated inside the spectrometer, indicating that they were bound equally strongly to the wood. The water released from the green wood had the same isotopic composition regardless of whether or not the wood was microwaved (Table 1), indicating that the exchangeable protons in wood were not affected by microwaving. However, as the wood progressively dried, the water released from the microwaved wood was of lower isotopic content, which means that microwaving increases access of the exchangeable protons in wood tissue to water. The only exchangeable protons in dried wood are those sited on hydroxyl groups, and the difference in isotopic exchange is the greatest for dried wood. This must mean that as wood dries, internal hydrogen bonding restricts access of D{sub 2}O to the hydroxyl protons. Presumably the energy transferred to water upon microwaving is sufficient to at least partially overcome this barrier. The effect is akin to the hysteresis that occurs for moisture sorption to green and dried wood. Similar isotope exchange work with D{sub 2}O has been previously conducted to determine the accessibility of cellulose to water.

  4. Low VOC drying of lumber and wood panel products. Progress report No. 8

    SciTech Connect

    Su, W.; Yan, H.; Hooda, U.; Wild, M.P.; Banerjee, S.; Shmulsky, R.; Thompson, A.; Ingram, L.; Conners, T.

    1998-07-01

    This study was initiated by an Institute of Paper Science and Technology finding that heating softwood in a low-headspace environment removed much of the VOCs without removing the water. This offered the possibility of removing VOCs from wet wood, capturing them as a product, and then drying the VOC-depleted wood conventionally with little or no VOC controls. Two means of low-headspace heating were explored: steam and radiofrequency (RF). It was found in the previous year, that while both steam and RF were able to drive out VOCs, steam was impracticably slow for lumber. Hence the effect of RF or microwave on wood was the principal focus of the work reported here. Finally, in order to understand the mechanism of VOC release, the transport of the VOCs in wood was studied, together with the seasonal effects that influence VOC concentration in trees.

  5. Low VOC drying of lumber and wood panel products. Progress report No. 4, annual summary

    SciTech Connect

    Boerner, J.; Su, Wei; Yan, Hui

    1997-07-01

    Heating softwood in a low-headspace environment draws out the VOCs from the wood, without removing the water. The VOCs can be collected from the headspace, and represent a valuable product. The VOC-depleted wood can then be dried conventionally with much reduced emissions. Heating can be accomplished through radiofrequency (RF) or steam. For lumber, steam is inefficient, but brief RF treatment under low-headspace conditions draws out 80% of the VOCs. The power used is quite low, since the RF energy is not used to remove water, but only to maintain the wood at a set temperature. The technology is now at the pre-pilot stage. Either steam or RF can be used for particle, OSB, and veneer, again under low-headspace conditions. Increasing steam temperature facilitates VOC removal. In order to understand the mechanism of VOC release in lumber, the transport of water and VOCs to the surface is being studied as a function of sample size and orientation. Characterization of the terpenes and resin/fatty acids from a control set of trees is underway in order to define the seasonal influence on VOCs.

  6. Progressive Failure Analysis of Composite Stiffened Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Yarrington, Phillip W.; Collier, Craig S.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2006-01-01

    A new progressive failure analysis capability for stiffened composite panels has been developed based on the combination of the HyperSizer stiffened panel design/analysis/optimization software with the Micromechanics Analysis Code with Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC). MAC/GMC discretizes a composite material s microstructure into a number of subvolumes and solves for the stress and strain state in each while providing the homogenized composite properties as well. As a result, local failure criteria may be employed to predict local subvolume failure and the effects of these local failures on the overall composite response. When combined with HyperSizer, MAC/GMC is employed to represent the ply level composite material response within the laminates that constitute a stiffened panel. The effects of local subvolume failures can then be tracked as loading on the stiffened panel progresses. Sample progressive failure results are presented at both the composite laminate and the composite stiffened panel levels. Deformation and failure model predictions are compared with experimental data from the World Wide Failure Exercise for AS4/3501-6 graphite/epoxy laminates.

  7. 7. CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS VIEW (INTERIOR) OF CONTROL ROOM PANEL INSIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS VIEW (INTERIOR) OF CONTROL ROOM PANEL INSIDE BUNKER. SHOWS OPENING TO CABLE CHASE, FOUR PULLEY DEVICES, POWER OUTLET, CONDUIT, AND EAST END WALL OF BUNKER. INEL PHOTO NUMBER 65-5441, TAKEN OCTOBER 20, 1965. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  8. Progressive Failure Studies of Stiffened Panels Subjected to Shear Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.; Jaunky, Navin; Hilburger, Mark W.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Experimental and analytical results are presented for progressive failure of stiffened composite panels with and without a notch and subjected to in plane shear loading well into their postbuckling regime. Initial geometric imperfections are included in the finite element models. Ply damage modes such as matrix cracking, fiber-matrix shear, and fiber failure are modeled by degrading the material properties. Experimental results from the test include strain field data from video image correlation in three dimensions in addition to other strain and displacement measurements. Results from nonlinear finite element analyses are compared with experimental data. Good agreement between experimental data and numerical results are observed for the stitched stiffened composite panels studied.

  9. Progressive Failure Studies of Composite Panels with and without Cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaunky, Navin; Ambur, Damodar R.; Davila, Carlos G.; Hilburger, Mark; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Progressive failure analyses results are presented for composite panels with and without a cutout and subjected to in-plane shear loading and compression loading well into their postbuckling regime. Ply damage modes such as matrix cracking, fiber-matrix shear, and fiber failure are modeled by degrading the material properties. Results from finite element analyses are compared with experimental data. Good agreement between experimental data and numerical results are observed for most structural configurations when initial geometric imperfections are appropriately modeled.

  10. Post Buckling Progressive Failure Analysis of Composite Laminated Stiffened Panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anyfantis, Konstantinos N.; Tsouvalis, Nicholas G.

    2012-06-01

    The present work deals with the numerical prediction of the post buckling progressive and final failure response of stiffened composite panels based on structural nonlinear finite element methods. For this purpose, a progressive failure model (PFM) is developed and applied to predict the behaviour of an experimentally tested blade-stiffened panel found in the literature. Failure initiation and propagation is calculated, owing to the accumulation of the intralaminar failure modes induced in fibre reinforced composite materials. Hashin failure criteria have been employed in order to address the fiber and matrix failure modes in compression and tension. On the other hand, the Tsai-Wu failure criterion has been utilized for addressing shear failure. Failure detection is followed with the introduction of corresponding material degradation rules depending on the individual failure mechanisms. Failure initiation and failure propagation as well as the post buckling ultimate attained load have been numerically evaluated. Final failure behaviour of the simulated stiffened panel is due to sudden global failure, as concluded from comparisons between numerical and experimental results being in good agreement.

  11. Progressive Failure Studies of Composite Panels With and Without Cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.; Jaunky, Navin; Davila, Carlos G.; Hilburger, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Progressive failure analyses results are presented for composite panels with and without a cutout and are subjected to in-plane shear loading and compression loading well into their post-buckling regime. Ply damage modes such as matrix cracking, fiber-matrix shear, and fiber failure are modeled by degrading the material properties. Results from finite element analyses are compared with experimental data. Good agreement between experimental data and numerical results are observed for most structural configurations when initial geometric imperfections are appropriately modeled.

  12. Low-cost production of solar-cell panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickler, D. B.; Gallagher, B. D.; Sanchez, L. E.

    1980-01-01

    Large-scale production model combines most modern manufacturing techniques to produce silicon-solar-cell panels of low costs by 1982. Model proposes facility capable of operating around the clock with annual production capacity of 20 W of solar cell panels.

  13. Application of Interface Technology in Progressive Failure Analysis of Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleight, D. W.; Lotts, C. G.

    2002-01-01

    A progressive failure analysis capability using interface technology is presented. The capability has been implemented in the COMET-AR finite element analysis code developed at the NASA Langley Research Center and is demonstrated on composite panels. The composite panels are analyzed for damage initiation and propagation from initial loading to final failure using a progressive failure analysis capability that includes both geometric and material nonlinearities. Progressive failure analyses are performed on conventional models and interface technology models of the composite panels. Analytical results and the computational effort of the analyses are compared for the conventional models and interface technology models. The analytical results predicted with the interface technology models are in good correlation with the analytical results using the conventional models, while significantly reducing the computational effort.

  14. Dissemination Recommendations on and Descriptions of Exemplary Products. Panel Review of Products (PROP), 1972-1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Wesley W.; And Others

    The 23 products selected in the Panel Review of Products (PROP) in 1972-1973 and the dissemination recommendations made are discussed, and product descriptions are provided. The product descriptions present information as to what each product is, what it does, and whom it is designed to serve. Emphasis is given to evaluation evidence on…

  15. Multipurpose Panel Display Device Investigation. [technology assessment and product development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliwa, R.

    1977-01-01

    A multipurpose panel was developed to provide a flexible control and a LED display panel with easily changeable nomenclature for use in applications where panel space is limited, but where a number of similar subsystems must be controlled, or where basic panel nomenclature and functions must be changed rapidly, as in the case of between mission changes of space shuttle payloads. In the first application, panel area limitations are overcome by time sharing a central control panel among several subsystems. In the latter case, entire control panel changes are effected by simply replacing a memory module, thereby reducing the extent of installation and checkout procedures between missions. Several types of control technologies (other than LED's) which show potential in meeting criteria for overcoming limitations of the panel are assessed.

  16. The Fifth Calibration/Data Product Validation Panel Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The minutes and associated documents prepared from presentations and meetings at the Fifth Calibration/Data Product Validation Panel meeting in Boulder, Colorado, April 8 - 10, 1992, are presented. Key issues include (1) statistical characterization of data sets: finding statistics that characterize key attributes of the data sets, and defining ways to characterize the comparisons among data sets; (2) selection of specific intercomparison exercises: selecting characteristic spatial and temporal regions for intercomparisons, and impact of validation exercises on the logistics of current and planned field campaigns and model runs; and (3) preparation of data sets for intercomparisons: characterization of assumptions, transportable data formats, labeling data files, content of data sets, and data storage and distribution (EOSDIS interface).

  17. 77 FR 17524 - Roseburg Forest Products, Composite Panels Division, Missoula, MT; Notice of Affirmative...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-26

    ... Register on February 21, 2012 (77 FR 9973). The workers engage in activities related to the production of... Employment and Training Administration Roseburg Forest Products, Composite Panels Division, Missoula, MT... workers and former workers of Roseburg Forest Products, Composite Panels Division, Missoula,...

  18. Intralaminar and Interlaminar Progressive Failure Analysis of Composite Panels with Circular Cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goyal, Vinay K.; Jaunky, Navin; Johnson, Eric R.; Ambur, Damodar

    2002-01-01

    A progressive failure methodology is developed and demonstrated to simulate the initiation and material degradation of a laminated panel due to intralaminar and interlaminar failures. Initiation of intralaminar failure can be by a matrix-cracking mode, a fiber-matrix shear mode, and a fiber failure mode. Subsequent material degradation is modeled using damage parameters for each mode to selectively reduce lamina material properties. The interlaminar failure mechanism such as delamination is simulated by positioning interface elements between adjacent sublaminates. A nonlinear constitutive law is postulated for the interface element that accounts for a multi-axial stress criteria to detect the initiation of delamination, a mixed-mode fracture criteria for delamination progression, and a damage parameter to prevent restoration of a previous cohesive state. The methodology is validated using experimental data available in the literature on the response and failure of quasi-isotropic panels with centrally located circular cutouts loaded into the postbuckling regime. Very good agreement between the progressive failure analyses and the experimental results is achieved if the failure analyses includes the interaction of intralaminar and interlaminar failures.

  19. A Progressive Damage Methodology for Residual Strength Predictions of Notched Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coats, Timothy W.; Harris, Charles E.

    1998-01-01

    The translaminate fracture behavior of carbon/epoxy structural laminates with through-penetration notches was investigated to develop a residual strength prediction methodology for composite structures. An experimental characterization of several composite materials systems revealed a fracture resistance behavior that was very similar to the R-curve behavior exhibited by ductile metals. Fractographic examinations led to the postulate that the damage growth resistance was primarily due to fractured fibers in the principal load-carrying plies being bridged by intact fibers of the adjacent plies. The load transfer associated with this bridging mechanism suggests that a progressive damage analysis methodology will be appropriate for predicting the residual strength of laminates with through-penetration notches. A progressive damage methodology developed by the authors was used to predict the initiation and growth of matrix cracks and fiber fracture. Most of the residual strength predictions for different panel widths, notch lengths, and material systems were within about 10% of the experimental failure loads.

  20. 21 CFR 355.55 - Principal display panel of all fluoride rinse drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Principal display panel of all fluoride rinse drug products. 355.55 Section 355.55 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... § 355.55 Principal display panel of all fluoride rinse drug products. In addition to the statement...

  1. 21 CFR 355.55 - Principal display panel of all fluoride rinse drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Principal display panel of all fluoride rinse drug products. 355.55 Section 355.55 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... § 355.55 Principal display panel of all fluoride rinse drug products. In addition to the statement...

  2. 21 CFR 352.50 - Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE SUNSCREEN DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Labeling § 352.50 Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug products. In addition to the statement...

  3. 21 CFR 352.50 - Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE SUNSCREEN DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Labeling § 352.50 Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug products. In addition to the statement...

  4. 21 CFR 352.50 - Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE SUNSCREEN DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Labeling § 352.50 Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug products. In addition to the statement...

  5. 21 CFR 352.50 - Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE SUNSCREEN DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Labeling § 352.50 Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug products. In addition to the statement...

  6. 21 CFR 352.50 - Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE SUNSCREEN DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Labeling § 352.50 Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug products. In addition to the statement...

  7. 75 FR 58414 - Dental Products Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Amendment of Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-24

    ... (75 FR 33315). The amendment is being made to reflect a change in the Agenda portion of the document... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Dental Products Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory... Administration (FDA) is announcing an amendment to the notice of meeting of the Dental Products Panel of...

  8. 21 CFR 355.55 - Principal display panel of all fluoride rinse drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Principal display panel of all fluoride rinse drug products. 355.55 Section 355.55 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... § 355.55 Principal display panel of all fluoride rinse drug products. In addition to the statement...

  9. 21 CFR 355.55 - Principal display panel of all fluoride rinse drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Principal display panel of all fluoride rinse drug products. 355.55 Section 355.55 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... § 355.55 Principal display panel of all fluoride rinse drug products. In addition to the statement...

  10. Flight Qualification And Production Results With Large Area Space Solar Cells And Panel Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S. K.; Hanley, James; Jun, Bogim; Bardfield, Rina; Stone, Beth

    2011-10-01

    Spectrolab's product roadmap provides improvement in product performance in parallel with continuous cost reduction to maintain competitive standing in our industry. Product performance improvement is achieved by developing higher efficiency solar cells (e.g. 29.5% XTJ and 33% IMM cells).Reduced product cost is achieved historically through a variety of means including yield improvements, direct material cost reductions, process changes, and most recently, a transition to large area cell configurations (e.g. "LEONE" at 59.65 cm2). Spectrolab has successfully completed the qualification of its latest triple junction space solar cell, the 29.5% 2 XTJ (26.62 cm ), per AIAA-S-111-2005 - augmented by additional Spectrolab testing. Large area LEONE UTJ and XTJ cells (59.65 cm2 from 100 mm diameter germanium wafer) have also been qualified. Use of these large area cells has resulted in the reduction of solar panel cost, add-on mass and manufacturing cycle time for programs. This evolution to larger area cells is the result of a strategic cost reduction effort initiated in 2006; the first step of which was to manufacture the largest possible cells (LEONE) using the 100 mm germanium (Ge) wafer. In flight production since 2007, the LEONE UTJ cell has now completed rigorous qualification testing to 15,549 GEO (Geosynchronous orbit) and 66,060 LEO (Low Earth Orbit) thermal cycles. Over 53,000 LEONE UTJ cells, including more than 27,000 cells on panels delivered to flight programs, have been produced to date. The on-orbit performance of the LEONE UTJ cells is nominal. Finally, progress on the second step of our strategic cost reduction effort towards larger cells and less piece part handling is presented. This effort involves the establishment of a 150 mm Ge -based manufacturing infrastructure.

  11. Fuselage Versus Subcomponent Panel Response Correlation Based on ABAQUS Explicit Progressive Damage Analysis Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Kevin E.; Satyanarayana, Arunkumar; Bogert, Philip B.

    2016-01-01

    Analysis performed in this study substantiates the need for high fidelity vehicle level progressive damage analyses (PDA) structural models for use in the verification and validation of proposed sub-scale structural models and to support required full-scale vehicle level testing. PDA results are presented that capture and correlate the responses of sub-scale 3-stringer and 7-stringer panel models and an idealized 8-ft diameter fuselage model, which provides a vehicle level environment for the 7-stringer sub-scale panel model. Two unique skin-stringer attachment assumptions are considered and correlated in the models analyzed: the TIE constraint interface versus the cohesive element (COH3D8) interface. Evaluating different interfaces allows for assessing a range of predicted damage modes, including delamination and crack propagation responses. Damage models considered in this study are the ABAQUS built-in Hashin procedure and the COmplete STress Reduction (COSTR) damage procedure implemented through a VUMAT user subroutine using the ABAQUS/Explicit code.

  12. A Progressive Damage Methodology for Residual Strength Predictions of Center-Crack Tension Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coats, Timothy William

    1996-01-01

    An investigation of translaminate fracture and a progressive damage methodology was conducted to evaluate and develop a residual strength prediction capability for laminated composites with through penetration notches. This is relevant to the damage tolerance of an aircraft fuselage that might suffer an in-flight accident such as an uncontained engine failure. An experimental characterization of several composite materials systems revealed an R-curve type of behavior. Fractographic examinations led to the postulate that this crack growth resistance could be due to fiber bridging, defined here as fractured fibers of one ply bridged by intact fibers of an adjacent ply. The progressive damage methodology is currently capable of predicting the initiation and growth of matrix cracks and fiber fracture. Using two difference fiber failure criteria, residual strength was predicted for different size panel widths and notch lengths. A ply discount fiber failure criterion yielded extremely conservative results while an elastic-perfectly plastic fiber failure criterion showed that the fiber bridging concept is valid for predicting residual strength for tensile dominated failure loads. Furthermore, the R-curves predicted by the model using the elastic-perfectly plastic fiber criterion compared very well with the experimental R-curves.

  13. Ash-Based Building Panels Production and Demonstration of Aerock Decking Building Product

    SciTech Connect

    Alan E. Bland; Jesse Newcomer

    2007-06-30

    Western Research Institute (WRI) of Laramie, Wyoming and AeRock, LLC of Eagar, Arizona (formerly of Bellevue, Washington) partnered, under sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (U.S. DOE-NETL), to support the development of rapid-setting, ash-based, fiber-incorporated ''green'' building products. Green building materials are a rapidly growing trend in the building and construction industry in the US. A two phase project was implemented wherein Phase I assessed, through chemical and physical testing, ash, ash-based cement and fiber composites exhibiting superior structural performance when applied to the AeRock mixing and extrusion process and involved the conduct of pilot-scale production trials of AeRock products, and wherein Phase II involved the design, construction, and operation of a commercial-scale plant to confirm production issues and to produce panels for performance evaluations. Phase I optimized the composite ingredients including ash-based cement, Class F and Class C DFGD ash, and various fiber reinforcements. Additives, such as retardants and accelerators, were also evaluated as related to extruder performance. The optimized composite from the Phase I effort was characterized by a modulus of rupture (MOR) measured between 1,931 and 2,221 psi flexural strength, comparable to other wood and non-wood building materials. Continuous extrusion of the optimum composite in the AeRock pilot-scale facility produced an excellent product that was assembled into a demonstration for exhibit and durability purposes. Finishes, from plain to marbled, from bright reds to muted earth tones and with various textures, could easily be applied during the mixing and extrusion process. The successful pilot-scale demonstration was in turn used to design the production parameters and extruder dies for a commercial scale demonstration at Ultrapanel Pty, Ltd of Ballarat, Australia under Phase II. The initial commercial-scale production

  14. A novel heuristic for optimization aggregate production problem: Evidence from flat panel display in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Kuhali, K.; Hussain M., I.; Zain Z., M.; Mullenix, P.

    2015-05-01

    Aim: This paper contribute to the flat panel display industry it terms of aggregate production planning. Methodology: For the minimization cost of total production of LCD manufacturing, a linear programming was applied. The decision variables are general production costs, additional cost incurred for overtime production, additional cost incurred for subcontracting, inventory carrying cost, backorder costs and adjustments for changes incurred within labour levels. Model has been developed considering a manufacturer having several product types, which the maximum types are N, along a total time period of T. Results: Industrial case study based on Malaysia is presented to test and to validate the developed linear programming model for aggregate production planning. Conclusion: The model development is fit under stable environment conditions. Overall it can be recommended to adapt the proven linear programming model to production planning of Malaysian flat panel display industry.

  15. An expert panel report of a proposed scientific model demonstrating the effectiveness of antibacterial handwash products.

    PubMed

    Boyce, John M; Dupont, Herbert L; Massaro, Joseph; Sack, David; Schaffner, Donald W

    2012-10-01

    In 2005, a US Food and Drug Administration Nonprescription Drug Advisory Committee (NDAC) review of consumer antiseptic handwash product studies concluded that the data regarding existing products failed to demonstrate any association between specific log reductions of bacteria achieved by antiseptic handwashing and reduction of infection. The NDAC recommended that consumer antibacterial handwashing products should demonstrate a reduction in infection compared with non-antibacterial handwash products. In response to the NDAC review, a consumer product industry-sponsored expert panel meeting was held in October 2007 to review new methods for assessing the efficacy of antibacterial handwashes. The expert panel reviewed a newly proposed model for linking the effectiveness of antibacterial handwashing to infection reduction and made recommendations for conducting future studies designed to demonstrate the efficacy of antibacterial handwash formulations. The panel concluded that using the surrogate infection model to demonstrate efficacy has a sound scientific basis, that the use of Shigella flexneri as a test organism coupled with a modified hand contamination procedure is supported by published data, and that the model represents a realistic test for the efficacy of consumer antibacterial handwash products. This article summarizes the expert panel's deliberations, conclusions, and recommendations.

  16. An expert panel report of a proposed scientific model demonstrating the effectiveness of antibacterial handwash products.

    PubMed

    Boyce, John M; Dupont, Herbert L; Massaro, Joseph; Sack, David; Schaffner, Donald W

    2012-10-01

    In 2005, a US Food and Drug Administration Nonprescription Drug Advisory Committee (NDAC) review of consumer antiseptic handwash product studies concluded that the data regarding existing products failed to demonstrate any association between specific log reductions of bacteria achieved by antiseptic handwashing and reduction of infection. The NDAC recommended that consumer antibacterial handwashing products should demonstrate a reduction in infection compared with non-antibacterial handwash products. In response to the NDAC review, a consumer product industry-sponsored expert panel meeting was held in October 2007 to review new methods for assessing the efficacy of antibacterial handwashes. The expert panel reviewed a newly proposed model for linking the effectiveness of antibacterial handwashing to infection reduction and made recommendations for conducting future studies designed to demonstrate the efficacy of antibacterial handwash formulations. The panel concluded that using the surrogate infection model to demonstrate efficacy has a sound scientific basis, that the use of Shigella flexneri as a test organism coupled with a modified hand contamination procedure is supported by published data, and that the model represents a realistic test for the efficacy of consumer antibacterial handwash products. This article summarizes the expert panel's deliberations, conclusions, and recommendations. PMID:22300895

  17. Further development of a Low Cost Solar Panel. Semiannual technical progress report, September 28, 1979-March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, T.; Erskine, D.; Short, R.; Torok, R.

    1980-04-01

    The primary objective of this phase of the Low Cost Solar Panel (LCSP) development is to fabricate, test, and gain practical operational experience on a full-scale prototype panel section, with emphasis on the unglazed configuration. The program includes design refinement, fabrication of full-scale prototypes by hand and semiautomated equipment, subscale and full-scale structural testing, outdoor performance tests, and an assessment of manufacturing requirements and production costs. The report describes the LCSP concept in more detail, the project approach and the more significant accomplishments to date.

  18. 75 FR 33315 - Dental Products Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ... received by FDA concerning the final rule on the classification of dental amalgam, which published in the... adequacy of the risk assessment performed by FDA in classifying dental amalgam in light of a new report on... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Dental Products Panel of the Medical Devices...

  19. The Impact of Educational Mismatch on Firm Productivity: Evidence from Linked Panel Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kampelmann, Stephan; Rycx, Francois

    2012-01-01

    We provide first evidence regarding the direct impact of educational mismatch on firm productivity. To do so, we rely on representative linked employer-employee panel data for Belgium covering the period 1999-2006. Controlling for simultaneity issues, time-invariant unobserved workplace characteristics, cohort effects and dynamics in the…

  20. Production status of GaAs/Ge solar cells and panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, B.; Gillanders, M.; Vijayakumar, P.; Lillington, D.; Yang, H.; Rolph, R.

    1991-01-01

    GaAs/Ge solar cells with lot average efficiencies in excess of 18 percent were produced by MOCVD growth techniques. A description of the cell, its performance and the production facility are discussed. Production GaAs/Ge cells of this type were recently assembled into circuits and bonded to aluminum honeycomb panels to be used as the solar array for the British UOSAT-F program.

  1. [Progress on engineered strains for ethanol production].

    PubMed

    Wang, Fan-qiang; Xu, Ping

    2006-08-01

    With the 21 century's coming, the era of cheap oil is coming to the end. There has been an increasing worldwide interest in fuel ethanol. In the last two decades, lots of work has been done to develop strains for ethanol producing. Research progress on metabolic engineering of strains for fuel ethanol production is summarized, including genetically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae to utilize starch, pentose and cellulose, Zymomonas mobilis to ferment arabinose and xylose, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella oxytoca to introduce heterogenous ethanol production pathway. The aim of engineering these strains is to obtain an ideal microorganism which can converse the available carbon sources to ethanol rapidly and efficiently with high tolerance to ethanol and to inhibitory components in the cheap materials such as lignocellulose hydrolysate. The importance of fuel ethanol will be a stimulus to develop engineered hardy strains to utilize cheap materials for high ethanol concentration production. Since both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zymomonas mobilis are generally regarded as safe (GRAS), genetically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae which can utilize raw starch directly and recombinant Zymomonas mobilis which can ferment glucose, arabinose and xylose in the lignocellulose hydrolysate have potential application to industry in the near future.

  2. Post-Buckling and Ultimate Strength Analysis of Stiffened Composite Panel Base on Progressive Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guofan; Sun, Xiasheng; Sun, Zhonglei

    Stiffened composite panel is the typical thin wall structure applied in aerospace industry, and its main failure mode is buckling subjected to compressive loading. In this paper, the development of an analysis approach using Finite Element Method on post-buckling behavior of stiffened composite structures under compression was presented. Then, the numerical results of stiffened panel are obtained by FE simulations. A thorough comparison were accomplished by comparing the load carrying capacity and key position strains of the specimen with test. The comparison indicates that the FEM results which adopted developed methodology could meet the demand of engineering application in predicting the post-buckling behavior of intact stiffened structures in aircraft design stage.

  3. Will the future lie in multitude? A critical appraisal of biomarker panel studies on prediction of diabetic kidney disease progression.

    PubMed

    Schutte, Elise; Gansevoort, Ron T; Benner, Jacqueline; Lutgers, Helen L; Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J

    2015-08-01

    Diabetic kidney disease is diagnosed and staged by albuminuria and estimated glomerular filtration rate. Although albuminuria has strong predictive power for renal function decline, there is still variability in the rate of renal disease progression across individuals that are not fully captured by the level of albuminuria. Therefore, research focuses on discovering and validating additional biomarkers that improve risk stratification for future renal function decline and end-stage renal disease in patients with diabetes, on top of established biomarkers. Most studies address the value of single biomarkers to predict progressive renal disease and aim to understand the mechanisms that underlie accelerated renal function decline. Since diabetic kidney disease is a disease encompassing several pathophysiological processes, a combination of biomarkers may be more likely to improve risk prediction than a single biomarker. In this review, we provide an overview of studies on the use of multiple biomarkers and biomarker panels, appraise their study design, discuss methodological pitfalls and make recommendations for future biomarker panel studies.

  4. Comparison of Advanced SPF Die Technologies in the Forming of a Production Panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Y.; Luckey, S. G.; Copple, W. B.; Friedman, P. A.

    2008-04-01

    Superplastic forming (SPF) is a manufacturing process that can facilitate increased use of aluminum in automobile body structures. Despite considerable advantages with regards to formability and tooling costs, the process has been mostly limited to low volume production due to relatively long cycle times and the need to use specially processed sheet alloys. To address these issues, advanced processes such as two stage gas forming (TSGF) and hot draw mechanical pre-forming (HDMP) have been developed. Advantages of these processes have been demonstrated on the forming of a complex dash panel part. Final thickness distribution and forming time on this part manufactured with these two processes were compared to that of the same panel produced with conventional SPF. The HDMP technology which combines hot stamping with SPF was found to have the capability of forming a complex shaped component with a superior thickness profile and faster forming cycle than that formed with a conventional single stage or two stage forming cycle. Additionally, the HDMP process proved to be a robust process with a wide temperature window and allowed for the forming of lower-cost, non-spf aluminum, and magnesium sheet alloys. Finally, analysis of the post-form microstructure indicated that there was essentially no cavitation in panels formed with the HDMP process and that material with a coarse grain structure could be successfully formed.

  5. 21 CFR 328.50 - Principal display panel of all OTC drug products intended for oral ingestion that contain alcohol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Principal display panel of all OTC drug products... OTC drug products intended for oral ingestion that contain alcohol. (a) The amount (percentage) of... contain no alcohol (0 percent). (f) For any OTC drug product intended for oral ingestion containing over...

  6. 21 CFR 328.50 - Principal display panel of all OTC drug products intended for oral ingestion that contain alcohol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Principal display panel of all OTC drug products... OTC drug products intended for oral ingestion that contain alcohol. (a) The amount (percentage) of... contain no alcohol (0 percent). (f) For any OTC drug product intended for oral ingestion containing over...

  7. SNS Cryomodule Production Progress & Key Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    John Hogan; Edward Daly; John Fischer; Joseph Preble; Timothy Whitlatch; Mark Wiseman

    2003-09-08

    Jefferson Lab has been commissioned to design and manufacture one prototype, eleven-.61 Beta and twelve-.81 Beta cryomodules for the Spallation Neutron Source project. The production process is up and running with half of the .61 Beta cryomodules complete to date. This paper will present an overview of the beginning of production, with an emphasis on key lessons learned, that have been used to refine cryomodule production.

  8. Optimization of outdoor cultivation in flat panel airlift reactors for lipid production by Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Münkel, Ronja; Schmid-Staiger, Ulrike; Werner, Achim; Hirth, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    Microalgae are discussed as a potential renewable feedstock for biofuel production. The production of highly concentrated algae biomass with a high fatty acid content, accompanied by high productivity with the use of natural sunlight is therefore of great interest. In the current study an outdoor pilot plant with five 30 L Flat Panel Airlift reactors (FPA) installed southwards were operated in 2011 in Stuttgart, Germany. The patented FPA reactor works on the basis of an airlift loop reactor and offers efficient intermixing for homogeneous light distribution. A lipid production process with the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris (SAG 211-12), under nitrogen and phosphorous deprivation, was established and evaluated in regard to the fatty acid content, fatty acid productivity and light yield. In the first set of experiments limitations caused by restricted CO₂ availability were excluded by enriching the media with NaOH. The higher alkalinity allows a higher CO₂ content of supplied air and leads to doubling of fatty acid productivity. The second set of experiments focused on how the ratio of light intensity to biomass concentration in the reactor impacts fatty acid content, productivity and light yield. The specific light availability was specified as mol photons on the reactor surface per gram biomass in the reactor. This is the first publication based on experimental data showing the quantitative correlation between specific light availability, fatty acid content and biomass light yield for a lipid production process under nutrient deprivation and outdoor conditions. High specific light availability leads to high fatty acid contents. Lower specific light availability increases fatty acid productivity and biomass light yield. An average fatty acid productivity of 0.39 g L⁻¹  day⁻¹ for a 12 days batch process with a final fatty acid content of 44.6% [w/w] was achieved. Light yield of 0.4 g mol photons⁻¹ was obtained for the first 6 days of

  9. Gender-specific Regulatory Challenges to Product Approval: A Panel Discussion

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Alyson J.; Barr, Helen; Greenberg, Marna Rayl; Safdar, Basmah; Wildgoose, Peter; Wright, David W.; Hollander, Judd E.

    2015-01-01

    On May 13, 2014, a 1-hour panel discussion session titled “Gender-Specific Regulatory Challenges to Product Approval” was held during the Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference, “Gender-Specific Research in Emergency Medicine: Investigate, Understand, and Translate How Gender Affects Patient Outcomes.” The session sought to bring together leaders in emergency medicine (EM) research, authors, and reviewers in EM research publications, as well as faculty, fellows, residents, and students engaged in research and clinical practice. A panel was convened involving a representative from the Office of Women’s Health of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, two pharmaceutical executives, and a clinical EM researcher. The moderated discussion also involved audience members who contributed significantly to the dialogue. Historical background leading up to the session along with the main themes of the discussion are reproduced in this article. These revolve around sex- and gender-specific research, statistical analysis of sex and gender, clinical practice, financial costs associated with pharmaceutical development, adaptive design, and specific recommendations on the regulatory process as it affects the specialty of EM. PMID:25443664

  10. Improving the environmental profile of wood panels via co-production of ethanol and acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Earles, J Mason; Halog, Anthony; Shaler, Stephen

    2011-11-15

    The oriented strand board (OSB) biorefinery is an emerging technology that could improve the building, transportation, and chemical sectors' environmental profiles. By adding a hot water extraction stage to conventional OSB panel manufacturing, hemicellulose polysaccharides can be extracted from wood strands and converted to renewably sourced ethanol and acetic acid. Replacing fossil-based gasoline and acetic acid has the potential to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, among other possible impacts. At the same time, hemicellulose extraction could improve the environmental profile of OSB panels by reducing the level of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted during manufacturing. In this study, the life cycle significance of such GHG, VOC, and other emission reductions was investigated. A process model was developed based on a mix of laboratory and industrial-level mass and energy flow data. Using these data a life cycle assessment (LCA) model was built. Sensitive process parameters were identified and used to develop a target production scenario for the OSB biorefinery. The findings suggest that the OSB biorefinery's deployment could substantially improve human and ecosystem health via reduction of select VOCs compared to conventionally produced OSB, gasoline, and acetic acid. Technological advancements are needed, however, to achieve desirable GHG reductions. PMID:21967719

  11. [Progress in biotechnological production of pyruvic acid].

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-Ming; Li, Yin; Du, Guo-Cheng; Chen, Jian

    2002-11-01

    Pyruvate, an important organic acid, is widely used in the industries of pharmaceuticals, chemicals, agrochemicals, food additives and so on. Compared with the chemical method, biotechnological production of pyruvic acid is an alternative approach because of the low cost and high product quality. In this article, biosynthesis of pyruvate, including direct fermentative production and resting cell method as well as enzymatic method, was discussed. Furthermore, a comparison of these different methods was proposed. Since, a multi-vitamin auxotrophic strain of Torulopsis glabrata is the most competitive strain for industrial production of pyruvate, emphasis was therefore placed on the development of strains screening and fermentation optimization. Finally, some suggestions were put forward to improve the research in this field in the near future.

  12. Further Progress with Metarhizium Microsclerotial Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microsclerotium production by Metarhizium anisopliae, previously reported for flask scale, was successfully achieved at a 100-Liter fermenter scale. The resulting granular formulations readily conidiated on water agar or in moist soil to the same extent as reported for flask fermentations. Both Phar...

  13. Progress and Challenges in Microalgal Biodiesel Production.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Nirupama; Bagchi, Sourav K; Koley, Shankha; Singh, Akhilesh K

    2016-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed a tremendous impetus on biofuel research due to the irreversible diminution of fossil fuel reserves for enormous demands of transportation vis-a-vis escalating emissions of green house gasses (GHGs) into the atmosphere. With an imperative need of CO2 reduction and considering the declining status of crude oil, governments in various countries have not only diverted substantial funds for biofuel projects but also have introduced incentives to vendors that produce biofuels. Currently, biodiesel production from microalgal biomass has drawn an immense importance with the potential to exclude high-quality agricultural land use and food safe-keeping issues. Moreover, microalgae can grow in seawater or wastewater and microalgal oil can exceed 50-60% (dry cell weight) as compared with some best agricultural oil crops of only 5-10% oil content. Globally, microalgae are the highest biomass producers and neutral lipid accumulators contending any other terrestrial oil crops. However, there remain many hurdles in each and every step, starting from strain selection and lipid accumulation/yield, algae mass cultivation followed by the downstream processes such as harvesting, drying, oil extraction, and biodiesel conversion (transesterification), and overall, the cost of production. Isolation and screening of oleaginous microalgae is one pivotal important upstream factor which should be addressed according to the need of freshwater or marine algae with a consideration that wild-type indigenous isolate can be the best suited for the laboratory to large scale exploitation. Nowadays, a large number of literature on microalgal biodiesel production are available, but none of those illustrate a detailed step-wise description with the pros and cons of the upstream and downstream processes of biodiesel production from microalgae. Specifically, harvesting and drying constitute more than 50% of the total production costs; however, there are quite a less number

  14. Progress and Challenges in Microalgal Biodiesel Production

    PubMed Central

    Mallick, Nirupama; Bagchi, Sourav K.; Koley, Shankha; Singh, Akhilesh K.

    2016-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed a tremendous impetus on biofuel research due to the irreversible diminution of fossil fuel reserves for enormous demands of transportation vis-a-vis escalating emissions of green house gasses (GHGs) into the atmosphere. With an imperative need of CO2 reduction and considering the declining status of crude oil, governments in various countries have not only diverted substantial funds for biofuel projects but also have introduced incentives to vendors that produce biofuels. Currently, biodiesel production from microalgal biomass has drawn an immense importance with the potential to exclude high-quality agricultural land use and food safe-keeping issues. Moreover, microalgae can grow in seawater or wastewater and microalgal oil can exceed 50–60% (dry cell weight) as compared with some best agricultural oil crops of only 5–10% oil content. Globally, microalgae are the highest biomass producers and neutral lipid accumulators contending any other terrestrial oil crops. However, there remain many hurdles in each and every step, starting from strain selection and lipid accumulation/yield, algae mass cultivation followed by the downstream processes such as harvesting, drying, oil extraction, and biodiesel conversion (transesterification), and overall, the cost of production. Isolation and screening of oleaginous microalgae is one pivotal important upstream factor which should be addressed according to the need of freshwater or marine algae with a consideration that wild-type indigenous isolate can be the best suited for the laboratory to large scale exploitation. Nowadays, a large number of literature on microalgal biodiesel production are available, but none of those illustrate a detailed step-wise description with the pros and cons of the upstream and downstream processes of biodiesel production from microalgae. Specifically, harvesting and drying constitute more than 50% of the total production costs; however, there are quite a less

  15. Comparison of tubular and panel type photobioreactors for biohydrogen production utilizing Chlamydomonas reinhardtii considering mixing time and light intensity.

    PubMed

    Oncel, S; Kose, A

    2014-01-01

    Two different photobioreactor designs; tubular and panel, were investigated for the biohydrogen production utilizing a green microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strain CC124 following the two stage protocol. Mixing time and light intensity of the systems were adjusted to compare the productivity of both aerobic culture phase and the following anaerobic biohydrogen production phase. The results showed there was an effect on both phases related with the design. During the aerobic phase bigger illumination area serving more energy, tubular photobioreactor reached higher biomass productivity of 31.8±2.1 mg L(-1) h(-1) which was about 11% higher than the panel photobioreactor. On the other hand biohydrogen productivity in the panel photobioreactor reached a value of 1.3±0.05 mL L(-1) h(-1) based on the efficient removal of biohydrogen gas. According to the results it would be a good approach to utilize tubular design for aerobic phase and panel for biohydrogen production phase.

  16. Comparison of tubular and panel type photobioreactors for biohydrogen production utilizing Chlamydomonas reinhardtii considering mixing time and light intensity.

    PubMed

    Oncel, S; Kose, A

    2014-01-01

    Two different photobioreactor designs; tubular and panel, were investigated for the biohydrogen production utilizing a green microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strain CC124 following the two stage protocol. Mixing time and light intensity of the systems were adjusted to compare the productivity of both aerobic culture phase and the following anaerobic biohydrogen production phase. The results showed there was an effect on both phases related with the design. During the aerobic phase bigger illumination area serving more energy, tubular photobioreactor reached higher biomass productivity of 31.8±2.1 mg L(-1) h(-1) which was about 11% higher than the panel photobioreactor. On the other hand biohydrogen productivity in the panel photobioreactor reached a value of 1.3±0.05 mL L(-1) h(-1) based on the efficient removal of biohydrogen gas. According to the results it would be a good approach to utilize tubular design for aerobic phase and panel for biohydrogen production phase. PMID:24246482

  17. Progress of Validation of GOSAT Standard Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchino, Osamu

    2010-05-01

    Isamu Morino, Tomoaki Tanaka, Yuki Miyamoto, Yukio Yoshida, Tatsuya Yokota, Toshinobu Machida National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan Debra Wunch, Paul Wennberg Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, USA Geoffrey Toon Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, USA Thorsten Warneke, Justus Notholt Institute of Environmental Physics, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany David Griffith, Nicholas Deutscher Department of Chemistry, University of Wollongong, Wollongong New South Wales, Australia Vanessa Sherlock National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Lauder, Central Otago, New Zealand Hidekazu Matsueda, Yousuke Sawa Meteorological Research Institute, 1-1 Nagamine, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0052, Japan Colm Sweeney, Pieter Tans Earth System Research Laboratory, NOAA, Boulder, USA The Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT), launched on 23 January 2009, is the world's first satellite dedicated to measuring the concentrations of the two major greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4), from space. The data measured with the Thermal And Near-infrared Sensor for carbon Observation Fourier Transform Spectrometer (TANSO-FTS) and the Cloud and Aerosol Imager (TANSO-CAI) are processed into several types of data products. Column abundances of CO2 and CH4 (TANSO-FTS SWIR L2 data product) are retrieved from the FTS L1B spectral data. Validation of the FTS Level 2 data product is critical since the data is used for generating the FTS Level 3 (global distributions of column-averaged mixing ratio data of XCO2 and XCH4) and the FTS Level 4 (regional CO2 fluxes and three dimensional distribution of CO2 calculated from the estimated fluxes) products. The reference data to be used for validating abundances are required to have uncertainties of less than 1.0 % (0.3 % or 1 ppm is desirable) for CO2 and 2.0 % for CH4. Ground

  18. Make Your Own Solar Panel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suzuki, David

    1992-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students make a simulated solar panel to learn about the principles behind energy production using solar panels. Provides information about how solar panels function to produce energy. (MCO)

  19. Production of Doctorates in the Biosciences, 1975-1980: An Experimental Forecast. Higher Education Panel Reports, No. 34.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atelsek, Frank J.; Gomberg, Irene L.

    A survey was undertaken in 1976 to obtain short-term estimates of doctorate production directly from the heads of the science departments involved. These biosciences departments were surveyed in the 235 member institutions of the Higher Education Panel that grant doctorates: anatomy, biochemistry, biology, biometry/biostatistics/biomathematics,…

  20. Report of Industry Panel Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallimore, Simon; Gier, Jochen; Heitland, Greg; Povinelli, Louis; Sharma, Om; VandeWall, Allen

    2006-01-01

    A final report is presented from the industry panel group. The contents include: 1) General comments; 2) Positive progress since Minnowbrook IV; 3) Industry panel outcome; 4) Prioritized turbine projects; 5) Prioritized compressor projects; and 6) Miscellaneous.

  1. Technical review of the SWELL product. Second quarterly progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Alexanian, G.

    1998-03-23

    This progress report describes design and marketing efforts made to reduce the cost of the product, and reassess its market potential in light of reduced manufacturing costs and modified design. Marketing has looked at applications in agriculture, the turf grass industry, and golf coarse applications. The new controller offers energy efficiency in control of valves and minimization of costs associated with hard wired systems.

  2. Recycled-PET fibre based panels for building thermal insulation: environmental impact and improvement potential assessment for a greener production.

    PubMed

    Ingrao, Carlo; Lo Giudice, Agata; Tricase, Caterina; Rana, Roberto; Mbohwa, Charles; Siracusa, Valentina

    2014-09-15

    A screening of Life Cycle Assessment for the evaluation of the damage arising from the production of 1 kg of recycled Polyethylene Terephthalate (RPET) fibre-based panel for building heat insulation was carried out according to the ISO 14040:2006 and 14044:2006. All data used were collected on site based on observations during site visits, review of documents and interviews with technical personnel and management. These data were processed by using SimaPro 7.3.3, accessing the Ecoinvent v.2.2 database and using the Impact 2002+ method. The study showed damage to be equal to 0.000299 points mostly due to the: 1) PET thermo-bonding fibre supply from China by means of a freight-equipped intercontinental aircraft; 2) production of bottle-grade granulate PET; 3) medium voltage electricity consumption during the manufacturing of RPET fibre panel. It was also highlighted that there were environmental benefits due to recycling through mainly avoiding significant emissions and reduced resource consumption. An improvement assessment was carried out to find solutions aimed at reducing the damage coming from the most impacting phases. Furthermore, the environmental impacts due to the production of the analysed RPET fibre-based panel were compared to other materials with the same insulating function, such as polystyrene foam, rock wool and cork slab. Finally, the environmental benefits of the recycling of PET bottles for flake production were highlighted compared to other treatment scenarios such as landfill and municipal incineration.

  3. Recycled-PET fibre based panels for building thermal insulation: environmental impact and improvement potential assessment for a greener production.

    PubMed

    Ingrao, Carlo; Lo Giudice, Agata; Tricase, Caterina; Rana, Roberto; Mbohwa, Charles; Siracusa, Valentina

    2014-09-15

    A screening of Life Cycle Assessment for the evaluation of the damage arising from the production of 1 kg of recycled Polyethylene Terephthalate (RPET) fibre-based panel for building heat insulation was carried out according to the ISO 14040:2006 and 14044:2006. All data used were collected on site based on observations during site visits, review of documents and interviews with technical personnel and management. These data were processed by using SimaPro 7.3.3, accessing the Ecoinvent v.2.2 database and using the Impact 2002+ method. The study showed damage to be equal to 0.000299 points mostly due to the: 1) PET thermo-bonding fibre supply from China by means of a freight-equipped intercontinental aircraft; 2) production of bottle-grade granulate PET; 3) medium voltage electricity consumption during the manufacturing of RPET fibre panel. It was also highlighted that there were environmental benefits due to recycling through mainly avoiding significant emissions and reduced resource consumption. An improvement assessment was carried out to find solutions aimed at reducing the damage coming from the most impacting phases. Furthermore, the environmental impacts due to the production of the analysed RPET fibre-based panel were compared to other materials with the same insulating function, such as polystyrene foam, rock wool and cork slab. Finally, the environmental benefits of the recycling of PET bottles for flake production were highlighted compared to other treatment scenarios such as landfill and municipal incineration. PMID:25006757

  4. Connected speech production in three variants of primary progressive aphasia

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Maya L.; Besbris, Max; Ogar, Jennifer M.; Dronkers, Nina F.; Jarrold, William; Miller, Bruce L.; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa

    2010-01-01

    Primary progressive aphasia is a clinical syndrome defined by progressive deficits isolated to speech and/or language, and can be classified into non-fluent, semantic and logopenic variants based on motor speech, linguistic and cognitive features. The connected speech of patients with primary progressive aphasia has often been dichotomized simply as ‘fluent’ or ‘non-fluent’, however fluency is a multidimensional construct that encompasses features such as speech rate, phrase length, articulatory agility and syntactic structure, which are not always impacted in parallel. In this study, our first objective was to improve the characterization of connected speech production in each variant of primary progressive aphasia, by quantifying speech output along a number of motor speech and linguistic dimensions simultaneously. Secondly, we aimed to determine the neuroanatomical correlates of changes along these different dimensions. We recorded, transcribed and analysed speech samples for 50 patients with primary progressive aphasia, along with neurodegenerative and normal control groups. Patients were scanned with magnetic resonance imaging, and voxel-based morphometry was used to identify regions where atrophy correlated significantly with motor speech and linguistic features. Speech samples in patients with the non-fluent variant were characterized by slow rate, distortions, syntactic errors and reduced complexity. In contrast, patients with the semantic variant exhibited normal rate and very few speech or syntactic errors, but showed increased proportions of closed class words, pronouns and verbs, and higher frequency nouns, reflecting lexical retrieval deficits. In patients with the logopenic variant, speech rate (a common proxy for fluency) was intermediate between the other two variants, but distortions and syntactic errors were less common than in the non-fluent variant, while lexical access was less impaired than in the semantic variant. Reduced speech rate

  5. Metabolic Panel

    MedlinePlus

    A metabolic panel is a group of tests that measures different chemicals in the blood. These tests are usually ... kidneys and liver. There are two types: basic metabolic panel (BMP) and comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP). The ...

  6. Evaluation of productivity in Iranian pharmaceutical companies: A DEA-based Malmquist approach and panel data analysis

    PubMed Central

    Varmaghani, Mehdi; Meshkini, Amir Hashemi; Farzadfar, Farshad; Yousefi, Mehdi; Yaghoubifard, Saeed; Varahrami, Vida; Darzi, Ehsan Rezaei; Anabi, Majid; Kebriaeezadeh, Abbas; Zekri, Hedieh-Sadat

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In this study, we aimed to assess comparative productivity of 21 pharmaceutical companies in Iran during 2000–2013. Methods: To evaluate the productivity trend of pharmaceutical companies in Iran, we used data envelopment analysis-based Malmquist index. “Total assets” and “capital stock” as inputs and “net sales” and “net profit” as outputs extracted from Tehran stock exchange, were selected to be included in the analysis. This method provides the possibility for analyzing the performance of each company in term of productivity changes over time. We also used an estimation generalized least square panel data model to identify the factors that might affect productivity of pharmaceutical companies in Iran using EViews 7 and Deep 2.1 software. Findings: The mean total productivity during all years of the study was 0.9829, which indicates the improvement in their overall productivity. The results, over the 13-year period, indicated that the range of productivity changes in pharmaceutical companies, that were included in this study, was between 0.884 and 1.098. Panel data model indicated that age of company could positively (t = 4.765978, P < 0.001) and being located in cities other than Tehran (the capital) could negatively (t = −5.369549, P < 0.001) affect the productivity of pharmaceutical companies. The analysis showed the new policy (brand-generic scheme) and also the type of ownership did not have a significant effect on the productivity of pharmaceutical companies. Conclusion: In this study, pharmaceutical productivity trends were fluctuated that could be due to the sub-optimal attention of policy makers and managers of pharmaceutical companies toward long-term strategic planning, focusing on productivity improvement. PMID:25984541

  7. Low VOC drying of lumber and wood panel products. Progress report Number 9

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, H.; Banerjee, S.; Conners, T.; Ingram, L.L.; Dalton, A.T.; Templeton, M.C.; Diehl, S.V.

    1999-01-01

    Results from a multi-year study show that a significant part of the extensive variability observed in oriented strand board (OSB) flake dryer emissions can be traced to physiological effects, and the rest can be attributed to handling and other factors. Low-headspace treatment of lumber was scaled up to the 50 kg level. The amount of turpentine collected was of the same magnitude as that released upon drying lumber. For the process to be economical, the wood must first be brought to about 95 C with steam, and then processed with RF. Attempts to remove VOCs from OSB through low-headspace by placing a curtain over the wood failed because of leaks. A more rigid container will be required. RF-treatment does not alter the gas permeability of lumber.

  8. Low VOC drying of lumber and wood panel products. Progress report Number 9 [January 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, H.; Banerjee, S.; Conners, T.; Ingram, L.L.; Dalton, A.T.; Templeton, M.C.; Diehl, S.V.

    1999-01-01

    Results from a multi-year study show that a significant part of the extensive variability observed in oriented strand board (OSB) flake dryer emissions can be traced to physiological effects, and the rest can be attributed to handling and other factors. Low-headspace treatment of lumber was scaled up to the 50 kg level. The amount of turpentine collected was of the same magnitude as that released upon drying lumber. For the process to be economical, the wood must first be brought to about 95 C with steam, and then processed with RF. Attempts to remove VOCs from OSB through low-headspace by placing a curtain over the wood failed because of leaks. A more rigid container will be required. RF-treatment does not alter the gas permeability of lumber.

  9. Low VOC drying of lumber and wood panel products. Progress report number 9

    SciTech Connect

    Hooda, U.; Banerjee, S.; Ingram, L.; Conners, T.

    1998-10-01

    This project is based on the finding that brief microwave or RF-treatment of wood under low-headspace conditions leads to the release of VOCs. On occasion the authors have found that prolonged irradiation increases turpentine yield much more than anticipated from a simple mass balance; i.e., more pinene appeared to be released than was present in the wood in the first place. If taken at face value, this suggests that brief low-headspace irradiation removes VOCs, while prolonged exposure creates it. While seemingly improbable, this could follow if dielectric heating exposed regions of wood that were otherwise inaccessible to the solvent used for extraction (unlikely), or if the irradiation induced depolymerization of terpene dimers or higher polymers. In this report the authors attempt to identify the conditions that lead to this apparent enhancement of terpene yield, by constructing relationships between yield and irradiation parameters. The tentative conclusions are that this enhancement only occurs with relatively wet heartwood, and only under prolonged irradiation. An additional conclusion is that continuing analyses of twelve trees in the MSU forest confirm that the absence of a significant seasonal influence on turpentine content. An apparatus for permeability testing has been constructed, and work is underway.

  10. Low VOC drying of lumber and wood panel products. Progress report number 6

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, H.; Wild, M.P.; Hooda, U.; Banerjee, S.; Shmulsky, R.; Thompson, A.; Ingram, L.; Conners, T.

    1998-01-01

    Twenty five Southern pine boards were machined into 2 x 4 inch pieces. Next, the 8 foot boards were cut in half into matched pairs. One of the two was irradiated with RF, while the other served as a control. Both sets were dried under a conventional temperature-time based schedule. Results and conclusions are: RF pretreatment of lumber does not affect strength; the amount of pinene lost into the headspace during low-VOC RF-treatment of wood approximately corresponds to the amount of material lost from the wood; virtually all the pinene can be removed from the low-VOC reactor with steam, suggesting that pinene can be collected when the small amount of steam released during low-headspace treatment is condensed; temperature and moisture loss profiles for particle at 105 C has been modeled using experimental data at 130 C and 160 C; the VOC-temperature curve from dried particle shows a break at about 156 C, the boiling point of {alpha}-pinene, demonstrating that pinene boil-off occurs beyond this threshold; VOC release from dry particle has been successfully modeled; the transport of VOC from sapwood to the atmosphere for pine is faster than the corresponding movement from heartwood to sapwood; and seasonal variations in pine extractives are small.

  11. MHD/steam electrical power production - Promise, progress and problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, J. N.; Strom, S. S.; Wu, Y. C. L.

    1980-08-01

    The MHD/Steam Power Plant has promise to burn coal and produce electrical power more efficiently than conventional coal fired plants while producing less environmental intrusion. Problems have been encountered in developing a high temperature air heater (HTAH) using coal exhaust products. Early commercial plants have been proposed that use either a gasifier to produce clean fuel for a separately fired HTAH or use oxygen enrichment to avoid the need for a HTAH. Component development is progressing rapidly but test data is needed at intermediate sizes before a commercial plant can be designed with high confidence of success. Related commercial technology is being adapted for the steam bottoming plant.

  12. Boards and panels aren`t just wood products anymore: Two innovative customer feedback techniques at Duke Power

    SciTech Connect

    Ireland, G.

    1994-11-01

    In their push to become truly customer-driven, utilities have come to require a greater amount of customer input and feedback than ever before. Likewise, in this changing environment, speed and cost-effectiveness have become the name of the game in all that they do. In response to these demands and pressures, Duke Power has developed two methods of getting residential customer feedback and input in a cost-effective and timely way: the Board of Customers (for qualitative feedback) and the Consumer Panel (for quantitative applications). These feedback tools have been used successfully at Duke Power for a variety of applications, including gleaning customer reaction to customer service options, concept-testing product ideas, and assessing corporate image and reputation. With both qualitative and quantitative capabilities in place, Duke Power has the ability to respond quickly to a variety of needs and situations. For example, Duke used the Consumer Panel to implement a lengthy mail survey on image and reputation in a total of 25 days. Likewise, using a regularly scheduled quarterly meeting of the Board of Customers, Duke was able to provide customer reactions to a product concept within 48 hours of the client`s request. As the nature of competition continues to change in the utility industry, the ability to gather cost-effective customer input for quick, concise decision-making will be even more vital to maintaining the competitive edge. This paper describes the design, implementation and applications of the Board of Customers and the Consumer Panel, and how these two innovative tools translate to the bottom line in cost-effective decision-making at Duke Power.

  13. Pyrolysis characteristics and pyrolysis products separation for recycling organic materials from waste liquid crystal display panels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruixue; Xu, Zhenming

    2016-01-25

    Waste liquid crystal display (LCD) panels mainly contain inorganic materials (glass substrate with indium-tin oxide film), and organic materials (polarizing film and liquid crystal). The organic materials should be removed beforehand since the organic matters would hinder the indium recycling process. In the present study, pyrolysis process is used to remove the organic materials and recycle acetic as well as and triphenyl phosphate (TPP) from waste LCD panels in an environmental friendly way. Several highlights of this study are summarized as follows: (i) Pyrolysis characteristics and pyrolysis kinetics analysis are conducted which is significant to get a better understanding of the pyrolysis process. (ii) Optimum design is developed by applying Box-Behnken Design (BBD) under response surface methodology (RSM) for engineering application which is significant to guide the further industrial recycling process. The oil yield could reach 70.53 wt% and the residue rate could reach 14.05 wt% when the pyrolysis temperature is 570 °C, nitrogen flow rate is 6 L min(-1) and the particle size is 0.5 mm. (iii) Furthermore, acetic acid and TPP are recycled, and then separated by rotary evaporation, which could reduce the consumption of fossil energy for producing acetic acid, and be reused in electronics manufacturing industry.

  14. Pyrolysis characteristics and pyrolysis products separation for recycling organic materials from waste liquid crystal display panels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruixue; Xu, Zhenming

    2016-01-25

    Waste liquid crystal display (LCD) panels mainly contain inorganic materials (glass substrate with indium-tin oxide film), and organic materials (polarizing film and liquid crystal). The organic materials should be removed beforehand since the organic matters would hinder the indium recycling process. In the present study, pyrolysis process is used to remove the organic materials and recycle acetic as well as and triphenyl phosphate (TPP) from waste LCD panels in an environmental friendly way. Several highlights of this study are summarized as follows: (i) Pyrolysis characteristics and pyrolysis kinetics analysis are conducted which is significant to get a better understanding of the pyrolysis process. (ii) Optimum design is developed by applying Box-Behnken Design (BBD) under response surface methodology (RSM) for engineering application which is significant to guide the further industrial recycling process. The oil yield could reach 70.53 wt% and the residue rate could reach 14.05 wt% when the pyrolysis temperature is 570 °C, nitrogen flow rate is 6 L min(-1) and the particle size is 0.5 mm. (iii) Furthermore, acetic acid and TPP are recycled, and then separated by rotary evaporation, which could reduce the consumption of fossil energy for producing acetic acid, and be reused in electronics manufacturing industry. PMID:26444486

  15. National Assessment of Educational Progress, Report 1--Science: National Results. Observations and Commentary of a Panel of Reviewers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Assessment of Educational Progress, Ann Arbor, MI.

    Presented are five reviews of the National Assessment of Educational Progress results in science. Dr. Mildred Ballou discusses the objectives of the assessment by age level with concern over explanations for responses, social implications, and validity of testing exercises. Wilmer Cooksey comments on the results as viewed by the classroom teacher…

  16. A procedure for sensory detection of androstenone in meat and meat products from entire male pigs: Development of a panel training.

    PubMed

    Garrido, M Dolores; Egea, Macarena; Linares, M Belén; Martínez, Beatriz; Viera, Ceferina; Rubio, Begoña; Borrisser-Pairó, Francesc

    2016-12-01

    This study represents a proposal for training sensory panels in androstenone (AND) perception in meat and meat products. The procedure consists of four main parts: (1) selection and training of a sensory panel (11 panelists) using standards with Vaseline oil media as carriers of AND and skatole (SKA); (2) developing a training method AND detection in meat; (3) dry cured meat product and (4) cooked meat product. All candidates were able to distinguish between AND, SKA and AND+SKA in Vaseline oil, order AND solutions with different concentrations and classify them in the three categories: low, medium and high. The panel was able to differentiate the meat in the three categories, but only the high level in meat products. Due to the individual features in AND perception, specific training for each type of product is required. PMID:27486958

  17. Clinical review: Canadian National Advisory Committee on Blood and Blood Products - Massive Transfusion Consensus Conference 2011: report of the panel

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In June 2011 the Canadian National Advisory Committee on Blood and Blood Products sponsored an international consensus conference on transfusion and trauma. A panel of 10 experts and two external advisors reviewed the current medical literature and information presented at the conference by invited international speakers and attendees. The Consensus Panel addressed six specific questions on the topic of blood transfusion in trauma. The questions focused on: ratio-based blood resuscitation in trauma patients; the impact of survivorship bias in current research conclusions; the value of nonplasma coagulation products; the role of protocols for delivery of urgent transfusion; the merits of traditional laboratory monitoring compared with measures of clot viscoelasticity; and opportunities for future research. Key findings include a lack of evidence to support the use of 1:1:1 blood component ratios as the standard of care, the importance of early use of tranexamic acid, the expected value of an organized response plan, and the recommendation for an integrated approach that includes antifibrinolytics, rapid release of red blood cells, and a foundation ratio of blood components adjusted by results from either traditional coagulation tests or clot viscoelasticity or both. The present report is intended to provide guidance to practitioners, hospitals, and policy-makers. PMID:22188866

  18. Progress in DRS production line for uncooled focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Chien J.; Howard, Christopher G.; Howard, Philip E.; Ionescu, Adrian C.; Li, Chuan C.; Monson, John C.; Naranjo, Robert L.; Scholten, Myron J.; Sweeney, R. Michael; Strong, Roger L.; Sullivan, William; Teherani, Towfik H.

    2004-08-01

    To improve its capacity to meet customer needs, DRS Infrared Technologies began technology transfer of the VOx uncooled FPA process from its Anaheim facility to its Dallas facility in the Fall of 2002. The new facility delivered its first U3000 arrays (320x240, 51μm pitch) three months after the VOx deposition system was installed, and produced over 300 units of U3000 per month just twelve months after beginning the transfer. Process enhancements and tool upgrades have enabled excellent control of the microbolometer process. Today, this line selectively fabricates arrays with NETD varying from 30mK to 80mK in 15mK bins with less than 30 ms time constant. The same arrays also have low defect density of less than 2% dead pixels and no more than one row and one column out. The arrays are packaged in imager or radiometer (F/1.4) packages. DRS also transferred small and large format arrays with 25μm pitch under the PEO-Soldier Sensor Producibility to the Dallas facility. Production of the 25μm pitch devices is currently more that 100 units per month and is ramping up to meet customer demand. This paper reports on production progress on the U3000s and the status of U3500 and U6000 25μm pitch array.

  19. "MARK I" MEASUREMENT METHODOLOGY FOR POLLUTION PREVENTION PROGRESS OCCURRING AS A RESULT OF PRODUCT DECISIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A methodology for assessing progress in pollution prevention resulting from product redesign, reformulation or replacement is described. The method compares the pollution generated by the original product with that from the modified or replacement product, taking into account, if...

  20. Panel discussion: Progress and plans for magnetic fusion: Summary of comments on recent progress in fusion research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, J.

    1989-01-01

    Progress in fusion research is marked not so much by a few giant steps as by a continual number of small steps, which yield a steady advance toward the goal of producing a fusion reactor. During the past year, there have been two such steps in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) program: the experimental demonstration of access to the second stable region of beta in the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF); and the acceleration of a frozen hydrogen pellet by an intense electron beam. This paper discusses these steps.

  1. Blue Ribbon Panel Report - BRP - Cancer Moonshot

    Cancer.gov

    The Blue Ribbon Panel Report outlines 10 recommendations to accelerate progress against cancer. The panel was established to ensure that the Cancer Moonshot's approaches are grounded in the best science.

  2. Recent progress and future challenges in algal biofuel production

    PubMed Central

    Shurin, Jonathan B.; Burkart, Michael D.; Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Modern society is fueled by fossil energy produced millions of years ago by photosynthetic organisms. Cultivating contemporary photosynthetic producers to generate energy and capture carbon from the atmosphere is one potential approach to sustaining society without disrupting the climate. Algae, photosynthetic aquatic microorganisms, are the fastest growing primary producers in the world and can therefore produce more energy with less land, water, and nutrients than terrestrial plant crops. We review recent progress and challenges in developing bioenergy technology based on algae. A variety of high-value products in addition to biofuels can be harvested from algal biomass, and these may be key to developing algal biotechnology and realizing the commercial potential of these organisms. Aspects of algal biology that differentiate them from plants demand an integrative approach based on genetics, cell biology, ecology, and evolution. We call for a systems approach to research on algal biotechnology rooted in understanding their biology, from the level of genes to ecosystems, and integrating perspectives from physical, chemical, and social sciences to solve one of the most critical outstanding technological problems. PMID:27781084

  3. Simulating cosmic radiation absorption and secondary particle production of solar panel layers of Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite with GEANT4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiǧitoǧlu, Merve; Veske, Doǧa; Nilüfer Öztürk, Zeynep; Bilge Demirköz, Melahat

    2016-07-01

    All devices which operate in space are exposed to cosmic rays during their operation. The resulting radiation may cause fatal damages in the solid structure of devices and the amount of absorbed radiation dose and secondary particle production for each component should be calculated carefully before the production. Solar panels are semiconductor solid state devices and are very sensitive to radiation. Even a short term power cut-off may yield a total failure of the satellite. Even little doses of radiation can change the characteristics of solar cells. This deviation can be caused by rarer high energetic particles as well as the total ionizing dose from the abundant low energy particles. In this study, solar panels planned for a specific LEO satellite, IMECE, are analyzed layer by layer. The Space Environment Information System (SPENVIS) database and GEANT4 simulation software are used to simulate the layers of the panels. The results obtained from the simulation will be taken in account to determine the amount of radiation protection and resistance needed for the panels or to revise the design of the panels.

  4. Panel flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowell, E. H.

    1972-01-01

    Criteria are presented for the prediction of panel flutter, determination of its occurrence, design for its prevention, and evaluation of its severity. Theoretical analyses recommended for the prediction of flutter stability boundaries, vibration amplitudes, and frequencies for several types of panels are described. Vibration tests and wind tunnel tests are recommended for certain panels and environmental flow conditions to provide information for design of verification analysis. Appropriate design margins on flutter stability boundaries are given and general criteria are presented for evaluating the severity of possible short-duration, limited-amplitude panel flutter on nonreusable vehicles.

  5. Hexagon solar power panel

    DOEpatents

    Rubin, Irwin

    1978-01-01

    A solar energy panel comprises a support upon which silicon cells are arrayed. The cells are wafer thin and of two geometrical types, both of the same area and electrical rating, namely hexagon cells and hourglass cells. The hourglass cells are composites of half hexagons. A near perfect nesting relationship of the cells achieves a high density packing whereby optimum energy production per panel area is achieved.

  6. Production and characterization of an allergen panel for component-resolved diagnosis of celery allergy.

    PubMed

    Bublin, Merima; Lauer, Iris; Oberhuber, Christina; Alessandri, Stefano; Briza, Peter; Radauer, Christian; Himly, Martin; Breiteneder, Heimo; Vieths, Stefan; Hoffmann-Sommergruber, Karin

    2008-11-01

    In celery a relevant food allergen source, three allergens have been identified so far: Api g 1 and Api g 4, and one glycosylated protein, Api g 5. For component-resolved food allergy diagnosis high amounts of well-defined allergens are needed. Depending on the individual celery allergen, protocols for heterologous production and purification from natural source, respectively, were established to obtain homogenous protein batches. Afterwards the purified recombinant allergens, Api g 1, Api g 4 and natural Api g 5 were characterized regarding their structural integrity and immunological activity. Therefore, several methods were applied. Proteins were identified by partial N-terminal sequencing, protein mass was verified by MS and sequence integrity by MALDI-TOF and N-terminal sequencing after tryptic digestion. Presence of isoforms in natural allergen preparations was identified by 2-DE. Secondary and tertiary structures were evaluated by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and NMR analysis. Finally, IgE binding capacity was verified using selected sera from celery allergic patients in IgE immunoblots and IgE ELISA. These well-defined celery allergens will be used to prove the concept of component-resolved diagnosis and will contribute to improve food allergy diagnosis in the future.

  7. Panel 5: Microbiology and Immunology Panel

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Timothy F.; Chonmaitree, Tasnee; Barenkamp, Stephen; Kyd, Jennelle; Nokso-Koivisto, Johanna; Patel, Janak A.; Heikkinen, Terho; Yamanaka, Noboru; Ogra, Pearay; Swords, W. Edward; Sih, Tania; Pettigrew, Melinda M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective is to perform a comprehensive review of the literature from January 2007 through June 2011 on the virology, bacteriology, and immunology related to otitis media. Data Sources PubMed database of the National Library of Medicine. Review Methods Three subpanels with co-chairs comprising experts in the virology, bacteriology, and immunology of otitis media were formed. Each of the panels reviewed the literature in their respective fields and wrote draft reviews. The reviews were shared with all panel members, and a second draft was created. The entire panel met at the 10th International Symposium on Recent Advances in Otitis Media in June 2011 and discussed the review and refined the content further. A final draft was created, circulated, and approved by the panel. Conclusion Excellent progress has been made in the past 4 years in advancing an understanding of the microbiology and immunology of otitis media. Advances include laboratory-based basic studies, cell-based assays, work in animal models, and clinical studies. Implications for Practice The advances of the past 4 years formed the basis of a series of short-term and long-term research goals in an effort to guide the field. Accomplishing these goals will provide opportunities for the development of novel interventions, including new ways to better treat and prevent otitis media. PMID:23536533

  8. Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    During 1997, the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) continued its safety reviews of NASA's human space flight and aeronautics programs. Efforts were focused on those areas that the Panel believed held the greatest potential to impact safety. Continuing safe Space Shuttle operations and progress in the manufacture and testing of primary components for the International Space Station (ISS) were noteworthy. The Panel has continued to monitor the safety implications of the transition of Space Shuttle operations to the United Space Alliance (USA). One area being watched closely relates to the staffing levels and skill mix in both NASA and USA. Therefore, a section of this report is devoted to personnel and other related issues that are a result of this change in NASA's way of doing business for the Space Shuttle. Attention will continue to be paid to this important topic in subsequent reports. Even though the Panel's activities for 1997 were extensive, fewer specific recommendations were formulated than has been the case in recent years. This is indicative of the current generally good state of safety of NASA programs. The Panel does, however, have several longer term concerns that have yet to develop to the level of a specific recommendation. These are covered in the introductory material for each topic area in Section 11. In another departure from past submissions, this report does not contain individual findings and recommendations for the aeronautics programs. While the Panel devoted its usual efforts to examining NASA's aeronautic centers and programs, no specific recommendations were identified for inclusion in this report. In lieu of recommendations, a summary of the Panel's observations of NASA's safety efforts in aeronautics and future Panel areas of emphasis is provided. With profound sadness the Panel notes the passing of our Chairman, Paul M. Johnstone, on December 17, 1997, and our Staff Assistant, Ms. Patricia M. Harman, on October 5, 1997. Other

  9. SPIDER Progress Towards High Resolution Correlated Fission Product Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Dan; Meierbachtol, Krista; Tovesson, Fredrik; Arnold, Charles; Blackeley, Rick; Bredeweg, Todd; Devlin, Matt; Hecht, Adam; Jandel, Marian; Jorgenson, Justin; Nelson, Ron; White, Morgan; Spider Team

    2014-09-01

    The SPIDER detector (SPectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research) is under development with the goal of obtaining high-resolution, high-efficiency, correlated fission product data needed for many applications including the modeling of next generation nuclear reactors, stockpile stewardship, and the fundamental understanding of the fission process. SPIDER simultaneously measures velocity and energy of both fission products to calculate fission product yields (FPYs), neutron multiplicity (ν), and total kinetic energy (TKE). A detailed description of the prototype SPIDER detector components will be presented. Characterization measurements with alpha and spontaneous fission sources will also be discussed. LA-UR-14-24875. The SPIDER detector (SPectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research) is under development with the goal of obtaining high-resolution, high-efficiency, correlated fission product data needed for many applications including the modeling of next generation nuclear reactors, stockpile stewardship, and the fundamental understanding of the fission process. SPIDER simultaneously measures velocity and energy of both fission products to calculate fission product yields (FPYs), neutron multiplicity (ν), and total kinetic energy (TKE). A detailed description of the prototype SPIDER detector components will be presented. Characterization measurements with alpha and spontaneous fission sources will also be discussed. LA-UR-14-24875. This work is in part supported by LANL Laboratory Directed Research and Development Projects 20110037DR and 20120077DR.

  10. Panel Sessions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proceedings of the ASIS Mid-Year Meeting, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Lists the speakers and summarizes the issues addressed for 12 panel sessions on topics related to networking, including libraries and national networks, federal national resources and energy programs, multimedia issues, telecommuting, remote image serving, accessing the Internet, library automation, scientific information, applications of Z39.50,…

  11. Advanced solar panel designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ralph, E. L.; Linder, E.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes solar cell panel designs that utilize new hgih efficiency solar cells along with lightweight rigid panel technology. The resulting designs push the W/kg and W/sq m parameters to new high levels. These new designs are well suited to meet the demand for higher performance small satellites. This paper reports on progress made on two SBIR Phase 1 contracts. One panel design involved the use of large area (5.5 cm x 6.5 cm) GaAs/Ge solar cells of 19% efficiency combined with a lightweight rigid graphite fiber epoxy isogrid substrate configuration. A coupon (38 cm x 38 cm) was fabricated and tested which demonstrated an array specific power level of 60 W/kg with a potential of reaching 80 W/kg. The second panel design involved the use of newly developed high efficiency (22%) dual junction GaInP2/GaAs/Ge solar cells combined with an advanced lightweight rigid substrate using aluminum honeycomb core with high strength graphite fiber mesh facesheets. A coupon (38 cm x 38 cm) was fabricated and tested which demonstrated an array specific power of 105 W/kg and 230 W/sq m. This paper will address the construction details of the panels and an a analysis of the component weights. A strawman array design suitable for a typical small-sat mission is described for each of the two panel design technologies being studied. Benefits in respect to weight reduction, area reduction, and system cost reduction are analyzed and compared to conventional arrays.

  12. [Research progress on water footprint in agricultural products].

    PubMed

    Lu, Yang; Liu, Xiu-wei; Zhang, Xi-ying

    2015-10-01

    Water is one of the important resources in human activities. Scientifically and rationally evaluating the effects of human activities on water resources is important for sustainable water resource management. The innovative concepts of water footprint (WF) distinguished the human water consumption into green water, blue water and grey water which extended the evaluation methods in sustainable utilization of water resources. Concepts of WF based on virtual water (VW) and based on life cycle assessment (LCA) both combined water quality and water quantity are now the focuses in agricultural water management researches. Theory of WF based on VW includes the calculation of green, blue and grey WF as well as the evaluation of the sustainability of water environment. Theory of WF based on LCA reflects the overall impact of consumptive and degradative water use on the environment. The purpose of this article was to elaborate the research progresses in theoretical calculation methods and environmental sustainability assessment of the two water footprint theories and then to analyze the differentiation of these two methodologies in describing the consumptive water use in agriculture and its effects on environment. Finally, some future research aspects on water footprint were provided.

  13. Responsiveness of muscle tone characteristics to progressive force production.

    PubMed

    Mustalampi, Sirpa; Häkkinen, Arja; Kautiainen, Hannu; Weir, Adam; Ylinen, Jari

    2013-01-01

    It is possible to measure muscle tone reliably, quickly and objectively using tonometers although they are not yet widely used. In clinical practice, it may be helpful if clinicians could assess the degree of contraction in different parts of a muscle without having to perform time-consuming electromyography measurements. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the responsiveness of different muscle tone characteristics to progressively increased contraction force of quadriceps muscle. Twenty healthy subjects (mean age 39.9 years, 50% women) volunteered. Using 2 different tonometers various muscle viscoelastic properties were measured. The frequency (hertz), logarithmic decrement, and stiffness (newtons per meter) of damped mechanical oscillation of the muscle tissue and tissue compliance (millijoules) were registered from rectus femoris muscle at rest and 20, 40, 60, 80% of maximal voluntary contraction determined using dynamometry. All the values changed linearly with increasing force level. Compliance, oscillation stiffness, and frequency parameters showed large effect sizes (ESs ≥ 0.8). The standardized respoknse mean for compliance was 5.3 (4.8-5.7) mJ, for oscillation stiffness 1.8 (1.3-2.2) N·m(-1), frequency 1.1 (0.6-1.5) Hz, and decrement -0.6 (-1.0 to -0.2). The results indicate that the compliance and oscillation stiffness parameters showed the highest responsiveness and can thus best detect changes in muscle contraction state. The additional value of using tonometers to measure these properties in clinical practice should be investigated further.

  14. Panel 3 - characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Erck, R.A.; Erdemir, A.; Janghsing Hsieh; Lee, R.H.; Xian Zheng Pan; Deming Shu; Feldman, A.; Glass, J.T.; Kleimer, R.; Lawton, E.A.

    1993-01-01

    The task of this panel was to identify and prioritize needs in the area of characterization of diamond and diamond-like-carbon (DLC) films for use in the transportation industry. Until recent advances in production of inexpensive films of diamonds and DLC, it was not feasible that these materials could be mass produced. The Characterization Panel is restricting itself to identifying needs in areas that would be most useful to manufacturers and users in producing and utilizing diamond and DLC coatings in industry. These characterization needs include in-situ monitoring during growth, relation of structure to performance, and standards and definitions.

  15. Five Thousand American Families -- Patterns of Economic Progress. Volume II: Special Studies of the First Five Year's of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, James N., Ed.

    Volume II of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics presents special studies from the matrix of data which allowed further policy relevant analysis. The ten special studies, each corresponding to a chapter in the volume, are as follows: Housing and Homeownership; Residential Mobility and Family Housing Adjustments; Modes of Travel to Work; The…

  16. Heck products of parthenolide and melampomagnolide-B as anticancer modulators that modify cell cycle progression

    PubMed Central

    Penthala, Narsimha R.; Bommagani, Shobanbabu; Janganati, Venumadhav; MacNicol, Kenzie B.; Cragle, Chad E.; Madadi, Nikhil R.; Hardy, Linda L.; MacNicol, Angus M.; Crooks, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    (E)-13-(Aryl/heteroaryl)parthenolides (5a–i and 6a–i) were synthesized and evaluated for their ability to modify cell cycle progression during progesterone-stimulated Xenopus oocyte maturation and screened for their anticancer activity against a panel of 60 human cancer cell lines. (E)-13-(4-aminophenyl) parthenolide (5b) caused a significant inhibition of progesterone-stimulated oocyte maturation, and was determined to function downstream of MAP kinase signaling, but upstream of the activation of the universal G2/M regulator, M-phase promoting factor (MPF, cyclin B/Cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK). The compound (E)-13-(2-bromo-phenyl)parthenolide (5c) activates oocyte maturation independently of progesterone stimulation. Compounds 5b and 5c displayed modest growth inhibition on select cancer cell lines at 10 micromolar dose when tested on the panel of 60 cancer cell lines. By contrast, compounds (5f and 7) did not modulate oocyte maturation but did exhibit micromolar level growth inhibition against most of the human cancer cell lines over a range of doses. Together, our findings indicate that screening of compounds in the oocyte maturation assay may identify additional effective cell cycle regulatory compounds that do not necessarily exert overt cytotoxicity as assessed in traditional drug screening assays. PMID:25117652

  17. Heck products of parthenolide and melampomagnolide-B as anticancer modulators that modify cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Penthala, Narsimha R; Bommagani, Shobanbabu; Janganati, Venumadhav; MacNicol, Kenzie B; Cragle, Chad E; Madadi, Nikhil R; Hardy, Linda L; MacNicol, Angus M; Crooks, Peter A

    2014-10-01

    (E)-13-(Aryl/heteroaryl)parthenolides (5a-i and 6a-i) were synthesized and evaluated for their ability to modify cell cycle progression during progesterone-stimulated Xenopus oocyte maturation and screened for their anticancer activity against a panel of 60 human cancer cell lines. (E)-13-(4-aminophenyl) parthenolide (5b) caused a significant inhibition of progesterone-stimulated oocyte maturation, and was determined to function downstream of MAP kinase signaling, but upstream of the activation of the universal G2/M regulator, M-phase promoting factor (MPF), cyclin B/Cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK). The compound (E)-13-(2-bromo-phenyl)parthenolide (5c) activates oocyte maturation independently of progesterone stimulation. Compounds 5b and 5c displayed modest growth inhibition on select cancer cell lines at 10 μM dose when tested on the panel of 60 cancer cell lines. By contrast, compounds (5f and 7) did not modulate oocyte maturation but did exhibit micromolar level growth inhibition against most of the human cancer cell lines over a range of doses. Together, our findings indicate that screening of compounds in the oocyte maturation assay may identify additional effective cell cycle regulatory compounds that do not necessarily exert overt cytotoxicity as assessed in traditional drug screening assays.

  18. 61. Upper panel in cornerpower panel lcpa lower panel in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    61. Upper panel in corner-power panel lcpa lower panel in corner-oxygen regeneration unit, at right-air conditioner control panel, on floor-bio-pack 45 for emergency breathing, looking northwest - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Control Facility, County Road CS23A, North of Exit 127, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  19. Capacity, production, and manufacturing of wood-based panels in north America. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Spelter, H.

    1994-10-01

    This report is an informational report about four wood-based panel industries particleboard, oriented strandboard, medium density fiberboard, and Southern Pine plywood. Items highlighted are trends in manufacturing and new plant costs, industry manufacturing capacity, and location. Recent data show the greatest amount of growth taking place in the oriented strandboard sector. Modest rates of growth are occuring in the Southern Pine Plywood, particleboard, and medium density fiberboard sectors.

  20. Architectural Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Alliance Wall Corporation's Whyteboard, a porcelain enamel on steel panels wall board, owes its color stability to a KIAC engineering background study to identify potential technologies and manufacturers of equipment which could be used to detect surface flaws. One result of the data base search was the purchase of a spectrocolorimeter which enables the company to control some 250 standard colors, and match special colors.

  1. A novel potential source of β-carotene: Eustigmatos cf. polyphem (Eustigmatophyceae) and pilot β-carotene production in bubble column and flat panel photobioreactors.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Ma, Xiaoqin; Li, Aifen; Zhang, Chengwu

    2012-08-01

    Carotenoids profile of the unicellular Eustigmatos cf. polyphem (Eustigmatophyceae) and β-carotene production of the microalga in bubble column and large flat panel bioreactors were studied. The microalga which contained β-carotene, violaxanthin and vaucheriaxanthin as the major carotenoids accumulated large amount of β-carotene. The β-carotene production of this microalga in the bubble column bioreactor was considerable, with the maximum intracellular β-carotene content reaching 60.76 mg g(-1), biomass reaching 9.2 g L(-1), and β-carotene yield up to 470.2 mg L(-1). The β-carotene productions in two large flat panel bioreactors were relatively lower, whereas over 100 mg β-carotene L(-1) was achieved. Besides, high light intensity helped to accumulate intracellular β-carotene and biomass. Deficient nitrate supply inhibited biomass growth, though it helped to accumulate β-carotene. Our results first proved that E. cf. polyphem was a potential source and producer of β-carotene, making it an interesting subject for further β-carotene study or commercial exploration.

  2. A novel potential source of β-carotene: Eustigmatos cf. polyphem (Eustigmatophyceae) and pilot β-carotene production in bubble column and flat panel photobioreactors.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Ma, Xiaoqin; Li, Aifen; Zhang, Chengwu

    2012-08-01

    Carotenoids profile of the unicellular Eustigmatos cf. polyphem (Eustigmatophyceae) and β-carotene production of the microalga in bubble column and large flat panel bioreactors were studied. The microalga which contained β-carotene, violaxanthin and vaucheriaxanthin as the major carotenoids accumulated large amount of β-carotene. The β-carotene production of this microalga in the bubble column bioreactor was considerable, with the maximum intracellular β-carotene content reaching 60.76 mg g(-1), biomass reaching 9.2 g L(-1), and β-carotene yield up to 470.2 mg L(-1). The β-carotene productions in two large flat panel bioreactors were relatively lower, whereas over 100 mg β-carotene L(-1) was achieved. Besides, high light intensity helped to accumulate intracellular β-carotene and biomass. Deficient nitrate supply inhibited biomass growth, though it helped to accumulate β-carotene. Our results first proved that E. cf. polyphem was a potential source and producer of β-carotene, making it an interesting subject for further β-carotene study or commercial exploration. PMID:22617035

  3. Risk-based decisionmaking (Panel)

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, T.H.

    1995-12-31

    By means of a panel discussion and extensive audience interaction, explore the current challenges and progress to date in applying risk considerations to decisionmaking related to low-level waste. This topic is especially timely because of the proposed legislation pertaining to risk-based decisionmaking and because of the increased emphasis placed on radiological performance assessments of low-level waste disposal.

  4. A Progressive Concern: Productivity in Education. The Productivity for Results Series No. 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Cynthia G.; Miller, Raegen T.

    2015-01-01

    The authors concentrate on financial resources available to schools, how to improve fiscal equity, and how schools can use resources in smarter ways. They explain why political progressives should assist in--and even lead--efforts to bring the idea of managing performance with measurable outcomes to public schools. The first section dwells on…

  5. Progressive Powder Coating: New Infrared Curing Oven at Metal Finishing Plant Increases Production by 50%

    SciTech Connect

    2003-05-01

    Progressive Powder Coating in Mentor, Ohio, is a metal finishing plant that uses a convection oven in its manufacturing process. In an effort to save energy and improve production, the company installed an infrared oven in between the powder coating booth and the convection oven on its production line. This installation allowed the plant to increase its conveyor line speed and increase production by 50 percent. In addition, the plant reduced its natural gas consumption, yielding annual energy savings of approximately $54,000. With a total project cost of $136,000, the simple payback is 2.5 years.

  6. Heat exchanger panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warburton, Robert E. (Inventor); Cuva, William J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to a heat exchanger panel which has broad utility in high temperature environments. The heat exchanger panel has a first panel, a second panel, and at least one fluid containment device positioned intermediate the first and second panels. At least one of the first panel and the second panel have at least one feature on an interior surface to accommodate the at least one fluid containment device. In a preferred embodiment, each of the first and second panels is formed from a high conductivity, high temperature composite material. Also, in a preferred embodiment, the first and second panels are joined together by one or more composite fasteners.

  7. Hydrogen production by the engineered cyanobacterial strain Nostoc PCC 7120 ΔhupW examined in a flat panel photobioreactor system.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Marcus; Heidorn, Thorsten; Lindblad, Peter

    2015-12-10

    Nitrogenase based hydrogen production was examined in a ΔhupW strain of the filamentous heterocystous cyanobacterium Nostoc PCC 7120, i.e., cells lacking the last step in the maturation system of the large subunit of the uptake hydrogenase and as a consequence with a non-functional uptake hydrogenase. The cells were grown in a developed flat panel photobioreactor system with 3.0L culture volume either aerobically (air) or anaerobically (Ar or 80% N2/20% Ar) and illuminated with a mixture of red and white LED. Aerobic growth of the ΔhupW strain of Nostoc PCC 7120 at 44μmolar photons m(-2)s(-1) PAR gave the highest hydrogen production of 0.7mL H2 L(-1)h(-1), 0.53mmol H2 mg chlorophyll a(-1)h(-1), and a light energy conversion efficiency of 1.2%. Anaerobic growth using 100% argon showed a maximal hydrogen production of 1.7mLL(-1)h(-1), 0.85mmol per mg chlorophyll a(-1) h(-1), and a light energy conversion efficiency of 2.7%. Altering between argon/N2 (20/80) and 100% argon phases resulted in a maximal hydrogen production at hour 128 (100% argon phase) with 6.2mL H2L(-1)h(-1), 0.71mL H2 mg chlorophyll a(-1)h(-1), and a light energy efficiency conversion of 4.0%. The highest buildup of hydrogen gas observed was 6.89% H2 (100% argon phase) of the total photobioreactor system with a maximal production of 4.85mL H2 L(-1)h(-1). The present study clearly demonstrates the potential to use purpose design cyanobacteria in developed flat panel photobioreactor systems for the direct production of the solar fuel hydrogen. Further improvements in the strain used, environmental conditions employed, and growth, production and collection systems used, are needed before a sustainable and economical cyanobacterial based hydrogen production can be realized.

  8. Hydrogen production by the engineered cyanobacterial strain Nostoc PCC 7120 ΔhupW examined in a flat panel photobioreactor system.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Marcus; Heidorn, Thorsten; Lindblad, Peter

    2015-12-10

    Nitrogenase based hydrogen production was examined in a ΔhupW strain of the filamentous heterocystous cyanobacterium Nostoc PCC 7120, i.e., cells lacking the last step in the maturation system of the large subunit of the uptake hydrogenase and as a consequence with a non-functional uptake hydrogenase. The cells were grown in a developed flat panel photobioreactor system with 3.0L culture volume either aerobically (air) or anaerobically (Ar or 80% N2/20% Ar) and illuminated with a mixture of red and white LED. Aerobic growth of the ΔhupW strain of Nostoc PCC 7120 at 44μmolar photons m(-2)s(-1) PAR gave the highest hydrogen production of 0.7mL H2 L(-1)h(-1), 0.53mmol H2 mg chlorophyll a(-1)h(-1), and a light energy conversion efficiency of 1.2%. Anaerobic growth using 100% argon showed a maximal hydrogen production of 1.7mLL(-1)h(-1), 0.85mmol per mg chlorophyll a(-1) h(-1), and a light energy conversion efficiency of 2.7%. Altering between argon/N2 (20/80) and 100% argon phases resulted in a maximal hydrogen production at hour 128 (100% argon phase) with 6.2mL H2L(-1)h(-1), 0.71mL H2 mg chlorophyll a(-1)h(-1), and a light energy efficiency conversion of 4.0%. The highest buildup of hydrogen gas observed was 6.89% H2 (100% argon phase) of the total photobioreactor system with a maximal production of 4.85mL H2 L(-1)h(-1). The present study clearly demonstrates the potential to use purpose design cyanobacteria in developed flat panel photobioreactor systems for the direct production of the solar fuel hydrogen. Further improvements in the strain used, environmental conditions employed, and growth, production and collection systems used, are needed before a sustainable and economical cyanobacterial based hydrogen production can be realized. PMID:26325196

  9. Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    little flexibility to begin long lead-time items for upgrades or contingency planning. For example, the section on computer hardware and software contains specific findings related to required longer range safety-related actions. NASA can be proud of its accomplishments this past year, but must remain ever vigilant, particularly as ISS assembly begins to accelerate. The Panel will continue to focus on both the short- and long-term aspects of risk management and safety planning. This task continues to be made manageable and productive by the excellent cooperation the Panel receives from both NASA and its contractors. Particular emphasis will continue to be directed to longer term workforce and program planning issues as well as the immediate risks associated with ISS assembly and the initial flights of the X-33 and X-34. Section 2 of this report presents specific findings and recommendations generated by ASAP activities during 1998. Section 3 contains more detailed information in support of these findings and recommendations. Appendix A is a current roster of Panel members, consultants, and staff. Appendix B contains NASA's response to the findings and recommendations from the 1997 ASAP Annual Report. Appendix C details the fact-finding activities of the Panel in 1998. During the year, Mr. Richard D. Blomberg was elected chair of the Panel and Vice Admiral (VADM) Robert F Dunn was elected deputy chair. VADM Bernard M. Kauderer moved from consultant to member. Mr. Charles J. Donlan retired from the Panel after many years of meritorious service. Ms. Shirley C. McCarty and Mr. Robert L. ('Hoot') Gibson joined the Panel as consultants.

  10. Panel Discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, James

    1997-03-01

    Panelists: Arthur Bienenstock, Stanford University Cherry Ann Murray, Lucent Technologies Venkatesh Narayanamurti, University of California-Santa Barbara Paul Peercy, SEMI-SEMATECH Robert Richardson, Cornell University James Roberto, Oak Ridge National Laboratory The Board on Physics and Astronomy is undertaking a series of reassessments of all branches of physics as the foundation of a new physics survey. As part of this project, a Committee on Condensed Matter and Materials Physics has been established under the leadership of Venkatesh Narayanamurti of the University of California-Santa Barbara. The committee has been working since June on a study that will include an illustrative recounting of major recent achievements; identification of new opportunities and challenges facing the field; and articulation-for leaders in government, industry, universities, and the public at large-of the important roles played by the field in modern society. An especially urgent issue is how to maintain the intellectual vitality of condensed matter and materials physics, and its contributions to the well-being of the United States, in an era of limited resources. The forum will feature a panel of materials researchers who are members of the Committee on Condensed Matter and Materials Physics. They will give a brief report on the status of the study and engage in a dialogue with the audience about issues facing the condensed matter and materials physics community. Broad community input is vital to the success of the study. Please come and make your voice heard!

  11. Recent progress on MHD-induced loss of D-D fusion products in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Zweben, S.J.; Darrow, D.S.; Budny, R.V.; Cheng, C.Z.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Herrmann, H.; Mynick, H.E.; Schivell, J.; Chang, Z.

    1993-08-01

    This paper reviews the recent progress made toward understanding the MHD-induced loss of D-D fusion products which has been seen on TFTR since 1988. These measurements have been made using the ``lost alpha`` diagnostic, which is described briefly. The largest MHD- induced loss occurs with coherent 3/2 or 2/1 MHD activity (kink/tearing modes), which can cause up to {approx}3--5 times the first-orbit loss at I{approx}1.6--1.8 MA, roughly a {approx}20--30% global los of D-D fusion products. Modeling of these MHD-induced losses has progressed to the point where the basic loss mechanism can be accounted for qualitatively, but the experimental results can not yet be understood quantitatively. Several alpha loss codes are being developed to improve the quantitative comparison between experiment and theory.

  12. Multi‐omic profiling ­of EPO‐producing Chinese hamster ovary cell panel reveals metabolic adaptation to heterologous protein production

    PubMed Central

    Ley, Daniel; Seresht, Ali Kazemi; Engmark, Mikael; Magdenoska, Olivera; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the preferred production host for many therapeutic proteins. The production of heterologous proteins in CHO cells imposes a burden on the host cell metabolism and impact cellular physiology on a global scale. In this work, a multi‐omics approach was applied to study the production of erythropoietin (EPO) in a panel of CHO‐K1 cells under growth‐limited and unlimited conditions in batch and chemostat cultures. Physiological characterization of the EPO‐producing cells included global transcriptome analysis, targeted metabolome analysis, including intracellular pools of glycolytic intermediates, NAD(P)H/NAD(P)+, adenine nucleotide phosphates (ANP), and extracellular concentrations of sugars, organic acids, and amino acids. Potential impact of EPO expression on the protein secretory pathway was assessed at multiple stages using quantitative PCR (qPCR), reverse transcription PCR (qRT‐PCR), Western blots (WB), and global gene expression analysis to assess EPO gene copy numbers, EPO gene expression, intracellular EPO retention, and differentially expressed genes functionally related to secretory protein processing, respectively. We found no evidence supporting the existence of production bottlenecks in energy metabolism (i.e., glycolytic metabolites, NAD(P)H/NAD(P)+ and ANPs) in batch culture or in the secretory protein production pathway (i.e., gene dosage, transcription and post‐translational processing of EPO) in chemostat culture at specific productivities up to 5 pg/cell/day. Time‐course analysis of high‐ and low‐producing clones in chemostat culture revealed rapid adaptation of transcription levels of amino acid catabolic genes in favor of EPO production within nine generations. Interestingly, the adaptation was followed by an increase in specific EPO productivity. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2015;112: 2373–2387. © 2015 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID

  13. Recent progress concerning the production of controlled highly oriented electrospun nanofibrous arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manea, L. R.; Hristian, L.; Leon, A. L.; Popa, A.

    2016-08-01

    Among the foreground domains of all the research-development programs at national and international level, a special place is occupied by that concerning the nanosciences, nanotechnologies, new materials and technologies. Electrospinning found a well-deserved place in this space, offering the preparation of nanomaterials with distinctive properties and applications in medicine, environment, photonic sensors, filters, etc. These multiple applications are generated by the fact that the electrospinning technology makes available the production of nanofibers with controllable characteristics (length, porosity, density, and mechanical characteristics), complexity and architecture. The apparition of 3D printing technology favors the production of complex nanofibrous structures, controlled assembly, self-assembly of electrospun nanofibers for the production of scaffolds used in various medical applications. The architecture of fibrous deposits has a special influence on the subsequent development of the cells of the reconstructed organism. The present work proposes to study of recent progress concerning the production of controlled highly oriented electrospun nanofibrous arrays and progress in research on the production of complex 2D and 3D structures.

  14. Ground movements associated with gas hydrate production. Progress report, July 1--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Siriwardane, H.J.

    1992-12-31

    The grantee will evaluate the influence of hydrate production on ground subsidence near the wellbore and the surface. The objective of this research will be achieved by using computer simulations of what is expected in a hydrate reservoir during the production stage as reported by hydrate production models and available data. The model will be based on theories of continuum mechanics, thermomechanics of hydrate production, principles of rock mechanics and geomechanics, and special features of geomaterials under cold temperatures such as those found in permafrost regions. The research work involved in the proposed investigation will be divided into three major tasks: (1) Mechanics of subsidence in permafrost regions; (2) modeling of subsidence; and (3) parametric studies. Progress reports are presented for tasks 1 and 2.

  15. Thin film concentrator panel development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, D. K.

    1982-01-01

    The development and testing of a rigid panel concept that utilizes a thin film reflective surface for application to a low-cost point-focusing solar concentrator is discussed. It is shown that a thin film reflective surface is acceptable for use on solar concentrators, including 1500 F applications. Additionally, it is shown that a formed steel sheet substrate is a good choice for concentrator panels. The panel has good optical properties, acceptable forming tolerances, environmentally resistant substrate and stiffeners, and adaptability to low to mass production rates. Computer simulations of the concentrator optics were run using the selected reflector panel design. Experimentally determined values for reflector surface specularity and reflectivity along with dimensional data were used in the analysis. The simulations provided intercept factor and net energy into the aperture as a function of aperture size for different surface errors and pointing errors. Point source and Sun source optical tests were also performed.

  16. Expert Panels, Consumers, and Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rehfeldt, Thomas K.

    2000-01-01

    Studied the attributes, properties, and consumer acceptance of antiperspirant products through responses of 400 consumers (consumer data), expert panel data, and analytical data about the products. Results show how the Rasch model can provide the tool necessary to combine data from several sources. (SLD)

  17. [Declassification productivity initiative]. Declassification Productivity Research Center progress report {number_sign}8, 1 January 1998--31 March 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    The Declassification Productivity Research Center (DPRC) was established as an independent, world-class research capability and computer facility to support the DOE Declassification Productivity Initiative (DPI). The goal of DPI is to increase the flow of unrestricted government information to the public. This report documents progress during the second quarter of DPRC`s third year of operations. The DPRC has made very good progress this quarter, and has also begun several new projects with potential benefits for the declassification community. After significant delays, work is now progressing well on the Federal Intelligent Document Understanding Laboratory (FIDUL) project. The DPRC has become a familiar, respected member of the declassification community because of its efforts in the Declassification Productivity Management Council`s (DPMC`s) Automation Working Group (AWG). The DPRC provided a lead role and coordinating efforts in delivery of the AWG Electronic Document Interchange Standard (EDIS), and the associated (DPTC developed) (1) Document Interchange System (DIS) and (2) Document Review/Redaction System (DRS). These two PC based application systems are being offered free of charge, along with several other government-developed computer application programs, to smaller agencies which do not have the resources to purchase or develop such systems to support their declassification activities. The DPRC has also moved into a bigger facility at the GWU Virginia campus, which provides more space for expansion and for setting up the long envisioned DPRC Declassification Test Laboratory. Finally, the DPRC has also helped to develop a World Wide Web-based design concept and an operational prototype database system for one-stop coordination of multi-agency equity reviews. The Equity Notification Database (or END) is being developed to resolve difficulties being experienced by agencies engaged in and responsible for the review of documents with multiple equities.

  18. Consensus panel's assessment and recommendations on the use of 3 botulinum toxin type A products in facial aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Lorenc, Z Paul; Kenkel, Jeffrey M; Fagien, Steven; Hirmand, Haideh; Nestor, Mark S; Sclafani, Anthony P; Sykes, Jonathan M; Waldorf, Heidi A

    2013-03-01

    In this summary article, the authors discuss the characteristics of abobotulinumtoxinA, incobotulinumtoxinA, and onabotulinumtoxinA. With 3 neuromodulators available in the US market, comparisons between and among products will invariably be made, so arguments for the most effective facial aesthetic uses of each neuromodulator are presented. Topics addressed in this article include patient expectations, toxin reconstitution and preparation, patient positioning, differences among products, the role of complexing proteins, and dosing and injection strategies. Recommendations are also provided by treatment area.

  19. Consensus panel's assessment and recommendations on the use of 3 botulinum toxin type A products in facial aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Lorenc, Z Paul; Kenkel, Jeffrey M; Fagien, Steven; Hirmand, Haideh; Nestor, Mark S; Sclafani, Anthony P; Sykes, Jonathan M; Waldorf, Heidi A

    2013-03-01

    In this summary article, the authors discuss the characteristics of abobotulinumtoxinA, incobotulinumtoxinA, and onabotulinumtoxinA. With 3 neuromodulators available in the US market, comparisons between and among products will invariably be made, so arguments for the most effective facial aesthetic uses of each neuromodulator are presented. Topics addressed in this article include patient expectations, toxin reconstitution and preparation, patient positioning, differences among products, the role of complexing proteins, and dosing and injection strategies. Recommendations are also provided by treatment area. PMID:23515197

  20. Making Large Suction Panels For Laminar-Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, Dal V.

    1991-01-01

    Perforated titanium panels used to identify and resolve issues related to manufacture. Recently, relatively large suction panels with aerodynamically satisfactory surface perforations and with surface contours and smoothness characteristics necessary for Laminar-Flow Control (LFC) designed, fabricated, and tested. Requirements of production lines for commercial transport airplanes carefully considered in development of panels. Sizes of panels representative of what is used on wing of commercial transport airplane. Tests of perforated panels in transonic wind tunnel demonstrated aerodynamic stability at flight mach numbers.

  1. Characterization and application of the Andean Diversity Panel for the improvement of common bean productivity in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) productivity in Sub-Saharan Africa is far below yield potential, while climate change and access to inputs are persistent challenges. In addition, the market and human nutrition needs for common bean continue to expand in the African continent, which has the highest ...

  2. Development of a Low-Cost Solar Panel using laminated polymer films. Final report, September 15, 1977-November 15, 1978

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, E V; Adams, G J; Elkins, W; McLeod, A H

    1980-03-01

    The objective of this program is to demonstrate the fabrication of an inexpensive single-glazed flat plate collector which is fabricated with thin polymer films in high speed production processes. Progress is reported on the following tasks: design analysis, materials selection, panel manufacturing, thermal performance testing, and applications and cost analysis. (WHK)

  3. Progress on Oceanographic Tables and Standards 1983-1986: Work and Recommendations of the Unesco/SCOR/ICES/IAPSO Joint Panel. Unesco Technical Papers in Marine Science No. 50.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Div. of Marine Sciences.

    The present document covers activities carried out by and under the auspices of the Joint Panel on Oceanographic Tables and Standards (JPOTS) over the period of 1983-1986. The first part is the report of the Chairman of JPOTS on the activities of the Panel during the period 1983-1985. Two major topics were considered by the Panel: (1) the…

  4. Emissions and Noise Pervasive Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda; Lee, Chi

    2008-01-01

    Objectives include: Provide interagency coordination of technology development, aimed at engine noise reduction. a) Provide recommendations to the Steering Committee on potential areas of interagency technology collaboration to maximize the use of government investments in noise reduction. b) Serve as a forum for information and technology exchange in order to coordinate gas turbine engine environmental strategies and policies among the member agencies and industry; c) Coordinate activities across panel representatives; and d) Communicate progress to VAATE steering committee.

  5. Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This report presents the results of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) activities during 2002. The format of the report has been modified to capture a long-term perspective. Section II is new and highlights the Panel's view of NASA's safety progress during the year. Section III contains the pivotal safety issues facing NASA in the coming year. Section IV includes the program area findings and recommendations. The Panel has been asked by the Administrator to perform several special studies this year, and the resulting white papers appear in Appendix C. The year has been filled with significant achievements for NASA in both successful Space Shuttle operations and International Space Station (ISS) construction. Throughout the year, safety has been first and foremost in spite of many changes throughout the Agency. The relocation of the Orbiter Major Modifications (OMMs) from California to Kennedy Space Center (KSC) appears very successful. The transition of responsibilities for program management of the Space Shuttle and ISS programs from Johnson Space Center (JSC) to NASA Headquarters went smoothly. The decision to extend the life of the Space Shuttle as the primary NASA vehicle for access to space is viewed by the Panel as a prudent one. With the appropriate investments in safety improvements, in maintenance, in preserving appropriate inventories of spare parts, and in infrastructure, the Space Shuttle can provide safe and reliable support for the ISS for the foreseeable future. Indications of an aging Space Shuttle fleet occurred on more than one occasion this year. Several flaws went undetected in the early prelaunch tests and inspections. In all but one case, the problems were found prior to launch. These incidents were all handled properly and with safety as the guiding principle. Indeed, launches were postponed until the problems were fully understood and mitigating action could be taken. These incidents do, however, indicate the need to analyze the

  6. The GEOGLAM Rangelands and Pasture Productivity Activity: Recent Progress and Future Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerschman, J. P.; Held, A. A.; Donohue, R. J.; Renzullo, L. J.; Sims, N.; Kerblat, F.; Grundy, M.

    2015-12-01

    Rangelands and pastures cover about a third of the world's land area and support livestock production which represents ~40% of global agricultural gross domestic product. The global consumption of animal protein shows a clear increasing trend, driven by both total population and per capita income increases, putting a growing pressure on the sustainability of grazing lands worldwide. Despite their relevance, rangelands have received less attention than croplands regarding global monitoring of the resource productivity and condition. The Rangelands and Pasture Productivity (RaPP) activity is a component within the Global Agricultural Monitoring initiative established under the Group on Earth Observations (GEOGLAM) in 2013. GEOGLAM RaPP is aimed at providing the global community with the means to monitor the world's rangelands and pastures on a routine basis, and the capacity to produce animal protein in real-time, at global, regional and national levels. Since its launch two years ago GEOGLAM RAPP has made progress in the four implementation elements. These include: 1- the establishment of community of practice; 2- the development of a global monitoring system for rangeland condition; 3- the establishment of pilot sites in main rangeland systems for satellite data products validation and model testing; and 4- integration with livestock production models. Three international workshops have been held building the community of practice. A prototype monitoring system that provides global visualisations and querying capability of vegetation cover data and anomalies has been established. Pilot sites, mostly in areas with long records of field measurements of rangeland condition and productivity have been proposed for nine countries. The link to global livestock models, including physical and economic components, have been established. Future challenges for GEOGLAM RaPP have also been identified and include: better representation of the areas occupied by rangelands

  7. Thermal-structural panel buckling tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Randolph C.; Richards, W. L.

    A titanium-matrix-composite (TMC) hat-stiffened panel of 61 cm sq area and 3.175 cm thick was nondestructively tested to 649 C to examine its buckling characteristics. Compressive loads were applied to the panel in a 978.6 kN uniaxial load frame system. High-temperature testing was performed using quartz lamp heating. A single-strain-age force/stiffness buckling prediction technique was developed to predict panel buckling loads. For the monolithic panel, these test predictions correlated within 10 percent with a finite-element buckling analyses performed elsewhere. Comparisons between force/stiffness predictions and analyses for the TMC panel are in progress.

  8. Thermal-structural panel buckling tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Randolph C.; Richards, W. L.

    1991-01-01

    A titanium-matrix-composite (TMC) hat-stiffened panel of 61 cm sq area and 3.175 cm thick was nondestructively tested to 649 C to examine its buckling characteristics. Compressive loads were applied to the panel in a 978.6 kN uniaxial load frame system. High-temperature testing was performed using quartz lamp heating. A single-strain-age force/stiffness buckling prediction technique was developed to predict panel buckling loads. For the monolithic panel, these test predictions correlated within 10 percent with a finite-element buckling analyses performed elsewhere. Comparisons between force/stiffness predictions and analyses for the TMC panel are in progress.

  9. CDC Panel Says FluMist Nasal Flu Vaccine Ineffective

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159535.html CDC Panel Says FluMist Nasal Flu Vaccine Ineffective Agency advisors say the product has lost ... without the easier, nasal spray form of flu vaccine next flu season, a panel of experts decided ...

  10. Indomethacin Treatment of Mice with Premalignant Oral Lesions Sustains Cytokine Production and Slows Progression to Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sara D.; Young, M. Rita I.

    2016-01-01

    Current treatment options for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients are often ineffective due to tumor-localized and systemic immunosuppression. Using the 4-NQO mouse model of oral carcinogenesis, this study showed that premalignant oral lesion cells produce higher levels of the immune modulator, PGE2, compared to HNSCC cells. Inhibiting prostaglandin production of premalignant lesion cells with the pan-cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin stimulated their induction of spleen cell cytokine production. In contrast, inhibiting HNSCC prostaglandin production did not stimulate their induction of spleen cell cytokine production. Treatment of mice bearing premalignant oral lesions with indomethacin slowed progression of premalignant oral lesions to HNSCC. Flow cytometric analysis of T cells in the regional lymph nodes of lesion-bearing mice receiving indomethacin treatment showed an increase in lymph node cellularity and in the absolute number of CD8+ T cells expressing IFN-γ compared to levels in lesion-bearing mice receiving diluent control treatment. The cytokine-stimulatory effect of indomethacin treatment was not localized to regional lymph nodes but was also seen in the spleen of mice with premalignant oral lesions. Together, these data suggest that inhibiting prostaglandin production at the premalignant lesion stage boosts immune capability and improves clinical outcomes. PMID:27713748

  11. Declassification Productivity Research Center: Progress report number 9, April 1--June 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    This report documents the progress achieved by the Declassification Productivity Research Center (DPRC) during the third quarter of its third year of operations. The DPRC was established at The George Washington University (GWU) as an independent world-class research capability and computer facility to support the DOE Declassification Productivity Initiative (DPI). The original intent of DOE was to provide seed funding for the DPRC, which might be supplemented by other interested agencies as opportunities for research were identified and projects funded. The goal of DPI is to increase the flow of unrestricted government information to the public. To this end, the work at GWU involves both basic and applied research in the areas of (1) system-level declassification process analysis and modeling, (2) development of computer systems to automate declassification processes, including text analysis and interpretation, (3) coordination/integration of new technology into the processes, and (4) development and promulgation of inter-operability and document transfer standards.

  12. Intra-Testicular Signals Regulate Germ Cell Progression and Production of Qualitatively Mature Spermatozoa in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Meccariello, Rosaria; Chianese, Rosanna; Chioccarelli, Teresa; Ciaramella, Vincenza; Fasano, Silvia; Pierantoni, Riccardo; Cobellis, Gilda

    2014-01-01

    Spermatogenesis, a highly conserved process in vertebrates, is mainly under the hypothalamic–pituitary control, being regulated by the secretion of pituitary gonadotropins, follicle stimulating hormone, and luteinizing hormone, in response to stimulation exerted by gonadotropin releasing hormone from hypothalamic neurons. At testicular level, gonadotropins bind specific receptors located on the somatic cells regulating the production of steroids and factors necessary to ensure a correct spermatogenesis. Indeed, besides the endocrine route, a complex network of cell-to-cell communications regulates germ cell progression, and a combination of endocrine and intra-gonadal signals sustains the production of high quality mature spermatozoa. In this review, we focus on the recent advances in the area of the intra-gonadal signals supporting sperm development. PMID:24847312

  13. Progress in converting {sup 99}Mo production from high- to low-enriched uranium--1999.

    SciTech Connect

    Snelgrove, J. L.; Vandegrift, G. F.; Conner, C.; Wiencek, T. C.; Hofman, G. L.

    1999-09-29

    Over this past year, extraordinary progress has been made in executing our charter to assist in converting Mo-99 production worldwide from HEU to LEU. Building on the successful development of the experimental LEU-foil target, we have designed a new, economical irradiation target. We have also successfully demonstrated, in collaboration with BATAN in Indonesia, that LEU can be substituted for HEU in the Cintichem target without loss of product yield or purity; in fact, conversion may make economic sense. We are interacting with a number of commercial producers--we have begun active collaborations with the CNEA and ANSTO; we are working to define the scope of collaborations with MDS Nordion and Mallinckrodt; and IRE has offered its services to irradiate and test a target at the appropriate time. Conversion of the CNEA process is on schedule. Other papers presented at this meeting will present specific results on the demonstration of the LEU-modified Cintichem process, the development of the new target, and progress in converting the CNEA process.

  14. Summary Report Panel 2: Regulatory Issues.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Craig; Dolman, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The Effects of Noise on Aquatic Life 2013 Conference convened four panels to discuss specific topics related to the effects of anthropogenic noise on aquatic ecosystems. The second of these four panels, the Regulatory Issues Panel, brought together several different perspectives: representatives of agencies responsible for regulating activities that introduce anthropogenic noise into aquatic ecosystems: representatives of the regulated industries, agencies, and consultancies that advise regulators and regulated industries; and nongovernmental organizations and other stakeholders with an interest in anthropogenic noise. The goal of the panel was to help develop a more productive relationship between these groups.

  15. 7 CFR 2902.19 - Composite panels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... interior applications and providing a surface that is impact-, scratch-, and wear-resistant and that does... structural construction applications, including cabinetry, casework, paneling, and decorative panels. (5... information on the BioPreferred Web site of qualifying biobased products about the intended uses of...

  16. 7 CFR 2902.19 - Composite panels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... interior applications and providing a surface that is impact-, scratch-, and wear-resistant and that does... structural construction applications, including cabinetry, casework, paneling, and decorative panels. (5... information on the BioPreferred Web site of qualifying biobased products about the intended uses of...

  17. Coeur d'Alene Tribal Production Facility, Volume I of III, 2002-2003 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Paul

    2003-01-01

    In fulfillment of the NWPPC's 3-Step Process for the implementation of new hatcheries in the Columbia Basin, this Step 1 submission package to the Council includes four items: (1) Cover letter from the Coeur d'Alene Tribe, Interdisciplinary Team Chair, and the USFWS; (2) References to key information (Attachments 1-4); (3) The updated Master Plan for the Tribe's native cutthroat restoration project; and (4) Appendices. In support of the Master Plan submitted by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe the reference chart (Item 2) was developed to allow reviewers to quickly access information necessary for accurate peer review. The Northwest Power Planning Council identified pertinent issues to be addressed in the master planning process for new artificial production facilities. References to this key information are provided in three attachments: (1) NWPPC Program language regarding the Master Planning Process, (2) Questions Identified in the September 1997 Council Policy, and (3) Program language identified by the Council's Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP). To meet the need for off-site mitigation for fish losses on the mainstem Columbia River, in a manner consistent with the objectives of the Council's Program, the Coeur d'Alene Tribe is proposing that the BPA fund the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of a trout production facility located adjacent to Coeur d'Alene Lake on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation. The updated Master Plan (Item 3) represents the needs associated with the re-evaluation of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's Trout Production Facility (No.199004402). This plan addresses issues and concerns expressed by the NWPPC as part of the issue summary for the Mountain Columbia provincial review, and the 3-step hatchery review process. Finally, item 4 (Appendices) documents the 3-Step process correspondence to date between the Coeur d'Alene Tribe and additional relevant entities. Item 4 provides a chronological account of previous ISRP reviews

  18. Advanced concentrator panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, D. M.; Bedard, R. J., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The prototype fabrication of a lightweight, high-quality cellular glass substrate reflective panel for use in an advanced point-focusing solar concentrator was completed. The reflective panel is a gore shaped segment of an 11-m paraboloidal dish. The overall concentrator design and the design of the reflective panels are described. prototype-specific panel design modifications are discussed and the fabrication approach and procedure outlined.

  19. Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This annual report is based on the activities of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel in calendar year 2000. During this year, the construction of the International Space Station (ISS) moved into high gear. The launch of the Russian Service Module was followed by three Space Shuttle construction and logistics flights and the deployment of the Expedition One crew. Continuous habitation of the ISS has begun. To date, both the ISS and Space Shuttle programs have met or exceeded most of their flight objectives. In spite of the intensity of these efforts, it is clear that safety was always placed ahead of cost and schedule. This safety consciousness permitted the Panel to devote more of its efforts to examining the long-term picture. With ISS construction accelerating, demands on the Space Shuttle will increase. While Russian Soyuz and Progress spacecraft will make some flights, the Space Shuttle remains the primary vehicle to sustain the ISS and all other U.S. activities that require humans in space. Development of a next generation, human-rated vehicle has slowed due to a variety of technological problems and the absence of an approach that can accomplish the task significantly better than the Space Shuttle. Moreover, even if a viable design were currently available, the realities of funding and development cycles suggest that it would take many years to bring it to fruition. Thus, it is inescapable that for the foreseeable future the Space Shuttle will be the only human-rated vehicle available to the U.S. space program for support of the ISS and other missions requiring humans. Use of the Space Shuttle will extend well beyond current planning, and is likely to continue for the life of the ISS.

  20. TRMM Solar Array Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This final report presents conclusions/recommendations concerning the TRMM Solar Array; deliverable list and schedule summary; waivers and deviations; as-shipped performance data, including flight panel verification matrix, panel output detail, shadow test summary, humidity test summary, reverse bias test panel; and finally, quality assurance summary.

  1. [Progress in engineering Escherichia coli for production of high-value added organic acids and alcohols].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiming; Liu, Wei; Xu, Xin; Zhang, Haibo; Xian, Mo

    2013-10-01

    Confronted with the gradual exhaustion of the earth's fossil energy resources and the grimmer environmental deterioration, the bio-based process to produce high-value added platform chemicals from renewable biomass is attracting growing interest. Escherichia coli has been chosen as a workhouse for the production of many valuable chemicals due to various advantages, such as clear genetic background, convenient to be genetically modified and good growth properties with low nutrient requirements. Rational strain development of E. coli achieved by metabolic engineering strategies has provided new processes for efficiently biotechnological production of various high-value chemical building blocks. This review focuses on recent progresses in metabolic engineering of E. coli that lead to efficient recombinant biocatalysts for production of high-value organic acids such as succinic acid, 3-hydroxypropanoic acid and glucaric acid as well as alcohols like glycerol and xylitol. Besides, this review also discusses several other platform chemicals, including 2,5-furan dicarboxylic acid, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, itaconic acid, levulinic acid, 3-hydroxy-gamma-butyrolactone and sorbitol, which have not been produced by E. coli until now. PMID:24432652

  2. Repeated buckling of composite shear panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Josef; Weller, Tanchum

    1990-01-01

    epoxy shear panels with small holes in the center showed no similar fatigue life degradation and no shift in failure mode. Further tests on the effect of holes are in progress.

  3. Safety Panel Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Christine E.

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to explore what resources are potentially available to safety panels and to provide some guidance on how to utilize those resources. While the examples used in this paper will concentrate on the Flight Equipment and Reliability Review Panel (FESRRP) and Extravehicular Activity (EVA) hardware that have come through that panel, as well as resources at Johnson Space Center, the paper will address how this applies to safety panels in general, and where possible cite examples for other safety panels.

  4. Failure Analysis of Discrete Damaged Tailored Extension-Shear-Coupled Stiffened Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Donald J.

    2005-01-01

    The results of an analytical and experimental investigation of the failure of composite is tiffener panels with extension-shear coupling are presented. This tailored concept, when used in the cover skins of a tiltrotor aircraft wing has the potential for increasing the aeroelastic stability margins and improving the aircraft productivity. The extension-shear coupling is achieved by using unbalanced 45 plies in the skin. The failure analysis of two tailored panel configurations that have the center stringer and adjacent skin severed is presented. Finite element analysis of the damaged panels was conducted using STAGS (STructural Analysis of General Shells) general purpose finite element program that includes a progressive failure capability for laminated composite structures that is based on point-stress analysis, traditional failure criteria, and ply discounting for material degradation. The progressive failure predicted the path of the failure and maximum load capability. There is less than 12 percent difference between the predicted failure load and experimental failure load. There is a good match of the panel stiffness and strength between the progressive failure analysis and the experimental results. The results indicate that the tailored concept would be feasible to use in the wing skin of a tiltrotor aircraft.

  5. ICFA neutrino panel report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, K.

    2015-07-01

    In the summer of 2013 the International Committee on Future Accelerators (ICFA) established a Neutrino Panel with the mandate: "To promote international cooperation in the development of the accelerator-based neutrino-oscillation program and to promote international collaboration in the development of a neutrino factory as a future intense source of neutrinos for particle physics experiments." In its first year the Panel organised a series of regional Town Meetings to collect input from the community and to receive reports from the regional planning exercises. The Panel distilled its findings and presented them in a report to ICFA [1]. In this contribution the formation and composition of the Panel are presented together with a summary of the Panel's findings from the three Regional Town Meetings. The Panel's initial conclusions are then articulated and the steps that the Panel seeks to take are outlined.

  6. Quiet Honeycomb Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Daniel L.; Klos, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Sandwich honeycomb composite panels are lightweight and strong, and, therefore, provide a reasonable alternative to the aluminum ring frame/stringer architecture currently used for most aircraft airframes. The drawback to honeycomb panels is that they radiate noise into the aircraft cabin veil- efficiently provoking the need for additional sound treatment which adds weight and reduces the material's cost advantage. A series of honeycomb panels was made -hick incorporated different design strategies aimed at reducing the honeycomb panels' radiation efficiency while at the same time maintaining their strength. The majority of the designs were centered around the concept of creating areas of reduced stiffness in the panel by adding voids and recesses to the core. The effort culminated with a reinforced/recessed panel which had 6 dB higher transmission loss than the baseline solid core panel while maintaining comparable strength.

  7. Interactive optical panel

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    1995-10-03

    An interactive optical panel assembly 34 includes an optical panel 10 having a plurality of ribbon optical waveguides 12 stacked together with opposite ends thereof defining panel first and second faces 16, 18. A light source 20 provides an image beam 22 to the panel first face 16 for being channeled through the waveguides 12 and emitted from the panel second face 18 in the form of a viewable light image 24a. A remote device 38 produces a response beam 40 over a discrete selection area 36 of the panel second face 18 for being channeled through at least one of the waveguides 12 toward the panel first face 16. A light sensor 42,50 is disposed across a plurality of the waveguides 12 for detecting the response beam 40 therein for providing interactive capability.

  8. Introduction to the panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, Gary T.

    1990-05-01

    The way the last part of this seminar was structured was originally as a panel. And based on your survey results that you're all going to turn in when you leave, we tried to estimate what are the areas that you really want to know more about. And they change. Two years ago, Rich Bravman from Symbol Technologies came and he was one of the top ranked people for the day as far as the interest level, the way the material was presented. And we watched that market carefully. When you start to see laser diode based bar code scanners in the market, we decided that was a good time to come back. ESI is a phenomenal success in the diode pumped YAG market in electronics. Just unbelievable success with a brand new product, hit the market at exactly the right time for memory repair, and thirdly there's a lot of concern about the cost of laser diodes.

  9. Analysis of the structural parameters that influence gas production from the Devonian shale. Annual progress report, 1979-1980

    SciTech Connect

    Negus-de Wys, J.; Dixon, J. M.; Evans, M. A.; Lee, K. D.; Ruotsala, J. E.; Wilson, T. H.; Williams, R. T.

    1980-10-01

    The executive study presents the results and progress of efforts toward understanding shale gas production from the Devonian shale in Appalachia. A correlation was found between the geochemical parameters of the shale in eastern Kentucky and shale gas production there. Tasks on resource inventory tasks and shale characterization include regional structure studies, production studies, geophysical studies, structure studies, fracture density and orientation, and fracture studies. (DLC)

  10. TAK-603 selectively suppresses Th1-type cytokine production and inhibits the progression of adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Y; Yamane, M; Sohda, T; Makino, H

    1997-01-01

    We have shown that TAK-603, a new anti-rheumatic drug, is more effective in animal models in which cellular immunity plays a central role. Here, we studied the effect of the drug on Th1 cytokines, which are dominantly produced in this type of immune reaction, in an in vitro system and an in vivo model. We established Th1- and Th2-dominant T-cell lines, and studied the effect of TAK-603 on their cytokine production. Th1 cell lines were BALB/c mouse allo-reactive T cells and C57BL mouse mite antigen-reactive T cells, and the Th2 cell line was BALB/c mouse ovalbumin-reactive T cells. TAK-603 suppressed the production of Th1 cytokines [interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and interleukin-2 (IL-2)] and not that of Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5) in these cell lines. Furthermore, selective suppression of Th1 cytokine production was also observed in the T-cell clones obtained from the ovalbumin-reactive T-cell line. To investigate the effect on cytokine production in animal models of arthritis, we analysed the expression of cytokine messenger RNA using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. In adjuvant arthritis rats, Th1-dominant cytokine production was observed both in the arthritic joint and the spleen, and the time-course paralleled the progression of arthritis. On the other hand, in type-II collagen-induced arthritis, in which TAK-603 has little effect, Th1-dominant cytokine production was not observed and Th2 cytokines were shown to be more important. The adjuvant arthritis rats treated with TAK-603 (6.25 mg/kg/day, per os) showed significantly lower cytokine mRNA expression both locally and systemically. These data suggest that TAK-603 selectively suppresses Th1 cytokine production, which is consistent with its effect on cellular immunity in animal models. Images Figure 4 PMID:9370927

  11. Production of human pluripotent stem cell therapeutics under defined xeno-free conditions: progress and challenges.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yongjia; Wu, Jincheng; Ashok, Preeti; Hsiung, Michael; Tzanakakis, Emmanuel S

    2015-02-01

    Recent advances on human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have brought us closer to the realization of their clinical potential. Nonetheless, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications will require the generation of hPSC products well beyond the laboratory scale. This also mandates the production of hPSC therapeutics in fully-defined, xeno-free systems and in a reproducible manner. Toward this goal, we summarize current developments in defined media free of animal-derived components for hPSC culture. Bioinspired and synthetic extracellular matrices for the attachment, growth and differentiation of hPSCs are also reviewed. Given that most progress in xeno-free medium and substrate development has been demonstrated in two-dimensional rather than three dimensional culture systems, translation from the former to the latter poses unique difficulties. These challenges are discussed in the context of cultivation platforms of hPSCs as aggregates, on microcarriers or after encapsulation in biocompatible scaffolds.

  12. Production of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Therapeutics Under Defined Xeno-free Conditions: Progress and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yongjia; Wu, Jincheng; Ashok, Preeti; Hsiung, Michael; Tzanakakis, Emmanuel S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances on human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have brought us closer to the realization of their clinical potential. Nonetheless, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications will require the generation of hPSC products well beyond the laboratory scale. This also mandates the production of hPSC therapeutics in fully-defined, xeno-free systems and in a reproducible manner. Toward this goal, we summarize current developments in defined media free of animal-derived components for hPSC culture. Bioinspired and synthetic extracellular matrices for the attachment growth and differentiation of hPSCs are also reviewed. Given that most progress in xeno-free medium and substrate development has been demonstrated in two-dimensional rather than three dimensional culture systems, translation from the former to the latter poses unique difficulties. These challenges are discussed in the context of cultivation platforms of hPSCs as aggregates, on microcarriers or after encapsulation in biocompatible scaffolds. PMID:25077810

  13. Oxidative Stress and Lipid Peroxidation Products in Cancer Progression and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Barrera, Giuseppina

    2012-01-01

    The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and an altered redox status are common biochemical aspects in cancer cells. ROS can react with the polyunsaturated fatty acids of lipid membranes and induce lipid peroxidation. The end products of lipid peroxidation, 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), have been considered to be a second messenger of oxidative stress. Beyond ROS involvement in carcinogenesis, increased ROS level can inhibit tumor cell growth. Indeed, in tumors in advanced stages, a further increase of oxidative stress, such as that occurs when using several anticancer drugs and radiation therapy, can overcome the antioxidant defenses of cancer cells and drive them to apoptosis. High concentrations of HNE can also induce apoptosis in cancer cells. However, some cells escape the apoptosis induced by chemical or radiation therapy through the adaptation to intrinsic oxidative stress which confers drug resistance. This paper is focused on recent advances in the studies of the relation between oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation products, and cancer progression with particular attention to the pro-oxidant anticancer agents and the drug-resistant mechanisms, which could be modulated to obtain a better response to cancer therapy. PMID:23119185

  14. Frontal White Matter Tracts Sustaining Speech Production in Primary Progressive Aphasia

    PubMed Central

    Caverzasi, Eduardo; Binney, Richard J.; Henry, Maya L.; Lobach, Iryna; Block, Nikolas; Amirbekian, Bagrat; Dronkers, Nina; Miller, Bruce L.; Henry, Roland G.; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa

    2014-01-01

    In primary progressive aphasia (PPA), speech and language difficulties are caused by neurodegeneration of specific brain networks. In the nonfluent/agrammatic variant (nfvPPA), motor speech and grammatical deficits are associated with atrophy in a left fronto-insular-striatal network previously implicated in speech production. In vivo dissection of the crossing white matter (WM) tracts within this “speech production network” is complex and has rarely been performed in health or in PPA. We hypothesized that damage to these tracts would be specific to nfvPPA and would correlate with differential aspects of the patients' fluency abilities. We prospectively studied 25 PPA and 21 healthy individuals who underwent extensive cognitive testing and 3 T MRI. Using residual bootstrap Q-ball probabilistic tractography on high angular resolution diffusion-weighted imaging (HARDI), we reconstructed pathways connecting posterior inferior frontal, inferior premotor, insula, supplementary motor area (SMA) complex, striatum, and standard ventral and dorsal language pathways. We extracted tract-specific diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) metrics to assess changes across PPA variants and perform brain–behavioral correlations. Significant WM changes in the left intrafrontal and frontostriatal pathways were found in nfvPPA, but not in the semantic or logopenic variants. Correlations between tract-specific DTI metrics with cognitive scores confirmed the specific involvement of this anterior–dorsal network in fluency and suggested a preferential role of a posterior premotor-SMA pathway in motor speech. This study shows that left WM pathways connecting the speech production network are selectively damaged in nfvPPA and suggests that different tracts within this system are involved in subcomponents of fluency. These findings emphasize the emerging role of diffusion imaging in the differential diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25031413

  15. Pyrroloquinoline Quinone Slows Down the Progression of Osteoarthritis by Inhibiting Nitric Oxide Production and Metalloproteinase Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Tao, Ran; Wang, Shitao; Xia, Xiaopeng; Wang, Youhua; Cao, Yi; Huang, Yuejiao; Xu, Xinbao; Liu, Zhongbing; Liu, Peichao; Tang, Xiaohang; Liu, Chun; Shen, Gan; Zhang, Dongmei

    2015-08-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common arthritis and also one of the major causes of joint pain in elderly people. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) on degenerated-related changes in osteoarthritis (OA). SW1353 cells were stimulated with IL-1β to establish the chondrocyte injury model in vitro. PQQ was administrated into SW1353 cultures 1 h before IL-1β treatment. Amounts of MMP-1, MMP-13, P65, IκBα, ERK, p-ERK, P38, and p-P38 were measured via western blot. The production of NO was determined by Griess reaction assay and reflected by the iNOS level. Meniscal-ligamentous injury (MLI) was performed on 8-week-old rats to establish the OA rat model. PQQ was injected intraperitoneally 3 days before MLI and consecutively until harvest, and the arthritis cartilage degeneration level was assessed. The expressions of MMP-1 and MMP-13 were significantly downregulated after PQQ treatment compared with that in IL-1β alone group. NO production and iNOS expression were decreased by PQQ treatment compared with control group. Amounts of nucleus P65 were upregulated in SW1353 after stimulated with IL-1β, while PQQ significantly inhibited the translocation. In rat OA model, treatment with PQQ markedly decelerated the degeneration of articular cartilage. These findings suggested that PQQ could inhibit OA-related catabolic proteins MMPs expression, NO production, and thus, slow down the articular cartilage degeneration and OA progression. Owing to its beneficial effects, PQQ is expected to be a novel pharmacological application in OA clinical prevention and treatment in the near future.

  16. Titanium honeycomb panel testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, W. L.; Thompson, Randolph C.

    The paper describes the procedures of thermal mechanical tests carried out at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility on two tianium honeycomb wing panels bonded using liquid interface diffusion (LID) technique, and presents the results of these tests. The 58.4 cm square panels consisted of two 0.152-cm-thick Ti 6-2-4-2 face sheets LID-bonded to a 1.9-cm-thick honeycomb core, with bearing plates fastened to the perimeter of the upper and the lower panel surfaces. The panels were instrumented with sensors for measuring surface temperature, strain, and deflections to 315 C and 482 C. Thermal stress levels representative of those encountered during aerodynamic heating were produced by heating the upper panel surface and restraining all four edges. After more than 100 thermal cycles from room temperature to 315 C and 50 cycles from room temperature to 482 C, no significant structural degradation was detected in the panels.

  17. Aerospace safety advisory panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This report from the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) contains findings, recommendations, and supporting material concerning safety issues with the space station program, the space shuttle program, aeronautics research, and other NASA programs. Section two presents findings and recommendations, section three presents supporting information, and appendices contain data about the panel membership, the NASA response to the March 1993 ASAP report, and a chronology of the panel's activities during the past year.

  18. Progress in quantifying rates and product ratios of microbial denitrification using stable isotope approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Well, Reinhard; Buchen, Caroline; Giesemann, Anette; Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika; Rohe, Lena; Flessa, Heinz

    2015-04-01

    Although it is known since long that microbial denitrification plays a central role in N cycling in soils due to loss of nutrient N, emissions of N2O and lowering of N leaching, few data at the field scale are available due to the difficulty in measurement. In recent years, stable isotope signatures of N2O such as δ18O, average δ15N (δ15Nbulk) and 15N site preference (SP = difference in δ15N between the central and peripheral N positions of the asymmetric N2O molecule) have been used to constrain the atmospheric N2O budget and to characterize N2O turnover processes including N2O production and reduction by microbial denitrification. However, the use of this approach to study N2O dynamics in soils requires knowledge of isotope fractionation factors for the various partial processes involved, e.g. N2O production by nitrification or fungal/bacterial denitrification, and N2O reduction by bacterial denitrification. Here we present recent progress on the principles of isotope fractionation modeling to estimate N2O reduction and on the role of microbial groups and their specific impact on isotope values. Moreover, we report and discuss approaches to determine isotope values of produced N2O prior to its reduction as well as enrichment factors of N2O reduction. Finally, a variety of results from lab and field studies will be shown were N2O reduction estimates by isotope fractionation modeling are validated by independent measurements using 15N tracing or He/O2 incubations. Methodical improvements to increase sensitivity of the 15N tracing approach will be briefly addressed. We conclude that up to now SP of soil-emitted N2O proved to be suitable to constrain the product ratio of denitrification if N2O fluxes are dominated by bacterial denitrification. Although this approach is not yet precise enough for robust quantification of N2 fluxes, improved precision can be obtained in future, if further progress in understanding the control of fractionation factors of production

  19. Solar reflection panels

    DOEpatents

    Diver, Jr., Richard B.; Grossman, James W.; Reshetnik, Michael

    2006-07-18

    A solar collector comprising a glass mirror, and a composite panel, wherein the back of the mirror is affixed to a front surface of the composite panel. The composite panel comprises a front sheet affixed to a surface of a core material, preferably a core material comprising a honeycomb structure, and a back sheet affixed to an opposite surface of the core material. The invention may further comprise a sealing strip, preferably comprising EPDM, positioned between the glass mirror and the front surface of the composite panel. The invention also is of methods of making such solar collectors.

  20. PANEL LIBRARY AND EDITOR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raible, E.

    1994-01-01

    The Panel Library and Editor is a graphical user interface (GUI) builder for the Silicon Graphics IRIS workstation family. The toolkit creates "widgets" which can be manipulated by the user. Its appearance is similar to that of the X-Windows System. The Panel Library is written in C and is used by programmers writing user-friendly mouse-driven applications for the IRIS. GUIs built using the Panel Library consist of "actuators" and "panels." Actuators are buttons, dials, sliders, or other mouse-driven symbols. Panels are groups of actuators that occupy separate windows on the IRIS workstation. The application user can alter variables in the graphics program, or fire off functions with a click on a button. The evolution of data values can be tracked with meters and strip charts, and dialog boxes with text processing can be built. Panels can be stored as icons when not in use. The Panel Editor is a program used to interactively create and test panel library interfaces in a simple and efficient way. The Panel Editor itself uses a panel library interface, so all actions are mouse driven. Extensive context-sensitive on-line help is provided. Programmers can graphically create and test the user interface without writing a single line of code. Once an interface is judged satisfactory, the Panel Editor will dump it out as a file of C code that can be used in an application. The Panel Library (v9.8) and Editor (v1.1) are written in C-Language (63%) and Scheme, a dialect of LISP, (37%) for Silicon Graphics 4D series workstations running IRIX 3.2 or higher. Approximately 10Mb of disk space is required once compiled. 1.5Mb of main memory is required to execute the panel editor. This program is available on a .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge in UNIX tar format for an IRIS, and includes a copy of XScheme, the public-domain Scheme interpreter used by the Panel Editor. The Panel Library Programmer's Manual is included on the distribution media. The Panel Library and

  1. Panel Endorses Active Monitoring for Low-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    An independent panel convened this week by NIH has concluded that many men with localized, low-risk prostate cancer should be closely monitored, permitting treatment to be delayed until warranted by disease progression. However, monitoring strategies—such

  2. Utilization of agricultural wastes for production of ethanol. Progress report, October 1979-May 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, B.

    1980-05-01

    The project proposes to develop methods to utilize agricultural wastes, especially cottonseed hulls and peanut shells to produce ethanol. Initial steps will involve development of methods to break down cellulose to a usable form of substrates for chemical or biological digestion. The process of ethanol production will consist of (a) preparatory step to separate fibrous (cellulose) and non-fibrous (non-cellulosic compounds). The non-cellulosic residues which may include grains, fats or other substrates for alcoholic fermentation. The fibrous residues will be first pre-treated to digest cellulose with acid, alkali, and sulfur dioxide gas or other solvents. (b) The altered cellulose will be digested by suitable micro-organisms and cellulose enzymes before alcoholic fermentation. The digester and fermentative unit will be specially designed to develop a prototype for pilot plant for a continuous process. The first phase of the project will be devoted toward screening of a suitable method for cellulose modification, separation of fibrous and non-fibrous residues, the micro-organism and enzyme preparations. Work is in progress on: the effects of various microorganisms on the degree of saccharification; the effects of higher concentrations of acids, alkali, and EDTA on efficiency of microbial degradation; and the effects of chemicals on enzymatic digestion.

  3. Microgravity Science Research Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Bradley M.; Trinh, Eugene H.; DeLucas, Lawrence J.; Larson, David; Koss, Matthew; Ostrach, Simon

    2000-01-01

    This document is a transcription of the Microgravity Science Research Panel's discussion about their research and about some of the contributions that they feel have been important to the field during their time with the program. The panel includes Dr. Eugene Trinh, Dr. Lawrence DeLucas, Dr. Charles Bugg, Dr. David Larson, and Dr. Simon Ostrach.

  4. Technology Panel Reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Results are presented from five technology panels which convened to identify relevant technologies within their discipline for the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) and to assess the current and projected state of these technologies. The five panels considered the following topics: optics, materials and structure, sensing and control, science instruments, and systems and missions.

  5. JTEC panel on display technologies in Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tannas, Lawrence E., Jr.; Glenn, William E.; Credelle, Thomas; Doane, J. William; Firester, Arthur H.; Thompson, Malcolm

    1992-01-01

    This report is one in a series of reports that describes research and development efforts in Japan in the area of display technologies. The following are included in this report: flat panel displays (technical findings, liquid crystal display development and production, large flat panel displays (FPD's), electroluminescent displays and plasma panels, infrastructure in Japan's FPD industry, market and projected sales, and new a-Si active matrix liquid crystal display (AMLCD) factory); materials for flat panel displays (liquid crystal materials, and light-emissive display materials); manufacturing and infrastructure of active matrix liquid crystal displays (manufacturing logistics and equipment); passive matrix liquid crystal displays (LCD basics, twisted nematics LCD's, supertwisted nematic LCD's, ferroelectric LCD's, and a comparison of passive matrix LCD technology); active matrix technology (basic active matrix technology, investment environment, amorphous silicon, polysilicon, and commercial products and prototypes); and projection displays (comparison of Japanese and U.S. display research, and technical evaluation of work).

  6. JTEC panel on display technologies in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tannas, Lawrence E., Jr.; Glenn, William E.; Credelle, Thomas; Doane, J. William; Firester, Arthur H.; Thompson, Malcolm

    1992-06-01

    This report is one in a series of reports that describes research and development efforts in Japan in the area of display technologies. The following are included in this report: flat panel displays (technical findings, liquid crystal display development and production, large flat panel displays (FPD's), electroluminescent displays and plasma panels, infrastructure in Japan's FPD industry, market and projected sales, and new a-Si active matrix liquid crystal display (AMLCD) factory); materials for flat panel displays (liquid crystal materials, and light-emissive display materials); manufacturing and infrastructure of active matrix liquid crystal displays (manufacturing logistics and equipment); passive matrix liquid crystal displays (LCD basics, twisted nematics LCD's, supertwisted nematic LCD's, ferroelectric LCD's, and a comparison of passive matrix LCD technology); active matrix technology (basic active matrix technology, investment environment, amorphous silicon, polysilicon, and commercial products and prototypes); and projection displays (comparison of Japanese and U.S. display research, and technical evaluation of work).

  7. ICFA neutrino panel report

    SciTech Connect

    Long, K.

    2015-07-15

    In the summer of 2013 the International Committee on Future Accelerators (ICFA) established a Neutrino Panel with the mandate: <<>>In its first year the Panel organised a series of regional Town Meetings to collect input from the community and to receive reports from the regional planning exercises. The Panel distilled its findings and presented them in a report to ICFA [1]. In this contribution the formation and composition of the Panel are presented together with a summary of the Panel’s findings from the three Regional Town Meetings. The Panel’s initial conclusions are then articulated and the steps that the Panel seeks to take are outlined.

  8. Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) provided oversight on the safety aspects of many NASA programs. In addition, ASAP undertook three special studies. At the request of the Administrator, the panel assessed the requirements for an assured crew return vehicle (ACRV) for the space station and reviewed the organization of the safety and mission quality function within NASA. At the behest of Congress, the panel formed an independent, ad hoc working group to examine the safety and reliability of the space shuttle main engine. Section 2 presents findings and recommendations. Section 3 consists of information in support of these findings and recommendations. Appendices A, B, C, and D, respectively, cover the panel membership, the NASA response to the findings and recommendations in the March 1992 report, a chronology of the panel's activities during the reporting period, and the entire ACRV study report.

  9. An automatic LCD panel quality detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Bianfang; Hou, Wenguang; Ding, Mingyue

    2009-10-01

    Automatic detection using computer vision expands rapidly along with the development of image processing technology. In this paper, we developed a rapid LCD quality detection system for automobile instrument panel production, which has wide range of usage and good stability.Our automatic detection system consists of four parts: panel fixture, signal generator module, image acquisition module and image processing software. Experiments demonstrated that our system is feasible, efficient and fast compared to manual detection.

  10. High-speed machining of space shuttle External Tank (ET) panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    The applicability to and advantages of the high-speed machining process for the production of Space Shuttle external tank panels by physically machining selected sample portions of an external tank panel were investigated. The panel sample configuration was selected, and potential high speed milling procedures identified. An 8 foot long panel was machined and the milling demonstration is described in detail.

  11. Cyclooxygenase product inhibition with acetylsalicylic acid slows disease progression in the Han:SPRD-Cy rat model of polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Naser H M; Gregoire, Melanie; Devassy, Jessay G; Wu, Yinhong; Yoshihara, Daisuke; Yamaguchi, Tamio; Nagao, Shizuko; Aukema, Harold M

    2015-01-01

    Renal cyclooxygenase (COX) derived eicosanoids are elevated and lipoxygenase (LOX) products are reduced in the Han:SPRD-Cy rat model of polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Selective COX2 inhibition reduces kidney disease progression, but COX1 levels also are elevated in this model. Since the effect of reducing the products of both COX isoforms and the role of LOX products is not known, weanling normal and diseased Han:SPRD-cy littermates were given either low dose acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), nordihydroguaiaretic (NDGA) or no treatment for eight weeks. Renal eicosanoids were altered in the diseased compared to normal cortex, with COX products being higher and LOX products being lower. ASA reduced COX products, cyst growth and kidney water content, while NDGA reduced LOX products without altering disease progression or kidney function. Hence, a human equivalent ASA dose equal to less than one regular strength aspirin per day slowed disease progression, while further reduction of LOX products did not worsen disease progression.

  12. Flutter Research on Skin Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kordes, Eldon E.; Tuovila, Weimer J.; Guy, Lawrence D.

    1960-01-01

    Representative experimental results are presented to show the current status of the panel flutter problem. Results are presented for unstiffened rectangular panels and for rectangular panels stiffened by corrugated backing. Flutter boundaries are established for all types of panels when considered on the basis of equivalent isotropic plates. The effects of Mach number, differential pressure, and aerodynamic heating on panel flutter are discussed. A flutter analysis of orthotropic panels is presented in the appendix.

  13. Damage tolerant composite wing panels for transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Peter J.; Wilson, Robert D.; Gibbins, M. N.

    1985-01-01

    Commercial aircraft advanced composite wing surface panels were tested for durability and damage tolerance. The wing of a fuel-efficient, 200-passenger airplane for 1990 delivery was sized using grahite-epoxy materials. The damage tolerance program was structured to allow a systematic progression from material evaluations to the optimized large panel verification tests. The program included coupon testing to evaluate toughened material systems, static and fatigue tests of compression coupons with varying amounts of impact damage, element tests of three-stiffener panels to evaluate upper wing panel design concepts, and the wing structure damage environment was studied. A series of technology demonstration tests of large compression panels is performed. A repair investigation is included in the final large panel test.

  14. POPOVER Review Panel report

    SciTech Connect

    Davito, A.; Baker, C.J.; King, C.J.; Costerus, B.; Nelson, T.; Prokosch, D.; Pastrnak, J.; Grace, P.

    1996-04-10

    The POPOVER series of high explosive (HE) certification tests was conducted at the Big Explosives Experimental Facility (BEEF) in Area 4 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The two primary objectives of POPOVER were to certify that: (1) BEEF meets DOE requirements for explosives facilities and is safe for personnel-occupied operations during testing of large charges of conventional HE. (2) Facility structures and equipment will function as intended when subjected to the effects of these charges. After careful analysis of test results, the POPOVER Review Panel concludes that the POPOVER series met both objectives. Further details on the Review Panel`s conclusions are included in Section 7--Findings and Recommendations.

  15. TVA/DOE integrated onfarm alcohol production system. Phase II. Progress report, October 1981-February 1982. Circular Z-134

    SciTech Connect

    Badger, P.C.; Pile, R.S.; Burch, D.W.; Mays, D.A.; Lewis, J.M.

    1982-03-01

    Equipment and procedures necessary for using a grain (corn) feedstock for onfarm alcohol production were refined and documented to provide benchmark data. Also, significant progress was made in developing technology to convert other agricultural crops into 190-proof alcohol with the farm-sized alcohol production facility. This was achieved by modifying the base alcohol-from-grain facility to process the nongrain feedstocks (Irish potatoes, sweet sorghum, sweet potatoes, sugar beets, fodder beets, and Jerusalem artichokes) being evaluated in field production trials by TVA. Alcohol production capacities of cull potatoes, water chestnuts, and cull apples were also tested. A computerized investment model was refined to predict rapidly the economic implications for alcohol production levels, feedstocks, and various system components.

  16. Comprehensive metabolic panel

    MedlinePlus

    A comprehensive metabolic panel is a group of blood tests. They provide an overall picture of your body's chemical balance and metabolism. Metabolism refers to all the physical and chemical processes ...

  17. Blue Ribbon Panel Report

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog by the NCI acting director thanking the cancer community for contributing to the Cancer Moonshot Blue Ribbon Panel report, which was presented to the National Cancer Advisory Board on September 7.

  18. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    MedlinePlus

    Liver disease test panel - autoimmune ... Autoimmune disorders are a possible cause of liver disease. The most common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis. This group of tests helps your health care provider ...

  19. Comprehensive Metabolic Panel

    MedlinePlus

    ... page helpful? Also known as: CMP; Chem 12; Chemistry Panel; Chemistry Screen; SMA 12; SMA 20; SMAC (somewhat outdated ... Health Professionals ©2001 - by American Association for Clinical Chemistry • Contact Us | Terms of Use | Privacy We comply ...

  20. BMP (Basic Metabolic Panel)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Was this page helpful? Also known as: BMP; Chemistry Panel; Chemistry Screen; Chem 7; SMA 7; SMAC7 (somewhat outdated ... Health Professionals ©2001 - by American Association for Clinical Chemistry • Contact Us | Terms of Use | Privacy We comply ...

  1. Assessing the lifetime performance index of products with the exponential distribution under progressively type II right censored samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wen-Chuan; Wu, Jong-Wuu; Hong, Ching-Wen

    2009-09-01

    In practice, lifetime performance index CL is used to measure the potential and performance of a process, where L is the lower specification limit. Progressive censoring scheme is quite useful in many practical situations where budget constraints are in place or there is a demand for rapid testing. In this paper, under the assumption of exponential distribution, this study constructs a maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) of CL based on the progressively type II right censored sample. The MLE of CL is then utilized to develop the hypothesis testing procedure in the condition of known L. The new testing procedure can be employed by product managers to assess whether the lifetime of products (or items) adheres to the required level in the condition of known L. Finally, we give one example to illustrate the use of the testing algorithmic procedure under given significance level.

  2. Pop-Art Panels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alford, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    James Rosenquist's giant Pop-art panels included realistic renderings of well-known contemporary foods and objects, juxtaposed with famous people in the news--largely from the 1960s, '70s and '80s--and really serve as visual time capsules. In this article, eighth-graders focus on the style of James Rosenquist to create their own Pop-art panel that…

  3. Photovoltaic panel support assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, J.M.; Underwood, J.C.; Shingleton, J.

    1993-07-20

    A solar energy electrical power source is described comprising in combination at least two flat photovoltaic panels disposed side-by-side in co-planar relation with one another, a pivot shaft extending transversely across the panels, at least two supports spaced apart lengthwise of the pivot shaft, means for connecting the pivot shaft to the at least two supports, attachment means for connecting the at least two panels to the pivot shaft so that the panels can pivot about the longitudinal axis of the shaft, coupling means mechanically coupling all of the panels together so as to form a unified flat array, and selectively operable drive means for mechanically pivoting the unified flat array about the axis; wherein each of the flat photovoltaic panels comprises at least two modules each comprising a plurality of electrically interconnected photovoltaic cells, the at least two modules being aligned along a line extending at a right angle to the pivot shaft, and the coupling means comprises (a) an elongate member extending parallel to and spaced from the pivot shaft and (b) means for attaching the elongate member to the panels; and further wherein each flat photovoltaic panel comprises a unitary frame consisting of a pair of end frame members extending parallel to the pivot shaft, a pair of side frame members extending between and connected to the end frame members, and a pair of spaced apart cross frame members, with one of the two modules being embraced by and secured to the side frame members and a first one of each of the end and cross frame members, and the other of the two modules being embraced by and secured to the side frame members and the second one of each of the end and cross frame members, whereby the gap created by the spaced apart cross frame members allow air to pass between them in order to reduce the sail effect when the solar array is subjected to buffeting winds.

  4. Gas filled panel insulation

    DOEpatents

    Griffith, Brent T.; Arasteh, Dariush K.; Selkowitz, Stephen E.

    1993-01-01

    A structural or flexible highly insulative panel which may be translucent, is formed from multi-layer polymeric material in the form of an envelope surrounding a baffle. The baffle is designed so as to minimize heat transfer across the panel, by using material which forms substantially closed spaces to suppress convection of the low conductivity gas fill. At least a portion of the baffle carries a low emissivity surface for suppression of infrared radiation.

  5. Gas filled panel insulation

    DOEpatents

    Griffith, B.T.; Arasteh, D.K.; Selkowitz, S.E.

    1993-12-14

    A structural or flexible highly insulative panel which may be translucent, is formed from multi-layer polymeric material in the form of an envelope surrounding a baffle. The baffle is designed so as to minimize heat transfer across the panel, by using material which forms substantially closed spaces to suppress convection of the low conductivity gas fill. At least a portion of the baffle carries a low emissivity surface for suppression of infrared radiation. 18 figures.

  6. Multiscale Fatigue Life Prediction for Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Yarrington, Phillip W.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Fatigue life prediction capabilities have been incorporated into the HyperSizer Composite Analysis and Structural Sizing Software. The fatigue damage model is introduced at the fiber/matrix constituent scale through HyperSizer s coupling with NASA s MAC/GMC micromechanics software. This enables prediction of the micro scale damage progression throughout stiffened and sandwich panels as a function of cycles leading ultimately to simulated panel failure. The fatigue model implementation uses a cycle jumping technique such that, rather than applying a specified number of additional cycles, a specified local damage increment is specified and the number of additional cycles to reach this damage increment is calculated. In this way, the effect of stress redistribution due to damage-induced stiffness change is captured, but the fatigue simulations remain computationally efficient. The model is compared to experimental fatigue life data for two composite facesheet/foam core sandwich panels, demonstrating very good agreement.

  7. Logopenic and nonfluent variants of primary progressive aphasia are differentiated by acoustic measures of speech production.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Kirrie J; Savage, Sharon; Leyton, Cristian E; Vogel, Adam P; Hornberger, Michael; Hodges, John R

    2014-01-01

    Differentiation of logopenic (lvPPA) and nonfluent/agrammatic (nfvPPA) variants of Primary Progressive Aphasia is important yet remains challenging since it hinges on expert based evaluation of speech and language production. In this study acoustic measures of speech in conjunction with voxel-based morphometry were used to determine the success of the measures as an adjunct to diagnosis and to explore the neural basis of apraxia of speech in nfvPPA. Forty-one patients (21 lvPPA, 20 nfvPPA) were recruited from a consecutive sample with suspected frontotemporal dementia. Patients were diagnosed using the current gold-standard of expert perceptual judgment, based on presence/absence of particular speech features during speaking tasks. Seventeen healthy age-matched adults served as controls. MRI scans were available for 11 control and 37 PPA cases; 23 of the PPA cases underwent amyloid ligand PET imaging. Measures, corresponding to perceptual features of apraxia of speech, were periods of silence during reading and relative vowel duration and intensity in polysyllable word repetition. Discriminant function analyses revealed that a measure of relative vowel duration differentiated nfvPPA cases from both control and lvPPA cases (r(2) = 0.47) with 88% agreement with expert judgment of presence of apraxia of speech in nfvPPA cases. VBM analysis showed that relative vowel duration covaried with grey matter intensity in areas critical for speech motor planning and programming: precentral gyrus, supplementary motor area and inferior frontal gyrus bilaterally, only affected in the nfvPPA group. This bilateral involvement of frontal speech networks in nfvPPA potentially affects access to compensatory mechanisms involving right hemisphere homologues. Measures of silences during reading also discriminated the PPA and control groups, but did not increase predictive accuracy. Findings suggest that a measure of relative vowel duration from of a polysyllable word repetition task

  8. Logopenic and Nonfluent Variants of Primary Progressive Aphasia Are Differentiated by Acoustic Measures of Speech Production

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Kirrie J.; Savage, Sharon; Leyton, Cristian E.; Vogel, Adam P.; Hornberger, Michael; Hodges, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Differentiation of logopenic (lvPPA) and nonfluent/agrammatic (nfvPPA) variants of Primary Progressive Aphasia is important yet remains challenging since it hinges on expert based evaluation of speech and language production. In this study acoustic measures of speech in conjunction with voxel-based morphometry were used to determine the success of the measures as an adjunct to diagnosis and to explore the neural basis of apraxia of speech in nfvPPA. Forty-one patients (21 lvPPA, 20 nfvPPA) were recruited from a consecutive sample with suspected frontotemporal dementia. Patients were diagnosed using the current gold-standard of expert perceptual judgment, based on presence/absence of particular speech features during speaking tasks. Seventeen healthy age-matched adults served as controls. MRI scans were available for 11 control and 37 PPA cases; 23 of the PPA cases underwent amyloid ligand PET imaging. Measures, corresponding to perceptual features of apraxia of speech, were periods of silence during reading and relative vowel duration and intensity in polysyllable word repetition. Discriminant function analyses revealed that a measure of relative vowel duration differentiated nfvPPA cases from both control and lvPPA cases (r2 = 0.47) with 88% agreement with expert judgment of presence of apraxia of speech in nfvPPA cases. VBM analysis showed that relative vowel duration covaried with grey matter intensity in areas critical for speech motor planning and programming: precentral gyrus, supplementary motor area and inferior frontal gyrus bilaterally, only affected in the nfvPPA group. This bilateral involvement of frontal speech networks in nfvPPA potentially affects access to compensatory mechanisms involving right hemisphere homologues. Measures of silences during reading also discriminated the PPA and control groups, but did not increase predictive accuracy. Findings suggest that a measure of relative vowel duration from of a polysyllable word repetition task

  9. The effects of progressing and nonprogressing Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis infection on milk production in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rebecca L; Gröhn, Y T; Pradhan, A K; Whitlock, R H; Van Kessel, J S; Smith, J M; Wolfgang, D R; Schukken, Y H

    2016-02-01

    Longitudinal data from 3 commercial dairy herds in the northeast United States, collected from 2004 to 2011, were analyzed to determine the effect of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection status and progression path on milk production. Disease status, as indicated by MAP test results, was determined through quarterly ELISA serum testing, biannual fecal culture, and culture of tissues and feces at slaughter. Milk production data were collected from the Dairy Herd Information Association. Animals with positive MAP test results were categorized, based on test results over the full course of the study, as high path (at least one high-positive culture) or low path (at least one positive culture or ELISA). The cumulative numbers of positive ELISA and culture results were recorded. The effects of both MAP infection path, status, and number of positive tests on milk production were analyzed using a mixed linear model with an autocorrelation random effect structure. Low- and high-path animals produced more milk before their first positive test than always-negative animals, especially high-path animals. Although mean production decreased after a first positive test, low-path animals were shown to recover some productivity. High-path animals continued to exhibit a decrease in milk production, especially after their first high-positive fecal culture. These results show that not all animals that test positive for MAP will have long-term production losses. Milk production decreased significantly with each additional positive test. Ultimately, production loss appeared to be a function of MAP infection progression. PMID:26686721

  10. Proceedings of the 9th U.S.-Japan natural resources panel for earthquake research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Detweiler, Shane T.; Ellsworth, William L.

    2015-01-01

    The Panel strongly urges that the appropriate agencies in the U.S. and Japan that are represented on this panel work together with the academic sector to support and coordinate scientific work in these areas of cooperation. The Panel recognizes the importance of promoting the exchange of scientific personnel, exchange of data, and fundamental studies to advance progress in earthquake research. The U.S. and Japan should promote these exchanges throughout the world. The Panel endorses continuation of these activities.

  11. Idaho Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation : Annual Progress Report February 1, 2007 - January 31, 2008.

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, Timothy; Johnson, June; Putnam, Scott

    2008-12-01

    River stocks of steelhead and spring/summer Chinook salmon still have significant natural reproduction and thus are the focal species for this project's investigations. The overall goal is to monitor the abundance, productivity, distribution, and stock-specific life history characteristics of naturally produced steelhead trout and Chinook salmon in Idaho (IDFG 2007). We have grouped project tasks into three objectives, as defined in our latest project proposal and most recent statement of work. The purpose of each objective involves enumerating or describing individuals within the various life stages of Snake River anadromous salmonids. By understanding the transitions between life stages and associated controlling factors, we hope to achieve a mechanistic understanding of stock-specific population dynamics. This understanding will improve mitigation and recovery efforts. Objective 1. Measure 2007 adult escapement and describe the age structure of the spawning run of naturally produced spring/summer Chinook salmon passing Lower Granite Dam. Objective 2. Monitor the juvenile production of Chinook salmon and steelhead trout for the major population groups (MPGs) within the Clearwater and Salmon subbasins. Objective 3. Evaluate life cycle survival and the freshwater productivity/production of Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon. There are two components: update/refine a stock-recruit model and estimate aggregate smolt-to-adult survival. In this annual progress report, we present technical results for work done during 2007. Part 2 contains detailed results of INPMEP aging research and estimation of smolt-to-adult return rates for wild and naturally produced Chinook salmon (Objectives 1 and 3). Part 3 is a report on the ongoing development of a stock-recruit model for the freshwater phase of spring/summer Chinook salmon in the Snake River basin (Objective 3). Part 4 is a summary of the parr density data (Objective 2) collected in 2007 using the new site selection

  12. AQUEOUS HOMOGENEOUS REACTORTECHNICAL PANEL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, D.J.; Bajorek, S.; Bakel, A.; Flanagan, G.; Mubayi, V.; Skarda, R.; Staudenmeier, J.; Taiwo, T.; Tonoike, K.; Tripp, C.; Wei, T.; Yarsky, P.

    2010-12-03

    Considerable interest has been expressed for developing a stable U.S. production capacity for medical isotopes and particularly for molybdenum- 99 (99Mo). This is motivated by recent re-ductions in production and supply worldwide. Consistent with U.S. nonproliferation objectives, any new production capability should not use highly enriched uranium fuel or targets. Conse-quently, Aqueous Homogeneous Reactors (AHRs) are under consideration for potential 99Mo production using low-enriched uranium. Although the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has guidance to facilitate the licensing process for non-power reactors, that guidance is focused on reactors with fixed, solid fuel and hence, not applicable to an AHR. A panel was convened to study the technical issues associated with normal operation and potential transients and accidents of an AHR that might be designed for isotope production. The panel has produced the requisite AHR licensing guidance for three chapters that exist now for non-power reactor licensing: Reac-tor Description, Reactor Coolant Systems, and Accident Analysis. The guidance is in two parts for each chapter: 1) standard format and content a licensee would use and 2) the standard review plan the NRC staff would use. This guidance takes into account the unique features of an AHR such as the fuel being in solution; the fission product barriers being the vessel and attached systems; the production and release of radiolytic and fission product gases and their impact on operations and their control by a gas management system; and the movement of fuel into and out of the reactor vessel.

  13. Post transcriptional regulation of chloroplast gene expression by nuclear encoded gene products. Progress report, June 1, 1990--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchka, M.R.

    1992-08-01

    Many individual chloroplast genes require the products of a collection of nuclear genes for their successful expression. These nuclear gene products apparently work with great specificity, each committed to the expression of a single chloroplast gene. We have chosen as a model nuclear mutants of Chlamydomonas affected in different stages in the expression of the chloroplast encoded Photosystem II polypeptide, D2. We have made the progress in understanding how nuclear gene products affect the translation of the D2 encoding MRNA. Two nuclear genes are required for this process which have been mapped genetically. In contrast to other examples of nuclear control of translation in the chloroplast, these nuclear gene products appear to be required either for specific stages in translation elongation or for the post-translational stabilization of the nascent D2 protein. Pseudoreversion analysis has led us to a locus which may be directly involved in D2 expression. We have made considerable progress in pursuing the molecular basis of psbd MRNA stabilization. psbD 5` UTR specific transcripts have been synthesized in vitro and used in gel mobility shift assays. UV-crosslinking studies are underway to identify the transacting factors which bind to these sequences. The continued examination of these mutants will help us to understand how nuclear gene products work in this specific case of chloroplast gene expression, and will elucidate how two distinct genomes can interact generally.

  14. Organization of Human Papillomavirus Productive Cycle during Neoplastic Progression Provides a Basis for Selection of Diagnostic Markers

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Kate; Peh, Woei; Southern, Shirley; Griffin, Heather; Sotlar, Karl; Nakahara, Tomomi; El-Sherif, Amira; Morris, Lesley; Seth, Rashmi; Hibma, Merilyn; Jenkins, David; Lambert, Paul; Coleman, Nicholas; Doorbar, John

    2003-01-01

    The productive cycle of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) can be divided into discrete phases. Cell proliferation and episomal maintenance in the lower epithelial layers are followed by genome amplification and the expression of capsid proteins. These events, which occur in all productive infections, can be distinguished by using antibodies to viral gene products or to surrogate markers of their expression. Here we have compared precancerous lesions caused by HPV type 16 (HPV16) with lesions caused by HPV types that are not generally associated with human cancer. These include HPV2 and HPV11, which are related to HPV16 (supergroup A), as well as HPV1 and HPV65, which are evolutionarily divergent (supergroups E and B). HPV16-induced low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (CIN1) are productive infections which resemble those caused by other HPV types. During progression to cancer, however, the activation of late events is delayed, and the thickness of the proliferative compartment is progressively increased. In many HPV16-induced high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (CIN3), late events are restricted to small areas close to the epithelial surface. Such heterogeneity in the organization of the productive cycle was seen only in lesions caused by HPV16 and was not apparent when lesions caused by other HPV types were compared. By contrast, the order in which events in the productive cycle were initiated was invariant and did not depend on the infecting HPV type or the severity of disease. The distribution of viral gene products in the infected cervix depends on the extent to which the virus can complete its productive cycle, which in turn reflects the severity of cervical neoplasia. It appears from our work that the presence of such proteins in cells at the epithelial surface allows the severity of the underlying disease to be predicted and that markers of viral gene expression may improve cervical screening. PMID:12970404

  15. Automated solar panel assembly line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somberg, H.

    1981-01-01

    The initial stage of the automated solar panel assembly line program was devoted to concept development and proof of approach through simple experimental verification. In this phase, laboratory bench models were built to demonstrate and verify concepts. Following this phase was machine design and integration of the various machine elements. The third phase was machine assembly and debugging. In this phase, the various elements were operated as a unit and modifications were made as required. The final stage of development was the demonstration of the equipment in a pilot production operation.

  16. EXPERIMENTAL ANALYSIS OF THE CONTROL OF SPEECH PRODUCTION AND PERCEPTION--IV. PROGRESS REPORT NO. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LANE, HARLAN; AND OTHERS

    THE PROGRESS OF AN EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH PROGRAM IN SPEECH CONTROL WAS REPORTED. DISCUSSION TOPICS WERE (1) PROGRAMED LEARNING OF A SECOND LANGUAGE, (2) A CRITICAL REVIEW OF THE MOTOR THEORY OF SPEECH PERCEPTION, (3) VISUAL CONTROL OF PHONEMIC CONTRASTS (A TEST OF THE MOTOR THEORY OF SPEECH PERCEPTION), (4) SINGLE STIMULUS PROPERTIES IN THE…

  17. The Relationship between the Perception and Production of Coarticulation during a Sound Change in Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleber, Felicitas; Harrington, Jonathan; Reubold, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    The present study is concerned with lax /[upsilon]/-fronting in Standard British English and in particular with whether this sound change in progress can be attributed to a waning of the perceptual compensation for the coarticulatory effects of context. Younger and older speakers produced various monosyllables in which /[upsilon]/ occurred in…

  18. EXPERIMENTAL ANALYSIS OF THE CONTROL OF SPEECH PRODUCTION AND PERCEPTION--VI. PROGRESS REPORT NO. 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LANE, HARLAN

    VARIOUS ASPECTS OF THE PROGRESS OF AN EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM IN SPEECH CONTROL WERE REPORTED. THE TOPICS COVERED IN THE DISCUSSIONS WERE (1) ACOUSTIC AND DISCRIMINATIVE PROPERTIES OF SPEECH SOUNDS, (2) MATCHING FUNCTIONS AND EQUAL-SENSATION CONTOURS FOR LOUDNESS, (3) RELATIONS BETWEEN IDENTIFICATION AND DISCRIMINATION FUNCTIONS FOR SPEECH AND…

  19. Optimization of aircraft interior panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A.; Roper, Willard D.

    1986-01-01

    Eight different graphite composite panels were fabricated using four different resin matrices. The resin matrices included Hercules 71775, a blend of vinylpolystyrpyridine and bismaleimide, H795, a bismaleimide, Cycom 6162, a phenolic, and PSP 6022M, a polystyrylpyridine. Graphite panels were fabricated using fabric or unidirectional tape. This report describes the processes for preparing these panels and some of their mechanical, thermal and flammability properties. Panel properties are compared with state-of-the-art epoxy fiberglass composite panels.

  20. Panel methods: An introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Larry L.

    1990-01-01

    Panel methods are numerical schemes for solving (the Prandtl-Glauert equation) for linear, inviscid, irrotational flow about aircraft flying at subsonic or supersonic speeds. The tools at the panel-method user's disposal are (1) surface panels of source-doublet-vorticity distributions that can represent nearly arbitrary geometry, and (2) extremely versatile boundary condition capabilities that can frequently be used for creative modeling. Panel-method capabilities and limitations, basic concepts common to all panel-method codes, different choices that were made in the implementation of these concepts into working computer programs, and various modeling techniques involving boundary conditions, jump properties, and trailing wakes are discussed. An approach for extending the method to nonlinear transonic flow is also presented. Three appendices supplement the main test. In appendix 1, additional detail is provided on how the basic concepts are implemented into a specific computer program (PANAIR). In appendix 2, it is shown how to evaluate analytically the fundamental surface integral that arises in the expressions for influence-coefficients, and evaluate its jump property. In appendix 3, a simple example is used to illustrate the so-called finite part of the improper integrals.

  1. Aerospace safety advisory panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) monitored NASA's activities and provided feedback to the NASA Administrator, other NASA officials and Congress throughout the year. Particular attention was paid to the Space Shuttle, its launch processing and planned and potential safety improvements. The Panel monitored Space Shuttle processing at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and will continue to follow it as personnel reductions are implemented. There is particular concern that upgrades in hardware, software, and operations with the potential for significant risk reduction not be overlooked due to the extraordinary budget pressures facing the agency. The authorization of all of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Block II components portends future Space Shuttle operations at lower risk levels and with greater margins for handling unplanned ascent events. Throughout the year, the Panel attempted to monitor the safety activities related to the Russian involvement in both space and aeronautics programs. This proved difficult as the working relationships between NASA and the Russians were still being defined as the year unfolded. NASA's concern for the unique safety problems inherent in a multi-national endeavor appears appropriate. Actions are underway or contemplated which should be capable of identifying and rectifying problem areas. The balance of this report presents 'Findings and Recommendations' (Section 2), 'Information in Support of Findings and Recommendations' (Section 3) and Appendices describing Panel membership, the NASA response to the March 1994 ASAP report, and a chronology of the panel's activities during the reporting period (Section 4).

  2. Progress achieved in restricting the marketing of high-fat, sugary and salty food and beverage products to children.

    PubMed

    Kraak, Vivica I; Vandevijvere, Stefanie; Sacks, Gary; Brinsden, Hannah; Hawkes, Corinna; Barquera, Simón; Lobstein, Tim; Swinburn, Boyd A

    2016-07-01

    In May 2010, 192 Member States endorsed Resolution WHA63.14 to restrict the marketing of food and non-alcoholic beverage products high in saturated fats, trans fatty acids, free sugars and/or salt to children and adolescents globally. We examined the actions taken between 2010 and early 2016 - by civil society groups, the World Health Organization (WHO) and its regional offices, other United Nations (UN) organizations, philanthropic institutions and transnational industries - to help decrease the prevalence of obesity and diet-related noncommunicable diseases among young people. By providing relevant technical and policy guidance and tools to Member States, WHO and other UN organizations have helped protect young people from the marketing of branded food and beverage products that are high in fat, sugar and/or salt. The progress achieved by the other actors we investigated appears variable and generally less robust. We suggest that the progress being made towards the full implementation of Resolution WHA63.14 would be accelerated by further restrictions on the marketing of unhealthy food and beverage products and by investing in the promotion of nutrient-dense products. This should help young people meet government-recommended dietary targets. Any effective strategies and actions should align with the goal of WHO to reduce premature mortality from noncommunicable diseases by 25% by 2025 and the aim of the UN to ensure healthy lives for all by 2030.

  3. "Deep" language disorders in nonfluent progressive Aphasia: an evaluation of the "summation" account of semantic errors across language production tasks.

    PubMed

    Tree, Jeremy J; Kay, Janice; Perfect, Timothy J

    2005-09-01

    This study focuses on the pattern of impairments seen in a new case KT, diagnosed with nonfluent progressive aphasia (NFPA), a degenerative disorder of language production. A systematic examination of KT's performance on a wide range of language production tasks (i.e., repetition, reading, spelling, spoken and written naming) determined that both written naming and repetition were better preserved than reading, spelling-to-dictation, and spoken naming. Closer examination of error performance in both reading aloud and written production revealed evidence of "deep dyslexia" and "deep dysgraphia" that has not been documented in previous cases of NFPA, and as such the present case represents the first detailed case study of this pattern of impairment in the context of progressive aphasia. An evaluation and discussion of such deep language impairment disorders in the context of other cases of NFPA has been undertaken with reference to the summation hypothesis proposed by Hillis and Caramazza (1991, 1995). It is suggested that as a principle that holds across all language production tasks, this account can encompass patterns of deep disorders thus far reported in NFPA, although other theoretical hypotheses cannot be excluded. PMID:21038271

  4. Progress achieved in restricting the marketing of high-fat, sugary and salty food and beverage products to children.

    PubMed

    Kraak, Vivica I; Vandevijvere, Stefanie; Sacks, Gary; Brinsden, Hannah; Hawkes, Corinna; Barquera, Simón; Lobstein, Tim; Swinburn, Boyd A

    2016-07-01

    In May 2010, 192 Member States endorsed Resolution WHA63.14 to restrict the marketing of food and non-alcoholic beverage products high in saturated fats, trans fatty acids, free sugars and/or salt to children and adolescents globally. We examined the actions taken between 2010 and early 2016 - by civil society groups, the World Health Organization (WHO) and its regional offices, other United Nations (UN) organizations, philanthropic institutions and transnational industries - to help decrease the prevalence of obesity and diet-related noncommunicable diseases among young people. By providing relevant technical and policy guidance and tools to Member States, WHO and other UN organizations have helped protect young people from the marketing of branded food and beverage products that are high in fat, sugar and/or salt. The progress achieved by the other actors we investigated appears variable and generally less robust. We suggest that the progress being made towards the full implementation of Resolution WHA63.14 would be accelerated by further restrictions on the marketing of unhealthy food and beverage products and by investing in the promotion of nutrient-dense products. This should help young people meet government-recommended dietary targets. Any effective strategies and actions should align with the goal of WHO to reduce premature mortality from noncommunicable diseases by 25% by 2025 and the aim of the UN to ensure healthy lives for all by 2030. PMID:27429493

  5. Progress achieved in restricting the marketing of high-fat, sugary and salty food and beverage products to children

    PubMed Central

    Vandevijvere, Stefanie; Sacks, Gary; Brinsden, Hannah; Hawkes, Corinna; Barquera, Simón; Lobstein, Tim; Swinburn, Boyd A

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In May 2010, 192 Member States endorsed Resolution WHA63.14 to restrict the marketing of food and non-alcoholic beverage products high in saturated fats, trans fatty acids, free sugars and/or salt to children and adolescents globally. We examined the actions taken between 2010 and early 2016 – by civil society groups, the World Health Organization (WHO) and its regional offices, other United Nations (UN) organizations, philanthropic institutions and transnational industries – to help decrease the prevalence of obesity and diet-related noncommunicable diseases among young people. By providing relevant technical and policy guidance and tools to Member States, WHO and other UN organizations have helped protect young people from the marketing of branded food and beverage products that are high in fat, sugar and/or salt. The progress achieved by the other actors we investigated appears variable and generally less robust. We suggest that the progress being made towards the full implementation of Resolution WHA63.14 would be accelerated by further restrictions on the marketing of unhealthy food and beverage products and by investing in the promotion of nutrient-dense products. This should help young people meet government-recommended dietary targets. Any effective strategies and actions should align with the goal of WHO to reduce premature mortality from noncommunicable diseases by 25% by 2025 and the aim of the UN to ensure healthy lives for all by 2030. PMID:27429493

  6. Nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species production causes progressive damage in rats after cessation of silica inhalation.

    PubMed

    Porter, Dale W; Millecchia, Lyndell L; Willard, Patsy; Robinson, Victor A; Ramsey, Dawn; McLaurin, Jeffery; Khan, Amir; Brumbaugh, Kurt; Beighley, Christoper M; Teass, Alexander; Castranova, Vincent

    2006-03-01

    Our laboratory has previously reported results from a rat silica inhalation study which determined that, even after silica exposure ended, pulmonary inflammation and damage progressed with subsequent fibrosis development. In the present study, the relationship between silica exposure, nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and the resultant pulmonary damage is investigated in this model. Rats were exposed to silica (15 mg/m3, 6 h/day) for either 20, 40, or 60 days. A portion of the rats from each exposure were sacrificed at 0 days postexposure, while another portion was maintained without further exposure for 36 days to examine recovery or progression. The major findings of this study are: (1) silica-exposed rat lungs were in a state of oxidative stress, the severity of which increased during the postexposure period, (2) silica-exposed rats had significant increase in lung NO production which increased in magnitude during the postexposure period, and (3) the presence of silica particle(s) in an alveolar macrophage (AM) was highly associated with inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein. These data indicate that, even after silica exposure has ended, and despite declining silica lung burden, silica-induced pulmonary NO and ROS production increases, thus producing a more severe oxidative stress. A quantitative association between silica and expression of iNOS protein in AMs was also determined, which adds to our previous observation that iNOS and NO-mediated damage are associated anatomically with silica-induced pathological lesions. Future studies will be needed to determine whether the progressive oxidative stress, and iNOS activation and NO production, is a direct result of silica lung burden or a consequence of silica-induced biochemical mediators. PMID:16339787

  7. Origami of thick panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yan; Peng, Rui; You, Zhong

    2015-07-01

    Origami patterns, including the rigid origami patterns in which flat inflexible sheets are joined by creases, are primarily created for zero-thickness sheets. In order to apply them to fold structures such as roofs, solar panels, and space mirrors, for which thickness cannot be disregarded, various methods have been suggested. However, they generally involve adding materials to or offsetting panels away from the idealized sheet without altering the kinematic model used to simulate folding. We develop a comprehensive kinematic synthesis for rigid origami of thick panels that differs from the existing kinematic model but is capable of reproducing motions identical to that of zero-thickness origami. The approach, proven to be effective for typical origami, can be readily applied to fold real engineering structures.

  8. Oven wall panel construction

    DOEpatents

    Ellison, Kenneth; Whike, Alan S.

    1980-04-22

    An oven roof or wall is formed from modular panels, each of which comprises an inner fabric and an outer fabric. Each such fabric is formed with an angle iron framework and somewhat resilient tie-bars or welded at their ends to flanges of the angle irons to maintain the inner and outer frameworks in spaced disposition while minimizing heat transfer by conduction and permitting some degree of relative movement on expansion and contraction of the module components. Suitable thermal insulation is provided within the module. Panels or skins are secured to the fabric frameworks and each such skin is secured to a framework and projects laterally so as slidingly to overlie the adjacent frame member of an adjacent panel in turn to permit relative movement during expansion and contraction.

  9. Progress and status of the IAEA coordinated research project: production of Mo-99 using LEU fission or neutron activation

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, Ira N.; Adelfang, Pablo E-mail: P.Adelfang@iaea.org; Ramamoorthy, Natesan

    2008-07-15

    Since late 2004, the IAEA has developed and implemented a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) to assist countries interested in initiating indigenous, small-scale production of Mo-99 to meet local nuclear medicine requirements. The objective of the CRP is to provide interested countries with access to non-proprietary technologies and methods to produce Mo-99 using LEU foil or LEU mini-plate targets, or for the utilization of n,gamma neutron activation, e.g. through the use of gel generators. The project has made further progress since the RERTR 2006 meeting, with a Technical Workshop on Operational Aspects of Mo99 Production held 28-30 November 2006 in Vienna and the Second Research Coordination Meeting held in Bucharest, Romania 16-20 April 2007. The paper describes activities carried out as noted above, and as well as the provision of LEU foils to a number of participants, and the progress by a number of groups in preparing for LEU target assembly and disassembly, irradiation, chemical processing, and waste management. The participants' progress in particular on thermal hydraulics computations required for using LEU targets is notable, as also the progress in gel generator plant operations in India and Kazakhstan. Poland has joined as a new research agreement holder and an application by Egypt to be a contract holder is undergoing internal review in the IAEA and is expected to be approved. The IAEA has also participated in several open meetings of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences Study on Producing Medical Radioisotopes without HEU, which will also be discussed in the paper. (author)

  10. PRSEUS Acoustic Panel Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolette, Velicki; Yovanof, Nicolette P.; Baraja, Jaime; Mathur, Gopal; Thrash, Patrick; Pickell, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the development of a novel structural concept, Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS), that addresses the demanding fuselage loading requirements for the Hybrid Wing or Blended Wing Body (BWB) airplane configuration with regards to acoustic response. A PRSEUS panel was designed and fabricated and provided to NASA-LaRC for acoustic response testing in the Structural Acoustics Loads and Transmission (SALT) facility). Preliminary assessments of the sound transmission characteristics of a PRSEUS panel subjected to a representative Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) operating environment were completed for the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program.

  11. Wisconsin Twin Panel.

    PubMed

    Van Hulle, Carol A; Lemery, Kathryn S; Goldsmith, H Hill

    2002-10-01

    The Wisconsin Twin Panel was initiated in 1994 to serve a study of the development of childhood mood and behavioral disorders. Families who give birth to twins within the state of Wisconsin are recruited within 6 months of the birth. The panel currently supports three ongoing, longitudinal research projects. Research foci include studying epigenetic contributions to emotional, physical, cognitive, and motoric development of infant and toddler twins; physiological concomitants of childhood temperament; and early risk and resiliency factors related to child psychopathology. All three studies include videotaped observational assessments and biological measures. PMID:12537886

  12. Ground movements associated with gas hydrate production. Progress report, October 1--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Siriwardane, H.J.

    1992-12-31

    The grantee will evaluate the influence of hydrate production on ground subsidence near the wellbore and the surface. The objective of this research will be achieved by using computer simulations of what is expected in a hydrate reservoir during the production stage as reported by hydrate production models and available data. The model will be based on theories of continuum mechanics, thermomechanics of hydrate production, principles of rock mechanics and geomechanics, and special features of geomaterials under cold temperatures such as those found in permafrost regions. The research work involved in the proposed investigation will be divided into three major tasks; mechanics of subsidence in permafrost regions, modeling of subsidence, and parametric studies.

  13. Production and screening of carbon products precursors from coal. Quarterly progress report, July 1, 1996--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Zondlo, J.; Stiller, A.

    1996-10-25

    This quarterly report covers activities during the period from July 1, 1996 through September 30, 1996 on the development of carbon products precursor materials from coal. The first year of the project ended in February, 1996; however, the WVU research effort continued through August 14, 1997 on a no-cost extension of the original contract. PETC chose to exercise the option for continuation of the projects and $100,000 became available on August 9, 1996. The objective for year two is to focus on development of those carbon products from coal-based solvent extract precursors which have the greatest possibility for commercial success.

  14. 42. Interior detail, parlor, paneled chimney breast. This paneling likely ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. Interior detail, parlor, paneled chimney breast. This paneling likely dates from the house's phase I construction spanning from 1728 into the 1730's. - John Bartram House & Garden, House, 54th Street & Lindbergh Boulevard, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  15. 78. DETAIL OF COMMUNICATIONS PANEL ON LAUNCH ANALYST PANEL SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    78. DETAIL OF COMMUNICATIONS PANEL ON LAUNCH ANALYST PANEL SHOWING 20 CHANNEL-SELECTION SWITCHES, ROTARY DIAL, HEADSET, AND FOOT PEDAL - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  16. Stepped inlet optical panel

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2001-01-01

    An optical panel includes stacked optical waveguides having stepped inlet facets collectively defining an inlet face for receiving image light, and having beveled outlet faces collectively defining a display screen for displaying the image light channeled through the waveguides by internal reflection.

  17. WTEC panel report on research submersibles and undersea technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seymore, Richard J.; Blidberg, D. Richard; Brancart, Claude P.; Gentry, Larry L.; Kalvaitis, Algis N.; Lee, Michael J.; Mooney, Brad; Walsh, Don

    1994-01-01

    This report covers research submersibles and related subsea technologies in Finland, France, Russia, Ukraine and the United Kingdom. Manned, teleoperated, and autonomous submersibles were of interest. The panel found that, in contrast to the United States, Europe is making substantial progress in cooperative and coordinated research in subsea technology, including the development of standards. France is a leader in autonomous vehicle technology. Because much less was known a priori about the technologies in Russia and Ukraine, there were more new findings in those countries than in those Western European nations visited. However, Russia and Ukraine have a sizeable (and currently underutilized) infrastructure in this field, including a highly educated and experienced manpower pool, impressive (in some cases unique) facilities for physical testing, extensive fleets of seagoing research vessels capable of long voyages, and state-of-the-art facilities for conducting oceanographic investigations. The panel visited newly-formed commercial companies associated with long-standing submersible R&D and production centers in Russia and Ukraine. So far, these new efforts are undercapitalized, and as such represent opportunities at very low cost for Western nations, as detailed in the site reports.

  18. [Degradation pathways and main degradation products of tetracycline antibiotics: research progress].

    PubMed

    Li, Wei-Ming; Bao, Yan-Yu; Zhou, Qi-Xing

    2012-08-01

    Tetracycline antibiotics (TCs) can produce a series of abiotic degradation reactions in the process of production and storage, and some of the degradation products have lower antibacterial activity but higher toxicity, as compared to the parent antibiotics. TCs can enter the environment via the disposal of livestock and poultry wastes, and then degrade in one or more ways according to the external conditions. Besides abiotic degradation, bio-degradation also happens. This paper reviewed the degradation pathways and main degradation products of TCs in different ecological environments, and discussed the future research directions, aimed to provide valuable reference for the ecological risk assessment of the antibiotics.

  19. Concise review: Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells: progress toward safe clinical products.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yunjoon; Bauer, Gerhard; Nolta, Jan A

    2012-01-01

    Adult stem cell therapies have provided success for more than 50 years, through reconstitution of the hematopoietic system using bone marrow, umbilical cord blood, and mobilized peripheral blood transplantation. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-mediated therapy is a fast-growing field that has proven safe and effective in the treatment of various degenerative diseases and tissue injuries. Since the first derivation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), there has been impressive progress toward developing safe clinical applications from PSCs. Recent successes in transgene-free iPSC reprogramming have brought attention to the potential of clinical applications of these pluripotent cells, but key hurdles must be overcome, which are discussed in this review. Looking to the future, it could be advantageous to derive MSC from iPSC or human ESC in cases where genetic engineering is needed, since in the PSCs, clones with "safe harbor" vector integration could be selected, expanded, and differentiated. Here, we describe the status of the progress of the use of MSC and PSCs in clinical trials and analyze the challenges that should be overcome before iPSC-derived MSC therapy can be used widely in the clinic.

  20. Final Progress Report on Model-Based Diagnosis of Soil Limitations to Forest Productivity

    SciTech Connect

    Luxmoore, R.J.

    2004-08-30

    This project was undertaken in support of the forest industry to link modeling of nutrients and productivity with field research to identify methods for enhancing soil quality and forest productivity and for alleviating soil limitations to sustainable forest productivity. The project consisted of a series of related tasks, including (1) simulation of changes in biomass and soil carbon with nitrogen fertilization, (2) development of spreadsheet modeling tools for soil nutrient availability and tree nutrient requirements, (3) additional modeling studies, and (4) evaluation of factors involved in the establishment and productivity of southern pine plantations in seasonally wet soils. This report also describes the two Web sites that were developed from the research to assist forest managers with nutrient management of Douglas-fir and loblolly pine plantations.

  1. Perception of products by progressive multisensory integration. A study on hammers.

    PubMed

    Vergara, Margarita; Mondragón, Salvador; Sancho-Bru, Joaquín Luis; Company, Pedro; Agost, María-Jesús

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this work is to determine the influence of multisensory (visual-haptic) integration and the level of interaction (seeing photographs, seeing the actual product, touching it and using it) on the perception of products, including perceived ergonomics. The product selected for the experiment was the hammer, as this will help to establish whether emotional design studies can also apply to 'commercial' products. Subjective opinions of users were evaluated through semantic differential tests. A factor analysis identified six semantic factors or axes (Quality/Robustness, Ergonomics/Appearance, Innovation, Lightness, Dynamic Effects, and Efficacy). Results show that Lightness and Dynamic Effects are quite sensitive to the level of interaction, while Ergonomics/Appearance is partially affected. However, the perceptions of Innovation, Quality/Robustness and Efficacy are not so affected and they could be detected through a lower level of interaction (i.e. seeing photographs). This suggests that commercial products seem sensitive to emotional design studies and that multisensory integration enhances the perception of the factors that are clearly linked with physical interaction between users and tools, i.e. Ergonomics/Appearance, Lightness and Dynamic Effects. Additionally, it should be highlighted that some aspects related with the ergonomics and ease of use of products are also perceived at different stages of interaction.

  2. Progress in the microbial production of S-adenosyl-L-methionine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hailong; Wang, Zhilai; Cai, Haibo; Zhou, Changlin

    2016-09-01

    S-Adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM), which exists in all living organisms, serves as an activated group donor in a range of metabolic reactions, including trans-methylation, trans-sulfuration and trans-propylamine. Compared with its chemical synthesis and enzyme catalysis production, the microbial production of SAM is feasible for industrial applications. The current clinical demand for SAM is constantly increasing. Therefore, vast interest exists in engineering the SAM metabolism in cells for increasing product titers. Here, we provided an overview of updates on SAM microbial productivity improvements with an emphasis on various strategies that have been used to enhance SAM production based on increasing the precursor and co-factor availabilities in microbes. These strategies included the sections of SAM-producing microbes and their mutant screening, optimization of the fermentation process, and the metabolic engineering. The SAM-producing strains that were used extensively were Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia pastoris, Candida utilis, Scheffersomyces stipitis, Kluyveromyces lactis, Kluyveromyces marxianus, Corynebacterium glutamicum, and Escherichia coli, in addition to others. The optimization of the fermentation process mainly focused on the enhancement of the methionine, ATP, and other co-factor levels through pulsed feeding as well as the optimization of nitrogen and carbon sources. Various metabolic engineering strategies using precise control of gene expression in engineered strains were also highlighted in the present review. In addition, some prospects on SAM microbial production were discussed. PMID:27465853

  3. LCD Panels: The Electronic Wonder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Glenn

    1994-01-01

    Describes Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) panels and their use in the classroom. Topics discussed include active versus passive matrix panels; the number of pixels; projectors, including transmissive or reflective overhead projectors; costs; and vendors that supply LCDs. (LRW)

  4. Assessment of phthalates/phthalate alternatives in children's toys and childcare articles: Review of the report including conclusions and recommendation of the Chronic Hazard Advisory Panel of the Consumer Product Safety Commission.

    PubMed

    Lioy, Paul J; Hauser, Russ; Gennings, Chris; Koch, Holger M; Mirkes, Philip E; Schwetz, Bernard A; Kortenkamp, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) convened a Chronic Hazard Advisory Panel (CHAP) on Phthalates found in children's toys, and childcare products, and in products used by women of childbearing age. The CHAP conducted a risk assessment on phthalates and phthalate substitutes, and made recommendations to either ban, impose an interim ban, or allow the continued use of phthalates and phthalate substitutes in the above products. After a review of the literature, the evaluation included toxic end points of primary concern, biomonitoring results, extant exposure reconstruction, and epidemiological results. The health end points chosen were associated with the rat phthalate syndrome, which is characterized by malformations of the epididymis, vas deferens, seminal vesicles, prostate, external genitalia (hypospadias), and by cryptorchidism (undescended testes), retention of nipples/areolae, and demasculinization (~incomplete masculinization) of the perineum, resulting in reduced anogenital distance. Risk assessment demonstrated that some phthalates should be permanently banned, removed from the banned list, or remain interim banned. Biomonitoring and toxicology data provided the strongest basis for a mixture risk assessment. In contrast, external exposure data were the weakest and need to be upgraded for epidemiological studies and risk assessments. Such studies would focus on routes and sources. The review presents recommendations and uncertainties. PMID:25944701

  5. Assessment of phthalates/phthalate alternatives in children's toys and childcare articles: Review of the report including conclusions and recommendation of the Chronic Hazard Advisory Panel of the Consumer Product Safety Commission.

    PubMed

    Lioy, Paul J; Hauser, Russ; Gennings, Chris; Koch, Holger M; Mirkes, Philip E; Schwetz, Bernard A; Kortenkamp, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) convened a Chronic Hazard Advisory Panel (CHAP) on Phthalates found in children's toys, and childcare products, and in products used by women of childbearing age. The CHAP conducted a risk assessment on phthalates and phthalate substitutes, and made recommendations to either ban, impose an interim ban, or allow the continued use of phthalates and phthalate substitutes in the above products. After a review of the literature, the evaluation included toxic end points of primary concern, biomonitoring results, extant exposure reconstruction, and epidemiological results. The health end points chosen were associated with the rat phthalate syndrome, which is characterized by malformations of the epididymis, vas deferens, seminal vesicles, prostate, external genitalia (hypospadias), and by cryptorchidism (undescended testes), retention of nipples/areolae, and demasculinization (~incomplete masculinization) of the perineum, resulting in reduced anogenital distance. Risk assessment demonstrated that some phthalates should be permanently banned, removed from the banned list, or remain interim banned. Biomonitoring and toxicology data provided the strongest basis for a mixture risk assessment. In contrast, external exposure data were the weakest and need to be upgraded for epidemiological studies and risk assessments. Such studies would focus on routes and sources. The review presents recommendations and uncertainties.

  6. Effect of progressive drought stress on growth, leaf gas exchange, and antioxidant production in two maize cultivars.

    PubMed

    Anjum, Shakeel Ahmad; Tanveer, Mohsin; Ashraf, Umair; Hussain, Saddam; Shahzad, Babar; Khan, Imran; Wang, Longchang

    2016-09-01

    Drought stress is one of the major environmental factors responsible for reduction in crop productivity. In the present study, responses of two maize cultivars (Rung Nong 35 and Dong Dan 80) were examined to explicate the growth, yield, leaf gas exchange, leaf water contents, osmolyte accumulation, membrane lipid peroxidation, and antioxidant activity under progressive drought stress. Maize cultivars were subjected to varying field capacities (FC) viz., well-watered (80 % FC) and drought-stressed (35 % FC) at 45 days after sowing. The effects of drought stress were analyzed at 5, 10, 15, 20, ad 25 days after drought stress (DAS) imposition. Under prolonged drought stress, Rung Nong 35 exhibited higher reduction in growth and yield as compared to Dong Dan 80. Maize cultivar Dong Dan 80 showed higher leaf relative water content (RWC), free proline, and total carbohydrate accumulation than Run Nong 35. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide anion were increased with prolongation of drought stress, with higher rates in cultivar Run Nong 35 than cultivar Dong Dan 80. Higher production of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), and catalase (CAT) and glutathione reductase (GR) resulted in improved growth and yield in Dong Dan 80. Overall, the cultivar Dong Dan 80 was better able to resist the detrimental effects of progressive drought stress as indicated by better growth and yield due to higher antioxidant enzymes, reduced lipid peroxidation, better accumulation of osmolytes, and maintenance of tissue water contents. PMID:27215981

  7. Energy biomass tree seedling production study. Fuels from woody biomass. Progress report, September 1978-January 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Foote, K.R.

    1980-03-01

    The research to date has centered around the establishment of baseline growing conditions for a number of species of tree seedlings, primarily deciduous hardwoods. As these baseline conditions were established for each specie, the shoot and root environments were manipulated in an attempt to establish techniques to increase seedling growth and reduce production times. Seedlings were outplanted in an attempt to establish baseline survival rates for seedlings grown in totally controlled environments. Studies to determine the optimum container for tree seedling production have been run and will continue as other containers are identified and made available. The most significant of the research results has been in the maximization of seedling growth. Seedling production times have been decreased in some species by as much as 50% under the baseline production times. Controlled environment production techniques provide for plant densities as high as 144 seedlings per square foot of growing space. Investigations of growing media indicate a significant species specific responses. Preliminary results of outplanting indicate survival rates as high as 90% plus.

  8. Progress toward evaluating the sustainability of switchgrass production as a bioenergy crop using the SWAT model

    SciTech Connect

    Baskaran, Latha Malar; Jager, Yetta; Schweizer, Peter E; Srinivasan, Raghavan

    2010-01-01

    Adding bioenergy to the US energy portfolio requires long-term profitability for bioenergy producers and the long-term protection of affected ecosystems. In this study, we present steps along the path towards evaluating both sides of the sustainability equation (production and environmental) for switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). We modeled production of switchgrass and river flow using SWAT for current landscapes at a regional scale. To quantify feedstock production, we compared lowland switchgrass yields simulated by SWAT with estimates from a model based on empirical data for the eastern US. Geographic patterns were very similar. Average yields reported in field trials tended to be higher than average SWAT-predicted yields, which may nevertheless be more representative of production-scale yields. As a preliminary step toward quantifying bioenergy-related changes in water quality, we evaluated flow predictions by the SWAT model for the Arkansas-Red-White river basin. Monthly SWAT flow predictions were compared to USGS measurements from 86 subbasins across the region. Although agreement was good, analysis of residuals (functional validation) identified patterns to guide future improvements. Our next step will be to continue model improvement, after which we will forecast changes in water quality associated with incorporating bioenergy crops into future landscapes. This analysis will help us, in future, to identify areas with the highest economic and environmental potential for feedstock production.

  9. Heterotrophic microalgae cultivation to synergize biodiesel production with waste remediation: progress and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Venkata Mohan, S; Rohit, M V; Chiranjeevi, P; Chandra, Rashmi; Navaneeth, B

    2015-05-01

    Microalgae are inexhaustible feedstock for synthesis of biodiesel rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and valuable bioactive compounds. Their cultivation is critical in sustaining the global economy in terms of human consumption of food and fuel. When compared to autotrophic cultivation, heterotrophic systems are more suitable for producing high cell densities of microalgae for accumulation of large quantities of lipids (triacylglycerols) which can be converted into biodiesel. Consorted efforts are made in this communication to converge recent literature on heterotrophic cultivation systems with simultaneous wastewater treatment and algal oil production. Challenges faced during large scale production and limiting factors which hinder the microalgae growth are enumerated. A strategic deployment of integrated closed loop biorefinery concept with multi-product recovery is proposed to exploit the full potential of algal systems. Sustainable algae cultivation is essential to produce biofuels leading to green future.

  10. Progress in chemical processing of LEU targets for {sup 99}Mo production -- 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Vandegrift, G.F.; Conner, C.; Sedlet, J.; Wygmans, D.G.; Wu, D.; Iskander, F.; Landsberger, S.

    1997-10-01

    Presented here are recent experimental results of the continuing development activities associated with converting current processes for producing fission-product {sup 99}Mo from targets using high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU). Studies were focused in four areas: (1) measuring the chemical behavior of iodine, rhodium, and silver in the LEU-modified Cintichem process, (2) performing experiments and calculations to assess the suitability of zinc fission barriers for LEU metal foil targets, (3) developing an actinide separations method for measuring alpha contamination of the purified {sup 99}Mo product, and (4) developing a cooperation with Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory that will lead to approval by the US Federal Drug Administration for production of {sup 99}Mo from LEU targets. Experimental results continue to show the technical feasibility of converting current HEU processes to LEU.

  11. Recent progress in synthetic biology for microbial production of C3–C10 alcohols

    PubMed Central

    Lamsen, Edna N.; Atsumi, Shota

    2012-01-01

    The growing need to address current energy and environmental problems has sparked an interest in developing improved biological methods to produce liquid fuels from renewable sources. While microbial ethanol production is well established, higher-chain alcohols possess chemical properties that are more similar to gasoline. Unfortunately, these alcohols (except 1-butanol) are not produced efficiently in natural microorganisms, and thus economical production in industrial volumes remains a challenge. Synthetic biology, however, offers additional tools to engineer synthetic pathways in user-friendly hosts to help increase titers and productivity of these advanced biofuels. This review concentrates on recent developments in synthetic biology to produce higher-chain alcohols as viable renewable replacements for traditional fuel. PMID:22701113

  12. Progress towards the production of the 236gNp standard sources and competing fission fragment production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larijani, C.; Pickford, O. L.; Collins, S. M.; Ivanov, P.; Jerome, S. M.; Keightley, J. D.; Pearce, A. K.; Regan, P. H.

    2015-11-01

    The isobaric distribution of fission residues produced following the bombardment of a natural uranium target with a beam of 25 MeV protons has been evaluated. Decay analysis of thirteen isobarically distinct fission residues were carried out using high-resolution γ-spectrometry at the UK National Physical Laboratory. Stoichiometric abundances were calculated via the determination of absolute activity concentrations associated with the longest-lived members of each isobaric chain. This technique was validated by computational modelling of likely sequential decay processes through an isobaric decay chain. The results were largely in agreement with previously published values for neutron bombardments on 238U at energies of 14 MeV. Higher yields of products with mass numbers A~110-130 were found, consistent with the increasing yield of these radionuclides as the bombarding energy is increased.

  13. Payload advisory panel recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Berrien, III

    1991-01-01

    The Payload Advisory Panel proposes a restructured Earth Observing System (EOS) mission to address high-priority science and environmental policy issues in Earth System Science. These issues have been identified through studies conducted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Committee on Earth and Environmental Sciences (CEES). The restructured EOS defers efforts to improve the understanding of the middle and upper stratosphere and solid earth geophysics. The strategy of the mission combines high priority new measurements with continuation of critical data sets begun by missions which precede EOS. Collaborative arrangements with international partners are an essential part of the program and additional arrangements are posed. The need for continuity in Earth observations and the urgency of environmental questions require launch of some EOS elements as soon as possible. They further require maintenance of the EOS objective of obtaining consistent 15-year measurement records.

  14. Medical Physics Panel Discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guèye, Paul; Avery, Steven; Baird, Richard; Soares, Christopher; Amols, Howard; Tripuraneni, Prabhakar; Majewski, Stan; Weisenberger, Drew

    2006-03-01

    The panel discussion will explore opportunities and vistas in medical physics research and practice, medical imaging, teaching medical physics to undergraduates, and medical physics curricula as a recruiting tool for physics departments. Panel members consist of representatives from NSBP (Paul Guèye and Steven Avery), NIH/NIBIB (Richard Baird), NIST (Christopher Soares), AAPM (Howard Amols), ASTRO (Prabhakar Tripuraneni), and Jefferson Lab (Stan Majewski and Drew Weisenberger). Medical Physicists are part of Departments of Radiation Oncology at hospitals and medical centers. The field of medical physics includes radiation therapy physics, medical diagnostic and imaging physics, nuclear medicine physics, and medical radiation safety. It also ranges from basic researcher (at college institutions, industries, and laboratories) to applications in clinical environments.

  15. ARS Research Review on "Recent progress in developing alternative strategies to antibiotics in poultry production"

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The global animal industry needs to address the increasing regulatory restrictions on the use of antibiotic growth promoters (AGPs) in animal production. Many AGPs have already been restricted by animal farms in the European Union and soon other countries are expected to be under increasing scrutin...

  16. Energy Productivity: Key to Environmental Protection and Economic Progress. Worldwatch Paper 63.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandler, William U.

    This report examines various topics and issues related to worldwide energy productivity and energy conservation. Following an introduction, these issues are considered in 6 sections focusing on: (1) energy demand projections (with data on 1982 energy consumption in selected countries); (2) continued industrial efficiency gains (including data on…

  17. Reducing the acrylamide content of processed potato products through germplasm improvement: opportunities, challenges and progress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Processed potato products, including french fries and potato chips, make a substantial contribution to total dietary acrylamide. Health safety concerns raised by acrylamide in food increase financial risks to the potato industry and have encouraged industry to take a proactive response toward acryla...

  18. Clinical Space Medicine Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baisden, Denise L.; Billica, Roger (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The practice of space medicine is diverse. It includes routine preventive medical care of astronauts and pilots, the development of inflight medical capability and training of flight crews as well as the preflight, inflight, and postflight medical assessment and monitoring. The Johnson Space Center Medical Operations Branch is a leader in the practice of space medicine. The papers presented in this panel will demonstrate some of the unique aspects of space medicine.

  19. Heat pipe thermal conditioning panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saaski, E. W.; Loose, J. D.; Mccoy, K. E.

    1974-01-01

    Thermal control of electronic hardware and experiments on future space vehicles is critical to proper functioning and long life. Thermal conditioning panels (cold plates) are a baseline control technique in current conceptual studies. Heat generating components mounted on the panels are typically cooled by fluid flowing through integral channels within the panel. However, replacing the pumped fluid coolant loop within the panel with heat pipes offers attractive advantages in weight, reliability, and installation. This report describes the development and fabrication of two large 0.76 x 0.76 m heat pipe thermal conditioning panels to verify performance and establish the design concept.

  20. Lightweight, Thermally Insulating Structural Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisen, Howard J.; Hickey, Gregory; Wen, Liang-Chi; Layman, William E.; Rainen, Richard A.; Birur, Gajanana C.

    1996-01-01

    Lightweight, thermally insulating panels that also serve as structural members developed. Honeycomb-core panel filled with low-thermal-conductivity, opacified silica aerogel preventing convection and minimizes internal radiation. Copper coating on face sheets reduces radiation. Overall thermal conductivities of panels smaller than state-of-art commercial non-structurally-supporting foam and fibrous insulations. On Earth, panels suitable for use in low-air-pressure environments in which lightweight, compact, structurally supporting insulation needed; for example, aboard high-altitude aircraft or in partially evacuated panels in refrigerators.

  1. Characterization of TMI-type wastes and solid products. Quarterly progress report, April-September 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, A.J.

    1981-12-01

    A research program is under way to systematically characterize the type of radwastes which may be generated in cleanup procedures following off-normal reactor operations. Specifically, the program is presently investigating how the properties of wastes containing ion-exchange media may be modified by heavy doses of irradiation from sorbed radionuclides. Special effort is being devoted toward quantifying the effects of factors such as radiation dose rate, chemical loading on the ion exchangers, moisture content and composition of external media, etc., which may inflence the relation between laboratory test results and field performance. Initial irradation damage measurements have been carried out on organic cation resin IRN-77 in both hydrogen and sodium forms. Gamma irradiation of both of these materials produces water soluble acidic decomposition products; the acid product yields depend on the chemical loading and are lower for the sodium form.

  2. Progress on a generalized coordinates tensor product finite element 3DPNS algorithm for subsonic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.; Orzechowski, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    A generalized coordinates form of the penalty finite element algorithm for the 3-dimensional parabolic Navier-Stokes equations for turbulent subsonic flows was derived. This algorithm formulation requires only three distinct hypermatrices and is applicable using any boundary fitted coordinate transformation procedure. The tensor matrix product approximation to the Jacobian of the Newton linear algebra matrix statement was also derived. Tne Newton algorithm was restructured to replace large sparse matrix solution procedures with grid sweeping using alpha-block tridiagonal matrices, where alpha equals the number of dependent variables. Numerical experiments were conducted and the resultant data gives guidance on potentially preferred tensor product constructions for the penalty finite element 3DPNS algorithm.

  3. Improved electroacoustic dewatering (EAD) belt press for food products. Phase 3, Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    Battelle`s electroacoustic dewatering (EAD) process improves the performance of mechanical dewatering processes for several food products (such as corn fiber) by superimposing electric and ultrasonic fields. EAD has the potential to save 0.027 to 0.035 quad/yr energy by 1995 in the food processing industry, which consumed 0.15 to 0.18 quad in 1986. This report covers Phase III for demonstrating the EAD prototype on corn wet milling products (corn fiber and gluten); only Task 1 (prototype preparation and planning) was completed. EAD performance was examined in the laboratory; availability of a test site was examined. The single-roll, postdewatering EAD belt press prototype can accept material predewatered by a screw press, centrifuge, or any other mechanical dewatering device. The two-belt system, utilizing a copper-polymer cathode belt, performed as well as the three-belt system used in Phase II.

  4. Exploring the limits of crop productivity: A model to evaluate progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugbee, Bruce

    1990-01-01

    The goal was to determine the limits of crop productivity when all environmental constraints were removed. Researchers define productivity as food output per unit of input. Researchers evaluated cultivars of wheat with reduced leaf size and number to decrease the leaf area index at high plant densities. These cultivars may also have an improved harvest index. Hydroponic studies indicate that 1 mM nitrate in solution is adequate to support maximum growth in these systems, provided iron nutrition is adequate. Wheat does not accumulate nitrate in leaves even when the solution nitrate concentration is 15 mM. Long-term photosynthetic efficiency (g mol (exp -1) of photons) and harvest index were not altered by photoperiod (16, 20, or 24 hours). Wheat does not need, nor benefit from, a diurnal dark period.

  5. Ground movements associated with gas hydrate production. Progress report, April 1, 1992--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Siriwardane, H.J.

    1992-12-31

    An obvious consequence of hydrate dissociation is the compression of reservoir matrix causing displacements in the surrounding area. The reservoir compression is a time-dependent process which depends on the production rate. The ground movements cause additional stresses in the overburden which may result in rock mass fracture and failure. Rock failure may cause rubble formation or bulking in the fracture zone. This in turn can cause an increase in permeability for gas flow which may offset the reduction in permeability caused by closure of existing fractures during reservoir compression. The mechanics of ground movements during hydrate production can be more closely simulated by considering similarities with ground movements associated with subsidence in permafrost regions. The purpose of this research work is to investigate the potential strata movements associated with hydrate production by considering similarities with ground movements in permafrost regions. The work primarily involves numerical modeling of subsidence caused by hydrate dissociation. The investigation is based on the theories of continuum mechanics, thermomechanical behavior of frozen geo-materials, principles of rock mechanics and geomechanics. It is expected that some phases of the investigation will involve the use of finite element method, which is a powerful computer-based method which has been widely used in many areas of science and engineering. Parametric studies will be performed to predict expected strata movements and surface subsidence for different reservoir conditions and properties of geological materials. The results from this investigation will be useful in predicting the magnitude of the subsidence problem associated with gas hydrate production. The analogy of subsidence in permafrost regions may provide lower bounds for subsidence expected in hydrate reservoirs. Furthermore, it is anticipated that the results will provide insight into planning of hydrate recovery operations.

  6. Progress towards antihydrogen production by the reaction of cold antiprotons with positronium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Charlton, M.; Laricchia, G.; Deutch, B.I.

    1995-03-01

    An experiment aimed at producing antihydrogen atoms by the reaction of cold antiprotons stored in a Penning trap with injected ground state positronium atoms is described. The apparatus developed in an attempt to observe the charge conjugate reaction using proton projectiles is discussed. Technically feasible upgrades to this apparatus are identified which may allow, in conjunction with the PS200 trap, antihydrogen production at LEAR.

  7. Built-in Test Equipment (BITE) to improve front-end-loader productivity. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1981-05-01

    This Topical Report describes an equipment system being developed to improve the availability and productivity of large front-end loaders used in surface-mining operations. The equipment is mounted on the front end loader and includes an operator display and keypad, a microcomputer, machine sensors and a signal conditioner. Safety and machine performance problems are displayed to the operator and a report is printed for the maintenance shop. The BITE equipment, environment and system operation are described.

  8. Progress in enzyme immunoassays: production of reagents, experimental design, and interpretation*

    PubMed Central

    Kurstak, Edouard

    1985-01-01

    Enzyme immunoassays represent in many cases the preferred procedure for the detection of antigens or corresponding antibodies. However, many of the current procedures are performed suboptimally. This article reviews the available designs, auxiliary recognition systems, production and purification of antibodies, conjugation procedures, solid-phase materials, recording and interpretation of results, and quality control and standardization of procedures to improve the reproducibility of tests. PMID:3910300

  9. Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This Annual Report of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) presents results of activities during calendar year 2001. The year was marked by significant achievements in the Space Shuttle and International Space Station (ISS) programs and encouraging accomplishments by the Aerospace Technology Enterprise. Unfortunately, there were also disquieting mishaps with the X-43, a LearJet, and a wind tunnel. Each mishap was analyzed in an orderly process to ascertain causes and derive lessons learned. Both these accomplishments and the responses to the mishaps led the Panel to conclude that safety and risk management is currently being well served within NASA. NASA's operations evidence high levels of safety consciousness and sincere efforts to place safety foremost. Nevertheless, the Panel's safety concerns have never been greater. This dichotomy has arisen because the focus of most NASA programs has been directed toward program survival rather than effective life cycle planning. Last year's Annual Report focused on the need for NASA to adopt a realistically long planning horizon for the aging Space Shuttle so that safety would not erode. NASA's response to the report concurred with this finding. Nevertheless, there has been a greater emphasis on current operations to the apparent detriment of long-term planning. Budget cutbacks and shifts in priorities have severely limited the resources available to the Space Shuttle and ISS for application to risk-reduction and life-extension efforts. As a result, funds originally intended for long-term safety-related activities have been used for operations. Thus, while safety continues to be well served at present, the basis for future safety has eroded. Section II of this report develops this theme in more detail and presents several important, overarching findings and recommendations that apply to many if not all of NASA's programs. Section III of the report presents other significant findings, recommendations and supporting

  10. [Research progress of Terahertz wave technology in quality measurement of food and agricultural products].

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhan-Ke; Zhang, Hong-Jian; Ying, Yi-Bin

    2007-11-01

    The quality concern of food and agricultural products has become more and more significant. The related technologies for nondestructive measurement or quality control of food products have been the focus of many researches. Terahertz (THz) radiation, or THz wave, the least explored region of the spectrum, is the electromagnetic wave that lies between mid-infrared and microwave radiation, which has very important research and application values. THz spectroscopy and THz imaging technique are the two main applications of THz wave. During the past decade, THz waves have been used to characterize the electronic, vibrational and compositional properties of solid, liquid and gas phase materials. Recently, THz technology has gained a lot of attention of researchers in various fields from biological spectral analysis to bio-medical imaging due to its unique features compared with microwave and optical waves. In the present paper, the properties of THz wave and its uniqueness in sensing and imaging applications were discussed. The most recent researches on THz technology used in food quality control and agricultural products inspection were summarized. The prospect of this novel technology in agriculture and food industry was also discussed.

  11. Idaho Habitat/Natural Production Monitoring, Part II: Intensive Monitoring Subproject : Annual Progress Report 1990.

    SciTech Connect

    Kiefer, Russell B.; Forster, Katharine A.

    1992-04-01

    Project 83-7 was established under the Northeast Power Planning Council's 1982 Fish and Wildlife Program, Measure 704 (d) (1) to monitor natural production of anadromous fish, evaluate Bonneville Power Administration habitat improvement project, and develop a credit record for off-site mitigation projects in Idaho. Project 83-7 is divided into two sub-projects: general and intensive monitoring. Results of the intensive monitoring sub-project are reported here. Results from the general monitoring sub-project will be reported in a separate document. The purpose of this intensive monitoring project is to determine the number of returning chinook and steelhead adults necessary to achieve optimal smolt production, and develop mitigation accounting based on increases in smolt production. Two locations are being intensively studied to meet these objectives. Information from this research will be applied to parr monitoring streams statewide to develop escapement objectives and determine success of habitat enhancement projects. Field work began in 1987 in upper Salmon River and Crooked River (South Fork Clearwater River tributary). Methods include using weirs to trap adults, conducting ground and aerial redd counts, snorkeling to estimate parr populations, PIT-tagging juveniles to determine parr-tosmolt survival, trapping fall and spring downstream emigrants with scoop traps, and outplanting adults to determine juvenile carrying capacity. PIT tags also provide a wide range of other information such as migration timing, effects of flow and passage conditions on smolt survival, other factors affecting smolt survival, and growth.

  12. Ethanol production via fungal decomposition and fermentation of biomass. Semiannual progress report, October 1981-March 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Antonopoulos, A.A.; Wene, E.G.

    1982-04-01

    During the first half of FY 1982, a few additional Fusarium isolates were obtained and screened for their cellulolytic and fermenting abilities. Experiments with an isolate from Fusarium strain ANL 22-760 showed that cellulose was the best inducer of FPase and CMCase, while glucose, lactose, and xylose almost completely inhibited cellulase production. Tests with Fusarium strain ANL 11182 indicated that a cellulase production of 2.5 IU/mL in 14 days was obtained at 28/sup 0/C in a medium of 1% cellulose and in the presence of 0.7 mg/mL extracellular protein. Increasing the nitrogen content of the medium stimulated cell growth but decreased cellulase production. The ratio of CMCase to FPase remained nearly constant at about 10:1 during fermentations with varying concentrations of cellulose and nitrogen sources. Several of the new isolates and mutants, when screened for their fermenting ability in glucose, produced ethanol at a conversion efficiency close to that achieved in yeast fermentations. Fermentations of 1% glucose by isolates from strain ANL 99A-78 repeatedly produced 4.3 mg/mL ehtanol within 48 hours. A few of the new isolates and mutants produced, in consecutive fermentations of 1% xylose, up to 4.2 mg/mL ethanol within 48 hours. Addition of glucose to higher concentrations of xylose increased the yield of ethanol.

  13. Large thermal protection system panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Franklin K. (Inventor); Weinberg, David J. (Inventor); Tran, Tu T. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A protective panel for a reusable launch vehicle provides enhanced moisture protection, simplified maintenance, and increased temperature resistance. The protective panel includes an outer ceramic matrix composite (CMC) panel, and an insulative bag assembly coupled to the outer CMC panel for isolating the launch vehicle from elevated temperatures and moisture. A standoff attachment system attaches the outer CMC panel and the bag assembly to the primary structure of the launch vehicle. The insulative bag assembly includes a foil bag having a first opening shrink fitted to the outer CMC panel such that the first opening and the outer CMC panel form a water tight seal at temperatures below a desired temperature threshold. Fibrous insulation is contained within the foil bag for protecting the launch vehicle from elevated temperatures. The insulative bag assembly further includes a back panel coupled to a second opening of the foil bag such that the fibrous insulation is encapsulated by the back panel, the foil bag, and the outer CMC panel. The use of a CMC material for the outer panel in conjunction with the insulative bag assembly eliminates the need for waterproofing processes, and ultimately allows for more efficient reentry profiles.

  14. Development of Quiet Honeycomb Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Daniel L.; Klos, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Sandwich honeycomb composite panels are lightweight and strong, and, therefore, provide a reasonable alternative to the aluminum ring framelstringer architecture currently used for most aircraft airframes. The drawback to honeycomb panels is that they radiate noise into the aircraft cabin very efficiently provoking the need for additional sound treatment which adds weight and reduces the material's cost advantage. A series of honeycomb panels were made which incorporated different design strategies aimed at reducing the honeycomb panels' radiation efficiency while at the same time maintaining its strength. The majority of the desi gns were centered around the concept of creatin g areas of reduced stiffness in the panel by adding voids and recesses to the core. The effort culminated with a reinforced./recessed panel which had 6 dB higher transmission loss than the baseline solid core panel while maintaining comparable strength.

  15. 7 CFR 205.509 - Peer review panel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM Accreditation of Certifying Agents § 205.509 Peer review panel....

  16. Commercialization of bacterial cell factories for the sustainable production of polyhydroxyalkanoate thermoplastics: progress and prospects.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Abhishek; Srivastava, Janmejai K; Mallick, Nirupama; Singh, Akhilesh K

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitous conventional plastics, generally manufactured from finite, nonsustainable fossil fuels are non-biodegradable wonder entities but their ill effect on Mother Nature has subsequently raised major environmental concerns like their safe disposal, solid waste management and several potential hazards. Such concerns have fuelled initiatives for research globally towards development of sustainable and eco-friendly bioplastics. The new generation of plastics called 'bioplastics' are polymers of long chain of repeating monomer units that are classified as photodegradable, semi-biodegradable, chemically synthesized and polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs). The commonly emerged novel bioplastics are polyesters of hydroxyalkanoates (HAs) called PHAs, which are lipoidic storage materials found in the cytosol of vast and diverse forms of bacteria. Among 150 different PHAs known so far, poly- 3-hydroxybutyrate is the most common and comprehensively characterized PHA. Interestingly, PHAs are only completely biodegradable plastics with material properties comparable to conventional plastics that can be achieved by regulating the co-monomers incorporation into PHAs backbone. PHA bioplastics are exploited in the form of user-friendly goods viz. films, absorbable sutures, bone plates, drug carriers, etc. Besides advantages, such useful entity(s) has major shortcomings as well like high production cost compared to conventional plastics. Precisely, in PHAs production, about fifty percent of the overall price is due to the carbon substrates. Consequently, exploring novel cost-effective substrates is a major compulsion for successful commercialization of this bioplastic, which is anticipated to reduce the cost of production as a result of advancing and intensifying research work. This review presents an insight and patent developments in the field of PHAs bioplastics.

  17. Commercialization of bacterial cell factories for the sustainable production of polyhydroxyalkanoate thermoplastics: progress and prospects.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Abhishek; Srivastava, Janmejai K; Mallick, Nirupama; Singh, Akhilesh K

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitous conventional plastics, generally manufactured from finite, nonsustainable fossil fuels are non-biodegradable wonder entities but their ill effect on Mother Nature has subsequently raised major environmental concerns like their safe disposal, solid waste management and several potential hazards. Such concerns have fuelled initiatives for research globally towards development of sustainable and eco-friendly bioplastics. The new generation of plastics called 'bioplastics' are polymers of long chain of repeating monomer units that are classified as photodegradable, semi-biodegradable, chemically synthesized and polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs). The commonly emerged novel bioplastics are polyesters of hydroxyalkanoates (HAs) called PHAs, which are lipoidic storage materials found in the cytosol of vast and diverse forms of bacteria. Among 150 different PHAs known so far, poly- 3-hydroxybutyrate is the most common and comprehensively characterized PHA. Interestingly, PHAs are only completely biodegradable plastics with material properties comparable to conventional plastics that can be achieved by regulating the co-monomers incorporation into PHAs backbone. PHA bioplastics are exploited in the form of user-friendly goods viz. films, absorbable sutures, bone plates, drug carriers, etc. Besides advantages, such useful entity(s) has major shortcomings as well like high production cost compared to conventional plastics. Precisely, in PHAs production, about fifty percent of the overall price is due to the carbon substrates. Consequently, exploring novel cost-effective substrates is a major compulsion for successful commercialization of this bioplastic, which is anticipated to reduce the cost of production as a result of advancing and intensifying research work. This review presents an insight and patent developments in the field of PHAs bioplastics. PMID:26073514

  18. A clearer view of singing voice production: 25 years of progress.

    PubMed

    Cleveland, T F

    1994-03-01

    Voice research has enjoyed its most productive period of history during the past 25 years. Many of the enigmas related to the biomechanics and acoustics of the singing voice have been resolved. This paper presents state-of-the-art understanding regarding the following topics: vibrato, the singer's formant, formant tracking, voice registers, subglottal pressure, voice classification, modes of vocal fold vibration, laryngeal position during singing, flow glottography, and singing synthesis. In addition to these topics, the people who have made the most significant contributions to the advancement of singing research are recognized. PMID:8167783

  19. Progress in the production of samples of gamma ray laser candidate materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, C. B.

    1994-04-01

    Studies of the 29 possible candidates to use as the working medium of a gamma ray laser have identified the 31-year isomer of Hafnium-178 as the best. It is a natural exawatt material capable of emitting 0.05 exawatt per gram if triggered. The problem being addressed in this work is the development of a production cycle for this rare substance. A success of this first year's work has been the identification of two fuel cycles, (alpha, 2n) reactions upon separated Yb-176 and proton spallation upon natural Ta feedstock.

  20. Fire containment tests of aircraft interior panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.; Leon, H. A.; Williamson, R. B.; Hasegawa, H.; Fisher, F.; Draemel, R.; Marcussen, W. H.; Hilado, C. J.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes an experimental program carried out to evaluate a possible method for testing the fire-containment qualities of aircraft interior panels. The experimental apparatus consisted of a burner that simulates various fire loads under different ventilation conditions in an enclosure of approximately the same size as an aircraft lavatory module. Two fire-containment tests are discussed in which two adjoining walls of the enclosure were made from state-of-the-art composite panels; rats were exposed to the combustion products in order to evaluate the toxic threat posed by those products. The results show that the burner can be employed to represent various fire-load conditions and that the methodology developed for fire containment can be useful in evaluating the fire resistance of composite panels before conducting large-scale tests. It is concluded that elements of the fire-containment criteria include the temperature rise on the backface of the panels as a function of time, the flame burn-through by either decomposition or severe distortion of the material, and the toxicity of the combustion gases evolved.

  1. Fabrication of titanium thermal protection system panels by the NOR-Ti-bond process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, R. R.

    1971-01-01

    A method for fabricating titanium thermal protection system panels is described. The method has the potential for producing wide faying surface bonds to minimize temperature gradients and thermal stresses resulting during service at elevated temperatures. Results of nondestructive tests of the panels are presented. Concepts for improving the panel quality and for improved economy in production are discussed.

  2. Recent progress in nonperturbative electromagnetic lepton-pair production with capture in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, J.C.; Oberacker, V.E.; Umar, A.S. |; Strayer, M.R.

    1993-12-31

    The prospect of new colliding-beam accelerators capable of producing collisions of highly stripped high-Z ions, at fixed-target energies per nucleon up to 20 TeV or more, has motivated much interest in lepton-pair production from the QED vacuum. The time-dependent and essentially classical electromagnetic fields involved in such collisions contain larger Fourier components which give rise to sizable lepton-pair production in addition to many other exotic particles. The process of electron-positron production with electron capture is a principal beam-loss mechanism for highly charged ions in a storage ring. In this process, the electron is created in a bound state of one of the participant heavy ions (most likely the 1s state), thus changing the ion`s charge state and causing it to be deflected out of the beam. There is a long and sometimes controversial history concerning the use of perturbative methods in studying electromagnetic lepton-pair production; however, reliable perturbative calculations have been used as input into design models for the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC). Applying perturbation theory to these processes at high energies and small impact parameters results in probabilities which violate unitarity, and cross sections which violate the Froissart bound. This evidence, along with the initial nonperturbative studies, suggests that higher-order QED effects will be important for extreme relativistic collisions. Clearly, large nonperturbative effects in electron-pair production with capture would have important implications for RHIC. In this paper, the authors briefly discuss recent progress in nonperturbative studies of the capture problem. In Section 2, they state the Dirac equation for a lepton in the time-dependent external field of a heavy ion which must be solved to compute lepton-capture probabilities. Section 4 surveys results from recent applications of coupled-channel and lattice techniques to the lepton-capture problem.

  3. The Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project, 2008 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Contor, Craig R.; Harris, Robin; King, Marty

    2009-06-10

    The Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (UBNPMEP) is funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as directed by section 4(h) of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P.L.96-501). This project is in accordance with and pursuant to measures 4.2A, 4.3C.1, 7.1A.2, 7.1C.3, 7.1C.4 and 7.1D.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Work was conducted by the Fisheries Program of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR). The UBNPMEP is coordinated with two Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) research projects that also monitor and evaluate the success of the Umatilla Fisheries Restoration Plan. This project deals with the natural production component of the plan, and the ODFW projects evaluate hatchery operations (project No. 1990-005-00, Umatilla Hatchery M & E) and smolt outmigration (project No. 1989-024-01, Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration and Survival in the Lower Umatilla River). Collectively these three projects monitor and evaluate natural and hatchery salmonid production in the Umatilla River Basin. The need for natural production monitoring has been identified in multiple planning documents including Wy-Kan-Ush-Mi Wa-Kish-Wit Volume I, 5b-13 (CRITFC 1996), the Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan (CTUIR & ODFW 1990), the Umatilla Basin Annual Operation Plan, the Umatilla Subbasin Summary (CTUIR & ODFW 2001), the Subbasin Plan (CTUIR & ODFW 2004), and the Comprehensive Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation Plan (CTUIR and ODFW 2006). Natural production monitoring and evaluation is also consistent with Section III, Basinwide Provisions, Strategy 9 of the 2000 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994, NPCC 2004). The Umatilla Basin M&E plan developed along with efforts to restore natural populations of spring and fall Chinook salmon, (Oncorhynchus tshawytsha), coho

  4. PROGRESS IN HIGH-TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION USING PLANAR SOFC TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, J. E.; Herring, J. S.; Stoots, C. M.; Hawkes, G. L.; Hartvigsen, J., J.; Mehrdad Shahnam

    2005-04-01

    A research program is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory to assess the performance of solid-oxide cells operating in the steam electrolysis mode for hydrogen production over a temperature range of 800 to 900ºC. The research program includes both experimental and modeling activities. Selected results from both activities are presented in this paper. Experimental results were obtained from a ten-cell planar electrolysis stack, fabricated by Ceramatec , Inc. The electrolysis cells are electrolyte-supported, with scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolytes (~140 µm thick), nickel-cermet steam/hydrogen electrodes, and manganite air-side electrodes. The metallic interconnect plates are fabricated from ferritic stainless steel. The experiments were performed over a range of steam inlet mole fractions (0.1 - 0.6), gas flow rates (1000 - 4000 sccm), and current densities (0 to 0.38 A/cm2). Hydrogen production rates up to 90 Normal liters per hour were demonstrated. Stack performance is shown to be dependent on inlet steam flow rate. A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was also created to model high-temperature steam electrolysis in a planar solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC). The model represents a single cell as it would exist in the experimental electrolysis stack. Mass, momentum, energy, and species conservation and transport are provided via the core features of the commercial CFD code FLUENT1. A solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) model adds the electrochemical reactions and loss mechanisms and computation of the electric field throughout the cell. The FLUENT SOFC user-defined subroutine was modified for this work to allow for operation in the SOEC mode. Model results provide detailed profiles of temperature, Nernst potential, operating potential, anode-side gas composition, cathode-side gas composition, current density and hydrogen production over a range of stack operating conditions. Mean model results are shown to compare favorably with

  5. Plate-fin panel heat exchanger and panel components thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Heronemus, W.E.

    1985-02-05

    A plate-fin panel for a heat exchanger may be either formed as an aluminum extrusion or fabricated from a corrugated metal sheet sandwiched between two flat metal sheets. The extruded aluminum version may be clad with protective sheet metal jackets made of, or coated with, a corrosion resistant Cu-Ni alloy. Individual panel sections can be joined together by tongue and groove engagement to obtain a total desired panel width if available extrusion press or rolling mill capacity is insufficient. The plate-fin panels are assembled into slotted headering plates, and a layer of synthetic plastics potting compound seals dissimilar metal joints against electrolytic corrosion as well as leakage and provides sufficient adhesive strength to reduce or eliminate the need for welding the panels to the headers. Mechanical brush or hydraulic jet apparatus is capable of continuously or intermittently cleaning slime or encrustations from all panel surfaces exposed to seawater.

  6. Recent Progress At The Idaho National Laboratory In High Temperature Electrolysis For Hydrogen And Syngas Production

    SciTech Connect

    C. Stoots; J. O'Brien; J. Herring; J. Hartvigsen

    2008-11-01

    This paper presents the most recent results of experiments conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) studying electrolysis of steam and coelectrolysis of steam / carbon dioxide in solid-oxide electrolysis stacks. Single button cell tests as well as multi-cell stack testing have been conducted. Multi-cell stack testing used 10 x 10 cm cells (8 x 8 cm active area) supplied by Ceramatec, Inc (Salt Lake City, Utah, USA) and ranged from 10 cell short stacks to 240 cell modules. Tests were conducted either in a bench-scale test apparatus or in a newly developed 5 kW Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) test facility. Gas composition, operating voltage, and operating temperature were varied during testing. The tests were heavily instrumented, and outlet gas compositions were monitored with a gas chromatograph. The ILS facility is currently being expanded to 15 kW testing capacity (H2 production rate based upon lower heating value).

  7. Regulation of extracellular polygalacturonase production in Pseudomonas solanacearum. Progress report, [May 1, 1992--April 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, C.

    1994-06-01

    Pseudomonas solanacearum is an economically important plant pathogen that causes bacterial wilt disease of diverse crops. The bacterium produces at least three isozymes of polygalacturonase, which degrade plant cell walls and contribute substantially to bacterial wilt disease development. The central objective of this research project is to determine how expression of these enzymes is regulated. To this end, we isolated a positive trans-acting regulator of polygalacturonase production (pehR). We have focused on further characterization of the pehR mutant pheonotype, and studies of pehR expression. Preliminary results suggest pehR also regulates bacterial motility. An investigation of two unusual tyrosine phosphoproteins in P. solanacearum is also described.

  8. Precast concrete sandwich panels subjected to impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runge, Matthew W.

    Precast concrete sandwich panels are a relatively new product in the construction industry. The design of these panels incorporates properties that allow for great resilience against temperature fluctuation as well as the very rapid and precise construction of facilities. The concrete sandwich panels investigated in this study represent the second generation of an ongoing research and development project. This second generation of panels have been engineered to construct midsized commercial buildings up to three stories in height as well as residential dwellings. The panels consist of a double-tee structural wythe, a foam core and a fascia wythe, joined by shear connectors. Structures constructed from these panels may be subjected to extreme loading including the effects of seismic and blast loading in addition to wind. The aim of this work was to investigate the behaviour of this particular sandwich panel when subjected to structural impact events. The experimental program consisted of fourteen concrete sandwich panels, five of which were considered full-sized specimens (2700 mm X 1200mm X 270 mm) and nine half-sized specimens (2700mm X 600mm X 270 mm) The panels were subjected to impact loads from a pendulum impact hammer where the total energy applied to the panels was varied by changing the mass of the hammer. The applied loads, displacements, accelerations, and strains at the mid-span of the panel as well as the reaction point forces were monitored during the impact. The behaviour of the panels was determined primarily from the experimental results. The applied loads at low energy levels that caused little to no residual deflection as well as the applied loads at high energy levels that represent catastrophic events and thus caused immediate failure were determined from an impact on the structural and the fascia wythes. Applied loads at intermediate energy levels representing extreme events were also used to determine whether or not the panels could withstand

  9. Coeur d'Alene Tribal Production Facility, Volume II of III, 2002-2003 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Paul

    2003-01-01

    This appendices covers the following reports: (1) Previous ISRP Reviews (Project 199004400) Implement Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities-Coeur d'Alene Reservation; (2) Step 1 review of the hatchery master plan (Memorandum from Mark Fritsch, Fish Production Coordinator, Draft version March 10, 2000); (3) Coeur d'Alene Tribe response to ISRP comments on Project No. 199004402; includes attachment A Water Quantity Report. This is an incomplete document Analysis of Well Yield Potential for a Portion of the Coeur d'Alene Reservation near Worley, Idaho, February 2001; (4) Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program, Rainbow Trout Feasibility Report on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation prepared by Ronald L. Peters, February 2001; (5) Coeur d'Alene Tribe response letter pursuant to the questions raised in the Step 1 review of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Trout Production Facility from Ronald L. Peters, March 27, 2001 ; includes attachments Water quantity report (this is the complete report), Appendix A Logs for Test Wells and 1999 Worley West Park Well, letters from Ralston, Appendix B Cost of Rainbow Purchase Alternative; (6) NPPC response (memorandum from Mark Fritsch, March 28, 2001); (7) Response to NPPC (letter to Frank Cassidy, Jr., Chair, from Ernest L. Stensgar, April 18, 2001); (8) Final ISRP review (ISRP 2001-4: Mountain Columbia Final Report); (9) Response to ISRP comment (letter to Mark Walker, Director of Public Affairs, from Ronald Peters, May 7, 2001); (10) Final comments to the Fish 4 committee; (11) Scope of Work/Budget FY 2001-2004; (12) Letter from City of Worley concerning water service; (13) Letter to BPA regarding status of Step 1 package; (14) Fisheries Habitat Evaluation on Tributaries of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, 1990 annual report; (15) Fisheries Habitat Evaluation on Tributaries of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, 1991 annual report; and (16) Fisheries Habitat Evaluation on Tributaries of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, 1992 annual

  10. The Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project : Progress Report, 1999-2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Contor, Craig R.; Sexton, Amy D.

    2003-06-02

    The Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (WWNPME) was funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as directed by section 4(h) of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P. L. 96-501). This project is in accordance with and pursuant to measures 4.2A, 4.3C.1, 7.1A.2, 7.1C.3, 7.1C.4 and 7.1D.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Work was conducted by the Fisheries Program of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) under the Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (WWNPME). Chapter One provides an overview of the entire report and how the objectives of each statement of work from 1999, 2000, 2001, and 2002 contract years are organized and reported. Chapter One also provides background information relevant to the aquatic resources of the Walla Walla River Basin. Objectives are outlined below for the statements of work for the 1999, 2000, 2001 and 2002 contract years. The same objectives were sometimes given different numbers in different years. Because this document is a synthesis of four years of reporting, we gave objectives letter designations and listed the objective number associated with the statement of work for each year. Some objectives were in all four work statements, while other objectives were in only one or two work statements. Each objective is discussed in a chapter. The chapter that reports activities and findings of each objective are listed with the objective below. Because data is often interrelated, aspects of some findings may be reported or discussed in more than one chapter. Specifics related to tasks, approaches, methods, results and discussion are addressed in the individual chapters.

  11. Ethanol production via fungal decomposition and fermentation of biomass. Phase II (FY 1981) annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Antonopoulos, A. A.; Wene, E. G.

    1981-10-01

    This program has as its main goal the isolation and development of Fusarium strains that can efficiently and economically decompose plant polysaccharides to pentoses and hexoses and ferment them to ethanol for fuel purposes. During Phase II (FY 1981) of this program, more than 800 new Fusarium isolates were isolated and screened. All showed cellulolytic activity. The Fusarium mutant ANL 3-72181 (derived after uv exposure of ANL 22 isolate) produced 2.45 iu cellulase after 14 days. This cellulase activity was achieved in the presence of 0.7 mg/mL extracellular protein. In separate tests, the use of both proteose peptone and yeast extract with 1% cellulose increased the production of extracellular protein three times over that on cellulose alone. Initial fermentation by Fusarium strains on 1% glucose produced up to 4.2 mg/mL ethanol in 48 hours. All Fusarium isolates and mutants found during this period were screened for xylose fermentation. Ethanol production during early experimentation required from 120 to 144 hours to yield 4.0 to 4.5 mg/mL ethanol from 1% xylose solutions. Through continuous selection of isolates, this time was reduced to 66 hours. By recycling Fusarium cell mass, fermentations of 1% xylose yielded 4.0 to 4.3 mg/mL ethanol in 48 hours. Consecutive fermentations of 2% xylose produced an average of 8.1 mg/mL ethanol in 48 hours. Fermentation of a 4.5% xylose + 2% glucose solution produced 21 mg/mL ethanol and 0.8 mg/mL acetic acid, while fermentation of a 7% xylose + 2% glucose solution yielded 25.5 mg/mL ethanol and 0.85 mg/mL acetic acid; these fermentations were aerated at a rate of 0.03 v/v-min.

  12. Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This report covers the activities of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) for calendar year 1998-a year of sharp contrasts and significant successes at NASA. The year opened with the announcement of large workforce cutbacks. The slip in the schedule for launching the International Space Station (ISS) created a 5-month hiatus in Space Shuttle launches. This slack period ended with the successful and highly publicized launch of the STS-95 mission. As the year closed, ISS assembly began with the successful orbiting and joining of the Functional Cargo Block (FGB), Zarya, from Russia and the Unity Node from the United States. Throughout the year, the Panel maintained its scrutiny of NASAs safety processes. Of particular interest were the potential effects on safety of workforce reductions and the continued transition of functions to the Space Flight Operations Contractor. Attention was also given to the risk management plans of the Aero-Space Technology programs, including the X-33, X-34, and X-38. Overall, the Panel concluded that safety is well served for the present. The picture is not as clear for the future. Cutbacks have limited the depth of talent available. In many cases, technical specialties are "one deep." The extended hiring freeze has resulted in an older workforce that will inevitably suffer significant departures from retirements in the near future. The resulting "brain drain" could represent a future safety risk unless appropriate succession planning is started expeditiously. This and other topics are covered in the section addressing workforce. In the case of the Space Shuttle, beneficial and mandatory safety and operational upgrades are being delayed because of a lack of sufficient present funding. Likewise, the ISS has little flexibility to begin long lead-time items for upgrades or contingency planning.

  13. Photovoltaic panel clamp

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Malcolm P.; Mittan, Margaret Birmingham; Miros, Robert H. J.; Stancel, Robert

    2013-03-19

    A photovoltaic panel clamp includes an upper and lower section. The interface between the assembled clamp halves and the module edge is filled by a flexible gasket material, such as EPDM rubber. The gasket preferably has small, finger like protrusions that allow for easy insertion onto the module edge while being reversed makes it more difficult to remove them from the module once installed. The clamp includes mounting posts or an integral axle to engage a bracket. The clamp also may include a locking tongue to secure the clamp to a bracket.

  14. Photovoltaic panel clamp

    DOEpatents

    Mittan, Margaret Birmingham; Miros, Robert H. J.; Brown, Malcolm P.; Stancel, Robert

    2012-06-05

    A photovoltaic panel clamp includes an upper and lower section. The interface between the assembled clamp halves and the module edge is filled by a flexible gasket material, such as EPDM rubber. The gasket preferably has small, finger like protrusions that allow for easy insertion onto the module edge while being reversed makes it more difficult to remove them from the module once installed. The clamp includes mounting posts or an integral axle to engage a bracket. The clamp also may include a locking tongue to secure the clamp to a bracket.

  15. Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The results of the Panel's activities are presented in a set of findings and recommendations. Highlighted here are both improvements in NASA's safety and reliability activities and specific areas where additional gains might be realized. One area of particular concern involves the curtailment or elimination of Space Shuttle safety and reliability enhancements. Several findings and recommendations address this area of concern, reflecting the opinion that safety and reliability enhancements are essential to the continued successful operation of the Space Shuttle. It is recommended that a comprehensive and continuing program of safety and reliability improvements in all areas of Space Shuttle hardware/software be considered an inherent component of ongoing Space Shuttle operations.

  16. Concentrating photovoltaic solar panel

    DOEpatents

    Cashion, Steven A; Bowser, Michael R; Farrelly, Mark B; Hines, Braden E; Holmes, Howard C; Johnson, Jr., Richard L; Russell, Richard J; Turk, Michael F

    2014-04-15

    The present invention relates to photovoltaic power systems, photovoltaic concentrator modules, and related methods. In particular, the present invention features concentrator modules having interior points of attachment for an articulating mechanism and/or an articulating mechanism that has a unique arrangement of chassis members so as to isolate bending, etc. from being transferred among the chassis members. The present invention also features adjustable solar panel mounting features and/or mounting features with two or more degrees of freedom. The present invention also features a mechanical fastener for secondary optics in a concentrator module.

  17. Fracture Mechanics Analyses of the Slip-Side Joggle Regions of Wing-Leading Edge Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Ivatury S.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Song, Kyongchan; Phillips, Dawn R.

    2010-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Orbiter wing comprises of 22 leading edge panels on each side of the wing. These panels are part of the thermal protection system that protects the Orbiter wings from extreme heating that take place on the reentry in to the earth atmosphere. On some panels that experience extreme heating, liberation of silicon carbon (SiC) coating was observed on the slip side regions of the panels. Global structural and local fracture mechanics analyses were performed on these panels as a part of the root cause investigation of this coating liberation anomaly. The wing-leading-edge reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) panels, Panel 9, T-seal 10, and Panel 10, are shown in Figure 1 and the progression of the stress analysis models is presented in Figure 2. The global structural analyses showed minimal interaction between adjacent panels and the T-seal that bridges the gap between the panels. A bounding uniform temperature is applied to a representative panel and the resulting stress distribution is examined. For this loading condition, the interlaminar normal stresses showed negligible variation in the chord direction and increased values in the vicinity of the slip-side joggle shoulder. As such, a representative span wise slice on the panel can be taken and the cross section can be analyzed using plane strain analysis.

  18. Idaho Habitat/Natural Production Monitoring, Pt. I: General Monitoring Subproject : Annual Progress Report 1990.

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, Bruce A.; Scully, Richard J.; Petrosky, Charles Edward

    1992-01-01

    The Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) has been monitoring and evaluating proposed and existing habitat improvement projects for rainbow-steelhead trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, hereafter called steelhead, and chinook salmon O. tshawytscha, hereafter called chinook, in the Clearwater and Salmon River drainages for the past seven years. Projects included in the evaluation are funded by, or proposed for funding by, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Northwest Power Planning Act as off-site mitigation for downstream hydropower development on the Snake and Columbia rivers. This evaluation project is also funded under the same authority (Fish and Wildlife Program, Northwest Power Planning Council). A mitigation record is being developed using increased carrying capacity and/or survival as the best measure of benefit from a habitat enhancement project. Determination of full benefit from a project depends on completion or maturation of the project and presence of adequate numbers of fish to document actual increases in fish production. The depressed status of upriver anadromous stocks has precluded measuring full benefits of any habitat project in Idaho. Partial benefit is credited to the mitigation record in the interim period of run restoration.

  19. [Toxicity studies of mild gasification products: Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    The major hypothesis of carcinogenesis is that malignancy is due to an alteration (mutation) of the genetic material in a somatic cell. Reactive electrophilic metabolites are generated from many chemicals by the action of endogenous mixed function oxidases. These reactive metabolites may bind to cellular macromolecules, such as DNA, and can, therefore, initiate a mutagenic or carcinogenic event. Prokaryotes and non-mammalian eukaryotes are used in mutation assays, while cultured mammalian cells are generally used for mutagenic as well as clastogenic tests examining alterations and damage to the DNA and/or chromosomes of somatic cells. One of the first mammalian cell lines used in genotoxicity studies is V79, which was derived from Chinese hamster lung cells. According to the test plan on toxicity studies of mild gasification products, mammalian cell in vitro assays are to be performed on selected samples displaying mutagenic activity in the Ames assay. The results of the Ames testing of the mild gasification sample IST {number_sign}10 indicate significant mutagenic activity. Hence, assays for the induction of gene mutation, sister chromatid exchange and micronucleus formation in V79 cells have been carried out for the sample. This paper reports the results of these assays.

  20. Liquid fuels production from biomass. Progress report No. 10, October 1-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Sanderson, J.E.; Levy, P.F.; Wise, D.L.; Nabor, M.R.; Molyneaux, M.S.; Hughes, C.A.

    1980-02-01

    It was found that marine algae could be converted to higher aliphatic organic acids and that these acids could be readily removed from the fermentation broth by membrane or liquid-liquid extraction. It was then proposed to convert these higher organic acids via Kolbe Electrolysis to aliphatic hydrocarbons, which may be used as a diesel fuel. A coenzyme M analogue, 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid has been shown to be an effective suppressor of methane in nonsterile anaerobic fermentation of cellulosic substrates. Preliminary experiments have also been completed utilizing corn meal in which 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid and carbon monoxide were both found to be effective methane suppressors. An analysis of the energy outputs and requirements for the production of liquid hydrocarbon fuel from corn has been performed. As a means of expanding the number of potential substrates, pretreatment schemes are being investigated. A tapered auger device has been designed and built which has been demonstrated on the bench to be effective for adding substrate and removing residue in a continuous manner from a fixed packed bed fermenter. A solvent extractor system using kerosene as the nonaqueous phase has been constructed and is currently in operation in series with the 300 liter fixed packed bed fermenter. Although additional work is required to optimize the electrolysis process, the electrolytic oxidation of organic acids produced in the 300 liter fixed packed bed fermenter is operating with a favorable energy balance of 6/1 based on the applied potential.

  1. Increasing the biomass production of short rotation coppice forests. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Steinbeck, K.; Brown, C. L.

    1980-09-01

    The objective of the project is to increase biomass yields from coppice forests by admixing tree species (Alnus glutinosa, Robinia pseudoacacia and others) to plantations of Platanus occidentalis and Liquidambar styraciflua. Yield increases due to intensive cultivation, especially fertilization and irrigation, will be documented. A genetic improvement program of promising candidate species both through the identification of superior genotypes and mass cloning with tissue culture is also included. Three plantings have been established successfully to screen candidate species on various sites and to test the effects of weed control, fertilization and irrigation on short rotation forests. Two plantations in Georgia are in their 2nd and 3rd growing seasons while one in South Carolina is in its 1st growing season. A two acre plantation has been established to test development of geographic seed source material for sycamore. A nursery is in operation to develop seedling production methods for new species and to grow and maintain genetic material. Mass cloning of selected material by tissue culture techniques has produced material for testing in outplantings.

  2. Microgap flat panel display

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, Craig R.

    1998-01-01

    A microgap flat panel display which includes a thin gas-filled display tube that utilizes switched X-Y "pixel" strips to trigger electron avalanches and activate a phosphor at a given location on a display screen. The panel utilizes the principal of electron multiplication in a gas subjected to a high electric field to provide sufficient electron current to activate standard luminescent phosphors located on an anode. The X-Y conductive strips of a few micron widths may for example, be deposited on opposite sides of a thin insulating substrate, or on one side of the adjacent substrates and function as a cathode. The X-Y strips are separated from the anode by a gap filled with a suitable gas. Electrical bias is selectively switched onto X and Y strips to activate a "pixel" in the region where these strips overlap. A small amount of a long-lived radioisotope is used to initiate an electron avalanche in the overlap region when bias is applied. The avalanche travels through the gas filled gap and activates a luminescent phosphor of a selected color. The bias is adjusted to give a proportional electron multiplication to control brightness for given pixel.

  3. Microgap flat panel display

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, C.R.

    1998-12-08

    A microgap flat panel display is disclosed which includes a thin gas-filled display tube that utilizes switched X-Y ``pixel`` strips to trigger electron avalanches and activate a phosphor at a given location on a display screen. The panel utilizes the principal of electron multiplication in a gas subjected to a high electric field to provide sufficient electron current to activate standard luminescent phosphors located on an anode. The X-Y conductive strips of a few micron widths may for example, be deposited on opposite sides of a thin insulating substrate, or on one side of the adjacent substrates and function as a cathode. The X-Y strips are separated from the anode by a gap filled with a suitable gas. Electrical bias is selectively switched onto X and Y strips to activate a ``pixel`` in the region where these strips overlap. A small amount of a long-lived radioisotope is used to initiate an electron avalanche in the overlap region when bias is applied. The avalanche travels through the gas filled gap and activates a luminescent phosphor of a selected color. The bias is adjusted to give a proportional electron multiplication to control brightness for given pixel. 6 figs.

  4. Solar panel parallel mounting configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mutschler, Jr., Edward Charles (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A spacecraft includes a plurality of solar panels interconnected with a power coupler and an electrically operated device to provide power to the device when the solar cells are insolated. The solar panels are subject to bending distortion when entering or leaving eclipse. Spacecraft attitude disturbances are reduced by mounting each of the solar panels to an elongated boom made from a material with a low coefficient of thermal expansion, so that the bending of one panel is not communicated to the next. The boom may be insulated to reduce its bending during changes in insolation. A particularly advantageous embodiment mounts each panel to the boom with a single mounting, which may be a hinge. The single mounting prevents transfer of bending moments from the panel to the boom.

  5. Liquid fuels production from biomass. Progress report No. 11, January 1-March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, P.F.; Sanderson, J.E.; Wise, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    It was found that marine algae could be converted to higher aliphatic organic acids and that these acids could be readily removed from the fermentation broth by membrane or liquid-liquid extraction. It was then proposed to convert these higher organic acids via Kolbe Electrolysis to aliphatic hydrocarbons, which may be used as a diesel fuel. A coenzyme M analogue, 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid, has been shown to be an effective suppressor of methane in nonsterile anaerobic fermentation of cellulosic substrates. Preliminary experiments have also been completed utilizing corn meal which 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid and carbon monoxide were both found to be effective methane suppressors. An analysis of the energy outputs and requirements for the production of liquid hydrocarbon fuel from corn has been performed. As a means of expanding the number of potential substrates, pretreatment schemes are being investigated. An analytical scheme for determining composition of biomass materials has been devised. A tapered auger device has been designed and built which has been demonstrated on the bench to be effective for adding substrate and removing residue in a continuous manner from a fixed packed bed fermenter. A solvent extractor system using kerosene as the nonaqueous phase has been constructed and is currently in operation in series with the 300-liter fixed packed bed fermenter. The electrolytic oxidation of organic acids produced in the 300-liter fixed packed bed fermenter is operating with a favorable energy balance of 6/1 based on the applied potential. The liquid-liquid extractor system is operating in line withy 300-liter fixed packed bed fermenter. An economic analysis for a 1000 ton per day plant has been performed and has been improved and updated based on additional experimental results.

  6. Advanced glycation end products and the progressive course of renal disease.

    PubMed

    Heidland, A; Sebekova, K; Schinzel, R

    2001-10-01

    In experimental and human diabetic nephropathy (DN), it has been shown that advanced glycation end products (AGEs), in particular, carboxymethyl-lysine and pentosidine, accumulate with malondialdehyde in glomerular lesions in relation to disease severity and in the presence of an upregulated receptor for AGE (RAGE) in podocytes. Toxic effects of AGEs result from structural and functional alterations in plasma and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, in particular, from cross-linking of proteins and interaction of AGEs with their receptors and/or binding proteins. In mesangial and endothelial cells, the AGE-RAGE interaction caused enhanced formation of oxygen radicals with subsequent activation of nuclear factor-kappaB and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha), growth factors (transforming growth factor-beta1 [TGF-beta1], insulin-like growth factor-1), and adhesion molecules (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, intercellular adhesion molecule-1). In tubular cells, incubation with AGE albumin was followed by stimulation of the mitogen-activating protein (MAP) kinase pathway and its downstream target, the activating protien-1 (AP-1) complex, TGF-beta1 overexpression, enhanced protein kinase C activity, decreased cell proliferation, and impaired protein degradation rate, in part caused by decreased cathepsin activities. The pathogenic relevance of AGEs was further verified by in vivo experiments in euglycemic rats and mice by the parenteral administration of AGE albumin, leading in the glomeruli to TGF-beta1 overproduction, enhanced gene expression of ECM proteins, and morphological lesions similar to those of DN. Evidence for the pathogenic relevance of AGEs in DN also comes from experimental studies in which the formation and/or action of AGEs was modulated by aminoguanidine, OPB-9195, pyridoxamine, soluble RAGEs, serine protease trypsin, and antioxidants, resulting in improved cell and/or renal function.

  7. Post transcriptional regulation of chloroplast gene expression by nuclear encoded gene products. Progress report, June 1, 1991--May 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchka, M.R.

    1992-05-01

    The following is a review of research accomplished in the first two years of funding for the above mentioned project. The work performed is a molecular characterization of nuclear mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii which are deficient in different stages in the post-transcriptional expression of a single chloroplast encoded polypeptide, the D2 protein of Photosystem II. Our long-term goals are to understand the molecular mechanisms by which nuclear gene products affect the expression of chloroplast genes. Specifically, we which to understand how specific nuclear gene products affect the turnover rate of the D2 encoding mRNA (psbD), how other nuclear encoded factors work to promote the translation of psbD mRNA and/or stabilize the D2 protein, and what the role of the D2 protein itself is in Photosystem II assembly and in the control of expression of other chloroplast genes. This progress report will be organized into four major sections concerning (I) The characterization of nuclear mutants affected in D2 translation/turnover, (II) The study of trans-acting factors which associate with the 5{prime} end of the psbD mRNA, (III) In vitro mutagenesis of the psbD gene, and (IV) Additional studies.

  8. Panel Discussion: The State of Play for Parental Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenig, John; Staud, John

    2014-01-01

    This article contains transcripts of a panel presentation from the 2013 Catholic Higher Education Collaborative conference, held on September 22, 23, and 24 at the University of Notre Dame. The panelists (Scott Jensen, Doug Tuthill, and Patrick Wolf) discussed current progress around the country in publicly-created, private school choice options…

  9. 78 FR 25309 - Proposal Review Panel Physics; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-30

    ... Proposal Review Panel Physics; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub... Closed. Contact Person: Jean Cottam-Allen, Program Director for Physics Frontier Center; National Science... the progress of the Center for the Physics of Living Cells, and a proposed in for supplemental...

  10. Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1995--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Chugh, Y.P.; Dutta, D.; Esling, S.

    1995-07-01

    On September 30, 1993, the U.S. Department of Energy-Morgantown Energy Technology Center and Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC) entered into a cooperative research agreement entitled {open_quotes}Management of Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products in Underground Mines{close_quotes} (DE-FC21-93MC30252). Under the agreement Southern Illinois University at Carbondale will develop and demonstrate several technologies for the placement of coal combustion residues in abandoned coal mines, and will assess the environmental impact of such underground residues placement. Previous quarterly Technical Progress Reports have set forth the specific objectives of the program, and a discussion of these is not repeated here. Rather, this report discusses the technical progress made during the period April 1 - June 30, 1995. A final topical report on the SEEC, Inc. demonstration of its technology for the transporting of coal combustion residues was completed during the quarter, although final printing of the report was accomplished early in July, 1995. The SEEC technology involves the use of Collapsible Intermodal Containers (CIC`s) developed by SEEC, and the transportation of such containers - filled with fly ash or other coal combustion residues - on rail coal cars or other transportation means. Copies of the final topical report, entitled {open_quotes}The Development and Testing of Collapsible Intermodal Containers for the Handling and Transport of Coal Combustion Residues{close_quotes} were furnished to the Morgantown Energy Technology Center. The Rapid Aging Test colums were placed in operation during the quarter. This test is to determine the long-term reaction of both the pneumatic and hydraulic mixtures to brine as a leaching material, and simulates the conditions that will be encountered in the actual underground placement of the coal combustion residues mixtures. The tests will continue for about one year.

  11. Report of the Federal Panel on Formaldehyde.

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    The Federal Panel on Formaldehyde concluded that definitive experiments exist which demonstrate the mutagenicity and carcinogenicity of formaldehyde under laboratory conditions. Formaldehyde induces both gene mutations and chromosomal aberrations in a variety of test systems. Inhalation of formaldehyde causes cancer of the nose in rats. The concentrations of formaldehyde in inhaled air that caused nasal cancer in Fisher 344 rats are within the same order of magnitude as those to which humans may be exposed. The data presently available do not permit a direct assessment of the carcinogenicity of formaldehyde to man. Epidemiologic studies on exposed human populations are in progress and may further clarify the situation. Other experimental and human studies on toxic effects such as teratogenicity and reproductive disorders are as yet inadequate for a health risk assessment. The CIIT 24 month study on animal carcinogenicity has not yet been completely evaluated. Additional data are expected on the effects of prolonged exposure to lower doses of formaldehyde and on the possible carcinogenicity of formaldehyde in the mouse. The panel recommends that, for a comprehensive health risk assessment, further experiments be conducted on the effects of other modes of exposure (ingestion and skin penetration), the effects in humans, and on the pharmacokinetics of formaldehyde in man and animals and the possible role for formaldehyde in reproductive and chronic respiratory disorders. It is the conclusion of the panel that formaldehyde should be presumed to pose a carcinogenic risk to humans. PMID:6977445

  12. Structural wood panels with improved fire resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawko, P. M. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Structural wood paneling or other molded wood compositions consisting of finely divided wood chips, flour, or strands are bound together and hot pressed with a modified novolac resin which is the cured product of a prepolymer made from an aralkyl ether or halide with a phenol and a hardening agent such as hexamethylene tetramine. The fire resistance of these articles is further improved by incorporating in the binder certain inorganic fillers, especially a mixture of ammonium oxalate and ammonium phosphate.

  13. Optics Alignment Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, Daniel J.

    1992-01-01

    The Optics Alignment Panel (OAP) was commissioned by the HST Science Working Group to determine the optimum alignment of the OTA optics. The goal was to find the position of the secondary mirror (SM) for which there is no coma or astigmatism in the camera images due to misaligned optics, either tilt or decenter. The despace position was reviewed of the SM and the optimum focus was sought. The results of these efforts are as follows: (1) the best estimate of the aligned position of the SM in the notation of HDOS is (DZ,DY,TZ,TY) = (+248 microns, +8 microns, +53 arcsec, -79 arcsec), and (2) the best focus, defined to be that despace which maximizes the fractional energy at 486 nm in a 0.1 arcsec radius of a stellar image, is 12.2 mm beyond paraxial focus. The data leading to these conclusions, and the estimated uncertainties in the final results, are presented.

  14. ALDS 1980 panel review

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, D. L.

    1981-11-01

    The overall goal of PNL (Pacific Northwest Laboratory) Applied Mathematical Sciences Research is development of a DOE (Department of Energy) capability for Analysis of Large Data Sets (ALDS) and transfer of this capability to other DOE laboratories and contractors. This capability is needed to satisfy DOE's increasing requirements for handling and analyzing large volumes of diverse energy and environmental data. The integrated statistics and computer science research includes the development of improved methodologies in data definition, data management, data analysis, and visual display. The purpose of this document is three-fold. First, the document is the permanent record of the ALDS 1979 panel review. Second, the document provides the PNL staff with a benchmark of where we were at the end of the second year of ALDS. Third, the document is available to laboratories, universities, and DOE headquarters as detailed description of the ALDS project, as well as an example of the new direction of AMS-funded research.

  15. Fifth Single-Shell Tank Integrity Project Expert Panel Meeting August 28-29, 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Todd M.; Boomer, Kayle D.

    2015-01-07

    On August 28th and 29th, 2014 the Single-Shell Tank Integrity Project (SSTIP) Expert Panel (Panel) convened in Richland, Washington. This was the Panel’s first meeting since 2011 and, as a result, was focused primarily on updating the Panel on progress in response to the past recommendations (Single-Shell Tank Integrity Expert Panel Report, RPP-RPT-45921, Rev 0, May 2010). This letter documents the Panel’s discussions and feedback on Phase I activities and results.

  16. Cellular capsules as a tool for multicellular spheroid production and for investigating the mechanics of tumor progression in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Alessandri, Kévin; Sarangi, Bibhu Ranjan; Gurchenkov, Vasily Valérïévitch; Sinha, Bidisha; Kießling, Tobias Reinhold; Fetler, Luc; Rico, Felix; Scheuring, Simon; Lamaze, Christophe; Simon, Anthony; Geraldo, Sara; Vignjević, Danijela; Doméjean, Hugo; Rolland, Leslie; Funfak, Anette; Bibette, Jérôme; Bremond, Nicolas; Nassoy, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Deciphering the multifactorial determinants of tumor progression requires standardized high-throughput preparation of 3D in vitro cellular assays. We present a simple microfluidic method based on the encapsulation and growth of cells inside permeable, elastic, hollow microspheres. We show that this approach enables mass production of size-controlled multicellular spheroids. Due to their geometry and elasticity, these microcapsules can uniquely serve as quantitative mechanical sensors to measure the pressure exerted by the expanding spheroid. By monitoring the growth of individual encapsulated spheroids after confluence, we dissect the dynamics of pressure buildup toward a steady-state value, consistent with the concept of homeostatic pressure. In turn, these confining conditions are observed to increase the cellular density and affect the cellular organization of the spheroid. Postconfluent spheroids exhibit a necrotic core cemented by a blend of extracellular material and surrounded by a rim of proliferating hypermotile cells. By performing invasion assays in a collagen matrix, we report that peripheral cells readily escape preconfined spheroids and cell–cell cohesivity is maintained for freely growing spheroids, suggesting that mechanical cues from the surrounding microenvironment may trigger cell invasion from a growing tumor. Overall, our technology offers a unique avenue to produce in vitro cell-based assays useful for developing new anticancer therapies and to investigate the interplay between mechanics and growth in tumor evolution. PMID:23980147

  17. One carbon metabolism in anaerobic bacteria: Regulation of carbon and electron flow during organic acid production. Progress report, June 1990--May 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Zeikus, J.G.; Jain, M.K.

    1992-04-01

    This reporting period, progress is reported on the following: metabolic pathway of solvent production in B. methylotrophicum; the biochemical mechanism for metabolic regulation of the succinate fermentation; models to understand the physiobiochemical function of formate metabolism in anaerobes and; models for understanding the influence of low pH on one carbon metabolism. (CBS)

  18. Study of the damping characteristics of general aviation aircraft panels and development of computer programs to calculate the effectiveness of interior noise control treatment, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navaneethan, R.; Hunt, J.; Quayle, B.

    1982-01-01

    Tests were carried out on 20 inch x 20 inch panels at different test conditions using free-free panels, clamped panels, and panels as installed in the KU-FRL acoustic test facility. Tests with free-free panels verified the basic equipment set-up and test procedure. They also provided a basis for comparison. The results indicate that the effect of installed panels is to increase the damping ratio at the same frequency. However, a direct comparison is not possible, as the fundamental frequency of a free-free panel differs from the resonance frequency of the panel when installed. The damping values of panels installed in the test facility are closer to the damping values obtained with fixed-fixed panels. Effects of damping tape, stiffeners, and bonded and riveted edged conditions were also investigated. Progress in the development of a simple interior noise level control program is reported.

  19. 76 FR 32957 - Hydrographic Services Review Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-07

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Hydrographic Services Review Panel AGENCY: National Ocean... membership solicitation for Hydrographic Services Review Panel. SUMMARY: This notice responds to the... on the Hydrographic Services Review Panel (HSRP). The HSRP, a Federal advisory committee, advises...

  20. Bexar County Parking Garage Photovoltaic Panels

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, Golda

    2012-01-23

    The main objective of the Bexar County Parking Garage Photovoltaic (PV) Panel project is to install a PV System that will promote the use of renewable energy. This project will also help sustain Bexar County ongoing greenhouse gas emissions reduction and energy efficiency goals. The scope of this project includes the installation of a 100-kW system on the top level of a new 236,285 square feet parking garage. The PV system consists of 420 solar panels that covers 7,200 square feet and is tied into the electric-grid. It provides electricity to the office area located within the garage. The estimated annual electricity production of the PV system is 147,000 kWh per year.

  1. JTEC panel report on advanced composites in Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diefendorf, R. J.; Grisaffe, S. J.; Hillig, W. B.; Perepezko, J. H.; Pipes, R. B.; Sheehan, J. E.

    1991-01-01

    The JTEC Panel on Advanced Composites visited Japan and surveyed the status and future directions of Japanese high performance ceramic and carbon fibers and their composites in metal, intermetallic, ceramic and carbon matrices. The panel's interests included not only what composite systems were chosen, but also how these systems were developed. A strong carbon and fiber industry makes Japan the leader in carbon fiber technology. Japan has initiated an oxidation resistant carbon/carbon composite program. The goals for this program are ambitious, and it is just starting, but its progress should be closely monitored in the United States.

  2. Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1989-03-01

    This report provides findings, conclusions and recommendations regarding the National Space Transportation System (NSTS), the Space Station Freedom Program (SSFP), aeronautical projects and other areas of NASA activities. The main focus of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) during 1988 has been monitoring and advising NASA and its contractors on the Space Transportation System (STS) recovery program. NASA efforts have restored the flight program with a much better management organization, safety and quality assurance organizations, and management communication system. The NASA National Space Transportation System (NSTS) organization in conjunction with its prime contractors should be encouraged to continue development and incorporation of appropriate design and operational improvements which will further reduce risk. The data from each Shuttle flight should be used to determine if affordable design and/or operational improvements could further increase safety. The review of Critical Items (CILs), Failure Mode Effects and Analyses (FMEAs) and Hazard Analyses (HAs) after the Challenger accident has given the program a massive data base with which to establish a formal program with prioritized changes.

  3. Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This report provides findings, conclusions and recommendations regarding the National Space Transportation System (NSTS), the Space Station Freedom Program (SSFP), aeronautical projects and other areas of NASA activities. The main focus of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) during 1988 has been monitoring and advising NASA and its contractors on the Space Transportation System (STS) recovery program. NASA efforts have restored the flight program with a much better management organization, safety and quality assurance organizations, and management communication system. The NASA National Space Transportation System (NSTS) organization in conjunction with its prime contractors should be encouraged to continue development and incorporation of appropriate design and operational improvements which will further reduce risk. The data from each Shuttle flight should be used to determine if affordable design and/or operational improvements could further increase safety. The review of Critical Items (CILs), Failure Mode Effects and Analyses (FMEAs) and Hazard Analyses (HAs) after the Challenger accident has given the program a massive data base with which to establish a formal program with prioritized changes.

  4. The Food and Drug Administration advisory committees and panels: how they are applied to the drug regulatory process.

    PubMed

    Ciociola, Arthur A; Karlstadt, Robyn G; Pambianco, Daniel J; Woods, Karen L; Ehrenpreis, Eli D

    2014-10-01

    Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advisory panels and committees play a critical role in advising the FDA on the safety and efficacy of medical devices and drugs marketed in the US. Advisory panel recommendations are used by the FDA to make decisions regarding medical products. Currently, the FDA utilizes over 50 advisory panels that serve the three major FDA centers, including the Centers for Biologics, Drugs and Device Products. Members of an advisory panel typically include academicians, clinicians, consumers, patients, and industry representatives. The FDA establishes the schedules for advisory panel meetings on an annual basis and a panel usually meets several times a year for two consecutive days in Washington, DC. Typically, the advisory panel discusses issues highlighted by the FDA and is then asked to vote a response to the questions posed in advance by the FDA. Advisory panel recommendations have a strong influence on FDA's decision to approve a product, as evidenced by the 214 Advisory Panels FDA convened between January 2008 to November 2012, during which advisory panel members voted to approve the product (or use of the product) ∼74% of the time, with FDA ultimately approving the medical product (or use of the product) ∼79% of the time. The ACG membership are encouraged to consider serving the public's interest by participating in an FDA advisory panel utilizing their expertise for the evaluation of a new drug or medical device, and providing advice about whether the product should be sold in the US.

  5. Panelized wall system with foam core insulation

    DOEpatents

    Kosny, Jan; Gaskin, Sally

    2009-10-20

    A wall system includes a plurality of wall members, the wall members having a first metal panel, a second metal panel, and an insulating core between the first panel and the second panel. At least one of the first panel and the second panel include ridge portions. The insulating core can be a foam, such as a polyurethane foam. The foam can include at least one opacifier to improve the k-factor of the foam.

  6. Glass/Epoxy Door Panel for Automobiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, J. L. JR.

    1985-01-01

    Lightweight panel cost-effective. Integrally-molded intrusion strap key feature of composite outer door panel. Strap replaces bulky and heavy steel instrusion beam of conventional door. Standard steel inner panel used for demonstration purposes. Door redesigned to exploit advantages of composite outer panel thinner. Outer panel for automobilie door, made of glass/epoxy composite material, lighter than conventional steel door panel, meets same strength requirements, and less expensive.

  7. Development effort of sheet molding compound (SMC) parabolic trough panels

    SciTech Connect

    Kirsch, P.A.; Champion, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    The objectives of the development effort are to: investigate the problems of molding parabolic trough solar reflector panels of sheet molding compound (SMC); develop molding techniques and processes by which silvered glass reflector sheets can be integrally molded into SMC trough panels; provide representative prototype panels for evaluation; and provide information regarding the technical feasibility of molding SMC panels in high volume production. The approach taken to meet the objectives was to design the parabolic panel, fabricate a prototype die, choose an SMC formulation and mold the glass and SMC together into a vertex to rim mirrored panel. The main thrust of the program was to successfully co-mold a mirrored glass sheet with the SMC. Results indicate that mirrored glass sheets, if properly strengthened to withstand the temperature and pressure of the molding process, can be successfully molded with SMC in a single press stroke using standard compression molding techniques. The finalized design of the trough panel is given. The SMC formulation chosen is a low shrink, low profile SMC using 40% by weight one inch chopped glass fibers in a uv stabilized polyester resin matrix. A program to test for the adhesion between mirrored glass sheets and the SMC is discussed briefly. (LEW)

  8. AGU Sonar Data Restriction Panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The AGU Council accepted the report of the panel set up in February to study the issue of restriction by the U.S. Navy of access to high-resolution sonar data for the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone. Panel chairman John Bossier announced that “the Navy has acted in the best interests of the nation” in lifting the restriction order. Only two areas, egress routes to two submarine bases (see “Navy Defines Areas Under Sonar Ban,” in News, this issue), remain restricted.Panel members were Bruce Douglas, Alexander Malahoff, Donald Piepgras, Paul Richards, David Smith and Manik Talwani.

  9. Reductive coupling of carbon monoxide to C{sub 2} products. Progress report, May 1990--November 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Templeton, J.L.

    1991-08-01

    We first prepared Tp{prime}(CO){sub 2}W{equivalent_to}CH from a conversion of the cationic phosphonium carbyne Tp{prime}(CO){sub 2}W{equivalent_to}CPMe{sub 3}+ to a neutral carbene by hydride addition at carbon. Removal of PMe{sub 3} with a Lewis acid trap yielded milligram quantities of the desired terminal carbyne. More recently we have prepared a silylcarbyne precursor which reacts with Bu{sub 4}NF in wet THF to form substantial amounts of the CH carbyne. Dimerization to form an unusual vinylidene bridged complex is a facile decomposition route which consumes the Tp{prime}(CO){sub 2}M{equivalent_to}CH monometer for both M=MO and M=W,. Preparation of other carbyne complexes has been achieved using Tp{prime}(CO){sub 2}W{equivalent_to}C-Cl as a reagent. Another carbyne derivative was synthesized from Tp{prime}(CO){sub 2}M{equivalent_to}C-Cl by adding K[CpFe(Co){sub 2}] to displace the chloride. Organometallic products formed from the reaction of an electrophilic iron carbene complex with nitrosoarenes or azobenzene reflect net insertion of the ArN-X moiety into the Fe=CHAr bond. Cp(CO){sub 2}Fe-O-N(Ar{prime})=CHAr+ and Cp(CO){sub 2}FeN(Ph)-N(Pha)=CHAr+ have been isolated and spectroscopically characterized. More promising results for long term progress in building electrophilic nitrene complexes have been achieved with Group VI reagents. Simple methods for generating Tp{prime}(CO){sub 2}W=NHR for R= Ar and Bu{sup t} are encouraging. Furthermore, removal of H{sup minus} from the amido ligand with either I{sub 2} or [Ph{sub 3}C][BF{sub 4}] provides access to cationic nitrene complexes.

  10. PRSEUS Panel Fabrication Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linton, Kim A.; Velicki, Alexander; Hoffman, Krishna; Thrash, Patrick; Pickell, Robert; Turley, Robert

    2014-01-01

    NASA and the Boeing Company have been working together under the Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project to develop stitched unitized structure for reduced weight, reduced fuel burn and reduced pollutants in the next generation of commercial aircraft. The structural concept being evaluated is PRSEUS (Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure). In the PRSEUS concept, dry carbon fabric, pultruded carbon rods, and foam are stitched together into large preforms. Then these preforms are infused with an epoxy resin into large panels in an out-of-autoclave process. These panels have stiffeners in the length-wise and width-wise directions but contain no fasteners because all stiffeners are stitched to the panel skin. This document contains a description of the fabrication of panels for use in the 30-foot-long Multi-Bay Box test article to be evaluated at NASA LaRC.

  11. Exascale Workshop Panel Report Meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2010-07-01

    The Exascale Review Panel consists of 12 scientists and engineers with experience in various aspects of high-performance computing and its application, development, and management. The Panel hear presentations by several representatives of the workshops and town meetings convened over the past few years to examine the need for exascale computation capability and the justification for a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program to develop such capability. This report summarizes information provided by the presenters and substantial written reports to the Panel in advance of the meeting in Washington D.C. on January 19-20, 2010. The report also summarizes the Panel's conclusions with regard to the justification of a DOE-led exascale initiative.

  12. 77 FR 24933 - Hydrographic Services Review Panel Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-26

    ... Spring, Maryland 20910; Telephone: 301-713-2770 ext. 158; Fax: 301-713-4019; Email: Hydroservices.panel..., tide and water level, and hydrographic products, services and information for the Alaska/Arctic region... regional navigation and geospatial, tide and water level, products, services and information, as well...

  13. Panel to review EOSDIS plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Formed in Jan. 1992, the Panel to Review EOSDIS Plans was charged with advising NASA on its plans for developing the Earth Observing System (EOS) Data and Information System (EOSDIS). Specifically, the panel was asked to do the following: assess the validity of the engineering and technical underpinnings of the EOSDIS; assess its potential value to scientific users; suggest how technical risk can be minimized; and assess whether current plans are sufficiently resilient to be adaptable to changing technology and requirements such as budget environments, data volumes, new users, and new databases. The panel completed an interim report (Addendum A) and transmitted it to NASA and other interested parties in the government on 9 Apr. 1992. Because of a delay in NASA's plans to select the contractor for EOSDIS, the panel was not able to complete its review of the program according to the original government request. With the issuance of a letter report (Addendum B) on 28 Sep. 1992, the panel became inactive until such time as NASA could release the details of the contractor's proposed architecture, schedule, and costs for developing EOSDIS. In early 1993, NASA awarded the contract for the EOSDIS Core System (ECS). On 20 Apr. 1993, NASA asked the panel to reconvene to do the following: ( 1) complete its review of NASA's approach to the EOSDIS architecture and implementation; (2) appraise NASA's responses to the panel's previous recommendations; and (3) review the planning for EOSDIS in the context of NASA's role in the Global Change Data and Information System (GCDIS) implementation plan. To respond to the NASA charge, the panel met three times in 1993 including sessions with NASA officials and the EOSDIS contractor. In addition, several of the panel members visited individual Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAAC's) to obtain additional views of EOSDIS. The panel has now obtained substantial information on the EOSDIS budget, contractor work program, and current

  14. Two Thick Microwave Dichroic Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epp, Larry W.; Chen, Jacqueline C.; Stanton, Philip H.; Jorgenson, Roy E.

    1994-01-01

    Cross-shaped apertures enable relatively tight packing, eliminating some grating lobes. Two panels made of thin, honey-comblike metal walls constitute planar arrays of waveguidelike apertures designed to satisfy special requirements with respect to microwave transmittance and reflectance. Considered for use in multiplexing signals at various frequencies in microwave communication system. Both panels required to exhibit low insertion loss. Angle of incidence 30 degrees.

  15. Circulating biomarker panels for targeted therapy in brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Tanase, Cristiana; Albulescu, Radu; Codrici, Elena; Popescu, Ionela Daniela; Mihai, Simona; Enciu, Ana Maria; Cruceru, Maria Linda; Popa, Adrian Claudiu; Neagu, Ana Iulia; Necula, Laura Georgiana; Mambet, Cristina; Neagu, Monica

    2015-01-01

    An important goal of oncology is the development of cancer risk-identifier biomarkers that aid early detection and target therapy. High-throughput profiling represents a major concern for cancer research, including brain tumors. A promising approach for efficacious monitoring of disease progression and therapy could be circulating biomarker panels using molecular proteomic patterns. Tailoring treatment by targeting specific protein-protein interactions and signaling networks, microRNA and cancer stem cell signaling in accordance with tumor phenotype or patient clustering based on biomarker panels represents the future of personalized medicine for brain tumors. Gathering current data regarding biomarker candidates, we address the major challenges surrounding the biomarker field of this devastating tumor type, exploring potential perspectives for the development of more effective predictive biomarker panels.

  16. Economical evaluation of damaged vacuum insulation panels in buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y. M.; Lee, H. Y.; Choi, G. S.; Kang, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    In Korea, thermal insulation standard of buildings have been tightened annually to satisfy the passive house standard from the year 2009. The current domestic policies about disseminating green buildings are progressively conducted. All buildings should be the zero energy building in the year 2025, obligatorily. The method is applied to one of the key technologies for high-performance insulation for zero energy building. The vacuum insulation panel is an excellent high performance insulation. But thermal performance of damaged vacuum insulation panels is reduced significantly. In this paper, the thermal performance of damaged vacuum insulation panels was compared and analyzed. The measurement result of thermal performance depends on the core material type. The insulation of building envelope is usually selected by economic feasibility. To evaluate the economic feasibility of VIPs, the operation cost was analyzed by simulation according to the types and damaged ratio of VIPs

  17. Improving battery charging with solar panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boico, Florent Michael

    Recent technological developments in thin-film photovoltaics, such as amorphous silicon and hybrid dye sensitized photovoltaic (PV) cells are leading to new generations of portable solar arrays. These new arrays are lightweight, durable, flexible, and have been reported to achieve power efficiencies of up to 10%. Already, commercial-off-the-shelf arrays exist that have panels embedded in fabric that can be folded to dimensions of less than 12" x 12", yet are able to produce up to 50Watts of power at 12V. These new products make solar power available to various types of applications. In particular, military applications are emerging to give soldier a source of power that can always be at reach. In parallel with these developments, NiMH and Li-ion batteries are increasingly being used to power various equipment. Currently, the military is field testing solar charging of its batteries with portable solar arrays. However, so far, all known charge control algorithm have failed as they commonly falsely detect overcharge at random times in the charging and leave the battery partially charged. The goal of our research is to investigate the origins of failure in existing charge control algorithms and to propose adequate algorithms that would improve the battery charging. Additionally, ways to optimize the generated photovoltaic power is critical for portable solar application as the energy produced is limited. It is known that the use of a DC-DC converter between the solar panel and the load allows optimization of the power delivered by the solar panel when "Maximum Power Point Tracking" is utilized. Therefore we are developing new solutions that address the specific problem of Maximum Power Point Tracking for modular solar panels.

  18. Analysis of 3-panel and 4-panel microscale ionization sources

    SciTech Connect

    Natarajan, Srividya; Parker, Charles B.; Glass, Jeffrey T.; Piascik, Jeffrey R.; Gilchrist, Kristin H.; Stoner, Brian R.

    2010-06-15

    Two designs of a microscale electron ionization (EI) source are analyzed herein: a 3-panel design and a 4-panel design. Devices were fabricated using microelectromechanical systems technology. Field emission from carbon nanotube provided the electrons for the EI source. Ion currents were measured for helium, nitrogen, and xenon at pressures ranging from 10{sup -4} to 0.1 Torr. A comparison of the performance of both designs is presented. The 4-panel microion source showed a 10x improvement in performance compared to the 3-panel device. An analysis of the various factors affecting the performance of the microion sources is also presented. SIMION, an electron and ion optics software, was coupled with experimental measurements to analyze the ion current results. The electron current contributing to ionization and the ion collection efficiency are believed to be the primary factors responsible for the higher efficiency of the 4-panel microion source. Other improvements in device design that could lead to higher ion source efficiency in the future are also discussed. These microscale ion sources are expected to find application as stand alone ion sources as well as in miniature mass spectrometers.

  19. Panel Speaker 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doering, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Profitable products are frequently enabled by innovations that prevent early commoditization. At its best, industrial physics research provides the key differentiators for such products. To fulfill this goal, it's necessary to establish effective working relationships between R&D staff with both physics and engineering backgrounds. In the semiconductor industry, the ``middle ground'' is often materials science, electromagnetics, or a wide range of phenomena useful for creating sensors. In this brief presentation, we will mention a few examples of such collaborative development at Texas Instruments, including MEMS devices, ferroelectric memory, and silicon-IC-based radar.

  20. Degradation of cellulosic biomass and its subsequent utilization for the production of chemical feedstocks. Progress report, March 1-August 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, D. I.C.

    1980-09-01

    Progress is reported in this coordinated research program to effect the microbiological degradation of cellulosic biomass by anaerobic microorganisms possessing cellulolytic enzymes. Three main areas of research are discussed: increasing enzyme levels through genetics, mutations, and genetic manipulation; the direct conversion of cellulosic biomass to liquid fuel (ethanol); and the production of chemical feedstocks from biomass (acrylic acid, acetone/butanol, and acetic acid). (DMC)

  1. Evaluation of using cyclocranes to support drilling & production of oil & gas in wetland areas. Sixth quarterly technical progress report, incorporating milestone schedule/status, October 1993--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Eggington, W.J.

    1994-04-01

    This report is a progress report on a planned program falling under wetlands area research related to drilling, production, and transportation of oil and gas resources. Specifically the planned program addresses an evaluation of using cyclocraft to transport drill rigs, mud, pipes and other materials and equipment in a cost effective and environmentally safe manner to support oil and gas drilling and production operations in wetland areas. During this period, task 5, subscale tests, and task 7, environmental impacts, were completed. Work was continued on task 10, technology transfer, and the preparation of the final report as part of task 11.

  2. [Research Progress in Genotoxic Effects of Degradation Products, Cobalt, Chromium Ions and Nanoparticles from Metal-on-metal Prostheses on Cells].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hao; Han, Qinglin; Liu, Fan

    2015-04-01

    Cobalt or chromium alloys are the most common clinical materials of prosthesis and there have been some investigators at home and abroad have done related researches about the genotoxic effects of cobalt and chromium ions and nanoparticles. People have certain understanding about the mechanism of production of ions as well as their influence on cells. However, chromium or cobalt nanoparticles genotoxicity related research is still in its preliminary stage. In each stage, the mechanisms, from creating of the particles, through entering cells, until finally causing genotoxic, are still contained many problems to be solved. This article reviews the research progress in mechanisms of production and genotoxic effects of cobalt, chromium ions and nanoparticles.

  3. 7 CFR 1940.968 - Rural Economic Development Review Panel Grant (Panel Grant).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Rural Economic Development Review Panel Grant (Panel... of Certain Rural Development Programs § 1940.968 Rural Economic Development Review Panel Grant (Panel... associated with a State rural economic development review panel. (b) Objective. The objective of the...

  4. 7 CFR 1940.968 - Rural Economic Development Review Panel Grant (Panel Grant).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Rural Economic Development Review Panel Grant (Panel... of Certain Rural Development Programs § 1940.968 Rural Economic Development Review Panel Grant (Panel... associated with a State rural economic development review panel. (b) Objective. The objective of the...

  5. High temperature structural sandwich panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papakonstantinou, Christos G.

    High strength composites are being used for making lightweight structural panels that are being employed in aerospace, naval and automotive structures. Recently, there is renewed interest in use of these panels. The major problem of most commercial available sandwich panels is the fire resistance. A recently developed inorganic matrix is investigated for use in cases where fire and high temperature resistance are necessary. The focus of this dissertation is the development of a fireproof composite structural system. Sandwich panels made with polysialate matrices have an excellent potential for use in applications where exposure to high temperatures or fire is a concern. Commercial available sandwich panels will soften and lose nearly all of their compressive strength temperatures lower than 400°C. This dissertation consists of the state of the art, the experimental investigation and the analytical modeling. The state of the art covers the performance of existing high temperature composites, sandwich panels and reinforced concrete beams strengthened with Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP). The experimental part consists of four major components: (i) Development of a fireproof syntactic foam with maximum specific strength, (ii) Development of a lightweight syntactic foam based on polystyrene spheres, (iii) Development of the composite system for the skins. The variables are the skin thickness, modulus of elasticity of skin and high temperature resistance, and (iv) Experimental evaluation of the flexural behavior of sandwich panels. Analytical modeling consists of a model for the flexural behavior of lightweight sandwich panels, and a model for deflection calculations of reinforced concrete beams strengthened with FRP subjected to fatigue loading. The experimental and analytical results show that sandwich panels made with polysialate matrices and ceramic spheres do not lose their load bearing capability during severe fire exposure, where temperatures reach several

  6. Learning from Consumer-Oriented Review Efforts To Guide the Development of a System of Expert Panels To Identify and Share Promising and Exemplary Products and Programs. Working Papers. Volumes One and Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC. Office of Reform Assistance and Dissemination.

    These volumes contain working papers related to the development of the Office of Educational Research and Improvement (OERI) Facilitated System of Expert Panels. Introductory papers by Susan Klein, Michael Scriven, Sharon Bobbitt and Susan Klein, and Michael Scriven and Lois-ellin Datta (printed in both volumes) set the stage for the discussions…

  7. Postbuckling of laminated anisotropic panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeffrey, Glenda L.

    1987-01-01

    A two-part study of the buckling and postbuckling of laminated anisotropic plates with bending-extensional coupling is presented. The first part involves the development and application of a modified Rayleigh-Ritz analysis technique. Modifications made to the classical technique can be grouped into three areas. First, known symmetries of anisotropic panels are exploited in the selection of approximation functions. Second, a reduced basis technique based on these same symmetries is applied in the linear range. Finally, geometric boundary conditions are enforced via an exterior penalty function approach, rather than relying on choice of approximation functions to satisfy these boundary conditions. Numerical results are presented for both the linear and nonlinear range, with additional studies made to determine the effect of variation in penalty parameter and number of basis vectors. In the second part, six panels possessing anisotropy and bending-extensional coupling are tested. Detailed comparisons are made between experiment and finite element results in order to gain insight into the postbuckling and failure characteristics of such panels. The panels are constructed using two different lamination sequences, and panels with three different aspect ratios were constructed for each lamination sequence.

  8. Commercial users panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrd, Joseph S.; Flatau, Carl; Hodge, David C.; Hollis, Ralph; Leach, Eugene F.; Gilbert, Ray; Cleland, John; Leifer, Larry; Naser, Joseph; Schmuter, Samson D.

    1987-01-01

    The discussions of motives and requirements for telerobotics application demonstrated that, in many cases, lack of progress was a result not of limited opportunities but of inadequate mechanisms and resources for promoting opportunities. Support for this conclusion came from Telerobotics, Inc., one of the few companies devoted primarily to telerobot systems. They have produced units for such diverse applications as nuclear fusion research, particle accelerators, cryogenics, firefighting, marine biology/undersea systems and nuclear mobile robotics. Mr. Flatau offered evidence that telerobotics research is only rarely supported by the private sector and that it often presents a difficult market. Questions on the mechanisms contained within the NASA technology transfer process for promoting commercial opportunities were fielded by Ray Gilbert and Tom Walters. A few points deserve emphasis: (1) NASA/industry technology transfer occurs in both directions and NASA recognizes the opportunity to learn a great deal from industry in the fields of automation and robotics; (2) promotion of technology transfer projects takes a demand side approach, with requests to industry for specific problem identification. NASA then proposes possible solutions; and (3) comittment ofmotivated and technically qualified people on each end of a technology transfer is essential.

  9. SU-E-I-53: Comparison of Kerma-Area-Product Between the Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) and a Flat Panel Detector (FPD) as Used in Neuro-Endovascular Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayan, S; Rana, V; Nagesh, S Setlur; Xiong, Z; Rudin, S; Bednarek, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the reduction of integral dose to the patient when using the micro-angiographic fluoroscope (MAF) compared to when using the standard flat-panel detector (FPD) for the techniques used during neurointerventional procedures. Methods: The MAF is a small field-of-view, high resolution x-ray detector which captures 1024 x 1024 pixels with an effective pixel size of 35μm and is capable of real-time imaging up to 30 frames per second. The MAF was used in neuro-interventions during those parts of the procedure when high resolution was needed and the FPD was used otherwise. The technique parameters were recorded when each detector was used and the kerma-area-product (KAP) per image frame was determined. KAP values were calculated for seven neuro interventions using premeasured calibration files of output as a function of kVp and beam filtration and included the attenuation of the patient table for the frontal projections to be more representative of integral patient dose. The air kerma at the patient entrance was multiplied by the beam area at that point to obtain the KAP values. The ranges of KAP values per frame were determined for the range of technique parameters used during the clinical procedures. To appreciate the benefit of the higher MAF resolution in the region of interventional activity, DA technique parameters were generally used with the MAF. Results: The lowest and highest values of KAP per frame for the MAF in DA mode were 4 and 50 times lower, respectively, compared to those of the FPD in pulsed fluoroscopy mode. Conclusion: The MAF was used in those parts of the clinical procedures when high resolution and image quality was essential. The integral patient dose as represented by the KAP value was substantially lower when using the MAF than when using the FPD due to the much smaller volume of tissue irradiated. This research was supported in part by Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation and NIH Grant R01EB002873.

  10. Nonlinear Analysis and Post-Test Correlation for a Curved PRSEUS Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Kevin; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Jegley, Dawn; Neal, Albert L.; Linton, Kim, A.; Bergan, Andrew C.; Bakuckas, John G., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    The Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) concept, developed by The Boeing Company, has been extensively studied as part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA s) Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program. The PRSEUS concept provides a light-weight alternative to aluminum or traditional composite design concepts and is applicable to traditional-shaped fuselage barrels and wings, as well as advanced configurations such as a hybrid wing body or truss braced wings. Therefore, NASA, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and The Boeing Company partnered in an effort to assess the performance and damage arrestments capabilities of a PRSEUS concept panel using a full-scale curved panel in the FAA Full-Scale Aircraft Structural Test Evaluation and Research (FASTER) facility. Testing was conducted in the FASTER facility by subjecting the panel to axial tension loads applied to the ends of the panel, internal pressure, and combined axial tension and internal pressure loadings. Additionally, reactive hoop loads were applied to the skin and frames of the panel along its edges. The panel successfully supported the required design loads in the pristine condition and with a severed stiffener. The panel also demonstrated that the PRSEUS concept could arrest the progression of damage including crack arrestment and crack turning. This paper presents the nonlinear post-test analysis and correlation with test results for the curved PRSEUS panel. It is shown that nonlinear analysis can accurately calculate the behavior of a PRSEUS panel under tension, pressure and combined loading conditions.

  11. 7th U.S. / Japan Natural Resources (UJNR) Panel on Earthquake Research: Abstract Volume and Technical Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Detweiler, Shane T.; Ellsworth, William L.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. / Japan Natural Resources (UJNR) Panel on Earthquake Research promotes advanced study toward a more fundamental understanding of the earthquake process and hazard estimation. The Panel promotes basic and applied research to improve our understanding of the causes and effects of earthquakes and to facilitate the transmission of research results to those who implement hazard reduction measures on both sides of the Pacific and around the world. Meetings are held every other year, and alternate between countries with short presentation on current research and local field trips being the highlights. The 5th Joint Panel meeting was held at Asilomar, California in October, 2004. The technical sessions featured reports on the September 28, 2004 Parkfield, California earthquake, progress on earthquake early warning and rapid post-event assessment technology, probabilistic earthquake forecasting and the newly discovered phenomenon of nonvolcanic tremor. The Panel visited the epicentral region of the M 6.0 Parkfield earthquake and viewed the surface ruptures along the San Andreas Fault. They also visited the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD), which had just completed the first phase of drilling into the fault. The 6th Joint Panel meeting was held in Tokushima, Japan in November, 2006. The meeting included very productive exchanges of information on approaches to systematic observation of earthquake processes. Sixty eight technical papers were presented during the meeting on a wide range of subjects, including interplate earthquakes in subduction zones, slow slip and nonvolcanic tremor, crustal deformation, recent earthquake activity and hazard mapping. Through our discussion, we reaffirmed the benefits of working together to achieve our common goal of reducing earthquake hazard, continued cooperation on issues involving densification of observation networks and the open exchange of data among scientific communities. We also reaffirmed the importance of

  12. NREL Energy conversion panel review

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, D. )

    1993-01-01

    This paper summarizes the recommendations of the NREL Energy Conversion Panel which met in April 1993 to discuss the DOE Geothermal program. The panel felt that DOE support is still appropriate, and should be channeled to those areas that serve to help the industry in general. Because of the diversity of the industry, in particular the differing types of thermal reservoirs being tapped, it is difficult to have a particular project impact the entire industry. The panel concluded research support was most needed in three main areas: improvements in the cost competitiveness of new steam turbine plants; improvements in the utilization of troubled or declining resources; and improvements in the utilization of low and medium temperature resources. Details are briefly highlighted for each of these areas.

  13. A Progress Report on a Department of Psychiatry Faculty Practice Plan Designed to Reward Educational and Research Productivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hales, Robert E.; Shahrokh, Narriman C.; Servis, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors provide a progress report on a faculty practice plan that assigns a monetary value to administrative duties, teaching, scholarship, community service, and research. Methods: Modifications to the original plan are described and quantifiable results in the areas of scholarship and research are summarized. Results: During a…

  14. Technological progress and challenges towards cGMP manufacturing of human pluripotent stem cells based therapeutic products for allogeneic and autologous cell therapies.

    PubMed

    Abbasalizadeh, Saeed; Baharvand, Hossein

    2013-12-01

    Recent technological advances in the generation, characterization, and bioprocessing of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have created new hope for their use as a source for production of cell-based therapeutic products. To date, a few clinical trials that have used therapeutic cells derived from hESCs have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), but numerous new hPSC-based cell therapy products are under various stages of development in cell therapy-specialized companies and their future market is estimated to be very promising. However, the multitude of critical challenges regarding different aspects of hPSC-based therapeutic product manufacturing and their therapies have made progress for the introduction of new products and clinical applications very slow. These challenges include scientific, technological, clinical, policy, and financial aspects. The technological aspects of manufacturing hPSC-based therapeutic products for allogeneic and autologous cell therapies according to good manufacturing practice (cGMP) quality requirements is one of the most important challenging and emerging topics in the development of new hPSCs for clinical use. In this review, we describe main critical challenges and highlight a series of technological advances in all aspects of hPSC-based therapeutic product manufacturing including clinical grade cell line development, large-scale banking, upstream processing, downstream processing, and quality assessment of final cell therapeutic products that have brought hPSCs closer to clinical application and commercial cGMP manufacturing.

  15. The "Virtual" Panel: A Computerized Model for LGBT Speaker Panels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beasley, Christopher; Torres-Harding, Susan; Pedersen, Paula J.

    2012-01-01

    Recent societal trends indicate more tolerance for homosexuality, but prejudice remains on college campuses. Speaker panels are commonly used in classrooms as a way to educate students about sexual diversity and decrease negative attitudes toward sexual diversity. The advent of computer-delivered instruction presents a unique opportunity to…

  16. Solar panel truss mounting systems and methods

    DOEpatents

    Al-Haddad, Tristan Farris; Cavieres, Andres; Gentry, Russell; Goodman, Joseph; Nolan, Wade; Pitelka, Taylor; Rahimzadeh, Keyan; Brooks, Bradley; Lohr, Joshua; Crooks, Ryan; Porges, Jamie; Rubin, Daniel

    2015-10-20

    An exemplary embodiment of the present invention provides a solar panel truss mounting system comprising a base and a truss assembly coupled to the base. The truss assembly comprises a first panel rail mount, second panel rail mount parallel to the first panel rail mount, base rail mount parallel to the first and second panel rail mounts, and a plurality of support members. A first portion of the plurality of support members extends between the first and second panel rail mounts. A second portion of the plurality of support members extends between the first panel rail mount and the base rail mount. A third portion of the plurality of support members extends between the second panel rail mount and the base rail mount. The system can further comprise a plurality of connectors for coupling a plurality of photovoltaic solar panels to the truss assembly.

  17. Solar panel truss mounting systems and methods

    DOEpatents

    Al-Haddad, Tristan Farris; Cavieres, Andres; Gentry, Russell; Goodman, Joseph; Nolan, Wade; Pitelka, Taylor; Rahimzadeh, Keyan; Brooks, Bradley; Lohr, Joshua; Crooks, Ryan; Porges, Jamie; Rubin, Daniel

    2016-06-28

    An exemplary embodiment of the present invention provides a solar panel truss mounting system comprising a base and a truss assembly coupled to the base. The truss assembly comprises a first panel rail mount, second panel rail mount parallel to the first panel rail mount, base rail mount parallel to the first and second panel rail mounts, and a plurality of support members. A first portion of the plurality of support members extends between the first and second panel rail mounts. A second portion of the plurality of support members extends between the first panel rail mount and the base rail mount. A third portion of the plurality of support members extends between the second panel rail mount and the base rail mount. The system can further comprise a plurality of connectors for coupling a plurality of photovoltaic solar panels to the truss assembly.

  18. Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    An assessment of NASA's safety performance for 1983 affirms that NASA Headquarters and Center management teams continue to hold the safety of manned flight to be their prime concern, and that essential effort and resources are allocated for maintaining safety in all of the development and operational programs. Those conclusions most worthy of NASA management concentration are given along with recommendations for action concerning; product quality and utility; space shuttle main engine; landing gear; logistics and management; orbiter structural loads, landing speed, and pitch control; the shuttle processing contractor; and the safety of flight operations. It appears that much needs to be done before the Space Transportation System can achieve the reliability necessary for safe, high rate, low cost operations.

  19. Increased oil production and reserves from improved completion techniques in the Bluebell Field, Uinta Basin, Utah. Seventh quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, C.D.

    1995-09-01

    The objective of this project is to increase oil production and reserves in the Uinta Basin by demonstrating improved completion techniques. Low productivity of Uinta Basin wells is caused by gross production intervals of several thousand feet that contain perforated thief zones, water-bearing zones, and unperforated oil-bearing intervals. Geologic and engineering characterization and computer simulation of the Green River and Wasatch formations in the Bluebell field will determine reservoir heterogeneities related to fractures and depositional trends. This will be followed by drilling and recompletion of several wells to demonstrate improved completion techniques based on the reservoir characterization. Transfer of the project results will be an ongoing component of the project. Technical progress for this quarter are discussed for subsurface and engineering studies.

  20. Automatic inspection of reconstituted wood panels for surface defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penman, David W.; Olsson, Olof J.; Bowman, Chris C.

    1992-11-01

    Forestry has for many years been a major New Zealand industry, within which the manufacture of reconstituted products from wood fiber is becoming increasingly significant. The demand for a consistently high-quality surface finish in products, such as medium density fiberboard panels, introduces inspection requirements that cannot be easily met by manual inspection. This paper discusses the development of a prototype inspection system for wood panels to detect and classify the various defect types at production rates. The range of surface defects occurring during the manufacture of this product includes those having both color and textural variations. With some of these being quite small and subtle, the processing requirements are major. The prototype uses a combination of general purpose processor and pipelined processing modules to process images obtained from the moving product.

  1. Learning Physics with Physical Panels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syurin, O.; Shulik, B.

    2000-01-01

    Presents two components of a piece of experimental equipment, the optical training ground and the electrical panel, which can be used to construct and test different electrical circuits and study laws of electricity, experimental problem solving, and basic light phenomena. (YDS)

  2. NAS Panel faults export controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzoff, Judith A.

    A study prepared by a top-level panel says that current export controls on militarily sensitive U.S. technology may be “overcorrecting” previous weaknesses in that system, resulting in “a complex and confusing control system” that makes it more difficult for U.S. businesses to compete in international markets. Moreover, this control system has “an increasingly corrosive effect” on U.S. relations with allies. The panel recommended that the United States concentrate more effort on bringing about uniformity in the export control policies of countries belonging to the Coordinating Committee on Multilateral Export Controls (CoCom), i.e., most of the member nations in NATO (the North Atlantic Treaty Organization) and Japan.The 21-member panel was appointed by the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy (COSEPUP), a joint unit of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), and the Institute of Medicine (IOM). The panel, composed of administrators, researchers, and former government officials, was chaired by AGU member Lew Allen, Jr., director of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (Pasadena, Calif.) and former chief of staff of the U.S. Air Force. Their report was supported by NAS funds, by a number of private organizations (including AGU), by the U.S. Departments of Commerce, Defense, Energy, and State, by the National Science Foundation, and by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  3. Peg supported thermal insulation panel

    DOEpatents

    Nowobilski, Jeffert J.; Owens, William J.

    1985-01-01

    A thermal insulation panel which is lightweight, load bearing, accommodates thermal stress, and has excellent high temperature insulation capability comprising high performance insulation between thin metal walls supported by high density, high strength glass pegs made in compliance with specified conditions of time, temperature and pressure.

  4. Peg supported thermal insulation panel

    DOEpatents

    Nowobilski, J.J.; Owens, W.J.

    1985-04-30

    A thermal insulation panel which is lightweight, load bearing, accommodates thermal stress, and has excellent high temperature insulation capability comprises high performance insulation between thin metal walls supported by high density, high strength glass pegs made in compliance with specified conditions of time, temperature and pressure. 2 figs.

  5. ASIST 2003: Part II: Panels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proceedings of the ASIST Annual Meeting, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Forty-six panels address topics including women in information science; users and usability; information studies; reference services; information policies; standards; interface design; information retrieval; information networks; metadata; shared access; e-commerce in libraries; knowledge organization; information science theories; digitization;…

  6. Panel I: Technology and Jobs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appalachia, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Panel I features two case histories of state government, university, and private corporation cooperation to bring technology to the workplace (Microelectronics Center of North Carolina and Ben Franklin Partnership Program) and presentations about Burlington Industries and General Electric Company investments in technology to save jobs and boost…

  7. 16 CFR Figure 10 to Subpart A of... - Insulation Radiant Panel Test Data Log Format

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Insulation Radiant Panel Test Data Log Format 10 Figure 10 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION.... 1209, Subpt. A, Fig. 10 Figure 10 to Subpart A of Part 1209—Insulation Radiant Panel Test Data...

  8. 16 CFR Figure 10 to Subpart A of... - Insulation Radiant Panel Test Data Log Format

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Insulation Radiant Panel Test Data Log... CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS INTERIM SAFETY STANDARD FOR CELLULOSE INSULATION The Standard Pt. 1209, Subpt. A, Fig. 10 Figure 10 to Subpart A of Part 1209—Insulation Radiant Panel Test Data...

  9. 16 CFR Figure 10 to Subpart A of... - Insulation Radiant Panel Test Data Log Format

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Insulation Radiant Panel Test Data Log... CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS INTERIM SAFETY STANDARD FOR CELLULOSE INSULATION The Standard Pt. 1209, Subpt. A, Fig. 10 Figure 10 to Subpart A of Part 1209—Insulation Radiant Panel Test Data...

  10. 16 CFR Figure 10 to Subpart A of... - Insulation Radiant Panel Test Data Log Format

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Insulation Radiant Panel Test Data Log... CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS INTERIM SAFETY STANDARD FOR CELLULOSE INSULATION The Standard Pt. 1209, Subpt. A, Fig. 10 Figure 10 to Subpart A of Part 1209—Insulation Radiant Panel Test Data...

  11. 16 CFR Figure 10 to Subpart A of... - Insulation Radiant Panel Test Data Log Format

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Insulation Radiant Panel Test Data Log... CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS INTERIM SAFETY STANDARD FOR CELLULOSE INSULATION The Standard Pt. 1209, Subpt. A, Fig. 10 Figure 10 to Subpart A of Part 1209—Insulation Radiant Panel Test Data...

  12. 75 FR 18165 - Notice of Meeting of Chronic Hazard Advisory Panel on Phthalates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-09

    ... COMMISSION Notice of Meeting of Chronic Hazard Advisory Panel on Phthalates AGENCY: Consumer Product Safety... the first meeting of the Chronic Hazard Advisory Panel (CHAP) on Phthalates. The Commission appointed this CHAP to study the effects on children's health of all phthalates and phthalate alternatives...

  13. 7 CFR 205.509 - Peer review panel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Peer review panel. 205.509 Section 205.509 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION...

  14. 7 CFR 205.509 - Peer review panel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Peer review panel. 205.509 Section 205.509 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION...

  15. 19. VIEW OF THE PLATING BATHS AND CONTROL PANELS. GOLD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. VIEW OF THE PLATING BATHS AND CONTROL PANELS. GOLD AND SILVER WERE AMONG THE MATERIALS PLATED ONTO PARTS MADE OF COPPER, STAINLESS STEEL AND STEEL. (11/15/89) - Rocky Flats Plant, Non-Nuclear Production Facility, South of Cottonwood Avenue, west of Seventh Avenue & east of Building 460, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  16. 7 CFR 205.509 - Peer review panel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Peer review panel. 205.509 Section 205.509 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC...

  17. Use of Internet panels to conduct surveys.

    PubMed

    Hays, Ron D; Liu, Honghu; Kapteyn, Arie

    2015-09-01

    The use of Internet panels to collect survey data is increasing because it is cost-effective, enables access to large and diverse samples quickly, takes less time than traditional methods to obtain data for analysis, and the standardization of the data collection process makes studies easy to replicate. A variety of probability-based panels have been created, including Telepanel/CentERpanel, Knowledge Networks (now GFK KnowledgePanel), the American Life Panel, the Longitudinal Internet Studies for the Social Sciences panel, and the Understanding America Study panel. Despite the advantage of having a known denominator (sampling frame), the probability-based Internet panels often have low recruitment participation rates, and some have argued that there is little practical difference between opting out of a probability sample and opting into a nonprobability (convenience) Internet panel. This article provides an overview of both probability-based and convenience panels, discussing potential benefits and cautions for each method, and summarizing the approaches used to weight panel respondents in order to better represent the underlying population. Challenges of using Internet panel data are discussed, including false answers, careless responses, giving the same answer repeatedly, getting multiple surveys from the same respondent, and panelists being members of multiple panels. More is to be learned about Internet panels generally and about Web-based data collection, as well as how to evaluate data collected using mobile devices and social-media platforms.

  18. Use of Internet panels to conduct surveys.

    PubMed

    Hays, Ron D; Liu, Honghu; Kapteyn, Arie

    2015-09-01

    The use of Internet panels to collect survey data is increasing because it is cost-effective, enables access to large and diverse samples quickly, takes less time than traditional methods to obtain data for analysis, and the standardization of the data collection process makes studies easy to replicate. A variety of probability-based panels have been created, including Telepanel/CentERpanel, Knowledge Networks (now GFK KnowledgePanel), the American Life Panel, the Longitudinal Internet Studies for the Social Sciences panel, and the Understanding America Study panel. Despite the advantage of having a known denominator (sampling frame), the probability-based Internet panels often have low recruitment participation rates, and some have argued that there is little practical difference between opting out of a probability sample and opting into a nonprobability (convenience) Internet panel. This article provides an overview of both probability-based and convenience panels, discussing potential benefits and cautions for each method, and summarizing the approaches used to weight panel respondents in order to better represent the underlying population. Challenges of using Internet panel data are discussed, including false answers, careless responses, giving the same answer repeatedly, getting multiple surveys from the same respondent, and panelists being members of multiple panels. More is to be learned about Internet panels generally and about Web-based data collection, as well as how to evaluate data collected using mobile devices and social-media platforms. PMID:26170052

  19. Use of Internet Panels to Conduct Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Hays, Ron D.; Liu, Honghu; Kapteyn, Arie

    2015-01-01

    Use of internet panels to collect survey data is increasing because it is cost-effective, enables access to large and diverse samples quickly, takes less time than traditional methods to obtain back for analysis, and the standardization of data collection process makes studies easy to replicate. A variety of probability-based panels have been created including Telepanel/CentERpanel, Knowledge Networks (now GFK KnowledgePanel®), the American Life Panel, the LISS Panel, and the Understanding American Study panel. Despite the advantage of having a known denominator (sampling frame), the probability-based internet panels often have low recruitment participation rates and some have argued that there is little practical difference between opting out of a probability sample and opting into a non-probability (convenience) internet panel. This paper provides an overview of both probability-based and convenience panels, discussing potential benefits and cautions for each method, and summarizing approaches used to weight panel respondents to better represent the underlying population. Challenges in using internet panel data such as false answers, careless responses, giving the same answer repeatedly, getting multiple surveys from the same respondent, and panelists being members of multiple panels are discussed. There is more to be learned about internet panels generally and web-based data collection along with opportunities to evaluate data collected using mobile devices and social media platforms. PMID:26170052

  20. Recent progress in the synthesis and characterization of 2,4,6-trinitro-toluene transformation products

    SciTech Connect

    Junk, T.; Catallo, W.J.

    1996-10-01

    Environmental concern over soil contamination with trinitrotoluene (TNT) and its transformation products at sites of munitions production, loading, and testing calls for a thorough characterization of these compounds. Work presented here includes new and improved synthetic pathways to these transformation products, as well as their characterization by methods including X-ray crystallography, electrochemistry, and spectroscopy. Experimental results are compared to structural parameters derived from semi-empirical quantum-mechanical calculations, and their significance with respect to TNT transformation pathways discussed.

  1. Panel report: nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Joseph A; Hartouni, Edward P

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear science is at the very heart of the NNSA program. The energy produced by nuclear processes is central to the NNSA mission, and nuclear reactions are critical in many applications, including National Ignition Facility (NIF) capsules, energy production, weapons, and in global threat reduction. Nuclear reactions are the source of energy in all these applications, and they can also be crucial in understanding and diagnosing the complex high-energy environments integral to the work of the NNSA. Nuclear processes are complex quantum many-body problems. Modeling and simulation of nuclear reactions and their role in applications, coupled tightly with experiments, have played a key role in NNSA's mission. The science input to NNSA program applications has been heavily reliant on experiment combined with extrapolations and physical models 'just good enough' to provide a starting point to extensive engineering that generated a body of empirical information. This body of information lacks the basic science underpinnings necessary to provide reliable extrapolations beyond the domain in which it was produced and for providing quantifiable error bars. Further, the ability to perform additional engineering tests is no longer possible, especially those tests that produce data in the extreme environments that uniquely characterize these applications. The end of testing has required improvements to the predictive capabilities of codes simulating the reactions and associated applications for both well known and well characterized cases as well as incompletely known cases. Developments in high performance computing, computational physics, applied mathematics and nuclear theory have combined to make spectacular advances in the theory of fission, fusion and nuclear reactions. Current research exploits these developments in a number of Office of Science and NNSA programs, and in joint programs such as the SciDAC (Science Discovery through Advanced Computing) that supports the

  2. Blue Ribbon Panel 2016 Video Playlist

    Cancer.gov

    Blue Ribbon Panel members discuss recommendations from the panel report that was presented to the National Cancer Advisory Board. The playlist includes an overview video and 10 videos on the specific recommendations.

  3. Retaining Ring Fastener for Solar Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, A. H.

    1983-01-01

    Simple articulating linkage secures solar panels into supporting framework. Five element linkage collapses into W-shape for easy placement into framework, then expands to form rectangle of same dimensions as those of panel.

  4. 78 FR 5184 - Special Emphasis Panel Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Special Emphasis Panel Meeting AGENCY: Agency... Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Special Emphasis Panel (SEP) meeting on ``Patient Centered Outcomes... contact: Mrs. Bonnie Campbell, Committee Management Officer, Office of Extramural Research, Education...

  5. Silicone-Rubber Tooling for Hollow Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallimore, F. H.

    1985-01-01

    Wave-free contour surface obtained by using flexible mold. Silicone-rubber layup tool, when used in conjunction with hard plastic laminating mold defining desired contour, produces panel with wave-free surface that accurately reproduces shape of mold. In addition to providing porous hollow-panel wing structure that acts as duct for transporting sucked boundary layer tooling, also used to fabricate high-strength lightweight door panels and any single-or compound-contour panel.

  6. Thermal-structural panel buckling tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Randolph C.; Richards, W. Lance

    1991-01-01

    The buckling characteristics of a titanium matrix composite hat-stiffened panel were experimentally examined for various combinations of thermal and mechanical loads. Panel failure was prevented by maintaining the applied loads below real-time critical buckling predictions. The test techniques used to apply the loads, minimize boundary were shown to compare well with a finite-element buckling analysis for previous panels. Comparisons between test predictions and analysis for this panel are ongoing.

  7. Lightweight composites for modular panelized construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidya, Amol S.

    Rapid advances in construction materials technology have enabled civil engineers to achieve impressive gains in the safety, economy, and functionality of structures built to serve the common needs of society. Modular building systems is a fast-growing modern, form of construction gaining recognition for its increased efficiency and ability to apply modern technology to the needs of the market place. In the modular construction technique, a single structural panel can perform a number of functions such as providing thermal insulation, vibration damping, and structural strength. These multifunctional panels can be prefabricated in a manufacturing facility and then transferred to the construction site. A system that uses prefabricated panels for construction is called a "panelized construction system". This study focuses on the development of pre-cast, lightweight, multifunctional sandwich composite panels to be used for panelized construction. Two thermoplastic composite panels are proposed in this study, namely Composite Structural Insulated Panels (CSIPs) for exterior walls, floors and roofs, and Open Core Sandwich composite for multifunctional interior walls of a structure. Special manufacturing techniques are developed for manufacturing these panels. The structural behavior of these panels is analyzed based on various building design codes. Detailed descriptions of the design, cost analysis, manufacturing, finite element modeling and structural testing of these proposed panels are included in this study in the of form five peer-reviewed journal articles. The structural testing of the proposed panels involved in this study included flexural testing, axial compression testing, and low and high velocity impact testing. Based on the current study, the proposed CSIP wall and floor panels were found satisfactory, based on building design codes ASCE-7-05 and ACI-318-05. Joining techniques are proposed in this study for connecting the precast panels on the construction

  8. Assessment in Transition: Monitoring the Nation's Educational Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaser, Robert; Linn, Robert; Bohrnstedt, George

    This is the final report of the National Academy of Education's Panel on the Evaluation of the National Assessment of Education (NAEP) Progress Trial State Assessment. In this report, the Panel considers philosophical, technical, and policy issues concerning the NAEP in the immediate future and in the long term. The high technical quality of the…

  9. 30 CFR 77.310 - Control panels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control panels. 77.310 Section 77.310 Mineral....310 Control panels. (a) All thermal dryer system control panels constructed after June 30, 1971 shall... each thermocouple, pressure tap, or other control or gaging instrument in the drying system shall...

  10. 30 CFR 77.310 - Control panels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control panels. 77.310 Section 77.310 Mineral....310 Control panels. (a) All thermal dryer system control panels constructed after June 30, 1971 shall... each thermocouple, pressure tap, or other control or gaging instrument in the drying system shall...

  11. Solar panel handling and mounting device

    SciTech Connect

    Diba, K.T.

    1985-02-12

    The device is formed with flanges at right angles to each other which can engage the edge and side of a solar panel and be secured thereto. The device has a handgrip thereon for manual handling of the solar panel during transportation and installation. The device has openings therein for securing the solar panel in place during transportation and at installation.

  12. MS5 Mediates Early Meiotic Progression and Its Natural Variants May Have Applications for Hybrid Production in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Xin, Qiang; Shen, Yi; Li, Xi; Lu, Wei; Wang, Xiang; Han, Xue; Dong, Faming; Wan, Lili; Yang, Guangsheng; Hong, Dengfeng; Cheng, Zhukuan

    2016-06-01

    During meiotic prophase I, chromatin undergoes dynamic changes to establish a structural basis for essential meiotic events. However, the mechanism that coordinates chromosome structure and meiotic progression remains poorly understood in plants. Here, we characterized a spontaneous sterile mutant MS5(b)MS5(b) in oilseed rape (Brassica napus) and found its meiotic chromosomes were arrested at leptotene. MS5 is preferentially expressed in reproductive organs and encodes a Brassica-specific protein carrying conserved coiled-coil and DUF626 domains with unknown function. MS5 is essential for pairing of homologs in meiosis, but not necessary for the initiation of DNA double-strand breaks. The distribution of the axis element-associated protein ASY1 occurs independently of MS5, but localization of the meiotic cohesion subunit SYN1 requires functional MS5. Furthermore, both the central element of the synaptonemal complex and the recombination element do not properly form in MS5(b)MS5(b) mutants. Our results demonstrate that MS5 participates in progression of meiosis during early prophase I and its allelic variants lead to differences in fertility, which may provide a promising strategy for pollination control for heterosis breeding. PMID:27194707

  13. The importance of grasslands for animal production and other functions: a review on management and methodological progress in the tropics.

    PubMed

    Boval, M; Dixon, R M

    2012-05-01

    The global importance of grasslands is indicated by their extent; they comprise some 26% of total land area and 80% of agriculturally productive land. The majority of grasslands are located in tropical developing countries where they are particularly important to the livelihoods of some one billion poor peoples. Grasslands clearly provide the feed base for grazing livestock and thus numerous high-quality foods, but such livestock also provide products such as fertilizer, transport, traction, fibre and leather. In addition, grasslands provide important services and roles including as water catchments, biodiversity reserves, for cultural and recreational needs, and potentially a carbon sink to alleviate greenhouse gas emissions. Inevitably, such functions may conflict with management for production of livestock products. Much of the increasing global demand for meat and milk, particularly from developing countries, will have to be supplied from grassland ecosystems, and this will provide difficult challenges. Increased production of meat and milk generally requires increased intake of metabolizable energy, and thus increased voluntary intake and/or digestibility of diets selected by grazing animals. These will require more widespread and effective application of improved management. Strategies to improve productivity include fertilizer application, grazing management, greater use of crop by-products, legumes and supplements and manipulation of stocking rate and herbage allowance. However, it is often difficult to predict the efficiency and cost-effectiveness of such strategies, particularly in tropical developing country production systems. Evaluation and on-going adjustment of grazing systems require appropriate and reliable assessment criteria, but these are often lacking. A number of emerging technologies may contribute to timely low-cost acquisition of quantitative information to better understand the soil-pasture-animal interactions and animal management in

  14. Global law for commercial digital products: work in progress at the United Nations and in United States commercial law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Jeffrey B.

    1996-03-01

    Recent efforts at the United Nations and in the United States to define the legal structures for electronic commerce are providing insights into the component elements of a global legal structure for commercial digital products. Critical is the important role of originators in defining the rules for the transport, storage and use of standards-based digital messages, and the function of intermediaries as third party resources for assuring the integrity of transactions in digital products.

  15. Mechanisms controlling the production and transport of methane, carbon dioxide, and dissolved solutes within a boreal peatland. Progress report, July 15, 1992--July 14, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, D.I.

    1993-06-24

    The role of freshwater peatlands in the global methane cycle remains uncertain. Field measurements of methane emissions tend to be highly variable across a peatland and exhibit sharp seasonal fluctuations. The process of extrapolating these variable measurements to regional estimates is further complicated by rudimentary knowledge of the environmental controls can the production and emissions of methane from peat. The distribution of methanogenesis within the peat profile will strongly influence the response of methane emissions to potential climatic changes. During the summers of 1990 and 1991 we conducted a study on the mechanisms for the production, transport, and storage of methane within the Glacial Lake Agassiz peatland region as the regional climate shifted from extreme drought to a period of normal rainfall. This natural experiment provided unexpected insights on the linkages among climate, hydrology, and the methane cycle in large peat basins. This report presents project progress for period July 15, 1992--July 14, 1993

  16. Flat panel planar optic display

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1994-11-01

    A prototype 10 inch flat panel Planar Optic Display, (POD), screen has been constructed and tested. This display screen is comprised of hundreds of planar optic class sheets bonded together with a cladding layer between each sheet where each glass sheet represents a vertical line of resolution. The display is 9 inches wide by 5 inches high and approximately 1 inch thick. A 3 milliwatt HeNe laser is used as the illumination source and a vector scanning technique is employed.

  17. Panel 4 - applications to transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, F.; Au, J.; Bhattacharya, R.; Bhushan, B.; Blunier, D.; Boardman, B.; Brombolich, L.; Davidson, J.; Graham, M.; Hakim, N.; Harris, K.; Hay, R.; Herk, L.; Hojnacki, H.; Rourk, D.; Kamo, R.; Nieman, B.; O`Neill, D.; Peterson, M.B.; Pfaffenberger, G.; Pryor, R.W.; Russell, J.; Syniuta, W.; Tamor, M.; Vojnovich, T.; Yarbrough, W.; Yust, C.S.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this group was to compile a listing of current and anticipated future problem areas in the transportation industry where the properties of diamond and DLC films make them especially attractive and where the panel could strongly endorse the establishment of DOE/Transportation Industry cooperative research efforts. This section identifies the problem areas for possible applications of diamond/DLC technology and presents indications of current approaches to these problems.

  18. Panel labels extraction from multi-panel figures for facilitating multi-modal information retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mushtaq; Dong, Le; Liang, Yan; He, Ling; Feng, Ning

    2015-07-01

    The association of subfigures in the multi-panel figure with related text in the accompanying caption and research article is necessary for the implementation of multi-modal information retrieval system. The panel labels in the multipanel figure are used as a source for making this kind of association. In this paper, we propose a novel method for the detection of panel labels in the multi-panel figures. The proposed method uses segmentation of multi-panel figure and its accompanying caption into subfigures and sub captions, respectively, as a preprocessing step. Next, the features of panel label, i.e., area and its distance from the borders in the upper left most subfigure of the multi panel figure are computed. These features are then used for detecting panel labels located in the rest of subfigures of the same multi-panel figure. Experiments on multi-panel figures selected from imageCLEF2013 dataset show promising results.

  19. Panel urges cloning ethics boards

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, E.

    1997-01-03

    A 7-month review of the system that guides U.S. policy on the ethical, legal, and social issues (ELSI) of the Human Genome Project has concluded that it is time for a radical overhaul. A report completed last month recommends that a high-level policy board be created in the office of the Secretary of Health and Human Services to help develop policies on such sensitive issues as genetic privacy, antidiscrimination legislation, public education on genetic risks, and the regulation of genetic testing. If accepted, the proposal-from a review panel chaired by attorney Mark Rothstein of the University of Houston and geneticist M. Anne Spence of the University of California, Irvine-would create a new panel of 15 to 18 members to serve as {open_quotes}a public forum for discussion of ... critical issues.{close_quotes} This panel would replace the current advisory body, known as the ELSI Working Group, and end what the report calls a {open_quotes}discordance{close_quotes} between the broad scope of the Working Group and the {open_quotes}very limited focus{close_quotes} of the research program under which it operates.

  20. Progress in developing processes for converting {sup 99}Mo production from high- to low-enriched uranium--1998.

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, C.

    1998-10-28

    During 1998, the emphasis of our activities was focused mainly on target fabrication. Successful conversion requires a reliable irradiation target; the target being developed uses thin foils of uranium metal, which can be removed from the target hardware for dissolution and processing. This paper describes successes in (1) improving our method for heat-treating the uranium foil to produce a random-small grain structure, (2) improving electrodeposition of zinc and nickel fission-fragment barriers onto the foil, and (3) showing that these fission fragment barriers should be stable during transport of the targets following irradiation. A method was also developed for quantitatively electrodepositing uranium and plutonium contaminants in the {sup 99}Mo. Progress was also made in broadening international cooperation in our development activities.

  1. High Efficiency, High Density Terrestrial Panel. [for solar cell modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohlgemuth, J.; Wihl, M.; Rosenfield, T.

    1979-01-01

    Terrestrial panels were fabricated using rectangular cells. Packing densities in excess of 90% with panel conversion efficiencies greater than 13% were obtained. Higher density panels can be produced on a cost competitive basis with the standard salami panels.

  2. Cytokine and chemokine profiles in multiple myeloma; significance of stromal interaction and correlation of IL-8 production with disease progression.

    PubMed

    Kline, Michael; Donovan, Kathleen; Wellik, Linda; Lust, Christopher; Jin, Wendy; Moon-Tasson, Laurie; Xiong, Yuning; Witzig, Thomas E; Kumar, Shaji; Rajkumar, S Vincent; Lust, John A

    2007-05-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a product of interactions between tumor plasma cells and multiple cell types native to the bone marrow (BM). We have used antibody array technology to examine the proteins produced by BM stromal cells in response to stimulation by BM taken from patients diagnosed with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM), and MM. We observed increased production of the chemokine IL-8 by stromal cells co-cultured with supernatants from bone marrow cells of patients with active myeloma. IL-8 production is correlated with active disease and is dependent upon IL-1beta and NF-kappaB signaling. Consistent with the pro-angiogenic activity of IL-8, increased BM microvessel density (MVD) correlated with stimulation of stromal cell IL-8 production. In addition, the majority of MM cell lines and MM patient plasma cells were found to express IL-8 receptors CXCR1 and CXCR2. We conclude that stromal cell IL-8 production parallels MM disease activity, is IL-1beta induced, and correlates with bone marrow angiogenesis. PMID:16879867

  3. Promising Practices: Progress toward the Goals, 1999. Lessons for the States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wurtz, Emily

    This document examines progress in the United States toward the National Education Goals. The data are rooted in the annual report of the National Education Goals Panel (NEGP). The Panel, a bipartisan group, drew on the advice of education experts to select the best available data as indicators of progress. States that performed well or improved…

  4. Analytical comparison of three stiffened panel concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloney, Jill M.; Wu, K. Chauncey; Robinson, James C.

    1995-01-01

    Three stiffened panel concepts are evaluated to find optimized designs for integral stiffeners in the barrels of Reusable Launch Vehicle fuel tanks. The three panel concepts considered are a T-stiffened panel, a panel with one blade stiffener centered between each pair of T-stiffeners, and a panel with two blade stiffeners equally spaced between each pair of T-stiffeners. The panels are optimized using PASCO for a range of compressive loads, and the computed areal weight for each panel is used to compare the concepts and predict tank weights. The areal weight of the T-stiffened panel with one blade is up to seven-percent lower than the other panel concepts. Two tank construction methods are compared for a representative tank design with three barrels. In the first method, 45-degree circumferential sections of a barrel are each designed to carry the same maximum load in the barrel. In the second method, each barrel section is designed for the maximum load in that section. Representative tanks designed with the first method are over 250 lb heavier than tanks designed using the second method. Optimized panel designs and areal weights are also computed for variation of the nominal panel length and skin thickness.

  5. Separation, fractionation, concentration and drying of food products: Technology progress report, October 1, 1984-March 3, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, W. W.; Pederson, L. D.; Merlo, C. A.; Brewbaker, P. L.

    1987-11-01

    This report describes the first and second phases of a three phase project, the object of which is to develop energy efficient separation, concentration, and drying processes for food products, especially juice products, in order to reduce energy requirements and their associated costs for processing, preservation, and transportation. Presently in juice processing, much water is eliminated through evaporation. However, there are significant limits to the current evaporation technology. If, however, the juice could be separated, prior to evaporation, into liquid and solid fractions, and the liquid concentrated further, the containerization and transportation costs could be significantly reduced. Separation methods investigated in this project are: vacuum filtration, centrifugation, and crossflow microfiltration.

  6. Highly stretchable, transparent ionic touch panel.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chong-Chan; Lee, Hyun-Hee; Oh, Kyu Hwan; Sun, Jeong-Yun

    2016-08-12

    Because human-computer interactions are increasingly important, touch panels may require stretchability and biocompatibility in order to allow integration with the human body. However, most touch panels have been developed based on stiff and brittle electrodes. We demonstrate an ionic touch panel based on a polyacrylamide hydrogel containing lithium chloride salts. The panel is soft and stretchable, so it can sustain a large deformation. The panel can freely transmit light information because the hydrogel is transparent, with 98% transmittance for visible light. A surface-capacitive touch system was adopted to sense a touched position. The panel can be operated under more than 1000% areal strain without sacrificing its functionalities. Epidermal touch panel use on skin was demonstrated by writing words, playing a piano, and playing games. PMID:27516597

  7. Highly stretchable, transparent ionic touch panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chong-Chan; Lee, Hyun-Hee; Oh, Kyu Hwan; Sun, Jeong-Yun

    2016-08-01

    Because human-computer interactions are increasingly important, touch panels may require stretchability and biocompatibility in order to allow integration with the human body. However, most touch panels have been developed based on stiff and brittle electrodes. We demonstrate an ionic touch panel based on a polyacrylamide hydrogel containing lithium chloride salts. The panel is soft and stretchable, so it can sustain a large deformation. The panel can freely transmit light information because the hydrogel is transparent, with 98% transmittance for visible light. A surface-capacitive touch system was adopted to sense a touched position. The panel can be operated under more than 1000% areal strain without sacrificing its functionalities. Epidermal touch panel use on skin was demonstrated by writing words, playing a piano, and playing games.

  8. Ultrasonic Spectroscopy of Stainless Steel Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgriff, Laura M.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Hebsur, Mohan G.; Baaklini, George Y.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2003-01-01

    Enhanced, lightweight material systems, such as 17-4PH stainless steel sandwich panels are being developed for use as fan blades and fan containment material systems for next generation engines. In order to improve the production for these systems, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques, such as ultrasonic spectroscopy, are being utilized to evaluate the brazing quality between the 17-4PH stainless steel face plates and the 17-4PH stainless steel foam core. Based on NDE data, shear tests are performed on sections representing various levels of brazing quality from an initial batch of these sandwich structures. Metallographic characterization of brazing is done to corroborate NDE findings and the observed shear failure mechanisms.

  9. Production and screening of carbon products precursors from coal. Quarterly technical progress report No. 5, January 1,1996--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    Individual quarterly reports of four industrial participants of this project are included in this report. The technical emphasis continues to be the supply of coal-based feedstocks to the industrial participants. There have been several iterations of samples and feedback to meet feedstock characteristics for a wide variety of carbon products. Technology transfer and marketing of the Carbon Products Consortium (CPC) is a continual effort. Interest in the program and positive results from the research continue to grow. In several aspects, the program is ahead of schedule.

  10. Production and turnover of suspended organic detritus in the coastal water of the southeastern continental shelf. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Pomeroy, L.R.

    1984-12-01

    Data processing from the GABEX II study of 1981 have been completed, and manuscripts are nearing completion at this time. In April, 1985, we will participate in the study of removal of coastal water from the continental shelf (SPREX). Our role will be to follow the movement and degradation of particulate organic matter as it is transported across the shelf by wind-driven mixing events. Total suspended C and N will be measured, as well as production of bacteria and numbers of bacteria and protozoa. In preparation from SPREX, we are developing a sensitive method for measuring microbial respiration in the water. Beginning in the summer of 1985, we will participate in a series of studies of the biological processes in the coastal water off the coast of Georgia (BIOTRANS). In preparation for that we are developing a system for following production and degradation of particles in a large water sample under laboratory conditions. This will, of course, be supplemented by field observations. To evaluate the suspension of particulate matter of benthic origin we are constructing an annular flume in which box cores of bottom sediment will be inserted to measure the shear stress necessary to resuspend naturally produced materials. We are continuing field and laboratory studies of the roles of bacteria in the production, as well as the utilization of particulate organic materials. The production of macroflocs has been shown by us to involve the adherence of bacteria to particles and to each other. The macroflocs do not develop in sterile conditions.

  11. The production of chemicals from food processing wastes using a novel fermenter separator. Annual progress report, January 1993--March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, M.C.; Venkatesh, K.V.; Choi, H.; Salicetti-Piazza, L.; Borgos-Rubio, N.; Okos, M.R.; Wankat, P.C.

    1994-03-15

    The basic objective of this project is to convert waste streams from the food processing industry to usable fuels and chemicals using novel bioreactors. These bioreactors should allow economical utilization of waste (whey, waste sugars, waste starch, bottling wastes, candy wastes, molasses, and cellulosic wastes) by the production of ethanol, acetone/butanol, organic acids (acetic, lactic, and gluconic), yeast diacetyl flavor, and antifungal compounds. Continuous processes incorporating various processing improvements such as simultaneous product separation and immobilized cells are being developed to allow commercial scale utilization of waste stream. The production of ethanol by a continuous reactor-separator is the process closest to commercialization with a 7,500 liter pilot plant presently sited at an Iowa site to convert whey lactose to ethanol. Accomplishments during 1993 include installation and start-up of a 7,500 liter ICRS for ethanol production at an industry site in Iowa; Donation and installation of a 200 liter yeast pilot Plant to the project from Kenyon Enterprises; Modeling and testing of a low energy system for recovery of ethanol from vapor is using a solvent absorption/extractive distillation system; Simultaneous saccharification/fermentation of raw corn grits and starch in a stirred reactor/separator; Testing of the ability of `koji` process to ferment raw corn grits in a `no-cook` process.

  12. ANL progress in minimizing effects of LEU conversion on calcination of fission-product {sup 99}Mo acid waste solution.

    SciTech Connect

    Bakel, A.; Vandegrift, G.; Quigley, K.; Aase, S.; Neylon, M.; Carney, K.

    2003-01-01

    A partnership between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), MDS Nordion (MDSN), Atomic Energy Canada Limited (AECL) and SGN (France) has addressed the conversion of the MAPLE Reactor 99Mo production process from high-enriched uranium (HEU) targets to low-enriched uranium (LEU) targets. One effect of the conversion would be to increase the amount of solid uranium waste five-fold; we have worked to minimize the effect of the additional waste on the overall production process and, in particular, solid waste storage. Two processes were investigated for the treatment of the uranium-rich acidic waste solution: direct calcination, and oxalate precipitation as a prelude to calcination. Direct calcination generates a dense UO3 solid that should allow a significantly greater amount of uranium in one waste container than is planned for the HEU process, but doing so results in undesirable sputtering. These results suggest that direct calcination could be adapted for use with LEU targets without a large effect on the uranium waste treatment procedures. The oxalate-calcination generates a lower-density granular U3O8 product; sputtering is not significant during calcination of the uranyl oxalate precipitate. A physical means to densify the product would need to be developed to increase the amount of uranium in each waste container. Future work will focus on the specific chemical reactions that occur during the direct and oxalate calcination processes.

  13. The effects of progressing and nonprogressing Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis infection on milk production in dairy cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Longitudinal data from three commercial dairy herds in the northeast United States, collected from 2004 to 2011, were analyzed to determine the effect of Johne’s disease status and path on milk production. Disease status, as indicated by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis test results, was ...

  14. Machine vision inspection system for automobile gauge panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming-Yuan; Wang, Dong-Wen; Shi, Hao

    1995-03-01

    A machine vision inspection system is designed and built for automatic inspection at the end of automobile gauge panel production line. The inspection items on the gauge panel are pointing errors on all scales of 5 indicators and possible damage or missing assembled warning lights and light bulbs for indicators. Image acquisition camera is set to have a small field of view, a CNC system is established to drive the camera focusing on any target on the gauge panel. The position of the camera is close-loop controlled by a image character feedback control strategy. Automatic calibration is performed by using a stochastic adaptive control scheme. A two-CPU computer system is established to assure real time image processing and CNC control as well as test signal source management working in parallel way. Precision test signal source for speedometer, petrol gauge, oil pressure indicator, water-thermometer and rheometer are designed and made integrated under computer management and control. Each scale and pointer on the gauge panel has a set of image processing parameters, therefore a learning sequence method is designed to reduce programming load and increase flexibility which allows quick adaptation to various products inspection.

  15. Eicosanoid Profiling in an Orthotopic Model of Lung Cancer Progression by Mass Spectrometry Demonstrates Selective Production of Leukotrienes by Inflammatory Cells of the Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Poczobutt, Joanna M.; Gijon, Miguel; Amin, Jay; Hanson, Dwight; Li, Howard; Walker, Deandra; Weiser-Evans, Mary; Lu, Xian; Murphy, Robert C.; Nemenoff, Raphael A.

    2013-01-01

    Eicosanoids are bioactive lipid mediators derived from arachidonic acid1 (AA), which is released by cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2). AA is metabolized through three major pathways, cyclooxygenase (COX), lipoxygenase (LO) and cytochrome P450, to produce a family of eicosanoids, which individually have been shown to have pro- or anti-tumorigenic activities in cancer. However, cancer progression likely depends on complex changes in multiple eicosanoids produced by cancer cells and by tumor microenvironment and a systematic examination of the spectrum of eicosanoids in cancer has not been performed. We used liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) to quantitate eicosanoids produced during lung tumor progression in an orthotopic immunocompetent mouse model of lung cancer, in which Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells are injected into lungs of syngeneic mice. The presence of tumor increased products of both the cyclooxygenase and the lipoxygenase pathways in a time-dependent fashion. Comparing tumors grown in cPLA2 knockout vs wild-type mice, we demonstrated that prostaglandins (PGE2, PGD2 and PGF2a) were produced by both cancer cells and the tumor microenvironment (TME), but leukotriene (LTB4, LTC4, LTD4, LTE4) production required cPLA2 expression in the TME. Using flow cytometry, we recovered tumor-associated neutrophils and 2 types of tumor-associated macrophages from tumor-bearing lungs and we defined their distinct eicosanoid profiles by LC/MS/MS. The combination of flow cytometry and LC/MS/MS unravels the complexity of eicosanoid production in lung cancer and provides a rationale to develop therapeutic strategies that target select cell populations to inhibit specific classes of eicosanoids. PMID:24244531

  16. Excessive collagen turnover products are released during colorectal cancer progression and elevated in serum from metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kehlet, S N; Sanz-Pamplona, R; Brix, S; Leeming, D J; Karsdal, M A; Moreno, V

    2016-01-01

    During cancer progression, the homeostasis of the extracellular matrix becomes imbalanced with an excessive collagen remodeling by matrix metalloproteinases. As a consequence, small protein fragments of degraded collagens are released into the circulation. We have investigated the potential of protein fragments of collagen type I, III and IV as novel biomarkers for colorectal cancer. Specific fragments of degraded type I, III and IV collagen (C1M, C3M, C4M) and type III collagen formation (Pro-C3) were assessed in serum from colorectal cancer patients, subjects with adenomas and matched healthy controls using well-characterized and validated ELISAs. Serum levels of the biomarkers were significantly elevated in colorectal cancer patients compared to subjects with adenomas (C1M, Pro-C3, C3M) and controls (C1M, Pro-C3). When patients were stratified according to their tumour stage, all four biomarkers were able to differentiate stage IV metastatic patients from all other stages. Combination of all markers with age and gender in a logistic regression model discriminated between metastatic and non-metastatic patients with an AUROC of 0.80. The data suggest that the levels of these collagen remodeling biomarkers may be a measure of tumour activity and invasiveness and may provide new clinical tools for monitoring of patients with advanced stage colorectal cancer. PMID:27465284

  17. Excessive collagen turnover products are released during colorectal cancer progression and elevated in serum from metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Kehlet, S. N.; Sanz-Pamplona, R.; Brix, S.; Leeming, D. J.; Karsdal, M. A.; Moreno, V.

    2016-01-01

    During cancer progression, the homeostasis of the extracellular matrix becomes imbalanced with an excessive collagen remodeling by matrix metalloproteinases. As a consequence, small protein fragments of degraded collagens are released into the circulation. We have investigated the potential of protein fragments of collagen type I, III and IV as novel biomarkers for colorectal cancer. Specific fragments of degraded type I, III and IV collagen (C1M, C3M, C4M) and type III collagen formation (Pro-C3) were assessed in serum from colorectal cancer patients, subjects with adenomas and matched healthy controls using well-characterized and validated ELISAs. Serum levels of the biomarkers were significantly elevated in colorectal cancer patients compared to subjects with adenomas (C1M, Pro-C3, C3M) and controls (C1M, Pro-C3). When patients were stratified according to their tumour stage, all four biomarkers were able to differentiate stage IV metastatic patients from all other stages. Combination of all markers with age and gender in a logistic regression model discriminated between metastatic and non-metastatic patients with an AUROC of 0.80. The data suggest that the levels of these collagen remodeling biomarkers may be a measure of tumour activity and invasiveness and may provide new clinical tools for monitoring of patients with advanced stage colorectal cancer. PMID:27465284

  18. High conversion of coal to transportation fuels for the future with low HC gas production. Progress report No. 11, April 1--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Wiser, W.H.; Oblad, A.G.

    1995-07-01

    The objectives of this research are: (1) produce a synthetic crude from coal at a cost lower than $30.00 per barrel; and (2) produce a fuel which is low in aromatics, yet of sufficiently high octane number for use in the gasoline-burning transportation vehicles of today. To meet this second objective, research was proposed, and funding awarded, for conversion of the highly-aromatic liquid product from coal conversion to a product high in isoparaffins, which compounds in the gasoline range exhibit a high octane number. Experimental coal liquefaction studies conducted in a batch microreactor in our laboratory have demonstrated potential for high conversions of coal to liquids with low yield of hydrocarbon (HC) gases, hence small consumption of hydrogen in the primary liquefaction step. Ratios of liquids/HC gases as high as 30/1, at liquid yields as high as 82% of the coal by weight, have been achieved. The principal objective of this work is to examine how nearly we may approach these results in a continuous-flow system, at a size sufficient to evaluate the process concept for production of transportation fuels from coal. A continuous-flow reactor system is to be designed, constructed and operated. The system is to be computer-operated for process control and data logging, and is to be fully instrumented. The primary liquid products will be characterized by GC, FTIR, and GC/MS, to determine the types and quantities of the principal components produced under conditions of high liquids production with high ratios of liquids/HC gases, hydrogen consumption for the conversion to primary liquids will be calculated. Conversion of the aromatics of this liquid product to isoparrafins will be investigated, to examine the potential for producing a transportation fuel from coal with satisfactory octane rating but low in aromatic content. Progress to date is described.

  19. Progressive Fracture of Fiber Composite Build-Up Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, Pascal K.; Chamis, C. C.; Minnetyan, Levon

    1997-01-01

    Damage progression and fracture of built-up composite structures is evaluated by using computational simulation. The objective is to examine the behavior and response of a stiffened composite (0/ +/- 45/90)(sub s6) laminate panel by simulating the damage initiation, growth, accumulation, progression and propagation to structural collapse. An integrated computer code, CODSTRAN, was augmented for the simulation of the progressive damage and fracture of built-up composite structures under mechanical loading. Results show that damage initiation and progression have significant effect on the structural response. Influence of the type of loading is investigated on the damage initiation, propagation and final fracture of the build-up composite panel.

  20. Investigation of rare particle production in high energy nuclear collisions. Progress report, December 15, 1997--December 14, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, H.J.; Engelage, J.

    1998-11-01

    The program is an investigation of the hadronization process through experimental measurement of rare particle production in high energy nuclear interactions. These interactions provide an environment similar in energy density to the conditions in the Big Bang. The authors are currently involved in two major experiments to study this environment, E896 at the AGS and STAR at RHIC. They have completed the first physics running of E896, a search for the H dibaryon and measurement of hyperon production in AuAu collisions, and are in the process of analyzing the data. They have prototyped the STAR trigger and are in the process of fabricating its components and installing them in the STAR detector.

  1. Handheld camera 3D modeling system using multiple reference panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimura, Kouta; Oue, Yasuhiro; Terauchi, Tomoya; Emi, Tetsuichi

    2002-03-01

    A novel 3D modeling system in which a target object is easily captured and modeled by using a hand-held camera with several reference panels is presented in this paper. The reference panels are designed to be able to obtain the camera position and discriminate between each other. A conventional 3D modeling system using a reference panel has several restrictions regarding the target object, specifically the size and its location. Our system uses multiple reference panels, which are set around the target object to remove these restrictions. The main features of this system are as follows: 1) The whole shape and photo-realistic textures of the target object can be digitized based on several still images or a movie captured by using a hand-held camera; as well as each location of the camera that can be calculated using the reference panels. 2) Our system can be provided as a software product only. That means there are no special requirements for hardware; even the reference panels , because they can be printed from image files or software. 3) This system can be applied to digitize a larger object. In the experiments, we developed and used an interactive region selection tool to detect the silhouette on each image instead of using the chroma -keying method. We have tested our system with a toy object. The calculation time is about 10 minutes (except for the capturing the images and extracting the silhouette by using our tool) on a personal computer with a Pentium-III processor (600MHz) and 320MB memory. However, it depends on how complex the images are and how many images you use. Our future plan is to evaluate the system with various kind of objects, specifically, large ones in outdoor environments.

  2. Quarterly Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program tasks for January 2000 through March 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.P.

    2000-08-18

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems (OSDPS) of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides radioisotope Power Systems (BPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of .I 997 to study the planet Saturn. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. For the Cassini Mission, for example, ORNL was involved in the production of carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVSs) and weld shields (WSs). This quarterly report has been divided into three sections to reflect program guidance from OSDPS for fiscal year (FY) 2000. The first section deals primarily with maintenance of the capability to produce flight quality carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, clad vent sets (CVSs), and weld shields (WSs). In all three cases, production maintenance is assured by the manufacture of limited quantities of flight quality (FQ) components. The second section deals with several technology activities to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop technologies for two new RPS. The last section is dedicated to studies of the potential for the production of 238Pu at OBNL.

  3. Quarterly Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program tasks for April 2000 through June 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.P.

    2000-10-23

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems (OSDPS) of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. For the Cassini Mission, for example, ORNL was involved in the production of carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVSs) and weld shields (WSs). This quarterly report has been divided into three sections to reflect program guidance from OSDPS for fiscal year (FY) 2000. The first section deals primarily with maintenance of the capability to produce flight quality carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, clad vent sets (CVSs), and weld shields (WSs). In all three cases, production maintenance is assured by the manufacture of limited quantities of flight quality (FQ) components. The second section deals with several technology activities to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop technologies for two new RPS. The last section is dedicated to studies of the potential for the production of 238Pu at ORNL.

  4. Development of an advanced, continuous mild gasification process for the production of co-products. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Ness, R.O. Jr.

    1988-07-01

    The Department of Energy is investigating a process concept called Mild Gasification in which rapid devolatilization of coal under mild conditions of temperature and pressure would yield three product slates: a low- or medium-BTU gas, a valuable hydrocarbon condensate, and a reactive char. The ongoing objective of this program is to develop a continuous mild gasification process which will produce a product mix that optimizes process economics. In order to provide the incentive for private industry to commercialize the process, it is necessary to demonstrate yields and qualities in a versatile continuous process development unit (PDU). This unit must be capable of assessing both coal- and process-specific effects in a cost-effective and timely manner. Based on literature reviews and experimental verification, a data base will be developed correlating coal and process parameters with product characteristics. This will provide process developers with the information necessary to derive site-specific economics which will be crucial for the commercialization of the mild gasification process. The literature review and market assessment has been completed under Task 1 of the program. Under Task 2, coal-specific tests are being conducted on three AMAX coals: Chinook, an Indiana {number_sign}3 bituminous coal; Delta, an Illinois {number_sign}6 bituminous coal; and Eagle Butte, a Wyodak subbituminous coal. Various methods of char upgrading are being conducted by AMAX R&D of Golden, Colorado. The upgraded char is then combined with iron ore and tested for pig iron production under an AMAX subcontract to Pellet Technology Corporation of Marquette, Michigan. In addition to the test program, process development and scaleup information is being developed for a 1 ton/hr pilot plant unit. Plans for Tasks 2 and 3, equipment modifications, and report. Results include: char analysis, condensable analysis, waste water analysis, and gas analysis.

  5. 8-gene Panel for Barrett's Esophagus — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Eight methylation biomarkers - p16, RUNX3, HPP1 (HGNC name TMEFF2), NELL1, TAC1, SST, AKAP12 and CDH13 - were tested in a restrospective multicenter double-blinded validation study for their accuracy in predicting neoplastic progression in Barrett's Esophagus. Hypermethylation of p16, RUNX3 and HPP1 has been show to occur in early Barrett's Esophagus-related neoplastic progression and predicts progression risk. Several of the panel (NELL1, TAC1, SST, AKAP12 and CDH13) were also shown to be methylated early and often in Barrett's Esophagus-related neoplastic progression.

  6. 2015 Occupant Protection Standing Review Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, Susan

    2015-01-01

    The 2015 Occupant Protection (OP) Risk Standing Review Panel (from here on referred to as the SRP) participated in a WebEx/teleconference with members of the Space Human Factors and Habitability (SHFH) Element, representatives from the Human Research Program (HRP), NASA Headquarters, and NASA Research and Education Support Services on November 3, 2015 (list of participants is in Section VII of this report). The SRP reviewed the updated research plans for the Risk of Injury from Dynamic Loads (OP Risk). The SRP agrees that the Gaps are relevant and appropriate to mitigate the injury risk. All the appropriate and relevant Tasks have been identified to fill the Gaps. Depending upon the findings, additional tasks may need to be identified or modified. Excellent progress has been made since the 2014 SRP meeting. Publications in peer-reviewed journals validate the scientific merit of the research findings. As detailed in this report, the SRP has specific comments, guidance, and information in the following areas: human finite element modeling, human vs. surrogate dynamic responses, chest injury risk curves, matched pair testing of Test device for Human Occupant Restraint (THOR) and Hybrid III, and disc herniation risk analysis.

  7. Insulating panels with rice husk

    SciTech Connect

    Salas, J.; Veras, J.

    1986-01-01

    This study includes the quantitative results of tests caried out on 7.5 x 15.0 cm cylindrical test pieces and fullsized panels with a cement and rice husk, produced by using means belonging to the so-called ''appropriate technologies''. These results are summarized and analyzed with a view to providing a possible alternative for substituting other insulating materials, which are generally imported, in developing countries. The technical results presented point towards a promising future for the task undertaken, within the context of a research project on ''materials, technologies and prototypes for very low-cost housing'' which, in a - multinational capacity, is being developed at the Instituto E. Torroja.

  8. Hormone receptor-independent CXCL10 production is associated with the regulation of cellular factors linked to breast cancer progression and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Ejaeidi, Ahmed A; Craft, Barbara S; Puneky, Louis V; Lewis, Robert E; Cruse, Julius M

    2015-08-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is a major health problem for women around the world. Although advances in the field of molecular therapy have been achieved, the successful therapeutic management of BC, particularly metastatic disease, remains a challenge for patients and clinicians. One of the areas of current investigation is the circulating tumor cells (CTCs), which have a determinant role in the development of distant metastasis. At the present, many of the available treatment strategies for metastatic disease are of limited benefit. However, the elucidation of the mechanisms of tumor progression and metastasis may help to identify key molecules/components that may function as therapeutic targets in the future. In the present study, the functional analysis of CTCs revealed their ability to grow and proliferate to form colonies. Immunofluorescence staining of the CTCs' colonies exhibits elevated expression of cell growth and survival associated proteins such as, survivin, ERK and Akt1. More importantly, the functional screening of the chemokine profile in BC patients' sera revealed an HR-independent elevation of the chemokine CXCL10 when compared to healthy controls. The analysis of chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL11 demonstrated an HR-dependent production pattern. The levels of both CXCL9 and CXCL11 were markedly high in HR+ patients' sera when compared to HR- patients and healthy controls. The functional analysis of HR+ and HR- BC derived cell lines when cultivated in media supplemented with patients' sera demonstrated the alteration of tumor progression and metastasis related proteins. We noted the induction of survivin, β-catenin, MKP-1, pERK, CXCR4 and MMP-1 both at the protein and mRNA levels. The induction of those proteins was in keeping with patients' sera induced cell proliferation as measured by the MTT assay. In conclusion, our data emphasizes the role of chemokines, especially CXCL10, in BC progression and metastasis via the induction of signaling pathways, which

  9. Energy absorption capabilities of composite sandwich panels under blast loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankar Ray, Tirtha

    As blast threats on military and civilian structures continue to be a significant concern, there remains a need for improved design strategies to increase blast resistance capabilities. The approach to blast resistance proposed here is focused on dissipating the high levels of pressure induced during a blast through maximizing the potential for energy absorption of composite sandwich panels, which are a competitive structural member type due to the inherent energy absorption capabilities of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites. Furthermore, the middle core in the sandwich panels can be designed as a sacrificial layer allowing for a significant amount of deformation or progressive failure to maximize the potential for energy absorption. The research here is aimed at the optimization of composite sandwich panels for blast mitigation via energy absorption mechanisms. The energy absorption mechanisms considered include absorbed strain energy due to inelastic deformation as well as energy dissipation through progressive failure of the core of the sandwich panels. The methods employed in the research consist of a combination of experimentally-validated finite element analysis (FEA) and the derivation and use of a simplified analytical model. The key components of the scope of work then includes: establishment of quantified energy absorption criteria, validation of the selected FE modeling techniques, development of the simplified analytical model, investigation of influential core architectures and geometric parameters, and investigation of influential material properties. For the parameters that are identified as being most-influential, recommended values for these parameters are suggested in conceptual terms that are conducive to designing composite sandwich panels for various blast threats. Based on reviewing the energy response characteristic of the panel under blast loading, a non-dimensional parameter AET/ ET (absorbed energy, AET, normalized by total energy

  10. Production of reactive sintered nickel aluminide. Fifth quarterly technical progress report, February 22, 1993--May 22, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, R.M.

    1993-06-01

    Effort over the past 3 months was directed at increasing manufacturing capacity (ball milling) and improving product quality. Orders for the powder have increased, mainly for plasma spray powders. NiAl is an excellent coat between a metal and a ceramic, and its use instead of cobalt should extending operating range for carbide tools. The feather phase in the sintered Ni{sub 3}Al was identified to be a Ni-rich phase nucleated on the grain boundaries with 10 wt % Al composition. The ductile to brittle temperature of powder extruded NiAl was found to be between 500 and 600 C, and shows a 50% elongation at 600 C.

  11. Increasing heavy oil reserves in the Wilmington oil field through advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Quarterly technical progress report, March 30, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, D.; Ershaghi, I.; Davies, D.; Phillips, C.; Mondragon, J.

    1995-07-28

    This is the first quarterly technical progress report for the project. Although the contract was awarded on March 30, 1995 and Pre-Award Approval was given on January 26, 1995, the partners of this project initiated work on October 1, 1994. As such, this progress report summarizes the work performed from project inception. The production and injection data, reservoir engineering data, and digitized and normalized log data were all completed sufficiently by the end of the quarter to start work on the basic reservoir engineering and geologic stochastic models. Basic reservoir engineering analysis began June 1 and will continue to March, 1996. Design work for the 5 observation/core holes, oil finger printing of the cored oil sands, and tracers surveys began in January, 1995. The wells will be drilled from July--August, 1995 and tracer injection work is projected to start in October, 1995. A preliminary deterministic 3-D geologic model was completed in June which is sufficient to start work on the stochastic 3-D geologic model. The four proposed horizontal wells (two injectors and two producers) have been designed, equipment has been ordered, and the wells will be drilled from mid-August through September. Four existing steam injection wells were converted to hot water injection in March, 1995. Initial rates were kept low to minimize operational problems. Injection rates will be increased significantly in July.

  12. The production of fuels and chemicals from food processing wastes using a novel fermenter separator. Annual progress report, January 1991--December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, M.C.; Venkatesh, K.V.; Choi, Hojoon; Moelhman, M.; Saliceti, L.; Okos, M.R.; Wankat, P.C.

    1991-12-01

    During 1991, considerable progress was made on the waste utilization project. Two small Wisconsin companies have expressed an interest in promoting and developing the ICRS technology. Pilot plant sites at (1) Hopkinton, IA, for a sweet whey plant, and Beaver Dam WI, for an acid whey site have been under development siting ICRS operations. The Hopkinton, IA site is owned and operated by Permeate Refining Inc., who have built a batch ethanol plant across the street from Swiss Valley Farms cheddar cheese operations. Permeate from Swiss Valley is piped across to PRI. PRI has signed a contract to site a 300--500,000 gallon/yr to ICRS pilot plant. They feel that the lower labor, lower energy, continuous process offered by the ICRS will substantially improve their profitability. Catalytics, Inc, is involved with converting whey from a Kraft cream cheese operation to ethanol and yeast. A complete project including whey concentration, sterilization, and yeast growth has been designed for this site. Process design improvements with the ICRS focussed on ethanol recovery techniques during this year`s project. A solvent absorption/extractive distillation (SAED) process has been developed which offers the capability of obtaining an anhydrous ethanol product from vapors off 3 to 9% ethanol solutions using very little energy for distillation. Work on products from waste streams was also performed. a. Diacetyl as a high value flavor compound was very successfully produced in a Stirred Tank Reactor w/Separation. b. Yeast production from secondary carbohydrates in the whey, lactic acid, and glycerol was studied. c. Lactic acid production from cellulose and lactose studies continued. d. Production of anti-fungal reagents by immobilized plant cells; Gossypol has antifungal properties and is produced by G. arboretum.

  13. IFN-γ and TNF-α are involved during Alzheimer disease progression and correlate with nitric oxide production: a study in Algerian patients.

    PubMed

    Belkhelfa, Mourad; Rafa, Hayet; Medjeber, Oussama; Arroul-Lammali, Amina; Behairi, Nassima; Abada-Bendib, Myriam; Makrelouf, Mohamed; Belarbi, Soreya; Masmoudi, Ahmed Nacer; Tazir, Meriem; Touil-Boukoffa, Chafia

    2014-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease leading to a progressive and irreversible loss of mental functions. It is characterized by 3 stages according to the evolution and the severity of the symptoms. This disease is associated with an immune disorder, which appears with significant rise in the inflammatory cytokines and increased production of free radicals such as nitric oxide (NO). Our study aims to investigate interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) involvement in NO production, in vivo and ex vivo, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from Algerian patients (n=25), according to the different stages of the disease (mild Alzheimer's, moderate Alzheimer's, and severe Alzheimer's) in comparison to mild cognitive impairment (MCI) patients. Interestingly, we observed that in vivo IFN-γ and TNF-α levels assessed in patients with AD in mild and severe stages, respectively, are higher than those observed in patients with moderate stage and MCI. Our in vivo and ex vivo results show that NO production is related to the increased levels of IFN-γ and TNF-α, in mild and severe stages of AD. Remarkably, significant IFN-γ level is only detected in mild stage of AD. Our study suggests that NO production is IFN-γ dependent both in MCI and mild Alzheimer's patients. Further, high levels of NO are associated with an elevation of TNF-α levels in severe stage of AD. Collectively, our data indicate that the proinflammatory cytokine production seems, in part, to be involved in neurological deleterious effects observed during the development of AD through NO pathway.

  14. The roles of family history of dyslexia, language, speech production and phonological processing in predicting literacy progress.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Julia M; Mundy, Ian R; Cunningham, Anna J

    2014-09-01

    It is well established that speech, language and phonological skills are closely associated with literacy, and that children with a family risk of dyslexia (FRD) tend to show deficits in each of these areas in the preschool years. This paper examines what the relationships are between FRD and these skills, and whether deficits in speech, language and phonological processing fully account for the increased risk of dyslexia in children with FRD. One hundred and fifty-three 4-6-year-old children, 44 of whom had FRD, completed a battery of speech, language, phonology and literacy tasks. Word reading and spelling were retested 6 months later, and text reading accuracy and reading comprehension were tested 3 years later. The children with FRD were at increased risk of developing difficulties in reading accuracy, but not reading comprehension. Four groups were compared: good and poor readers with and without FRD. In most cases good readers outperformed poor readers regardless of family history, but there was an effect of family history on naming and nonword repetition regardless of literacy outcome, suggesting a role for speech production skills as an endophenotype of dyslexia. Phonological processing predicted spelling, while language predicted text reading accuracy and comprehension. FRD was a significant additional predictor of reading and spelling after controlling for speech production, language and phonological processing, suggesting that children with FRD show additional difficulties in literacy that cannot be fully explained in terms of their language and phonological skills.

  15. Hydrogen production by supercritical water gasification of biomass. Phase 1 -- Technical and business feasibility study, technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-01

    The nine-month Phase 1 feasibility study was directed toward the application of supercritical water gasification (SCWG) for the economical production and end use of hydrogen from renewable energy sources such as sewage sludge, pulp waste, agricultural wastes, and ultimately the combustible portion of municipal solid waste. Unique in comparison to other gasifier systems, the properties of supercritical water (SCW) are ideal for processing biowastes with high moisture content or contain toxic or hazardous contaminants. During Phase I, an end-to-end SCWG system was evaluated. A range of process options was initially considered for each of the key subsystems. This was followed by tests of sewage sludge feed preparation, pumping and gasification in the SCW pilot plant facility. Based on the initial process review and successful pilot-scale testing, engineering evaluations were performed that defined a baseline system for the production, storage and end use of hydrogen. The results compare favorably with alternative biomass gasifiers currently being developed. The results were then discussed with regional wastewater treatment facility operators to gain their perspective on the proposed commercial SCWG systems and to help define the potential market. Finally, the technical and business plans were developed based on perceived market needs and the projected capital and operating costs of SCWG units. The result is a three-year plan for further development, culminating in a follow-on demonstration test of a 5 MT/day system at a local wastewater treatment plant.

  16. The roles of family history of dyslexia, language, speech production and phonological processing in predicting literacy progress.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Julia M; Mundy, Ian R; Cunningham, Anna J

    2014-09-01

    It is well established that speech, language and phonological skills are closely associated with literacy, and that children with a family risk of dyslexia (FRD) tend to show deficits in each of these areas in the preschool years. This paper examines what the relationships are between FRD and these skills, and whether deficits in speech, language and phonological processing fully account for the increased risk of dyslexia in children with FRD. One hundred and fifty-three 4-6-year-old children, 44 of whom had FRD, completed a battery of speech, language, phonology and literacy tasks. Word reading and spelling were retested 6 months later, and text reading accuracy and reading comprehension were tested 3 years later. The children with FRD were at increased risk of developing difficulties in reading accuracy, but not reading comprehension. Four groups were compared: good and poor readers with and without FRD. In most cases good readers outperformed poor readers regardless of family history, but there was an effect of family history on naming and nonword repetition regardless of literacy outcome, suggesting a role for speech production skills as an endophenotype of dyslexia. Phonological processing predicted spelling, while language predicted text reading accuracy and comprehension. FRD was a significant additional predictor of reading and spelling after controlling for speech production, language and phonological processing, suggesting that children with FRD show additional difficulties in literacy that cannot be fully explained in terms of their language and phonological skills. PMID:24581037

  17. Environmental assessment of Oklahoma abandoned drilling and production sites and associated public education outreach activities. Quarterly technical progress report, October--December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, M.

    1996-01-29

    Oklahoma oil producers and royalty owners are taking part in the nation`s first oil industry funded environmental cleanup and education program. The program is administered by the Oklahoma Energy Resources Board (OERB), a state agency which was created by the Oklahoma Independent Energy Education and Marketing Act. The purpose of this project will be accomplished through two primary objectives: (1) Conduct environmental assessment of abandoned oil and gas drilling and production sites where no responsible owner can be found and transfer environmental technology to oil and gas operators; and (2) Provide a comprehensive public education/outreach program to increase public awareness of the importance of the Oklahoma oil (and gas) industry. Technical progress is reported for these tasks.

  18. Castro Valley High School's Solar Panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lew, A.; Ham, S.; Shin, Y.; Yang, W.; Lam, J.

    2014-12-01

    Solar panels are photovoltaic cells that are designed to convert the sun's kinetic energy to generate usable energy in the form of electricity. Castro Valley High School has tried to offset the cost of electricity by installing solar panels, costing the district approximately 3.29 million dollars, but have been installed incorrectly and are not operating at peak efficency. By using trigonometry we deduced that Castro Valley High School's south facing solar panels were at an incline of 10o and that the east and west facing solar panels are at an incline of 5o. By taking the averages of the optimum angles for the months of September through May, roughly when school is in session, we found that the optimum angle for south facing solar panels should be roughly 46o. This shows that Castro Valley High School has not used it's budget to its full potential due to the fact that the solar panels were haphazardly installed.

  19. Solar-Panel Dust Accumulation and Cleanings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Air-fall dust accumulates on the solar panels of NASA's Mars Exploration Rovers, reducing the amount of sunlight reaching the solar arrays. Pre-launch models predicted steady dust accumulation. However, the rovers have been blessed with occasional wind events that clear significant amounts of dust from the solar panels.

    This graph shows the effects of those panel-cleaning events on the amount of electricity generated by Spirit's solar panels. The horizontal scale is the number of Martian days (sols) after Spirit's Jan. 4, 2005, (Universal Time) landing on Mars. The vertical scale indicates output from the rover's solar panels as a fraction of the amount produced when the clean panels first opened. Note that the gradual declines are interrupted by occasional sharp increases, such as a dust-cleaning event on sol 420.

  20. Recent progress in Open Data production and consumption - examples from a Governmental institute (SMHI) and a collaborative EU research project (SWITCH-ON)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arheimer, Berit; Falkenroth, Esa

    2014-05-01

    The Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI) has a long tradition both in producing and consuming open data on a national, European and global scale. It is also promoting community building among water scientists in Europe by participating in and initiating collaborative projects. This presentation will exemplify the contemporary European movement imposed by the INSPIRE directive and the Open Data Strategy, by showing the progress in openness and shift in attitudes during the last decade when handling Research Data and Public Sector Information at a national European institute. Moreover, the presentation will inform about a recently started collaborative project (EU FP7 project No 603587) coordinated by SMHI and called SWITCH-ON http://water-switch-on.eu/. The project addresses water concerns and currently untapped potential of open data for improved water management across the EU. The overall goal of the project is to make use of open data, and add value to society by repurposing and refining data from various sources. SWITCH-ON will establish new forms of water research and facilitate the development of new products and services based on principles of sharing and community building in the water society. The SWITCH-ON objectives are to use open data for implementing: 1) an innovative spatial information platform with open data tailored for direct water assessments, 2) an entirely new form of collaborative research for water-related sciences, 3) fourteen new operational products and services dedicated to appointed end-users, 4) new business and knowledge to inform individual and collective decisions in line with the Europe's smart growth and environmental objectives. The presentation will discuss challenges, progress and opportunities with the open data strategy, based on the experiences from working both at a Governmental institute and being part of the global research community.

  1. Optimization and scale-up of fermentation process for production of microbial polysaccharide. Final technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Buller, C.S.

    1994-12-21

    This grant was awarded to provide for the scale-up of the process of production of a (1 {r_arrow})-{beta}-D-glucan which is produced by Cellulomonas flavigena. One of the goals was to provide sufficient amounts of the polysaccharide polymer to conduct a field test of its usefulness in subterranean permeability modification procedures of enhanced oil recovery. During September and October, 1994, fermentations and recoveries were done by Abbott Laboratories, to develop a process to provide at least 400 lbs of the glucan polymer for field testing. Shake flask runs and four fermentation runs were completed. A summary of the fourth fermentation run, conducted in a 40,000 liter fermentor, follows.

  2. Geothermal Technologies Program Blue Ribbon Panel Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2011-06-17

    The Geothermal Technologies Program assembled a geothermal Blue Ribbon Panel on March 22-23, 2011 in Albuquerque, New Mexico for a guided discussion on the future of geothermal energy in the United States and the role of the DOE Program. The Geothermal Blue Ribbon Panel Report captures the discussions and recommendations of the experts. An addendum is available here: http://www.eere.energy.gov/geothermal/pdfs/gtp_blue_ribbon_panel_report_addendum10-2011.pdf

  3. Development of a Plasma Panel Muon Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, Daniel S.; Ball, Robert; Beene, James R; Benhammou, Yan; Chapman, J. Wehrley; Dai, T.; Etzion, E; Friedman, Dr. Peter S.; Ben Moshe, M.; Silver, Yiftah; Varner Jr, Robert L; Weaverdyck, Curtis; White, Sebastion; Zhou, Bing

    2010-01-01

    A radiation detector technology based on Plasma Display Panels (PDP), the underlying engine of panel plasma television displays is being investigated. Emerging from this well established television technology is the Plasma Panel Sensor (PPS), a novel variant of the micropattern radiation detector. The PPS is fundamentally a fast, high resolution detector comprised of an array of plasma discharge cells operating in a hermetically sealed gas mixture. We report on the PPS development effort, including proof-of-principle results of laboratory signal observations.

  4. Sound transmission loss of composite sandwich panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ran

    Light composite sandwich panels are increasingly used in automobiles, ships and aircraft, because of the advantages they offer of high strength-to-weight ratios. However, the acoustical properties of these light and stiff structures can be less desirable than those of equivalent metal panels. These undesirable properties can lead to high interior noise levels. A number of researchers have studied the acoustical properties of honeycomb and foam sandwich panels. Not much work, however, has been carried out on foam-filled honeycomb sandwich panels. In this dissertation, governing equations for the forced vibration of asymmetric sandwich panels are developed. An analytical expression for modal densities of symmetric sandwich panels is derived from a sixth-order governing equation. A boundary element analysis model for the sound transmission loss of symmetric sandwich panels is proposed. Measurements of the modal density, total loss factor, radiation loss factor, and sound transmission loss of foam-filled honeycomb sandwich panels with different configurations and thicknesses are presented. Comparisons between the predicted sound transmission loss values obtained from wave impedance analysis, statistical energy analysis, boundary element analysis, and experimental values are presented. The wave impedance analysis model provides accurate predictions of sound transmission loss for the thin foam-filled honeycomb sandwich panels at frequencies above their first resonance frequencies. The predictions from the statistical energy analysis model are in better agreement with the experimental transmission loss values of the sandwich panels when the measured radiation loss factor values near coincidence are used instead of the theoretical values for single-layer panels. The proposed boundary element analysis model provides more accurate predictions of sound transmission loss for the thick foam-filled honeycomb sandwich panels than either the wave impedance analysis model or the

  5. Synthesis of oxygenate products for high volume fuels applications. Quarterly technical progress report, November 1, 1994--January 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-08

    The objective of this project is to develop high yield syntheses of oxygenate products that are liquid at room temperature using as starting materials dimethy ether (DME) or methanol. The identified products include: Dimethyl Carbonate (DMC), 1,1-Dimethoxyethane (DMOE), C{sub 2}{sup +} Alcohols/Ethers (C{sub 2}AE). The technical strategy is outlined below: (A) Synthesis of DMC via oxidative carbonylation of DME instead of methanol. Since this synthesis would not co-produce water as a byproduct, there is a potential for very high DME conversions in contrast to the low (ca 20%) conversions obtained in conventional plants. Technical emphasis will be placed on development of a supported copper catalyst with a capability for cleavage of DME into its chemisorbed organic moieties. (B) Synthesis of 1,1-dimethoxymethane (DMOE) from acetylene/CO/H{sub 2} process streams obtained from commercial methane oxidative pyrolysis processes. In the overall processing scheme the syngas would be converted to DME. The wet acetylene stream would be partially condensed to retain an equivalent of water and then condensed with DME to produce EMOE. (C) Direct conversion of DME or DME/methanol to ethanol/propanol or their methyl ethers. Under the influence of functionalized alcohol condensation catalysts developed exclusively at Amoco it should be possible to achieve direct conversion of dimethyl ether (or methanol) to ethanol/propanol and/or the methyl ethers of these alcohols. Although this reaction is not currently known, a combination of key catalyst components from identified systems should result in a DME conversion catalyst to C{sub 2}+ oxygenates. (D) Reaction of DME or acetylene with synthesis gas (CO/H{sub 2}) or methanol. A variety of catalysts will be tested for conversion of acetylene/CO/H{sub 2} or acetylene/methanol to propylene and conversion of DME/CO/H{sub 2} or DME/methanol to dimenthyoxymethane (DMM) and/or other oxygenates.

  6. ELECTROLUMINESCENT MATERIAL FOR FLAT PANEL DISPLAY

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.B.

    2000-11-13

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was to develop a new-generation electroluminescent (EL) material for flat panel displays and related applications by using unique and complementary research capabilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and OSRAM Sylvania, Inc. The goal was to produce an EL material with a luminance 10 times greater than conventional EL phosphors. An EL material with this increased luminance would have immediate applications for flat panel display devices (e.g., backlighting for liquid-crystal diodes) and for EL lamp technology. OSRAM Sylvania proposed that increased EL phosphor luminance could be obtained by creating composite EL materials capable of alignment under an applied electric field and capable of concentrating the applied electric field. Oak Ridge National Laboratory used pulsed laser deposition as a method for making these composite EL materials. The materials were evaluated for electroluminescence at laboratory facilities at OSRAM Sylvania, Inc. Many composite structures were thus made and evaluated, and it was observed that a composite structure based on alternating layers of a ferroelectric and a phosphor yielded electroluminescence. An enabling step that was not initially proposed but was conceived during the cooperative effort was found to be crucial to the success of the composite structure. The CRADA period expired before we were able to make quantitative measurements of the luminance and efficiency of the composite EL material. Future cooperative work, outside the scope of the CRADA, will focus on making these measurements and will result in the production of a prototype composite EL device.

  7. Microbial reduction of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} as a means of by-product recovery/disposal from regenerable processes for the desulfurization of flue gas. Technical progress report, December 11, 1992--March 11, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Sublette, K.L.

    1993-12-31

    This report describes the potential of sulfate reducing bacteria to fix sulfur derived from flue gas desulfurization. The first section reviews the problem, the second section reviews progress of this study to use desulfovibrio desulfuricans for this purpose. The final section related progress during the current reporting period. This latter section describes studies to immobilize the bacteria in co-culture with floc-forming anaerobes, use of sewage sludges in the culture media, and sulfate production from sulfur dioxide.

  8. Progressive Fracture of Fiber Composite Builtup Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, Pascal K.; Chamis, Christos C.; Minnetyan, Levon

    1996-01-01

    The damage progression and fracture of builtup composite structures was evaluated by using computational simulation to examine the behavior and response of a stiffened composite (0 +/- 45/90)(sub s6) laminate panel subjected to a bending load. The damage initiation, growth, accumulation, progression, and propagation to structural collapse were simulated. An integrated computer code (CODSTRAN) was augmented for the simulation of the progressive damage and fracture of builtup composite structures under mechanical loading. Results showed that damage initiation and progression have a significant effect on the structural response. Also investigated was the influence of different types of bending load on the damage initiation, propagation, and final fracture of the builtup composite panel.

  9. JTEC Panel report on electronic manufacturing and packaging in Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Michael J.; Boulton, William R. (Editor); Kukowski, John; Meieran, Gene; Pecht, Michael; Peeples, John; Tummala, Rao; Dehaemer, Michael J.; Holdridge, Geoff (Editor); Gamota, George

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes the status of electronic manufacturing and packaging technology in Japan in comparison to that in the United States, and its impact on competition in electronic manufacturing in general. In addition to electronic manufacturing technologies, the report covers technology and manufacturing infrastructure, electronics manufacturing and assembly, quality assurance and reliability in the Japanese electronics industry, and successful product realization strategies. The panel found that Japan leads the United States in almost every electronics packaging technology. Japan clearly has achieved a strategic advantage in electronics production and process technologies. Panel members believe that Japanese competitors could be leading U.S. firms by as much as a decade in some electronics process technologies.

  10. 75 FR 67142 - Proposal Review Panel for Physics; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-01

    ... Proposal Review Panel for Physics; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act...: Site Visit to the Center for the Physics of Living Cells 1208. Dates/Time: November 8, 2010, 9 a.m.- 4... advice and recommendations concerning progress of the Center for the Physics of Living Cells...

  11. Uncertainties in predicting solar panel power output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B.

    1974-01-01

    The problem of calculating solar panel power output at launch and during a space mission is considered. The major sources of uncertainty and error in predicting the post launch electrical performance of the panel are considered. A general discussion of error analysis is given. Examples of uncertainty calculations are included. A general method of calculating the effect on the panel of various degrading environments is presented, with references supplied for specific methods. A technique for sizing a solar panel for a required mission power profile is developed.

  12. 77 FR 49026 - Arts Advisory Panel Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-15

    ...): Literature (application review): In room 716. This meeting will be closed. DATES: September 11-13, 2012... of Panel review, discussion, evaluation, and recommendations on financial assistance under...

  13. 78 FR 42982 - Arts Advisory Panel Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-18

    ... are Eastern Daylight Time): Literature (application review): Room 716. This meeting will be closed.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The closed portions of meetings are for the purpose of Panel review,...

  14. Development of Electrostatically Clean Solar Array Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Theodore G.

    2000-01-01

    Certain missions require Electrostatically Clean Solar Array (ECSA) panels to establish a favorable environment for the operation of sensitive scientific instruments. The objective of this program was to demonstrate the feasibility of an ECSA panel that minimizes panel surface potential below 100mV in LEO and GEO charged particle environments, prevents exposure of solar cell voltage and panel insulating surfaces to the ambient environment, and provides an equipotential, grounded structure surrounding the entire panel. An ECSA panel design was developed that uses a Front Side Aperture-Shield (FSA) that covers all inter-cell areas with a single graphite composite laminate, composite edge clips for connecting the FSA to the panel substrate, and built-in tabs that interconnect the FSA to conductive coated coverglasses using a conductive adhesive. Analysis indicated the ability of the design to meet the ECSA requirements. Qualification coupons and a 0.5m x 0.5m prototype panel were fabricated and tested for photovoltaic performance and electrical grounding before and after exposure to acoustic and thermal cycling environments. The results show the feasibility of achieving electrostatic cleanliness with a small penalty in mass, photovoltaic performance and cost, with a design is structurally robust and compatible with a wide range of current solar panel technologies.

  15. Rapid genotype imputation from sequence without reference panels.

    PubMed

    Davies, Robert W; Flint, Jonathan; Myers, Simon; Mott, Richard

    2016-08-01

    Inexpensive genotyping methods are essential for genetic studies requiring large sample sizes. In human studies, array-based microarrays and high-density haplotype reference panels allow efficient genotype imputation for this purpose. However, these resources are typically unavailable in non-human settings. Here we describe a method (STITCH) for imputation based only on sequencing read data, without requiring additional reference panels or array data. We demonstrate its applicability even in settings of extremely low sequencing coverage, by accurately imputing 5.7 million SNPs at a mean r(2) value of 0.98 in 2,073 outbred laboratory mice (0.15× sequencing coverage). In a sample of 11,670 Han Chinese (1.7× coverage), we achieve accuracy similar to that of alternative approaches that require a reference panel, demonstrating that our approach can work for genetically diverse populations. Our method enables straightforward progression from low-coverage sequence to imputed genotypes, overcoming barriers that at present restrict the application of genome-wide association study technology outside humans. PMID:27376236

  16. The economical production of alcohol fuels from coal-derived synthesis gas. Quarterly technical progress report No. 5, October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    Two base case flow sheets have now been prepared. In the first, which was originally presented in TPR4, a Texaco gasifier is used. Natural gas is also burned in sufficient quantity to increase the hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratio of the synthesis gas to the required value of 1. 1 for alcohol synthesis. Acid gas clean up and sulfur removal are accomplished using the Rectisol process followed by the Claus and Beavon processes. About 10% of the synthesis gas is sent to a power generation unit in order to produce electric power, with the remaining 90% used for alcohol synthesis. For this process, the estimated installed cost is $474.2 mm. The estimated annual operating costs are $64.5 MM. At a price of alcohol fuels in the vicinity of $1. 00/gal, the pay back period for construction of this plant is about four years. The details of this case, called Base Case 1, are presented in Appendix 1. The second base case, called Base Case 2, also has a detailed description and explanation in Appendix 1. In Base Case 2, a Lurgi Gasifier is used. The motivation for using a Lurgi Gasifier is that it runs at a lower temperature and pressure and, therefore, produces by-products such as coal liquids which can be sold. Based upon the economics of joint production, discussed in Technical Progress Report 4, this is a necessity. Since synthesis gas from natural gas is always less expensive to produce than from coal, then alcohol fuels will always be less expensive to produce from natural gas than from coal. Therefore, the only way to make coal- derived alcohol fuels economically competitive is to decrease the cost of production of coal-derived synthesis gas. one method for accomplishing this is to sell the by-products from the gasification step. The details of this strategy are discussed in Appendix 3.

  17. Progressive degradation of crude oil n-alkanes coupled to methane production under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lei; Shi, Shengbao; Li, Qiang; Chen, Jianfa; Zhang, Hui; Lu, Yahai

    2014-01-01

    Although methanogenic degradation of hydrocarbons has become a well-known process, little is known about which crude oil tend to be degraded at different temperatures and how the microbial community is responded. In this study, we assessed the methanogenic crude oil degradation capacity of oily sludge microbes enriched from the Shengli oilfield under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions. The microbial communities were investigated by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of 16S rRNA genes combined with cloning and sequencing. Enrichment incubation demonstrated the microbial oxidation of crude oil coupled to methane production at 35 and 55°C, which generated 3.7±0.3 and 2.8±0.3 mmol of methane per gram oil, respectively. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis revealed that crude oil n-alkanes were obviously degraded, and high molecular weight n-alkanes were preferentially removed over relatively shorter-chain n-alkanes. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the concurrence of acetoclastic Methanosaeta and hydrogenotrophic methanogens but different methanogenic community structures under the two temperature conditions. Candidate divisions of JS1 and WWE 1, Proteobacteria (mainly consisting of Syntrophaceae, Desulfobacteraceae and Syntrophorhabdus) and Firmicutes (mainly consisting of Desulfotomaculum) were supposed to be involved with n-alkane degradation in the mesophilic conditions. By contrast, the different bacterial phylotypes affiliated with Caldisericales, "Shengli Cluster" and Synergistetes dominated the thermophilic consortium, which was most likely to be associated with thermophilic crude oil degradation. This study revealed that the oily sludge in Shengli oilfield harbors diverse uncultured microbes with great potential in methanogenic crude oil degradation over a wide temperature range, which extend our previous understanding of methanogenic degradation of crude oil alkanes.

  18. Grid-connected polymer solar panels: initial considerations of cost, lifetime, and practicality.

    PubMed

    Medford, Andrew J; Lilliedal, Mathilde R; Jørgensen, Mikkel; Aarø, Dennis; Pakalski, Heinz; Fyenbo, Jan; Krebs, Frederik C

    2010-09-13

    Large solar panels were constructed from polymer solar cell modules prepared using full roll-to-roll (R2R) manufacture based on the previously published ProcessOne. The individual flexible polymer solar modules comprising multiple serially connected single cell stripes were joined electrically and laminated between a 4 mm tempered glass window and black Tetlar foil using two sheets of 0.5 mm thick ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA). The panels produced up to 8 W with solar irradiance of ~960 Wm⁻², and had outer dimensions of 1 m x 1.7 m with active areas up to 9180 cm². Panels were mounted on a tracking station and their output was grid connected between testing. Several generations of polymer solar cells and panel constructions were tested in this context to optimize the production of polymer solar panels. Cells lacking a R2R barrier layer were found to degrade due to diffusion of oxygen after less than a month, while R2R encapsulated cells showed around 50% degradation after 6 months but suffered from poor performance due to de-lamination during panel production. A third generation of panels with various barrier layers was produced to optimize the choice of barrier foil and it was found that the inclusion of a thin protective foil between the cell and the barrier foil is critical. The findings provide a preliminary foundation for the production and optimization of large-area polymer solar panels and also enabled a cost analysis of solar panels based on polymer solar cells.

  19. Grid-connected polymer solar panels: initial considerations of cost, lifetime, and practicality.

    PubMed

    Medford, Andrew J; Lilliedal, Mathilde R; Jørgensen, Mikkel; Aarø, Dennis; Pakalski, Heinz; Fyenbo, Jan; Krebs, Frederik C

    2010-09-13

    Large solar panels were constructed from polymer solar cell modules prepared using full roll-to-roll (R2R) manufacture based on the previously published ProcessOne. The individual flexible polymer solar modules comprising multiple serially connected single cell stripes were joined electrically and laminated between a 4 mm tempered glass window and black Tetlar foil using two sheets of 0.5 mm thick ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA). The panels produced up to 8 W with solar irradiance of ~960 Wm⁻², and had outer dimensions of 1 m x 1.7 m with active areas up to 9180 cm². Panels were mounted on a tracking station and their output was grid connected between testing. Several generations of polymer solar cells and panel constructions were tested in this context to optimize the production of polymer solar panels. Cells lacking a R2R barrier layer were found to degrade due to diffusion of oxygen after less than a month, while R2R encapsulated cells showed around 50% degradation after 6 months but suffered from poor performance due to de-lamination during panel production. A third generation of panels with various barrier layers was produced to optimize the choice of barrier foil and it was found that the inclusion of a thin protective foil between the cell and the barrier foil is critical. The findings provide a preliminary foundation for the production and optimization of large-area polymer solar panels and also enabled a cost analysis of solar panels based on polymer solar cells. PMID:21165057

  20. Laser illuminated flat panel display

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1995-12-31

    A 10 inch laser illuminated flat panel Planar Optic Display (POD) screen has been constructed and tested. This POD screen technology is an entirely new concept in display technology. Although the initial display is flat and made of glass, this technology lends itself to applications where a plastic display might be wrapped around the viewer. The display screen is comprised of hundreds of planar optical waveguides where each glass waveguide represents a vertical line of resolution. A black cladding layer, having a lower index of refraction, is placed between each waveguide layer. Since the cladding makes the screen surface black, the contrast is high. The prototype display is 9 inches wide by 5 inches high and approximately I inch thick. A 3 milliwatt HeNe laser is used as the illumination source and a vector scanning technique is employed.

  1. 6. COMPRESSOR CONTROL PANELS: AT LEFT, 6,000 P.S.I. PANEL, CIRCA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. COMPRESSOR CONTROL PANELS: AT LEFT, 6,000 P.S.I. PANEL, CIRCA 1957; AT RIGHT, FACING CAMERA, 10,000 P.S.I. PANEL. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Helium Compression Plant, Test Area 1-115, intersection of Altair & Saturn Boulevards, Boron, Kern County, CA

  2. Investigation of microclimatology under solar panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    hassanpour Adeh, E.; Higgins, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    Photo voltaic solar energy is a clean source of energy with much lower carbon footprint than other sources. However, the vast land requirements of solar energy arrays may make installation impractical when available land is better suited for other purposes, like livestock grazing lands. The goal of this research was to investigate changes to the environmental physics, grass production, and grass species diversification under solar panels in an active pasture. To this end, different land characteristics were studied observationally including the length of the growing season, the greenness, the production per acre (especially in winter-limited environments), and the environmental physical processes (soil water movement and air movement). The observation setup involved two microclimatological stations that were installed in the Rabbit Hills solar array, OSU campus Oregon; one in and open area and the other in the solar array. The soil moisture was quantified using a complimentary system of electronic sensors and neutron probe readings. The data analysis was conducted to obtain the possible coupling between local atmospheric temperature, wind speed, humidity, and soil moisture. Soil moisture beneath the solar array was significantly higher. The solar array was found to reduce the local wind speed, and increase the local humidity. This resulted in a reduced evaporation resulting and a longer period of grass growth through the season.

  3. The economical production of alcohol fuels from coal-derived synthesis gas. Quarterly technical progress report number 13, October 1--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    At WVU, Mo{sub 2}S{sub 3} was produced from gas-phase reactions at 1,100 C. The gas-phase reactor was modified to increase product yields and to decrease particle size. Four Chevrel phases were synthesized for catalytic evaluation. In addition, four supported alkali-modified MoS{sub 2} materials were prepared from a single-source precursor, K{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}S{sub 13}. Screening runs have been carried out on some of these materials and others prepared earlier. At UCC and P, test runs on the reactor system have commenced. Higher alcohols up to butanol were observed and identified at high temperatures. Significant progress has been made on the Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis. Frequency distributions have been determined for all of the equipment blocks for the Texaco gasifier cases. For these cases, there is a 10% chance that the actual installed capital cost could exceed the estimated installed capital cost by $40 million dollars. This work will continue with inclusion of variable costs and prediction of the uncertainties in the return on investment. Modifications to the simulated annealing optimization program have been underway in order to increase the level of certainty that the final result is near the global optimum. Alternative design cases have been examined in efforts to enhance the economics of the production of high alcohols. One such process may be the generation of electric power using combustion turbines fueled by synthesis gas.

  4. 9 CFR 355.35 - Label information to be displayed on principal panel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Label information to be displayed on principal panel. 355.35 Section 355.35 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION CERTIFIED PRODUCTS FOR DOGS, CATS, AND OTHER...

  5. 9 CFR 355.35 - Label information to be displayed on principal panel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Label information to be displayed on principal panel. 355.35 Section 355.35 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION CERTIFIED PRODUCTS FOR DOGS, CATS, AND OTHER...

  6. 9 CFR 355.35 - Label information to be displayed on principal panel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Label information to be displayed on principal panel. 355.35 Section 355.35 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION CERTIFIED PRODUCTS FOR DOGS, CATS, AND OTHER...

  7. 9 CFR 355.35 - Label information to be displayed on principal panel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Label information to be displayed on principal panel. 355.35 Section 355.35 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION CERTIFIED PRODUCTS FOR DOGS, CATS, AND OTHER...

  8. Analytical structural efficiency studies of borsic/aluminum compression panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcwithey, R. R.

    1976-01-01

    Analytically determined mass-strength curves, strain-strength curves, and dimensions are presented for structurally efficient hat-stiffened panels, corrugation-stiffened panels, hat-stiffened honeycomb-core sandwich panels, open-section corrugation panels, and honeycomb-core sandwich panels. The panels were assumed to be fabricated from either titanium, borsic/aluminum, or a combination of these materials. Borsic/aluminum panels and titanium panels reinforced with borsic/aluminum were lighter and stiffer than comparably designed titanium panels. Reinforced titanium panels had the same extensional stiffness as comparably designed Borsic/aluminum panels. For a given load, the structural efficiency of the hat-stiffened honeycomb-core sandwich panel was higher than the structural efficiency of the other stiffened panels.

  9. High-Speed Machining (HSM) of Space Shuttle External Tank (ET) panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    The External Fuel Tank (ET) of the Space Shuttle is not recovered after launch and a new one must be provided for each launch. Currently, the external ""skin'' panels of the tank are produced by machining from solid wrought 2219-T87 aluminum plate stock approximately 1-3/4 inch thick. The reduction of costs in producing External Fuel Tank panels is obviously of increasing production rates and decreasing costs of the panels through the application of high-speed machining (HSM) techniques was conducted.

  10. 77 FR 22613 - Arts Advisory Panel Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-16

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Arts Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: National Endowment for the Arts, National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 10(a)(2... meetings of the Arts Advisory Panel to the National Council on the Arts will be held at the Nancy...

  11. Circuits in the Sun: Solar Panel Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gfroerer, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Typical commercial solar panels consist of approximately 60 individual photovoltaic cells connected in series. Since the usual Kirchhoff rules apply, the current is uniform throughout the circuit, while the electric potential of the individual devices is cumulative. Hence, a solar panel is a good analog of a simple resistive series circuit, except…

  12. Improving Strength of Postbuckled Panels Through Stitching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C.

    2007-01-01

    The behavior of blade-stiffened graphite-epoxy panels with impact damage is examined to determine the effect of adding through-the-thickness stitches in the stiffener flange-to-skin interface. The influence of stitches is evaluated by examining buckling and failure for panels with failure loads up to 3.5 times greater than buckling loads. Analytical and experimental results from four configurations of panel specimens are presented. For each configuration, two panels were manufactured with skin and flanges held together with through-the-thickness stitches introduced prior to resin infusion and curing and one panel was manufactured with no stitches holding the flange to the skin. No mechanical fasteners were used for the assembly of any of these panels. Panels with and without low-speed impact damage were loaded to failure in compression. Buckling and failure modes are discussed. Stitching had little effect on buckling loads but increased the failure loads of impact-damaged panels by up to 30%.

  13. Outgassing tests on iras solar panel samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Premat, G.; Zwaal, A.; Pennings, N. H.

    1980-01-01

    Several outgassing tests were carried out on representative solar panel samples in order to determine the extent of contamination that could be expected from this source. The materials for the construction of the solar panels were selected as a result of contamination obtained in micro volatile condensable materials tests.

  14. 77 FR 56875 - Arts Advisory Panel Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-14

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Arts Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: National Endowment for the Arts, National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 10(a)(2) of... meetings of the Arts Advisory Panel to the National Council on the Arts will be held by teleconference...

  15. 78 FR 5213 - Arts Advisory Panel Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-24

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Arts Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: National Endowment for the Arts, National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 10(a)(2) of... meeting of the Arts Advisory Panel to the National Council on the Arts will be held at the Nancy...

  16. 78 FR 26399 - Arts Advisory Panel Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Arts Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: National Endowment for the Arts, National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities. ACTION: Notice of Meeting. SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 10(a)(2) of... meeting of the Arts Advisory Panel to the National Council on the Arts will be held by teleconference...

  17. 78 FR 17942 - Arts Advisory Panel Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-25

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Arts Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: National Endowment for the Arts, National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 10(a)(2) of... meetings of the Arts Advisory Panel to the National Council on the Arts will be held at the Nancy...

  18. 78 FR 59978 - Arts Advisory Panel Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-30

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Arts Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: National Endowment for the Arts, National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 10(a)(2) of... meeting of the Arts Advisory Panel to the National Council on the Arts will be held at the Nancy...

  19. 77 FR 75672 - Arts Advisory Panel Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-21

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Arts Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: National Endowment for the Arts, National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities. ACTION: Notice of Meeting. SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 10(a)(2) of... meetings of the Arts Advisory Panel to the National Council on the Arts will be held at the Nancy...

  20. 77 FR 2766 - Arts Advisory Panel Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-19

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Arts Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: National Endowment for the Arts, National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities. ACTION: Notice--additional information. Pursuant to Section 10(a)(2... additional information regarding the previously announced open session of the Media Arts panel, scheduled...

  1. 77 FR 13367 - Arts Advisory Panel Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-06

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Arts Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: National Endowment for the Arts, National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 10(a)(2) of... of the Arts Advisory Panel to the National Council on the Arts will be held by teleconference at...

  2. 75 FR 27825 - Arts Advisory Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-18

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES National Endowment for the Arts Arts Advisory Panel Pursuant to Section 10(a)(2... meeting of the Arts Advisory Panel to the National Council on the Arts will be held at the Nancy Hanks... financial assistance under the National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities Act of 1965, as...

  3. 76 FR 3677 - Arts Advisory Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-20

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES National Endowment for the Arts Arts Advisory Panel Pursuant to Section 10(a)(2... meeting of the Arts Advisory Panel to the National Council on the Arts will be held at the Nancy Hanks..., discussion, evaluation, and recommendations on financial assistance under the National Foundation on the...

  4. 78 FR 50451 - Arts Advisory Panel Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Arts Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: National Endowment for the Arts, National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities. ACTION: Notice of Meetings. SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 10(a)(2) of... meeting of the Arts Advisory Panel to the National Council on the Arts will be held at the Nancy...

  5. 76 FR 50499 - Arts Advisory Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-15

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES National Endowment for the Arts Arts Advisory Panel Pursuant to Section 10(a)(2... meeting of the Arts Advisory Panel to the National Council on the Arts will be held at the Nancy Hanks... financial assistance under the National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities Act of 1965, as...

  6. 76 FR 23845 - Arts Advisory Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-28

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES National Endowment for the Arts Arts Advisory Panel Pursuant to Section 10(a)(2... meeting of the Arts Advisory Panel to the National Council on the Arts will be held at the Nancy Hanks..., evaluation, and recommendations on financial assistance under the National Foundation on the Arts and...

  7. MoMLA: From Panel to Gallery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitanza, Victor, Ed.; Kuhn, Virginia, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    The work presented here in this "Panel to Gallery" was originally produced and assembled for the 2012 Modern Language Association Conference in Seattle, Washington. Similar to "From Gallery to Webtext", the event Victor curated for the 2006 College Composition and Communication Conference, this "Panel to Gallery" event at MLA set aside the…

  8. 21 CFR 660.3 - Reference panel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.3 Reference panel. A Reference Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Panel shall be obtained from the Center... shall be used for determining the potency and specificity of Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen....

  9. 21 CFR 660.3 - Reference panel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.3 Reference panel. A Reference Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Panel shall be obtained from the Center... shall be used for determining the potency and specificity of Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen....

  10. 21 CFR 660.3 - Reference panel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.3 Reference panel. A Reference Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Panel shall be obtained from the Center for... used for determining the potency and specificity of Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen....

  11. 21 CFR 660.3 - Reference panel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.3 Reference panel. A Reference Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Panel shall be obtained from the Center... shall be used for determining the potency and specificity of Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen....

  12. 21 CFR 660.3 - Reference panel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.3 Reference panel. A Reference Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Panel shall be obtained from the Center... shall be used for determining the potency and specificity of Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen....

  13. 76 FR 27671 - Meetings of Humanities Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-12

    ... THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Meetings of Humanities Panel AGENCY: The National Endowment for the Humanities. ACTION: Notice of additional meeting. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the provisions of the Federal Advisory... Humanities Panel will be held via telephone conference call from the Old Post Office, 1100...

  14. 78 FR 22345 - Meetings of Humanities Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Meetings of Humanities Panel AGENCY: National Endowment for the Humanities, National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities. . ACTION: Notice of Meetings. SUMMARY: Pursuant to... meetings of the Humanities Panel will be held during May, 2013 as follows. The purpose of the meetings...

  15. 76 FR 1462 - Meetings of Humanities Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-10

    ... THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Meetings of Humanities Panel AGENCY: The National Endowment for the Humanities. ACTION: Notice of additional meeting. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the provisions of the Federal Advisory... Humanities Panel will be held at the Old Post Office, 1100 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW., Washington, DC...

  16. 76 FR 70168 - Meetings of Humanities Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-10

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Meetings of Humanities Panel AGENCY: The National Endowment for the Humanities... Humanities Panel will be held at the Old Post Office, 1100 Pennsylvania Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20506. FOR... Endowment for the Humanities, Washington, DC 20506; telephone (202) 606-8322. Hearing-impaired...

  17. 76 FR 20375 - Meetings of Humanities Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-12

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Meetings of Humanities Panel AGENCY: The National Endowment for the Humanities... Humanities Panel will be held at the Old Post Office, 1100 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW., Washington, DC 20506... Endowment for the Humanities, Washington, DC 20506; telephone (202) 606-8322. Hearing-impaired...

  18. 78 FR 74174 - Humanities Panel Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-10

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Humanities Panel Advisory Committee AGENCY: National Endowment for the Humanities. ACTION: Notice of Charter Renewal for Humanities Panel Advisory Committee. SUMMARY: Pursuant to... CFR 102-3.65, the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) gives notice that the Charter for...

  19. 77 FR 48552 - Meetings of Humanities Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-14

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Meetings of Humanities Panel AGENCY: National Endowment for the Humanities... (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given that 10 meetings of the Humanities Panel will be held during... recommendation of applications for financial assistance under the National Foundation on the Arts and...

  20. 78 FR 74175 - Meetings of Humanities Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-10

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Meetings of Humanities Panel AGENCY: National Endowment for the Humanities... (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given that three meetings of the Humanities Panel will be held... and Humanities Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 951-960, as amended). DATES: See SUPPLEMENTARY...

  1. 76 FR 52697 - Meetings of Humanities Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Meetings of Humanities Panel AGENCY: The National Endowment for the Humanities... (Pub. L. 92-463, as amended), notice is hereby given that the following meetings of Humanities Panels... Humanities, Washington, DC 20506; telephone (202) 606-8322. Hearing-impaired individuals are advised...

  2. 77 FR 17102 - Meetings of Humanities Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-23

    ... on March 13, 2012, 77 FR 14836. DATES: April 23, 2012. Time: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Room: 315. Program... THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Meetings of Humanities Panel AGENCY: The National Endowment for the Humanities, National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities ACTION: Cancellation of Panel Meeting....

  3. 76 FR 41826 - Meetings of Humanities Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Meetings of Humanities Panel AGENCY: The National Endowment for the Humanities... Humanities Panel will be held at the Old Post Office, 1100 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW., Washington, DC 20506... Endowment for the Humanities, Washington, DC 20506; telephone (202) 606-8322. Hearing-impaired...

  4. 76 FR 63664 - Meetings of Humanities Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Meetings of Humanities Panel AGENCY: The National Endowment for the Humanities... (Pub. L. 92-463, as amended), notice is hereby given that the following meetings of Humanities Panels... Humanities, Washington, DC 20506; telephone (202) 606-8322. Hearing-impaired individuals are advised...

  5. 76 FR 20375 - Meetings of Humanities Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-12

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Meetings of Humanities Panel AGENCY: The National Endowment for the Humanities... (Pub. L. 92-463, as amended), notice is hereby given that the following meetings of Humanities Panels... Humanities, Washington, DC 20506; telephone (202) 606-8322. Hearing-impaired individuals are advised...

  6. 78 FR 69455 - Meetings of Humanities Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Meetings of Humanities Panel AGENCY: National Endowment for the Humanities... (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given that twelve meetings of the Humanities Panel will be held... and Humanities Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 951-960, as amended). DATES: See SUPPLEMENTARY...

  7. 76 FR 70765 - Meetings of Humanities Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-15

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Meetings of Humanities Panel AGENCY: The National Endowment for the Humanities, National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the... the following meetings of Humanities Panels will be held at the Old Post Office, 1100...

  8. 77 FR 68153 - Meetings of Humanities Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-15

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Meetings of Humanities Panel AGENCY: National Endowment for the Humanities... (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given that 10 meetings of the Humanities Panel will be held during... recommendation of applications for financial assistance under the National Foundation on the Arts and...

  9. 77 FR 75198 - Meetings of Humanities Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-19

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Meetings of Humanities Panel AGENCY: National Endowment for the Humanities... (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given that 4 meetings of the Humanities Panel will be held during... recommendation of applications for financial assistance under the National Foundation on the Arts and...

  10. 76 FR 56242 - Meetings of Humanities Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-12

    ... Register on August 23, 2011, 76 FR 52698. Dates: September 27, 2011. Time: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Room: 315... THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Meetings of Humanities Panel AGENCY: The National Endowment for the Humanities, The National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities. ACTION: Cancellation of panel...

  11. 75 FR 18906 - Meetings of Humanities Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-13

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Meetings of Humanities Panel AGENCY: The National Endowment for the Humanities... (Pub. L. 92-463, as amended), notice is hereby given that the following meetings of Humanities Panels... Humanities, Washington, DC 20506; telephone (202) 606-8322. Hearing-impaired individuals are advised...

  12. 78 FR 63207 - Special Emphasis Panel; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Special Emphasis Panel; Meeting AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: In accordance with section 10(a)(2... Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Special Emphasis Panel (SEP) meeting on ``AHRQ RFA-HS-13-010,...

  13. 14 CFR 1259.600 - Panel description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM Space Grant Review Panel § 1259.600 Panel description. An independent committee... established to advise the Administrator with respect to Space Grant program and project awards, the Space Grant fellowship program and the designation and operation of Space Grant colleges and consortia....

  14. 14 CFR 1259.600 - Panel description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM Space Grant Review Panel § 1259.600 Panel description. An independent committee, the Space... advise the Administrator with respect to Space Grant program and project awards, the Space Grant fellowship program and the designation and operation of Space Grant colleges and consortia. A majority of...

  15. 14 CFR 1259.600 - Panel description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM Space Grant Review Panel § 1259.600 Panel description. An independent committee... established to advise the Administrator with respect to Space Grant program and project awards, the Space Grant fellowship program and the designation and operation of Space Grant colleges and consortia....

  16. 14 CFR 1259.600 - Panel description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM Space Grant Review Panel § 1259.600 Panel description. An independent committee... established to advise the Administrator with respect to Space Grant program and project awards, the Space Grant fellowship program and the designation and operation of Space Grant colleges and consortia....

  17. Gas pump with movable gas pumping panels

    DOEpatents

    Osher, J.L.

    Apparatus for pumping gas continuously a plurality of articulated panels of getter material, each of which absorbs gases on one side while another of its sides is simultaneously reactivated in a zone isolated by the panels themselves from a working space being pumped.

  18. Panel fabrication utilizing GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardesich, N.

    1984-01-01

    The development of the GaAs solar cells for space applications is described. The activities in the fabrication of GaAs solar panels are outlined. Panels were fabricated while introducing improved quality control, soldering laydown and testing procedures. These panels include LIPS II, San Marco Satellite, and a low concentration panel for Rockwells' evaluation. The panels and their present status are discussed.

  19. 37 CFR 251.55 - Post-panel motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Post-panel motions. 251.55... Procedures of Copyright Arbitration Royalty Panels § 251.55 Post-panel motions. (a) Any party to the... Copyright Arbitration Royalty Panel within 14 days of the Librarian's receipt of the panel's report of...

  20. Method for producing micro heat panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarda, Charles J. (Inventor); Peterson, George P. (Inventor); Rummler, Donald R. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Flat or curved micro heat pipe panels are fabricated by arranging essentially parallel filaments in the shape of the desired panel. The configuration of the filaments corresponds to the desired configuration of the tubes that will constitute the heat pipes. A thermally conductive material is then deposited on and around the filaments to fill in the desired shape of the panel. The filaments are then removed, leaving tubular passageways of the desired configuration and surface texture in the material. The tubes are then filled with a working fluid and sealed. Composite micro heat pipe laminates are formed by layering individual micro heat pipe panels and bonding them to each other to form a single structure. The layering sequence of the micro heat pipe panels can be tailored to transport heat preferentially in specific directions as desired for a particular application.