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Sample records for papilloma virus genotyping

  1. Giant magnetoimpedance-based microchannel system for quick and parallel genotyping of human papilloma virus type 16/18

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hao; Chen, Lei; Lei, Chong; Zhang, Ju; Li, Ding; Zhou, Zhi-Min; Bao, Chen-Chen; Hu, Heng-Yao; Chen, Xiang; Cui, Feng; Zhang, Shuang-Xi; Zhou, Yong; Cui, Da-Xiang

    2010-07-01

    Quick and parallel genotyping of human papilloma virus (HPV) type 16/18 is carried out by a specially designed giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) based microchannel system. Micropatterned soft magnetic ribbon exhibiting large GMI ratio serves as the biosensor element. HPV genotyping can be determined by the changes in GMI ratio in corresponding detection region after hybridization. The result shows that this system has great potential in future clinical diagnostics and can be easily extended to other biomedical applications based on molecular recognition.

  2. Genotyping, levels of expression and physical status of human papilloma virus in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma among Colombian patients.

    PubMed

    Erira, Alveiro; Motta, Leidy Angélica; Chala, Andrés; Moreno, Andrey; Gamboa, Fredy; García, Dabeiba Adriana

    2015-10-23

    One of the risk factors for squamous cell oropharyngeal carcinoma is infection with the human papilloma virus (HPV), with prevalences that vary depending on the geographical region.  To identify the most frequent HPV viral types in oropharyngeal cancer, the levels of expression and the physical condition of the viral genome.  Forty-six patients were included in the study from among those attending head and neck surgical services in the cities of Bogotá, Manizales and Bucaramanga. In the histopathological report all study samples were characterized as oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. DNA extraction was subsequently performed for HPV genotyping and to determine the physical state of the viral genome, as well as RNA to determine viral transcripts using real-time PCR.  HPV prevalence in tumors was 21.74% (n=10) and the most common viral type was HPV-16 (nine cases). Viral expression for HPV-16 was low (one of 11 copies) and the predominant physical state of the virus was mixed (eight cases), with disruption observed at the E1 - E2 binding site (2525 - 3720 nucleotides).  The prevalence of HPV associated with oropharyngeal carcinoma among the Colombian study population was 21.7%, which is relatively low. The most frequent viral type was HPV-16, found in a mixed form and with low expression of E7, possibly indicating a poor prognosis for these patients.

  3. Human papilloma virus genotypes in women from Nayarit, Mexico, with squamous intraepithelial lesions and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Cervantes, Laura; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Rojas-García, Aurora Elizabeth; Barrón-Vivanco, Briscia Socorro; Vallejo-Ruiz, Verónica; León, David Cantú-De; Hernández, Yael Yvette Bernal; Jáuregui-Martínez, Armando; Medina-Díaz, Irma Martha

    2016-07-01

    In Mexico cervical cancer (CC) is the most common cause of death from neoplasia in women. Study aimed to analyze the current distribution of Human papillomavirus (HPV) types in women from Nayarit, Mexico, with Squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) and Cervical cancer (CC). Between January 2011 and July 2013, cervical samples were collected from female residents of the Mexican state of Nayarit and were analyzed by means of a LINEAR ARRAY® HPV genotyping test. Data analyses were performed using Stata ver. 8.0 statistical software. Of the samples analyzed, 91.2%, HPV DNA was detected. Of these positive samples, 82% were High-risk (HR) viral types. The most prevalent HPV genotypes identified were 16, 58, 31, 18, and 70. Forty two percent of participants had a single infection, while 23 and 26% of participants were infected with two or more HPV genotypes, respectively. HPV 16 was the most prevalent genotype identified and was frequently present as a co-infection with HPV types 18, 51, 52, 59, 66, or 70. Women <20 years of age were most often infected with HPV, and the HPV Quadrivalent vaccine (types 16, 18, 6, and 11), currently available in Mexico, no confers protection against a subset of the HPV genotypes identified in the present study (58, 31, 70, and 35). Thus, it is important evaluate the geographical distribution of specific HPV genotypes in all health of center across Mexico in order to implement a successful vaccination program and to diagnose CC in its early stages.

  4. Human papilloma virus genotypes in women from Nayarit, Mexico, with squamous intraepithelial lesions and cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Cervantes, Laura; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Rojas-García, Aurora Elizabeth; Barrón-Vivanco, Briscia Socorro; Vallejo-Ruiz, Verónica; León, David Cantú-De; Hernández, Yael Yvette Bernal; Jáuregui-Martínez, Armando; Medina-Díaz, Irma Martha

    2016-01-01

    Objective In Mexico cervical cancer (CC) is the most common cause of death from neoplasia in women. Study aimed to analyze the current distribution of Human papillomavirus (HPV) types in women from Nayarit, Mexico, with Squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) and Cervical cancer (CC). Methodology Between January 2011 and July 2013, cervical samples were collected from female residents of the Mexican state of Nayarit and were analyzed by means of a LINEAR ARRAY® HPV genotyping test. Data analyses were performed using Stata ver. 8.0 statistical software. Results Of the samples analyzed, 91.2%, HPV DNA was detected. Of these positive samples, 82% were High-risk (HR) viral types. The most prevalent HPV genotypes identified were 16, 58, 31, 18, and 70. Forty two percent of participants had a single infection, while 23 and 26% of participants were infected with two or more HPV genotypes, respectively. HPV 16 was the most prevalent genotype identified and was frequently present as a co-infection with HPV types 18, 51, 52, 59, 66, or 70. Conclusion Women <20 years of age were most often infected with HPV, and the HPV Quadrivalent vaccine (types 16, 18, 6, and 11), currently available in Mexico, no confers protection against a subset of the HPV genotypes identified in the present study (58, 31, 70, and 35). Thus, it is important evaluate the geographical distribution of specific HPV genotypes in all health of center across Mexico in order to implement a successful vaccination program and to diagnose CC in its early stages. PMID:27610056

  5. The role of Human papilloma virus (HPV) genotyping in recurrent respiratory papillomatosis in Rasoul Akram Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Izadi, Farzad; Hamkar, Rasool; Abdolmotallebi, Fereshteh; Jahandideh, Hesam

    2012-01-01

    Background The most common laryngeal mass in children is recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP). Studies have attempted to correlate viral typing and its aggressiveness. Method 29 patients with histologically confirmed RRP enrolled in adjuvant therapies. Patients underwent several surgical interventions. Results HPV genotyping demonstrated 45% HPV-6 and 55% HPV-11. The mean age at the first surgical intervention was 52.39 months (SD=102.28) (range from 4 months to 426 months). The mean number of surgical intervention was 10.39 (SD=7.76) (range from 2 to 30). The mean time of surgical intervals was 4.63 months (SD=4.02) (range from 2 to 24 months). In fourteen patients (48%) tracheotomy was done. All patients who had tracheotomy received alpha-interferon. One of our cases was a male who had pulmonary extension with HPV-6. Conclusion A review of patients with RRP was regarding to HPV genotyping and need for adjuvant therapy and tracheostomy. Mean number of surgical procedure was 10/40 and nearly fourteen patients (48%) need to tracheotomy. The clinical differences between HPV6 and HPV11 disease may not be accurately predictable. Patients with less age and with HPV-11 seemed to have more severe problems, but these differences were not statistically significant which needs much more investigations for reasonable starting point of evaluation for these differences. PMID:23483670

  6. Immunological responses against human papilloma virus and human papilloma virus induced laryngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chitose, Shun-ichi; Sakazaki, T; Ono, T; Kurita, T; Mihashi, H; Nakashima, T

    2010-06-01

    This study aimed to clarify the local immune status in the larynx in the presence of infection or carcinogenesis associated with human papilloma virus. Cytological samples (for human papilloma virus detection) and laryngeal secretions (for immunoglobulin assessment) were obtained from 31 patients with laryngeal disease, during microscopic laryngeal surgery. On histological examination, 12 patients had squamous cell carcinoma, four had laryngeal papilloma and 15 had other benign laryngeal disease. Cytological samples were tested for human papilloma virus DNA using the Hybrid Capture 2 assay. High risk human papilloma virus DNA was detected in 25 per cent of patients (three of 12) with laryngeal cancer. Low risk human papilloma virus DNA was detected only in three laryngeal papilloma patients. The mean laryngeal secretion concentrations of immunoglobulins M, G and A and secretory immunoglobulin A in human papilloma virus DNA positive patients were more than twice those in human papilloma virus DNA negative patients. A statistically significant difference was observed between the secretory immunoglobulin A concentrations in the two groups. Patients with laryngeal cancer had higher laryngeal secretion concentrations of each immunoglobulin type, compared with patients with benign laryngeal disease. The study assessed the mean laryngeal secretion concentrations of each immunoglobulin type in the 12 laryngeal cancer patients, comparing human papilloma virus DNA positive patients (n = 3) and human papilloma virus DNA negative patients (n = 9); the mean concentrations of immunoglobulins M, G and A and secretory immunoglobulin A tended to be greater in human papilloma virus DNA positive cancer patients, compared with human papilloma virus DNA negative cancer patients. These results suggest that the local laryngeal immune response is activated by infection or carcinogenesis due to human papilloma virus. The findings strongly suggest that secretory IgA has inhibitory activity

  7. Effect of human papilloma virus expression on clinical course of laryngeal papilloma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang Moon; Cho, Nam Hoon; Choi, Hong Shik; Kim, Young Ho; Byeon, Hyung Kwon; Min, Hyun Jin; Kim, Se-Heon

    2008-10-01

    Our observations suggest that human papilloma virus (HPV) 6/11 is the main causative agent of laryngeal papilloma and that detection of active HPV DNA expression may be helpful in identifying patients with aggressive recurrent laryngeal papilloma. HPV is assumed to be the main causative agent of this disease. We investigated the expression of the entire genotype of HPV in cases of laryngeal papilloma and correlated their expression with the clinical course of the disease. Seventy cases of laryngeal papilloma were evaluated for the presence of the HPV genome by in situ hybridization (ISH) using wide-spectrum HPV DNA probe. Specific types of HPV infection were determined by DNA ISH using type-specific HPV DNA probes (HPV 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33). Separate analyses were conducted comparing viral types, frequency of recurrences and duration of disease-free periods. We detected HPV DNA in 40 of the 70 laryngeal papilloma cases (57%). In particular, HPV DNA was detected in 75% of the juvenile types. There were significant associations between HPV and laryngeal papilloma (p<0.01). Among the HPV-positive cases, major specific types were HPV 6/11 (97%). Significant associations were also noted between viral expression and clinical course.

  8. Papilloma of lip associated with human papilloma viruses-32 infection in a child.

    PubMed

    Sabeena, Sasidharanpillai; Pallade, Sadashiva Rao; Kamath, Nutan; Mathew, Mary; Arunkumar, Govindakarnavar

    2016-01-01

    Squamous papilloma is the most common benign oral epithelial lesion, and it is well known to be associated with human papilloma virus 6 and 11. Here, we report a case of squamous papilloma associated with human papilloma viruses (HPV)-32 in a 4-year-old boy who presented with a verrucous lesion on the lower lip. HPV-32 is often associated with a rare benign condition focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH). A limited number of lesions and the absence of characteristic histology ruled out FEH in our patient. To the best of our knowledge, the association of oral squamous papilloma with HPV-32 is hitherto unreported.

  9. The Association of High Risk Human Papillomaviruses in Patients With Cervical Cancer: An Evidence Based Study on Patients With Squamous Cell Dysplasia or Carcinoma for Evaluation of 23 Human Papilloma Virus Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Piroozmand, Ahmad; Mostafavi Zadeh, Seyed Mostafa; Madani, Azita; Soleimani, Reza; Nedaeinia, Reza; Niakan, Mohammad; Avan, Amir; Manian, Mostafa; Moradi, Mohammad; Eftekhar, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death in females. Human papilloma virus (HPV) is the major risk factor of cervical cancer. Objectives The aim of the current study was to explore the frequency and role of 23 different HPVs in patients with cervical cancer. Materials and Methods Overall, 117 formalin-fix and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues from cervical cancer patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) or dysplasia were collected from Mirza-Kochakkhan-Jangali hospital, Tehran, Iran during year 2013, to investigate the presence of HPV- HPV- 67, 68, 6, 11, 13, 16, 17, 30, 69, 39, 40, 42, 64, 66 and 51 to 59 genotypes. Results The Pap smear report illustrated the presence of malignancy in 71 cases, while 11 cases had no evidence of malignancy. Among the patients, 26 cases had sexually transmitted disease with relative frequency of 0.58. Infection with papilloma virus was observed in 83.6% of SCC patients and 45% of the dysplasia group. The most prevalent HPV genotypes were 18 with 31.62% and 16 with 27.35% of cases. Moreover the relative frequencies of HPV-33, -6, -58, -52, -35 and -51, genotypes were 15.38, 7.69, 5.98, 5.12 and 3.41%, respectively. Among the different genotypes of HPV, 31 had the lowest and 16 had the highest relative frequency. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that HPV-16 and -18 have a higher prevalence in our population than 31 and 51. Further investigations are required to evaluate the role of these genotypes in a larger multicenter setting for establishing their values for early detection of patients, which is useful for screening and vaccination programs of cancerous and precancerous lesions of cervical cancer. PMID:27279992

  10. THE SUPERINFECTION OF THE RABBIT PAPILLOMA (SHOPE) BY EXTRANEOUS VIRUSES

    PubMed Central

    Syverton, Jerome T.; Berry, George Packer

    1947-01-01

    1. The potentialities that viruses have for the superinfection of virus tumors have not been recognized nor has the fact that a single cell can harbor more than one virus. 2. Rabbit papillomas, induced by the papilloma virus (Shope), were superinfected by B virus, myxoma virus, vaccinia virus, and probably, virus III. Similar attempts at superinfection by herpes virus were without success. The criteria for parasitization included the histopathological finding of specific inclusion bodies, the recovery of each virus by suitable animal passage, and the immunological identification of each virus. 3. Papillomas and probably the individual cells thereof were readily infected simultaneously by two viruses when the combination of B virus and myxoma virus was used. 4. Cells of the Shope papilloma have a selective affinity for certain extraneous viruses introduced at a site distant from the tumor growths. It was found that exceptionally few cells in the basal layers of the epidermis escaped when myxoma virus was used as the superinfecting agent. 5. The cells of an epidermoid carcinoma which terminated the rabbit papilloma-to-carcinoma sequence were readily infected by B virus with resultant multiple intranuclear inclusion bodies in single cells. 6. Attempts to establish a prolonged superinfection of cells of the Shope papilloma by virus III were unsuccessful. This rabbit tumor differs therein from the Brown-Pearce tumor, an epithelioma of rabbits, in its susceptibility to infection with virus III. PMID:19871661

  11. Human papilloma virus infection and psoriasis: Did human papilloma virus infection trigger psoriasis?

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sonia P.; Gulhane, Sachin; Pandey, Neha; Bisne, Esha

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is an autoimmune chronic inflammatory skin disease known to be triggered by streptococcal and HIV infections. However, human papilloma virus infection (HPV) as a triggering factor for the development of psoriasis has not been reported yet. We, hereby report a case of plaque type with inverse psoriasis which probably could have been triggered by genital warts (HPV infection) and discuss the possible pathomechanisms for their coexistence and its management. PMID:26692619

  12. Does human papilloma virus play a role in sinonasal inverted papilloma?

    PubMed

    Govindaraj, Satish; Wang, Hailun

    2014-02-01

    Inverted papillomas are a benign sinonasal tumor with a propensity for recurrence and malignant transformation. Although many investigations have been made into the nature of this disease, its etiology and causes for malignant transformation have yet to be fully elucidated. It is the authors' objective to present a review on management of the disease and evaluate the present relationship between human papilloma virus (HPV) and inverted papilloma. A causal relationship between HPV and the pathogenesis and progression of inverted papilloma has been posited since the 1980s. Although widely varied HPV detection rates have been reported, recent studies have noted a substantial increase in both recurrence and malignant transformation in HPV-infected inverted papillomas. However, exact cellular mechanisms by which infection leads to subsequent recurrence and development of carcinoma have yet to be elucidated. Evidence exists suggesting that HPV infection plays a role in the progression of inverted papilloma and confers an increased risk for recurrence and malignant transformation. PCR is the preferred detection method, and fresh or frozen specimens are the ideal source of tissue for evaluation. Although multiple studies have detected an association between HPV and inverted papilloma (both recurrent and malignant transformation), further studies are necessary to elucidate the underlying molecular pathways before an association can be changed to causation.

  13. Isolated corneal papilloma-like lesion associated with human papilloma virus type 6.

    PubMed

    Park, Choul Yong; Kim, Eo-Jin; Choi, Jong Sun; Chuck, Roy S

    2011-05-01

    To report a case of a corneal papilloma-like lesion associated with human papilloma virus type 6. A 48-year-old woman presented with a 2-year history of ocular discomfort and gradual visual deterioration in her right eye. Ophthalmic examination revealed an elevated, semitranslucent, well-defined vascularized mass approximately 4 × 2.5 mm in size localized to the right cornea. The surface of the mass appeared smooth and many small, shallow, and irregular elevations were noted. An excisional biopsy was performed. The underlying cornea was markedly thinned, and fine ramifying vasculature was also noted on the exposed corneal stroma. Typical koilocytic change was observed on the histopathologic examination. Polymerase chain reaction revealed the existence of human papilloma virus type 6 DNA. Here we describe a case of an isolated corneal papilloma-like lesion. Although the corneal extension of the limbal or the conjunctival papillomas has been commonly observed, an isolated corneal papilloma-like lesion with underlying stromal destruction has only rarely been reported.

  14. Smoking, not human papilloma virus infection, is a risk factor for recurrence of sinonasal inverted papilloma.

    PubMed

    Roh, Hwan-Jung; Mun, Sue Jean; Cho, Kyu-Sup; Hong, Sung-Lyong

    2016-01-01

    The recurrence rate of sinonasal inverted papillomas (SNIP) is 15-20%. However, few studies have investigated patient-dependent factors related to recurrence of SNIPs. To analyze risk factors, including human papilloma virus (HPV) infection and smoking, as well as other factors, for recurrence of SNIPs. Fifty-four patients who were diagnosed with SNIP and underwent surgery were enrolled: 39 men and 15 women, with the mean age of 54.0 years. Their mean follow-up was 40.6 months. Demographics and information about the history of smoking, previous surgery, tumor extent, follow-up, and recurrence were reviewed retrospectively. Those patients whose tumors were associated with malignant transformation were excluded in this study. HPV detection and genotyping in the tumor specimens were performed with the HPV DNA chip, a polymerase chain reaction-based DNA microarray system. Seven patients (13.0%) had recurrence, with a mean time to recurrence of 39.8 months. Recurrence rates in T1, T2, T3, and T4 of the Krouse staging system were 0% (0/4), 8.3% (2/24), 17.4% (4/23), and 33.3% (1/3), respectively (p > 0.5). Eight patients (14.8%) were positive for HPV DNA. All of these patients belonged to the group without recurrence (p > 0.5). However, recurrence rates according to HPV DNA positivity were not statistically different (0% versus 15.2%). Three (42.9%) in the group with recurrence and four (8.5%) in the group without recurrence were smokers (p < 0.5). Smoking was associated with recurrence of SNIP. However, HPV infection is not a recurrence of SNIP risk factor.

  15. Molecular identification of a papilloma virus from cutaneous lesions of captive and free-ranging Florida manatees

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodruff, R.A.; Bonde, R.K.; Bonilla, J.A.; Romero, C.H.

    2005-01-01

    Cutaneous papillomatous lesions were biopsied from three captive Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) at Homosassa Springs State Wildlife Park (HSSWP), Homosassa, Florida, USA, and from six free-ranging Florida manatees from Crystal and Homosassa rivers, Florida. Total DNA extracted from these lesions was assayed for the presence of papilloma virus genomes using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with primers that target the L1 capsid protein gene. The amplification generated DNA fragments 458 base pairs in length that encompassed a highly conserved domain within the L1 capsid protein and translated into identical polypeptides of 152 amino acids, suggesting the involvement of a single papilloma virus genotype. Multiple amino acid sequence and phylogenetic analyses of the L1 fragment indicated that the Florida manatee papilloma virus is a unique and quite distinct papillomavirus from other known papilloma viruses. The emergence of this new pathogen raises concerns about its potential impact on the already endangered Florida manatee.

  16. Molecular identification of a papilloma virus from cutaneous lesions of captive and free-ranging Florida manatees.

    PubMed

    Woodruff, Rebecca A; Bonde, Robert K; Bonilla, J Alfredo; Romero, Carlos H

    2005-04-01

    Cutaneous papillomatous lesions were biopsied from three captive Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) at Homosassa Springs State Wildlife Park (HSSWP), Homosassa, Florida, USA, and from six free-ranging Florida manatees from Crystal and Homosassa rivers, Florida. Total DNA extracted from these lesions was assayed for the presence of papilloma virus genomes using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with primers that target the L1 capsid protein gene. The amplification generated DNA fragments 458 base pairs in length that encompassed a highly conserved domain within the L1 capsid protein and translated into identical polypeptides of 152 amino acids, suggesting the involvement of a single papilloma virus genotype. Multiple amino acid sequence and phylogenetic analyses of the L1 fragment indicated that the Florida manatee papilloma virus is a unique and quite distinct papillomavirus from other known papilloma viruses. The emergence of this new pathogen raises concerns about its potential impact on the already endangered Florida manatee.

  17. Human papilloma virus in oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most prevalent cancer among women, and it arises from cells that originate in the cervix uteri. Among several causes of cervical malignancies, infection with some types of human papilloma virus (HPV) is well known to be the greatest cervical cancer risk factor. Over 150 subtypes of HPV have been identified; more than 40 types of HPVs are typically transmitted through sexual contact and infect the anogenital region and oral cavity. The recently introduced vaccine for HPV infection is effective against certain subtypes of HPV that are associated with cervical cancer, genital warts, and some less common cancers, including oropharyngeal cancer. Two HPV vaccines, quadrivalent and bivalent types that use virus-like particles (VLPs), are currently used in the medical commercial market. While the value of HPV vaccination for oral cancer prevention is still controversial, some evidence supports the possibility that HPV vaccination may be effective in reducing the incidence of oral cancer. This paper reviews HPV-related pathogenesis in cancer, covering HPV structure and classification, trends in worldwide applications of HPV vaccines, effectiveness and complications of HPV vaccination, and the relationship of HPV with oral cancer prevalence. PMID:28053902

  18. Human papilloma virus in oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soung Min

    2016-12-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most prevalent cancer among women, and it arises from cells that originate in the cervix uteri. Among several causes of cervical malignancies, infection with some types of human papilloma virus (HPV) is well known to be the greatest cervical cancer risk factor. Over 150 subtypes of HPV have been identified; more than 40 types of HPVs are typically transmitted through sexual contact and infect the anogenital region and oral cavity. The recently introduced vaccine for HPV infection is effective against certain subtypes of HPV that are associated with cervical cancer, genital warts, and some less common cancers, including oropharyngeal cancer. Two HPV vaccines, quadrivalent and bivalent types that use virus-like particles (VLPs), are currently used in the medical commercial market. While the value of HPV vaccination for oral cancer prevention is still controversial, some evidence supports the possibility that HPV vaccination may be effective in reducing the incidence of oral cancer. This paper reviews HPV-related pathogenesis in cancer, covering HPV structure and classification, trends in worldwide applications of HPV vaccines, effectiveness and complications of HPV vaccination, and the relationship of HPV with oral cancer prevalence.

  19. Human papilloma virus infection prior to coitarche.

    PubMed

    Doerfler, Daniela; Bernhaus, Astrid; Kottmel, Andrea; Sam, Christine; Koelle, Dieter; Joura, Elmar A

    2009-05-01

    The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence and the natural course of anogenital human papilloma virus (HPV) infections in girls prior to coitarche attending an outpatient gynecological unit. Specimens were taken from the anogenital region of 114 unselected 4-15 year old girls who were referred consecutively for various gynecological problems. Four girls were excluded because of sexual abuse. Low-risk HPV-deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was detected in 4 girls (3.6%) and high-risk HPV DNA in 15 children (13.6%). Two girls testing positive for HPV DNA had clinical apparent warts. After 1 year, 2 children had persistent high-risk HPV DNA, and in 1 case we found a switch from high-risk to low-risk HPV DNA. Subclinical genital low- and high-risk HPV infections are common in girls without any history of sexual abuse or sexual activity. We found persistence of genital HPV infection in children, which could be a reservoir for HPV-associated diseases later in life.

  20. Virus-induced papillomas of the alimentary tract of cattle.

    PubMed

    Jarrett, W F; Murphy, J; O'Neil, B W; Laird, H M

    1978-09-15

    An abattoir survey was carried out to determine the incidence and aetiology of squamous papillomas of the alimentary tract of cattle in Scotland and North England as they were suspected of being involved in the genesis of alimentary carcinoma in certain localized geographical areas. A total of 7,746 cattle of a wide age range was examined. Various subsets of this number were subjected to analyses of certain specific factors. The calculated overall incidence was 19% and the detailed site incidence and tumour multiplicity are given. The sites at which papillomas were found were identical with those at which carcinoma had been noted in animals from a high-cancer area. The number of sites affected by papilloma and the tumour multiplicity were much lower in the general population than in the high-cancer area. Inclusion bodies, identified by electronmicroscopy as virus, were found in tumour cell nuclei and a typical papilloma virus was purified from the tumours. The structure of the tumours is described and the possible plurality of bovine papilloma-viruses is discussed in the light of recent findings in the human viruses. The general interest of a naturally occurring and geographically localized oncogenic system, in which an environmental carcinogen and a virus might be involved, is extended.

  1. Genotyping of the human papilloma virus in a group of Mexican women treated in a highly specialist hospital: Multiple infections and their potential transcendence in the current vaccination programme.

    PubMed

    Romero-Morelos, Pablo; Uribe-Jiménez, Arizbett; Bandala, Cindy; Poot-Vélez, Albros; Ornelas-Corral, Nora; Rodríguez-Esquivel, Miriam; Valdespino-Zavala, Mariana; Taniguchi, Keiko; Marrero-Rodríguez, Daniel; López-Romero, Ricardo; Salcedo, Mauricio

    2017-10-11

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) is one of the main risk factors associated with the development of cervical cancer and its precursor lesions. It has been reported that HPV16 and 18 types cover approximately 70% of cervical cancer worldwide; however, significant variation in percentages of HPV infections could be related to specific populations. Purified DNA of 67 cervical samples were analyzed by Linear Array® HPV genotyping kit. These analyzed samples correspond to 19 cervical tumors, 15 high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions, 20 low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions, and 13 cervical samples without injury were studied, all of them previously diagnosed. In general, 16 different HPV types were found with differences in their frequencies, cervical invasive cancer being the richest in HPV sequences, followed by the low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions and then high-grade lesions. HPV16 was the most frequently distributed type in neoplastic lesions of the cervix, followed by the HPV52, suggesting viral type variability, probably associated to the geographical region studied. The results could indicate variability in HPV presence in Mexico, underlining the important role for HPV52 among others in the Mexican population. This would also potentially have an impact on the current anti-HPV vaccination schemes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Prevalence of Human Papilloma Virus in Sinonasal Papilloma in Southern Iranian Population.

    PubMed

    Valibeigi, Behnaz; Ashraf, Mohamad Javad; Kerdegari, Narges; Safai, Akbar; Abedi, Elham; Khademi, Bijan; Azarpira, Negar

    2017-06-01

    Sinonasal papilloma (SNP) is a rare benign lesion characterized by high recurrence rate and malignant transformation. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of human papilloma virus (HPV) infection in these lesions in South of Iran. In this cross sectional retrospective study, a total of 41 patients, 38 SNP and 3 SNP/Squamous cell carcinoma cases, from 2007 to 2014 were studied. Human papilloma virus (HPV) DNA detection was performed by nested PCR method and positive cases were analyzed for high risk HPV-16 and HPV-18. HPV was detected in 31.7%; HPV- 16 in 4.9% and HPV 18 was not detected at all. Dysplastic epithelium was detected in 53% that was not associated with HPV. Three cases were accompanied with malignant transformation that HPV genome was detected in only one case and none of them were positive for HPV16 /18 genomic DNA. Current research suggests that HPV may be involved in the development of SNP. But the high risk HPV is not important in malignant transformation. More studies are needed to elucidate the possible etiologic mechanism between HPV, inverted papilloma, and squamous cell carcinoma.

  3. [The implementation of polymerase chain reaction technique: the real time to reveal and differentiate the viruses of human papilloma of high carcinogenic risk].

    PubMed

    Andosova, L D; Kontorshchikova, K N; Blatova, O L; Kudel'kina, S Iu; Kuznetsova, I A; Belov, A V; Baĭkova, R A

    2011-07-01

    The polymerase chain reaction technique was applied in "real time" format to evaluate the occurrence rate and infection ratio of various genotypes of human papilloma of high carcinogenic risk in virus-positive women and contact persons. The examination sampling consisted of 738 women aged of 17-50 years. The examination results permitted to establish high percentage of infection of 546 patients (74%) by carcinogenic papilloma viruses. The analysis of detection rate of various genotypes of human papilloma of high carcinogenic risk established that the 56th and 16th types of high carcinogenic risk are revealed more often than others--in 33% and 15.4% correspondingly. In males, first place in occurrence rate is for those types of virus of human papilloma: the 56th n = 10 (33.3%), 16th n = 3 (10%), 45th n = 3 (10%), 51th n = 3 (10%). The rest of genotypes are detected in 3-7% cases.

  4. Assessment of human papilloma virus infection in adult laryngeal papilloma using a screening test.

    PubMed

    Makiyama, Kiyoshi; Hirai, Ryoji; Matsuzaki, Hiroumi; Ikeda, Minoru

    2013-03-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) infection is involved in both juvenile and adult laryngeal papilloma. We wished to determine which types of adult laryngeal papilloma were clinically related to HPV infection. We hypothesized that multiple-site and recurrent papillomas would have a strong relationship to HPV and conducted the present study to test this hypothesis. Thirteen male patients with adult laryngeal papilloma who underwent resection of papilloma between August 2006 and September 2009 were studied. We examined the relationships between whether the tumor was solitary or multiple, presence or absence of recurrence after surgery, and HPV infection. High-risk HPV types (HPV-DNA types 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59, and 68) and low-risk HPV types (6, 11, 42, 43, and 44) were tested by a liquid-phase hybridization method. In addition, HPV typing was performed for patients positive for low-risk HPV types. Twenty patients with laryngeal carcinoma or laryngeal leukoplakia were enrolled as the control group. In the laryngeal papilloma group, all patients tested were negative for high-risk HPV and 69.2% were positive for low-risk HPV. Typing performed for seven of the patients who tested positive for low-risk HPV showed that one patient was positive for HPV-11, whereas the remaining six patients were positive for HPV-6. All patients with recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis (RLP) were positive for low-risk HPV. All patients who were positive for low-risk HPV had RLP. Tumor samples from repeat operations were positive for low-risk HPV in all patients tested. HPV was not detected in the control group. The relationship between RLP and low-risk HPV was strong, with all cases that were positive for low-risk HPV showing recurrence. Tumor tissue resected at the time of repeat surgery was positive for low-risk HPV in all cases tested. Copyright © 2013 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Detection of human papilloma viruses using in situ hybridization].

    PubMed

    Kuljić-Kapulica, N; Radojković, M; Majstorović, J; Matić, V; Krstić, L; Budisin, A; Lepsanović, Z

    1993-01-01

    First experiences in the diagnosis of human papilloma viruses are reported. The method of in situ hybridization was used together with biotin tests for types of HPV: 6/11, 16/18 and 31/33/51. The study was performed on the preparations of of the cervix tissue with displasmic proliferation and laryngeal papilloma tissues. There have been examined 37 specimens: in 6 were found sequence of HPV genoma for types 6/11 and in 1 specimen for types 16/18 and 31/33/51/.

  6. [Microbiological diagnosis of human papilloma virus infection].

    PubMed

    Mateos-Lindemann, Maria Luisa; Pérez-Castro, Sonia; Rodríguez-Iglesias, Manuel; Pérez-Gracia, Maria Teresa

    2016-06-25

    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is the leading cause of sexually transmitted infection worldwide. This virus generally causes benign lesions, such as genital warts, but persistent infection may lead to cervical cancer, anal cancer, vaginal cancer, and oropharyngeal cancer, although less frequently. Cervical cancer is a severe disease with a high mortality in some countries. Screening with cytology has been very successful in the last few years, but nowadays there are numerous studies that confirm that cytology should be replaced with the detection of HPV as a first line test in population based screening. There are several commercially available FDA approved tests for screening of cervical cancer. A new strategy, based on individual detection of the high risk genotypes HPV16 and HPV18, present in 70% of cervical cancer biopsies, has been proposed by some experts, and is going to be implemented in most countries in the future.

  7. An adult case of multiple squamous papillomas of the trachea associated with human papilloma virus type 6.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Hideki; Kutomi, Tomoko; Kujime, Kosei; Hara, Kei; Hisada, Tetsuya

    2008-01-01

    A 72-year-old woman with primary biliary cirrhosis complained of dry cough and wheezing. Chest computed tomography showed a tumor arising from the posterior wall of the trachea. Bronchoscopic examination revealed that the tumor was cauliflower-like, with two small polypoid tumors. They were diagnosed as multiple squamous papillomas. The main tumor was recurrent and removed by repeated microwave coagulation therapy (MCT) through bronchoscopy, whereas the two polypoid tumors were likely to disappear spontaneously. Human papilloma virus (HPV) type 6 DNA was detected in the tumor by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification, suggesting that this virus was the cause of her papillomas.

  8. Human papilloma virus and oral infections: an update.

    PubMed

    Kumaraswamy, K L; Vidhya, M

    2011-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) is one of the most common virus groups affecting the skin and mucosal areas of the body in the world today. It is also a known fact that HPV causes many lesions in the oral cavity. The most common conditions induced by oral HPV infection are usually benign-like oral papillomas, oral condylomas, and focal epithelial hyperplasia. Oral HPV infection has been found to be associated with some cases of oropharyngeal cancer, but it is not the main risk factor for this kind of cancer. HPV is been proved to be the causative agent in causation of cervical cancers without doubt, but its role as a etiologic agent in causing oral cancers needs to be evaluated and studied more to come into any conclusion. We have used review papers, case reports, cohort studies, case control studies, and various internet sources published from 1960 to 2011 to prepare this review of literature.

  9. Women's awareness of the human papilloma virus and related health problems.

    PubMed

    Akyuz, Aygul; Yılmaz, Cevriye; Yenen, Müfit Cemal; Yavan, Tülay; Kılıç, Ayşe

    2011-12-01

    This paper is a report of a study of women's awareness of the human papilloma virus and related health problems. Cervical cancer is an important cause of mortality, making up approximately 12% of all cancers in women. Awareness on the part of carriers of human papilloma virus is crucial in preventing transmission of the infection and protecting against cervical cancer. The study was performed as a cross-sectional descriptive study. The study consists of 79 human papilloma virus-positive women who had not been diagnosed with cervical cancer and 150 women who had not been diagnosed with human papilloma virus. Data were collected via questionnaires between November 2007 and April 2008. Percentages and chi-square test were used. A significantly higher percentage of women with positive human papilloma virus knew the definition of human papilloma virus, the fact that it is transmitted via sexual contact and that it can lead to cervical cancer than did women with negative human papilloma virus. It was established that approximately half the women with positive human papilloma virus presented at the hospital with a genital wart. None of the women knew that a Pap smear test was a necessary tool in the prevention of cervical cancer. Women with positive human papilloma virus have insufficient knowledge of human papilloma virus, sexually transmitted diseases, the health risks associated with human papilloma virus and the means of preventing these risks. It is therefore necessary to evaluate the education of health workers, and especially of nurses, on human papilloma virus and its prevention. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Human papilloma virus and squamous cell carcinoma of the anus.

    PubMed

    Gami, Bhavna; Kubba, Faris; Ziprin, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of anal cancer is increasing. In the UK, the incidence is estimated at approximately 1.5 per 100,000. Most of this increase is attributed to certain at-risk populations. Persons who are human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive and men who have sex with men (MSM), Organ transplant recipients, women with a history of cervical cancer, human papilloma virus (HPV), or cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) are known to have a greater risk for anal cancer. This paper will focus on HPV as a risk factor for anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) and discusses the etiology, anatomy, pathogenesis, management of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the anus.

  11. Immunohistochemical study on the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 2 and high-risk human papilloma virus in the malignant progression of papillomas.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ho-Jin; Kim, Jin-Wook

    2013-10-01

    Papilloma frequently develops as a benign tumor of the head and neck area, but its potential for malignant transformation has yet to be studied. This study aims to provide basic information for papillomas using the immunohistochemical staining of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) and human papilloma virus (HPV) 16 and 18. To evaluate the malignant transformation of papillomas, the selected tissue samples were serially diagnosed with pre-cancerous papilloma (with epithelial dysplasia, pseudo-epitheliomatous hyperplasia) or malignant lesion (squamous cell carcinoma, SCC) after the first diagnosis (squamous papilloma, inverted papilloma). The selected tissues were stained with an antibody to MMP-2 and HPV 16-E7, HPV 18-L1. A statistical analysis was performed according to each transformation step. The epithelial layer of papilloma and pre-cancerous papilloma lesions had a similar MMP-2 expression, but that of the malignant lesion had a significantly increased MMP-2 expression. HPV 16 and 18 infection rates were 28.6%, 33.3% and 63.6% in papillomas, pre-cancerous papilloma lesions, and SCC. A relatively high MMP-2 expression and HPV 16 or 18 infection of papillomas may be associated with early events in the multistep processes of malignant transformation of papillomas.

  12. Immunohistochemical study on the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 2 and high-risk human papilloma virus in the malignant progression of papillomas

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho-Jin

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Papilloma frequently develops as a benign tumor of the head and neck area, but its potential for malignant transformation has yet to be studied. This study aims to provide basic information for papillomas using the immunohistochemical staining of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) and human papilloma virus (HPV) 16 and 18. Materials and Methods To evaluate the malignant transformation of papillomas, the selected tissue samples were serially diagnosed with pre-cancerous papilloma (with epithelial dysplasia, pseudo-epitheliomatous hyperplasia) or malignant lesion (squamous cell carcinoma, SCC) after the first diagnosis (squamous papilloma, inverted papilloma). The selected tissues were stained with an antibody to MMP-2 and HPV 16-E7, HPV 18-L1. A statistical analysis was performed according to each transformation step. Results The epithelial layer of papilloma and pre-cancerous papilloma lesions had a similar MMP-2 expression, but that of the malignant lesion had a significantly increased MMP-2 expression. HPV 16 and 18 infection rates were 28.6%, 33.3% and 63.6% in papillomas, pre-cancerous papilloma lesions, and SCC. Conclusions A relatively high MMP-2 expression and HPV 16 or 18 infection of papillomas may be associated with early events in the multistep processes of malignant transformation of papillomas. PMID:24471049

  13. IDENTITY OF "INHIBITOR" AND ANTIBODY IN EXTRACTS OF VIRUS-INDUCED RABBIT PAPILLOMAS

    PubMed Central

    Friedewald, William F.

    1940-01-01

    The "inhibitor" demonstrable in extracts of the virus-induced rabbit papillomas is identical with the antiviral antibody found in the blood of hosts bearing the growths. The conditions in these latter are frequently favorable to its extravasation in considerable amount into them. Its significance and its influence upon the recovery of virus from the papillomas are discussed. PMID:19871016

  14. Human papilloma virus (HPV) infection in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Mammas, Ioannis N; Sourvinos, George; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2009-03-01

    Human papilloma viruses (HPV) are common pathogens associated with a wide range of cutaneous and mucosal infections in childhood. Different HPV types can cause common warts, genital warts, low-grade as well as high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions. Anogenital warts represent an issue with legal and clinical implications and evaluation of children for the possibility of sexual abuse should be considered in all cases. Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis has also been associated with HPV infection in a variety of studies. The recently introduced HPV vaccination is expected to prevent HPV-related cervical cancer in adulthood; however, HPV infection will continue to affect children.

  15. Modulation of TIP60 by Human Papilloma Virus in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    Human Papilloma virus (HPV), Human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV-1) and Kaposi’s associated Sarcoma virus (KSHV) (1). Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is...was not decreased (Figure 1A). Similar results were obtained in U2OS osteosarcoma cells and HCT116 colon cancer cells (Figure 1B). Evaluating MCF10A...F12 medium containing donor calf serum, while U2OS cells (human osteosarcoma cell line) were maintained in DMEM media containing 10% donor calf serum

  16. Genital human papilloma virus infection in mentally-institutionalized virgins.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Takako; Miyashita, Masako; Miura, Shoko; Nakayama, Daisuke; Miura, Kiyonori; Fukuda, Masafumi; Masuzaki, Hideaki

    2007-09-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) can cause cervical cancer. Risk factors for HPV infection are primarily related to sexual behavior. We determined the prevalence of HPV infection and abnormal cervical cytology in institutionalized women with no previous sexual experience. The study subjects were 251 patients who sought screening for cervical cancer (45.9+/-9.4 years, mean+/-S.D., range, 14 to 66). They were institutionalized for psychosomatic disorders since childhood, and had no previous sexual experience. In addition to screening for cervical cancer, specimens for HPV testing were collected. No women who were positive for HPV DNA was detected, though 251 women without sexual experiences were screened by the hybrid capture 2 test including 26 types of HPV-DNA. Transmission through means other than sexual intercourse may not exist because we could not detect HPV DNA in 251 women with no previous sexual experience.

  17. Ethical considerations of universal vaccination against human papilloma virus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background From an epidemiological perspective, the practice of universal vaccination of girls and young women in order to prevent human papilloma virus (HPV) infection and potential development of cervical cancer is widely accepted even though it may lead to the neglect of other preventive strategies against cervical cancer. Discussion It is argued that removing the deterrent effect – the fear of developing cancer – could encourage teenage sex. This paper reflects on the ethical legitimacy of the universal vaccination of girls and young women against HPV infection, especially regarding safety issues, the need to vaccinate people who have opted to abstain from sex, the presumption of early onset of sexual relations, the commercial interests of the companies that manufacture the vaccine, and the recommendation of universal vaccination in males. Summary Based on the aforementioned information, we believe that the universal vaccination against HPV in young women is acceptable from an ethical point of view, given the medical advantages it presents. PMID:24708813

  18. [Prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines against human papilloma virus].

    PubMed

    Albers, A E; Hoffmann, T K; Klussmann, J P; Kaufmann, A M

    2010-08-01

    Infection with human papilloma virus (HPV) has been identified as the cause of recurrent papillomatosis and of a subgroup of squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck. A change in prevalence of these lesions, especially for oropharyngeal carcinoma, can be expected as a consequence of the introduction of prophylactic HPV vaccines for young women, targeting the most frequent high- and low-risk HPV subtypes. Vaccination for the major low-risk HPV types has proven to be highly effective against genital warts and activity against papillomatosis can be expected. The possibilities of prophylactic HPV vaccination as well as new developments and the rationale for therapeutic vaccines are discussed on the basis of the current literature.

  19. [Principles of the immune modulation therapy against papilloma virus infections].

    PubMed

    Kamladze, P O; Mamamgavrishvili, I D; Kintraia, N P

    2006-10-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of Immudone on local immune responses of cervical mucous in patients with papilloma virus cervicitis. 80 women of reproductive age with chronic cervicitis, 60 women with no signs of infection and 70 bioptates obtained from the base of vaginal section of the cervix. Colposcopic, bacterioscopic, patho-histological and immunohistochemical investigations have been performed. After using of Immudone healing of ectopia was observed in the most of cases. As a result of local application of Immudone in patients with PVI in the tissue of cervix the rate of CD4+ cells was increased, expression of receptors of interleukin-2 was increased, CD4/CD8 ratio also increased, quantity of macrophages and natural killers was increased. Local sIgA synthesis was restored.

  20. CERTAIN CONDITIONS DETERMINING ENHANCED INFECTION WITH THE RABBIT PAPILLOMA VIRUS

    PubMed Central

    Friedewald, William F.

    1944-01-01

    The infection of normal or hyperplastic rabbit skin with the papilloma virus can be greatly enhanced by protecting the scarified and inoculated area with a layer of paraffined gauze until healing occurs. In this way the necrosis which follows upon scarification and also the scabbing are almost entirely prevented and in consequence epithelial regeneration is usually complete within 24 hours. Not only are many susceptible cells provided to the virus far earlier than would otherwise be the case,—and collateral tests have shown that it becomes associated with them within a few hours instead of after many,—but the inoculum is itself conserved, instead of becoming largely lost amidst necrotic tissue and scab, as under ordinary circumstances. The effective titer of the virus is increased by the procedure from 10 to 100 times over that attained when hyperplastic skin is allowed to dry after inoculation. Since the results under the latter circumstances are 10 to 100 times better than those when normal skin is treated in the same way it follows that a 100- to 10,000-fold increase in the effectiveness of the virus has now been obtained. PMID:19871399

  1. [HPV (Human Papilloma Virus) implication in other cancers than gynaecological].

    PubMed

    Badoual, C; Tartour, E; Roussel, H; Bats, A S; Pavie, J; Pernot, S; Weiss, L; Mohamed, A Si; Thariat, J; Hoffmann, C; Péré, H

    2015-08-01

    Worldwide, approximately 5 to 10% of the population is infected by a Human Papilloma Virus (HPV). Some of these viruses, with a high oncogenic risk (HPV HR), are responsible for about 5% of cancer. It is now accepted that almost all carcinomas of the cervix and the vulva are due to an HPV HR (HPV16 and 18) infection. However, these viruses are known to be involved in the carcinogenesis of many other cancers (head and neck [SCCHN], penis, anus). For head and neck cancer, HPV infection is considered as a good prognostic factor. The role of HPV HR in anal cancer is also extensively studied in high-risk patient's population. The role of HPV infection in the carcinogenesis of esophageal, bladder, lung, breast or skin cancers is still debated. Given the multiple possible locations of HPV HR infection, the question of optimizing the management of patients with a HPV+ cancer arises in the implementation of a comprehensive clinical and biological monitoring. It is the same in therapeutics with the existence of a preventive vaccination, for example.

  2. Immunohistochemistry and Polymerase Chain Reaction for Detection Human Papilloma Virus in Warts: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong Sun; Lee, Ji Hyun; Choo, Ji Yoon; Byun, Hee Jin; Jun, Jin Hyun; Lee, Jun Young

    2016-08-01

    Immunohistochemistry and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) are the most widely used methods for the detection of viruses. PCR is known to be a more sensitive and specific method than the immunohistochemical method at this time, but PCR has the disadvantages of high cost and skilled work to use widely. With the progress of technology, the immunohistochemical methods used in these days has come to be highly sensitive and actively used in the diagnostic fields. To evaluate and compare the usefulness of immunohistochemistry and PCR for detection human papilloma virus (HPV) in wart lesions. Nine biopsy samples of verruca vulgaris and 10 of condyloma accuminatum were examined. Immunohistochemical staining using monoclonal antibody to HPV L1 capsid protein and PCR were done for the samples. DNA sequencing of the PCR products and HPV genotyping were also done. HPV detection rate was 78.9% (88.9% in verruca vulgaris, 70.0% in condyloma accuminatum) on immunohistochemistry and 100.0% for PCR. HPV-6 genotype showed a lower positivity rate on immunohistochemistry (50.0%) as compared to that of the other HPV genotypes. Immunohistochemistry for HPV L1 capsid protein showed comparable sensitivity for detection HPV. Considering the high cost and great effort needed for the PCR methods, we can use immunohistochemistry for HPV L1 capsid protein with the advantage of lower cost and simple methods for HPV detection.

  3. Herpes viruses and human papilloma virus in nasal polyposis and controls.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, Dimitrios; Lachanas, Vasileios A; Florou, Zoe; Bizakis, John G; Petinaki, Efthymia; Skoulakis, Charalampos E

    2015-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps is a multifactorial disease entity with an unclear pathogenesis. Contradictory data exist in the literature on the potential implication of viral elements in adult patients with chronic rhinosinusitis. To compare the prevalence of human herpes viruses (1-6) and Human Papilloma Virus in adult patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps and healthy controls. Viral DNA presence was evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction application to nasal polyps specimens from 91 chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps patients and nasal turbinate mucosa from 38 healthy controls. Epstein-Barr virus positivity was higher in nasal polyps (24/91; 26.4%) versus controls (4/38; 10.5%), but the difference did not reach significance (p=0.06). Human herpes virus-6 positivity was lower in nasal polyps (13/91; 14.29%) versus controls (10/38; 26.32%, p=0.13). In chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps group, 1 sample was herpes simplex virus-1-positive (1/91; 1.1%), and another was cytomegalovirus-positive (1/91; 1.1%), versus none in controls. No sample was positive for herpes simplex virus-2, varicella-zoster virus, high-risk-human papilloma viruses (16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59) and low-risk-human papilloma viruses (6, 11). Differences in Epstein-Barr virus and human herpes virus-6 positivity among patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps and healthy controls are not statistically significant, weakening the likelihood of their implication in chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps pathogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. THE RECOVERABILITY OF VIRUS FROM PAPILLOMAS PRODUCED THEREWITH IN DOMESTIC RABBITS

    PubMed Central

    Friedewald, William F.; Kidd, John G.

    1944-01-01

    By preliminary preparation of the skin in ways that render it hyperplastic the presence of infective virus can be demonstrated in extracts of domestic rabbit papillomas which yield no growths when inoculated by the ordinary methods and which for this reason have been supposed to contain no virus. The amount of virus recovered by the method outlined in the present work, however, is small when compared with the yield obtained in most instances from comparable cottontail rabbit papillomas. The yield is greatly influenced not only by the virus strain used to produce the growths but by the individual rabbit host. Although virus has been obtained from papillomas produced in domestic rabbits by all of the virus strains tested, a total of 21 thus far, only about one-fourth of these strains are readily to be procured again from the growths they cause and the others are demonstrable only in hosts in which the conditions are favorable for reasons unknown. An experimental comparison of the capacity of suspensions of papilloma tissue from domestic and cottontail rabbits to elicit specific antibodies has shown that the titers attained are approximately proportional to the amount of infective virus demonstrable in the suspensions. The findings as a whole indicate that far less virus exists in infective or antigenic form in the papillomas of domestic rabbits than in those of cottontail rabbits. PMID:19871389

  5. Advances in human papilloma virus vaccines: a patent review.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hee-Jeong; Oh, Yu-Kyoung; Kim, Young Bong

    2011-03-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) infection is the main factor associated with the development of cervical cancer. The currently available HPV vaccines, Gardasil and Cervarix, can prevent infection by certain HPV types, but not all. At present, research efforts are being devoted to developing more broad spectrum preventative vaccines, as well as therapeutic vaccines. Recent advances in HPV vaccine development are reviewed in this paper, with a focus on worldwide patents and patent applications. In principle, patents that have been granted since 2002 are covered. Exceptions are the patents pending at PCT stage and recent patent applications since 2009. Readers will gain insights into the cutting-edge technologies being used in the development and production of vaccines, as well as adjuvant systems. In the future, the use of mosaic virus-like particles (VLPs,) comprising at least one L1 protein of each HPV type, may be able to prevent infection by all HPV types while patented codon-optimization techniques and the use of edible or DNA-based vaccines may be good places to start for reducing costs. Future vaccines should ideally have both preventive and therapeutic efficacies. Enhanced immunogenicity could be achieved by the use of more effective adjuvants, such as nanoparticle-based delivery systems, or new classes of adjuvants.

  6. OBSERVATIONS ON THE RELATION OF THE VIRUS CAUSING RABBIT PAPILLOMAS TO THE CANCERS DERIVING THEREFROM

    PubMed Central

    Rous, Peyton; Beard, J. W.; Kidd, John G.

    1936-01-01

    The papillomas caused by the Shope virus sometimes grow down spontaneously into the subcutaneous tissue and extend along the lymphatics in the same way as do many cancers of the human breast. They may even invade the voluntary muscle under such circumstances, taking on an aspect suggestive of squamous cell carcinomatosis, but ultimately they differentiate in the way characteristic of the papilloma. Slight operative interferences with papillomas may be followed by a development of secondary nodules in the lungs. These result from cell emboli, and the same local conditions determine their fate as are effective in the case of emboli composed of human cancer cells. The virus-induced papilloma is not only a neoplasm in its immediate aspect and habit but sometimes one that verges upon malignancy. The tumors, including the cancers, which eventually derive from it in favorable hosts, are representative of more than a mere enhancement of the activity of the growth. They develop within a relatively brief period of time but only after the papilloma has grown for a long while; and they are morphologically various whereas the parent tumor is remarkably constant in its form. Some of the new growths differ but little from the papilloma, however, even when possessed of the ability to metastasize, and many continue to be influenced by the virus. The Shope virus is heavily conditioned in its carcinogenic activity, yet it is the nearest cause for cancer now known. PMID:19870544

  7. Human papilloma virus vaccination: impact and recommendations across the world.

    PubMed

    Bonanni, Paolo; Bechini, Angela; Donato, Rosa; Capei, Raffaella; Sacco, Cristiana; Levi, Miriam; Boccalini, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination has been implemented in several countries for about the past 7 years, mainly in the adolescent female population, with varying coverage results. Although the impact of immunization on cervical and other HPV-related cancers will be evident in the next decades, a marked decrease of prevalent HPV infections, precancerous lesions and genital warts is already dramatic in the vaccinated cohorts, and also in their sexual partners, thus providing clear evidence of the effectiveness of HPV vaccination, including a herd-protection effect. Today, recommendations and implementation of universal HPV vaccination for adolescent girls are a public-health priority in all countries of the world. Countries with limited resources are presently involved in demonstration projects and, in some cases, have launched national programmes with the help of international agencies and alliances. Extension of immunization offer to young women and to adolescent male subjects has become an important additional opportunity for several countries, with a special focus needed on homosexual men with HIV infection who are at particularly increased risk of HPV-related diseases. Public-health authorities are confronted with the need to enlarge HPV-vaccination offer to all target groups, especially pre-adolescent girls, so that they can be saved from dreadful cancers by reaching high immunization coverage.

  8. Human Papilloma Viruses and Breast Cancer - Assessment of Causality.

    PubMed

    Lawson, James Sutherland; Glenn, Wendy K; Whitaker, Noel James

    2016-01-01

    High risk human papilloma viruses (HPVs) may have a causal role in some breast cancers. Case-control studies, conducted in many different countries, consistently indicate that HPVs are more frequently present in breast cancers as compared to benign breast and normal breast controls (odds ratio 4.02). The assessment of causality of HPVs in breast cancer is difficult because (i) the HPV viral load is extremely low, (ii) HPV infections are common but HPV associated breast cancers are uncommon, and (iii) HPV infections may precede the development of breast and other cancers by years or even decades. Further, HPV oncogenesis can be indirect. Despite these difficulties, the emergence of new evidence has made the assessment of HPV causality, in breast cancer, a practical proposition. With one exception, the evidence meets all the conventional criteria for a causal role of HPVs in breast cancer. The exception is "specificity." HPVs are ubiquitous, which is the exact opposite of specificity. An additional reservation is that the prevalence of breast cancer is not increased in immunocompromised patients as is the case with respect to HPV-associated cervical cancer. This indicates that HPVs may have an indirect causal influence in breast cancer. Based on the overall evidence, high-risk HPVs may have a causal role in some breast cancers.

  9. Human Papilloma Viruses and Breast Cancer – Assessment of Causality

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, James Sutherland; Glenn, Wendy K.; Whitaker, Noel James

    2016-01-01

    High risk human papilloma viruses (HPVs) may have a causal role in some breast cancers. Case–control studies, conducted in many different countries, consistently indicate that HPVs are more frequently present in breast cancers as compared to benign breast and normal breast controls (odds ratio 4.02). The assessment of causality of HPVs in breast cancer is difficult because (i) the HPV viral load is extremely low, (ii) HPV infections are common but HPV associated breast cancers are uncommon, and (iii) HPV infections may precede the development of breast and other cancers by years or even decades. Further, HPV oncogenesis can be indirect. Despite these difficulties, the emergence of new evidence has made the assessment of HPV causality, in breast cancer, a practical proposition. With one exception, the evidence meets all the conventional criteria for a causal role of HPVs in breast cancer. The exception is “specificity.” HPVs are ubiquitous, which is the exact opposite of specificity. An additional reservation is that the prevalence of breast cancer is not increased in immunocompromised patients as is the case with respect to HPV-associated cervical cancer. This indicates that HPVs may have an indirect causal influence in breast cancer. Based on the overall evidence, high-risk HPVs may have a causal role in some breast cancers. PMID:27747193

  10. [THE COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF RESULTS OF DETECTION OF CARCINOGENIC TYPES OF HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUS BY QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE TESTS].

    PubMed

    Kuzmenko, E T; Labigina, A V; Leshenko, O Ya; Rusanov, D N; Kuzmenko, V V; Fedko, L P; Pak, I P

    2015-05-01

    The analysis of results of screening (n = 3208; sexually active citizen aged from 18 to 59 years) was carried out to detect oncogene types of human papilloma virus in using qualitative (1150 females and 720 males) and quantitative (polymerase chain reaction in real-time (843 females and 115 males) techniques. The human papilloma virus of high oncogene type was detected in 65% and 68.4% of females and in 48.6% and 53% of males correspondingly. Among 12 types of human papilloma virus the most frequently diagnosed was human papilloma virus 16 independently of gender of examined and technique of analysis. In females, under application of qualitative tests rate of human papilloma virus 16 made up to 18.3% (n = 280) and under application of quantitative tests Rte of human papilloma virus made up to 14.9% (n = 126; p ≤ 0.05). Under examination of males using qualitative tests rate of human papilloma virus 16 made up to 8.3% (n = 60) and under application of qualitative tests made up to 12.2% (n = 14; p ≥ 0.05). Under application of qualitative tests rate of detection on the rest ofoncogene types of human papilloma virus varied in females from 3.4% to 8.4% and in males from 1.8% to 5.9%. Under application of qualitative tests to females rate of human papilloma virus with high viral load made up to 68.4%, with medium viral load - 2.85% (n = 24) and with low viral load -0.24% (n = 2). Under application of quantitative tests in males rate of detection of types of human papilloma virus made up to 53% and at that in all high viral load was established. In females, the most of oncogene types of human papilloma virus (except for 31, 39, 59) are detected significantly more often than in males.

  11. Assessment of the incidence of squamous cell papilloma of the esophagus and the presence of high-risk human papilloma virus.

    PubMed

    Pantham, Ganesh; Ganesan, Santhi; Einstadter, Douglas; Jin, Ge; Weinberg, Aaron; Fass, Ronnie

    2017-01-01

    There has been a recent increase in the incidence of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) associated with high-risk human papilloma virus (HPV) infection. We investigated the incidence of esophageal papilloma and the presence of high-risk HPV infection. This is a cross-sectional study conducted at a County teaching hospital. Patients with esophageal papilloma between January 2000 and December 2013 were identified. Patients with sufficient specimens were tested for the HPV virus. Sixty patients with esophageal papilloma lesions were identified from 2000 to 2013. (31 males, age 51 ± 13 years). The incidence was 0.13% in 2000 and increased to 0.57% in 2013 (P < 0.0001). Twenty-nine patients (48.3%) had a papilloma that was more than 5 mm in size, and 20% had multiple lesions. The papilloma was located in the distal esophagus in 35 (58.3%) patients, mid esophagus in 17 (28.3%) patients, and proximal in 8 (13.3%) patients. Three (5%) patients had associated OPC, and 9 (47.4%) of the 19 patients tested were positive for high-risk HPV serotype 16. The incidence of esophageal papilloma has increased by fourfolds over the past 14 years. About half of the tested patients demonstrated high risk HPV. This may suggest a potential growing risk for esophageal squamous cell cancer in the future. © 2016 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  12. Human papilloma virus infection in female kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Ghazizadeh, Shirin; Lessan-Pezeshki, Mahboob; Nahayati, Mohamad Ali

    2011-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the incidence of genital human papilloma virus (HPV) infection and cervical intra-epithelial lesions in transplanted patients. Cervical Papanicolaou (Pap) smear/HPV test and colposcopic examinations were performed in 58 patients who were candidates for renal transplant surgery; these tests were repeated one year later. Their age range was 26-53 years (mean, 37.2 years). Hypertension was the most common cause of renal insufficiency (34.4%), while in 41.4% of the patients, the causative pathology was unknown. In 24.1% of the patients, there was no history of dialysis, i.e. they had pre-emptive transplantation. The mean duration of marriage (years since first intercourse) was 16.2 years (range, 1-35). Coitus interruptus was the most common contraceptive method used (37.9%), followed by tubal ligation and condom (10.3% and 6.9%, respectively). All patients had negative Pap tests and normal gynecologic exam before undergoing transplantation. The Pap test remained normal after transplant surgery, although the HPV test became positive in four patients (6.9%). There were five cases of white epithelium on colposcopy, but biopsy showed normal metaplasia. Two cases of extensive anogenital warts were treated by CO 2 laser, and one patient had recurrent warts, which responded well to second laser surgery. None of the study patients had squamous intra-epithelial lesions (SIL) or vulvar intra-epithelial neoplasia. Our study suggests that screening with HPV and Pap test should be performed before transplant surgery and should be repeated at regular intervals in order to avoid irreversible situations such as high-grade SILs, which are difficult to treat. Avoiding high-risk sexual relations in this group of patients is highly recommended.

  13. THE MASKING EFFECT OF EXTRAVASATED ANTIBODY ON THE RABBIT PAPILLOMA VIRUS (SHOPE)

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, John G.

    1939-01-01

    The foregoing experiments have shown that the causative virus is usually "masked" in the large, disorderly, fissured and inflamed papillomas of cottontails when antiviral antibody is present in quantity in their blood, though virus can be recovered as a rule from the smaller, discrete, well ordered papillomas of these rabbits, almost irrespective of the amount of antibody in the blood of the individuals bearing them. Other findings are described which indicate that the masking of the virus in the large fissured growths is due to serum antibody present in them as result of exudation or hemorrhage, which neutralizes the virus when the growths are extracted or preserved in vitro. The local conditions that favor extravasation of serum (and the accumulation of antibody) prevail as a rule in the large, confluent growths arising after virus has been sown broadcast on scarified skin, but to lesser extent or not at all in the discrete papillomas that occur naturally or as result of tattoo inoculation. The state of affairs is notably different in the papillomas of domestic rabbits. The virus is regularly masked in these, and usually masked completely, even when there is little antibody in the blood and the local conditions do not favor its extravasation into the growths. The findings indicate that something other than antibody is primarily responsible for the masking in this species. PMID:19870932

  14. The prevalence of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) infection in the oligospermic and azoospermic men

    PubMed Central

    Nasseri, Sherko; Monavari, Seyed Hamidreza; Keyvani, Hossein; Nikkhoo, Bahram; Vahabpour Roudsari, Rouhollah; Khazeni, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Human papilloma virus (HPV) infection is one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases that affects men like women and infected cutaneous and mucosal squamous epithelium. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of HPV in the semen of oligospermic, azoospermic and normal patients. Methods: From June 2012 to June 2013, a total of 90 individuals were enrolled in this cross sectional comparative study. The participants were classified into three groups (oligospermia, azoosprmia and normal). This classification was based on a new WHO reference values for human semen characteristics published on 2010. After extraction of DNA from specimens L1 gene of HPV was amplified by nested polymerase chain reaction (Nested-PCR) and the PCR products of positive specimens were genotyped using INNO-LiPA HPV Genotyping Extra assay. Results: Among 50 confirmed oligospermic male, 15 were HPV DNA positive (30%). In azoospemic group we had 8 HPV DNA positive (40%) and in normal group just 3 of 20(15%) samples were positive. Statistical assessment was done with SPSS v.15. Chi-square test showed no significant relationship between 3 groups results. Based on independent samples t-test, we found statistical significant relationship for sperm count (p<0.05) and sperm motility (slow) (p<0.05) in oligospermic group positive samples compared with negative. In the present study, 13 HPV genotypes were detected among positive samples. HPV genotypes 16, 45 in the high risk group and 6,11,42 in the low risk group were more frequent than the others. Conclusion: The current study shows that HPV infection can affect on sperm count and motility and decrease count of sperm cell and decrease motility capability of these cells. PMID:26793663

  15. Detection of human papilloma viruses in paraffin wax sections with biotinylated synthetic oligonucleotide probes and immunogold staining.

    PubMed

    Cubie, H A; Norval, M

    1989-09-01

    Human papilloma virus was detected by in situ hybridisation in routinely processed paraffin wax sections using a synthetically produced oligonucleotide probe, end-labelled with biotin, and amplified with anti-biotin-immunogold silver staining (anti-biotin-IGSS). This system proved more sensitive than amplification with streptavidin-biotinylated alkaline phosphatase for detecting human papilloma virus type 16 in cervical tissues. The method was successfully combined with antigen staining for papilloma virus common antigens in skin and genital warts. This simple and quick method, using non-radioactively labelled synthetic probes, may be useful for the detection of other viruses in stored material and may be suitable for other double staining procedures.

  16. Sun exposure, sexual behavior and uterine cervical human papilloma virus.

    PubMed

    Hrushesky, William J M; Sothern, Robert B; Rietveld, Wop J; Du-Quiton, Jovelyn; Boon, Mathilde E

    2006-01-01

    We have previously observed marked seasonal fluctuations in the frequency of cervical smears positive for human papilloma virus (HPV) in a series of smears obtained in Holland, with a peak in the summer months, especially August. Here, we tested two possible mechanisms that might underlie this summer peak: (1) enhanced transmission of HPV due to increased seasonal sexual activity, or (2) suppression of immunity due to summertime population exposure to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Data derived from a continuous series of >900,000 independent cervical smears obtained from 1983 to 1998 were assessed for histopathologic epithelial changes pathognomonic of HPV. The rate of HPV positivity was then compared to both the rate of sexual activity (using conception frequency as a readily available surrogate) as well as yearly and monthly fluctuations in solar-UV fluency. The rate of HPV positivity was found to be twice as high during the summer months, with a peak in August corresponding with maximal UV fluency. Furthermore, over these 16 consecutive years of continuous observation, maximum HPV detection rate and maximum UV fluency are positively correlated (r=0.59, P<0.01); the sunnier the year, the greater the rate of HPV. Likewise, there is a positive correlation of the monthly UV fluency, and monthly HPV discovery rate (r=0.16, P<0.03). In contrast, conception frequency (and, presumably, population sexual HPV transmission) was maximal near the vernal equinox, with relatively modest (<10%) seasonal fluctuation, i.e., not fully explaining this prominent August peak in HPV discovery. There is a clear relationship between the detection of HPV-positive cervical smears and sunlight exposure. We speculate that the well-known phenomenon of UV-mediated suppression of immune surveillance may be causally related to this unusual increase in cytologically defined active HPV infections during the summer months in northern countries such as Holland. Confirming this relationship

  17. [Cost effectiveness of human papilloma virus testing in cervical cancer screening: a literature review].

    PubMed

    Mejía, Aurelio; Salas, Walter

    2008-03-01

    Human papilloma virus DNA testing may improve the cost effectiveness of cervical cancer screening programs. However, the circumstances to get this improvement are not the same between countries. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the cost effectiveness of introducing human papilloma virus testing in the current screening practice both in developed and developing countries. We conducted a review of published articles since January 2000 until December 2006 related to the cost effectiveness of introducing human papilloma virus testing in cervical cancer screening programs. A total of 17 original researches and six reviews were analyzed. Human papilloma virus testing is cost effective in developed countries only if it is a complementary test to Pap test and used to determine the management of women with atypical squamus cells of undetermined significance, the interval among tests is increased more than two years and it is performed in women over 30 years. On the other hand, developing countries should establish first organized screening programs and guarantee full coverage and access to diagnosis and treatment.

  18. Problem-Solving Test: The Mechanism of Action of a Human Papilloma Virus Oncoprotein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2009-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: human papilloma virus; cervical cancer; oncoproteins; malignant transformation; retinoblastoma protein; cell cycle; quiescent and cycling cells; cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) complexes; E2F; S-phase genes; enhancer element; proto-oncogenes; tumor suppressor genes; radioactive…

  19. Evaluation of Human Papilloma Virus Communicative Education Strategies: A Pilot Screening Study for Cervical Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrera-Clavijo, Lizeth K.; Wiesner-Ceballos, Carolina; Rincón-Martínez, Lina M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: High-risk human papilloma virus (HR-HPV) is highly prevalent in sexually active men and women; HR-HPV has been classified as a sexually transmitted infection (STI) and as a necessary, but not sufficient, causal agent for cervical cancer. Women who test positive for HPV often experience serious psychosocial consequences such as fear,…

  20. Evaluation of Human Papilloma Virus Communicative Education Strategies: A Pilot Screening Study for Cervical Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrera-Clavijo, Lizeth K.; Wiesner-Ceballos, Carolina; Rincón-Martínez, Lina M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: High-risk human papilloma virus (HR-HPV) is highly prevalent in sexually active men and women; HR-HPV has been classified as a sexually transmitted infection (STI) and as a necessary, but not sufficient, causal agent for cervical cancer. Women who test positive for HPV often experience serious psychosocial consequences such as fear,…

  1. Problem-Solving Test: The Mechanism of Action of a Human Papilloma Virus Oncoprotein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2009-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: human papilloma virus; cervical cancer; oncoproteins; malignant transformation; retinoblastoma protein; cell cycle; quiescent and cycling cells; cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) complexes; E2F; S-phase genes; enhancer element; proto-oncogenes; tumor suppressor genes; radioactive…

  2. The effect of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase polymorphisms on susceptibility to human papilloma virus infection and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Hajiesmaeil, Mogge; Tafvizi, Farzaneh; Sarmadi, Soheila

    2016-12-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer among women worldwide. Several factors lead to cervical cancer, among which human papilloma virus (HPV) infection has a prominent role. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is crucial in folate metabolic pathway and plays an important role in DNA synthesis and DNA methylation. MTHFR gene polymorphisms, including C677T and A1298C, lead to reduced enzyme activity. This case-control study aims to illustrate the association between MTHFR gene polymorphisms and the risk of cervical cancer. This study was conducted on 196 samples, which included 96 cervical biopsy samples compared to 100 Pap smear samples of normal healthy women without HPV infection. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method was used for the MTHFR polymorphism detection, followed by fluorescent amplification-based specific hybridization PCR method to detect HPV16 and HPV18. The results show that the MTHFR 677TT genotype plays a protective role in cervical cancer (P=0.0030) (OR=0.21, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.07-0.59). Furthermore, there was a strong significant association between MTHFR 1298CC genotype and the risk of cervical cancer (OR=10.69; 95% CI: 4.28-26.71, P=0.0001). It can be concluded that A1298C polymorphism is a genetic risk factor for cervical cancer in the assessed Iranian population group. It seems that MTHFR 1298CC genotype is more susceptible to HPV 16 infection. Combination analysis of MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms revealed that combined MTHFR 677CC and 1298CC are strongly associated with a risk of cervical cancer.

  3. Infectious virus replication in papillomas induced by molecularly cloned cottontail rabbit papillomavirus DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Brandsma, J L; Xiao, W

    1993-01-01

    The ability to obtain infectious papillomavirus virions from molecularly cloned DNA has not been previously reported. We demonstrate here that viral genomes isolated from a recombinant++ DNA clone of cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV) gave rise to infectious virus when inoculated into cottontail rabbit skin. Replication occurred in papillomas that formed at inoculation sites. Extract of a DNA-induced papilloma was serially passaged to naive rabbits with high efficiency. Complete virus was fractionated on cesium chloride density gradients, and papillomavirus particles were visualized by electron microscopy. CRPV DNA isolated from virions contained DNA sequence polymorphisms that are characteristic of the input CRPV-WA strain of virus, thereby proving that the newly generated virus originated from the molecularly cloned viral genome. These findings indicate that this will be a useful system in which to perform genetic analysis of viral gene functions involved in replication. Images PMID:8380092

  4. Human papilloma virus, DNA methylation and microRNA expression in cervical cancer (Review)

    PubMed Central

    JIMÉNEZ-WENCES, HILDA; PERALTA-ZARAGOZA, OSCAR; FERNÁNDEZ-TILAPA, GLORIA

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a complex disease caused by genetic and epigenetic abnormalities that affect gene expression. The progression from precursor lesions to invasive cervical cancer is influenced by persistent human papilloma virus (HPV) infection, which induces changes in the host genome and epigenome. Epigenetic alterations, such as aberrant miRNA expression and changes in DNA methylation status, favor the expression of oncogenes and the silencing of tumor-suppressor genes. Given that some miRNA genes can be regulated through epigenetic mechanisms, it has been proposed that alterations in the methylation status of miRNA promoters could be the driving mechanism behind their aberrant expression in cervical cancer. For these reasons, we assessed the relationship among HPV infection, cellular DNA methylation and miRNA expression. We conclude that alterations in the methylation status of protein-coding genes and various miRNA genes are influenced by HPV infection, the viral genotype, the physical state of the viral DNA, and viral oncogenic risk. Furthermore, HPV induces deregulation of miRNA expression, particularly at loci near fragile sites. This deregulation occurs through the E6 and E7 proteins, which target miRNA transcription factors such as p53. PMID:24737381

  5. [A retrospective study of clinical manifestation and human papilloma virus detection of oral condyloma acuminate in children].

    PubMed

    He, Zhixiu; Liu, Laikui; Chen, Yan

    2002-02-01

    The aim of this study is to study genotype, transmission, clinical and pathological characteristics, and prognosis of oral condyloma acuminate (CA) in children. The authors retrospected the clinical characteristics and slices of HE staining of six cases which have been diagnosed as oral CA and, performed inmunohistochemistry (IHC) and in situ hybridization (ISH) analysis to detect the DNA of human papilloma virus in 5 cases. Oral CA often happened in the hard or soft plates of children of two-year-old. Most of them came from the families had been infected by human papilloma virus (HPV). Histological examination demonstrated that koilocytes were common in the upper spinous and corneal layers. HPV was detected in all cases. HPV16/18-E6 antigen was positive in 4 of 5 cases examined. The result of ISH only show one case was HPV6- and HPV11-positive, and the other case was HPV-positive, but HPV could not be detected when recurring. The pathogen leading to oral condyloma acuminate (CA) and the transmission way of children may be different from that of adults.

  6. Modulation of TIP60 by Human Papilloma Virus in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    associated Sarcoma virus (KSHV) (1). Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is known to cause cervical cancer and head and neck cancer and has been proposed to play...Figure 1A). Similar results were obtained in U2OS osteosarcoma cells and HCT116 colon cancer cells (Figure 1B). Evaluating MCF10A lysates harvested...containing donor calf serum, while U2OS cells (human osteosarcoma cell line) were maintained in DMEM media containing 10% donor calf serum. HCT116 cells

  7. Prevalence of high-risk human papilloma virus genotypes and associated risk of cervical precancerous lesions in a large U.S. screening population: data from the ATHENA trial.

    PubMed

    Monsonego, Joseph; Cox, J Thomas; Behrens, Catherine; Sandri, Maria; Franco, Eduardo L; Yap, Poh-Sin; Huh, Warner

    2015-04-01

    We assessed the age-related prevalence of high risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) genotypes and the genotype-associated risk for high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) in a large U.S. screening population. A total of 40,901 women aged ≥25 years were screened with liquid-based cytology and HPV testing in the ATHENA (Addressing the Need for Advanced HPV Diagnostics) trial. Genotyping was performed using the LINEAR ARRAY HPV Genotyping Test. HPV16 was the most prevalent genotype in all age groups, ranging from 3.5% to 0.8% in women aged 25-29 and ≥50 years, respectively. The next most prevalent genotypes were HPV52, HPV31 and HPV18. In the overall population, HPV16 conferred the greatest absolute risk of ≥CIN3 both in women aged 25-29 and ≥30 years (14.2% and 15.1%, respectively) followed by HPV31 (8.0% and 7.9%), HPV52 (6.7% and 4.4%) and HPV18 (2.7% and 9.0%). Similar trends were seen in women with negative cytology. The percent positivity increased markedly with disease progression for HPV16 and HPV18 which were responsible for 45.6% and 8.4% of ≥CIN3, respectively. Of note, HPV 18 was responsible for 50% of adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) and 50% of invasive cancer cases. HPV16 played a major role in the development of ≥CIN3 irrespective of age, supporting the identification of HPV16 in primary screening for all women. Identification of HPV18 is also warranted, given its significant contribution to AIS and cancer. Identification of non-16/18 genotypes as a pool should provide sufficient information for screening. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. The role of human papilloma virus and herpes viruses in the etiology of nasal polyposis.

    PubMed

    Koçoğlu, Mücahide Esra; Mengeloğlu, Fırat Zafer; Apuhan, Tayfun; Özsoy, Şeyda; Yilmaz, Beyhan

    2016-02-17

    The aim of this study was to investigate the etiological role of human papilloma virus (HPV), herpes simplex virus (HSV), varicella-zoster virus (VZV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and human herpes virus-6 (HHV-6) and -7 (HHV-7) in the occurrence of nasal polyposis. Nasal polyp samples from 30 patients with nasal polyposis and normal nasal mucosa from 10 patients without nasal polyps were obtained. DNA was extracted from tissues. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed for all runs. No HSV-1, HSV-2, or VZV was detected in the samples. Among the patient samples, EBV and HHV-7 DNA were detected in 18 (60%), HHV-6 was detected in 20 (66.7%), and HPV was detected in 4 (13.3%) samples. Among the controls, CMV DNA was positive in one (10%). EBV was positive in 5 (50%), HHV-6 and HHV-7 were positive in 7 (70%), and HPV was positive in 2 (20%) samples. No significant difference was found among the groups with any test in terms of positivity. The association of Herpesviridae and HPV with the pathogenesis of nasal polyps was investigated in this study and no relationship was found. Thus, these viruses do not play a significant role in the formation of nasal polyps.

  9. A human papilloma virus testing algorithm comprising a combination of the L1 broad-spectrum SPF10 PCR assay and a novel E6 high-risk multiplex type-specific genotyping PCR assay.

    PubMed

    van Alewijk, Dirk; Kleter, Bernhard; Vent, Maarten; Delroisse, Jean-Marc; de Koning, Maurits; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Quint, Wim; Colau, Brigitte

    2013-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) epidemiological and vaccine studies require highly sensitive HPV detection and genotyping systems. To improve HPV detection by PCR, the broad-spectrum L1-based SPF10 PCR DNA enzyme immunoassay (DEIA) LiPA system and a novel E6-based multiplex type-specific system (MPTS123) that uses Luminex xMAP technology were combined into a new testing algorithm. To evaluate this algorithm, cervical swabs (n = 860) and cervical biopsy specimens (n = 355) were tested, with a focus on HPV types detected by the MPTS123 assay (types 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59, 66, 68, 6, and 11). Among the HPV-positive samples, identifications of individual HPV genotypes were compared. When all MPTS123 targeted genotypes were considered together, good overall agreement was found (κ = 0.801, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.784 to 0.818) with identification by SPF10 LiPA, but significantly more genotypes (P < 0.0001) were identified by the MPTS123 PCR Luminex assay, especially for HPV types 16, 35, 39, 45, 58, and 59. An alternative type-specific assay was evaluated that is based on detection of a limited number of HPV genotypes by type-specific PCR and a reverse hybridization assay (MPTS12 RHA). This assay showed results similar to those of the expanded MPTS123 Luminex assay. These results confirm the fact that broad-spectrum PCRs are hampered by type competition when multiple HPV genotypes are present in the same sample. Therefore, a testing algorithm combining the broad-spectrum PCR and a range of type-specific PCRs can offer a highly accurate method for the analysis of HPV infections and diminish the rate of false-negative results and may be particularly useful for epidemiological and vaccine studies.

  10. A Human Papilloma Virus Testing Algorithm Comprising a Combination of the L1 Broad-Spectrum SPF10 PCR Assay and a Novel E6 High-Risk Multiplex Type-Specific Genotyping PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Kleter, Bernhard; Vent, Maarten; Delroisse, Jean-Marc; de Koning, Maurits; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Quint, Wim; Colau, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) epidemiological and vaccine studies require highly sensitive HPV detection and genotyping systems. To improve HPV detection by PCR, the broad-spectrum L1-based SPF10 PCR DNA enzyme immunoassay (DEIA) LiPA system and a novel E6-based multiplex type-specific system (MPTS123) that uses Luminex xMAP technology were combined into a new testing algorithm. To evaluate this algorithm, cervical swabs (n = 860) and cervical biopsy specimens (n = 355) were tested, with a focus on HPV types detected by the MPTS123 assay (types 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59, 66, 68, 6, and 11). Among the HPV-positive samples, identifications of individual HPV genotypes were compared. When all MPTS123 targeted genotypes were considered together, good overall agreement was found (κ = 0.801, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.784 to 0.818) with identification by SPF10 LiPA, but significantly more genotypes (P < 0.0001) were identified by the MPTS123 PCR Luminex assay, especially for HPV types 16, 35, 39, 45, 58, and 59. An alternative type-specific assay was evaluated that is based on detection of a limited number of HPV genotypes by type-specific PCR and a reverse hybridization assay (MPTS12 RHA). This assay showed results similar to those of the expanded MPTS123 Luminex assay. These results confirm the fact that broad-spectrum PCRs are hampered by type competition when multiple HPV genotypes are present in the same sample. Therefore, a testing algorithm combining the broad-spectrum PCR and a range of type-specific PCRs can offer a highly accurate method for the analysis of HPV infections and diminish the rate of false-negative results and may be particularly useful for epidemiological and vaccine studies. PMID:23363835

  11. [The detection of the human papilloma virus during hyperplastic processes in the nose, ears and throat].

    PubMed

    Boiko, N V; Panchenko, S N

    The objective of the present work was to carry out the virological and histological studies of various neoplastic and hyperplastic processes in the nose, ears, and throat with a view to identifying the presence of human papilloma virus and Epstein-Barr virus. The brush biopsies and remote neoplasms obtained from 18 patients (including 2 children and 16 adults) presenting with various ENT diseases and tumours were available for the virological investigation with the use of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and a system MY09-MY11 degenerate primers . The histological study of biopsies and remote neoplasms was carried out by means of conventional light microscopy. The virological and histological studies conducted in parallel confirmed the diagnostic significance of morphological changes at the tissue and cellular levels caused by the human papilloma virus.

  12. Severe cutaneous human papilloma virus infection associated with Natural Killer cell deficiency following stem cell transplantation for severe combined immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kamili, Qurat-ul-Ain; Seeborg, Filiz O; Saxena, Kapil; Nicholas, Sarah K; Banerjee, Pinaki P; Angelo, Laura S; Mace, Emily M; Forbes, Lisa R; Martinez, Caridad; Wright, Teresa S; Orange, Jordan S.; Hanson, Imelda Celine

    2016-01-01

    Capsule Summary The authors identify Natural Killer cell deficiency in post-transplant severe combined immunodeficiency patients who developed severe human papilloma virus infections as a long term complication. PMID:25159470

  13. THE PROGRESSION TO CARCINOMA OF VIRUS-INDUCED RABBIT PAPILLOMAS (SHOPE)

    PubMed Central

    Rous, Peyton; Beard, J. W.

    1935-01-01

    The papillomas induced in domestic rabbits with virus procured from cottontails undergo progressive changes in the direction of malignancy when they grow vigorously. From the beginning they exhibit the traits whereby tumors are characterized, and they have malignant potentialities. In seven animals of a group of ten carrying papillomas for more than 200 days, cancer has developed, and in an eighth a tumor of problematic malignancy has arisen. One of the remaining two rabbits died early in the cancer period, and the papillomas of the other eventually retrogressed. Ten cottontails with induced growths of much longer duration have not developed cancer. The malignant tumors have all been acanthomatous in type, and have arisen directly from the papillomas by graded, continuous alterations. These have often gone further after malignancy has been attained, and have eventuated in great anaplasia. Metastasis has been frequent, and transplantation to another host has proved successful. Individual growths have occurred expressive of each stage of the transformation to cancer, as if through a stabilization at this stage; yet despite the variety thus afforded, the tumors must all be looked upon as the consequence of alterations in cells of a single sort, namely epidermal cells affected by the virus, and the alterations themselves have taken a single direction. In the morphology of many of the cancers the influence of the virus is still manifest. The better the papilloma grew, the more likely was cancer to occur, and the greater was the tendency to multiple tumors. In the most favorable rabbits malignant changes took place at numerous locations in the papillomatous tissue, and were imminent at many others. Intercurrent factors had much to do with determining frank carcinosis; and when the tendency to it was not marked their influence sometimes seemed crucial. Analogous instances of a graded alteration from papilloma to cancer are frequent in human pathology. The virus that gives

  14. [Induction of cutaneous or subcutaneous fibroblastic tumors in the Afghan pika (Ochotona rufescens rufescens) by injection or bovine papilloma virus].

    PubMed

    Puget, A; Favre, M; Orth, G

    1975-06-23

    Newborn Afghan pikas have been inoculated with bovine papilloma virus via the subcutaneous route. Cutaneous or subcutaneous fibromas and fibrosarcomas were observed after a mean incubation period of nine months. The transmission of these tumors by homograft has been obtained. Bovine papilloma virus antibodies have been demonstrated in most of the animals inoculated at birth. They have not been detected in animals bearing transplanted tumors.

  15. Long-term survival outcomes in patients with surgically treated oropharyngeal cancer and defined human papilloma virus status.

    PubMed

    Dale, O T; Sood, S; Shah, K A; Han, C; Rapozo, D; Mehanna, H; Winter, S C

    2016-11-01

    This study investigated long-term survival outcomes in surgically treated oropharyngeal cancer patients with known human papilloma virus status. A case note review was performed of all patients undergoing primary surgery for oropharyngeal cancer in a single centre over a 10-year period. Human papilloma virus status was determined via dual modality testing. Associations between clinicopathological variables and survival were identified using a log-rank test. Of the 107 cases in the study, 40 per cent (n = 41) were human papilloma virus positive. The positive and negative predictive values of p16 immunohistochemistry for human papilloma virus status were 57 per cent and 100 per cent, respectively. At a mean follow up of 59.5 months, 5-year overall and disease-specific survival estimates were 78 per cent and 69 per cent, respectively. Human papilloma virus status (p = 0.014), smoking status (p = 0.021) and tumour stage (p = 0.03) were significant prognostic indicators. The long-term survival rates in surgically treated oropharyngeal cancer patients were comparable to other studies. Variables including human papilloma virus status and tumour stage were associated with survival in patients treated with primary surgery; however, nodal stage and presence of extracapsular spread were non-prognostic.

  16. THE EFFECT OF CHEMICAL CARCINOGENS ON VIRUS-INDUCED RABBIT PAPILLOMAS

    PubMed Central

    Rous, Peyton; Friedewald, William F.

    1944-01-01

    The application of methylcholanthrene and tar to virus-induced papillomas of the domestic rabbit caused them to become carcinomatous with great rapidity, and the malignant changes were frequently multiple. In bringing on the cancers the chemical agents acted in their specific capacity as carcinogens, not as ordinary stimulants of cell proliferation. The cancers derived from the virus-infected cells and were of the same types as arise from these elements spontaneously after a much longer time. The evidence would seem to indicate that the chemical carcinogens acted by way of the virus. PMID:19871385

  17. Confronting human papilloma virus/oropharyngeal cancer: a model for interprofessional collaboration.

    PubMed

    Fried, Jacquelyn L

    2014-06-01

    A collaborative practice model related to Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) associated oropharyngeal cancer highlights the role of the dental hygienist in addressing this condition. The incidence of HPV associated head and neck cancer is rising. Multiple professionals including the dental hygienist can work collaboratively to confront this growing public health concern. A critical review applies the growth and utilization of interprofessional education (IPE) and interprofessional collaboration (IPC) to multi-disciplinary models addressing the human papilloma virus and oropharyngeal cancers. A model related to HPV associated oropharyngeal cancer addresses an oral systemic condition that supports the inclusion of a dental hygienist on collaborative teams addressing prevention, detection, treatment and cure of OPC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Rome consensus conference - statement; human papilloma virus diseases in males

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is a very resistant, ubiquitous virus that can survive in the environment without a host. The decision to analyse HPV-related diseases in males was due to the broad dissemination of the virus, and, above all, by the need to stress the importance of primary and secondary prevention measures (currently available for women exclusively). The objective of the Consensus Conference was to make evidence-based recommendations that were designed to facilitate the adoption of a standard approach in clinical practice in Italy. Methods The Sponsoring Panel put a series of questions to the members of the Scientific Committee who prepared a summary of the currently available information, relevant for each question, after the review and grading of the existing scientific literature. The summaries were presented to a Jury, also called multidisciplinary Consensus Panel, who drafted a series of recommendations. Results The prevalence of HPV in males ranges between 1.3–72.9%;. The prevalence curve in males is much higher than that in females and does not tend to decline with age. Women appear to have a higher probability of acquiring HPV genotypes associated with a high oncogenic risk, whereas in males the probability of acquiring low- or high-risk genotypes is similar. The HPV-related diseases that affect males are anogenital warts and cancers of the penis, anus and oropharynx. The quadrivalent vaccine against HPV has proved to be effective in preventing external genital lesions in males aged 16–26 years in 90.4%; (95%; CI: 69.2–98.1) of cases. It has also proved to be effective in preventing precancerous anal lesions in 77.5%; (95%; CI: 39.6–93.3) of cases in a per-protocol analysis and in 91.7%; (95%; CI: 44.6–99.8) of cases in a post-hoc analysis. Early ecological studies demonstrate reduction of genital warts in vaccinated females and some herd immunity in males when vaccine coverage is high, although males who have sex with males

  19. Rome Consensus Conference - statement; human papilloma virus diseases in males.

    PubMed

    Lenzi, Andrea; Mirone, Vincenzo; Gentile, Vincenzo; Bartoletti, Riccardo; Ficarra, Vincenzo; Foresta, Carlo; Mariani, Luciano; Mazzoli, Sandra; Parisi, Saverio G; Perino, Antonio; Picardo, Mauro; Zotti, Carla Maria

    2013-02-07

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is a very resistant, ubiquitous virus that can survive in the environment without a host. The decision to analyse HPV-related diseases in males was due to the broad dissemination of the virus, and, above all, by the need to stress the importance of primary and secondary prevention measures (currently available for women exclusively). The objective of the Consensus Conference was to make evidence-based recommendations that were designed to facilitate the adoption of a standard approach in clinical practice in Italy. The Sponsoring Panel put a series of questions to the members of the Scientific Committee who prepared a summary of the currently available information, relevant for each question, after the review and grading of the existing scientific literature. The summaries were presented to a Jury, also called multidisciplinary Consensus Panel, who drafted a series of recommendations. The prevalence of HPV in males ranges between 1.3-72.9%;. The prevalence curve in males is much higher than that in females and does not tend to decline with age. Women appear to have a higher probability of acquiring HPV genotypes associated with a high oncogenic risk, whereas in males the probability of acquiring low- or high-risk genotypes is similar. The HPV-related diseases that affect males are anogenital warts and cancers of the penis, anus and oropharynx. The quadrivalent vaccine against HPV has proved to be effective in preventing external genital lesions in males aged 16-26 years in 90.4%; (95%; CI: 69.2-98.1) of cases. It has also proved to be effective in preventing precancerous anal lesions in 77.5%; (95%; CI: 39.6-93.3) of cases in a per-protocol analysis and in 91.7%; (95%; CI: 44.6-99.8) of cases in a post-hoc analysis. Early ecological studies demonstrate reduction of genital warts in vaccinated females and some herd immunity in males when vaccine coverage is high, although males who have sex with males gained no benefit at all. Males with

  20. Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) Induced Head & Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Comprehensive Retrospect

    PubMed Central

    Nishat, Roquaiya; Ramachandra, Sujatha; Kumar, Harish; Bandyopadhyay, Alokenath

    2015-01-01

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma accounts for the sixth most common malignancy occurring worldwide with tobacco and alcohol being the two well established risk factors. In the recent years, substantial evidence has been obtained that Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) associated head and neck cancers are on the rise. This article provides an insight into the structure of HPV genome, molecular pathogenesis, detection methods and clinical implications of HPV positive Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma. PMID:26266234

  1. Poverty eradication and decreased human papilloma virus related cancer of the penis and vulva in Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, H M; Hanchard, B

    2008-04-01

    Human papilloma virus causes genital cancers. Decreases in cervical cancer have been reported to be due to comprehensive screening programmes difficult to replicate in poorer countries. HPV cancer may be related to poverty. In Jamaica, we have seen decreases in cancer of the penis and vulva and there has also been a decrease in poverty. The decrease cannot be attributed to screening. We believe elimination of poverty has decreased HPV persistence and decreased cancer rates.

  2. SEROLOGICAL REACTIONS WITH A VIRUS CAUSING RABBIT PAPILLOMAS WHICH BECOME CANCEROUS

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, John G.; Beard, J. W.; Rous, Peyton

    1936-01-01

    A method has been devised for serological tests with a virus producing rabbit papillomas that become carcinomatous. The discrete character of the growths caused by the virus when suitably diluted fits it notably for quantitative experimentation. It shows no tendency to lie latent in domestic rabbits though it does so on occasion in cottontails, the natural hosts. Sera which partially neutralize it do not alter its character, or attenuate it, but merely cut down the number of its effective entities. The serum of normal domestic rabbits is ordinarily devoid of neutralizing influence on the virus, but that of animals carrying the papillomas usually exhibits neutralizing power soon after these appear. The rate at which this power increases depends in general upon the amount of papillomatous tissue developing, but exceptions to the rule occur, the presence of fairly large growths being compatible with a lack of such powers in demonstrable amount. Even when the antiviral power is great it has no evident influence on the course of established papillomas, other factors determining whether these enlarge or retrogress. It acts to prevent successful reinoculation of the animal, however. PMID:19870523

  3. Concept Analysis: Health-Promoting Behaviors Related to Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) Infection.

    PubMed

    McCutcheon, Tonna; Schaar, Gina; Parker, Karen L

    2015-01-01

    The concept of health-promoting behaviors incorporates ideas presented in the Ottawa Charter of Public Health and the nursing-based Health Promotion Model. Despite the fact that the concept of health-promoting behaviors has a nursing influence, literature suggests nursing has inadequately developed and used this concept within nursing practice. A further review of literature regarding health promotion behaviors and the human papilloma virus suggest a distinct gap in nursing literature. This article presents a concept analysis of health-promoting behaviors related to the human papilloma virus in order to encourage the application of the concept into nursing practice, promote continued nursing research regarding this concept, and further expand the application of health-promoting behaviors to other situations and populations within the nursing discipline. Attributes of health-promoting behaviors are presented and include empowerment, participation, community, and a positive concept of health. Antecedents, consequences, and empirical referents are also presented, as are model, borderline, and contrary cases to help clarify the concept. Recommendations for human papilloma virus health-promoting behaviors within the nursing practice are also provided. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) Oral Prevalence in Scotland (HOPSCOTCH): A Feasibility Study in Dental Settings

    PubMed Central

    Conway, David I.; Robertson, Chris; Gray, Heather; Young, Linda; McDaid, Lisa M.; Winter, Andrew J.; Campbell, Christine; Pan, Jiafeng; Kavanagh, Kimberley; Kean, Sharon; Bhatia, Ramya; Cubie, Heather; Clarkson, Jan E.; Bagg, Jeremy; Pollock, Kevin G.; Cuschieri, Kate

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of undertaking a full population investigation into the prevalence, incidence, and persistence of oral Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) in Scotland via dental settings. Male and female patients aged 16–69 years were recruited by Research Nurses in 3 primary care and dental outreach teaching centres and 2 General Dental Practices (GDPs), and by Dental Care Teams in 2 further GDPs. Participants completed a questionnaire (via an online tablet computer or paper) with socioeconomic, lifestyle, and sexual history items; and were followed up at 6-months for further questionnaire through appointment or post/online. Saline oral gargle/rinse samples, collected at baseline and follow-up, were subject to molecular HPV genotyping centrally. 1213 dental patients were approached and 402 individuals consented (participation rate 33.1%). 390 completed the baseline questionnaire and 380 provided a baseline oral specimen. Follow-up rate was 61.6% at 6 months. While recruitment was no different in Research Nurse vs Dental Care Team models the Nurse model ensured more rapid recruitment. There were relatively few missing responses in the questionnaire and high levels of disclosure of risk behaviours (99% answered some of the sexual history questions). Data linkage of participant data to routine health records including HPV vaccination data was successful with 99.1% matching. Oral rinse/gargle sample collection and subsequent HPV testing was feasible. Preliminary analyses found over 95% of samples to be valid for molecular HPV detection prevalence of oral HPV infection of 5.5% (95%CI 3.7, 8.3). It is feasible to recruit and follow-up dental patients largely representative / reflective of the wider population, suggesting it would be possible to undertake a study to investigate the prevalence, incidence, and determinants of oral HPV infection in dental settings. PMID:27861508

  5. Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) Oral Prevalence in Scotland (HOPSCOTCH): A Feasibility Study in Dental Settings.

    PubMed

    Conway, David I; Robertson, Chris; Gray, Heather; Young, Linda; McDaid, Lisa M; Winter, Andrew J; Campbell, Christine; Pan, Jiafeng; Kavanagh, Kimberley; Kean, Sharon; Bhatia, Ramya; Cubie, Heather; Clarkson, Jan E; Bagg, Jeremy; Pollock, Kevin G; Cuschieri, Kate

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of undertaking a full population investigation into the prevalence, incidence, and persistence of oral Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) in Scotland via dental settings. Male and female patients aged 16-69 years were recruited by Research Nurses in 3 primary care and dental outreach teaching centres and 2 General Dental Practices (GDPs), and by Dental Care Teams in 2 further GDPs. Participants completed a questionnaire (via an online tablet computer or paper) with socioeconomic, lifestyle, and sexual history items; and were followed up at 6-months for further questionnaire through appointment or post/online. Saline oral gargle/rinse samples, collected at baseline and follow-up, were subject to molecular HPV genotyping centrally. 1213 dental patients were approached and 402 individuals consented (participation rate 33.1%). 390 completed the baseline questionnaire and 380 provided a baseline oral specimen. Follow-up rate was 61.6% at 6 months. While recruitment was no different in Research Nurse vs Dental Care Team models the Nurse model ensured more rapid recruitment. There were relatively few missing responses in the questionnaire and high levels of disclosure of risk behaviours (99% answered some of the sexual history questions). Data linkage of participant data to routine health records including HPV vaccination data was successful with 99.1% matching. Oral rinse/gargle sample collection and subsequent HPV testing was feasible. Preliminary analyses found over 95% of samples to be valid for molecular HPV detection prevalence of oral HPV infection of 5.5% (95%CI 3.7, 8.3). It is feasible to recruit and follow-up dental patients largely representative / reflective of the wider population, suggesting it would be possible to undertake a study to investigate the prevalence, incidence, and determinants of oral HPV infection in dental settings.

  6. A VIRUS-INDUCED MAMMALIAN GROWTH WITH THE CHARACTERS OF A TUMOR (THE SHOPE RABBIT PAPILLOMA)

    PubMed Central

    Rous, Peyton; Beard, J. W.

    1934-01-01

    Rabbit papillomas developing on the skin as the result of virus inoculation can be readily transferred to the inner organs of favorable hosts by implanting bits of the living tissue. The growths thus produced proliferate actively as a rule and frequently cause death. Often they are markedly invasive and destructive; and they tend to recur after excision. Bacterial infection may greatly enhance their malignancy. Accidental dissemination may occur during operation, and distribution to the peritoneal surface has been repeatedly noted. There may be no cellular reaction whatever about the invading epithelium of interior growths, but usually some new formation of connective tissue takes place, its amount varying inversely with the rate of epithelial proliferation. An immediate reason exists for the inflammatory changes and scarring found beneath long-established skin papillomas, in the trauma and secondary infection to which the projecting, necrotizing masses have been subjected. In animals dying of progressively enlarging interior growths the skin papilloma may long have been stationary in size. The growths appearing after the transfer of papillomatous tissue to the inner organs are due to the survival and multiplication of transplanted cells. However, the virus can be readily recovered from them, in the case of wild rabbits. No distinctive changes in the blood of the host have been found. The virus itself is highly specific for the epithelium of the skin, failing to act not only upon that of the other organs thus far tested but even upon embryonic skin. The papilloma frequently penetrates into the blood and lymph vessels, especially at the edge of implantation growths. The intravascular injection of fragments of it sometimes results in pulmonary nodules of characteristic morphology. These are due to survival and proliferation of the injected cells. Secondary nodules have been encountered at autopsy in a lymph gland and in the lungs, but under conditions more suggestive

  7. Follow-up of men with genital papilloma virus infection. Psychosexual aspects.

    PubMed

    Voog, E; Löwhagen, G B

    1992-01-01

    Genital papilloma virus infection (GPVI) is in many patients a longlasting, relapsing disease for which no effective treatment is available. This fact and the association between the virus and cancer puts much stress on the afflicted patient. Of 41 men with GPVI interviewed, 17 (40%) reported a negative effect of the disease on their sexual life. Most distressing was the fear of transmitting the disease to their partner. After 18 months, 15 (37%) of the 41 men still exhibited signs of GPVI. In the care of patients with GPVI, more attention needs to be paid to the psychosexual effects of the disease.

  8. Role of the human papilloma virus in the development of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Jastreboff, A; Cymet, T

    2002-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) is a public health problem as a sexually transmitted disease and as a critical factor in the pathogenesis of various cancers. The clinical manifestations, epidemiology, and virology that are critical to understanding the process of cervical dysplasia and neoplasia are reviewed. A discussion of the cervical transformation zone and the classification of cervical dysplasia and neoplasia leads into the importance of the Papanicolaou smear in prevention of potentially devastating sequelae of this virus. The role of the immune system in the progression of the disease and how it relates to vaccines, as well as treatment and prevention of HPV, are reviewed. PMID:11930025

  9. Detection of human papilloma viruses in paraffin wax sections with biotinylated synthetic oligonucleotide probes and immunogold staining.

    PubMed Central

    Cubie, H A; Norval, M

    1989-01-01

    Human papilloma virus was detected by in situ hybridisation in routinely processed paraffin wax sections using a synthetically produced oligonucleotide probe, end-labelled with biotin, and amplified with anti-biotin-immunogold silver staining (anti-biotin-IGSS). This system proved more sensitive than amplification with streptavidin-biotinylated alkaline phosphatase for detecting human papilloma virus type 16 in cervical tissues. The method was successfully combined with antigen staining for papilloma virus common antigens in skin and genital warts. This simple and quick method, using non-radioactively labelled synthetic probes, may be useful for the detection of other viruses in stored material and may be suitable for other double staining procedures. Images PMID:2551931

  10. THE CARCINOGENIC EFFECT OF A PAPILLOMA VIRUS ON THE TARRED SKIN OF RABBITS

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, John G.; Rous, Peyton

    1938-01-01

    A considerable variety of tumors, both benign and malignant, result from the localization of the rabbit papilloma virus in skin which has been prepared by repeated tarrings. They appear only in individuals highly susceptible to the action of the virus, and are more likely to be engendered by highly pathogenic inocula. No evidence has been found that differences in the potentialities of the virus entities are responsible for the diversity of the growths. This is referable to changes in the epidermal cells; and much more preliminary tarring is required to produce these changes than suffices to cause localization of the virus out of the blood stream with a resulting papillomatosis of the ordinary sort. The character of the individual anomalous tumors depends in some degree upon the extent of the preparatory changes in the cells, malignant growths being more frequent when the epidermis has been tarred for a relatively long period. All are focal or punctate in origin, and they exhibit their peculiar characters from the first, none being due to secondary alterations in ordinary papillomas. Tarring after the virus has localized in the epidermis does not significantly increase their number. They are the outcome of the state of the cells at the time of virus infection. Tarring exerts important influences in addition to changing the cells in such a way that unusual tumors result from the action of the virus. The procedure is notably effective in determining localization of the virus out of the blood stream; enables it to produce growths when otherwise it would not do so though present in the tarred skin; stimulates the proliferation of the tumors engendered; makes them disorderly and aggressive; and hastens the anaplasia of such of them as are malignant. It has similar effects upon the tar tumors, as will be demonstrated in a subsequent paper. PMID:19870803

  11. Immunohistochemical localization of human papilloma virus in conjunctival neoplasias: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anjana; Panda, Anita

    2007-01-01

    Background: The extent of association of human papilloma virus (HPV) in human conjunctival neoplasias has been debated in studies originating from different parts of the world, but no substantial evidence has been generated on Indian subjects. This prompted us to carry out a retrospective study on conjunctival neoplasias diagnosed over the past 12 years. Materials and Methods: Histopathological and immunohistochemical analysis of 65 specimens of ocular neoplasias and 30 normal controls diagnosed between 1991 and 2002 at a tertiary eye care hospital, was undertaken. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues were reviewed for confirming histopathological diagnosis, presence of koilocytosis and changes related to actinic keratosis. Immunohistochemical analysis was done using HPV-specific monoclonal antibodies. Clinicopathological correlation and the association of HPV antigen with the histopathological features were performed. Results: Out of the 65 cases analyzed, 35 were papillomas and 30 were ocular surface squamous neoplasias (OSSN). The mean age was 48 years with a male preponderance. Histologically, koilocytosis was observed in 17.1% of papillomas and 36.6% of OSSN. Actinic keratosis was present in 33% of OSSN. Immunohistochemically 17.1% conjunctival papillomas stained positive for HPV antigen, all cases of OSSN were negative for HPV. There was no correlation between koilocytosis or actinic keratosis and the detection of HPV antigen. Conclusions: The association between HPV and conjunctival neoplasias is variable in different geographical areas and also depends on the methods of detection used. This study warrants the need for applying more advanced techniques at a molecular level to determine the possible etiology of HPV in conjunctival neoplasias among Asian-Indians. PMID:17699945

  12. [Identification of human papilloma viruses (HPV) in inflammatory states and ear neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Rydzewski, Bogdan; Goździcka-Józefiak, Anna; Sokalski, Jerzy; Matusiak, Monika; Durzyński, Lukasz

    2007-01-01

    Human Papilloma Virus has a strong relation to oropharyngeal mucosa and is considered to be responsible for a wide range of upper respiratory tract pathologies, like laryngeal papilloma. There's a hypothesis, that it plays a significant role in middle ear chronic inflammations and neoplasm's. MATERIAL AND METHODIC. The examination was carried on a group of 53 patients, 39 of which was suffering from granulation tissue chronic otitis media, 7-cholesteatomatous otitis media, 6--middle ear malignant neoplasm, and 1 middle and/or external ear benign neoplasm. The control group consisted of 5 patients operated on: otosclerosis--4 cases and post-traumatic tympanic membrane perforation--1 case. The material was postoperative tissue, like polyps, inflammatory granulation tissue, cholesteatoma masses and malignant neoplasm's tissue. In the whole group of 53 examined cases, HPV DNA was confirmed in 22 cases (41.5%), in that group oncogenic types 16 or 18 in 12 cases (22.6%), and in 14 cases (26.4%) types 6 or 11. In a group of chronic granulomatous otitis media DNA characteristic for Papilloma was identified in 12 cases (25.6%), in it in 9 cases DNA HPV type 6 or 11 was confirmed, and in 7 cases type 16 or 18. Among cholesteatomatous chronic otitis media HPV DNA types 6 or 11 was identified in 70%. In every case of middle ear malignant neoplasm a presence of high-risk DNA Papilloma types 16 or 18 was confirmed. In any case of control group HPV DNA was detected. The results has been compared with other authors examinations and it is claimed that they confirm the observation, that Human Papilloma Viruses may be a factor, that might play an important role in pathology of chronic otitis media and ear neoplasm's. It is concluded, that differences in percentages of HPV presence in chronic inflammations (70%) and ear neoplasm's may be explained by viral co-infection during bacterial c. o. m. Viral infection probably evolves carcinogenesis, which leads to a neoplastic growth.

  13. Two Cases of Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis Following Vaccination Against Human Papilloma Virus.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Kenji; Yasui, Naoko; Kowa, Hisatomo; Kanda, Fumio; Toda, Tatsushi

    We herein present two cases of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) following vaccination against human papilloma virus (HPV). Case 1 experienced diplopia and developed an unstable gait 14 days after a second vaccination of Cervarix. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an isolated small, demyelinating lesion in the pontine tegmentum. Case 2 experienced a fever and limb dysesthesia 16 days after a second vaccination of Gardasil. Brain MRI revealed hyperintense lesion in the pons with slight edema on a T2-weighted image. Both cases resolved completely. It is important to accumulate further data on confirmed cases of ADEM temporally associated with HPV vaccination.

  14. "Saving lives": Adapting and adopting Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccination in Austria.

    PubMed

    Paul, Katharina T

    2016-03-01

    Vaccination against the sexually transmitted Human Papilloma Virus (HPV), a necessary agent for the development of cervical cancer, has triggered much debate. In Austria, HPV policy turned from "lagging behind" in 2008 into "Europe's frontrunner" by 2013. Drawing on qualitative research, the article shows how the vaccine was transformed and made "good enough" over the course of five years. By means of tinkering and shifting storylines, policy officials and experts disassociated the vaccine from gender, vaccine manufacturers, and youth sexuality. Ultimately, the HPV vaccine functioned to strengthen the national immunization program. To this end, preventing an effective problematization of the extant screening program was essential.

  15. Development of procedures for the identification of human papilloma virus DNA fragments in laser plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woellmer, Wolfgang; Meder, Tom; Jappe, Uta; Gross, Gerd; Riethdorf, Sabine; Riethdorf, Lutz; Kuhler-Obbarius, Christina; Loening, Thomas

    1996-01-01

    For the investigation of laser plume for the existence of HPV DNA fragments, which possibly occur during laser treatment of virus infected tissue, human papillomas and condylomas were treated in vitro with the CO2-laser. For the sampling of the laser plume a new method for the trapping of the material was developed by use of water-soluble gelatine filters. These samples were analyzed with the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique, which was optimized in regard of the gelatine filters and the specific primers. Positive PCR results for HPV DNA fragments up to the size of a complete oncogene were obtained and are discussed regarding infectiousity.

  16. “Saving lives”: Adapting and adopting Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccination in Austria

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Katharina T.

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination against the sexually transmitted Human Papilloma Virus (HPV), a necessary agent for the development of cervical cancer, has triggered much debate. In Austria, HPV policy turned from “lagging behind” in 2008 into “Europe's frontrunner” by 2013. Drawing on qualitative research, the article shows how the vaccine was transformed and made “good enough” over the course of five years. By means of tinkering and shifting storylines, policy officials and experts disassociated the vaccine from gender, vaccine manufacturers, and youth sexuality. Ultimately, the HPV vaccine functioned to strengthen the national immunization program. To this end, preventing an effective problematization of the extant screening program was essential. PMID:26921834

  17. Identification of the human papilloma virus-1a E4 gene products.

    PubMed Central

    Doorbar, J; Campbell, D; Grand, R J; Gallimore, P H

    1986-01-01

    Antibodies prepared against a human papilloma virus-1 (HPV-1) E4/beta-galactosidase fusion protein identified several polypeptides in HPV-1, but not HPV-2 or 4, induced papillomas. The major E4 protein, that represented up to 30% of total cellular protein, was a 16/17-K doublet which was purified by column chromatography and analysed for amino acid content. A peptide derived by chymotryptic digestion was purified by h.p.l.c. and subjected to amino acid sequencing. The unique sequence obtained, Gly-His-Pro-Asp-Leu-Ser-Leu, identified the 16/17-K doublet as a product of the HPV-1 E4 gene region. Antibodies to both the E4/beta-galactosidase fusion protein and the 16/17-K doublet identified two smaller polypeptides (10/11-K) which may represent spliced products of E4. We propose that the products of the HPV-1 E4 gene region are not classical DNA tumor virus early proteins and suggest that they play a role in virus maturation. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:3011404

  18. Rapid Genotyping of Swine Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Polly W.Y.; Wong, Chloe K.S.; Li, Olive T.W.; Chan, Kwok Hung; Cheung, Chung Lam; Ma, Edward S.; Webby, Richard J.; Guan, Yi; Peiris, Joseph S. Malik

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus highlighted the need for enhanced surveillance of swine influenza viruses. We used real-time reverse–transcription PCR–based genotyping and found that this rapid and simple genotyping method may identify reassortants derived from viruses of Eurasian avian-like, triple reassortant-like, and pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus lineages. PMID:21470462

  19. Persistent infection with high-risk human papilloma viruses: cohort study, Mérida, Venezuela

    PubMed Central

    Téllez, Luis; Michelli, Elvia; Mendoza, José Andrés; Vielma, Silvana; Noguera, María-Eugenia; Callejas, Diana; Cavazza, María; Correnti, María

    2015-01-01

    Cervical lesions have been associated with infection by high-risk human papilloma virus (high-risk HPV). In 409 women aged >15 years high-risk HPV lesions were identified. In a cohort of this population persistent infection was compared with cytological, colposcopic, and histological lesions. Cervical scrapes were taken and DNA was isolated. HPV was detected by PCR in the E6/E7 region. Genotyping was performed by PCR nested multiple E6/E7. HPV was detected in a 37.40% (153/409), high-risk HPV in 86% (153/178), HPV18 46.64% (83/178), HPV16 34.28% (61/178). Among these 53.93% (96/178) were multiple infections, and HPV18/16 (30/96) was the most frequent 31.25%. The cytology showed changes in 15% of positive patients. A 49.67% in women positive for HPV infection showed abnormalities in the colposcopic study, a relationship that turned out to be statistically significant ( p < 0.0019 test χ2). Among all 85% of the women were younger than 45 years of age. Fifty-seven patients were evaluated 15 months after the base study, with initial prevalence of morbidity 49.12% (28/57) and at the end 10.53% (6/57), showing in 89.29% (25/28) negative for HR-HPV infection, 10.34% (3/28) showed persistence of infection, 17.54% (10/57) presented cytological alterations, with 80% of positivity for HPV, and a regression of 100% (10/10) of the previously identified lesions. With colposcopy, 50% (14/28) presented alterations related to HPV, of these 85.71% (12/14) showed regression of such an alteration. The cumulative incidence for HPV was 10.34% (3/29). The incidence rate was 4.23% (3/71), which is equal to 4.23 new cases of HPV infection per 100 people, per year of follow-up. In conclusion, the present work shows a high frequency of infection by high-risk HPV, with predominance of HPV18 and 16 and in general for multiple infections. Colposcopy was better predictor than the Pap smear for infection. The follow-up study revealed a low percentage of persistent infection, and a high frequency

  20. Persistent infection with high-risk human papilloma viruses: cohort study, Mérida, Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Téllez, Luis; Michelli, Elvia; Mendoza, José Andrés; Vielma, Silvana; Noguera, María-Eugenia; Callejas, Diana; Cavazza, María; Correnti, María

    2015-01-01

    Cervical lesions have been associated with infection by high-risk human papilloma virus (high-risk HPV). In 409 women aged >15 years high-risk HPV lesions were identified. In a cohort of this population persistent infection was compared with cytological, colposcopic, and histological lesions. Cervical scrapes were taken and DNA was isolated. HPV was detected by PCR in the E6/E7 region. Genotyping was performed by PCR nested multiple E6/E7. HPV was detected in a 37.40% (153/409), high-risk HPV in 86% (153/178), HPV18 46.64% (83/178), HPV16 34.28% (61/178). Among these 53.93% (96/178) were multiple infections, and HPV18/16 (30/96) was the most frequent 31.25%. The cytology showed changes in 15% of positive patients. A 49.67% in women positive for HPV infection showed abnormalities in the colposcopic study, a relationship that turned out to be statistically significant ( p < 0.0019 test χ(2)). Among all 85% of the women were younger than 45 years of age. Fifty-seven patients were evaluated 15 months after the base study, with initial prevalence of morbidity 49.12% (28/57) and at the end 10.53% (6/57), showing in 89.29% (25/28) negative for HR-HPV infection, 10.34% (3/28) showed persistence of infection, 17.54% (10/57) presented cytological alterations, with 80% of positivity for HPV, and a regression of 100% (10/10) of the previously identified lesions. With colposcopy, 50% (14/28) presented alterations related to HPV, of these 85.71% (12/14) showed regression of such an alteration. The cumulative incidence for HPV was 10.34% (3/29). The incidence rate was 4.23% (3/71), which is equal to 4.23 new cases of HPV infection per 100 people, per year of follow-up. In conclusion, the present work shows a high frequency of infection by high-risk HPV, with predominance of HPV18 and 16 and in general for multiple infections. Colposcopy was better predictor than the Pap smear for infection. The follow-up study revealed a low percentage of persistent infection, and a high

  1. Differential regulation of papilloma virus early gene expression in transformed fibroblasts and carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Kleiner, E; Dietrich, W; Pfister, H

    1986-01-01

    Treatment of bovine papilloma virus (BPV) 1-transformed mouse fibroblasts with cycloheximide led to a 10-fold increase in the amount of viral transcripts, after as little as 1 h of protein synthesis inhibition. Northern blots revealed no qualitative changes in the RNA pattern. Nuclear run-on experiments showed about a 7-fold increase in specific transcriptional activity after cycloheximide treatment. The half-life of BPV1 mRNA was twice as long as in untreated controls. These results indicate that both RNA synthesis and degradation of viral RNA are controlled by labile proteins. Cycloheximide stimulation turned out to be independent of the BPV1 E2 gene activity which enhances viral transcription. Cycloheximide treatment had no effect on the amount of human papilloma virus (HPV) 18 transcripts in cervical carcinoma derived HeLa and C4-1 cells. Transcription of HPV16 in the cervical carcinoma line SiHa was likewise unaffected. The differential regulation of transcription in transformed fibroblasts and cancer-derived cells, and the significance for malignant conversion are discussed. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. PMID:3019673

  2. Human papilloma virus testing in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma: what the clinician should know.

    PubMed

    Mirghani, Haïtham; Amen, Furrat; Moreau, Frederique; Guigay, Joel; Ferchiou, Malek; Melkane, Antoine E; Hartl, Dana M; Lacau St Guily, Jean

    2014-01-01

    High risk Human Papilloma virus (HR-HPV) associated oropharyngeal cancers are on the increase. Although, the scientific community is aware of the importance of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) testing, there is no consensus on the assays that are required to reliably identify HR-HPV related tumors. A wide range of methods have been developed. The most widely used techniques include viral DNA detection, with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or In Situ Hybridization, and p16 detected by immunohistochemistry. However, these tests provide different information and have their own specific limitations. In this review, we summarize these different techniques, in light of the recent literature. p16 Overexpression, which is an indirect marker of HPV infection, is considered by many head and neck oncologists to be the most important marker for patient stratification. We describe the frequent lack of concordance of this marker with other assays and the possible reasons for this. The latest developments in HPV testing are also reported, such as the RNAscope™ HPV test, and how they fit into the existing framework of techniques. HPV testing must not be considered in isolation, as there are important interactions with other parameters, such as tobacco exposure. This is an important and rapidly evolving field and is likely to become pivotal to staging and choice of treatment of oropharyngeal carcinoma in the future.

  3. A proposal to reduce the risk of transmission of human papilloma virus via transvaginal ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Combs, C Andrew; Fishman, Alan

    2016-07-01

    Three steps must be followed to prevent the transmission of infection via a contaminated transvaginal ultrasound probe: cleaning the probe after every use, high-level disinfection, and covering the probe with a single-use barrier during the examination. There may be critical flaws in at least 2 of these steps as they are currently practiced. First, 2 widely used disinfectants, glutaraldehyde and orthophthalaldehyde, have recently been found to be ineffective at neutralizing human papilloma virus type 16 and type 18. Second, commercial ultrasound probe covers have an unacceptable rate of leakage (8-81%) compared to condoms (0.9-2%). We recommend the use of a sonicated hydrogen peroxide disinfectant system rather than aldehyde-type disinfectants. We recommend that the probe be covered with a condom rather than a commercial probe cover during transvaginal ultrasound examination. Combined with probe cleaning, these 2 steps are estimated to result in an 800 million- to 250 billion-fold reduction in human papilloma virus viral load, which should translate to greatly enhanced patient safety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Validation of the Turkish Cervical Cancer and Human Papilloma Virus Awareness Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Özdemir, E; Kısa, S

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the validity and reliability of the 'Cervical Cancer and Human Papilloma Virus Awareness Questionnaire' among fertility age women by adapting the scale into Turkish. Cervical cancer is the fourth most commonly form seen among women. Death from cervical cancer ranks third among causes and is one of the most preventable forms of cancer. This cross-sectional study included 360 women from three family health centres between January 5 and June 25, 2014. Internal consistency showed that the Kuder-Richardson 21 reliability coefficient in the first part was 0.60, Cronbach's alpha reliability coefficient was 0.61 in the second part. The Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin value of the items on the scale was 0.712. The Barlett test was significant. The confirmatory factor analysis indicated that the model matched the data adequately. This study shows that the Turkish version of the instrument is a valid and reliable tool to evaluate knowledge, perceptions and preventive behaviours of women regarding human papilloma virus and cervical cancer. Nurses who work in the clinical and primary care settings need to screen, detect and refer women who may be at risk from cervical cancer. © 2016 International Council of Nurses.

  5. Health Belief Model Scale for Human Papilloma Virus and its Vaccination: Adaptation and Psychometric Testing.

    PubMed

    Guvenc, Gulten; Seven, Memnun; Akyuz, Aygul

    2016-06-01

    To adapt and psychometrically test the Health Belief Model Scale for Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) and Its Vaccination (HBMS-HPVV) for use in a Turkish population and to assess the Human Papilloma Virus Knowledge score (HPV-KS) among female college students. Instrument adaptation and psychometric testing study. The sample consisted of 302 nursing students at a nursing school in Turkey between April and May 2013. Questionnaire-based data were collected from the participants. Information regarding HBMS-HPVV and HPV knowledge and descriptive characteristic of participants was collected using translated HBMS-HPVV and HPV-KS. Test-retest reliability was evaluated and Cronbach α was used to assess internal consistency reliability, and exploratory factor analysis was used to assess construct validity of the HBMS-HPVV. The scale consists of 4 subscales that measure 4 constructs of the Health Belief Model covering the perceived susceptibility and severity of HPV and the benefits and barriers. The final 14-item scale had satisfactory validity and internal consistency. Cronbach α values for the 4 subscales ranged from 0.71 to 0.78. Total HPV-KS ranged from 0 to 8 (scale range, 0-10; 3.80 ± 2.12). The HBMS-HPVV is a valid and reliable instrument for measuring young Turkish women's beliefs and attitudes about HPV and its vaccination. Copyright © 2015 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. No evidence for infection of UK prostate cancer patients with XMRV, BK virus, Trichomonas vaginalis or human papilloma viruses.

    PubMed

    Groom, Harriet C T; Warren, Anne Y; Neal, David E; Bishop, Kate N

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of specific infections in UK prostate cancer patients was investigated. Serum from 84 patients and 62 controls was tested for neutralisation of xenotropic murine leukaemia virus-related virus (XMRV) Envelope. No reactivity was found in the patient samples. In addition, a further 100 prostate DNA samples were tested for XMRV, BK virus, Trichomonas vaginalis and human papilloma viruses by nucleic acid detection techniques. Despite demonstrating DNA integrity and assay sensitivity, we failed to detect the presence of any of these agents in DNA samples, bar one sample that was weakly positive for HPV16. Therefore we conclude that these infections are absent in this typical cohort of men with prostate cancer.

  7. Specific immunity to human papilloma virus (HPV) in patients with genital warts.

    PubMed Central

    Viac, J; Staquet, M J; Miguet, M; Chabanon, M; Thivolet, J

    1978-01-01

    A study of human papilloma virus (HPV) specific cellular and humoral immunity in 30 patients with genital warts is reported. By in vivo testing with purified, inactivated plantar wart virus, a cell-mediated immunity to HPV was determined in 60% of patients. Circulating antibodies, evaluated by immunofluorescence testing, were rare, but these increased after an intradermal test had been carried out, especially in patients with a positive skin test, suggesting a booster effect. No significant difference was found between this group of patients and those having skin warts. Our results showed a specific immune response to HPV in most patients, confirming the role of the viral agent in the induction of genital warts. Images PMID:207383

  8. 78 FR 18359 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Papilloma Pseudovirus and Virus-Like Particles as a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Papilloma Pseudovirus and Virus-Like Particles as a Delivery System for Human Cancer Therapeutics and Diagnostics AGENCY...

  9. High incidence area of cattle cancer with a possible interaction between an environmental carcinogen and a papilloma virus.

    PubMed

    Jarrett, W F; McNeil, P E; Grimshaw, W T; Selman, I E; McIntyre, W I

    1978-07-20

    Cattle in upland areas of Scotland and northern England are substantially more prone to alimentary cancer than those of the immediately neighbouring lowlands, and epidemiological evidence implicates a combination of papilloma virus and bracken in the aetiology of the disease. Here Professor Jarrett outlines the circumstantial case against these agents and discusses its implications.

  10. Gene promoter methylation and protein expression of BRMS1 in uterine cervix in relation to high-risk human papilloma virus infection and cancer.

    PubMed

    Panagopoulou, Maria; Lambropoulou, Maria; Balgkouranidou, Ioanna; Nena, Evangelia; Karaglani, Makrina; Nicolaidou, Christina; Asimaki, Anthi; Konstantinidis, Theocharis; Constantinidis, Theodoros C; Kolios, George; Kakolyris, Stylianos; Agorastos, Theodoros; Chatzaki, Ekaterini

    2017-04-01

    Cervical cancer is strongly related to certain high-risk types of human papilloma virus infection. Breast cancer metastasis suppressor 1 (BRMS1) is a tumor suppressor gene, its expression being regulated by DNA promoter methylation in several types of cancers. This study aims to evaluate the methylation status of BRMS1 promoter in relation to high-risk types of human papilloma virus infection and the development of pre-cancerous lesions and describe the pattern of BRMS1 protein expression in normal, high-risk types of human papilloma virus-infected pre-cancerous and malignant cervical epithelium. We compared the methylation status of BRMS1 in cervical smears of 64 women with no infection by high-risk types of human papilloma virus to 70 women with proven high-risk types of human papilloma virus infection, using real-time methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. The expression of BRMS1 protein was described by immunohistochemistry in biopsies from cervical cancer, pre-cancerous lesions, and normal cervices. Methylation of BRMS1 promoter was detected in 37.5% of women with no high-risk types of human papilloma virus infection and was less frequent in smears with high-risk types of human papilloma virus (11.4%) and in women with pathological histology (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia) (11.9%). Methylation was detected also in HeLa cervical cancer cells. Immunohistochemistry revealed nuclear BRMS1 protein staining in normal high-risk types of human papilloma virus-free cervix, in cervical intraepithelial neoplasias, and in malignant tissues, where staining was occasionally also cytoplasmic. In cancer, expression was stronger in the more differentiated cancer blasts. In conclusion, BRMS1 promoter methylation and aberrant protein expression seem to be related to high-risk types of human papilloma virus-induced carcinogenesis in uterine cervix and is worthy of further investigation.

  11. Achalasia is not associated with measles or known herpes and human papilloma viruses.

    PubMed

    Birgisson, S; Galinski, M S; Goldblum, J R; Rice, T W; Richter, J E

    1997-02-01

    Achalasia is an esophageal motility disorder of unknown etiology. Several studies suggest possible herpes or measles virus etiology, but results are inconclusive. The aim of this study was to test whether herpesvirus (HV), measles (MV), or human papilloma virus (HPV) sequences could be detected in myotomy specimens from a wide spectrum of achalasia patients, using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. Myotomy specimens from 13 achalasia patients, esophagectomy specimens from nine esophageal cancer patients, and autopsy specimens from six fetuses were studied with the PCR technique. Paired oligonucleotide primers of HV (HSV-1 and 2, CMV, EBV, VZV, and HHV-6), MV and HPV sequences and exon 3 of the HPRT gene were used for the PCR DNA amplification. Amplified products were resolved on agarose gels and stained with ethidium bromide. All specimens yielded the appropriate-sized products for exon 3 of the HPRT and viral controls. No amplified products were seen in the achalasia specimens or controls corresponding to any of the virus sequences tested. The absence of HV, MV, and HPV sequences suggests that these viruses are not associated with achalasia but does not exclude the possibility of a previously unidentified virus as a causal agent. Further studies aimed at identifying an unknown viral agent as a cause for achalasia are warranted.

  12. Chimeric human papilloma virus-simian/human immunodeficiency virus virus-like-particle vaccines: immunogenicity and protective efficacy in macaques.

    PubMed

    Dale, C Jane; Liu, Xiaosong Song; De Rose, Robert; Purcell, Damian F J; Anderson, Jenny; Xu, Yan; Leggatt, Graham R; Frazer, Ian H; Kent, Stephen J

    2002-09-15

    Vaccines to efficiently block or limit sexual transmission of both HIV and human papilloma virus (HPV) are urgently needed. Chimeric virus-like-particle (VLP) vaccines consisting of both multimerized HPV L1 proteins and fragments of SIV gag p27, HIV-1 tat, and HIV-1 rev proteins (HPV-SHIV VLPs) were constructed and administered to macaques both systemically and mucosally. An additional group of macaques first received a priming vaccination with DNA vaccines expressing the same SIV and HIV-1 antigens prior to chimeric HPV-SHIV VLP boosting vaccinations. Although HPV L1 antibodies were induced in all immunized macaques, weak antibody or T cell responses to the chimeric SHIV antigens were detected only in animals receiving the DNA prime/HPV-SHIV VLP boost vaccine regimen. Significant but partial protection from a virulent mucosal SHIV challenge was also detected only in the prime/boosted macaques and not in animals receiving the HPV-SHIV VLP vaccines alone, with three of five prime/boosted animals retaining some CD4+ T cells following challenge. Thus, although some immunogenicity and partial protection was observed in non-human primates receiving both DNA and chimeric HPV-SHIV VLP vaccines, significant improvements in vaccine design are required before we can confidently proceed with this approach to clinical trials.

  13. Knowledge levels of adolescent girls about human papilloma virus and its vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Çetin, Orkun; Verit, Fatma Ferda; Keskin, Seda; Zebitay, Ali Galip; Deregözü, Ayşegül; Usta, Taner; Yücel, Oğuz

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of our study was to evaluate the level of knowledge of the adolescent girls who presented to our clinic about human papilloma virus (HPV) infection and HPV vaccine. Material and Methods: Five hundred and one adolescent girls aged between 13 and 18 years who presented to the gynecology outpatient clinic between March 2012 and March 2013 were asked to answer the questions of the questionnaire about HPV and HPV vaccine. The “Participant Information Form” and “HPV Information Assessment Form” were used by examination of the related literature by the investigators. The data obtained were entered into the computer using the SPSS 16.5 program and evaluated. Descriptive statistics were shown with mean, standard deviation, number and percentage values. Results: The mean age of 501 subjects who were included into the study was 15.92 years. 390 subjects (77.8%) who were included in the study had no information about HPV. 111 subjects (22.2%) stated that they heard of HPV before or had information about HPV. The mean age of the subjects who had information about human papilloma virus was found to be 16.52 years. The mean age of 390 subjects (77.8%) who had no information about human papilloma virus was 15.75 years. It was found that only one of the subjects (0.9%) was vaccinated with HPV vaccine. When the subjects who did not wish to be vaccinated were asked for the reason, 40.9% stated that the reason was inadequate information, 26.4% stated that the reason was high cost, 16.4% stated that the reason was the fact that they did not consider themselves at risk and 16.4% stated that the reason was the fact that they were afraid of side effects. Conclusions: In our study, it was found that the adolescent girls who constituted our study group had insufficient information about HPV and HPV vaccine. Verbal, written and visual communication tools and internet should be used intensively and efficiently for the objective of introducing HPV vaccine and teaching the

  14. Determination of knowledge of Turkish midwifery students about human papilloma virus infection and its vaccines.

    PubMed

    Genc, Rabia Ekti; Sarican, Emine Serap; Turgay, Ayse San; Icke, Sibel; Sari, Dilek; Saydam, Birsen Karaca

    2013-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) is one of the most common sexually transmitted agents and its infection is the most established cause of cervical cancer. Midwives play a key position in the implementation of cervical cancer. This descriptive study aimed to determine the level of knowledge concerning HPV and HPV vaccination among 268 midwifery students. Data were collected between November 15 and 30, 2011, through a self-reported questionnaire. The mean age of participants was 20.75 ± 1.60. Among all students, 44.4% had heard of HPV, while 40.4% had heard of HPV vaccinatiob. The relationship between the midwifery student knowledge on HPV and HPV vaccine and their current educational year was significant (p=0.001). In conclusion midwifery students have moderate level of knowledge about HPV and its vaccine and relevant information should be included in their teaching curriculum.

  15. Attitudes towards Human Papilloma Virus Vaccination in the Latin American Andean Region.

    PubMed

    Nwanodi, Oroma

    2017-09-08

    This commentary explores the distribution of human papilloma virus (HPV) and HPV-related diseases, and factors affecting attitudes towards HPV, HPV-related diseases, and HPV vaccination in the Latin American Andean region. Lack of knowledge of HPV, known negative attitudes or incorrect assumptions about HPV, HPV-related diseases, and HPV vaccination provide a basis upon which to develop targeted HPV awareness and preventive health media campaigns. For maximal effect, media campaigns should use the internet, radio, and television to address health care providers, parents, and students. Additional programming can be developed for clinics to use in-house with their clients. Ministries of Education, Finance, and Health all have roles to play to increase national HPV, HPV-related diseases, and HPV vaccination awareness.

  16. Attitudes towards Human Papilloma Virus Vaccination in the Latin American Andean Region

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    This commentary explores the distribution of human papilloma virus (HPV) and HPV-related diseases, and factors affecting attitudes towards HPV, HPV-related diseases, and HPV vaccination in the Latin American Andean region. Lack of knowledge of HPV, known negative attitudes or incorrect assumptions about HPV, HPV-related diseases, and HPV vaccination provide a basis upon which to develop targeted HPV awareness and preventive health media campaigns. For maximal effect, media campaigns should use the internet, radio, and television to address health care providers, parents, and students. Additional programming can be developed for clinics to use in-house with their clients. Ministries of Education, Finance, and Health all have roles to play to increase national HPV, HPV-related diseases, and HPV vaccination awareness. PMID:28885601

  17. Association of acute cerebellar ataxia and human papilloma virus vaccination: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yonee, Chihiro; Toyoshima, Mitsuo; Maegaki, Yoshihiro; Kodama, Yuichi; Hayami, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Yukitoshi; Kusunoki, Susumu; Uchibori, Ayumi; Chiba, Atsuro; Kawano, Yoshifumi

    2013-10-01

    We report the case of a patient who developed symptoms of acute cerebellar ataxia (ACA) after administration of the human papilloma virus (HPV)-16/18 vaccine. This patient developed symptoms of ACA, including nausea, vertigo, severe limb and truncal ataxia, and bilateral spontaneous continuous horizontal nystagmus with irregular rhythm, 12 days after administration of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted cervical cancer vaccine. After this, the patient received methylprednisolone pulse and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapies as well as immunoadsorption plasmapheresis. Severe ACA symptoms did not improve after methylprednisolone pulse and IVIG therapies, but the patient recovered completely after immunoadsorption plasmapheresis. This temporal association strongly suggests that ACA was induced by the vaccination. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Human Papilloma Virus Associated Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    PubMed Central

    Ajila, Vidya; Shetty, Harish; Babu, Subhas; Shetty, Veena; Hegde, Shruthi

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the commonest causes for mortality and morbidity with squamous cell carcinoma being the sixth most frequent malignant tumour worldwide. In addition to tobacco and alcohol, human papilloma virus (HPV) is associated with a proportion of head and neck cancers. As in cervical cancers, HPV types 16 and 18 are the cause of malignant transformation. HPV-positive cancers of head and neck have unique characteristics such as occurrence in a younger age group, distinct clinical and molecular features, and better prognosis as compared to HPV-negative carcinomas. They also possess the potential for prevention by using vaccination. The present review describes in detail the salient features of HPV associated oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), its differences from HPV-negative OSCC, diagnostic features, and recent strategies in prevention and management. PMID:26483987

  19. [Association of Chlamydia trachomatis and human papilloma virus as predisposing factors in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia].

    PubMed

    González Sánchez, J L; Flores Avilés, Y; Gómez Campos, G; Montero Ramírez, A

    1995-10-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) has a predisposing association as cofactor in etiopathology of cervicouterine cancer; it is known also that viral infection is not enough, and there are other agents, as Chlamydia trachomatis. The objective of this study was to investigate the association of these cofactors as predisposal for intraepithelial cervical neoplasia (NIC). Prospectively, at Clinica de Colposcopia, Hospital de Ginecología y Obstetricia "Luis Castelazo Ayala", IMSS, 37 patients with cytologic, colposcopic and histological diagnosis of CIN pure or associated to HPV, underwent endocervical cytologies, and by immunofluorescence method, using monoclonal antibodies of conjugated fluoresceine, it was tried to demonstrate Chlamydia trachomatis, presence. From all patients, 12(32,4) were positive for Chlamydia trachomatis, significant percentually, and with Xi square of 0.32, non significant for this group of population. It is concluded that there is an important association of Chlamydia trachomatis and HPV, which should be taken into consideration in diagnosis and treatment of intraepithelial cervical neoplasia.

  20. Metastasis occurring eleven years after diagnosis of human papilloma virus-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ley, Jessica; Wildes, Tanya; El-Mofty, Samir; Adkins, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV)-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is associated with a favourable prognosis, although approximately 20–25% of patients ultimately develop recurrent cancer. Most disease recurrence events appear within 3 years; however, long-term follow-up of reported studies are limited, and the risk of late recurrence is unknown. We present a case report of a patient who developed distant metastases of HPV-related SCC 11 years after initial diagnosis and treatment of HPV-related OPSCC. Late disease recurrence may occur after initial diagnosis of HPV-related OPSCC. This observation has implications on the appropriate duration of follow-up and surveillance of these patients. PMID:25435908

  1. [The care needs of women infected with the human papilloma virus: a comprehensive approach].

    PubMed

    Cestari, Maria Elisa Wotzasek; Merighi, Miriam Aparecida Barbosa; Garanhani, Mara Lúcia; Cardeli, Alexandrina Aparecida Maciel; de Jesus, Maria Cristina Pinto; Lopes, Dolores Ferreira de Melo

    2012-10-01

    This study is founded on the phenomenology of Martin Heidegger, with the objective to understand the care needs of women infected with the human papilloma virus. Participants were fourteen women who had been diagnosed with this infection. The guiding questions were: What is it like to have this diagnosis? Tell me your experience, from when you received your diagnosis until today. What has your health care been like? The questions revealed the theme - seeking care as solitude - which showed the importance of the support of family and friends. The presence of the infection as the cause of marital conflicts and separation was another highlighted aspect. The statements showed that there was a sense of resignation after an unsuccessful attempt to find accurate and clear information in order to make assertive decisions. Health interventions for infected women must overcome the traditional models of care, including interventions for health promotion and prevention, with trained professionals who are sensitive to the subjective dimension.

  2. Respiratory papillomas

    PubMed Central

    Alagusundaramoorthy, Sayee Sundar; Agrawal, Abhinav

    2016-01-01

    Papillomas are known to occur in the lower respiratory tract. They are however, rare compared to their occurrence in the upper respiratory tract. These are generally exophytic tumors in the more proximal upper airways however cases with more distal location with an inverted growth pattern have also been described in the literature. These can be solitary or multiple and multifocality associated with multiple papillomas in the upper respiratory/aerodigestive tract. The four major types of respiratory papillomas are (1) Recurrent respiratory papillomas, (2) solitary squamous papillomas, (3) solitary glandular papillomas, (4) mixed papillomas. We review the incidence, etiopathology, diagnosis, and possible treatment modalities and algorithms for these respiratory papillomas. PMID:27625447

  3. A recombinant vaccinia virus containing the papilloma E2 protein promotes tumor regression by stimulating macrophage antibody-dependent cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Rosales, C; Graham, V V; Rosas, G A; Merchant, H; Rosales, R

    2000-09-01

    Human papillomavirus infection is associated with cervical cancer. The E6 and E7 papillomavirus proteins are normally required for the maintenance of the malignant phenotype. Expression of these proteins in infected cells is negatively regulated by the binding of the papilloma E2 protein to the long terminal control region of the papilloma virus genome. The E2 protein can also promote cell arrest and apoptosis in HeLa cells. Therefore, it is clear that this protein has the potential of inhibiting the malignant phenotype. Because, anticancer vaccines based in vaccinia viruses have recently been shown to be an effective way to treat and to eradicate tumors, a recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the E2 gene of bovine papilloma virus (Modified Vaccinia Ankara, MVA E2) was created, to explore further the antitumor potential of the E2 protein. A series of rabbits, containing the VX2 transplantable papilloma carcinoma, were treated with MVA E2. An impressive tumor regression, up to a complete disappearance of tumor, was observed in most animals (80%). In contrast, very little or no regression was detected if the normal vaccinia virus was used. Lymphocytes isolated from MVA E2-treated rabbits did not show cytotoxic activity against tumor cells. However, in these animals a humoral immune response against tumor cells was observed. These antitumor antibodies were capable of activating macrophages to destroy tumor cells efficiently. These data indicate that injecting the MVA E2 recombinant vaccinia virus directly into the tumor results in a robust and long-lasting tumor regression. Data also suggest that antitumor antibodies are responsible, at least in part, for eliminating tumors by activating macrophage antibody-dependent cytotoxicity.

  4. [Hepatitis C virus genotypes circulating in Colombia].

    PubMed

    Santos, Óscar; Gómez, Alberto; Vizcaíno, Viviana; Casas, María Consuelo; Ramírez, María Del Pilar; Olaya, Patricia

    2017-01-24

    Chronic hepatitis C virus infection is a worldwide public health problem; it has been estimated that over 180 million people are infected with this virus worldwide. Its precise incidence and prevalence (i.e., epidemiology) and the most frequent circulating genotypes in Colombia are unknown. To describe the hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes and subtypes in infected Colombian patients. We recovered the data on 1,538 HCV isolates from 1,527 patients in two Colombian reference laboratories typed by PAGE or qPCR. Patients' mean age was 53 years; 70% of them were 40 to 70 years old, and 52%, females; 57% of all tests were ordered in Bogotá and 80% of cases were from Cundinamarca, Valle and Atlántico departments. Genotype 1 was detected in 88.6% of cases, distributed as follows: 70% subtype 1b, 13.5% subtype 1a and 5.1%, undetermined subtypes. Genotype 2 was found in 5.4% of the patients, genotype 3 in 2% and genotype 4 in 4%. Mixed genotypes were found in 0.8% of the samples. Genotype 1 is the most common HCV genotype circulating in Colombia, and subtype 1b the most frequent.

  5. Effective nonvaccine interventions to be considered alongside human papilloma virus vaccine delivery.

    PubMed

    Hindin, Michelle J; Bloem, Paul; Ferguson, Jane

    2015-01-01

    World Health Organization recommends that girls, ages 9-13 years, get the human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine. Global Alliance for Vaccines Initiative, which provides low-cost vaccine to eligible countries, requires that an additional intervention to be offered alongside the vaccine. We systematically searched and assessed the published literature in lower- and middle-income countries to identify effective interventions. We conducted systematic searches of four databases: PubMed, EMBASE, Global Index Medicus Regional Databases, and Cochrane Reviews for effective adolescent health interventions that could be delivered with the HPV vaccine in the following areas: (1) iron and folic acid supplementation (iron alone or with folic acid); (2) voucher delivery and cash transfer programs; (3) hand washing and soap provision; (4) vision screening; (5) promotion of physical activity/exercise; (6) menstrual hygiene education; (7) sexual and reproductive health education; (8) human immunodeficiency virus prevention activities; and (9) condom promotion, condom use skill building, and demonstration. We found limited evidence of consistent positive impact. Iron supplementation reduced iron-deficiency anemia and raised serum ferritin levels. Promotion of physical activity lowered blood pressure and reduced weight gain. Sexual and reproductive health and human immunodeficiency virus interventions improved adolescent communication with adults but did not influence behavioral outcomes. Countries should consider locally relevant and proven interventions to be offered alongside the HPV vaccine. Copyright © 2015 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Giant condyloma of the cervix: an uncommon entity associated with low-risk human papilloma virus infection.

    PubMed

    Parra-Herran, Carlos; Herfs, Michael; Doria, Manuel; Crum, Christopher P; Nucci, Marisa R

    2013-02-01

    "Giant Condylomas" of the cervix are very uncommon, and have not been fully characterized in the English literature. We report 4 cases of cervical giant condyloma seen in our practice. Patients were predominantly young and presented with a cervical lesion producing bleeding or a mass effect. Biopsy/excision revealed a uniformly bland, exophytic squamous epithelial proliferation with viral cytopathic changes and absence of stromal invasion. Human papilloma virus types 6 and 11 were detected in all cases. Follow-up was uneventful without recurrence or spread. Giant condylomas of the cervix as defined in this report signify a benign albeit extensive variant of low-risk human papilloma virus infection. This term is proposed as a specific descriptor for such lesions and should be considered in the setting of any large well-differentiated exophytic cervical squamous lesion in young or immunosuppressed women. The term "giant condyloma of Buschke and Loewenstein" should be discontinued given the lack of specificity.

  7. Histopathology of papilloma virus infection of the cervix uteri: the history, taxonomy, nomenclature and reporting of koilocytic dysplasias.

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, S

    1983-01-01

    Papilloma virus infections of the squamous cervix are common and determine the incidence of koilocytes in cervical smears and biopsies. Typical exophytic condyloma acuminatum accounts for few of the infections. Most are "flat condylomata" (flat koilocytosis)--slightly raised plaques of flat profile. Superficial koilocytosis, dyskeratosis and often disturbed deep cells are their main histological features. The association between koilocytosis and dysplasia is considered and the different taxonomic approaches to the koilodysplastic states are compared. Equivalence is established between different nomenclatures by reference to the familiar dysplastic grades. Methods of reporting koilodysplasias are given and a prognostically difficult state of "full thickness" or "plenary" koilocytosis is described. In applying the "high technology" of nucleic acid hybridisation to confirm the lesion specificity of papilloma virus strains the lesions must be well defined and clearly identified by precise nomenclature: the nature and nomenclature of the lesions is critically discussed. Images PMID:6304149

  8. DETECTION OF HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUS IN HEAD AND NECK SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMAS: A LITERATURE REVIEW.

    PubMed

    Jelihovschi, I; Bidescu, Aida Corina; Tucaliuc, Simona Elena; Iancu, Luminiţa Smaranda

    2015-01-01

    Human papilloma viruses (HPV) are the most common sexually transmitted viruses. There is mounting evidence that incriminates HPV as a risk factor for malignant transformation of oropharyngeal epithelium. In 2011 the International Research Agency of Cancer and National Cancer Institute (USA) declared HPV-16 as an independent risk factor for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). Leaders in the field of HPV research admit that this subtype of head and neck cancer is a sexually transmitted entity and its global incidence is on the rise. In the 1980s, clinicians observed a new group of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) independent of tobacco smoking or alcohol use. The new HNSCC patient is a middle-aged man, non-smoker, non-drinker with higher social status and the suspected risk factors for HNSCC being related to sexual practices (oral sex, multiple sexual partners, unprotected sex and drug use). Routine HPV testing of HNSCC patients is seriously considered as HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancers comprise a distinct molecular, clinical and pathologic entity that has a markedly better prognosis than HPV-negative oropharyngeal cancers. The current treatment protocols for OPSCC include radiation, chemotherapy and surgery alone or in combination, involving high toxicity levels. Future therapeutic concepts for OPSCC may be personalized in relation to HPV-status to avoid unnecessary toxicity. The current review summarizes the contemporary trends in the diagnosis of HPV-related head and neck cancers, presenting the advantages and disadvantages of the main methods.

  9. No Evidence of Human Papilloma Virus Infection in Basal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nahidi, Yalda; Meibodi, Naser Tayyebi; Meshkat, Zahra; Esmaili, Habibollah; Jahanfakhr, Samaneh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common skin cancer among whites, and several risk factors have been discussed in itsdevelopment and progress. Detection of human papilloma virus (HPV) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) BCCs in some studies suggests that the virus may play a role in the pathogenesis of this disease. Several molecular studies showed conflicting reports. Aims: The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between HPV and BCC using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Materials and Methods: HPV DNA detection was done for 42 paraffin-embedded tissue specimens of BCC and 42 normal skin samples around the lesions by PCR using GP5+/GP6+ primers. Results: HPV DNA was not found in any of the 42 samples of BCC, and only one normal skin sample around the lesions was positive for HPV DNA by PCR. Conclusion: In this study, no statistically significant difference was seen between the presence of HPV DNA in BCC and normal skin around the lesion, and HPV is not likely to have an important role in pathogenesis of BCC. PMID:26288402

  10. Human Papilloma Virus and Cervical Cancer Education Needs among HIV-Positive Haitian Women in Miami.

    PubMed

    Kenya, Sonjia; Carrasquillo, Olveen; Fatil, Marie; Jones, Jamal; Jean, Chrystelle; Huff, India; Kobetz, Erin

    2015-01-01

    Haitian immigrant women, the largest growing Black ethnic group in Miami, experience the highest rates of cervical cancer and account for one of the largest populations diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) in South Florida. Using community-based participatory research methods, we conducted a pilot study to examine human papilloma virus (HPV)/cervical cancer knowledge and identify intervention preferences among HIV positive Haitian women. Community health workers conducted three focus groups with 21 HIV-positive Haitian women. All sessions were conducted in Haitian Kreyol, digitally recorded, and subsequently interpreted and transcribed into English. The first focus group assessed HPV/cervical cancer knowledge, the second session explored HPV/cervical cancer considerations specific to HIV-positive women, and the third focus group discussed HPV/cervical cancer screening and intervention preferences. Data analysis was guided by a grounded theory approach. Our sample had limited HPV/cervical cancer knowledge. Misconceptions about screening, transmission, and treatment were common. Participants felt that stigma by providers impacted negatively the care they received and that stigma by the community diminished social support. Strong support for culturally tailored interventions to improve HPV/cervical cancer knowledge was expressed. Although no participants had participated in research previously, all were willing to participate in future trials. There is critical need for culturally relevant interventions to improve HPV/cervical cancer knowledge among HIV-positive Haitian women. Copyright © 2015 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Hepatitis B virus taxonomy and hepatitis B virus genotypes.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Stephan

    2007-01-07

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a member of the hepadnavirus family. Hepadnaviruses can be found in both mammals (orthohepadnaviruses) and birds (avihepadnaviruses). The genetic variability of HBV is very high. There are eight genotypes of HBV and three clades of HBV isolates from apes that appear to be additional genotypes of HBV. Most genotypes are now divided into subgenotypes with distinct virological and epidemiological properties. In addition, recombination among HBV genotypes increases the variability of HBV. This review summarises current knowledge of the epidemiology of genetic variability in hepadnaviruses and, due to rapid progress in the field, updates several recent reviews on HBV genotypes and subgenotypes.

  12. Human Papilloma Virus Detection by INNOLiPA HPV in Prostate Tissue from Men of Northeast Mexico

    PubMed

    Dávila-Rodríguez, Martha I; Ignacio Morales, Cesar V; Aragón Tovar, Anel R; Olache Jimenez, Delia; Castelán Maldonado, Edmundo; Lara Miranda, Sandra; Cortés Gutiérrez, Elva I

    2016-11-01

    Background: Prostatic adenocarcinoma by Prosate cancer (PCa) is the most prevalent cancer and the second cause of cancer-related death among men in the Western world. Human papilloma virus (HPV) may be considered as a preventable risk factor. In this study, we assessed the frequencies of HPV infection in prostatic adenocarcinoma and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) cases in Northeast Mexico. Materials and Methods: A total of 87 paraffin-embedded blocks (from 25 and 62 patients with definite diagnoses of BPH and adenocarcinoma, respectively) were selected and subjected to INNOLiPA HPV Genotyping to detect 28 high- and low-risk HPV types. The rates of infection were compared in the two studied groups. Results: INNOLiPA HPV demonstrated great sensitivity for HPV detection on paraffin-embedded tissue. Global prevalence was 14.9% (13/87). HPV infection was positive in 19.4% (12/62) of patients with adenocarcinoma and 4.0% (1/25) of patients with BPH. HPV-11, which is considered to be low risk, was more prevalent. Interestingly, one patient with BPH and six with prostate cancer showed examples considered to be high risk (HPV-18, -51, -52, and -66). Conclusion: A higher rate of HPV infection among Mexican patients with prostatic carcinoma than among those with BPH was observed. HPV infections may thus contribute to the risk of prostate cancer. Further studies are required to elucidate any roles of HPV infection in prostate disease in Mexico and the effect of prevention and treatment of HPV infection on prostatic adenocarcinoma. Creative Commons Attribution License

  13. Human Papilloma Virus Detection by INNOLiPA HPV in Prostate Tissue from Men of Northeast Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Martha I Dávila; Morales, Cesar V Ignacio; Tovar, Anel R Aragón; Jimenez, Delia Olache; Maldonado, Edmundo Castelán; Miranda, Sandra Lara; Gutiérrez, Elva I Cortés

    2016-01-01

    Background: Prostatic adenocarcinoma by Prosate cancer (PCa) is the most prevalent cancer and the second cause of cancer-related death among men in the Western world. Human papilloma virus (HPV) may be considered as a preventable risk factor. In this study, we assessed the frequencies of HPV infection in prostatic adenocarcinoma and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) cases in Northeast Mexico. Materials and Methods: A total of 87 paraffin-embedded blocks (from 25 and 62 patients with definite diagnoses of BPH and adenocarcinoma, respectively) were selected and subjected to INNOLiPA HPV Genotyping to detect 28 high- and low-risk HPV types. The rates of infection were compared in the two studied groups. Results: INNOLiPA HPV demonstrated great sensitivity for HPV detection on paraffin-embedded tissue. Global prevalence was 14.9% (13/87). HPV infection was positive in 19.4% (12/62) of patients with adenocarcinoma and 4.0% (1/25) of patients with BPH. HPV-11, which is considered to be low risk, was more prevalent. Interestingly, one patient with BPH and six with prostate cancer showed examples considered to be high risk (HPV-18, -51, -52, and -66). Conclusion: A higher rate of HPV infection among Mexican patients with prostatic carcinoma than among those with BPH was observed. HPV infections may thus contribute to the risk of prostate cancer. Further studies are required to elucidate any roles of HPV infection in prostate disease in Mexico and the effect of prevention and treatment of HPV infection on prostatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:28030912

  14. Hepatitis B Virus Genotypes and Variants

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chih-Lin; Kao, Jia-Horng

    2015-01-01

    At least 10 hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes (A to J) with distinct geographic distributions and several HBV mutants, including precore/core promoter mutations and pre-S/S deletion mutations, have been recognized to be not only predictive of liver disease progression but also associated with response to antiviral therapy. HBV genotype–specific pathogenesis may contribute to heterogeneous clinical outcomes in chronic hepatitis B patients across the world. For example, patients with HBV genotypes C and D infection have a lower rate of spontaneous HBeAg seroconversion. In addition, HBV genotypes C and D have a higher frequency of core promoter and pre-S mutations than genotypes A and B. Genotypes C and D also carry a higher lifetime risk of cirrhosis and HCC development than genotypes A and B. Core promoter and pre-S mutations also correlate with an increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Therapeutically, genotypes A and B patients have a better response to interferon-based therapy than genotypes C and D patients, but the response to nucleos(t)ide analogs is comparable across different HBV genotypes. In conclusion, HBV genotypes and variants may serve as viral genetic markers to predict disease progression as well as help practicing physicians optimize individualized antiviral therapy in clinical practice. PMID:25934462

  15. Association of human papilloma virus with pterygia and ocular-surface squamous neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Di Girolamo, N

    2012-01-01

    There are more microorganisms that colonize the human body than resident cells; some are commensal whereas others are pathogenic. Pathogenic microorganisms are sensed by the innate or adaptive immune system, an immune response is initiated, and the infection is often cleared. Some microorganisms have developed strategies to evade immune defenses, ensuring their long-term survival with potentially devastating consequences for the host. Approximately 18% of all cancers can be attributed to infective agents; the most common being Helicobacter pylori, Human papilloma virus (HPV) and Hepatitis B and C virus in causing stomach, cervical and liver carcinoma, respectively. This review focuses on whether HPV infection is necessary for initiating pterygia, a common benign condition and ocular-surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN), a rare disease with metastatic potential. The search engine PubMed was used to identify articles from the literature related to HPV and pterygium or conjunctival neoplasia. From 34 investigations that studied HPV in pterygia and OSSN, a prevalence rate of 18.6% (136/731) and 33.8% (144/426), respectively, was recorded. The variation in HPV prevalence (0–100%) for both disease groups may have arisen from study-design faults and the techniques used to identify the virus. Overall, the data suggest that HPV is not necessary for initiating either condition but may be a co-factor in susceptible hosts. Currently, over 60 million people worldwide have been immunized with HPV vaccines, but any effect on pterygium and OSSN development may not be known for some time as these lesions can evolve over decades or occur in older individuals. PMID:22134594

  16. Hepatitis C virus genotypes in Myanmar

    PubMed Central

    Win, Nan Nwe; Kanda, Tatsuo; Nakamoto, Shingo; Yokosuka, Osamu; Shirasawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Myanmar is adjacent to India, Bangladesh, Thailand, Laos and China. In Myanmar, the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is 2%, and HCV infection accounts for 25% of hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, we reviewed the prevalence of HCV genotypes in Myanmar. HCV genotypes 1, 3 and 6 were observed in volunteer blood donors in and around the Myanmar city of Yangon. Although there are several reports of HCV genotype 6 and its variants in Myanmar, the distribution of the HCV genotypes has not been well documented in areas other than Yangon. Previous studies showed that treatment with peginterferon and a weight-based dose of ribavirin for 24 or 48 wk could lead to an 80%-100% sustained virological response (SVR) rates in Myanmar. Current interferon-free treatments could lead to higher SVR rates (90%-95%) in patients infected with almost all HCV genotypes other than HCV genotype 3. In an era of heavy reliance on direct-acting antivirals against HCV, there is an increasing need to measure HCV genotypes, and this need will also increase specifically in Myanmar. Current available information of HCV genotypes were mostly from Yangon and other countries than Myanmar. The prevalence of HCV genotypes in Myanmar should be determined. PMID:27468202

  17. Knowledge of Greek adolescents on human papilloma virus (HPV) and vaccination: A national epidemiologic study.

    PubMed

    Vaidakis, Dennis; Moustaki, Irini; Zervas, Ioannis; Barbouni, Anastasia; Merakou, Kyriaki; Chrysi, Maria S; Creatsa, George; Panoskaltsis, Theodoros

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the sexual behavior, attitudes, beliefs, and knowledge on sexually transmitted infections (STIs) focused on human papilloma virus (HPV) in the Greek adolescent population. The participants were 4547 adolescents, a representative sample for Greek territory with a mean age of 17 years. After written permission from Greek ministry of education each student completed a questionnaire with 36 questions. The fields covered were demographic characteristics, sexual life data, and basic knowledge on HPV. In the present study, 43% and 75% of the participants knew about HPV or cervical cancer, while more than 6 out of 10 did not know the association between the 2. More than 60% of the participants could not answer correctly neither about HPV infection and cervical cancer frequency in sexually active women, nor about protection methods against HPV and cervical cancer. This study shows that the low vaccination coverage of the Greek population may be due to lack of information and awareness of the adolescents and their parents. It is our duty to increase our efforts in order to better educate the population and vaccinate the population as early as possible in their reproductive years.

  18. A review of the use of human papilloma virus (HPV) in cervical screening.

    PubMed

    Crossley, B; Crossley, J

    2017-07-01

    Using key words online databases were searched to identify relevant publications to review the use of Human papilloma virus (HPV) in cervical screening. The mode of cervical screening in the UK has been decided but implementation plans have yet to be announced. The protracted uncertainty surrounding the initial announcement to move to HPV primary screening together with the lack of a national steer has resulted in a flight of staff which threatens the provision of the current and future service. The transition will be a challenging time but analysis of data from more than 176,000 women has shown clear evidence of a reduction in the incidence of cancer where HPV testing is used. There will however, be a population of women who are cytologically negative but high-risk HPV positive and the management of these women will be key to maximising the benefits of HPV primary screening. As cervical cytology becomes increasingly rare its effectiveness and role in cervical screening will come under scrutiny and we must ensure the specificity of reporting is maintained in order for it to survive.

  19. Human Papilloma Virus-Dependent HMGA1 Expression Is a Relevant Step in Cervical Carcinogenesis1

    PubMed Central

    Mellone, Massimiliano; Rinaldi, Christian; Massimi, Isabella; Petroni, Marialaura; Veschi, Veronica; Talora, Claudio; Truffa, Silvia; Stabile, Helena; Frati, Luigi; Screpanti, Isabella; Gulino, Alberto; Giannini, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    HMGA1 is a member of a small family of architectural transcription factors involved in the coordinate assembly of multiprotein complexes referred to as enhanceosomes. In addition to their role in cell proliferation, differentiation, and development, high-mobility group proteins of the A type (HMGA) family members behave as transforming protoncogenes either in vitro or in animal models. Recent reports indicated that HMGA1 might counteract p53 pathway and provided an interesting hint on the mechanisms determining HMGA's transforming potential. HMGA1 expression is deregulated in a very large array of human tumors, including cervical cancer, but very limited information is available on the molecular mechanisms leading to HMGA1 deregulation in cancer cells. Here, we report that HMGA1 expression is sustained by human papilloma virus (HPV) E6/E7 proteins in cervical cancer, as demonstrated by either E6/E7 overexpression or by repression through RNA interference. Knocking down HMGA1 expression by means of RNA interference, we also showed that it is involved in cell proliferation and contributes to p53 inactivation in this type of neoplasia. Finally, we show that HMGA1 is necessary for the full expression of HPV18 E6 and E7 oncoproteins thus establishing a positive autoregulatory loop between HPV E6/E7 and HMGA1 expression. PMID:18670638

  20. The biological significance of methylome differences in human papilloma virus associated head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Worsham, Maria J.; Chen, Kang Mei; Datta, Indrani; Stephen, Josena K.; Chitale, Dhananjay; Gothard, Alexandra; Divine, George

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, studies have suggested that promoter methylation in human papilloma virus (HPV) positive head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has a mechanistic role and has the potential to improve patient survival. The present study aimed to replicate key molecular findings from previous analyses of the methylomes of HPV positive and HPV negative HNSCC in an independent cohort, to assess the reliability of differentially methylated markers in HPV-associated tumors. HPV was measured using real-time quantitative PCR and the biological significance of methylation differences was assessed by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). Using an identical experimental design of a 450K methylation platform, 7 of the 11 genes were detected to be significantly differentially methylated and all 11 genes were either hypo- or hypermethylated, which was in agreement with the results of a previous study. IPA's enriched networks analysis identified one network with msh homeobox 2 (MSX2) as a central node. Locally dense interactions between genes in networks tend to reflect significant biology; therefore MSX2 was selected as an important gene. Sequestration in the top four canonical pathways was noted for 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 1E (serotonin signaling), collapsin response mediator protein 1 (semaphorin signaling) and paired like homeodomain 2 (bone morphogenic protein and transforming growth factor-β signaling). Placement of 9 of the 11 genes in highly ranked pathways and bionetworks identified key biological processes to further emphasize differences between HNSCC HPV positive and negative pathogenesis. PMID:28101231

  1. [Withdrawal of an advertising campaign to promote the quadrivalent human papilloma virus vaccine in Spain].

    PubMed

    Martín-Llaguno, Marta; Alvarez-Dardet, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    The inclusion of the quadrivalent human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine in the schedule of the Spanish National Health System sparked the debate over Gardasil, which was presented to the public as a "vaccine against cervical cancer". In this context, Sanofi Pasteur MSD was sued for misleading advertising in the campaign "cuentaselo.org". Although the complaint was not admitted, the lawsuit triggered five changes in the ownership of the web domain which, although backed by scientific societies, was not supported by law. Because of the violation of the Law of the Society of Information Services, and prompted by the suspicion that the pharmaceutical company was behind these changes (as it could not advertise the product), the platform for the moratorium on the HPV vaccine filed a complaint against the Spanish Society of Gynecology and Obstetrics (whose logo appeared on the webpage) for breaching the code of advertising self-regulation. Sanofi Pasteur MSD, the advertiser which was not mentioned, "accepted the complaint and removed the webpage", thus corroborating its involvement. Copyright 2009 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Oropharyngeal cancer - is it time to change management according to human papilloma virus status?

    PubMed

    Mehanna, Hisham; Olaleye, Oladejo; Licitra, Lisa

    2012-04-01

    There is currently strong evidence supporting human papilloma virus (HPV) causation in a distinct disease entity of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC), with an increasing incidence worldwide.This review aims to critically analyse whether a change in our management approaches to HPV-positive OPC is now required for this increasingly significant public health concern. HPV-positive OPC appears to have increased worldwide. HPV status has a strong prognostic effect, and, in combination with smoking status, primary, and nodal stage, is useful in the risk stratification of OPC. HPV-positive OPC responds better to chemoradiotherapy, surgery, and postoperative chemoradiotherapy than HPV-negative tumours, with improved survival outcomes. There remain concerns regarding the efficacy of HPV detection assays in clinical practice. HPV-negative head and neck cancer still accounts for the largest subset of patients that we treat and carries poor survival outcomes. It is currently not advisable to change management for either HPV-positive or HPV-negative OPC as there is a lack of high-quality evidence to support this. High-quality randomized controlled trials are required to assess the efficacy of the different treatment modalities currently available for both HPV-positive and HPV-negative OPC.

  3. Esophageal verrucous carcinoma arising from hyperkeratotic plaques associated with human papilloma virus type 51.

    PubMed

    Tonna, J; Palefsky, J M; Rabban, J; Campos, G M; Theodore, P; Ladabaum, U

    2010-07-01

    Esophageal verrucous carcinoma is a rare variant of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. We report a case of esophageal verrucous carcinoma associated with human papilloma virus (HPV) type 51. The patient had long-standing dysphagia and odynophagia, and white esophageal plaques showing hyperkeratosis on biopsy. At repeat endoscopy, the esophagus was covered with verrucous white plaques and areas of nodular mucosa with white fronds, with a distal 10-cm smooth mass protruding into the lumen. Biopsies demonstrated an atypical squamoproliferative lesion but no frank malignancy. HPV type 51 DNA was detected in endoscopic biopsy specimens by polymerase chain reaction. Because the size of the lesion favored an underlying verrucous carcinoma, our patient underwent minimally invasive esophagectomy with gastric pull-up and cervical anastomosis. The pathologic diagnosis was a well-differentiated esophageal verrucous carcinoma. One year after esophagectomy, the patient feels well and is free of disease. Although HPV DNA was not detected in the cancer tissue obtained at surgery, our case suggests an association between HPV type 51 and esophageal verrucous carcinoma. The clinical evolution in this case highlights the importance of endoscopic surveillance in patients with exuberant esophageal hyperkeratosis, and of definitive surgical resection when malignancy is suspected even if frank malignancy is not demonstrated on superficial biopsies.

  4. Current and future techniques for human papilloma virus (HPV) testing in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Qureishi, Ali; Mawby, Thomas; Fraser, Lisa; Shah, Ketan A; Møller, Henrik; Winter, Stuart

    2017-03-11

    Despite a reduction in smoking and alcohol consumption, the incidence of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is rising. This is attributed to human papilloma virus (HPV) infection and screening for HPV is now recommended in all cases of OPSCC. Despite a variety of clinically available tests and new non-invasive test strategies there is no consensus on which technique is best. This review reports on current techniques for HPV detection in OPSCC and the clinical applicability of emerging techniques. Literature searches of Medline, Embase and clinicaltrials.gov using the search terms 'head and neck neoplasms', 'squamous cell carcinoma' and 'HPV testing' were performed. 45 studies were identified and included. p16 immunohistochemistry (IHC), HPV DNA in situ hybridization (ISH) and HPV polymerase chain reaction (PCR) are the commonest tests to determine HPV status. p16 IHC and HPV DNA PCR are highly sensitive whilst HPV DNA ISH is more specific, these techniques conventionally utilize surgical biopsies. New tests using PCR to screen fine needle aspirates, saliva, brush cytology and serum for HPV are promising but have variable sensitivity and specificity. These non-invasive samples avoid the morbidity of surgical biopsies and need for tissue blocks; their clinical role in screening and surveillance remains largely untested. Further work is needed to validate these tests and define their role.

  5. Human papilloma virus DNAs immortalize normal human mammary epithelial cells and reduce their growth factor requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Band, V.; Zajchowski, D.; Kulesa, V.; Sager, R. )

    1990-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) types 16 and 18 are most commonly associated with cervical carcinoma in patients and induce immortalization of human keratinocytes in culture. HPV has not been associated with breast cancer. This report describes the immortalization of normal human mammary epithelial cells (76N) by plasmid pHPV18 or pHPV16, each containing the linearized viral genome. Transfectants were grown continuously for more than 60 passages, whereas 76N cells senesce after 18-20 passages. The transfectants also differ from 76N cells in cloning in a completely defined medium called D2 and growing a minimally supplemented defined medium (D3) containing epidermal growth factor. All transfectant tested contain integrated HPV DNA, express HPV RNA, and produce HPV E7 protein. HPV transfectants do not form tumors in a nude mouse assay. It is concluded that products of the HPV genome induce immortalization of human breast epithelial cells and reduce their growth factor requirements. This result raises the possibility that HPV might be involved in breast cancer. Furthermore, other tissue-specific primary epithelial cells that are presently difficult to grown and investigate may also be immortalized by HPV.

  6. Expectation prior to human papilloma virus vaccination: 11 to 12-Year-old girls' written narratives.

    PubMed

    Forsner, M; Nilsson, S; Finnström, B; Mörelius, E

    2016-09-01

    Expectations prior to needle-related procedures can influence individuals' decision making and compliance with immunization programmes. To protect from human papilloma virus (HPV) and cervical cancer, the immunization needs to be given before sexual debut raising interest for this study's aim to investigate how 11 to 12-year-old girls narrate about their expectations prior to HPV vaccination. A total of 27 girls aged 11 to 12 years participated in this qualitative narrative study by writing short narratives describing their expectations. The requirement for inclusion was to have accepted HPV vaccination. Data were subjected to qualitative content analysis. Findings showed the following expectations: going to hurt, going to be scared and going to turn out fine. The expectations were based on the girls' previous experiences, knowledge and self-image. The latent content revealed that the girls tried to transform uneasiness to confidence. The conclusion drawn from this study is that most girls of this age seem confident about their ability to cope with possible unpleasantness related to vaccinations. However, nurses need to find strategies to help those children who feel uneasy about needle-related procedures. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Human papilloma virus-dependent HMGA1 expression is a relevant step in cervical carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mellone, Massimiliano; Rinaldi, Christian; Massimi, Isabella; Petroni, Marialaura; Veschi, Veronica; Talora, Claudio; Truffa, Silvia; Stabile, Helena; Frati, Luigi; Screpanti, Isabella; Gulino, Alberto; Giannini, Giuseppe

    2008-08-01

    HMGA1 is a member of a small family of architectural transcription factors involved in the coordinate assembly of multiprotein complexes referred to as enhanceosomes. In addition to their role in cell proliferation, differentiation, and development, high-mobility group proteins of the A type (HMGA) family members behave as transforming protoncogenes either in vitro or in animal models. Recent reports indicated that HMGA1 might counteract p53 pathway and provided an interesting hint on the mechanisms determining HMGA's transforming potential. HMGA1 expression is deregulated in a very large array of human tumors, including cervical cancer, but very limited information is available on the molecular mechanisms leading to HMGA1 deregulation in cancer cells. Here, we report that HMGA1 expression is sustained by human papilloma virus (HPV) E6/E7 proteins in cervical cancer, as demonstrated by either E6/E7 overexpression or by repression through RNA interference. Knocking down HMGA1 expression by means of RNA interference, we also showed that it is involved in cell proliferation and contributes to p53 inactivation in this type of neoplasia. Finally, we show that HMGA1 is necessary for the full expression of HPV18 E6 and E7 oncoproteins thus establishing a positive autoregulatory loop between HPV E6/E7 and HMGA1 expression.

  8. Human Papilloma Virus Infection in Patients with Male Accessory Gland Infection: Usefulness of the Ultrasound Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Condorelli, Rosita A.; Vicari, Enzo; Mongioi, Laura M.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the ultrasound (US) features of 20 patients with MAGI and concomitant papilloma virus (HPV) infection compared to 20 patients with microbial (presence of Chlamydia trachomatis alone) MAGI and 20 patients with amicrobial (inflammatory) MAGI. Patients with HPV infection showed significantly (p < 0.05) higher total prostate, seminal vesicles, and epididymal US signs (18.0 ± 2.0) compared to the other 2 groups (12.0 ± 4.0 versus 10.0 ± 3.0, resp.). In addition, patients with MAGI and HPV had a higher prevalence of complicated forms of MAGI [prostatovesiculitis (PV) and prostate-vesiculo-epididymitis (PVE)] and a higher frequency of the fibrosclerotic variant compared to the other groups (70.0 ± 10.0% versus 48.0 ± 5.0% versus 15.0 ± 10.0%). Moreover, HPV infected patients had a higher number of US criteria suggestive for MAGI in the periurethral region of the prostate compared to the other groups. In particular, the patients showed a higher ratio between periurethral and lobar US criteria distribution (5.0 versus 0.5). Finally, the seminal fluid concentration of CD45pos leukocytes (2.0 ± 0.2 versus 1.3 ± 0.3 versus 1.0 ± 0.3 mil/mL) was significantly higher and sperm progressive motility was significantly lower in these patients compared to other groups. PMID:27242899

  9. Human Papilloma Virus Infection in Patients with Male Accessory Gland Infection: Usefulness of the Ultrasound Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Condorelli, Rosita A; Vicari, Enzo; Mongioi, Laura M; Russo, Giorgio I; Morgia, Giuseppe; La Vignera, Sandro; Calogero, Aldo E

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the ultrasound (US) features of 20 patients with MAGI and concomitant papilloma virus (HPV) infection compared to 20 patients with microbial (presence of Chlamydia trachomatis alone) MAGI and 20 patients with amicrobial (inflammatory) MAGI. Patients with HPV infection showed significantly (p < 0.05) higher total prostate, seminal vesicles, and epididymal US signs (18.0 ± 2.0) compared to the other 2 groups (12.0 ± 4.0 versus 10.0 ± 3.0, resp.). In addition, patients with MAGI and HPV had a higher prevalence of complicated forms of MAGI [prostatovesiculitis (PV) and prostate-vesiculo-epididymitis (PVE)] and a higher frequency of the fibrosclerotic variant compared to the other groups (70.0 ± 10.0% versus 48.0 ± 5.0% versus 15.0 ± 10.0%). Moreover, HPV infected patients had a higher number of US criteria suggestive for MAGI in the periurethral region of the prostate compared to the other groups. In particular, the patients showed a higher ratio between periurethral and lobar US criteria distribution (5.0 versus 0.5). Finally, the seminal fluid concentration of CD45pos leukocytes (2.0 ± 0.2 versus 1.3 ± 0.3 versus 1.0 ± 0.3 mil/mL) was significantly higher and sperm progressive motility was significantly lower in these patients compared to other groups.

  10. The Prevalence of Human Papilloma Virus in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Noori, Sadat; Monabati, Ahmad; Ghaderi, Abbasali

    2012-01-01

    Background: Carcinomas of esophagus, mostly squamous cell carcinomas, occur throughout the world. There are a number of suspected genetic or environmental etiologies. Human papilloma virus (HPV) is said to be a major etiology in areas with high incidence of esophageal carcinoma, while it is hardly detectable in low incidence regions. This study was designed to evaluate the prevalence of HPV in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cases diagnosed in Pathology Department, Medical School, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: DNA material for PCR amplification of HPV genome was extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue blocks of 92 cases of ESCC, diagnosed during 20 years from 1982 to 2002. Polymerase chain reaction was performed for amplification and detection of common HPV and type specific HPV-16 and HPV-18 genomic sequences in the presence of positive control (HPV-18 and HPV positive biopsies of uterine exocervix) and additional internal controls i.e. beta-globin and cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA4). Result: Good amplification of positive control and internal controls was observed. However, no amplification of HPV genome was observed. Conclusion: There is no association between HPV infection and the development of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in the cases evaluated. PMID:23115442

  11. Knowledge of Greek adolescents on human papilloma virus (HPV) and vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Vaidakis, Dennis; Moustaki, Irini; Zervas, Ioannis; Barbouni, Anastasia; Merakou, Kyriaki; Chrysi, Maria S.; Creatsa, George; Panoskaltsis, Theodoros

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the present study was to identify the sexual behavior, attitudes, beliefs, and knowledge on sexually transmitted infections (STIs) focused on human papilloma virus (HPV) in the Greek adolescent population. The participants were 4547 adolescents, a representative sample for Greek territory with a mean age of 17 years. After written permission from Greek ministry of education each student completed a questionnaire with 36 questions. The fields covered were demographic characteristics, sexual life data, and basic knowledge on HPV. In the present study, 43% and 75% of the participants knew about HPV or cervical cancer, while more than 6 out of 10 did not know the association between the 2. More than 60% of the participants could not answer correctly neither about HPV infection and cervical cancer frequency in sexually active women, nor about protection methods against HPV and cervical cancer. This study shows that the low vaccination coverage of the Greek population may be due to lack of information and awareness of the adolescents and their parents. It is our duty to increase our efforts in order to better educate the population and vaccinate the population as early as possible in their reproductive years. PMID:28072683

  12. [Study on the feasibility of human papilloma virus subtypes detection by automatic nucleic acid extraction workstation].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Ye, Ali; Dou, Yaling; Gan, Yong; Kong, Lingjun; Chen, Yu; Xu, Yingchun

    2015-12-08

    To verify the feasibility of human papilloma virus(HPV) subtypes detection by AUTRAX automatic nucleic acid extraction workstation. A total of 183 HPV test samples (2 562 types) were collected during August 2014 in Peking Union Medical College Hospital. Nucleic acid determination kit of high-risk HPV types (16, 18, 35, 39, 58, 31, 33, 68, 56, 45, 59, 51, 52) and 6 , 11 type (real-time PCR) were applied for detection. Each sample was divided into two parts. One part was treated with manual extraction, which entailed manually preparing PCR reaction system and added the sample to the PCR plate. Another was treated with the AUTRAX automatic nucleic acid extraction workstation, which automatically prepared the reaction system and added to the PCR board. These two parts proceeded to the real-time PCR detection. The result of manual extraction was set as the golden standard and the Kappa consistency analysis was conducted. Meanwhile, precision and pollution prevention of the AUTRAX were verified. The sensitivity of AUTRAX automatic nucleic acids extraction workstation was 97.12% (101/104). The specificity was 99.51% (2 446/2 458). The accuracy was 99.42% (2 547/2 562). The result of Kappa consistency analysis showed that the two parts were the same (Kappa=0.926). Coefficient of variation (CV) of each HPV types was less than 5%.No pollution phenomenon was found. AUTRAX automatic nucleic acids extraction workstation can be used for the HPV subtypes detection in clinical settings.

  13. Genetic Mutation and Exosome Signature of Human Papilloma Virus Associated Oropharyngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Anbarasu; Hertweck, Kate L.; Philley, Julie V.; Wells, Robert B.; Dasgupta, Santanu

    2017-01-01

    Human papilloma virus-16 (HPV-16) associated oropharyngeal cancer (HPVOPC) is increasing alarmingly in the United States. We performed whole genome sequencing of a 44 year old, male HPVOPC subject diagnosed with moderately differentiated tonsillar carcinoma. We identified new somatic mutation in MUC16 (A.k.a. CA-125), MUC12, MUC4, MUC6, MUC2, SIRPA, HLA-DRB1, HLA-A and HLA-B molecules. Increased protein expression of MUC16, SIRPA and decreased expression of HLA-DRB1 was further demonstrated in this HPVOPC subject and an additional set of 15 HPVOPC cases. Copy number gain (3 copies) was also observed for MUC2, MUC4, MUC6 and SIRPA. Enhanced expression of MUC16, SIRPA and HPV-16-E7 protein was detectable in the circulating exosomes of numerous HPVOPC subjects. Treatment of non-tumorigenic mammary epithelial cells with exosomes derived from aggressive HPVOPC cells harboring MUC16, SIRPA and HPV-16-E7 proteins augmented invasion and induced epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) accompanied by an increased expression ratio of the EMT markers Vimentin/E-cadherin. Exosome based screening of key HPVOPC associated molecules could be beneficial for early cancer diagnosis, monitoring and surveillance. PMID:28383029

  14. [QUANTITATIVE DNA EVALUATION OF THE HIGH CARCINOGENIC RISK OF HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUSES AND HUMAN HERPES VIRUSES IN MALES WITH FERTILITY DISORDERS].

    PubMed

    Evdokimov, V V; Naumenko, V A; Tulenev, Yu A; Kurilo, L F; Kovalyk, V P; Sorokina, T M; Lebedeva, A L; Gomberg, M A; Kushch, A A

    2016-01-01

    Infertility is an actual medical and social problem. In 50% of couples it is associated with the male factor and in more than 50% of cases the etiology of the infertility remains insufficiently understood. The goal of this work was to study the prevalence and to perform quantitative analysis of the human herpes viruses (HHV) and high carcinogenic risk papilloma viruses (HR HPV) in males with infertility, as well as to assess the impact of these infections on sperm parameters. Ejaculate samples obtained from 196 males fall into 3 groups. Group 1 included men with the infertility of unknown etiology (n = 112); group 2, patients who had female partners with the history of spontaneous abortion (n = 63); group 3 (control), healthy men (n = 21). HHV and HR HPV DNA in the ejaculates were detected in a total of 42/196 (21.4%) males: in 31 and 11 patients in groups 1 and 2, respectively (p > 0.05) and in none of healthy males. HHV were detected in 24/42; HR HPV, in 18/42 males (p > 0.05) without significant difference between the groups. Among HR HPV genotypes of the clade A9 in ejaculate were more frequent (14/18, p = 0.04). Comparative analysis of the sperm parameters showed that in the ejaculates of the infected patients sperm motility as well as the number of morphologically normal cells were significantly reduced compared with the healthy men. The quantification of the viral DNA revealed that in 31% of the male ejaculates the viral load was high: > 3 Ig10/100000 cells. Conclusion. The detection of HHV and HR HPV in the ejaculate is associated with male infertility. Quantification of the viral DNA in the ejaculate is a useful indicator for monitoring viral infections in infertility and for decision to start therapy.

  15. Intraductal papilloma

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001238.htm Intraductal papilloma To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Intraductal papilloma is a small, noncancerous (benign) tumor that grows ...

  16. Human papilloma viruses and cancer in the post-vaccine era.

    PubMed

    Galani, E; Christodoulou, C

    2009-11-01

    Human papilloma viruses (HPV) are strong human carcinogens, in fact today they are considered as the second most frequent carcinogen. In the middle of the 1970s the hypothesis that cervical cancer may arise from viruses was established and in the 1990s the relationship between HPV and cervical neoplasia was confirmed. HPV infections are the most common sexually transmitted infections. Specific subtypes of human papilomaviruses are now considered as the etiological agents in nearly all cases of cervical cancer and cervical epithelial neoplasia. Approximately 470,000 new cases and 23,000 deaths of cervical cancer occur each year, with the majority taking place in developing countries. Cervical cancer remains among the three leading causes of cancer deaths among women below the age of 45. Human papilomaviruses are classified into two groups: high-risk (oncogenic) types and low risk types. HPV types 16, 18, 45 and 31 are considered to be the most important oncogenic types. Subtypes 16 and 18 are the causative agents of more than 50% of cervical pre-cancerous lesions, and more than 70% of cervical cancer cases. High risk subtypes are also implicated with anal, perianal and oropharyngeal carcinomas. Recently, the prophylactic bivalent HPV 16/18 and the quadrivalent HPV 6/11/16/18/ vaccines have been approved. The development of prophylactic vaccines against human papilomavirus has been hailed as one of the most significant advances of recent years and it is expected to reduce dramatically the mortality of human papilomavirus associated cancers, but has also given rise to some of the most intense scientific debates.

  17. P16(INK 4a) and Ki-67 expression in human papilloma virus-related head and neck mucosal lesions.

    PubMed

    Gültekin, Sibel Elif; Sengüven, Burcu; Klussmann, Jens Peter; Dienes, Hans Peter

    2015-03-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) is postulated as a risk factor in the etiology of some specific mucosal pathologies in the head and neck regions. Despite the frequent use of p16(INK4a) as a surrogate marker for HPV-infection, there is still controversy with respect to its reliability. This study has been undertaken to assess the potential role of p16(INK 4a) and Ki-67 expression in HPV-related lesions. The study was conducted on 71 specimens of oral, tonsillar and laryngeal lesions which comprised 25 dysplasia and 46 papilloma specimens. Specimens were immunohistochemically stained for p16(INK4A) and Ki-67 proteins. HPV DNA was determined by one step multiplex polymerase chain reaction. HPV DNA was detected in 33.8% of all lesions. Tonsil and larynx lesions showed significant differences with oral lesions for HPV positivity (p < 0.001). p16(INK 4a) over-expression was seen in 56.5% of papilloma and 60% of dysplasia specimens. HPV status showed a positive correlation with p16(INK 4a) expression in tonsillar dysplasias (p < 0.001). p16(INK 4a) expression may have a value as a marker in high risk HPV induced dysplasias, but not in low risk infected lesions. The proliferation index is not related to HPV-induced lesions and may be evaluated as an independent marker in head and neck premalignant lesions.

  18. Novel Hepatitis E Virus Genotype in Norway Rats, Germany

    PubMed Central

    Johne, Reimar; Heckel, Gerald; Plenge-Bönig, Anita; Kindler, Eveline; Maresch, Christina; Reetz, Jochen; Schielke, Anika

    2010-01-01

    Human hepatitis E virus infections may be caused by zoonotic transmission of virus genotypes 3 and 4. To determine whether rodents are a reservoir, we analyzed the complete nucleotide sequence of a hepatitis E–like virus from 2 Norway rats in Germany. The sequence suggests a separate genotype for this hepatotropic virus. PMID:20735931

  19. Human papilloma virus infection and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia in transplanted patients.

    PubMed

    Paternoster, D M; Cester, M; Resente, C; Pascoli, I; Nanhorngue, K; Marchini, F; Boccagni, P; Cillo, U; Ribaldone, R; Amoruso, E; Cocca, N; Cuccolo, V; Bertolino, M; Surico, N; Stratta, P

    2008-01-01

    Progress in diagnosis and treatment has led to an increased number of transplantation patients who consequently have immunological depression and emergence of tumors. The incidence of cervical neoplasia, according to previous studies, is 11%; this tumor is the only one that can be investigated by screening before and after a graft. Our purpose was to evaluate whether transplanted patients showed an increased incidence of genital human papilloma virus (HPV) infection and whether this infection produced greater progression of disease in cases of low-risk HPV infections. Our study involved 151 transplant patients who underwent Papanicolaou (Pap) and HPV tests. Patients listed for grafts underwent Pap and HPV tests 6 months before and 6 months after transplantation. All patients had negative Pap tests before their grafts. After their grafts 16 patients (10.59%) had negative Pap tests, but positive viral typing. Eleven patients (7.28%) showed positive Pap tests, 6 of whom had low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (SIL) and 5 patients high-grade SIL. The final HPV infection incidence (15.23%) was consistent with the literature. The incidence of lower female genital tract intraepithelial lesions (7.28%) was higher than the healthy population or analogous studies (4.5%-8.5%). We showed a constant association between high-risk HPV infection and gynecologic intraepithelial neoplasia, whereas there was no association between low-risk broods HPV infection and neoplasia. In conclusion, screening should start at almost 6 months before grafting to avoid an irreversible situation that is difficult to treat.

  20. Basics of tumor development and importance of human papilloma virus (HPV) for head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wittekindt, Claus; Wagner, Steffen; Mayer, Christina Sabine; Klussmann, Jens Peter

    2012-01-01

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas (HNSCC) are the 6th most common cancers worldwide. While incidence rates for cancer of the hypopharynx and larynx are decreasing, a significant increase in cancer of the oropharynx (OSCC) is observed. Classical risk factors for HNSCC are smoking and alcohol. It has been shown for 25 to 60% of OSCC to be associated with an infection by oncogenic human papilloma viruses (HPV). The development of “common” cancer of the head and neck is substantially enhanced by an accumulation of genetic changes, which lead to an inactivation of tumor suppressor genes or activation of proto-oncogenes. A more or less uniform sequence of different DNA-damages leads to genetic instability. In this context, an early and frequent event is deletion on the short arm of chromosome 9, which results in inactivation of the p16-gene. In contrast, for HPV-induced carcinogenesis, expression of the viral proteins E6 and E7 is most important, since they lead to inactivation of the cellular tumor-suppressor-proteins p53 and Rb. The natural route of transoral infection is a matter of debate; peroral HPV-infections might be frequent and disappear uneventfully in most cases. Smoking seems to increase the probability for developing an HPV-associated OSCC. The association of HNSCC with HPV can be proven with established methods in clinical diagnostics. In addition to classical prognostic factors, diagnosis of HPV-association may become important for selection of future therapies. Prognostic relevance of HPV probably surmounts many known risk-factors, for example regional metastasis. Until now, no other molecular markers are established in clinical routine. Future therapy concepts may vary for the two subgroups of patients, particularly patients with HPV-associated OSCC may take advantage of less aggressive treatments. Finally, an outlook will be given on possible targeted therapies. PMID:23320061

  1. Streptococci-human papilloma virus interaction with ethanol exposure leads to keratinocyte damage.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Joel; Pavlova, Sylvia; Kolokythas, Antonia; Lugakingira, Mulokozi; Tao, Lin; Miloro, Michael

    2012-08-01

    Ethanol, human papilloma virus (HPV), and poor oral hygiene are risk factors that have been attributed to oral carcinogenesis. Streptococci sp and HPV infections are common in the head and neck, often associated with sexual activity. Although HPV is linked to head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, it is unclear whether there is a similar role for Streptococci sp. This cell study examines whether Streptococci sp and HPV-16 with exposure to ethyl alcohol (ETOH) can act as cofactors in the malignant transformation of oral keratinocytes. ETOH (0.1%-20% vol/vol) was used to investigate Streptococci sp attachment with immortalized E6-expressing HPV/HOK-16B cells, human oral buccal keratinocytes, and foreskin keratinocytes. Streptococci sp (Streptococci mutans [LT11]) and various strains of acetaldehyde (AA) producer and nonproducer Streptococcus salivarius (110-1, 109-2, 101-7, and 107-1) and a lactic acid producer bacterium, Lactobacillus rhamnosus (24-1 and 25-2), were examined for interactions with keratinocytes by use of a green dye (percent of cells with colonies after 24 hours). Carcinogens, AA, malondialdehyde, DNA damage, and proliferation (5'-bromo-2-deoxyuridine) among keratinocytes were also quantified. AA and malondialdehyde production from permissible Streptococci sp significantly increased with attachment to keratinocytes, whereas L rhamnosus did not significantly attach to keratinocytes. This attachment was associated with enhanced levels of AA adduct formation, proliferation (5'-bromo-2-deoxyuridine incorporation), and enhanced migration through integrin-coated basement membrane by HPV oral keratinocytes, which are characteristics of a malignant phenotype. These cell studies suggest that oral Streptococci sp and HPV (HPV-16) cooperate to transform oral keratinocytes after low-level ETOH (1%) exposure. These results appear to suggest a significant clinical interaction, but further validation is warranted. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Oral and

  2. A Small Molecule Inhibitor Selectively Induces Apoptosis in Cells Transformed by High Risk Human Papilloma Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min S.; Qi, Huilin; Chaniewski, Susan; Zheng, Xiaofan; Farr, Glen A.; Esposito, Kim; Harden, David; Lei, Ming; Schweizer, Liang; Friborg, Jacques; Agler, Michele; McPhee, Fiona; Gentles, Robert; Beno, Brett R.; Chupak, Lou; Mason, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    A phenotypic high-throughput cell culture screen was performed to identify compounds that prevented proliferation of the human Papilloma virus type 16 (HPV-16) transformed cell line Ca Ski. A series of quinoxaline compounds exemplified by Compound 1 was identified. Testing against a panel of cell lines demonstrated that Compound 1 selectively inhibited replication of all HPV-16, HPV-18, and HPV-31 transformed cell lines tested with 50% Inhibitory Concentration (IC50) values of 2 to 8 μM relative to IC50 values of 28 to 73 μM in HPV-negative cell lines. Treatment with Compound 1 resulted in a cascade of multiple apoptotic events, including selective activation of effector caspases 3 and 7, fragmentation of cellular DNA, and PARP (poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase) cleavage in HPV-positive cells relative to HPV-negative cells. Unregulated proliferation of HPV transformed cells is dependent on the viral oncogenes, E6 and E7. Treatment with Compound 1 resulted in a decrease in HPV E7 protein in Ca Ski cells. However, the timing of this reduction relative to other effects of compound treatment suggests that this was a consequence, rather than a cause, of the apoptotic cascade. Likewise, compound treatment resulted in no obvious effects on the E6- and E7- mediated down regulation of p53 and Rb, or their downstream effectors, p21 or PCNA. Further investigation of apoptotic signals induced by Compound 1 revealed cleavage of Caspase-8 in HPV-positive cells as early as 2 hours post-treatment, suggesting the compound initiates apoptosis through the extrinsic, death receptor-mediated, pathway of cell death. These studies provide proof of concept that cells transformed by oncogenic Papillomaviruses can be selectively induced to undergo apoptosis by compound treatment. PMID:27280728

  3. Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the endometrium unrelated to human papilloma virus: a molecular study.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Giovanna; Pizzi, Silvia; Azzoni, Cinzia; Bottarelli, Lorena; D'Adda, Tiziana

    2013-07-01

    In this paper we report a molecular study of a case of Primary Endometrial Squamous Carcinoma (PESC), in which a Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) infection had been previously excluded by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). The studies performed in an effort to explain the carcinogenesis included immunohistochemical over-expression of p53 and p16 proteins as previously observed in our own papers, plus microsatellite analysis of D10S1765 at 10q23.3 (PTEN) and TP53 at 17p13.1 (P53) as well as the methylation status of the of BRCA1 and p16 promoters using specific PCRs. In this rare malignancy, we found allelic imbalance (AI) at 17p13.1 (P53). Instead, AI at D10S1765 (PTEN) gene was absent. The genetic alteration of p53, with hyper-expression of p53 protein and an absence of abnormalities in the PTEN gene are consistent with the similarities between Uterine Serous Carcinoma (USC) and our case of PESC. The aberrant methylation of both p16 and BCAR1 promoters was not detected in our case. This finding too could imply that ESC is more similar to Uterine Serous Carcinoma than Uterine Endometrioid Carcinoma (UEC). Moreover, the lack of aberrant methylation of p16, which is in accordance with over-expression of p16 immunoreactivity, in the absence of HPV infection may be related to other unknown genetic alterations. In our opinion, it is hard to reach any definite conclusion concerning the carcinogenesis of PESC, because of its rarity and the very few molecular studies reported in the literature. Further studies with more numerous cases and larger molecular analyses are mandatory for this malignancy, to confirm whether it is more closely related to papillary endometrial cancer than to endometrioid carcinoma.

  4. Dendritic cell subsets and immunological milieu in inflammatory human papilloma virus-related skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Yumi; Asagoe, Kenji; Yamauchi, Akiko; Yamamoto, Takenobu; Shirafuji, Yoshinori; Morizane, Shin; Nakanishi, Gen; Iwatsuki, Keiji

    2011-09-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV)-related warts persist, evading host immune surveillance, but sometimes disappear with inflammation. To elucidate the immune evasion mechanisms of HPV, we have examined the density, dynamics, and subsets of dendritic cell (DC) types in non-inflammatory or inflammatory HPV-related skin lesions such as warts and Bowen's disease (HPV-Bowen), and compared the epidermal expression levels of macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-3α and E-cadherin. The expression of various DC markers, MIP-3α, and E-cadherin in the tissue samples obtained from patients with warts, HPV-Bowen and HPV-unrelated skin diseases was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. MIP-3α gene expression levels were examined in warts and HPV-Bowen by in situ hybridization (ISH) and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). The numbers of Langerhans cells (LCs) and the expression levels of MIP-3α and E-cadherin were decreased in non-inflammatory warts and HPV-Bowen, as compared with normal skin. Both epidermal LCs and MIP-3α expression reappeared in inflammatory warts, associated with dermal infiltrates composed of many cytotoxic T cells and various subsets of DCs, while cellular infiltrates in HPV-Bowen contained many B cells and plasma cells with sparse infiltration of DCs. The upregulation of MIP-3α gene expression was confirmed in the inflammatory warts and HPV-Bowen by ISH and RT-qPCR. The depletion of LCs in the non-inflammatory warts and HPV-Bowen is associated with a down-regulation of expression levels of MIP-3α and E-cadherin in the lesional keratinocytes. MIP-3α expression is upregulated in lesional keratinocytes of inflammatory warts, with the subsequent recruitment of various DC subsets and cytotoxic T cells, whereas plasma cell-rich infiltration was induced in HPV-Bowen. Copyright © 2011 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [Genotyping and molecular marking of bacteria and viruses in epidemiological surveillance of actual infections].

    PubMed

    Zhebrun, A B; Mukomolov, S L; Narvskaia, O V

    2011-01-01

    Determination of genetic and molecular features of pathogens circulating in Russia, in the northwest of the country and in St. Petersburg to resolve the problems of spread of diseases caused by these pathogens. Complete and limited gene sequencing, DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, spoligotyping, VNTR-typing, resistotyping and other methods were used. Data on population structure and dominant genotypes of tuberculosis mycobacteria, corynebacteria, helicobacteria, hepatitis A, B, C, human papilloma viruses circulating in Russia, in the northwest of the country and in St. Petersburg were obtained. Genetic divergence of rubella virus and poliovirus vaccine strains under mass vaccination conditions was detected. Evidence of higher effectiveness of pathogen genotyping methods in epidemiologic diagnostics compared with traditional epidemiological investigation was obtained. Microorganism genotyping methods were helpful in resolving strategic problems of contemporary epidemiology. Perspectives of further development of these methods are related to obtaining data on circulating genotypes in all regions of the world, establishment of complete databases on circulating genotypes and integration of this methodology into daily diagnostics and epidemiological surveillance.

  6. Human papilloma virus dermatosis in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients: A 14-year retrospective study in 965 patients.

    PubMed

    Nuno-Gonzalez, Almudena; Losa Garcia, Juan Emilio; López Estebaranz, José Luis; Martin-Rios, María Dolores

    2017-05-10

    The incidence of the human papilloma virus (HPV) has not dropped in HIV-positive patients despite the discovery of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Our goal is to assess the prevalence of HPV in HIV patients and its relationship with the epidemiological and virological characteristics of HIV patients. Retrospective cohort of 965 patients diagnosed with HIV from 1998 to 2012. We analyzed patients' demographic factors and factors related to the HPV. Of the 965 patients examined, 333 consulted a dermatologist. Of these, 52 patients had genital warts (15.6%), 43 had common warts (12.9%) and 8% had both conditions. In total, 28.5% of patients had a skin lesion caused by HPV. This is the first longitudinal observational study carried out on HIV-positive patients in the era of ART in which HPV infection is the most common skin pathology. We observed a similar trend in countries with access to ART. This study spreads awareness on the importance of preventing HPV and the difficulty of treating it in HIV-positive patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. [Economic effectiveness of vaccination against papilloma virus in the Russian Federation].

    PubMed

    Kostinov, M P; Zverev, V V

    2012-01-01

    Perform pharmacoeconomic analysis of effectiveness of implementation of program of pre-exposition vaccination against HPV-associated diseases in the Russian Federation. Pharmacoeconomic analysis consisted of comparison of vaccination costs and assumed benefits of prevented losses from HPV-associated diseases from the society perspective as a whole under the condition of cohort vaccination of girls aged 12 years. A population model executed in MS Excel that allows to perform calculations and obtain results when initial data are changed was adapted for the analysis. The number of prevented HPV-associated diseases was determined by multiplying the number of disease cases observed per year and the effectiveness of the vaccine against each type of the disease. The resulting number of prevented cases was then multiplied by the cost of every HPV-associated condition, and as a result the benefit of vaccine use against human papilloma virus was determined. The cervical cancer (CC) morbidity parameter in the Russian Federation is 13 807. By method of simple proportional extrapolation based on the European data, a calculation of morbidity in the Russian Federation was performed: atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS)--1 454 015; low grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN 1)--660 207; high grade CIN2, CIN3--142 153. Vaccine effectiveness against CIN1, CIN2, CIN3 and CC would presumably be 45.9%, 65.1%, 85.7%, respectively. Vaccine effectiveness against these diseases caused by HPV type 16 and 18 would be 98%, and HPV type 31, 33, 45, 52, 58, 35, 39, 51, 56, 59 cumulatively--47.7%. The cost of HPV-associated diseases (per case) was 8200 RUR (Russian ruble) for ASCUS, 25 200 RUR for CIN1, 60 020 RUR for CIN2 and CIN3, average weighted cost of CC--188 772 RUR. The number of prevented cases of ASCUS, CIN1, CIN2, CIN3 and CC when vaccine was used was 322 791, 303 050, 92 496 and 11 827, respectively. The cost of vaccination of 1 cohort was 3.4 milliards

  8. [Health economic evaluation of bivalent human papilloma virus vaccine in China: based on the dynamic model].

    PubMed

    Song, X B; Zhao, Q J; Zhou, Z; Fang, Y

    2017-09-06

    Objective: This study aims to evaluate the prevention effect and cost-effectiveness of a prophylactic bivalent human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine. Methods: A multiple health status dynamic model was developed, including natural history of diseases and prevention strategies. We built 19 prevention strategies including visual inspection with acetic acid/lugol's iodine (VIA/VILI) and/or 3 does prophylactic bivalent HPV vaccine administered to adolescent girls at the age of 15 years old every year under the assumption that vaccine coverage and screening coverage were 70%. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER), optimal price of 3 does vaccine and cost-effectiveness frontier of these strategies were analyzed compared with no-intervention. The ICER threshold is 152 087 CNY. Results: Compared with no-intervention, Routine vaccination reduced the incidence of cervical cancer by 69.5%, superior to 5 strategies including VIA/VILI screening only. The range of effect was between 9.0% and 69.2%, and the effect of strategy increased significantly with the increase of screening frequency. Combination vaccination with screening at ages of 35 reduced the incidence of cervical cancer by 72.0%, and the effect increased with the increase of screening frequency. Combination vaccination with screening every 3 years between (35-64) years old reduced the incidence by 89.4%. Compared with no-intervention, the ICER of combination vaccination with screening twice between 35 years and 64 years was 121 292 CNY/life-year, which was cost-effective. The price of vaccine had a significant impact on the ICER of the strategy; when the vaccine price was less than 600 CNY, only routine vaccination or supplementary vaccination between 16-39 years old after routine vaccination was cost-effective; when the vaccine price was less than 1 200 CNY, supplementary vaccination between 16-19 years old plus VIA/VILI was cost-effective. Conclusion: Ther prevention strategy was cost-effective, which could

  9. Beta-Catenin Accelerates Human Papilloma Virus Type-16 Mediated Cervical Carcinogenesis in Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bulut, Gülay; Fallen, Shannon; Beauchamp, Elspeth M.; Drebing, Lauren E.; Sun, Junfeng; Berry, Deborah L.; Kallakury, Bhaskar; Crum, Christopher P.; Toretsky, Jeffrey A.; Schlegel, Richard; Üren, Aykut

    2011-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) is the principal etiological agent of cervical cancer in women, and its DNA is present in virtually all of these tumors. However, exposure to the high-risk HPV types alone is insufficient for tumor development. Identifying specific collaborating factors that will lead to cervical cancer remains an unanswered question, especially because millions of women are exposed to HPV. Our earlier work using an in vitro model indicated that activation of the canonical Wnt pathway in HPV-positive epithelial cells was sufficient to induce anchorage independent growth. We therefore hypothesized that constitutive activation of this pathway might function as the “second hit.” To address this possibility, we developed two double-transgenic (DT) mouse models, K14-E7/ΔN87βcat and K14-HPV16/ΔN87βcat that express either the proteins encoded by the E7 oncogene or the HPV16 early region along with constitutively active β-catenin, which was expressed by linking it to the keratin-14 (K14) promoter. We initiated tumor formation by treating all groups with estrogen for six months. Invasive cervical cancer was observed in 11% of the K14-ΔN87βcat mice, expressing activated β-catenin and in 50% of the animals expressing the HPV16 E7 oncogene. In double-transgenic mice, coexpression of β-catenin and HPV16 E7 induced invasive cervical cancer at about 7 months in 94% of the cases. We did not observe cervical cancer in any group unless the mice were treated with estrogen. In the second model, K14-HPV16 mice suffered cervical dysplasias, but this phenotype was not augmented in HPV16/ΔN87βcat mice. In summary, the phenotypes of the K14-E7/ΔN87βcat mice support the hypothesis that activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in HPV-associated premalignant lesions plays a functional role in accelerating cervical carcinogenesis. PMID:22087269

  10. Schneiderian papilloma of the temporal bone.

    PubMed

    van der Putten, Lisa; Bloemena, Elisabeth; Merkus, Paul; Hensen, Erik F

    2013-12-05

    Temporal bone Schneiderian papilloma may present as a primary tumour originating from the middle ear and mastoid process, or an extension from sinonasal disease. Both forms are rare, this being only the 18th case of primary temporal bone Schneiderian papilloma described to date. Although the current patient has remained disease free after excision of the papilloma, the reported recurrence rate is high, comparable to sinonasal Schneiderian papilloma with extrasinus extension. Malignant progression of primary Schneiderian papillomas is significantly reduced as compared to Schneiderian papillomas that extend from the sinonasal tract into the temporal bone. A positive human papilloma virus status, as found in this case, is a common feature and prognostic factor of sinonasal Schneiderian papilloma but an infrequent finding in temporal bone disease. Owing to the high recurrence rate, the risk of malignant progression and the absence of reliable prognostic markers, stringent follow-up consisting of otoscopy, nasendoscopy and imaging is essential.

  11. Defective or effective? Mutualistic interactions between virus genotypes.

    PubMed Central

    López-Ferber, Miguel; Simón, Oihane; Williams, Trevor; Caballero, Primitivo

    2003-01-01

    Defective viruses lack genes essential for survival but they can co-infect with complete virus genotypes and use gene products from the complete genotype for their replication and transmission. As such, they are detrimental to the fitness of complete genotypes. Here, we describe a mutualistic interaction between genotypes of an insect baculovirus (nucleopolyhedrovirus of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera)) that increases the pathogenicity of the viral population. Mixtures of a complete genotype able to be transmitted orally and a deletion mutant unable to be transmitted orally resulted in a phenotype of increased pathogenicity. Because the infectiousness of mixed genotype infections was greater than that of single genotype infections, we predict that the transmissibility of mixed genotype occlusion bodies will be greater than that of any of their single genotype components. Such interactions will be subject to frequency-dependent selection and will influence the impact of these viruses on insect population dynamics and their efficacy as biological insecticides. PMID:14613611

  12. Reversal of papilloma growth in rabbits therapeutically vaccinated against E6 with naked DNA and/or vesicular stomatitis virus vectors

    PubMed Central

    Brandsma, Janet L.; Shlyankevich, Mark; Su, Yuhua; Zelterman, Daniel; Rose, John K.; Buonocore, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Persistent infection with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) is the greatest risk factor for the development of HPV-associated cancers. In this study rabbits bearing persistent and potentially malignant papillomas were used to test the efficacy of vaccination with a recombinant DNA and/or vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) targeting the cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV) E6 protein. Immune responses were primed with either vector and boosted twice with the homologous or heterologous E6 vector. Over the course of 18 weeks, E6 vaccination reduced papilloma volumes to one third the volume in the controls, and the rabbits boosted with an heterologous vector tended to mount stronger responses. Small and medium-sized papillomas responded significantly but only slightly better than large papillomas. Finally the initial papilloma burden per rabbit, ranging from <100 mm3 to >1000 mm3, was not prognostic of antitumor efficacy. In summary both E6 vaccines elicited significant therapeutic immunity, and their sequential use tended to be advantageous. PMID:19615481

  13. Incidence of human papilloma virus in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in patients from the Lublin region.

    PubMed

    Dąbrowski, Andrzej; Kwaśniewski, Wojciech; Skoczylas, Tomasz; Bednarek, Wiesława; Kuźma, Dorota; Goździcka-Józefiak, Anna

    2012-10-28

    To assess the prevalence of human papilloma virus (HPV) in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) in the south-eastern region of Poland. The study population consisted of 56 ESCC patients and 35 controls. The controls were patients referred to our department due to other non-esophageal and non-oncological disorders with no gross or microscopic esophageal pathology as confirmed by endoscopy and histopathology. In the ESCC patients, samples were taken from normal mucosa (56 mucosa samples) and from the tumor (56 tumor samples). Tissue samples from the controls were taken from normal mucosa of the middle esophagus (35 control samples). Quantitative determination of DNA was carried out using a spectrophotometric method. Genomic DNA was isolated using the QIAamp DNA Midi Kit. HPV infection was identified following PCR amplification of the HPV gene sequence, using primers MY09 and MY11 complementary to the genome sequence of at least 33 types of HPV. The sequencing results were computationally analyzed using the basic local alignment search tool database. In tumor samples, HPV DNA was identified in 28 of 56 patients (50%). High risk HPV phenotypes (16 or/and 18) were found in 5 of 56 patients (8.9%), low risk in 19 of 56 patients (33.9%) and other types of HPV (37, 81, 97, CP6108) in 4 of 56 patients (7.1%). In mucosa samples, HPV DNA was isolated in 21 of 56 patients (37.5%). High risk HPV DNA was confirmed in 3 of 56 patients (5.3%), low risk HPV DNA in 12 of 56 patients (21.4%), and other types of HPV in 6 of 56 patients (10.7%). In control samples, HPV DNA was identified in 4 of 35 patients (11.4%) with no high risk HPV. The occurrence of HPV in ESCC patients was significantly higher than in the controls [28 of 56 (50%) vs 4 of 35 (11.4%), P < 0.001]. In esophageal cancer patients, both in tumor and mucosa samples, the predominant HPV phenotypes were low risk HPV, isolated 4 times more frequently than high risk phenotypes [19 of 56 (33.9%) vs 5 of 56 (8.9%), P < 0

  14. Incidence of human papilloma virus in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in patients from the Lublin region

    PubMed Central

    Dąbrowski, Andrzej; Kwaśniewski, Wojciech; Skoczylas, Tomasz; Bednarek, Wiesława; Kuźma, Dorota; Goździcka-Józefiak, Anna

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To assess the prevalence of human papilloma virus (HPV) in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) in the south-eastern region of Poland. METHODS: The study population consisted of 56 ESCC patients and 35 controls. The controls were patients referred to our department due to other non-esophageal and non-oncological disorders with no gross or microscopic esophageal pathology as confirmed by endoscopy and histopathology. In the ESCC patients, samples were taken from normal mucosa (56 mucosa samples) and from the tumor (56 tumor samples). Tissue samples from the controls were taken from normal mucosa of the middle esophagus (35 control samples). Quantitative determination of DNA was carried out using a spectrophotometric method. Genomic DNA was isolated using the QIAamp DNA Midi Kit. HPV infection was identified following PCR amplification of the HPV gene sequence, using primers MY09 and MY11 complementary to the genome sequence of at least 33 types of HPV. The sequencing results were computationally analyzed using the basic local alignment search tool database. RESULTS: In tumor samples, HPV DNA was identified in 28 of 56 patients (50%). High risk HPV phenotypes (16 or/and 18) were found in 5 of 56 patients (8.9%), low risk in 19 of 56 patients (33.9%) and other types of HPV (37, 81, 97, CP6108) in 4 of 56 patients (7.1%). In mucosa samples, HPV DNA was isolated in 21 of 56 patients (37.5%). High risk HPV DNA was confirmed in 3 of 56 patients (5.3%), low risk HPV DNA in 12 of 56 patients (21.4%), and other types of HPV in 6 of 56 patients (10.7%). In control samples, HPV DNA was identified in 4 of 35 patients (11.4%) with no high risk HPV. The occurrence of HPV in ESCC patients was significantly higher than in the controls [28 of 56 (50%) vs 4 of 35 (11.4%), P < 0.001]. In esophageal cancer patients, both in tumor and mucosa samples, the predominant HPV phenotypes were low risk HPV, isolated 4 times more frequently than high risk phenotypes [19 of 56 (33

  15. Letter: Human papilloma virus and molluscum contagiosum lesions related to infliximab therapy for psoriasis: a case series.

    PubMed

    Georgala, S; Katoulis, A C; Kanelleas, A; Befon, A; Georgala, C

    2012-04-15

    Biological therapy for psoriasis exerts its action via an immunomodulatory and eventually immunosuppressive mode. Immunosuppression is linked to HPV flares. Our purpose is to investigate a possible relationship between infliximab therapy for psoriasis and human papilloma virus and molluscum (HPV/MC) infections. We report a case series of three patients with psoriasis on infliximab, who developed HPV/MC lesions following their treatment. Our patients developed HPV/MC lesions within a few months after the initiation of infliximab infusions for psoriasis. Immunosuppresion is related to HPV/MC flares. Biological therapy and in particular infliximab treatment acts by immunomodulation and eventually a degree of immunosuppression. Anti-TNF treatment could be associated with HPV and/or MC flares. For this reason, we suggest the consideration of obtaining a routine cervical PAP smear before the commencement and during treatment with anti-TNF agents for psoriasis.

  16. Factors associated with future commitment and past history of human papilloma virus vaccination among female college students in northern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Ping-Fen; Yeh, Ying-Tse; Sheu, Shuh-Jen; Wang, Tze-Fang

    2014-07-01

    To investigate factors influencing commitment to human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination and prior vaccination among female college students in northern Taiwan. A quota sample of 400 female college students was recruited from nine colleges in northern Taiwan during March 2013. Of these, 398 completed the self administered questionnaire which was designed based on the health promotion model. The results showed that factors associated with prior vaccination behavior were family history of gynecologic malignancy, ever being advised to get HPV vaccination, perceived barriers of action and perceived self-efficacy. Predictors for commitment to HPV vaccination in the next 6 months were the cost of vaccination, ever being advised to get HPV vaccination, perceived self-efficacy and situational influences. Perceived self-efficacy was significantly influenced by relationship status, past receipt of a recommendation for HPV vaccination and level of knowledge about HPV. When formulating vaccination policies, governmental or medical institutions should include these factors to promote vaccination.

  17. Cost-Effectiveness Evaluation of Quadrivalent Human Papilloma Virus Vaccine for HPV-Related Disease in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Khatibi, Mohsen; Rasekh, Hamid Reza; Shahverdi, Zohreh; jamshidi, Hamid Reza

    2014-01-01

    Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccine has been added recently to the Iran Drug List. So, decision makers need information beyond that available from RCTs to recommend funding for this vaccination program to add it to the National Immunization program in Iran. Modeling and economic studies have addressed some of those information needs in foreign countries. In order to determine the long term benefit of this vaccine and impact of vaccine program on the future rate of cervical cancer in Iran, we described a model, based on the available economic and health effects of human papilloma virus (HPV), to estimate the cost-effectiveness of HPV vaccination of 15-year-old girls in Iran. Our objective is to estimate the cost-effectiveness of HPV vaccination in Iran against cervical cancer based on available data; incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) calculations were based on a model comparing a cohort of 15-year-old girls with and without vaccination. We developed a static model based on available data in Iran on the epidemiology of HPV related health outcome. The model compared the cohort of all 15-year old girls alive in the year 2013 with and without vaccination. The cost per QALY, which was found based on our assumption for the vaccination of 15-years old girl to current situation was 439,000,000 Iranian Rial rate (IRR). By considering the key parameters in our sensitivity analysis, value varied from 251,000,000 IRR to 842,000,000 IRR. In conclusion, quadrivalent HPV vaccine (Gardasil) is not cost-effective in Iran based on the base-case parameters value. PMID:24711850

  18. Evidence for and Localization of Vegetative Viral DNA Replication by Autoradiographic Detection of RNA·DNA Hybrids in Sections of Tumors Induced by Shope Papilloma Virus

    PubMed Central

    Orth, Gérard; Jeanteur, Philippe; Croissant, Odile

    1971-01-01

    The occurrence and localization of vegetative viral DNA replication was studied in sections of tumors induced by the rabbit Shope papilloma virus, in cottontail and domestic rabbit papillomas, in primary domestic rabbit carcinoma, and in transplantable VX2 carcinoma, by in situ hybridization of radioactive RNA complementary to viral DNA. Vegetative viral DNA replication and viral protein synthesis were compared by means of cytological hybridization and immunofluorescence techniques on adjacent frozen sections. Vegetative viral DNA replication is completely repressed in the proliferating cellular layers of these tumors, which suggests a provirus state of the viral genome, as in other cells transformed by oncogenic DNA viruses. Vegetative viral DNA replication is induced, after initiation of the keratinization, in cells of cottonail rabbit papillomas, where it is usually followed by viral protein synthesis; this illustrates the influence of the physiological state of the host cell on the control of viral functions. Vegetative viral DNA replication is deteced only in a few cells of domestic rabbit papillomas, at the end of the keratinization process; this observation provides indirect evidence that the DNA synthesis specifically induced in these tumors after the onset of keratinization reflects mostly the induction of cellular DNA synthesis. Images PMID:4331563

  19. Association of human papilloma virus with atypical and malignant oral papillary lesions.

    PubMed

    McCord, Christina; Xu, Jing; Xu, Wei; Qiu, Xin; Muhanna, Nidal; Irish, Jonathan; Leong, Iona; McComb, Richard John; Perez-Ordonez, Bayardo; Bradley, Grace

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to examine atypical and malignant papillary oral lesions for low- and high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and to correlate HPV infection with clinical and pathologic features. Sections of 28 atypical papillary lesions (APLs) and 14 malignant papillary lesions (MPLs) were examined for HPV by in situ hybridization and for p16 and MIB-1 by immunohistochemistry; 24 conventional papillomas were studied for comparison. Low-risk HPV was found in 10 of 66 cases, including 9 APLs and 1 papilloma. All low-risk HPV-positive cases showed suprabasilar MIB-1 staining, and the agreement was statistically significant (P < .0001). Diffuse p16 staining combined with high-risk HPV was not seen in any of the cases. A subset of HPV(-) APLs progressed to carcinoma. Oral papillary lesions are a heterogeneous group. Low-risk HPV infection is associated with a subset of APLs with a benign clinical course. Potentially malignant APLs and MPLs are not associated with low- or high-risk HPV. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Hepatitis C virus genotypes in Pakistan: a systemic review.

    PubMed

    Attaullah, Sobia; Khan, Sanaullah; Ali, Ijaz

    2011-09-08

    Phylogenetic analysis has led to the classification of hepatitis C virus (HCV) into 1-6 major genotypes. HCV genotypes have different biological properties, clinical outcome and response to antiviral treatment and provide important clues for studying the epidemiology, transmission and pathogenesis. This article deepens the current molecular information about the geographical distribution of HCV genotypes and subgenotypes in population of four provinces of Pakistan. 34 published papers (1996-2011) related to prevalence of HCV genotypes/serotypes and subgenotypes in Pakistan were searched. HCV genotype/s distribution from all 34 studies was observed in 28,400 HCV infected individuals in the following pattern: 1,999 (7.03%) cases of genotype 1; 1,085 (3.81%) cases of genotype 2; 22,429 (78.96%) cases of genotype 3; 453 (1.59%) cases of genotype 4; 29 (0.10%) cases of genotype 5; 37 (0.13%) cases of genotype 6; 1,429 (5.03%) cases of mixed genotypes, and 939 (3.30%) cases of untypeable genotypes. Overall, genotype 3a was the predominant genotype with a rate of 55.10%, followed by genotype 1a, 3b and mixed genotype with a rate of 10.25%, 8.20%, and 5.08%, respectively; and genotypes 4, 5 and 6 were rare. Genotype 3 occurred predominately in all the provinces of Pakistan. Second more frequently genotype was genotype 1 in Punjab province and untypeable genotypes in Sindh, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and Balochistan provinces.

  1. Intraductal papilloma in an axillary lymph node of a patient with human immunodeficiency virus: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Cottom, Hannah; Rengabashyam, Bhavani; Turton, Philip E; Shaaban, Abeer M

    2014-05-23

    Inclusions of ectopic breast tissue in axillary lymph nodes are reported very infrequently and typically are only identified microscopically as an incidental finding. Furthermore the development of a benign proliferative lesion in the form of an intraductal papilloma from intranodal ectopic breast tissue is an extremely rare phenomenon with only three previous cases reported. This report describes an unusual and rare case of an intraductal papilloma arising in an axillary lymph node of a patient known to have the human immunodeficiency virus. A 40-year-old Black African woman underwent excision of an enlarged palpable axillary lymph node. In the preceding 7 years she had received at least six separate surgical excisions to her ipsilateral breast for papillomatosis. The last surgical intervention was performed 1 year prior to presentation with an enlarged axillary lymph node. Histological examination of her axillary lymph node revealed a papillomatous proliferative epithelial lesion within an apparent encompassing duct, resembling a mammary intraductal papilloma. In the surrounding lymphoid tissue small groups of duct-like structures were additionally noted. Immunostaining with a panel of myoepithelial markers in conjunction with oestrogen receptor produced a mixed heterogeneous staining pattern in both the papillomatous lesion and the peripheral duct-like structures. This confirmed the diagnosis of a benign intraductal papilloma within an axillary lymph node, considered to have arisen from ectopic breast tissue. This case demonstrates that intranodal ectopic breast tissue has the potential to undergo benign proliferative change albeit extremely rarely. Therefore this possibility must be considered to ensure the correct diagnosis is made. In addition, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report which has described recurrent intraductal papillomas and the subsequent development of an intraductal papilloma within an ipsilateral axillary lymph node, in

  2. Frequency and Type Distribution of Human Papilloma Virus in Patients with Prostate Cancer, Kerman, Southeast of Iran.

    PubMed

    Atashafrooz, Fatemeh; Rokhbakhsh-Zamin, Farokh

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic cancer is the second cause of cancer-related death among men worldwide. The human papilloma viruses (HPVs) are a family of sexually transmitted viruses which have may have roles in the etiology of inflammation in the prostate leading to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (PCa). In this study, we evaluated the frequency of different HPV types in prostatic cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in Kerman province, southeast of Iran, using real-time PCR techniques. The aim of the present research was to clarify any association with prostatic carcinogenesis. Real Time PCR showed that HPV DNA was found in 20% of 200 PCa samples, 80 percent of these with high-risk HPV types, 40% with type-16,18, 30 % type-31,33 and 10% type 54. High risk HPV DNA was detected in only 2% of BPH samples. Values for low risk types were much higher. Our study provided support for a role of high risk HPV infection in prostatic disease in Iranian patients, and association between presence of HPV DNA and prostate carcinoma. In particular, HPV 16 and18 might have an important role in prostate cancer.

  3. Systemic and mucosal immune responses to sublingual or intramuscular human papilloma virus antigens in healthy female volunteers.

    PubMed

    Huo, Zhiming; Bissett, Sara L; Giemza, Raphaela; Beddows, Simon; Oeser, Clarissa; Lewis, David J M

    2012-01-01

    The sublingual route has been proposed as a needle-free option to induce systemic and mucosal immune protection against viral infections. In a translational study of systemic and mucosal humoral immune responses to sublingual or systemically administered viral antigens, eighteen healthy female volunteers aged 19-31 years received three immunizations with a quadravalent Human Papilloma Virus vaccine at 0, 4 and 16 weeks as sublingual drops (SL, n = 12) or intramuscular injection (IM, n = 6). IM antigen delivery induced or boosted HPV-specific serum IgG and pseudovirus-neutralizing antibodies, HPV-specific cervical and vaginal IgG, and elicited circulating IgG and IgA antibody secreting cells. SL antigens induced ~38-fold lower serum and ~2-fold lower cervical/vaginal IgG than IM delivery, and induced or boosted serum virus neutralizing antibody in only 3/12 subjects. Neither route reproducibly induced HPV-specific mucosal IgA. Alternative delivery systems and adjuvants will be required to enhance and evaluate immune responses following sublingual immunization in humans. ClinicalTrials.govNCT00949572.

  4. Systemic and Mucosal Immune Responses to Sublingual or Intramuscular Human Papilloma Virus Antigens in Healthy Female Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Giemza, Raphaela; Beddows, Simon; Oeser, Clarissa; Lewis, David J. M.

    2012-01-01

    The sublingual route has been proposed as a needle-free option to induce systemic and mucosal immune protection against viral infections. In a translational study of systemic and mucosal humoral immune responses to sublingual or systemically administered viral antigens, eighteen healthy female volunteers aged 19–31 years received three immunizations with a quadravalent Human Papilloma Virus vaccine at 0, 4 and 16 weeks as sublingual drops (SL, n = 12) or intramuscular injection (IM, n = 6). IM antigen delivery induced or boosted HPV-specific serum IgG and pseudovirus-neutralizing antibodies, HPV-specific cervical and vaginal IgG, and elicited circulating IgG and IgA antibody secreting cells. SL antigens induced ∼38-fold lower serum and ∼2-fold lower cervical/vaginal IgG than IM delivery, and induced or boosted serum virus neutralizing antibody in only 3/12 subjects. Neither route reproducibly induced HPV-specific mucosal IgA. Alternative delivery systems and adjuvants will be required to enhance and evaluate immune responses following sublingual immunization in humans. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00949572 PMID:22438987

  5. Enhancing the Sensitivity of DNA Microarray Using Dye-Doped Silica Nanoparticles: Detection of Human Papilloma Virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enrichi, F.; Riccò, R.; Meneghello, A.; Pierobon, R.; Canton, G.; Cretaio, E.

    2010-10-01

    DNA microarray is a high-throughput technology used for detection and quantification of nucleic acid molecules and others of biological interest. The analysis is based on the specific hybridization between probe sequences deposited in array and a target ss-DNA amplified by PCR and functionalized by a fluorescent dye. Organic labels have well known disadvantages like photobleaching and low signal intensities, which put a limitation to the lower amount of DNA material that can be detected. Therefore for trace analysis the development of more efficient biomarkers is required. With this aim we present in this paper the synthesis and application of alternative hybrid nanosystems obtained by incorporating standard fluorescent molecules into monodisperse silica nanoparticles. Efficient application to the detection of Human Papilloma Virus is demonstrated. This virus is associated to the formation of cervical cancer, a leading cause of death by cancer for women worldwide. It is shown that the use of the novel biomarkers increases the optical signal of about one order of magnitude with respect to the free dyes or quantum dots in conventional instruments. This is due to the high number of molecules that can be accommodated into each nanoparticle, to the reduced photobleaching and to the improved environmental protection of the dyes when encapsulated in the silica matrix. The cheap and easy synthesis of these luminescent particles, the stability in water, the surface functionalizability and bio-compatibility make them very promising for present and future bio-labeling and bio-imaging applications.

  6. Human papilloma virus types in the oral and cervical mucosa of HIV-positive South African women prior to antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Richter, Karin L; van Rensburg, Estrelita Janse; van Heerden, Willie F P; Boy, Sonja C

    2008-10-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of human papilloma virus (HPV) infection and types in the oral and cervix mucosa of treatment-naïve HIV-1-positive women with CD4 counts less than 300 cells per ml with no HPV-associated oral lesions. Oral epithelium was harvested from the buccal mucosa and lateral borders of the tongue and cervical samples were collected from the endocervical area of 30 women, 22-64 years old. Cytobrush Plus cell collectors were used for sampling both anatomical areas. Genital pathology, obstetric and gynaecological history, co-morbid disease, hormone therapy, sexual behavior and smoking history were assessed via physical examination and clinical interviews. Special investigations included cervical Papanicolau smears, CD4 counts and HIV-1 viral loads. The linear array HPV test was used to determine HPV genotypes present in the specimens. Oral HPV were identified in 20% (n = 6) of the patients, of which two had infection with two HPV types. Genital HPV was found in 96.7% (n = 29) of the women, of which only 14 had cytological abnormalities on Papanicolau smear. Infection with multiple HPV types were present in 93.1% (n = 27) of the patients, with an average of four HPV types per individual. South African HIV-positive women with CD4 counts less than 300 cells per ml have a significant risk of cervical HPV strains and multiple strain infection of the cervix. The prevalence of HPV in normal oral mucosa was low but high-risk types were present. Limited correlation between oral HPV types and those identified in the cervical mucosa was found.

  7. Prevalence of Human Papilloma Virus Infection in Young Primiparous Women During Postpartum Period: Study from a Tertiary Care Center in Northern India

    PubMed Central

    Suri, Vanita; Nijhawan, Raje; Aggarwal, Neelam; Aggarwal, Ritu; Guleria, Charu; Thakur, Mili

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Assessment of high-risk Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) prevalence is important for monitoring long-term decrease in cervical cancer after implementation of the prophylactic HPV vaccination. Aim To determine the prevalence of high-risk HPV infection and cytological abnormalities in young primiparous women in the age group of 16-26years. Materials and Methods In this cross-sectional study, 214 primiparous women aged 16-26years were recruited from a public tertiary health care center postpartum clinic between June 2013 and May 2014. Cytological analysis was performed by Pap smear test and patients underwent sampling with cervical brushes for HPV-DNA detection and typing by a PCR-based assay for HPV types 16, 18, 33 and 45. Results High-risk HPV was detected in 41 (19.2%) women. HPV 16 was found to be most prevalent with 17 (7.9%) samples testing positive, followed by HPV 18 in nine (4.2%), HPV 45 in six (2.8%) and HPV 31 in four (1.8%) women. Five women tested positive for more than one HPV types. There were no cases of intraepithelial lesions or cervical cancer. One patient who had Atypical Cells of Undetermined Significance (ASCUS) on cytology tested negative for all four HPV genotypes. Conclusion This study provides a geographic baseline data of high-risk HPV prevalence in young Indian women before implementation of a vaccination program. The results are important for comparison with other global regions and monitoring the effect of HPV vaccination. PMID:27891400

  8. [Comparison of human papilloma virus infection status between men who have sex with men recruited from gay bathhouses and HIV voluntary counseling and testing clinics respectively in Urumqi].

    PubMed

    Tian, T; Cai, A J; Huang, B X; Abidan, Ainiwaer; Wang, H; Dai, J H

    2017-01-10

    Objective: To understand the human papilloma virus (HPV) infection status in men who have sex with men (MSM) recruited from gay bathhouses and HIV voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) clinics in Urumqi, Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region, and identify the associated risk factors. Methods: A total of 200 MSM aged ≥18 years were recruited by using the " snowballing" sampling method from gay bathhouses and VCT clinics in Urumqi during March-May, 2016. The MSM recruited completed questionnaires after filling in the informed consent form. The information about their demographic characteristics and sexual behaviors were collected, and anal swabs were collected from them for HPV genotyping. Results: The overall HPV infection rate was 54.0%. The HPV infection rate was 66.7%(74/111) in MSM from gay bathhouses and 38.2%(34/89) in MSM from VCT clinics and the high risk type HPV infection rate was 39.6% (44/111) in MSM from gay bathhouses and 14.6% (13/89) in MSM from VCT clinics, the differences were significant (χ(2)=16.112, P<0.05; χ(2)=15.190, P<0.05). Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that the major risk factors for HPV infection included activity in gay bathhouse (OR=3.732, 95% CI: 1.950-7.141) and anal sexual behavior (OR=2.555, 95%CI: 1.329-4.912). Conclusion: The prevalence of HPV in MSM from gay bathhouses was higher than that in MSM from VCT clinics, indicating that close attention should be paid to the behavior intervention in MSM.

  9. Pharyngeal squamous cell papilloma in adult Japanese: comparison with laryngeal papilloma in clinical manifestations and HPV infection.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Ryoji; Makiyama, Kiyoshi; Higuti, Yusho; Ikeda, Atsuo; Miura, Masatoshi; Hasegawa, Hisashi; Kinukawa, Noriko; Ikeda, Minoru

    2012-10-01

    A number of reports have investigated the relationship between laryngeal papilloma and human papilloma virus (HPV) infection. On the other hand, it is unclear whether the HPV infection is involved in the occurrence of pharyngeal papilloma. We hypothesized that HPV infection was involved in the occurrence of pharyngeal papilloma similarly to laryngeal papilloma. To verify this hypothesis, we investigated the presence of HPV infection. Furthermore, clinical manifestations of pharyngeal papilloma, which had rarely been reported, were discussed. A male-to-female ratio, solitary or multiple occurrences, and koilocytosis were examined in cases with pharyngeal papilloma. HPV DNA was examined with unfixed surgically resected specimens of pharyngeal papilloma. A screening test by the liquid-phase hybridization method was carried out for the HPV high-risk group (16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 56, 58, 59, and 68) and HPV low-risk group (6, 11, 42, 43, 44). As a control, 15 cases with laryngeal papilloma for which the same screening test was carried out were employed. Pharyngeal papilloma occurred as a solitary lesion more often, whereas laryngeal papilloma occurred as multiple tumors more frequently. The HPV infection rate was 0% in pharyngeal papilloma cases, which was in stark contrast with 66.7% in the HPV low-risk group in laryngeal papilloma cases. Pharyngeal papilloma occurred as a solitary lesion in females more frequently. Contrary to our hypothesis, the involvement of HPV infection was unlikely in the occurrence of pharyngeal papilloma.

  10. Human papilloma virus, herpes simplex virus and epstein barr virus in oral squamous cell carcinoma from eight different countries.

    PubMed

    Jalouli, Jamshid; Jalouli, Miranda M; Sapkota, Dipak; Ibrahim, Salah O; Larsson, Per-Anders; Sand, Lars

    2012-02-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a major health problem in many parts of the world, and the major causative agents are thought to be the use of alcohol and tobacco. Oncogenic viruses have also been suggested to be involved in OSCC development. This study investigated the prevalence of human papillomaviruses (HPV), herpes simplex virus (HSV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in 155 OSCC from eight different countries from different ethnic groups, continents and with different socioeconomic backgrounds. 41 A total of OSCCs were diagnosed in the tongue (26%) and 23 in the floor of the mouth (15%); the other 91 OSCCs were diagnosed in other locations (59%). The patients were also investigated regarding the use of alcohol and smoking and smokeless tobacco habits. Tissue samples were obtained from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples of the OSCC. DNA was extracted and the viral genome was examined by single, nested and semi-nested PCR assays. Sequencing of double-stranded DNA from the PCR product was carried out. Following sequencing of the HPV-, HSV- and EBV-positive PCR products, 100% homology between the sampels was found. Of all the 155 OSCCs examined, 85 (55%) were positive for EBV, 54 (35%) for HPV and 24 (15%) for HSV. The highest prevalence of HPV was seen in Sudan (65%), while HSV (55%) and EBV (80%) were most prevalent in the UK. In 34% (52/155) of all the samples examined, co-infection by two (46/155=30%) or three (6/155=4%) virus specimens was detected. The most frequent double infection was HPV with EBV in 21% (32/155) of all OSCCs. There was a statistically significant higher proportion of samples with HSV (p=0.026) and EBV (p=0.015) in industrialized countries (Sweden, Norway, UK and USA) as compared to developing countries (Sudan, India, Sri Lanka and Yemen). Furthermore, there was a statistically significant higher co-infection of HSV and EBV in samples from industrialized countries (p=0.00031). No firm conclusions could be drawn regarding the

  11. Association between septal deviation and sinonasal papilloma.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Kazuhiro; Ogawa, Takenori; Sugawara, Mitsuru; Honkura, Yohei; Oshima, Hidetoshi; Arakawa, Kazuya; Oshima, Takeshi; Katori, Yukio

    2013-12-01

    Sinonasal papilloma is a common benign epithelial tumor of the sinonasal tract and accounts for 0.5% to 4% of all nasal tumors. The etiology of sinonasal papilloma remains unclear, although human papilloma virus has been proposed as a major risk factor. Other etiological factors, such as anatomical variations of the nasal cavity, may be related to the pathogenesis of sinonasal papilloma, because deviated nasal septum is seen in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis. We, therefore, investigated the involvement of deviated nasal septum in the development of sinonasal papilloma. Preoperative computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging findings of 83 patients with sinonasal papilloma were evaluated retrospectively. The side of papilloma and the direction of septal deviation showed a significant correlation. Septum deviated to the intact side in 51 of 83 patients (61.4%) and to the affected side in 18 of 83 patients (21.7%). Straight or S-shaped septum was observed in 14 of 83 patients (16.9%). Even after excluding 27 patients who underwent revision surgery and 15 patients in whom the papilloma touched the concave portion of the nasal septum, the concave side of septal deviation was associated with the development of sinonasal papilloma (p = 0.040). The high incidence of sinonasal papilloma in the concave side may reflect the consequences of the traumatic effects caused by wall shear stress of the high-velocity airflow and the increased chance of inhaling viruses and pollutants. The present study supports the causative role of human papilloma virus and toxic chemicals in the occurrence of sinonasal papilloma.

  12. Genotype III Saint Louis Encephalitis Virus Outbreak, Argentina, 2005

    PubMed Central

    Ré, Viviana; Almirón, Walter R.; Farías, Adrián; Vázquez, Ana; Sanchez-Seco, María Paz; Aguilar, Javier; Spinsanti, Lorena; Konigheim, Brenda; Visintin, Andrés; García, Jorge; Morales, Maria Alejandra; Tenorio, Antonio; Contigiani, Marta

    2006-01-01

    Twenty-six years after it was last detected, Saint Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) genotype III reemerged in 2005 in Córdoba, Argentina, where it caused an outbreak. Two genotype III SLEV strains were isolated from Culex quinquefasciatus. A 71.43% prevalence for neutralizing antibodies was found in domestic fowl in the homestead of a patient with encephalitis. PMID:17283629

  13. Genotype-Specific Evolution of Hepatitis E Virus.

    PubMed

    Brayne, Adam B; Dearlove, Bethany L; Lester, James S; Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L; Frost, Simon D W

    2017-05-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is the most common cause of acute viral hepatitis globally. HEV comprises four genotypes with different geographic distributions and host ranges. We utilize this natural case-control study for investigating the evolution of zoonotic viruses compared to single-host viruses, using 244 near-full-length HEV genomes. Genome-wide estimates of the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous evolutionary changes (dN/dS ratio) located a region of overlapping reading frames, which is subject to positive selection in genotypes 3 and 4. The open reading frames (ORFs) involved have functions related to host-pathogen interaction, so genotype-specific evolution of these regions may reflect their fitness. Bayesian inference of evolutionary rates shows that genotypes 3 and 4 have significantly higher rates than genotype 1 across all ORFs. Reconstruction of the phylogenies of zoonotic genotypes demonstrates significant intermingling of isolates between hosts. We speculate that the genotype-specific differences may result from cyclical adaptation to different hosts in genotypes 3 and 4.IMPORTANCE Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is increasingly recognized as a pathogen that affects both the developing and the developed world. While most often clinically mild, HEV can be severe or fatal in certain demographics, such as expectant mothers. Like many other viral pathogens, HEV has been classified into several distinct genotypes. We show that most of the HEV genome is evolutionarily constrained. One locus of positive selection is unusual in that it encodes two distinct protein products. We are the first to detect positive selection in this overlap region. Genotype 1, which infects humans only, appears to be evolving differently from genotypes 3 and 4, which infect multiple species, possibly because genotypes 3 and 4 are unable to achieve the same fitness due to repeated host jumps. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  14. A link between human papilloma virus vaccination and primary ovarian insufficiency: current analysis.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Noah; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-08-01

    The cause of primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) is multifactorial. Known causes include external factors such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy, exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals, infections that lead to a permanent insult to the ovary, autoimmune conditions, and genetic causes. An association between the quadrivalent antihuman papilloma vaccine (HPV4) and POI was recently suggested. An increasing number of cases of POI post-HPV4 are being reported. Possible mechanisms for the suspected effect of HPV on female reproductive function are a toxic effect or an autoimmune response. The trigger could be the vaccine immunogen contents or the adjuvants, the latter are used to increase the immune reaction. The adjuvant in HPV4 contains aluminum. Animal models have shown aluminum exposure to inhibit expression of female reproductive hormones and to induce histologic changes in the ovaries. Specific genetic compositions may be more susceptible to developing an autoinflammatory syndrome after exposure to an environmental factor. The mechanisms responsible for POI are not yet fully understood. Although case reports cannot establish causation, awareness of a possible link between HPV4 and POI will help to identify and manage future cases that may arise.

  15. Distribution of hepatitis C virus genotypes in Kayseri region, in Turkey: unexpected rate of genotype 4.

    PubMed

    Sariguzel, Fatma Mutlu; Kayman, Tuba; Karaman, Hatice; Karaman, Ahmet; Karakukcu, Cigdem

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an important cause of chronic liver disease. There are six genotypes and more than 80 subtypes of HCV. The aim of this study was to investigate the distribution of HCV genotypes in Middle Anatolia in Turkey, and the association of HCV genotypes with pre-treatment HCV RNA viral load, serum transaminase levels, and histopathological grade of liver fibrosis. A total of 160 patients (103 female, 57 male) with chronic hepatitis C were retrospectively evaluated. HCV RNA level was determined by commercial real time PCR method. HCV RNA positive sera were genotyped by the Abbott Real Time HCV Genotype II assay and sequenced by the ABI Prism 310 Genetic Analyzer. Gender, age, serum ALT, AST, HCV RNA viral load, and fibrosis staging of liver were determined in all patients. Genotype 1b was the most frequent (64.7%) followed by genotype 4d (28.3%), 2 (4.4%), and la (2.5%). The HCV genotype results were found consistent with both methods. The gender distribution of the 160 HCV infected patients was 57 male/103 female. Log HCVRNA was significantly higher in genotype 1b compared to genotype 4 and 1a. Stage of liver fibrosis, histology activity index, serum ALT and AST levels did not differ between groups depending on genotypes. Advanced liver fibrosis (Group 2) was found in 36 (76.6%) patients with genotype 1b and in 10 (21.3%) patients with genotype 4 and only in 1 patient (2.1%) with genotype 1a. HCV genotype 1b is the most frequent type (64.7%) in this region. Prevalence of genotype 4 in this region is higher than the national HCV genotype distribution. Serum transaminase levels and liver fibrosis scores are not associated with HCV genotypes.

  16. Human papilloma virus transformed CaSki cells constitutively express high levels of functional SerpinB2.

    PubMed

    Major, Lee; Schroder, Wayne A; Gardner, Joy; Fish, Richard J; Suhrbier, Andreas

    2011-02-01

    Many malignant tissues, including human papilloma virus (HPV)-associated cancers, express SerpinB2, also known as plasminogen activator inhibitor type-2 (PAI-2). Whether SerpinB2 is expressed by the HPV-transformed cancer cells, and if so, whether SerpinB2 is mutated or behaves aberrantly remains unclear. Here we show that HPV-transformed CaSki cells express high levels of constitutive wild-type SerpinB2, with cellular distribution, glycosylation, secretion, cleavage, induction and urokinase binding similar to that reported for primary cells. Neutralization of secreted SerpinB2 failed to affect CaSki cell migration or growth. Lentivirus-based over-expression of SerpinB2 also had no effect on growth, and we were unable to confirm a role for SerpinB2 in binding or regulating expression of the retinoblastoma protein. CaSki cells thus emerge as a useful tool for studying SerpinB2, with the physiological function of SerpinB2 expression by tumor cells remaining controversial. Using CaSki cells as a source of endogenous SerpinB2, we confirmed that SerpinB2 efficiently binds the proteasomal subunit member β1.

  17. The role of human papilloma virus (HPV) infection in non-anogenital cancer and the promise of immunotherapy: a review.

    PubMed

    Cobos, Chris; Figueroa, José A; Mirandola, Leonardo; Colombo, Michela; Summers, Gabby; Figueroa, Alejandro; Aulakh, Amardeep; Konala, Venu; Verma, Rashmi; Riaz, Jehanzeb; Wade, Raymond; Saadeh, Charles; Rahman, Rakhshanda L; Pandey, Apurva; Radhi, Saba; Nguyen, Diane D; Jenkins, Marjorie; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio; Cobos, Everardo

    2014-10-01

    Over the past 30 years, human papilloma virus (HPV) has been shown to play a role in the development of various cancers. Most notably, HPV has been linked to malignant progression in neoplasms of the anogenital region. However, high-risk HPV has also been suggested to play a significant role in the development of cancers in other anatomic locations, such as the head and neck, lung, breast and bladder. In 2006, the first vaccine for HPV, Gardasil, was approved for the prevention of subtypes 6, 11, 16 and 18. A few years later, Cevarix was approved for the prevention of subtypes 16 and 18, the HPV subtypes most frequently implicated in malignant progression. Although increased awareness and vaccination could drastically decrease the incidence of HPV-positive cancers, these approaches do not benefit patients who have already contracted HPV and developed cancer as a result. For this reason, researchers need to continue developing treatment modalities, such as targeted immunotherapies, for HPV-positive lesions. Here, we review the potential evidence linking HPV infection with the development of non-anogenital cancers and the potential role of immunotherapy in the prevention and eradication of HPV infection and its oncogenic sequela.

  18. Dynamics of deletion genotypes in an experimental insect virus population

    PubMed Central

    Simón, Oihane; Williams, Trevor; Caballero, Primitivo; López-Ferber, Miguel

    2005-01-01

    Defective viruses, that are deficient in certain essential genes, are maintained in the population by transcomplementation, exploiting the gene products of complete genotypes in co-infected cells. This process becomes prevalent only when cells are frequently infected by several virus particles, and only then will the fitness of defective viruses be subjected to frequency-dependent selection. Deletion variants that are not infectious per os are present in a multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (SfMNPV, Baculoviridae) that infects the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda. These variants enhance the pathogenicity and, therefore, the likelihood of transmission of the virus when co-infecting cells with complete genotypes, resulting in occlusion bodies (OBs) that may contain both genotypes co-occluded. Mixtures of complete (B) and defective (C) variants in ratios of 90% B+10% C, 50% B+50% C and 10% B+90% C were used to inoculate by injection S. frugiperda larvae. Viral OBs extracted from diseased insects were subjected to four or five successive rounds of per os infection. Following successive passages, genotype frequencies in all three experimental populations converged to a single equilibrium frequency comprising ∼20% of deletion genotype C and ∼80% of complete genotype B. This mirrors the relative proportions of deletion (22%) and complete (78%) genotypes observed in the wild-type SfMNPV population. The pathogenicity of experimental populations at the final passage was not significantly different from that of the wild-type isolate. In contrast, OBs of all genotype mixtures were significantly more pathogenic than OBs of genotype B alone. A population genetics model, in which virus populations were assigned linear frequency-dependent transmissibility values, was in remarkably close agreement to empirical data. Clearly, non-infectious deletion variants can profoundly affect the likelihood of transmission and the genetic structure and stability of virus populations. PMID

  19. Hepatitis delta virus genotype-1 alone cocirculates with hepatitis B virus genotypes A and D in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Butt, Fatima A; Amin, Iram; Idrees, Muhammad; Iqbal, Muhammad

    2014-03-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) have been identified as major causes of morbidity and mortality in Pakistan because HDV causes infection only in the presence of HBV. Coinfection with both hepatitis viruses can lead to a more severe acute form of disease and to an increased risk of fulminant hepatitis. HDV infection differs in its distribution and severity depending on the geographical distribution, and several genotypes of HDV have been identified so far. The aim of the present study was to establish the HDV and HBV genotypes in chronically infected Pakistani patients and to determine whether there is any correlation between HDV and HBV genotypes. We studied samples from a total of 46 chronically infected HBV and HDV patients for HBV and HDV genotype analysis out of a total of 75 chronic HBV carriers enrolled. HBV and HDV genotypes were determined using type-specific PCR, followed by sequencing of PCR amplified products. The results of HBV genotyping showed that 33 of 46 (71.7%) patients had genotype D, five (10.9%) had A+D mixed genotypes, whereas eight (17.3) samples were untypable. We could detect only one HDV genotype (HDV-1) prevalent in the Pakistani population. The HDV-1 genotype isolate was associated with HBV genotype D alone or in combination with A (HBV-A+D). The present study concludes that HDV/HBV coinfection is very high in the Pakistani population and was previously underestimated. The most prevalent circulating genotypes of HBV and HDV are HDV-1 and HBV-D, respectively, in the studied area. There is no specific interaction between HBV and HDV genotypes as suggested by HDV-1/HBV-D or HDV-1/HBV-A+D coinfection. Coinfection of HDV-1 and HBV-D simply reflects the most frequent genotypes circulating in this specific geographical region of the world.

  20. Comparative analysis of African swine fever virus genotypes and serogroups.

    PubMed

    Malogolovkin, Alexander; Burmakina, Galina; Titov, Ilya; Sereda, Alexey; Gogin, Andrey; Baryshnikova, Elena; Kolbasov, Denis

    2015-02-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) causes highly lethal hemorrhagic disease among pigs, and ASFV's extreme antigenic diversity hinders vaccine development. We show that p72 ASFV phylogenetic analysis does not accurately define ASFV hemadsorption inhibition assay serogroups. Thus, conventional ASFV genotyping cannot discriminate between viruses of different virulence or predict efficacy of a specific ASFV vaccine.

  1. Comparative Analysis of African Swine Fever Virus Genotypes and Serogroups

    PubMed Central

    Burmakina, Galina; Titov, Ilya; Sereda, Alexey; Gogin, Andrey; Baryshnikova, Elena; Kolbasov, Denis

    2015-01-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) causes highly lethal hemorrhagic disease among pigs, and ASFV’s extreme antigenic diversity hinders vaccine development. We show that p72 ASFV phylogenetic analysis does not accurately define ASFV hemadsorption inhibition assay serogroups. Thus, conventional ASFV genotyping cannot discriminate between viruses of different virulence or predict efficacy of a specific ASFV vaccine. PMID:25625574

  2. Changes in hepatitis C virus genotype distribution in Japan.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, H; Kumada, T; Takaguchi, K; Shimada, N; Tanaka, J

    2014-12-01

    Genotypes are associated with the natural course of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and response to antiviral therapy for HCV. HCV genotype 1b has been the dominant genotype in Japan, where the prevention of HCV transmission through blood transfusion or nosocomial infection has been established since 1990. The distribution of HCV genotype was investigated based on patient's birth year in 5515 HCV-infected Japanese individuals at three institutions from different areas of Japan. At all three institutions, the proportion of HCV genotype 1b decreased and was <50% in individuals born after 1970. By contrast, the percentage of HCV genotype 2b increased in subsequent birth cohorts after 1920-1929. Significant changes in HCV genotype distribution were observed across Japan regardless of area.

  3. [The identification of viruses of human papilloma of high carcinogenic risk and evaluation of physical status of viral DNA using technique of polymerase-chain reaction under affection of cervical epithelium].

    PubMed

    Viazovaia, A A; Kuevda, D A; Trofimova, O B; Shipulina, O Iu; Ershov, V A; Lialina, L V; Narvskaia, O V

    2013-08-01

    The DNA of virus of human papilloma of high carcinogenic risk was detected in 116 cervical samples. At that, the morphological symptoms of background processes are detected in 19 samples, CIN 1 in 9, CIN 2 in 23, CIN 3 in 54 (and out of them carcinoma in situ in 13), epidermoid cancer (squamous cell carcinoma) in 11 cases. The viral load of human papilloma of high carcinogenic risk in all samples of DNA exceeded threshold of clinical value (3 lg copies of DNA of human papilloma/105 cells). The genetic typing of human papilloma of high carcinogenic risk revealed the dominance of human papilloma of type 16 in 49.7%, type 33 in 15.3%, type 31 in 12.3% and type 45 in 5.5%. In women with background processes in cervix of the uterus DNA of human papilloma type 16 was detected more often in episome form. In case of dysplastic alterations of epithelium and cervical cancer DNA of human papilloma type 16 is detected in mixt form with different degree of integration into cell genome.

  4. [Statistical analysis of the influence of the virus of papilloma human in the development of the vesical carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Jiménez Pacheco, A; Martínez Torres, J I; Pareja Vilchez, M; Arrabal Martín, M; Valle Díaz de la Guardia, F; López León, V; Zuluaga Gómez, A

    2007-05-01

    The bladder cancer is an important disease by its morbi-mortality and its multifactorialidad. At the moment, between the possible aetiology agents that they have been indicated is the infection by the virus of papilloma human (VPH). The objective study is to analyse, by meta-analysis, the relationship between bladder cancer and infection by human papillomavirus. We made a search in the electronic data base MEDLINE of the articles published until September of the 2004 that relate the infection of the VPH to the bladder tumors. Of 414 listed articles, we selected 38 articles. The articles were classified in two groups, according to they use or non methods based on the detection of the DNA. In articles based on the detection of the DNA, it was that the global proportion from the cases that had contact with the virus, through the detection of the genome was of the 19.4% (95% CI 0.160 to 0.228). Of the total of studies based on the detection of the DNA 8 were selected, to show to a group defined control, in which, the OR was investigated. If we combined the ORs, we obtain an OR estimation of 3.2 (95% CI 1.19 to 8.60) and p = 0.02. Most of these studies showed the relation rose at the beginning of the study. Although the majority lacked a group defined control, is possible to analyze the value of the Odds global ratio due to the homogenous behaviour of the studies with defined cases and controls affluent. This demonstrated to association between VPH and the bladder cancer.

  5. Immune Modulation and Treatment of Human Papilloma Virus-Related Warts with Energetics of Living Systems Acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Brustin, Rom; Toledano, Martine; Geffen, Tal; Goona, Raia; Hochberg, Malka; Kreisberg, Bilha; Murad, Sari; Pitcovski, Jacob

    2017-06-01

    Background: Cutaneous warts are small skin lesions formed as a result of infection by the human papilloma virus (HPV). In the lesion, viral manipulation creates a microenvironment that favors virus survival and reproduction. Most lesions eventually regress, probably as a result of a Th1-mediated immune response. However, some warts fail to regress and become persistent. Objective: The efficacy of treatment of persistent HPV-caused warts with Energetics of Living Systems acupuncture and monitored immune system involvement was tested. Methods: Eighteen patients with persistent warts were recruited for the study; 9 received acupuncture treatment and 9 received placebo. Each patient was treated 4 times. Results: Clinical success was defined as total clearance of all lesions with no recurrence for 3 months. In the treatment group, clinical success was 36.6% versus 0% in the placebo group. In the treatment group, the level of interleukin (IL)-10 decreased. In a comparison of patients with cleared warts and overall patients with nonresponding warts, different expression levels of IL-8, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-6, and interferon-γ were found, although these differences were not always statistically significant. Trends of differences (not significant) were observed in leukocyte levels. Acupuncture eliminated persistent warts in some of the patients, along with inducing changes in immunologic parameters. Conclusions: Taking the clinical and immunologic outcomes together, clearance of persistent warts following acupuncture might be due to a shift toward a Th1 immune response, or an anti-inflammatory effect against the lesion-induced microenvironment.

  6. Genotype circulation pattern of human respiratory syncytial virus in Iran.

    PubMed

    Faghihloo, Ebrahim; Yavarian, Jila; Jandaghi, Nazanin Zahra Shafiei; Shadab, Azadeh; Azad, Talat Mokhtari

    2014-03-01

    In order to have information on the molecular epidemiology and genetic circulation pattern of human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) in Iran, we studied the genetic variability of both group A and B HRSV strains during seven consecutive years by sequencing the hypervariable C-terminal domain of G protein. A total of 485 children <2years of age who were negative for influenza viruses, screened for the presence of HRSV in this research. HRSV was detected in 94 (19.38%) of the samples using nested RT-PCR. Group A viruses were isolated during each year, while group B viruses were isolated during 2009 and 2013. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all HRSV group A viruses belonged to three genotypes: GA1, GA2, GA5 and the group B viruses were in BA genotype.

  7. Hepatitis B virus genotypes: Global distribution and clinical importance

    PubMed Central

    Sunbul, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    At least 600000 individuals worldwide annually die of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related diseases, such as chronic hepatitis B (CHB), liver cirrhosis (LC), and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Many viral factors, such as viral load, genotype, and specific viral mutations, are known to affect disease progression. HBV reverse transcriptase does not have a proofreading function, therefore, many HBV genotypes, sub-genotypes, mutants, and recombinants emerge. Differences between genotypes in response to antiviral treatment have been determined. To date, 10 HBV genotypes, scattered across different geographical regions, have been identified. For example, genotype A has a tendency for chronicity, whereas viral mutations are frequently encountered in genotype C. Both chronicity and mutation frequency are common in genotype D. LC and progression to HCC are more commonly encountered with genotypes C and D than the other genotypes. Pathogenic differences between HBV genotypes explain disease intensity, progression to LC, and HCC. In conclusion, genotype determination in CHB infection is important in estimating disease progression and planning optimal antiviral treatment. PMID:24833873

  8. Hepatitis B virus genotypes: global distribution and clinical importance.

    PubMed

    Sunbul, Mustafa

    2014-05-14

    At least 600000 individuals worldwide annually die of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related diseases, such as chronic hepatitis B (CHB), liver cirrhosis (LC), and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Many viral factors, such as viral load, genotype, and specific viral mutations, are known to affect disease progression. HBV reverse transcriptase does not have a proofreading function, therefore, many HBV genotypes, sub-genotypes, mutants, and recombinants emerge. Differences between genotypes in response to antiviral treatment have been determined. To date, 10 HBV genotypes, scattered across different geographical regions, have been identified. For example, genotype A has a tendency for chronicity, whereas viral mutations are frequently encountered in genotype C. Both chronicity and mutation frequency are common in genotype D. LC and progression to HCC are more commonly encountered with genotypes C and D than the other genotypes. Pathogenic differences between HBV genotypes explain disease intensity, progression to LC, and HCC. In conclusion, genotype determination in CHB infection is important in estimating disease progression and planning optimal antiviral treatment.

  9. [Hepatitis B virus genotypes and the response to lamivudine therapy].

    PubMed

    Zalewska, Małgorzata; Domagała, Małgorzata; Simon, Krzysztof; Gładysz, Andrzej

    2005-12-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) can be classified into eight major genotypes (A-H) that have mainly a geographic distribution. The HBV genotype may influence disease progression, HBeAg seroconversion rates, response to antiviral treatment. The aim of study was to analyze the distribution and frequency of genotypes in patients with chronic hepatitis B. Response to lamivudine 100 mg daily therapy was examined in respect to genotype. Sixty six patients (45 (68,2%) male, 21 (31,8%) female) with chronic hepatits B were enrolled. HBV genotypes were assigned before treatment with INNO-LiPA HBV Genotyping, Innogenetics, N. V., Ghent assay, which is a line probe test based on the reverse hybridization principle. In baseline and after 12 months of treatment serological markers of HBV infection, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activities and HBV DNA serum levels were tested. Patients with chronic hepatitis B were infected predominantly with genotype A. HBV genotype distribution was: 78,8% for genotype A, 13,6% for genotype D, 1,5% for mixed infection with genotypes A and D. Distribution of genotypes A and D was asymmetrically regardless of sex, HBeAg status, ALT and HBV DNA levels. Four (6,1%) specimens had indeterminate A results by LiPA. There were no significant differences between patients with genotypes A and D regarding age and sex. There were also no significant differences between these two groups regarding rates of HBeAg and anti-HBe positivity, ALT activity and viral load. Twenty months of lamivudine (100 mg daily) therapy resulted in significant decreases in serum HBV DNA and ALT activities in patients with genotype A as well as with genotype D. After 12 months of treatment there were no statistical differences in HBeAg seroconversion rates, ALT activities, viral loads, frequency of HBeAg and anti-HBe between genotypes A and D.

  10. Hepatitis B virus genotype A: design of reference sequences for sub-genotypes.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qun; Zhu, Huilan; Zhang, Yafei; Li, Xu; Zhang, Zhenhua

    2016-06-01

    Genotype A of hepatitis B virus (HBV/A) is widespread and is currently divided into six sub-genotypes. Suitable reference sequences for different sub-genotypes can facilitate research on HBV/A. However, the current reference sequences for this virus are insufficient. In the present work, we retrieved 442 full-length HBV/A genomic sequences from the GenBank database and classified them into sub-genotypes by phylogenetic analysis. By the maximum likelihood method using the MEGA6.0 software, we established the reference sequences for different HBV/A sub-genotypes. Our analyses demonstrated that these reference sequences clustered phylogenetically with known strains, indicating that the reference sequences we established indeed belonged to the right sub-genotypes. HBV/A subtype sequences were selected by geographic origins and grouped as sub-genotypes including A1-South Africa, A2-Europe, A3-Cameroon, and A5-Haiti. Reference sequences of sub-genotypes A1, A2, A3, and A5 were constructed and deposited into GenBank (KP234050-KP234053). By applying phylogenetic analyses, we further determined the time to most recent common ancestor of HBV/A lineages. In conclusion, these newly established reference sequences can provide suitable reference standards for studies on the molecular biology and virology of HBV genotype A.

  11. Citrus tristeza virus: Evolution of Complex and Varied Genotypic Groups.

    PubMed

    Harper, S J

    2013-01-01

    Amongst the Closteroviridae, Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is almost unique in possessing a number of distinct and characterized strains, isolates of which produce a wide range of phenotype combinations among its different hosts. There is little understanding to connect genotypes to phenotypes, and to complicate matters more, these genotypes are found throughout the world as members of mixed populations within a single host plant. There is essentially no understanding of how combinations of genotypes affect symptom expression and disease severity. We know little about the evolution of the genotypes that have been characterized to date, little about the biological role of their diversity and particularly, about the effects of recombination. Additionally, genotype grouping has not been standardized. In this study we utilized an extensive array of CTV genomic information to classify the major genotypes, and to determine the major evolutionary processes that led to their formation and subsequent retention. Our analyses suggest that three major processes act on these genotypes: (1) ancestral diversification of the major CTV lineages, followed by (2) conservation and co-evolution of the major functional domains within, though not between CTV genotypes, and (3) extensive recombination between lineages that have given rise to new genotypes that have subsequently been retained within the global population. The effects of genotype diversity and host-interaction are discussed, as is a proposal for standardizing the classification of existing and novel CTV genotypes.

  12. Citrus tristeza virus: Evolution of Complex and Varied Genotypic Groups

    PubMed Central

    Harper, S. J.

    2013-01-01

    Amongst the Closteroviridae, Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is almost unique in possessing a number of distinct and characterized strains, isolates of which produce a wide range of phenotype combinations among its different hosts. There is little understanding to connect genotypes to phenotypes, and to complicate matters more, these genotypes are found throughout the world as members of mixed populations within a single host plant. There is essentially no understanding of how combinations of genotypes affect symptom expression and disease severity. We know little about the evolution of the genotypes that have been characterized to date, little about the biological role of their diversity and particularly, about the effects of recombination. Additionally, genotype grouping has not been standardized. In this study we utilized an extensive array of CTV genomic information to classify the major genotypes, and to determine the major evolutionary processes that led to their formation and subsequent retention. Our analyses suggest that three major processes act on these genotypes: (1) ancestral diversification of the major CTV lineages, followed by (2) conservation and co-evolution of the major functional domains within, though not between CTV genotypes, and (3) extensive recombination between lineages that have given rise to new genotypes that have subsequently been retained within the global population. The effects of genotype diversity and host-interaction are discussed, as is a proposal for standardizing the classification of existing and novel CTV genotypes. PMID:23630519

  13. Changing prevalence of hepatitis B virus genotypes in Iceland.

    PubMed

    Björnsdottir, Thora B; Stanzeit, Barbara; Sällberg, Matti; Löve, Arthur; Hultgren, Catharina

    2005-12-01

    At present eight hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes have been characterized: A to H. The most common genotype in Northern Europe is genotype A. So far there is no record of the specific HBV genotype distribution in Iceland. Iceland has a small population whose homogeneity has changed due to increasing migration during the past decades. The distribution of HBV genotypes in Iceland was analyzed using sera from 170 Icelandic patients. The samples were obtained before 1989, during an HBV epidemic among intravenous drug users in 1989 to 1992 and after 1994. A fragment of the HBV S-gene was amplified, sequenced and subjected to phylogenetic analysis. Among samples derived before 1989 genotypes A, C, and D were found. Most of the samples diagnosed during the epidemic belonged to genotype D and a smaller portion to genotype A. This suggests that the epidemic was most likely caused either by an endogenous HBV strain or by a strain imported from Europe or the USA. Among samples obtained after 1994, genotypes A to E and G were found, but the majority were of genotypes A, C, and D. This is consistent with an increase in migration and immigration from regions in Asia and Africa during the past 10 years. Thus, the changing prevalence of HBV genotypes in a small isolated community such as Iceland reflects the influence of migration and increasing contacts with regions outside the Western World.

  14. Hepatitis B virus genotypes: epidemiological and clinical relevance in Asia.

    PubMed

    Tian, Qiuju; Jia, Jidong

    2016-11-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is characterized by a high genetic heterogeneity since it replicates via a reverse transcriptase that lacks proofreading ability. Up to now, ten genotypes (A-J) have been described, with genotype A and D being ubiquitous but most prevalent in Europe and Africa, genotype B and C being confined to Asia and Oceania. Infections with other genotypes such as E, F, G and H are also occasionally observed in Asia. Genotype I is rare and can be found in Laos, Vietnam, India and China, whereas genotype J has been described in Japan and Ryukyu. Novel variants generated by recombination and co-infection with other genotypes have gradually gotten worldwide attention and may be correlated with certain clinical features. There are substantial differences in HBV infection regarding prevalence, clinical manifestation, disease progression and response to antiviral therapy. Due to the complex interplay among viral, host and environmental factors, the relationship between HBV genotypes and clinical profiles remains incompletely revealed. In general, genotype A is associated with better response to interferon therapy; genotype C, and to lesser extent B, usually represent a risk factor for perinatal infection and are associated with advanced liver diseases such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma; genotype D may be linked with poor response to interferon therapy. Future studies with better design and larger sample size are warranted to further clarify the controversial issues and guide the day-to-day clinical practice.

  15. Comprehensive Annotation of Mature Peptides and Genotypes for Zika Virus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guangyu; Larsen, Christopher N; Baumgarth, Nicole; Klem, Edward B; Scheuermann, Richard H

    2017-01-01

    The rapid spread of Zika virus (ZIKV) has caused much concern in the global health community, due in part to a link to fetal microcephaly and other neurological illnesses. While an increasing amount of ZIKV genomic sequence data is being generated, an understanding of the virus molecular biology is still greatly lacking. A significant step towards establishing ZIKV proteomics would be the compilation of all proteins produced by the virus, and the resultant virus genotypes. Here we report for the first time such data, using new computational methods for the annotation of mature peptide proteins, genotypes, and recombination events for all ZIKV genomes. The data is made publicly available through the Virus Pathogen Resource at www.viprbrc.org.

  16. Comprehensive Annotation of Mature Peptides and Genotypes for Zika Virus

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Guangyu; Baumgarth, Nicole; Klem, Edward B.; Scheuermann, Richard H.

    2017-01-01

    The rapid spread of Zika virus (ZIKV) has caused much concern in the global health community, due in part to a link to fetal microcephaly and other neurological illnesses. While an increasing amount of ZIKV genomic sequence data is being generated, an understanding of the virus molecular biology is still greatly lacking. A significant step towards establishing ZIKV proteomics would be the compilation of all proteins produced by the virus, and the resultant virus genotypes. Here we report for the first time such data, using new computational methods for the annotation of mature peptide proteins, genotypes, and recombination events for all ZIKV genomes. The data is made publicly available through the Virus Pathogen Resource at www.viprbrc.org. PMID:28125631

  17. Sinonasal inverted papilloma: From diagnosis to treatment.

    PubMed

    Lisan, Q; Laccourreye, O; Bonfils, P

    2016-11-01

    Inverted papilloma is a rare sinonasal tumor that mainly occurs in adults during the 5th decade. Three characteristics make this tumor very different from other sinonasal tumors: a relatively strong potential for local destruction, high rate of recurrence, and a risk of carcinomatous evolution. Etiology remains little understood, but an association with human papilloma virus has been reported in up to 40% of cases, raising the suspicions of implication in the pathogenesis of inverted papilloma. Treatment of choice is surgery, by endonasal endoscopic or external approach, depending on extension and tumoral characteristics. Follow-up is critical, to diagnose local relapse, which is often early but may also be late. The seriousness of this pathology lies in its association with carcinoma, which may be diagnosed at the outset or at recurrence during follow-up. It is important to diagnose recurrence to enable early treatment, especially in case of associated carcinoma or malignancy. A comprehensive review of the international literature was performed on PubMed and Embase, using the following search-terms: "sinonasal" [All Fields] AND ("papilloma, inverted" [MeSH Terms] OR ("papilloma" [All Fields] AND "inverted" [All Fields]) OR "inverted papilloma" [All Fields] OR ("inverted" [All Fields] AND "papilloma" [All Fields])). We reviewed all articles referring to sinonasal inverted papilloma published up to January 2015. The present article updates the state of knowledge regarding sinonasal inverted papilloma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. E6 and E7 oncogene expression by human papilloma virus (HPV) and the aggressive behavior of recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis (RLP).

    PubMed

    Shehata, Bahig M; Otto, Kristen J; Sobol, Steven E; Stockwell, Christina A; Foulks, Cora; Lancaster, Wayne; Gregoire, Lucie; Hill, Charles E

    2008-01-01

    Recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis (RLP), a chronic disease associated with human papilloma virus (HPV), requires serial surgical procedures for debulking, resulting in debilitating long-term dysphonia, laryngeal scarring, and rarely malignant degeneration. Human papilloma virus 11 tumors have been widely accepted as more aggressive than HPV 6 tumors; however, the clinical course has been difficult to predict at disease onset, and the biologic mediators of proliferation have not been well characterized. A retrospective case review of 43 patients (4 months to 10 years at diagnosis) was performed on children treated for recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis. Patient charts were reviewed for demographic information, age at RLP diagnosis, approximate frequency of surgical intervention, and absolute number of surgical procedures performed. Human papilloma virus subtyping was performed. Expression analysis of the HPV-encoded E6 and E7 oncogenes was performed by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Fourteen patients had subtype 11 (33%) and 29 patients had subtype 6 (67%). As expected, HPV 11 patients showed a more aggressive clinical course than HPV 6 patients. However, 38% of patients with subtype 6 (11 patients) followed a clinical course that mirrored the more severe subtype 11 patients. These patients expressed the disease at a younger age (P < 0.0002) and showed higher levels of E6 and E7 oncogenes compared to the patients with the more indolent course. Although HPV subtype and early onset of RLP are well characterized prognostic factors, our study documents the significance of E6 and E7 oncogene expression as potential biologic mediators of proliferation and thereby clinical behavior.

  19. Knowledge Assessment of the Dental Community in Texas on the Role of Human Papilloma Virus in Oropharyngeal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Stephanie D; Hu, Shirley L; Brotzman, Jacob S; Redding, Spencer W; Rankin, K Vendrell; Vigneswaran, Nadarajah

    2015-08-01

    The epidemiology of oral cancer is changing. From 1988 to 2004, there has been a dramatic increase in Human Papilloma virus (HPV) positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPC) in the U.S. At the same time there have been decreasing rates of OPC associated with the traditional risk factors of smoking and alcohol consumption. The epidemiology of oral cancer is changing. As the epidemiology changes, it is important that the dental community recognize these factors. The goal of this study was to assess the baseline level of knowledge about HPV and OPC within the Texas dental community. Practicing dentists and dental hygienists from Texas dental professional networks and dental students from the three Texas schools of dentistry were recruited to participate in the study. Participants were requested to access and complete a 7-item online survey. To ensure anonymity, a third party practice facilitator or department administrator disseminated the survey link to participants. Of the 457 surveys completed, 100% of respondents reported conducting oral soft tissue examinations at least annually. However, only 73% included the oropharynx in their exam. Less than 50% of dental professionals selected the correct location of the greatest increase in oral cancer incidence during the last 10 years. Less than 30% of each of the groups answered correctly in indicating the age group with the most rapidly increasing incidence of oral cancer. Approximately 40% of all groups indicated that a biopsy from the posterior oropharynx should be tested for HPV. Survey results across Texas dentists, dental hygienists, and Texas dental students demonstrated a lack of knowledge of the changing profile of oral cancer regarding HPV-associated OPC. This aim of this initial phase was to determine the baseline level of knowledge surrounding the risks associated with oropharyngeal cancer in the survey population. Our goal is to utilize these findings to develop educational interventions that will

  20. Community-Based Prevalence of Genital Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) Infection: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed

    Sabeena, Sasidharanpillai; Bhat, Parvati V; Kamath, Veena; Bhat, Shashikala K; Nair, Sreekumaran; n, Ravishankar; Chandrabharani, Kiran; Arunkumar, Govindakarnavar

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Cervical cancer probably represents the best-studied human cancer caused by a viral infection and the causal association of this preventable cancer with human papilloma virus (HPV) is well established. Worldwide there is a scarcity of data regarding HPV prevalence with vast differences existing among populations. Objective: The aim of this meta-analysis was to determine the community-based HPV prevalence estimates among asymptomatic women from urban and rural set ups and in participants of cancer screening clinics. Study design: Systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods: PubMed-Medline, CINAHL, Scopus, and Google scholar were systematically searched for studies providing prevalence data for HPV infection among asymptomatic women between 1986 and 2016. Results: The final analysis included 32 studies comprising a population of 224,320 asymptomatic women. The overall pooled HPV prevalence was 11% (95% confidence interval (CI), 9%-12%). The pooled HPV prevalence of 11% (95% CI, 9%-11%) was observed among women attending cervical cancer screening clinics. The pooled HPV prevalences were 10% (95% CI 8%-12%) and 11% (95% CI 4%-18%) from urban and rural areas respectively, indicating higher infection rates among the rural women with the least access to cancer screening and cancer care. Conclusion: The prevalence rates in this systematic quantitative review provide a reliable estimate of the burden of HPV infection among asymptomatic women from developed as well as developing nations. Rural women and women attending cervical cancer screening programmes feature higher genital HPV prevalences compared to their urban counterparts.

  1. Cervical human papilloma virus (HPV) DNA primary screening test: Results of a population-based screening programme in central Italy.

    PubMed

    Passamonti, Basilio; Gustinucci, Daniela; Giorgi Rossi, Paolo; Cesarini, Elena; Bulletti, Simonetta; Carlani, Angela; Martinelli, Nadia; Broccolini, Massimo; D'Angelo, Valentina; D'Amico, Maria Rosaria; Di Dato, Eugenio; Galeazzi, Paola; Malaspina, Morena; Spita, Nicoletta; Tintori, Beatrice; Giaimo, Maria Donata

    2017-09-01

    Objective To present the results of the first and second round human papilloma virus (HPV)-based screening programme in the Umbria region after three years. Methods From August 2010 to November 2011, the entire female population aged 35-64 in a local health district was invited for HPV testing (HPV-DNA cobas4800 on a liquid-based cytology sample). HPV-negative women were re-invited after three years. For HPV-positive women, a slide was prepared and interpreted. Positive cytologies were referred to colposcopy; negatives were referred to repeat HPV after one year. If HPV was persistently positive, women were referred to colposcopy; if negative, to normal screening. Indicators of the first and second round are compared with those of cytology screening in the same area in the preceding three years. Results Participation was 56.5%, the same as cytology (56.6%). HPV-positivity was 6.4% (396/6272), cytology triage positivity was 35.6%; 251 cytology negative women were referred to one-year HPV retesting, 84.1% complied, and 55.5% were positive. Total colposcopy referral was 4.1%, and for cytology 1%. The detection rate for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or more severe was 10‰, compared with 3.7‰ using cytology. After three years, HPV-positivity was 3.4% (129/3831), overall colposcopy referral was 2.3% (most at one-year follow-up), and detection rate was 0.5/1000. Conclusions The first round detection rate was more than twice that of cytology screening, while colposcopy referral increased fourfold. At the second round, the detection rate decreased dramatically, showing that longer interval and more conservative protocols are needed.

  2. Knowledge, attitudes, and acceptability of a human papilloma virus vaccine among students, parents and teachers in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Songthap, Archin; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Fungladda, Wijitr; Bussaratid, Valai

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the knowledge and attitudes about human papilloma virus (HPV) and cervical cancer, and the acceptability of HPV vaccine among students, parents and teachers in secondary schools in Bangkok, Thailand. We conducted a school-based cross-sectional study at four public secondary schools in Bangkok. A total of 644 students aged 12-15 years, 664 parents and 304 teachers were recruited into the study. Data were collected by self-administered questionnaires. The percentages of students, parents and teachers who were willing to be vaccinated were 26, 49 and 43%, respectively. Forty-one percent of parents wanted their children to be vaccinated. Students, parents and teachers had a moderate knowledge of HPV, cervical cancer and the HPV vaccine with mean scores of 6.91 (SD = 1.75), 6.82 (SD = 1.88), and 6.70 (SD = 1.89), respectively. The attitudes of students, parents, and teachers were fair with scores of 3.46 (SD = 0.41), 3.52 (SD = 0.43), and 3.46 (SD = 0.47) out of 5, respectively. Twenty-nine percent of students and 36% of parents were willing to pay USD 14.3-28.5 per dose for the quadrivalent vaccine; 33% of teachers were willing to pay < USD 14.3 per dose for the quadrivalent vaccine. This study is the first study to report the knowledge, and attitudes and acceptability of HPV vaccination in Thailand. The findings suggest the willingness to pay was relatively low and related to the price, while knowledge and attitudes regarding the importance of the HPV vaccine were fair particularly among parents and teachers. Greater effort may be needed to educate people regarding the cost and benefits of HPV vaccination before it would be more acceptable to parents, teachers and students in Thailand.

  3. Transcriptomic analyses of genes differentially expressed by high-risk and low-risk human papilloma virus E6 oncoproteins.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Pooja; Ganguly, Niladri

    2015-09-01

    Human papilloma virus is the causative agent for cervical cancer with 99 % of cervical cancer cases containing HPV. The high risk HPV-16, 18 and 31 are the major causative agents. The low risk HPV-6, 11 have been reported to cause penile, laryngeal, bronchogenic and oesophageal cancer. Since E6 oncoprotein is frequently over expressed in cancers, we did gene expression studies to compare between the E6 genes of high-risk (HPV18) or low-risk (HPV11)stably transfected in epithelial cell line EPC-2 or mock transfected with the basic vector pCDNA3.1. Microarray studies showed a total of 697 genes showing differential expression between the samples. Genes involved in several key cellular processes such as cell adhesion, angiogenesis, transcription regulation, cell cycle regulation and cell division showed altered expression between the samples. Gene Ontology mapping of 44 genes according cellular pathways revealed 13 pathways namely angiogenesis, alzhemier's, Wnt, p53, interleukin, TGF-β, cadherin, integrin, PI3-kinase, catennin, insulin, chemokine and G protein signalling pathways. The microarray results were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR for some representative genes like IFI27, CTNNA1, OSMR, CYP1B1, TNFSF13, LAMA2 and COL5A3. Analysis of differentially expressed genes by high-risk and low-risk HPV E6 proteins might help in identification of potential biomarkers for diagnosis, progression and therapy of oesophageal cancer. The understanding of mechanisms of activation of these genes as well as the function of gene products will give a further insight into their roles in oesophageal cancer.

  4. [Acceptance of the vaccine against human papilloma virus from mothers to daughters aged 9 to 13 years old].

    PubMed

    Godoy Verdugo, Melissa Karina; Zonana Nacach, Abraham; Anzaldo Campos, Maria Cecilia

    2013-11-01

    If you consider that at some point in life 50% of sexually active women have had an infection with the human papilloma virus is indisputable that any attempt to reduce the prevalence worth undertaking it. The vaccine to prevent HIV infection has not enjoyed the same degree of acceptance than others, hence the interest in knowing some of the reasons that has not achieved universal vaccination. To examine human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine acceptability among mothers with adolescents girls between 9 and 13 years old. The mothers were interrogated about HVP vaccine acceptability, reasons provided for acceptance or non-acceptance and if mothers know that vaccine is offered free for public health institutions We interview a 250 mothers with 281 daughters, 38 daughters have already received the vaccine. Eighty nine percent of the mothers reacted positively to the possibility of vaccinating theirs daughters. The reasons of vaccine non-acceptance were because not knowing enough about infection, mother felt that their daughters were not at risk for acquiring HVP infection, the vaccine is new and mothers unknown side effects. Thirty nine percent of the mothers want to know more about the vaccine safety, 21% about length protection duration and 16% concerning about if the vaccine is effective. Fifty seven per cent of the mothers know that Health Secretary offers vaccine free. Mothers whom have been vaccinated their daughters, had daughters with lower age (9.8 +/- 0.9 vs 10.8 +/- 1.3 years, p = 0.0001), were more frequently married (79 vs 51%, p = 0.002) and more likely to report that they had heard about VPH vaccine from some source (100 vs 66%, p = 0.0001) that mothers have not yet vaccinated their daughters. The acceptability of VPH vaccine was 89%. Continued health education and propaganda is needed to promote a better knowledge of VPH vaccine.

  5. Knowledge of Saudi female university students regarding cervical cancer and acceptance of the human papilloma virus vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shaikh, Ghadeer K.; Almussaed, Eman M.; Fayed, Amel A.; Khan, Farida H.; Syed, Sadiqa B.; Al-Tamimi, Tahani N.; Elmorshedy, Hala N.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the level of knowledge regarding cervical cancer and the acceptance of the human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine among Saudi female students in health colleges. Methods: This cross-sectional study of a convenient sample encompassed 1400 students in Health Colleges at Princess Nora Bint Abdul Rahman University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia was conducted between December 2013 and February 2014. A self-administrated questionnaire was distributed to all participants. Data collected included socio-demographic data, knowledge of cervical cancer risk factors and clinical presentation, Pap smear, and HPV vaccine acceptance. The questionnaire reliability as tested by Cronbach’s alpha was 0.82. Results: The response rate was 89.9%, and data analysis revealed that 95.7% of students had poor knowledge level. The Pap smear was poorly recognized as a screening tool, with 46.7% of students having heard of the test. Senior and medical students had a significantly higher knowledge score. Father’s health profession, high monthly income, and presence of cervical cancer among family members or friends increased the level of knowledge. Vaccine acceptance is influenced by its price, approximately 80% of students thought that an affordable vaccine price should not exceed 300 Saudi Riyals. Perceived barriers to the vaccine were fear of injections and vaccine side effects. Conclusion: There is a lack of knowledge and misinformation regarding cervical cancer, Pap smear, and HPV as a major risk factor for cancer of the cervix. These data can be used as a benchmark to formulate effective awareness programs. PMID:25316467

  6. High-risk human papilloma virus infection decreases the frequency of dendritic Langerhans' cells in the human female genital tract

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Flores, Rafael; Mendez-Cruz, Rene; Ojeda-Ortiz, Jorge; Muñoz-Molina, Rebeca; Balderas-Carrillo, Oscar; de la Luz Diaz-Soberanes, Maria; Lebecque, Serge; Saeland, Sem; Daneri-Navarro, Adrian; Garcia-Carranca, Alejandro; Ullrich, Stephen E; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo

    2006-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are often arranged in planar layers in tissues with high antigenic exposure, such as skin and mucosae. Providing an en face view, this arrangement optimizes in situ analysis regarding morphology (even of individual dendrites), topographic distribution (regular/clustered) and quantification. The few reports on human genital DC usually utilize single markers and conventional sections, restricting immunolabelling only to cell parts sectioned by the cut. To better assess DC in situ, we labelled epithelial sheets, prepared from fresh cervix biopsies, with antibodies to major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-CII, CD1a and Langerin, revealing (with each of these markers) a dense DC network in a planar-like, regular distribution. Using the hybrid capture system to detect the high-risk mucotropic human papilloma virus (HPV) group, 16 positive and five negative women were studied and the results were compared between these groups. DC frequency per area was substantially reduced (to ≈ 50% for the three markers) in samples from all HPV-infected patients compared with samples from controls. Unlike HPV– samples, Langerin+ DC in HPV+ cervix exhibited a highly accentuated dendritic appearance. We believe this to be the first study using these three DC-restricted markers (Langerin, CD1a and MHC-CII) in cervical epithelial sheets from high-risk HPV+ donors and also the first study to demonstrate the morphological and quantitative changes triggered by high-risk HPV infection. Cervical DC reduction in early, premalignant high-risk HPV infection might represent viral subversion strategies interfering with efficient antigen handling by the immune system's peripheral sentinels, the DC, perhaps hampering appropriate recruitment and subsequent development of effector (cytotoxic) T cells. PMID:16423058

  7. Investigating the Prevalence of Human Papilloma Virus in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx and Its Correlation with Disease Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Atighechi, Saeid; Meybodian, Mojtaba; Dadgarnia, Mohammad Hossein; Baradaranfar, Mohammad Hossein; Behniafard, Nasim

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The human papilloma virus (HPV) can play a role in the development of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Our aim was to assess the prevalence of HPV DNA in SCC of the larynx. The impact of HPV infection on patient survival was also evaluated. Materials and Methods: This case-control study was performed in 44 patients with SCC of the larynx (case group), while the control group comprised samples obtained from cadavers with no previous history of malignancy. A preliminary pathologic evaluation was performed on all samples in the control group (36 samples) to ensure the absence of dysplasia or malignancy. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect HPV DNA. After completing the treatment protocol, patients were followed to assess the impact of HPV infection on overall survival (OS). Results: PCR evaluation in the case group showed that HPV DNA was successfully isolated from 11 (25%) samples, while only two (5.6%) HPV DNA-positive were obtained from cadavers. According to these results, a significant difference was obtained in the prevalence of HPV DNA and laryngeal SCC between cases and controls (P=0.031). No statistically significant difference was observed in the OS of patients with or without HPV infection in the case group (P=0.235). Conclusion: Based on these results, we suggest that the prevalence of HPV infection is higher in laryngeal SCC subjects compared with healthy individuals. Although a longer OS was seen in HPV-positive patients, survival analysis did not show a significant difference in the comparison of HPV-positive and negative findings in SCC patients. PMID:27429948

  8. Translational Potential into Health Care of Basic Genomic and Genetic Findings for Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Human Papilloma Virus

    PubMed Central

    Brankovic, Ivan; Verweij, Stephan P.; van Agtmael, Michiel A.; Brand, Angela; Morré, Servaas A.

    2013-01-01

    Individual variations in susceptibility to an infection as well as in the clinical course of the infection can be explained by pathogen related factors, environmental factors, and host genetic differences. In this paper we review the state-of-the-art basic host genomic and genetic findings' translational potential of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), and Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) into applications in public health, especially in diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of complications of these infectious diseases. There is a significant amount of knowledge about genetic variants having a positive or negative influence on the course and outcome of HIV infection. In the field of Chlamydia trachomatis, genomic advances hold the promise of a more accurate subfertility prediction test based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In HPV research, recent developments in early diagnosis of infection-induced cervical cancer are based on methylation tests. Indeed, triage based on methylation markers might be a step forward in a more effective stratification of women at risk for cervical cancer. Our review found an imbalance between the number of host genetic variants with a role in modulating the immune response and the number of practical genomic applications developed thanks to this knowledge. PMID:23781508

  9. The distribution of hepatitis B virus genotypes in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Louisirirotchanakul, Suda; Olinger, Christophe M; Arunkaewchaemsri, Panida; Poovorawan, Yong; Kanoksinsombat, Chinda; Thongme, Chittima; Sa-Nguanmoo, Pattaratida; Krasae, Sasithorn; Theamboonlert, Apiradee; Oota, Sineenart; Fongsatitkul, Ladda; Puapairoj, Chintana; Promwong, Charuporn; Weber, Bernard

    2012-10-01

    Phylogenetic analysis was performed on hepatitis B virus (HBV) strains obtained from 86 hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positive donors from Thailand originating throughout the country. Based on the S gene, 87.5% of strains were of genotype C while 10.5% were of genotype B, with all genotype B strains obtained from patients originating from the central or the south Thailand. No genotype B strains were found in the north of Thailand. Surprisingly, one patient was infected with a genotype H strain while another patient was infected with a genotype G strain. Complete genome sequencing and recombination analysis identified the latter as being a genotype G and C2 recombinant with the breakpoint around nucleotide position 700. The origin of the genotype G fragment was not identifiable while the genotype C2 fragment most likely came from strains circulating in Laos or Malaysia. The performance of different HBsAg diagnostic kits and HBV nucleic acid amplification technology (NAT) was evaluated. The genotype H and G/C2 recombination did not interfere with HBV detection.

  10. Prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes in Balochistan.

    PubMed

    Afridi, Sarwat; Naeem, Muhammad; Hussain, Abid; Kakar, Naseebullah; Babar, Masroor Ellahi; Ahmad, Jamil

    2009-07-01

    A molecular study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of Hepatitis C virus genotypes in HCV infected population of Balochistan. Forty HCV seropositive samples belonging to seven different locations of Balochistan were collected from different health care centres. Qualitative analysis of these samples using PCR resulted in 28 positive samples. The PCR positive samples were subjected to genotyping using the method described by Ohno et al (J Clin Microbiol 35:201-202, 1997) with minor modifications. Genotyping of 28 samples revealed three different genotypes including 3a, 3b and 1a. The most prevalent genotype was 3a with rate of 50% followed by genotype 3b and 1a, respectively. Nine samples remained untyped, suggesting the need of further investigation of genotypes in this region. It has been proposed that sequencing of these samples may be helpful to unreveal these genotypes and further epidemiology of HCV genotypes. Further more, extensive and large scale studies are needed to understand the epidemiology of HCV genotypes, as no such study has been carried in this province.

  11. The GARDASIL vaccine can prevent cervical carcinoma caused by human papilloma virus (HPV) (results from our participation and from the study carried out in Greece).

    PubMed

    Ansstasiou-Fotaki, P; Deligeoroglou, E; Kreatsas, G

    2007-01-01

    GARDASIL is a quadrivalent recombinant vaccine against the human papilloma virus (HPV), more specifically against types 6, 11, 16 and 18. We present our 10 cases of vaccinated patients, aged from 16 to 23, whose condition was followed for a period of 5 years after vaccination. Our study was part of the world program for investigating GARDASIL, which included 25,000 patients from 33 countries. The results showed that GARDASIL vaccination reduced precancerous cervical, vaginal and vulvar lesions, associated with HPV types 16 and 18, as well as condylomas associated with HPV types 6 and 11.

  12. New Measles Virus Genotype Associated with Outbreak, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Ding, Zhengrong; Wang, Huiling; Li, Liqun; Pang, Yankun; Brown, Kevin E.; Xu, Songtao; Zhu, Zhen; Rota, Paul A.; Featherstone, David

    2010-01-01

    To determine the origin of the virus associated with a measles outbreak in Menglian County, Yunnan Province, People’s Republic of China, in 2009, we conducted genetic analyses. Phylogenetic analyses based on nucleoprotein (N) and hemagglutinin (H) gene sequences showed that these Menglian viruses were not closely related to sequences of any World Health Organization (WHO) reference strains representing the 23 currently recognized genotypes. The minimum nucleotide divergence between the Menglian viruses and the most closely related reference strain, genotype D7, was 3.3% for the N gene and 3.0% for the H gene. A search of the databases of GenBank, WHO, and the Health Protection Agency Measles Nucleotide Surveillance showed that the Menglian viruses, together with the 2 older non-Menglian viruses, could be members of a new proposed measles genotype, d11. The new genotype designation will allow for better description of measles transmission patterns, especially in the Southeast Asian and Western Pacific regions. PMID:20507744

  13. Prevalence of cervical neoplastic lesions and Human Papilloma Virus infection in Egypt: National Cervical Cancer Screening Project.

    PubMed

    el-All, Howayda S Abd; Refaat, Amany; Dandash, Khadiga

    2007-07-04

    Data from Egyptian studies provide widely varying estimates on the prevalence of pre-malignant and malignant cervical abnormalities and human papilloma virus (HPVs) infection. To define the prevalence and risk factors of pre-invasive and invasive cervical cancer (cacx), a community based full-scale cross sectional, household survey including 5453 women aged between 35 and 60 years was conducted. The study period was between February 2000 and December 2002. Initially, conventional Papanicolaou (Pap) smears were evaluated using the Bethesda system (TBS), followed by colposcopic guided biopsy (CGB) for all epithelial abnormalities (EA). In a third step, HPV was tested on all EA by in-situ hybridization (ISH) using first the broad spectrum HPV probe recognizing HPVs 6, 11, 16, 18, 30, 31, 35, 45, 51 and 52 followed by subtyping with probes 6/11, 16/18 and 31/33. Lastly, unequivocal cases were immunostained for herpes simplex type-2 (HSV-2), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). EA representing 7.8% (424/5453), were categorized into atypical squamous cell of undetermined significance (ASCUS) (34.4%), atypical glandular cell of undetermined significance (AGCUS) (15.3%), combined ASCUS and AGCUS (3.1%), low grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) (41.0%), high grade SIL (5.2%) and invasive lesions (1%). CGB of EA (n = 281) showed non neoplastic lesions (12.8%), atypical squamous metaplasia (ASM) (19.2%), cervical intraepithelial neoplasia I (CIN) (44.4%), CIN II (4.4%), CINIII (2.8%), endocervical lesions (5.2%), combined squamous and endocervical lesions (10.0%), invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) (0.02%) and extranodal marginal zone B cell lymphoma (MZBCL) (0.02%). The overall predictive value of cytology was 87% while the predictive value for high grade lesions was 80%. On histological basis, HPVs were present in 94.3% of squamous lesions while it was difficult to be identified in endocervical ones. ISH revealed positivity for pan HPV

  14. ASSOCIATION AMONG HISTOLOGICAL FINDINGS SUGGESTIVE OF PAPILLOMA VIRUS ON HEMORRHOIDECTOMY SPECIMENS

    PubMed Central

    da SILVA, Soraya Souto; NAKAJIMA, Gerson Suguiyama; GUIMARÃES, Ricardo Alexandre; MOURÃO, Flávia da Costa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Many researchers studied human Papillomavirus infection in the anal area supposing it represents a risk factor for precursor lesions of anal cancer. Aim: To study the association between histological findings suggestive of injury by the virus in hemorrhoidectomy specimens. Method: Prevalence study was carried out based on histopathological analysis of hemorrhoidectomy specimens to find viral cytopathic effects. These findings were compared with anal condyloma acuminata that had no relationship with hemorrhoidectomy for microscopic comparison. Results: Of the 91 hemorroidectomies analyzed, eight had findings suggestive of viral cytopathic effects, with the presence of irregular acanthosis in 63%, koilocytes in 50% and other indirect viral cytopathic effects, such as hyperkeratosis (38%), parakeratosis (25% ) and papillomatosis (13%). Conclusion: This study was unable to conclude that there is an association between these two pathologic entities. PMID:26734795

  15. Hepatitis B virus genotypes circulating in Brazil: molecular characterization of genotype F isolates.

    PubMed

    Mello, Francisco C A; Souto, Francisco J D; Nabuco, Leticia C; Villela-Nogueira, Cristiane A; Coelho, Henrique Sergio M; Franz, Helena Cristina F; Saraiva, Joao Carlos P; Virgolino, Helaine A; Motta-Castro, Ana Rita C; Melo, Mabel M M; Martins, Regina M B; Gomes, Selma A

    2007-11-23

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) isolates have been classified in eight genotypes, A to H, which exhibit distinct geographical distributions. Genotypes A, D and F are predominant in Brazil, a country formed by a miscegenated population, where the proportion of individuals from Caucasian, Amerindian and African origins varies by region. Genotype F, which is the most divergent, is considered indigenous to the Americas. A systematic molecular characterization of HBV isolates from different parts of the world would be invaluable in establishing HBV evolutionary origins and dispersion patterns. A large-scale study is needed to map the region-by-region distribution of the HBV genotypes in Brazil. Genotyping by PCR-RFLP of 303 HBV isolates from HBsAg-positive blood donors showed that at least two of the three genotypes, A, D, and F, co-circulate in each of the five geographic regions of Brazil. No other genotypes were identified. Overall, genotype A was most prevalent (48.5%), and most of these isolates were classified as subgenotype A1 (138/153; 90.2%). Genotype D was the most common genotype in the South (84.2%) and Central (47.6%) regions. The prevalence of genotype F was low (13%) countrywide. Nucleotide sequencing of the S gene and a phylogenetic analysis of 32 HBV genotype F isolates showed that a great majority (28/32; 87.5%) belonged to subgenotype F2, cluster II. The deduced serotype of 31 of 32 F isolates was adw4. The remaining isolate showed a leucine-to-isoleucine substitution at position 127. The presence of genotypes A, D and F, and the absence of other genotypes in a large cohort of HBV infected individuals may reflect the ethnic origins of the Brazilian population. The high prevalence of isolates from subgenotype A1 (of African origin) indicates that the African influx during the colonial slavery period had a major impact on the circulation of HBV genotype A currently found in Brazil. Although most genotype F isolates belonged to cluster II, the presence of some

  16. P16INK4a Immunostaining but Lack of Human Papilloma Virus Type 16 in Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Basal Cell Carcinoma: a Report from West Iran.

    PubMed

    Ramezani, Mazaher; Abdali, Elham; Khazaei, Sedigheh; Vaisi-Raygani, Asad; Sadeghi, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p16 is a biomarker for transforming human papilloma virus (HPV) infections that can lead to contradictory results in skin carcinomas. The aim of this study was to evaluate p16 expression and HPV-16 infection in the cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). This case-control study was performed on paraffin blocks of BCCs and SCCs and normal skin (53, 36, and 44 cases, respectively), between 2006 to 2015. Initial sections for groups were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H and E). Immunohistochemistry was performed for p16 expression and human papilloma virus type 16 (HPV-16) infection. Normal group was skin of mammoplasty specimens and normal skin tissue in the periphery of tumors. The mean age at diagnosis was 42.1, 61.7 and 71.4 years for normal, BCC and SCC groups, respectively. P16 positivity was more in SCC and BCC groups compared to normal group (P<0.05) and HPV was negative in all patients in three groups. Also, the mean age at diagnosis and P16-positivity were higher for the SCC group than the BCC group (P<0.005). In conclusion, in non-melanoma skin cancers (SCC and BCC), p16-positivity can be a prognostic factor but there is no correlation between HPV-16 and p16 in these tumors.

  17. Avian nephritis virus (ANV) on Brazilian chickens farms: circulating genotypes and intra-genotypic diversity.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Luis Luna; Beserra, Laila A R; Soares, Rodrigo M; Gregori, Fabio

    2016-12-01

    Avian nephritis virus (ANV), which belongs to the family Astroviridae, is associated with different clinical manifestations (including enteric disorders). Despite being frequently found in the avian industry worldwide, information regarding genetic features of these viruses in Brazil is scarce. Therefore, sixty fecal sample pools (5-6 birds of the same flock), representing 60 poultry farms from six Brazilian States, were screened using an astrovirus-specific hemi-nested-PCR assay targeting the conserved ORF1b gene, followed by nucleotide sequencing of amplified products. PCR and phylogenetic analysis confirmed the detection of 21 positive samples to ANV (35 %). In order to investigate the genetic diversity represented by these viruses, amplification, cloning and phylogenetic analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence of ORF2 gene were attempted. Eight samples were successfully cloned (generating 32 clones in total) and sequenced. Based on phylogenetic analysis of ORF2, sequences defined in this study were classified into three genotypes: genotype 5, which has already been described in birds, and two other novel genotypes, tentatively named genotype 8 and 9, all of which occurred in single or mixed infections. Moreover, high intra-genotypic diversity and co-circulation of distinct strains in a same host population were observed. This study revealed the presence of new strains of ANV in Brazilian poultry and their circulation in commercial chicken flocks.

  18. Hepatitis E Virus Genotype 4 Outbreak, Italy, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Garbuglia, Anna R.; Scognamiglio, Paola; Petrosillo, Nicola; Mastroianni, Claudio Maria; Sordillo, Pasquale; Gentile, Daniele; La Scala, Patrizia; Girardi, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    During 2011, 5 persons in the area of Lazio, Italy were infected with a monophyletic strain of hepatitis E virus that showed high sequence homology with isolates from swine in China. Detection of this genotype in Italy parallels findings in other countries in Europe, signaling the possible spread of strains new to Western countries. PMID:23260079

  19. Hepatitis E Virus Genotype 3 in Humans and Swine, Bolivia

    PubMed Central

    Cavallo, Annalisa; Gonzales, José Luis; Bonelli, Sara Irene; Valda, Ybar; Pieri, Angela; Segundo, Higinio; Ibañez, Ramón; Mantella, Antonia; Bartalesi, Filippo; Tolari, Francesco; Bartoloni, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    We determined the seroprevalence of hepatitis E virus (HEV) in persons in 2 rural communities in southeastern Bolivia and the presence of HEV in human and swine fecal samples. HEV seroprevalence was 6.3%, and HEV genotype 3 strains with high sequence homology were detected. PMID:21801630

  20. Sources of Hepatitis E Virus Genotype 3 in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Lodder, Willemijn J.; Lodder-Verschoor, Froukje; van den Berg, Harold H.J.L.; Vennema, Harry; Duizer, Erwin; Koopmans, Marion; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria

    2009-01-01

    Non–travel-related hepatitis E virus (HEV) genotype 3 infections in persons in the Netherlands may have a zoonotic, foodborne, or water-borne origin. Possible reservoirs for HEV transmission by water, food, and animals were studied. HEV genotype 3/open reading frame 2 sequences were detected in 53% of pig farms, 4% of wild boar feces, and 17% of surface water samples. HEV sequences grouped within 4 genotype 3 clusters, of which 1 is so far unique to the Netherlands. The 2 largest clusters contained 35% and 43% of the animal and environmental sequences and 75% and 6%, respectively, of human HEV sequences obtained from a study on Dutch hepatitis E patients. This finding suggests that infection risk may be also dependent on transmission routes other than the ones currently studied. Besides the route of exposure, virus characteristics may be an important determinant for HEV disease in humans. PMID:19239749

  1. Betulin and ursolic acid synthetic derivatives as inhibitors of Papilloma virus.

    PubMed

    Kazakova, Oxana B; Giniyatullina, Gul'nara V; Yamansarov, Emil Yu; Tolstikov, Genrikh A

    2010-07-15

    The synthesis of new betulin and ursolic acid derivatives and evaluation of their antiviral activity in vitro is reported. Betulin was modified at positions C-3, C-20 and C-28 to afford the derivatives with nicotinoyl-, methoxycynnamoyl-, alkyne and aminopropoxy-2-cyanoethyl-moieties. The two stage conversion of betulin to the new ursane-type triterpenoid by treatment of allobetulin with Ac(2)O-HClO(4) is suggested. Cyanoethylation of ursonic acid oxime led to cyanoethyloximinoderivative. According to the results of antiviral screening against human papillomavirus type 11 the selectivity index for tested triterpenoids has a range from 10 to 35 with no cellular cytotoxicity, the most remarkable activity was found for 3beta,28-di-O-nicotinoylbetulin. 3Beta,28-dihydroxy-29-norlup-20(30)-yne was also active against HCV replicon (EC(50) 1.32; EC(90) 16.82; IC(50) 12.41; IC(90) >20; SI(50) 9.4; SI(90) >1.19). 28-O-methoxycynnamoylbetulin was active against influenza type A virus (H1N1) (EC(50) 2; IC(50) >200; SI >100).

  2. Identification of genotypes of Influenza A virus in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    MM, Rahman; KK, Wong; I, Isahak; ZZ, Rashid; H, Alfizah

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Influenza is considered as an emerging disease until today. The present study was undertaken to determine the prevalent genotypes of Influenza A virus in Malaysia. Methods: Influenza A virus was identified from respiratory specimens by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR). Phylogenetic analysis of the identified isolates was performed and genotypes were detected. Results: A total number of 505 throat swabs and nasopharyngeal aspirates were examined by rRT-PCR at Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre (UKMMC) in which 65(12.87%) were positive for influenza A. The identified isolates were successfully genotyped by phylogenetic analysis. The identified influenza A genotypes were: H1N1 (42), H3N2 (20) and H5N1 (3). Conclusion: The findings indicated that 3 genotypes were circulating in Malaysia during 2011 in which H1N1 was the predominant. Results added new genotype (H5N1) identification record in Malaysia that may be added in data base of WHO and CDC. PMID:25225528

  3. Neuroimmune mechanisms of behavioral alterations in a syngeneic murine model of human papilloma virus-related head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Vichaya, Elisabeth G; Vermeer, Daniel W; Christian, Diana L; Molkentine, Jessica M; Mason, Kathy A; Lee, John H; Dantzer, Robert

    2017-05-01

    Patients with cancer often experience a high symptom burden prior to the start of treatment. As disease- and treatment-related neurotoxicities appear to be additive, targeting disease-related symptoms may attenuate overall symptom burden for cancer patients and improve the tolerability of treatment. It has been hypothesized that disease-related symptoms are a consequence of tumor-induced inflammation. We tested this hypothesis using a syngeneic heterotopic murine model of human papilloma virus (HPV)-related head and neck cancer. This model has the advantage of being mildly aggressive and not causing cachexia or weight loss. We previously showed that this tumor leads to increased IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α expression in the liver and increased IL-1β expression in the brain. The current study confirmed these features and demonstrated that the tumor itself exhibits high inflammatory cytokine expression (e.g., IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α) compared to healthy tissue. While there is a clear relationship between cytokine levels and behavioral deficits in this model, the behavioral changes are surprisingly mild. Therefore, we sought to confirm the relationship between behavior and inflammation by amplifying the effect using a low dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 0.1mg/kg). In tumor-bearing mice LPS induced deficits in nest building, tail suspension, and locomotor activity approximately 24h after LPS. However, these mice did not display an exacerbation of LPS-induced weight loss, anorexia, or anhedonia. Further, while heightened serum IL-6 was observed there was minimal priming of liver or brain cytokine expression. Next we sought to inhibit tumor-induced burrowing deficits by reducing inflammation using minocycline. Minocycline (∼50mg/kg/day in drinking water) was able to attenuate tumor-induced inflammation and burrowing deficits. These data provide evidence in favor of an inflammatory-like mechanism for the behavioral alterations associated with tumor growth in a syngeneic

  4. [Epidemiologic characteristics in women with sterility and cervical lesions with and without human papilloma virus infection. Comparative study].

    PubMed

    Alvarez Fernández, J; Bustos López, H H; Villanueva Díaz, C; Zambrana Castañeda, M C; Coria Soto, I; Aranda Flores, C

    1998-04-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) infections frequently cause cervical lesions of different morphologies. We have previously reported a 53.5% pregnancy rate after treatment in a group of women with infertility associated to HPV infection of the cervix uteri. In that paper it was stated that a controlled study should be conducted in order to confirm this finding. Present work was aimed to find if there is any correlation between HPV infections of the cervix uteri and infertility in a retrospective design using an historical cohort of patients studied between 1991 and 1996 in our clinic. A total of 61 women attending the Infertility Clinic at the Instituto Nacional de Perinatología were included into two group. Group 1 (n = 45) included women with HPV lesions of the cervix and group II (n = 16) was formed by women with other type of cervical lesions who had no evidence of HPV infections on colposcopy. Cervico-vaginal citology, colposcopyc study and biopsy specimens were evaluated in all this medical records and the patients status (pregnant-not pregnant) at one year after treatment was registered. The mean duration time of infertility was 4.86 in group I and 3.5 in group II. Pregnancy rate was 16/45 (35.55%) in group I and 6/16 (37.5%) in group II. Seventy five percent of patients in group I and 66% in group II achieved a spontaneous pregnancy after specific treatment of cervical lesions whereas 25% and 33.3% required only ovarian stimulation with clomiphene or hMG. Pregnancies occurred approximately at 9 months after treatment in group I and at 7 months in group II. An association of cervical lesions and a tuboperitoneal factor (excluding endometriosis) was found on 53.57% of women in group I and on 46.66% of women in group II. Cervico-vaginal cytology was suspicious of HPV infection in less than 25% of cases. Present study emphasizes the need for a colposcopic study for the diagnosis of HPV infection in infertile women with cervical lesions even in cases with a negative

  5. High risk human papilloma viruses (HPVs) are present in benign prostate tissues before development of HPV associated prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Wendy K; Ngan, Christopher C; Amos, Timothy G; Edwards, Richard J; Swift, Joshua; Lutze-Mann, Louise; Shang, Fei; Whitaker, Noel J; Lawson, James S

    2017-01-01

    Although high risk HPVs are associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer it is not known if they have a causal role. The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential role of human papilloma viruses (HPVs) in prostate cancer. The aims are (i) to investigate the presence and confirm the identity of high risk HPVs in benign prostate tissues prior to the development of HPV positive prostate cancer in the same patients, and (ii) to determine if HPVs are biologically active. We used polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to identify HPVs in specimens from 52 Australian men with benign prostate biopsies who 1 to 10 years later developed prostate cancer. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to assess the expression of HPV E7 oncoproteins, cytokeratin and prostate specific antigen (PSA). We used RNASeq data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) to identify possible HPV RNA sequences in prostate cancer. HPV screening using standard PCR was conducted on 28 of the 52 sets of benign and later prostate cancers. HPV L1 genes were identified in 13 (46%) benign and 8 (29%) of 28 later prostate cancers in the same patients. HPV E7 genes were identified in 23 (82%) benign and 19 (68%) of 28 subsequent prostate cancers in the same patients. The same HPV types were present in both the benign and subsequent prostate cancers in 9 sets of specimens. HPV type 16 was identified in 15% of benign and 3% of prostate cancers. HPV type 18 was identified in 26% of benign and 16% of prostate cancers. Small numbers of HPV types 45, 47, 76 and 115 were also identified. High confidence RNA-Seq evidence for high risk HPV types 16 and 18 was identified in 12 (2%) of the 502 TCGA prostate cancer transcriptomes. High risk HPV E7 oncoprotein was positively expressed in 23 (82%) of 28 benign prostate specimens but only in 8 (29%) of 28 of the later prostate cancer specimens. This difference is statistically significant (p = 0.001). Prostate specific antigen (PSA) was more highly expressed in 26

  6. Health-related quality of life in Indian patients with three viral sexually transmitted infections: herpes simplex virus-2, genital human papilloma virus and HIV.

    PubMed

    Raj, Rama; Sreenivas, Vishnubhatla; Mehta, Manju; Gupta, Somesh

    2011-04-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) has not been studied in Indian patients with viral sexually transmitted infections (STIs): herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) and genital human papilloma virus (HPV) infections. Furthermore, there is no reported study that compares HRQOL among these two viral STIs and HIV. All consenting adults with any of the three viral infections attending a sexually transmitted disease clinic and 35 healthy controls were enrolled. HRQOL was evaluated using the WHOQOL-BREF instrument, which evaluates QOL under physical, psychological, social and environmental domains. Data concerning demographic and socioeconomic status were collected. There were 65 (27.3%), 60 (25.2%) and 53 (22.3%) patients with HIV, HSV-2 and HPV, respectively, and 25 (10.5%) patients with mixed infections. The WHOQOL-BREF scores of patients in different STI groups were significantly lower than those of controls. The total HRQOL scores (mean±SD) were 280.1±83.56 (among controls), 196.9±72.41 (genital HPV), 141.0±50.50 (HSV-2), 101.0±75.25 (HIV) and 103.4±47.23(mixed infection groups). Mean HRQOL scores were lowest in the physical and psychological domains. HRQOL scores were least in HIV and mixed infections groups, while patients with genital HPV infection had significantly better HRQOL scores compared to other patient groups. Higher education and socioeconomic status had a positive influence on HRQOL. Viral STIs were associated with a significant reduction in HRQOL scores. Among patient groups, the greatest impact on HRQOL was seen in those with HIV and mixed infections and the least impact seen in those with genital HPV infection. Comprehensive care including counselling services need to be implemented in STI clinics.

  7. Hepatitis E virus genotype 3 in wild rats, United States.

    PubMed

    Lack, Justin B; Volk, Kylie; Van Den Bussche, Ronald A

    2012-08-01

    The role of rodents in the epidemiology of zoonotic hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection has been a subject of considerable debate. Seroprevalence studies suggest widespread HEV infection in commensal Rattus spp. rats, but experimental transmission has been largely unsuccessful and recovery of zoonotic genotype 3 HEV RNA from wild Rattus spp. rats has never been confirmed. We surveyed R. rattus and R. norvegicus rats from across the United States and several international populations by using a hemi-nested reverse transcription PCR approach. We isolated HEV RNA in liver tissues from 35 of 446 rats examined. All but 1 of these isolates was relegated to the zoonotic HEV genotype 3, and the remaining sequence represented the recently discovered rat genotype from the United States and Germany. HEV-positive rats were detected in urban and remote localities. Genetic analyses suggest all HEV genotype 3 isolates obtained from wild Rattus spp. rats were closely related.

  8. Genotyping of hepatitis C virus-comparison of three assays.

    PubMed

    Haushofer, Alexander C; Berg, Jörg; Hauer, René; Trubert-Exinger, Doris; Stekel, Herbert G; Kessler, Harald H

    2003-08-01

    Genotyping of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is clinically relevant to epidemiology, prognosis, and therapeutical management of HCV infection. Accuracy and specificity of three assays for HCV genotyping/subtyping were determined. The TruGene HCV 5'NC Genotyping Kit (TruGene), which is a direct sequencing test and two assays based on reversed hybridization, Inno-LiPA HCV II assay and ViennaLab HCV Strip Assay, were compared. Amplification products generated by the Cobas Amplicor HCV Test were used. A total of 100 consecutive HCV RNA positive samples derived from patients with chronic hepatitis C were examined for their genotypes/subtypes by the three assays. Identification of genotypes and subtypes by the TruGene assay as reference test for the Inno-LiPA HCV II assay and the ViennaLab HCV Strip Assay or Inno-LiPA HCV II assay as reference test for the TruGene and the ViennaLab HCV Strip Assay showed similar results for overall accuracies (TruGene as reference test for Inno-LiPA HCV II and ViennaLab HCV Strip Assay, genotypes/subtypes: 100%/95.5% and 97%/92%; Inno-LiPA HCV II as reference test for TruGene and ViennaLab HCV Strip Assay, genotypes/subtypes: 99%/85.9% and 97%/87.9%) and specificities (TruGene as reference test for Inno-LiPA HCV II and ViennaLab HCV Strip Assay, genotypes/subtypes: 100%/97.8% and 99%/97.7%; Inno-LiPA HCV II as reference test for TruGene and ViennaLab HCV Strip Assay, genotypes/subtypes: 100%/99.4% and 99.7%/98%). The three assays were found to be reliable for the detection and discrimination of all HCV genotypes common in Europe and in North America and to be suitable for the routine diagnostic laboratory.

  9. Coinfection of hepatitis E virus and other hepatitis virus in Colombia and its genotypic characterization.

    PubMed

    Peláez, Dioselina; Martínez-Vargas, Daniel; Escalante-Mora, Martha; Palacios-Vivero, Mariel; Contreras-Gómez, Lady

    2015-12-04

    Hepatitis E virus has emerged as a public health problem, particularly in developing countries. The four genotypes identified in mammals include the G3 found in indigenous hepatitis in countries and regions with high porcine population, and the G1, associated with maternal deaths.  To determine coinfection by hepatitis E virus and the circulating genotypes in Colombia in 1,097 samples using serological markers for hepatitis A, B and C.  Serum samples of 1,097 patients from different regions of Colombia stored at the Laboratorio de Virología of the Instituto Nacional de Salud were selected to detect IgG and IgM anti-hepatitis E virus antibodies. The viral genomes of positive samples were amplified by RT-PCR, and the products were sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed by comparing ORF2 sequences deposited in the GenBank.  IgG anti-hepatitis E virus antibodies were found in 278 samples, IgM in 62, and both markers in 64. Hepatitis E virus and hepatitis A virus coinfection determined by IgG anti-hepatitis E virus was 33.6% and 16.1% by IgM; hepatitis E virus and hepatitis B virus coinfection was 23.4% and 8.1%, and hepatitis E virus and hepatitis C virus coinfection was 35.4% and 5.83%, respectively. Among the 52 positive samples by PCR nine were sequenced and grouped within genotype 3A of the American porcine strain.  The highest seropositivity was observed for hepatitis A and E. The incidence of hepatitis E virus coinfection with other hepatotropic viruses indicated that this pathogen is more frequent than expected. The circulation of genotype 3A implies that this disease may occur in outbreaks and as zoonosis in Colombia.

  10. New Genotype of Dengue Type 3 Virus Circulating in Brazil and Colombia Showed a Close Relationship to Old Asian Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Aquino, Victor Hugo; Amarilla, Alberto Anastacio; Alfonso, Helda Liz; Batista, Weber Cheli; Figueiredo, Luiz Tadeu Moraes

    2009-01-01

    Dengue type 3 genotype V viruses have been recently detected in Brazil and Colombia. In this study, we described another Brazilian isolate belonging to this genotype. Phylogenetic analysis including dengue type 3 viruses isolated worldwide showed that Brazilian and Colombian viruses were closely related to viruses isolated in Asia more than two decades ago. The characteristic evolutionary pattern of dengue type 3 virus cannot explain the close similarity of new circulating viruses with old viruses. Further studies are needed to confirm the origin of the new dengue type III genotype circulating in Brazil and Colombia. PMID:19823677

  11. New genotype of dengue type 3 virus circulating in Brazil and Colombia showed a close relationship to old Asian viruses.

    PubMed

    Aquino, Victor Hugo; Amarilla, Alberto Anastacio; Alfonso, Helda Liz; Batista, Weber Cheli; Figueiredo, Luiz Tadeu Moraes

    2009-10-13

    Dengue type 3 genotype V viruses have been recently detected in Brazil and Colombia. In this study, we described another Brazilian isolate belonging to this genotype. Phylogenetic analysis including dengue type 3 viruses isolated worldwide showed that Brazilian and Colombian viruses were closely related to viruses isolated in Asia more than two decades ago. The characteristic evolutionary pattern of dengue type 3 virus cannot explain the close similarity of new circulating viruses with old viruses. Further studies are needed to confirm the origin of the new dengue type III genotype circulating in Brazil and Colombia.

  12. Detection of bovine papilloma viruses in wart-like lesions of upper gastrointestinal tract of cattle and buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, P; Nagarajan, N; Saikumar, G; Arya, R S; Somvanshi, R

    2015-06-01

    In present investigation, etiopathological characterization of upper gastrointestinal tract (GIT) tumours of cattle and buffaloes was undertaken. A total of 27 GIT wart-like lesions in rumen, reticulum, mouth and oesophagus of cattle and buffaloes revealed the presence of small nodular to larger spherical or slender growths with thin base present on mucosa and ruminal pillar. Histopathologically, these cases were diagnosed as fibropapilloma/papilloma. This is the first world record on ruminal papillomatosis in buffaloes. Ruminal warts of cattle and buffaloes revealed the presence of BPV-5, -1 & -2, which is the first report of presence of these BPVs in the ruminal warts from India. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that DNA samples of different GIT wart-like lesions contained varying amount of BPV DNA copy numbers. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the PCNA and Ki67 immunopositivity was present in the basal and spinosum layer of the fibropapilloma/papilloma, indicating these as the cellular proliferation site. In conclusion, the present investigation revealed that BPV-5, -1 & -2 are associated with certain ruminal wart-like lesions/growths in cattle and buffaloes, and the basal and spinosum layer of the ruminal fibropapilloma/papilloma were cellular proliferation sites.

  13. Asian genotypes of dengue virus 4 in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pinho, A C O; Sardi, S I; Paula, F L; Peixoto, I B; Brandão, C J; Fernandez, F M C; Campos, G S

    2015-10-01

    Dengue virus, commonly transmitted by mosquitoes, causes a human disease of significant social impact and presents a serious public health problem in Brazil. This report describes the unusual emergence of DENV-4 in northern Brazil after a nearly 30-year-long absence. DENV-4 genotype I is of Asian origin and was identified in the serum of patients receiving treatment at a hospital serving the Salvador area (Brazilian state of Bahia). The identification of dengue virus serotypes through molecular and phylogenetic analysis is essential for predicting disease severity or fatal illness, principally in endemic countries such as Brazil.

  14. Hepatitis B Virus Genotype C Prevails Among Chronic Carriers of the Virus in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Si Hyun; Yoon, Seung Kew; Jang, Jeong Won; Kim, Chang Wook; Nam, Soon Woo; Choi, Jong Young; Kim, Boo Sung; Park, Young Min; Suzuki, Seiji; Sugauchi, Fuminaka

    2005-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is one of the major causative agents of chronic liver diseases in Korea. HBV has been classified into 8 genotypes by a divergence of >8% in the entire genomic sequence, and have distinct geographic distributions. There are limited data on the relevance between HBV genotypes and clinical outcomes in Korea. To investigate the clinical feature relating to HBV genotype in Korea, a total 120 serum samples with HBsAg (65 from Seoul and 55 from the other city in Korea) were obtained from each 30 chronic HBV carriers with asymptomatic carrier (ASC), chronic hepatitis (CH), liver cirrhosis (LC) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). HBV genotype was determined by either enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using monoclonal antibodies against genotype-specific epitopes in the preS2-region or the direct sequencing of small S gene. HBV genotypes were determined in 105 (87.5%) of 120 samples. HBV genotype C was identified in all HBV carriers with ASC, CH, LC, and HCC. Genotypes A, B, D, E, F and G were not detected in any of them. Genotype C HBV prevails predominantly among chronic carriers of the virus in Korea, irrespective of their clinical stages of liver disease and geographic origin. PMID:16224156

  15. Herpes and papilloma viruses

    SciTech Connect

    De Palo, G.; Rilke, F.; Zur Hausen, H.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains over 25 selections. Some of the titles are: Seroepidemiologic Asociation of HSV-2 with Cervical Cancers: Transforming Viral Genes; Organization and Expression of Human Papillomavirus DNA in Cervical Cancer Cell Lines; An Investigation of Cervical Scrapes by DNA Hybridization: and Human Papillomaviruses in Genital Tissue: Examination by Immunohistochemistry and in situ DNA Hybridization.

  16. Squamous Papilloma: Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Jaju, Prashant P; Suvarna, Prashant V; Desai, Rajiv S

    2010-01-01

    Squamous papillomas are common lesions of the oral mucosa with a predilection for the mucosa of the hard and soft palate. As an oral lesion, it raises concern because of its clinical appearance, which may mimic exophytic carcinoma, verrucous carcinoma or condyloma acuminatum. Its pathogenesis is related to human papilloma virus but there is controversy regarding its viral origin. We present a case of squamous papilloma presenting as oral lesion along with a review of the literature. PMID:21404972

  17. Measles virus genotypes circulating in India, 2011-2015.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Sunil R; Chowdhury, Deepika T

    2017-05-01

    The Government of India is accepted to participate in the measles elimination and rubella control goal 2020, hence genetic characterization of measles viruses (MeV) becomes essential. At National Reference Laboratory (National Institute of Virology, Pune), the throat swabs/urine specimens (n = 380) or PCR products (n = 219) obtained from the suspected measles cases were referred for the molecular testing and subsequently, MeV nucleoprotein (N) gene sequencing/genotyping. In addition, 2,449 suspected measles cases, mainly from the Maharashtra state were referred for the laboratory diagnosis. A detailed study was performed on N gene sequences obtained during last two decades. Indian MeV sequences obtained during 2011-2015 were compared with 1996-2010 sequences and genetic divergence was studied. Circulation of measles genotypes B3 (n = 3), D4 (n = 49), and D8 (n = 351) strains were observed in 19 States and three Union Territories of India. In addition, 64 measles viruses were isolated from 253 throat swab or urine specimens obtained from the suspected measles cases. During 2011-2015, 67.9% (1,663/2,449) suspected measles cases were laboratory confirmed. Molecular studies showed circulation of measles genotype B3 in India along with prominently circulating genotypes D4 and D8 except D7 strains. The genetic diversion within Indian B3, D4, and D8 genotypes was 0.3%, 1.1%, and 2.1%, respectively. The genetic divergence of Indian B3, D4, and D8 measles strains with the WHO reference sequences was 2.5%, 2.6%, and 1.8%, respectively. It is crucial data for national immunization program. More measles/rubella genotyping studies are necessary to track transmission and to support measles elimination and rubella control. J. Med. Virol. 89:753-758, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Low risk of contamination with human papilloma virus during treatment of condylomata acuminata with multilayer argon plasma coagulation and CO₂ laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Weyandt, Gerhard H; Tollmann, Franz; Kristen, Peter; Weissbrich, Benedikt

    2011-03-01

    Multilayer argon plasma coagulation (APC) is a new effective method for the treatment of genital warts. We assessed the generation of aerosols containing human papilloma virus (HPV) DNA during treatment of genital warts with multilayer APC and with CO₂ laser ablation. Surveillance petri dishes, swabs from the glasses and nasolabial folds of the operating physician, and swabs taken from the suction units used during CO₂ laser ablation were tested by HPV PCR. HPV DNA corresponding to patient derived HPV types of genital warts was not found in any of the petri dishes and swabs obtained during APC treatment. HPV DNA was detected in none of the petri dishes obtained during CO₂ laser treatment, but in suction filters. In conclusion, both CO₂ laser ablation with plume suction and APC treatment seem to have a low risk of HPV contamination of the operation room.

  19. In situ hybridization with novel biotinyl-tyramide: fundamental studies and its utility of the detection of human papilloma virus in tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Hikino, Toshiaki

    2007-10-01

    We developed an in situ hybridization (ISH) method with a higher sensitivity and less background staining than the generally used catalyzed reporter deposition amplification method of in situ hybridization (CARD-ISH). The characteristics of this method are follows: sections heated in citrate buffer (pH6.0) containing 0.1% Triton X-100 showed the strongest signals, and a well-preserved morphology. The strongest signals were observed when borate buffer of biotinyl-tyramide stock and phosphate buffer of working solution were changed to Tris-HCl buffer. Compared with hematoxylin counter staining, alcian blue counter staining made it easier to identify dot, diffuse, and mixed type signals, respectively. Thus, we were able to clearly detect positive signals in the SiHa cell line with 1-2 copies of the integrated human papilloma virus-16 (HPV-16) gene, and in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cervical lesion specimens for the HPV-16 gene.

  20. Genotype X/C recombinant (putative genotype I) of hepatitis B virus is rare in Hanoi, Vietnam--genotypes B4 and C1 predominate.

    PubMed

    Phung, Thi Bich Thuy; Alestig, Erik; Nguyen, Thanh Liem; Hannoun, Charles; Lindh, Magnus

    2010-08-01

    There are eight known genotypes of hepatitis B virus, A-H, and several subgenotypes, with rather well-defined geographic distributions. HBV genotypes were evaluated in 153 serum samples from Hanoi, Vietnam. Of the 87 samples that could be genotyped, genotype B was found in 67 (77%) and genotype C in 19 (22%). All genotype C strains were of subgenotype C1, and the majority of genotype B strains were B4, while a few were B2. The genotype X/C recombinant strain, identified previously in Swedish patients of indigenous Vietnamese origin, was found in one sample. This variant, proposed to be classified as genotype I, has been found recently also by others in Vietnam and Laos. The current study indicates that the genotype X/C recombinant may represent approximately 1% of the HBV strains circulating in Vietnam. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Global Identification of Three Major Genotypes of Varicella-Zoster Virus: Longitudinal Clustering and Strategies for Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Loparev, Vladimir N.; Gonzalez, Antonio; Deleon-Carnes, Marlene; Tipples, Graham; Fickenscher, Helmut; Torfason, Einar G.; Schmid, D. Scott

    2004-01-01

    By analysis of a single, variable, and short DNA sequence of 447 bp located within open reading frame 22 (ORF22), we discriminated three major varicella-zoster virus (VZV) genotypes. VZV isolates from all six inhabited continents that showed nearly complete homology to ORF22 of the European reference strain Dumas were assigned to the European (E) genotype. All Japanese isolates, defined as the Japanese (J) genotype, were identical in the respective genomic region and proved the most divergent from the E strains, carrying four distinct variations. The remaining isolates carried a combination of E- and J-specific variations in the target sequence and thus were collectively termed the mosaic (M) genotype. Three hundred twenty-six isolates collected in 27 countries were genotyped. A distinctive longitudinal distribution of VZV genotypes supports this approach. Among 111 isolates collected from European patients, 96.4% were genotype E. Consistent with this observation, approximately 80% of the VZV strains from the United States were also genotype E. Similarly, genotype E viruses were dominant in the Asian part of Russia and in eastern Australia. M genotype viruses were strongly dominant in tropical regions of Africa, Indochina, and Central America, and they were common in western Australia. However, genotype M viruses were also identified as a minority in several countries worldwide. Two major intertypic variations of genotype M strains were identified, suggesting that the M genotype can be further differentiated into subgenotypes. These data highlight the direction for future VZV genotyping efforts. This approach provides the first simple genotyping method for VZV strains in clinical samples. PMID:15254207

  2. Prevalence of high-risk human papilloma virus among women with hepatitis C virus before liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tarallo, P.A.; Smolowitz, J.; Carriero, D.; Tarallo, J.; Siegel, A.; Jia, H.; Emond, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    Background We sought to assess the prevalence and risk factors for high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection among female liver transplant (LT) candidates. Traditional health screening before LT listing has included Pap smear and is typically carried out by the patient’s local provider. The prevalence of high-risk HPV in this population has not been studied. Methods With Institutional Review Board approval, 62 LT candidates received a liquid-based Pap smear with high-risk HPV testing as part of their pre-transplant evaluation by a single provider. Clinical variables included age, ethnicity, insurance status, prior Pap smear, and HPV results, HPV risk factors including age of first intercourse, number of lifetime partners, last sexual activity, smoking, birth control pill use, history of sexually transmitted infections, human immunodeficiency virus status, immunosuppressive medication, medical diagnoses, prescribed medications, and history of hepatitis A, B, C, or D. Results The 62 women had a median age of 56 years, and 39% had high-risk behavior known to be associated with HPV. Ten of 62 patients (16.1%) had high-risk HPV at baseline screening, 5 of whom had atypical cytology. All of the patients who were positive for high-risk HPV had an etiology of hepatitis C virus (HCV) as the underlying cause of liver disease, with the majority (90%) having no history of high-risk behavior for HPV. In contrast, all patients with high-risk behavior who were HCV negative were HPV negative. Fisher’s exact test demonstrated a statistically significant relationship between HPV and HCV; odds ratio = 24.4, 95% confidence interval, P-value = 0.0013. None of the other potential risk factors were associated with HPV in this cohort. Conclusions In this study, we provide evidence of a strong association between HCV and HPV in LT candidates, which has not been previously reported. HPV positivity was observed in non-sexually active women, suggesting a reactivation of dormant HPV

  3. Comparison of 2 different PCR-based technologies for the detection of human papilloma virus from paraffin-embedded tissue: genómica clinical arrays versus SPF(10)-LiPA(25).

    PubMed

    Pérez, Cristina; Klaustermeier, Jo Ellen; Alemany, Laia; Tous, Sara; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Velasco, Julio

    2012-03-01

    The great interest in molecular epidemiology of human papilloma virus (HPV) in cervical cancer led us to perform a thorough evaluation of 2 polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods for the detection of HPV in archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples. Thus, the aim of this study was to compare HPV detection in FFPE samples that have histopathologic diagnosis of invasive cervical cancer using SPF10 broad-spectrum primers PCR followed by DNA enzyme immunoassay and LiPA25 (version 1: Labo Biomedical products, Rijswijk, The Netherlands version 1) and the Papillomavirus Clinical Arrays technique (Genómica, Tres Cantos, Madrid, Spain). In this study, 235 biopsies with histopathologic diagnosis of invasive cervical cancer were analyzed for the detection and genotyping of HPV by LiPA25 SPF10-PCR System (version 1) and Papillomavirus Clinical Arrays technique. The detection of HPV DNA with Genómica technique was 75.1%, and 91.9% with LiPA25 SPF10-PCR. The Genómica technique detected a higher percentage of multiple infections (35%) than LiPA25 (8.9%), with a very low agreement for the detection of multiple infections between them (P>0.05). Our study highlights an important difference between 2 PCR-based methods for detection and genotyping of HPV. LiPA25 SPF10-PCR technology may be more adequate than Genómica for the detection of HPV DNA when using FFPE tissue.

  4. The upstream regulatory region of the human papilloma virus-16 contains an E2 protein-independent enhancer which is specific for cervical carcinoma cells and regulated by glucocorticoid hormones.

    PubMed Central

    Gloss, B; Bernard, H U; Seedorf, K; Klock, G

    1987-01-01

    The upstream regulatory region of the human papilloma virus-16 (HPV-16) genomic DNA contains a sequence element with a large degree of homology to the partially palindromic sequence GGTACANNNTGTTCT, which is the consensus sequence of the glucocorticoid responsive elements of known genes regulated by this steroid hormone. DNase I and dimethylsulfate protection experiments reveal the binding of this sequence by rat glucocorticoid receptor protein. A 400-bp DNA segment centrally containing this sequence confers strong inducibility by dexamethasone to the promoter p97 of HPV-16 and to the Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase promoter, as judged by chloramphenicol acetyltransferase activity and RNase protection assays. The same DNA segment, that does not contain the consensus sequences of all papilloma viruses relevant for E2 protein-mediated transcription enhancement, functions in an enhancer-like fashion in addition to its glucocorticoid responsive action. This hormone-independent transcription enhancement is absent in human MCF7 cells, but is strong in human HeLa cells where the combined activity of the constitutive and the steroid hormone-dependent enhancer elements stimulate transcription by a factor of 500. This cell type specificity of the HPV-16 enhancer may be responsible for the tissue tropism of the virus. These observations and the presence of numerous homologies to known enhancers of cellular and viral genes suggest a complex pattern of activation of the human papilloma virus-16 promoters. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 6. PMID:2828035

  5. Epidemiology and genetic characterization of hepatitis A virus genotype IIA.

    PubMed

    Desbois, Delphine; Couturier, Elisabeth; Mackiewicz, Vincent; Graube, Arielle; Letort, Marie-José; Dussaix, Elisabeth; Roque-Afonso, Anne-Marie

    2010-09-01

    Three hepatitis A virus (HAV) genotypes, I, II, and III, divided into subtypes A and B, infect humans. Genotype I is the most frequently reported, while genotype II is hardly ever isolated, and its genetic diversity is unknown. From 2002 to 2007, a French epidemiological survey of HAV identified 6 IIA isolates, mostly from patients who did not travel abroad. The possible African origin of IIA strains was investigated by screening the 2008 mandatory notification records of HAV infection: 171 HAV strains from travelers to West Africa and Morocco were identified. Genotyping was performed by sequencing of the VP1/2A junction in 68 available sera. Entire P1 and 5' untranslated regions of IIA strains were compared to reference sequences of other genotypes. The screening retrieved 5 imported IIA isolates. An additional autochthonous case and 2 more African cases were identified in 2008 and 2009, respectively. A total of 14 IIA isolates (8 African and 6 autochthonous) were analyzed. IIA sequences presented lower nucleotide and amino acid variability than other genotypes. The highest variability was observed in the N-terminal region of VP1, while for other genotypes the highest variability was observed at the VP1/2A junction. Phylogenetic analysis identified 2 clusters, one gathering all African and two autochthonous cases and a second including only autochthonous isolates. In conclusion, most IIA strains isolated in France are imported by travelers returning from West Africa. However, the unexplained contamination mode of autochthonous cases suggests another, still to be discovered geographical origin or a French reservoir to be explored.

  6. Epidemiology and Genetic Characterization of Hepatitis A Virus Genotype IIA▿

    PubMed Central

    Desbois, Delphine; Couturier, Elisabeth; Mackiewicz, Vincent; Graube, Arielle; Letort, Marie-José; Dussaix, Elisabeth; Roque-Afonso, Anne-Marie

    2010-01-01

    Three hepatitis A virus (HAV) genotypes, I, II, and III, divided into subtypes A and B, infect humans. Genotype I is the most frequently reported, while genotype II is hardly ever isolated, and its genetic diversity is unknown. From 2002 to 2007, a French epidemiological survey of HAV identified 6 IIA isolates, mostly from patients who did not travel abroad. The possible African origin of IIA strains was investigated by screening the 2008 mandatory notification records of HAV infection: 171 HAV strains from travelers to West Africa and Morocco were identified. Genotyping was performed by sequencing of the VP1/2A junction in 68 available sera. Entire P1 and 5′ untranslated regions of IIA strains were compared to reference sequences of other genotypes. The screening retrieved 5 imported IIA isolates. An additional autochthonous case and 2 more African cases were identified in 2008 and 2009, respectively. A total of 14 IIA isolates (8 African and 6 autochthonous) were analyzed. IIA sequences presented lower nucleotide and amino acid variability than other genotypes. The highest variability was observed in the N-terminal region of VP1, while for other genotypes the highest variability was observed at the VP1/2A junction. Phylogenetic analysis identified 2 clusters, one gathering all African and two autochthonous cases and a second including only autochthonous isolates. In conclusion, most IIA strains isolated in France are imported by travelers returning from West Africa. However, the unexplained contamination mode of autochthonous cases suggests another, still to be discovered geographical origin or a French reservoir to be explored. PMID:20592136

  7. High-risk human papilloma virus infection, tumor pathophenotypes, and BRCA1/2 and TP53 status in juvenile breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Aceto, Gitana Maria; Solano, Angela Rosaria; Neuman, Maria Isabel; Veschi, Serena; Morgano, Annalisa; Malatesta, Sara; Chacon, Reinaldo Daniel; Pupareli, Carmen; Lombardi, Mercedes; Battista, Pasquale; Marchetti, Antonio; Mariani-Costantini, Renato; Podestà, Ernesto Jorge

    2010-08-01

    Juvenile breast cancer is rare and poorly known. We studied a series of five breast cancer patients diagnosed within 25 years of age that included two adolescents, 12- and 15-years-old, and 3 young women, 21-, 21-, and 25-years-old, respectively. All cases were scanned for germline mutations along the entire BRCA1/2 coding sequences and TP53 exons 4-10, using protein truncation test, denaturing high performance liquid chromatography and direct sequencing. Paraffin-embedded primary tumors (available for 4/5 cases), and a distant metastasis (from the 15-years-old) were characterized for histological and molecular tumor subtype, human papilloma virus (HPV) types 16/18 E6 sequences and tumor-associated mutations in TP53 exons 5-8. A BRCA2 germline mutation (p.Ile2490Thr), previously reported in breast cancer and, as compound heterozygote, in Fanconi anemia, was identified in the 21-year-old patient diagnosed after pregnancy, negative for cancer family history. The tumor was not available for study. Only germline polymorphisms in BRCA1/2 and/or TP53 were detected in the other cases. The tumors of the 15- and 12-years-old were, respectively, classified as glycogen-rich carcinoma with triple negative subtype and as secretory carcinoma with basal subtype. The tumors of the 25-year-old and of the other 21-year-old were, respectively, diagnosed as infiltrating ductal carcinoma with luminal A subtype and as lobular carcinoma with luminal B subtype. No somatic TP53 mutations were found, but tumor-associated HPV 16 E6 sequences were retrieved from the 12- and 25-year-old, while both HPV 16 and HPV 18 E6 sequences were found in the tumor of the 15-year-old and in its associated metastasis. Blood from the 15- and 25-year-old, diagnosed with high-stage disease, resulted positive for HPV 16 E6. All the HPV-positive cases were homozygous for arginine at TP53 codon 72, a genotype associated with HPV-related cancer risk, and the tumors showed p16(INK4A) immunostaining, a marker of HPV

  8. Antibodies Targeting Novel Neutralizing Epitopes of Hepatitis C Virus Glycoprotein Preclude Genotype 2 Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Deng, Kai; Liu, Ruyu; Rao, Huiying; Jiang, Dong; Wang, Jianghua; Xie, Xingwang; Wei, Lai

    2015-01-01

    Currently, there is no effective vaccine to prevent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, partly due to our insufficient understanding of the virus glycoprotein immunology. Most neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) were identified using glycoprotein immunogens, such as recombinant E1E2, HCV pseudoparticles or cell culture derived HCV. However, the fact that in the HCV acute infection phase, only a small proportion of patients are self-resolved accompanied with the emergence of nAbs, indicates the limited immunogenicity of glycoprotein itself to induce effective antibodies against a highly evolved virus. Secondly, in previous reports, the immunogen sequence was mostly the genotype of the 1a H77 strain. Rarely, other genotypes/subtypes have been studied, although theoretically one genotype/subtype immunogen is able to induce cross-genotype neutralizing antibodies. To overcome these drawbacks and find potential novel neutralizing epitopes, 57 overlapping peptides encompassing the full-length glycoprotein E1E2 of subtype 1b were synthesized to immunize BALB/c mice, and the neutralizing reactive of the induced antisera against HCVpp genotypes 1-6 was determined. We defined a domain comprising amino acids (aa) 192-221, 232-251, 262-281 and 292-331 of E1, and 421-543, 564-583, 594-618 and 634-673 of E2, as the neutralizing regions of HCV glycoprotein. Peptides PUHI26 (aa 444-463) and PUHI45 (aa 604-618)-induced antisera displayed the most potent broad neutralizing reactive. Two monoclonal antibodies recognizing the PUHI26 and PUHI45 epitopes efficiently precluded genotype 2 viral (HCVcc JFH and J6 strains) infection, but they did not neutralize other genotypes. Our study mapped a neutralizing epitope region of HCV glycoprotein using a novel immunization strategy, and identified two monoclonal antibodies effective in preventing genotype 2 virus infection.

  9. African swine fever virus p72 genotype IX in domestic pigs, Congo, 2009.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, Carmina; Anchuelo, Raquel; Pelayo, Virginia; Poudevigne, Frédéric; Leon, Tati; Nzoussi, Jacques; Bishop, Richard; Pérez, Covadonga; Soler, Alejandro; Nieto, Raquel; Martín, Hilario; Arias, Marisa

    2011-08-01

    African swine fever virus p72 genotype IX, associated with outbreaks in eastern Africa, is cocirculating in the Republic of the Congo with West African genotype I. Data suggest that viruses from eastern Africa are moving into western Africa, increasing the threat of outbreaks caused by novel viruses in this region.

  10. Dengue Virus 3 Genotype I in Aedes aegypti Mosquitoes and Eggs, Brazil, 2005–2006

    PubMed Central

    Vilela, Ana P.P.; Figueiredo, Leandra B.; dos Santos, João R.; Eiras, Álvaro E.; Bonjardim, Cláudio A.; Ferreira, Paulo C.P.

    2010-01-01

    Dengue virus type 3 genotype I was detected in Brazil during epidemics in 2002–2004. To confirm this finding, we identified this virus genotype in naturally infected field-caught Aedes aegypti mosquitoes and eggs. Results showed usefulness of virus investigations in vectors as a component of active epidemiologic surveillance. PMID:20507754

  11. Characterization of Mumps Viruses Circulating in Mongolia: Identification of a Novel Cluster of Genotype H▿

    PubMed Central

    Kidokoro, Minoru; Tuul, Rentsengiin; Komase, Katsuhiro; Nymadawa, Pagbajab

    2011-01-01

    Although mumps virus is still causing annual epidemics in Mongolia, very few epidemiological and virological data have been reported. We describe here the first phylogenetic analysis data on the mumps viruses circulated in Mongolia in 2009. We detected 21 mumps virus cDNAs and obtained a virus isolate from 32 throat swabs of mumps patients in Ulaanbaatar, the capital of Mongolia. The phylogenetic analyses based on the 316 nucleotides of the small hydrophobic gene show that these sequences form a single cluster, with the closest relatedness to the viruses belonging to genotype H. According to the recommendation of the World Health Organization, Mongolian mumps viruses could be classified into a novel genotype because the divergence between new sequences and genotype H reference viruses is >5% (6.3 to 8.2%). However, additional analyses based on the fusion gene, the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase gene, and the whole-genome indicate that the divergences between the Mongolian isolate and other genotype H strains never exceed the within-genotype divergences of other genotypes. These results suggest that Mongolia strains should be included in genotype H and that the current criteria for mumps virus genotyping should be revised. We propose here that the Mongolian viruses should be classified as a new subgenotype termed H3. Since previous epidemiological studies suggested that genotypes H may be associated with central nervous system diseases, we evaluated the neurovirulence of the Mongolian isolate in the neonatal rat system. However, the virus does not exhibit prominent neurovirulence in rats. PMID:21411578

  12. Biological and phylogenetic characterization of a genotype VII Newcastle disease virus from Venezuela: Efficacy of vaccination

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Here we describe the characterization a virulent genotype VII Newcastle disease virus (NDV) from Venezuela and evaluate the efficacy of heterologous genotype commercial vaccination under field and controlled rearing conditions. Biological pathotyping and molecular analysis were applied. Results sh...

  13. The Role of Polymerase Chain Reaction of High-Risk Human Papilloma Virus in the Screening of High-Grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions in the Anal Mucosa of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Males Having Sex with Males

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo-Tenorio, Carmen; Rivero-Rodriguez, Mar; Gil-Anguita, Concepción; Esquivias, Javier; López-Castro, Rodrigo; Ramírez-Taboada, Jessica; de Hierro, Mercedes López; López-Ruiz, Miguel A.; Martínez, R. Javier; Llaño, Juan P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the advantages of cytology and PCR of high-risk human papilloma virus (PCR HR-HPV) infection in biopsy-derived diagnosis of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL = AIN2/AIN3) in HIV-positive men having sex with men (MSM). Methods This is a single-centered study conducted between May 2010 and May 2014 in patients (n = 201, mean age 37 years) recruited from our outpatient clinic. Samples of anal canal mucosa were taken into liquid medium for PCR HPV analysis and for cytology. Anoscopy was performed for histology evaluation. Results Anoscopy showed 33.8% were normal, 47.8% low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), and 18.4% HSIL; 80.2% had HR-HPV. PCR of HR-HPV had greater sensitivity than did cytology (88.8% vs. 75.7%) in HSIL screening, with similar positive (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of 20.3 vs. 22.9 and 89.7 vs. 88.1, respectively. Combining both tests increased the sensitivity and NPV of HSIL diagnosis to 100%. Correlation of cytology vs. histology was, generally, very low and PCR of HR-HPV vs. histology was non-existent (<0.2) or low (<0.4). Area under the receiver operating characteristics (AUROC) curve analysis of cytology and PCR HR-HPV for the diagnosis of HSIL was poor (<0.6). Multivariate regression analysis showed protective factors against HSIL were: viral suppression (OR: 0.312; 95%CI: 0.099-0.984), and/or syphilis infection (OR: 0.193; 95%CI: 0.045-0.827). HSIL risk was associated with HPV-68 genotype (OR: 20.1; 95%CI: 2.04-197.82). Conclusions When cytology and PCR HR-HPV findings are normal, the diagnosis of pre-malignant HSIL can be reliably ruled-out in HIV-positive patients. HPV suppression with treatment protects against the appearance of HSIL. PMID:25849412

  14. Genotype 3 Infection: The Last Stand of Hepatitis C Virus.

    PubMed

    Chan, Austin; Patel, Keyur; Naggie, Susanna

    2017-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) represents a significant global disease burden, with an estimated 130-150 million people worldwide living with chronic HCV infection. Within the six major clinical HCV genotypes, genotype 3 represents 22-30% of all infection and is described as a unique entity with higher rates of steatosis, faster progression to cirrhosis, and higher rates of hepatocellular carcinoma. Hepatic steatosis in the setting of hepatitis C genotype 3 (HCV-3) is driven by viral influence on three major pathways: microsomal triglyceride transfer protein, sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c, and peroxisome proliferator-associated receptor-α. Historically with direct-acting antivirals, the rates of cure for HCV-3 therapies lagged behind the other genotypes. As current therapies for HCV-3 continue to close this gap, it is important to be cognizant of common drug interactions such as acid-suppressing medication and amiodarone. In this review, we discuss the rates of steatosis in HCV-3, the mechanisms behind HCV-3-specific steatosis, and current and future therapies.

  15. Emergence of dengue virus type 4 genotype IIA in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    AbuBakar, Sazaly; Wong, Pooi-Fong; Chan, Yoke-Fun

    2002-10-01

    Phylogenetic analyses of the envelope (E) gene sequence of five recently isolated dengue virus type 4 (DENV-4) suggested the emergence of a distinct geographical and temporal DENV-4 subgenotype IIA in Malaysia. Four of the isolates had direct ancestral lineage with DENV-4 Indonesia 1973 and showed evidence of intra-serotypic recombination with the other recently isolated DENV-4, MY01-22713. The E gene of isolate MY01-22713 had strong evidence of an earlier recombination involving DENV-4 genotype II Indonesia 1976 and genotype I Malaysia 1969. These results suggest that intra-serotypic recombination amongst DENV-4 from independent ancestral lineages may have contributed to the emergence of DENV-4 subgenotype IIA in Malaysia.

  16. Papillomas and cancer in cattle.

    PubMed

    Campo, M S

    1987-01-01

    Papillomaviruses induce hyperproliferation of epithelial cells of the skin or mucosa (papillomas), and certain types can also infect fibroblasts. They are a very heterogeneous group of viruses, and individual types are associated with specific lesions. The papillomas are mostly benign but some tumours may eventually undergo malignant conversion when genetic or environmental factors are involved. In cattle, bovine papillomavirus type 4 (BPV-4) is the causative agent of papillomas of the alimentary canal, which can become the focus for the development of carcinomas in animals feeding on the bracken fern. These animals are immunosuppressed and are often affected also by adenocarcinomas of the lower bowel and by carcinomas and haemangiosarcomas of the urinary bladder. Persistent, widespread papillomatosis and cancers of both the alimentary tract and the urinary bladder have been experimentally reproduced in animals either kept on a diet of bracken or immunosuppressed with azathioprine. As is the case for the naturally occurring cancers, no viral DNA was detected in the experimental cancers of the upper alimentary canal or of the lower bowel, indicating that the viral genome is not required for the maintenance of the malignant state. On the contrary, BPV-2 DNA was detected in several bladder cancers, both natural and experimental, suggesting that this virus can be present in a latent form and can be involved in malignant transformation. Further evidence of latent infection was provided by the onset of BPV-1 or BPV-2 skin warts in papillomatosis-free animals. These findings are obviously relevant to the human disease.

  17. Pepino mosaic virus genotype shift in North America and rapid genotype identification using loop-mediated isothermal amplification

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pepino mosaic, once an emerging disease a decade ago, has become endemic on greenhouse tomatoes worldwide in recent years. Three distinct genotypes of Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV), including EU, US1 and CH2 have been recognized. Our earlier study in 2006-2007 demonstrated a predominant EU genotype ...

  18. Genotyping of feline leukemia virus in Mexican housecats.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Hugo; Autran, Marcela; García, M Martha; Carmona, M Ángel; Rodríguez, Cecilia; Martínez, H Alejandro

    2016-04-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is a retrovirus with variable rates of infection globally. DNA was obtained from cats' peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and proviral DNA of pol and env genes was detected using PCR. Seventy-six percent of cats scored positive for FeLV using env-PCR; and 54 %, by pol-PCR. Phylogenetic analysis of both regions identified sequences that correspond to a group that includes endogenous retroviruses. They form an independent branch and, therefore, a new group of endogenous viruses. Cat gender, age, outdoor access, and cohabitation with other cats were found to be significant risk factors associated with the disease. This strongly suggests that these FeLV genotypes are widely distributed in the studied feline population in Mexico.

  19. Identification of new sub-genotypes of virulent Newcastle disease virus with potential panzootic features.

    PubMed

    Miller, Patti J; Haddas, Ruth; Simanov, Luba; Lublin, Avishay; Rehmani, Shafqat Fatima; Wajid, Abdul; Bibi, Tasra; Khan, Taseer Ahmad; Yaqub, Tahir; Setiyaningsih, Surachmi; Afonso, Claudio L

    2015-01-01

    Virulent Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolates from new sub-genotypes within genotype VII are rapidly spreading through Asia and the Middle East causing outbreaks of Newcastle disease (ND) characterized by significant illness and mortality in poultry, suggesting the existence of a fifth panzootic. These viruses, which belong to the new sub-genotypes VIIh and VIIi, have epizootic characteristics and do not appear to have originated directly from other genotype VII NDV isolates that are currently circulating elsewhere, but are related to the present and past Indonesian NDV viruses isolated from wild birds since the 80s. Viruses from sub-genotype VIIh were isolated in Indonesia (2009-2010), Malaysia (2011), China (2011), and Cambodia (2011-2012) and are closely related to the Indonesian NDV isolated in 2007, APMV1/Chicken/Karangasem, Indonesia (Bali-01)/2007. Since 2011 and during 2012 highly related NDV isolates from sub-genotype VIIi have been isolated from poultry production facilities and occasionally from pet birds, throughout Indonesia, Pakistan and Israel. In Pakistan, the viruses of sub-genotype VIIi have replaced NDV isolates of genotype XIII, which were commonly isolated in 2009-2011, and they have become the predominant sub-genotype causing ND outbreaks since 2012. In a similar fashion, the numbers of viruses of sub-genotype VIIi isolated in Israel increased in 2012, and isolates from this sub-genotype are now found more frequently than viruses from the previously predominant sub-genotypes VIId and VIIb, from 2009 to 2012. All NDV isolates of sub-genotype VIIi are approximately 99% identical to each other and are more closely related to Indonesian viruses isolated from 1983 through 1990 than to those of genotype VII, still circulating in the region. Similarly, in addition to the Pakistani NDV isolates of the original genotype XIII (now called sub-genotype XIIIa), there is an additional sub-genotype (XIIIb) that was initially detected in India and Iran

  20. Psittacid herpesviruses associated with mucosal papillomas in neotropical parrots.

    PubMed

    Styles, Darrel K; Tomaszewski, Elizabeth K; Jaeger, Laurie A; Phalen, David N

    2004-07-20

    Mucosal papillomas are relatively common lesions in several species of captive neotropical parrots. They cause considerable morbidity and in some cases, result in mortality. Previous efforts to identify papillomavirus DNA and proteins in these lesions have been largely unsuccessful. In contrast, increasing evidence suggests that mucosal papillomas may contain psittacid herpesviruses (PsHVs). In this study, 41 papillomas from 30 neotropical parrots were examined by PCR with PsHV-specific primers. All 41 papillomas were found to contain PsHV DNA. This 100% prevalence of PsHV infection in the papilloma population was found to be significantly higher than PsHV infection prevalence observed in other surveys of captive parrots. PsHV genotypes 1, 2, and 3, but not 4 were found in these lesions. Psittacus erithacus papillomavirus DNA and finch papillomavirus DNA were not found in the papillomas. A papilloma from a hyacinth macaw (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus) was found to contain cells that had immunoreactivity to antiserum made to the common antigenic region of human papillomavirus (HPV) L1 major capsid protein. However, four other mucosal papillomas were negative for this immunoreactivity, and negative control tissues from a parrot embryo showed a similar staining pattern to that seen in the cloaca papilloma of the hyacinth macaw, strongly suggesting that the staining seen in hyacinth macaw papilloma was nonspecific. Based on these findings, it was concluded that specific genotypes of PsHV play a direct role in the development of mucosal papillomas of neotropical parrots and there is no evidence to suggest the concurrent presence of a papillomavirus in these lesions.

  1. Identification of Asian genotype of chikungunya virus isolated in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Quiñonez, José Alberto; Escobar-Escamilla, Noé; Ortíz-Alcántara, Joanna; Vázquez-Pichardo, Mauricio; de la Luz Torres-Rodríguez, María; Nuñez-León, Alma; Torres-Longoria, Belem; López-Martínez, Irma; Ruiz-Matus, Cuitláhuac; Kuri-Morales, Pablo; Ramírez-González, José Ernesto

    2016-02-01

    We identified 25 autochthonous chikungunya virus cases in Mexico, initially detected by RT-PCR targeting the E1 gene and propagated in C6/36 Aedes albopictus cells, in 2014. To determine the type of virus found, in a previous report, the genomes of 2 CHIKV strains were fully sequenced. Genome sequence analysis revealed that these isolates from Mexico belonged to the Asian genotype, and a phylogenetic association with the circulating strain in the British Virgin Islands was also established in the same year. This was further supported by changes in specific amino acids, E2-V368A and 6K-L20M. For these reasons, it can be inferred that the route of virus entry to Mexico was held across the countries in the Caribbean and Central America. The presence of E1-A226V mutation associated with more efficient replication in the salivary gland of the A. albopictus mosquito was not observed. Interestingly, a newly acquired NSP4-S399C mutation was observed; however, the significance of changes in amino acid found in non-structural proteins in autochthonous strains remains to be elucidated.

  2. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification. The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay is a device that consists of nucleic acid...

  3. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification. The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay is a device that consists of nucleic acid...

  4. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification. The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay is a device that consists of nucleic acid...

  5. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification. The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay is a device that consists of nucleic acid...

  6. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. 866.3950 Section 866.3950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a...

  7. Genotyping of occult hepatitis B virus infection in Egyptian hemodialysis patients without hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Esmail, Mona A; Mahdi, Wafaa K M; Khairy, Rasha M; Abdalla, Nilly H

    2016-01-01

    Occult hepatitis B viral infection is the presence of hepatitis B viral nucleic acids in the serum and/or liver in the absence of hepatitis B surface antigen. The study aimed to determine the prevalence of occult hepatitis B virus infection among hepatitis C virus-negative hemodialysis patients and to identify their genotypes. of 144 patients on maintenance hemodialysis, 50 hepatitis B surface antigen and hepatitis C virus nucleic acid-negative patients were selected according to strict inclusion criteria to avoid the effect of confounding variables. The following investigations were done: serum AST and ALT; HBsAg; HBcAb; HCV-Ab; HCV-RNA; and HBV-DNA. Positive hepatitis B viral nucleic acid was confirmed in 12/144 (8.3%) hemodialysis patients and 12/50 (24%) in our study group (occult infection). Mean hemodialysis periods for negative patients and occult hepatitis B virus patients were 27.3±18.8 and 38.4±8.14 months, respectively, and this difference was significant (p-value=0.02). Mean alanine transaminase levels were 20.27±5.5IU/L and 25.3±9.6 in negative patients and occult infection patients, respectively. This difference was non-significant. Aspartate transaminase levels were 21.4±10.2IU/L and 27.3±4.6IU/L, respectively, in negative patients and infected patients; this difference was significant (p-value=0.03). Half (6/12) of the positive samples belonged to genotype 'B', 33.3% (4/12) to 'C', and 16.6% (2/12) to genotype 'D'. OBI is likely among hemodialysis patients even without HCV coinfection (24%). Genotype D cannot be the only genotype distributed in Upper Egypt, as the current study reported relatively new results that 50% of the patients with occult B carry genotype B, 33.3% carry genotype C and only 16.6% carry genotype D. Copyright © 2015 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Hepatitis C virus genotype 4 responds better to pegylated interferon with ribavirin than genotype 1 in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Mira, José A; Rivero, Antonio; de Los Santos-Gil, Ignacio; López-Cortés, Luis F; Girón-González, José A; Márquez, Manuel; Merino, Dolores; del Mar Viloria, María; Téllez, Francisco; Ríos-Villegas, María J; Omar, Mohamed; Rivero-Juárez, Antonio; Macías, Juan; Pineda, Juan A

    2012-08-24

    We assess the efficacy of pegylated interferon (peg-IFN) with ribavirin (RBV) and the predictors of sustained virological response (SVR) among HIV/hepatitis C virus genotype 4 (HCV-4)-coinfected patients. Thirty-nine (31.5%) of 124 individuals with HCV-4 achieved SVR compared with 103 (22.7%) of 453 individuals with HCV genotype 1 (P=0.046). Only interleukin-28B (IL28B) genotype CC was independently associated with SVR in HIV/HCV-4-coinfected patients. The efficacy of peg-IFN with RBV in coinfected individuals with genotype 4 is significantly higher than in those with genotype 1. IL28B CC genotype is the main predictor of response in this population.

  9. Viral fitness does not correlate with three genotype displacement events involving infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus.

    PubMed

    Kell, Alison M; Wargo, Andrew R; Kurath, Gael

    2014-09-01

    Viral genotype displacement events are characterized by the replacement of a previously dominant virus genotype by a novel genotype of the same virus species in a given geographic region. We examine here the fitness of three pairs of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) genotypes involved in three major genotype displacement events in Washington state over the last 30 years to determine whether increased virus fitness correlates with displacement. Fitness was assessed using in vivo assays to measure viral replication in single infection, simultaneous co-infection, and sequential superinfection in the natural host, steelhead trout. In addition, virion stability of each genotype was measured in freshwater and seawater environments at various temperatures. By these methods, we found no correlation between increased viral fitness and displacement in the field. These results suggest that other pressures likely exist in the field with important consequences for IHNV evolution.

  10. Viral fitness does not correlate with three genotype displacement events involving infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kell, Alison M.; Wargo, Andrew R.; Kurath, Gael

    2014-01-01

    Viral genotype displacement events are characterized by the replacement of a previously dominant virus genotype by a novel genotype of the same virus species in a given geographic region. We examine here the fitness of three pairs of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) genotypes involved in three major genotype displacement events in Washington state over the last 30 years to determine whether increased virus fitness correlates with displacement. Fitness was assessed using in vivo assays to measure viral replication in single infection, simultaneous co-infection, and sequential superinfection in the natural host, steelhead trout. In addition, virion stability of each genotype was measured in freshwater and seawater environments at various temperatures. By these methods, we found no correlation between increased viral fitness and displacement in the field. These results suggest that other pressures likely exist in the field with important consequences for IHNV evolution.

  11. Development of a novel genotype-specific loop-mediated isothermal amplification technique for Hepatitis B virus genotypes B and C genotyping and quantification.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhejun; Lou, Guoqiang; Cai, Ting; Yang, Jin; Wu, Nanping

    2011-12-01

    There is the need for a rapid, economical method for genotyping Hepatitis B virus (HBV) to support clinical practice. To develop a novel HBV genotyping process using genotype specific loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP). HBV genotypes B and C specific LAMP methods were evaluated using standard panel. A comparative analysis of the LAMP test against Taqman assay using 105 clinical samples, was undertaken to evaluate the quantitation capacity of the method. 111 clinical samples were used to test the clinical applicability of the genotype specific LAMP method. The results were compared with those obtained by real-time PCR based genotyping and sequencing. Using genotype-specific primers, the LAMP assay correctly identified all predefined genotypes B and C, and no cross-reaction was observed. Real-time format of this assay provides simultaneous identification and quantification of genotypes B and C. The detection sensitivity of the method was found to be 323 and 515 copies/ml for genotypes B and C specific LAMP assay respectively. High correlation (R(2)=0.91) and good agreement between the LAMP method and the real-time PCR test were achieved for HBV quantitation. Samples from 111 HBV-infected patients were genotyped with LAMP, revealing 53% HBV as genotype B, 36% as genotype C, and 12% as mixed genotypes B and C. LAMP method showed coincidence rates of 96.7% with the real-time PCR genotyping results. This approach is a promising tool for HBV genotyping and quantitation. It appears to be useful for routine clinical practice even in field investigation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Pathogenesis of new sub-genotypes of Newcastle disease virus strains from Israel and Pakistan

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Newcastle disease (ND) is a devastating disease of poultry worldwide caused by virulent strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV). New genotypes and sub-genotypes of NDV frequently emerge. In the past few years, NDV strains belonging to sub-genotype VIIi and XIIIb emerged in the Middle East and Asi...

  13. Nucleotide sequence variation of the envelope protein gene identifies two distinct genotypes of yellow fever virus.

    PubMed

    Chang, G J; Cropp, B C; Kinney, R M; Trent, D W; Gubler, D J

    1995-09-01

    The evolution of yellow fever virus over 67 years was investigated by comparing the nucleotide sequences of the envelope (E) protein genes of 20 viruses isolated in Africa, the Caribbean, and South America. Uniformly weighted parsimony algorithm analysis defined two major evolutionary yellow fever virus lineages designated E genotypes I and II. E genotype I contained viruses isolated from East and Central Africa. E genotype II viruses were divided into two sublineages: IIA viruses from West Africa and IIB viruses from America, except for a 1979 virus isolated from Trinidad (TRINID79A). Unique signature patterns were identified at 111 nucleotide and 12 amino acid positions within the yellow fever virus E gene by signature pattern analysis. Yellow fever viruses from East and Central Africa contained unique signatures at 60 nucleotide and five amino acid positions, those from West Africa contained unique signatures at 25 nucleotide and two amino acid positions, and viruses from America contained such signatures at 30 nucleotide and five amino acid positions in the E gene. The dissemination of yellow fever viruses from Africa to the Americas is supported by the close genetic relatedness of genotype IIA and IIB viruses and genetic evidence of a possible second introduction of yellow fever virus from West Africa, as illustrated by the TRINID79A virus isolate. The E protein genes of American IIB yellow fever viruses had higher frequencies of amino acid substitutions than did genes of yellow fever viruses of genotypes I and IIA on the basis of comparisons with a consensus amino acid sequence for the yellow fever E gene. The great variation in the E proteins of American yellow fever virus probably results from positive selection imposed by virus interaction with different species of mosquitoes or nonhuman primates in the Americas.

  14. Nucleotide sequence variation of the envelope protein gene identifies two distinct genotypes of yellow fever virus.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, G J; Cropp, B C; Kinney, R M; Trent, D W; Gubler, D J

    1995-01-01

    The evolution of yellow fever virus over 67 years was investigated by comparing the nucleotide sequences of the envelope (E) protein genes of 20 viruses isolated in Africa, the Caribbean, and South America. Uniformly weighted parsimony algorithm analysis defined two major evolutionary yellow fever virus lineages designated E genotypes I and II. E genotype I contained viruses isolated from East and Central Africa. E genotype II viruses were divided into two sublineages: IIA viruses from West Africa and IIB viruses from America, except for a 1979 virus isolated from Trinidad (TRINID79A). Unique signature patterns were identified at 111 nucleotide and 12 amino acid positions within the yellow fever virus E gene by signature pattern analysis. Yellow fever viruses from East and Central Africa contained unique signatures at 60 nucleotide and five amino acid positions, those from West Africa contained unique signatures at 25 nucleotide and two amino acid positions, and viruses from America contained such signatures at 30 nucleotide and five amino acid positions in the E gene. The dissemination of yellow fever viruses from Africa to the Americas is supported by the close genetic relatedness of genotype IIA and IIB viruses and genetic evidence of a possible second introduction of yellow fever virus from West Africa, as illustrated by the TRINID79A virus isolate. The E protein genes of American IIB yellow fever viruses had higher frequencies of amino acid substitutions than did genes of yellow fever viruses of genotypes I and IIA on the basis of comparisons with a consensus amino acid sequence for the yellow fever E gene. The great variation in the E proteins of American yellow fever virus probably results from positive selection imposed by virus interaction with different species of mosquitoes or nonhuman primates in the Americas. PMID:7637022

  15. The appearance of a second genotype of Japanese encephalitis virus in the Australasian region.

    PubMed

    Pyke, A T; Williams, D T; Nisbet, D J; van den Hurk, A F; Taylor, C T; Johansen, C A; Macdonald, J; Hall, R A; Simmons, R J; Mason, R J; Lee, J M; Ritchie, S A; Smith, G A; Mackenzie, J S

    2001-12-01

    In mid-January 2000, the reappearance of Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus activity in the Australasian region was first demonstrated by the isolation of JE virus from 3 sentinel pigs on Badu Island in the Torres Strait. Further evidence of JE virus activity was revealed through the isolation of JE virus from Culex gelidus mosquitoes collected on Badu Island and the detection of specific JE virus neutralizing antibodies in 3 pigs from Saint Pauls community on Moa Island. Nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analyses of the premembrane and envelope genes were performed which showed that both the pig and mosquito JE virus isolates (TS00 and TS4152, respectively) clustered in genotype I, along with northern Thai, Cambodian, and Korean isolates. All previous Australasian JE virus isolates belong to genotype II, along with Malaysian and Indonesian isolates. Therefore, for the first time, the appearance and transmission of a second genotype of JE virus in the Australasian region has been demonstrated.

  16. Human papilloma virus (HPV) infection leads to the development of head and neck lesions but offers better prognosis in malignant Indian patients.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Shreya; Alam, Neyaz; Chakraborty, Jayanta; Biswas, Jaydip; Mandal, Syam Sundar; Roychoudhury, Susanta; Panda, Chinmay Kumar

    2017-03-25

    Head and neck cancers constitute a multifactorial global disease burden and are associated with human papilloma virus (HPV) as a possible risk factor. The aim of the study is to understand the relationship between HPV and the development of head and neck lesions in Indian patients. To this end, frequency of HPV was assessed in relation to different demographic and etiological features and correlated with patient survival. The prevalence of HPV significantly increased from mild dysplastic lesions (43.6%) to head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) stage IV (68.5%) with HPV 16 being pre-dominant in both dysplasia (43.8%) and HNSCC (61.5%). Similar trend was observed in increasing grades of the tumour. In invasive lesions, patients aged below the median age of onset showed significantly higher occurrence of HPV than those above it. Patients harbouring HPV showed a significantly better survival irrespective of age of onset. Likewise, better survival was observed in tobacco habit negative/HPV-positive patients, and as reflected in both univariate and multivariate analysis. Majority of the HPV 16-positive samples showed moderate/high nuclear expression of HPV E6 and E7 proteins in tumours and respective basal layer of adjacent normal tissues. Thus, our data indicate that frequent HPV infection, along with tobacco habit, is a pre-requisite factor for the development of HNSCC of Indian patients but offers a better survival even during tobacco usage, implicating its diagnostic and prognostic importance.

  17. The prevalence of human papilloma virus (HPV) infections in oral squamous cell carcinomas: a retrospective analysis of 88 patients and literature overview.

    PubMed

    Krüger, M; Pabst, A M; Walter, C; Sagheb, K; Günther, C; Blatt, S; Weise, K; Al-Nawas, B; Ziebart, T

    2014-10-01

    In addition to tobacco and alcohol consumption, the two main risk factors for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), recent studies have revealed infections with human papilloma virus (HPV) as an additional risk factor for OSCC development. In the field of head and neck malignancies, the prevalence of HPV infections in oropharyngeal cancer (OC) ranges in different studies up to 84%. While HPV infection is discussed as an independent risk factor in this region, its distinguished role in carcinogenesis of tumours localized to the oral cavity remains still uncertain. In this study, we analysed the HPV status in 88 consecutive patients with OSCCs localized anterior of the palatoglossal arch who were treated in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at the University Medical Center Mainz. The HPV status analysis was performed using DNA-PCR and immunostaining of p16 protein. The prevalence of HPV-positive OSCCs was about 6% (5 patients). In 3 patients the HPV subtypes 16/18 were found. No significant differences between the HPV positive and negative patients regarding age, gender, smoking and alcohol consumption, localization and TNM level could be detected. Contrary to other studies focussing on cancers of the lingual and palatine tonsil, the prevalence of HPV infections was much lower in the oral cavity. Therefore HPV infection might play a less important role in oral carcinogenesis.

  18. E6 and E7 fusion immunoglobulin from human papilloma virus 16 induces dendritic cell maturation and antigen specific activation of T helper 1 response.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Hoon; Hur, Yu Jin; Lee, Suk Jun; Kim, Sang Joon; Park, Chung-Gyu; Oh, Yu-Koung; Jung, Woon-Won; Seo, Jong Bok; Nam, Myung Hee; Choi, Inho; Chun, Taehoon

    2011-04-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) 16 causes cervical cancer. Induction of oncogenesis by HPV 16 is primarily dependent on the function of E6 and E7 proteins, which inactivate the function of p53 and pRB, respectively. Thus, blocking the activity of the E6 and E7 proteins from HPV 16 is critical to inhibiting oncogenesis during infection. We have expressed and purified soluble HPV 16 E6 and E7 fusion immunoglobulin (Ig), which were combined with the constant region of an Ig heavy chain, in a mammalian system. To assess whether soluble E6 and E7 fusion Igs induce effective cellular immune responses, immature dendritic cells (DCs) were treated with these fusion proteins. Soluble E6 and E7 fusion Igs effectively induced maturation of DCs. Furthermore, immunization with soluble E6 and E7 fusion Igs in mice resulted in antigen-specific activation of T helper 1 (Th1) cells. This is the first comprehensive study to show the molecular basis of how soluble HPV 16 E6 or E7 fusion Igs induces Th1 responses through the maturation of DCs. In addition, we show that DC therapy using soluble HPV E6 and E7 fusion Igs may be a valuable tool for controlling the progress of cervical cancer.

  19. The role of human papilloma virus and p16 in occult primary of the head and neck: a comprehensive review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Fotopoulos, George; Pavlidis, Nicholas

    2015-02-01

    Cancer of unknown primary of the head and neck is a challenging entity for the oncologist. The role of human papilloma virus/p16 in carcinogenesis and in prognosis is well established in certain HNSCC especially in that of the oropharynx. In the case of occult primary of the head and neck the role of HPV/p16 positivity is not well defined regarding prognosis and localization of the primary. An independent review of PubMed and ScienceDirect database was performed up to May 2014 using combinations of terms such as "occult primary of the head and neck", "CUP of the head and neck" "metastatic cervical squamous cell carcinoma of unknown primary", "HPV" and "HPV and head and neck cancer". Literature review shows a strong association between HPV/p16 positivity and primary location in the oropharynx in patients with CUP of the head and neck as well as a better clinical outcome. HPV positivity and p16 overexpression could be used as surrogate markers in the search of the primary site of patients with CUP of the head and neck therefore maybe guiding treatment decisions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. No difference in sexual behavior of adolescent girls following Human Papilloma Virus vaccination: a case study two districts in Uganda; Nakasongola and Luwero.

    PubMed

    Aujo, Judith Caroline; Bakeera-Kitaka, Sabrina; Kiguli, Sarah; Mirembe, Florence

    2014-02-12

    Vaccination against Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) before sexual debut has been recommended by WHO as a primary prevention strategy against cervical cancer. In Uganda, vaccination against HPV started as a demonstration project among young girls in Nakasongola; and Ibanda districts. Studies have suggested that vaccination against HPV could result in risky sexual behavior and increase the risk of early sexual debut.This study was done to compare the sexual behavior of HPV vaccinated and non vaccinated adolescent girls in two neighboring districts in Uganda; and to assess whether HPV vaccination had any influence on sexual behavior of vaccinated adolescent girls. This was an unmatched comparative study, which used both qualitative and quantitative study methods. It was carried out among 400 primary school girls aged 12 to 15 years in the districts of Nakasongola (vaccinated) and Luwero (non vaccinated). Quantitative data was collected using a questionnaire while qualitative data was obtained using focus group discussions and key informant interviews. The main outcome measure was the number of sexually active girls in each group. Of the 400 girls, 8 volunteered information that they were sexually active, 5(2.5%) from Luwero (non vaccinated) and 3 (1.5%) from Nakasongola (vaccinated), but there was no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups. HPV vaccination was not significantly associated with being sexually active. There was no significant difference in sexual behavior between vaccinated and non vaccinated girls.

  1. Screening for cervical neoplasia: a community-based trial comparing Pap staining, human papilloma virus testing, and the new bi-functional Celldetect® stain.

    PubMed

    Idelevich, Pavel; Kristt, Don; Schechter, Eduardo; Lew, Sylvia; Elkeles, Adi; Terkieltaub, Dov; Rivkin, Ilia; Bruchim, Ilan; Fishman, Ami

    2012-12-01

    Although cytological screening for cervical neoplasia has lowered mortality rates, current screening methods are plagued by sub-optimal sensitivity and/or specificity. The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of the new CellDetect® staining technology as a potential screening tool. This initial, non-blinded study, utilized samples are taken at a community-based clinic. The diagnostic results using CellDetect® were compared with the performance of Pap staining and human papilloma virus (HPV) testing on the same material, as well as the follow-up biopsies. These data were statistically analyzed in terms of sensitivity, specificity, predictive value (N.P.V and P.P.V), and inter-observer agreement. Bi-functional CellDetect® staining revealed morphological details and tinctorial properties that permitted recognition of neoplasia even at low magnification. Performance-wise, CellDetect® demonstrated non-inferiority for all statistical parameters to both Pap and HPV tests. Importantly, superior sensitivity compared with Pap staining was observed, as well as higher specificity than HPV testing with near equivalent sensitivity. We conclude that CellDetect® is a promising approach to early detection of cervical cancer because of its bi-functional capabilities that afford high sensitivity and specificity. The data suggest that this new methodology warrants further and more extensive clinical evaluation.

  2. Human papilloma virus lesions of the oral cavity: healing and relapse after treatment with 810-980 nm diode laser.

    PubMed

    Angiero, Francesca; Buccianti, Alberto; Parma, Luisa; Crippa, Rolando

    2015-02-01

    This study evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of laser therapy in treating oral human papilloma virus (HPV) lesions. In particular, mode of action, healing, postoperative patient compliance, visual numeric scale (VNS) pain index, and recurrence were analyzed. During 2001-2012, in 170 patients (80 women and 90 men), 174 intraoral and lip HPV lesions were detected and excised by diode laser of different wavelengths (810-980 nm), with an average power of 2.1 W, in continuous wave mode, using 300 to 320 μm optical fibers. In most cases (95.4%), complete healing occurred in the first 30 days. There were no adverse effects and all patients were carefully followed up until complete healing occurred, documenting any complications. There was only one recurrence, which was later treated successfully; the mean VNS pain score was below one. In treating HPV lesions, the diode laser is not only a valuable tool for their eradication but especially it reduces relapses, thanks to the characteristics of the laser light.

  3. Genetic diversity of the genotype VII Newcastle disease virus: identification of a novel VIIj sub-genotype.

    PubMed

    Xue, Cong; Cong, Yanlong; Yin, Renfu; Sun, Yixue; Ding, Chan; Yu, Shengqing; Liu, Xiufan; Hu, Shunlin; Qian, Jing; Yuan, Qianliang; Yang, Mingxi; Wang, Chunfeng; Ding, Zhuang

    2017-02-01

    Newcastle disease (ND) is a highly contagious disease of poultry caused by Newcastle disease virus (NDV). Multiple genotypes of NDV have been circulating worldwide and NDV is continuously evolving, resulting into more diversity. Of multiple viral genotypes, VII is particularly important given that it had been associated with most recent ND outbreaks worldwide. In this study, an epidemiological investigation performed in northeastern China during 2014-2015 showed that 11 genotype VII isolates amounted to 55 percent in a total number of NDV isolates. Therefore, to evaluate the genetic diversity worldwide and epidemiological distribution in China of genotype VII NDV, a phylogenetic analysis based on the 1255 complete F gene sequences showed that VII is the most predominant genotype worldwide. A further detailed characterization on genotype VII was conducted based on the 477 complete F gene sequences from 11 isolates and 466 reference viruses available in GenBank. The results demonstrated that VII can be further divided into 8 sub-genotypes (VIIb, VIId-VIIj), indicating its complex genetic diversity. It is worthy of note that the isolation rate of VIIj is increasing recently. It emphasizes the necessity to pay close attention to the epidemiological dynamic of genotype VII NDV and highlights the importance of vaccination program.

  4. Hepatitis C virus genotypes in the Middle East and North Africa: Distribution, diversity, and patterns.

    PubMed

    Mahmud, Sarwat; Al-Kanaani, Zaina; Chemaitelly, Hiam; Chaabna, Karima; Kouyoumjian, Silva P; Abu-Raddad, Laith J

    2017-08-26

    Our objective was to characterize the distribution, diversity and patterns of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). Source of data was a database of HCV genotype studies in MENA populated using a series of systematic literature searches. Pooled mean proportions were estimated for each genotype and by country using DerSimonian-Laird random-effects meta-analyses. Genotype diversity within countries was assessed using Shannon Diversity Index. Number of chronic infections by genotype and country was calculated using the pooled proportions and country-specific numbers of chronic infection. Analyses were conducted on 338 genotype studies including 82 257 genotyped individuals. Genotype 1 was dominant (≥50%) in Algeria, Iran, Morocco, Oman, Tunisia, and UAE, and was overall ubiquitous across the region. Genotype 2 was common (10-50%) in Algeria, Bahrain, Libya, and Morocco. Genotype 3 was dominant in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Genotype 4 was dominant in Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Palestine, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and Syria. Genotypes 5, 6, and 7 had limited or no presence across countries. Genotype diversity varied immensely throughout MENA. Weighted by population size, MENA's chronic infections were highest among genotype 3, followed by genotype 4, genotype 1, genotype 2, genotype 5, and genotype 6. Despite ubiquitous presence of genotype 1, the vast majority of chronic infections were of genotypes 3 or 4, because of the sizable epidemics in Pakistan and Egypt. Three sub-regional patterns were identified: genotype 3 pattern centered in Pakistan, genotype 4 pattern centered in Egypt, and genotype 1 pattern ubiquitous in most MENA countries. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Medical Virology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Virus-Like Particle Secretion and Genotype-Dependent Immunogenicity of Dengue Virus Serotype 2 DNA Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Galula, Jedhan U.; Shen, Wen-Fan; Chuang, Shih-Te

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dengue virus (DENV), composed of four distinct serotypes, is the most important and rapidly emerging arthropod-borne pathogen and imposes substantial economic and public health burdens. We constructed candidate vaccines containing the DNA of five of the genotypes of dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV-2) and evaluated the immunogenicity, the neutralizing (Nt) activity of the elicited antibodies, and the protective efficacy elicited in mice immunized with the vaccine candidates. We observed a significant correlation between the level of in vitro virus-like particle secretion, the elicited antibody response, and the protective efficacy of the vaccines containing the DNA of the different DENV genotypes in immunized mice. However, higher total IgG antibody levels did not always translate into higher Nt antibodies against homologous and heterologous viruses. We also found that, in contrast to previous reports, more than 50% of total IgG targeted ectodomain III (EDIII) of the E protein, and a substantial fraction of this population was interdomain highly neutralizing flavivirus subgroup-cross-reactive antibodies, such as monoclonal antibody 1B7-5. In addition, the lack of a critical epitope(s) in the Sylvatic genotype virus recognized by interdomain antibodies could be the major cause of the poor protection of mice vaccinated with the Asian 1 genotype vaccine (pVD2-Asian 1) from lethal challenge with virus of the Sylvatic genotype. In conclusion, although the pVD2-Asian 1 vaccine was immunogenic, elicited sufficient titers of Nt antibodies against all DENV-2 genotypes, and provided 100% protection against challenge with virus of the homologous Asian 1 genotype and virus of the heterologous Cosmopolitan genotype, it is critical to monitor the potential emergence of Sylvatic genotype viruses, since vaccine candidates under development may not protect vaccinated humans from these viruses. IMPORTANCE Five genotype-specific dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV-2) DNA vaccine

  6. Determination of genotypes of hepatitis C virus in Venezuela by restriction fragment length polymorphism.

    PubMed Central

    Pujol, F H; Loureiro, C L; Devesa, M; Blitz, L; Parra, K; Beker, S; Liprandi, F

    1997-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus genotypes in Venezuela were analyzed by restriction fragment length polymorphism in the 5' noncoding region. The absence of BstUI digestion was found to be a useful marker for genotype 2 specimens. From 122 serum samples, 66, 20, and 2.5% were classified as genotypes 1, 2, and 3, respectively; 0.8% were classified as genotype 4; and 10% appeared to be mixed infections. PMID:9196212

  7. Hepatitis E virus genotype 3 in mussels (Mytilus galloprovinciallis), Spain.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, João R; Oliveira, Danielle; Rivadulla, Enrique; Abreu-Silva, Joana; Varela, Miguel F; Romalde, Jesús L; Nascimento, Maria S J

    2016-09-01

    Coastal waters can become contaminated with both human waste from sewage treatment plants and runoff following manure application. Thus, shellfish produced close to land can bioaccumulate enteric viruses of human and animal origin, including zoonotic hepatitis E virus that infect both human and swine. The goal of this study was to evaluate the presence of HEV in shellfish from Galicia (NW Spain), a densely populated region with a strong tradition of swine farming, and one of the most important regions in the world for mussel production. We tested 81 mussel batches by RT-qPCR followed by conventional broad-spectrum nested RT-PCR and phylogenetic analysis. We have obtained 12 positive samples by RT-qPCR (14.81%) with HEV contamination levels ranging from 6.7 × 10(1) to 8.6 × 10(4) RNA copies/g digestive tissue. Phylogenetic analysis based on a 330 nt region of the ORF 1 showed that all sequenced isolates belonged to the zoonotic genotype 3 subgenotype e, being closely related to strains of human and swine origin. Results show that shellfish may be a potential route for HEV transmission to humans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Immunogenicity of mumps virus vaccine candidates matching circulating genotypes in the United States and China.

    PubMed

    Zengel, James; Phan, Shannon I; Pickar, Adrian; Xu, Pei; He, Biao

    2017-07-13

    Mumps virus (MuV) causes acute infection in humans with characteristic swelling of the parotid gland. While vaccination has greatly reduced the incidence of MuV infection, there have been multiple large outbreaks of mumps virus (MuV) in highly vaccinated populations. The most common vaccine strain, Jeryl Lynn, belongs to genotype A, which is no longer a circulating genotype. We have developed two vaccine candidates that match the circulating genotypes in the United States (genotype G) and China (genotype F). We found that there was a significant decrease in the ability of the Jeryl Lynn vaccine to produce neutralizing antibody responses to non-matched viruses, when compared to either of our vaccine candidates. Our data suggests that an updated vaccine may allow for better immunity against the circulating MuV genotypes G and F. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Hepatitis E virus genotype 4 in a pig farm, Italy, 2013.

    PubMed

    Monne, I; Ceglie, L; DI Martino, G; Natale, A; Zamprogna, S; Morreale, A; Rampazzo, E; Cattoli, G; Bonfanti, L

    2015-02-01

    Zoonotic strains of hepatitis E virus (HEV) in Europe have been reported to belong to genotypes 3 and 4. In 2012 and 2013, 57 pig farms in Northern Italy that had previously resulted seropositive for HEV were surveyed for the presence of the virus, with positive samples subsequently genotyped. Hepatitis E RNA was identified in 17/57 (29·8%) seropositive farms. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that distinct subtypes of genotype 3 were circulating in the north-east of Italy; as well, for the first time in the Italian swine population, genotype 4 was identified and attributed to subtype d.

  10. High prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 2 in Italian patients with chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Sartori, M; Andorno, S; Avogadro, E; Ballarè, M; La Terra, G; Leone, F; Quaglia, V; Fortina, G; Aglietta, M

    1996-01-01

    The prevalence of different genotypes of Hepatitis C virus may vary between geographic areas and it is possible that various genotypes have different pathogenic characteristics. Therefore, 90 consecutive Italian patients anti-Hepatitis C Virus positive with a broad spectrum of chronic liver disease, have been analysed to observe prevalence of various genotypes of Hepatitis C Virus. Genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction with a set of nested biotinylated primers, located in 5'UTR region. Genotype 1b and genotype 2a were the most commonly encountered (respectively, 50% and 37%) whereas other genotypes were rare. The unexpected high prevalence of genotype 2a allowed direct comparison of clinical characteristics and response to therapy between patients with genotype 2a and those with 1b. Genotype 1b was more prevalent than 2a in patients over 60 years (29 vs 12) and in those with more severe liver disease (34 vs 16). In a univariate analysis, genotype 2a was associated with less severe liver disease (p = 0.02) and younger age (p = 0.018), in comparison with genotype 1b. Patients with genotype 2a responded to interferon alpha therapy better than those with 1b (p = 0.007). In a multivariate analysis, only younger age was associated with genotype 2a. Genotype 2a (in comparison with 1b) and absence of cirrhosis were independent predictors of response to interferon alpha. In conclusion, genotype 2a is playing an emerging role in younger Italian patients and seems more sensitive than 1b to interferon alpha therapy.

  11. Presence of human papilloma virus, herpes simplex virus and Epstein-Barr virus DNA in oral biopsies from Sudanese patients with regard to toombak use.

    PubMed

    Jalouli, Jamshid; Ibrahim, Salah O; Sapkota, Dipak; Jalouli, Miranda M; Vasstrand, Endre N; Hirsch, Jan M; Larsson, Per-Anders

    2010-09-01

    Using PCR/DNA sequencing, we investigated the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV), herpes simplex virus (HSV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA in brush biopsies obtained from 150 users of Sudanese snuff (toombak) and 25 non-users of toombak in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples obtained from 31 patients with oral dysplasias (25 toombak users and 6 non-users), and from 217 patients with oral cancers (145 toombak users and 72 non-users). In the brush tissue samples from toombak users, HPV was detected in 60 (40%), HSV in 44 (29%) and EBV in 97 (65%) of the samples. The corresponding figures for the 25 samples from non-users were 17 (68%) positive for HPV, 6 (24%) positive for HSV and 21 (84%) for EBV. The formalin-fixed samples with oral dysplasias were all negative for HPV. In the 145 oral cancer samples from toombak users, HPV was detected in 39 (27%), HSV in 15 (10%) and EBV in 53 (37%) of the samples. The corresponding figures for the samples from non-users were 15 (21%) positive for HPV, 5 (7%) for HSV and 16 (22%) for EBV. These findings illustrate that prevalence of HSV, HPV and EBV infections are common and may influence oral health and cancer development. It is not obvious that cancer risk is increased in infected toombak users. These observations warrant further studies involving toombak-associated oral lesions, to uncover the possible mechanisms of these viral infections in the development of oral cancer, and the influence of toombak on these viruses. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Screening for high risk human papilloma virus (HR-HPV) subtypes, among Sudanese patients with oral lesions

    PubMed Central

    Babiker, Ali Yousif; Eltom, Faris Margani; Abdalaziz, Mohamed S; Rahmani, Arshad; Abusail, Saadalnour; Ahmed, Hussain Gadelkareem

    2013-01-01

    HR-HPV subtypes are strongly linked to etiology of many human cancers including oral cancer. The epidemiology of infection with different HPV genotypes greatly varies in different countries. The aim of this study was to identify and genotype the HR-HPV subtypes in oral tissues obtained from Sudanese patients with oral lesions. In this retrospective study 200 patients with oral lesions were screened by molecular methods (PCR) for the presence of HR-HPV subtypes. Of the 200 patients, 100/200 were patients with oral cancer (ascertained as case group) and 100/200 were patients with non-neoplastic oral lesions (ascertained as control group). Out of the 200 patients, 12/200 (6%) were found with HR-HPV infection. Of the 12 positive patients, 8/12 (66.7%) were among cases and the remaining 4/12 (33.3%) were among control group. The distribution of different genotypes was: type HPV 16 6/12 (50%), HPV18 4/12 (34%), HPV 31 1/12 (8%) and HPV 33 1/12 (8%). In view of these findings, HPV particularly subtypes 16 and 18 play a role in the etiology of oral cancer in the Sudan. PMID:23641304

  13. [Serotypes and genotypes of dengue virus circulating in Venezuela, 1990-1997].

    PubMed

    Salas, R A; Tovar, D; Barreto, A; de Miller, E; Leitmeyer, K; Rico-Hesse, R

    1998-01-01

    Due to the increasing severity of hemorrhagic dengue epidemics during the last years in Venezuela, a retrospective analysis was conducted to identify the behaviour of the dengue virus serotypes circulating in the country and the molecular evolution of dengue virus serotype 2. The data presented here indicates that dengue virus serotypes 1, 2 and 4 are endemic in Venezuela, they circulate simultaneously around the year in the biggest urban cities, however, one particular serotype is predominant during an epidemic period and replaces the virus serotype dominant during the previous epidemic period. The increased severity of dengue fever since 1989 in Venezuela might be associated to the introduction of the Asiatic genotype of virus which replaced the autochthonous Caribbean genotype. The Asiatic genotype is recognised as a more virulent virus.

  14. Epidemiology of cervical cancer and human papilloma virus infection among Iranian women - analyses of national data and systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Khorasanizadeh, Faezeh; Hassanloo, Jaleh; Khaksar, Nafiseh; Mohammad Taheri, Somayeh; Marzaban, Maryam; H Rashidi, Batool; Akbari Sari, Ali; Zendehdel, Kazem

    2013-02-01

    Few studies have evaluated the epidemiology of cervical cancer in low risk Muslim countries, where the prognosis of cervical cancer is poor and which lack an organized cervical screening program. We studied incidence and mortality rates of cervical cancer and the prevalence of high risk human papilloma virus (HPV) infection in the Islamic Republic (I.R.) of Iran. We analyzed national cancer and mortality registration data and estimated age-standardized incidence (ASR) and mortality (ASMR) rates and age-specific patterns of cervical cancer. Furthermore, based on a systematic review we estimated prevalence of HPV infection in Iran. The mean cervical cancer ASR was 2.5 per 100,000 in pathology-based cancer registries. However, ASRs were almost double in the population-based cancer registry and reached 6 per 100,000. The mean cervical cancer ASMR for Iran was 1.04 per 100,000. The mortality to incidence ratio was 42%. The cervical cancer incidence rate increased after age 30 and peaked between ages 55 and 65. The prevalence of HPV infection was 76% in cervical cancer patients and 7% among healthy Iranian women. Of the HPV types isolated, HPV 16 (54%), 18 (14%), and 31 (6%) were the most commonly detected in Iranian cervical cancer patients. An organized prevention program is needed to fight against cervical cancer in Iran and other low incidence countries. We suggest a screening program starting after age 30 and with at least three screenings tests over each woman's lifetime. With a reservation on cost-effectiveness issue, available HPV vaccine will prevent HPV infection and cervical cancer in Iran. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Combined treatment of the experimental human papilloma virus-16-positive cervical and head and neck cancers with cisplatin and radioimmunotherapy targeting viral E6 oncoprotein.

    PubMed

    Harris, M; Wang, X G; Jiang, Z; Phaeton, R; Koba, W; Goldberg, G L; Casadevall, A; Dadachova, E

    2013-03-05

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) is implicated in >99% of cervical cancers and ∼40% of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). We previously targeted E6 oncogene with (188)Rhenium-labelled monoclonal antibody (mAb) C1P5 to HPV16 E6 in cervical cancer and HNSCC. Intranuclear E6 can be accessed by mAbs in non-viable cells with leaky membranes. As radioimmunotherapy (RIT) efficacy depends on the availability of target protein-we hypothesised that pretreatment with cisplatin will kill some tumour cells and increase E6 availability for RIT. Mice with subcutaneous HPV16+ cervical (CasKi) and HNSCC (2A3) tumours were pretreated with 0-7.5 mg kg(-1) per day cisplatin for 3 days followed by (188)Re-C1P5 and biodistribution was performed 24 h later. For RIT, the animals were treated with: 5 mg kg(-1) per day cisplatin for 3 days; or 5 mg kg(-1) per day cisplatin for 3 days followed 200 or 400μCi (188)Re-C1P5 mAb; or 200 or 400μCi (188)Re-C1P5 mAb; or left untreated, and observed for tumour growth for 24 days. Pretreatment with cisplatin increased the uptake of (188)Re-C1P5 in the tumours 2.5 to 3.5-fold and caused significant retardation in tumour growth for CasKi and 2A3 tumours in both RIT alone and cisplatin, and RIT groups in comparison with the untreated control and cisplatin alone groups (P<0.05). The combined treatment was more effective than either modality alone (P<0.05). Our study demonstrates that preceding RIT targeting E6 oncogene with chemotherapy is effective in suppressing tumour growth in mouse models of HPV16+ cancers.

  16. Impact of human papilloma virus vaccination on adolescent knowledge, perception of sexual risk and need for safer sexual behaviors in Bali, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Prayudi, Pande Kadek Aditya; Permatasari, Anak Agung Istri Yulan; Winata, I Gde Sastra; Suwiyoga, Ketut

    2016-12-01

    To determine the impact of human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination on knowledge, perception of sexual risk and need for continued safe sexual behavior among Indonesian girls. A comparative cross-sectional study was carried on in Denpasar, the capital city of Bali, Indonesia, during September 2015-February 2016. A total of 828 adolescent girls (12-16 years) were recruited to assess their knowledge on HPV/HPV vaccine, perception of sexual risks and need for continued safe sexual behavior. A total of 419 girls (50.7%) had received HPV vaccination prior to the study, 76.4% of whom (320/419) had sufficient knowledge about HPV. HPV vaccination was a strong and independent predictor of higher HPV/HPV vaccine knowledge (adjusted OR [AOR], 9.358; 95%CI: 6.816-12.849, P < 0.001). HPV vaccination (AOR, 0.107; 95%CI: 0.074-0.155, P < 0.001) and higher knowledge level (AOR, 0.667; 95%CI: 0.464-0.958, P = 0.028) were associated with lower perceived HPV risk. Despite the low risk perception, most of the vaccinated girls (408/419, 97.4%) continued to perceive higher need for safe sexual behaviors. On multivariate analysis, higher knowledge was the independent predictor for higher perceived need for safe sexual behaviors (AOR, 4.260; 95%CI: 2.016-9.001, P < 0.001). The HPV vaccination was associated with higher knowledge and appropriately lower perception of HPV risk. Despite the vaccination, most of the adolescents continued to perceive a need for safer sexual behavior. All adolescent girls should receive HPV vaccination in order to reduce cervical cancer burden in the future. © 2016 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  17. Performance of Pap smear and human papilloma virus testing in the follow-up of women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 1 managed conservatively.

    PubMed

    Santos, André Luis Ferreira; Derchain, Sophie Françoise Mauricette; Sarian, Luis Otávio; Martins, Marcos Roberto; Morais, Sirlei Siani; Syrjänen, Kari Juhani

    2006-01-01

    Conservative management (follow-up) of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 1 (CIN1) is acceptable, but evidence on performance of follow-up tools, such as Pap smear and human papilloma virus (HPV) test, is still needed. A cohort of 78 women with histologically confirmed CIN1, referred because of atypical squamous cell or low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion in their Pap smear, was enrolled between August 2000 and September 2002 and was prospectively followed-up at 6 and 12 months, until September 2003. Follow-up examinations included Pap test and Hybrid Capture II (HCII) with high-risk HPV, colposcopy, and cervical biopsies in patients with persistent abnormalities. Odds ratios and performance indicators (with 95% confidence interval) were calculated for HPV and Pap test results in detecting biopsy-confirmed CIN during the follow-up. Thirty-seven (47%) of the women were HPV-positive at baseline. At first follow-up visit, 30 women had persistent CIN1 and one woman progressed to CIN2; 15 patients had CIN1 and one patient CIN2 at the second follow-up visit. Women with persistent CIN1 (or progression) during follow-up had a significantly higher HPV detection rate and abnormal Pap tests, compared to women with regressive disease. Cytology had a far better sensitivity in detecting CIN than HCII at the first follow-up visit (81 versus 52%, respectively), whereas both examinations had equivalent sensitivities at the second follow-up visit (69 and 56%, respectively). Cytology had a superior negative predictive value at the first follow-up visit and better positive predictive value, in addition, at the second visit. Because cytological abnormalities correlated generally better with the persistence of biopsy-confirmed CIN1 in this follow-up protocol, HCII test is the second-hand option to Pap test, but the use of both Pap and HCII together seems an unnecessary waste of resources.

  18. [Clinical efficacy of compound periploca liquid in treating condyloma acuminatum and its effect on human papilloma virus DNA expression in vitro].

    PubMed

    Cui, Bing-nan; Xu, Xian; Zhao, Yan-song

    2005-05-01

    To investigate the clinical efficacy of compound periploca liquid (CPL) in treating condyloma acuminatum (CA), and to explore its mechanisms at molecular level. Eighty-one patients with CA were randomly divided into three groups, 30 patients in Group A were treated with CPL, 21 in Group B were treated with periploca syrup and 30 in Group C were treated with Youtuoxin (YXG). The clinical efficacy and adverse reaction occurred in the three groups was evaluated respectively. Besides, change of human papilloma virus (HPV) DNA in two patients with CA was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in vitro after being treated with CPL and periploca, the monarchic drug of CPL. The cure rate obtained in group A, B, and C was 56.67%, 42.86% and 63.33% respectively, the total effective rate in them was 83.33%, 71.43% and 86.67% respectively, the difference of therapeutic efficacy was insignificant among the three groups. But the adverse reaction occurrence in them (6.67%, 4.76% and 86.67%) was significantly different (P < 0.01). The recurrent rate in them was 14.29%, 12.5% and 47.1% respectively. PCR showed negative expression of HPV in the two samples of CA of same concentration after the verrucous homogenate suspension being treated with CPL or periploca syrup of different concentration, while it was positive after the suspension was treated with the group of normal saline without any drug. The therapeutic efficacies of CPL, periploca syrup and Youtuoxin are not significantly different, but the former two have advantages of less adverse effects and lower recurrent rate. And they are possibly having germicidal action on HPV-DNA in CA tissue in vitro.

  19. Sociodemographic and Behavioral Correlates of Anogenital Warts and Human Papilloma Virus-Related Knowledge Among Men who have Sex with Men and Trans Women in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Brandon; Monsour, Emmi; Klausner, Jeffrey D.; Galea, Jerome T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Human papilloma virus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection (STI) globally, with a high burden of anogenital warts (AGW) among men who have sex with men (MSM) and transwomen (TW). Methods Six-hundred HIV negative MSM and TW (300 with AGW, 300 without) were recruited for a prospective cohort study to examine HPV outcomes and HPV vaccine knowledge. Participants completed a self-administered online questionnaire. Logistic regression was used to assess the association between sociodemographic and behavioral characteristics with HPV vaccine knowledge. Results The average participant age was 25.5 years. Most (67%) were single and 41.2% self-reported STI symptoms. The average age of first anal intercourse was 17 years, with self-reported sexual role as active (36%), passive (36%), and both (27%). Three quarters (77%) of participants reported engaging in condomless anal or oral sex up to six months prior to the study. Less than half (48%) of participants had heard of HPV. Participants with AGW were more likely to report that condoms helped prevent HPV (p=0.01) and that the absence of genital warts does not mean the absence of HPV (p<0.01). Conclusion Study participants had low levels of HPV knowledge but likely high HPV exposure due to condomless anal sex. The HPV knowledge gap may be explained in part by the stigma of sex work, underreporting of STIs, the high cost of the HPV vaccine in Peru, and misinformation about HPV vaccine. More work is needed to educate MSM and TW on HPV and the HPV vaccine. PMID:25763672

  20. Mixed genotype transmission bodies and virions contribute to the maintenance of diversity in an insect virus

    PubMed Central

    Clavijo, Gabriel; Williams, Trevor; Muñoz, Delia; Caballero, Primitivo; López-Ferber, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    An insect nucleopolyhedrovirus naturally survives as a mixture of at least nine genotypes. Infection by multiple genotypes results in the production of virus occlusion bodies (OBs) with greater pathogenicity than those of any genotype alone. We tested the hypothesis that each OB contains a genotypically diverse population of virions. Few insects died following inoculation with an experimental two-genotype mixture at a dose of one OB per insect, but a high proportion of multiple infections were observed (50%), which differed significantly from the frequencies predicted by a non-associated transmission model in which genotypes are segregated into distinct OBs. By contrast, insects that consumed multiple OBs experienced higher mortality and infection frequencies did not differ significantly from those of the non-associated model. Inoculation with genotypically complex wild-type OBs indicated that genotypes tend to be transmitted in association, rather than as independent entities, irrespective of dose. To examine the hypothesis that virions may themselves be genotypically heterogeneous, cell culture plaques derived from individual virions were analysed to reveal that one-third of virions was of mixed genotype, irrespective of the genotypic composition of the OBs. We conclude that co-occlusion of genotypically distinct virions in each OB is an adaptive mechanism that favours the maintenance of virus diversity during insect-to-insect transmission. PMID:19939845

  1. Wheat Genotypes With Combined Resistance to Wheat Curl Mite, Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus, Wheat Mosaic Virus, and Triticum Mosaic Virus.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Wen-Po; Rojas, Lina Maria Aguirre; Khalaf, Luaay Kahtan; Zhang, Guorong; Fritz, Allan K; Whitfield, Anna E; Smith, C Michael

    2017-01-13

    The wheat curl mite, Aceria tosichella Keifer, (WCM) is a global pest of bread wheat that reduces yields significantly. In addition, WCM carries Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV, family Potyviridae, genus Tritimovirus), the most significant wheat virus in North America; High Plains wheat mosaic virus (HPWMoV, genus Emaravirus, formerly High plains virus); and Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV, family Potyviridae, genus Poacevirus). Viruses carried by WCM have reduced wheat yields throughout the U.S. Great Plains for >50 yr, with average yield losses of 2-3% and occasional yield losses of 7-10%. Acaricides are ineffective against WCM, and delayed planting of winter wheat is not feasible. Five wheat breeding lines containing Cmc4, a WCM resistance gene from Aegilops tauschii, and Wsm2, a WSMV resistance gene from wheat germplasm CO960293-2 were selected from the breeding process and assessed for phenotypic reaction to WCM feeding, population increase, and the degree of WSMV, HPWMoV, and TriMV infection. Experiments determined that all five lines are resistant to WCM biotype 1 feeding and population increase, and that two breeding lines contain resistance to WSMV, HPWMoV, and TriMV infection as well. These WCM-, WSMV-, HPWMoV-, and TriMV-resistant genotypes can be used improve management of wheat yield losses from WCM-virus complexes.

  2. Tracing Jomon and Yayoi ancestries in Japan using ALDH2 and JC virus genotype distributions.

    PubMed

    Miyamori, Daisuke; Ishikawa, Noboru; Idota, Nozomi; Kakiuchi, Yasuhiro; McLean, Stuart; Kitamura, Tadaichi; Ikegaya, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    According to the dual structure model, the modern Japanese ethnic population consists of a mixture of the Jomon people, who have existed in Japan since at least the New Stone Age, and the Yayoi people, who migrated to western Japan from China around the year 300 bc Some reports show that the Yayoi are linked to a mutation of the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 gene (ALDH2). Recent viral studies indicate two major groups found in the Japanese population: a group with the CY genotype JC virus (JCV) and a group with the MY genotype JCV. It is unclear whether either genotype of the JC virus is related to the Jomon or Yayoi. In this study, we attempted to detect JCV genotypes and ALDH2 mutations from the DNA of 247 Japanese urine samples to clarify the relationship between the dual structure model and the JCV genotype through ALDH2 mutation analysis and JCV genotyping. The ALDH2 polymorphism among 66 JC virus-positive samples was analyzed, and it was found that the ALDH2 variant is significantly higher in the population with CY genotype JCV (51.5 %) than in the population with the MY genotype (24.2 %) (p < 0.05). From these findings, it may be inferred that the ALDH2 mutation, which is related to the Yayoi, is related to CY genotype JCV. When the Yayoi migrated to the Japanese archipelago, they brought the ALDH2 mutation as well as the CY genotype JCV.

  3. Distribution of hepatitis C virus genotypes in volunteer blood donors from Chengdu, China.

    PubMed

    Gong, Tianxiang; Zhao, Xin; Luo, Yijia; Hong, Ying; Li, Shuping; Fu, Xuemei

    2016-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a significant pathogen of global concern. The virus is usually spread through blood contact, such as transfusion, hemodialysis and injection of illegal drugs. HCV genotypes have a geographic distribution in different areas. In this paper, we focus on the distribution of HCV genotypes from volunteer blood donors in Chengdu. The prevalence of genotypes was analyzed using phylogenetic analysis. Phylogenetic trees were constructed based on the HCV core and NS5B regions from 313 sequences. HCV sequences were classified into six subtypes, and HCV genotypes were determined with the following results: 1b in 283, 2a in 14, 3b in seven, 3a in three, 6a in five and 6u in one. Subtype 1b was the most common and accounted for approximately 90.41 % (283/313), and a virus of subtype 6u was isolated for the first time from the Chengdu area. Genotypes 4 and 5 were not detected.

  4. Hepatitis C virus infection: Are there still specific problems with genotype 3?

    PubMed Central

    Gondeau, Claire; Pageaux, Georges Philippe; Larrey, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is one of the most common causes of chronic liver disease and the main indication for liver transplantation worldwide. As promising specific treatments have been introduced for genotype 1, clinicians and researchers are now focusing on patients infected by non-genotype 1 HCV, particularly genotype 3. Indeed, in the golden era of direct-acting antiviral drugs, genotype 3 infections are no longer considered as easy to treat and are associated with higher risk of developing severe liver injuries, such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Moreover, HCV genotype 3 accounts for 40% of all HCV infections in Asia and is the most frequent genotype among HCV-positive injecting drug users in several countries. Here, we review recent data on HCV genotype 3 infection/treatment, including clinical aspects and the underlying genotype-specific molecular mechanisms. PMID:26576095

  5. Introduction of new subtypes and variants of hepatitis C virus genotype 4 in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Gededzha, Maemu P; Selabe, Selokela G; Kyaw, Thanda; Rakgole, J Nare; Blackard, Jason T; Mphahlele, M Jeffery

    2012-04-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype is an important predictor of disease progression and treatment response. This descriptive study investigated the sequence diversity and genotypes of HCV in South Africa based on comparative analysis of the 5' untranslated region (UTR), C/E1, and NS5B regions of 60 sequences from 52 patients. Genotype distribution in the studied population was as follows: 54% (28/52) were genotype 5, 19% (10/52) were genotype 1, 19% (10/52) were genotype 4, and 2% (1/52) were genotype 3. Three of 52 (6%) individuals were infected with multiple genotypes based on the 5'UTR. Phylogenetic analysis of the 5'UTR was accurate in determining genotypes, while the C/E1 and NS5B coding region was able to differentiate both genotypes and subtypes, including an outlier group. Furthermore, this study observed the existence of distinct variants of HCV which were divergent from confirmed genotype 4 subtypes. For the first time in South Africa, this analysis has shown the presence of HCV subtypes 4k, 4q, and 4r, as well as evidence of intragenotypic recombinant 4l/4q within NS5B. In conclusion, while genotype 5a remains the predominant genotype in South Africa, the current study indicates the introduction of new subtypes and existence of variants of genotype 4 in South Africa. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Molecular characterization of the Hepatitis B virus genotypes in Colombia: a Bayesian inference on the genotype F.

    PubMed

    Alvarado Mora, Mónica Viviana; Romano, Camila Malta; Gomes-Gouvêa, Michele Soares; Gutierrez, Maria Fernanda; Botelho, Livia; Carrilho, Flair José; Pinho, João Renato Rebello

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis B is a worldwide health problem affecting about 2 billion people and more than 350 million are chronic carriers of the virus. Nine HBV genotypes (A to I) have been described. The geographical distribution of HBV genotypes is not completely understood due to the limited number of samples from some parts of the world. One such example is Colombia, in which few studies have described the HBV genotypes. In this study, we characterized HBV genotypes in 143 HBsAg-positive volunteer blood donors from Colombia. A fragment of 1306 bp partially comprising HBsAg and the DNA polymerase coding regions (S/POL) was amplified and sequenced. Bayesian phylogenetic analyses were conducted using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach to obtain the maximum clade credibility (MCC) tree using BEAST v.1.5.3. Of all samples, 68 were positive and 52 were successfully sequenced. Genotype F was the most prevalent in this population (77%) - subgenotypes F3 (75%) and F1b (2%). Genotype G (7.7%) and subgenotype A2 (15.3%) were also found. Genotype G sequence analysis suggests distinct introductions of this genotype in the country. Furthermore, we estimated the time of the most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) for each HBV/F subgenotype and also for Colombian F3 sequences using two different datasets: (i) 77 sequences comprising 1306 bp of S/POL region and (ii) 283 sequences comprising 681 bp of S/POL region. We also used two other previously estimated evolutionary rates: (i) 2.60 × 10(-4)s/s/y and (ii) 1.5 × 10(-5)s/s/y. Here we report the HBV genotypes circulating in Colombia and estimated the TMRCA for the four different subgenotypes of genotype F.

  7. Disruption of predicted dengue virus type 3 major outbreak cycle coincided with switching of the dominant circulating virus genotype.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kim-Kee; Zulkifle, Nurul-Izzani; Abd-Jamil, Juraina; Sulaiman, Syuhaida; Yaacob, Che Norainon; Azizan, Noor Syahida; Che Mat Seri, Nurul Asma Anati; Samsudin, Nur Izyan; Mahfodz, Nur Hidayana; AbuBakar, Sazaly

    2017-10-01

    Dengue is hyperendemic in most of Southeast Asia. In this region, all four dengue virus serotypes are persistently present. Major dengue outbreak cycle occurs in a cyclical pattern involving the different dengue virus serotypes. In Malaysia, since the 1980s, the major outbreak cycles have involved dengue virus type 3 (DENV3), dengue virus type 1 (DENV1) and dengue virus type 2 (DENV2), occurring in that order (DENV3/DENV1/DENV2). Only limited information on the DENV3 cycles, however, have been described. In the current study, we examined the major outbreak cycle involving DENV3 using data from 1985 to 2016. We examined the genetic diversity of DENV3 isolates obtained during the period when DENV3 was the dominant serotype and during the inter-dominant transmission period. Results obtained suggest that the typical DENV3/DENV1/DENV2 cyclical outbreak cycle in Malaysia has recently been disrupted. The last recorded major outbreak cycle involving DENV3 occurred in 2002, and the expected major outbreak cycle involving DENV3 in 2006-2012 did not materialize. DENV genome analyses revealed that DENV3 genotype II (DENV3/II) was the predominant DENV3 genotype (67%-100%) recovered between 1987 and 2002. DENV3 genotype I (DENV3/I) emerged in 2002 followed by the introduction of DENV3 genotype III (DENV3/III) in 2008. These newly emerged DENV3 genotypes replaced DENV3/II, but there was no major upsurge of DENV3 cases that accompanied the emergence of these viruses. DENV3 remained in the background of DENV1 and DENV2 until now. Virus genome sequence analysis suggested that intrinsic differences within the different dengue virus genotypes could have influenced the transmission efficiency of DENV3. Further studies and continuous monitoring of the virus are needed for better understanding of the DENV transmission dynamics in hyperendemic regions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Development of hepatitis C virus genotype 3a cell culture system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sulyi; Date, Tomoko; Yokokawa, Hiroshi; Kono, Tamaki; Aizaki, Hideki; Maurel, Patrick; Gondeau, Claire; Wakita, Takaji

    2014-12-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 3a infection poses a serious health problem worldwide. A significant association has been reported between HCV genotype 3a infections and hepatic steatosis. Nevertheless, virological characterization of genotype 3a HCV is delayed due to the lack of appropriate virus cell culture systems. In the present study, we established the first infectious genotype 3a HCV system by introducing adaptive mutations into the S310 strain. HCV core proteins had different locations in JFH-1 and S310 virus-infected cells. Furthermore, the lipid content in S310 virus-infected cells was higher than Huh7.5.1 cells and JFH-1 virus-infected cells as determined by the lipid droplet staining area. This genotype 3a infectious cell culture system may be a useful experimental model for studying genotype 3a viral life cycles, molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis, and genotype 3a-specific antiviral drug development. © 2014 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  9. Experimental evidence for competitive growth advantage of genotype VII over VI: implications for foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype A genotype turnover in nature.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, J K; Subramaniam, S; Singh, N K; Sanyal, A; Pattnaik, B

    2012-04-01

    In India, systematic genotype replacement has been observed for serotype A foot-and-mouth disease virus. After a decade of co-circulation of genotypes VI and VII, genotype VII emerged as the single dominant genotype since 2001. To derive possible explanations for such epochal evolution dynamics, in vitro intergenotype growth competition experiments involving both co- and superinfection regimes were conducted. Coinfection of BHK-21 cells demonstrated abrupt loss in the genotype VI viral load with commensurate increase in the load of genotype VII as measured by the genotype differentiating ELISA, RT-PCR and real-time RT-PCR. The superinfection dynamics was shaped by temporal spacing of infection, where the invading genotype VII took more number of passages than coinfection to eventually overtake the resident genotype VI. It was speculated that such superior replicative fitness of genotype VII could have been a possible factor for the ultimate dominance of genotype VII in nature.

  10. Molecular epidemiology of dengue in Jamaica dengue virus genotypes in Jamaica, 2007.

    PubMed

    Brown, M G; Salas, R A; Vickers, I E; Heslop, O D; Smikle, M F

    2011-03-01

    The genotypes of dengue viruses (DENV) isolated from patients with dengue in Jamaica during 2007 were determined using DNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the C-prM gene junction. The 17 DENV analysed included strains of DENVserotypes 1 (DENV-1, n = 3), DENV-2 (n = 7) and DENV-4 (n = 7). All strains ofDENV-1 were classified as genotype III, while 1 of 7 strains of DENV-2 belonged to the Asian American/Asian genotype, genotype I/III (Jamaica genotype), 2 were genotype V, the American genotype and 4 strains clustered with reference strains belonging to genotype IV. The 6 DENV-4 strains from Jamaica and the control strain clustered together in a separate clade from Caribbean/American reference strains, which belong to genotype II and Asian strains, classified as genotypes I and III. There has been little evolution in the DENV-1 strains circulating in Jamaica over the years and this might reduce the risk of outbreaks due to this serotype. In contrast, the high genetic diversity in strains of DENV-2 viruses in circulation, the presence of more recently introduced genotypes and a new clade of DENV-4 might contribute to the epidemic potential of these DENV serotypes. These preliminary data clearly indicate the need to maintain laboratory surveillance, and other control measures against hyperendemicity of dengue in Jamaica.

  11. Emergence of new sub-genotypes of virulent Newcastle disease virus with panzootic features

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) strains with epizootic characteristics from three new sub-genotypes of genotypes VII and XIII are rapidly spreading through Asia and the Middle East causing outbreaks of Newcastle disease (ND) that are producing significant illness and mortality in vaccinated poultry, s...

  12. The prevalence of the citrus tristeza virus trifoliate resistant breaking genotype among Puerto Rican isolates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates have been grouped previously into five genotypes: T3, T30, T36, VT, B165 based on symptoms, host range and genomic sequence data. A sixth genotype has recently been identified with the novel property of replicating in trifoliate orange trees, a non host for the o...

  13. Development of interdigitated arrays coated with functional polyaniline/MWCNT for electrochemical biodetection: application for human papilloma virus.

    PubMed

    Tran, Lam Dai; Nguyen, Dzung Tuan; Nguyen, Binh Hai; Do, Quan Phuc; Nguyen, Huy Le

    2011-09-15

    In this study, polyaniline-multiwalled carbon nanotube film (PANi-MWCNT) has been polymerized on interdigitated platinum electrode arrays (IDA), fabricated by MEMS technology for the detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, using immobilized peptide aptamers as affinity capture reagent. Label-free, electrochemical detection of the specific immune reaction between antigen peptide aptamer HPV-16-L1 (with a molecular weight of 1825 Da), the most common genotype in cytological normal women worldwide, and its specific antibody of HPV-16 (which is much bigger with molecular weight of ca. 150 kDa) on multifunctional PANi-MWCNT based arrays was reported. The most significant advantage of this technique consists of reagentless and multiple detection of antigen-antibody complex formation on well conducting IDA interface of PANi-MWCNT, without intermediate steps or any labeling reagents, as normally required in the previous works.

  14. Pattern and molecular epidemiology of Hepatitis B virus genotypes circulating in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Awan, Zunaira; Idrees, Muhammad; Amin, Irum; Butt, Sadia; Afzal, Samia; Akbar, Haji; Rehman, Irshad-ur; Younas, Saima; Shahid, Muhammad; Lal, Amreek; Saleem, Sana; Rauff, Bisma

    2010-12-01

    The continuously mutating nature of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is responsible for the emergence of varying genotypes in different regions of the world affecting the disease outcome. The objective of the current study was to find out the pattern of HBV genotypes circulating in Pakistan. HBV genotypes were determined in HBV chronic patients of different age and gender from all the four different geographical regions (provinces) of Pakistan for a period of 2 years (2007-2009). Out of the total 3137 consecutive patients, 300 (175; 58.3% males and 125; 41.7% females) were randomly selected for HBV genotype A through H determination using molecular genotyping methods. Total 269 (89.6%) isolates were successfully genotyped where as 31 (10.3%) samples failed to generate a type-specific PCR band and were found untypable. Out of the successfully genotyped samples, 43 (14.3%) were with type A, 54 (18%) were with type B, 83 (27.6%) were with type C, 39 (13%) were with type D, 2 (0.6%) were with type E, 4 (1.3%) were with genotype F and total 44 (14.6%) were with mixed HBV infections. Of the mixed genotype infection cases, 16 were with genotypes A/D, 9 were B/C, six were A/D/F, five were with genotypes A/F, two were with A/B/D and B/E and one each for A/C as well as A/E genotypes. Four common genotypes of HBV found worldwide (A, B, C & D) were isolated from Pakistan along with uncommon genotypes E and F for the first time in Pakistan. Overall Genotype C is the most prevalent genotype. Genotypes B and C are predominant in Punjab & Balochistan and Khyber Pakhtoonkhwa, respectively whereas genotype A in Sindh. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Further evidence of hepatitis B virus genotype I circulation in Northeast India.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Ashrafali Mohamed; Goel, Ashish; Kannangai, Rajesh; Abraham, Priya

    2013-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes have known to show a geographical pattern in their distribution and have been used to trace the migration of populations from geographically distant regions. Novel recombinants between HBV genotypes A, G and C referred as genotype I has been recently reported from Eastern India. In our investigation to characterise antiviral resistance mutations, we identified a rare case of HBV genotype I infection in chronic hepatitis B subject. We encountered confounding results of this emerging genotype 'designated as genotype G' in three widely used HBV sequence database for genotype determination. The recombinant fragment of genotype G largely occupies the surface gene sequence of the newly identified genotype I and could hence lead to misclassification of genotype I. Additionally, recombination analysis of the generated sequences in Simplot and jpHMM model showed two different patterns of recombination events. In conclusion, the increasing recognition of genotype I in this population suggests that further studies may reveal uncommon genotypes from other geographically distant regions. Our observation of potential genotype I misclassification despite the use of public HBV sequence database and other recombination analysis tools highlights the need for updating and validating public sequence domains of diagnostic importance.

  16. Molecular Assay and Genotyping of Hepatitis C Virus among Infected Egyptian and Saudi Arabian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Farag, Mohamed MS; Sofy, Ahmed R; Mousa, Adel A; Ahmed, Mohamed A; Alganzory, Mohamed R

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major health problem recognized globally. HCV is a common cause of liver fibrosis that may lead to liver cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of HCV infection and genotyping among Egyptian and Saudi Arabian chronic patients using different molecular techniques. HCV RNA viral load was assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technology. For HCV genotyping, RT-PCR hybridization fluorescence-based method and reverse hybridization line probe assay (INNO-LiPA) were used. A total of 40 anti-HCV-positive patients with chronic hepatitis C were examined for HCV RNA, genotyping, and different laboratory investigations. In the present study, HCV genotypes 4, mixed 4.1b, and 1 were detected in patients of both countries, while genotype 2 was only detected in Saudi Arabian patients. Genotyping methods for HCV showed no difference in the classification at the genotype level. With regard to HCV subtypes, INNO-LiPA assay was a reliable test in HCV genotyping for the detection of major genotypes and subtypes, while RT-PCR-based assay was a good test at the genotype level only. HCV genotype 4 was found to be the predominant genotype among Egyptian and Saudi Arabian chronic patients. In conclusion, data analysis for detecting and genotyping HCV was an important factor for understanding the epidemiology and treatment strategies of HCV among Egyptian and Saudi Arabian chronic patients. PMID:26512201

  17. Hepatitis E virus genotype 3 in humans and swine, Cuba.

    PubMed

    de la Caridad Montalvo Villalba, María; Owot, Jacob Canwat; Benedito, Eduardo-Correia; Corrreia, Benedito; Corredor, Marité Bello; Flaquet, Placido Pedroso; Frometa, Susel Sariego; Wong, Meilin Sanchez; Rodríguez Lay, Licel de Los Ángeles

    2013-03-01

    This study was conduced to determinate the seroprevalence and risk factors associated to hepatitis E virus (HEV) exposition, in individuals who work in pig farms located at western of Artemise Province. The presence of HEV in human and swine samples and the phylogenetic analysis were evaluated. One hundred six workers (with an age range of 18-70years) were enrolled in this study. Two groups were defined, 69 employees with swine related occupations and 37 workers without contact with pigs. None had abroad travel history. Serum samples were tested for immunoglobulins (Ig) M, G and A against HEV. Individual fecal samples were obtained from 57 workers and 53 swine. All feces were tested for HEV RNA using reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). The amplification products were sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed by using MEGA5 software. A total of 38 (35.8%) (95% CI: 26.2-45.4) sera was positive for antibodies against HEV (anti-HEV). These were higher in persons who work in contact with swine compare as individuals with occupations without pig contact (40.5%, 28/69, 95% CI: 28.2-52.8, versus 27.0%, 10/37, 95% CI: 11.3-42.6, respectively). The prevalence of anti-HEV was higher in workers with an age range of 60-70years old and time-work 10-13years. HEV RNA was detected in 8 (14.0%) of 57 human fecal samples and 10 (18.8%) of 53 swine fecal samples. Phylogenetic analysis was performed on 7 amplification products obtained from 3 human and 4 swine fecal samples. Human and swine HEV sequences were closely related (94-99% nucleotide homology) and belonged to HEV genotype 3, subtype 3a. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A new genotype of border disease virus with implications for molecular diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Peletto, Simone; Caruso, Claudio; Cerutti, Francesco; Modesto, Paola; Zoppi, Simona; Dondo, Alessandro; Acutis, Pier Luigi; Masoero, Loretta

    2016-02-01

    Border disease virus (BDV) is a (+) single-stranded RNA pestivirus affecting mainly sheep and goats worldwide. Genetic typing of BDV has led to the identification of at least seven major genotypes. This study reports the detection of a BDV strain from a goat in northwestern Italy during routine investigations. Sequence analysis revealed mutations in the 5'-UTR of the virus with implications for BDV molecular diagnostics. Moreover, subsequent phylogenetic analysis based on the combined 5'-UTR and Npro/partial C genes, showed divergence from known BDV genotypes, revealing the detection of a novel pestivirus group, for which we propose the name BDV genotype 8.

  19. Identification of new sub-genotypes of virulent Newcastle disease virus with potential panzootic features

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Strains of virulent Newcastle disease virus (NDV) with epizootic characteristics are rapidly spreading through Asia and the Middle East causing outbreaks of Newcastle disease (ND). Significant illness and mortality in vaccinated poultry caused by highly related viruses of new sub-genotypes within ge...

  20. High Prevalence and Predominance of Hepatitis Delta Virus Genotype 1 Infection in Cameroon▿

    PubMed Central

    Foupouapouognigni, Yacouba; Noah, Dominique Noah; Sartre, Michèle Tagni; Njouom, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Antibodies to the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) were found in 17.6% of 233 hepatitis B virus surface antigen-positive subjects in Cameroon. Phylogenetic analyses showed the presence of HDV-1, HDV-5, HDV-6, and HDV-7 genotypes. These results enrich the limited data on HDV prevalence and molecular diversity in Cameroon. PMID:21209162

  1. High prevalence and predominance of hepatitis delta virus genotype 1 infection in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Foupouapouognigni, Yacouba; Noah, Dominique Noah; Sartre, Michèle Tagni; Njouom, Richard

    2011-03-01

    Antibodies to the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) were found in 17.6% of 233 hepatitis B virus surface antigen-positive subjects in Cameroon. Phylogenetic analyses showed the presence of HDV-1, HDV-5, HDV-6, and HDV-7 genotypes. These results enrich the limited data on HDV prevalence and molecular diversity in Cameroon.

  2. Identification of a divergent genotype of equine arteritis virus from South American donkeys.

    PubMed

    Rivas, J; Neira, V; Mena, J; Brito, B; Garcia, A; Gutierrez, C; Sandoval, D; Ortega, R

    2017-09-17

    A novel equine arteritis virus (EAV) was isolated and sequenced from feral donkeys in Chile. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that the new virus and South African asinine strains diverged at least 100 years from equine EAV strains. The results indicate that asinine strains belonged to a different EAV genotype. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  3. Introduction into Nigeria of a Distinct Genotype of Avian Influenza Virus (H5N1)

    PubMed Central

    Fusaro, Alice; Joannis, Tony; Monne, Isabella; Salviato, Annalisa; Yakubu, Bitrus; Meseko, Clement; Oladokun, Tinuke; Fassina, Sonia; Capua, Ilaria

    2009-01-01

    Genetic characterization of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (H5N1) isolated in July 2008 in Nigeria indicates that a distinct genotype, never before detected in Africa, reached the continent. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the viruses are genetically closely related to European and Middle Eastern influenza A (H5N1) isolates detected in 2007. PMID:19239760

  4. Prevalence of hepatitis C virus genotypes in Mexican patients.

    PubMed

    Dehesa-Violante, Margarita; Bosques-Padilla, Francisco; Kershenobich-Stalnikowitz, David

    2007-01-01

    Worldwide HCV studies have documented its large genetic variability; HCV has major genetic groups called genotypes that are designated from 1 to 6, as well as > 50 subtypes. This is very important considering that treatment response varies according to genotype. The purpose of this trial was to ascertain prevalence of HCV genotypes in a group of patients from 10 states in Mexico. This study enrolled patients from 22 hospitals throughout the country. Patients tested positive to hepatitis C antibody and genotyping was preformed by Lipa method. To carry out a comparison, two regions were arbitrarily defined, the northern region embodied the cities of Culiacan, Torreón, Monterrey, Ciudad Obregón, and Tijuana, while the central-southern region embodied Mexico City, Guadalajara, León, Puebla, and Veracruz. The test was performed on a total of 421 patients. The most frequently found genotype was genotype 1, present in 70.55% of cases. The majority (40.1%) corresponded to genotype 1b, 17.81% to 1a, and genotype 2a/2c (11.64%). A total of 29.4% of samples corresponded to genotypes non-1. Genotype 1 was found in 72.34 (northern region) and 70.03% (central-southern) of the two regions, and genotypes non-1 in 27.66 and 29.97%, respectively. We conclude that the most frequent genotype in Mexico is 1b, followed by 1a, and, in third place 1b1a, for a total of 70.55%; the remaining 29.45% had genotypes other than 1.

  5. Genotype and phylogenetic characterization of hepatitis B virus among multi-ethnic cohort in Hawaii

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Mayumi; Sugauchi, Fuminaka; Tsai, Naoky; Suzuki, Seiji; Hasegawa, Izumi; Fujiwara, Kei; Orito, Etsuro; Ueda, Ryuzo; Mizokami, Masashi

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) genomes in carriers from Hawaii have not been evaluated previously. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the distribution of HBV genotypes and their clinical relevance in Hawaii. METHODS: Genotyping of HBV among 61 multi-ethnic carriers in Hawaii was performed by genetic methods. Three complete genomes and 61 core promoter/precore regions of HBV were sequenced directly. RESULTS: HBV genotype distribution among the 61 carriers was 23.0% for genotype A, 14.7% for genotype B and 62.3% for genotype C. Genotypes A, B and C were obtained from the carriers whose ethnicities were Filipino and Caucasian, Southeast Asian, and various Asian and Micronesian, respectively. All cases of genotype B were composed of recombinant strains with genotype C in the precore plus core region named genotype Ba. HBeAg was detected more frequently in genotype C than in genotype B (68.4% vs 33.3%, P < 0.05) and basal core promoter (BCP) mutation (T1762/A1764) was more frequently found in genotype C than in genotype B. Twelve of the 38 genotype C strains possessed C at nucleotide (nt) position 1858 (C -1858). However there was no significant difference in clinical characteristics between C-1858 and T-1858 variants. Based on complete genome sequences, phylogenetic analysis revealed one patient of Micronesian ethnicity as having C-1858 clustered with two isolates from Polynesia with T-1858. In addition, two strains from Asian ethnicities were clustered with known isolates in carriers from Southeast Asia. CONCLUSION: Genotypes A, B and C are predominant types among multi-ethnic HBV carriers in Hawaii, and distribution of HBV genotypes is dependent on the ethnic background of the carriers in Hawaii. PMID:15259069

  6. The spread of hepatitis C virus genotype 1a in North America: a retrospective phylogenetic study.

    PubMed

    Joy, Jeffrey B; McCloskey, Rosemary M; Nguyen, Thuy; Liang, Richard H; Khudyakov, Yury; Olmstead, Andrea; Krajden, Mel; Ward, John W; Harrigan, P Richard; Montaner, Julio S G; Poon, Art F Y

    2016-06-01

    The timing of the initial spread of hepatitis C virus genotype 1a in North America is controversial. In particular, how and when hepatitis C virus reached extraordinary prevalence in specific demographic groups remains unclear. We quantified, using all available hepatitis C virus sequence data and phylodynamic methods, the timing of the spread of hepatitis C virus genotype 1a in North America. We screened 45 316 publicly available sequences of hepatitis C virus genotype 1a for location and genotype, and then did phylogenetic analyses of available North American sequences from five hepatitis C virus genes (E1, E2, NS2, NS4B, NS5B), with an emphasis on including as many sequences with early collection dates as possible. We inferred the historical population dynamics of this epidemic for all five gene regions using Bayesian skyline plots. Most of the spread of genotype 1a in North America occurred before 1965, and the hepatitis C virus epidemic has undergone relatively little expansion since then. The effective population size of the North American epidemic stabilised around 1960. These results were robust across all five gene regions analysed, although analyses of each gene separately show substantial variation in estimates of the timing of the early exponential growth, ranging roughly from 1940 for NS2, to 1965 for NS4B. The expansion of genotype 1a before 1965 suggests that nosocomial or iatrogenic factors rather than past sporadic behavioural risk (ie, experimentation with injection drug use, unsafe tattooing, high risk sex, travel to high endemic areas) were key contributors to the hepatitis C virus epidemic in North America. Our results might reduce stigmatisation around screening and diagnosis, potentially increasing rates of screening and treatment for hepatitis C virus. The Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research, and BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Rapid replacement of prevailing genotype of human respiratory syncytial virus by genotype ON1 in Beijing, 2012-2014.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guanglin; Zhu, Runan; Deng, Jie; Zhao, Linqing; Sun, Yu; Wang, Fang; Qian, Yuan

    2015-07-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is the most common viral pathogen causing lower respiratory infections in infants and young children worldwide. HRSV ON1 genotype in subgroup A with a characteristic of a 72 nucleotide duplication in the second highly variable region of attachment glycoprotein gene, has been reported in some countries since it was first detected in clinical samples collected in Canada in 2010. In this study, 557 HRSV antigen-positive nasopharyngeal aspirates were randomly selected during 2012/2013 to 2013/2014 HRSV seasons in Beijing for subgroup typing and for ON1 genotype screening by using a PCR based method developed for easily identifying genotype ON1 out of strains of subtype A. It was found that subgroup B was dominant in the 2012/2013 season and sudden shift of subgroup dominance from B to A and rapid replacement of previously prevailing NA1 genotype by ON1 genotype occurred in the 2013/2014 season. Reversible amino acid replacement in the G protein gene was found in a new branch of ON1 genotype. The evolutionary rate of the 351 global ON1 sequences was estimated to 7.34 × 10(-3) nucleotide substitutions per site per year (95% highest probability density intervals, HPD, 5.71 × 10(-3) to 9.04 × 10(-3)), with the time of most recent common ancestor dating back to June 2009. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A Virus-Like Particle Vaccine Elicits Broad Neutralizing Antibody Responses in Humans to All Chikungunya Virus Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Goo, Leslie; Dowd, Kimberly A; Lin, Tsai-Yu; Mascola, John R; Graham, Barney S; Ledgerwood, Julie E; Pierson, Theodore C

    2016-11-15

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an alphavirus that has emerged as a global health burden. There are 3 CHIKV genotypes: Asian, West African, and Eastern/Central/South African. No licensed CHIKV vaccine is available, and whether the antibody response elicited by one genotype can neutralize heterologous genotypes is unclear. We assessed neutralizing antibody (NAb) responses of volunteers in a phase 1 study of a CHIKV vaccine against 9 viral strains representing all 3 genotypes. Minimal differences in vaccine-elicited NAb responses were observed among genotypes, suggesting that vaccination with a single CHIKV strain can elicit cross-protective NAbs against all 3 genotypes. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  9. Hepatitis B virus with a proposed genotype I was found in Sichuan Province, China.

    PubMed

    Tong, Wenbin; He, Jilan; Sun, Li; He, Shusen; Qi, Qi

    2012-06-01

    To date, eight hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes, A-H, have been designated, and two additional genotypes, I and J, have also been proposed. A serological survey targeting children in difficult-to-reach vaccination areas was carried out in remote counties of Sichuan Province, China. HBV genotypes and serotypes were also determined from HBsAg-positive serum samples by direct sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis showed two strains isolated from the Yi ethnic children clustered with the proposed genotype I. The pairwise genome genetic distance was 7.5% between genotypes I and C, and ranged from 8.4% to 15.2% between genotype I and other genotypes, except genotype C. Grouping Scan analyses of the two strains revealed apparent recombination events between an unknown genotype and genotype C. Two out of four HBV strains isolated from the Yi ethnic children were confirmed to be genotype I, suggesting widespread circulation and common infection with genotype I HBV in the local Yi population. High prevalence of HBsAg and low hepatitis B vaccination coverage indicated that additional efforts are needed to control HBV infection in those areas.

  10. Human Papilloma Virus prevalence and type-specific relative contribution in invasive cervical cancer specimens from Italy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer represents an important global public health problem. It is the 2nd most common cancer among women worldwide. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection is now well-established as a necessary cause of invasive cervical cancer (ICC) development. Only a few studies on HPV prevalence and type-specific distribution in ICC have been conducted in Italy. Aim To describe the prevalence of HPV and the HPV type-specific distribution in ICC cases identified in Rome, Italy. Methods 140 paraffin embedded tissue blocks of primary ICC diagnosed between 2001 and 2006 were identified at the Regina Elena Cancer Institute in Rome (Italy). HPV was detected through amplification of HPV DNA using SPF-10 HPV broad-spectrum primers followed by DEIA and then genotyping by LiPA25 (version 1). Results 134 cases were considered suitable for HPV DNA detection after histological evaluation; and overall, 90.3% (121/134) HPV prevalence was detected. 111 cases had a single HPV type, 4 cases had an uncharacterized type (HPVX) and 6 cases had multiple HPV infections. The five most common single HPV types among positive cases were: HPV16 (71/121; 58.7%), HPV18 (12/121; 9.9%), HPV31, HPV45 and HPV58 (5/121; 4.1% each). 2 (1.5%) of the single infections and 2 (1.5%) of the multiple infections contained low risk types. Statistically significant differences in the relative contribution of HPV18 were found when comparing squamous cell carcinomas with adenocarcinomas. Conclusions HPV16 and HPV18 accounted for almost 70% of all the HPV positive ICC cases. The study provides baseline information for further evaluation on the impact of recently introduced HPV vaccines in Italy. PMID:20525370

  11. Changing Epidemiology of Hepatitis C Virus Genotype among Patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Hepatitis C Virus Co-Infection in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weilie; Liao, Baolin; Hu, Fengyu; Nie, Jingmin; Lan, Yun; Li, Huiqin; Lu, Ruichao; Gao, Yanqing; Song, Yuxia; Zhao, Qingxia; Zheng, Yuhuang; Tang, Xiaoping; Cai, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Co-infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) has become the most common cause of death in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients on antiretroviral therapy. The distribution of HCV genotypes varies with geographical regions and time, and limited studies have focused on the HCV genotype in HIV/HCV co-infection. The distribution of HCV genotypes was evaluated in 414 patients with HIV/HCV co-infection in three regions (South, Central and Northwest) of China from 2008 to 2010. The NS5B region of HCV was characterized using nested reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Nucleotide sequences obtained were subjected to phylogenetic analysis, and genotypes were assigned using published reference genotypes. Genotype 3 was the most prevalent HCV strain (36.2%), followed by genotype 6 (30.0%), genotype 1 (28.5%), genotype 2 (5.1%), and genotype 5 (0.2%). The distribution varied geographically. Genotype 6 (37.6%) was the predominant strain while genotype 1 (20.2%) was less common in the South compared to the Central and Northwest regions (all P < 0.001). The distribution also varied temporally. There was no significant difference in genotype distribution in Guangdong (a province in the South region), between patient cohorts from 2005-2008 and 2009-2010. However, outside Guangdong, genotypes 3 and 6a became significantly more prevalent (22.4% vs.42.2%, P< 0.001; 8.0% vs. 19.8%, P = 0.004), and genotype 1 less prevalent (54.4% vs.26.6%, P< 0.001) over time. The most dramatic shift in genotypic distribution was the movement of HCV genotypes 3 and 6a outside of Guangdong in HIV/HCV co-infected patients. This movement appeared closely associated with transmission via injected drug use.

  12. Changing Epidemiology of Hepatitis C Virus Genotype among Patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Hepatitis C Virus Co-Infection in China

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Fengyu; Nie, Jingmin; Lan, Yun; Li, Huiqin; Lu, Ruichao; Gao, Yanqing; Song, Yuxia; Zhao, Qingxia; Zheng, Yuhuang; Tang, Xiaoping; Cai, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Background Co-infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) has become the most common cause of death in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients on antiretroviral therapy. The distribution of HCV genotypes varies with geographical regions and time, and limited studies have focused on the HCV genotype in HIV/HCV co-infection. Methods The distribution of HCV genotypes was evaluated in 414 patients with HIV/HCV co-infection in three regions (South, Central and Northwest) of China from 2008 to 2010. The NS5B region of HCV was characterized using nested reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Nucleotide sequences obtained were subjected to phylogenetic analysis, and genotypes were assigned using published reference genotypes. Results Genotype 3 was the most prevalent HCV strain (36.2%), followed by genotype 6 (30.0%), genotype 1 (28.5%), genotype 2 (5.1%), and genotype 5 (0.2%). The distribution varied geographically. Genotype 6 (37.6%) was the predominant strain while genotype 1 (20.2%) was less common in the South compared to the Central and Northwest regions (all P < 0.001). The distribution also varied temporally. There was no significant difference in genotype distribution in Guangdong (a province in the South region), between patient cohorts from 2005–2008 and 2009–2010. However, outside Guangdong, genotypes 3 and 6a became significantly more prevalent (22.4% vs.42.2%, P< 0.001; 8.0% vs. 19.8%, P = 0.004), and genotype 1 less prevalent (54.4% vs.26.6%, P< 0.001) over time. Conclusion The most dramatic shift in genotypic distribution was the movement of HCV genotypes 3 and 6a outside of Guangdong in HIV/HCV co-infected patients. This movement appeared closely associated with transmission via injected drug use. PMID:27603929

  13. Three Complete Genome Sequences of Genotype G Mumps Virus from the 2016 Outbreak in Arkansas, USA.

    PubMed

    Alkam, Duah; Wongsurawat, Thidathip; Jenjaroenpun, Piroon; Connor, Skylar; Hobbs, Charlotte; Wassenaar, Trudy M; Jun, Se-Ran; Nookaew, Intawat; Ussery, David

    2017-08-10

    We present here the complete genome sequences of three mumps virus (MuV) strains isolated from patients who tested positive for the mumps virus during a mumps outbreak in Springdale, AR (USA), in 2016. The virus genomes, sequenced with Oxford Nanopore technology, belong to genotype G and have an average length of 15,342 nucleotides (nt). Copyright © 2017 Alkam et al.

  14. Murine hypothalamic destruction with vascular cell apoptosis subsequent to combined administration of human papilloma virus vaccine and pertussis toxin

    PubMed Central

    Aratani, Satoko; Fujita, Hidetoshi; Kuroiwa, Yoshiyuki; Usui, Chie; Yokota, Shumpei; Nakamura, Ikuro; Nishioka, Kusuki; Nakajima, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination is the most powerful way to prevent human beings from contracting infectious diseases including viruses. In the case of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, an unexpectedly novel disease entity, HPV vaccination associated neuro-immunopathetic syndrome (HANS), has been reported and remains to be carefully verified. To elucidate the mechanism of HANS, we applied a strategy similar to the active experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE) model - one of the most popular animal models used to induce maximum immunological change in the central nervous system. Surprisingly, mice vaccinated with pertussis toxin showed neurological phenotypes that include low responsiveness of the tail reflex and locomotive mobility. Pathological analyses revealed the damage to the hypothalamus and circumventricular regions around the third ventricle, and these regions contained apoptotic vascular endothelial cells. These data suggested that HPV-vaccinated donners that are susceptible to the HPV vaccine might develop HANS under certain environmental factors. These results will give us the new insight into the murine pathological model of HANS and help us to find a way to treat of patients suffering from HANS. PMID:27833142

  15. [High-risk human papilloma virus associated oropharynx squamous cell carcinomas: clinical, biological implications and therapeutical perspectives].

    PubMed

    Guihard, S; Jung, A-C; Noël, G

    2012-02-01

    The infection of the head and neck epithelium by high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) is a risk factor for cancer onset and development. The incidence of HPV-related head and neck squamous cell carcinoma is currently increasing. These lesions display distinct clinical features. HPV positive patients are often younger and have a smaller history of tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking, but have a history of virus-transmitting sex practices. HPV-related tumours are mainly found in the oropharynx, are more associated to a local lymph node invasion and display a poorly differentiated morphology. Despite these more aggressive features, HPV-positive head and neck squamous cell carcinomas correlate with an improved local control, disease-free and global survival. It is thought that HPV-driven specific biologic abnormalities underlie higher tumour sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs and ionizing radiations. The expression of the HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins induce cell transformation by interfering with cell signalling pathways involved in apoptosis, cell cycle, angiogenesis and induce the overexpression of the CDKN2A gene. Therefore, alternative treatments based on therapies targeting these pathways in combination with radiation dose de-escalation could be proposed to HPV-positive patients, if they are properly and reliably identified.

  16. A systematic review of the role of human papilloma virus (HPV) testing within a cervical screening programme: summary and conclusions.

    PubMed

    Cuzick, J; Sasieni, P; Davies, P; Adams, J; Normand, C; Frater, A; van Ballegooijen, M; van den Akker-van Marle, E

    2000-09-01

    A systematic review of the available evidence on the role of HPV testing in cervical screening has been published by the Health Technology Assessment Committee of the UK Department of Health. The review summarized relevant data on testing methods, natural history, and prevalence of the virus in different disease groups. Cost-effectiveness modelling was undertaken. Ten major conclusions were reached and are reported here. The key conclusions were that HPV testing was more sensitive than cytology, but that there were concerns about specificity, especially in young women. The increased sensitivity led to a recommendation that HPV testing be introduced on a pilot basis for women with borderline and mild smears. HPV testing has great potential as a primary screening test, but large trials are needed to properly evaluate this application and to determine if its introduction can reduce invasive cancer rates. There is an urgent need to undertake a large trial of HPV testing in conjunction with other new technologies (liquid-based cytology and computer-assisted cytology reading) to determine the best way to integrate them into ongoing screening programmes. A range of issues including the age to start and stop screening, the appropriate screening interval, the role of self-sampling for HPV testing and the choice of primary test (HPV and/or cytology) require further evaluation. Copyright 2000 Cancer Research Campaign.

  17. Combined treatment of the experimental human papilloma virus-16-positive cervical and head and neck cancers with cisplatin and radioimmunotherapy targeting viral E6 oncoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Harris, M; Wang, X G; Jiang, Z; Phaeton, R; Koba, W; Goldberg, G L; Casadevall, A; Dadachova, E

    2013-01-01

    Background: Human papilloma virus (HPV) is implicated in >99% of cervical cancers and ∼40% of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). We previously targeted E6 oncogene with 188Rhenium-labelled monoclonal antibody (mAb) C1P5 to HPV16 E6 in cervical cancer and HNSCC. Intranuclear E6 can be accessed by mAbs in non-viable cells with leaky membranes. As radioimmunotherapy (RIT) efficacy depends on the availability of target protein—we hypothesised that pretreatment with cisplatin will kill some tumour cells and increase E6 availability for RIT. Methods Mice with subcutaneous HPV16+ cervical (CasKi) and HNSCC (2A3) tumours were pretreated with 0–7.5 mg kg−1 per day cisplatin for 3 days followed by 188Re-C1P5 and biodistribution was performed 24 h later. For RIT, the animals were treated with: 5 mg kg−1 per day cisplatin for 3 days; or 5 mg kg−1 per day cisplatin for 3 days followed 200 or 400μCi 188Re-C1P5 mAb; or 200 or 400μCi 188Re-C1P5 mAb; or left untreated, and observed for tumour growth for 24 days. Results: Pretreatment with cisplatin increased the uptake of 188Re-C1P5 in the tumours 2.5 to 3.5-fold and caused significant retardation in tumour growth for CasKi and 2A3 tumours in both RIT alone and cisplatin, and RIT groups in comparison with the untreated control and cisplatin alone groups (P<0.05). The combined treatment was more effective than either modality alone (P<0.05). Conclusion: Our study demonstrates that preceding RIT targeting E6 oncogene with chemotherapy is effective in suppressing tumour growth in mouse models of HPV16+ cancers. PMID:23385729

  18. Distinct Distribution Pattern of Hepatitis B Virus Genotype C and D in Liver Tissue and Serum of Dual Genotype Infected Liver Cirrhosis and Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Somenath; Roychoudhury, Shrabasti; Ghosh, Alip; Dasgupta, Debanjali; Ghosh, Amit; Chakraborty, Bidhan; Roy, Sukanta; Gupta, Subash; Santra, Amal Kumar; Datta, Simanti; Das, Kausik; Dhali, Gopal Krishna; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Banerjee, Soma

    2014-01-01

    Aims The impact of co-infection of several hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes on the clinical outcome remains controversial. This study has for the first time investigated the distribution of HBV genotypes in the serum and in the intrahepatic tissue of liver cirrhotic (LC) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients from India. In addition, the genotype-genotype interplay and plausible mechanism of development of HCC has also been explored. Methods The assessment of HBV genotypes was performed by nested PCR using either surface or HBx specific primers from both the circulating virus in the serum and replicative virus that includes covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) and relaxed circular DNA (rcDNA) of HBV from the intrahepatic tissue. The integrated virus within the host chromosome was genotyped by Alu-PCR method. Each PCR products were cloned and sequences of five randomly selected clones were subsequently analysed. Results HBV/genotype D was detected in the serum of all LC and HCC patients whereas the sequences of the replicative HBV DNA (cccDNA and rcDNA) from the intrahepatic tissue of the same patients revealed the presence of both HBV/genotype C and D. The sequences of the integrated viruses exhibited the solo presence of HBV/genotype C in the majority of LC and HCC tissues while both HBV/genotype C and D clones were found in few patients in which HBV/genotype C was predominated. Moreover, compared to HBV/genotype D, genotype C had higher propensity to generate double strand breaks, ER stress and reactive oxygen species and it had also showed higher cellular homologous-recombination efficiency that engendered more chromosomal rearrangements, which ultimately led to development of HCC. Conclusions Our study highlights the necessity of routine analysis of HBV genotype from the liver tissue of each chronic HBV infected patient in clinical practice to understand the disease prognosis and also to select therapeutic strategy. PMID:25032957

  19. Human papilloma virus in non-small cell lung cancer in never smokers: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Yoshikazu; Ando, Masahiko; Kubo, Akihito; Isa, Shun-Ichi; Yamamoto, Satomi; Tsujino, Kazuyuki; Kurata, Takayasu; Ou, Sai-Hong I; Takada, Minoru; Kawaguchi, Tomoya

    2014-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in never smokers has emerged as a global public health issue. The cause is still unclear, and few studies have focused on the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the never smokers. We performed a systematic search of PubMed for articles of HPV infection in human subjects with NSCLC up to September 2012. Although smoking status was not fully reported in all studies, we contacted the authors by e-mail to supplement this information. Differences in the distribution of patients with and without HPV infection were tested with the Chi squared test. We identified 46 eligible articles, including 23 from Asian countries (N=2337 NSCLC cases), 19 from European countries (N=1553) and 4 from North and South America (N=160). The HPV prevalence was 28.1% (95% confidence interval (CI) 26.6-30.3%), 8.4% (95% CI 7.1-9.9%) and 21.3% (95% CI 15.2-28.4%), respectively. Eleven studies from East Asia (N=1110) and 4 from Europe (N=569) provided information on smoking status. The number of never smoker was 392 patients (33.9%) in East Asia and 54 patients (14.8%) in Europe. The HPV prevalence in East Asian countries was similar between never and ever smokers (33.9% vs 39.2%, P=0.080). Based on the literature confirming the presence of HPV in lung cancer in never smokers, the virus plays a role in carcinogenesis in the disease. There were different patterns of HPV prevalence between Asian and European countries in the never smokers as well as in ever smokers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes among positive UAE patients.

    PubMed

    Alfaresi, Mubarak S

    2011-04-01

    A molecular study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of Hepatitis C virus genotypes in HCV infected population of UAE. 67 HCV seropositive samples were collected from different health care centres. Quantitative analysis of these samples using PCR resulted in 67 positive samples. The PCR positive samples were subjected to genotyping using the method described by Simmonds et al. (J Gen Virol 74: 2391-2399, 1993). HCV genotype 4 was the predominant genotype (46.2%) followed by genotype 3a (23.8%) and 1a (15%). The predominant genotype among the female patients was genotype 4 (65.6%), while genotype 3a was the predominant among the male patients (42.8%). The predominance of HCV genotype 4 in our population confirms the predominance of HCV genotype 4 in UAE and most of the Arab countries in the Middle East. Implications of genotyping for clinical outcome of HCV infection, response to treatment as well as for vaccine development are discussed.

  1. Central African Republic is part of the West-African hepatitis B virus genotype E crescent.

    PubMed

    Bekondi, Claudine; Olinger, Christophe M; Boua, Nathalie; Talarmin, Antoine; Muller, Claude P; Le Faou, Alain; Venard, Véronique

    2007-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that Hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotype E predominates in a vast crescent in West-Africa spanning from Senegal to Angola. To determine whether HBV strains in the Central African Republic (CAR) belong predominately to the homogeneous West-African genotype E or whether they are more closely related to genotypes found in East Africa. Serum samples were randomly collected from 196 patients admitted with symptoms of acute or chronic hepatitis to the Central Hospital in Bangui. Thirty complete and 36 partial sequences of HBV strains were obtained. Ninety-four percent (62/66) of the strains belonged to genotype E, while genotype A1, most closely related to a strain from Tanzania and genotype D were detected in only one and three samples, respectively. One strain presented a recombination between the S and X gene of a genotype E precursor and a partial PreC/C gene of a genotype D precursor. Genotype E is predominant in CAR with little overlap with genotypes from Eastern Africa, extending the West-African HBV genotype E crescent further to the East.

  2. Novel hepatitis C virus reporter replicon cell lines enable efficient antiviral screening against genotype 1a.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Margaret; Yang, Huiling; Sun, Siu-Chi; Peng, Betty; Tian, Yang; Pagratis, Nikos; Greenstein, Andrew E; Delaney, William E

    2010-08-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) subgenomic replicon is the primary tool for evaluating the activity of anti-HCV compounds in drug discovery research. Despite the prevalence of HCV genotype 1a (approximately 70% of U.S. HCV patients), few genotype 1a reporter replicon cell lines have been described; this is presumably due to the low replication capacity of such constructs in available Huh-7 cells. In this report, we describe the selection of highly permissive Huh-7 cell lines that support robust replication of genotype 1a subgenomic replicons harboring luciferase reporter genes. These novel cell lines support the replication of multiple genotype 1a replicons (including the H77 and SF9 strains), are significantly more permissive to genotype 1a HCV replication than parental Huh7-Lunet cells, and maintain stable genotype 1a replication levels suitable for antiviral screening. We found that the sensitivity of genotype 1a luciferase replicons to known antivirals was highly consistent between individual genotype 1a clonal cell lines but could vary significantly between genotypes 1a and 1b. Sequencing of the nonstructural region of 12 stable replicon cell clones suggested that the enhanced permissivity is likely due to cellular component(s) in these new cell lines rather than the evolution of novel adaptive mutations in the replicons. These new reagents will enhance drug discovery efforts targeting genotype 1a and facilitate the profiling of compound activity among different HCV genotypes and subtypes.

  3. [Determination of hepatitis C virus genotype distribution in Mersin province, Turkey].

    PubMed

    Tezcan, Seda; Ulger, Mahmut; Aslan, Gönül; Yaraş, Serkan; Altıntaş, Engin; Sezgin, Orhan; Emekdaş, Gürol; Gürer Giray, Burcu; Sungur, Mehmet Ali

    2013-04-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a member of the Flaviviridae family and the RNA genome e x hibit high genetic heterogeneity. Six major genotypes were phylogenetically determined and each genotype contains different subtypes. The distribution of HCV genotypes varies geographically throughout the world. Determination of viral genotype has great importance in the selection of antiviral therapy, treatment duration and monitoring the response to treatment. The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of HCV genotypes in Mersin province located at the Southern part of Turkey. A total of 236 patients (137 females, 99 males; mean age: 53.28 ± 14.99 years) with chronic HCV infection who were admitted to Mersin University Hospital Microbiology Laboratory during March 2010-May 2012 period were included in the study. The patients were anti-HCV (ELISA; Abbott Laboratories, USA) and HCV-RNA (Cobas TaqMan 48, Roche Diagnostic, USA) positive. HCV genotype analysis was determined by using a commercial LiPA kit (Line Probe Assay; AMPLIQUALITY HCV-TS; AB Analitica, Italy) based on the reverse hybridization of amplification products of viral 5'-UTR region. Out of the 236 patients, genotype 1b was observed in 84.7% (n= 200), genotype 3a in 4.2% (n= 10), genotype 1 in 3.8% (n= 9), genotype 1a/1b in 2.1% (n= 5), genotype 4a in 2% (n= 2), genotype 1a in 1.7% (n= 4), genotype 2b in 1.3% (n= 3), genotype 2 in 0.4% (n= 1), genotype 2a/2c in 0.4% (n= 1) and genotype 6 in 0.4% (n= 1). In the cases infected with genotype 1b, statistically significant differences were detected between gender distribution with the mean serum ALT (46.14 IU/L in females, 63.9 IU/L in males; p= 0.029) and HCV-RNA (634 x 103 IU/L in females, 20 x 105 IU/L in males; p= 0.005) levels. This was the first study that reflected the distribution of HCV genotypes in southern Turkey region. Genotype 1b, associated with poor prognosis and which had the highest prevalence in Turkey, was also determined as the most common

  4. Distribution and clinical significance of hepatitis B virus genotypes in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Majid; Anwar, Muhammad Asim; Khanum, Azra; Zaman, Nasib; Raza, Abida

    2016-08-26

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotype and its role in disease progression and patients' response to antiviral treatment, is not well studied in Pakistan. This comprehensive study was aimed to determine the distribution of HBV genotypes in Pakistan and their possible association with phases of HBV infection. A total of 840 HBsAg positive samples was collected and tested for HBV DNA quantity. Samples below 100 IU/ml were excluded from the study. A total of 715 samples representing all the six parts of the country were genotyped by type specific primer PCR method. Clinical data of only 384 patients was compared as the remaining 332 were either receiving antiviral treatment or their infection phase was not confirmed. Genotype D was found in 509 samples (71.2 %), genotype A in 55 samples (7.7 %) and mixed infection with genotypes A and D in 124 samples (17.3 %). Genotypes B, C and E were identified in less than 1 % of the total samples. Genotype A, D and their mixture (A + D) were compared for severity of HBV infection. Significant differences were not found in distribution of HBV genotypes among different disease stages. HBV genotype D was the predominant infection in all study areas of Pakistan followed by mixed genotypes infection (A + D) whereas genotype A has 10 times lower prevalence than genotype D. Genotypes B, C, E and F altogether make only 1.5 % of the prevalence. Genotype do not appears to show the severity of liver disease.

  5. Investigation of the genotype III to genotype I shift in Japanese encephalitis virus and the impact on human cases.

    PubMed

    Han, Na; Adams, James; Fang, Wei; Liu, Si-Qing; Rayner, Simon

    2015-08-01

    Japanese encephalitis is a mosquito borne disease and is the leading cause of viral encephalitis in the Asia-Pacific area. The causative agent, Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) can be phylogenetically classified into five genotypes based on nucleotide sequence. In recent years, genotype I (GI) has displaced genotype III (GIII) as the dominant lineage, but the mechanisms behind this displacement event requires elucidation. In an earlier study, we compared host variation over time between the two genotypes and observed that GI appears to have evolved to achieve more efficient infection in hosts in the replication cycle, with the tradeoff of reduced infectivity in secondary hosts such as humans. To further investigate this phenomenon, we collected JEV surveillance data on human cases and, together with sequence data, and generated genotype/case profiles from seven Asia-Pacific countries and regions to characterize the GI/GIII displacement event. We found that, when comprehensive and consistent vaccination and surveillance data was available, and the GIII to GI shift occurred within a well-defined time period, there was a statistically significant drop in JEV human cases. Our findings provide further support for the argument that GI is less effective in infecting humans, who represent a dead end host. However, experimental investigation is necessary to confirm this hypothesis. The study highlights the value of alternative approaches to investigation of epidemics, as well as the importance of effective data collection for disease surveillance and control.

  6. Displacement of predominant respiratory syncytial virus genotypes in Malaysia between 1989 and 2011.

    PubMed

    Khor, Chee-Sieng; Sam, I-Ching; Hooi, Poh-Sim; Chan, Yoke-Fun

    2013-03-01

    From 1989 to 2011 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, multiple genotypes from both respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) subgroups were found co-circulating each year. RSV-A subgroup predominated in 12 out of 17years with the remaining years predominated by RSV-B subgroup. Local RSV strains exhibited temporal clustering with RSV strains reported in previous epidemiological studies. Every few years, the existing predominant genotype was replaced by a new genotype. The RSV-A genotypes GA2, GA5 and GA7 were replaced by NA1 and NA2, while BA became the predominant RSV-B genotype. A unique local cluster, BA12, was seen in 2009, and the recently-described ON1 genotype with 72-nt duplication emerged in 2011. Our findings will have important implications for future vaccine intervention. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Distribution of Hepatitis B Virus Genotypes in Two Different Pediatric Populations from Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Mbayed, V. A.; López, J. L.; Telenta, P. F. S.; Palacios, G.; Badía, I.; Ferro, A.; Galoppo, C.; Campos, R.

    1998-01-01

    Differences in pathogenesis and the probability of becoming a chronic carrier depend on the age at which hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is acquired, ranging from 82% in infants less than 6 months of age to 15 to 30% in older children. HBV genotypes from 22 pediatric patients from two areas that differ in prevalence have been determined. Phylogenetic analysis shows a clear difference between the genotype distribution in Buenos Aires, a low-prevalence area, and that found in Gualeguay, Entre Ríos, a high-prevalence area. While the analysis allocated the sequences in the Buenos Aires group to genotypes A (36%), D (9%), and F (55%), the Gualeguay group presented exclusively genotype A isolates with very low nucleotide divergence, which suggests a strong founder viral population. The high prevalence of genotype F in the Buenos Aires group and its high intragroup heterogeneity agree with the American origin of this genotype. PMID:9774595

  8. Distribution and diversity of hepatitis B virus genotypes in Yunnan, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Binghui; Feng, Yue; Li, Zheng; Duan, Haiping; Zhao, Ting; Zhang, Amei; Liu, Li; Baloch, Zulqarnain; Xia, Xueshan

    2014-10-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is one of the most prevalent pathogens in the world, and infection with this virus is a serious threat for public health. Yunnan is considered as an important endemic center for blood-borne viruses such as human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus, in China. However, the distribution and diversity of HBV subgenotypes remain unclear in Yunnan province. In the current study, HBV positive samples were collected from different prefectures of Yunnan province and their molecular epidemiological characters were determined. Phylogenetic analysis on the pre-S/S gene (865 bps) showed the prevalence of four HBV genotypes, including genotype B (24 cases, 33.3%), genotype C (45 cases, 62.5%), genotype I (two cases, 2.78%) and C/D recombinants (one case, 1.39%). The most prevalent genotypes B and C could be sub classified into subgenotype B2 and C1, C2, C5, and C7, respectively. Clusters of subgenotype B2 and C2 consisted of strains from China and other East Asian countries, while subgenotype C1, C5, and C7 and genotype I formed a cluster together with strains from Southeast Asia. Using Bayesian inference from phylogenetic, HBV genotypes B and C were estimated to have originated in 1860s and 1910s with an evolutionary rate of 3.26 and 8.01 × 10(-4) substitutions/site/year, respectively. These findings indicate that the distribution of HBV genotypes in Yunnan was influenced by strains from the rest of China and the neighboring countries.

  9. Structural basis for the neutralization of hepatitis E virus by a cross-genotype antibody

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Ying; Tang, Xuhua; Zhang, Xiao; Song, Cuiling; Zheng, Minghua; Wang, Kaihang; Zhang, Jun; Ng, Mun-Hon; Hew, Choy-Leong; Li, Shaowei; Xia, Ningshao; Sivaraman, J.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV), a non-enveloped, positive-sense, single-stranded RNA virus, is a major cause of enteric hepatitis. Classified into the family Hepeviridae, HEV comprises four genotypes (genotypes 1-4), which belong to a single serotype. We describe a monoclonal antibody (mAb), 8G12, which equally recognizes all four genotypes of HEV, with ∼2.53–3.45 nM binding affinity. The mAb 8G12 has a protective, neutralizing capacity, which can significantly block virus infection in host cells. Animal studies with genotypes 1, 3 and 4 confirmed the cross-genotype neutralizing capacity of 8G12 and its effective prevention of hepatitis E disease. The complex crystal structures of 8G12 with the HEV E2s domain (the most protruded region of the virus capsid) of the abundant genotypes 1 and 4 were determined at 4.0 and 2.3 Å resolution, respectively. These structures revealed that 8G12 recognizes both genotypes through the epitopes in the E2s dimerization region. Structure-based mutagenesis and cell-model assays with virus-like particles identified several conserved residues (Glu549, Lys554 and Gly591) that are essential for 8G12 neutralization. Moreover, the epitope of 8G12 is identified as a key epitope involved in virus-host interactions. These findings will help develop a common strategy for the prevention of the most abundant form of HEV infection. PMID:25793314

  10. Prevailing genotype distribution and characteristics of human respiratory syncytial virus in northeastern China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yuxuan; Liu, Li; Wang, Shaohua; Li, Zhaolong; Hou, Min; Li, Jingliang; Yu, Xiao-Fang; Zhang, Wenyan; Hua, Shucheng

    2017-02-01

    Although human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the most common viruses inducing respiratory tract infections in young children and the elderly, the genotype distribution and characteristics of RSV in northeastern China have not been investigated. Here, we identified 25 RSV-A and 8 RSV-B strains from 80 samples of patients with respiratory infections between February 2015 and May 2015. All 25 RSV-A viruses were classified as the ON1 genotype, which rapidly spread and became the dominant genotype in the world since being identified in Ontario (Canada) in December 2010. All eight RSV-B viruses belonged to the BA genotype with a 60-nucleotide duplication, seven of which formed two new genotypes, BA-CCA and BA-CCB. The remaining RSV-B virus clustered with one of the Hangzhou strains belonging to genotype BA11. Construction of a phylogenetic tree and amino acid substitution analysis showed that Changchun ON1 viruses exclusively constituted Lineages 3, 5 and 6, and contained several unique and newly identified amino acid substitutions, including E224G, R244K, L289I, Y297H, and L298P. Selective pressure was also evaluated, and various N and O-glycosylation sites were predicted. This study provides the first genetic analysis of RSV in northeastern China and may facilitate a better understanding of the evolution of this virus locally and globally. J. Med. Virol. 89:222-233, 2017. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Medical Virology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Medical Virology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Prevailing genotype distribution and characteristics of human respiratory syncytial virus in northeastern China

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yuxuan; Liu, Li; Wang, Shaohua; Li, Zhaolong; Hou, Min; Li, Jingliang; Yu, Xiao‐Fang

    2016-01-01

    Although human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the most common viruses inducing respiratory tract infections in young children and the elderly, the genotype distribution and characteristics of RSV in northeastern China have not been investigated. Here, we identified 25 RSV‐A and 8 RSV‐B strains from 80 samples of patients with respiratory infections between February 2015 and May 2015. All 25 RSV‐A viruses were classified as the ON1 genotype, which rapidly spread and became the dominant genotype in the world since being identified in Ontario (Canada) in December 2010. All eight RSV‐B viruses belonged to the BA genotype with a 60‐nucleotide duplication, seven of which formed two new genotypes, BA‐CCA and BA‐CCB. The remaining RSV‐B virus clustered with one of the Hangzhou strains belonging to genotype BA11. Construction of a phylogenetic tree and amino acid substitution analysis showed that Changchun ON1 viruses exclusively constituted Lineages 3, 5 and 6, and contained several unique and newly identified amino acid substitutions, including E224G, R244K, L289I, Y297H, and L298P. Selective pressure was also evaluated, and various N and O‐glycosylation sites were predicted. This study provides the first genetic analysis of RSV in northeastern China and may facilitate a better understanding of the evolution of this virus locally and globally. J. Med. Virol. 89:222–233, 2017. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Medical Virology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27448044

  12. Genotypic distribution of hepatitis C virus in Thailand and Southeast Asia.

    PubMed

    Wasitthankasem, Rujipat; Vongpunsawad, Sompong; Siripon, Nipaporn; Suya, Chutima; Chulothok, Phrutsada; Chaiear, Kasemporn; Rujirojindakul, Pairaya; Kanjana, Sawan; Theamboonlers, Apiradee; Tangkijvanich, Pisit; Poovorawan, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The majority of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection results in chronic infection, which can lead to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Global burden of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is estimated at 150 million individuals, or 3% of the world's population. The distribution of the seven major genotypes of HCV varies with geographical regions. Since Asia has a high incidence of HCV, we assessed the distribution of HCV genotypes in Thailand and Southeast Asia. From 588 HCV-positive samples obtained throughout Thailand, we characterized the HCV 5' untranslated region, Core, and NS5B regions by nested PCR. Nucleotide sequences obtained from both the Core and NS5B of these isolates were subjected to phylogenetic analysis, and genotypes were assigned using published reference genotypes. Results were compared to the epidemiological data of HCV genotypes identified within Southeast Asian. Among the HCV subtypes characterized in the Thai samples, subtype 3a was the most predominant (36.4%), followed by 1a (19.9%), 1b (12.6%), 3b (9.7%) and 2a (0.5%). While genotype 1 was prevalent throughout Thailand (27-36%), genotype 3 was more common in the south. Genotype 6 (20.9%) constituted subtype 6f (7.8%), 6n (7.7%), 6i (3.4%), 6j and 6m (0.7% each), 6c (0.3%), 6v and 6xa (0.2% each) and its prevalence was significantly lower in southern Thailand compared to the north and northeast (p = 0.027 and p = 0.030, respectively). Within Southeast Asia, high prevalence of genotype 6 occurred in northern countries such as Myanmar, Laos, and Vietnam, while genotype 3 was prevalent in Thailand and Malaysia. Island nations of Singapore, Indonesia and Philippines demonstrated prevalence of genotype 1. This study further provides regional HCV genotype information that may be useful in fostering sound public health policy and tracking future patterns of HCV spread.

  13. Prior infection of pigs with a genotype 3 swine hepatitis E virus (HEV) protects against subsequent challenges with homologous and heterologous genotypes 3 and 4 human HEV.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Brenton J; Dryman, Barbara A; Huang, Yao-Wei; Feagins, Alicia R; Leroith, Tanya; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2011-07-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an important human pathogen. At least four recognized and two putative genotypes of mammalian HEV have been reported: genotypes 1 and 2 are restricted to humans whereas genotypes 3 and 4 are zoonotic. The current experimental vaccines are all based on a single strain of HEV, even though multiple genotypes of HEV are co-circulating in some countries and thus an individual may be exposed to more than one genotype. Genotypes 3 and 4 swine HEV is widespread in pigs and known to infect humans. Therefore, it is important to know if prior infection with a genotype 3 swine HEV will confer protective immunity against subsequent exposure to genotypes 3 and 4 human and swine HEV. In this study, specific-pathogen-free pigs were divided into 4 groups of 6 each. Pigs in the three treatment groups were each inoculated with a genotype 3 swine HEV, and 12 weeks later, challenged with the same genotype 3 swine HEV, a genotype 3 human HEV, and a genotype 4 human HEV, respectively. The control group was inoculated and challenged with PBS buffer. Weekly sera from all pigs were tested for HEV RNA and IgG anti-HEV, and weekly fecal samples were also tested for HEV RNA. The pigs inoculated with swine HEV became infected as evidenced by fecal virus shedding and viremia, and the majority of pigs also developed IgG anti-HEV prior to challenge at 12 weeks post-inoculation. After challenge, viremia was not detected and only two pigs challenged with swine HEV had 1-week fecal virus shedding, suggesting that prior infection with a genotype 3 swine HEV prevented pigs from developing viremia and fecal virus shedding after challenges with homologous and heterologous genotypes 3 and 4 HEV. The results from this study have important implications for future development of an effective HEV vaccine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Molecular identification of Saint Louis encephalitis virus genotype IV in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Hoyos-López, Richard; Soto, Sandra Uribe; Rúa-Uribe, Guillermo; Gallego-Gómez, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Saint Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) is a member of the Japanese-encephalitis virus serocomplex of the genus Flavivirus. SLEV is broadly distributed in the Americas and the Caribbean Islands, where it is usually transmitted by mosquitoes of the genus Culex and primarily to birds and mammalian-hosts. Humans are occasionally infected by the virus and are dead-end hosts. SLEV causes encephalitis in temperate regions, while in tropical regions of the Americas, several human cases and a wide biological diversity of SLEV-strains have been reported. The phylogenetic analysis of the envelope (E) protein genes indicated eight-genotypes of SLEV with geographic overlap. The present paper describes the genotyping of two SLEV viruses detected in mosquito-pools collected in northern Colombia (department of Cordoba). We used reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to amplify a fragment of theE-gene to confirm the virus identity and completeE-gene sequencing for phylogenetic analysis and genotyping of the two-SLEV viruses found circulating in Córdoba. This is the first report of SLEV genotype IV in Colombia (Córdoba) in mosquitoes from a region of human inhabitation, implicating the risk of human disease due to SLEV infection. Physicians should consider SLEV as a possible aetiology for undiagnosed febrile and neurologic syndromes among their patients who report exposure to mosquito-bites. PMID:26313538

  15. Molecular identification of Saint Louis encephalitis virus genotype IV in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Hoyos-López, Richard; Soto, Sandra Uribe; Rúa-Uribe, Guillermo; Gallego-Gómez, Juan Carlos

    2015-09-01

    Saint Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) is a member of the Japanese-encephalitis virus serocomplex of the genus Flavivirus. SLEV is broadly distributed in the Americas and the Caribbean Islands, where it is usually transmitted by mosquitoes of the genus Culex and primarily to birds and mammalian-hosts. Humans are occasionally infected by the virus and are dead-end hosts. SLEV causes encephalitis in temperate regions, while in tropical regions of the Americas, several human cases and a wide biological diversity of SLEV-strains have been reported. The phylogenetic analysis of the envelope (E) protein genes indicated eight-genotypes of SLEV with geographic overlap. The present paper describes the genotyping of two SLEV viruses detected in mosquito-pools collected in northern Colombia (department of Cordoba). We used reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to amplify a fragment of the E-gene to confirm the virus identity and complete E-gene sequencing for phylogenetic analysis and genotyping of the two-SLEV viruses found circulating in Córdoba. This is the first report of SLEV genotype IV in Colombia (Córdoba) in mosquitoes from a region of human inhabitation, implicating the risk of human disease due to SLEV infection. Physicians should consider SLEV as a possible aetiology for undiagnosed febrile and neurologic syndromes among their patients who report exposure to mosquito-bites.

  16. Expanded classification of hepatitis C virus into 7 genotypes and 67 subtypes: updated criteria and genotype assignment web resource.

    PubMed

    Smith, Donald B; Bukh, Jens; Kuiken, Carla; Muerhoff, A Scott; Rice, Charles M; Stapleton, Jack T; Simmonds, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The 2005 consensus proposal for the classification of hepatitis C virus (HCV) presented an agreed and uniform nomenclature for HCV variants and the criteria for their assignment into genotypes and subtypes. Since its publication, the available dataset of HCV sequences has vastly expanded through advancement in nucleotide sequencing technologies and an increasing focus on the role of HCV genetic variation in disease and treatment outcomes. The current study represents a major update to the previous consensus HCV classification, incorporating additional sequence information derived from over 1,300 (near-)complete genome sequences of HCV available on public databases in May 2013. Analysis resolved several nomenclature conflicts between genotype designations and using consensus criteria created a classification of HCV into seven confirmed genotypes and 67 subtypes. There are 21 additional complete coding region sequences of unassigned subtype. The study additionally describes the development of a Web resource hosted by the International Committee for Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) that maintains and regularly updates tables of reference isolates, accession numbers, and annotated alignments (http://talk.ictvonline.org/links/hcv/hcv-classification.htm). The Flaviviridae Study Group urges those who need to check or propose new genotypes or subtypes of HCV to contact the Study Group in advance of publication to avoid nomenclature conflicts appearing in the literature. While the criteria for assigning genotypes and subtypes remain unchanged from previous consensus proposals, changes are proposed in the assignment of provisional subtypes, subtype numbering beyond "w," and the nomenclature of intergenotypic recombinant. This study represents an important reference point for the consensus classification of HCV variants that will be of value to researchers working in clinical and basic science fields. © 2013 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  17. Performance comparison of the versant HCV genotype 2.0 assay (LiPA) and the abbott realtime HCV genotype II assay for detecting hepatitis C virus genotype 6.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ruifeng; Cong, Xu; Du, Shaocai; Fei, Ran; Rao, Huiying; Wei, Lai

    2014-10-01

    The Versant HCV genotype 2.0 assay (line probe assay [LiPA] 2.0), based on reverse hybridization, and the Abbott Realtime HCV genotype II assay (Realtime II), based on genotype-specific real-time PCR, have been widely used to analyze hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes. However, their performances for detecting HCV genotype 6 infections have not been well studied. Here, we analyzed genotype 6 in 63 samples from the China HCV Genotyping Study that were originally identified as genotype 6 using the LiPA 2.0. The genotyping results were confirmed by nonstructural 5B (NS5B) or core sequence phylogenetic analysis. A total of 57 samples were confirmed to be genotype 6 (51 genotype 6a, 5 genotype 6n, and 1 genotype 6e). Four samples identified as a mixture of genotypes 6 and 4 by the LiPA 2.0 were confirmed to be genotype 3b. The remaining two samples classified as genotype 6 by the LiPA 2.0 were confirmed to be genotype 1b, which were intergenotypic recombinants and excluded from further comparison. In 57 genotype 6 samples detected using the Realtime II version 2.00 assay, 47 genotype 6a samples were identified as genotype 6, one 6e sample was misclassified as genotype 1, and four 6a and five 6n samples yielded indeterminate results. Nine nucleotide profiles in the 5' untranslated region affected the performances of both assays. Therefore, our analysis shows that both assays have limitations in identifying HCV genotype 6. The LiPA 2.0 cannot distinguish some 3b samples from genotype 6 samples. The Realtime II assay fails to identify some 6a and all non-6a subtypes, and it misclassifies genotype 6e as genotype 1. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Performance Comparison of the Versant HCV Genotype 2.0 Assay (LiPA) and the Abbott Realtime HCV Genotype II Assay for Detecting Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 6

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ruifeng; Cong, Xu; Du, Shaocai; Fei, Ran; Rao, Huiying

    2014-01-01

    The Versant HCV genotype 2.0 assay (line probe assay [LiPA] 2.0), based on reverse hybridization, and the Abbott Realtime HCV genotype II assay (Realtime II), based on genotype-specific real-time PCR, have been widely used to analyze hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes. However, their performances for detecting HCV genotype 6 infections have not been well studied. Here, we analyzed genotype 6 in 63 samples from the China HCV Genotyping Study that were originally identified as genotype 6 using the LiPA 2.0. The genotyping results were confirmed by nonstructural 5B (NS5B) or core sequence phylogenetic analysis. A total of 57 samples were confirmed to be genotype 6 (51 genotype 6a, 5 genotype 6n, and 1 genotype 6e). Four samples identified as a mixture of genotypes 6 and 4 by the LiPA 2.0 were confirmed to be genotype 3b. The remaining two samples classified as genotype 6 by the LiPA 2.0 were confirmed to be genotype 1b, which were intergenotypic recombinants and excluded from further comparison. In 57 genotype 6 samples detected using the Realtime II version 2.00 assay, 47 genotype 6a samples were identified as genotype 6, one 6e sample was misclassified as genotype 1, and four 6a and five 6n samples yielded indeterminate results. Nine nucleotide profiles in the 5′ untranslated region affected the performances of both assays. Therefore, our analysis shows that both assays have limitations in identifying HCV genotype 6. The LiPA 2.0 cannot distinguish some 3b samples from genotype 6 samples. The Realtime II assay fails to identify some 6a and all non-6a subtypes, and it misclassifies genotype 6e as genotype 1. PMID:25100817

  19. Resolving ambiguity in the phylogenetic relationship of genotypes A, B, and C of hepatitis B virus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is an important infectious agent that causes widespread concern because billions of people are infected by at least 8 different HBV genotypes worldwide. However, reconstruction of the phylogenetic relationship between HBV genotypes is difficult. Specifically, the phylogenetic relationships among genotypes A, B, and C are not clear from previous studies because of the confounding effects of genotype recombination. In order to clarify the evolutionary relationships, a rigorous approach is required that can effectively explore genetic sequences with recombination. Result In the present study, phylogenetic relationship of the HBV genotypes was reconstructed using a consensus phylogeny of phylogenetic trees of HBV genome segments. Reliability of the reconstructed phylogeny was extensively evaluated in agreements of local phylogenies of genome segments. The reconstructed phylogenetic tree revealed that HBV genotypes B and C had a closer phylogenetic relationship than genotypes A and B or A and C. Evaluations showed the consensus method was capable to reconstruct reliable phylogenetic relationship in the presence of recombinants. Conclusion The consensus method implemented in this study provides an alternative approach for reconstructing reliable phylogenetic relationships for viruses with possible genetic recombination. Our approach revealed the phylogenetic relationships of genotypes A, B, and C of HBV. PMID:23758960

  20. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes in a group of Sri Lankan patients with chronic infection.

    PubMed

    Manamperi, A; Gunawardene, N S; Wellawatta, C; Abeyewickreme, W; de Silva, H J

    2011-08-01

    Hepatitis B infection causes a wide spectrum of liver diseases. Previous analyses of hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome have revealed eight HBV genotypes (A-H), with distinct geographical distribution worldwide. The epidemiology of HBV genotypes and their implications for natural history of disease progression and response to anti viral therapy have been increasingly recognized. This study was undertaken to determine the HBV genotypes in a group of Sri Lankan patients with chronic infection who presented for investigation prior to treatment. Genotypes were determined (2007-2009) in 25 patients with evidence of chronic HBV infection. A genotyping system based on multiplex-nested PCR using type-specific primers was employed in assigning genotypes A through F. Genotypes G and H were not determined. Among the 25 patients tested, genotypes B [9 (36%)], C [4 (16%)], D [3 (12%)], A [2 (8%)] and E [1 (4%)] were detected. There was a relatively high prevalence of mixed infections with genotypes B+C (3), A+D (1), and B+D (2), which overall constituted 24% of patients. Although this is a non-representative sample, HBV infections among this group of Sri Lankan patients were predominantly genotypes B, C and D.

  1. Discrepancy between Hepatitis C Virus Genotypes and NS4-Based Serotypes: Association with Their Subgenomic Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Win, Nan Nwe; Nakamoto, Shingo; Kanda, Tatsuo; Takahashi, Hiroki; Takahashi-Nakaguchi, Azusa; Yasui, Shin; Nakamura, Masato; Wu, Shuang; Imazeki, Fumio; Mikami, Shigeru; Yokosuka, Osamu; Gonoi, Tohru; Shirasawa, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Determination of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes plays an important role in the direct-acting agent era. Discrepancies between HCV genotyping and serotyping assays are occasionally observed. Eighteen samples with discrepant results between genotyping and serotyping methods were analyzed. HCV serotyping and genotyping were based on the HCV nonstructural 4 (NS4) region and 5′-untranslated region (5′-UTR), respectively. HCV core and NS4 regions were chosen to be sequenced and were compared with the genotyping and serotyping results. Deep sequencing was also performed for the corresponding HCV NS4 regions. Seventeen out of 18 discrepant samples could be sequenced by the Sanger method. Both HCV core and NS4 sequences were concordant with that of genotyping in the 5′-UTR in all 17 samples. In cloning analysis of the HCV NS4 region, there were several amino acid variations, but each sequence was much closer to the peptide with the same genotype. Deep sequencing revealed that minor clones with different subgenotypes existed in two of the 17 samples. Genotyping by genome amplification showed high consistency, while several false reactions were detected by serotyping. The deep sequencing method also provides accurate genotyping results and may be useful for analyzing discrepant cases. HCV genotyping should be correctly determined before antiviral treatment. PMID:28106726

  2. A Smartphone-Based Genotyping Method for Hepatitis B Virus at Point-of-Care Settings.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Huiqin; Wu, Di; Song, Liuwei; Yuan, Quan; Ge, Shengxiang; Min, Xiaoping; Xia, Ningshao; Qian, Shizhi; Qiu, Xianbo

    2017-04-01

    We reported a rapid, convenient, and easy-to-use genotyping method for hepatitis B virus (HBV) based on the smartphone at point-of-care (POC) settings. To perform HBV genotyping especially for genotypes A, B, C, and D, a smartphone is used to image and analyze a one-step immunoassay lateral flow strip functionalized with genotype-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) on multiple capture lines. A light-emitting diode (LED) positioned on the top of the lateral flow strip is used to shine the multiple capture lines for excitation. Fluorescence detection is obtained with a smartphone whose camera is used to take the fluorescent images. An intelligent algorithm is developed to first identify each capture line from the fluorescent image and then determine the HBV genotype based on a genotyping model. Based on the pattern of the detection signal from different samples, a custom HBV genotyping model is developed. Custom application software running on a smartphone is developed with Java to collect and analyze the fluorescent image, display the genotyping result, and transmit it if necessary. Compared with the existing methods with nucleic acid analysis, more convenient, instant, and efficient HBV genotyping with significantly lower cost and a simpler procedure can be obtained with the developed smartphone POC HBV genotyping method.

  3. [Hepatitis B virus genotype E infection in Turkey: the detection of the first case].

    PubMed

    Sayan, Murat; Sanlıdağ, Tamer; Akçalı, Sinem; Arıkan, Ayşe

    2014-10-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a global major health problem. Currently, 10 genotypes (A-J) of hepatitis B virus (HBV) are identified based on the nucleic acid sequence heterogeneity, and these genotypes have been shown to have distinct geographic distribution. Reports of the previous studies indicated that the genotype D is the predominant type among hepatitis B patients in different regions of Turkey. However, recent studies indicated that other HBV genotypes are also seen with an increasing rate. Although epidemiological and clinical information on genotype E infection is currently limited, it is known that genotype E infection is common in West and Central Africa. In this report, the first case of HBV genotype E infection in Turkey was presented. A 22-year-old Nigerian male employee who resided in Manisa for five years was admitted to Celal Bayar University Hospital Manisa, Turkey, for his routine check-up. Since HBsAg was found positive, other HBV markers were tested with a repeated serum sample. Laboratory findings were as follows; HBsAg (+), anti-HBs (-), HBeAg (-), anti-HBe (+), anti-HBc (+), anti-HCV (-), anti-HIV (-), ALT: 44 U/L and AST: 45 U/L. HBV-DNA level was detected as 700 IU/ml by real-time PCR (Artus HBV QS RGQ Qiagen, Germany). HBV-DNA isolated from the serum sample of the patient was amplified by PCR and polymerase gene segment of HBV was directly sequenced. UPGMA method was used for phylogenetic analysis and Inno-LIPA HBV genotyping method (Innogenetics, Belgium) was performed to determine multiple HBV genotype infection. On the basis of those methods the genotype of the virus was identified as genotype E. The partial sequences of the HBV polymerase gene were loaded to the international DNA data bank (GenBank) for contribution to the global HBV surveillance. This report emphasized that besides genotype D the other HBV genotypes could be found in Turkey. Since the patient was an inactive HBsAg carrier before his residence in Turkey, this

  4. [National and regional distribution of hepatitis C virus genotypes in Chile].

    PubMed

    Venegas, Mauricio; Torres, Claudio; Urzúa, Alvaro; Brahm, Javier

    2013-10-01

    Genotyping of hepatitis C virus has an important prognostic value for response to antiviral therapy. The results of hepatits C virus genotyping performed between 1994 and 2012 from 1,766 patients of different regions of Chile are reported. Global genotype (Gt) distribution was as follows: 7.87% Gt1a, 72.71% Gt1b, 1.98% Gt2, 16.53% Gt3a, 0.57% Gt4, 0.28% Gt5a and 0.06% Gt6. In most regions the genotype distribution was similar to the global. However, there were some differences, in particular in the south of our country, where 3a is present in more than 30% in some regions.

  5. Putative novel genotype of avian hepatitis E virus, Hungary, 2010.

    PubMed

    Bányai, Krisztián; Tóth, Ádám György; Ivanics, Éva; Glávits, Róbert; Szentpáli-Gavallér, Katalin; Dán, Ádám

    2012-08-01

    To explore the genetic diversity of avian hepatitis E virus strains, we characterized the near-complete genome of a strain detected in 2010 in Hungary, uncovering moderate genome sequence similarity with reference strains. Public health implications related to consumption of eggs or meat contaminated by avian hepatitis E virus, or to poultry handling, require thorough investigation.

  6. [First case of hepatitis B virus genotype H infection in Turkey].

    PubMed

    Ural, Onur; Sayan, Murat; Akhan, Sıla; Sümer, Sua; Simşek, Funda

    2013-07-01

    Clinical studies reported from Turkey indicate that hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotype D is more prevalent than other genotypes. Epidemiological and clinical information on genotype H infection is currently limited. Genotype H infection is most likely due to its regional (Central and South America) prevalence throughout the world. The aim of this report is to present the first HBV genotype H infection in a chronic hepatitis B patient in Turkey. Laboratory findings of a 42 years old male patient admitted to our hospital revealed HBsAg (+), anti-HBs (-), HBeAg (-), anti-HBe (+), anti-HBc IgM (-), anti-HBc IgG (+), anti-HAV IgG (+), HBV-DNA: 5.689.776 IU/ml and high liver enzymes (ALT: 223 U/L, AST: 121 U/L). History of the patient indicated no risk factor (intravenous drug use, blood transfusion, suspicious sexual contact) related to HBV transmission. Since liver ultrasonography showed multiple hemangiomas, biopsy was performed and histologic activity index was found as 6/18 and fibrosis as 2/6, according to modified Knodell score system. HBV DNA isolated from the serum sample of the patient was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and polymerase gene segment of HBV was directly sequenced. UPGMA method was used for phylogenetic analysis, and the genotype of the virus was identified accordingly. The nucleotide sequence was compared to those from the international DNA data bank (GenBank). The genotyping of the patient revealed that the isolated HBV was genotype H. Treatment with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate was initiated and the patient responded to the treatment. This finding suggested that other HBV genotypes, except the predominant genotype D may also be in circulation in Turkey. In conclusion, detection of epidemiologic and molecular characteristics of HBV genotype H which is related to chronic hepatitis, seems to be necessary in order to better understand its circulation and progression around the world.

  7. Interferon lambda 4 genotypes and resistance-associated variants in patients infected with hepatitis C virus genotypes 1 and 3.

    PubMed

    Peiffer, Kai-Henrik; Sommer, Lisa; Susser, Simone; Vermehren, Johannes; Herrmann, Eva; Döring, Matthias; Dietz, Julia; Perner, Dany; Berkowski, Caterina; Zeuzem, Stefan; Sarrazin, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the interferon lambda 4 (IFNL4) gene are predictors for treatment success in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. For direct-acting antiviral combinations only weak association with IFNL4 SNPs was observed. Little is known about potential selections of resistance-associated variants (RAVs) by the IFNL4 genotype. This study analyzed the prevalence of RAVs to currently approved direct-acting antivirals in a large European population in correlation to SNPs in IFNL4. Samples of 633 patients chronically infected with HCV genotypes 1a (n = 259), 1b (n = 323), and 3 (n = 51) were genotyped for rs12979860 (formerly known as IL28B) and rs368234815. RAVs in NS3, NS5A, and NS5B were detected by population-based sequencing. In addition, IFNL4 SNPs and NS5A RAVs were analyzed including deep sequencing (n = 109) in an independent replication cohort of HCV genotype 1-infected patients (n = 201). No significant correlation was found between IFNL4 SNPs and rare and common RAVs within NS3 and NS5B. In contrast, the NS5A RAV Y93H was detected frequently in HCV genotype 1b (14%) and significantly associated with the beneficial IFNL4 SNPs (P < 0.001 and P = 0.002, respectively). Moreover, the presence of Y93H in HCV genotype 1b patients was significantly associated with the second site variant T83M (P < 0.001). Independent factors significantly associated with the presence of Y93H were IFNL4 genotype and high baseline viral load. The NS5A RAV Y93H is significantly associated with the presence of beneficial IFNL4 SNPs and a high baseline viral load in HCV genotype 1-infected patients, which may explain a lack of correlation or even an inverse correlation of treatment response with IFNL4 genotype in some NS5A inhibitor containing IFN-free regimens. © 2015 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  8. [Imported B3 genotype measles viruses were isolated from measles cases in the Chinese mainland].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-Lei; Li, Chong-Shan; Wang, Hui-Ling; Tang, Wei; Song Jin-Hua; Yang, Jin-Hua; Wang, Shi-Wen; Zhang, Yan; Xu, Wen-Bo

    2014-09-01

    We isolated and identified the genotypes and molecular characteristics of the imported B3 measles virus (MeV) in the Chinese mainland. The Vero/SLAM cell line was used to isolate the viruses. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was undertaken to amplify the 450 nucleotide acids of the 3-terminal of the nucleoprotein gene. A phylogenetic tree was constructed and similarities in homology assessed. Results suggested that the Shanghai isolates MVi/Shanghai. CHN/38. 13/02 [B3] and MVi/Shanghai. CHN/40. 13/02[B3] were clustered within the same genotype group as the World Health Organization (WHO) B3 genotype reference strain. The number of differences in nucleotide acids between the two Shanghai isolates was one. The homology of nucleotide acids between the Shanghai isolates and the WHO B3 genotype reference strain (MVi/Ibadan. NGA/0.97/1/B3) was 98%. Comparative results from the Measles Nucleotide Surveillance system suggested that the sequences of Shanghai isolates and the 2013 vi- ruses from Australia, Japan, Korea, Hong Kong China, Philippines and Iran were identical. This is the first time that the B3 genotype of MeV in the Chinese mainland has been isolated since 1993. These data can be used to create a "baseline" of genetic information for measles viruses in China, and help to trace the transmission of measles viruses in China and the rest of the world.

  9. Evolutionary genotypes of influenza A (H7N9) viruses over five epidemic waves in China.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiao; Luo, Jiejian; Quan, Lijun; Wu, Aiping; Jiang, Taijiao

    2017-09-22

    Since the first human case of influenza A (H7N9) infection was identified in March 2013, five epidemics have emerged in China. Diverse H7N9 virus genotypes created through reassortments were already detected in the first epidemic wave, but how the H7N9 virus genetic diversities have evolved during the subsequent epidemics remained unclear. Here, to assess the ongoing genetic evolution of H7N9 viruses, we performed in-depth investigations of the dynamic H7N9 genotypes in these waves. We found that the H7N9 genotypes in the second and third epidemic waves are more diverse than those in the first wave, due to new reassortments that occurred during the second wave. However, the number of different H7N9 genotypes identified in the fourth and fifth waves decreased significantly. Furthermore, we found that different dominant genotypes existed in each of the five epidemic waves, and these wave-specific genotypes possess unique mutations that are enriched in the PB2 protein. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Detection of bovine leukemia virus and identification of its genotype in Mongolian cattle.

    PubMed

    Ochirkhuu, Nyamsuren; Konnai, Satoru; Odbileg, Raadan; Nishimori, Asami; Okagawa, Tomohiro; Murata, Shiro; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2016-04-01

    Epidemiological studies have indicated that bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection is globally distributed. However, no information regarding the disease and genetic diversity of the virus in the cattle of Mongolia is currently available. In this study, the prevalence of BLV was assessed using PCR, and the genetic diversity was analyzed through DNA sequencing. Of the 517 samples tested, 20 positives were identified. Phylogenetic analysis showed that six, one, and four isolates were classified into genotype 4, 7, and 1, respectively. Most isolates were clustered with isolates from Eastern Europe and Russia. This study is the first to investigate the BLV genotype in Mongolia.

  11. Complex Genotype Mixtures Analyzed by Deep Sequencing in Two Different Regions of Hepatitis B Virus.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Andrea; Gregori, Josep; Homs, Maria; Tabernero, David; Gonzalez, Carolina; Quer, Josep; Blasi, Maria; Casillas, Rosario; Nieto, Leonardo; Riveiro-Barciela, Mar; Esteban, Rafael; Buti, Maria; Rodriguez-Frias, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    This study assesses the presence and outcome of genotype mixtures in the polymerase/surface and X/preCore regions of the HBV genome in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Thirty samples from ten chronic hepatitis B patients were included. The polymerase/surface and X/preCore regions were analyzed by deep sequencing (UDPS) in the first available sample at diagnosis, a pre-treatment sample, and a sample while under treatment. HBV genotype was determined by phylogenesis. Quasispecies complexity was evaluated by mutation frequency and nucleotide diversity. The polymerase/surface and X/preCore regions were validated for genotyping from 113 GenBank reference sequences. UDPS yielded a median of 10,960 sequences per sample (IQR 16,645) in the polymerase/surface region and 11,595 sequences per sample (IQR 14,682) in X/preCore. Genotype mixtures were more common in X/preCore (90%) than in polymerase/surface (30%) (p<0.001). On X/preCore genotyping, all samples were genotype A, whereas polymerase/surface yielded genotypes A (80%), D (16.7%), and F (3.3%) (p = 0.036). Genotype changes in polymerase/surface were observed in four patients during natural quasispecies dynamics and in two patients during treatment. There were no genotype changes in X/preCore. Quasispecies complexity was higher in X/preCore than in polymerase/surface (p = 0.004). The results provide evidence of genotype mixtures and differential genotype proportions in the polymerase/surface and X/preCore regions. The genotype dynamics in HBV infection and the different patterns of quasispecies complexity in the HBV genome suggest a new paradigm for HBV genotype classification.

  12. Complex Genotype Mixtures Analyzed by Deep Sequencing in Two Different Regions of Hepatitis B Virus

    PubMed Central

    Homs, Maria; Tabernero, David; Gonzalez, Carolina; Quer, Josep; Blasi, Maria; Casillas, Rosario; Nieto, Leonardo; Riveiro-Barciela, Mar; Esteban, Rafael; Buti, Maria; Rodriguez-Frias, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    This study assesses the presence and outcome of genotype mixtures in the polymerase/surface and X/preCore regions of the HBV genome in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Thirty samples from ten chronic hepatitis B patients were included. The polymerase/surface and X/preCore regions were analyzed by deep sequencing (UDPS) in the first available sample at diagnosis, a pre-treatment sample, and a sample while under treatment. HBV genotype was determined by phylogenesis. Quasispecies complexity was evaluated by mutation frequency and nucleotide diversity. The polymerase/surface and X/preCore regions were validated for genotyping from 113 GenBank reference sequences. UDPS yielded a median of 10,960 sequences per sample (IQR 16,645) in the polymerase/surface region and 11,595 sequences per sample (IQR 14,682) in X/preCore. Genotype mixtures were more common in X/preCore (90%) than in polymerase/surface (30%) (p<0.001). On X/preCore genotyping, all samples were genotype A, whereas polymerase/surface yielded genotypes A (80%), D (16.7%), and F (3.3%) (p = 0.036). Genotype changes in polymerase/surface were observed in four patients during natural quasispecies dynamics and in two patients during treatment. There were no genotype changes in X/preCore. Quasispecies complexity was higher in X/preCore than in polymerase/surface (p = 0.004). The results provide evidence of genotype mixtures and differential genotype proportions in the polymerase/surface and X/preCore regions. The genotype dynamics in HBV infection and the different patterns of quasispecies complexity in the HBV genome suggest a new paradigm for HBV genotype classification. PMID:26714168

  13. [Hepatitis c virus genotype research by ABC programs of 5'-NCR restriction endonuclease digestion].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Guo-hua; Du, Shao-cai; Sun, Nan-xiong; You, Peng; Fan, Xiao-feng; Zhang, Yong-xiang; Wei, Lai

    2004-04-01

    In order to fully understand hepatitis c virus (HCV) genotype 3b, 1a, 2b and 6a infection in China, We built HCV 5'-noncoding region (5'-NCR) of different genotypes and subtypes. The classification HCV into variable genotypes (subtypes) was carried on by programs A, B and C A. Using a combination of three restriction endonuclease BHH' (BsrB I, Hae II, Hinf I) digestions at the same time. The distinct genotypes were classified into 5 groups: genotype 1 (1a, 1b), 6a, 2 (2a, 2b), genotype 3 (3a, 3b), genotype4 (4a). B. With regard to genotype 1, we could distinguish subtype 1a from 1b using BstU I digestion. C. Using restriction endonuclease Hae III, genotype 2a, 2b, 3b, 4a, 6a are differentiated respectively. (1) HCV genotype 1a, 1b, 2a, 2b, 3a, 3b, 4a, 6a are fully discriminated by comparison with the genotypes regular samples. (2) Of the 93 patients, HCV genotype distribution in China was 66.67% for 1b, 18.28% for 2a, 3.23% for 1b/2b, 3b, 2b respectively. 2.15% for 2a/2b, 1b/2a respectively. 1.08% for 1a. This research indicated that adoption of HCV 5'-NCR A B C restriction endonuclease digestions techniques, might be sensitive and efficient to detect HCV and discriminate HCV genotype (subtypes) 1a to 6a.

  14. Hepatitis B virus in Buenos Aires, Argentina: genotypes, virological characteristics and clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Pezzano, S C; Torres, C; Fainboim, H A; Bouzas, M B; Schroder, T; Giuliano, S F; Paz, S; Alvarez, E; Campos, R H; Mbayed, V A

    2011-02-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is classified into eight major genotypes, A-H, which are geographically distributed worldwide. The aim of this work was to describe the clinical characteristics associated with the HBV genotypes circulating in Buenos Aires city. The study included 139 patients infected with HBV, whose clinical courses were classified as acute symptomatic self-limiting hepatitis, inactive carrier state and chronic active hepatitis (HBV e-antigen (HBeAg)-positive and HBeAg-negative). The HBV genotypes were determined in 128 patients by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism and phylogenetic analysis. Biochemical, virological, clinical and histological features were analysed. A differential distribution of genotypes between acute symptomatic and chronic infections was found. Among the acute cases, genotype F was predominant (65.2%, 30/46) and genotype D was rare (4.3%, 2/46), whereas among the chronic infections, a homogeneous distribution of genotypes A (26.8%, 22/82), D (31.7%, 26/82) and F (36.6%, 30/82), with an unusual presence of genotypes B (1.2%, 1/82) and C (3.7%, 3/82), was observed. Regarding the liver histology of chronically infected patients, genotype F tended to display higher histological activity indexes. Mutations related to HBV surface antigen immunoreactivity, antiviral resistance and HBeAg-negative status were studied. This work constitutes, to our knowledge, the first description of the clinical characteristics related to HBV genotypes in Argentina, where the distribution of genotypes in patients with acute infection has not been reported previously. Finally, it was established that genotype F is the prevalent genotype among the acute symptomatic infections in Buenos Aires city, and that it shows a tendency to cause an adverse disease outcome among the chronic cases.

  15. Emergence and Continuous Evolution of Genotype 1E Rubella Viruses in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhen; Cui, Aili; Wang, Huanhuan; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Chunyu; Wang, Changyin; Zhou, Shujie; Chen, Xia; Zhang, Zhenying; Feng, Daxin; Wang, Yan; Chen, Haiyun; Pan, Zhengfan; Zeng, Xiangjie; Zhou, Jianhui; Wang, Shuang; Chang, Xin; Lei, Yue; Tian, Hong; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Shunde; Zhan, Jun; Chen, Hui; Gu, Suyi; Tian, Xiaoling; Liu, Jianfeng; Chen, Ying; Fu, Hong; Yang, Xiuhui; Zheng, Huanying; Liu, Leng; Zheng, Lei; Gao, Hui; He, Jilan; Sun, Li

    2012-01-01

    In China, rubella vaccination was introduced into the national immunization program in 2008, and a rubella epidemic occurred in the same year. In order to know whether changes in the genotypic distribution of rubella viruses have occurred in the postvaccination era, we investigate in detail the epidemiological profile of rubella in China and estimate the evolutionary rate, molecular clock phylogeny, and demographic history of the predominant rubella virus genotypes circulating in China using Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo phylodynamic analyses. 1E was found to be the predominant rubella virus genotype since its initial isolation in China in 2001, and no genotypic shift has occurred since then. The results suggest that the global 1E genotype may have diverged in 1995 and that it has evolved at a mutation rate of 1.65 × 10−3 per site per year. The Chinese 1E rubella virus isolates were grouped into either cluster 1 or cluster 2, which likely originated in 1997 and 2006, respectively. Cluster 1 viruses were found in all provinces examined in this study and had a mutation rate of 1.90 × 10−3 per site per year. The effective number of infections remained constant until 2007, and along with the introduction of rubella vaccine into the national immunization program, although the circulation of cluster 1 viruses has not been interrupted, some viral lineages have disappeared, and the epidemic started a decline that led to a decrease in the effective population size. Cluster 2 viruses were found only in Hainan Province, likely because of importation. PMID:22162559

  16. Hepatitis B virus genotype G: prevalence and impact in patients co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Dao, Doan Y; Balko, Jody; Attar, Nahid; Neak, Enayet; Yuan, He-Jun; Lee, William M; Jain, Mamta K

    2011-09-01

    Relatively little is known about the role of hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotype G (HBV/G) in patients co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and HBV. This study examined the prevalence and association of HBV/G to liver fibrosis in co-infected patients. HBV genotypes were determined by direct sequencing of the HBV surface gene or Trugene® HBV 1.0 assay in 133 patients infected with HIV/HBV. Quantitative testing of HBV-DNA, HBeAg, and anti-HBe were performed using the Versant® HBV 3.0 (for DNA) and the ADVIA®Centaur assay. The non-invasive biomarkers Fib-4 and APRI were used to assess fibrosis stage. Genotype A was present in 103/133 (77%) of the cohort, genotype G in 18/133 (14%) with genotypes D in 8/133, (6%), F 2/133 (1.5%), and H 2/133 (1.5%). Genotype G was associated with hepatitis B e antigen-positivity and high HBV-DNA levels. Additionally, HBV/G (OR 8.25, 95% CI 2.3-29.6, P = 0.0012) was associated with advanced fibrosis score using Fib-4, whereas, being black was not (OR 0.19, 95% CI 0.05-0.07, P = 0.01). HBV/G in this population exhibited a different phenotype than expected for pure G genotypes raising the question of recombination or mixed infections. The frequent finding of HBV/G in co-infected patients and its association with more advanced fibrosis, suggests that this genotype leads to more rapid liver disease progression. Further studies are needed to understand why this genotype occurs more frequently and what impact it has on liver disease progression in patients with HBV/HIV.

  17. [Human PAPILLOMA Virus (HPV) vaccine].

    PubMed

    Safra, Tamar

    2007-10-01

    A solid tumor related to viral infection is a rare and challenging condition to the medical community raising the possibility to fight and prevent this cancer by vaccine. Cervical cancer, caused by human papillomavirus (HPV), is a major health problem worldwide. The two HPV vaccines approved lately could lead to more than a 70% reduction in cases of cervical cancer and a similar reduction in deaths from the cancer. Pap smear screening significantly (80%) reduced disease incidence and is still useful and needed. In addition to early detection, vaccination will prevent the development of precancerous and cancerous lesion and reduce morbidity, mortality and psychological and social stress as well as stressful and expensive follow-ups in women with suspicious lesions. The vaccinations described will bring to a significant reduction in genital warts incidence, a serious social and psychological burden to the infected population. Practical social and psychological issues are still to be addressed, some of them are: time and frequency of administration, use of vaccination in men, public acceptance and behavior, appropriate populations to be vaccinated, etc. Most unresolved questions will be answered over time. The new vaccines embody a big promise to humanity, although we still have to overcome the financial burden and possible late side effects of the vaccine.

  18. Development of a monoclonal antibody against viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) genotype IVa.

    PubMed

    Ito, T; Olesen, N J; Skall, H F; Sano, M; Kurita, J; Nakajima, K; Iida, T

    2010-02-24

    The viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) comprises 4 major genotypes and a number of subtypes with, in most cases, distinct geographical distribution. A quick and simple detection method that can discriminate the different genotypes is desirable for a quick and more efficient prevention of the spread of genotypes to new geographical areas. A monoclonal antibody (MAb) against VHSV genotype IVa was produced, with the aim of providing a simple method of discriminating this genotype from the other VHSV genotypes (I, II, III and IVb). Balb/c mice were injected with purified VHSV-JF00Ehil (genotype IVa) from diseased farmed Japanese flounder. Ten hybridoma clones secreting monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against VHSV were established. One of these, MAb VHS-10, reacted only with genotype IVa in indirect fluorescent antibody technique (IFAT) and ELISA. Using cell cultures that were transfected with each of the viral protein genes, it was shown that the MAb VHS-10 recognizes a nonlinear genotype IVa-specific epitope on the VHSV N-protein.

  19. Molecular epidemiology of TT virus (TTV) and characterization of two novel TTV genotypes in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Muljono, D H; Nishizawa, T; Tsuda, F; Takahashi, M; Okamoto, H

    2001-07-01

    The prevalence of TT virus (TTV) DNA among 244 healthy individuals in 23 cities on 12 islands in Indonesia was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with primers derived from the coding region (N22), which can detect TTV DNA of genotypes 1-6. By N22 PCR, TTV DNA was detected in 102 (42%) individuals. The amplified PCR products were molecularly cloned and three clones each were subjected to sequence analysis. Three hundred one (98%) of the 306 TTV clones were classified into genotype 1, 2 or 3, and none into genotypes 4-6. The remaining five clones from two individuals (Kt-08 and Kt-10) on Kutai, Kalimantan Island, differed by >30% from known TTV isolates of all 21 genotypes and were tentatively classified into genotypes 22 and 23, respectively. Using primers specific for the new TTV genotype 22 or 23, TTV genotype 22 was detected significantly more frequently in Kutai than in the other 22 cities (41% vs. 5%, P < 0.001). TTV genotype 23 was restricted to Kutai (17% vs. 0%, P < 0.001), suggesting the indigenous nature of this genotype. Analysis of two TTV isolates (Kt-08F and Kt-10F) demonstrated the extreme diversity of TTV and the preservation of the genomic organization and transcription profile.

  20. Commercially available immunoglobulins contain virus neutralizing antibodies against all major genotypes of polyomavirus BK.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, P; Pastrana, D V; Zeng, G; Huang, Y; Shapiro, R; Sood, P; Puttarajappa, C; Berger, M; Hariharan, S; Buck, C B

    2015-04-01

    Neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) form the basis of immunotherapeutic strategies against many important human viral infections. Accordingly, we studied the prevalence, titer, genotype-specificity, and mechanism of action of anti-polyomavirus BK (BKV) NAbs in commercially available human immune globulin (IG) preparations designed for intravenous (IV) use. Pseudovirions (PsV) of genotypes Ia, Ib2, Ic, II, III, and IV were generated by co-transfecting a reporter plasmid encoding luciferase and expression plasmids containing synthetic codon-modified VP1, VP2, and VP3 capsid protein genes into 293TT cells. NAbs were measured using luminometry. All IG preparations neutralized all BKV genotypes, with mean EC50 titers as high as 254 899 for genotype Ia and 6,666 for genotype IV. Neutralizing titers against genotypes II and III were higher than expected, adding to growing evidence that infections with these genotypes are more common than currently appreciated. Batch to batch variation in different lots of IG was within the limits of experimental error. Antibody mediated virus neutralizing was dose dependent, modestly enhanced by complement, genotype-specific, and achieved without effect on viral aggregation, capsid morphology, elution, or host cell release. IG contains potent NAbs capable of neutralizing all major BKV genotypes. Clinical trials based on sound pharmacokinetic principles are needed to explore prophylactic and therapeutic applications of these anti-viral effects, until effective small molecule inhibitors of BKV replication can be developed.

  1. Hepatitis B virus infection and genotype in asymptomatic people from 10 ethnic groups in Yunnan, China

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yuan-Ying; Hou, Wei; Yang, Zhan-Qiu; Xiao, Wen

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the infection and genotype distribution of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in ethnic groups in Yunnan, China. METHODS: Two thousand five hundred and eighty-four asymptomatic local people from 10 ethnic groups were investigated in Yunnan, China. Infection and genotype distribution were evaluated by serological and genetic methods. Genotyping was verified by sequencing. Ethnic genotype distribution was compared by proportion test. RESULTS: Four types of infection model based on HBV serum markers were identified, and the average HBV infection rate was 5.7% in those asymptomatic local people. The genotype prevalence was 59.6% for B, 21.1% for C and 19.3% BC; subgenotypes Ba, Cs and Ce were identified in this study. Hepatitis B surface antigen-positive rate and the proportion of genotype B were significantly lower in ethnic groups with a northern origin compared to those with a southern origin (50% vs 73.9%, P = 0.037; 4.2% vs 10.5%, P = 0.000). CONCLUSION: Genotype B is dominant and genotype BC has high occurrence in asymptomatic local ethnic groups in Yunnan. HBV infection status and genotype distribution may associate with ethnic origin. PMID:26640334

  2. Hepatitis B virus infection and genotype in asymptomatic people from 10 ethnic groups in Yunnan, China.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yuan-Ying; Hou, Wei; Yang, Zhan-Qiu; Xiao, Wen

    2015-11-28

    To evaluate the infection and genotype distribution of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in ethnic groups in Yunnan, China. Two thousand five hundred and eighty-four asymptomatic local people from 10 ethnic groups were investigated in Yunnan, China. Infection and genotype distribution were evaluated by serological and genetic methods. Genotyping was verified by sequencing. Ethnic genotype distribution was compared by proportion test. Four types of infection model based on HBV serum markers were identified, and the average HBV infection rate was 5.7% in those asymptomatic local people. The genotype prevalence was 59.6% for B, 21.1% for C and 19.3% BC; subgenotypes Ba, Cs and Ce were identified in this study. Hepatitis B surface antigen-positive rate and the proportion of genotype B were significantly lower in ethnic groups with a northern origin compared to those with a southern origin (50% vs 73.9%, P = 0.037; 4.2% vs 10.5%, P = 0.000). Genotype B is dominant and genotype BC has high occurrence in asymptomatic local ethnic groups in Yunnan. HBV infection status and genotype distribution may associate with ethnic origin.

  3. Development of an Electrochemical Sensing Technique for Rapid Genotyping of Hepatitis B Virus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinyuan; Weng, Shaohuang; Chen, Qingqiong; Liu, Ailin; Wang, Fengqing; Chen, Jing; Yi, Qiang; Liu, Qicai; Lin, Xinhua

    2014-01-01

    Objective To develop a convenient; sensitive; accurate; and economical technique for genotyping of hepatitis B viruses (HBVs). Methods The mercapto-modified B1; B2; C1; and C2-specific genotyping probes consisted of two probes for each HBV genotype that served as a double verification system. These probes were fixed on the surface of No. 1; 2; 3; and 4 gold electrodes; respectively; via Au-S bonds. Different charge generated by the binding of RuHex to phosphate groups of the DNA backbone before and after hybridization was used for distinguishing the different genotypes. Results During hybridization with genotype B; the charges detected at the No. 1 and 2 electrodes were significantly increased; while the charge at the No. 3 and 4 electrodes did not change significantly. During hybridization with genotype C; the charges detected at No. 3 and 4 electrodes were significantly increased; while the signals remained unchanged at the No. 1 and 2 electrodes. During hybridization with mixed genotypes (B and C); the charges detected at all four electrodes were significantly increased. The linear range of detection was 10−7 to 10−10 mol/L and the sensitivity for detecting mixed B (10%) or C (10%). Conclusions Rapid genotyping of HBVs based on electrochemical sensing is simple, has good specificity; and can greatly reduce the cost. This method can be used for sensitive detection of mixed B and C HBV genotypes. PMID:24658623

  4. Genotypes and subtypes of hepatitis C virus in Burundi: a particularity in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Ntagirabiri, Rénovat; Poveda, Jean Dominique; Mumana, Annie; Ndayishimiye, Hermelance

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major public health issue. HCV genotype identification is clinically important to tailor the dosage and duration of treatment. Indeed, distinct therapeutic approaches are required for each genotype. Up to now, there is no study assessing HCV genotypes and subtypes in Burundi. The aim of the study was to determine HCV genotypes and subtypes in Burundi and to highlight the difficulties related to LiPA Method, widely used for African samples. In this study, a total of 179 samples contained anti-HCV antibodies were tested for HCV RNA, genotyping and subtyping. The analysis had been made in Cerba laboratory, Paris, France. 166 patients (92.7%) were genotype 4; 10 patients (5.6%) were genotype 1 and 3 patients (1.7%) were genotype 3. It was possible to determine subtypes for 51 HCV-4 (30.7%) patients. Among these, 25 (49.1%) had 4h subtype; 11 (21.6%) had 4e subtype; 2 (3.9%) had 4k subtype and 13 patients (25.5%) had 4a/4c/4d subtype. The LiPA method failed to subtype 115 (69.3%) HCV-4 and to separate the three subtype: 4a, 4c and 4d. Genotype 4 and subtype 4h followed by 4e are the widespread in Burundi.

  5. Molecular characterization of hepatitis C virus genotype 6 subtypes in Thai blood donors.

    PubMed

    Sistayanarain, Anchalee; Chaiwong, Suriya

    2017-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype is important for identifying effective antiviral therapy, evaluating pathogenic severity, and tracking transmission routes. In Thailand, HCV genotypes 3 and 1 are the most common. We have previously demonstrated an increasing appearance of genotype 6 in HCV infections in Thailand. However, only limited epidemiological data on genotype 6 in Thailand are available. This study aimed to characterize HCV genotype 6 among apparently healthy Thai blood donors. In total, 240 blood samples were collected from Phitsanulok Regional Blood Center, Phitsanulok, Thailand. RNA was reverse transcribed and amplified by the nested polymerase chain reaction. HCV genotyping was performed by direct sequencing and phylogenetic tree analysis of core sequences. Amino acid polymorphism of various subtypes of HCV genotype 6 was investigated. Of the 240 samples, 192 were successfully sequenced for the core region and 84 were determined to be of HCV genotype 6 by phylogenetic analysis. The most prevalent HCV-6 subtypes were 6f > 6n > 6c > 6i. Amino acid sequences of the partial core region among these four subtypes differed by one to seven residues. For HCV-6, the subtype 6f was commonly found in Thai blood donors. Comparison of core protein from various HCV-6 subtypes showed substantial polymorphisms, which may form the basis of future studies using samples from patients with clear HCV histories. This feature can be applied to therapies tailored to particular genotype variants. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Role of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir combination for genotype 1 hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Sundaram, Vinay; Kowdley, Kris V

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is one of the most common etiologies of liver-related mortality throughout the world. Among the six HCV genotypes, genotype 1 was significantly more aggressive when utilizing the combination of pegylated interferon and ribavirin, as genotype 1-infected patients had the lowest likelihood of achieving cure (40%–50%) and required twice as long duration of treatment, as compared to genotypes 2 and 3. Recently, however, significant advances have been made with the advent of all-oral direct-acting antiviral agents, which have significantly improved the safety, efficacy, and tolerability of the treatment of HCV genotype 1. Among the available treatments for HCV genotype 1, the combination therapy of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir provides several advantages compared to other regimens, including use of a single-pill regimen, possibility to shorten the duration of treatment to 8 weeks, efficacy in patients exposed to protease inhibitors, safety in decompensated cirrhosis, and potential to avoid ribavirin. In this review, we discuss the pharmacotherapy of the combination of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir therapy and summarize the results of the Phase III clinical trials for this treatment in HCV genotype 1 patients. We will also discuss the data for special populations, including decompensated cirrhosis, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfected patients, African-Americans, the elderly, and those who failed sofosbuvir-containing regimens. PMID:27418860

  7. [Determination of hepatitis C virus genotypes among hepatitis C patients in Eastern Black Sea Region, Turkey].

    PubMed

    Buruk, Celal Kurtuluş; Bayramoğlu, Gülçin; Reis, Ahu; Kaklıkkaya, Neşe; Tosun, Ilknur; Aydın, Faruk

    2013-10-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV), the major cause of transfusion-associated hepatitis, is an important public health problem in the world as well as in Turkey. HCV is grouped as six distinct genotypes and a large number of closely-related subtypes. Genotyping of HCV is an important tool for providing epidemiological data, prediction of prognosis, and optimization of antiviral therapy. This study was carried out to determine the distribution of HCV genotypes in hepatitis C patients residing in different provinces of the Eastern Black Sea Region, Turkey. A total of 304 HCV-RNA positive cases (151 male, 153 female; age range: 11-93 years, mean age: 55.2 ± 13.3 years) who were admitted to the Molecular Microbiology Unit of Department of Medical Microbiology, Karadeniz Technical University Faculty of Medicine, between January 2009 to December 2012, were included in the study. HCV genotypes were detected in plasma samples of the patients by using commercial assays [INNO-LiPA HCV II (Innogenetics, Belgium) or Abbott RealTime HCV Genotype II (Abbott Molecular Inc, USA)]. Due to the ambiguous genotyping results in some samples with these methods, an in-house multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay with genotype-specific primers was also used in the study. Similar to the previous reports from Turkey, our results showed that four HCV genotypes (1, 2, 3, and 4) prevailed in the Eastern Black Sea Region and the predominant genotype and subtype were genotype 1 (92.8%) and 1b (87.5%), respectively. Distribution of genotypes were observed to vary according to the province. Prevalences of subtype 1a, genotype 2, 3, and 4 were noted as 5.3%, 1.6%, 4.9%, and 0.7%, respectively. Furthermore, the samples from Giresun, Gumushane and Bayburt provinces, which are relatively less immigrated, had higher genotype 1, and the prevalence rates in the region was affected by the presence of non-citizen residents. This study is the first report on distribution of HCV genotypes in chronic hepatitis

  8. Mutations and CpG islands among hepatitis B virus genotypes in Europe.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Chengyao; Hou, Zhiwei; Huang, Jihua; Xie, Qingdong; Zhong, Ying

    2015-02-05

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes have a distinct geographical distribution and influence disease progression and treatment outcomes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the distribution of HBV genotypes in Europe, the impact of mutation of different genotypes on HBV gene abnormalities, the features of CpG islands in each genotype and their potential role in epigenetic regulation. Of 383 HBV isolates from European patients, HBV genotypes A-G were identified, with the most frequent being genotype D (51.96%) in 12 countries, followed by A (39.16%) in 7 countries, and then E (3.66%), G (2.87%), B (1.57%), F (0.52%) and C (0.26%). A higher rate of mutant isolates were identified in those with genotype D (46.7%) followed by G (45.5%), and mutations were associated with structural and functional abnormalities of HBV genes. Conventional CpG island I was observed in genotypes A, B, C, D and E. Conventional islands II and III were detected in all A-G genotypes. A novel CpG island IV was found in genotypes A, D and E, and island V was only observed in genotype F. The A-G genotypes lacked the novel CpG island VI. "Split" CpG island I in genotypes D and E and "split" island II in genotypes A, D, E, F and G were observed. Two mutant isolates from genotype D and one from E were found to lack both CpG islands I and III. HBV genotypes A-G were identified in European patients. Structural and functional abnormalities of HBV genes were caused by mutations leading to the association of genotypes D and G with increased severity of liver disease. The distribution, length and genetic traits of CpG islands were different between genotypes and their biological and clinical significances warrant further study, which will help us better understand the potential role of CpG islands in epigenetic regulation of the HBV genome.

  9. Progression of choroid plexus papilloma.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Rana S; Wang, Yi Yuen; McKelvie, Penny A; O'Brien, Brendan

    2013-12-01

    Choroid plexus papillomas are rare neoplasms that arise from choroid plexus epithelium. The World Health Organization classification describes three histological grades. Grade I is choroid plexus papilloma, grade II is atypical choroid plexus papilloma and grade III is choroid plexus carcinoma. Progression between grades is rare but documented. We present two adult cases, a 53-year-old female and a 70-year-old male, who demonstrated clear interval histological progression from grade I choroid plexus papilloma to higher grades. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Role of hepatitis B virus genotype D & its mutants in occult hepatitis B infection

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Sonali; Panda, Subrat Kumar; Acharya, Subrat Kumar; Durgapal, Hemlata

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Non-detection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) envelope protein (hepatitis B surface antigen, HBsAg) in a chronically HBV infected individual has been described as occult infection. One possible reason for this phenotype is alteration in large (L-HBsAg) to small (S-HBsAg) envelope protein ratio associated with reduced or non secretion of HBsAg. This results in quantitative levels of serum HBsAg below the detection limit of enzyme immunoassays. Genotype D of HBV has a characteristic 33 nucleotide (nt) deletion upstream of the pre-S2/S promoter. This deletion may reduce HBsAg secretion in occult infection patients infected with genotype D HBV. Additional deletions in the pre-S2/S promoter may further aggravate reduced HBsAg secretion in patients infected with genotype D HBV. Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine the role of genotype D specific 33nt deletion and additional pre-S2/S promoter deletions in causing reduced or no secretion of HBsAg, in occult infection. Since these deletions overlap virus polymerase, their effect on virus replication was also investigated. Methods: We examined the in vitro expression of HBsAg, ratio of cure and ‘e’ antigen (HBcAg/HBeAg), their secretion and virus replication, using overlength 1.3 mer/1.86 mer genotype A replicons, and genotype D replicons with and without additional pre-S2/S promoter deletions from cases of occult infection. Results: Genotype D replicon showed a decrease in HBsAg secretion compared to the wild-type genotype A. Genotype D replicons carrying additional pre-S2/S promoter deletions, showed further reduction in HBsAg secretion, demonstrated presence of intracellular HBcAg/HBeAg, virus replication intermediates and ‘e’ antigen secretion. Interpretation & conclusions: The characteristic 33 nt deletion of genotype D HBV reduces HBsAg secretion. Additional pre-S2/S promoter deletions may further diminish HBsAg secretion, leading to occult infection. Pre-S2/S promoter

  11. Clinical and Serological Variation between Patients Infected with Different Hepatitis B Virus Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Kidd-Ljunggren, Karin; Myhre, Erling; Bläckberg, Jonas

    2004-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) has eight genotypes which have distinct geographical distributions. Studies comparing differences in the clinical outcomes of infections caused by strains with genotype-related variations in the HBV genome have largely compared genotypes B and C and genotypes A and D but not all four genotypes. The present study included 196 HBV-infected patients attending an infectious diseases outpatient clinic in Sweden. The age and geographic origin, liver function, HBeAg and anti-HBe status, and the presence or absence of HBV DNA were analyzed for each patient. HBV DNA was detected in 144 patients, and the HBV genotype and the core promoter and precore sequences were determined for the isolates from 101 of these patients. Among the patients who might be considered most likely to be nonviremic, namely, anti-HBe-positive HBV carriers with normal alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels, 65% had detectable HBV DNA and were thus viremic. Among the viremic patients, HBeAg-positive patients were more likely to have elevated ALT levels than anti-HBe-positive patients. HBV genotypes A to F were represented in the study, and their distributions coincided accurately with the origin of the patient. A significantly higher number of genotype D-infected patients were anti-HBe positive and had elevated ALT levels (42% of genotype D-infected patients but 0% of patients infected with genotypes B and C). Genotype D strains with mutations in the core promoter and precore regions were significantly correlated with elevated ALT levels in the patients. The differences were not age related. Therefore, in this large-scale cross-sectional study, genotype D appears to be associated with more active disease. PMID:15583320

  12. Different distributions of hepatitis C virus genotypes among HIV-infected patients with acute and chronic hepatitis C according to interleukin-28B genotype.

    PubMed

    Neukam, K; Nattermann, J; Rallón, N; Rivero, A; Caruz, A; Macías, J; Vogel, M; Benito, Jm; Camacho, A; Mira, Ja; Schwarze-Zander, C; Barreiro, P; Martínez, A; Rockstroh, Jk; Soriano, V; Pineda, Ja

    2011-09-01

    The C allele of the single nucleotide polymorphism rs12979860, located near the interleukin-28B (IL-28B) gene, has a strong impact on hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment response, as well as on spontaneous viral clearance. In patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC), genotype CC carriers harbour HCV genotype 3 more commonly than those with non-CC genotypes. The aim of this study was to compare the HCV genotype distributions, according to IL-28B genotype, in HIV-infected patients with CHC and those with acute hepatitis C (AHC). The rs12979860 genotype was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in two subpopulations of HIV-infected patients. The first consisted of 80 German patients with AHC. The second consisted of 476 patients with CHC, belonging to one German and two Spanish cohorts. In the AHC group, 31 (81.6%) rs12979860 CC carriers were infected with HCV genotype 1 or 4 vs. 32 (76.2%) among non-CC carriers (P=0.948). In patients with CHC, among those with the CC genotype, 119 (54.6%) were infected with HCV genotype 1 or 4 and 99 (45.4%) with genotype 2 or 3, whereas in the subset with non-CC genotypes, 200 (77.5%) harboured HCV genotype 1 or 4 and 58 (22.5%) genotype 2 or 3 (P<0.001). Among HIV-infected patients with CHC, those bearing the IL-28B genotype CC were more commonly infected with genotype 3 than subjects with non-CC genotypes, whereas in HIV-infected subjects with AHC this finding was not obtained. These results strongly suggest that the protective effect of the CC genotype against evolution to CHC is mainly exerted in patients infected with HCV genotype 1 or 4. © 2011 British HIV Association.

  13. Evolutionary analysis of rubella viruses in mainland China during 2010-2012: endemic circulation of genotype 1E and introductions of genotype 2B.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhen; Rivailler, Pierre; Abernathy, Emily; Cui, Aili; Zhang, Yan; Mao, Naiyin; Xu, Songtao; Zhou, Shujie; Lei, Yue; Wang, Yan; Zheng, Huanying; He, Jilan; Chen, Ying; Li, Chongshan; Bo, Fang; Zhao, Chunfang; Chen, Meng; Lu, Peishan; Li, Fangcai; Gu, Suyi; Gao, Hui; Guo, Yu; Chen, Hui; Feng, Daxing; Wang, Shuang; Tang, Xiaomin; Lei, Yake; Feng, Yan; Deng, Lili; Gong, Tian; Fan, Lixia; Xu, Wenbo; Icenogle, Joseph

    2015-01-23

    Rubella remains a significant burden in mainland China. In this report, 667 viruses collected in 24 of 31 provinces of mainland China during 2010-2012 were sequenced and analyzed, significantly extending previous reports on limited numbers of viruses collected before 2010. Only viruses of genotypes 1E and 2B were found. Genotype 1E viruses were found in all 24 provinces. Genotype 1E viruses were likely introduced into mainland China around 1997 and endemic transmission of primarily one lineage became established. Viruses reported here from 2010-2012 are largely in a single cluster within this lineage. Genotype 2B viruses were rarely detected in China prior to 2010. This report documents a previously undetected 2B lineage, which likely became endemic in eastern provinces of China between 2010 and 2012. Bayesian analyses were performed to estimate the evolutionary rates and dates of appearance of the genotype 1E and 2B viral linages in China. A skyline plot of viral population diversity did not provide evidence of reduction of diversity as a result of vaccination, but should be useful as a baseline for such reductions as vaccination programs for rubella become widespread in mainland China.

  14. Mechanism of the dependence of hepatitis B virus genotype G on co-infection with other genotypes for viral replication.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, T; Tanaka, Y; Watanabe, T; Iijima, S; Kani, S; Sugiyama, M; Murakami, S; Matsuura, K; Kusakabe, A; Shinkai, N; Sugauchi, F; Mizokami, M

    2013-04-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is classified into several genotypes. Genotype G (HBV/G) is characterised by worldwide dispersion, low intragenotypic diversity and a peculiar sequence of the precore and core region (stop codon and 36-nucleotide insertion). As a rule, HBV/G is detected in co-infection with another genotype, most frequently HBV/A2. In a previous in vivo study, viral replication of HBV/G was significantly enhanced by co-infection with HBV/A2. However, the mechanism by which co-infection with HBV/A2 enhances HBV/G replication is not fully understood. In this study, we employed 1.24-fold HBV/A2 clones that selectively expressed each viral protein and revealed that the core protein expressing construct significantly enhanced the replication of HBV/G in Huh7 cells. The introduction of the HBV/A2 core promoter or core protein or both genomic regions into the HBV/G genome showed that both the core promoter and core protein are required for efficient HBV/G replication. The effect of genotype on the interaction between foreign core protein and HBV/G showed that HBV/A2 was the strongest enhancer of HBV/G replication. Furthermore, Western blot analysis of Dane particles isolated from cultures of Huh7 cells co-transfected by HBV/G and a cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter-driven HBV/A2 core protein expression construct indicated that HBV/G employed HBV/A2 core protein during particle assembly. In conclusion, HBV/G could take advantage of core proteins from other genotypes during co-infection to replicate efficiently and to effectively package HBV DNA into virions.

  15. Hepatitis B virus genotypes and precore and core mutants in UAE patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Knowledge of the HBV genotype with which a patient is infected is crucial information for a physician to have when planning clinical treatment for that patient. Previous studies have suggested that there are possible differences in the pathogenicity and therapeutic response of different HBV genotypes. However, the prevalence of the various HBV genotypes and Precore and Core mutations is unknown in the UAE. Therefore, we sought to determine the prevalence of the different HBV genotypes in the UAE population. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of 88 HBsAg-positive patients were included in the study. A method for genotyping and subtyping HBV by partial HBsAg gene sequencing using primers that are complementary to all known genotypes was used. Precore and core region of these viruses were also sequenced in 88 patients. HBV genotype D was the most prevalent (79.5%) genotype identified in our study population, followed by genotypes A (18.2%) and C (2.3%). The following subtypes were isolated: ayw2 (80.7%), adw2 (14.8%), and adw (2.3%). The HBV-DNA viral load was higher in HBeAg-positive patients than it was in patients who were HBeAg-negative. Precore mutants were found in 51 (58.0%) of 88 patients. Mutations in the basal core promotor were found in 22 (25.3%) of 88 patients. Conclusion/Significance HBV infection is a major health problem in the UAE, and while genotypes B and C are the most prevalent HBV genotypes in the Asian population, our study reveals that genotype D is the predominant genotype that is present in the UAE. More patients were HBeAg-negative than were HBeAg-positive in our study sample, which could be due to the duration of infection of the included patients. Additionally, the viral loads of the HBeAg-positive patients were higher those of the HBeAg-negative patients. Analysis of nucleotide 1858 showed presence of thymine in all patients with genotypes C, and D and in a few patients with genotypes A. This nucleotide was closely related

  16. Hepatitis B virus genotypes and precore and core mutants in UAE patients.

    PubMed

    Alfaresi, Mubarak; Elkoush, Abida; Alshehhi, Hajer; Alzaabi, Azza; Islam, Adeel

    2010-07-15

    Knowledge of the HBV genotype with which a patient is infected is crucial information for a physician to have when planning clinical treatment for that patient. Previous studies have suggested that there are possible differences in the pathogenicity and therapeutic response of different HBV genotypes. However, the prevalence of the various HBV genotypes and Precore and Core mutations is unknown in the UAE. Therefore, we sought to determine the prevalence of the different HBV genotypes in the UAE population. A total of 88 HBsAg-positive patients were included in the study. A method for genotyping and subtyping HBV by partial HBsAg gene sequencing using primers that are complementary to all known genotypes was used. Precore and core region of these viruses were also sequenced in 88 patients.HBV genotype D was the most prevalent (79.5%) genotype identified in our study population, followed by genotypes A (18.2%) and C (2.3%). The following subtypes were isolated: ayw2 (80.7%), adw2 (14.8%), and adw (2.3%). The HBV-DNA viral load was higher in HBeAg-positive patients than it was in patients who were HBeAg-negative. Precore mutants were found in 51 (58.0%) of 88 patients. Mutations in the basal core promotor were found in 22 (25.3%) of 88 patients. HBV infection is a major health problem in the UAE, and while genotypes B and C are the most prevalent HBV genotypes in the Asian population, our study reveals that genotype D is the predominant genotype that is present in the UAE. More patients were HBeAg-negative than were HBeAg-positive in our study sample, which could be due to the duration of infection of the included patients. Additionally, the viral loads of the HBeAg-positive patients were higher those of the HBeAg-negative patients. Analysis of nucleotide 1858 showed presence of thymine in all patients with genotypes C, and D and in a few patients with genotypes A. This nucleotide was closely related to the presence of precore mutants. Mutations in the basal core

  17. Determination of hepatitis C virus genotypes circulating in different districts of Punjab (Pakistan).

    PubMed

    Waqar, Muhammad; Khan, Asad U; Rehman, Habib U; Idrees, Muhammad; Wasim, Muhammad; Ali, Amjad; Niaz, Zeeshan; Ismail, Zobia; Rehman, Mujaddad U; Tariq, Muhammad; Shah, Muqarrab; Murtaza, Bibi N

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a principal cause of severe liver diseases worldwide and a possible source of significant morbidity and fatality in the long term. Information on the genotype is more significant because it has prognostic value in the response to antiviral therapy. This study aimed to determine the frequency of various HCV genotypes circulating in the different districts of Punjab and to show the pattern distribution of HCV genotypes in different age groups and sexes. A total of 542 HCV-positive patients were selected from various districts of the province and were subjected to an HCV genotype-specific assay. Among 542 positive patients, 300 (55.35%) were men and 242 (44.65%) were women. There were 245 (45.20%), 61 (11.25%), 56 (10.33%), 56 (10.33%), 53 (9.77%), 27 (5%), 20 (3.69%), 16 (3%), and eight (1.47%) HCV-positive patients from Lahore, Sargodha, Multan, Toba Tek Singh, Faisalabad, Rawalpindi, Mandi Bahauddin Gujranwala, and Sahiwal districts, respectively. Of a total of 542 serum samples analyzed, 476 (88%) were successfully genotyped whereas 66 (12%) samples were undetermined genotypes. Among the typable genotypes, 1a was found in 37 (7%), 1b in 18 (3%), 3a in 386 (71%), and genotype 3b in five (1%) patients. Thirty patients (6%) were identified to be infected with mixed HCV genotypes. Genotypes 3a (P=0.0001), 1a (P=0.001), and untypable genotypes (P=0.03) were circulating significantly in all the studied districts. All the genotypes were distributed evenly in male and female patients. The most affected age range of patients was 21-40 years as compared with teenage and older age groups. The study found a significantly high prevalence of HCV among the patients of Punjab. In addition, genotype 1a was found to be a significantly and rapidly increasing genotype in the study area. It appears that HCV-3a (the most prevalent genotype) may be replaced by genotype 1a. If this occurs, it will make the present scenario more complex in terms of response to

  18. Measles Resurgence Associated with Continued Circulation of Genotype H1 Viruses in China, 2005

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yixin; Zhang, Yan; Xu, Songtao; Zhu, Zhen; Zuo, Shuyan; Jiang, Xiaohong; Lu, Peishan; Wang, Changyin; Liang, Yong; Zheng, Huanying; Liu, Yang; Mao, Naiying; Liang, Xiaofeng; Featherstone, David Alexander; Rota, Paul A; Bellini, William J; Xu, Wenbo

    2009-01-01

    Measles morbidity and mortality decreased significantly after measles vaccine was introduced into China in 1965. From 1995 to 2004, average annual measles incidence decreased to 5.6 cases per 100,000 population following the establishment of a national two-dose regimen. Molecular characterization of wild-type measles viruses demonstrated that genotype H1 was endemic and widely distributed throughout the country in China during 1995-2004. A total of 124,865 cases and 55 deaths were reported from the National Notifiable Diseases Reporting System (NNDRS) in 2005, which represented a 69.05% increase compared with 2004. Over 16,000 serum samples obtained from 914 measles outbreaks and the measles IgM positive rate was 81%. 213 wild-type measles viruses were isolated from 18 of 31 provinces in China during 2005, and all of the isolates belonged to genotype H1. The ranges of the nucleotide sequence and predicted amino acid sequence homologies of the 213 genotype H1 strains were 93.4%-100% and 90.0%-100%, respectively. H1-associated cases and outbreaks caused the measles resurgence in China in 2005. H1 genotype has the most inner variation within genotype, it could be divided into 2 clusters, and cluster 1 viruses were predominant in China throughout 2005. PMID:19737391

  19. Genome Sequence of a Genotype 2 Hepatitis E Virus World Health Organization Reference Strain.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Marco; Kamili, Saleem; Hayden, Tonya; Blümel, Johannes; Baylis, Sally A

    2017-02-16

    We report here the sequence of a genotype 2a reference strain of hepatitis E virus (HEV), developed on behalf of the World Health Organization. The HEV reference strain is intended for use in assays based on nucleic acid amplification for the validation of HEV RNA detection.

  20. Genome Sequence of a Genotype 2 Hepatitis E Virus World Health Organization Reference Strain

    PubMed Central

    Kamili, Saleem; Hayden, Tonya; Blümel, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report here the sequence of a genotype 2a reference strain of hepatitis E virus (HEV), developed on behalf of the World Health Organization. The HEV reference strain is intended for use in assays based on nucleic acid amplification for the validation of HEV RNA detection. PMID:28209837

  1. Complete genome sequence of a novel genotype of squash mosaic virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Complete genome sequence of a novel genotype of Squash mosaic virus (SqMV) infecting squash plants in Spain was obtained using deep sequencing of small ribonucleic acids and assembly. The low nucleotide sequence identities, with 87-88% on RNA1 and 84-86% on RNA2 to known SqMV isolates, suggest a new...

  2. Complete Genome Sequences of Two Dengue Virus Serotype 1 Genotype V Strains from Different Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Vedovello, Danila; Menegaldo, Tauyne; Biselli-Périco, Joice M.; Ullmann, Leila Sabrina; Araújo Junior, João Pessoa

    2016-01-01

    Previous phylogenetic studies involving dengue virus serotype 1 (DENV1) have shown several lineages of genotype V circulating worldwide. After sequencing the complete genome of strains from São José do Rio Preto, São Paulo, Brazil, we identified a list of 50 different amino acids that differ between the two lineages, announced here. PMID:27688321

  3. Spread of Chikungunya Virus East/Central/South African Genotype in Northeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    Charlys da Costa, Antonio; Thézé, Julien; Komninakis, Shirley Cavalcante Vasconcelos; Sanz-Duro, Rodrigo Lopes; Felinto, Marta Rejane Lemos; Moura, Lúcia Cristina Corrêa; Barroso, Ivoneide Moreira de Oliveira; Santos, Lucineide Eliziario Correia; Nunes, Mardjane Alves de Lemos; Moura, Adriana Avila; Lourenço, José; Deng, Xutao; Delwart, Eric L; Guimarães, Maria Raquel Dos Anjos Silva; Pybus, Oliver G; Sabino, Ester C; Faria, Nuno R

    2017-10-01

    We investigated an outbreak of exanthematous illness in Maceió by using molecular surveillance; 76% of samples tested positive for chikungunya virus. Genetic analysis of 23 newly generated genomes identified the East/Central/South African genotype, suggesting that this lineage has persisted since mid-2014 in Brazil and may spread in the Americas and beyond.

  4. Detection of East/Central/South African Genotype of Chikungunya Virus in Myanmar, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Tun, Mya Myat Ngwe; Thant, Kyaw Zin; Inoue, Shingo; Nabeshima, Takeshi; Aoki, Kotaro; Kyaw, Aung Kyaw; Myint, Tin; Tar, Thi; Maung, Kay Thwe Thwe; Hayasaka, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, chikungunya virus of the East Central South African genotype was isolated from 4 children in Myanmyar who had dengue-like symptoms. Phylogenetic analysis of the E1 gene revealed that the isolates were closely related to isolates from China, Thailand, and Malaysia that harbor the A226V mutation in this gene. PMID:25062511

  5. Mannose-Binding Lectin Genotypes and Susceptibility to Epstein-Barr Virus Infection in Infancy▿

    PubMed Central

    Friborg, Jeppe T.; Jarrett, Ruth F.; Koch, Anders; Garred, Peter; Freeland, June M. L.; Andersen, Andreas; Melbye, Mads

    2010-01-01

    In a cohort study of children <4 years of age in Greenland, mannose-binding lectin (MBL2) genotypes and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) antibody levels were determined. EBV seropositivity was significantly lower and time to seroconversion increased in MBL-insufficient compared with MBL-sufficient children, indicating that MBL may be involved in primary EBV infection in infancy. PMID:20610664

  6. Genetic characterization of Japanese encephalitis virus genotype II strains isolated from 1951 to 1978.

    PubMed

    Schuh, Amy J; Tesh, Robert B; Barrett, Alan D T

    2011-03-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), the prototype member of the JEV serocomplex, genus Flavivirus, family Flaviviridae, is the most significant arthropod-borne encephalitis worldwide in terms of morbidity and mortality. At least four genotypes (GI-GIV) of the virus have been identified; however, to date, the genomic nucleotide sequence of only one GII virus has been determined (FU strain, Australia, 1995). This study sequenced three additional GII strains of JEV isolated between 1951 and 1978 in Korea, Malaysia and Indonesia, respectively, and compared them with the FU strain, as well as with virus strains representing the other three genotypes. Based on nucleotide and amino acid composition, the genotype II strains were the most similar to GI strains; however, these two genotypes are epidemiologically distinct. Selection analyses revealed that the strains utilized in this study are under predominantly purifying selection, and evidence of positive selection was detected at aa 24 of the NS4B protein, a protein that functions as an alpha/beta interferon signalling inhibitor.

  7. Hepatitis E virus genotype 3f sequences from pigs in Thailand, 2011-2012.

    PubMed

    Keawcharoen, Juthatip; Thongmee, Thanunrat; Panyathong, Raphee; Joiphaeng, Pichai; Tuanthap, Supansa; Oraveerakul, Kanisak; Theamboonlers, Apiradee; Poovorawan, Yong

    2013-04-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of partial ORF1 and ORF2 genes of Hepatitis E virus (HEV) strains from pigs in Thailand during 2011-2012 was performed. The result indicated that the current Thai strains belonged to the genotype 3 subgroup 3f, which were similar to the previous HEVs circulating in humans in Thailand.

  8. Identification and complete genome sequence analysis of a genotype XIV Newcastle disease virus from Nigeria

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The first complete genome sequence of a strain of Newcastle disease virus from genotype XIV is reported here. Strain duck/Nigeria/NG-695/KG.LOM.11-16/2009 was isolated from an apparently healthy domestic duck from a live bird market in Kogi State, Nigeria, in 2009. This strain is classified as a m...

  9. Complete genome sequence of an emerging genotype of tobacco streak virus in the U.S.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We report the complete genome sequence of an emerging genotype of Tobacco streak virus (TSV) infecting zucchini squash in Florida (TSV_FL13-07), through deep sequencing of sRNAs and validation by Sanger sequencing. TSV_FL13-07 only shares less than 90% sequence identity in three genomic ribonucleic...

  10. Genome Sequence of a Virulent Genotype III Newcastle Disease Virus Isolated from Laying Ducks in China

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Guoyuan; Wang, Min; Wang, Honglin; Li, Lintao; Luo, Qingping; Zhang, Tengfei

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of a virulent Newcastle disease virus (NDV) strain HN1007, isolated from diseased duck flocks in Henan, China, in 2010. The isolate has a genome length of 15,186 nucleotides, and was classified as a member of genotype III of class II. PMID:28034854

  11. Universal Primers for Detection and Sequencing of Hepatitis B Virus Genomes across Genotypes A to G.

    PubMed

    Chook, Jack Bee; Teo, Woon Li; Ngeow, Yun Fong; Tee, Kok Keng; Ng, Kee Peng; Mohamed, Rosmawati

    2015-06-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) has been divided into 10 genotypes, A to J, based on an 8% nucleotide sequence divergence between genotypes. The conventional practice of using a single set of primers to amplify a near-complete HBV genome is hampered by its low analytical sensitivity. The current practice of using overlapping conserved primer sets to amplify a complete HBV genome in a clinical sample is limited by the lack of pan-primers to detect all HBV genotypes. In this study, we designed six highly conserved, overlapping primer sets to cover the complete HBV genome. We based our design on the sequences of 5,154 HBV genomes of genotypes A to I downloaded from the GenBank nucleotide database. These primer sets were tested on 126 plasma samples from Malaysia, containing genotypes A to D and with viral loads ranging from 20 to >79,780,000 IU/ml. The overall success rates for PCR amplification and sequencing were >96% and >94%, respectively. Similarly, there was 100% amplification and sequencing success when the primer sets were tested on an HBV reference panel of genotypes A to G. Thus, we have established primer sets that gave a high analytical sensitivity for PCR-based detection of HBV and a high rate of sequencing success for HBV genomes in most of the viral genotypes, if not all, without prior known sequence data for the particular genotype/genome.

  12. Dual daclatasvir and sofosbuvir for treatment of genotype 3 chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Vinay; Kowdley, Kris V

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is one of the most common etiologies of liver-related mortality throughout the world. Traditionally, therapy has been focused on pegylated interferon in combination with ribavirin, with clinical trials demonstrating that HCV genotype 1 had the lowest response rate (40-50%), while genotype 3 had an intermediate response rate (60-70%). Recently, significant advances have been made with all-oral direct-acting antiviral (DAA) therapy, which have significantly improved cure rates for HCV genotype 1. Accordingly, HCV genotype 3 is now potentially the most difficult to treat. One of the most potent DAA medications is sofosbuvir, a pan-genotypic nucleotide analogue that inhibits the NS5B polymerase of HCV. Daclatasvir, a pan-genotypic inhibitor of the HCV NS5A replication complex, was recently approved in the United States for treatment of HCV genotype 3 in conjunction with sofosbuvir. This combination may provide a powerful tool in the treatment of HCV genotype 3.

  13. Incident Hepatitis C Virus Genotype Distribution and Multiple Infection in Australian Prisons

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Melanie R.; Li, Hui; Teutsch, Suzy; Betz-Stablein, Brigid; Luciani, Fabio; Lloyd, Andrew R.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a highly diverse pathogen that is classified into seven distinct genotypes. Simultaneous or sequential reinfection with multiple HCV genotypes is recognized in high-risk populations, such as injecting drug users (IDUs). Multiple infection is of clinical concern as different genotypes have various sensitivities to current antiviral therapies. Therefore, a better understanding of the frequency of multiple infection and of the genotypes currently being transmitted is clinically relevant. An Australian cohort of IDUs (n = 123), identified with primary incident infection, was followed for multiple infection by regular HCV RNA testing between 2005 and 2013. A total of 354 samples were tested. Sequencing of primary incident infections revealed that genotype 3a was the most common circulating genotype, followed by genotype 1a. Examination of longitudinally collected samples identified complex patterns of multiple infection, including reinfection and superinfection. In those with multiple infection, there was no apparent evidence of homotypic immunity conferring protection against reinfection of the same subtype. This study revealed frequent multiple infection in a high-risk prisoner cohort, illustrating the complex nature of HCV infection and reinfection and highlighting the need for pan-genotypic antiviral therapies. PMID:27170021

  14. Interrelationship of hepatitis C virus genotypes with patient characteristics in Bahrain

    PubMed Central

    Abdulla, Maheeba A; Murad, Eman A; Aljenaidi, Hend A; Aljowder, Duha R; Aljeeran, Omar IK; Farid, Eman; Al Qamish, Jehad R

    2017-01-01

    Aim Hepatitis C virus (HCV) shows genotype-based variation in prevalence across geographical regions. This study was conducted to understand the clinical interrelationship of HCV genotypes with patient characteristics. Methods Medical records of 122 patients positive for HCV RNA test collected during 2013 and 2014 were included for analysis. Only adults were included in the study. HCV RNA extraction and genotyping was done as part of the routine diagnostic requirements. The association of continuous and categorical variables with genotypes was analyzed through analysis of variance and chi-square tests, respectively. Results Of the 122 patients selected, 103 were Bahrainis, 18 non-Bahrainis, and 1 was unregistered. Genotype 1 was the predominant (53%) one, followed by types 3 (23%) and 4 (20%). Classical symptoms, clinical signs, liver function test, and ultrasonographic results were recorded. Cirrhosis and ascites showed significant variation across genotypes. Although alanine transaminase, total bilirubin, and albumin levels were increased, gamma-glutamyltransferase and alkaline phosphatase levels were normal. About 12% of the subjects were alcohol users, 4% were positive for HIV infection and 2.4% were positive for hepatitis B virus infection. The circulating HCV RNA load was at medium-level in the study cohort and showed significant association with the HCV genotypes and subtypes. Patients with genotype 1a had 6 times more load than patients with type 4 (P<0.05). Conclusion This study reconfirmed the incidence and distribution of different genotypes in Bahrain population, and delineated the relationship of HCV RNA viral load with the severity of liver disease in our cohort. PMID:28280398

  15. Proteome Differences between Hepatitis B Virus Genotype-B- and Genotype-C-Induced Hepatocellular Carcinoma Revealed by iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Wei, Dahai; Zeng, Yongyi; Xing, Xiaohua; Liu, Hongzhi; Lin, Minjie; Han, Xiao; Liu, Xiaolong; Liu, Jingfeng

    2016-02-05

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the main cause of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in southeast Asia where HBV genotype B and genotype C are the most prevalent. Viral genotypes have been reported to significantly affect the clinical outcomes of HCC. However, the underlying molecular differences among different genotypes of HBV virus infected HCC have not been revealed. Here, we applied isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) technology integrated with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis to identify the proteome differences between the HBV genotypes B- and C-induced HCC. In brief, a total of 83 proteins in the surrounding noncancerous tissues and 136 proteins in the cancerous tissues between HBV genotype-B- and genotype-C-induced HCC were identified, respectively. This information revealed that there might be different molecular mechanisms of the tumorigenesis and development of HBV genotypes B- and C-induced HCC. Furthermore, our results indicate that the two proteins ARFIP2 and ANXA1 might be potential biomarkers for distinguishing the HBV genotypes B- and C-induced HCC. Thus, the quantitative proteomic analysis revealed molecular differences between the HBV genotypes B- and C-induced HCC, and might provide fundamental information for further deep study.

  16. Genotype characterization of occult hepatitis B virus strains among Egyptian chronic hepatitis C patients.

    PubMed

    Kishk, R; Atta, H Aboul; Ragheb, M; Kamel, M; Metwally, L; Nemr, N

    2014-03-13

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection combined with occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has been associated with increased risk of hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of occult HBV infection among Egyptian chronic HCV patients, the genotype and occurrence of surface gene mutations of HBV and the impact of co-infection on early response to treatment. The study enrolled 162 chronic HCV patients from Ismailia Fever Hospital, Egypt, who were HBV surface antigen-negative. All patients were given clinical assessment and biochemical, histological and virological examinations. HBV-DNA was detectable in sera from 3 patients out of the 40 patients who were positive for hepatitis B core antibody. These 3 patients were responsive to combination therapy at treatment week 12; only 1 of them had discontinued therapy by week 24. HBV genotype D was the only detectable genotype in those patients, with absence of "a" determinant mutations among those isolates.

  17. Genotype-specific variation in West Nile virus dispersal in California.

    PubMed

    Duggal, Nisha K; Reisen, William K; Fang, Ying; Newman, Ruchi M; Yang, Xiao; Ebel, Gregory D; Brault, Aaron C

    2015-11-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is an arbovirus that was first reported in North America in New York in 1999 and, by 2003, had spread more than 4000 km to California. However, variation in viral genetics associated with spread is not well understood. Herein, we report sequences for more than 100 WNV isolates made from mosquito pools that were collected from 2003 to 2011 as part of routine surveillance by the California Mosquito-borne Virus Surveillance System. We performed phylogeographic analyses and demonstrated that 5 independent introductions of WNV (1 WN02 genotype strain and 4 SW03 genotype strains) occurred in California. The SW03 genotype of WNV was constrained to the southwestern U.S. and had a more rapid rate of spread. In addition, geographic constraint of WNV strains within a single region for up to 6 years suggest viral maintenance has been driven by resident, rather than migratory, birds and overwintering in mosquitoes.

  18. Genotype-specific variation in West Nile virus dispersal in California

    PubMed Central

    Duggal, Nisha K.; Reisen, William K.; Fang, Ying; Newman, Ruchi M.; Yang, Xiao; Ebel, Gregory D.; Brault, Aaron C.

    2015-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is an arbovirus that was first reported in North America in New York in 1999 and, by 2003, had spread more than 4,000 km to California. However, variation in viral genetics associated with spread are not well understood. Herein, we report sequences for more than 100 WNV isolates made from mosquito pools that were collected from 2003 – 2011 as part of routine surveillance by the California Mosquito-borne Virus Surveillance System. We performed phylogeographic analyses and demonstrated that 5 independent introductions of WNV (1 WN02 genotype strain and 4 SW03 genotype strains) occurred in California. The SW03 genotype of WNV was constrained to the southwestern U.S. and had a more rapid rate of spread. In addition, geographic constraint of WNV strains within a single region for up to 6 years suggest viral maintenance has been driven by resident, rather than migratory, birds and overwintering in mosquitoes. PMID:26210076

  19. Rapid fluorescent lateral-flow immunoassay for hepatitis B virus genotyping.

    PubMed

    Song, Liu-Wei; Wang, Ying-Bin; Fang, Lin-Lin; Wu, Yong; Yang, Lin; Chen, Jie-Yu; Ge, Sheng-Xiang; Zhang, Jing; Xiong, You-Zheng; Deng, Xiu-Mei; Min, Xiao-Ping; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Pei-Jer; Yuan, Quan; Xia, Ning-Shao

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotyping plays an important role in the clinical management of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients. However, the current nucleic acid based techniques are expensive, time-consuming, and inconvenient. Here, we developed a novel DNA-independent HBV genotyping tool based on a one-step fluorescent lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA). Epitope-targeting immunization and screening techniques were used to develop HBV genotype specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). These mAbs were used to develop a multitest LFIA with a matched scanning luminoscope for HBV genotyping (named the GT-LFIA). The performance of this novel assay was carefully evaluated in well-characterized clinical cohorts. The GT-LFIA, which can specifically differentiate HBV genotypes A, B, C, and D in a pretreatment-free single test, was successfully developed using four genotype specific mAbs. The detection limits of the GT-LFIA for HBV genotypes A, B, C, and D were 2.5-10.0 IU HBV surface antigen/mL, respectively. Among the sera from 456 CHB patients, 439 (96.3%; 95% confidence interval (CI), 94.1-97.8%) were genotype-differentiable by the GT-LFIA and 437 (99.5%; 95% CI, 98.4-99.9%) were consistent with viral genome sequencing. In the 21 patients receiving nucleos(t)ide analogue therapy, for end-of-treatment specimens that were HBV DNA undetectable and were not applicable for DNA-dependent genotyping, the GT-LFIA presented genotyping results that were consistent with those obtained in pretreatment specimens by viral genome sequencing and the GT-LFIA. In conclusion, the novel GT-LFIA is a convenient, fast, and reliable tool for differential HBV genotyping, especially in patients with low or undetectable HBV DNA levels.

  20. Analysis of hepatitis B virus genotypes by restriction fragment length polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Rendón, Julio-C; Cortés-Mancera, Fabián; Duque-Jaramillo, Alejandra; Ospina, Marta C; Navas, María Cristina

    2015-12-07

    Ten viral genotypes (A-J) distributed in all continents have been described for hepatitis B virus (HBV). One of the methodologies for determining the viral genotype is the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) technique, a simple and relatively inexpensive method, albeit with some limitations. The initial objective of the project was to identify the HBV genotypes by RFLP in serum samples obtained from patients and blood donors. However, due to the discrepancies of RFLP patterns it was also necessary to perform phylogenetic genotyping and in silico analysis of HBV sequences. We obtained 56 serum samples. DNA extraction was followed by PCR amplification of a fragment of HBV ORF S. We analyzed PCR products by RFLP with AlwI, BsrI, CfrI, HpaII and StyI, and we sequenced some. We compared the patterns obtained with those in previous reports. We also performed RFLP analysis in silico since we found differences between the patterns expected and those obtainedResults: We identified genotypes A and F, subgenotype F3, in the samples. This result is in agreement with those of previous studies carried out in Colombia; indeed, subgenotype F3 is the most frequent in the Andean region of the country, while genotype A is the most frequent HBV genotype in the western region (department of Chocó). Based on the in silico analysis of 229 HBV sequences from GenBank and 11 sequences of this study, we identified the RLFP pattern for genotype F, subgenotype F3, and we described some modifications of genotype A RFLP patterns. We identified the single nucleotide polymorphism pattern for genotype F, subgenotype F3, by in silico analysis and sequencing. Further robust in silico analyses are necessary to validate the RFLP patterns of HBV genotype and subgenotypes.

  1. Cross-genotype-specific T-cell responses in acute hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection.

    PubMed

    Gisa, A; Suneetha, P V; Behrendt, P; Pischke, S; Bremer, B; Falk, C S; Manns, M P; Cornberg, M; Wedemeyer, H; Kraft, A R M

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis E is an inflammatory liver disease caused by infection with the hepatitis E virus (HEV). In tropical regions, HEV is highly endemic and predominantly mediated by HEV genotypes 1 and 2 with >3 million symptomatic cases per year and around 70 000 deaths. In Europe and America, the zoonotic HEV genotypes 3 and 4 have been reported with continues increasing new infections per year. So far, little is known about T-cell responses during acute HEV genotype 3 infection. Therefore, we did a comprehensive study investigating HEV-specific T-cell responses using genotypes 3- and 1-specific overlapping peptides. Additional cytokines and chemokines were measured in the plasma. In four patients, longitudinal studies were performed. Broad functional HEV-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses were detectable in patients acutely infected with HEV genotype 3. Elevated of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine levels during acute HEV infection correlated with ALT levels. Memory HEV-specific T-cell responses were detectable up to >1.5 years upon infection. Importantly, cross-genotype HEV-specific T-cell responses (between genotypes 1 and 3) were measurable in all investigated patients. In conclusion, we could show for the first time HEV-specific T-cell responses during and after acute HEV genotype 3 infection. Our data of cross-genotype HEV-specific T-cell responses might suggest a potential role in cross-genotype-specific protection between HEV genotypes 1 and 3. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Hepatitis C virus genotypes in north eastern Algeria: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Rouabhia, Samir; Sadelaoud, Mourad; Chaabna-Mokrane, Karima; Toumi, Wided; Abenavoli, Ludovico

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To determine the frequency of various hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes present in patients from north eastern Algeria. METHODS: This is a retrospective cross-sectional study of 435 HCV infected patients from northeast Algeria, detected in the Sadelaoud laboratory and diagnosed between January 2010 and December 2012. The patients were diagnosed with HCV infection in their local hospitals and referred to be assessed for HCV genotype before the antiviral treatment. Demographic information (sex, age and address), genotype, subtype and viral load were retrieved from the patient medical records. The serum samples were tested by the type-specific genotyping assay. RESULTS: The majority of the patients (82.5%) were from the central part of the examined region (P = 0.002). The mean age of the patients studied was 53.6 ± 11.5 years. HCV genotype 1 was the most frequent (88.7%), followed by genotypes 2 (8.5%), 4 (1.1%), 3 (0.9%) and 5 (0.2%). Genotype 6 was not detected in these patients. Mixed infection across the HCV subtypes was detected in twenty patients (4.6%). The genotype distribution was related to age and region. Genotype 1 was significantly less frequent in the ≥ 60 age group than in the younger age group (OR = 0.2; 95%CI: 0.1-0.5, P < 0.001). Furthermore, genotype 1 was more frequent in the central part of the examined region than elsewhere (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: The HCV genotype (type 1b was dominant) distribution in Algeria is different from those in other northern countries of Africa. PMID:23898373

  3. Evidence of independent evolution of genotype XIII Newcastle disease viruses in India.

    PubMed

    Das, Moushumee; Kumar, Sachin

    2017-04-01

    Despite the prevalence of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) outbreaks in India through the decades, there has been little genetic characterisation of the virulent strains circulating in Northeast India. In 2014, a poultry farm in the Kamrup district of Assam reported an ND outbreak. In this study, genetic analysis and clinicopathological tests showed the virulent nature of the isolate Kamrup. Based on prudent classification criteria, the virulent strain Kamrup was found to be most closely related to members of genotype XIII of class II NDV. A phylogenetic analysis of NDV strains suggested three sub-genotypes: XIIIa, XIIIb and XIIIc. NDV strain Kamrup belonged to sub-genotype XIIIc. Sub-genotype XIIIc isolates were similar to the 1982 isolate from cockatoo and appeared to have evolved parallel to the preceding genotype XIII viruses circulating in India. The high genetic diversity and frequency of mutations observed in the envelope glycoproteins of strain Kamrup demonstrate the evolution of the pandemic genotype XIII NDV in India, which further undermines and complicates of NDV management in India.

  4. Molecular characterization and genotype shift of dengue virus strains between 2001 and 2014 in Guangzhou.

    PubMed

    Jiang, L Y; Jing, Q L; Liu, Y; Cao, Y M; Su, W Z; Biao, D; Yang, Z C

    2017-03-01

    We studied the evolution, genotypes, and the molecular clock of dengue virus serotype 1 (DENV-1), between 2001 and 2014 in Guangzhou, China. The analysis of the envelope (E) gene sequences of 67 DENV-1 strains isolated in Guangzhou, together with 58 representative sequences downloaded from NCBI, have shown shifts in viral genotypes. The genotype changed several times, from genotype I to IV in 2002, from IV to I in 2005, and from I to V in 2014. These genotype shifts may be the cause of DENV outbreaks. The diversity of genotypes and clades demonstrates a high risk of future outbreaks in Guangzhou. The mean rate of virus nucleotide substitution in Guangzhou was determined to be 7·77 × 10-4 per site per year, which represents a medium substitution rate compared to two other countries. Our research can point to different ancestors of the isolated strains, which may further reveal the different origins and transmission of DENV-1 strains in Guangzhou.

  5. Genotyping of bovine viral diarrhoea viruses isolated from cattle in northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Falcone, E; Cordioli, P; Sala, G; Tarantino, M; Tollis, M

    2001-02-01

    Following the first official report of a clinically severe outbreak of bovine viral diarrhoea disease occurring in a farm in northern Italy, which had originated from the use of a live vaccine contaminated with a strain of BVD genotype II virus, a retrospective study on the prevalence of BVDV genotypes in Italy became highly relevant. For this purpose, the genotype of 78 BVDV-positive specimens, obtained in 1998-1999 from dairy cattle in an area near to where the outbreak occurred, was characterized by PCR technology. Two sets of primers, spanning the 5' UTR of BVDV genome, were used sequentially in a first round of RT-PCR, performed on viral RNA extracted directly from 15 clinical samples and 63 BVDV-infected cell-culture fluids; a second PCR assay followed to selectively amplify only BVDV genotype II. All the viruses under study were characterized as BVDV genotype I. As well as contributing to a better understanding of the prevalence of BVDV genotypes in the field, the results of the present study illustrate the possibility that novel BVDV strains can emerge in susceptible animals through the use of contaminated immunobiological products for bovine use.

  6. Emergence of multiple genotypes of H5N1 avian influenza viruses in Hong Kong SAR

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Y.; Peiris, J. S. M.; Lipatov, A. S.; Ellis, T. M.; Dyrting, K. C.; Krauss, S.; Zhang, L. J.; Webster, R. G.; Shortridge, K. F.

    2002-01-01

    Although A/Hong Kong/156/97 (H5N1/97)-like viruses associated with the “bird flu” incident in Hong Kong SAR have not been detected since the slaughter of poultry in 1997, its putative precursors continue to persist in the region. One of these, Goose/Guangdong/1/96 (H5N1 Gs/Gd)-like viruses, reassorted with other avian viruses to generate multiple genotypes of H5N1 viruses that crossed to chickens and other terrestrial poultry from its reservoir in geese. Whereas none of these recent reassortants had acquired the gene constellation of H5N1/97, these events provide insight into how such a virus may have been generated. The recent H5N1 reassortants readily infect and kill chicken and quail after experimental infection, and some were associated with significant mortality of chickens within the poultry retail markets in Hong Kong. Some genotypes are lethal for mice after intra-nasal inoculation and spread to the brain. On this occasion, the early detection of H5N1 viruses in the retail, live poultry markets led to preemptive intervention before the occurrence of human disease, but these newly emerging, highly pathogenic H5N1 viruses provide cause for pandemic concern. PMID:12077307

  7. Circulating genotypes of Dengue-1 virus in South West India, 2014-2015.

    PubMed

    Pooja, Shetty; Sabeena, Sasidharanpillai; Revti, Bhaskar; Sanjay, Ramachandran; Anjali, Aithal; Rajendra, Kumar; Aswathyraj, Sushama; Giselle, Dsouza; Hindol, Maity; Arunkumar, Govindakarnavar

    2017-09-11

    Dengue is found to be the most prevalent arboviral disease affecting humans. Tropical and subtropical regions are at high risk of dengue virus infections. The clinical manifestations often range from mild fever to fever with hemorrhagic manifestations and shock. Since 2010, India is witnessing a marked increase in the number of Dengue Virus Serotype 1(DENV-1) apart from Dengue Virus 2 (DENV-2) and Dengue Virus 3 (DENV-3) Serotypes. The present study was undertaken to understand the circulating genotypes of DENV-1 in South West India by sequencing the envelope gene of DENV-1 samples representative of the time period 2014-2015. The extracted RNA from Dengue NS1 antigen ELISA positive samples, archived at Manipal Centre for Virus Research (MCVR), National Vector Borne Disease Control Apex referral laboratory for arboviruses were employed for the study. The currently circulating genotypes of DENV-1 identified from the study area belonged to genotypes V and I. Multicentric laboratory-based studies analysing the envelope gene of all dengue serotypes are required from endemic countries like India.

  8. Spread and Evolution of Respiratory Syncytial Virus A Genotype ON1, Coastal Kenya, 2010–2015

    PubMed Central

    Kamau, Everlyn M.; Agoti, Charles N.; Lewa, Clement; Otieno, Grieven; Bett, Ann; Ngama, Mwanajuma; Cane, Patricia A.; Nokes, D. James

    2017-01-01

    In February 2012, the novel respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) group A, genotype ON1, was detected in Kilifi County, coastal Kenya. ON1 is characterized by a 72-nt duplication within the highly variable G gene (encoding the immunogenic attachment surface protein). Cases were diagnosed through surveillance of pneumonia in children at the county hospital. Analysis of epidemiologic, clinical, and sequence data of RSV-A viruses detected over 5 RSV seasons (2010/2011 to 2014/2015) indicated the following: 1) replacement of previously circulating genotype GA2 ON1, 2) an abrupt expansion in the number of ON1 variants detected in the 2014/2015 epidemic, 3) recently accumulation of amino acid substitutions within the ON1 duplicated sequence, and 4) no clear evidence of altered pathogenicity relative to GA2. The study demonstrates the public health importance of molecular surveillance in defining the spread, clinical effects, and evolution of novel respiratory virus variants. PMID:28098528

  9. Influence of delta virus infection on the virologic status in Egyptian patients with chronic hepatitis B virus genotype D.

    PubMed

    Fouad, Rabab; Abdo, Mahmoud; Eldeen, Hadeel Gamal; Sabry, Dina; Atef, Mira; Ahmed, Rasha; Zayed, Naglaa

    2016-05-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) usually have an unfavorable clinical outcome in chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) patients. In Egypt, data about epidemiology, the spectrum of disease, and impact of HDV on HBV infection are rare. To assess the prevalence, clinical and virological characteristics of HDV infection among Egyptian patients with chronic HBV. Adult patients with Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive were evaluated for the presence of HDV using anti HDV-IgG and HDV RNA by RT-PCR. Routine laboratory investigations, genotypes and subtypes for both HBV and HDV, abdominal sonography, and transient elastography (TE) were done. Liver biopsy was performed only in whenever indicated. One hundred and twenty-one treatment-naïve chronic HBV patients were included. Wild HBV genotype-D2 was found in 98.2% and 81.9% were HBeAg negative. Prevalence of HDV was 8.3% by anti-HDV IgG and 9.9% by RT-PCR. Wild HDV genotype-IIb was reported in 83.3%. HDV infection was more common in males, 90.9% of delta patients were HBeAg negative. Compared to the mono-infected HBV, concomitant HBV/HDV infection was not associated with more derangment in ALT nor advanced stage of fibrosis. 66.7% of HDV patients had significantly lower HBV-DNA level compared to the non-delta patients (P < 0.001). HDV is not uncommon in Egypt. HBV genotype-D was associated with HDV genotype-IIb. Delta infection was associated with negative HBeAg status, reduction of HBV replication, but neither influenced the clinical course nor increased significant liver damage risk.

  10. The genotypes of citrus tristeza virus isolates from China revealed by sequence analysis of multiple molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guan-Wei; Pan, Song; Wang, Guo-Ping; Tang, Min; Liu, Yong; Yang, Fan; Hong, Ni

    2013-01-01

    The genotypes of ten citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates from central China were determined by examining multiple molecular markers (MMMs) using 11 primer pairs. The results revealed that one isolate contained a single T30 genotype, two isolates contained a single VT genotype, and the other seven isolates were mixtures of two or more genotypes. Sequence analysis of amplified MMMs showed a high genetic diversity in Chinese CTV populations. The genotypes resembling T36, RB and B165 were identified from Chinese CTV isolates for the first time. Our results suggest that genotype assignment of CTV cannot be based solely on the amplification profiles of MMMs, and sequencing of MMMs is required.

  11. Simultaneous circulation of genotypes I and III of dengue virus 3 in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Usme-Ciro, Jose A; Mendez, Jairo A; Tenorio, Antonio; Rey, Gloria J; Domingo, Cristina; Gallego-Gomez, Juan C

    2008-01-01

    Background Dengue is a major health problem in tropical and subtropical regions. In Colombia, dengue viruses (DENV) cause about 50,000 cases annually, 10% of which involve Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever/Dengue Shock Syndrome. The picture is similar in other surrounding countries in the Americas, with recent outbreaks of severe disease, mostly associated with DENV serotype 3, strains of the Indian genotype, introduced into the Americas in 1994. Results The analysis of the 3'end (224 bp) of the envelope gene from 32 DENV-3 strains recently recovered in Colombia confirms the circulation of the Indian genotype, and surprisingly the co-circulation of an Asian-Pacific genotype only recently described in the Americas. Conclusion These results have important implications for epidemiology and surveillance of DENV infection in Central and South America. Molecular surveillance of the DENV genotypes infecting humans could be a very valuable tool for controlling/mitigating the impact of the DENV infection. PMID:18764951

  12. Slave trade and hepatitis B virus genotypes and subgenotypes in Haiti and Africa.

    PubMed

    Andernach, Iris E; Nolte, Claudine; Pape, Jean W; Muller, Claude P

    2009-08-01

    In Haiti, >90% of the population descended from African slaves. Of 7,147 Haitian pregnant women sampled, 44% of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections were caused by genotype A1, which today is found mainly in eastern Africa. Twenty percent belong to a rare subgenotype, A5, which has been found only in the former Bight of Benin, a former primary slave trading post. Haitian A subgenotypes appear to have separated early from the African subgenotypes; the most prevalent genotype and subgenotype in West Africa today (E and A3, respectively) are rare in Haiti. This difference indicates that the dominant subgenotypes in Africa emerged in the general population only after the slave trade and explains the low genetic diversity of genotype E. The high prevalence of HBV genotype E in much of Africa further suggests that HBV hyperendemicity is a recent phenomenon, probably resulting from extensive use of unsafe needles.

  13. Slave Trade and Hepatitis B Virus Genotypes and Subgenotypes in Haiti and Africa

    PubMed Central

    Andernach, Iris E.; Nolte, Claudine; Pape, Jean W.

    2009-01-01

    In Haiti, >90% of the population descended from African slaves. Of 7,147 Haitian pregnant women sampled, 44% of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections were caused by genotype A1, which today is found mainly in eastern Africa. Twenty percent belong to a rare subgenotype, A5, which has been found only in the former Bight of Benin, a former primary slave trading post. Haitian A subgenotypes appear to have separated early from the African subgenotypes; the most prevalent genotype and subgenotype in West Africa today (E and A3, respectively) are rare in Haiti. This difference indicates that the dominant subgenotypes in Africa emerged in the general population only after the slave trade and explains the low genetic diversity of genotype E. The high prevalence of HBV genotype E in much of Africa further suggests that HBV hyperendemicity is a recent phenomenon, probably resulting from extensive use of unsafe needles. PMID:19751583

  14. Distribution of Hepatitis B Virus Genotypes among Patients with Chronic Infection in Japan Shifting toward an Increase of Genotype A▿

    PubMed Central

    Matsuura, Kentaro; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Hige, Shuhei; Yamada, Gotaro; Murawaki, Yoshikazu; Komatsu, Masafumi; Kuramitsu, Tomoyuki; Kawata, Sumio; Tanaka, Eiji; Izumi, Namiki; Okuse, Chiaki; Kakumu, Shinichi; Okanoue, Takeshi; Hino, Keisuke; Hiasa, Yoichi; Sata, Michio; Maeshiro, Tatsuji; Sugauchi, Fuminaka; Nojiri, Shunsuke; Joh, Takashi; Miyakawa, Yuzo; Mizokami, Masashi

    2009-01-01

    Acute hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has been increasing through promiscuous sexual contacts, and HBV genotype A (HBV/A) is frequent in patients with acute hepatitis B (AHB) in Japan. To compare the geographic distribution of HBV genotypes in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) in Japan between 2005 and 2006 and between 2000 and 2001, with special attention to changes in the proportion of HBV/A, a cohort study was performed to survey changes in genotypes of CHB patients at 16 hospitals throughout Japan. Furthermore, we investigated the clinical characteristics of each genotype and examined the genomic characteristics of HBV/A isolates by molecular evolutionary analyses. Of the 1,271 patients, 3.5%, 14.1%, and 82.3% were infected with HBV/A, -B, and -C, respectively. In comparison with our previous survey during 2000 and 2001, HBV/A was twice as frequent (3.5% versus 1.7%; P = 0.02). The mean age was lower in the patients with HBV/A than in those with HBV/B or -C. Based on phylogenetic analyses of 11 full-length genomes and 29 pre-S2/S region sequences from patients, HBV/A isolates were imported from Europe and the United States, as well as the Philippines and India. They clustered with HBV/A from AHB patients and have spread throughout Japan. HBV/A has been increasing in CHB patients in Japan as a consequence of AHB spreading in the younger generation through promiscuous sexual contacts, aided by a tendency of HBV/A to induce chronic hepatitis. The spread of HBV/A infection in Japan should be prevented by universal vaccination programs. PMID:19297602

  15. Multiplex real-time reverse transcription-PCR assay for determination of hepatitis C virus genotypes.

    PubMed

    Cook, Linda; Sullivan, KaWing; Krantz, Elizabeth M; Bagabag, Arthur; Jerome, Keith R

    2006-11-01

    A variety of methods have been used to determine hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes. Because therapeutic decisions for chronic HCV-related hepatitis are made on the basis of genotype, it is important that genotype be accurately determined by clinical laboratories. Existing methods are often subjective, inaccurate, manual, time-consuming, and contamination prone. We therefore evaluated real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) reagents that have recently become commercially available (Abbott HCV Genotype ASR). The assay developed by our laboratory starts with purified RNA and can be performed in 4 to 5 h. An initial evaluation of 479 samples was done with a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) method and the RT-PCR assay, and discrepant samples were sequenced. An additional 1,200 samples were then tested, and data from all assays were used to evaluate the efficiency and specificity of each genotype-specific reaction. Good correlation between results by the two methods was seen. Discrepant samples included those indeterminate by the RT-PCR assay (n = 110) and a subset that were incorrectly called 2a by the RFLP method (n = 75). The real-time RT-PCR assay performed well with genotype 1, 2, and 3 samples. Inadequate numbers of samples were available to evaluate fully genotypes 4, 5, and 6. Analysis of each primer-probe set demonstrated that weak cross-reactive amplifications were common but usually did not interfere with the genotype determination. However, in about 1% of samples, two or more genotypes amplified at roughly equivalent amounts. Further studies are necessary to determine whether these mixed-genotype samples are true mixtures or a reflection of occasional cross-reactive amplifications.

  16. Literature review of the distribution of hepatitis C virus genotypes across Europe.

    PubMed

    Alberti, Alfredo; Lacoin, Laure; Morais, Edith; Lefevre, Cinira; Abogunrin, Seye; Iheanacho, Ike

    2016-12-01

    Recent advances in hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapies have transformed the treatment landscape for this disease. However, efficacy of current treatments depends on HCV genotype and individual patient characteristics. This review aimed to appraise observational studies reporting epidemiological outcomes to characterize HCV genotype distribution in Europe, in the general HCV population and various subpopulations of interest. MEDLINE and EMBASE entries published between November 2008 and November 2013 were systematically searched. Studies were grouped according to the patient populations of interest: general HCV population, HCV-HIV co-infected patients, patients with advanced fibrosis/cirrhosis, and liver transplant recipients. Thirty publications provided estimates of HCV genotype distribution in four distinct patient groups: general HCV population (n = 21), HCV-HIV co-infected patients (n = 6), liver transplant patients (n = 3), and patients with HCV-compensated cirrhosis (n = 1). Nationwide estimates of genotype distribution in the general HCV population were available for 10 countries, with genotypes 1 and 3 the most commonly reported. Romanian studies were found to have reported genotype 1 infections almost exclusively (98.0-99.8%). Considerable regional variation was reported in some countries (e.g., Italy), but not others (e.g., France). National and multi-national estimates for the HCV-HIV co-infected population suggested a different genotype distribution to that in the general HCV population. No studies reported nationwide genotype distribution in patients with advanced liver disease. Given the clinical importance of genotype in developing optimal HCV eradication strategies, further nationwide European studies are needed to fully characterize genotype distribution in both the general HCV population and in HCV subpopulations. J. Med. Virol. 88:2157-2169, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.