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Sample records for paper-thinned diaphragm ct

  1. Fully automatic algorithm for segmenting full human diaphragm in non-contrast CT Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karami, Elham; Gaede, Stewart; Lee, Ting-Yim; Samani, Abbas

    2015-03-01

    The diaphragm is a sheet of muscle which separates the thorax from the abdomen and it acts as the most important muscle of the respiratory system. As such, an accurate segmentation of the diaphragm, not only provides key information for functional analysis of the respiratory system, but also can be used for locating other abdominal organs such as the liver. However, diaphragm segmentation is extremely challenging in non-contrast CT images due to the diaphragm's similar appearance to other abdominal organs. In this paper, we present a fully automatic algorithm for diaphragm segmentation in non-contrast CT images. The method is mainly based on a priori knowledge about the human diaphragm anatomy. The diaphragm domes are in contact with the lungs and the heart while its circumference runs along the lumbar vertebrae of the spine as well as the inferior border of the ribs and sternum. As such, the diaphragm can be delineated by segmentation of these organs followed by connecting relevant parts of their outline properly. More specifically, the bottom surface of the lungs and heart, the spine borders and the ribs are delineated, leading to a set of scattered points which represent the diaphragm's geometry. Next, a B-spline filter is used to find the smoothest surface which pass through these points. This algorithm was tested on a noncontrast CT image of a lung cancer patient. The results indicate that there is an average Hausdorff distance of 2.96 mm between the automatic and manually segmented diaphragms which implies a favourable accuracy.

  2. Variation compensation and analysis on diaphragm curvature analysis for emphysema quantification on whole lung CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Brad M.; Reeves, Anthony P.; Barr, R. Graham; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.

    2010-03-01

    CT scans allow for the quantitative evaluation of the anatomical bases of emphysema. Recently, a non-density based geometric measurement of lung diagphragm curvature has been proposed as a method for the quantification of emphysema from CT. This work analyzes variability of diaphragm curvature and evaluates the effectiveness of a compensation methodology for the reduction of this variability as compared to emphysema index. Using a dataset of 43 scan-pairs with less than a 100 day time-interval between scans, we find that the diaphragm curvature had a trend towards lower overall variability over emphysema index (95% CI:-9.7 to + 14.7 vs. -15.8 to +12.0), and that the variation of both measures was reduced after compensation. We conclude that the variation of the new measure can be considered comparable to the established measure and the compensation can reduce the apparent variation of quantitative measures successfully.

  3. Emphysema quantification from CT scans using novel application of diaphragm curvature estimation: comparison with standard quantification methods and pulmonary function data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Brad M.; Reeves, Anthony P.; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Barr, R. Graham

    2009-02-01

    Emphysema is a disease of the lungs that destroys the alveolar air sacs and induces long-term respiratory dysfunction. CT scans allow for the imaging of the anatomical basis of emphysema and quantification of the underlying disease state. Several measures have been introduced for the quantification emphysema directly from CT data; most,however, are based on the analysis of density information provided by the CT scans, which vary by scanner and can be hard to standardize across sites and time. Given that one of the anatomical variations associated with the progression of emphysema is the flatting of the diaphragm due to the loss of elasticity in the lung parenchyma, curvature analysis of the diaphragm would provide information about emphysema from CT. Therefore, we propose a new, non-density based measure of the curvature of the diaphragm that would allow for further quantification methods in a robust manner. To evaluate the new method, 24 whole-lung scans were analyzed using the ratios of the lung height and diaphragm width to diaphragm height as curvature estimates as well as using the emphysema index as comparison. Pearson correlation coefficients showed a strong trend of several of the proposed diaphragm curvature measures to have higher correlations, of up to r=0.57, with DLCO% and VA than did the emphysema index. Furthermore, we found emphysema index to have only a 0.27 correlation to the proposed measures, indicating that the proposed measures evaluate different aspects of the disease.

  4. Metallic positive expulsion diaphragms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleich, D.

    1972-01-01

    High-cycle life ring-reinforced hemispherical type positive expulsion diaphragm performance was demonstrated by room temperature fluid expulsion tests of 13" diameter, 8 mil thick stainless steel configurations. A maximum of eleven (11) leak-free, fluid expulsions were achieved by a 25 deg cone angle diaphragm hoop-reinforced with .110-inch cross-sectional diameter wires. This represents a 70% improvement in diaphragm reversal cycle life compared to results previously obtained. The reversal tests confirmed analytic predictions for diaphragm cycle life increases due to increasing values of diaphragm cone angle, radius to thickness ratio and material strain to necking capacity. Practical fabrication techniques were demonstrated for forming close-tolerance, thin corrugated shells and for obtaining closely controlled reinforcing ring stiffness required to maximize diaphragm cycle life. A non-destructive inspection technique for monitoring large local shell bending strains was developed.

  5. Nonmetallic Diaphragms for Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, H N; Buckingham, C T

    1925-01-01

    This report, the second of a series of reports relating to the general subject of instrument diaphragms. The first report of the series was published as Technical Report no. 165, "diaphragms for aeronautic instruments," and comprised an outline of historical developments and theoretical principles. The present report relates entirely to nonmetallic diaphragms, the use of which in certain types of pressure elements has been increasing for some time. Little, if any, information has been available to aid the designer of instruments using this form of pressure element. It was to attempt to meet the need for such information that the investigation reported in this paper was undertaken. The report describes the various materials which have been used as nonmetallic diaphragms, discusses the factors which affect the performance of the diaphragms and gives the results of tests made for the purpose of investigating the effect produced by these factors.

  6. Computed tomography to diagnose blunt diaphragm injuries: not ready for prime time.

    PubMed

    Sprunt, Julie M; Brown, Carlos V R; Reifsnyder, Andrew C; Shestopalov, Alex V; Ali, Sadia; Fielder, W Drew

    2014-11-01

    Diaphragm injuries after blunt trauma are uncommon but require early diagnosis to expedite repair. The advancing technology of computed tomography (CT) scanners has improved the detection of almost all traumatic injuries; however, the literature regarding the diagnostic accuracy of CT scan for blunt diaphragm injuries is lacking. The purpose of this study was to determine the CT scan findings in the setting of known blunt diaphragm injury. We performed a retrospective review of all blunt trauma patients with a known diaphragm injury confirmed at laparotomy who also had a preoperative CT scan of the torso. Every CT scan was retrospectively reviewed by a board-certified radiologist for evidence of diaphragm injury as well as associated abdominal and thoracic injuries. Forty-two patients sustaining blunt trauma had preoperative CT scans of the torso and a diaphragm injury confirmed at laparotomy. Only 57 per cent of CT scans showed evidence of diaphragmatic injury. The most common thoracic injury identified was a pulmonary contusion (79%). Although the advancement of imaging technology has markedly improved the diagnosis and management of blunt traumatic injuries, the detection of diaphragm injuries using CT continues to be low and reconstructions do not help in finding diaphragm injuries.

  7. Pressure activated diaphragm bonder

    DOEpatents

    Evans, L.B.; Malba, V.

    1997-05-27

    A device is available for bonding one component to another, particularly for bonding electronic components of integrated circuits, such as chips, to a substrate. The bonder device in one embodiment includes a bottom metal block having a machined opening wherein a substrate is located, a template having machined openings which match solder patterns on the substrate, a thin diaphragm placed over the template after the chips have been positioned in the openings therein, and a top metal block positioned over the diaphragm and secured to the bottom block, with the diaphragm retained therebetween. The top block includes a countersink portion which extends over at least the area of the template and an opening through which a high pressure inert gas is supplied to exert uniform pressure distribution over the diaphragm to keep the chips in place during soldering. A heating means is provided to melt the solder patterns on the substrate and thereby solder the chips thereto. 4 figs.

  8. Automatic delineation of the diaphragm in computed tomographic images.

    PubMed

    Rangayyan, Rangaraj M; Vu, Randy H; Boag, Graham S

    2008-10-01

    Segmentation of the internal organs in medical images is a difficult task. By incorporating a priori information regarding specific organs of interest, results of segmentation may be improved. Landmarking (i.e., identifying stable structures to aid in gaining more knowledge concerning contiguous structures) is a promising segmentation method. Specifically, segmentation of the diaphragm may help in limiting the scope of segmentation methods to the abdominal cavity; the diaphragm may also serve as a stable landmark for identifying internal organs, such as the liver, the spleen, and the heart. A method to delineate the diaphragm is proposed in the present work. The method is based upon segmentation of the lungs, identification of the lower surface of the lungs as an initial representation of the diaphragm, and the application of least-squares modeling and deformable contour models to obtain the final segmentation of the diaphragm. The proposed procedure was applied to nine X-ray computed tomographic (CT) exams of four pediatric patients with neuroblastoma. The results were evaluated against the boundaries of the diaphragm as identified independently by a radiologist. Good agreement was observed between the results of segmentation and the reference contours drawn by the radiologist, with an average mean distance to the closest point of 5.85 mm over a total of 73 CT slices including the diaphragm.

  9. Active Piezoelectric Diaphragms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G.; Effinger, Robert T., IV; Aranda, Isaiah, Jr.; Copeland, Ben M.; Covington, Ed W., III

    2002-01-01

    Several active piezoelectric diaphragms were fabricated by placing unelectroded piezoelectric disks between copper clad films patterned with Inter-Circulating Electrodes "ICE". When a voltage potential is applied to the electrodes, the result is radially distributed electric field that mechanically strains the piezo-ceramic along the Z-axis (perpendicular to the applied electric field), rather than the expected in-plane (XY-axis) direction. Unlike other out of plane piezoelectric actuators, which are benders, these Radial Field Diaphragms (RFDs) strain concentrically yet afford high displacements while maintaining a constant circumference. This paper covers the fabrication and characterization of these diaphragms as a function of poling field strength, ceramic diameter and line spacing, as well as the surface topography, the resulting strain field and displacement as a function of applied voltage ranging from DC to 10 Hz.

  10. Materials for Slack Diaphragms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puschmann, Traute

    1940-01-01

    This report deals with systematic experiments carried out on five diaphragm materials with different pretreatment, for the purpose of ascertaining the suitability of such materials for slack diaphragms. The relationship of deflection and load, temperature and moisture, was recorded. Of the explored materials, synthetic leather, balloon cloth, goldbeaters skin, Igelit and Buna, synthetic leather treated with castor oil is the most suitable material for the small pressure range required. Balloon cloth is nearly as good, while goldbeaters skin, Igelit and Buna were found to be below the required standards.

  11. Diaphragms for Aeronautic Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersey, M D

    1924-01-01

    This investigation was carried out at the request of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics and comprises an outline of historical developments and theoretical principles, together with a discussion of expedients for making the most effective use of existing diaphragms actuated by the hydrostatic pressure form an essential element of a great variety instruments for aeronautic and other technical purposes. The various physical data needed as a foundation for rational methods of diaphragm design have not, however, been available hitherto except in the most fragmentary form.

  12. APU diaphragm testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelley, Richard; Ross, William L., Sr.

    1993-01-01

    The Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) fuel (hydrazine) tanks were removed from the Columbia Shuttle during major modification of the vehicle, because of long-term hydrazine compatibility concerns. The three tanks had been in service for 11 years. As part of an effort to determine whether the useful life of the fuel tanks can be extended, examination of the ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) diaphragm and the metal casing from one of the APU tanks was required. NASA Johnson Space Center Propulsion and Power Division requested the NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility to examine the EPR diaphragm for signs of degradation that might limit the life of its function in the APU tank and to examine the metal casing for signs of surface corrosion. No appreciable degradation of the EPR diaphragm was noted. A decrease in the tensile properties was found, but tensile failure is considered unlikely because the metal casing constrains the diaphragm, preventing it from elongating more than a few percent. The titanium casing showed no evidence of surface corrosion.

  13. Radial Field Piezoelectric Diaphragms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, R. G.; Effinger, R. T., IV; Copeland, B. M., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    A series of active piezoelectric diaphragms were fabricated and patterned with several geometrically defined Inter-Circulating Electrodes "ICE" and Interdigitated Ring Electrodes "ICE". When a voltage potential is applied to the electrodes, the result is a radially distributed electric field that mechanically strains the piezoceramic along the Z-axis (perpendicular to the applied electric field). Unlike other piezoelectric bender actuators, these Radial Field Diaphragms (RFDs) strain concentrically yet afford high displacements (several times that of the equivalent Unimorph) while maintaining a constant circumference. One of the more intriguing aspects is that the radial strain field reverses itself along the radius of the RFD while the tangential strain remains relatively constant. The result is a Z-deflection that has a conical profile. This paper covers the fabrication and characterization of the 5 cm. (2 in.) diaphragms as a function of poling field strength, ceramic thickness, electrode type and line spacing, as well as the surface topography, the resulting strain field and displacement as a function of applied voltage at low frequencies. The unique features of these RFDs include the ability to be clamped about their perimeter with little or no change in displacement, the environmentally insulated packaging, and a highly repeatable fabrication process that uses commodity materials.

  14. Diaphragm Stirling cryocooler developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacy, W. D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on the status of several ongoing development programs aimed at the demonstration of diaphragm Stirling cycle cryocooler performance. Key attributes of this technology focus on long reliable operating life and excellent efficiency, making it a candidate for cooling of satellite-borne long wavelength sensors for astrophysics and earth observing missions. Three programs are described, each leading to system or component test hardware: a 2 W 65 K single-stage Standard Spacecraft Cryocooler, a 300 mW 30 K two-stage cooler and a 200 mW 4-20 K single-stage cooler. Design features are described, and breadboard experimental data are presented.

  15. Flexible Sandwich Diaphragms Are Less Permeable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalovic, John G.; Vassallo, Franklin A.

    1993-01-01

    Diaphragms for use in refrigerator compressors made as laminates of commercially available elastomers and metals. Diaphragms flexible, but less permeable by chlorofluorocarbon refrigerant fluids than diaphragms made of homogeneous mixtures of materials.

  16. [Diaphragm dysfunction : Facts for clinicians].

    PubMed

    Bruells, C S; Marx, G

    2016-10-20

    Diaphragm function is crucial for patient outcome in the ICU setting and during the treatment period. The occurrence of an insufficiency of the respiratory pump, which is predominantly formed by the diaphragm, may result in intubation after failure of noninvasive ventilation. Especially patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are in danger of hypercapnic respiratory failure. Changes in biomechanical properties and fiber texture of the diaphragm are further cofactors directly leading to a need for intubation and mechanical ventilation. After intubation and the following inactivity the diaphragm is subject to profound pathophysiologic changes resulting in atrophy and dysfunction. Besides this inactivity-triggered mechanism (termed as ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction) multiple factors, comorbidities, pharmaceutical agents and additional hits during the ICU treatment, especially the occurrence of sepsis, influence diaphragm homeostasis and can lead to weaning failure. During the weaning process monitoring of diaphragm function can be done with invasive methods - ultrasound is increasingly established to monitor diaphragm contraction, but further and better powered studies are in need to prove its value as a diagnostic tool.

  17. Novel diaphragm based Stirling cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caughley, Alan; Tucker, Alan; Gschwendtner, Michael; Sellier, Mathieu

    2012-06-01

    Industrial Research Ltd has developed a unique diaphragm-based pressure wave generator technology for employment in pulse tube and Stirling cryocoolers. The system uses a pair of metal diaphragms to separate the clean cryocooler gas circuit from a conventionally lubricated mechanical driver, thus producing a clean pressure wave with a long-life drive. We have now extended the same diaphragm concept to support and seal the displacer in a free piston Stirling expander. The diaphragms allow displacer movement without rubbing or clearance gap seals, hence allowing for the development of costeffective long-life and efficient Stirling cryocoolers. Initial modeling, operating in conjunction with a 200 cc swept volume pressure wave generator, predicted in excess of 300 W cooling at 77 K with a Carnot efficiency of over 25%. A proof-of-concept prototype has achieved cryogenic temperatures. Details of the concept, modeling, and testing will be presented.

  18. Miniature electrically operated diaphragm valve

    DOEpatents

    Adkins, Douglas R.; Spletzer, Barry L.; Wong, Chungnin C.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Fischer, Gary J.; Hesketh, Peter J.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a miniature electrically operated valve that can stand off significant pressures, that can be inexpensively produced, and that can be made to operate without continuous electrical power. A valve according to the present invention comprises a housing and a beam mounted with the housing. A diaphragm mounted with the housing forms a sealed fluid volume. An electromagnetic energy source, such as an electromagnetic coil, mounts with the housing and when energized urges the beam in one direction. The beam can be urged in the opposing direction by passive means or by reversing the polarity of the electromagnetic energy source or by a second electromagnetic energy source. Two fluid ports mount with the housing. A first fluid port mounts so that, as the beam is urged in one direction or the opposite, the beam urges the diaphragm to move between engaging and substantially sealing the fluid port and disengaging and not substantially sealing the fluid port. A seat can be mounted with the diaphragm to aid in sealing the fluid port. Latching mechanisms such as permanent magnets can be mounted so that the valve remains in the open or closed positions without continuous electrical power input. Fluid can flow through the housing between the two fluid ports when the diaphragm does not seal the first fluid port, but can be prevented from flowing by urging the beam so that the diaphragm seals the first fluid port. Various embodiments accommodate various latching mechanisms, electromagnetic energy sources, number of fluid ports, and diaphragm design considerations.

  19. APU diaphragm testing. Test plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelley, Richard

    1992-01-01

    Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) fuel (hydrazine) tanks have had to be removed from the Columbia Shuttle (OV-102) because they have been in service for 11 years, which is the limit of their useful life. As part of an effort to determine whether the useful life of the fuel tanks can be extended, examination of the ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) diaphragm and the metal from one of the APU tanks is required. The JSC Propulsion and Power Division has requested White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) to examine the EPR diaphragm thoroughly and the metal casing generally from one tank. The objective is to examine the EPR diaphragm for signs of degradation that may limit the life of its function in the APU propellant tank. The metal casing will also be examined for signs of surface corrosion.

  20. Electrolysis-based diaphragm actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, C.; Tai, Y.-C.; Burdick, J. W.; Andersen, R. A.

    2006-02-01

    This work presents a new electrolysis-based microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) diaphragm actuator. Electrolysis is a technique for converting electrical energy to pneumatic energy. Theoretically electrolysis can achieve a strain of 136 000% and is capable of generating a pressure above 200 MPa. Electrolysis actuators require modest electrical power and produce minimal heat. Due to the large volume expansion obtained via electrolysis, small actuators can create a large force. Up to 100 µm of movement was achieved by a 3 mm diaphragm. The actuator operates at room temperature and has a latching and reversing capability.

  1. Diaphragm Dysfunction: Diagnostic Approaches and Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Dubé, Bruno-Pierre; Dres, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The diaphragm is the main inspiratory muscle, and its dysfunction can lead to significant adverse clinical consequences. The aim of this review is to provide clinicians with an overview of the main causes of uni- and bi-lateral diaphragm dysfunction, explore the clinical and physiological consequences of the disease on lung function, exercise physiology and sleep and review the available diagnostic tools used in the evaluation of diaphragm function. A particular emphasis is placed on the clinical significance of diaphragm weakness in the intensive care unit setting and the use of ultrasound to evaluate diaphragmatic action. PMID:27929389

  2. Birth Control: How to Use Your Diaphragm

    MedlinePlus

    ... contributed by: familydoctor.org editorial staff Tags: barrier method, birth control, contraception, diaphragm, patient education, patient information, prevent pregnancy, preventing pregnancy Birth Control, ...

  3. Diaphragm

    MedlinePlus

    ... a dome-shaped bowl made of thin, flexible rubber that sits over the cervix. How Does It ... or baby oil. These substances can cause the rubber to become brittle and crack. Other vaginal creams, ...

  4. Diaphragm

    MedlinePlus

    ... general, how well each type of birth control method works depends on a lot of things. In the ... ON THIS TOPIC About Birth Control Birth Control Methods: How Well Do They Work? What Can I Expect From the Gynecologist? Cervical ...

  5. Spontaneous diaphragm rupture associated with vaginal delivery.

    PubMed

    Hamaji, Masatsugu; Burt, Bryan M; Ali, Syed Osman; Cohen, Daniel M

    2013-08-01

    Spontaneous rupture of the diaphragm associated with vaginal delivery is a rare occurrence, but has high rates of morbidity and mortality. Herein, we present a first uncomplicated case of spontaneous rupture of the diaphragm associated with vaginal delivery, which was treated successfully with surgery via a thoracotomy.

  6. Benefits of the rotary diaphragm pump.

    PubMed

    Borstell, D

    2005-03-01

    The huge variety of applications in the medical field represents a challenge for the design of miniature pumps. There are well-known designs such as piston pumps, eccenter diaphragm pumps and peristaltic pumps. There are lesser-known types such as the rotary diaphragm pump, the subject of this article. Its design features, variants, and advantages and disadvantages are examined.

  7. Dual diaphragm tank with telltale drain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuthill, Wallace C., Jr. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A fluid storage and expulsion system comprising a tank with an internal flexible diaphragm assembly of dual diaphragms in back-to-back relationship, at least one of which is provided with a patterned surface having fine edges such that the diaphragms are in contact along said edges without mating contact of surface areas to thereby form fluid channels which extend outwardly to the peripheral edges of the diaphragms is described. The interior wall of the tank at the juncture of tank sections is formed with a circumferential annular recess comprising an outer annular recess portion which forms a fluid collection chamber and an inner annular recess portion which accommodates the peripheral edge portions of the diaphragms and a sealing ring in clamped sealing relation therebetween. The sealing ring is perforated with radially extending passages which allow any fluid leaking or diffusing past a diaphragm to flow through the fluid channels between the diaphragms to the fluid collection chamber. Ports connectable to pressure fittings are provided in the tank sections for admission of fluids to opposite sides of the diaphragm assembly. A drain passage through the tank wall to the fluid collection chamber permits detection, analysis and removal of fluids in the collection chamber.

  8. PERFORMANCE OF AN EARTHQUAKE EXCITED ROOF DIAPHRAGM.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Celebi, M.; Brady, G.; Safak, E.; Converse, A.; ,

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to study the earthquake performance of the roof diaphragm of the West Valley College gymnasium in Saratoga, California through a complete set of acceleration records obtained during the 24 April 1984 Morgan Hill Earthquake (M equals 6. 1). The roof diaphragm of the 112 ft. multiplied by 144 ft. rectangular, symmetric gymnasium consists of 3/8 in. plywood over tongue-and-groove sheathing attached to steel trusses supported by reinforced concrete columns and walls. Three sensors placed in the direction of each of the axes of the diaphragm facilitate the evaluation of in-plane deformation of the diaphragm. Other sensors placed at ground level measure vertical and horizontal motion of the building floor, and consequently allow the calculation of the relative motion of the diaphragm with respect to the ground level.

  9. Laparoscopic vs computerized tomography-guided radiofrequency ablation for large hepatic hemangiomas abutting the diaphragm

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jun; Kong, Jian; Ding, Xue-Mei; Ke, Shan; Niu, Hai-Gang; Xin, Zong-Hai; Ning, Chun-Min; Guo, Shi-Gang; Li, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Long; Dong, Yong-Hong; Sun, Wen-Bing

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare safety and therapeutic efficacy of laparoscopic radiofrequency (RF) ablation vs computed tomography (CT)-guided RF ablation for large hepatic hemangiomas abutting the diaphragm. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed our sequential experience of treating 51 large hepatic hemangiomas abutting the diaphragm in 51 patients by CT-guided or laparoscopic RF ablation due to either the presence of symptoms and/or the enlargement of hemangioma. Altogether, 24 hemangiomas were ablated via a CT-guided percutaneous approach (CT-guided ablation group), and 27 hemangiomas were treated via a laparoscopic approach (laparoscopic ablation group). RESULTS: The mean diameter of the 51 hemangiomas was 9.6 ± 1.8 cm (range, 6.0-12.0 cm). There was no difference in the diameter of hemangiomas between the two groups (P > 0.05). RF ablation was performed successfully in all patients. There was no difference in ablation times between groups (P > 0.05). There were 23 thoracic complications in 17 patients: 15 (62.5%, 15/24) in the CT-guided ablation group and 2 (7.4%, 2/27) in the laparoscopic ablation group (P < 0.05). According to the Dindo-Clavien classification, two complications (pleural effusion and diaphragmatic rupture grade III) were major in two patients. All others were minor (grade I). Both major complications occurred in the CT-guided ablation group. The minor complications were treated successfully with conservative measures, and the two major complications underwent treatment by chest tube drainage and thoracoscopic surgery, respectively. Complete ablation was achieved in 91.7% (22/24) and 96.3% (26/27) in the CT-guided and the laparoscopic ablation groups, respectively (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Laparoscopic RF ablation therapy should be used as the first-line treatment option for large hepatic hemangiomas abutting the diaphragm. It avoids thermal injury to the diaphragm and reduces thoracic complications. PMID:26019459

  10. Radial-Electric-Field Piezoelectric Diaphragm Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G.; Working, Dennis C.; Mossi, Karla; Castro, Nicholas D.; Mane, Pooma

    2009-01-01

    In a recently invented class of piezoelectric diaphragm pumps, the electrode patterns on the piezoelectric diaphragms are configured so that the electric fields in the diaphragms have symmetrical radial (along-the-surface) components in addition to through-the-thickness components. Previously, it was accepted in the piezoelectric-transducer art that in order to produce the out-of-plane bending displacement of a diaphragm needed for pumping, one must make the electric field asymmetrical through the thickness, typically by means of electrodes placed on only one side of the piezoelectric material. In the present invention, electrodes are placed on both sides and patterned so as to produce substantial radial as well as through-the-thickness components. Moreover, unlike in the prior art, the electric field can be symmetrical through the thickness. Tests have shown in a given diaphragm that an electrode configuration according to this invention produces more displacement than does a conventional one-sided electrode pattern. The invention admits of numerous variations characterized by various degrees of complexity. Figure 1 is a simplified depiction of a basic version. As in other piezoelectric diaphragm pumps of similar basic design, the prime mover is a piezoelectric diaphragm. Application of a suitable voltage to the electrodes on the diaphragm causes it to undergo out-of-plane bending. The bending displacement pushes a fluid out of, or pulls the fluid into, a chamber bounded partly by the diaphragm. Also as in other diaphragm pumps in general, check valves ensure that the fluid flows only in through one port and only out through another port.

  11. Slit Diaphragms Contain Tight Junction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fukasawa, Hirotaka; Bornheimer, Scott; Kudlicka, Krystyna; Farquhar, Marilyn G.

    2009-01-01

    Slit diaphragms are essential components of the glomerular filtration apparatus, as changes in these junctions are the hallmark of proteinuric diseases. Slit diaphragms, considered specialized adherens junctions, contain both unique membrane proteins (e.g., nephrin, podocin, and Neph1) and typical adherens junction proteins (e.g., P-cadherin, FAT, and catenins). Whether slit diaphragms also contain tight junction proteins is unknown. Here, immunofluorescence, immunogold labeling, and cell fractionation demonstrated that rat slit diaphragms contain the tight junction proteins JAM-A (junctional adhesion molecule A), occludin, and cingulin. We found these proteins in the same protein complexes as nephrin, podocin, CD2AP, ZO-1, and Neph1 by cosedimentation, coimmunoprecipitation, and pull-down assays. PAN nephrosis increased the protein levels of JAM-A, occludin, cingulin, and ZO-1 several-fold in glomeruli and loosened their attachment to the actin cytoskeleton. These data extend current information about the molecular composition of slit diaphragms by demonstrating the presence of tight junction proteins, although slit diaphragms lack the characteristic morphologic features of tight junctions. The contribution of these proteins to the assembly of slit diaphragms and potential signaling cascades requires further investigation. PMID:19478094

  12. Pressure compensated transducer system with constrained diaphragm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percy, Joseph L.

    1992-08-01

    An acoustic source apparatus has an acoustic transducer that is enclosed in a substantially rigid and watertight enclosure to resist the pressure of water on the transducer and to seal the transducer from the water. The enclosure has an opening through which acoustic signals pass and over which is placed a resilient, expandable and substantially water-impermeable diaphragm. A net stiffens and strengthens the diaphragm as well as constrains the diaphragm from overexpansion or from migrating due to buoyancy forces. Pressurized gas, regulated at slightly above ambient pressure, is supplied to the enclosure and the diaphragm to compensate for underwater ambient pressures. Gas pressure regulated at above ambient pressure is used to selectively tune the pressure levels within the enclosure and diaphragm so that diaphragm resonance can be achieved. Controls are used to selectively fill, as well as vent the enclosure and diaphragm during system descent and ascent, respectively. A signal link is used to activate these controls and to provide the driving force for the acoustic transducer.

  13. Assessing breathing motion by shape matching of lung and diaphragm surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urschler, Martin; Bischof, Horst

    2005-04-01

    Studying complex thorax breating motion is an important research topic for accurate fusion of functional and anatomical data, radiotherapy planning or reduction of breathing motion artifacts. We investigate segmented CT lung, airway and diaphragm surfaces at several different breathing states between Functional Residual and Total Lung Capacity. In general, it is hard to robustly derive corresponding shape features like curvature maxima from lung and diaphragm surfaces since diaphragm and rib cage muscles tend to deform the elastic lung tissue such that e.g. ridges might disappear. A novel registration method based on the shape context approach for shape matching is presented where we extend shape context to 3D surfaces. The shape context approach was reported as a promising method for matching 2D shapes without relying on extracted shape features. We use the point correspondences for a non-rigid thin-plate-spline registration to get deformation fields that describe the movement of lung and diaphragm. Our validation consists of experiments on phantom and real sheep thorax data sets. Phantom experiments make use of shapes that are manipulated with known transformations that simulate breathing behaviour. Real thorax data experiments use a data set showing lungs and diaphragm at 5 distinct breathing states, where we compare subsets of the data sets and qualitatively and quantitatively asses the registration performance by using manually identified corresponding landmarks.

  14. Titanium diaphragm makes excellent amplitron cathode support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teich, W. W.

    1965-01-01

    Cathode support structure designed around a titanium diaphragm prevents radial misalignment between the cathode and anode in amplitrons. The titanium exhibits low thermal conductivity, tolerates lateral thermal expansion of the cathode, and is a poor primary and secondary emission medium.

  15. Flexible diaphragm-extreme temperature usage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerma, Guillermo (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A diaphragm suitable for extreme temperature usage, such as encountered in critical aerospace applications, is fabricated by a unique method, and of a unique combination of materials. The materials include multilayered lay-ups of diaphragm materials sandwiched between layers of bleeder fabrics. After being formed in the desired shape on a mold, they are vacuum sealed and then cured under pressure, in a heated autoclave. A bond capable of withstanding extreme temperatures are produced.

  16. Diaphragm injury in individuals with airflow obstruction.

    PubMed

    Macgowan, N A; Evans, K G; Road, J D; Reid, W D

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the nature of diaphragm injury, to quantify the injury and number of macrophages at the light microscopic level, and to determine their association with airflow obstruction in humans. Partial-thickness diaphragm biopsies were obtained from 21 subjects going for thoracotomy surgery (FEV(1): 74 +/- 34% predicted; range: 16 to 122% predicted). Cross sections cut from frozen diaphragm were processed with H&E or processed for immunohistochemistry using the monoclonal antibody Ber-MAC3 (DAKO Corp., Carpinteria, CA) to label macrophages. Area fractions (A(A)) or the proportions of the cross- sectional area were determined by point counting all viable fields of H&E-stained diaphragm cross sections. A(A) were 66.2 +/- 9.0% for normal muscle, 17.6 +/- 7.2% for abnormal muscle, and 16.3 +/- 4.2% for connective tissue. Percent predicted FEV(1) was inversely related to the A(A) of abnormal muscle (r = -0.53, p < 0.01) and directly related to the A(A) of normal muscle (r = 0.37, p < 0.05). The number of macrophages was not related to % predicted FEV(1) (mean +/- SD: 0.41 +/- 0.18/fiber; 52 +/- 19/mm(2)). We conclude that increasing severity of airflow obstruction is associated with an increased A(A) of abnormal diaphragm and a decreased A(A) of normal diaphragm.

  17. Computed tomography of blunt and penetrating diaphragmatic injury: sensitivity and inter-observer agreement of CT Signs.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Mark M; Flagg, Eric; Mellnick, Vincent M; Cummings, Kristopher W; Bhalla, Sanjeev; Raptis, Constantine A

    2014-04-01

    Diaphragmatic injury is an uncommon but clinically important entity in the setting of trauma. Computed tomography (CT) is widely used to evaluate hemodynamically stable trauma patients. While prior studies have identified CT signs of diaphragm injury in blunt or penetrating trauma, no study has directly compared signs across these two types of injuries. We identified patients with surgically proven diaphragm injuries who underwent CT at presentation. Three reviewers examined each for 12 signs of diaphragm injury, as well as for an overall impression of diaphragm injury. We reviewed a total of 84 patients (37 % blunt trauma, 63 % penetrating). The initial interpreting radiologists discovered 77 % of blunt and 47 % of penetrating injuries (p = 0.01). We found that the majority of signs of diaphragmatic injury were split between those common in blunt trauma and those common in penetrating trauma, with minimal overlap. The presence of at least one blunt injury sign has 90 % sensitivity for diaphragm injury in blunt trauma; the presence of a wound tract traversing the diaphragm has 92 % sensitivity in penetrating trauma. Inter-observer reliability of these signs is also high (κ > 0.65). Penetrating diaphragm injuries present a different spectrum of imaging findings from those in blunt trauma and are underdiagnosed at CT; looking for a wound tract traversing the diaphragm is highly sensitive for diaphragm injury in these cases. Signs of organ or diaphragm fragment displacement are sensitive for blunt diaphragm injuries, consistent with these injuries being caused by increased intra-abdominal pressure.

  18. Airflow limitation is accompanied by diaphragm dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hellebrandová, L; Chlumský, J; Vostatek, P; Novák, D; Rýznarová, Z; Bunc, V

    2016-07-18

    Chronic airflow limitation, caused by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or by asthma, is believed to change the shape and the position of the diaphragm due to an increase in lung volume. We have made a comparison of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of diaphragm in supine position with pulmonary functions, respiratory muscle function and exercise tolerance. We have studied the differences between patients with COPD, patients with asthma, and healthy subjects. Most interestingly we found the lung hyperinflation leads to the changes in diaphragmatic excursions during the breathing cycle, seen in the differences between the maximal expiratory diaphragm position (DPex) in patients with COPD and control group (p=0.0016). The magnitude of the diaphragmatic dysfunction was significantly related to the airflow limitation expressed by the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 s to slow vital capacity (FEV(1)/SVC), (%, p=0.0007); to the lung hyperinflation expressed as the ratio of the residual volume to total lung capacity (RV/TLC), (%, p=0.0018) and the extent of tidal volume constrain expressed as maximal tidal volume (V(Tmax)), ([l], p=0.0002); and the ratio of tidal volume to slow vital capacity (V(T)/SVC), (p=0.0038) during submaximal exercise. These results suggest that diaphragmatic movement fails to contribute sufficiently to the change in lung volume in emphysema. Tests of respiratory muscle function were related to the position of the diaphragm in deep expiration, e.g. neuromuscular coupling (P(0.1)/V(T)) (p=0.0232). The results have shown that the lung volumes determine the position of the diaphragm and function of the respiratory muscles. Chronic airflow limitation seems to change the position of the diaphragm, which thereafter influences inspiratory muscle function and exercise tolerance. There is an apparent relationship between the position of the diaphragm and the pulmonary functions and exercise tolerance.

  19. Diaphragm pacing: the state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Legras, Antoine; Arame, Alex; Pricopi, Ciprian; Boucherie, Jean-Claude; Badia, Alain; Panzini, Capucine Morelot

    2016-01-01

    Diaphragm pacing (DP) is an orphan surgical procedure that may be proposed in strictly selected ventilator-dependent patients to get an active diaphragm contraction. The goal is to wean from mechanical ventilation (MV) and restore permanent efficient breathing. The two validated indications, despite the lack of randomised control trials, concern patients with high-level spinal cord injuries (SCI) and central hypoventilation syndromes (CHS). To date, two different techniques exist. The first, intrathoracic diaphragm pacing (IT-DP), based on a radiofrequency method, in which the electrodes are directly placed around the phrenic nerve. The second, intraperitoneal diaphragm pacing (IP-DP) uses intradiaphragmatic electrodes implanted through laparoscopy. In both techniques, the phrenic nerves must be intact and diaphragm reconditioning is always required after implantation. No perioperative mortality has been reported and ventilator-weaning rate is about 72% to 96% in both techniques. Improvement of quality of life, by restoring a more physiological breathing, has been almost constant in patients that could be weaned. Failure or delay in recovery of effective diaphragm contractions could be due to irreversible amyotrophy or chest wall damage. Recent works have evaluated the interest of IP-DP in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). After some short series were reported in the literature, the only multicentric randomized study including 74 ALS patients was prematurely stopped because of excessive mortality in paced patients. Then, another trial analysed the place of IP-DP in peripheral diaphragm dysfunction but, given the multiple biases, the published results cannot validate that indication. Reviewing all available literature as in our experience, shows that DP is an effective method to wean selected patients dependent on ventilator and improve their daily life. Other potential indications will have to be evaluated by randomised control trials. PMID:27195135

  20. Manual evaluation of the diaphragm muscle

    PubMed Central

    Bordoni, Bruno; Marelli, F; Morabito, B; Sacconi, B

    2016-01-01

    The respiratory diaphragm is the most important muscle for breathing. It contributes to various processes such as expectoration, vomiting, swallowing, urination, and defecation. It facilitates the venous and lymphatic return and helps viscera located above and below the diaphragm to work properly. Its activity is fundamental in the maintenance of posture and body position changes. It can affect the pain perception and emotional state. Many authors reported on diaphragmatic training by using special instruments, whereas only a few studies focused on manual therapy approaches. To the knowledge of the authors, the existing scientific literature does not exhaustively examines the manual evaluation of the diaphragm in its different portions. A complete evaluation of the diaphragm is mandatory for several professional subjects, such as physiotherapists, osteopaths, and chiropractors not only to elaborate a treatment strategy but also to obtain information on the validity of the training performed on the patient. This article aims to describe a strategy of manual evaluation of the diaphragm, with particular attention to anatomical fundamentals, in order to stimulate further research on this less explored field. PMID:27574419

  1. Valveless impedance micropump with integrated magnetic diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chia-Yen; Chen, Zgen-Hui

    2010-04-01

    This study presents a planar valveless impedance-based micropump for biomedical applications comprising a lower glass substrate patterned with a copper micro-coil, a microchannel, an upper glass cover plate, and a PDMS diaphragm with an electroplated magnet on its upper surface. When a current is passed through the micro-coil, an electromagnetic force is established between the coil and the magnet. The resulting deflection of the PDMS diaphragm creates an acoustic impedance mismatch within the microchannel, which in turn produces a net flow. The performance of the micropump is characterized experimentally. The experimental results show that a maximum diaphragm deflection of 30 microm is obtained when the micro-coil is supplied with an input current of 0.5 A. The corresponding flow rate is found to be 1.5 microl/sec when the PDMS membrane is driven by an actuating frequency of 240 Hz.

  2. Microfluidic Pumps Containing Teflon [Trademark] AF Diaphragms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Peter; White, Victor; Grunthaner, Frank; Ikeda, Mike; Mathies, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    Microfluidic pumps and valves based on pneumatically actuated diaphragms made of Teflon AF polymers are being developed for incorporation into laboratory-on-a-chip devices that must perform well over temperature ranges wider than those of prior diaphragm-based microfluidic pumps and valves. Other potential applications include implanted biomedical microfluidic devices, wherein the biocompatability of Teflon AF polymers would be highly advantageous. These pumps and valves have been demonstrated to function stably after cycling through temperatures from -125 to 120 C. These pumps and valves are intended to be successors to similar prior pumps and valves containing diaphragms made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) [commonly known as silicone rubber]. The PDMS-containing valves ae designed to function stably only within the temperature range from 5 to 80 C. Undesirably, PDMS membranes are somwehat porous and retain water. PDMS is especially unsuitable for use at temperatures below 0 C because the formation of ice crystals increases porosity and introduces microshear.

  3. La chirurgie du diaphragme sous aortique

    PubMed Central

    Moutakiallah, Younes; Maaroufi, Ilham; Aithoussa, Mahdi; Bamous, Mehdi; Abdou, Abdessamad; Atmani, Noureddine; Hatim, Abdedaïm; Amahzoune, Brahim; Bekkali, Youssef El; Boulahya, Abdelatif

    2016-01-01

    Le diaphragme sous aortique se caractérise par une certaine latence clinique et une faible morbi-mortalité. La chirurgie reste le traitement de choix malgré un réel risque de récurrence à long terme. Nous rapportons 18 patients opérés entre Avril 1994 et Mars 2011 pour diaphragme sous aortique d’âge moyen de 18,1±9,7 ans avec 11 patients de sexe masculin. Le diaphragme était de nature fibreuse chez 13 patients et fibro-musculaire chez 5 patients. Tous les patients ont été opérés par résection de diaphragme associée à une myectomie, une plastie aortique, une fermeture de communication interventriculaire et une ligature de canal artériel perméable respectivement chez 3, 3, 2 et 2 patients. La Mortalité opératoire était nulle et sans aucun cas de trouble de conduction postopératoire. Le suivi a duré en moyenne 44,3±36,8 mois sans aucun décès tardif. Deux patients ont présenté une récidive de diaphragme qui a nécessité une réopération avec bonne évolution. La tendance actuelle dans la chirurgie du diaphragme se fait vers des interventions précoces et des résections plus extensives. Cependant, le risque de récidive impose une surveillance échographique systématique et rapprochée. PMID:27516830

  4. Design study of a flexible diaphragm

    SciTech Connect

    Whatley, M E; Morgan, J G

    1982-10-01

    A design study was made to meet the requirements for a diaphragm for a rotary seal at the discharge end of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program`s prototypic voloxidizer. Using a computer program called NEPSAP, the study examined thickness, outer radius, corrugation wavelength and corrugation amplitude as variables, and established the general effect of each on stiffness and stresses. The result comprises a basis for the selection of diaphragms for similar applications. Limited experimental measurements of stress validate the stress values calculated by NEPSAP.

  5. 14 CFR 125.149 - Engine accessory section diaphragm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Engine accessory section diaphragm. 125.149... Requirements § 125.149 Engine accessory section diaphragm. Unless equivalent protection can be shown by other means, a diaphragm that complies with § 125.145 must be provided on air-cooled engines to isolate...

  6. 14 CFR 25.1192 - Engine accessory section diaphragm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Engine accessory section diaphragm. 25.1192....1192 Engine accessory section diaphragm. For reciprocating engines, the engine power section and all portions of the exhaust system must be isolated from the engine accessory compartment by a diaphragm...

  7. 14 CFR 125.149 - Engine accessory section diaphragm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Engine accessory section diaphragm. 125.149... Requirements § 125.149 Engine accessory section diaphragm. Unless equivalent protection can be shown by other means, a diaphragm that complies with § 125.145 must be provided on air-cooled engines to isolate...

  8. The diaphragm: barrier contraception has a new social role.

    PubMed

    Tagg, P I

    1995-12-01

    Using a diaphragm as a barrier contraceptive has received little attention in recent literature. A discussion of the role of the diaphragm to prevent pregnancy, as well as sexually transmitted diseases, is presented. A procedure for properly fitting the diaphragm is described. To ensure compliance, a review of a plan for education and practice by users is outlined.

  9. 14 CFR 125.149 - Engine accessory section diaphragm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Engine accessory section diaphragm. 125.149... Requirements § 125.149 Engine accessory section diaphragm. Unless equivalent protection can be shown by other means, a diaphragm that complies with § 125.145 must be provided on air-cooled engines to isolate...

  10. 14 CFR 25.1192 - Engine accessory section diaphragm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Engine accessory section diaphragm. 25.1192....1192 Engine accessory section diaphragm. For reciprocating engines, the engine power section and all portions of the exhaust system must be isolated from the engine accessory compartment by a diaphragm...

  11. 14 CFR 25.1192 - Engine accessory section diaphragm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Engine accessory section diaphragm. 25.1192....1192 Engine accessory section diaphragm. For reciprocating engines, the engine power section and all portions of the exhaust system must be isolated from the engine accessory compartment by a diaphragm...

  12. 14 CFR 125.149 - Engine accessory section diaphragm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Engine accessory section diaphragm. 125.149... Requirements § 125.149 Engine accessory section diaphragm. Unless equivalent protection can be shown by other means, a diaphragm that complies with § 125.145 must be provided on air-cooled engines to isolate...

  13. Toxic shock syndrome associated with diaphragm use.

    PubMed

    Hyde, L

    1983-03-01

    A case report is presented of toxic shock syndrome associated wtih diaphragm use. The patient, an 18-year old white woman, gravida 1, para 1, was in good health prior to the reported episode. She had a low transverse cesarean section for fetal distress 3 months prior to admission and had not yet resumed menstruation. 48 hours prior to admission, after unprotected intercourse, she developed a vaginal discharge requiring the use of a pad. 12 hours later she used a diaphragm, left it in place overnight, and failed to remove it the next morning. During the day pelvic and lumbar pain developed, followed by vomiting and a fever as high as 103 degrees Farenheit. That evening, 12 hours before admission, the diaphragm was removed with drainage of copious purulent discharge. The edges of the diaphragm and the discharge were blood streaked. She also developed a diffuse macular blanching rash, sparing only the circumoral region. At the time of admission the following morning her blood pressure was 60/0mmHg; pulse, 180 beats/minute; and temperature, 102 degrees Farenheit. Significant physical findings included the rash, conjunctivitis, a pharyngeal infection, and a lack of adenopathy. Pelvic examination showed a vaginal discharge, a very tender, slightly enlarged warm uterus, and normal adnexa. Cultures of the vaginal discharge were positive for Staphylococcus aureus, resistant to penicillin and ampicillin, and sensitive to methicillin, cephalothin, erythromycin, colistin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, sulfisoxazole, and aminoglycoside antibiotics. The white blood count rose from 11,000/mm on admission to a high of 13,000/mm with a left shift the next day. The patient received 1.2 million units of intravenous penicillin every 4 hours, 80 mg of gentamicin every 8 hours, and 300 mg of clindamycin every 6 hours, as well as fluid replacement of 2 g of methylprednisolone followed by 1 g every 6 hours. The shock, fever, and rash resolved in the following 48 hours. 2 days after

  14. Diaphragm Pump With Resonant Piezoelectric Drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Kline-Schoder, Robert J.; Shimko, Martin A.

    2007-01-01

    A diaphragm pump driven by a piezoelectric actuator is undergoing development. This pump is intended to be a prototype of lightweight, highly reliable pumps for circulating cooling liquids in protective garments and high-power electronic circuits, and perhaps for some medical applications. The pump would be highly reliable because it would contain no sliding seals or bearings that could wear, the only parts subject to wear would be two check valves, and the diaphragm and other flexing parts could be designed, by use of proven methods, for extremely long life. Because the pump would be capable of a large volumetric flow rate and would have only a small dead volume, its operation would not be disrupted by ingestion of gas, and it could be started reliably under all conditions. The prior art includes a number piezoelectrically actuated diaphragm pumps. Because of the smallness of the motions of piezoelectric actuators (typical maximum strains only about 0.001), the volumetric flow rates of those pumps are much too small for typical cooling applications. In the pump now undergoing development, mechanical resonance would be utilized to amplify the motion generated by the piezoelectric actuator and thereby multiply the volumetric flow rate. The prime mover in this pump would be a stack of piezoelectric ceramic actuators, one end of which would be connected to a spring that would be part of a spring-and-mass resonator structure. The mass part of the resonator structure would include the pump diaphragm (see Figure 1). Contraction of the spring would draw the diaphragm to the left, causing the volume of the fluid chamber to increase and thereby causing fluid to flow into the chamber. Subsequent expansion of the spring would push the diaphragm to the right, causing the volume of the fluid chamber to decrease, and thereby expelling fluid from the chamber. The fluid would enter and leave the chamber through check valves. The piezoelectric stack would be driven electrically to

  15. Inflatable containment diaphragm for sealing and removing stacks

    DOEpatents

    Meskanick, G.R.; Rosso, D.T.

    1993-04-13

    A diaphragm with an inflatable torus-shaped perimeter is used to seal at least one end of a stack so that debris that might be hazardous will not be released during removal of the stack. A diaphragm is inserted and inflated in the lower portion of a stack just above where the stack is to be cut such that the perimeter of the diaphragm expands and forms a seal against the interior surface of the stack.

  16. An Autopsy Case of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis with Diaphragm Pacing

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hisashi; Kamei, Tetsumasa; Odake, Sanae; Nakano, Masayuki; Okeda, Riki; Kohriki, Shunsaku; Kawachi, Jun; Onders, Raymond P.; Yoshii, Fumihito

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory insufficiency is a critical problem in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. We herein present the case of an autopsied patient with sporadic ALS who underwent diaphragm pacing (DP). The pathology showed several localized adhesions with a markedly atrophied diaphragm. A marked loss of motor neurons with Bunina bodies and phosphorylated TDP-43 positive inclusions was found in the spinal cord and primary motor cortex. Mild hyalinization and a few multinucleated giant cells were present around the electrode tracks in the diaphragm. However, no infiltration of inflammatory cells was detected. Our findings suggest that full-time DP might not cause severe damage to adjacent diaphragm tissue. PMID:27904119

  17. Contraction of the human diaphragm during rapid postural adjustments.

    PubMed

    Hodges, P W; Butler, J E; McKenzie, D K; Gandevia, S C

    1997-12-01

    1. The response of the diaphragm to the postural perturbation produced by rapid flexion of the shoulder to a visual stimulus was evaluated in standing subjects. Gastric, oesophageal and transdiaphragmatic pressures were measured together with intramuscular and oesophageal recordings of electromyographic activity (EMG) in the diaphragm. To assess the mechanics of contraction of the diaphragm, dynamic changes in the length of the diaphragm were measured with ultrasonography. 2. With rapid flexion of the shoulder in response to a visual stimulus, EMG activity in the costal and crural diaphragm occurred about 20 ms prior to the onset of deltoid EMG. This anticipatory contraction occurred irrespective of the phase of respiration in which arm movement began. The onset of diaphragm EMG coincided with that of transversus abdominis. 3. Gastric and transdiaphragmatic pressures increased in association with the rapid arm flexion by 13.8 +/- 1.9 (mean +/- S.E.M.) and 13.5 +/- 1.8 cmH2O, respectively. The increases occurred 49 +/- 4 ms after the onset of diaphragm EMG, but preceded the onset of movement of the limb by 63 +/- 7 ms. 4. Ultrasonographic measurements revealed that the costal diaphragm shortened and then lengthened progressively during the increase in transdiaphragmatic pressure. 5. This study provides definitive evidence that the human diaphragm is involved in the control of postural stability during sudden voluntary movement of the limbs.

  18. An Autopsy Case of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis with Diaphragm Pacing.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hisashi; Kamei, Tetsumasa; Odake, Sanae; Nakano, Masayuki; Okeda, Riki; Kohriki, Shunsaku; Kawachi, Jun; Onders, Raymond P; Yoshii, Fumihito

    Respiratory insufficiency is a critical problem in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. We herein present the case of an autopsied patient with sporadic ALS who underwent diaphragm pacing (DP). The pathology showed several localized adhesions with a markedly atrophied diaphragm. A marked loss of motor neurons with Bunina bodies and phosphorylated TDP-43 positive inclusions was found in the spinal cord and primary motor cortex. Mild hyalinization and a few multinucleated giant cells were present around the electrode tracks in the diaphragm. However, no infiltration of inflammatory cells was detected. Our findings suggest that full-time DP might not cause severe damage to adjacent diaphragm tissue.

  19. CT and MRI of the thorax

    SciTech Connect

    Zerhouni, E.A.

    1990-01-01

    This book addresses a variety of topics in thoracic imaging, including magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in thoracic lymphoma; focal and high-resolution computed tomography (CT) of diffuse lung disease; imaging and disorders of the pleura, diaphragm, and mediastinum; and the increasingly important topic of the immunocompromised patient. Eight case studies close out the volume.

  20. Imaging of the diaphragm: anatomy and function.

    PubMed

    Nason, Laura K; Walker, Christopher M; McNeeley, Michael F; Burivong, Wanaporn; Fligner, Corinne L; Godwin, J David

    2012-01-01

    The diaphragm is the primary muscle of ventilation. Dysfunction of the diaphragm is an underappreciated cause of respiratory difficulties and may be due to a wide variety of entities, including surgery, trauma, tumor, and infection. Diaphragmatic disease usually manifests as elevation at chest radiography. Functional imaging with fluoroscopy (or ultrasonography or magnetic resonance imaging) is a simple and effective method of diagnosing diaphragmatic dysfunction, which can be classified as paralysis, weakness, or eventration. Diaphragmatic paralysis is indicated by absence of orthograde excursion on quiet and deep breathing, with paradoxical motion on sniffing. Diaphragmatic weakness is indicated by reduced or delayed orthograde excursion on deep breathing, with or without paradoxical motion on sniffing. Eventration is congenital thinning of a segment of diaphragmatic muscle and manifests as focal weakness. Treatment of diaphragmatic paralysis depends on the cause of the dysfunction and the severity of the symptoms. Treatment options include plication and phrenic nerve stimulation. Supplemental material available at http://radiographics.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/rg.322115127/-/DC1.

  1. 14 CFR 23.1192 - Engine accessory compartment diaphragm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Engine accessory compartment diaphragm. 23... Powerplant Powerplant Fire Protection § 23.1192 Engine accessory compartment diaphragm. For aircooled radial engines, the engine power section and all portions of the exhaust sytem must be isolated from the...

  2. 14 CFR 23.1192 - Engine accessory compartment diaphragm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Engine accessory compartment diaphragm. 23... Powerplant Powerplant Fire Protection § 23.1192 Engine accessory compartment diaphragm. For aircooled radial engines, the engine power section and all portions of the exhaust sytem must be isolated from the...

  3. 14 CFR 23.1192 - Engine accessory compartment diaphragm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Engine accessory compartment diaphragm. 23... Powerplant Powerplant Fire Protection § 23.1192 Engine accessory compartment diaphragm. For aircooled radial engines, the engine power section and all portions of the exhaust sytem must be isolated from the...

  4. 14 CFR 23.1192 - Engine accessory compartment diaphragm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Engine accessory compartment diaphragm. 23... Powerplant Powerplant Fire Protection § 23.1192 Engine accessory compartment diaphragm. For aircooled radial engines, the engine power section and all portions of the exhaust sytem must be isolated from the...

  5. Experimental investigation of solar powered diaphragm and helical pumps

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For several years, many types of solar powered water pumping systems were evaluated, and in this paper, diaphragm and helical solar photovoltaic (PV) powered water pumping systems are discussed. Data were collected on diaphragm and helical pumps which were powered by different solar PV arrays at mul...

  6. Silicon-micromachined poppet valve with an octagonal diaphragm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siekkinen, James W.; Haltiner, K. J.; Chilcott, Dan W.; Huang, L. X.; Staller, Steve E.

    1996-09-01

    A new pressure-activated silicon micromachined poppet valve design and fabrication process are presented for automotive fuel applications. Although non-electrically activated, micromachining provides a physical structure which is difficult or expensive to achieve with conventional method machined parts. Bulk etching is used to fabricate an octagonal silicon diaphragm which moves in response to the inlet fluid pressure. Silicon direct bonding is used to combine two layers, one with an inlet flow chamber and valve boss, and a second with a movable diaphragm and valve seat. The outlet side of the diaphragm includes a spring locator to position a counter-force mechanical spring. The diaphragm's burst pressure is reduced and varies greatly depending on the alignment of the clamping edges above and below the diaphragm.

  7. Influence of diaphragm configuration on DC diaphragm discharge breakdown in electrolyte solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlavatá, L.; Hlochová, L.; Kozáková, Z.; Krčma, F.; Guaitella, O.

    2016-10-01

    This paper deals with generation of diaphragm discharge in water solutions of sodium chloride with fixed conductivity of 275 μS. The photos were recorded by high-speed iCCD camera at defined times synchronized by the current passing through the system. Three different phases in the current-voltage curve were recognized under all conditions. Only electrolysis proceeds during the first phase at the lowest applied voltage (300 - 1200 V depending on the orifice dimensions), while bubbles were created thanks to the intense Joule heating inside the orifice during the second phase. Finally, the discharge was ignited at applied voltages over 1600 V. These facts were confirmed by iCCD images taken during all three phases. We concluded, by comparing current-voltage characteristics of different orifice diameter sizes, that this parameter had an important influence on the bubbles generation phase. On the contrary, the diaphragm thickness played an important role at the discharge breakdown.

  8. Photographic photometry with Iris diaphragm photometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, B. E.

    1981-01-01

    A general method is presented for solving problems encountered in the analysis of Iris diaphragm photometer (IDP) data. The method is used to derive the general shape of the calibration curve, allowing both a more accurate fit to the IDP data for comparison stars and extrapolation to magnitude ranges for which no comparison stars are measured. The profile of starlight incident and the characteristic curve of the plate are both assumed and then used to derive the profile of the star image. An IDP reading is then determined for each star image. A procedure for correcting the effects of a nonconstant background fog level on the plate is also demonstrated. Additional applications of the method are made in the appendix to determine the relation between the radius of a photographic star image and the star's magnitude, and to predict the IDP reading of the 'point of optimum density'.

  9. Seismic response of a large-span roof diaphragm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Celebi, Mehmet; Bongiovanni, Giovanni; Safak, Erdal; Brady, A. Gerald

    1989-01-01

    Records obtained from the West Valley College Gymnasium in Saratoga, California during the 1984 Morgan Hill earthquake are used to study the dynamic behavior of the overall gymnasium as well as its flexible disaphragm. The ground-level motions recorded in the two orthogonal axes of the structure differ considerably in peak acceleration and amplify by approximately 1.5 times at the roof edges and by 4-5 times at the center of the diaphragm. The diaphragm responds with a frequency of approximately 4 Hz in both orthogonal axes. A simple finite-element model is used to match the fundamental frequency of the diaphragm with that from the records. Using this model and the ground-level motions as input, the diaphragm center displacements are calculated by varying the structural damping. Best comparisons are obtained for 5% damping. These results are discussed in terms of the code provisions.

  10. Pellagra revealing a congenital duodenal diaphragm in an adult.

    PubMed

    Khouloud, Bouslama; Haykel, Bedioui; Ahmed, Saidani; Houcine, Maghrebi; Yacine, Ben Safta; Farah, Jokho; Zoubeir, Ben Safta

    2013-12-01

    Pellagra is a nutritional disease caused by the deficiency of niacin. It is a clinical syndrome characterized by four "D's": diarrhea, dermatitis, dementia and ultimately death. We describe a case of pellagra as the initial presentation of congenital duodenal diaphragm.

  11. Endocytic Trafficking at the Mature Podocyte Slit Diaphragm

    PubMed Central

    Swiatecka-Urban, Agnieszka

    2017-01-01

    Endocytic trafficking couples cell signaling with the cytoskeletal dynamics by organizing a crosstalk between protein networks in different subcellular compartments. Proteins residing in the plasma membrane are internalized and transported as cargo in endocytic vesicles (i.e., endocytosis). Subsequently, cargo proteins can be delivered to lysosomes for degradation or recycled back to the plasma membrane. The slit diaphragm is a modified tight junction connecting foot processes of the glomerular epithelial cells, podocytes. Signaling at the slit diaphragm plays a critical role in the kidney while its dysfunction leads to glomerular protein loss (proteinuria), manifesting as nephrotic syndrome, a rare condition with an estimated incidence of 2–4 new cases per 100,000 each year. Relatively little is known about the role of endocytic trafficking in podocyte signaling and maintenance of the slit diaphragm integrity. This review will focus on the role of endocytic trafficking at the mature podocyte slit diaphragm. PMID:28286744

  12. Diaphragm Thickness and Inspiratory Muscle Functions in Chronic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minkyu; Lee, Kyeongbong; Cho, Jieun; Lee, Wanhee

    2017-01-01

    Background The aims of this study are to investigate the difference between the diaphragm thickness at end expiration and the thickness at total lung capacity (TLC), and to examine differences in inspiratory muscle function between stroke patients and healthy individuals. Material/Methods Forty-five stroke patients and 49 healthy volunteers were included in this study. Diaphragm thickness was measured at end expiration and at TLC by ultrasonography. The maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), peak inspiratory flow (PIF), vital capacity (VC), and inspiratory muscle endurance (IME) were assess to evaluate inspiratory muscle function. Results In stroke patients, the diaphragm was significantly thinner on the affected side than the less affected side at end expiration and at TLC. The change between the thickness at end expiration and at TLC were also significant on both sides. Between groups, the difference in diaphragm thickness at end expiration was not significant, but at TLC, the diaphragms were significantly thicker in healthy individuals than on either side in stroke patients, and the change in diaphragm thickness was significantly greater for healthy individuals. Inspiratory muscle functions were also significantly greater in healthy individuals. MIP, PIF, and VC were positively correlated with the change in thickness in healthy individuals, and MIP was positively correlated with the change in thickness and IME in stroke patients. Conclusions Stroke patients showed decreases in the thickening ability of the diaphragm at TLC and in inspiratory muscle function. The change between the diaphragm thickness at end expiration and at TLC was positively correlated with MIP, PIF, and VC. PMID:28284044

  13. Formation of sodium chlorate in diaphragmed chlorine electrolyzers

    SciTech Connect

    Gorbachev, A.K.; Andryushchenko, F.K.; Maksimchuk, E.F.; Potapov, V.N.

    1985-11-01

    This paper examines the formation of sodium chlorate under conditions of diaphragmed electrolysis with ruthenium-titanium oxide anodes. The authors establish that the sodium chlorate is formed chemically in such an electrolyzer. The data indicate that effective methods of reducing the amounts of sodium chlorate in diaphragm chlorine electrolyzers are to supply an acidified brine and to ensure catalytic decomposition of hypochlorous acid and sodium chlorate directly in the electrolyzer.

  14. Fluid Sloshing Characteristics in Spacecraft Propellant Tanks with Diaphragms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Steve; Burkey, Russell; Viana, Flavia; Sudermann, James

    2007-01-01

    All spacecraft are launched from the Earth as payloads on a launch vehicle. During portions of the launch profile, the spacecraft could be subjected to nearly purely translational oscillatory lateral motions as the launch vehicle control system guides the rocket along its flight path. All partially-filled liquids tanks, even those with diaphragms, exhibit sloshing behavior under these conditions and some tanks can place large loads on their support structures if the sloshing is in resonance with the control system oscillation frequency. The objectives of this project were to conduct experiments using a full-scale model of a flight tank to 1) determine whether launch vehicle vibrations can cause the diaphragm to achieve a repeatable configuration, regardless of initial condition, and 2) identify the slosh characteristics of the propellant tank under flight-like lateral motions for different diaphragm shapes and vibration levels. The test results show that 1) the diaphragm shape is not affected by launch vibrations, and 2) the resonance-like behavior of the fluid and diaphragm is strongly affected by the nonlinear stiffness and damping provided by the diaphragm.

  15. Role of the diaphragm in trunk rotation in humans.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Anna L; Butler, Jane E; Gandevia, Simon C; De Troyer, Andre

    2011-10-01

    The objectives of the present study were to test the hypothesis that the costal diaphragm contracts during ipsilateral rotation of the trunk and that such trunk rotation increases the motor output of the muscle during inspiration. Monopolar electrodes were inserted in the right costal hemidiaphragm in six subjects, and electromyographic (EMG) recordings were made during isometric rotation efforts of the trunk to the right ("ipsilateral rotation") and to the left ("contralateral rotation"). EMG activity was simultaneously recorded from the parasternal intercostal muscles on the right side. The parasternal intercostals were consistently active during ipsilateral rotation but silent during contralateral rotation. In contrast, the diaphragm was silent in the majority of rotations in either direction, and whenever diaphragm activity was recorded, it involved very few motor units. In addition, whereas parasternal inspiratory activity substantially increased during ipsilateral rotation and decreased during contralateral rotation, inspiratory activity in the diaphragm was essentially unaltered and the discharge frequency of single motor units in the muscle remained at 13-14 Hz in the different postures. It is concluded that 1) the diaphragm makes no significant contribution to trunk rotation and 2) even though the diaphragm and parasternal intercostals contract in a coordinated manner during resting breathing, the inspiratory output of the two muscles is affected differently by voluntary drive during trunk rotation.

  16. Diaphragm Dysfunction in Mechanically Ventilated Patients.

    PubMed

    Dot, Irene; Pérez-Teran, Purificación; Samper, Manuel-Andrés; Masclans, Joan-Ramon

    2017-03-01

    Muscle involvement is found in most critical patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). Diaphragmatic muscle alteration, initially included in this category, has been differentiated in recent years, and a specific type of muscular dysfunction has been shown to occur in patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. We found this muscle dysfunction to appear in this subgroup of patients shortly after the start of mechanical ventilation, observing it to be mainly associated with certain control modes, and also with sepsis and/or multi-organ failure. Although the specific etiology of process is unknown, the muscle presents oxidative stress and mitochondrial changes. These cause changes in protein turnover, resulting in atrophy and impaired contractility, and leading to impaired functionality. The term 'ventilator-induced diaphragm dysfunction' was first coined by Vassilakopoulos et al. in 2004, and this phenomenon, along with injury cause by over-distention of the lung and barotrauma, represents a challenge in the daily life of ventilated patients. Diaphragmatic dysfunction affects prognosis by delaying extubation, prolonging hospital stay, and impairing the quality of life of these patients in the years following hospital discharge. Ultrasound, a non-invasive technique that is readily available in most ICUs, could be used to diagnose this condition promptly, thus preventing delays in starting rehabilitation and positively influencing prognosis in these patients.

  17. Diaphragm Motor Unit Recruitment in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mantilla, Carlos B.; Seven, Yasin B.; Zhan, Wen-Zhi; Sieck, Gary C.

    2010-01-01

    We hypothesized that considerable force reserve exists for the diaphragm muscle (DIAm) to generate transdiaphragmatic pressures (Pdi) necessary to sustain ventilation. In rats, we measured Pdi and DIAm EMG activity during different ventilatory (eupnea and hypoxia (10% O2) – hypercapnia (5% CO2)) and non-ventilatory (airway occlusion and sneezing induced by intranasal capsaicin) behaviors. Compared to maximum Pdi (Pdimax - generated by bilateral phrenic nerve stimulation), the Pdi generated during eupnea (21±2%) and hypoxia-hypercapnia (28±4%) were significantly less (P<0.0001) than that generated during airway occlusion (63±4%) and sneezing (94±5%). The Pdi generated during spontaneous sighs was 62±5% of Pdimax. Relative DIAm EMG activity (root mean square [RMS] amplitude) paralleled the changes in Pdi during different ventilatory and non-ventilatory behaviors (r2=0.78; p<0.0001). These results support our hypothesis of a considerable force reserve for the DIAm to accomplish ventilatory behaviors. A model for DIAm motor unit recruitment predicted that ventilatory behaviors would require activation of only fatigue resistant units. PMID:20620243

  18. The maximum life expectancy for a micro-fabricated diaphragm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cǎlimǎnescu, Ioan; Stan, Liviu-Constantin; Popa, Viorica

    2015-02-01

    Micro-fabricated diaphragms can be used to provide pumping action in microvalve and microfluidic applications. The functionality of the microdiaphragm in a wirelessly actuated micropump plays a major role in low-powered device actuation. In developing micropumps and their components, it is becoming an increasing trend to predict the performance before the prototype is fabricated. Because performance prediction allows for an accurate estimation of yield and lifetime, in addition to developing better understanding of the device while taking into account the details of the device structure and second order effects. Hence avoid potential pitfalls in the device operation in a practical environment. The goal of this research is to determine via FEA the life expectancy for a corrugated circular diaphragm made out of an aluminum alloy. The geometry of the diaphragm is given below being generated within SolidWorks 2010, all the calculations were made using Ansys 13TM . The sound design of a micropump is heavily depending on the lifetime expectancy of the working part of the device which is the diaphragm. This will be subjected on cyclic loading and the fatigue will limit the life of this part. Once the diaphragm is breaking, the micropump is no more able to fulfill its scope. Any micropump manufacturer will then be very concerned on the life expectancy from the fatigue point of view of the diaphragms. The diaphragm circular and corrugated and made of Al alloy, showed a very good behavior from the fatigue point of view, the maximum life expectancy being 1.9 years of continuous functioning with 100 cycles per second. This work showed an simple and forward application of FEA analysis methods in order to estimate the fatigue behavior of corrugated circular microdiaphragms.

  19. CT Enterography

    MedlinePlus

    ... obstructions and Crohn’s disease. CT scanning is fast, painless, noninvasive and accurate. CT enterography is better able ... the benefits vs. risks? Benefits CT scanning is painless, noninvasive and accurate. A major advantage of CT ...

  20. Development of the diaphragm, a skeletal muscle essential for mammalian respiration

    PubMed Central

    Merrell, Allyson J.; Kardon, Gabrielle

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian diaphragm muscle is essential for respiration, and thus it is among the most critical of the skeletal muscles in the human body. Defects in diaphragm development, leading to congenital diaphragmatic hernias (CDH), are common birth defects and result in severe morbidity or mortality. Given its functional importance and the frequency of congenital defects, an understanding of diaphragm development normally and during herniation is important. We review the current knowledge of the embryological origins of the diaphragm, diaphragm development and morphogenesis, and the genetic and developmental etiology of diaphragm birth defects. PMID:23586979

  1. Chondroma of the diaphragm mimicking a giant liver tumor with calcification: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Asahi, Yoh; Kamiyama, Toshiya; Nakanishi, Kazuaki; Yokoo, Hideki; Tahara, Munenori; Usui, Akihiro; Funakoshi, Tohru; Sato, Masanori; Sasaki, Ayami; Matsuno, Yoshihiro; Taketomi, Akinobu; Todo, Satoru

    2014-12-01

    Extraskeletal chondroma is an unusual benign tumor, which rarely arises in the diaphragm. We report a case of chondroma of the diaphragm in a 31-year-old woman. Initially, a benign liver tumor with calcification was suspected, based on pre and intraoperative examination findings. Although parts of the tumor were contiguous with the diaphragm, its connections with the diaphragm were much narrower than its connection with the liver, which suggested a liver tumor. Pathological examination subsequently revealed that the chondroma was contiguous with the diaphragm and that there was a distinct border between the tumor and the liver; thus, the tumor was diagnosed as a chondroma of the diaphragm.

  2. Interstitial space and collagen alterations of the developing rat diaphragm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosselin, L. E.; Martinez, D. A.; Vailas, A. C.; Sieck, G. C.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of growth on the relative interstitial space [%total cross-sectional area (CSA)] and collagen content of the rat diaphragm muscle was examined at postnatal ages of 0, 7, 14, and 21 days as well as in adult males. The proportion of interstitial space relative to total muscle CSA was determined by computerized image analysis of lectin-stained cross sections of diaphragm muscle. To assess collagen content and extent of collagen maturation (i.e., cross-linking), high-pressure liquid chromatography analysis was used to measure hydroxyproline concentration and the nonreducible collagen cross-link hydroxylysylpyridinoline (HP), respectively. At birth, interstitial space accounted for approximately 47% of total diaphragm muscle CSA. During postnatal growth, the relative contribution of interstitial space decreased such that by adulthood the interstitial space accounted for approximately 18% of total muscle CSA. The change in relative interstitial space occurred without a concomitant change in hydroxyproline concentration. However, the concentration of HP markedly increased with age such that the adult diaphragm contained approximately 17 times more HP than at birth. These results indicate that during development the relative CSA occupied by interstitial space decreases as muscle fiber size increases. However, the reduction in relative interstitial space is not associated with a change in collagen concentration. Thus collagen density in the interstitial space may increase with age. It is possible that the observed changes in relative interstitial space and collagen influence the passive length-force properties of the diaphragm.

  3. Mechanical ventilation, diaphragm weakness and weaning: A rehabilitation perspective

    PubMed Central

    Martin, A Daniel; Smith, Barbara; Gabrielli, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Most patients are easily liberated from mechanical ventilation (MV) following resolution of respiratory failure and a successful trial of spontaneous breathing, but about 25% of patients experience difficult weaning. MV use leads to cellular changes and weakness, which has been linked to weaning difficulties and has been labeled ventilator induced diaphragm dysfunction (VIDD). Aggravating factors in human studies with prolonged weaning include malnutrition, chronic electrolyte abnormalities, hyperglycemia, excessive resistive and elastic loads, corticosteroids, muscle relaxant exposure, sepsis and compromised cardiac function. Numerous animal studies have investigated the effects of MV on diaphragm function. Virtually all of these studies have concluded that MV use rapidly leads to VIDD and have identified cellular and molecular mechanisms of VIDD. Molecular and functional studies on the effects of MV on the human diaphragm have largely confirmed the animal results and identified potential treatment strategies. Only recently have potential VIDD treatments been tested in humans, including pharmacologic interventions and diaphragm “training”. A limited number of human studies have found that specific diaphragm training can increase respiratory muscle strength in FTW patients and facilitate weaning, but larger, multicenter trials are needed. PMID:23692928

  4. Diaphragm Pressure Wave Generator Developments at Industrial Research Ltd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caughley, A. J.; Emery, N.; Glasson, N. D.

    2010-04-01

    Industrial Research Ltd (IRL) have been developing a unique diaphragm based pressure wave generator technology for pulse tube and Stirling cryocoolers. Our system uses a metal diaphragm to separate the clean cryocooler gas circuit from a conventionally lubricated mechanical driver, thus producing a clean pressure wave with a long life drive that does not require the precision manufacture and associated costs of large linear motors. The first successful diaphragm pressure wave generator produced 3.2 kW of acoustic power at an electro-acoustic efficiency of 72% with a swept volume of 200 ml and a prototype has now accumulated over 2500 hours running. This paper describes recent developments in the technology. To explore scaling, a small diaphragm pressure wave generator with a swept volume of 20 ml has been constructed and has delivered 454 W of acoustic power at an electro-acoustic efficiency of 60%. Improvements have been made to the hydraulic force amplifier mechanism for driving the diaphragms resulting in a cheaper and lighter mechanism than the mechanical linkage originally used. To meet a customer's specific requirements, the 200 ml pressure wave generator's stroke was extended to achieve 240 ml of swept volume thereby increasing its acoustic power delivery to 4.1 kW without compromising efficiency.

  5. SU-E-J-140: Availability of Using Diaphragm Matching in Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) at the Time in Breath-Holding SBRT for Liver Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, D; Tsuda, S.; Ozawa, S; Ohno, Y.; Kimura, T.; Nagata, Y.; Nakashima, T.; Aita, M.; Ochi, Y.; Okumura, T.; Masuda, H.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: IGRT based on the bone matching may produce a larger target positioning error in terms of the reproducibility of the expiration breath hold. Therefore, the feasibility of the 3D image matching between planning CT image and pretreatment CBCT image based on the diaphragm matching was investigated. Methods: In fifteen-nine liver SBRT cases, Lipiodol, uptake after TACE was outlined as the marker of the tumor. The relative coordinate of the isocenter obtained by the contrast matching was defined as the reference coordinate. The target positioning difference between diaphragm matching and bone matching were evaluated by the relative coordinate of the isocenter from the reference coordinate obtained by each matching technique. In addition, we evaluated PTV margins by van Herk setup margin formula. Results: The target positioning error by the diaphragm matching and the bone matching was 1.31±0.83 and 3.10±2.80 mm in the cranial-caudal(C-C) direction, 1.04±0.95 and 1.62±1.02 mm in the anterior-posterior(A-P) direction, 0.93±1.19 and 1.12±0.94 mm in the left-right(L-R) direction, respectively. The positioning error by the diaphragm matching was significantly smaller than the bone matching in the C-C direction (p<0.05). The setup margin of diaphragm matching and bone matching that we had calculated based on van Herk margin formula was 4.5mm and 6.2mm(C-C), and 3.6mm and 6.3mm(A-P), and 2.6mm and 4.5mm(L-R), respectively. Conclusion: IGRT based on a diaphragm matching could be one alternative image matching technique for the positioning of the patients with liver tumor.

  6. Survey of blood pump diaphragm damage in the NIPRO-ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Kashiwa, Koichi; Nishimura, Takashi; Nakahata, Aoi; Momose, Naoki; Umeda, Chinori; Kubo, Hitoshi; Tamai, Hisayoshi; Kinugawa, Koichiro; Adachi, Hideo; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Yambe, Tomoyuki; Katohgi, Toshiyuki; Kyo, Shunei; Ono, Minoru

    2012-12-01

    We surveyed the incidence of blood pump diaphragm damage (rupture or crack) in the NIPRO-ventricular assist device (VAD). In the cases in which rupture or suspected blood pump crack was detected, we disassembled the pumps to visually check the condition of the diaphragm after replacement or use. Of 366 blood pumps surveyed, diaphragm damage was observed in 2.7 %. The duration of use of the blood pumps with diaphragm damage was significantly longer than that of pumps without damage. The incidence of diaphragm damage increased with longer duration of use. On the basis of these findings, blood pump diaphragm damage in the NIPRO-VAD may be associated with duration of use. However, some blood pumps were used for prolonged periods without diaphragm damage. All blood pumps with damage had a crack in the diaphragm on the air chamber side near the diaphragm-housing (D-H) junction. Cracks were not found in any specific part of the diaphragm. In blood pumps with diaphragm rupture, the crack had a through-hole reaching the blood-contacting surface. Although we were unable to identify the causes of the cracks, it is suggested that when a crack appears in the diaphragm it will gradually expand and eventually lead to rupture. If a crack is detected in a blood pump, we advocate replacing the pump before it grows. When the NIPRO-VAD is used, it is necessary to keep in mind that blood pump diaphragm damage may occur.

  7. Interactive Simulation of Diaphragm Motion Through Muscle and Rib Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villard, Pierre-Frédéric; Bourne, Wesley; Bello, Fernando

    Modeling of diaphragm behaviour is of relevance to a number of clinical procedures such as lung cancer radiotherapy and liver access interventions. The heterogeneity in tissue composition of the diaphragm, as well as the various physiological phenomena influencing its behaviour, requires a complex model in order to accurately capture its motion. In this chapter we present a novel methodology based on a heterogenous model composed of mass-spring and tensegrity elements. The physiological boundary conditions have been carefully taken into account and applied to our model. Thus, it incorporates the influence of the rib kinematics, the muscle natural contraction/relaxation and the motion of the sternum. Initial validation results show that the behaviour of the model closely follows that of a real diaphragm.

  8. Plasma Discharge Process in a Pulsed Diaphragm Discharge System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Jianjin; Hu, Jue; Zhang, Chao; Wen, Yuanbin; Meng, Yuedong; Zhang, Chengxu

    2014-12-01

    As one of the most important steps in wastewater treatment, limited study on plasma discharge process is a key challenge in the development of plasma applications. In this study, we focus on the plasma discharge process of a pulsed diaphragm discharge system. According to the analysis, the pulsed diaphragm discharge proceeds in seven stages: (1) Joule heating and heat exchange stage; (2) nucleated site formation; (3) plasma generation (initiation of the breakdown stage); (4) avalanche growth and plasma expansion; (5) plasma contraction; (6) termination of the plasma discharge; and (7) heat exchange stage. From this analysis, a critical voltage criterion for breakdown is obtained. We anticipate this finding will provide guidance for a better application of plasma discharges, especially diaphragm plasma discharges.

  9. The Impact of Midcervical Contusion Injury on Diaphragm Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Argote, Santiago; Gransee, Heather M.; Mora, Juan C.; Stowe, Jessica M.; Jorgenson, Amy J.; Sieck, Gary C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Midcervical contusion injuries disrupt descending ipsilateral excitatory bulbospinal projections to phrenic motoneurons, compromising ventilation. We hypothesized that a unilateral contusion injury at C3 versus C5 would differentially impact phrenic activity reflecting more prominent disruption of ipsilateral descending excitatory drive to more caudal segments of the phrenic motor pool with more cranial injuries. Phrenic motoneuron counts and evidence of diaphragm muscle denervation at individual neuromuscular junctions (NMJ) were evaluated at 14 days post-injury after unilateral contusion injury (100 kDynes). Whole body plethysmography and chronic diaphragm EMG were measured before the injury and at 3, 7, and 14 days post-injury. Contusion injuries at either level resulted in a similarly sized cavity. C3 contusion resulted in loss of 39 ± 13% of ipsilateral phrenic motoneurons compared with 13 ± 21% after C5 contusion (p = 0.003). Cervical contusion injuries resulted in diaphragm muscle denervation (C3 contusion: 17 ± 4%; C5 contusion: 7 ± 4%; p = 0.047). The pattern of denervation revealed segmental innervation of the diaphragm muscle, with greater denervation ventrally after C3 contusion and dorsally after C5 contusion. Overall, diaphragm root mean square electromyography activity did not change ipsilaterally after C3 or C5 contusion, but increased contralaterally (∼11%) after C3 contusion only on the first day post-injury (p = 0.026). Similarly, there were no significant changes in breathing parameters during eupnea or exposure to hypoxia (10% O2) – hypercapnia (5% CO2) at any time post-injury. Unilateral midcervical contusions minimally impair ventilatory behaviors despite phrenic motoneuron loss and diaphragm muscle denervation. PMID:26413840

  10. CFD analysis of a diaphragm free-piston Stirling cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caughley, Alan; Sellier, Mathieu; Gschwendtner, Michael; Tucker, Alan

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis of a novel free-piston Stirling cryocooler that uses a pair of metal diaphragms to seal and suspend the displacer. The diaphragms allow the displacer to move without rubbing or moving seals. When coupled to a metal diaphragm pressure wave generator, the system produces a complete Stirling cryocooler with no rubbing parts in the working gas space. Initial modelling of this concept using the Sage modelling tool indicated the potential for a useful cryocooler. A proof-of-concept prototype was constructed and achieved cryogenic temperatures. A second prototype was designed and constructed using the experience gained from the first. The prototype produced 29 W of cooling at 77 K and reached a no-load temperature of 56 K. The diaphragm's large diameter and short stroke produces a significant radial component to the oscillating flow fields inside the cryocooler which were not modelled in the one-dimensional analysis tool Sage that was used to design the prototypes. Compared with standard pistons, the diaphragm geometry increases the gas-to-wall heat transfer due to the higher velocities and smaller hydraulic diameters. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model of the cryocooler was constructed to understand the underlying fluid-dynamics and heat transfer mechanisms with the aim of further improving performance. The CFD modelling of the heat transfer in the radial flow fields created by the diaphragms shows the possibility of utilizing the flat geometry for heat transfer, reducing the need for, and the size of, expensive heat exchangers. This paper presents details of a CFD analysis used to model the flow and gas-to-wall heat transfer inside the second prototype cryocooler, including experimental validation of the CFD to produce a robust analysis.

  11. Is Diaphragm Motion a Good Surrogate for Liver Tumor Motion?

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Juan; Cai, Jing; Wang, Hongjun; Chang, Zheng; Czito, Brian G.; Bashir, Mustafa R.; Palta, Manisha; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the relationship between liver tumor motion and diaphragm motion. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (10 of 14) or liver metastases (4 of 14) undergoing radiation therapy were included in this study. All patients underwent single-slice cine–magnetic resonance imaging simulations across the center of the tumor in 3 orthogonal planes. Tumor and diaphragm motion trajectories in the superior–inferior (SI), anterior–posterior (AP), and medial–lateral (ML) directions were obtained using an in-house-developed normalized cross-correlation–based tracking technique. Agreement between the tumor and diaphragm motion was assessed by calculating phase difference percentage, intraclass correlation coefficient, and Bland-Altman analysis (Diff). The distance between the tumor and tracked diaphragm area was analyzed to understand its impact on the correlation between the 2 motions. Results: Of all patients, the mean (±standard deviation) phase difference percentage values were 7.1% ± 1.1%, 4.5% ± 0.5%, and 17.5% ± 4.5% in the SI, AP, and ML directions, respectively. The mean intraclass correlation coefficient values were 0.98 ± 0.02, 0.97 ± 0.02, and 0.08 ± 0.06 in the SI, AP, and ML directions, respectively. The mean Diff values were 2.8 ± 1.4 mm, 2.4 ± 1.1 mm, and 2.2 ± 0.5 mm in the SI, AP, and ML directions, respectively. Tumor and diaphragm motions had high concordance when the distance between the tumor and tracked diaphragm area was small. Conclusions: This study showed that liver tumor motion had good correlation with diaphragm motion in the SI and AP directions, indicating diaphragm motion in the SI and AP directions could potentially be used as a reliable surrogate for liver tumor motion.

  12. Bending-induced electromechanical coupling and large piezoelectric response in a micromachined diaphragm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhihong; Yao, Yingbang; Wang, Xianbin; Yue, Weisheng; Chen, Longqing; Zhang, Xi Xiang

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the dependence of electromechanical coupling and the piezoelectric response of a micromachined Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3 (PZT) diaphragm on its curvature by observing the impedance spectrum and central deflection responses to a small AC voltage. The curvature of the diaphragm was controlled by applying air pressure to its back. We found that a depolarized flat diaphragm does not initially exhibit electromechanical coupling or the piezoelectric response. However, upon the application of static air pressure to the diaphragm, both electromechanical coupling and the piezoelectric response can be induced in the originally depolarized diaphragm. The piezoelectric response increases as the curvature increases and a giant piezoelectric response can be obtained from a bent diaphragm. The obtained results clearly demonstrate that a high strain gradient in a diaphragm can polarize a PZT film through a flexoelectric effect, and that the induced piezoelectric response of the diaphragm can be controlled by adjusting its curvature.

  13. Measured opening characteristics of an electromagnetically opened diaphragm for the Langley expansion tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    Results from an experimental study of the opening characteristics of an electromagnetically opened, 15.24 cm diameter diaphragm are presented. This diaphragm consists of a polyester film bonded to a preformed wire and is opened by passing a current pulse (capacitor discharge) through the wire. The diaphragm separates the acceleration section of the expansion tunnel from the nozzle so that the nozzle may be at a lower pressure than the acceleration section prior to a test. Opening times and cleanness of the opened area were examined for dependence on diaphragm thickness, on wire diameter, on technique of bonding the wire to the diaphragm, and on voltage and energy level of the energy source. Time histories of the pitot pressure measured at the expansion-tunnel nozzle entrance location are presented for (1) no diaphragm, (2) a flow-opened diaphragm, and (3) an electromagnetically opened diaphragm.

  14. Diaphragm plication for eventration or paralysis: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Groth, Shawn S; Andrade, Rafael S

    2010-06-01

    Although etiology and pathology of symptomatic diaphragm paralysis and eventration are distinct, their treatments are the same: to reduce dysfunctional caudal excursion of the diaphragm during inspiration by plication. Minimally invasive diaphragm plication techniques have emerged as equally effective and less morbid alternatives to open plication. This review focuses on the etiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of diaphragmatic eventration or paralysis in adults.

  15. 14 CFR 121.251 - Engine accessory section diaphragm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Engine accessory section diaphragm. 121.251... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Special Airworthiness Requirements § 121.251 Engine... complies with § 121.247 must be provided on air-cooled engines to isolate the engine power section and...

  16. 14 CFR 121.251 - Engine accessory section diaphragm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Engine accessory section diaphragm. 121.251... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Special Airworthiness Requirements § 121.251 Engine... complies with § 121.247 must be provided on air-cooled engines to isolate the engine power section and...

  17. Design of fabric preforms for double diaphragm forming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luby, Steven; Bernardon, Edward

    1992-01-01

    Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) has the potential of becoming one of the most cost effective ways of producing composite structures since the raw materials used, resin and dry fabric, are less costly than prepregs. Unfortunately these low material costs are offset by the high labor costs incurred to layup the dry fabric into 3D shapes. To reduce the layup costs, double diaphragm forming is being investigated as a potential technique for creating a complex 3D preform from a simple flat layup. As part of our effort to develop double diaphragm forming into a production capable process, we have undertaken a series of experiments to investigate the interactions between process parameters, mold geometry, fabric weave, tow size, and the quality of the formed part. The results of these tests will be used to determine the forming geometry limitations of double diaphragm forming and to characterize the formability of fabric configurations. An important part of this work was the development of methods to measure and analyze fiber orientations, deformation angles, tow spreading, and shape conformation of the formed parts. This paper will describe the methods used to mark plies, the double diaphragm forming process, the techniques used to measure the formed parts, and the calculation of the parameters of interest. The results can be displayed as 3D contour plots. These experimental results have also been used to verify and improve a computer model which simulates the draping of fabrics over 3D mold shapes.

  18. Effect of hyperinflation on inspiratory function of the diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Minh, V D; Dolan, G F; Konopka, R F; Moser, K M

    1976-01-01

    The inspiratory efficiency of the diaphragm during unilateral and bilateral phrenic stimulation (UEPS and BEPS) with constant stimulus was studied in seven dogs from FRC to 120% TLC. Alveolar pressures (PAl) were recorded during relaxation, BEPS and UEPS at each lung volume in the closed respiratory system. From the PAl-lung volume curves, tidal volume (VT), and pressure developed by the diaphragm (Pmus) were derived. Results are summarized below. a) Hyperinflation impaired the inspiratory efficiency of the diaphragm which behaved as an expiratory muscle beyond the lung volume of 103.7% TLC (Vinef). b) The diaphragm during UEPS became expiratory at the same Vinef as during (BEPS. C) The VT-lung volume relationship was linear during BEPS, allowing simple quantitation of VT loss with hyperinflation and prediction of Vinef. d) With only one phrenic nerve stimulated, the functional loss is less pronounced in VT than in Pmus, as compared to BEPS, indicating that the respiratory system was more compliant during UEPS than BEPS. This compliance difference from UEPS to BEPS diminished with severe hyperinflation.

  19. 14 CFR 121.251 - Engine accessory section diaphragm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Engine accessory section diaphragm. 121.251... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Special Airworthiness Requirements § 121.251 Engine... complies with § 121.247 must be provided on air-cooled engines to isolate the engine power section and...

  20. 14 CFR 121.251 - Engine accessory section diaphragm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Engine accessory section diaphragm. 121.251... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Special Airworthiness Requirements § 121.251 Engine... complies with § 121.247 must be provided on air-cooled engines to isolate the engine power section and...

  1. Die and telescoping punch form convolutions in thin diaphragm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Die and punch set forms convolutions in thin dished metal diaphragm without stretching the metal too thin at sharp curvatures. The die corresponds to the metal shape to be formed, and the punch consists of elements that progressively slide against one another under the restraint of a compressed-air cushion to mate with the die.

  2. Diaphragm weakness in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    PubMed Central

    Laroche, C M; Carroll, N; Moxham, J; Stanley, N N; Evans, R J; Green, M

    1988-01-01

    Two patients are described with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease and chronic peripheral neuropathy. Both had dyspnoea, orthopnoea, and evidence of severe diaphragm weakness. Expiratory muscle function was well preserved and abnormalities of gas exchange during sleep were only minor. PMID:3420560

  3. Duplicated right crus of the diaphragm: a cadaveric case report.

    PubMed

    Sirasanagandla, Srinivasa Rao; Nayak, Satheesha B; Bhat, Kumar Mr; Surendran, Sudarshan; Regunathan, Deepthinath; Kumar, Naveen; Shetty, Surekha D; Patil, Jyothsna

    2014-03-01

    The lumbar part of the diaphragm arises from the lumbar vertebrae by right and left crura. The duplication of crura of the diaphragm is rarely reported in the past. During regular dissection classes to the medical students, we came across a case of duplicated right crus of the diaphragm. The right crus of the diaphragm was duplicated completely and presented two separate crura; medial right crus & lateral right crus. The medial right crus was attached to the anterolateral surfaces of the superior three lumbar vertebral bodies and intervertebral discs and merged with the anterior longitudinal ligament. The lateral right crus attached only to the intervertebral disc between the third and fourth lumbar vertebrae. These two crura bordered a retrocrural space in the inferior posterior mediastinum. The greater and lesser splanchnic nerves entered the abdomen by passing through this space. No duplication was observed in the left crus. The muscle fibres of medial right crus contributed to the formation of the esophageal opening. Knowledge of variations in the diaphragmatic crural anatomy is useful in the diagnosis of disease processes in the retrocrural space and also might help while performing the surgical repair of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

  4. Rapid diaphragm atrophy following cervical spinal cord hemisection.

    PubMed

    Gill, L C; Ross, H H; Lee, K Z; Gonzalez-Rothi, E J; Dougherty, B J; Judge, A R; Fuller, D D

    2014-02-01

    A cervical (C2) hemilesion (C2Hx), which disrupts ipsilateral bulbospinal inputs to the phrenic nucleus, was used to study diaphragm plasticity after acute spinal cord injury. We hypothesized that C2Hx would result in rapid atrophy of the ipsilateral hemidiaphragm and increases in mRNA expression of proteolytic biomarkers. Diaphragm tissue was harvested from male Sprague-Dawley rats at 1 or 7 days following C2Hx. Histological analysis demonstrated reduction in cross-sectional area (CSA) of type I and IIa fibers in the ipsilateral hemidiaphragm at 1 but not 7 days. Type IIb/x fibers, however, had reduced CSA at 1 and 7 days. A targeted gene array was used to screen mRNA changes for genes associated with skeletal muscle myopathy and myogenesis; this was followed by qRT-PCR validation. Changes in diaphragm gene expression suggested that profound myoplasticity is initiated immediately following C2Hx including activation of both proteolytic and myogenic pathways. We conclude that an immediate myoplastic response occurs in the diaphragm after C2Hx with atrophy occurring in ipsilateral myofibers within 1 day.

  5. Crural diaphragm inhibition during esophageal distension correlates with contraction of the esophageal longitudinal muscle in cats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianmin; Puckett, James L; Takeda, Torahiko; Jung, Hwoon-Yong; Mittal, Ravinder K

    2005-05-01

    Esophageal distension causes simultaneous relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and crural diaphragm. The mechanism of crural diaphragm relaxation during esophageal distension is not well understood. We studied the motion of crural and costal diaphragm along with the motion of the distal esophagus during esophageal distension-induced relaxation of the LES and crural diaphragm. Wire electrodes were surgically implanted into the crural and costal diaphragm in five cats. In two additional cats, radiopaque markers were also sutured into the outer wall of the distal esophagus to monitor esophageal shortening. Under light anesthesia, animals were placed on an X-ray fluoroscope to monitor the motion of the diaphragm and the distal esophagus by tracking the radiopaque markers. Crural and costal diaphragm electromyograms (EMGs) were recorded along with the esophageal, LES, and gastric pressures. A 2-cm balloon placed 5 cm above the LES was used for esophageal distension. Effects of baclofen, a GABA(B) agonist, were also studied. Esophageal distension induced LES relaxation and selective inhibition of the crural diaphragm EMG. The crural diaphragm moved in a craniocaudal direction with expiration and inspiration, respectively. Esophageal distension-induced inhibition of the crural EMG was associated with sustained cranial motion of the crural diaphragm and esophagus. Baclofen blocked distension-induced LES relaxation and crural diaphragm EMG inhibition along with the cranial motion of the crural diaphragm and the distal esophagus. There is a close temporal correlation between esophageal distension-mediated LES relaxation and crural diaphragm inhibition with the sustained cranial motion of the crural diaphragm. Stretch caused by the longitudinal muscle contraction of the esophagus during distension of the esophagus may be important in causing LES relaxation and crural diaphragm inhibition.

  6. Repeated exposure to heat stress results in a diaphragm phenotype that resists ventilator-induced diaphragm dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Toshinori; Ichinoseki-Sekine, Noriko; Kakigi, Ryo; Tsuzuki, Takamasa; Sugiura, Takao; Powers, Scott K; Naito, Hisashi

    2015-11-01

    Controlled mechanical ventilation (CMV) is a life-saving intervention for patients in respiratory failure. Unfortunately, prolonged mechanical ventilation (MV) results in diaphragmatic atrophy and contractile dysfunction, both of which are predicted to contribute to problems in weaning patients from the ventilator. Therefore, developing a strategy to protect the diaphragm against ventilator-induced weakness is important. We tested the hypothesis that repeated bouts of heat stress result in diaphragm resistance against CMV-induced atrophy and contractile dysfunction. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into six experimental groups: 1) control; 2) single bout of whole body heat stress; 3) repeated bouts of whole body heat stress; 4) 12 h CMV; 5) single bout of whole body heat stress 24 h before CMV; and 6) repeated bouts of whole body heat stress 1, 3, and 5 days before 12 h of CMV. Our results revealed that repeated bouts of heat stress resulted in increased levels of heat shock protein 72 in the diaphragm and protection against both CMV-induced diaphragmatic atrophy and contractile dysfunction at submaximal stimulation frequencies. The specific mechanisms responsible for this protection remain unclear: this heat stress-induced protection against CMV-induced diaphragmatic atrophy and weakness may be partially due to reduced diaphragmatic oxidative stress, diminished activation of signal transducer/transcriptional activator-3, lower caspase-3 activation, and decreased autophagy in the diaphragm.

  7. Integrated optical interferometer with micromechanical diaphragm for pressure sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Brabander, Gregory N.; Boyd, Joseph T.; Beheim, Glenn

    1994-10-01

    An electrically passive optical pressure sensor has been fabricated which uses a integrated-optical Y-junction ring resonator to measure the strain induced in a micromachined silicon diaphragm. A silicon substrate is etched from the side opposite the silicon oxynitride optical waveguides to produce a rectangular diaphragm whose long edge lies underneath a straight section in the ring. Pressure-induced changes in the resonant frequency of the ring are measured using a frequency swept laser diode. A linear response to pressure is observed for the TM mode with a sensitivity of 0.0094 rad/kPa. The transmissivity function of the resonator is derived and compared with measured response. This pressure sensor is rugged, amenable to batch fabrication, and it provides a link insensitive readout.

  8. Coupling Impedance of a Periodic Array of Diaphragms (Erratum)

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.V.; /SLAC

    2012-05-24

    A method is presented for calculating the high-frequency longitudinal and transverse coupling impedances in a periodic array of diaphragms in a circular perfectly conducting pipe. The method is based on Weinstein's theory of diffraction of a plane electromagnetic wave on a stack of halfplanes. Using Weinstein's solution, it is shown that the problem of finding the beam field in the pipe reduces to an effective boundary condition at the radius of the diaphragms that couples the longitudinal electric field with the azimuthal magnetic one. Solving Maxwell's equations with this boundary condition leads to simple formulae for Z{sub long} and Z{sub tr}. A good agreement with a numerical solution of the problem found by other authors is demonstrated.

  9. Effects of diaphragm discharge in water solutions containing humic substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halamova, Ivana; Stara, Zdenka; Krcma, Frantisek

    2010-01-01

    Preliminary results of research focused on the applications of DC diaphragm discharge in water solutions containing humic substances are presented in this paper. Diaphragm discharge investigated by this work was created in the reactor using constant DC high voltage up to 2 kV that gave the total input power from 100 to 200 W. Presented work investigated decomposition of humic substances by the electric discharge in the dependence of discharge conditions (electrode polarity) as well as solution properties (electrolyte kind, pH). Especially substantial effect of pH on humic acid decomposition has been observed when acidic conditions stimulated the degradation process. Absorption spectroscopy in UV-VIS region together with fluorescence spectroscopy has been used for the detection of changes in humic solutions. Index of humification was calculated from obtained fluorescence spectra and a significant decrease of aromatic components in the humic mixture was determined during the discharge treatment.

  10. Coupling impedance of a periodic array of diaphragms

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.V.

    1995-06-01

    A method is presented for calculating the high-frequency longitudinal and transverse coupling impedances in a periodic array of diaphragms in a circular perfectly conducting pipe. The method is based on Weinstein`s theory of diffraction of a plane electromagnetic wave on a stack of halfplanes. Using Weinstein`s solution, it is shown that the problem of finding the beam field in the pipe reduces to an effective boundary condition at the radius of the diaphragms that couples the longitudinal electric field with the azimuthal magnetic one. Solving Maxwell`s equations with this boundary condition leads to simple formulae for Z{sub long} and Z{sub tr}. A good agreement with a numerical solution of the problem found by other authors is demonstrated.

  11. In utero LPS exposure impairs preterm diaphragm contractility.

    PubMed

    Song, Yong; Karisnan, Kanakeswary; Noble, Peter B; Berry, Clare A; Lavin, Tina; Moss, Timothy J M; Bakker, Anthony J; Pinniger, Gavin J; Pillow, J Jane

    2013-11-01

    Preterm birth is associated with inflammation of the fetal membranes (chorioamnionitis). We aimed to establish how chorioamnionitis affects the contractile function and phenotype of the preterm diaphragm. Pregnant ewes received intra-amniotic injections of saline or 10 mg LPS, 2 days or 7 days before delivery at 121 days of gestation (term = 150 d). Diaphragm strips were dissected for the assessment of contractile function after terminal anesthesia. The inflammatory cytokine response, myosin heavy chain (MHC) fibers, proteolytic pathways, and intracellular molecular signaling were analyzed using quantitative PCR, ELISA, immunofluorescence staining, biochemical assays, and Western blotting. Diaphragm peak twitch force and maximal tetanic force were approximately 30% lower than control values in the 2-day and 7-day LPS groups. Activation of the NF-κB pathway, an inflammatory response, and increased proteasome activity were observed in the 2-day LPS group relative to the control or 7-day LPS group. No inflammatory response was evident after a 7-day LPS exposure. Seven-day LPS exposure markedly decreased p70S6K phosphorylation, but no effect on other signaling pathways was evident. The proportion of MHC IIa fibers was lower than that for control samples in the 7-day LPS group. MHC I fiber proportions did not differ between groups. These results demonstrate that intrauterine LPS impairs preterm diaphragmatic contractility after 2-day and 7-day exposures. Diaphragm dysfunction, resulting from 2-day LPS exposure, was associated with a transient activation of proinflammatory signaling, with subsequent increased atrophic gene expression and enhanced proteasome activity. Persistently impaired contractility for the 7-day LPS exposure was associated with the down-regulation of a key component of the protein synthetic signaling pathway and a reduction in the proportions of MHC IIa fibers.

  12. SU8 diaphragm micropump with monolithically integrated cantilever check valves.

    PubMed

    Ezkerra, Aitor; Fernández, Luis José; Mayora, Kepa; Ruano-López, Jesús Miguel

    2011-10-07

    This paper presents a SU8 unidirectional diaphragm micropump with embedded out-of-plane cantilever check valves. The device represents a reliable and low-cost solution for integration of microfluidic control in lab-on-a-chip devices. Its planar architecture allows monolithic definition of its components in a single step and potential integration with previously reported PCR, electrophoresis and flow-sensing SU8 microdevices. Pneumatic actuation is applied on a PDMS diaphragm, which is bonded to the SU8 body at wafer level, further enhancing its integration and mass production capabilities. The cantilever check valves move synchronously with the diaphragm, feature fast response (10ms), low dead volume (86nl) and a 94% flow blockage up to 300kPa. The micropump achieves a maximum flow rate of 177 μl min(-1) at 6 Hz and 200 kPa with an effective area of 10 mm(2). The device is reliable, self-priming and tolerant to particles and big bubbles. To the knowledge of the authors, this is the first micropump in SU8 with monolithically integrated cantilever check valves.

  13. Integrated Optical Interferometers with Micromachined Diaphragms for Pressure Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeBrabander, Gregory N.; Boyd, Joseph T.

    1996-01-01

    Optical pressure sensors have been fabricated which use an integrated optical channel waveguide that is part of an interferometer to measure the pressure-induced strain in a micromachined silicon diaphragm. A silicon substrate is etched from the back of the wafer leaving a rectangular diaphragm. On the opposite side of the wafer, ring resonator and Mach-Zehnder interferometers are formed with optical channel waveguides made from a low pressure chemical vapor deposited film of silicon oxynitride. The interferometer's phase is altered by pressure-induced stress in a channel segment positioned over the long edge of the diaphragm. The phase change in the ring resonator is monitored using a link-insensitive swept frequency laser diode, while in the Mach-Zehnder it is determined using a broad band super luminescent diode with subsequent wavelength separation. The ring resonator was found to be highly temperature sensitive, while the Mach-Zehnder, which had a smaller optical path length difference, was proportionally less so. The quasi-TM mode was more sensitive to pressure, in accord with calculations. Waveguide and sensor theory, sensitivity calculations, a fabrication sequence, and experimental results are presented.

  14. Diaphragm pacers as a treatment for congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chen, Maida Lynn; Tablizo, Mary Anne; Kun, Sheila; Keens, Thomas G

    2005-09-01

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome is a rare syndrome present from birth, and is defined as the failure of automatic control of breathing. All patients with congenital central hypoventilation syndrome require life-long ventilatory support during sleep, although approximately a third of patients require ventilatory support 24 h per day. Diaphragm pacers offer a modality of ventilatory support that affords congenital central hypoventilation syndrome patients with maximal mobility for full-time ventilatory patients, and they may allow for a more normal lifestyle in the appropriate patient. They may permit tracheostomy decannulation in those requiring only support during sleep. Diaphragm pacing entails surgical placement of an electrode onto the phrenic nerve, connected to a subcutaneous receiver. There is an external battery-operated transmitter and antenna placed on the skin over the receiver. The transmitter emits energy, similar to radio transmission, which is converted into an electrical current by the receiver. This stimulates the phrenic nerve resulting in a diaphragmatic contraction. Settings on the transmitter include respiratory rate and electrical voltage, and are adjusted to give enough tidal volume to allow for adequate oxygenation and ventilation. Therefore, diaphragm pacing is an attractive alternative mode of mechanically assisted ventilation for many patients with congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

  15. A free-piston Stirling cryocooler using metal diaphragms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caughley, Alan; Sellier, Mathieu; Gschwendtner, Michael; Tucker, Alan

    2016-12-01

    A novel concept for a free-piston Stirling cryocooler has been proposed. The concept uses a pair of metal diaphragms to seal and suspend the displacer of a free-piston Stirling cryocooler. The diaphragms allow the displacer to move without rubbing or moving seals, potentially resulting in a long-life mechanism. When coupled to a metal diaphragm pressure wave generator, the system produces a complete Stirling cryocooler with no rubbing parts in the working gas space. Initial modelling of this concept using the Sage modelling tool indicates the potential for a useful cryocooler. A proof-of-concept prototype was constructed and achieved cryogenic temperatures. A second prototype was designed and constructed using the experience gained from the first. The prototype produced 29 W of cooling at 77 K and reached a no-load temperature of 56 K. Sage predicted the macroscopic behaviour of the prototype well but did not provide sufficient insights to improve performance significantly. This paper presents details of the development, modelling and testing of the proof-of-concept prototype and a second, improved prototype.

  16. Contractile properties of the rat external abdominal oblique and diaphragm muscles during development.

    PubMed

    Watchko, J F; Brozanski, B S; O'Day, T L; Guthrie, R D; Sieck, G C

    1992-04-01

    We studied the in vitro contractile and fatigue properties of the rat external abdominal oblique (EAO) and costal diaphragm (DIA) muscles during postnatal development. Isometric twitch contraction (CT) and half-relaxation (RT1/2) times were longer in both the EAO and DIA muscles during the early postnatal period and decreased with age. In the first postnatal week, the CT and RT1/2 were longer in the EAO than the DIA muscle. At 14 days of age and thereafter, the CT and RT1/2 were shorter in the EAO than in the DIA muscle. Force-frequency relationships of the EAO and DIA muscles changed during postnatal development such that the relative force (percent maximum) generated at lower frequencies (less than 15 pulses/s) decreased with age. Moreover the relative force generated by the EAO muscle at lower frequencies was greater than that of the DIA muscle during the early postnatal period but less than that of the DIA muscle in adults. The specific force of both the EAO and DIA muscles increased progressively with age. There were no differences in specific force between the EAO and DIA muscles at any age. The fatigability of the EAO and DIA muscles was comparable during the early postnatal period and increased in both muscles with postnatal development. In adults the EAO muscle was more fatigable than the DIA muscle. We conclude that the contractile and fatigue properties of the EAO and DIA muscles undergo significantly different postnatal transitions, which may reflect their functional involvement in sustaining ventilation.

  17. CT Scans

    MedlinePlus

    ... cross-sectional pictures of your body. Doctors use CT scans to look for Broken bones Cancers Blood clots Signs of heart disease Internal bleeding During a CT scan, you lie still on a table. The table ...

  18. Diaphragm curvature modulates the relationship between muscle shortening and volume displacement.

    PubMed

    Greybeck, Brad J; Wettergreen, Matthew; Hubmayr, Rolf D; Boriek, Aladin M

    2011-07-01

    During physiological spontaneous breathing maneuvers, the diaphragm displaces volume while maintaining curvature. However, with maximal diaphragm activation, curvature decreases sharply. We tested the hypotheses that the relationship between diaphragm muscle shortening and volume displacement (VD) is nonlinear and that curvature is a determinant of such a relationship. Radiopaque markers were surgically placed on three neighboring muscle fibers in the midcostal region of the diaphragm in six dogs. The three-dimensional locations were determined using biplanar fluoroscopy and diaphragm VD, curvature, and muscle shortening were computed in the prone and supine postures during spontaneous breathing (SB), spontaneous inspiration efforts after airway occlusion at lung volumes ranging from functional residual capacity (FRC) to total lung capacity, and during bilateral maximal phrenic nerve stimulation at those same lung volumes. In supine dogs, diaphragm VD was approximately two- to three-fold greater during maximal phrenic nerve stimulation than during SB. The contribution of muscle shortening to VD nonlinearly increases with level of diaphragm activation independent of posture. During submaximal diaphragm activation, the contribution is essentially linear due to constancy of diaphragm curvature in both the prone and supine posture. However, the sudden loss of curvature during maximal bilateral phrenic nerve stimulation at muscle shortening values greater than 40% (ΔL/L(FRC)) causes a nonlinear increase in the contribution of muscle shortening to diaphragm VD, which is concomitant with a nonlinear change in diaphragm curvature. We conclude that the nonlinear relationship between diaphragm muscle shortening and its VD is, in part, due to a loss of its curvature at extreme muscle shortening.

  19. Diameter and position effect determination of diaphragm on hybrid rocket motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xingliang; Tian, Hui; Cai, Guobiao

    2016-09-01

    This study is aimed to determine and better reveal the mixture enhancement and regression rate distribution of hybrid rocket motor with diaphragm by numerical approach. A numerical model based on the computational fluid dynamics software is built to simulate the flow and combustion inside the motor. Four firing tests of the motor, including one without diaphragm and three with diaphragm, are conducted on a standard experimental system and also used as a reference for numerical simulation, the consistency between the simulation and experiment demonstrates that the numerical approach is an effective method to study the diaphragm effect on the motor performance. The flow field characteristic and regression rate distribution inside the hybrid rocket motor are then calculated to analyze the effect of position and diameter of the diaphragm. The results indicate that the diaphragm almost have no effect on the regression rate before it. However, the regression rate after the diaphragm has a strong dependence on the position and diameter of the diaphragm. As the diameter decreases and the position moves backward, the regression rate increases larger and larger, this is mainly due to the augmentation of the eddy generated by the diaphragm, which enhances the heat feedback transferred to the grain surface. When the diameter of diaphragm located at middle of grain decreases from 50 mm to 20 mm, regression rate is increased from 0.30 mm/s to 0.57 mm/s. The use of the diaphragm does cause a combustion efficiency improvement; the maximum combustion efficiency is enhanced to 98.9% from lower than 90% of the motor with no diaphragm. The increasing amplitude displays a square relation with the diameter decrease, since the entrainment of the eddy make the reactants mix sufficiently to release more energy inside the motor.

  20. Application of Microsecond Voltage Pulses for Water Disinfection by Diaphragm Electric Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakaurov, S. V.; Suvorov, I. F.; Yudin, A. S.; Solovyova, T. L.; Kuznetsova, N. S.

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents the dependence of copper and silver ions formation on the duration of voltage pulses of diaphragm electric discharge and on the pH of treated liquid medium. Knowing it allows one to create an automatic control system to control bactericidal agent's parameters obtained in diaphragm electric discharge reactor. The current-voltage characteristic of the reactor with a horizontal to the diaphragm membrane water flow powered from the author's custom pulse voltage source is also presented. The results of studies of the power consumption of diaphragm electric discharge depending on temperature of the treated liquid medium are given.

  1. Titanium acoustic diaphragm coated with polycrystal diamond film

    SciTech Connect

    Zhiwei Zhang; Zhen Yan; Hesun Zhu

    1995-12-31

    The spherical titanium diaphragm, which is widely used in high frequency loudspeaker, coat with polycrystal diamond film (DF) was prepared for the first time in China by the method of DC arc plasma jet. Its acoustic performance was remarkably upgraded, as confirmed by Raman Shift Spectrum and frequency response curve. Its sensibility was improved by 3-6 dB and frequency widened by 5x10{sup 3}Hz. The frequency range extended from 2.2x10{sup 3}Hz to 25x10{sup 3}Hz. The preparation and process of DF is discussed.

  2. Gene Expression Profiling in the Type 1 Diabetes Rat Diaphragm

    PubMed Central

    van Lunteren, Erik; Moyer, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    Background Respiratory muscle contractile performance is impaired by diabetes, mechanisms of which included altered carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, oxidative stress and changes in membrane electrophysiology. The present study examined to what extent these cellular perturbations involve changes in gene expression. Methodology/Principal Findings Diaphragm muscle from streptozotocin-diabetic rats was analyzed with Affymetrix gene expression arrays. Diaphragm from diabetic rats had 105 genes with at least ±2-fold significantly changed expression (55 increased, 50 decreased), and these were assigned to gene ontology groups based on over-representation analysis using DAVID software. There was increased expression of genes involved in palmitoyl-CoA hydrolase activity (a component of lipid metabolism) (P = 0.037, n = 2 genes, fold change 4.2 to 27.5) and reduced expression of genes related to carbohydrate metabolism (P = 0.000061, n = 8 genes, fold change −2.0 to −8.5). Other gene ontology groups among upregulated genes were protein ubiquitination (P = 0.0053, n = 4, fold change 2.2 to 3.4), oxidoreductase activity (P = 0.024, n = 8, fold change 2.1 to 6.0), and morphogenesis (P = 0.012, n = 10, fold change 2.1 to 4.3). Other downregulated gene groups were extracellular region (including extracellular matrix and collagen) (P = 0.00032, n = 13, fold change −2.2 to −3.7) and organogenesis (P = 0.032, n = 7, fold change −2.1 to −3.7). Real-time PCR confirmed the directionality of changes in gene expression for 30 of 31 genes tested. Conclusions/Significance These data indicate that in diaphragm muscle type 1 diabetes increases expression of genes involved in lipid energetics, oxidative stress and protein ubiquitination, decreases expression of genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism, and has little effect on expression of ion channel genes. Reciprocal changes in expression of genes involved in

  3. [Surgery of the diaphragm in the planned thoracic surgery].

    PubMed

    Parshin, V D; Parshin, V V; Mirzoian, O S; Stepanian, A

    2013-01-01

    122 patients with different diseases of the diaphragm were operated on during 1963-2011 yy. The majority of patients - 76 (62.3%) - had hernias of the weak phrenic zones. 14 (11.5%) and 17 (14.0%) patients had posttraumatic hernia and phrenic relaxation, respectively. The majority of patients had no complaints and the disease was diagnosed on the X-ray examination. Rarely, the compression syndrome, caused by the translocation of the bowel into the thoracic cavity, was registered. That clinically emerged as short breath, heaviness sensation and cardiac rhythm disorders. The worked out reconstructive operations allow to cure such patients with minimal risk.

  4. Diaphragm Muscle Fiber Weakness and Ubiquitin–Proteasome Activation in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hooijman, Pleuni E.; Beishuizen, Albertus; Witt, Christian C.; de Waard, Monique C.; Girbes, Armand R. J.; Spoelstra-de Man, Angelique M. E.; Niessen, Hans W. M.; Manders, Emmy; van Hees, Hieronymus W. H.; van den Brom, Charissa E.; Silderhuis, Vera; Lawlor, Michael W.; Labeit, Siegfried; Stienen, Ger J. M.; Hartemink, Koen J.; Paul, Marinus A.; Heunks, Leo M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: The clinical significance of diaphragm weakness in critically ill patients is evident: it prolongs ventilator dependency, and increases morbidity and duration of hospital stay. To date, the nature of diaphragm weakness and its underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms are poorly understood. Objectives: We hypothesized that diaphragm muscle fibers of mechanically ventilated critically ill patients display atrophy and contractile weakness, and that the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway is activated in the diaphragm. Methods: We obtained diaphragm muscle biopsies from 22 critically ill patients who received mechanical ventilation before surgery and compared these with biopsies obtained from patients during thoracic surgery for resection of a suspected early lung malignancy (control subjects). In a proof-of-concept study in a muscle-specific ring finger protein-1 (MuRF-1) knockout mouse model, we evaluated the role of the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway in the development of contractile weakness during mechanical ventilation. Measurements and Main Results: Both slow- and fast-twitch diaphragm muscle fibers of critically ill patients had approximately 25% smaller cross-sectional area, and had contractile force reduced by half or more. Markers of the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway were significantly up-regulated in the diaphragm of critically ill patients. Finally, MuRF-1 knockout mice were protected against the development of diaphragm contractile weakness during mechanical ventilation. Conclusions: These findings show that diaphragm muscle fibers of critically ill patients display atrophy and severe contractile weakness, and in the diaphragm of critically ill patients the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway is activated. This study provides rationale for the development of treatment strategies that target the contractility of diaphragm fibers to facilitate weaning. PMID:25760684

  5. A highly sensitive fiber Bragg grating diaphragm pressure transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allwood, Gary; Wild, Graham; Lubansky, Alex; Hinckley, Steven

    2015-10-01

    In this work, a novel diaphragm based pressure transducer with high sensitivity is described, including the physical design structure, in-depth analysis of optical response to changes in pressure, and a discussion of practical implementation and limitations. A flat circular rubber membrane bonded to a cylinder forms the body of the transducer. A fiber Bragg grating bonded to the center of the diaphragm structure enables the fractional change in pressure to be determined by analyzing the change in Bragg wavelength of the reflected spectra. Extensive evaluation of the physical properties and optical characteristics of the transducer has been performed through experimentation, and modeling using small deformation theory. The results show the transducer has a sensitivity of 0.116 nm/kPa, across a range of 15 kPa. Ultra-low cost interrogation of the optical signal was achieved through the use of an optically mismatched Bragg grating acting as an edge filter to convert the spectral change into an intensity change. A numerical model of the intensity based interrogation was implemented in order to validate the experimental results. Utilizing this interrogation technique and housing both the sensing and reference Bragg gratings within the main body of the transducer means it is effectively temperature insensitive and easily connected to electronic systems.

  6. 30 kW metal diaphragm pressure wave generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caughley, A.; Branje, P.; Klok, T.

    2014-01-01

    Callaghan Innovation has been developing a metal-diaphragm pressure wave generator technology for pulse tube or Stirling cryocoolers since 2005. A series of successful pressure wave generators have been designed, fabricated and demonstrated ranging in swept volume from 20 to 240 cc driven by commercially available induction motors of powers from 0.5 kW to 7.5 kW respectively. A number of pulse tubes have also been design and successfully trialed with these pressure wave generators. Cooling powers up to 600 W at 120 K have been achieved. We have now scaled the pressure wave generator technology to 1000cc swept volume, powered by a 30 kW induction motor with the intention of providing over 20 kW of acoustic power to either pulse tube or Stirling expanders. The aim is to develop a cryocooler with more than 1000 W of refrigeration at 77 K. Target applications include liquefaction and High Temperature Superconducting devices. Initial results from testing the 1000 cc pressure wave generator are presented and we will discuss the challenges and advantages involved in scaling the metal diaphragm technology to higher acoustic powers.

  7. Head CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Brain CT; Cranial CT; CT scan - skull; CT scan - head; CT scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial; CAT scan - brain ... conditions: Birth (congenital) defect of the head or brain Brain infection Brain tumor Buildup of fluid inside ...

  8. Improved tolerance of acute severe hypoxic stress in chronic hypoxic diaphragm is nitric oxide-dependent.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Philip; McMorrow, Clodagh; Bradford, Aidan; O'Halloran, Ken D

    2015-09-01

    The effects of chronic hypoxia (CH) on respiratory muscle performance have hardly been investigated, despite clinical relevance. Results from recent studies are indicative of unique adaptive strategies in hypoxic diaphragm. Respiratory muscle tolerance of acute severe hypoxic stress was examined in normoxic and CH diaphragm in the presence and absence of a nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor. We tested the hypothesis that improved tolerance of severe hypoxic stress in CH diaphragm is NO-dependent. Wistar rats were exposed to normoxia (sea-level, n = 6) or CH (ambient pressure = 380 mmHg, n = 6) for 6 weeks. Diaphragm muscle functional properties were determined ex vivo under severe hypoxic conditions (gassed with 95%N2/5% CO2) with and without 1 mM L-N(G)-nitroarginine (L-NNA, nNOS inhibitor). Fatigue tolerance, but not force, was significantly improved in CH diaphragm (p = 0.008). CH exposure did not affect diaphragm muscle fibre oxidative capacity determined from cluster analysis of area-density plots of muscle fibre succinate dehydrogenase activity. Acute NOS inhibition reduced diaphragm peak tetanic force (p = 0.018), irrespective of gas treatment, and completely reversed improved fatigue tolerance of the CH diaphragm. We conclude that CH exposure improves fatigue tolerance during acute severe hypoxic stress in an NO-dependent manner, independent of muscle fibre oxidative capacity.

  9. Effects of perinatal undernutrition on elimination of immature myosin isoforms in the rat diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Brozanski, B S; Daood, M J; LaFramboise, W A; Watchko, J F; Foley, T P; Butler-Browne, G S; Whalen, R G; Guthrie, R D; Ontell, M

    1991-08-01

    The effect of perinatal undernutrition on the postnatal elimination of immature myosin isoforms in rat diaphragm muscle was examined using electrophoretic and immunocytochemical techniques. Electrophoresis of native myosin showed that neonatal bands were present in diaphragm muscles of both control and undernourished rats on day 4. By day 21, the neonatal bands were diminished in the control diaphragm compared with the diaphragm of the undernourished rats. Neonatal bands persisted on postnatal day 30 in the diaphragm of the undernourished rats but not in the diaphragm of control rats. No significant difference in the time course of elimination of embryonic myosin light chain (LCemb) was observed between the diaphragm muscles of control and undernourished rats with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Immunocytochemical analysis demonstrated embryonic myosin heavy chain (MHCemb) in all myofibers of the diaphragm muscle of both groups at day 4, but this isoform was not detected in either group by day 14. Reactivity with anti-neonatal myosin heavy chain (MHCneo) indicated that rate of elimination of the MHCneo was delayed in the undernourished state as compared with the normal rats (P less than 0.001). Serum triiodothyronine levels were measured at 14, 21, and 30 days and were significantly lower in the undernourished rats compared with age-matched controls. These data demonstrate that the normal postnatal decrease in MHCneo, but not MHCemb or LCemb, is affected by the nutritional state of the animal. We speculate that these alterations in myosin isoform transitions are induced by hypothyroidism associated with undernutrition.

  10. Effects of diaphragm breathing exercise and feedback breathing exercise on pulmonary function in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Yong, Min-Sik; Lee, Hae-Yong; Lee, Yun-Seob

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The present study investigated effects of diaphragm breathing exercise and feedback breathing exercise on respiratory function. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-one subjects were randomly assigned to two groups; the feedback breathing exercise group and the maneuver-diaphragm exercise group. The feedback breathing exercise group was asked to breathe with feedback breathing device, and the maneuver-diaphragm exercise group was asked to perform diaphragm respiration. Respiratory function was evaluated when a subject sat on a chair comfortably. [Results] There was a significant difference in the functional vital capacity and slow vital capacity before and after all breathing exercises. There was a significant between-group difference in functional vital capacity. However, no between-group difference was found in slow vital capacity. [Conclusion] Diaphragm breathing exercise and feedback breathing exercise can affect respiratory function.

  11. Effects of diaphragm breathing exercise and feedback breathing exercise on pulmonary function in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Min-Sik; Lee, Hae-Yong; Lee, Yun-Seob

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The present study investigated effects of diaphragm breathing exercise and feedback breathing exercise on respiratory function. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-one subjects were randomly assigned to two groups; the feedback breathing exercise group and the maneuver-diaphragm exercise group. The feedback breathing exercise group was asked to breathe with feedback breathing device, and the maneuver-diaphragm exercise group was asked to perform diaphragm respiration. Respiratory function was evaluated when a subject sat on a chair comfortably. [Results] There was a significant difference in the functional vital capacity and slow vital capacity before and after all breathing exercises. There was a significant between-group difference in functional vital capacity. However, no between-group difference was found in slow vital capacity. [Conclusion] Diaphragm breathing exercise and feedback breathing exercise can affect respiratory function. PMID:28210046

  12. Hydraulic Resistance and Liberation of Air in Aviation Kerosene Flow Through Diaphragms at Low Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitanin, É. L.; Kitanina, E. É.; Zherebtsov, V. A.; Peganova, M. M.; Stepanov, S. G.; Bondarenko, D. A.; Morisson, D.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the results of experimental investigations of the liberation of air in gravity flow of aviation fuel through a pipeline with diaphragms. Experiments were carried out in the pressure range 0.2-1.0 bar and temperature range -20 to +20°C. The TC-1 kerosene was preliminarily saturated with air at atmospheric pressure. The liberation of air after the diaphragms with three ratios of the flow area to the cross-sectional area of the pipeline has been investigated. The results of investigations of the two-phase flow in several experimental pipelines containing one or two diaphragms and other local hydraulic resistances have been generalized. The obtained approximation equations permit calculating the hydraulic resistance of the diaphragm in the two-phase flow and the mass gas content of air after the diaphragm in pipelines of complex geometry.

  13. Introducing diaphragms into the mix: what happens to male condom use patterns?

    PubMed

    Posner, Samuel F; van der Straten, Ariane; Kang, Mi-Suk; Padian, Nancy; Chipato, Tsungai

    2005-12-01

    The objective of this analysis was to assess the effect of introducing the diaphragm on condom use patterns. Participants included one hundred eighty-nine women attending family planning clinics in Harare, Zimbabwe who reported less than 100% condom use. The proportion of acts where at least one method was used significantly increased over using follow-up; male condom use remained stable. A diaphragm was used with 50% to 54% of acts; male condoms were also used about 50% of the time. The proportion of acts where a female condom was used decreased. Women who used both male and female condoms were more likely to use diaphragms than those who reported not using female condoms. Introducing the diaphragm increased the overall proportion of protected acts. The proportion of acts where a male condom was used did not change. Female condoms use declined because concurrent use with the diaphragm is not possible.

  14. DC diaphragm discharge in water solutions of selected organic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyhnankova, Edita J.; Hammer, Malte U.; Reuter, Stephan; Krcma, Frantisek

    2015-07-01

    Effect of four simple organic acids water solution on a DC diaphragm discharge was studied. Efficiency of the discharge was quantified by the hydrogen peroxide production determined by UV-VIS spectrometry of a H2O2 complex formed with specific titanium reagent. Automatic titration was used to study the pH behaviour after the plasma treatment. Optical emission spectroscopy overview spectra were recorded and detailed spectra of OH band and Hβ line were used to calculate the rotational temperature and comparison of the line profile (reflecting electron concentration) in the acid solutions. Contribution to the topical issue "The 14th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XIV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ronny Brandenburg and Lars Stollenwark

  15. Diaphragm Stirling engine heat-actuated heat pump development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, R. A.; Swenson, P.

    A power module, consisting of a free displacer, resonant Stirling engine, hydraulic transmission, and resonant Rankine refrigerant (F-22) compressor, embodies several innovative concepts in free-piston Stirling engine heat pump design that will advance the state of the art of this technology. Progress is reported in three areas of the program. A compressor/engine matching analysis and a stability analysis show that the power module, which is representative of a two-degree-of-freedom resonant system, can operate stably over the full range of heat pump conditions. A compressor design evolved that has met criteria for performance and cost. Tests employing a hydraulic simulator test rig show that the transmission losses are less than had been predicted, and that properly designed and fabricated diaphragms can attain long life.

  16. Modulation of glucose transporters in rat diaphragm by sodium tungstate.

    PubMed

    Girón, M D; Caballero, J J; Vargas, A M; Suárez, M D; Guinovart, J J; Salto, R

    2003-05-08

    Oral administration of sodium tungstate is an effective treatment for diabetes in animal models. We examined the effects of 6 weeks of oral administration of tungstate on glucose transporters (GLUT) in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat diaphragm. Diabetes decreased GLUT4 expression while tungstate treatment normalized not only GLUT4 protein but also GLUT4 mRNA in the diabetic rats. Furthermore, treatment increased GLUT4 protein in plasma and internal membranes, suggesting a stimulation of its translocation to the plasma membrane. Tungstate had no effect on healthy animals. There were no differences in the total amount of GLUT1 transporter in any group. We conclude that the normoglycemic effect of tungstate may be partly due to a normalization of the levels and subcellular localization of GLUT4, which should result in an increase in muscle glucose uptake.

  17. Cerium oxide nanoparticle treatment ameliorates peritonitis-induced diaphragm dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Asano, Shinichi; Arvapalli, Ravikumar; Manne, Nandini D P K; Maheshwari, Mani; Ma, Bing; Rice, Kevin M; Selvaraj, Vellaisamy; Blough, Eric R

    2015-01-01

    The severe inflammation observed during sepsis is thought to cause diaphragm dysfunction, which is associated with poor patient prognosis. Cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles have been posited to exhibit anti-inflammatory and antioxidative activities suggesting that these particles may be of potential use for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. To investigate this possibility, Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned to the following groups: sham control, CeO2 nanoparticle treatment only (0.5 mg/kg iv), sepsis, and sepsis+CeO2 nanoparticles. Sepsis was induced by the introduction of cecal material (600 mg/kg) directly into the peritoneal cavity. Nanoparticle treatment decreased sepsis-associated impairments in diaphragmatic contractile (P(o)) function (sham: 25.6±1.6 N/cm(2) vs CeO2: 23.4±0.8 N/cm(2) vs Sep: 15.9±1.0 N/cm(2) vs Sep+CeO2: 20.0±1.0 N/cm(2), P<0.05). These improvements in diaphragm contractile function were accompanied by a normalization of protein translation signaling (Akt, FOXO-1, and 4EBP1), diminished proteolysis (caspase 8 and ubiquitin levels), and decreased inflammatory signaling (Stat3 and iNOS). Histological analysis suggested that nanoparticle treatment was associated with diminished sarcolemma damage and diminished inflammatory cell infiltration. These data indicate CeO2 nanoparticles may improve diaphragmatic function in the septic laboratory rat.

  18. Progress in Karl Fischer coulometry using diaphragm-free cells.

    PubMed

    Cedergren, A; Jonsson, S

    2001-11-15

    Different designs of a semiopen, drainable cathode compartment of a medium-sized coulometric Karl Fischer (KF) cell for the determination of water in the range 0.1-500 microg were evaluated. The main criterion for the design was to keep the resistance between the anolyte and catholyte low enough to permit the generation of currents larger than 20 mA (for an output voltage of 28 V). It was found that a good compromise between the size of this current and a minimal influence from diffusing/migrating oxidizable reduction products from the catholyte was achieved by means of an interface having a channel length and diameter of 8 and 2.1 mm, respectively (catholyte volume, approximately 1 mL). To show the general applicability of the concept, the following different types of coulometric reagents suitable for nonpolar and polar samples, as well as for samples containing active carbonyl compounds, were investigated: Hydranal Coulomat A, AD, AK, AG-H (modified with chloroform, Merck), and two homemade methanolic reagents modified with 40% (v/v) chloroform and 50% (v/v) formamide, respectively. Except for Hydranal Coulomat A, the mean value of five consecutive titrations of 50 microg water did not deviate by more than 0.2% from the expected value for all reagents. Draining after every titration was sufficient to obtain accurate results, even for Coulomat A which, when used in the commercial diaphragm-free system of Metrohm, gave values which were about 10% too high. As compared to earlier reported results for diaphragm-free coulometry, the descibed modified cell represents a significant improvement, mainly because of the high accuracy achieved for all types of reagents.

  19. Effects of undernutrition on diaphragm fiber size, SDH activity, and fatigue resistance.

    PubMed

    Sieck, G C; Lewis, M I; Blanco, C E

    1989-05-01

    The influence of prolonged nutritional deprivation on the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity and cross-sectional areas of individual fibers in the rat diaphragm and deep portion of the medial gastrocnemius (MGr) muscles was determined. Fatigue resistance of the diaphragm was measured by means of an in vitro nerve-muscle strip preparation. Fiber SDH activity and cross-sectional area were quantified by means of an image processing system. Diaphragm fatigue resistance was significantly improved in the nutritionally deprived (ND) group. In both muscles, nutritional deprivation resulted in a significant decrease in fiber cross-sectional area (both type I and II), type II fibers showing greater atrophy. The SDH activities of type I and II fibers in the diaphragm were not affected by nutritional deprivation. This contrasted with a significant decrease in the SDH activity of both type I and II fibers in the MGr of ND animals. An assessment of the interrelationships between fiber atrophy and fiber SDH activity revealed a greater effect of malnutrition on those diaphragm type II fibers that had the lowest relative SDH activities and the largest cross-sectional areas. By comparison, the effect of malnutrition on type I and II fibers in the MGr was nonselective with regard to fiber SDH activity. We conclude that the enhanced diaphragm fatigue resistance in the ND animals does not result from an increase in the oxidative capacity of muscle fibers and is best explained by the pattern of diaphragm muscle fiber atrophy.

  20. Investigating the functionality of diamond-like carbon films on an artificial heart diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Ohgoe, Yasuharu; Takada, Satoshi; Hirakuri, Kenji K; Tsuchimoto, Katsuya; Homma, Akihiko; Miyamatsu, Toshinobu; Saitou, Tomoyuki; Friedbacher, Gernot; Tatsumi, Eisuke; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki; Fukui, Yasuhiro

    2003-01-01

    In this study, the authors used diamond-like carbon film to coat the ellipsoidal diaphragm (polyurethane elastomer) of artificial hearts. The purpose of such coatings is to prevent the penetration of hydraulic silicone oil and blood through the diaphragm. To attach diamond-like carbon film uniformly on the diaphragm, the authors developed a special electrode. In estimating the uniformity of the diamond-like carbon film, the thickness was measured using a scanning electron microscope, and the characteristics of the diamond-like carbon film was investigated using infrared spectroscopy, Ar-laser Raman spectrophotometer, and x-ray photoelectron spectrometer. Also, to estimate the penetration of silicone oil through the diaphragm, in vitro testing was operated by alternating the pressure of silicone oil for 20 days. The authors were able to successfully attach uniform deposition of diamond-like carbon film on the ellipsoidal diaphragm. In this in vitro test, diamond-like carbon film was proven to have good stability. The amount of silicone oil penetration was improved by one-third using the diamond-like carbon film coating compared with an uncoated diaphragm. It is expected that through the use of the diamond-like carbon film, the dynamic compatibility of an artificial heart diaphragm will increase.

  1. Monitoring of Diaphragm Position in Pulsatile Pnumatic Ventricular Assisted Device by Ultrasound Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamimura, Tadayuki; Homma, Akihiko; Tsukiya, Tomonori; Kakuta, Yukihide; Lee, Hwansung; Tatsumi, Eisuke; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki; Kitamura, Soichiro

    A new method using ultrasound sensors to detect the diaphragm position of a ventricular assist device (VAD) was proposed. Two small ultrasound sensors of 2.4mm diameter were attached to the outside surface of blood chamber of a pneumatic VAD. The receiving crystal received the ultrasound from the transmitting crystal reflected by the diaphragm. The diaphragm position was calculated by using geometric relation among two sensors and ultrasound propagation time. Validity of this method was evaluated in a mock circulation test under various driving conditions of VAD by comparing the ultrasound signals with driving pressure waveforms. The ultrasound signals could detect full-fill (FF) and full-eject (FE) status shortly before the spikes appeared on pressure waves, which are currently available to detect FE and FF but accompanies excessive extension of the diaphragm. This method would be helpful to avoid overloading of diaphragm. Linear correlation was observed between the output from VAD and blood volume calculated from the change of diaphragm position multiplied by the heart rate. This monitoring method of diaphragm of a VAD was proven to have advantages over the current method toward better control of a pneumatic VAD.

  2. Wt1 and β-catenin cooperatively regulate diaphragm development in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Paris, Nicole D.; Coles, Garry L.; Ackerman, Kate G.

    2015-01-01

    The developing diaphragm consists of various differentiating cell types, many of which are not well characterized during organogenesis. One important but incompletely understood tissue, the diaphragmatic mesothelium, is distinctively present from early stages of development. Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH) occurs in humans when diaphragm tissue is lost during development, resulting in high morbidity and mortality postnatally. We utilized a Wilms Tumor 1 (Wt1) mutant mouse model to investigate the involvement of the mesothelium in normal diaphragm signaling and development. Additionally, we developed and characterized a Wt1CreERT2 -driven β-catenin loss-of-function model of CDH after finding that canonical Wnt signaling and β-catenin are reduced in Wt1 mutant mesothelium. Mice with β-catenin loss or constitutive activation induced in the Wt1 lineage are only affected when tamoxifen injection occurs between E10.5 and E11.5, revealing a critical time-frame for Wt1/β-catenin activity. Conditional β-catenin loss phenocopies the Wt1 mutant diaphragm defect, while constitutive activation of β-catenin on the Wt1 mutant background is sufficient to close the diaphragm defect. Proliferation and apoptosis are affected, but primarily these genetic manipulations appear to lead to a change in normal diaphragm differentiation. Our data suggest a fundamental role for mesothelial signaling in proper formation of the diaphragm. PMID:26278035

  3. Convergence of pattern generator outputs on a common mechanism of diaphragm motor unit recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Mantilla, Carlos B.; Seven, Yasin B.; Sieck, Gary C.

    2014-01-01

    Motor units are the final element of neuromotor control. In manner analogous to the organization of neuromotor control in other skeletal muscles, diaphragm motor units comprise phrenic motoneurons located in the cervical spinal cord that innervate the diaphragm muscle, the main inspiratory muscle in mammals. Diaphragm motor units play a primary role in sustaining ventilation, but are also active in other non-ventilatory behaviors, including coughing, sneezing, vomiting, defecation and parturition. Diaphragm muscle fibers comprise all fiber types. Thus, diaphragm motor units display substantial differences in contractile and fatigue properties, but importantly properties of the motoneuron and muscle fibers within a motor unit are matched. As in other skeletal muscles, diaphragm motor units are recruited in order such that motor units that display greater fatigue resistance are recruited earlier and more often than more fatigable motor units. The properties of the motor unit population are critical determinants of the function of a skeletal muscle across the range of possible motor tasks. Accordingly, fatigue-resistant motor units are sufficient to generate the forces necessary for ventilatory behaviors whereas more fatigable units are only activated during expulsive behaviors important for airway clearance. Neuromotor control of diaphragm motor units may reflect selective inputs from distinct pattern generators distributed according to the motor unit properties necessary to accomplish these different motor tasks. In contrast, widely-distributed inputs to phrenic motoneurons from various pattern generators (e.g., for breathing, coughing or vocalization) would dictate recruitment order based on intrinsic electrophysiological properties. PMID:24746055

  4. Finite element analysis of AlGaN/GaN micro-diaphragms with diamond coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzuba, J.; Vanko, G.; Vojs, M.; Rýger, I.; Ižák, T.; Jirásek, V.; Kutiš, V.; Lalinský, T.

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we present a pressure sensor based on diamond coated AlGaN/GaN diaphragm with integrated high electron mobility transistor (HEMT). The influence of the diamond film thickness (in the range of 1 μm to 50 μm) on the properties of the AlGaN/GaN diaphragm is studied by finite element simulation method (FEM). The effect of thermal buckling as well as the induced piezoelectric charge of HEMTs as a function of pressure and temperature is investigated. It was found out that diamond coated sensor better prevents the effect known as thermal buckling of the diaphragm at elevated temperature. Thermal buckling of diaphragms with 1, 5, 10 μm diamond coating occurs at temperature 40, 73 and 142 °C, respectively. Compared with original GaN diaphragm, diamond expanded the operational temperature range of the pressure sensor. Moreover, compared with the operational range of pressure sensor based on pure GaN diaphragm (up to 30 kPa), diamond coated modified MEMS sensors withstand relatively higher pressures (2.2 MPa). The maximum load on the diaphragm increased two times by adding only 1 μm of diamond coating.

  5. The action of the canine diaphragm on the lower ribs depends on activation.

    PubMed

    De Troyer, André

    2011-11-01

    Conventional wisdom maintains that the diaphragm lifts the lower ribs during isolated contraction. Recent studies in dogs have shown, however, that supramaximal, tetanic stimulation of the phrenic nerves displaces the lower ribs caudally and inward. In the present study, the hypothesis was tested that the action of the canine diaphragm on these ribs depends on the magnitude of muscle activation. Two experiments were performed. In the first, the C5 and C6 phrenic nerve roots were selectively stimulated in 6 animals with the airway occluded, and the level of diaphragm activation was altered by adjusting the stimulation frequency. In the second experiment, all the inspiratory intercostal muscles were severed in 7 spontaneously breathing animals, so that the diaphragm was the only muscle active during inspiration, and neural drive was increased by a succession of occluded breaths. The changes in airway opening pressure and the craniocaudal displacements of ribs 5 and 10 were measured in each animal. The data showed that 1) contraction of the diaphragm causes the upper ribs to move caudally; 2) during phrenic nerve stimulation, the lower ribs move cranially when the level of diaphragm activation is low, but they move caudally when the level of muscle activation is high and the entire rib cage is exposed to pleural pressure; and 3) during spontaneous diaphragm contraction, however, the lower ribs always move cranially, even when neural drive is elevated and the change in pleural pressure is large. It is concluded that the action of the diaphragm on the lower ribs depends on both the magnitude and the mode of muscle activation. These findings can reasonably explain the apparent discrepancies between previous studies. They also imply that observations made during phrenic nerve stimulation do not necessarily reflect the physiological action of the diaphragm.

  6. Quantification of Diaphragm Mechanics in Pompe Disease Using Dynamic 3D MRI

    PubMed Central

    Mogalle, Katja; Perez-Rovira, Adria; Ciet, Pierluigi; Wens, Stephan C. A.; van Doorn, Pieter A.; Tiddens, Harm A. W. M.; van der Ploeg, Ans T.; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2016-01-01

    Background Diaphragm weakness is the main reason for respiratory dysfunction in patients with Pompe disease, a progressive metabolic myopathy affecting respiratory and limb-girdle muscles. Since respiratory failure is the major cause of death among adult patients, early identification of respiratory muscle involvement is necessary to initiate treatment in time and possibly prevent irreversible damage. In this paper we investigate the suitability of dynamic MR imaging in combination with state-of-the-art image analysis methods to assess respiratory muscle weakness. Methods The proposed methodology relies on image registration and lung surface extraction to quantify lung kinematics during breathing. This allows for the extraction of geometry and motion features of the lung that characterize the independent contribution of the diaphragm and the thoracic muscles to the respiratory cycle. Results Results in 16 3D+t MRI scans (10 Pompe patients and 6 controls) of a slow expiratory maneuver show that kinematic analysis from dynamic 3D images reveals important additional information about diaphragm mechanics and respiratory muscle involvement when compared to conventional pulmonary function tests. Pompe patients with severely reduced pulmonary function showed severe diaphragm weakness presented by minimal motion of the diaphragm. In patients with moderately reduced pulmonary function, cranial displacement of posterior diaphragm parts was reduced and the diaphragm dome was oriented more horizontally at full inspiration compared to healthy controls. Conclusion Dynamic 3D MRI provides data for analyzing the contribution of both diaphragm and thoracic muscles independently. The proposed image analysis method has the potential to detect less severe diaphragm weakness and could thus be used to determine the optimal start of treatment in adult patients with Pompe disease in prospect of increased treatment response. PMID:27391236

  7. Diaphragm Abnormalities in Patients with End-Stage Heart Failure: NADPH Oxidase Upregulation and Protein Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Bumsoo; Coblentz, Philip D.; Beharry, Adam W.; Patel, Nikhil; Judge, Andrew R.; Moylan, Jennifer. S.; Hoopes, Charles W.; Bonnell, Mark R.; Ferreira, Leonardo F.

    2017-01-01

    Patients with heart failure (HF) have diaphragm abnormalities that contribute to disease morbidity and mortality. Studies in animals suggest that reactive oxygen species (ROS) cause diaphragm abnormalities in HF. However, the effects of HF on ROS sources, antioxidant enzymes, and protein oxidation in the diaphragm of humans is unknown. NAD(P)H oxidase, especially the Nox2 isoform, is an important source of ROS in the diaphragm. Our main hypothesis was that diaphragm from patients with HF have heightened Nox2 expression and p47phox phosphorylation (marker of enzyme activation) that is associated with elevated protein oxidation. We collected diaphragm biopsies from patients with HF and brain-dead organ donors (controls). Diaphragm mRNA levels of Nox2 subunits were increased 2.5–4.6-fold over controls (p < 0.05). Patients also had increased protein levels of Nox2 subunits (p47phox, p22phox, and p67phox) and total p47phox phosphorylation, while phospho-to-total p47phox levels were unchanged. The antioxidant enzyme catalase was increased in patients, whereas glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutases were unchanged. Among markers of protein oxidation, carbonyls were increased by ~40% (p < 0.05) and 4-hydroxynonenal and 3-nitrotyrosines were unchanged in patients with HF. Overall, our findings suggest that Nox2 is an important source of ROS in the diaphragm of patients with HF and increases in levels of antioxidant enzymes are not sufficient to maintain normal redox homeostasis. The net outcome is elevated diaphragm protein oxidation that has been shown to cause weakness in animals. PMID:28119629

  8. Effect of Elastase-induced Emphysema on the Force-generating Ability of the Diaphragm

    PubMed Central

    Supinski, Gerald S.; Kelsen, Steven G.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of emphysema on the ability of the diaphragm to generate force was examined in costal diaphragm muscle strips from 10 Golden hamsters killed 18 mo after intratracheal injection of pancreatic elastase in a dose producing hyperinflation (mean total lung capacity [TLC] = 163% of control) and generalized panacinar emphysema. 13 saline-injected normal animals served as controls. The time course of isometric tension and the effect of alterations in muscle fiber and sarcomere length on the isometric tension (T) generated in response to tetanizing electrical stimuli (length-tension [L-T] relationship) were examined. Elastase administration caused an increase in diaphragm muscle thickness and reduction in the length of costal diaphragm muscle fibers measured in situ. Emphysema significantly increased the maximum tetanic tension as a result of hypertrophy. Maximal tension corrected for increases in muscle cross-sectional area (T/cm2), however, was the same in emphysematous (E) and control (C) animals. Emphysema also shifted the muscle fiber L-T curve of the diaphragm but not of a control muscle, the soleus, toward shorter lengths. In contrast to the effects of E on the diaphragm muscle fiber L-T curve, the sarcomere L-T curve was the same in E and C. Since the length at which tension was maximal correlated closely with sarcomere number (r = 0.94; P < 0.001) reduction in the number of sarcomeres in series in muscles from emphysematous animals appeared to explain the shift in the muscle fiber L-T curve. We conclude that in elastase-induced emphysema adaptive changes both in diaphragm cross-sectional area and sarcomere number augment the force-generating ability of the diaphragm. We speculate that changes in sarcomere number compensate for alterations in muscle fiber length resulting from chronic hyperinflation of the thorax, while diaphragmatic muscle hypertrophy represents a response to changes in respiratory load and/or diaphragm configuration (La

  9. Internally-cooled centrifugal compressor with cooling jacket formed in the diaphragm

    DOEpatents

    Moore, James J.; Lerche, Andrew H.; Moreland, Brian S.

    2014-08-26

    An internally-cooled centrifugal compressor having a shaped casing and a diaphragm disposed within the shaped casing having a gas side and a coolant side so that heat from a gas flowing though the gas side is extracted via the coolant side. An impeller disposed within the diaphragm has a stage inlet on one side and a stage outlet for delivering a pressurized gas to a downstream connection. The coolant side of the diaphragm includes at least one passageway for directing a coolant in a substantially counter-flow direction from the flow of gas through the gas side.

  10. High-sensitivity Fabry-Perot interferometric pressure sensor based on a nanothick silver diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Ren, Dongxu; Shi, Xiaolong; Li, Can; Lu, Weiwei; Lu, Lu; Lu, Liang; Yu, Benli

    2012-01-15

    We present a fiber-optic extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer pressure sensor based on a nanothick silver diaphragm. The sensing diaphragm, with a thickness measured in a few hundreds of nanometers, is fabricated by the electroless plating method, which provides a simple fabrication process involving a high-quality diaphragm at a low cost. The sensor exhibits a relatively linear response within the pressure variation range of 0-50 kPa, with a high pressure sensitivity of 70.5 nm/kPa. This sensor is expected to have potential applications in the field of highly sensitive pressure sensors.

  11. Development, Fabrication, and Characterization of Hydrogel Based Piezoresistive Pressure Sensors with Perforated Diaphragms

    PubMed Central

    Orthner, M.P.; Buetefisch, Sebastian; Magda, J.; Rieth, L.W.; Solzbacher, F.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogels have been demonstrated to swell in response to a number of external stimuli including pH, CO2, glucose, and ionic strength making them useful for detection of metabolic analytes. To measure hydrogel swelling pressure, we have fabricated and tested novel perforated diaphragm piezoresistive pressure sensor arrays that couple the pressure sensing diaphragm with a perforated semi-permeable membrane. The 2×2 arrays measure approximately 3 × 5 mm2 and consist of four square sensing diaphragms with widths of 1.0, 1.25, and 1.5 mm used to measure full scale pressures of 50, 25, and 5 kPa, respectively. An optimized geometry of micro pores was etched in silicon diaphragm to allow analyte diffusion into the sensor cavity where the hydrogel material is located. The 14-step front side wafer process was carried out by a commercial foundry service (MSF, Frankfurt (Oder), Germany) and diaphragm pores were created using combination of potassium hydroxide (KOH) etching and deep reactive ion etching (DRIE). Sensor characterization was performed (without the use of hydrogels) using a custom bulge testing apparatus that simultaneously measured deflection, pressure, and electrical output. Test results are used to quantify the sensor sensitivity and demonstrate proof-of-concept. Simulations showed that the sensitivity was slightly improved for the perforated diaphragm designs while empirical electrical characterization showed that the perforated diaphragm sensors were slightly less sensitive than solid diaphragm sensors. This discrepancy is believed to be due to the influence of compressive stress found within passivation layers and poor etching uniformity. The new perforated diaphragm sensors were fully functional with sensitivities ranging from 23 to 252 μV/V-kPa (FSO= 5 to 80mV), and show a higher nonlinearity at elevated pressures than identical sensors with solid diaphragms. Sensors (1.5×1.5 mm2) with perforated diaphragms (pores=40 μm) have a nonlinearity of

  12. [Routes of resorption of peritoneal fluid in the diaphragm in liver cirrhosis (morphologic study)].

    PubMed

    Khoroshaev, V A; Vorozheĭkin, V M; Baĭbekov, I M

    1991-01-01

    The diaphragm peritoneum from 12 operated patients and 34 patients who died from liver cirrhosis with or without ascites was studied by means of light microscopy and electron transmission and scanning microscopy. Considerable lesions are found in the peritoneum: cuboidization of mesothelial cells, basal membrane thickening, dilation of stomata, lymphatic lacunae and collectors lumina. Liver cirrhosis with ascites is frequently followed by lymphatic vessels thrombosis and firm attachment of the diaphragm to the liver resulting in the inhibition of the ascitic liquid elimination. Thus both the enhancement of liquid transudation into the abdominal cavity and the disturbance of the drainage function of the diaphragm peritoneum take place.

  13. Delayed Traumatic Diaphragm Hernia after Thoracolumbar Fracture in a Patient with Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyoun-Ho; Kim, Sang Woo; Jung, Young Jin

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic diaphragm hernia can occur in rare cases and generally accompanies thoracic or abdominal injuries. When suffering from ankylosing spondylitis, a small force can develop into vertebral fracture and an adjacent structural injury, and lead to diaphragm hernia without accompanying concomitant thoracoabdominal injury. A high level of suspicion may be a most reliable diagnostic tool in the detection of a diaphragm injury, and we need to keep in mind a possibility in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis and a thoracolumbar fracture, even in the case of minor trauma. PMID:25733996

  14. An experimental evaluation of metallic diaphragms for positive fuel expulsion in the atmosphere explorer hydrazine propulsion subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodruff, W. L.

    1973-01-01

    Four Arde conospheroid metallic diaphragms were tested to evaluate their capability for use in the orbit adjust propulsion subsystem (OAPS) of the Explorer spacecraft. The diaphragms will be used for positive propellant expulsion and spacecraft center of mass control. A leak-free cycle life capability of nine reversals was demonstrated. The diaphragms rolled smoothly from ring to ring in a predictable manner on the first reversal. Varying amounts of diaphragm cocking and ring skipping were observed on subsequent reversals. The diaphragm pressure differential did not exceed 7 N/sq cm during any reversal. Cycle life capability, reversal mode, and pressure differential were not affected by sudden reversals, environmental tests, or 18,000 partial reversals. An expulsion efficiency of approximately 97 percent was demonstrated. The results of these tests show that metallic diaphragms can be used as an effective means of positive fuel expulsion; however, to achieve spacecraft center of mass control, the diaphragm must not be reversed prior to flight.

  15. Design of Diaphragm and Coil for Stable Performance of an Eddy Current Type Pressure Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyo Ryeol; Lee, Gil Seung; Kim, Hwa Young; Ahn, Jung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop an eddy current type pressure sensor and investigate its fundamental characteristics affected by the mechanical and electrical design parameters of sensor. The sensor has two key components, i.e., diaphragm and coil. On the condition that the outer diameter of sensor is 10 mm, two key parts should be designed so as to keep a good linearity and sensitivity. Experiments showed that aluminum is the best target material for eddy current detection. A round-grooved diaphragm is suggested in order to measure more precisely its deflection caused by applied pressures. The design parameters of a round-grooved diaphragm can be selected depending on the measuring requirements. A developed pressure sensor with diaphragm of t = 0.2 mm and w = 1.05 mm was verified to measure pressure up to 10 MPa with very good linearity and errors of less than 0.16%. PMID:27376306

  16. Lead-Free Piezoelectric Diaphragm Biosensors Based on Micro-Machining Technology and Chemical Solution Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaomeng; Wu, Xiaoqing; Shi, Peng; Ye, Zuo-Guang

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new approach to the fabrication of integrated silicon-based piezoelectric diaphragm-type biosensors by using sodium potassium niobate-silver niobate (0.82KNN-0.18AN) composite lead-free thin film as the piezoelectric layer. The piezoelectric diaphragms were designed and fabricated by micro-machining technology and chemical solution deposition. The fabricated device was very sensitive to the mass changes caused by various targets attached on the surface of diaphragm. The measured mass sensitivity value was about 931 Hz/μg. Its good performance shows that the piezoelectric diaphragm biosensor can be used as a cost-effective platform for nucleic acid testing. PMID:26771617

  17. Lead-Free Piezoelectric Diaphragm Biosensors Based on Micro-Machining Technology and Chemical Solution Deposition.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaomeng; Wu, Xiaoqing; Shi, Peng; Ye, Zuo-Guang

    2016-01-12

    In this paper, we present a new approach to the fabrication of integrated silicon-based piezoelectric diaphragm-type biosensors by using sodium potassium niobate-silver niobate (0.82KNN-0.18AN) composite lead-free thin film as the piezoelectric layer. The piezoelectric diaphragms were designed and fabricated by micro-machining technology and chemical solution deposition. The fabricated device was very sensitive to the mass changes caused by various targets attached on the surface of diaphragm. The measured mass sensitivity value was about 931 Hz/μg. Its good performance shows that the piezoelectric diaphragm biosensor can be used as a cost-effective platform for nucleic acid testing.

  18. Anatomic connections of the diaphragm: influence of respiration on the body system

    PubMed Central

    Bordoni, Bruno; Zanier, Emiliano

    2013-01-01

    The article explains the scientific reasons for the diaphragm muscle being an important crossroads for information involving the entire body. The diaphragm muscle extends from the trigeminal system to the pelvic floor, passing from the thoracic diaphragm to the floor of the mouth. Like many structures in the human body, the diaphragm muscle has more than one function, and has links throughout the body, and provides the network necessary for breathing. To assess and treat this muscle effectively, it is necessary to be aware of its anatomic, fascial, and neurologic complexity in the control of breathing. The patient is never a symptom localized, but a system that adapts to a corporeal dysfunction. PMID:23940419

  19. Diaphragm weakness as a cause of breathlessness after anatomically distant surgery

    PubMed Central

    Moore, A; Moxham, J; Polkey, M

    2005-01-01

    The case histories are presented of two patients in whom breathlessness developed following surgery to an anatomically distant site. Respiratory muscle testing demonstrated diaphragm weakness in both patients. PMID:16135683

  20. Embossed Teflon AF Laminate Membrane Microfluidic Diaphragm Valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Peter; Hunt, Brian; White,Victor; Grunthaner, Frank

    2008-01-01

    A microfluidic system has been designed to survive spaceflight and to function autonomously on the Martian surface. It manipulates microscopic quantities of liquid water and performs chemical analyses on these samples to assay for the presence of molecules associated with past or present living processes. This technology lies at the core of the Urey Instrument, which is scheduled for inclusion on the Pasteur Payload of the ESA ExoMars rover mission in 2013. Fabrication processes have been developed to make the microfabricated Teflon-AF microfluidic diaphragm pumps capable of surviving extreme temperature excursions before and after exposure to liquid water. Two glass wafers are etched with features and a continuous Teflon membrane is sandwiched between them (see figure). Single valves are constructed using this geometry. The microfabricated devices are then post processed by heating the assembled device while applying pneumatic pressure to force the Teflon diaphragm against the valve seat while it is softened. After cooling the device, the embossed membrane retains this new shape. This solves previous problems with bubble introduction into the fluid flow where deformations of the membrane at the valve seat occurred during device bonding at elevated temperatures (100-150 C). The use of laminated membranes containing commercial Teflon AF 2400 sheet sandwiched between spun Teflon AF 1600 layers performed best, and were less gas permeable than Teflon AF 1600 membranes on their own. Spinning Teflon AF 1600 solution (6 percent in FLOURINERT(Registered TradeMark) FC40 solvent, 3M Company) at 500 rpm for 1.5 seconds, followed by 1,000 rpm for 3 seconds onto Borofloat glass wafers, results in a 10-micron-thick film of extremely smooth Teflon AF. This spinning process is repeated several times on flat, blank, glass wafers in order to gradually build a thick, smooth membrane. After running this process at least five times, the wafer and Teflon coating are heated under vacuum

  1. Seismic design repair and retrofit strategies for steel roof deck diaphragms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franquet, John-Edward

    Structural engineers will often rely on the roof diaphragm to transfer lateral seismic loads to the bracing system of single-storey structures. The implementation of capacity-based design in the NBCC 2005 has caused an increase in the diaphragm design load due to the need to use the probable capacity of the bracing system, thus resulting in thicker decks, closer connector patterns and higher construction costs. Previous studies have shown that accounting for the in-plane flexibility of the diaphragm when calculating the overall building period can result in lower seismic forces and a more cost-efficient design. However, recent studies estimating the fundamental period of single storey structures using ambient vibration testing showed that the in-situ approximation was much shorter than that obtained using analytical means. The difference lies partially in the diaphragm stiffness characteristics which have been shown to decrease under increasing excitation amplitude. Using the diaphragm as the energy-dissipating element in the seismic force resisting system has also been investigated as this would take advantage of the diaphragm's ductility and limited overstrength; thus, lower capacity based seismic forces would result. An experimental program on 21.0m by 7.31m diaphragm test specimens was carried out so as to investigate the dynamic properties of diaphragms including the stiffness, ductility and capacity. The specimens consisted of 20 and 22 gauge panels with nailed frame fasteners and screwed sidelap connections as well a welded and button-punch specimen. Repair strategies for diaphragms that have previously undergone inelastic deformations were devised in an attempt to restitute the original stiffness and strength and were then experimentally evaluated. Strength and stiffness experimental estimations are compared with those predicted with the Steel Deck Institute (SDI) method. A building design comparative study was also completed. This study looks at the

  2. A new scenario of the evolutionary derivation of the mammalian diaphragm from shoulder muscles

    PubMed Central

    Hirasawa, Tatsuya; Kuratani, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    The evolutionary origin of the diaphragm remains unclear, due to the lack of a comparable structure in other extant taxa. However, recent researches into the developmental mechanism of this structure have yielded new insights into its origin. Here we summarize current understanding regarding the development of the diaphragm, and present a possible scenario for the evolutionary acquisition of this uniquely mammalian structure. Recent developmental analyses indicate that the diaphragm and forelimb muscles are derived from a shared cell population during embryonic development. Therefore, the embryonic positions of forelimb muscle progenitors, which correspond to the position of the brachial plexus, likely played an important role in the evolution of the diaphragm. We surveyed the literature to reexamine the position of the brachial plexus among living amniotes and confirmed that the cervico-thoracic transition in ribs reflects the brachial plexus position. Using this osteological correlate, we concluded that the anterior borders of the brachial plexuses in the stem synapsids were positioned at the level of the fourth spinal nerve, suggesting that the forelimb buds were laid in close proximity of the infrahyoid muscles. The topology of the phrenic and suprascapular nerves of mammals is similar to that of subscapular and supracoracoid nerves, respectively, of the other amniotes, suggesting that the diaphragm evolved from a muscle positioned medial to the pectoral girdle (cf. subscapular muscle). We hypothesize that the diaphragm was acquired in two steps: first, forelimb muscle cells were incorporated into tissues to form a primitive diaphragm in the stem synapsid grade, and second, the diaphragm in cynodonts became entrapped in the region controlled by pulmonary development. PMID:23448284

  3. Computer simulation analysis of normal and abnormal development of the mammalian diaphragm

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Jason C; Bodenstein, Lawrence

    2006-01-01

    Background Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a birth defect with significant morbidity and mortality. Knowledge of diaphragm morphogenesis and the aberrations leading to CDH is limited. Although classical embryologists described the diaphragm as arising from the septum transversum, pleuroperitoneal folds (PPF), esophageal mesentery and body wall, animal studies suggest that the PPF is the major, if not sole, contributor to the muscular diaphragm. Recently, a posterior defect in the PPF has been identified when the teratogen nitrofen is used to induce CDH in fetal rodents. We describe use of a cell-based computer modeling system (Nudge++™) to study diaphragm morphogenesis. Methods and results Key diaphragmatic structures were digitized from transverse serial sections of paraffin-embedded mouse embryos at embryonic days 11.5 and 13. Structure boundaries and simulated cells were combined in the Nudge++™ software. Model cells were assigned putative behavioral programs, and these programs were progressively modified to produce a diaphragm consistent with the observed anatomy in rodents. Homology between our model and recent anatomical observations occurred under the following simulation conditions: (1) cell mitoses are restricted to the edge of growing tissue; (2) cells near the chest wall remain mitotically active; (3) mitotically active non-edge cells migrate toward the chest wall; and (4) movement direction depends on clonal differentiation between anterior and posterior PPF cells. Conclusion With the PPF as the sole source of mitotic cells, an early defect in the PPF evolves into a posteromedial diaphragm defect, similar to that of the rodent nitrofen CDH model. A posterolateral defect, as occurs in human CDH, would be more readily recreated by invoking other cellular contributions. Our results suggest that recent reports of PPF-dominated diaphragm morphogenesis in the rodent may not be strictly applicable to man. The ability to recreate a CDH defect

  4. Estimation of vibration frequency of loudspeaker diaphragm by parallel phase-shifting digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakue, T.; Endo, Y.; Shimobaba, T.; Ito, T.

    2014-11-01

    We report frequency estimation of loudspeaker diaphragm vibrating at high speed by parallel phase-shifting digital holography which is a technique of single-shot phase-shifting interferometry. This technique records multiple phaseshifted holograms required for phase-shifting interferometry by using space-division multiplexing. We constructed a parallel phase-shifting digital holography system consisting of a high-speed polarization-imaging camera. This camera has a micro-polarizer array which selects four linear polarization axes for 2 × 2 pixels. We set a loudspeaker as an object, and recorded vibration of diaphragm of the loudspeaker by the constructed system. By the constructed system, we demonstrated observation of vibration displacement of loudspeaker diaphragm. In this paper, we aim to estimate vibration frequency of the loudspeaker diaphragm by applying the experimental results to frequency analysis. Holograms consisting of 128 × 128 pixels were recorded at a frame rate of 262,500 frames per second by the camera. A sinusoidal wave was input to the loudspeaker via a phone connector. We observed displacement of the loudspeaker diaphragm vibrating by the system. We also succeeded in estimating vibration frequency of the loudspeaker diaphragm by applying frequency analysis to the experimental results.

  5. Action of the isolated canine diaphragm on the lower ribs at high lung volumes.

    PubMed

    De Troyer, André; Wilson, Theodore A

    2014-10-15

    The normal diaphragm has an inspiratory action on the lower ribs, but subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease commonly have an inward displacement of the lateral portions of the lower rib cage during inspiration. This paradoxical displacement, conventionally called 'Hoover's sign', has traditionally been attributed to the direct action of radially oriented diaphragmatic muscle fibres. In the present study, the inspiratory intercostal muscles in all interspaces in anaesthetized dogs were severed so that the diaphragm was the only muscle active during inspiration. The displacements of the lower ribs along the craniocaudal and laterolateral axes and the changes in pleural pressure (∆Ppl) and transdiaphragmatic pressure were measured during occluded breaths and mechanical ventilation at different lung volumes between functional residual capacity (FRC) and total lung capacity. From these data, the separate effects on rib displacement of ∆Ppl and of the force exerted by the diaphragm on the ribs were determined. Isolated spontaneous diaphragm contraction at FRC displaced the lower ribs cranially and outward, but this motion was progressively reversed into a caudal and inward motion as lung volume increased. However, although the force exerted by the diaphragm on the ribs decreased with increasing volume, it continued to displace the ribs cranially and outward. These observations suggest that Hoover's sign is usually caused by the decrease in the zone of apposition and, thus, by the dominant effect of ∆Ppl on the lower ribs, rather than an inward pull from the diaphragm.

  6. 31P-NMR study of resting in vitro rat diaphragm exposed to hypercapnia.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, R S; Howell, S; Jacobus, W E

    1988-11-01

    We have reported previously that, when exposed to hypercapnia of various intensities, the diaphragm reduces its force of twitch and tetanic contractions in the in vitro rat preparation as well as in the in vivo dog preparation. The experiments reported here with 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR) spectroscopy attempt to examine cellular mechanisms that might be responsible for this deterioration in mechanical performance. Specifically they describe certain characteristics of this preparation and cautions needed to study the resting in vitro rat diaphragm with such techniques. Second, they report the response of intracellular pH (pHi), phosphocreatine (PCr), ATP, and inorganic phosphate (Pi) in the resting in vitro rat diaphragm exposed to long-term normocapnia or to long-term hypercapnia. The results show that 1) to maintain a viable preparation, it was necessary to keep the diaphragm extended to an area approximating that at functional residual capacity, 2) the diaphragm seemed quite capable of maintaining a constant pHi and constant contents of ATP and Pi during normocapnia, but there was a gradual decline in PCr, and 3) during hypercapnia there was a significant decrease in pHi, but the behavior of the phosphate metabolites was exactly as during normocapnia. The results suggest that the decrease in mechanical performance of the diaphragm is probably not due to a decrease in the availability of the high-energy phosphates, although they do not completely exclude this possibility or possibilities related to regional compartmentation.

  7. Measurement of thermal expansion coefficient of graphene diaphragm using optical fiber Fabry-Perot interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng; Liu, Qianwen; Peng, Xiaobin; Fan, Shangchun

    2016-07-01

    Application of the Fabry-Perot (FP) interference method for determining the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of a graphene diaphragm is investigated in this paper. A miniature extrinsic FP interferometric (EFPI) sensor was fabricated by using an approximate 8-layer graphene diaphragm. The extremely thin diaphragm was transferred onto the endface of a ferrule with an inner diameter of 125 μm, and van der Waals interactions between the graphene diaphragm and its substrate created a low finesse FP interferometer with a cavity length of 36.13 μm. Double reference FP cavities using two cleaved optical fibers as reflectors were also constructed to differentially cancel the thermal expansion effects of the trapped gas and adhesive material. A temperature test demonstrated an approximate cavity length change of 166.1 nm °C-1 caused by film thermal expansion in the range of 20-60 °C. Then along with the established thermal deformation model of the suspended circular diaphragm, the calculated CTE ranging from  -9.98  ×  10-6 K-1 to  -2.09  ×  10-6 K-1 conformed well to the previously measured results. The proposed method would be applicable in other types of elastic materials as the sensitive diaphragm of an EFPI sensor over a wide temperature range.

  8. An analytical solution for curved piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducers with spherically shaped diaphragms.

    PubMed

    Sammoura, Firas; Akhbari, Sina; Lin, Liwei

    2014-09-01

    An analytical solution for piezoelectrically actuated spherically shaped diaphragms has been developed to study their dynamic behavior with targeted applications in piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducers (pMUT). The analytical model starts with a curved pMUT composed of a piezoelectric diaphragm with a nominal radius in size, a radius of curvature in shape, and under both possible actuation sources of radial pressure and electric potential. The diaphragm has the piezoelectric material polarized in the direction perpendicular to its surface and sandwiched between two metal electrodes. When an electric field is applied between the two electrodes, the in-plane piezoelectric strain can cause larger out-of-plane deflections than a flat unimorph piezoelectric diaphragm because of the diaphragm's spherical curvature with a clamped periphery for high electromechanical coupling factor. Key performance parameters, including mechanical mode shapes, resonant frequencies, dynamic responses, and displacements, with respect to the curvature and size of the diaphragm have been investigated. Both analytical derivations and numerical simulations using finite element analysis have been performed for the optimal design of the electromechanical coupling factor, with varying factors such as mechanical resonant frequency, radius of curvature, nominal radius, and thickness. As such, this work provides theoretical foundations for the design of curved pMUTs with high electromechanical coupling factor compared with planar-shape pMUTs.

  9. Improvement of low-frequency characteristics of piezoelectric speakers based on acoustic diaphragms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye Jin; Yang, Woo Seok; No, Kwangsoo

    2012-09-01

    The vibrational characteristics of 3 types of the acoustic diaphragms are investigated to enhance the output acoustic performance of the piezoelectric ceramic speaker in a low-frequency range. In other to achieve both a higher output sound pressure level and wider frequency range of the piezoelectric speaker, we have proposed a rubber/resin bi-layer acoustic diaphragm. The theoretical square-root dependence of the fundamental resonant frequency on the thickness and Young's modulus of the acoustic diaphragm was verified by finite-element analysis simulation and laser scanning vibrometer measurement. The simulated resonant frequencies for each diaphragm correspond well to the measured results. From the simulated and measured resonant frequency results, it is found that the fundamental resonant frequency of the piezoelectric ceramic speaker can be designed by adjusting the thickness ratio of the rubber/resin bi-layer acoustic diaphragm. Compared with a commercial piezoelectric speaker, the fabricated piezoelectric ceramic speaker with the rubber/resin bi-layer diaphragm has at least 10 dB higher sound pressures in the low-frequency range of less than 1 kHz.

  10. Differential adenosine sensitivity of diaphragm and skeletal muscle arterioles.

    PubMed

    Aaker, Aaron; Laughlin, M H

    2002-09-01

    The hyperemic response in exercising skeletal muscle is dependent on muscle fiber-type composition and fiber recruitment patterns, but the vascular control mechanisms producing exercise hyperemia in skeletal muscle remain poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that arterioles from white, low-oxidative skeletal muscle are less responsive to adenosine-induced dilation than are arterioles from diaphragm (Dia) and red, high-oxidative skeletal muscle. Second-order arterioles (2As) were isolated from the white portion of gastrocnemius muscle (WG; low-oxidative, fast-twitch muscle tissue) and two types of high-oxidative skeletal muscle [Dia and red portion of gastrocnemius muscle (RG)] of rats. Results reveal that 2As from all three types of muscle dilated in response to the endothelium-dependent dilator acetylcholine (WG: 48 +/- 3%, Dia: 51 +/- 3%, RG: 74 +/- 3%). In contrast, adenosine dilated only 2As from WG (48 +/- 4%) and Dia (46 +/- 5%) but not those from RG (5 +/- 5%). Thus adenosine-induced dilator responses differed among 2As of these different types of muscle tissue. However, the results do not support our hypothesis because 2As from Dia and WG dilated in response to adenosine, whereas 2As from RG did not. We conclude that the adenosine responsiveness of 2As from rat skeletal muscle cannot be predicted only by the fiber-type composition or oxidative capacity of the skeletal muscle tissue wherein the arteriole lies.

  11. Energy harvester array using piezoelectric circular diaphragm for rail vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Huang, Rong-Jin; Huang, Chuan-Jun; Li, Lai-Feng

    2014-12-01

    Generating electric energy from mechanical vibration using a piezoelectric circular membrane array is presented in this paper. The electrical characteristics of the functional array consisted of three plates with varies tip masses are examined under dynamic conditions. With an optimal load resistor of 11 kΩ, an output power of 21.4 mW was generated from the array in parallel connection at 150 Hz under a pre-stress of 0.8 N and a vibration acceleration of 9.8 m/s2. Moreover, the broadband energy harvesting using this array still can be realized with different tip masses. Three obvious output power peaks can be obtained in a frequency spectra of 110 Hz to 260 Hz. The results show that using a piezoelectric circular diaphragm array can increase significantly the output of energy compared with the use of a single plate. And by optimizing combination of tip masses with piezoelectric elements in array, the frequency range can be tuned to meet the broadband vibration. This array may possibly be exploited to design the energy harvesting for practical applications such as future high speed rail.

  12. Diaphragm Based Fiber Bragg Grating Acceleration Sensor with Temperature Compensation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tianliang; Tan, Yuegang; Han, Xue; Zheng, Kai; Zhou, Zude

    2017-01-01

    A novel fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensing-based acceleration sensor has been proposed to simultaneously decouple and measure temperature and acceleration in real-time. This design applied a diaphragm structure and utilized the axial property of a tightly suspended optical fiber, enabling improvement in its sensitivity and resonant frequency and achieve a low cross-sensitivity. The theoretical vibrational model of the sensor has been built, and its design parameters and sensing properties have been analyzed through the numerical analysis. A decoupling method has been presented with consideration of the thermal expansion of the sensor structure to realize temperature compensation. Experimental results show that the temperature sensitivity is 8.66 pm/°C within the range of 30–90 °C. The acceleration sensitivity is 20.189 pm/g with a linearity of 0.764% within the range of 5~65 m/s2. The corresponding working bandwidth is 10~200 Hz and its resonant frequency is 600 Hz. This sensor possesses an excellent impact resistance for the cross direction, and the cross-axis sensitivity is below 3.31%. This implementation can avoid the FBG-pasting procedure and overcome its associated shortcomings. The performance of the proposed acceleration sensor can be easily adjusted by modifying their corresponding physical parameters to satisfy requirements from different vibration measurements. PMID:28124998

  13. Inhibition of Janus kinase signaling during controlled mechanical ventilation prevents ventilation-induced diaphragm dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ira J; Godinez, Guillermo L; Singh, Baljit K; McCaughey, Kelly M; Alcantara, Raniel R; Gururaja, Tarikere; Ho, Melissa S; Nguyen, Henry N; Friera, Annabelle M; White, Kathy A; McLaughlin, John R; Hansen, Derek; Romero, Jason M; Baltgalvis, Kristen A; Claypool, Mark D; Li, Wei; Lang, Wayne; Yam, George C; Gelman, Marina S; Ding, Rongxian; Yung, Stephanie L; Creger, Daniel P; Chen, Yan; Singh, Rajinder; Smuder, Ashley J; Wiggs, Michael P; Kwon, Oh-Sung; Sollanek, Kurt J; Powers, Scott K; Masuda, Esteban S; Taylor, Vanessa C; Payan, Donald G; Kinoshita, Taisei; Kinsella, Todd M

    2014-07-01

    Controlled mechanical ventilation (CMV) is associated with the development of diaphragm atrophy and contractile dysfunction, and respiratory muscle weakness is thought to contribute significantly to delayed weaning of patients. Therefore, therapeutic strategies for preventing these processes may have clinical benefit. The aim of the current study was to investigate the role of the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway in CMV-mediated diaphragm wasting and weakness in rats. CMV-induced diaphragm atrophy and contractile dysfunction coincided with marked increases in STAT3 phosphorylation on both tyrosine 705 (Tyr705) and serine 727 (Ser727). STAT3 activation was accompanied by its translocation into mitochondria within diaphragm muscle and mitochondrial dysfunction. Inhibition of JAK signaling during CMV prevented phosphorylation of both target sites on STAT3, eliminated the accumulation of phosphorylated STAT3 within the mitochondria, and reversed the pathologic alterations in mitochondrial function, reduced oxidative stress in the diaphragm, and maintained normal diaphragm contractility. In addition, JAK inhibition during CMV blunted the activation of key proteolytic pathways in the diaphragm, as well as diaphragm atrophy. These findings implicate JAK/STAT3 signaling in the development of diaphragm muscle atrophy and dysfunction during CMV and suggest that the delayed extubation times associated with CMV can be prevented by inhibition of Janus kinase signaling.-Smith, I. J., Godinez, G. L., Singh, B. K., McCaughey, K. M., Alcantara, R. R., Gururaja, T., Ho, M. S., Nguyen, H. N., Friera, A. M., White, K. A., McLaughlin, J. R., Hansen, D., Romero, J. M., Baltgalvis, K. A., Claypool, M. D., Li, W., Lang, W., Yam, G. C., Gelman, M. S., Ding, R., Yung, S. L., Creger, D. P., Chen, Y., Singh, R., Smuder, A. J., Wiggs, M. P., Kwon, O.-S., Sollanek, K. J., Powers, S. K., Masuda, E. S., Taylor, V. C., Payan, D. G

  14. Inhibition of Janus kinase signaling during controlled mechanical ventilation prevents ventilation-induced diaphragm dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ira J.; Godinez, Guillermo L.; Singh, Baljit K.; McCaughey, Kelly M.; Alcantara, Raniel R.; Gururaja, Tarikere; Ho, Melissa S.; Nguyen, Henry N.; Friera, Annabelle M.; White, Kathy A.; McLaughlin, John R.; Hansen, Derek; Romero, Jason M.; Baltgalvis, Kristen A.; Claypool, Mark D.; Li, Wei; Lang, Wayne; Yam, George C.; Gelman, Marina S.; Ding, Rongxian; Yung, Stephanie L.; Creger, Daniel P.; Chen, Yan; Singh, Rajinder; Smuder, Ashley J.; Wiggs, Michael P.; Kwon, Oh-Sung; Sollanek, Kurt J.; Powers, Scott K.; Masuda, Esteban S.; Taylor, Vanessa C.; Payan, Donald G.; Kinoshita, Taisei; Kinsella, Todd M.

    2014-01-01

    Controlled mechanical ventilation (CMV) is associated with the development of diaphragm atrophy and contractile dysfunction, and respiratory muscle weakness is thought to contribute significantly to delayed weaning of patients. Therefore, therapeutic strategies for preventing these processes may have clinical benefit. The aim of the current study was to investigate the role of the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway in CMV-mediated diaphragm wasting and weakness in rats. CMV-induced diaphragm atrophy and contractile dysfunction coincided with marked increases in STAT3 phosphorylation on both tyrosine 705 (Tyr705) and serine 727 (Ser727). STAT3 activation was accompanied by its translocation into mitochondria within diaphragm muscle and mitochondrial dysfunction. Inhibition of JAK signaling during CMV prevented phosphorylation of both target sites on STAT3, eliminated the accumulation of phosphorylated STAT3 within the mitochondria, and reversed the pathologic alterations in mitochondrial function, reduced oxidative stress in the diaphragm, and maintained normal diaphragm contractility. In addition, JAK inhibition during CMV blunted the activation of key proteolytic pathways in the diaphragm, as well as diaphragm atrophy. These findings implicate JAK/STAT3 signaling in the development of diaphragm muscle atrophy and dysfunction during CMV and suggest that the delayed extubation times associated with CMV can be prevented by inhibition of Janus kinase signaling.—Smith, I. J., Godinez, G. L., Singh, B. K., McCaughey, K. M., Alcantara, R. R., Gururaja, T., Ho, M. S., Nguyen, H. N., Friera, A. M., White, K. A., McLaughlin, J. R., Hansen, D., Romero, J. M., Baltgalvis, K. A., Claypool, M. D., Li, W., Lang, W., Yam, G. C., Gelman, M. S., Ding, R., Yung, S. L., Creger, D. P., Chen, Y., Singh, R., Smuder, A. J., Wiggs, M. P., Kwon, O.-S., Sollanek, K. J., Powers, S. K., Masuda, E. S., Taylor, V. C., Payan, D. G

  15. Ultrasound evaluation of diaphragm function and its application in critical patients, mechanical ventilation and brachial plexus block.

    PubMed

    de la Quintana Gordon, F de B; Nacarino Alcorta, B; Fajardo Pérez, M

    2017-03-23

    Before diaphragm ultrasonography, assessment of diaphragm function was very difficult due to the complex nature of its exploration. The use of this new technique has shed light on diagnostic problems and treatment with an improvement in final outcomes for critically ill patients, in whom the incidence of diaphragm weakness or dysfunction has been underestimated. Better knowledge of diaphragm function enables us earlier diagnosis by quantification of diaphragm contractile activity or evaluation of functional status after delivery of plexus block anaesthesia, facilitating therapeutic decisions. It is also being used as a guide in the process of weaning from mechanical ventilation or as the safest approach for braquial plexus block. In this review we present how to perform a systematic exploration of diaphragm function and its clinical implications.

  16. Diaphragm efficiency estimated as power output relative to activation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Finucane, Kevin E; Singh, Bhajan

    2012-11-01

    Muscle efficiency increases with fiber length and decreases with load. Diaphragm efficiency (Eff(di)) in healthy humans, measured as power output (Wdi) relative to the root mean square of diaphragm electromyogram (RMS(di)), increases with hyperpnea due to phasic activity of abdominal muscles acting to increase diaphragm length at end expiration (L(di ee)) and decrease inspiratory load. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), hyperpnea may decrease Eff(di) if L(di ee) decreases and load increases due to airflow obstruction and dynamic hyperinflation. To examine this hypothesis, we measured Eff(di) in six COPD subjects (mean forced expiratory volume in 1 s: 54% predicted) when breathing air and at intervals during progressive hypercapnic hyperpnea. Wdi was measured as the product of mean inspiratory transdiaphragmatic pressure (ΔPdi(mean)), diaphragm tidal volume measured fluoroscopically, and 1/inspiratory duration. Results were compared with those of six healthy subjects reported previously. In COPD, L(di ee) was normal when breathing air. ΔPdi(mean) and Wdi increased normally, and RMS(di) increased disproportionately (P = 0.01) with hyperpnea, and, unlike health, inspiratory capacity (IC), L(di ee), and Eff(di) did not increase. IC and L(di ee) were constant with hyperpnea because mean expiratory flow increased as expiratory duration decreased (r(2) = 0.65), and because expiratory flow was terminated actively by the balance between expiratory and inspiratory muscle forces near end expiration, and these forces increased proportionately with hyperpnea (r(2) = 0.49). At maximum ventilation, diaphragm radius of curvature at end inspiration increased in COPD (P = 0.04) but not controls; diaphragm radius of curvature at end inspiration and ln(Eff(di)) were negatively correlated (P = 0.01). Thus in COPD with modest airflow obstruction, Eff(di) did not increase normally with hyperpnea due to a constant L(di ee) and inspiratory flattening of the diaphragm.

  17. High-intensity interval training prevents oxidant-mediated diaphragm muscle weakness in hypertensive mice.

    PubMed

    Bowen, T Scott; Eisenkolb, Sophia; Drobner, Juliane; Fischer, Tina; Werner, Sarah; Linke, Axel; Mangner, Norman; Schuler, Gerhard; Adams, Volker

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension is a key risk factor for heart failure, with the latter characterized by diaphragm muscle weakness that is mediated in part by increased oxidative stress. In the present study, we used a deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt mouse model to determine whether hypertension could independently induce diaphragm dysfunction and further investigated the effects of high-intensity interval training (HIIT). Sham-treated (n = 11), DOCA-salt-treated (n = 11), and DOCA-salt+HIIT-treated (n = 15) mice were studied over 4 wk. Diaphragm contractile function, protein expression, enzyme activity, and fiber cross-sectional area and type were subsequently determined. Elevated blood pressure confirmed hypertension in DOCA-salt mice independent of HIIT (P < 0.05). Diaphragm forces were impaired by ∼15-20% in DOCA-salt vs. sham-treated mice (P < 0.05), but this effect was prevented after HIIT. Myosin heavy chain (MyHC) protein expression tended to decrease (∼30%; P = 0.06) in DOCA-salt vs. sham- and DOCA-salt+HIIT mice, whereas oxidative stress increased (P < 0.05). Enzyme activity of NADPH oxidase was higher, but superoxide dismutase was lower, with MyHC oxidation elevated by ∼50%. HIIT further prevented direct oxidant-mediated diaphragm contractile dysfunction (P < 0.05) after a 30 min exposure to H2O-2 (1 mM). Our data suggest that hypertension induces diaphragm contractile dysfunction via an oxidant-mediated mechanism that is prevented by HIIT.-Bowen, T. S., Eisenkolb, S., Drobner, J., Fischer, T., Werner, S., Linke, A., Mangner, N., Schuler, G., Adams, V. High-intensity interval training prevents oxidant-mediated diaphragm muscle weakness in hypertensive mice.

  18. CT Colonography (Virtual Colonoscopy)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Z CT Colonography Computed tomography (CT) colonography or virtual colonoscopy uses special x-ray equipment to examine ... and blood vessels. CT colonography, also known as virtual colonoscopy, uses low dose radiation CT scanning to ...

  19. Human diaphragm efficiency estimated as power output relative to activation increases with hypercapnic hyperpnea.

    PubMed

    Finucane, Kevin E; Singh, Bhajan

    2009-11-01

    Hyperpnea with exercise or hypercapnia causes phasic contraction of abdominal muscles, potentially lengthening the diaphragm at end expiration and unloading it during inspiration. Muscle efficiency in vitro varies with load, fiber length, and precontraction stretch. To examine whether these properties of muscle contractility determine diaphragm efficiency (Eff(di)) in vivo, we measured Eff(di) in six healthy adults breathing air and during progressive hypercapnia at three levels of end-tidal Pco(2) with mean values of 48 (SD 2), 55 (SD 2), and 61 (SD 1) Torr. Eff(di) was estimated as the ratio of diaphragm power (Wdi) [the product of mean inspiratory transdiaphragmatic pressure, diaphragm volume change (DeltaVdi) measured fluoroscopically, and 1/inspiratory duration (Ti(-1))] to activation [root mean square values of inspiratory diaphragm electromyogram (RMS(di)) measured from esophageal electrodes]. At maximum hypercapnea relative to breathing air, 1) gastric pressure and diaphragm length at end expiration (Pg(ee) and Ldi(ee), respectively) increased 1.4 (SD 0.2) and 1.13 (SD 0.08) times, (P < 0.01 for both); 2) inspiratory change (Delta) in Pg decreased from 4.5 (SD 2.2) to -7.7 (SD 3.8) cmH(2)O (P < 0.001); 3) DeltaVdi.Ti(-1), Wdi, RMS(di), and Eff(di) increased 2.7 (SD 0.6), 4.9 (SD 1.8), 2.6 (SD 0.9), and 1.8 (SD 0.3) times, respectively (P < 0.01 for all); and 4) net and inspiratory Wdi were not different (P = 0.4). Eff(di) was predicted from Ldi(ee) (P < 0.001), Pg(ee) (P < 0.001), DeltaPg.Ti(-1) (P = 0.03), and DeltaPg (P = 0.04) (r(2) = 0.52) (multivariate regression analysis). We conclude that, with hypercapnic hyperpnea, 1) approximately 47% of the maximum increase of Wdi was attributable to increased Eff(di); 2) Eff(di) increased due to preinspiratory lengthening and inspiratory unloading of the diaphragm, consistent with muscle behavior in vitro; 3) passive recoil of the diaphragm did not contribute to inspiratory Wdi or Eff(di); and 4) phasic

  20. Time course analysis of mechanical ventilation-induced diaphragm contractile muscle dysfunction in the rat.

    PubMed

    Corpeno, R; Dworkin, B; Cacciani, N; Salah, H; Bergman, H-M; Ravara, B; Vitadello, M; Gorza, L; Gustafson, A-M; Hedström, Y; Petersson, J; Feng, H-Z; Jin, J-P; Iwamoto, H; Yagi, N; Artemenko, K; Bergquist, J; Larsson, L

    2014-09-01

    Controlled mechanical ventilation (CMV) plays a key role in triggering the impaired diaphragm muscle function and the concomitant delayed weaning from the respirator in critically ill intensive care unit (ICU) patients. To date, experimental and clinical studies have primarily focused on early effects on the diaphragm by CMV, or at specific time points. To improve our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the impaired diaphragm muscle function in response to mechanical ventilation, we have performed time-resolved analyses between 6 h and 14 days using an experimental rat ICU model allowing detailed studies of the diaphragm in response to long-term CMV. A rapid and early decline in maximum muscle fibre force and preceding muscle fibre atrophy was observed in the diaphragm in response to CMV, resulting in an 85% reduction in residual diaphragm fibre function after 9-14 days of CMV. A modest loss of contractile proteins was observed and linked to an early activation of the ubiquitin proteasome pathway, myosin:actin ratios were not affected and the transcriptional regulation of myosin isoforms did not show any dramatic changes during the observation period. Furthermore, small angle X-ray diffraction analyses demonstrate that myosin can bind to actin in an ATP-dependent manner even after 9-14 days of exposure to CMV. Thus, quantitative changes in muscle fibre size and contractile proteins are not the dominating factors underlying the dramatic decline in diaphragm muscle function in response to CMV, in contrast to earlier observations in limb muscles. The observed early loss of subsarcolemmal neuronal nitric oxide synthase activity, onset of oxidative stress, intracellular lipid accumulation and post-translational protein modifications strongly argue for significant qualitative changes in contractile proteins causing the severely impaired residual function in diaphragm fibres after long-term mechanical ventilation. For the first time, the present study demonstrates

  1. Skeletal muscle alterations in chronic heart failure: differential effects on quadriceps and diaphragm

    PubMed Central

    Mangner, Norman; Weikert, Bettina; Bowen, T Scott; Sandri, Marcus; Höllriegel, Robert; Erbs, Sandra; Hambrecht, Rainer; Schuler, Gerhard; Linke, Axel; Gielen, Stephan; Adams, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic heart failure (CHF) results in limb and respiratory muscle weakness, which contributes to exercise intolerance and increased morbidity and mortality, yet the molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Therefore, we aimed to compare parameters of antioxidative capacity, energy metabolism, and catabolic/anabolic balance in diaphragm and quadriceps muscle in an animal model of CHF. Methods Ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery (n = 13) or sham operation (n = 11) was performed on Wistar Kyoto rats. After 12 weeks, echocardiography and invasive determination of maximal rates of left ventricular (LV) pressure change were performed. Antioxidative and metabolic enzyme activities and expression of catabolic/anabolic markers were assessed in quadriceps and diaphragm muscle. Results Ligated rats developed CHF (i.e. severe LV dilatation, reduced LV ejection fraction, and impaired maximal rates of LV pressure change; P < 0.001). There was a divergent response for antioxidant enzymes between the diaphragm and quadriceps in CHF rats, with glutathione peroxidase and manganese superoxide dismutase activity increased in the diaphragm but reduced in the quadriceps relative to shams (P < 0.01). Metabolic enzymes were unaltered in the diaphragm, but cytochrome c oxidase activity (P < 0.01) decreased and lactate dehydrogenase activity (P < 0.05) increased in the quadriceps of CHF animals. Protein expression of the E3 ligase muscle ring finger 1 and proteasome activity were increased (P < 0.05) in both the diaphragm and quadriceps in CHF rats compared with shams. Conclusion Chronic heart failure induced divergent antioxidative and metabolic but similar catabolic responses between the diaphragm and quadriceps. Despite the quadriceps demonstrating significant impairments in CHF, apparent beneficial adaptations of an increased antioxidative capacity were induced in the diaphragm. Nevertheless, muscle ring finger 1 and

  2. Time course analysis of mechanical ventilation-induced diaphragm contractile muscle dysfunction in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Corpeno, R; Dworkin, B; Cacciani, N; Salah, H; Bergman, H-M; Ravara, B; Vitadello, M; Gorza, L; Gustafson, A-M; Hedström, Y; Petersson, J; Feng, H-Z; Jin, J-P; Iwamoto, H; Yagi, N; Artemenko, K; Bergquist, J; Larsson, L

    2014-01-01

    Controlled mechanical ventilation (CMV) plays a key role in triggering the impaired diaphragm muscle function and the concomitant delayed weaning from the respirator in critically ill intensive care unit (ICU) patients. To date, experimental and clinical studies have primarily focused on early effects on the diaphragm by CMV, or at specific time points. To improve our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the impaired diaphragm muscle function in response to mechanical ventilation, we have performed time-resolved analyses between 6 h and 14 days using an experimental rat ICU model allowing detailed studies of the diaphragm in response to long-term CMV. A rapid and early decline in maximum muscle fibre force and preceding muscle fibre atrophy was observed in the diaphragm in response to CMV, resulting in an 85% reduction in residual diaphragm fibre function after 9–14 days of CMV. A modest loss of contractile proteins was observed and linked to an early activation of the ubiquitin proteasome pathway, myosin:actin ratios were not affected and the transcriptional regulation of myosin isoforms did not show any dramatic changes during the observation period. Furthermore, small angle X-ray diffraction analyses demonstrate that myosin can bind to actin in an ATP-dependent manner even after 9–14 days of exposure to CMV. Thus, quantitative changes in muscle fibre size and contractile proteins are not the dominating factors underlying the dramatic decline in diaphragm muscle function in response to CMV, in contrast to earlier observations in limb muscles. The observed early loss of subsarcolemmal neuronal nitric oxide synthase activity, onset of oxidative stress, intracellular lipid accumulation and post-translational protein modifications strongly argue for significant qualitative changes in contractile proteins causing the severely impaired residual function in diaphragm fibres after long-term mechanical ventilation. For the first time, the present study

  3. The role of Sema3–Npn-1 signaling during diaphragm innervation and muscle development

    PubMed Central

    Huettl, Rosa-Eva; Hanuschick, Philipp; Amend, Anna-Lena; Alberton, Paolo; Aszodi, Attila; Huber, Andrea B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Correct innervation of the main respiratory muscle in mammals, namely the thoracic diaphragm, is a crucial pre-requisite for the functionality of this muscle and the viability of the entire organism. Systemic impairment of Sema3A–Npn-1 (Npn-1 is also known as NRP1) signaling causes excessive branching of phrenic nerves in the diaphragm and into the central tendon region, where the majority of misguided axons innervate ectopic musculature. To elucidate whether these ectopic muscles are a result of misguidance of myoblast precursors due to the loss of Sema3A–Npn-1 signaling, we conditionally ablated Npn-1 in somatic motor neurons, which led to a similar phenotype of phrenic nerve defasciculation and, intriguingly, also formation of innervated ectopic muscles. We therefore hypothesize that ectopic myocyte fusion is caused by additional factors released by misprojecting growth cones. Slit2 and its Robo receptors are expressed by phrenic motor axons and migrating myoblasts, respectively, during innervation of the diaphragm. In vitro analyses revealed a chemoattractant effect of Slit2 on primary diaphragm myoblasts. Thus, we postulate that factors released by motor neuron growth cones have an influence on the migration properties of myoblasts during establishment of the diaphragm. PMID:27466379

  4. Mechanostimulation, electrostimulation and force measurement in an in vitro model of the isolated rat diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Armbruster, Caroline; Dassow, Constanze; Gamerdinger, Katharina; Schneider, Matthias; Sumkauskaite, Migle; Guttmann, Josef; Schumann, Stefan

    2011-12-01

    In an in vitro model of the entire rat diaphragm, diaphragmatic contraction forces at defined preload levels were investigated. A total of 24 excised rat diaphragms were electrically stimulated inside a two-chamber strain-applicator. The resulting contraction forces were determined on eight adjusted preload levels via measuring the elicited pressure in the chamber below the diaphragm. Subsequently, diaphragms were exposed for 6 h to one of four treatments: (1) control, (2) cyclic mechanical stretch, (3) intermittent electrical stimulation or (4) combination of cyclic mechanical stretch and electrical stimulation. Diaphragmatic contraction force increased from 116 ± 21 mN at the lowest preload level to 775 ± 85 mN at the maximal preload level. After 6 h maximal muscle contraction forces were smallest after non-electrostimulated treatment (control: 81 ± 15 mN, mechanical deflection: 94 ± 12 mN) and largest after electrostimulation treatment (mere electrostimulation: 165 ± 20 mN, combined mechano- and electro-stimulation: 164 ± 14 mN). We conclude that our model allows force measurements on isolated rat diaphragms. Furthermore, we conclude that by intermediate electrical stimulation diaphragmatic force generation was better preserved than by mechanical stimulation.

  5. Mechanical ventilation triggers abnormal mitochondrial dynamics and morphology in the diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Picard, Martin; Azuelos, Ilan; Jung, Boris; Giordano, Christian; Matecki, Stefan; Hussain, Sabah; White, Kathryn; Li, Tong; Liang, Feng; Benedetti, Andrea; Gentil, Benoit J; Burelle, Yan; Petrof, Basil J

    2015-05-01

    The diaphragm is a unique skeletal muscle designed to be rhythmically active throughout life, such that its sustained inactivation by the medical intervention of mechanical ventilation (MV) represents an unanticipated physiological state in evolutionary terms. Within a short period after initiating MV, the diaphragm develops muscle atrophy, damage, and diminished strength, and many of these features appear to arise from mitochondrial dysfunction. Notably, in response to metabolic perturbations, mitochondria fuse, divide, and interact with neighboring organelles to remodel their shape and functional properties-a process collectively known as mitochondrial dynamics. Using a quantitative electron microscopy approach, here we show that diaphragm contractile inactivity induced by 6 h of MV in mice leads to fragmentation of intermyofibrillar (IMF) but not subsarcolemmal (SS) mitochondria. Furthermore, physical interactions between adjacent organellar membranes were less abundant in IMF mitochondria during MV. The profusion proteins Mfn2 and OPA1 were unchanged, whereas abundance and activation status of the profission protein Drp1 were increased in the diaphragm following MV. Overall, our results suggest that mitochondrial morphological abnormalities characterized by excessive fission-fragmentation represent early events during MV, which could potentially contribute to the rapid onset of mitochondrial dysfunction, maladaptive signaling, and associated contractile dysfunction of the diaphragm.

  6. Diaphragm motion characterization using chest motion data for biomechanics-based lung tumor tracking during EBRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karami, Elham; Gaede, Stewart; Lee, Ting-Yim; Samani, Abbas

    2016-03-01

    Despite recent advances in image-guided interventions, lung cancer External Beam Radiation Therapy (EBRT) is still very challenging due to respiration induced tumor motion. Among various proposed methods of tumor motion compensation, real-time tumor tracking is known to be one of the most effective solutions as it allows for maximum normal tissue sparing, less overall radiation exposure and a shorter treatment session. As such, we propose a biomechanics-based real-time tumor tracking method for effective lung cancer radiotherapy. In the proposed algorithm, the required boundary conditions for the lung Finite Element model, including diaphragm motion, are obtained using the chest surface motion as a surrogate signal. The primary objective of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of developing a function which is capable of inputting the chest surface motion data and outputting the diaphragm motion in real-time. For this purpose, after quantifying the diaphragm motion with a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) model, correlation coefficient between the model parameters of diaphragm motion and chest motion data was obtained through Partial Least Squares Regression (PLSR). Preliminary results obtained in this study indicate that the PCA coefficients representing the diaphragm motion can be obtained through chest surface motion tracking with high accuracy.

  7. Diaphragm opening effects on shock wave formation and acceleration in a rectangular cross section channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakdaman, S. A.; Garcia, M.; Teh, E.; Lincoln, D.; Trivedi, M.; Alves, M.; Johansen, C.

    2016-11-01

    Shock wave formation and acceleration in a high-aspect ratio cross section shock tube were studied experimentally and numerically. The relative importance of geometric effects and diaphragm opening time on shock formation are assessed. The diaphragm opening time was controlled through the use of slit-type (fast opening time) and petal-type (slow opening time) diaphragms. A novel method of fabricating the petal-type diaphragms, which results in a consistent burst pressure and symmetric opening without fragmentation, is presented. High-speed schlieren photography was used to visualize the unsteady propagation of the lead shock wave and trailing gas dynamic structures. Surface-mounted pressure sensors were used to capture the spatial and temporal development of the pressure field. Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes simulation predictions using the shear-stress-transport turbulence model are compared to the experimental data. Simulation results are used to explain the presence of high-frequency pressure oscillations observed experimentally in the driver section as well as the cause of the initial acceleration and subsequent rapid decay of shock velocity measured along the top and bottom channel surfaces. A one-dimensional theoretical model predicting the effect of the finite opening time of the diaphragm on the rate of driver depressurization and shock acceleration is proposed. The model removes the large amount of empiricism that accompanies existing models published in the literature. Model accuracy is assessed through comparisons with experiments and simulations. Limitations of and potential improvements in the model are discussed.

  8. Theoretical Evaluation of Electroactive Polymer Based Micropump Diaphragm for Air Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Tian-Bing; Su, Ji; Zhang, Qiming

    2004-01-01

    An electroactive polymer (EAP), high energy electron irradiated poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) [P(VDFTrFE)] copolymer, based actuation micropump diaphragm (PAMPD) have been developed for air flow control. The displacement strokes and profiles as a function of amplifier and frequency of electric field have been characterized. The volume stroke rates (volume rate) as function of electric field, driving frequency have been theoretically evaluated, too. The PAMPD exhibits high volume rate. It is easily tuned with varying of either amplitude or frequency of the applied electric field. In addition, the performance of the diaphragms were modeled and the agreement between the modeling results and experimental data confirms that the response of the diaphragms follow the design parameters. The results demonstrated that the diaphragm can fit some future aerospace applications to replace the traditional complex mechanical systems, increase the control capability and reduce the weight of the future air dynamic control systems. KEYWORDS: Electroactive polymer (EAP), micropump, diaphragm, actuation, displacement, volume rate, pumping speed, clamping ratio.

  9. A pressure-deformation analytical model for rectangular diaphragm of MEMS pressure sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wu; Wang, Dong; Yu, Huijun; Peng, Bei

    2017-02-01

    Rectangular diaphragm is commonly used as a pressure sensitive component in MEMS pressure sensors. Its deformation under applied pressure directly determines the performance of micro-devices, accurately acquiring the pressure-deflection relationship, therefore, plays a significant role in pressure sensor design. This paper analyzes the deflection of an isotropic rectangular diaphragm under combined effects of loads. The model is regarded as a clamped plate with full surface uniform load and partially uniform load applied on its opposite sides. The full surface uniform load stands for the external measured pressure. The partial load is used to approximate the opposite reaction of the silicon island which is planted on the diaphragm to amplify the deformation displacement, thus to improve the sensitivity of the pressure sensor. Superposition method is proposed to calculate the diaphragm deflections. This method considers separately the actions of loads applied on the simple supported plate and moments distributed on edges. Considering the boundary condition of all edges clamped, the moments are constructed to eliminate the boundary rotations caused by lateral load. The diaphragm’s deflection is computed by superposing deflections which produced by loads applied on the simple supported plate and moments distributed on edges. This method provides higher calculation accuracy than Galerkin variational method, and it is used to analyze the influence factors of the diaphragm’s deflection, includes aspect ratio, thickness and the applied force area of the diaphragm.

  10. Diaphragm correction factors for free-air chamber standards for air kerma in x-rays.

    PubMed

    Burns, D T; Kessler, C

    2009-05-07

    At present, only a correction factor for photon transmission, k(l), is systematically applied for the entrance diaphragm of free-air chamber standards for air kerma. In the present work, the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE is used to re-evaluate k(l) for the BIPM standards and new correction factors are calculated for photon scatter and for fluorescence production in the diaphragm. An additional effect arising from electrons emitted from the diaphragm is shown to be significant at the highest photon energies. The results for the radiation qualities used for international comparisons give a combined diaphragm correction factor k(dia) = 0.9980(3) for the BIPM medium-energy standard at 250 kV. This is significantly different from the factor k(l) = 0.9996(1) in use at present and it might be concluded that differences are likely to exist for all free-air chamber standards. The effect of using a conical taper at the downstream edge of the diaphragm is shown to be negligible for these radiation qualities.

  11. Age-related changes in satellite cell proliferation by compensatory activation in rat diaphragm muscles.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Minako; Saitsu, Kiyokazu; Yamashita, Hiroki; Miyata, Hirofumi

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the age-related changes in satellite cell (SC) proliferation in vivo, we used a compensatory activation (CAC) model of the hemi-diaphragm muscle. Young (2-month), adult (14-month) and old (24-month) rats were randomly divided into control and CAC groups. In the CAC group, denervation surgery in the left hemi-diaphragm was performed to induce CAC of the right hemi-diaphragm. Six days after the surgery, the CAC diaphragm muscle was removed and separated into two blocks for immunohistochemical staining and real time RT-PCR procedures. The number of SCs in type I and IIa fibers were not affected significantly by the CAC in any age groups, but that in type IIx/b fibers was significantly increased in the young and adult groups. As compared to the age-matched control group, the Pax7 mRNA expression level was significantly higher in the young and adult CAC groups, but not in the old CAC group. These results may suggest that the mechanism of SC proliferation in type IIx/b fibers is impaired in aged diaphragm muscles.

  12. Transneuronal tracing of neural pathways influencing both diaphragm and genioglossal muscle activity in the ferret.

    PubMed

    Shintani, T; Anker, A R; Billig, I; Card, J P; Yates, B J

    2003-10-01

    In prior experiments that employed the transneuronal transport of isogenic recombinants of pseudorabies virus (PRV), we demonstrated that neurons located ventrally in the medial medullary reticular formation (MRF) of the ferret provide collateralized projections to both diaphragm and abdominal muscle motoneurons as well as to multiple abdominal muscle motoneuron pools. The goal of the present study was to determine whether single MRF neurons also furnish inputs to diaphragm motoneurons and those innervating an airway muscle with inspiratory-related activity: the tongue protruder genioglossus. For this purpose, PRV recombinants expressing unique reporters (beta-galactosidase or enhanced green fluorescent protein) were injected into either the diaphragm or the genioglossal muscle. The virus injections produced transneuronal infection of overlapping populations of MRF neurons. A small proportion of these neurons (<15%) was infected by both PRV recombinants, which indicated that they provide collateralized inputs to genioglossal and diaphragm motoneurons. These findings show that, whereas some MRF neurons simultaneously influence the activity of upper airway and respiratory pump muscles, other cells in this brain stem region independently contribute to diaphragm and genioglossal muscle contraction regulation.

  13. Effect of undernutrition on contractile and fatigue properties of rat diaphragm during development.

    PubMed

    Brozanski, B S; Watchko, J F; O'Day, T L; Guthrie, R D

    1993-05-01

    The present study was designed to assess the effects of combined pre- and postnatal undernutrition on the in vitro contractile and fatigue properties of the rat diaphragm during development. In vitro direct stimulation of costal diaphragm from control (CTL) and undernourished (UN) rats was done on postnatal days 1, 4, 14, 21, 30, 40, 50, and 60. Combined pre- and postnatal undernutrition resulted in stunted animal growth but did not alter the diaphragm-to-total body weight ratio. Twitch contraction time, half-relaxation time, and force-frequency relationships were not consistently affected by undernutrition. Specific twitch force and specific tetanic force were also unchanged in the UN group. Fatigue resistance was high and comparable in UN and CTL groups at days 1 and 4. At day 14 and thereafter, fatigue resistance declined but was consistently higher in the UN than in the CTL group. We conclude that combined pre- and postnatal undernutrition results in a significant increase in fatigue resistance of the diaphragm compared with CTL, whereas diaphragm muscle contractile properties are not appreciably affected by prolonged undernutrition.

  14. Effects of continuous low-frequency pacing on immature canine diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Marzocchi, M; Brouillette, R T; Klemka-Walden, L M; Heller, S L; Weese-Mayer, D E; Brozanski, B S; Caliendo, J; Daood, M; Ilbawi, M N; Hunt, C E

    1990-09-01

    Although diaphragm pacing has been shown to be a practical method of supporting ventilation in children, its usefulness has been limited because of concern that continuous (24 h/day) diaphragm pacing would fatigue and damage the diaphragm. We examined the functional and structural effects of continuous low-frequency diaphragm pacing on the left hemidiaphragm of five immature dogs aged 65 +/- 2 (SD) days at onset of pacing. Stimulus parameters approximated those required to pace infants: frequency 11.1 Hz, inspiratory time 810 ms, and respiratory rate 20 breaths/min. Animals were paced 24 h/day for 24-28 days. Paced tidal volumes and airway occlusion pressures were unchanged at low (less than 15 Hz) stimulus frequencies but were reduced at high (greater than 20 Hz) stimulus frequencies. Although histologically the paced hemidiaphragms appeared normal, histochemical studies showed a conversion from a mixture of type I (54%) and type II (46%) fibers to a uniform population of type I fibers with high oxidative enzyme activity. Transformation of muscle type was also demonstrated by pyrophosphate gel electrophoresis; fast and slow isomyosin bands were noted in control specimens, whereas only slow isomyosin was identified in paced specimens. Thus, in immature dogs, continuous low-frequency pacing affects both function and structure of the diaphragm.

  15. CT-guided versus laparoscopic radiofrequency ablation in recurrent small hepatocellular carcinoma against the diaphragmatic dome

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Huaiyin; Su, Mu; Zhu, Chuandong; Wang, Lixue; Zheng, Qin; Wan, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Computed tomography-guided radiofrequency ablation (CT-RFA) and laparoscopic RFA (L-RFA) have been used to treat intrahepatic recurrent small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) against the diaphragmatic dome. However, the therapeutic safety, efficacy, and hospital fee have never been compared between the two techniques due to scarcity of cases. In this retrospective study, 116 patients were divided into two groups with a total of 151 local recurrent HCC lesions abutting the diaphragm. We compared overall survival (OS), local tumor progression (LTP), postoperative complications, and hospital stay and fee between the two groups. Our findings revealed no significant differences in 5-year OS (36.7% vs. 44.6%, p = 0.4289) or 5-year LTP (73.3% vs. 67.9%, p = 0.8897) between CT-RFA and L-RFA. The overall hospital stay (2.8 days vs. 4.1 days, p < 0.0001) and cost (¥ 19217.6 vs. ¥ 25553.6, p < 0.0001) were significantly lower in the CT-RFA in comparison to that of L-RFA. In addition, we elaborated on the choice of percutaneous puncture paths depending on the locations of the HCC nodules and 11-year experience with CT-RFA. In conclusion, CT-RFA is a relatively easy and economic technique for recurrent small HCC abutting the diaphragm, and both CT-RFA and L-RFA are effective techniques. PMID:28291254

  16. CT-guided versus laparoscopic radiofrequency ablation in recurrent small hepatocellular carcinoma against the diaphragmatic dome.

    PubMed

    Ding, Huaiyin; Su, Mu; Zhu, Chuandong; Wang, Lixue; Zheng, Qin; Wan, Yuan

    2017-03-14

    Computed tomography-guided radiofrequency ablation (CT-RFA) and laparoscopic RFA (L-RFA) have been used to treat intrahepatic recurrent small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) against the diaphragmatic dome. However, the therapeutic safety, efficacy, and hospital fee have never been compared between the two techniques due to scarcity of cases. In this retrospective study, 116 patients were divided into two groups with a total of 151 local recurrent HCC lesions abutting the diaphragm. We compared overall survival (OS), local tumor progression (LTP), postoperative complications, and hospital stay and fee between the two groups. Our findings revealed no significant differences in 5-year OS (36.7% vs. 44.6%, p = 0.4289) or 5-year LTP (73.3% vs. 67.9%, p = 0.8897) between CT-RFA and L-RFA. The overall hospital stay (2.8 days vs. 4.1 days, p < 0.0001) and cost (¥ 19217.6 vs. ¥ 25553.6, p < 0.0001) were significantly lower in the CT-RFA in comparison to that of L-RFA. In addition, we elaborated on the choice of percutaneous puncture paths depending on the locations of the HCC nodules and 11-year experience with CT-RFA. In conclusion, CT-RFA is a relatively easy and economic technique for recurrent small HCC abutting the diaphragm, and both CT-RFA and L-RFA are effective techniques.

  17. Myosin heavy chain composition in the rat diaphragm - Effect of age and exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosselin, Luc E.; Betlach, Michael; Vailas, Arthur C.; Greaser, Marion L.; Thomas, D. P.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of aging and exercise training on the myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition were determined in both the costal and crural diaphragm regions of female Fischer 344 rats. Treadmill running at 75 percent maximal oxygen consumption resulted in similar increases in plantaris muscle citrate synthase activity in both young (5 mo) and old (23mo) trained animals (P less than 0.05). It was found that the ratio of fast to slow MHC was significantly higher (P less than 0.005) in the crural compared with costal diaphragm region in both age groups. A significant age-related increase in persentage of slow MHC was observed in both diaphragm regions. The relative proportion of slow MHC in either costal or crural region was not changed by exercise training.

  18. Discharge ignition in the diaphragm configuration supplied by DC non-pulsing voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlochová, L.; Hlavatá, L.; Kozáková, Z.; Krčma, F.

    2016-05-01

    This work deals with the ignition of the discharge in the diaphragm configuration generated in water solutions containing supporting NaCl electrolyte. The reactor has volume of 110 ml and it is made of polycarbonate. HV electrodes made of stainless steel are placed in this reactor. Ceramic (Shapal-MTM) diaphragm is placed in the barrier separating the cathode and the anode space. An electric power source supplies the reactor by constant DC voltage up to 4 kV and electric current up to 300 mA. The discharge ignition is compared in the reactor with different sizes of diaphragms. Measurements are carried out in electrolyte solutions with the same conductivity. Images of plasma streamers and bubble formation are taken by an ICCD camera iStar 734. Electrical characteristics are measured by an oscilloscope LeCroy LT 374 L in order to determine breakdown moments at different experimental conditions.

  19. TRPC6 is a glomerular slit diaphragm-associated channel required for normal renal function

    PubMed Central

    Reiser, Jochen; Polu, Krishna R.; Möller, Clemens C.; Kenlan, Peter; Altintas, Mehmet M.; Wei, Changli; Faul, Christian; Herbert, Stephanie; Villegas, Ivan; Avila-Casado, Carmen; McGee, Mary; Sugimoto, Hikaru; Brown, Dennis; Kalluri, Raghu; Mundel, Peter; Smith, Paula L.; Clapham, David E.; Pollak, Martin R.

    2006-01-01

    Progressive kidney failure is a genetically and clinically heterogeneous group of disorders. Podocyte foot processes and the interposed glomerular slit diaphragm are critical components of the permeability barrier in the kidney. Mutations in genes encoding for structural proteins of the podocyte lead to the development of proteinuria resulting in progressive kidney failure and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). Here, we show that the canonical transient receptor potential 6 (TRPC6) ion channel is expressed in podocytes and represents a component of the glomerular slit diaphragm. We identified five families with autosomal dominant FSGS in which disease segregated with mutations in the TRPC6 gene on chromosome 11q. Two of the TRPC6 mutants displayed increased current amplitudes. Together, this data demonstrates that TRPC6 channel activity at the slit diaphragm is essential for proper regulation of podocyte structure and function. PMID:15924139

  20. Eventration of diaphragm with dextrocardia and type 2 respiratory failure: A rare entity.

    PubMed

    Mir, Mohmad Hussain; Arshad, Faheem; Bagdadi, Farhana Siraj; Nasir, Syed Aejaz; Hajni, Mubashir Rashid

    2014-09-01

    Eventration of the diaphragm is a rare condition where the muscle is permanently elevated, but retains its continuity and attachments to costal margin. In this condition, all or part of the diaphragm is largely composed of fibrous tissue with a few or no interspersed muscle fibers. It can be complete or partial. It is seldom symptomatic and often requires no treatment. We present a 70-year-old male who came with progressive breathlessness and was admitted with type 2 respiratory failure, and on evaluation was found to have complete eventration of the left diaphragm with herniation of colon and stomach in the left chest with dextrocardia. Aim of reporting this rare case is to highlight the importance of history taking, good physical examination, and imaging in the diagnosis of diaphragmatic eventration.

  1. Process engineering and economic evaluations of diaphragm and membrane chlorine cell technologies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    The chlor-alkali manufacturing technologies of (1), diaphragm cells (2), current technology membrane cells (3), catalytic cathode membrane cells (4), oxygen-cathode membrane cells and to a lesser extent several other related emerging processes are studied. Comparisons have been made on the two bases of (1) conventional industrial economics, and (2) energy consumption. The current diaphragm cell may have a small economic advantage over the other technologies at the plant size of 544 metric T/D (600 T/D). The three membrane cells all consume less energy, with the oxygen-cathode cell being the lowest. The oxygen-cathode cell appears promising as a low energy chlor-alkali cell where there is no chemical market for hydrogen. Federal funding of the oxygen-cathode cell has been beneficial to the development of the technology, to electrochemical cell research, and may help maintain the US's position in the international chlor-alkali technology marketplace. Tax law changes inducing the installation of additional cells in existing plants would produce the quickest reduction in power consumption by the chlor-alkali industry. Alternative technologies such as the solid polymer electrolyte cell, the coupling of diaphragm cells with fuel cells and the dynamic gel diaphragm have a strong potential for reducing chloralkali industry power consumption. Adding up all the recent and expected improvements that have become cost-effective, the electrical energy required to produce a unit of chlorine by 1990 should be only 50% to 60% of that used in 1970. In the United States the majority of the market does not demand salt-free caustic. About 75% of the electrolytic caustic is produced in diaphragm cells and only a small part of that is purified. This study indicates that unless membrane cell costs are greatly reduced or a stronger demand develops for salt-free caustic, the diaphragm cells will remain competitive. (WHK)

  2. Short-term influences of lung volume reduction surgery on the diaphragm in emphysematous hamsters.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Michael I; Fournier, Mario; Da, Xiaoyu; Li, Hongmei; Mosenifar, Zab; McKenna, Robert J; Cohen, Arthur H

    2004-10-01

    With emphysema, diaphragm length adaptation results in shortened fibers. We hypothesize that passive diaphragm stretch occurring acutely after lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) results in fiber injury. Bilateral LVRS was performed in emphysematous hamsters. Studies were performed 1 (D1) and 4 (D4) days after LVRS, and compared with sham-treated groups. Sarcolemmal rupture was evident in 10.9% of fibers in LVRS-D1 and reduced to 1.6% in LVRS-D4. Ultrastructural analysis revealed focal abnormalities in both LVRS-D1 and LVRS-D4 animals in over one-third of fibers. Myofibrillar disruption was not observed in sham-treated animals. Diaphragm insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) was increased in LVRS-D4 compared with other emphysematous groups. Increased IGF-I immunoreactivity was localized to types IIA and I fibers. The abundance of the splice variant of IGF-I mRNA sensitive to muscle stretch (IGF-IEb) increased 3.2-fold in LVRS D-4 diaphragms, compared with emphysema-sham animals. The main form of IGF-I mRNA was unchanged. Marked force deficit was observed in the LVRS-D1 diaphragm, compared with emphysema-sham and emphysema (no surgery) animals. These data highlight a markedly compromised ventilatory pump acutely after LVRS. Acute fiber stretch predisposes to muscle fiber injury and may also be a necessary mechanotransductive stimulus for fiber remodeling as the diaphragm adapts to reduced lung volume.

  3. Respiratory muscle activity during REM sleep in patients with diaphragm paralysis.

    PubMed

    Bennett, J R; Dunroy, H M A; Corfield, D R; Hart, N; Simonds, A K; Polkey, M I; Morrell, M J

    2004-01-13

    The diaphragm is the main inspiratory muscle during REM sleep. It was hypothesized that patients with isolated bilateral diaphragm paralysis (BDP) might not be able to sustain REM sleep. Polysomnography with EMG recordings was undertaken from accessory respiratory muscles in patients with BDP and normal subjects. Patients with BDP had a normal quantity of REM sleep (mean +/- SD, 18.6 +/- 7.5% of total sleep time) achieved by inspiratory recruitment of extradiaphragmatic muscles in both tonic and phasic REM, suggesting brainstem reorganization.

  4. WE-G-18C-06: Is Diaphragm Motion a Good Surrogate for Liver Tumor Motion?

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J; Cai, J; Zheng, C; Czito, B; Palta, M; Yin, F; Wang, H; Bashir, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether diaphragm motion is a good surrogate for liver tumor motion by comparing their motion trajectories obtained from cine-MRI. Methods: Fourteen patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (10/14) or liver metastases (4/14) undergoing radiation therapy were included in this study. All patients underwent single-slice 2D cine-MRI simulations across the center of the tumor in three orthogonal planes. Tumor and diaphragm motion trajectories in the superior-inferior (SI), anteriorposterior (AP), and medial-lateral (ML) directions were obtained using the normalized cross-correlation based tracking technique. Agreement between tumor and diaphragm motions was assessed by calculating the phase difference percentage (PDP), intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC), Bland-Altman analysis (Diffs) and paired t-test. The distance (D) between tumor and tracked diaphragm area was analyzed to understand its impact on the correlation between tumor and diaphragm motions. Results: Of all patients, the means (±standard deviations) of PDP were 7.1 (±1.1)%, 4.5 (±0.5)% and 17.5 (±4.5)% in the SI, AP and ML directions, respectively. The means of ICC were 0.98 (±0.02), 0.97 (±0.02), and 0.08 (±0.06) in the SI, AP and ML directions, respectively. The Diffs were 2.8 (±1.4) mm, 2.4 (±1.1) mm, and 2.2 (±0.5) mm in the SI, AP and ML directions, respectively. The p-values derived from the paired t-test were < 0.02 in SI and AP directions, whereas were > 0.58 in ML direction primarily due to the small motion in ML direction. Tumor and diaphragmatic motion had high concordance when the distance between the tumor and tracked diaphragm areas was small. Conclusion: Preliminary results showed that liver tumor motion had good correlations with diaphragm motion in the SI and AP directions, indicating diaphragm motion in the SI and AP directions could potentially be a reliable surrogate for liver tumor motion. NIH (1R21CA165384-01A1), Golfers Against Cancer (GAC

  5. Effects of cartap on isolated mouse phrenic nerve diaphragm and its related mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liao, J W; Kang, J J; Liu, S H; Jeng, C R; Cheng, Y W; Hu, C M; Tsai, S F; Wang, S C; Pang, V F

    2000-06-01

    Cartap, a nereistoxin analogue pesticide, is reported to have no irritation to eyes in rabbits. However, we have demonstrated recently that cartap could actually cause acute death in rabbits via ocular exposure. Our preliminary study with isolated mouse phrenic nerve diaphragms has shown that instead of neuromuscular blockade, cartap caused muscular contracture. The objective of the study was to examine the effect of cartap on the neuromuscular junction in more detail and to investigate its possible underlying mechanism with isolated mouse phrenic nerve diaphragms and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) vesicles. Cartap or nereistoxin at various concentrations was added in the organ bath with isolated mouse phrenic nerve diaphragm and both nerve- and muscle-evoked twitches were recorded. Instead of blocking the neuromuscular transmission as nereistoxin did, cartap caused contracture in stimulated or quiescent isolated mouse phrenic nerve diaphragm. Both the cartap-induced muscular contracture force and the time interval to initiate the contracture were dose-dependent. The contracture induced by cartap was not affected by the pretreatment of the diaphragm with the acetylcholine receptor blocker alpha-bungarotoxin; the Na(+) channel blocker tetrodotoxin; or various Ca(2+) channel blockers, NiCl(2), verapamil, and nifedipine. On the contrary, the contracture was significantly inhibited when the diaphragm was pretreated with ryanodine or EGTA containing Ca(2+)-free Krebs solution or in combination. This suggested that both internal and extracellular Ca(2+) might participate in cartap-induced skeletal muscle contracture. Moreover, cartap inhibited the [(3)H]-ryanodine binding to the Ca(2+) release channel of SR in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, cartap could induce a significant reduction in Ca(2+)-ATPase activity of SR vesicles at a relatively high dose. The results suggested that cartap might cause the influx of extracellular Ca(2+) and the release of internal Ca(2

  6. Improving the Performance of Two-Stage Gas Guns By Adding a Diaphragm in the Pump Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanoff, D. W.; Miller, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    Herein, we study the technique of improving the gun performance by installing a diaphragm in the pump tube of the gun. A CFD study is carried out for the 0.28 in. gun in the Hypervelocity Free Flight Radiation (HFF RAD) range at the NASA Ames Research Center. The normal, full-length pump tube is studied as well as two pump tubes of reduced length (approximately 75% and approximately 33% of the normal length). Significant improvements in performance are calculated to be gained for the reduced length pump tubes upon the addition of the diaphragm. These improvements are identified as reductions in maximum pressures in the pump tube and at the projectile base of approximately 20%, while maintaining the projectile muzzle velocity or as increases in muzzle velocity of approximately 0.5 km/sec while not increasing the maximum pressures in the gun. Also, it is found that both guns with reduced pump tube length (with diaphragms) could maintain the performance of gun with the full length pump tube without diaphragms, whereas the guns with reduced pump tube lengths without diaphragms could not. A five-shot experimental investigation of the pump tube diaphragm technique is carried out for the gun with a pump tube length of 75% normal. The CFD predictions of increased muzzle velocity are borne out by the experimental data. Modest, but useful muzzle velocity increases (2.5 - 6%) are obtained upon the installation of a diaphragm, compared to a benchmark shot without a diaphragm.

  7. The effect of hypodynamia on the structure of the intraorganic blood vessels and the capacity of the blood stream in the diaphragm of white rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerus, A. I.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of hypodynamia on the vascular system of white rats with diaphragm deprivation was investigated. Morphological changes in the intraorganic blood stream of the diaphragm were determined. The capacity of the intraorganic vascular flow within the diaphragm muscles was established.

  8. Morphological and ultrastructural evaluation of the golden retriever muscular dystrophy trachea, lungs, and diaphragm muscle.

    PubMed

    Lessa, Thais Borges; de Abreu, Dilayla Kelly; Rodrigues, Márcio Nogueira; Brólio, Marina Pandolphi; Miglino, Maria Angélica; Ambrósio, Carlos Eduardo

    2014-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic disease, characterized by atrophy and muscle weakness. The respiratory failure is a common cause of early death in patients with DMD. Golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) is a canine model which has been extensively used for many advances in therapeutics applications. As the patients with DMD, the GRMD frequently died from cardiac and respiratory failure. Observing the respiratory failure in DMD is one of the major causes of mortality we aimed to describe the morphological and ultrastructural data of trachea, lungs (conductive and respiratory portion of the system), and diaphragm muscle using histological and ultrastructural analysis. The diaphragm muscle showed discontinuous fibers architecture, with different diameter; a robust perimysium inflammatory infiltrate and some muscle cells displayed central nuclei. GRMD trachea and lungs presented collagen fibers and in addition, the GRMD lungs showed higher of levels collagen fibers that could limit the alveolar ducts and alveoli distension. Therefore, the most features observed were the collagen areas and fibrosis. We suggested in this study that the collagen remodeling in the trachea, lungs, and diaphragm muscle may increase fibrosis and affect the trachea, lungs, and diaphragm muscle function that can be a major cause of respiratory failure that occur in patients with DMD.

  9. Mitochondrial function in diaphragm of emphysematous hamsters after treatment with nandrolone

    PubMed Central

    Wijnhoven, Hanneke JH; Ennen, Leo; Rodenburg, Richard JT; Dekhuijzen, PN Richard

    2006-01-01

    Respiratory failure in patients with COPD may be caused by insufficient force production or insufficient endurance capacity of the respiratory muscles. Anabolic steroids may improve respiratory muscle function in COPD. The effect of anabolic steroids on mitochondrial function in the diaphragm in emphysema is unknown. In an emphysematous male hamster model, we investigated whether administration of the anabolic steroid nandrolone decanoate (ND) altered the activity of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes in the diaphragm. The bodyweight of hamsters treated with ND was decreased after treatment compared with initial values, and serum testosterone levels were significantly lower in hamsters treated with ND than in control hamsters. No difference in the activity of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes in the diaphragm between normal and emphysematous hamsters was observed. Treatment with ND did not change the activity of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes in the diaphragm of both normal and emphysematous hamsters. In emphysematous hamsters, administration of ND decreased the activity of succinate:cytochrome c oxidoreductase compared with ND treatment in normal hamsters. We conclude that anabolic steroids have negative effects on the activity of succinate:cytochrome c oxidoreductase and anabolic status in this emphysematous hamster model. PMID:18046906

  10. Studies on neuromuscular blockade by boldine in the mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Kang, J J; Cheng, Y W; Fu, W M

    1998-02-01

    The effects of boldine [(S)-2,9-dihydroxyl-1,10-dimethoxy-aporphine], a major alkaloid in the leaves and bark of Boldo (Peumus boldus Mol.), on neuromuscular transmission were studied using a muscle phrenic-nerve diaphragm preparation. Boldine at concentrations lower than 200 microM preferentially inhibited, after an initial period of twitch augmentation, the nerve-evoked twitches of the mouse diaphragm and left the muscle-evoked twitches unaffected. The twitch inhibition could be restored by neostigmine or washout with Krebs solution. The twitches evoked indirectly and directly were both augmented initially, suggesting that the twitch augmentation induced by boldine was myogenic. Boldine inhibited the acetylcholine-induced contraction of denervated diaphragm dose-dependently with an IC50 value of 13.5 microM. At 50 microM, boldine specifically inhibited the amplitude of the miniature end plate potential. In addition, boldine was similar to d-tubocurarine in its action to reverse the neuromuscular blocking action of alpha-bungarotoxin. These results showed that the neuromuscular blockade by boldine on isolated mouse phrenic-nerve diaphragm might be due to its direct interaction with the postsynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

  11. Wheel-running exercise alters rat diaphragm action potentials and their regulation by K+ channels.

    PubMed

    Van Lunteren, Erik; Moyer, Michelle

    2003-08-01

    Endurance exercise modifies regulatory systems that control skeletal muscle Na+ and K+ fluxes, in particular Na+-K+-ATPase-mediated transport of these ions. Na+ and K+ ion channels also play important roles in the regulation of ionic movements, specifically mediating Na+ influx and K+ efflux that occur during contractions resulting from action potential depolarization and repolarization. Whether exercise alters skeletal muscle electrophysiological properties controlled by these ion channels is unclear. The present study tested the hypothesis that endurance exercise modifies diaphragm action potential properties. Exercised rats spent 8 wk with free access to running wheels, and they were compared with sedentary rats living in conventional rodent housing. Diaphragm muscle was subsequently removed under anesthesia and studied in vitro. Resting membrane potential was not affected by endurance exercise. Muscle from exercised rats had a slower rate of action potential repolarization than that of sedentary animals (P = 0.0098), whereas rate of depolarization was similar in the two groups. The K+ channel blocker 3,4-diaminopyridine slowed action potential repolarization and increased action potential area of both exercised and sedentary muscle. However, these effects were significantly smaller in diaphragm from exercised than sedentary rats. These data indicate that voluntary running slows diaphragm action potential repolarization, most likely by modulating K+ channel number or function.

  12. Tissue damage in kidney, adrenal glands and diaphragm following extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Gecit, Ilhan; Kavak, Servet; Oguz, Elif Kaval; Pirincci, Necip; Günes, Mustafa; Kara, Mikail; Ceylan, Kadir; Kaba, Mehmet; Tanık, Serhat

    2014-10-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether exposure to short-term extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) produces histologic changes or induces apoptosis in the kidney, adrenal glands or diaphragm muscle in rats. The effect of shock waves on the kidney of male Wistar rats (n = 12) was investigated in an experimental setting using a special ESWL device. Animals were killed at 72 h after the last ESWL, and the tissues were stained with an in situ Cell Death Detection Kit, Fluorescein. Microscopic examination was performed by fluorescent microscopy. Apoptotic cell deaths in the renal tissue were not observed in the control group under fluorescent microscopy. In the ESWL group, local apoptotic changes were observed in the kidney in the area where the shock wave was focused. The apoptotic cell deaths observed in the adrenal gland of the control group were similar to those observed in the ESWL groups, and apoptosis was occasionally observed around the capsular structure. Apoptotic cell deaths in the diaphragm muscle were infrequently observed in the control group. Apoptosis in the ESWL group was limited to the mesothelial cells. This study demonstrated that serious kidney, adrenal gland and diaphragm muscles damage occurred following ESWL, which necessitated the removal of the organ in the rat model. It is recognized that the ESWL complications related to the kidney, adrenal gland and diaphragm muscles are rare and may be managed conservatively.

  13. Vanadium diaphragm electrode serves as hydrogen diffuser in lithium hydride cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouthamel, C. E.; Heinrich, R. R.; Johnson, C. E.

    1967-01-01

    Lithium hydride cell uses vanadium diaphragm electrode as a hydrogen diffuser. Vanadium is high in hydrogen gas solubility and permeability, is least sensitive to adverse surface effects, maintains good mechanical strength in hydrogen atmospheres, and appears to be compatible with all alkali-halide electrolytes and lithium metals.

  14. Experimental research of the synthetic jet generator designs based on actuation of diaphragm with piezoelectric actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimasauskiene, R.; Matejka, M.; Ostachowicz, W.; Kurowski, M.; Malinowski, P.; Wandowski, T.; Rimasauskas, M.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental analyses of four own developed synthetic jet generator designs were presented in this paper. The main task of this work was to find the most appropriate design of the synthetic jet generator. Dynamic characteristics of the synthetic jet generator's diaphragm with piezoelectric material were measured using non-contact measuring equipment laser vibrometer Polytec®PSV 400. Temperatures of the piezoelectric diaphragms working in resonance frequency were measured with Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensor. Experimental analysis of the synthetic jet generator amplitude-frequency characteristics were performed using CTA (hot wire anemometer) measuring techniques. Piezoelectric diaphragm in diameter of 27 mm was excited by sinusoidal voltage signal and it was fixed tightly inside the chamber of the synthetic jet generator. The number of the synthetic jet generator orifices (1 or 3) and volume of cavity (height of cavity vary from 0.5 mm to 1.5 mm) were changed. The highest value of the synthetic jet velocity 25 m/s was obtained with synthetic jet generator which has cavity 0.5 mm and 1 orifice (resonance frequency of the piezoelectric diaphragm 2.8 kHz). It can be concluded that this type of the design is preferred in order to get the peak velocity of the synthetic jet.

  15. Electrophysiological and Ultrastructural Characterization of Neuromuscular Junctions in Diaphragm Muscle of Acetylcholinesterase Knockout Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    Electrophysiological and Ultrastructural Characterization of Neuromuscular Junctions in 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Diaphragm Muscle of Acetylcholinesterase Knockout Mice...AChE +/+) and acetylcholinesterase knockout (AChE -/-) mice to determine the compensatory mechanism manifested by the neuromuscular junction to...had smaller nerve terminals and diminished pre- and postsynaptic surface contacts relative to neuromuscular junctions of AChE +/+ mice. The

  16. Comparison of solar powered water pumping systems which use diaphragm pumps

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four solar photovoltaic (PV) powered diaphragm pumps were tested at different simulated pumping depths at the USDA-ARS Conservation and Production Research Laboratory near Bushland, Texas. Two of the pumps were designed for intermediate pumping depths (30 to 70 meters), and the other two pumps were...

  17. Diaphragm remodeling and compensatory respiratory mechanics in a canine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Mead, A F; Petrov, M; Malik, A S; Mitchell, M A; Childers, M K; Bogan, J R; Seidner, G; Kornegay, J N; Stedman, H H

    2014-04-01

    Ventilatory insufficiency remains the leading cause of death and late stage morbidity in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). To address critical gaps in our knowledge of the pathobiology of respiratory functional decline, we used an integrative approach to study respiratory mechanics in a translational model of DMD. In studies of individual dogs with the Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) mutation, we found evidence of rapidly progressive loss of ventilatory capacity in association with dramatic morphometric remodeling of the diaphragm. Within the first year of life, the mechanics of breathing at rest, and especially during pharmacological stimulation of respiratory control pathways in the carotid bodies, shift such that the primary role of the diaphragm becomes the passive elastic storage of energy transferred from abdominal wall muscles, thereby permitting the expiratory musculature to share in the generation of inspiratory pressure and flow. In the diaphragm, this physiological shift is associated with the loss of sarcomeres in series (∼ 60%) and an increase in muscle stiffness (∼ 900%) compared with those of the nondystrophic diaphragm, as studied during perfusion ex vivo. In addition to providing much needed endpoint measures for assessing the efficacy of therapeutics, we expect these findings to be a starting point for a more precise understanding of respiratory failure in DMD.

  18. CFD Fuel Slosh Modeling of Fluid-Structure Interaction in Spacecraft Propellant Tanks with Diaphragms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sances, Dillon J.; Gangadharan, Sathya N.; Sudermann, James E.; Marsell, Brandon

    2010-01-01

    Liquid sloshing within spacecraft propellant tanks causes rapid energy dissipation at resonant modes, which can result in attitude destabilization of the vehicle. Identifying resonant slosh modes currently requires experimental testing and mechanical pendulum analogs to characterize the slosh dynamics. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques have recently been validated as an effective tool for simulating fuel slosh within free-surface propellant tanks. Propellant tanks often incorporate an internal flexible diaphragm to separate ullage and propellant which increases modeling complexity. A coupled fluid-structure CFD model is required to capture the damping effects of a flexible diaphragm on the propellant. ANSYS multidisciplinary engineering software employs a coupled solver for analyzing two-way Fluid Structure Interaction (FSI) cases such as the diaphragm propellant tank system. Slosh models generated by ANSYS software are validated by experimental lateral slosh test results. Accurate data correlation would produce an innovative technique for modeling fuel slosh within diaphragm tanks and provide an accurate and efficient tool for identifying resonant modes and the slosh dynamic response.

  19. Where Did the Water Go?: Boyle's Law and Pressurized Diaphragm Water Tanks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brimhall, James; Naga, Sundar

    2007-01-01

    Many homes use pressurized diaphragm tanks for storage of water pumped from an underground well. These tanks are very carefully constructed to have separate internal chambers for the storage of water and for the air that provides the pressure. One might expect that the amount of water available for use from, for example, a 50-gallon tank would be…

  20. Abdominal CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Computed tomography scan - abdomen; CT scan - abdomen; CT abdomen and pelvis ... 2016:chap 133. Radiologyinfo.org. Computed tomography (CT) - abdomen and pelvis. Updated June 16, 2016. www.radiologyinfo. ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... test used to help diagnose—or rule out—spinal column damage in injured patients. CT scanning is fast, ... CT is to detect—or to rule out—spinal column damage in patients who have been injured. CT ...

  2. Muscle reorganisation through local injection of stem cells in the diaphragm of mdx mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The diaphragm is the major respiratory muscle affected by Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and is responsible for causing 80% of deaths. The use of mechanical forces that act on the body or intermittent pressure on the airways improves the quality of life of patients but does not prevent the progression of respiratory failure. Thus, diseases that require tissue repair, such as DMD, represent a group of pathologies that have great potential for cell therapy. The application of stem cells directly into the diaphragm instead of systemic application can reduce cell migration to other affected areas and increase the chances of muscle reorganisation. The mdx mouse is a suitable animal model for this research because its diaphragmatic phenotype is similar to human DMD. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the potential cell implantation in the diaphragm muscle after the xenotransplantation of stem cells. Methods A total of 9 mice, including 3 control BALB/Cmice, 3 5-month-old mdx mice without stem cell injections and 3 mdx mice injected with stem cells, were used. The animals injected with stem cells underwent laparoscopy so that stem cells from GFP-labelled rabbit olfactory epithelium could be locally injected into the diaphragm muscle. After 8 days, all animals were euthanised, and the diaphragm muscle was dissected and subjected to histological and immunohistochemical analyses. Results Both the fresh diaphragm tissue and immunohistochemical analyses showed immunopositive GFP labelling of some of the cells and immunonegativity of myoblast bundles. In the histological analysis, we observed a reduction in the inflammatory infiltrate as well as the presence of a few peripheral nuclei and myoblast bundles. Conclusion We were able to implant stem cells into the diaphragm via local injection, which promoted moderate muscle reorganisation. The presence of myoblast bundles cannot be attributed to stem cell incorporation because there was no immunopositive

  3. Myosin heavy chain and physiological adaptation of the rat diaphragm in elastase-induced emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Kwan; Zhu, Jianliang; Kozyak, Benjamin W; Burkman, James M; Rubinstein, Neal A; Lankford, Edward B; Stedman, Hansell H; Nguyen, Taitan; Levine, Sanford; Shrager, Joseph B

    2003-01-01

    Background Several physiological adaptations occur in the respiratory muscles in rodent models of elastase-induced emphysema. Although the contractile properties of the diaphragm are altered in a way that suggests expression of slower isoforms of myosin heavy chain (MHC), it has been difficult to demonstrate a shift in MHCs in an animal model that corresponds to the shift toward slower MHCs seen in human emphysema. Methods We sought to identify MHC and corresponding physiological changes in the diaphragms of rats with elastase-induced emphysema. Nine rats with emphysema and 11 control rats were studied 10 months after instillation with elastase. MHC isoform composition was determined by both reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunocytochemistry by using specific probes able to identify all known adult isoforms. Physiological adaptation was studied on diaphragm strips stimulated in vitro. Results In addition to confirming that emphysematous diaphragm has a decreased fatigability, we identified a significantly longer time-to-peak-tension (63.9 ± 2.7 ms versus 53.9 ± 2.4 ms). At both the RNA (RT-PCR) and protein (immunocytochemistry) levels, we found a significant decrease in the fastest, MHC isoform (IIb) in emphysema. Conclusion This is the first demonstration of MHC shifts and corresponding physiological changes in the diaphragm in an animal model of emphysema. It is established that rodent emphysema, like human emphysema, does result in a physiologically significant shift toward slower diaphragmatic MHC isoforms. In the rat, this occurs at the faster end of the MHC spectrum than in humans. PMID:12617755

  4. Global Proteome Changes in the Rat Diaphragm Induced by Endurance Exercise Training

    PubMed Central

    Burniston, Jatin G.; Kavazis, Andreas N.; Morton, Aaron B.; Wiggs, Michael P.; Ahn, Bumsoo; Smuder, Ashley J.; Powers, Scott K.

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) is a life-saving intervention for many critically ill patients. Unfortunately, prolonged MV results in the rapid development of diaphragmatic atrophy and weakness. Importantly, endurance exercise training results in a diaphragmatic phenotype that is protected against ventilator-induced diaphragmatic atrophy and weakness. The mechanisms responsible for this exercise-induced protection against ventilator-induced diaphragmatic atrophy remain unknown. Therefore, to investigate exercise-induced changes in diaphragm muscle proteins, we compared the diaphragmatic proteome from sedentary and exercise-trained rats. Specifically, using label-free liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we performed a proteomics analysis of both soluble proteins and mitochondrial proteins isolated from diaphragm muscle. The total number of diaphragm proteins profiled in the soluble protein fraction and mitochondrial protein fraction were 813 and 732, respectively. Endurance exercise training significantly (P<0.05, FDR <10%) altered the abundance of 70 proteins in the soluble diaphragm proteome and 25 proteins of the mitochondrial proteome. In particular, key cytoprotective proteins that increased in relative abundance following exercise training included mitochondrial fission process 1 (Mtfp1; MTP18), 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3MPST), microsomal glutathione S-transferase 3 (Mgst3; GST-III), and heat shock protein 70 kDa protein 1A/1B (HSP70). While these proteins are known to be cytoprotective in several cell types, the cyto-protective roles of these proteins have yet to be fully elucidated in diaphragm muscle fibers. Based upon these important findings, future experiments can now determine which of these diaphragmatic proteins are sufficient and/or required to promote exercise-induced protection against inactivity-induced muscle atrophy. PMID:28135290

  5. Sleep-disordered breathing in unilateral diaphragm paralysis or severe weakness.

    PubMed

    Steier, J; Jolley, C J; Seymour, J; Kaul, S; Luo, Y M; Rafferty, G F; Hart, N; Polkey, M I; Moxham, J

    2008-12-01

    Few data exist concerning sleep in patients with hemidiaphragm paralysis or weakness. Traditionally, such patients are considered to sustain normal ventilation in sleep. In the present study, diaphragm strength was measured in order to identify patients with unilateral paralysis or severe weakness. Patients underwent polysomnography with additional recordings of the transoesophageal electromyogram (EMG) of the diaphragm and surface EMG of extra-diaphragmatic respiratory muscles. These data were compared with 11 normal, healthy subjects matched for sex, age and body mass index (BMI). In total, 11 patients (six males, mean+/-sd age 56.5+/-10.0 yrs, BMI 28.7+/-2.8 kg x m(-2)) with hemidiaphragm paralysis or severe weakness (unilateral twitch transdiaphragmatic pressure 3.3+/-1.7 cmH(2)O (0.33+/-0.17 kPa) were studied. They had a mean+/-sd respiratory disturbance index of 8.1+/-10.1 events x h(-1) during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and 26.0+/-17.8 events x h(-1) during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep (control groups 0.4+/-0.4 and 0.7+/-0.9 events x h(-1), respectively). The diaphragm EMG, as a percentage of maximum, was double that of the control group in NREM sleep (15.3+/-5.3 versus 8.9+/-4.9% max, respectively) and increased in REM sleep (20.0+/-6.9% max), while normal subjects sustained the same level of activation (6.2+/-3.1% max). Patients with unilateral diaphragm dysfunction are at risk of developing sleep-disordered breathing during rapid eye movement sleep. The diaphragm electromyogram, reflecting neural respiratory drive, is doubled in patients compared with normal subjects, and increases further in rapid eye movement sleep.

  6. Thoracic cancer imaging with PET/CT in radiation oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Pai-Chun Melinda

    located below the dome of the diaphragm was affected the most by the artifact. Conclusions. We have shown that ACT is an effective method for minimizing respiration artifact in PET/CT. The removal of the artifact significantly changed the SUVmax in 10% of the patients and substantially affected the segmented GTV.

  7. Paper-Thin Coating Offers Maximum Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Wessex Incorporated has recently taken a technology that was originally developed for NASA as a protective coating for ceramic materials used in heatshields for space vehicles, and modified it for use in applications such as building materials, machinery, and transportation. The technology, developed at NASA Ames Research Center as a protective coating for flexible ceramic composites (PCC), is environmentally safe, water-based, and contains no solvents. Many other flame-retardant materials contain petroleum-based components, which can produce toxic smoke under flame. Wessex versions of PCC can be used to shield ceramics, wood, plasterboard, steel, plastics, fiberglass, and other materials from catastrophic fires. They are extraordinarily tough and exhibit excellent resistance to thermal shock, vibration, abrasion, and mechanical damage. One thin layer of coating provides necessary protection and allows for flexibility while avoiding excessive weight disadvantages. The coating essentially reduces the likelihood of the underlying material becoming so hot that it combusts and thus inhibits the "flashover" phenomenon from occurring.

  8. Modeling and analysis of a novel combined peninsula-island structure diaphragm for ultra-low pressure sensing with high sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tingzhong; Zhao, Libo; Jiang, Zhuangde; Xu, Yu; Zhao, Yulong

    2016-02-01

    A novel combined peninsula-island structure diaphragm has been developed with four pairs of peninsula and island structures as well as four gaps between them. When a pressure is applied to the diaphragm, the major strain energy of the diaphragm is locked in the position above each gap, which is called the stress concentration region (SCR). Also, minimal strain energy is wasted outside the SCR. Therefore, this novel diaphragm is favorable in obtaining high sensitivity for a micro-electromechanical system piezoresistive ultra-low pressure sensor. In order to optimize the diaphragm structure, the partial differential equation governing the diaphragm deflection has been given under pressure. The theoretical analysis solutions are obtained based on the theory of the Navier trigonometric series and the mirror image method, and in accordance with the finite element method simulation results. Finally, a sensor with the proposed diaphragm is designed with the working range of 0-500 Pa and has sensitivity above 0.055 mV V-1 Pa-1. In comparison to a flat diaphragm with the same dimensions, this novel diaphragm achieves a sensitivity level increased by 256%, a nonlinearity reduced by 79%, and a resonance frequency increased by 5.5%. In addition, the proposed theoretical analysis solution of the diaphragm can also be applied to other kinds of diaphragm with different islands to achieve optimization.

  9. Distribution of abdominal and pelvic Hodgkin disease: implications for CT scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Aisen, A.M.; Gross, B.H.; Glazer, G.M.; Amendola, M.A.

    1985-05-01

    Computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis is frequently performed for the staging of abdominal and pelvic lymphoma. Certain limited CT protocols have been nearly as accurate as more complete examinations at defining the extent of lymphadenopathy and the response to therapy, with the advantages of decreased scanning time and patient radiation dose. The authors reviewed abdominal and pelvic CT scans and reports of 58 patients with Hodgkin disease to determine whether the entire abdomen and pelvis must always be scanned in such patients. Pelvic adenopathy without concurrent abdominal adenopathy was present in only one of 58 patients, and that patient presented clinically with inguinal adenopathy. These findings are supported by larger pathologic studies showing that Hodgkin disease always spreads contiguously. Patients with Hodgkin disease presenting above the diaphragm should undergo abdominal CT for staging; if the abdomen is normal, the pelvis need not be scanned. For Hodgkin patients with clinical or CT evidence of disease below the diaphragm, both abdomen and pelvis should be scanned.

  10. A qualitative study of obstacles to diaphragm and condom use in an HIV prevention trial in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Kacanek, Deborah; Dennis, Amanda; Sahin-Hodoglugil, Nuriye Nalan; Montgomery, Elizabeth T; Morar, Neetha; Mtetwa, Sibongile; Nkala, Busi; Phillip, Jessica; Watadzaushe, Connie; van der Straten, Ariane

    2012-02-01

    Consistent condom use and the substitution of condoms with potential HIV prevention methods of lower or unknown effectiveness are important concerns in the development of new prevention technologies. This qualitative study explored obstacles to consistent condom use with the diaphragm in MIRA, an HIV prevention trial in South Africa and Zimbabwe. We conducted 26 focus group discussions (FGDs) with 206 women and 7 FGDs and 10 in-depth interviews with 41 male partners of intervention-arm women. The belief that the diaphragm/gel prevented HIV, women's difficulties negotiating condom use, and men's unawareness that using the products together was recommended were obstacles to consistent condom use with the diaphragm/gel. Concerns about protection from HIV and pregnancy, recognition that the diaphragm was not yet proven to prevent HIV or sexually transmitted infections, and the trial context were facilitators. Understanding selective study product use in HIV prevention trials may inform improved adherence counseling and male involvement strategies.

  11. The Effects of Phrenic Nerve Degeneration by Axotomy and Crush on the Electrical Activities of Diaphragm Muscles of Rats.

    PubMed

    Alkiş, Mehmet Eşref; Kavak, Servet; Sayır, Fuat; Him, Aydin

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of axotomy and crush-related degeneration on the electrical activities of diaphragm muscle strips of experimental rats. In the present study, twenty-one male Wistar-albino rats were used and divided into three groups. The animals in the first group were not crushed or axotomized and served as controls. Phrenic nerves of the rats in the second and third groups were crushed or axotomized in the diaphragm muscle. Resting membrane potential (RMP) was decreased significantly in both crush and axotomy of diaphragm muscle strips of experimental rats (p < 0.05). Depolarization time (T DEP) and half-repolarization (1/2 RT) time were significantly prolonged in crush and axotomy rats (p < 0.05). Crushing or axotomizing the phrenic nerves may produce electrical activities in the diaphragm muscle of the rat by depolarization time and half-repolarization time prolonged in crush and axotomy rats.

  12. Realization of a High Sensitivity Microphone for a Hearing Aid Using a Graphene-PMMA Laminated Diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Woo, SeongTak; Han, Jae-Hyung; Lee, Jyung Hyun; Cho, Sunghun; Seong, Ki-Woong; Choi, Muhan; Cho, Jin-Ho

    2017-01-18

    Microphones for hearing aid systems are required to have high sensitivity, an appropriate bandwidth, and a wide dynamic range. In this paper, a high sensitivity microphone, 4 mm in diameter and using a multilayer graphene-PMMA laminated diaphragm that can be applied in hearing aids, is designed, optimized, and implemented. Typically, polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) has been used for the diaphragm of electret condenser microphones (ECM), and this method provides simple, low cost mass production. Generally, the sensitivity of the commercial 4 mm diameter ECM is about -30 to 35 dB (0 dB = 1 V/Pa). A microphone using a nanometer-thick graphene diaphragm has been found to have higher sensitivity than the conventional ECM. However, nanometer-thick multilayer graphene is vulnerable to large mechanical shocks or high sound pressures, and the practical production of nanometer-thick diaphragms also poses a challenge. However, if a multilayer graphene diaphragm of the same thickness as the conventional ECM is used, displacement during diaphragm vibration will be severely attenuated due to the high elastic modulus of graphene, and the microphone sensitivity will be greatly reduced. In this paper, we fabricate a multilayer graphene/poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) laminated diaphragm with sensitivity higher than that of any other microphones currently available for hearing aids, with the appropriate bandwidth in the auditory range. The high sensitivity arises from the laminated structure of the thin graphene membrane with high elastic modulus and from the PMMA membrane with lower elastic modulus and higher dielectric constant. The optimal thickness ratio of the graphene-PMMA layered diaphragm was studied by both analytical and experimental methods, and then a fabricated diaphragm was assembled in a 4 mm diameter microphone package. The performance of the implemented microphone was evaluated, including the sensitivity and total harmonic distortion. It is demonstrated that the

  13. Diaphragm based long cavity Fabry-Perot fiber acoustic sensor using phase generated carrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Lin, Jie; Liu, Huan; Ma, Yuan; Yan, Lei; Jin, Peng

    2017-01-01

    A diaphragm based long cavity Fabry-Perot interferometric fiber acoustic sensor is proposed. The Fabry-Perot cavity is formed by a flat fiber facet and an ultra-thin silver diaphragm with a 6-meter long fiber inserted in the cavity. A narrow-linewidth ring-cavity erbium-doped fiber laser is applied to demodulate the sensing signal in the phase generated carrier algorithm. Experimental results have demonstrated that the phase sensitivity is about -140 dB re 1 rad/μPa at 2 kHz. The noise equivalent acoustic signal level is 60.6 μPa/Hz1/2 and the dynamic range is 65.1 dB-SPL at 2 kHz. The sensor is suitable for sensing of weak acoustic signals.

  14. [A rare case of metastases in the diaphragm in a patient with gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Vasil'ev, A Iu; Maev, I V; Penkina, T V; Dicheva, D T; Bulanova, T V; Buragina, T A

    2006-01-01

    In spite of the general affection of the greater curvature of the stomach, there were no dyspeptic manifestations, pains in the upper half of the stomach were not related to meals, 'and the stool remained unchanged. The main characteristic of the clinical picture was the distribution of the tumor process to the diaphragm, which was a reason explaining the complaints about acute pains in the right flank enhancing in the course of movements or deep breaths. No data about any metastatic affection of the skeleton bones, lungs or pleura were received. This case shows the need in the close examination of the diaphragm in the case of the pain syndrome in the right hypochondrium in patients with generalized tumor diseases.

  15. Enhanced Transmissions Through Three-dimensional Cascade Sharp Waveguide Bends Using C-slit Diaphragms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Rui; Hu, Bowei; Zhang, Aofang; Gao, Dongxing; Wang, Hui; Shi, Ayuan; Lei, Zhenya; Yang, Pei

    2017-03-01

    Transmission properties through sharp rectangular waveguide bends are investigated to determine the cut-off bending angles of the wave propagation. We show that a simple metallic diaphragm at the bending corner with properly devised sub-wavelength defect apertures of C-slits would be readily to turn on the transmissions with scarce reflections of the propagating modes, while preserving the integrity of the transmitting fields soon after the bends. In particularly, our design also demonstrates the capability of eliminating all the unwanted cavity resonant transmissions that exist in the three-dimensional cascade sharp waveguide bends, and solely let the desired signals travel along the whole passage of the waveguide. The present approach, using C-slit diaphragms to support the sharp bending behaviors of the guided waves with greatly enhanced transmissions, would be especially effective in constructing novel waveguides and pave the way for the development of more compact and miniaturized electromagnetic systems that exploit these waveguide bends.

  16. Training-induced alterations in young and senescent rat diaphragm muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosselin, Luc E.; Betlach, Michael; Vailas, Arthur C.; Thomas, D. P.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of progressive treadmill exercise on oxidative capacity in three specific diaphragm muscle fiber types and on the capillary density of known fiber types was investigated in young (5 month) and senescent (23 months or older) rats. All animals were trained for 1 hr/day, 5 days weekly, for 10 weeks. Measurements of succinate dehydrogenase activity showed significant increases in all three fiber types in both the young and the senescent trained animals, compared with their sedentary controls. Fiber size and capillary density were not affected by exercise or age. The results demonstrate that the senescent costal diaphragm maintains its ability to adapt to an increased metabolic demand brought about by locomotor exercises.

  17. Initial Pulmonary Respiration Causes Massive Diaphragm Damage and Hyper-CKemia in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Dog

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Akinori; Kobayashi, Masanori; Kuraoka, Mutsuki; Yuasa, Katsutoshi; Yugeta, Naoko; Okada, Takashi; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of muscle degeneration in a lethal muscle disorder Duchene muscular dystrophy (DMD) has not been fully elucidated. The dystrophic dog, a model of DMD, shows a high mortality rate with a marked increase in serum creatine kinase (CK) levels in the neonatal period. By measuring serum CK levels in cord and venous blood, we found initial pulmonary respiration resulted in massive diaphragm damage in the neonates and thereby lead to the high serum CK levels. Furthermore, molecular biological techniques revealed that osteopontin was prominently upregulated in the dystrophic diaphragm prior to the respiration, and that immediate-early genes (c-fos and egr-1) and inflammation/immune response genes (IL-6, IL-8, COX-2, and selectin E) were distinctly overexpressed after the damage by the respiration. Hence, we segregated dystrophic phases at the molecular level before and after mechanical damage. These molecules could be biomarkers of muscle damage and potential targets in pharmaceutical therapies. PMID:23851606

  18. Enhanced Transmissions Through Three-dimensional Cascade Sharp Waveguide Bends Using C-slit Diaphragms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui; Hu, Bowei; Zhang, Aofang; Gao, Dongxing; Wang, Hui; Shi, Ayuan; Lei, Zhenya; Yang, Pei

    2017-03-21

    Transmission properties through sharp rectangular waveguide bends are investigated to determine the cut-off bending angles of the wave propagation. We show that a simple metallic diaphragm at the bending corner with properly devised sub-wavelength defect apertures of C-slits would be readily to turn on the transmissions with scarce reflections of the propagating modes, while preserving the integrity of the transmitting fields soon after the bends. In particularly, our design also demonstrates the capability of eliminating all the unwanted cavity resonant transmissions that exist in the three-dimensional cascade sharp waveguide bends, and solely let the desired signals travel along the whole passage of the waveguide. The present approach, using C-slit diaphragms to support the sharp bending behaviors of the guided waves with greatly enhanced transmissions, would be especially effective in constructing novel waveguides and pave the way for the development of more compact and miniaturized electromagnetic systems that exploit these waveguide bends.

  19. Anesthetic management of staged thoracoscopic repair of bilateral eventration of diaphragm in a neonate

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Subramanian Hari; Natarajan, Saravanan; Pallavi, Vyapaka

    2016-01-01

    Congenital eventration of the diaphragm is a rare disorder, the perioperative management of which is challenging. The introduction of thoracoscopic repair of these defects has considerably reduced the perioperative morbidity and mortality in these patients. In spite of the advantages of thoracoscopy which include smaller chest incisions, reduced postoperative pain, and more rapid postoperative recovery compared with thoracotomy, it is still inherent with complications unique to it. A clear understanding of the pathophysiologic changes, potential complications and institution of appropriate monitoring and good planning is essential for the safe conduct of thoracoscopic procedures in neonates. We describe the anesthetic management of staged thoracoscopic repair of bilateral congenital eventration of the diaphragm in a neonate. PMID:26957704

  20. Telomere shortening in diaphragm and tibialis anterior muscles of aged mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Lund, Troy C; Grange, Robert W; Lowe, Dawn A

    2007-09-01

    The progression of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is, in part, due to satellite cell senescence driven by high replicative pressure as these muscle stem cells repeatedly divide and fuse to damaged muscle fibers. We hypothesize that telomere shortening in satellite cells underlies their senescence. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated the diaphragm and a leg muscle from dystrophic mice of various ages for telomere dynamics. We found 30% telomere shortening in tibialis anterior muscles from 600-day-old mdx mice relative to age-matched wildtype mice. We also found a more severe shortening of telomere length in diaphragm muscles of old mdx mice. In those muscles, telomeres were shortened by approximately 15% and 40% in 100- and 600-day-old mdx mice, respectively. These findings indicate that satellite cells undergo telomere erosion, which may contribute to the inability of these cells to perpetually repair DMD muscle.

  1. Enhanced Transmissions Through Three-dimensional Cascade Sharp Waveguide Bends Using C-slit Diaphragms

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Rui; Hu, Bowei; Zhang, Aofang; Gao, Dongxing; Wang, Hui; Shi, Ayuan; Lei, Zhenya; Yang, Pei

    2017-01-01

    Transmission properties through sharp rectangular waveguide bends are investigated to determine the cut-off bending angles of the wave propagation. We show that a simple metallic diaphragm at the bending corner with properly devised sub-wavelength defect apertures of C-slits would be readily to turn on the transmissions with scarce reflections of the propagating modes, while preserving the integrity of the transmitting fields soon after the bends. In particularly, our design also demonstrates the capability of eliminating all the unwanted cavity resonant transmissions that exist in the three-dimensional cascade sharp waveguide bends, and solely let the desired signals travel along the whole passage of the waveguide. The present approach, using C-slit diaphragms to support the sharp bending behaviors of the guided waves with greatly enhanced transmissions, would be especially effective in constructing novel waveguides and pave the way for the development of more compact and miniaturized electromagnetic systems that exploit these waveguide bends. PMID:28322344

  2. Partial Support Ventilation and Mitochondrial-Targeted Antioxidants Protect against Ventilator-Induced Decreases in Diaphragm Muscle Protein Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Matthew B; Smuder, Ashley J; Nelson, W Bradley; Wiggs, Michael P; Shimkus, Kevin L; Fluckey, James D; Szeto, Hazel H; Powers, Scott K

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) is a life-saving intervention in patients in respiratory failure. Unfortunately, prolonged MV results in the rapid development of diaphragm atrophy and weakness. MV-induced diaphragmatic weakness is significant because inspiratory muscle dysfunction is a risk factor for problematic weaning from MV. Therefore, developing a clinical intervention to prevent MV-induced diaphragm atrophy is important. In this regard, MV-induced diaphragmatic atrophy occurs due to both increased proteolysis and decreased protein synthesis. While efforts to impede MV-induced increased proteolysis in the diaphragm are well-documented, only one study has investigated methods of preserving diaphragmatic protein synthesis during prolonged MV. Therefore, we evaluated the efficacy of two therapeutic interventions that, conceptually, have the potential to sustain protein synthesis in the rat diaphragm during prolonged MV. Specifically, these experiments were designed to: 1) determine if partial-support MV will protect against the decrease in diaphragmatic protein synthesis that occurs during prolonged full-support MV; and 2) establish if treatment with a mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant will maintain diaphragm protein synthesis during full-support MV. Compared to spontaneously breathing animals, full support MV resulted in a significant decline in diaphragmatic protein synthesis during 12 hours of MV. In contrast, diaphragm protein synthesis rates were maintained during partial support MV at levels comparable to spontaneous breathing animals. Further, treatment of animals with a mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant prevented oxidative stress during full support MV and maintained diaphragm protein synthesis at the level of spontaneous breathing animals. We conclude that treatment with mitochondrial-targeted antioxidants or the use of partial-support MV are potential strategies to preserve diaphragm protein synthesis during prolonged MV.

  3. Diaphragm Pacing as a Rehabilitative Tool for Patients With Pompe Disease Who Are Ventilator-Dependent: Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, David D.; Martin, A. Daniel; Lottenberg, Lawrence; Islam, Saleem; Lawson, Lee Ann; Onders, Raymond P.; Byrne, Barry J.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Pompe disease is an inherited disorder notable for severe, progressive ventilatory compromise. Although ventilatory failure has been attributed to myofiber dysfunction secondary to diaphragmatic glycogen accumulation, neural involvement of the phrenic motor system is also a prominent feature. Direct diaphragm pacing supplements respiratory function in other disorders of the phrenic motor system. Accordingly, it is hypothesized that augmented neuromuscular activity via diaphragm pacing would promote weaning from mechanical ventilation in patients with Pompe disease who are unresponsive to conventional, muscle-directed treatments. Case Description Three patients with Pompe disease developed diaphragm paresis that resulted in chronic mechanical ventilation dependence. After preoperative inspiratory muscle strengthening exercises failed to improve function, fine-wire pacing electrodes were laparoscopically implanted into the diaphragm. Diaphragm conditioning was initiated the first postoperative week and consisted of gradual increases in stimulation parameters, lengthening of stimulation sessions, and ventilator weaning. Ventilation and intramuscular electromyographic activity were recorded periodically during conditioning to quantify diaphragm neuromuscular function. Outcomes During paced breathing without mechanical ventilation, tidal volumes increased, and 2 patients were weaned from daytime ventilator dependence within the first 3 months of pacing, which has been sustained over the long-term. A third patient reduced reliance on daytime ventilation, but weaning was delayed by malacia of the large airways. In all patients, pacing appeared to facilitate spontaneous phrenic motor unit activity during independent breathing without ventilator or pacer support. Discussion The findings are consistent with the view that diaphragm pacing has potential rehabilitative value to reduce reliance on mechanical ventilation in people with Pompe disease, but

  4. Oxidative damage induced by cigarette smoke exposure in mice: impact on lung tissue and diaphragm muscle*,**

    PubMed Central

    de Carlos, Samanta Portão; Dias, Alexandre Simões; Forgiarini, Luiz Alberto; Patricio, Patrícia Damiani; Graciano, Thaise; Nesi, Renata Tiscoski; Valença, Samuel; Chiappa, Adriana Meira Guntzel; Cipriano, Gerson; de Souza, Claudio Teodoro; Chiappa, Gaspar Rogério da Silva

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate oxidative damage (lipid oxidation, protein oxidation, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances [TBARS], and carbonylation) and inflammation (expression of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase and mammalian target of rapamycin [p-AMPK and p-mTOR, respectively]) in the lung parenchyma and diaphragm muscles of male C57BL-6 mice exposed to cigarette smoke (CS) for 7, 15, 30, 45, or 60 days. METHODS: Thirty-six male C57BL-6 mice were divided into six groups (n = 6/group): a control group; and five groups exposed to CS for 7, 15, 30, 45, and 60 days, respectively. RESULTS: Compared with control mice, CS-exposed mice presented lower body weights at 30 days. In CS-exposed mice (compared with control mice), the greatest differences (increases) in TBARS levels were observed on day 7 in diaphragm-muscle, compared with day 45 in lung tissue; the greatest differences (increases) in carbonyl levels were observed on day 7 in both tissue types; and sulfhydryl levels were lower, in both tissue types, at all time points. In lung tissue and diaphragm muscle, p-AMPK expression exhibited behavior similar to that of TBARS. Expression of p-mTOR was higher than the control value on days 7 and 15 in lung tissue, as it was on day 45 in diaphragm muscle. CONCLUSION: Our data demonstrate that CS exposure produces oxidative damage, not only in lung tissue but also (primarily) in muscle tissue, having an additional effect on respiratory muscle, as is frequently observed in smokers with COPD. PMID:25210964

  5. Respiratory kinematics by optoelectronic analysis of chest-wall motion and ultrasonic imaging of the diaphragm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliverti, Andrea; Pedotti, Antonio; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Macklem, P. T.

    1998-07-01

    Although from a respiratory point of view, compartmental volume change or lack of it is the most crucial variable, it has not been possible to measure the volume of chest wall compartments directly. Recently we developed a new method based on a optoelectronic motion analyzer that can give the three-dimensional location of many markers with the temporal and spatial accuracy required for respiratory measurements. Marker's configuration has been designed specifically to measure the volume of three chest wall compartments, the pulmonary and abdominal rib cage compartments and the abdomen, directly. However, it can not track the exact border between the two rib cage compartments (pulmonary and abdominal) which is determined by the cephalic extremity of the area of apposition of the diaphragm to the inner surface of the rib cage, and which can change systematically as a result of disease processes. The diaphragm displacement can be detected by ultrasonography. In the present study, we propose an integrated system able to investigate the relationships between external (chest wall) and internal (diaphragm) movements of the different respiratory structures by simultaneous external imaging with the optoelectronic system combined with internal kinematic imaging using ultrasounds. 2D digitized points belonging to the lower lung margin, taken from ultrasonographic views, are mapped into the 3D space, where chest wall markers are acquired. Results are shown in terms of accuracy of 3D probe location, relative movement between the probe and the body landmarks, dynamic relationships between chest wall volume and position of the diaphragm during quiet breathing, slow inspirations, relaxations and exercise.

  6. Acoustic emission (AE) health monitoring of diaphragm type couplings using neural network analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godinez-Azcuaga, Valery F.; Shu, Fong; Finlayson, Richard D.; O'Donnell, Bruce

    2005-05-01

    This paper presents the latest results obtained from Acoustic Emission (AE) monitoring and detection of cracks and/or damage in diaphragm couplings, which are used in some aircraft and engine drive systems. Early detection of mechanical failure in aircraft drive train components is a key safety and economical issue with both military and civil sectors of aviation. One of these components is the diaphragm-type coupling, which has been evaluated as the ideal drive coupling for many application requirements such as high speed, high torque, and non-lubrication. Its flexible axial and angular displacement capabilities have made it indispensable for aircraft drive systems. However, diaphragm-type couplings may develop cracks during their operation. The ability to monitor, detect, identify, and isolate coupling cracks on an operational aircraft system is required in order to provide sufficient advance warning to preclude catastrophic failure. It is known that metallic structures generate characteristic Acoustic Emission (AE) during crack growth/propagation cycles. This phenomenon makes AE very attractive among various monitoring techniques for fault detection in diaphragm-type couplings. However, commercially available systems capable of automatic discrimination between signals from crack growth and normal mechanical noise are not readily available. Positive classification of signals requires experienced personnel and post-test data analysis, which tend to be a time-consuming, laborious, and expensive process. With further development of automated classifiers, AE can become a fully autonomous fault detection technique requiring no human intervention after implementation. AE has the potential to be fully integrated with automated query and response mechanisms for system/process monitoring and control.

  7. Investigation of geometric design in piezoelectric microelectromechanical systems diaphragms for ultrasonic energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Qiongfeng; Wang, Tao; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Lee, Chengkuo

    2016-05-01

    Acoustic energy transfer (AET) has been widely used for contactless energy delivery to implantable devices. However, most of the energy harvesters (ultrasonic receivers) for AET are macro-scale transducers with large volume and limited operation bandwidth. Here, we propose and investigate two microelectromechanical systems diaphragm based piezoelectric ultrasonic energy harvesters (PUEHs) as an alternative for AET. The proposed PUEHs consist of micro-scale diaphragm array with different geometric parameter design. Diaphragms in PUEH-1 have large length to width ratio to achieve broadband property, while its energy harvesting performance is compromised. Diaphragms in PUEH-2 have smaller length to width ratio and thinner thickness to achieve both broadband property and good energy harvesting performance. Both PUEHs have miniaturized size and wide operation bandwidth that are ideally suitable to be integrated as power source for implantable biomedical devices. PUEH-1 has a merged -6 dB bandwidth of 74.5% with a central frequency of 350 kHz. PUEH-2 has two separate -6 dB bandwidth of 73.7%/30.8% with central frequencies of 285 kHz/650 kHz. They can adapt to various ultrasonic sources with different working frequency spectrum. Maximum output power is 34.3 nW and 84.3 nW for PUEH-1 and PUEH-2 at 1 mW/cm2 ultrasound intensity input, respectively. The associated power density is 0.734 μW/cm2 and 4.1 μW/cm2, respectively. Better energy harvesting performance is achieved for PUEH-2 because of the optimized length to width ratio and thickness design. Both PUEHs offer more alignment flexibility with more than 40% power when they are in the range of the ultrasound transmitter.

  8. Analytical comparison of circular diaphragm based simple, single and double touch mode - MEMS capacitive pressure sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jindal, Sumit Kumar; Raghuwanshi, Sanjeev Kumar

    2016-03-01

    In this paper a comparative study is done between normal capacitive pressure sensor, a touch mode capacitive pressure sensor and a double touch mode capacitive pressure sensor. The diaphragm in use is of circular shape. The theory and underlying equations has been described for the said devices and then simulations have been done for different performance parameters to understand the advantage of one over the other.

  9. Recovery of PdiTwitch following the induction of diaphragm fatigue in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Travaline, J M; Sudarshan, S; Criner, G J

    1997-11-01

    Low frequency diaphragm fatigue (LFF) may play a major role in the pathogenesis of ventilatory failure; however, recovery from LFF is not well studied. We measured transdiaphragmatic twitch pressure (PdiT) at FRC (using a reduction of PdiT as an index of LFF) and maximum transdiaphragmatic pressure (Pdimax) before and after the induction of diaphragm fatigue in seven normal subjects, age 31 +/- 3 yr (mean +/- SD). Fatigue was induced by breathing through an inspiratory resistive load. PdiT produced by bilateral transcutaneous supramaximal electrophrenic stimulation was measured at baseline, 15, 30 min, 1, 2, 3, 4 h, and then 1 to 3 times between hour 20-25 post-fatigue. Pdimax estimated by twitch occlusion was measured at baseline, 30 min, 2-3, and 20-25 h post-fatigue. Pre-fatigue values (mean +/- SE) were: PdiT 23.6 +/- 2.5 cm H2O. The mean +/- SD time to fatigue was 25.3 +/- 12.3 min. Post-fatigue PdiT was reduced to 50%, and by 3 h was 72% of the initial value; 100% by 25 h. Pdimax was reduced to 75% post-fatigue, but recovered to 87% by 3 h, and 100% by 25 h. We concluded that recovery of PdiT and Pdimax in normal subjects starts to occur within the first few hours following diaphragm fatigue, and is complete by 25 h.

  10. High temperature energy harvesters utilizing ALN/3C-SiC composite diaphragms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Yun-Ju; Li, Wei-Chang; Felmetsger, Valery V.; Senesky, Debbie G.; Pisano, Albert P.

    2014-06-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) energy harvesting devices aiming at powering wireless sensor systems for structural health monitoring in harsh environments are presented. For harsh environment wireless sensor systems, sensor modules are required to operate at elevated temperatures (> 250°C) with capabilities to resist harsh chemical conditions, thereby the use of battery-based power sources becomes challenging and not economically efficient if considering the required maintenance efforts. To address this issue, energy harvesting technology is proposed to replace batteries and provide a sustainable power source for the sensor systems towards autonomous harsh environment wireless sensor networks. In particular, this work demonstrates a micromachined aluminum nitride/cubic silicon carbide (AlN/3C-SiC) composite diaphragm energy harvester, which enables high temperature energy harvesting from ambient pulsed pressure sources. The fabricated device yields an output power density of 87 μW/cm2 under 1.48-psi pressure pulses at 1 kHz while connected to a 14.6-kΩ load resistor. The effects of pulse profile on output voltage have been studied, showing that the output voltage can be maximized by optimizing the diaphragm resonance frequency based on specific pulse characteristics. In addition, temperature dependence of the diaphragm resonance frequency over the range of 20°C to 600°C has been investigated and the device operation at temperatures as high as 600°C has been verified.

  11. Molecular, cellular, and muscle strip mechanics of the mdx mouse diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Bates, Genevieve; Sigurdardottir, Sara; Kachmar, Linda; Zitouni, Nedjma B; Benedetti, Andrea; Petrof, Basil J; Rassier, Dilson; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2013-05-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal disorder caused by defects in the dystrophin gene, which leads to respiratory or cardiac muscle failure. Lack of dystrophin predisposes the muscle cell sarcolemmal membrane to mechanical damage. However, the role of myosin in this muscle weakness has been poorly addressed. In the current study, in addition to measuring the velocity of actin filament propulsion (υmax) of mdx myosin molecules purified from 3- and 12-mo-old control (C57Bl/10) and mdx (C57Bl/10mdx) mouse diaphragms, we also measured myosin force production. Furthermore, we measured cellular and muscle strip force production at three mo of age. Stress (force/cross-sectional area) was smaller for mdx than control at the muscle strip level but was not different at the single fiber level. υmax of mdx myosin was not different from control at either 3 or 12 mo nor was their relative myosin force. The type I and IIb myosin heavy chain composition was not different between control and mdx diaphragms at 3 or 12 mo. These results suggest that the myosin function, as well as the single fiber mechanics, do not underlie the weakness of the mdx diaphragm. This weakness was only observed at the level of the intact muscle bundle and could not be narrowed down to a specific mechanical impairment of its individual fibers or myosin molecules.

  12. Electro-active device using radial electric field piezo-diaphragm for sonic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor); Fox, Robert L. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An electro-active transducer for sonic applications includes a ferroelectric material sandwiched by first and second electrode patterns to form a piezo-diaphragm coupled to a mounting frame. When the device is used as a sonic actuator, the first and second electrode patterns are configured to introduce an electric field into the ferroelectric material when voltage is applied to the electrode patterns. When the device is used as a sonic sensor, the first and second electrode patterns are configured to introduce an electric field into the ferroelectric material when the ferroelectric material experiences deflection in a direction substantially perpendicular thereto. In each case, the electrode patterns are designed to cause the electric field to: i) originate at a region of the ferroelectric material between the first and second electrode patterns, and ii) extend radially outward from the region of the ferroelectric material (at which the electric field originates) and substantially parallel to the plane of the ferroelectric material. The mounting frame perimetrically surrounds the peizo-diaphragm and enables attachment of the piezo-diaphragm to a housing.

  13. Monte Carlo analysis of thermal transpiration effects in capacitance diaphragm gauges with helicoidal baffle system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, M.; Wüest, M.; Stefanov, S.

    2012-05-01

    The Capacitance Diaphragm Gauge (CDG) is one of the most widely used vacuum gauges in low and middle vacuum ranges. This device consists basically of a very thin ceramic or metal diaphragm which forms one of the electrodes of a cap acitor. The pressure is determined by measuring the variation in the capacitance due to the deflection of the diaphragm caused by the pressure difference established across the membrane. In order to minimize zero drift, some CDGs are operated keeping the sensor at a higher temperature. This difference in the temperature between the sensor and the vacuum chamber makes the behaviour of the gauge non-linear due to thermal transpiration effects. This effect becomes more significant when we move from the transitional flow to the free molecular regime. Besides, CDGs may incorporate different baffle systems to avoid the condensation on the membrane or its contamination. In this work, the thermal transpiration effect on the behaviour of a rarefied gas and on the measurements in a CDG with a helicoidal baffle system is investigated by using the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method (DSMC). The study covers the behaviour of the system under the whole range of rarefaction, from the continuum up to the free molecular limit and the results are compared with empirical results. Moreover, the influence of the boundary conditions on the thermal transpiration effects is investigated by using Maxwell boundary conditions.

  14. Improving accuracy of markerless tracking of lung tumours in fluoroscopic video by incorporating diaphragm motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, M.; Teske, H.; Stoll, M.; Bendl, Rolf

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Conformal radiation of moving tumours is a challenging task in radiotherapy. Tumour motion induced by respiration can be visualized in fluoroscopic images recorded during patients breathing. Markerless methods making use of registration techniques can be used to estimate tumour motion. However, registration methods might fail when the tumour is hidden by ribs. Using motion of anatomical surrogates, like the diaphragm, is promising to model tumour motion. Methods: A sequence of 116 fluoroscopic images was analyzed and the tumour positions were manually defined by three experts. A block matching (BM) technique is used to calculate the displacement vector relatively to a selected reference image of the first breathing cycle. An enhanced method was developed: Positions, when the tumour is not located behind a rib, are taken as valid estimations of the tumour position. Furthermore, these valid estimations are used to establish a linear model of tumour position and diaphragm motion. For invalid estimations the calculated tumour positions are not taken into consideration, and instead the model is used to determine tumour motion. Results: Enhancing BM with a model of tumour motion from diaphragm motion improves the tracking accuracy when the tumour moves behind a rib. The error (mean ± SD) in longitudinal dimension was 2.0 ± 1.5mm using only BM and 1.0 ± 1.1mm when the enhanced approach was used. Conclusion: The enhanced tracking technique is capable to improve tracking accuracy compared to BM in the case that the tumour is occluded by ribs.

  15. Piston diaphragm pumps: An economic and reliable tool for slurry pipeline transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Broek, B. van den

    1998-07-01

    Slurry transportation systems by means of pumps and pipelines has been in use now for over 100 years. Hydraulic transportation of slurries is defined as a two-phase transportation of a mixture of a fluid carrier and solids, mainly in enclosed pipelines. In the mid fifties, slurry transportation techniques became more sophisticated, resulting in the design and operation of long distance pipelines for raw materials, such as coal, copper concentrate, iron concentrate, kaolin and phosphate. Nowadays, slurry transportation through pipelines has become a generally accepted means of solids transportation. A major contribution to its acceptance was the development of reliable and efficient high pressure positive displacement piston diaphragm slurry pumps. This paper will deal with the latest development in this field, namely, the high pressure GEHO piston diaphragm pump. In order to create more understanding for the possible applications and use of such piston diaphragm pumps in relation to minerals and waste transportation through pipelines, a number of typical examples will be discussed.

  16. Targeting Heat Shock Proteins Mitigates Ventilator Induced Diaphragm Muscle Dysfunction in an Age-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Ogilvie, Hannah; Cacciani, Nicola; Akkad, Hazem; Larsson, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Intensive care unit (ICU) patients are often overtly subjected to mechanical ventilation and immobilization, which leads to impaired limb and respiratory muscle function. The latter, termed ventilator-induced diaphragm dysfunction (VIDD) has recently been related to compromised heat shock protein (Hsp) activation. The administration of a pharmacological drug BGP-15 acting as a Hsp chaperone co-inducer has been found to partially alleviate VIDD in young rats. Considering that the mean age in the ICU is increasing, we aimed to explore whether the beneficial functional effects are also present in old rats. For that, we exposed young (7–8 months) and old (28–32 months) rats to 5-day controlled mechanical ventilation and immobilization with or without systemic BGP-15 administration. We then dissected diaphragm muscles, membrane–permeabilized bundles and evaluated the contractile function at single fiber level. Results confirmed that administration of BGP-15 restored the force-generating capacity of isolated muscle cells from young rats in conjunction with an increased expression of Hsp72. On the other hand, our results highlighted that old rats did not positively respond to the BGP-15 treatment. Therefore, it is of crucial importance to comprehend in more depth the effect of VIDD on diaphragm function and ascertain any further age-related differences. PMID:27729867

  17. Vibration and sound radiation of an electrostatic speaker based on circular diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Hsin-Yuan; Huang, Yu-Hsi

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated the lumped parameter method (LPM) and distributed parameter method (DPM) in the measurement of vibration and prediction of sound pressure levels (SPLs) produced by an electrostatic speaker with circular diaphragm. An electrostatic speaker with push-pull configuration was achieved by suspending the circular diaphragm (60 mm diameter) between two transparent conductive plates. The transparent plates included a two-dimensional array of holes to enable the visualization of vibrations and avoid acoustic distortion. LPM was used to measure the displacement amplitude at the center of the diaphragm using a scanning vibrometer with the aim of predicting symmetric modes using Helmholtz equations and SPLs using Rayleigh integral equations. DPM was used to measure the amplitude of displacement across the entire surface of the speaker and predict SPL curves. LPM results show that the prediction of SPL associated with the first three symmetric resonant modes is in good agreement with the results of DPM and acoustic measurement. Below the breakup frequency of 375 Hz, the SPL predicted by LPM and DPM are identical with the results of acoustic measurement. This study provides a rapid, accurate method with which to measure the SPL associated with the first three symmetric modes using semi-analytic LPM.

  18. Contractile function is unaltered in diaphragm from mice lacking calcium release channel isoform 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, J. S.; Takeshima, H.; Hamilton, S. L.; Reid, M. B.

    1999-01-01

    Skeletal muscle expresses at least two isoforms of the calcium release channel in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (RyR1 and RyR3). Whereas the function of RyR1 is well defined, the physiological significance of RyR3 is unclear. Some authors have suggested that RyR3 participates in excitation-contraction coupling and that RyR3 may specifically confer resistance to fatigue. To test this hypothesis, we measured contractile function of diaphragm strips from adult RyR3-deficient mice (exon 2-targeted mutation) and their heterozygous and wild-type littermates. In unfatigued diaphragm, there were no differences in isometric contractile properties (twitch characteristics, force-frequency relationships, maximal force) among the three groups. Our fatigue protocol (30 Hz, 0.25 duty cycle, 37 degrees C) depressed force to 25% of the initial force; however, lack of RyR3 did not accelerate the decline in force production. The force-frequency relationship was shifted to higher frequencies and was depressed in fatigued diaphragm; lack of RyR3 did not exaggerate these changes. We therefore provide evidence that RyR3 deficiency does not alter contractile function of adult muscle before, during, or after fatigue.

  19. Diaphragm Muscle Adaptation to Sustained Hypoxia: Lessons from Animal Models with Relevance to High Altitude and Chronic Respiratory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Philip; O'Halloran, Ken D.

    2016-01-01

    The diaphragm is the primary inspiratory pump muscle of breathing. Notwithstanding its critical role in pulmonary ventilation, the diaphragm like other striated muscles is malleable in response to physiological and pathophysiological stressors, with potential implications for the maintenance of respiratory homeostasis. This review considers hypoxic adaptation of the diaphragm muscle, with a focus on functional, structural, and metabolic remodeling relevant to conditions such as high altitude and chronic respiratory disease. On the basis of emerging data in animal models, we posit that hypoxia is a significant driver of respiratory muscle plasticity, with evidence suggestive of both compensatory and deleterious adaptations in conditions of sustained exposure to low oxygen. Cellular strategies driving diaphragm remodeling during exposure to sustained hypoxia appear to confer hypoxic tolerance at the expense of peak force-generating capacity, a key functional parameter that correlates with patient morbidity and mortality. Changes include, but are not limited to: redox-dependent activation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) and MAP kinases; time-dependent carbonylation of key metabolic and functional proteins; decreased mitochondrial respiration; activation of atrophic signaling and increased proteolysis; and altered functional performance. Diaphragm muscle weakness may be a signature effect of sustained hypoxic exposure. We discuss the putative role of reactive oxygen species as mediators of both advantageous and disadvantageous adaptations of diaphragm muscle to sustained hypoxia, and the role of antioxidants in mitigating adverse effects of chronic hypoxic stress on respiratory muscle function. PMID:28018247

  20. Diaphragm Muscle Adaptation to Sustained Hypoxia: Lessons from Animal Models with Relevance to High Altitude and Chronic Respiratory Diseases.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Philip; O'Halloran, Ken D

    2016-01-01

    The diaphragm is the primary inspiratory pump muscle of breathing. Notwithstanding its critical role in pulmonary ventilation, the diaphragm like other striated muscles is malleable in response to physiological and pathophysiological stressors, with potential implications for the maintenance of respiratory homeostasis. This review considers hypoxic adaptation of the diaphragm muscle, with a focus on functional, structural, and metabolic remodeling relevant to conditions such as high altitude and chronic respiratory disease. On the basis of emerging data in animal models, we posit that hypoxia is a significant driver of respiratory muscle plasticity, with evidence suggestive of both compensatory and deleterious adaptations in conditions of sustained exposure to low oxygen. Cellular strategies driving diaphragm remodeling during exposure to sustained hypoxia appear to confer hypoxic tolerance at the expense of peak force-generating capacity, a key functional parameter that correlates with patient morbidity and mortality. Changes include, but are not limited to: redox-dependent activation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) and MAP kinases; time-dependent carbonylation of key metabolic and functional proteins; decreased mitochondrial respiration; activation of atrophic signaling and increased proteolysis; and altered functional performance. Diaphragm muscle weakness may be a signature effect of sustained hypoxic exposure. We discuss the putative role of reactive oxygen species as mediators of both advantageous and disadvantageous adaptations of diaphragm muscle to sustained hypoxia, and the role of antioxidants in mitigating adverse effects of chronic hypoxic stress on respiratory muscle function.

  1. Implications for Cardiac Function Following Rescue of the Dystrophic Diaphragm in a Mouse Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Betts, Corinne A; Saleh, Amer F; Carr, Carolyn A; Muses, Sofia; Wells, Kim E; Hammond, Suzan M; Godfrey, Caroline; McClorey, Graham; Woffindale, Caroline; Clarke, Kieran; Wells, Dominic J; Gait, Michael J; Wood, Matthew J A

    2015-06-26

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by absence of the integral structural protein, dystrophin, which renders muscle fibres susceptible to injury and degeneration. This ultimately results in cardiorespiratory dysfunction, which is the predominant cause of death in DMD patients, and highlights the importance of therapeutic targeting of the cardiorespiratory system. While there is some evidence to suggest that restoring dystrophin in the diaphragm improves both respiratory and cardiac function, the role of the diaphragm is not well understood. Here using exon skipping oligonucleotides we predominantly restored dystrophin in the diaphragm and assessed cardiac function by MRI. This approach reduced diaphragmatic pathophysiology and markedly improved diaphragm function but did not improve cardiac function or pathophysiology, with or without exercise. Interestingly, exercise resulted in a reduction of dystrophin protein and exon skipping in the diaphragm. This suggests that treatment regimens may require modification in more active patients. In conclusion, whilst the diaphragm is an important respiratory muscle, it is likely that dystrophin needs to be restored in other tissues, including multiple accessory respiratory muscles, and of course the heart itself for appropriate therapeutic outcomes. This supports the requirement of a body-wide therapy to treat DMD.

  2. Superoxide dismutase/catalase mimetic EUK-134 prevents diaphragm muscle weakness in monocrotalin-induced pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Tatebayashi, Daisuke; Lee, Jaesik; Westerblad, Håkan; Lanner, Johanna T.

    2017-01-01

    Patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) suffer from inspiratory insufficiency, which has been associated with intrinsic contractile dysfunction in diaphragm muscle. Here, we examined the role of redox stress in PH-induced diaphragm weakness by using the novel antioxidant, EUK-134. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into control (CNT), CNT + EUK-134 (CNT + EUK), monocrotaline-induced PH (PH), and PH + EUK groups. PH was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of monocrotaline (60 mg/kg body weight). EUK-134 (3 mg/kg body weight/day), a cell permeable mimetic of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, was daily intraperitoneally administered starting one day after induction of PH. After four weeks, diaphragm muscles were excised for mechanical and biochemical analyses. There was a decrease in specific tetanic force in diaphragm bundles from the PH group, which was accompanied by increases in: protein expression of NADPH oxidase 2/gp91phox, SOD2, and catalase; 3-nitrotyrosine content and aggregation of actin; glutathione oxidation. Treatment with EUK-134 prevented the force decrease and the actin modifications in PH diaphragm bundles. These data show that redox stress plays a pivotal role in PH-induced diaphragm weakness. Thus, antioxidant treatment can be a promising strategy for PH patients with inspiratory failure. PMID:28152009

  3. Different tissue reaction of oesophagus and diaphragm after mesh hiatoplasty. Results of an animal study

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Jens; Kämmer, Daniel; Jansen, Petra Lynen; Anurov, Michael; Titkova, Svetlana; Öttinger, Alexander; Rosch, Raphael; Schumpelick, Volker; Jansen, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Background Laparoscopic mesh-reinforcement of the hiatal region in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and paraesophageal hernia (PEH) reduces the risk of recurrence. However, there are still controversies about the technique of mesh placement, shape, structure and material. We therefore compared tissue integration and scar formation after implantation of two different polypropylene-meshes in a rabbit model. Methods A total of 20 female chinchilla rabbits were included in this study. Two different meshes (Polypropylene PP, Polyglecaprone 25 Composite PP-PG) were implanted on the abdominal diaphragm around the oesophagus. After 3 months the implanted meshes were excised en-bloc. Histological and morphological analyses were carried out accordingly proliferation rate, apoptosis and collagen type I/III ratio. Results Regarding proliferation rate of oesophagus PP (9.31 ± 3.4%) and PP-PG (13.26 ± 2.54%) differ in a significant (p = 0.0097) way. In the diaphragm we found a significant (p = 0.00066) difference between PP (9.43 ± 1.45%) and PP-PG (18.73 ± 5.92%) respectively. Comparing oesophagus and diaphragm we could prove a significant difference within PP-PG-group (p = 0.0195). Within PP-group the difference reached no statistical significance (p = 0.88). We found analogous results regarding apoptosis. Furthermore, there is a significant (p = 0.00013) difference of collagen type I/III ratio in PP-PG (12.28 ± 0.8) compared to PP (8.44 ± 1,63) in case of oesophageal tissue. Concerning diaphragm we found a significant difference (p = 0.000099) between PP-PG (8.85 ± 0.81) and PP (6.32 ± 1.07) as well. Conclusion The histologic and morphologic characteristics after prosthetic enforcement of the hiatus in this animal model show a more distinct tissue integration using PP-PG compared to PP. Additionally, different wound healing and remodelling capability influence tissue integration of the mesh in diaphragm and oesophagus. PMID:18405386

  4. Automatic assessment of average diaphragm motion trajectory from 4DCT images through machine learning

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guang; Wei, Jie; Huang, Hailiang; Gaebler, Carl Philipp; Yuan, Amy; Deasy, Joseph O

    2016-01-01

    To automatically estimate average diaphragm motion trajectory (ADMT) based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT), facilitating clinical assessment of respiratory motion and motion variation and retrospective motion study. We have developed an effective motion extraction approach and a machine-learning-based algorithm to estimate the ADMT. Eleven patients with 22 sets of 4DCT images (4DCT1 at simulation and 4DCT2 at treatment) were studied. After automatically segmenting the lungs, the differential volume-per-slice (dVPS) curves of the left and right lungs were calculated as a function of slice number for each phase with respective to the full-exhalation. After 5-slice moving average was performed, the discrete cosine transform (DCT) was applied to analyze the dVPS curves in frequency domain. The dimensionality of the spectrum data was reduced by using several lowest frequency coefficients (fv) to account for most of the spectrum energy (Σfv2). Multiple linear regression (MLR) method was then applied to determine the weights of these frequencies by fitting the ground truth—the measured ADMT, which are represented by three pivot points of the diaphragm on each side. The ‘leave-one-out’ cross validation method was employed to analyze the statistical performance of the prediction results in three image sets: 4DCT1, 4DCT2, and 4DCT1 + 4DCT2. Seven lowest frequencies in DCT domain were found to be sufficient to approximate the patient dVPS curves (R = 91%−96% in MLR fitting). The mean error in the predicted ADMT using leave-one-out method was 0.3 ± 1.9 mm for the left-side diaphragm and 0.0 ± 1.4 mm for the right-side diaphragm. The prediction error is lower in 4DCT2 than 4DCT1, and is the lowest in 4DCT1 and 4DCT2 combined. This frequency-analysis-based machine learning technique was employed to predict the ADMT automatically with an acceptable error (0.2 ± 1.6 mm). This volumetric approach is not affected by the presence of the lung tumors

  5. Diaphragm degeneration and cardiac structure in mdx mouse: potential clinical implications for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Barbin, Isabel Cristina Chagas; Pereira, Juliano Alves; Bersan Rovere, Matheus; de Oliveira Moreira, Drielen; Marques, Maria Julia; Santo Neto, Humberto

    2016-05-01

    We examined the effects of exercise on diaphragm degeneration and cardiomyopathy in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice. Mdx mice (11 months of age) were exercised (swimming) for 2 months to worsen diaphragm degeneration. Control mdx mice were kept sedentary. Morphological evaluation demonstrated increased fibrosis in the diaphragm of exercised mdx mice (33.3 ± 6.0% area of fibrosis) compared with control mdx mice (20.9 ± 1.7% area of fibrosis). Increased (26%) activity of MMP-2, a marker of fibrosis, was detected in the diaphragms from exercised mdx mice. Morphological evaluation of the heart demonstrated a 45% increase in fibrosis in the right ventricle (8.3 ± 0.6% in sedentary vs. 12.0 ± 0.6% of fibrosis in exercised) and in the left ventricle (35% increase) in the exercised mdx mice. The density of inflammatory cells-degenerating cardiomyocytes increased 95% in the right ventricle (2.3 ± 0.6 in sedentary vs. 4.5 ± 0.8 in exercised) and 71% in the left ventricle (1.4 ± 0.6 sedentary vs. 2.4 ± 0.5 exercised). The levels of both active MMP-2 and the pro-fibrotic factor transforming growth factor beta were elevated in the hearts of exercised compared with sedentary mdx mice. The wall thickness to lumen diameter ratio of the pulmonary trunk was significantly increased in the exercised mdx mice (0.11 ± 0.04 in sedentary vs. 0.28 ± 0.12 in exercised), as was the thickness of the right ventricle wall, which suggests the occurrence of pulmonary hypertension in those animals. It is suggested that diaphragm degeneration is a main contributor to right ventricle dystrophic pathology. These findings may be relevant for future interventional studies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy-associated cardiomyopathy.

  6. NETL CT Imaging Facility

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

  7. Body CT (CAT Scan)

    MedlinePlus

    ... may increase the risk of an unusual adverse effect. Women should always inform their physician and the CT ... of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of your body, which are then displayed on a monitor. CT ...

  8. The effect of progressive high-intensity inspiratory muscle training and fixed high-intensity inspiratory muscle training on the asymmetry of diaphragm thickness in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ju-Hyeon; Kim, Nan-Soo

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of progressive load and fixed load high-intensity inspiratory muscle training on the asymmetry of diaphragm thickness in stroke patients. [Subjects] Twenty-one stroke patients were assigned to one of three groups: progressive load high-intensity inspiratory muscle training (n = 8), fixed load high-intensity inspiratory muscle training (n = 6), and controls (n = 7). [Methods] The progressive load and fixed load high-intensity inspiratory muscle training participants undertook an exercise program for 20 minutes, three times weekly, for 6 weeks. After each session, diaphragm thickness was measured using ultrasonography. The diaphragm asymmetry ratio and diaphragm thickening ratio were standardized using a formula. [Results] After intervention, the diaphragm asymmetry ratio significantly differed among the three groups, and the diaphragm asymmetry ratio significantly increased in the control group. A significant increase was identified in the diaphragm thickening ratio within the progressive load and fixed load high-intensity inspiratory muscle training groups. [Conclusion] Progressive load and fixed load high-intensity inspiratory muscle training decreased the asymmetry of diaphragm thickness in stroke patients; this effect, in turn, increased the diaphragm thickening ratio in stroke patients. The two interventions examined here should be selectively applied to individuals in the clinical field.

  9. Instantaneous changes in respiratory function induced by passive pelvic suspension in the supine position in relation to increased diaphragm excursion

    PubMed Central

    Ishizuka, Tatsuya; Nishida, Naoya; Homma, Yuuki; Hirayama, Tetsuro; Ishida, Yukisato; Kakizaki, Fujiyasu; Konishi, Masato

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to introduce an approach of pelvic suspension (PS) using sling cords and to obtain evidence for changes in respiratory function of healthy subjects. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects were 25 healthy men. In the supine position, with hip and knee joints flexed at 90°, the subjects’ pelvises were suspended with sling belts. Diaphragm excursion, respiratory function, and respiratory comfort in these postures were measured using ultrasonography, respirometry, and visual analog scale (VAS), respectively. [Results] When the pelvis was passively suspended with sling cords, the diaphragm moved 5 mm cranially and diaphragm excursion showed an instantaneous increase compared with the control. The tidal volume (VT) showed an increase and the respiration rate (RR) showed a decrease. The extent of diaphragm excursion was correlated with changes in VT under the control and PS conditions. Independent measurements of pulmonary function revealed that PS reduced the expiratory reserve volume, being correlated positively and negatively to increases in vital and inspiratory capacities, respectively. Furthermore, VAS values for respiratory ease were greater with PS than with the control. [Conclusion] These results suggest that PS effectively changed diaphragm excursion and respiratory function, leading to ease of breathing (i.e., deep and slow respiration). PMID:28356625

  10. Improvement in Neural Respiratory Drive Estimation From Diaphragm Electromyographic Signals Using Fixed Sample Entropy.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Luis; Torres, Abel; Sarlabous, Leonardo; Jané, Raimon

    2016-03-01

    Diaphragm electromyography is a valuable technique for the recording of electrical activity of the diaphragm. The analysis of diaphragm electromyographic (EMGdi) signal amplitude is an alternative approach for the quantification of the neural respiratory drive (NRD). The EMGdi signal is, however, corrupted by electrocardiographic (ECG) activity, and this presence of cardiac activity can make the EMGdi interpretation more difficult. Traditionally, the EMGdi amplitude has been estimated using the average rectified value (ARV) and the root mean square (RMS). In this study, surface EMGdi signals were analyzed using the fixed sample entropy (fSampEn) algorithm, and compared to the traditional ARV and RMS methods. The fSampEn is calculated using a tolerance value fixed and independent of the standard deviation of the analysis window. Thus, this method quantifies the amplitude of the complex components of stochastic signals (such as EMGdi), and being less affected by changes in amplitude due to less complex components (such as ECG). The proposed method was tested in synthetic and recorded EMGdi signals. fSampEn was less sensitive to the effect of cardiac activity on EMGdi signals with different levels of NRD than ARV and RMS amplitude parameters. The mean and standard deviation of the Pearson's correlation values between inspiratory mouth pressure (an indirect measure of the respiratory muscle activity) and fSampEn, ARV, and RMS parameters, estimated in the recorded EMGdi signal at tidal volume (without inspiratory load), were 0.38±0.12, 0.27±0.11 , and 0.11±0.13, respectively. Whereas at 33 cmH2O (maximum inspiratory load) were 0.83±0.02, 0.76±0.07, and 0.61±0.19 , respectively. Our findings suggest that the proposed method may improve the evaluation of NRD.

  11. Effects of Theophylline with Methylprednisolone Combination Therapy on Biomechanics and Histopathology in Diaphragm Muscles of Rats.

    PubMed

    Yuzkat, Nureddin; Kati, Ismail; Isik, Yasemin; Kavak, Servet; Goktas, Ugur; Cengiz, Nurettin

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of theophylline and methylprednisolone on the mechanical response and histopathology of hemidiaphragm muscle in rats. In the current study, we aimed to investigate the effects of theophylline and methylprednisolone, which are frequently used in clinics and which have different effects on the respiratory system and on the biomechanics and histopathology of the diaphragm muscle. The study included four groups of rats. Group T received 1 mg/kg of intraperitoneal theophylline, group M received 2 mg/kg of intraperitoneal methylprednisolone, group TM received 1 mg/kg of intraperitoneal theophylline plus 2 mg/kg of intraperitoneal methylprednisolone, and group K received of 1 mL intraperitoneal isotonic solution (of 0.9 % NaCl). The medications were continued for 7 days in each group. The rats underwent cervical dislocation under anesthesia on the eighth day, and their diaphragm samples were extracted. The left hemidiaphragm was used for the investigation of biomechanical parameters, and the right hemidiaphragm was used for the histopathological evaluation. It was observed that the medication administered in group T increased the contraction strength and duration compared with that in group M. Additionally, the duration of semi-relaxation was prolonged in group T compared with group M. The highest contraction strength and the longest contraction period among all of the groups were observed in group TM. It was concluded that the combined use of theophylline and methylprednisolone had positive effects on the contraction strength and the durations of contraction and semi-relaxation of the diaphragm muscle. In addition, both drugs had synergistic effects on each other.

  12. Modeling and Parameter Estimation of Spacecraft Fuel Slosh with Diaphragms Using Pendulum Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatman, Yadira; Gangadharan, Sathya; Schlee, Keith; Ristow, James; Suderman, James; Walker, Charles; Hubert, Carl

    2007-01-01

    Prediction and control of liquid slosh in moving containers is an important consideration in the design of spacecraft and launch vehicle control systems. Even with modern computing systems, CFD type simulations are not fast enough to allow for large scale Monte Carlo analyses of spacecraft and launch vehicle dynamic behavior with slosh included. It is still desirable to use some type of simplified mechanical analog for the slosh to shorten computation time. Analytic determination of the slosh analog parameters has met with mixed success and is made even more difficult by the introduction of propellant management devices such as elastomeric diaphragms. By subjecting full-sized fuel tanks with actual flight fuel loads to motion similar to that experienced in flight and measuring the forces experienced by the tanks, these parameters can be determined experimentally. Currently, the identification of the model parameters is a laborious trial-and-error process in which the hand-derived equations of motion for the mechanical analog are evaluated and their results compared with the experimental results. This paper will describe efforts by the university component of a team comprised of NASA's Launch Services Program, Embry Riddle Aeronautical University, Southwest Research Institute and Hubert Astronautics to improve the accuracy and efficiency of modeling techniques used to predict these types of motions. Of particular interest is the effect of diaphragms and bladders on the slosh dynamics and how best to model these devices. The previous research was an effort to automate the process of slosh model parameter identification using a MATLAB/SimMechanics-based computer simulation. These results are the first step in applying the same computer estimation to a full-size tank and vehicle propulsion system. The introduction of diaphragms to this experimental set-up will aid in a better and more complete prediction of fuel slosh characteristics and behavior. Automating the

  13. Recurrent Sigmoid Volvulus Associated With Eventration of Diaphragm in a Twenty-Six-Year-Old Man

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Shailesh Mukund; Venkatesan, Bhuvaneswari; Shetty, Gurucharan; Narula, Mahender Kaur; Chauhan, Udit; Udiya, Alok Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent sigmoid volvulus is a clinical entity characterized by recurrent episodes of partial or complete sigmoid volvulus. Although it is commonly seen in the elderly, it can be occasionally seen in younger patients. Patients with recurrent partial sigmoid volvulus are relatively asymptomatic or present with mild abdominal pain. Early diagnosis and treatment is essential to prevent conversion to acute gangrenous volvulus. We present a case of recurrent partial sigmoid volvulus in association with eventration of diaphragm in a 26-year-old man. PMID:25901269

  14. About the flowage of vortex chamber with outlet diaphragm and side slot swirler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, M. S.; Naumkin, V. S.

    2016-10-01

    The vortex chambers are the widespread equipment in energy, chemical and mining industries. The upgrade of existing equipment and development of new models of vortex chambers require the detail analysis of swirling flow structure. This paper presents results of numerical modeling of the airflow dynamic in a vortex chamber with the outlet diaphragm and side slot swirler. The main attention is paid to the end boundary layers and to their influence on the flowage of vortex chambers. The study has been done for a wide range of swirl angles with Reynolds numbers of up to 1720.

  15. The effects of elevated body temperature on the complexity of the diaphragm EMG signals during maturation.

    PubMed

    Akkurt, David; Akay, Yasemin M; Akay, Metin

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, we examine the effect of elevated body temperature on the complexity of the diaphragm electromyography (EMGdia), the output of the respiratory neural network--using the approximate entropy method. The diaphragm EMG, EEG, EOG as well as other physiological signals (tracheal pressure, blood pressure and respiratory volume) in chronically instrumented rats were recorded at two postnatal ages: 25-35 days age (juvenile, n = 5) and 36-44 days age (early adult, n = 6) groups during control (36-37 degrees C), mild elevated body temperature (38 degrees C) and severe elevated body temperature (39-40 degrees C). Three to five trials of the recordings were performed at normal body temperature before raising the animal's core temperature by 1-4 degrees C with an electric heating pad. At the elevated temperature, another 3-5 trials were performed. Finally, the animal was cooled to the original temperature, and trials were again repeated. Complexity values of the diaphragm EMG signal were estimated and evaluated using the approximate entropy method (ApEn) over the ten consecutive breaths. Our results suggested that the mean approximate entropy values for the juvenile age group were 1.01 +/- 0.01 (standard error) during control, 0.91 +/- 0.02 during mild elevated body temperature and 0.81 +/- 0.02 during severe elevated body temperature. For the early adult age group, these values were 0.94 +/- 0.01 during control, 0.93 +/- 0.01 during mild elevated body temperature and 0.92 +/- 0.01 during severe elevated body temperature. Our results show that the complexity values and the durations of the diaphragm EMG (EMGdia) were significantly decreased when the elevated body temperature was shifted from control or mild to severe body temperature (p < 0.05) for the juvenile age group. However, for the early adult age group, an increase in body temperature slightly reduced the complexity measures and the duration of the EMGdia. But, these changes were not statistically

  16. Innervation of periesophageal region of cat's diaphragm - Implication for studies of control of vomiting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, L. K.; Miller, A. D.

    1986-01-01

    The extent of the region of the diaphragm around the esophagus that displays greatly reduced activity during the expulsive phase of vomiting was determined from electromyographic studies in cats to be about 0.75-1.0 cm from the esophagus. Horseradish peroxidase injected into this region retrogradely labeled motoneurons throughout most of the rostral-caudal extent of the phrenic nucleus, with the exception of caudal C6 and rostral C7. This widespread intermingling of motoneurons that innervate the region of reduced activity with other phrenic motoneurons creates a difficulty for needed follow-up studies of diaphragmatic control during vomiting.

  17. An optical fiber Fabry-Perot pressure sensor using corrugated diaphragm and angle polished fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jiali; Wang, Ming; Chen, Lu; Ni, Xiaoqi; Ni, Haibin

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, a Fabry-Perot pressure sensor using a corrugated diaphragm and angle polished fiber is proposed. A SU-8 structure using two step of lithography is formed to fix the polished fiber, which helps control the cavity length precisely. The fabrication process is described. The characteristics of both pressure and temperature are tested. Also the temperature compensation is realized. Experimental results show that the sensor has high sensitivity and good linearity over the pressure range of 0-0.1 MPa. The sensitivity (change in cavity/loaded pressure) is 705.64 μm/MPa.

  18. Bohr's Diaphragms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Tongdong; Stachel, John

    In his response to EPR, Bohr introduces several ideal experimental arrangements that often are not understood correctly, and his discussion about them is given a positivist reading. Our analysis demonstrates the difference between such areading and Bohr's actual position, and also clarifies the meaning of several of Bohr's key physical and philosophical ideas: * The role of the quantum of action in the distinction between classical and quantum systems; * The criterion of measurability for theoretically defined concepts; * The freedom in placement of the "cut" between measuring instrument and measured system; * The non-visualizability of the quantum formalism; and Bohr's concepts of phenomenon and complementarity.

  19. Maternal Creatine Supplementation during Pregnancy Prevents Long-Term Changes in Diaphragm Muscle Structure and Function after Birth Asphyxia

    PubMed Central

    LaRosa, Domenic A.; Ellery, Stacey J.; Parkington, Helena C.; Snow, Rod J.

    2016-01-01

    Using a model of birth asphyxia, we previously reported significant structural and functional deficits in the diaphragm muscle in spiny mice, deficits that are prevented by supplementing the maternal diet with 5% creatine from mid-pregnancy. The long-term effects of this exposure are unknown. Pregnant spiny mice were fed control or 5% creatine-supplemented diet for the second half of pregnancy, and fetuses were delivered by caesarean section with or without 7.5 min of in-utero asphyxia. Surviving pups were raised by a cross-foster dam until 33±2 days of age when they were euthanized to obtain the diaphragm muscle for ex-vivo study of twitch tension and muscle fatigue, and for structural and enzymatic analyses. Functional analysis of the diaphragm revealed no differences in single twitch contractile parameters between any groups. However, muscle fatigue, induced by stimulation of diaphragm strips with a train of pulses (330ms train/sec, 40Hz) for 300sec, was significantly greater for asphyxia pups compared with controls (p<0.05), and this did not occur in diaphragms of creatine + asphyxia pups. Birth asphyxia resulted in a significant increase in the proportion of glycolytic, fast-twitch fibres and a reduction in oxidative capacity of Type I and IIb fibres in male offspring, as well as reduced cross-sectional area of all muscle fibre types (Type I, IIa, IIb/d) in both males and females at 33 days of age. None of these changes were observed in creatine + asphyxia animals. Thus, the changes in diaphragm fatigue and structure induced by birth asphyxia persist long-term but are prevented by maternal creatine supplementation. PMID:26930669

  20. Degeneration of Phrenic Motor Neurons Induces Long-Term Diaphragm Deficits following Mid-Cervical Spinal Contusion in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nicaise, Charles; Putatunda, Rajarshi; Hala, Tamara J.; Regan, Kathleen A.; Frank, David M.; Brion, Jean-Pierre; Leroy, Karelle; Pochet, Roland; Wright, Megan C.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A primary cause of morbidity and mortality following cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) is respiratory compromise, regardless of the level of trauma. In particular, SCI at mid-cervical regions targets degeneration of both descending bulbospinal respiratory axons and cell bodies of phrenic motor neurons, resulting in deficits in the function of the diaphragm, the primary muscle of inspiration. Contusion-type trauma to the cervical spinal cord is one of the most common forms of human SCI; however, few studies have evaluated mid-cervical contusion in animal models or characterized consequent histopathological and functional effects of degeneration of phrenic motor neuron–diaphragm circuitry. We have generated a mouse model of cervical contusion SCI that unilaterally targets both C4 and C5 levels, the location of the phrenic motor neuron pool, and have examined histological and functional outcomes for up to 6 weeks post-injury. We report that phrenic motor neuron loss in cervical spinal cord, phrenic nerve axonal degeneration, and denervation at diaphragm neuromuscular junctions (NMJ) resulted in compromised ipsilateral diaphragm function, as demonstrated by persistent reduction in diaphragm compound muscle action potential amplitudes following phrenic nerve stimulation and abnormalities in spontaneous diaphragm electromyography (EMG) recordings. This injury paradigm is reproducible, does not require ventilatory assistance, and provides proof-of-principle that generation of unilateral cervical contusion is a feasible strategy for modeling diaphragmatic/respiratory deficits in mice. This study and its accompanying analyses pave the way for using transgenic mouse technology to explore the function of specific genes in the pathophysiology of phrenic motor neuron degeneration and respiratory dysfunction following cervical SCI. PMID:23176637

  1. Maternal Creatine Supplementation during Pregnancy Prevents Long-Term Changes in Diaphragm Muscle Structure and Function after Birth Asphyxia.

    PubMed

    LaRosa, Domenic A; Ellery, Stacey J; Parkington, Helena C; Snow, Rod J; Walker, David W; Dickinson, Hayley

    2016-01-01

    Using a model of birth asphyxia, we previously reported significant structural and functional deficits in the diaphragm muscle in spiny mice, deficits that are prevented by supplementing the maternal diet with 5% creatine from mid-pregnancy. The long-term effects of this exposure are unknown. Pregnant spiny mice were fed control or 5% creatine-supplemented diet for the second half of pregnancy, and fetuses were delivered by caesarean section with or without 7.5 min of in-utero asphyxia. Surviving pups were raised by a cross-foster dam until 33±2 days of age when they were euthanized to obtain the diaphragm muscle for ex-vivo study of twitch tension and muscle fatigue, and for structural and enzymatic analyses. Functional analysis of the diaphragm revealed no differences in single twitch contractile parameters between any groups. However, muscle fatigue, induced by stimulation of diaphragm strips with a train of pulses (330 ms train/sec, 40 Hz) for 300 sec, was significantly greater for asphyxia pups compared with controls (p<0.05), and this did not occur in diaphragms of creatine + asphyxia pups. Birth asphyxia resulted in a significant increase in the proportion of glycolytic, fast-twitch fibres and a reduction in oxidative capacity of Type I and IIb fibres in male offspring, as well as reduced cross-sectional area of all muscle fibre types (Type I, IIa, IIb/d) in both males and females at 33 days of age. None of these changes were observed in creatine + asphyxia animals. Thus, the changes in diaphragm fatigue and structure induced by birth asphyxia persist long-term but are prevented by maternal creatine supplementation.

  2. Mini-open anterior instrumentation with diaphragm sparing for thoracolumbar idiopathic scoliosis: its technique and clinical results.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yong; Zhu, Feng; Wang, Bin; Zhu, Zezhang; Yu, Yang; Sun, Xu; Ma, Weiwei

    2011-02-01

    The traditional method of thoracoabdominal retroperitoneal approach requires dissection of diaphragm which bears potential complications such as postoperatively weakened abdominal breathing and dysfunction of diaphragm. Mini-open anterior instrumentation with diaphragm sparing is designed to minimize the damage to diaphragm and improve cosmesis. This study compared the traditional anterior instrumentation and mini-open anterior instrumentation under the hypothesis that both results in similar surgical outcomes in treating thoracolumbar scoliosis. In Group A, 38 patients with an average age of 16.5 years underwent mini-open anterior instrumentation with diaphragm sparing. The average standing coronal Cobb angle was 56.4° in Group A. Thirty-eight patients with average age of 16.7 years in Group B received traditional open approach. The preoperative average Cobb angle was 55.8° in Group B. The average correction rate of coronal curve was 78% in group A while 75% in group B. No statistical difference between the two groups in terms of coronal curve correction, sagittal profile restoration and estimated blood loss was observed. The operation time was significantly higher in Group A than that in Group B. All patients in the two groups had good healing of incisions without neurological and instrumental complications during minimal 2 year follow-up. In Groups A and B, two patients suffered from pleural effusion, respectively. The wedging of the vertebral discs distal to the lowest fused level occurred in three and four patients in Group A and B, respectively. One case in group B was found to be suspicious pseudoarthrosis without loss of correction. Mini-open anterior instrumentation with diaphragm sparing could minimize the surgical invasion as well as achieve similar clinical outcomes compared with classical anterior approach.

  3. Laterally Driven Resonant Pressure Sensor with Etched Silicon Dual Diaphragms and Combined Beams.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaohui; Liu, Yifang; Li, Anlin; Zhou, Zhou; Sun, Daoheng; Wang, Lingyun

    2016-01-26

    A novel structure of the resonant pressure sensor is presented in this paper, which tactfully employs intercoupling between dual pressure-sensing diaphragms and a laterally driven resonant strain gauge. After the resonant pressure sensor principle is introduced, the coupling mechanism of the diaphragms and resonator is analyzed and the frequency equation of the resonator based on the triangle geometry theory is developed for this new coupling structure. The finite element (FE) simulation results match the theoretical analysis over the full scale of the device. This pressure sensor was first fabricated by dry/wet etching and thermal silicon bonding, followed by vacuum-packaging using anodic bonding technology. The test maximum error of the fabricated sensor is 0.0310%F.S. (full scale) in the range of 30 to 190 kPa, its pressure sensitivity is negative and exceeding 8 Hz/kPa, and its Q-factor reaches 20,000 after wafer vacuum-packaging. A novel resonant pressure sensor with high accuracy is presented in this paper.

  4. Laterally Driven Resonant Pressure Sensor with Etched Silicon Dual Diaphragms and Combined Beams

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiaohui; Liu, Yifang; Li, Anlin; Zhou, Zhou; Sun, Daoheng; Wang, Lingyun

    2016-01-01

    A novel structure of the resonant pressure sensor is presented in this paper, which tactfully employs intercoupling between dual pressure-sensing diaphragms and a laterally driven resonant strain gauge. After the resonant pressure sensor principle is introduced, the coupling mechanism of the diaphragms and resonator is analyzed and the frequency equation of the resonator based on the triangle geometry theory is developed for this new coupling structure. The finite element (FE) simulation results match the theoretical analysis over the full scale of the device. This pressure sensor was first fabricated by dry/wet etching and thermal silicon bonding, followed by vacuum-packaging using anodic bonding technology. The test maximum error of the fabricated sensor is 0.0310%F.S. (full scale) in the range of 30 to 190 kPa, its pressure sensitivity is negative and exceeding 8 Hz/kPa, and its Q-factor reaches 20,000 after wafer vacuum-packaging. A novel resonant pressure sensor with high accuracy is presented in this paper. PMID:26821031

  5. Miniature fiber optic pressure sensor with composite polymer-metal diaphragm for intradiscal pressure measurements

    PubMed Central

    Nesson, Silas; Yu, Miao; Zhang, Xuming; Hsieh, Adam H.

    2009-01-01

    We developed a miniature fiber optic pressure sensor system and utilized it for in vitro intradiscal pressure measurements for rodents. One of the unique features of this work is the design and fabrication of a sensor element with a multilayer polymer-metal diaphragm. This diaphragm consists of a base polyimide layer (150 nm thick), a metal reflective layer (1 μm thick), and another polyimide layer for protection and isolation (150 nm thick). The sensor element is biocompatible and can be fabricated by simple, batch-fabrication methods in a non-cleanroom environment with good device-to-device uniformity. The fabricated sensor element has an outer diameter of only 366 μm, which is small enough to be inserted into the rodent discs without disrupting the structure or altering the intradiscal pressures. In the calibration and in vitro rodent intradiscal pressure measurements, the sensor element exhibits a linear response to the applied pressure over the range of 0–70 kPa, with a sensitivity of 0.0206 μm/kPa and a resolution of 0.17 kPa. To our best knowledge, this work is the first successful demonstration of rodent intradiscal pressure measurements. PMID:19021367

  6. Effects of the insertional and appositional forces of the canine diaphragm on the lower ribs.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Theodore A; De Troyer, André

    2013-07-15

    The diaphragm has an inspiratory action on the lower ribs, and current conventional wisdom maintains that this action is the result of two mechanisms, namely, the force applied by the muscle fibres on the ribs into which they insert (insertional force) and the transmission of abdominal pressure through the zone of apposition (appositional force). The magnitude of the diaphragmatic force and the relative contributions of the insertional and appositional components, however, are unknown. To assess these forces, the inspiratory intercostal muscles in all interspaces were severed in anaesthetized dogs, so that the diaphragm was the only muscle active during inspiration, and the displacements of the lower ribs along the craniocaudal and laterolateral axes were measured during quiet breathing, during occluded breaths and during passive lung inflation. From these data, the isolated effects of pleural pressure and transdiaphragmatic pressure on rib displacement were determined. Then external forces were applied to the ribs in the cranial and the lateral direction to simulate, respectively, the effects of the insertional and appositional forces, and the rib trajectories for these external forces were used as the basis for a vector analysis to obtain the relative magnitudes of the insertional and appositional contributions to the rib displacement driven by transdiaphragmatic pressure. The results show that, per unit pressure, the inspiratory effect of the diaphragmatic force on the lower ribs is equal to the expiratory effect of pleural pressure, and that the insertional force contributes 60% of that inspiratory effect.

  7. A non-diaphragm type small shock tube for application to a molecular beam source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Yuta; Osuka, Kenichi; Miyoshi, Nobuya; Kinefuchi, Ikuya; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2013-07-01

    A non-diaphragm type small shock tube was developed for application to a molecular beam source, which can generate beams in the energy range from 1 to several electron volts and beams containing dissociated species such as atomic oxygen. Since repetitive high-frequency operation is indispensable for rapid signal acquisition in beam scattering experiments, the dimensions of the shock tube were miniaturized to reduce the evacuation time between shots. The designed shock tube is 2-4 mm in diameter and can operate at 0.5 Hz. Moreover, a high shock Mach number at the tube end is required for high-energy molecular beam generation. To reduce the shock attenuation caused by the wall boundary layer, which becomes significant in small-diameter tubes, we developed a high-speed response valve employing the current-loop mechanism. The response time of this mechanism is about 100 μs, which is shorter than the rupture time of conventional diaphragms. We show that the current-loop valve generates shock waves with shorter formation distances (about 200-300 mm) than those of conventional shock tubes. In addition, the converging geometry efficiently accelerates shock wave in the small-diameter tubes. The optimal geometry of the shock tube yields shock Mach number around 7, which indicates that the translation energy of molecular beams can exceed 1 eV even in the presence of the real gas effect.

  8. Hyperthermal molecular beam source using a non-diaphragm-type small shock tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Yuta; Osuka, Kenichi; Miyoshi, Nobuya; Kinefuchi, Ikuya; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2016-10-01

    We have developed a hyperthermal molecular beam source employing a non-diaphragm-type small shock tube for gas-surface interaction studies. Unlike conventional shock-heated beam sources, the capability of repetitive beam generation without the need for replacing a diaphragm makes our beam source suitable for scattering experiments, which require signal accumulation for a large number of beam pulses. The short duration of shock heating alleviates the usual temperature limit due to the nozzle material, enabling the generation of a molecular beam with higher translational energy or that containing dissociated species. The shock-heated beam is substantially free from surface-contaminating impurities that are pronounced in arc-heated beams. We characterize the properties of nitrogen and oxygen molecular beams using the time-of-flight method. When both the timing of beam extraction and the supply quantity of nitrogen gas are appropriately regulated, our beam source can generate a nitrogen molecular beam with translational energy of approximately 1 eV, which corresponds to the typical activation energy of surface reactions. Furthermore, our beam source can generate an oxygen molecular beam containing dissociated oxygen atoms, which can be a useful probe for surface oxidation. The dissociation fraction along with the translational energy can be adjusted through the supply quantity of oxygen gas.

  9. Bench- and pilot-scale sludge electrodewatering in a diaphragm filter press.

    PubMed

    Saveyn, H; Van der Meeren, P; Pauwels, G; Timmerman, R

    2006-01-01

    Electrodewatering is a technique in which pressure dewatering is combined with electrokinetic effects to realize an improved solid/liquid separation and hence increased filter cake dry matter contents. In order to be energy efficient, it is shown that sludge should be dewatered by pressure dewatering to a high extent prior to electric field application, and a sufficient contact time for the electric field must be guaranteed. In order to realize these goals, a bench- and pilot-scale diaphragm filter press suited for electrodewatering were constructed for treatment of sewage and other types of sludges. It was shown that electrodewatering of sludge is a feasible technique, especially for biological sludge types. Other types of sludge are less suited for electrodewatering because of the restricted improvements that can be realized in cake dry matter content and the high electric energy consumption. Furthermore, it was shown in pilot-scale tests that the use of a diaphragm filter press with electrodewatering facilities was very well suited to deliver dry filter cakes of sewage sludge at a moderate energy consumption. Depending on local market prices for investment, operating and sludge disposal costs, this technology may therefore lead to important savings in the sludge management process.

  10. A caseian point for the evolution of a diaphragm homologue among the earliest synapsids.

    PubMed

    Lambertz, Markus; Shelton, Christen D; Spindler, Frederik; Perry, Steven F

    2016-12-01

    The origin of the diaphragm remains a poorly understood yet crucial step in the evolution of terrestrial vertebrates, as this unique structure serves as the main respiratory motor for mammals. Here, we analyze the paleobiology and the respiratory apparatus of one of the oldest lineages of mammal-like reptiles: the Caseidae. Combining quantitative bone histology and functional morphological and physiological modeling approaches, we deduce a scenario in which an auxiliary ventilatory structure was present in these early synapsids. Crucial to this hypothesis are indications that at least the phylogenetically advanced caseids might not have been primarily terrestrial but rather were bound to a predominantly aquatic life. Such a lifestyle would have resulted in severe constraints on their ventilatory system, which consequently would have had to cope with diving-related problems. Our modeling of breathing parameters revealed that these caseids were capable of only limited costal breathing and, if aquatic, must have employed some auxiliary ventilatory mechanism to quickly meet their oxygen demand upon surfacing. Given caseids' phylogenetic position at the base of Synapsida and under this aquatic scenario, it would be most parsimonious to assume that a homologue of the mammalian diaphragm had already evolved about 50 Ma earlier than previously assumed.

  11. Piezoelectric circular diaphragm with mechanically induced pre-stress for energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palosaari, J.; Leinonen, M.; Juuti, J.; Hannu, J.; Jantunen, H.

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents the results of a piezoelectric circular diaphragm harvester utilising a unique measurement setup with tailored input force (walk profile), adjustable mechanical pre-stress, and simultaneous measurement of the harvested energy output and input force pressure. The harvester, incorporating the pre-stressing mechanism, consisted of a 191 μm thick PZ-5A piezoelectric disc (Ø 34.5 mm) and a 100 μm thick steel plate (Ø 45.5 mm). Its performance was measured with pressure cycles at a frequency of 0.96 Hz. Harvested energy was measured as a function of the pre-stressing state, the applied force, and the pressure profile. The optimal bending pre-stress was found to improve the efficiency of harvesting by ˜141% compared to the case without pre-stress. The maximum obtained efficiency was 14.7%, and the maximum average power density of 6.06 mW cm-3 was measured for a unimorph diaphragm energy harvester. The results show that the pre-stressing technique is an effective method to improve the efficiency and generated power in this type of piezoelectric harvester, potentially enabling it to power different portable devices and sensors in future applications.

  12. Effect of spaceflight on oxidative and antioxidant enzyme activity in rat diaphragm and intercostal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Mona D.; Tuttle, Ronald; Girten, Beverly

    1995-01-01

    There are limited data regarding changes in oxidative and antioxidant enzymes induced by simulated or actual weightlessness, and any additional information would provide insight into potential mechanisms involving other changes observed in muscles from animals previously flown in space. Thus, the NASA Biospecimen Sharing Program was an opportunity to collect valuable information. Oxidative and antioxidant enzyme levels, as well as lipid peroxidation, were measured in respiratory muscles from rates flown on board Space Shuttle mission STS-54. The results indicated that there was an increasing trend in citrate synthase activity in the flight diaphragm when compared to ground based controls, and there were no significant changes observed in the intercostal muscles for any of the parameters. However, the lipid peroxidation was significantly (p less than 0.05) decreased in the flight diaphragm. These results indicate that 6 day exposure to microgravity may have a different effect on oxidative and antioxidant activity in rat respiratory muscles when compared to data from previous 14 day hindlimb suspension studies.

  13. Prolonged exercise potentiates sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ uptake in rat diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Stavrianeas, Stasinos; Spangenburg, Espen; Batts, Tim; Williams, Jay H; Klug, Gary A

    2003-03-01

    The effects of a single bout of prolonged treadmill exercise [mean=81 (13) min] on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) release, uptake and ATPase activity were determined in the costal region of rat diaphragm (D) and red gastrocnemius (RG). Glycogen depletion measurements made immediately following exercise suggested that treadmill running substantially recruited the fibers throughout both muscles. SR Ca(2+) ATPase activity, measured in isolated SR vesicles, decreased in the RG by 33% but remained unchanged in D in response to the exercise bout. This effect in RG was matched by a 37% decline in Ca(2+) uptake and a 28% depression in Ca(2+) release when measured in muscle homogenates. Conversely, Ca(2+) uptake increased between 157% and 263% in the D in the absence of any change in Ca(2+) release. These data show that the attenuation of SR function that has been consistently observed in limb muscle over the last several decades is absent in diaphragm despite the fact that its fibers appear to experience sufficient activity to deplete their glycogen. In fact, the large increase in Ca(2+) uptake in D shows that prolonged activity actually potentiates the ability of SR vesicles to sequester Ca(2+) in the absence of any increase in energy cost. Thus, it appears necessary to re-evaluate the role of exercise in regulating Ca(2+) sequestration by the SR as different muscles may respond in ways that are dictated by their function.

  14. Postural disturbances resulting from unilateral and bilateral diaphragm contractions: a phrenic nerve stimulation study.

    PubMed

    Hamaoui, Alain; Hudson, Anna L; Laviolette, Louis; Nierat, Marie-Cécile; Do, Manh-Cuong; Similowski, Thomas

    2014-10-15

    Thoracoabdominal breathing movements are a complex source of postural disturbance, but there are contradictory reports in the literature with inspiration described as having either a backward or a forward disturbing effect. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon, the present study studied the postural disturbance caused by isolated contractions of the diaphragm. Eight male and four female healthy subjects followed an original paradigm of phrenic nerve stimulation (bilateral and unilateral) and "diaphragmatic" voluntary sniff maneuvers in the seated and standing postures. Center of gravity (CG) acceleration was calculated from force plate recordings, and respiratory kinematics were assessed with thoracic and abdominal sensor belts. CG and respiratory signals revealed that, while seated, bilateral phrenic stimulation and sniff maneuvers consistently produced expansion of the abdomen associated with a forward peak of CG acceleration. In the standing posture, the direction of the CG peak was reversed and always directed backward. Unilateral phrenic stimulation induced an additional medial-lateral acceleration of the CG, directed toward the nonactive side while seated, but in the opposite direction while standing. These results suggest that isolated diaphragmatic contractions produce a constant disturbing pattern for a given posture, but with opposite effects between standing and seated postures. This could be related to the different biomechanical configuration of the body in each posture, corresponding to distinct kinematic patterns of the osteoarticular chain. In addition, the lateral component of the CG acceleration induced by unilateral diaphragm contractions could be clinically relevant in patients with hemidiaphragm paralysis.

  15. Super-resolution stimulated emission depletion imaging of slit diaphragm proteins in optically cleared kidney tissue.

    PubMed

    Unnersjö-Jess, David; Scott, Lena; Blom, Hans; Brismar, Hjalmar

    2016-01-01

    The glomerular filtration barrier, consisting of podocyte foot processes with bridging slit diaphragm, glomerular basement membrane, and endothelium, is a key component for renal function. Previously, the subtlest elements of the filtration barrier have only been visualized using electron microscopy. However, electron microscopy is mostly restricted to ultrathin two-dimensional samples, and the possibility to simultaneously visualize multiple different proteins is limited. Therefore, we sought to implement a super-resolution immunofluorescence microscopy protocol for the study of the filtration barrier in the kidney. Recently, several optical clearing methods have been developed making it possible to image through large volumes of tissue and even whole organs using light microscopy. Here we found that hydrogel-based optical clearing is a beneficial tool to study intact renal tissue at the nanometer scale. When imaging samples using super-resolution STED microscopy, the staining quality was critical in order to assess correct nanoscale information. The signal-to-noise ratio and immunosignal homogeneity were both improved in optically cleared tissue. Thus, STED of slit diaphragms in fluorescently labeled, optically cleared, intact kidney samples is a new tool for studying the glomerular filtration barrier in health and disease.

  16. Phenol degradation by a nonpulsed diaphragm glow discharge in an aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong Jun; Jiang, Xuan Zhen

    2005-11-01

    In the present study, a nonpulsed direct current diaphragm glow discharge process was developed for the first time for phenol degradation in an aqueous solution. The discharge was generated in a small hole in a dielectric diaphragm interposed between two submersed graphite electrodes. The experimental results revealed that supplied voltage, initial pH, iron salts, and radical scavengers impact the phenol degradation significantly. Enhancing the applied voltage, lowering the solution pH, and adding appropriate amounts of Fe2+ or Fe3+ to the solution were found to be favorable for phenol degradation. Carbonate ions or n-butanol in the solution can decelerate the phenol removal. When the treatment time is increased, the pH value of the solution decreased, leading to an increase in the phenol decomposition. It was revealed by high performance liquid chromatography and ionic chromatography that the main intermediates of phenol decomposition are hydroquinone, pyrocatechol, p-benzoquinone and organic acids. In comparison with the high-voltage corona discharge plasma in distilled water, this process offers simple technology, higher energy efficiency, easier scaleup, and easier applicability to salt-containing wastewater with no electrode erosion and electromagnetic radiation.

  17. Contribution of oxidative stress to pathology in diaphragm and limb muscles with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Hee; Kwak, Hyo-Bum; Thompson, LaDora V; Lawler, John M

    2013-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a degenerative skeletal muscle disease that makes walking and breathing difficult. DMD is caused by an X-linked (Xp21) mutation in the dystrophin gene. Dystrophin is a scaffolding protein located in the sarcolemmal cytoskeleton, important in maintaining structural integrity and regulating muscle cell (muscle fiber) growth and repair. Dystrophin deficiency in mouse models (e.g., mdx mouse) destabilizes the interface between muscle fibers and the extracellular matrix, resulting in profound damage, inflammation, and weakness in diaphragm and limb muscles. While the link between dystrophin deficiency with inflammation and pathology is multi-factorial, elevated oxidative stress has been proposed as a central mediator. Unfortunately, the use of non-specific antioxidant scavengers in mouse and human studies has led to inconsistent results, obscuring our understanding of the importance of redox signaling in pathology of muscular dystrophy. However, recent studies with more mechanistic approaches in mdx mice suggest that NAD(P)H oxidase and nuclear factor-kappaB are important in amplifying dystrophin-deficient muscle pathology. Therefore, more targeted antioxidant therapeutics may ameliorate damage and weakness in human population, thus promoting better muscle function and quality of life. This review will focus upon the pathobiology of dystrophin deficiency in diaphragm and limb muscle primarily in mouse models, with a rationale for development of targeted therapeutic antioxidants in DMD patients.

  18. Modeling of a dielectric elastomer diaphragm for a prosthetic blood pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulbourne, Nakhiah; Frecker, Mary I.; Mockensturm, Eric M.; Snyder, Alan J.

    2003-07-01

    The electromechanical behavior of dielectric elastomers is to be exploited for medical application in artificial blood pumps. It is required that the pump diaphragm achieves a swept volume increase of 70 cc into a systolic pressure of 120 mmHg with the main design objective being volumetric efficiency. As such, a model that accommodates large deformation behavior is used. In order to design prosthetic blood pumps that closely mimic the natural pumping chambers of the heart, a dielectric elastomer diaphragm design is proposed. The elastomer's change in shape in response to the applied electric field will permit it to be the active element of the pump just as the ventricular walls are in the natural heart. A comprehensive analytical model that accounts for the combined elastic and dielectric behavior of the membrane is used to compute the stresses and deformations of the inflated membrane. Dielectric elastomers are often pre-strained in order to obtain optimal electromechanical performance. The resulting model incorporates pre-strain and shows how system parameters such as pre-strain, pressure, electric field, and edge constraints affect membrane deformation. The model predicts more than adequate volume displacement for moderate pre-strain of the elastomer.

  19. Design considerations of a slit diaphragm flexure used in a precision mirror gimbal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Brian; Kaufman, Morris

    2011-09-01

    Two precision mirror gimbals were designed using slit diaphragm flexures to provide two-axis precision mirror alignment in space-limited applications. Both gimbals are currently in use in diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility: one design in the Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostic and the other in the Neutron Imaging System (NIS) diagnostic. The GRH gimbal has an adjustment sensitivity of 0.1 mrad about both axes and a total adjustment capability of +/-6° the NIS gimbal has an adjustment sensitivity of 0.8 μrad about both axes and a total adjustment range of +/-3°. Both slit diaphragm flexures were electro-discharge machined out of high-strength titanium and utilize stainless steel stiffeners. The stiffener-flexure design results in adjustment axes with excellent orthogonality and centering with respect to the mirror in a single stage; a typical two-axis gimbal flexure requires two stages. Finite element analyses are presented for both flexure designs, and a design optimization of the GRH flexure is discussed.

  20. Evaluation of COPD's diaphragm motion extracted from 4D-MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swastika, Windra; Masuda, Yoshitada; Kawata, Naoko; Matsumoto, Koji; Suzuki, Toshio; Iesato, Ken; Tada, Yuji; Sugiura, Toshihiko; Tanabe, Nobuhiro; Tatsumi, Koichiro; Ohnishi, Takashi; Haneishi, Hideaki

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a method called intersection profile method to construct a 4D-MRI (3D+time) from time-series of 2D-MRI. The basic idea is to find the best matching of the intersection profile from the time series of 2D-MRI in sagittal plane (navigator slice) and time series of 2D-MRI in coronal plane (data slice). In this study, we use 4D-MRI to semiautomatically extract the right diaphragm motion of 16 subjects (8 healthy subjects and 8 COPD patients). The diaphragm motion is then evaluated quantitatively by calculating the displacement of each subjects and normalized it. We also generate phase-length map to view and locate paradoxical motion of the COPD patients. The quantitative results of the normalized displacement shows that COPD patients tend to have smaller displacement compared to healthy subjects. The average normalized displacement of total 8 COPD patients is 9.4mm and the average of normalized displacement of 8 healthy volunteers is 15.3mm. The generated phase-length maps show that not all of the COPD patients have paradoxical motion, however if it has paradoxical motion, the phase-length map is able to locate where does it occur.

  1. Vibrational mode and sound radiation of electrostatic speakers using circular and annular diaphragms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu-Hsi; Chiang, Hsin-Yuan

    2016-06-01

    This study modeled two diaphragms comprising a pair of indium tin oxide (ITO) transparent plates sandwiching a vibrating diaphragm to create circular (30 mm radius) and annular (30 mm outer and 3 mm inner radius) push-pull electrostatic speakers. We then measured the displacement amplitudes and mode shapes produced by the devices. Vibration characteristics were used to predict sound pressure levels (SPLs) using the lumped parameter method (LPM) and distributed parameter method (DPM). The two measurement results obtained using a laser system were compared to the SPLs obtained using traditional acoustic measurement (AM) from 20 Hz to 20 kHz in order to verify our predictions. When using LPM and DPM, the SPL prediction results in the first three symmetric modes were in good agreement with the AM results. Under the assumption of linear operations, the DPM and amplitude-fluctuation electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) techniques proved effective in determining the visualization of mode shape (0,1)-(0,3). The use of ITO plates is a practical technique for the prediction of SPL, as well as measurement of mode shapes. The four evaluation methods, i.e. LPM, DPM, ESPI and AM, present a high degree of consistency with regard to vibrational mode and sound radiation characteristics.

  2. Autophagy-Associated Atrophy and Metabolic Remodeling of the Mouse Diaphragm after Short-Term Intermittent Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Christian; Lemaire, Christian; Li, Tong; Kimoff, R. John; Petrof, Basil J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Short-term intermittent hypoxia (IH) is common in patients with acute respiratory disorders. Although prolonged exposure to hypoxia induces atrophy and increased fatigability of skeletal muscle, the response to short-term IH is less well known. We hypothesized that the diaphragm and limb muscles would adapt differently to short-term IH given that hypoxia stimulates ventilation and triggers a superimposed exercise stimulus in the diaphragm. Methods We determined the structural, metabolic, and contractile properties of the mouse diaphragm after 4 days of IH (8 hours per day, 30 episodes per hour to a FiO2 nadir=6%), and compared responses in the diaphragm to a commonly studied reference limb muscle, the tibialis anterior. Outcome measures included muscle fiber size, assays of muscle proteolysis (calpain, ubiquitin-proteasome, and autophagy pathways), markers of oxidative stress and mitochondrial function, quantification of intramyocellular lipid and lipid metabolism genes, type I myosin heavy chain (MyHC) expression, and in vitro contractile properties. Results After 4 days of IH, the diaphragm alone demonstrated significant atrophy (30% decrease of myofiber size) together with increased LC3B-II protein (2.4-fold) and mRNA markers of the autophagy pathway (LC3B, Gabarapl1, Bnip3), whereas active calpain and E3 ubiquitin ligases (MuRF1, atrogin-1) were unaffected in both muscles. Succinate dehydrogenase activity was significantly reduced by IH in both muscles. However, only the diaphragm exhibited increased intramyocellular lipid droplets (2.5-fold) after IH, along with upregulation of genes linked to activated lipid metabolism. In addition, although the diaphragm showed evidence for acute fatigue immediately following IH, it underwent an adaptive fiber type switch toward slow type I MyHC-expressing fibers, associated with greater intrinsic endurance of the muscle during repetitive stimulation in vitro. Conclusions Short-term IH induces preferential atrophy

  3. CT angiography - chest

    MedlinePlus

    Computed tomography angiography - thorax; CTA - lungs; Pulmonary embolism - CTA chest; Thoracic aortic aneurysm - CTA chest; Venous thromboembolism - CTA lung; Blood clot - CTA lung; Embolus - CTA lung; CT ...

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    MedlinePlus

    ... More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses uses special x-ray equipment to evaluate the paranasal sinus cavities – hollow, air-filled spaces within the bones of the face surrounding the ...

  5. Quantification of the Variability of Diaphragm Motion and Implications for Treatment Margin Construction

    SciTech Connect

    Rit, Simon; Herk, Marcel van; Zijp, Lambert; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To quantify the variability of diaphragm motion during free-breathing radiotherapy of lung patients and its effect on treatment margins to account for geometric uncertainties. Methods and Materials: Thirty-three lung cancer patients were analyzed. Each patient had 5-19 cone-beam scans acquired during different treatment fractions. The craniocaudal position of the diaphragm dome on the same side as the tumor was tracked over 2 min in the projection images, because it is both easily visible and a suitable surrogate to study the variability of the tumor motion and its impact on treatment margins. Intra-acquisition, inter-acquisition, and inter-patient variability of the respiratory cycles were quantified separately, as were the probability density functions (PDFs) of the diaphragm position over each cycle, each acquisition, and each patient. Asymmetric margins were simulated using each patient PDF and compared to symmetric margins computed from a margin recipe. Results: The peak-to-peak amplitude variability (1 SD) was 3.3 mm, 2.4 mm, and 6.1 mm for the intra-acquisition, inter-acquisition, and inter-patient variability, respectively. The average PDF of each cycle was similar to the sin{sup 4} function but the PDF of each acquisition was closer to a skew-normal distribution because of the motion variability. Despite large interfraction baseline variability, the PDF of each patient was generally asymmetric with a longer end-inhale tail because the end-exhale position was more stable than the end-inhale position. The asymmetry of the PDF required asymmetric margins around the time-averaged position to account for the position uncertainty but the average difference was 1.0 mm (range, 0.0-4.4 mm) for a sharp penumbra and an idealized online setup correction protocol. Conclusion: The respiratory motion is more irregular during the fractions than between the fractions. The PDF of the respiratory motion is asymmetrically distributed. Both the intra

  6. Long-term follow-up of pacing of the conditioned diaphragm in quadriplegia.

    PubMed

    Elefteriades, John A; Quin, Jacquelyn A; Hogan, James F; Holcomb, Wade G; Letsou, George V; Chlosta, William F; Glenn, William W W L

    2002-06-01

    The authors have previously shown that conditioning of the diaphragm for continuous bilateral pacing is a feasible and effective means of ventilation in patients with complete respiratory paralysis from high cervical (above C3) quadriplegia. The present study reports the long-term results of continuous diaphragmatic pacing. Twelve quadriplegia patients underwent bilateral phrenic nerve pacemaker placement and diaphragm conditioning from 1981 to 1987. Pacing was initiated at 11 Hz and progressively decreased to 7.1 Hz. A pulse train duration of 1.3 seconds for adults and 0.9 seconds for children was used. Long-term follow-up information obtained included pacing status (full-time, part-time, or mechanical ventilation), ventilation parameters, and social circumstances. Of the 12 patients, 6 continued to pace full time (mean 14.8 years); all were living at home. Three patients paced for an average of 1.8 years before stopping; two were institutionalized. One patient who paced full time for 6.5 years before lapsing to part time, lived at home. Two patients were deceased; one paced continuously for 10 years before his demise, the other stopped pacing after 1 year. Patients who stopped full-time pacing did so mainly for reasons of inadequate social or financial support or associated medical problems. All patients demonstrated normal tidal volumes and arterial blood gases while pacing full time. Despite theoretical concerns about long-term nerve damage, no patient lost the ability to pace the phrenic nerve. Threshold currents did not increase over time (original/follow-up: 0.46/0.47 for right, 0.45/0.46 for left), nor did maximal currents (original/follow-up: 1.16/1.14 for right, 1.37/1.26 for left). This follow-up confirms that quadriplegic patients are able to meet long-term, full-time ventilation requirements using phrenic nerve stimulation of the conditioned diaphragm. Careful review of diaphragmatic pacing candidates with respect to associated medical conditions

  7. Multi-step formation of a hemifusion diaphragm for vesicle fusion revealed by all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hui-Hsu Gavin; Chang, Che-Ming; Lee, Jian-Bin

    2014-06-01

    Membrane fusion is essential for intracellular trafficking and virus infection, but the molecular mechanisms underlying the fusion process remain poorly understood. In this study, we employed all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the membrane fusion mechanism using vesicle models which were pre-bound by inter-vesicle Ca(2+)-lipid clusters to approximate Ca(2+)-catalyzed fusion. Our results show that the formation of the hemifusion diaphragm for vesicle fusion is a multi-step event. This result contrasts with the assumptions made in most continuum models. The neighboring hemifused states are separated by an energy barrier on the energy landscape. The hemifusion diaphragm is much thinner than the planar lipid bilayers. The thinning of the hemifusion diaphragm during its formation results in the opening of a fusion pore for vesicle fusion. This work provides new insights into the formation of the hemifusion diaphragm and thus increases understanding of the molecular mechanism of membrane fusion. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Structure and Function: Relevance in the Cell's Physiology, Pathology and Therapy.

  8. Analyzing the applicability of miniature ultra-high sensitivity Fabry-Perot acoustic sensor using a nanothick graphene diaphragm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng; Gao, Xiangyang; Guo, Tingting; Xiao, Jun; Fan, Shangchun; Jin, Wei

    2015-08-01

    A miniature Fabry-Perot interferometric acoustic sensor with an ultra-high pressure sensitivity was constructed by using approximately 13 layers of graphene film as the diaphragm. The extremely thin diaphragm was transferred onto the endface of a ferrule, which had an inner diameter of 125 μm, and van der Waals interactions between the graphene diaphragm and its substrate created a low finesse Fabry-Perot interferometer with a cavity length of 98 μm. Acoustic testing demonstrated a pressure-induced deflection of 2380 nm kPa-1 and a noise equivalent acoustic signal level of ~2.7 mPa/Hz1/2 for a 3 dB bandwidth with a center frequency of 15 kHz. The sensor also exhibited a dynamic frequency response between 1 and 20 kHz, which conformed well to the result obtained by a reference microphone. The use of a suspended graphene diaphragm has potential applications in highly sensitive pressure/acoustic sensors.

  9. Progressive Dystrophic Pathology in Diaphragm and Impairment of Cardiac Function in FKRP P448L Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Blaeser, Anthony; Awano, Hiroyuki; Wu, Bo; Lu, Qi-Long

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the gene for fukutin-related protein represent a subset of muscular dystrophies known as dystroglycanopathies characterized by loss of functionally-glycosylated-alpha-dystroglycan and a wide range of dystrophic phenotypes. Mice generated by our lab containing the P448L mutation in the fukutin-related protein gene demonstrate the dystrophic phenotype similar to that of LGMD2I. Here we examined the morphology of the heart and diaphragm, focusing on pathology of diaphragm and cardiac function of the mutant mice for up to 12 months. Both diaphragm and heart lack clear expression of functionally-glycosylated-alpha-dystroglycan throughout the observed period. The diaphragm undergoes progressive deterioration in histology with increasing amount of centranucleation and inflammation. Large areas of mononuclear cell infiltration and fibrosis of up to 60% of tissue area were detected as early as 6 months of age. Despite a less severe morphology with only patches of mononuclear cell infiltration and fibrosis of ~5% by 12 months of age in the heart, cardiac function is clearly affected. High frequency ultrasound reveals a smaller heart size up to 10 months of age. There are significant increases in myocardial thickness and decrease in cardiac output through 12 months. Dysfunction in the heart represents a key marker for evaluating experimental therapies aimed at cardiac muscle. PMID:27711214

  10. Kif7 is required for the patterning and differentiation of the diaphragm in a model of syndromic congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Coles, Garry L.; Ackerman, Kate G.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a common birth defect that results in a high degree of neonatal morbidity and mortality, but its pathological mechanisms are largely unknown. Therefore, we performed a forward genetic screen in mice to identify unique genes, models, and mechanisms of abnormal diaphragm development. We identified a mutant allele of kinesin family member 7 (Kif7), the disorganized diaphragm (dd). Embryos homozygous for the dd allele possess communicating diaphragmatic hernias, central tendon patterning defects, and increased cell proliferation with diaphragmatic tissue hyperplasia. Because the patterning of the central tendon is undescribed, we analyzed the expression of genes regulating tendonogenesis in dd/dd mutant embryos, and we determined that retinoic acid (RA) signaling was misregulautted. To further investigate the role of Kif7 and RA signaling in the development of the embryonic diaphragm, we established primary mesenchymal cultures of WT embryonic day 13.5 diaphragmatic cells. We determined that RA signaling is necessary for the expression of tendon markers as well as the expression of other CDH-associated genes. Knockdown of Kif7, and retinoic acid receptors alpha (Rara), beta (Rarb), and gamma (Rarg) indicated that RA signaling is dependent on these genes to promote tendonogenesis within the embryonic diaphragm. Taken together, our results provide evidence for a model in which inhibition of RA receptor signaling promotes CDH pathogenesis through a complex gene network. PMID:23650387

  11. Effects of Processing Parameters on the Forming Quality of C-Shaped Thermosetting Composite Laminates in Hot Diaphragm Forming Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, X. X.; Gu, Y. Z.; Sun, J.; Li, M.; Liu, W. P.; Zhang, Z. G.

    2013-10-01

    In this study, the effects of processing temperature and vacuum applying rate on the forming quality of C-shaped carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin matrix composite laminates during hot diaphragm forming process were investigated. C-shaped prepreg preforms were produced using a home-made hot diaphragm forming equipment. The thickness variations of the preforms and the manufacturing defects after diaphragm forming process, including fiber wrinkling and voids, were evaluated to understand the forming mechanism. Furthermore, both interlaminar slipping friction and compaction behavior of the prepreg stacks were experimentally analyzed for showing the importance of the processing parameters. In addition, autoclave processing was used to cure the C-shaped preforms to investigate the changes of the defects before and after cure process. The results show that the C-shaped prepreg preforms with good forming quality can be achieved through increasing processing temperature and reducing vacuum applying rate, which obviously promote prepreg interlaminar slipping process. The process temperature and forming rate in hot diaphragm forming process strongly influence prepreg interply frictional force, and the maximum interlaminar frictional force can be taken as a key parameter for processing parameter optimization. Autoclave process is effective in eliminating voids in the preforms and can alleviate fiber wrinkles to a certain extent.

  12. Costal and crural diaphragm, and intercostal and genioglossal electromyogram activities during spontaneous augmented breaths (sighs) in kittens.

    PubMed

    Watchko, J F; Brozanski, B S; O'Day, T L; Klesh, K W; Guthrie, R D

    1989-01-01

    Spontaneously occurring augmented breaths (sighs) are common in infants. The pattern of electrical activity of the inspiratory muscles of the thorax and upper airway during augmented breaths, however, has not been fully characterized in this less than fully mature age group. We therefore examined costal and crural diaphragm and external intercostal and genioglossal EMG activities during spontaneous augmented breaths (n = 46) in 10 anesthetized (1.35% halothane) 1-month-old kittens breathing room air. EMG responses were assessed by comparing the spontaneous augmented breaths (AB) to the five immediately preceding breaths (control). The peak moving time average EMG activity observed during the AB was 240 +/- 32% (mean +/- SD) of control for the costal diaphragm, 279 +/- 66% of control for the crural diaphragm, and 274 +/- 68% of control for the external intercostal muscle. The mean increase in EMG activity during the AB was not significantly different among these three muscle groups (P greater than 0.25). Genioglossal EMG activity during AB was observed in only 1 of 10 study animals. These results document that during AB in anesthetized kittens, activity of the thoracic inspiratory muscles (costal/crural diaphragm and external intercostal muscles) increase in parallel, suggesting that they are modulated in a uniform manner. The infrequent observance of genioglossal activity during AB suggests that either 1) halothane anesthesia depresses genioglossal activity more than diaphragmatic and intercostal activity during AB or 2) that genioglossal recruitment is not necessary to maintain upper airway patency during this period of heightened respiratory drive.

  13. Artificial pleural effusion in percutaneous microwave ablation of hepatic tumors near the diaphragm under the guidance of ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gang; Sun, Yao; Cong, Lin; Jing, Xuehong; Yu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility, safety and efficacy of artificial pleural effusion in percutaneous microwave ablation of hepatic tumors near the diaphragm under ultrasound guidance. Methods: For localization and navigation of tumors near the dome of the diaphragm by ultrasound during microwave ablation in 14 tumors of 11 cases, artificial pleural effusion was performed in the volume of 1000~1500 ml of Normal saline or 5% Glucose injection solution via the right thoracic cavity. The tumor marker, AFP was monitored before and after operation in 6 times in a period of 2 years. We analyzed the successful rate and effectiveness of artificial pleural effusion. Results: The successful rate of artificial pleural effusion was 100% without complications. Artificial hydrothorax on the right eliminated the interference of intrapulmonary gas to the visualization of hepatic tumors near the diaphragm on ultrasound. In the follow-up of 2 years, the ablation rate reached to 92.9% with no serious complications. The AFP value before operation was in significant statistical difference with the others after operation (P = 0.000). Conclusions: Artificial pleural effusion aids the visualization of hepatic tumors near the diaphragm on ultrasound. A good therapeutic effectiveness can be reached in percutaneous microwave ablation of tumors in the hepatic dome under the guidance of ultrasound. PMID:26629218

  14. Diaphragm-free fiber-optic Fabry-Perot interferometer based on tapered hollow silica tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Guocheng; Jia, Pinggang; Liang, Ting; Tan, Qiulin; Hong, Yingping; Liu, Wenyi; Xiong, Jijun

    2016-07-01

    A miniature fiber-optic Fabry-Perot interferometer fabricated by splicing a diaphragm-free hollow silica tube to a single-mode fiber and fusing the inner core to a taper is presented. The tapered zone forces lights to propagate from the fiber core into the silica tube, and the lights is reflected from the end faces of the optical fiber and the hollow silica tube. The contrast ratio of the interference fringe is determined by the minimum inner diameter of hollow silica tube. The responses of the proposed interferometer to high-temperature, gas refractive index, liquid refractive index and pressure were measured and were found to be linear with sensitivities of 16.26 pm/°C, 610.47 nm/RIU, -122.36 dB/RIU and 1.56 pm/kPa, respectively.

  15. A High-speed Engine Pressure Indicator of the Balanced Diaphragm Type

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, H C; Newell, F B

    1921-01-01

    This report describes a pressure-measuring device especially adapted for use in mapping indicator diagrams of high-speed internal combustion engines. The cards are obtained by a point-to-point method giving the average of a large number of engine cycles. The principle involved is the balancing of the engine cylinder pressure against a measured pressure on the opposite side of the metal a diaphragm of negligible stiffness. In its application as an engine indicator the phase of the engine cycle to which a pressure measurement corresponds is selected by a timing device. The report discusses briefly the errors which must be avoided in the development of an indicator for light high-speed engines, where vibration is serious, and outlines the principles underlying the design of this instrument in order to be free of such errors. A detailed description of the instrument and accessories follows together with operating directions.

  16. Effect of collagen digestion on the passive elastic properties of diaphragm muscle in rat.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Justin; Chen, Qingshan; Domire, Zachary J; McCullough, Matthew B; Sieck, Gary; Zhan, Wen-Zhi; An, Kai-Nan

    2010-01-01

    Effects of collagen digestion have been defined up to the fibril level. However, the question remains as to whether the alteration of skeletal muscle extracellular matrix (ECM) affects a muscle's passive elastic response. Various elastography methods have been applied as tools for evaluating the mechanical properties and ECM content of skeletal muscle. In an effort to develop an ECM altered skeletal muscle model, this study determined the effect of collagen digestion on the passive elastic properties of skeletal muscle. Passive mechanical properties of rat diaphragms were evaluated in various degrees of collagen digestion. Between cyclic loading tests, muscle strips were immersed in various concentrations of clostridium histolyticum derived bacterial collagenase. All samples were later viewed via light microscopy. Cyclic testing revealed linear relationships between passive muscle stiffness and digestion time at multiple concentrations. These results demonstrate that collagenase digestion of the ECM in skeletal muscle could be used as a simple and reliable model of mechanically altered in vitro tissue samples.

  17. High temperature diaphragm valve-based comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Freye, Chris E; Mu, Lan; Synovec, Robert E

    2015-12-11

    A high-temperature diaphragm valve-based comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) instrument is demonstrated which readily allows separations up to 325°C. Previously, diaphragm valve-based GC×GC was limited to 175°C if the valve was mounted in the oven, or limited to 265°C if the valve was faced mounted on the outside of the oven. A new diaphragm valve has been commercially developed, in which the temperature sensitive O-rings that previously limited the separation temperatures have been replaced with Kalrez O-rings, a perfluoroelastomer, allowing for significantly higher temperatures permitting a greater range of volatile and semi-volatile compounds to be readily separated. In the current investigation, a separation temperature up to 325°C is demonstrated with the valve mounted directly in the oven. Since the temperature limit for most commonly used GC columns is at or below 325°C, the scope of diaphragm valve-based GC×GC is now dramatically broadened to encompass a majority of all column stationary phase chemistries. A 44-component mixture of alkanes, alcohols, and polyaromatic hydrocarbons is used to study this new configuration whose boiling points range from 98°C (n-heptane) to 450°C (n-triacontane). For the test mixture using a modulation period PM of 1.0s, peak shapes on second dimension separations, (2)D, are symmetric with average widths at base of 79.4ms, producing a (2)D peak capacity of (2)nc∼12. Based on the average peak width of 2.4s for the first dimension separation with a run time of 32.5min, the (1)D peak capacity is (1)nc∼800. Thus, the ideal two-dimensional peak capacity [Formula: see text] is 9600. Little variation in within-analyte (2)D peak width was observed with an average %RSD of less than 3.0%. Furthermore, retention time on (2)D was very reproducible with an average %RSD less than 0.5%. Measured peak areas (sum of all (2)D peaks for given analyte) had an average %RSD of 4.4%. The transfer fraction from (1)D

  18. Electro-elastic modeling of a dielectric elastomer diaphragm for a prosthetic blood pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulbourne, Nakhiah C.; Frecker, Mary I.; Mockensturm, Eric

    2004-07-01

    A dielectric elastomer diaphragm is to be designed for potential use in a prosthetic blood pump. Application of an electric field deforms the membrane such that it moves from an initially flat configuration to an inflated state. This motion creates positive displacement of blood from the cardiac chambers thus mimicking the pump-like behavior of the natural heart. A comprehensive large deformation model accounting for the combined dielectric and elastic effect has been formulated. This paper presents recent developments in the model to further incorporate the entire nonlinear range of material elastic behavior and to more accurately represent the applied electric field by keeping the voltage constant as the membrane thickness decreases. The updated model is used to calculate the effects of varying system parameters such as pressure, voltage, prestretch, material constants, and membrane geometry. Analytical results are obtained for biaxially stretched 3M VHB 4905 polyacrylate films.

  19. [Duodenal diaphragm diagnosis in a school-aged child and minimally invasive treatment: case report].

    PubMed

    Barrueto Barrera, Andrea; Santelices Baeza, Sofia; Miranda Labra, Francisco; Schnettler Rodríguez, David

    2017-01-31

    Duodenal atresia is the third cause of intrinsic intestinal obstruction in the neonatal period. Typical presentation includes early-onset vomiting of gastric or bilious content, abdominal distension and poor weight gain. If the obstruction is incomplete, as in a perforated duodenal diaphragm, presenting symptoms tend to appear later and be nonspecific, so diagnosis is usually delayed. We present the case of a 9-year-old girl with a history of biliary postprandial vomiting from the infancy period, without any impact on the nutritional status, managed symptomatically. At two years of age, an upper digestive endoscopy was performed, which was frustrated by an abundance of gastric contents. She is again studied at nine years of age with contrasting upper digestive tract and upper digestive endoscopy, which suggest the diagnosis of fenestrated duodenal membrane. Duodeno-jejunum anastomosis is performed in Roux-en-Y, with a good postoperative outcome.

  20. Experimental and Analytical Study of Balanced-Diaphragm Fuel Distributors for Gas-Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straight, David M.; Gold, Harold

    1950-01-01

    A method of distributing fuel equally to a plurality of spray nozzles in a gas-turbine engine by means of balanced-diaphragm fuel distributors is presented. The experimental performance of three of eight possible distributor arrangements are discussed. An analysis of all eight arrangements is included. Criterions are given for choosing a fuel-distributor arrangement to meet specific fuel-system requirements of fuel-distribution accuracy, spray-nozzle pressure variations, and fuel-system pressures. Data obtained with a model of one distributor arrangement indicated a maximum deviation from perfect distribution of 3.3 percent for a 44 to 1 range (19.5 to 862 lb/hr) of fuel-flow rates. The maximum distributor pressure drop was 125 pounds per square inch. The method used to obtain the required wide range of flow control in the distributor valves consisted in varying the length of a constant-area flow path.

  1. Laparoscopic repair of diaphragm perforation with heart patch after microwave ablation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qing-Chen; Tian, Yan-Jie; Jiang, Xiao-Ting

    2016-03-01

    Microwave ablation (MWA) is a new technology developed in recent years, which is widely used in various disciplines. Microwave ablation is an alternative to surgery in the management of various tumors, and it has been demonstrated to be effective in the management of primary tumors and metastatic tumors. Microwave ablation is widely used in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma with an obvious effect and less side effects, and only 2.7% had serious complications. Many studies have confirmed the complications are thermal damage, hemorrhage, pleural effusion, bile leak, tumor seeding, hepatic abscess, cholangitis, and so forth. But diaphragm perforation is rare, and it is probably the first case reported. This article describes diaphragmatic perforation secondary to MWA of the liver with subsequent pleural effusion and diaphragmatic hernia. We also describe its management via the laparoscopic approach.

  2. Laparoscopic repair of diaphragm perforation with heart patch after microwave ablation

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Qing-Chen; Tian, Yan-Jie; Xiao-Jiang, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Microwave ablation (MWA) is a new technology developed in recent years, which is widely used in various disciplines. Microwave ablation is an alternative to surgery in the management of various tumors, and it has been demonstrated to be effective in the management of primary tumors and metastatic tumors. Microwave ablation is widely used in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma with an obvious effect and less side effects, and only 2.7% had serious complications. Many studies have confirmed the complications are thermal damage, hemorrhage, pleural effusion, bile leak, tumor seeding, hepatic abscess, cholangitis, and so forth. But diaphragm perforation is rare, and it is probably the first case reported. This article describes diaphragmatic perforation secondary to MWA of the liver with subsequent pleural effusion and diaphragmatic hernia. We also describe its management via the laparoscopic approach. PMID:26905357

  3. Conformal piezoelectric energy harvesting and storage from motions of the heart, lung, and diaphragm

    PubMed Central

    Dagdeviren, Canan; Yang, Byung Duk; Su, Yewang; Tran, Phat L.; Joe, Pauline; Anderson, Eric; Xia, Jing; Doraiswamy, Vijay; Dehdashti, Behrooz; Feng, Xue; Lu, Bingwei; Poston, Robert; Khalpey, Zain; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Huang, Yonggang; Slepian, Marvin J.; Rogers, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report advanced materials and devices that enable high-efficiency mechanical-to-electrical energy conversion from the natural contractile and relaxation motions of the heart, lung, and diaphragm, demonstrated in several different animal models, each of which has organs with sizes that approach human scales. A cointegrated collection of such energy-harvesting elements with rectifiers and microbatteries provides an entire flexible system, capable of viable integration with the beating heart via medical sutures and operation with efficiencies of ∼2%. Additional experiments, computational models, and results in multilayer configurations capture the key behaviors, illuminate essential design aspects, and offer sufficient power outputs for operation of pacemakers, with or without battery assist. PMID:24449853

  4. An unusual cause of acute cor pulmonale--significance of the 'continuous diaphragm sign'.

    PubMed

    Mohanan, Sandeep; Sajeev, C G; Muneer, Kader; Rajesh, G; Krishnan, M N; Pillai, Vivek

    2014-01-01

    A patient presented with chest pain and clinical features of acute right heart failure. Initial work up revealed the presence of severe PAH. Acute pulmonary embolism is the commonest and most life-threatening cause for acute cor pulmonale. Even though the clinical picture suggested pulmonary embolism, a subtle sign was missed from the first chest X-ray taken in the emergency department. However on reanalysis the 'continuous diaphragm sign' later guided us towards the diagnosis. Our case represents one of the first reports of a rare etiology for acute cor pulmonale--hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Right ventricular dysfunction was caused by an acute rise in pulmonary artery pressures as well as by the compressive effects of pneumomediastinum. We emphasize the role played by a good quality chest X-ray early in the management of acute chest pain syndromes. However pulmonary embolism should be ruled out conclusively before redirecting attention to less malignant conditions.

  5. Noninvasive respiratory management and diaphragm and electrophrenic pacing in neuromuscular disease and spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Bach, John R

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to describe noninvasive management of respiratory muscle weakness/paralysis for patients with neuromuscular disease (NMD) and spinal cord injury (SCI). Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) assists and supports inspiratory muscles, whereas mechanically assisted coughing (MAC) simulates an effective cough. Long-term outcomes will be reviewed as well as the use of NIV, MAC, and electrophrenic pacing (EPP) and diaphragm pacing (DP) to facilitate extubation and decannulation. Although EPP and DP can facilitate decannulation and maintain alveolar ventilation for high-level SCI patients when they cannot use NIV because of lack of access to oral interfaces, there is no evidence that they have any place in the management of NMD.

  6. The DDBD Method In The A-Seismic Design of Anchored Diaphragm Walls

    SciTech Connect

    Manuela, Cecconi; Vincenzo, Pane; Sara, Vecchietti

    2008-07-08

    The development of displacement based approaches for earthquake engineering design appears to be very useful and capable to provide improved reliability by directly comparing computed response and expected structural performance. In particular, the design procedure known as the Direct Displacement Based Design (DDBD) method, which has been developed in structural engineering over the past ten years in the attempt to mitigate some of the deficiencies in current force-based design methods, has been shown to be very effective and promising ([1], [2]). The first attempts of application of the procedure to geotechnical engineering and, in particular, earth retaining structures are discussed in [3], [4] and [5]. However in this field, the outcomes of the research need to be further investigated in many aspects. The paper focuses on the application of the DDBD method to anchored diaphragm walls. The results of the DDBD method are discussed in detail in the paper, and compared to those obtained from conventional pseudo-static analyses.

  7. Lipid intermediates in membrane fusion: formation, structure, and decay of hemifusion diaphragm.

    PubMed Central

    Kozlovsky, Yonathan; Chernomordik, Leonid V; Kozlov, Michael M

    2002-01-01

    Lipid bilayer fusion is thought to involve formation of a local hemifusion connection, referred to as a fusion stalk. The subsequent fusion stages leading to the opening of a fusion pore remain unknown. The earliest fusion pore could represent a bilayer connection between the membranes and could be formed directly from the stalk. Alternatively, fusion pore can form in a single bilayer, referred to as hemifusion diaphragm (HD), generated by stalk expansion. To analyze the plausibility of stalk expansion, we studied the pathway of hemifusion theoretically, using a recently developed elastic model. We show that the stalk has a tendency to expand into an HD for lipids with sufficiently negative spontaneous splay, (~)J(s)< 0. For different experimentally relevant membrane configurations we find two characteristic values of the spontaneous splay. (~)J*(s) and (~)J**(s), determining HD dimension. The HD is predicted to have a finite equilibrium radius provided that the spontaneous splay is in the range (~)J**(s)< (~)J(s)<(~)J*(s), and to expand infinitely for (~)J(s)<(~)J**(s). In the case of common lipids, which do not fuse spontaneously, an HD forms only under action of an external force pulling the diaphragm rim apart. We calculate the dependence of the HD radius on this force. To address the mechanism of fusion pore formation, we analyze the distribution of the lateral tension emerging in the HD due to the establishment of lateral equilibrium between the deformed and relaxed portions of lipid monolayers. We show that this tension concentrates along the HD rim and reaches high values sufficient to rupture the bilayer and form the fusion pore. Our analysis supports the hypothesis that transition from a hemifusion to a fusion pore involves radial expansion of the stalk. PMID:12414697

  8. Functional Changes of Diaphragm Type Shunt Valves Induced by Pressure Pulsation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chong-Sun; Suh, Chang-Min; Ra, Young-Shin

    Shunt valves used to treat patients with hydrocephalus were tested to investigate influence of pressure pulsation on their flow control characteristics. Our focus was on flow dynamic and functional changes of the small and thin diaphragms in the valves that serve as the main flow control mechanism and are made from silicone elastomer. Firstly, pressure-flow control curves were compared under pulsed and steady flow (without pulsation) conditions. Secondly, functional changes of the valves were tested after a long-term continuous pulsation with a peristaltic pump. Thirdly, flushing procedures selectively conducted by neurosurgeons were simulated with a fingertip pressed on the dome of the valves. As 20cc/hr of flow rate was adjusted at a constant pressure, application of 40mmH2O of pressure pulse increased flow rate through shunt valves more than 60%. As a 90cm length silicone catheter was connected to the valve outlet, increase in the flow rate was substantially reduced to 17.5%. Pressure-flow control characteristics of some valves showed significant changes after twenty-eight days of pressure pulsation at 1.0 Hz under 50.0cc/hr of flow rate. Flushing simulation resulted in temporary decrease in the pressure level. It took three hours to fully recover the normal pressure-flow control characteristics after the flushing. Our results suggest that shunt valves with a thin elastic diaphragm as the main flow control mechanism are sensitive to intracranial pressure pulsation or pressure spikes enough to change their pressure-flow control characteristics.

  9. Influence of mechanical ventilation and sepsis on redox balance in diaphragm, myocardium, limb muscles, and lungs.

    PubMed

    Chacon-Cabrera, Alba; Rojas, Yeny; Martínez-Caro, Leticia; Vila-Ubach, Monica; Nin, Nicolas; Ferruelo, Antonio; Esteban, Andrés; Lorente, José A; Barreiro, Esther

    2014-12-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV), using high tidal volumes (V(T)), causes lung (ventilator-induced lung injury [VILI]) and distant organ injury. Additionally, sepsis is characterized by increased oxidative stress. We tested whether MV is associated with enhanced oxidative stress in sepsis, the commonest underlying condition in clinical acute lung injury. Protein carbonylation and nitration, antioxidants, and inflammation (immunoblotting) were evaluated in diaphragm, gastrocnemius, soleus, myocardium, and lungs of nonseptic and septic (cecal ligation and puncture 24 hours before MV) rats undergoing MV (n = 7 per group) for 150 minutes using 3 different strategies (low V(T) [V(T) = 9 mL/kg], moderate V(T) [V(T) = 15 mL/kg], and high V(T) [V(T) = 25 mL/kg]) and in nonventilated control animals. Compared with nonventilated control animals, in septic and nonseptic rodents (1) diaphragms, limb muscles, and myocardium of high-V(T) rats exhibited a decrease in protein oxidation and nitration levels, (2) antioxidant levels followed a specific fiber-type distribution in slow- and fast-twitch muscles, (3) tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) levels were higher in respiratory and limb muscles, whereas no differences were observed in myocardium, and (4) in lungs, protein oxidation was increased, antioxidants were rather decreased, and TNF-α remained unmodified. In this model of VILI, oxidative stress does not occur in distant organs or skeletal muscles of rodents after several hours of MV with moderate-to-high V(T), whereas protein oxidation levels were increased in the lungs of the animals. Inflammatory events were moderately expressed in skeletal muscles and lungs of the MV rats. Concomitant sepsis did not strongly affect the MV-induced effects on muscles, myocardium, or lungs in the rodents.

  10. Potential Lung Nodules Identification for Characterization by Variable Multistep Threshold and Shape Indices from CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Saleem; Iqbal, Khalid; Shaukat, Arslan; Khanum, Aasia

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is an important imaging modality. Physicians, surgeons, and oncologists prefer CT scan for diagnosis of lung cancer. However, some nodules are missed in CT scan. Computer aided diagnosis methods are useful for radiologists for detection of these nodules and early diagnosis of lung cancer. Early detection of malignant nodule is helpful for treatment. Computer aided diagnosis of lung cancer involves lung segmentation, potential nodules identification, features extraction from the potential nodules, and classification of the nodules. In this paper, we are presenting an automatic method for detection and segmentation of lung nodules from CT scan for subsequent features extraction and classification. Contribution of the work is the detection and segmentation of small sized nodules, low and high contrast nodules, nodules attached with vasculature, nodules attached to pleura membrane, and nodules in close vicinity of the diaphragm and lung wall in one-go. The particular techniques of the method are multistep threshold for the nodule detection and shape index threshold for false positive reduction. We used 60 CT scans of “Lung Image Database Consortium-Image Database Resource Initiative” taken by GE medical systems LightSpeed16 scanner as dataset and correctly detected 92% nodules. The results are reproducible. PMID:25506388

  11. Potential lung nodules identification for characterization by variable multistep threshold and shape indices from CT images.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Saleem; Iqbal, Khalid; Arif, Fahim; Shaukat, Arslan; Khanum, Aasia

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is an important imaging modality. Physicians, surgeons, and oncologists prefer CT scan for diagnosis of lung cancer. However, some nodules are missed in CT scan. Computer aided diagnosis methods are useful for radiologists for detection of these nodules and early diagnosis of lung cancer. Early detection of malignant nodule is helpful for treatment. Computer aided diagnosis of lung cancer involves lung segmentation, potential nodules identification, features extraction from the potential nodules, and classification of the nodules. In this paper, we are presenting an automatic method for detection and segmentation of lung nodules from CT scan for subsequent features extraction and classification. Contribution of the work is the detection and segmentation of small sized nodules, low and high contrast nodules, nodules attached with vasculature, nodules attached to pleura membrane, and nodules in close vicinity of the diaphragm and lung wall in one-go. The particular techniques of the method are multistep threshold for the nodule detection and shape index threshold for false positive reduction. We used 60 CT scans of "Lung Image Database Consortium-Image Database Resource Initiative" taken by GE medical systems LightSpeed16 scanner as dataset and correctly detected 92% nodules. The results are reproducible.

  12. Malignant pleural mesothelioma: value of CT and MR imaging in predicting resectability

    SciTech Connect

    Patz, E.F. Jr.; Shaffer, K.; Piwnica-Worms, D.R.; Jochelson, M.; Sarin, M.; Sugarbaker, D.J.; Pugatch, R.D. )

    1992-11-01

    OBJECTIVE. The objective was to determine if CT or MR imaging findings could be used to accurately predict resectability in patients with biopsy-proved malignant pleural mesotheliomas. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. CT and MR findings in 41 consecutive patients with malignant mesotheliomas who were referred to the thoracic surgery clinic for extrapleural pneumonectomy were studied by thoracic radiologists before surgery. Review of radiologic studies focused on local invasion of three separate regions: the diaphragm, chest wall, and mediastinum. Results of all imaging examinations were carefully correlated with intraoperative, gross, and microscopic pathologic findings. RESULTS. After radiologic and clinical evaluation, 34 patients (83%) had thoracotomy; 24 of these had tumors that were resectable. The sensitivity was high (> 90%) for both CT and MR in each region. Specificity, however, was low, probably because of the small number of patients with unresectable tumors. CONCLUSION. CT and MR provided similar information on resectability in most cases. Sensitivity was high for both procedures. Because CT is more widely available and used, the authors suggest it as the initial study when determining resectability. In difficult cases, important complementary anatomic information can be derived from MR images obtained before surgical intervention.

  13. CT Angiography (CTA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... CT Angiography? Angiography is a minimally invasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Angiography uses one of three imaging technologies and, in most cases, a contrast material injection ...

  14. Leg CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - leg; Computed axial tomography scan - leg; Computed tomography scan - leg; CT scan - leg ... scanners can perform the exam without stopping.) A computer creates separate images of the body area, called ...

  15. Arm CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - arm; Computed axial tomography scan - arm; Computed tomography scan - arm; CT scan - arm ... scanners can perform the exam without stopping.) A computer creates separate images of the arm area, called ...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... to urinate; however, this is actually a contrast effect and subsides quickly. When you enter the CT scanner room, special light lines may be seen projected onto your body, and are used to ensure that you are ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... to urinate; however, this is actually a contrast effect and subsides quickly. When you enter the CT scanner room, special light lines may be seen projected onto your body, and are used to ensure that you are ...

  18. Thoracic spine CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Narrowing of the spine ( spinal stenosis ) Scoliosis Tumor Risks Risks of CT scans include: Exposure to radiation ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  19. Lumbar spine CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - lumbar spine; Computed axial tomography scan - lumbar spine; Computed tomography scan - lumbar spine; CT - lower back ... stopping.) A computer creates separate images of the spine area, called slices. These images can be stored, ...

  20. Pediatric CT Scans

    Cancer.gov

    The Radiation Epidemiology Branch and collaborators have initiated a retrospective cohort study to evaluate the relationship between radiation exposure from CT scans conducted during childhood and adolescence and the subsequent development of cancer.

  1. Body CT (CAT Scan)

    MedlinePlus

    ... lives. CT has been shown to be a cost-effective imaging tool for a wide range of ... accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, ...

  2. Cardiac CT Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... CT Scan Related Topics Aneurysm Coronary Calcium Scan Coronary Heart Disease Heart Attack Pulmonary Embolism Send a link to ... imaging test can help doctors detect or evaluate coronary heart disease, calcium buildup in the coronary arteries, problems with ...

  3. CT of pituitary abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, T.C.; Johns, R.D.; Long, M.; Myles, S.T.

    1985-06-01

    Pituitary abscess is a rare condition, with only 50 cases reported in the literature. Of those, 29 cases were well documented for analysis. Preoperative diagnosis of pituitary abscess is difficult. The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of pituitary abscess was first described in 1983; the abscess was depicted by axial images with coronal reconstruction. The authors recently encountered a case of pituitary abscess documented by direct coronal CT of the sella turcica.

  4. Line-of-sight sealed silicon carbide diaphragms for harsh environment sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Debbie Gahaton

    2007-12-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is currently being developed as a platform material for micro scale devices that operate in harsh environments. One vision of the future is an all-SiC sensor chip composed of crystalline SiC substrate, doped polycrystalline SiC structures, and sputtered amorphous SiC sealing layers. Such a chip would have minimal internal stresses over a wide thermal range. The chemical inertness, as well as the electrical and mechanical properties of SiC in harsh environments overcomes the limitations of traditional silicon-based platforms. The development of robust SiC devices requires fabrication techniques and a materials system that are compatible with the thermal budget and operational environment. This thesis describes a process for depositing wafer-level, SiC sealing layers for harsh environment sensors. An emerging method of diaphragm fabrication is a sealing technique that utilizes deposition of two thin films: a porous scaffold layer and a second sealing layer. This approach offers many advantages in comparison to traditional bulk etch methods such as improved wafer-level uniformity and reduction in die size. This work describes a novel approach for the fabrication of diaphragms by the utilization of an ion beam sputter deposition of amorphous SiC for line-of-sight sealing. The approach was developed to be compatible with harsh environment specifications and can be applied to applications such as vacuum encapsulation and pressure sensing. This thesis also presents the etching of SiC films and substrates, which is important for device feature definition. A high density plasma etch system was used to further explore the etching of SiC with SiO2 etch masks in HBr/Cl2 etch chemistries. An etch recipe was developed for the fabrication of a thin film SiC resonant strain gauge. In addition, the use of aluminum nitride (AlN) as an etch mask with SF6/O2 was investigated for the first time and demonstrated improved etch rates, selectivities and sidewall

  5. DiPALS: Diaphragm Pacing in patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis - a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Christopher J; Bradburn, Mike J; Maguire, Chin; Cooper, Cindy L; Baird, Wendy O; Baxter, Susan K; Cohen, Judith; Cantrill, Hannah; Dixon, Simon; Ackroyd, Roger; Baudouin, Simon; Bentley, Andrew; Berrisford, Richard; Bianchi, Stephen; Bourke, Stephen C; Darlison, Roy; Ealing, John; Elliott, Mark; Fitzgerald, Patrick; Galloway, Simon; Hamdalla, Hisham; Hanemann, C Oliver; Hughes, Philip; Imam, Ibrahim; Karat, Dayalan; Leek, Roger; Maynard, Nick; Orrell, Richard W; Sarela, Abeezar; Stradling, John; Talbot, Kevin; Taylor, Lyn; Turner, Martin; Simonds, Anita K; Williams, Tim; Wedzicha, Wisia; Young, Carolyn; Shaw, Pamela J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease resulting in death, usually from respiratory failure, within 2-3 years of symptom onset. Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) is a treatment that when given to patients in respiratory failure leads to improved survival and quality of life. Diaphragm pacing (DP), using the NeuRx/4(®) diaphragm pacing system (DPS)™ (Synapse Biomedical, Oberlin, OH, USA), is a new technique that may offer additional or alternative benefits to patients with ALS who are in respiratory failure. OBJECTIVE The Diaphragm Pacing in patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (DiPALS) trial evaluated the effect of DP on survival over the study duration in patients with ALS with respiratory failure. DESIGN The DiPALS trial was a multicentre, parallel-group, open-label, randomised controlled trial incorporating health economic analyses and a qualitative longitudinal substudy. PARTICIPANTS Eligible participants had a diagnosis of ALS (ALS laboratory-supported probable, clinically probable or clinically definite according to the World Federation of Neurology revised El Escorial criteria), had been stabilised on riluzole for 30 days, were aged ≥ 18 years and were in respiratory failure. We planned to recruit 108 patients from seven UK-based specialist ALS or respiratory centres. Allocation was performed using 1 : 1 non-deterministic minimisation. INTERVENTIONS Participants were randomised to either standard care (NIV alone) or standard care (NIV) plus DP using the NeuRX/4 DPS. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES The primary outcome was overall survival, defined as the time from randomisation to death from any cause. Secondary outcomes were patient quality of life [assessed by European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions, three levels (EQ-5D-3L), Short Form questionnaire-36 items and Sleep Apnoea Quality of Life Index questionnaire]; carer quality of life (EQ-5D-3L and Caregiver Burden Inventory); cost-utility analysis and health

  6. A bossed diaphragm piezoresistive pressure sensor with a peninsula-island structure for the ultra-low-pressure range with high sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Libo; Xu, Tingzhong; Hebibul, Rahman; Jiang, Zhuangde; Ding, Jianjun; Peng, Niancai; Guo, Xin; Xu, Yu; Wang, Hongyan; Zhao, Yulong

    2016-12-01

    A sensor chip with a bossed diaphragm combined with a peninsula-island structure was developed for a piezoresistive pressure sensor. By introducing a stiffness mutation above the gap position between the peninsula and island structures, the strain energy of the proposed diaphragm was mainly concentrated upon the gap position, which remarkably increased the sensitivity of the sensor chip. A beam-diaphragm coupled model and an optimization method for the novel sensor chip were also developed, which gave guidelines for optimizing the sensor chip structure. Finally, a sensor chip with the bossed diaphragm combined with peninsula-island structure was fabricated and tested. The experimental results showed that the proposed sensor chip was able to measure ultra-low pressure within 500 Pa with high sensitivity.

  7. Changes in diaphragm muscle collagen gene expression after acute unilateral denervation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosselin, L. E.; Sieck, G. C.; Aleff, R. A.; Martinez, D. A.; Vailas, A. C.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of acute (3 days) unilateral diaphragm denervation (DNV) on 1) levels of alpha 1(I) and alpha 1(III) procollagen mRNA; 2) collagen concentration [hydroxyproline (HYP)]; 3) amount of the nonreducible collagen cross-link hydroxylysylpyridinoline (HP); and 4) the passive force-length relationship of the muscle. The levels of alpha 1(I) and alpha 1(III) procollagen mRNA, HYP concentration, and amount of HP were measured in muscle segments from the midcostal region of DNV and intact (INT) hemidiaphragms of adult male Fischer 344 rats (250-300 g). The in vitro passive force-length relationship of DNV and INT hemidiaphragm was determined by lengthening and shortening the diaphragm muscle segments from 85 to 115% of optimal length at a constant velocity (0.6 optimal length/s). Three days after DNV, the level of alpha 1(I) procollagen mRNA was increased over 15-fold in the DNV hemidiaphragm compared with INT (P < 0.05), whereas the level of alpha 1(III) procollagen mRNA was increased by approximately sixfold in the DNV hemidiaphragm compared with INT (P < 0.05). Collagen (HYP) concentration did not differ between groups, averaging 8.7 and 8.9 micrograms/mg dry wt for the DNV and INT hemidiaphragms, respectively. In addition, there was no difference in the amount of the mature nonreducible collagen cross-link HP between the DNV and INT hemidiaphragms (0.66 vs. 0.76 mole HP/mole collagen, respectively). The amount of passive force developed during lengthening did not differ between DNV and INT hemidiaphragms. These data indicate that acute DNV of the hemidiaphragm is associated with an increase in the mRNA level of the two principal fibrillar collagen phenotypes in skeletal muscle. However, despite extensive muscle remodeling, the passive force-length relationship of the DNV hemidiaphragm is unaffected compared with the INT muscle.

  8. Coulometric Karl Fischer titration of trace water in diaphragm-free cells.

    PubMed

    Larsson, William; Cedergren, Anders

    2005-03-15

    Factors influencing the accuracy and precision for diaphragm-free Karl Fischer coulometric determinations of low mug-amounts of water have been studied using the Metrohm 756 (pulsed current) coulometer and eight different types of commercial coulometric reagents and some modifications of these. As in the case of diaphragm-free coulometric titration of large amounts of water, the positive errors, due to the formation of oxidizable reduction products (of sulfur dioxide) in the cathode reaction (besides hydrogen), were found to be minimized by the use of highest possible pulse current (in the range 100-400mA) in combination with the fastest possible titration rate. Most accurate (102-103%) and precise results (typical relative standard deviation 1.8%) were obtained for reagents containing very large concentrations of imidazole in combination with the presence of modifiers like hexanol, chloroform and propylene glycol (i.e. the HYDRA-POINT reagents). Similar results were obtained when this type of reagent was mixed 60/40 with xylene according to the ASTM recommendation for water determinations in petroleum products like crude and lubricating oils. Addition of decanol to this type of reagent mixture was found to reduce the influence from the oxidative reduction products significantly. A reduction of the error from 3.6% relative to 1.6% was achieved by addition of 9% (v/v) of decanol to a 60/40 reagent mixture of HYDRA-POINT Coulometric Gen (containing hexanol as modifier) and xylene. For larger concentrations of decanol the pulse current had to be lowered to 100mA and this might explain why no further improvement was observed. An additional attempt to minimize the interference by lowering the concentration of sulfur dioxide in the reagents gave no significant effect. However, by means of a home-built computer-controlled coulometric instrumentation based on continuous instead of pulsed current (including a large cathodic current density) it was possible to achieve

  9. CT Fluoroscopy-Guided Lung Biopsy with Novel Steerable Biopsy Canula: Ex-Vivo Evaluation in Ventilated Porcine Lung Explants

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, Philipp J. Fabel, Michael; Bolte, Hendrik; Schaefer, Fritz K. W.; Jahnke, Thomas; Heller, Martin; Lammer, Johannes; Biederer, Juergen

    2010-08-15

    The purpose was to evaluate ex-vivo a prototype of a novel biopsy canula under CT fluoroscopy-guidance in ventilated porcine lung explants in respiratory motion simulations. Using an established chest phantom for porcine lung explants, n = 24 artificial lesions consisting of a fat-wax-Lipiodol mixture (approx. 70HU) were placed adjacent to sensible structures such as aorta, pericardium, diaphragm, bronchus and pulmonary artery. A piston pump connected to a reservoir beneath a flexible silicone reconstruction of a diaphragm simulated respiratory motion by rhythmic inflation and deflation of 1.5 L water. As biopsy device an 18-gauge prototype biopsy canula with a lancet-like, helically bended cutting edge was used. The artificial lesions were punctured under CT fluoroscopy-guidance (SOMATOM Sensation 64, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany; 30mAs/120 kV/5 mm slice thickness) implementing a dedicated protocol for CT fluoroscopy-guided lung biopsy. The mean-diameter of the artificial lesions was 8.3 {+-} 2.6 mm, and the mean-distance of the phantom wall to the lesions was 54.1 {+-} 13.5 mm. The mean-displacement of the lesions by respiratory motion was 14.1 {+-} 4.0 mm. The mean-duration of CT fluoroscopy was 9.6 {+-} 5.1 s. On a 4-point scale (1 = central; 2 = peripheral; 3 = marginal; 4 = off target), the mean-targeted precision was 1.9 {+-} 0.9. No misplacement of the biopsy canula affecting adjacent structures could be detected. The novel steerable biopsy canula proved to be efficient in the ex-vivo set-up. The chest phantom enabling respiratory motion and the steerable biopsy canula offer a feasible ex-vivo system for evaluating and training CT fluoroscopy-guided lung biopsy adapted to respiratory motion.

  10. Analysis of the eigenvalue equation of the FEL amplifier with axisymmetric electron beam and diaphragm focusing line

    SciTech Connect

    Saldin, E.L.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Ulyanov, Yu.N.

    1995-12-31

    The paper presents analysis of the eigenvalue problem of the FEL amplifier with axisymmetric electron beam and diaphragm focusing line. An FEL model is discussed wherein diffraction effects, space charge fields and energy spread of electrons in the beam are taken into account. To take into account diffraction effects at the diaphragms we apply the rigorous impedance boundary conditions proposed by Veinstein. The rigorous solutions of the eigenvalue problem leave been found for the stepped and bounded parabolic electron beam profiles. Analytical expressions for eigenfunctions of active open waveguide and formulae of their expansion in eigenfunctions of passive open waveguide, are derived, too. Asymptotic behaviour of the obtained solutions is studied in details. The multilayer approximation method has been used to solve the eigenvalue problem for the beams with an arbitrary gradient profile of current density. This novel type of an FEL amplifier has perspective to be used for applications where high average and peak radiation power is required.

  11. Diaphragm disease: pathology of disease of the small intestine induced by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Lang, J; Price, A B; Levi, A J; Burke, M; Gumpel, J M; Bjarnason, I

    1988-01-01

    Operative small bowel resection specimens received over a period of 16 years were reviewed to assess whether any intestinal disease could be directly attributed to the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID). Seven cases of intestinal disease associated with the use of NSAID were identified, all of which occurred in the final six years of the survey, which may reflect the increasing use of these compounds. A spectrum of patterns was found from multiple pathognomonic ileal mucosal diaphragms to broad strictures similar to those seen as a complication of enteric potassium. It seems likely that the formation of diaphragm lesions requires an additional factor, but what is not known as yet is whether the effects of NSAID are local or systemic. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 Fig 4 Fig 5 Fig 6 Fig 7 Fig 8 Fig 9 Fig 10 PMID:3384981

  12. Occlusion néonatale par diaphragme duodénale: à propos d’un cas

    PubMed Central

    Musapudi, Eric Mbuya; Mujinga, Didier Tshibangu; Ilunga, Guy Nday

    2016-01-01

    Le diaphragme duodénal est l’une de rare forme d’atrésie duodénale décrite, qui provoque l’occlusion intestinale pendant la période néonatale. La cause est embryologique. Les auteurs rapportent le cas d’un nouveau-né de 17 jours, hospitalisé et prise en charge aux cliniques universitaires de Lubumbashi pour occlusion duodénale et dont le constat per opératoire était un diaphragme duodénal. Son évolution était bonne après l’intervention chirurgicale. PMID:28292048

  13. Long-term wheel running compromises diaphragm function but improves cardiac and plantarflexor function in the mdx mouse.

    PubMed

    Selsby, Joshua T; Acosta, Pedro; Sleeper, Meg M; Barton, Elisabeth R; Sweeney, H Lee

    2013-09-01

    Dystrophin-deficient muscles suffer from free radical injury, mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis, and inflammation, among other pathologies that contribute to muscle fiber injury and loss, leading to wheelchair confinement and death in the patient. For some time, it has been appreciated that endurance training has the potential to counter many of these contributing factors. Correspondingly, numerous investigations have shown improvements in limb muscle function following endurance training in mdx mice. However, the effect of long-term volitional wheel running on diaphragm and cardiac function is largely unknown. Our purpose was to determine the extent to which long-term endurance exercise affected dystrophic limb, diaphragm, and cardiac function. Diaphragm specific tension was reduced by 60% (P < 0.05) in mice that performed 1 yr of volitional wheel running compared with sedentary mdx mice. Dorsiflexor mass (extensor digitorum longus and tibialis anterior) and function (extensor digitorum longus) were not altered by endurance training. In mice that performed 1 yr of volitional wheel running, plantarflexor mass (soleus and gastrocnemius) was increased and soleus tetanic force was increased 36%, while specific tension was similar in wheel-running and sedentary groups. Cardiac mass was increased 15%, left ventricle chamber size was increased 20% (diastole) and 18% (systole), and stroke volume was increased twofold in wheel-running compared with sedentary mdx mice. These data suggest that the dystrophic heart may undergo positive exercise-induced remodeling and that limb muscle function is largely unaffected. Most importantly, however, as the diaphragm most closely recapitulates the human disease, these data raise the possibility of exercise-mediated injury in dystrophic skeletal muscle.

  14. Effects of Gestational and Postnatal Exposure to Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia on Diaphragm Muscle Contractile Function in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Fiona B.; Dempsey, Eugene M.; O'Halloran, Ken D.

    2016-01-01

    Alterations to the supply of oxygen during early life presents a profound stressor to physiological systems with aberrant remodeling that is often long-lasting. Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) is a feature of apnea of prematurity, chronic lung disease, and sleep apnea. CIH affects respiratory control but there is a dearth of information concerning the effects of CIH on respiratory muscles, including the diaphragm—the major pump muscle of breathing. We investigated the effects of exposure to gestational CIH (gCIH) and postnatal CIH (pCIH) on diaphragm muscle function in male and female rats. CIH consisted of exposure in environmental chambers to 90 s of hypoxia reaching 5% O2 at nadir, once every 5 min, 8 h a day. Exposure to gCIH started within 24 h of identification of a copulation plug and continued until day 20 of gestation; animals were studied on postnatal day 22 or 42. For pCIH, pups were born in normoxia and within 24 h of delivery were exposed with dams to CIH for 3 weeks; animals were studied on postnatal day 22 or 42. Sham groups were exposed to normoxia in parallel. Following gas exposures, diaphragm muscle contractile, and endurance properties were examined ex vivo. Neither gCIH nor pCIH exposure had effects on diaphragm muscle force-generating capacity or endurance in either sex. Similarly, early life exposure to CIH did not affect muscle tolerance of severe hypoxic stress determined ex vivo. The findings contrast with our recent observation of upper airway dilator muscle weakness following exposure to pCIH. Thus, the present study suggests a relative resilience to hypoxic stress in diaphragm muscle. Co-ordinated activity of thoracic pump and upper airway dilator muscles is required for optimal control of upper airway caliber. A mismatch in the force-generating capacity of the complementary muscle groups could have adverse consequences for the control of airway patency and respiratory homeostasis. PMID:27462274

  15. Preoperative parameters and their prognostic value in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients undergoing implantation of a diaphragm pacing stimulation system

    PubMed Central

    Şanlı, Aydın; Şengün, Ihsan Şükrü; Karaçam, Volkan; Alpaydın, Aylin Özgen; Tertemiz, Kemal Can; Özalevli, Sevgi; Şanlı, Bahar Ağaoğlu; Kaya, Alper; Özdemir, Nezih

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neuromuscular disease with devastating and fatal respiratory complications. Diaphragm pacing stimulation (DPS) is a treatment option in diaphragm insufficient ALS patients. Ventilatory insufficiency depending on diaphragmatic failure is treated by the present study aimed to investigate prognostic value of preoperative clinical and functional characteristics of ALS patients undergoing implantation of a DPS system and to determine appropriate indications for the DPS system. Methods: The study included 34 ALS patients implanted with DPS system. All patients underwent multidisciplinary and laboratory evaluations before the surgery. The laboratory examinations included pulmonary function tests and arterial blood gas analysis. Survival rates were recorded in a 2-year follow-up after the surgery. Results: Twenty-eight of 34 patients with ALS survived after a 2-year follow-up. These patients were younger than those who died and had the disease for a longer time; however, the differences were not significant. Both right and left hemidiaghragms were thicker in the survived patients (P < 0.0001 for each). Pulmonary function tests revealed no significant differences between the patients who survived. Arterial blood gas analysis demonstrated lower partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the survived patients (P = 0.025). Conclusions: DPS implantation was more efficacious in ALS patients with mild respiratory failure and thicker diaphragm. Predictors of long-term effectiveness of DPS system are needed to be addressed by large-scale studies. PMID:28298842

  16. Effects of diaphragm stretching on posterior chain muscle kinematics and rib cage and abdominal excursion: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    González-Álvarez, Francisco J.; Valenza, Marie C.; Torres-Sánchez, Irene; Cabrera-Martos, Irene; Rodríguez-Torres, Janet; Castellote-Caballero, Yolanda

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Few studies have explored the effects of stretching techniques on diaphragm and spine kinematics. Objective To determine whether the application of diaphragm stretching resulted in changes in posterior chain muscle kinematics and ribcage and abdominal excursion in healthy subjects. Method Eighty healthy adults were included in this randomized clinical trial. Participants were randomized into two groups: the experimental group, which received a diaphragmatic stretching technique, or the placebo group, which received a sham-ultrasound procedure. The duration of the technique, the position of participants, and the therapist who applied the technique were the same for both treatments. Participant assessment (cervical range of movement, lumbar flexibility, flexibility of the posterior chain, and rib cage and abdominal excursion) was performed at baseline and immediately after the intervention by a blinded assessor. Results The mean between-group difference [95% CI] for the ribcage excursion after technique at xiphoid level was 2.48 [0.97 to 3.99], which shows significant differences in this outcome. The remaining between-group analysis showed significant differences in cervical extension, right and left flexion, flexibility of the posterior chain, and ribcage excursion at xiphoid level (p<0.05) in favor of the experimental group. Conclusion Diaphragm stretching generates a significant improvement in cervical extension, right and left cervical flexion, flexibility of the posterior chain, and ribcage excursion at xiphoid level compared to a placebo technique in healthy adults. PMID:27333481

  17. [Postraumatic rupture of diaphragm with projection of the liver into the right pleural cavity--the case description].

    PubMed

    Jabłoński, Sławomir; Wcisło, Edyta Santorek-strumiłłoszymon; Wawrzycki, Marcin; Misiak, Piotr; Kordiak, Jacek

    2009-05-01

    The proper initial diagnosis of acute diaphragm rupture in patients with multiple blunt trauma can be found difficult. It is the result of non specific clinical picture and dominating signs of injuries of other organs. Delayed diagnosis has a serious impact on worse conditions of diaphragm reconstruction and prognosis. A 53-year-old woman, with a severe abdomen injury after a car accident, is reported with perforation of the alimentary tract in two places (the small bowel and the sigmoid) and respiratory insufficiency caused by the projection of the liver into the thoracic cavity due to a large rupture of the right hemidiaphragm. The patient was initialy treated in another hospital in the intensive care ward where she was operated on three times by laparotomy acces owing to the perforations of the small and large bowels and the following complications. Eventually, she was admitted to our hospital one month after the accident so as to be treated for respiratory insufficiency. We described the difficulties in the treatment of this case in the late period after the injury. Finally the woman was treated with moderate success. Diaphragm laceration was repaired by the right thoracotomy access. In the next stage we performed the reconstruction of the alimentary tract and eliminated iloeostomy and colostomy during the fourth in turn laparotomy. Afterwards the patient in the state of the relative respiratory sufficiency was sent to the original hospital for further treatment.

  18. The effect of respiratory muscle training with CO2 breathing on cellular adaptation of mdx mouse diaphragm

    PubMed Central

    Matécki, Stefan; Rivier, François; Hugon, Gerald; Koechlin, Christelle; Michel, Alain; Préfaut, Christian; Mornet, Dominique; Ramonatxo, Michèle

    2005-01-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the cellular mechanisms induced by hypercapnic stimulation of ventilation, during 6 weeks/30 min per day, in 10 mdx and 8 C57BL10 mice (10G0.2 months old). Ten mdx and eight C57BL10 mice served as control group. This respiratory training increases in vitro maximal tetanic tension of the diaphragm only in mdx mice. Western blot analysis of diaphragm showed: (1) an over-expression of a-dystrobrevin in mdx and C57BL10 training group compared to control group (8100G710 versus 6100G520 and 2800G400 versus 2200G250 arbitrary units); (2) a decrease in utrophin expression only in mdx training group compared to control group (2100G320 versus 3100G125 arbitrary units). Daily respiratory muscle training in mdx mice, induces a beneficial effect on diaphragm strength, with an over-expression of a-dystrobrevin. Further studies are needed to determine if, in absence of dystrophin, the over-expression of a-dystrobrevin could be interpreted as a possible pathway to improve function of dystrophic muscle. PMID:15907290

  19. Enhancing the sensitivity of a micro-diaphragm resonating sensor by effectively positioning the mass on the membrane

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinsik; Kim, Hye Jin; Cho, EunAe; Shin, Hyun-Joon; Park, Jung Ho; Hwang, Kyo Seon

    2015-01-01

    The detection of biomarkers in the liquid phase using mechanical sensors is difficult because of noise caused by the liquid. To reduce and verify the side effects of liquid loading, we performed calculations and experiments to determine the shift in resonant frequency according to the loading conditions. A 2-μm-thick piezoelectric rectangular micro-diaphragm with a 500 × 500 μm membrane was used. These dimensions were determined such that there would be an analogous resonant frequency shift ratio in both (1, 1) and (2, 2) modes. By calculating and measuring the resonant frequency, we verified that the resonant frequency of the sensor would change only through contact with the liquid, even the resonant frequency change by only liquid much higher than the changes caused by the nanoparticles. The real signal constituted only 0.017% of the initial resonant frequency. To enhance the sensitivity by reducing the unexpected surface stress in the liquid, the liquid was dropped onto the surface of the micro-diaphragm. This resulted in an improvement of more than 10 times the sensitivity in both modes. In addition, by controlling the position in the micro-diaphragm resonating sensor, more sensitive positions with large displacements were determined according to each mode. PMID:26594022

  20. A Computational Investigation for Determining the Natural Frequencies and Damping Effects of Diaphragm-Implemented Spacecraft Propellant Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenahen, Brian; Bernier, Adrien; Gangadharan, Sathya; Sudermann, James; Marsell, Brandon

    2012-01-01

    Spin-stabilization maneuvers are typically performed by spacecraft entering low-earth orbit to maintain attitude stability. These maneuvers induce periodic fluid movement inside the spacecraft's propellant tank known as fuel slosh, which is responsible for creating forces and moments on the sidewalls of the propellant tank. These forces and moments adversely affect spin-stabilization and risk jeopardizing the mission of the spacecraft. Therefore, propellant tanks are designed with propellant management devices (PMD's) such as barnes or diaphragms which work to counteract the forces and moments associated with fuel slosh. However, despite the presence of PMD's, the threat of spin-stabilization interference still exists should the propellant tank be excited at its natural frequency. When the fluid is excited at its natural frequency, the forces and moments acting on the propellant tank are amplified and may result in destabilizing the spacecraft. Thus, a computational analysis is conducted concerning diaphragm-implemented propellant tanks excited at their natural frequencies. Using multi-disciplinary computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software, computational models are developed to reflect potential scenarios that spacecraft propellant tanks could experience. By simulating the propellant tank under a wide array of parameters and variables including fill-level, gravity and diaphragm material and shape, a better understanding is gained as to how these parameters individually and collectively affect liquid propellant tanks and ultimately, spacecraft attitude dynamics.

  1. Anatomical and mesoscopic characterization of the dystrophic diaphragm: An in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance imaging study in the Golden retriever muscular dystrophy dog.

    PubMed

    Thibaud, J L; Matot, B; Barthélémy, I; Fromes, Y; Blot, S; Carlier, P G

    2017-04-01

    Because respiratory failure remains a major issue in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy patients, respiratory muscles are a key target of systemic therapies. In the Golden Retriever Muscular Dystrophy (GRMD) dogs, the disease shows strong clinical and histological similarities with the human pathology, making it a valuable model for preclinical therapeutic trials. We report here the first nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging anatomical study of the diaphragm in GRMD dogs and healthy controls. Both T1- and T2-weighted images of the diaphragm of seven healthy and thirteen GRMD dogs, from 3 to 36 months of age, were acquired on a 3 tesla NMR scanner. Abnormalities of texture and shape were revealed and consisted of increases in signal intensity on T2-weighted images and in signal heterogeneity on both T1- and T2-weighted images of the dystrophic diaphragm. These abnormalities were associated with a significant thickening of the muscle and we identified a clear 8-mm-threshold distinguishing clinically preserved GRMD dogs from those more severely affected. In this study, we demonstrated the feasibility of NMR imaging of the diaphragm and depicted several anatomical and mesoscopic anomalies in the dystrophic diaphragm. NMR imaging of the diaphragm shows a promise as an outcome measure in preclinical trials using GRMD dogs.

  2. Mechanical characterization of the mouse diaphragm with optical coherence elastography reveals fibrosis-related change of direction-dependent muscle tissue stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shang; Loehr, James A.; Larina, Irina V.; Rodney, George G.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2016-03-01

    The diaphragm, composed of skeletal muscle, plays an important role in respiration through its dynamic contraction. Genetic and molecular studies of the biomechanics of mouse diaphragm can provide great insights into an improved understanding and potential treatment of the disorders that lead to diaphragm dysfunction (i.e. muscular dystrophy). However, due to the small tissue size, mechanical assessment of mouse diaphragm tissue under its proper physiological conditions has been challenging. Here, we present the application of noncontact optical coherence elastography (OCE) for quantitative elastic characterization of ex vivo mouse diaphragm. Phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography was combined with a focused air-puff system to capture and measure the elastic wave propagation from tissue surface. Experiments were performed on wildtype and dystrophic mouse diaphragm tissues containing different levels of fibrosis. The OCE measurements of elastic wave propagation were conducted along both the longitudinal and transverse axis of the muscle fibers. Cross-correlation of the temporal displacement profiles from different spatial locations was utilized to obtain the propagation time delay, which was used to calculate the wave group velocity and to further quantify the tissue Young's modulus. Prior to and after OCE assessment, peak tetanic force was measured to monitor viability of the tissue during the elasticity measurements. Our experimental results indicate a positive correlation between fibrosis level and tissue stiffness, suggesting this elastic-wave-based OCE method could be a useful tool to monitor mechanical properties of skeletal muscle under physiological and pathological conditions.

  3. SU-E-T-217: Intrinsic Respiratory Gating in Small Animal CT

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y; Smith, M; Mistry, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Preclinical animal models of lung cancer can provide a controlled test-bed for testing dose escalation or function-based-treatment-planning studies. However, to extract lung function, i.e. ventilation, one needs to be able to image the lung at different phases of ventilation (in-hale / ex-hale). Most respiratory-gated imaging using micro-CT involves using an external ventilator and surgical intervention limiting the utility in longitudinal studies. A new intrinsic respiratory retrospective gating method was developed and tested in mice. Methods: A fixed region of interest (ROI) that covers the diaphragm was selected on all projection images to estimate the mean intensity (M). The mean intensity depends on the projection angle and diaphragm position. A 3-point moving average (A) of consecutive M values: Mpre, Mcurrent and Mpost, was calculated to be subtracted from Mcurrent. A fixed threshold was used to enable amplitude based sorting into 4 different phases of respiration. Images at full-inhale and end-exhale phases of respiration were reconstructed using the open source OSCaR. Lung volumes estimated at the 2 phases of respiration were validated against literature values. Results: Intrinsic retrospective gating was accomplished without the use of any external breathing waveform. While projection images were acquired at 360 different angles. Only 138 and 104 projections were used to reconstruct images at full-inhale and end-exhale. This often results in non-uniform under-sampled angular projections leading to some minor streaking artifacts. The calculated expiratory, inspiratory and tidal lung volumes correlated well with the values known from the literature. Conclusion: Our initial result demonstrates an intrinsic gating method that is suitable for flat panel cone beam small animal CT systems. Reduction in streaking artifacts can be accomplished by oversampling the data or using iterative reconstruction methods. This initial experience will enable

  4. Neuro-genetic optimization of the diffuser elements for applications in a valveless diaphragm micropumps system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hing Wah; Azid, Ishak Hj Abdul

    2009-01-01

    In this study, a hybridized neuro-genetic optimization methodology realized by embedding numerical simulations trained artificial neural networks (ANN) into a genetic algorithm (GA) is used to optimize the flow rectification efficiency of the diffuser element for a valveless diaphragm micropump application. A higher efficiency ratio of the diffuser element consequently yields a higher flow rate for the micropump. For that purpose, optimization of the diffuser element is essential to determine the maximum pumping rate that the micropump is able to generate. Numerical simulations are initially carried out using CoventorWare® to analyze the effects of varying parameters such as diffuser angle, Reynolds number and aspect ratio on the volumetric flow rate of the micropump. A limited range of simulation results will then be used to train the neural network via back-propagation algorithm and optimization process commence subsequently by embedding the trained ANN results as a fitness function into GA. The objective of the optimization is to maximize the efficiency ratio of the diffuser element for the range of parameters investigated. The optimized efficiency ratio obtained from the neuro-genetic optimization is 1.38, which is higher than any of the maximum efficiency ratio attained from the overall parametric studies, establishing the superiority of the optimization method.

  5. Respiratory rate detection by empirical mode decomposition method applied to diaphragm mechanomyographic signals.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Luis; Torres, Abel; Sarlabous, Leonardo; Fiz, José A; Jané, Raimon

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive evaluation of respiratory activity is an area of increasing research interest, resulting in the appearance of new monitoring techniques, ones of these being based on the analysis of the diaphragm mechanomyographic (MMGdi) signal. The MMGdi signal can be decomposed into two parts: (1) a high frequency activity corresponding to lateral vibration of respiratory muscles, and (2) a low frequency activity related to excursion of the thoracic cage. The purpose of this study was to apply the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) method to obtain the low frequency of MMGdi signal and selecting the intrinsic mode functions related to the respiratory movement. With this intention, MMGdi signals were acquired from a healthy subject, during an incremental load respiratory test, by means of two capacitive accelerometers located at left and right sides of rib cage. Subsequently, both signals were combined to obtain a new signal which contains the contribution of both sides of thoracic cage. Respiratory rate (RR) measured from the mechanical activity (RR(MMG)) was compared with that measured from inspiratory pressure signal (RR(P)). Results showed a Pearson's correlation coefficient (r = 0.87) and a good agreement (mean bias = -0.21 with lower and upper limits of -2.33 and 1.89 breaths per minute, respectively) between RR(MMG) and RR(P) measurements. In conclusion, this study suggests that RR can be estimated using EMD for extracting respiratory movement from low mechanical activity, during an inspiratory test protocol.

  6. Effects of boldine on mouse diaphragm and sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles isolated from skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Kang, J J; Cheng, Y W

    1998-02-01

    The effects of boldine [(S)-2,9-dihydroxy-1,10-dimethoxyaporphine], a major alkaloid in the leaves and bark of boldo (Peumus boldus Mol.), on skeletal muscle were studied using mouse diaphragm and isolated sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane vesicles. Boldine, at 10-200 microM, has little effect on the muscle-evoked twitches; however, the ryanodine-induced contracture was potentiated dose-dependently. At higher concentrations of 300 microM, boldine by itself induced muscle contracture of two phases, which were caused by the influx of extracellular Ca2+ and induction of Ca2+ release from the internal Ca2+ storage site, the sarcoplasmic reticulum, respectively. When tested with isolated sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane vesicles, boldine dose-dependently induced Ca2+ release from actively loaded sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles isolated from skeletal muscle of rabbit or rat which was inhibited by ruthenium red, suggesting that the release was through the Ca2+ release channel, also known as the ryanodine receptor. Boldine also dose-dependently increased apparent [3H]-ryanodine binding with the EC50 value of 50 microM. In conclusion, we have shown that boldine could sensitize the ryanodine receptor and induce Ca2+ release from the internal Ca2+ storage site of skeletal muscle.

  7. Compressing Spin-Polarized 3He With a Modified Diaphragm Pump

    PubMed Central

    Gentile, T. R.; Rich, D. R.; Thompson, A. K.; Snow, W. M.; Jones, G. L.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear spin-polarized 3He gas at pressures on the order of 100 kPa (1 bar) are required for several applications, such as neutron spin filters and magnetic resonance imaging. The metastability-exchange optical pumping (MEOP) method for polarizing 3He gas can rapidly produce highly polarized gas, but the best results are obtained at much lower pressure (~0.1 kPa). We describe a compact compression apparatus for polarized gas that is based on a modified commercial diaphragm pump. The gas is polarized by MEOP at a typical pressure of 0.25 kPa (2.5 mbar), and compressed into a storage cell at a typical pressure of 100 kPa. In the storage cell, we have obtained 20 % to 35 % 3He polarization using pure 3He gas and 35 % to 50 % 3He polarization using 3He-4He mixtures. By maintaining the storage cell at liquid nitrogen temperature during compression, the density has been increased by a factor of four. PMID:27500044

  8. The Combination of Micro Diaphragm Pumps and Flow Sensors for Single Stroke Based Liquid Flow Control.

    PubMed

    Jenke, Christoph; Pallejà Rubio, Jaume; Kibler, Sebastian; Häfner, Johannes; Richter, Martin; Kutter, Christoph

    2017-04-03

    With the combination of micropumps and flow sensors, highly accurate and secure closed-loop controlled micro dosing systems for liquids are possible. Implementing a single stroke based control mode with piezoelectrically driven micro diaphragm pumps can provide a solution for dosing of volumes down to nanoliters or variable average flow rates in the range of nL/min to μL/min. However, sensor technologies feature a yet undetermined accuracy for measuring highly pulsatile micropump flow. Two miniaturizable in-line sensor types providing electrical readout-differential pressure based flow sensors and thermal calorimetric flow sensors-are evaluated for their suitability of combining them with mircopumps. Single stroke based calibration of the sensors was carried out with a new method, comparing displacement volumes and sensor flow volumes. Limitations of accuracy and performance for single stroke based flow control are described. Results showed that besides particle robustness of sensors, controlling resistive and capacitive damping are key aspects for setting up reproducible and reliable liquid dosing systems. Depending on the required average flow or defined volume, dosing systems with an accuracy of better than 5% for the differential pressure based sensor and better than 6.5% for the thermal calorimeter were achieved.

  9. Implementation of the CMOS MEMS condenser microphone with corrugated metal diaphragm and silicon back-plate.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chien-Hsin; Lee, Chien-Hsing; Hsieh, Tsung-Min; Tsao, Li-Chi; Wu, Shaoyi; Liou, Jhyy-Cheng; Wang, Ming-Yi; Chen, Li-Che; Yip, Ming-Chuen; Fang, Weileun

    2011-01-01

    This study reports a CMOS-MEMS condenser microphone implemented using the standard thin film stacking of 0.35 μm UMC CMOS 3.3/5.0 V logic process, and followed by post-CMOS micromachining steps without introducing any special materials. The corrugated diaphragm for the microphone is designed and implemented using the metal layer to reduce the influence of thin film residual stresses. Moreover, a silicon substrate is employed to increase the stiffness of the back-plate. Measurements show the sensitivity of microphone is -42 ± 3 dBV/Pa at 1 kHz (the reference sound-level is 94 dB) under 6 V pumping voltage, the frequency response is 100 Hz-10 kHz, and the S/N ratio >55 dB. It also has low power consumption of less than 200 μA, and low distortion of less than 1% (referred to 100 dB).

  10. Progress in pulsed-current Karl Fischer coulometry using diaphragm-free cells.

    PubMed

    Nordmark, U; Cedergren, A

    2000-07-01

    Factors influencing the accuracy of water determinations using diaphragm-free, pulsed current Karl Fischer (KF) coulometry were investigated with the new Metrohm 756 instrument. Results obtained with commercially available reagents from Riedel-deHaen and Merck were compared with home-made ones that were especially designed to minimize the formation of iodine-consuming reduction products generated in the cathode reaction. Positive errors in the range 2-5% were found for the commercial reagents as compared to 0.2-1% for the home-made ones which were buffered at about pH 10 containing modifiers like chloroform, hexanol or ethylene glycol. Except for the composition of the KF-reagent, the cathode current density and the titration rate were found to be critical parameters for the accuracy of the determinations. For all reagents investigated, the best results were obtained for the maximum generator current 400 mA (corresponding to a current density of 1,400 mA cm(-2)) in combination with a maximum titration rate of 2,000 microg min(-1). Surprisingly, the errors found under optimum conditions for the pulse technique were always somewhat larger than the corresponding values obtained with continuous coulometry.

  11. Optimal Design by Using Various Solutions for Vibration of Laminated Shallow Shells on Shear Diaphragms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narita, Y.; Nitta, T.

    1998-07-01

    Free vibration and corresponding optimal design problems are solved for laminated composite shallow shells of rectangular planform. The shells have symmetric laminated construction and are supported by shear diaphragms along the edges. The first-order transverse shear deformation is assumed in the Donnell type shell theory to account for the thickness shear effect, and an analytical solution is presented which is exact for cross-ply laminates and is approximate for angle-ply laminates. A simplified formula is also derived by neglecting inplane inertia terms. Analytical solutions with/without the inplane inertia terms from the classical thin shell theory are also shown. In numerical examples, natural frequencies are presented for various types of shell curvature, e.g., circular cylindrical, spherical and hyperbolic paraboloidal shells. Fibre orientation angles, which cause the maximized fundamental frequencies of the alternating angle-ply shells, are determined, and effects of using the four different vibration solutions are discussed on the optimal frequencies and fibre orientation angles. Questions of how the different solutions quantitatively affect the optimal design results and which solution is recommended in the present type of optimization problems are clarified in the conclusions.

  12. Accumulation of extracellular calcium at the endplate of mouse diaphragm after ecothiopate in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Burd, P. F.; Ferry, C. B.; Smith, J. W.

    1989-01-01

    1. Experiments were carried out to investigate the accumulation from the extracellular medium of 45Ca2+ by the endplate region of skeletal muscle. 2. Mouse diaphragm muscle was incubated in physiological saline labelled with 45Ca at 37 degrees C for periods of up to 1.5 h. 3. The muscle was divided into junctional and non-junctional portions and the Ca from the extracellular fluid accumulated at the endplate determined from the 45Ca content of the portions. 4. The accumulation of extracellular Ca at the endplate region of muscles incubated in pysiological saline alone was nil, but there was accumulation in the presence of the anticholinesterase ecothiopate iodide 0.5 x 10(-6) M (ECO). Stimulation of the phrenic nerve at 0.02 Hz caused no further increase in accumulation but reduced the amount of spontaneous fasciculation. In tetrodotoxin (TTX) 10(-6) M, the accumulation was halved, and in 3.5 mM Mg2+ the accumulation was nil. Carbachol 10(-4) M resulted in an accumulation of Ca similar to that in ECO. 5. It is concluded that there was an accumulation of extracellular Ca following excitation of the nerve by stimulation at a low frequency and during the spontaneous fasciculations, and about half of the accumulation of extracellular Ca after ECO in the experiments was due to the postsynaptic action of ACh released non-quantally from the nerve terminals. PMID:2804548

  13. Fiber type composition of the sternomastoid and diaphragm muscles of dystrophin-deficient mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Guido, Anderson Neri; Campos, Gerson Eduardo Rocha; Neto, Humberto Santo; Marques, Maria Julia; Minatel, Elaine

    2010-10-01

    The muscle fiber phenotype is mainly determined by motoneuron innervation and changes in neuromuscular interaction alter the muscle fiber type. In dystrophin-deficient mdx mice, changes in the molecular assembly of the neuromuscular junction and in nerve terminal sprouting occur in the sternomastoid (STN) muscle during early stages of the disease. In this study, we were interested to see whether early changes in neuromuscular assembly are correlated with alterations in fiber type in dystrophic STN at 2 months of age. A predominance of hybrid fast myofibers (about 52% type IIDB) was observed in control (C57Bl/10) STN. In mdx muscle, the lack of dystrophin did not change this profile (about 54% hybrid type IIDB). Pure fast type IID fibers predominated in normal and dystrophic diaphragm (DIA; about 39% in control and 30% in mdx muscle) and a population of slow Type I fibers was also present (about 10% in control and 13% in mdx muscle). In conclusion, early changes in neuromuscular assembly do not affect the fiber type composition of dystrophic STN. In contrast to the pure fast fibers of the more affected DIA, the hybrid phenotype of the STN may permit dynamic adaptations during progression of the disease.

  14. Postnatal expression of myosin isoforms in the genioglossus and diaphragm muscles.

    PubMed

    Brozanski, B S; Daood, M J; Watchko, J F; LaFramboise, W A; Guthrie, R D

    1993-04-01

    We studied the expression of myosin heavy chain (MHC) and native myosin isoforms in the genioglossus (GG) and costal diaphragm (DIA) muscles of the rat during postnatal development using both denaturing and nondenaturing gel electrophoresis. Primary myotubes in both fast and slow muscles homogeneously express slow as well as embryonic myosin. Since the adult GG is comprised primarily of fast MHC isoforms, whereas the adult DIA is characterized by a mixture of MHC slow and fast isoforms, we hypothesized that the GG and DIA would be subject to different temporal patterns of MHC isoform expression during postnatal development. Native myosin and MHC gels demonstrated a persistence of neonatal MHC (MHC neo) on day 25 in the GG, whereas this isoform was not detected beyond day 21 in the DIA. The MHC phenotype in GG of the adult demonstrated a predominance of MHC 2X (35% +/- 8) and MHC 2B (45% +/- 10) with a smaller proportion of MHC 2A (19% +/- 5). In contrast, the MHC phenotype in adult DIA was characterized by approximately equal proportions of MHC slow (25% +/- 3), MHC 2A (34% +/- 10), and MHC 2X (31% +/- 12) with a small percentage of MHC 2B (9% +/- 7). These data suggest that postnatal regulation of MHC expression in the GG and DIA is muscle specific.

  15. The electromechanical behavior of piezoelectric thin film composite diaphragms possessing in-plane stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, B. A.; Williams, M. D.; Wang, G.; Sankar, B. V.; Cattafesta, L. N.; Sheplak, M.

    2017-04-01

    Many piezoelectric microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) measure or generate acoustic signals via the motion of radially non-uniform, thin film composite plates. The composite layers provide piezoelectric actuation, structural support, electrode metallization, passivation, etc. Often, the layers are non-uniform over the plate and contain residual stresses introduced during the fabrication process. Accurate models of non-uniform composite plate mechanics are crucial for predicting and optimizing device performance. In this paper, an analytical solution for a radially non-uniform, piezoelectric, circular composite plate incorporating residual stress is derived. The analytical solution is compared to experimental measurements of a MEMS piezoelectric diaphragm. The results show the improved accuracy of the analytical model when including film stress, the speed of the analytical solution as compared to finite element analysis, the sensitivity of device performance to residual stress and the importance of accurate film stresses as model inputs. The analytical model presented is useful as a design optimization tool given the efficiency of the computational time, shown to be 275 times less than a comparable finite element analysis.

  16. CT of abdominal tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, B.M.; Mann, J.H.

    1982-11-01

    Intraabdominal tuberculosis (TB) presents with a wide variety of clinical and radiologic features. Besides the reported computed tomographic (CT) finding of high-density ascites in tuberculous peritonitis, this report describes additional CT features highly suggestive of abdominal tuberculosis in eight cases: (1) irregular soft-tissue densities in the omental area; (2) low-density masses surrounded by thick solid rims; (3) a disorganized appearance of soft-tissue densities, fluid, and bowel loops forming a poorly defined mass; (4) low-density lymph nodes with a multilocular appearance after intravenous contrast administration; and (5) possibly high-density ascites. The differential diagnosis of these features include lymphoma, various forms of peritonitis, peritoneal carcinomatosis, and peritoneal mesothelioma. It is important that the CT features of intraabdominal tuberculosis be recognized in order that laparotomy be avoided and less invasive procedures (e.g., laparoscopy, biopsy, or a trial of antituberculous therapy) be instituted.

  17. CT Perfusion of the Head

    MedlinePlus

    ... the machine as the actual CT scanning is performed. Depending on the type of CT scan, the machine may make several passes. The contrast material will then be injected through an intravenous line ( ...

  18. NSAID enteropathy: appearance at CT and MR enterography in the age of multi-modality imaging and treatment.

    PubMed

    Frye, Judson M; Hansel, Stephanie L; Dolan, Steven G; Fidler, Jeff L; Song, Louis M Wong Kee; Barlow, John M; Smyrk, Tom C; Flicek, Kristina T; Hara, Amy K; Bruining, David H; Fletcher, Joel G

    2015-06-01

    CT and MR enterography and capsule endoscopy are increasingly used as routine diagnostic tests for patients with potential small bowel disorders and obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are commonly used drugs that disrupt prostaglandin synthesis and result in a variety of localized complications within the small bowel ranging from ulcer formation to characteristic circumferential strictures, or diaphragms. NSAID enteropathy encompasses this spectrum of acute and chronic inflammatory sequelae, and is associated with typical findings at capsule endoscopy and surgery. Herein we review the typical clinical presentation of NSAID enteropathy, in addition to its endoscopic appearances, focusing on imaging findings at cross-sectional enterography. Multiple, short-segment strictures are the hallmarks of imaging diagnosis. Strictures may have minimal hyperenhancement or wall thickening, but these findings are typically symmetric and circumferential with respect to the bowel lumen. Multifocal Crohn's strictures, and occasionally radiation-induced strictures or adhesions, will mimic NSAID diaphragms. Multi-phase or multi-sequence imaging at CT and MR enterography increase diagnostic confidence in stricture presence. Strategies for subsequent workup and therapy after enterography are also discussed. Given the frequent use of NSAIDs and typical appearance of these strictures, knowledge of characteristic imaging findings can be particularly useful when evaluating patients with anemia and recurrent small bowel obstruction.

  19. Technical aspects of CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Kuszyk, B S; Fishman, E K

    1998-10-01

    The basic tasks of spiral CT acquisition, image processing, and image display are the foundations underlying CT angiography regardless of the anatomic region of interest. Volume rendering is a rapidly emerging image processing technique for creating three-dimensional (3D) images from CT datasets, which has important advantages over other 3D rendering techniques including maximum intensity projection and surface rendering. This articles reviews the techniques that are commonly used in CT angiography and key considerations for optimization.

  20. Seventh-generation CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besson, G. M.

    2016-03-01

    A new dual-drum CT system architecture has been recently introduced with the potential to achieve significantly higher temporal resolution than is currently possible in medical imaging CT. The concept relies only on known technologies; in particular rotation speeds several times higher than what is possible today could be achieved leveraging typical x-ray tube designs and capabilities. However, the architecture lends itself to the development of a new arrangement of x-ray sources in a toroidal vacuum envelope containing a rotating cathode ring and a (optionally rotating) shared anode ring to potentially obtain increased individual beam power as well as increase total exposure per rotation. The new x-ray source sub-system design builds on previously described concepts and could make the provision of multiple conventional high-power cathodes in a CT system practical by distributing the anode target between the cathodes. In particular, relying on known magnetic-levitation technologies, it is in principle possible to more than double the relative speed of the electron-beam with respect to the target, thus potentially leading to significant individual beam power increases as compared to today's state-of-the-art. In one embodiment, the proposed design can be naturally leveraged by the dual-drum CT concept previously described to alleviate the problem of arranging a number of conventional rotating anode-stem x-ray tubes and power conditioners on the limited space of a CT gantry. In another embodiment, a system with three cathodes is suggested leveraging the architecture previously proposed by Franke.

  1. Diaphragm arterioles are less responsive to alpha1- adrenergic constriction than gastrocnemius arterioles.

    PubMed

    Aaker, Aaron; Laughlin, M H

    2002-05-01

    The sympathetic nervous system has greater influence on vascular resistance in low-oxidative, fast-twitch skeletal muscle than in high-oxidative skeletal muscle (17). The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that arterioles isolated from low-oxidative, fast-twitch skeletal muscle [the white portion of gastrocnemius (WG)] possess greater responsiveness to adrenergic constriction than arterioles isolated from high-oxidative skeletal muscle [red portion of the gastrocnemius muscle (RG) and diaphragm (Dia)]. Second-order arterioles (2As) were isolated from WG, RG, and Dia of rats and reactivity examined in vitro. Results reveal that Dia 2As constrict less to norepinephrine (NE) (10(-9) to 10 (-4) M) than 2As from RG and WG, which exhibited similar NE-induced constrictions. This difference was not endothelium dependent, because responses of denuded 2As were similar to those of intact arterioles. The blunted NE-induced constrictor response of Dia 2As appears to be the result of differences in alpha1-receptor effects because 1) arterioles from Dia also responded less to selective alpha1-receptor stimulation with phenylephrine than RG and WG arterioles; 2) arterioles from Dia, RG, and WG dilated similarly to isoproterenol (10(-9) to 10(-4) M) and did not respond to selective alpha2-receptor stimulation with UK-14304; and 3) endothelin-1 produced similar constriction in 2As from Dia, RG, and WG. We conclude that differences in oxidative capacity and/or fiber type composition of muscle tissue do not explain different NE responsiveness of Dia 2As compared with 2As from gastrocnemius muscle. Differences in alpha1-adrenergic constrictor responsiveness among arterioles in skeletal muscle may contribute to nonuniform muscle blood flow responses observed during exercise and serve to maintain blood flow to Dia during exercise-induced increases in sympathetic nerve activity.

  2. Diaphragm plication following phrenic nerve injury: a comparison of paediatric and adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Simansky, D; Paley, M; Refaely, Y; Yellin, A

    2002-01-01

    Background: A study was undertaken to evaluate whether adults differ from children in the indications and outcome of diaphragmatic plication following phrenic nerve injury. Methods: A retrospective study was performed of 21 patients, 10 below the age of 5 and 11 older than 37 years. The indication for surgery for all the children was failure to wean from ventilatory support. The indications for surgery in the adult group were ventilator dependency (n=4) and symptomatic dyspnoea (n=7). All patients had at least one imaging study confirming diaphragmatic paralysis. The American Thoracic Society (ATS) dyspnoea scale, pulmonary function tests, and quantitative pulmonary perfusion scans were used as evaluation parameters. At surgery the diaphragm was centrally plicated. Results: One child died immediately after surgery due to irreversible heart failure and two children died within 2 months of surgery from ongoing complications of their original condition. These three patients were considered as selection failures. Seven children were weaned from ventilatory support within a median of 4 days (range 2–140). Only one of four ventilated adults was successfully weaned. Seven adults who underwent surgery for chronic symptoms had a marked subjective improvement of 2–3 levels in the ATS dyspnoea scale. Pulmonary function studies in the seven symptomatic adults showed a 40% improvement above baseline. Severely asymmetrical perfusion scans reverted to a normal pattern after plication. Conclusions: Diaphragmatic plication offers a significant benefit to children with diaphragmatic paralysis and should be performed early to facilitate weaning from mechanical ventilation. While plication is of limited benefit in weaning ventilated adults, it results in significant subjective and objective lifetime improvement in non-ventilated symptomatic adults. PMID:12096205

  3. Conditions for accurate Karl Fischer coulometry using diaphragm-free cells.

    PubMed

    Nordmark, U; Cedergren, A

    2000-01-01

    Factors influencing the extent of formation of oxidizable reduction products in coulometric cells used for Karl Fischer (KF) determination of water were investigated. For methanolic KF reagents buffered with imidazole (Im) or diethanolamine (DEA) (separately or in combination), three parameters were found to be of outmost importance: the cathodic current density, the pH, and the concentration of protonated base (ImH+ or DEAH+). For reagents buffered with only Im, the relative formation of oxidizable reduction products varied in the range 2-40%; i.e., 51-70 micrograms of water was found for a 50 micrograms water sample, depending on the above-mentioned parameters. The lowest values were observed for reagents having a pH around 10 in combination with cathodic current densities in the range 2000-5000 mA cm-2. For all the Imbuffered reagents investigated, the addition of modifiers such as chloroform, hexanol, and carbon tetrachloride was found to decrease the formation of oxidizable reduction products significantly. For example, a reagent buffered at pH 10 containing 1 M hexanol gave less than 0.3% formation in the current density interval from 200 to 4000 mA cm-2. The best reagents based on the above-mentioned modifiers were tested in the continuous coulometric mode with errors typically in the interval 0-0.5% using optimum conditions. One prerequisite for obtaining such small errors with diaphragm-free continuous coulometry is to use a cathode area no larger than 0.002 cm2. For some of the reagents based on both Im and DEA, the formation of oxidizable reduction products was close to zero at certain current densities, although the analytical performance was not as good as for the reagents buffered solely by Im due to longer conditioning and titration times.

  4. Tumor and normal tissue motion in the thorax during respiration: Analysis of volumetric and positional variations using 4D CT

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Elisabeth . E-mail: eweiss@mcvh-vcu.edu; Wijesooriya, Krishni; Dill, S. Vaughn; Keall, Paul J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate temporospatial variations of tumor and normal tissue during respiration in lung cancer patients. Methods and Materials: In 14 patients, gross tumor volume (GTV) and normal tissue structures were manually contoured on four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) scans. Structures were evaluated for volume changes, centroid (center of mass) motion, and phase dependence of variations relative to inspiration. Only volumetrically complete structures were used for analysis (lung in 2, heart in 8, all other structures in >10 patients). Results: During respiration, the magnitude of contoured volumes varied up to 62.5% for GTVs, 25.5% for lungs, and 12.6% for hearts. The range of maximum three-dimensional centroid movement for individual patients was 1.3-24.0 mm for GTV, 2.4-7.9 mm for heart, 5.2-12.0 mm for lungs, 0.3-5.5 mm for skin markers, 2.9-10.0 mm for trachea, and 6.6-21.7 mm for diaphragm. During respiration, the centroid positions of normal structures varied relative to the centroid position of the respective GTV by 1.5-8.1 mm for heart, 2.9-9.3 mm for lungs, 1.2-9.2 mm for skin markers, 0.9-7.1 mm for trachea, and 2.7-16.4 mm for diaphragm. Conclusion: Using 4D-CT, volumetric changes, positional alterations as well as changes in the position of contoured structures relative to the GTV were observed with large variations between individual patients. Although the interpretation of 4D-CT data has considerable uncertainty because of 4D-CT artifacts, observer variations, and the limited acquisition time, the findings might have a significant impact on treatment planning.

  5. Lung Dose Calculation With SPECT/CT for {sup 90}Yittrium Radioembolization of Liver Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Naichang; Srinivas, Shaym M.; DiFilippo, Frank P.; Shrikanthan, Sankaran; Levitin, Abraham; McLennan, Gordon; Spain, James; Xia, Ping; Wilkinson, Allan

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To propose a new method to estimate lung mean dose (LMD) using technetium-99m labeled macroaggregated albumin ({sup 99m}Tc-MAA) single photon emission CT (SPECT)/CT for {sup 90}Yttrium radioembolization of liver tumors and to compare the LMD estimated using SPECT/CT with clinical estimates of LMD using planar gamma scintigraphy (PS). Methods and Materials: Images of 71 patients who had SPECT/CT and PS images of {sup 99m}Tc-MAA acquired before TheraSphere radioembolization of liver cancer were analyzed retrospectively. LMD was calculated from the PS-based lung shunt assuming a lung mass of 1 kg and 50 Gy per GBq of injected activity shunted to the lung. For the SPECT/CT-based estimate, the LMD was calculated with the activity concentration and lung volume derived from SPECT/CT. The effect of attenuation correction and the patient's breathing on the calculated LMD was studied with the SPECT/CT. With these effects correctly taken into account in a more rigorous fashion, we compared the LMD calculated with SPECT/CT with the LMD calculated with PS. Results: The mean dose to the central region of the lung leads to a more accurate estimate of LMD. Inclusion of the lung region around the diaphragm in the calculation leads to an overestimate of LMD due to the misregistration of the liver activity to the lung from the patient's breathing. LMD calculated based on PS is a poor predictor of the actual LMD. For the subpopulation with large lung shunt, the mean overestimation from the PS method for the lung shunt was 170%. Conclusions: A new method of calculating the LMD for TheraSphere and SIR-Spheres radioembolization of liver cancer based on {sup 99m}Tc-MAA SPECT/CT is presented. The new method provides a more accurate estimate of radiation risk to the lungs. For patients with a large lung shunt calculated from PS, a recalculation of LMD based on SPECT/CT is recommended.

  6. Onset and Offset Estimation of the Neural Inspiratory Time in Surface Diaphragm Electromyography: A Pilot Study in Healthy Subjects.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Luis; Torres-Cebrian, Abel; Sarlabous, Leonardo; Jane, Raimon

    2017-02-22

    This study evaluates the onset and offset of neural inspiratory time estimated from surface diaphragm electromyographic (EMGdi) recordings. EMGdi and airflow signals were recorded in ten healthy subjects according to two respiratory protocols based on respiratory rate (RR) increments, from 15 to 40 breaths per minute (bpm), and fractional inspiratory time (Ti/Ttot) decrements, from 0.54 to 0.18. The analysis of diaphragm electromyographic (EMGdi) signal amplitude is an alternative approach for the quantification of neural respiratory drive (NRD). The EMGdi amplitude was estimated using the fixed sample entropy computed over a 250 ms moving window of the EMGdi signal (EMGdifse). The neural onset was detected through a dynamic threshold over the EMGdifse using the kernel density estimation method, while neural offset was detected by finding when the EMGdifse had decreased to 70 % of the peak value reached during inspiration. The Bland-Altman analysis between airflow and neural onsets showed a global bias of 46 ms in the RR protocol and 22 ms in the Ti/Ttot protocol. The Bland-Altman analysis between airflow and neural offsets reveals a global bias of 11 ms in the RR protocol and -2 ms in the Ti/Ttot protocol. The relationship between pairs of RR values (Pearson's correlation coefficient of 0.99, Bland- Altman limits of -2.39 to 2.41 bpm, and mean bias of 0.01 bpm) and between pairs of Ti/Ttot values (Pearson's correlation coefficient of 0.86, Bland-Altman limits of -0.11 to 0.10, and mean bias of -0.01) showed a good agreement. In conclusion, we propose a method for determining neural onset and neural offset based on non-invasive recordings of the electrical activity of the diaphragm that requires no filtering of cardiac muscle interference.

  7. MAGI-1 Interacts with Nephrin to Maintain Slit Diaphragm Structure through Enhanced Rap1 Activation in Podocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Jie; Bao, Sujin; Johnson, Ruth I.; Zhu, Bingbing; Li, Jianhua; Vadaparampil, Justin; Smith, Christopher M.; Campbell, Kirk N; Grahammer, Florian; Huber, Tobias B.; He, John C.; D'Agati, Vivette D.; Chan, Andrew; Kaufman, Lewis

    2016-01-01

    MAGI-1 is a multidomain cytosolic scaffolding protein that in the kidney is specifically located at the podocyte slit diaphragm, a specialized junction that is universally injured in proteinuric diseases. There it interacts with several essential molecules, including nephrin and neph1, which are required for slit diaphragm formation and as an intracellular signaling hub. Here, we show that diminished MAGI-1 expression in cultured podocytes reduced nephrin and neph1 membrane localization and weakened tight junction integrity. Global magi1 knock-out mice, however, demonstrated normal glomerular histology and function into adulthood. We hypothesized that a second mild but complementary genetic insult might induce glomerular disease susceptibility in these mice. To identify such a gene, we utilized the developing fly eye to test for functional complementation between MAGI and its binding partners. In this way, we identified diminished expression of fly Hibris (nephrin) or Roughest (neph1) as dramatically exacerbating the effects of MAGI depletion. Indeed, when these combinations were studied in mice, the addition of nephrin, but not neph1, heterozygosity to homozygous deletion of MAGI-1 resulted in spontaneous glomerulosclerosis. In cultured podocytes, MAGI-1 depletion reduced intercellular contact-induced Rap1 activation, a pathway critical for proper podocyte function. Similarly, magi1 knock-out mice showed diminished glomerular Rap1 activation, an effect dramatically enhanced by concomitant nephrin haploinsufficiency. Finally, combined overexpression of MAGI-1 and nephrin increased Rap1 activation, but not when substituting a mutant MAGI-1 that cannot bind nephrin. We conclude that the interaction between nephrin and MAGI-1 regulates Rap1 activation in podocytes to maintain long term slit diaphragm structure. PMID:27707879

  8. Diaphragm Repair with a Novel Cross-Linked Collagen Biomaterial in a Growing Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Steffi; Decaluwe, Herbert; Ruol, Michele; Manodoro, Stefano; Kramer, Manuel; Till, Holger; Deprest, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Background Neonates with congenital diaphragmatic hernia and large defects often require patch closure. Acellular collagen matrices (ACM) have been suggested as an alternative to synthetic durable patches as they are remodeled by the host or could also be used for tissue engineering purposes. Materials and Methods 2.0x1.0 cm diaphragmatic defects were created in 6-weeks old New-Zealand white rabbits. We compared reconstruction with a purpose-designed cross-linked ACM (Matricel) to 4-layer non-cross-linked small intestinal submucosa (SIS) and a 1-layer synthetic Dual Mesh (Gore-Tex). Unoperated animals or animals undergoing primary closure (4/0 polyglecaprone) served as age-matched controls. 60 (n = 25) resp. 90 (n = 17) days later, animals underwent chest x-ray and obduction for gross examination of explants, scoring of adhesion and inflammatory response. Also, uniaxial tensiometry was done, comparing explants to contralateral native diaphragmatic tissue. Results Overall weight nearly doubled from 1,554±242 g at surgery to 2,837±265 g at obduction (+84%). X-rays did show rare elevation of the left diaphragm (SIS = 1, Gore-Tex = 1, unoperated control = 1), but no herniation of abdominal organs. 56% of SIS and 10% of Matricel patches degraded with visceral bulging in four (SIS = 3, Matricel = 1). Adhesion scores were limited: 0.5 (Matricel) to 1 (SIS, Gore-Tex) to the left lung (p = 0.008) and 2.5 (Gore-Tex), 3 (SIS) and 4 (Matricel) to the liver (p<0.0001). Tensiometry revealed a reduced bursting strength but normal compliance for SIS. Compliance was reduced in Matricel and Gore-Tex (p<0.01). Inflammatory response was characterized by a more polymorphonuclear cell (SIS) resp. macrophage (Matricel) type of infiltrate (p<0.05). Fibrosis was similar for all groups, except there was less mature collagen deposited to Gore-Tex implants (p<0.05). Conclusions Matricel induced a macrophage-dominated inflammatory response, more adhesions, had appropriate strength but a

  9. Motion gated small animal imaging with a flat-panel CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasruck, M.; Bartling, S.; Dinkel, J.; Kiessling, F.; Semmler, W.; Stierstorfer, K.; Schmidt, B.

    2008-03-01

    Small animal CT gains increasing interest in preclinical research. However, physiological motion compensation like in clinical CT has seldom been employed so far. We present different methods of retrospective motion correction for small animal imaging despite their high respiratory and heart rate. Beside respiratory gating alone the combination of respiratory and simultaneous cardiac gating is shown. In vivo data are acquired with an experimental flat-panel based CT scanner*(Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim Germany). Whole mice or rats fit in the available FOV of 25 * 25 * 4 cm 3, while acquisition rate is 100fps. Extrinsic gating is realized by tracing the physiological motion from a small animal monitoring system with a pneumatic pillow for respiratory motion and ECG for heart motion. At the alternative intrinsic method, the lung motion is directly correlated to the movement of the center of gravity in the acquired projection data. As an advantage of the second method the even low preparation effort per scan is reduced. As long as the rotation time of the gantry is far below the cycle time of heart or the lung a multi-segment reconstruction is used in both methods. Motion artifacts are largely suppressed after gating. While in non gated images, the diaphragm, heart contours, bronchi and lung vessels are already visible, they are more sharply defined in the gated datasets. Four-dimensional assessment of lung motion is possible and lung volume in several phases such as peak inspiration and expiration could be segmented, quantified and compared.

  10. High-accuracy fiber optical microphone in a DBR fiber laser based on a nanothick silver diaphragm by self-mixing technique.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhengting; Lu, Liang; Zhang, Wenhua; Yang, Bo; Wu, Shuang; Zhao, Yunhe; Xu, Feng; Wang, Zhiping; Gui, Huaqiao; Liu, Jianguo; Yu, Benli

    2013-12-16

    A high-accuracy fiber optical microphone (FOM) is first applied by self-mixing technique in a DBR fiber laser based on a nanothick silver diaphragm. The nanothick silver diaphragm fabricated by the convenient and low cost electroless plating method is functioned as sensing diaphragm due to critically susceptible to the air vibration. Simultaneously, micro-vibration theory model of self-mixing interference fiber optical microphone is deduced based on quasi-analytical method. The dynamic property to frequencies and amplitudes are experimentally carried out to characterize the fabricated FOM and also the reproduced sound of news and music can clearly meet the ear of the people which shows the technique proposed in this paper guarantee steady, high signal-noise ratio operation and outstanding accuracy in the DBR fiber laser which is potential to medical and security applications such as real-time voice reproduction for throat and voiceprint verification.

  11. Comparison of Diaphragmatic Breathing Exercise, Volume and Flow Incentive Spirometry, on Diaphragm Excursion and Pulmonary Function in Patients Undergoing Laparoscopic Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Anand, R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the effects of diaphragmatic breathing exercises and flow and volume-oriented incentive spirometry on pulmonary function and diaphragm excursion in patients undergoing laparoscopic abdominal surgery. Methodology. We selected 260 patients posted for laparoscopic abdominal surgery and they were block randomization as follows: 65 patients performed diaphragmatic breathing exercises, 65 patients performed flow incentive spirometry, 65 patients performed volume incentive spirometry, and 65 patients participated as a control group. All of them underwent evaluation of pulmonary function with measurement of Forced Vital Capacity (FVC), Forced Expiratory Volume in the first second (FEV1), Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR), and diaphragm excursion measurement by ultrasonography before the operation and on the first and second postoperative days. With the level of significance set at p < 0.05. Results. Pulmonary function and diaphragm excursion showed a significant decrease on the first postoperative day in all four groups (p < 0.001) but was evident more in the control group than in the experimental groups. On the second postoperative day pulmonary function (Forced Vital Capacity) and diaphragm excursion were found to be better preserved in volume incentive spirometry and diaphragmatic breathing exercise group than in the flow incentive spirometry group and the control group. Pulmonary function (Forced Vital Capacity) and diaphragm excursion showed statistically significant differences between volume incentive spirometry and diaphragmatic breathing exercise group (p < 0.05) as compared to that flow incentive spirometry group and the control group. Conclusion. Volume incentive spirometry and diaphragmatic breathing exercise can be recommended as an intervention for all patients pre- and postoperatively, over flow-oriented incentive spirometry for the generation and sustenance of pulmonary function and diaphragm excursion in the management of laparoscopic

  12. Liquid Metal Droplet and Micro Corrugated Diaphragm RF-MEMS for reconfigurable RF filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irshad, Wasim

    detail and have proved pivotal to this work. The second part of the dissertation focuses on the Liquid Metal Droplet RF-MEMS. A novel tunable RF MEMS resonator that is based upon electrostatic control over the morphology of a liquid metal droplet (LMD) is conceived. We demonstrate an LMD evanescent-mode cavity resonator that simultaneously achieves wide analog tuning from 12 to 18 GHz with a measured quality factor of 1400-1840. A droplet of 250-mum diameter is utilized and the applied bias is limited to 100 V. This device operates on a principle called Electro-Wetting On Dielectric (EWOD). The liquid metal employed is a non-toxic eutectic alloy of Gallium, Indium and Tin known as Galinstan. This device also exploits interfacial surface energy and viscous body forces that dominate at nanoliter scale. We then apply our Liquid Metal Droplet (LMD) RF-MEMS architecture to demonstrate a continuously tunable electrostatic Ku-Band Filter. A 2-pole bandpass filter with measured insertion loss of less than 0.4dB and 3dB FBW of 3.4% is achieved using a Galinstan droplet of 250mum diameter and bias limited to 100V. We demonstrate that the LMD is insensitive to gravity by performing inversion and tilt experiments. In addition, we study its thermal tolerance by subjecting the LMD up to 150° C. The third part of the dissertation is dedicated to the Micro-Corrugated Diaphragm (MCD) RF-MEMS. We present an evanescent-mode cavity bandpass filter with state-of-the-art RF performance metrics like 4:1 tuning ratio from 5 to 20 GHz with less than 2dB insertion loss and 2-6% 3dB bandwidth. Micro-Corrugated Diaphragm (MCD) is a novel electrostatic MEMS design specifically engineered to provide large-scale analog deflections necessary for such continuous and wide tunable filtering with very high quality factor. We demonstrate a 1.25mm radius and 2mum thick Gold MCD which provides 30mum total deflection with nearly 60% analog range. We also present a detailed and systematic MCD design

  13. Colonic Interposition between the Liver and Diaphragm: “The Chilaiditi Sign”

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Nita; Takieddine, Zeina; Tariq, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    A 90-year-old wheelchair bound male was brought to the emergency department with complaints of worsening abdominal pain over the last 2-3 days. The patient also had difficulty in passing urine. Abdominal examination revealed tenderness in the umbilical and hypogastric area without rebound tenderness or guarding. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen showed a loop of colon interpositioned between the liver and the right hemidiaphragm (the Chilaiditi sign), mimicking free air. Foley's catheter was placed and the patient was managed conservatively. The patient clinically improved with improvement of the abdominal pain. PMID:27446829

  14. Role of the medial medullary reticular formation in relaying vestibular signals to the diaphragm and abdominal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mori, R. L.; Bergsman, A. E.; Holmes, M. J.; Yates, B. J.

    2001-01-01

    Changes in posture can affect the resting length of respiratory muscles, requiring alterations in the activity of these muscles if ventilation is to be unaffected. Recent studies have shown that the vestibular system contributes to altering respiratory muscle activity during movement and changes in posture. Furthermore, anatomical studies have demonstrated that many bulbospinal neurons in the medial medullary reticular formation (MRF) provide inputs to phrenic and abdominal motoneurons; because this region of the reticular formation receives substantial vestibular and other movement-related input, it seems likely that medial medullary reticulospinal neurons could adjust the activity of respiratory motoneurons during postural alterations. The objective of the present study was to determine whether functional lesions of the MRF affect inspiratory and expiratory muscle responses to activation of the vestibular system. Lidocaine or muscimol injections into the MRF produced a large increase in diaphragm and abdominal muscle responses to vestibular stimulation. These vestibulo-respiratory responses were eliminated following subsequent chemical blockade of descending pathways in the lateral medulla. However, inactivation of pathways coursing through the lateral medulla eliminated excitatory, but not inhibitory, components of vestibulo-respiratory responses. The simplest explanation for these data is that MRF neurons that receive input from the vestibular nuclei make inhibitory connections with diaphragm and abdominal motoneurons, whereas a pathway that courses laterally in the caudal medulla provides excitatory vestibular inputs to these motoneurons.

  15. Descriptive study of the diaphragm and lungs in the short-nosed echidna, Tachyglossus aculeatus (Mammalia: monotremata).

    PubMed

    Perry, S F; Schmitz, A; Andersen, N A; Wallau, B R; Nicol, S

    2000-03-01

    In this descriptive study, we characterize the diaphragm and lungs of the short-nosed echidna, Tachyglossus aculeatus, using a combination of gross anatomical, light-microscopic, electron microscopic, and morphometric techniques, including airway casting. The diaphragm is inclined from ventro-cranial to dorso-caudal and possesses a large central tendon (centrum tendineum). The crural and costal muscle groups and the associated trigoni are located in the same positions as in other mammals. The bronchial branching pattern reveals cranially broad, tapering stem bronchi and an unusually small number of first order bronchi. The asymmetrical primary branching pattern and possibly also the asymmetry of right and left lungs are plesiomorphic within the Mammalia. The histology and ultrastructure of the airways and lung parenchyma reveal no unusual features: alveolar type 1 and type 2 cells in the parenchyma; type 2 cells, exocrine bronchiolar cells (Clara cells), ciliated cells, and goblet cells in the terminal airways and the latter two cell types in the bronchi. Both a double and a single capillary net are found on the interalveolar septa. The high capillary loading of the double net may be of selective advantage because of long apneas and low metabolic rate in the echidna.

  16. Numerical study of a novel micro-diaphragm flow channel with piezoelectric device for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, H. K.; Huang, S. H.; Chen, B. R.; Cheng, L. W.

    Previous studies have shown that the amplitude of the vibration of a piezoelectric (PZT) device produces an oscillating flow that changes the chamber volume along with a curvature variation of the diaphragm. In this study, an actuating micro-diaphragm with piezoelectric effects is utilized as an air-flow channel in proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) systems, called PZT-PEMFC. This newly designed gas pump, with a piezoelectric actuation structure, can feed air into the system of an air-breathing PEMFC. When the actuator moves outward to increase the cathode channel volume, the air is sucked into the chamber; moving inward decreases the channel's volume and thereby compresses air into the catalyst layer and enhancing the chemical reaction. The air-standard PZT-PEMFC cycle is proposed to describe an air-breathing PZT-PEMFC. A novel design for PZT-PEMFCs has been proposed and a three-dimensional, transitional model has been successfully built to account for its major phenomena and performance. Moreover, at high frequencies, PZT actuation leads to a more stable current output, more drained water, higher sucked air, higher hydrogen consumption, and also overcomes concentration losses.

  17. Screening for sleep-disordered breathing in neuromuscular disease using a questionnaire for symptoms associated with diaphragm paralysis.

    PubMed

    Steier, J; Jolley, C J; Seymour, J; Teschler, H; Luo, Y M; Polkey, M I; Moxham, J

    2011-02-01

    Patients with neuromuscular disease (NMD) are at risk of developing sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) following respiratory muscle involvement. We hypothesised that a questionnaire based on clinical symptoms and signs of diaphragm weakness can be used to screen for SDB in such patients. We developed a self-administered multiple choice questionnaire containing five questions (Sleep-Disordered Breathing in Neuromuscular Disease Questionnaire (SiNQ)-5), scoring 0-10 points. 125 patients were enrolled: 32 with respiratory muscle weakness, 35 subjects with normal respiratory muscle strength and 58 patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). All subjects underwent full polysomnography. NMD patients with involvement of the respiratory muscles scored mean ± sd 6.8 ± 2.3 out of 10 points, significantly higher than both OSA patients 2.5 ± 2.3 and normal subjects 1.0 ± 2.0 (p < 0.001). A score of five or more points in the SiNQ-5 had a sensitivity of 86.2%, specificity of 88.5%, positive predictive value of 69.4% and a negative predictive value of 95.5% to identify NMD with combined SDB. A short self-administered questionnaire, the SiNQ-5, based on clinical symptoms can reliably screen for SDB in patients with diaphragm weakness. However, comorbidities, such as heart failure, that have symptoms influenced by posture could alter diagnostic accuracy.

  18. Generalized free-space diffuse photon transport model based on the influence analysis of a camera lens diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueli; Gao, Xinbo; Qu, Xiaochao; Chen, Duofang; Ma, Xiaopeng; Liang, Jimin; Tian, Jie

    2010-10-10

    The camera lens diaphragm is an important component in a noncontact optical imaging system and has a crucial influence on the images registered on the CCD camera. However, this influence has not been taken into account in the existing free-space photon transport models. To model the photon transport process more accurately, a generalized free-space photon transport model is proposed. It combines Lambertian source theory with analysis of the influence of the camera lens diaphragm to simulate photon transport process in free space. In addition, the radiance theorem is also adopted to establish the energy relationship between the virtual detector and the CCD camera. The accuracy and feasibility of the proposed model is validated with a Monte-Carlo-based free-space photon transport model and physical phantom experiment. A comparison study with our previous hybrid radiosity-radiance theorem based model demonstrates the improvement performance and potential of the proposed model for simulating photon transport process in free space.

  19. Chronic osteomyelitis examined by CT

    SciTech Connect

    Wing, V.W.; Jeffrey, R.B. Jr.; Federle, M.P.; Helms, C.A.; Trafton, P.

    1985-01-01

    CT examination of 25 patients who had acute exacerbations of chronic osteomyelitis allowed for the correct identification of single or multiple sequestra in 14 surgical patients. Plain radiographs were equivocal for sequestra in seven of these patients, because the sequestra were too small or because diffuse bony sclerosis was present. CT also demonstrated a foreign body and five soft tissue abscesses not suspected on the basis of plain radiographs. CT studies, which helped guide the operative approach, were also useful in treating those patients whose plain radiographs were positive for sequestra. The authors review the potential role of CT in evaluating patients with chronic osteomyelitis.

  20. Electromyographic study of differential sensitivity to succinylcholine of the diaphragm, laryngeal and somatic muscles: a swine model.

    PubMed

    Lu, I-Cheng; Wang, Hsun-Mo; Kuo, Yi-Wei; Shieh, Chia-Fang; Chiang, Feng-Yu; Wu, Che-Wei; Tsai, Cheng-Jing

    2010-12-01

    Neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs) might diminish the electromyography signal of the vocalis muscles during intraoperative neuromonitoring of the recurrent laryngeal nerve. The aim of this study was to compare differential sensitivity of different muscles to succinylcholine in a swine model, and to realize the influence of NMBAs on neuromonitoring. Six male Duroc-Landrace piglets were anesthetized with thiamylal and underwent tracheal intubation without the use of an NMBA. The left recurrent laryngeal nerve, the spinal accessory nerve, the right phrenic nerve and the brachial plexus were stimulated. Evoked potentials (electromyography signal) of four muscle groups were elicited from needle electrodes before and after intravenous succinylcholine bolus (1.0 mg/kg). Recorded muscles included the vocalis muscles, trapezius muscle, diaphragm and triceps brachii muscles. The onset time and 80% recovery of control response were recorded and analyzed. The testing was repeated after 30 minutes. The onset time of neuromuscular blocking for the vocalis muscles, trapezius muscle, diaphragm and triceps brachii muscle was 36.3 ± 6.3 seconds, 38.8 ± 14.9 seconds, 52.5 ± 9.7 seconds and 45.0 ± 8.2 seconds during the first test; and 49.3 ± 10.8 seconds, 40.0 ± 12.2 seconds, 47.5 ± 11.9 seconds and 41.3 ± 10.1 seconds during the second test. The 80% recovery of the control response for each muscle was 18.3 ± 2.7 minutes, 16.5±6.9 minutes, 8.1±2.5 minutes and 14.8±2.9 minutes during the first test; and 21.5±3.8 minutes, 12.5 ± 4.3 minutes, 10.5 ± 3.1 minutes and 16.4 ± 4.2 minutes during the second test. The sensitivity of the muscles to succinylcholine, ranked in order, was: the vocalis muscles, the triceps brachii muscle, the trapezius muscle and the diaphragm. We demonstrated a useful and reliable animal model to investigate the effects of NMBAs on intraoperative neuromonitoring. Extrapolation of these data to humans should be done with caution.

  1. Conducting and voltage-dependent behaviors of potassium ion channels reconstituted from diaphragm sarcoplasmic reticulum: comparison with the cardiac isoform.

    PubMed

    Picher, M; Decrouy, A; Rousseau, E

    1996-02-21

    Sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) K+ channels from canine diaphragm were studied upon fusion of longitudinal and junctional membrane vesicles into planar lipid bilayers (PLB). The large-conductance cation selective channel (gamma(max) = 250 pS; Km = 33 mM) displays long-lasting open events which are much more frequent at positive than at negative voltages. A major subconducting state about 45% of the fully-open state current amplitude was occasionally observed at all voltages. The voltage-dependence of the open probability displays a sigmoid relationship that was fitted by the Boltzmann equation and expressed in terms of thermodynamic parameters, namely the free energy (delta Gi) and the effective gating charge (Zs): delta Gi = 0.27 kcal/mol and Zs = -1.19 in 250 mM potassium gluconate (K-gluconate). Kinetic analyses also confirmed the voltage-dependent gating behavior of this channel, and indicate the implication of at least two open and three closed states. The diaphragm SR K+ channel shares several biophysical properties with the cardiac isoform: g = 180 pS, delta Gi = 0.75 kcal/mol, Zs = -1.45 in 150 mM K-gluconate, and a similar sigmoid P(o)/voltage relationship. Little is known about the regulation of the diaphragm and cardiac SR K+ channels. The conductance and gating of these channels were not influenced by physiological concentrations of Ca2+ (0.1 microM-1 mM) or Mg2+ (0.25-1 mM), as well as by cGMP (25-100 microM), lemakalim (1-100 microM), glyburide (up to 10 microM) or charybdotoxin (45-200 nM), added either to the cis or to the trans chamber. The apparent lack of biochemical or pharmacological modulation of these channels implies that they are not related to any of the well characterized surface membrane K+ channels. On the other hand, their voltage sensitivity strongly suggests that their activity could be modulated by putative changes in SR membrane potential that might occur during calcium fluxes.

  2. [Tension gastrothorax as a late consequence of an undiagnosed rupture of the diaphragm].

    PubMed

    Chmátal, P l; Novotný, M; Kupka, P; Voldrich, M

    2005-01-01

    The authors present a case-review of a 20-year-old male who suffered from a car accident polytruma (the ISS 22, brain contusion, lung contusion, serial ribs fructures, fracture of the Th8, haematoma of the left kidney with haematuria). Surgery was not indicated, his thorax and abdomen were repeatedly examined with x-rays, ultrasound and CT scans, during the patient's hospitalization and during the follow-up period. After some time, the stomach expansion in the pleural cavity imitated the clinical and roentgenological findings typical for the tension pneumothorax. Urgent drainage solved the cardiopulmonary failure and cleared up the diagnosis. This atypical case is followed by a short literature overview.

  3. Femtosecond-pulsed laser micromachining of a 4H SiC wafer for MEMS pressure sensor diaphragms and via holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yuanyuan; Nair, Rajeev; Molian, Raathai; Molian, Pal

    2008-03-01

    The challenging issues in conventional microfabrication of SiC pressure sensor diaphragms from bulk wafers are low etch rates, thicker (>40 µm) diaphragms, low spatial resolutions, rough surfaces and substantial contamination. In via hole drilling of SiC, the critical concern is the low drilling speed (nm per minute). In this work, femtosecond (fs)-pulsed laser ablation was conducted to overcome some of these deficiencies. Circular diaphragms (0.5 to 1 mm) by trepanning mode and via holes (30-50 µm) by percussion drilling mode were micromachined in 250 µm thick 4H-SiC single crystals using an 800 nm wavelength, 120 fs, 1 mJ Ti:sapphire laser. Pulse energy, number of pulses and scan rate were varied to obtain a high etch rate and high quality features. Results showed that the etch rates are 2-10 µm per pulse, diaphragm thicknesses are 20-200 µm, surface roughness is 1-2 µm Ra and via hole drilling speeds are up to 25 µm per second. The etch depth control was well within ± 1%. High aspect ratio features with excellent spatial resolutions were obtained due to the absence of thermal damages such as a recast layer and contamination. Thus, femtosecond-pulsed laser ablation by virtue of its unique characteristics such as multiphoton ionization and the absence of lattice heating offers high speed, precision and accuracy in micromachining 4H-SiC wafers.

  4. Replace the Carburetor Diaphragm. Pulsa-Jet Style with Automatic Choke. Fuel System. Student Manual 2. Small Engine Repair Series. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Pamela

    This student manual, part of a small-engine repair series on servicing fuel systems, is designed for use by special needs students in Texas. The manual explains in pictures and short sentences, written on a low reading level, the job of replacing carburetor diaphragms. Along with the steps of this repair job, specific safety and caution…

  5. Thoracic textilomas: CT findings*

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Dianne Melo; Zanetti, Gláucia; Araujo, Cesar Augusto; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Meirelles, Gustavo de Souza Portes; Pereira e Silva, Jorge Luiz; Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Souza, Arthur Soares; Hochhegger, Bruno; Marchiori, Edson

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyze chest CT scans of patients with thoracic textiloma. METHODS: This was a retrospective study of 16 patients (11 men and 5 women) with surgically confirmed thoracic textiloma. The chest CT scans of those patients were evaluated by two independent observers, and discordant results were resolved by consensus. RESULTS: The majority (62.5%) of the textilomas were caused by previous heart surgery. The most common symptoms were chest pain (in 68.75%) and cough (in 56.25%). In all cases, the main tomographic finding was a mass with regular contours and borders that were well-defined or partially defined. Half of the textilomas occurred in the right hemithorax and half occurred in the left. The majority (56.25%) were located in the lower third of the lung. The diameter of the mass was ≤ 10 cm in 10 cases (62.5%) and > 10 cm in the remaining 6 cases (37.5%). Most (81.25%) of the textilomas were heterogeneous in density, with signs of calcification, gas, radiopaque marker, or sponge-like material. Peripheral expansion of the mass was observed in 12 (92.3%) of the 13 patients in whom a contrast agent was used. Intraoperatively, pleural involvement was observed in 14 cases (87.5%) and pericardial involvement was observed in 2 (12.5%). CONCLUSIONS: It is important to recognize the main tomographic aspects of thoracic textilomas in order to include this possibility in the differential diagnosis of chest pain and cough in patients with a history of heart or thoracic surgery, thus promoting the early identification and treatment of this postoperative complication. PMID:25410842

  6. Series integration of the diaphragm cell transport equation when the diffusion coefficient is a function of concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cain, Judith B.; Baird, James K.

    1992-01-01

    An integral of the form, t = B0 + BL ln(Delta-c) + B1(Delta-c) + B2(Delta-c)-squared + ..., where t is the time and Delta-c is the concentration difference across the frit, is derived in the case of the diaphragm cell transport equation where the interdiffusion coefficient is a function of concentration. The coefficient, B0, is a constant of the integration, while the coefficients, BL, B1, B2,..., depend in general upon the constant, the compartment volumes, and the interdiffusion coefficient and various of its concentration derivatives evaluated at the mean concentration for the cell. Explicit formulas for BL, B1, B2,... are given.

  7. The mean fibre area of the semitendinosus, diaphragm and pectoralis transversus muscles in differing types of horse and dog.

    PubMed

    Gunn, H M

    1978-10-01

    The mean fibre areas of samples from m. semitendinosus, m. diaphragma and m. pectoralis transversus of thoroughbred horses and greyhounds have been compared with those in similar samples from other members of their species. Athletes (greyhounds and thoroughbreds) have larger fibres in the semitendinosus and diaphragm than their fellows. However, the mean area of pectoralis transversus is similar in the two types of animal within each species. During growth the mean fibre areas increase to a greater extent in athletes than in non-athletes. Detraining adult greyhounds for a period of one year did not signficantly alter the fibre area; nor were any sex differences detected. Although the mean fibre area of corresponding muscles is significantly larger in horses than in dogs, the difference is proportionately less than that of their live weights.

  8. Multi-stage FEL amplifier with diaphragm focusing line as direct energy driver for inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Saldin, E.L.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Ulyanov, Yu.N.

    1995-12-31

    An FEL based energy driver for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) is proposed. The key element of the scheme is free electron laser system. Novel technical solutions, namely, using of multichannel, multi-stage FEL amplifier with diaphragm focusing line, reveal a possibility to construct the FEL system operating at radiation wavelength {lambda} = 0.5 {mu}m and providing flush energy E = 1 MJ and brightness 4 x 10{sup 22} W cm{sup -2} sr{sup -1} within steering pulse duration {tau} {approximately} 0.1-2 ns. Total energy efficiency of the proposed ICF energy driver is about of 11% and repetition rate is 40 Hz. It is shown that the FEL based ICF energy driver may be constructed at the present level of accelerator technique R& D.

  9. CT scanning of the breast using a conventional CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Doust, B D; Milbrath, J R; Doust, V L

    1981-09-01

    Using a conventional body CT scanner, computed tomography of the breast was performed on 32 patients known to have or suspected of having breast masses. Xeromammograms were available for comparison in all cases. All mass lesions were histologically proved. Seven patients were examined prone, 25 supine. The prone position yielded pictures that resembled craniocaudal mammograms. Breast asymmetry, skin thickening, stranding from a mass to the chest wall, calcification, and axillary lymphadenopathy could be demonstrated by means of CT. The portion of the breast adjacent to the chest wall was more readily examined by means of CT than by conventional mammography. Internal mammary nodes could not be demonstrated.

  10. Helical CT in emergency radiology.

    PubMed

    Novelline, R A; Rhea, J T; Rao, P M; Stuk, J L

    1999-11-01

    Today, a wide range of traumatic and nontraumatic emergency conditions are quickly and accurately diagnosed with helical computed tomography (CT). Many traditional emergency imaging procedures have been replaced with newer helical CT techniques that can be performed in less time and with greater accuracy, less patient discomfort, and decreased cost. The speed of helical technology permits CT examination of seriously ill patients in the emergency department, as well as patients who might not have been taken to CT previously because of the length of the examinations of the past. Also, helical technology permits multiple, sequential CT scans to be quickly obtained in the same patient, a great advance for the multiple-trauma patient. Higher quality CT examinations result from decreased respiratory misregistration, enhanced intravenous contrast material opacification of vascular structures and parenchymal organs, greater flexibility in image reconstruction, and improved multiplanar and three-dimensional reformations. This report summarizes the role and recommended protocols for the helical CT diagnosis of thoracic aortic trauma; aortic dissection; pulmonary embolism; acute conditions of the neck soft tissues; abdominal trauma; urinary tract stones; appendicitis; diverticulitis; abdominal aortic aneurysm; fractures of the face, spine, and extremities; and acute stroke.

  11. MULTIMODALITY IMAGING: BEYOND PET/CT AND SPECT/CT

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Simon R.

    2009-01-01

    Multimodality imaging with PET/CT and SPECT/CT has become commonplace in clinical practice and in preclinical and basic medical research. Do other combinations of imaging modalities have a similar potential to impact medical science and clinical medicine? The combination of PET or SPECT with MRI is an area of active research at the present time, while other, perhaps less obvious combinations, including CT/MR and PET/optical also are being studied. In addition to the integration of the instrumentation, there are parallel developments in synthesizing imaging agents that can be viewed by multiple imaging modalities. Is the fusion of PET and SPECT with CT the ultimate answer in multimodality imaging, or is it just the first example of a more general trend towards harnessing the complementary nature of the different modalities on integrated imaging platforms? PMID:19646559

  12. Errors in CT colonography.

    PubMed

    Trilisky, Igor; Ward, Emily; Dachman, Abraham H

    2015-10-01

    CT colonography (CTC) is a colorectal cancer screening modality which is becoming more widely implemented and has shown polyp detection rates comparable to those of optical colonoscopy. CTC has the potential to improve population screening rates due to its minimal invasiveness, no sedation requirement, potential for reduced cathartic examination, faster patient throughput, and cost-effectiveness. Proper implementation of a CTC screening program requires careful attention to numerous factors, including patient preparation prior to the examination, the technical aspects of image acquisition, and post-processing of the acquired data. A CTC workstation with dedicated software is required with integrated CTC-specific display features. Many workstations include computer-aided detection software which is designed to decrease errors of detection by detecting and displaying polyp-candidates to the reader for evaluation. There are several pitfalls which may result in false-negative and false-positive reader interpretation. We present an overview of the potential errors in CTC and a systematic approach to avoid them.

  13. A reappraisal of adult thoracic and abdominal surface anatomy via CT scan in Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xin-Hua; Su, Bai-Yan; Liu, Jing-Juan; Zhang, Gu-Muyang; Xue, Hua-Dan; Jin, Zheng-Yu; Mirjalili, S Ali; Ma, Chao

    2016-03-01

    Accurate surface anatomy is essential for safe clinical practice. There are numerous inconsistencies in clinically important surface markings among and within contemporary anatomical reference texts. The aim of this study was to investigate key thoracic and abdominal surface anatomy landmarks in living Chinese adults using computed tomography (CT). A total of 100 thoracic and 100 abdominal CT scans were examined. Our results indicated that the following key surface landmarks differed from current commonly-accepted descriptions: the positions of the tracheal bifurcation, azygos vein termination, and pulmonary trunk bifurcation (all below the plane of the sternal angle at vertebral level T5-T6 in most individuals); the superior vena cava formation and junction with the right atrium (most often behind the 1st and 4th intercostal spaces, respectively); and the level at which the inferior vena cava and esophagus traverse the diaphragm (T10 and T11, respectively). The renal arteries were most commonly at L1; the midpoint of the renal hila was most frequently at L2; the 11th rib was posterior to the left kidney in only 29% of scans; and the spleen was most frequently located between the 10th and 12th ribs. A number of significant sex- and age-related differences were noted. The Chinese population was also compared with western populations on the basis of published reports. Reappraisal of surface anatomy using modern imaging tools in vivo will provide both quantitative and qualitative evidence to facilitate the clinical application of these key surface landmarks.

  14. Greening America's Capitals - Hartford, CT

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Greening America's Capitals report gives Hartford, CT, a new vision for Capitol Avenue that highlights existing assets and fills in gaps along the mile-long area of focus and into the surrounding neighborhoods.

  15. Multiplanar CT of the spine

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, S.L.G.; Glenn, W.V. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    This is an illustrated text on computed tomography (CT) of the lumbar spine with an emphasis on the role and value of multiplanar imaging for helping determine diagnoses. The book has adequate discussion of scanning techniques for the different regions, interpretations of various abnormalities, degenerative disk disease, and different diagnoses. There is a 50-page chapter on detailed sectional anatomy of the spine and useful chapters on the postoperative spine and the planning and performing of spinal surgery with CT multiplanar reconstruction. There are comprehensive chapters on spinal tumors and trauma. The final two chapters of the book are devoted to CT image processing using digital networks and CT applications of medical computer graphics.

  16. CT Perfusion of the Head

    MedlinePlus

    ... ray beam follows a spiral path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create ... process. Nearly all CT scanners now have special computer programs that help to increase image quality at lower ...

  17. CT Demonstration of Caput Medusae

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Edward C.; Vilensky, Joel A.

    2009-01-01

    Maximum intensity and volume rendered CT displays of caput medusae are provided to demonstrate both the anatomy and physiology of this portosystemic shunt associated with portal hypertension. (Contains 2 figures.)

  18. Adrenal cortex dysfunction: CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Huebener, K.H.; Treugut, H.

    1984-01-01

    The computed tomographic appearance of the adrenal gland was studied in 302 patients with possible endocrinologic disease and 107 patients undergoing CT for nonendocrinologic reasons. Measurements of adrenal size were also made in 100 adults with no known adrenal pathology. CT proved to be a sensitive diagnostic tool in combination with clinical studies. When blood hormone levels are increased, CT can differentiate among homogeneous organic hyperplasia, nodular hyperplasia, benign adenoma, and malignant cortical adenoma. When blood hormone levels are decreased, CT can demonstrate hypoplasia or metastatic tumorous destruction. Calcifications can be demonstrated earlier than on plain radiographs. When hormone elimination is increased, the morphologic substrate can be identified; tumorous changes can be localized and infiltration of surrounding organs recognized.

  19. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... What are the limitations of Children's CT? A person who is very large may not fit into ... facility staff and/or your insurance provider to get a better understanding of the possible charges you ...

  20. CT angiography - head and neck

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007677.htm CT angiography - head and neck To use the sharing features on this page, ... create pictures of the blood vessels in the head and neck. How the Test is Performed You will be ...

  1. Multiplanar CT of the spine

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, S.L.G.; Glenn, W.V.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 16 chapters. Some of the topics are: CT of the Sacrum, The Postoperative Spine, Film Organizations and Case Reporting, Degeneration and Disc Disease of the Intervertebral Joint, Lumbar Spinal Stenosis, and Cervical and Thoracic Spine.

  2. A tonsillolith seen on CT.

    PubMed

    Espe, B J; Newmark, H

    1992-01-01

    A case of a large tonsillolith visualized by computerized tomography is presented. Although otolaryngologists are well aware of this entity, few radiologists are. The importance of distinguishing tonsilloliths from other structures by CT scan is discussed.

  3. Liver echinococcus - CT scan (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This upper abdominal CT scan shows multiple cysts in the liver, caused by dog tapeworm (echinococcus). Note the large circular cyst (seen on the left side of the screen) and multiple smaller cysts throughout ...

  4. Primary lower extremity lymphedema: CT diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Gamba, J.L.; Silverman, P.M.; Ling, D.; Dunnick, N.R.; Korobkin, M.

    1983-10-01

    The CT findings of two cases of primary lymphedema of the lower extremities are presented. CT showed a coarse, nonenhancing, reticular pattern in an enlarged subcutaneous compartment. CT excluded the diagnosis of secondary lymphedema from an obstructing mass by demonstrating a normal retroperitoneum and pelvis. The CT findings are correlated with pedal lymphangiograms.

  5. Primary epiploic appendagitis: CT diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Sandrasegaran, Kumaresan; Maglinte, Dean D; Rajesh, Arumugam; Akisik, Fatih M

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the CT signs of primary epiploic appendagitis. A retrospective search of the CT database over 12 months for this diagnosis revealed 11 cases. The clinical findings were recorded. Softcopy CT images were reviewed by two experienced abdominal radiologists (KS, DM) for location of lesion, size, shape, presence of central hyperdense focus, degree of bowel wall thickening, mass effect, and ancillary signs. Abdominal pain was the primary symptom in all patients. Preliminary diagnoses were appendicitis (n=2), diverticulitis (n=5), pancreatitis (n=1), ovarian lesion (n=1), or unknown (n=2). Abdominal examination and white blood cell count were uninformative. CT examination revealed a solitary (n=11), ovoid (n=9) fatty lesion with some soft tissue stranding adjacent to the left colon (n=6), transverse colon (n=3), or right colon (n=2). Central hyperdensity (n=5), mild bowel wall thickening (n=2), and parietal peritoneal thickening (n=4) were also seen. In 4 patients the lesions were not visible on follow-up CT examination performed 23-184 days later. Primary epiploic appendagitis can clinically mimic other, more serious inflammatory conditions. Knowledge of its findings on CT would help the radiologist make the diagnosis and allow a more conservative approach to patient care.

  6. Cone beam CT with zonal filters for simultaneous dose reduction, improved target contrast and automated set-up in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Moore, C J; Marchant, T E; Amer, A M

    2006-05-07

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) using a zonal filter is introduced. The aims are reduced concomitant imaging dose to the patient, simultaneous control of body scatter for improved image quality in the tumour target zone and preserved set-up detail for radiotherapy. Aluminium transmission diaphragms added to the CBCT x-ray tube of the Elekta Synergytrade mark linear accelerator produced an unattenuated beam for a central "target zone" and a partially attenuated beam for an outer "set-up zone". Imaging doses and contrast noise ratios (CNR) were measured in a test phantom for transmission diaphragms 12 and 24 mm thick, for 5 and 10 cm long target zones. The effect on automatic registration of zonal CBCT to conventional CT was assessed relative to full-field and lead-collimated images of an anthropomorphic phantom. Doses along the axis of rotation were reduced by up to 50% in both target and set-up zones, and weighted dose (two thirds surface dose plus one third central dose) was reduced by 10-20% for a 10 cm long target zone. CNR increased by up to 15% in zonally filtered CBCT images compared to full-field images. Automatic image registration remained as robust as that with full-field images and was superior to CBCT coned down using lead-collimation. Zonal CBCT significantly reduces imaging dose and is expected to benefit radiotherapy through improved target contrast, required to assess target coverage, and wide-field edge detail, needed for robust automatic measurement of patient set-up error.

  7. Cardiac cone-beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Manzke, Robert . E-mail: robert.manzke@philips.com

    2005-10-15

    This doctoral thesis addresses imaging of the heart with retrospectively gated helical cone-beam computed tomography (CT). A thorough review of the CT reconstruction literature is presented in combination with a historic overview of cardiac CT imaging and a brief introduction to other cardiac imaging modalities. The thesis includes a comprehensive chapter about the theory of CT reconstruction, familiarizing the reader with the problem of cone-beam reconstruction. The anatomic and dynamic properties of the heart are outlined and techniques to derive the gating information are reviewed. With the extended cardiac reconstruction (ECR) framework, a new approach is presented for the heart-rate-adaptive gated helical cardiac cone-beam CT reconstruction. Reconstruction assessment criteria such as the temporal resolution, the homogeneity in terms of the cardiac phase, and the smoothness at cycle-to-cycle transitions are developed. Several reconstruction optimization approaches are described: An approach for the heart-rate-adaptive optimization of the temporal resolution is presented. Streak artifacts at cycle-to-cycle transitions can be minimized by using an improved cardiac weighting scheme. The optimal quiescent cardiac phase for the reconstruction can be determined automatically with the motion map technique. Results for all optimization procedures applied to ECR are presented and discussed based on patient and phantom data. The ECR algorithm is analyzed for larger detector arrays of future cone-beam systems throughout an extensive simulation study based on a four-dimensional cardiac CT phantom. The results of the scientific work are summarized and an outlook proposing future directions is given. The presented thesis is available for public download at www.cardiac-ct.net.

  8. Diaphragm-free cell for trace determination of water based on the karl Fischer reaction using continuous coulometric titration.

    PubMed

    Cedergren, A; Jonsson, S

    1997-08-01

    A new type of diaphragm-free coulometric cell for continuous coulometric Karl Fischer titrations of water in the range 0.1-1000 μg is described. The relative standard deviation obtained for titrations of 1 μg amounts of water was typically 1%. The background due to diffusion of water from the air was normally in the range 0.3-0.9 μg of water min(-1) depending on environmental humidity. The variation in the background was normally ±0.01 μg min(-1). The construction makes it possible, at any time in a sequence of titrations, to renew the catholyte by means of a Teflon plunger inside the cathode compartment. In this way, the interference effects caused by oxidizable reduction products of methyl sulfite which are formed at the cathode can be controlled in a very simple way. These products are rapidly eliminated by means of a normal titration before a new titration starts. The need for this draining step differs depending on the type of reagent used. The coulometric titration system makes use of true potentiometric end-point detection, and this principle makes it possible to control the iodine level at the end-point at much lower levels as compared with commercial instrumentation. The analytical advantages gained by this option are demonstrated for the determination of water in ethylenediamine, a task which was found to be impossible when using end-point concentrations in the range (3-7) × 10(-5) M, which is typical for the bipotentiometric indicating system used in commercial instruments. Recovery rates in the range 100-102% were obtained and are shown to be dependent on the type of reagent used. The most accurate results were obtained for an imidazole-buffered methanolic reagent in which the concentration of sulfur dioxide was kept relatively low (0.10 M). The diaphragm-free cell described was shown to be compatible with all of the commercial reagents (designed for coulometry) investigated, including the well-known Hydranal products Coulomat A, AK, AG, AG-H, and

  9. Radioembolization with Y-90 Glass Microspheres: Do We Really Need SPECT-CT to Identify Extrahepatic Shunts?

    PubMed Central

    Theysohn, Jens M.; Ruhlmann, Marcus; Müller, Stefan; Dechene, Alexander; Best, Jan; Haubold, Johannes; Umutlu, Lale; Gerken, Guido; Bockisch, Andreas; Lauenstein, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT) with 90yttrium (Y-90) is an increasingly used therapeutic option for unresectable liver malignancies. Nontarget embolization of extrahepatic tissue secondary to vascular shunting can lead to SIRT associated complications. Our aim was to assess whether extrahepatic shunts can reliably be diagnosed based on hepatic digital subtraction angiography (DSA) or whether subsequent SPECT/CT data can provide additional information. Materials and Methods 825 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (n = 636), hepatic metastases (n = 158) or cholangiocellular carcinoma (n = 31) were retrospectively analyzed. During hepatic DSA 128 arteries causing shunt flow to gastrointestinal tissue were coilembolized (right gastric artery n = 63, gastroduodenal artery n = 29; branches to duodenum / pancreas n = 36). Technectium-99m-labeled human serum albumin (HSA) was injected in all 825 patients. SPECT/CT data was used to identify additional or remaining shunts to extrahepatic tissue. Results An unexpected uptake of HSA in extrahepatic tissue was found by SPECT/CT in 54/825 (6.5%) patients (located in stomach n = 13, duodenum n = 26, distal bowel segments n = 12, kidney n = 1, diaphragm n = 2). These patients underwent repeated DSA and newly identified shunt vessels were coilembolized in 22/54 patients, while in 12/54 patients a more distal catheter position for repeat injection of HSA was chosen. In 20/54 patients the repeated SPECT/CT data still revealed an extrahepatic HSA uptake. These patients did not receive SIRT. Conclusion Most extrahepatic shunts can be identified on DSA prior to Y-90 therapy. However, SPECT-CT data helps to identify additional shunts that were initially not seen on DSA. PMID:26335790

  10. Visual Assessment of CT Findings in Smokers With Nonobstructed Spirometric Abnormalities in The COPDGene® Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Song Soo; Yagihashi, Kunihiro; Stinson, Douglas S.; Zach, Jordan A.; McKenzie, Alexander S.; Curran-Everett, Douglas; Wan, Emily S.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Crapo, James D.; Lynch, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Within the COPD Genetic Epidemiology (COPDGene®) study population of cigarette smokers, 9% were found to be unclassifiable by the Global Initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) criteria. This study was to identify the differences in computed tomography (CT) findings between this nonobstructed (GOLDU) group and a control group of smokers with normal lung function. This research was approved by the institutional review board of each institution. CT images of 400 participants in the COPDGene® study (200 GOLDU, 200 smokers with normal lung function) were retrospectively evaluated in a blinded fashion. Visual CT assessment included lobar analysis of emphysema (type, extent), presence of paraseptal emphysema, airway wall thickening, expiratory air trapping, centrilobular nodules, atelectasis, non-fibrotic and fibrotic interstitial lung disease (ILD), pleural thickening, diaphragmatic eventration, vertebral body changes and internal thoracic diameters (in mm). Univariate comparisons of groups for each CT parameter and multiple logistic regression were performed to determine the imaging features associated with GOLDU. When compared with the control group, GOLDU participants had a significantly higher prevalence of unilateral diaphragm eventration (30% vs. 16%), airway wall thickening, centrilobular nodules, reticular abnormality, paraseptal emphysema (33% vs. 17%), linear atelectasis (60% vs. 35.6%), kyphosis (12% vs. 4%), and a smaller internal transverse thoracic diameter (255 ± 22.5 [standard deviation] vs. 264.8 ± 22.4, mm) (all p<0.05). With multiple logistic regression, all of these CT parameters, except non-fibrotic ILD and kyphosis, remained significantly associated with GOLDU status (p<0.05). In cigarette smokers, chest wall abnormalities and parenchymal lung disease, which contribute to restrictive physiologic impairment, are associated with GOLD-nonobstructed status. PMID:25197723

  11. Effect of a poloxamer 407-based thermosensitive gel on minimization of thermal injury to diaphragm during microwave ablation of the liver

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li-Li; Xia, Gui-Min; Liu, Yu-Jiang; Dou, Rui; Eisenbrey, John; Liu, Ji-Bin; Wang, Xiao-Wei; Qian, Lin-Xue

    2017-01-01

    AIM To assess the insulating effect of a poloxamer 407 (P407)-based gel during microwave ablation of liver adjacent to the diaphragm. METHODS We prepared serial dilutions of P407, and 22.5% (w/w) concentration was identified as suitable for ablation procedures. Subsequently, microwave ablations were performed on the livers of 24 rabbits (gel, saline, control groups, n = 8 in each). The P407 solution and 0.9% normal saline were injected into the potential space between the diaphragm and liver in experimental groups. No barriers were applied to the controls. After microwave ablations, the frequency, size and degree of thermal injury were compared histologically among the three groups. Subsequently, another 8 rabbits were injected with the P407 solution and microwave ablation was performed. The levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine (Cr) in serum were tested at 1 d before microwave ablation and 3 and 7 d after operation. RESULTS In vivo ablation thermal injury to the adjacent diaphragm was evaluated in the control, saline and 22.5% P407 gel groups (P = 0.001-0.040). However, there was no significant difference in the volume of ablation zone among the three groups (P > 0.05). Moreover, there were no statistical differences among the preoperative and postoperative gel groups according to the levels of ALT, AST, BUN and Cr in serum (all P > 0.05). CONCLUSION Twenty-two point five percent P407 gel could be a more effective choice during microwave ablation of hepatic tumors adjacent to the diaphragm. Further studies for clinical translation are warranted.

  12. Comparative phosphoproteomic analysis of mammalian glomeruli reveals conserved podocin C-terminal phosphorylation as a determinant of slit diaphragm complex architecture.

    PubMed

    Rinschen, Markus M; Pahmeyer, Caroline; Pisitkun, Trairak; Schnell, Nicole; Wu, Xiongwu; Maaß, Martina; Bartram, Malte P; Lamkemeyer, Tobias; Schermer, Bernhard; Benzing, Thomas; Brinkkoetter, Paul T

    2015-04-01

    Glomerular biology is dependent on tightly controlled signal transduction networks that control phosphorylation of signaling proteins such as cytoskeletal regulators or slit diaphragm proteins of kidney podocytes. Cross-species comparison of phosphorylation events is a powerful mean to functionally prioritize and identify physiologically meaningful phosphorylation sites. Here, we present the result of phosphoproteomic analyses of cow and rat glomeruli to allow cross-species comparisons. We discovered several phosphorylation sites with potentially high biological relevance, e.g. tyrosine phosphorylation of the cytoskeletal regulator synaptopodin and the slit diaphragm protein neph-1 (Kirrel). Moreover, cross-species comparisons revealed conserved phosphorylation of the slit diaphragm protein nephrin on an acidic cluster at the intracellular terminus and conserved podocin phosphorylation on the very carboxyl terminus of the protein. We studied a highly conserved podocin phosphorylation site in greater detail and show that phosphorylation regulates affinity of the interaction with nephrin and CD2AP. Taken together, these results suggest that species comparisons of phosphoproteomic data may reveal regulatory principles in glomerular biology. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001005 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001005).

  13. The effects of inspiratory diaphragm breathing exercise and expiratory pursed-lip breathing exercise on chronic stroke patients’ respiratory muscle activation

    PubMed Central

    Seo, KyoChul; Hwan, Park Seung; Park, KwangYong

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of inspiratory diaphragm breathing exercise and expiratory pursed-lip breathing exercise on chronic stroke patients’ respiratory muscle activation. [Subjects and Methods] All experimental subjects performed exercises five times per week for four weeks. Thirty chronic stroke patients were randomly assign to an experimental group of 15 patients and a control group of 15 patients. The experimental group underwent exercises consisting of basic exercise treatment for 15 minutes and inspiratory diaphragm breathing exercise and expiratory pursed-lip breathing exercise for 15 minutes and the control group underwent exercises consisting of basic exercise treatment for 15 minutes and auto-med exercise for 15 minutes. The activation levels of respiratory muscles were measured before and after the experiment using MP 150WSW to obtain the results of the experiment. [Results] In the present study, when the pulmonary functions of the experimental group and the control group before and after the experiment were compared, whereas the experimental group showed significant differences in all sections. In the verification of intergroup differences between the experimental group and the control group before and after the experiment. [Conclusion] The respiratory rehabilitation exercise is considered to be capable of inducing positive effects on stroke patients’ respiratory muscles through diaphragm breathing exercise and lip puckering breathing exercise. PMID:28356632

  14. Effects of static magnetic field on specific adenosine-5{prime}-triphosphatase activities and bioelectrical and biomechanical properties in the rat diaphragm muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Itegin, M.; Guenay, I.; Logoglu, G.; Isbir, T.

    1995-08-01

    In this study, the authors aimed to clarify the effects of chronically applied static magnetic field (200 Gauss) on specific ATPase activities and bioelectrical and biomechanical responses in the isolated rat diaphragm muscle. The mean activities of Na{sup +}-K{sup +} ATPase and Ca{sup 2+} ATPase determined from the diaphragm homogenates were significantly higher in the magnetic field exposed group (n = 20), but that of Mg{sup 2+} ATPase was nonsignificantly lower compared to the control group (n = 13). Resting membrane potential, amplitude of muscle action potential, and overshoot values (mean {+-} SE) in the control group were found to be {minus}76.5 {+-} 0.6, 100 {+-} 0.8, and 23.5 {+-} 0.6 mV, respectively; these values were determined to be {minus}72.8 {+-} 0.4, 90.3 {+-} 0.5, and 17.2 {+-} 0.4 mV in the magnetic field-exposed group, respectively. The latency was determined to increase in the experimental group, and all the above-mentioned bioelectrical differences between the groups were significant statistically. Force of muscle twitch was found to decrease significantly in the magnetic field-exposed group, and this finding was attributed to the augmenting effect of magnetic field on Ca{sup 2+} ATPase activity. These results suggest that magnetic field exposure changes specific ATPase activities and, thence, bioelectrical and biomechanical properties in the rat diaphragm muscle.

  15. Vibration-based energy harvesting with a clamped piezoelectric circular diaphragm: analysis and identification of optimal structural parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yangyiwei; Wang, Shuai; Stein, Peter; Xu, Bai-Xiang; Yang, Tongqing

    2017-04-01

    Due to many potential promising applications, vibration-based piezoelectric energy harvesters (VPEH) with a clamped circular diaphragm are an intensively studied design in the field of piezoelectric energy harvesters. Nonetheless, their performance still leaves space for improvement, which is the primary target of this article. We define two structural parameters, namely the ratio ϖ 1 between the bonding area and the piezoceramic diameter as well as the ratio ϖ 2 between the clamping rim and the substrate diameter, to characterize these structures. A vibration model is developed in order to provide an analytical foundation for the identification of optimal parameters ϖ 1 and ϖ 2. It is verified by finite-element simulations and substantive experiments. The results allow to relate the device performance, including resonance frequency and output power, to ϖ 1 and ϖ 2. This shows that the output rises with increasing ϖ 2, and that the maximum output for a given ϖ 2 always lies in the range {\\varpi }1\\in ({0.1,} 0.2). Based on this observation, an improved harvester structure with a pre-stress of 0.3 N is identified, that exhibits a matched power up to 16.3 mW at 219 Hz. This demonstrates the feasibility to achieve VPEHs with higher outputs and lower eigenfrequency through simultaneous modification of ϖ 1 and ϖ 2, which is highly beneficial for low-frequency energy harvesting.

  16. Colonic interposition between the liver and left diaphragm - management of Chilaiditi syndrome: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    WENG, WEI-HONG; LIU, DA-REN; FENG, CHENG-CHENG; QUE, RI-SHENG

    2014-01-01

    Chilaiditi syndrome refers to a medical condition that is indicated by the presence of Chilaiditi sign, the radiological observation of a colonic interposition between the liver and the diaphragm, and is associated with other clinical symptoms. Chilaiditi syndrome is a rare entity and therefore, is often misdiagnosed in clinical practice, however, it may be accompanied by a series of severe complications, such as bowel obstruction and perforation. The current study describes a 47-year-old male who presented with repeated abdominal pain and acute intestinal obstruction. The patient was diagnosed with Chilaiditi syndrome via radiological observation and was cured by conservative treatment. The clinical data of seven additional patients with Chilaiditi syndrome, which was reported in the Chinese literature between January 1990 and January 2013, were also collected. The pathogenesis, clinical manifestation, diagnosis and treatment of this syndrome have been reviewed and analyzed. The current study may be useful to familiarize clinical practitioners with Chilaiditi syndrome, in order to avoid a misdiagnosis during clinical treatment. PMID:24765195

  17. Generation of dc pin-hole discharges in liquids: comparison of discharge breakdown in diaphragm and capillary configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozáková, Zdenka; Krčma, František; Vašíček, Michal; Hlavatá, Lucie; Hlochová, Lenka

    2015-04-01

    Electrical discharges in liquids can be generated in several electrode configurations; one of them is called as a pin-hole. The discharge is created inside a small orifice in the dielectric barrier connecting two chambers filled by any conductive solution. Each chamber contains one electrode. Based on the orifice length/diameter ratio, the discharge is called as a capillary or diaphragm discharge. The present paper gives the first detailed observation of the dependence of discharge creation on the orifice shape for selected NaCl solution conductivities (250-1000 μS cm-1). As a dielectric barrier, ceramic discs with thickness varying from 0.3 to 1.5 mm were used. Diameter of one central pin-hole was in the range of 0.25-1.00 mm. The non-pulsing dc high voltage up to 2 kV with power up to 500 W was used for the presented study. The bubble theory of the discharge generation was confirmed at the set conditions.

  18. Increase of lower esophageal sphincter pressure after osteopathic intervention on the diaphragm in patients with gastroesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    da Silva, R C V; de Sá, C C; Pascual-Vaca, Á O; de Souza Fontes, L H; Herbella Fernandes, F A M; Dib, R A; Blanco, C R; Queiroz, R A; Navarro-Rodriguez, T

    2013-07-01

    The treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease may be clinical or surgical. The clinical consists basically of the use of drugs; however, there are new techniques to complement this treatment, osteopathic intervention in the diaphragmatic muscle is one these. The objective of the study is to compare pressure values in the examination of esophageal manometry of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) before and immediately after osteopathic intervention in the diaphragm muscle. Thirty-eight patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease - 16 submitted to sham technique and 22 submitted osteopathic technique - were randomly selected. The average respiratory pressure (ARP) and the maximum expiratory pressure (MEP) of the LES were measured by manometry before and after osteopathic technique at the point of highest pressure. Statistical analysis was performed using the Student's t-test and Mann-Whitney, and magnitude of the technique proposed was measured using the Cohen's index. Statistically significant difference in the osteopathic technique was found in three out of four in relation to the group of patients who performed the sham technique for the following measures of LES pressure: ARP with P= 0.027. The MEP had no statistical difference (P= 0.146). The values of Cohen d for the same measures were: ARP with d= 0.80 and MEP d= 0.52. Osteopathic manipulative technique produces a positive increment in the LES region soon after its performance.

  19. mdx(⁵cv) mice manifest more severe muscle dysfunction and diaphragm force deficits than do mdx Mice.

    PubMed

    Beastrom, Nicholas; Lu, Haiyan; Macke, Allison; Canan, Benjamin D; Johnson, Eric K; Penton, Christopher M; Kaspar, Brian K; Rodino-Klapac, Louise R; Zhou, Lan; Janssen, Paul M L; Montanaro, Federica

    2011-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is characterized by progressive skeletal muscle dysfunction leading to premature death by the third decade of life. The mdx mouse, the most widely used animal model of DMD, has been extremely useful to study disease mechanisms and to screen new therapeutics. However, unlike patients with DMD, mdx mice have a very mild motor function deficit, posing significant limitations for its use as a platform to assess the impact of treatments on motor function. It has been suggested that an mdx variant, the mdx(5cv) mouse, might be more severely affected. Here, we compared the motor activity, histopathology, and individual muscle force measurements of mdx and mdx(⁵cv) mice. Our study revealed that mdx(⁵cv) mice showed more severe exercise-induced fatigue, Rotarod performance deficits, and gait anomalies than mdx mice and that these deficits began at a younger age. Muscle force studies showed more severe strength deficits in the diaphragm of mdx(⁵cv) mice compared to mdx mice, but similar force generation in the extensor digitorum longus. Muscle histology was similar between the two strains. Differences in genetic background (genetic modifiers) probably account for these functional differences between mdx strains. Overall, our findings indicate that the mdx and mdx(⁵cv) mouse models of DMD are not interchangeable and identify the mdx(⁵cv) mouse as a valuable platform for preclinical studies that require assessment of muscle function in live animals.

  20. A simple method for automated lung segmentation in x-ray CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Bin; Leader, J. Ken, III; Maitz, Glenn S.; Chapman, Brian E.; Fuhrman, Carl R.; Rogers, Robert M.; Sciurba, Frank C.; Perez, Andrew; Thompson, Paul; Good, Walter F.; Gur, David

    2003-05-01

    We developed and tested an automated scheme to segment lung areas depicted in CT images. The scheme includes a series of six steps. 1) Filtering and removing pixels outside the scanned anatomic structures. 2) Segmenting the potential lung areas using an adaptive threshold based on pixel value distribution in each CT slice. 3) Labeling all selected pixels ingo segmented regions and deleting isolated regions in non-lung area. 4) Labeling and filling interior cavities (e.g., pleural nodules, airway wall, and major blood vessels) inside lung areas. 5) Detecting and deleting the main airways (e.g., trachea and central bronchi) connected to the segmented lung areas. 6) Detecting and separating possible anterior or posterior junctions between the lungs. Five lung CT cases (7-10 mm in slice thickness) with variety of disease patterns were used to train or set up the classification rules in the scheme. Fifty examinations of emphysema patients were then used to test the scheme. The results were compared with the results generated from a semi-automated method with manual interaction by an expert observer. The experimental results showed that the average difference in estimated lung volumes between the automated scheme and manually corrected approach was 2.91%+/-0.88%. Visual examination of segmentation results indicated that the difference of the two methods was larger in the areas near the apices and the diaphragm. This preliminary study demonstrated that a simple multi-stage scheme had potential of eliminating the need for manual interaction during lunch segmentation. Hence, it can ultimately be integrated into computer schemes for quantitative analysis and diagnosis of lung diseases.

  1. Fully automated intrinsic respiratory and cardiac gating for small animal CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntz, J.; Dinkel, J.; Zwick, S.; Bäuerle, T.; Grasruck, M.; Kiessling, F.; Gupta, R.; Semmler, W.; Bartling, S. H.

    2010-04-01

    A fully automated, intrinsic gating algorithm for small animal cone-beam CT is described and evaluated. A parameter representing the organ motion, derived from the raw projection images, is used for both cardiac and respiratory gating. The proposed algorithm makes it possible to reconstruct motion-corrected still images as well as to generate four-dimensional (4D) datasets representing the cardiac and pulmonary anatomy of free-breathing animals without the use of electrocardiogram (ECG) or respiratory sensors. Variation analysis of projections from several rotations is used to place a region of interest (ROI) on the diaphragm. The ROI is cranially extended to include the heart. The centre of mass (COM) variation within this ROI, the filtered frequency response and the local maxima are used to derive a binary motion-gating parameter for phase-sensitive gated reconstruction. This algorithm was implemented on a flat-panel-based cone-beam CT scanner and evaluated using a moving phantom and animal scans (seven rats and eight mice). Volumes were determined using a semiautomatic segmentation. In all cases robust gating signals could be obtained. The maximum volume error in phantom studies was less than 6%. By utilizing extrinsic gating via externally placed cardiac and respiratory sensors, the functional parameters (e.g. cardiac ejection fraction) and image quality were equivalent to this current gold standard. This algorithm obviates the necessity of both gating hardware and user interaction. The simplicity of the proposed algorithm enables adoption in a wide range of small animal cone-beam CT scanners.

  2. Malignant external otitis: CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Curtin, H.D.; Wolfe, P.; May, M.

    1982-11-01

    Malignant external otitis is an aggressive infection caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa that most often occurs in elderly diabetics. Malignant external otitis often spreads inferiorly from the external canal to involve the subtemporal area and progresses medially towards the petrous apex leading to multiple cranial nerve palsies. The computed tomographic (CT) findings in malignant external otitis include obliteration of the normal fat planes in the subtemporal area as well as patchy destruction of the bony cortex of the mastoid. The point of exit of the various cranial nerves can be identified on CT scans, and the extent of the inflammatory mass correlates well with the clinical findings. Four cases of malignant external otitis are presented. In each case CT provided a good demonstration of involvement of the soft tissues at the base of the skull.

  3. [Gallstone ileus. Abdominal CT usefulness].

    PubMed

    Sukkarieh, F; Brasseur, P; Bissen, L

    2004-06-01

    The authors report the case of a 93-year old woman referred to the emergency department and presenting with an intestinal obstruction. Abdominal CT reveals a biliary ileus caused by the migration and the impaction of a 3 cm gallstone in the small bowel. Surgical treatment by enterolithotomy was successful. In over 90% of cases, gallstone ileus is a complication of cholelithiasis and accounts for 25% of intestinal obstruction in patients over 65 years. To reduce morbidity and mortality, early diagnosis and prompt treatment are essential. Abdominal CT-scan is the gold standard technique.

  4. Granulocytic sarcoma (chloroma): CT manifestations

    SciTech Connect

    Pomeranz, S.J.; Hawkins, H.H.; Towbin, R.; Lisberg, W.N.; Clark, R.A.

    1985-04-01

    Nests of granulocytic tumor cells in patients who have myelogeneous leukemia are termed chloromas. Eight cases of chloroma seen on CT were reviewed. Lymph nodes, subcutaneous tissues, peritoneum, pleural space, pelvis, and portal hepatis were involved. The extracranial appearance of chloroma on CT is that of small, nonenhancing, nodular densities that resemble lymphoma. Cranial involvement is characteristically in the orbit. The central nervous system appearance is variable, however, and high attenuation masses may occur that mimic lymphoma, hematoma, and metastatic neuroblastoma. The recognition of these lesions is important, since radiation, not chemotherapy, is often the preferred treatment for localized chloroma.

  5. Ontological analysis of SNOMED CT

    PubMed Central

    Héja, Gergely; Surján, György; Varga, Péter

    2008-01-01

    Background SNOMED CT is the most comprehensive medical terminology. However, its use for intelligent services based on formal reasoning is questionable. Methods The analysis of the structure of SNOMED CT is based on the formal top-level ontology DOLCE. Results The analysis revealed several ontological and knowledge-engineering errors, the most important are errors in the hierarchy (mostly from an ontological point of view, but also regarding medical aspects) and the mixing of subsumption relations with other types (mostly 'part of'). Conclusion The found errors impede formal reasoning. The paper presents a possible way to correct these problems. PMID:19007445

  6. PET/CT in radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Tinsu; Mawlawi, Osama

    2008-11-15

    PET/CT is an effective tool for the diagnosis, staging and restaging of cancer patients. It combines the complementary information of functional PET images and anatomical CT images in one imaging session. Conventional stand-alone PET has been replaced by PET/CT for improved patient comfort, patient throughput, and most importantly the proven clinical outcome of PET/CT over that of PET and that of separate PET and CT. There are over two thousand PET/CT scanners installed worldwide since 2001. Oncology is the main application for PET/CT. Fluorine-18 deoxyglucose is the choice of radiopharmaceutical in PET for imaging the glucose uptake in tissues, correlated with an increased rate of glycolysis in many tumor cells. New molecular targeted agents are being developed to improve the accuracy of targeting different disease states and assessing therapeutic response. Over 50% of cancer patients receive radiation therapy (RT) in the course of their disease treatment. Clinical data have demonstrated that the information provided by PET/CT often changes patient management of the patient and/or modifies the RT plan from conventional CT simulation. The application of PET/CT in RT is growing and will become increasingly important. Continuing improvement of PET/CT instrumentation will also make it easier for radiation oncologists to integrate PET/CT in RT. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the current PET/CT technology, to project the future development of PET and CT for PET/CT, and to discuss some issues in adopting PET/CT in RT and potential improvements in PET/CT simulation of the thorax in radiation therapy.

  7. Low-dose interpolated average CT for attenuation correction in cardiac PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tung-Hsin; Zhang, Geoffrey; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Chen, Chih-Hao; Yang, Bang-Hung; Wu, Nien-Yun; Huang, Tzung-Chi

    2010-07-01

    Because of the advantages in the use of high photon flux and thus the short scan times of CT imaging, the traditional 68Ge scans for positron emission tomography (PET) image attenuation correction have been replaced by CT scans in the modern PET/CT technology. The combination of fast CT scan and slow PET scan often causes image misalignment between the PET and CT images due to respiration motion. Use of the average CT derived from cine CT images is reported to reduce such misalignment. However, the radiation dose to patients is higher with cine CT scans. This study introduces a method that uses breath-hold CT images and their interpolations to generate the average CT for PET image attenuation correction. Breath-hold CT sets are taken at end-inspiration and end-expiration. Deformable image registration is applied to generate a voxel-to-voxel motion matrix between the two CT sets. The motion is equally divided into 5 steps from inspiration to expiration and 5 steps from expiration to inspiration, generating a total of 8 phases of interpolated CT sets. An average CT image is generated from all the 10 phase CT images, including original inhale/exhale CT and 8 interpolated CT sets. Quantitative comparison shows that the reduction of image misalignment artifacts using the average CT from the interpolation technique for PET attenuation correction is at a similar level as that using cine average CT, while the dose to the patient from the CT scans is reduced significantly. The interpolated average CT method hence provides a low dose alternative to cine CT scans for PET attenuation correction.

  8. CT angiography - arms and legs

    MedlinePlus

    ... combines a CT scan with the injection of dye. This technique is able to create pictures of ... Some exams require a special dye, called contrast, to be injected into your body before the test. Contrast helps certain areas show up better on the x- ...

  9. Pocket atlas of normal CT anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, J.B.; Lee, J.K.T.; Sagel, S.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book is a quick reference for interpreting CT scans of the extracranial organs. This collection of 41 CT scans covers all the major organs of the body: neck and larynx; chest; abdomen; male pelvis; and female pelvis.

  10. Abdominal CT findings in small bowel perforation.

    PubMed

    Zissin, R; Osadchy, A; Gayer, G

    2009-02-01

    Small bowel perforation is an emergent medical condition for which the diagnosis is usually not made clinically but by CT, a common imaging modality used for the diagnosis of acute abdomen. Direct CT features that suggest perforation include extraluminal air and oral contrast, which are often associated with secondary CT signs of bowel pathology. This pictorial review illustrates the CT findings of small bowel perforation caused by various clinical entities.

  11. CT Scans - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... الأشعة المقطعية الحاسوبية - العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) CT (Computerized Tomography) Scan CT ( ... 扫描 - 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) CT (Computerized Tomography) Scan CT ( ...

  12. Traumatic avulsion of kidney and spleen into the chest through a ruptured diaphragm in a young worker: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinos, Stamatiou; Georgios, Ilias; Christos, Chlopsios; Vasilissa, Karanasiou; Nikolaos, Kavouras; Fred, Lebrun; John, Heretis; Frank, Sofras

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Rupture of the diaphragm is almost always due to major trauma. Diaphragmatic injuries are rare (5–7%), usually secondary to blunt, or more rarely to penetrating, thoracic or abdominal trauma. No single investigation provides a reliable diagnosis of diaphragmatic rupture when a patient first arrives at hospital. Almost 33% are suspected on initial chest x-ray, but the percentage is lower in patients who are immediately intubated. Mortality in patients with diaphragmatic rupture following blunt abdominal trauma is generally associated with coexistent vascular and visceral injuries that could be rapidly fatal. It's mandatory that the right diagnosis is reached as soon as possible given that mortality is influenced by the time elapsing between trauma and diagnosis. Case presentation A 35-year-old worker was hit by a heavy object while working in the factory. He was transferred immediately to our emergency room. Chest x-ray showed massive left hemothorax without any additional signs to suggest diaphragmatic injury. It was decided to perform immediate surgical exploration before further radiological examination. During surgery, the right kidney and liver appeared normal, but the left kidney and spleen were not found in their anatomical position. The left hemidiaphragm had a10-cm oblique posterior tear. The left kidney was found lacerated in the left side of the chest, separated completely from its vascular pedicle and ureter, along with the entire spleen which was also separated from its vascular tree. Conclusion The avulsion of both kidney and spleen following abdominal trauma is uncommon and survival depends on prompt diagnosis and treatment. PMID:18076752

  13. Ultrasound in obstructive lung diseases: the effect of airway obstruction on diaphragm kinetics. A short pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Zanforlin, Alessandro; Smargiassi, Andrea; Inchingolo, Riccardo; Valente, Salvatore; Ramazzina, Emilio

    2015-12-01

    The ultrasound study of the chest is showing a continuous development. This technique could be helpful in managing several chest diseases, but it is limited to the acoustic windows provided by intercostal spaces and by the inability to study healthy lung parenchyma and all intra-parenchymal diseases such as chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD), because the interaction between ventilated lung and ultrasound generates only artifacts. Currently, there are few applications of ultrasound that are useful in COPD, with recent studies providing some innovation potentially useful in clinical practice. The similarity of the trend between the time/volume curve of spirometry and the M-mode representation of diaphragm during forced breath allowed to identify the M-mode Index of Obstruction (MIO), an index obtained from the ratio between forced diaphragmatic excursion in the first second (FEDE1, cm) and the maximal expiratory diaphragmatic excursion (EDEMax, cm). MIO has shown a linear correlation with the ratio between forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1) and vital capacity (VC), used in spirometry to identify airways obstruction. The value of MIO seems to be lower in patients affected by airways obstruction as showed by a recent study. The technique is easy to learn and fast to perform and the analysis could be provided with any ultrasound machine equipped with M-mode. In conclusion, these findings, if confirmed by other studies, could suggest a new add-on screening tool for obstructive lung diseases, in particular COPD, that could be performed during a routine abdominal ultrasound exam.

  14. The influence of ouabain on twitch potentiation by anticholinesterases in the phrenic nerve-diaphragm muscles of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, M.; Ohtani, H.; Yagasaki, O.

    1989-01-01

    1. (+)-Tubocurarine, hexamethonium, atropine, ouabain, and removal of potassium from the bathing medium were examined for their effects on indirectly evoked twitches (IT) of mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm muscles in the presence or absence of neostigmine. 2. Neostigmine increased the amplitude of IT. The twitch potentiation was reduced by (+)-tubocurarine at low concentrations that had no inhibitory effect on normal IT. Hexamethonium (10-100 microM), but not atropine (0.1-1 microM), partially inhibited the twitch potentiation. Neither hexamethonium nor atropine had an inhibitory effect on IT in the absence of neostigmine. 3. Ouabain (5 microM) abolished the twitch potentiation by neostigmine while having no inhibitory effect on directly evoked twitches in the presence of neostigmine and (+)-tubocurarine together. 4. The potentiating effect of neostigmine was less in a potassium-free bathing solution. The inhibitory effect of ouabain disappeared in this solution. 5. Reinclusion of KCl at 2.5 mM restored both the potentiating effect of neostigmine and the antagonistic effect of ouabain. This reinclusion did not potentiate IT in the absence of neostigmine. 6. An interaction resembling that between ouabain and neostigmine was obtained between ouabain and physostigmine or paraoxon. 7. Both endplate potentials (e.p.ps) and miniature e.p.ps increased in terms of their amplitude and duration in the presence of neostigmine. Ouabain did not reduce the enhanced endplate responses. 8. These results indicate that the potentiation of IT by anticholinesterases may occur via nicotinic receptors which are sensitive to both (+)-tubocurarine and hexamethonium, and that the interaction between anticholinesterases and ouabain depends on the presence of K+. It appears that the mechanisms of twitch potentiation are dependent on the ionic gradients maintained by Na+-K+-ATPase. PMID:2924070

  15. Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarkers in the Rational Assessment of Mesothelioma (DIAPHRAGM) study: protocol of a prospective, multicentre, observational study

    PubMed Central

    Tsim, Selina; Kelly, Caroline; Alexander, Laura; McCormick, Carol; Thomson, Fiona; Woodward, Rosie; Foster, John E; Stobo, David B; Paul, Jim; Maskell, Nick A; Chalmers, Anthony; Blyth, Kevin G

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an asbestos-related cancer, which is difficult to diagnose. Thoracoscopy is frequently required but is not widely available. An accurate, non-invasive diagnostic biomarker would allow early specialist referral, limit diagnostic delays and maximise clinical trial access. Current markers offer insufficient sensitivity and are not routinely used. The SOMAmer proteomic classifier and fibulin-3 have recently demonstrated sensitivity and specificity exceeding 90% in retrospective studies. DIAPHRAGM (Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarkers in the Rational Assessment of Mesothelioma) is a suitably powered, multicentre, prospective observational study designed to determine whether these markers provide clinically useful diagnostic and prognostic information. Methods and analysis Serum and plasma (for SOMAscan and fibulin-3, respectively) will be collected at presentation, prior to pleural biopsy/pleurodesis, from 83 to 120 patients with MPM, at least 480 patients with non-MPM pleural disease and 109 asbestos-exposed controls. Final numbers of MPM/non-MPM cases will depend on the incidence of MPM in the study population (estimated at 13–20%). Identical sampling and storage protocols will be used in 22 recruiting centres and histological confirmation sought in all cases. Markers will be measured using the SOMAscan proteomic assay (SomaLogic) and a commercially available fibulin-3 ELISA (USCN Life Science). The SE in the estimated sensitivity and specificity will be <5% for each marker and their performance will be compared with serum mesothelin. Blood levels will be compared with paired pleural fluid levels and MPM tumour volume (using MRI) in a nested substudy. The prognostic value of each marker will be assessed and a large bioresource created. Ethics and dissemination The study has been approved by the West of Scotland Research Ethics Committee (Ref: 13/WS/0240). A Trial Management Group meets on a monthly basis. Results

  16. Nicotine and elevated body temperature reduce the complexity of the genioglossus and diaphragm EMG signals in rats during early maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkurt, David; Akay, Yasemin M.; Akay, Metin

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, we examined the effect of nicotine exposure and increased body temperature on the complexity (dynamics) of the genioglossus muscle (EMGg) and the diaphragm muscle (EMGdia) to explore the effects of nicotine and hyperthermia. Nonlinear dynamical analysis of the EMGdia and EMGg signals was performed using the approximate entropy method on 15 (7 saline- and 8 nicotine-treated) juvenile rats (P25-P35) and 19 (11 saline- and 8 nicotine-treated) young adult rats (P36-P44). The mean complexity values were calculated over the ten consecutive breaths using the approximate entropy method during mild elevated body temperature (38 °C) and severe elevated body temperature (39-40 °C) in two groups. In the first (nicotine) group, rats were treated with single injections of nicotine enough to produce brain levels of nicotine similar to those achieved in human smokers (2.5 (mg kg-1)/day) until the recording day. In the second (control) group, rats were treated with injections of saline, beginning at postnatal 5 days until the recording day. Our results show that warming the rat by 2-3 °C and nicotine exposure significantly decreased the complexity of the EMGdia and EMGg for the juvenile age group. This reduction in the complexity of the EMGdia and EMGg for the nicotine group was much greater than the normal during elevated body temperatures. We speculate that the generalized depressive effects of nicotine exposure and elevated body temperature on the respiratory neural firing rate and the behavior of the central respiratory network could be responsible for the drastic decrease in the complexity of the EMGdia and EMGg signals, the outputs of the respiratory neural network during early maturation.

  17. Capillary supply, fibre types and fibre morphometry in rat tibialis anterior and diaphragm muscles after intermittent exposure to hypobaric hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Panisello, Pere; Torrella, Joan Ramon; Esteva, Santiago; Pagés, Teresa; Viscor, Ginés

    2008-05-01

    Three groups of sedentary male rats were exposed to intermittent hypobaric hypoxia (IHH) for 22 days (4 h/day, 5 days/week) in a hypobaric chamber at a simulated altitude of 5,000 m. Tibialis anterior (TA) and diaphragm (DG) were removed at the end of the programme (H group), and 20 or 40 days later (P20 and P40 groups). A control group (C) was maintained at sea-level pressure and their TA and DG were compared to those of the experimental rats at the end of the IHH programme, and also 20 and 40 days later. We measured the fibre morphometry and capillaries of each muscle. Our results demonstrate that IHH does not change the fibre type composition (with reference to either their contractile or oxidative properties) for most muscle regions of the muscles analysed analysed. We found few significant differences in muscle capillarity and fibre morphometry for TA after IHH. However, IHH did induce some statistically significant changes in DG: capillary density of the H rats (736 capillaries/mm2) increased compared to C animals (610 capillaries/mm2). Although IHH did not change the fibre capillarization or morphometric parameters of fast fibre types, we observed reductions ranging from 7 to 13% in fibre area, perimeter and diffusion distances between C and H for slow fibres. Moreover, these morphometric changes accounted for increases of 10-20% in capillarization, fibre unit area and fibre unit perimeter. This indicates that SO fibres are more sensitive to IHH than both fast fibre types.

  18. New LANL Group M-7 two-stage gun: Double-diaphragm and wrap-around gas breech

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, S.A.; Martinez, A.R.

    1992-01-01

    A new two-stage gun is being installed in a high explosive testing facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the purpose of subjecting insensitive high explosives to controlled projectile impacts so that shock-to-detonation transition can be studied in detail. This gun has been patterned after guns designed by Alois Stilp at Ernst Mach Institut (EMI) in Freiburg and Wintersweiler, Germany. Several changes were made to adapt the design to our needs. The gun has a 100-mm diameter pump tube and 33-mm and 50-mm diameter launch tubes; both pump and launch tubes are 7.6 m long. We plan to use only helium as the reservoir gas. Large hydraulic clamps hold the gun together in three places during a shot; these are located on both sides of the transition section and at the breech. These clamps make gun conversions to different setups relatively simple, i.e., the two-stage gun can be converted into a single-stage gun. A gas breech has been designed which can be operated in either wrap-around or double-diaphragm mode with a maximum operating pressure of 15,000 psi. Two-stage gun calculations indicate that in the gas breech configuration, projectile velocities up to 4 km/s can be obtained using helium in both the breech and the reservoir. The gun has been fabricated and is being installed at the present time. Testing is expected to begin in early 1993 if the startup difficulties do not become excessive.

  19. New LANL Group M-7 two-stage gun: Double-diaphragm and wrap-around gas breech

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, S.A.; Martinez, A.R.

    1992-10-01

    A new two-stage gun is being installed in a high explosive testing facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the purpose of subjecting insensitive high explosives to controlled projectile impacts so that shock-to-detonation transition can be studied in detail. This gun has been patterned after guns designed by Alois Stilp at Ernst Mach Institut (EMI) in Freiburg and Wintersweiler, Germany. Several changes were made to adapt the design to our needs. The gun has a 100-mm diameter pump tube and 33-mm and 50-mm diameter launch tubes; both pump and launch tubes are 7.6 m long. We plan to use only helium as the reservoir gas. Large hydraulic clamps hold the gun together in three places during a shot; these are located on both sides of the transition section and at the breech. These clamps make gun conversions to different setups relatively simple, i.e., the two-stage gun can be converted into a single-stage gun. A gas breech has been designed which can be operated in either wrap-around or double-diaphragm mode with a maximum operating pressure of 15,000 psi. Two-stage gun calculations indicate that in the gas breech configuration, projectile velocities up to 4 km/s can be obtained using helium in both the breech and the reservoir. The gun has been fabricated and is being installed at the present time. Testing is expected to begin in early 1993 if the startup difficulties do not become excessive.

  20. Cervical tuberculous adenitis: CT manifestations

    SciTech Connect

    Reede, D.L.; Bergeron, R.T.

    1985-03-01

    Cervical tuberculous adenitis is being seen with increasing frequency in the United States; in the appropriate clinical setting it should be included in the differential diagnosis of an asymptomatic neck mass. Patients are typically young adults who are recent arrivals from Southeast Asia. A history of tuberculosis is not always elicited nor is the chest radiograph always abnormal. All of these patients have positive purified protein derivative tests unless they are anergic. The CT findings may lead to the diagnosis. Several CT patterns of nodal disease can be seen in tuberculous adenitis; some may mimic benign and neoplastic disease. The presence of a multiloculated or multichambered (conglomerate nodal) mass with central lucency and thick rims of enhancement and minimally effaced fascial planes is highly suggestive of tuberculous adenitis, especially if the patient has a strongly positive tuberculosis skin test.

  1. Dual energy CT for attenuation correction with PET/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M.; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The authors evaluate the energy dependent noise and bias properties of monoenergetic images synthesized from dual-energy CT (DECT) acquisitions. These monoenergetic images can be used to estimate attenuation coefficients at energies suitable for positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. This is becoming more relevant with the increased use of quantitative imaging by PET/CT and SPECT/CT scanners. There are, however, potential variations in the noise and bias of synthesized monoenergetic images as a function of energy. Methods: The authors used analytic approximations and simulations to estimate the noise and bias of synthesized monoenergetic images of water-filled cylinders with different shapes and the NURBS-based cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantom from 40 to 520 keV, the range of SPECT and PET energies. The dual-kVp spectra were based on the GE Lightspeed VCT scanner at 80 and 140 kVp with added filtration of 0.5 mm Cu. The authors evaluated strategies of noise suppression with sinogram smoothing and dose minimization with reduction of tube currents at the two kVp settings. The authors compared the impact of DECT-based attenuation correction with single-kVp CT-based attenuation correction on PET quantitation for the NCAT phantom for soft tissue and high-Z materials of bone and iodine contrast enhancement. Results: Both analytic calculations and simulations displayed the expected minimum noise value for a synthesized monoenergetic image at an energy between the mean energies of the two spectra. In addition the authors found that the normalized coefficient of variation in the synthesized attenuation map increased with energy but reached a plateau near 160 keV, and then remained constant with increasing energy up to 511 keV and beyond. The bias was minimal, as the linear attenuation coefficients of the synthesized monoenergetic images were within 2.4% of the known true values across the entire energy range

  2. Ultra-low dose CT attenuation correction for PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M.; De Man, Bruno; Manjeshwar, Ravindra; Asma, Evren; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    A challenge for positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) quantitation is patient respiratory motion, which can cause an underestimation of lesion activity uptake and an overestimation of lesion volume. Several respiratory motion correction methods benefit from longer duration CT scans that are phase matched with PET scans. However, even with the currently available, lowest dose CT techniques, extended duration cine CT scans impart a substantially high radiation dose. This study evaluates methods designed to reduce CT radiation dose in PET/CT scanning. We investigated selected combinations of dose reduced acquisition and noise suppression methods that take advantage of the reduced requirement of CT for PET attenuation correction (AC). These include reducing CT tube current, optimizing CT tube voltage, adding filtration, CT sinogram smoothing and clipping. We explored the impact of these methods on PET quantitation via simulations on different digital phantoms. CT tube current can be reduced much lower for AC than that in low dose CT protocols. Spectra that are higher energy and narrower are generally more dose efficient with respect to PET image quality. Sinogram smoothing could be used to compensate for the increased noise and artifacts at radiation dose reduced CT images, which allows for a further reduction of CT dose with no penalty for PET image quantitation. When CT is not used for diagnostic and anatomical localization purposes, we showed that ultra-low dose CT for PET/CT is feasible. The significant dose reduction strategies proposed here could enable respiratory motion compensation methods that require extended duration CT scans and reduce radiation exposure in general for all PET/CT imaging.

  3. Comparison of two experimental methods for the mechanical characterization of thin or thick films from the study of micromachined circular diaphragms.

    PubMed

    Malhaire, C

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare two experimental methods and evaluate the effectiveness of a set of analytical models in order to measure the initial stress and the Young's modulus value of thin and thick film materials. Two types of experiments were performed on micromachined circular diaphragms: bulge testing and vibrometry. The range of validity and accuracy of the analytical models with respect to the vibration of the diaphragms was discussed from the finite element simulations. It was shown that the a/t ratio should be considered carefully to determine the value of the Young's modulus by vibrometry with an acceptable error. A relative error of approximately ±10% on E was obtained for a/t ≤ 750. For 750 ≤ a/t ≤ 1000, the value of the dimensionless parameter k must also be considered. It has been shown that the residual stress value can be obtained with an accuracy of 10% or less, given that k > 12. As an illustration, experimental methods and models were applied to the characterization of a thick electroplated gold film and a sputter-deposited Inconel thin film. Circular structures were defined by vertical sidewalls etched on the back of a Si wafer using the deep reactive ion etching technique. In addition to analytical models, parametric finite element simulations and a design optimization technique were used to determine the material's mechanical properties. The static deflections of the diaphragms were measured as a function of the applied pressure. The resonant frequencies and mode shapes of the vibrating structures were observed under vacuum by white-light interferometric microscopy. For gold, it was found that E = (53 ± 20) GPa and σ(0) = (180 ± 10) MPa. For Inconel, it was found that E = (157 ± 14) GPa and σ(0) = (172 ± 5) MPa.

  4. The effects of calcium ions, ionophore A23187 and inhibition of energy metabolism on protein degradation in the rat diaphragm and epitrochlearis muscles in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sugden, P H

    1980-09-15

    1. The effects of external Ca2+, EGTA, ionophore A23187, CN-, dinitrophenol and iodoacetamide on the rate of protein degradation in the rat diaphragm and epitrochlearis muscles in vitro were investigated. 2. External Ca2+ increased protein degradation when compared with external EGTA. Protein degradation was further increased by Ca2+ + ionophore A23187. 3. EGTA and ionophore A23187 decreased ATP and phosphocreatine concentrations and the ATP/ADP ratio. 4. CN-, dinitrophenol and iodoacetamide decreased protein degradation, presumably by interfering with energy metabolism. 5. The effects of EGTA may be caused by disturbances in energy metabolism. The effects of ionophore A23187 cannot be readily explained by disturbances in energy metabolism. 6. Incubation of diaphragms with Ca2+ causes a rapid increase in whole-tissue Ca content. This is further stimulated by ionophore A23187. The uptake of Ca2+ may be, at least in part, into the cytoplasm because an increase in the glycogen phosphorylase activity ratio is observed. 7. A Ca2+-activated proteinase is present in rat heart and diaphragm. This enzyme may mediate in part the effects of Ca2+ described above. The apparent KA of this enzyme for Ca2+ is about 0.25 mM. 8. Because effects of ionophore A23187 cause a large increase in whole-tissue Ca content and because the Ca2+-activated proteinase has a relatively low affinity for Ca2+, it is felt that the effects of Ca2+ upon muscle proteolysis are unlikely to be of importance in steady-state protein turnover in vivo. The mechanism may, however, be important in breakdown of necrotic tissue in the living animal.

  5. Comparison of two experimental methods for the mechanical characterization of thin or thick films from the study of micromachined circular diaphragms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malhaire, C.

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare two experimental methods and evaluate the effectiveness of a set of analytical models in order to measure the initial stress and the Young's modulus value of thin and thick film materials. Two types of experiments were performed on micromachined circular diaphragms: bulge testing and vibrometry. The range of validity and accuracy of the analytical models with respect to the vibration of the diaphragms was discussed from the finite element simulations. It was shown that the a/t ratio should be considered carefully to determine the value of the Young's modulus by vibrometry with an acceptable error. A relative error of approximately ±10% on E was obtained for a/t ≤ 750. For 750 ≤ a/t ≤ 1000, the value of the dimensionless parameter k must also be considered. It has been shown that the residual stress value can be obtained with an accuracy of 10% or less, given that k > 12. As an illustration, experimental methods and models were applied to the characterization of a thick electroplated gold film and a sputter-deposited Inconel thin film. Circular structures were defined by vertical sidewalls etched on the back of a Si wafer using the deep reactive ion etching technique. In addition to analytical models, parametric finite element simulations and a design optimization technique were used to determine the material's mechanical properties. The static deflections of the diaphragms were measured as a function of the applied pressure. The resonant frequencies and mode shapes of the vibrating structures were observed under vacuum by white-light interferometric microscopy. For gold, it was found that E = (53 ± 20) GPa and σ0 = (180 ± 10) MPa. For Inconel, it was found that E = (157 ± 14) GPa and σ0 = (172 ± 5) MPa.

  6. Changes in pelvic floor and diaphragm kinematics and respiratory patterns in subjects with sacroiliac joint pain following a motor learning intervention: a case series.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Peter B; Beales, Darren J

    2007-08-01

    This study was a case series design. The objectives of the study were to investigate the ability of a motor learning intervention to change aberrant pelvic floor and diaphragm kinematics and respiratory patterns observed in subjects with sacroiliac joint pain (SIJP) during the active straight leg raise (ASLR) test. The ASLR test is a valid and reliable tool to assist in the assessment of load transference through the pelvis. Irregular respiratory patterns, decreased diaphragmatic excursion and descent of the pelvic floor have been reported in subjects with SIJP during this test. To date the ability to alter these patterns has not been determined. Respiratory patterns, kinematics of the diaphragm and pelvic floor during the ASLR test and the ability to consciously elevate the pelvic floor in conjunction with changes in pain and disability levels were assessed in nine subjects with a clinical diagnosis of SIJP. Each subject then undertook an individualized motor learning intervention. The initial variables were then reassessed. Results showed that abnormal kinematics of the diaphragm and pelvic floor during the ASLR improved following intervention. Respiratory patterns were also influenced in a positive manner. An inability to consciously elevate the pelvic floor pre-treatment was reversed. These changes were associated with improvement in pain and disability scores. This study provides preliminary evidence that aberrant motor control strategies in subjects with SIJP during the ASLR can be enhanced with a motor learning intervention. Positive changes in motor control were associated with improvements in pain and disability. Randomized controlled research is required to validate these results.

  7. Postmortem pulmonary CT in hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Wolf; Thali, Michael; Giugni, Giannina; Winklhofer, Sebastian

    2014-12-01

    Fatal hypothermia has been associated with pulmonary edema. With postmortem full body computed tomography scanning (PMCT), the lungs can also be examined for CT attenuation. In fatal hypothermia cases low CT attenuation appeared to prevail in the lungs. We compared 14 cases of fatal hypothermia with an age-sex matched control group. Additionally, 4 cases of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning were examined. Furthermore, 10 test cases were examined to test predictability based on PMCT. Two readers measured CT attenuation on four different axial slices across the lungs (blinded to case group and other reader's results). Hypothermia was associated with statistically significantly lower lung PMCT attenuation and lower lung weights than controls, and there was a dose-effect relationship at an environmental temperature cutoff of 2 °C. CO poisoning yielded low pulmonary attenuation but higher lung weights. General model based prediction yielded a 94% probability for fatal hypothermia deaths and a 21% probability for non-hypothermia deaths in the test group. Increased breathing rate is known to accompany both CO poisoning and hypothermia, so this could partly explain the low PMCT lung attenuation due to an oxygen dissociation curve left shift. A more marked distension in fatal hypothermia, compared to CO poisoning, indicates that further, possibly different mechanisms, are involved in these cases. Increased dead space and increased stiffness to deflation (but not inflation) appear to be effects of inhaling cold air (but not CO) that may explain the difference in low PMCT attenuation seen in hypothermia cases.

  8. CT-assisted agile manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, James H.; Yancey, Robert N.

    1996-11-01

    The next century will witness at least two great revolutions in the way goods are produced. First, workers will use the medium of virtual reality in all aspects of marketing, research, development, prototyping, manufacturing, sales and service. Second, market forces will drive manufacturing towards small-lot production and just-in-time delivery. Already, we can discern the merging of these megatrends into what some are calling agile manufacturing. Under this new paradigm, parts and processes will be designed and engineered within the mind of a computer, tooled and manufactured by the offspring of today's rapid prototyping equipment, and evaluated for performance and reliability by advanced nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques and sophisticated computational models. Computed tomography (CT) is the premier example of an NDE method suitable for future agile manufacturing activities. It is the only modality that provides convenient access to the full suite of engineering data that users will need to avail themselves of computer- aided design, computer-aided manufacturing, and computer- aided engineering capabilities, as well as newly emerging reverse engineering, rapid prototyping and solid freeform fabrication technologies. As such, CT is assured a central, utilitarian role in future industrial operations. An overview of this exciting future for industrial CT is presented.

  9. Evaluation of a rubber-compound diaphragm for acoustic fisheries surveys: Effects on dual-beam signal intensity and beam patterns

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleischer, Guy W.; Argyle, R.L.; Nester, R.T.; Dawson, J.J.

    2002-01-01

    The use of rubber-compound windows for fisheries acoustics must consider operating frequency and ambient water temperatures. Signal attenuation by the rubber becomes pronounced with increased frequency and decreased temperature. Based on our results, a 420 k Hz system could be expected to lose up to 3-4 dB in colder water through a 5.1-cm thick rubber diaphragm. At 120 k Hz, signal loss was negligible and would undoubtedly also be inconsequential for even lower frequencies used in fisheries applications (e.g., 70, 38 k Hz).

  10. Extraction of the respiratory signal from small-animal CT projections for a retrospective gating method.

    PubMed

    Chavarrías, C; Vaquero, J J; Sisniega, A; Rodríguez-Ruano, A; Soto-Montenegro, M L; García-Barreno, P; Desco, M

    2008-09-07

    We propose a retrospective respiratory gating algorithm to generate dynamic CT studies. To this end, we compared three different methods of extracting the respiratory signal from the projections of small-animal cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanners. Given a set of frames acquired from a certain axial angle, subtraction of their average image from each individual frame produces a set of difference images. Pixels in these images have positive or negative values (according to the respiratory phase) in those areas where there is lung movement. The respiratory signals were extracted by analysing the shape of the histogram of these difference images: we calculated the first four central and non-central moments. However, only odd-order moments produced the desired breathing signal, as the even-order moments lacked information about the phase. Each of these curves was compared to a reference signal recorded by means of a pneumatic pillow. Given the similar correlation coefficients yielded by all of them, we selected the mean to implement our retrospective protocol. Respiratory phase bins were separated, reconstructed independently and included in a dynamic sequence, suitable for cine playback. We validated our method in five adult rat studies by comparing profiles drawn across the diaphragm dome, with and without retrospective respiratory gating. Results showed a sharper transition in the gated reconstruction, with an average slope improvement of 60.7%.

  11. Evaluation of deformable image registration and a motion model in CT images with limited features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, F.; Hu, Y.; Zhang, Q.; Kincaid, R.; Goodman, K. A.; Mageras, G. S.

    2012-05-01

    Deformable image registration (DIR) is increasingly used in radiotherapy applications and provides the basis for a previously described model of patient-specific respiratory motion. We examine the accuracy of a DIR algorithm and a motion model with respiration-correlated CT (RCCT) images of software phantom with known displacement fields, physical deformable abdominal phantom with implanted fiducials in the liver and small liver structures in patient images. The motion model is derived from a principal component analysis that relates volumetric deformations with the motion of the diaphragm or fiducials in the RCCT. Patient data analysis compares DIR with rigid registration as ground truth: the mean ± standard deviation 3D discrepancy of liver structure centroid positions is 2.0 ± 2.2 mm. DIR discrepancy in the software phantom is 3.8 ± 2.0 mm in lung and 3.7 ± 1.8 mm in abdomen; discrepancies near the chest wall are larger than indicated by image feature matching. Marker's 3D discrepancy in the physical phantom is 3.6 ± 2.8 mm. The results indicate that visible features in the images are important for guiding the DIR algorithm. Motion model accuracy is comparable to DIR, indicating that two principal components are sufficient to describe DIR-derived deformation in these datasets.

  12. Extraction of the respiratory signal from small-animal CT projections for a retrospective gating method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavarrías, C.; Vaquero, J. J.; Sisniega, A.; Rodríguez-Ruano, A.; Soto-Montenegro, M. L.; García-Barreno, P.; Desco, M.

    2008-09-01

    We propose a retrospective respiratory gating algorithm to generate dynamic CT studies. To this end, we compared three different methods of extracting the respiratory signal from the projections of small-animal cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanners. Given a set of frames acquired from a certain axial angle, subtraction of their average image from each individual frame produces a set of difference images. Pixels in these images have positive or negative values (according to the respiratory phase) in those areas where there is lung movement. The respiratory signals were extracted by analysing the shape of the histogram of these difference images: we calculated the first four central and non-central moments. However, only odd-order moments produced the desired breathing signal, as the even-order moments lacked information about the phase. Each of these curves was compared to a reference signal recorded by means of a pneumatic pillow. Given the similar correlation coefficients yielded by all of them, we selected the mean to implement our retrospective protocol. Respiratory phase bins were separated, reconstructed independently and included in a dynamic sequence, suitable for cine playback. We validated our method in five adult rat studies by comparing profiles drawn across the diaphragm dome, with and without retrospective respiratory gating. Results showed a sharper transition in the gated reconstruction, with an average slope improvement of 60.7%.

  13. Dissociation between nerve-muscle transmission and nerve trophic effects on rat diaphragm using type D botulinum toxin.

    PubMed Central

    Bray, J J; Harris, A J

    1975-01-01

    Small doses of botulinum toxin can produce partial blockage of transmitter release at the nerve--muscle junction. 2. Subthreshold e.p.p.s, 3--10 days after poisoning, show a distribution of amplitudes that is fitted by Poisson statistics. Successive e.p.p.s. in a short train show a marked facilitation. 3. Two weeks or more after poisoning with a dose of toxin that paralyses the whole muscle, when nerve--muscle transmission is in course of recovery, subthreshold e.p.p.s have an amplitude distribution that is fitted by binomial statistics. This property of transmission is similar to those described in newly formed nerve--muscle junctions, during embryogenesis or regeneration. 4. Muscle fibres with subthreshold transmission in the 5--10 day group of muscles were all supersensitive to ACh, as were a number of fibres in which nerve stimulation still produced an action potential. 5. Two weeks or more after poisoning, muscle fibres with subthreshold transmission had lost their extrajunctional ACh-sensitivity, as had many fibres with m.e.p.p.s of roughly normal frequency but no response to nerve stimulation. 6. In diaphragm muscles poisoned with botulinum toxin between 1 and 4 days previously, the rate of fast axonal transport of radioactively labelled proteins down the phrenic nerve is not greatly affected, but the amount of materials carried is reduced to about one quarter of normal. These labelled proteins accumulate in the intramuscular portion of the phrenic nerve, in or near the nerve terminals, to a much greater extent than in controls, showing that the normal release of some of these materials has been prevented by the toxin. 7. It is concluded that the blockage of the trophic effects of nerves by botulinum toxin is due to a blockage of release of trophic factors other than ACh. 8. The muscle nerve cannot maintain a muscle in its normal state simply by activation of contraction, and a regenerating nerve terminal can restore a muscle towards its normal state before

  14. CT of 338 active professional boxers.

    PubMed

    Jordan, B D; Jahre, C; Hauser, W A; Zimmerman, R D; Zarrelli, M; Lipsitz, E C; Johnson, V; Warren, R F; Tsairis, P; Folk, F S

    1992-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) was performed in 338 active professional boxers. CT scans were abnormal in 25 boxers (7%). The most common CT abnormality was brain atrophy (22 cases). Focal lesions of low attenuation consistent with posttraumatic encephalomalacia were noted in only three boxers. Boxers with abnormal CT scans did not differ from those with borderline or normal CT scans in regard to age, win-loss record, number of bouts, or history of an abnormal electroencephalogram. Thirty-seven boxers with borderline CT scans (49%) and 17 with abnormal CT scans (68%) reported a previous technical knockout (TKO) or knockout (KO), compared with only 89 (37%) of the 238 boxers with normal CT scans (P < .01). Brain atrophy was noted more frequently in boxers with a large cavum septum pellucidum (CSP) than in those with a small or no CSP (P < .05). Boxers with abnormal or borderline CT scans who experienced a TKO or KO were slightly older than those with normal CT scans and a history of a TKO or KO (P < .05).

  15. Modern CT applications in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Garland, Melissa R; Lawler, Leo P; Whitaker, Brent R; Walker, Ian D F; Corl, Frank M; Fishman, Elliot K

    2002-01-01

    Although computed tomography (CT) is used primarily for diagnosis in humans, it can also be used to diagnose disease in veterinary patients. CT and associated three-dimensional reconstruction have a role in diagnosis of a range of illnesses in a variety of animals. In a sea turtle with failure to thrive, CT showed a nodal mass in the chest, granulomas in the lungs, and a ball in the stomach. CT of a sea dragon with balance and movement problems showed absence of the swim bladder. In a sloth with failure to thrive, CT allowed diagnosis of a coin in the intestine. CT of a puffin with failure to thrive showed a mass in the chest, which was found to be a hematoma. In a smooth-sided toad whose head was tilted to one side and who was circling in that direction, CT showed partial destruction of the temporal bone. CT of a domestic cat with listlessness showed a mass with focal calcification, which proved to be a leiomyosarcoma. CT of a sea otter showed pectus excavatum, which is caused by the animal smashing oysters against its chest. In a Japanese koi with abdominal swelling, CT allowed diagnosis of a hepatoma.

  16. Integrated electrochromic aperture diaphragm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deutschmann, T.; Oesterschulze, E.

    2014-05-01

    In the last years, the triumphal march of handheld electronics with integrated cameras has opened amazing fields for small high performing optical systems. For this purpose miniaturized iris apertures are of practical importance because they are essential to control both the dynamic range of the imaging system and the depth of focus. Therefore, we invented a micro optical iris based on an electrochromic (EC) material. This material changes its absorption in response to an applied voltage. A coaxial arrangement of annular rings of the EC material is used to establish an iris aperture without need of any mechanical moving parts. The advantages of this device do not only arise from the space-saving design with a thickness of the device layer of 50μm. But it also benefits from low power consumption. In fact, its transmission state is stable in an open circuit, phrased memory effect. Only changes of the absorption require a voltage of up to 2 V. In contrast to mechanical iris apertures the absorption may be controlled on an analog scale offering the opportunity for apodization. These properties make our device the ideal candidate for battery powered and space-saving systems. We present optical measurements concerning control of the transmitted intensity and depth of focus, and studies dealing with switching times, light scattering, and stability. While the EC polymer used in this study still has limitations concerning color and contrast, the presented device features all functions of an iris aperture. In contrast to conventional devices it offers some special features. Owing to the variable chemistry of the EC material, its spectral response may be adjusted to certain applications like color filtering in different spectral regimes (UV, optical range, infrared). Furthermore, all segments may be switched individually to establish functions like spatial Fourier filtering or lateral tunable intensity filters.

  17. Early effects of ageing on the mechanical performance of isolated locomotory (EDL) and respiratory (diaphragm) skeletal muscle using the work-loop technique.

    PubMed

    Tallis, Jason; James, Rob S; Little, Alexander G; Cox, Val M; Duncan, Michael J; Seebacher, Frank

    2014-09-15

    Previous isolated muscle studies examining the effects of ageing on contractility have used isometric protocols, which have been shown to have poor relevance to dynamic muscle performance in vivo. The present study uniquely uses the work-loop technique for a more realistic estimation of in vivo muscle function to examine changes in mammalian skeletal muscle mechanical properties with age. Measurements of maximal isometric stress, activation and relaxation time, maximal power output, and sustained power output during repetitive activation and recovery are compared in locomotory extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and core diaphragm muscle isolated from 3-, 10-, 30-, and 50-wk-old female mice to examine the early onset of ageing. A progressive age-related reduction in maximal isometric stress that was of greater magnitude than the decrease in maximal power output occurred in both muscles. Maximal force and power developed earlier in diaphragm than EDL muscle but demonstrated a greater age-related decline. The present study indicates that ability to sustain skeletal muscle power output through repetitive contraction is age- and muscle-dependent, which may help rationalize previously reported equivocal results from examination of the effect of age on muscular endurance. The age-related decline in EDL muscle performance is prevalent without a significant reduction in muscle mass, and biochemical analysis of key marker enzymes suggests that although there is some evidence of a more oxidative fiber type, this is not the primary contributor to the early age-related reduction in muscle contractility.

  18. [Effects of chronic nicotine exposure on electrogenic activity of the Na+, K(+)-ATPase and contractility in the rat diaphragm muscle].

    PubMed

    Vasil'ev, A N; Kravtsova, V V; Krivoĭ, I I

    2011-11-01

    Rats were chronically treated with nicotine via subcutaneous injections up to a dose 6 mg/kg/day during 2-3 weeks. After this period, resting membrane potential and action potentials of muscle fibres as well as isometric twitch and tetanic (20 s(-1) and 50(-1)) contractions of isolated rat diaphragm were studied. To estimate electrogenic contribution of the alpha2 isoform of the Na+, K(+)-ATPase ouabain in concentration 1 microM was used. Chronic nicotine exposure induced depolarization of resting membrane potential of 2.2 +/- 0.6 mV (p < 0.01). In rats chronically exposed to nicotine, electrogenic contribution of the Na+, K(+)-ATPase alpha2 isoform was twofold lesser than in control animals (3.7 +/- 0.6 mV and 6.4 +/- 0.6 mV, respectively, p < 0.01). Chronic nicotine exposure did not affect force of twitch and tetanic contractions in response to direct or indirect stimulation. A decrease in the twitch contraction time as well as in the rise time of tetanic contractions was observed. Fatigue dynamics was unchanged. The results suggest that chronic nicotine exposure leads to decrease of the Na+, K(+)-ATPase alpha2 isoform electrogenic activity, and as a consequence to damage of the rat diaphragm muscle electogenesis.

  19. Functional Imaging: CT and MRI

    PubMed Central

    van Beek, Edwin JR; Hoffman, Eric A

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis Numerous imaging techniques permit evaluation of regional pulmonary function. Contrast-enhanced CT methods now allow assessment of vasculature and lung perfusion. Techniques using spirometric controlled MDCT allow for quantification of presence and distribution of parenchymal and airway pathology, Xenon gas can be employed to assess regional ventilation of the lungs and rapid bolus injections of iodinated contrast agent can provide quantitative measure of regional parenchymal perfusion. Advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lung include gadolinium-enhanced perfusion imaging and hyperpolarized helium imaging, which can allow imaging of pulmonary ventilation and .measurement of the size of emphysematous spaces. PMID:18267192

  20. Cortical Tremor (CT) with coincident orthostatic movements.

    PubMed

    Termsarasab, Pichet; Frucht, Steven J

    2015-01-01

    Cortical tremor (CT) is a form of cortical reflex myoclonus that can mimic essential tremor (ET). Clinical features that are helpful in distinguishing CT from ET are the irregular and jerky appearance of the movements. We report two patients with CT with coexisting orthostatic movements, either orthostatic tremor (OT) or myoclonus, who experienced functional improvement in both cortical myoclonus and orthostatic movements when treated with levetiracetam.

  1. Pediatric CT and radiation: our responsibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frush, Donald P.

    2009-02-01

    In order to discuss the cost-benefit ratio of CT examinations in children, one must be familiar with the reasons why CT can provide a high collective or individual dose. The reasons include increasing CT use as well as lack of attention to dose reduction strategies. While those have been substantial efforts for dose reduction, additional work is necessary to prevent unnecessary radiation exposure. This responsibility is shared between science and medicine, industry, regulatory agencies, and patients as well.

  2. Multimodal CT in stroke imaging: new concepts.

    PubMed

    Ledezma, Carlos J; Wintermark, Max

    2009-01-01

    A multimodal CT protocol provides a comprehensive noninvasive survey of acute stroke patients with accurate demonstration of the site of arterial occlusion and its hemodynamic tissue status. It combines widespread availability with the ability to provide functional characterization of cerebral ischemia, and could potentially allow more accurate selection of candidates for acute stroke reperfusion therapy. This article discusses the individual components of multimodal CT and addresses the potential role of a combined multimodal CT stroke protocol in acute stroke therapy.

  3. Radiation dose measurements in coronary CT angiography

    PubMed Central

    Sabarudin, Akmal; Sun, Zhonghua

    2013-01-01

    Coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography is associated with high radiation dose and this has raised serious concerns in the literature. Awareness of various parameters for dose estimates and measurements of coronary CT angiography plays an important role in increasing our understanding of the radiation exposure to patients, thus, contributing to the implementation of dose-saving strategies. This article provides an overview of the radiation dose quantity and its measurement during coronary CT angiography procedures. PMID:24392190

  4. Normal conus medullaris: CT criteria for recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Grogan, J.P.; Daniels, D.L.; Williams, I.L.; Rauschning, W.; Haughton, V.M.

    1984-06-01

    The normal CT configuration and dimension of the conus medullaris and adjacent spinal cord were determined in 30 patients who had no clinical evidence of conus compression. CT studies were also correlated with anatomic sections in cadavers. The normal conus on CT has a distinctive oval configuration, an arterior sulcus, and a posterior promontory. The anteroposterior diameter ranged from 5 to 8 mm; the transverse diameter from 8 to 11 mm. Intramedullary processes altered both the dimensions and configuration of the conus.

  5. Intracranial CT angiography obtained from a cerebral CT perfusion examination

    SciTech Connect

    Gratama van Andel, H. A. F.; Venema, H. W.; Majoie, C. B.; Den Heeten, G. J.; Grimbergen, C. A.; Streekstra, G. J.

    2009-04-15

    CT perfusion (CTP) examinations of the brain are performed increasingly for the evaluation of cerebral blood flow in patients with stroke and vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Of the same patient often also a CT angiography (CTA) examination is performed. This study investigates the possibility to obtain CTA images from the CTP examination, thereby possibly obviating the CTA examination. This would save the patient exposure to radiation, contrast, and time. Each CTP frame is a CTA image with a varying amount of contrast enhancement and with high noise. To improve the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) we combined all 3D images into one 3D image after registration to correct for patient motion between time frames. Image combination consists of weighted averaging in which the weighting factor of each frame is proportional to the arterial contrast. It can be shown that the arterial CNR is maximized in this procedure. An additional advantage of the use of the time series of CTP images is that automatic differentiation between arteries and veins is possible. This feature was used to mask veins in the resulting 3D images to enhance visibility of arteries in maximum intensity projection (MIP) images. With a Philips Brilliance 64 CT scanner (64x0.625 mm) CTP examinations of eight patients were performed on 80 mm of brain using the toggling table technique. The CTP examination consisted of a time series of 15 3D images (2x64x0.625 mm; 80 kV; 150 mAs each) with an interval of 4 s. The authors measured the CNR in images obtained with weighted averaging, images obtained with plain averaging, and images with maximal arterial enhancement. The authors also compared CNR and quality of the images with that of regular CTA examinations and examined the effectiveness of automatic vein masking in MIP images. The CNR of the weighted averaged images is, on the average, 1.73 times the CNR of an image at maximal arterial enhancement in the CTP series, where the use of plain averaging

  6. SU-D-12A-05: Iterative Reconstruction Techniques to Enable Intrinsic Respiratory Gated CT in Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, T; Sun, N; Tan, S; Liu, Y; Mistry, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Longitudinal studies of lung function in mice need the ability to image different phases of ventilation in free-breathing mice using retrospective gating. However, retrospective gating often produces under-sampled and uneven angular samples, resulting in severe reconstruction artifacts when using traditional FDK based reconstruction algorithms. We wanted to demonstrate the utility of iterative reconstruction method to enable intrinsic respiratory gating in small-animal CT. Methods: Free-breathing mice were imaged using a Siemens Inveon PET/micro-CT system. Evenly distributed projection images were acquired at 360 angles. Retrospective respiratory gating was performed using an intrinsic marker based on the average intensity in a region covering the diaphragm. Projections were classified into 4 and 6 phases (finer temporal resolution) resulting in 138 and 67 projections respectively. Reconstruction was carried out using 3 Methods: conventional FDK, iterative penalized least-square (PWLS) with total variation (TV), and PWLS with edge-preserving penalty. The performance of the methods was compared using contrast-to-noise (CNR) in a region of interest (ROI). Line profile through a specific region was plotted to evaluate the preserving of edges. Results: In both the cases with 4 and 6 phases, inadequate and non-uniform angular sampling results in artifacts using conventional FDK. However, such artifacts are minimized using both the iterative methods. Using both 4 and 6 phases, the iterative techniques outperformed FDK in terms of CNR and maintaining sharp edges. This is further evidenced especially with increased artifacts using FDK for 6 phases. Conclusion: This work indicates fewer artifacts and better image details can be achieved with iterative reconstruction methods in non-uniform under-sampled reconstruction. Using iterative methods can enable free-breathing intrinsic respiratory gating in small-animal CT. Further studies are needed to compare the

  7. High performance liquid level monitoring system based on polymer fiber Bragg gratings embedded in silicone rubber diaphragms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Carlos A. F.; Peng, Gang-Ding; Webb, David J.

    2015-05-01

    Liquid-level sensing technologies have attracted great prominence, because such measurements are essential to industrial applications, such as fuel storage, flood warning and in the biochemical industry. Traditional liquid level sensors are based on electromechanical techniques; however they suffer from intrinsic safety concerns in explosive environments. In recent years, given that optical fiber sensors have lots of well-established advantages such as high accuracy, costeffectiveness, compact size, and ease of multiplexing, several optical fiber liquid level sensors have been investigated which are based on different operating principles such as side-polishing the cladding and a portion of core, using a spiral side-emitting optical fiber or using silica fiber gratings. The present work proposes a novel and highly sensitive liquid level sensor making use of polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings (POFBGs). The key elements of the system are a set of POFBGs embedded in silicone rubber diaphragms. This is a new development building on the idea of determining liquid level by measuring the pressure at the bottom of a liquid container, however it has a number of critical advantages. The system features several FBG-based pressure sensors as described above placed at different depths. Any sensor above the surface of the liquid will read the same ambient pressure. Sensors below the surface of the liquid will read pressures that increase linearly with depth. The position of the liquid surface can therefore be approximately identified as lying between the first sensor to read an above-ambient pressure and the next higher sensor. This level of precision would not in general be sufficient for most liquid level monitoring applications; however a much more precise determination of liquid level can be made by linear regression to the pressure readings from the sub-surface sensors. There are numerous advantages to this multi-sensor approach. First, the use of linear regression using

  8. CT enterography with polyethylene glycol solution vs CT enteroclysis in small bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Minordi, L M; Vecchioli, A; Mirk, P; Bonomo, L

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study is to compare CT enterography with polyethylene glycol solution (PEG-CT) with CT enteroclysis (CT-E) in patients with suspected small bowel disease. Methods 145 patients underwent abdominal contrast-enhanced 16-row multidetector CT after administration of 2000 ml of PEG by mouth (n = 75) or after administration of 2000 ml of methylcellulose by nasojejunal tube (n = 70). Small bowel distension, luminal and extraluminal findings were evaluated and compared with small bowel follow-through examination in 60 patients, double contrast enema in 50, surgery in 25 and endoscopy in 35. Statistical evaluation was carried out by χ2 testing. For both techniques we have also calculated the effective dose and the equivalent dose in a standard patient. Results Crohn's disease was diagnosed in 64 patients, neoplasms in 16, adhesions in 6. Distension of the jejunum was better with CT-E than PEG-CT (p<0.05: statistically significant difference). No significant difference was present for others sites (p>0.05). Evaluation of pathological ileal loops was good with both techniques. The values of sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy were respectively 94%, 100% and 96% with CT-E, and 93%, 94% and 93% with PEG-CT. The effective dose for PEG-CT was less than the dose for the CT-E (34.7 mSv vs 39.91 mSv). Conclusion PEG-CT shows findings of Crohn's disease as well as CT-E does, although CT-E gives better bowel distension, especially in the jejunum, and has higher specificity than PEG-CT. PMID:20959377

  9. CT demonstration of bilateral adrenal hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, D.; Korobkin, M.; Silverman, P.M.; Dunnick, N.R.

    1983-08-01

    Bilateral adrenal hemorrhage with subsequent adrenal insufficiency is a recognized complication of anticoagulant therapy. Because the clinical manifestations are often nonspecific, the antemortem diagnosis of adrenal hemorrhage has been a difficult clinical problem. Computed tomography (CT) provides detailed images of the adrenal glands that are not possible with conventional imaging methods. The CT findings of bilateral adrenal hemorrhage in an anticoagulated patient are reported.

  10. Reconstructing misaligned x-ray CT data

    SciTech Connect

    Divin, C. J.

    2016-10-24

    Misalignment errors for x-ray computed tomography (CT) systems can manifest as artifacts and a loss of spatial and contrast resolution. To mitigate artifacts, significant effort is taken to determine the system geometry and minimizing any residual error in the system alignment. This project improved our ability to post-correct data which was acquired on a misaligned CT system.

  11. CT of schistosomal calcification of the intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Fataar, S.; Bassiony, H.; Satyanath, S.; Rudwan, M.; Hebbar, G.; Khalifa, A.; Cherian, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    The spectrum of schistosomal colonic calcification on abdominal radiographs has been described. The appearance on computed tomography (CT) is equally distinctive and occurs with varying degrees of genitourinary calcification. The authors have experience in three cases with the appearance on CT of intestinal calcification due to schistosomiasis.

  12. State-of-the-art in CT hardware and scan modes for cardiovascular CT

    PubMed Central

    Halliburton, Sandra; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Dey, Damini; Einstein, Andrew J.; Gentry, Ralph; George, Richard T.; Gerber, Thomas; Mahesh, Mahadevappa; Weigold, Wm. Guy

    2013-01-01

    Multidetector row computed tomography (CT) allows noninvasive anatomic and functional imaging of the heart, great vessels, and the coronary arteries. In recent years, there have been several advances in CT hardware, which have expanded the clinical utility of CT for cardiovascular imaging; such advances are ongoing. This review article from the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) Basic and Emerging Sciences and Technology (BEST) Working Group summarizes the technical aspects of current state-of-the-art CT hardware and describes the scan modes this hardware supports for cardiovascular CT imaging. PMID:22551595

  13. State-of-the-art in CT hardware and scan modes for cardiovascular CT.

    PubMed

    Halliburton, Sandra; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Dey, Damini; Einstein, Andrew J; Gentry, Ralph; George, Richard T; Gerber, Thomas; Mahesh, Mahadevappa; Weigold, Wm Guy

    2012-01-01

    Multidetector row computed tomography (CT) allows noninvasive anatomic and functional imaging of the heart, great vessels, and coronary arteries. In recent years, there have been several advances in CT hardware, which have expanded the clinical utility of CT for cardiovascular imaging; such advances are ongoing. This review article from the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Basic and Emerging Sciences and Technology Working Group summarizes the technical aspects of current state-of-the-art CT hardware and describes the scan modes this hardware supports for cardiovascular CT imaging.

  14. An analysis of plasticity in the rat respiratory system following cervical spinal cord injury and the application of nanotechnology to induce or enhance recovery of diaphragm function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Janelle

    Second cervical segment spinal cord hemisection (C2Hx) results in ipsilateral hemidiaphragm paralysis. However, the intact latent crossed phrenic pathway can restore function spontaneously over time or immediately following drug administration. WGA bound fluorochromes were administered to identify nuclei associated with diaphragm function in both the acute and chronic C2Hx models. WGA is unique in that it undergoes receptor mediated endocytosis and is transsynaptically transported across select physiologically active synapses. Comparison of labeling in the acutely injured to the chronically injured rat provided an anatomical map of spinal and supraspinal injury induced synaptic plasticity. The plasticity occurs over time in the chronic C2Hx model in an effort to adapt to the loss of hemidiaphragm function. Utilizing the selectivity of WGA, a nanoconjugate was developed to target drug delivery to nuclei involved in diaphragm function post C2Hx in an effort to restore lost function. Theophylline was selected due to its established history as a respiratory stimulant. Theophylline was attached to gold nanoparticles by a transient bond designed to degrade intracellularly. The gold nanoparticles were then permanently attached to WGA-HRP. Following intradiaphragmatic injection, the WGA portion was identified in the ipsilateral phrenic nuclei and bilaterally in the rVRGs. The location of WGA should reflect the location of the AuNP since the peptide bond between them is permanent. The effectiveness of the nanoconjugate was verified with EMG analysis of the diaphragm and recordings from the phrenic nerves. All doses administered in the acute C2Hx model resulted in resorted hemidiaphragm and phrenic nerve activity. A dose of 0.14mg/kg had a significantly higher percent recovery on day 3, whereas 0.03mg/kg was significantly higher on day 14. The change in most effective dose over time is likely due to the availability or concentration of the drug and location of drug release

  15. Opportunities for new CT contrast agents to maximize the diagnostic potential of emerging spectral CT technologies.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Benjamin M; FitzGerald, Paul F; Edic, Peter M; Lambert, Jack W; Colborn, Robert E; Marino, Michael E; Evans, Paul M; Roberts, Jeannette C; Wang, Zhen J; Wong, Margaret J; Bonitatibus, Peter J

    2016-09-09

    The introduction of spectral CT imaging in the form of fast clinical dual-energy CT enabled contrast material to be differentiated from other radiodense materials, improved lesion detection in contrast-enhanced scans, and changed the way that existing iodine and barium contrast materials are used in clinical practice. More profoundly, spectral CT can differentiate between individual contrast materials that have different reporter elements such that high-resolution CT imaging of multiple contrast agents can be obtained in a single pass of the CT scanner. These spectral CT capabilities would be even more impactful with the development of contrast materials designed to complement the existing clinical iodine- and barium-based agents. New biocompatible high-atomic number contrast materials with different biodistribution and X-ray attenuation properties than existing agents will expand the diagnostic power of spectral CT imaging without penalties in radiation dose or scan time.

  16. Dual source CT (DSCT) imaging of obese patients: evaluation of CT number accuracy, uniformity, and noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walz-Flannigan, A.; Schmidt, B.,; Apel, A.; Eusemann, C.; Yu, L.; McCollough, C. H.

    2009-02-01

    Obese patients present challenges in obtaining sufficient x-ray exposure over reasonable time periods for acceptable CT image quality. To overcome this limitation, the exposure can be divided between two x-ray sources using a dualsource (DS) CT system. However, cross-scatter issues in DS CT may also compromise image quality. We evaluated a DS CT system optimized for imaging obese patients, comparing the CT number accuracy and uniformity to the same images obtained with a single-source (SS) acquisition. The imaging modes were compared using both solid cylindrical PMMA phantoms and a semi-anthropomorphic thorax phantom fitted with extension rings to simulate different size patients. Clinical protocols were used and CTDIvol and kVp were held constant between SS and DS modes. Results demonstrated good agreement in CT number between SS and DS modes in CT number, with the DS mode showing better axial uniformity for the largest phantoms.

  17. Thoracic meningocele in lumbo-costo-vertebral syndrome in a child: possible enlargement with repeated motion by anchoring to the diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Wataya, Takafumi; Horikawa, Kyohei; Kitagawa, Masashi; Tashiro, Yuzuru

    2016-08-01

    Lumbo-costo-vertebral syndrome (LCVS) is a rare disorder in children that is characterized by hemivertebrae, congenital absence of ribs, meningocele, and hypoplasia of the truncal and abdominal wall presenting as a congenital lumbar hernia. An otherwise healthy 12-month-old girl was referred to the authors' hospital with soft swelling on her left middle back; scoliosis had been present since birth. Imaging revealed a thoracic meningocele, ectopia of the spleen suggesting lumbar hernia, multiple anomalies of the thoracic vertebral columns, and defects of the ribs; thus, LCVS was diagnosed. Surgical observation revealed that the meningocele was firmly anchored to part of the diaphragm, which created stretching tension in the meningocele continuously with exhalation. Once detached, the meningocele shrank spontaneously and never developed again after cauterization. In this case, continuous or pulsatile pressure in the presence of a vertebral defect was thus considered to be an important factor for formation of the thoracic meningocele.

  18. A high performance micro-pressure sensor based on a double-ended quartz tuning fork and silicon diaphragm in atmospheric packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Rongjun; Li, Cun; Zhao, Yulong; Li, Bo; Tian, Bian

    2015-06-01

    A resonant micro-pressure sensor based on a double-ended quartz tuning fork (DEQTF) and bossed silicon diaphragm in atmospheric packaging is presented. To achieve vacuum-free packaging with a high quality factor, the DEQTF is designed to resonate in an anti-phase vibration mode in a plane that is under the effect of slide-film damping. The feasibility is demonstrated by theoretical analysis and a finite element simulation. The dimensions of the DEQTF and diaphragm are optimized in accordance with the principles of improving sensitivity and minimizing energy dissipation. The sensor chip is fabricated using quartz and silicon micromachining technologies, and simply packaged in a stainless steel shell with standard atmosphere. The experimental setup is established for the calibration, where an additional sensor prototype without a pressure port is introduced as a frequency reference. By detecting the frequency difference of the tested sensor and reference sensor, the influences of environmental factors such as temperature and shocks on measuring accuracy are eliminated effectively. Under the action of a self-excitation circuit, static performance is obtained. The sensitivity of the sensor is 299 kHz kPa-1 in the operating range of 0-10 kPa at room temperature. Testing results shows a nonlinearity of 0.0278%FS, a hysteresis of 0.0207%FS and a repeatability of 0.0375%FS. The results indicate that the proposed sensor has favorable features, which provides a cost-effective and high-performance approach for low pressure measurement.

  19. Short-term and long-term effect of diaphragm biofeedback training in gastroesophageal reflux disease: an open-label, pilot, randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Sun, X; Shang, W; Wang, Z; Liu, X; Fang, X; Ke, M

    2016-10-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of diaphragm biofeedback training (DBT) for patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). A total of 40 patients with GERD treated at the Peking Union Medical College Hospital between September 2004 and July 2006 were randomized to receive DBT and rabeprazole proton pump inhibitor (PPI) or rabeprazole alone. The DBT + rabeprazole group received DBT during the 8-week initial treatment; the rabeprazole group did not. During the 6-month follow up, all patients took acid suppression according to their reflux symptoms, and the patients in the DBT + rabeprazole group were required to continue DBT. The primary outcome (used for power analysis) was the amount of acid suppression used at 6 months. Secondary outcomes were reflux symptoms, health-related quality of life (HRQL), and esophageal motility differences after the 8-week treatment compared with baseline. Acid suppression usage significantly decreased in the DBT + rabeprazole group compared with the rabeprazole group at 6 months (P < 0.05). At 8 weeks, reflux symptoms and GERD-HRQL were significantly improved in both groups (P < 0.05), without difference between them. Crural diaphragm tension (CDT) and gastroesophageal junction pressure (GEJP) significantly increased in the DBT + rabeprazole group (P < 0.05), but without change in lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure. There was no significant change in CDT, GEJP, and LES pressure compared with baseline in the rabeprazole group. In conclusion, long-term DBT could reduce acid suppression usage by enhancing the anti-reflux barrier, providing a non-pharmacological maintenance therapy and reducing medical costs for patients with GERD.

  20. Iterative image reconstruction in spectral CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Daniel; Michel, Eric; Kim, Hye S.; Kim, Jae G.; Han, Byung H.; Cho, Min H.; Lee, Soo Y.

    2012-03-01

    Scan time of spectral-CTs is much longer than conventional CTs due to limited number of x-ray photons detectable by photon-counting detectors. However, the spectral pixel information in spectral-CT has much richer information on physiological and pathological status of the tissues than the CT-number in conventional CT, which makes the spectral- CT one of the promising future imaging modalities. One simple way to reduce the scan time in spectral-CT imaging is to reduce the number of views in the acquisition of projection data. But, this may result in poorer SNR and strong streak artifacts which can severely compromise the image quality. In this work, spectral-CT projection data were obtained from a lab-built spectral-CT consisting of a single CdTe photon counting detector, a micro-focus x-ray tube and scan mechanics. For the image reconstruction, we used two iterative image reconstruction methods, the simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT) and the total variation minimization based on conjugate gradient method (CG-TV), along with the filtered back-projection (FBP) to compare the image quality. From the imaging of the iodine containing phantoms, we have observed that SIRT and CG-TV are superior to the FBP method in terms of SNR and streak artifacts.