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Sample records for panoramic dental radiography

  1. Leaded apron for use in panoramic dental radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Whitcher, B.L.; Gratt, B.M.; Sickles, E.A.

    1980-05-01

    The leaded aprons currently available for use during dental radiography do not protect the thyroid gland from radiation. Conventional aprons may produce artifacts when used with panoramic dental x-ray units. This study measures the dose reduction obtained with an experimental leaded apron designed for use with panoramic dental x-ray units. Skin exposures measured at the thyroid and at the sternum were reduced with the use of the apron. Films produced during the study were free from apron artifacts.

  2. Optimisation of patient doses in programmable dental panoramic radiography.

    PubMed

    Lecomber, A R; Downes, S L; Mokhtari, M; Faulkner, K

    2000-03-01

    To estimate the radiation-related risk associated with twelve imaging programs available on the Orthophos (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) dental panoramic radiography unit. Organ absorbed doses for each program were measured using a Rando anthropomorphic phantom loaded with thermoluminescent dosemeters. Effective dose (E) was calculated in two ways; first, using the method recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection, which excludes the salivary glands (designated Eexc), and second, with its inclusion (designated Einc). Organ and effective doses were both used to compare the various imaging programs. In 11 of the 12 programs studied the salivary glands received the highest individual organ dose, and Einc was found to be up to double Eexc. When the image was restricted to the dentition (program 2) organ doses were lower than for the complete jaws (program 1) by up to 85%, and Eexc and Einc reduced by about one half. When programs 2 and 6 (to image the temporomandibular joints) are used in place of program 1, the former combination provides more image information at an equivalent risk. The value of E in panoramic radiography depends on the inclusion of the salivary glands in the calculation and the magnitude of the dose.

  3. Strut analyses for detecting osteoporosis using dental panoramic radiography.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae Joon; Lee, Jeong-Hee; Kim, Young Hyun; Jeong, Ho-Gul; Choi, Yoon Jeong; Park, Wonse; Han, Sang-Sun

    2017-07-14

    The aim of this study was to identify variables that can be used for osteoporosis detection using strut analysis, fractal dimension (FD), and the gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) using multiple regions of interest (ROIs) and to develop an osteoporosis detection model based on panoramic radiography. A total of 454 panoramic radiographs from oral examinations in our dental hospital from 2012 to 2015 were randomly selected, equally distributed among osteoporotic and non-osteoporotic patients (n=227 in each group). The radiographs were classified by bone mineral density (T-score). After 3 marrow regions and the endosteal margin area were selected, strut features, FD, and GLCM were analyzed using a customized image processing program. Image upsampling was used to obtain the optimal binarization for calculating strut features and FD. The independent-samples t-test was used to assess statistical differences between the 2 groups. A decision tree and support vector machine (SVM) were used to create and verify an osteoporosis detection model. The endosteal margin area showed statistically significant differences in FD, GLCM, and strut variables between the osteoporotic and non-osteoporotic patients, whereas the medullary portions showed few distinguishing features. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the strut variables in the endosteal margin area were 97.1%, 95.7%, and 96.25 using the decision tree and 97.2%, 97.1%, and 96.9% using SVM, and these were the best results obtained among the 3 methods. Strut variables with FD and/or GLCM did not increase the diagnostic accuracy. The analysis of strut features in the endosteal margin area showed potential for the development of an osteoporosis detection model based on panoramic radiography.

  4. Panoramic dental radiography image intensification employing minification techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, R.H.

    1981-09-01

    Panoramic dental x-ray machine wherein an x-ray source-camera assembly orbits a seated patient is described. A slot in the camera assembly collimates the x-rays which are continuously generated by the x-ray source, which x-rays are converted to light images of the patient's dental arch structure by only a single intensifying screen which remains stationary. This screen comprises about 1/40 the area of conventional intensifying screens and is made thicker for providing improved detection efficiency. A fiber optic minifying lens reduces the size of the image from the screen while proportionately increasing the light intensity of the image, thus making it possible to provide useable film images at reduced x-ray exposures due to non-linear film exposure versus optical density characteristics. The resultant minified, light-intensified image may now be recorded on 35 mm roll film, for example, as opposed to standard radiographic film of 5'' X 12'' size, or 12.70 cm X 30.48 cm.

  5. Quality of digital panoramic radiography in a newly established dental school.

    PubMed

    Kullman, Leif; Joseph, Bobby

    2006-01-01

    Panoramic radiographs are known to be difficult to expose without errors. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the degree of success in taking error free digital panoramic radiographs. An experienced Oral and Maxillofacial Radiologist assessed the subjective image quality of 199 panoramic radiographs exposed in a newly established dental school in Kuwait. The number of errors according to an international "quality standard" in a panoramic radiograph was assessed. All radiographs were exposed by a dentist with minimal experience in taking panoramic radiographs. It was found that the number of errors in each radiograph ranged from 1 to 9 and no radiograph was completely free from errors. The average number of errors in the radiographs was 3.7. Hence, these results confirm that panoramic radiography is a difficult radiographic technique, which needs an experienced operator in order to get high quality radiographs. Both theoretical and practical training is recommended for radiology staff, as in Sweden, where dental staff should be properly trained to make exposures.

  6. Image quality assessment in panoramic dental radiography: a comparative study between conventional and digital systems.

    PubMed

    Sabarudin, Akmal; Tiau, Yu Jin

    2013-02-01

    This study is designed to compare and evaluate the diagnostic image quality of dental panoramic radiography between conventional and digital systems. Fifty-four panoramic images were collected and divided into three groups consisting of conventional, digital with and without post processing image. Each image was printed out and scored subjectively by two experienced dentists who were blinded to the exposure parameters and system protocols. The evaluation covers of anatomical coverage and structures, density and image contrast. The overall image quality score revealed that digital panoramic with post-processing scored the highest of 3.45±0.19, followed by digital panoramic system without post-processing and conventional panoramic system with corresponding scores of 3.33±0.33 and 2.06±0.40. In conclusion, images produced by digital panoramic system are better in diagnostic image quality than that from conventional panoramic system. Digital post-processing visualization can improve diagnostic quality significantly in terms of radiographic density and contrast.

  7. Image quality assessment in panoramic dental radiography: a comparative study between conventional and digital systems

    PubMed Central

    Tiau, Yu Jin

    2013-01-01

    This study is designed to compare and evaluate the diagnostic image quality of dental panoramic radiography between conventional and digital systems. Fifty-four panoramic images were collected and divided into three groups consisting of conventional, digital with and without post processing image. Each image was printed out and scored subjectively by two experienced dentists who were blinded to the exposure parameters and system protocols. The evaluation covers of anatomical coverage and structures, density and image contrast. The overall image quality score revealed that digital panoramic with post-processing scored the highest of 3.45±0.19, followed by digital panoramic system without post-processing and conventional panoramic system with corresponding scores of 3.33±0.33 and 2.06±0.40. In conclusion, images produced by digital panoramic system are better in diagnostic image quality than that from conventional panoramic system. Digital post-processing visualization can improve diagnostic quality significantly in terms of radiographic density and contrast. PMID:23483085

  8. Accuracy and head positioning effects on measurements of anterior tooth length using 3-dimensional and conventional dental panoramic radiography.

    PubMed

    Kitai, Noriyuki; Murabayashi, Manabu; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Fujiwara, Atsushi; Tome, Wakako; Katsumata, Akitoshi

    2017-03-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine the accuracy and the head positioning effects on measurements of anterior tooth length using 3-dimensional (3D) and conventional dental panoramic radiography and to investigate whether 3D panoramic radiography is suitable for the evaluation of anterior tooth length. A simulated human head was radiographed at 4, 8, and 12 mm displaced positions, and at 5°, 10°, and 15° tilted positions from the standard head position using 3D and conventional panoramic radiography, and also using cone-beam computed tomography. Anterior tooth lengths were measured on the panoramic and cone-beam computed tomography images. The values for the standard head position in the panoramic radiographs were defined as the standard values. Measurement error was defined as the standard value minus the cone-beam computed tomography value on each panoramic radiograph. The head position ratio of the measurement value to the standard value at each head position was calculated. Measurement errors for the 3D panoramic radiographs were significantly smaller than those for the conventional panoramic radiographs. In the 3D panoramic radiographs, the head position ratios at the 4, 8, and 12 mm displaced positions and at the 5° tilted position were within ±5% of the standard value. Three-dimensional panoramic radiography is suitable for the quantitative evaluation of anterior tooth length with high accuracy. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. DNA damage and cellular death in oral mucosa cells of children who have undergone panoramic dental radiography.

    PubMed

    Angelieri, Fernanda; de Oliveira, Gabriela R; Sannomiya, Eduardo K; Ribeiro, Daniel A

    2007-06-01

    Despite wide use as a diagnostic tool in medical and dental practice, radiography can induce cytotoxic effects and genetic damage. To evaluate DNA damage (micronucleus) and cellular death (pyknosis, karyolysis and karyorrhexis) in exfoliated buccal mucosa cells taken from healthy children following exposure to radiation during dental radiography. A total of 17 children who had undergone panoramic dental radiography were included. We found no statistically significant differences (P > 0.05) between micronucleated oral mucosa cells in children before and after exposure to radiation. On the other hand, radiation did cause other nuclear alterations closely related to cytotoxicity including karyorrhexis, pyknosis and karyolysis. Taken together, these results indicate that panoramic dental radiography might not induce chromosomal damage, but may be cytotoxic. Overall, the results reinforce the importance of evaluating the health side effects of radiography and contribute to the micronucleus database, which will improve our understanding and practice of this methodology in children.

  10. Genotoxic effects of X-rays on keratinized mucosa cells during panoramic dental radiography.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, E M M; Meireles, J R C; Lopes, M A; Junqueira, V C; Gomes-Filho, I S; Trindade, S; Machado-Santelli, G M

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic effects of X-rays on epithelial gingival cells during panoramic dental radiography using a differentiated protocol for the micronucleus test. 40 healthy individuals who underwent this procedure for diagnostic purposes on request from their dentists agreed to participate in this study. All of them answered a questionnaire before the examination. Epithelial gingival cells were obtained from the keratinized mucosa of the upper dental arcade by gentle scraping with a cervical brush immediately before exposure and 10 days later. Cytological preparations were stained according to the Feulgen-Rossenbeck reaction, counterstained with fast green 1% for 1 min and analysed under a light microscope. Micronuclei, nuclear projections (broken eggs) and degenerative nuclear alterations (pyknosis, karyolysis, karyorrhexis and condensed chromatin) were scored. The frequency of micronuclei was significantly higher after exposure (P < 0.05), as were the frequencies of nuclear alterations indicative of apoptosis (P < 0.001). These results indicate that X-ray radiation emitted during panoramic dental radiography induces a genotoxic effect on epithelial gingival cells that increases the frequency of chromosomal damage and nuclear alterations indicative of apoptosis.

  11. [The exposure dose of the sella turcica in panoramic dental radiography with an intraoral radiogenic source].

    PubMed

    Pastremoli, A; Cucchi, G; Ciminari, R

    1991-06-01

    Panoramic dental radiography using an intraoral X-ray source exposes critical organs, such as the crystalline and the thyroid, as well as organs of fundamental importance such as the pituitary gland, to X-rays. An experimental study was carried out to assess the exposure dose to the sella turcica during the radiological examination of the upper and lower dental arches using an X-ray source within the oral cavity. The comprehensive exposure dose for the upper and lower dental arches exceeded that found in orthopantomography (110 micro Gy/examination vs 47 micro Gy/examination) with errors which are respectively inferior to 15% and 30%. The authors conclude that the risk of provoking anatomical or functional changes of the pituitary gland is extremely remote using this type of examination.

  12. Dosimetric study of the effective doses resulting during dental X-ray and panoramic radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shousha, Hany A.; Abd-El Hafez, A. I.; Ahmad, Fawzia

    2011-01-01

    The panoramic image is one of the most commonly used radiographic examinations in dentistry, owing to its low dose and large area for evaluation, including bone and teeth in the same image. Although digital images are usually reported to deliver a lower radiation dose to the patient, conventional images are still available, especially in countries where digital systems are not widely economically available. Dentists should weigh the benefits of dental radiographs against the consequences of increasing a patient's exposure to radiation, the effects of which accumulate from multiple sources over time. The "as low as reasonably achievable" principle should be followed to minimize the exposure to radiation. The purpose of this investigation is to measure the absorbed radiation doses at 12 anatomical sites of a Rando-phantom and calculate the effective doses result from a full-mouth survey and panoramic radiography. Organ-absorbed doses are measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD 100) and effective organ doses (μ Sv) are estimated according to the International Commission on Radiological Protection in 2007. The total effective dose results from the panoramic imaging system have so far been below those obtained using the full-mouth survey technique used in intra-oral radiographic examination.

  13. Techniques for measurement of dose width product in panoramic dental radiography.

    PubMed

    Doyle, P; Martin, C J; Robertson, J

    2006-02-01

    Dose width product (DWP) is the quantity recommended for assessment of patient dose for panoramic dental radiography. It is the product of the absorbed dose in air in the X-ray beam integrated over an exposure cycle and the width of the beam, both measured at the receiving slit. A robust method for measuring the DWP is required in order to facilitate optimization of practices and enable comparison of dose levels at different centres. In this study, three techniques for measuring the DWP have been evaluated through comparison of results from 20 orthopantomographic units. These used a small in-beam semiconductor detector and X-ray film, a pencil ionization chamber and an array of thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs). The mean results obtained with the three techniques agreed within +/-6%. The technique employing a pencil ionization chamber of the type used for dose assessment of CT scanners is the simplest and most reliable method. The in-beam detector and film method has larger errors both from positioning the radiation detector and from measurement of X-ray beam width, which should be the full width at half maximum obtained from a scan of the film optical density. The TLD array method was accurate, but more time consuming to carry out. The mean DWP for the units studied was 65 mGy mm and the mean dose-area product was 89 mGy cm2. The DWP for 30% of the units tested exceeded the diagnostic reference dose of 65 mGy mm, recommended by the National Radiological Protection Board.

  14. Reliability of panoramic radiography in determination of neurosensory disturbances related to dental implant placement in posterior mandible.

    PubMed

    Kütük, Nükhet; Gönen, Zeynep Burçin; Yaşar, M Taha; Demirbaş, Ahmet Emin; Alkan, Alper

    2014-12-01

    During implantology procedures, one of the most serious complications is the damage of the inferior alveolar nerve, which may result in neurosensory disturbances (NSD). Panoramic radiographs have been considered for a primary evaluation to determine the bone height and implant-mandibular canal distance. One thousand five hundred ninety-seven panoramic radiographs of patients, who were treated with 3608 dental implants in Erciyes University, Oral and Maxillofacial Hospital between 2007 and 2012, were examined. Forty-eight implants were determined to be near the mandibular canal using a 2-dimensional software program. A total of 48 implants were closer than 2 mm to the mandibular canal. A range of 0 to 1.9 mm distance was detected between the mandibular canal and these implants. Fourteen implants (29.16%) placed in a distance less than 1 mm to the mandibular canal, and 34 (70.83%) between 1 and 2 mm. One patient had NSD. Determination of the dental implant length using panoramic radiography is a reliable technique to prevent neurosensory complications. However computed tomography or cone-beam computed tomography based planning of dental implants may be required for borderline cases.

  15. The current status of panoramic radiography.

    PubMed

    Hirschmann, P N

    1987-03-01

    The current status of dental panoramic tomography (rotational panoramic radiography) is reviewed. This technique is based on a combination of tomography and slit-beam radiography to provide an image of both jaws on a single film. There is a greater degree of image degradation when compared with conventional radiographic techniques due to tomographic blurring, magnification and distortion, secondary images and burn-out. Meticulous patient position is essential to accommodate their jaws to the image layer determined by the manufacturers. The absorbed doses from panoramic radiography are of a similar order to that from bitewing radiography and lower than those from a full-mouth periapical series. The individual risk of 1.3 X 10(-6) is compared with that from other radiographic examinations and smoking. The collective risk, 1.04 deaths in the UK in 1981, is relatively insignificant as is the genetic dose. The risk to the dentist and his staff is also low compared to other risks. The methods of dose limitation currently available are reviewed. The clinical indications are considered in relation to the guidelines of the American Dental Association and the Dental Estimates Board in the UK. The problems associated with attempts to measure diagnostic yield are considered. In view of the world-wide public concern at the potential dangers of ionising radiation, dentists are urged to maximize the diagnostic yield from their panoramic radiography by taking such radiographs only when clinically necessary, ensuring meticulous positioning and processing, followed by scrupulous assessment of the radiography for any sign of pathological change.

  16. Establishment of diagnostic reference levels for dental panoramic radiography in Greece.

    PubMed

    Manousaridis, G; Koukorava, C; Hourdakis, C J; Kamenopoulou, V; Yakoumakis, E; Tsiklakis, K

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to present the national diagnostic reference levels (DRL) established for panoramic dental examinations in Greece. The establishment of DRL, as a tool for the optimisation of radiological procedures, is a requirement of national regulations. Measurements performed by the Greek Atomic Energy Commission on 90 panoramic systems have been used for the derivation of DRL values. DRL values have been proposed for exposure settings of different patient types (child, small adult and standard adult), both for film and digital imaging. The DRLs for different patient types are grouped in three categories: children, small adults (corresponding to female) and average adults (corresponding to male). Proposed DRLs for these groups are 2.2, 3.3 and 4.1 mGy, respectively. In order to investigate the correlation of DRLs with the available imaging modalities (CR, DR and film), this parameter was taken into account. DR imaging DRL is the lowest at 3.5 mGy, CR imaging the highest at 4.2 mGy and film imaging at 3.7 mGy. In order to facilitate comparison with other studies, kerma-width product values were calculated from Ki, air and field size.

  17. Panoramic Dental X-Ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Panoramic Dental X-ray Panoramic dental x-ray uses a ... Your e-mail address: Personal message (optional): Bees: Wax: Notice: RadiologyInfo respects your privacy. Information entered here ...

  18. Radiation absorbed from dental implant radiography: a comparison of linear tomography, CT scan, and panoramic and intra-oral techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.E.; Danforth, R.A.; Barnes, R.W.; Burtch, M.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Absorbed radiation dose in bone marrow, thyroid, salivary gland, eye, and skin entrance was determined by placement of lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD's) at selected anatomical sites within and on a human-like x-ray phantom. The phantom was exposed to radiation from linear tomographic and computer-assisted tomographic (CT) simulated dental implant radiographic examinations. The mean dose was determined for each anatomical site. Resulting dose measurements from linear tomography and computer-assisted tomography are compared with reported panoramic and intra-oral doses. CT examination delivered the greatest dose, while linear tomography was generally lowest. Panoramic and intra-oral doses were similar to those of linear tomography.

  19. Panoramic radiography for temporomandibular joint arthrography: a description of arthropanoramograms.

    PubMed

    Abramovitch, K; Langlais, R P; Dolwick, M F

    1989-06-01

    TMJ arthrograms done with panoramic radiography, i.e., arthropanoramography, can demonstrate intracapsular disk displacement and perforation pathoses. These views are very practical for inferior synovial cavity arthrograms performed in the dental operatory since panoramic radiographic machines have become common in modern dental practices. Specific advantages of arthropanoramography include the decreased financial cost and decreased radiation exposure to the patient. Arthropanoramography does not replace tomography or videofluoroscopy in TMJ arthrography. It is, however, described as a simple alternative to the more conventional forms of arthrography.

  20. Genotoxic effects of dental panoramic radiograph in children.

    PubMed

    El-Ashiry, Eman A; Abo-Hager, Eman A; Gawish, Abeer S

    2010-01-01

    This study was completed to evaluate chromosomal damage (micronucleus) and cellular death in exfoliated buccal mucosa cells taken from healthy children following exposure to panoramic radiation during dental radiography. Twenty children who underwent panoramic dental radiography for diagnostic purposes were included. Cytological preparations were stained with Feulgen stain, identified under light microscopy. Micronuclei, apoptotic nuclear alterations (condensed chromatin, karyorrhexis, pyknosis) and necrosis (karyolysis) were scored. showed no statistically significant differences in children's micronucleated oral mucosa cells before and after panoramic dental X-Ray exposure. On the other hand, there was a statistically significant increase in nuclear alterations closely related to genotoxicity such as condensed chromatin, karyorrhexis and pyknosis, while karyolysis of oral mucosal cells did not show significant increase after panoramic X-Ray exposure. Dental panoramic radiography may not be a factor that induces chromosomal damage, but is able to promote genotoxicity in children.

  1. Using GafChromic film to estimate the effective dose from dental cone beam CT and panoramic radiography.

    PubMed

    Al-Okshi, A; Nilsson, M; Petersson, A; Wiese, M; Lindh, C

    2013-01-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of GafChromic(®) XR-QA2 (ISP Corp., Wayne, NJ) as a dosemeter when performing measurements of the effective dose from three cone beam CT (CBCT) units and to compare the doses from examinations of three common dental clinical situations. A second aim was to compare the radiation doses for three digital panoramic units with the doses for the CBCT units. The CBCT units used were Veraviewepocs 3De(®) (J Morita MFG Corp., Kyoto, Japan), ProMax(®) 3D (Planmeca, Helsinki, Finland) and NewTom VGi(®) (Quantitative Radiology, Verona, Italy). GafChromic XR-QA2 films were placed between the selected layers of the head and neck of a tissue-equivalent human skull (RANDO(®) phantom; The Phantom Laboratory, Salem, NY). The exposure parameters were set using the automatic exposure control function of the units. Depending on the availability, medium and smaller field of view (FOV) scanning modes were used. The effective dose was estimated using the 2007 International Commission on Radiological Protection formalism. The lowest effective dose of a CBCT unit was observed for ProMax 3D, FOV 4 × 5 cm (10 μSv), the highest for NewTom VGi, FOV 8 × 8 cm-high resolution (129 μSv). The range of effective doses for digital panoramic machines measured was 8-14 μSv. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using radiochromic films for dental CBCT and panoramic dosimetry.

  2. Panoramic radiography: digital technology fosters efficiency.

    PubMed

    Benson, Byron W; Liang, Hui; Flint, Diane J

    2011-01-01

    Panoramic imaging continues to be a clinically popular tool in the diagnosis and assessment of dental patients. Digital technology improves the efficiency of the imaging system, may reduce overall costs and radiation risk, and aids in optimal interpretation of the image.

  3. Reference doses for dental radiography.

    PubMed

    Napier, I D

    1999-04-24

    To establish reference doses for use within dental radiography. Retrospective analysis, single centre. UK General Dental Practice, 1995-1998. A statistical analysis was performed on the results from NRPB evaluations of dental x-ray equipment within general practice. The third quartile patient entrance dose was determined from 6,344 assessments of intra-oral x-ray equipment. The third quartile dose-width product was determined from 387 assessments of panoramic x-ray equipment. The third quartile patient entrance dose for an adult mandibular molar intra-oral radiograph is 3.9 mGy. The third quartile dose-width product for a standard adult panoramic radiograph is 66.7 mGy mm. NRPB recommends the adoption of reference doses of 4 mGy for an adult mandibular molar intra-oral radiograph and 65 mGy mm for a standard adult panoramic radiograph. These reference values can be used as a guide to accepted clinical practice. Where radiography is carried out using doses above these reference values, a thorough review of radiographic practice should be made to either improve techniques, or justify keeping the current techniques. However, attainment of doses at or below the reference values cannot be construed as achievement of optimum performance; further dose reductions below the reference value are still practicable.

  4. Genotoxicity of digital panoramic radiography on oral epithelial tissues.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Soheyl; Pallagatti, Shambulingappa; Grewal, Harshaminder; Kalucha, Aman; Kaur, Harkamal

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate the genotoxic effects of x-rays on gingival and buccal epithelial cells during panoramic dental radiography using the micronucleus test. Eighty otherwise healthy subjects who required a diagnostic panoramic radiograph and met the selection criteria were included in the study. Epithelial cells were obtained from the maxillary anterior gingiva and buccal mucosa by gentle scraping with a wooden spatula immediately before exposure and again 10 days after exposure. Cytologic preparations were made according to the Papanicolaou staining method and analyzed under a light microscope for micronucleus count. The mean ± SD micronucleus count of gingival epithelial cells was 1.08 ± 0.76 before radiographic exposure and 1.6 ± 0.93 after exposure. This increase was statistically significant (P < .05). Similarly, there was an increase in the postexposure micronucleus count in the buccal mucosa, but this increase was not significant (P > .05). A significant correlation was observed between the age of subjects and micronucleus count, although no such correlation was found between sex and micronucleus count. Although radiation-related effects from panoramic radiography were reduced compared with full-mouth intraoral periapical radiographs or radiotherapy, the results of this study show that genotoxic effects do take place. Thus, radiographs should be taken with adequate protection measures and only when the potential benefit outweighs the potential risk.

  5. Clinical feline dental radiography.

    PubMed

    Lemmons, Matthew

    2013-05-01

    Dental radiography is a necessary diagnostic modality in small animal practice. It is not possible to accurately assess and diagnose tooth resorption, periodontal disease, endodontic disease, neoplasia and injury without it. Dental radiography is also necessary for treatment and assessment of the patient postoperatively.

  6. Thyroid dose distribution in dental radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Bristow, R.G.; Wood, R.E.; Clark, G.M. )

    1989-10-01

    The anatomic position and proven radiosensitivity of the thyroid gland make it an organ of concern in dental radiography. A calibrated thermoluminescent dosimetry system was used to investigate the absorbed dose (microGy) to the thyroid gland resultant from a minimum irradiated volume, intraoral full-mouth radiography technique with the use of rectangular collimation with a lead-backed image receptor, and conventional panoramic radiography performed with front and rear lead aprons. Use of the minimum irradiated volume technique resulted in a significantly decreased absorbed dose over the entire thyroid region ranging from 100% to 350% (p less than 0.05). Because this intraoral technique results in radiographs with greater image quality and also exposes the thyroid gland to less radiation than the panoramic, this technique may be an alternative to the panoramic procedure.

  7. Calcification of the stylohyoid ligament in panoramic radiography and cone beam computed tomography among patients referred for dental implant treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Mahdian, Mina; Moghaddam, Elnaz Jalali; Alzahrani, Adel; Rengasamy, Kandasamy; Tadinada, Aditya

    2014-08-01

    Calcification of the stylohyoid ligament (SHL) is a common condition noted as an incidental finding in routine radiographic examination. Due to proximity with important neurovascular structures, elongation and calcification may sometimes lead to dysphagia and pain. The objective of this study was to evaluate the incidence of calcified SHL detected on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans and panoramic radiographs (PR) in patients referred for dental implant therapy. Retrospective analysis of 30 patients referred for dental implants to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology at the University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine was done. Patients were imaged using Hitachi CB MercuRay CBCT machine, and PRs were obtained using Planmeca panoramic machine. CBCT reconstructions and panoramic images were evaluated for the incidence and pattern of SHL calcification. Nineteen patients (63.3%) had calcified SHLs, 16 of whom were reported to have bilateral involvement. PR was unable to show complete calcification of the ligament in any of the cases, whereas CBCT showed evidence of complete calcification when present (14 cases). CBCT was more accurate in determining the pattern and extent of calcification of the SHL in patients undergoing implant treatment planning.

  8. Shielding effect of thyroid collar for digital panoramic radiography.

    PubMed

    Han, G-S; Cheng, J-G; Li, G; Ma, X-C

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the shielding effect of thyroid collar for digital panoramic radiography. 4 machines [Orthopantomograph(®) OP200 (Instrumentarium Dental, Tuusula, Finland), Orthophos CD (Sirona Dental Systems GmbH, Bensheim, Germany), Orthophos XG Plus (Sirona Dental Systems GmbH) and ProMax(®) (Planmeca Oy, Helsinki, Finland)] were used in this study. Average tissue-absorbed doses were measured using thermoluminescent dosemeter chips in an anthropomorphic phantom. Effective organ and total effective doses were derived according to the International Commission of Radiological Protection 2007 recommendations. The shielding effect of one collar in front and two collars both in front and at the back of the neck was measured. The effective organ doses of the thyroid gland obtained from the 4 panoramic machines were 1.12 μSv for OP200, 2.71 μSv for Orthophos CD, 2.18 μSv for Orthophos XG plus and 2.20 μSv for ProMax, when no thyroid collar was used. When 1 collar was used in front of the neck, the effective organ doses of the thyroid gland were 1.01 μSv (9.8% reduction), 2.45 μSv (9.6% reduction), 1.76 μSv (19.3% reduction) and 1.70 μSv (22.7% reduction), respectively. Significant differences in dose reduction were found for Orthophos XG Plus and ProMax. When two collars were used, the effective organ doses of the thyroid gland were also significantly reduced for the two machines Orthophos XG Plus and ProMax. The same trend was observed in the total effective doses for the four machines. Wearing a thyroid collar was helpful when the direct digital panoramic imaging systems were in use, whereas for the indirect digital panoramic imaging systems, the thyroid collar did not have an extra protective effect on the thyroid gland and whole body.

  9. Common positioning errors in panoramic radiography: A review

    PubMed Central

    Rondon, Rafael Henrique Nunes; Pereira, Yamba Carla Lara

    2014-01-01

    Professionals performing radiographic examinations are responsible for maintaining optimal image quality for accurate diagnoses. These professionals must competently execute techniques such as film manipulation and processing to minimize patient exposure to radiation. Improper performance by the professional and/or patient may result in a radiographic image of unsatisfactory quality that can also lead to a misdiagnosis and the development of an inadequate treatment plan. Currently, the most commonly performed extraoral examination is panoramic radiography. The invention of panoramic radiography has resulted in improvements in image quality with decreased exposure to radiation and at a low cost. However, this technique requires careful, accurate positioning of the patient's teeth and surrounding maxillofacial bone structure within the focal trough. Therefore, we reviewed the literature for the most common types of positioning errors in panoramic radiography to suggest the correct techniques. We would also discuss how to determine if the most common positioning errors occurred in panoramic radiography, such as in the positioning of the patient's head, tongue, chin, or body. PMID:24701452

  10. High-yield criteria for panoramic radiography. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    White, S.C.; Forsythe, A.B.

    1982-06-01

    Panoramic radiographs should be obtained when the examination offers the prospect of providing information that will assist in patient care. The purpose of this study was to determine whether high-yield criteria could be developed for the use of panoramic radiographs in the treatment planning of patients seeking dental care. Clinicians were asked what signs or symptoms caused them to order a panoramic radiograph upon patient admission into the UCLA Dental Clinic. At the time the patient was radiographed, a variety of demographic and clinical measures were recorded. The most important high-yield criterion for the panoramic examination is whether the radiograph is ordered for 'general screening examination' (a negative predictor) and whether the radiograph was ordered for any specific examination (a positive predictor). The use of these (or any other) decision rules required clinical judgment of the costs (social and economic) of a missed positive finding relative to that of an unproductive examination.

  11. Measurement of dose in panoramic dental radiology.

    PubMed

    Williams, J R; Montgomery, A

    2000-09-01

    The National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) has recommended the introduction of dose-width product (DWP) for the measurement of patient dose in panoramic dental radiology and has proposed a reference level of 65 mGy mm for adult exposures. This paper describes a method for measuring DWP and dose-area product (DAP) using thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs). The technique was used on 16 sets with a range of exposure settings. The mean value of DWP was 14% higher than the mean value reported from a survey by the NRPB. This difference is most likely to be caused by systematic variations due to measurement method. The average DAP for a standard adult examination was shown to be 11.3 cGy cm2. Data are presented so that the DAP can be derived from the exposure factors (tube current and operating potential) and beam area. Based on published data for effective dose, it is estimated that the DAP to effective dose conversion factor is approximately 0.06 mSv(Gy cm2)-1. The average DAP value (11.3 cGy cm2) can be compared with the average value for intraoral radiography (9.3 cGy cm2) based on the NRPB survey of entrance surface doses assuming 6 cm circular collimation.

  12. [Analysis of epidermoid carcinomas using panoramic radiography and computerized tomography].

    PubMed

    Pereira, A C; Cavalcanti, M G; Tossato, P S; Guida, F J; Duaik, M C; Kuroishi, M

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to compare radiographic findings, such as localization and extension of tumors toward the bone and soft tissues, in panoramic radiography and computed tomography (CT). Four radiologists assessed the radiographic findings of 48 patients with the histopathological diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma in different sites of the maxillofacial region. Panoramic radiographs and computed tomographs were obtained at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, at FUNDECTO-USP and at the hospital of the University of São Paulo (USP). We observed a considerable limitation of the panoramic radiography in determining the localization and extension of tumors, since it revealed unclear delimitations. Regarding CT, better results were obtained: it was possible to observe the invasion of the tumor toward adjacent soft tissues, as well as the extension of bone destruction and the depth of the lesion, which were confirmed by surgical findings. We concluded that computed tomography demonstrated to be a sensitive radiographic technique for the detection of the involvement of bone and soft tissues, contributing for a more precise diagnosis, surgical planning and intervention. On the other hand, panoramic radiography was considered less sensitive and less efficient than CT, since it shows only unclear borders of the lesions and is not able to assess the involvement of soft tissues.

  13. Usefulness of an energy-binned photon-counting x-ray detector for dental panoramic radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, Tatsumasa; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Ogawa, Koichi; Fujiwara, Shuu

    2015-03-01

    A newly developed dental panoramic radiography system is equipped with a photon-counting semiconductor detector. This photon-counting detector acquires transparent X-ray beams by dividing them into several energy bands. We developed a method to identify dental materials in the patient's teeth by means of the X-ray energy analysis of panoramic radiographs. We tested various dental materials including gold alloy, dental amalgam, dental cement, and titanium. The results of this study suggest that X-ray energy scattergram analysis could be used to identify a range of dental materials in a patient's panoramic radiograph.

  14. Does the Panoramic Radiography Have the Power to Identify the Gonial Angle in Orthodontics?

    PubMed Central

    Okşayan, Rıdvan; Aktan, Ali Murat; Sökücü, Oral; Haştar, Esin; Ciftci, Mehmet Ertuğrul

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. The objective of this study was to assess gonial angle under the angle classification by comparing panoramic radiograph and lateral cephalometric radiograph. Materials and Methods. 49 patients (25 males, 24 females) with an age range of 12–29 years participated in the present study. Subjects were retrospectively selected among those categorised as skeletal and dental Class I, II, and III malocclusion group. Using lateral cephalometric radiograph, mandibular and ramal planes were drawn and based on these planes. Gonial angle was determined from two tangents which were drawn from the inferior border of the mandible and posterior borders of the condyle and ramus of both sides in the panoramic radiographs. Multiple comparison tests (ANOVA) were used to determine differences between the three angle groups. Results. There were no significant differences between Class I, II, and III malocclusion group values of gonial angles determined by lateral cephalometric radiograph and panoramic radiographs (P > 0.05). Conclusion. Panoramic radiograph results were shown to be as reliable as lateral cephalometric radiograph in all angle classifications. Panoramic radiography can be used as an alternative radiographic technique to detect gonial angle in orthodontic patients. PMID:23365514

  15. [Digital panoramic radiography in patients with rigid internal fixations devices after maxillofacial surgery].

    PubMed

    Nessi, R; Ottolina, P; Lazzerini, F; Giannì, A B

    1998-01-01

    Digital techniques have found promising applications in dental radiology in the recent past, namely with radiovisiography and digital panoramic radiography. These images present some features making them particularly interesting for alveolar bone studies. Digital panoramic radiography with light-emitting phosphors was performed on 16 patients during postoperative follow-up. The patients were previously submitted to multiple maxillofacial osteosynthesis with rigid internal fixation devices (32 miniplates, 12 microplates, 14 screws). Digital images were always observed and printed with analogic-like and Xeroradiographic-like post-processing. Digital panoramic radiographs yielded clear and effective images of the maxillary and mandibular arches and of surgical osteosynthesis, as demonstrated by a retrospective evaluation performed by three independent observers on a blind basis (score 3: 60.42%), with no major interobserver differences (p = .7286). Xeroradiographic-like images were the most effective in depicting bone structures and osteosynthesis materials, thanks to their better detailing and typically lower overall contrast. Among the drawbacks of the digital technique, reduced cassette size may prevent the full view of the mandibular arch from the symphysis to both condylar regions. The edge effect, which is typical of Xeroradiographic images, may mask useful details within the trabecular bone close to metal implants. This effect was present in some of our cases, but it was seldom disturbing according to our retrospective evaluation (score 3: 53.40%), with good interobserver agreement (p = .1117). Digital panoramic radiography proves to be a useful tool to study metal implants after maxillofacial surgery as well as alveolar bone structure. The digital technique markedly reduces the radiation dose to the patient, which is very important for an X-ray examination that must be repeated several times, often in young subjects.

  16. Method and apparatus for providing simultaneous displays in panoramic radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, R.H.

    1980-03-18

    Two different areas of a focal trough of a dental arch structure are simultaneously displayed on a radiograph when tubehead-camera assembly of an x-ray machine panoramically scans the dental arch structure. The different areas of the focal trough are obtained when a pair of parallel disposed film holding devices within the camera are caused to travel in proximate relationship to each other at different speeds. The x-rays activate and pass through one film before activating the other immediately therebehind.

  17. PARAMETERS IN PANORAMIC RADIOGRAPHY FOR DIFFERENTIATION OF RADIOLUCENT LESIONS

    PubMed Central

    Raitz, Ricardo; Assunção, José Narciso Rosa; Correa, Luciana; Fenyo-Pereira, Marlene

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The aims of this study were to establish parameters in panoramic radiography for interpretation of unilocular radiolucent lesions, and to compare the accuracy of diagnoses given by examiners before and after using these parameters. Material and Methods: In Part I, 12 specialists analyzed 24 images and the diagnostic criteria used by each examiner to make correct diagnoses were used to build a list of basic radiographic parameters for each pathology (ameloblastoma, keratocystic odontogenic tumor, dentigerous cyst, and idiopathic bone cavity). In Part II, this list was used by 6 undergraduate students (Un), 8 recently graduated dentists (D), 3 oral pathologists, 3 stomatologists, 3 oral radiologists, and 3 oral surgeons to diagnose the corresponding pathologies in the other set of 24 panoramic radiographs (T2). The same analysis occurred without using this list (T1). The method of generalized estimating equations (GEE) was used in order to estimate the probability of making a correct diagnosis depending on the specialty of the examiner, type of lesion, and moment of the evaluation, T1 or T2 (before or after they had access to the list of parameters, respectively). Results: Higher values were obtained for the probability (GEE) of making a correct diagnosis on T2; the group Un presented the highest improvement (14.6 %); no differences between the probabilities were observed either between Un and D, or among the different groups of specialists. Conclusions: The use of panoramic radiographic parameters did allow improving the diagnostic accuracy for all groups of examiners. PMID:19936512

  18. A dose monitoring system for dental radiography

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chena; Kim, Jo-Eun; Symkhampha, Khanthaly; Lee, Woo-Jin; Huh, Kyung-Hoe; Yi, Won-Jin; Heo, Min-Suk; Choi, Soon-Chul; Yeom, Heon-Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The current study investigates the feasibility of a platform for a nationwide dose monitoring system for dental radiography. The essential elements for an unerring system are also assessed. Materials and Methods An intraoral radiographic machine with 14 X-ray generators and five sensors, 45 panoramic radiographic machines, and 23 cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) models used in Korean dental clinics were surveyed to investigate the type of dose report. A main server for storing the dose data from each radiographic machine was prepared. The dose report transfer pathways from the radiographic machine to the main sever were constructed. An effective dose calculation method was created based on the machine specifications and the exposure parameters of three intraoral radiographic machines, five panoramic radiographic machines, and four CBCTs. A viewing system was developed for both dentists and patients to view the calculated effective dose. Each procedure and the main server were integrated into one system. Results The dose data from each type of radiographic machine was successfully transferred to the main server and converted into an effective dose. The effective dose stored in the main server is automatically connected to a viewing program for dentist and patient access. Conclusion A patient radiation dose monitoring system is feasible for dental clinics. Future research in cooperation with clinicians, industry, and radiologists is needed to ensure format convertibility for an efficient dose monitoring system to monitor unexpected radiation dose. PMID:27358817

  19. Identifying risk groups for osteoporosis by digital panoramic radiography.

    PubMed

    Alapati, Satish; Reddy, Reddy Sudhakara; Tatapudi, Ramesh; Kotha, Ramya; Bodu, Naveen Kumar; Chennoju, Saikiran

    2015-09-01

    Osteoporosis is a disease characterized by low bone mass and microarchitectural deterioration of bone tissue, leading to bone fragility, and enhanced susceptibility to fractures. Dental radiographs, especially panoramic images, have been used to predict bone mineral density. A number of indices, (mandibular cortical index [MCI], mandibular cortical width [MCW], and panoramic mandibular index [PMI]) have been developed to assess and quantify the quality of mandibular bone mass and to observe the signs of resorption. The objectives of the study were to assess mental index (MI), MCW index, and PMI with bone density in identifying risk group for osteoporosis and also to investigate influence of age and gender on MI, MCI, and PMI. After obtaining consent, details regarding age, gender, systemic health status, and oral parafunctional habits were recorded in each patient. Then a digital panoramic radiograph was taken. The image thus obtained was subjected to calibrations and morphometric analysis using Digora version 2.7. The obtained values of indices were compared with the mean values of indices, to evaluate subjects whether they are prone to osteoporosis or not. The obtained information was subjected to statistical analysis for the significance of the parameters. Data analysis showed that calibration indices were highly significant in the assessment of risk group for osteoporosis than noncalibration index. The subjects at a higher risk for development of osteoporosis were old-aged adults with higher prevalence being reported in women compared to male subjects. In conclusion, our results suggest that higher percentage of subjects with undetected decreased bone mineral density may be identified based on trained general dental practitioners analyses of their panoramic radiographs using simple screening analytical calibration MI and MCI.

  20. Optimization of exposure in panoramic radiography while maintaining image quality using adaptive filtering.

    PubMed

    Svenson, Björn; Larsson, Lars; Båth, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of the present study was to investigate the potential of using advanced external adaptive image processing for maintaining image quality while reducing exposure in dental panoramic storage phosphor plate (SPP) radiography. Materials and methods Thirty-seven SPP radiographs of a skull phantom were acquired using a Scanora panoramic X-ray machine with various tube load, tube voltage, SPP sensitivity and filtration settings. The radiographs were processed using General Operator Processor (GOP) technology. Fifteen dentists, all within the dental radiology field, compared the structural image quality of each radiograph with a reference image on a 5-point rating scale in a visual grading characteristics (VGC) study. The reference image was acquired with the acquisition parameters commonly used in daily operation (70 kVp, 150 mAs and sensitivity class 200) and processed using the standard process parameters supplied by the modality vendor. Results All GOP-processed images with similar (or higher) dose as the reference image resulted in higher image quality than the reference. All GOP-processed images with similar image quality as the reference image were acquired at a lower dose than the reference. This indicates that the external image processing improved the image quality compared with the standard processing. Regarding acquisition parameters, no strong dependency of the image quality on the radiation quality was seen and the image quality was mainly affected by the dose. Conclusions The present study indicates that advanced external adaptive image processing may be beneficial in panoramic radiography for increasing the image quality of SPP radiographs or for reducing the exposure while maintaining image quality.

  1. Location of mental foramen using digital panoramic Radiography

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Ajmal; Nataraj, Kannan; Mathew, Vinod B.; Varma, Beena; Mohamed, Shamil; Valappila, Nidhin J.; Meena, Aravind S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Comparative evaluation of the location of mental foramen in different age groups. Determine the variation in position of mental foramen with gender using digital panoramic radiography. Materials and Methods: Digital panoramic radiographs of 250 patients were reviewed. The study population was divided into five age groups with 50 patients each. Radiographic position of mental foramen was evaluated in each radiograph based on three parameters. Measurements were taken in each radiograph using Planmeca Dimaxis pro version 4.4.0 (Helsinki, Finland). The collected data were subjected to statistical analysis using paired Student's t-test. Results: The mean distance of position of mental foramen showed a significant variation within the five age groups. In the first group, female patients showed an increase in mean distance of mental foramen position in relation to three parameters. From the second to fifth groups, male patient showed an increase in the mean distance of mental foramen position. The first and fifth group showed a reduced mean distance of mental foramen position when compared to other age groups. Conclusion: This study concluded that the position of mental foramen varies with age. There was a gender-related variation in position of mental foramen within the population too. PMID:27555723

  2. Digital panoramic radiography versus cone beam computed tomography in the delineation of maxillomandibular tumors.

    PubMed

    Almeida-Barros, Renata Quirino de; Abilio, Vanessa Maria Freire; Yamamoto, Angela Toshie Araki; Melo, Daniela Pita de; Godoy, Gustavo Pina; Bento, Patricia Meira

    2015-01-01

    This research aimed to compare the efficacy of digital panoramic radiography (DPR) with that of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for delineation of odontogenic and nonodontogenic tumors. From November 2009 through March 2011, 23 tumors in the maxillomandibular complex were diagnosed by histopathological examination. All DPRs and CBCTs were obtained and analyzed by a single previously calibrated radiologist, who considered the following radiographic aspects: clarity of the lesion edges, relation with dental elements, involvement of adjacent anatomical structures, cortical bone expansion and disruption, and, if present, type of involved anatomical structures and site of bone expansion and disruption. Of 23 patients, 15 (65.2%) were male and 8 (34.8%) were female. The tumor was classified as odontogenic in 73.9% of patients and nonodontogenic in 26.1% of patients. Analysis revealed that 56.5% of the tumors were located in the mandible, 34.8% in the maxilla, and 8.7% in both arches. For all analyzed variables, CBCTs offered more accurate details than did DPRs. Panoramic radiography should not be the examination of choice to visualize lesions in the maxillomandibular complex.

  3. Fragile X syndrome: panoramic radiographic evaluation of dental anomalies, dental mineralization stage, and mandibular angle.

    PubMed

    Sabbagh-Haddad, Aida; Haddad, Denise Sabbagh; Michel-Crosato, Edgard; Arita, Emiko Saito

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dental radiographic characteristics as described in 40 records of patients with panoramic radiography. The patients were in the range of 6-17 years old, and were divided into two groups (20 subjects who were compatible with the normality standard and 20 individuals diagnosed with the FXS), which were matched for gender and age. Analysis of the panoramic radiographic examination involved the evaluation of dental mineralization stage, mandibular angle size, and presence of dental anomalies in both deciduous and permanent dentitions. The results of radiographic evaluation demonstrated that the chronology of tooth eruption of all third and second lower molars is anticipated in individuals with FXS (p<0.05). In this group, supernumerary deciduous teeth (2.83%), giroversion of permanent teeth (2.31%), and partial anodontia (1.82%) were the most frequent dental anomalies. In addition, an increase was observed in the mandibular angle size in the FXS group (p<0.05). We conclude that knowledge of dental radiographic changes is of great importance for dental surgeons to plan the treatment of these individuals.

  4. Effective doses from panoramic radiography and CBCT (cone beam CT) using dose area product (DAP) in dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Shin, H S; Nam, K C; Park, H; Choi, H U; Kim, H Y

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: We compared the effective dose from panoramic radiography with that from cone beam CT (CBCT) using dose area product under adult and child exposure conditions. Methods: The effective doses of the cephalo, panorama, implant and dental modes of Alphard 3030 (Asahi Roentgen Ind., Co. Ltd, Kyoto, Japan) CBCT and the Jaw, Wide, Facial and temporomandibular joint modes of Rayscan Symphony (RAY Co., Ltd, Hwaseong, Republic of Korea) CBCT were compared with those of CRANEX® 3+ CEPH (Soredex Orion Corporation, Helsinki, Finland) panoramic radiography equipment under adult and child exposure conditions. Each effective dose was calculated using a conversion formula from dose area product meter measured values (VacuTec Messtechnik GmbH, Dresden, Germany). The conversion formulae used were suggested by Helmrot and Alm Carlsson and Batista et al, and they were applied with the tube voltage taken into consideration. Results: The maximum effective doses from the Alphard 3030 and Rayscan Symphony were 67 and 21 times greater than that from panoramic radiography, respectively. The ratios of the effective dose under the child setting to that under the adult condition were 0.60–0.62 and 0.84–0.95, and the maximum differences in effective doses between the adult and child exposure settings were equivalent to 27 and 4 times greater than a panoramic examination in the Alphard 3030 and Rayscan Symphony, respectively. Conclusions: The effective CBCT doses were higher than those of panoramic radiography. The differences in effective doses between the adult and child CBCT settings were dependent on equipment type and exposure parameters. Therefore, adequate mode selection and control of exposure as well as further research are necessary to minimize the effective dose to patients, especially for radiosensitive children. PMID:24845340

  5. Absorbed organ and effective doses from digital intra-oral and panoramic radiography applying the ICRP 103 recommendations for effective dose estimations.

    PubMed

    Granlund, Christina; Thilander-Klang, Anne; Ylhan, Betȕl; Lofthag-Hansen, Sara; Ekestubbe, Annika

    2016-10-01

    During dental radiography, the salivary and thyroid glands are at radiation risk. In 2007, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) updated the methodology for determining the effective dose, and the salivary glands were assigned tissue-specific weighting factors for the first time. The aims of this study were to determine the absorbed dose to the organs and to calculate, applying the ICRP publication 103 tissue-weighting factors, the effective doses delivered during digital intraoral and panoramic radiography. Thermoluminescent dosemeter measurements were performed on an anthropomorphic head and neck phantom. The organ-absorbed doses were measured at 30 locations, representing different radiosensitive organs in the head and neck, and the effective dose was calculated according to the ICRP recommendations. The salivary glands and the oral mucosa received the highest absorbed doses from both intraoral and panoramic radiography. The effective dose from a full-mouth intraoral examination was 15 μSv and for panoramic radiography, the effective dose was in the range of 19-75 μSv, depending on the panoramic equipment used. The effective dose from a full-mouth intraoral examination is lower and that from panoramic radiography is higher than previously reported. Clinicians should be aware of the higher effective dose delivered during panoramic radiography and the risk-benefit profile of this technique must be assessed for the individual patient. The effective dose of radiation from panoramic radiography is higher than previously reported and there is large variability in the delivered radiation dosage among the different types of equipment used.

  6. Absorbed organ and effective doses from digital intra-oral and panoramic radiography applying the ICRP 103 recommendations for effective dose estimations

    PubMed Central

    Thilander-Klang, Anne; Ylhan, Betȕl; Lofthag-Hansen, Sara; Ekestubbe, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Objective: During dental radiography, the salivary and thyroid glands are at radiation risk. In 2007, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) updated the methodology for determining the effective dose, and the salivary glands were assigned tissue-specific weighting factors for the first time. The aims of this study were to determine the absorbed dose to the organs and to calculate, applying the ICRP publication 103 tissue-weighting factors, the effective doses delivered during digital intraoral and panoramic radiography. Methods: Thermoluminescent dosemeter measurements were performed on an anthropomorphic head and neck phantom. The organ-absorbed doses were measured at 30 locations, representing different radiosensitive organs in the head and neck, and the effective dose was calculated according to the ICRP recommendations. Results: The salivary glands and the oral mucosa received the highest absorbed doses from both intraoral and panoramic radiography. The effective dose from a full-mouth intraoral examination was 15 μSv and for panoramic radiography, the effective dose was in the range of 19–75 μSv, depending on the panoramic equipment used. Conclusion: The effective dose from a full-mouth intraoral examination is lower and that from panoramic radiography is higher than previously reported. Clinicians should be aware of the higher effective dose delivered during panoramic radiography and the risk–benefit profile of this technique must be assessed for the individual patient. Advances in knowledge: The effective dose of radiation from panoramic radiography is higher than previously reported and there is large variability in the delivered radiation dosage among the different types of equipment used. PMID:27452261

  7. The comparison of mandibular radiomorphometric indices in panoramic radiography between patients with chronic periodontitis and healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Moeintaghavi, Amir; Hosseinizarch, Hossein; Tabassi, Sara Mohammadzadeh

    2014-07-01

    Osteoporosis and periodontitis are two separate diseases with different origins and manifestations. It is believed that these diseases linked together, because they both lead to bone damage, some risk factors are similar, they both have the highest prevalence in middle-aged and older women. Some studies showed that the use of panoramic radiography and special indices could be reliable tools for osteoporosis screening. This study was performed to evaluate the relationship between periodontal disease and jaw osteoporotic indices. Eighty-two patients with chronic periodontitis and 80 healthy individuals were selected, they had been referred to a private oral and maxillofacial radiology clinic to take a panoramic radiograph. Then panoramic indicators; including the mandibular cortical index (MCI), mental index (MI), and panoramic mandible index (PMI) in both groups were measured, recorded and analyzed. The mean age of investigated individuals was 39/8 ± 9/33. 58.6% of participants were females and 41.4% were males. MI and PMI levels in the periodontal group were more than the periodontally healthy group, but the differences between the two groups was not statistically significant (p = 0.808 and p = 0.102 respectively). The MCI level was significantly different between two groups (p = 0.028). The results of this study showed that there is significant relationship between MCI in panoramic radiography and chronic periodontitis. It is suggested to perform more studies to confrm if this index could be used for screening and indicating of bone status in high risk individuals. This study did not show a strong evidence of a relationship between osteoporosis and periodontitis. Since panoramic radiographs are routinely used for screening in dental practice, any association between radiomorphometric indices of mandible in periodontitis patients might be useful in prediction of osteoporosis in patients referring to dental clinics.

  8. Genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of X-ray on buccal epithelial cells following panoramic radiography: A pediatric study.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Poonam; Vinuth, Dhundanalli Puttalingaiah; Haranal, Shashidevi; Thippanna, Chandrashekar K; Naresh, Nitesh; Moger, Ganapathi

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a potent mutagenic agent capable of inducing both mutation and chromosomal aberrations. Non-lethal doses of ionizing radiation may induce genomic instability favoring carcinogenesis. In spite of their mutagenic potential, this kind of radiation is an important tool for diagnosis of the disease and is used in medical and dental practice. It has been believed that the number of micronucleus and increased frequency of other nuclear alterations, including karyorrhexis, condensed chromatin and pyknosis, are related to the increasing effects of carcinogens. Many approaches and techniques have been developed for the monitoring of human populations exposed to various mutagens, but the analysis of micronuclei (MN) has become a standard approach for the assessment of chromosomal damage in human populations. To assess the effects of radiation exposure from panoramic radiography on the buccal epithelial cells (BECs) of pediatric patients. The study included 20 pediatric patients who had to undergo panoramic radiography for further dental treatment. Exfoliated BECs were obtained and examined immediately before and 10 days after radiation exposure. The cells were stained using rapid Papanicolaou (PAP) kit. Evaluation for MN and nuclear alterations was carried out by an oral pathologist and data were statistically analyzed using the "t" test. The mean number of MN in the BECs before exposure of pediatric patients to panoramic radiography was 4.25 and after exposure was 4.40. This difference was not found to be statistically significant (P < 0.0001). However, the mean nuclear alterations of 8.70 and 15.75 before and after exposure were statistically significant (P < 0.0001). Panoramic radiographs can induce cytotoxicity but not genotoxic effects in buccal mucosal cells. Hence, dental radiographs should be prescribed only when deemed indispensable.

  9. Clinical canine dental radiography.

    PubMed

    Bannon, Kristin M

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide small animal veterinarians in private practice a guideline for interpretation of the most common findings in canine intraoral radiology. Normal oral and dental anatomy is presented. A brief review of variations of normal, common periodontal and endodontic pathology findings and developmental anomalies is provided.

  10. Pain Sensation and Postsurgical Complications in Posterior Mandibular Implant Placement Using Ridge Mapping, Panoramic Radiography, and Infiltration Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this study was to investigate intrasurgical and after surgical, pain and the incidence of after surgical alteration of sensation in the mandible and lower lip when placing implants in the posterior mandible using ridge mapping, panoramic radiography, and infiltration anesthesia. Methods. This was a longitudinal clinical study of healthy patients needing implant placement in the posterior mandible. After thorough examination and treatment plan using ridge mapping and panoramic radiography, all patients received dental implants under local infiltration anesthesia. The patients were then given a questionnaire to assess the pain during anesthesia and implant surgery. Change of sensation in the lower lip was evaluated by standard neurosensory examination tests at 7 days and 1 and 4 months. Prosthetic treatment was carried out 4 months postsurgery and the patients were followed for an average of 28.5 months afterwards. Results. A total of 103 implants were placed in 62 patients. Patients reported very minor pain during injection. No pain was reported during either implant placement or bone grafting procedures. No alteration of sensation in the mandible or lower lip was recorded postsurgery. Conclusion. In most cases, ridge mapping, panoramic radiography, and infiltration anesthesia are sufficient for posterior mandibular implant placement without pain or complications. PMID:23762571

  11. Diagnostic value of panoramic radiography in predicting inferior alveolar nerve injury after mandibular third molar extraction: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, W; Yin, W; Zhang, R; Li, J; Zheng, Y

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive value of panoramic radiography on inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injury after extraction of the mandibular third molar. Relevant studies up to 1 June 2014 that discussed the association of panoramic radiography signs and post-mandibular third molar extraction IAN injury were systematically retrieved from the databases of PubMed, Embase, Springerlink, Web of Science and Cochrane library. The effect size of pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratios (PLR), negative likelihood ratios (NLR) and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) with their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were statistically analysed with Meta-disc 1.4 software. Nine articles were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled estimates of sensitivity and specificity were 0.56 (95% CI: 0.50-0.61) and 0.86 (95% CI: 0.84-0.87), respectively. The overall PLR was 3.46 (95% CI: 2.02-5.92) and overall NLR was 0.58 (95% CI: 0.45-0.73). The pooled estimate of DOR was 6.49 (95% CI: 2.92-14.44). The area under the summary receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.7143 ± 0.0604. The meta-analysis indicated that interpretation of panoramic radiography based on darkening of the root had a high specificity in predicting IAN injury after mandibular third molar extraction. However, the ability of this panoramic radiography marker to detect true positive IAN injury was not satisfactory. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  12. Dose area product reference levels in dental panoramic radiology.

    PubMed

    Tierris, Christine E; Yakoumakis, Emmanuel N; Bramis, George N; Georgiou, Evangelos

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure DAP (Dose Area Product) values in panoramic radiology with the use of a DAP meter, to determine corresponding reference levels, and to compare DAP between panoramic and intraoral radiology. DAP was measured in 62 panoramic X-ray units for 3 types of exposure (male, female and child) and in 20 intraoral X-ray units of 50, 60 and 70 kVp. DAP reference levels were 117 mGy cm2, 97 mGy cm2 and 77 mGy cm2 for exposure of a male, female and child respectively. Results showed that DAP from a panoramic dental examination is approximately twice that from a single intraoral examination. DAP meter is a very convenient and easy to use tool for patient dosimetry and for the establishment of reference levels in dental panoramic radiology.

  13. Fragile X syndrome: panoramic radiographic evaluation of dental anomalies, dental mineralization stage, and mandibular angle

    PubMed Central

    Sabbagh-Haddad, Aida; Haddad, Denise Sabbagh; Michel-Crosato, Edgard; Arita, Emiko Saito

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a disorder linked to the chromosome X long arm (Xq27.3), which is identified by a constriction named fragile site. It determines various changes, such as behavioral or emotional problems, learning difficulties, and intellectual disabilities. Craniofacial abnormalities such as elongated and narrow face, prominent forehead, broad nose, large and prominent ear pavilions, strabismus, and myopia are frequent characteristics. Regarding the oral aspects, deep and high-arched palate, mandibular prognathism, and malocclusion are also observed. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dental radiographic characteristics as described in 40 records of patients with panoramic radiography. Material and Methods: The patients were in the range of 6–17 years old, and were divided into two groups (20 subjects who were compatible with the normality standard and 20 individuals diagnosed with the FXS), which were matched for gender and age. Analysis of the panoramic radiographic examination involved the evaluation of dental mineralization stage, mandibular angle size, and presence of dental anomalies in both deciduous and permanent dentitions. Results: The results of radiographic evaluation demonstrated that the chronology of tooth eruption of all third and second lower molars is anticipated in individuals with FXS (p<0.05). In this group, supernumerary deciduous teeth (2.83%), giroversion of permanent teeth (2.31%), and partial anodontia (1.82%) were the most frequent dental anomalies. In addition, an increase was observed in the mandibular angle size in the FXS group (p<0.05). Conclusion: We conclude that knowledge of dental radiographic changes is of great importance for dental surgeons to plan the treatment of these individuals. PMID:27812623

  14. [Absorbed dose and the effective dose of panoramic temporo mandibular joint radiography].

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Ayae; Okano, Tsuneichi; Gotoh, Kenichi; Yokoi, Midori; Hirukawa, Akiko; Okumura, Shinji; Koyama, Syuji

    2011-01-01

    This study measured the radiation doses absorbed by the patient during Panoramic temporo mandibular joint radiography (Panoramic TMJ), Schüllers method and Orbitoramus projection. The dose of the frontal view in Panoramic TMJ was compared to that with Orbitoramus projection and the lateral view in Panoramic TMJ was compared to that with Schüllers method. We measured the doses received by various organs and calculated the effective doses using the guidelines of the International Commission on Radiological Protection in Publication 103. Organ absorbed doses were measured using an anthropomorphic phantom, loaded with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD), located at 160 sensitive sites. The dose shows the sum value of irradiation on both the right and left sides. In addition, we set a few different exposure field sizes. The effective dose for a frontal view in Panoramic TMJ was 11 µSv, and that for the lateral view was 14 µSv. The lens of the Orbitoramus projection was 40 times higher than the frontal view in Panoramic TMJ. Although the effective dose of the lateral view in Panoramic TMJ was 3 times higher than that of the small exposure field (10×10 cm on film) in Schüller's method, it was the same as that of a mid-sized exposure field. When the exposure field in the inferior 1/3 was reduced during panoramic TMJ, the effective doses could be decreased. Therefore we recommend that the size of the exposure field in Panoramic TMJ be decreased.

  15. Measurement of dose-width product in panoramic dental radiology.

    PubMed

    Isoardi, P; Ropolo, R

    2003-02-01

    The National Radiological Protection Board has recommended the introduction of dose-width product (DWP) for the measurement of patient dose in panoramic dental radiology. The present work describes a method for measuring DWP using a pencil ionization chamber. The technique was tested on five panoramic dental units; the reproducibility of the method was 5.7%. In order to test the method, DWP was also assessed using thermoluminescent dosemeters and film. The results obtained agreed within 8.6% with those obtained using the pencil ionization chamber method. The proposed method appears to be simple and precise.

  16. The limit values for brightness and contrast adjustment in digital panoramic radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahra, A. T.; Syahraini, S. I.; Kiswanjaya, B.; Ustriyana, P.

    2017-08-01

    There is an overall lack of studies about digital panoramic radiography. The application of image enhancement techniques is still being done based on the operator’s preferences, since there is no objective limitation. The aim is to evaluate the limit values of the brightness and contrast adjustment in digital panoramic radiography. Digital panoramic radiographs were divided into three groups (dark, medium, and light), and the contrast and brightness adjustments were done using Digora for Windows. The static evaluations were done using three criteria: 1 if the image had lower quality, 2 if there was no difference and 3 if the image had better quality. The radiographic changes differed in each group depending on the initial imaging conditions. The brightness adjustment limit values in the dark and medium groups were -10 and +20, respectively, and -20 and +10 in the light group. The contrast adjustment limit values in all of the groups were -10 and +10.

  17. Comparative adoption of cone beam computed tomography and panoramic radiography machines across Australia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, A; Critchley, S; Monsour, P A

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the current adoption of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and panoramic radiography (PR) machines across Australia. Information regarding registered CBCT and PR machines was obtained from radiation regulators across Australia. The number of X-ray machines was correlated with the population size, the number of dentists, and the gross state product (GSP) per capita, to determine the best fitting regression model(s). In 2014, there were 232 CBCT and 1681 PR machines registered in Australia. Based on absolute counts, Queensland had the largest number of CBCT and PR machines whereas the Northern Territory had the smallest number. However, when based on accessibility in terms of the population size and the number of dentists, the Australian Capital Territory had the most CBCT machines and Western Australia had the most PR machines. The number of X-ray machines correlated strongly with both the population size and the number of dentists, but not with the GSP per capita. In 2014, the ratio of PR to CBCT machines was approximately 7:1. Projected increases in either the population size or the number of dentists could positively impact on the adoption of PR and CBCT machines in Australia. © 2016 Australian Dental Association.

  18. Evaluation of diagnostic accuracy of conventional and digital periapical radiography, panoramic radiography, and cone-beam computed tomography in the assessment of alveolar bone loss.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Wilton Mitsunari; Vessoni Iwaki, Lilian Cristina; Da Silva, Mariliani Chicarelli; Tonin, Renata Hernandes

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of different radiographic methods in the assessment of proximal alveolar bone loss (ABL). ABL, the distance between cement-enamel junction and alveolar bone crest, was measured in 70 mandibular human teeth - directly on the mandibles (control), using conventional periapical radiography with film holders (Rinn XCP and Han-Shin), digital periapical radiography with complementary metal-oxide semiconductor sensor, conventional panoramic, and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Three programs were used to measure ABL on the images: Image tool 3.0 (University of Texas Health Sciences Center, San Antonio, Texas, USA), Kodak Imaging 6.1 (Kodak Dental Imaging 6.1, Carestream Health(®), Rochester, NY, USA), and i-CAT vision 1.6.20. Statistical analysis used ANOVA and Tukey's test at 5% significance level. The tomographic images showed the highest means, whereas the lowest were found for periapical with Han-Shin. Controls differed from periapical with Han-Shin (P < 0.0001). CBCT differed from panoramic (P = 0.0130), periapical with Rinn XCP (P = 0.0066), periapical with Han-Shin (P < 0.0001), and digital periapical (P = 0.0027). Conventional periapicals with film holders differed from each other (P = 0.0007). Digital periapical differed from conventional periapical with Han-Shin (P = 0.0004). Conventional periapical with Han-Shin film holder was the only method that differed from the controls. CBCT had the closest means to the controls.

  19. Feline dental radiography and radiology: A primer.

    PubMed

    Niemiec, Brook A

    2014-11-01

    Information crucial to the diagnosis and treatment of feline oral diseases can be ascertained using dental radiography and the inclusion of this technology has been shown to be the best way to improve a dental practice. Becoming familar with the techniques required for dental radiology and radiography can, therefore, be greatly beneficial. Novices to dental radiography may need some time to adjust and become comfortable with the techniques. If using dental radiographic film, the generally recommended 'E' or 'F' speeds may be frustrating at first, due to their more specific exposure and image development requirements. Although interpreting dental radiographs is similar to interpreting a standard bony radiograph, there are pathologic states that are unique to the oral cavity and several normal anatomic structures that may mimic pathologic changes. Determining which teeth have been imaged also requires a firm knowledge of oral anatomy as well as the architecture of dental films/digital systems. This article draws on a range of dental radiography and radiology resources, and the benefit of the author's own experience, to review the basics of taking and interpreting intraoral dental radiographs. A simplified method for positioning the tubehead is explained and classic examples of some common oral pathologies are provided. © ISFM and AAFP 2014.

  20. Analysis of micronuclei in buccal epithelial cells in patients subjected to panoramic radiography.

    PubMed

    Waingade, Manjushri; Medikeri, Raghavendra S

    2012-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a well-known carcinogen in humans. Chromosomal aberrations and formation of micronuclei in cell cytoplasm are early biological evidence of carcinogenesis. This study was undertaken to assess the genotoxic effect of panoramic radiography in the buccal epithelial cells. The study included 60 healthy individuals (median age 23.5 years; age range 12-65 years) who underwent panoramic radiographic examination. Exfoliated buccal epithelial cells were obtained immediately before and 10 days after radiation exposure. The cells were stained with Giemsa and evaluated for micronuclei by scoring 1000 cells per sample. The paired 't ' test was used to find out the significance of difference in the number of micronuclei before and after x-ray exposure. The Karl Pearson correlation coefficient was used to find out the correlation between age and micronucleated cell frequencies and number of micronucleus per 1000 cells. The ANOVA test was used to find out if there were significant differences in micronucleated cell frequencies between different age-groups. Student's unpaired 't' test was used to find out the significance of difference in micronucleated cell frequencies and number of micronucleus per 1000 cells between genders. The paired 't' test showed that micronucleated cell frequencies (P = 0.02) and number of micronucleus per 1000 cells (P = 0.047) were significantly higher after radiographic exposure. The mean number of micronucleated cells before and after radiation exposure were 0.48 ± 0.14 and 0.51 ± 0.15, respectively. There was statistically significant increase in the frequency of micronuclei in buccal epithelial cells after exposure to panoramic radiography. The correlation of micronucleus frequency with age and gender was statistically nonsignificant. The results indicate that panoramic radiography may induce genotoxic effects in buccal epithelial cells. Considering this risk, panoramic radiography should be used cautiously.

  1. Dose-area product measurements in panoramic dental radiology.

    PubMed

    Poppe, B; Looe, H K; Pfaffenberger, A; Chofor, N; Eenboom, F; Sering, M; Rühmann, A; Poplawski, A; Willborn, K

    2007-01-01

    In this study, dose-area product (DAP) measurements in panoramic dental radiology have been performed in Germany. The results obtained in this study were proposed as diagnostic reference levels (DRLs). A representative number of dental panoramic units, both with digital and conventional image receptors, have been chosen. Common statistical parameters such as mean, standard deviation and 3rd quartile have been calculated. For four different standard programmes, 'large adult', 'adult male', 'adult female' and 'child', the proposed DRLs are 101, 87, 84 and 75 mGy cm(2), respectively. No clear tendency to a generalised dose reduction from the transition to digital techniques has been observed. Effective doses have been calculated from E/DAP conversion factors published in literature. Even though these values differ by a factor of approximately 3, upper limits of 15.8-21.2 microSv for the four different exposure settings were derived from the data.

  2. The integral dose in panoramic intraoral x-ray tube radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Hayami, A.; Fujishita, M.; Sumida, A.; Kanke, M.; Fujiki, T.; Uemura, S.; Fuchihata, H.

    1983-07-01

    A Monte Carlo computer program was developed to estimate the integral dose to the head and thyroid for panoramic intraoral x-ray tube radiography. The advantage of this computer simulation is that it is able to avoid many of the difficulties associated with low-energy and low-dose x-ray dosimetry. The calculations were made for maxillary and mandibular projections separately, using 10 kv. increments between 40 and 60 kv. The results obtained were presented in terms of the integral dose per milliampere second. Typical integral doses for a routine examination of the head are 2.1 mJ. and 8.5 microJ for the thyroid during mandibular radiography and 1.7 microJ for the thyroid during radiography of the maxilla using 55 kv. and 0.5 mAs.

  3. Doses to critical organs from dental radiography.

    PubMed

    Antoku, S; Kihara, T; Russell, W J; Beach, D R

    1976-02-01

    Participants in the jointly sponsored Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission and Japanese National Institute of Health (ABCC-JNIH) Adult Health Study, a fixed-population sample under continual observation for late effects of the atomic bombs, are also being evaluated for their exposure to other sources of ionizing radiation. In the present study, the subjects' thyroid, lens, pituitary, bone marrow, and gonadal doses acquired during dental radiography were estimated from dosimetry of simulated human material exposed according to technical factors as ascertained in previously reported surveys of patients, dental clinics and hospitals, and dosimetry with phantom human material containing lithium fluoride thermoluminescence dosimeters and ionization chambers. Dental radiography comprised a relatively small segment of the contaminating sources of ionizing radiation exposure among this population sample. Efforts should be made to improve exposure conditions, especially in view of the increasing frequency of dental x-ray examinations.

  4. National reference doses for dental cephalometric radiography.

    PubMed

    Holroyd, J R

    2011-12-01

    Diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) are an important tool in the optimisation of clinical radiography. Although national DRLs are provided for many diagnostic procedures including dental intra-oral radiography, there are currently no national DRLs set for cephalometric radiography. In the absence of formal national DRLs, the Health Protection Agency (HPA) has previously published National Reference Doses (NRDs) covering a wide range of diagnostic X-ray examinations. The aim of this study was to determine provisional NRDs for cephalometric radiography. Measurements made by the Dental X-ray Protection Service (DXPS) of the HPA, as part of the cephalometric X-ray equipment testing service provided to dentists and dental trade companies throughout the UK, were used to derive provisional NRDs. Dose-area product measurements were made on 42 X-ray sets. Third quartile dose-area product values for adult and child lateral cephalometric radiography were found to be 41 mGy cm² and 25 mGy cm², respectively, with individual measurements ranging from 3 mGy cm² to 108 mGy cm². This report proposes provisional NRDs of 40 mGy cm² and 25 mGy cm² for adult and child lateral cephalometric radiographs, respectively; these doses could be considered by employers when establishing their local DRLs.

  5. Assessment of vertical facial and dentoalveolar changes using panoramic radiography.

    PubMed

    Nohadani, Nasila; Ruf, Sabine

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyse longitudinal vertical facial and dentoalveolar changes using panoramic radiographs (PRs) and to compare the results with measurements on lateral cephalometric radiographs (LCRs) in order to determine whether, under certain circumstances, the radiation dose for a patient may be reduced by taking only a PR instead of a PR and a LCR. Pre- and post-treatment PRs and LCRs of 30 (15 females and 15 males) orthodontically treated adolescents (mean age pre-treatment 10.9 years, post-treatment 13.4 years) were analysed using Pearson's correlation coefficients and gender differences using Fisher's z-transformation. The results revealed that most variables exhibited larger absolute values on PRs than on LCRs. Comparison of dentoskeletal morphology between the LCRs and the PRs revealed moderate to high, mostly statistically significant, interrelations both before and after orthodontic treatment. The lowest correlations were found for the maxillary jaw base angle (NL/H; r= 0.35***) and the highest for the gonial angle (ML/RL; r = 0.90***). However, when assessing the combined growth and treatment changes from before to after treatment, only weak to moderate, not statistically significant, interrelations were found between LCRs and PRs. Anterior face height (AFH; r = 0.43***), the mandibular plane angle (ML/H; r = 0.06*), and the distance of the incisal tip of the most extruded mandibular incisor to the ML-line (ii-ML; r = -0.21*) were the only statistically significant parameters. The average group differences for growth and treatment changes, however, were small for most parameters. Analysis of vertical facial and dentoalveolar parameters on PRs delivers a moderate approximation to the situation depicted on LCRs. However, PRs cannot be recommended for the analysis of individual longitudinal changes in vertical facial and dentoalveolar parameters.

  6. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following section... individual State licensure processes, all of which include assessment of competence in dental radiography....

  7. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following section... individual State licensure processes, all of which include assessment of competence in dental radiography....

  8. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following section... individual State licensure processes, all of which include assessment of competence in dental radiography....

  9. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following section... individual State licensure processes, all of which include assessment of competence in dental radiography....

  10. Diagnosis of simulated condylar bone defects using panoramic radiography, spiral tomography and cone-beam computed tomography: A comparison study

    PubMed Central

    Salemi, Fatemeh; Shokri, Abbas; Baharvand, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Radiographic examination is one of the most important parts of the clinical assessment routine for temporomandibular disorders. The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography(CBCT) with panoramic radiography and spiral computed tomography for the detection of the simulated mandibular condyle bone lesions. Study Design: The sample consisted of 10 TMJs from 5 dried human skulls. Simulated erosive and osteophytic lesions were created in 3 different sizes using round diamond bur and bone chips, respectively. Panoramic radiography, spiral tomography and cone-beam computed tomography were used in defect detection. Data were statistically analyzed with the Mann-Whitney test. The reliability and degrees of agreement between two observers were also determined by the mean of Cohen’s Kappa analysis. Results: CBCT had a statistically significant superiority than other studied techniques in detection of both erosive and osteophytic lesions with different sizes. There were significant differences between tomography and panoramic in correct detection of both erosive and osteophytic lesions with 1mm and 1.5 mm in size. However, there were no significant differences between Tomography and Panoramic in correct detection of both erosive and osteophytic lesions with 0.5 mm in size. Conclusions: CBCT images provide a greater diagnostic accuracy than spiral tomography and panoramic radiography in the detection of condylar bone erosions and osteophytes. Key words:Bone defect, Condyle, CBCT, Panoramic, radiography. PMID:25810839

  11. Comparison between DICOM-calibrated and uncalibrated consumer grade and 6-MP displays under different lighting conditions in panoramic radiography

    PubMed Central

    Haapea, M; Liukkonen, E; Huumonen, S; Tervonen, O; Nieminen, M T

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To compare observer performance in the detection of anatomical structures and pathology in panoramic radiographs using consumer grade with and without digital imaging and communication in medicine (DICOM)-calibration and 6-megapixel (6-MP) displays under different lighting conditions. Methods: 30 panoramic radiographs were randomly evaluated on three displays under bright (510 lx) and dim (16 lx) ambient lighting by two observers with different years of experience. Dentinoenamel junction, dentinal caries and periapical inflammatory lesions, visibility of cortical border of the floor and pathological lesions in maxillary sinus were evaluated. Consensus between the observers was considered as reference. Intraobserver agreement was determined. Proportion of equivalent ratings and weighted kappa were used to assess reliability. The level of significance was set to p < 0.05. Results: The proportion of equivalent ratings with consensus differed between uncalibrated and DICOM-calibrated consumer grade displays in dentinal caries in the lower molar in dim lighting (p = 0.021) and between DICOM-calibrated consumer grade and 6-MP display in bright lighting (p = 0.038) for an experienced observer. Significant differences were found between uncalibrated and DICOM-calibrated consumer grade displays in dentinal caries in bright lighting (p = 0.044) and periapical lesions in the upper molar in dim lighting (p = 0.008) for a less experienced observer. Intraobserver reliability was better at detecting dentinal caries than at detecting periapical and maxillary sinus pathology. Conclusions: DICOM calibration may improve observer performance in panoramic radiography in different lighting conditions. Therefore, a DICOM-calibrated consumer grade display can be used instead of a medical display in dental practice without compromising the diagnostic quality. PMID:25564888

  12. Comparison between DICOM-calibrated and uncalibrated consumer grade and 6-MP displays under different lighting conditions in panoramic radiography.

    PubMed

    Kallio-Pulkkinen, S; Haapea, M; Liukkonen, E; Huumonen, S; Tervonen, O; Nieminen, M T

    2015-01-01

    To compare observer performance in the detection of anatomical structures and pathology in panoramic radiographs using consumer grade with and without digital imaging and communication in medicine (DICOM)-calibration and 6-megapixel (6-MP) displays under different lighting conditions. 30 panoramic radiographs were randomly evaluated on three displays under bright (510 lx) and dim (16 lx) ambient lighting by two observers with different years of experience. Dentinoenamel junction, dentinal caries and periapical inflammatory lesions, visibility of cortical border of the floor and pathological lesions in maxillary sinus were evaluated. Consensus between the observers was considered as reference. Intraobserver agreement was determined. Proportion of equivalent ratings and weighted kappa were used to assess reliability. The level of significance was set to p < 0.05. The proportion of equivalent ratings with consensus differed between uncalibrated and DICOM-calibrated consumer grade displays in dentinal caries in the lower molar in dim lighting (p = 0.021) and between DICOM-calibrated consumer grade and 6-MP display in bright lighting (p = 0.038) for an experienced observer. Significant differences were found between uncalibrated and DICOM-calibrated consumer grade displays in dentinal caries in bright lighting (p = 0.044) and periapical lesions in the upper molar in dim lighting (p = 0.008) for a less experienced observer. Intraobserver reliability was better at detecting dentinal caries than at detecting periapical and maxillary sinus pathology. DICOM calibration may improve observer performance in panoramic radiography in different lighting conditions. Therefore, a DICOM-calibrated consumer grade display can be used instead of a medical display in dental practice without compromising the diagnostic quality.

  13. Effects of dose reduction on the detectability of standardized radiolucent lesions in digital panoramic radiography.

    PubMed

    Dula, K; Sanderink, G; van der Stelt, P F; Mini, R; Buser, D

    1998-08-01

    Dose reduction in digital panoramic radiography was studied. Intentional underexposure was performed with the Orthophos DS while six different human mandibles were radiographed. Exposure settings were 69 kV/15 mA (standard), 64 kV/16 mA, and 60 kV/16 mA. Standardized spherical defects, each either 1 or 1.25 mm in diameter, were simulated in 288 of 432 images, and seven observers decided whether defects were present or not. Areas under the receiver operating characteristics curves were calculated. They showed no significant differences in the detectability of the 1-mm defect at 69, 64, or 60 kV. For the 1.25-mm defect, no difference was found between the 69 and 60 kV images, but a statistically significant different detectability was found for 64 kV images in comparison with both 69 and 60 kV images. A dose reduction of up to 43% was ascertained with a Pedo-RT-Humanoid phantom when panoramic radiography was performed at 60 kV/16 mA. The conclusion is that with the Orthophos DS, it seems possible to reduce the dose rate of x-rays without loss of diagnostic quality in the case of radiolucent changes.

  14. Assessment of maxillary third molars with panoramic radiography and cone-beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yun-Hoa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated maxillary third molars and their relation to the maxillary sinus using panoramic radiography and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods A total of 395 maxillary third molars in 234 patients were examined using panoramic radiographs and CBCT images. We examined the eruption level of the maxillary third molars, the available retromolar space, the angulation, the relationship to the second molars, the number of roots, and the relationship between the roots and the sinus. Results Females had a higher frequency of maxillary third molars with occlusal planes apical to the cervical line of the second molar (Level C) than males. All third molars with insufficient retromolar space were Level C. The most common angulation was vertical, followed by buccoangular. Almost all of the Level C molars were in contact with the roots of the second molar. Erupted teeth most commonly had three roots, and completely impacted teeth most commonly had one root. The superimposition of one third of the root and the sinus floor was most commonly associated with the sinus floor being located on the buccal side of the root. Conclusion Eruption levels were differently distributed according to gender. A statistically significant association was found between the eruption level and the available retromolar space. When panoramic radiographs showed a superimposition of the roots and the sinus floor, expansion of the sinus to the buccal side of the root was generally observed in CBCT images. PMID:26730371

  15. Magnification rate of digital panoramic radiographs and its effectiveness for pre-operative assessment of dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Y-K; Park, J-Y; Kim, S-G; Kim, J-S; Kim, J-D

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy and effectiveness of digital panoramic radiographs for pre-operative assessment of dental implants. Methods We selected 86 patients (221 implants) and calculated the length of the planned implant based on the distance between a selection of critical anatomical structures and the alveolar crest using the scaling tools provided in the digital panoramic system. We analysed the magnification rate and the difference between the actual inserted implant length and planned implant length according to the location of the implant placement and the clarity of anatomical structures seen in the panoramic radiographs. Results There was no significant difference between the planned implant length and actual inserted implant length (P > 0.05). The magnification rate of the width and length of the inserted implants, seen in the digital panoramic radiographs, was 127.28 ± 13.47% and 128.22 ± 4.17%, respectively. The magnification rate of the implant width was largest in the mandibular anterior part and there was a significant difference in the magnification rate of the length of implants between the maxilla and the mandible (P < 0.05). When the clarity of anatomical structures seen in the panoramic radiographs is low, the magnification rate of the width of the inserted implants is significantly higher (P < 0.05), but there is no significant difference between the planned implant length and actual inserted implant length according to the clarity of anatomical structures (P < 0.05). Conclusions Digital panoramic radiography can be considered a simple, readily available and considerably accurate pre-operative assessment tool in the vertical dimension for dental implant therapy. PMID:21239569

  16. Dental panoramic image analysis for enhancement biomarker of mandibular condyle for osteoporosis early detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suprijanto; Azhari; Juliastuti, E.; Septyvergy, A.; Setyagar, N. P. P.

    2016-03-01

    Osteoporosis is a degenerative disease characterized by low Bone Mineral Density (BMD). Currently, a BMD level is determined by Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA) at the lumbar vertebrae and femur. Previous studies reported that dental panoramic radiography image has potential information for early osteoporosis detection. This work reported alternative scheme, that consists of the determination of the Region of Interest (ROI) the condyle mandibular in the image as biomarker and feature extraction from ROI and classification of bone conditions. The minimum value of intensity in the cavity area is used to compensate an offset on the ROI. For feature extraction, the fraction of intensity values in the ROI that represent high bone density and the ROI total area is perfomed. The classification will be evaluated from the ability of each feature and its combinations for the BMD detection in 2 classes (normal and abnormal), with the artificial neural network method. The evaluation system used 105 panoramic image data from menopause women which consist of 36 training data and 69 test data that were divided into 2 classes. The 2 classes of classification obtained 88.0% accuracy rate and 88.0% sensitivity rate.

  17. Comparative Study of the Diagnostic Value of Panoramic and Conventional Radiography of the Wrist in Scaphoid Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Ezoddini Ardakani, Fatemeh; Zangoie Booshehri, Maryam; Banadaki, Seyed Hossein Saeed; Nafisi-Moghadam, Reza

    2012-01-01

    Background Scaphoid fractures are the most common type of carpal fractures. Objectives The aim of the study was to compare the diagnostic value of panoramic and conventional radiographs of the wrist in scaphoid fractures. Patients and Methods The panoramic and conventional radiographs of 122 patients with acute and chronic wrist trauma were studied. The radiographs were analyzed and examined by two independent radiologist observers; one physician radiologist and one maxillofacial radiologist. The final diagnosis was made by an orthopedic specialist. Kappa test was used for statistical calculations, inter- and intra-observer agreement and correlation between the two techniques. Results Wrist panoramic radiography was more accurate than conventional radiography for ruling out scaphoid fractures. There was an agreement in 85% or more of the cases. Agreement values were higher with better inter and intra observer agreement for panoramic examinations than conventional radiographic examinations. Conclusion The panoramic examination of the wrist is a useful technique for the diagnosis and follow-up of scaphoid fractures. Its use is recommended as a complement to conventional radiography in cases with inconclusive findings. PMID:23599708

  18. Anatomical variations of mandibular canal detected by panoramic radiography and CT: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dutra, Kamile; Porporatti, André Luís; Mezzomo, Luis A; De Luca Canto, Graziela; Flores-Mir, Carlos; Corrêa, Márcio

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the anatomical variations of the mandibular canal through assessment in situ, panoramic radiography, CT or CBCT and assess their frequency. Methods: Articles were selected from databases (Cochrane Library, LILACS, ProQuest, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Google Scholar), articles without limitations of language, in which the main objective was to evaluate the frequency of bifurcation of the mandibular canal through assessment in situ, panoramic radiography, CT or CBCT were selected. A meta-analysis of prevalence using random effects was performed. Results: Using a selection process in two phases, 15 articles were identified, and a meta-analysis was conducted. The results from these meta-analyses showed that the overall prevalence of anatomical variations for in situ studies was 6.46%, and through assessment of panoramic radiography and CT or CBCT the overall prevalence shown was 4.20% and 16.25%, respectively. Conclusions: There are two types of variations of the mandibular canal: the retromolar canal and bifid mandibular canal. The frequency variations through assessing in situ, panoramic radiography and CT or CBCT were 6.46%, 4.20% and 16.25%, respectively. PMID:26576624

  19. Dental radiography in New Zealand: digital versus film.

    PubMed

    Ting, N A; Broadbent, J M; Duncan, W J

    2013-09-01

    Digital x-ray systems offer advantages over conventional film systems, yet many dentists have not adopted digital technology. To assess New Zealand dental practitioners' use of--and preferences for--dental radiography systems. Cross-sectional survey. General and specialist dental practice. Postal questionnaire survey of a sample of 770 dentists (520 randomly selected general dental practitioners and all 250 specialists) listed in the 2012 NZ Dental Council Register. Type of radiography systems used by dentists. Dentists' experiences and opinions of conventional film and digital radiography. The participation rate was 55.2%. Digital radiography systems were used by 58.0% of participating dentists, most commonly among those aged 31-40 years. Users of digital radiography tended to report greater satisfaction with their radiography systems than users conventional films. Two-thirds of film users were interested in switching to digital radiography in the near future. Reasons given by conventional film users for not using digital radiography included cost, difficulty in integrating with other software systems, concern about potential technical errors, and the size and nature of the intra-oral sensors. Many dental practitioners have still not adopted digital radiography, yet its users are more satisfied with their radiography systems than are conventional film users. The latter may find changing to a digital system to be satisfying and rewarding.

  20. Utility of panoramic radiography for identification of the pubertal growth period.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Luciana Jácome; de Oliveira Gamba, Thiago; Visconti, Maria Augusta Portella Guedes; Ambrosano, Glaucia Maria Bovi; Haiter-Neto, Francisco; Freitas, Deborah Queiroz

    2016-04-01

    Our aim in this study was to investigate the association between dental mineralization stages and the periods of the pubertal growth spurt (PGS). The sample included panoramic and hand-wrist radiographs from 491 subjects (222 boys, 269 girls) aged 7 to 17 years. Dental development was rated, and skeletal maturation was evaluated. The relevant associations were investigated by analysis of ordinal multinomial logistic regression. The second molar (odds ratio [OR] = 4.34) and the first premolar (OR = 2.45) were the best growth predictors for girls. For boys, the second molar (OR = 6.80), second premolar (OR = 2.41), and canine (OR = 3.21) proved to be the best predictors. Stages D and E of the second molar for girls, and stages E and F for boys, corresponded to the onset of the accelerated growth spurt. Stage F of the second molar for girls and stage G for boys corresponded to the peak of the PGS. At the end of the PGS, most teeth had already attained apical closure. In girls, however, most second molars were found at stage G. An association exists between the dental mineralization stages and the periods of the PGS, especially for second molars. Panoramic radiographs can be used as the first diagnostic tool to estimate the pubertal growth period. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The prevalence of foreign bodies in jaw bones on panoramic radiography

    PubMed Central

    Omezli, Mehmet Melih; Torul, Damla; Sivrikaya, Efe Can

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Foreign bodies can be deposited in the oral cavity either by traumatic or iatrogenic injury. The most common foreign bodies of iatrogenic origin encountered are restorative materials, like amalgam, and root canal fillings. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of foreign bodies detected with panoramic radiography in the jawbones, as well as to evaluate the etiology and characteristics of these pathologies. Materials and Methods: From March 2012 to January 2014, 11,144 panoramic radiographs were taken and retrospectively reviewed. The number, characteristics, location of the foreign bodies, age, and gender of the patients were recorded. Results: Of the 11,144 patients reviewed, 62 of them have a foreign body with a frequency of 0.6%. The patients who had a foreign body were between 14 and 81 years old. Female patients showed more foreign bodies than male patients. Among the 62 patients, 63 filling materials, one stapler, and five shrapnel were detected. Only 8 patients had symptoms associated with foreign bodies and these foreign bodies excised surgically. Conclusion: If possible, these pathologies must be removed at the time of detection to prevent further complications; however, in asymptomatic cases, according to location and the characteristic of the foreign body, they can be kept under observation without performing any operations. PMID:26752878

  2. Development of a digital panoramic X-ray imaging system of adaptive image layers for dental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S. I.; Park, Y. O.; Cho, H. S.; Oh, J. E.; Cho, H. M.; Hong, D. K.; Lee, M. S.; Yang, Y. J.; Je, U. K.; Kim, D. S.; Lee, H. K.

    2011-10-01

    As a continuation of our digital radiographic sensor R&D, we have developed a prototyped digital panoramic X-ray imaging system for dental applications. The imaging system consists of a slit-collimated X-ray generator with a 0.4 mm focal spot size and a 3.5 mm Al filtration, a linear-array typed CMOS imager with a 48×48 μm 2 pixel size and a 128 (in the scan direction)×3072 (in the vertical direction) pixel format, a series of microstep motors for the precise motion control of the imaging system, and the designed sequences for the motion control and pixel readout required to make a specific plane of interest (POI) to be focused. With the several test phantoms we designed, we obtained useful digital panoramic X-ray images by moving the X-ray generator and the CMOS imager along a continuously sliding rotational center. In this study, we demonstrated that the prototype system can be applicable to any shaped POI or multi-POIs simultaneously to be focused, provided that adequate sequences for motion control and pixel readout are designed. We expect that the imaging system will be useful for our ongoing applications of dental panoramic radiography and nondestructive testing.

  3. Comparison of ionisation chamber and semiconductor detector devices for measurement of the dose-width product for panoramic dental units.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, S A; Martin, C J

    2013-06-01

    Doses for panoramic dental radiography are assessed in terms of the dose-width product (DWP) or dose-area product, which gives a measure of the radiation through a whole exposure. The DWP can be measured using a pencil ionisation chamber (IC) similar to that used for computed tomography dose assessment. However, ICs are sensitive to radiation incident from all directions and so backscatter from the image receptor may increase the recorded dose. This study compares measurements performed using four options: a pencil IC mounted straight on the image receptor, the IC mounted with a steel plate to the rear to standardise scatter conditions, the IC mounted with a steel plate and lead collimators in front to minimise the effect of extra-focal radiation, and a Quart Dido employing a one square centimetre semiconductor detector (SD) designed for panoramic measurements. The results indicate that modification of the current method by incorporating a steel plate reduced the measurement dose by 7% on average, but the reduction was greater for units with semiconductor imaging plates. The measurements with the SD agree more closely with the IC with the steel plate to the rear. An IC with a backing plate to standardise scatter or a suitable SD is recommended for measurement on panoramic dental units.

  4. Panoramic Radiography in the Diagnosis of Carotid Artery Atheromas and the Associated Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães Henriques, João César; Kreich, Eliane Maria; Helena Baldani, Márcia; Luciano, Mariely; Cezar de Melo Castilho, Julio; Cesar de Moraes, Luiz

    2011-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a serious chronic disease, responsible for thousands of deaths worldwide and is characterized by thickening and loss of elasticity of the arterial walls, associated with the presence of atheromatous plaques. Various risk factors act directly on predisposition to the disease, among which the following are pointed out: diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension and inadequate diet and eating habits. More recent researches have elucidated new risk factors acting in the development of this disease, such as, for example: periodontitis, chronic renal disease and menopause. The panoramic radiograph, commonly used in dental practice, makes it possible to see calcified atherosclerotic plaques that are eventually deposited in the carotid arteries. The aim of this review article was to emphasize the dentist’s important role in the detection of carotid artery atheromas in panoramic radiographs and the immediate referral of patients affected by these calcifications to doctors. In addition, the study intended to guide the dentist, especially the dental radiologist, with regard to differential diagnosis, which should be made taking into consideration particularly the triticeal cartilage when it is calcified. PMID:21760860

  5. Panoramic radiography in the diagnosis of carotid artery atheromas and the associated risk factors.

    PubMed

    Guimarães Henriques, João César; Kreich, Eliane Maria; Helena Baldani, Márcia; Luciano, Mariely; Cezar de Melo Castilho, Julio; Cesar de Moraes, Luiz

    2011-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a serious chronic disease, responsible for thousands of deaths worldwide and is characterized by thickening and loss of elasticity of the arterial walls, associated with the presence of atheromatous plaques. Various risk factors act directly on predisposition to the disease, among which the following are pointed out: diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension and inadequate diet and eating habits. More recent researches have elucidated new risk factors acting in the development of this disease, such as, for example: periodontitis, chronic renal disease and menopause. The panoramic radiograph, commonly used in dental practice, makes it possible to see calcified atherosclerotic plaques that are eventually deposited in the carotid arteries. The aim of this review article was to emphasize the dentist's important role in the detection of carotid artery atheromas in panoramic radiographs and the immediate referral of patients affected by these calcifications to doctors. In addition, the study intended to guide the dentist, especially the dental radiologist, with regard to differential diagnosis, which should be made taking into consideration particularly the triticeal cartilage when it is calcified.

  6. Auto-focused panoramic dental tomosynthesis imaging with exponential polynomial based sharpness indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taewon; Lee, Yeon Ju; Cho, Seungryong

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we develop an improved auto-focusing capability of a panoramic dental tomosynthesis imager. We propose an auto-focusing algorithm with an efficient sharpness indicator based on exponential polynomials which provides better quantitation of steep gradients than the conventional one based on algebraic polynomials. With its accurate estimation of the sharpness of the reconstructed slices, the proposed method resulted in a better performance of automatically extracting in-focus slices in the dental panoramic tomosynthesis.

  7. Digital versus conventional panoramic radiography in predicting inferior alveolar nerve injury after mandibular third molar removal.

    PubMed

    Szalma, József; Lempel, Edina; Jeges, Sára; Olasz, Lajos

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the accuracy of conventional and digital panoramic radiography (OPG) in relation to 4 specific high-risk signs (interruption of the superior cortical line, diversion, narrowing of the canal, and dark band of the root), which would indicate a close anatomic relationship between third molar roots and the inferior alveolar canal.Four hundred mandibular third molar surgical removals after conventional and 272 after digital radiographs were evaluated in the study. The association between postoperative inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) paresthesia and the presence of any preoperative high-risk signs in the OPG was investigated. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were completed to compare the accuracy of conventional and digital radiographic techniques detecting high-risk signs predicting possible IAN paresthesia.Digital OPG results showed significantly higher sensitivity in diversion (P = 0.014) and narrowing (P < 0.002) of the canal, whereas the specificity of these signs was significantly lower (P < 0.001 and P = 0.035). The likelihood ratio analysis and multivariate logistic regression analysis did not prove the significant difference between digital and conventional imaging according to the examined high-risk signs. Positive predictive values of the signs were found in conventional radiography between 3.6% and 10.9%, whereas in the digital images, it ranged from 2.9% to 7.9%.The results of this study failed to prove significant difference between the accuracy of digital and conventional OPG for predicting IAN paresthesia, whereas low positive predictive values indicate both imaging techniques as inadequate screening methods for predicting IAN paresthesia after mandibular third molar removal.

  8. Quantitative assessment of mandibular cortical erosion on dental panoramic radiographs for screening osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Chisako; Horiba, Kazuki; Hayashi, Tatsuro; Fukui, Tatsumasa; Hara, Takeshi; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2016-11-01

    Studies reported that the mandibular cortical width (MCW) measured on dental panoramic radiographs (DPRs) was significantly correlated with bone mineral density. However, MCW is not a perfect index by itself, and studies suggest the added utility of mandibular cortical index (MCI). In this study, we propose a method for computerized estimation of mandibular cortical degree (MCD), a new continuous measure of MCI, for osteoporotic risk assessment. The mandibular contour was automatically segmented using an active contour model. The regions of interest near mental foramen were extracted for MCW and MCD determination. The MCW was measured on the basis of residue-line detection results and pixel profiles. Image features including texture features based on gray-level co-occurrence matrices were determined. The MCD were estimated using support vector regression (SVR). The SVR was trained using previously collected 99 DPRs, including 26 osteoporotic cases, by a computed radiography system. The proposed scheme was tested using 99 DPRs obtained by a photon-counting system with data of bone mineral density at distal forearm. The number of osteoporotic, osteopenic, and control cases were 12, 18, and 69 cases, respectively. The subjective MCD by a dental radiologist was employed for training and evaluation. The correlation coefficients with the subjective MCD were -0.549 for MCW alone, 0.609 for the MCD by the features without MCW, and 0.617 for the MCD by the features and MCW. The correlation coefficients with the BMD were 0.619, -0.608, and -0.670, respectively. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves for detecting osteoporotic cases were 0.830, 0.884, and 0.901, respectively, whereas those for detecting high-risk cases were 0.835, 0.833, and 0.880, respectively. In conclusion, our scheme may have a potential to identify asymptomatic osteoporotic and osteopenic patients through dental examinations.

  9. Comparison of state dental radiography safety regulations.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, Thomas F; Parashar, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare and provide an overview of state policies on occupational exposure, dosimetry, collimation, patient protection, and the use of portable handheld X-ray machines in dentistry. State government webpages containing radiation protection rules and regulations were scanned. The contents were compared against current federal regulations established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). They were further evaluated in light of current recommendations from the National Council on Radiation Protection & Measurements (NCRP) and the American Dental Association (ADA). Most states' regulations mirror the exposure limits set forth by the NRC and FDA. Nonregulatory recommendations regarding use of dental radiography are periodically put forth by the NCRP and the ADA. State and federal agencies often follow recommendations from these scientific organizations when creating regulations. Clinicians must be aware of their state's radiation protection rules, as variations among states exist. In addition, recommendations published by organizations such as the NCRP and the ADA, while not legally binding, contribute significantly to the reduction of radiation risks for operators and patients alike.

  10. The Efficacy of the Graft Materials after Sinus Elevation: Retrospective Comparative Study Using Panoramic Radiography

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Tae Min; Lee, Jeong Keun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study compares and evaluates the efficacy of graft materials after maxillary sinus bone grafts with autogenous tooth bone graft material (AutoBT), demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft (DFDBA) and deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM). Methods: The study involved 30 sinuses in 26 patients who visited the Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Dentistry in Ajou University Hospital and received either AutoBT, DFDBA or DBBM with sinus elevation using the lateral window technique. Sinus graft height was measured before, immediately after, and six months after bone graft with panoramic radiography and the height changes of the sinus floor was compared according to the graft materials. Results: After six months, the decrease ratio of graft heights were 13.57% for AutoBT group, 14.30% for DFDBA group, and 11.92% for DBBM group. There was no statistically significant difference. Conclusion: The new maxillary sinus floor formed by the upper border of bone graft material, can repneumatize after the maxillary sinus elevation. Thus, long-term stability of sinus graft height represents an important factor for implant success. We found that the three graft materials for sinus elevation do not differ significantly and all three graft materials showed excellent resistance to maxillary sinus repneumatization. However, due to the special circumstances of the maxillary sinus and small sample, the actual difference between the three graft materials may not have been detectable. Therefore further study needs to be conducted for more reliable study results. PMID:27489826

  11. The Efficacy of the Graft Materials after Sinus Elevation: Retrospective Comparative Study Using Panoramic Radiography.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Tae Min; Lee, Jeong Keun

    2014-07-01

    This study compares and evaluates the efficacy of graft materials after maxillary sinus bone grafts with autogenous tooth bone graft material (AutoBT), demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft (DFDBA) and deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM). The study involved 30 sinuses in 26 patients who visited the Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Dentistry in Ajou University Hospital and received either AutoBT, DFDBA or DBBM with sinus elevation using the lateral window technique. Sinus graft height was measured before, immediately after, and six months after bone graft with panoramic radiography and the height changes of the sinus floor was compared according to the graft materials. After six months, the decrease ratio of graft heights were 13.57% for AutoBT group, 14.30% for DFDBA group, and 11.92% for DBBM group. There was no statistically significant difference. The new maxillary sinus floor formed by the upper border of bone graft material, can repneumatize after the maxillary sinus elevation. Thus, long-term stability of sinus graft height represents an important factor for implant success. We found that the three graft materials for sinus elevation do not differ significantly and all three graft materials showed excellent resistance to maxillary sinus repneumatization. However, due to the special circumstances of the maxillary sinus and small sample, the actual difference between the three graft materials may not have been detectable. Therefore further study needs to be conducted for more reliable study results.

  12. Quality assurance tests for digital radiography in general dental practice.

    PubMed

    Greenall, Chris; Drage, Nicholas; Ager, Matthew

    2014-03-01

    Quality assurance (QA) is essential in dental radiography. Digital radiography is becoming more common in dentistry, so it is important that appropriate QA tests are carried out on the digital equipment, including the viewing monitor. The aim of this article is to outline the tests that can be carried out in dental practice. Quality assurance for digital equipment is important to ensure consistently high quality images are produced.

  13. Diagnostic reference levels in intraoral dental radiography in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Kyung; Han, Won-Jeong; Choi, Jin-Woo; Jung, Yun-Hoa; Yoon, Suk-Ja; Lee, Jae-Seo

    2012-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to survey the radiographic exposure parameters, to measure the patient doses for intraoral dental radiography nationwide, and thus to establish the diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) in intraoral dental X-ray examination in Korea. One hundred two intraoral dental radiographic machines from all regions of South Korea were selected for this study. Radiographic exposure parameters, size of hospital, type of image receptor system, installation duration of machine, and type of dental X-ray machine were documented. Patient entrance doses (PED) and dose-area products (DAP) were measured three times at the end of the exit cone of the X-ray unit with a DAP meter (DIAMENTOR M4-KDK, PTW, Freiburg, Germany) for adult mandibular molar intraoral dental radiography, and corrections were made for room temperature and pressure. Measured PED and DAP were averaged and compared according to the size of hospital, type of image receptor system, installation duration, and type of dental X-ray machine. The mean exposure parameters were 62.6 kVp, 7.9 mA, and 0.5 second for adult mandibular molar intraoral dental radiography. The mean patient dose was 2.11 mGy (PED) and 59.4 mGycm(2) (DAP) and the third quartile one 3.07 mGy (PED) and 87.4 mGycm(2) (DAP). Doses at university dental hospitals were lower than those at dental clinics (p<0.05). Doses of digital radiography (DR) type were lower than those of film-based type (p<0.05). We recommend 3.1 mGy (PED), 87.4 mGycm(2) (DAP) as the DRLs in adult mandibular molar intraoral dental radiography in Korea.

  14. A benchmark for comparison of dental radiography analysis algorithms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching-Wei; Huang, Cheng-Ta; Lee, Jia-Hong; Li, Chung-Hsing; Chang, Sheng-Wei; Siao, Ming-Jhih; Lai, Tat-Ming; Ibragimov, Bulat; Vrtovec, Tomaž; Ronneberger, Olaf; Fischer, Philipp; Cootes, Tim F; Lindner, Claudia

    2016-07-01

    Dental radiography plays an important role in clinical diagnosis, treatment and surgery. In recent years, efforts have been made on developing computerized dental X-ray image analysis systems for clinical usages. A novel framework for objective evaluation of automatic dental radiography analysis algorithms has been established under the auspices of the IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging 2015 Bitewing Radiography Caries Detection Challenge and Cephalometric X-ray Image Analysis Challenge. In this article, we present the datasets, methods and results of the challenge and lay down the principles for future uses of this benchmark. The main contributions of the challenge include the creation of the dental anatomy data repository of bitewing radiographs, the creation of the anatomical abnormality classification data repository of cephalometric radiographs, and the definition of objective quantitative evaluation for comparison and ranking of the algorithms. With this benchmark, seven automatic methods for analysing cephalometric X-ray image and two automatic methods for detecting bitewing radiography caries have been compared, and detailed quantitative evaluation results are presented in this paper. Based on the quantitative evaluation results, we believe automatic dental radiography analysis is still a challenging and unsolved problem. The datasets and the evaluation software will be made available to the research community, further encouraging future developments in this field. (http://www-o.ntust.edu.tw/~cweiwang/ISBI2015/). Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Automatic Synthesis of Panoramic Radiographs from Dental Cone Beam Computed Tomography Data

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ting; Shi, Changrong; Zhao, Xing; Zhao, Yunsong; Xu, Jinqiu

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an automatic method of synthesizing panoramic radiographs from dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) data for directly observing the whole dentition without the superimposition of other structures. This method consists of three major steps. First, the dental arch curve is generated from the maximum intensity projection (MIP) of 3D CBCT data. Then, based on this curve, the long axial curves of the upper and lower teeth are extracted to create a 3D panoramic curved surface describing the whole dentition. Finally, the panoramic radiograph is synthesized by developing this 3D surface. Both open-bite shaped and closed-bite shaped dental CBCT datasets were applied in this study, and the resulting images were analyzed to evaluate the effectiveness of this method. With the proposed method, a single-slice panoramic radiograph can clearly and completely show the whole dentition without the blur and superimposition of other dental structures. Moreover, thickened panoramic radiographs can also be synthesized with increased slice thickness to show more features, such as the mandibular nerve canal. One feature of the proposed method is that it is automatically performed without human intervention. Another feature of the proposed method is that it requires thinner panoramic radiographs to show the whole dentition than those produced by other existing methods, which contributes to the clarity of the anatomical structures, including the enamel, dentine and pulp. In addition, this method can rapidly process common dental CBCT data. The speed and image quality of this method make it an attractive option for observing the whole dentition in a clinical setting. PMID:27300554

  16. Prevalence of dental anomalies among 7- to 35-year-old people in Hamadan, Iran in 2012-2013 as observed using panoramic radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Shokri, Abbas; Khajeh, Samira; Faramarzi, Farhad; Kahnamoui, Hanieh Mogaver

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to evaluate the prevalence of all types and subtypes of dental anomalies among 7- to 35-year-old patients by using panoramic radiographs. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted on 1649 people in Hamadan City, in 2012-2013. The prevalence of four types and 12 subtypes of dental anomalies was evaluated by two observers separately by using panoramic radiography. Dental anomalies were divided into four types: (a) shape (including fusion, taurodontism, and dens invagination); (b) number (including hypodontia, oligodontia, and hyperdontia); (c) structure (including amelogenesis imperfecta, dentinogenesis imperfecta, and dentin dysplasia); and (d) position (including displacement, impaction, and dilacerations). Results The reliability between the two observers was 79.56% according to the Kappa statistics. The prevalence of dental anomalies diagnosed by panoramic radiographs was 29%. Anomalies of position and number were the most common types of abnormalities, and anomalies of shape and structure were the least in both genders. Anomalies of impaction (44.76%), dilacerations (21.11%), hypodontia (15.88%), taurodontism (9.29%), and hyperdontia (6.76%) were the most common subtypes of dental anomalies. The anomalies of shape and number were more common in the age groups of 7-12 years and 13-15 years, respectively, while the anomalies of structure and position were more common among the other age groups. Conclusion Anomalies of tooth position were the most common type of dental anomalies, and structure anomalies were the least in this Iranian population. The frequency and type of dental anomalies vary within and between populations, confirming the role of racial factors in the prevalence of dental anomalies. PMID:24701453

  17. Dental digital radiography: a survey of quality aspects.

    PubMed

    Hellén-Halme, Kristina; Rohlin, Madeleine; Petersson, Arne

    2005-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate the experiences of Swedish general dental practitioners (GDPs) with digital radiography and their opinion on the same, particularly regarding quality issues. A letter was sent to all GDPs in private care in Region Skåne, Sweden, asking whether they used digital radiography (n=513). The response rate was 79%. The number of private GDPs who replied that they used digital radiography was 106. The Public Dental Service in Region Skåne listed 33 GDPs who worked with digital radiography. Based on these answers, a questionnaire was sent to the GDPs working with digital radiography (n=139). The questionnaire comprised 27 questions about the dentists, the system of intra-oral digital radiography, and the GDPs' experiences of and opinions on issues regarding image quality and quality control. The response rate to the questionnaire was 94%. Almost all, 92%, worked with charge-coupled device (CCD) and complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) sensors. Most GDPs were satisfied with their digital radiographic system. The majority (65%) experienced problems. Detector failure and trouble with the software were common. The GDPs wrote that they used lower exposure times in digital radiography than traditional film radiography. The estimated reduction in exposure time was said to be between 51% and 75%. Thirty-five per cent continued to use film parallel with digital radiography. The answers indicated that less than half of the equipment (40%) underwent quality control. Quality controls, when conducted, were undertaken once or twice a year, mainly by technicians from the companies that had sold the digital equipment. Based on the results of the questionnaire, there seems to be a need to improve the maintenance and the quality of digital radiography. It is also important that the GDPs become more aware of the problems that can occur when a new technique is introduced and that they develop the skills to handle these problems.

  18. Parental knowledge and attitudes towards dental radiography for children.

    PubMed

    Chiri, R; Awan, S; Archibald, S; Abbott, P V

    2013-06-01

    Radiographs are an essential part of most clinical dental examinations and diagnoses. The aim of the study was to assess the knowledge and attitudes of parents towards dental radiographs for their children. A 21-item questionnaire, covering parental level of radiation knowledge and socio-demographics was applied. Sliding scales were used to assess attitude towards dental radiographs. There were 1467 questionnaires distributed between five primary schools in the Perth (Western Australia) metropolitan area, with 309 surveys (21%) returned for collection. Most parents displayed a low level of knowledge, but had a positive attitude towards dental radiographs. Parents with children who have previously had dental radiographs perceived dental radiographs as 'good', 'useful' and 'pleasant'. A higher level of education and parents with children who have previously had radiographs were significantly associated with a higher level of knowledge about dental radiography. Parents who had higher scores on questions assessing radiation knowledge were more likely to perceive dental radiographs as 'safe' and 'beneficial'. Most parents have a positive attitude towards dental radiographs on their children. However, the majority of parents lack knowledge regarding dental radiography, especially regarding the risks involved. © 2013 Australian Dental Association.

  19. Removing Distortion of Periapical Radiographs in Dental Digital Radiography Using Embedded Markers in an External frame

    PubMed Central

    Kafieh, Rahele; Shahamoradi, Mahdi; Hekmatian, Ehsan; Foroohandeh, Mehrdad; Emamidoost, Mostafa

    2012-01-01

    To carry out in vivo and in vitro comparative pilot study to evaluate the preciseness of a newly proposed digital dental radiography setup. This setup was based on markers placed on an external frame to eliminate the measurement errors due to incorrect geometry in relative positioning of cone, teeth and the sensor. Five patients with previous panoramic images were selected to undergo the proposed periapical digital imaging for in vivo phase. For in vitro phase, 40 extracted teeth were replanted in dry mandibular sockets and periapical digital images were prepared. The standard reference for real scales of the teeth were obtained through extracted teeth measurements for in vitro application and were calculated through panoramic imaging for in vivo phases. The proposed image processing thechnique was applied on periapical digital images to distinguish the incorrect geometry. The recognized error was inversely applied on the image and the modified images were compared to the correct values. The measurement findings after the distortion removal were compared to our gold standards (results of panoramic imaging or measurements from extracted teeth) and showed the accuracy of 96.45% through in vivo examinations and 96.0% through in vitro tests. The proposed distortion removal method is perfectly able to identify the possible inaccurate geometry during image acquisition and is capable of applying the inverse transform to the distorted radiograph to obtain the correctly modified image. This can be really helpful in applications like root canal therapy, implant surgical procedures and digital subtraction radiography, which are essentially dependent on precise measurements. PMID:23724372

  20. Comparison of clinical and dental panoramic findings: a practice-based crossover study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Aim was to compare clinical findings with x-ray findings using dental panoramic radiography (DPR). In addition, type and frequency of secondary findings in x-rays were investigated. Methods Patients were selected on the basis of available DPRs (not older than 12 months). No therapeutic measures were permitted between the DPR and the clinical findings. The clinical findings were carried out by several investigators who had no knowledge of the purpose of the study. A calibrated investigator established the x-ray findings, independently and without prior knowledge of the clinical findings. The evaluation parameters for each tooth were: missing, healthy, carious, restorative or prosthetically sufficient or insufficient treatment. Type and frequency of additional findings in the DPR were documented, e.g. quality of a root canal filling and apical changes. Results Findings of 275 patients were available. Comparison showed a correspondence between clinical and radiographic finding in 93.6% of all teeth (n = 7,789). The differences were not significant (p > 0.05). Regarding carious as well as insufficiently restored or prosthetically treated teeth, respectively there were significant differences between the two methods (p < 0.05). The DPRs showed additional findings: root fillings in 259 teeth and 145 teeth with periapical changes. Conclusions With reference to the assessment of teeth, there was no difference between the two methods. However, in the evaluation of carious as well as teeth with insufficiently restorative or prosthetic treatment, there was a clear discrepancy between the two methods. Therefore, it would have been possible to have dispensed with x-rays. Nevertheless, additional x-ray findings were found. PMID:24066660

  1. Use of dental radiography among Lithuanian general dentists.

    PubMed

    Peciuliene, Vytaute; Rimkuviene, Jurate; Maneliene, Rasma; Drukteinis, Saulius

    2009-01-01

    To gather information about the radiographic facilities and techniques used by Lithuanian general dentists. Questionnaires were sent to all 2879 Lithuanian dental practitioners registered on the Lithuanian Dental Chamber licence registry data list. The questionnaire was made with multiple-choice answers. Respondents were invited to choose the only one category of answer that best fitted their clinical attitude. Questions included in the present survey concerned general and specific information regarding peculiarities of radiographic imaging. Only answers of respondents who are licensed as general dentists were included in this study. From the 2850 questionnaires mailed 1532 were returned. The response rate was 53.8%. Of the total responses 1431 questionnaires were received from licensed general dentists. Of total 956 dentists practiced in urban and 576 dentists in rural areas. 61.6% of respondents had access to an intra-oral radiographic unit in their practice and 91.5% of them used dental radiography always or often as the diagnostic tool. To support the film packet in the patient's mouth alternatively film holder or patient's finger was used by 48% of respondents, while film holder was used only by 19.3% of dentists. Recently graduated dental practitioners more common used diagnostic radiography in endodontic pathology than dentists with a longer time from graduation. Film holder was not a popular device among general dental practitioners to perform periapical radioraphs. It is important to improve the existing dental curriculum to ensure the necessary competency when using dental radiography and film holders routinely in clinical practice.

  2. Panoramic radiography and cone-beam computed tomography findings in preoperative examination of impacted mandibular third molars.

    PubMed

    Peker, Ilkay; Sarikir, Cigdem; Alkurt, Meryem Toraman; Zor, Zeynep Fatma

    2014-06-14

    Preoperative radiographic examination of impacted mandibular third molars (IMTM) is essential to prevent inferior alveolar nerve injury during extraction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation between cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and digital panoramic radiography (DPR) findings in preoperative examination of IMTM. This retrospective study included 298 teeth in 191 individuals. The relationship between the inferior alveolar canal (IAC) and the IMTM (buccal, lingual, interradicular or inferior), the position of the IMTM with respect to the IAC (contact, no contact), the morphologic shape of the mandible in the IMTM region (round, lingual extended, lingual concave), the type of IMTM (vertical, horizontal or angular) and the number of roots of the IMTM were evaluated on CBCT images. DPR images were evaluated for the number of roots of the IMTM and for the most common radiographic findings indicating a relationship between the IAC and the IMTM (darkening of the roots, diversion of the IAC, narrowing of the IAC and interruption of the white line). Data were statistically analyzed with Cramer V coefficient, Kappa statistic, chi-square and Fisher's exact test. There was a significant difference in number of roots detected on DPR versus CBCT images. There was a significant association between the type of IMTM and the morphologic shape of the mandible on CBCT images. Darkening of the roots and interruption of the white line on DPR images were significantly associated with the presence of contact between the IMTM and the IAC on CBCT images. Panoramic radiography is inadequate, whereas CBCT is useful to detect multiple roots of IMTM. When darkening of the roots and interruption of the white line are observed on panoramic images, there is increased likelihood of contact between the IMTM and the IAC. CBCT is required in these cases.

  3. Panoramic radiography and cone-beam computed tomography findings in preoperative examination of impacted mandibular third molars

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Preoperative radiographic examination of impacted mandibular third molars (IMTM) is essential to prevent inferior alveolar nerve injury during extraction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation between cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and digital panoramic radiography (DPR) findings in preoperative examination of IMTM. Methods This retrospective study included 298 teeth in 191 individuals. The relationship between the inferior alveolar canal (IAC) and the IMTM (buccal, lingual, interradicular or inferior), the position of the IMTM with respect to the IAC (contact, no contact), the morphologic shape of the mandible in the IMTM region (round, lingual extended, lingual concave), the type of IMTM (vertical, horizontal or angular) and the number of roots of the IMTM were evaluated on CBCT images. DPR images were evaluated for the number of roots of the IMTM and for the most common radiographic findings indicating a relationship between the IAC and the IMTM (darkening of the roots, diversion of the IAC, narrowing of the IAC and interruption of the white line). Data were statistically analyzed with Cramer V coefficient, Kappa statistic, chi-square and Fisher’s exact test. Results There was a significant difference in number of roots detected on DPR versus CBCT images. There was a significant association between the type of IMTM and the morphologic shape of the mandible on CBCT images. Darkening of the roots and interruption of the white line on DPR images were significantly associated with the presence of contact between the IMTM and the IAC on CBCT images. Conclusions Panoramic radiography is inadequate, whereas CBCT is useful to detect multiple roots of IMTM. When darkening of the roots and interruption of the white line are observed on panoramic images, there is increased likelihood of contact between the IMTM and the IAC. CBCT is required in these cases. PMID:24928108

  4. Panoramic radiographic demonstration of bilateral tonsilloliths.

    PubMed

    Guevara, Carlo; Mandel, Louis

    2011-04-01

    Calcifications can develop within the crypts of the palatine tonsil. During routine dental panoramic radiography, these tonsillar calcifications, or tonsilloliths, may be visualized superimposed upon the mandibular ramus. Their anatomic location and radiographic appearance are such that confusion with parotid sialolithiasis may occur. This report defines the symptomatology and differential diagnosis of these tonsilloliths.

  5. A new screening pathway for identifying asymptomatic patients using dental panoramic radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Tatsuro; Matsumoto, Takuya; Sawagashira, Tsuyoshi; Tagami, Motoki; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Hayashi, Yoshinori; Muramatsu, Chisako; Zhou, Xiangrong; Iida, Yukihiro; Matsuoka, Masato; Katagi, Kiyoji; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2012-03-01

    To identify asymptomatic patients is the challenging task and the essential first step in diagnosis. Findings of dental panoramic radiographs include not only dental conditions but also radiographic signs that are suggestive of possible systemic diseases such as osteoporosis, arteriosclerosis, and maxillary sinusitis. Detection of such signs on panoramic radiographs has a potential to provide supplemental benefits for patients. However, it is not easy for general dental practitioners to pay careful attention to such signs. We addressed the development of a computer-aided detection (CAD) system that detects radiographic signs of pathology on panoramic images, and the design of the framework of new screening pathway by cooperation of dentists and our CAD system. The performance evaluation of our CAD system showed the sensitivity and specificity in the identification of osteoporotic patients were 92.6 % and 100 %, respectively, and those of the maxillary sinus abnormality were 89.6 % and 73.6 %, respectively. The detection rate of carotid artery calcifications that suggests the need for further medical evaluation was approximately 93.6 % with 4.4 false-positives per image. To validate the utility of the new screening pathway, preliminary clinical trials by using our CAD system were conducted. To date, 223 panoramic images were processed and 4 asymptomatic patients with suspected osteoporosis, 7 asymptomatic patients with suspected calcifications, and 40 asymptomatic patients with suspected maxillary sinusitis were detected in our initial trial. It was suggested that our new screening pathway could be useful to identify asymptomatic patients with systemic diseases.

  6. Computer-aided system for morphometric mandibular index computation (Using dental panoramic radiographs)

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-López, Jose M.; Jané-Salas, Enrique; Estrugo-Devesa, Albert; Ayuso-Montero, Raul; Velasco-Ortega, Eugenio; Segura-Egea, Juan J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: We propose and validate a computer—aided system to measure three different mandibular indexes: cortical width, panoramic mandibular index and, mandibular alveolar bone resorption index. Study Design: Repeatability and reproducibility of the measurements are analyzed and compared to the manual estimation of the same indexes. Results: The proposed computerized system exhibits superior repeatability and reproducibility rates compared to standard manual methods. Moreover, the time required to perform the measurements using the proposed method is negligible compared to perform the measurements manually. Conclusions: We have proposed a very user friendly computerized method to measure three different morphometric mandibular indexes. From the results we can conclude that the system provides a practical manner to perform these measurements. It does not require an expert examiner and does not take more than 16 seconds per analysis. Thus, it may be suitable to diagnose osteoporosis using dental panoramic radiographs. Key words:Osteoporosis, panoramic mandibular index, cortical width, mandibular alveolar bone resorption index. PMID:22322489

  7. Dental radiography exposure of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki populations

    SciTech Connect

    Antoku, S.; Hoshi, M.; Russell, W.J.; Kihara, T.; Sawada, S.; Takeshita, K.; Otake, M.; Yoshinaga, H.; Beach, D.R.

    1989-03-01

    Dental radiography doses in Hiroshima and Nagasaki were estimated on the basis of survey data from dental hospitals and clinics in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and doses were measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters and a phantom. Doses to organs, including the lens, pituitary fossa, thyroid gland, and skin were calculated from data obtained during a 2-week survey in both cities. The mean caput doses were calculated from the data indicating frequency per year and were tabulated by organs, age, teeth examined, type of examination, population, sex, and city. No significant difference was observed by age, population, sex, or city. Currently the doses incurred during dental radiography may not be sufficiently high to cause bias in the assessments for late radiation effects among atomic-bomb survivors. However, the mean caput thyroid doses of 62 mrad and 67 mrad in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, respectively, cannot be ignored from the standpoint of their potential in contributing to radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

  8. An automatic early stage alveolar-bone-resorption evaluation method on digital dental panoramic radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Muramatsu, Chisako; Hara, Takeshi; Suzuki, Hiroki; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    Periodontal disease is a kind of typical dental diseases, which affects many adults. The presence of alveolar bone resorption, which can be observed from dental panoramic radiographs, is one of the most important signs of the progression of periodontal disease. Automatically evaluating alveolar-bone resorption is of important clinic meaning in dental radiology. The purpose of this study was to propose a novel system for automated alveolar-bone-resorption evaluation from digital dental panoramic radiographs for the first time. The proposed system enables visualization and quantitative evaluation of alveolar bone resorption degree surrounding the teeth. It has the following procedures: (1) pre-processing for a test image; (2) detection of tooth root apices with Gabor filter and curve fitting for the root apex line; (3) detection of features related with alveolar bone by using image phase congruency map and template matching and curving fitting for the alveolar line; (4) detection of occlusion line with selected Gabor filter; (5) finally, evaluation of the quantitative alveolar-bone-resorption degree in the area surrounding teeth by simply computing the average ratio of the height of the alveolar bone and the height of the teeth. The proposed scheme was applied to 30 patient cases of digital panoramic radiographs, with alveolar bone resorption of different stages. Our initial trial on these test cases indicates that the quantitative evaluation results are correlated with the alveolar-boneresorption degree, although the performance still needs further improvement. Therefore it has potential clinical practicability.

  9. Application of segmented dental panoramic tomography among children: positive effect of continuing education in radiation protection.

    PubMed

    Pakbaznejad Esmaeili, Elmira; Waltimo-Sirén, Janna; Laatikainen, Tuula; Haukka, Jari; Ekholm, Marja

    2016-05-23

    Dental panoramic tomography is the most frequent examination among 7-12-year olds, according to the Radiation Safety and Nuclear Authority of Finland. At those ages, dental panoramic tomographs (DPTs) are mostly obtained for orthodontic reasons. Children's dose reduction by trimming the field size to the area of interest is important because of their high radiosensitivity. Yet, the majority of DPTs in this age group are still taken by using an adult programme and never by using a segmented programme. The purpose of the present study was to raise the awareness of dental staff with respect to children's radiation safety, to increase the application of segmented and child DPT programmes by further educating the whole dental team and to evaluate the outcome of the educational intervention. A five-step intervention programme, focusing on DPT field limitation possibilities, was carried out in community-based dental care as a part of mandatory continuing education in radiation protection. Application of segmented and child DPT programmes was thereafter prospectively followed up during a 1-year period and compared with our similar data from 2010 using a logistic regression analysis. Application of the child programme increased by 9% and the segmented programme by 2%, reaching statistical significance (odds ratios 1.68; 95% confidence interval 1.23-2.30; p-value < 0.001). The number of repeated exposures remained at an acceptable level. The segmented DPTs were most frequently taken from the maxillary lateral incisor-canine area. The educational intervention resulted in improvement of radiological practice in respect to radiation safety of children during dental panoramic tomography. Segmented and child DPT programmes can be applied successfully in dental practice for children.

  10. Application of segmented dental panoramic tomography among children: positive effect of continuing education in radiation protection

    PubMed Central

    Waltimo-Sirén, Janna; Laatikainen, Tuula; Haukka, Jari; Ekholm, Marja

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Dental panoramic tomography is the most frequent examination among 7–12-year olds, according to the Radiation Safety and Nuclear Authority of Finland. At those ages, dental panoramic tomographs (DPTs) are mostly obtained for orthodontic reasons. Children's dose reduction by trimming the field size to the area of interest is important because of their high radiosensitivity. Yet, the majority of DPTs in this age group are still taken by using an adult programme and never by using a segmented programme. The purpose of the present study was to raise the awareness of dental staff with respect to children's radiation safety, to increase the application of segmented and child DPT programmes by further educating the whole dental team and to evaluate the outcome of the educational intervention. Methods: A five-step intervention programme, focusing on DPT field limitation possibilities, was carried out in community-based dental care as a part of mandatory continuing education in radiation protection. Application of segmented and child DPT programmes was thereafter prospectively followed up during a 1-year period and compared with our similar data from 2010 using a logistic regression analysis. Results: Application of the child programme increased by 9% and the segmented programme by 2%, reaching statistical significance (odds ratios 1.68; 95% confidence interval 1.23–2.30; p-value < 0.001). The number of repeated exposures remained at an acceptable level. The segmented DPTs were most frequently taken from the maxillary lateral incisor–canine area. Conclusions: The educational intervention resulted in improvement of radiological practice in respect to radiation safety of children during dental panoramic tomography. Segmented and child DPT programmes can be applied successfully in dental practice for children. PMID:27142159

  11. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE... EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS FOR AND THE CREDENTIALING OF RADIOLOGIC PERSONNEL Pt. 75, App. G Appendix G to Part 75...

  12. Automatic Molar Extraction from Dental Panoramic Radiographs for Forensic Personal Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samopa, Febriliyan; Asano, Akira; Taguchi, Akira

    Measurement of an individual molar provides rich information for forensic personal identification. We propose a computer-based system for extracting an individual molar from dental panoramic radiographs. A molar is obtained by extracting the region-of-interest, separating the maxilla and mandible, and extracting the boundaries between teeth. The proposed system is almost fully automatic; all that the user has to do is clicking three points on the boundary between the maxilla and the mandible.

  13. Updated quality assurance self-assessment exercise in intraoral and panoramic radiography. American Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Radiology Practice Committee.

    PubMed

    Goren, A D; Lundeen, R C; Deahl, S T; Hashimoto, K; Kapa, S F; Katz, J O; Ludlow, J B; Platin, E; Van Der Stelt, P F; Wolfgang, L

    2000-03-01

    This updated self-assessment exercise for the dental team by the Radiology Practice Committee of the American Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology is intended to produce the highest quality diagnostic radiographs while keeping patient exposure as low as is reasonably achievable. To continue to provide the best radiographic services to patients, those involved in dental radiography need to be aware of the latest changes and advances in dental radiography and need to use them in their practice.

  14. Automated contralateral subtraction of dental panoramic radiographs for detecting abnormalities in paranasal sinus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Takeshi; Mori, Shintaro; Kaneda, Takashi; Hayashi, Tatsuro; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2011-03-01

    Inflammation in the paranasal sinus is often observed in seasonal allergic rhinitis or with colds, but is also an indication for odontogenic tumors, carcinoma of the maxillary sinus or a maxillary cyst. The detection of those findings in dental panoramic radiographs is not difficult for radiologists, but general dentists may miss the findings since they focus on treatments of teeth. The purpose of this work is to develop a contralateral subtraction method for detecting the odontogenic sinusitis region on dental panoramic radiographs. We developed a contralateral subtraction technique in paranasal sinus region, consisting of 1) image filtering of the smoothing and sobel operation for noise reduction and edge extraction, 2) image registration of mirrored image by using mutual information, and 3) image display method of subtracted pixel data. We employed 56 cases (24 normal and 32 abnormal). The abnormal regions and the normal cases were verified by a board-certified radiologist using CT scans. Observer studies with and without subtraction images were performed for 9 readers. The true-positive rate at a 50% confidence level in 7 out of 9 readers was improved, but there was no statistical significance in the difference of area-under-curve (AUC) in each radiologist. In conclusion, the contralateral subtraction images of dental panoramic radiographs may improve the detection rate of abnormal regions in paranasal sinus.

  15. An investigation into dental digital radiography in dental practices in West Kent following the introduction of the 2006 NHS General Dental Services contract.

    PubMed

    Mauthe, Peter W; Eaton, Kenneth A

    2011-04-01

    The primary aims of the study were to investigate the use of digital radiography within primary dental care practices in the West Kent Primary Care Trust (PCT) area and general dental practitioners' (GDPs) self-reported change in radiographic prescribing patterns following the introduction of the nGDS contract in 2006. Data were gathered via a piloted, self-completed questionnaire, and circulated to all GDPs listed on the National Health Service (NHS) Choices website as practising in the West Kent PCT area. There were three mailings and follow-up telephone calls. The resulting data were entered into a statistical software database and, where relevant, statistically tested, using the chi-square test and Pearson correlation coefficient. Of 223 GDPs, 168 (75%) responded. There were 163 usable questionnaires. The respondents represented 85% of the general dental practices in West Kent. Eighty (49%) respondents were using digital intra-oral radiography. Of those who used digital radiography, 44 (55%) reported that they used phosphor plate systems and 36 (45%) that they used direct digital sensors. Eighty-three (51%) had a panoramic machine in their practice, 46 of whom (55%) were using digital systems; of these, 32 (67%) were using a direct digital system. Seventy-one GDPs reported that they worked exclusively or mainly in private practice. Forty (56%) of these 'mainly private' GDPs reported that they used digital radiographic systems, whereas only 40 (44%) of the 89 'mainly NHS' GDPs reported using digital radio-graphic systems. On average, mainly private GDPs made the transition to a digital radiographic system six months before mainly NHS GDPs. Of those who provided NHS dentistry before and after April 2006, only 18 (14%) reported taking fewer radiographs and seven (6%) taking more. In February 2010, of the West Kent GDPs who responded to the questionnaire, just under 50% used digital radio graphy. Mainly private GDPs were more likely to use digital radiography than

  16. Assessment of digital panoramic radiography's diagnostic value in angular bony lesions with 5 mm or deeper pocket depth in mandibular molars.

    PubMed

    Saberi, Bardia Vadiati; Nemati, Somayeh; Malekzadeh, Meisam; Javanmard, Afrooz

    2017-01-01

    Assessment of alveolar bone level in periodontitis is very important in determining prognosis and treatment plan. Panoramic radiography is a diagnostic tool used to screen patients. The aim of the present study was to assess the diagnostic value of digital panoramic radiography in angular bony defects with 5 mm or deeper pocket depth in mandibular molars. In this cross-sectional study, ninety angular bony defects in mandibular molars teeth with 5 mm or deeper pocket depth were selected in sixty patients with the diagnosis of chronic periodontitis. Before surgery, bone probing was performed. During the surgery, the vertical distance from cementoenamel junction to the most apical part of bony defect was measured using a Williams probe and this measurements were employed as gold standard. This distance was measured on the panoramic radiographs by a Digital Calliper and Digital Ruler. All data were compare dusing independent samples t-test and Pearson's correlation coefficient. No significant difference was found between the results of bone probing and intra-surgical measurements (P = 0.377). The mean defect depth determined by Digital Caliper and Digital Ruler on panoramic radiographs was significantly less than surgical measurements (P < 0.001). The correlation between bone probing and surgical measurements in determining the defect depth was strong (r = 0.98, P < 0.001). Radiographic measurements made by Digital Ruler (r = 0.86), comparing to Digital Caliper (r = 0.79), showed a higher degree of correlation with surgical measurements. Based on this study, bone probing is a reliable method in vertical alveolar bone defect measurements. While the information obtained from digital panoramic radiographs should be used with caution and the ability of digital panoramic radiography in the determination of defect depth is limited.

  17. Assessment of digital panoramic radiography's diagnostic value in angular bony lesions with 5 mm or deeper pocket depth in mandibular molars

    PubMed Central

    Saberi, Bardia Vadiati; Nemati, Somayeh; Malekzadeh, Meisam; Javanmard, Afrooz

    2017-01-01

    Background: Assessment of alveolar bone level in periodontitis is very important in determining prognosis and treatment plan. Panoramic radiography is a diagnostic tool used to screen patients. The aim of the present study was to assess the diagnostic value of digital panoramic radiography in angular bony defects with 5 mm or deeper pocket depth in mandibular molars. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, ninety angular bony defects in mandibular molars teeth with 5 mm or deeper pocket depth were selected in sixty patients with the diagnosis of chronic periodontitis. Before surgery, bone probing was performed. During the surgery, the vertical distance from cementoenamel junction to the most apical part of bony defect was measured using a Williams probe and this measurements were employed as gold standard. This distance was measured on the panoramic radiographs by a Digital Calliper and Digital Ruler. All data were compare dusing independent samples t-test and Pearson's correlation coefficient. Results: No significant difference was found between the results of bone probing and intra-surgical measurements (P = 0.377). The mean defect depth determined by Digital Caliper and Digital Ruler on panoramic radiographs was significantly less than surgical measurements (P < 0.001). The correlation between bone probing and surgical measurements in determining the defect depth was strong (r = 0.98, P < 0.001). Radiographic measurements made by Digital Ruler (r = 0.86), comparing to Digital Caliper (r = 0.79), showed a higher degree of correlation with surgical measurements. Conclusion: Based on this study, bone probing is a reliable method in vertical alveolar bone defect measurements. While the information obtained from digital panoramic radiographs should be used with caution and the ability of digital panoramic radiography in the determination of defect depth is limited. PMID:28348615

  18. Computers in dental radiography: a scenario for the future

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, R.L.

    1985-09-01

    The recent emergence of cost-effective computing power makes it possible to integrate sophisticated data-sampling and image-interpretation techniques into dental radiography for the first time. A prototype system is being developed to permit clinical information expressed in three dimensions--plus time--to be made visible almost instantly. The associated X-ray dose for a complete three-dimensional survey of a selected dental region is predicted to be less than that required for a single conventional periapical radiograph exposed on D-speed film.

  19. Quality aspects of digital radiography in general dental practice.

    PubMed

    Hellén-Halme, Kristina

    2007-01-01

    The number of dentists who have converted from conventional film radiography to digital radiography continues to grow. A digital system has numerous advantages, but there are also many new aspects to consider. The overall aim of this thesis was to study how digital radiography was used in general dental practices. The specific aims were to study how different factors affected image quality. To determine whether there were any differences in image quality between conventional film radiographs and digital radiographs, 4863 images (540 cases) were evaluated. The cases had been sent to the Swedish Dental Insurance Office for prior treatment approval. The image quality of digital radiographs was found to be significantly lower than that of film radiographs. This result led to a questionnaire study of dentists experienced in digital radiography. In 2003, a questionnaire was sent to the 139 general practice dentists who worked with digital radiography in Skine, Sweden; the response rate was 94%. Many general practice dentists had experienced several problems (65%), and less than half of the digital systems (40%) underwent some kind of quality control. One of the weaker links in the technical chain of digital radiography appeared to be the monitor. A field study to 19 dentists at their clinics found that the brightness and contrast settings of the monitors had to be adjusted to obtain the subjectively best image quality. The ambient light in the evaluation room was also found to affect the diagnostic outcome of low-contrast patterns in radiographs. To evaluate the effects of ambient light and technical adjustments of the monitor, a study using standardised set-ups was designed. Seven observers evaluated radiographs of 100 extracted human teeth for approximal caries under five different combinations of brightness and contrast settings on two different occasions with high and low ambient light levels in the evaluation room. The ability to diagnose carious lesions was found

  20. Risk factors associated with inferior alveolar nerve injury after extraction of the mandibular third molar--a comparative study of preoperative images by panoramic radiography and computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, T; Ri, S; Shigeta, T; Akashi, M; Imai, Y; Kakei, Y; Shibuya, Y; Komori, T

    2013-07-01

    In this study we investigated the relationships among the risk factors for inferior alveolar nerve injury (IANI), and the difference between preoperative imaging findings on panoramic radiographs and computed tomography (CT), by univariate and multivariate analyses. We determined the following to be significant variables by multivariate analysis: panoramic radiographic signs, such as the loss of the white line of the inferior alveolar canal or the diversion of the canal; excessive haemorrhage during extraction; and a close relationship of the roots to the IAN (type 1 cases) on CT examination. CT findings of type 1 were associated with a significantly higher risk (odds ratio 43.77) of IANI. In addition, many panoramic findings were not consistent with CT findings (275 of 440 teeth; 62.5%). These results suggest that CT findings may be able to predict the development of IANI more accurately than panoramic findings. Panoramic radiography alone did not provide sufficiently reliable images required for predicting IANI. Therefore, when the panoramic image is suggestive of a close relationship between the impacted tooth and the IAN, CT should be recommended as a means of conducting further investigations.

  1. Antepartum dental radiography and infant low birth weight.

    PubMed

    Hujoel, Philippe P; Bollen, Anne-Marie; Noonan, Carolyn J; del Aguila, Michael A

    2004-04-28

    Both high- and low-dose radiation exposures in women have been associated with low-birth-weight offspring. It is unclear if radiation affects the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis and thereby indirectly birth weight, or if the radiation directly affects the reproductive organs. To investigate whether antepartum dental radiography is associated with low-birth-weight offspring. A population-based case-control study. Enrollees of a dental insurance plan with live singleton births in Washington State between January 1993 and December 2000. Cases were 1117 women with low-birth-weight infants (<2500 g), of whom 336 were term low-birth-weight infants (1501-2499 g and gestation > or =37 weeks). Four control pregnancies resulting in normal-birth-weight infants (> or =2500 g) were randomly selected for each case (n = 4468). Odds of low birth weight and term low birth weight by dental radiographic dose during gestation. An exposure higher than 0.4 milligray (mGy) during gestation occurred in 21 (1.9%) mothers of low-birth-weight infants and, when compared with women who had no known dental radiography, was associated with an adjusted odds ratio (OR) for a low-birth-weight infant of 2.27 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.11-4.66, P =.03). Exposure higher than 0.4 mGy occurred in 10 (3%) term low-birth-weight pregnancies and was associated with an adjusted OR for a term low-birth-weight infant of 3.61 (95% CI, 1.46-8.92, P =.005). Dental radiography during pregnancy is associated with low birth weight, specifically with term low birth weight.

  2. A note on digital dental radiography in forensic odontology

    PubMed Central

    Chiam, Sher-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Digital dental radiography, intraoral and extraoral, is becoming more popular in dental practice. It offers convenience, such as lower exposure to radiation, ease of storing of images, and elimination of chemical processing. However, it also has disadvantages and drawbacks. One of these is the potential for confusion of the orientation of the image. This paper outlines one example of this, namely, the lateral inversion of the image. This source of confusion is partly inherent in the older model of phosphor storage plates (PSPs), as they allow both sides to be exposed without clue to the fact that the image is acquired on the wrong side. The native software allows digital manipulation of the X-ray image, permitting both rotation and inversion. Attempts to orientate the X-ray according to the indicator incorporated on the plate can then sometimes lead to inadvertent lateral inversion of the image. This article discusses the implications of such mistakes in dental digital radiography to forensic odontology and general dental practice. PMID:25177144

  3. A note on digital dental radiography in forensic odontology.

    PubMed

    Chiam, Sher-Lin

    2014-09-01

    Digital dental radiography, intraoral and extraoral, is becoming more popular in dental practice. It offers convenience, such as lower exposure to radiation, ease of storing of images, and elimination of chemical processing. However, it also has disadvantages and drawbacks. One of these is the potential for confusion of the orientation of the image. This paper outlines one example of this, namely, the lateral inversion of the image. This source of confusion is partly inherent in the older model of phosphor storage plates (PSPs), as they allow both sides to be exposed without clue to the fact that the image is acquired on the wrong side. The native software allows digital manipulation of the X-ray image, permitting both rotation and inversion. Attempts to orientate the X-ray according to the indicator incorporated on the plate can then sometimes lead to inadvertent lateral inversion of the image. This article discusses the implications of such mistakes in dental digital radiography to forensic odontology and general dental practice.

  4. Free focus radiography with miniaturized dental x-ray machines: a comparison of ''midline'' and ''lateral'' techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, T.W.

    1983-08-01

    The use of free focus radiography (FFR) employing miniaturized dental x-ray machines with radiation probes has never been generally accepted in dentistry despite its recognized radiographic potential. The present investigation studied ways to improve imaging and lower radiation burdens in dental free focus radiography. Relatively high air exposures ranging from 42,050 mR per film for high-resolution images to 3,214 mR per film for lower-resolution images using a current midline radiographic technique for panoramic FFR were found. In a proposed lateral FFR panoramic technique, reduced exposures ranged from 420 mR per film for high-resolution images to 14 mR per film for lower-resolution images. In each technique the lower exposure was obtained with a rare earth imaging system. A proposed modification of the current midline FFR technique using a rare earth imaging system and heavy added copper filtration was found to produce exposures in the range normally used in dentistry (207 mr), and the resultant image was high in contrast with relatively low detail. A comparison of essential characteristics of midline and lateral FFR techniques failed to identify specific advantages for the midline technique in current use. Lateral exposure modes in dental FFR should receive increased attention in the interest of good imaging and radiation control. It was noted that existing miniaturized dental x-ray machines may have been designed specifically for use of the midline FFR exposure technique, and modification of this equipment to support reliable lateral exposure modes was recommended.

  5. Personal computer equipment for dental digital subtraction radiography vs. industrial computer equipment and conventional radiography.

    PubMed

    Möystad, A; Svanaes, D B; Larheim, T A

    1992-04-01

    A "low-cost" personal computer (PC) system used to digitize dental radiographs was tested by assessing the accuracy of its subtraction images versus those of "high-cost" industrial equipment and conventional radiography. Subtraction images were made of artificial lesions in human femur bone and subsequently evaluated by students and teachers. The observations were analyzed in terms of true positive and false positive reports. "Low-cost" and "high-cost" subtraction images revealed only small differences in diagnostic accuracy. Compared to conventional radiography, the diagnostic accuracy of the subtraction images with the "low-cost" PC system was significantly higher for all observers. The interexaminer variance was similar for the subtraction and the conventional images for both students and teachers, except for a significantly reduced interexaminer variance for the teachers concerning the true positive reports with the "low-cost" PC subtraction technique.

  6. Diagnostic efficacy of panoramic radiography in detection of osteoporosis in post-menopausal women with low bone mineral density.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Sunanda; Krishnamurthy, Vasavi; Pagare, Sandeep S

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate panoramic radiograph, a commonly taken dental radiograph as a screening tool to detect early osseous changes (normal, mildly or severely eroded) of the mandibular inferior cortex and measure the mandibular cortical width (CW) in post-menopausal women and correlate it with the bone mineral density (BMD) measured by the ultrasound bone sonometer at the mid-shaft tibia region. The study included females between 45 years and 65 years of age in their post-menopausal stage (no menstruation for at least 6-12 months). Mandibular indices (mandibular CW and mandibular cortical shape) were evaluated from panoramic radiographs. The BMD assessment was carried out at the mid-shaft tibia region, exactly half-way between the heel and the knee joint perpendicular to the direction of the bone, using an ultrasound bone sonometer. It is a non-invasive device designed for quantitative measurement of the velocity of ultrasound waves as speed of sound in m/s, capable of measuring bone density at one or more skeletal sites. Using 1994 WHO criteria the study subjects were categorized as Group 1: Normal, Group 2: Osteopenia, Group 3: Osteoporosis. (WHO T score for tibia BMD can be used as a standard). The diagnostic efficacy of the panoramic radiograph in detecting osseous changes in post-menopausal women with low BMD was shown to have 96% specificity and 60% sensitivity with mandibular cortical shape and 58% specificity and 73% sensitivity with mandibular CW measurement. Factorial ANOVA analysis carried out indicated a significant correlation of BMD classification with mandibular cortical shape (F = 29.0, P < 0.001, partial eta squared [η(2)] =0.85), a non-significant correlation with mandibular CW, (F = 1.6, P = 0.23, η(2) = 0.86), and a more significant correlation with combined cortical shape and width (F = 3.3, P < 0.05, η(2) = 0.70). The study concludes that the combined mandibular cortical findings (P < 0.05) and mandibular cortical shape

  7. Lonizing radiation regulations and the dental practitioner: 3. Quality assurance in dental radiography.

    PubMed

    Rout, John; Brown, Jackie

    2012-06-01

    This is the last in a series of three articles on X-ray dose reduction and covers aspects of quality assurance. The first outlined radiation physics and protection and the second the legislation relating to radiation safety. Quality assurance is an essential part of dental radiography and is required to produce images of a consistently high standard, necessary for accurate diagnosis.

  8. Descriptive study of the bifid mandibular canals and retromolar foramina: cone beam CT vs panoramic radiography

    PubMed Central

    Muinelo-Lorenzo, J; Suárez-Quintanilla, J A; Fernández-Alonso, A; Marsillas-Rascado, S

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the presence and morphologic characteristics of bifid mandibular canals (BMCs) and retromolar foramens (RFs) using cone beam CT (CBCT) and to determine their visualization on panoramic radiographs (PANs). Methods: A sample of 225 CBCT examinations was analysed for the presence of BMCs, as well as length, height, diameter and angle. The diameter of the RF was also determined. Subsequently, corresponding PANs were analysed to determine whether the BMCs and RFs were visible or not. Results: The BMCs were observed on CBCT in 83 out of the 225 patients (36.8%). With respect to gender, statistically significant differences were found in the number of BMCs. There were also significant differences in anatomical characteristics of the types of BMCs. Only 37.8% of the BMCs and 32.5% of the RFs identified on CBCT were also visible on PANs. The diameter had a significant effect on the capability of PANs to visualize BMCs and RFs (B = 0.791, p = 0.035; B = 1.900, p = 0.017, respectively). Conclusions: PANs are unable to sufficiently identify BMCs and RFs. The diameter of these anatomical landmarks represents a relevant factor for visualization on PANs. Pre-operative images using only PANs may lead to underestimation of the presence of BMCs and to surgical complications and anaesthetic failures, which could have been avoided. For true determination of BMCs, a CBCT device should be considered better than a PAN. PMID:24785820

  9. Influence of Experience and Training on Dental Students' Examination Performance Regarding Panoramic Images.

    PubMed

    Turgeon, Daniel P; Lam, Ernest W N

    2016-02-01

    Physician training has greatly benefitted from insights gained in understanding the manner in which experts search medical images for abnormalities. The aims of this study were to compare the search patterns of 30 fourth-year dental students and 15 certified oral and maxillofacial radiologists (OMRs) over panoramic images and to determine the most robust variables for future studies involving image visualization. Eye tracking was used to capture the eye movement patterns of both subject groups when examining 20 panoramic images classified as normal or abnormal. Abnormal images were further subclassified as having an obvious, intermediate, or subtle abnormality. The images were presented in random order to each participant, and data were collected on duration of the participants' observations and total distance tracked, time to first eye fixation, and total duration and numbers of fixations on and off the area of interest (AOI). The results showed that the OMRs covered greater distances than the dental students (p<0.001) for normal images. For images of pathosis, the OMRs required less total time (p<0.001), made fewer eye fixations (p<0.01) with fewer saccades (p<0.001) than the students, and required less time before making the first fixation on the AOI (p<0.01). Furthermore, the OMRs covered less distance (p<0.001) than the dental students for obvious pathoses. For investigations of images of pathosis, time to first fixation is a robust parameter in predicting ability. For images with different levels of subtlety of pathoses, the number of fixations, total time spent, and numbers of revisits are important parameters to analyze when comparing observer groups with different levels of experience.

  10. Use of digital panoramic radiography as an auxiliary means of low bone mineral density detection in post-menopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Valerio, C S; Trindade, A M; Mazzieiro, Ê T; Amaral, T P; Manzi, F R

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To correlate the radiomorphometric indices obtained using digital panoramic radiography (DPR) with bone mineral densities, evaluated by the dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry test, in a population of post-menopausal females to identify patients with asymptomatic low bone mineral densities. Methods: The morphology of the mandibular cortex was evaluated using the mandibular cortical index (MCI) and the inferior mandibular cortex width was evaluated using the mental index (MI) in 64 female patients who had undergone dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry assessment. Of these patients, 21 were diagnosed with osteopaenia and 20 with osteoporosis, and 23 were normal. Three new indices for evaluating the inferior mandibular cortex width were designed: the mental posterior index 1 (MPI1), MPI2 and MPI3. Statistical analyses were performed using the χ2 and Kruskal–Wallis tests and the receiver operating characteristic curve. Results: There were significant differences between the normal and lower bone mineral density groups (osteopaenia and osteoporosis) for MCI (p < 0.01). In the osteoporosis group, the MI, MPI1, MPI2 and MPI3 were significantly different from the normal and osteopaenia groups (p < 0.05). The MI, MPI1, MPI2 and MPI3 showed that there is an area in the mandibular cortex, located between the mental foramen and the antegonial region, which is valid for identifying females at high risk for osteoporosis. Conclusions: The MCI, MI, MPI1, MPI2, and MPI3 radiomorphometric indices evaluated using DPR can be used to identify post-menopausal females with low bone densities and to provide adequate medical treatment for them. PMID:24005062

  11. Use of digital panoramic radiography as an auxiliary means of low bone mineral density detection in post-menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Valerio, C S; Trindade, A M; Mazzieiro, E T; Amaral, T P; Manzi, F R

    2013-01-01

    To correlate the radiomorphometric indices obtained using digital panoramic radiography (DPR) with bone mineral densities, evaluated by the dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry test, in a population of post-menopausal females to identify patients with asymptomatic low bone mineral densities. The morphology of the mandibular cortex was evaluated using the mandibular cortical index (MCI) and the inferior mandibular cortex width was evaluated using the mental index (MI) in 64 female patients who had undergone dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry assessment. Of these patients, 21 were diagnosed with osteopaenia and 20 with osteoporosis, and 23 were normal. Three new indices for evaluating the inferior mandibular cortex width were designed: the mental posterior index 1 (MPI1), MPI2 and MPI3. Statistical analyses were performed using the χ(2) and Kruskal-Wallis tests and the receiver operating characteristic curve. There were significant differences between the normal and lower bone mineral density groups (osteopaenia and osteoporosis) for MCI (p < 0.01). In the osteoporosis group, the MI, MPI1, MPI2 and MPI3 were significantly different from the normal and osteopaenia groups (p < 0.05). The MI, MPI1, MPI2 and MPI3 showed that there is an area in the mandibular cortex, located between the mental foramen and the antegonial region, which is valid for identifying females at high risk for osteoporosis. The MCI, MI, MPI1, MPI2, and MPI3 radiomorphometric indices evaluated using DPR can be used to identify post-menopausal females with low bone densities and to provide adequate medical treatment for them.

  12. Dose measurements for dental cone-beam CT: a comparison with MSCT and panoramic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deman, P.; Atwal, P.; Duzenli, C.; Thakur, Y.; Ford, N. L.

    2014-06-01

    To date there is a lack of published information on appropriate methods to determine patient doses from dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) equipment. The goal of this study is to apply and extend the methods recommended in the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Report 111 for CBCT equipment to characterize dose and effective dose for a range of dental imaging equipment. A protocol derived from the one proposed by Dixon et al (2010 Technical Report 111, American Association of Physicist in Medicine, MD, USA), was applied to dose measurements of multi-slice CT, dental CBCT (small and large fields of view (FOV)) and a dental panoramic system. The computed tomography dose index protocol was also performed on the MSCT to compare both methods. The dose distributions in a cylindrical polymethyl methacrylate phantom were characterized using a thimble ionization chamber and Gafchromic™ film (beam profiles). Gafchromic™ films were used to measure the dose distribution in an anthropomorphic phantom. A method was proposed to extend dose estimates to planes superior and inferior to the central plane. The dose normalized to 100 mAs measured in the center of the phantom for the large FOV dental CBCT (11.4 mGy/100 mAs) is two times lower than that of MSCT (20.7 mGy/100 mAs) for the same FOV, but approximately 15 times higher than for a panoramic system (0.6 mGy/100 mAs). The effective dose per scan (in clinical conditions) found for the dental CBCT are 167.60 ± 3.62, 61.30 ± 3.88 and 92.86 ± 7.76 mSv for the Kodak 9000 (fixed scan length of 3.7 cm), and the iCAT Next Generation for 6 cm and 13 cm scan lengths respectively. The method to extend the dose estimates from the central slice to superior and inferior slices indicates a good agreement between theory and measurement. The Gafchromic™ films provided useful beam profile data and 2D distributions of dose in phantom.

  13. Patient exposure trends in medical and dental radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.W.; Goetz, W.A.

    1986-01-01

    Patient exposure to medical and dental x rays has long been of interest to the radiological health community. With the cooperation of state and local agencies and professional groups, the Center for Devices and Radiological Health has conducted three major surveys of patient exposure to x rays. The latest of these surveys, the Nationwide Evaluation of X-ray Trends (NEXT), collected x-ray exposure data for each year starting in 1972. Two earlier studies, the 1964 and 1970 X-ray Exposure Studies collected x-ray data during the years these surveys were conducted. Exposure trends presented are based on results of all three studies. Major improvements in beam limitation are seen for medical and dental radiography. Since 1964, when the first nationwide survey was conducted, dental exposures have decreased about 75%. Decreases of up to one-third occurred in exposures for medical examinations. The current exposure data presented continue to show a wide variation in medical exposures. Also presented are organ doses for four organs (ovaries, testes, thyroid and active bone marrow).

  14. Dental panoramic indices and fractal dimension measurements in osteogenesis imperfecta children under pamidronate treatment.

    PubMed

    Apolinário, Ana C; Sindeaux, Rafael; de Souza Figueiredo, Paulo T; Guimarães, Ana T B; Acevedo, Ana C; Castro, Luiz C; de Paula, Ana P; de Paula, Lilian M; de Melo, Nilce S; Leite, André F

    2016-01-01

    To verify radiomorphometric indices and fractal dimension (FD) in dental panoramic radiographs (DPRs) of children with different types of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) and also to verify the effect of pamidronate (PAM) treatment in such panoramic analyses. In this retrospective study, 197 DPRs of 62 children with OI Types I, III and IV who were in treatment with a comparable dosage of intravenous PAM were selected. The mandibular cortical width (MCW), mandibular cortical index, visual estimation of the cortical width and FD of three standardized trabecular and cortical mandibular regions of interest were obtained from the radiographs. Factorial analysis of variance and Fisher test were used to compare FD and MCW measurements in children with different types of OI for different PAM cycles. Children with all types of OI have thinner and more porous mandibular cortices at the beginning of treatment. There were significant differences between MCW and FD of the cortical bone, regarding different types of OI and number of PAM cycles (p = 0.037 and p = 0.044, respectively). FD measurements of the trabecular bone were not statistically different among OI types nor were PAM cycles (p > 0.05). Children with OI presented cortical bone alterations after PAM treatment. Both MCW and the FD of the cortical bone were higher in children with OI after PAM treatment. It is argued that cortical bone should be considered for analyzing patients with OI, as well as to monitor the progress of PAM treatment.

  15. Automated scheme for measuring mandibular cortical thickness on dental panoramic radiographs for osteoporosis screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, T.; Hayashi, T.; Hara, T.; Katsumata, A.; Muramatsu, C.; Zhou, X.; Iida, Y.; Matsuoka, M.; Katagi, Ki.; Fujita, H.

    2012-03-01

    Findings of dental panoramic radiographs (DPRs) have shown that the mandibular cortical thickness (MCT) was significantly correlated with osteoporosis. Identifying asymptomatic patients with osteoporosis through dental examinations may bring a supplemental benefit for the patients. However, most of the DPRs are used for only diagnosing dental conditions by dentists in their routine clinical work. The aim of this study was to develop a computeraided diagnosis scheme that automatically measures MCT to assist dentists in screening osteoporosis. First, the inferior border of mandibular bone was detected by use of an active contour method. Second, the locations of mental foramina were estimated on the basis of the inferior border of mandibular bone. Finally, MCT was measured on the basis of the grayscale profile analysis. One hundred DPRs were used to evaluate our proposed scheme. Experimental results showed that the sensitivity and specificity for identifying osteoporotic patients were 92.6 % and 100 %, respectively. We conducted multiclinic trials, in which 223 cases have been obtained and processed in about a month. Our scheme succeeded in detecting all cases of suspected osteoporosis. Therefore, our scheme may have a potential to identify osteoporotic patients at an early stage.

  16. Automated classification of mandibular cortical bone on dental panoramic radiographs for early detection of osteoporosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiba, Kazuki; Muramatsu, Chisako; Hayashi, Tatsuro; Fukui, Tatsumasa; Hara, Takeshi; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    Findings on dental panoramic radiographs (DPRs) have shown that mandibular cortical index (MCI) based on the morphology of mandibular inferior cortex was significantly correlated with osteoporosis. MCI on DPRs can be categorized into one of three groups and has the high potential for identifying patients with osteoporosis. However, most DPRs are used only for diagnosing dental conditions by dentists in their routine clinical work. Moreover, MCI is not generally quantified but assessed subjectively. In this study, we investigated a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system that automatically classifies mandibular cortical bone for detection of osteoporotic patients at early stage. First, an inferior border of mandibular bone was detected by use of an active contour method. Second, regions of interest including the cortical bone are extracted and analyzed for its thickness and roughness. Finally, support vector machine (SVM) differentiate cases into three MCI categories by features including the thickness and roughness. Ninety eight DPRs were used to evaluate our proposed scheme. The number of cases classified to Class I, II, and III by a dental radiologist are 56, 25 and 17 cases, respectively. Experimental result based on the leave-one-out cross-validation evaluation showed that the sensitivities for the classes I, II, and III were 94.6%, 57.7% and 94.1%, respectively. Distribution of the groups in the feature space indicates a possibility of MCI quantification by the proposed method. Therefore, our scheme has a potential in identifying osteoporotic patients at an early stage.

  17. External root resorption of the second molar associated with third molar impaction: comparison of panoramic radiography and cone beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Oenning, Anne Caroline Costa; Neves, Frederico Sampaio; Alencar, Phillipe Nogueira Barbosa; Prado, Rodrigo Freire; Groppo, Francisco Carlos; Haiter-Neto, Francisco

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare panoramic radiography and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for the assessment of external root resorption (ERR) of second molars associated with impacted third molars. In addition, the prevalence of ERR in second molars and the inclinations of the third molars more associated with ERR were investigated in both imaging methods. The sample consisted of 66 individuals with maxillary and mandibular impacted third molars (n = 188) seen on panoramic radiographs and CBCT images. The presence of ERR on the adjacent second molar was investigated, and the position of the third molar was determined using Winter's classification (vertical, horizontal, mesioangular, distoangular, and transverse). Statistical analysis was performed using the χ(2) test, Fisher exact test, and 2-proportion Z test (the significance level was set at 5%). A significantly greater number of cases of ERR (P < .0001) was diagnosed from CBCT images (n = 43, 22.88%) than panoramic radiographs (n = 10, 5.31%). The agreement between the panoramic radiographs and CBCT scans for diagnosing ERR was 4.3%. Mandibular third molars in mesioangular and horizontal inclinations were more likely to cause resorption of the adjacent teeth. CBCT should be indicated for the diagnosis of ERR in second molars when direct contact between the mandibular second and third molars has been observed on panoramic radiographs, especially in mesioangular or horizontal impactions. Furthermore, considering the propensity of these teeth to cause ERR in second molars, third molar prophylactic extraction could be suggested. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Quality assurance in digital dental radiography--justification and dose reduction in dental and maxillofacial radiology.

    PubMed

    Hellstern, F; Geibel, M-A

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the implementation of quality assurance requirements for digital dental radiography in routine clinical practice. The results should be discussed by radiation protection authorities in the context of the relevant legal requirements and current debates on radiation protection. Two hundred digital dental radiographs were randomly selected from the digital database of the Department of Dentistry's Dental and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinic, Ulm University, and evaluated for various aspects of image quality and compliance with radiographic documentation requirements. The dental films were prepared by different radiology assistants (RAs) using one of two digital intraoral radiographic systems: Sirona Heliodent DS, 60 kV, focal spot size: 0.7 mm (group A) or KaVo Gendex 765 DC, 65 kV, focal spot size: 0.4 mm (group B). Radiographic justification was documented in 70.5% of cases, and the radiographic findings in 76.5%. Both variables were documented in the patient records as well as in the software in 14% of cases. Clinical documentation of the required information (name of the responsible dentist and radiology assistant, date, patient name, department, tube voltage, tube current, exposure time, type of radiograph, film size, department and serial number of the dental radiograph) was 100% complete in all cases. Moreover, the department certified according to DIN ISO 9001:2008 specifications demonstrated complete clinical documentation of radiographic justifications and radiographic findings. The entire dentition was visible on 83% of the digital films. The visible area corresponded to the target region on 85.7% of the digital dental radiographs. Seven to 8.5% of the images were classified as "hypometric" or "hypermetric". This study indicates that improvements in radiology training and continuing education fordentists and dental staff performing x-ray examinations are needed to ensure consistent high quality of digital dental radiography. Implementation of

  19. Comparison of the diagnostic value of CBCT and Digital Panoramic Radiography with surgical findings to determine the proximity of an impacted third mandibular molar to the inferior alveolar nerve canal

    PubMed Central

    Saraydar-Baser, R; Dehghani-Tafti, M; Navab-Azam, A; Ezoddini-Ardakani, F; Nayer, S; Safi, Y; Shamloo, N

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study evaluated and determined the proximity of an impacted third mandibular molar (TMM) to the inferior alveolar canal (IAC) by using CBCT and digital panoramic radiography. Materials and Methods: This descriptive-analytic research applied CBCT and panoramic radiographs for 60 subjects (28 men, 32 women). Subjects selected showed a close proximity about the TMM to the inferior nerve canal on panoramic radiographs; these subjects then received CBCT radiographs. The CBCT findings for the proximity of the TMM to inferior nerve canal used the outcomes of surgical findings as the standard of comparison. Results: Eight cases showed positive surgical findings indicating vicinity of the third molar and the mandibular nerve canal. Only 13.3% of the cases in which panoramic views showed the proximity of the TMM and the IAC were confirmed during surgery. The result for CBCT radiographic diagnosis was 95%. Conclusion: It can be concluded that CBCT is preferred over panoramic radiography to determine the proximity of the impacted TMM to the IAC. Narrowing of the mandibular canal or root canal, disconnection of root borders in panoramic radiography, and the inferior-lingual proximity of the tooth to the root in CBCT strongly indicated the close nearness of the impacted TMM to the IAC. PMID:28316671

  20. Comparison of the diagnostic value of CBCT and Digital Panoramic Radiography with surgical findings to determine the proximity of an impacted third mandibular molar to the inferior alveolar nerve canal.

    PubMed

    Saraydar-Baser, R; Dehghani-Tafti, M; Navab-Azam, A; Ezoddini-Ardakani, F; Nayer, S; Safi, Y; Shamloo, N

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study evaluated and determined the proximity of an impacted third mandibular molar (TMM) to the inferior alveolar canal (IAC) by using CBCT and digital panoramic radiography. Materials and Methods: This descriptive-analytic research applied CBCT and panoramic radiographs for 60 subjects (28 men, 32 women). Subjects selected showed a close proximity about the TMM to the inferior nerve canal on panoramic radiographs; these subjects then received CBCT radiographs. The CBCT findings for the proximity of the TMM to inferior nerve canal used the outcomes of surgical findings as the standard of comparison. Results: Eight cases showed positive surgical findings indicating vicinity of the third molar and the mandibular nerve canal. Only 13.3% of the cases in which panoramic views showed the proximity of the TMM and the IAC were confirmed during surgery. The result for CBCT radiographic diagnosis was 95%. Conclusion: It can be concluded that CBCT is preferred over panoramic radiography to determine the proximity of the impacted TMM to the IAC. Narrowing of the mandibular canal or root canal, disconnection of root borders in panoramic radiography, and the inferior-lingual proximity of the tooth to the root in CBCT strongly indicated the close nearness of the impacted TMM to the IAC.

  1. Adherence to NICE guidelines on recall intervals and the FGDP(UK) Selection Criteria for Dental Radiography.

    PubMed

    Davies, Kristian J M; Drage, Nicholas A

    2013-01-01

    The study investigated adherence of GDPs to National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines on recall intervals and the FGDP (UK)'s Selection Criteria for Dental Radiography. It also explored any factors that might influence GDPs' compliance with the guidelines. A previously piloted questionnaire was circulated to all GDPs within the district of the Cardiff and Vale University Health Board (UHB). The questionnaire sought demographic data as well as answers to questions relating to compliance with guidelines. Of 215 questionnaires, 133 (61.9%) were returned. One hundred a nd thirty (97.7%) respondents were familiar with NICE recall guidelines and 112 (84.2%) were familiar with the FGDP(UK) publication Selection Criteria for Dental Radiography. Thirty six (27.7%) 'always' followed the NICE recall guidelines and, overall, 108 (81.8%) 'always or mostly' followed the guidance. Fifty one (38.6%) respondents 'always' carried out a caries risk assessment for adult patients and 57 (43.5%) 'always' carried out a caries risk assessment for child patients. Seventy nine (59.8%) reported that they 'always or mostly' recorded the patient's disease risk category in the notes. Fifty two (39.7%) respondents 'always' took bitewing radiographs that corresponded to disease risk. Overall, however, 119 GDPs (90.8%) 'always or mostly' took bitewing radiographs at appropriate intervals according to disease risk. Bitewing radiographs for new adult patients were prescribed more often for new child patients. The dentist's length of experience, NHS commitment, country of graduation, access to digital radiography or panoramic machines, receipt of any postgraduate qualifications or involvement in dental foundation training were proven not to have any statistically significant association with adherence to NICE or FGDP(UK) guidelines. Most dentists are familiar with NICE guidelines on recall intervals and the FGDP(UK)'s Selection Criteria for Dental Radiography. The number

  2. Volumetric image reconstruction in a dental panoramic imaging system with a limited-angle zigzag scan geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Daeki; Cho, Hyosung; Lee, Seonhwa; Oh, Jieun; Lee, Minsik; Kim, Hyojeong; Je, Uikyu; Park, Yeonok; Choi, Sungil; Koo, Yangseo; Cho, Heemoon

    2013-01-01

    As a continuation of our dental imaging R&D, we have proposed a novel idea that is capable of implementing cost-effective, low-dose, volumetric image reconstruction directly onto a dental panoramic imaging system. In the proposed geometry, a linear-type panoramic detector is rotated 90° from the orientation for panoramic imaging and scanned along a limited-angle zigzag trajectory in the axial direction to cover the whole imaging volume thickness. We used an effective reconstruction algorithm based on the total-variation (TV) minimization approach for the proposed geometry and performed systematic simulation work to demonstrate the viability of our proposed approach and its effectiveness for three-dimensional (3D) dental X-ray imaging. We have successfully reconstructed images of substantially high image accuracy from the proposed geometry and evaluated the reconstruction quality by using an image similarity metric, the universal-quality index (UQI). We expect the proposed method to be applicable to developing a cost-effective, low-dose, all-in-one dental X-ray imaging system.

  3. Evaluation of developmental dental anomalies in digital panoramic radiographs in Southeast Iranian Population

    PubMed Central

    Saberi, Eshagh Ali; Ebrahimipour, Sediqe

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of dental developmental anomalies in digital panoramic radiographs of the patients referred to the Zahedan medical imaging center and to evaluate the frequency of anomalies regarding the disorders in shape, position and number in the Southeast of Iran. Materials and Methods: A total of 1172 panoramic radiographs from 581 males and 586 females aged over 16 years were obtained from the files of the Zahedan medical imaging center between the years of 2014 and 2015. The selected radiographs were evaluated in terms of the anomalies such as dilacerations, taurodontism, supernumerary teeth, congenitally missing teeth, fusion, gemination, tooth impaction, tooth transposition, dens invagination, and peg lateral. Then, the anomalies were compared to each other regarding the frequency of the anomaly type (morphological, positional and numerical). Data were evaluated using descriptive statistics such as frequency and percent, and statistical tests such as X2 at 0.05 significant level using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 16.5. Results: The prevalence of dental anomaly was 213 (18.17%), which was higher in females (9.90) than male, (8.28), however, this difference was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). The prevalence of dilacerated teeth was 62 (5.29%), taurodontism 63 (5.38%), supernumerary teeth 6 (0.51%), congenitally missing teeth 13 (1.11%), fusion 1 (0.09%), gemination 1 (0.09%), impaction 40 (3.41%), transposition 2 (0.18%), dens invagination 16 (1.37) and peg lateral was 9 (0.77%). The prevalence of morphological anomaly was 152 (71.36%), malposition 42 (19.72%) and numerous anomaly was 19 (8.92%). Conclusions: Dental anomalies are relatively common; although their occurrence is not symptomatic, they can lead to several clinical problems in patients. Detailed clinical and radiographic assessment and counseling during patient visits is a critical factor in assessing the

  4. [The specific panoramic radiographic signs and their relation with inferior alveolar nerve injuries after mandibular third molar surgery].

    PubMed

    Szalma, József; Lempel, Edina; Csuta, Tamás; Vajta, László; Jeges, Sára; Olasz, Lajos

    2011-03-01

    The aim of the authors was to describe the classic specific panoramic signs (indicating a close spatial relationship between dental canal and third molar's root) on panoramic radiographic images and determine their role in the risk assessment, predicting inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) paresthesia after lower third molar removal. The authors represented an informative case, where the IAN was visible during the surgery. The exact knowledge of classic panoramic radiographic signs should help the determination of "high risk" cases predicting IAN paresthesia after mandibular third molar removal. The authors keep panoramic radiography rather a routine than the most superior diagnostic tool in third molar surgery.

  5. Dental panoramic indices and fractal dimension measurements in osteogenesis imperfecta children under pamidronate treatment

    PubMed Central

    Apolinário, Ana C; Sindeaux, Rafael; de Souza Figueiredo, Paulo T; Guimarães, Ana T B; Acevedo, Ana C; Castro, Luiz C; de Paula, Ana P; de Paula, Lilian M; de Melo, Nilce S

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To verify radiomorphometric indices and fractal dimension (FD) in dental panoramic radiographs (DPRs) of children with different types of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) and also to verify the effect of pamidronate (PAM) treatment in such panoramic analyses. Methods: In this retrospective study, 197 DPRs of 62 children with OI Types I, III and IV who were in treatment with a comparable dosage of intravenous PAM were selected. The mandibular cortical width (MCW), mandibular cortical index, visual estimation of the cortical width and FD of three standardized trabecular and cortical mandibular regions of interest were obtained from the radiographs. Factorial analysis of variance and Fisher test were used to compare FD and MCW measurements in children with different types of OI for different PAM cycles. Results: Children with all types of OI have thinner and more porous mandibular cortices at the beginning of treatment. There were significant differences between MCW and FD of the cortical bone, regarding different types of OI and number of PAM cycles (p = 0.037 and p = 0.044, respectively). FD measurements of the trabecular bone were not statistically different among OI types nor were PAM cycles (p > 0.05). Conclusions: Children with OI presented cortical bone alterations after PAM treatment. Both MCW and the FD of the cortical bone were higher in children with OI after PAM treatment. It is argued that cortical bone should be considered for analyzing patients with OI, as well as to monitor the progress of PAM treatment. PMID:26954289

  6. Radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, C. G.

    1973-01-01

    Radiography is discussed as a method for nondestructive evaluation of internal flaws of solids. Gamma ray and X-ray equipment are described along with radiographic film, radiograph interpretation, and neutron radiography.

  7. Occlusal interferences related to dental panoramic radiographic changes in subjects treated with fixed prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Ettala-Ylitalo, U M; Syrjänen, S; Markkanen, H

    1987-09-01

    Because of contradictory reports between clinical and radiographic findings, occlusal analysis correlated to dental panoramic findings was completed in 147 patients treated with fixed prosthesis. Both occlusal interferences and radiographic changes in the TMJ area and/or in dentition were frequently discovered. Dysfunction and occlusal indices gave statistically significant correlations to radiographic changes (P less than 0.01 and P less than 0.05, respectively) in the TMJ area. Periodontal changes with vertical bone pocket formation and sclerotic lamina dura seem to be early radiographic findings and occlusal interferences were the only means to give a clear-cut correlation to the radiographic changes (P less than 0.001). However, if periodontal tissues with supporting bone structure fail to respond to occlusal trauma, changes in the TMJ area will probably appear. From the clinical changes the deviation on mouth opening, tenderness to palpation of TMJ, and slide from retrusion to intercuspidation (RP-IP) explained most of the radiological TMJ changes when tested by the discriminant analysis. The value of radiographic follow-up of subjects following prosthetic treatment is emphasized.

  8. Image texture in dental panoramic radiographs as a potential biomarker of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Martin G; Graham, James; Devlin, Hugh

    2013-09-01

    Previous studies have shown an association between osteoporosis and automatic measurements of mandibular cortical width on dental panoramic radiographs (DPRs). In this study, we show that additional image texture features increase this association and propose the combined features as a potential biomarker for osteoporosis. We used an existing dataset of 663 DPRs of female patients with bone mineral density (BMD) measurements. The mandibular cortex was located using a previously described computer algorithm. Texture features, based on co-occurrence matrices and fractal dimension, were measured in the bone within the cortex and also in the superior basal bone above the cortex. These, augmented by cortical width measurements, were used by a random forest classifier to identify osteoporosis at femoral neck, total hip, and lumbar spine. Classification performance was assessed by ROC analysis. Area-under-curve (AUC) values for identifying osteoporosis at femoral neck were 0.830, 0.824, and 0.872 using, respectively, cortical width alone, cortical texture (co-occurrence matrix features) alone, and combined width and texture. At 80% sensitivity, these classifiers produced specificity values of 74.4%, 73.6%, and 80.0%, respectively. Fractal dimension was a less effective texture feature. Prediction of osteoporosis at the lumbar spine was poorer, but a combined width and superior basal bone texture classifier gave a significant improvement in AUC at over the use of width alone.

  9. Total variation minimization-based spiral CT reconstruction in a dental panoramic imaging system for cost-effective, low-dose dental X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, D. K.; Lee, S. H.; Cho, H. S.; Oh, J. E.; Lee, M. S.; Kim, H. J.; Park, Y. O.; Je, U. K.; Choi, S. I.; Koo, Y. S.; Cho, H. M.

    2012-12-01

    In the paper, we proposed a pragmatic method capable of implementing a cost-effective, low-dose CT reconstruction directly onto a dental panoramic X-ray imaging system by adopting a spiral source trajectory. In the proposed geometry, a linear-type panoramic imaging sensor is rotated 90° from the orientation for panoramic imaging to imitate fan-beam image acquisition. For image reconstruction, we considered a total variation (TV) minimization-based algorithm that exploited the sparsity of the image gradient and was capable of reconstructing CT images with substantially high image accuracy against the image artifacts from sparse-view data. We implemented the algorithm for the proposed geometry and performed systematic simulation works to demonstrate its feasibility for dental imaging applications. CT images were successfully reconstructed from the proposed geometry, and the reconstruction quality was evaluated quantitatively by using an image similarity metric. We expect the proposed method to be applicable to developing a cost-effective, low-dose, all-in-one dental imaging system.

  10. Are children's dental panoramic tomographs and lateral cephalometric radiographs sufficiently optimized?

    PubMed

    Pakbaznejad Esmaeili, Elmira; Ekholm, Marja; Haukka, Jari; Evälahti, Marjut; Waltimo-Sirén, Janna

    2016-02-01

    Children are especially vulnerable to harmful effects of ionizing radiation. Cutting down the dimensions of the X-ray beam is the most effective way to reduce the patient dose. We evaluated the appropriateness of field-size in the most frequent radiographs, dental panoramic tomographs (DPTs) and lateral cephalometric radiographs (LCRs) among 7- to 12-year-olds. The image field-size of 241 DPTs and 118 LCRs was analysed. The image field was considered appropriate when it did not include anatomic structures beyond the area of clinical interest. The image field was compared with factors such as the age of the patient, the radiographic equipment used and the programme selected. Moreover, we assessed the use of thyroid shield in LCR. The field-size was too large in 70% of the DPTs horizontally and in 96% vertically. None of the DPTs were segmented. Every LCR showed appropriate limitation anteriorly, but the image field was too large in 54% posteriorly, in 86% superiorly, and in 76% inferiorly. A thyroid shield had been used in only 71% of cases. Most DPTs and LCRs had been performed sub-optimally. An abundancy of DPTs had been taken using an adult programme, and the field-size had not been sufficiently adjusted in LCRs, possibly for technical reasons. To facilitate adherence to radiological best practice the equipment used for DPTs and LCRs should facilitate the adjustment of field-size in both the vertical and horizontal planes. In addition, those involved in taking radiographs should maintain their skills through regular update courses. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Biological effects of radiation from dental radiography. Council on Dental Materials, Instruments, and Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, S.J.

    1982-08-01

    Clearly, there is ample evidence of adverse effects of radiation in sufficient doses. There is at present no proof of such effects from doses commonly employed in dental practice; however, it has not been possible to prove the absence of such effects. Most experts now agree that there may be a small, difficult to quantify risk of cancer or genetic mutation from diagnostic exposure in patients and in personnel exposed during work. Prudence dictates acceptance of this position until proof to the contrary is available. This report has presented recent attempts to quantify the risk to patients based on speculative calculations and extrapolations. Indices of population risks indicate that medical radiology is the largest source of human-made genetic and leukemogenic radiation burden to the American public. Dental radiology contributes a small-but not necessarily insignificant-portion. Of major concern is the increasing use of radiation for diagnostic purposes in both medicine and dentistry. Technological advances have reduced exposure per examination; presumably this trend will continue so that total exposure of populations to radiation in the healing arts will not increase. Recent analyses suggest that the cancer risk to a patient from a dental radiographic examination is of the order of one in a million; the genetic risk is substantially less, about one in a billion. The risks appear to be essentially equal for full-mouth intraoral and for panoramic examinations. These estimates are numerically quite small, but the effects are severe. Thus, these risks cannot be ignored. However, we currently accept risks of similar magnitude in our daily lives (Table 9)50,51 In addition, the risk of failure to make an accurate diagnosis may be greater than the risk from exposure to the radiation from a justified and properly conducted radiographic examination.

  12. Prevalence of dental anomalies on panoramic radiographs in a population of the state of Pará, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Goncalves-Filho, Antonio Jg; Moda, Larissa B; Oliveira, Roberta P; Ribeiro, Andre Luis Ribeiro; Pinheiro, João Jv; Alver-Junior, S Rgio M

    2014-01-01

    Dental anomalies (DAs) are the result of disorders that are able to modify the shape, number, size, and structure of teeth. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of DAs using panoramic radiographs in a population of the City of Belém, northern Brazil. In this study, 487 panoramic radiographs were evaluated searching for DAs. Dental records were reviewed for diagnostic confirmation. DAs related to the shape, number, size, and structure of teeth were investigated. Our results showed a DA prevalence of 56.9%. The most prevalent DA was taurodontism, which was present in 27.19% of cases. Root dilaceration was the second most prevalent DA in adults, whereas hypodontia was the second most prevalent DA in children. A total of 13 DAs were found. Dental anomalies were present in over half of the sample, and most of them were related to the shape of the teeth. Although there was a high prevalence of shape-related DAs, these alterations are generally of lower severity, and most do not require specific treatment. However, in 19.25% of cases, DAs were found involving the number, size and structure of the teeth. These DAs should be diagnosed and treated early, avoiding thus more serious complications.

  13. Effects of instruction on the knowledge, attitudes and beliefs of dental students towards digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Scarfe, W C; Potter, B J; Farman, A G

    1996-04-01

    To investigate the effects of a course of instruction in intraoral digital radiology on the knowledge, attitudes and beliefs of dental students. A questionnaire was administered to dental students at two institutions with (UL) and without (MCG) formal instruction in digital dental radiology, investigating their understanding of the principles of digital radiography, their attitudes to its use in the near future, and on the timing and suitability of the topic in the undergraduate dental curriculum. Differences in the responses between preclinical and clinical students at the two institutions were statistically assessed. The overall response rate was 66% (277) with rates of 52% (103) at MCG and 76% (174) at UL. UL students knew significantly more about digital radiography but they also had some significant misconceptions and differed in their perception of its future role. Most students (93%) believed that digital radiography should be included in the curriculum or offered as an elective course. Dental students want digital radiology to be introduced into the dental radiology curriculum, regardless of whether it is examined or not. The teaching methods and content of such a course need careful consideration.

  14. Development of a new dental panoramic radiographic system based on a tomosynthesis method

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, K; Langlais, R P; McDavid, W D; Noujeim, M; Seki, K; Okano, T; Yamakawa, T; Sue, T

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a new practical method to reconstruct a high-quality panoramic image in which radiographers would be free from the onerous task of correctly locating the patient's jaws within the image layer of the panoramic unit. In addition, dentists would be able to freely select any panoramic plane to be reconstructed after the acquisition of the raw scan data. A high-speed data acquisition device was used with a CdTe (cadmium telluride) semiconductor detector and a sophisticated digital signal-processing technique based on tomosynthesis was developed. The system processes many vertical strip images acquired with the detector and generates a high-resolution and high-contrast image. To apply the tomosynthesis technique to the acquired strip images correctly, the actual movement of the panoramic unit was measured, including the X-ray tube and detector, in a scan using a calibration phantom and the authors generated a shift amount table needed for the shift-and-add tomosynthesis operation. The results of the experiments with a PanoACT-1000 panoramic unit, which was a PC-1000® panoramic unit fitted with a high frame rate semiconductor detector SCAN-300FPC®, demonstrated the capability of a tomosynthesis technique which, when applied to the strip images of a dry skull phantom, could change the location and inclination of an imaging plane. This system allowed the extraction of an optimum-quality panoramic image regardless of irregularities in patient positioning. Moreover, the authors could freely reconstruct a fine image of an arbitrary plane with different parameters from those used in the original data acquisition to study fine anatomical details in specific locations. PMID:20089744

  15. A retrospective radiographic evaluation of the anterior loop of the mental nerve: Comparison between panoramic radiography and cone beam computerized tomography

    PubMed Central

    Vujanovic-Eskenazi, Aleksandar; Valero-James, Jesus-Manuel; Sánchez-Garcés, María-Angeles

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the prevalence and the length of mental loop, measured with panoramic radiography (PR) and cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT). Material and Methods: PG and CBCT images where analyzed by a single calibrated examiner to determine the presence and the position of the mental foramen (MF), its distance to the lower mandible border, the anterior length of the mental loop (ML) and the bone quality in 82 PR and 82 CBCT. Results: ML was identified in 36.6 % of PR and 48.8 % of CBCT. PR showed a magnification of 1.87 when compared to CBCT. The mean of anterior extension of the inferior alveolar nerve and the distance to the inferior border of the mandible was higher for PR (2.8 mm, sd 0.91 mm on the PR , range 1.5 to 4.7 mm and 1.59, sd 0.9 on the CBCT ,range 0.4 to 4.0 mm) Conclusions: There is a magnification in PR images with respect to those of CBCT. The differences between CBCT and PR with regards to the identification and length of the ML are not statistically significant. Identification and accuracy measurements of ML did not depend on the bone quality. Considering that two dimensional imaging provides less accurate and reliable information regarding the anterior loop, a CBCT scan could be recommended when planning implant placement in the anterior region. Key words:Mental loop, mental nerve, mental canal, preoperative implant planning, panoramic tomography, cone beam computerized tomography. PMID:25549693

  16. Quality assurance in dental radiography: intra-oral image quality analysis.

    PubMed

    Bolas, Andrew; Fitzgerald, Maurice

    With the introduction of criteria for clinical audit by the Irish Dental Council, and the statutory requirement on dentists to introduce this into their practice, this article will introduce the basic concepts of quality standards in intra-oral radiography and the subsequent application of these standards in an image quality audit cycle. Subjective image quality analysis is not a new concept, but its application can prove beneficial to both patient and dental practitioner. The ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) principle is fundamental in radiation protection, and therefore the prevention of repeat exposures demonstrates one facet of this that the dental practitioner can employ within daily practice.

  17. Cone beam computed tomography and intraoral radiography for diagnosis of dental abnormalities in dogs and cats

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Luiz Antonio F.; Barriviera, Mauricio; Januário, Alessandro L.; Bezerra, Ana Cristina B.; Fioravanti, Maria Clorinda S.

    2011-01-01

    The development of veterinary dentistry has substantially improved the ability to diagnose canine and feline dental abnormalities. Consequently, examinations previously performed only on humans are now available for small animals, thus improving the diagnostic quality. This has increased the need for technical qualification of veterinary professionals and increased technological investments. This study evaluated the use of cone beam computed tomography and intraoral radiography as complementary exams for diagnosing dental abnormalities in dogs and cats. Cone beam computed tomography was provided faster image acquisition with high image quality, was associated with low ionizing radiation levels, enabled image editing, and reduced the exam duration. Our results showed that radiography was an effective method for dental radiographic examination with low cost and fast execution times, and can be performed during surgical procedures. PMID:22122905

  18. General Dental Practitioners’ Concept towards Using Radiography and Apex-Locators in Endodontics

    PubMed Central

    Raoof, Maryam; Heidaripour, Maryam; Shahravan, Arash; Haghani, Jahangir; Afkham, Arash; Razifar, Mahsa; Mohammadizadeh, Sakineh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Despite being the gold standard as well as a routine technique in endodontics, radiographic working length (WL) determination owns many drawbacks. Electronic apex-locators (EALs) are recommended to complement radiographies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the perceptions of Iranian general dental practitioners (GDPs) towards using radiography and EAL. Methods and Materials: Three hundred and ninety one GDPs attending the 53th Iranian Dental Association Congress completed a questionnaire focusing on the use of radiography and EALs during the various stages of root canal treatment. The data was analyzed with the chi-square test with the level of significance set at 0.05. The results were then calculated as frequencies and percentages. Results: More than half of the GDPs reported using radiographs as the sole method for WL determination. A total of 30.4% of the practitioners were using the combined approach during root canal therapy of a single-rooted tooth, while 38.9% used this method in multi-rooted teeth. Approximately half of the respondents would not order follow-up radiographies after root canal treatment. Conclusion: Radiography continues to be the most common method for WL determination in Iran. PMID:25386209

  19. Automatic segmentation of mandible in panoramic x-ray

    PubMed Central

    Abdi, Amir Hossein; Kasaei, Shohreh; Mehdizadeh, Mojdeh

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. As the panoramic x-ray is the most common extraoral radiography in dentistry, segmentation of its anatomical structures facilitates diagnosis and registration of dental records. This study presents a fast and accurate method for automatic segmentation of mandible in panoramic x-rays. In the proposed four-step algorithm, a superior border is extracted through horizontal integral projections. A modified Canny edge detector accompanied by morphological operators extracts the inferior border of the mandible body. The exterior borders of ramuses are extracted through a contour tracing method based on the average model of mandible. The best-matched template is fetched from the atlas of mandibles to complete the contour of left and right processes. The algorithm was tested on a set of 95 panoramic x-rays. Evaluating the results against manual segmentations of three expert dentists showed that the method is robust. It achieved an average performance of >93% in Dice similarity, specificity, and sensitivity. PMID:26587551

  20. Necessity of 3D visualization for the removal of lower wisdom teeth: required sample size to prove non-inferiority of panoramic radiography compared to CBCT.

    PubMed

    Roeder, Felix; Wachtlin, Daniel; Schulze, Ralf

    2012-06-01

    The availability of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and the numbers of CBCT scans rise constantly, increasing the radiation burden to the patient. A growing discussion is noticeable if a CBCT scan prior to the surgical removal of wisdom teeth may be indicated. We aimed to confirm non-inferiority with respect to damage of the inferior alveolar nerve in patients diagnosed by panoramic radiography compared to CBCT in a prospective randomized controlled multicentre trial. Sample size (number of required third molar removals) was calculated for the study and control groups as 183,474 comparing temporary and 649,036 comparing permanent neurosensory disturbances of the inferior alveolar nerve. Modifying parameter values resulted in sample sizes ranging from 39,584 to 245,724 respectively 140,024 to 869,250. To conduct a clinical study to prove a potential benefit from CBCT scans prior to surgical removal of lower wisdom teeth with respect to the most important parameter, i.e., nerval damage, is almost impossible due to the very large sample sizes required. This fact vice versa indicates that CBCT scans should only be performed in high risk wisdom tooth removals.

  1. Diagnosis of osteoporosis from dental panoramic radiographs using the support vector machine method in a computer-aided system.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, M S; Asano, Akira; Taguchi, Akira; Kurita, Takio; Sanada, Mitsuhiro

    2012-01-16

    Early diagnosis of osteoporosis can potentially decrease the risk of fractures and improve the quality of life. Detection of thin inferior cortices of the mandible on dental panoramic radiographs could be useful for identifying postmenopausal women with low bone mineral density (BMD) or osteoporosis. The aim of our study was to assess the diagnostic efficacy of using kernel-based support vector machine (SVM) learning regarding the cortical width of the mandible on dental panoramic radiographs to identify postmenopausal women with low BMD. We employed our newly adopted SVM method for continuous measurement of the cortical width of the mandible on dental panoramic radiographs to identify women with low BMD or osteoporosis. The original X-ray image was enhanced, cortical boundaries were determined, distances among the upper and lower boundaries were evaluated and discrimination was performed by a radial basis function. We evaluated the diagnostic efficacy of this newly developed method for identifying women with low BMD (BMD T-score of -1.0 or less) at the lumbar spine and femoral neck in 100 postmenopausal women (≥50 years old) with no previous diagnosis of osteoporosis. Sixty women were used for system training, and 40 were used in testing. The sensitivity and specificity using RBF kernel-SVM method for identifying women with low BMD were 90.9% [95% confidence interval (CI), 85.3-96.5] and 83.8% (95% CI, 76.6-91.0), respectively at the lumbar spine and 90.0% (95% CI, 84.1-95.9) and 69.1% (95% CI, 60.1-78.6), respectively at the femoral neck. The sensitivity and specificity for identifying women with low BMD at either the lumbar spine or femoral neck were 90.6% (95% CI, 92.0-100) and 80.9% (95% CI, 71.0-86.9), respectively. Our results suggest that the newly developed system with the SVM method would be useful for identifying postmenopausal women with low skeletal BMD.

  2. Dental age assessment on panoramic radiographs in a Swiss population: a validation study of two prediction models.

    PubMed

    Birchler, Flavia A; Kiliaridis, Stavros; Combescure, Christophe; Vazquez, Lydia

    2016-01-01

    Dental age assessment methods are widely used for age estimation. This study aimed to analyse the accuracy of a meta-analysis method to estimate dental age in Swiss individuals and to detect potential limitations of the method. Precision of repeated tooth staging using Demirjian's classification on maxillary and mandibular teeth was also assessed. Panoramic radiographs of 50 Swiss white healthy children were analysed. Developing teeth on the left maxilla and mandible and all third permanent molars were staged following Demirjian's classification. Dental age was calculated for each subject, using a random effects model and a fixed effect model, and compared with chronological age. The mean error of the dental age ranged between -3 and +1 months for both the calculation models. Dental age calculated with the fixed effect model overestimated the age of the subjects (average + 0.10 y, ranging from -1.95 y to +2.16 y) compared with their chronological age, whereas the random effects model underestimated the age (average -0.32 y, ranging from -2.24 y to +1.61 y). Demirjian's method allowed a precise repeated staging of maxillary and mandibular developing teeth. For both calculation models, dental age correlated well, on average, with chronological age of Swiss subjects younger than 12 years. The random effects model showed a better accuracy for these subjects than the fixed effect model. However, both models underestimated the chronological age in subjects older than 12 years.

  3. A novel method of dental panoramic tomogram analysis: a perspective tool for a screening test for osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Božič, Marko; Ihan Hren, Nataša

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to test a new method of dental panoramic tomogram (DPT) analysis to show the differences of mandibular bone volume and relative bone density (RBD) in order to detect osteoporosis. A case-control study compared 62 women with osteoporosis (O) and 24 women with osteopenia (o) to a control group of 33 women with normal bone mineral density (N). DPTs were analyzed using an original method resulting in anatomic and RBD indexes as well as using previously described methods: panoramic mandibular index (PMI) and mandibular cortical width (MCW). One anatomic and four RBD indexes differed statistically significantly between the group O and N and three RBD indexes differed statistically significantly between o and N. PMI did not show statistically significant differences between the groups. The MCW differed significantly at two measured sites between O and N. Average values of RBD indexes were statistically significantly different between O and N and also between o and N. Important differences regarding RBD were confirmed using a new and original method of common DPT analysis. This method could serve as a screening tool for osteoporosis. Copyright © 2013 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. High-speed dental radiography achieved with a kilohertz-range pulsed x-ray generator

    SciTech Connect

    Takabe, Akihito; Yamamoto, Mariko; Sakamaki, Kimio

    1995-12-31

    The development of a high-intensity kilohertz-range pulsed x-ray generator and its application to dental radiography are described. The pulsed x-ray generator consisted of the following major components: a constant high-voltage power supply, a high-voltage main condenser, a hot-cathode triode, a DC power supply for the filament (hot cathode), and a grid controller. The main condenser of 0.5 {micro}F-100 kV in the pulser was charged from 50 to 70 kV by the power supply, and the electric charges in the condenser were discharged to the triode by the grid controller. To be exact, the tube voltage decreased during the discharging for generating pulsed x-rays, yet the maximum value was equivalent to the initial charging voltage of the main condenser. The maximum values of the tube current and the repetition rate were about 0.5 A and 30 kHz, respectively. The pulse width of the x-rays ranged from approximately 20 to 400 {micro}s, and the x-ray intensity with a charging voltage of 70 kV and a total resistance of 5.1 M{Omega} was about 0.83 {micro}C/kg at 1.0 m per pulse. Using this generator, high-speed dental radiography, e.g., delayed radiography and multiple-shot radiography, was performed.

  5. Toward early diagnosis of arteriosclerotic diseases: collaborative detection of carotid artery calcifications by computer and dentists on dental panoramic radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Chisako; Takahashi, Ryo; Hara, Takeshi; Hayashi, Tatsuro; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Zhou, Xiangrong; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    Several studies have reported the presence of carotid artery calcifications (CACs) on dental panoramic radiographs (DPRs) as a possible sign of arteriosclerotic diseases. However, CACs are not easily visible at the common window level for dental examinations, and dentists, in general, are not looking for CACs. Computerized detection of CACs may help dentists in referring patients with a risk of arteriosclerotic diseases to have a detailed examination at a medical clinic. Downside of our previous method was a relatively large number of false positives (FPs). In this study, we attempted to reduce FPs by including an additional feature and selecting effective features for the classifier. A hundred DPRs including 34 cases with calcifications were included. Initial candidates were detected by thresholding the output of top-hat operation. For each candidate, 10 features and a new feature characterizing the relative position of a CAC with reference to the lower mandible edge were determined. After the rule-based FP reduction, candidates were classified into CACs and FPs by a support vector machine. Based on the leave-one-out cross-validation evaluations, an average number of FPs was 3.1 per image at 90.4% sensitivity using seven features selected. Compared to our previous method, the number of FPs was reduced by 38% at the same sensitivity level. The proposed method has a potential in identifying patients with a risk of arteriosclerosis early via general dental examinations.

  6. Continuous measurements of mandibular cortical width on dental panoramic radiographs for computer-aided diagnosis of osteoporosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavitha, M. S.; Asano, Akira; Taguchi, Akira

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a computer-aided osteoporosis diagnosis system that automatically determines the inferior cortical width of the mandible continuously on dental panoramic radiographs to realize statistically more robust measurements than the conventional one-point measurements. The cortical width was continuously measured on dental panoramic radiographs by enhancing the original image, determining cortical boundaries, and finally evaluating the distance between boundaries continuously throughout the region of interest. The diagnostic performance using the average width calculated from the continuous measurement was compared with BMD at lumbar spine and femoral neck in 100 postmenopausal women of whom 50 to the development of the tool and 50 to its validation with no history of osteoporosis was evaluated. We experimentally showed the superiority of our method with improved sensitivity and specificity of identifying the development subjects were 90.0% and 75.0% in women with low spinal BMD and 81.8% and 69.2% in those with low femoral BMD, respectively. The corresponding values in the validation subjects were 93.3% and 82.9% at the lumbar spine and 92.3% and 75.7% at the femoral neck, respectively in terms of efficacy for diagnosing osteoporosis. We also assessed the diagnosis and classification of women with osteoporosis using support vector machine employing the average and variance of the continuous measurements gave excellent discrimination ability. It yields sensitivity and specificity of 90.9% and 83.8%, respectively with lumbar spine and 90.0% and 69.1%, respectively with femoral neck BMD. Performance comparison and simplicity of this method indicate that our computeraided system is readily applicable to clinical practice.

  7. The potential of digital dental radiography in recording the adductor sesamoid and the MP3 stages.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Kader, H M

    1999-12-01

    The current study was undertaken to evaluate the reliability of using a recent advance in clinical radiographic technique, digital dental radiography, in recording two growth indicators: the adductor sesamoid and MP3 stages. With an exposure time five times less than that used in the conventional approach, this method shows greatest flexibility in providing a high quality digitized radiographic images of the two growth indicators under investigation. Refereed Paper

  8. Classifying degenerative joint disease by the RDC/TMD and by panoramic imaging: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Winocur, E; Reiter, S; Krichmer, M; Kaffe, I

    2010-03-01

    The purposes of the study were to evaluate the utility of diagnosing degenerative joint disease (DJD) by the clinical finding of coarse crepitus alone, without supporting imaging studies, as defined by the RDC/TMD, and to evaluate the contribution of panoramic radiography as an aid in the diagnosis of DJD. A retrospective analysis of 372 consecutive patients with TMD was conducted. Their panoramic radiographs were evaluated for the extent of their contribution to the final diagnosis. Panoramic radiography was of no diagnostic value in 94.4% of the cases when the group was considered as a whole. When patients diagnosed with DJD were considered separately, panoramic radiography was completely sufficient for reaching the final diagnosis in 20.0% of the cases. In almost 90% of these patients, however, the clinical examination did not support the diagnosis of DJD (no coarse crepitus was found). This raises some doubts about the effectiveness of the clinical examination according to the RDC/TMD and about the utility of panoramic radiography in the definitive diagnosis of DJD, because both techniques have low accuracy (11.1% and 20%, respectively). The present study supports the current recommendations that panoramic radiography should not be ordered routinely to assess DJD, but still it is first choice when any dental problem is suspected. Further additional imaging (computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging) should be considered only if there is reason to expect that the findings might affect diagnosis and management. This study adds to recent criticisms of the clinical validity of the RDC/TMD, with regard to DJD.

  9. Adaptive panoramic tomography with a circular rotational movement for the formation of multifocal image layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D. S.; Cho, H. S.; Park, Y. O.; Je, U. K.; Hong, D. K.; Choi, S. I.; Koo, Y. S.

    2012-02-01

    Panoramic radiography with which only structures within a certain image layer are in focus and others out of focus on the panoramic image has become a popular imaging technique especially in dentistry. However, the major drawback to the technique is a mismatch between the structures to be focused and the predefined image layer mainly due to the various shapes and sizes of dental arches and/or to malpositioning of the patient. These result in image quality typically inferior to that obtained using intraoral radiographic techniques. In this paper, to overcome these difficulties, we suggest a new panoramic reconstruction algorithm, the so-called adaptive panoramic tomography ( APT), capable of reconstructing multifocal image layers with no additional exposure. In order to verify the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm, we performed systematic simulation studies with a circular rotational movement and investigated the image performance.

  10. Intracranial arachnoid cyst on dental radiography: a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lisha; Sun, Zhipeng; Ma, Xuchen

    2013-03-01

    Intracranial arachnoid cysts (IACs) can present as congenital asymptomatic lesions that may predispose them to present as an incidental finding during radiographic examination. On the other hand, IACs may also give rise to a series of neurologic symptoms depending on their size and location, such as vomiting, seizures, headache, and ataxia. Skull deformities, including macrocephaly, may occur and become remarkable on dental radiology. We report 2 patients who were identified with IAC before orthodontic treatment. The dental radiologic appearance of IAC is discussed and may constitute a diagnostic challenge to both the dentist and radiologist.

  11. Can dental pulp calcification predict the risk of ischemic cardiovascular disease?

    PubMed

    Khojastepour, Leila; Bronoosh, Pegah; Khosropanah, Shahdad; Rahimi, Elham

    2013-09-01

    To report the association of pulp calcification with that of cardiovascular disease (CVD) using digital panoramic dental radiographs. Digital panoramic radiographs of patients referred from the angiography department were included if the patient was under 55 years old and had non-restored or minimally restored molars and canines. An oral and maxillofacial radiologist evaluated the images for pulpal calcifications in the selected teeth. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of panoramic radiography in predicting CVD were calculated. Out of 122 patients who met the criteria, 68.2% of the patients with CVD had pulp chamber calcifications. Pulp calcification in panoramic radiography had a sensitivity of 68.9% to predict CVD. This study demonstrates that patients with CVD show an increased incidence of pulp calcification compared with healthy patients. The findings suggest that pulp calcification on panoramic radiography may have possibilities for use in CVD screening.

  12. Predictability of Dental Emergencies by Panography.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-30

    population (recruits with little or no prior dental care) demonstrate a high incidence of 1,2dental disease . Various epidemiologic studies have shown the...Medical Center, Washington, DC 20012 I Abstract: A study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness and reliability of panoramic radiography for...dental complaints ranked second only to upper respiratory infections. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and reliability of

  13. Digital radiography in the dental practice: an update.

    PubMed

    Makdissi, Jimmy; Pawar, Ravikiran

    2013-01-01

    The implementation of digital imaging in dental practice should be considered. The vast number of advantages of digital imaging include time saving and image manipulation. Dose reduction is a big attraction but in practical terms this might not be fully taken advantage of, as a number of studies suggest. Challenges of images storage, back-up and exchange should be taken into account. Careful planning and integration with practice software should lead to a smooth transition. Remember, computer systems sometimes fail and contingency plans should be in place to avoid disruption to the workflow of the practice.

  14. Establishment of diagnostic reference levels for dental intraoral radiography.

    PubMed

    Manousaridis, G; Koukorava, C; Hourdakis, C J; Kamenopoulou, V; Yakoumakis, E; Tsiklakis, K

    2013-10-01

    Diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) is a tool for the optimisation of radiological procedures. Establishment of a DRL is a requirement of national regulations. Measurements performed by the Greek Atomic Energy Commission on 529 dental intraoral radiographic facilities have been used in order to define DRLs for digital and film imaging modalities, taking into account the region of the mouth to be imaged. Thus, different DRL values have been proposed for minimum (usually incisors), maximum (usually maxillary molars) and average exposure settings, both for film and digital imaging. The results have been compared with similar studies performed in Europe and the USA and are in line with the most recent ones.

  15. [Radiation protection in intra-oral dental radiography].

    PubMed

    Rothe, V W

    1975-01-01

    At the time being, all dental X-ray apparatuses in the German Democratic Republic are inspected step by step on the basis of the regulations in force. An essential objective of these measures consists in ensuring that the X-ray apparatuses used comply with the standards for radiation hygiene. In this regard, the present situation is still unsatisfactory. A considerable reduction of the radiation exposure to the patients and the operating personnel, however, may be achieved easily, using simple means. An example is the restriction of the useful beam, as to which practical advice is given. Furthermore, recommendations are presented for the proper operation and for the determination of the control area required by the radiological protection regulation.

  16. Clinical utility of dental cone-beam computed tomography: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Jaju, Prashant P; Jaju, Sushma P

    2014-01-01

    Panoramic radiography and computed tomography were the pillars of maxillofacial diagnosis. With the advent of cone-beam computed tomography, dental practice has seen a paradigm shift. This review article highlights the potential applications of cone-beam computed tomography in the fields of dental implantology and forensic dentistry, and its limitations in maxillofacial diagnosis. PMID:24729729

  17. Texture analysis of mandibular cortical bone on digital dental panoramic radiographs for the diagnosis of osteoporosis in Korean women.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, Muthu Subash; An, Seo-Young; An, Chang-Hyeon; Huh, Kyung-Hoe; Yi, Won-Jin; Heo, Min-Suk; Lee, Sam-Sun; Choi, Soon-Chul

    2015-03-01

    To determine whether individual measurements or a combination of textural features and mandibular cortical width (MCW) derived from digital dental panoramic radiographs (DPRs) are more useful in assessment of osteoporosis. Textural features were obtained by using fractal dimension (FD) and gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM). Digital DPRs and bone mineral densities (BMDs) of the lumbar spine and the femoral neck were obtained from 141 female patients. A naïve Bayes classifier, a k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) algorithm, and a support vector machine were assessed for classifying osteoporosis. The combinations of FD plus MCW (95.3%, 92.1%, 96.8%) and GLCM plus MCW (93.7%, 89.5%, 94.2%) for femoral neck BMD showed the highest diagnostic accuracy with the use of the naïve Bayes, k-NN, and support vector machine classifiers, respectively. The combination of textural features and MCW contributed a better assessment of osteoporosis compared with the use of only individual measurements. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparison between cone beam computed tomography and panoramic radiography in the assessment of the relationship between the mandibular canal and impacted class C mandibular third molars

    PubMed Central

    Dalili, Zahra; Mahjoub, Porousha; Sigaroudi, Ali Khalighi

    2011-01-01

    Background: Preoperative radiographic evaluation of impacted third molars is essential to determine the proximity to the mandibular canal to minimize the risk of nerve injury. Our study aim was to evaluate the relationship between the mandibular canal and impacted mandibular third molars using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and to compare findings therein with panoramic radiographic signs. Methods: CBCT images were taken from 29 patients having 43 Class C impacted mandibular third molars whose panoramic radiographs showed a close relationship between the mandibular canal and mandibular third molars. We evaluated their tomographs to determine the course of the canal, its proximity to the root, any narrowing of the canal, the presence of root grooving or hooks and the proximity of the root to the cortex. A Chi-square test was used for data analysis. Results: The lingual course of the canal was the most frequently detected course in all panoramic findings. Contact of the tooth with the canal was observed in all cases in which panoramic signs of deviation of the canal and darkening of the roots were found. The frequency of observing the narrowing of the canal in CBCT as compared to seeing the presence or the absence of canal narrowing in panoramic radiographs was significantly different (P=0.01). Conclusion: CBCT provides more precise diagnostic information to determine the relationship of impacted third molars to the canal. Deviation of the canal and darkening of the roots in panoramic view can be highly valuable to predict the risk of nerve injury. PMID:22135692

  19. Use of radiography in public dental care for children and adolescents in northern Sweden.

    PubMed

    Falk Kieri, Catarina; Twetman, Svante; Stecksén-Blicks, Christina

    2009-01-01

    The primary aims were to investigate the total number of radiographs and the reason for dental radiography in children and adolescents in the Public Dental Health Service. Secondary aims were to study the influence of caries experience and orthodontic treatment on the number of radiographs. For this retrospective study, 544 adolescents regularly attending three Public Dental Health clinics in the county of Västerbotten, northern Sweden were selected. The number of radiographs exposed each year from 3 to 19 years of age was registered. Information on reason for the radiographic examination was extracted from dental records as well as the caries experience at 19 years of age. The attrition rate was 7% due to incomplete data. The total mean number of radiographs exposed was 23+/-6 of which 1+/-2 were extra-oral radiographs. Bitewing radiographs for caries registration constituted 87% of the intra-oral radiographs with a mean number of 19+/-4 exposures. There was a statistically significant difference (p<0.01) between subjects with caries experience (20+/-4) and those with no caries (16+/-4). No gender-related differences were displayed. During preschool ages, bitewing radiographs were taken in less than 10% of the children. Children treated at specialist clinics in orthodontics displayed higher number of radiographic examinations than non-referred children (p<0.01). A mean of 23 radiographs were exposed and bitewings for caries detection were the most common radiographic examination. Fewer bitewing radiographs were exposed in caries-free subjects over time but its use during the preschool ages was low. Orthodontics treatment increased the frequency of radiography significantly.

  20. Efficacy of Panoramic Radiography in the Detection of Osteoporosis in Post-Menopausal Women When Compared to Dual Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry.

    PubMed

    Pallagatti, Shambulingappa; Parnami, Priyanka; Sheikh, Soheyl; Gupta, Deepak

    2017-01-01

    It is a well-known fact that osteoporosis affects the people with old age and remains unnoticeable until the patient presents with fracture. Various studies in the literature reveal that panoramic radiographs may prove to be beneficial in the detection of Osteoporosis in patients. Henceforth this present study was aimed to validate the use of Klemetti Index (KI) on panoramic radiographs so as to detect osteoporosis in the patients at an early stage. 60 postmenopausal women were selected. A panoramic radiograph was taken to grade their mandibular cortex on the basis of Klemetti Index. All the panoramic radiographs were evaluated by 5 different Oral Medicine and Radiology specialists. Later all the patients were subjected to dual energy X-ray absorptimetry (DEXA) scan for bone mineral density evaluation. The results were evaluated statistically. The average accuracy of the five observers to demonstrate normal bone, osteopenia and osteoporosis when compared to DEXA scan was 58.08%, 63.3% and 64.74% respectively. The observations of the 5 observers on the basis of KI were not statistically different from the BMD evaluation done with the help of DEXA Scan. Panoramic radiographs can be used as a screening tool for the evaluation as well as early detection of osteoporosis with the usage of Klemetti Index.

  1. Survey of radiography and radiation protection in general dental practice in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Mutyabule, T K; Whaites, E J

    2002-05-01

    To carry out the first survey in Uganda of all dentists and all public health dental officers (PHDO) to assess the status of dental radiography and radiation protection. All 74 dentists and 76 PHDOs in Uganda were sent a postal questionnaire including 33 questions relating to various demographic details, radiographic equipment and radiographic techniques, including processing and radiation protection. A second questionnaire was sent to non-respondents after 3 months. Eighty-two per cent of dentists responded and 83% of PHDOs. Seventy per cent of the dentists and 100% of the PHDOs were trained in Uganda. Seventy-five per cent of the dentists and 30% of the PHDOs had access to one of the approximately 30 X-ray machines in the country. The majority of the equipment did not comply with current recommendations in Europe. Fifty-one per cent of dentists used machines with mechanical timers, 28% used machines with no visual warning signal and 17% used equipment with no audible warning signal. Most of the equipment was over 30 years old and only 15% of dentists knew when the equipment was last serviced. The most relevant finding of the surveys was the level of 'don't know' responses to many questions from both groups. The lack of knowledge regarding dental radiography and radiation protection plus the condition of most equipment in Uganda is a matter of concern. Standards of care are considerably lower than in developed countries requiring improved undergraduate training, provision of postgraduate courses and Ugandan governmental or international financial assistance.

  2. Automated detection of abnormalities in paranasal sinus on dental panoramic radiographs by using contralateral subtraction technique based on mandible contour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Shintaro; Hara, Takeshi; Tagami, Motoki; Muramatsu, Chicako; Kaneda, Takashi; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2013-02-01

    Inflammation in paranasal sinus sometimes becomes chronic to take long terms for the treatment. The finding is important for the early treatment, but general dentists may not recognize the findings because they focus on teeth treatments. The purpose of this study was to develop a computer-aided detection (CAD) system for the inflammation in paranasal sinus on dental panoramic radiographs (DPRs) by using the mandible contour and to demonstrate the potential usefulness of the CAD system by means of receiver operating characteristic analysis. The detection scheme consists of 3 steps: 1) Contour extraction of mandible, 2) Contralateral subtraction, and 3) Automated detection. The Canny operator and active contour model were applied to extract the edge at the first step. At the subtraction step, the right region of the extracted contour image was flipped to compare with the left region. Mutual information between two selected regions was obtained to estimate the shift parameters of image registration. The subtraction images were generated based on the shift parameter. Rectangle regions of left and right paranasal sinus on the subtraction image were determined based on the size of mandible. The abnormal side of the regions was determined by taking the difference between the averages of each region. Thirteen readers were responded to all cases without and with the automated results. The averaged AUC of all readers was increased from 0.69 to 0.73 with statistical significance (p=0.032) when the automated detection results were provided. In conclusion, the automated detection method based on contralateral subtraction technique improves readers' interpretation performance of inflammation in paranasal sinus on DPRs.

  3. Correlation of panoramic radiography and cone beam CT findings in the assessment of the relationship between impacted mandibular third molars and the mandibular canal

    PubMed Central

    Neves, F S; Souza, T C; Almeida, S M; Haiter-Neto, F; Freitas, D Q; Bóscolo, F N

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the reliability of four panoramic radiographic findings, both individually and in association, in predicting the absence of corticalization between the mandibular canal and the third molar on cone beam CT (CBCT) images. Methods The sample consisted of 72 individuals (142 mandibular third molars) who underwent pre-operative radiographic evaluation before extraction of impacted mandibular third molars. On panoramic radiographs, the most common signs of corticalization (darkening of roots, diversion of mandibular canal, narrowing of mandibular canal and interruption of white line) and the presence or absence of corticalization between the mandibular third molar and the mandibular canal on CBCT images were evaluated. Results Darkening of roots and interruption of white line associated with the absence of corticalization between the mandibular third molar and the mandibular canal on CBCT images were statistically significant, both as isolated findings (p = 0.0001 and p = 0.0006, respectively) and in association (p = 0.002). No statistically significant association was observed for the other panoramic radiographic findings, either individually or in association (p > 0.05). Conclusion Darkening of roots and interruption of white line observed on panoramic radiographs, both as isolated findings and in association, were effective in determining the risk relationship between the tooth roots and the mandibular canal, requiring three-dimensional evaluation of the case. PMID:22282507

  4. Integrating photo-stimulable phosphor plates into dental and dental hygiene radiography curricula.

    PubMed

    Tax, Cara L; Robb, Christine L; Brillant, Martha G S; Doucette, Heather J

    2013-11-01

    It is not known whether the integration of photo-stimulable phosphor (PSP) plates into dental and dental hygiene curricula creates unique learning challenges for students. The purpose of this two-year study was to determine if dental hygiene students had more and/or different types of errors when using PSP plates compared to film and whether the PSP imaging plates had any particular characteristics that needed to be addressed in the learning process. Fifty-nine first-year dental hygiene students at one Canadian dental school were randomly assigned to two groups (PSP or film) before exposing their initial full mouth series on a teaching manikin using the parallel technique. The principal investigator determined the number and types of errors based on a specific set of performance criteria. The two groups (PSP vs. film) were compared for total number and type of errors made. Results of the study indicated the difference in the total number of errors made using PSP or film was not statistically significant; however, there was a difference in the types of errors made, with the PSP group having more horizontal errors than the film group. In addition, the study identified a number of unique characteristics of the PSP plates that required special consideration for teaching this technology.

  5. The quality of dental radiography in the Czech Republic--results of a TLD and film postal audit.

    PubMed

    Novák, Leos

    2006-01-01

    Since 2002, the postal audit in dental radiography has been supplementing standard quality control (QC) tools for dental intraoral X-ray machines. An aim of the audit is to check basic X-ray machine parameters (field size, exposure reproducibility), and a quality of the whole process of diagnostic imaging (entrance surface air-kerma measurement, a check of film processing and an image quality evaluation). The standard QC tests, performed by private companies, check mainly the X-ray unit. Conversely, the audit gives better information about the patient examination practices. During the period of January 2002 to May 2004 approximately 4000 audits were performed. The results confirmed that main problems in dental radiography are due to incorrect film processing, non-optimised setting of the exposure parameters and use of obsolete X-ray machines. Only approximately 30% of performed audits were satisfactory with respect to all checked parameters.

  6. Effective dose equivalent to the operator in intra-oral dental radiography

    SciTech Connect

    de Haan, R.A.; van Aken, J. )

    1990-08-01

    The effective dose equivalent to the operator in intra-oral dental radiography has been determined. The exposure from a bitewing radiograph and periapical views of the left maxillary incisors and first molar was measured at nine heights and 16 positions, all 1 m from the patient. The effective dose equivalent was determined using data from ICRP 51 (International Commission on Radiological Protection: Data for Use in Protection Against External Radiation). The values presented are related to an exposure of 1 C kg-1 (3876 R) measured free in air at the tube-end. They thus constitute ratios which are not influenced by the sensitivity of the film or other detector used and form standard tables which permit the calculation of the effective dose equivalent in clinical situations.

  7. Effective dose equivalent to the operator in intra-oral dental radiography.

    PubMed

    de Haan, R A; van Aken, J

    1990-08-01

    The effective dose equivalent to the operator in intra-oral dental radiography has been determined. The exposure from a bitewing radiograph and periapical views of the left maxillary incisors and first molar was measured at nine heights and 16 positions, all 1 m from the patient. The effective dose equivalent was determined using data from ICRP 51 (International Commission on Radiological Protection: Data for Use in Protection Against External Radiation). The values presented are related to an exposure of 1 C kg-1 (3876 R) measured free in air at the tube-end. They thus constitute ratios which are not influenced by the sensitivity of the film or other detector used and form standard tables which permit the calculation of the effective dose equivalent in clinical situations.

  8. Comparison of radiography and scintigraphy in the diagnosis of dental disorders in the horse.

    PubMed

    Weller, R; Livesey, L; Maierl, J; Nuss, K; Bowen, I M; Cauvin, E R; Weaver, M; Schumacher, J; May, S A

    2001-01-01

    Scintigraphy, with 99mTechnetium methylenediphosphonate (99mTc-MDP) and 99mTc-labelled leucocytes, was compared to radiography in the diagnosis of dental disease in the horse in a prospective case-controlled study, comprising 30 horses with clinical signs of dental disease and 30 control horses. In each case, right and left lateral, ventral and dorsal soft tissue and bone phase scintigraphic images were obtained after i.v. injection of 1 GBq/100 kg bwt 99mTc-MDP, using a gamma camera. The same views were acquired in 10 horses with clinical signs of dental disease and 12 control horses after injection of 99mTc-labelled leucocytes. Standard radiographic projections of the paranasal sinuses and of the apices of the maxillary and mandibular teeth were obtained. The scintigraphs and radiographs were assessed subjectively by 2 board-certified surgeons and one board-certified radiologist, with extensive experience of equine radiology, from who the clinical history was withheld. Sensitivity, specificity and kappa, as a measure of agreement, were calculated for the different methods. Bone phase images were also scored subjectively on a scale from 0 to 3 on the basis of isotope uptake over the teeth. Regions of interest were defined over the teeth, and normal teeth compared to diseased counterparts. Total scintigraphic counts were related to the age of the animal and to the disease process. Differences in density ratios between left and right teeth were evaluated using the Mann-Whitney Test. Dental disease was confirmed in 22 horses at surgery or postmortem examination. Horses with dental disease showed a significant increase in scintigraphic activity over the affected tooth compared to the contralateral tooth, with a typical pattern for different diseases. The sensitivity of scintigraphy with 99mTc-MDP proved to be excellent (95.5%), whereas the specificity was moderate (86.4%). In contrast, radiography had excellent specificity (95.0%) and a low sensitivity (51.5%). The

  9. Diagnostic performance of general dental practitioners after lecture in identifying post-menopausal women with low bone mineral density by panoramic radiographs.

    PubMed

    Sutthiprapaporn, P; Taguchi, A; Nakamoto, T; Ohtsuka, M; Mallick, P C; Tsuda, M; Kodama, I; Kudo, Y; Suei, Y; Tanimoto, K

    2006-07-01

    Mandibular cortical erosion detected on panoramic radiographs may be useful for identifying post-menopausal women with low skeletal bone mineral density (BMD). The purposes of this study were to calculate the diagnostic performance of general dental practitioners (GDPs) who attended a lecture on identifying post-menopausal women with low BMD from findings on panoramic radiographs and to evaluate the influence of GDPs' age on diagnostic performance. After a 1 h lecture, 111 GDPs were asked to classify the mandibular cortex (normal or eroded) on panoramic radiographs obtained from 100 post-menopausal women who have had skeletal BMD assessment. Low BMD was defined as a BMD T score of -1.0 or less. Diagnostic performance was analysed by comparing two groups classified by mandibular cortex (women with normal cortex and women with any eroded cortex) with those classified by BMD (women with normal BMD and women with low BMD). The mean sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, accuracy and likelihood ratio for a positive risk result were 73.0% (95% confidence interval [CI]; 71.3 to 74.7%), 49.0% (95% CI; 46.4 to 51.5%), 66.9% (95% CI; 66.0 to 67.8%), 57.0% (95% CI; 55.8 to 58.2%), 62.9% (95% CI; 62.1 to 63.7%) and 1.51 (95% CI; 1.44 to 1.58), respectively. GDPs' age did not influence diagnostic performance. Our results suggest that 73.0% of women who had low skeletal BMD can be identified by GDPs after a lecture on the use of panoramic radiographs as an aid in diagnosing low BMD; however, the diagnostic performance may not be influenced by GDPs' age.

  10. Curricular Guidelines for Clinical Competency by Dental Auxiliaries in Dental Radiography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Guidelines developed for educational institutions as curriculum development aids are presented. They are the result of efforts within the American Association of Dental Schools (AADS) by the Section on Oral Radiology. Their use as course development aids is suggested by AADS policy. (MLW)

  11. Curricular Guidelines for Clinical Competency by Dental Auxiliaries in Dental Radiography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Guidelines developed for educational institutions as curriculum development aids are presented. They are the result of efforts within the American Association of Dental Schools (AADS) by the Section on Oral Radiology. Their use as course development aids is suggested by AADS policy. (MLW)

  12. Observer performance in diagnosing osteoporosis by dental panoramic radiographs: results from the osteoporosis screening project in dentistry (OSPD).

    PubMed

    Taguchi, A; Asano, A; Ohtsuka, M; Nakamoto, T; Suei, Y; Tsuda, M; Kudo, Y; Inagaki, K; Noguchi, T; Tanimoto, K; Jacobs, R; Klemetti, E; White, S C; Horner, K

    2008-07-01

    Mandibular cortical erosion detected on dental panoramic radiographs (DPRs) may be useful for identifying women with osteoporosis, but little is known about the variation in diagnostic efficacy of observers worldwide. The purpose of this study was to measure the accuracy in identifying women at risk for osteoporosis in a worldwide group of observers using DPRs. We constructed a website that included background information about osteoporosis screening and instructions regarding the interpretation of mandibular cortical erosion. DPRs of 100 Japanese postmenopausal women aged 50 years or older who had completed skeletal bone mineral measurements by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry were digitized at 300 dpi. These were displayed on the website and used for the evaluation of diagnostic efficacy. Sixty observers aged 25 to 66 years recruited from 16 countries participated in this study. These observers classified cortical erosion into one of three groups (none, mild to moderate, and severe) on the website via the Internet, twice with an approximately 2-week interval. The diagnostic efficacy of the Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool (OST), a simple clinical decision rule based on age and weight, was also calculated and compared with that of cortical erosion. The overall mean sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of the 60 observers in identifying women with osteoporosis by cortical erosion on DPRs were 82.5, 46.2, 46.7, and 84.0%, respectively. Those same values by the OST index were 82.9, 43.1, 43.9, and 82.4%, respectively. The intra-observer agreement in classifying cortical erosion on DPRs was sufficient (weighted kappa values>0.6) in 36 (60%) observers. This was significantly increased in observers who specialized in oral radiology (P<0.05). In the 36 observers with sufficient intra-observer agreement, the overall mean sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV in identifying women with osteoporosis by any cortical

  13. Comparison of mesiodistal root angulation with posttreatment panoramic radiographs and cone-beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Bouwens, Daniel G.; Cevidanes, Lucia; Ludlow, John B.; Phillips, Ceib

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Orthodontists assess mesiodistal root angulations before, during, and after orthodontic treatment as an aid in establishing proper root position. Panoramic imaging has been useful for this purpose and is a valuable screening tool in diagnosis and planning treatment of orthodontic patients. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) for imaging of the craniofacial complex creates the opportunity to evaluate 3-dimensional images compared with traditional 2-dimensional images. The purpose of this project was to compare mesiodistal root angulations by using posttreatment panoramic radiographic images and CBCT scans. Methods Mesiodistal root angulations from panoramic images and CBCT scans of 35 orthognathic surgery patients after orthodontic treatment were compared. The panoramic images were measured by using VixWin (Gendex Dental Systems, Des Plaines, Ill), and the CBCT scans by using InvivoDental 3D (version 4.1, Anatomage, San Jose, Calif). The mesiodistal root angulation of each maxillary and mandibular tooth was measured by using the occlusal plane as the reference line. With an intercept-only linear regression for correlated data (with an unstructured covariance structure), the global test of whether the mean vector of all differences for the teeth is zero was performed separately for the 2 arches. Results The global test for both arches was statistically significant (P<0.001), indicating an overall difference in root angulation between measurements from panoramic and CBCT images. There was no discernible pattern in the average differences between panoramic and CBCT measurements. Conclusions The assessment of mesiodistal tooth angulation with panoramic radiography should be approached with caution and reinforced by a thorough clinical examination of the dentition. PMID:21195286

  14. Comparative evaluation of the sensitometric properties of screen-film systems and conventional dental receptors for intraoral radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Kircos, L.T.; Staninec, M.; Chou, L.

    1989-12-01

    This investigation determined the sensitometric properties of 27 rare-earth screen-film combinations and compared them to E- and D-speed films and xeroradiography, the current standards for intraoral radiography. A series of exposures from base plus fog to film saturation were made to determine the Hurter and Driffield curve of each image receptor. The base plus fog, film saturation, speed, gamma, average gradient, and resolution were determined. When dental receptors and screen-film systems are compared on the basis of radiographic quality (contrast and resolution), many screen-film systems have similar resolution (greater than 10 line pairs/mm), significantly greater contrast (greater than 2.0), and a substantial speed advantage (greater than 10). Thus selected screen-film systems may be an alternative to conventional dental receptors for intraoral radiography.

  15. Dental radiography: efficacy in the assessment of intraosseous lesions of the face and jaws in asymptomatic patients

    SciTech Connect

    Zeichner, S.J.; Ruttimann, U.E.; Webber, R.L.

    1987-03-01

    In this investigation the efficacy of dental radiography for the detection of occult intraosseous lesions of the face and jaws was evaluated. An analysis of 30 million health insurance records indicated that the period prevalence of malignant lesions was less than 5 cases/million/year, and for benign lesions approximately 100 cases/million/year. Data from a controlled observer-performance study showed that radiographic sensitivities ranged between 50% and 80%. The cost per true-positive finding was estimated to be +8.6 million per malignant case and +430,000 per benign case. An assessment of the dosimetric literature indicated that the benefits of radiographic screening as a means for early detection of a malignancy appear to be counterbalanced by the risk of causing a radiation-induced malignancy. Taken together, these data demonstrate that dental radiography is not efficacious for the purpose of detecting occult lesions.

  16. Comparison of Virtual Dental Implant Planning Using the Full Cross-Sectional and Transaxial Capabilities of Cone Beam Computed Tomography vs Reformatted Panoramic Imaging and 3D Modeling.

    PubMed

    Khan, Moiz; Elathamna, Eiad N; Lin, Wei-Shao; Harris, Bryan T; Farman, Allan G; Scheetz, James P; Morton, Dean; Scarfe, William C

    2015-01-01

    To compare the choice and placement of virtual dental implants in the posterior edentulous bounded regions using the full cross-sectional and transaxial capabilities of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) vs reformatted panoramic images and three-dimensional (3D) virtual models. Fifty-two cases with posterior bounded edentulous regions (61 dental implant sites) were identified from a retrospective audit of 4,014 radiographic volumes. Two image sets were created from selected CBCT data: (1) a combination of reformatted panoramic imaging and a 3D model (PIref/3D), and (2) the full 3D power in CBCT image volume analyses (XS). One virtual implant was placed by consensus of three prosthodontists in each image set: PIref/3D and XS. The choice of implant length and the perceived need for ridge augmentation were recorded for implant placement in both test situations. All the virtual implant placements from both PIref/3D and XS image sets were inspected retrospectively using virtual 3D models, and the number of exposed threads on both the buccal and lingual/palatal aspects of the virtual dental implant was evaluated. The chi-square and paired t tests were used with the level of significance set at α = .05. Shorter implants were chosen more often using XS than PIref/3D (P = .001). Fewer threads were exposed when placed with XS than with PIref/3D (P = .001). The use of XS reduced the perceived need for ridge augmentation compared with PIref/3D (P = .001). The use of the full 3D power of CBCT (including cross-sectional images in all three orthagonal planes and transaxially) provides supplemental information that significantly changes the choice of virtual implant length and vertical position of the implant, and reduces the frequency of perceived need for ridge augmentation before implant placement.

  17. Early prediction of mandibular third molar eruption/impaction using linear and angular measurements on digital panoramic radiography: A radiographic study

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Rachninder; Kumar, Anand C.; Garg, Ranjana; Sharma, Sugandha; Rastogi, Trisha; Gupta, Vivek Vijay

    2016-01-01

    Background: The impaction rate is higher for the third molars than for any other tooth in modern human population. This study was conducted with the aim to evaluate the validity of linear and angular measurements on the digital panoramic radiograph as a reference for early prediction of mandibular third molar eruption/impaction. Materials and Methods: Digital panoramic radiographs of 200 subjects were selected based on their status of eruption of mandibular third molars; fully erupted (Group A), partially erupted (Group B), fully developed but not erupted (Group C) and partially developed groups (Group D). Each group comprised 50 subjects with 25 males and 25 females. Nine variables (linear measurements, angles, and ratios) were determined and measured bilaterally by two observers and values were compared between the study groups and genders. Results: The data thus obtained were analyzed for comparison among all the study groups. It was found that the difference in the mean values of lower eruption space (LES) measurements, α-angle (angle between long axis of the third molar and gonial-symphyseal plane) and β-angle (angle between long axis of mandibular second and third molars) were significant (P < 0.05). The mean values of mesiodistal width, LES-ramus, LES-Xi point and β-angle were found more in males than in females. No significant difference was observed between the sides. Conclusion: α- and β-angle together with LES measurements give the accurate information on early prediction of lower third molar eruption or impaction. PMID:27433048

  18. Flemish general dental practitioners' knowledge of dental radiology

    PubMed Central

    Aps, J K M

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess general dental practitioners' knowledge of dental radiography and radiation protection in order to alert the Belgian authorities and dental professional societies. Prior to attending a postgraduate course on intraoral radiology, general dental practitioners in Flanders, Belgium, were asked to fill in a questionnaire regarding the radiological equipment and the techniques they used for intraoral radiography. The availability and type of dental panoramic equipment were also assessed. A total of 374 questionnaires were available for this study. 15% of the attendants used radiographic equipment that was more than 27 years old and 43% reported equipment that operated with a clockwork timer. 32% and 75% respectively had no idea what the kV or mA settings were on their intraoral equipment. 5% were unaware which cone geometry or geometric technique (paralleling or bisecting angle technique) they were using. 81% claimed to be using a short cone technique. 47% did not know what collimation meant, whereas 40% stated that they were using circular collimation. 38% used digital intraoral image detectors (63% were photostimulable storage phosphorplate (PSPP)), but 16% were not sure about the type of sensor they were using (PSPP or solid-state sensors). 61% also had dental panoramic equipment available, 25% of which was digital (10% charge coupled device (CCD) and 15% PSPP). These results clearly indicate the need for continued education on this subject. The latter is an important signal to Belgian authorities and dental professional societies. PMID:20100924

  19. Relationship of elongated styloid process in digital panoramic radiography with carotid intima thickness and carotid atheroma in Doppler ultrasonography in osteoporotic females.

    PubMed

    Hamedani, Shahram; Dabbaghmanesh, Mohammad Hossein; Zare, Zahra; Hasani, Mahvash; Torabi Ardakani, Mahshid; Hasani, Mahsa; Shahidi, Shoaleh

    2015-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis are major health dilemmas. Osteoporotic patients frequently display vascular calcification that consequently increases the cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This study aimed to investigate the relation of osteoporosis, vascular calcification (atheroma, intima-media thickness (IMT)) and elongated styloid process (ESP) in a sample of osteoporotic and normal female individuals. This study recruited 78 women who were assessed for bone mass density (BMD). Sample included individuals with normal BMD (n=13, 17 %), osteopenia (n=36, 46 %), and osteoporosis (n=29, 37%). The presence of atheroma and IMT was examined using color Doppler ultrasonography (CD-US). In addition, digital panoramic radiographs (PRs) were obtained to assess ESP. In this study, 55 subjects (70%) with low BMD exhibited at least one side ESP. Femoral BMD decreased significantly in subjects with ESP (p= 0.03). Bilateral ESP was correlated with the presence of atheroma (p= 0.029). The CIMT was greater in patients with ESP, although the relation was not significant. The obtained data suggest referring the aged individuals with ESP for BMD assessment and individuals with low bone mass and ESP for more cardiovascular risk assessment.

  20. Panorametry: suggestion of a method for mandibular measurements on panoramic radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Puricelli, Edela

    2009-01-01

    Background Orthopantomography (panoramic radiography) has been used for the study of measurements involving particularly the prediction of the eruption of impacted lower third molars and analyses of measurements of the ramus and head of mandible. The discrepancies involved with the projection of this radiographic image has stimulated the search for further ways to use it, particularly in orthodontic treatments and oral and maxillofacial surgeries. The author proposes a graphimetric method for the mandible, based on panoramic radiography. The results are expressed in linear and angular measurements, aiming at bilateral comparisons as well as the determination of the proportion of skeletal and dental structures, individually and among themselves as a whole. The method has been named Panorametry, and allows measurement of the mandible (Mandibular Panorametry) or the posterior mandibular teeth (Dental Panorametry). When combining mandible and maxilla, it should be referred to as Total Panorametry. It may also be used, in the future, with Cone Beam computed tomography (CT) images, and in this case it may be mentioned as CT Panorametry. PMID:19852787

  1. Effect of rare earth filtration on patient exposure, dose reduction, and image quality in oral panoramic radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Tyndall, D.A.; Washburn, D.B.

    1987-01-01

    Rare earth intensifying screen material (Gd2O2S:Tb) was added to the standard Al filtration of an oral panoramic x-ray unit, resulting in a beam capable of achieving reductions in patient dose without a loss of image quality. The added rare earth filtration technique resulted in patient dose reductions of 21-56%, depending on anatomic sites, when compared to the conventional Al filtration technique. Films generated from both techniques were measured densitometrically and evaluated by a panel of practicing clinicians. Diagnostically significant differences were minimal. The results indicate that use of rare earth filters in oral panoramic radiography is an effective means of reducing exposures of dental patients to ionizing radiation.

  2. Collimator with filtration compensator: clinical adaptation to meet European Union recommendation 4F on radiological protection for dental radiography.

    PubMed

    Alcaraz, M; García-Vera, M C; Bravo, L A; Martínez-Beneyto, Y; Armero, D; Morant, J J; Canteras, M

    2009-09-01

    Our aim was to develop a compensated filtration collimator for use in paediatric patients undergoing cephalometric radiography that reduces the radiation dose administered and fulfils recommendation 4F of the European guidelines on radiation protection in dental radiology. An easy to use filtration-compensated collimator was constructed of plastic, lead and aluminium and used randomly with a group of 32 children (mean age 11 years) undergoing cephalometric radiography before receiving orthodontic treatment. The radiation doses administered to patients (eye lens and thyroid, submandibular and parotid glands) and to the chassis of the radiographic equipment were determined. The filtration-compensated collimator is easily fixed to the external surface of the radiographic equipment and results in (a) as collimator, a reduction of 40% in the surface irradiated in the children and of 61.4% in the dose administered to the thyroid glands (P<0.001); (b) as filtration compensator, a reduction of 32.8% administered to the eye lens (P<0.001), 31.45% to the submaxillary gland (P<0.01) and 11.4% to the parotid gland (P<0.05); there was no difference in the dose determined on the radiographic film. A radiographic examination can be carried out with children using only a third of the dose normally used with no increase in the time or cost involved.

  3. Preliminary Evaluation of an Educational Outcomes Assessment Process for Dental Interpretive Radiography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weems, Richard A.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A procedure for testing the ability of dental students to detect presence and depth of dental caries was evaluated. Students (n=40) from four experience groups examined radiographs obtained from a model. Results indicated that this method of assessing student competence in radiographic interpretation is valid. (MSE)

  4. Preliminary Evaluation of an Educational Outcomes Assessment Process for Dental Interpretive Radiography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weems, Richard A.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A procedure for testing the ability of dental students to detect presence and depth of dental caries was evaluated. Students (n=40) from four experience groups examined radiographs obtained from a model. Results indicated that this method of assessing student competence in radiographic interpretation is valid. (MSE)

  5. Evaluation of conventional and digital radiography capacities for distinguishing dental materials on radiograms depending on the present radiopacifying agent.

    PubMed

    Antonijević, Djordje; Ilić, Dragan; Medić, Vesna; Dodić, Slobodan; Obradović-Djuriĉić, Kosovka; Rakoĉević, Zoran

    2014-11-01

    The radiopacity of an endodontic material can considerably vary as measured on film and a digital sensor. Digital radiography offers numerous advantages over conventional film-based radiography in dental clinical practice regarding both diagnostic capabilities and postintervention procedures. The aim of this study was to investigate the capacity of conventional and charge-conpled device (CCD) based digital radiography to detect material on radiograph depending on the radio-pacifying agent present in the mate- rial. Experimental cements were formulated by mixing Portland cement with the following radiopacifying agents: zinc oxide (ZnO), zirconium oxide (ZrO2), titanium dioxide (TiO2), barium sulphate (BaSO4), iodoform (CHI3), bismuth oxide (Bi2O3) and ytterbium trifluoride (YbF3). In addition, 5 endodontic materials comprising Endometh- asone, Diaket, N2, Roth 801 and Acroseal were investigated to serve as control. Per three specimens of each material were radiographed alongside an aluminum step wedge on film (Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, NY) and a CCD-based digital sensor (Trophy Radiologie, Cedex, France). Radiopacity values were calculated by converting the radiographic densities of the specimens expressed as a mean optical densities or mean grey scale values into equivalent thickness of aluminum. Two-way ANOVA detected no significant differences with respect to the imaging system (p > 0.05), but the differences were significant with respect to radiopacifier (p < 0.001) and the interaction of the two factors (p < 0.05). Paired t-test revealed significant differences between the methods used for pure Portland cement, all concentrations of BaSO4 and CHI3, 10% and 20% additions of ZrO2 and Bi2O3 and 10% and 30% additions of YbF3 (p < 0.05). The materials which incorporate CHI3 OR BaSO4 as radiopacifying agents are expected to be significantly more radiopaque on a digital sensor than on film. During clinical practice one should concern to the quality of contrast

  6. Comparison of conventional and digital radiography for radiometric differentiation of dental cements.

    PubMed

    Baksi, B Güniz; Ermis, R Banu

    2007-10-01

    To test the efficacy of conventional radiometry with indirect digital image analysis in the assessment of the relative radiopacity of dental cements used as liners or bases compared to human enamel and dentin. Disks of 15 different dental cements, 5 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick, were exposed to radiation together with 2-mm-thick disks of enamel and dentin and an aluminum step wedge. Density was evaluated by digital transmission densitometry and with the histogram function of an image analysis program following digitization of the radiographs with a flatbed scanner. A higher number of dental cements were discriminated from both dentin and enamel with conventional radiographic densitometer. All the cements examined, except Ionoseal (Voco) and Ionobond (Voco), were more radiopaque than dentin. With both methods, Chelon-Silver (3M ESPE) had the highest radiopacity and glass-ionomer cements the lowest. Radiodensity of dental cements can be differentiated with a high probability with the conventional radiometric method.

  7. Panographic Survey of U. S. Army Recruits: Analysis of Dental Health Status.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-16

    pathoses which may not be evident on a routine periapical survey.3-6 The advantages of panoramic radiography make it particularly attractive for mass...perlapical radiolucencles. Radiolucent lesions, other than periapical or anatomical, were recorded separately. Folli- cular enlargements (over 3 m) surrounding...retention cysts . RESULTS Table I summarizes the findings. Dental Caries. A 58 percent incidence of carious lesions was noted overall. Many of these lesions

  8. Determining the age of cats by pulp cavity/tooth width ratio using dental radiography.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyoungsun; Ahn, Jaesang; Kang, Sunmee; Lee, Euiri; Kim, Soohyun; Park, Sangwan; Park, Sungwon; Noh, Hyunwoo; Seo, Kangmoon

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of age on the ratio of pulp cavity/tooth width (P/T ratio) in healthy cats. The dental radiographs of 32 cats (16 males and 16 females) were generated with a digital dental X-ray unit with the animals under general anesthesia. Standardized measurement of the canine teeth was performed by drawing a line on the radiograph perpendicular to the cemento- enamel junction (CEJ) of the tooth. There was an inversely proportional correlation between chronological age and the P/T ratio. Moreover, a strong Pearson squared correlation (γ(2) = 0.92) was identified by the curved regression model. No significant differences in the P/T ratio based on gender or breed were found. These results suggest that determination of age by P/T ratio could be clinically useful for estimating the chronological age of cats.

  9. Assessment of dental abnormalities by full-mouth radiography in small breed dogs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chun-Geun; Lee, So-Young; Kim, Ju-Won; Park, Hee-Myung

    2013-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate full-mouth radiographic findings to determine the prevalence of dental abnormalities and analyze the relationship between dental abnormalities and age in small breed dogs. Sixteen predetermined categories of abnormal radiographic findings were evaluated in 233 small breed dogs. In total, 9,786 possible permanent teeth could be evaluated. Of those, 8,308 teeth were evaluated and abnormal radiographic findings were found in 2,458 teeth (29.6%). The most common teeth with abnormal radiographic findings were the mandibular first molars (74.5% on the left and 63.9% on the right) and the maxillary fourth premolars (40.5% on the left and 38.2% on the right). Bone loss of any type (15.8%) was the most commonly detected radiographic abnormal finding among the 16 categories. Dental conditions with a genetic predisposition were frequently occurred in the mandibular premolar teeth. Shih tzu frequently had unerupted teeth and dentigerous cysts. Among the teeth with abnormal radiographic findings, 4.5%, 19.8%, and 5.3% were considered incidental, additional, and important, respectively. Findings that were only detected on radiographs, which were not noted on routine oral examination, were more common in older dogs. Full-mouth radiographic evaluation should be performed to obtain important information for making accurate diagnoses.

  10. Panoramic Dental X-Ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... sometimes create a slightly blurry image where accurate measurements of your teeth and jaw are not possible. ... accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, ...

  11. Technique-dependent decrease in thyroid absorbed dose for dental radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, R.E.; Bristow, R.G.; Clark, G.M.; Nussbaum, C.; Taylor, K.W.

    1989-06-01

    A LiF thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) system, calibrated in the tissue of interest with the beam used for experimentation, was employed to investigate dosages (muGy) to the thyroid region of an anthropomorphic phantom resultant from two dental complete-mouth radiographic procedures. Both techniques were compared in terms of dosages associated with combinations of lead apron and thyroid collar shielding while using a 70-kVp or 90-kVp x-ray beam for a 20-film complete-mouth series. Lead shielding significantly decreased the dose to the thyroid using both techniques (p less than 0.05). The use of the 90-kVp beam resulted in a significant reduction in the thyroid absorbed dose when using the bisecting angle technique (p less than 0.05) but caused a significant increase in the thyroid absorbed dose when the paralleling technique was used (p less than 0.05). The implementation of higher kilovoltage techniques in dental offices must therefore be dependent on the radiographic technique employed.

  12. Technique-dependent decrease in thyroid absorbed dose for dental radiography.

    PubMed

    Wood, R E; Bristow, R G; Clark, G M; Nussbaum, C; Taylor, K W

    1989-06-01

    A LiF thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) system, calibrated in the tissue of interest with the beam used for experimentation, was employed to investigate dosages (muGy) to the thyroid region of an anthropomorphic phantom resultant from two dental complete-mouth radiographic procedures. Both techniques were compared in terms of dosages associated with combinations of lead apron and thyroid collar shielding while using a 70-kVp or 90-kVp x-ray beam for a 20-film complete-mouth series. Lead shielding significantly decreased the dose to the thyroid using both techniques (p less than 0.05). The use of the 90-kVp beam resulted in a significant reduction in the thyroid absorbed dose when using the bisecting angle technique (p less than 0.05) but caused a significant increase in the thyroid absorbed dose when the paralleling technique was used (p less than 0.05). The implementation of higher kilovoltage techniques in dental offices must therefore be dependent on the radiographic technique employed.

  13. Local diagnostic reference levels for intraoral dental radiography in the public hospitals of Cyprus.

    PubMed

    Christofides, Stelios; Pitri, Elina; Lampaskis, Marios; Papaefstathiou, Christos

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine local DRLs for children and adults undergoing intraoral dental examinations at the intraoral radiology units of the public hospitals in Cyprus. Measurements were made on all the twenty intraoral X-ray units of the public hospitals in Cyprus with the intention to establish the local DRLs for all the possible intraoral X-ray examinations for children and adults. All units are film based. The measurements were made by a Dose Area Product (DAP) meter (GAMMEX RMI 841-RD) placed at the surface of the dental unit's X-ray shaping cone (FSD 20cm). A diagnostic radiology dosimeter (Dosimax Plus A) was also placed at an FSD of 100cm to compare the dose reading between the two dosimeters. DRLs were established at the 3rd quartile for 7 exposure settings corresponding to 12 types of teeth (Adult and children mandibular and maxillary incisor, premolar and molar) with values of 197, 163, 128, 102, 81, 65 and 49mGycm(-2) and 7.23, 5.94, 4.75, 3.68, 3.10, 2.41 and 1.88mGy for benchmark nominal exposure times of 1000, 800, 640, 500, 400, 320 and 250ms respectively, at a nominal exposure voltage of 70kVp. The local DRLs of the present study compare well with other similar published DRLs. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Stitched large format CMOS image sensors for dental x-ray digital radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinqiao (Chiao); Fowler, Boyd; Do, Hung; Jaffe, Mark; Rassel, Richard; Leidy, Bob

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we present a family of large format CIS's designed for dental x-ray applications. The CIS areas vary from small 31.5mm x 20.1mm, to medium 34.1mm x 26.3mm, to large 37.1mm x 26.3mm. Pixel size is 19.5um x 19.5um. The sensor family was fabricated in a 0.18um CIS process. Stitching is used in the CIS fabrication for the medium and large size sensors. We present the CIS and detector system design that includes pixel circuitry, readout circuitry, x-ray trigger mechanism, scintillator, and the camera electronics. We also present characterization results including the detector performances under both visible light and x-ray radiation.

  15. Obstacles in spatial evaluation of CBCT-reformatted panoramic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Reinhard E; Rashad, Ashkan; Schulze, Dirk; Hanken, Henning; Heiland, Max; Gröbe, Alexander; Riecke, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Conventional panoramic radiography (cPR) underlines procedure-related limitations in the display of objects. CBCT is presumed to overcome these constraints. To virtualize a cPR view, reformatted panoramic images (rPIs) can be generated. This study evaluated the rPI with regard to its susceptibility to sterical object deposition in comparison with cPR. Methods: A specially developed implant model with dental implants each of 4.0-mm diameter and 11.0-mm length was depositioned by shift, rotation and tilt of 5.00 mm (±0.01 mm) of horizontal shift and 5.0° (±0.167°), respectively, on a highly precise goniometer rotation table, and cPRs and rPIs were generated. Automated evaluation of the cPRs was carried out using a specially developed software. rPIs were processed and analyzed by a semi-automated image analysis. Results: Object deposition lead to distortive effects in the rPI analogue to cPR, but they appear in display only. Objects illustrated in the rPI were dimensionally correct, but sterical relations are elusive. Results are obtained for the horizontal shift, declination and reclination, lateral tilt and rotation. Conclusions: Distortions within the rPI represent the illustration of the hyperbolic-shaped layer out of the three-dimensional data set. With this study, we demonstrated these procedure-related inherent but practically underestimated consequences. Effects of sterical object malpositioning must be compensated by the observer by adequate virtual adjustment of the processed layer. Accurate virtual adjustment leads to vertical dimensions. Sterical relations, e.g. angulation of two objects, are irretraceable unless precisely referenced. PMID:26959644

  16. Effectiveness of digital subtraction radiography in detecting artificially created osteophytes and erosions in the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Demirturk Kocasarac, Husniye; Celenk, Peruze

    2017-06-01

    Erosions and osteophytes are radiographic characteristics that are found in different stages of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis. This study assessed the effectiveness of digital subtraction radiography (DSR) in diagnosing simulated osteophytes and erosions in the TMJ. Five intact, dry human skulls were used to assess the effectiveness of DSR in detecting osteophytes. Four cortical bone chips of varying thicknesses (0.5 mm, 1.0 mm, 1.5 mm, and 2.0 mm) were placed at the medial, central, and lateral aspects of the condyle anterior surface. Two defects of varying depth (1.0 mm and 1.5 mm) were created on the lateral, central, and medial poles of the condyles of 2 skulls to simulate erosions. Panoramic images of the condyles were acquired before and after artificially creating the changes. Digital subtraction was performed with Emago dental image archiving software. Five observers familiar with the interpretation of TMJ radiographs evaluated the images. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the imaging methods. The area under the ROC curve (Az) value for the overall diagnostic accuracy of DSR in detecting osteophytic changes was 0.931. The Az value for the overall diagnostic accuracy of panoramic imaging was 0.695. The accuracy of DSR in detecting erosive changes was 0.854 and 0.696 for panoramic imaging. DSR was remarkably more accurate than panoramic imaging in detecting simulated osteophytic and erosive changes. The accuracy of panoramic imaging in detecting degenerative changes was significantly lower than the accuracy of DSR (P<.05). DSR improved the accuracy of detection using panoramic images.

  17. Panoramic lens applications revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibault, Simon

    2008-04-01

    During the last few years, innovative optical design strategies to generate and control image mapping have been successful in producing high-resolution digital imagers and projectors. This new generation of panoramic lenses includes catadioptric panoramic lenses, panoramic annular lenses, visible/IR fisheye lenses, anamorphic wide-angle attachments, and visible/IR panomorph lenses. Given that a wide-angle lens images a large field of view on a limited number of pixels, a systematic pixel-to-angle mapping will help the efficient use of each pixel in the field of view. In this paper, we present several modern applications of these modern types of hemispheric lenses. Recently, surveillance and security applications have been proposed and published in Security and Defence symposium. However, modern hemispheric lens can be used in many other fields. A panoramic imaging sensor contributes most to the perception of the world. Panoramic lenses are now ready to be deployed in many optical solutions. Covered applications include, but are not limited to medical imaging (endoscope, rigiscope, fiberscope...), remote sensing (pipe inspection, crime scene investigation, archeology...), multimedia (hemispheric projector, panoramic image...). Modern panoramic technologies allow simple and efficient digital image processing and the use of standard image analysis features (motion estimation, segmentation, object tracking, pattern recognition) in the complete 360° hemispheric area.

  18. Accuracy of Panoramic Radiograph in Assessment of the Relationship Between Mandibular Canal and Impacted Third Molars

    PubMed Central

    Tantanapornkul, Weeraya; Mavin, Darika; Prapaiphittayakun, Jaruthai; Phipatboonyarat, Natnicha; Julphantong, Wanchanok

    2016-01-01

    Background: The relationship between impacted mandibular third molar and mandibular canal is important for removal of this tooth. Panoramic radiography is one of the commonly used diagnostic tools for evaluating the relationship of these two structures. Objectives: To evaluate the accuracy of panoramic radiographic findings in predicting direct contact between mandibular canal and impacted third molars on 3D digital images, and to define panoramic criterion in predicting direct contact between the two structures. Methods: Two observers examined panoramic radiographs of 178 patients (256 impacted mandibular third molars). Panoramic findings of interruption of mandibular canal wall, isolated or with darkening of third molar root, diversion of mandibular canal and narrowing of third molar root were evaluated for 3D digital radiography. Direct contact between mandibular canal and impacted third molars on 3D digital images was then correlated with panoramic findings. Panoramic criterion was also defined in predicting direct contact between the two structures. Results: Panoramic findings of interruption of mandibular canal wall, isolated or with darkening of third molar root were statistically significantly correlated with direct contact between mandibular canal and impacted third molars on 3D digital images (p < 0.005), and were defined as panoramic criteria in predicting direct contact between the two structures. Conclusion: Interruption of mandibular canal wall, isolated or with darkening of third molar root observed on panoramic radiographs were effective in predicting direct contact between mandibular canal and impacted third molars on 3D digital images. Panoramic radiography is one of the efficient diagnostic tools for pre-operative assessment of impacted mandibular third molars. PMID:27398105

  19. Dental x-rays

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - teeth; Radiograph - dental; Bitewings; Periapical film; Panoramic film; Digital image ... dentist's office. There are many types of dental x-rays. Some of them are: Bitewing. Shows the crown ...

  20. Quality assurance in digital dental imaging: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Metsälä, Eija; Henner, Anja; Ekholm, Marja

    2014-07-01

    Doses induced by individual dental examinations are low. However, dental radiography accounts for nearly one third of the total number of radiological examinations in the European Union. Therefore, special attention is needed with regard to radiation protection. In order to lower patient doses, the staff performing dental examinations must have competence in imaging as well as in radiation protection issues. This paper presents a systematic review about the core competencies needed by the healthcare staff in performing digital dental radiological imaging quality assurance. The following databases were searched: Pubmed, Cinahl, Pro Quest and IEEXplore digital library. Also volumes of some dental imaging journals and doctoral theses of the Finnish universities educating dentists were searched. The search was performed using both MeSH terms and keywords using the option 'search all text'. The original keywords were: dental imaging, digital, x-ray, panoramic, quality, assurance, competence, competency, skills, knowledge, radiographer, radiologist technician, dentist, oral hygienist, radiation protection and their Finnish synonyms. Core competencies needed by the healthcare staff performing digital dental radiological imaging quality assurance described in the selected studies were: management of dental imaging equipment, competence in image quality and factors associated with it, dose optimization and quality assurance. In the future there will be higher doses in dental imaging due to increasing use of CBCT and digital imaging. The staff performing dental imaging must have competence in dental imaging quality assurance issues found in this review. They also have to practice ethical radiation safety culture in clinical practice.

  1. Panoramic stereo sphere vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Weijia; Zhang, Baofeng; Röning, Juha; Zong, Xiaoning; Yi, Tian

    2013-01-01

    Conventional stereo vision systems have a small field of view (FOV) which limits their usefulness for certain applications. While panorama vision is able to "see" in all directions of the observation space, scene depth information is missed because of the mapping from 3D reference coordinates to 2D panoramic image. In this paper, we present an innovative vision system which builds by a special combined fish-eye lenses module, and is capable of producing 3D coordinate information from the whole global observation space and acquiring no blind area 360°×360° panoramic image simultaneously just using single vision equipment with one time static shooting. It is called Panoramic Stereo Sphere Vision (PSSV). We proposed the geometric model, mathematic model and parameters calibration method in this paper. Specifically, video surveillance, robotic autonomous navigation, virtual reality, driving assistance, multiple maneuvering target tracking, automatic mapping of environments and attitude estimation are some of the applications which will benefit from PSSV.

  2. Hand skeletal maturity and its correlation with mandibular dental development

    PubMed Central

    Pousti, Maryam; Adelianfar, Elahe

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Assessment of pubertal status and pubertal growth spurt in orthodontic patients has a considerable impact on the diagnosis, treatment plan and the outcome of orthodontic treatments. Hand-wrist radiography is routinely used to evaluate skeletal development. Some studies have shown that there is an association between bone development and different stages of dental calcification; therefore, the stages of dental calcification can be used as the first tool for diagnosis, in case there is an association. This study was performed with the aim to evaluate the association between the phases of dental development and the stages of skeletal maturity. Study design: In this study, a total of 52 patients (26 males and 26 females), referring to Mashhad School of Dentistry for orthodontic treatment, were evaluated; the subjects were within the age range of 9-14 years. Hand-wrist radiographic evaluation of skeletal maturation was performed using Fishman method. Also, the Demirjian method was used to identify the stages of dental calcification by panoramic radiographs. Independent t-test and Spearman correlation coefficient were used for data analyses. Results: The mean age of males and females was 11.05 ± 1.05 and 10.62 ± 1.12 years, respectively (p=0.156). The Spearman correlation coefficients between skeletal maturity indicators (SMIs) and developmental stages of mandibular left and right canines and second molars were significant in males only (p<0.05). Also, correlation coefficients were significant between adductor sesamoid ossification and mandibular right and left canines developmental stages in males (p<0.05). Conclusions: Findings of this study showed that the correlation between dental developmental stages and skeletal maturity only were significant in males; thus, different skeletal maturity patterns in males and females might be perceptible. Key words:Skeletal maturation, hand-wrist radiography, panoramic radiography. PMID:25136430

  3. The evaluation of MCI, MI, PMI and GT on both genders with different age and dental status.

    PubMed

    Bozdag, G; Sener, S

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the mandibular cortical index (MCI), mental index (MI), panoramic mandibular index (PMI) and cortical bone thickness in the zone of the gonial angle (GT) in panoramic radiographies from a large sample of males and females and to determine how they relate to patients' age, gender and dental status. 910 panoramic radiographs were obtained and grouped into age, dental status and gender. The MCI, MI, PMI and GT were analysed. Remarkable differences were observed for MCI and GT regarding gender, age groups and dental status on both sides (p < 0.05). While age and dental status had an effect on the MI and PMI in females, dental status had an effect on the MI and PMI in males (p < 0.05). Also, gender had an effect on the MI and PMI (p < 0.05). The effects of age and tooth loss are different in females and males. In females, the harmful effects of tooth loss and age are more prominent according to the PMI and MI measurements. The effects of age and tooth loss in the GT and MCI measurements are similar, and these indices can be accepted as more reliable in studies including both genders.

  4. Effect of diabetes mellitus and insulin therapy on bone density around osseointegrated dental implants: a digital subtraction radiography study in rats.

    PubMed

    de Morais, Juliana Aparecida Najarro Dearo; Trindade-Suedam, Ivy Kiemle; Pepato, Maria Teresa; Marcantonio, Elcio; Wenzel, Ann; Scaf, Gulnara

    2009-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of diabetes mellitus (DM) and insulin therapy on bone density around osseointegrated dental implants by digital subtraction radiography (DSR). Forty implants were placed in tibiae of 40 adult rats. After a healing period of 2 months, the animals were divided into four groups of 10 animals each: a 2-month control group, sacrificed at time (A), a diabetic group (D), an insulin-treated group (I) and a 4-month control group (C). During 2 months, group I received subcutaneous doses of insulin, whereas groups C and D received only saline. The animals in groups D, I and C were thereafter sacrificed. The glucose plasma levels (GPLs) were monitored throughout the experiment. Film radiographs were taken at implant surgery and on the day of sacrifice. The radiographs were digitized, and bone density in regions of osseointegration (OR) around the implants was evaluated by quantitative DSR between baseline and final images. Differences in shades of gray among the groups were assessed using ANOVA. GPLs were within normal range for groups A, C and I and higher for group D. There was a significant difference in mean gray shade values in the OR of subtraction images between groups D (122+/-7) and I (136+/-5) (P<0.05) while there were no significant differences between control groups A (128+/-13) and C (134+/-10) and the insulin group I. DM impaired bone density around osseointegrated dental implant. Further, insulin therapy maintained bone density in diabetic rats.

  5. Using the Monte Carlo method for assessing the tissue and organ doses of patients in dental radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarevich, K. O.; Minenko, V. F.; Verenich, K. A.; Kuten, S. A.

    2016-05-01

    This work is dedicated to modeling dental radiographic examinations to assess the absorbed doses of patients and effective doses. For simulating X-ray spectra, the TASMIP empirical model is used. Doses are assessed on the basis of the Monte Carlo method by using MCNP code for voxel phantoms of ICRP. The results of the assessment of doses to individual organs and effective doses for different types of dental examinations and features of X-ray tube are presented.

  6. A new technique for imaging the temporomandibular joint with a panoramic x-ray machine. Part I. Description of the technique.

    PubMed

    Chilvarquer, I; McDavid, W D; Langlais, R P; Chilvarquer, L W; Nummikoski, P V

    1988-05-01

    A new technique for imaging the temporomandibular joint with rotational panoramic radiography is explained and demonstrated with a tissue-equivalent phantom. In this technique the patient is displaced forward and laterally away from the side under examination. Radiographs made with the proposed technique show the temporomandibular joint with more sharpness and less distortion than do radiographs made with conventional panoramic techniques.

  7. Panoramic projection avionics displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmanash, Michael H.

    2003-09-01

    Avionics projection displays are entering production in advanced tactical aircraft. Early adopters of this technology in the avionics community used projection displays to replace or upgrade earlier units incorporating direct-view CRT or AMLCD devices. Typical motivation for these upgrades were the alleviation of performance, cost and display device availability concerns. In these systems, the upgraded (projection) displays were one-for-one form / fit replacements for the earlier units. As projection technology has matured, this situation has begun to evolve. The Lockheed-Martin F-35 is the first program in which the cockpit has been specifically designed to take advantage of one of the more unique capabilities of rear projection display technology, namely the ability to replace multiple small screens with a single large conformal viewing surface in the form of a panoramic display. Other programs are expected to follow, since the panoramic formats enable increased mission effectiveness, reduced cost and greater information transfer to the pilot. Some of the advantages and technical challenges associated with panoramic projection displays for avionics applications are described below.

  8. Effective dose from direct and indirect digital panoramic units.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gun-Sun; Kim, Jin-Soo; Seo, Yo-Seob; Kim, Jae-Duk

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to provide comparative measurements of the effective dose from direct and indirect digital panoramic units according to phantoms and exposure parameters. Dose measurements were carried out using a head phantom representing an average man (175 cm tall, 73.5 kg male) and a limbless whole body phantom representing an average woman (155 cm tall, 50 kg female). Lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips were used for the dosimeter. Two direct and 2 indirect digital panoramic units were evaluated in this study. Effective doses were derived using 2007 International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations. The effective doses of the 4 digital panoramic units ranged between 8.9 µSv and 37.8 µSv. By using the head phantom, the effective doses from the direct digital panoramic units (37.8 µSv, 27.6 µSv) were higher than those from the indirect units (8.9 µSv, 15.9 µSv). The same panoramic unit showed the difference in effective doses according to the gender of the phantom, numbers and locations of TLDs, and kVp. To reasonably assess the radiation risk from various dental radiographic units, the effective doses should be obtained with the same numbers and locations of TLDs, and with standard hospital exposure. After that, it is necessary to survey the effective doses from various dental radiographic units according to the gender with the corresponding phantom.

  9. Effective dose from direct and indirect digital panoramic units

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gun-Sun; Kim, Jin-Soo; Seo, Yo-Seob

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to provide comparative measurements of the effective dose from direct and indirect digital panoramic units according to phantoms and exposure parameters. Materials and Methods Dose measurements were carried out using a head phantom representing an average man (175 cm tall, 73.5 kg male) and a limbless whole body phantom representing an average woman (155 cm tall, 50 kg female). Lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips were used for the dosimeter. Two direct and 2 indirect digital panoramic units were evaluated in this study. Effective doses were derived using 2007 International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations. Results The effective doses of the 4 digital panoramic units ranged between 8.9 µSv and 37.8 µSv. By using the head phantom, the effective doses from the direct digital panoramic units (37.8 µSv, 27.6 µSv) were higher than those from the indirect units (8.9 µSv, 15.9 µSv). The same panoramic unit showed the difference in effective doses according to the gender of the phantom, numbers and locations of TLDs, and kVp. Conclusion To reasonably assess the radiation risk from various dental radiographic units, the effective doses should be obtained with the same numbers and locations of TLDs, and with standard hospital exposure. After that, it is necessary to survey the effective doses from various dental radiographic units according to the gender with the corresponding phantom. PMID:23807930

  10. Association and comparison between visual inspection and bitewing radiography for the detection of recurrent dental caries under restorations.

    PubMed

    Lino, José R; Ramos-Jorge, Joana; Coelho, Valéria Silveira; Ramos-Jorge, Maria L; Moysés, Marcos R; Ribeiro, José C R

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate, in posterior teeth, the association between the characteristics of the margins of a restoration visually inspected and the presence, under restorations, of recurrent or residual dental caries detected by radiographic examination. Furthermore, the agreement between visual inspection and radiographs to detect dental caries was assessed. Eighty-five permanent molars and premolars with resin restorations on the interproximal and/or occlusal faces, from 18 patients, were submitted for visual inspection and radiographic examination. The visual inspection involved the criteria of the International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS). Bitewing radiographs were used for the radiographic examination. Logistic regression was used to analyse the association between the characteristics of the margins of a restoration assessed by visual inspection (absence of dental caries, or early, established, inactive and active lesions) and the presence of recurrent caries detected by radiographs. Kappa coefficients were calculated for determining agreement between the two methods. The Kappa coefficient for agreement between visual inspection and radiographic examination was 0.19. Established lesions [odds ratio (OR) = 9.89; 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 2.94-33.25; P < 0.05] and lesion activity (OR = 2.57; 95% CI: 0.91-7.27; P < 0.05) detected by visual inspection, were associated with recurrent or residual dental caries detected by radiographs. Restorations with established and active lesions at the margins had a greater chance of exhibiting recurrent or residual lesions in the radiographic examination. The present findings demonstrate that restorations with established and active lesions at the margins when visually inspected often require removal and retreatment. © 2015 FDI World Dental Federation.

  11. Radiation dose in dental radiology.

    PubMed

    Cohnen, M; Kemper, J; Möbes, O; Pawelzik, J; Mödder, U

    2002-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare radiation exposure in panoramic radiography (PR), dental CT, and digital volume tomography (DVT). An anthropomorphic Alderson-Rando phantom and two anatomical head phantoms with thermoluminescent dosimeters fixed at appropriate locations were exposed as in a dental examination. In PR and DVT, standard parameters were used while variables in CT included mA, pitch, and rotation time. Image noise was assessed in dental CT and DVT. Radiation doses to the skin and internal organs within the primary beam and resulting from scatter radiation were measured and expressed as maximum doses in mGy. For PR, DVT, and CT, these maximum doses were 0.65, 4.2, and 23 mGy. In dose-reduced CT protocols, radiation doses ranged from 10.9 to 6.1 mGy. Effective doses calculated on this basis showed values below 0.1 mSv for PR, DVT, and dose-reduced CT. Image noise was similar in DVT and low-dose CT. As radiation exposure and image noise of DVT is similar to low-dose CT, this imaging technique cannot be recommended as a general alternative to replace PR in dental radiology.

  12. Exposure Geometry And Film Contrast Differences As Bases For Incomplete Cancellation Of Irrelevant Structures In Dental Subtraction Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruttimann, Urs E.; Okano, Tomohiro; Grondahl, Hans-Goran; Grondahl, Kerstin; Webber, Richard L.

    1981-11-01

    Subtraction radiography for longitudinal studies requires both reproducible imaging geometry and film contrast characteristics to permit perfect alignment of the radiographs, and achieve good cancellation of diagnostically irrelevant background structures. The standard deviation (SD) of gray levels about the mean in a subtraction image was used as a relative measure of the residual structured noise. In order to estimate the effects of improperly standardized radiographs on SD in the subtraction image, both the imaging angle and film exposure time were systematically varied. The results showed that SD changed linear for small misalignment angles of the central beam, the variance attributable to this error source reaching about the same magnitude as the variance due to anatomical differences for angulation errors within ±20. The SD increase due to large film contrast disparity could be partly reverted for angulation errors within this bound by using a quadratic transformation which matched the first two moments of the gray level distributions in the two parent radiographs. Therefore, in order to use some of the retrospective data obtained under less stringent standardizations for subtraction imagery, it appears possible to adjust for differences in film contrast, and, perhaps, correct for geometric misalignment by a separate algorithm.

  13. Neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, H.; Iddings, F.

    1998-08-01

    Neutron radiography is becoming a well established nondestructive testing (NDT) method. The American Society for Nondestructive Testing (ASNT) has recognized the method through its recommended practice SNT-TCIA which outlines training, knowledge, and experience necessary to obtain levels of competency in the method. Certification of nondestructive testing personnel is also covered in a military standard. Technical publications in the field of NDT and nuclear technology carry articles on neutron radiography and technical meetings include papers or even entire sessions on neutron radiography. There is an on-going series of international conferences on neutron radiography. Many books are available to provide introductory and advanced material on neutron radiographic techniques and applications. Neutron radiography as a service for hire is available, similar to that offered for other NDT services. The method is being adopted to solve NDT problems in specialty areas. The objective of this report is to provide a brief survey of the current state of the art in the use of neutron radiography. The survey will include information on the technique including principles of the method, sources of neutrons, detection methodology, standards and image quality indicators, and representative applications. An extensive reference list provides additional information for those who wish to investigate further and a Glossary is included which provides definitions for terms used in Neutron Radiography.

  14. An in vitro radiographic analysis of the density of dental luting cements as measured by CCD-based digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Antonijevic, Djordje; Jevremovic, Danimir; Jovanovic, Svetlana; Obradovic-Djuricic, Kosovka

    2012-05-01

    According to the ISO, the radiopacity of luting cements should be equal to or greater than that of aluminum. The aim of this in vitro study was to determine the radiopacity of 13 commercially available dental luting cements and compare them with human enamel and dentin. Five classes of luting cements were evaluated: zinc phosphate (Cegal N and Harvard Zinc Phosphate), zinc polycarboxylate (Harvard Polycarboxylate and Hoffmann's Carboxylate), glass ionomers (Ketac Cem Easymix, Ketac Cem Radiopaque, and Fuji I), resin-modified glass ionomer (Rely X Luting), and resin cements (Multilink Automix, Variolink II, Speed CEM, Rely X Unicem Automix, and three shades of Variolink Veneer). Tooth slices served as controls. Five specimens of each material measuring 8 mm in diameter and 1 mm thick were prepared and radiographed alongside tooth slices and an aluminum stepwedge using a Trophy RVG sensor. The radiopacity values were expressed in mm Al and analyzed by the ANOVA and Tukey tests (P < .05). All the cements examined except Variolink Veneer had significantly higher radiopacities than that of dentin. Rely X Unicem Automix, glass ionomer, and resin-modified glass-ionomer cements demonstrated radiopacities that were not significantly different with respect to enamel. Zinc phosphate, zinc polycarboxylate, and three of the resin cements presented radiopacity values that were significantly greater than that of enamel. Almost all the investigated materials presented an acceptable radiopacity. Radiopacity of dental cements seems to depend more on the presence of elements with high atomic numbers than on the type of the material.

  15. Are Panoramic Radiographs Reliable to Diagnose Mild Alveolar Bone Resorption?

    PubMed Central

    Semenoff, Larissa; Semenoff, Tereza Aparecida Delle; Pedro, Fabio Luiz Miranda; Volpato, Evaristo Ricci; Machado, Maria Aparecida de Andrade Moreira; Borges, Álvaro Henrique; Semenoff-Segundo, Alex

    2011-01-01

    It is extremely important to assess variations between the most used radiographs in dental practice, since minimum distortion on obtained images may change diagnosis, treatment plan, and prognosis for the patient. For this, the distance between the enamel-cementum junction and the alveolar bone crest was measured on conventional and digitized periapical, bitewing, and panoramic radiographs and compared among them. From a total of 1484 records, 39 sets of radiographs that fulfilled the inclusion criteria of the study sample were selected. The measurements were grouped according to the intensity of bone loss. Statistically significant difference was found in the averages of the measurements assessed in radiographs with absence of bone loss between conventional panoramic and periapical radiographs, between digitized panoramic and periapical radiographs and between digitized bitewing and panoramic radiographs. By analyzing the results of this work and considering the research protocol used, one can conclude that small losses in height of alveolar bone crest observed in panoramic radiographs should be cautiously evaluated, as they may be overestimated. PMID:21991470

  16. Are panoramic radiographs reliable to diagnose mild alveolar bone resorption?

    PubMed

    Semenoff, Larissa; Semenoff, Tereza Aparecida Delle; Pedro, Fabio Luiz Miranda; Volpato, Evaristo Ricci; Machado, Maria Aparecida de Andrade Moreira; Borges, Alvaro Henrique; Semenoff-Segundo, Alex

    2011-01-01

    It is extremely important to assess variations between the most used radiographs in dental practice, since minimum distortion on obtained images may change diagnosis, treatment plan, and prognosis for the patient. For this, the distance between the enamel-cementum junction and the alveolar bone crest was measured on conventional and digitized periapical, bitewing, and panoramic radiographs and compared among them. From a total of 1484 records, 39 sets of radiographs that fulfilled the inclusion criteria of the study sample were selected. The measurements were grouped according to the intensity of bone loss. Statistically significant difference was found in the averages of the measurements assessed in radiographs with absence of bone loss between conventional panoramic and periapical radiographs, between digitized panoramic and periapical radiographs and between digitized bitewing and panoramic radiographs. By analyzing the results of this work and considering the research protocol used, one can conclude that small losses in height of alveolar bone crest observed in panoramic radiographs should be cautiously evaluated, as they may be overestimated.

  17. Digital radiography: an overview.

    PubMed

    Parks, Edwin T; Williamson, Gail F

    2002-11-15

    Since the discovery of X-rays in 1895, film has been the primary medium for capturing, displaying, and storing radiographic images. It is a technology that dental practitioners are the most familiar and comfortable with in terms of technique and interpretation. Digital radiography is the latest advancement in dental imaging and is slowly being adopted by the dental profession. Digital imaging incorporates computer technology in the capture, display, enhancement, and storage of direct radiographic images. Digital imaging offers some distinct advantages over film, but like any emerging technology, it presents new and different challenges for the practitioner to overcome. This article presents an overview of digital imaging including basic terminology and comparisons with film-based imaging. The principles of direct and indirect digital imaging modalities, intraoral and extraoral applications, image processing, and diagnostic efficacy will be discussed. In addition, the article will provide a list of questions dentists should consider prior to purchasing digital imaging systems for their practice.

  18. Prevalence of Pathologic Findings in Panoramic Radiographs: Calcified Carotid Artery Atheroma

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Jéssica Rodrigues da Silva Noll; Yamada, Juliana Laís Yoshie; Berrocal, Cristina; Westphalen, Fernando Henrique; Franco, Ademir

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the prevalence of images suggestive of calcified carotid artery atheromas (ISCCAA) in panoramic radiographs of patients under dental treatment. Materials and methods The sample consisted of 8.338 panoramic radiographs from female (n=5.049) and male (n=3.289) patients under dental treatment between 4 and 94 years of age. The panoramic radiographs were evaluated searching for ISCCAA. The obtained findings were statistically associated with sex and age. Results ISCCAA were found in 579 radiographs (6.9%). No statistically significant differences were observed between females and males (p>0.05). ISCCAA were more prevalent in patients having a mean age of 50 (p<0.05). Conclusion The potential cases of ISCCAA that were assessed on panoramic radiographs are of utmost clinical significance because they can ensure early and correct diagnosis. PMID:27847396

  19. Wireless networking for the dental office: current wireless standards and security protocols.

    PubMed

    Mupparapu, Muralidhar; Arora, Sarika

    2004-11-15

    Digital radiography has gained immense popularity in dentistry today in spite of the early difficulty for the profession to embrace the technology. The transition from film to digital has been happening at a faster pace in the fields of Orthodontics, Oral Surgery, Endodontics, Periodontics, and other specialties where the radiographic images (periapical, bitewing, panoramic, cephalometric, and skull radiographs) are being acquired digitally, stored within a server locally, and eventually accessed for diagnostic purposes, along with the rest of the patient data via the patient management software (PMS). A review of the literature shows the diagnostic performance of digital radiography is at least comparable to or even better than that of conventional radiography. Similarly, other digital diagnostic tools like caries detectors, cephalometric analysis software, and digital scanners were used for many years for the diagnosis and treatment planning purposes. The introduction of wireless charged-coupled device (CCD) sensors in early 2004 (Schick Technologies, Long Island City, NY) has moved digital radiography a step further into the wireless era. As with any emerging technology, there are concerns that should be looked into before adapting to the wireless environment. Foremost is the network security involved in the installation and usage of these wireless networks. This article deals with the existing standards and choices in wireless technologies that are available for implementation within a contemporary dental office. The network security protocols that protect the patient data and boost the efficiency of modern day dental clinics are enumerated.

  20. Digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Mattoon, J S

    2006-01-01

    Digital radiography has been used in human medical imaging since the 1980s with recent and rapid acceptance into the veterinary profession. Using advanced image capture and computer technology, radiographic images are viewed on a computer monitor. This is advantageous because radiographic images can be adjusted using dedicated computer software to maximize diagnostic image quality. Digital images can be accessed at computer workstations throughout the hospital, instantly retrieved from computer archives, and transmitted via the internet for consultation or case referral. Digital radiographic data can also be incorporated into a hospital information system, making record keeping an entirely paperless process. Digital image acquisition is faster when compared to conventional screen-film radiography, improving workflow and patient throughput. Digital radiography greatly reduces the need for 'retake' radiographs because of wide latitude in exposure factors. Also eliminated are costs associated with radiographic film and x-ray film development. Computed radiography, charged coupled devices, and flat panel detectors are types of digital radiography systems currently available.

  1. Neutron Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, A. K.; Brenizer, J. S.

    Neutron radiography and its related two-dimensional (2D) neutron imaging techniques have been established as invaluable nondestructive inspection methods and quantitative measurement tools. They have been used in a wide variety of applications ranging from inspection of aircraft engine turbine blades to study of two-phase fluid flow in operating proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Neutron radiography is similar to X-ray radiography in that the method produces a 2D attenuation map of neutron radiation that has penetrated the object being examined. However, the images produced differ and are often complementary due to the differences between X-ray and neutron interaction mechanisms. The uses and types of 2D neutron imaging have expanded over the past 15 years as a result of advances in imaging technology and improvements in neutron generators/sources and computers. Still, high-intensity sources such as those from reactors and spallation neutron sources, together with conventional film radiography, remain the mainstay of high-resolution, large field-of-view neutron imaging. This chapter presents a summary of the history, methods, and related variations of neutron radiography techniques.

  2. Tonsillolith: a panoramic radiograph presentation.

    PubMed

    Babu B, Balaji; Tejasvi M L, Avinash; Avinash, C K Anulekha; B, Chittaranjan

    2013-10-01

    Tonsilloliths are calcifications within a tonsillar crypt, involve primarily the palatine tonsil caused by dystrophic calcification as a result of chronic inflammation. Tonsilloliths are very uncommon and are microscopic. Tonsillar concretions sometimes produce symptoms which include non-specific chronic halitosis, irritable cough, dysphagia, otalgia and foreign body-like sensation or foul taste. Patients with tonsillolithiasis may also be asymptomatic, with their lesions being discovered incidentally on panoramic radiographs. This article presents an unusual case of multiple bilateral and asymptomatic tonsilloliths which were found during a routine panoramic radiographic examination.

  3. Utilization of computer-aided detection system in diagnosing unilateral maxillary sinusitis on panoramic radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Yasufumi; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Miwa; Fukuda, Motoki; Nozawa, Michihito; Ariji, Eiichiro

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: It is unclear whether computer-aided detection (CAD) systems for panoramic radiography can help inexperienced dentists to diagnose maxillary sinusitis. The aim of this study was to clarify whether a CAD system for panoramic radiography can contribute to improved diagnostic performance for maxillary sinusitis by inexperienced dentists. Methods: The panoramic radiographs of 49 patients with maxillary sinusitis and 49 patients with healthy sinuses were evaluated in this study. The diagnostic performance of the CAD system was determined. 12 inexperienced dentists and 4 expert oral and maxillofacial radiologists observed the total of 98 panoramic radiographs and judged the presence or absence of maxillary sinusitis, under conditions with and without the support of the CAD system. The receiver operating characteristic curves of the two groups were compared. Results: The CAD system provided sensitivity of 77.6%, specificity of 69.4% and accuracy of 73.5%. The diagnostic performance of the inexperienced dentists increased with the support of the CAD system. When the inexperienced dentists diagnosed maxillary sinusitis with CAD support, the area under the curve (AUC) was significantly higher than that without CAD support. When the focus was only on panoramic radiographs in which CAD support led to a correct diagnosis, the AUC of the inexperienced dentists increased to an equivalent level to that of the experienced radiologists. Conclusions: The CAD system supported the inexperienced dentists in diagnosing maxillary sinusitis on the panoramic radiographs. If the accuracy of the CAD system can be increased, the benefits of CAD support will be further enhanced. PMID:26837670

  4. [Aplication of demineralized human bone matrix in the surgical dental fusion treatment. Report of a case].

    PubMed

    Mora-Rincones, Oscar A; Corona-Rodríguez, Julio C; Díaz-Carvajal, Alvaro L; Franco-Carrero, Isabel C

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this work is to present a surgical alternative in the treatment of the dental fusions through the placement of demineralized human bone matrix (DHBM) (Grafton Putty)*, immediately after the separation and extraction of the fused tooth to the permanent one. The dental fusion is a dental anomaly of union, that consists in the union of two dental germs during development. It could happen at any of the dental germ evolution stages from the dental sheet or from more advanced processes of differentiation. For the clinical treatment, an allograft of DHBM with osteoinductive and osteoconductive properties was used. This had several factors of bone growth, it allowed the gradual growth of a new bone that helped to correct the bone defects post-extraction and to cover the exposed distal wall of the remaining permanent tooth. The clinic evaluation and the periapical and panoramic radiographies images were used for the clinical control. It can be concluded that the surgical separation and the extraction of the tooth with less anatomical likeness to the contralateral and the placement of the DHBM, represent a surgical treatment alternative of the dental fusion.

  5. Automatic panoramic thermal integrated sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutin, Mikhail A.; Tsui, Eddy K.; Gutin, Olga N.

    2005-05-01

    Historically, the US Army has recognized the advantages of panoramic imagers with high image resolution: increased area coverage with fewer cameras, instantaneous full horizon detection, location and tracking of multiple targets simultaneously, extended range, and others. The novel ViperViewTM high-resolution panoramic thermal imager is the heart of the Automatic Panoramic Thermal Integrated Sensor (APTIS), being jointly developed by Applied Science Innovative, Inc. (ASI) and the Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center (ARDEC) in support of the Future Combat Systems (FCS) and the Intelligent Munitions Systems (IMS). The APTIS is anticipated to operate as an intelligent node in a wireless network of multifunctional nodes that work together to improve situational awareness (SA) in many defense and offensive operations, as well as serve as a sensor node in tactical Intelligence Surveillance Reconnaissance (ISR). The ViperView is as an aberration-corrected omnidirectional imager with small optics designed to match the resolution of a 640x480 pixels IR camera with improved image quality for longer range target detection, classification, and tracking. The same approach is applicable to panoramic cameras working in the visible spectral range. Other components of the ATPIS sensor suite include ancillary sensors, advanced power management, and wakeup capability. This paper describes the development status of the APTIS system.

  6. Panoramic cone beam computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Jenghwa; Zhou Lili; Wang Song; Clifford Chao, K. S.

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is the main imaging tool for image-guided radiotherapy but its functionality is limited by a small imaging volume and restricted image position (imaged at the central instead of the treatment position for peripheral lesions to avoid collisions). In this paper, the authors present the concept of ''panoramic CBCT,'' which can image patients at the treatment position with an imaging volume as large as practically needed. Methods: In this novel panoramic CBCT technique, the target is scanned sequentially from multiple view angles. For each view angle, a half scan (180 deg. + {theta}{sub cone} where {theta}{sub cone} is the cone angle) is performed with the imaging panel positioned in any location along the beam path. The panoramic projection images of all views for the same gantry angle are then stitched together with the direct image stitching method (i.e., according to the reported imaging position) and full-fan, half-scan CBCT reconstruction is performed using the stitched projection images. To validate this imaging technique, the authors simulated cone-beam projection images of the Mathematical Cardiac Torso (MCAT) thorax phantom for three panoramic views. Gaps, repeated/missing columns, and different exposure levels were introduced between adjacent views to simulate imperfect image stitching due to uncertainties in imaging position or output fluctuation. A modified simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (modified SART) was developed to reconstruct CBCT images directly from the stitched projection images. As a gold standard, full-fan, full-scan (360 deg. gantry rotation) CBCT reconstructions were also performed using projection images of one imaging panel large enough to encompass the target. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and geometric distortion were evaluated to quantify the quality of reconstructed images. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to evaluate the effect of scattering on the image quality and

  7. Image preprocessing for vehicle panoramic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ting; Chen, Liguo

    2016-10-01

    Due to the problem that distortion exist for panoramic image stitching in terms of vehicle panoramic system, the research on image preprocessing for panoramic system was carried out. Firstly, the principal of vehicle panoramic vision was analyzed and the fundamental role that image preprocessing procedure plays in panoramic vision is found out. And then, the camera was calibrated with Hyperboloid model and the correction for distorted image is realized. Oriented by panoramic system, the effect of mounting position was taken into consideration for image correction and the suggested angle of camera installation for different mounting position is given. Through analyzing the existing problem of bird-eye image, a method of transforming twice with calibration plates is proposed. Experiment results indicate that the proposed method can weaken the existing problem of bird-eye image effectively and it can contribute to reduce the distortion in terms of image stitching for panoramic system.

  8. Digital Radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    System One, a digital radiography system, incorporates a reusable image medium (RIM) which retains an image. No film is needed; the RIM is read with a laser scanner, and the information is used to produce a digital image on an image processor. The image is stored on an optical disc. System allows the radiologist to "dial away" unwanted images to compare views on three screens. It is compatible with existing equipment and cost efficient. It was commercialized by a Stanford researcher from energy selective technology developed under a NASA grant.

  9. Differences between panoramic and Cone Beam-CT in the surgical evaluation of lower third molars

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez y Baena, Ruggero; Beltrami, Riccardo; Tagliabo, Angelo; Rizzo, Silvana

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability to identify the contiguity between the root of the mandibular third molar and the mandibular canal (MC) in panoramic radiographs compared with Cone Beam-CT. Material and Methods Panoramic radiographs of 326 third molars and CBCT radiographs of 86 cases indicated for surgery and considered at risk were evaluated. The following signs were assessed in panoramic radiographs as risk factors: radiolucent band, loss of MC border, change in MC direction, MC narrowing, root narrowing, root deviation, bifid apex, superimposition, and contact between the root third molar and the MC. Results Radiographic signs associated with absence of MC cortical bone are: radiolucent band, loss of MC border, change in MC direction, and superimposition. The number of risk factors was significantly increased with an increasing depth of inclusion. CBCT revealed a significant association between the absence of MC cortical bone and a lingual or interradicular position of the MC. Conclusions In cases in which panoramic radiographs do not exclude contiguity between the MC and tooth, careful assessment the signs and risks on CBCT radiographs is indicated for proper identification of the relationships between anatomic structures. Key words:Panoramic radiography, Cone-Beam computed tomography, third molar, mandibular nerve. PMID:28210446

  10. Chemical intensification of dental radiographs

    SciTech Connect

    Price, C.

    1983-04-01

    The potential applications of chemical intensification in dental radiography are explored. Three standard photographic intensifiers and three methods designed for radiographic use are evaluated. One of these methods is shown to be capable of reducing radiation dose to one half, without loss of diagnostic quality. Further work is necessary to achieve a system sufficiently practicable to deserve widespread use in routine clinical dental radiography.

  11. Diagnostic quality versus patient exposure with five panoramic screen-film combinations

    SciTech Connect

    D'Ambrosio, J.A.; Schiff, T.G.; McDavid, W.D.; Langland, O.E.

    1986-04-01

    Five film-screen combinations were used to make five density-matched panoramic radiographs of a tissue-equivalent phantom skull using the Midwest/Morita Panoral x-ray machine. The radiographs were evaluated as to their diagnostic quality by twenty dental radiologists. The results demonstrate that proper screen-film selection can significantly reduce patient exposure without compromising diagnostic quality.

  12. Panoramic views for virtual endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Bernhard; Chefd'hotel, Christophe; Sudarsky, Sandra

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a panoramic projection designed to increase the surface visibility during virtual endoscopies. The proposed projection renders five faces of a cubic viewing space into the plane in a continuous fashion. Using this real-time and interactive visualization technique as a screening method for colon cancer could lead to significantly shorter evaluation time. It avoids having to fly through the colon in both directions and prevents the occlusion of potential polyps behind haustral folds.

  13. Cerebellopontine angle mass mimicking lingual nerve injury after dental implant placement: a case report.

    PubMed

    Momota, Y; Kani, K; Takano, H; Azuma, M

    2015-09-01

    This is a rare case report of a cerebellopontine angle (CPA) mass mimicking lingual nerve injury after a dental implant placement. Lingual nerve injury is a common complication following dental implant placement. CPA masses are likely to cause symptomatic trigeminal neuralgia, and thus can mimic and be easily confused with oral diseases. We experienced a case of CPA mass mimicking lingual nerve injury after dental implant placement. The patient was a 57-year-old Japanese female who complained of glossalgia. She underwent dental implant placement in the mandible before visiting our clinic. Panoramic x-ray radiography revealed no abnormalities; the salivary flow rate by gum test was 7.0 ml/10 min. She was diagnosed with lingual nerve injury and secondary burning mouth syndrome. Vitamin B12 and oral moisturizer did not provide relief; furthermore, numbness in the lower lip emerged. A Semmes Weinstein test demonstrated elevation of her sensitivity threshold. Finally, magnetic resonance imaging revealed a 20-mm diameter mass in the CPA. The patient is now being followed under conservative management. Our experience underscores the importance of including CPA mass in the differential diagnosis of dental diseases. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  14. Experiments in interactive panoramic cinema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Scott S.; Anderson, Steve; Ruiz, Susana; Naimark, Michael; Hoberman, Perry; Bolas, Mark; Weinberg, Richard

    2005-03-01

    For most of the past 100 years, cinema has been the premier medium for defining and expressing relations to the visible world. However, cinematic spectacles delivered in darkened theaters are predicated on a denial of both the body and the physical surroundings of the spectators who are watching it. To overcome these deficiencies, filmmakers have historically turned to narrative, seducing audiences with compelling stories and providing realistic characters with whom to identify. This paper describes several research projects in interactive panoramic cinema that attempt to sidestep the narrative preoccupations of conventional cinema and instead are based on notions of space, movement and embodied spectatorship rather than traditional storytelling. Example projects include interactive works developed with the use of a unique 360 degree camera and editing system, and also development of panoramic imagery for a large projection environment with 14 screens on 3 adjacent walls in a 5-4-5 configuration with observations and findings from an experiment projecting panoramic video on 12 of the 14, in a 4-4-4 270 degree configuration.

  15. [Digital radiography].

    PubMed

    Haendle, J

    1983-03-01

    Digital radiography is a generally accepted term comprising all x-ray image systems producing a projected image which resembles the conventional x-ray film image, and which are linked to any type of digital image processing. Fundamental criteria of differentiation are based on the production and detection method of the x-ray image. Various systems are employed, viz. the single-detector, line-detector or fanbeam detector and the area-beam or area-detector image converters, which differ from one another mainly in the manner of conversion of the radiation produced by the x-ray tube. The article also deals with the pros and cons of the various principles, the multitude of systems employed, and the varying frequency of their use in x-ray diagnosis work.

  16. Thermal infrared panoramic imaging sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutin, Mikhail; Tsui, Eddy K.; Gutin, Olga; Wang, Xu-Ming; Gutin, Alexey

    2006-05-01

    Panoramic cameras offer true real-time, 360-degree coverage of the surrounding area, valuable for a variety of defense and security applications, including force protection, asset protection, asset control, security including port security, perimeter security, video surveillance, border control, airport security, coastguard operations, search and rescue, intrusion detection, and many others. Automatic detection, location, and tracking of targets outside protected area ensures maximum protection and at the same time reduces the workload on personnel, increases reliability and confidence of target detection, and enables both man-in-the-loop and fully automated system operation. Thermal imaging provides the benefits of all-weather, 24-hour day/night operation with no downtime. In addition, thermal signatures of different target types facilitate better classification, beyond the limits set by camera's spatial resolution. The useful range of catadioptric panoramic cameras is affected by their limited resolution. In many existing systems the resolution is optics-limited. Reflectors customarily used in catadioptric imagers introduce aberrations that may become significant at large camera apertures, such as required in low-light and thermal imaging. Advantages of panoramic imagers with high image resolution include increased area coverage with fewer cameras, instantaneous full horizon detection, location and tracking of multiple targets simultaneously, extended range, and others. The Automatic Panoramic Thermal Integrated Sensor (APTIS), being jointly developed by Applied Science Innovative, Inc. (ASI) and the Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center (ARDEC) combines the strengths of improved, high-resolution panoramic optics with thermal imaging in the 8 - 14 micron spectral range, leveraged by intelligent video processing for automated detection, location, and tracking of moving targets. The work in progress supports the Future Combat Systems (FCS) and the

  17. Design on catadioptric panoramic imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ye; Hao, Chenyang; Li, Wenhua

    2016-01-01

    With the VR(Virtual Reality) technology becoming a hot spot nowadays, one of the key technology-panoramic imaging technology is particularly important. This paper simply introduces various types of panoramic imaging technology, and compares the advantages and disadvantages of the hyperboloidal and paraboloidal catadioptric panoramic imaging system in principle and other aspects. The mathematical models of the hyperboloidal and paraboloidal system is established, and the related system is also designed.

  18. Calcified carotid artery atheromas on panoramic radiographs of head and neck cancer patients before and after radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Markman, Renata-Lucena; Conceição-Vasconcelos, Karina-Gondim-Moutinho; Brandão, Thais-Bianca; Prado-Ribeiro, Ana-Carolina; Santos-Silva, Alan-Roger

    2017-01-01

    Background The aims of this study were to verify if head and neck radiotherapy (RT) is able to induce calcified carotid artery atheroma (CCAA) in a large head and neck cancer (HNC) population and also to compare the socio-demographic and clinical findings of patients with and without CCAA detected on panoramic radiographs. Material and Methods Panoramic radiographs taken before and after head and neck radiotherapy (RT) of 180 HNC patients were selected and analyzed in order to identify the presence of CCAA. In addition, CCAA presence or absence on panoramic radiographs were compared and correlated with clinicopathological findings. Results A high overall prevalence of CCAA was found on panoramic radiographs (63 out of 180 = 35%) of HNC patients. No significant difference of CCAA before and after RT was observed. There were also no differences between groups (with and without CCAA) regarding age, gender, tobacco and alcohol use, arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus, acute myocardial infarction, hypercholesterolemia, tumor location, clinical stage of disease and RT dose. However, there was a greater prevalence of strokes in patients with CCAA (p<0.05). Conclusions Although CCAA were frequently found in panoramic radiographs of patients with HNC, RT seems not to alter the prevalence of these calcifications. Key words:Head and neck cancer, radiotherapy, carotid artery diseases, panoramic radiography. PMID:28160583

  19. Zygomatic air cell defect: A panoramic radiographic study of a south Indian population.

    PubMed

    Hs, Srikanth; Patil, Karthikeya; Vg, Mahima

    2010-05-01

    To determine the prevalence, patterns of occurrence and variations of zygomatic air cell defects (ZACDs) using panoramic radiographs. Dental panoramic radiographs of 600 outpatients were examined to evaluate the variations and characteristics of ZACDs. ZACDs were identified in 15 subjects out of 600, giving an overall prevalence of 2.5%. Seven ZACDs were seen in males and eight in females. Among the 15 ZACDs, nine were unilateral and six were bilateral. The overall prevalence of ZACD is relatively low in south Indian population and careful radiographic evaluation is needed to detect these entities.

  20. Zygomatic air cell defect: A panoramic radiographic study of a south Indian population

    PubMed Central

    HS, Srikanth; Patil, Karthikeya; VG, Mahima

    2010-01-01

    Aims: To determine the prevalence, patterns of occurrence and variations of zygomatic air cell defects (ZACDs) using panoramic radiographs. Methods and Materials: Dental panoramic radiographs of 600 outpatients were examined to evaluate the variations and characteristics of ZACDs. Results: ZACDs were identified in 15 subjects out of 600, giving an overall prevalence of 2.5%. Seven ZACDs were seen in males and eight in females. Among the 15 ZACDs, nine were unilateral and six were bilateral. Conclusion: The overall prevalence of ZACD is relatively low in south Indian population and careful radiographic evaluation is needed to detect these entities. PMID:20607021

  1. Panoramic Sinai Peninsula, Red Sea

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1984-10-13

    An excellent panoramic view of the entire Sinai Peninsula (29.0N, 34.0E) and the nearby Nile River Delta and eastern Mediterranean coastal region. The Suez Canal, at the top of the scene just to the right of the Delta, connects the Mediterranean Sea with the Gulf of Suez on the west side of the Sinai Peninsula and the Gulf of Aqaba is on the west where they both flow into the Red Sea. At upper right, is the Dead Sea, Jordan River and Lake Tiberius.

  2. Panoramic View of Hurricane Charley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This panoramic view of Hurricane Charley was photographed by the Expedition 9 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS) on August 13, 2004, at a vantage point just north of Tampa, Florida. The small eye was not visible in this view, but the raised cloud tops near the center coincide roughly with the time that the storm began to rapidly strengthen. The category 2 hurricane was moving north-northwest at 18 mph packing winds of 105 mph. Crew Earth Observations record Earth surface changes over time, as well as more fleeting events such as storms, floods, fires, and volcanic eruptions.

  3. Age estimation based on Kvaal's technique using digital panoramic radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Samta; Nagendrareddy, Suma Gundareddy; Sharma, Manisha Lakhanpal; Agnihotri, Poornapragna; Chaudhary, Sunil; Dhillon, Manu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Age estimation is important for administrative and ethical reasons and also because of legal consequences. Dental pulp undergoes regression in size with increasing age due to secondary dentin deposition and can be used as a parameter of age estimation even beyond 25 years of age. Kvaal et al. developed a method for chronological age estimation based on the pulp size using periapical dental radiographs. There is a need for testing this method of age estimation in the Indian population using simple tools like digital imaging on living individuals not requiring extraction of teeth. Aims and Objectives: Estimation of the chronological age of subjects by Kvaal's method using digital panoramic radiographs and also testing the validity of regression equations as given by Kvaal et al. Materials and Methods: The study sample included a total of 152 subjects in the age group of 14-60 years. Measurements were performed on the standardized digital panoramic radiographs based on Kvaal's method. Different regression formulae were derived and the age was assessed. The assessed age was then correlated to the actual age of the patient using Student's t-test. Results: No significant difference between the mean of the chronological age and the estimated age was observed. However, the values of the mean age estimated by using regression equations as given previously in the study of Kvaal et al. significantly underestimated the chronological age in the present study sample. Conclusion: The results of the study give an inference for the feasibility of this technique by calculation of regression equations on digital panoramic radiographs. However, it negates the applicability of same regression equations as given by Kvaal et al. on the study population. PMID:27555738

  4. Performance analysis of panoramic infrared systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furxhi, Orges; Driggers, Ronald G.; Holst, Gerald; Krapels, Keith

    2014-05-01

    Panoramic imagers are becoming more commonplace in the visible part of the spectrum. These imagers are often used in the real estate market, extreme sports, teleconferencing, and security applications. Infrared panoramic imagers, on the other hand, are not as common and only a few have been demonstrated. A panoramic image can be formed in several ways, using pan and stitch, distributed aperture, or omnidirectional optics. When omnidirectional optics are used, the detected image is a warped view of the world that is mapped on the focal plane array in a donut shape. The final image on the display is the mapping of the omnidirectional donut shape image back to the panoramic world view. In this paper we analyze the performance of uncooled thermal panoramic imagers that use omnidirectional optics, focusing on range performance.

  5. Single-Camera Panoramic-Imaging Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Jeffrey L.; Gilbert, John

    2007-01-01

    Panoramic detection systems (PDSs) are developmental video monitoring and image-data processing systems that, as their name indicates, acquire panoramic views. More specifically, a PDS acquires images from an approximately cylindrical field of view that surrounds an observation platform. The main subsystems and components of a basic PDS are a charge-coupled- device (CCD) video camera and lens, transfer optics, a panoramic imaging optic, a mounting cylinder, and an image-data-processing computer. The panoramic imaging optic is what makes it possible for the single video camera to image the complete cylindrical field of view; in order to image the same scene without the benefit of the panoramic imaging optic, it would be necessary to use multiple conventional video cameras, which have relatively narrow fields of view.

  6. Patient risk from interproximal radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, S.J.; Pujol, A. Jr.; Chen, T.S.; Malcolm, A.W.; James, A.E. Jr.

    1984-09-01

    Computer simulation methods for determining patient dose from dental radiography have demonstrated that patient risk from a two-film interproximal examination ranges from 1.1 X 10(-8) to 3.4 X 10(-7) using 90-kVp beams, depending on film speed, projection technique, and age and sex of the patient. Further, changing from a short-cone round-beam to a long-cone technique with rectangular collimation reduces risk by a factor of 2.9, independent of other factors.

  7. Conventional radiography and cross-sectional imaging when planning dental implants in the anterior edentulous mandible to support an overdenture: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Shelley, A M; Glenny, A-M; Goodwin, M; Brunton, P; Horner, K

    2014-01-01

    The objectives for this systematic review were to determine if the pre-operative availability of cross-sectional imaging, such as cone beam CT, has a diagnostic impact, therapeutic impact or impact on patients' outcome when placing two dental implants in the anterior mandible to support an overdenture. The Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register (CENTRAL), MEDLINE® and Embase were searched up to, and including, February 2013. Studies were considered eligible for inclusion if they compared the impact of conventional and cross-sectional imaging when placing dental implants in sites including the anterior mandible. An adapted quality assessment tool was used for the assessment of the risk of bias in included studies. Pooled quantitative analysis was not possible and, therefore, synthesis was qualitative. Of 2374 potentially eligible papers, 5 studies were included. Little can be determined from a synthesis of these studies because of their small number, clinical diversity and high risks of bias. Notwithstanding, it may be tentatively inferred that cross-sectional imaging has a therapeutic impact in the more challenging cases. In terms of impact, this review has found no evidence to support any specific imaging modality when planning dental implant placement in any region of the mouth. Therefore, those who argue that cross-sectional imaging should be used for the assessment of all dental implant sites are unsupported by evidence.

  8. INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY INSTRUCTOR'S GUIDE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Adult, Vocational, and Technical Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    THIS LABORATORY GUIDE WAS DEVELOPED FOR AN 80-HOUR COURSE IN INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY FOR HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES TRAINING TO BECOME BEGINNING RADIOGRAPHERS. IT IS USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH TWO OTHER VOLUMES--(1) INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY INSTRUCTOR'S GUIDE, AND (2) INUDSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY MANUAL. THE PROGRAM WAS DEVELOPED BY A COMMITTEE OF REPRESENTATIVES…

  9. Increasing mobile radiography productivity.

    PubMed

    Wong, Edward; Lung, Ngan Tsz; Ng, Kris; Jeor, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Mobile radiography using computed radiography (CR) cassettes is a common equipment combination with a workflow bottleneck limited by location of CR readers. Advent of direct digital radiography (DDR) mobile x-ray machines removes this limitation by immediate image review and quality control. Through the use of key performance indicators (KPIs), the increase in efficiency can be quantified.

  10. [The role of panoramic radiography in assessing the risk of injury to the inferior alveolar nerve before the extraction of mandibular wisdom teeth. The effect of the extent of root curvature and inferior alveolar canal-root tip overlap on the risk assessment].

    PubMed

    Szalma, József; Lempel, Edina; Csuta, Tamás; Bártfai, Dóra; Jeges, Sára; Olasz, Lajos

    2010-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine on panoramic radiographic images the effect of the distance between the root curvatures and inferior alveolar canal (IAC) root tip overlap on the surgeon's risk assessment predicting inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) paresthesia after lower third molar removal. In this case-control study 41 cases with postoperative IAN paresthesia and 359 controls without any postoperative complications were involved. Demographic data, root curvatures and the extent of IAC-root tip overlap were registered. The cases of major curvature--larger than 90 degrees (P=0.015; odds ratio [OR]=2.65), the "deepest" superimposition (P<0.001; OR=1.96), female gender (P=0.020) and increased age (P=0.008) were significantly associated with IAN paresthesia. Assessing root curvatures and the extent of IAC-root tip overlap for predicting IAN paresthesia after mandibular third molar removal should help to improve risk assessment.

  11. Virtual environments from panoramic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, David P.; Deacon, Andrew

    1998-12-01

    A number of recent projects have demonstrated the utility of Internet-enabled image databases for the documentation of complex, inaccessible and potentially hazardous environments typically encountered in the petrochemical and nuclear industries. Unfortunately machine vision and image processing techniques have not, to date, enabled the automatic extraction geometrical data from such images and thus 3D CAD modeling remains an expensive and laborious manual activity. Recent developments in panoramic image capture and presentation offer an alternative intermediate deliverable which, in turn, offers some of the benefits of a 3D model at a fraction of the cost. Panoramic image display tools such as Apple's QuickTime VR (QTVR) and Live Spaces RealVR provide compelling and accessible digital representations of the real world and justifiably claim to 'put the reality in Virtual Reality.' This paper will demonstrate how such technologies can be customized, extended and linked to facility management systems delivered over a corporate intra-net to enable end users to become familiar with remote sites and extract simple dimensional data. In addition strategies for the integration of such images with documents gathered from 2D or 3D CAD and Process and Instrumentation Diagrams (P&IDs) will be described as will techniques for precise 'As-Built' modeling using the calibrated images from which panoramas have been derived and the use of textures from these images to increase the realism of rendered scenes. A number of case studies relating to both nuclear and process engineering will demonstrate the extent to which such solution are scaleable in order to deal with the very large volumes of image data required to fully document the large, complex facilities typical of these industry sectors.

  12. Modeling analysis metrics for panoramic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furxhi, Orges; Driggers, Ronald G.; Preece, Bradley; Krapels, Keith

    2015-05-01

    Panoramic infrared imaging is relatively new and has many applications to include tower mounted security systems, shipboard protection, and platform situational awareness. In this paper, we review metrics and methods that can be used for analysis of requirements for an infrared panoramic imaging system for military vehicles. We begin with a broad view of general military requirements organized into three categories, survivability, mobility, and lethality. A few requirements for the sensor modes of operation across all categories are selected so that panoramic system design can address as many needs as possible, but with affordability applied to system design. Metrics and associated methods that can translate military operational requirements into panoramic imager requirements are discussed in detail in this paper.

  13. First Panoramic View from Comet Lander

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-13

    The Philae lander of Europe Rosetta mission has returned the first panoramic image from the surface of a comet. The unprocessed panorama from the lander CIVA-P camera shows a 360-degree view around the point of final touchdown.

  14. Endoscopic measurements using a panoramic annular lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, John A.; Matthys, Donald R.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this project was to design, build, demonstrate, and deliver a prototype system for making measurements within cavities. The system was to utilize structured lighting as the means for making measurements and was to rely on a stationary probe, equipped with a unique panoramic annular lens, to capture a cylindrical view of the illuminated cavity. Panoramic images, acquired with a digitizing camera and stored in a desk top computer, were to be linearized and analyzed by mouse-driven interactive software.

  15. Panoramic lens designed with transformation optics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huaping; Deng, Yangyang; Zheng, Bin; Li, Rujiang; Jiang, Yuyu; Dehdashti, Shahram; Xu, Zhiwei; Chen, Hongsheng

    2017-01-01

    The panoramic lens is a special kind of lens, which is applied to observe full view. In this letter, we theoretically present a panoramic lens (PL) using transformation optics method. The lens is designed with inhomogeneous and anisotropic constitutive parameters, which has the ability to gather light from all directions and confine light within the visual angle of observer. Simulation results validate our theoretical design. PMID:28059142

  16. Panoramic lens designed with transformation optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huaping; Deng, Yangyang; Zheng, Bin; Li, Rujiang; Jiang, Yuyu; Dehdashti, Shahram; Xu, Zhiwei; Chen, Hongsheng

    2017-01-01

    The panoramic lens is a special kind of lens, which is applied to observe full view. In this letter, we theoretically present a panoramic lens (PL) using transformation optics method. The lens is designed with inhomogeneous and anisotropic constitutive parameters, which has the ability to gather light from all directions and confine light within the visual angle of observer. Simulation results validate our theoretical design.

  17. Use of digital panoramic radiology in presurgical implant treatment planning to accurately assess bone density.

    PubMed

    Chugh, Niranjan Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Jayanta; Das, Samiran; Ghosh, Soumitra; Dutta, Kaushik; Goel, Preeti

    2016-08-01

    No cost-effective method of ascertaining bone density from 2-dimensional radiographic images is currently available for dental implants before surgery. The purpose of this in vivo study was to use digital panoramic radiology and dental computed tomography (CT) to evaluate the bone density of specific points in the jaw near the tooth-bearing areas. The objective was to determine whether digital panoramic radiology can be used in assessing bone density as an alternative to a more expensive and complex dental CT. This study involved determining bone densities at predetermined anatomic landmarks near tooth-bearing areas of the jaws of 20 participants, using digital panoramic radiology in gray-level scale with a lead step wedge. Subsequently, the bone densities of the same points were determined in Hounsfield units (Hu) with dental CT. The data collected after interpretation of the panoramic radiograph and CT were tabulated and analyzed statistically. Bone density measured using CT correlated with the first 3 steps of (A, B, and C) the digital scale of gray. Further analysis conducted using the Mann-Whitney U test showed a significant association between step A to detect D4 bone, step B to detect D3 bone, and step C to detect D2 type bone. The digital scale of gray obtained from a lead step wedge can be effectively used with digital orthopanoramic radiology to assess bone density before the placement of implants, but with certain restrictions. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Dental radiology for children

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    The benefit for the child from the judicious use of diagnostic dental radiography is improved dental health. The risk to the child from dental diagnostic radiation exposure appears to be extremely low. Despite the low risk, the dentist must minimize the child's exposure to ionizing radiation by using sound clinical judgment to determine what radiographs are necessary and to provide children with optimal protection from ionizing radiation.

  19. The implementation of digital sensors in maxillofacial radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Stelt, Paul F.

    2001-03-01

    Systems for intra-oral digital radiography in dentistry can be divided into two main groups: direct sensor systems and semi-direct or indirect sensor systems. Direct imaging is performed by a two-dimensional array of sensor elements. The size of a typical intra-oral CCD-sensor is approximately from 18 mm×24 mm to 30 mm×40 mm; the active area is somewhat smaller, because of the thickness of the packaging of the sensor. CCD-based imaging is now also available for panoramic and cephalometric radiography. Indirect (semi-direct) imaging is based on storage phosphor plates (SPP) imaging. The plate is positioned in the mouth of the patient behind the teeth, and exposed to radiation. The positioning of the sensor plate resembles very much the way conventional radiographic films are handled. SPP technology is also available for panoramic and cephalometric imaging. The purpose of radiography is to provide information to solve a particular diagnostic task. It is therefore very likely that the role of dedicated diagnostic software will become essential in the near future. The importance of dedicated software for diagnostic imaging will increase. As a result of worldwide research, more procedures will become available, for research as well as for use in general practice.

  20. Digital radiography in dentistry: a survey of Indiana dentists.

    PubMed

    Brian, J N; Williamson, G F

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the number of Indiana dental practices that utilize digital radiography and to identify the reasons for using or not using digital radiography. A questionnaire was sent to a random sample of 300 licensed dentists in the State of Indiana. Demographic, clinical and digital technology responses were obtained. The data were analysed using SPSS 12.0 (Statistical Package Social Sciences) software; t-tests and Pearson's chi(2) test were performed on several variables with significance levels set at P< 0.05. One hundred and fifty-two dental practices (51%) responded to the survey. Thirty dental practices (19.7%) used digital radiography in their office. Twenty-two (73%) of the dentists using digital radiography were general practitioners. The number of dentists in a practice was a significant factor in predicting the use of digital radiography (t=2.57, P=0.011). The results of this study indicate that digital radiography is more commonly used by general dentists in group practices.

  1. Effectiveness of the thyroid shield in dental radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Sikorski, P.A.; Taylor, K.W.

    1984-08-01

    The effectiveness of the thyroid shield in reducing patient exposure during routine dental radiographic examinations was studied. A nonscreen film and two film-screen combinations were used as dosimeters and to show the spatial distribution of x-ray exposure. The error in the absolute accuracy of the film dosimeter and the error in the reproducibility of the film-screen combinations were less than +/- 10%. Measurements of thyroid exposure and exposure distribution, with and without the shield, were made on a Rando phantom and on patients. In the phantom study, the reduction by the shield of exposure to the thyroid from primary beam and from scatter was found to be highly dependent on the position of the primary beam relative to the thyroid gland but independent of kVp. Exposure reduction by the shield varied from 5% to 56% for a complete-mouth survey, 2% to 18% for a bitewing survey, and 10% to 79% for a panoramic survey. In the patient study, thyroid skin exposures measured on adults were 33% to 84% lower in offices in which the shield was used as compared to offices in which it was not used. Thyroid skin exposures measured on children were 63% to 92% lower. In accordance with the ALARA principle, these results support the routine use of the thyroid shield for all dental radiography.

  2. Have panoramic indices the power to identify women with low BMD at the axial skeleton?

    PubMed

    Damilakis, John; Vlasiadis, Konstantinos

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether panoramic mandibular indices i.e. mandibular cortical width (MCW), alveolar bone resorption degree (M/M ratio) and panoramic mandibular index (PMI) can be used as pre-selection tests to identify women with low bone mineral density (BMD) at the axial skeleton. MCW, PMI and M/M ratio were measured on dental panoramic radiographs in a group of 151 postmenopausal women aged 38-80 years. BMD at the lumbar spine and hip was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. BMD values were categorized as normal, osteopenic or osteoporotic according to the WHO classification. ROC analysis was used to determine cut-off values for MCW. MCW performed better than PMI and M/M ratio in its power to differentiate women with osteopenia or osteoporosis from healthy subjects. Cut-off values for the MCW estimated to detect women with T-score < -1 and those with T-score ≤ -2.5 identified a total of 45% and 34% of subjects respectively. Sensitivity and specificity was found to be low ranging between 55 and 70 for both cut-off values. Panoramic indices appear to have limited power in their ability to identify women with low BMD at the axial skeleton.

  3. Panoramic view from the intersection of Flower and Chapman looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Panoramic view from the intersection of Flower and Chapman looking west ( Views 11,12,13 complete 360 degree Panoramic) - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Marion Branch, 1700 East 38th Street, Marion, Grant County, IN

  4. Panoramic view from the intersection of Flower and Chapman looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Panoramic view from the intersection of Flower and Chapman looking southwest ( Views 11,12,13 complete 360 degree Panoramic) - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Marion Branch, 1700 East 38th Street, Marion, Grant County, IN

  5. Panoramic view from the intersection of Flower and Chapman looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Panoramic view from the intersection of Flower and Chapman looking northeast ( Views 11,12,13 complete 360 degree Panoramic) - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Marion Branch, 1700 East 38th Street, Marion, Grant County, IN

  6. Panoramic thermal imaging: challenges and tradeoffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aburmad, Shimon

    2014-06-01

    Over the past decade, we have witnessed a growing demand for electro-optical systems that can provide continuous 3600 coverage. Applications such as perimeter security, autonomous vehicles, and military warning systems are a few of the most common applications for panoramic imaging. There are several different technological approaches for achieving panoramic imaging. Solutions based on rotating elements do not provide continuous coverage as there is a time lag between updates. Continuous panoramic solutions either use "stitched" images from multiple adjacent sensors, or sophisticated optical designs which warp a panoramic view onto a single sensor. When dealing with panoramic imaging in the visible spectrum, high volume production and advancement of semiconductor technology has enabled the use of CMOS/CCD image sensors with a huge number of pixels, small pixel dimensions, and low cost devices. However, in the infrared spectrum, the growth of detector pixel counts, pixel size reduction, and cost reduction is taking place at a slower rate due to the complexity of the technology and limitations caused by the laws of physics. In this work, we will explore the challenges involved in achieving 3600 panoramic thermal imaging, and will analyze aspects such as spatial resolution, FOV, data complexity, FPA utilization, system complexity, coverage and cost of the different solutions. We will provide illustrations, calculations, and tradeoffs between three solutions evaluated by Opgal: A unique 3600 lens design using an LWIR XGA detector, stitching of three adjacent LWIR sensors equipped with a low distortion 1200 lens, and a fisheye lens with a HFOV of 180º and an XGA sensor.

  7. The effects of image compression on quantitative measurements of digital panoramic radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Apaydın, Burcu; Yılmaz, Hasan-Hüseyin

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aims of this study were to explore how image compression affects density, fractal dimension, linear and angular measurements on digital panoramic images and assess inter and intra-observer repeatability of these measurements. Study Design: Sixty-one digital panoramic images in TIFF format (Tagged Image File Format) were compressed to JPEG (Joint Photographic Experts Group) images. Two observers measured gonial angle, antegonial angle, mandibular cortical width, coronal pulp width of maxillary and mandibular first molar, tooth length of maxillary and mandibular first molar on the left side of these images twice. Fractal dimension of the selected regions of interests were calculated and the density of each panoramic radiograph as a whole were also measured on TIFF and JPEG compressed images. Intra-observer and inter-observer consistency was evaluated with Cronbach’s alpha. Paired samples t-test and Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used to evaluate the difference between the measurements of TIFF and JPEG compressed images. Results: The repeatability of angular measurements had the highest Cronbach’s alpha value (0.997). There was statistically significant difference for both of the observers in mandibular cortical width (MCW) measurements (1st ob. p: 0.002; 2nd ob. p: 0.003), density (p<0.001) and fractal dimension (p<0.001) between TIFF and JPEG images. There was statistically significant difference for the first observer in antegonial angle (1st ob p< 0.001) and maxillary molar coronal pulp width (1st ob. p<0.001) between JPEG and TIFF files. Conclusions: The repeatability of angular measurements is better than linear measurements. Mandibular cortical width, fractal dimension and density are affected from compression. Observer dependent factors might also cause statistically significant differences between the measurements in TIFF and JPEG images. Key words:Digital panoramic radiography, image compression, linear measurements, angular measurements

  8. Portable digital device UHDTV panoramic image formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinov, I. S.; Lazarev, S. A.; Rubcov, K. A.; Maslakov, Y. N.

    2017-02-01

    Systems of panoramic photography and video are developed, as a rule, on the basis of an array of light-sensitive sensors, with different ways of positioning in space. The authors developed a high-quality portable system panoramic photo and video using a 12 light-sensitive sensors and the formation of the video standard Ultra HD 4K. According to the simulation results, it was found that the optimal arrangement of 12 the light-sensitive sensors in conjunction with lenses is their location in the center of the dodecahedron faces. In this case, part of the image formed on each photosensitive lens sensor is unique (not repeating other sensors) as part of the panorama of a regular pentagon. This design allows you to create a panorama of 360-degrees. The developed system is a panoramic photo and video, using PLD (programmable logic devices) and includes modules removal of distortions, masking, calibration, image formation on the sphere describing the dodecahedron and obtaining equidistant projection, modules and compression encoding an image. The article presents the basic elements of the developed system of panoramic photography and video.

  9. Panoramic View of Lander During Turn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 360-degree panoramic mosaic image composed of data from the hazard avoidance camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows a view of the lander from under the rover deck. The images were taken as the rover turned from its landing position 95 degrees toward the northwest side of the lander.

  10. Mobile Panoramic Video Applications for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Multisilta, Jari

    2014-01-01

    The use of videos on the internet has grown significantly in the last few years. For example, Khan Academy has a large collection of educational videos, especially on STEM subjects, available for free on the internet. Professional panoramic video cameras are expensive and usually not easy to carry because of the large size of the equipment.…

  11. Mobile Panoramic Video Applications for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Multisilta, Jari

    2014-01-01

    The use of videos on the internet has grown significantly in the last few years. For example, Khan Academy has a large collection of educational videos, especially on STEM subjects, available for free on the internet. Professional panoramic video cameras are expensive and usually not easy to carry because of the large size of the equipment.…

  12. High energy neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Gavron, A.; Morley, K.; Morris, C.; Seestrom, S.; Ullmann, J.; Yates, G.; Zumbro, J.

    1996-06-01

    High-energy spallation neutron sources are now being considered in the US and elsewhere as a replacement for neutron beams produced by reactors. High-energy and high intensity neutron beams, produced by unmoderated spallation sources, open potential new vistas of neutron radiography. The authors discuss the basic advantages and disadvantages of high-energy neutron radiography, and consider some experimental results obtained at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility at Los Alamos.

  13. Phase-contrast radiography.

    PubMed

    Gao, D; Pogany, A; Stevenson, A W; Wilkins, S W

    1998-01-01

    For the past 100 years, the paradigm for radiography has been premised on absorption as the sole means of contrast formation and on ray optics as the basis for image interpretation. A new conceptual approach to radiography has been developed that includes phase (ie, refractive) contrast and requires wave optics for proper treatment. This new approach greatly increases the amount of information that can be obtained with radiographic techniques and is particularly well suited to the imaging of soft tissue and of very small features in biologic samples. A key feature of the present technique of phase-contrast radiography is the use of a microfocus x-ray source about an order of magnitude (< or = 20 microm) smaller than that used in conventional radiography. Phase-contrast radiography offers a number of improvements over conventional radiography in a clinical setting, especially in soft-tissue imaging. These improvements include increased contrast resulting in improved visualization of anatomic detail, reduced absorbed dose to the patient, inherent image magnification and high spatial resolution, use of harder x rays, and relative ease of implementation. More technologically advanced detectors are currently being developed and commercialized, which will help fully realize the considerable potential of phase-contrast imaging.

  14. Free-focus radiography using conventional films: Radiation exposures in a simulated clinical study

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, T.W.; Randall, G.J.; Goldberg, A.J.

    1980-07-01

    This study compared air exposures during conventional dental and maxillofacial radiography and similar views using free-focus radiography with conventional image receptors. The results show that periapical type surveys on nonscreen film placed extraorally or in the buccal fold may be carried out with an exposure to the surface tissues, which is similar to or less than conventional dental radiography. Extraoral survey type radiographs of the jaws may be carried out with significantly less surface exposure than lateral oblique views of the jaws. The least exposure was required, when the film was placed in the buccla fold instead of against the face during free-focus radiography. The exposures with film screen combinations were reduced by an order of magnitude when compared to the nonscreen techniques. Proper filtration of the beam of the miniaturized x-ray machines radiography in dentistry may thus be desirable and applications in other parts of the body encouraged.

  15. The use of radiography in the diagnosis of oral conditions in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, W P; Drummond, B K; Brosnan, M G

    2015-12-01

    Radiography can serve as a useful aid in the diagnosis of numerous oral conditions, with a place in nearly all of the disciplines of dentistry. As such it can have a beneficial role in caring for the oral health of children and adolescents. The following review discusses the use of radiography in the diagnosis of oral conditions in children and adolescents, with particular reference to the diagnosis of dental caries, dental trauma, growth and development and in other dental scenarios, along with the importance of incidental findings. The risks associated with radiation exposure from the use of radiography are discussed, how these need to be balanced with the possible benefits associated with such use, as well as how risks could be minimised. Summary recommendations are also presented, providing an overview of the use of radiography for oral diagnosis in various clinical scenarios for children and adolescents.

  16. 8. VIEW OF RADIOGRAPHY EQUIPMENT, TEST METHODS INCLUDED RADIOGRAPHY AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF RADIOGRAPHY EQUIPMENT, TEST METHODS INCLUDED RADIOGRAPHY AND BETA BACKSCATTERING. (7/13/56) - Rocky Flats Plant, Non-Nuclear Production Facility, South of Cottonwood Avenue, west of Seventh Avenue & east of Building 460, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  17. Panoramic cockpit displays for tactical military cockpits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Mark; Huffman, David

    2010-04-01

    The F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) incorporates the latest technology for aerial warfighting. To support this aircraft's mission and to provide the pilot with the increased situational awareness needed in today's battlespace, a panoramic AMLCD was developed and is being deployed for the first time. This 20" by 8" display is the largest fielded to date in a tactical fighter. Key system innovations had to be employed to allow this technology to function in this demanding environment. Certain older generation aircraft are now considering incorporating a panoramic display to provide their crews with this level of increased capability. Key design issues that had to be overcome dealt with sunlight readability, vibration resistance, touchscreen operation, and reliability concerns to avoid single-point failures. A completely dual redundant system design had to be employed to ensure that the pilot would always have access to critical mission and flight data.

  18. Quality metric for spherical panoramic video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharchenko, Vladyslav; Choi, Kwang Pyo; Park, Jeong Hoon

    2016-09-01

    Virtual reality (VR)/ augmented reality (AR) applications allow users to view artificial content of a surrounding space simulating presence effect with a help of special applications or devices. Synthetic contents production is well known process form computer graphics domain and pipeline has been already fixed in the industry. However emerging multimedia formats for immersive entertainment applications such as free-viewpoint television (FTV) or spherical panoramic video require different approaches in content management and quality assessment. The international standardization on FTV has been promoted by MPEG. This paper is dedicated to discussion of immersive media distribution format and quality estimation process. Accuracy and reliability of the proposed objective quality estimation method had been verified with spherical panoramic images demonstrating good correlation results with subjective quality estimation held by a group of experts.

  19. Study of edge detection task in dental panoramic radiographs.

    PubMed

    Gráfová, L; Kasparová, M; Kakawand, S; Procházka, A; Dostálová, T

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is (1) to introduce a new approach for edge detection in orthopantograms (OPGs) and an improved automatic parameter selector for common edge detectors, (2) to present a comparison between our novel approach with common edge detectors and (3) to provide faster outputs without compromising quality. A new approach for edge detection based on statistical measures was introduced: (1) a set of N edge detection results is calculated from a given input image and a selected type of edge detector, (2) N correspondence maps are constructed from N edge detection results, (3) probabilities and average probabilities are computed, (4) an overall correspondence is evaluated for each correspondence map and (5) the correspondence map providing the best overall correspondence is taken as the result of edge detection procedure. A comparison with common edge detectors (the Roberts, Prewitt, Sobel, Laplacian of the Gaussian and Canny methods) with various parameter settings (304 combinations for each test image) was carried out. The methods were assessed objectively [edge mismatch error (EME), modified Hausdorff distance (MHD) and principal component analysis] and subjectively by experts in dentistry and based on time demands. The suitability of the new approach for edge detection in OPGs was confirmed by experts. The current conventional methods in edge detection in OPGs are inadequate (none of the tested methods reach an EME value or MHD value below 0.1). Our proposed approach for edge detection shows promising potential for its implementation in clinical dentistry. It enhances the accuracy of OPG interpretation and advances diagnosis and treatment planning.

  20. Study of edge detection task in dental panoramic radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Gráfová, L; Kašparová, M; Kakawand, S; Procházka, A; Dostálová, T

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is (1) to introduce a new approach for edge detection in orthopantograms (OPGs) and an improved automatic parameter selector for common edge detectors, (2) to present a comparison between our novel approach with common edge detectors and (3) to provide faster outputs without compromising quality. A new approach for edge detection based on statistical measures was introduced: (1) a set of N edge detection results is calculated from a given input image and a selected type of edge detector, (2) N correspondence maps are constructed from N edge detection results, (3) probabilities and average probabilities are computed, (4) an overall correspondence is evaluated for each correspondence map and (5) the correspondence map providing the best overall correspondence is taken as the result of edge detection procedure. A comparison with common edge detectors (the Roberts, Prewitt, Sobel, Laplacian of the Gaussian and Canny methods) with various parameter settings (304 combinations for each test image) was carried out. The methods were assessed objectively [edge mismatch error (EME), modified Hausdorff distance (MHD) and principal component analysis] and subjectively by experts in dentistry and based on time demands. The suitability of the new approach for edge detection in OPGs was confirmed by experts. The current conventional methods in edge detection in OPGs are inadequate (none of the tested methods reach an EME value or MHD value below 0.1). Our proposed approach for edge detection shows promising potential for its implementation in clinical dentistry. It enhances the accuracy of OPG interpretation and advances diagnosis and treatment planning. PMID:23640989

  1. Panoramic view of the Mexican Pacific Coastline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    In this scenic panoramic view, the orbiter tail points toward the Mexican Pacific coastline (18.0N, 103.0W) near the international resort of Acapulco on the nearly cloud free eastern Pacific Ocean. Almost all of southern Mexico can be seen from Puerto Vallarta in the north to the Isthmus of Tehuantepec in the south. The cloud covered Gulf of Mexico at the horizon contrasts sharply with the blue Pacific.

  2. [Dental pulp metastasis from oral squamous cell carcinoma: a case report and a review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Stefani, M; Angiero, F

    2006-02-01

    A 61-year-old man was seen in the Oral Pathology Department with a three-month history of right mandibular pain. Clinical examination revealed a 3 cm mass involving the body and the angle of the right site of the mandible and palpable masses in the neck. The dental panoramic radiography showed on the right a radiolucenT area surrounding the lower second molar, extending to the mandible angle. Additionally, chest radiograph and routine laboratory analysis results were unremarkable. An incisional biopsy of the area, revealed histologically a well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma and after few days, the patient received a right hemimandibulectomy with dissection of submandibular salivary gland and laterocervical lymph nodes on the same side. The histology of surgical material confirmed the diagnosis of a differentiated squamous cell carcinoma G1, homolateral diffusion in the mandible bone and metastasis to the dental pulp of the second lower molar tooth and to one of 18 lymph nodes dissected. In this report is described a very rare metastasis to the dental pulp and literature review, in which only fifteen other cases are reported.

  3. Digital radiography: update for oral health care workers.

    PubMed

    Noffke, C E E; Nzima, N; Chabikuli, N J

    2004-08-01

    Digital Radiography is an imaging system that does away with the use of films. It constitutes an advance in computer technology and has made a significant impact on the field of Maxillofacial- and Dental Radiology. This paper presents an overview of the basic concepts and applications of dental digital radiography and compares it with conventional film-based imaging. In addition, it provides a thorough understanding of the direct, semi-direct and indirect dental digital imaging systems with their advantages and disadvantages. Universal acceptance of digital radiographic imaging as a diagnostic tool makes it important for oral health care workers to understand the principles thereof and to master the techniques involved in acquiring a diagnosable digital radiographic image.

  4. Detecting ground moving objects using panoramic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fuyuan; Gu, Guohua; Wang, Jing

    2015-09-01

    The moving objects detection is an essential issue in many computer vision and video processing tasks. In this paper, a detecting moving objects method using a panoramic system is proposed. It can detect ground moving objects when the camera is rotated, so it can be called the moving objects detection in rotation (MODIR). The detection area and flexible of the panoramic system are be enhanced by MODIR. The background and moving objects are moving in image when the camera is rotated. Compare with the traditional methods, the aim of MODIR is to segment the isolated entities out according to the motions in the video whether imaging platform is moving or not. Firstly, the corresponding relations between the images captured from two different views is deduced from the multi-view geometric. The moving objects and stationary background in the images are distinguished by this corresponding relations. Secondly, the moving object detection framework base on multi-frame is established. This detection framework can reduce the impacts of the image matching error and cumulative error on the moving objects detection. In the experiment, an evaluation metrics method is used to compare the performance of MODIR with the traditional methods. And a lot of videos captured by the panoramic system are processed by MODIR to demonstrate its good performance in practice.

  5. Radiography of the Paranasal Sinuses

    MedlinePlus

    ... your back or over your lap. This head. Radiography of the paranasal sinuses apron will protect your ... face, especially when lowering his or her head. Radiography of sitting and others while you are standing. ...

  6. Can dental students be taught to use dental radiographs for osteoporosis screening?

    PubMed

    Shintaku, Werner Harumiti; Enciso, Reyes; Covington, John Stansill; Migliorati, Cesar Augusto

    2013-05-01

    This study investigated the possibility of teaching dental students to detect radiographic changes suggestive of osteoporosis. Twenty-five panoramic radiographs from dental school patients with a history of osteoporosis and radiographic changes suggestive of the disease and twenty-five normal panoramic radiographs were selected by a clinician from the database of the College of Dentistry, University of Tennessee Health Science Center. Twenty students were taught to use the mandibular cortical index (MCI) and detect changes suggestive of osteoporosis. Students also used a five-point scale to determine the diagnostic accuracy of panoramic images for osteoporosis. Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICCC) and Cronbach's alpha internal coefficiency statistical tests were used to evaluate interrater reliability among the twenty students and between the students and the radiologist. To test for differences in diagnosis between the gold standard (dental clinician) and the oral radiologist, we performed a McNemar's chi-square test for matched data. The interrater consistency was excellent for both the students (α=0.902) and between the students and the radiologist (α=0.909). The diagnostic accuracy of panoramic images was moderate (Az=0.81). No statistically significant difference between radiographic and clinical evaluations (McNemar's chi-square=3.063; p=0.0801) was observed. Teaching dental students to recognize radiographic changes suggestive of osteoporosis in routine panoramic radiographs should be emphasized to improve their awareness and identification of this disease.

  7. Real-time radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Bossi, R.H.; Oien, C.T.

    1981-02-26

    Real-time radiography is used for imaging both dynamic events and static objects. Fluorescent screens play an important role in converting radiation to light, which is then observed directly or intensified and detected. The radiographic parameters for real-time radiography are similar to conventional film radiography with special emphasis on statistics and magnification. Direct-viewing fluoroscopy uses the human eye as a detector of fluorescent screen light or the light from an intensifier. Remote-viewing systems replace the human observer with a television camera. The remote-viewing systems have many advantages over the direct-viewing conditions such as safety, image enhancement, and the capability to produce permanent records. This report reviews real-time imaging system parameters and components.

  8. Evaluation of Web-Based Interactive Instruction in Intraoral and Panoramic Radiographic Anatomy.

    PubMed

    Farkhondeh, Alireza; Geist, James R

    2015-07-01

    The objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of Web-based interactive modules in the instruction of dental hygiene students on intraoral and panoramic radiographic landmarks. The experimental group studied these landmarks as presented on interactive Web-based modules instead of in classroom presentations. The control group (the previous year's class) received instruction in the traditional classroom format. The outcomes measures included quizzes, examinations and an in-class project. Independent samples t-tests compared the scores of the two groups. A survey was administered to the experimental group to determine their perceptions of instruction with the modules. There was no significant difference in scores between the two groups on the project (p = .926) or the intraoral quiz and exam scores (p = .1 22), but the experimental group scored significantly lower on the panoramic outcomes (p = .039). Only 26% of the students preferred computer-assisted instruction to classroom instruction. The narration and interactive quizzes in the intraoral module may have contributed to the similar performance of the experimental and control groups, while their absence may have adversely affected the effectiveness of the panoramic module.

  9. Subtraction Radiography for the Diagnosis of Bone Lesions in Dogs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-31

    AD-A142 726 SUBTRACTION RADIOGRAPHY FOR THE DIAGNOSIS OF BONE • LESIONS IN DOGS (U) ARMY INST OF DENTAL RESEARCH WASHINGTON DC M P RETHMRN ET AL. 31...11sk01 o -py- Rt one. Lesions in Dogs 11,4 -OG. 3(0?NUL AU THOR~q caraACT 0R GRANT NUMBER,&) * * __ M.P. Rethman, U.E. Ruttiman, R.B. O’Neal, R.I...research article titled "Subtraction Radiography for the Diagnosis of Bone Lesions in Dogs " solely to the Journal of Periodontology for review and

  10. Phosphor plate radiography: an integral component of the filmless practice.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Scott

    2010-11-01

    The federal government has mandated that all dental and medical patient records be electronic in 3 years. Practices using film radiography will be unable to comply with this mandate. PSP radiography is not only a surprisingly convenient way to transition from film to digital imaging, it can also greatly enhance the practice's productivity, profitability, and patient satisfaction. Modern, forward-thinking practices will want to take full advantage of PSP's superiority by making this transition now rather than waiting until they are forced to.

  11. Investigation of prevalence and characteristics of mesiodens in a non-syndromic 11256 dental outpatients.

    PubMed

    Colak, H; Uzgur, R; Tan, E; Hamidi, M M; Turkal, M; Colak, T

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the prevalence of mesiodens in a sample of Turkish dental patients and their distribution among genders. A retrospective study was performed using panoramic radiography of 11256 patients, who ranged in age from 15 to 55 years old. All data (age, sex and or syndrome) were obtained from the patient files and analyzed for mesiodens. Statistical evaluation of the presence of mesiodens related to gender was performed by the Pearson chi-squared test. Mesiodens was detected in 15 subjects (0.13%). The prevalence of mesiodens for females and males was 0.20% and 0.057%, respectively (p = 0.037). The most commonly observed mesiodens was maxillary canine-like type (60%). Most of the mesiodens (67%) were found in the vertical position, followed by horizontal position (33%). The age and sex distribution, number of mesiodens per patient, shape, direction, size, and effect on permanent maxillary incisors are also presented in this study. The most common complication caused by mesiodens was midline of the permanent incisors. Mesiodens is an uncommon developmental anomaly in Turkish dental patients. Early diagnosis allows the most appropriate treatment, often reducing the extent of surgery, orthodontic treatment and possible complications.

  12. Transitioning to digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Drost, Wm Tod

    2011-04-01

    To describe the different forms of digital radiography (DR), image file formats, supporting equipment and services required for DR, storage of digital images, and teleradiology. Purchasing a DR system is a major investment for a veterinary practice. Types of DR systems include computed radiography, charge coupled devices, and direct or indirect DR. Comparison of workflow for analog and DR is presented. On the surface, switching to DR involves the purchase of DR acquisition hardware. The X-ray machine, table and grids used in analog radiography are the same for DR. Realistically, a considerable infrastructure supports the image acquisition hardware. This infrastructure includes monitors, computer workstations, a robust computer network and internet connection, a plan for storage and back up of images, and service contracts. Advantages of DR compared with analog radiography include improved image quality (when used properly), ease of use (more forgiving to the errors of radiographic technique), speed of making a complete study (important for critically ill patients), fewer repeat radiographs, less time looking for imaging studies, less physical storage space, and the ability to easily send images for consultation. With an understanding of the infrastructure requirements, capabilities and limitations of DR, an informed veterinary practice should be better able to make a sound decision about transitioning to DR. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2011.

  13. Low-cost panoramic infrared surveillance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kecskes, Ian; Engel, Ezra; Wolfe, Christopher M.; Thomson, George

    2017-05-01

    A nighttime surveillance concept consisting of a single surface omnidirectional mirror assembly and an uncooled Vanadium Oxide (VOx) longwave infrared (LWIR) camera has been developed. This configuration provides a continuous field of view spanning 360° in azimuth and more than 110° in elevation. Both the camera and the mirror are readily available, off-the-shelf, inexpensive products. The mirror assembly is marketed for use in the visible spectrum and requires only minor modifications to function in the LWIR spectrum. The compactness and portability of this optical package offers significant advantages over many existing infrared surveillance systems. The developed system was evaluated on its ability to detect moving, human-sized heat sources at ranges between 10 m and 70 m. Raw camera images captured by the system are converted from rectangular coordinates in the camera focal plane to polar coordinates and then unwrapped into the users azimuth and elevation system. Digital background subtraction and color mapping are applied to the images to increase the users ability to extract moving items from background clutter. A second optical system consisting of a commercially available 50 mm f/1.2 ATHERM lens and a second LWIR camera is used to examine the details of objects of interest identified using the panoramic imager. A description of the components of the proof of concept is given, followed by a presentation of raw images taken by the panoramic LWIR imager. A description of the method by which these images are analyzed is given, along with a presentation of these results side-by-side with the output of the 50 mm LWIR imager and a panoramic visible light imager. Finally, a discussion of the concept and its future development are given.

  14. Apollo 11 lunar surface panoramic views

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    An Apollo 11 panoramic view of two areas of the lunar surface near where the Apollo 11 Lunar Module (LM) touched down on July 20, 1969. The upper view shows tiny rocks and craters on the surface, looking east. The view in the bottom panorama is focused on a partially shaded crater some 200 feet east of the Apollo 11 LM. The object in the foreground, casting a shadow toward the photo's left corner, is the Apollo 11 35mm stereo close-up camera.

  15. Apollo 11 lunar surface panoramic views

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Three panoramic views of the vicinity of the lunar surface where the Apollo 11 lunar module touched down on July 20, 1969. The top view is looking northwest, revealing many tiny rocks and craters; the center view is looking north, with Lunar Module (LM) leg in right edge of photo and large LM shadow at left; and the bottom view is looking south. The bottom view shows a portion of the LM, most conspicuously the ladder which Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. used to descend to the lunar surface after egressing the LM. Heavy shadow cast by the LM is visible in the bottom view.

  16. Endoscopic inspection using a panoramic annular lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, John A.; Matthys, Donald R.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this one year study was to design, build, and demonstrate a prototype system for cavity inspection. A cylindrical view of the cavity interior was captured in real time through a compound lens system consisting of a unique panoramic annular lens and a collector lens. Images, acquired with a digitizing camera and stored in a desktop computer, were manipulated using image processing software to aid in visual inspection and qualitative analysis. A detailed description of the lens and its applications is given.

  17. Forensic dental identification of casualties during Operation Desert Storm.

    PubMed

    Kessler, H P; Pemble, C W

    1993-06-01

    Forensic dental identification of casualties during Operation Desert Storm was performed at the Dover Port Mortuary, Dover Air Force Base, under the auspices of the Office of the Armed Forces Medical Examiner. A total of 251 dental identifications were attempted and 244 individuals were positively identified by dental comparison. The panoramic radiographs on file at the Central Panograph Storage Facility were the primary antemortem records utilized in establishing the dental identification. The inability to establish a positive dental identification was most often the result of a lack of available antemortem dental records.

  18. Radiation exposure to foetus and breasts from dental X-ray examinations: effect of lead shields.

    PubMed

    Kelaranta, Anna; Ekholm, Marja; Toroi, Paula; Kortesniemi, Mika

    2016-01-01

    Dental radiography may involve situations where the patient is known to be pregnant or the pregnancy is noticed after the X-ray procedure. In such cases, the radiation dose to the foetus, though low, needs to be estimated. Uniform and widely used guidance on dental X-ray procedures during pregnancy are presently lacking, the usefulness of lead shields is unclear and practices vary. Upper estimates of radiation doses to the foetus and breasts of the pregnant patient were estimated with an anthropomorphic female phantom in intraoral, panoramic, cephalometric and CBCT dental modalities with and without lead shields. The upper estimates of foetal doses varied from 0.009 to 6.9 μGy, and doses at the breast level varied from 0.602 to 75.4 μGy. With lead shields, the foetal doses varied from 0.005 to 2.1 μGy, and breast doses varied from 0.002 to 10.4 μGy. The foetal dose levels without lead shielding were <1% of the annual dose limit of 1 mSv for a member of the public. Albeit the relative shielding effect, the exposure-induced increase in the risk of breast cancer death for the pregnant patient (based on the breast dose only) and the exposure-induced increase in the risk of childhood cancer death for the unborn child are minimal, and therefore, need for foetal and breast lead shielding was considered irrelevant. Most important is that pregnancy is never a reason to avoid or to postpone a clinically justified dental radiographic examination.

  19. Radiation exposure to foetus and breasts from dental X-ray examinations: effect of lead shields

    PubMed Central

    Ekholm, Marja; Toroi, Paula; Kortesniemi, Mika

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Dental radiography may involve situations where the patient is known to be pregnant or the pregnancy is noticed after the X-ray procedure. In such cases, the radiation dose to the foetus, though low, needs to be estimated. Uniform and widely used guidance on dental X-ray procedures during pregnancy are presently lacking, the usefulness of lead shields is unclear and practices vary. Methods: Upper estimates of radiation doses to the foetus and breasts of the pregnant patient were estimated with an anthropomorphic female phantom in intraoral, panoramic, cephalometric and CBCT dental modalities with and without lead shields. Results: The upper estimates of foetal doses varied from 0.009 to 6.9 μGy, and doses at the breast level varied from 0.602 to 75.4 μGy. With lead shields, the foetal doses varied from 0.005 to 2.1 μGy, and breast doses varied from 0.002 to 10.4 μGy. Conclusions: The foetal dose levels without lead shielding were <1% of the annual dose limit of 1 mSv for a member of the public. Albeit the relative shielding effect, the exposure-induced increase in the risk of breast cancer death for the pregnant patient (based on the breast dose only) and the exposure-induced increase in the risk of childhood cancer death for the unborn child are minimal, and therefore, need for foetal and breast lead shielding was considered irrelevant. Most important is that pregnancy is never a reason to avoid or to postpone a clinically justified dental radiographic examination. PMID:26313308

  20. Mars Cameras Make Panoramic Photography a Snap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    If you wish to explore a Martian landscape without leaving your armchair, a few simple clicks around the NASA Web site will lead you to panoramic photographs taken from the Mars Exploration Rovers, Spirit and Opportunity. Many of the technologies that enable this spectacular Mars photography have also inspired advancements in photography here on Earth, including the panoramic camera (Pancam) and its housing assembly, designed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Cornell University for the Mars missions. Mounted atop each rover, the Pancam mast assembly (PMA) can tilt a full 180 degrees and swivel 360 degrees, allowing for a complete, highly detailed view of the Martian landscape. The rover Pancams take small, 1 megapixel (1 million pixel) digital photographs, which are stitched together into large panoramas that sometimes measure 4 by 24 megapixels. The Pancam software performs some image correction and stitching after the photographs are transmitted back to Earth. Different lens filters and a spectrometer also assist scientists in their analyses of infrared radiation from the objects in the photographs. These photographs from Mars spurred developers to begin thinking in terms of larger and higher quality images: super-sized digital pictures, or gigapixels, which are images composed of 1 billion or more pixels. Gigapixel images are more than 200 times the size captured by today s standard 4 megapixel digital camera. Although originally created for the Mars missions, the detail provided by these large photographs allows for many purposes, not all of which are limited to extraterrestrial photography.

  1. Comparative analysis of the gonial angle on lateral cephalometric radiographs and panoramic radiographs.

    PubMed

    Araki, Masao; Kiyosaki, Takeshi; Sato, Mai; Kohinata, Kiyomi; Matsumoto, Kunihito; Honda, Kazuya

    2015-01-01

    We measured the gonial angle (GA) on panoramic radiography (PR) and analyzed the correlation between the GA on PR and lateral cephalometric radiography (LCR). In total, 49 PR films and LCR films from dentate young adults were evaluated. Orthodontists plotted four points (articulare, menton, posterior gonion, and lower gonion) on the PR and carefully traced them. Using a protractor, two radiologists measured the GA on LCR images. A simultaneous experimental study of two dry skulls was performed to compare the GA on LCR and PR. The GA was slightly smaller on the PR of the dry mandible than on the LCR and tended to decrease continuously with magnitude toward the Frankfort horizontal plane. The mean GA was 115.1 ± 5.2° on PR and 122.2 ± 6.4° on the LCR. The values were highly correlated (Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient, 0.801). The GA on PR was nonsignificantly smaller than that measured on LCR. The difference may be due to head position, the inclination angle of the mandibular body, and/or the direction of the incident X-ray beam.

  2. Apparatus for proton radiography

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Ronald L.

    1976-01-01

    An apparatus for effecting diagnostic proton radiography of patients in hospitals comprises a source of negative hydrogen ions, a synchrotron for accelerating the negative hydrogen ions to a predetermined energy, a plurality of stations for stripping extraction of a radiography beam of protons, means for sweeping the extracted beam to cover a target, and means for measuring the residual range, residual energy, or percentage transmission of protons that pass through the target. The combination of information identifying the position of the beam with information about particles traversing the subject and the back absorber is performed with the aid of a computer to provide a proton radiograph of the subject. In an alternate embodiment of the invention, a back absorber comprises a plurality of scintillators which are coupled to detectors.

  3. Forensic radiography: an overview.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, April

    2010-01-01

    Perhaps the first instance of forensic radiography occurred in the 1890s when Professor AW Wright of Yale University tested Wilhelm Roentgen's newly discovered x-ray photography on a deceased rabbit. Of interest were small, round objects inside the rabbit that appeared as dark spots on the positive film. The objects were extracted and identified as bullets, thereby helping to determine the cause of the rabbit's death. In the years since Roentgen's discovery, the use of radiography and other medical imaging specialties to aid in investigating civil and criminal matters has increased as investigators realize how radiologic technology can yield information that otherwise is unavailable. Radiologic technologists can play a key role in forensic investigations.

  4. Quantitative film radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Devine, G.; Dobie, D.; Fugina, J.; Hernandez, J.; Logan, C.; Mohr, P.; Moss, R.; Schumacher, B.; Updike, E.; Weirup, D.

    1991-02-26

    We have developed a system of quantitative radiography in order to produce quantitative images displaying homogeneity of parts. The materials that we characterize are synthetic composites and may contain important subtle density variations not discernible by examining a raw film x-radiograph. In order to quantitatively interpret film radiographs, it is necessary to digitize, interpret, and display the images. Our integrated system of quantitative radiography displays accurate, high-resolution pseudo-color images in units of density. We characterize approximately 10,000 parts per year in hundreds of different configurations and compositions with this system. This report discusses: the method; film processor monitoring and control; verifying film and processor performance; and correction of scatter effects.

  5. Cosmic Ray Scattering Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    Cosmic ray muons are ubiquitous, are highly penetrating, and can be used to measure material densities by either measuring the stopping rate or by measuring the scattering of transmitted muons. The Los Alamos team has studied scattering radiography for a number of applications. Some results will be shown of scattering imaging for a range of practical applications, and estimates will be made of the utility of scattering radiography for nondestructive assessments of large structures and for geological surveying. Results of imaging the core of the Toshiba Nuclear Critical Assembly (NCA) Reactor in Kawasaki, Japan and simulations of imaging the damaged cores of the Fukushima nuclear reactors will be presented. Below is an image made using muons of a core configuration for the NCA reactor.

  6. Biomedical radiography: radiation protection and safety. (latest citations from the NTIS data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the safety of biomedical radiography. Radiation protection methods and techniques are described for both patients and operators. Safety techniques for dental radiology, routine x-rays, radiotherapy, thoracic radiography and other radiology procedures are included. Radiation exposure limits for patients and healthcare workers are defined. (Contains a minimum of 247 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  7. Digital radiography in space.

    PubMed

    Hart, Rob; Campbell, Mark R

    2002-06-01

    With the permanent habitation of the International Space Station, the planning of longer duration exploration missions, and the possibility of space tourism, it is likely that digital radiography will be needed in the future to support medical care in space. Ultrasound is currently the medical imaging modality of choice for spaceflight. Digital radiography in space is limited because of prohibitive launch costs (in the region of $20,000/kg) that severely restrict the volume, weight, and power requirements of medical care hardware. Technological increases in radiography, a predicted ten-fold decrease in future launch costs, and an increasing clinical need for definitive medical care in space will drive efforts to expand the ability to provide medical care in space including diagnostic imaging. Normal physiological responses to microgravity, in conjunction with the high-risk environment of spaceflight, increase the risk of injury and could imply an extended recovery period for common injuries. The advantages of gravity on Earth, such as the stabilization of patients undergoing radiography and the drainage of fluids, which provide radiographic contrast, are unavailable in space. This creates significant difficulties in patient immobilization and radiographic positioning. Gravity-dependent radiological signs, such as lipohemarthrosis in knee and shoulder trauma, air or fluid levels in pneumoperitoneum, pleural effusion, or bowel obstruction, and the apical pleural edge in pneumothorax become unavailable. Impaired healing processes such as delayed callus formation following fracture will have implications on imaging, and recovery time lines are unknown. The confined nature of spacecraft and the economic impossibility of launching lead-based personal protective equipment present significant challenges to crew radiation safety. A modified, free-floating radiographic C-arm device equipped with a digital detector and utilizing teleradiology support is proposed as a

  8. Patient care in radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, R.A.; McCloskey, E.D.

    1989-01-01

    This book focuses on patient care procedures for radiographers. The authors focus on the role of the radiographer as a member of the health care team. The authors report on such topics as communication in patient care: safety, medico-legal considerations, transfer and positioning; physical needs; infection control; medication; CPR standards, acute situations; examination of the GI tract; contrast media; special imaging techniques and bedside radiography.

  9. Particle Beam Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peach, Ken; Ekdahl, Carl

    2014-02-01

    Particle beam radiography, which uses a variety of particle probes (neutrons, protons, electrons, gammas and potentially other particles) to study the structure of materials and objects noninvasively, is reviewed, largely from an accelerator perspective, although the use of cosmic rays (mainly muons but potentially also high-energy neutrinos) is briefly reviewed. Tomography is a form of radiography which uses multiple views to reconstruct a three-dimensional density map of an object. There is a very wide range of applications of radiography and tomography, from medicine to engineering and security, and advances in instrumentation, specifically the development of electronic detectors, allow rapid analysis of the resultant radiographs. Flash radiography is a diagnostic technique for large high-explosive-driven hydrodynamic experiments that is used at many laboratories. The bremsstrahlung radiation pulse from an intense relativistic electron beam incident onto a high-Z target is the source of these radiographs. The challenge is to provide radiation sources intense enough to penetrate hundreds of g/cm2 of material, in pulses short enough to stop the motion of high-speed hydrodynamic shocks, and with source spots small enough to resolve fine details. The challenge has been met with a wide variety of accelerator technologies, including pulsed-power-driven diodes, air-core pulsed betatrons and high-current linear induction accelerators. Accelerator technology has also evolved to accommodate the experimenters' continuing quest for multiple images in time and space. Linear induction accelerators have had a major role in these advances, especially in providing multiple-time radiographs of the largest hydrodynamic experiments.

  10. Summary of: radiation protection in dental X-ray surgeries--still rooms for improvement.

    PubMed

    Walker, Anne

    2013-03-01

    To illustrate the authors' experience in the provision of radiation protection adviser (RPA)/medical physics expert (MPE) services and critical examination/radiation quality assurance (QA) testing, to demonstrate any continuing variability of the compliance of X-ray sets with existing guidance and of compliance of dental practices with existing legislation. Data was collected from a series of critical examination and routine three-yearly radiation QA tests on 915 intra-oral X-ray sets and 124 panoramic sets. Data are the result of direct measurements on the sets, made using a traceably calibrated Unfors Xi meter. The testing covered the measurement of peak kilovoltage (kVp); filtration; timer accuracy and consistency; X-ray beam size; and radiation output, measured as the entrance surface dose in milliGray (mGy) for intra-oral sets and dose-area product (DAP), measured in mGy.cm(2) for panoramic sets. Physical checks, including mechanical stability, were also included as part of the testing process. The Health and Safety Executive has expressed concern about the poor standards of compliance with the regulations during inspections at dental practices. Thirty-five percent of intra-oral sets exceeded the UK adult diagnostic reference level on at least one setting, as did 61% of those with child dose settings. There is a clear advantage of digital radiography and rectangular collimation in dose terms, with the mean dose from digital sets 59% that of film-based sets and a rectangular collimator 76% that of circular collimators. The data shows the unrealised potential for dose saving in many digital sets and also marked differences in dose between sets. Provision of radiation protection advice to over 150 general dental practitioners raised a number of issues on the design of surgeries with X-ray equipment and critical examination testing. There is also considerable variation in advice given on the need (or lack of need) for room shielding. Where no radiation protection

  11. Radiation protection in dental X-ray surgeries--still rooms for improvement.

    PubMed

    Hart, G; Dugdale, M

    2013-03-01

    To illustrate the authors' experience in the provision of radiation protection adviser (RPA)/medical physics expert (MPE) services and critical examination/radiation quality assurance (QA) testing, to demonstrate any continuing variability of the compliance of X-ray sets with existing guidance and of compliance of dental practices with existing legislation. Data was collected from a series of critical examination and routine three-yearly radiation QA tests on 915 intra-oral X-ray sets and 124 panoramic sets. Data are the result of direct measurements on the sets, made using a traceably calibrated Unfors Xi meter. The testing covered the measurement of peak kilovoltage (kVp); filtration; timer accuracy and consistency; X-ray beam size; and radiation output, measured as the entrance surface dose in milliGray (mGy) for intra-oral sets and dose-area product (DAP), measured in mGy.cm(2) for panoramic sets. Physical checks, including mechanical stability, were also included as part of the testing process. The Health and Safety Executive has expressed concern about the poor standards of compliance with the regulations during inspections at dental practices. Thirty-five percent of intra-oral sets exceeded the UK adult diagnostic reference level on at least one setting, as did 61% of those with child dose settings. There is a clear advantage of digital radiography and rectangular collimation in dose terms, with the mean dose from digital sets 59% that of film-based sets and a rectangular collimator 76% that of circular collimators. The data shows the unrealised potential for dose saving in many digital sets and also marked differences in dose between sets. Provision of radiation protection advice to over 150 general dental practitioners raised a number of issues on the design of surgeries with X-ray equipment and critical examination testing. There is also considerable variation in advice given on the need (or lack of need) for room shielding. Where no radiation protection

  12. Relationship between dental disease and radiation necrosis of the mandible

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, C.G.; Daly, T.E.; Zimmerman, S.O.

    1980-02-01

    Preirradiation panoramic radiographs of forty-six dentate patients were examined for the presence of significant dental disease. Evidence of a positive association between dental disease present before radiation therapy and subsequent necrosis of the mandible was found leading to a recommendation that significant disease be eradicated before irradiation of oral tissues. Considerable suffering results from bone necrosis, which can be reduced by careful and rational dental diagnosis and treatment.

  13. Correlation of the Radiographic and Morphological Features of the Dental Follicle of Third Molars with Incomplete Root Formation

    PubMed Central

    de OLIVEIRA, David Moraes; de Souza ANDRADE, Emanuel Sávio; da SILVEIRA, Márcia Maria Fonseca; CAMARGO, Igor Batista

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the correlation of the radiographic and morphological features of the dental follicle of unerupted third molars with incomplete root formation. A cross-sectional study was carried out with 56 patients (105 teeth) aged 13 to 24 years. Panoramic radiography was used to determine the stage of root formation to locate and measure pericoronal radiolucency. The width of the dental follicle ranged from 0.0 to 4.0 mm, the distal face being the one most frequently involved, and stage 7 of root formation showing the highest incidence. An inactive enamel reduced epithelium and inactive epithelium remnant also showed a high incidence. Dense connective tissue showed a high incidence, chronic inflammation was infrequent and calcification was a common finding. There was a significant association between the progression of the rhizogenesis and the transformation of the enamel reduced epithelium into a stratified squamous epithelium. No significant association was found between rhizogenesis and the other morphological findings or between the latter and the width of the pericoronal space. It was concluded that there was no clinically significant correlation between the radiographic and morphological features. Every asymptomatic unerupted third molar should be followed up and the follicular tissue analyzed. PMID:18311329

  14. Real-time panoramic of multiple sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauvais, Jason R.

    2008-04-01

    The current state of technology limits the spectral sensitivity and field of view of any single sensor. To compensate for this limitation, singular sensors are configured in groupings of varying sensor types. In systems utilizing multiple sensors, operators can become overwhelmed with data. The effectiveness of these new multi-sensor systems requires the construction of an environment that optimizes the delivery of maximum intelligence to the operator so as to provide as much information about the environment as possible. GE Fanuc / Octec has developed such an environment; a panoramic, near-immersive visualization tool that is intuitive to use and seamlessly integrates multiple sensors into natural view with important intelligence information retained and enhanced. We will discuss methods to generate and inject metadata such as automatic detection and tracking of possible threats and the fusing of multi-spectral streams into this environment significantly raising the level of situational awareness for the operator.

  15. Radiographic Assessment of Dental Maturation in Children With Dental Agenesis.

    PubMed

    Medina, Aida Carolina; Pozo, Rodrigo Del; de Cedres, Lucila Blanco

    Dental agenesis is the most common developmental anomaly in humans, frequently associated with disorders in dental development and maturation. The purpose of this study is to determine radiographic variations in dental maturation in a group of Venezuelan children with dental agenesis. 1,188 panoramic radiographs, from healthy patients ages 5 to 12 years old were studied for agenesis of permanent teeth. Dental maturation was assessed by relative eruption and dental age according to Nolla, comparing children affected with dental agenesis to a stratified control group selected from the same population, excluding children with premature loss of primary teeth in the left quadrants and unclear radiographs. Descriptive analysis, and differences between means and medians (Student t test, Kruskall-Wallis p=0.05) were performed. Medians for Nolla stages were similar between groups, with delay in tooth formation in the agenesis group for second molars (p<0.05) and maxillary lateral incisors and second premolars. Dental age was significantly underestimated for both groups, -0.89 (±0.78) for the control group and -1.20 (±0.95) for the study group. Tooth eruption was similar between groups. Dental age was significantly delayed in Venezuelan children with dental agenesis, with variable significance for tooth formation of studied teeth.

  16. Lower Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Lower GI Tract Lower gastrointestinal tract radiography ... GI Tract Radiography? What is Lower GI Tract X-ray Radiography (Barium Enema)? Lower gastrointestinal (GI) tract radiography, ...

  17. [Metric and angular variables of the mandibular ramus on panoramic radiographs, as indicators for chronologic age].

    PubMed

    Espina-Fereira, Angela; Ortega, Ana Isabel; Barrios, Fernando Alonso; Maldonado, Yadelsy Jackelina; Fereira, José Luis

    2007-12-01

    This paper had as goals to identify the presence of age indicators in the mandibular ramus and to study their applicability in estimating the chronological age of children between the ages of 6 and 12 years. For this, a sample of 128 individuals (70 males and 58 females) was selected, all without chronic or acute sicknesses. An evaluation was made of the metric and angular variables of the mandibular ramus on panoramic radiographs of the oral cavity. The Greulich-Pyle method was applied to estimate the skeletal age, and the Demirjian et al. method was applied to estimate the dental age. A positive correlation, statistically significant, could be observed between the metric variables studied and the chronological age; nevertheless, the angular variables did not show correlation with the chronological age. Regression models were built using metric variables of the mandibular ramus in order to estimate the age, which made a significant contribution to the calculation of the age. A consistent subestimation of the skeletal age and an overestimation of the dental age were found in both sexes. It was evident that a combination of the dental age, the skeletal age and the metric variables obtained in the mandibular ramus, increases the precision for calculating the chronological age, when compared to separate-made estimations of the dental and skeletal age. The proposed regression models can be used for estimating the age of cadavers in advanced states of decomposition and in living individuals without valid identification documents.

  18. Neutron Induced Beta Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Shaikh, A. M.; Shylaja, D.

    2011-07-15

    In the present paper we give a new methodology named, 'neutron induced beta radiography-NIBR' which makes use of neutron activated Dy or In foils as source of (3-radiation. Radiographs are obtained with an aluminium cassette containing image plate, a sample under inspection and the activated Dy or In foil kept in tight contact. The sensitivity of the technique to thickness was evaluated for different materials in the form of step wedges. Some radiographs are presented to demonstrate potential of method to inspect thin samples.

  19. Student Incivility in Radiography Education.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kevin R

    2017-07-01

    To examine student incivility in radiography classrooms by exploring the prevalence of uncivil behaviors along with the classroom management strategies educators use to manage and prevent classroom disruptions. A survey was designed to collect data on the severity and frequency of uncivil student behaviors, classroom management strategies used to address minor and major behavioral issues, and techniques to prevent student incivility. The participants were educators in radiography programs accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology. Findings indicated that severe uncivil student behaviors in radiography classrooms do not occur as often as behaviors classified as less severe. Radiography educators in this study used a variety of strategies and techniques to manage and prevent student incivility; however, radiography educators who received formal training in classroom management reported fewer incidents of student incivility than those who had not received formal training. The participants in this study took a proactive approach to addressing severe behavioral issues in the classroom. Many radiography educators transition from the clinical environment to the classroom setting with little to no formal training in classroom management. Radiography educators are encouraged to attend formal training sessions to learn how to manage the higher education classroom effectively. Student incivility is present in radiography classrooms. This study provides a foundation for future research on incivility. ©2017 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  20. Infraocclusion: Dental development and associated dental variations in singletons and twins.

    PubMed

    Odeh, Ruba; Townsend, Grant; Mihailidis, Suzanna; Lähdesmäki, Raija; Hughes, Toby; Brook, Alan

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of selected dental variations in association with infraocclusion, as well as determining the effects of infraocclusion on dental development and tooth size, in singletons and twins. Two samples were analysed. The first sample comprised 1454 panoramic radiographs of singleton boys and girls aged 8-11 years. The second sample comprised dental models of 202 pairs of monozygotic and dizygotic twins aged 8-11 years. Adobe Photoshop CS5 was used to construct reference lines and measure the extent of infraocclusion (in mm) of primary molars on the panoramic radiographs and on 2D images obtained from the dental models. The panoramic radiographs were examined for the presence of selected dental variations and to assess dental development following the Demirjian and Willems systems. The twins' dental models were measured to assess mesiodistal crown widths. In the singleton sample there was a significant association of canines in an altered position during eruption and the lateral incisor complex (agenesis and/or small tooth size) with infraocclusion (P<0.001), but there was no significant association between infraocclusion and agenesis of premolars. Dental age assessment revealed that dental development was delayed in individuals with infraocclusion compared to controls. The primary mandibular canines were significantly smaller in size in the infraoccluded group (P<0.05). The presence of other dental variations in association with infraocclusion, as well as delayed dental development and reduced tooth size, suggests the presence of a pleiotropic effect. The underlying aetiological factors may be genetic and/or epigenetic. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. 63. PANORAMIC VIEW OF HEADWORKS FROM WEST SIDE OF RIVER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. PANORAMIC VIEW OF HEADWORKS FROM WEST SIDE OF RIVER, LOOKING UPSTREAM, Prints No. 173, 174 and 175, November 1903 - Electron Hydroelectric Project, Along Puyallup River, Electron, Pierce County, WA

  2. 19. PANORAMIC VIEW OF RADAR SITE, CONTROL ROOM, AND HELIPORT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. PANORAMIC VIEW OF RADAR SITE, CONTROL ROOM, AND HELIPORT, LOOKING WEST-SOUTHWEST Everett Weinreb, photographer, March 1988 - Los Pinetos Nike Missile Site, Santa Clara Road, Los Angeles National Forest, Sylmar, Los Angeles County, CA

  3. Panoramic view from bluff south of Grand Coulee Dam; this ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Panoramic view from bluff south of Grand Coulee Dam; this segment of the panorama shows the westernmost extend of Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake and part of Grand Coulee Dam, looking north. - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  4. 36. Panoramic shot from atop Power Plant, Coal Testing Laboratory ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. Panoramic shot from atop Power Plant, Coal Testing Laboratory (left), Aerial Tramway Loading Terminal (center), and Huber Breaker (right) Photograph taken by Joseph E.B. Elliot - Huber Coal Breaker, 101 South Main Street, Ashley, Luzerne County, PA

  5. 31. Panoramic shot, Huber Breaker (left), Retail Coal Storage Bins ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. Panoramic shot, Huber Breaker (left), Retail Coal Storage Bins (center), Boney Elevator (right) Photographs taken by Joseph E.B. Elliot - Huber Coal Breaker, 101 South Main Street, Ashley, Luzerne County, PA

  6. PANORAMIC VIEW OF SHIPYARD NO. 3, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. FIRST AID ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PANORAMIC VIEW OF SHIPYARD NO. 3, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. FIRST AID STATION AT CENTER LEFT AND FORGE SHOP AT RIGHT - Rosie the Riveter National Historical Park, Richmond Shipyard No. 3, Point Potrero, Richmond, Contra Costa County, CA

  7. 360-deg panoramic camera using a mirror rotation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakao, Toshiyasu; Kashitani, Atsushi

    2000-12-01

    In this paper, we describe a new panoramic camera that incorporates a 2-axes mirror rotation mechanism and image mosaicing software to get high-resolution panoramic images in a short time. The mirror is located in front of the camera via the mirror rotation mechanism to move the camera's view. Partial images taken with the mirror rotation are merged into a high-resolution panoramic image by mosaicing software. The 2-axes mirror rotation mechanism consist of a mirror pedestal and a cam. The image mosaicing software projects each partial image onto a projection surface around the rotation center of the mirror. In that process, the projection center is shifted from the original principal point of the lens or the viewpoint to the mirror rotation center, and the projection positions for each pixel of partial images are calculated by using the limiting point. With these features, our panoramic camera has four advantages: (1) accurate, continuous, high-resolution, large and endless (360 degrees wide) panoramic images; (2) short panoramic image acquisition time with fast mirror rotation; (3) small body size; and (4) endless (360 degrees wide) fast mirror rotation. We also describe its prototype and its application to the Internet broadcasting of a tennis game.

  8. Versatile 360-deg panoramic optical system for autonomous robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, George G.; Feldman, Sidney; Beckstead, Jeffrey A.; Nordhauser, Sidney R.

    1999-01-01

    Autonomous mobile robots require wide angle vision for navigation and threat detection and analysis, best served with full panoramic vision. The panoramic optical element is a unique inexpensive first surface reflective aspheric convex cone. This cone can be sized and configured for any vertical FOV desired. The cone acts as a negative optical element generating a panoramic virtual image. When this virtual image is viewed through a standard camera lens it produces at the lenses focal pane a panoramic toroidal image with a translational linearity of > 99 percent. One of three image transducers can be used to convert the toroidal panoramic image to a video signal. Raster scanned CCDs, radially scanned Vidicons and linear CCD arrays on a mechanically rotated state, each have their own particular advantage. Field object distances can be determined in two ways. If the robot is moving the range can be calculated by the size change of a field object versus the distance traversed in a specific time interval. By vertically displacing the panoramic camera by several inches a quasibinocular system is created and the range determined by simple math. Ranging thus produces the third dimension.

  9. Rank distributions: A panoramic macroscopic outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo I.; Cohen, Morrel H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a panoramic macroscopic outlook of rank distributions. We establish a general framework for the analysis of rank distributions, which classifies them into five macroscopic "socioeconomic" states: monarchy, oligarchy-feudalism, criticality, socialism-capitalism, and communism. Oligarchy-feudalism is shown to be characterized by discrete macroscopic rank distributions, and socialism-capitalism is shown to be characterized by continuous macroscopic size distributions. Criticality is a transition state between oligarchy-feudalism and socialism-capitalism, which can manifest allometric scaling with multifractal spectra. Monarchy and communism are extreme forms of oligarchy-feudalism and socialism-capitalism, respectively, in which the intrinsic randomness vanishes. The general framework is applied to three different models of rank distributions—top-down, bottom-up, and global—and unveils each model's macroscopic universality and versatility. The global model yields a macroscopic classification of the generalized Zipf law, an omnipresent form of rank distributions observed across the sciences. An amalgamation of the three models establishes a universal rank-distribution explanation for the macroscopic emergence of a prevalent class of continuous size distributions, ones governed by unimodal densities with both Pareto and inverse-Pareto power-law tails.

  10. Rank distributions: a panoramic macroscopic outlook.

    PubMed

    Eliazar, Iddo I; Cohen, Morrel H

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a panoramic macroscopic outlook of rank distributions. We establish a general framework for the analysis of rank distributions, which classifies them into five macroscopic "socioeconomic" states: monarchy, oligarchy-feudalism, criticality, socialism-capitalism, and communism. Oligarchy-feudalism is shown to be characterized by discrete macroscopic rank distributions, and socialism-capitalism is shown to be characterized by continuous macroscopic size distributions. Criticality is a transition state between oligarchy-feudalism and socialism-capitalism, which can manifest allometric scaling with multifractal spectra. Monarchy and communism are extreme forms of oligarchy-feudalism and socialism-capitalism, respectively, in which the intrinsic randomness vanishes. The general framework is applied to three different models of rank distributions-top-down, bottom-up, and global-and unveils each model's macroscopic universality and versatility. The global model yields a macroscopic classification of the generalized Zipf law, an omnipresent form of rank distributions observed across the sciences. An amalgamation of the three models establishes a universal rank-distribution explanation for the macroscopic emergence of a prevalent class of continuous size distributions, ones governed by unimodal densities with both Pareto and inverse-Pareto power-law tails.

  11. Panoramic night vision goggle flight test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franck, Douglas L.; Geiselman, Eric E.; Craig, Jeffrey L.

    2000-06-01

    The Panoramic Night Vision Goggle (PNVG) has begun operational test and evaluation with its 100-degree horizontal by 40-degree vertical field of view (FOV) on different aircraft and at different locations. Two configurations of the PNVG are being evaluated. The first configuration design (PNVG I) is very low in profile and fits underneath a visor. PNVG I can be retained by the pilot during ejection. This configuration is interchangeable with a day helmet mounted tracker and display through a standard universal connector. The second configuration (PNVG II) resembles the currently fielded 40-degree circular FOV Aviator Night Vision Imaging Systems (ANVIS) and is designed for non-ejection seat aircraft and ground applications. Pilots completed subjective questionnaires after each flight to compare the capability of the 100-degree horizontal by 40-degree vertical PNVG to the 40-degree circular ANVIS across different operational tasks. This paper discusses current findings and pilot feedback from the flight trials objectives of the next phase of the PNVG program are also discussed.

  12. A comparison of Web page and slide/tape for instruction in periapical and panoramic radiographic anatomy.

    PubMed

    Ludlow, J B; Platin, E

    2000-04-01

    Self-guided slide/tape (ST) and web page (WP) instruction in normal radiographic anatomy of periapical and panoramic images is compared using objective test performance and subjective preference of freshman dental students. A class of seventy-four students was divided into a group studying anatomy in periapical images using WP and a group studying similar ST material. In a modified cross-over design the groups switched presentation technologies to learn anatomy in panoramic images. Students completed self-administered on-line quizzes covering WP materials and conventional quizzes for ST material. Students also completed a voluntary survey. Mean quiz performance identifying matched anatomic features in PA (n = 26) and panoramic images (n = 35) was excellent (96.9%) and not different between image types (p = 0.12) or presentation technologies (p = 0.81). Students preferred WP for accessibility, ease of use, freedom of navigation, and image quality (p < .01). Student comfort level with the quiz formats of the two technologies was not different (p = 0.11). Students experienced a higher rate of mechanical and logistical problems with ST than with WP technology. While 71 percent of the students preferred WP technology, this preference appears to be related to ease of use and facilitation of flexible learning styles rather than improved didactic performance.

  13. Radiography students' clinical learning styles.

    PubMed

    Ward, Patti; Makela, Carole

    2010-01-01

    To examine the common learning styles of radiography students during clinical practice. Descriptive research methodology, using a single self-report questionnaire, helped to identify common learning styles of radiography students during clinical practice. The results indicated that 3 learning styles predominate among radiography students during clinical practice: task oriented, purposeful and tentative. Insight into clinical practice learning styles can help students understand how they learn and allow them to recognize ways to maximize learning. It also heightens awareness among clinical instructors and technologists of the different learning styles and their relevance to clinical practice education.

  14. Accuracy of direct digital radiography for detecting occlusal caries in primary teeth compared with conventional radiography and visual inspection: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Dias da Silva, P R; Martins Marques, M; Steagall, W; Medeiros Mendes, F; Lascala, C A

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The diagnosis of caries lesions is still a matter of concern in dentistry. The diagnosis of dental caries by digital radiography has a number of advantages over conventional radiography; however, this method has not been explored fully in the field of paediatric dentistry. This in vitro research evaluated the accuracy of direct digital radiography compared with visual inspection and conventional radiography in the diagnosis of occlusal caries lesions in primary molars. Methods 50 molars were selected and evaluated under standardized conditions by 2 previously calibrated examiners according to 3 diagnostic methods (visual inspection, conventional radiography and direct digital radiography). Direct digital radiographs were obtained with the Dixi3 system (Planmeca, Helsinki, Finland) and the conventional radiographs with InSight film (Kodak Eastman Co., Rochester, NY). The images were scored and a reference standard was obtained histologically. The interexaminer reliability was calculated using Cohen's kappa test and the specificity, sensitivity and accuracy of the methods were calculated. Results Examiner reliability was good. For lesions limited to the enamel, visual inspection showed significantly higher sensitivity and accuracy than both radiographic methods, but no significant difference was found in specificity. For teeth with dentinal caries, no significant differences were found for any parameter when comparing visual and radiographic evaluation. Conclusions Although less accurate than the visual method for detecting caries lesions confined to the enamel, the direct digital radiographic method is as effective as conventional radiographic examination and visual inspection of primary teeth with occlusal caries when the dentine is involved. PMID:20729186

  15. Electronic system for digital acquisition of rotational panoramic radiographs

    SciTech Connect

    McDavid, W.D.; Dove, S.B.; Welander, U.; Tronje, G. )

    1991-04-01

    A prototype system for digital panoramic imaging of the maxillofacial complex has been developed. In this system x-ray film is replaced by an electronic sensor that delivers the image information to a computer for storage in digital format. The images, which are similar to conventional panoramic radiographs, are displayed on a high-resolution video monitor and may be stored on optical disk for future use. Hard-copy output is also available. The present prototype system has been installed on an Orthopantomograph model OP10 panoramic x-ray machine is programmed for operation with this machine, but in principle the system can be installed on any such device. The system may be incorporated into the design of future panoramic x-ray systems or may be used to retrofit panoramic x-ray systems now using photographic film to record the radiographic image. Greater sensitivity of electronic sensors should make possible a reduction of x-ray dose to the patient, compared with film-based systems.

  16. Quantitative localization of impacted mesiodens using panoramic and periapical radiographs.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hang-Moon; Han, Jin-Woo; Park, In-Woo; Baik, Jee-Seon; Seo, Hyun-Woo; Lee, Joo-Hyun; Park, Ho-Won

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a new technique for localizing impacted mesiodens using its horizontal magnification ratio on panoramic radiographs. Location-magnification equation of a panoramic equipment was obtained from horizontal magnification ratio of a metal ball which was located variable positions from the center of image layer at interval of 2 mm. Panoramic radiographs were obtained from a skull phantom with a metal ball which was a substitute for impacted mesiodens and was embedded 10mm(Group 1), 15mm(Group 2), and 20mm(Group 3) posterior to the central incisor. Each group obtained 7 panoramic radiographs at variable positions and one periapical radiograph. Three methods were used to estimate the actual width of the incisors and the balls which were used to calculate the magnification ratio. The methods included using the actual incisor width and the calculated ball width (Method 1), using the actual incisor width and the ball widths measured on periapical radiograph (Method 2), and using the incisor and the ball widths measured on periapical radiograph (Method 3). The location of the metal ball was calculated by using the location-magnification equation. The smallest difference between the calculated and the actual distance was 0.1±0.7 mm in Group 1/Method 3. The largest difference was -4.2±1.6 mm in Group 3/Method 2. In all groups, method 3 was the most accurate. Quantitative localization of impacted mesiodens is possible by using panoramic radiograph.

  17. Digital radiography: a survey of dentists in Hawai'i.

    PubMed

    Brady, Daniel T

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of digital radiography among dentists in Hawai'i and report their experiences using it. A 20-question survey was developed and used to interview dentists in Hawai'i. Approximately 500 dentists were contacted. The survey asked whether or not the dentist uses digital radiography. For those not using digital equipment, reasons were given as well as proposed future use. For users of digital equipment, further information was requested: group or solo practice, length of time with digital equipment, length of time to decide, brand of dental software, brand and type of digital equipment, how many different systems, satisfaction, would they do it again, financially worth it, advantages, disadvantages, diagnostic or not, use of special features, sensor replacement and maintenance costs, and any other comments about digital radiography. 102 dentists responded to the survey. 36 percent utilize digital radiography. Only 40 percent of nonusers have any inclination of converting to digital, cost being the most common reason not to convert. Average length of time with digital was 3.4 years and about 2 years to make the decision. Dentrix was the most popular software and Dexis the most popular equipment. The overwhelming majority are satisfied with systems, feel they are financially worth it, feel it is diagnostic, and would purchase them again. Advantages included things such as speed, no use of chemicals, and lower radiation. Disadvantages included cost, sensor-related issues, and computer issues. Digital users find special features helpful and utilize them regularly. Maintenance costs include annual software upgrades, sensor replacement, and barriers and bitetabs. Digital radiography is becoming more prevalent in Hawai'i. The big obstacle seems to be cost for most dentists, although users believe it is a good financial investment.

  18. Survey of radiographic requirements and techniques in United States dental assisting programs, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Farman, A.G.; Grammer, S.; Hunter, N.; Baker, C.

    1983-10-01

    A survey of dental assisting programs revealed little standardization of student requirements for dental radiography in the United States. Areas for concern were: the high proportion of programs in which classmates exposed one another to ionizing radiation for training purposes; and the continued use of closed cones in some cases. Preclinical laboratories in radiography were, on average, of considerably longer duration than those previously reported for dental students. Conversely, clinical requirements in intraoral techniques were less for dental assisting students than is the case for dental students. Available methods of reducing patient exposure to ionizing radiation are not being fully implemented.

  19. Lower Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Lower GI Tract Lower gastrointestinal tract radiography or lower GI ... of Lower GI Tract Radiography? What is Lower GI Tract X-ray Radiography (Barium Enema)? Lower gastrointestinal ( ...

  20. Panoramic dynamic data acquisition system based on unmanned helicopter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yigang; Zhao, Shuguang; Lin, Zhaorong; Wen, Gaojin; Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Weiwei

    2012-10-01

    In recent years, the archaeological tourism has rapidly been developed all over the world, and it has become more and more popular. However, the scope of the human activities has been restricted by complicated geographical terrain, and the popularization of archaeological tourism has been hampered. For the purpose of solving the above problem, the archaeological tourism system of the panoramic dynamic data acquisition system based on unmanned helicopter is designed, and we got the image of the Chinese Ming Dynasty Great Wall realtime 360˚ panoramic dynamic monitor. The applying of this system will increase the scope of the archaeological tourism activities.

  1. Monocular panoramic 3D reconstruction based on a particle filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagel, Frank

    2010-04-01

    This paper adresses the issue of generating a panoramic view and a panoramic depth maps using only a single camera. The proposed approach first estimates the egomotion of the camera. Based on this information, a particle filter approximates the 3D structure of the scene. Hence, 3D scene points are modeled probabilistically. These points are accumulated in a cylindric coordinate system. The probabilistic representation of 3D points is used to handle the problem of visualizing occluding and occluded scene points in a noisy environment to get a stable data visualization. This approach can be easily extended to calibrated multi-camera applications (even with non-overlapping field of views).

  2. A Taxonomy of Functions of Dental X-Ray Technologists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doty, Charles R.; And Others

    The taxonomy of the functions of dental x-ray technologists presented in this report resulted from a dental radiography curriculum development project undertaken at Middlesex County College (MCC) in 1981. After an introductory section citing arguments for creating taxonomies of objectives, the report explains the impetus for the curriculum…

  3. Dental CT imaging as a screening tool for dental profiling: advantages and limitations.

    PubMed

    Thali, Michael J; Markwalder, Thomas; Jackowski, Christian; Sonnenschein, Martin; Dirnhofer, Richard

    2006-01-01

    The use of dental processing software for computed tomography (CT) data (Dentascan) is described on postmortem (pm) CT data for the purpose of pm identification. The software allows reconstructing reformatted images comparable to conventional panoramic dental radiographs by defining a curved reconstruction line along the teeth on oblique images. Three corpses that have been scanned within the virtopsy project were used to test the software for the purpose of dental identification. In every case, dental panoramic images could be reconstructed and compared to antemortem radiographs. The images showed the basic component of teeth (enamel, dentin, and pulp), the anatomic structure of the alveolar bone, missing or unerupted teeth as well as restorations of the teeth that could be used for identification. When streak artifacts due to metal-containing dental work reduced image quality, it was still necessary to perform pm conventional radiographs for comparison of the detailed shape of the restoration. Dental identification or a dental profiling seems to become possible in a noninvasive manner using the Dentascan software.

  4. Industrial Radiography | Radiation Protection | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    2016-12-09

    Manufacturers use a method called industrial radiography to check for cracks or flaws in materials. Radiation is used in industrial radiography to show problems not visible from the outside without damaging the material.

  5. Accelerator system for neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Rusnak, B; Hall, J

    2000-09-21

    The field of x-ray radiography is well established for doing non-destructive evaluation of a vast array of components, assemblies, and objects. While x-rays excel in many radiography applications, their effectiveness diminishes rapidly if the objects of interest are surrounded by thick, high-density materials that strongly attenuate photons. Due to the differences in interaction mechanisms, neutron radiography is highly effective in imaging details inside such objects. To obtain a high intensity neutron source suitable for neutron imaging a 9-MeV linear accelerator is being evaluated for putting a deuteron beam into a high-pressure deuterium gas cell. As a windowless aperture is needed to transport the beam into the gas cell, a low-emittance is needed to minimize losses along the high-energy beam transport (HEBT) and the end station. A description of the HEBT, the transport optics into the gas cell, and the requirements for the linac will be presented.

  6. Image Acquisition and Quality in Digital Radiography.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Shannon

    2016-09-01

    Medical imaging has undergone dramatic changes and technological breakthroughs since the introduction of digital radiography. This article presents information on the development of digital radiography and types of digital radiography systems. Aspects of image quality and radiation exposure control are highlighted as well. In addition, the article includes related workplace changes and medicolegal considerations in the digital radiography environment. ©2016 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  7. 18. PANORAMIC VIEW OF RADAR SITE, LOOKING WEST, SHOWING NORTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. PANORAMIC VIEW OF RADAR SITE, LOOKING WEST, SHOWING NORTH-WEST HELIPAD AT UPPER LEFT AND CIRCLE BUILDING PAD Everett Weinreb, photographer, March 1988 - Los Pinetos Nike Missile Site, Santa Clara Road, Los Angeles National Forest, Sylmar, Los Angeles County, CA

  8. First of three panoramic views of North Base as seen ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    First of three panoramic views of North Base as seen from top of Building 4500, Control Tower. View looks southwest (220°) at taxiway, hangars, apron, and edge of Rogers Dry Lake. Buildings in distance in left of view are part of Edwards Air Force Base's Main Base. - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, North Base Road, Boron, Kern County, CA

  9. 8. SECOND IMAGE OF THE PANORAMIC SERIES LOOKING WEST FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. SECOND IMAGE OF THE PANORAMIC SERIES LOOKING WEST FROM THE UPHILL SIDE OF THE MILL. THE ORE RECEIVING HOUSE AND THE ORE DELIVERY TRESTLE IS IMAGE RIGHT, THE MILL BUILDING AND ANCILLARY STRUCTURE ARE IMAGE CENTER AND THE TOWN OF BODIE IS IMAGE BACKGROUND RIGHT. - Standard Gold Mill, East of Bodie Creek, Northeast of Bodie, Bodie, Mono County, CA

  10. Panoramic view from bluff south of Grand Coulee Dam; this ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Panoramic view from bluff south of Grand Coulee Dam; this segment of the panorama shows the terminus of the concrete-lined feeder canal and entrance to Banks Lake at the head of the Grand Coulee. The southernmost limits of the town of Grand Coulee are seen in the middle. - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  11. Panoramic view from bluff south of Grand Coulee Dam; this ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Panoramic view from bluff south of Grand Coulee Dam; this segment of the panorama shows the terminus of the concrete-lined feeder canal and entrance to Banks Lake at the head of the Grand Coulee. Note the earthen embankment at the easternmost section of Banks Lake, looking northwest. - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  12. Panoramic view from bluff south of Grand Coulee Dam; this ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Panoramic view from bluff south of Grand Coulee Dam; this segment of the panorama shows Crescent Bay Lake (in the foreground), the southern limits of the town of Grand Coulee, and Grand Coulee Dam, looking north. - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  13. 60. PANORAMIC VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM FACE. No date, but believed ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    60. PANORAMIC VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM FACE. No date, but believed to be just subsequent to construction. Photograph by C.G. Duffey, Long Beach, California. (38' x 11' framed print). - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  14. 9. PANORAMIC VIEW WEST, FERNOW EXPERIMENTAL FOREST RESIDENCE, CHEAT DISTRICT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. PANORAMIC VIEW WEST, FERNOW EXPERIMENTAL FOREST RESIDENCE, CHEAT DISTRICT RANGER RESIDENCE AND GARAGE, IMPLEMENT BUILDING, SEED EXTRACTOR BUILDING, CONE DRYING SHED, PUMP HOUSE, OIL HOUSE, CHEAT DISTRICT RANGER OFFICE, WASH HOUSE, AND NURSERY MANAGER'S RESIDENCE. PLANTING BEDS IN BACKGROUND. - Parsons Nursery, South side of U.S. Route 219, Parsons, Tucker County, WV

  15. Motorized Panoramic Camera Mount - Calibration and Image Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauhanen, H.; Rönnholm, P.; Lehtola, V. V.

    2016-06-01

    interesting applications. Among the large variation of panoramic camera systems, we have focused on concentric panoramic imaging with a frame camera. In order to establish the concentric image acquisition, the camera mount must be calibrated so that the projection centre of the camera is located at the rotation centre of the mount. For this purpose, we developed a novel mount calibration method, which allows an accurate recovery of the rotation centre in two image acquisition steps. In addition, we have built a motorized camera mount that can self-calibrate the camera position within the mount, given the previously solved rotation centre, and then be used to automatically capture panoramic images. Hence, we have streamlined the previously laborious manual phase of iterative position calibration, but also automated the capturing of panoramic images. For validation purposes, reference results from a conventional manual mount are provided. In the case of non-motorized mount, the average distance between the projection centre of the camera and the rotation centre of the mount was 0.253 mm and the standard deviation was 0.161 mm. For the motorized mount, the corresponding average distance and standard deviation were 0.549 mm and 0.404 mm, respectively.

  16. Left panel of panoramic overview of Beaver River Bridge and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Left panel of panoramic overview of Beaver River Bridge and New Brighton, looking NE from Patterson Heights, abuts PA-511-2 - Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne & Chicago Railway, Beaver River Bridge, Spanning Beaver River along line of Second Avenue, New Brighton, Beaver County, PA

  17. Right panel of panoramic overview of Beaver River Bridge and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Right panel of panoramic overview of Beaver River Bridge and New Brighton, looking SE from Patternson Heights, abuts PA-511-1. - Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne & Chicago Railway, Beaver River Bridge, Spanning Beaver River along line of Second Avenue, New Brighton, Beaver County, PA

  18. 2. Photocopy of section of panoramic map of 'Savannah, Georgia ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Photocopy of section of panoramic map of 'Savannah, Georgia 1891' showing Savannah Repair Shops; drawn and published by Augustus Koch, Morning-News Lithograph, Savannah, GA. - Central of Georgia Railway, Savannah Repair Shops & Terminal Facilities, Bounded by West Broad, Jones, West Boundary & Hull Streets, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  19. Designing 3 Dimensional Virtual Reality Using Panoramic Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan Abd Arif, Wan Norazlinawati; Wan Ahmad, Wan Fatimah; Nordin, Shahrina Md.; Abdullah, Azrai; Sivapalan, Subarna

    The high demand to improve the quality of the presentation in the knowledge sharing field is to compete with rapidly growing technology. The needs for development of technology based learning and training lead to an idea to develop an Oil and Gas Plant Virtual Environment (OGPVE) for the benefit of our future. Panoramic Virtual Reality learning based environment is essential in order to help educators overcome the limitations in traditional technical writing lesson. Virtual reality will help users to understand better by providing the simulations of real-world and hard to reach environment with high degree of realistic experience and interactivity. Thus, in order to create a courseware which will achieve the objective, accurate images of intended scenarios must be acquired. The panorama shows the OGPVE and helps to generate ideas to users on what they have learnt. This paper discusses part of the development in panoramic virtual reality. The important phases for developing successful panoramic image are image acquisition and image stitching or mosaicing. In this paper, the combination of wide field-of-view (FOV) and close up image used in this panoramic development are also discussed.

  20. Design of a novel panoramic lens without central blindness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Chen; Cheng, Dewen; Xu, Chen; Wang, Yongtian

    2015-08-01

    The panoramic lenses are getting more and more popular in recent years. However, these lenses have the drawback of obscuring the rays of the coaxial fields, thus cause blind area in the center field of vision. We present a novel panoramic system consisting of two optical channels to overcome this issue, the system has a field of view (FOV) reaching 200 in vertical and 360 in horizontal direction without blindness area. The two channels have different focal lengths, providing design flexibility to meet application requirements where the center FOV or the marginal FOV is of more interest. The system has no half-reflecting surfaces to ensure high transmission ratio, but this feature greatly increase the design difficulty. The distortion of the novel lens is much smaller than traditional panoramic lenses since the distortion has two node points. Due to the ability of information acquisition in real-time and wide-angle, the novel panoramic lens would be very useful for a variety of real-world applications such as surveillance, short-throw projector and pilotless automobile.

  1. New point matching algorithm for panoramic reflectance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Zhizhong; Zlatanova, Sisi

    2007-11-01

    Much attention is paid to registration of terrestrial point clouds nowadays. Research is carried out towards improved efficiency and automation of the registration process. The most important part of registration is finding correspondence. The panoramic reflectance images are generated according to the angular coordinates and reflectance value of each 3D point of 360° full scans. Since it is similar to a black and white photo, it is possible to implement image matching on this kind of images. Therefore, this paper reports a new corresponding point matching algorithm for panoramic reflectance images. Firstly SIFT (Scale Invariant Feature Transform) method is employed for extracting distinctive invariant features from panoramic images that can be used to perform reliable matching between different views of an object or scene. The correspondences are identified by finding the nearest neighbors of each keypoint form the first image among those in the second image afterwards. The rigid geometric invariance derived from point cloud is used to prune false correspondences. Finally, an iterative process is employed to include more new matches for transformation parameters computation until the computation accuracy reaches predefined accuracy threshold. The approach is tested with panoramic reflectance images (indoor and outdoor scenes) acquired by the laser scanner FARO LS 880. 1

  2. Digital Radiography: A Technology Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Ben A.

    1982-12-01

    Digital radiography, a term hardly recognized two years ago, has grown to become the talk of the radiology community and the excitement of many commercial companies. M2st of this attention has been directed toward digital subtraction intravenous angiography), although during this same time period, a variety of digital radiography apparatus and image processing techniques have been under development. In November of 1980 at the RSNA Conference in Chicago, three commercial digital angiography systems were announced by Philips, Technicare and ADAC Corporations. During this same time period, the University of Arizona was discussing the concept of a photo electronic radiology department2, the University of Pittsburg and Stanford University were investigating line scan radiography3,4 and approximately five laboratories were carrying out clinical IV angiography with digital video systems.5-9 These developments followed basic research programs in digital electronic and computerized imaging at various locations around the world. 10-18 In the spring of 1981 we attempted to review the state of digital radiography, focusing on the various detector systems and image acquisition approaches.19 Since that time, rapid advancements in digital radiography have occurred. A major conference was held on digital radiography at Stanford UniversityzO, a new area detector system for digital radiography was announced by Fuji Film Corporation, clinical testing began on the Picker line scan digital chest unit21, and improvements were made in selenium detectors for digital radiography. Several additional companies announced digital video angiography systems, bringing the total now to approximately 15 companies worldwide. Digital video subtraction angiography is now well established as an important clinical diagnostic procedure and a variety of improvements and extensions of digital angiography systems are now ongoing. Digital acquisition and storage systems are increasing in both speed and

  3. Chest X-Ray (Chest Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Chest Chest x-ray uses a very ... limitations of Chest Radiography? What is a Chest X-ray (Chest Radiography)? The chest x-ray is the ...

  4. The usage of digital radiography and cone beam computed tomography among Turkish dentists

    PubMed Central

    Dölekoğlu, S; Fişekçioğlu, E; İlgüy, M; İlgüy, D

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of the use of digital radiography and report how it was used by Turkish dentists. Methods The survey was based on 383 dentists who were present at the sixteenth International Congress organized by the Turkish Dental Association. A questionnaire which consisted of 19 questions was given to the dentists who participated in the study. Data were assessed according to frequency distribution and the χ2 test was used to determine the significance of differences between two independent groups. Results 376 questionnaires were analysed. The mean age of the dentists who participated in the study was 37.14 ± 9.6 years (range: 20–63 years). The distribution of the dentists according to the 7 regions of Turkey were: Marmara 58%, Aegean 13% and Mediterranean 10%, Central Anatolia 8%, Black Sea 7%, Southeastern Anatolia 3%, Eastern Anatolia 1%. 124 dentists (33%) said they did not work with digital radiography. 95 dentists indicated that they did not use digital radiography owing to cost (60%). 252 dentists (67%) said they used digital radiography. 40% of the participants noted that the repetition of periapical radiographs was due to digital radiography. 166 dentists (55.9%) and 79.1% academicians had knowledge about cone beam CT (CBCT). Conclusion Digital radiography users are increasing in Turkey and levels of knowledge of CBCT and awareness of radiation safety has also increased. PMID:21831978

  5. The usage of digital radiography and cone beam computed tomography among Turkish dentists.

    PubMed

    Dölekoğlu, Semanur; Fişekçioğlu, E; İlgüy, M; İlgüy, D

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of the use of digital radiography and report how it was used by Turkish dentists. The survey was based on 383 dentists who were present at the sixteenth International Congress organized by the Turkish Dental Association. A questionnaire which consisted of 19 questions was given to the dentists who participated in the study. Data were assessed according to frequency distribution and the χ(2) test was used to determine the significance of differences between two independent groups. 376 questionnaires were analysed. The mean age of the dentists who participated in the study was 37.14 ± 9.6 years (range: 20-63 years). The distribution of the dentists according to the 7 regions of Turkey were: Marmara 58%, Aegean 13% and Mediterranean 10%, Central Anatolia 8%, Black Sea 7%, Southeastern Anatolia 3%, Eastern Anatolia 1%. 124 dentists (33%) said they did not work with digital radiography. 95 dentists indicated that they did not use digital radiography owing to cost (60%). 252 dentists (67%) said they used digital radiography. 40% of the participants noted that the repetition of periapical radiographs was due to digital radiography. 166 dentists (55.9%) and 79.1% academicians had knowledge about cone beam CT (CBCT). Digital radiography users are increasing in Turkey and levels of knowledge of CBCT and awareness of radiation safety has also increased.

  6. Basic radiation protection considerations in dental practice.

    PubMed

    Michel, R; Zimmerman, T L

    1999-11-01

    This article provides basic guidance to radiation safety professionals unfamiliar with dental radiography on how to optimize the use of x-ray equipment and maintain occupational and non-occupational doses ALARA. Topics discussed in this article include basic protective measures commonly used to minimize the patient and operator's exposure to radiation, recommendations for the development of operating procedures, and the performance of compliance audits in dental practice.

  7. The dental development in patients with Aperts syndrome.

    PubMed

    Woods, Eva; Parekh, Susan; Evans, Robert; Moles, David R; Gill, Daljit

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to quantify the level of dental developmental delay in a group of patients with Aperts syndrome when compared to matched controls. Twenty-six Dental Panoramic Tomographic (DPT) radiographs of patients with Apert syndrome attending Great Ormond Street Hospital were compared to controls (n = 29) from the Eastman Dental Hospital, UK. Dental development was assessed using the staging systems of Demirjian and Haavikko, and dental age (DA) was estimated using the weighted averages method. Dental age, as estimated using the 12 stages of Haavikko and eight stages of Demirjian, suggested no statistical evidence of developmental delay between the Aperts and control group. The hypothesis 'that there is no difference in the dental development of subjects with Apert syndrome, when compared to a group of matched controls', was accepted. © 2014 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Clinical Application of Cone Beam Computed Tomography of the Rabbit Head: Part 2—Dental Disease

    PubMed Central

    Riggs, G. G.; Cissell, Derek D.; Arzi, Boaz; Hatcher, David C.; Kass, Philip H.; Zhen, Amy; Verstraete, Frank J. M.

    2017-01-01

    Domestic rabbits are increasing in popularity as household pets; therefore, veterinarians need to be familiar with the most common diseases afflicting rabbits including dental disease. Current diagnostic approaches include gross oral examination, endoscopic oral examination, skull radiography, and computed tomography (CT). Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), a new oral and maxillofacial imaging modality that has the capability to produce high-resolution images, has not yet been described for use in evaluating dental disease in rabbits. A total of 15 client-owned rabbits had CBCT, oral examination, dental charting, and dental treatment performed under general anesthesia. Images were evaluated using transverse and custom multiplanar (MPR), 3D, and panoramic reconstructed images. The CBCT findings were grouped into abnormalities that could be detected on conscious oral examination vs. abnormalities that could not be detected by conscious oral examination. Potential associations between the two categories were examined by pairwise Fisher’s exact test with statistical significance determined by P < 0.05. The most common findings identified on CBCT images were periodontal ligament space widening (14/15), premolar and molar malocclusion (13/15), apical elongation (13/15), coronal elongation (12/15), inflammatory tooth resorption (12/15), periapical lucency (11/15), moth-eaten pattern of osteolysis of the alveolar bone (9/15), ventral mandibular border contour changes (9/15), and missing teeth (8/15). Of the CBCT abnormalities likely to be observed on oral examination, coronal elongation (detectable on oral examination) was significantly associated with apical elongation (P = 0.029). There were no other significant associations between CBCT findings that are also clinically detectable and CBCT findings that are not be detectable on oral examination. This suggests that pathology often exists that is not apparent upon oral examination. This study establishes the

  9. Quantitative localization of impacted mesiodens using panoramic and periapical radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jin-Woo; Park, In-Woo; Baik, Jee-Seon; Seo, Hyun-Woo; Lee, Joo-Hyun; Park, Ho-Won

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate a new technique for localizing impacted mesiodens using its horizontal magnification ratio on panoramic radiographs. Materials and Methods Location-magnification equation of a panoramic equipment was obtained from horizontal magnification ratio of a metal ball which was located variable positions from the center of image layer at interval of 2 mm. Panoramic radiographs were obtained from a skull phantom with a metal ball which was a substitute for impacted mesiodens and was embedded 10mm(Group 1), 15mm(Group 2), and 20mm(Group 3) posterior to the central incisor. Each group obtained 7 panoramic radiographs at variable positions and one periapical radiograph. Three methods were used to estimate the actual width of the incisors and the balls which were used to calculate the magnification ratio. The methods included using the actual incisor width and the calculated ball width (Method 1), using the actual incisor width and the ball widths measured on periapical radiograph (Method 2), and using the incisor and the ball widths measured on periapical radiograph (Method 3). The location of the metal ball was calculated by using the location-magnification equation. Results The smallest difference between the calculated and the actual distance was 0.1±0.7 mm in Group 1/Method 3. The largest difference was -4.2±1.6 mm in Group 3/Method 2. In all groups, method 3 was the most accurate. Conclusion Quantitative localization of impacted mesiodens is possible by using panoramic radiograph. PMID:21977477

  10. IMPACT OF THE BITEWING RADIOGRAPHY EXAM INCLUSION ON THE PREVALENCE OF DENTAL CARIES IN 12-YEAR-OLD STUDENTS IN THE CITY OF FRANCA, SÃO PAULO, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    Mestriner, Soraya Fernandes; Pardini, Luiz Carlos; Mestriner, Wilson

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: The pattern of development of carious lesions has changed. The carious lesion has been progressive and reaches the dentin without showing alterations in the clinical aspects. Objectives: To determine the prevalence of caries in 12-year-old students in the city of Franca – São Paulo, Brazil, during the year of 2003, and to evaluate the additional value of bitewing radiograph to detect hidden carious lesions in permanent molar dentin. Materials and Methods: A probabilistic sample composed of two hundred and fifty six (256) students, from public and private schools, was submitted to a cross-sectional study through examination by a calibrated examiner, in order to detect the caries prevalence, using the methodology recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). For 66% of the sample, bitewing radiographs of the permanent molar region were obtained. The images were analyzed by a calibrated examiner, who established the presence of hidden caries in teeth with radiolucency in dentin, yet considered healthy in the epidemiological survey. Results: The prevalence of dental caries in epidemiological exam without (WHO) and with (WHO/R) the inclusion of hidden caries lesion was 54% and 64%, and the DMFT index was 1.73 and 1.92 respectively. Conclusion: Utilization of the method of bitewing radiographic diagnosis significantly increased (p<0.001) the prevalence of caries in the studied population. PMID:19089067

  11. Monocular catadioptric panoramic depth estimation via caustics-based virtual scene transition.

    PubMed

    He, Yu; Wang, Lingxue; Cai, Yi; Xue, Wei

    2016-09-01

    Existing catadioptric panoramic depth estimation systems usually require two panoramic imaging subsystems to achieve binocular disparity. The system structures are complicated and only sparse depth maps can be obtained. We present a novel monocular catadioptric panoramic depth estimation method that achieves dense depth maps of panoramic scenes using a single unmodified conventional catadioptric panoramic imaging system. Caustics model the reflection of the curved mirror and establish the distance relationship between the virtual and real panoramic scenes to overcome the nonlinear problem of the curved mirror. Virtual scene depth is then obtained by applying our structure classification regularization to depth from defocus. Finally, real panoramic scene depth is recovered using the distance relationship. Our method's effectiveness is demonstrated in experiments.

  12. Abdomen X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Abdomen Abdominal x-ray uses a very ... of an abdominal x-ray? What is abdominal x-ray? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical ...

  13. Embossed radiography utilizing energy subtraction.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Akihiro; Watanabe, Manabu; Sato, Eiichi; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Nagao, Jiro; Abderyim, Purkhet; Aizawa, Katsuo; Tanaka, Etsuro; Mori, Hidezo; Kawai, Toshiaki; Ehara, Shigeru; Sato, Shigehiro; Ogawa, Akira; Onagawa, Jun

    2009-01-01

    Currently, it is difficult to carry out refraction-contrast radiography by using a conventional X-ray generator. Thus, we developed an embossed radiography system utilizing dual-energy subtraction for decreasing the absorption contrast in unnecessary regions, and the contrast resolution of a target region was increased by use of image-shifting subtraction and a linear-contrast system in a flat panel detector (FPD). The X-ray generator had a 100-microm-focus tube. Energy subtraction was performed at tube voltages of 45 and 65 kV, a tube current of 0.50 mA, and an X-ray exposure time of 5.0 s. A 1.0-mm-thick aluminum filter was used for absorbing low-photon-energy bremsstrahlung X-rays. Embossed radiography was achieved with cohesion imaging by use of the FPD with pixel sizes of 48 x 48 microm, and the shifting dimension of an object in the horizontal direction ranged from 100 to 200 microm. At a shifting distance of 100 mum, the spatial resolutions in the horizontal and vertical directions measured with a lead test chart were both 83 microm. In embossed radiography of non-living animals, we obtained high-contrast embossed images of fine bones, gadolinium oxide particles in the kidney, and coronary arteries approximately 100 microm in diameter.

  14. Lasers In Dental Diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everse, K. E.; Sinor, T. W.; Menzel, E. R.

    1987-01-01

    We have investigated the potential of lasers for real time in situ dental diagnosis via transillumination of teeth and gums and via fluorescence. Not surprisingly, absorption and/or scattering of light by teeth was found to be insensitive to light color. However, monochromatic transillumination revealed detail better than white light. Transillumination of gums was best performed with orange-red light because of tissue absorption. Illumination of oral structures by 488 nm Ar-laser light was effective in revealing diagnosis detail by fluorescence. Incipient caries and fine tooth fracture lines that are generally not revealed by radiography were observable by laser.

  15. A sign of the times: contemporary dental imaging artifacts.

    PubMed

    Frommer, Herbert H; Stabulas-Savage, Jeanine J

    2008-11-01

    There have been new findings evident in dental imaging that reflect changes in society over time. Although we may interpret these findings as "artifacts," they could simply be images that we cannot readily identify. The following article is presented to notify dental professionals of the presence of these images, which are truly "signs of the times," and to assist clinicians in recognizing these images in dental radiography.

  16. [The place of radiography in endodontic treatment carried out in general practice in Dakar].

    PubMed

    Gaye, F; Mbaye, M; Faye, B; Diallo, B

    2002-03-01

    An investigation conducted over dental surgeons of 52 dental offices in Dakar and it's near suburb (40 from private sector and 12 from public and quasi-public) has shown that the use of retro-alveolar radiography during endodontic treatment was not systematic, due to the price of retro-alveolar film, waste of time and relative facility of the endodontic treatment of monoradicular teeth. The preparatory negative is favored (32.70%) particularly by private dental surgeons, who use two retro-alveolar films for endodontic treatment: pre and post operative radiography (30%). The immediate post operator control is executed only in case of post-operator pains by public and quasi-public dental surgeons (16.67%) with one retro-alveolar film on average for the endodontic treatment; at term any radiographic control is done. Three retro-alveolar films per endodontic treatment were exceptionally used (9.61%) and offset incidences (15%) are not much used as well as support-films (angulators). The retro-alveolar radiography is still a reliable guide for a clinical success in endodontic treatment with a minimum of three retro-alveolar films and offset incidences.

  17. Panoramic Measures for Oral Bone Mass in Detecting Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Calciolari, E.; Donos, N.; Park, J.C.; Petrie, A.; Mardas, N.

    2015-01-01

    Different quantitative and qualitative indices calculated on oral panoramic radiographs have been proposed as useful tools to screen for reduced skeletal bone mineral density (BMD). Our aim was to systematically review the literature on linear and qualitative panoramic measures and to assess the accuracy of these indices by performing a meta-analysis of their sensitivity and specificity. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement was followed. Fifty studies were included in the qualitative appraisal and 19 were considered for meta-analysis. The methodological quality of the retrieved studies, assessed with the QUADAS-2 tool, was on average low. Three indices were reported by most of the studies: mandibular cortical width, panoramic mandibular index, and the Klemetti index. Mandibular cortical width presented with a better accuracy in excluding osteopenia/osteoporosis (specificity), since patients with a cortical width more than 4 mm had a normal BMD in 90% of the cases. Almost all studies used a cutoff of 0.3 for the panoramic mandibular index, resulting in an estimated sensitivity and specificity in detecting reduced BMD, respectively, of 0.723 (SE 0.160; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.352–0.926) and 0.733 (SE 0.066; 95% CI, 0.587–0.841). The presence of any kind of mandibular cortical erosion gave an estimated sensitivity and specificity in detecting reduced BMD, respectively, of 0.789 (SE 0.031; 95% CI, 0.721–0.843) and 0.562 (SE 0.047; 95% CI, 0.47–0.651) and a sensitivity and specificity in detecting osteoporosis, respectively, of 0.806 (SE 0.105; 95% CI, 0.528–0.9200) and 0.643 (SE 0.109; 95% CI, 0.417–0.820). The mandibular cortical width, panoramic mandibular index, and Klemetti index are overall useful tools that potentially could be used by dentists to screen for low BMD. Their limitations are mainly related to the experience/agreement between different operators and the different image quality

  18. Dental Amalgam

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pin it Email Print Dental amalgam is a dental filling material which is used to fill cavities caused by ... tooth structure. Dental amalgam is one type of dental filling material used to repair tooth structure that has been ...

  19. Panoramic radiographic study of mental foramen in selected dravidians of south Indian population: A hospital based study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vaibhav; Pitti, Parag

    2015-01-01

    Background This study aimed at documenting information on appearance, size, horizontal and vertical locations of Mental Foramen (MF) in Panoramic Radiograph. We also analyzed the age and gender differences with radiographic appearance and location of MF. We evaluated these findings in our population and co-relate with results of previous studies. Material and Methods 1662 panoramic radiographs were evaluated, of which 245 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Each radiograph was traced to record the horizontal and vertical locations. The size of MF was recorded using digital caliper and its appearance was determined by visual examination. Chi-square and t-test were employed. Results The most common appearance of MF was continuous type and the tests showed significant difference with age and gender. The most frequent horizontal location of MF was “location c” with no statistical significant difference with age and gender. The MF was most commonly positioned mesially in relation to the apex of second premolar with no significant differences with gender. The vertical location of the foramen varied drastically with no statistical significant difference in both sides. The difference in dimensions on the left and right sides were not statistically significant. Conclusions Determining the morphological appearance and positional variation of MF is important for isolation of mental nerves and vessels when administering local anesthesia and performing surgeries. We therefore stress the importance of accurate radiographic identification of MF and interpretation. Our research findings can be used as reference material by the dental practitioners of South India while performing clinical procedures that involve MF. Key words:Mental foramen, mental nerve, panoramic radiograph, mandible. PMID:26535088

  20. Dental implants in bilateral bifid canal and compromised interocclusal space using cone beam computerized tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Nizar; Arunachalam, Lalitha Tanjore; Jacob, Caroline Annette; Kumar, Suresh Anand

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of various anatomic landmarks is pivotal for important success. Bifid canals pose a challenge and can lead to difficulties while performing implant surgery in the mandible. Bifid canals can be diagnosed with panoramic radiography and more accurately with cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT). This case report details the placement of the implant in a patient with bilateral bifid canal and compromised interocclusal space, which was successfully treated using CBCT. PMID:27433073

  1. Panoramic view from bluff south of Grand Coulee Dam; this ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Panoramic view from bluff south of Grand Coulee Dam; this segment of the panorama shows the western end of Crescent Bay Lake (in the foreground), the western limits of the town of Grand Coulee, part of Grand Coulee's transformer yard (center in the distance), and the concrete-lined feeder canal that extends to Banks Lake, looking northwest. - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  2. Panoramic Okavango Swamp, Botswana and Fires in Angola, Africa

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1991-08-11

    In this panoramic view of the Okavango Swamp, Botswana, (19.0S, 22.0E), the Okavango River, seen in sunglint, flows into a topographic trough to form an inland delta. Water, trapped in the meandering delta distributaries is evaporated or transpired by vegetation. In Angola to the north, the many fires of the seasonal burning of savannah vegetation for land clearing, in preparation for agriculture, has filled the atmosphere with haze and smoke.

  3. Panoramic view of the electrical Department & Boiler House Complex, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Panoramic view of the electrical Department & Boiler House Complex, looking southwest from the roof of the lower shops. Originally constructed in 1888, only sections of original walls remain. In the right foreground is the no. 2 steel foundry, originally constructed in 1888 and converted many times as different furnaces were added. Behind the buildings (to the south and west) is the Stony Creek River. - Johnson Steel Street Rail Company, Electrical Department & Boiler House, 525 Central Avenue, Johnstown, Cambria County, PA

  4. Photocopy of panoramic photograph entitled "Ground Breaking, April 27, 1918, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of panoramic photograph entitled "Ground Breaking, April 27, 1918, U.S.A. General Hospital no. 21…". Photograph by Rocky Mountain photo and is in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Public Affairs Office, building 120. Photograph in public domain as it is not copyrighted. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Bounded by East Colfax to south, Peoria Street to west, Denver City/County & Adams County Line to north, & U.S. Route 255 to east, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  5. Revealing of HII-regions in Galaxies with Panoramic Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakopian, S. A.; Balayan, S. K.

    2016-06-01

    Observations intended to investigation and revealing of nodes of processes of nuclear and starforming activity in galaxies were performed via panoramic spectroscopy. Data obtained on Mrk 1050 revealed evidence of starforming activity also outside the central engine of high surface brightness. Two small HII-regions, being likely a part of the chain, are located in the part of the spiral branch coming from the nucleus part.

  6. Mercator - Independent rover localization using stereophotoclinometry and panoramic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Eric E.; Head, James N.; Gaskell, Robert W.; Sykes, Mark V.; McComas, Brian

    2016-12-01

    We present a navigation technique for a lunar vehicle based upon matching horizon imagery with a database of synthetic panoramas generated from ultrahigh-resolution topographic models created by stereophotoclinometry. We conducted two tests, one with lunar topography and fully synthetic panoramas, and another using Earth-based data and actual panoramic images. We have shown that the horizon-matching technique can search a wide area for a vehicle's location and determine that location to within 6 m using readily available imagery.

  7. Detectability of normal anatomy in digital panoramic radiographs.

    PubMed

    Gross, Heidi; Nilsson, Mats; Hellén-Halme, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the image quality of digital panoramic radiographs and its correlation with the detectability of normal anatomical structures. The effects of image enhancement on the detectability were also studied. A total of 500 panoramic images (DICOM format) obtained with a storage phosphor-based digital system were evaluated. The image quality and the detectability of selected normal anatomical structures were evaluated in all images. Images with inadequate image quality were subjected to enhancement after which the detectability of the structures was re-evaluated. Only 9% of the images were classified as having adequate technical quality. The main sources of poor image quality were that the patient's tongue was not held against the palate and incorrect positioning of the patient. Not holding the tongue against the palate was found to have a negative impact on the detectability of maxillary structures. Of the images with horizontal positioning errors the patient's head was rotated to the left in 81% (70 images). The most effective form of enhancement was a combination of increased contrast and decreased brightness. Images in which the tongue was not held against the palate were partially improved, whereas images with positioning errors remained unaffected by this enhancement. In conclusion, most of the panoramic images showed some technical flaws. The marginal bone level and the maxillary area were the most difficult areas to reproduce. Retakes could be avoided in some cases by using image enhancement. However, this should not be regarded as an option to avoid poor image quality.

  8. MR360: Mixed Reality Rendering for 360° Panoramic Videos.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Taehyun; Petikam, Lohit; Allen, Benjamin; Chalmers, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents a novel immersive system called MR360 that provides interactive mixed reality (MR) experiences using a conventional low dynamic range (LDR) 360° panoramic video (360-video) shown in head mounted displays (HMDs). MR360 seamlessly composites 3D virtual objects into a live 360-video using the input panoramic video as the lighting source to illuminate the virtual objects. Image based lighting (IBL) is perceptually optimized to provide fast and believable results using the LDR 360-video as the lighting source. Regions of most salient lights in the input panoramic video are detected to optimize the number of lights used to cast perceptible shadows. Then, the areas of the detected lights adjust the penumbra of the shadow to provide realistic soft shadows. Finally, our real-time differential rendering synthesizes illumination of the virtual 3D objects into the 360-video. MR360 provides the illusion of interacting with objects in a video, which are actually 3D virtual objects seamlessly composited into the background of the 360-video. MR360 was implemented in a commercial game engine and tested using various 360-videos. Since our MR360 pipeline does not require any pre-computation, it can synthesize an interactive MR scene using a live 360-video stream while providing realistic high performance rendering suitable for HMDs.

  9. Panomorph lenses: a low-cost solution for panoramic surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibault, Simon; Artonne, Jean-Claude

    2006-05-01

    Historically, the US Army, border security agencies as well as in transportation security planner has recognized the advantages of panoramic imagers, increased areas coverage with fewer cameras, tracking of multiple target simultaneously and others. However, panoramic imager has blind zone when using catadioptric system and required high bandwidth and heavy installation with fisheye lens to get an interesting resolution. The novel Panomorph lens is the heart of the new surveillance and security system developed by ImmerVision. The Panomorph lens is anticipated to be a new generation of lenses that can be used with NTSC or PAL camera to provide equivalent resolution than a 2 MPixels system but at a fraction of the cost by using existing facilities (cable, camera...). By introducing at the optical design stage a proper angular to pixel function (distortion), the new lens can provide a higher resolution in a define zone of interest than a standard fisheye. To achieve a gain in resolution, a pixel size well corrected image spot size is required. Our development included a strong optical design effort that resulted in an all refractive anamorphic panoramic imager with uncompromised image resolution for longer range detection in the zone of interest. The paper describes the development and real performance status of the Panomorph lens. Other components of the ImmerVision system include image correction, image compression and data transferred to handle devices. The same approach can also be used with IR imager where the number of pixel is limited.

  10. System for uncollimated digital radiography

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Han; Hall, James M.; McCarrick, James F.; Tang, Vincent

    2015-08-11

    The inversion algorithm based on the maximum entropy method (MEM) removes unwanted effects in high energy imaging resulting from an uncollimated source interacting with a finitely thick scintillator. The algorithm takes as input the image from the thick scintillator (TS) and the radiography setup geometry. The algorithm then outputs a restored image which appears as if taken with an infinitesimally thin scintillator (ITS). Inversion is accomplished by numerically generating a probabilistic model relating the ITS image to the TS image and then inverting this model on the TS image through MEM. This reconstruction technique can reduce the exposure time or the required source intensity without undesirable object blurring on the image by allowing the use of both thicker scintillators with higher efficiencies and closer source-to-detector distances to maximize incident radiation flux. The technique is applicable in radiographic applications including fast neutron, high-energy gamma and x-ray radiography using thick scintillators.

  11. Clinical radiography education across Europe.

    PubMed

    England, A; Geers-van Gemeren, S; Henner, A; Kukkes, T; Pronk-Larive, D; Rainford, L; McNulty, J P

    2017-09-01

    To establish a picture of clinical education models within radiography programmes across Europe by surveying higher education institutions registered as affiliate members of the European Federation of Radiography Societies (EFRS). An online survey was developed to ascertain data on: practical training, supervisory arrangements, placement logistics, quality assurance processes, and the assessment of clinical competencies. Responses were identifiable in terms of educational institution and country. All educational institutions who were affiliate members at the time of the study were invited to participate (n = 46). Descriptive and thematic analyses are reported. A response rate of 82.6% (n = 38) was achieved from educational institutions representing 21 countries. Over half of responding institutions (n = 21) allocated in excess of 60 European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System (ECTS) credits to practical training. In nearly three-quarters of clinical placements there was a dedicated clinical practice supervisor in place; two-thirds of these were employed directly by the hospital. Clinical practice supervisors were typically state registered radiographers, who had a number of years of clinical experience and had received specific training for the role. Typical responsibilities included monitoring student progress, providing feedback and completing paperwork, this did however vary between respondents. In almost all institutions there were support systems in place for clinical placement supervisors within their roles. Similarities exist in the provision of clinical radiography education across Europe. Clinical placements are a core component of radiography education and are supported by experienced clinical practice supervisors. Mechanisms are in place for the selection, training and support of clinical practice supervisors. Professional societies should work collaboratively to establish guidelines for effective clinical placements. Copyright © 2017 The

  12. Measurement of radiation dose in dental radiology.

    PubMed

    Helmrot, Ebba; Alm Carlsson, Gudrun

    2005-01-01

    Patient dose audit is an important tool for quality control and it is important to have a well-defined and easy to use method for dose measurements. In dental radiology, the most commonly used dose parameters for the setting of diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) are the entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) for intraoral examinations and dose width product (DWP) for panoramic examinations. DWP is the air kerma at the front side of the secondary collimator integrated over the collimator width and an exposure cycle. ESAK or DWP is usually measured in the absence of the patient but with the same settings of tube voltage (kV), tube current (mA) and exposure time as with the patient present. Neither of these methods is easy to use, and, in addition, DWP is not a risk related quantity. A better method of monitoring patient dose would be to use a dose area product (DAP) meter for all types of dental examinations. In this study, measurements with a DAP meter are reported for intraoral and panoramic examinations. The DWP is also measured with a pencil ionisation chamber and the product of DWP and the height H (DWP x H) of the secondary collimator (measured using film) was compared to DAP. The results show that it is feasible to measure DAP using a DAP meter for both intraoral and panoramic examinations. The DAP is therefore recommended for the setting of DRLs.

  13. Neutron imaging and tomography with Medipix2 and dental micro-roentgenography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubek, J.; Granja, C.; Holy, T.; Lehmann, E.; Linhart, V.; Pospisil, S.; Rypar, V.; Uher, J.; Vacik, J.; Vavrik, D.; Vykydal, Z.; Cevallos, M.

    2006-12-01

    The position-sensitive semiconductor Medipix2 detector has been adapted for high-resolution dental X-ray and neutron imaging. As a fully electronic, low-dose and high spatial resolution digital dental-imaging device the system aims to observe the bone-to-implant tissue of order of tens of microns. Neutron radiography is proposed as a complementary diagnostic method to standard X-ray radiography as it can produce contrast images of materials which are otherwise indistinguishable in X-ray images. Neutron radiography and tomography tests have been carried out. Results are compared with other techniques. A review of recent developments and current status is presented.

  14. Radiographic signs and diagnosis of dental disease.

    PubMed

    Bellows, J

    1993-08-01

    Dental radiographs are critical for the complete assessment and treatment of dental diseases. Dental radiography is commonly used to evaluate congenital dental defects, periodontal disease, orthodontic manipulations, oral tumors, endodontic treatments, oral trauma, and any situation where an abnormality is suspected. Although standard radiographic equipment and film can be used to produce dental radiographs, dental X-ray equipment and film provide superior quality images and greater convenience of animal patient positioning. An understanding of normal dental radiographic anatomy is important when interpreting dental radiographs. Stage III periodontitis is the earliest stage of periodontal disease at which radiographic abnormalities become apparent. Bone loss associated with periodontal disease can be classified as either horizontal or vertical. Periapical radiolucencies can represent granulomas, cysts, or abscesses, whereas periapical radiodensities may represent sclerotic bone or condensing osteitis. Lytic lesions of the bone of the jaw often represent oral neoplasms. Neoplasms also can displace or disrupt teeth in the dental arch. Resorptive lesions can be external or internal and appear as radiolucent areas involving the external surface of the root or the pulp cavity, respectively. Feline dental resorptive lesions, also known as odontoclastic resorptions, are a specific form of dental resorptive lesions unique to cats.

  15. Using panoramic radiographs to detect carotid artery calcifications: are they a helpful diagnostic tool?

    PubMed

    Gouvea, Adriele Ferreira; Vargas, Pablo Agustin; Jorge, Jacks; Lopes, Marcio Ajudarte

    2009-01-01

    More than 50% of cerebrovascular accidents are caused by atherosclerotic disease at the carotid artery.1 Carotid artery stenosis may be detected by the standard method of duplex ultrasound (DUS), while calcifications can be detected by panoramic radiographs.2-4 Panoramic radiographs may be used as a selective tool, reducing health costs by identifying individuals at risk of stroke or myocardial infarction.5-7 The present study sought a correlation between laboratory findings/behaviors and panoramic radiographs and DUS images, thus determining the value of the panoramic radiographs' findings.

  16. Panoramic Images Mapping Tools Integrated Within the ESRI ArcGIS Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jiao; Zhong, Ruofei; Zeng, Fanyang

    2014-03-01

    There is a general study on panoramic images which are presented along with appearance of the Google street map. Despite 360 degree viewing of street, we can realize more applications over panoramic images. This paper developed a toolkits plugged in ArcGIS, which can view panoramic photographs at street level directly from ArcMap and measure and capture all visible elements as frontages, trees and bridges. We use a series of panoramic images adjoined with absolute coordinate through GPS and IMU. There are two methods in this paper to measure object from these panoramic images: one is to intersect object position through a stereogram; the other one is multichip matching involved more than three images which all cover the object. While someone wants to measure objects from these panoramic images, each two panoramic images which both contain the object can be chosen to display on ArcMap. Then we calculate correlation coefficient of the two chosen panoramic images so as to calculate the coordinate of object. Our study test different patterns of panoramic pairs and compare the results of measurement to the real value of objects so as to offer the best choosing suggestion. The article has mainly elaborated the principles of calculating correlation coefficient and multichip matching.

  17. Evaluation of two methods of tracings for implants in panoramic radiographs.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Deborah Queiroz de; Montebello Filho, Agenor

    2004-03-01

    In the last years, computer programs have appeared in order to help dental practitioners in implants planning. These programs aim to facilitate the acquisition of adequate measures in digitalized radiographs. The aims of this study were: to evaluate the intra-examiner agreement in the acquisition of measures using two methods (manual and computer program - Radioimp), comparing their performances. Three examiners analyzed twenty-one panoramic radiographs. They used the two methods in two occasions. In the manual method, the examiners made a tracing on a paper fixed to the images and measured nine regions with a caliper. The images were digitalized and showed in a computer screen to be analyzed in the computer program. The examiners acquired measures of the same regions by the manual method. Vertical measures of spheres in the images were acquired in order to discount the magnifying factor of the technique. Through statistics analysis (p=.05), it was possible to conclude that there were differences in intra-examiner agreement and the examiners had greater difficulty in reproducing the measures when they used the computer program; the measures acquired by the manual method were closer to the real ones.

  18. Radiography of Chaotically Moving Objects

    SciTech Connect

    Vavrik, Daniel; Jandejsek, Ivan; Dammer, Jiri; Holy, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jakubek, Martin

    2007-11-26

    Radiography of moving objects is an advanced problem when the dynamic range of acquired radiograms is restricted by a limited exposition time. Exposition time has to be short to avoid image blurring due to object moving. It is possible to increase the dynamic range by summing short time radiograms set when the periodical object movement is presented as in the case of heart beating for instance. On the other hand a non periodical movement can be studied using tools of X-ray Digital Image Correlation technique. Short time radiograms are fitted into corresponding positions and consequently summed for higher data statistics as it is presented in this work.

  19. Lesion detectability in digital radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagne, Robert M.; Boswell, Jonathan S.; Myers, Kyle J.; Peter, Guillaume

    2001-06-01

    The usefulness of Fourier-based measures of imaging performance has come into question for the evaluation of digital imaging systems. Figures of merit such as detective quantum efficiency are relevant for linear, shift-invariant systems with stationary noise. However, no digital imaging system is shift invariant, and realistic images do not satisfy the stationarity condition. Our methods for task- based evaluation of imaging systems, based on lesion detectability, do not require such assumptions. We have computed the performance of Hotelling and nonprewhitening matched-filter observers for the task of lesion detection in digital radiography.

  20. Image post-processing in dental practice.

    PubMed

    Gormez, Ozlem; Yilmaz, Hasan Huseyin

    2009-10-01

    Image post-processing of dental digital radiographs, a function which used commonly in dental practice is presented in this article. Digital radiography has been available in dentistry for more than 25 years and its use by dental practitioners is steadily increasing. Digital acquisition of radiographs enables computer-based image post-processing to enhance image quality and increase the accuracy of interpretation. Image post-processing applications can easily be practiced in dental office by a computer and image processing programs. In this article, image post-processing operations such as image restoration, image enhancement, image analysis, image synthesis, and image compression, and their diagnostic efficacy is described. In addition this article provides general dental practitioners with a broad overview of the benefits of the different image post-processing operations to help them understand the role of that the technology can play in their practices.

  1. Sex Determination of Adult Human Maxillary Sinuses on Panoramic Radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Leao de Queiroz, Cristhiane; Terada, Andrea Sayuri Silveira Dias; Dezem, Thais Uenoyama; Gomes de Araújo, Lais; Galo, Rodrigo; Oliveira-Santos, Christiano

    2016-01-01

    Absract The purpose of this study was to evaluate dimensions of adult human maxillary sinuses on panoramic radiographs and their possible application on the sex determination for forensic purposes. The sample comprised 64 database panoramic radiographs from individuals aged 20 years or older (32 male and 32 female subjects), with complete permanent dentition (or absence of third molars). One examiner measured the width and height of the right and left maxillary sinuses using the software Image J 1.47v (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, USA). Measurements were repeated to calculate intra-observer agreement. Chi-Square test, Kappa, ANOVA and T-Student were used for results analysis for p≤ 0.05. Intra-observer agreement with correlation Kappa ranged between 0.38 and 0.96. For female subjects, the mean height and width of the left maxillary sinus were 28.7856mm and 44.6178mm, respectively. And right maxillary sinus was 27.7163mm for height and 45.1850mm for width. Male subjects were found to have the mean height and width of the left maxillary sinus 30.9981mm and 48.7753mm, respectively. And right maxillary sinus was 30.7403mm for height and 48.5753mm for width. There was a statistically significant difference in the height and width of maxillary sinuses between males and females. It can be concluded that maxillary sinuses height and width on panoramic radiographs can be used to determine the gender of adult human subjects. PMID:27847394

  2. Sex Determination of Adult Human Maxillary Sinuses on Panoramic Radiographs.

    PubMed

    Leao de Queiroz, Cristhiane; Terada, Andrea Sayuri Silveira Dias; Dezem, Thais Uenoyama; Gomes de Araújo, Lais; Galo, Rodrigo; Oliveira-Santos, Christiano; Alves da Silva, Ricardo Henrique

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate dimensions of adult human maxillary sinuses on panoramic radiographs and their possible application on the sex determination for forensic purposes. The sample comprised 64 database panoramic radiographs from individuals aged 20 years or older (32 male and 32 female subjects), with complete permanent dentition (or absence of third molars). One examiner measured the width and height of the right and left maxillary sinuses using the software Image J 1.47v (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, USA). Measurements were repeated to calculate intra-observer agreement. Chi-Square test, Kappa, ANOVA and T-Student were used for results analysis for p≤ 0.05. Intra-observer agreement with correlation Kappa ranged between 0.38 and 0.96. For female subjects, the mean height and width of the left maxillary sinus were 28.7856mm and 44.6178mm, respectively. And right maxillary sinus was 27.7163mm for height and 45.1850mm for width. Male subjects were found to have the mean height and width of the left maxillary sinus 30.9981mm and 48.7753mm, respectively. And right maxillary sinus was 30.7403mm for height and 48.5753mm for width. There was a statistically significant difference in the height and width of maxillary sinuses between males and females. It can be concluded that maxillary sinuses height and width on panoramic radiographs can be used to determine the gender of adult human subjects.

  3. Dental development in Apert syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kaloust, S; Ishii, K; Vargervik, K

    1997-03-01

    Apert syndrome has been extensively studied and described. However, an area that has not been studied is the dental development of these individuals. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the development of the dentition and compare it with that of unaffected children. There appears to be clinical observations indicating delayed eruption of the permanent teeth in the Apert child. This retrospective study examined all Apert syndrome patients from four craniofacial centers who had a panoramic radiograph taken before the age of 16 years. Thirty-six individuals, 19 boys and 17 girls ranging in age from 4.1 to 15.8 (mean = 9.3) years were examined. The seven left mandibular permanent teeth, second molar to central incisor, were rated on an eight-stage scale (A-H) using methods described by Demirjian and Goldstein (1976). The stage of each tooth was converted to the corresponding numeric value, and then all seven values were added to obtain a dental maturity score, which corresponded to a dental age, based on the sample of 4500+ normal children of the Demirjian et al. study. The dental age and chronologic age were length of delay was also determined. Thirty-one of 36 individuals had a dental age lower than their chronologic age. Compared to the normal sample, the mean developmental dental delay was 0.96 years (p < .001). The range in delay was 0.5 years advanced to 2.9 years delayed. There was a positive correlation to increased age with greater delay in dental development (p < .05). Our study confirmed our clinical impressions: The results showed a mean developmental delay of 0.96 years, with a trend of increasing delay with increased age. This positive correlation found between increased age and increased delay parallels the general growth of Apert children, with a greater degree of delay as the child grows older.

  4. High-resolution high-speed panoramic cardiac imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Evertson (In Memoriam), Dale W.; Holcomb, Mark R.; Eames, Matthew D.C.; Bray, Mark-Anthony P.; Sidorov, Veniamin Y.; Xu, Junkai; Wingard, Holley; Dobrovolny, Hana M.; Woods, Marcella C.; Gauthier, Daniel J.; Wikswo, John P.

    2008-01-01

    A panoramic cardiac imaging system consisting of three high-speed CCD cameras has been developed to image the surface electrophysiology of a rabbit heart via fluorescence imaging using a voltage-sensitive fluorescent dye. A robust, unique mechanical system was designed to accommodate the three cameras and to adapt to the requirements of future experiments. A unified computer interface was created for this application – a single workstation controls all three CCD cameras, illumination, and stimulation, and the stepping motor rotates the heart. The geometric reconstruction algorithms were adapted from a previous cardiac imaging system. We demonstrate the system by imaging a polymorphic cardiac tachycardia. PMID:18334422

  5. 9. THIRD IMAGE OF THE PANORAMIC SERIES WITH CONSIDERABLE OVERLAP. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. THIRD IMAGE OF THE PANORAMIC SERIES WITH CONSIDERABLE OVERLAP. A SETTLING TANK, SMOKESTACK FROM THE MILL'S BOILER ROOM, MILL ANNEX AND OTHER MILL OUT BUILDINGS ARE IN THE MIDDLE RIGHT OF THE IMAGE THE SUPERINTENDENTS HOUSE IS IN THE MIDDLE LEFT OF THE IMAGE SPANNING FROM LEFT TO RIGHT IN THE BACKGROUND IS THE TOWN OF BODIE. IN THE FAR BACKGROUND LEFT IS THE ROAD THAT IS THE ACCESS PARK. - Standard Gold Mill, East of Bodie Creek, Northeast of Bodie, Bodie, Mono County, CA

  6. Photocopy of left half of panoramic photograph marked "C 1928 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of left half of panoramic photograph marked "C 1928 Goldbeck". Photograph appears to have been taken from 1919 water tower, no longer extant, looking southwest with a rotating camera to encompass the entire installation. Photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Directorate of Public Works conference room, building 118. This photograph is in the public domain as it was never actually registered with the Copyright Office. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Bounded by East Colfax to south, Peoria Street to west, Denver City/County & Adams County Line to north, & U.S. Route 255 to east, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  7. Second of three panoramic views of North Base as seen ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Second of three panoramic views of North Base as seen from top of Building 4500, Control Tower. View looks west (268°) at North Base complex. In foreground is taxiway, with Building 4456 (Fire House No. 4) at right. Building 4452 (Utility Vault) appears in extreme left foreground, with Building 4412 (Liquid Oxygen Repair Facility) and Building 4410 (Liquid Oxygen Storage) in extreme left background. In view over Building 4456 is the "loop" bound by Third, Fourth, A, and B Streets. Concrete slabs are all that remain of military housing constructed in the 1940s. - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, North Base Road, Boron, Kern County, CA

  8. 7. THE BEGINNING OF A PANORAMIC SERIES VIEW LOOKING WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. THE BEGINNING OF A PANORAMIC SERIES VIEW LOOKING WEST NORTHWEST FROM THE UPHILL SIDE OF THE MILL. THE ORE RECEIVING HOUSE IS IN THE IMAGE CENTER, THE ORE DELIVERY TRESTLE EXTENDS FROM THE RECEIVING HOUSE TO THE MILL BUILDING IN THE BACKGROUND LEFT. IN THE MID-GROUND LEFT IS A CYLINDRICAL STRUCTURE BELIEVE TO BE A SETTLING TANK FROM A LATER CHEMICAL RETREATMENT OF THE TAILINGS IN THE FOREGROUND RIGHT IS AN EXTANT ORE BUCKET. - Standard Gold Mill, East of Bodie Creek, Northeast of Bodie, Bodie, Mono County, CA

  9. PROTON RADIOGRAPHY FOR AN ADVANCED HYDROTEST FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    C. MORRIS

    2000-11-01

    Analysis of data from BNL experiment 933 is presented. Results demonstrate that proton radiography can meet many of the requirements for an Advanced Hydrotest Facility (AHF). Results for background, position resolution, metrology, quantitative radiography, material identification, and edge resolution are presented.

  10. ARG portable neutron radiography. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.P.

    1995-04-01

    In this report all available neutron radiographic data, including results of tests run at LANL, McClellan AFB, and University of Virginia, will be combined to outline specific transportable neutron radiography systems that could achieve the desired results as a complement to x-radiography capabilities for the Accident Response Group (ARG).

  11. INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY STUDENT GUIDE AND LABORATORY EXERCISES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Adult, Vocational, and Technical Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    THIS INSTRUCTOR'S GUIDE TO AN 80-HOUR COURSE IN INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY IS COORDINATED WITH LESSONS IN THE STUDENT GUIDE AND LABORATORY EXERCISES AND IS BASED ON MATERIAL IN THE COURSE MANUAL, INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY. THE COURSE IS INTENDED TO TRAIN HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES AS BEGINNING RADIOGRAPHERS WHO ARE EXPECTED TO BE ABLE TO EXTEND THEIR…

  12. Radiological protection in equine radiography and radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yoxall, A T

    1977-10-01

    The principles of radiological protection are summarised and consideration is then given to problems, which may confront the equine practitioner, in the fulfillment of these principles during diagnostic radiography of the limbs, head, and spine of the horse. The place of anaesthesia in such procedures is discussed and the special problems associated with therapeutic radiography of the horse are considered.

  13. Process waste assessment for the Radiography Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, N.M.

    1994-07-01

    This Process Waste Assessment was conducted to evaluate the Radiography Laboratory, located in Building 923. It documents the processes, identifies the hazardous chemical waste streams generated by these processes, recommends possible ways to minimize waste, and serves as a reference for future assessments of this facility. The Radiography Laboratory provides film radiography or radioscopy (electronic imaging) of weapon and nonweapon components. The Radiography Laboratory has six x-ray machines and one gamma ray source. It also has several other sealed beta- and gamma-ray isotope sources of low microcurie ({mu}Ci) activity. The photochemical processes generate most of the Radiography Laboratory`s routinely generated hazardous waste, and most of that is generated by the DuPont film processor. Because the DuPont film processor generates the most photochemical waste, it was selected for an estimated material balance.

  14. Dental anomalies in pediatric patients with familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Septer, Seth; Bohaty, Brenda; Onikul, Robin; Kumar, Vandana; Williams, Karen B; Attard, Thomas M; Friesen, Craig A; Friesen, Lynn Roosa

    2017-09-08

    Familial adenomatous polyposis patients often present with non-malignant extra-intestinal manifestations which include dental anomalies that may be evident prior to the appearance of the colonic adenomas. The aims of this study were to describe the prevalence and type of dental anomalies and the relationships between gene mutations and dental anomalies in these patients. Twenty-two pediatric familial adenomatous polyposis patients and 46 controls, who were age and gender matched participated. Familial adenomatous polyposis patient's had a dental examination with panoramic radiograph and medical record review for age at diagnosis, the presence of the adenomatous polyposis coli gene mutation, and determination of other extra-intestinal manifestations on the body. The control group was identified from a retrospective chart review and selected if there was a current panoramic radiograph. The only significant difference between familial adenomatous polyposis patients and controls were the presence of jaw osteomas and sclerosis (p = .0001). Patients with a mutation in, or upstream of codon 1309 had a higher frequency of osteomas (77.8%) and jaw-bone sclerosis (44.4%), and 77% of these had at least one dental anomaly. This preliminary study showed an association between a genetic variant at, or upstream of codon 1309, and radiographic dental anomalies.

  15. Dental Procedures.

    PubMed

    Ramponi, Denise R

    2016-01-01

    Dental problems are a common complaint in emergency departments in the United States. There are a wide variety of dental issues addressed in emergency department visits such as dental caries, loose teeth, dental trauma, gingival infections, and dry socket syndrome. Review of the most common dental blocks and dental procedures will allow the practitioner the opportunity to make the patient more comfortable and reduce the amount of analgesia the patient will need upon discharge. Familiarity with the dental equipment, tooth, and mouth anatomy will help prepare the practitioner for to perform these dental procedures.

  16. Quality assurance in film radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Van Bellegem, L.; Vaessen, B.

    1993-12-31

    The ISO 9000 standards were originally developed during the 1980`s to provide uniform, worldwide quality assurance requirements. The EC (European Communities) adopted these standards as part of their modular approach to ``conformity assessment`` procedures, for several product categories. This includes the development of standards (specifications) which define what the purchaser wants and what the supplier agrees to provide, as well as quality system registration (certification) which increases confidence in the supplier`s ability to produce consistently. The requirements are typically most rigorous for regulated products that have a major impact on health and safety i.e film radiographic systems. This is the main reason for making available the necessary Q.C. tools in film radiography to comply with Q.A. specifications and guarantee the required consistent performance. These tools can only give satisfying support if they are dedicated, easy to use, precise and cost effective at the user`s level. The main topics for such a Q.A. package are: (1) standard for Film System classification for industrial radiography; (2) film system certification; and (3) standard for control of film processing by means of reference values i.e. pre-exposed film wedges and archiving quality control method.

  17. Dose measurements in intraoral radiography using thermoluminescent dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azorín, C.; Azorín, J.; Aguirre, F.; Rivera, T.

    2015-01-01

    The use of X-ray in medicine demands to expose the patient and the professional to the lowest radiation doses available in agreement with ALARA philosophy. The reference level for intraoral dental radiography is 7 mGy and, in Mexico, a number of examinations of this type are performed annually. It is considered that approximately 25% of all the X-rays examinations carried out in our country correspond to intraoral radiographies. In other hand, most of the intraoral X-ray equipment correspond to conventional radiological systems using film, which are developed as much manual as automatically. In this work the results of determining the doses received by the patients in intraoral radiological examinations made with different radiological systems using LiF:Mg,Cu,P+PTFE thermoluminescent dosimeters are presented. In some conventional radiological systems using film, when films are developed manual or automatically, incident kerma up to 10.61 ± 0.74 mGv were determined. These values exceed that reference level suggested by the IAEA and in the Mexican standards for intraoral examinations.

  18. Panoramic ultrasound to measure in vivo tendo Achilles strain.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Oliver M; Theobald, Peter S; Pugh, Neil D; Nokes, Leonard D M

    2010-10-01

    The tendo Achilles (TA) is a tendon very susceptible to injury. Biomechanical methodologies for exploring tendon strain are limited, however, as they are typically performed in vitro or by indirectly measuring the displacement of reference markers. By using panoramic ultrasound, this study reports a novel approach to acquire direct, in vivo tendon extension data. Sonographic scans were acquired between two in vivo landmarks following a consistent pathway along the long axis of the distal TA. Ten subjects were scanned with an unloaded tendon and then when resisting a range of loads. Tendon cross-sectional area was measured following coronal scans of the TA in three subjects, allowing for calculation and plotting of stress versus strain. Coefficients of variation were also calculated to measure the reliability and robustness of the protocol. Data from all ten subjects were found to fit with classic tendon force versus extension trend. The stress versus strain plot indicated that the wavy collagen fibers were fully straightened at 4% to 6% strain, which is comparable to results reported in other studies. The Young's modulus of 0.5 to 2.1 GPa also compared favorably to published data. Coefficients of variation indicated that the protocol was repeatable, although the technique for measuring cross-sectional area could be improved. As the reported data is comparable to previous invasive and in vitro studies, we believe sports medicine specialists and orthopaedic surgeons can utilize panoramic ultrasound to directly measure in vivo tendon strain.

  19. Using Vertical Panoramic Images to Record a Historic Cemetery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tommaselli, A. M. G.; Polidori, L.; Hasegawa, J. K.; Camargo, P. O.; Hirao, H.; Moraes, M. V. A.; Rissate, E. A., Jr.; Henrique, G. R.; Abreu, P. A. G.; Berveglieri, A.; Marcato, J., Jr.

    2013-07-01

    In 1919, during colonization of the West Region of São Paulo State, Brazil, the Ogassawara family built a cemetery and a school with donations received from the newspaper Osaka Mainichi Shimbum, in Osaka, Japan. The cemetery was closed by President Getúlio Vargas in 1942, during the Second World War. The architecture of the Japanese cemetery is a unique feature in Latin America. Even considering its historical and cultural relevance, there is a lack of geometric documentation about the location and features of the tombs and other buildings within the cemetery. As an alternative to provide detailed and fast georeferenced information about the area, it is proposed to use near vertical panoramic images taken with a digital camera with fisheye lens as the primary data followed by bundle adjustment and photogrammetric restitution. The aim of this paper is to present a feasibility study on the proposed technique with the assessment of the results with a strip of five panoramic images, taken over some graves in the Japanese cemetery. The results showed that a plant in a scale of 1 : 200 can be produced with photogrammetric restitution at a very low cost, when compared to topographic surveying or laser scanning. The paper will address the main advantages of this technique as well as its drawbacks, with quantitative analysis of the results achieved in this experiment.

  20. Panoramic, large-screen, 3-D flight display system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, Henry; Larson, Brent; Johnson, Michael; Droessler, Justin; Reinhart, William F.

    1995-01-01

    The report documents and summarizes the results of the required evaluations specified in the SOW and the design specifications for the selected display system hardware. Also included are the proposed development plan and schedule as well as the estimated rough order of magnitude (ROM) cost to design, fabricate, and demonstrate a flyable prototype research flight display system. The thrust of the effort was development of a complete understanding of the user/system requirements for a panoramic, collimated, 3-D flyable avionic display system and the translation of the requirements into an acceptable system design for fabrication and demonstration of a prototype display in the early 1997 time frame. Eleven display system design concepts were presented to NASA LaRC during the program, one of which was down-selected to a preferred display system concept. A set of preliminary display requirements was formulated. The state of the art in image source technology, 3-D methods, collimation methods, and interaction methods for a panoramic, 3-D flight display system were reviewed in depth and evaluated. Display technology improvements and risk reductions associated with maturity of the technologies for the preferred display system design concept were identified.

  1. Design of a panoramic long-wave infrared athermal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yuan; Geng, Anbing; Bai, Jian; Wang, Haitao; Guo, Jie; Xiong, Tao; Luo, Yujie; Huang, Zhi; Hou, Xiyun

    2016-12-01

    A panoramic long-wave infrared athermal system is introduced in this paper. The proposed system includes a panoramic annular lens (PAL) block providing a stereo field of view of (30 deg - 100 deg) × 360 deg without the need to move its components. Moreover, to ensure the imaging quality at different temperatures, a refractive/diffractive hybrid lens is introduced to achieve optical passive athermalization. The system operates in a spectral band between 8 and 12 μm, with a total length of 175 mm and a focal length of 3.4 mm. To get a bright and clear image, the aperture of the system was set to f/1.15. The introduction of aspherical surface and even-order diffractive surface not only eliminates the differential thermal but also makes the structure simple and lightweight and improves the image quality. The results show that the modulation transfer function below 20 lp/mm of the system is above 0.2 at each temperature ranging from -20°C to +60°C, which is close to the diffraction limit. The system is suitable to be applied in an uncooled infrared focal plane array detector and will serve as a static alert system. It has a number of pixels of 640×480, and the pixel size is 25 μm.

  2. Image panoramic mosaicing with global and local registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qi; Ji, Zhen; Zhang, Jihong

    2001-09-01

    This paper presents techniques for constructing full view panoramic mosaics from sequences of images. The goal of this work is to remove too many limitations for pure panning motion. The best reference block is critical for the block- matching method for improving the robustness and performance. It is automatically selected in the high- frequency image, which always contains the plenty visible features. In order to reduce accumulated registration errors, the global registration using the phase-correlation matching method with rotation adjustment is applied to the whole sequence of images, which results in an optimal image mosaic with resolving translational or rotational motion. The local registration using the Levenberg-Marquardt iterative non-linear minimization algorithm is applied to compensate for small amounts of motion parallax introduced by translations of the camera and other unmodeled distortions, when minimize the discrepancy after applying the global registration. The accumulated misregistration errors may cause a visible gap between the two images. A smoothing filter is introduced, derived from Marr's computer vision theory for removing the visible artifact. By combining both global and local registration, together with artifact smoothing, the quality of the image mosaics is significantly improved, thereby enabling the creation of full view panoramic mosaics with hand-held cameras.

  3. Relative Panoramic Camera Position Estimation for Image-Based Virtual Reality Networks in Indoor Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, M.; Akano, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Sekiguchi, Y.

    2017-09-01

    Image-based virtual reality (VR) is a virtual space generated with panoramic images projected onto a primitive model. In imagebased VR, realistic VR scenes can be generated with lower rendering cost, and network data can be described as relationships among VR scenes. The camera network data are generated manually or by an automated procedure using camera position and rotation data. When panoramic images are acquired in indoor environments, network data should be generated without Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) positioning data. Thus, we focused on image-based VR generation using a panoramic camera in indoor environments. We propose a methodology to automate network data generation using panoramic images for an image-based VR space. We verified and evaluated our methodology through five experiments in indoor environments, including a corridor, elevator hall, room, and stairs. We confirmed that our methodology can automatically reconstruct network data using panoramic images for image-based VR in indoor environments without GNSS position data.

  4. Plasma-flash radiography utilizing a molybdenum target in dentistry

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Mariko; Takabe, Akihito; Sakamaki, Kimio

    1995-12-31

    The construction and the radiographic characteristics of a plasma flash x-ray generator having a molybdenum-target (anode tip) triode are described. This generator was primarily designed in order to perform soft radiography in dental medicine and employed the following essential components: a high-voltage power supply, a low-impedance coaxial transmission line with a gap switch, a coaxial oil condenser of 0.2 {micro}F, a turbo-molecular pump, a Krytron pulser as a trigger device, and a flash x-ray tube. The high-voltage main condenser of 0.2 {micro}F was charged from 40 to 60 kV by the power supply, and the electric charges in the condenser were discharged to the tube after closing the gap switch. Because this tube employed a long target, the plasma x-ray source which consists of molybdenum ions and electrons was easily produced by the target evaporating. The maximum tube voltage was nearly equivalent to the initial charging voltage of the main condenser, and the maximum current had a value of about 25 kA with a charging voltage of 60 kV. The average width of flash x rays was less than 1 {micro}s, and the time-integrated x-ray intensity with a charging voltage of 60 kV was approximately 20 {micro}C/kg at 1.0 m per pulse. The characteristic K-series intensity substantially increased according to increases in the charging voltage. High-speed dental radiography was performed by using a laser timing switch and a trigger-delay device.

  5. Plasma-flash radiography utilizing a molybdenum target in dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Mariko; Takabe, Akihito; Sakamaki, Kimio; Sato, Eiichi; Takahashi, Kei; Sagae, Michiaki; Oizumi, Teiji; Hayasi, Yasuomi; Sasaki, Katsuaki; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu; Yanagisawa, Toru

    1995-09-01

    The construction and the radiographic characteristics of a plasma flash x-ray generator having a molybdenum-target (anode tip) triode are described. This generator was primarily designed in order to perform soft radiography in dental medicine and employed the following essential components: a high-voltage power supply, a low-impedance coaxial transmission line with a gap switch, a coaxial oil condenser of 0.2 (mu) F, a turbo-molecular pump, a Krytron pulser as a trigger device, and a flash x-ray tube. The high-voltage main condenser of 0.2 (mu) F was charged from 40 to 60 kV by the power supply, and the electric charges in the condenser were discharged to the tube after closing the gap switch. Because this tube employed a long target, the plasma x-ray source which consists of molybdenum ions and electrons was easily produced by the target evaporating. The maximum tube voltage was nearly equivalent to the initial charge voltage of the main condenser, and the maximum current had a value of about 25 kA with a charging voltage of 60 kV. The average width of flash x rays was less than 1 microsecond(s) , and the time-integrated x-ray intensity with a charging voltage of 60 kV was approximately 20 (mu) C/kg at 1.0 m per pulse. The characteristic K-series intensity substantially increased according to increases in the charged voltage. High-speed dental radiography was performed using a laser timing switch and a trigger-delay device.

  6. Dental Assistants

    MedlinePlus

    ... the direction of a dentist . They may prepare materials for dental impressions or to create temporary crowns. All dental ... Nursing assistants, sometimes called nursing aides , help provide basic care for patients in hospitals and residents of ... more information about becoming a dental assistant and for a list of accredited dental ...

  7. Image enhancement for radiography inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Wong, Brian Stephen; Guan, Tui Chen

    2005-04-01

    The x-ray radiographic testing method is often used for detecting defects as a non-destructive testing method (NDT). In many cases, NDT is used for aircraft components, welds, etc. Hence, the backgrounds are always more complex than a piece of steel. Radiographic images are low contrast, dark and high noise image. It is difficult to detect defects directly. So, image enhancement is a significant part of automated radiography inspection system. Histogram equalization and median filter are the most frequently used techniques to enhance the radiographic images. In this paper, the adaptive histogram equalization and contrast limited histogram equalization are compared with histogram equalization. The adaptive wavelet thresholding is compared with median filter. Through comparative analysis, the contrast limited histogram equalization and adaptive wavelet thresholding can enhance perception of defects better.

  8. Panoramic camera on the Yutu lunar rover of the Chang'e-3 mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jian-Feng; Li, Chun-Lai; Xue, Bin; Ruan, Ping; Gao, Wei; Qiao, Wei-Dong; Lu, Di; Ma, Xiao-Long; Li, Fu; He, Ying-Hong; Li, Ting; Ren, Xin; Yan, Xing-Tao

    2015-11-01

    The Chang'e-3 panoramic camera, which is composed of two cameras with identical functions, performances and interfaces, is installed on the lunar rover mast. It can acquire 3D images of the lunar surface based on the principle of binocular stereo vision. By rotating and pitching the mast, it can take several photographs of the patrol area. After stitching these images, panoramic images of the scenes will be obtained. Thus the topography and geomorphology of the patrol area and the impact crater, as well as the geological structure of the lunar surface, will be analyzed and studied. In addition, it can take color photographs of the lander using the Bayer color coding principle. It can observe the working status of the lander by switching between static image mode and dynamic video mode with automatic exposure time. The focal length of the lens on the panoramic camera is 50 mm and the field of view is 19.7° × 14.5°. Under the best illumination and viewing conditions, the largest signal-to-noise ratio of the panoramic camera is 44 dB. Its static modulation transfer function is 0.33. A large number of ground testing experiments and on-orbit imaging results show that the functional interface of the panoramic camera works normally. The image quality of the panoramic camera is satisfactory. All the performance parameters of the panoramic camera satisfy the design requirements.

  9. Different roles of the parahippocampal place area (PPA) and retrosplenial cortex (RSC) in panoramic scene perception

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soojin; Chun, Marvin M.

    2009-01-01

    Constructing a rich and continuous visual experience requires computing specific details across views as well as integrating similarities across views. In this paper, we report functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) evidence that these distinct computations may occur in two scene-sensitive regions in the brain, the parahippocampal place area (PPA) and retrosplenial cortex (RSC). Participants saw different snapshot views from panoramic scenes, which represented clearly different views, but appeared to come from the same scene. Using fMRI adaptation, we tested whether the PPA and RSC treated these panoramic views as the same or different. In the panoramic condition, three different views from a single panoramic scene were presented. We did not find any attenuation for panoramic repeats in the PPA, showing viewpoint-specificity. In contrast, RSC showed significant attenuation for the panoramic condition, showing viewpoint-integration. However, when the panoramic views were not presented in a continuous way, both the specificity in the PPA and the integration in RSC were lost. These results demonstrate that the PPA and RSC compute different properties of scenes: the PPA focuses on selective discrimination of different views while RSC focuses on the integration of scenes under the same visual context. These complementary functions of the PPA and RSC enable both specific and integrative representations of scenes across several viewpoints. PMID:19398014

  10. a Method of Generating Panoramic Street Strip Image Map with Mobile Mapping System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tianen, Chen; Yamamoto, Kohei; Tachibana, Kikuo

    2016-06-01

    This paper explores a method of generating panoramic street strip image map which is called as "Pano-Street" here and contains both sides, ground surface and overhead part of a street with a sequence of 360° panoramic images captured with Point Grey's Ladybug3 mounted on the top of Mitsubishi MMS-X 220 at 2m intervals along the streets in urban environment. On-board GPS/IMU, speedometer and post sequence image analysis technology such as bundle adjustment provided much more accuracy level position and attitude data for these panoramic images, and laser data. The principle for generating panoramic street strip image map is similar to that of the traditional aero ortho-images. A special 3D DEM(3D-Mesh called here) was firstly generated with laser data, the depth map generated from dense image matching with the sequence of 360° panoramic images, or the existing GIS spatial data along the MMS trajectory, then all 360° panoramic images were projected and stitched on the 3D-Mesh with the position and attitude data. This makes it possible to make large scale panoramic street strip image maps for most types of cities, and provides another kind of street view way to view the 360° scene along the street by avoiding the switch of image bubbles like Google Street View and Bing Maps Streetside.

  11. Comparison of the diagnostic performance of panoramic and occlusal radiographs in detecting submandibular sialoliths

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun Ho; Aoki, Eduardo Massaharu; Abdala-Júnior, Reinaldo; Asaumi, Junichi; Arita, Emiko Saito

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to assess and compare the diagnostic performance of panoramic and occlusal radiographs in detecting submandibular sialoliths. Materials and Methods A total of 40 patients (20 cases and 20 controls) were included in this retrospective study. Cases were defined as subjects with a submandibular sialolith confirmed by computed tomography (CT), whereas controls did not have any submandibular calcifications. Three observers with different expertise levels assessed panoramic and occlusal radiographs of all subjects for the presence of sialoliths. Intraobserver and interobserver agreement were assessed using the kappa test. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive values, and the diagnostic odds ratio of panoramic and occlusal radiographs in screening for submandibular sialoliths were calculated for each observer. Results The sensitivity and specificity values for occlusal and panoramic radiographs all ranged from 80% to 100%. The lowest values of sensitivity and specificity observed among the observers were 82.6% and 80%, respectively (P=0.001). Intraobserver and interobserver agreement were higher for occlusal radiographs than for panoramic radiographs, although panoramic radiographs demonstrated a higher overall accuracy. Conclusion Both panoramic and occlusal radiographic techniques displayed satisfactory diagnostic performance and should be considered before using a CT scan to detect submandibular sialoliths. PMID:27358815

  12. Dental agenesis patterns in Crouzon syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stavropoulos, Dimitrios; Bartzela, Theodosia; Tarnow, Peter; Mohlin, Bengt; Kahnberg, Karl-Erik; Hagberg, Catharina

    2011-01-01

    Dental agenesis may be present in an isolated familiar manner, or occur as a part of a syndrome.To date, this clinical trait seems to have been overlooked in patients with Crouzon syndrome.The aim of the present study was to investigate dental agenesis and dental agenesis patterns in a population of persons with Crouzon syndrome in Sweden. Serial panoramic radiographs of 26 individuals with Crouzon syndrome (20 males, 6 females) were examined.Third molars were excluded from the assessment. The prevalence of agenesis for at least one tooth was 42.3%. Each affected patient was found to have up to 5 missing teeth. Upper and lower second premolars were the most frequently congenitally missing teeth. Eleven dental agenesis patterns of the entire dentition were identified, as described by the tooth agenesis code (TAC). All patterns were unique and asymmetric,with only one exception, a symmetric pattern of the maxillary and mandibular second premolars. In conclusion, persons with Crouzon syndrome were found to have a high prevalence of dental agenesis and a remarkable variability of dental agenesis patterns. It is important to be aware of this clinical situation, especially when orthodontic treatment planning for these patients is performed as early as in the mixed dentition.

  13. Evaluation of the position of unerupted mandibular third molars with and without root dilacerations: a study on panoramic radiographs.

    PubMed

    Nadaes, Mariana R; Maues, Caroline P; DE Andrade, Carolina O; Salvio, Luciana A; Devito, Karina L; Romano Sousa, Claudia M

    2016-06-01

    Factors that can directly influence the extraction of third molars include the position of the tooth and the presence of root dilacerations. Knowledge of these features favors an accurate therapeutic evaluation of third molars; therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate, using panoramic radiographs, the positioning of unerupted third molars with and without root dilacerations and to verify a possible association between these two variables. In this study, 16,136 panoramic radiographs were analyzed, including 1756 lower third molars, in which the positioning was assessed according to the Winter classification and the presence of root dilacerations was determined. The data obtained from the assessments of the frequencies of the positions and the presence of root dilacerations of impacted mandibular third molar was described. A χ2 test was applied to verify a possible association between the variables. The results indicated that the most frequent position was mesioangular (44.5%), followed by horizontal (24.9%), vertical (17.4%), distoangular (12.5%), inverted (0.4%), and linguoangular (0.3%). Of the mandibular third molars evaluated, 35% had root dilacerations. The chi-square test revealed a significant association between the position of the tooth and the presence of root dilacerations (P<0.0001, χ2=34.28). The frequency of root dilaceration was statistically higher for the vertical (45.5%) and distoangular positions (40.9%). The mesioangular position was the most prevalent location for lower third molars, and the highest frequencies of root dilacerations were observed in the vertical and distoangular positions. Knowledge about the prevalence of root dilacerations and the significant association between the position of the third molars and root dilacerations will allow safer surgical planning for dental extractions of third molars.

  14. An innovative algorithm for panoramic representation in observation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luison, Cristian; Aquilanti, Valeria; Riccobono, Aldo; Liberace, Claudio

    2013-06-01

    This document presents the study and test carried out for the development of an innovative algorithm designed to create a panoramic representation of the scene scanned by observation systems operating with passive sensors. The purpose of the algorithm is to represent 360° of scene using staring sensors mounted on stabilized or semi-stabilized platforms, without requirements on video output, both in terms of the transmission format and in terms of frame rate. The algorithm is real-time and does not require step-and-stare technique or special systems to scan the scene. The architecture of the algorithm requires a very low computational cost for the electronics contained in a Multi-Functional Display (MDP) used in defense applications. The algorithm has been implemented and tested on the JANUS NAVAL system, where the results were very satisfactory. Today, a patent is pendent.

  15. Multi-purpose neutron radiography system

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.P.; Bryant, L.E.; Berry, P.

    1996-07-01

    A conceptual design is given for a low cost, multipurpose radiography system suited for the needs of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The proposed neutron source is californium-252. One purpose is to provide an in-house capability for occasional, reactor quality, neutron radiography thus replacing the recently closed Omega-West Reactor. A second purpose is to provide a highly reliable standby transportable neutron radiography system. A third purpose is to provide for transportable neutron probe gamma spectroscopy techniques. The cost is minimized by shared use of an existing x-ray facility, and by use of an existing transport cask. The achievable neutron radiography and radioscopy performance characteristics have been verified. The demonstrated image qualities range from high resolution gadolinium - SR film, with L:D = 100:1, to radioscopy using a LIXI image with L:D = 30:1 and neutron fluence 3.4 x 10{sup 5} n/cm{sup 2}.

  16. Information extraction from muon radiography data

    SciTech Connect

    Borozdin, K. N.; Asaki, T. J.; Chartrand, R.; Hengartner, N. W.; Hogan, G. E.; Morris, C. L.; Priedhorsky, W. C.; Schirato, R.C.; Schultz, L. J.; Sottile, M. J.; Vixie, K. R.; Wohlberg, B. E.; Blanpied, G.

    2004-01-01

    Scattering muon radiography was proposed recently as a technique of detection and 3-d imaging for dense high-Z objects. High-energy cosmic ray muons are deflected in matter in the process of multiple Coulomb scattering. By measuring the deflection angles we are able to reconstruct the configuration of high-Z material in the object. We discuss the methods for information extraction from muon radiography data. Tomographic methods widely used in medical images have been applied to a specific muon radiography information source. Alternative simple technique based on the counting of high-scattered muons in the voxels seems to be efficient in many simulated scenes. SVM-based classifiers and clustering algorithms may allow detection of compact high-Z object without full image reconstruction. The efficiency of muon radiography can be increased using additional informational sources, such as momentum estimation, stopping power measurement, and detection of muonic atom emission.

  17. First Panoramic View From The Surface Of Mars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-12-30

    First panoramic view by NASA's Viking 1 from the surface of Mars. The out of focus spacecraft component toward left center is the housing for the Viking sample arm, which is not yet deployed. Parallel lines in the sky are an artifact and are not real features. However, the change of brightness from horizon towards zenith and towards the right (west) is accurately reflected in this picture, taken in late Martian afternoon. At the horizon to the left is a plateau-like prominence much brighter than the foreground material between the rocks. The horizon features are approximately three kilometers (1.8 miles) away. At left is a collection of fine-grained material reminiscent of sand dunes. The dark sinuous markings in left foreground are of unknown origin. Some unidentified shapes can be perceived on the hilly eminence at the horizon towards the right. A horizontal cloud stratum can be made out halfway from the horizon to the top of the picture. At left is seen the low gain antenna for receipt of commands from the Earth. The projections on or near the horizon may represent the rims distant impact craters. In right foreground are color charts for Lander camera calibration, a mirror for the Viking magnetic properties experiment and part of a grid on the top of the Lander body. At upper right is the high gain dish antenna for direct communication between landed spacecraft and Earth. Toward the right edge is an array of smooth fine-grained material which shows some hint of ripple structure and may be the beginning of a large dune field off to the right of the picture, which joins with dunes seen at the top left in this 300 degree panoramic view. Some of the rocks appear to be undercut on one side and partially buried by drifting sand on the other. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00383

  18. [Panoramic radiograph in edentulous and partially edentulous patients].

    PubMed

    Angulo, F

    1989-01-01

    A group of two hundred patients from the School of Dentistry, UCV were study using panoramic RX, in order to determined the incidence of impacted roots, impacted teeth, radiographic feature (radiolucent and radiopaque) and foreign body. From the 200 patient 118 (59%) were edentulous and 82 (415) partially edentulous, from of clinically point of view; 40 (20%) were male and 160 (80%) female. From the total sample only 77 (38.5%) showed radiographic feature meanwhile 123 (61.5%) had not any present. Only the patients with radiographic feature were considered and the result according the age were the following: 18 patients 20-40 years old (23.4%); 41 patients 41-60 years old (53.2%) and 18 patients 61-80 years old (23.4%). The higher numbers of feature were observed in the range of age 41-60 years old. In relation to the form there was a predominance of diffuse form (53.3%). However, the size was greater of 5 mm. (43.3%). On the other hand, the higher numbers of feature were observed in the area 456 in the mandible (50%). This findings are in agreement with the result found by Jones & et al (1985) (J. Prosthet Dent 53:535-539). This values are in the same range 20-60% founded in other countries. No significant difference were founded between the partially or totally edentulous patients. This work suggest the important of the panoramic RX as a diagnostic aid before a prosthetic treatment.

  19. The algorithm for generation of panoramic images for omnidirectional cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarenko, Vasiliy P.; Yarishev, Sergey; Korotaev, Valeriy

    2015-05-01

    The omnidirectional cameras are used in areas where large field-of-view is important. Omnidirectional cameras can give a complete view of 360° along one of direction. But the distortion of omnidirectional cameras is great, which makes omnidirectional image unreadable. One way to view omnidirectional images in a readable form is the generation of panoramic images from omnidirectional images. At the same time panorama keeps the main advantage of the omnidirectional image - a large field of view. The algorithm for generation panoramas from omnidirectional images consists of several steps. Panoramas can be described as projections onto cylinders, spheres, cubes, or other surfaces that surround a viewing point. In practice, the most commonly used cylindrical, spherical and cubic panoramas. So at the first step we describe panoramas field-of-view by creating virtual surface (cylinder, sphere or cube) from matrix of 3d points in virtual object space. Then we create mapping table by finding coordinates of image points for those 3d points on omnidirectional image by using projection function. At the last step we generate panorama pixel-by-pixel image from original omnidirectional image by using of mapping table. In order to find the projection function of omnidirectional camera we used the calibration procedure, developed by Davide Scaramuzza - Omnidirectional Camera Calibration Toolbox for Matlab. After the calibration, the toolbox provides two functions which express the relation between a given pixel point and its projection onto the unit sphere. After first run of the algorithm we obtain mapping table. This mapping table can be used for real time generation of panoramic images with minimal cost of CPU time.

  20. Corrosion Inhibitors as Penetrant Dyes for Radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, Howard L.; Hall, Phillip B.

    2003-01-01

    Liquid/vapor-phase corrosion inhibitors (LVCIs) have been found to be additionally useful as penetrant dyes for neutron radiography (and perhaps also x-radiography). Enhancement of radiographic contrasts by use of LVCIs can reveal cracks, corrosion, and other defects that may be undetectable by ultrasonic inspection, that are hidden from direct optical inspection, and/or that are difficult or impossible to detect in radiographs made without dyes.

  1. Motivations for muon radiography of active volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macedonio, G.; Martini, M.

    2010-02-01

    Muon radiography represents an innovative tool for investigating the interior of active volcanoes. This method integrates the conventional geophysical techniques and provides an independent way to estimate the density of the volcano structure and reveal the presence of magma conduits. The experience from the pioneer experiments performed at Mt. Asama, Mt. West Iwate, and Showa-Shinzan (Japan) are very encouraging. Muon radiography could be applied, in principle, at any stratovolcano. Here we focus our attention on Vesuvius and Stromboli (Italy).

  2. Panoramic 3d Vision on the ExoMars Rover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paar, G.; Griffiths, A. D.; Barnes, D. P.; Coates, A. J.; Jaumann, R.; Oberst, J.; Gao, Y.; Ellery, A.; Li, R.

    The Pasteur payload on the ESA ExoMars Rover 2011/2013 is designed to search for evidence of extant or extinct life either on or up to ˜2 m below the surface of Mars. The rover will be equipped by a panoramic imaging system to be developed by a UK, German, Austrian, Swiss, Italian and French team for visual characterization of the rover's surroundings and (in conjunction with an infrared imaging spectrometer) remote detection of potential sample sites. The Panoramic Camera system consists of a wide angle multispectral stereo pair with 65° field-of-view (WAC; 1.1 mrad/pixel) and a high resolution monoscopic camera (HRC; current design having 59.7 µrad/pixel with 3.5° field-of-view) . Its scientific goals and operational requirements can be summarized as follows: • Determination of objects to be investigated in situ by other instruments for operations planning • Backup and Support for the rover visual navigation system (path planning, determination of subsequent rover positions and orientation/tilt within the 3d environment), and localization of the landing site (by stellar navigation or by combination of orbiter and ground panoramic images) • Geological characterization (using narrow band geology filters) and cartography of the local environments (local Digital Terrain Model or DTM). • Study of atmospheric properties and variable phenomena near the Martian surface (e.g. aerosol opacity, water vapour column density, clouds, dust devils, meteors, surface frosts,) 1 • Geodetic studies (observations of Sun, bright stars, Phobos/Deimos). The performance of 3d data processing is a key element of mission planning and scientific data analysis. The 3d Vision Team within the Panoramic Camera development Consortium reports on the current status of development, consisting of the following items: • Hardware Layout & Engineering: The geometric setup of the system (location on the mast & viewing angles, mutual mounting between WAC and HRC) needs to be optimized w

  3. Biometric Analysis – A Reliable Indicator for Diagnosing Taurodontism using Panoramic Radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Veda; Anegundi, Rajesh Trayambhak; Pravinchandra, K.R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Taurodontism is a clinical entity with a morpho–anatomical change in the shape of the tooth, which was thought to be absent in modern man. Taurodontism is mostly observed as an isolated trait or a component of a syndrome. Various techniques have been devised to diagnose taurodontism. Aim: The aim of this study was to analyze whether a biometric analysis was useful in diagnosing taurodontism, in radiographs which appeared to be normal on cursory observations. Setting and Design: This study was carried out in our institution by using radiographs which were taken for routine procedures. Material and Methods: In this retrospective study, panoramic radiographs were obtained from dental records of children who were aged between 9–14 years, who did not have any abnormality on cursory observations. Biometric analyses were carried out on permanent mandibular first molar(s) by using a novel biometric method. The values were tabulated and analysed. Statistics: Fischer exact probability test, Chi square test and Chi-square test with Yates correction were used for statistical analysis of the data. Results: Cursory observation did not yield us any case of taurodontism. In contrast, the biometric analysis yielded us a statistically significant number of cases of taurodontism. However, there was no statistically significant difference in the number of cases with taurodontism, which was obtained between the genders and the age group which was considered. Conclusion: Thus, taurodontism was diagnosed on a biometric analysis, which was otherwise missed on a cursory observation. It is therefore necessary from the clinical point of view, to diagnose even the mildest form of taurodontism by using metric analysis rather than just relying on a visual radiographic assessment, as its occurrence has many clinical implications and a diagnostic importance. PMID:24086912

  4. Digital radiography image quality: image acquisition.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mark B; Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Strauss, Keith J; Breeden, William K; Rzeszotarski, Mark S; Applegate, Kimberly; Wyatt, Margaret; Bjork, Sandra; Seibert, J Anthony

    2007-06-01

    This article on digital radiography image acquisition is the first of two articles written as part of an intersociety effort to establish image quality standards for digital and computed radiography. The topic of the other paper is digital radiography image processing and display. The articles were developed collaboratively by the ACR, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, and the Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine. Increasingly, medical imaging and patient information are being managed using digital data during acquisition, transmission, storage, display, interpretation, and consultation. Data management during each of these operations has a direct impact on the quality of patient care. These articles describe what is known to improve image quality for digital and computed radiography and make recommendations on optimal acquisition, processing, and display. The practice of digital radiography is a rapidly evolving technology that will require the timely revision of any guidelines and standards. This document provides a basis for the technologies available today in clinical practice and may be useful in guiding the future clinical practice of digital radiography.

  5. Validation of a computed radiography device to monitor the HIV-1 RNase H activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, F.; Fanti, V.; Marzeddu, R.; Randaccio, P.; Tramontano, E.; Zinzula, L.

    2009-08-01

    A commercially available computed radiography (CR) system for dental radiography was used to produce images from radiolabeled polyacrilamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) assays. Typically, similar investigations require specific and expensive autoradiography devices. The CR unit was characterized in terms of sensitivity and fading by means of a 90Sr source that well simulates the experimental conditions, and then used for quantitative analyses of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) polymerase-independent ribonuclease H (RNase H) activity monitored by PAGE analysis. The results showed that the present methodology allows quantifying effectively the RNase H catalyses and that the obtained data are in good agreement with previous reference works. Finally, in order to further validate the present method in terms of relationship between enzyme activity, the rate of products formation and signal intensity, a PAGE analyses of the HIV-1 RNase H inhibition by the known diketo acid derivative RDS1643 was carried out.

  6. Dose distribution and mapping with 3D imaging presentation in intraoral and panoramic examinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Huang, Yung-Hui; Wu, Tung-Hsin; Wang, Shih-Yuan; Lee, Jason J. S.

    2011-10-01

    In current medical imaging applications, high quality images not only provide more diagnostic value for anatomic delineation but also offer functional information for treatment direction. However, this approach would potentially subscribe higher radiation dose in dental radiographies, which has been putatively associated with low-birth-weight during pregnancy, which affects the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis or thereby directly affects the reproductive organs. The aim of this study was to apply the high resolution 3-D image mapping technique to evaluate radiation doses from the following aspects: (1) verifying operating parameters of dental X-ray units, (2) measuring the leakage radiations and (3) mapping dose with 3-D radiographic imaging to evaluate dose distribution in head and neck regions. From the study results, we found that (1) leakage radiation from X-ray units was about 21.31±15.24 mR/h (<100 mR/h), (2) error of actual tube voltage for 60 kVp setting was from 0.2% to 6.5%, with an average of 2.5% (<7%) and (3) the error of exposure time for a 0.5-1.5 s setting was within 0.7-8.5%, with an average of 7.3% (<10%) error as well. Our 3-D dose mapping demonstrated that dose values were relatively lower in soft tissues and higher in bone surfaces compared with other investigations. Multiple causes could contribute to these variations, including irradiation geometry, image equipment and type of technique applied, etc. From the results, we also observed that larger accumulated doses were presented in certain critical organs, such as salivary gland, thyroid gland and bone marrow. Potential biological affects associated with these findings warrant further investigation.

  7. Analysis of Dental Maturation in Relation to Sagittal Jaw Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Durka-Zając, Magdalena; Derwich, Marcin; Mituś-Kenig, Maria; Łoboda, Magdalena; Pawłowska, Elżbieta

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background The degree of mineralization of permanent tooth germs in dental age assessment has been an area of interest among many authors for years. However, only recently have researchers attempted to determine the potential interdependencies between dental age and jaw relationships. The aim of this work was to compare dental maturation in patients with skeletal Class II to patients with skeletal Classes I and III. Material/Methods The study involved 150 patients who sought orthodontic treatment. Dental age was assessed from panoramic radiographs using the Demirjian’s method. Skeletal class was evaluated according to the value of the ANPg angle from the Björk’s analysis. We used the analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Student’s t-test. Results The mean dental age in patients with skeletal Class III was significantly higher than the mean dental age in patients with skeletal Class II (p<0.0005). A correlation between the dental age and chronological age was established. The weakest correlation was seen between the dental age and skeletal Class II. Among patients with skeletal Class II, the strongest correlation was found between chronological age and the formation of the germ of the second lower premolar (r=0.67; p<0.001). Conclusions Dental age among patients with skeletal Class II was the lowest. PMID:28203310

  8. Obesity and dental caries in paediatric patients. A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Costacurta, M; Di Renzo, L; Bianchi, A; Fabiocchi, F; De Lorenzo, A; Docimo, R

    2011-06-01

    The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to evaluate the relationship between childhood obesity and dental caries, in paediatric subjects, through the use of two methods of diagnosis of overweight-obesity: Body Mass Index (BMI), and Dual energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA). A total of 107 healthy patients, aged between 6 and 12 years (53.3% females, 46.7% males) were included in the study. Each patient underwent a nutritional examination and dental check-up. The nutritional examination was performed at the Department of Neuroscience, Human Nutrition Unit, University of Rome Tor Vergata and consisted of anthropometric measurements, BMI calculation, DXA exam, body fat mass (FM) assessment. Dental examinations were performed by a trained dentist of the Paediatric Dentistry Unit of PTV Hospital, University of Rome Tor Vergata. Dental caries was assessed using visual-tactile method and X-rays (bite-wing and panoramic radiography); the dmft/DMFT index was calculated. The subjects were classified as underweight, normal weight, pre-obese, obese, according to different criteria: a) age- and sex-specific BMI according to the Cacciari growth charts and cut-offs, b) body fat mass percentage (FM%) according to the WHO cut-offs, c) body fat mass percentage (FM%) according to the McCarthy growth charts and cut-offs. The statistical analysis was performed with the SPSS software (version 11.01; SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). The dmft/DMFT index was checked for normality using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Independence of the dmft/DMFT distribution from sex and age was checked by using the Mann Whitney and Kruskal Wallis tests. Differences in the dmft/DMFT values between groups, according to BMI and FM% classifications, were tested using the Mann Whitney test. The minimal level of significance of the differences was fixed at p- value ≤ 0.05 for all procedures. The comparison between BMI and DXA data shows statistically significant differences between BMI-%FM (WHO cut

  9. Age estimation by modified Demirjian's method (2004) and its applicability in Tibetan young adults: A digital panoramic study

    PubMed Central

    Bijjaragi, Shobha C; Sangle, Varsha A; Saraswathi, FK; Patil, Veerendra S; Ashwini Rani, SR; Bapure, Sunil K

    2015-01-01

    Context: Estimation of the age is a procedure adopted by anthropologists, archeologists and forensic scientists. Different methods have been undertaken. However none of them meet the standards as Demirjian's method since 1973. Various researchers have applied this method, in both original and modified form (Chaillet and Demirjian in 2004) in different ethnic groups and the results obtained were not satisfactory. Aims: To determine the applicability and accuracy of modified Demirjian's method of dental age estimation (AE) in 8–18 year old Tibetan young adults to evaluate the interrelationship between dental and chronological age and the reliability between intra- and inter observer relationship. Settings and Design: Clinical setting and computerized design. Subjects and Methods: A total of 300 Tibetan young adults with an age range from 8 to 18 years were recruited in the study. Digital panoramic radiographs (DPRs) were evaluated as per the modified Demirjian's method (2004). Statistical Analysis Used: Pearson correlation, paired t-test, linear regression analysis. Results: Inter -and intraobserver reliability revealed a strong agreement. A positive and strong association was found between chronological age and estimated dental age (r = 0.839) with P < 0.01. Modified Demirjian method (2004) overestimated the age by 0.04 years (2.04 months)in Tibetan young adults. Conclusions: Results suggest that, the modified Demirjian method of AE is not suitable for Tibetan young adults. Further studies: With larger sample size and comparision with different methods of AE in a given population would be an interesting area for future research. PMID:26097317

  10. Accuracy of digital subtraction radiography in combination with a contrast media in assessment of proximal caries depth.

    PubMed

    Valizadeh, Solmaz; Ehsani, Sara; Esmaeili, Farzad; Tavakoli, Mohammad Amin

    2008-01-01

    Radiography is used to diagnose the demineralization process and carious lesions; however, conventional radiography and direct digital images do not show these lesions when the amount of demineralization is less than 40%. Digital subtraction radiography has recently been used to improve the diagnostic quality of these le-sions. The purpose of this study was to compare the caries depth estimated by digital subtraction radiog-raphy in combination with barium sulfate in diag-nosing proximal dental caries with histopathologic evaluation. In this study 30 molars and premolars (24 demineralized lesions with cavity, 8 without cavity) were studied. Direct digital images were taken (kVp: 68, mA: 8; t: 0.12 for premolars and t: 0.16 for molars) whereas the position of X-ray tube and CCD receptor and teeth was fixed. To prepare the second images 135 gr/L barium sulfate was used. The images obtained with the same exposure and geometry and then subtracted. The depth of the lesions in direct digital and subtracted images were assessed and compared with the depth measured in histopathologic assessments. The mean depths (± SD) of the lesions were 1.80 ± 0.77 mm in direct digital radiography, 2.32 ± 0.76 mm in subtracted images after barium sulfate treatment, and 2.51 ± 0.43 mm in histopathologic sections. The statistical difference between direct digital radiography and the other methods was significant (P < 0.05). However, the differences were not statistically significant between subtracted images and histopathologic sections. The average intra-class correlation coefficient was 0.7241 (CI: 95%). The present study has demonstrated that digital subtraction radiography images have the potential to measure the depth of proximal caries with no significant difference with histopathologic evaluation.

  11. Thorium-uranium fission radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, E. L.; Weiss, J. R.; Burnett, D. S.; Woolum, D. S.

    1976-01-01

    Results are described for studies designed to develop routine methods for in-situ measurement of the abundance of Th and U on a microscale in heterogeneous samples, especially rocks, using the secondary high-energy neutron flux developed when the 650 MeV proton beam of an accelerator is stopped in a 42 x 42 cm diam Cu cylinder. Irradiations were performed at three different locations in a rabbit tube in the beam stop area, and thick metal foils of Bi, Th, and natural U as well as polished silicate glasses of known U and Th contents were used as targets and were placed in contact with mica which served as a fission track detector. In many cases both bare and Cd-covered detectors were exposed. The exposed mica samples were etched in 48% HF and the fission tracks counted by conventional transmitted light microscopy. Relative fission cross sections are examined, along with absolute Th track production rates, interaction tracks, and a comparison of measured and calculated fission rates. The practicality of fast neutron radiography revealed by experiments to data is discussed primarily for Th/U measurements, and mixtures of other fissionable nuclei are briefly considered.

  12. Proton radiography for clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talamonti, C.; Reggioli, V.; Bruzzi, M.; Bucciolini, M.; Civinini, C.; Marrazzo, L.; Menichelli, D.; Pallotta, S.; Randazzo, N.; Sipala, V.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Petterson, M.; Blumenkrantz, N.; Feldt, J.; Heimann, J.; Lucia, D.; Seiden, A.; Williams, D. C.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Bashkirov, V.; Schulte, R.

    2010-01-01

    Proton imaging is not yet applied as a clinical routine, although its advantages have been demonstrated. In the context of quality assurance in proton therapy, proton images can be used to verify the correct positioning of the patient and to control the range of protons. Proton computed tomography (pCT) is a 3D imaging method appropriate for planning and verification of proton radiation treatments, because it allows evaluating the distributions of proton stopping power within the tissues and can be directly utilized when the patient is in the actual treatment position. The aim of the PRoton IMAging experiment, supported by INFN, and the PRIN 2006 project, supported by MIUR, is to realize a proton computed radiography (pCR) prototype for reconstruction of proton images from a single projection in order to validate the technique with pre-clinical studies and, eventually, to conceive the configuration of a complete pCT system. A preliminary experiment performed at the 250 MeV proton synchrotron of Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) allowed acquisition of experimental data before the completion of PRIMA project's prototype. In this paper, the results of the LLUMC experiment are reported and the reconstruction of proton images of two phantoms is discussed.

  13. Mobile real time radiography system

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, J.; Taggart, D.; Betts, S.

    1997-11-01

    A 450-keV Mobile Real Time Radiography (RTR) System was delivered to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in January 1996. It was purchased to inspect containers of radioactive waste produced at (LANL). Since its delivery it has been used to radiograph more than 600 drums of radioactive waste at various LANL sites. It has the capability of inspecting waste containers of various sizes from <1-gal. buckets up to standard waste boxes (SWB, dimensions 54.5 in. x 71 in. x 37 in.). It has three independent x-ray acquisition formats. The primary system used is a 12- in. image intensifier, the second is a 36-in. linear diode array (LDA) and the last is an open system. It is fully self contained with on board generator, HVAC, and a fire suppression system. It is on a 53-ft long x 8-ft. wide x 14-ft. high trailer that can be moved over any highway requiring only an easily obtainable overweight permit because it weights {approximately}38 tons. It was built to conform to industry standards for a cabinet system which does not require an exclusion zone. The fact that this unit is mobile has allowed us to operate where the waste is stored, rather than having to move the waste to a fixed facility.

  14. Thorium-uranium fission radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, E. L.; Weiss, J. R.; Burnett, D. S.; Woolum, D. S.

    1976-01-01

    Results are described for studies designed to develop routine methods for in-situ measurement of the abundance of Th and U on a microscale in heterogeneous samples, especially rocks, using the secondary high-energy neutron flux developed when the 650 MeV proton beam of an accelerator is stopped in a 42 x 42 cm diam Cu cylinder. Irradiations were performed at three different locations in a rabbit tube in the beam stop area, and thick metal foils of Bi, Th, and natural U as well as polished silicate glasses of known U and Th contents were used as targets and were placed in contact with mica which served as a fission track detector. In many cases both bare and Cd-covered detectors were exposed. The exposed mica samples were etched in 48% HF and the fission tracks counted by conventional transmitted light microscopy. Relative fission cross sections are examined, along with absolute Th track production rates, interaction tracks, and a comparison of measured and calculated fission rates. The practicality of fast neutron radiography revealed by experiments to data is discussed primarily for Th/U measurements, and mixtures of other fissionable nuclei are briefly considered.

  15. A retrospective comparative study of cone-beam computed tomography versus rendered panoramic images in identifying the presence, types, and characteristics of dens invaginatus in a Turkish population.

    PubMed

    Capar, Ismail Davut; Ertas, Huseyin; Arslan, Hakan; Tarim Ertas, Elif

    2015-04-01

    This study assessed the presence, characteristics, and type of dens invaginatus (DI) by using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and panoramic images rendered from CBCT images. In addition, the findings of the imaging techniques were compared. We evaluated 300 CBCT images to determine the type of DI, the presence of an impacted tooth near the DI, and the presence of apical pathosis. The McNemar test was used to compare the prevalence of DI according to CBCT and panoramic images rendered from CBCT images. The presence of DI was lower on panoramic images rendered from CBCT images (3% of the patients) compared with on CBCT images (10.7% of the patients) (P < .001). According to the CBCT images, the distribution of teeth with DI was as follows: maxillary lateral incisors (75%), maxillary central incisors (6.8%), mandibular premolars (4.6%), mesiodens (9%), maxillary canines (2.3%), and mandibular canines (2.3%). Type I DI was the most commonly observed type of invaginatus (65.9%), followed by type II (29.5%) and type III (4.6%). All patients with type III DI and 25% of the patients with type II DI had apical pathosis at the time of referral, but periapical lesions were not observed in teeth with type I DI. In total, 13.6% of DI cases had impacted teeth. CBCT can be recommended as an effective diagnostic device for identifying DI because it provides an accurate representation of the external and internal dental anatomy. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. 6. INTERIOR OVERVIEW WITH TURBINE WATERWHEEL GOVERNOR. PANORAMIC VIEW 1/2, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. INTERIOR OVERVIEW WITH TURBINE WATERWHEEL GOVERNOR. PANORAMIC VIEW 1/2, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-3 Powerhouse, San Bernardino National Forest, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  17. Photographic technology development project: Timber typing in the Tahoe Basin using high altitude panoramic photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    Procedures were developed and tested for using KA-80A optical bar camera panoramic photography for timber typing forest land and classifying nonforest land. The study area was the south half of the Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit. Final products from this study include four timber type map overlays on 1:24,000 orthophoto maps. The following conclusions can be drawn from this study: (1) established conventional timber typing procedures can be used on panoramic photography if the necessary equipment is available, (2) The classification and consistency results warrant further study in using panoramic photography for timber typing; and (3) timber type mapping can be done as fast or faster with panoramic photography than with resource photography while maintaining comparable accuracy.

  18. Dental radiology.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Tony M

    2009-02-01

    Dental radiology is the core diagnostic modality of veterinary dentistry. Dental radiographs assist in detecting hidden painful pathology, estimating the severity of dental conditions, assessing treatment options, providing intraoperative guidance, and also serve to monitor success of prior treatments. Unfortunately, most professional veterinary training programs provide little or no training in veterinary dentistry in general or dental radiology in particular. Although a technical learning curve does exist, the techniques required for producing diagnostic films are not difficult to master. Regular use of dental x-rays will increase the amount of pathology detected, leading to healthier patients and happier clients who notice a difference in how their pet feels. This article covers equipment and materials needed to produce diagnostic intraoral dental films. A simplified guide for positioning will be presented, including a positioning "cheat sheet" to be placed next to the dental x-ray machine in the operatory. Additionally, digital dental radiograph systems will be described and trends for their future discussed.

  19. Dental development in children with severe molar-incisor hypomineralization in Samsun, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Tunc, Emine S; Ulusoy, Ayca T; Bayrak, Sule; Cankaya, Soner

    2013-09-01

    Anomalies in amelogenesis may be due to developmental defects or abnormalities in different components of developing teeth and can affect dental development. We compared dental development in a group of children with molar-incisor hypomineralization (MIH) with that in age- and sex-matched controls. Dental age was determined using panoramic radiographs of 105 children (59 girls, 46 boys) aged 7-11 years with severe MIH, and the findings were compared with those from 105 healthy age- and sex-matched controls. Although accelerated dental development was noted in the MIH group, the difference between the MIH and control groups was not statistically significant (P < 0.05). Furthermore, no relationship was found between number of affected teeth and the difference between dental and chronological age. In conclusion, children with severe MIH had slightly accelerated dental development as compared with controls.

  20. Comparison of Conventional Radiography and Digital Computerized Radiography in Patients Presenting to Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Ozcete, Enver; Boydak, Bahar; Ersel, Murat; Kiyan, Selahattin; Uz, Ilhan; Cevrim, Ozgur

    2015-03-01

    To compare the differences between conventional radiography and digital computerized radiography (CR) in patients presenting to the emergency department. The study enrolled consecutive patients presenting to the emergency department who needed chest radiography. Quality score of the radiogram was assessed with visual analogue score (VAS-100 mm), measured in terms of millimeters and recorded at the end of study. Examination time, interpretation time, total time, and cost of radiograms were calculated. There were significant differences between conventional radiography and digital CR groups in terms of location unit (Care Unit, Trauma, Resuscitation), hour of presentation, diagnosis group, examination time, interpretation time, and examination quality. Examination times for conventional radiography and digital CR were 45.2 and 34.2 minutes, respectively. Interpretation times for conventional radiography and digital CR were 25.2 and 39.7 minutes, respectively. Mean radiography quality scores for conventional radiography and digital CR were 69.1 mm and 82.0 mm. Digital CR had a 1.05 TL cheaper cost per radiogram compared to conventional radiography. Since interpretation of digital radiograms is performed via terminals inside the emergency department, the patient has to be left in order to interpret the digital radiograms, which prolongs interpretation times. We think that interpretation of digital radiograms with the help of a mobile device would eliminate these difficulties. Although the initial cost of setup of digital CR and PACS service is high at the emergency department, we think that Digital CR is more cost-effective than conventional radiography for emergency departments in the long-term.

  1. DENTAL MATERIALS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The study deals with the determination of characteristic physical and mechanical properties of restorative dental materials, and effect of...manipulative variables on these properties. From the study an entirely new dental gold inlay casting technic was developed, based on the principle of...controlled water added hygroscopic technic. The method has had successful dental applications and is a recognized method of dental inlay casting procedure

  2. Radiographic study of delayed tooth development in patients with dental agenesis.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Mealin, Erika V; Parekh, Susan; Jones, Steven P; Moles, David R; Gill, Daljit S

    2012-03-01

    The aims of this study were to compare the radiographic development of permanent teeth in a group of children affected by dental agenesis with an unaffected control group and to determine the effects of confounding factors including the severity of the dental agenesis, age, sex, ethnicity, and the number of stages used to estimate dental age. A single-center retrospective cross-sectional study of dental panoramic tomographs was undertaken between July 2007 and April 2008 in a postgraduate teaching school. A total of 139 patients (aged 9-18 years) were recruited from the orthodontic clinic on the basis of predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria to either a dental agenesis group or a control group. Dental panoramic tomograms were assessed, and the stages of development of the permanent teeth in the left maxillary and left mandibular regions were scored by using the 12 stages of Haavikko and the 8 stages of Demirjian and Goldstein. For each tooth scored, the mean dental age and standard error were determined by using the dental age assessment method, and an estimated dental age for each subject was derived by using the weighted average method. A statistically significant delay in dental age was found in the patients with dental agenesis compared with the control group. The dental age assessment method of Haavikko showed a delay of 1.20 years (SD, 1.74), and the method of Demirjian and Goldstein showed a delay of 1.64 years (SD, 1.75). It was also observed that older patients with dental agenesis had greater delays in tooth formation (P <0.001). With the Haavikko method, for every year of chronologic age, the delay in dental age increased by 0.53 year; with the Demirjian and Goldstein method, the delay increased by 0.48 year. A significant association was seen between the severity of dental agenesis and the delay in dental age (P <0.01). With both methods, for each additional developmentally absent tooth, the dental age was delayed by 0.13 year (lower confidence

  3. First Panoramic View From The Surface Of Mars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-12-30

    First panoramic view by Viking 1 from the surface of Mars. (Top): The out-of-focus spacecraft component toward left center is the housing for the Viking sample arm, which is not yet deployed. Parallel lines in the sky are an artifact and are not real features. However, the change of brightness from horizon towards zenith and towards the right (west) is accurately reflected in this picture, taken in late Martian afternoon. At the horizon to the left is a plateau-like prominence much brighter than the foreground material between the rocks. The horizon features are approximately three kilometers (1.8 miles) away. At left is a collection of fine-grained material reminiscent of sand dunes. The dark sinuous markings in left foreground are of unknown origin. Some unidentified shapes can be perceived on the hilly eminence at the horizon towards the right. Patches of bright sand can be discerned among the rocks and boulders in middle distance. In right fore-ground are two peculiarly shaped rocks which may possibly be ventifacts produced by wind abrasion on Mars. A horizontal cloud stratum can be made out halfway from the horizon to the top of the picture. (Bottom): At left is seen the low gain antenna for receipt of commands from the Earth. The projections on or near the horizon may represent the rims distant impact craters. In right foreground are color charts for Lander camera calibration, a mirror for the Viking magnetic properties experiment and part of a grid on the top of the Lander body. At upper right is the high-gain dish antenna for direct communication between landed space-craft and Earth. Toward the right edge is an array of smooth fine-grained material which shows some hint of ripple structure and may be the beginning of a large dune field off to the right of the picture, which joins with dunes seen at the top left in this 300 panoramic view. Some of the rocks appear to be undercut on one side and partially buried by drifting sand on the other. http

  4. Using Google Streetview Panoramic Imagery for Geoscience Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Paor, D. G.; Dordevic, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    Google Streetview is a feature of Google Maps and Google Earth that allows viewers to switch from map or satellite view to 360° panoramic imagery recorded close to the ground. Most panoramas are recorded by Google engineers using special cameras mounted on the roofs of cars. Bicycles, snowmobiles, and boats have also been used and sometimes the camera has been mounted on a backpack for off-road use by hikers and skiers or attached to scuba-diving gear for "Underwater Streetview (sic)." Streetview panoramas are linked together so that the viewer can change viewpoint by clicking forward and reverse buttons. They therefore create a 4-D touring effect. As part of the GEODE project ("Google Earth for Onsite and Distance Education"), we are experimenting with the use of Streetview imagery for geoscience education. Our web-based test application allows instructors to select locations for students to study. Students are presented with a set of questions or tasks that they must address by studying the panoramic imagery. Questions include identification of rock types, structures such as faults, and general geological setting. The student view is locked into Streetview mode until they submit their answers, whereupon the map and satellite views become available, allowing students to zoom out and verify their location on Earth. Student learning is scaffolded by automatic computerized feedback. There are lots of existing Streetview panoramas with rich geological content. Additionally, instructors and members of the general public can create panoramas, including 360° Photo Spheres, by stitching images taken with their mobiles devices and submitting them to Google for evaluation and hosting. A multi-thousand-dollar, multi-directional camera and mount can be purchased from DIY-streetview.com. This allows power users to generate their own high-resolution panoramas. A cheaper, 360° video camera is soon to be released according to geonaute.com. Thus there are opportunities for

  5. Mars Exploration Rover Athena Panoramic Camera (Pancam) investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, J. F.; Squyres, S. W.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Maki, J. N.; Arneson, H. M.; Brown, D.; Collins, S. A.; Dingizian, A.; Elliot, S. T.; Hagerott, E. C.; Hayes, A. G.; Johnson, M. J.; Johnson, J. R.; Joseph, J.; Kinch, K.; Lemmon, M. T.; Morris, R. V.; Scherr, L.; Schwochert, M.; Shepard, M. K.; Smith, G. H.; Sohl-Dickstein, J. N.; Sullivan, R. J.; Sullivan, W. T.; Wadsworth, M.

    2003-11-01

    The Panoramic Camera (Pancam) investigation is part of the Athena science payload launched to Mars in 2003 on NASA's twin Mars Exploration Rover (MER) missions. The scientific goals of the Pancam investigation are to assess the high-resolution morphology, topography, and geologic context of each MER landing site, to obtain color images to constrain the mineralogic, photometric, and physical properties of surface materials, and to determine dust and aerosol opacity and physical properties from direct imaging of the Sun and sky. Pancam also provides mission support measurements for the rovers, including Sun-finding for rover navigation, hazard identification and digital terrain modeling to help guide long-term rover traverse decisions, high-resolution imaging to help guide the selection of in situ sampling targets, and acquisition of education and public outreach products. The Pancam optical, mechanical, and electronics design were optimized to achieve these science and mission support goals. Pancam is a multispectral, stereoscopic, panoramic imaging system consisting of two digital cameras mounted on a mast 1.5 m above the Martian surface. The mast allows Pancam to image the full 360° in azimuth and +/-90° in elevation. Each Pancam camera utilizes a 1024 × 1024 active imaging area frame transfer CCD detector array. The Pancam optics have an effective focal length of 43 mm and a focal ratio of f/20, yielding an instantaneous field of view of 0.27 mrad/pixel and a field of view of 16° × 16°. Each rover's two Pancam ``eyes'' are separated by 30 cm and have a 1° toe-in to provide adequate stereo parallax. Each eye also includes a small eight position filter wheel to allow surface mineralogic studies, multispectral sky imaging, and direct Sun imaging in the 400-1100 nm wavelength region. Pancam was designed and calibrated to operate within specifications on Mars at temperatures from -55° to +5°C. An onboard calibration target and fiducial marks provide the

  6. Mars Exploration Rover Athena Panoramic Camera (Pancam) investigation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bell, J.F.; Squyres, S. W.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Maki, J.N.; Arneson, H.M.; Brown, D.; Collins, S.A.; Dingizian, A.; Elliot, S.T.; Hagerott, E.C.; Hayes, A.G.; Johnson, M.J.; Johnson, J. R.; Joseph, J.; Kinch, K.; Lemmon, M.T.; Morris, R.V.; Scherr, L.; Schwochert, M.; Shepard, M.K.; Smith, G.H.; Sohl-Dickstein, J. N.; Sullivan, R.J.; Sullivan, W.T.; Wadsworth, M.

    2003-01-01

    The Panoramic Camera (Pancam) investigation is part of the Athena science payload launched to Mars in 2003 on NASA's twin Mars Exploration Rover (MER) missions. The scientific goals of the Pancam investigation are to assess the high-resolution morphology, topography, and geologic context of each MER landing site, to obtain color images to constrain the mineralogic, photometric, and physical properties of surface materials, and to determine dust and aerosol opacity and physical properties from direct imaging of the Sun and sky. Pancam also provides mission support measurements for the rovers, including Sun-finding for rover navigation, hazard identification and digital terrain modeling to help guide long-term rover traverse decisions, high-resolution imaging to help guide the selection of in situ sampling targets, and acquisition of education and public outreach products. The Pancam optical, mechanical, and electronics design were optimized to achieve these science and mission support goals. Pancam is a multispectral, stereoscopic, panoramic imaging system consisting of two digital cameras mounted on a mast 1.5 m above the Martian surface. The mast allows Pancam to image the full 360?? in azimuth and ??90?? in elevation. Each Pancam camera utilizes a 1024 ?? 1024 active imaging area frame transfer CCD detector array. The Pancam optics have an effective focal length of 43 mm and a focal ratio f/20, yielding an instantaneous field of view of 0.27 mrad/pixel and a field of view of 16?? ?? 16??. Each rover's two Pancam "eyes" are separated by 30 cm and have a 1?? toe-in to provide adequate stereo parallax. Each eye also includes a small eight position filter wheel to allow surface mineralogic studies, multispectral sky imaging, and direct Sun imaging in the 400-1100 nm wavelength region. Pancam was designed and calibrated to operate within specifications on Mars at temperatures from -55?? to +5??C. An onboard calibration target and fiducial marks provide the capability

  7. Radiobiologic risk estimation from dental radiology. Part II. Cancer incidence and fatality

    SciTech Connect

    Underhill, T.E.; Kimura, K.; Chilvarquer, I.; McDavid, W.D.; Langlais, R.P.; Preece, J.W.; Barnwell, G.

    1988-08-01

    With the use of the measured absorbed doses from part I of this article, the specific radiobiologic risk to the patient from (1) five different panoramic machines with rare-earth screens, (2) a 20-film complete-mouth survey with E-speed film, long round cone, (3) a 20-film complete-mouth survey with E-speed film, long rectangular cone, (4) a 4-film interproximal survey with E-speed film, long round cone, and (5) a 4-film interproximal survey with E-speed film, long rectangular cone, was calculated. The estimated risks are expressed in two ways: the probability of radiation-induced cancer in specific organs per million examinations and the probability of expression of a fatal cancer per million examinations. The highest risks calculated were from the complete-mouth survey with the use of round collimation. The lowest risks calculated were from panoramic radiography and four interproximal radiographs with rectangular collimation.

  8. Radiobiologic risk estimation from dental radiology. Part II. Cancer incidence and fatality.

    PubMed

    Underhill, T E; Kimura, K; Chilvarquer, I; McDavid, W D; Langlais, R P; Preece, J W; Barnwell, G

    1988-08-01

    With the use of the measured absorbed doses from part I of this article, the specific radiobiologic risk to the patient from (1) five different panoramic machines with rare-earth screens, (2) a 20-film complete-mouth survey with E-speed film, long round cone, (3) a 20-film complete-mouth survey with E-speed film, long rectangular cone, (4) a 4-film interproximal survey with E-speed film, long round cone, and (5) a 4-film interproximal survey with E-speed film, long rectangular cone, was calculated. The estimated risks are expressed in two ways: the probability of radiation-induced cancer in specific organs per million examinations and the probability of expression of a fatal cancer per million examinations. The highest risks calculated were from the complete-mouth survey with the use of round collimation. The lowest risks calculated were from panoramic radiography and four interproximal radiographs with rectangular collimation.

  9. Microbiological contamination in digital radiography: evaluation at the radiology clinic of an educational institution.

    PubMed

    Malta, Cristiana P; Damasceno, Naiana Nl; Ribeiro, Rosangela A; Silva, Carolina Sf; Devito, Karina L

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the contamination rate of intra and extraoral digital X ray equipment in a dental radiology clinic at a public educational institution. Samples were collected on three different days, at two times in the day: in the morning, before attending patients, and at the end of the day, after appointment hours and before cleaning and disinfection procedures. Samples were collected from the periapical X-ray machine (tube head, positioning device, control panel and activator button), the panoramic X- ray machine (temporal support, bite block, control panel and activator button), the intraoral digital system (sensor), and the digital system computers (keyboard and mouse). The samples were seeded in different culture media, incubated, and colony forming units (CFU/mL) counted. Biochemical tests were performed for suspected colonies of Staphylococcus, Streptococcus and Gramnegative bacilli (GNB). Fungi were visually differentiated into filamentous fungi and yeasts. The results indicated the growth of fungi and Staphylococcus fromall sampling locations. GNB growth was observed from all sites sampled from the intraoral X-ray equipment. On the panoramic unit, GNB growth was observed in samples from activator button, keyboard and mouse. In general, a higher number of CFU/mL was present before use. It can be concluded that more stringent protocols are needed to control infection and prevent X-ray exams from acting as vehicle for cross contamination.

  10. Muon radiography for exploration of Mars geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedar, S.; Tanaka, H. K. M.; Naudet, C. J.; Jones, C. E.; Plaut, J. P.; Webb, F. H.

    2013-06-01

    Muon radiography is a technique that uses naturally occurring showers of muons (penetrating particles generated by cosmic rays) to image the interior of large-scale geological structures in much the same way as standard X-ray radiography is used to image the interior of smaller objects. Recent developments and application of the technique to terrestrial volcanoes have demonstrated that a low-power, passive muon detector can peer deep into geological structures up to several kilometers in size, and provide crisp density profile images of their interior at ten meter scale resolution. Preliminary estimates of muon production on Mars indicate that the near horizontal Martian muon flux, which could be used for muon radiography, is as strong or stronger than that on Earth, making the technique suitable for exploration of numerous high priority geological targets on Mars. The high spatial resolution of muon radiography also makes the technique particularly suited for the discovery and delineation of Martian caverns, the most likely planetary environment for biological activity. As a passive imaging technique, muon radiography uses the perpetually present background cosmic ray radiation as the energy source for probing the interior of structures from the surface of the planet. The passive nature of the measurements provides an opportunity for a low power and low data rate instrument for planetary exploration that could operate as a scientifically valuable primary or secondary instrument in a variety of settings, with minimal impact on the mission's other instruments and operation.

  11. Muon radiography for exploration of Mars geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedar, S.; Tanaka, H. K. M.; Naudet, C. J.; Jones, C. E.; Plaut, J. P.; Webb, F. H.

    2012-10-01

    Muon radiography is a technique that uses naturally occurring showers of muons (penetrating particles generated by cosmic rays) to image the interior of large scale geological structures in much the same way as standard X-ray radiography is used to image the interior of smaller objects. Recent developments and application of the technique to terrestrial volcanoes have demonstrated that a low-power, passive muon detector can peer deep into geological structures up to several kilometers in size, and provide crisp density profile images of their interior at ten meter scale resolution. Preliminary estimates of muon production on Mars indicate that the near horizontal Martian muon flux, which could be used for muon radiography, is as strong or stronger than that on Earth, making the technique suitable for exploration of numerous high priority geological targets on Mars. The high spatial resolution of muon radiography also makes the technique particularly suited for the discovery and delineation of Martian caverns, the most likely planetary environment for biological activity. As a passive imaging technique, muon radiography uses the perpetually present background cosmic ray radiation as the energy source for probing the interior of structures from the surface of the planet. The passive nature of the measurements provides an opportunity for a low power and low data rate instrument for planetary exploration that could operate as a scientifically valuable primary or secondary instrument in a variety of settings, with minimal impact on the mission's other instruments and operation.

  12. Dental service in 2008 Summer Olympic Games.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Jiang; Schamach, Patrick; Dai, Jian-Ping; Zhen, Xiao-Zhen; Yi, Biao; Liu, Hongchen; Hu, Min; Clough, Tony; Li, Yuan; Ma, Chun-mei

    2011-04-01

    How to organise an appropriate team to provide quality dental care during the Olympic Games has become an important consideration for each successive host country. The aims of this study were to document dental services provided at the Olympic Games and to provide data for planning future events. SET-UP OF THE DENTAL CARE DEPARTMENT: There were six dental chairs in six independent treatment rooms, one technical laboratory, a sterilising room and an x-ray room equipped with one digital panoramic screening machine and one intraoral x-ray machine in the polyclinic in the Olympic Village in Beijing. Shifts comprised 80 dentists and 28 nurses who were organised into three shifts working from 08:00 until 23:00. In the 2008 Olympic Games, there were 1607 cases involving 1126 patients requiring dental care: 795 cases from 516 athletes; 483 cases from 370 coaches and other staff; and 99 cases from volunteers. Endodontic treatments, permanent fillings, oral hygiene, mouthguards and treatment of pericoronitis were the most frequent procedures in dental care. The Mouthguard Service was extremely popular and well utilised. 122 athletes received new custom-made mouthguards in Beijing. As the utilisation of the dental service grows, and the burden of providing care for such a large cohort increases, a well-organised dental team becomes increasingly important. More general-practice dentists were needed in the team. Different kinds of specialist were suggested for working in the team-for example, oral and maxillofacial surgeons, sport dentists for mouthguards and endodontists.

  13. The development of a learning management system for dental radiology education: A technical report.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hee-Jin; Symkhampha, Khanthaly; Huh, Kyung-Hoe; Yi, Won-Jin; Heo, Min-Suk; Lee, Sam-Sun; Choi, Soon-Chul

    2017-03-01

    This study was conducted to suggest the development of a learning management system for dental radiology education using the Modular Object-Oriented Dynamic Learning Environment (Moodle). Moodle is a well-known and verified open-source software-learning management system (OSS-LMS). The Moodle software was installed on a server computer and customized for dental radiology education. The system was implemented for teaching undergraduate students to diagnose dental caries in panoramic images. Questions were chosen that could assess students' diagnosis ability. Students were given several questions corre-sponding to each of 100 panoramic images. The installation and customization of Moodle was feasible, cost-effective, and time-saving. By having students answer questions repeatedly, it was possible to train them to examine panoramic images sequentially and thoroughly. Based on its educational efficiency and efficacy, the adaptation of an OSS-LMS in dental school may be highly recommended. The system could be extended to continuing education for dentists. Further studies on the objective evaluation of knowledge acquisition and retention are needed.

  14. The development of a learning management system for dental radiology education: A technical report

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hee-Jin; Symkhampha, Khanthaly; Huh, Kyung-Hoe; Yi, Won-Jin; Lee, Sam-Sun; Choi, Soon-Chul

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This study was conducted to suggest the development of a learning management system for dental radiology education using the Modular Object-Oriented Dynamic Learning Environment (Moodle). Materials and Methods Moodle is a well-known and verified open-source software-learning management system (OSS-LMS). The Moodle software was installed on a server computer and customized for dental radiology education. The system was implemented for teaching undergraduate students to diagnose dental caries in panoramic images. Questions were chosen that could assess students' diagnosis ability. Students were given several questions corre-sponding to each of 100 panoramic images. Results The installation and customization of Moodle was feasible, cost-effective, and time-saving. By having students answer questions repeatedly, it was possible to train them to examine panoramic images sequentially and thoroughly. Conclusion Based on its educational efficiency and efficacy, the adaptation of an OSS-LMS in dental school may be highly recommended. The system could be extended to continuing education for dentists. Further studies on the objective evaluation of knowledge acquisition and retention are needed. PMID:28361030

  15. Dental OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colston, Bill W.; Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Dasilva, Luiz B.; Everett, Matthew J.; Stroeve, Pieter; Otis, L. L.

    1998-09-01

    We present here the first in vivo optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of human dental tissue. A novel dental optical coherence tomography system has been developed. This system incorporates the interferometer sample arm and transverse scanning optics into a handpiece that can be used intraorally to image human dental tissues. The average imaging depth of this system varied from 3 mm in hard tissues to 1.5 mm in soft tissues. We discuss the application of this imaging system for dentistry and illustrate the potential of our dental OCT system for diagnosis of periodontal disease, detection of caries, and evaluation of dental restorations.

  16. Accuracy of dental age estimation in Venezuelan children: comparison of Demirjian and Willems methods.

    PubMed

    Medina, Aída C; Blanco, Lucila

    2014-01-01

    Dental age is a somatic maturity indicator with importance in clinical and forensic dentistry. The purpose of this study is to compare the applicability of the Demirjian and Willems methods for dental age estimation in a group of Venezuelan children. Panoramic radiographs of 238 Venezuelan children aged 5-13 years were used to assess dental age using the methods described by Demirjian and Willems. Children with unclear panoramic radiographs, dental agenesis, and premature loss of primary teeth were excluded. Mean differences between dental age and chronological age by gender and age groups were estimated (ANOVA, Student tests p = 0.05). For the Demirjian method, the mean difference between dental age and chronological age was 0.62 +/- 0.93 years, statistically significant. The mean overestimation was lower for females than for males (females 0.56 +/- 0.96 years, males 0.67 +/- 0.93 years). For the Willems method, the mean difference between dental age and chronological age was 0.15 +/- 0.97 years, not statistically significant. Accuracy was significantly different between genders, performing best for females (females 0.01 +/- 0.96 years, males 0.29 +/- 0.96 years). The Willems method for age estimation was found to be more accurate than the Demirjian method in this sample of Venezuelan children.

  17. Visually Coupled Systems (VCS): The Virtual Panoramic Display (VPD) System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kocian, Dean F.

    1992-01-01

    The development and impact is described of new visually coupled system (VCS) equipment designed to support engineering and human factors research in the military aircraft cockpit environment. VCS represents an advanced man-machine interface (MMI). Its potential to improve aircrew situational awareness seems enormous, but its superiority over the conventional cockpit MMI has not been established in a conclusive and rigorous fashion. What has been missing is a 'systems' approach to technology advancement that is comprehensive enough to produce conclusive results concerning the operational viability of the VCS concept and verify any risk factors that might be involved with its general use in the cockpit. The advanced VCS configuration described here, was ruggedized for use in military aircraft environments and was dubbed the Virtual Panoramic Display (VPD). It was designed to answer the VCS portion of the systems problem, and is implemented as a modular system whose performance can be tailored to specific application requirements. The overall system concept and the design of the two most important electronic subsystems that support the helmet mounted parts, a new militarized version of the magnetic helmet mounted sight and correspondingly similar helmet display electronics, are discussed in detail. Significant emphasis is given to illustrating how particular design features in the hardware improve overall system performance and support research activities.

  18. Indoor Positioning and Navigation Based on Control Spherecal Panoramic Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tsung-Che; Tseng, Yi-Hsing

    2016-06-01

    Continuous indoor and outdoor positioning and navigation is the goal to achieve in the field of mobile mapping technology. However, accuracy of positioning and navigation will be largely degraded in indoor or occluded areas, due to receiving weak or less GNSS signals. Targeting the need of high accuracy indoor and outdoor positioning and navigation for mobile mapping applications, the objective of this study is to develop a novel method of indoor positioning and navigation with the use of spherical panoramic image (SPI). Two steps are planned in the technology roadmap. First, establishing a control SPI database that contains a good number of well-distributed control SPIs pre-acquired in the target space. A control SPI means an SPI with known exterior orientation parameters, which can be solved with a network bundle adjustment of SPIs. Having a control SPI database, the target space will be ready to provide the service of positioning and navigation. Secondly, the position and orientation of a newly taken SPI can be solved by using overlapped SPIs searched from the control SPI database. The method of matching SPIs and finding conjugate image features will be developed and tested. Two experiments will be planned and conducted in this paper to test the feasibility and validate the test results of the proposed methods. Analysis of appropriate number and distribution of needed control SPIs will also be included in the experiments with respect to different test cases.

  19. Performance characteristics of a submarine panoramic infrared imaging sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, J. M.; Waterman, J. R.; Menon, Raghu; Devitt, John

    2010-04-01

    A high-resolution mid-wave infrared panoramic periscope sensor system has been developed. The sensor includes a catadioptric optical system that provides a 360° horizontal azimuth by -10° to +30° elevation field of view without requiring moving components (e.g. rotating mirrors). The focal plane is a 2048 x 2048, 15μm pitch InSb detector operating at 80K. An on-board thermo-electric reference source allows for real-time nonuniformity correction using the two-point correction method. The entire system (detector-dewar assembly, cooler, electronics and optics) is packaged to fit in an 8" high, 6.5" diameter volume. This work describes both the system optics and electronics and presents sample imagery. We also discuss the sensor's radiometric performance, quantified by the NEDT, as a function of key system parameters. The ability of the system to resolve targets as a function of imaged spatial frequency is also presented.

  20. Real-time panoramic infrared imaging system based on FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao-Jun; Shen, Yong-Ge

    2010-11-01

    During the past decades, signal processing architecture, which is based on FPGA, conventional DSP processor and host computer, is popular for infrared or other electro-optical systems. With the increasing processing requirement, the former architecture starts to show its limitation in several respects. This paper elaborates a solution based on FPGA for panoramic imaging system as our first step of upgrading the processing module to System-on-Chip (SoC) solution. Firstly, we compare this new architecture with the traditional to show its superiority mainly in the video processing ability, reduction in the development workload and miniaturization of the system architecture. Afterwards, this paper provides in-depth description of this imaging system, including the system architecture and its function, and addresses several related issues followed by the future development. FPGA has developed so rapidly during the past years, not only in silicon device but also in the design flow and tools. In the end, we briefly present our future system development and introduce those new design tools to make up the limitation of the traditional FPGA design methodology. The advanced design flow through Simulink and Xilinx System Generator (Sysgen) has been elaborated, which enables engineers to develop sophisticated DSP algorithms and implement them in FPGA more efficiently. It is believed that this new design approach can shorten system design cycle by allowing rapid prototyping and refining design process.