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Sample records for papilloma virus genotyping

  1. Giant magnetoimpedance-based microchannel system for quick and parallel genotyping of human papilloma virus type 16/18

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hao; Chen, Lei; Lei, Chong; Zhang, Ju; Li, Ding; Zhou, Zhi-Min; Bao, Chen-Chen; Hu, Heng-Yao; Chen, Xiang; Cui, Feng; Zhang, Shuang-Xi; Zhou, Yong; Cui, Da-Xiang

    2010-07-01

    Quick and parallel genotyping of human papilloma virus (HPV) type 16/18 is carried out by a specially designed giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) based microchannel system. Micropatterned soft magnetic ribbon exhibiting large GMI ratio serves as the biosensor element. HPV genotyping can be determined by the changes in GMI ratio in corresponding detection region after hybridization. The result shows that this system has great potential in future clinical diagnostics and can be easily extended to other biomedical applications based on molecular recognition.

  2. High-risk human papilloma virus genotypes in cervical carcinoma of Serbian women: Distribution and association with pathohistological findings.

    PubMed

    Stamenković, Miodrag; Knežević, Aleksandra; Knežević, Ivana; Kuzmanović, Igor; Karalić, Danijela; Milenković, Sanja; Jovanović, Tanja

    2016-09-01

    A significant role of high-risk Human papilloma viruses (HR HPV) in the development of cervical carcinoma is well known. HR HPV 16 and 18 account for approximately 70% of all cases of cervical cancer worldwide. The incidence of cervical cancer in Serbia, is one of the highest in Europe. The aim of our study was to investigate the distribution of HR HPV types in cervical carcinoma of Serbian women, as well as association between the HPV types and pathohistological findings. The study included 80 archival cervical cancer tissues from the same number of patients. The presence of HPV DNA was determined using MY09/MY11 primers for L1 gene and GP1/GP2 primers for E1 gene. HPV was detected in 78.75% tissues. HR HPV genotypes found in the decreasing order of frequency were: HPV16 (80.39%), HPV33 (7.84%), HPV58 (5.88%), HPV18 (1.96%), HPV45 (1.96%) and HPV53 (1.96%). The examined tissues were 91.25% squamous cell carcinomas and 8.75% adenocarcinoma. The high frequency of HPV 16 was observed in both types of carcinoma (80.8% and 75%, respectively) while the prevalence of HPV18 was low. These results may contribute to the implementation of cervical carcinoma prevention program in Serbia, including the selection of the most appropriate vaccine and immunization program. PMID:27461126

  3. Human papilloma virus genotypes in women from Nayarit, Mexico, with squamous intraepithelial lesions and cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Cervantes, Laura; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Rojas-García, Aurora Elizabeth; Barrón-Vivanco, Briscia Socorro; Vallejo-Ruiz, Verónica; León, David Cantú-De; Hernández, Yael Yvette Bernal; Jáuregui-Martínez, Armando; Medina-Díaz, Irma Martha

    2016-01-01

    Objective In Mexico cervical cancer (CC) is the most common cause of death from neoplasia in women. Study aimed to analyze the current distribution of Human papillomavirus (HPV) types in women from Nayarit, Mexico, with Squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) and Cervical cancer (CC). Methodology Between January 2011 and July 2013, cervical samples were collected from female residents of the Mexican state of Nayarit and were analyzed by means of a LINEAR ARRAY® HPV genotyping test. Data analyses were performed using Stata ver. 8.0 statistical software. Results Of the samples analyzed, 91.2%, HPV DNA was detected. Of these positive samples, 82% were High-risk (HR) viral types. The most prevalent HPV genotypes identified were 16, 58, 31, 18, and 70. Forty two percent of participants had a single infection, while 23 and 26% of participants were infected with two or more HPV genotypes, respectively. HPV 16 was the most prevalent genotype identified and was frequently present as a co-infection with HPV types 18, 51, 52, 59, 66, or 70. Conclusion Women <20 years of age were most often infected with HPV, and the HPV Quadrivalent vaccine (types 16, 18, 6, and 11), currently available in Mexico, no confers protection against a subset of the HPV genotypes identified in the present study (58, 31, 70, and 35). Thus, it is important evaluate the geographical distribution of specific HPV genotypes in all health of center across Mexico in order to implement a successful vaccination program and to diagnose CC in its early stages. PMID:27610056

  4. Human papilloma virus genotypes in women from Nayarit, Mexico, with squamous intraepithelial lesions and cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Cervantes, Laura; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Rojas-García, Aurora Elizabeth; Barrón-Vivanco, Briscia Socorro; Vallejo-Ruiz, Verónica; León, David Cantú-De; Hernández, Yael Yvette Bernal; Jáuregui-Martínez, Armando; Medina-Díaz, Irma Martha

    2016-01-01

    Objective In Mexico cervical cancer (CC) is the most common cause of death from neoplasia in women. Study aimed to analyze the current distribution of Human papillomavirus (HPV) types in women from Nayarit, Mexico, with Squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) and Cervical cancer (CC). Methodology Between January 2011 and July 2013, cervical samples were collected from female residents of the Mexican state of Nayarit and were analyzed by means of a LINEAR ARRAY® HPV genotyping test. Data analyses were performed using Stata ver. 8.0 statistical software. Results Of the samples analyzed, 91.2%, HPV DNA was detected. Of these positive samples, 82% were High-risk (HR) viral types. The most prevalent HPV genotypes identified were 16, 58, 31, 18, and 70. Forty two percent of participants had a single infection, while 23 and 26% of participants were infected with two or more HPV genotypes, respectively. HPV 16 was the most prevalent genotype identified and was frequently present as a co-infection with HPV types 18, 51, 52, 59, 66, or 70. Conclusion Women <20 years of age were most often infected with HPV, and the HPV Quadrivalent vaccine (types 16, 18, 6, and 11), currently available in Mexico, no confers protection against a subset of the HPV genotypes identified in the present study (58, 31, 70, and 35). Thus, it is important evaluate the geographical distribution of specific HPV genotypes in all health of center across Mexico in order to implement a successful vaccination program and to diagnose CC in its early stages.

  5. Use of anticontamination primers in the polymerase chain reaction for the detection of human papilloma virus genotypes in cervical scrapes and biopsies.

    PubMed

    van den Brule, A J; Claas, E C; du Maine, M; Melchers, W J; Helmerhorst, T; Quint, W G; Lindeman, J; Meijer, C J; Walboomers, J M

    1989-09-01

    A reliable application of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for detection of the human papilloma virus (HPV) genotypes in cervical smears and biopsies was developed. Primers flanking the HPV cloning site were used to avoid detection of cloned HPV plasmids. These anticontamination primers were used for the specific detection of HPV 6, 11, 16, 18, and 33 in cervical scrapes that had been tested previously for HPV with a combined modified filter in situ hybridization (modified FISH) and dot blotting procedure. The PCR appeared to be superior. Two groups of women were screened for HPV genotypes. Group A consisted of women belonging to a regularly screened population, and group B contained women attending a gynaecological clinic. It appeared that the overall prevalence of HPV in cytologically normal scrapes in the first group was 6%, whereas in the second group 12% was found. In scrapes with cytological dysplasia, the prevalence of HPV in group A and B was approximately 40% and 60%, respectively. HPV 16 was present predominantly. In biopsies of squamous cell carcinomas of the cervix uteri, an HPV prevalence rate of 90% was found, all of which contained only HPV 16 and 18. These data indicate an important role for HPV detection in the screening of cervical scrapes to identify women with an increased risk of cervical cancer. PMID:2555442

  6. Association of Human Papilloma Virus 16 Infection and p53 Polymorphism among Tobacco using Oral Leukoplakia Patients: A Clinicopathologic and Genotypic Study

    PubMed Central

    Sikka, Seema; Sikka, Pranav

    2014-01-01

    Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV) and p53 alterations are speculated to play a role in carcinogenesis. This study was carried out to find out the association of HPV and p53 with precancerous lesions of the oral cavity such as leukoplakia: The objective of this study was to find the association among human papilloma virus (HPV) 16 infections and p53 polymorphism in tobacco using the oral leukoplakia patients. Methods: A total of 91 oral leukoplakia patients and 100 controls were randomly selected from the out-patient department of a tertiary care dental hospital of North-east India. Blood samples were drawn incisional biopsy was performed from the lesion proper and the tissue was processed for histopathological grading. Cytological smears were taken from the lesional site of leukoplakia patients and buccal mucosa of controls. The rate of HPV infection and p53 polymorphism was detected with the help of polymerase chain reaction, gel electrophoresis and deoxyribonucleic acid sequencing. Results: The rate of HPV 16 infection was found significantly high in the oral leukoplakia patients. No particular p53 genotype at exon 4 of codon 72 was found to be associated with oral leukoplakia, but “C” allele (proline) at exon 4 of codon 72 was significantly raised in these patients. Conclusions: Oral leukoplakia, a well-known pre-cancerous lesion, has been shown to be associated with tobacco, but certain other factors like HPV infection and p53 polymorphism may play an important role in its development. PMID:24829730

  7. Papilloma of lip associated with human papilloma viruses-32 infection in a child.

    PubMed

    Sabeena, Sasidharanpillai; Pallade, Sadashiva Rao; Kamath, Nutan; Mathew, Mary; Arunkumar, Govindakarnavar

    2016-01-01

    Squamous papilloma is the most common benign oral epithelial lesion, and it is well known to be associated with human papilloma virus 6 and 11. Here, we report a case of squamous papilloma associated with human papilloma viruses (HPV)-32 in a 4-year-old boy who presented with a verrucous lesion on the lower lip. HPV-32 is often associated with a rare benign condition focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH). A limited number of lesions and the absence of characteristic histology ruled out FEH in our patient. To the best of our knowledge, the association of oral squamous papilloma with HPV-32 is hitherto unreported.

  8. Papilloma of lip associated with human papilloma viruses-32 infection in a child.

    PubMed

    Sabeena, Sasidharanpillai; Pallade, Sadashiva Rao; Kamath, Nutan; Mathew, Mary; Arunkumar, Govindakarnavar

    2016-01-01

    Squamous papilloma is the most common benign oral epithelial lesion, and it is well known to be associated with human papilloma virus 6 and 11. Here, we report a case of squamous papilloma associated with human papilloma viruses (HPV)-32 in a 4-year-old boy who presented with a verrucous lesion on the lower lip. HPV-32 is often associated with a rare benign condition focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH). A limited number of lesions and the absence of characteristic histology ruled out FEH in our patient. To the best of our knowledge, the association of oral squamous papilloma with HPV-32 is hitherto unreported. PMID:26776129

  9. Identification of bovine papilloma virus 10 in teat warts of cattle by DNase-SISPA.

    PubMed

    Rai, Gaurava K; Saxena, Meeta; Singh, Vidya; Somvanshi, Ramesh; Sharma, Bhaskar

    2011-01-27

    Papilloma viruses are detected and identified by PCR with consensus primers designed from human papilloma virus sequences. These and other primers could not detect papilloma virus in bovine teat wart samples despite repeated attempts. DNase-SISPA, a metagenomic method for identifying viruses, could identify bovine papilloma virus type 10 in bovine teat warts. The sequence comparison between consensus primers and bovine papilloma virus type 10 sequences revealed many differences between consensus primers and BPV-10 sequences. We suggest, DNase-SISPA may be used as an alternate method for papilloma virus diagnosis, in cases where PCR fails to identify papilloma viruses.

  10. Human papilloma virus infection and psoriasis: Did human papilloma virus infection trigger psoriasis?

    PubMed

    Jain, Sonia P; Gulhane, Sachin; Pandey, Neha; Bisne, Esha

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is an autoimmune chronic inflammatory skin disease known to be triggered by streptococcal and HIV infections. However, human papilloma virus infection (HPV) as a triggering factor for the development of psoriasis has not been reported yet. We, hereby report a case of plaque type with inverse psoriasis which probably could have been triggered by genital warts (HPV infection) and discuss the possible pathomechanisms for their coexistence and its management.

  11. Molecular identification of a papilloma virus from cutaneous lesions of captive and free-ranging Florida manatees

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodruff, R.A.; Bonde, R.K.; Bonilla, J.A.; Romero, C.H.

    2005-01-01

    Cutaneous papillomatous lesions were biopsied from three captive Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) at Homosassa Springs State Wildlife Park (HSSWP), Homosassa, Florida, USA, and from six free-ranging Florida manatees from Crystal and Homosassa rivers, Florida. Total DNA extracted from these lesions was assayed for the presence of papilloma virus genomes using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with primers that target the L1 capsid protein gene. The amplification generated DNA fragments 458 base pairs in length that encompassed a highly conserved domain within the L1 capsid protein and translated into identical polypeptides of 152 amino acids, suggesting the involvement of a single papilloma virus genotype. Multiple amino acid sequence and phylogenetic analyses of the L1 fragment indicated that the Florida manatee papilloma virus is a unique and quite distinct papillomavirus from other known papilloma viruses. The emergence of this new pathogen raises concerns about its potential impact on the already endangered Florida manatee.

  12. Human papilloma virus (HPV) molecular diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Kroupis, Christos; Vourlidis, Nikolaos

    2011-11-01

    Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is becoming a menace worldwide, especially to the developing world, due to its involvement in a variety of malignancies, with cervical cancer being the most important and prevalent. There are many HPV types; HPV 16/18 are the most carcinogenic but few others are also characterized as high-risk (HR). They can cause a variety of low- or high-grade cellular abnormalities, most frequently detected in a routine Pap test. Most infections clear within 2 years, however, a minority persists and potentially could progress to cervical cancer. Molecular tests detecting HPV DNA, RNA or proteins are now being available either commercially or in-house developed. DNA detection is nowadays an established tool for diagnosis and monitoring of HPV-related disease, however, there is lack of a reference method and standardization with reference materials. The various available test formats create confusion on which molecular test to choose and what are its limitations. Therefore, the need for lab accreditation and participation in proficiency testing has to be stressed. Novel HPV biomarkers (RNA, protein etc.) are now intensively examined for their inclusion as adjunct tools. Recently, developed prophylactic vaccines for HPV 16/18 have already proven safe and efficient and raise high expectations for the complete eradication of these types in the future.

  13. [The implementation of polymerase chain reaction technique: the real time to reveal and differentiate the viruses of human papilloma of high carcinogenic risk].

    PubMed

    Andosova, L D; Kontorshchikova, K N; Blatova, O L; Kudel'kina, S Iu; Kuznetsova, I A; Belov, A V; Baĭkova, R A

    2011-07-01

    The polymerase chain reaction technique was applied in "real time" format to evaluate the occurrence rate and infection ratio of various genotypes of human papilloma of high carcinogenic risk in virus-positive women and contact persons. The examination sampling consisted of 738 women aged of 17-50 years. The examination results permitted to establish high percentage of infection of 546 patients (74%) by carcinogenic papilloma viruses. The analysis of detection rate of various genotypes of human papilloma of high carcinogenic risk established that the 56th and 16th types of high carcinogenic risk are revealed more often than others--in 33% and 15.4% correspondingly. In males, first place in occurrence rate is for those types of virus of human papilloma: the 56th n = 10 (33.3%), 16th n = 3 (10%), 45th n = 3 (10%), 51th n = 3 (10%). The rest of genotypes are detected in 3-7% cases.

  14. An adult case of multiple squamous papillomas of the trachea associated with human papilloma virus type 6.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Hideki; Kutomi, Tomoko; Kujime, Kosei; Hara, Kei; Hisada, Tetsuya

    2008-01-01

    A 72-year-old woman with primary biliary cirrhosis complained of dry cough and wheezing. Chest computed tomography showed a tumor arising from the posterior wall of the trachea. Bronchoscopic examination revealed that the tumor was cauliflower-like, with two small polypoid tumors. They were diagnosed as multiple squamous papillomas. The main tumor was recurrent and removed by repeated microwave coagulation therapy (MCT) through bronchoscopy, whereas the two polypoid tumors were likely to disappear spontaneously. Human papilloma virus (HPV) type 6 DNA was detected in the tumor by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification, suggesting that this virus was the cause of her papillomas.

  15. Human papilloma virus: a new risk factor in a subset of head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Bisht, Manisha; Bist, Sampan Singh

    2011-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is the sixth most common malignancy worldwide. Tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption are two well known behavioral risk factors associated with head and neck cancer. Recently, evidence is mounting that infection with human papilloma virus, most commonly human papilloma virus-16 is responsible for a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma especially tumors of tonsillar origin. The molecular pathway used by human papilloma virus to trigger malignant transformation of tissue is different from that of other well known risk factors, i.e. smoking and alcohol, associated with squamous cell carcinoma. Apparently, these subsets of patients with human papilloma virus positive tumor are more likely to have a better prognosis than human papilloma virus negative tumor. Considering this fact, the human papilloma virus infection should be determined in all oropharyngeal cancers since it can have a major impact on the decision making process of the treatment.

  16. Host response to papilloma virus in focal epithelial hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Jáuregui, P; Tamayo Pérez, R; Pazbueso, H R

    1989-01-01

    The ultrastructural features of the lesions of four FEH patients disclosed changes in the nuclei interpreted as a premature disintegration of the nucleoli and the presence of papilloma-like viruses. Changes in ribosome number and distribution, glycogen content and formation of vesicles within the cytoplasm of FEH keratinocytes were observed and compared with normal epithelia. The observed cell changes were explained as specific host response due to HPV-13.

  17. Human papilloma virus vaccination: should it be mandatory?

    PubMed

    Prasai, S

    2008-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common malignancy and a leading killer among women worldwide. Seventy percent of these cervical cancers are known to be caused by Human Papilloma Virus, which is transmitted primarily by sexual contact. The use of Human Papilloma Virus prophylactic vaccine among young adolescents, who have not been previously exposed to the infection, as primary prevention holds most promise for the prevention of this cervical cancer. Each year 80% of the 274,000 deaths caused by cervical cancer occur in developing nations like Nepal. Largest promise of this vaccine is in such countries where screening program is difficult to implement and maintain. However this also raises concerns and debates about the enduring effectiveness and the long term side effects of the vaccine, which are yet unknown. Garnering public trust and public acceptance is key to the success of any public health intervention. More research on the long term safety and efficacy on Human Papilloma Virus vaccine and dissemination of these findings is recommended to increase the acceptance of the program before making it a state mandate.

  18. THE COURSE OF VIRUS-INDUCED RABBIT PAPILLOMAS AS DETERMINED BY VIRUS, CELLS, AND HOST

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, John G.

    1938-01-01

    An experimental analysis of the factors responsible for the observed differences in the course of virus-induced papillomas of the rabbit has shown that some are referable to the virus, others to the cells, and yet others to host influences. The interplay of these factors affords enlightening illustration of the nature of the cell-virus relationship in virus-induced tumors. Retrogression of the rabbit papillomas appears to be consequent on a generalized resistance of host origin, elicited by and directed against the proliferating, virus-infected cells. PMID:19870740

  19. [Prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines against human papilloma virus].

    PubMed

    Albers, A E; Hoffmann, T K; Klussmann, J P; Kaufmann, A M

    2010-08-01

    Infection with human papilloma virus (HPV) has been identified as the cause of recurrent papillomatosis and of a subgroup of squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck. A change in prevalence of these lesions, especially for oropharyngeal carcinoma, can be expected as a consequence of the introduction of prophylactic HPV vaccines for young women, targeting the most frequent high- and low-risk HPV subtypes. Vaccination for the major low-risk HPV types has proven to be highly effective against genital warts and activity against papillomatosis can be expected. The possibilities of prophylactic HPV vaccination as well as new developments and the rationale for therapeutic vaccines are discussed on the basis of the current literature.

  20. Human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination in childhood: challenges and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Mammas, I; Maher, F; Theodoridou, M; Spandidos, D

    2011-01-01

    Vaccination against human papilloma virus (HPV) in childhood is a significant step forward in the reduction of HPV associated morbidity and mortality and a considerable scientific achievement. However, many challenges remain to be overcome if an effective HPV vaccine programme is to be successfully introduced worldwide. The aim of this review is to identify and summarize the new issues concerning HPV vaccination that have emerged since its introduction into clinical practice in school-aged girls. According to the literature, the overall impact of HPV vaccination on cervical cancer is unlikely to be apparent for the next decade. Cost-effectiveness is of particular importance, particularly in developing countries. Determining the age at which the vaccine should be administered, whether to include boys in addition to girls, the costs and the implications for cervical screening are issues that need to be addressed by conducting further research. PMID:24391408

  1. Ethical considerations of universal vaccination against human papilloma virus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background From an epidemiological perspective, the practice of universal vaccination of girls and young women in order to prevent human papilloma virus (HPV) infection and potential development of cervical cancer is widely accepted even though it may lead to the neglect of other preventive strategies against cervical cancer. Discussion It is argued that removing the deterrent effect – the fear of developing cancer – could encourage teenage sex. This paper reflects on the ethical legitimacy of the universal vaccination of girls and young women against HPV infection, especially regarding safety issues, the need to vaccinate people who have opted to abstain from sex, the presumption of early onset of sexual relations, the commercial interests of the companies that manufacture the vaccine, and the recommendation of universal vaccination in males. Summary Based on the aforementioned information, we believe that the universal vaccination against HPV in young women is acceptable from an ethical point of view, given the medical advantages it presents. PMID:24708813

  2. [HPV (Human Papilloma Virus) implication in other cancers than gynaecological].

    PubMed

    Badoual, C; Tartour, E; Roussel, H; Bats, A S; Pavie, J; Pernot, S; Weiss, L; Mohamed, A Si; Thariat, J; Hoffmann, C; Péré, H

    2015-08-01

    Worldwide, approximately 5 to 10% of the population is infected by a Human Papilloma Virus (HPV). Some of these viruses, with a high oncogenic risk (HPV HR), are responsible for about 5% of cancer. It is now accepted that almost all carcinomas of the cervix and the vulva are due to an HPV HR (HPV16 and 18) infection. However, these viruses are known to be involved in the carcinogenesis of many other cancers (head and neck [SCCHN], penis, anus). For head and neck cancer, HPV infection is considered as a good prognostic factor. The role of HPV HR in anal cancer is also extensively studied in high-risk patient's population. The role of HPV infection in the carcinogenesis of esophageal, bladder, lung, breast or skin cancers is still debated. Given the multiple possible locations of HPV HR infection, the question of optimizing the management of patients with a HPV+ cancer arises in the implementation of a comprehensive clinical and biological monitoring. It is the same in therapeutics with the existence of a preventive vaccination, for example.

  3. Immunohistochemistry and Polymerase Chain Reaction for Detection Human Papilloma Virus in Warts: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hong Sun; Lee, Ji Hyun; Choo, Ji Yoon; Byun, Hee Jin; Jun, Jin Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background Immunohistochemistry and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) are the most widely used methods for the detection of viruses. PCR is known to be a more sensitive and specific method than the immunohistochemical method at this time, but PCR has the disadvantages of high cost and skilled work to use widely. With the progress of technology, the immunohistochemical methods used in these days has come to be highly sensitive and actively used in the diagnostic fields. Objective To evaluate and compare the usefulness of immunohistochemistry and PCR for detection human papilloma virus (HPV) in wart lesions. Methods Nine biopsy samples of verruca vulgaris and 10 of condyloma accuminatum were examined. Immunohistochemical staining using monoclonal antibody to HPV L1 capsid protein and PCR were done for the samples. DNA sequencing of the PCR products and HPV genotyping were also done. Results HPV detection rate was 78.9% (88.9% in verruca vulgaris, 70.0% in condyloma accuminatum) on immunohistochemistry and 100.0% for PCR. HPV-6 genotype showed a lower positivity rate on immunohistochemistry (50.0%) as compared to that of the other HPV genotypes. Conclusion Immunohistochemistry for HPV L1 capsid protein showed comparable sensitivity for detection HPV. Considering the high cost and great effort needed for the PCR methods, we can use immunohistochemistry for HPV L1 capsid protein with the advantage of lower cost and simple methods for HPV detection. PMID:27489431

  4. Human Papilloma Virus and Oropharyngeal Carcinoma - Lessons from History.

    PubMed

    Vlantis, Alexander Chris

    2016-03-01

    The human papilloma virus (HPV) is a common virus that infects epithelium in 10% of the world's population. While most sexually active people become infected, the majority with a healthy natural immunity control their infection. When the infection becomes persistent in cervical mucosa for instance, it is associated with nearly all cervical cancers. Fortunately cervical cancer screening is both sensitive and specific and when accessed has led to significant reductions of this disease. Despite this, cervical cancer still remains one of the leading causes of death from cancer. Oropharyngeal mucosa is becoming persistently infected with HPV in an increasing number of people leading to a potential epidemic of oropharyngeal carcinoma. While only 10% of new oropharyngeal infections persist, those in elderly men who smoke are more likely to do so. Some centres report more than 70% of oropharyngeal cancers are associated with HPV infection, which is different to cancers caused by alcohol and tobacco. Other centres report only a 20% association. Education against high-risk sexual behaviour has been met with limited success. Screening for oropharyngeal HPV infection has been disappointing with a pickup rate of only 40%. Some hope lies in detecting viral DNA in both the saliva and plasma. A HPV vaccine has been available since 2006 but is not yet routinely given to both sexes in many countries. Its effect on the incidence of HPV-positive oropharyngeal carcinomas is currently unknown. Vigilance by dental and medical colleagues in the meantime is essential. PMID:26981602

  5. Human Papilloma Viruses and Breast Cancer – Assessment of Causality

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, James Sutherland; Glenn, Wendy K.; Whitaker, Noel James

    2016-01-01

    High risk human papilloma viruses (HPVs) may have a causal role in some breast cancers. Case–control studies, conducted in many different countries, consistently indicate that HPVs are more frequently present in breast cancers as compared to benign breast and normal breast controls (odds ratio 4.02). The assessment of causality of HPVs in breast cancer is difficult because (i) the HPV viral load is extremely low, (ii) HPV infections are common but HPV associated breast cancers are uncommon, and (iii) HPV infections may precede the development of breast and other cancers by years or even decades. Further, HPV oncogenesis can be indirect. Despite these difficulties, the emergence of new evidence has made the assessment of HPV causality, in breast cancer, a practical proposition. With one exception, the evidence meets all the conventional criteria for a causal role of HPVs in breast cancer. The exception is “specificity.” HPVs are ubiquitous, which is the exact opposite of specificity. An additional reservation is that the prevalence of breast cancer is not increased in immunocompromised patients as is the case with respect to HPV-associated cervical cancer. This indicates that HPVs may have an indirect causal influence in breast cancer. Based on the overall evidence, high-risk HPVs may have a causal role in some breast cancers. PMID:27747193

  6. [THE COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF RESULTS OF DETECTION OF CARCINOGENIC TYPES OF HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUS BY QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE TESTS].

    PubMed

    Kuzmenko, E T; Labigina, A V; Leshenko, O Ya; Rusanov, D N; Kuzmenko, V V; Fedko, L P; Pak, I P

    2015-05-01

    The analysis of results of screening (n = 3208; sexually active citizen aged from 18 to 59 years) was carried out to detect oncogene types of human papilloma virus in using qualitative (1150 females and 720 males) and quantitative (polymerase chain reaction in real-time (843 females and 115 males) techniques. The human papilloma virus of high oncogene type was detected in 65% and 68.4% of females and in 48.6% and 53% of males correspondingly. Among 12 types of human papilloma virus the most frequently diagnosed was human papilloma virus 16 independently of gender of examined and technique of analysis. In females, under application of qualitative tests rate of human papilloma virus 16 made up to 18.3% (n = 280) and under application of quantitative tests Rte of human papilloma virus made up to 14.9% (n = 126; p ≤ 0.05). Under examination of males using qualitative tests rate of human papilloma virus 16 made up to 8.3% (n = 60) and under application of qualitative tests made up to 12.2% (n = 14; p ≥ 0.05). Under application of qualitative tests rate of detection on the rest ofoncogene types of human papilloma virus varied in females from 3.4% to 8.4% and in males from 1.8% to 5.9%. Under application of qualitative tests to females rate of human papilloma virus with high viral load made up to 68.4%, with medium viral load - 2.85% (n = 24) and with low viral load -0.24% (n = 2). Under application of quantitative tests in males rate of detection of types of human papilloma virus made up to 53% and at that in all high viral load was established. In females, the most of oncogene types of human papilloma virus (except for 31, 39, 59) are detected significantly more often than in males.

  7. Prevalence of human papilloma virus among women with breast cancer since 2005-2009 in Isfahan

    PubMed Central

    Manzouri, Leila; Salehi, Rasoul; Shariatpanahi, Shervin; rezaie, Parisa

    2014-01-01

    Background: Human papilloma virus (HPV) DNA has been detected in breast carcinoma by different laboratorial techniques, suggesting that the virus could play a role in the pathogenesis of this tumor. Materials and Methods: It was a descriptive study. Systematic random sampling was used for selecting 55 cases of breast cancer and 51 controls of benign breast lesions from the file of Seyedshohada hospital of Isfahan since 2005-2009. A total of 106 paraffin-embedded specimens were selected and HPV DNA was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced for different types of HPV in case of positivity for HPV DNA. Data analysis was performed by SPSS 16 software using descriptive statistic, Chi-square, and Fisher's exact tests. Results: Out of 55 malignant and 51 benign breast specimens, 18.2% (10) and 13.7% (7) were positive to HPV DNA, respectively (P = 0.53); 70% (7) malignant and 43% (3) benign breast specimens were positive to high-risk HPV genotypes. In malignant specimens, the most common high- and low-risk genotypes were HPV-16 (3.6%) and HPV-11 (3.6%), respectively. In benign specimens, the most common high- and low-risk genotypes were HPV-31 (3.9%) and HPV-43 (3.9%), respectively. Among malignant and benign specimens, ductal carcinoma and fibro adenoma were the most common lesions positive to different types of HPV, respectively. Conclusion: This study demonstrated the presence of HPV genome in both malignant and benign tumor tissues in women with breast lesions in Isfahan; therefore, further larger epidemiologic studies need to be analyzed to establish the exact role of this virus in the pathogenesis of breast cancer. PMID:24627883

  8. Predictors associated with the willingness to take human papilloma virus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Naing, Cho; Pereira, Joanne; Abe, Tatsuki; Eh Zhen Wei, Daniel; Rahman Bajera, Ibrizah Binti Abdul; Kavinda Perera, Undugodage Heshan

    2012-04-01

    Human papilloma virus vaccine is considered to be the primary form of cervical cancer prevention. The objectives were (1) to determine knowledge about, and perception of human papilloma virus infection in relation to cervical cancer, (2) to explore the intention of the community to be vaccinated with human papilloma virus vaccine, and (3) to identify variables that could predict the likelihood of uptake of the vaccine. A cross-sectional survey was carried out in a semi-urban Town of Malaysia, using a pre-tested structured questionnaire. Summary statistics, Pearson chi-square test and a binary logistic regression were used for data analysis. A total of 232 respondents were interviewed. Overall, only a few had good knowledge related to human papilloma virus (14%) or vaccination (8%). Many had misconceptions that it could be transmitted through blood transfusion (57%). Sixty percent had intention to take vaccination. In the binary logistic model, willingness to take vaccination was significant with 'trusts that vaccination would be effective for prevention of cervical cancer' (P = 0.001), 'worries for themselves' (P < 0.001) or 'their family members' (P = 0.003) and 'being Indian ethnicity' (P = 0.024). The model could fairly predict the likelihood of uptake of the vaccine (Cox & Snell R(2) = .415; Nagelkerke R(2) = 0.561). Results indicate that intensive health education dispelling misconception and risk perception towards human papilloma virus infection and cervical cancer would be helpful to increase the acceptability of vaccination program.

  9. Predictors associated with the willingness to take human papilloma virus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Naing, Cho; Pereira, Joanne; Abe, Tatsuki; Eh Zhen Wei, Daniel; Rahman Bajera, Ibrizah Binti Abdul; Kavinda Perera, Undugodage Heshan

    2012-04-01

    Human papilloma virus vaccine is considered to be the primary form of cervical cancer prevention. The objectives were (1) to determine knowledge about, and perception of human papilloma virus infection in relation to cervical cancer, (2) to explore the intention of the community to be vaccinated with human papilloma virus vaccine, and (3) to identify variables that could predict the likelihood of uptake of the vaccine. A cross-sectional survey was carried out in a semi-urban Town of Malaysia, using a pre-tested structured questionnaire. Summary statistics, Pearson chi-square test and a binary logistic regression were used for data analysis. A total of 232 respondents were interviewed. Overall, only a few had good knowledge related to human papilloma virus (14%) or vaccination (8%). Many had misconceptions that it could be transmitted through blood transfusion (57%). Sixty percent had intention to take vaccination. In the binary logistic model, willingness to take vaccination was significant with 'trusts that vaccination would be effective for prevention of cervical cancer' (P = 0.001), 'worries for themselves' (P < 0.001) or 'their family members' (P = 0.003) and 'being Indian ethnicity' (P = 0.024). The model could fairly predict the likelihood of uptake of the vaccine (Cox & Snell R(2) = .415; Nagelkerke R(2) = 0.561). Results indicate that intensive health education dispelling misconception and risk perception towards human papilloma virus infection and cervical cancer would be helpful to increase the acceptability of vaccination program. PMID:21928103

  10. Construction and characterization of recombinant fowlpox viruses expressing human papilloma virus E6 and E7 oncoproteins.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, Eleana; Basavecchia, Valeria; Zanotto, Carlo; Pacchioni, Sole; Morghen, Carlo De Giuli; Radaelli, Antonia

    2009-06-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV)-16 is the most prevalent high-risk mucosal genotype and the expression of the E6 and E7 proteins, which can bind to the p53 and p105Rb host cell-cycle regulatory proteins, is related to its tumorigenicity. Virus-like-particle (VLP)-based immunogens developed recently are successful as prophylactic HPV vaccines. However, given the high number of individuals infected already with HPV and the absence of expression of the L1 structural protein in HPV-infected or HPV-transformed cells, an efficient therapeutic vaccine targeting the non-structural E6 and E7 oncoproteins is required. In this study, two new fowlpox virus (FPV) recombinants encoding the HPV-16 E6 and E7 proteins were engineered and evaluated for their correct expression in vitro, with the final aim of developing a therapeutic vaccine against HPV-related cervical tumors. Although vaccinia viruses expressing the HPV-16 and HPV-18 E6 and E7 oncoproteins have already been studied, due to their natural host-range restriction to avian species and their ability to elicit a complete immune response, FPV recombinants may represent efficient and safer vectors also for immunocompromised hosts. The results indicate that FPV recombinants can express correctly the E6 and E7 oncoproteins, and they should represent appropriate vectors for the expression of these oncoproteins in human cells.

  11. Dermatopathic lymphadenitis associated with human papilloma virus infection and verruca vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Acipayam, Can; Kupeli, Serhan; Sezgin, Gulay; Acikalin, Arbil; Ozkan, Ayse; Inan, Defne Ay; Bayram, Ibrahim; Tanyeli, Atila

    2014-05-01

    Here we present a pediatric case of human papilloma virus associated with dermatopathic lymphadenitis (DL). A 5-year-old boy presented to the pediatric oncology clinic with swelling of the neck and warts on his lower jaw. His blood chemistry and complete blood count were normal, as was chest x-ray. HIV, EBV, CMV, and parvovirus serologies were negative. The patient was investigated for malignancy and lymphoma but no association was found. Histopathologic examination of the lymph node and the lesion revealed DL and verruca vulgaris, respectively. DL represents a benign form of reactive lymph node hyperplasia and described in patients with HIV and EBV infections. It is a rare entity described in patients with human papilloma virus infection. To our knowledge, this is the first report of DL in a patient with human papilloma virus infection.

  12. Human papilloma virus (HPV) modulation of the HNSCC epigenome.

    PubMed

    Stephen, Josena K; Worsham, Maria J

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the human papilloma virus (HPV), in addition to tobacco and alcohol, is considered another independent risk factor for oropharyngeal squamous head and neck cancer (OPSCC), where the prevalence of HPV-16 increases to 50-90 % for the oropharynx. Also, incidence and mortality in head and neck SCC (HNSCC) continue to be higher in African Americans (AA) than in Caucasian Americans (CA). A recent study found that poorer survival outcomes for AA versus CA with oropharyngeal tumors were attributable to racial differences in the prevalence of HPV positive (+) tumors; HPV negative (-) AA and CA patients had similar outcomes (Settle et al., Cancer Prev Res (Phila) 2:776-781, 2009). Evidence indicates that a HPV+ diagnosis has significant prognostic implications; these patients have at least half the risk of death when compared with the HPV- patient, due in part to a better response to chemoradiotherapy (Fakhry et al., J Natl Cancer Inst 100:261-269, 2008).Epigenetic events of promoter hypermethylation are emerging as promising molecular strategies for cancer detection, representing tumor-specific markers occurring early in tumor progression. HPV infection is now recognized to play a role in the pathogenesis of OPSCC, where HPV+ and HPV- patients appear to be clinically and biologically distinct with reported genome-wide hypomethylation and promoter hypermethylation in HPV+ HNSCC tumors. A recent study from our group applying pathway analysis to investigate the biological role of the differentially methylated genes in HPV+ and HPV- HNSCC reported 8 signal transduction pathways germane to HNSCC (Worsham et al., Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 149:409-416, 2013).

  13. Sun exposure, sexual behavior and uterine cervical human papilloma virus.

    PubMed

    Hrushesky, William J M; Sothern, Robert B; Rietveld, Wop J; Du-Quiton, Jovelyn; Boon, Mathilde E

    2006-01-01

    We have previously observed marked seasonal fluctuations in the frequency of cervical smears positive for human papilloma virus (HPV) in a series of smears obtained in Holland, with a peak in the summer months, especially August. Here, we tested two possible mechanisms that might underlie this summer peak: (1) enhanced transmission of HPV due to increased seasonal sexual activity, or (2) suppression of immunity due to summertime population exposure to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Data derived from a continuous series of >900,000 independent cervical smears obtained from 1983 to 1998 were assessed for histopathologic epithelial changes pathognomonic of HPV. The rate of HPV positivity was then compared to both the rate of sexual activity (using conception frequency as a readily available surrogate) as well as yearly and monthly fluctuations in solar-UV fluency. The rate of HPV positivity was found to be twice as high during the summer months, with a peak in August corresponding with maximal UV fluency. Furthermore, over these 16 consecutive years of continuous observation, maximum HPV detection rate and maximum UV fluency are positively correlated (r=0.59, P<0.01); the sunnier the year, the greater the rate of HPV. Likewise, there is a positive correlation of the monthly UV fluency, and monthly HPV discovery rate (r=0.16, P<0.03). In contrast, conception frequency (and, presumably, population sexual HPV transmission) was maximal near the vernal equinox, with relatively modest (<10%) seasonal fluctuation, i.e., not fully explaining this prominent August peak in HPV discovery. There is a clear relationship between the detection of HPV-positive cervical smears and sunlight exposure. We speculate that the well-known phenomenon of UV-mediated suppression of immune surveillance may be causally related to this unusual increase in cytologically defined active HPV infections during the summer months in northern countries such as Holland. Confirming this relationship

  14. Initial prevalence of anal human papilloma virus infection in liver transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Grąt, Michał; Grąt, Karolina; Hołówko, Wacław; Malejczyk, Magdalena; Walter de Walthoffen, Szymon; Lewandowski, Zbigniew; Kobryń, Konrad; Patkowski, Waldemar; Majewski, Sławomir; Młynarczyk, Grażyna; Krawczyk, Marek

    2014-08-01

    Although liver transplant recipients are at increased risk of human papilloma virus (HPV)-related anal cancer, limited data are available regarding the initial prevalence of anal HPV infection in this population. Anal swabs collected from 50 liver transplant recipients within the first three postoperative weeks were subjected to real-time polymerase chain reaction for detection of the four HPV genotypes: 6, 11, 16, and 18. Predictors of any, low-risk, and high-risk anal HPV infection were evaluated. Overall, the prevalence of any anal HPV infection was 18.0%, with the corresponding rates for high- and low-risk HPV genotypes being 8.0% and 10.0%, respectively. Infection with any type of anal HPV was higher in patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection (P = 0.027), ≥3 sexual partners (P = 0.031), and alcoholic liver disease (P = 0.063). HBV infection was the only factor significantly associated with high-risk HPV infection (P = 0.038). Male sex (P = 0.050), age ≥52 years (P = 0.016), ≥30 sexual partners (P = 0.003), age at first intercourse ≤18 years (P = 0.045), and time since first intercourse ≥38 years (P = 0.012) were identified as predictors of low-risk HPV infection. These results indicate that HPV vaccination of liver transplant candidates and screening for anal HPV infection in high-risk groups should be considered.

  15. Multiple Human Papilloma Virus 16 Infection Presenting as Various Skin Lesions.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hwan Jun; Lee, Jun Ho

    2016-06-01

    The 53-year-old woman admitted with multiple persistent, progressive, slightly raised, red, and crusted plague form masses that suddenly occurred on left thumb, both upper and lower extremity about 10 years ago. There was no induration in the lesion or in its surrounding skin. There was no unusual opinion on a radiologic test and family history. And she had no history of working in the business related to any chemical product such as arsenic or tar which was carcinogen. The patient has had total hysterectomy to treat uterine myoma 10 years ago. The wide excision and split thickness skin graft of 2 × 1.5 cm was performed around mass in the size of 1.5 × 1.2 cm on the left thumb and wide excision and local advancement flap was done on the other sites. As a result of biopsy, masses were diagnosed as Bowen disease, actinic keratosis, and Seborrheic keratosis. These specimens were obtained during surgery: broom-type cell sampling devices were used to collect samples from the specimens, and they were placed into PreservCyt solution (Cytyc Corp, Boxborough, MA). Then, the collected samples underwent the Roche Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test (Roche Diagnostics, Branchburg, NJ) that allows for the simultaneous identification of human papilloma virus (HPV) types from liquid-based cell preparations. On histopathological examination of the surgical specimen, atypical squamous cells proliferate through the whole thickness of the epidermis. The entire tumor was confined to the epidermis and did not invade into the dermis. The cells were often highly atypical. That were the irregular shape which the resection margin of masses had a negative tumor component. And HPV 16 genotyping test was positive although vaginal examination of HPV 16 genotyping was negative. PMID:27192658

  16. [Prevalence of human papilloma virus isolated from cervix lesions in a female population from Transilvania].

    PubMed

    Feticu, Lucia; Bocşan, I S; Bondor, Cosmina loana; Boboş, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    Between the years 2008-2011 reverse hibridisation (INNO-LiPA HPV Genotyping Extra test) and genotyping 1a Roche (the kit: Linear array HPV genotyping test) were used for detection of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) in the cervix secretions of 182 female patients aged 16-63 years, predominantly of urban origin. 99 patients (54.4%) were identified as being infected with various types of HPV, prevalent in urban (53 single infections and 46 multiple infections). HPV infection was not detected in 83 (45.6%) patients. Only 7 females from rural areas were tested (5 females had single or multiple HPV infections). 32 types of HPV were identificated: 15 HPV types with high risk (51, 82, 56, 18, 39, 45, 59, 68, 16, 31, 33, 35, 52, 58, 73), 14 types with low risk (42, 61, 62, 72, 81, 83, 84, CP6108, 70, 6, 11, 55, 74, 54), and 3 types with possible high risk (26, 53, 66). The type of HPV could not be identified in other two cases. The most frecvent types of HPV with high risk isolated were: the type 16. The types 51 and 58 of HPV with high risk and the type 84 with low risk are detected in single infections in urban and in rural. HPV clades involved in single infections are: 1 (1 case), 3 (5 cases), 5 (4 cases), 6 (5 cases), 7 (5 cases), 9 (21 cases), 10 (7 cases). The clades 11 (7 cases) and 13 (6 cases) were involved only in multiple infections detected in urban. The types 35, 39, 59, 68 of HPV with high risk were isolated from multple infections. In rural, multiple infections with two HPV were detected. The citological screening by Babe-Papanicolaou examination was made only in 9 cases: HPV was not detected in 4 cases (one female had ASC-US: atypical squamous cells of "undetermined significance"); in 5 positive cases were detected HPV 16, 31, 58, 6.

  17. Problem-Solving Test: The Mechanism of Action of a Human Papilloma Virus Oncoprotein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2009-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: human papilloma virus; cervical cancer; oncoproteins; malignant transformation; retinoblastoma protein; cell cycle; quiescent and cycling cells; cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) complexes; E2F; S-phase genes; enhancer element; proto-oncogenes; tumor suppressor genes; radioactive…

  18. EPIDERMAL PAPILLOMAS WITH VIRUS-LIKE PARTICLES IN FLATHEAD SOLE, HIPPOGLOSSOIDES ELASSODON.

    PubMed

    WELLINGS, S R; CHUINARD, R G

    1964-11-13

    Epidermal papillomas frequently occur on the external surfaces of flathead sole, Hippoglossoides elassodon, in the waters of San Juan Islands, Washington. Virus-like particles and associated granular bodies, also of possible viral nature, are commnonly found in the neoplastic epithelial cells of these tumors. Similar structures are not observed in normal epidermis. PMID:14199716

  19. Evaluation of Human Papilloma Virus Communicative Education Strategies: A Pilot Screening Study for Cervical Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrera-Clavijo, Lizeth K.; Wiesner-Ceballos, Carolina; Rincón-Martínez, Lina M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: High-risk human papilloma virus (HR-HPV) is highly prevalent in sexually active men and women; HR-HPV has been classified as a sexually transmitted infection (STI) and as a necessary, but not sufficient, causal agent for cervical cancer. Women who test positive for HPV often experience serious psychosocial consequences such as fear,…

  20. Human papilloma virus, DNA methylation and microRNA expression in cervical cancer (Review)

    PubMed Central

    JIMÉNEZ-WENCES, HILDA; PERALTA-ZARAGOZA, OSCAR; FERNÁNDEZ-TILAPA, GLORIA

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a complex disease caused by genetic and epigenetic abnormalities that affect gene expression. The progression from precursor lesions to invasive cervical cancer is influenced by persistent human papilloma virus (HPV) infection, which induces changes in the host genome and epigenome. Epigenetic alterations, such as aberrant miRNA expression and changes in DNA methylation status, favor the expression of oncogenes and the silencing of tumor-suppressor genes. Given that some miRNA genes can be regulated through epigenetic mechanisms, it has been proposed that alterations in the methylation status of miRNA promoters could be the driving mechanism behind their aberrant expression in cervical cancer. For these reasons, we assessed the relationship among HPV infection, cellular DNA methylation and miRNA expression. We conclude that alterations in the methylation status of protein-coding genes and various miRNA genes are influenced by HPV infection, the viral genotype, the physical state of the viral DNA, and viral oncogenic risk. Furthermore, HPV induces deregulation of miRNA expression, particularly at loci near fragile sites. This deregulation occurs through the E6 and E7 proteins, which target miRNA transcription factors such as p53. PMID:24737381

  1. Detection and Typing of Human Papilloma Viruses by Nested Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jalal Kiani, Seyed; Shatizadeh Malekshahi, Somayeh; Yousefi Ghalejoogh, Zohreh; Ghavvami, Nastaran; Shafiei Jandaghi, Nazanin Zahra; Shahsiah, Reza; Jahanzad, Isa; Yavarian, Jila

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cervical cancer is the leading cause of death from cancer in under-developed countries. Human papilloma virus (HPV) 16 and 18 are the most prevalent types associated with carcinogenesis in the cervix. Conventional Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), type-specific and consensus primer-based PCR followed by sequencing, Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) or hybridization by specific probes are common methods for HPV detection and typing. In addition, some researchers have developed a multiplex PCR for simultaneous detection and typing of different HPVs. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of HPV infection and its types in cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) using the Nested Multiplex PCR (NMPCR) assay. Patients and Methods: Sixty-six samples with histologically confirmed SCC were evaluated. Total DNA was isolated by phenol–chloroform extraction and ethanol precipitation. Nested multiplex PCR was performed with first-round PCR by GP-E6/E7 consensus primers for amplification of the genomic DNA of all known mucosal HPV genotypes and second-round PCR by type-specific multiplex PCR primer cocktails. Results: Human papilloma virus infection was detected in 78.8% of samples, with the highest prevalence of HPV 16 (60.6%) while concurrent infections with two types was detected in 10.6%. Conclusions: The NMPCR assay is more convenient and easy for analysis of results, which is important for fast diagnosis and patient management, in a type-specific manner. PMID:26865940

  2. Risk factors and distribution of oncogenic strains of human papilloma virus in women presenting for cervical cancer screening in Port Harcourt, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Nyengidiki Tamunomie; Ikechukwu, Durugbo; Goddy, Bassey

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Human papilloma virus(HPV) accounts for most cases of cervical cancer with high risk HPV(hrHPV) genotypes largely responsible. The objective is to ascertain the distribution of oncogenic strains of human papilloma virus genotypes and predisposing risk factors in women presenting for cervical cancer screening in Nigeria. Methods A cross-sectional study of 80 women who presented for cervical cancer screening. The biodata of the participants, the presence of risk factors to HPV were recorded and hrHPV were identified using PCR technique. The information obtained was processed using the SPSS version 20 software. Results were presented in tables, test of significance and association done using student's t-test and Odds ratio, with P value < 0.05 as significant. Results The age range of patients was 19-62 years with prevalence of hrHPV of 10%. HrHPV are more in patients with more than one life time sexual partner (OR 1.26,95%CI 0.13-29.99), multiple sexual partners (OR 1.55, 95% CI 0.28-8.70), early coitarche (OR 1.57, 95% CI 0.14-15.00) and previous STI (OR 150, 95%CI 9.53-1979. 62). Four hrHPV genotypes: 16, 18, 31 and 35 were detected. Conclusion HPV genotype 18 was predominant in Port Harcourt, Nigeria. High risk sexual behaviours are associated with acquisition of hrHPV. PMID:27222684

  3. Problem-solving test: The mechanism of action of a human papilloma virus oncoprotein.

    PubMed

    Szeberényi, József

    2009-03-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: human papilloma virus; cervical cancer; oncoproteins; malignant transformation; retinoblastoma protein; cell cycle; quiescent and cycling cells; cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) complexes; E2F; S-phase genes; enhancer element; proto-oncogenes; tumor suppressor genes; radioactive labeling; immunoprecipitation; SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis; autoradiography; protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation; gene induction; agarose beads; centrifugation; Western blot analysis; phases of cell cycle; generation time.

  4. Human papilloma virus vaccination induces strong human papilloma virus specific cell-mediated immune responses in HIV-infected adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Rainone, Veronica; Giacomet, Vania; Penagini, Francesca; Fabiano, Valentina; Calascibetta, Francesca; Mameli, Chiara; Pisanelli, Stefania; Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo; Clerici, Mario; Trabattoni, Daria

    2015-03-27

    The ability of a quadrivalent human papilloma virus (HPV)-16/18/6/11 virus-like particles vaccine (Gardasil) to elicit HPV-specific cell-mediated immune responses was evaluated in antiretroviral therapy (ART)-treated HIV-infected young adults. Results showed that, after three doses of vaccine, central memory and effector memory CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes, as well as HPV-specific interleukin (IL)2(+)/CD4(+), interferon-gamma (IFN-γ(+))/CD4(+), IFN-γ(+)/CD8(+) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)(+)/CD8(+) T lymphocytes and Perforin and Granzyme B secreting CD8(+) T lymphocytes were significantly increased. Notably, results obtained in HIV-infected patients were comparable to those seen in HIV-uninfected age-matched healthy controls.

  5. Rapid genotyping of swine influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Mak, Polly W Y; Wong, Chloe K S; Li, Olive T W; Chan, Kwok Hung; Cheung, Chung Lam; Ma, Edward S; Webby, Richard J; Guan, Yi; Malik Peiris, Joseph S; Poon, Leo L M

    2011-04-01

    The emergence of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus highlighted the need for enhanced surveillance of swine influenza viruses. We used real-time reverse-transcription PCR-based genotyping and found that this rapid and simple genotyping method may identify reassortants derived from viruses of Eurasian avian-like, triple reassortant-like, and pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus lineages.

  6. Rapid Genotyping of Swine Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Polly W.Y.; Wong, Chloe K.S.; Li, Olive T.W.; Chan, Kwok Hung; Cheung, Chung Lam; Ma, Edward S.; Webby, Richard J.; Guan, Yi; Peiris, Joseph S. Malik

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus highlighted the need for enhanced surveillance of swine influenza viruses. We used real-time reverse–transcription PCR–based genotyping and found that this rapid and simple genotyping method may identify reassortants derived from viruses of Eurasian avian-like, triple reassortant-like, and pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus lineages. PMID:21470462

  7. “Saving lives”: Adapting and adopting Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccination in Austria

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Katharina T.

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination against the sexually transmitted Human Papilloma Virus (HPV), a necessary agent for the development of cervical cancer, has triggered much debate. In Austria, HPV policy turned from “lagging behind” in 2008 into “Europe's frontrunner” by 2013. Drawing on qualitative research, the article shows how the vaccine was transformed and made “good enough” over the course of five years. By means of tinkering and shifting storylines, policy officials and experts disassociated the vaccine from gender, vaccine manufacturers, and youth sexuality. Ultimately, the HPV vaccine functioned to strengthen the national immunization program. To this end, preventing an effective problematization of the extant screening program was essential. PMID:26921834

  8. Development of procedures for the identification of human papilloma virus DNA fragments in laser plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woellmer, Wolfgang; Meder, Tom; Jappe, Uta; Gross, Gerd; Riethdorf, Sabine; Riethdorf, Lutz; Kuhler-Obbarius, Christina; Loening, Thomas

    1996-01-01

    For the investigation of laser plume for the existence of HPV DNA fragments, which possibly occur during laser treatment of virus infected tissue, human papillomas and condylomas were treated in vitro with the CO2-laser. For the sampling of the laser plume a new method for the trapping of the material was developed by use of water-soluble gelatine filters. These samples were analyzed with the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique, which was optimized in regard of the gelatine filters and the specific primers. Positive PCR results for HPV DNA fragments up to the size of a complete oncogene were obtained and are discussed regarding infectiousity.

  9. [Pulmonary cystic disease may be a rare complication to recurrent respiratory human papilloma virus infection].

    PubMed

    Laurberg, Peter Thaysen; Weinreich, Ulla M Øller

    2014-12-01

    A 19-year-old woman with a history of juvenile laryngeal papillomatosis (JLP), treated since childhood with multiple resections, was admitted with symptoms of pneumonia. A chest X-ray and CAT-scan revealed multiple lung cysts and a bronchoalveolar lavage detected human papilloma virus 11. The patient responded well to antibiotics. A body plethysmography showed small lung volumes and low diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide, but normal volume diffusion capacity divided by alveolar volume. Pulmonary cystic disease should be considered when patients with JLP have symptoms of pneumonia.

  10. "Saving lives": Adapting and adopting Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccination in Austria.

    PubMed

    Paul, Katharina T

    2016-03-01

    Vaccination against the sexually transmitted Human Papilloma Virus (HPV), a necessary agent for the development of cervical cancer, has triggered much debate. In Austria, HPV policy turned from "lagging behind" in 2008 into "Europe's frontrunner" by 2013. Drawing on qualitative research, the article shows how the vaccine was transformed and made "good enough" over the course of five years. By means of tinkering and shifting storylines, policy officials and experts disassociated the vaccine from gender, vaccine manufacturers, and youth sexuality. Ultimately, the HPV vaccine functioned to strengthen the national immunization program. To this end, preventing an effective problematization of the extant screening program was essential.

  11. Persistent infection with high-risk human papilloma viruses: cohort study, Mérida, Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Téllez, Luis; Michelli, Elvia; Mendoza, José Andrés; Vielma, Silvana; Noguera, María-Eugenia; Callejas, Diana; Cavazza, María; Correnti, María

    2015-01-01

    Cervical lesions have been associated with infection by high-risk human papilloma virus (high-risk HPV). In 409 women aged >15 years high-risk HPV lesions were identified. In a cohort of this population persistent infection was compared with cytological, colposcopic, and histological lesions. Cervical scrapes were taken and DNA was isolated. HPV was detected by PCR in the E6/E7 region. Genotyping was performed by PCR nested multiple E6/E7. HPV was detected in a 37.40% (153/409), high-risk HPV in 86% (153/178), HPV18 46.64% (83/178), HPV16 34.28% (61/178). Among these 53.93% (96/178) were multiple infections, and HPV18/16 (30/96) was the most frequent 31.25%. The cytology showed changes in 15% of positive patients. A 49.67% in women positive for HPV infection showed abnormalities in the colposcopic study, a relationship that turned out to be statistically significant ( p < 0.0019 test χ(2)). Among all 85% of the women were younger than 45 years of age. Fifty-seven patients were evaluated 15 months after the base study, with initial prevalence of morbidity 49.12% (28/57) and at the end 10.53% (6/57), showing in 89.29% (25/28) negative for HR-HPV infection, 10.34% (3/28) showed persistence of infection, 17.54% (10/57) presented cytological alterations, with 80% of positivity for HPV, and a regression of 100% (10/10) of the previously identified lesions. With colposcopy, 50% (14/28) presented alterations related to HPV, of these 85.71% (12/14) showed regression of such an alteration. The cumulative incidence for HPV was 10.34% (3/29). The incidence rate was 4.23% (3/71), which is equal to 4.23 new cases of HPV infection per 100 people, per year of follow-up. In conclusion, the present work shows a high frequency of infection by high-risk HPV, with predominance of HPV18 and 16 and in general for multiple infections. Colposcopy was better predictor than the Pap smear for infection. The follow-up study revealed a low percentage of persistent infection, and a high

  12. Persistent infection with high-risk human papilloma viruses: cohort study, Mérida, Venezuela

    PubMed Central

    Téllez, Luis; Michelli, Elvia; Mendoza, José Andrés; Vielma, Silvana; Noguera, María-Eugenia; Callejas, Diana; Cavazza, María; Correnti, María

    2015-01-01

    Cervical lesions have been associated with infection by high-risk human papilloma virus (high-risk HPV). In 409 women aged >15 years high-risk HPV lesions were identified. In a cohort of this population persistent infection was compared with cytological, colposcopic, and histological lesions. Cervical scrapes were taken and DNA was isolated. HPV was detected by PCR in the E6/E7 region. Genotyping was performed by PCR nested multiple E6/E7. HPV was detected in a 37.40% (153/409), high-risk HPV in 86% (153/178), HPV18 46.64% (83/178), HPV16 34.28% (61/178). Among these 53.93% (96/178) were multiple infections, and HPV18/16 (30/96) was the most frequent 31.25%. The cytology showed changes in 15% of positive patients. A 49.67% in women positive for HPV infection showed abnormalities in the colposcopic study, a relationship that turned out to be statistically significant ( p < 0.0019 test χ2). Among all 85% of the women were younger than 45 years of age. Fifty-seven patients were evaluated 15 months after the base study, with initial prevalence of morbidity 49.12% (28/57) and at the end 10.53% (6/57), showing in 89.29% (25/28) negative for HR-HPV infection, 10.34% (3/28) showed persistence of infection, 17.54% (10/57) presented cytological alterations, with 80% of positivity for HPV, and a regression of 100% (10/10) of the previously identified lesions. With colposcopy, 50% (14/28) presented alterations related to HPV, of these 85.71% (12/14) showed regression of such an alteration. The cumulative incidence for HPV was 10.34% (3/29). The incidence rate was 4.23% (3/71), which is equal to 4.23 new cases of HPV infection per 100 people, per year of follow-up. In conclusion, the present work shows a high frequency of infection by high-risk HPV, with predominance of HPV18 and 16 and in general for multiple infections. Colposcopy was better predictor than the Pap smear for infection. The follow-up study revealed a low percentage of persistent infection, and a high frequency

  13. A proposal to reduce the risk of transmission of human papilloma virus via transvaginal ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Combs, C Andrew; Fishman, Alan

    2016-07-01

    Three steps must be followed to prevent the transmission of infection via a contaminated transvaginal ultrasound probe: cleaning the probe after every use, high-level disinfection, and covering the probe with a single-use barrier during the examination. There may be critical flaws in at least 2 of these steps as they are currently practiced. First, 2 widely used disinfectants, glutaraldehyde and orthophthalaldehyde, have recently been found to be ineffective at neutralizing human papilloma virus type 16 and type 18. Second, commercial ultrasound probe covers have an unacceptable rate of leakage (8-81%) compared to condoms (0.9-2%). We recommend the use of a sonicated hydrogen peroxide disinfectant system rather than aldehyde-type disinfectants. We recommend that the probe be covered with a condom rather than a commercial probe cover during transvaginal ultrasound examination. Combined with probe cleaning, these 2 steps are estimated to result in an 800 million- to 250 billion-fold reduction in human papilloma virus viral load, which should translate to greatly enhanced patient safety.

  14. No evidence for infection of UK prostate cancer patients with XMRV, BK virus, Trichomonas vaginalis or human papilloma viruses.

    PubMed

    Groom, Harriet C T; Warren, Anne Y; Neal, David E; Bishop, Kate N

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of specific infections in UK prostate cancer patients was investigated. Serum from 84 patients and 62 controls was tested for neutralisation of xenotropic murine leukaemia virus-related virus (XMRV) Envelope. No reactivity was found in the patient samples. In addition, a further 100 prostate DNA samples were tested for XMRV, BK virus, Trichomonas vaginalis and human papilloma viruses by nucleic acid detection techniques. Despite demonstrating DNA integrity and assay sensitivity, we failed to detect the presence of any of these agents in DNA samples, bar one sample that was weakly positive for HPV16. Therefore we conclude that these infections are absent in this typical cohort of men with prostate cancer.

  15. Prevalence of human papilloma virus and human herpes virus types 1-7 in human nasal polyposis.

    PubMed

    Zaravinos, Apostolos; Bizakis, John; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2009-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of human papilloma virus (HPV), herpes simplex virus-1/-2 (HSV-1/-2), varicella-zoster virus (VZV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and human herpes virus-6/-7 (HHV-6/-7) in 23 human nasal polyps by applying PCR. Two types of control tissues were used: adjacent inferior/middle turbinates from the patients and inferior/middle turbinates from 13 patients undergoing nasal corrective surgery. EBV was the virus most frequently detected (35%), followed by HPV (13%), HSV-1 (9%), and CMV (4%). The CMV-positive polyp was simultaneously positive for HSV-1. HPV was also detected in the adjacent turbinates (4%) and the adjacent middle turbinate (4%) of one of the HPV-positive patients. EBV, HSV, and CMV were not detected in the adjacent turbinates of the EBV-, HSV- or CMV-positive patients. All mucosae were negative for the VZV, HHV-6, and HHV-7. This is the first study to deal with the involvement of a comparable group of viruses in human nasal polyposis. The findings support the theory that the presence of viral EBV markedly influences the pathogenesis of these benign nasal tumors. The low incidence of HPV detected confirms the hypothesis that HPV is correlated with infectious mucosal lesions to a lesser extent than it is with proliferative lesions, such as inverted papilloma. The low incidence of HSV-1 and CMV confirms that these two herpes viruses may play a minor role in the development of nasal polyposis. Double infection with HSV-1 and CMV may also play a minor, though causative, role in nasal polyp development. VZV and HHV-6/-7 do not appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of these mucosal lesions.

  16. Human papilloma virus (HPV) antigens and local immunologic reactivity in oral squamous cell tumors and hyperplasias.

    PubMed

    Syrjänen, K; Happonen, R P; Syrjänen, S; Calonius, B

    1984-08-01

    A series of 191 oral mucosal tumors including those with suspected HPV (Human Papilloma Virus) etiology; squamous cell papilloma (SQP), condyloma acuminatum (CA), focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH), as well as those regarded as unrelated to HPV; fibrous hyperplasia (FH), papillary hyperplasia (PH), and true fibroma (TF), were analyzed for HPV structural proteins (by indirect immunoperoxidase IP-PAP technique), for the presence of epithelial dysplasia, and for the cellular composition (B and T lymphocytes, mononuclear phagocytes, (MPS cells] of their local inflammatory cell infiltrates using ANAE-(acid alpha-naphthyl acetate esterase) stain. HPV structural proteins were disclosed in 85% of FEH, in 75% of CA, and in 41% of SQP. These three lesions significantly differed from PH and FH with regard to the intensity and cellular composition of the local infiltrates, being most intense and B cell predominated in the latter two. Mild dysplasia was found in 20% of both CA and SQP lesions, the former also showing moderate dysplasia in 12% of cases. The HPV antigen positivity was negatively correlated with dysplasia in CA and SQP, the intensity of the infiltrate showing positive association with dysplasia. The results are discussed in terms of HPV etiology of CA, SQP and FEH, of the host immunologic reactivity against these lesions, as well as of the possible role of HPV in human squamous cell carcinogenesis.

  17. Human Papilloma Virus in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma - The Enigma Unravelled.

    PubMed

    Khot, Komal P; Deshmane, Swati; Choudhari, Sheetal

    2016-03-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) has long been regarded as a disease entity having a remarkable incidence worldwide and a fairly onerous prognosis; thus encouraging further research on factors that might modify disease outcome. Squamous cell carcinomas encompass at least 90% of all oral malignancies. Several factors like tobacco and tobacco-related products, alcohol, genetic predisposition and hormonal factors are suspected as possible causative factors. Human papilloma virus (HPV), the causal agent of cervical cancer also appears to be involved in the aetiology of oral and oropharyngeal cancer. HPVpositive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) seems to differ from HPV-negative SCC. Many questions about the natural history of oral HPV infection remain under investigation. The aim of this review is to highlight the current understanding of HPV-associated oral cancer with an emphasis on its prognosis, detection and management. PMID:26981603

  18. Human papilloma virus strain detection utilising custom-designed oligonucleotide microarrays.

    PubMed

    Ayers, Duncan; Platt, Mark; Javad, Farzad; Day, Philip J R

    2011-01-01

    Within the past 15 years, the utilisation of microarray technology for the detection of specific pathogen strains has increased rapidly. Presently, it is possible to simply purchase a pre-manufactured "off the shelf " oligonucleotide microarray bearing a wide variety of known signature DNA sequences previously identified in the organism being studied. Consequently, a hybridisation analysis may be used to pinpoint which strain/s is present in any given clinical sample. However, there exists a problem if the study necessitates the identification of novel sequences which are not represented in commercially available microarray chips. Ideally, such investigations require an in situ oligonucleotide microarray platform with the capacity to synthesise microarrays bearing probe sequences designed solely by the researcher. This chapter will focus on the employment of the Combimatrix® B3 CustomArray™ for the synthesis of reusable, bespoke microarrays for the purpose of discerning multiple Human Papilloma Virus strains. PMID:20938834

  19. Exploring the link between human papilloma virus and oral and oropharyngeal cancers.

    PubMed

    Khode, Shailesh R; Dwivedi, Raghav C; Rhys-Evans, Peter; Kazi, Rehan

    2014-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma involving the oral cavity (OC) and oropharynx regions are a major cause of morbidity and mortality world-wide. The recent discovery of a strong association between human papilloma virus (HPV) infection and OC and oropharyngeal (OP) cancer has prompted world-wide research into the exact etiology and pathogenesis of these cancers in relation to the HPV. HPV-positive OC/OP cancers generally present at a relatively advanced stage (by virtue of cervical nodal involvement) and are more commonly seen in younger patients without significant exposure to alcohol or tobacco. These factors are implicated in prognosis, regardless of HPV association. In this article, we review the biology and epidemiology, risk factors, association, molecular analyses, treatment response and prognosis of HPV-related cancers. Role of HPV vaccination in HPV-related OC/OP cancers has also been discussed.

  20. Metastasis occurring eleven years after diagnosis of human papilloma virus-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ley, Jessica; Wildes, Tanya; El-Mofty, Samir; Adkins, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV)-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is associated with a favourable prognosis, although approximately 20–25% of patients ultimately develop recurrent cancer. Most disease recurrence events appear within 3 years; however, long-term follow-up of reported studies are limited, and the risk of late recurrence is unknown. We present a case report of a patient who developed distant metastases of HPV-related SCC 11 years after initial diagnosis and treatment of HPV-related OPSCC. Late disease recurrence may occur after initial diagnosis of HPV-related OPSCC. This observation has implications on the appropriate duration of follow-up and surveillance of these patients. PMID:25435908

  1. Human papilloma virus vaccine: determinants of acceptability by mothers for adolescents in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ezeanochie, Michael C; Olagbuji, Biodun N

    2014-09-01

    Vaccination of adolescent females against Human Papilloma Virus (HPV), the causative agent for cervical cancer has recently become available. As minors, parental acceptance of the vaccines for adolescent daughters requires exploration. This was a cross-sectional survey of 201 mothers attending the gynaecology clinic in a University Teaching Hospital in Nigeria on acceptability of the HPV vaccines and its determinants. Although 70% accepted vaccination of their daughters, 30% were unwilling and the commonest reason for unwillingness was that it may encourage sexual promiscuity (62.3%). Mothers with poor knowledge of STI were significantly more unwilling to accept HPV vaccines compared to those with average or good knowledge (p = 0.002). Furthermore, perception of susceptibility to HPV infection by daughters was significantly associated with acceptance of the vaccines (p = 0.0001). Increased advocacy and public enlightenment on cervical cancer control and the role of HPV vaccines in its prevention is still necessary especially in developing countries. PMID:25438520

  2. Determination of knowledge of Turkish midwifery students about human papilloma virus infection and its vaccines.

    PubMed

    Genc, Rabia Ekti; Sarican, Emine Serap; Turgay, Ayse San; Icke, Sibel; Sari, Dilek; Saydam, Birsen Karaca

    2013-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) is one of the most common sexually transmitted agents and its infection is the most established cause of cervical cancer. Midwives play a key position in the implementation of cervical cancer. This descriptive study aimed to determine the level of knowledge concerning HPV and HPV vaccination among 268 midwifery students. Data were collected between November 15 and 30, 2011, through a self-reported questionnaire. The mean age of participants was 20.75 ± 1.60. Among all students, 44.4% had heard of HPV, while 40.4% had heard of HPV vaccinatiob. The relationship between the midwifery student knowledge on HPV and HPV vaccine and their current educational year was significant (p=0.001). In conclusion midwifery students have moderate level of knowledge about HPV and its vaccine and relevant information should be included in their teaching curriculum. PMID:24377604

  3. Respiratory papillomas

    PubMed Central

    Alagusundaramoorthy, Sayee Sundar; Agrawal, Abhinav

    2016-01-01

    Papillomas are known to occur in the lower respiratory tract. They are however, rare compared to their occurrence in the upper respiratory tract. These are generally exophytic tumors in the more proximal upper airways however cases with more distal location with an inverted growth pattern have also been described in the literature. These can be solitary or multiple and multifocality associated with multiple papillomas in the upper respiratory/aerodigestive tract. The four major types of respiratory papillomas are (1) Recurrent respiratory papillomas, (2) solitary squamous papillomas, (3) solitary glandular papillomas, (4) mixed papillomas. We review the incidence, etiopathology, diagnosis, and possible treatment modalities and algorithms for these respiratory papillomas.

  4. Respiratory papillomas.

    PubMed

    Alagusundaramoorthy, Sayee Sundar; Agrawal, Abhinav

    2016-01-01

    Papillomas are known to occur in the lower respiratory tract. They are however, rare compared to their occurrence in the upper respiratory tract. These are generally exophytic tumors in the more proximal upper airways however cases with more distal location with an inverted growth pattern have also been described in the literature. These can be solitary or multiple and multifocality associated with multiple papillomas in the upper respiratory/aerodigestive tract. The four major types of respiratory papillomas are (1) Recurrent respiratory papillomas, (2) solitary squamous papillomas, (3) solitary glandular papillomas, (4) mixed papillomas. We review the incidence, etiopathology, diagnosis, and possible treatment modalities and algorithms for these respiratory papillomas.

  5. Respiratory papillomas

    PubMed Central

    Alagusundaramoorthy, Sayee Sundar; Agrawal, Abhinav

    2016-01-01

    Papillomas are known to occur in the lower respiratory tract. They are however, rare compared to their occurrence in the upper respiratory tract. These are generally exophytic tumors in the more proximal upper airways however cases with more distal location with an inverted growth pattern have also been described in the literature. These can be solitary or multiple and multifocality associated with multiple papillomas in the upper respiratory/aerodigestive tract. The four major types of respiratory papillomas are (1) Recurrent respiratory papillomas, (2) solitary squamous papillomas, (3) solitary glandular papillomas, (4) mixed papillomas. We review the incidence, etiopathology, diagnosis, and possible treatment modalities and algorithms for these respiratory papillomas. PMID:27625447

  6. A recombinant vaccinia virus containing the papilloma E2 protein promotes tumor regression by stimulating macrophage antibody-dependent cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Rosales, C; Graham, V V; Rosas, G A; Merchant, H; Rosales, R

    2000-09-01

    Human papillomavirus infection is associated with cervical cancer. The E6 and E7 papillomavirus proteins are normally required for the maintenance of the malignant phenotype. Expression of these proteins in infected cells is negatively regulated by the binding of the papilloma E2 protein to the long terminal control region of the papilloma virus genome. The E2 protein can also promote cell arrest and apoptosis in HeLa cells. Therefore, it is clear that this protein has the potential of inhibiting the malignant phenotype. Because, anticancer vaccines based in vaccinia viruses have recently been shown to be an effective way to treat and to eradicate tumors, a recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the E2 gene of bovine papilloma virus (Modified Vaccinia Ankara, MVA E2) was created, to explore further the antitumor potential of the E2 protein. A series of rabbits, containing the VX2 transplantable papilloma carcinoma, were treated with MVA E2. An impressive tumor regression, up to a complete disappearance of tumor, was observed in most animals (80%). In contrast, very little or no regression was detected if the normal vaccinia virus was used. Lymphocytes isolated from MVA E2-treated rabbits did not show cytotoxic activity against tumor cells. However, in these animals a humoral immune response against tumor cells was observed. These antitumor antibodies were capable of activating macrophages to destroy tumor cells efficiently. These data indicate that injecting the MVA E2 recombinant vaccinia virus directly into the tumor results in a robust and long-lasting tumor regression. Data also suggest that antitumor antibodies are responsible, at least in part, for eliminating tumors by activating macrophage antibody-dependent cytotoxicity.

  7. Effective nonvaccine interventions to be considered alongside human papilloma virus vaccine delivery.

    PubMed

    Hindin, Michelle J; Bloem, Paul; Ferguson, Jane

    2015-01-01

    World Health Organization recommends that girls, ages 9-13 years, get the human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine. Global Alliance for Vaccines Initiative, which provides low-cost vaccine to eligible countries, requires that an additional intervention to be offered alongside the vaccine. We systematically searched and assessed the published literature in lower- and middle-income countries to identify effective interventions. We conducted systematic searches of four databases: PubMed, EMBASE, Global Index Medicus Regional Databases, and Cochrane Reviews for effective adolescent health interventions that could be delivered with the HPV vaccine in the following areas: (1) iron and folic acid supplementation (iron alone or with folic acid); (2) voucher delivery and cash transfer programs; (3) hand washing and soap provision; (4) vision screening; (5) promotion of physical activity/exercise; (6) menstrual hygiene education; (7) sexual and reproductive health education; (8) human immunodeficiency virus prevention activities; and (9) condom promotion, condom use skill building, and demonstration. We found limited evidence of consistent positive impact. Iron supplementation reduced iron-deficiency anemia and raised serum ferritin levels. Promotion of physical activity lowered blood pressure and reduced weight gain. Sexual and reproductive health and human immunodeficiency virus interventions improved adolescent communication with adults but did not influence behavioral outcomes. Countries should consider locally relevant and proven interventions to be offered alongside the HPV vaccine.

  8. The role of human papilloma virus in lung cancer: a review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Rezazadeh, Arash; Laber, Damian A; Ghim, Shin-Je; Jenson, Alfred Ben; Kloecker, Goetz

    2009-07-01

    Papillomaviruses are small nonenveloped DNA viruses that infect squamous epithelial cells. These viruses have been found in many organisms. Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) give rise to a large spectrum of epithelial lesions, mainly benign hyperplasia (eg, warts and papillomas) with low malignant potential. There is a subgroup of HPV, the "high-risk" HPV, which is associated with precancerous and cancerous lesions. A small fraction of people infected with high-risk HPV will develop cancers that usually arise many years after the initial infection (Psyrri and Dimaio, Nat Clin Pract Oncol. 2008;5:24-31). Nonsmall cell lung cancer is a heterogeneous disease. The most common histologic subtypes include squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, and large cell carcinoma. Despite different histologies, nonsmall cell lung cancers are often classified together because of similarities in approach and management of the disease. In this article, we reviewed the current literature on lung cancer and HPV. On the basis of this data, we suggested a possible mechanism of carcinogenesis induced by HPV.

  9. Periodontal pocket as a potential reservoir of high risk human papilloma virus: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Dayakar, Manjunath Mundoor; Shipilova, Anna; Gupta, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Human papilloma viruses (HPVs) are small DNA viruses that have been identified in periodontal pocket as well as gingival sulcus. High risk HPVs are also associated with a subset of head and neck carcinomas. HPV detection in periodontium has previously involved DNA detection. This study attempts to: (a) Detect the presence or absence of high risk HPV in marginal periodontiun by identifying E6/E7 messenger RNA (mRNA) in cells from samples obtained by periodontal pocket scraping. (b) Detect the percentage of HPV E6/E7 mRNA in cells of pocket scrapings, which is responsible for producing oncoproteins E6 and E7. Materials and Methods: Pocket scrapings from the periodontal pockets of eight subjects with generalized chronic periodontitis were taken the detection of presence or absence of E6, E7 mRNA was performed using in situ hybridization and flow cytometry. Results: HPV E6/E7 mRNA was detected in four of the eight samples. Conclusion: Presence of high risk human papillomaviruses in periodontal pockets patients of diagnosed with chronic periodontitis, not suffering from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in the present day could link periodontitis to HPV related squamous cell carcinoma. Prevalence studies are needed detecting the presence of HPV in marginal periodontium as well as prospective studies of HPV positive periodontitis patients are required to explore this possible link. PMID:27143823

  10. DETECTION OF HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUS IN HEAD AND NECK SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMAS: A LITERATURE REVIEW.

    PubMed

    Jelihovschi, I; Bidescu, Aida Corina; Tucaliuc, Simona Elena; Iancu, Luminiţa Smaranda

    2015-01-01

    Human papilloma viruses (HPV) are the most common sexually transmitted viruses. There is mounting evidence that incriminates HPV as a risk factor for malignant transformation of oropharyngeal epithelium. In 2011 the International Research Agency of Cancer and National Cancer Institute (USA) declared HPV-16 as an independent risk factor for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). Leaders in the field of HPV research admit that this subtype of head and neck cancer is a sexually transmitted entity and its global incidence is on the rise. In the 1980s, clinicians observed a new group of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) independent of tobacco smoking or alcohol use. The new HNSCC patient is a middle-aged man, non-smoker, non-drinker with higher social status and the suspected risk factors for HNSCC being related to sexual practices (oral sex, multiple sexual partners, unprotected sex and drug use). Routine HPV testing of HNSCC patients is seriously considered as HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancers comprise a distinct molecular, clinical and pathologic entity that has a markedly better prognosis than HPV-negative oropharyngeal cancers. The current treatment protocols for OPSCC include radiation, chemotherapy and surgery alone or in combination, involving high toxicity levels. Future therapeutic concepts for OPSCC may be personalized in relation to HPV-status to avoid unnecessary toxicity. The current review summarizes the contemporary trends in the diagnosis of HPV-related head and neck cancers, presenting the advantages and disadvantages of the main methods.

  11. [Human papilloma viruses: other risk factor of head and neck carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Woto-Gaye, G; M'Farrej, M K; Doh, K; Thiam, I; Touré, S; Diop, R; Dial, C

    2016-08-01

    Head and neck carcinoma (HNC) occupy the sixth place as the most frequent type of cancer worldwide. Next to alcohol and tobacco intoxication, other risk factors (RF) are suspected, including the human papilloma viruses (HPVs). The aim of this study was to highlight the prevalence of HPVs and histo-epidemiological characteristics of HNC HPV+ in Senegal. This is a prospective, multicenter preliminary study of 18 months (January 1, 2012-June 30, 2014). The cases of HNC histologically confirmed in Senegal were then sent to the bio-pathology department of the Curie Institute in Paris to search HPVs. In the 90 included cases, the PCR technique was successful in 54 cases (60%). HPVs were found in seven cases, that is, a prevalence of 13%. HPVs were associated with 5 cases of hypopharyngeal carcinoma and 2 cases of carcinoma of the oral cavity. Patients with HNC HPV+ had a median age of 42 years against 49 years for HPV-patients. Three patients (42.8%) with HPV+ carcinomas were smokers. Of the 47 HPV-patients, 40 patients (87.1%) had alcohol intoxication and/or smoking. The concept of oral sex was refuted by all our patients. Squamous cell carcinoma was the only histological type found. HPV+ cell carcinoma showed no specific histological appearance. HPVs are another certain RF of HNC in Senegal. The major therapeutic and prognostic impact of HPVinduced cancers requires the systematic search of the viruses by the PCR technique.

  12. Sensitivity of cervical carcinoma cells to vesicular stomatitis virus-induced oncolysis: potential role of human papilloma virus infection.

    PubMed

    Le Boeuf, Fabrice; Niknejad, Nima; Wang, Jiahu; Auer, Rebecca; Weberpals, Johanne I; Bell, John C; Dimitroulakos, Jim

    2012-08-01

    High-risk carcinogenic subtypes of human papilloma virus (HPV) are associated with the development of squamous cell carcinomas of the cervix (CC) and a subset of head and neck (HNSCC). Recurrent metastatic diseases of these sites display a dismal prognosis. Therefore, there is an urgent need to uncover innovative therapeutic strategies in this clinical setting. Oncolytic viruses, including vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), were identified due to their ability to specifically target tumor cells that generally display defects in interferon (IFN) signaling. HPV expressed proteins can inhibit IFN signaling; therefore, HPV-infected cells may be particularly sensitive to VSV oncolysis. In this study, we evaluated the sensitivity of four CC (HPV+) and four HNSCC (HPV-) derived cell lines to VSV oncolysis. Interestingly, the CC cell lines were consistently more sensitive to VSV cytotoxicity than the HNSCC cell lines tested. Exogenous IFN addition or infection with two attenuated VSV variants that are more susceptible to IFN inhibition failed to attenuate VSV oncolysis in hypersensitive CC cell lines. Furthermore, the expression of HPV-E6, that inhibits IFN receptor signaling, in the VSV-resistant HNSCC cell line SCC25 attenuated VSV-induced IFN response and significantly enhanced VSV cytotoxicity. Finally, differential VSV infection and replication was confirmed in xenograft murine tumor models and explant tumor tissues from two patients with CC. Taken together, these results demonstrate that HPV-infected cells are susceptible to oncolytic virus therapy and that this approach may represent a novel therapeutic approach in HPV positive CC and HNSCC patients.

  13. Hepatitis C virus genotypes in Myanmar

    PubMed Central

    Win, Nan Nwe; Kanda, Tatsuo; Nakamoto, Shingo; Yokosuka, Osamu; Shirasawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Myanmar is adjacent to India, Bangladesh, Thailand, Laos and China. In Myanmar, the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is 2%, and HCV infection accounts for 25% of hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, we reviewed the prevalence of HCV genotypes in Myanmar. HCV genotypes 1, 3 and 6 were observed in volunteer blood donors in and around the Myanmar city of Yangon. Although there are several reports of HCV genotype 6 and its variants in Myanmar, the distribution of the HCV genotypes has not been well documented in areas other than Yangon. Previous studies showed that treatment with peginterferon and a weight-based dose of ribavirin for 24 or 48 wk could lead to an 80%-100% sustained virological response (SVR) rates in Myanmar. Current interferon-free treatments could lead to higher SVR rates (90%-95%) in patients infected with almost all HCV genotypes other than HCV genotype 3. In an era of heavy reliance on direct-acting antivirals against HCV, there is an increasing need to measure HCV genotypes, and this need will also increase specifically in Myanmar. Current available information of HCV genotypes were mostly from Yangon and other countries than Myanmar. The prevalence of HCV genotypes in Myanmar should be determined. PMID:27468202

  14. Human Papilloma Virus Infection in Patients with Male Accessory Gland Infection: Usefulness of the Ultrasound Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Condorelli, Rosita A.; Vicari, Enzo; Mongioi, Laura M.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the ultrasound (US) features of 20 patients with MAGI and concomitant papilloma virus (HPV) infection compared to 20 patients with microbial (presence of Chlamydia trachomatis alone) MAGI and 20 patients with amicrobial (inflammatory) MAGI. Patients with HPV infection showed significantly (p < 0.05) higher total prostate, seminal vesicles, and epididymal US signs (18.0 ± 2.0) compared to the other 2 groups (12.0 ± 4.0 versus 10.0 ± 3.0, resp.). In addition, patients with MAGI and HPV had a higher prevalence of complicated forms of MAGI [prostatovesiculitis (PV) and prostate-vesiculo-epididymitis (PVE)] and a higher frequency of the fibrosclerotic variant compared to the other groups (70.0 ± 10.0% versus 48.0 ± 5.0% versus 15.0 ± 10.0%). Moreover, HPV infected patients had a higher number of US criteria suggestive for MAGI in the periurethral region of the prostate compared to the other groups. In particular, the patients showed a higher ratio between periurethral and lobar US criteria distribution (5.0 versus 0.5). Finally, the seminal fluid concentration of CD45pos leukocytes (2.0 ± 0.2 versus 1.3 ± 0.3 versus 1.0 ± 0.3 mil/mL) was significantly higher and sperm progressive motility was significantly lower in these patients compared to other groups. PMID:27242899

  15. Expectation prior to human papilloma virus vaccination: 11 to 12-Year-old girls' written narratives.

    PubMed

    Forsner, M; Nilsson, S; Finnström, B; Mörelius, E

    2016-09-01

    Expectations prior to needle-related procedures can influence individuals' decision making and compliance with immunization programmes. To protect from human papilloma virus (HPV) and cervical cancer, the immunization needs to be given before sexual debut raising interest for this study's aim to investigate how 11 to 12-year-old girls narrate about their expectations prior to HPV vaccination. A total of 27 girls aged 11 to 12 years participated in this qualitative narrative study by writing short narratives describing their expectations. The requirement for inclusion was to have accepted HPV vaccination. Data were subjected to qualitative content analysis. Findings showed the following expectations: going to hurt, going to be scared and going to turn out fine. The expectations were based on the girls' previous experiences, knowledge and self-image. The latent content revealed that the girls tried to transform uneasiness to confidence. The conclusion drawn from this study is that most girls of this age seem confident about their ability to cope with possible unpleasantness related to vaccinations. However, nurses need to find strategies to help those children who feel uneasy about needle-related procedures. PMID:26311482

  16. High-risk human papilloma virus in archival tissues of oral pathosis and normal oral mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Dhanapal, Raghu; Ranganathan, K.; Kondaiah, Paturu; Devi, R. Uma; Joshua, Elizabeth; Saraswathi, T. R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Oral cancer ranks third among all cancers in the Indian population. Human papilloma virus (HPV) plays a significant role in oral carcinogenesis. Population-based subtype variations are present in the HPV prevalence. This study gives an emphasis on the parameters to be considered in formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissues for polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based research work. Materials and Methods: Cross-sectional study on archival paraffin-embedded tissue samples of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), epithelial dysplasia, and normal oral mucosa surrounding impacted tooth was amplified by PCR for the E6 gene of HPV type 16 and E1 gene of HPV type 18. Results: HPV 18 was positive in three OSCC cases. There was no statistically significant association of the positivity of HPV with the age, gender or habit. The HPV positive patients had a tobacco habit and were of a younger age group. Conclusion: The presence of HPV in carcinomatous tissue highlights the possible role of HPV in carcinogenesis and archival paraffin embedded tissue specimen can be used for this analysis. Recent studies on genomic analyses have highlighted that the HPV positive tumors are a separate subgroup based on genomic sequencing. The results of a larger retrospective study will help further in our understanding of the role of HPV in carcinogenesis, this study could form the baseline for such follow-up studies. PMID:26097346

  17. MicroRNAs as new biomarkers for human papilloma virus related head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuhan; Wang, Jie; Huang, Yuanshuai

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck cancers are the sixth most common cancer in the world and the predominant type of which consist of squamous cell carcinomas (head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, HNSCC). Besides tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption, human papilloma virus (HPV) infection is the third leading cause of the occurrence of HNSCC. The presence of HPV is a distinct group of head and neck cancers exhibiting epidemiological, histopathological, clinical and prognostic differences opposed to the typical HNSCC. HPV positive HNSCC normally have a favorable prognosis compared with HPV negative HNSCC, so biomarkers suitable for the early detection of HPV positive HNSCC should be developed urgently to improve patient outcomes. HPV DNA screening is sensitive, but probably not useful because of the high prevalence of oral HPV and low risk of HNSCC. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) constitute a class of small non-coding RNAs that act as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Since miRNAs have a role in the cancer development and HPV status may affect the miRNAs expression pattern in HNSCC, the specific of miRNAs' expression in HPV positive HNSCC may expound the role of HPV in HNSCC and be new biomarkers for the early detection of HNSCC. More excitingly, saliva as proximal biofluid in the context of HNSCC contains a good deal of miRNAs. These miRNAs are stabile and may be suitable for noninvasive biomarkers of HNSCC.

  18. Human papilloma virus DNAs immortalize normal human mammary epithelial cells and reduce their growth factor requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Band, V.; Zajchowski, D.; Kulesa, V.; Sager, R. )

    1990-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) types 16 and 18 are most commonly associated with cervical carcinoma in patients and induce immortalization of human keratinocytes in culture. HPV has not been associated with breast cancer. This report describes the immortalization of normal human mammary epithelial cells (76N) by plasmid pHPV18 or pHPV16, each containing the linearized viral genome. Transfectants were grown continuously for more than 60 passages, whereas 76N cells senesce after 18-20 passages. The transfectants also differ from 76N cells in cloning in a completely defined medium called D2 and growing a minimally supplemented defined medium (D3) containing epidermal growth factor. All transfectant tested contain integrated HPV DNA, express HPV RNA, and produce HPV E7 protein. HPV transfectants do not form tumors in a nude mouse assay. It is concluded that products of the HPV genome induce immortalization of human breast epithelial cells and reduce their growth factor requirements. This result raises the possibility that HPV might be involved in breast cancer. Furthermore, other tissue-specific primary epithelial cells that are presently difficult to grown and investigate may also be immortalized by HPV.

  19. miRNAs in human papilloma virus associated oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Carolina; Calvopiña, Diego; Punyadeera, Chamindie

    2014-11-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common cancer in the world with 600,000 new cases diagnosed annually. Tobacco and alcohol use have been associated as the principal etiological factors of this pathogenesis. The incidence of smoking-associated HNSCC has declined, while human papilloma virus (HPV)-associated HNSCC is on the rise. There are currently no clinically validated biomarkers to detect this cancer at an early stage (cancers independent of HPV status). It is well-established that the aberrant expression of miRNAs can lead to tumorigenesis. miRNA expression differences have also been demonstrated in HPV-positive and HPV-negative HNSCC tumor tissues as well as in body fluids. Therefore, miRNAs have the potential to provide an unprecedented insight into the pathogenesis of HNSCC and serve as potential biomarkers. This review addresses HNSCC disease burden and the regulation of miRNA by HPV viral oncoproteins, potential miRNA biomarkers and future perspectives. miRNA provides an unique opportunity to fulfill the current clinical challenge in HNSCC patient management by enabling early detection followed by targeted interventions, leading to a significant reduction in mortality and morbidity.

  20. [Clinical usefulness of diagnostic methods for human papilloma virus dependent lesions].

    PubMed

    Suwalska, Anna; Owczarek, Witold; Fiedor, Piotr

    2014-02-01

    Persistent infection of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is confirmed necessary factor for development of cervical cancer and anogenital neoplasia. DNA HPV is detected in 96% of cervical cancer, 40% of vulvar and vaginal cancer, 90% of anal cancer and 26% of oral cavity cancer cases in general population. The most common high-risk HPV types observed in anogenital intraepithelial neoplasia or anogenital cancer are HPV 16, 18 and 45. Numerous diagnostic methods of detection of HPV infection and lesions causes by persistent HPV infection are widely used. Epidemiological data reveals correlation of incidence and mortality reduction due to cervical cancer and consequent prosecution and improvement of screening programmes based on morphological assessment of exfoliative smears. In last decade some limitations of conventional smear method were pointed out and a new diagnostic techniques were introduced: liquid-based cytology and HPV DNA testing. Combination of cytological examination and HPV DNA testing seems to be optimal solution to be introduced in large population because of combining high sensitivity of molecular test with high specificity of cytological smear. PMID:24720112

  1. Perceptions of Nigerian Women about Human Papilloma Virus, Cervical Cancer, and HPV Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Akanbi, Olusola Anuoluwapo; Iyanda, Abiodun; Osundare, Folakemi; Opaleye, Oluyinka Oladele

    2015-01-01

    Background. Cervical cancer caused by human papilloma virus (HPV) though preventable has claimed the lives of many women worldwide. This study was embarked upon to evaluate the general knowledge and perceptions of Nigerian women on HPV, cervical cancer, and HPV vaccine. Methods. Structured questionnaires were administered to a cross section of 737 women randomly selected from the general population in two southwestern States of Nigeria. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS computer software version 16. A P value >0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results. One hundred and seventy-six (23.9%) of the respondents had knowledge of HPV; 474 (64.3%) are aware of cervical cancer but only 136 (18.5%) know that HPV causes cervical cancer. 200 (27.1%) are aware that there is an HPV vaccine while 300 (40.7%) had knowledge of Pap smear test. Two hundred and sixty (35.3%) of the respondents know that early detection of HPV can prevent cervical cancer and in spite of this, only 110 (14.9%) have taken the Pap smear test before while 151 (20.5%) are not willing to go for the test at all. Conclusions. There is therefore the need to create proper awareness on the HPV and its possible consequence of cervical carcinoma. PMID:26550522

  2. The Prevalence of Human Papilloma Virus in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Noori, Sadat; Monabati, Ahmad; Ghaderi, Abbasali

    2012-01-01

    Background: Carcinomas of esophagus, mostly squamous cell carcinomas, occur throughout the world. There are a number of suspected genetic or environmental etiologies. Human papilloma virus (HPV) is said to be a major etiology in areas with high incidence of esophageal carcinoma, while it is hardly detectable in low incidence regions. This study was designed to evaluate the prevalence of HPV in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cases diagnosed in Pathology Department, Medical School, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: DNA material for PCR amplification of HPV genome was extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue blocks of 92 cases of ESCC, diagnosed during 20 years from 1982 to 2002. Polymerase chain reaction was performed for amplification and detection of common HPV and type specific HPV-16 and HPV-18 genomic sequences in the presence of positive control (HPV-18 and HPV positive biopsies of uterine exocervix) and additional internal controls i.e. beta-globin and cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA4). Result: Good amplification of positive control and internal controls was observed. However, no amplification of HPV genome was observed. Conclusion: There is no association between HPV infection and the development of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in the cases evaluated. PMID:23115442

  3. Acceptability of the human papilloma virus vaccine among Moroccan parents: a population-based crosssectional study.

    PubMed

    Selmouni, F; Zidouh, A; Nejjari, C; Bekkali, R

    2015-08-01

    Data about the public's awareness and acceptability of the human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine are lacking in the Eastern Mediterranean Region. This study aimed to explore parental acceptability of HPV vaccination for their daughters in Morocco. A cross-sectional survey was carried out among mothers and fathers of girls aged 12-15 years at 12 middle schools from 6 regions of Morocco. Despite weak knowledge of genital warts and HPV infection, acceptability of the HPV vaccine was 76.8% (95% CI: 73.3-79.9%) among mothers and 68.9% (95% CI: 65.2-72.5%) among fathers. Only 8.8% of mothers and 7.0% of fathers were against administration of the HPV vaccine to their daughters. Predictors of parents' acceptance of the HPV vaccine were living in precarious housing/slums and low household income (for mothers) and living in urban areas (for fathers). These results will be useful for preparing the introduction of the HPV vaccine in health ministry programmes. PMID:26446526

  4. Perceptions of Nigerian Women about Human Papilloma Virus, Cervical Cancer, and HPV Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Akanbi, Olusola Anuoluwapo; Iyanda, Abiodun; Osundare, Folakemi; Opaleye, Oluyinka Oladele

    2015-01-01

    Background. Cervical cancer caused by human papilloma virus (HPV) though preventable has claimed the lives of many women worldwide. This study was embarked upon to evaluate the general knowledge and perceptions of Nigerian women on HPV, cervical cancer, and HPV vaccine. Methods. Structured questionnaires were administered to a cross section of 737 women randomly selected from the general population in two southwestern States of Nigeria. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS computer software version 16. A P value >0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results. One hundred and seventy-six (23.9%) of the respondents had knowledge of HPV; 474 (64.3%) are aware of cervical cancer but only 136 (18.5%) know that HPV causes cervical cancer. 200 (27.1%) are aware that there is an HPV vaccine while 300 (40.7%) had knowledge of Pap smear test. Two hundred and sixty (35.3%) of the respondents know that early detection of HPV can prevent cervical cancer and in spite of this, only 110 (14.9%) have taken the Pap smear test before while 151 (20.5%) are not willing to go for the test at all. Conclusions. There is therefore the need to create proper awareness on the HPV and its possible consequence of cervical carcinoma.

  5. [Withdrawal of an advertising campaign to promote the quadrivalent human papilloma virus vaccine in Spain].

    PubMed

    Martín-Llaguno, Marta; Alvarez-Dardet, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    The inclusion of the quadrivalent human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine in the schedule of the Spanish National Health System sparked the debate over Gardasil, which was presented to the public as a "vaccine against cervical cancer". In this context, Sanofi Pasteur MSD was sued for misleading advertising in the campaign "cuentaselo.org". Although the complaint was not admitted, the lawsuit triggered five changes in the ownership of the web domain which, although backed by scientific societies, was not supported by law. Because of the violation of the Law of the Society of Information Services, and prompted by the suspicion that the pharmaceutical company was behind these changes (as it could not advertise the product), the platform for the moratorium on the HPV vaccine filed a complaint against the Spanish Society of Gynecology and Obstetrics (whose logo appeared on the webpage) for breaching the code of advertising self-regulation. Sanofi Pasteur MSD, the advertiser which was not mentioned, "accepted the complaint and removed the webpage", thus corroborating its involvement.

  6. [QUANTITATIVE DNA EVALUATION OF THE HIGH CARCINOGENIC RISK OF HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUSES AND HUMAN HERPES VIRUSES IN MALES WITH FERTILITY DISORDERS].

    PubMed

    Evdokimov, V V; Naumenko, V A; Tulenev, Yu A; Kurilo, L F; Kovalyk, V P; Sorokina, T M; Lebedeva, A L; Gomberg, M A; Kushch, A A

    2016-01-01

    Infertility is an actual medical and social problem. In 50% of couples it is associated with the male factor and in more than 50% of cases the etiology of the infertility remains insufficiently understood. The goal of this work was to study the prevalence and to perform quantitative analysis of the human herpes viruses (HHV) and high carcinogenic risk papilloma viruses (HR HPV) in males with infertility, as well as to assess the impact of these infections on sperm parameters. Ejaculate samples obtained from 196 males fall into 3 groups. Group 1 included men with the infertility of unknown etiology (n = 112); group 2, patients who had female partners with the history of spontaneous abortion (n = 63); group 3 (control), healthy men (n = 21). HHV and HR HPV DNA in the ejaculates were detected in a total of 42/196 (21.4%) males: in 31 and 11 patients in groups 1 and 2, respectively (p > 0.05) and in none of healthy males. HHV were detected in 24/42; HR HPV, in 18/42 males (p > 0.05) without significant difference between the groups. Among HR HPV genotypes of the clade A9 in ejaculate were more frequent (14/18, p = 0.04). Comparative analysis of the sperm parameters showed that in the ejaculates of the infected patients sperm motility as well as the number of morphologically normal cells were significantly reduced compared with the healthy men. The quantification of the viral DNA revealed that in 31% of the male ejaculates the viral load was high: > 3 Ig10/100000 cells. Conclusion. The detection of HHV and HR HPV in the ejaculate is associated with male infertility. Quantification of the viral DNA in the ejaculate is a useful indicator for monitoring viral infections in infertility and for decision to start therapy.

  7. [QUANTITATIVE DNA EVALUATION OF THE HIGH CARCINOGENIC RISK OF HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUSES AND HUMAN HERPES VIRUSES IN MALES WITH FERTILITY DISORDERS].

    PubMed

    Evdokimov, V V; Naumenko, V A; Tulenev, Yu A; Kurilo, L F; Kovalyk, V P; Sorokina, T M; Lebedeva, A L; Gomberg, M A; Kushch, A A

    2016-01-01

    Infertility is an actual medical and social problem. In 50% of couples it is associated with the male factor and in more than 50% of cases the etiology of the infertility remains insufficiently understood. The goal of this work was to study the prevalence and to perform quantitative analysis of the human herpes viruses (HHV) and high carcinogenic risk papilloma viruses (HR HPV) in males with infertility, as well as to assess the impact of these infections on sperm parameters. Ejaculate samples obtained from 196 males fall into 3 groups. Group 1 included men with the infertility of unknown etiology (n = 112); group 2, patients who had female partners with the history of spontaneous abortion (n = 63); group 3 (control), healthy men (n = 21). HHV and HR HPV DNA in the ejaculates were detected in a total of 42/196 (21.4%) males: in 31 and 11 patients in groups 1 and 2, respectively (p > 0.05) and in none of healthy males. HHV were detected in 24/42; HR HPV, in 18/42 males (p > 0.05) without significant difference between the groups. Among HR HPV genotypes of the clade A9 in ejaculate were more frequent (14/18, p = 0.04). Comparative analysis of the sperm parameters showed that in the ejaculates of the infected patients sperm motility as well as the number of morphologically normal cells were significantly reduced compared with the healthy men. The quantification of the viral DNA revealed that in 31% of the male ejaculates the viral load was high: > 3 Ig10/100000 cells. Conclusion. The detection of HHV and HR HPV in the ejaculate is associated with male infertility. Quantification of the viral DNA in the ejaculate is a useful indicator for monitoring viral infections in infertility and for decision to start therapy. PMID:27451497

  8. Potential role of human papilloma virus in the pathogenesis of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Snietura, Miroslaw; Waniczek, Dariusz; Piglowski, Wojciech; Kopec, Agnieszka; Nowakowska-Zajdel, Ewa; Lorenc, Zbigniew; Muc-Wierzgon, Malgorzata

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To demonstrate the presence and biological activity of human papilloma virus (HPV) in gastric cancer (GAC) tissues. METHODS: The study involved 84 surgically treated patients with gastric adenocarcinoma, regardless of the clinical stage of the disease. The presence of HPV DNA of high oncogenic risk types in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor samples was determined using quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. A stringent protocol of prevention of cross- and environmental contamination was applied during DNA isolation, and amplification, as well as confirmation of the biological activity of the virus in tumor cells, was implemented. The study utilized the Real-time High Risk HPV test, which detects the DNA of 14 HPV subtypes that are considered to have high oncogenic potential. The overexpression of the p16INK4a protein assessed immunohistochemically was considered confirmation of the HPV infection. RESULTS: Among the 89 patients initially included in the study group, diagnostic results were obtained for 84 individuals. In five cases, either the histopathological material was too scant to isolate the necessary amount of DNA, or the isolated DNA was significantly degraded, resulting in the failure of internal control amplification within the predefined number of 35 cycles. Those patients were excluded from further analysis. The amplification of HPV DNA was demonstrated in none of the 84 tissue samples; thus, all cases were considered to have a negative DNA status of highly oncogenic HPV subtypes. Immunohistochemical staining provided diagnostic results for all of the examined tissue samples, and excluded the accumulation of the p16INK4a protein in tumor cells, thus confirming the lack of active HPV infection in all of the individuals. CONCLUSION: The study does not confirm the presence or biological activity of HPV in tumor tissues. Thus, the relationship between GAC and HPV infection, in the Central European population seems doubtful. PMID

  9. Intraductal papilloma

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001238.htm Intraductal papilloma To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Intraductal papilloma is a small, noncancerous (benign) tumor that grows ...

  10. Hepatitis C virus genotypes in Tirana, Albania.

    PubMed

    Haldeda, Migena; Baume, Julien; Tamalet, Catherine; Bizhga, Melpomeni; Colson, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a worldwide concern. Knowledge of the HCV genotype is clinically important because it predicts the rate of response to therapy and guides the treatment duration. Moreover, it allows molecular epidemiology to be performed. To our knowledge, the prevalence of HCV genotypes has been assessed only once in Albania, using a line probe genotyping assay. We determined HCV genotypes by population sequencing of HCV-infected patients in Tirana, Albania. HCV genotype and sequence analyses were performed for serum samples collected from January 2011 through May 2012 from 61 HCV-seropositive patients using population sequencing of the NS3 protease gene and alternatively the NS5b gene and the 5' untranslated region (UTR). HCV RNA was retrieved from the blood samples of 50 patients. The HCV NS3 protease gene was sequenced for 28 patients and NS5b and/or 5'UTR fragments were sequenced for an additional 22 patients. The predominant genotype was 1b in 25 patients (50%), followed by genotypes 2c, 4a, 3a, and 1a in 18%, 14%, 8%, and 6% of cases, respectively. Best matches for these HCV RNAs in GenBank were obtained in different countries worldwide. One NS3 protease naturally harbored an amino acid conferring minor drug resistance to newly available HCV protease inhibitors. In conclusion, HCV-1b was predominant in the present Albanian population, as in southeastern Europe.

  11. The L1 protein of human papilloma virus 16 expressed by a fowlpox virus recombinant can assemble into virus-like particles in mammalian cell lines but elicits a non-neutralising humoral response.

    PubMed

    Bissa, Massimiliano; Zanotto, Carlo; Pacchioni, Sole; Volonté, Luca; Venuti, Aldo; Lembo, David; De Giuli Morghen, Carlo; Radaelli, Antonia

    2015-04-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV)-16 is the prevalent genotype associated with cervical tumours. Virus-like-particle (VLP)-based vaccines have proven to be effective in limiting new infections of high-risk HPVs, but their high cost has hampered their use, especially in the poor developing countries. Avipox-based recombinants are replication-restricted to avian species and represent efficient and safe vectors also for immunocompromised hosts, as they can elicit a complete immune response. A new fowlpox virus recombinant encoding HPV-L1 (FPL1) was engineered and evaluated side-by-side with a FP recombinant co-expressing L1 and green fluorescent protein (FPL1GFP) for correct expression of L1 in vitro in different cell lines, as confirmed by Western blotting, immunofluorescence, real-time PCR, and electron microscopy. Mice were also immunised to determine its immunogenicity. Here, we demonstrate that the FPL1 recombinant better expresses L1 in the absence of GFP, correctly assembles structured capsomers into VLPs, and elicits an immune response in a preclinical animal model. To our knowledge, this is the first report of HPV VLPs assembled in eukaryotic cells using an avipox recombinant.

  12. Manipulated microenvironment in human papilloma virus-infected epithelial cells: is the CD40-CD154 pathway beneficial for host or virus?

    PubMed

    Shimauchi, Takatoshi; Piguet, Vincent

    2014-12-01

    In this issue, Tummers et al. (2014) demonstrate that high-risk human papilloma viruses (hrHPVs) attenuate the magnitude of responses to CD40 ligation and the epithelial cells' (ECs) capacity to attract leukocytes. These results suggest that hrHPVs can escape from host immune surveillance by modulating pro-inflammatory responses in infected ECs, resulting in persistent infections and potential carcinogenesis.

  13. Vaccination Against Human Papilloma Viruses Leads to a Favorable Cytokine Profile of Specific T Cells.

    PubMed

    Luckau, Stefanie; Wehrs, Tim P; Brandau, Sven; Horn, Peter A; Lindemann, Monika

    2016-10-01

    Several human papilloma viruses (HPV) are known to cause malignant transformation. The high-risk type HPV 16 is associated with cervical carcinoma and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. HPV 16-positive tumor cells exclusively carry the HPV 16 oncogenes E6 and E7. These oncogenes appear as excellent targets for an adoptive immunotherapy. We here addressed the question whether specific T cells from HPV-vaccinated healthy volunteers could be especially suitable for an HPV-specific cellular immunotherapy. Of note, vaccines contain HPV 16. To quantify HPV 16 E6-specific and E7-specific cells, enzyme-linked immunospot assays to measure interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin-10 (Th1-Th2 balance) and the secretion of the cytotoxic molecules granzyme B and perforin have been optimized. The frequency of peripheral blood mononuclear cells secreting IFN-γ and perforin was significantly (P<0.05) increased in HPV-vaccinated versus nonvaccinated volunteers. Overall, however, the median frequency of HPV 16-specific cells with a favorable secretion profile (Th1 balanced and cytotoxic) was low even in vaccinated volunteers (IFN-γ: 0.0018% and 0.0023%, perforin: 0.01% and 0.0087% for E6-specific and E7-specific cells, respectively). But some vaccinated volunteers showed up to 0.1% HPV-specific, IFN-γ or perforin-secreting cells. In conclusion, our data suggest that vaccinated volunteers are superior to nonvaccinated donors for HPV-specific cellular cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27548034

  14. A Small Molecule Inhibitor Selectively Induces Apoptosis in Cells Transformed by High Risk Human Papilloma Viruses.

    PubMed

    Sheaffer, Amy K; Lee, Min S; Qi, Huilin; Chaniewski, Susan; Zheng, Xiaofan; Farr, Glen A; Esposito, Kim; Harden, David; Lei, Ming; Schweizer, Liang; Friborg, Jacques; Agler, Michele; McPhee, Fiona; Gentles, Robert; Beno, Brett R; Chupak, Lou; Mason, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    A phenotypic high-throughput cell culture screen was performed to identify compounds that prevented proliferation of the human Papilloma virus type 16 (HPV-16) transformed cell line Ca Ski. A series of quinoxaline compounds exemplified by Compound 1 was identified. Testing against a panel of cell lines demonstrated that Compound 1 selectively inhibited replication of all HPV-16, HPV-18, and HPV-31 transformed cell lines tested with 50% Inhibitory Concentration (IC50) values of 2 to 8 μM relative to IC50 values of 28 to 73 μM in HPV-negative cell lines. Treatment with Compound 1 resulted in a cascade of multiple apoptotic events, including selective activation of effector caspases 3 and 7, fragmentation of cellular DNA, and PARP (poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase) cleavage in HPV-positive cells relative to HPV-negative cells. Unregulated proliferation of HPV transformed cells is dependent on the viral oncogenes, E6 and E7. Treatment with Compound 1 resulted in a decrease in HPV E7 protein in Ca Ski cells. However, the timing of this reduction relative to other effects of compound treatment suggests that this was a consequence, rather than a cause, of the apoptotic cascade. Likewise, compound treatment resulted in no obvious effects on the E6- and E7- mediated down regulation of p53 and Rb, or their downstream effectors, p21 or PCNA. Further investigation of apoptotic signals induced by Compound 1 revealed cleavage of Caspase-8 in HPV-positive cells as early as 2 hours post-treatment, suggesting the compound initiates apoptosis through the extrinsic, death receptor-mediated, pathway of cell death. These studies provide proof of concept that cells transformed by oncogenic Papillomaviruses can be selectively induced to undergo apoptosis by compound treatment.

  15. A human papilloma virus type 11 transcript encoding an E1--E4 protein.

    PubMed

    Nasseri, M; Hirochika, R; Broker, T R; Chow, L T

    1987-08-01

    The human papilloma virus (HPV) associated with a genital wart (condyloma acuminatum) was determined to be type 11. The majority of the viral DNA molecules were monomeric circles present in the cells at high copy number, as demonstrated by one- and two-dimensional agarose gell electrophoretic separation followed by Southern blot analysis. A cDNA library in phage lambda gt11 was constructed from poly(A)-selected mRNA recovered from the tissue. Recombinant clones corresponding to the most abundant 1.2-kb viral mRNA species detected by Northern blot hybridization and by electron microscopic analysis of R loops were isolated and their nucleotide sequence was determined. Comparison to the prototype HPV-11 DNA sequence revealed that this message consisted of two exons. The promotor-proximal exon spanned nucleotides 716 through 847 and the distal exon included nucleotides 3325 through 4390 or 4392. The mRNAs were alternatively polyadenylated after either of these latter two sites, in both cases following a G and preceding a U residue. Fourteen or sixteen bases upstream from the poly(A) was the hexanucleotide AGUAAA, which apparently serves as the signal for cleavage and polyadenylation of the nascent message. The splice donor and acceptor sites conformed to the usual /GU. . .AG/pattern. The exons joined open reading frame (ORF) E1, which contributed the initiation codon and four additional triplets, to ORF E4, which specified 85 amino acids to encode a protein of 10,022 Da. The cDNA also contained the ORFs E5a and E5b toward the 3' end. The complete sequence of the cDNA revealed three single-base changes from the prototype HPV-11, two resulting in altered amino acids in E4. Neither affects the coding potential of the overlapping E2 ORF. The function of the E1--E4 protein is unknown. PMID:2887066

  16. A Small Molecule Inhibitor Selectively Induces Apoptosis in Cells Transformed by High Risk Human Papilloma Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min S.; Qi, Huilin; Chaniewski, Susan; Zheng, Xiaofan; Farr, Glen A.; Esposito, Kim; Harden, David; Lei, Ming; Schweizer, Liang; Friborg, Jacques; Agler, Michele; McPhee, Fiona; Gentles, Robert; Beno, Brett R.; Chupak, Lou; Mason, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    A phenotypic high-throughput cell culture screen was performed to identify compounds that prevented proliferation of the human Papilloma virus type 16 (HPV-16) transformed cell line Ca Ski. A series of quinoxaline compounds exemplified by Compound 1 was identified. Testing against a panel of cell lines demonstrated that Compound 1 selectively inhibited replication of all HPV-16, HPV-18, and HPV-31 transformed cell lines tested with 50% Inhibitory Concentration (IC50) values of 2 to 8 μM relative to IC50 values of 28 to 73 μM in HPV-negative cell lines. Treatment with Compound 1 resulted in a cascade of multiple apoptotic events, including selective activation of effector caspases 3 and 7, fragmentation of cellular DNA, and PARP (poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase) cleavage in HPV-positive cells relative to HPV-negative cells. Unregulated proliferation of HPV transformed cells is dependent on the viral oncogenes, E6 and E7. Treatment with Compound 1 resulted in a decrease in HPV E7 protein in Ca Ski cells. However, the timing of this reduction relative to other effects of compound treatment suggests that this was a consequence, rather than a cause, of the apoptotic cascade. Likewise, compound treatment resulted in no obvious effects on the E6- and E7- mediated down regulation of p53 and Rb, or their downstream effectors, p21 or PCNA. Further investigation of apoptotic signals induced by Compound 1 revealed cleavage of Caspase-8 in HPV-positive cells as early as 2 hours post-treatment, suggesting the compound initiates apoptosis through the extrinsic, death receptor-mediated, pathway of cell death. These studies provide proof of concept that cells transformed by oncogenic Papillomaviruses can be selectively induced to undergo apoptosis by compound treatment. PMID:27280728

  17. Detection of human papilloma virus in women referred for colposcopy. A comparison between different diagnostic methods.

    PubMed

    Bodén, E; Evander, M; Wadell, G; Bjersing, L; von Schoultz, B; Rylander, E

    1990-01-01

    Various methods presently available for the diagnosis of genital Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) were compared regarding their sensitivity in women referred for specific diagnosis and treatment because of atypical Pap smears or clinically suspected neoplasia. Colposcopic examination was performed in all cases. In addition to taking a second Pap smear, cell suspensions were made from 105 women and analysed by the Filter In Situ Hybridization (FISH) technique and tested for HPV 6 + 11 and HPV 16 + 18 + 31. The FISH technique was also used for the possible detection of HPV-DNA in a reference material comprising 119 apparently healthy women with normal Pap smears. Colposcopically directed cervical biopsies in altogether 196 specimens were obtained from 155 women for histopathological examination and also for the detection of HPV-DNA by the Southern blot hybridization technique. These specimens were tested for the presence of HPV 6, 11, 16, 18, 31 and 33. Three per cent of the women with and 34% without cytological signs of HPV in Pap smears had cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) III according to histopatology. CIN III was present in 35% of biopsies with and 59% of biopsies without histological signs of HPV in the biopsies. Altogether 46% of the women were HPV-DNA positive. Of the women analysed by Southern blot, 39% were HPV-DNA positive. Of the samples analysed by FISH, 27% with atypical cells were HPV-DNA positive, compared with 11% of the samples from reference women with normal cytology.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2166988

  18. A Small Molecule Inhibitor Selectively Induces Apoptosis in Cells Transformed by High Risk Human Papilloma Viruses.

    PubMed

    Sheaffer, Amy K; Lee, Min S; Qi, Huilin; Chaniewski, Susan; Zheng, Xiaofan; Farr, Glen A; Esposito, Kim; Harden, David; Lei, Ming; Schweizer, Liang; Friborg, Jacques; Agler, Michele; McPhee, Fiona; Gentles, Robert; Beno, Brett R; Chupak, Lou; Mason, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    A phenotypic high-throughput cell culture screen was performed to identify compounds that prevented proliferation of the human Papilloma virus type 16 (HPV-16) transformed cell line Ca Ski. A series of quinoxaline compounds exemplified by Compound 1 was identified. Testing against a panel of cell lines demonstrated that Compound 1 selectively inhibited replication of all HPV-16, HPV-18, and HPV-31 transformed cell lines tested with 50% Inhibitory Concentration (IC50) values of 2 to 8 μM relative to IC50 values of 28 to 73 μM in HPV-negative cell lines. Treatment with Compound 1 resulted in a cascade of multiple apoptotic events, including selective activation of effector caspases 3 and 7, fragmentation of cellular DNA, and PARP (poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase) cleavage in HPV-positive cells relative to HPV-negative cells. Unregulated proliferation of HPV transformed cells is dependent on the viral oncogenes, E6 and E7. Treatment with Compound 1 resulted in a decrease in HPV E7 protein in Ca Ski cells. However, the timing of this reduction relative to other effects of compound treatment suggests that this was a consequence, rather than a cause, of the apoptotic cascade. Likewise, compound treatment resulted in no obvious effects on the E6- and E7- mediated down regulation of p53 and Rb, or their downstream effectors, p21 or PCNA. Further investigation of apoptotic signals induced by Compound 1 revealed cleavage of Caspase-8 in HPV-positive cells as early as 2 hours post-treatment, suggesting the compound initiates apoptosis through the extrinsic, death receptor-mediated, pathway of cell death. These studies provide proof of concept that cells transformed by oncogenic Papillomaviruses can be selectively induced to undergo apoptosis by compound treatment. PMID:27280728

  19. Human Papilloma Virus Awareness Among Hispanic Females with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Acosta, José E; Aponte, Maysabel; Villamil, Irene; Romaguera, Josefina; Ortiz, Ana P; Torres, Esther A

    2016-03-01

    Women with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may be at increased risk of human papilloma virus (HPV) infection and HPV-related malignancies, as many are immunocompromised secondary to the use of immunosuppressant agents. Several studies have addressed the knowledge about cervical cancer risk factors in different populations, particularly HPV infection and its association with cervical malignancies; most of these studies show poor patient knowledge. The purpose of this study is to describe the knowledge of females with IBD about HPV infection and the HPV vaccine. We performed a cross-sectional study in 147 consecutive patients attending the clinics of the University of Puerto Rico Center for IBD from 2009 to 2010. An interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to collect information on demographics, lifestyles, and HPV-related knowledge of participants. Bivariate analysis using the chi-square statistics and Fisher's exact test was used to examine factors associated with HPV awareness. The mean age of participants was 36.6 years (SD = 13.91 years). Three fourth (77 %) of women had awareness of the existence of HPV, and 58 % did know about the existence of HPV vaccines. Among those who had heard about HPV, 79.6 % knew that HPV can cause cervical cancer, and 57.5 % knew that the virus is sexually transmitted. Among those who knew of the vaccine, 75.3 % learned about its existence through the media, while only 15.3 %, through their health-care provider. Only three women within recommended ages (2 %) had been vaccinated against HPV, although 50 % of participants indicated that they would definitely/probably vaccinate against HPV in the future. A significant trend was observed, where more educated women were more likely to have heard of HPV (p for trend = 0.0017). Women who were high school graduates/some college (OR = 6.63, 95 % CI = 1.71-25.66) and those with at least an associate degree (OR = 11.69, 95 % CI = 3.05-45.89) were more likely to

  20. Schneiderian papilloma of the temporal bone

    PubMed Central

    van der Putten, Lisa; Bloemena, Elisabeth; Merkus, Paul; Hensen, Erik F

    2013-01-01

    Temporal bone Schneiderian papilloma may present as a primary tumour originating from the middle ear and mastoid process, or an extension from sinonasal disease. Both forms are rare, this being only the 18th case of primary temporal bone Schneiderian papilloma described to date. Although the current patient has remained disease free after excision of the papilloma, the reported recurrence rate is high, comparable to sinonasal Schneiderian papilloma with extrasinus extension. Malignant progression of primary Schneiderian papillomas is significantly reduced as compared to Schneiderian papillomas that extend from the sinonasal tract into the temporal bone. A positive human papilloma virus status, as found in this case, is a common feature and prognostic factor of sinonasal Schneiderian papilloma but an infrequent finding in temporal bone disease. Owing to the high recurrence rate, the risk of malignant progression and the absence of reliable prognostic markers, stringent follow-up consisting of otoscopy, nasendoscopy and imaging is essential. PMID:24311418

  1. Therapeutic immunisation of rabbits with cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV) virus-like particles (VLP) induces regression of established papillomas

    PubMed Central

    Govan, Vandana A; Rybicki, Edward P; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2008-01-01

    There is overwhelming evidence that persistent infection with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV) is the main risk factor for invasive cancer of the cervix. Due to this global public health burden, two prophylactic HPV L1 virus-like particles (VLP) vaccines have been developed. While these vaccines have demonstrated excellent type-specific prevention of infection by the homologous vaccine types (high and low risk HPV types), no data have been reported on the therapeutic effects in people already infected with the low-risk HPV type. In this study we explored whether regression of CRPV-induced papillomas could be achieved following immunisation of out-bred New Zealand White rabbits with CRPV VLPs. Rabbits immunised with CRPV VLPs had papillomas that were significantly smaller compared to the negative control rabbit group (P ≤ 0.05). This data demonstrates the therapeutic potential of PV VLPs in a well-understood animal model with potential important implications for human therapeutic vaccination for low-risk HPVs. PMID:18355406

  2. Reversal of papilloma growth in rabbits therapeutically vaccinated against E6 with naked DNA and/or vesicular stomatitis virus vectors.

    PubMed

    Brandsma, Janet L; Shlyankevich, Mark; Su, Yuhua; Zelterman, Daniel; Rose, John K; Buonocore, Linda

    2010-12-01

    Persistent infection with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) is the greatest risk factor for the development of HPV-associated cancers. In this study rabbits bearing persistent and potentially malignant papillomas were used to test the efficacy of vaccination with a recombinant DNA and/or vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) targeting the cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV) E6 protein. Immune responses were primed with either vector and boosted twice with the homologous or heterologous E6 vector. Over the course of 18 weeks, E6 vaccination reduced papilloma volumes to one third the volume in the controls, and the rabbits boosted with an heterologous vector tended to mount stronger responses. Small and medium-sized papillomas responded significantly but only slightly better than large papillomas. Finally the initial papilloma burden per rabbit, ranging from <100 mm(3) to >1000 mm(3), was not prognostic of antitumor efficacy. In summary both E6 vaccines elicited significant therapeutic immunity, and their sequential use tended to be advantageous.

  3. Cost-Effectiveness Evaluation of Quadrivalent Human Papilloma Virus Vaccine for HPV-Related Disease in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Khatibi, Mohsen; Rasekh, Hamid Reza; Shahverdi, Zohreh; jamshidi, Hamid Reza

    2014-01-01

    Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccine has been added recently to the Iran Drug List. So, decision makers need information beyond that available from RCTs to recommend funding for this vaccination program to add it to the National Immunization program in Iran. Modeling and economic studies have addressed some of those information needs in foreign countries. In order to determine the long term benefit of this vaccine and impact of vaccine program on the future rate of cervical cancer in Iran, we described a model, based on the available economic and health effects of human papilloma virus (HPV), to estimate the cost-effectiveness of HPV vaccination of 15-year-old girls in Iran. Our objective is to estimate the cost-effectiveness of HPV vaccination in Iran against cervical cancer based on available data; incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) calculations were based on a model comparing a cohort of 15-year-old girls with and without vaccination. We developed a static model based on available data in Iran on the epidemiology of HPV related health outcome. The model compared the cohort of all 15-year old girls alive in the year 2013 with and without vaccination. The cost per QALY, which was found based on our assumption for the vaccination of 15-years old girl to current situation was 439,000,000 Iranian Rial rate (IRR). By considering the key parameters in our sensitivity analysis, value varied from 251,000,000 IRR to 842,000,000 IRR. In conclusion, quadrivalent HPV vaccine (Gardasil) is not cost-effective in Iran based on the base-case parameters value. PMID:24711850

  4. Immunohistochemical demonstration of human papilloma virus (HPV) antigens in oral squamous cell lesions.

    PubMed

    Syrjänen, K J; Pyrhönen, S; Syrjänen, S M; Lamberg, M A

    1983-06-01

    Six oral squamous cell tumours classified as focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH), Condyloma acuminatum (CA) and squamous cell papilloma (SQP) were subjected to indirect immunoperoxidase staining with anti-human papillomavirus (anti-HPV) antiserum to demonstrate the possible presence of HPV antigens in these lesions. The results are discussed in the light of the observations on HPV-lesions elsewhere in the body (in uterine cervix), and a suggestion is made to adopt the name condyloma for all those tumours where HPV aetiology can be established by ultrastructural or immunohistochemical means.

  5. Intraductal papilloma in an axillary lymph node of a patient with human immunodeficiency virus: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Inclusions of ectopic breast tissue in axillary lymph nodes are reported very infrequently and typically are only identified microscopically as an incidental finding. Furthermore the development of a benign proliferative lesion in the form of an intraductal papilloma from intranodal ectopic breast tissue is an extremely rare phenomenon with only three previous cases reported. This report describes an unusual and rare case of an intraductal papilloma arising in an axillary lymph node of a patient known to have the human immunodeficiency virus. Case presentation A 40-year-old Black African woman underwent excision of an enlarged palpable axillary lymph node. In the preceding 7 years she had received at least six separate surgical excisions to her ipsilateral breast for papillomatosis. The last surgical intervention was performed 1 year prior to presentation with an enlarged axillary lymph node. Histological examination of her axillary lymph node revealed a papillomatous proliferative epithelial lesion within an apparent encompassing duct, resembling a mammary intraductal papilloma. In the surrounding lymphoid tissue small groups of duct-like structures were additionally noted. Immunostaining with a panel of myoepithelial markers in conjunction with oestrogen receptor produced a mixed heterogeneous staining pattern in both the papillomatous lesion and the peripheral duct-like structures. This confirmed the diagnosis of a benign intraductal papilloma within an axillary lymph node, considered to have arisen from ectopic breast tissue. Conclusions This case demonstrates that intranodal ectopic breast tissue has the potential to undergo benign proliferative change albeit extremely rarely. Therefore this possibility must be considered to ensure the correct diagnosis is made. In addition, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report which has described recurrent intraductal papillomas and the subsequent development of an intraductal papilloma

  6. Enhancing the Sensitivity of DNA Microarray Using Dye-Doped Silica Nanoparticles: Detection of Human Papilloma Virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enrichi, F.; Riccò, R.; Meneghello, A.; Pierobon, R.; Canton, G.; Cretaio, E.

    2010-10-01

    DNA microarray is a high-throughput technology used for detection and quantification of nucleic acid molecules and others of biological interest. The analysis is based on the specific hybridization between probe sequences deposited in array and a target ss-DNA amplified by PCR and functionalized by a fluorescent dye. Organic labels have well known disadvantages like photobleaching and low signal intensities, which put a limitation to the lower amount of DNA material that can be detected. Therefore for trace analysis the development of more efficient biomarkers is required. With this aim we present in this paper the synthesis and application of alternative hybrid nanosystems obtained by incorporating standard fluorescent molecules into monodisperse silica nanoparticles. Efficient application to the detection of Human Papilloma Virus is demonstrated. This virus is associated to the formation of cervical cancer, a leading cause of death by cancer for women worldwide. It is shown that the use of the novel biomarkers increases the optical signal of about one order of magnitude with respect to the free dyes or quantum dots in conventional instruments. This is due to the high number of molecules that can be accommodated into each nanoparticle, to the reduced photobleaching and to the improved environmental protection of the dyes when encapsulated in the silica matrix. The cheap and easy synthesis of these luminescent particles, the stability in water, the surface functionalizability and bio-compatibility make them very promising for present and future bio-labeling and bio-imaging applications.

  7. Characterization of hepatitis B virus genotypes in chronically infected patients.

    PubMed

    Basaras, M; Arrese, E; Blanco, S; Sota, M; de las Heras, B; Cisterna, R

    2007-12-01

    Genomic mutations occurring during reverse transcription of hepatitis B virus (HBV) could explain its genetic diversity and account for 8 genetically distinct genotypes that are geographically distributed quite differently. The main objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of hepatitis B virus genotypes in patients with chronic hepatitis B and to see if there was a relationship between genotypes and risk factors for transmission based on HBeAg status. A total of 14 serum samples were analyzed using INNO-LIPA HBV genotyping assay. Genotype D was the most prevalent (64.3%) followed by genotype A (28.6%). There was one case of co-infection (D/E genotypes) that was confirmed by PCR sequencing. All patients except one were HBeAg-negative and anti-HBe-positive. The risk factors for HBV transmission were unknown in half of the cases; in the other half, sexual, transfusion, maternal or interfamilial transmission were observed. The results show that genotype D is the most prevalent genotype in our hospital, followed by genotype A. On the other hand, no relationship was found between HBeAg status and genotype.

  8. Human papilloma virus, herpes simplex virus and epstein barr virus in oral squamous cell carcinoma from eight different countries.

    PubMed

    Jalouli, Jamshid; Jalouli, Miranda M; Sapkota, Dipak; Ibrahim, Salah O; Larsson, Per-Anders; Sand, Lars

    2012-02-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a major health problem in many parts of the world, and the major causative agents are thought to be the use of alcohol and tobacco. Oncogenic viruses have also been suggested to be involved in OSCC development. This study investigated the prevalence of human papillomaviruses (HPV), herpes simplex virus (HSV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in 155 OSCC from eight different countries from different ethnic groups, continents and with different socioeconomic backgrounds. 41 A total of OSCCs were diagnosed in the tongue (26%) and 23 in the floor of the mouth (15%); the other 91 OSCCs were diagnosed in other locations (59%). The patients were also investigated regarding the use of alcohol and smoking and smokeless tobacco habits. Tissue samples were obtained from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples of the OSCC. DNA was extracted and the viral genome was examined by single, nested and semi-nested PCR assays. Sequencing of double-stranded DNA from the PCR product was carried out. Following sequencing of the HPV-, HSV- and EBV-positive PCR products, 100% homology between the sampels was found. Of all the 155 OSCCs examined, 85 (55%) were positive for EBV, 54 (35%) for HPV and 24 (15%) for HSV. The highest prevalence of HPV was seen in Sudan (65%), while HSV (55%) and EBV (80%) were most prevalent in the UK. In 34% (52/155) of all the samples examined, co-infection by two (46/155=30%) or three (6/155=4%) virus specimens was detected. The most frequent double infection was HPV with EBV in 21% (32/155) of all OSCCs. There was a statistically significant higher proportion of samples with HSV (p=0.026) and EBV (p=0.015) in industrialized countries (Sweden, Norway, UK and USA) as compared to developing countries (Sudan, India, Sri Lanka and Yemen). Furthermore, there was a statistically significant higher co-infection of HSV and EBV in samples from industrialized countries (p=0.00031). No firm conclusions could be drawn regarding the

  9. Association between septal deviation and sinonasal papilloma.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Kazuhiro; Ogawa, Takenori; Sugawara, Mitsuru; Honkura, Yohei; Oshima, Hidetoshi; Arakawa, Kazuya; Oshima, Takeshi; Katori, Yukio

    2013-01-01

    Sinonasal papilloma is a common benign epithelial tumor of the sinonasal tract and accounts for 0.5% to 4% of all nasal tumors. The etiology of sinonasal papilloma remains unclear, although human papilloma virus has been proposed as a major risk factor. Other etiological factors, such as anatomical variations of the nasal cavity, may be related to the pathogenesis of sinonasal papilloma, because deviated nasal septum is seen in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis. We, therefore, investigated the involvement of deviated nasal septum in the development of sinonasal papilloma. Preoperative computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging findings of 83 patients with sinonasal papilloma were evaluated retrospectively. The side of papilloma and the direction of septal deviation showed a significant correlation. Septum deviated to the intact side in 51 of 83 patients (61.4%) and to the affected side in 18 of 83 patients (21.7%). Straight or S-shaped septum was observed in 14 of 83 patients (16.9%). Even after excluding 27 patients who underwent revision surgery and 15 patients in whom the papilloma touched the concave portion of the nasal septum, the concave side of septal deviation was associated with the development of sinonasal papilloma (p = 0.040). The high incidence of sinonasal papilloma in the concave side may reflect the consequences of the traumatic effects caused by wall shear stress of the high-velocity airflow and the increased chance of inhaling viruses and pollutants. The present study supports the causative role of human papilloma virus and toxic chemicals in the occurrence of sinonasal papilloma.

  10. Circulating interleukin-10 levels and human papilloma virus and Epstein–Barr virus-associated cancers: evidence from a Mendelian randomization meta-analysis based on 11,170 subjects

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Kai; Pang, Qing; Lin, Ting; Zhang, Li; Gu, Mingliang; Niu, Wenquan; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have showed interleukin 10 (IL-10) is a critical cytokine that determines antiviral immune response and is related to virus-associated cancers. However, whether genetically elevated circulating IL-10 levels are associated with the risk of human papilloma virus and Epstein–Barr virus-associated cancers (HEACs) is still unclear. Mendelian randomization method was implemented to meta-analyze available observational studies by employing IL-10 three variants (−592C>A, −819C>T, and −1082A>G) as instruments. A total of 24 articles encompassing 11,170 subjects were ultimately eligible for the meta-analysis. Overall, there was a significant association between IL-10 promoter variant −1082A>G and HEACs under allelic and dominant models (both P<0.01). Subgroup analysis by cancer type indicated that the risk estimate of −1082A>G was significant for nasopharyngeal cancer under allelic, homozygous genotypic and dominant models (all P<0.001). Moreover by ethnicity, carriers of −1082G allele had a 74% increased risk for nasopharyngeal cancer in Asians under dominant model (odds ratio [OR] =1.737; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.280–2.358; P<0.001). In further Mendelian randomization analysis, the predicted OR for 10 pg/mL increment in IL-10 levels was 1.14 (95% CI: 1.01–16.99) in HEACs. Our findings provided strong evidence for a critical role of genetically elevated circulating IL-10 levels in the development of HEACs, especially in Asian population and for nasopharyngeal cancer. PMID:27022283

  11. Circulating interleukin-10 levels and human papilloma virus and Epstein-Barr virus-associated cancers: evidence from a Mendelian randomization meta-analysis based on 11,170 subjects.

    PubMed

    Qu, Kai; Pang, Qing; Lin, Ting; Zhang, Li; Gu, Mingliang; Niu, Wenquan; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have showed interleukin 10 (IL-10) is a critical cytokine that determines antiviral immune response and is related to virus-associated cancers. However, whether genetically elevated circulating IL-10 levels are associated with the risk of human papilloma virus and Epstein-Barr virus-associated cancers (HEACs) is still unclear. Mendelian randomization method was implemented to meta-analyze available observational studies by employing IL-10 three variants (-592C>A, -819C>T, and -1082A>G) as instruments. A total of 24 articles encompassing 11,170 subjects were ultimately eligible for the meta-analysis. Overall, there was a significant association between IL-10 promoter variant -1082A>G and HEACs under allelic and dominant models (both P<0.01). Subgroup analysis by cancer type indicated that the risk estimate of -1082A>G was significant for nasopharyngeal cancer under allelic, homozygous genotypic and dominant models (all P<0.001). Moreover by ethnicity, carriers of -1082G allele had a 74% increased risk for nasopharyngeal cancer in Asians under dominant model (odds ratio [OR] =1.737; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.280-2.358; P<0.001). In further Mendelian randomization analysis, the predicted OR for 10 pg/mL increment in IL-10 levels was 1.14 (95% CI: 1.01-16.99) in HEACs. Our findings provided strong evidence for a critical role of genetically elevated circulating IL-10 levels in the development of HEACs, especially in Asian population and for nasopharyngeal cancer.

  12. Prediction of promiscuous epitopes in the e6 protein of three high risk human papilloma viruses: a computational approach.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Nirmala; Chinnappan, Sudandiradoss

    2013-01-01

    A najor current challenge and constraint in cervical cancer research is the development of vaccines against human papilloma virus (HPV) epitopes. Although many studies are done on epitope identification on HPVs, no computational work has been carried out for high risk forms which are considered to cause cervical cancer. Of all the high risk HPVs, HPV 16, HPV 18 and HPV 45 are responsible for 94% of cervical cancers in women worldwide. In this work, we computationally predicted the promiscuous epitopes among the E6 proteins of high risk HPVs. We identified the conserved residues, HLA class I, HLA class II and B-cell epitopes along with their corresponding secondary structure conformations. We used extremely precise bioinformatics tools like ClustalW2, MAPPP, NetMHC, EpiJen, EpiTop 1.0, ABCpred, BCpred and PSIPred for achieving this task. Our study identified specific regions 'FAFR(K)DL' followed by 'KLPD(Q)LCTEL' fragments which proved to be promiscuous epitopes present in both human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I, class II molecules and B cells as well. These fragments also follow every suitable character to be considered as promiscuous epitopes with supporting evidences of previously reported experimental results. Thus, we conclude that these regions should be considered as the important for design of specific therapeutic vaccines for cervical cancer.

  13. Cis activation of the c-myc gene in bovine papilloma virus type 1/human c-myc hybrid plasmids

    SciTech Connect

    Modjtahedi, N.; Feunteun, J.; Brison, O. )

    1988-01-01

    The c-myc gene amplification observed in human tumors is likely to represent an activation mechanism aiming at an increased transcription level. In order to evaluate the biological significance of this amplification in the malignant transformation the authors designed an experimental model that could possibly mimic this situation in vitro. They have constructed a series of plasmids which physically link the human c-myc gene to the bovine papilloma virus type 1 genome (BPV1) and therefore should be maintained as amplified episomes upon transformation of rodent cells. Anticipating that the high copy number will bring about the immortalizing capacity of the c-myc gene, the constructions were introduced into primary rat embryo cells. Immortal cell lines were established by transfection of the hybrid plasmids carrying either the complete BPV1 genome or the transforming region of the viral genome. The BPV1 DNA alone or the c-myc gene alone has no activity in this assay. The analysis of the established cell lines demonstrates that the transfected plasmids are present not as free copies as anticipated but rather integrated as tandem repeats. They present data which strongly suggest that the immortalization capacity of the hybrid plasmids reflects the activation of the c-myc gene by the transactivable BPV1 enhancer. Although both the BPV1 early genes and the c-myc gene are actively transcribed, most of the cell lines do not display a transformed phenotype.

  14. Human papilloma virus transformed CaSki cells constitutively express high levels of functional SerpinB2.

    PubMed

    Major, Lee; Schroder, Wayne A; Gardner, Joy; Fish, Richard J; Suhrbier, Andreas

    2011-02-01

    Many malignant tissues, including human papilloma virus (HPV)-associated cancers, express SerpinB2, also known as plasminogen activator inhibitor type-2 (PAI-2). Whether SerpinB2 is expressed by the HPV-transformed cancer cells, and if so, whether SerpinB2 is mutated or behaves aberrantly remains unclear. Here we show that HPV-transformed CaSki cells express high levels of constitutive wild-type SerpinB2, with cellular distribution, glycosylation, secretion, cleavage, induction and urokinase binding similar to that reported for primary cells. Neutralization of secreted SerpinB2 failed to affect CaSki cell migration or growth. Lentivirus-based over-expression of SerpinB2 also had no effect on growth, and we were unable to confirm a role for SerpinB2 in binding or regulating expression of the retinoblastoma protein. CaSki cells thus emerge as a useful tool for studying SerpinB2, with the physiological function of SerpinB2 expression by tumor cells remaining controversial. Using CaSki cells as a source of endogenous SerpinB2, we confirmed that SerpinB2 efficiently binds the proteasomal subunit member β1. PMID:20974129

  15. The role of human papilloma virus (HPV) infection in non-anogenital cancer and the promise of immunotherapy: a review.

    PubMed

    Cobos, Chris; Figueroa, José A; Mirandola, Leonardo; Colombo, Michela; Summers, Gabby; Figueroa, Alejandro; Aulakh, Amardeep; Konala, Venu; Verma, Rashmi; Riaz, Jehanzeb; Wade, Raymond; Saadeh, Charles; Rahman, Rakhshanda L; Pandey, Apurva; Radhi, Saba; Nguyen, Diane D; Jenkins, Marjorie; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio; Cobos, Everardo

    2014-10-01

    Over the past 30 years, human papilloma virus (HPV) has been shown to play a role in the development of various cancers. Most notably, HPV has been linked to malignant progression in neoplasms of the anogenital region. However, high-risk HPV has also been suggested to play a significant role in the development of cancers in other anatomic locations, such as the head and neck, lung, breast and bladder. In 2006, the first vaccine for HPV, Gardasil, was approved for the prevention of subtypes 6, 11, 16 and 18. A few years later, Cevarix was approved for the prevention of subtypes 16 and 18, the HPV subtypes most frequently implicated in malignant progression. Although increased awareness and vaccination could drastically decrease the incidence of HPV-positive cancers, these approaches do not benefit patients who have already contracted HPV and developed cancer as a result. For this reason, researchers need to continue developing treatment modalities, such as targeted immunotherapies, for HPV-positive lesions. Here, we review the potential evidence linking HPV infection with the development of non-anogenital cancers and the potential role of immunotherapy in the prevention and eradication of HPV infection and its oncogenic sequela.

  16. A new genotype of Japanese encephalitis virus from Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Chen, W R; Rico-Hesse, R; Tesh, R B

    1992-07-01

    Primer-extension sequencing of the RNA template of polio, dengue, Rift Valley fever, and Japanese encephalitis (JE) viruses has provided new information on their geographic distribution, origin, and evolution. In a previous study of 46 diverse JE virus strains, we demonstrated the existence of three distinct JE genotypes in Asia. We now report the occurrence of a fourth genotype. In the present study, 19 JE virus isolates, representing various geographic regions of Asia and a 50-year time span, were compared with each other and with Murray Valley encephalitis, West Nile, and Kunjin viruses. Twelve of the JE strains from the Indonesian Archipelago and the Philippines had not been previously examined; the remainder were representatives of the three previously identified genotypes. Two hundred forty nucleotides from the pre-M gene region of the virus were used in these comparisons. Using 12% divergence as a cut-off point, the 19 JE strains fell into four distinct genotypic groups; maximum divergence across the comparison region was 21%. The newly recognized fourth genotype was comprised of five Indonesian isolates that were 7% divergent from the rest of the JE viruses.

  17. Distribution of Hepatitis C Virus Genotypes in Bahrain

    PubMed Central

    Janahi, Essam M.; Al-Mannai, Mariam; Singh, Hemlata; Jahromi, Mohamed M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Approximately 170 million people are infected with Hepatitis C virus (HCV) worldwide, making it one of the world’s major infectious diseases. There are no published population based studies about the prevalence of HCV genotypes in Bahrain. Objectives: Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence and distribution of HCV genotypes and subtypes among a large sample of patients with chronic HCV infection in Bahrain. Patients and Methods: Serum samples were collected from 202 HCV positive patients; of them 128 had a viral load (> 500 IU/mL) suitable for the type-specific genotyping assay. Gender-wise and age-wise differences in the distribution of HCV genotypes were determined by Chi Square and Fisher’s Exact tests. Results: The predominant genotype among Bahraini patients was type 1 (36.71%), followed by genotypes 3 and 4 (15.6% each) and the lowest frequency was found for genotype 2 (3.9%). Among genotype 1, subtype 1b had the highest frequency (21.09%), followed by subtype 1a (14.06%). Among genotype 3, subtype 3a had the highest frequency (11.72%), while among genotype 4, most of subtypes were undetermined. The frequency of all different HCV genotypes was higher in male patients compared to female patients. Genotype 1 was most common in the age group of 51 - 60 years (38.3%), genotype 2 in 21 - 30 years (60%) and genotype 3 in 51 - 60 years (30%), while genotype 4 was most frequent among the age group > 61 (40%). Conclusions: The most common HCV genotype in Bahrain was subtype 1b followed by 1a and 3a. Further studies involving sources of transmission in Bahrain are required to enhance control measures for HCV infection. PMID:26977163

  18. Global Distribution and Prevalence of Hepatitis C Virus Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Jane P; Humphreys, Isla; Flaxman, Abraham; Brown, Anthony; Cooke, Graham S; Pybus, Oliver G; Barnes, Eleanor

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) exhibits high genetic diversity, characterized by regional variations in genotype prevalence. This poses a challenge to the improved development of vaccines and pan-genotypic treatments, which require the consideration of global trends in HCV genotype prevalence. Here we provide the first comprehensive survey of these trends. To approximate national HCV genotype prevalence, studies published between 1989 and 2013 reporting HCV genotypes are reviewed and combined with overall HCV prevalence estimates from the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) project. We also generate regional and global genotype prevalence estimates, inferring data for countries lacking genotype information. We include 1,217 studies in our analysis, representing 117 countries and 90% of the global population. We calculate that HCV genotype 1 is the most prevalent worldwide, comprising 83.4 million cases (46.2% of all HCV cases), approximately one-third of which are in East Asia. Genotype 3 is the next most prevalent globally (54.3 million, 30.1%); genotypes 2, 4, and 6 are responsible for a total 22.8% of all cases; genotype 5 comprises the remaining <1%. While genotypes 1 and 3 dominate in most countries irrespective of economic status, the largest proportions of genotypes 4 and 5 are in lower-income countries. Conclusion: Although genotype 1 is most common worldwide, nongenotype 1 HCV cases—which are less well served by advances in vaccine and drug development—still comprise over half of all HCV cases. Relative genotype proportions are needed to inform healthcare models, which must be geographically tailored to specific countries or regions in order to improve access to new treatments. Genotype surveillance data are needed from many countries to improve estimates of unmet need. (Hepatology 2015;61:77–87) PMID:25069599

  19. [The identification of viruses of human papilloma of high carcinogenic risk and evaluation of physical status of viral DNA using technique of polymerase-chain reaction under affection of cervical epithelium].

    PubMed

    Viazovaia, A A; Kuevda, D A; Trofimova, O B; Shipulina, O Iu; Ershov, V A; Lialina, L V; Narvskaia, O V

    2013-08-01

    The DNA of virus of human papilloma of high carcinogenic risk was detected in 116 cervical samples. At that, the morphological symptoms of background processes are detected in 19 samples, CIN 1 in 9, CIN 2 in 23, CIN 3 in 54 (and out of them carcinoma in situ in 13), epidermoid cancer (squamous cell carcinoma) in 11 cases. The viral load of human papilloma of high carcinogenic risk in all samples of DNA exceeded threshold of clinical value (3 lg copies of DNA of human papilloma/105 cells). The genetic typing of human papilloma of high carcinogenic risk revealed the dominance of human papilloma of type 16 in 49.7%, type 33 in 15.3%, type 31 in 12.3% and type 45 in 5.5%. In women with background processes in cervix of the uterus DNA of human papilloma type 16 was detected more often in episome form. In case of dysplastic alterations of epithelium and cervical cancer DNA of human papilloma type 16 is detected in mixt form with different degree of integration into cell genome.

  20. Prevalence of Hepatitis C Virus Genotypes in Mashhad, Northeast Iran

    PubMed Central

    Vossughinia, H; Goshayeshi, LA; Bayegi, H Rafatpanah; Sima, H; Kazemi, A; Erfani, S; Abedini, S; Goshayeshi, LE; Ghaffarzadegan, K; Nomani, H; Jamehdar, S Amel

    2012-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis C is a disease with significant global impact. The distribution of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes in Mashhad (the Northeast and the biggest city after the capital of Iran) is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of HCV genotypes among HCV seropositive patients, and to study the relationship between types, virologic and demographic features of patients in Mashhad. Methods: Three hundred and eighty-two clinical specimens obtained from HCV-infected patients referred to Ghaem Hospital in Mashhad during a period of 2009 to 2010 were selected. HCV genotype was determined by Nested PCR amplification of HCV core gene using genotype specific primers. Results: Totally, 299 patients were male (79.9%). The most common HCV genotype was genotype 3a, with 150 (40%) of subjects. Genotype 1a was the other frequent genotype, with 147(39.2%) subjects. Frequency of genotypes for 1b, 5 and 2 was 41(10.9%), 13(3.4%) and 9(2.4%), respectively. Mix genotype including 1a+1b in 4 (1.04%), 1a+3a in 3 (0.8%) was found in 7 patients. Four percent out of these samples had an undetermined genotype. Among the hemophilia patient, there were 13(48.1%) genotypes as 1a, 3(11.1%) 1b and 10(37%) 3a, respectively. Conclusion: The dominant HCV genotype among patients living in Mashhad was 3a. This study gives added evidence of the predominant HCV genotypes in Iran. PMID:23193507

  1. Prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes in Balochistan.

    PubMed

    Afridi, Sarwat; Naeem, Muhammad; Hussain, Abid; Kakar, Naseebullah; Babar, Masroor Ellahi; Ahmad, Jamil

    2009-07-01

    A molecular study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of Hepatitis C virus genotypes in HCV infected population of Balochistan. Forty HCV seropositive samples belonging to seven different locations of Balochistan were collected from different health care centres. Qualitative analysis of these samples using PCR resulted in 28 positive samples. The PCR positive samples were subjected to genotyping using the method described by Ohno et al (J Clin Microbiol 35:201-202, 1997) with minor modifications. Genotyping of 28 samples revealed three different genotypes including 3a, 3b and 1a. The most prevalent genotype was 3a with rate of 50% followed by genotype 3b and 1a, respectively. Nine samples remained untyped, suggesting the need of further investigation of genotypes in this region. It has been proposed that sequencing of these samples may be helpful to unreveal these genotypes and further epidemiology of HCV genotypes. Further more, extensive and large scale studies are needed to understand the epidemiology of HCV genotypes, as no such study has been carried in this province.

  2. Tissue distribution of Epstein-Barr virus genotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, H L; Lung, M L; Chan, K H; Griffin, B E; Ng, M H

    1996-01-01

    The genome of naturally occurring Epstein-Barr virus contains either two or three copies of a 29-bp tandem repeat sequence in the first intron of the BZLF gene. These genotypes differ markedly in their distribution between blood and epithelial tissues, presumably because they have adapted to separate life cycles in these sites. The genotype prevalent in the blood also appears to be better able to transform B lymphocytes. PMID:8794387

  3. Geographic distribution of hepatitis C virus genotypes in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Campiotto, S; Pinho, J R R; Carrilho, F J; Da Silva, L C; Souto, F J D; Spinelli, V; Pereira, L M M B; Coelho, H S M; Silva, A O; Fonseca, J C; Rosa, H; Lacet, C M C; Bernardini, A P

    2005-01-01

    Brazil is a country of continental dimension with a population of different ethnic backgrounds. Thus, a wide variation in the frequencies of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes is expected to occur. To address this point, 1,688 sequential samples from chronic HCV patients were analyzed. HCV-RNA was amplified by the RT-PCR from blood samples collected from 1995 to 2000 at different laboratories located in different cities from all Brazilian States. Samples were collected in tubes containing a gel separator, centrifuged in the site of collection and sent by express mail in a refrigerated container to Laboratório Bioquímico Jardim Paulista, São Paulo, SP, Brazil. HCV-RNA was extracted from serum and submitted to RT and nested PCR using standard procedures. Nested PCR products were submitted to cycle sequencing reactions without prior purification. Sequences were analyzed for genotype determination and the following frequencies were found: 64.9% (1,095) for genotype 1, 4.6% (78) for genotype 2, 30.2% (510) for genotype 3, 0.2% (3) for genotype 4, and 0.1% (2) for genotype 5. The frequencies of HCV genotypes were statistically different among Brazilian regions (P = 0.00017). In all regions, genotype 1 was the most frequent (51.7 to 74.1%), reaching the highest value in the North; genotype 2 was more prevalent in the Center-West region (11.4%), especially in Mato Grosso State (25.8%), while genotype 3 was more common in the South (43.2%). Genotypes 4 and 5 were rarely found and only in the Southeast, in São Paulo State. The present data indicate the need for careful epidemiological surveys throughout Brazil since knowing the frequency and distribution of the genotypes would provide key information for understanding the spread of HCV. PMID:15665987

  4. High-risk human papilloma virus infection decreases the frequency of dendritic Langerhans' cells in the human female genital tract

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Flores, Rafael; Mendez-Cruz, Rene; Ojeda-Ortiz, Jorge; Muñoz-Molina, Rebeca; Balderas-Carrillo, Oscar; de la Luz Diaz-Soberanes, Maria; Lebecque, Serge; Saeland, Sem; Daneri-Navarro, Adrian; Garcia-Carranca, Alejandro; Ullrich, Stephen E; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo

    2006-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are often arranged in planar layers in tissues with high antigenic exposure, such as skin and mucosae. Providing an en face view, this arrangement optimizes in situ analysis regarding morphology (even of individual dendrites), topographic distribution (regular/clustered) and quantification. The few reports on human genital DC usually utilize single markers and conventional sections, restricting immunolabelling only to cell parts sectioned by the cut. To better assess DC in situ, we labelled epithelial sheets, prepared from fresh cervix biopsies, with antibodies to major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-CII, CD1a and Langerin, revealing (with each of these markers) a dense DC network in a planar-like, regular distribution. Using the hybrid capture system to detect the high-risk mucotropic human papilloma virus (HPV) group, 16 positive and five negative women were studied and the results were compared between these groups. DC frequency per area was substantially reduced (to ≈ 50% for the three markers) in samples from all HPV-infected patients compared with samples from controls. Unlike HPV– samples, Langerin+ DC in HPV+ cervix exhibited a highly accentuated dendritic appearance. We believe this to be the first study using these three DC-restricted markers (Langerin, CD1a and MHC-CII) in cervical epithelial sheets from high-risk HPV+ donors and also the first study to demonstrate the morphological and quantitative changes triggered by high-risk HPV infection. Cervical DC reduction in early, premalignant high-risk HPV infection might represent viral subversion strategies interfering with efficient antigen handling by the immune system's peripheral sentinels, the DC, perhaps hampering appropriate recruitment and subsequent development of effector (cytotoxic) T cells. PMID:16423058

  5. E6 and E7 oncogene expression by human papilloma virus (HPV) and the aggressive behavior of recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis (RLP).

    PubMed

    Shehata, Bahig M; Otto, Kristen J; Sobol, Steven E; Stockwell, Christina A; Foulks, Cora; Lancaster, Wayne; Gregoire, Lucie; Hill, Charles E

    2008-01-01

    Recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis (RLP), a chronic disease associated with human papilloma virus (HPV), requires serial surgical procedures for debulking, resulting in debilitating long-term dysphonia, laryngeal scarring, and rarely malignant degeneration. Human papilloma virus 11 tumors have been widely accepted as more aggressive than HPV 6 tumors; however, the clinical course has been difficult to predict at disease onset, and the biologic mediators of proliferation have not been well characterized. A retrospective case review of 43 patients (4 months to 10 years at diagnosis) was performed on children treated for recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis. Patient charts were reviewed for demographic information, age at RLP diagnosis, approximate frequency of surgical intervention, and absolute number of surgical procedures performed. Human papilloma virus subtyping was performed. Expression analysis of the HPV-encoded E6 and E7 oncogenes was performed by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Fourteen patients had subtype 11 (33%) and 29 patients had subtype 6 (67%). As expected, HPV 11 patients showed a more aggressive clinical course than HPV 6 patients. However, 38% of patients with subtype 6 (11 patients) followed a clinical course that mirrored the more severe subtype 11 patients. These patients expressed the disease at a younger age (P < 0.0002) and showed higher levels of E6 and E7 oncogenes compared to the patients with the more indolent course. Although HPV subtype and early onset of RLP are well characterized prognostic factors, our study documents the significance of E6 and E7 oncogene expression as potential biologic mediators of proliferation and thereby clinical behavior.

  6. Detection of Salivary Human Papilloma Viruses 16 and 18 (HPV) in Smoker Men in an Iranian Population by PCR: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Arbabi-Kalati, Fateme; Nosratzehi, Tahereh; Bameri, Zakaria; Rigi, Fiz Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Human papilloma virus (HPV) infection of the oropharynx is acquired through a variety of sexual and social forms of transmission. Recent epidemiologic evidence has suggested that HPV may be an independent risk factor for oropharyngeal cancers, but risk factors for persistent HPV infection in the oropharynx are unknown. More evidence is needed regarding the prevalence of oral high-risk HPV among healthy smoker and nonsmoker adults. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare salivary infection with human papilloma virus types 16 and 18 between smokers and nonsmokers. Patients and Methods: A hundred healthy adult subjects were selected from Zahedan dental school for this pilot study. DNA was isolated from saliva samples and screened for high-risk HPV strains of HPV 16 and 18. Then, further processed using Real Time PCR for quantification and confirmation of sensitivity and specificity of the test. Data was analyzed by t-test. Results: There were no high-risk types of virus in patients and no significant differences between the groups (P = 1). Conclusions: It seems that smoking cannot increase the prevalence of high risk HPV 16, 18 in saliva samples. PMID:25632381

  7. Temperature-dependent genotype-by-genotype interaction between a pathogenic fungus and its hyperparasitic virus.

    PubMed

    Bryner, Sarah Franziska; Rigling, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The outcome of host-parasite interactions may depend not only on the genotypes of the species involved but also on environmental factors. We used the fungus Cryphonectria parasitica, the causal agent of chestnut blight, and its hyperparasitic virus, Cryphonectria hypovirus-1 (CHV1), to test for genotype-by-genotype-by-environment interactions in a host-parasite system. In C. parasitica, infection with CHV1 induces a hypovirulent phenotype with reduced virulence toward the chestnut tree (Castanea spp.) and thus controls chestnut blight in many European regions. In contrast, uninfected virulent C. parasitica have nearly eradicated the American chestnut in North America. We applied a full factorial design and assessed the fungal growth and sporulation of four C. parasitica strains, uninfected and infected with each of the four known CHV1 subtypes, at 12°, 18°, 24°, and 30°C. We found a significant (P ≤ .00001) genotype-by-genotype-by-environment interaction, demonstrating the potential for a selection mosaic. As a consequence, different host and parasite genotypes would be selected under different climatic conditions, affecting the coevolutionary dynamics of the host-parasite interaction and the course of chestnut blight epidemics. Genotype-by-genotype-by-environment interactions are essential to take into account when designing biological control strategies.

  8. Hepatitis E Virus Genotype 3 in Humans and Swine, Bolivia

    PubMed Central

    Cavallo, Annalisa; Gonzales, José Luis; Bonelli, Sara Irene; Valda, Ybar; Pieri, Angela; Segundo, Higinio; Ibañez, Ramón; Mantella, Antonia; Bartalesi, Filippo; Tolari, Francesco; Bartoloni, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    We determined the seroprevalence of hepatitis E virus (HEV) in persons in 2 rural communities in southeastern Bolivia and the presence of HEV in human and swine fecal samples. HEV seroprevalence was 6.3%, and HEV genotype 3 strains with high sequence homology were detected. PMID:21801630

  9. Genotypic and Pathotypic Characterization of Newcastle Disease Viruses from India

    PubMed Central

    Tirumurugaan, Krishnaswamy G.; Vijayarani, Kumanan; Kumanan, Kathaperumal; Elankumaran, Subbiah

    2011-01-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is an avian paramyxovirus that causes significant economic losses to the poultry industry in most parts of the world. The susceptibility of a wide variety of avian species coupled with synanthropic bird reservoirs has contributed to the vast genomic diversity of this virus as well as diagnostic failures. Since the first panzootic in 1926, Newcastle disease (ND) became enzootic in India with recurrent outbreaks in multiple avian species. The genetic characteristics of circulating strains in India, however, are largely unknown. To understand the nature of NDV genotypes in India, we characterized two representative strains isolated 13 years apart from a chicken and a pigeon by complete genome sequence analysis and pathotyping. The viruses were characterized as velogenic by pathogenicity indices devised to distinguish these strains. The genome length was 15,186 nucleotides (nt) and consisted of six non-overlapping genes, with conserved and complementary 3′ leader and 5′ trailer regions, conserved gene starts, gene stops, and intergenic sequences similar to those in avian paramyxovirus 1 (APMV-1) strains. Matrix gene sequence analysis grouped the pigeon isolate with APMV-1 strains. Phylogeny based on the fusion (F), and hemagglutinin (HN) genes and complete genome sequence grouped these viruses into genotype IV. Genotype IV strains are considered to have “died out” after the first panzootic (1926–1960) of ND. But, our results suggest that there is persistence of genotype IV strains in India. PMID:22174801

  10. ASSOCIATION AMONG HISTOLOGICAL FINDINGS SUGGESTIVE OF PAPILLOMA VIRUS ON HEMORRHOIDECTOMY SPECIMENS

    PubMed Central

    da SILVA, Soraya Souto; NAKAJIMA, Gerson Suguiyama; GUIMARÃES, Ricardo Alexandre; MOURÃO, Flávia da Costa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Many researchers studied human Papillomavirus infection in the anal area supposing it represents a risk factor for precursor lesions of anal cancer. Aim: To study the association between histological findings suggestive of injury by the virus in hemorrhoidectomy specimens. Method: Prevalence study was carried out based on histopathological analysis of hemorrhoidectomy specimens to find viral cytopathic effects. These findings were compared with anal condyloma acuminata that had no relationship with hemorrhoidectomy for microscopic comparison. Results: Of the 91 hemorroidectomies analyzed, eight had findings suggestive of viral cytopathic effects, with the presence of irregular acanthosis in 63%, koilocytes in 50% and other indirect viral cytopathic effects, such as hyperkeratosis (38%), parakeratosis (25% ) and papillomatosis (13%). Conclusion: This study was unable to conclude that there is an association between these two pathologic entities. PMID:26734795

  11. Intraductal Papilloma: Atypical Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, P.; Khaitan, Tanya; Anuradha, A.; Kumar, B. Praveen; Sudhakar, S.

    2013-01-01

    Ductal papillomas have unique papillary features arising from the salivary gland duct system. They comprise three rare benign adenomas, namely, inverted ductal papilloma, sialadenoma papilliferum, and intraductal papilloma. Intraductal papilloma is an extremely rare benign salivary gland tumor that occurs most commonly in the minor salivary glands. Here, we are presenting a case report of intraductal papilloma in an 18-year-old patient. PMID:23762648

  12. [Distribution of hepatitis C virus genotypes in Manisa region, Turkey].

    PubMed

    Sanlidağ, Tamer; Akçali, Sinem; Ozbakkaloğlu, Beril; Ertekin, Deniz; Akduman, Elçin

    2009-10-01

    The duration of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and the response to the standard therapy is strongly related to the HCV genotypes. In addition, the geographical distribution of HCV genotypes is important for the epidemiological studies in terms of distribution and possible risk groups. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the distribution of HCV genotypes in Manisa region (located at the Aegean part of Turkey). A total of 100 anti-HCV (microparticle EIA; Abbott Laboratories, USA) and HCV-RNA (real time RT-PCR; Applied Biosystems, USA) positive patients (53 female, 47 male; mean age: 44.4 +/- 10.4 years), who were admitted to Celal Bayar University Medical School Hospital between 2002-2005, were included to the study. Quantitative HCV-RNA levels of the patients were between 10(4)-10(8) copies/ml. Complementary DNAs obtained from HCV-RNAs isolated by Invitek RTP DNA/RNA Virus Mini Kit were used for genotyping with selected primers [primer 11 (5'-AGG TCT CTG AGA CCG TGC ACC ATG AGC AC-3') and primer 13 (5'-CTG TGA GGA ACT ACT GTC TT-3') for the first PCR; primer 12 (5'-ACT GCC TGA TAG GGT GCT TGC GAG TG-3') and primer 14 (5'-CAC GCA GAA AGC GTC TAG-3') for the second PCR]. The RT-PCR products were purified with Invisorb Spin PCRapid Kit and sequenced by BigDye Terminator v3.1 Cycle Sequencing Kit in ABI Prism 310 Genetic Analyzer. Genotype 1 was found in 92% of the patients (92%) and genotypes 2 and 4 were found in 7% of the patients, while HCV genotype could not be identified in one patient (1%). When evaluating the subtypes, genotype 1b was determined in 90 patients (90%), genotype 4a in five patients (5%), genotype 1a in two patients (2%) and genotype 2a in two patients (2%). In conclusion, 1b was found to be the most common HCV genotype in Manisa region in concordance with the previous data obtained in Turkey, followed by genotype 4a, although a rare one. The data of this study is noteworthy especially for the arrangement of treatment and

  13. Hepatitis E Virus Genotype 3 in Wild Rats, United States

    PubMed Central

    Volk, Kylie; Van Den Bussche, Ronald A.

    2012-01-01

    The role of rodents in the epidemiology of zoonotic hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection has been a subject of considerable debate. Seroprevalence studies suggest widespread HEV infection in commensal Rattus spp. rats, but experimental transmission has been largely unsuccessful and recovery of zoonotic genotype 3 HEV RNA from wild Rattus spp. rats has never been confirmed. We surveyed R. rattus and R. norvegicus rats from across the United States and several international populations by using a hemi-nested reverse transcription PCR approach. We isolated HEV RNA in liver tissues from 35 of 446 rats examined. All but 1 of these isolates was relegated to the zoonotic HEV genotype 3, and the remaining sequence represented the recently discovered rat genotype from the United States and Germany. HEV-positive rats were detected in urban and remote localities. Genetic analyses suggest all HEV genotype 3 isolates obtained from wild Rattus spp. rats were closely related. PMID:22840202

  14. Hepatitis E virus genotype 3 in wild rats, United States.

    PubMed

    Lack, Justin B; Volk, Kylie; Van Den Bussche, Ronald A

    2012-08-01

    The role of rodents in the epidemiology of zoonotic hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection has been a subject of considerable debate. Seroprevalence studies suggest widespread HEV infection in commensal Rattus spp. rats, but experimental transmission has been largely unsuccessful and recovery of zoonotic genotype 3 HEV RNA from wild Rattus spp. rats has never been confirmed. We surveyed R. rattus and R. norvegicus rats from across the United States and several international populations by using a hemi-nested reverse transcription PCR approach. We isolated HEV RNA in liver tissues from 35 of 446 rats examined. All but 1 of these isolates was relegated to the zoonotic HEV genotype 3, and the remaining sequence represented the recently discovered rat genotype from the United States and Germany. HEV-positive rats were detected in urban and remote localities. Genetic analyses suggest all HEV genotype 3 isolates obtained from wild Rattus spp. rats were closely related. PMID:22840202

  15. Phylogeography of Japanese Encephalitis Virus: Genotype Is Associated with Climate

    PubMed Central

    Schuh, Amy J.; Ward, Melissa J.; Leigh Brown, Andrew J.; Barrett, Alan D. T.

    2013-01-01

    The circulation of vector-borne zoonotic viruses is largely determined by the overlap in the geographical distributions of virus-competent vectors and reservoir hosts. What is less clear are the factors influencing the distribution of virus-specific lineages. Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is the most important etiologic agent of epidemic encephalitis worldwide, and is primarily maintained between vertebrate reservoir hosts (avian and swine) and culicine mosquitoes. There are five genotypes of JEV: GI-V. In recent years, GI has displaced GIII as the dominant JEV genotype and GV has re-emerged after almost 60 years of undetected virus circulation. JEV is found throughout most of Asia, extending from maritime Siberia in the north to Australia in the south, and as far as Pakistan to the west and Saipan to the east. Transmission of JEV in temperate zones is epidemic with the majority of cases occurring in summer months, while transmission in tropical zones is endemic and occurs year-round at lower rates. To test the hypothesis that viruses circulating in these two geographical zones are genetically distinct, we applied Bayesian phylogeographic, categorical data analysis and phylogeny-trait association test techniques to the largest JEV dataset compiled to date, representing the envelope (E) gene of 487 isolates collected from 12 countries over 75 years. We demonstrated that GIII and the recently emerged GI-b are temperate genotypes likely maintained year-round in northern latitudes, while GI-a and GII are tropical genotypes likely maintained primarily through mosquito-avian and mosquito-swine transmission cycles. This study represents a new paradigm directly linking viral molecular evolution and climate. PMID:24009790

  16. Phylogeography of Japanese encephalitis virus: genotype is associated with climate.

    PubMed

    Schuh, Amy J; Ward, Melissa J; Brown, Andrew J Leigh; Barrett, Alan D T

    2013-01-01

    The circulation of vector-borne zoonotic viruses is largely determined by the overlap in the geographical distributions of virus-competent vectors and reservoir hosts. What is less clear are the factors influencing the distribution of virus-specific lineages. Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is the most important etiologic agent of epidemic encephalitis worldwide, and is primarily maintained between vertebrate reservoir hosts (avian and swine) and culicine mosquitoes. There are five genotypes of JEV: GI-V. In recent years, GI has displaced GIII as the dominant JEV genotype and GV has re-emerged after almost 60 years of undetected virus circulation. JEV is found throughout most of Asia, extending from maritime Siberia in the north to Australia in the south, and as far as Pakistan to the west and Saipan to the east. Transmission of JEV in temperate zones is epidemic with the majority of cases occurring in summer months, while transmission in tropical zones is endemic and occurs year-round at lower rates. To test the hypothesis that viruses circulating in these two geographical zones are genetically distinct, we applied Bayesian phylogeographic, categorical data analysis and phylogeny-trait association test techniques to the largest JEV dataset compiled to date, representing the envelope (E) gene of 487 isolates collected from 12 countries over 75 years. We demonstrated that GIII and the recently emerged GI-b are temperate genotypes likely maintained year-round in northern latitudes, while GI-a and GII are tropical genotypes likely maintained primarily through mosquito-avian and mosquito-swine transmission cycles. This study represents a new paradigm directly linking viral molecular evolution and climate.

  17. Entire genome sequence analysis of genotype IX Newcastle disease viruses reveals their early-genotype phylogenetic position and recent-genotype genome size

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Six nucleotide (nt) insertion in the 5'-noncoding region (NCR) of the nucleoprotein (NP) gene of Newcaslte disease virus (NDV) is considered to be a genetic marker for recent genotypes of NDV, which emerged after 1960. However, F48-like NDVs from China, identified a 6-nt insert in the NP gene, have been previously classified into genotype III or genotype IX. Results In order to clarify their phylogenetic position and explore the origin of NDVs with the 6-nt insert and its significance in NDV evolution, we determined the entire genome sequences of five F48-like viruses isolated in China between 1946 and 2002 by RT-PCR amplification of overlapping fragments of full-length genome and rapid amplification of cDNA ends. All the five NDV isolates shared the same genome size of 15,192-nt with the recent genotype V-VIII viruses whereas they had the highest homology with early genotype III and IV isolates. Conclusions The unique characteristic of the genome size and phylogenetic position of F48-like viruses warrants placing them in a separate geno-group, genotype IX. Results in this study also suggest that genotype IX viruses most likely originate from a genotype III virus by insertion of a 6-nt motif in the 5'-NCR of the NP gene which had occurred as early as in 1940 s, and might be the common origin of genotype V-VIII viruses. PMID:21396134

  18. Asian genotypes of dengue virus 4 in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pinho, A C O; Sardi, S I; Paula, F L; Peixoto, I B; Brandão, C J; Fernandez, F M C; Campos, G S

    2015-10-01

    Dengue virus, commonly transmitted by mosquitoes, causes a human disease of significant social impact and presents a serious public health problem in Brazil. This report describes the unusual emergence of DENV-4 in northern Brazil after a nearly 30-year-long absence. DENV-4 genotype I is of Asian origin and was identified in the serum of patients receiving treatment at a hospital serving the Salvador area (Brazilian state of Bahia). The identification of dengue virus serotypes through molecular and phylogenetic analysis is essential for predicting disease severity or fatal illness, principally in endemic countries such as Brazil.

  19. Detection of bovine papilloma viruses in wart-like lesions of upper gastrointestinal tract of cattle and buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, P; Nagarajan, N; Saikumar, G; Arya, R S; Somvanshi, R

    2015-06-01

    In present investigation, etiopathological characterization of upper gastrointestinal tract (GIT) tumours of cattle and buffaloes was undertaken. A total of 27 GIT wart-like lesions in rumen, reticulum, mouth and oesophagus of cattle and buffaloes revealed the presence of small nodular to larger spherical or slender growths with thin base present on mucosa and ruminal pillar. Histopathologically, these cases were diagnosed as fibropapilloma/papilloma. This is the first world record on ruminal papillomatosis in buffaloes. Ruminal warts of cattle and buffaloes revealed the presence of BPV-5, -1 & -2, which is the first report of presence of these BPVs in the ruminal warts from India. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that DNA samples of different GIT wart-like lesions contained varying amount of BPV DNA copy numbers. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the PCNA and Ki67 immunopositivity was present in the basal and spinosum layer of the fibropapilloma/papilloma, indicating these as the cellular proliferation site. In conclusion, the present investigation revealed that BPV-5, -1 & -2 are associated with certain ruminal wart-like lesions/growths in cattle and buffaloes, and the basal and spinosum layer of the ruminal fibropapilloma/papilloma were cellular proliferation sites.

  20. Herpes and papilloma viruses

    SciTech Connect

    De Palo, G.; Rilke, F.; Zur Hausen, H.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains over 25 selections. Some of the titles are: Seroepidemiologic Asociation of HSV-2 with Cervical Cancers: Transforming Viral Genes; Organization and Expression of Human Papillomavirus DNA in Cervical Cancer Cell Lines; An Investigation of Cervical Scrapes by DNA Hybridization: and Human Papillomaviruses in Genital Tissue: Examination by Immunohistochemistry and in situ DNA Hybridization.

  1. Comparison of 2 different PCR-based technologies for the detection of human papilloma virus from paraffin-embedded tissue: genómica clinical arrays versus SPF(10)-LiPA(25).

    PubMed

    Pérez, Cristina; Klaustermeier, Jo Ellen; Alemany, Laia; Tous, Sara; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Velasco, Julio

    2012-03-01

    The great interest in molecular epidemiology of human papilloma virus (HPV) in cervical cancer led us to perform a thorough evaluation of 2 polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods for the detection of HPV in archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples. Thus, the aim of this study was to compare HPV detection in FFPE samples that have histopathologic diagnosis of invasive cervical cancer using SPF10 broad-spectrum primers PCR followed by DNA enzyme immunoassay and LiPA25 (version 1: Labo Biomedical products, Rijswijk, The Netherlands version 1) and the Papillomavirus Clinical Arrays technique (Genómica, Tres Cantos, Madrid, Spain). In this study, 235 biopsies with histopathologic diagnosis of invasive cervical cancer were analyzed for the detection and genotyping of HPV by LiPA25 SPF10-PCR System (version 1) and Papillomavirus Clinical Arrays technique. The detection of HPV DNA with Genómica technique was 75.1%, and 91.9% with LiPA25 SPF10-PCR. The Genómica technique detected a higher percentage of multiple infections (35%) than LiPA25 (8.9%), with a very low agreement for the detection of multiple infections between them (P>0.05). Our study highlights an important difference between 2 PCR-based methods for detection and genotyping of HPV. LiPA25 SPF10-PCR technology may be more adequate than Genómica for the detection of HPV DNA when using FFPE tissue. PMID:22306675

  2. Dengue virus 3 genotype I in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes and eggs, Brazil, 2005-2006.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Ana P P; Figueiredo, Leandra B; dos Santos, João R; Eiras, Alvaro E; Bonjardim, Cláudio A; Ferreira, Paulo C P; Kroon, Erna G

    2010-06-01

    Dengue virus type 3 genotype I was detected in Brazil during epidemics in 2002-2004. To confirm this finding, we identified this virus genotype in naturally infected field-caught Aedes aegypti mosquitoes and eggs. Results showed usefulness of virus investigations in vectors as a component of active epidemiologic surveillance. PMID:20507754

  3. African Swine Fever Virus p72 Genotype IX in Domestic Pigs, Congo, 2009

    PubMed Central

    Anchuelo, Raquel; Pelayo, Virginia; Poudevigne, Frédéric; Leon, Tati; Nzoussi, Jacques; Bishop, Richard; Pérez, Covadonga; Soler, Alejandro; Nieto, Raquel; Martín, Hilario; Arias, Marisa

    2011-01-01

    African swine fever virus p72 genotype IX, associated with outbreaks in eastern Africa, is cocirculating in the Republic of the Congo with West African genotype I. Data suggest that viruses from eastern Africa are moving into western Africa, increasing the threat of outbreaks caused by novel viruses in this region. PMID:21801650

  4. High-risk human papilloma virus infection, tumor pathophenotypes, and BRCA1/2 and TP53 status in juvenile breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Aceto, Gitana Maria; Solano, Angela Rosaria; Neuman, Maria Isabel; Veschi, Serena; Morgano, Annalisa; Malatesta, Sara; Chacon, Reinaldo Daniel; Pupareli, Carmen; Lombardi, Mercedes; Battista, Pasquale; Marchetti, Antonio; Mariani-Costantini, Renato; Podestà, Ernesto Jorge

    2010-08-01

    Juvenile breast cancer is rare and poorly known. We studied a series of five breast cancer patients diagnosed within 25 years of age that included two adolescents, 12- and 15-years-old, and 3 young women, 21-, 21-, and 25-years-old, respectively. All cases were scanned for germline mutations along the entire BRCA1/2 coding sequences and TP53 exons 4-10, using protein truncation test, denaturing high performance liquid chromatography and direct sequencing. Paraffin-embedded primary tumors (available for 4/5 cases), and a distant metastasis (from the 15-years-old) were characterized for histological and molecular tumor subtype, human papilloma virus (HPV) types 16/18 E6 sequences and tumor-associated mutations in TP53 exons 5-8. A BRCA2 germline mutation (p.Ile2490Thr), previously reported in breast cancer and, as compound heterozygote, in Fanconi anemia, was identified in the 21-year-old patient diagnosed after pregnancy, negative for cancer family history. The tumor was not available for study. Only germline polymorphisms in BRCA1/2 and/or TP53 were detected in the other cases. The tumors of the 15- and 12-years-old were, respectively, classified as glycogen-rich carcinoma with triple negative subtype and as secretory carcinoma with basal subtype. The tumors of the 25-year-old and of the other 21-year-old were, respectively, diagnosed as infiltrating ductal carcinoma with luminal A subtype and as lobular carcinoma with luminal B subtype. No somatic TP53 mutations were found, but tumor-associated HPV 16 E6 sequences were retrieved from the 12- and 25-year-old, while both HPV 16 and HPV 18 E6 sequences were found in the tumor of the 15-year-old and in its associated metastasis. Blood from the 15- and 25-year-old, diagnosed with high-stage disease, resulted positive for HPV 16 E6. All the HPV-positive cases were homozygous for arginine at TP53 codon 72, a genotype associated with HPV-related cancer risk, and the tumors showed p16(INK4A) immunostaining, a marker of HPV

  5. Hepatitis B virus genotypes and genome characteristics in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong-Mei; Wang, Jian-Qiong; Wang, Rui; Zhao, Qian; Li, Li; Zhang, Jin-Ping; Shen, Tao

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the hepatitis B virus (HBV) characters in China, as well as the correlation between several HBV mutation and hepatitis symptoms. METHODS: A total of 1148 HBV genome sequences from patients throughout China were collected via the National Center For Biotechnology Information database (information including: genotype, territory and clinical status). HBV genotypes were classified by a direct reference from the Genbank sequence annotation, phylogenetic tree and online software analysis (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/projects/genotyping/formpage.cgi). The phylogenetic tree was constructed based on the neighbor-joining method by MEGA5.0 software. HBV sequences were grouped based on phylogenetic tree and the distance between the groups was calculated by using the computer between group mean distance methods. Seven hundred and twelve HBV sequences with clear annotation of clinical symptoms were selected to analyses the correlation of mutation and clinical symptoms. Characteristics of sequences were analyzed by using DNAStar and BioEdit software packages. The codon usage bias and RNA secondary structures analysis were performed by RNAdraw software. Recombination analysis was performed by using Simplot software. RESULTS: In China, HBV genotype C was the predominant in Northeastern, genotype B was predominant in Central Southern areas, genotype B and C were both dominant in Southwestern areas, and the recombinant genotype C/D was predominant in Northwestern areas. C2 and B2 were identified as the two major sub-genotypes, FJ386674 might be a putative sub-genotype as B10. The basal core promoter double mutation and pre-C mutation showed various significant differences between hepatitis symptoms. In addition to ATG, many other HBV initiation codons also exist. HBV has codon usage bias; the termination codon of X, C and P open reading frames (ORF) were TAA, TAG, and TGA, respectively. The major stop codons of S-ORF were TAA (96.45%) and TGA (83.60%) in B2 and C2

  6. Biological and phylogenetic characterization of a genotype VII Newcastle disease virus from Venezuela: Efficacy of vaccination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we describe the characterization a virulent genotype VII Newcastle disease virus (NDV) from Venezuela and evaluate the efficacy of heterologous genotype commercial vaccination under field and controlled rearing conditions. Biological pathotyping and molecular analysis were applied. Results sh...

  7. Pepino mosaic virus genotype shift in North America and rapid genotype identification using loop-mediated isothermal amplification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pepino mosaic, once an emerging disease a decade ago, has become endemic on greenhouse tomatoes worldwide in recent years. Three distinct genotypes of Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV), including EU, US1 and CH2 have been recognized. Our earlier study in 2006-2007 demonstrated a predominant EU genotype ...

  8. Oncogenic human papilloma virus and cervical pre-cancerous lesions in brothel-based sex workers in India.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Kamalesh; Bhattacharya, Swati; Bhattacharyya, Subhasish; Chatterjee, Soma; Mallick, Aiyel Haque; Chakraborti, Sekhar; Chatterjee, Debashree; Bal, Baishali

    2008-01-01

    A community-based cross-sectional study was conducted in brothel-based sex workers of West Bengal, Eastern India, to determine their oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) status and the presence of pre-cancerous lesions. A total of 229 sex workers from three districts of West Bengal participated in the study. All the study participants were interviewed with the aid of a pre-tested questionnaire to determine their sociodemographics, risk behaviour and risk perceptions after obtaining informed verbal consent. The interview was followed by collection of cervical cells from all participants using a disposable vaginal speculum and cervical cytobrush. Oncogenic HPV DNA was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A simultaneous Papanicolaou test ('Pap smear') was performed to detect cervical cytological abnormalities. Overall, the prevalence of oncogenic HPV was found to be 25% (58/229) among the studied population. A subset (n=112) of the sample was tested separately to determine the existence and magnitude of HPV genotypes 16 and 18. The results showed that genotype 16 was prevalent in 10% (11/112), genotype 18 in 7% (8/112) and both genotype 16 and 18 in 7% (8/112). The HPV prevalence rate showed a decreasing trend with age, being 71.4% in the 10-19 years age group, 32.3% in the 20-29 years age group, 18.3% in the 30-39 years age group and 2.5% in the >or=40 years age group (statistically significant differences, P1 year, respectively. This difference was found to be statistically significant both by univariate and multivariate analysis. In this study, it was observed that sex workers with an average number of daily clients of six or more had an HPV prevalence of 67% (n=6), those with four to five clients had a prevalence of 45% (n=9), those with two to three clients had a

  9. The Role of Polymerase Chain Reaction of High-Risk Human Papilloma Virus in the Screening of High-Grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions in the Anal Mucosa of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Males Having Sex with Males

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo-Tenorio, Carmen; Rivero-Rodriguez, Mar; Gil-Anguita, Concepción; Esquivias, Javier; López-Castro, Rodrigo; Ramírez-Taboada, Jessica; de Hierro, Mercedes López; López-Ruiz, Miguel A.; Martínez, R. Javier; Llaño, Juan P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the advantages of cytology and PCR of high-risk human papilloma virus (PCR HR-HPV) infection in biopsy-derived diagnosis of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL = AIN2/AIN3) in HIV-positive men having sex with men (MSM). Methods This is a single-centered study conducted between May 2010 and May 2014 in patients (n = 201, mean age 37 years) recruited from our outpatient clinic. Samples of anal canal mucosa were taken into liquid medium for PCR HPV analysis and for cytology. Anoscopy was performed for histology evaluation. Results Anoscopy showed 33.8% were normal, 47.8% low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), and 18.4% HSIL; 80.2% had HR-HPV. PCR of HR-HPV had greater sensitivity than did cytology (88.8% vs. 75.7%) in HSIL screening, with similar positive (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of 20.3 vs. 22.9 and 89.7 vs. 88.1, respectively. Combining both tests increased the sensitivity and NPV of HSIL diagnosis to 100%. Correlation of cytology vs. histology was, generally, very low and PCR of HR-HPV vs. histology was non-existent (<0.2) or low (<0.4). Area under the receiver operating characteristics (AUROC) curve analysis of cytology and PCR HR-HPV for the diagnosis of HSIL was poor (<0.6). Multivariate regression analysis showed protective factors against HSIL were: viral suppression (OR: 0.312; 95%CI: 0.099-0.984), and/or syphilis infection (OR: 0.193; 95%CI: 0.045-0.827). HSIL risk was associated with HPV-68 genotype (OR: 20.1; 95%CI: 2.04-197.82). Conclusions When cytology and PCR HR-HPV findings are normal, the diagnosis of pre-malignant HSIL can be reliably ruled-out in HIV-positive patients. HPV suppression with treatment protects against the appearance of HSIL. PMID:25849412

  10. Identification of new sub-genotypes of virulent Newcastle disease virus with potential panzootic features.

    PubMed

    Miller, Patti J; Haddas, Ruth; Simanov, Luba; Lublin, Avishay; Rehmani, Shafqat Fatima; Wajid, Abdul; Bibi, Tasra; Khan, Taseer Ahmad; Yaqub, Tahir; Setiyaningsih, Surachmi; Afonso, Claudio L

    2015-01-01

    Virulent Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolates from new sub-genotypes within genotype VII are rapidly spreading through Asia and the Middle East causing outbreaks of Newcastle disease (ND) characterized by significant illness and mortality in poultry, suggesting the existence of a fifth panzootic. These viruses, which belong to the new sub-genotypes VIIh and VIIi, have epizootic characteristics and do not appear to have originated directly from other genotype VII NDV isolates that are currently circulating elsewhere, but are related to the present and past Indonesian NDV viruses isolated from wild birds since the 80s. Viruses from sub-genotype VIIh were isolated in Indonesia (2009-2010), Malaysia (2011), China (2011), and Cambodia (2011-2012) and are closely related to the Indonesian NDV isolated in 2007, APMV1/Chicken/Karangasem, Indonesia (Bali-01)/2007. Since 2011 and during 2012 highly related NDV isolates from sub-genotype VIIi have been isolated from poultry production facilities and occasionally from pet birds, throughout Indonesia, Pakistan and Israel. In Pakistan, the viruses of sub-genotype VIIi have replaced NDV isolates of genotype XIII, which were commonly isolated in 2009-2011, and they have become the predominant sub-genotype causing ND outbreaks since 2012. In a similar fashion, the numbers of viruses of sub-genotype VIIi isolated in Israel increased in 2012, and isolates from this sub-genotype are now found more frequently than viruses from the previously predominant sub-genotypes VIId and VIIb, from 2009 to 2012. All NDV isolates of sub-genotype VIIi are approximately 99% identical to each other and are more closely related to Indonesian viruses isolated from 1983 through 1990 than to those of genotype VII, still circulating in the region. Similarly, in addition to the Pakistani NDV isolates of the original genotype XIII (now called sub-genotype XIIIa), there is an additional sub-genotype (XIIIb) that was initially detected in India and Iran

  11. Genotype phenotype mapping in RNA viruses - disjunctive normal form learning.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chuang; Walsh, Andrew S; Rosenfeld, Roni

    2011-01-01

    RNA virus phenotypic changes often result from multiple alternative molecular mechanisms, where each mechanism involves changes to a small number of key residues. Accordingly, we propose to learn genotype-phenotype functions, using Disjunctive Normal Form (DNF) as the assumed functional form. In this study we develop DNF learning algorithms that attempt to construct predictors as Boolean combinations of covariates. We demonstrate the learning algorithm's consistency and efficiency on simulated sequences, and establish their biological relevance using a variety of real RNA virus datasets representing different viral phenotypes, including drug resistance, antigenicity, and pathogenicity. We compare our algorithms with previously published machine learning algorithms in terms of prediction quality: leave-one-out performance shows superior accuracy to other machine learning algorithms on the HIV drug resistance dataset and the UCIs promoter gene dataset. The algorithms are powerful in inferring the genotype-phenotype mapping from a moderate number of labeled sequences, as are typically produced in mutagenesis experiments. They can also greedily learn DNFs from large datasets. The Java implementation of our algorithms will be made publicly available.

  12. Psittacid herpesviruses associated with mucosal papillomas in neotropical parrots.

    PubMed

    Styles, Darrel K; Tomaszewski, Elizabeth K; Jaeger, Laurie A; Phalen, David N

    2004-07-20

    Mucosal papillomas are relatively common lesions in several species of captive neotropical parrots. They cause considerable morbidity and in some cases, result in mortality. Previous efforts to identify papillomavirus DNA and proteins in these lesions have been largely unsuccessful. In contrast, increasing evidence suggests that mucosal papillomas may contain psittacid herpesviruses (PsHVs). In this study, 41 papillomas from 30 neotropical parrots were examined by PCR with PsHV-specific primers. All 41 papillomas were found to contain PsHV DNA. This 100% prevalence of PsHV infection in the papilloma population was found to be significantly higher than PsHV infection prevalence observed in other surveys of captive parrots. PsHV genotypes 1, 2, and 3, but not 4 were found in these lesions. Psittacus erithacus papillomavirus DNA and finch papillomavirus DNA were not found in the papillomas. A papilloma from a hyacinth macaw (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus) was found to contain cells that had immunoreactivity to antiserum made to the common antigenic region of human papillomavirus (HPV) L1 major capsid protein. However, four other mucosal papillomas were negative for this immunoreactivity, and negative control tissues from a parrot embryo showed a similar staining pattern to that seen in the cloaca papilloma of the hyacinth macaw, strongly suggesting that the staining seen in hyacinth macaw papilloma was nonspecific. Based on these findings, it was concluded that specific genotypes of PsHV play a direct role in the development of mucosal papillomas of neotropical parrots and there is no evidence to suggest the concurrent presence of a papillomavirus in these lesions.

  13. Identification of Asian genotype of chikungunya virus isolated in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Quiñonez, José Alberto; Escobar-Escamilla, Noé; Ortíz-Alcántara, Joanna; Vázquez-Pichardo, Mauricio; de la Luz Torres-Rodríguez, María; Nuñez-León, Alma; Torres-Longoria, Belem; López-Martínez, Irma; Ruiz-Matus, Cuitláhuac; Kuri-Morales, Pablo; Ramírez-González, José Ernesto

    2016-02-01

    We identified 25 autochthonous chikungunya virus cases in Mexico, initially detected by RT-PCR targeting the E1 gene and propagated in C6/36 Aedes albopictus cells, in 2014. To determine the type of virus found, in a previous report, the genomes of 2 CHIKV strains were fully sequenced. Genome sequence analysis revealed that these isolates from Mexico belonged to the Asian genotype, and a phylogenetic association with the circulating strain in the British Virgin Islands was also established in the same year. This was further supported by changes in specific amino acids, E2-V368A and 6K-L20M. For these reasons, it can be inferred that the route of virus entry to Mexico was held across the countries in the Caribbean and Central America. The presence of E1-A226V mutation associated with more efficient replication in the salivary gland of the A. albopictus mosquito was not observed. Interestingly, a newly acquired NSP4-S399C mutation was observed; however, the significance of changes in amino acid found in non-structural proteins in autochthonous strains remains to be elucidated.

  14. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification. The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay is a device that consists of nucleic acid...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification. The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay is a device that consists of nucleic acid...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification. The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay is a device that consists of nucleic acid...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification. The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay is a device that consists of nucleic acid...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification. The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay is a device that consists of nucleic acid...

  19. Papillomas on fish exposed to chlorinated wastewater effluent.

    PubMed

    Grizzle, J M; Melius, P; Strength, D R

    1984-11-01

    The presence of carcinogenic and mutagenic chemical(s) in the effluent of a wastewater treatment plant was indicated by papillomas developing on caged black bullheads (Ictalurus melas), hepatic enzyme induction in exposed fish, and Ames test mutagenicity of organic extracts of the wastewater. Although virus-like particles have been reported in papillomas of several other fish species, no evidence was obtained for the presence of viruses in the black bullhead papillomas. Mutagenic and carcinogenic chemicals were not identified in the wastewater, but chlorination was implicated as a factor contributing to the induction of the papillomas. The prevalence of papillomas on wild black bullheads exposed to the effluent decreased from 73 to 23% after the amount of residual chlorine (CAS: 7782-50-5) in the effluent leaving the chlorine contact chamber was reduced from 1.3-3.1 mg/liter to 0.25-1.2 mg/liter. PMID:6593489

  20. Viral fitness does not correlate with three genotype displacement events involving infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kell, Alison M.; Wargo, Andrew R.; Kurath, Gael

    2014-01-01

    Viral genotype displacement events are characterized by the replacement of a previously dominant virus genotype by a novel genotype of the same virus species in a given geographic region. We examine here the fitness of three pairs of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) genotypes involved in three major genotype displacement events in Washington state over the last 30 years to determine whether increased virus fitness correlates with displacement. Fitness was assessed using in vivo assays to measure viral replication in single infection, simultaneous co-infection, and sequential superinfection in the natural host, steelhead trout. In addition, virion stability of each genotype was measured in freshwater and seawater environments at various temperatures. By these methods, we found no correlation between increased viral fitness and displacement in the field. These results suggest that other pressures likely exist in the field with important consequences for IHNV evolution.

  1. Viral fitness does not correlate with three genotype displacement events involving infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus.

    PubMed

    Kell, Alison M; Wargo, Andrew R; Kurath, Gael

    2014-09-01

    Viral genotype displacement events are characterized by the replacement of a previously dominant virus genotype by a novel genotype of the same virus species in a given geographic region. We examine here the fitness of three pairs of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) genotypes involved in three major genotype displacement events in Washington state over the last 30 years to determine whether increased virus fitness correlates with displacement. Fitness was assessed using in vivo assays to measure viral replication in single infection, simultaneous co-infection, and sequential superinfection in the natural host, steelhead trout. In addition, virion stability of each genotype was measured in freshwater and seawater environments at various temperatures. By these methods, we found no correlation between increased viral fitness and displacement in the field. These results suggest that other pressures likely exist in the field with important consequences for IHNV evolution. PMID:25068402

  2. Viral fitness does not correlate with three genotype displacement events involving infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    PubMed Central

    Kell, Alison M; Wargo, Andrew R; Kurath, Gael

    2014-01-01

    Viral genotype displacement events are characterized by the replacement of a previously dominant virus genotype by a novel genotype of the same virus species in a given geographic region. We examine here the fitness of three pairs of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) genotypes involved in three major genotype displacement events in Washington state over the last 30 years to determine whether increased virus fitness correlates with displacement. Fitness was assessed using in vivo assays to measure viral replication in single infection, simultaneous co-infection, and sequential superinfection in the natural host, steelhead trout. In addition, virion stability of each genotype was measured in freshwater and seawater environments at various temperatures. By these methods, we found no correlation between increased viral fitness and displacement in the field. These results suggest that other pressures likely exist in the field with important consequences for IHNV evolution. PMID:25068402

  3. Pathogenesis of new sub-genotypes of Newcastle disease virus strains from Israel and Pakistan

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Newcastle disease (ND) is a devastating disease of poultry worldwide caused by virulent strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV). New genotypes and sub-genotypes of NDV frequently emerge. In the past few years, NDV strains belonging to sub-genotype VIIi and XIIIb emerged in the Middle East and Asi...

  4. Identification of early proteins of the human papilloma viruses type 16 (HPV 16) and type 18 (HPV 18) in cervical carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Seedorf, K; Oltersdorf, T; Krämmer, G; Röwekamp, W

    1987-01-01

    We have sequenced 1730 bp of human papilloma virus type 18 (HPV 18) DNA containing the open reading frames (ORF) E6, E7, the N-terminal part of E1 and, additionally, 120 bp of the N-terminal part of L1. Based on these sequencing data, together with the human papilloma virus type 16 (HPV 16) DNA sequence published recently, we identified and cloned the ORF E6, E7, E1 and L1 of HPV 18 and the ORF E6, E7, E1, E4, E5, L2 and L1 of HPV 16 into prokaryotic expression vectors. The expression system used provides fusions to the N-terminal part of the MS2 polymerase gene controlled by the heat-inducible lambda PL promoter. Using the purified fusion proteins as immunogens we raised antisera against the proteins encoded by the ORF E6, E7 and E1 of HPV 18 as well as those encoded by the ORF E6, E7, E4 and L1 of HPV 16. By Western blot analysis we could show that the E7 gene product is the most abundant protein in cell lines containing HPV 16 or HPV 18 DNA. It is a cytoplasmic protein of 15 kd in the SiHa and the CaSki cell lines which contain HPV 16 DNA, and 12 kd in the HeLa, the C4-1 and the SW756 cell lines which contain HPV 18 DNA. These results were confirmed by in vitro translation of hybrid-selected HPV 16 and HPV 18 specific poly(A)+ RNA from SiHa, CaSki and HeLa cells. Additionally, these experiments led to the identification of an 11-kd E6 and a 10-kd E4 protein in the CaSki cell line as well as a 70-kd E1 protein in HeLa cells. PMID:3034571

  5. Distribution of Hepatitis C Virus Genotypes Among Patients With Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Hormozgan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, Seyedeh Farzaneh; Moosavy, Seyed Hamid; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Eghbali, Hajar; Mahboobi, Hamidreza

    2013-01-01

    Background More than 170 million people in the world are infected with Hepatitis C virus (HCV). Determination of HCV genotype before starting the treatment is required, because HCV genotype affects the course of treatment and drug dosage Objectives We aimed to evaluate HCV genotypes among patients with positive results for anti-HCV in Bandar Abbas from 2011 to 2012. Patients and Methods Five hundred and nine consecutive patients with established chronic HCV infection referred to Behavioral Diseases Consultation Center, Blood Transfusion and Center for Special Diseases from March 2011 to March 2012 were enrolled in this cross sectional study. Five mL of peripheral blood was taken from precipitants and viral RNA extracted after plasma separation. Hepatitis C virus RNA was detected by reverse transcriptase-nested polymerase chain reaction (RT-nested PCR) assay and then HCV genotypes analyzed using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) method. Results In overall, 509 patients enrolled to this study. The mean age of these patients was 38.87 ± 9.55 years ranging from 1 to 90 years. Routs of transmission were: 238 (46.7%) inject of substance, 149 (29.3%) unknown rout, 62 (12.2%) blood transfusion, 50 (9.8%) sexual contact, and 10 (2%) mother to child. Frequency of HCV genotypes were: 316 (62.1%) 1a, 117 (23%) 1b, and 76 (14.9%) 3a. there was no significant association between HCV genotypes and gender, educational degree, risk factor of Hepatitis C, job, monthly income, HIV infection, Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, Intravenous drug injection, and underlying disease (P > 0.05). Conclusions This results the same as many similar studies demonstrated that common HCV genotypes in Iranian patients were 1a, 3a and 1b, respectively. Patients with 1a and 1b genotypes have lower responses to interferon treatment, and it is reasonable to perform early screening to diagnose and determine HCV genotype for effective treatment and diagnose high-risk cases. PMID:24403914

  6. Classification of hepatitis B virus genotypes by the PCR-Invader method with genotype-specific probes.

    PubMed

    Tadokoro, Kenichi; Kobayashi, Mariko; Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Suzuki, Fumitaka; Miyauchi, Saeko; Egashira, Toru; Kumada, Hiromitsu

    2006-12-01

    Hepatitis B virus is a worldwide public health problem. A simple and effective test to identify viral genotypes would greatly aid efforts to understand and control the spread of this disease. A serial invasive signal amplification reaction assay (PCR-Invader assay) was developed for distinguishing the known eight genotypes (A-H) and four subgenotypes (Aa, Ae, Ba, Bj) of hepatitis B virus (HBV). The preS/S and core regions were amplified by multiplex PCR and delivered to 12 wells containing genotype-specific Invader probes. By observing the fluorescence patterns in the wells, HBV sub/genotypes can be assigned. A total of 505 serum samples containing HBV/HBsAg in Japan was examined by PCR-Invader and compared the results with those from ELISA assays with monoclonal antibodies against epitopes on gene products of the preS2 region and with a genotype-specific probe assay (GSPA) based on the preS1 region. Genotypes determined by the PCR-Invader agreed with those of the ELISA method in 98.2% of cases and with the GSPA method in 97.1% of cases. Co-infection with two distinct genotypes was correctly identified by the PCR-Invader in four serum samples, as determined by GSPA. Thus, the PCR-Invader assay is a useful tool for detecting the 10 known HBV sub/genotypes. PMID:16934340

  7. Hepatitis E Virus Genotype 3 in Sewage and Genotype 1 in Acute Hepatitis Cases, Israel.

    PubMed

    Ram, Daniela; Manor, Yossi; Gozlan, Yael; Schwartz, Eli; Ben-Ari, Ziv; Mendelson, Ella; Mor, Orna

    2016-07-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an emerging infectious agent in developed countries. HEV genotypes 1 (G1) and 3 (G3) have been identified in environmental and clinical samples in Europe. In Israel, the overall prevalence of anti-HEV IgG antibodies was found to be 10.6%; however, reports of HEV infection are scarce. In this study, the presence of HEV in Israel was investigated using 169 sewage samples from 32 treatment facilities and 49 samples from acute hepatitis patients, all collected between 2013 and 2015. Fourteen sewage samples, from Haifa (11/18 samples), Tel Aviv (2/29 samples), and Beer Sheva (1/17 samples), regions with good sanitary conditions and middle-high socioeconomic populations, were HEV positive. Among the patient samples, 6.1% (3/49) were HEV positive, all returning travelers from India. Genotype analysis revealed G1 HEV in patients and G3 HEV sequences in sewage. Evidence that HEV could be establishing itself in our region may justify more active surveillance to monitor its spread. PMID:27246446

  8. Recombination and natural selection in hepatitis E virus genotypes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoming; Zhang, Qian; He, Chao; Zhang, Lei; Li, Jinghua; Zhang, Weilu; Cao, Wei; Lv, Yong-Gang; Liu, Zhengcai; Zhang, Jing-Xia; Shao, Zhong-Jun

    2012-09-01

    To gain new insights into the evolutionary processes that created the genetic diversity of the hepatitis E virus (HEV), the Recombination Detection Program (RDP) and SimPlot program were employed to detect recombination events in the genome, then the fixed-effects likelihood (FEL) method was used to detect natural selection effects on viral proteins. Recombination analysis provided strong evidence for both intergenotype and intragenotype recombination events in the sequences analyzed. Recombination events were found to be distributed non-randomly, with the highest frequency in the X domain and the helicase. Strain DQ450072 was identified as intergenotype-recombinant. Natural selection analysis revealed that codons under both negative selection and positive selection were distributed non-randomly. ORF1 and ORF2 have experienced strong purifying selection across genotypes. Furthermore, potentially important sites were also found under positive selection in the N-terminal end of ORF2 and the C-terminal end of ORF3. No significant difference was found among the selective pressures on different genotypes.

  9. Virus-Like Particle Secretion and Genotype-Dependent Immunogenicity of Dengue Virus Serotype 2 DNA Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Galula, Jedhan U.; Shen, Wen-Fan; Chuang, Shih-Te

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dengue virus (DENV), composed of four distinct serotypes, is the most important and rapidly emerging arthropod-borne pathogen and imposes substantial economic and public health burdens. We constructed candidate vaccines containing the DNA of five of the genotypes of dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV-2) and evaluated the immunogenicity, the neutralizing (Nt) activity of the elicited antibodies, and the protective efficacy elicited in mice immunized with the vaccine candidates. We observed a significant correlation between the level of in vitro virus-like particle secretion, the elicited antibody response, and the protective efficacy of the vaccines containing the DNA of the different DENV genotypes in immunized mice. However, higher total IgG antibody levels did not always translate into higher Nt antibodies against homologous and heterologous viruses. We also found that, in contrast to previous reports, more than 50% of total IgG targeted ectodomain III (EDIII) of the E protein, and a substantial fraction of this population was interdomain highly neutralizing flavivirus subgroup-cross-reactive antibodies, such as monoclonal antibody 1B7-5. In addition, the lack of a critical epitope(s) in the Sylvatic genotype virus recognized by interdomain antibodies could be the major cause of the poor protection of mice vaccinated with the Asian 1 genotype vaccine (pVD2-Asian 1) from lethal challenge with virus of the Sylvatic genotype. In conclusion, although the pVD2-Asian 1 vaccine was immunogenic, elicited sufficient titers of Nt antibodies against all DENV-2 genotypes, and provided 100% protection against challenge with virus of the homologous Asian 1 genotype and virus of the heterologous Cosmopolitan genotype, it is critical to monitor the potential emergence of Sylvatic genotype viruses, since vaccine candidates under development may not protect vaccinated humans from these viruses. IMPORTANCE Five genotype-specific dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV-2) DNA vaccine

  10. Determination of genotypes of hepatitis C virus in Venezuela by restriction fragment length polymorphism.

    PubMed Central

    Pujol, F H; Loureiro, C L; Devesa, M; Blitz, L; Parra, K; Beker, S; Liprandi, F

    1997-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus genotypes in Venezuela were analyzed by restriction fragment length polymorphism in the 5' noncoding region. The absence of BstUI digestion was found to be a useful marker for genotype 2 specimens. From 122 serum samples, 66, 20, and 2.5% were classified as genotypes 1, 2, and 3, respectively; 0.8% were classified as genotype 4; and 10% appeared to be mixed infections. PMID:9196212

  11. Interferon-β Induces Cellular Senescence in Cutaneous Human Papilloma Virus-Transformed Human Keratinocytes by Affecting p53 Transactivating Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chiantore, Maria V.; Vannucchi, Serena; Accardi, Rosita; Tommasino, Massimo; Percario, Zulema A.; Vaccari, Gabriele; Affabris, Elisabetta; Fiorucci, Gianna; Romeo, Giovanna

    2012-01-01

    Interferon (IFN)-β inhibits cell proliferation and affects cell cycle in keratinocytes transformed by both mucosal high risk Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) and cutaneous HPV E6 and E7 proteins. In particular, upon longer IFN-β treatments, cutaneous HPV38 expressing cells undergo senescence. IFN-β appears to induce senescence by upregulating the expression of the tumor suppressor PML, a well known IFN-induced gene. Indeed, experiments in gene silencing via specific siRNAs have shown that PML is essential in the execution of the senescence programme and that both p53 and p21 pathways are involved. IFN-β treatment leads to a modulation of p53 phosphorylation and acetylation status and a reduction in the expression of the p53 dominant negative ΔNp73. These effects allow the recovery of p53 transactivating activity of target genes involved in the control of cell proliferation. Taken together, these studies suggest that signaling through the IFN pathway might play an important role in cellular senescence. This additional understanding of IFN antitumor action and mechanisms influencing tumor responsiveness or resistance appears useful in aiding further promising development of biomolecular strategies in the IFN therapy of cancer. PMID:22615843

  12. The prevalence of human papilloma virus (HPV) infections in oral squamous cell carcinomas: a retrospective analysis of 88 patients and literature overview.

    PubMed

    Krüger, M; Pabst, A M; Walter, C; Sagheb, K; Günther, C; Blatt, S; Weise, K; Al-Nawas, B; Ziebart, T

    2014-10-01

    In addition to tobacco and alcohol consumption, the two main risk factors for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), recent studies have revealed infections with human papilloma virus (HPV) as an additional risk factor for OSCC development. In the field of head and neck malignancies, the prevalence of HPV infections in oropharyngeal cancer (OC) ranges in different studies up to 84%. While HPV infection is discussed as an independent risk factor in this region, its distinguished role in carcinogenesis of tumours localized to the oral cavity remains still uncertain. In this study, we analysed the HPV status in 88 consecutive patients with OSCCs localized anterior of the palatoglossal arch who were treated in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at the University Medical Center Mainz. The HPV status analysis was performed using DNA-PCR and immunostaining of p16 protein. The prevalence of HPV-positive OSCCs was about 6% (5 patients). In 3 patients the HPV subtypes 16/18 were found. No significant differences between the HPV positive and negative patients regarding age, gender, smoking and alcohol consumption, localization and TNM level could be detected. Contrary to other studies focussing on cancers of the lingual and palatine tonsil, the prevalence of HPV infections was much lower in the oral cavity. Therefore HPV infection might play a less important role in oral carcinogenesis.

  13. The role of human papilloma virus and p16 in occult primary of the head and neck: a comprehensive review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Fotopoulos, George; Pavlidis, Nicholas

    2015-02-01

    Cancer of unknown primary of the head and neck is a challenging entity for the oncologist. The role of human papilloma virus/p16 in carcinogenesis and in prognosis is well established in certain HNSCC especially in that of the oropharynx. In the case of occult primary of the head and neck the role of HPV/p16 positivity is not well defined regarding prognosis and localization of the primary. An independent review of PubMed and ScienceDirect database was performed up to May 2014 using combinations of terms such as "occult primary of the head and neck", "CUP of the head and neck" "metastatic cervical squamous cell carcinoma of unknown primary", "HPV" and "HPV and head and neck cancer". Literature review shows a strong association between HPV/p16 positivity and primary location in the oropharynx in patients with CUP of the head and neck as well as a better clinical outcome. HPV positivity and p16 overexpression could be used as surrogate markers in the search of the primary site of patients with CUP of the head and neck therefore maybe guiding treatment decisions.

  14. The prevalence of human papilloma virus (HPV) infections in oral squamous cell carcinomas: a retrospective analysis of 88 patients and literature overview.

    PubMed

    Krüger, M; Pabst, A M; Walter, C; Sagheb, K; Günther, C; Blatt, S; Weise, K; Al-Nawas, B; Ziebart, T

    2014-10-01

    In addition to tobacco and alcohol consumption, the two main risk factors for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), recent studies have revealed infections with human papilloma virus (HPV) as an additional risk factor for OSCC development. In the field of head and neck malignancies, the prevalence of HPV infections in oropharyngeal cancer (OC) ranges in different studies up to 84%. While HPV infection is discussed as an independent risk factor in this region, its distinguished role in carcinogenesis of tumours localized to the oral cavity remains still uncertain. In this study, we analysed the HPV status in 88 consecutive patients with OSCCs localized anterior of the palatoglossal arch who were treated in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at the University Medical Center Mainz. The HPV status analysis was performed using DNA-PCR and immunostaining of p16 protein. The prevalence of HPV-positive OSCCs was about 6% (5 patients). In 3 patients the HPV subtypes 16/18 were found. No significant differences between the HPV positive and negative patients regarding age, gender, smoking and alcohol consumption, localization and TNM level could be detected. Contrary to other studies focussing on cancers of the lingual and palatine tonsil, the prevalence of HPV infections was much lower in the oral cavity. Therefore HPV infection might play a less important role in oral carcinogenesis. PMID:24947612

  15. Mouse Retinal Pigmented Epithelial Cell Lines retain their phenotypic characteristics after transfection with Human Papilloma Virus: A new tool to further the study of RPE biology

    PubMed Central

    Catanuto, Paola; Espinosa-Heidmann, Diego; Pereira-Simon, Simone; Sanchez, Patricia; Salas, Pedro; Hernandez, Eleut; Cousins, Scott W.; Elliot, Sharon J.

    2009-01-01

    Development of immortalized mouse retinal pigmented epithelial cell (RPE) lines that retain many of their in vivo phenotypic characteristics, would aid in studies of ocular diseases including age related macular degeneration (AMD). RPE cells were isolated from 16 month old (estrogen receptor knockout) ERKOα and ERKOβ mice and their C57Bl/6 wild type littermates. RPE65 and cellular retinaldehyde binding protein (CRALBP) expression, in vivo markers of RPE cells, were detected by real-time RT-PCR and western analysis. We confirmed the presence of epithelial cell markers, ZO1, cytokeratin 8 and 18 by immunofluorescence staining. In addition, we confirmed the distribution of actin filaments and the expression of ezrin. To develop cell lines, RPE cells were isolated, propagated and immortalized using human papilloma virus (HPV) 16 (E6/E7). RPE-specific markers and morphology were assessed before and after immortalization. In wildtype littermate controls, there was no evidence of any alterations in the parameters that we examined including MMP-2, TIMP-2, collagen type IV, and estrogen receptor (ER) α and ERβ protein expression and ER copy number ratio. Therefore, immortalized mouse RPE cell lines that retain their in vivo phenotype can be isolated from either pharmacologically or genetically manipulated mice, and may be used to study RPE cell biology. PMID:19013153

  16. Hepatitis E virus genotype 3 in mussels (Mytilus galloprovinciallis), Spain.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, João R; Oliveira, Danielle; Rivadulla, Enrique; Abreu-Silva, Joana; Varela, Miguel F; Romalde, Jesús L; Nascimento, Maria S J

    2016-09-01

    Coastal waters can become contaminated with both human waste from sewage treatment plants and runoff following manure application. Thus, shellfish produced close to land can bioaccumulate enteric viruses of human and animal origin, including zoonotic hepatitis E virus that infect both human and swine. The goal of this study was to evaluate the presence of HEV in shellfish from Galicia (NW Spain), a densely populated region with a strong tradition of swine farming, and one of the most important regions in the world for mussel production. We tested 81 mussel batches by RT-qPCR followed by conventional broad-spectrum nested RT-PCR and phylogenetic analysis. We have obtained 12 positive samples by RT-qPCR (14.81%) with HEV contamination levels ranging from 6.7 × 10(1) to 8.6 × 10(4) RNA copies/g digestive tissue. Phylogenetic analysis based on a 330 nt region of the ORF 1 showed that all sequenced isolates belonged to the zoonotic genotype 3 subgenotype e, being closely related to strains of human and swine origin. Results show that shellfish may be a potential route for HEV transmission to humans. PMID:27217353

  17. Newcastle Disease Virus in Madagascar: Identification of an Original Genotype Possibly Deriving from a Died Out Ancestor of Genotype IV

    PubMed Central

    Maminiaina, Olivier F.; Gil, Patricia; Briand, François-Xavier; Albina, Emmanuel; Keita, Djénéba; Andriamanivo, Harentsoaniaina Rasamoelina; Chevalier, Véronique; Lancelot, Renaud; Martinez, Dominique; Rakotondravao, R.; Rajaonarison, Jean-Joseph; Koko, M.; Andriantsimahavandy, Abel A.; Jestin, Véronique; Servan de Almeida, Renata

    2010-01-01

    In Madagascar, Newcastle disease (ND) has become enzootic after the first documented epizootics in 1946, with recurrent annual outbreaks causing mortality up to 40%. Four ND viruses recently isolated in Madagascar were genotypically and pathotypically characterised. By phylogenetic inference based on the F and HN genes, and also full-genome sequence analyses, the NDV Malagasy isolates form a cluster distant enough to constitute a new genotype hereby proposed as genotype XI. This new genotype is presumably deriving from an ancestor close to genotype IV introduced in the island probably more than 50 years ago. Our data show also that all the previously described neutralising epitopes are conserved between Malagasy and vaccine strains. However, the potential implication in vaccination failures of specific amino acid substitutions predominantly found on surface-exposed epitopes of F and HN proteins is discussed. PMID:21085573

  18. FluGenome: a web tool for genotyping influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guoqing; Rowley, Thaine; Garten, Rebecca; Donis, Ruben O

    2007-07-01

    Influenza A viruses are hosted by numerous avian and mammalian species, which have shaped their evolution into distinct lineages worldwide. The viral genome consists of eight RNA segments that are frequently exchanged between different viruses via a process known as genetic reassortment. A complete genotype nomenclature is essential to describe gene segment reassortment. Specialized bioinformatic tools to analyze reassortment are not available, which hampers progress in understanding its role in host range, virulence and transmissibility of influenza viruses. To meet this need, we have developed a nomenclature to name influenza A genotypes and implemented a web server, FluGenome (http://www.flugenome.org/), for the assignment of lineages and genotypes. FluGenome provides functions for the user to interrogate the database in different modalities and get detailed reports on lineages and genotypes. These features make FluGenome unique in its ability to automatically detect genotype differences attributable to reassortment events in influenza A virus evolution.

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of Border Disease Virus Genotype 3 Strain Gifhorn

    PubMed Central

    Fahnøe, Ulrik; Höper, Dirk; Schirrmeier, Horst; Beer, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of the genotype 3 border disease virus strain Gifhorn has been determined; this strain was originally isolated from pigs. This represents the consensus sequence for the virus used to produce the bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) cDNA clone pBeloGif3, which yields a virus that is severely attenuated in cell culture. PMID:24435861

  20. Hepatitis E virus genotype 4 in a pig farm, Italy, 2013.

    PubMed

    Monne, I; Ceglie, L; DI Martino, G; Natale, A; Zamprogna, S; Morreale, A; Rampazzo, E; Cattoli, G; Bonfanti, L

    2015-02-01

    Zoonotic strains of hepatitis E virus (HEV) in Europe have been reported to belong to genotypes 3 and 4. In 2012 and 2013, 57 pig farms in Northern Italy that had previously resulted seropositive for HEV were surveyed for the presence of the virus, with positive samples subsequently genotyped. Hepatitis E RNA was identified in 17/57 (29·8%) seropositive farms. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that distinct subtypes of genotype 3 were circulating in the north-east of Italy; as well, for the first time in the Italian swine population, genotype 4 was identified and attributed to subtype d.

  1. Prevalence of Polyoma BK Virus (BKPyV), Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) and Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) in Oropharyngeal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Polz-Gruszka, Dorota; Morshed, Kamal; Jarzyński, Adrian; Polz-Dacewicz, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence of BK virus, Human Papillomavirus and Epstein-Barr virus in oropharyngeal cancer, and to test our hypothesis that BKV/HPV/EBV co-infection plays a role in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. The correlation between viral infection, OSCC, anatomic location, pre-treatment staging, evidence of metastases to lymph nodes, and grading was also investigated. The examination samples were collected from 62 patients from paraffin tissue blocks. Males (90.3%) with, smoking (83.9%) and alcohol abuse (67.7%) problems prevailed in the studied group. G2 histological type was recognized in 80.6% cases. T4 (77.4%) and N2 (56.5%) traits occurred in the majority of patients. No cases of metastasis were observed (M0 100%). HPV - 24.2%, EBV - 27.4% and BKV 17.7% were detected in the studied samples. We observed co-infection EBV/BKV in 8% of cases, HPV/BKV in 4.8%, and HPV/EBV in 9% cases. Only in two cases co-infection of all three viruses was found.

  2. [Serotypes and genotypes of dengue virus circulating in Venezuela, 1990-1997].

    PubMed

    Salas, R A; Tovar, D; Barreto, A; de Miller, E; Leitmeyer, K; Rico-Hesse, R

    1998-01-01

    Due to the increasing severity of hemorrhagic dengue epidemics during the last years in Venezuela, a retrospective analysis was conducted to identify the behaviour of the dengue virus serotypes circulating in the country and the molecular evolution of dengue virus serotype 2. The data presented here indicates that dengue virus serotypes 1, 2 and 4 are endemic in Venezuela, they circulate simultaneously around the year in the biggest urban cities, however, one particular serotype is predominant during an epidemic period and replaces the virus serotype dominant during the previous epidemic period. The increased severity of dengue fever since 1989 in Venezuela might be associated to the introduction of the Asiatic genotype of virus which replaced the autochthonous Caribbean genotype. The Asiatic genotype is recognised as a more virulent virus.

  3. Genotypes of hepatitis B virus among voluntary blood donors in northern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Jutavijittum, Prapan; Jiviriyawat, Yupa; Yousukh, Amnat; Kunachiwa, Warunee; Toriyama, Kan

    2006-08-01

    There are distinct ethnogeographic variations for the distribution of various hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes, and pathogenic and therapeutic differences are also observed. In general, genotype B infection has a relatively better prognosis than genotype C. In Thailand, genotypes C and B were reported as the major genotypes; however, there were no previous reports of HBV genotyping in the north of the country. From 1998 to 2000, 216 HBsAg-positive serum samples (164 males and 52 females, aged 16-52 years), were screened and collected from voluntary blood donors in four provinces of northern Thailand. The method of Naito et al. was employed in this study, with the multiplex-PCR approach and genotype-specific primers to identify genotypes A-F. We found that the HBV genotype C was highly predominant in northern Thailand (89.3%), when compared with the previous reports of genotype C distribution among voluntary blood donors from other areas in the country (50-65%), followed by genotype B (7.4%), mixed infection of genotype B and C (1.9%) and genotype A (0.5%). Four samples (1.9%) were unclassifiable. There was no significant difference of genotype distribution among four northern Thai provinces or each age group.

  4. Hepatitis C virus infection: Are there still specific problems with genotype 3?

    PubMed Central

    Gondeau, Claire; Pageaux, Georges Philippe; Larrey, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is one of the most common causes of chronic liver disease and the main indication for liver transplantation worldwide. As promising specific treatments have been introduced for genotype 1, clinicians and researchers are now focusing on patients infected by non-genotype 1 HCV, particularly genotype 3. Indeed, in the golden era of direct-acting antiviral drugs, genotype 3 infections are no longer considered as easy to treat and are associated with higher risk of developing severe liver injuries, such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Moreover, HCV genotype 3 accounts for 40% of all HCV infections in Asia and is the most frequent genotype among HCV-positive injecting drug users in several countries. Here, we review recent data on HCV genotype 3 infection/treatment, including clinical aspects and the underlying genotype-specific molecular mechanisms. PMID:26576095

  5. Evaluation of the Prevalence Rate and the Prognostic Effect of Human Papilloma Virus Infection in a Group of Patients With Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Saghravanian, Nasrollah; Zamanzadeh, Maryam; Meshkat, Zahra; Afzal Aghaee, Monavar; Salek, Roham

    2016-01-01

    Background Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the most common malignancy of the oral cavity. A relationship between the human papilloma virus (HPV) infection and the prognosis of oral cavity SCC (OCSCC) has been discussed before. Objectives We investigated the prevalence rate of HPV status in patients with OCSCC, and its effects on clinicopathological characteristics of tumors and patients’ prognosis. Patients and Methods Sections of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue blocks from 114 histopathologically confirmed OCSCC cases were investigated in this study. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was applied to evaluate the HPV status in the samples. Results Fifteen (13.16%) cases were identified as HPV positive. The detected viral subtypes in this study were the subtypes 6 and 11. The stage and especially lymph node stage was significantly higher in the HPV positive group compared to the HPV negative group (P = 0.04). Disease free survival (DFS) was remarkably lower in the HPV positive group compared to the HPV negative group (13.9 vs. 49.9 months, P = 0.02). Overall survival (OS) was also significantly inferior in the HPV positive group (15.7 vs. 49.6 months, P = 0.01). In the current study, no significant differences were observed between two groups in relation to the variables of age, gender, tumors site, tumor size, tumor grading and also the recurrence rate. Conclusions The observed higher mortality rate among the HPV positive group indicates the poorer prognosis of this group in comparison with the HPV negative patients. The incidence rate of HPV infection was low in the studied samples; however, interaction of subtypes 6 and 11 of HPV in poorer prognosis of the patients and a carcinogenic role of HPV in OCSCC cannot be ruled out. PMID:27703640

  6. Sociodemographic and Behavioral Correlates of Anogenital Warts and Human Papilloma Virus-Related Knowledge Among Men who have Sex with Men and Trans Women in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Brandon; Monsour, Emmi; Klausner, Jeffrey D.; Galea, Jerome T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Human papilloma virus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection (STI) globally, with a high burden of anogenital warts (AGW) among men who have sex with men (MSM) and transwomen (TW). Methods Six-hundred HIV negative MSM and TW (300 with AGW, 300 without) were recruited for a prospective cohort study to examine HPV outcomes and HPV vaccine knowledge. Participants completed a self-administered online questionnaire. Logistic regression was used to assess the association between sociodemographic and behavioral characteristics with HPV vaccine knowledge. Results The average participant age was 25.5 years. Most (67%) were single and 41.2% self-reported STI symptoms. The average age of first anal intercourse was 17 years, with self-reported sexual role as active (36%), passive (36%), and both (27%). Three quarters (77%) of participants reported engaging in condomless anal or oral sex up to six months prior to the study. Less than half (48%) of participants had heard of HPV. Participants with AGW were more likely to report that condoms helped prevent HPV (p=0.01) and that the absence of genital warts does not mean the absence of HPV (p<0.01). Conclusion Study participants had low levels of HPV knowledge but likely high HPV exposure due to condomless anal sex. The HPV knowledge gap may be explained in part by the stigma of sex work, underreporting of STIs, the high cost of the HPV vaccine in Peru, and misinformation about HPV vaccine. More work is needed to educate MSM and TW on HPV and the HPV vaccine. PMID:25763672

  7. Human papilloma virus 16 E6 RNA interference enhances cisplatin and death receptor-mediated apoptosis in human cervical carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, Shinta; Hougardy, Brigitte M T; Meersma, Gert J; Schaap, Bessel; de Vries, Elisabeth G E; van der Zee, Ate G J; de Jong, Steven

    2012-05-01

    In cervical cancer, the p53 and retinoblastoma (pRb) tumor suppressor pathways are disrupted by the human papilloma virus (HPV) E6 and E7 oncoproteins, because E6 targets p53 and E7 targets pRb for rapid proteasome-mediated degradation. We have investigated whether E6 suppression with small interfering RNA (siRNA) restores p53 functionality and sensitizes the HPV16-positive cervical cancer cell line SiHa to apoptosis by cisplatin, irradiation, recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (rhTRAIL), or agonistic anti-Fas antibody. E6 siRNA resulted in decreased E6 mRNA levels and enhanced p53 and p21 expression, demonstrating the restoration of p53 functionality in SiHa cells, without inducing high levels of apoptosis (<10%). Cell surface expression of the proapoptotic death receptors (DRs) DR4, DR5, and Fas was not affected by E6 suppression. E6 suppression conferred susceptibility to cisplatin-induced apoptosis but not to irradiation-, rhTRAIL-, or anti-Fas antibody-induced apoptosis. Combining cisplatin with rhTRAIL or anti-Fas antibody induced even higher apoptosis levels in E6-suppressed cells. At the molecular level, cisplatin treatment resulted in elevated p53 levels, enhanced caspase-3 activation, and reduced p21 levels in E6-suppressed cells. Cisplatin in combination with death receptor ligands enhanced caspase-8 and caspase-3 activation and reduced X-linked inhibitor-of-apoptosis protein (XIAP) levels in these cells. We showed using siRNA that the enhanced apoptosis in E6-supressed cells was related to reduced XIAP levels and not due to reduced p21 levels. In conclusion, targeting E6 or XIAP in combination with cisplatin can efficiently potentiate rhTRAIL-induced apoptosis in HPV-positive cervical cancer cells. PMID:22328720

  8. Hepatitis B Virus Genotypes and Precore and Core Mutants in Brazilian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sitnik, Roberta; Pinho, João Renato Rebello; Bertolini, Dennis Armando; Bernardini, Antonio Plinio; da Silva, Luiz Caetano; Carrilho, Flair José

    2004-01-01

    A method for genotyping hepatitis B virus by partial HBsAg gene sequencing with primers common to all known genotypes was developed. Mutations related to anti-HBs resistance are also detected with this method. Samples from 103 Brazilian patients were analyzed. Precore and core region of these viruses were also sequenced in 101 patients. Genotypes A, B, C, D, and F were found with frequencies of 49.5, 2.9, 13.6, 24.3, and 9.7%, respectively. Genotypes B and C were found only in Asian patients, whereas genotypes A, D, and F were more common in patients without an Asian background. Precore mutants were found in 32 (31.7%) of 101 patients, with a higher frequency in those infected with genotype D (22 of 25 [88.0%]). Analysis of nucleotide 1858 showed presence of thymine in all patients with genotypes B, C, and D and in a few patients with genotypes A (10.0%) and F (30.0%), who showed more frequently the presence of cytosine. This nucleotide was closely related to the presence of precore mutants. Mutations in the basal core promoter were found in 64 of 101 (63.4%) samples. These mutations were more frequent in patients infected with genotype F (90.0%) and less frequent in patients infected with genotype B (33.3%). Deletions in this region were found in two genotype C-infected patients. PMID:15184419

  9. Distribution of Hepatitis B Virus Genotypes in Azerbaijani Patients With Chronic Hepatitis B Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bokharaei-Salim, Farah; Keyvani, Hossein; Monavari, Seyed Hamidreza; Esghaei, Maryam; Fakhim, Shahin; Ataei Pirkooh, Angila; Behnava, Bita

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) has been classified into ten genotypes (A-J) based on genome sequence divergence, which is very important for etiological and clinical investigations. HBV genotypes have distinct geographical distributions worldwide. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the distribution of HBV genotypes among Azerbaijani patients with chronic hepatitis B, came from the Republic of Azerbaijan country to Iran to receive medical care. Patients and Methods: One hundred and three patients with chronic HBV infection, referred to hospitals related to Iran University of Medical Sciences and Tehran Hepatitis Center from August 2011 to July 2014, were enrolled in this cross sectional study. About 3-milliliter of peripheral blood was taken from each patient. After viral DNA extraction, HBV genotypes were tested using the INNO-LiPA™ HBV kit (Innogenetics, Ghent, Belgium). HBV genotyping was confirmed using sequencing of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and polymerase (pol) regions of HBV. Results: The mean age of patients was 35.9 ± 11.7 years (19-66). Of 103 patients, 72 (69.9%) were male. In the present study, the predominant HBV genotype was D (93.2%) followed by genotype A (5.8%) and concurrent infection with A and D genotypes (0.97%). Conclusions: The main and frequent HBV genotype among Azerbaijani patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection was genotype D followed by genotype A. PMID:25685166

  10. Emergence of new sub-genotypes of virulent Newcastle disease virus with panzootic features

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) strains with epizootic characteristics from three new sub-genotypes of genotypes VII and XIII are rapidly spreading through Asia and the Middle East causing outbreaks of Newcastle disease (ND) that are producing significant illness and mortality in vaccinated poultry, s...

  11. Dengue virus 3 genotype 1 associated with dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Barcelos Figueiredo, Leandra; Batista Cecílio, Alzira; Portela Ferreira, Gustavo; Paiva Drumond, Betânia; Germano de Oliveira, Jaquelline; Bonjardim, Cláudio Antônio; Peregrino Ferreira, Paulo César; Kroon, Erna Geessien

    2008-02-01

    Dengue serotype 3 viruses were isolated from patients in Brazil from 2002 through 2004. On the basis of phylogenetic analyses, these isolates were assigned genotype 1. This genotype had never been reported in South America before. Its appearance indicates a major risk factor for dengue epidemics and severe disease.

  12. Pattern and molecular epidemiology of Hepatitis B virus genotypes circulating in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Awan, Zunaira; Idrees, Muhammad; Amin, Irum; Butt, Sadia; Afzal, Samia; Akbar, Haji; Rehman, Irshad-ur; Younas, Saima; Shahid, Muhammad; Lal, Amreek; Saleem, Sana; Rauff, Bisma

    2010-12-01

    The continuously mutating nature of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is responsible for the emergence of varying genotypes in different regions of the world affecting the disease outcome. The objective of the current study was to find out the pattern of HBV genotypes circulating in Pakistan. HBV genotypes were determined in HBV chronic patients of different age and gender from all the four different geographical regions (provinces) of Pakistan for a period of 2 years (2007-2009). Out of the total 3137 consecutive patients, 300 (175; 58.3% males and 125; 41.7% females) were randomly selected for HBV genotype A through H determination using molecular genotyping methods. Total 269 (89.6%) isolates were successfully genotyped where as 31 (10.3%) samples failed to generate a type-specific PCR band and were found untypable. Out of the successfully genotyped samples, 43 (14.3%) were with type A, 54 (18%) were with type B, 83 (27.6%) were with type C, 39 (13%) were with type D, 2 (0.6%) were with type E, 4 (1.3%) were with genotype F and total 44 (14.6%) were with mixed HBV infections. Of the mixed genotype infection cases, 16 were with genotypes A/D, 9 were B/C, six were A/D/F, five were with genotypes A/F, two were with A/B/D and B/E and one each for A/C as well as A/E genotypes. Four common genotypes of HBV found worldwide (A, B, C & D) were isolated from Pakistan along with uncommon genotypes E and F for the first time in Pakistan. Overall Genotype C is the most prevalent genotype. Genotypes B and C are predominant in Punjab & Balochistan and Khyber Pakhtoonkhwa, respectively whereas genotype A in Sindh.

  13. Molecular Assay and Genotyping of Hepatitis C Virus among Infected Egyptian and Saudi Arabian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Farag, Mohamed MS; Sofy, Ahmed R; Mousa, Adel A; Ahmed, Mohamed A; Alganzory, Mohamed R

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major health problem recognized globally. HCV is a common cause of liver fibrosis that may lead to liver cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of HCV infection and genotyping among Egyptian and Saudi Arabian chronic patients using different molecular techniques. HCV RNA viral load was assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technology. For HCV genotyping, RT-PCR hybridization fluorescence-based method and reverse hybridization line probe assay (INNO-LiPA) were used. A total of 40 anti-HCV-positive patients with chronic hepatitis C were examined for HCV RNA, genotyping, and different laboratory investigations. In the present study, HCV genotypes 4, mixed 4.1b, and 1 were detected in patients of both countries, while genotype 2 was only detected in Saudi Arabian patients. Genotyping methods for HCV showed no difference in the classification at the genotype level. With regard to HCV subtypes, INNO-LiPA assay was a reliable test in HCV genotyping for the detection of major genotypes and subtypes, while RT-PCR-based assay was a good test at the genotype level only. HCV genotype 4 was found to be the predominant genotype among Egyptian and Saudi Arabian chronic patients. In conclusion, data analysis for detecting and genotyping HCV was an important factor for understanding the epidemiology and treatment strategies of HCV among Egyptian and Saudi Arabian chronic patients. PMID:26512201

  14. Further evidence of hepatitis B virus genotype I circulation in Northeast India.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Ashrafali Mohamed; Goel, Ashish; Kannangai, Rajesh; Abraham, Priya

    2013-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes have known to show a geographical pattern in their distribution and have been used to trace the migration of populations from geographically distant regions. Novel recombinants between HBV genotypes A, G and C referred as genotype I has been recently reported from Eastern India. In our investigation to characterise antiviral resistance mutations, we identified a rare case of HBV genotype I infection in chronic hepatitis B subject. We encountered confounding results of this emerging genotype 'designated as genotype G' in three widely used HBV sequence database for genotype determination. The recombinant fragment of genotype G largely occupies the surface gene sequence of the newly identified genotype I and could hence lead to misclassification of genotype I. Additionally, recombination analysis of the generated sequences in Simplot and jpHMM model showed two different patterns of recombination events. In conclusion, the increasing recognition of genotype I in this population suggests that further studies may reveal uncommon genotypes from other geographically distant regions. Our observation of potential genotype I misclassification despite the use of public HBV sequence database and other recombination analysis tools highlights the need for updating and validating public sequence domains of diagnostic importance.

  15. A new genotype of border disease virus with implications for molecular diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Peletto, Simone; Caruso, Claudio; Cerutti, Francesco; Modesto, Paola; Zoppi, Simona; Dondo, Alessandro; Acutis, Pier Luigi; Masoero, Loretta

    2016-02-01

    Border disease virus (BDV) is a (+) single-stranded RNA pestivirus affecting mainly sheep and goats worldwide. Genetic typing of BDV has led to the identification of at least seven major genotypes. This study reports the detection of a BDV strain from a goat in northwestern Italy during routine investigations. Sequence analysis revealed mutations in the 5'-UTR of the virus with implications for BDV molecular diagnostics. Moreover, subsequent phylogenetic analysis based on the combined 5'-UTR and Npro/partial C genes, showed divergence from known BDV genotypes, revealing the detection of a novel pestivirus group, for which we propose the name BDV genotype 8.

  16. Identification of new sub-genotypes of virulent Newcastle disease virus with potential panzootic features

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Strains of virulent Newcastle disease virus (NDV) with epizootic characteristics are rapidly spreading through Asia and the Middle East causing outbreaks of Newcastle disease (ND). Significant illness and mortality in vaccinated poultry caused by highly related viruses of new sub-genotypes within ge...

  17. High Prevalence and Predominance of Hepatitis Delta Virus Genotype 1 Infection in Cameroon▿

    PubMed Central

    Foupouapouognigni, Yacouba; Noah, Dominique Noah; Sartre, Michèle Tagni; Njouom, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Antibodies to the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) were found in 17.6% of 233 hepatitis B virus surface antigen-positive subjects in Cameroon. Phylogenetic analyses showed the presence of HDV-1, HDV-5, HDV-6, and HDV-7 genotypes. These results enrich the limited data on HDV prevalence and molecular diversity in Cameroon. PMID:21209162

  18. High prevalence and predominance of hepatitis delta virus genotype 1 infection in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Foupouapouognigni, Yacouba; Noah, Dominique Noah; Sartre, Michèle Tagni; Njouom, Richard

    2011-03-01

    Antibodies to the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) were found in 17.6% of 233 hepatitis B virus surface antigen-positive subjects in Cameroon. Phylogenetic analyses showed the presence of HDV-1, HDV-5, HDV-6, and HDV-7 genotypes. These results enrich the limited data on HDV prevalence and molecular diversity in Cameroon.

  19. Greater diversity of hepatitis C virus genotypes found in Hong Kong than in mainland China.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y Y; Lok, A S; Chan, D T; Widell, A

    1995-01-01

    A hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotyping PCR assay based on type-specific primers was expanded to include genotype 6a as well as genotypes 1a, 1b, 2a, and 3a. The nucleotide sequences of a 194-bp fragment in the center of the HCV core gene showed that the homologies between genotype 6a and genotypes 1a, 1b, 2a, 2b, 3a, and 5 were 81.2, 82.1, 73.8, 77.3, 81.4, and 78.9%, respectively. A high degree of homology (99.6%) was seen in the amplified core region among eight clinically unrelated genotype 6a isolates. Although the Hong Kong Chinese patients had predominantly genotype 1b (70%), it was noteworthy that genotype 6a was the second most common genotype (14%). Four other HCV genotypes--1a, 1b, 2a, and 2b--were also present. In contrast, HCV infection by mainland China was confined to genotypes 1b and 2a. Thus, we found a greater diversity of HCV genotypes in Hong Kong than in mainland China. PMID:8576348

  20. Full-length sequence analysis of hepatitis E virus isolates: showing potential determinants of virus genotype and identity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dong; Jiang, Mei; Jin, Min; Qiu, Zhigang; Cui, Weihong; Shen, Zhiqiang; Li, Bo; Gong, Lianfeng; Chen, Zhaoli; Wang, Xinwei; Li, Jun-Wen

    2013-12-01

    The complete genome sequence of a genotype 4 strain of hepatitis E virus (CH-YT-HEV02) from a patient (in Yantai, China) has been determined. Phylogenetic analysis showed that CH-YT-HEV02 belongs to genotype 4, subtype 4a. However, the phylogenetic analysis indicated that it was most closely related to JKO-CHiSai98C (AB197673) strain, sharing only 91.6% sequence identity with it. Judging from the phylogenetic tree based on the full-length nucleotide sequences of all 70 genotype 4 HEV isolates retrieved from GenBank up to May, 2013, the CH-YT-HEV02 isolates could serve as a Yantai-indigenous strain. A broader comparison with other genotype isolates revealed that there are a few conserved amino acids in the HVR region of different HEV genotypes, and two amino acid motifs in ORF2 and ORF3 might serve as signatures of genotype diversity of HEV.

  1. Molecular epidemiology of dengue 2 viruses in the Philippines: genotype shift and local evolution.

    PubMed

    Salda, Leonora T D; Parquet, Maria D C; Matias, Ronald R; Natividad, Filipinas F; Kobayashi, Noboyuki; Morita, Kouichi

    2005-10-01

    The pre-membrane (prM) and envelope (E) genes of 41 viruses isolated from dengue fever (DF), dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), and dengue shock syndrome (DSS) patients from 1995 to 2002 were sequenced to determine the genetic variability of dengue 2 (DENV 2) viruses in the Philippines. The envelope sequence data were compared with a global sample of DENV 2 obtained from GenBank. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that two distinct genotypes, Asian 2 and Cosmopolitan, are currently circulating locally, each with the potential to cause severe hemorrhagic disease. After the initial isolation in 1998, the Cosmopolitan genotype has gradually and effectively replaced Asian genotype 2 in the Philippines. Members of this genotype were closely related to viruses from Australia, Singapore, and Thailand.

  2. Changing Epidemiology of Hepatitis C Virus Genotype among Patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Hepatitis C Virus Co-Infection in China

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Fengyu; Nie, Jingmin; Lan, Yun; Li, Huiqin; Lu, Ruichao; Gao, Yanqing; Song, Yuxia; Zhao, Qingxia; Zheng, Yuhuang; Tang, Xiaoping; Cai, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Background Co-infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) has become the most common cause of death in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients on antiretroviral therapy. The distribution of HCV genotypes varies with geographical regions and time, and limited studies have focused on the HCV genotype in HIV/HCV co-infection. Methods The distribution of HCV genotypes was evaluated in 414 patients with HIV/HCV co-infection in three regions (South, Central and Northwest) of China from 2008 to 2010. The NS5B region of HCV was characterized using nested reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Nucleotide sequences obtained were subjected to phylogenetic analysis, and genotypes were assigned using published reference genotypes. Results Genotype 3 was the most prevalent HCV strain (36.2%), followed by genotype 6 (30.0%), genotype 1 (28.5%), genotype 2 (5.1%), and genotype 5 (0.2%). The distribution varied geographically. Genotype 6 (37.6%) was the predominant strain while genotype 1 (20.2%) was less common in the South compared to the Central and Northwest regions (all P < 0.001). The distribution also varied temporally. There was no significant difference in genotype distribution in Guangdong (a province in the South region), between patient cohorts from 2005–2008 and 2009–2010. However, outside Guangdong, genotypes 3 and 6a became significantly more prevalent (22.4% vs.42.2%, P< 0.001; 8.0% vs. 19.8%, P = 0.004), and genotype 1 less prevalent (54.4% vs.26.6%, P< 0.001) over time. Conclusion The most dramatic shift in genotypic distribution was the movement of HCV genotypes 3 and 6a outside of Guangdong in HIV/HCV co-infected patients. This movement appeared closely associated with transmission via injected drug use. PMID:27603929

  3. Evaluation of novel assays for the detection of human papilloma virus in self-collected samples for cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Chen, Q; Du, H; Zhang, R; Zhao, J H; Hu, Q C; Wang, C; Wang, G X; Tang, J L; Wu, R F

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of three new high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) assays for primary cervical cancer screening, by using self-collected samples, and to identify an HPV assay that could overcome the major obstacles faced during large-scale population-based screening. Two hundred and ten women showing abnormal cervical cytology (and referred for a colposcopy) were recruited in this study. Self-collected samples obtained from all women were tested with the Cobas, Seq, and BioPerfectus Multiplex Real Time HPV assays; simultaneously, clinician-collected samples (from the same women) were tested with the gold-standard Cobas HPV assay. The results of all the assays were consistent. The sensitivity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2+ (CIN2+) and CIN3+ were comparable between the self-collected samples tested with the three new assays and the clinician-collected samples tested with the Cobas HPV assay (P > 0.05). The single-genotype HPV load per sample did not differ significantly between the self- and clinician-collected samples (P = 0.195). In conclusion, the results of this study demonstrated the applicability of the three new HPV assays for primary cervical cancer screening based on self-collection. PMID:27420961

  4. Human Papilloma Virus prevalence and type-specific relative contribution in invasive cervical cancer specimens from Italy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer represents an important global public health problem. It is the 2nd most common cancer among women worldwide. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection is now well-established as a necessary cause of invasive cervical cancer (ICC) development. Only a few studies on HPV prevalence and type-specific distribution in ICC have been conducted in Italy. Aim To describe the prevalence of HPV and the HPV type-specific distribution in ICC cases identified in Rome, Italy. Methods 140 paraffin embedded tissue blocks of primary ICC diagnosed between 2001 and 2006 were identified at the Regina Elena Cancer Institute in Rome (Italy). HPV was detected through amplification of HPV DNA using SPF-10 HPV broad-spectrum primers followed by DEIA and then genotyping by LiPA25 (version 1). Results 134 cases were considered suitable for HPV DNA detection after histological evaluation; and overall, 90.3% (121/134) HPV prevalence was detected. 111 cases had a single HPV type, 4 cases had an uncharacterized type (HPVX) and 6 cases had multiple HPV infections. The five most common single HPV types among positive cases were: HPV16 (71/121; 58.7%), HPV18 (12/121; 9.9%), HPV31, HPV45 and HPV58 (5/121; 4.1% each). 2 (1.5%) of the single infections and 2 (1.5%) of the multiple infections contained low risk types. Statistically significant differences in the relative contribution of HPV18 were found when comparing squamous cell carcinomas with adenocarcinomas. Conclusions HPV16 and HPV18 accounted for almost 70% of all the HPV positive ICC cases. The study provides baseline information for further evaluation on the impact of recently introduced HPV vaccines in Italy. PMID:20525370

  5. Circulation of Mumps Virus Genotypes in Spain from 1996 to 2007▿

    PubMed Central

    Echevarría, J. E.; Castellanos, A.; Sanz, J. C.; Pérez, C.; Palacios, G.; Martínez de Aragón, M. V.; Peña Rey, I.; Mosquera, M.; de Ory, F.; Royuela, E.

    2010-01-01

    Although the WHO recommends the use of genotyping as a tool for epidemiological surveillance for mumps, limited data on mumps virus (MV) genotype circulation that may be used to trace the patterns of virus spread are available. We describe the first complete series of data from Spain. The small hydrophobic region was sequenced from 237 MV-positive samples from several regions of Spain collected between 1996 and 2007. Six different genotypes were identified: A, C, D (D1), G (G1, G2), H (H1, H2), and J. Genotype H1 was predominant during the epidemic that occurred from 1999 to 2003 but was replaced by genotype G1 as the dominant genotype in the epidemic that occurred from 2005 to 2007. The same genotype G1 strain caused concomitant outbreaks in different parts of the world (the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom). The remaining genotypes (genotypes A, C, D, and J) appeared in sporadic cases or small limited outbreaks. This pattern of circulation seems to reflect continuous viral circulation at the national level, despite the high rates of vaccine coverage. PMID:20107099

  6. Novel measles virus genotype, East Timor and Australia.

    PubMed

    Chibo, Doris; Riddell, Michaela; Catton, Michael; Birch, Christopher

    2002-07-01

    Measles outbreaks in 1999 in Queensland and Victoria, Australia, were caused by a novel strain of clade G virus (proposed name g3). Epidemiologic and molecular evidence supports independent circulation of this virus in Queensland, northern Australia, in addition to importation of the virus by East Timor refugees seeking safe haven in Australia. PMID:12095446

  7. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 2a has a better virologic response to antiviral therapy than HCV genotype 1b

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Zhang, Yi; Li, Zhiqin; Zhang, Hongyu; Zhang, Zhen; Yue, Dongli; Zhou, Rong; Li, Xiaogang; Wu, Shuhuan; Li, Jiansheng

    2015-01-01

    The standard treatment, pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) plus ribavirin (RBV), for patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC), does not provide a sustained virologic response (SVR) in a large majority of patients. In the present study, 211 treatment-naïve patients with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1b and 2a were recruited and treated weekly with PEG-IFN plus RBV to determine the response of HCV genotype 1b and 2a patients to standard antiviral treatment. Virologic responses were assessed by TaqMan at week 4, 12, 24, 48 and 24 weeks of treatment. Patients with HCV genotype 2a had a significantly higher rapid virologic response (RVR), early virologic response, end-of-treatment response and SVR, and a lower relapse rate than patients with HCV genotype 1b. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the HCV genotype 2a patients had a HCV RNA level ≤ 5.70 log10 IU/ml, a fibrosis stage < S3, and that HLA-A02 expression and RVR were independent factors of SVR that may improve HCV clearance. PMID:26221288

  8. Human papilloma virus in non-small cell lung cancer in never smokers: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Yoshikazu; Ando, Masahiko; Kubo, Akihito; Isa, Shun-Ichi; Yamamoto, Satomi; Tsujino, Kazuyuki; Kurata, Takayasu; Ou, Sai-Hong I; Takada, Minoru; Kawaguchi, Tomoya

    2014-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in never smokers has emerged as a global public health issue. The cause is still unclear, and few studies have focused on the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the never smokers. We performed a systematic search of PubMed for articles of HPV infection in human subjects with NSCLC up to September 2012. Although smoking status was not fully reported in all studies, we contacted the authors by e-mail to supplement this information. Differences in the distribution of patients with and without HPV infection were tested with the Chi squared test. We identified 46 eligible articles, including 23 from Asian countries (N=2337 NSCLC cases), 19 from European countries (N=1553) and 4 from North and South America (N=160). The HPV prevalence was 28.1% (95% confidence interval (CI) 26.6-30.3%), 8.4% (95% CI 7.1-9.9%) and 21.3% (95% CI 15.2-28.4%), respectively. Eleven studies from East Asia (N=1110) and 4 from Europe (N=569) provided information on smoking status. The number of never smoker was 392 patients (33.9%) in East Asia and 54 patients (14.8%) in Europe. The HPV prevalence in East Asian countries was similar between never and ever smokers (33.9% vs 39.2%, P=0.080). Based on the literature confirming the presence of HPV in lung cancer in never smokers, the virus plays a role in carcinogenesis in the disease. There were different patterns of HPV prevalence between Asian and European countries in the never smokers as well as in ever smokers.

  9. Prior infection of pigs with a genotype 3 swine hepatitis E virus (HEV) protects against subsequent challenges with homologous and heterologous genotypes 3 and 4 human HEV.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Brenton J; Dryman, Barbara A; Huang, Yao-Wei; Feagins, Alicia R; Leroith, Tanya; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2011-07-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an important human pathogen. At least four recognized and two putative genotypes of mammalian HEV have been reported: genotypes 1 and 2 are restricted to humans whereas genotypes 3 and 4 are zoonotic. The current experimental vaccines are all based on a single strain of HEV, even though multiple genotypes of HEV are co-circulating in some countries and thus an individual may be exposed to more than one genotype. Genotypes 3 and 4 swine HEV is widespread in pigs and known to infect humans. Therefore, it is important to know if prior infection with a genotype 3 swine HEV will confer protective immunity against subsequent exposure to genotypes 3 and 4 human and swine HEV. In this study, specific-pathogen-free pigs were divided into 4 groups of 6 each. Pigs in the three treatment groups were each inoculated with a genotype 3 swine HEV, and 12 weeks later, challenged with the same genotype 3 swine HEV, a genotype 3 human HEV, and a genotype 4 human HEV, respectively. The control group was inoculated and challenged with PBS buffer. Weekly sera from all pigs were tested for HEV RNA and IgG anti-HEV, and weekly fecal samples were also tested for HEV RNA. The pigs inoculated with swine HEV became infected as evidenced by fecal virus shedding and viremia, and the majority of pigs also developed IgG anti-HEV prior to challenge at 12 weeks post-inoculation. After challenge, viremia was not detected and only two pigs challenged with swine HEV had 1-week fecal virus shedding, suggesting that prior infection with a genotype 3 swine HEV prevented pigs from developing viremia and fecal virus shedding after challenges with homologous and heterologous genotypes 3 and 4 HEV. The results from this study have important implications for future development of an effective HEV vaccine.

  10. Molecular identification of Saint Louis encephalitis virus genotype IV in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Hoyos-López, Richard; Soto, Sandra Uribe; Rúa-Uribe, Guillermo; Gallego-Gómez, Juan Carlos

    2015-09-01

    Saint Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) is a member of the Japanese-encephalitis virus serocomplex of the genus Flavivirus. SLEV is broadly distributed in the Americas and the Caribbean Islands, where it is usually transmitted by mosquitoes of the genus Culex and primarily to birds and mammalian-hosts. Humans are occasionally infected by the virus and are dead-end hosts. SLEV causes encephalitis in temperate regions, while in tropical regions of the Americas, several human cases and a wide biological diversity of SLEV-strains have been reported. The phylogenetic analysis of the envelope (E) protein genes indicated eight-genotypes of SLEV with geographic overlap. The present paper describes the genotyping of two SLEV viruses detected in mosquito-pools collected in northern Colombia (department of Cordoba). We used reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to amplify a fragment of the E-gene to confirm the virus identity and complete E-gene sequencing for phylogenetic analysis and genotyping of the two-SLEV viruses found circulating in Córdoba. This is the first report of SLEV genotype IV in Colombia (Córdoba) in mosquitoes from a region of human inhabitation, implicating the risk of human disease due to SLEV infection. Physicians should consider SLEV as a possible aetiology for undiagnosed febrile and neurologic syndromes among their patients who report exposure to mosquito-bites.

  11. Molecular identification of Saint Louis encephalitis virus genotype IV in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Hoyos-López, Richard; Soto, Sandra Uribe; Rúa-Uribe, Guillermo; Gallego-Gómez, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Saint Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) is a member of the Japanese-encephalitis virus serocomplex of the genus Flavivirus. SLEV is broadly distributed in the Americas and the Caribbean Islands, where it is usually transmitted by mosquitoes of the genus Culex and primarily to birds and mammalian-hosts. Humans are occasionally infected by the virus and are dead-end hosts. SLEV causes encephalitis in temperate regions, while in tropical regions of the Americas, several human cases and a wide biological diversity of SLEV-strains have been reported. The phylogenetic analysis of the envelope (E) protein genes indicated eight-genotypes of SLEV with geographic overlap. The present paper describes the genotyping of two SLEV viruses detected in mosquito-pools collected in northern Colombia (department of Cordoba). We used reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to amplify a fragment of theE-gene to confirm the virus identity and completeE-gene sequencing for phylogenetic analysis and genotyping of the two-SLEV viruses found circulating in Córdoba. This is the first report of SLEV genotype IV in Colombia (Córdoba) in mosquitoes from a region of human inhabitation, implicating the risk of human disease due to SLEV infection. Physicians should consider SLEV as a possible aetiology for undiagnosed febrile and neurologic syndromes among their patients who report exposure to mosquito-bites. PMID:26313538

  12. Partially Neutralizing Potency against Emerging Genotype I Virus among Children Received Formalin-Inactivated Japanese Encephalitis Virus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yi-Chin; Chen, Jo-Mei; Chiu, Hsien-Chung; Chen, Yi-Ying; Lin, Jen-Wei; Shih, Chen-Chang; Chen, Chih-Ming; Chang, Chao-Chin; Chang, Gwong-Jen J.; Chiou, Shyan-Song

    2012-01-01

    Background Genotype I (GI) Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) that replaced GIII virus has become the dominant circulating virus in Asia. Currently, all registered live and inactivated JEV vaccines are derived from genotype III viruses. In Taiwan, the compulsory JEV vaccination policy recommends that children receives four doses of formalin-inactivated Nakayama (GIII) JEV vaccine. Methodology/Principal Findings To evaluate the influence of genotype replacement on the post-vaccination viral neutralizing ability by GIII and GI viruses, the small panel of vaccinated-children serum specimens was assembled, and the reciprocal 50% plaque-reduction neutralizing antibody titers (PRNT50) were measured against Nakayama vaccine strain, CJN GIII human brain isolate and TC2009-1 GI mosquito isolate. The seropositivity rate (PRNT50≥1∶10) and geometric mean titers (GMT) against the TC2009-1 virus were the lowest among the three viruses. The protective threshold against the CJN and TC2009-1 viruses could only be achieved when the GMT against Nakayama virus was ≥1∶20 or ≥1∶80, respectively. Using undiluted vaccinees' sera, the enhancement of JEV infection in K562 cells was observed in some low or non-neutralizing serum specimens. Conclusions/Significance Our preliminary study has shown that neutralizing antibodies, elicited by the mouse brain-derived and formalin-inactivated JEV Nakayama vaccine among a limited number of vaccinees, have reduced neutralizing capacity against circulating GI virus, but more detailed studies are needed to address the potential impact on the future vaccine policy. PMID:23029592

  13. [Hepatitis B virus genotype E infection in Turkey: the detection of the first case].

    PubMed

    Sayan, Murat; Sanlıdağ, Tamer; Akçalı, Sinem; Arıkan, Ayşe

    2014-10-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a global major health problem. Currently, 10 genotypes (A-J) of hepatitis B virus (HBV) are identified based on the nucleic acid sequence heterogeneity, and these genotypes have been shown to have distinct geographic distribution. Reports of the previous studies indicated that the genotype D is the predominant type among hepatitis B patients in different regions of Turkey. However, recent studies indicated that other HBV genotypes are also seen with an increasing rate. Although epidemiological and clinical information on genotype E infection is currently limited, it is known that genotype E infection is common in West and Central Africa. In this report, the first case of HBV genotype E infection in Turkey was presented. A 22-year-old Nigerian male employee who resided in Manisa for five years was admitted to Celal Bayar University Hospital Manisa, Turkey, for his routine check-up. Since HBsAg was found positive, other HBV markers were tested with a repeated serum sample. Laboratory findings were as follows; HBsAg (+), anti-HBs (-), HBeAg (-), anti-HBe (+), anti-HBc (+), anti-HCV (-), anti-HIV (-), ALT: 44 U/L and AST: 45 U/L. HBV-DNA level was detected as 700 IU/ml by real-time PCR (Artus HBV QS RGQ Qiagen, Germany). HBV-DNA isolated from the serum sample of the patient was amplified by PCR and polymerase gene segment of HBV was directly sequenced. UPGMA method was used for phylogenetic analysis and Inno-LIPA HBV genotyping method (Innogenetics, Belgium) was performed to determine multiple HBV genotype infection. On the basis of those methods the genotype of the virus was identified as genotype E. The partial sequences of the HBV polymerase gene were loaded to the international DNA data bank (GenBank) for contribution to the global HBV surveillance. This report emphasized that besides genotype D the other HBV genotypes could be found in Turkey. Since the patient was an inactive HBsAg carrier before his residence in Turkey, this

  14. [Hepatitis B virus genotype E infection in Turkey: the detection of the first case].

    PubMed

    Sayan, Murat; Sanlıdağ, Tamer; Akçalı, Sinem; Arıkan, Ayşe

    2014-10-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a global major health problem. Currently, 10 genotypes (A-J) of hepatitis B virus (HBV) are identified based on the nucleic acid sequence heterogeneity, and these genotypes have been shown to have distinct geographic distribution. Reports of the previous studies indicated that the genotype D is the predominant type among hepatitis B patients in different regions of Turkey. However, recent studies indicated that other HBV genotypes are also seen with an increasing rate. Although epidemiological and clinical information on genotype E infection is currently limited, it is known that genotype E infection is common in West and Central Africa. In this report, the first case of HBV genotype E infection in Turkey was presented. A 22-year-old Nigerian male employee who resided in Manisa for five years was admitted to Celal Bayar University Hospital Manisa, Turkey, for his routine check-up. Since HBsAg was found positive, other HBV markers were tested with a repeated serum sample. Laboratory findings were as follows; HBsAg (+), anti-HBs (-), HBeAg (-), anti-HBe (+), anti-HBc (+), anti-HCV (-), anti-HIV (-), ALT: 44 U/L and AST: 45 U/L. HBV-DNA level was detected as 700 IU/ml by real-time PCR (Artus HBV QS RGQ Qiagen, Germany). HBV-DNA isolated from the serum sample of the patient was amplified by PCR and polymerase gene segment of HBV was directly sequenced. UPGMA method was used for phylogenetic analysis and Inno-LIPA HBV genotyping method (Innogenetics, Belgium) was performed to determine multiple HBV genotype infection. On the basis of those methods the genotype of the virus was identified as genotype E. The partial sequences of the HBV polymerase gene were loaded to the international DNA data bank (GenBank) for contribution to the global HBV surveillance. This report emphasized that besides genotype D the other HBV genotypes could be found in Turkey. Since the patient was an inactive HBsAg carrier before his residence in Turkey, this

  15. Hepatitis C Virus Genotypes and Association With Viral Load in Yazd, Central Province of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Hadinedoushan, Hossein; Salmanroghani, Hasan; Amirbaigy, Mohammad Kazem; Akhondi-Meybodi, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of liver disease. Infection with HCV is a global public health problem. The virus is classified into 6 genotypes and more than 80 subtypes named as a, b, c, etc. HCV genotyping has been an important parameter for the treatment of HCV infection. Objectives: The main aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of HCV genotypes in Yazd, central province of Iran. In addition, the study investigated whether there was any association between HCV load and genotypes. Patients and Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was performed on samples suspicious of HCV infection from March 2010 to June 2013. Peripheral blood sample was obtained and screened for anti-HCV antibodies using Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). Then sera of anti-HCV positive samples were analyzed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction method. Plasma samples were used to determine the HCV genotypes of 1a, 1b, 2, 3, and 4 in 191 infected patients. Results: One hundred fifty-two out of 191 (79.6%) samples were from male patients. The mean of the patients’ age was 40.7 ± 11.9 years (range 21-75 years old). Sixty- three (33%) patients were included in 31-40 years group. The mean number of HCV in infected patients was 2.92 × 106 ± 1.85 × 106 copies/mL (Min: 508; Max: 2.75 × 108 copies/mL). HCV genotype 3 was the predominant genotype (50.3%) followed by subtypes 1a (38.7%) and 1b (6.8%). The distribution of other HCV genotypes showed genotype 2 in 1.6% and mixed genotypes in 2.6% of positive samples. Genotype 3 was predominant in all age groups except 21-30 years of age group. We were unable to find any significant difference between mean viral load of the patients infected with genotype 3 and those infected with genotype 1 (1a and 1b). Conclusions: Findings of the present study showed that HCV genotype 3 was the predominant genotype followed by the subtypes 1a and 1b in Yazd, central province of Iran. In addition, there was

  16. Detection of bovine leukemia virus and identification of its genotype in Mongolian cattle.

    PubMed

    Ochirkhuu, Nyamsuren; Konnai, Satoru; Odbileg, Raadan; Nishimori, Asami; Okagawa, Tomohiro; Murata, Shiro; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2016-04-01

    Epidemiological studies have indicated that bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection is globally distributed. However, no information regarding the disease and genetic diversity of the virus in the cattle of Mongolia is currently available. In this study, the prevalence of BLV was assessed using PCR, and the genetic diversity was analyzed through DNA sequencing. Of the 517 samples tested, 20 positives were identified. Phylogenetic analysis showed that six, one, and four isolates were classified into genotype 4, 7, and 1, respectively. Most isolates were clustered with isolates from Eastern Europe and Russia. This study is the first to investigate the BLV genotype in Mongolia. PMID:26711456

  17. Detection of bovine leukemia virus and identification of its genotype in Mongolian cattle.

    PubMed

    Ochirkhuu, Nyamsuren; Konnai, Satoru; Odbileg, Raadan; Nishimori, Asami; Okagawa, Tomohiro; Murata, Shiro; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2016-04-01

    Epidemiological studies have indicated that bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection is globally distributed. However, no information regarding the disease and genetic diversity of the virus in the cattle of Mongolia is currently available. In this study, the prevalence of BLV was assessed using PCR, and the genetic diversity was analyzed through DNA sequencing. Of the 517 samples tested, 20 positives were identified. Phylogenetic analysis showed that six, one, and four isolates were classified into genotype 4, 7, and 1, respectively. Most isolates were clustered with isolates from Eastern Europe and Russia. This study is the first to investigate the BLV genotype in Mongolia.

  18. An epidermal papilloma of the Atlantic samon II: Ultrastructure and etiology.

    PubMed

    Carlisle, J C

    1977-07-01

    Ultrastructure of the Atlantic salmon papilloma was studied, and virus isolation was attempted. The papilloma cells were similar to normal epidermis in having interdigitating cell membranes with desmosomes. The nuclei, however, were more regular in shape than normal epidermal nuclei and the chromatin tended to be marginated and clumped. No cytopathic viral agents were isolated. PMID:916134

  19. Commercially available immunoglobulins contain virus neutralizing antibodies against all major genotypes of polyomavirus BK.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, P; Pastrana, D V; Zeng, G; Huang, Y; Shapiro, R; Sood, P; Puttarajappa, C; Berger, M; Hariharan, S; Buck, C B

    2015-04-01

    Neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) form the basis of immunotherapeutic strategies against many important human viral infections. Accordingly, we studied the prevalence, titer, genotype-specificity, and mechanism of action of anti-polyomavirus BK (BKV) NAbs in commercially available human immune globulin (IG) preparations designed for intravenous (IV) use. Pseudovirions (PsV) of genotypes Ia, Ib2, Ic, II, III, and IV were generated by co-transfecting a reporter plasmid encoding luciferase and expression plasmids containing synthetic codon-modified VP1, VP2, and VP3 capsid protein genes into 293TT cells. NAbs were measured using luminometry. All IG preparations neutralized all BKV genotypes, with mean EC50 titers as high as 254 899 for genotype Ia and 6,666 for genotype IV. Neutralizing titers against genotypes II and III were higher than expected, adding to growing evidence that infections with these genotypes are more common than currently appreciated. Batch to batch variation in different lots of IG was within the limits of experimental error. Antibody mediated virus neutralizing was dose dependent, modestly enhanced by complement, genotype-specific, and achieved without effect on viral aggregation, capsid morphology, elution, or host cell release. IG contains potent NAbs capable of neutralizing all major BKV genotypes. Clinical trials based on sound pharmacokinetic principles are needed to explore prophylactic and therapeutic applications of these anti-viral effects, until effective small molecule inhibitors of BKV replication can be developed.

  20. Novel method for genotyping clinical herpes simplex virus type 1 isolates.

    PubMed

    Glück, Brigitte; Möbius, Susanne; Pfaff, Florian; Zell, Roland; Sauerbrei, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Up to now, three distinct genotypes, A, B and C, of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), based on polymorphisms in the US4 and US7 genes, have been reported. Here, we propose to include an additional polymorphism of the US2 gene. The refined genotyping method was validated using 423 clinical isolates from patients with different HSV-1 diseases. The proportions of three US2 genotypes were A, 46.6%; B, 23.2%; and C, 30.2 %. Genotype A of US2 and US4/US7 showed a highly significant correlation. In addition, the frequency of genotype A was significantly higher in women than in men with herpes labialis. PMID:26280525

  1. Role of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir combination for genotype 1 hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Sundaram, Vinay; Kowdley, Kris V

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is one of the most common etiologies of liver-related mortality throughout the world. Among the six HCV genotypes, genotype 1 was significantly more aggressive when utilizing the combination of pegylated interferon and ribavirin, as genotype 1-infected patients had the lowest likelihood of achieving cure (40%–50%) and required twice as long duration of treatment, as compared to genotypes 2 and 3. Recently, however, significant advances have been made with the advent of all-oral direct-acting antiviral agents, which have significantly improved the safety, efficacy, and tolerability of the treatment of HCV genotype 1. Among the available treatments for HCV genotype 1, the combination therapy of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir provides several advantages compared to other regimens, including use of a single-pill regimen, possibility to shorten the duration of treatment to 8 weeks, efficacy in patients exposed to protease inhibitors, safety in decompensated cirrhosis, and potential to avoid ribavirin. In this review, we discuss the pharmacotherapy of the combination of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir therapy and summarize the results of the Phase III clinical trials for this treatment in HCV genotype 1 patients. We will also discuss the data for special populations, including decompensated cirrhosis, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfected patients, African-Americans, the elderly, and those who failed sofosbuvir-containing regimens. PMID:27418860

  2. Role of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir combination for genotype 1 hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Vinay; Kowdley, Kris V

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is one of the most common etiologies of liver-related mortality throughout the world. Among the six HCV genotypes, genotype 1 was significantly more aggressive when utilizing the combination of pegylated interferon and ribavirin, as genotype 1-infected patients had the lowest likelihood of achieving cure (40%-50%) and required twice as long duration of treatment, as compared to genotypes 2 and 3. Recently, however, significant advances have been made with the advent of all-oral direct-acting antiviral agents, which have significantly improved the safety, efficacy, and tolerability of the treatment of HCV genotype 1. Among the available treatments for HCV genotype 1, the combination therapy of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir provides several advantages compared to other regimens, including use of a single-pill regimen, possibility to shorten the duration of treatment to 8 weeks, efficacy in patients exposed to protease inhibitors, safety in decompensated cirrhosis, and potential to avoid ribavirin. In this review, we discuss the pharmacotherapy of the combination of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir therapy and summarize the results of the Phase III clinical trials for this treatment in HCV genotype 1 patients. We will also discuss the data for special populations, including decompensated cirrhosis, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfected patients, African-Americans, the elderly, and those who failed sofosbuvir-containing regimens. PMID:27418860

  3. Hepatitis C virus genotypes distribution and transmission risk factors in Luxembourg from 1991 to 2006

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Francois; Hawotte, Karin; Struck, Daniel; Ternes, Anne-Marie; Servais, Jean-Yves; Arendt, Vic; Hoffman, Patrick; Hemmer, Robert; Staub, Thérèse; Seguin-Devaux, Carole; Schmit, Jean-Claude

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype distribution and transmission risk factors in a population of unselected patients in Luxembourg. METHODS: Epidemiological information (gender, age and transmission risks) were collected from 802 patients newly diagnosed for hepatitis C and living in Luxembourg, among whom 228 patients referred from prison. Genotyping using 5’noncoding (5’NC) sequencing was performed. We compared categorical data using the Fisher’s exact F-test and odds ratios (OR) were calculated for evaluating association of HCV genotype and risk factors. RESULTS: The sex ratio was predominantly male (2.2) and individuals aged less than 40 years represented 49.6% of the population. Genotype 1 was predominant (53.4%) followed by genotype 3 (33%). Among risk factors, intravenous drug usage (IVDU) was the most frequently reported (71.4%) followed by medical-related transmission (17.6%) including haemophilia, transfusion recipients and other nosocomial reasons. Genotype 3 was significantly associated to IVDU (OR = 4.84, P < 0.0001) whereas genotype 1 was significantly associated with a medical procedure (OR = 2.42, P < 0.001). The HCV genotype distribution from inmate patients differed significantly from the rest of the population (Chi-square test with four degrees of freedom, P < 0.0001) with a higher frequency of genotype 3 (46.5% vs 27.5%) and a lower frequency of genotype 1 and 4 (44.7% vs 56.8% and 5.3% vs 9.6%, respectively). IVDU was nearly exclusively reported as a risk factor in prison. CONCLUSION: We report the first description of the HCV genotype distribution in Luxembourg. The repartition is similar to other European countries, with one of the highest European prevalence rates of genotype 3 (33%). Since serology screening became available in 1991, IVDU remains the most common way of HCV transmission in Luxembourg. PMID:18300350

  4. Evolutionary analysis of rubella viruses in mainland China during 2010-2012: endemic circulation of genotype 1E and introductions of genotype 2B.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhen; Rivailler, Pierre; Abernathy, Emily; Cui, Aili; Zhang, Yan; Mao, Naiyin; Xu, Songtao; Zhou, Shujie; Lei, Yue; Wang, Yan; Zheng, Huanying; He, Jilan; Chen, Ying; Li, Chongshan; Bo, Fang; Zhao, Chunfang; Chen, Meng; Lu, Peishan; Li, Fangcai; Gu, Suyi; Gao, Hui; Guo, Yu; Chen, Hui; Feng, Daxing; Wang, Shuang; Tang, Xiaomin; Lei, Yake; Feng, Yan; Deng, Lili; Gong, Tian; Fan, Lixia; Xu, Wenbo; Icenogle, Joseph

    2015-01-23

    Rubella remains a significant burden in mainland China. In this report, 667 viruses collected in 24 of 31 provinces of mainland China during 2010-2012 were sequenced and analyzed, significantly extending previous reports on limited numbers of viruses collected before 2010. Only viruses of genotypes 1E and 2B were found. Genotype 1E viruses were found in all 24 provinces. Genotype 1E viruses were likely introduced into mainland China around 1997 and endemic transmission of primarily one lineage became established. Viruses reported here from 2010-2012 are largely in a single cluster within this lineage. Genotype 2B viruses were rarely detected in China prior to 2010. This report documents a previously undetected 2B lineage, which likely became endemic in eastern provinces of China between 2010 and 2012. Bayesian analyses were performed to estimate the evolutionary rates and dates of appearance of the genotype 1E and 2B viral linages in China. A skyline plot of viral population diversity did not provide evidence of reduction of diversity as a result of vaccination, but should be useful as a baseline for such reductions as vaccination programs for rubella become widespread in mainland China.

  5. Evolutionary analysis of rubella viruses in mainland China during 2010–2012: endemic circulation of genotype 1E and introductions of genotype 2B

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhen; Rivailler, Pierre; Abernathy, Emily; Cui, Aili; Zhang, Yan; Mao, Naiyin; Xu, Songtao; Zhou, Shujie; Lei, Yue; Wang, Yan; Zheng, Huanying; He, Jilan; Chen, Ying; Li, Chongshan; Bo, Fang; Zhao, Chunfang; Chen, Meng; Lu, Peishan; Li, Fangcai; Gu, Suyi; Gao, Hui; Guo, Yu; Chen, Hui; Feng, Daxing; Wang, Shuang; Tang, Xiaomin; Lei, Yake; Feng, Yan; Deng, Lili; Gong, Tian; Fan, Lixia; Xu, Wenbo; Icenogle, Joseph; Chen, Xia; Tian, Hong; Ma, Yan; Liu, Leng; Liu, Li; Liu, Jianfeng; Fu, Hong; Yang, Yuying; Ma, Yujie; Zhao, Hua; Huang, Fang; Hu, Ying; Zhang, Hong; Tian, Xiaoling; Du, Hui; Ma, Xuemin; Zhang, Zhenying; Xu, Jin; Zhou, Jianhui; Ye, Xufang; Li, Jing; Lu, Yiyu; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Yanni; Zhao, Shengcang; Ba, Zhuoma

    2015-01-01

    Rubella remains a significant burden in mainland China. In this report, 667 viruses collected in 24 of 31 provinces of mainland China during 2010–2012 were sequenced and analyzed, significantly extending previous reports on limited numbers of viruses collected before 2010. Only viruses of genotypes 1E and 2B were found. Genotype 1E viruses were found in all 24 provinces. Genotype 1E viruses were likely introduced into mainland China around 1997 and endemic transmission of primarily one lineage became established. Viruses reported here from 2010–2012 are largely in a single cluster within this lineage. Genotype 2B viruses were rarely detected in China prior to 2010. This report documents a previously undetected 2B lineage, which likely became endemic in eastern provinces of China between 2010 and 2012. Bayesian analyses were performed to estimate the evolutionary rates and dates of appearance of the genotype 1E and 2B viral linages in China. A skyline plot of viral population diversity did not provide evidence of reduction of diversity as a result of vaccination, but should be useful as a baseline for such reductions as vaccination programs for rubella become widespread in mainland China. PMID:25613734

  6. Emergence and continued circulation of dengue-2 (genotype IV) virus strains in northern India.

    PubMed

    Dash, Paban Kumar; Parida, Man Mohan; Saxena, Parag; Kumar, Manoj; Rai, Arvind; Pasha, Sayeed Tazeen; Jana, Asha Mukul

    2004-10-01

    Dengue (DEN) is an acute mosquito borne viral disease of mankind. Off late it has become an important public health concern in Southeast Asia. Although, all the four known dengue virus serotypes (DEN-1 to 4) are reported from time to time, in the recent past, DEN-2 has emerged as the predominant type, being the causative agent of several outbreaks of dengue fever (DF) and dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) in India. To elucidate the true molecular epidemiology of these viruses, we have sequenced C-prM gene junction (454 nucleotides) of 11 DEN-2 viruses directly from patient serum. The C-prM gene junction was amplified initially by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction followed by automated DNA sequencing. These sequences provide unique information with regard to molecular epidemiology when compared to other DEN-2 sequences from diverse geographic origins. The sequence analysis revealed that most of the mutations in this region remained silent, except a few at the carboxy-terminal of the capsid. Reported phylogenetic analysis classifies DEN-2 viruses into five distinct genotypes. The Gwalior DEN-2 viruses, included in the present study were classified into genotype-IV, and were found to be most closely related to Delhi 1996 DEN-2 viruses and FJ 10/11 strains prevalent in the Fujian state of China. However, two earlier Indian isolates of DEN-2 were classified into genotype-V. The present study indicates that genotype V of DEN-2 has been replaced by genotype IV during the past decade, which continues to circulate silently in north India, and have the potential to reemerge and cause major epidemics of DF and DHF.

  7. Hepatitis B Virus genotypic differences map structurally close to NRTI resistance hot spots

    PubMed Central

    Michailidis, Eleftherios; Singh, Kamlendra; Kirby, Karen A.; Hachiya, Atsuko; Yoo, Wangdon; Hong, Sun Pyo; Kim, Soo-Ok; Folk, William R.; Sarafianos, Stefan G.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the availability of a Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) vaccine, there are approximately 350 million people that are chronically infected with this virus that can cause liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Currently, most approved anti-HBV drugs are nucleoside RT inhibitors (NRTIs) that target the viral enzyme reverse transcriptase (RT or P gene product). They suppress viral replication very efficiently but require long-term therapies, which invariably lead to the development of drug resistant viral strains with drug resistance mutations at the P gene. Because the reading frames of the P and S (surface antigen) genes partially overlap, selection of NRTI-resistance mutations may impart changes on the surface structural landscape of the virus. Conversely, genotypic differences on viral surface residues may also change the amino acid composition of the P gene and in terms affect HBV RT properties such as susceptibility to NRTIs. Interestingly, several studies have shown that patients infected with HBV from various genotypes respond differently to NRTI therapies. Here, we built a three-dimensional homology model of the catalytic core of HBV RT using HIV-1 RT as a template. We then mapped on the molecular model the residues that vary among various HBV genotypes. Surprisingly, the genotypic variability residues are generally in the vicinity of residues that are involved in NRTI resistance. Our results suggest that emergence of NRTI resistance mutations in HBV RT may be constrained by structural interactions with residues that vary among different genotypes. PMID:22505793

  8. Hepatitis B Virus genotypic differences map structurally close to NRTI resistance hot spots.

    PubMed

    Michailidis, Eleftherios; Singh, Kamlendra; Kirby, Karen A; Hachiya, Atsuko; Yoo, Wangdon; Hong, Sun Pyo; Kim, Soo-Ok; Folk, William R; Sarafianos, Stefan G

    2011-10-01

    Despite the availability of a Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) vaccine, there are approximately 350 million people that are chronically infected with this virus that can cause liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Currently, most approved anti-HBV drugs are nucleoside RT inhibitors (NRTIs) that target the viral enzyme reverse transcriptase (RT or P gene product). They suppress viral replication very efficiently but require long-term therapies, which invariably lead to the development of drug resistant viral strains with drug resistance mutations at the P gene. Because the reading frames of the P and S (surface antigen) genes partially overlap, selection of NRTI-resistance mutations may impart changes on the surface structural landscape of the virus. Conversely, genotypic differences on viral surface residues may also change the amino acid composition of the P gene and in terms affect HBV RT properties such as susceptibility to NRTIs. Interestingly, several studies have shown that patients infected with HBV from various genotypes respond differently to NRTI therapies. Here, we built a three-dimensional homology model of the catalytic core of HBV RT using HIV-1 RT as a template. We then mapped on the molecular model the residues that vary among various HBV genotypes. Surprisingly, the genotypic variability residues are generally in the vicinity of residues that are involved in NRTI resistance. Our results suggest that emergence of NRTI resistance mutations in HBV RT may be constrained by structural interactions with residues that vary among different genotypes. PMID:22505793

  9. Proteome Differences between Hepatitis B Virus Genotype-B- and Genotype-C-Induced Hepatocellular Carcinoma Revealed by iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Wei, Dahai; Zeng, Yongyi; Xing, Xiaohua; Liu, Hongzhi; Lin, Minjie; Han, Xiao; Liu, Xiaolong; Liu, Jingfeng

    2016-02-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the main cause of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in southeast Asia where HBV genotype B and genotype C are the most prevalent. Viral genotypes have been reported to significantly affect the clinical outcomes of HCC. However, the underlying molecular differences among different genotypes of HBV virus infected HCC have not been revealed. Here, we applied isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) technology integrated with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis to identify the proteome differences between the HBV genotypes B- and C-induced HCC. In brief, a total of 83 proteins in the surrounding noncancerous tissues and 136 proteins in the cancerous tissues between HBV genotype-B- and genotype-C-induced HCC were identified, respectively. This information revealed that there might be different molecular mechanisms of the tumorigenesis and development of HBV genotypes B- and C-induced HCC. Furthermore, our results indicate that the two proteins ARFIP2 and ANXA1 might be potential biomarkers for distinguishing the HBV genotypes B- and C-induced HCC. Thus, the quantitative proteomic analysis revealed molecular differences between the HBV genotypes B- and C-induced HCC, and might provide fundamental information for further deep study. PMID:26709725

  10. Dual daclatasvir and sofosbuvir for treatment of genotype 3 chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Vinay; Kowdley, Kris V

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is one of the most common etiologies of liver-related mortality throughout the world. Traditionally, therapy has been focused on pegylated interferon in combination with ribavirin, with clinical trials demonstrating that HCV genotype 1 had the lowest response rate (40-50%), while genotype 3 had an intermediate response rate (60-70%). Recently, significant advances have been made with all-oral direct-acting antiviral (DAA) therapy, which have significantly improved cure rates for HCV genotype 1. Accordingly, HCV genotype 3 is now potentially the most difficult to treat. One of the most potent DAA medications is sofosbuvir, a pan-genotypic nucleotide analogue that inhibits the NS5B polymerase of HCV. Daclatasvir, a pan-genotypic inhibitor of the HCV NS5A replication complex, was recently approved in the United States for treatment of HCV genotype 3 in conjunction with sofosbuvir. This combination may provide a powerful tool in the treatment of HCV genotype 3.

  11. Serological Assay and Genotyping of Hepatitis C Virus in Infected Patients in Zanjan Province

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeilzadeh, Abdolreza; Erfanmanesh, Maryam; Ghasemi, Sousan; Mohammadi, Farzaneh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis C Virus (HCV), a public health problem, is an enveloped, single-stranded RNA virus and a member of the Hepacivirus genus of the Flaviviridae family. Liver cancer, cirrhosis, and end-stage liver are the outcomes of chronic infection with HCV. HCV isolates show significant heterogeneity in genetics around the world. Therefore, determining HCV genotypes is a vital step in determining prognosis and planning therapeutic strategies. Objectives: As distribution of HCV genotypes is different in various geographical regions and HCV genotyping of patients has not been investigated in Zanjan City, this study was designed for the first time, to determine HCV genotypes in the region and to promote the impact of the treatment. Materials and Methods: Serum samples of 136 patients were collected and analyzed for anti-HCV antibodies using ELISA (The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) method. Then, positive samples were exposed to RT-PCR, which was performed under standard condition. Afterwards, they investigated for genotyping using allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR), and HCV genotype 2.0 line probe assay (LiPA). Results: Samples indicated 216 bp bands on 2% agarose gel. Analyses of the results demonstrated that the most dominant subtype was 3a with frequency of 38.26% in Zanjan Province followed by subtypes of 1b, 1a, 2, and 4 with frequencies of 25.73%, 22.05%, 5.14%, and 4.41%, respectively. The frequency of unknown HCV genotypes was 4.41%. Conclusions: According to the results, it was found that HCV high prevalent genotype in Zanjan is subtype 3a. Analysis of the results provides identification of certain HCV genotypes, and these valuable findings could affect the type and duration of the treatment. PMID:25368655

  12. Detection of east/central/south African genotype of chikungunya virus in Myanmar, 2010.

    PubMed

    Tun, Mya Myat Ngwe; Thant, Kyaw Zin; Inoue, Shingo; Nabeshima, Takeshi; Aoki, Kotaro; Kyaw, Aung Kyaw; Myint, Tin; Tar, Thi; Maung, Kay Thwe Thwe; Hayasaka, Daisuke; Morita, Kouichi

    2014-08-01

    In 2010, chikungunya virus of the East Central South African genotype was isolated from 4 children in Myanmyar who had dengue-like symptoms. Phylogenetic analysis of the E1 gene revealed that the isolates were closely related to isolates from China, Thailand, and Malaysia that harbor the A226V mutation in this gene.

  13. Complete Genome Sequences of Two Dengue Virus Serotype 1 Genotype V Strains from Different Lineages.

    PubMed

    Vedovello, Danila; Menegaldo, Tauyne; Biselli-Périco, Joice M; Ullmann, Leila Sabrina; Araújo Junior, João Pessoa; Nogueira, Maurício Lacerda

    2016-01-01

    Previous phylogenetic studies involving dengue virus serotype 1 (DENV1) have shown several lineages of genotype V circulating worldwide. After sequencing the complete genome of strains from São José do Rio Preto, São Paulo, Brazil, we identified a list of 50 different amino acids that differ between the two lineages, announced here. PMID:27688321

  14. Identification and complete genome sequence analysis of a genotype XIV Newcastle disease virus from Nigeria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The first complete genome sequence of a strain of Newcastle disease virus from genotype XIV is reported here. Strain duck/Nigeria/NG-695/KG.LOM.11-16/2009 was isolated from an apparently healthy domestic duck from a live bird market in Kogi State, Nigeria, in 2009. This strain is classified as a m...

  15. Complete genome sequence of a novel genotype of squash mosaic virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Complete genome sequence of a novel genotype of Squash mosaic virus (SqMV) infecting squash plants in Spain was obtained using deep sequencing of small ribonucleic acids and assembly. The low nucleotide sequence identities, with 87-88% on RNA1 and 84-86% on RNA2 to known SqMV isolates, suggest a new...

  16. Complete Genome Sequences of Two Dengue Virus Serotype 1 Genotype V Strains from Different Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Vedovello, Danila; Menegaldo, Tauyne; Biselli-Périco, Joice M.; Ullmann, Leila Sabrina; Araújo Junior, João Pessoa

    2016-01-01

    Previous phylogenetic studies involving dengue virus serotype 1 (DENV1) have shown several lineages of genotype V circulating worldwide. After sequencing the complete genome of strains from São José do Rio Preto, São Paulo, Brazil, we identified a list of 50 different amino acids that differ between the two lineages, announced here. PMID:27688321

  17. Mannose-Binding Lectin Genotypes and Susceptibility to Epstein-Barr Virus Infection in Infancy▿

    PubMed Central

    Friborg, Jeppe T.; Jarrett, Ruth F.; Koch, Anders; Garred, Peter; Freeland, June M. L.; Andersen, Andreas; Melbye, Mads

    2010-01-01

    In a cohort study of children <4 years of age in Greenland, mannose-binding lectin (MBL2) genotypes and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) antibody levels were determined. EBV seropositivity was significantly lower and time to seroconversion increased in MBL-insufficient compared with MBL-sufficient children, indicating that MBL may be involved in primary EBV infection in infancy. PMID:20610664

  18. Complete genome sequence of an emerging genotype of tobacco streak virus in the U.S.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report the complete genome sequence of an emerging genotype of Tobacco streak virus (TSV) infecting zucchini squash in Florida (TSV_FL13-07), through deep sequencing of sRNAs and validation by Sanger sequencing. TSV_FL13-07 only shares less than 90% sequence identity in three genomic ribonucleic...

  19. Detection of East/Central/South African Genotype of Chikungunya Virus in Myanmar, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Tun, Mya Myat Ngwe; Thant, Kyaw Zin; Inoue, Shingo; Nabeshima, Takeshi; Aoki, Kotaro; Kyaw, Aung Kyaw; Myint, Tin; Tar, Thi; Maung, Kay Thwe Thwe; Hayasaka, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, chikungunya virus of the East Central South African genotype was isolated from 4 children in Myanmyar who had dengue-like symptoms. Phylogenetic analysis of the E1 gene revealed that the isolates were closely related to isolates from China, Thailand, and Malaysia that harbor the A226V mutation in this gene. PMID:25062511

  20. Rapid fluorescent lateral-flow immunoassay for hepatitis B virus genotyping.

    PubMed

    Song, Liu-Wei; Wang, Ying-Bin; Fang, Lin-Lin; Wu, Yong; Yang, Lin; Chen, Jie-Yu; Ge, Sheng-Xiang; Zhang, Jing; Xiong, You-Zheng; Deng, Xiu-Mei; Min, Xiao-Ping; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Pei-Jer; Yuan, Quan; Xia, Ning-Shao

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotyping plays an important role in the clinical management of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients. However, the current nucleic acid based techniques are expensive, time-consuming, and inconvenient. Here, we developed a novel DNA-independent HBV genotyping tool based on a one-step fluorescent lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA). Epitope-targeting immunization and screening techniques were used to develop HBV genotype specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). These mAbs were used to develop a multitest LFIA with a matched scanning luminoscope for HBV genotyping (named the GT-LFIA). The performance of this novel assay was carefully evaluated in well-characterized clinical cohorts. The GT-LFIA, which can specifically differentiate HBV genotypes A, B, C, and D in a pretreatment-free single test, was successfully developed using four genotype specific mAbs. The detection limits of the GT-LFIA for HBV genotypes A, B, C, and D were 2.5-10.0 IU HBV surface antigen/mL, respectively. Among the sera from 456 CHB patients, 439 (96.3%; 95% confidence interval (CI), 94.1-97.8%) were genotype-differentiable by the GT-LFIA and 437 (99.5%; 95% CI, 98.4-99.9%) were consistent with viral genome sequencing. In the 21 patients receiving nucleos(t)ide analogue therapy, for end-of-treatment specimens that were HBV DNA undetectable and were not applicable for DNA-dependent genotyping, the GT-LFIA presented genotyping results that were consistent with those obtained in pretreatment specimens by viral genome sequencing and the GT-LFIA. In conclusion, the novel GT-LFIA is a convenient, fast, and reliable tool for differential HBV genotyping, especially in patients with low or undetectable HBV DNA levels. PMID:25892477

  1. Genotype-specific variation in West Nile virus dispersal in California.

    PubMed

    Duggal, Nisha K; Reisen, William K; Fang, Ying; Newman, Ruchi M; Yang, Xiao; Ebel, Gregory D; Brault, Aaron C

    2015-11-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is an arbovirus that was first reported in North America in New York in 1999 and, by 2003, had spread more than 4000 km to California. However, variation in viral genetics associated with spread is not well understood. Herein, we report sequences for more than 100 WNV isolates made from mosquito pools that were collected from 2003 to 2011 as part of routine surveillance by the California Mosquito-borne Virus Surveillance System. We performed phylogeographic analyses and demonstrated that 5 independent introductions of WNV (1 WN02 genotype strain and 4 SW03 genotype strains) occurred in California. The SW03 genotype of WNV was constrained to the southwestern U.S. and had a more rapid rate of spread. In addition, geographic constraint of WNV strains within a single region for up to 6 years suggest viral maintenance has been driven by resident, rather than migratory, birds and overwintering in mosquitoes.

  2. Ceramide induces early and late apoptosis in human papilloma virus+ cervical cancer cells by inhibiting reactive oxygen species decay, diminishing the intracellular concentration of glutathione and increasing nuclear factor-kappaB translocation.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Gisela; Mendoza, Criselda; Montaño, Luis F; López-Marure, Rebeca

    2007-02-01

    Ceramide is regarded as an important cellular signal for the induction of cell death. We have previously shown that ceramide induces the death of cervical tumor cells without biochemical and morphological markers of apoptosis. The mechanisms by which ceramide induces cell death are not understood, therefore we evaluated the effect of C6-ceramide, a synthetic cell-permeable analog of endogenous ceramides, in signaling pathways involved in the oxidative stress of three cervical human papilloma virus cancer cell lines. Reactive oxygen species production was determined by fluorescent 2,7-dichlorofluorescein, nitrite concentration by the Griess reaction (as an indirect measure of nitric oxide production), mitochondrial membrane potential by staining with Rh123, reduced-glutathione concentration by high-pressure liquid chromatography, nuclear factor-kappaB translocation by electrophoretic mobility shift assay, inhibitory protein of nuclear factor-kappaB expression by Western blot and cell death by a poly-caspases fluorochrome-labeled inhibitors of caspases apoptosis assay. C6-ceramide induced early and late apoptosis, which was associated with an increase in reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide production, a loss in mitochondrial membrane potential, an increase in nuclear factor-kappaB translocation, and a decrease in reduced glutathione concentration. C6-ceramide did not modify the expression of inhibitory protein of nuclear factor-kappaB and its antiproliferative effect was not abrogated by Bay 11-7082, an inhibitory protein of nuclear factor-kappaB kinase inhibitor. Our results suggest that oxidative stress might participate in the ceramide-induced damage to human papilloma virus cervical cancer cells.

  3. New genotypes of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) and Taura syndrome virus (TSV) from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kathy F J; Navarro, Solangel A; Pantoja, Carlos R; Aranguren, Fernando L; Lightner, Donald V

    2012-07-25

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) and Taura syndrome virus (TSV) are highly pathogenic to penaeid shrimp and have caused significant economic losses in the shrimp culture industry around the world. During 2010 and 2011, both WSSV and TSV were found in Saudi Arabia, where they caused severe mortalities in cultured Indian white shrimp Penaeus indicus. Most outbreaks of shrimp viruses in production facilities can be traced to the importation of infected stocks or commodity shrimp. In an attempt to determine the origins of these viral outbreaks in Saudi Arabia, we performed variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) analyses for WSSV isolates and a phylogenetic analysis for TSV isolates. From the WSSV genome, the VNTR in open reading frames (ORFs) 125 and 94 were investigated with PCR followed by DNA sequence analysis. The genotypes were categorized as {N125, N94} where N is the number of repeat units in a specific ORF, and the subscript indicates the ORF (i.e. ORFs 125 and 94 in this case). From 15 Saudi Arabia WSSV isolates, we detected 3 genotypes: {6125, 794}, {7125, del94}, and {8125, 1394}. The WSSV genotype of {7125, del94} appears to be a new variant with a 1522 bp deletion encompassing complete coding regions of ORF 94 and ORF 95 and the first 82 bp of ORF 93. For TSV genotyping, we used a phylogenetic analysis based on the amino acid sequence of TSV capsid protein 2 (CP2). We analyzed 8 Saudi Arabian isolates in addition to 36 isolates from other areas: SE Asia, Mexico, Venezuela and Belize. The Saudi Arabian TSV clustered into a new, distinct group. Based on these genotyping analyses, new WSSV and TSV genotypes were found in Saudi Arabia. The data suggest that they have come from wild shrimp Penaeus indicus from the Red Sea that are used for broodstock. PMID:22832716

  4. New dengue virus type 1 genotype in Colombo, Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Tissera, Hasitha A; Ooi, Eng Eong; Gubler, Duane J; Tan, Ying; Logendra, Barathy; Wahala, Wahala M P B; de Silva, Aravinda M; Abeysinghe, M R Nihal; Palihawadana, Paba; Gunasena, Sunethra; Tam, Clarence C; Amarasinghe, Ananda; Letson, G William; Margolis, Harold S; De Silva, Aruna Dharshan

    2011-11-01

    The number of cases and severity of disease associated with dengue infection in Sri Lanka has been increasing since 1989, when the first epidemic of dengue hemorrhagic fever was recorded. We identified a new dengue virus 1 strain circulating in Sri Lanka that coincided with the 2009 dengue epidemic.

  5. Slave trade and hepatitis B virus genotypes and subgenotypes in Haiti and Africa.

    PubMed

    Andernach, Iris E; Nolte, Claudine; Pape, Jean W; Muller, Claude P

    2009-08-01

    In Haiti, >90% of the population descended from African slaves. Of 7,147 Haitian pregnant women sampled, 44% of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections were caused by genotype A1, which today is found mainly in eastern Africa. Twenty percent belong to a rare subgenotype, A5, which has been found only in the former Bight of Benin, a former primary slave trading post. Haitian A subgenotypes appear to have separated early from the African subgenotypes; the most prevalent genotype and subgenotype in West Africa today (E and A3, respectively) are rare in Haiti. This difference indicates that the dominant subgenotypes in Africa emerged in the general population only after the slave trade and explains the low genetic diversity of genotype E. The high prevalence of HBV genotype E in much of Africa further suggests that HBV hyperendemicity is a recent phenomenon, probably resulting from extensive use of unsafe needles.

  6. Hepatitis C Virus Heteroduplex Tracking Assay for Genotype Determination Reveals Diverging Genotype 2 Isolates in Italian Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, Pier Luigi; Kansopon, Joe; Sra, Kuldip; Quan, Stella; DiNello, Robert; Guaschino, Roberto; Calabrese, Giovanni; Danielle, Franca; Brunetto, Mauizia Rossana; Bonino, Ferruccio; Massaro, Anna Lucia; Polito, Alan; Houghton, Michael; Weiner, Amy J.

    1998-01-01

    A heteroduplex tracking assay (HTA) was developed for genetic analyses of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) using single-stranded probes from the core (C)/E1 region. Nucleotide sequencing of reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR products from 15 Italian dialysis patients confirmed the specificity and accuracy of the HTA genotyping method, which identified 5 of 15 (33.3%) 1b, 7 of 15 (46.7%) 3a, and 3 of 15 (20%) type 2 infections. The genotypes of an additional 12 HCV antibody-positive blood donors from different geographical locations were also in agreement with the genotypes determined by the Inno-LiPA HCV II kit (Innogenetics) and/or restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). Isolates which had between 35 to 40% nucleotide divergence from control subtype 1a, 1b, 2a, 2b, or 3a standards could be typed. Surprisingly, HTA detected one 1b-2 coinfection which was missed by DNA sequencing. Three samples that were designated non-2a or 2b type 2 by HTA were found to be type 2a by both RFLP and direct nucleotide sequencing of the 5′ untranslated region. The genetic distance between patient type 2 and control 2a, 2b, and 2c isolates indicated that a new subtype was present in the population being studied. Serotyping (RIBA serotyping strip immunoblot assay kit) of 23 dialysis patients showed that the genotype could be determined in 6 of 8 (75%) C/E1 RT-PCR-negative and 15 of 23 (65.2%) RT-PCR-positive samples, indicating that the two tests complement each other. PMID:9431953

  7. Genotypic Distribution of Hepatitis C Virus in Thailand and Southeast Asia

    PubMed Central

    Wasitthankasem, Rujipat; Vongpunsawad, Sompong; Siripon, Nipaporn; Suya, Chutima; Chulothok, Phrutsada; Chaiear, Kasemporn; Rujirojindakul, Pairaya; Kanjana, Sawan; Theamboonlers, Apiradee; Tangkijvanich, Pisit; Poovorawan, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The majority of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection results in chronic infection, which can lead to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Global burden of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is estimated at 150 million individuals, or 3% of the world’s population. The distribution of the seven major genotypes of HCV varies with geographical regions. Since Asia has a high incidence of HCV, we assessed the distribution of HCV genotypes in Thailand and Southeast Asia. From 588 HCV-positive samples obtained throughout Thailand, we characterized the HCV 5’ untranslated region, Core, and NS5B regions by nested PCR. Nucleotide sequences obtained from both the Core and NS5B of these isolates were subjected to phylogenetic analysis, and genotypes were assigned using published reference genotypes. Results were compared to the epidemiological data of HCV genotypes identified within Southeast Asian. Among the HCV subtypes characterized in the Thai samples, subtype 3a was the most predominant (36.4%), followed by 1a (19.9%), 1b (12.6%), 3b (9.7%) and 2a (0.5%). While genotype 1 was prevalent throughout Thailand (27–36%), genotype 3 was more common in the south. Genotype 6 (20.9%) constituted subtype 6f (7.8%), 6n (7.7%), 6i (3.4%), 6j and 6m (0.7% each), 6c (0.3%), 6v and 6xa (0.2% each) and its prevalence was significantly lower in southern Thailand compared to the north and northeast (p = 0.027 and p = 0.030, respectively). Within Southeast Asia, high prevalence of genotype 6 occurred in northern countries such as Myanmar, Laos, and Vietnam, while genotype 3 was prevalent in Thailand and Malaysia. Island nations of Singapore, Indonesia and Philippines demonstrated prevalence of genotype 1. This study further provides regional HCV genotype information that may be useful in fostering sound public health policy and tracking future patterns of HCV spread. PMID:25962112

  8. Analysis of genotype diversity and evolution of Dengue virus serotype 2 using complete genomes

    PubMed Central

    Waman, Vaishali P.; Kolekar, Pandurang; Ramtirthkar, Mukund R.; Kale, Mohan M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Dengue is one of the most common arboviral diseases prevalent worldwide and is caused by Dengue viruses (genus Flavivirus, family Flaviviridae). There are four serotypes of Dengue Virus (DENV-1 to DENV-4), each of which is further subdivided into distinct genotypes. DENV-2 is frequently associated with severe dengue infections and epidemics. DENV-2 consists of six genotypes such as Asian/American, Asian I, Asian II, Cosmopolitan, American and sylvatic. Comparative genomic study was carried out to infer population structure of DENV-2 and to analyze the role of evolutionary and spatiotemporal factors in emergence of diversifying lineages. Methods Complete genome sequences of 990 strains of DENV-2 were analyzed using Bayesian-based population genetics and phylogenetic approaches to infer genetically distinct lineages. The role of spatiotemporal factors, genetic recombination and selection pressure in the evolution of DENV-2 is examined using the sequence-based bioinformatics approaches. Results DENV-2 genetic structure is complex and consists of fifteen subpopulations/lineages. The Asian/American genotype is observed to be diversified into seven lineages. The Asian I, Cosmopolitan and sylvatic genotypes were found to be subdivided into two lineages, each. The populations of American and Asian II genotypes were observed to be homogeneous. Significant evidence of episodic positive selection was observed in all the genes, except NS4A. Positive selection operational on a few codons in envelope gene confers antigenic and lineage diversity in the American strains of Asian/American genotype. Selection on codons of non-structural genes was observed to impact diversification of lineages in Asian I, cosmopolitan and sylvatic genotypes. Evidence of intra/inter-genotype recombination was obtained and the uncertainty in classification of recombinant strains was resolved using the population genetics approach. Discussion Complete genome-based analysis revealed that the

  9. Analysis of genotype diversity and evolution of Dengue virus serotype 2 using complete genomes

    PubMed Central

    Waman, Vaishali P.; Kolekar, Pandurang; Ramtirthkar, Mukund R.; Kale, Mohan M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Dengue is one of the most common arboviral diseases prevalent worldwide and is caused by Dengue viruses (genus Flavivirus, family Flaviviridae). There are four serotypes of Dengue Virus (DENV-1 to DENV-4), each of which is further subdivided into distinct genotypes. DENV-2 is frequently associated with severe dengue infections and epidemics. DENV-2 consists of six genotypes such as Asian/American, Asian I, Asian II, Cosmopolitan, American and sylvatic. Comparative genomic study was carried out to infer population structure of DENV-2 and to analyze the role of evolutionary and spatiotemporal factors in emergence of diversifying lineages. Methods Complete genome sequences of 990 strains of DENV-2 were analyzed using Bayesian-based population genetics and phylogenetic approaches to infer genetically distinct lineages. The role of spatiotemporal factors, genetic recombination and selection pressure in the evolution of DENV-2 is examined using the sequence-based bioinformatics approaches. Results DENV-2 genetic structure is complex and consists of fifteen subpopulations/lineages. The Asian/American genotype is observed to be diversified into seven lineages. The Asian I, Cosmopolitan and sylvatic genotypes were found to be subdivided into two lineages, each. The populations of American and Asian II genotypes were observed to be homogeneous. Significant evidence of episodic positive selection was observed in all the genes, except NS4A. Positive selection operational on a few codons in envelope gene confers antigenic and lineage diversity in the American strains of Asian/American genotype. Selection on codons of non-structural genes was observed to impact diversification of lineages in Asian I, cosmopolitan and sylvatic genotypes. Evidence of intra/inter-genotype recombination was obtained and the uncertainty in classification of recombinant strains was resolved using the population genetics approach. Discussion Complete genome-based analysis revealed that the

  10. Sequence-based genotyping of hepatitis B virus in general population

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Ali; Moezzi, Ma’soumeh; Imani, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) causes acute and chronic liver disease worldwide. HBV has eight genotypes (A to H) which is the reflection of its genome with their characteristic geographical distribution. Each genotype could have different pathogenic and therapeutic characteristics. There have been few records on HBV genotyping in general population from our region. This study aimed to determine hepatitis B genotypes using sequencing in the general population of Shahrekord, a Southwestern region of Iran. Methods: A total of 3000 serum samples (cluster sampling method) were enrolled from general population tested for HBsAg using ELISA. Using appropriate extraction kit, HBV DNA was extracted from HBsAg positive samples and each was subjected to nested PCR for detection of HBV DNA. Finally, using sequencing, the samples were used for HBV genotyping. Data were analyzed by SPSS 19 using descriptive statistics, chi square, and Fisher’s exact test. P-value < 0.05 was considered as the level of significance. Results: Out of 3000 serum samples, 40 (1.3%) were positive for HBsAg. HBV DNA was detected in 10 out of 40 (25%) of the samples studied. Genotype D was the predominant HBV type found in all of these 10 HBV positive samples. Conclusion: Genotype D is probably the predominant HBV type in our region. PMID:26000259

  11. Characterization of Acute and Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Genotypes in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Osiowy, Carla; Giles, Elizabeth; Trubnikov, Max; Choudhri, Yogesh; Andonov, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Objective The prevalence and distribution of hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes in Canada is not known. Genotypic analysis may contribute to a better understanding of HBV strain distribution and transmission risk. Methods HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) positive samples of acute (n = 152) and chronic (n = 1533) HBV submitted for strain analysis or reference genotype testing between 2006 and 2012 were analyzed. The HBsAg coding region was amplified to determine the HBV genotype by INNO-LiPA assay or sequence analysis. Single and multivariate analyses were used to describe genotypes’ associations with known demographic and behavioral risk factors for 126 linked cases of acute HBV. Results Nine genotypes were detected (A to I), including mixed infections. Genotype C (HBV/C) dominated within chronic infections while HBV/D and A prevailed among acute HBV cases. History of incarceration and residing with a chronic HBV carrier or injection drug user were the most frequently reported risks for acute HBV infection. Over time, HBV/A increased among both acute and chronic infections, and HBV/C and HBV/D decreased among chronic infections. Conclusion Chronic and acute HBV genotypes in Canada differ in the relative distribution and their associations with known risk factors, suggesting different routes of transmission and clinical progression of infection. PMID:26406309

  12. Distribution of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes in seropositive patients in the state of Alagoas, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Gonzaga, Rosa Maria S.; Rodart, Itatiana F.; Reis, Mitermayer Galvão; Ramalho Neto, Cícero Eduardo; Silva, Denise Wanderlei

    2008-01-01

    We determined the frequency of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes in anti-HCV seropositive patients in the state of Alagoas, Brazil, by means of nested-reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-nested-PCR) followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of amplified fragments of the 5´NCR. The nested-PCR with genotype-specific primers from the core region was carried out when detection was not possible by the first approach. Detectable HCV-RNA was present in 115 (74.7%) of 154 serum samples. Genotype 1 was the most frequent (77.4%), against 20.9% of genotype 3 and 0.8% of genotype 2. Subtype 1b was predominant (65.2%), followed by subtypes 1a (8.7%), and 3a (6.1%). Coinfection (1a/3a) was detected in 0.8% of the samples. Indeed, there was no significant differences in the prevalence of genotype 1 compared to what has been obtained from anti-HCV seropositive patients from other locations in Brazil. Here we report for the first time the genotype 2 in the state of Alagoas. PMID:24031281

  13. Persistent infection and promiscuous recombination of multiple genotypes of an RNA virus within a single host generate extensive diversity.

    PubMed

    Weng, Ziming; Barthelson, Roger; Gowda, Siddarame; Hilf, Mark E; Dawson, William O; Galbraith, David W; Xiong, Zhongguo

    2007-01-01

    Recombination and reassortment of viral genomes are major processes contributing to the creation of new, emerging viruses. These processes are especially significant in long-term persistent infections where multiple viral genotypes co-replicate in a single host, generating abundant genotypic variants, some of which may possess novel host-colonizing and pathogenicity traits. In some plants, successive vegetative propagation of infected tissues and introduction of new genotypes of a virus by vector transmission allows for viral populations to increase in complexity for hundreds of years allowing co-replication and subsequent recombination of the multiple viral genotypes. Using a resequencing microarray, we examined a persistent infection by a Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) complex in citrus, a vegetatively propagated, globally important fruit crop, and found that the complex comprised three major and a number of minor genotypes. Subsequent deep sequencing analysis of the viral population confirmed the presence of the three major CTV genotypes and, in addition, revealed that the minor genotypes consisted of an extraordinarily large number of genetic variants generated by promiscuous recombination between the major genotypes. Further analysis provided evidence that some of the recombinants underwent subsequent divergence, further increasing the genotypic complexity. These data demonstrate that persistent infection of multiple viral genotypes within a host organism is sufficient to drive the large-scale production of viral genetic variants that may evolve into new and emerging viruses. PMID:17878952

  14. Comparison of the antigenic relationship between Japanese encephalitis virus genotypes 1 and 3

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) genotype circulating in Korea has changed from G3 to G1. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the antigenic relationship between the two genotypes by using antibody tests. Materials and Methods Blood samples from 42 sows and 216 horses were collected, and their seroprevalence was monitored using the hemagglutination inhibition and virus neutralization tests. Antisera against JEV G1 and G3 were isolated and prepared from guinea pigs. The cross-reactivity of these two viruses was then compared using the neutralizing antibody test. Results We found that there was a difference in the seropositive ratios of JEV G1 and G3. However, the difference was dependent on the antibody test used. There was also an observed difference in the antigenicity between the two genotypes, as ascertained using the neutralizing antibody test. Conclusion There is an evident difference in JEV antigenicity between the genotypes G1 and G3. Therefore, we propose monitoring of the seroprevalence of JEV, and reevaluating the antigenicity of the current vaccine by using the relevant tests. PMID:26866021

  15. Immortalization of Human Fetal Hepatocyte by Ectopic Expression of Human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase, Human Papilloma Virus (E7) and Simian Virus 40 Large T (SV40 T) Antigen Towards Bioartificial Liver Support

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Shibashish; Bader, Augustinus

    2014-01-01

    Background Generation of genetically stable and non-tumoric immortalization cell line from primary cells would be enormously useful for research and therapeutic purposes, but progress towards this goal has so far been limited. It is now universal acceptance that immortalization of human fetal hepatocytes based on recent advances of telomerase biology and oncogene, lead to unlimited population doubling could be the possible source for bioartificial liver device. Methods Immortalization of human fetal hepatocytes cell line by ectopic expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), human papilloma virus gene (E7) and simian virus 40 large T (SV40 T) antigens is main goal of present study. We used an inducible system containing human telomerase and E7, both of which are cloned into responder constructs controlled by doxycycline transactivator. We characterized the immortalized human fetal hepatocyte cells by analysis of green fluorescent cells (GFP) positive cells using flow cytometry (FACs) cell sorting and morphology, proliferative rate and antigen expression by immunohistochemical analysis. In addition to we analysized lactate formation, glucose consumption, albumin secretion and urea production of immortalized human fetal hepatocyte cells. Results After 25 attempts for transfection of adult primary hepatocytes by human telomerase and E7 to immortalize them, none of the transfection systems resulted in the production of a stable, proliferating cell line. Although the transfection efficiency was more than 70% on the first day, the vast majority of the transfected hepatocytes lost their signal within the first 5–7 days. The remaining transfected hepatocytes persisted for 2–4 weeks and divided one or two times without forming a clone. After 10 attempts of transfection human fetal hepatocytes using the same transfection system, we obtained one stable human fetal hepatocytes cell line which was able albumin secretion urea production and glucose

  16. Detection of mumps virus genotype H in two previously vaccinated patients from Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Del Valle, Alberto; García, Alí A; Barrón, Blanca L

    2016-06-01

    Infections caused by mumps virus (MuV) have been successfully prevented through vaccination; however, in recent years, an increasing number of mumps outbreaks have been reported within vaccinated populations. In this study, MuV was genotyped for the first time in Mexico. Saliva samples were obtained from two previously vaccinated patients in Mexico City who had developed parotitis. Viral isolation was carried out in Vero cells, and the SH and HN genes were amplified by RT-PCR. Amplicons were sequenced and compared to a set of reference sequences to identify the MuV genotype. PMID:26935913

  17. Clinical Features and Outcomes of Patients With Genotype 3 Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Ra Ri; Lee, Sang Soo; Lee, Chang Min; Ji, Sung Bok; Jung, Hee Cheul; Cho, Hyun Chin; Kim, Jin Joo; Lee, Jae Min; Kim, Hong Jun; Ha, Chang Yoon; Kim, Hyun Jin; Kim, Tae-Hyo; Jung, Woon Tae; Lee, Ok-Jae

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 3 infection is very rare in high-income Asia Pacific. The aim of our retrospective observational study was to evaluate the incidence, clinical features, and treatment outcomes of patients with a genotype 3 HCV infection in the Gyeongnam Province of Korea. Ninety-eight consecutive patients diagnosed with a genotype 3 HCV infection at Gyeongsang National University Hospital, between January 2005 and December 2014, were enrolled into the study. Relevant characteristics of the study group included: 80.6% men, mean age of 41.8 years, and including 69 patients with chronic hepatitis, 25 with liver cirrhosis, and 4 with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Risk factors for HCV infection, sustained virologic response rate, development of HCC, and mortality in patients with genotype 3 were retrospectively analyzed. Among all patients diagnosed with a HCV infection during the study period, the prevalence of genotype 3 was 7.3%. The incidence of genotype 3 was higher in young patients with a risk factor of IVDU (54.0%) and tattooing (62.3%). Among 45 treatment-naive genotype 3 patients, sustained virologic response was achieved with a combination of pegylated-interferon alpha and ribavirin in 75.6%. The cumulative 5-year incidence of HCC was 13.6%, and 8.9% for overall mortality. Liver cirrhosis at enrollment was an independent risk factor for HCC development. This is the first study to elucidate the clinical features and outcomes among the patients with HCV genotype 3 infection in Korea. Further prospective studies are needed to investigate transmission routes and outcomes for HCV genotype 3 infections. PMID:26871824

  18. Evaluation of Interferon Resistance in Newly Established Genotype 1b Hepatitis C Virus Cell Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Miki; Tasaka-Fujita, Megumi; Nakagawa, Mina; Watanabe, Takako; Kawai-Kitahata, Fukiko; Otani, Satoshi; Goto, Fumio; Nagata, Hiroko; Kaneko, Shun; Nitta, Sayuri; Murakawa, Miyako; Nishimura-Sakurai, Yuki; Azuma, Seishin; Itsui, Yasuhiro; Mori, Kenichi; Yagi, Shintaro; Kakinuma, Sei; Asahina, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1b is known to exhibit treatment resistance with respect to interferon (IFN) therapy. Substitution of amino acids 70 and 91 in the core region of the 1b genotype is a significant predictor of liver carcinogenesis and poor response to pegylated-IFN-α and ribavirin therapy. However, the molecular mechanism has not yet been clearly elucidated because of limitations of the HCV genotype 1b infectious model. Recently, the TPF1-M170T HCV genotype 1b cell culture system was established, in which the clone successfully replicates and infects Huh-7-derived Huh7-ALS32.50 cells. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare IFN resistance in various HCV clones using this system. Methods: HCV core amino acid substitutions R70Q and L91M were introduced to the TPF1-M170T clone and then transfected into Huh7-ALS32.50 cells. To evaluate the production of each virus, intracellular HCV core antigens were measured. Results were confirmed with Western blot analysis using anti-NS5A antibodies, and IFN sensitivity was subsequently measured. Results: Each clone was transfected successfully compared with JFH-1, with a significant difference in intracellular HCV core antigen (p < 0.05), an indicator of continuous HCV replication. Among all clones, L91M showed the highest increase in the HCV core antigen and HCV protein. There was no significant resistance against IFN treatment in core substitutions; however, IFN sensitivity was significantly different between the wildtype core and JFH-1 (p < 0.05). Conclusions: A novel genotype 1b HCV cell culture was constructed with core amino acid substitutions, which demonstrated IFN resistance of genotype 1b. This system will be useful for future analyses into the mechanisms of HCV genotype 1b treatment. PMID:27047766

  19. Molecular identification of hepatitis B virus genotypes/subgenotypes: Revised classification hurdles and updated resolutions

    PubMed Central

    Pourkarim, Mahmoud Reza; Amini-Bavil-Olyaee, Samad; Kurbanov, Fuat; Van Ranst, Marc; Tacke, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The clinical course of infections with the hepatitis B virus (HBV) substantially varies between individuals, as a consequence of a complex interplay between viral, host, environmental and other factors. Due to the high genetic variability of HBV, the virus can be categorized into different HBV genotypes and subgenotypes, which considerably differ with respect to geographical distribution, transmission routes, disease progression, responses to antiviral therapy or vaccination, and clinical outcome measures such as cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. However, HBV (sub)genotyping has caused some controversies in the past due to misclassifications and incorrect interpretations of different genotyping methods. Thus, an accurate, holistic and dynamic classification system is essential. In this review article, we aimed at highlighting potential pitfalls in genetic and phylogenetic analyses of HBV and suggest novel terms for HBV classification. Analyzing full-length genome sequences when classifying genotypes and subgenotypes is the foremost prerequisite of this classification system. Careful attention must be paid to all aspects of phylogenetic analysis, such as bootstrapping values and meeting the necessary thresholds for (sub)genotyping. Quasi-subgenotype refers to subgenotypes that were incorrectly suggested to be novel. As many of these strains were misclassified due to genetic differences resulting from recombination, we propose the term “recombino-subgenotype”. Moreover, immigration is an important confounding facet of global HBV distribution and substantially changes the geographic pattern of HBV (sub)genotypes. We therefore suggest the term “immigro-subgenotype” to distinguish exotic (sub)genotypes from native ones. We are strongly convinced that applying these two proposed terms in HBV classification will help harmonize this rapidly progressing field and allow for improved prophylaxis, diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24966586

  20. Development and Application of an In-house Line Probe Assay for Hepatitis C Virus Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Majidzadeh-A, Keivan; Morovvati, Abbas; Soleimani, Mohammad; Langeroudi, Arash Ghalianchi; Merat, Shahin; Jabbari, Hossain

    2013-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the major cause of chronic liver disease. HCV is a single stranded positive sense RNA of approximately 9.6 Kb. Because of high conservativeness of 5΄untranslated region of HCV genome, it is widely used for virus genotyping. Different methods are used for the virus genotyping, but all involve some difficulties. Objectives The aim of the present study was to develop an in-house reverse hybridization method as a line probe assay, for HCV genotyping. Materials and Methods Sixty serum samples were collected with newly diagnosis of HCV infection. Genotyping process had already been performed for the samples using RT-PCR RFLP method. After total RNA extraction from the samples and cDNA synthesis, nested PCR method was applied for amplification of the target sequence on the 5΄UTR. In the nested PCR, biotinylated oligonucleotides were used as inner primers. Optimized concentrations of the biotinylated inner primers (as positive control), two universal and seven specific probes were spotted onto nylon membrane stripes in a defined pattern. Hybridization process was conducted between the probes and the denaturized biotin labeled PCR products. Finally, the stripes were developed by using streptavidin conjugated alkaline phosphate as a signal generating agent. To determine the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the home made LiPA, a panel containing 60 confirmed sera with positive results for HCV (and PCR-RFLP genotyped) was subjected to evaluate. Results Agarose gel electrophoresis of the nested PCR products using the outer and inner primers showed 305 and 234 bp fragments respectively. After performing hybridization and detection processes on the prepared strips, the colored bands were formed for the positive control, universal probes and the corresponding genotypes. HCV genotype results were found to be in 100% concordance through studying 60 sera that were successfully typed by the two methods. P-value of 0.045 conveys that the

  1. The occurrence of five major Newcastle disease virus genotypes (II, IV, V, VI and VIIb) in Bulgaria between 1959 and 1996.

    PubMed Central

    Czeglédi, A.; Herczeg, J.; Hadjiev, G.; Doumanova, L.; Wehmann, E.; Lomniczi, B.

    2002-01-01

    Partial sequence and restriction enzyme cleavage site analyses of the fusion protein gene were used to genotype 47 Newcastle disease virus strains isolated between 1959 and 1996 in Bulgaria. Viruses belonged to five major genotypes that appeared to be associated with epizootics characterized by temporal and/or geographical restrictions. Genotype IV viruses (responsible for the European branch of the first panzootic) dominated the scene up to the early 1980s, interspersed with sporadic outbreaks caused by genotype II (US strains causing pneumoencephalitis) viruses. Genotype V viruses (transmitted by psittacines from South America) were first shown in 1973 and persisted until the late 1980s. Genotype VI (earliest members from the Middle-East 1968/70 outbreaks) was represented by scattered isolations between 1974 and 1996. A genotype VIIb (recent Middle East epizootic) virus was isolated as early as in 1984. Newcastle disease epizootics in Bulgaria were highlighted by multiple infection with more than one genotype at any one time. PMID:12558353

  2. Molecular identification of mumps virus genotypes from clinical samples: standardized method of analysis.

    PubMed

    Palacios, G; Jabado, O; Cisterna, D; de Ory, F; Renwick, N; Echevarria, J E; Castellanos, A; Mosquera, M; Freire, M C; Campos, R H; Lipkin, W I

    2005-04-01

    A sensitive nested reverse transcription-PCR assay, targeting a short fragment of the gene encoding the small hydrophobic protein (SH gene), was developed to allow rapid characterization of mumps virus in clinical samples. The sensitivity and specificity of the assay were established using representative genotypes A, B, C, D, E, and F. Mumps virus RNA was characterized directly from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples and in extracts of mumps virus isolates from patients with various clinical syndromes. Direct sequencing of products and subsequent phylogenetic analysis enabled genetic classification. A simple web-based system of sequence analysis was established. The study also allowed characterization of mumps virus strains from Argentina as part of a new subgenotype. This PCR assay for characterization of mumps infections coupled to a web-based analytical program provides a rapid method for identification of known and novel strains.

  3. Papilloma and squamous cell carcinoma in koi carp (Cyprinus carpio).

    PubMed

    Wildgoose, W H

    1992-02-22

    Over a period of two years four ornamental koi carp (Cyprinus carpio) of one variety in a mixed population of 16 were affected with papillomas of the head and body. In one fish there was a transition of these tumours into a squamous cell carcinoma in the region of the head and posterior gill space, with deep invasion of the underlying bone. One of the fish recovered completely after the sloughing of the papillomas. In view of the progressive nature of the lesions, the condition was presumed to be due to an infectious agent, but transmission electron microscopy failed to reveal any virus particles. PMID:1566540

  4. Injecting drug use: A vector for the introduction of new hepatitis C virus genotypes.

    PubMed

    Ruta, Simona; Cernescu, Costin

    2015-10-14

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes' monitoring allows real-time insight into the dynamic changes that occur in the global epidemiological picture of HCV infection. Intravenous drug use is currently the primary driver for HCV transmission in developed and developing countries. The distribution of HCV genotypes/subtypes differs significantly between people who inject drugs (PWID) and the general population. HCV genotypes that previously exhibited a limited geographical distribution (3a, 4) are becoming more prevalent in this high-risk group. Immigration from HCV-endemic countries and the evolving networks of HCV transmission in PWID influence HCV genotypes distribution in Europe. Social vulnerabilities (e.g., unemployment, homelessness, and limited access to social and healthcare insurances systems) are important triggers for illicit drug use, which increases the associated risks of HCV infection and the frequent emergence of less prevalent genotypes. Genotype/subtype determination bears important clinical consequences in the progression of liver disease, susceptibility to antiviral therapies and the emergence of resistance-associated variants. An estimated half of the chronically HCV-infected PWID are unaware of their infection, and only one in ten of those diagnosed enter treatment. Nevertheless, PWID exhibit high response rates to new antiviral regimens, and the level of HCV reinfection is unexpectedly low. The focus of the healthcare system must be on the early detection and treatment of infection, to avoid late presentations that are associated with high levels of viremia and liver fibrosis, which may diminish the therapeutic success rate. PMID:26478672

  5. Duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV) genotype definition: comment on the article by Cha et al.

    PubMed

    Wen, Huiqiang; Han, Lingxia; Zhang, Xiaona; Lian, Chuanjiang; Zhao, Lili; Si, Changde; Chen, Hongyan

    2014-06-01

    Duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV) is genetically divided into three different genotypes: the original type DHAV-1, a type recently isolated in Taiwan (DHAV-2), and a recently described type isolated in South Korea and China (DHAV-3). Recently, Cha et al. (2013) concluded that the existence that both DHAV-1 and DHAV-2 had been classified into one branch, with DHAV genotype 3 (DHAV-3) in another, and that the phylogenetic distance unit showed was 0.5, a tremendous value. However, there might be some concerns on the methodology application to define the genotypes of DHAV. Based on 110 genomic and 100 amino acid sequences of DHAV which included all the sequences from Cha et al. (2013) respectively, phylogenetic analysis in the present study showed a distinct and proposed DHAV genotype definition, that both DHAV-2 and DHAV-3 were clustered in one branch while DHAV-1 in another branch only, and that the phylogenetic distance unit of 0.02 was confirmed, which was much smaller than the value 0.5. Taking into account the genotype definition of DHAV, we also conducted the pairwise sequence comparisons (PASC) analysis of 110 genomic sequences, and proposed that the distance genotype definition threshold was 0.045.

  6. Evaluation of Mungbean Genotypes Based on Yield Stability and Reaction to Mungbean Yellow Mosaic Virus Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alam, AKM Mahbubul; Somta, Prakit; Jompuk, Choosak; Chatwachirawong, Prasert; Srinives, Peerasak

    2014-01-01

    This work was conducted to identify mungbean genotypes showing yield stability and resistance to mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) disease. Sixteen genotypes were evaluated in a randomized complete block design with two replications for two years (2011 and 2012) at three locations (Gazipur, Ishurdi and Madaripur) of the Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute. An analysis of variance exhibited significant effects of genotype (G), environment (E), and genotype × environment (G×E) on grain yield. Among eight agronomic characters, the principal component 1 (PC1) was always higher than the PC2. Considering G×E interaction, BM6 was the best genotype at all three locations in both years. Based on grain yield and stability performance, BM6 ranked first while the worst performing genotypes were BM1 and G10. Based on discrimination and representation, Gazipur was identified as an ideal environment for these mungbeans. Relationship between soil-plant analysis developments (SPAD) value was positive with yield but negative with MYMV severity. BM6, G1 and G2 were considered as promising sources of resistance for low disease score and stable response across the environments. The environment proved to have an influence on MYMV infection under natural infestation. A positive correlation was observed between disease score and the temperature under natural growing condition. PMID:25289012

  7. A genotype of hepatitis D virus that occurs in northern South America.

    PubMed Central

    Casey, J L; Brown, T L; Colan, E J; Wignall, F S; Gerin, J L

    1993-01-01

    Hepatitis D virus (HDV) is the cause of an unusually severe form of liver disease with distinct histologic features (morula cell) that occurs throughout northern South America and certain other areas of the world. Clinical studies of HDV disease worldwide indicate that there is, in fact, a wide variation in pathogenesis, and the reasons for these differences are presently unknown. One possible explanation is that factors associated with the viral genotype are determinants of HDV pathogenesis. In this study, nucleic acid sequences were determined for three different northern South American HDV isolates which were obtained from individuals with severe disease or a family history of severe disease, in areas that are hyperendemic for this disease pattern. The sequences of these three isolates are very similar to one another but only distantly related to other published HDV sequences. Comparison of the sequence of a semiconserved region from a total of 14 isolates indicates that there are at least three HDV genotypes. Most published HDV sequences, including those from North America, Europe, the Middle East, the South Pacific, and Asia, belong to a single genotype which may have some geographically based subtypes. A single Japanese isolate is the sole representative of a second HDV genotype. The South American sequences reported here constitute a third genotype. The association of a particular genotype with the severe form of type D hepatitis that occurs in northern South America supports the hypothesis that HDV genetic factors are important determinants in the pathogenesis of type D hepatitis. PMID:8415646

  8. Genotyping hepatitis B virus dual infections using population-based sequence data.

    PubMed

    Beggel, Bastian; Neumann-Fraune, Maria; Döring, Matthias; Lawyer, Glenn; Kaiser, Rolf; Verheyen, Jens; Lengauer, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) is classified into distinct genotypes A-H that are characterized by different progression of hepatitis B and sensitivity to interferon treatment. Previous computational genotyping methods are not robust enough regarding HBV dual infections with different genotypes. The correct classification of HBV sequences into the present genotypes is impaired due to multiple ambiguous sequence positions. We present a computational model that is able to identify and genotype inter- and intragenotype dual infections using population-based sequencing data. Model verification on synthetic data showed 100 % accuracy for intergenotype dual infections and 36.4 % sensitivity in intragenotype dual infections. Screening patient sera (n = 241) revealed eight putative cases of intergenotype dual infection (one A-D, six A-G and one D-G) and four putative cases of intragenotype dual infection (one A-A, two D-D and one E-E). Clonal experiments from the original patient material confirmed three out of three of our predictions. The method has been integrated into geno2pheno([hbv]), an established web-service in clinical use for analysing HBV sequence data. It offers exact and detailed identification of HBV genotypes in patients with dual infections that helps to optimize antiviral therapy regimens. geno2pheno([hbv]) is available under http://www.genafor.org/g2p_hbv/index.php.

  9. Phylogenetic Analysis of Hepatitis B Virus Genotypes Circulating in Different Risk Groups of Panama, Evidence of the Introduction of Genotype A2 in the Country

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Alexander A.; Zaldívar, Yamitzel; Arteaga, Griselda; de Castillo, Zoila; Ortiz, Alma; Mendoza, Yaxelis; Castillero, Omar; Castillo, Juan A.; Cristina, Juan; Pascale, Juan M.

    2015-01-01

    The Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) can cause acute or chronic infection it is also associated with the development of liver cancer, thousands of new infections occur on a yearly basis, and many of these cases are located in certain areas of the Caribbean and Latin America. In these areas, the HBV prevalence is still high which makes this virus a serious public health concern to the entire region. Studies performed in Panama suggest a complex pattern in the distribution of HBV among the country’s different risk groups. We use phylogenetic analysis in order to determine which HBV genotypes were circulating in these specific groups; for this we used a fragment of the PreS2/2 region of the HBV genome. Subsequently whole HBV genome sequences were used for Bayesian analysis of phylodynamics and phylogeography. Two main genotypes were found: genotype A (54.5%) and genotype F (45.5%). There was a difference in the distribution of genotypes according to risk groups: 72.9% of high risk groups were associated to genotype A, and 55.0% of samples of genotype F were associated to the low risk group (p<0.002). The Bayesian analysis of phylogeny-traits association revealed a statistically significant geographical association (p<0.0001) with both genotypes and different regions of the country. The Bayesian time of most recent common ancestor analysis (tMRCA) revealed a recent tMRCA for genotype A2 circulating in Panama (1997, 95% HPD: 1986—2005), when it is compared with Panamanian genotype F1c sequences (1930, 95% HPD: 1810 – 2005). These results suggest a possible change in the distribution of HBV genotypes in Panama and Latin America as a whole. They also serve to encourage the implementation of vaccination programs in high-risk groups, in order to prevent an increase in the number of new HBV cases in Latin America and worldwide. PMID:26230260

  10. Hypervariable region 1 differentially impacts viability of hepatitis C virus strains of genotypes 1 to 6 and impairs virus neutralization.

    PubMed

    Prentoe, Jannick; Jensen, Tanja B; Meuleman, Philip; Serre, Stéphanie B N; Scheel, Troels K H; Leroux-Roels, Geert; Gottwein, Judith M; Bukh, Jens

    2011-03-01

    Hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) E2 envelope glycoprotein has been implicated in virus neutralization and persistence. We deleted HVR1 from JFH1-based HCV recombinants expressing Core/E1/E2/p7/NS2 of genotypes 1 to 6, previously found to grow efficiently in human hepatoma Huh7.5 cells. The 2a(ΔHVR1), 5a(ΔHVR1), and 6a(ΔHVR1) Core-NS2 recombinants retained viability in Huh7.5 cells, whereas 1a(ΔHVR1), 1b(ΔHVR1), 2b(ΔHVR1), 3a(ΔHVR1), and 4a(ΔHVR1) recombinants were severely attenuated. However, except for recombinant 4a(ΔHVR1), viruses eventually spread, and reverse genetics studies revealed adaptive envelope mutations that rescued the infectivity of 1a(ΔHVR1), 1b(ΔHVR1), 2b(ΔHVR1), and 3a(ΔHVR1) recombinants. Thus, HVR1 might have distinct functional roles for different HCV isolates. Ultracentrifugation studies showed that deletion of HVR1 did not alter HCV RNA density distribution, whereas infectious particle density changed from a range of 1.0 to 1.1 g/ml to a single peak at ∼1.1 g/ml, suggesting that HVR1 was critical for low-density HCV particle infectivity. Using chronic-phase HCV patient sera, we found three distinct neutralization profiles for the original viruses with these genotypes. In contrast, all HVR1-deleted viruses were highly sensitive with similar neutralization profiles. In vivo relevance for the role of HVR1 in protecting HCV from neutralization was demonstrated by ex vivo neutralization of 2a and 2a(ΔHVR1) produced in human liver chimeric mice. Due to the high density and neutralization susceptibility of HVR1-deleted viruses, we investigated whether a correlation existed between density and neutralization susceptibility for the original viruses with genotypes 1 to 6. Only the 2a virus displayed such a correlation. Our findings indicate that HVR1 of HCV shields important conserved neutralization epitopes with implications for viral persistence, immunotherapy, and vaccine development.

  11. [Determination of hepatitis B virus genotypes by DNA sequence analysis in patients from Ankara, Turkey].

    PubMed

    Külah, Canan; Cirak, Meltem Yalinay

    2010-04-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes vary depending on the geographical region. The HBV genotype determined in Turkey has been genotype D which is found as the homogenously disseminated single genotype. The aim of this study was to determine HBV genotypes in a group of HBV infected patients who were admitted to a university hospital in Ankara, Turkey. Serum samples from HBsAg positive and anti-HBs negative 84 (52 male, 32 female) patients with HBV infection were included into the study. Anti-HBc was positive in 95.2%, HBeAg was positive in 47.6% and anti-HBe was positive in 11.9% of the patients. Mean HBV-DNA levels of the patients were 5.7 x 10(7) +/- 4.6 x 10(7) IU/ml; mean ALT levels were 131 +/- 171 IU/ml and mean AST levels were 98 +/- 170 IU/ml. HBV-DNA was extracted from serum by the phenol-chloroform method and PCR was performed to amplify the S gene region of HBV-DNA. Cycle sequencing of PCR products was performed by a commercial "Cy5/Cy5.5 Dye Primer Cycle Sequencing Kit" (Visible Genetics, Canada) based on dideoxy chain termination method. The sequences were read and analyzed in an automated fluorescence-based DNA-sequencing system (Long-Read Tower System, Visible Genetics, Canada). The nucleotide sequences of the patient samples were compared with the previously reported sequences in gene bank for each genotype. According to the comparative analysis of S-sequences of all patient samples with the published sequences of the genotypes in gene bank, all of the 84 hepatitis B strains (100%) were shown to be related to D genotypic group, subtype ayw. A phylogenetic analysis was performed and phylogenetic trees were constructed using programs in the PHYLIP phylogeny inference package. The patient samples clustered within the genotypic group D. According to these results, the main HBV genotype in our patients was genotype D in accordance with the previous molecular epidemiologic information on HBV in this geographic area. HBV genotype determination may help to

  12. Nucleotide sequencing and serological evidence that the recently recognized deer tick virus is a genotype of Powassan virus.

    PubMed

    Beasley, D W; Suderman, M T; Holbrook, M R; Barrett, A D

    2001-11-01

    Deer tick virus (DTV) is a recently recognized North American virus isolated from Ixodes dammini ticks. Nucleotide sequencing of fragments of structural and non-structural protein genes suggested that this virus was most closely related to the tick-borne flavivirus Powassan (POW), which causes potentially fatal encephalitis in humans. To determine whether DTV represents a new and distinct member of the Flavivirus genus of the family Flaviviridae, we sequenced the structural protein genes and 5' and 3' non-coding regions of this virus. In addition, we compared the reactivity of DTV and POW in hemagglutination inhibition tests with a panel of polyclonal and monoclonal antisera, and performed cross-neutralization experiments using anti-DTV antisera. Nucleotide sequencing revealed a high degree of homology between DTV and POW at both nucleotide (>80% homology) and amino acid (>90% homology) levels, and the two viruses were indistinguishable in serological assays and mouse neuroinvasiveness. On the basis of these results, we suggest that DTV should be classified as a genotype of POW virus. PMID:11551648

  13. Identification and Complete Genome Sequence Analysis of a Genotype XIV Newcastle Disease Virus from Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Shittu, Ismaila; Sharma, Poonam; Volkening, Jeremy D.; Solomon, Ponman; Sulaiman, Lanre K.; Joannis, Tony M.; Williams-Coplin, Dawn; Miller, Patti J.; Dimitrov, Kiril M.

    2016-01-01

    The first complete genome sequence of a strain of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) from genotype XIV is reported here. Strain duck/Nigeria/NG-695/KG.LOM.11-16/2009 was isolated from an apparently healthy domestic duck from a live bird market in Kogi State, Nigeria, in 2009. This strain is classified as a member of subgenotype XIVb of class II. PMID:26823576

  14. Complete genome sequence of an emerging genotype of tobacco streak virus in the United States.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, Chellappan; Gao, Shan; Li, Rugang; Zhang, Shouan; Fei, Zhangjun; Ling, Kai-Shu

    2014-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of an emerging genotype of tobacco streak virus (TSV) infecting zucchini squash in Florida (TSV_FL13-07), obtained using deep sequencing of short RNAs (sRNAs) and validation by Sanger sequencing. TSV_FL13-07 shares only <90% sequence identity in all three genomic RNAs to several known U.S. isolates. PMID:25377714

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Genotype VI Newcastle Disease Viruses Isolated from Pigeons in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Wajid, Abdul; Rehmani, Shafqat Fatima; Sharma, Poonam; Goraichuk, Iryna V.; Dimitrov, Kiril M.

    2016-01-01

    Two complete genome sequences of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) are described here. Virulent isolates pigeon/Pakistan/Lahore/21A/2015 and pigeon/Pakistan/Lahore/25A/2015 were obtained from racing pigeons sampled in the Pakistani province of Punjab during 2015. Phylogenetic analysis of the fusion protein genes and complete genomes classified the isolates as members of NDV class II, genotype VI. PMID:27540069

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of Genotype VI Newcastle Disease Viruses Isolated from Pigeons in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Wajid, Abdul; Rehmani, Shafqat Fatima; Sharma, Poonam; Goraichuk, Iryna V; Dimitrov, Kiril M; Afonso, Claudio L

    2016-01-01

    Two complete genome sequences of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) are described here. Virulent isolates pigeon/Pakistan/Lahore/21A/2015 and pigeon/Pakistan/Lahore/25A/2015 were obtained from racing pigeons sampled in the Pakistani province of Punjab during 2015. Phylogenetic analysis of the fusion protein genes and complete genomes classified the isolates as members of NDV class II, genotype VI. PMID:27540069

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of Hepatitis B Virus Genotype E: The First Molecular Characterization from an Imported Case in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Escobar-Escamilla, Noé; Fragoso-Fonseca, David Esaú; Arreguín-Porras, Dulce María; Esteban-Valencia, María del Carmen; Corona-Valdespino, Estela; Falcón-Acosta, Jaime Israel; Vázquez-Campuzano, Roberto; Garcés-Ayala, Fabiola; Ortiz-Alcantara, Joanna María; López-Martinez, Irma

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus infection is currently a global public health problem. Here, we present the first characterization and complete genome sequence of a strain belonging to genotype E in Mexico, obtained from a foreign carrier with chronic infection. PMID:27034495

  18. Production and characterization of a Brazilian candidate antigen for Hepatitis E Virus genotype 3 diagnosis.

    PubMed

    de Almeida Ramos, Denise; Miani, Michela; Pandolfi, Rafael; Tondo, Luis; Colli, Maikel L; Rosado Spilki, Fernando; Rovaris Gardinali, Noemi; Alves Pinto, Marcelo; Kreutz, Luiz C; Frandoloso, Rafael

    2016-03-01

    Hepatitis E, caused by hepatitis E virus (HEV), is a viral infectious pathology of great importance in the public health. Hepatitis E outbreaks were registered in developing countries with poor or no sanitation, where drinking water was contaminated with fecal material, but also in many industrialized countries probably due to consumption of HEV-positive swine meat. In this study, we present the development and characterization of a recombinant antigen from ORF2 HEV genotype 3. Viral RNA was extracted from swine feces infected with the native virus. A total of 267 residues from the C-terminal ORF2((394-661)) coding sequence were cloned into the pET20a vector and expressed in Escherichia coli ER2566. Recombinant protein was purified by liquid chromatography and the fragment obtained a 98% homology against other human or swine HEV genotype 3 ORF2 sequences. Wistar rats were inoculated with ORF2p, developing antibodies able to recognize both the homologous antigen and the native HEV genotype 3 ORF2 present in infected stool. In parallel, HEV-negative swine were experimentally challenged with HEV genotype 3. ORF2 was detected by PCR 14 days post-inoculation in three-fourth piglets' feces and one week later by dot blot. In conclusion, this study proved the immunogenic and antigenic properties of the recombinant protein ORF2p.

  19. Hepatitis E virus genotypes 1 and 3 in wastewater samples in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Béji-Hamza, A; Hassine-Zaafrane, M; Khélifi-Gharbi, H; Della Libera, S; Iaconelli, M; Muscillo, M; Petricca, S; Ciccaglione, A R; Bruni, R; Taffon, S; Aouni, M; La Rosa, G

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis E represents an important public-health concern throughout the world. It is one of the leading causes of hepatitis in North Africa, Asia and the Middle East. In Tunisia, the true burden of HEV infection is still unknown. The objectives of the present study were to assess the occurrence of hepatitis E virus in Tunisia through the monitoring of urban sewage and to characterize the strains identified using molecular assays. A total of 150 sewage samples (raw and treated) were collected from three wastewater treatment plants located in the regions of Monastir and Mahdia and analyzed by nested RT-PCR using a qualitative assay targeting the methyltransferase gene in ORF1. Of these, only three samples (2 %) were found to be positive for HEV, one belonging to genotype 1 and two to genotype 3. The results of the present study indicate a low level of virus excretion among the Tunisian population. Both genotypes 1 and 3 are circulating in this country, however, possibly causing sporadic infections. The presence of the zoonotic genotype 3, known to be transmitted to humans mainly by swine and demonstrated in Tunisia for the first time in this work, raises the question of possible reservoir species, since pork products are not consumed in this country, pigs are not bred, and wild boar is not endemic. Further studies will be needed to gather information on the occurrence and diversity of HEV strains circulating among humans and animals in Tunisia, and on possible animal reservoirs.

  20. Virulence correlates with fitness in vivo for two M group genotypes of Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wargo, Andrew R.; Garver, Kyle A.; Kurath, Gael

    2010-01-01

    The nature of the association between viral fitness and virulence remains elusive in vertebrate virus systems, partly due to a lack of in vivo experiments using statistically sufficient numbers of replicate hosts. We examined the relationship between virulence and fitness in Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), in vivo, in intact living rainbow trout. Trout were infected with a high or low virulence genotype of M genogroup IHNV, or a mixture of the two genotypes, so as to calculate relative fitness and the effect of a competition environment on fitness. Fitness was measured as total viral load in the host at time of peak viral density, quantified by genotype-specific quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). The more virulent IHNV genotype reached higher densities in both single and mixed infections. There was no effect of competition on the performance of either genotype. Our results suggest a positive link between IHNV genotype fitness and virulence.

  1. Human papillomavirus genotypes in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients with anal pathology in Madrid, Spain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We studied anal specimens to determine the distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes and co-infection occurrence. This information will contribute to the knowledge of HPV genotype distributions and provide an estimate of the prevalence of different oncogenic HPV genotypes found in patients in Madrid (Spain). Methods We studied a total of 82 anal biopsies from the Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón of Madrid. These included 4 specimens with benign lesions, 52 specimens with low-grade anal squamous intraepithelial lesion, 24 specimens with high-grade anal squamous intraepithelial lesions and 2 specimens with invasive anal carcinoma. HPV genotyping was performed with PCR amplification and reverse dot blot hybridization. Results We detected 33 different HPV genotypes, including 16 HPVs associated with a high risk of carcinogenesis, 3 HPVs associated with a highly likely risk of carcinogenesis and 14 HPVs associated with a low-risk of carcinogenesis. In two specimens, an uncharacterized HPV genotype was detected. The most frequent HPV genotypes found were HPV-16 (10.3%; 95% CI: 6.6%-15.1%), HPV-52 (8.5%; 95% CI: 5.2%-13%) and HPV-43/44 (7.6%; 95% CI: 4.5%-11.9%). HPV-18 was only detected in 0.9% (95% CI: 0.1%-3.2%) of the total viruses detected in all lesions. HPV co-infections were found in 83.9% of all types of lesions. The majority of cases (90.2%) were concomitantly infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Conclusion The prevalence of high-risk carcinogenic genotypes in anal pathological samples was remarkable. Therefore, further studies that include a greater number of samples, particularly invasive carcinoma cases are needed to evaluate the potential influence of these HPV genotypes in the appearance of anal carcinomas. Also, the influence of other accompanying infections should be evaluated clarify the appearance of this type of carcinoma. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here

  2. Nonsuppurative Encephalomyelitis in a Calf in Japan and Isolation of Japanese Encephalitis Virus Genotype 1 from the Affected Calf

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Takashi; Saito, Sachie; Horiuchi, Sanae; Maruta, Tetsuya; Kato, Tomoko; Yanase, Tohru; Yamakawa, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) was isolated from the cerebrum of a calf which showed severe neurological symptoms in late September 2009, and the JEV isolate was revealed to be of genotype 1. This is the first report describing the isolation of genotype 1 JEV from cattle. PMID:23885004

  3. Replication of a chronic hepatitis B virus genotype F1b construct.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Sergio; Jiménez, Gustavo; Alarcón, Valentina; Prieto, Cristian; Muñoz, Francisca; Riquelme, Constanza; Venegas, Mauricio; Brahm, Javier; Loyola, Alejandra; Villanueva, Rodrigo A

    2016-03-01

    Genotype F is one of the less-studied genotypes of human hepatitis B virus, although it is widely distributed in regions of Central and South American. Our previous studies have shown that HBV genotype F is prevalent in Chile, and phylogenetic analysis of its full-length sequence amplified from the sera of chronically infected patients identified it as HBV subgenotype F1b. We have previously reported the full-length sequence of a HBV molecular clone obtained from a patient chronically infected with genotype F1b. In this report, we established a system to study HBV replication based on hepatoma cell lines transfected with full-length monomers of the HBV genome. Culture supernatants were analyzed after transfection and found to contain both HBsAg and HBeAg viral antigens. Consistently, fractionated cell extracts revealed the presence of viral replication, with both cytoplasmic and nuclear DNA intermediates. Analysis of HBV-transfected cells by indirect immunofluorescence or immunoelectron microscopy revealed the expression of viral antigens and cytoplasmic viral particles, respectively. To test the functionality of the ongoing viral replication further at the level of chromatinized cccDNA, transfected cells were treated with a histone deacetylase inhibitor, and this resulted in increased viral replication. This correlated with changes posttranslational modifications of histones at viral promoters. Thus, the development of this viral replication system for HBV genotype F will facilitate studies on the regulation of viral replication and the identification of new antiviral drugs.

  4. Genetic variability of hepatitis B virus in Uruguay: D/F, A/F genotype recombinants.

    PubMed

    Lopez, L; Flichman, D; Mojsiejczuk, L; Gonzalez, M V; Uriarte, R; Campos, R; Cristina, J; Garcia-Aguirre, Laura

    2015-09-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a serious global health problem. Approximately 2 billion people worldwide have been infected, and approximately 350 million individuals currently suffer from HBV-induced chronic liver infection, which causes 600,000 deaths annually from chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. HBV is classified in eight genotypes (A-H), and two more have been proposed (I-J). In this paper, complete genome sequences of nine Uruguayan HBV are reported. Five samples belong to genotype F1b and one to genotype A2. Three HBV recombinants were detected: A1/F1b, A2/F1b and D3/F1b. The following mutations were detected: a G1896A substitution, a 33-nucleotide deletion from position 2896 to 2928 in the Pre-S1 region involving Pre-S1 residues 3-13, a 33-nt deletion in the Pre-S1 region involving nt 2913-2945 and Pre-S1 residues 9-19. More F genotypes strains than expected were detected in this study, supporting the hypothesis that there are more people of indigenous origin than declared in our population. Also, one third of the samples analyzed were recombinants. This cannot be explained by the low HBV prevalence in Uruguay, but a high HBV infection rate in drug addicts and dialysis patients could act in favor of multiple-genotype HBV infections that could lead to recombination.

  5. Ledipasvir/sofosbuvir fixed-dose combination for treatment of hepatitis C virus genotype 4 infection.

    PubMed

    Nehra, V; Tan, E M; Rizza, S A; Temesgen, Z

    2016-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 4 accounts for 8-13% of all chronic HCV infections worldwide. Patients with HCV genotype 4 have been reported to have poor treatment responses to PEGylated interferon and ribavirin regimens. Recently a single tablet, fixed-dose combination of sofosbuvir, an RNA-directed RNA polymerase (NS5B) inhibitor, and ledipasvir, a nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A) inhibitor, has been approved for treatment of chronic HCV infection. Two studies using the fixed-dose combination in chronic HCV genotype 4 for 12 weeks reported sustained virologic response rates at 12 weeks (SVR12) of 93-95%. Data also support the use of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir in chronic HCV genotype 4 and HIV co-infection. Administered as a single once-daily oral regimen, this ribavirin- and interferon-free regimen is well tolerated, with low potential for adverse effects and represents a significant advancement in the treatment of chronic HCV genotype 4 infection.

  6. Injecting drug use: A vector for the introduction of new hepatitis C virus genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Ruta, Simona; Cernescu, Costin

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes’ monitoring allows real-time insight into the dynamic changes that occur in the global epidemiological picture of HCV infection. Intravenous drug use is currently the primary driver for HCV transmission in developed and developing countries. The distribution of HCV genotypes/subtypes differs significantly between people who inject drugs (PWID) and the general population. HCV genotypes that previously exhibited a limited geographical distribution (3a, 4) are becoming more prevalent in this high-risk group. Immigration from HCV-endemic countries and the evolving networks of HCV transmission in PWID influence HCV genotypes distribution in Europe. Social vulnerabilities (e.g., unemployment, homelessness, and limited access to social and healthcare insurances systems) are important triggers for illicit drug use, which increases the associated risks of HCV infection and the frequent emergence of less prevalent genotypes. Genotype/subtype determination bears important clinical consequences in the progression of liver disease, susceptibility to antiviral therapies and the emergence of resistance-associated variants. An estimated half of the chronically HCV-infected PWID are unaware of their infection, and only one in ten of those diagnosed enter treatment. Nevertheless, PWID exhibit high response rates to new antiviral regimens, and the level of HCV reinfection is unexpectedly low. The focus of the healthcare system must be on the early detection and treatment of infection, to avoid late presentations that are associated with high levels of viremia and liver fibrosis, which may diminish the therapeutic success rate. PMID:26478672

  7. Prevalence of Hepatitis C Virus Genotypes in Iranian Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Khodabandehloo, Mazaher; Roshani, Daem

    2014-01-01

    Context: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a global public health problem and a major etiology of chronic liver disease, which may develop into cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Genotypes of HCV indicate the route of acquisition, the clinical outcome, response to treatment, prognosis and control strategies. Objectives: The aim of this study was to estimate the overall prevalence and trend of HCV genotypes or subtypes in Iran Data Sources: A literature review was done for papers reporting HCV genotypes in Iranian patients in PubMed, Magiran, IranMedex, Scientific Information Databank, and Google scholar databases. Study Selection: Data were selected according to inclusion and exclusion criteria. Data Extraction: Data were abstracted by two independent authors. Data were analyzed based on random-effects model using the Meta R. Pooled statistical software. Prevalence of HCV genotypes in cities and provinces of Iran with 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated. Results: Fifty-three articles published between 1999 and 31 June 2014 including 22952 HCV infected individuals were included in the meta-analysis. Subtype 1a was predominant with a rate of 39% (95% CI: 34-44%); followed by subtype 3a, 32% (95% CI: 26-39%); subtype 1b, 13% (95% CI: 10-15%); genotype 4, 5.18% (95% CI: 3.27-7.5%); and genotype 2, 3.6% (95% CI: 1.6-8.3%). Untypeable HCV had a rate of 0.11% (95% CI: 0.07-0.16%). Conclusions: The most frequent subtypes of HCV in Iran were 1a, 3a and 1b, respectively. This frequency differed in various provinces of Iran and fluctuated with time. It is important to determine the distribution of HCV genotypes in different geographical areas and its trend with time for epidemiological and patients’ management purposes. PMID:25685164

  8. Molecular Epidemiology and Genotyping of Hepatitis B Virus of HBsAg-Positive Patients in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Al Naamani, Khalid; Al Awaidy, Salah; Busaidy, Suleiman Al; Pauli, Georg; Bock, C.-Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major global health burden with distinct geographic public health significance. Oman is a country with intermediate HBV carrier prevalence; however, little is known about the incidence of HBV variants in circulation. We investigated the HBV genotype distribution, the occurrence of antiviral resistance, and HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) escape mutations in HBsAg-positive patients in Oman. Methods Serum samples were collected from 179 chronically HBV-infected patients enrolled in various gastroenterology clinics in Oman. HBV genotypes were determined by sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. Mutations in the HBV polymerase and the HBsAg gene were characterized by mutational analysis. Results HBV genotypes D (130/170; 76.47%) and A (32/170; 18.28%) are predominant in Oman. The HBV genotypes C and E were less frequent (each 1.18%), while the HBV genotypes B, G, F, and H were not detected. Four patients revealed HBV genotype mixtures (HBV-A/D and D/C). The analyses of vaccine escape mutations yield that 148/170 (87.06%) HBV sequences were wild type. 22/170 (12.94%) HBV sequences showed mutations in the “a” determinant of the HBsAg domain. Two patients showed the described HBV vaccine escape mutation sP120T. 8/146 (5.48%) HBV isolates harbored mutations in the HBV polymerase known to confer resistance against antiviral therapy. Especially the lamivudine resistance mutations rtL180M/rtM204V and rtM204I were detected. Conclusion This study shows the distribution of HBV genotypes, therapy resistance, and vaccine escape mutations in HBV-infected patients in Oman. Our findings will have a major impact on therapy management and diagnostics of chronic HBV infections in Oman to control HBV infection in this intermediate HBV-endemic country. PMID:24835494

  9. Novel Cell Culture-Adapted Genotype 2a Hepatitis C Virus Infectious Clone

    PubMed Central

    Date, Tomoko; Kato, Takanobu; Kato, Junko; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Morikawa, Kenichi; Akazawa, Daisuke; Murayama, Asako; Tanaka-Kaneko, Keiko; Sata, Tetsutaro; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Mizokami, Masashi

    2012-01-01

    Although the recently developed infectious hepatitis C virus system that uses the JFH-1 clone enables the study of whole HCV viral life cycles, limited particular HCV strains have been available with the system. In this study, we isolated another genotype 2a HCV cDNA, the JFH-2 strain, from a patient with fulminant hepatitis. JFH-2 subgenomic replicons were constructed. HuH-7 cells transfected with in vitro transcribed replicon RNAs were cultured with G418, and selected colonies were isolated and expanded. From sequencing analysis of the replicon genome, several mutations were found. Some of the mutations enhanced JFH-2 replication; the 2217AS mutation in the NS5A interferon sensitivity-determining region exhibited the strongest adaptive effect. Interestingly, a full-length chimeric or wild-type JFH-2 genome with the adaptive mutation could replicate in Huh-7.5.1 cells and produce infectious virus after extensive passages of the virus genome-replicating cells. Virus infection efficiency was sufficient for autonomous virus propagation in cultured cells. Additional mutations were identified in the infectious virus genome. Interestingly, full-length viral RNA synthesized from the cDNA clone with these adaptive mutations was infectious for cultured cells. This approach may be applicable for the establishment of new infectious HCV clones. PMID:22787209

  10. [Hepatitis C virus genotype 5 in Mexico: a case report with successful treatment and a literature review].

    PubMed

    Rubio-Lezama, M A; López-Alférez, R; Santillán-Arreygue, L; Romero-Figueroa, M

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 5 is extremely rare and there is very little reported on its management in the medical literature. We present herein the case of a patient with HCV genotype 5 that presumably acquired the disease through a blood transfusion during infancy. Sustained virologic response was achieved after 24 weeks of treatment. According to the available information on HCV genotype 5 treatment, it has a similar response to that of HCV genotype 1. Our patient presented with various favorable outcome factors. There is much less reported on the treatment of HCV genotype 5 than there is regarding HCV genotypes 1, 2, 3, and 4. This is mainly due to the low prevalence of genotype 5 in the Mexican environment.

  11. Pepino mosaic virus genotype shift in North America and development of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification for rapid genotype identification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pepino mosaic, once an emerging disease a decade ago, has become endemic on greenhouse tomatoes worldwide in recent years. Three distinct genotypes of Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV), including EU, US1 and CH2 have been recognized. Our earlier study conducted in 2006-2007 demonstrated a predominant EU...

  12. A Genetic Variant of Hepatitis B Virus Divergent from Known Human and Ape Genotypes Isolated from a Japanese Patient and Provisionally Assigned to New Genotype J▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Tatematsu, Kanako; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Kurbanov, Fuat; Sugauchi, Fuminaka; Mano, Shuhei; Maeshiro, Tatsuji; Nakayoshi, Tomokuni; Wakuta, Moriaki; Miyakawa, Yuzo; Mizokami, Masashi

    2009-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) of a novel genotype (J) was recovered from an 88-year-old Japanese patient with hepatocellular carcinoma who had a history of residing in Borneo during the World War II. It was divergent from eight human (A to H) and four ape (chimpanzee, gorilla, gibbon, and orangutan) HBV genotypes, as well as from a recently proposed ninth human genotype I, by 9.9 to 16.5% of the entire genomic sequence and did not have evidence of recombination with any of the nine human genotypes and four nonhuman genotypes. Based on a comparison of the entire nucleotide sequence against 1,440 HBV isolates reported, HBV/J was nearest to the gibbon and orangutan genotypes (mean divergences of 10.9 and 10.7%, respectively). Based on a comparison of four open reading frames, HBV/J was closer to gibbon/orangutan genotypes than to human genotypes in the P and large S genes and closest to Australian aboriginal strains (HBV/C4) and orangutan-derived strains in the S gene, whereas it was closer to human than ape genotypes in the C gene. HBV/J shared a deletion of 33 nucleotides at the start of preS1 region with C4 and gibbon genotypes, had an S-gene sequence similar to that of C4, and expressed the ayw subtype. Efficient infection, replication, and antigen expression by HBV/J were experimentally established in two chimeric mice with the liver repopulated for human hepatocytes. The HBV DNA sequence recovered from infected mice was identical to that in the inoculum. Since HBV/J is positioned phylogenetically in between human and ape genotypes, it may help to trace the origin of HBV and merits further epidemiological surveys. PMID:19640977

  13. New insights into the hepatitis E virus genotype 3 phylodynamics and evolutionary history.

    PubMed

    Mirazo, Santiago; Mir, Daiana; Bello, Gonzalo; Ramos, Natalia; Musto, Héctor; Arbiza, Juan

    2016-09-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an emergent hepatotropic virus endemic mainly in Asia and other developing areas. However, in the last decade it has been increasingly reported in high-income countries. Human infecting HEV strains are currently classified into four genotypes (1-4). Genotype 3 (HEV-3) is the prevalent virus genotype and the mostly associated with autochthonous and sporadic cases of HEV in developed areas. The evolutionary history of HEV worldwide remains largely unknown. In this study we reconstructed the spatiotemporal and population dynamics of HEV-3 at global scale, but with particular emphasis in South America, where case reports have increased dramatically in the last years. To achieve this, we applied a Bayesian coalescent-based approach to a comprehensive data set comprising 97 GenBank HEV-3 sequences for which the location and sampling date was documented. Our phylogenetic analyses suggest that the worldwide genetic diversity of HEV-3 can be grouped into two main Clades (I and II) with a Ƭmrca dated in approximately 320years ago (95% HPD: 420-236years) and that a unique independent introduction of HEV-3 seems to have occurred in Uruguay, where most of the human HEV cases in South America have been described. The phylodynamic inference indicates that the population size of this virus suffered substantial temporal variations after the second half of the 20th century. In this sense and conversely to what is postulated to date, we suggest that the worldwide effective population size of HEV-3 is not decreasing and that frequently sources of error in its estimates stem from assumptions that the analyzed sequences are derived from a single panmictic population. Novel insights on the global population dynamics of HEV are given. Additionally, this work constitutes an attempt to further describe in a Bayesian coalescent framework, the phylodynamics and evolutionary history of HEV-3 in the South American region.

  14. New insights into the hepatitis E virus genotype 3 phylodynamics and evolutionary history.

    PubMed

    Mirazo, Santiago; Mir, Daiana; Bello, Gonzalo; Ramos, Natalia; Musto, Héctor; Arbiza, Juan

    2016-09-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an emergent hepatotropic virus endemic mainly in Asia and other developing areas. However, in the last decade it has been increasingly reported in high-income countries. Human infecting HEV strains are currently classified into four genotypes (1-4). Genotype 3 (HEV-3) is the prevalent virus genotype and the mostly associated with autochthonous and sporadic cases of HEV in developed areas. The evolutionary history of HEV worldwide remains largely unknown. In this study we reconstructed the spatiotemporal and population dynamics of HEV-3 at global scale, but with particular emphasis in South America, where case reports have increased dramatically in the last years. To achieve this, we applied a Bayesian coalescent-based approach to a comprehensive data set comprising 97 GenBank HEV-3 sequences for which the location and sampling date was documented. Our phylogenetic analyses suggest that the worldwide genetic diversity of HEV-3 can be grouped into two main Clades (I and II) with a Ƭmrca dated in approximately 320years ago (95% HPD: 420-236years) and that a unique independent introduction of HEV-3 seems to have occurred in Uruguay, where most of the human HEV cases in South America have been described. The phylodynamic inference indicates that the population size of this virus suffered substantial temporal variations after the second half of the 20th century. In this sense and conversely to what is postulated to date, we suggest that the worldwide effective population size of HEV-3 is not decreasing and that frequently sources of error in its estimates stem from assumptions that the analyzed sequences are derived from a single panmictic population. Novel insights on the global population dynamics of HEV are given. Additionally, this work constitutes an attempt to further describe in a Bayesian coalescent framework, the phylodynamics and evolutionary history of HEV-3 in the South American region. PMID:27264728

  15. Heads or Tails: Genotyping of Hepatitis C Virus Concerning the 2k/1b Circulating Recombinant Form.

    PubMed

    Schuermans, Wim; Orlent, Hans; Desombere, Isabelle; Descheemaeker, Patrick; Van Vlierberghe, Hans; Geerts, Anja; Verhelst, Xavier; Reynders, Marijke; Padalko, Elizaveta

    2016-01-01

    As different hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes respond differently to initiated therapy, correct HCV genotyping is essential. A potential risk for misclassification of the intergenotypic HCV circulating recombinant form (CRF) 2k/1b strains exists, depending on the genotyping method used. The aim was to investigate the differences in HCV genotyping methods with regard to CRF 2k/1b and to gain insight in the prevalence of the CRF 2k/1b. Genotyping results by Versant HCV Genotype Assay were compared with nonstructural protein 5B (NS5B) sequencing. In total, from November 2001 until March 2015, 3296 serum samples were analyzed by Versant HCV Genotype Assay. As misclassified CRF is harbored among HCV genotype 2, we further focused our search on 142 (4.3%) samples positive for HCV genotype 2. On 116 (81.7%) retrieved samples, the NS5B sequencing was performed. Twelve out of the 116 retrieved samples (10.3%) were classified as CRF 2k/1b by sequencing of the NS5B region. Ten of these 12 samples were originally misclassified as genotype 2a or 2c, while 2 of them were misclassified as genotype 2. Our results show that the current prevalence of CRF 2k/1b is underestimated. The importance of correct HCV genotyping is emphasized, considering the tailored choice of treatment regimen and overall prognosis. PMID:27563879

  16. Heads or Tails: Genotyping of Hepatitis C Virus Concerning the 2k/1b Circulating Recombinant Form

    PubMed Central

    Schuermans, Wim; Orlent, Hans; Desombere, Isabelle; Descheemaeker, Patrick; Van Vlierberghe, Hans; Geerts, Anja; Verhelst, Xavier; Reynders, Marijke; Padalko, Elizaveta

    2016-01-01

    As different hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes respond differently to initiated therapy, correct HCV genotyping is essential. A potential risk for misclassification of the intergenotypic HCV circulating recombinant form (CRF) 2k/1b strains exists, depending on the genotyping method used. The aim was to investigate the differences in HCV genotyping methods with regard to CRF 2k/1b and to gain insight in the prevalence of the CRF 2k/1b. Genotyping results by Versant HCV Genotype Assay were compared with nonstructural protein 5B (NS5B) sequencing. In total, from November 2001 until March 2015, 3296 serum samples were analyzed by Versant HCV Genotype Assay. As misclassified CRF is harbored among HCV genotype 2, we further focused our search on 142 (4.3%) samples positive for HCV genotype 2. On 116 (81.7%) retrieved samples, the NS5B sequencing was performed. Twelve out of the 116 retrieved samples (10.3%) were classified as CRF 2k/1b by sequencing of the NS5B region. Ten of these 12 samples were originally misclassified as genotype 2a or 2c, while 2 of them were misclassified as genotype 2. Our results show that the current prevalence of CRF 2k/1b is underestimated. The importance of correct HCV genotyping is emphasized, considering the tailored choice of treatment regimen and overall prognosis. PMID:27563879

  17. Evolution of Cocirculating Varicella-Zoster Virus Genotypes during a Chickenpox Outbreak in Guinea-Bissau

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Eleanor R.; Kundu, Samit; Cooray, Samantha; Poulsen, Anja; Aaby, Peter; Breuer, Judith

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Varicella-zoster virus (VZV), a double-stranded DNA alphaherpesvirus, is associated with seasonal outbreaks of varicella in nonimmunized populations. Little is known about whether these outbreaks are associated with a single or multiple viral genotypes and whether new mutations rapidly accumulate during transmission. Here, we take advantage of a well-characterized population cohort in Guinea-Bissau and produce a unique set of 23 full-length genome sequences, collected over 7 months from eight households. Comparative sequence analysis reveals that four distinct genotypes cocirculated among the population, three of which were present during the first week of the outbreak, although no patients were coinfected, which indicates that exposure to infectious virus from multiple sources is common during VZV outbreaks. Transmission of VZV was associated with length polymorphisms in the R1 repeat region and the origin of DNA replication. In two cases, these were associated with the formation of distinct lineages and point to the possible coevolution of these loci, despite the lack of any known functional link in VZV or related herpesviruses. We show that these and all other sequenced clade 5 viruses possess a distinct R1 repeat motif that increases the acidity of an ORF11p protein domain and postulate that this has either arisen or been lost following divergence of the major clades. Thus, sequencing of whole VZV genomes collected during an outbreak has provided novel insights into VZV biology, transmission patterns, and (recent) natural history. IMPORTANCE VZV is a highly infectious virus and the causative agent of chickenpox and shingles, the latter being particularly associated with the risk of painful complications. Seasonal outbreaks of chickenpox are very common among young children, yet little is known about the dynamics of the virus during person-to-person to transmission or whether multiple distinct viruses seed and/or cocirculate during an outbreak. In this

  18. Imported Genotype 2B Rubella Virus Caused the 2012 Outbreak in Anqing City, China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhen; Pan, Guixia; Zhou, Shujie; Dai, Jingjing; Chen, Xia; Tang, Jihai; Chen, Shuping; Zheng, Yilun; Song, Jie; Xu, Wenbo

    2015-01-01

    A rubella outbreak occurred in Anqing city of Anhui province, China, from February to July of 2012, and a total of 241 clinically diagnosed or lab-confirmed patients were reported. The highest number of rubella cases during this outbreak was recorded in teenagers between 10 and 19 years of age who had not previously received the rubella vaccine. Genotyping results indicated that the genotype 2B rubella virus (RV) was responsible for the outbreak. However, a phylogenetic analysis showed that the genotype 2B RVs isolated in Anqing City were not related to 2B RVs found in other cities of Anhui province and in other provinces of China, thus providing evidence for importation. After importation, the transmission of Anqing RVs was interrupted owing to an effective immunization campaign against rubella, suggesting the timeliness and effectiveness of contingency vaccination. Strengthening rubella surveillance, including the integration of epidemiologic information and laboratory data, is a vital strategy for rubella control and elimination. In addition, except for routine immunization, targeted supplementary immunization activities aimed at susceptible groups according to sero-epidemiological surveillance data also play a key role in stopping the continuous transmission of rubella viruses and in preventing further congenital rubella syndrome cases.

  19. Detection and differentiation of Japanese encephalitis virus genotype I and genotype III by reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification combined with restriction fragment length polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Cao, Sanjie; Wu, Rui; Zhu, Shuquan; Liu, Hanyang; Yuan, Lei; Shi, Shuangyan; Zhang, Dan; Huang, Xiaobo; Wen, Xintian; Wen, Yiping; Yan, Qigui; Huang, Yong; Ma, Xiaoping

    2015-04-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE), which is a mosquito-borne arboviral infection, is the leading cause of viral encephalitis in Asian countries. The causative agent of JE is Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), in which the predominant genotype has changed from genotype III (G III) to genotype I (G I). However, a method for the rapid differentiation between JEV G I and G III remains unavailable. This study aimed to establish a rapid JEV genotyping method using reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP). An Spe I site, which was located in the target sequence (C gene) of JEV G III strains but not in JEV G I strains, was selected as the RT-LAMP target. After testing 64 specimens, results showed that RT-LAMP can detect and differentiate JEV G I and G III specifically. Thus, a novel RT-LAMP system for the rapid detection and differentiation of JEV G I and G III was developed successfully.

  20. First isolation and genotyping of viruses from recent outbreaks of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS) in Slovenia.

    PubMed

    Toplak, Ivan; Hostnik, Peter; Rihtaric, Danijela; Olesen, Niels Jørgen; Skall, Helle Frank; Jencic, Vlasta

    2010-10-26

    In November and December 2007, the virus causing viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS) was detected in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss from 2 fish farms in Slovenia. During 2008 and 2009 the infection spread only among rainbow trout farms and 4 new outbreaks were confirmed. High mortality and clinical signs of VHS were observed among the diseased fish. VHSV was confirmed by virus isolation, immunoperoxidase test, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and phylogenetic analysis. Based on 1 complete (1524 nucleotides [nt]) and 9 partial (600 nt) glycoprotein gene nucleotide sequences, 9 VHSV isolates from the 6 VHS outbreaks were genetically closely related (99 to 100% identity), and were classified into the Subgroup I-a of Genotype I, most closely related to the German isolates Dstg21-07, Dstg36-06, and Dstg54-1-07 (99 to 100% identity). Phylogenetic analysis and epidemiological investigations confirmed that the VHS virus had been (re)introduced with imported live fish, and that subsequent outbreaks were linked to the initial infection. Our study shows that direct nucleotide sequencing of RT-PCR products, amplified from the tissue of VHSV-infected fish, represents a reliable tool for fast routine genotyping in diagnostic laboratories. This is the first report of a natural epidemic associated with VHSV infection in Slovenia since the eradication of the disease in 1977. PMID:21166311

  1. Differential Infectivities among Different Japanese Encephalitis Virus Genotypes in Culex quinquefasciatus Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan-Jang S.; Park, So Lee; Higgs, Stephen; Barrett, Alan D. T.; Hsu, Wei-Wen; Harbin, Julie N.; Cohnstaedt, Lee W.; Vanlandingham, Dana L.

    2016-01-01

    During the last 20 years, the epidemiology of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) has changed significantly in its endemic regions due to the gradual displacement of the previously dominant genotype III (GIII) with clade b of GI (GI-b). Whilst there is only limited genetic difference distinguishing the two GI clades (GI-a and GI-b), GI-b has shown a significantly wider and more rapid dispersal pattern in several regions in Asia than the GI-a clade, which remains restricted in its geographic distribution since its emergence. Although previously published molecular epidemiological evidence has shown distinct phylodynamic patterns, characterization of the two GI clades has only been limited to in vitro studies. In this study, Culex quinquefasciatus, a known competent JEV mosquito vector species, was orally challenged with three JEV strains each representing GI-a, GI-b, and GIII, respectively. Infection and dissemination were determined based on the detection of infectious viruses in homogenized mosquitoes. Detection of JEV RNA in mosquito saliva at 14 days post infection indicated that Cx. quinquefasciatus can be a competent vector species for both GI and GIII strains. Significantly higher infection rates in mosquitoes exposed to the GI-b and GIII strains than the GI-a strain suggest infectivity in arthropod vectors may lead to the selective advantage of previously and currently dominant genotypes. It could thus play a role in enzootic transmission cycles for the maintenance of JEV if this virus were ever to be introduced into North America. PMID:27706157

  2. A sequence database allowing automated genotyping of Classical swine fever virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Dreier, Sabrina; Zimmermann, Bernd; Moennig, Volker; Greiser-Wilke, Irene

    2007-03-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is a highly contagious viral disease of pigs. According to the OIE classification of diseases it is classified as a notifiable (previously List A) disease, thus having the potential for causing severe socio-economic problems and affecting severely the international trade of pigs and pig products. Effective control measures are compulsory, and to expose weaknesses a reliable tracing of the spread of the virus is necessary. Genetic typing has proved to be the method of choice. However, genotyping involves the use of multiple software applications, which is laborious and complex. The implementation of a sequence database, which is accessible by the World Wide Web with the option to type automatically new CSF virus isolates once the sequence is available is described. The sequence to be typed is tested for correct orientation and, if necessary, adjusted to the right length. The alignment and the neighbor-joining phylogenetic analysis with a standard set of sequences can then be calculated. The results are displayed as a graph. As an example, the determination is shown of the genetic subgroup of the isolate obtained from the outbreaks registered in Russia, in 2005. After registration (Irene.greiser-wilke@tiho-hannover.de) the database including the module for genotyping are accessible under http://viro08.tiho-hannover.de/eg/eurl_virus_db.htm.

  3. Evaluation of the Editing Process in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Diana D.; Eshleman, Susan H.; Brambilla, Donald J.; Palumbo, Paul E.; Bremer, James W.

    2003-01-01

    Sequencing-based human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genotyping assays require subjective interpretation (editing) of sequence data from multiple primers to form consensus sequences and identify antiretroviral drug resistance mutations. We assessed interlaboratory variations in editing and their impact on the recognition of resistance mutations. Six samples were analyzed in a central laboratory by using a research-use-only HIV-1 genotyping system previously produced by Applied Biosystems. The electronic files of individual primer sequences from the samples were sent to 10 laboratories to compare sequence editing strategies. Each sequence data set included sequences from seven primers spanning protease codons 1 to 99 and reverse transcriptase codons 1 to 320. Each laboratory generated a consensus sequence for each sample and completed a questionnaire about editing strategy. The amount of editing performed, the concordance of consensus sequences among the laboratories, and the identification of resistance mutations were evaluated. Sequence agreement was high among the laboratories despite wide variations in editing strategies. All laboratories identified 66 (88%) of 75 resistance mutations in the samples. Nonconcordant identifications were made for 9 (12%) of the 75 mutations, all of which required editing for identification. These results indicate a need for standardized editing guidelines in genotyping assays. Proficiency in editing should be assessed in training and included in quality control programs for HIV-1 genotyping. PMID:12843074

  4. The role of a metastable RNA secondary structure in hepatitis delta virus genotype III RNA editing

    PubMed Central

    Linnstaedt, Sarah D.; Kasprzak, Wojciech K.; Shapiro, Bruce A.; Casey, John L.

    2006-01-01

    RNA editing plays a critical role in the life cycle of hepatitis delta virus (HDV). The host editing enzyme ADAR1 recognizes specific RNA secondary structure features around the amber/W site in the HDV antigenome and deaminates the amber/W adenosine. A previous report suggested that a branched secondary structure is necessary for editing in HDV genotype III. This branched structure, which is distinct from the characteristic unbranched rod structure required for HDV replication, was only partially characterized, and knowledge concerning its formation and stability was limited. Here, we examine the secondary structures, conformational dynamics, and amber/W site editing of HDV genotype III RNA using a miniaturized HDV genotype III RNA in vitro. Computational analysis of this RNA using the MPGAfold algorithm indicated that the RNA has a tendency to form both metastable and stable unbranched secondary structures. Moreover, native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated that this RNA forms both branched and unbranched rod structures when transcribed in vitro. As predicted, the branched structure is a metastable structure that converts readily to the unbranched rod structure. Only branched RNA was edited at the amber/W site by ADAR1 in vitro. The structural heterogeneity of HDV genotype III RNA is significant because not only are both conformations of the RNA functionally important for viral replication, but the ratio of the two forms could modulate editing by determining the amount of substrate RNA available for modification. PMID:16790843

  5. Characterization of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes in patients from Rondônia, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) can be classified into nine genotypes (A-I) defined by sequence divergence of more than 8% based on the complete genome. This study aims to identify the genotypic distribution of HBV in 40 HBsAg-positive patients from Rondônia, Brazil. A fragment of 1306 bp partially comprising surface and polymerase overlapping genes was amplified by PCR. Amplified DNA was purified and sequenced. Amplified DNA was purified and sequenced on an ABI PRISM® 377 Automatic Sequencer (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA, USA). The obtained sequences were aligned with reference sequences obtained from the GenBank using Clustal X software and then edited with Se-Al software. Phylogenetic analyses were conducted by the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach using BEAST v.1.5.3. Results The subgenotypes distribution was A1 (37.1%), D3 (22.8%), F2a (20.0%), D4 (17.1%) and D2 (2.8%). Conclusions These results for the first HBV genotypic characterization in Rondônia state are consistent with other studies in Brazil, showing the presence of several HBV genotypes that reflects the mixed origin of the population, involving descendants from Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans. PMID:21073730

  6. Hepatitis E Virus Genotype 3 in Colombia: Survey in Patients with Clinical Diagnosis of Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Rendon, Julio; Hoyos, Maria Cristina; di Filippo, Diana; Cortes-Mancera, Fabian; Mantilla, Carolina; Velasquez, Maria Mercedes; Sepulveda, Maria Elsy; Restrepo, Juan Carlos; Jaramillo, Sergio; Arbelaez, Maria Patricia; Correa, Gonzalo; Navas, Maria-Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatitis E virus is a major cause of outbreaks as well as sporadic hepatitis cases worldwide. The epidemiology of this enterically transmitted infection differs between developing and developed countries. The aims of this study were to describe HEV infection in Colombian patients and to characterize the genotype. Methods A prospective study was carried out on 40 patients aged over 15 with a clinical diagnosis of viral hepatitis, recruited from five primary health units in the city of Medellin, Colombia. Fecal samples obtained from the 40 consecutives cases were analyzed for HEV RNA using nested reverse transcription PCR for both ORF1 and ORF2-3. The amplicons were sequenced for phylogenetic analyses. Results Nine (22.5%) cases of HEV infection were identified in the study population. Three HEV strains obtained from patients were classified as genotype 3. No significant association was found between cases of Hepatitis E and the variables water drinking source, garbage collection system and contact with pigs. Conclusions This is the first prospective study of hepatitis E in Colombian patients. The circulation of the genotype 3 in this population is predictable considering the reports of the region and the identification of this genotype from pigs in the state of Antioquia, of which Medellin is the capital. Further studies are necessary to establish whether zoonotic transmission of HEV is important in Colombia. PMID:26886728

  7. Genotyping of clinical varicella-zoster virus isolates collected from Yunnan in Southwestern China

    PubMed Central

    LI, YUNLONG; ZHU, BAOSHENG

    2016-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) belongs to the α-herpesvirus family. Genetically, it is stable and is divided into several genotypes based upon the genetic variations. The genotypes of VZV are rarely studied in the Southwestern region of China. In the present study, the common genetic variations in the VZV genes were examined in 42 VZV isolates collected from the patients with herpes zoster in the Yunnan province (Southwestern China). The restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of open reading frames (ORFs) 38, 54 and 62 in the VZV genes showed that all the collected VZV isolates were PstI, BglI and SmaI positive. The R5 variable-repeat region in these isolates was variable (R5A: 46.4%; R5B: 53.6%). The sequencing data of ORFs 1, 21, 22 and 54 indicated that 41 of the 42 collected VZV isolates could be grouped into genotype J or J1. Only one VZV isolate was identified as genotype A1 or M2. No new substitutions in the sequenced fragments were found in the collected VZV isolates. The results of the present study provided a preliminary genetic characterization of the VZV strains in the Yunnan province of Southwestern China. PMID:26893840

  8. Global epidemiology and genotype distribution of the hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Gower, Erin; Estes, Chris; Blach, Sarah; Razavi-Shearer, Kathryn; Razavi, Homie

    2014-11-01

    The treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has the potential to change significantly over the next few years as therapeutic regimens are rapidly evolving. However, the burden of chronic infection has not been quantified at the global level using the most recent data. Updated estimates of HCV prevalence, viremia and genotypes are critical for developing strategies to manage or eliminate HCV infection. To achieve this, a comprehensive literature search was conducted for anti-HCV prevalence, viraemic prevalence and genotypes for all countries. Studies were included based on how well they could be extrapolated to the general population, sample size and the age of the study. Available country estimates were used to develop regional and global estimates. Eighty-seven countries reported anti-HCV prevalence, while HCV viraemic rates were available for fifty-four countries. Total global viraemic HCV infections were estimated at 80 (64-103) million infections. Genotype distribution was available for ninety-eight countries. Globally, genotype 1 (G1) was the most common (46%), followed by G3 (22%), G2 (13%), and G4 (13%). In conclusion, the total number of HCV infections reported here are lower than previous estimates. The exclusion of data from earlier studies conducted at the peak of the HCV epidemic, along with adjustments for reduced prevalence among children, are likely contributors. The results highlight the need for more robust surveillance studies to quantify the HCV disease burden more accurately.

  9. Hepatitis C virus genotype 6: Virology, epidemiology, genetic variation and clinical implication

    PubMed Central

    Thong, Vo Duy; Akkarathamrongsin, Srunthron; Poovorawan, Kittiyod; Tangkijvanich, Pisit; Poovorawan, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a serious public health problem affecting 170 million carriers worldwide. It is a leading cause of chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and liver cancer and is the primary cause for liver transplantation worldwide. HCV genotype 6 (HCV-6) is restricted to South China, South-East Asia, and it is also occasionally found in migrant patients from endemic countries. HCV-6 has considerable genetic diversity with 23 subtypes (a to w). Although direct sequencing followed by phylogenetic analysis is the gold standard for HCV-6 genotyping and subtyping, there are also now rapid genotyping tests available such as the reverse hybridization line probe assay (INNO-LiPA II; Innogenetics, Zwijnaarde, Belgium). HCV-6 patients present with similar clinical manifestations as patients infected with other genotypes. Based on current evidence, the optimal treatment duration of HCV-6 with pegylated interferon/ribavirin should be 48 wk, although a shortened treatment duration of 24 wk could be sufficient in patients with low pretreatment viral load who achieve rapid virological response. In addition, the development of direct-acting antiviral agents is ongoing, and they give high response rate when combined with standard therapy. Herein, we review the epidemiology, classification, diagnosis and treatment as it pertain to HCV-6. PMID:24659883

  10. Comparison of Genotypes I and III in Japanese Encephalitis Virus Reveals Distinct Differences in Their Genetic and Host Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Han, Na; Adams, James; Chen, Ping; Guo, Zhen-yang; Zhong, Xiang-fu; Fang, Wei; Li, Na; Wen, Lei; Tao, Xiao-yan; Yuan, Zhi-ming

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Japanese encephalitis (JE) is an arthropod-borne disease associated with the majority of viral encephalitis cases in the Asia-Pacific region. The causative agent, Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), has been phylogenetically divided into five genotypes. Recent surveillance data indicate that genotype I (GI) is gradually replacing genotype III (GIII) as the dominant genotype. To investigate the mechanism behind the genotype shift and the potential consequences in terms of vaccine efficacy, human cases, and virus dissemination, we collected (i) all full-length and partial JEV molecular sequences and (ii) associated genotype and host information comprising a data set of 873 sequences. We then examined differences between the two genotypes at the genetic and epidemiological level by investigating amino acid mutations, positive selection, and host range. We found that although GI is dominant, it has fewer sites predicted to be under positive selection, a narrower host range, and significantly fewer human isolates. For the E protein, the sites under positive selection define a haplotype set for each genotype that shows striking differences in their composition and diversity, with GIII showing significantly more variety than GI. Our results suggest that GI has displaced GIII by achieving a replication cycle that is more efficient but is also more restricted in its host range. IMPORTANCE Japanese encephalitis is an arthropod-borne disease associated with the majority of viral encephalitis cases in the Asia-Pacific region. The causative agent, Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), has been divided into five genotypes based on sequence similarity. Recent data indicate that genotype I (GI) is gradually replacing genotype III (GIII) as the dominant genotype. Understanding the reasons behind this shift and the potential consequences in terms of vaccine efficacy, human cases, and virus dissemination is important for controlling the spread of the virus and reducing human

  11. Recommendations for the diagnosis of human papilloma virus (HPV) high and low risk in the prevention and treatment of diseases of the oral cavity, pharynx and larynx. Guide of experts PTORL and KIDL.

    PubMed

    Wierzbicka, Małgorzata; Józefiak, Agata; Szydłowski, Jarosław; Marszałek, Andrzej; Stankiewicz, Czesław; Hassman-Poznańska, Elżbieta; Osuch-Wójcikiewicz, Ewa; Składzień, Jacek; Klatka, Janusz; Pietruszewska, Wioletta; Puacz, Elżbieta; Szyfter, Krzysztof; Szyfter, Witold

    2013-01-01

    The role of human papilloma viruses (HPV) in malignant and nonmalignant ENT diseases and the corresponding epidemiological burden has been widely described. International head and neck oncology community discussed growing evidence that oral HPV infection contributes to the risk of oro-pharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) and recommended HPV testing as a part of the work up for patients with OPC. Polish Society of ENT Head Neck Surgery and National Chamber of Laboratory Diagnosticians have worked together to define the minimum requirements for assigning a diagnosis of HPV-related conditions and testing strategy that include HPV specific tests in our country. This paper briefly frames the literature information concerning low risk (LR) and high risk (HR) HPV, reviews the epidemiology, general guidance on the most appropriate biomarkers for clinical assessment of HPV. The definition of HPV-related cancer was presented. The article is aiming to highlight some of major issues for the clinician dealing with patients with HPV-related morbidities and to introduce the diagnostic algorithm in Poland.

  12. Comparison of the association with eczema herpeticum in the two predominant genotypes of herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Umene, K; Yoshida, M; Sakaoka, H

    1996-08-01

    Eczema herpeticum, sometimes called Kaposi's varicelliform eruption, is usually caused by a disseminated herpes simplex virus infection in a patient whose underlying skin disease in atopic dermatitis. Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), a widespread infectious agent in human populations, is the etiologic agent of eczema herpeticum. Analyses of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of HSV-1 strains isolated in Japan, using restriction endonucleases, revealed the presence of two predominant genotypes of F1 and F35. The number of HSV-1 strains of F1 genotype was over twice that of the F35 genotype, and the nucleotide change between F1 and F35 was estimated to be 1.5%. The question of whether the genomic difference between two predominant genotypes could influence clinical manifestations remained to be addressed. On the basis of RFLP, we determined genotypes of HSV-1 strains isolated from the patients in Japan, including those with eczema herpeticum. Two of four HSV-1 strains of F35 genotype were from patients with eczema herpeticum, whereas none of 12 HSV-1 strains of F1 genotype was from those with eczema herpeticum. Thus, the F35 genotype seemed to be associated more frequently with eczema herpeticum than the F1 genotype.

  13. The relevance of dengue virus genotypes surveillance at country level before vaccine approval

    PubMed Central

    Usme-Ciro, José A; Méndez, Jairo A; Laiton, Katherine D; Páez, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is a major threat for public health in tropical and subtropical countries around the world. In the absence of a licensed vaccine and effective antiviral therapies, control measures have been based on education activities and vector elimination. Current efforts for developing a vaccine are both promising and troubling. At the advent of the introduction of a tetravalent dengue vaccine, molecular surveillance of the circulating genotypes in different geographical regions has gained considerable importance. A growing body of in vitro, preclinical, and clinical phase studies suggest that vaccine conferred protection in a geographical area could depends on the coincidence of the dengue virus genotypes included in the vaccine and those circulating. In this review we present the state-of-the-art in this field, highlighting the need of deeper knowledge on neutralizing immune response for making decisions about future vaccine approval and the potential need for different vaccine composition for regional administration. PMID:25483495

  14. Hepatitis C virus genotype testing in paraffin wax embedded liver biopsies for specimen identification.

    PubMed

    Ikura, Y; Ohsawa, M; Hai, E; Jomura, H; Ueda, M

    2003-12-01

    Despite advances in medical technology, careful specimen identification is still a fundamental principle of laboratory testing. If pathological samples are mixed up, especially in the case of extremely small biopsy samples, large amounts of time and energy may be wasted in correctly identifying the specimens. Recently, two liver biopsy specimens were mixed up in this department, and a new pathological technology was used to resolve the issue. Liver biopsy was performed on two patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. During sample transfer or tissue processing, the biopsy specimens were mixed up. Because the ABO blood group of the two patients was identical (type AB), the specimens were subsequently identified by analysing the HCV genotypes. RNA extracted from the paraffin wax embedded liver specimens was examined by a polymerase chain reaction based HCV genotype assay. This enabled the correct identification of the specimens, and each patient received the appropriate treatment on the basis of the accurate diagnosis.

  15. Phylogenetic analysis of hepatitis D viruses indicating a new genotype I subgroup among African isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y Y; Tsega, E; Hansson, B G

    1996-01-01

    Genetic analysis was performed on 13 hepatitis D virus (HDV) isolates from Ethiopia, Somalia, Jordan, Kuwait, Bulgaria, Moldavia, and Sweden. The complete nucleotide sequence and genomic organization are described for the first time for two African HDV isolates. Phylogenetic analysis showed all the African isolates to be intrarelated and to form a novel group within HDV genotype I; the suggested designation for this group is IC. The genetic distance to previously described type I isolates was about 0.15. The HDV genotype I isolates (total of 22 examined) phylogenetically formed three clusters, each of them corresponding to certain geographic regions; the "western" group consisted of six HDV isolates from western Europe and the United States plus one from Kuwait; the "eastern" group consisted of two isolates from Moldavia and one each from Bulgaria, Nauru, mainland China, and Taiwan; and the "African-Middle East" group consisted of six HDV isolates from Ethiopia and one from Somalia, Jordan, and Lebanon. PMID:8940442

  16. The relevance of dengue virus genotypes surveillance at country level before vaccine approval.

    PubMed

    Usme-Ciro, José A; Méndez, Jairo A; Laiton, Katherine D; Páez, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is a major threat for public health in tropical and subtropical countries around the world. In the absence of a licensed vaccine and effective antiviral therapies, control measures have been based on education activities and vector elimination. Current efforts for developing a vaccine are both promising and troubling. At the advent of the introduction of a tetravalent dengue vaccine, molecular surveillance of the circulating genotypes in different geographical regions has gained considerable importance. A growing body of in vitro, preclinical, and clinical phase studies suggest that vaccine conferred protection in a geographical area could depends on the coincidence of the dengue virus genotypes included in the vaccine and those circulating. In this review we present the state-of-the-art in this field, highlighting the need of deeper knowledge on neutralizing immune response for making decisions about future vaccine approval and the potential need for different vaccine composition for regional administration.

  17. Dendritic cells in hepatitis C virus infection: Key players in the IFNL3-genotype response

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Kate S; George, Jacob; Booth, David; Ahlenstiel, Golo

    2014-01-01

    Recently, single nucleotide polymorphisms, in the vicinity of the interferon lambda 3 (IFNL3) gene have been identified as the strongest predictor of spontaneous and treatment induced clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Since then, increasing evidence has implicated the innate immune response in mediating the IFNL3 genotype effect. Dendritic cells (DCs) are key to the host immune response in HCV infection and their vital role in the IFNL3 genotype effect is emerging. Reports have identified subclasses of DCs, particularly myeloid DC2s and potentially plasmacytoid DCs as the major producers of IFNL3 in the setting of HCV infection. Given the complexities of dendritic cell biology and the conflicting current available data, this review aims to summarize what is currently known regarding the role of dendritic cells in HCV infection and to place it into context of what is know about lambda interferons and dendritic cells in general. PMID:25548481

  18. The relevance of dengue virus genotypes surveillance at country level before vaccine approval.

    PubMed

    Usme-Ciro, José A; Méndez, Jairo A; Laiton, Katherine D; Páez, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is a major threat for public health in tropical and subtropical countries around the world. In the absence of a licensed vaccine and effective antiviral therapies, control measures have been based on education activities and vector elimination. Current efforts for developing a vaccine are both promising and troubling. At the advent of the introduction of a tetravalent dengue vaccine, molecular surveillance of the circulating genotypes in different geographical regions has gained considerable importance. A growing body of in vitro, preclinical, and clinical phase studies suggest that vaccine conferred protection in a geographical area could depends on the coincidence of the dengue virus genotypes included in the vaccine and those circulating. In this review we present the state-of-the-art in this field, highlighting the need of deeper knowledge on neutralizing immune response for making decisions about future vaccine approval and the potential need for different vaccine composition for regional administration. PMID:25483495

  19. Genotyping of classical swine fever virus using high-resolution melt analysis.

    PubMed

    Titov, Ilya; Tsybanov, Sodnom; Malogolovkin, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    Discrimination between different field and vaccine strains of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is crucial for meaningful disease diagnosis and epidemiological investigation. In this study, a rapid method for differentiating vaccine strains and outbreak CSFV isolates by combined RT-PCR and high-resolution melt (HRM) analysis has been developed. The assay is based on PCR amplification of short fragments from the most variable region of CSFVgene E2, followed by HRM analysis of amplicons. Real-Time PCR/HRM for CSFV detection and differentiation analysis has sensitivity comparable to RT-qPCR and genotyping resolution comparable to E2 nucleotide sequencing. This assay in one step enables rapid and sensitive identification and genotype discrimination of CSFV in field samples, and thus will be valuable for CSF outbreak response and disease control. PMID:26300371

  20. Oral inverted ductal papilloma associated with condyloma acuminata and HPV in an HIV+ patient.

    PubMed

    Infante-Cossio, P; Gonzalo, D H; Hernandez-Gutierrez, J; Borrero-Martin, J J

    2008-12-01

    Oral inverted ductal papillomas are rare benign tumours of minor salivary glands. A case that appeared in a middle-aged HIV+ woman simultaneous to two condyloma acuminata on the lips is described. The presence of human papilloma virus (HPV) 11 DNA was demonstrated in all the samples using polymerase chain reaction. HPV could play an important role in the aetiology and pathogenesis of these lesions in this patient.

  1. Hepatitis B virus in Pakistan: a systematic review of prevalence, risk factors, awareness status and genotypes.

    PubMed

    Ali, Muhammad; Idrees, Muhammad; Ali, Liaqat; Hussain, Abrar; Ur Rehman, Irshad; Saleem, Sana; Afzal, Samia; Butt, Sadia

    2011-01-01

    In Pakistan, there are estimated 7-9 million carriers of hepatitis B virus (HBV) with a carrier rate of 3-5%. This article reviews the available literature about the prevalence, risk factors, awareness status and genotypes of the HBV in Pakistan by using key words; HBV prevalence, risk factors, awareness status and genotypes in Pakistani population in PubMed, PakMediNet, Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) and Google Scholar. One hundred and six different studies published from 1998 to 2010 were included in this study. Weighted mean and standard deviation were determined for each population group. The percentage of hepatitis B virus infection in general population was 4.3318% ± 1.644%, healthy blood donors (3.93% ± 1.58%), military recruits (4.276% ± 1.646%), healthcare persons (3.25% ± 1.202%), pregnant women (5.872% ± 4.984), prisoners (5.75% ± 0.212%), surgical patients (7.397% ± 2.012%), patients with cirrhosis (28.87% ± 11.90%), patients with HCC (22% ± 2.645%), patients with hepatitis (15.896% ± 14.824%), patients with liver diseases (27.54% ± 6.385%), multiple transfused patients (6.223% ± 2.121%), opthalmic patients (3.89% ± 1.004%) and users of injectable drugs (14.95% ± 10.536%). Genotype D (63.71%) is the most prevalent genotype in Pakistani population. Mass vaccination and awareness programs should be initiated on urgent basis especially in populations with HBV infection rates of more than 5%. PMID:21375760

  2. Detection of Hepatitis E Virus Genotype 1 Among Blood Donors From Southwest of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Parsa, Rahil; Adibzadeh, Setare; Behzad Behbahani, Abbas; Farhadi, Ali; Yaghobi, Ramin; Rafiei Dehbidi, Gholam Reza; Hajizamani, Saeideh; Rahbar, Sanaz; Nikouyan, Negin; Okhovat, Mohammad Ali; Naderi, Samaneh; Salehi, Saeede; Alizadeh, Marzieh; Ranjbaran, Reza; Zarnegar, Golnoosh; Alavi, Parnian

    2016-01-01

    Background Infection with hepatitis E virus (HEV) is endemic in developing countries and reveals significant regional differences. Several studies have reported virus transmission via blood transfusion. To date, however, no cases of HEV RNA detection in blood donors have been reported from Iran. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the presence of HEV RNA in plasma samples of blood donors referred to a blood transfusion center in Shiraz in the southwest of Iran. The HEV genotypes were also investigated using nucleotide sequencing. Patients and Methods Blood samples were collected from 700 blood donors who were referred to Fars blood transfusion organization from January to March 2014. Plasma samples were screened for the presence of HEV IgG and IgM antibodies by standard enzyme immunoassay. Samples seroreactive to anti-HEV were further tested for the presence of HEV RNA using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with universal primers for detection of all four HEV genotypes. Positive PCR samples were then subjected to DNA sequencing for further analysis. Results Fifty (50, 7.1%) out of 700 plasma samples tested positive for anti-HEV antibodies. HEV RNA was detected in 7/50 (12%) of the antibody-positive samples, the majority of which were IgM positive. Sequence analysis of seven isolates of the HEV RNA ORF 2 gene region revealed > 80% similarity with genotype 1. Conclusions The analysis indicates that the HEV isolated from blood donors in the southwest of Iran belongs to genotype 1. However, more samples from other geographic regions of Iran are needed to confirm these findings. Because transmission of HEV by administration of blood or blood components is likely to occur, it may be sensible to screen donor blood for HEV to eliminate transfusion-transmitted HEV infection when the recipient is immunocompromised. PMID:27630719

  3. Hantavirus disease in Germany due to infection with Dobrava-Belgrade virus genotype Kurkino.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, J; Meier, M; Enders, M; Führer, A; Ettinger, J; Klempa, B; Schmidt, S; Ulrich, R G; Kruger, D H

    2014-10-01

    Members of the Dobrava-Belgrade virus (DOBV) species are hantaviruses carried by different Apodemus mice as reservoir hosts and causing haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in humans. In Central Europe, the Kurkino genotype of DOBV, associated with the striped field mouse, Apodemus agrarius, is prevalent. This paper presents the first extensive study of the serological and molecular diagnostics, epidemiology and clinics of DOBV-Kurkino infections in Central Europe. Serum samples from 570 German patients living in the habitat of A. agrarius (north and northeast Germany) and exhibiting febrile disease, were analysed. All samples were tested by ELISA, subsets of samples were also analysed by immunoblot, neutralization assay, and RT-PCR. A group of 86 individuals was confirmed as DOBV-infected. The virus neutralization assay allowed a reliable identification of DOBV antibodies during both acute and convalescent phases of infection. However, differentiation of relevant DOBV genotypes was not possible by neutralization test but required molecular analysis. Whereas DOBV IgM antibodies tend to persist in the infected organism, RNAaemia seems to be short. Nucleotide sequences were amplified from four patients, and their analysis demonstrated infection by DOBV-Kurkino. With respect to the initial results, the high degree of identity of local patient-derived and A. agrarius-derived virus sequences may allow a closer allocation of the geographical place where the human infection occurred. In contrast to moderate/severe HFRS caused by the DOBV genotypes Dobrava or Sochi, all available data showed a mild clinical course of HFRS caused by DOBV-Kurkino infection without lethal outcomes.

  4. Hepatitis B and D viruses replication interference: Influence of hepatitis B genotype

    PubMed Central

    Madejón, Antonio; Romero, Míriam; Hernández, Ángela; García-Sánchez, Araceli; Sánchez-Carrillo, Marta; Olveira, Antonio; García-Samaniego, Javier

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To study the hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis D virus (HDV) replication interferences in patients with chronic hepatitis delta infected with different HBV genotypes. METHODS: We conducted a transversal study including 68 chronic hepatitis delta (CHD) (37 HIV-positive) patients and a control group of 49 chronic hepatitis B (CHB) (22 HIV-positive) patients. In addition, a dynamic follow-up was performed in 16 CHD patients. In all the samples, the surface antigen of hepatitis B (HBsAg) serum titers were analyzed with the Monolisa HBsAg Ultra system (Bio-Rad), using as quantification standard a serial dilution curve of an international HBsAg standard. Serum HBV-DNA titers were analyzed using the Roche Cobas TaqMan (Roche, Barcelona, Spain), and the serum HDV-RNA using an in-house real-time qRT-PCR method, with TaqMan probes. HBV genotype was determined with the line immunoassay LiPA HBV genotyping system (Innogenetics, Ghent, Belgium). In those patients negative for LiPA assay, a nested PCR method of complete HBsAg coding region, followed by sequence analysis was applied. RESULTS: No differences in the HBV-DNA levels were found in CHB patients infected with different HBV genotypes. However, in CHD patients the HBV-DNA levels were lower in those infected with HBV-A than in those with HBV-D, both in HIV negative [median (IQR): 1.25 (1.00-1.35) vs 2.95 (2.07-3.93) log10 (copies/mL), P = 0.013] and HIV positive patients [2.63 (1.24-2.69) vs 7.25 (4.61-7.55) log10 (copies/mL), P < 0.001]. This was confirmed in the dynamic study of the HBV/HDV patients. These differences induce an under-estimation of HBV-A incidence in patients with CHD analyzed with LiPA assay. Finally, the HBsAg titers reflected no significant differences in CHD patients infected with HBV-A or D. CONCLUSION: Viral replication interference between HBV and HDV is HBV-genotype dependent, and more evident in patients infected with HBV-genotype A, than with HBV-D or E. PMID:27003993

  5. New yellow head virus genotype (YHV7) in giant tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon indigenous to northern Australia.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Peter G; Moody, Nicholas J G; Hoad, John; Williams, Lynette M; Bowater, Rachel O; Cummins, David M; Cowley, Jeff A; StJ Crane, Mark

    2015-08-20

    In 2012, giant tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon originally sourced from Joseph Bonaparte Gulf in northern Australia were examined in an attempt to identify the cause of elevated mortalities among broodstock at a Queensland hatchery. Nucleic acid extracted from ethanol-fixed gills of 3 individual shrimp tested positive using the OIE YHV Protocol 2 RT-PCR designed to differentiate yellow head virus (YHV1) from gill-associated virus (GAV, synonymous with YHV2) and the OIE YHV Protocol 3 RT-nested PCR designed for consensus detection of YHV genotypes. Sequence analysis of the 794 bp (Protocol 2) and 359 bp (Protocol 3) amplicons from 2 distinct regions of ORF1b showed that the yellow-head-complex virus detected was novel when compared with Genotypes 1 to 6. Nucleotide identity on the Protocol 2 and Protocol 3 ORF1b sequences was highest with the highly pathogenic YHV1 genotype (81 and 87%, respectively) that emerged in P. monodon in Thailand and lower with GAV (78 and 82%, respectively) that is enzootic to P. monodon inhabiting eastern Australia. Comparison of a longer (725 bp) ORF1b sequence, spanning the Protocol 3 region and amplified using a modified YH30/31 RT-nPCR, provided further phylogenetic evidence for the virus being distinct from the 6 described YHV genotypes. The virus represents a unique seventh YHV genotype (YHV7). Despite the mortalities observed, the role of YHV7 remains unknown.

  6. Goldfish Carassius auratus susceptibility to viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus genotype IVb depends on exposure route.

    PubMed

    Getchell, Rodman G; Erkinharju, Toni; Johnson, Anna O; Davis, Benjamin W; Hatch, Emily E; Cornwell, Emily R; Bowser, Paul R

    2015-06-29

    We assessed the susceptibility of goldfish Carassius auratus to infection by genotype IVb of the viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus. Goldfish were infected by intraperitoneal injections of 106 plaque-forming units (pfu) fish-1, single bath exposure of 105 pfu ml-1 for 24 h, or consumption of 0.4 g of commercial fish feed soaked in 107 pfu per 8 fish. The mortality rate of intraperitoneal-infected goldfish was 10 to 32%, although the virus was detected by quantitative RT-PCR in 77% (65/84) of the survivors at the end of the 42 d trial, suggesting a carrier state. Severe gross lesions were observed in many of the moribund and dead goldfish such as hemorrhaging in the skin, fin, liver, kidney, brain, intestine, and eye as well as abdominal distension, bilateral exophthalmia, and splenomegaly. There was minimal morbidity or mortality in the immersion, feeding, or control groups.

  7. High Diversity of Hepatitis B Virus Genotypes in Panamanian Blood Donors: A Molecular Analysis of New Variants

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Alexander A.; Zaldivar, Yamitzel Y.; De Castillo, Zoila; Ortiz, Alma Y.; Mendoza, Yaxelis; Cristina, Juan; Pascale, Juan M.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) is an infectious agent that causes more than half of the cases of liver disease and cancer in the world. Globally there are around 250 million people chronically infected with this virus. Despite 16% of the cases of liver disease in Central America are caused by HBV, the information regarding its genetic diversity, genotypes and circulation is scarce. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the genetic variability of the HBV genotypes from HBV-DNA positive samples obtained from screening blood donors at the Social Security System of Panama and to estimate its possible origin. From 59,696 blood donors tested for HBV infection during 2010–2012, there were 74 HBV-DNA positive subjects. Analysis of the partial PreS2-S region of 27 sequences shows that 21% of the infections were caused by genotype A, 3% by genotype D and 76% by genotype F. In addition, we were able to confirm circulation of six sub-genotypes A1, A2, A3, D4, F3, F1 and a proposed new sub-genotype denominated F5pan. We found a confinement of sub-genotypes F1 and F5pan to the western area of Panama. The tMRCA analysis suggests a simultaneous circulation of previously described sub-genotypes rather than recent introductions of the Panamanian sub-genotypes in the country. Moreover, these results highlight the need of more intensive research of the HBV strains circulating in the region at the molecular level. In conclusion, Panama has a high HBV genotype diversity that includes a new proposed sub-genotype, an elevated number of PreCore-Core mutations, and confinement of these variants in a specific geographical location. PMID:25093674

  8. Dynamics of the Emergence and Establishment of a Newly Dominant Genotype of Japanese Encephalitis Virus throughout Asia

    PubMed Central

    Schuh, Amy J.; Ward, Melissa J.; Leigh Brown, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT In recent years, genotype I (GI) of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) has displaced genotype III (GIII) as the dominant virus genotype throughout Asia. In this study, the largest collection of GIII and GI envelope gene-derived viral sequences assembled to date was used to reconstruct the spatiotemporal chronology of genotype displacement throughout Asia and to determine the evolutionary and epidemiological dynamics underlying this significant event. GI consists of two clades, GI-a and GI-b, with the latter being associated with displacement of GIII as the dominant JEV genotype throughout Asia in the 1990s. Phylogeographic analysis indicated that GI-a diverged in Thailand or Cambodia and has remained confined to tropical Asia, whereas GI-b diverged in Vietnam and then dispersed northwards to China, where it was subsequently dispersed to Japan, Korea, and Taiwan. Molecular adaptation was detected by more than one method at one site (residue 15), and coevolution was detected at two pairs of sites (residues 89 to 360 and 129 to 141) within the GI E gene protein alignment. Viral multiplication and temperature sensitivity analyses in avian and mosquito cells revealed that the GI-b isolate JE-91 had significantly higher infectivity titers in mosquito cells from 24 to 48 h postinfection than did the GI-a and GIII isolates. If the JE-91 isolate is indeed representative of GI-b, an increased multiplicative ability of GI-b viruses compared to that of GIII viruses early in mosquito infection may have resulted in a shortened extrinsic incubation period that led to an increased number of GI enzootic transmission cycles and the subsequent displacement of GIII. IMPORTANCE Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a mosquito-borne flavivirus, represents the most significant etiology of childhood viral neurological infection in Asia. Despite the existence of effective vaccines, JEV is responsible for an estimated 68,000 human cases and a reported 10,000 to 15,000 deaths annually

  9. Hepatitis C virus NS3 protease genotyping and drug concentration determination during triple therapy with telaprevir or boceprevir for chronic infection with genotype 1 viruses, southeastern France.

    PubMed

    Aherfi, Sarah; Solas, Caroline; Motte, Anne; Moreau, Jacques; Borentain, Patrick; Mokhtari, Saadia; Botta-Fridlund, Danielle; Dhiver, Catherine; Portal, Isabelle; Ruiz, Jean-Marie; Ravaux, Isabelle; Bregigeon, Sylvie; Poizot-Martin, Isabelle; Stein, Andreas; Gérolami, René; Brouqui, Philippe; Tamalet, Catherine; Colson, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    Telaprevir and boceprevir, the two first hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 protease inhibitors (PIs), considerably increase rates of sustained virologic response in association with pegylated interferon and ribavirin in chronic HCV genotype 1 infections. The 30 first patients treated by telaprevir or boceprevir including anti-HCV therapies since 2011 in Marseille University hospitals, France, were monitored. HCV loads and plasmatic concentrations of telaprevir and boceprevir were determined on sequential blood samples. HCV NS3 protease gene population sequencing was performed at baseline of treatment and in case of treatment failure. Fifteen patients (including 7 co-infected with HIV) received telaprevir and the other 15 patients (including 4 co-infected with HIV) received boceprevir. At baseline, HCV NS3 protease from six patients harbored amino acid substitutions associated with PI-resistance. Treatment failure occurred at week 12 for 7 patients. Amino acid substitutions associated with PI-resistance were observed in six of these cases. HCV NS3 R155K and T54A/S mutants, all of genotype 1a, were found from four patients. Median (interquartile range) plasma concentrations were 3,092 ng/ml (2,320-3,525) for telaprevir and 486 ng/ml (265-619) for boceprevir. For HIV-HCV co-infected patients, median concentrations were 3,162 ng/ml (2,270-4,232) for telaprevir and 374 ng/ml (229-519) for boceprevir. Plasma drug concentration monitoring revealed undetectable concentrations for two patients at week 4, and probable non-adherence to therapy for another patient. These findings indicate that routine HCV NS3 protease sequencing and plasma PI concentration monitoring might be helpful to characterize cases of therapy failure, at a cost dramatically low compared to that of anti-HCV therapy.

  10. Respiratory syncytial virus genotypes circulating in urban Ghana: february to november 2006

    PubMed Central

    Obodai, Evangeline; Asmah, Richard; Boamah, Isaac; Goka, Bamenla; Odoom, John Kofi; Adiku, Theophilus

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major cause of acute lower respiratory tract infection (ALRI) in young children. RSV strains have been divided into 2 major antigenic groups (A and B), which are further divided into several genotypes, but very little is known about its circulating genotypes in Ghana. This study characterized RSV genotypes detected in children with ALRI in Accra between February and November 2006. Methods Nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPA) were obtained from children diagnosed with ALRI between February and November 2006. The NPA were screened for RSV using a nested multiplex reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method for genotyping RSV. Viral RNA was extracted from the NPA using guanidinium isothiocyanate method and purified with an RNAID commercial kit. Care-givers gave their consent prior to specimen collection. Administered questionnaires captured information on patient demographic and clinical history. Results A total of 53 children were enrolled in the study with a male to female ratio of 3:1. Of the 53 NPA analyzed, 60.4% (32/53) were positive for RSV. Subsequent genotypic analysis showed that 72% (23/32) of the 60.4% RSV infections were RSV B only and 28% (9/32) were co-infections of both RSV A and B. Children between the ages of 2 - 12 months were the most affected age group per an RSV infection rate of 37.5% (12/32). No significant difference was detected in the recovery rate of ALRI (98.1%) and RSV (96.9%) positive patients from the infection. One patient died resulting in a mortality rate of 3.1%. Bronchopneumonia (20 out of 32 cases) was the major diagnosis on admission. RSV infection was seasonal dependent, described by 2 peaks in October and April-May. Conclusion Both RSV A and RSV B genotypes co-circulated during the study period with RSV B predominating. RSV may possibly be the main pathogen of lower respiratory tract illness during epidemics in the wet seasons. Genotyping by the multiplex RT

  11. Middle ear squamous papilloma: A report of four cases analyzed by HPV and EBV in situ hybridization

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, HAN; CHEN, ZHIBIN; ZHANG, WEIMING; XING, GUANGQIAN

    2014-01-01

    Squamous papilloma involving the middle ear as a primary lesion is an extremely rare occurrence. The aims of the present study were to investigate the presence of human papilloma virus (HPV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infections in primary middle ear squamous papilloma and to describe the clinical and pathological features of the disease along with therapeutic strategies. A retrospective review was conducted of four patients with clinical and pathological diagnoses of middle ear squamous papilloma. In situ hybridization (ISH) for a wide range of HPV DNA subtypes and EBV-encoded RNA was performed in the tissue samples obtained from these patients. Only two cases of primary squamous papilloma in the middle ear have been previously reported in the English literature. These papillomas developed in males of ~60-years of age and otorrhea was the most frequent complaint. Premalignant changes were observed in two of the present cases and ISH of HPV and EBV was negative in all four cases. The results of the present study indicated that chronic inflammatory stimulation, not HPV and EBV infection, is involved in the occurrence of middle ear squamous papilloma and its malignant transformation. Radical surgery and long-term postoperative follow-up are recommended due to its malignant and recurrent potential. Further genetic investigations with additional new cases are required to clarify the pathogenesis of squamous papilloma involving the middle ear. PMID:24348817

  12. A Novel Virus Detected in Papillomas and Carcinomas of the Endangered Western Barred Bandicoot (Perameles bougainville) Exhibits Genomic Features of both the Papillomaviridae and Polyomaviridae▿

    PubMed Central

    Woolford, Lucy; Rector, Annabel; Van Ranst, Marc; Ducki, Andrea; Bennett, Mark D.; Nicholls, Philip K.; Warren, Kristin S.; Swan, Ralph A.; Wilcox, Graham E.; O'Hara, Amanda J.

    2007-01-01

    Conservation efforts to prevent the extinction of the endangered western barred bandicoot (Perameles bougainville) are currently hindered by a progressively debilitating cutaneous and mucocutaneous papillomatosis and carcinomatosis syndrome observed in captive and wild populations. In this study, we detected a novel virus, designated the bandicoot papillomatosis carcinomatosis virus type 1 (BPCV1), in lesional tissue from affected western barred bandicoots using multiply primed rolling-circle amplification and PCR with the cutaneotropic papillomavirus primer pairs FAP59/FAP64 and AR-L1F8/AR-L1R9. Sequencing of the BPCV1 genome revealed a novel prototype virus exhibiting genomic properties of both the Papillomaviridae and the Polyomaviridae. Papillomaviral properties included a large genome size (∼7.3 kb) and the presence of open reading frames (ORFs) encoding canonical L1 and L2 structural proteins. The genomic organization in which structural and nonstructural proteins were encoded on different strands of the double-stranded genome and the presence of ORFs encoding the nonstructural proteins large T and small t antigens were, on the other hand, typical polyomaviral features. BPCV1 may represent the first member of a novel virus family, descended from a common ancestor of the papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses recognized today. Alternatively, it may represent the product of ancient recombination between members of these two virus families. The discovery of this virus could have implications for the current taxonomic classification of Papillomaviridae and Polyomaviridae and can provide further insight into the evolution of these ancient virus families. PMID:17898069

  13. Introduction of the American/Asian genotype of dengue 2 virus into the Yucatan State of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Loroño-Pino, María A; Farfán-Ale, José A; Zapata-Peraza, Alicia L; Rosado-Paredes, Elsy P; Flores-Flores, Luis F; García-Rejón, Julián E; Díaz, Francisco J; Blitvich, Bradley J; Andrade-Narváez, Manuel; Jiménez-Ríos, Eusebio; Blair, Carol D; Olson, Ken E; Black, William; Beaty, Barry J

    2004-10-01

    A dengue (DEN) outbreak occurred in the Yucatan State of Mexico in 2002. Three isolates were obtained from patients presenting with DEN-like symptoms, and examined by partial nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. The isolates were identified as DEN-2 viruses of the American-Asian genotype; this is the first report of this genotype in the Yucatan State. The DEN-2 viruses of the American-Asian genotype have been associated with more severe disease outcomes. Thus, its introduction into the Yucatan State presents a serious problem to public health authorities. During this outbreak, DEN virus infection was confirmed in 18% (282 of 1,560) of the patients who presented with DEN-like symptoms. Of these, 87 (31%) patients met the World Health Organization criteria for dengue hemorrhagic fever, including two patients who died. The majority (77%) of the patients experienced secondary infections in this epidemic.

  14. Virulence of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) genotypes Ia, IVa, IVb, and IVc in five fish species.

    PubMed

    Emmenegger, Eveline J; Moon, Chang Hoon; Hershberger, Paul K; Kurath, Gael

    2013-12-12

    The susceptibility of yellow perch Perca flavescens, rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha, koi Cyprinus carpio koi, and Pacific herring Clupea pallasii to 4 strains of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) was assessed. Fish were challenged via intraperitoneal injection with high (1 × 106 plaque-forming units, PFU) and low (1 × 103 PFU) doses of a European strain (genotype Ia), and North American strains from the West coast (genotype IVa), Great Lakes (genotype IVb), and the East coast (genotype IVc). Pacific herring were exposed to the same VHSV strains, but at a single dose of 5 × 103 PFU ml-1 by immersion in static seawater. Overall, yellow perch were the most susceptible, with cumulative percent mortality (CPM) ranging from 84 to 100%, and 30 to 93% in fish injected with high or low doses of virus, respectively. Rainbow trout and Chinook salmon experienced higher mortalities (47 to 98% CPM) after exposure to strain Ia than to the other virus genotypes. Pacific herring were most susceptible to strain IVa with an average CPM of 80% and moderately susceptible (42 to 52% CPM) to the other genotypes. Koi had very low susceptibility (≤5.0% CPM) to all 4 VHSV strains. Fish tested at 7 d post challenge were positive for all virus strains, with yellow perch having the highest prevalence and concentrations of virus, and koi the lowest. While genotype Ia had higher virulence in salmonid species, there was little difference in virulence or host-specificity between isolates from subtypes IVa, IVb, and IVc.

  15. Virulence of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) genotypes Ia, IVa, IVb, and IVc in five fish species.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emmenegger, Eveline J.; Moon, Chang Hoon; Hershberger, Paul K.; Kurath, Gael

    2013-01-01

    The susceptibility of yellow perch Perca flavescens, rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha, koi Cyprinus carpio koi, and Pacific herring Clupea pallasii to 4 strains of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) was assessed. Fish were challenged via intraperitoneal injection with high (1 × 106 plaque-forming units, PFU) and low (1 × 103 PFU) doses of a European strain (genotype Ia), and North American strains from the West coast (genotype IVa), Great Lakes (genotype IVb), and the East coast (genotype IVc). Pacific herring were exposed to the same VHSV strains, but at a single dose of 5 × 103 PFU ml-1 by immersion in static seawater. Overall, yellow perch were the most susceptible, with cumulative percent mortality (CPM) ranging from 84 to 100%, and 30 to 93% in fish injected with high or low doses of virus, respectively. Rainbow trout and Chinook salmon experienced higher mortalities (47 to 98% CPM) after exposure to strain Ia than to the other virus genotypes. Pacific herring were most susceptible to strain IVa with an average CPM of 80% and moderately susceptible (42 to 52% CPM) to the other genotypes. Koi had very low susceptibility (≤5.0% CPM) to all 4 VHSV strains. Fish tested at 7 d post challenge were positive for all virus strains, with yellow perch having the highest prevalence and concentrations of virus, and koi the lowest. While genotype Ia had higher virulence in salmonid species, there was little difference in virulence or host-specificity between isolates from subtypes IVa, IVb, and IVc.  

  16. Characterization of rubella virus genotypes among pregnant women in northern Vietnam, 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Van Le, Son; Le, Duc Hoang; Hoang, Huong Thi; Hoang, Ha; Nguyen, Nam Trung; Chu, Ha Hoang

    2015-02-01

    Rubella virus (RV) infection is an unresolved clinical complication that affects children in developing countries including Vietnam. RV infection during the first trimester of pregnancy causes severe birth defects known as congenital rubella syndrome. This study reports on the genomic characterization of RV strains circulating in northern Vietnam during 2011-2013. RV-IgM positive amniotic fluid specimens were collected from 38 women from northern Vietnam who presented with clinical rubella at the National Hospital of Obstetrics and Gynecology in Hanoi, Vietnam. The RV genes were determined by nested PCR with primers amplifying the 739-nucleotide coding region of the E1 gene. The sequences from the amplified DNA fragments were phylogenetically analyzed and compared to reference RV strains. Seventeen out of 38 samples are positive for RV detecting. All new RV isolates are clustered to genotype 2B. Eighteen amino acid mutations were found in the T and B cell epitopes. These results suggest that genotype 2B RV strains frequently circulate in northern Vietnam. These data describe the RV genotype in Vietnam with the aim of improving maternal and child health in this country.

  17. Co-circulation of two genotypes of dengue virus serotype 3 in Guangzhou, China, 2009.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; Yu, Xue-Dong; Hong, Wen-Xin; Zhou, Wei-Ze; Yu, Man; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Zhu, Shun-Ya; Qin, E-De; Wang, Jian; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Zhang, Fu-Chun

    2012-01-01

    Dengue is emerging as the most important mosquito borne viral disease in the world. In mainland China, sporadic and large outbreaks of dengue illness caused by the four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV-1 to DENV-4) have been well documented. Guangdong province is the major affected area in China, and DENV-1 has dominantly circulated in Guangdong for a long time. In this study, a family cluster of DENV-3 infection in Guangzhou was described. Three cases were diagnosed as dengue fever based on clinical manifestation, serological and RT-PCR assays. Two DENV-3 strains were isolated in C6/36 cells and the complete genome sequences were determined. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the new DENV-3 isolates from the family cluster were grouped within genotype III. Considering the fact that several DENV-3 strains within genotype V were also identified in Guangzhou in 2009, at least two genotypes of DENV-3 co-circulated in Guangzhou. Careful investigation and virological analysis should be warranted in the future.

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of a Genotype XVII Newcastle Disease Virus, Isolated from an Apparently Healthy Domestic Duck in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Shittu, Ismaila; Sharma, Poonam; Joannis, Tony M.; Volkening, Jeremy D.; Odaibo, Georgina N.; Olaleye, David O.; Williams-Coplin, Dawn; Solomon, Ponman; Abolnik, Celia; Miller, Patti J.; Dimitrov, Kiril M.

    2016-01-01

    The first complete genome sequence of a strain of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) of genotype XVII is described here. A velogenic strain (duck/Nigeria/903/KUDU-113/1992) was isolated from an apparently healthy free-roaming domestic duck sampled in Kuru, Nigeria, in 1992. Phylogenetic analysis of the fusion protein gene and complete genome classified the isolate as a member of NDV class II, genotype XVII. PMID:26847901

  19. High Genetic Diversity of Newcastle Disease Virus in Poultry in West and Central Africa: Cocirculation of Genotype XIV and Newly Defined Genotypes XVII and XVIII

    PubMed Central

    Snoeck, Chantal J.; Owoade, Ademola A.; Couacy-Hymann, Emmanuel; Alkali, Bello R.; Okwen, Mbah P.; Adeyanju, Adeniyi T.; Komoyo, Giscard F.; Nakouné, Emmanuel; Le Faou, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Despite rampant Newcastle disease virus (NDV) outbreaks in Africa for decades, the information about the genetic characteristics of the virulent strains circulating in West and Central Africa is still scarce. In this study, 96 complete NDV fusion gene sequences were obtained from poultry sampled in Cameroon, Central African Republic, Côte d'Ivoire, and Nigeria between 2006 and 2011. Based on rational criteria recently proposed for the classification of NDV strains into classes, genotypes, and subgenotypes, we revisited the classification of virulent strains, in particular those from West and Central Africa, leading to their grouping into genotype XIV and newly defined genotypes XVII and XVIII, each with two subgenotypes. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that several (sub)genotypes are found in almost every country. In Cameroon, most strains were related to vaccine strains, but a single genotype XVII strain was also found. Only three highly similar genotype XVII strains were detected in Central African Republic. Subgenotypes XVIIa, XVIIIa, and XVIIIb cocirculated in Côte d'Ivoire, while subgenotypes XIVa, XIVb, XVIIa, XVIIb, and XVIIIb were found in Nigeria. While these genotypes are so far geographically restricted, local and international trade of domestic and exotic birds may lead to their spread beyond West and Central Africa. A high genetic diversity, mutations in important neutralizing epitopes paired with suboptimal vaccination, various levels of clinical responses of poultry and wild birds to virulent strains, strains with new cleavage sites, and other genetic modifications found in these genotypes tend to undermine and complicate NDV management in Africa. PMID:23658271

  20. Genotyping of the fish rhabdovirus, viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus, by restriction fragment length polymorphisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Einer-Jensen, Katja; Winton, James R.; Lorenzen, Niels

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a standardized molecular assay that used limited resources and equipment for routine genotyping of isolates of the fish rhabdovirus, viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV). Computer generated restriction maps, based on 62 unique full-length (1524 nt) sequences of the VHSV glycoprotein (G) gene, were used to predict restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns that were subsequently grouped and compared with a phylogenetic analysis of the G-gene sequences of the same set of isolates. Digestion of PCR amplicons from the full-lengthG-gene by a set of three restriction enzymes was predicted to accurately enable the assignment of the VHSV isolates into the four major genotypes discovered to date. Further sub-typing of the isolates into the recently described sub-lineages of genotype I was possible by applying three additional enzymes. Experimental evaluation of the method consisted of three steps: (i) RT-PCR amplification of the G-gene of VHSV isolates using purified viral RNA as template, (ii) digestion of the PCR products with a panel of restriction endonucleases and (iii) interpretation of the resulting RFLP profiles. The RFLP analysis was shown to approximate the level of genetic discrimination obtained by other, more labour-intensive, molecular techniques such as the ribonuclease protection assay or sequence analysis. In addition, 37 previously uncharacterised isolates from diverse sources were assigned to specific genotypes. While the assay was able to distinguish between marine and continental isolates of VHSV, the differences did not correlate with the pathogenicity of the isolates.

  1. Analysis of the Molecular Evolution of Hepatitis B Virus Genotypes in Symptomatic Acute Infections in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, María Belén; Mojsiejczuk, Laura Noelia; Torres, Carolina; Sevic, Ina; González López Ledesma, María Mora; Perez, Paula Soledad; Bouzas, María Belén; Galdame, Omar; Marciano, Sebastián; Fainboim, Hugo; Flichman, Diego Martín; Campos, Rodolfo Héctor

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a globally distributed human pathogen that leads to both self-limited and chronic infections. At least eight genotypes (A-H) with distinct geographical allocations and phylodynamic behaviors have been described. They differ substantially in many virological and probably some clinical parameters. The aim of this study was to analyze full-length HBV genome sequences from individuals with symptomatic acute HBV infections using phylogenetic and coalescent methods. The phylogenetic analysis resulted in the following subgenotype distribution: F1b (52.7%), A2 (18.2%), F4 (18.2%) and A1, B2, D3 and F2a 1.8% each. These results contrast with those previously reported from chronic infections, where subgenotypes F1b, F4, A2 and genotype D were evenly distributed. This differential distribution might be related to recent internal migrations and/or intrinsic biological features of each viral genotype that could impact on the probability of transmission. The coalescence analysis showed that after a diversification process started in the 80s, the current sequences of subgenotype F1b were grouped in at least four highly supported lineages, whereas subgenotype F4 revealed a more limited diversification pattern with most lineages without offspring in the present. In addition, the genetic characterization of the studied sequences showed that only two of them presented mutations of clinical relevance at S codifyng region and none at the polymerase catalytic domains. Finally, since the acute infections could be an expression of the genotypes currently being transmitted to new hosts, the predominance of subgenotype F1b might have epidemiological, as well as, clinical relevance due to its potential adverse disease outcome among the chronic cases. PMID:27433800

  2. Hepatitis B Virus Genotype D Isolates Circulating in Chapecó, Southern Brazil, Originate from Italy.

    PubMed

    Gusatti, Carolina Souza; Costi, Cintia; Halon, Maria Laura; Grandi, Tarciana; Medeiros, Arlete Ferrari Rech; Silva, Cláudia Maria Dornelles; Gomes, Selma Andrade; Silva, Marcia Susana Nunes; Niel, Christian; Rossetti, Maria Lucia Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus genotype A1 (HBV/A1), of African origin, is the most prevalent genotype in Brazil, while HBV/F predominates in the other South American countries. However, HBV/D is the most common in the three states of southern Brazil, where 'islands' of elevated prevalence, as Chapecó and other cities, have been described. In this study, 202 HBV chronic carriers attending in 2013 the viral hepatitis ambulatory of Chapecó, were investigated. In comparison with previous studies performed in the same ambulatory, a rapid aging of the HBV infected population was observed (mean age of the newly diagnosed patients increasing from 29.9 ± 10.3 years in 1996 to 44.4 ± 13.3 years in 2013), probably due to a singular vaccination schedule at Chapecó that included not only children but also adolescents. Phylogenetic and BLAST analyses (S region) classified 91 HBV isolates into genotypes A (n = 3) and D (n = 88). The majority of HBV/D isolates were closely related to D3 sequences. To understand the reasons for the absence or near absence of genotypes A and F, and how HBV/D was introduced in the south of Brazil, HBV/D infected patients were inquired about their genealogical and geographical origins. Forty-three (52%) patients have their four grandparents of Italian origin, vs. seven (8%) who have their four grandparents of Brazilian origin. At all, 65 out of 83 (78%) patients had at least one grandparent originating from Italy. Taking into consideration the fact that Italy is one of the few countries where subgenotype D3 is predominant, the results strongly suggested that HBV/D was introduced in Brazil through Italian immigration which culminated between 1870 and 1920.

  3. Genotype 1 hepatitis C virus envelope features that determine antiviral response assessed through optimal covariance networks.

    PubMed

    Murray, John M; Moenne-Loccoz, Rémy; Velay, Aurélie; Habersetzer, François; Doffoël, Michel; Gut, Jean-Pierre; Fofana, Isabel; Zeisel, Mirjam B; Stoll-Keller, Françoise; Baumert, Thomas F; Schvoerer, Evelyne

    2013-01-01

    The poor response to the combined antiviral therapy of pegylated alfa-interferon and ribavarin for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection may be linked to mutations in the viral envelope gene E1E2 (env), which can result in escape from the immune response and higher efficacy of viral entry. Mutations that result in failure of therapy most likely require compensatory mutations to achieve sufficient change in envelope structure and function. Compensatory mutations were investigated by determining positions in the E1E2 gene where amino acids (aa) covaried across groups of individuals. We assessed networks of covarying positions in E1E2 sequences that differentiated sustained virological response (SVR) from non-response (NR) in 43 genotype 1a (17 SVR), and 49 genotype 1b (25 SVR) chronically HCV-infected individuals. Binary integer programming over covariance networks was used to extract aa combinations that differed between response groups. Genotype 1a E1E2 sequences exhibited higher degrees of covariance and clustered into 3 main groups while 1b sequences exhibited no clustering. Between 5 and 9 aa pairs were required to separate SVR from NR in each genotype. aa in hypervariable region 1 were 6 times more likely than chance to occur in the optimal networks. The pair 531-626 (EI) appeared frequently in the optimal networks and was present in 6 of 9 NR in one of the 1a clusters. The most frequent pairs representing SVR were 431-481 (EE), 500-522 (QA) in 1a, and 407-434 (AQ) in 1b. Optimal networks based on covarying aa pairs in HCV envelope can indicate features that are associated with failure or success to antiviral therapy. PMID:23840641

  4. Molecular characterization, distribution, and dynamics of hepatitis C virus genotypes in blood donors in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Mora, Mónica Viviana Alvarado; Romano, Camila Malta; Gomes-Gouvêa, Michele Soares; Gutiérrez, Maria Fernanda; Carrilho, Flair José; Pinho, João Renato Rebello

    2010-11-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a frequent cause of acute and chronic hepatitis and a leading cause for cirrhosis of the liver and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV is classified in six major genotypes and more than 70 subtypes. In Colombian blood banks, serum samples were tested for anti-HCV antibodies using a third-generation ELISA. The aim of this study was to characterize the viral sequences in plasma of 184 volunteer blood donors who attended the "Banco Nacional de Sangre de la Cruz Roja Colombiana," Bogotá, Colombia. Three different HCV genomic regions were amplified by nested PCR. The first of these was a segment of 180 bp of the 5'UTR region to confirm the previous diagnosis by ELISA. From those that were positive to the 5'UTR region, two further segments were amplified for genotyping and subtyping by phylogenetic analysis: a segment of 380 bp from the NS5B region; and a segment of 391 bp from the E1 region. The distribution of HCV subtypes was: 1b (82.8%), 1a (5.7%), 2a (5.7%), 2b (2.8%), and 3a (2.8%). By applying Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation, it was estimated that HCV-1b was introduced into Bogotá around 1950. Also, this subtype spread at an exponential rate between about 1970 to about 1990, after which transmission of HCV was reduced by anti-HCV testing of this population. Among Colombian blood donors, HCV genotype 1b is the most frequent genotype, especially in large urban conglomerates such as Bogotá, as is the case in other South American countries.

  5. Genotype determination of three dengue type 2 virus strains from Myanmar by sequencing E/NSI gene junction.

    PubMed

    Kyaw-Zin-Thant; Khin-Mar-Aye; Soe-Thein; Than-Swe; Hasebe, F; Morita, K; Igarashi, A

    1995-12-01

    Genotype of three dengue-2 virus strains from Myanmar was determined as genotype II by sequencing 240 nucleotide long fragment across the E/NS1 gene junction by the primer extension dideoxy chain termination method, applying direct sequencing of the PCR product. These strains were isolated from a dengue shock syndrome (DSS) patient and two patients with dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) grade 1, in Yangon (Rangoon), Myanmar (Burma), in 1987. Sequence homology of all three strains were highest (96%) to New Guinea C strain (genotype II), lesser homology (93%) to Jamaican 1409 strain (genotype III), and the least homology (91%) to PR 159/S1 strain (genotype I). Two DHF strains revealed only 2 nucleotide and 3 nucleotide differences compared with DSS strain, all at the 3rd position of the codons which resulted in silent mutations.

  6. Intra- and inter-genotypic size variation in the central variable region of the 9RL open reading frame of diverse African swine fever viruses.

    PubMed

    Phologane, Solomon B; Bastos, Armanda D S; Penrith, Mary-Louise

    2005-12-01

    African swine fever (ASF) viruses are characterised by numerous p72 genotypes, but by low levels of intra-genotypic variation, particularly in domestic pig associated genotypes. As it is precisely these viral lineages that are involved in outbreaks of the disease it is imperative that alternative, more informative gene regions be identified which are suitable for intra-genotypic resolution of relationships. To this end, the central variable region (CVR) of the 9RL open reading frame of diverse ASF viruses was amplified and product sizes scored and compared within and between genotypes. Results indicate that although product sizes are not genotype restricted, there is a high degree of intra-genotypic size variation particularly within the homogeneous p72 genotypes. Within one such genotype, the ESACWA virus genotype, 12 size-discrete CVR products were identified, four corresponding to viruses of west African origin and eight to viruses from countries where the disease is exotic, namely Europe, South America and the Caribbean. The high degree of size heterogeneity in the CVR of this genotype is significant and attests to the usefulness of the CVR gene marker in elucidating the epidemiology of African swine fever.

  7. Genotypic diversity of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zi-Ming; Shortridge, Kennedy F; Garcia, Maricarmen; Guan, Yi; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2008-09-01

    Besides enormous economic losses to the poultry industry, recent H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIVs) originating in eastern Asia have posed serious threats to public health. Up to April 17, 2008, 381 human cases had been confirmed with a mortality of more than 60 %. Here, we attempt to identify potential progenitor genes for H5N1 HPAIVs since their first recognition in 1996; most were detected in the Eurasian landmass before 1996. Combinations among these progenitor genes generated at least 21 reassortants (named H5N1 progenitor reassortant, H5N1-PR1-21). H5N1-PR1 includes A/Goose/Guangdong/1/1996(H5N1). Only reassortants H5N1-PR2 and H5N1-PR7 were associated with confirmed human cases: H5N1-PR2 in the Hong Kong H5N1 outbreak in 1997 and H5N1-PR7 in laboratory confirmed human cases since 2003. H5N1-PR7 also contains a majority of the H5N1 viruses causing avian influenza outbreaks in birds, including the first wave of genotype Z, Qinghai-like and Fujian-like virus lineages. Among the 21 reassortants identified, 13 are first reported here. This study illustrates evolutionary patterns of H5N1 HPAIVs, which may be useful toward pandemic preparedness as well as avian influenza prevention and control.

  8. Susceptibility of laboratory rats against genotypes 1, 3, 4, and rat hepatitis E viruses.

    PubMed

    Li, Tian-Cheng; Yoshizaki, Sayaka; Ami, Yasushi; Suzaki, Yuriko; Yasuda, Shumpei P; Yoshimatsu, Kumiko; Arikawa, Jiro; Takeda, Naokazu; Wakita, Takaji

    2013-04-12

    To determine whether or not rats are susceptible to hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection, each of group containing three laboratory rats (Wistar) were experimentally inoculated with genotypes 1, 3, 4 and rat HEV by intravenous injection. Serum and stool samples were collected and used to detect HEV RNA and anti-HEV antibodies by RT-PCR and ELISA, respectively. The virus infection was monitored up to 3 months after inoculation. None of the serum or stool samples collected from the rats inoculated with G1, G3, or G4 HEV indicated positive sign for virus replication. Although no alteration was observed in ALT level, rat HEV RNA was detected in stools from both of the rats inoculated with rat HEV, and both rats were positive for anti-rat HEV IgG and IgM from 3 weeks after inoculation. These results demonstrated that rats are susceptible to rat HEV but not to G1, G3, and G4 HEV. We also confirm that the nude rats were useful for obtaining a large amount of rat HEV and that the rat HEV was transmitted by the fecal-oral route.

  9. Maiden outbreaks of dengue virus 1 genotype III in rural central India.

    PubMed

    Barde, P V; Kori, B K; Shukla, M K; Bharti, P K; Chand, G; Kumar, G; Ukey, M J; Ali, N A; Singh, N

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is regarded as the most important arboviral disease. Although sporadic cases have been reported, serotypes responsible for outbreaks have not been identified from central India over the last 20 years. We investigated two outbreaks of febrile illness, in August and November 2012, from Korea district (Chhattisgarh) and Narsinghpur district (Madhya Pradesh), respectively. Fever and entomological surveys were conducted in the affected regions. Molecular and serological tests were conducted on collected serum samples. Dengue-specific amplicons were sequenced and phylogenetic analyses were performed. In Korea and Narsinghpur districts 37·3% and 59% of cases were positive, respectively, for dengue infection, with adults being the worst affected. RT-PCR confirmed dengue virus serotype 1 genotype III as the aetiology. Ninety-six percent of infections were primary. This is the first time that dengue virus 1 outbreaks have been documented from central India. Introduction of the virus into the population and a conducive mosquitogenic environment favouring increased vector density caused the outbreak. Timely diagnosis and strengthening vector control measures are essential to avoid future outbreaks.

  10. Identification of four genotypes of H3N2 swine influenza virus in pigs from southern China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jidang; Fu, Xinliang; Chen, Ye; He, Shuyi; Zheng, Yun; Cao, Zhenpeng; Yu, Wenxin; Zhou, Han; Su, Shuo; Zhang, Guihong

    2014-10-01

    In 2011, four H3N2 swine influenza viruses (SIVs) were isolated from nasal swabs of four pigs (800 nasal swabs were collected from pigs showing influenza-like symptoms) in Guangdong province, China. Four different genotypes of H3N2 appeared among pigs in southern China, including wholly human-like H3N2 viruses, intermediate (1975) double-reassortant human H3N2 viruses (resulting from reassortment between an early human lineage and a recent human lineage), recent double-reassortant human H3N2 viruses, and avian-like H3N2 viruses. Because pigs can support the reassortment of human and avian influenza viruses, our surveillance should be enhanced as a part of an overall pandemic preparedness plan.

  11. Cell culture replication of a genotype 1b hepatitis C virus isolate cloned from a patient who underwent liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Koutsoudakis, George; Perez-del-Pulgar, Sofia; Coto-Llerena, Mairene; Gonzalez, Patricia; Dragun, Jakub; Mensa, Laura; Crespo, Gonzalo; Navasa, Miguel; Forns, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of the genotype 2a isolate JFH1 was a major breakthrough in the field of hepatitis C virus (HCV), allowing researchers to study the complete life cycle of the virus in cell culture. However, fully competent culture systems encompassing the most therapeutically relevant HCV genotypes are still lacking, especially for the highly drug-resistant genotype 1b. For most isolated HCV clones, efficient replication in cultured hepatoma cells requires the introduction of replication-enhancing mutations. However, such mutations may interfere with viral assembly, as occurs in the case of the genotype 1b isolate Con1. In this study, we show that a clinical serum carrying a genotype 1b virus with an exceptionally high viral load was able to infect Huh7.5 cells. Similar to previous reports, inoculation of Huh7.5 cells by natural virus is very inefficient compared to infection by cell culture HCV. A consensus sequence of a new genotype 1b HCV isolate was cloned from the clinical serum (designated Barcelona HCV1), and then subjected to replication studies. This virus replicated poorly in a transient fashion in Huh7.5 cells after electroporation with in vitro transcribed RNA. Nonetheless, approximately 3 weeks post electroporation and thereafter, core protein-positive cells were detected by immunofluorescence. Surprisingly, small amounts of core protein were also measurable in the supernatant of electroporated cells, suggesting that HCV particles might be assembled and released. Our findings not only enhance the current method of cloning in vitro HCV replication-competent isolates, but also offer valuable insights for the realization of fully competent culture systems for HCV. PMID:21887279

  12. Cell Culture Replication of a Genotype 1b Hepatitis C Virus Isolate Cloned from a Patient Who Underwent Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Koutsoudakis, George; Perez-del-Pulgar, Sofia; Coto-Llerena, Mairene; Gonzalez, Patricia; Dragun, Jakub; Mensa, Laura; Crespo, Gonzalo; Navasa, Miguel; Forns, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of the genotype 2a isolate JFH1 was a major breakthrough in the field of hepatitis C virus (HCV), allowing researchers to study the complete life cycle of the virus in cell culture. However, fully competent culture systems encompassing the most therapeutically relevant HCV genotypes are still lacking, especially for the highly drug-resistant genotype 1b. For most isolated HCV clones, efficient replication in cultured hepatoma cells requires the introduction of replication-enhancing mutations. However, such mutations may interfere with viral assembly, as occurs in the case of the genotype 1b isolate Con1. In this study, we show that a clinical serum carrying a genotype 1b virus with an exceptionally high viral load was able to infect Huh7.5 cells. Similar to previous reports, inoculation of Huh7.5 cells by natural virus is very inefficient compared to infection by cell culture HCV. A consensus sequence of a new genotype 1b HCV isolate was cloned from the clinical serum (designated Barcelona HCV1), and then subjected to replication studies. This virus replicated poorly in a transient fashion in Huh7.5 cells after electroporation with in vitro transcribed RNA. Nonetheless, approximately 3 weeks post electroporation and thereafter, core protein-positive cells were detected by immunofluorescence. Surprisingly, small amounts of core protein were also measurable in the supernatant of electroporated cells, suggesting that HCV particles might be assembled and released. Our findings not only enhance the current method of cloning in vitro HCV replication-competent isolates, but also offer valuable insights for the realization of fully competent culture systems for HCV. PMID:21887279

  13. Viruses and human cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gallo, R.C.; Haseltine, W.; Klein, G.; Zur Hausen, H.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains papers on the following topics: Immunology and Epidemiology, Biology and Pathogenesis, Models of Pathogenesis and Treatment, Simian and Bovine Retroviruses, Human Papilloma Viruses, EBV and Herpesvirus, and Hepatitis B Virus.

  14. Epidemiological Distribution and Genotype Characterization of the Hepatitis C Virus Among HIV Patients in Kashan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Afzali, Hasan; Momen-Heravi, Mansooreh; Farokhzad, Asefeh

    2016-01-01

    Background Parenteral transmission is a common route of transmission for both human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV); therefore, hepatitis C viral infection is highly prevalent among people infected with HIV. Objectives This study was designed to examine the epidemiology and describe the clinical manifestation as well as the HCV genotypes in patients from the city of Kashan, Iran, who are coinfected with HIV and HCV. Patients and Methods This descriptive study was conducted in 2014 in the city of Kashan. The population consisted of all the HIV-infected patients who were referred to the behavioral counseling center and jail in Kashan. Demographic information and HCV- and HIV-related risk behaviors were obtained through the use of an interviewer-assisted questionnaire. After the participants gave written informed consent to participate, 10 cc venous blood samples were collected. The serum samples were screened for HCV infection using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In the event of a positive test for HCV, the RNA was then amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. The HCV subtypes were determined via the direct sequencing of the amplicons. All data analysis was performed using SPSS version 16.0 for the descriptive statistics, and then the chi-square test and Pearson coefficient were performed for additional analysis. Results The results of the analysis indicated that 54 (85%) of the 63 HIV-infected patients were males who were also HCV positive and who had less than a high school level education. There was a significant association between HCV infection and both occupation (P < 0.0001) and level of education (P < 0.05). All the HIV/HCV coinfected cases had a history of illicit drug use, while 92.6% had a history of imprisonment and 40.7% had high risk sexual contacts. Overall, genotype 1 was found in 75.9% of HCV patients, while genotype 3 was found in 24.1%. Some 94.4% of HCV patients had subtype A. There were

  15. Genotypes and phylogeographical relationships of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in California, USA.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Garry O; Bendorf, Christin M; Yun, Susan C; Kurath, Gael; Hedrick, Ronald P

    2007-08-13

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) contains 3 major genogroups in North America with discreet geographic ranges designated as upper (U), middle (M), and lower (L). A comprehensive genotyping of 237 IHNV isolates from hatchery and wild salmonids in California revealed 25 different sequence types (a to y) all in the L genogroup; specifically, the genogroup contained 14 sequence types that were unique to individual isolates as well as 11 sequence types representing 2 or more identical isolates. The most evident trend was the phylogenetic and geographical division of the L genogroup into 2 distinct subgroups designated as LI and LII. Isolates within Subgroup LI were primarily found within waterways linked to southern Oregon and northern California coastal rivers. Isolates in Subgroup LII were concentrated within inland valley watersheds that included the Sacramento River, San Joaquin River, and their tributaries. The temporal and spatial patterns of virus occurrence suggested that infections among adult Chinook salmon in the hatchery or that spawn in the river are a major source of virus potentially infecting other migrating or resident salmonids in California. Serum neutralization results of the California isolates of IHNV corroborated a temporal trend of sequence divergence; specifically, 2 progressive shifts in which more recent virus isolates represent new serotypes. A comparison of the estimates of divergence rates for Subgroup LI (1 x 10(-5) mutations per nucleotide site per year) indicated stasis similar to that observed in the U genogroup, while the Subgroup LII rate (1 x 10(-3) mutations per nucleotide site per year) suggested a more active evolution similar to that of the M genogroup.

  16. Spread of the emerging viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus strain, genotype IVb, in Michigan, USA.

    PubMed

    Faisal, Mohamed; Shavalier, Megan; Kim, Robert K; Millard, Elena V; Gunn, Michelle R; Winters, Andrew D; Schulz, Carolyn A; Eissa, Alaa; Thomas, Michael V; Wolgamood, Martha; Whelan, Gary E; Winton, James

    2012-05-01

    In 2003, viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) emerged in the Laurentian Great Lakes causing serious losses in a number of ecologically and recreationally important fish species. Within six years, despite concerted managerial preventive measures, the virus spread into the five Great Lakes and to a number of inland waterbodies. In response to this emerging threat, cooperative efforts between the Michigan Department of Natural Resources (MI DNR), the Michigan State University Aquatic Animal Health Laboratory (MSU-AAHL), and the United States Department of Agriculture-Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services (USDA-APHIS) were focused on performing a series of general and VHSV-targeted surveillances to determine the extent of virus trafficking in the State of Michigan. Herein we describe six years (2005-2010) of testing, covering hundreds of sites throughout Michigan's Upper and Lower Peninsulas. A total of 96,228 fish representing 73 species were checked for lesions suggestive of VHSV and their internal organs tested for the presence of VHSV using susceptible cell lines. Of the 1,823 cases tested, 30 cases from 19 fish species tested positive for VHSV by tissue culture and were confirmed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Gene sequence analyses of all VHSV isolates retrieved in Michigan demonstrated that they belong to the emerging sublineage "b" of the North American VHSV genotype IV. These findings underscore the complexity of VHSV ecology in the Great Lakes basin and the critical need for rigorous legislation and regulatory guidelines in order to reduce the virus spread within and outside of the Laurentian Great Lakes watershed.

  17. Spread of the Emerging Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Virus Strain, Genotype IVb, in Michigan, USA

    PubMed Central

    Faisal, Mohamed; Shavalier, Megan; Kim, Robert K.; Millard, Elena V.; Gunn, Michelle R.; Winters, Andrew D.; Schulz, Carolyn A.; Eissa, Alaa; Thomas, Michael V.; Wolgamood, Martha; Whelan, Gary E.; Winton, James

    2012-01-01

    In 2003, viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) emerged in the Laurentian Great Lakes causing serious losses in a number of ecologically and recreationally important fish species. Within six years, despite concerted managerial preventive measures, the virus spread into the five Great Lakes and to a number of inland waterbodies. In response to this emerging threat, cooperative efforts between the Michigan Department of Natural Resources (MI DNR), the Michigan State University Aquatic Animal Health Laboratory (MSU-AAHL), and the United States Department of Agriculture-Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services (USDA-APHIS) were focused on performing a series of general and VHSV-targeted surveillances to determine the extent of virus trafficking in the State of Michigan. Herein we describe six years (2005–2010) of testing, covering hundreds of sites throughout Michigan’s Upper and Lower Peninsulas. A total of 96,228 fish representing 73 species were checked for lesions suggestive of VHSV and their internal organs tested for the presence of VHSV using susceptible cell lines. Of the 1,823 cases tested, 30 cases from 19 fish species tested positive for VHSV by tissue culture and were confirmed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Gene sequence analyses of all VHSV isolates retrieved in Michigan demonstrated that they belong to the emerging sublineage “b” of the North American VHSV genotype IV. These findings underscore the complexity of VHSV ecology in the Great Lakes basin and the critical need for rigorous legislation and regulatory guidelines in order to reduce the virus spread within and outside of the Laurentian Great Lakes watershed. PMID:22754647

  18. Genotypes and phylogeographical relationships of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelley, G.O.; Bendorf, C.M.; Yun, S.C.; Kurath, G.; Hedrick, R.P.

    2007-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) contains 3 major genogroups in North America with discreet geographic ranges designated as upper (U), middle (M), and lower (L). A comprehensive genotyping of 237 IHNV isolates from hatchery and wild salmonids in California revealed 25 different sequence types (a to y) all in the L genogroup; specifically, the genogroup contained 14 sequence types that were unique to individual isolates as well as 11 sequence types representing 2 or more identical isolates. The most evident trend was the phylogenetic and geographical division of the L genogroup into 2 distinct subgroups designated as LI and LII. Isolates within Subgroup LI were primarily found within waterways linked to southern Oregon and northern California coastal rivers. Isolates in Subgroup LII were concentrated within inland valley watersheds that included the Sacramento River, San Joaquin River, and their tributaries. The temporal and spatial patterns of virus occurrence suggested that infections among adult Chinook salmon in the hatchery or that spawn in the river are a major source of virus potentially infecting other migrating or resident salmonids in California. Serum neutralization results of the California isolates of IHNV corroborated a temporal trend of sequence divergence; specifically, 2 progressive shifts in which more recent virus isolates represent new serotypes. A comparison of the estimates of divergence rates for Subgroup LI (1 ?? ICT5 mutations per nucleotide site per year) indicated stasis similar to that observed in the U genogroup, while the Subgroup LII rate (1 ?? 10 3 mutations per nucleotide site per year) suggested a more active evolution similar to that of the M genogroup. ?? Inter-Research 2007.

  19. Chronically infected wild boar can transmit genotype 3 hepatitis E virus to domestic pigs.

    PubMed

    Schlosser, Josephine; Vina-Rodriguez, Ariel; Fast, Christine; Groschup, Martin H; Eiden, Martin

    2015-10-22

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) causes acute hepatitis E in humans in developing countries, but sporadic and autochthonous cases do also occur in industrialized nations. In Europe, food-borne zoonotic transmission of genotype 3 (gt3) has been associated with the consumption of raw and undercooked products from domestic pig and wild boar. As shown recently, naturally acquired HEV gt3 replicates efficiently in experimentally infected wild boar and is transmissible from a wild boar to domestic pigs. Generally, following an acute infection swine suffer from a transient febrile illness and viremia in connection with fecal virus shedding. However, little is known about sub-acute or chronic HEV infections in swine, and how and where HEV survives the immune response. In this paper, we describe the incidental finding of a chronic HEVgt3 infection in two naturally infected European wild boar which were raised and housed at FLI over years. The wild boar displayed fecal HEV RNA excretion and viremia over nearly the whole observation period of more than five months. The animal had mounted a substantial antibody response, yet without initial clearance of the virus by the immune system. Further analysis indicated a subclinical course of HEV with no evidence of chronic hepatitis. Additionally, we could demonstrate that this chronic wild boar infection was still transmissible to domestic pigs, which were housed together with this animal. Sentinel pigs developed fecal virus shedding accompanied by seroconversion. Wild boar should therefore be considered as an important reservoir for transmission of HEV gt3 in Europe. PMID:26344041

  20. Development of RT-qPCR assays for the specific identification of two major genotypes of avian infectious bronchitis virus.

    PubMed

    Marandino, Ana; Tomás, Gonzalo; Hernández, Martín; Panzera, Yanina; Craig, María Isabel; Vagnozzi, Ariel; Vera, Federico; Techera, Claudia; Grecco, Sofía; Banda, Alejandro; Hernández, Diego; Pérez, Ruben

    2016-09-01

    Infectious bronchitis virus (Gammacoronavirus, Coronaviridae) is a genetically variable RNA virus (27.6kb) that causes one of the most persistent respiratory disease in poultry. The virus is classified in genotypes with different epidemiological relevance and clinical implications. The present study reports the development and validation of specific RT-qPCR assays for the detection of two major IBV genotypes: South America I (SAI) and Asia/South America II (A/SAII). The SAI genotype is an exclusive and widespread South American lineage while the A/SAII genotype is distributed in Asia, Europe and South America. Both identification assays employ TaqMan probes that hybridize with unique sequences in the spike glycoprotein gene. The assays successfully detected all the assessed strains belonging to both genotypes, showing high specificity and absence of cross-reactivity. Using serial dilutions of in vitro-transcribed RNA we obtained acceptable determination coefficients, PCR efficiencies and relatively small intra- and inter-assay variability. The assays demonstrated a wide dynamic range between 10(1)-10(7) and 10(2)-10(7) RNA copies/reaction for SAI and A/SAII strains, respectively. The possibility to characterize a large number of samples in a rapid, sensitive and reproducible way makes these techniques suitable tools for routine testing, IBV control, and epidemiological research in poultry.

  1. Complete genome sequencing of a genotype 3 hepatitis E virus strain identified in a swine farm in Italy.

    PubMed

    Di Bartolo, Ilaria; Angeloni, Giorgia; Monini, Marina; Maione, Ester; Marrone, Raffaele; Ostanello, Fabio; Ruggeri, Franco Maria

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection in piglets sampled in two farms in southern Italy. The virus was detected in 11 out of 15 animals tested. Based on sequence analysis, the 6 Italian strains examined belonged to two clusters containing both swine and human strains of either genotype 3 subtype e or f from Europe and Japan. The two Italian strain clusters shared nucleotide identity of 81.8% and 87.5% in the ORF2 (capsid protein) and ORF1 (RdRp) diagnostic fragments, respectively, confirming the heterogeneity of genotype 3 viruses circulating in pigs in Italy. The complete genome of one genotype 3 subtype e strain and the full ORF2 and ORF3 coding regions of one of the genotype 3f strains, obtained in this study, were compared to other HEV sequences available on line (NCBI database). The results of analysis showed that porcine strains clustered together with human and swine strains detected in Europe. Most changes in the coding region corresponded to synonymous mutations, and only the ORF3 showed a positive selection. Further, analyses are needed to understand the clinical significance of HEV genotypes and subtypes.

  2. Consequences of inaccurate hepatitis C virus genotyping on the costs of prescription of direct antiviral agents in an Italian district

    PubMed Central

    Polilli, Ennio; Cento, Valeria; Restelli, Umberto; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; Aragri, Marianna; Di Maio, Velia Chiara; Sciacca, Antonina; Santoleri, Fiorenzo; Fazii, Paolo; Costantini, Alberto; Perno, Carlo Federico; Parruti, Giustino

    2016-01-01

    Available commercial assays may yield inaccurate hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype assignment in up to 10% of cases. We investigated the cost-effectiveness of re-evaluating HCV genotype by population sequencing, prior to choosing a direct acting antiviral (DAA) regimen. Between March and September 2015, HCV sequence analysis was performed in order to confirm commercial LiPA-HCV genotype (Versant® HCV Genotype 2.0) in patients eligible for treatment with DAAs. Out of 134 consecutive patients enrolled, sequencing yielded 21 (15.7%) cases of discordant results. For three cases of wrong genotype assignment, the putative reduction in efficacy was gauged between 15% and 40%. Among the eight cases for whom G1b was assigned by commercial assays instead of G1a, potentially suboptimal treatments would have been prescribed. Finally, for five patients with G1 and indeterminate subtype, the choice of regimens would have targeted the worst option, with a remarkable increase in costs, as in the case of the four mixed HCV infections for whom pan-genotypic regimens would have been mandatory. Precise assignment of HCV genotype and subtype by sequencing may, therefore, be more beneficial than expected, until more potent pan-genotypic regimens are available for all patients. PMID:27695353

  3. Complete genome sequence of a genotype XVII Newcastle disease virus, isolated from an apparently healthy domestic duck in Nigeria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The first complete genome sequence of a strain of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) of genotype XVII is described here. A velogenic strain (duck/Nigeria/903/KUDU-113/1992) was isolated from an apparently healthy free-roaming domestic duck sampled in Kuru, Nigeria, in 1992. Phylogenetic analysis of the f...

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Genotype Ib Newcastle Disease Virus Isolated from a Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) in Russia

    PubMed Central

    Sobolev, Ivan A.; Glushchenko, Alexandra V.; Shestopalov, Alexander M.

    2015-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of a Newcastle disease virus isolate, NDV/Yakutiya/mallard/852/2011, isolated from a mallard in Russia. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis, this strain was clustered into class II genotype Ib. PMID:26634762

  5. Serological relationships among subgroups in bovine viral diarrhea virus genotype 1 (BVDV-1).

    PubMed

    Alpay, Gizem; Yeşilbağ, Kadir

    2015-01-30

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) has various economic impacts associated with diarrhea, poor performance, an increase in the frequency of other infections and lethal outcomes. Both genotypes, namely BVDV-1 and BVDV-2, as well as different subgroups within these genotypes have been reported worldwide. Understanding the serological differences among the BVDV subgroups is important for disease epidemiology and prevention as well as vaccination programs. The aim of this study was to determine the serological relatedness among the subgroups in BVDV-1. For that purpose, sheep hyperimmune sera were collected against representative strains from 6 of the subgroups of BVDV-1 (BVDV-1a, -1b, -1d, -1f, -1h and -1l). The serum samples that gave the peak antibody titer to the homologous strains were used to perform cross neutralization assays. The highest homologous antibody titer (1:5160) was obtained against BVDV-1h. Regarding the cross neutralizing (heterologous) antibodies, the lowest titer (1:20) was produced by the BVDV-1f antiserum against the BVDV-1a and BVDV1-b viruses. The highest cross neutralizing titer (1:2580) achieved by the BVDV-1h antiserum was against the BVDV-1b strain. The cross neutralization results indicated particular serological differences between the recently described subgroup (BVDV-1l) and BVDV-1a/-1b, which are widely used in commercial vaccines. Considering the cross neutralization titers, it is concluded that selected BVDV-1l and BVDV-1h strains can be used for the development of diagnostic and control tools.

  6. Virulence of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) genotype III in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takafumi; Kurita, Jun; Mori, Koh-ichiro; Olesen, Niels J

    2016-01-08

    In general, viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) isolates from marine fish species in European waters (genotypes GIb, GII and GIII) are non- to low virulent in rainbow trout. However, a VHSV isolation was made in 2007 from a disease outbreak in sea farmed rainbow trout in Norway. The isolate, named NO-2007-50-385, was demonstrated to belong to GIII. This isolate has attracted attention to assess which of the viral genome/proteins might be associated with the virulence in rainbow trout. In this study, we describe the difference of virulence in rainbow trout between the NO-2007-50-385 and 4p168 isolates as representatives of virulent and non-virulent GIII isolates, respectively. Rainbow trout were bath challenged with VHSV NO-2007-50-385 for 1 and 6 h, resulting in cumulative mortalities of 5 and 35%, respectively. No mortality was observed in the rainbow trout groups immersed with the genotype III VHSV isolate 4p168 for 1 and 6 h. The viral titre in organs from fish challenged with NO-2007-50-385 for 6 h increased more rapidly than those exposed for 1 h. By in vitro studies it was demonstrated that the final titres of VHSV DK-3592B (GI), NO-2007-50-385 and 4p168 inoculated on EPC cells were very similar, whereas when inoculated on the rainbow trout cell line RTG-2 the titre of the non-virulent 4p168 isolate was 3-4 logs below the two other VHSV isolates. Based on a comparative analysis of the entire genome of the genotype III isolates, we suggest that substitutions of amino acids in positions 118-123 of the nucleo-protein are candidates for being related to virulence of VHSV GIII in rainbow trout.

  7. Pan-genotypic Hepatitis C Virus Inhibition by Natural Products Derived from the Wild Egyptian Artichoke

    PubMed Central

    Elsebai, Mahmoud Fahmi; Koutsoudakis, George; Saludes, Verónica; Pérez-Vilaró, Gemma; Turpeinen, Ari; Mattila, Sampo; Pirttilä, Anna Maria; Fontaine-Vive, Fabien; Mehiri, Mohamed; Meyerhans, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the leading cause of chronic liver diseases. Water extracts of the leaves of the wild Egyptian artichoke (WEA) [Cynara cardunculus L. var. sylvestris (Lam.) Fiori] have been used for centuries in the Sinai Peninsula to treat hepatitis symptoms. Here we isolated and characterized six compounds from the water extracts of WEA and evaluated their HCV inhibition capacities in vitro. Importantly, two of these compounds, grosheimol and cynaropicrin, inhibited HCV with half-maximal effective concentrations (EC50s) in the low micromolar range. They inhibited HCV entry into target cells and were active against both cell-free infection as well as cell-cell transmission. Furthermore, the antiviral activity of both compounds was pan-genotypic as HCV genotypes 1a, 1b, 2b, 3a, 4a, 5a, 6a, and 7a were inhibited. Thus, grosheimol and cynaropicrin are promising candidates for the development of new pan-genotypic entry inhibitors of HCV infection. IMPORTANCE Because there is no preventive HCV vaccine available today, the discovery of novel anti-HCV cell entry inhibitors could help develop preventive measures against infection. The present study describes two compounds isolated from the wild Egyptian artichoke (WEA) with respect to their structural elucidation, absolute configuration, and quantitative determination. Importantly, both compounds inhibited HCV infection in vitro. The first compound was an unknown molecule, and it was designated “grosheimol,” while the second compound is the known molecule cynaropicrin. Both compounds belong to the group of sesquiterpene lactones. The mode of action of these compounds occurred during the early steps of the HCV life cycle, including cell-free and cell-cell infection inhibition. These natural compounds present promising candidates for further development into anti-HCV therapeutics. PMID:26656684

  8. Hepatitis C virus prevalence and genotype distribution in Pakistan: Comprehensive review of recent data

    PubMed Central

    Umer, Muhammad; Iqbal, Mazhar

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is endemic in Pakistan and its burden is expected to increase in coming decades owing mainly to widespread use of unsafe medical procedures. The prevalence of HCV in Pakistan has previously been reviewed. However, the literature search conducted here revealed that at least 86 relevant studies have been produced since the publication of these systematic reviews. A revised updated analysis was therefore needed in order to integrate the fresh data. A systematic review of data published between 2010 and 2015 showed that HCV seroprevalence among the general adult Pakistani population is 6.8%, while active HCV infection was found in approximately 6% of the population. Studies included in this review have also shown extremely high HCV prevalence in rural and underdeveloped peri-urban areas (up to 25%), highlighting the need for an increased focus on this previously neglected socioeconomic stratum of the population. While a 2.45% seroprevalence among blood donors demands immediate measures to curtail the risk of transfusion transmitted HCV, a very high prevalence in patients attending hospitals with various non-liver disease related complaints (up to 30%) suggests a rise in the incidence of nosocomial HCV spread. HCV genotype 3a continues to be the most prevalent subtype infecting people in Pakistan (61.3%). However, recent years have witnessed an increase in the frequency of subtype 2a in certain geographical sub-regions within Pakistan. In Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and Sindh provinces, 2a was the second most prevalent genotype (17.3% and 11.3% respectively). While the changing frequency distribution of various genotypes demands an increased emphasis on research for novel therapeutic regimens, evidence of high nosocomial transmission calls for immediate measures aimed at ensuring safe medical practices. PMID:26819533

  9. Hepatitis Delta virus genotype 8 infection in Northeast Brazil: inheritance from African slaves?

    PubMed

    Barros, L M F; Gomes-Gouvêa, M S; Pinho, J R R; Alvarado-Mora, M V; Dos Santos, A; Mendes-Corrêa, M C J; Caldas, A J M; Sousa, M T; Santos, M D C; Ferreira, A S P

    2011-09-01

    Hepatitis Delta virus (HDV) is endemic worldwide, but its prevalence varies in different geographical areas. While in the Brazilian Amazon, HDV is known to be endemic and to represent a significant public health problem, few studies have assessed its prevalence in other regions in the country. This study evaluated the seroprevalence of HDV among HBsAg chronic carriers from Maranhão state, a region located in the Northeast of Brazil. Among 133 patients, 5 had anti-HD, of whom 3 had HDV RNA. HDV genotypes were characterized by Bayesian phylogenetic analysis of nucleotide sequences from the HDAg coding region. HDV-3 was identified in one patient who lives in Maranhão, but was born in Amazonas state (Western Amazon basin). Phylogenetic analysis shows that this HDV-3 sequence grouped with other HDV-3 sequences isolated in this state, which suggests that the patient probably contracted HDV infection there. Surprisingly, the other two patients were infected with HDV-8, an African genotype. These patients were born and have always lived in Urbano Santos, a rural county of Maranhão state, moreover they had never been to Africa and denied any contact with people from that continent. This is the first description of the HDV-8 in non-native African populations. This genotype may have been introduced to Brazil through the slaves brought to the country from the West Africa regions during the 16-18th centuries. Our results indicate that the need of clinical and epidemiological studies to investigate the presence of this infection in other areas in Brazil.

  10. Global epidemiology of hepatitis C virus infection: An up-date of the distribution and circulation of hepatitis C virus genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Petruzziello, Arnolfo; Marigliano, Samantha; Loquercio, Giovanna; Cozzolino, Anna; Cacciapuoti, Carmela

    2016-01-01

    AIM To review Hepatitis C virus (HCV) prevalence and genotypes distribution worldwide. METHODS We conducted a systematic study which represents one of the most comprehensive effort to quantify global HCV epidemiology, using the best available published data between 2000 and 2015 from 138 countries (about 90% of the global population), grouped in 20 geographical areas (with the exclusion of Oceania), as defined by the Global Burden of Diseases project (GBD). Countries for which we were unable to obtain HCV genotype prevalence data were excluded from calculations of regional proportions, although their populations were included in the total population size of each region when generating regional genotype prevalence estimates. RESULTS Total global HCV prevalence is estimated at 2.5% (177.5 million of HCV infected adults), ranging from 2.9% in Africa and 1.3% in Americas, with a global viraemic rate of 67% (118.9 million of HCV RNA positive cases), varying from 64.4% in Asia to 74.8% in Australasia. HCV genotype 1 is the most prevalent worldwide (49.1%), followed by genotype 3 (17.9%), 4 (16.8%) and 2 (11.0%). Genotypes 5 and 6 are responsible for the remaining < 5%. While genotypes 1 and 3 are common worldwide, the largest proportion of genotypes 4 and 5 is in lower-income countries. Although HCV genotypes 1 and 3 infections are the most prevalent globally (67.0% if considered together), other genotypes are found more commonly in lower-income countries where still account for a significant proportion of HCV cases. CONCLUSION A more precise knowledge of HCV genotype distribution will be helpful to best inform national healthcare models to improve access to new treatments. PMID:27678366

  11. Global epidemiology of hepatitis C virus infection: An up-date of the distribution and circulation of hepatitis C virus genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Petruzziello, Arnolfo; Marigliano, Samantha; Loquercio, Giovanna; Cozzolino, Anna; Cacciapuoti, Carmela

    2016-01-01

    AIM To review Hepatitis C virus (HCV) prevalence and genotypes distribution worldwide. METHODS We conducted a systematic study which represents one of the most comprehensive effort to quantify global HCV epidemiology, using the best available published data between 2000 and 2015 from 138 countries (about 90% of the global population), grouped in 20 geographical areas (with the exclusion of Oceania), as defined by the Global Burden of Diseases project (GBD). Countries for which we were unable to obtain HCV genotype prevalence data were excluded from calculations of regional proportions, although their populations were included in the total population size of each region when generating regional genotype prevalence estimates. RESULTS Total global HCV prevalence is estimated at 2.5% (177.5 million of HCV infected adults), ranging from 2.9% in Africa and 1.3% in Americas, with a global viraemic rate of 67% (118.9 million of HCV RNA positive cases), varying from 64.4% in Asia to 74.8% in Australasia. HCV genotype 1 is the most prevalent worldwide (49.1%), followed by genotype 3 (17.9%), 4 (16.8%) and 2 (11.0%). Genotypes 5 and 6 are responsible for the remaining < 5%. While genotypes 1 and 3 are common worldwide, the largest proportion of genotypes 4 and 5 is in lower-income countries. Although HCV genotypes 1 and 3 infections are the most prevalent globally (67.0% if considered together), other genotypes are found more commonly in lower-income countries where still account for a significant proportion of HCV cases. CONCLUSION A more precise knowledge of HCV genotype distribution will be helpful to best inform national healthcare models to improve access to new treatments.

  12. Construction and characterization of infectious hepatitis C virus chimera containing structural proteins directly from genotype 1b clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jie; Tao, Wanyin; Li, Rui; Xiang, Yu; Zhang, Nan; Xiang, Xiaogang; Xie, Qing; Zhong, Jin

    2013-08-15

    HCV genotype is a major determinant of clinical outcome, and GT1b HCV infection is the most difficult to treat and also the predominant genotype in East Asia and Europe. We developed 1b/JFH-1 inter-genotypic recombinants containing the structural genes (Core, E1, E2), p7 and the 1stTMD of NS2 directly from GT1b clinical isolates. Through a cloning selection strategy, we obtained 4 functional clones from 3 cases of GT1b patients' sera, which could produce infectious viruses in Huh7.5.1 cells. Sequencing analysis of recovered viruses from serial passage and reverse genetics revealed that adaptive mutations in the GT1b-originated region were enough for the enhancement of infectivity. A monoclonal antibody to E2 and original patient sera could efficiently block 3 of the viruses (26C3mt, 52B6mt and 79L9) while had little effect on 26C6mt viruses. The availability of 1b/JFH-1 chimeric viruses will be important for studies of isolate-specific neutralization and useful in evaluating antiviral therapies.

  13. Genotyping by multiplex polymerase chain reaction for detection of endemic hepatitis B virus transmission.

    PubMed Central

    Repp, R; Rhiel, S; Heermann, K H; Schaefer, S; Keller, C; Ndumbe, P; Lampert, F; Gerlich, W H

    1993-01-01

    A nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocol was developed for rapid genotyping of hepatitis B virus (HBV). During the first PCR round, a universal HBV primer pair was used to amplify the entire pre-S region of the HBV genome. Within the pre-S region, many nucleotide exchanges are observed. These are partly correlated to the serological hepatitis B surface antigen subtypes. Five additional subtype-specific primers were selected from that region which, together with two universal non-group-specific primers, generated specific combinations of two to four DNA fragments of defined sizes. By this approach, 55 hepatitis B surface antigen-positive patients from a pediatric oncology unit in Germany were analyzed. Fifty-four patients who had been infected within 2 years had an identical pattern in the multiplex PCR, suggesting a common source of infection and person-to-person transmission within the unit. One child who was infected 5 years later had a different PCR pattern and, therefore, must have been infected from a different source. Furthermore, 109 serum samples taken from pregnant Cameroonian women and 25 serum samples from their babies taken 6 months after birth were analyzed. In one case, mother-to-infant transmission of the virus was demonstrated. Apart from its role in epidemiological studies on HBV, multiplex PCR may also be a useful tool for rapid genetic analysis in other fields if there is a moderate degree of sequence variation which enables the design of specific primers. Images PMID:8501209

  14. Diagnosis and genotyping of African swine fever viruses from 2015 outbreaks in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Thoromo, Jonas; Simulundu, Edgar; Chambaro, Herman M; Mataa, Liywalii; Lubaba, Caesar H; Pandey, Girja S; Takada, Ayato; Misinzo, Gerald; Mweene, Aaron S

    2016-01-01

    In early 2015, a highly fatal haemorrhagic disease of domestic pigs resembling African swine fever (ASF) occurred in North Western, Copperbelt, and Lusaka provinces of Zambia. Molecular diagnosis by polymerase chain reaction targeting specific amplification of p72 (B646L) gene of ASF virus (ASFV) was conducted. Fourteen out of 16 domestic pigs from the affected provinces were found to be positive for ASFV. Phylogenetic analyses based on part of the p72 and the complete p54 (E183L) genes revealed that all the ASFVs detected belonged to genotypes I and Id, respectively. Additionally, epidemiological data suggest that the same ASFV spread from Lusaka to other provinces possibly through uncontrolled and/or illegal pig movements. Although the origin of the ASFV that caused outbreaks in domestic pigs in Zambia could not be ascertained, it appears likely that the virus may have emerged from within the country or region, probably from a sylvatic cycle. It is recommended that surveillance of ASF, strict biosecurity, and quarantine measures be imposed in order to prevent further spread and emergence of new ASF outbreaks in Zambia. PMID:27247062

  15. Distribution and Predominance of Genotype 3 in Hepatitis C Virus Carriers in the Province of Kahramanmaras, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Caliskan, Ahmet; Kirisci, Ozlem; Ozkaya, Esra; Ozden, Sevinc; Tumer, Seray; Caglar, Serkan; Guler, Selma Ates; Senol, Hande

    2015-01-01

    Background: The hepatitis C virus (HCV) has six major genotypes and more than 100 subtypes, and the determination of the responsible genotype, collection of epidemiological data, tailoring antiviral therapy, and prediction of prognosis have an important place in disease management. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to determine the distribution of HCV genotypes across geographic regions and compare these data with those obtained from other geographic locations. Patients and Methods: The HCV genotypes were identified in HCV RNA positive blood samples, obtained from different centers. The HCV genotype was determined using molecular methods [Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR)] in 313 patients, who were found to be positive for HCV RNA. The presence of HCV RNA was investigated using the RT-PCR method in serum samples delivered to the Microbiology Laboratory at Kahramanmaras Necip Fazıl City Hospital, Kahramanmaras, Turkey, from the centers located in Kahramanmaras City center and peripheral districts of the province, between March 2010 and August 2014. The HCV genotype analysis was performed in HCV RNA positive samples, using RT-PCR reagents kit. Urine samples from the patients were tested for amphetamine with an Amphetamines II (AMPS2) kit, cocaine was tested with a Cocaine II (COC2) kit, opiates were tested with an Opiates II (OPI2) kit, and cannabinoids were tested with a Cannabinoids II (THC2) kit in Roche/Hitachi Cobas c501 device. Results: The blood samples collected from 313 patients were included in the study. Of these patients, 212 (67.7%) were male and 101 (32.3%) were female. The mean age of the patients was 41.29 ± 20.32 years. In terms of HCV genotype distribution, 162 patients (51.7%) had genotype 1, 144 patients (46%) had genotype 3, four patients (1.3%) had genotype 2, and three patients (1%) had genotype 4. The results of urine drug tests were available in only 65 patients (20.2%). Of these, 61 (93.8%) patients had HCV genotype 3

  16. [Characteristics of adolescent and adult young women diagnosed with human papilloma virus infection at the Center for Research on Human Reproduction (CIRH)].

    PubMed

    Grajales, B; Flores, H; Mendoza, A; Martínez, L; De León, A; Andino, N; Ronner, Z; De León, R G; Guerra, A; Austin, K L

    1997-01-01

    We reviewed 239 charts of adolescents and young adults, who visited our clinic. The purpose was to know the incidence of the Human Papiloma Virus infection (HPVI), diagnosed by Pap's smears, and the relationship to a population with some gynecological and sociodemographic characteristics. The women age population was between 14-24 years old with a mean age of 19.9 years. Seventy (29.3%) were PIV positive and 169 (70.7%) negatives. About 75% among both groups (PIV + and -) began active sexual life between 15-19 years old. Among the women with 4 or more sexual partners, 55.6% were HPVI positive. About 60% of all women had never used any method before being admitted to the clinic. In this study there is no correlation between IVSA and HPVI. We do demonstrate that the greater the number of sexual partners, the highest the risk of a sexual acquired disease.

  17. Genotypes of rubella virus and the epidemiology of rubella infections in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, 2004-2013.

    PubMed

    Pukuta, Elizabeth; Waku-Kouomou, Diane; Abernathy, Emily; Illunga, Benoit Kebela; Obama, Ricardo; Mondonge, Vital; Dahl, Benjamin A; Maresha, Balcha G; Icenogle, Joseph; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques

    2016-10-01

    Rubella is a viral infection that may cause fetal death or congenital defects, known as congenital rubella syndrome (CRS), during early pregnancy. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that countries assess the burden of rubella and CRS, including the determination of genotypes of circulating viruses. The goal of this study was to identify the genotypes of rubella viruses in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). Serum or throat swab samples were collected through the measles surveillance system. Sera that tested negative for measles IgM antibody were tested for rubella IgM antibody. Serum collected within 4 days of rash onset and throat swabs were screened by real-time RT-PCR for rubella virus RNA. For positive samples, an amplicon of the E1 glycoprotein gene was amplified by RT-PCR and sequenced. 11733 sera were tested for rubella IgM and 2816 (24%) were positive; 145 (5%) were tested for the presence of rubella RNA by real-time RT-PCR and 10 (7%) were positive. Seventeen throat swabs were analyzed by RT-PCR and three were positive. Sequences were obtained from eight of the positive samples. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the DRC rubella viruses belonged to genotypes 1B, 1E, 1G, and 2B. This report provides the first information on the genotypes of rubella virus circulating in the DRC. These data contribute to a better understanding of rubella burden and the dynamics of rubella virus circulation in Africa. Efforts to establish rubella surveillance in the DRC are needed to support rubella elimination in Africa. J. Med. Virol. 88:1677-1684, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Genotypes of rubella virus and the epidemiology of rubella infections in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, 2004-2013.

    PubMed

    Pukuta, Elizabeth; Waku-Kouomou, Diane; Abernathy, Emily; Illunga, Benoit Kebela; Obama, Ricardo; Mondonge, Vital; Dahl, Benjamin A; Maresha, Balcha G; Icenogle, Joseph; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques

    2016-10-01

    Rubella is a viral infection that may cause fetal death or congenital defects, known as congenital rubella syndrome (CRS), during early pregnancy. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that countries assess the burden of rubella and CRS, including the determination of genotypes of circulating viruses. The goal of this study was to identify the genotypes of rubella viruses in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). Serum or throat swab samples were collected through the measles surveillance system. Sera that tested negative for measles IgM antibody were tested for rubella IgM antibody. Serum collected within 4 days of rash onset and throat swabs were screened by real-time RT-PCR for rubella virus RNA. For positive samples, an amplicon of the E1 glycoprotein gene was amplified by RT-PCR and sequenced. 11733 sera were tested for rubella IgM and 2816 (24%) were positive; 145 (5%) were tested for the presence of rubella RNA by real-time RT-PCR and 10 (7%) were positive. Seventeen throat swabs were analyzed by RT-PCR and three were positive. Sequences were obtained from eight of the positive samples. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the DRC rubella viruses belonged to genotypes 1B, 1E, 1G, and 2B. This report provides the first information on the genotypes of rubella virus circulating in the DRC. These data contribute to a better understanding of rubella burden and the dynamics of rubella virus circulation in Africa. Efforts to establish rubella surveillance in the DRC are needed to support rubella elimination in Africa. J. Med. Virol. 88:1677-1684, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27479298

  19. Inverted ductal papilloma of minor salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Hegarty, D J; Hopper, C; Speight, P M

    1994-08-01

    Inverted ductal papillomas are rare tumours of minor salivary glands. A case is reported on the lower lip of a 50-year-old man. The tumour showed a characteristic endophytic growth pattern and was composed of bulbous papillary projections of basaloid cells dilating and filling the superficial portion of the excretory duct. Histologically, inverted ductal papillomas resemble the inverted papilloma of the nose and paranasal sinuses, but are completely benign and are not associated with malignant change.

  20. Genotyping and Molecular Characterization of Hepatitis B Virus from Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Individuals in Southern Africa

    PubMed Central

    Makondo, Euphodia; Bell, Trevor G.; Kramvis, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are hyperendemic in sub-Saharan Africa. The HBV genotypes prevailing in HIV-infected Africans are unknown. Our aim was to determine the HBV genotypes in HIV-infected participants and to identify clinically significant HBV mutations. From 71 HBV DNA+ve HIV-infected participants, 49 basic core promoter/precore (BCP/PC) and 29 complete S regions were successfully sequenced. Following phylogenetic analysis of 29 specimens in the complete S region, 28 belonged to subgenotype A1 and one to D3. Mutations affecting HBeAg expression at the transcriptional (1762T1764A), translational (Kozak 1809–1812, initiation 1814–1816, G1896A with C1858T), or post translational levels (G1862T), were responsible for the high HBeAg-negativity observed. The G1862T mutation occurred only in subgenotype A1 isolates, which were found in one third (7/21) of HBsAg−ve participants, but in none of the 18 HBsAg+ve participants (p<0.05). Pre-S deletion mutants were detected in four HBsAg+ve and one HBsAg−ve participant/s. The following mutations occurred significantly more frequently in HBV isolated in this study than in strains of the same cluster of the phylogenetic tree: ps1F25L, ps1V88L/A; ps2Q10R, ps2 R48K/T, ps2A53V and sQ129R/H, sQ164A/V/G/D, sV168A and sS174N (p<0.05). ps1I48V/T occurred more frequently in females than males (p<0.05). Isolates with sV168A occurred more frequently in participants with viral loads >200 IU per ml (p<0.05) and only sS174N occurred more frequently in HBsAg−ve than in HBsAg+ve individuals (p<0.05). Prior to initiation of ART, ten percent, 3 of 29 isolates sequenced, had drug resistance mutations rtV173L, rtL180M+rtM204V and rtV214A, respectively. This study has provided important information on the molecular characteristics of HBV in HIV-infected southern Africans prior to ART initiation, which has important clinical relevance in the management of HBV/HIV co-infection in our unique setting

  1. Gene expression changes in MDBK cells infected with genotype 2 bovine viral diarrhoea virus.

    PubMed

    Neill, John D; Ridpath, Julia F

    2003-11-01

    Bovine viral diarrhoea viruses (BVDVs) are ubiquitous viral pathogens of cattle. These viruses exist as one of two biotypes, cytopathic and noncytopathic, based on the ability to induce cytopathic effect in cell culture. The noncytopathic biotypes are able to establish inapparent, persistent infections in both cell culture and in bovine foetuses of less than 150 days gestation. Interactions with the host cell and the mechanism by which viral tolerance is established are unknown. To examine the changes in gene expression that occur following infection of host cells with BVDV, serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE), a global gene expression technology was used. SAGE allows quantitation of virtually every transcript in a cell type without prior sequence information. Transcript expression levels and identities are determined by sequencing libraries composed of concatamers of 14 base DNA fragments (tags) derived from the 3'-end of each cellular mRNA transcript. Comparison of data obtained from uninfected and BVDV genotype 2-infected cell libraries revealed changes in gene expression associated with distinct biochemical pathways or functions. Isotypes of both alpha- and beta-tubulins were down-regulated, indicating possible dysfunction in cell division and other functions where microtubules play a major role. Expression of genes encoding proteins involved in energy metabolism were expressed at essentially equivalent levels in both infected and uninfected cells. Genes encoding proteins involved in protein translation and post-translational modifications, functions necessary for viral replication, were generally up-regulated. These data indicate that following infection with BVDV, changes in gene expression occur that are beneficial for virus replication while having only minor changes in energy metabolism.

  2. Ledipasvir + sofosbuvir (Harvoni). A therapeutic advance in genotype 1 hepatitis C virus infection, despite uncertainties.

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    Treatment for chronic hepatitis C depends on the hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype and the patient's clinical characteristics. A fixed-dose combination of ledipasvir + sofosbuvir has been authorised in the European Union for adults with HCV genotype 1 (HCV-1), HCV-3 or HCV-4 infection. Ledipasvir targets the HCV protein NS5A, while sofosbuvir inhibits the HCV RNA polymerase NS5B. The ledipasvir+ sofosbuvircombination has not been compared directly with other antiviral drugs. No information is available on its ability to prevent hepatic complications, even in patients with cirrhosis. In four trials including over 1800 treatment-naive patients infected with HCV-1, a 12-week course of ledipasvir + sofosbuviryielded a sustained virological response in nearly every case. This is better than that reported with peginterferon alfa-based protocols. In four trials including more than 900 HCV-1-infected patients in whom treatments including peginterferon alfa had failed, a 24-week course of ledipasvir+ sofosbuvir yielded a sustained virological response in nearly every case, which is far better than reported with peginterferon alfa + ribavirin + protease inhibitor combinations, based on indirect comparison. In these trials, a 24-week course of the ledipasvir + sofosbuvir combination was effective in almost all patients with compensated cirrhosis. The same treatment also showed major efficacy in a non-comparative trial in 337 HCV-1-infected patients with decompensated cirrhosis or who had undergone liver transplantation. In mid-2015, very few data are available on the ledipasvir + sofosbuvir combination in HCV-1-infected patients in whom sofosbuvir combination therapy has failed, or in patients with HCV-3 or HCV-4 infection. Comparative data on the adverse effects of the ledipasvir + sofosbuvir combination are mainly based on a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in 155 patients. Overall, serious adverse effects were infrequent in this and other trials. The main adverse

  3. Genetic characterization of bovine viral diarrhoea (BVD) viruses: confirmation of the presence of BVD genotype 2 in Africa.

    PubMed

    Ularamu, H G; Sibeko, K P; Bosman, A B; Venter, E H; van Vuuren, M

    2013-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) has emerged as one of the economically important pathogens in cattle populations, with a worldwide distribution and causing a complex of disease syndromes. Two genotypes, BVDV 1 and 2, exist and are discriminated on the basis of the sequence of the 5' non-coding region (5' NCR) using real-time PCR. Real-time PCR is more sensitive, specific, and less time-consuming than conventional PCR, and it has less risk of cross-contamination of samples. Limited information exists on BVDV genetic subtypes in South Africa. The aim of this study was to determine the genotypes of BVDV currently circulating in South African feedlots. A total of 279 specimens (219 tissue samples, 59 trans-tracheal aspirates and 1 blood sample) were collected from dead and living cattle with lesions or clinical signs compatible with BVDV infection. Pooled homogenates from the same animals were prepared, and total RNA was extracted. A screening test was performed on the pooled samples, and positive pools were investigated individually. A Cador BVDV Type 1/2 RT-PCR Kit (QIAGEN, Hilden, Germany) was used for the real-time PCR assay on a LightCycler(®) V2.0 real-time PCR machine (Roche Diagnostics, Mannheim, Germany). The results were read at 530 and 640 nm for BVDV 1 and 2, respectively. Bovine viral diarrhoea virus was detected in a total of 103 samples that included 91 tissue samples, 1 blood sample and 11 trans-tracheal aspirates. Eighty-five (82.5 %) of the strains were genotype 1 and 18 (17.5 %) were genotype 2. Comparing the sequencing data, genotypes 1 and 2 from the field strains did not cluster with vaccine strains currently used in feedlots in South Africa. The present study revealed the presence of BVDV genotype 2 in cattle in South Africa based on the high sequence similarity between genotype 2 field strains and strain 890 from North America. The presence of genotype 2 viruses that phylogenetically belong to different clusters and coexist in feedlots is

  4. Real-time PCR assay for detection and quantification of hepatitis B virus genotypes A to G.

    PubMed

    Welzel, Tania M; Miley, Wendell J; Parks, Thomas L; Goedert, James J; Whitby, Denise; Ortiz-Conde, Betty A

    2006-09-01

    The detection and quantification of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA play an important role in diagnosing and monitoring HBV infection as well as assessing therapeutic response. The great variability among HBV genotypes and the enormous range of clinical HBV DNA levels present challenges for PCR-based amplification techniques. In this study, we describe the development, evaluation, and validation of a novel real-time PCR assay designed to provide accurate quantification of DNA from all eight HBV genotypes in patient plasma specimens. A computer algorithm was used to design degenerate real-time PCR primers and probes based upon a large number (n = 340) of full-length genomic sequences including HBV genotypes A to H from Europe, Africa, Asia, and North and South America. Genotype performance was tested and confirmed using 59 genotype A to G specimens from two commercially available worldwide genotype panels. This assay has a dynamic range of at least 8 log(10) without the need for specimen dilution, good clinical intra- and interassay precision, and excellent correlation with the Bayer Diagnostics VERSANT HBV DNA 3.0 (branched DNA) assay (r = 0.93). Probit analysis determined the 95% detection level was 56 IU/ml, corresponding to 11 copies per PCR well. The high sensitivity, wide linear range, good reproducibility, and genotype inclusivity, combined with a small sample volume requirement and low cost, make this novel quantitative HBV real-time PCR assay particularly well suited for application to large clinical and epidemiological studies.

  5. Genotypes and viral load of hepatitis C virus among persons attending a voluntary counseling and testing center in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Abreha, Tesfay; Woldeamanuel, Yimtubezinash; Pietsch, Corinna; Maier, Melanie; Asrat, Daniel; Abebe, Almaz; Hailegiorgis, Bereket; Aseffa, Abraham; Liebert, Uwe Gerd

    2011-05-01

    The prevalence of different genotypes of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in Ethiopia is not known. HCV genotypes influence the response to therapy with alpha-interferon alone or in combination with ribavirin. A cross sectional study was conducted on attendees of voluntary counseling and testing center. Serum samples from 1,954 (734 HIV positive and 1,220 HIV negative) individuals were screened for HCV antibody. Active HCV infection was confirmed by quantitative PCR in 18 of the 71 samples with anti-HCV antibodies. The HCV viral load ranged from 39,650 to 9,878,341 IU/ml (median 1,589,631 IU/ml) with no significant difference [χ(2)(17) = 18.00, P = 0.389] between persons positive or negative for HIV. The viral load of HCV was, however, higher in older study subjects (r = 0.80, P = 0.000). HCV genotypes were determined using the VERSANT HCV Genotype Assay (LiPA) and sequence analysis of the NS5b region of the HCV genome. Diverse HCV genotypes were found including genotypes 1, 2, 4, and 5. There was no difference in the distribution regarding the HIV status. As in other parts of the world, genotyping of HCV must be considered whenever HCV is incriminated as a cause of hepatitis. PMID:21351106

  6. Development of a Novel Allele-Specific PCR Method for Rapid Assessment of Nervous Necrosis Virus Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Toubanaki, Dimitra K; Margaroni, Maritsa; Karagouni, Evdokia

    2015-11-01

    Viral nervous necrosis infections are causing severe problems on aquaculture industry due to ecological and economic impacts. Their causal agent is nervous necrosis virus or nodavirus, which has been classified into four genotypes. Different genotypes correlate with differences in viral pathogenicity. Therefore, rational development of effective vaccines and diagnostic reagents requires analysis of the genetic variation. The development and validation of a polymerase chain reaction amplification (PCR)-based methodology for nodavirus genotype assessment in a simple and robust format is described. Degenerate external primers and two genotype-specific internal primers were utilized for simultaneous amplification of nodavirus products in a single PCR. A first set of cycles produced a long PCR product, defined by the outer primers, and the internal primers amplified short DNA fragments specific for each genotype in lower annealing temperature. Detection was based on the size of the short products. Nodavirus infected and healthy samples were analyzed and none of the non-infected samples showed any bands, while all infected samples were positive. The proposed method can be performed within 4 h and consumes standard PCR and electrophoresis reagents, with costs lower than 2€ per sample. Tetra-primer PCR is a suitable alternative for virus sequencing in medium scale research laboratories and farming facilities. PMID:26210900

  7. Development of a Novel Allele-Specific PCR Method for Rapid Assessment of Nervous Necrosis Virus Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Toubanaki, Dimitra K; Margaroni, Maritsa; Karagouni, Evdokia

    2015-11-01

    Viral nervous necrosis infections are causing severe problems on aquaculture industry due to ecological and economic impacts. Their causal agent is nervous necrosis virus or nodavirus, which has been classified into four genotypes. Different genotypes correlate with differences in viral pathogenicity. Therefore, rational development of effective vaccines and diagnostic reagents requires analysis of the genetic variation. The development and validation of a polymerase chain reaction amplification (PCR)-based methodology for nodavirus genotype assessment in a simple and robust format is described. Degenerate external primers and two genotype-specific internal primers were utilized for simultaneous amplification of nodavirus products in a single PCR. A first set of cycles produced a long PCR product, defined by the outer primers, and the internal primers amplified short DNA fragments specific for each genotype in lower annealing temperature. Detection was based on the size of the short products. Nodavirus infected and healthy samples were analyzed and none of the non-infected samples showed any bands, while all infected samples were positive. The proposed method can be performed within 4 h and consumes standard PCR and electrophoresis reagents, with costs lower than 2€ per sample. Tetra-primer PCR is a suitable alternative for virus sequencing in medium scale research laboratories and farming facilities.

  8. Molecular characterization of hepatitis B virus and a 9-year clinical profile in a patient infected with genotype I.

    PubMed

    Osiowy, Carla; Kaita, Kelly; Solar, Kaarina; Mendoza, Kenneth

    2010-05-01

    An unusual hepatitis B virus (HBV) variant, assigned provisionally to genotype I, was recently reported, characterized by an anomalous genotyping pattern and putative recombination; however, the natural history of this unusual strain is unknown. This study analyzed longitudinal sera collected over a 9-year period from a patient infected with this variant to investigate the clinical profile and intrahost viral evolution over time. The patient, who had immigrated to Canada in 1998 from Vietnam, was treated with lamivudine in 2000. Approximately 4-5 years following the withdrawal of lamivudine therapy, a genomic "shift" occurred coincident with ALT flares and increasing HBV viral load, resulting in numerous stable nucleotide substitutions within the core coding region, suggesting altered immune control that may provide a selective advantage to the virus. Analysis of quasispecies diversity over time demonstrated further this shift, with two sequence clusters associated with time points either prior to or following relapse observed, including increased diversity among quasispecies prior to relapse. In keeping with the complex nature of genotype I strains, majority population genomes had a mean genetic distance from genotype C of 7.6 +/- 0.1%, although large genomic segments lacked significant homology with any HBV genotype. Further study is needed to understand the evolutionary origin and natural history of infection with this unique HBV variant.

  9. Molecular surveillance of dengue in Semarang, Indonesia revealed the circulation of an old genotype of dengue virus serotype-1.

    PubMed

    Fahri, Sukmal; Yohan, Benediktus; Trimarsanto, Hidayat; Sayono, S; Hadisaputro, Suharyo; Dharmana, Edi; Syafruddin, Din; Sasmono, R Tedjo

    2013-01-01

    Dengue disease is currently a major health problem in Indonesia and affects all provinces in the country, including Semarang Municipality, Central Java province. While dengue is endemic in this region, only limited data on the disease epidemiology is available. To understand the dynamics of dengue in Semarang, we conducted clinical, virological, and demographical surveillance of dengue in Semarang and its surrounding regions in 2012. Dengue cases were detected in both urban and rural areas located in various geographical features, including the coastal and highland areas. During an eight months' study, a total of 120 febrile patients were recruited, of which 66 were serologically confirmed for dengue infection using IgG/IgM ELISA and/or NS1 tests. The cases occurred both in dry and wet seasons. Majority of patients were under 10 years old. Most patients were diagnosed as dengue hemorrhagic fever, followed by dengue shock syndrome and dengue fever. Serotyping was performed in 31 patients, and we observed the co-circulation of all four dengue virus (DENV) serotypes. When the serotypes were correlated with the severity of the disease, no direct correlation was observed. Phylogenetic analysis of DENV based on Envelope gene sequence revealed the circulation of DENV-2 Cosmopolitan genotype and DENV-3 Genotype I. A striking finding was observed for DENV-1, in which we found the co-circulation of Genotype I with an old Genotype II. The Genotype II was represented by a virus strain that has a very slow mutation rate and is very closely related to the DENV strain from Thailand, isolated in 1964 and never reported in other countries in the last three decades. Moreover, this virus was discovered in a cool highland area with an elevation of 1,001 meters above the sea level. The discovery of this old DENV strain may suggest the silent circulation of old virus strains in Indonesia.

  10. Genotyping and phylogenetic analysis of bovine viral diarrhea virus isolates from BVDV infected alpacas in North America.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung G; Anderson, Renee R; Yu, Jin Z; Zylich, Nancy C; Kinde, Hailu; Carman, Suzanne; Bedenice, Daniela; Dubovi, Edward J

    2009-05-12

    Over a three-year period, 2004-2007, greater than 12,000 alpacas in the United States were screened by real-time RT-PCR to identify alpacas persistently infected (PI) with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV). A total of 46 BVD viruses were isolated from PI alpacas or diagnostic samples from alpacas. Forty-three US alpaca BVDV isolates and 3 Canadian isolates were analyzed by comparison of nucleotide sequences of two viral genomic regions, the 5'-UTR and the N(pro) gene to determine their genetic relatedness. All 46 alpaca BVDV isolates from 8 different states of the US and Canada were genotype 1b with > or =99% nt identity in the 290-base 5'-UTR region with the exception of one Canadian isolate. In contrast, 21 bovine BVDV isolates collected during the same period were grouped into the typical 3 genotypes, 1a, 1b, and 2, respectively. Forty five alpaca BVDV isolates formed a distinctive cluster separated from closely related bovine genotype 1b isolates by phylogenetic analysis of the 5'-UTR region. Comparison of the 504-base N(pro) gene sequences of 32 alpaca isolates also assigned them all to type 1b in a similar fashion as observed with the 5'-UTR region. The results suggest that unique genotypes of bovine BVDV 1b may be maintained in the alpaca population even though camelids are susceptible to infection by other genotypes. Further studies are needed to address why alpacas were predominantly infected with genotype 1b BVDV isolates and how bovine BVD viruses evolved to infect alpacas.

  11. Correlation between Genetic Variations and Serum Level of Interleukin 28B with Virus Genotypes and Disease Progression in Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Al-Qahtani, Ahmed; Al-Anazi, Mashael; Abdo, Ayman A.; Sanai, Faisal M.; Al-Hamoudi, Waleed; Alswat, Khalid A.; Al-Ashgar, Hamad I.; Khan, Mohammed Q.; Khalaf, Nisreen; Al-Ahdal, Mohammed N.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that polymorphisms near the interleukin-28B (IL-28B) gene could predict the response to Peg-IFN-a/RBV combination therapy in HCV-infected patients. The aim of the study was to correlate the serum level of IL28B in HCV-infected patients with virus genotype/subgenotype and disease progression. IL28B serum level was detected and variations at five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in IL28B gene region were genotyped and analyzed. The variation of IL28B genetic polymorphisms was found to be strongly associated with HCV infection when healthy control group was compared to HCV-infected patients with all P values <0.0001. Functional analysis revealed that subjects carrying rs8099917-GG genotype had higher serum level of IL28B than those with GT or TT genotypes (P = 0.04). Also, patients who were presented with cirrhosis (Cirr) only or with cirrhosis plus hepatocellular carcinoma (Cirr+HCC) had higher levels of serum IL28B when compared to chronic HCV-infected patients (P = 0.005 and 0.003, resp.). No significant association was found when serum levels of IL28B were compared to virus genotypes/subgenotypes. This study indicates that variation at SNP rs8099917 could predict the serum levels of IL28B in HCV-infected patients. Furthermore, IL28B serum level may serve as a useful marker for the development of HCV-associated sequelae. PMID:25811035

  12. Molecular variants of human papilloma virus 16 E2, E4, E5, E6 and E7 genes associated with cervical neoplasia in Romanian patients.

    PubMed

    Plesa, Adriana; Anton, Gabriela; Iancu, Iulia V; Diaconu, Carmen C; Huica, Irina; Stanescu, Anca D; Socolov, Demetra; Nistor, Elena; Popa, Elena; Stoian, Mihai; Botezatu, Anca

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and associate the sequence variations of human Papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) genes from women who live in two different areas of Romania and associate them with malignant progression. One hundred twenty-four HPV16-positive cervical isolates were collected, and the E2, E4, E5, E6 and E7 viral genes were sequenced. Two new missense mutations in the E6 gene (C279G and A305C) were found (together or alone, in association with other mutations) in 44 of 124 cases. The most frequently simultaneously mutated genes were E4/E2 hinge, E5 and E6 (p = 0.0004) in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) samples. Also, for SCC patients, the best-correlated mutation patterns were obtained for E4/E2 hinge-E5 (r = 0.7984; p < 0.0001). No sample was found to have all of the investigated viral genes concurrently mutated. Phylogenetic analysis was performed to characterize the viral variants. Similar results were found for SCC and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia III (CINIII) cases. After all of the target gene sequences were assembled, all patients were found to be infected with viruses of the HPV16- European-German (EG) lineage, and two clusters were identified, the first (55/96 variants) from Moldavia and the second (41/96 variants) from Bucharest. The distinct cluster derived from EG in Moldavia could partially explain the increased frequency of SCC in this area. This study has generated a comprehensive set of sequence variation data on HPV16 circulating in Romania to join the existing data and highlight the important role of HPV16 variants during cervical carcinogenesis. PMID:25143263

  13. Human papilloma virus early proteins E6 (HPV16/18-E6) and the cell cycle marker P16 (INK4a) are useful prognostic markers in uterine cervical carcinomas in Qassim Region--Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Omran, O M; AlSheeha, M

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a common and an important public health problem for adult women in developing countries. In contrast, cervical cancer incidence is low in Saudi Arabia. High-risk types of human papilloma viruses (HPV16 and HPV18) are the most significant risk factors for cervical cancer. HPV16/18-E6 oncoprotein is associated with HPV etiology, viral persistence and epithelial transformation. Cell cycle protein p16 INK4a (p16) plays an important role in the pathophysiology of cervical carcinomas. The aims of this study were to investigate the expression of HPV16/18-E6 and p16 in uterine cervical carcinomas in Qassim Region--Saudi Arabia, and to relate the results to the established clinicopathological prognostic parameters (age of the patient, educational level, birth control methods, number of pregnancy, smoking status, degree of histological differentiation, clinical stage, and lymph node metastasis) The study included 40 specimens of uterine cervical squamous cell carcinomas diagnosed and confirmed by biopsy. Histopathological classification of cervical tumors cases was performed according to the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO). Immunohistochemical analysis for HPV16/18-E6 and p16 were carried out on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections of cervical tissues using avidin-biotin peroxidase method. There was a significant statistical correlation between HPV16/18-E6 expression in cervical carcinoma and nationality, smoking status and size of the tumor. HPV16/18-E6 oncoprotein expression in normal lymphocytes and endothelial cells in the tumor tissues and the adjacent normal cervical tissues suggest the possibility that HPV infection might spread to other organs through blood circulation. P16 expression has been correlated with high grade, stage of cervical SCC and HPV16/18-E6 expression. The current study supports the critical function of p16 and HPV16/18-E6 as specific markers for cervical carcinoma. However the potential for usage

  14. Digital genotyping of avian influenza viruses of H7 subtype detected in central Europe in 2007-2011.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Alexander; Cerníková, Lenka; Křivda, Vlastimil; Horníčková, Jitka

    2012-05-01

    The objective of our study was to provide a genotype analysis of H7N7 and H7N9 influenza A viruses (IAV) and infer their relationships to co-circulating non-H7 IAV genomes. The H7N7 strains were collected in central Europe (Hungary-1, Czech Republic-1, Slovenia-1 and Poland-4) and the H7N9 in the Czech Republic and Spain between 2007 and 2011. Hand in hand with this effort, a novel IAV genotype visualization approach called digital genotyping was developed. This approach relies on phylogenetic data summarization and transformation into a pixel array called a segment identity matrix. The digital genotyping revealed a complicated genetic interplay between the H7 and co-circulating non-H7 IAV genotypes. At the H7 IAV level the most obvious relationships were observed between one Polish H7N7/446/09 and Czech H7N7/11 viruses which, despite the special and temporal distance of 800 km and 15 months, retained at least 6/8 genome segments. Close relationships were also observed between the Czech H7N9, Polish and Slovenian H7N7 on one hand and Hungarian and Slovenian H7N7 isolates on the other. In addition the former genomes exhibited close interplays with the Czech H6N2/09 and H11N9/10-like viruses. The Czech and Spanish H7N9 genomes were completely different and 6/8 of the Czech H7N9-like segments were traced to either the Czech H3N8/07, H11N9/09 and Polish H7N7/09-like viruses. The results of digital genotyping correlated with the previous observations obtained on the Polish H7N7 isolates. As was demonstrated, the digital genotyping provides a well-arranged and easily interpretable output and may serve as an alternative genotyping tool useful for handling and analysing even a large panel of IAV genomes.

  15. Antigenic Variation of East/Central/South African and Asian Chikungunya Virus Genotypes in Neutralization by Immune Sera

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Chong-Long; Sam, I-Ching; Merits, Andres; Chan, Yoke-Fun

    2016-01-01

    Background Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a re-emerging mosquito-borne virus which causes epidemics of fever, severe joint pain and rash. Between 2005 and 2010, the East/Central/South African (ECSA) genotype was responsible for global explosive outbreaks across India, the Indian Ocean and Southeast Asia. From late 2013, Asian genotype CHIKV has caused outbreaks in the Americas. The characteristics of cross-antibody efficacy and epitopes are poorly understood. Methodology/Principal Findings We characterized human immune sera collected during two independent outbreaks in Malaysia of the Asian genotype in 2006 and the ECSA genotype in 2008–2010. Neutralizing capacity was analyzed against representative clinical isolates as well as viruses rescued from infectious clones of ECSA and Asian CHIKV. Using whole virus antigen and recombinant E1 and E2 envelope glycoproteins, we further investigated antibody binding sites, epitopes, and antibody titers. Both ECSA and Asian sera demonstrated stronger neutralizing capacity against the ECSA genotype, which corresponded to strong epitope-antibody interaction. ECSA serum targeted conformational epitope sites in the E1-E2 glycoprotein, and E1-E211K, E2-I2T, E2-H5N, E2-G118S and E2-S194G are key amino acids that enhance cross-neutralizing efficacy. As for Asian serum, the antibodies targeting E2 glycoprotein correlated with neutralizing efficacy, and I2T, H5N, G118S and S194G altered and improved the neutralization profile. Rabbit polyclonal antibody against the N-terminal linear neutralizing epitope from the ECSA sequence has reduced binding capacity and neutralization efficacy against Asian CHIKV. These findings imply that the choice of vaccine strain may impact cross-protection against different genotypes. Conclusion/Significance Immune serum from humans infected with CHIKV of either ECSA or Asian genotypes showed differences in binding and neutralization characteristics. These findings have implications for the continued

  16. Development of Hepatitis C Virus Genotyping by Real-Time PCR Based on the NS5B Region

    PubMed Central

    Nakatani, Sueli M.; Santos, Carlos A.; Riediger, Irina N.; Krieger, Marco A.; Duarte, Cesar A. B.; Lacerda, Marco A.; Biondo, Alexander W.; Carilho, Flair J.; Ono-Nita, Suzane K.

    2010-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotyping is the most significant predictor of the response to antiviral therapy. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a novel real-time PCR method for HCV genotyping based on the NS5B region. Methodology/Principal Findings Two triplex reaction sets were designed, one to detect genotypes 1a, 1b and 3a; and another to detect genotypes 2a, 2b, and 2c. This approach had an overall sensitivity of 97.0%, detecting 295 of the 304 tested samples. All samples genotyped by real-time PCR had the same type that was assigned using LiPA version 1 (Line in Probe Assay). Although LiPA v. 1 was not able to subtype 68 of the 295 samples (23.0%) and rendered different subtype results from those assigned by real-time PCR for 12/295 samples (4.0%), NS5B sequencing and real-time PCR results agreed in all 146 tested cases. Analytical sensitivity of the real-time PCR assay was determined by end-point dilution of the 5000 IU/ml member of the OptiQuant HCV RNA panel. The lower limit of detection was estimated to be 125 IU/ml for genotype 3a, 250 IU/ml for genotypes 1b and 2b, and 500 IU/ml for genotype 1a. Conclusions/Significance The total time required for performing this assay was two hours, compared to four hours required for LiPA v. 1 after PCR-amplification. Furthermore, the estimated reaction cost was nine times lower than that of available commercial methods in Brazil. Thus, we have developed an efficient, feasible, and affordable method for HCV genotype identification. PMID:20405017

  17. Second generation peanut genotypes resistant to thrips-transmitted tomato spotted wilt virus exhibit tolerance rather than true resistance and differentially affect thrips fitness.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Anita; Srinivasan, Rajagopalbabu; Sundaraj, Sivamani; Culbreath, Albert K; Riley, David G

    2013-04-01

    Spotted wilt disease caused by Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) (family Bunyaviridae; genus Tospovirus) is a major constraint to peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) production in the southeastern United States. Reducing yield losses to TSWV has heavily relied on planting genotypes that reduce the incidence of spotted wilt disease. However, mechanisms conferring resistance to TSWV have not been identified in these genotypes. Furthermore, no information is available on how these genotypes influence thrips fitness. In this study, we investigated the effects of newly released peanut genotypes (Georganic, GA-06G, Tifguard, and NC94022) with field resistance to TSWV and a susceptible genotype (Georgia Green) on tobacco thrips, Frankliniella fusca (Hinds), fitness, and TSWV incidence. Thrips-mediated transmission resulted in TSWV infection in both TSWV-resistant and susceptible genotypes and they exhibited typical TSWV symptoms. However, some resistant genotypes had reduced viral loads (fewer TSWV N-gene copies) than the susceptible genotype. F. fusca larvae acquired TSWV from resistant and susceptible genotypes indicating that resistant genotypes also can serve as inoculum sources. Unlike resistant genotypes in other crops that produce local lesions (hypersensitive reaction) upon TSWV infection, widespread symptom development was noticed in peanut genotypes. Results indicated that the observed field resistance in peanut genotypes could be because of tolerance. Further, fitness studies revealed some, but not substantial, differences in thrips adult emergence rates and developmental time between resistant and susceptible genotypes. Thrips head capsule length and width were not different when reared on different genotypes.

  18. Towards measles elimination: Phylogenetic analysis of measles viruses in Turkey (2012-2013) and identification of genotype D8.

    PubMed

    Kalaycioglu, Atila T; Yolbakan, Sultan; Guldemir, Dilek; Korukluoglu, Gulay; Coskun, Aslihan; Cosgun, Yasemin; Durmaz, Riza

    2016-11-01

    Molecular characterization of different measles virus (MV) strains is essential to combat the disease. Sixty measles MV strains were obtained from throat swabs or urine of patients in Turkey between 2012 and 2013 and characterized. MV RNA sequences (n = 60) were analysed for 456 nucleotides representing hypervariable domain of the nucleoprotein (N) gene. Of the 60 strains analysed 53 were the D8 genotype, 6 were B3, 1 was D4, and 1 was A. This report describes MV genotype D8 that was involved in a measles outbreak in Turkey. Sequences of most genotype D8 strains (n = 51) were identical to the sequence of variant D8-Frankfurt-Main, which has been associated with outbreaks throughout Europe. Despite the lack of epidemiologic information, a phylogenetic analysis suggested that the genotype D8 MV may have been brought to Turkey from elsewhere. Phylogenetic and epidemiological findings suggested that strains identified in tourists and associated with importation included one strain of genotype D8, one strain of genotype B3, and one strain of genotype D4. These findings from the 2012 to 2013 outbreak in Turkey confirm that pockets of unimmunised individuals are making the country susceptible to measles outbreaks. To prevent further outbreaks, deliberate and sustained effort must be made to reach, and immunise susceptible age groups. Towards measles elimination process, continued molecular surveillance of measles strains in Turkey will help identify transmission patterns of virus and evaluate vaccination efforts. J. Med. Virol. 88:1867-1873, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27089242

  19. Restricted Enzooticity of Hepatitis E Virus Genotypes 1 to 4 in the United States ▿

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chen; Meng, Jihong; Dai, Xing; Liang, Jiu-Hong; Feagins, Alicia R.; Meng, Xiang-Jin; Belfiore, Natalia M.; Bradford, Carol; Corn, Joseph L.; Cray, Carolyn; Glass, Gregory E.; Gordon, Melvin L.; Hesse, Richard A.; Montgomery, Donald L.; Nicholson, William L.; Pilny, Anthony A.; Ramamoorthy, Sheela; Shaver, Douglas D.; Drobeniuc, Jan; Purdy, Michael A.; Fields, Howard A.; Kamili, Saleem; Teo, Chong-Gee

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis E is recognized as a zoonosis, and swine are known reservoirs, but how broadly enzootic its causative agent, hepatitis E virus (HEV), is remains controversial. To determine the prevalence of HEV infection in animals, a serological assay with capability to detect anti-HEV-antibody across a wide variety of animal species was devised. Recombinant antigens comprising truncated capsid proteins generated from HEV-subgenomic constructs that represent all four viral genotypes were used to capture anti-HEV in the test sample and as an analyte reporter. To facilitate development and validation of the assay, serum samples were assembled from blood donors (n = 372), acute hepatitis E patients (n = 94), five laboratory animals (rhesus monkey, pig, New Zealand rabbit, Wistar rat, and BALB/c mouse) immunized with HEV antigens, and four pigs experimentally infected with HEV. The assay was then applied to 4,936 sera collected from 35 genera of animals that were wild, feral, domesticated, or otherwise held captive in the United States. Test positivity was determined in 457 samples (9.3%). These originated from: bison (3/65, 4.6%), cattle (174/1,156, 15%), dogs (2/212, 0.9%), Norway rats (2/318, 0.6%), farmed swine (267/648, 41.2%), and feral swine (9/306, 2.9%). Only the porcine samples yielded the highest reactivities. HEV RNA was amplified from one farmed pig and two feral pigs and characterized by nucleotide sequencing to belong to genotype 3. HEV infected farmed swine primarily, and the role of other animals as reservoirs of its zoonotic spread appears to be limited. PMID:21998412

  20. Analysis of hepatitis B virus genotyping and drug resistance gene mutations based on massively parallel sequencing.

    PubMed

    Han, Yingxin; Zhang, Yinxin; Mei, Yanhua; Wang, Yuqi; Liu, Tao; Guan, Yanfang; Tan, Deming; Liang, Yu; Yang, Ling; Yi, Xin

    2013-11-01

    Drug resistance to nucleoside analogs is a serious problem worldwide. Both drug resistance gene mutation detection and HBV genotyping are helpful for guiding clinical treatment. Total HBV DNA from 395 patients who were treated with single or multiple drugs including Lamivudine, Adefovir, Entecavir, Telbivudine, Tenofovir and Emtricitabine were sequenced using the HiSeq 2000 sequencing system and validated using the 3730 sequencing system. In addition, a mixed sample of HBV plasmid DNA was used to determine the cutoff value for HiSeq-sequencing, and 52 of the 395 samples were sequenced three times to evaluate the repeatability and stability of this technology. Of the 395 samples sequenced using both HiSeq and 3730 sequencing, the results from 346 were consistent, and the results from 49 were inconsistent. Among the 49 inconsistent results, 13 samples were detected as drug-resistance-positive using HiSeq but negative using 3730, and the other 36 samples showed a higher number of drug-resistance-positive gene mutations using HiSeq 2000 than using 3730. Gene mutations had an apparent frequency of 1% as assessed by the plasmid testing. Therefore, a 1% cutoff value was adopted. Furthermore, the experiment was repeated three times, and the same results were obtained in 49/52 samples using the HiSeq sequencing system. HiSeq sequencing can be used to analyze HBV gene mutations with high sensitivity, high fidelity, high throughput and automation and is a potential method for hepatitis B virus gene mutation detection and genotyping.

  1. Feline papillomas and papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, J P; Van Ranst, M; Montali, R; Homer, B L; Miller, W H; Rowland, P H; Scott, D W; England, J J; Dunstan, R W; Mikaelian, I; Jenson, A B

    2000-01-01

    Papillomaviruses (PVs) are highly species- and site-specific pathogens of stratified squamous epithelium. Although PV infections in the various Felidae are rarely reported, we identified productive infections in six cat species. PV-induced proliferative skin or mucous membrane lesions were confirmed by immunohistochemical screening for papillomavirus-specific capsid antigens. Seven monoclonal antibodies, each of which reacts with an immunodominant antigenic determinant of the bovine papillomavirus L1 gene product, revealed that feline PV capsid epitopes were conserved to various degrees. This battery of monoclonal antibodies established differential expression patterns among cutaneous and oral PVs of snow leopards and domestic cats, suggesting that they represent distinct viruses. Clinically, the lesions in all species and anatomic sites were locally extensive and frequently multiple. Histologically, the areas of epidermal hyperplasia were flat with a similarity to benign tumors induced by cutaneotropic, carcinogenic PVs in immunosuppressed human patients. Limited restriction endonuclease analyses of viral genomic DNA confirmed the variability among three viral genomes recovered from available frozen tissue. Because most previous PV isolates have been species specific, these studies suggest that at least eight different cat papillomaviruses infect the oral cavity (tentative designations: Asian lion, Panthera leo, P1PV; snow leopard, Panthera uncia, PuPV-1; bobcat, Felis rufus, FrPV; Florida panther, Felis concolor, FcPV; clouded leopard, Neofelis nebulosa, NnPV; and domestic cat, Felis domesticus, FdPV-2) or skin (domestic cat, F. domesticus, FdPV-1; and snow leopard, P. uncia, PuPV-2).

  2. Epidemic history of major genotypes of hepatitis C virus in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Castells, M; Bello, G; Ifrán, S; Pereyra, S; Boschi, S; Uriarte, R; Cristina, J; Colina, R

    2015-06-01

    Worldwide, more than 170 million people are chronically infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) and every year die more than 350,000 people from HCV-related liver diseases. Recently, HCV was reclassified into seven major genotypes and 67 subtypes. Some subtypes as 1a, 1b and 3a, have become epidemic as a result of the new parenteral transmission routes and are responsible for most HCV infections in Western countries. HCV 1a subtype have been sub-categorized into two separate sub clades. Recent studies based on the analysis of NS5B genome region, reveal that HCV epidemics in Argentina and Brazil are characterized by multiple introductions events of subtypes 1a, 1b and 3a, followed by subsequent local dispersion. There is no data about HCV genotypes circulating in Uruguay and their evolutionary and demographic history. To this end, a total of 153 HCV NS5B gene sequences were obtained from Uruguayan patients between 2005 and 2011. 86 (56%) sequences grouped with subtype 1a, 40 (26%) with subtype 3a and 27 (18%) with subtype 1b. Furthermore, subtype 1a sequences were distributed among both clades, 1 (n=62, 72%) and 2 (n=24, 28%). Four local HCV clades were found: UY-1a(I), UY-1a(II), UY-1a(III) and UY-3a; comprising a 39% of all HCV viruses analyzed in this study. HCV epidemic in Uruguay has been driving by multiple introductions of subtypes 1a, 1b and 3a and by local dissemination of a few country-specific strains. The evolutionary and demographic history of the major Uruguayan HCV clade UY-1a(I) was reconstructed under two different molecular clock rate models and displayed an epidemic history characterized by an initial phase of rapid expansion followed by a more recent reduction of growth rate since 2000-2005. This is the first comprehensive study about the molecular epidemiology and epidemic history of HCV in Uruguay.

  3. Polarisation of Major Histocompatibility Complex II Host Genotype with Pathogenesis of European Brown Hare Syndrome Virus

    PubMed Central

    Iacovakis, Christos; Mamuris, Zissis; Moutou, Katerina A.; Touloudi, Antonia; Hammer, Anne Sofie; Valiakos, George; Giannoulis, Themis; Stamatis, Costas; Spyrou, Vassiliki; Athanasiou, Labrini V.; Kantere, Maria; Asferg, Tommy; Giannakopoulos, Alexios; Salomonsen, Charlotte M.; Bogdanos, Dimitrios; Birtsas, Periklis; Petrovska, Liljana; Hannant, Duncan; Billinis, Charalambos

    2013-01-01

    A study was conducted in order to determine the occurrence of European Brown Hare Syndrome virus (EBHSV) in Denmark and possible relation between disease pathogenesis and Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) host genotype. Liver samples were examined from 170 brown hares (hunted, found sick or dead), collected between 2004 and 2009. Macroscopical and histopathological findings consistent with EBHS were detected in 24 (14.1%) hares; 35 (20.6%) had liver lesions not typical of the syndrome, 50 (29.4%) had lesions in other tissues and 61 (35.9%) had no lesions. Sixty five (38.2%) of 170 samples were found to be EBHSV-positive (RT-PCR, VP60 gene). In order to investigate associations between viral pathogenesis and host genotype, variation within the exon 2 DQA gene of MHC was assessed. DQA exon 2 analysis revealed the occurrence of seven different alleles in Denmark. Consistent with other populations examined so far in Europe, observed heterozygosity of DQA (Ho = 0.1180) was lower than expected (He = 0.5835). The overall variation for both nucleotide and amino acid differences (2.9% and 14.9%, respectively) were lower in Denmark than those assessed in other European countries (8.3% and 16.9%, respectively). Within the peptide binding region codons the number of nonsynonymous substitutions (dN) was much higher than synonymous substitutions (dS), which would be expected for MHC alleles under balancing selection. Allele frequencies did not significantly differ between EBHSV-positive and -negative hares. However, allele Leeu-DQA*30 was detected in significantly higher (P = 0.000006) frequency among the positive hares found dead with severe histopathological lesions than among those found sick or apparently healthy. In contrast, the latter group was characterized by a higher frequency of the allele Leeu-DQA*14 as well as the proportion of heterozygous individuals (P = 0.000006 and P = 0.027). These data reveal a polarisation between EBHSV pathogenesis

  4. Epstein-Barr Virus and Human Papillomavirus Infections and Genotype Distribution in Head and Neck Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zeyi; Uehara, Takayuki; Maeda, Hiroyuki; Hasegawa, Masahiro; Matayoshi, Sen; Kiyuna, Asanori; Agena, Shinya; Pan, Xiaoli; Zhang, Chunlin; Yamashita, Yukashi; Xie, Minqiang; Suzuki, Mikio

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence, genotypes, and prognostic values of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human papillomavirus (HPV) infections in Japanese patients with different types of head and neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials HPV and EBV DNA, EBV genotypes and LMP-1 variants, and HPV mRNA expression were detected by PCR from fresh-frozen HNC samples. HPV genotypes were determined by direct sequencing, and EBV encoded RNA (EBER) was examined by in situ hybridization. Results Of the 209 HNC patients, 63 (30.1%) had HPV infection, and HPV-16 was the most common subtype (86.9%). HPV E6/E7 mRNA expression was found in 23 of 60 (38.3%) HPV DNA-positive cases detected. The site of highest prevalence of HPV was the oropharynx (45.9%). Among 146 (69.9%) HNCs in which EBV DNA was identified, 107 (73.3%) and 27 (18.5%) contained types A and B, respectively, and 124 (84.9%) showed the existence of del-LMP-1. However, only 13 (6.2%) HNCs were positive for EBER, 12 (92.3%) of which derived from the nasopharynx. Co-infection of HPV and EBER was found in only 1.0% of HNCs and 10.0% of NPCs. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed significantly better disease-specific and overall survival in the HPV DNA+/mRNA+ oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPC) patients than in the other OPC patients (P = 0.027 and 0.017, respectively). Multivariate analysis showed that stage T1–3 (P = 0.002) and HPV mRNA-positive status (P = 0.061) independently predicted better disease-specific survival. No significant difference in disease-specific survival was found between the EBER-positive and -negative NPC patients (P = 0.155). Conclusions Our findings indicate that co-infection with HPV and EBV is rare in HNC. Oropharyngeal SCC with active HPV infection was related to a highly favorable outcome, while EBV status was not prognostic in the NPC cohort. PMID:25405488

  5. Different pre-S deletion patterns and their association with hepatitis B virus genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bing-Fang

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the associations of different types of pre-S deletions with hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes. METHODS The sequences of the pre-S region, basal core promoter (BCP) mutation, and precore (PC) mutation were examined through direct DNA sequencing or clonal analysis and sequencing in 273 HBV carriers, namely 55 asymptomatic carriers, 55 carriers with chronic hepatitis (CH), 55 with liver cirrhosis (LC), 53 with liver cirrhotic hepatocellular carcinoma (LC-HCC), and 55 with noncirrhotic HCC. A total of 126 HBV carriers (46.2%) harbored pre-S deletions. The DNA sequences of pre-S deletion mutants from 43 age-matched genotype B (HBV/B)-infected carriers and 43 age-matched genotype C (HBV/C)-infected carriers were further examined, aligned, and compared. RESULTS No significant difference was observed in the mean age distribution (P = 0.464), male sex (P = 0.805), viral load (P = 0.635), or BCP mutation (P = 0.117) between the HBV/B and HBV/C groups. However, the rate of PC mutation was significantly higher in the HBV/B-infected carriers than in the HBV/C-infected carriers (P = 0.003). Both genotypes exhibited a high rate of deletion in the C-terminal half of the pre-S1 region and N-terminus of the pre-S2 region (86.0% and 79.1% in the HBV/B group; 69.8% and 72.1% in the HBV/C group, respectively). Epitope mapping showed that deletion in several epitope sites was frequent in both genotypes, particularly pS1-BT and pS2-B2. Conversely, the rate of pS2-B1 deletion was significantly higher in the HBV/B group (72.1% vs 37.2%, P = 0.002), and the rate of pS2-T deletion was significantly higher in the HBV/C group (48.8% vs 25.6%, P = 0.044). Functional mapping showed that the rate of deletion in three functional sites (the nucleocapsid binding site, start codon of M, and site for viral secretion) located in the N-terminus of the pre-S2 region was significantly higher in the HBV/B group (P < 0.05). One type of N-terminus pre-S1 deletion mutant with deletion of

  6. Different pre-S deletion patterns and their association with hepatitis B virus genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bing-Fang

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the associations of different types of pre-S deletions with hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes. METHODS The sequences of the pre-S region, basal core promoter (BCP) mutation, and precore (PC) mutation were examined through direct DNA sequencing or clonal analysis and sequencing in 273 HBV carriers, namely 55 asymptomatic carriers, 55 carriers with chronic hepatitis (CH), 55 with liver cirrhosis (LC), 53 with liver cirrhotic hepatocellular carcinoma (LC-HCC), and 55 with noncirrhotic HCC. A total of 126 HBV carriers (46.2%) harbored pre-S deletions. The DNA sequences of pre-S deletion mutants from 43 age-matched genotype B (HBV/B)-infected carriers and 43 age-matched genotype C (HBV/C)-infected carriers were further examined, aligned, and compared. RESULTS No significant difference was observed in the mean age distribution (P = 0.464), male sex (P = 0.805), viral load (P = 0.635), or BCP mutation (P = 0.117) between the HBV/B and HBV/C groups. However, the rate of PC mutation was significantly higher in the HBV/B-infected carriers than in the HBV/C-infected carriers (P = 0.003). Both genotypes exhibited a high rate of deletion in the C-terminal half of the pre-S1 region and N-terminus of the pre-S2 region (86.0% and 79.1% in the HBV/B group; 69.8% and 72.1% in the HBV/C group, respectively). Epitope mapping showed that deletion in several epitope sites was frequent in both genotypes, particularly pS1-BT and pS2-B2. Conversely, the rate of pS2-B1 deletion was significantly higher in the HBV/B group (72.1% vs 37.2%, P = 0.002), and the rate of pS2-T deletion was significantly higher in the HBV/C group (48.8% vs 25.6%, P = 0.044). Functional mapping showed that the rate of deletion in three functional sites (the nucleocapsid binding site, start codon of M, and site for viral secretion) located in the N-terminus of the pre-S2 region was significantly higher in the HBV/B group (P < 0.05). One type of N-terminus pre-S1 deletion mutant with deletion of

  7. High prevalence of occult hepatitis B virus genotype H infection among children with clinical hepatitis in west Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Escobedo-Melendez, Griselda; Panduro, Arturo; Fierro, Nora A; Roman, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Studies on the prevalence of infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) among children are scarce in Latin American countries, especially in Mexico. This study was aimed to investigate the prevalence of HBV infection, occult hepatitis B infection (OBI) and HBV genotypes among children with clinical hepatitis. In total, 215 children with clinical hepatitis were evaluated for HBV infection. HBV serological markers and HBV DNA were analysed. OBI diagnosis and HBV genotyping was performed. HBV infection was found in 11.2% of children with clinical hepatitis. Among these HBV DNA positive-infected children, OBI was identified in 87.5% (n = 21/24) of the cases and 12.5% (n = 3/24) were positive for both HBV DNA and hepatitis B surface antigen. OBI was more frequent among children who had not been vaccinated against hepatitis B (p < 0.05) than in those who had been vaccinated. HBV genotype H was prevalent in 71% of the children followed by genotype G (8%) and genotype A (4%). In conclusion, OBI is common among Mexican children with clinical hepatitis and is associated with HBV genotype H. The results show the importance of the molecular diagnosis of HBV infection in Mexican paediatric patients with clinical hepatitis and emphasise the necessity of reinforcing hepatitis B vaccination in children. PMID:25099333

  8. High prevalence of occult hepatitis B virus genotype H infection among children with clinical hepatitis in west Mexico.

    PubMed

    Escobedo-Melendez, Griselda; Panduro, Arturo; Fierro, Nora A; Roman, Sonia

    2014-09-01

    Studies on the prevalence of infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) among children are scarce in Latin American countries, especially in Mexico. This study was aimed to investigate the prevalence of HBV infection, occult hepatitis B infection (OBI) and HBV genotypes among children with clinical hepatitis. In total, 215 children with clinical hepatitis were evaluated for HBV infection. HBV serological markers and HBV DNA were analysed. OBI diagnosis and HBV genotyping was performed. HBV infection was found in 11.2% of children with clinical hepatitis. Among these HBV DNA positive-infected children, OBI was identified in 87.5% (n = 21/24) of the cases and 12.5% (n = 3/24) were positive for both HBV DNA and hepatitis B surface antigen. OBI was more frequent among children who had not been vaccinated against hepatitis B (p < 0.05) than in those who had been vaccinated. HBV genotype H was prevalent in 71% of the children followed by genotype G (8%) and genotype A (4%). In conclusion, OBI is common among Mexican children with clinical hepatitis and is associated with HBV genotype H. The results show the importance of the molecular diagnosis of HBV infection in Mexican paediatric patients with clinical hepatitis and emphasise the necessity of reinforcing hepatitis B vaccination in children.

  9. Feline papillomas and papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, J P; Van Ranst, M; Montali, R; Homer, B L; Miller, W H; Rowland, P H; Scott, D W; England, J J; Dunstan, R W; Mikaelian, I; Jenson, A B

    2000-01-01

    Papillomaviruses (PVs) are highly species- and site-specific pathogens of stratified squamous epithelium. Although PV infections in the various Felidae are rarely reported, we identified productive infections in six cat species. PV-induced proliferative skin or mucous membrane lesions were confirmed by immunohistochemical screening for papillomavirus-specific capsid antigens. Seven monoclonal antibodies, each of which reacts with an immunodominant antigenic determinant of the bovine papillomavirus L1 gene product, revealed that feline PV capsid epitopes were conserved to various degrees. This battery of monoclonal antibodies established differential expression patterns among cutaneous and oral PVs of snow leopards and domestic cats, suggesting that they represent distinct viruses. Clinically, the lesions in all species and anatomic sites were locally extensive and frequently multiple. Histologically, the areas of epidermal hyperplasia were flat with a similarity to benign tumors induced by cutaneotropic, carcinogenic PVs in immunosuppressed human patients. Limited restriction endonuclease analyses of viral genomic DNA confirmed the variability among three viral genomes recovered from available frozen tissue. Because most previous PV isolates have been species specific, these studies suggest that at least eight different cat papillomaviruses infect the oral cavity (tentative designations: Asian lion, Panthera leo, P1PV; snow leopard, Panthera uncia, PuPV-1; bobcat, Felis rufus, FrPV; Florida panther, Felis concolor, FcPV; clouded leopard, Neofelis nebulosa, NnPV; and domestic cat, Felis domesticus, FdPV-2) or skin (domestic cat, F. domesticus, FdPV-1; and snow leopard, P. uncia, PuPV-2). PMID:10643975

  10. Phylogeography and epidemic history of hepatitis C virus genotype 4 in Africa.

    PubMed

    Iles, James C; Raghwani, Jayna; Harrison, G L Abby; Pepin, Jacques; Djoko, Cyrille F; Tamoufe, Ubald; LeBreton, Matthew; Schneider, Bradley S; Fair, Joseph N; Tshala, Felix M; Kayembe, Patrick K; Muyembe, Jean Jacques; Edidi-Basepeo, Samuel; Wolfe, Nathan D; Simmonds, Peter; Klenerman, Paul; Pybus, Oliver G

    2014-09-01

    HCV genotype 4 is prevalent in many African countries, yet little is known about the genotype׳s epidemic history on the continent. We present a comprehensive study of the molecular epidemiology of genotype 4. To address the deficit of data from the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) we PCR amplified 60 new HCV isolates from the DRC, resulting in 33 core- and 48 NS5B-region sequences. Our data, together with genotype 4 database sequences, were analysed using Bayesian phylogenetic approaches. We find three well-supported intra-genotypic lineages and estimate that the genotype 4 common ancestor existed around 1733 (1650-1805). We show that genotype 4 originated in central Africa and that multiple lineages have been exported to north Africa since ~1850, including subtype 4a which dominates the epidemic in Egypt. We speculate on the causes of the historical intra-continental spread of genotype 4, including population movements during World War 2.

  11. Intraductal papilloma of the submandibular gland.

    PubMed

    Mirza, S; Dutt, S N; Irving, R M; Jones, E L

    2000-06-01

    Salivary tissue intraductal papillomas are rare, benign tumours that predominantly affect minor salivary glands. We report a case of an intraductal papilloma arising in the unusual site of the submandibular gland. The tumour was completely excised and recurrence is not expected. A brief review of this histologically distinct lesion is presented.

  12. Whole-Genome Sequencing of Measles Virus Genotypes H1 and D8 During Outbreaks of Infection Following the 2010 Olympic Winter Games Reveals Viral Transmission Routes.

    PubMed

    Gardy, Jennifer L; Naus, Monika; Amlani, Ashraf; Chung, Walter; Kim, Hochan; Tan, Malcolm; Severini, Alberto; Krajden, Mel; Puddicombe, David; Sahni, Vanita; Hayden, Althea S; Gustafson, Reka; Henry, Bonnie; Tang, Patrick

    2015-11-15

    We used whole-genome sequencing to investigate a dual-genotype outbreak of measles occurring after the XXI Olympic Winter Games in Vancouver, Canada. By sequencing 27 complete genomes from H1 and D8 genotype measles viruses isolated from outbreak cases, we estimated the virus mutation rate, determined that person-to-person transmission is typically associated with 0 mutations between isolates, and established that a single introduction of H1 virus led to the expansion of the outbreak beyond Vancouver. This is the largest measles genomics project to date, revealing novel aspects of measles virus genetics and providing new insights into transmission of this reemerging viral pathogen. PMID:26153409

  13. Determining hepatitis C virus genotype distribution among high-risk groups in Iran using real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Jamalidoust, Marzieh; Namayandeh, Mandana; Asaei, Sadaf; Aliabadi, Nasrin; Ziyaeyan, Mazyar

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype patterns among high-risk Iranian groups, using real-time RT-PCR. METHODS: In this study, we evaluated the distribution of different HCV genotypes among injection drug users and other high-risk groups over a 4-year period (from 2009 to 2012) using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Sera from 888 HCV-infected patients residing in southern and southwest Iran were genotyped using real-time PCR with common primers and specific probes. These patients were grouped into distinct exposure categories. Illicit drug users constituted the primary group and were further evaluated for HCV genotype distribution and parameters such as age range. RESULTS: Of the examined HCV-infected patients, 62% were substance abusers, although the route of transmission could not be determined in approximately 30% of these patients. HCV genotyping revealed that Gt1 was the most prevalent genotype among the drug users as well as among patients with thalassemia, hemophilia, solid organ recipients and those on hemodialysis. Mixed infections were only seen in addict groups, where Gt2 genotype was also found. The highest frequencies in HCV-positive addict patients were observed in the 31-40 age group. Our research also showed that the addiction age has increased, whereas the addiction rate has dropped in this region. Most illicit drug users had more than one risk factor such as tattoo and/or a history of imprisonment. CONCLUSION: This study revealed that the most common HCV-infection route and HCV-genotype in southern and southwest Iran was illicit drug abuse and Gt1, respectively. PMID:24914351

  14. Highly divergent dengue virus type 1 genotype sets a new distance record

    PubMed Central

    Pyke, Alyssa T.; Moore, Peter R.; Taylor, Carmel T.; Hall-Mendelin, Sonja; Cameron, Jane N.; Hewitson, Glen R.; Pukallus, Dennis S.; Huang, Bixing; Warrilow, David; van den Hurk, Andrew F.

    2016-01-01

    Dengue viruses (DENVs) are the leading cause of mosquito-borne viral disease of humans. They exist in both endemic and sylvatic ecotypes. In 2014, a viremic patient who had recently visited the rainforests of Brunei returned to Australia displaying symptoms consistent with DENV infection. A unique DENV strain was subsequently isolated from the patient, which we propose belongs to a new genotype within DENV serotype 1 (DENV-1). Bayesian evolutionary phylogenetic analysis suggests that the putative sylvatic DENV-1 Brunei 2014 (Brun2014) is the most divergent DENV-1 yet recorded and increases the time to the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) for DENV-1 from ≈120 years to ≈315 years. DENV-1 classification of the Brun2014 strain was further supported by monoclonal antibody serotyping data. Phenotypic characterization demonstrated that Brun2014 replication rates in mosquito cells and infection rates in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes were not significantly different from an epidemic DENV-1 strain. Given its ability to cause human illness and infect Ae. aegypti, potential urban spillover and clinical disease from further Brun2014 transmission cannot be discounted. PMID:26924208

  15. Combination treatment with hepatitis C virus protease and NS5A inhibitors is effective against recombinant genotype 1a, 2a, and 3a viruses.

    PubMed

    Gottwein, Judith M; Jensen, Sanne B; Li, Yi-Ping; Ghanem, Lubna; Scheel, Troels K H; Serre, Stéphanie B N; Mikkelsen, Lotte; Bukh, Jens

    2013-03-01

    With the development of directly acting antivirals, hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapy entered a new era. However, rapid selection of resistance mutations necessitates combination therapy. To study combination therapy in infectious culture systems, we aimed at developing HCV semi-full-length (semi-FL) recombinants relying only on the JFH1 NS3 helicase, NS5B, and the 3' untranslated region. With identified adaptive mutations, semi-FL recombinants of genotypes(isolates) 1a(TN) and 3a(S52) produced supernatant infectivity titers of ~4 log(10) focus-forming units/ml in Huh7.5 cells. Genotype 1a(TN) adaptive mutations allowed generation of 1a(H77) semi-FL virus. Concentration-response profiles revealed the higher efficacy of the NS3 protease inhibitor asunaprevir (BMS-650032) and the NS5A inhibitor daclatasvir (BMS-790052) against 1a(TN and H77) than 3a(S52) viruses. Asunaprevir had intermediate efficacy against previously developed 2a recombinants J6/JFH1 and J6cc. Daclatasvir had intermediate efficacy against J6/JFH1, while low sensitivity was confirmed against J6cc. Using a cross-titration scheme, infected cultures were treated until viral escape or on-treatment virologic suppression occurred. Compared to single-drug treatment, combination treatment with relatively low concentrations of asunaprevir and daclatasvir suppressed infection with all five recombinants. Escaped viruses primarily had substitutions at amino acids in the NS3 protease and NS5A domain I reported to be genotype 1 resistance mutations. Inhibitors showed synergism at drug concentrations reported in vivo. In summary, semi-FL HCV recombinants, including the most advanced reported genotype 3a infectious culture system, permitted genotype-specific analysis of combination treatment in the context of the complete viral life cycle. Despite differential sensitivity to lead compound NS3 protease and NS5A inhibitors, genotype 1a, 2a, and 3a viruses were suppressed by combination treatment with relatively low

  16. Development of innovative and versatile polythiol probes for use on ELOSA or electrochemical biosensors: application in hepatitis C virus genotyping.

    PubMed

    Lereau, Myriam; Fournier-Wirth, Chantal; Mayen, Julie; Farre, Carole; Meyer, Albert; Dugas, Vincent; Cantaloube, Jean-François; Chaix, Carole; Vasseur, Jean-Jacques; Morvan, François

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to develop versatile diagnostic tools based on the use of innovative polythiolated probes for the detection of multiple viruses. This approach is compatible with optical enzyme-linked oligosorbent assay (ELOSA) or electrochemical (biosensors) detection methods. The application targeted here concerns the rapid genotyping of Hepatitis C virus (HCV). HCV genotyping is one of the predictive parameters currently used to define the antiviral treatment strategy and is based on the sequencing of the viral NS5b region. Generic and specific NS5b amplicons were produced by real-time polymease chain reaction (RT-PCR) on HCV(+) human plasma. Original NS5b probes were designed for genotypes 1a/1b, 2a/2b/2c, 3a, and 4a/4d. Robust polythiolated probes were anchored with good efficacy on maleimide-activated microplates (MAM) and gold electrodes. Their grafting on MAM greatly increased the sensitivity of the ELOSA test which was able to detect HCV amplicons with good sensitivity (10 nM) and specificity. Moreover, the direct and real-time electrochemical detection by differential pulse voltammetry enabled a detection limit of 10 fM to be reached with good reproducibility. These innovative polythiolated probes have allowed us to envisage developing flexible, highly sensitive, and easy-to-handle platforms dedicated to the rapid screening and genotyping of a wide range of viral agents. PMID:24050654

  17. A real-time quantitative assay for hepatitis B DNA virus (HBV) developed to detect all HBV genotypes.

    PubMed

    Sitnik, Roberta; Paes, Angela; Mangueira, Cristovão Pitangueira; Pinho, João Renato Rebello

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a major cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. Besides genotype, quantitative analysis of HBV infection is extensively used for monitoring disease progression and treatment. Affordable viral load monitoring is desirable in resource-limited settings and it has been already shown to be useful in developing countries for other viruses such as Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and HIV. In this paper, we describe the validation of a real-time PCR assay for HBV DNA quantification with TaqMan chemistry and MGB probes. Primers and probes were designed using an alignment of sequences from all HBV genotypes in order to equally amplify all of them. The assay is internally controlled and was standardized with an international HBV panel. Its efficacy was evaluated comparing the results with two other methods: Versant HBV DNA Assay 3.0 (bDNA, Siemens, NY, USA) and another real-time PCR from a reference laboratory. Intra-assay and inter-assay reproducibilities were determined and the mean of CV values obtained were 0.12 and 0.09, respectively. The assay was validated with a broad dynamic range and is efficient for amplifying all HBV genotypes, providing a good option to quantify HBV DNA as a routine procedure, with a cheap and reliable protocol. PMID:20602019

  18. The pan-genotype specificity of the hepatitis C virus anti-core monoclonal antibody C7-50 is contingent on the quasispecies profile of a population.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Brendan A; Menton, John; Levis, John; Kenny-Walsh, Elizabeth; Crosbie, Orla; Fanning, Liam J

    2012-11-01

    The inter/intra-genotype quasispecies makeup of hepatitis C virus (HCV) has retarded the development of antibodies capable of pan-genotype reactivity. Mutations, even in conserved domains, are tolerated to a degree. In this report, we characterise the pan-genotype specificity of the commercially available monoclonal anti-HCV core antibody C7-50. We demonstrate the antibody's ability to detect HCV core protein following infection of Huh7 cells with serum-derived HCV of genotypes 2-5 and that a single-site polymorphism in a genotype 3a core amino acid sequence is sufficient to disrupt antibody recognition of the epitope. This same polymorphism is a feature of genotype 3 viruses. PMID:22828781

  19. Hepatitis B Virus Genotype Distribution and Genotype-Specific BCP/preCore Substitutions in Acute and Chronic Infections in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    González López Ledesma, María Mora; Mojsiejczuk, Laura Noelia; Rodrigo, Belén; Sevic, Ina; Mammana, Lilia; Galdame, Omar; Gadano, Adrian; Fainboim, Hugo; Campos, Rodolfo; Flichman, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Aim In order to assess Hepatitis B Virus genotype (g) and subgenotype (sg) implications in the course of infection, 234 HBsAg positive patients in different infection stages were characterized (66 acute infections, 63 HBeAg positive chronic infections and 105 anti-HBe positive chronic infections). Results Overall, sgA2 (17.9%), gD (20.9%), sgF1b (34.2%) and sgF4 (19.7%) were the most prevalent. Subgenotype F1b was overrepresented in acute and chronic HBeAg infections (56.1%), whereas gD was the most frequent (40.0%) in anti-HBe positive chronic infections. Among chronic infections, HBeAg positivity rates were 50.0, 12.5, 62.8 and 35.3% for sgA2, gD, sgF1b and sgF4, respectively (p <0.05). A bias toward BCP/preCore mutations was observed among genotypes. In anti-HBe positive chronic infections, sgF1b was more prone to have A1762T/G1764A mutation than sgA2, sgF4 and gD (75.0, 40.0, 33.3 and 31.8%, p<0.005), whereas in the pC region, gD and sgF4 were more likely to have G1896A than sgA2 and sgF1b (81.0, 72.7, 0.0 and 31.3%, p <0.001). The unexpected low frequency of the G1896A mutation in the sgF1b (despite carrying 1858T) prompted us to perform a further analysis in order to identify genotype-specific features that could justify the pattern mutations observed. A region encompassing nucleotides 1720 to 1920 showed the higher dissimilarity between sgF1b and sgF4. Genotypes and subgenotypes carrying the 1727G, 1740C and 1773T polymorphisms were prevented to mutate position 1896. Discussion HBeAg seroconversion is a critical event in the natural history of HBV infection. Differences in the HBeAg positivity rate might be relevant since different studies have observed that delayed HBeAg seroconversion is associated with a more severe clinical course of infection, highlighting the critical role that genotypes/subgenotypes might play in the progression of HBV infection. Polymorphisms in the regions 1720 to 1920 could be involved in the molecular mechanisms underlying

  20. Identification, Molecular Cloning, and Analysis of Full-Length Hepatitis C Virus Transmitted/Founder Genotypes 1, 3, and 4

    PubMed Central

    Stoddard, Mark B.; Li, Hui; Wang, Shuyi; Saeed, Mohsan; Andrus, Linda; Ding, Wenge; Jiang, Xinpei; Learn, Gerald H.; von Schaewen, Markus; Wen, Jessica; Goepfert, Paul A.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Ploss, Alexander; Rice, Charles M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is characterized by persistent replication of a complex mixture of viruses termed a “quasispecies.” Transmission is generally associated with a stringent population bottleneck characterized by infection by limited numbers of “transmitted/founder” (T/F) viruses. Characterization of T/F genomes of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been integral to studies of transmission, immunopathogenesis, and vaccine development. Here, we describe the identification of complete T/F genomes of HCV by single-genome sequencing of plasma viral RNA from acutely infected subjects. A total of 2,739 single-genome-derived amplicons comprising 10,966,507 bp from 18 acute-phase and 11 chronically infected subjects were analyzed. Acute-phase sequences diversified essentially randomly, except for the poly(U/UC) tract, which was subject to polymerase slippage. Fourteen acute-phase subjects were productively infected by more than one genetically distinct virus, permitting assessment of recombination between replicating genomes. No evidence of recombination was found among 1,589 sequences analyzed. Envelope sequences of T/F genomes lacked transmission signatures that could distinguish them from chronic infection viruses. Among chronically infected subjects, higher nucleotide substitution rates were observed in the poly(U/UC) tract than in envelope hypervariable region 1. Fourteen full-length molecular clones with variable poly(U/UC) sequences corresponding to seven genotype 1a, 1b, 3a, and 4a T/F viruses were generated. Like most unadapted HCV clones, T/F genomes did not replicate efficiently in Huh 7.5 cells, indicating that additional cellular factors or viral adaptations are necessary for in vitro replication. Full-length T/F HCV genomes and their progeny provide unique insights into virus transmission, virus evolution, and virus-host interactions associated with immunopathogenesis. PMID:25714714

  1. New hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotyping system that allows for identification of HCV genotypes 1a, 1b, 2a, 2b, 3a, 3b, 4, 5a, and 6a.

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, O; Mizokami, M; Wu, R R; Saleh, M G; Ohba, K; Orito, E; Mukaide, M; Williams, R; Lau, J Y

    1997-01-01

    Recent studies have focused on whether different hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes are associated with different profiles of pathogenicity, infectivity, and response to antiviral therapy. The establishment of a simple and precise genotyping system for HCV is essential to address these issues. A new genotyping system based on PCR of the core region with genotype-specific PCR primers for the determination of HCV genotypes 1a, 1b, 2a, 2b, 3a, 3b, 4, 5a, and 6a was developed. A total of 607 samples (379 from Japan, 63 from the United States, 53 from Korea, 35 from Taiwan, 32 from China, 20 from Hong Kong, 15 from Australia, 6 from Egypt, 3 from Bangladesh, and 1 from South Africa) were tested by both the assay of Okamoto et al. (H. Okamoto, Y. Sugiyama, S. Okada, K. Kurai, Y. Akahane, Y. Sugai, T. Tanaka, K. Sato, F. Tsuda, Y. Miyamura, and M. Mayumi, J. Gen. Virol. 73:673-679, 1992) and this new genotyping system. Comparison of the results showed concordant results for 539 samples (88.8%). Of the 68 samples with discordant results, the nucleotide sequences of the HCV isolates were determined in 23, and their genotypes were determined by molecular evolutionary analysis. In all 23 samples, the assignment of genotype by our new genotyping system was correct. This genotyping system may be useful for large-scale determination of HCV genotypes in clinical studies. PMID:8968908

  2. Molecular marker-assisted genotyping of mungbean yellow mosaic India virus resistant germplasms of mungbean and urdbean.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Soumitra; Basak, Jolly; Kundagrami, Sabyasachi; Kundu, Anirban; Pal, Amita

    2011-02-01

    Mungbean Yellow Mosaic India Virus (MYMIV) belonging to the genus begomovirus causes the yellow mosaic disease in a number of economically important edible grain legumes including mungbean (Vigna radiata), urdbean (Vigna mungo) and soybean (Glycine max). The disease is severe, critical, open spread and inflicts heavy yield losses annually. The objective of this study is to develop molecular markers linked to MYMIV-resistance to facilitate genotyping of urdbean and mungbean germplasms for MYMIV-reaction. Resistance-linked molecular markers were successfully developed from consensus motifs of other resistance (R) gene or R gene homologue sequences. Applying linked marker-assisted genotyping, plant breeders can carry out repeated genotyping throughout the growing season in absence of any disease incidence. Two MYMIV-resistance marker loci, YR4 and CYR1, were identified and of these two CYR1 is completely linked with MYMIV-resistant germplasms and co-segregating with MYMIV-resistant F₂, F₃ progenies of urdbean. The present study demonstrated that these two markers could be efficiently employed together in a multiplex-PCR-reaction for genotyping both V. mungo and V. radiata germplasms from field grown plants and also directly from the seed stock. This method of genotyping would save time and labour during the introgression of MYMIV-resistance through molecular breeding, as methods of phenotyping against begomoviruses are tedious, labour and time intensive.

  3. Phylogenetic, virological, and clinical characteristics of genotype C hepatitis B virus with TCC at codon 15 of the precore region.

    PubMed

    Chan, Henry Lik-Yuen; Tse, Chi-Hang; Ng, Eddie Yuen-Tok; Leung, Kwong-Sak; Lee, Kin-Hong; Tsui, Stephen Kwok-Wing; Sung, Joseph Jao-Yiu

    2006-03-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) with T-1856 of the precore region is always associated with C-1858 (i.e., TCC at nucleotides 1856 to 1858), and it is reported only in genotype C HBV isolates. We aimed to investigate the phylogenetic, virological, and clinical characteristics of HBV isolates bearing TCC at nucleotides 1856 to 1858. We have previously reported on the presence of two major subgroups in genotype C HBV, namely, HBV genotype Cs (Southeast Asia) and HBV genotype Ce (Far East). We have designed a novel 5' nuclease technology based on the nucleotide polymorphism (C or A) at nucleotide 2733 to differentiate the two genotype C HBV subgroups. The mutations at the basal core promoter and precore regions were analyzed by direct sequencing. Among 214 genotype C HBV-infected patients, 31% had TCC, 37% had CCC, 3% had CTC, and 29% had CCT at nucleotides 1856 to 1858. All except one HBV strain with TCC at nucleotides 1856 to 1858 belonged to subgroup Cs, which has been reported only in Hong Kong; Guangzhou, China; and Vietnam. HBV with TCC at nucleotides 1856 to 1858 was associated with the G1898A mutation (64%). Patients infected with HBV harboring TCC had more liver cirrhosis than those infected with HBV harboring CCC (18% versus 5%; P = 0.008), and more of the patients infected with HBV harboring TCC were positive for HBeAg (58% versus 36%; P = 0.01) and had higher median alanine aminotransferase levels (65 IU/liter versus 49 IU/liter; P = 0.006); but similar proportions of patients infected with HBV harboring TCC and those infected with HBV harboring CCT had liver cirrhosis (18% versus 13%; P = 0.43). In summary, we report that HBV with TCC at nucleotides 1856 to 1858 of the precore region might represent a specific HBV strain associated with more aggressive liver disease than other genotype C HBV strains.

  4. Human papilloma virus and cervical preinvasive disease

    PubMed Central

    Bari, M; Iancu, G; Popa, F

    2009-01-01

    Cervical cancer lesions represent a major threat to the health of the women worldwide. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is responsible for 99.7% of cervical cancer cases, the infectious etiology giving the possibility of preventing cervical cancer by vaccination. The most aggressive HPV types are 16 and 18, which cause about 70% of cases of invasive cancer. The vaccination is recommended to the girls aged 11–12. The diagnosis and the treatment of cervical preinvasive disease allow the doctor to prevent the development of the invasive disease. PMID:20108750

  5. Pathogenesis of a genotype C strain of bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 infection in albino guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hong-Fei; Zhu, Yuan-Mao; Dong, Xiu-Mei; Cai, Hong; Ma, Lei; Wang, Shu; Yan, Hao; Wang, Xue-Zhi; Xue, Fei

    2014-08-01

    Bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV3) is one of the most important of the known viral respiratory tract agents of both young and adult cattle and widespread among cattle around the world. Up to present, three genotypes A, B and C of BPIV3 have been described on the basis of genetic and phylogenetic analysis and only limited studies on the pathogenesis of the genotype A of BPIV3 infection in calves and laboratory animals have been performed. The report about experimental infections of the genotypes B and C of BPIV3 in laboratory animals and calves was scant. Therefore, an experimental infection of guinea pigs with the Chinese BPIV3 strain SD0835 of the genotype C was performed. Sixteen guinea pigs were intranasally inoculated with the suspension of SD0835, while eight control guinea pigs were also intranasally inoculated with the same volume of supernatant from uninfected MDBK cells. The virus-inoculated guinea pigs displayed a few observable clinical signs that were related to the respiratory tract disease and two of the sixteen experimentally infected guinea pigs died at 2 and 3 days post inoculation (PI), respectively, and apparent gross pneumonic lesions were observed at necropsy. The gross pneumonic lesions in guinea pigs inoculated with SD0835 consisted of dark red, slightly depressed, irregular areas of consolidation in the lung lobes from the second to 9th day of infection at necropsy, and almost complete consolidation and atelectasis of the lung lobes were seen at 7 days PI. Histopathological changes including alveoli septa thickening and focal cellulose pneumonia were also observed in the lungs of guinea pigs experimentally infected with SD0835. Viral replication was detectable by virus isolation and titration, real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining in the respiratory tissues of guinea pigs as early as 24h after intranasal inoculation with SD0835. The results of virus isolation and titration showed that guinea pigs were permissive for

  6. Characterization of Samples Identified as Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1 without Subtype by Abbott RealTime HCV Genotype II Assay Using the New Abbott HCV Genotype Plus RUO Test

    PubMed Central

    Mokhtari, Camelia; Ebel, Anne; Reinhardt, Birgit; Merlin, Sandra; Proust, Stéphanie

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotyping continues to be relevant for therapeutic strategies. Some samples are reported as genotype 1 (gt 1) without subtype by the Abbott RealTime HCV Genotype II (GT II) test. To characterize such samples further, the Abbott HCV Genotype Plus RUO (Plus) assay, which targets the core region for gt 1a, gt 1b, and gt 6 detection, was evaluated as a reflex test in reference to NS5B or 5′-untranslated region (UTR)/core region sequencing. Of 3,626 routine samples, results of gt 1 without subtype were received for 171 samples (4.7%), accounting for 11.5% of gt 1 specimens. The Plus assay and sequencing were applied to 98 of those samples. NS5B or 5′-UTR/core region sequencing was successful for 91/98 specimens (92.9%). Plus assay and sequencing results were concordant for 87.9% of specimens (80/91 samples). Sequencing confirmed Plus assay results for 82.6%, 85.7%, 100%, and 89.3% of gt 1a, gt 1b, gt 6, and non-gt 1a/1b/6 results, respectively. Notably, 12 gt 6 samples that had been identified previously as gt 1 without subtype were assigned correctly here; for 25/28 samples reported as “not detected” by the Plus assay, sequencing identified the samples as gt 1 with subtypes other than 1a/1b. The genetic variability of HCV continues to present challenges for the current genotyping platforms regardless of the applied methodology. Samples identified by the GT II assay as gt 1 without subtype can be further resolved and reliably characterized by the new Plus assay. PMID:26582834

  7. Origin, Evolution, and Genotyping of Emergent Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus Strains in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yao-Wei; Dickerman, Allan W.; Piñeyro, Pablo; Li, Long; Fang, Li; Kiehne, Ross; Opriessnig, Tanja; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Coronaviruses are known to infect humans and other animals and cause respiratory and gastrointestinal diseases. Here we report the emergence of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) in the United States and determination of its origin, evolution, and genotypes based on temporal and geographical evidence. Histological lesions in small intestine sections of affected pigs and the complete genomic sequences of three emergent strains of PEDV isolated from outbreaks in Minnesota and Iowa were characterized. Genetic and phylogenetic analyses of the three U.S. strains revealed a close relationship with Chinese PEDV strains and their likely Chinese origin. The U.S. PEDV strains underwent evolutionary divergence, which can be classified into two sublineages. The three emergent U.S. strains are most closely related to a strain isolated in 2012 from Anhui Province in China, which might be the result of multiple recombination events between different genetic lineages or sublineages of PEDV. Molecular clock analysis of the divergent time based on the complete genomic sequences is consistent with the actual time difference, approximately 2 to 3 years, of the PED outbreaks between China (December 2010) and the United States (May 2013). The finding that the emergent U.S. PEDV strains share unique genetic features at the 5′-untranslated region with a bat coronavirus provided further support of the evolutionary origin of PEDV from bats and potential cross-species transmission. The data from this study have important implications for understanding the ongoing PEDV outbreaks in the United States and will guide future efforts to develop effective preventive and control measures against PEDV. PMID:24129257

  8. Genotype Distribution and Molecular Epidemiology of Hepatitis C Virus in Hubei, Central China

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jing; Lu, Yanjun; Liu, Weiyong; Zhu, Yaowu; Yan, Xiaoling; Xu, Jingxin; Wang, Xiong; Wang, Yue; Liu, Wei; Sun, Ziyong

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about the molecular epidemiology of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in Central China. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of 570 patients from Hubei Province in central China were enrolled. These patients were tested positive for HCV antibody prior to blood transfusion. Among them, 177 were characterized by partial NS5B and/or Core-E1 sequences and classified into five subtypes: 1b, 83.0% (147/177); 2a, 13.0% (23/177); 3b, 2.3% (4/177); 6a, 1.1% (2/177); 3a, 0.6% (1/177). Analysis of genotype-associated risk factors revealed that paid blood donation and transfusion before 1997 were strongly associated with subtypes 1b and 2a, while some subtype 2a cases were also found in individuals with high risk sexual behaviors; subtypes 3b, 6a, and 3a were detected only in intravenous drug users. Phylogeographic analyses based on the coalescent datasets demonstrated that 1b, 2a, 3b, and 6a were locally epidemic in Hubei Province. Among them, subtype 1b Hubei strains may have served as the origins of this subtype in China, and 2a and 3b Hubei strains may have descended from the northwest and southwest of China, respectively, while 6a Hubei strains may have been imported from the central south and southwest. Conclusion/Significance The results suggest that the migration patterns of HCV in Hubei are complex and variable among different subtypes. Implementation of mandatory HCV screening before donation has significantly decreased the incidence of transfusion-associated HCV infection since 1997. More attention should be paid to intravenous drug use and unsafe sexual contact, which may have become new risk factors for HCV infection in Hubei Province. PMID:26325070

  9. Phylogeography and evolutionary history of hepatitis B virus genotype F in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotype F (HBV/F) is considered to be indigenous to the Americas, but its emergence and spread in the continent remain unknown. Previously, only two HBV/F complete genome sequences from Brazil were available, limiting the contribution of Brazilian isolates to the phylogenetic studies of HBV/F. The present study was carried out to assess the proportion and geographic distributions of HBV/F subgenotypes in Brazil, to determine the full-length genomic sequences of HBV/F isolates from different Brazilian geographic regions, and to investigate the detailed evolutionary history and phylogeography of HBV/F in Brazil. Methods Complete HBV/F genomes isolated from 12 Brazilian patients, representing the HBV/F subgenotypes circulating in Brazil, were sequenced and analyzed together with sequences retrieved from GenBank, using the Bayesian coalescent and phylogeographic framework. Results Phylogenetic analysis using all Brazilian HBV/F S-gene sequences available in GenBank showed that HBV/F2a is found at higher frequencies countrywide and corresponds to all sequences isolated in the Brazilian Amazon Basin. In addition, the evolutionary analysis using complete genome sequences estimated an older median ancestral age for the Brazilian HBV/F2a compared to the Brazilian HBV/F1b and HBV/F4 subgenotypes, suggesting that HBV/F2a represents the original native HBV of Brazil. The phylogeographic patterns suggested a north-to-south flow of HBV/F2a from Venezuela to Brazil, whereas HBV/F1b and HBV/F4 strains appeared to have spread from Argentina to Brazil. Conclusions This study suggests a plausible route of introduction of HBV/F subgenotypes in Brazil and demonstrates the usefulness of recently developed computational tools for investigating the evolutionary history of HBV. PMID:23855930

  10. Phylogeography and epidemic history of hepatitis C virus genotype 4 in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Iles, James C.; Raghwani, Jayna; Harrison, G.L. Abby; Pepin, Jacques; Djoko, Cyrille F.; Tamoufe, Ubald; LeBreton, Matthew; Schneider, Bradley S.; Fair, Joseph N.; Tshala, Felix M.; Kayembe, Patrick K.; Muyembe, Jean Jacques; Edidi-Basepeo, Samuel; Wolfe, Nathan D.; Simmonds, Peter; Klenerman, Paul; Pybus, Oliver G.

    2014-01-01

    HCV genotype 4 is prevalent in many African countries, yet little is known about the genotype׳s epidemic history on the continent. We present a comprehensive study of the molecular epidemiology of genotype 4. To address the deficit of data from the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) we PCR amplified 60 new HCV isolates from the DRC, resulting in 33 core- and 48 NS5B-region sequences. Our data, together with genotype 4 database sequences, were analysed using Bayesian phylogenetic approaches. We find three well-supported intra-genotypic lineages and estimate that the genotype 4 common ancestor existed around 1733 (1650–1805). We show that genotype 4 originated in central Africa and that multiple lineages have been exported to north Africa since ~1850, including subtype 4a which dominates the epidemic in Egypt. We speculate on the causes of the historical intra-continental spread of genotype 4, including population movements during World War 2. PMID:25105489

  11. Genotype-specific mutations in the polymerase gene of hepatitis B virus potentially associated with resistance to oral antiviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Mirandola, Silvia; Sebastiani, Giada; Rossi, Cristina; Velo, Emanuela; Erne, Elke Maria; Vario, Alessandro; Tempesta, Diego; Romualdi, Chiara; Campagnolo, Davide; Alberti, Alfredo

    2012-12-01

    The evolution of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and the role of different variants during antiviral therapy may be influenced by HBV genotype. We have therefore analysed substitutions potentially related to nucleos(t)ide analogues (NAs) resistance at 42 positions within RT-region in a cohort of patients with chronic hepatitis B in relation to HBV-genotype. RT mutations analysis was performed by direct sequencing in 200 NAs-naïve patients and in 64 LAM or LAM+ADV experienced patients with NAs resistance, infected mainly by HBV-genotypes D and A. 27 polymorphic-sites were identified among the 42 positions analysed and 64 novel mutations were detected in 23 positions. Genotype-D displayed the highest mutation frequency (6.4%) among all HBV-genotypes analysed. Single or multiple mutations were detected in 80% of naïve patients. Overall, the most frequent single mutations were at residues rt54, rt53 and rt91 which may associate with significantly lower HBV-DNA levels (p=0.001). Comparison with sequencing data of patients failing LMV or LAM+ADV therapy revealed an higher frequency of novel genotype-specific mutations if compared with naïve patients: 3 mutations under LAM monotherapy in HBV-D (rtS85F; rtL91I; rtC256G) and 3 mutations under ADV therapy in HBV-A (rtI53V; rtW153R; rtF221Y). In HBV-D treated patients the dominant resistance mutation was rtL80V (31.4%) and rtM204I (60%) in LAM+ADV group while LAM-treated patients showed a preference of rtM204V (51.9%). Interestingly, none of HBV-A patients had mutation rtM204I under ADV add-on treatment but all of them had the "V" AA substitution. These results suggested that in patients with CHB, HBV-genotype might be relevant in the evolution and development of drug resistance showing also different mutation patterns in the YMDD motif between HBV genotype D and A. PMID:23026293

  12. Inactivated porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus vaccine adjuvanted with Montanide™ Gel 01 ST elicits virus-specific cross-protective inter-genotypic response in piglets.

    PubMed

    Tabynov, Kairat; Sansyzbay, Abylay; Tulemissova, Zhanara; Tabynov, Kaissar; Dhakal, Santosh; Samoltyrova, Aigul; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J; Mambetaliyev, Muratbay

    2016-08-30

    The efficacy of a novel BEI-inactivated porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) candidate vaccine in pigs, developed at RIBSP Republic of Kazakhstan and delivered with an adjuvant Montanide™ Gel 01 ST (D/KV/ADJ) was compared with a commercial killed PRRSV vaccine (NVDC-JXA1, C/KV/ADJ) used widely in swine herds of the Republic of Kazakhstan. Clinical parameters (body temperature and respiratory disease scores), virological and immunological profiles [ELISA and virus neutralizing (VN) antibody titers], macroscopic lung lesions and viral load in the lungs (quantitative real-time PCR and cell culture assay) were assessed in vaccinated and both genotype 1 and 2 PRRSV challenged pigs. Our results showed that the commercial vaccine failed to protect pigs adequately against the clinical disease, viremia and lung lesions caused by the challenged field isolates, Kazakh strains of PRRSV type 1 and type 2 genotypes. In contrast, clinical protection, absence of viremia and lung lesions in D/KV/ADJ vaccinated pigs was associated with generation of VN antibodies in both homologous vaccine strain LKZ/2010 (PRRSV type 2) and a heterogeneous type 1 PRRSV strain (CM/08) challenged pigs. Thus, our data indicated the induction of cross-protective VN antibodies by D/KV/ADJ vaccine, and importantly demonstrated that an inactivated PRRSV vaccine could also induce cross-protective response across the viral genotype. PMID:27527768

  13. Characterisation of genotype VII Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolated from NDV vaccinated chickens, and the efficacy of LaSota and recombinant genotype VII vaccines against challenge with velogenic NDV

    PubMed Central

    Roohani, Kiarash; Yeap, Swee Keong; Ideris, Aini; Bejo, Mohd Hair; Omar, Abdul Rahman

    2015-01-01

    A Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolate designated IBS002 was isolated from a commercial broiler farm in Malaysia. The virus was characterised as a virulent strain based on the multiple basic amino acid motif of the fusion (F) cleavage site 112RRRKGF117 and length of the C-terminus extension of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) gene. Furthermore, IBS002 was classified as a velogenic NDV with mean death time (MDT) of 51.2 h and intracerebral pathogenicity index (ICPI) of 1.76. A genetic distance analysis based on the full-length F and HN genes showed that both velogenic viruses used in this study, genotype VII NDV isolate IBS002 and genotype VIII NDV isolate AF2240-I, had high genetic variations with genotype II LaSota vaccine. In this study, the protection efficacy of the recombinant genotype VII NDV inactivated vaccine was also evaluated when added to an existing commercial vaccination program against challenge with velogenic NDV IBS002 and NDV AF2240-I in commercial broilers. The results indicated that both LaSota and recombinant genotype VII vaccines offered full protection against challenge with AF2240-I. However, the LaSota vaccine only conferred partial protection against IBS002. In addition, significantly reduced viral shedding was observed in the recombinant genotype VII-vaccinated chickens compared to LaSota-vaccinated chickens. PMID:25643805

  14. Esophageal papilloma: Flexible endoscopic ablation by radiofrequency

    PubMed Central

    del Genio, Gianmattia; del Genio, Federica; Schettino, Pietro; Limongelli, Paolo; Tolone, Salvatore; Brusciano, Luigi; Avellino, Manuela; Vitiello, Chiara; Docimo, Giovanni; Pezzullo, Angelo; Docimo, Ludovico

    2015-01-01

    Squamous papilloma of the esophagus is a rare benign lesion of the esophagus. Radiofrequency ablation is an established endoscopic technique for the eradication of Barrett esophagus. No cases of endoscopic ablation of esophageal papilloma by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) have been reported. We report a case of esophageal papilloma successfully treated with a single session of radiofrequency ablation. Endoscopic ablation of the lesion was achieved by radiofrequency using a new catheter inserted through the working channel of endoscope. The esophageal ablated tissue was removed by a specifically designed cup. Complete ablation was confirmed at 3 mo by endoscopy with biopsies. This case supports feasibility and safety of as a new potential indication for BarrxTM RFA in patients with esophageal papilloma. PMID:25789102

  15. Intraoral intraductal papilloma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuk-Kwan; Chen, Jing-Yi; Hsu, Han-Ren; Wang, Wen-Chen; Lin, Li-Min

    2008-12-01

    Ductal papillomas have unique papillary features arising from the salivary gland duct system. It comprises three rare benign adenomas, namely, inverted ductal papilloma, sialadenoma papilliferum and intraductal papilloma. Here the first case of intraductal papilloma developed in the minor salivary gland of the vestibule of the oral cavity in a 71-year-old Chinese female living in a nursing home is described. This case is worthy of clinical investigation as it presents as an intraoral swelling and is mistakenly regarded as the result of a periapical pathosis. It also emphasises that a nurse or an oral hygienist who is usually the first-line oral carer of the residents of a nursing home, should be trained to perform the daily dental check and request a dentist's services when necessary.

  16. Pathogenic and Genotypic Characterization of a Japanese Encephalitis Virus Isolate Associated with Reproductive Failure in an Indian Pig Herd

    PubMed Central

    Desingu, P. A.; Ray, Pradeep K.; Patel, B. H. M.; Singh, R.; Singh, R. K.; Saikumar, G

    2016-01-01

    Background India is endemic to Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) and recurrent outbreaks occur mainly in rice growing areas. Pigs are considered to be the amplifying host for JEV and infection in gestating pigs results in reproductive failure. Most studies conducted on JEV infection in Indian pigs have been serological surveys and very little is known about JEV genotypes circulating in pigs. So the potential risk posed by pigs in JEV transmission and the genetic relationship between viruses circulating in pigs, mosquitoes and humans is poorly understood. Methodology/Principal Findings This study was conducted in pigs with a history of reproductive failure characterized by stillborn piglets with neuropathological lesions. Japanese encephalitis (JE) suspected brain specimens inoculated intracerebrally into mice and Vero cells resulted in successful isolation of JEV/SW/IVRI/395A/2014. Clinicopathological observations in infected mice, demonstration of JEV antigen in brain, and analysis of the envelope protein identified the swine isolate as being neurovirulent. Phylogenetic analysis based on prM and E gene sequences showed that it belonged to genotype III. This swine isolate was closely related to JEV associated with the 2005 outbreak in India and JaoArS982 from Japan. Phylogenetic analysis of JEV strains collected between 1956 and 2014 in India categorized the GIII viruses into different clades blurring their spatial distribution, which has been discernible in the previous century. Conclusions/Significance Isolation of JEV from stillborn piglets and its close genetic relationship with viruses detected at least three decades ago in humans and mosquitoes in Japan suggests that the virus may have been circulating among Indian pigs for several decades. The close similarity between the present swine isolate and those detected in humans affected in the 2005 outbreak in Uttar Pradesh, India, suggests the need for more intensive surveillance of pigs and implementation of

  17. Distribution of Hepatitis B virus genotypes among healthy blood donors in eastern part of North India

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Kailash; Kumar, Manoj; Rahaman, Sk. H.; Singh, T. B.; Patel, Saurabh Kumar; Nath, Gopal

    2011-01-01

    Aim: We evaluated the distribution HBV genotypes among non-remunerated healthy blood donors in eastern North India. Materials and Methods: During screening of donated blood, 176 consecutive HBsAg positive, samples comprised the study. HBV-DNA was quantitative detected in 150 samples by PCR. HBV genotype was determined by identifying genotype-specific DNA band using nested PCR. Results: Majorities were of age group 31-40 yrs (65.3%). Males (92.7%) outnumbered females (7.3%) and were HbeAg-negative HBsAg carriers. Over all, genotype-A was the most prevalent (54%) followed by D (21.3%). We did not find genotype-G and H. Districts under study, divided into four zones: Zone–I genotype-A was most common (62.3%) followed by D (18.8%); Zone–II genotype–C (41.2%) was more frequent followed by D (20.6% and A (17.7%). Zone–III in adjoining Bihar state close to Zone–I, A was more prevalent (81.8%) followed by B and C (9.1%). In Zone-IV adjoining Zone- II had genotype-A (100%) only. Genotype–D had more sporadic distribution. Genotype-E and F were prevalent in Zone I and II (3/150, 2%). Conclusions: Among blood donors HBV genotype-A followed by D was the most prevalent in eastern North India. Genotype–A had pattern of distribution signifying common focus, while D was more sporadic and C had single large pocket (Zone-II) probably common focus but restricting to particular area. Evidences are suggestive of association of HBV genotype in liver dysfunction. An effective treatment and preventive strategies based of genotypes will reduce the disease burden and increase the blood safety. PMID:21897593

  18. Novel spiroketal pyrrolidine GSK2336805 potently inhibits key hepatitis C virus genotype 1b mutants: from lead to clinical compound.

    PubMed

    Kazmierski, Wieslaw M; Maynard, Andrew; Duan, Maosheng; Baskaran, Sam; Botyanszki, Janos; Crosby, Renae; Dickerson, Scott; Tallant, Matthew; Grimes, Rick; Hamatake, Robert; Leivers, Martin; Roberts, Christopher D; Walker, Jill

    2014-03-13

    Rapid clinical progress of hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication inhibitors, including these selecting for resistance in the NS5A region (NS5A inhibitors), promises to revolutionize HCV treatment. Herein, we describe our explorations of diverse spiropyrrolidine motifs in novel NS5A inhibitors and a proposed interaction model. We discovered that the 1,4-dioxa-7-azaspiro[4.4]nonane motif in inhibitor 41H (GSK2236805) supported high potency against genotypes 1a and 1b as well as in genotype 1b L31V and Y93H mutants. Consistent with this, 41H potently suppressed HCV RNA in the 20-day RNA reduction assay. Pharmacokinetic and safety data supported further progression of 41H to the clinic.

  19. Complete genome sequence analysis identifies a new genotype of brassica yellows virus that infects cabbage and radish in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Xiang, Hai-Ying; Zhou, Cui-Ji; Li, Da-Wei; Yu, Jia-Lin; Han, Cheng-Gui

    2014-08-01

    For brassica yellows virus (BrYV), proposed to be a member of a new polerovirus species, two clearly distinct genotypes (BrYV-A and BrYV-B) have been described. In this study, the complete nucleotide sequences of two BrYV isolates from radish and Chinese cabbage were determined. Sequence analysis suggested that these isolates represent a new genotype, referred to here as BrYV-C. The full-length sequences of the two BrYV-C isolates shared 93.4-94.8 % identity with BrYV-A and BrYV-B. Further phylogenetic analysis showed that the BrYV-C isolates formed a subgroup that was distinct from the BrYV-A and BrYV-B isolates based on all of the proteins except P5.

  20. Complete genome sequence analysis identifies a new genotype of brassica yellows virus that infects cabbage and radish in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Xiang, Hai-Ying; Zhou, Cui-Ji; Li, Da-Wei; Yu, Jia-Lin; Han, Cheng-Gui

    2014-08-01

    For brassica yellows virus (BrYV), proposed to be a member of a new polerovirus species, two clearly distinct genotypes (BrYV-A and BrYV-B) have been described. In this study, the complete nucleotide sequences of two BrYV isolates from radish and Chinese cabbage were determined. Sequence analysis suggested that these isolates represent a new genotype, referred to here as BrYV-C. The full-length sequences of the two BrYV-C isolates shared 93.4-94.8 % identity with BrYV-A and BrYV-B. Further phylogenetic analysis showed that the BrYV-C isolates formed a subgroup that was distinct from the BrYV-A and BrYV-B isolates based on all of the proteins except P5. PMID:24599564

  1. Whitefly population dynamics and evaluation of whitefly-transmitted tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV)-resistant tomato genotypes as whitefly and TYLCV reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Rajagopalbabu; Riley, David; Diffie, Stan; Sparks, Alton; Adkins, Scott

    2012-08-01

    Sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), and whitefly-transmitted tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) are major threats to tomato production in the southeastern United States. TYLCV was introduced to Florida from the Caribbean islands and has spread to other southern states of the United States. In Georgia, in recent years, the incidence of TYLCV has been steadily increasing. Studies were conducted to monitor population dynamics of whiteflies in the vegetable production belt of Georgia, to evaluate TYLCV-resistant genotypes against whiteflies and TYLCV, and to assess the potential role of resistant genotypes in TYLCV epidemiology. Monitoring studies indicated that the peak incidence of whiteflies varied seasonally from year to year. In general, whitefly populations were not uniformly distributed. Tomato genotypes exhibited minor differences in their ability to support whitefly populations. TYLCV symptoms were visually undetectable in all but one resistant genotype. The infection rates (visually) in susceptible genotypes ranged from 40 to 87%. Greenhouse inoculations with viruliferous whiteflies followed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) indicated that up to 100% of plants of resistant genotypes were infected, although predominantly symptomless. TYLCV acquisition by whiteflies from TYLCV-infected genotypes was tested by PCR; TYLCV acquisition rates from resistant genotypes were less than from susceptible genotypes. Nevertheless, this difference did not influence TYLCV transmission rates from resistant to susceptible genotypes. Results emphasize that resistant genotypes can serve as TYLCV and whitefly reservoirs and potentially influence TYLCV epidemics. PMID:22928328

  2. Comparative study of patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection due to genotypes 1 and 3 referred for treatment in southeast Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Vigani, Aline G; Pavan, Maria H; Tozzo, Raquel; Gonçales, Eduardo SL; Feltrin, Adriana; Fais, Viviane C; Lazarini, Maria SK; Gonçales, Neiva SL; Gonçales, Fernando L

    2008-01-01

    Background The progression of liver disease in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is influenced by host and viral factors. Distinct clinical outcomes in patients infected with different HCV genotypes have been described in the literatute. However, the association between specific HCV genotype and clinical outcome remains unclear. We set out to study the natural history of HCV genotype 1 and 3 infections in Campinas, São Paulo state, Brazil, focusing on epidemiological, clinical, biochemical, and histological characteristics. Methods Patients with HCV infection referred for treatment between January 2003 and December 2006 were included in this study. We collected epidemiological, clinical, and laboratorial data using standard forms. Results A total of 283 patients were included; genotype 1 was idenfied in 163 (57.6%) patients, genotype 3 in 112 (39.6%), genotype 2 in 7 (2.5%), and genotype 4 in 1 (0.35%). Patients with genotype 2 and 4 were excluded from analysis. Multivariate analysis showed that intravenous energetic drug, positive cryoglobulin, and cirrhosis were independently and significantly associated with HCV genotype 3 (p < 0.05). Conclusion Genotype 3 currently seems to be associated with intravenous energetic drug, high frequency of cryoglobulinemia, and advanced liver disease in our region. Understanding the distribution of the different HCV genotypes can elucidate transmission of HCV and support optimal prevention strategies. PMID:19055835

  3. Hepatitis E Virus in Cambodia: Prevalence among the General Population and Complete Genome Sequence of Genotype 4.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hiroko; Takahashi, Kazuaki; Lim, Olline; Svay, Somana; Chuon, Channarena; Hok, Sirany; Do, Son Huy; Fujimoto, Mayumi; Akita, Tomoyuki; Goto, Noboru; Katayama, Keiko; Arai, Masahiro; Tanaka, Junko

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a growing public health problem in many countries. In this study, we investigated HEV seroprevalence among the general population in the Siem Reap province, Cambodia, and performed HEV genetic analysis with the aim to develop an HEV prevention strategy. This seroepidemiological cross-sectional study conducted from 2010 to 2014 included 868 participants from four different locations in Siem Reap province, Cambodia. They answered questionnaires and provided blood samples for the analysis of hepatitis virus infections. Among the participants (360 men and 508 women; age range, 7-90 years), the prevalence of anti-HEV IgG was 18.4% (95% confidence interval: 15.9-21.0); HEV RNA was detected in two participants (0.23%) and was classified as genotype 3 and 4. Full-length genome of the genotype 4 isolate, CVS-Sie10, was sequenced; it contained 7,222 nucleotides and three ORFs and demonstrated high sequence identity with the swine China isolates swGX40 (95.57%), SS19 (94.37%), and swDQ (91.94%). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that men, elderly people, and house workers were risk groups significantly associated with the positivity for anti-HEV IgG. This is the first report on the detection of HEV genotype 4 in humans in Cambodia and on the complete genome sequence of HEV genotype 4 from this country. Our study demonstrates that new HEV infection cases occur frequently among the general population in Cambodia, and effective preventive measures are required.

  4. Hepatitis E Virus in Cambodia: Prevalence among the General Population and Complete Genome Sequence of Genotype 4

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Hiroko; Takahashi, Kazuaki; Lim, Olline; Svay, Somana; Chuon, Channarena; Hok, Sirany; Do, Son Huy; Fujimoto, Mayumi; Akita, Tomoyuki; Goto, Noboru; Katayama, Keiko; Arai, Masahiro; Tanaka, Junko

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a growing public health problem in many countries. In this study, we investigated HEV seroprevalence among the general population in the Siem Reap province, Cambodia, and performed HEV genetic analysis with the aim to develop an HEV prevention strategy. This seroepidemiological cross-sectional study conducted from 2010 to 2014 included 868 participants from four different locations in Siem Reap province, Cambodia. They answered questionnaires and provided blood samples for the analysis of hepatitis virus infections. Among the participants (360 men and 508 women; age range, 7–90 years), the prevalence of anti-HEV IgG was 18.4% (95% confidence interval: 15.9–21.0); HEV RNA was detected in two participants (0.23%) and was classified as genotype 3 and 4. Full-length genome of the genotype 4 isolate, CVS-Sie10, was sequenced; it contained 7,222 nucleotides and three ORFs and demonstrated high sequence identity with the swine China isolates swGX40 (95.57%), SS19 (94.37%), and swDQ (91.94%). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that men, elderly people, and house workers were risk groups significantly associated with the positivity for anti-HEV IgG. This is the first report on the detection of HEV genotype 4 in humans in Cambodia and on the complete genome sequence of HEV genotype 4 from this country. Our study demonstrates that new HEV infection cases occur frequently among the general population in Cambodia, and effective preventive measures are required. PMID:26317620

  5. Hepatitis E Virus in Cambodia: Prevalence among the General Population and Complete Genome Sequence of Genotype 4.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hiroko; Takahashi, Kazuaki; Lim, Olline; Svay, Somana; Chuon, Channarena; Hok, Sirany; Do, Son Huy; Fujimoto, Mayumi; Akita, Tomoyuki; Goto, Noboru; Katayama, Keiko; Arai, Masahiro; Tanaka, Junko

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a growing public health problem in many countries. In this study, we investigated HEV seroprevalence among the general population in the Siem Reap province, Cambodia, and performed HEV genetic analysis with the aim to develop an HEV prevention strategy. This seroepidemiological cross-sectional study conducted from 2010 to 2014 included 868 participants from four different locations in Siem Reap province, Cambodia. They answered questionnaires and provided blood samples for the analysis of hepatitis virus infections. Among the participants (360 men and 508 women; age range, 7-90 years), the prevalence of anti-HEV IgG was 18.4% (95% confidence interval: 15.9-21.0); HEV RNA was detected in two participants (0.23%) and was classified as genotype 3 and 4. Full-length genome of the genotype 4 isolate, CVS-Sie10, was sequenced; it contained 7,222 nucleotides and three ORFs and demonstrated high sequence identity with the swine China isolates swGX40 (95.57%), SS19 (94.37%), and swDQ (91.94%). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that men, elderly people, and house workers were risk groups significantly associated with the positivity for anti-HEV IgG. This is the first report on the detection of HEV genotype 4 in humans in Cambodia and on the complete genome sequence of HEV genotype 4 from this country. Our study demonstrates that new HEV infection cases occur frequently among the general population in Cambodia, and effective preventive measures are required. PMID:26317620

  6. Phylogenetic analysis of Japanese encephalitis virus: envelope gene based analysis reveals a fifth genotype, geographic clustering, and multiple introductions of the virus into the Indian subcontinent.

    PubMed

    Uchil, P D; Satchidanandam, V

    2001-09-01

    We report the analysis of the complete nucleotide sequence for the Indian isolate (P20778; Genbank Accession number AF080251) of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV). The phylogenetic tree topology obtained using thirteen complete genome sequences of JEV was reproduced with the envelope, NS1, NS3, and NS5 genes and revealed extensive divergence between the two Indian strains included. A more exhaustive analysis of JEV evolution using 107 envelope sequences available for isolates from different geographic locations worldwide revealed five distinct genotypes of JEV, displaying a minimum nucleotide divergence of 7% with high bootstrap support values. The tree also revealed overall clustering of strains based on geographic location, as well as multiple introductions of JEV into the Indian subcontinent. Nonsynonymous nucleotide divergence rates of the envelope gene estimated that the ancestor common to all JEV genotypes arose within the last three hundred years.

  7. Non-travel related Hepatitis E virus genotype 3 infections in the Netherlands; A case series 2004 – 2006

    PubMed Central

    Borgen, Katrine; Herremans, Tineke; Duizer, Erwin; Vennema, Harry; Rutjes, Saskia; Bosman, Arnold; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria; Koopmans, Marion

    2008-01-01

    Background Human hepatitis E virus (HEV) infections are considered an emerging disease in industrialized countries. In the Netherlands, Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infections have been associated with travel to high-endemic countries. Non-travel related HEV of genotype 3 has been diagnosed occasionally since 2000. A high homology of HEV from humans and pigs suggests zoonotic transmission but direct molecular and epidemiological links have yet to be established. We conducted a descriptive case series to generate hypotheses about possible risk factors for non-travel related HEV infections and to map the genetic diversity of HEV. Methods A case was defined as a person with HEV infection laboratory confirmed (positive HEV RT-PCR and/or HEV IgM) after 1 January 2004, without travel to a high-endemic country three months prior to onset of illness. For virus identification 148 bp of ORF2 was sequenced and compared with HEV from humans and pigs. We interviewed cases face to face using a structured questionnaire and collected information on clinical and medical history, food preferences, animal and water contact. Results We interviewed 19 cases; 17 were male, median age 50 years (25–84 y), 12 lived in the North-East of the Netherlands and 11 had preexisting disease. Most common symptoms were dark urine (n = 16) and icterus (n = 15). Sixteen ate pork ≥ once/week and six owned dogs. Two cases had received blood transfusions in the incubation period. Seventeen cases were viremic (genotype 3 HEV), two had identical HEV sequences but no identified relation. For one case, HEV with identical sequence was identified from serum and surface water nearby his home. Conclusion The results show that the modes of transmission of genotype-3 HEV infections in the Netherlands remains to be resolved and that host susceptibility may play an important role in development of disease. PMID:18462508

  8. Neurovirulence comparison of chikungunya virus isolates of the Asian and East/Central/South African genotypes from Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Chiam, Chun Wei; Chan, Yoke Fun; Ong, Kien Chai; Wong, Kum Thong; Sam, I-Ching

    2015-11-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), an alphavirus of the family Togaviridae, causes fever, polyarthritis and rash. There are three genotypes: West African, Asian and East/Central/South African (ECSA). The latter two genotypes have caused global outbreaks in recent years. Recent ECSA CHIKV outbreaks have been associated with severe neurological disease, but it is not known if different CHIKV genotypes are associated with different neurovirulence. In this study, the neurovirulence of Asian (MY/06/37348) and ECSA (MY/08/065) strains of CHIKV isolated in Malaysia were compared. Intracerebral inoculation of either virus into suckling mice was followed by virus titration, histopathology and gene expression analysis of the harvested brains. Both strains of CHIKV replicated similarly, yet mice infected with MY/06/37348 showed higher mortality. Histopathology findings showed that both CHIKV strains spread within the brain (where CHIKV antigen was localized to astrocytes and neurons) and beyond to skeletal muscle. In MY/06/37348-infected mice, apoptosis, which is associated with neurovirulence in alphaviruses, was observed earlier in brains. Comparison of gene expression showed that a pro-apoptotic gene (eIF2αK2) was upregulated at higher levels in MY/06/37348-infected mice, while genes involved in anti-apoptosis (BIRC3), antiviral responses and central nervous system protection (including CD40, IL-10RA, MyD88 and PYCARD) were upregulated more highly in MY/08/065-infected mice. In conclusion, the higher mortality observed following MY/06/37348 infection in mice is due not to higher viral replication in the brain, but to differentially expressed genes involved in host immune responses. These findings may help to identify therapeutic strategies and biomarkers for neurological CHIKV infections.

  9. Detection and genetic characterization of hepatitis E virus (HEV) genotype 3 subtype c in wild boars in Italy.

    PubMed

    Di Profio, Federica; Melegari, Irene; Sarchese, Vittorio; Robetto, Serena; Marruchella, Giuseppe; Bona, Maria Cristina; Orusa, Riccardo; Martella, Vito; Marsilio, Fulvio; Di Martino, Barbara

    2016-10-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) was detected in stools collected from wild boars in Italy, with an overall prevalence of 1.5 % (3/196). The sequence of a ~3.0-kb portion at the 3' end of the genome of one such strain, HEV/WB/P6-15/ITA, was determined. In the full-length ORF2, which encodes the capsid protein, the virus was genetically closest to wild boar and human HEV strains currently classified as genotype 3 subtype c. Interestingly, the 3' end of ORF2 of the WB/P6-15/ITA matched the 340-nucleotide (nt) sequence (94.0 % nt identity) of the human strain PeGe, identified in 2015 from a patient with acute hepatitis E in Genoa, Italy, suggesting that similar HEV strains are circulating in the same geographical setting in humans and animals.

  10. Hemoglobin Decrease with Iron Deficiency Induced by Daclatasvir plus Asunaprevir Combination Therapy for Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1b

    PubMed Central

    Shigefuku, Ryuta; Hattori, Nobuhiro; Watanabe, Tsunamasa; Matsunaga, Kotaro; Hiraishi, Tetsuya; Tamura, Tomohiro; Noguchi, Yohei; Fukuda, Yasunobu; Ishii, Toshiya; Okuse, Chiaki; Sato, Akira; Suzuki, Michihiro; Itoh, Fumio

    2016-01-01

    Background Decreased hemoglobin (Hb) level has been supposed to be a relatively rare side effect of a combination therapy against hepatitis C virus that consists of the NS5A inhibitor daclatasvir (DCV) and the NS3/4A protease inhibitor asunaprevir (ASV). Methods The study was conducted in 75 patients with genotype 1b chronic hepatitis C virus infection who had started combination therapy with DCV and ASV at St. Marianna University School of Medicine Hospital between September 2014 and December 2014. Results Among the patients examined, decreased Hb level by ≥1.5 g/dL from the values at treatment initiation was observed in 11 individuals. This was accompanied by decreased mean corpuscular volume, and iron and ferritin levels. Conclusions These findings suggest that the mechanism of the phenomenon is caused by iron deficiency. The underlying mechanism and clinical impacts will need to be further examined. PMID:26990758

  11. Detection and genetic characterization of hepatitis E virus (HEV) genotype 3 subtype c in wild boars in Italy.

    PubMed

    Di Profio, Federica; Melegari, Irene; Sarchese, Vittorio; Robetto, Serena; Marruchella, Giuseppe; Bona, Maria Cristina; Orusa, Riccardo; Martella, Vito; Marsilio, Fulvio; Di Martino, Barbara

    2016-10-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) was detected in stools collected from wild boars in Italy, with an overall prevalence of 1.5 % (3/196). The sequence of a ~3.0-kb portion at the 3' end of the genome of one such strain, HEV/WB/P6-15/ITA, was determined. In the full-length ORF2, which encodes the capsid protein, the virus was genetically closest to wild boar and human HEV strains currently classified as genotype 3 subtype c. Interestingly, the 3' end of ORF2 of the WB/P6-15/ITA matched the 340-nucleotide (nt) sequence (94.0 % nt identity) of the human strain PeGe, identified in 2015 from a patient with acute hepatitis E in Genoa, Italy, suggesting that similar HEV strains are circulating in the same geographical setting in humans and animals. PMID:27393602

  12. Using NS5B Sequencing for Hepatitis C Virus Genotyping Reveals Discordances with Commercial Platforms.

    PubMed

    Chueca, Natalia; Rivadulla, Isidro; Lovatti, Rubén; Reina, Gabriel; Blanco, Ana; Fernandez-Caballero, Jose Angel; Cardeñoso, Laura; Rodriguez-Granjer, Javier; Fernandez-Alonso, Miriam; Aguilera, Antonio; Alvarez, Marta; Galán, Juan Carlos; García, Federico

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the correct assignment of HCV genotypes by three commercial methods-Trugene HCV genotyping kit (Siemens), VERSANT HCV Genotype 2.0 assay (Siemens), and Real-Time HCV genotype II (Abbott)-compared to NS5B sequencing. We studied 327 clinical samples that carried representative HCV genotypes of the most frequent geno/subtypes in Spain. After commercial genotyping, the sequencing of a 367 bp fragment in the NS5B gene was used to assign genotypes. Major discrepancies were defined, e.g. differences in the assigned genotype by one of the three methods and NS5B sequencing, including misclassification of subtypes 1a and 1b. Minor discrepancies were considered when differences at subtype levels, other than 1a and 1b, were observed. The overall discordance with the reference method was 34% for Trugene and 15% for VERSANT HCV2.0. The Abbott assay correctly identified all 1a and 1b subtypes, but did not subtype all the 2, 3, 4 and 5 (34%) genotypes. Major discordances were found in 16% of cases for Trugene HCV, and the majority were 1b- to 1a-related discordances; major discordances were found for VERSANT HCV 2.0 in 6% of cases, which were all but one 1b to 1a cases. These results indicated that the Trugene assay especially, and to a lesser extent, Versant HCV 2.0, can fail to differentiate HCV subtypes 1a and 1b, and lead to critical errors in clinical practice for correctly using directly acting antiviral agents. PMID:27097040

  13. Using NS5B Sequencing for Hepatitis C Virus Genotyping Reveals Discordances with Commercial Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Chueca, Natalia; Rivadulla, Isidro; Lovatti, Rubén; Reina, Gabriel; Blanco, Ana; Fernandez-Caballero, Jose Angel; Cardeñoso, Laura; Rodriguez-Granjer, Javier; Fernandez-Alonso, Miriam; Aguilera, Antonio; Alvarez, Marta

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the correct assignment of HCV genotypes by three commercial methods—Trugene HCV genotyping kit (Siemens), VERSANT HCV Genotype 2.0 assay (Siemens), and Real-Time HCV genotype II (Abbott)—compared to NS5B sequencing. We studied 327 clinical samples that carried representative HCV genotypes of the most frequent geno/subtypes in Spain. After commercial genotyping, the sequencing of a 367 bp fragment in the NS5B gene was used to assign genotypes. Major discrepancies were defined, e.g. differences in the assigned genotype by one of the three methods and NS5B sequencing, including misclassification of subtypes 1a and 1b. Minor discrepancies were considered when differences at subtype levels, other than 1a and 1b, were observed. The overall discordance with the reference method was 34% for Trugene and 15% for VERSANT HCV2.0. The Abbott assay correctly identified all 1a and 1b subtypes, but did not subtype all the 2, 3, 4 and 5 (34%) genotypes. Major discordances were found in 16% of cases for Trugene HCV, and the majority were 1b- to 1a-related discordances; major discordances were found for VERSANT HCV 2.0 in 6% of cases, which were all but one 1b to 1a cases. These results indicated that the Trugene assay especially, and to a lesser extent, Versant HCV 2.0, can fail to differentiate HCV subtypes 1a and 1b, and lead to critical errors in clinical practice for correctly using directly acting antiviral agents. PMID:27097040

  14. Novel Genotyping and Quantitative Analysis of Neuraminidase Inhibitor Resistance-Associated Mutations in Influenza A Viruses by Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism Analysis▿§

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Susu; Boltz, David A.; Li, Jiang; Oshansky, Christine M.; Marjuki, Henju; Barman, Subrata; Webby, Richard J.; Webster, Robert G.; Govorkova, Elena A.

    2011-01-01

    Neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors are among the first line of defense against influenza virus infection. With the increased worldwide use of the drugs, antiviral susceptibility surveillance is increasingly important for effective clinical management and for public health epidemiology. Effective monitoring requires effective resistance detection methods. We have developed and validated a novel genotyping method for rapid detection of established NA inhibitor resistance markers in influenza viruses by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. The multi- or monoplex SNP analysis based on single nucleotide extension assays was developed to detect NA mutations H275Y and I223R/V in pandemic H1N1 viruses, H275Y in seasonal H1N1 viruses, E119V and R292K in seasonal H3N2 viruses, and H275Y and N295S in H5N1 viruses. The SNP analysis demonstrated high sensitivity for low-content NA amplicons (0.1 to 1 ng/μl) and showed 100% accordant results against a panel of defined clinical isolates. The monoplex assays for the H275Y NA mutation allowed precise and accurate quantification of the proportions of wild-type and mutant genotypes in virus mixtures (5% to 10% discrimination), with results comparable to those of pyrosequencing. The SNP analysis revealed the lower growth fitness of an H275Y mutant compared to the wild-type pandemic H1N1 virus by quantitatively genotyping progeny viruses grown in normal human bronchial epithelial cells. This novel method offers high-throughput screening capacity, relatively low costs, and the wide availability of the necessary equipment, and thus it could provide a much-needed approach for genotypic screening of NA inhibitor resistance in influenza viruses. PMID:21730113

  15. Daclatasvir vs telaprevir plus peginterferon alfa/ribavirin for hepatitis C virus genotype 1

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Ira; Zeuzem, Stefan; Flisiak, Robert; Knysz, Brygida; Lueth, Stefan; Zarebska-Michaluk, Dorota; Janczewska, Ewa; Ferenci, Peter; Diago, Moises; Zignego, Anna Linda; Safadi, Rifaat; Baruch, Yaacov; Abdurakhmanov, Dzhamal; Shafran, Stephen; Thabut, Dominique; Bruck, Rafael; Gadano, Adrian; Thompson, Alexander James; Kopit, Justin; McPhee, Fiona; Michener, Tracy; Hughes, Eric A; Yin, Philip D; Noviello, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate daclatasvir vs telaprevir, each combined with peginterferon alfa-2a/ribavirin (pegIFN/RBV), in treatment-naive hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype (GT) 1-infected patients. METHODS: In this phase 3, randomized, open-label, noninferiority study, 602 patients were randomly assigned (2:1) to daclatasvir vs telaprevir, stratified by IL28B rs12979860 host genotype (CC vs non-CC), cirrhosis status (compensated cirrhosis vs no cirrhosis), and HCV GT1 subtype (GT1a vs GT1b). Patients were selected by study inclusion criteria from a total of 793 enrolled patients. Patients received daclatasvir 60 mg once daily or telaprevir 750 mg 3 times daily plus pegIFN/RBV. Daclatasvir recipients received 24 wk of daclatasvir plus pegIFN/RBV; those without an extended rapid virologic response (eRVR; undetectable HCV-RNA at weeks 4 and 12) received an additional 24 wk of pegIFN/RBV. Telaprevir-treated patients received 12 wk of telaprevir plus pegIFN/RBV followed by 12 (with eRVR) or 36 (no eRVR) wk of pegIFN/RBV. The primary objective was to compare for noninferiority of sustained virologic response rates at posttreatment week 12 (SVR12) in GT1b-infected patients. Key secondary objectives were to demonstrate that the rates of anemia (hemoglobin < 10 g/dL) and rash-related events, through week 12, were lower with daclatasvir + pegIFN/RBV than with telaprevir + pegIFN/RBV among GT1b-infected patients. Resistance testing was performed using population-based sequencing of the NS5A region for all patients at baseline, and for patients with virologic failure or relapse and HCV-RNA ≥ 1000 IU/mL, to investigate any link between NS5A polymorphisms associated with daclatasvir resistance and virologic outcome. RESULTS: Patient demographics and disease characteristics were generally balanced across treatment arms; however, there was a higher proportion of black/African Americans in the daclatasvir groups (6.0% and 8.2% in the GT1b and GT1a groups, respectively) than in the

  16. Genotypic polymorphisms of hepatitis B virus provide useful information for estimating geographical origin or place of long-term residence of unidentified cadavers.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hiroyuki; Motani-Saitoh, Hisako; Sakurada, Koichi; Ikegaya, Hiroshi; Yajima, Daisuke; Nagasawa, Sayaka; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2014-01-01

    Increasing numbers of unidentified cadavers are a major problem. We have developed a new method for providing identification information that can determine the geographical origin or place of long-term residence of unidentified cadavers based on genotypic polymorphisms of hepatitis B virus (HBV) known to correlate with their geographical distribution. PCR of serum samples detected HBV DNA from 4 (3.9%) of 102 randomly selected Japanese forensic cadavers. Multiplex PCR did not detect multiple HBV genotypes from any single cadaver, confirming the absence of coinfection. Phylogenetic tree analysis based on a 485-bp mutant region of the HBV S gene successfully classified the HBV genotypes into A to J. Among 10 HBV-infected cadavers, 8 had genotype Ce/C2, a genotype prevalent in East Asia, and 2 had genotype Bj/B1, a Japanese-specific genotype. HBV genotypic polymorphisms correlate with the geographical distribution of the virus and thus provide important information for identifying unidentified cadavers infected with HBV.

  17. Characterization of a VHS virus genotype III isolated from rainbow trout (Oncorhychus mykiss) at a marine site on the west coast of Norway

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Norwegian production of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) has been without any outbreaks of VHS for many years until the disease emerged in a farm in western Norway in November 2007. The fish were, in addition to VHS virus, positive for gill chlamydia-like bacteria, Flavobacterium psychrophilum, and a microsporidian. A new VHS virus genotype III was isolated from the fish in RTgill-W1 cells and the complete coding region (11,065 nucleotides) was sequenced. This virus was also used in a challenge experiment to see if it could cause any mortality in rainbow trout in sea water. Results This is the first time a nearly complete sequence of a genotype III virus isolate has been presented. The organization of the genes is the same as in the other VHS virus genotypes studied (GI and GIV). Between the ORFs are nontranslated regions that contain highly conserved sequences encompassing the polyadenylation signal for one gene, and the putative transcription initiation site of the next gene. The intergenic regions vary in length from 74 nt to 128 nt. The nucleotide sequence is more similar to genotype I isolates compared to isolates from genotype II and IV. Analyses of the sequences of the N and G protein genes show that this new isolate is distinct from other VHS virus isolates and groups closely together with isolates from genotype III. In a challenge experiment, using intraperitoneal (ip) injection of the isolate, co-habitation with infected fish, and bath challenge, mortalities slightly above 40% were obtained. There was no significant difference in mortality between the bath challenged group and the ip injected group, while the mortality in the co-habitation group was as low as 30%. Conclusions All VHS virus isolates in genotype III are from marine fish in the North East Atlantic. Unlike the other known genotype III isolates, which are of low virulence, this new isolate is moderately virulent. It was not possible to detect any changes in the virus genome that

  18. A fast and low-cost genotyping method for hepatitis B virus based on pattern recognition in point-of-care settings.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xianbo; Song, Liuwei; Yang, Shuo; Guo, Meng; Yuan, Quan; Ge, Shengxiang; Min, Xiaoping; Xia, Ningshao

    2016-01-01

    A fast and low-cost method for HBV genotyping especially for genotypes A, B, C and D was developed and tested. A classifier was used to detect and analyze a one-step immunoassay lateral flow strip functionalized with genotype-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) on multiple capture lines in the form of pattern recognition for point-of-care (POC) diagnostics. The fluorescent signals from the capture lines and the background of the strip were collected via multiple optical channels in parallel. A digital HBV genotyping model, whose inputs are the fluorescent signals and outputs are a group of genotype-specific digital binary codes (0/1), was developed based on the HBV genotyping strategy. Meanwhile, a companion decoding table was established to cover all possible pairing cases between the states of a group of genotype-specific digital binary codes and the HBV genotyping results. A logical analyzing module was constructed to process the detected signals in parallel without program control, and its outputs were used to drive a set of LED indicators, which determine the HBV genotype. Comparing to the nucleic acid analysis to HBV viruses, much faster HBV genotyping with significantly lower cost can be obtained with the developed method. PMID:27306485

  19. A fast and low-cost genotyping method for hepatitis B virus based on pattern recognition in point-of-care settings

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xianbo; Song, Liuwei; Yang, Shuo; Guo, Meng; Yuan, Quan; Ge, Shengxiang; Min, Xiaoping; Xia, Ningshao

    2016-01-01

    A fast and low-cost method for HBV genotyping especially for genotypes A, B, C and D was developed and tested. A classifier was used to detect and analyze a one-step immunoassay lateral flow strip functionalized with genotype-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) on multiple capture lines in the form of pattern recognition for point-of-care (POC) diagnostics. The fluorescent signals from the capture lines and the background of the strip were collected via multiple optical channels in parallel. A digital HBV genotyping model, whose inputs are the fluorescent signals and outputs are a group of genotype-specific digital binary codes (0/1), was developed based on the HBV genotyping strategy. Meanwhile, a companion decoding table was established to cover all possible pairing cases between the states of a group of genotype-specific digital binary codes and the HBV genotyping results. A logical analyzing module was constructed to process the detected signals in parallel without program control, and its outputs were used to drive a set of LED indicators, which determine the HBV genotype. Comparing to the nucleic acid analysis to HBV viruses, much faster HBV genotyping with significantly lower cost can be obtained with the developed method. PMID:27306485

  20. Identification of Genotype 3 Hepatitis E Virus (HEV) in Serum and Fecal Samples from Pigs in Thailand and Mexico, Where Genotype 1 and 2 HEV Strains Are Prevalent in the Respective Human Populations

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, K.; Huang, F. F.; Batista, L.; Rayo, C. D.; Bezanilla, J. C.; Toth, T. E.; Meng, X. J.

    2005-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV), the causative agent of hepatitis E, is an important public health concern in many developing countries. Increasing evidence indicates that hepatitis E is a zoonotic disease. There exist four major genotypes of HEV, and HEV isolates identified in samples from pigs belong to either genotype 3 or 4. Genotype 1 and 2 HEVs are found exclusively in humans. To determine whether genotype 1 and 2 HEVs also exist in pigs, a universal reverse transcription-PCR assay that is capable of detecting all four HEV genotypes was used to test for the presence of HEV RNA in serum and/or fecal samples from pigs in Thailand, where genotype 1 human HEV is prevalent, and from pigs in Mexico, where genotype 2 human HEV was epidemic. In Thailand, swine HEV RNA was detected in sera from 10/26 pigs of 2 to 4 months of age but not in sera from 50 pigs of other ages. In Mexico, swine HEV RNA was detected in 8/125 sera and 28/92 fecal samples from 2- to 4-month-old pigs. Antibodies to swine HEV were also detected in about 81% of the Mexican pigs. A total of 44 swine HEV isolates were sequenced for the open reading frame 2 gene region. Sequence analyses revealed that all swine HEV isolates identified in samples from pigs in Thailand and Mexico belong to genotype 3. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that minor branches associated with geographic origin exist among the swine HEV isolates. The results indicated that genotype 1 or 2 swine HEV does not exist in pigs from countries where the respective human HEV genotype 1 or 2 is prevalent. It is likely that only genotype 3 and 4 HEV strains have zoonotic potential. PMID:15814985

  1. Shifting hepatitis B virus genotypes of acute hepatitis B patients in northeast Japan.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Jun; Kondo, Yasuteru; Umetsu, Teruyuki; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Miura, Masahito; Mano, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Tomoo; Obara, Noriyuki; Niitsuma, Hirofumi; Kogure, Takayuki; Nakagome, Yu; Kimura, Osamu; Iwata, Tomoaki; Morosawa, Tatsuki; Fujisaka, Yasuyuki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that acute hepatitis B (AHB) patients with genotype A HBV (HBV/A) have been increasing since the 1990s in metropolitan areas in Japan. However, little is known about the trends of HBV genotypes in AHB patients in northeast Japan where genotype B HBV (HBV/B) prevails more than in other areas. In this study, we aimed to clarify the changes in the HBV genotypes and clinical characteristics of AHB patients in this area. HBV genotypes were determined by direct sequencing (n = 125) or enzyme immunoassay (n = 9) using serum samples from AHB patients including fulminant hepatitis in 1987-2014. Among 134 patients, 26 (19%), 33 (25%), and 75 (56%) patients were infected with HBV of genotypes A, B, and C, respectively. HBV/A emerged from 2001 and the percentage was increased gradually up to 48% in 2010-2014, whereas HBV/B was reduced from 40% in 1987-1994 to 10% in 2010-2014. Phylogenetic analysis showed that three major subgenotype A2 strains had come into this area serially. The levels of HBV DNA and prothrombin time were higher in HBV/A patients than other genotypes. This study could not show significant difference in the HBsAg-positive period among genotypes nor the effect of nucleoside analogues to shorten the HBsAg-positive period. A higher level of initial HBV DNA was associated with late disappearance of HBsAg. In conclusion, the percentage of HBV/A in AHB patients has been increasing in northeast Japan since 2001, which is later than metropolitan areas, whereas that of HBV/B is decreasing.

  2. Delayed Viral Clearance after 6-Week Treatment with Peginterferon Plus Ribavirin in a Patient with Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1b

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Akira; Ishii, Toshiya; Adachi, Kayo; Takahashi, Hideaki; Sano, Fumiaki; Matsumoto, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Following interferon-based therapy for chronic hepatitis C, the negativity of hepatitis C virus RNA is essential to achieve viral clearance at the end of treatment. We report a case of clearance of chronic hepatitis C virus infection following early discontinuation (at 6 weeks) of peginterferon plus ribavirin therapy, without negativity for hepatitis C virus RNA during the treatment period. The patient was a 76-year-old Japanese male infected with hepatitis C virus genotype 1b and TT of IL28B rs8099917. Hepatitis C virus RNA remained positive at persistently low levels for more than 2 months after the cessation of therapy and became negative at 7 months after the discontinuation of therapy. Spontaneous clearance of hepatitis C virus RNA can occur following antiviral failure in patients with persistently low viral loads, and virological follow-up is therefore necessary in chronic hepatitis C virus infection, even after antiviral failure. PMID:27721727

  3. Prevalence of hepatitis C virus antibodies and genotypes in asymptomatic, first-time blood donors in Namibia.

    PubMed Central

    Vardas, E.; Sitas, F.; Seidel, K.; Casteling, A.; Sim, J.

    1999-01-01

    Reported is the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in Namibia as determined using a third-generation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) on samples of blood collected from all asymptomatic, first-time blood donors between 1 February and 31 July 1997 (n = 1941). The HCV seroprevalence was 0.9% (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.5-1.5%) and no associations were detected between a positive HCV serostatus and the person's sex, region of residence, or previous hepatitis B exposure or hepatitis B carrier status, as determined by hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). The only significant association in a logistic regression model was an increase in HCV positivity with increasing age (P = 0.04). Viral RNA was amplified from 2 out of 18 (11.1%) specimens that were ELISA positive. Genotyping of these specimens, by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), showed the presence of genotypes 5 and 1a. The positive predictive value of using HBsAg positivity as a surrogate screening marker for HCV in Namibian blood donors was poor (1.6%), with low sensitivity (16.7%) and specificity (89.3%), and detecting only 3 out of 18 serologically HCV-positive specimens. The results of this first study of the prevalence and epidemiology of HCV infection in Namibia suggest that donor blood should be screened for HCV by ELISA in order to prevent the transmission of hepatitis C virus. PMID:10680243

  4. A Linear Surface Epitope in a Proline-Rich Region of ORF3 Product of Genotype 1 Hepatitis E Virus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yonglin; Lin, Shaoli; Nan, Yuchen; Ma, Zexu; Yang, Liping; Zhang, Yanjin

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is one of the viral pathogens causing hepatitis in humans. HEV open reading frame 3 (ORF3) encodes a small multifunctional protein (VP13), which is essential for HEV infection. In this study, a linear epitope was identified in a polyproline (PXXP) motif from VP13 of genotype 1 HEV by using a monoclonal antibody. The epitope was detected in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), immunoblotting and immunofluorescence assays. Epitope mapping showed that the epitope locates in a proline-rich region containing a PXXP motif in amino acid residues 66-75 of VP13. The epitope was also detected in HEV-infected liver cells and reacted with genotype 1-specific antibodies in an HEV-positive human serum sample. The results demonstrated that the epitope in the PXXP motif of the genotype 1 VP13 is linear and surface-oriented, which should facilitate in-depth studies on the viral protein and HEV biology. PMID:27548202

  5. An expanded taxonomy of hepatitis C virus genotype 6: Characterization of 22 new full-length viral genomes.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunhua; Barnes, Eleanor; Newton, Paul N; Fu, Yongshui; Vongsouvath, Manivanh; Klenerman, Paul; Okamoto, Hiroaki; Abe, Kenji; Pybus, Oliver G; Lu, Ling

    2015-02-01

    We characterized the full-length genomes of 22 hepatitis C virus genotype 6 (HCV-6) isolates: 10 from Vietnam (classified into subtypes 6e, 6h, 6p, 6r, 6s, and 6u), one from China (confirmed as a new subtype 6xd), and 11 from the Lao PDR (representing a new subtype 6xe plus eight novel variants). With these 22 new genomes, HCV-6 now has a diverse and extended taxonomic structure, comprised of 28 assigned subtypes (denoted 6a-6xe) and 27 unassigned lineages, all of which have been represented by full-length genomes. Our phylogenetic analyses also included many partially-sequenced novel variants of HCV-6 from Lao PDR. This revealed that Lao HCV isolates are genetically very diverse and are phylogenetically distributed in multiple lineages within genotype 6. Our results suggest that HCV-6 has been maintained in Laos, a landlocked country, since the common ancestor of genotype 6 and indicates historical dispersal of HCV-6 across Southeast Asia.

  6. Genotypes of Canine Distemper Virus Determined by Analysis of the Hemagglutinin Genes of Recent Isolates from Dogs in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Mochizuki, Masami; Hashimoto, Michiru; Hagiwara, Shigeyuki; Yoshida, Yoshio; Ishiguro, Shinryo

    1999-01-01

    Canine distemper of domestic dogs is caused by canine distemper virus (CDV), a member of the morbilliviruses. It has been a highly contagious disease of great veterinary importance for centuries, but for the last several decades it has been controlled satisfactorily by modified live vaccines. In the 1990s, however, it was described that CDV strains genetically different from vaccine strains may have caused the disease in vaccinated dogs. The highest antigenic variation is found in the H protein. Therefore, in the present study, hemagglutinin (H) genes obtained from current vaccines and field isolates and amplified directly from clinical specimens were genetically analyzed by restriction fragment length polymorphism assay and sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis of the H-gene amino acid sequences revealed that at least two CDV genotypes are circulating among dogs in Japan; one is a genotype to which almost all Japanese CDV isolates belong and the other has not been previously described. Both are separate and independent from the other lineages or genotypes of vaccine strains, as well as European and U.S. CDV isolates. The results suggest that CDV has also evolved in Japan, and further studies will be needed for an evaluation and possible improvement of the efficacies of current CDV vaccines. PMID:10449479

  7. Validation of the QIAsymphony RGQ system for DNA quantitation of different BK virus genotypes in whole blood samples.

    PubMed

    Burrel, Sonia; Brunet, Christel; Hamm, Nathalie; Gits-Muselli, Maud; Hermet, Laurence; Aimé, Catherine; Agut, Henri; Boutolleau, David

    2014-02-01

    Human polyomavirus BK (BKV) is increasingly recognized as an opportunistic pathogen in transplant recipients. The aim of this work was to evaluate the artus(®) BK Virus QS-RGQ assay on the QIAsymphony RGQ system in whole blood (WB) samples (tests performed in an off-label capacity) according to different BKV genotypes by comparison with a laboratory-developed assay. BKV loads were measured in 111 WB samples and BKV genotype was determined by sequencing the full-length VP1 gene. The artus(®) assay exhibited a limit of detection of 77copies/mL, a linearity range from 3.0 to 6.0log10copies/mL, intra-assay and inter-assay coefficients of variation ranging from 0.65% to 5.18%. Regarding BKV quantitation, artus(®) and laboratory-developed assays were highly correlated (Spearman correlation coefficient Rho=0.79; P<0.0001) with an excellent overall agreement (96.4%) and no significant quantitative difference according to Bland-Altman analysis (mean difference: -0.34log10copies/mL). The results did not show any influence of BKV genotype on BKV quantitation by the artus(®) assay, except a potential underquantitation of BKV subtype Ia which deserves further confirmation. In conclusion, the QIAsymphony RGQ system appears to be appropriate for the quantitation of BKV load in WB samples.

  8. An expanded taxonomy of hepatitis C virus genotype 6: Characterization of 22 new full-length viral genomes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunhua; Barnes, Eleanor; Newton, Paul N.; Fu, Yongshui; Vongsouvath, Manivanh; Klenerman, Paul; Okamoto, Hiroaki; Abe, Kenji; Pybus, Oliver G.; Lu, Ling

    2015-01-01

    We characterized the full-length genomes of 22 hepatitis C virus genotype 6 (HCV-6) isolates: 10 from Vietnam (classified into subtypes 6e, 6h, 6p, 6r, 6s, and 6u), one from China (confirmed as a new subtype 6xd), and 11 from the Lao PDR (representing a new subtype 6xe plus eight novel variants). With these 22 new genomes, HCV-6 now has a diverse and extended taxonomic structure, comprised of 28 assigned subtypes (denoted 6a-6xe) and 27 unassigned lineages, all of which have been represented by full-length genomes. Our phylogenetic analyses also included many partially-sequenced novel variants of HCV-6 from Lao PDR. This revealed that Lao HCV isolates are genetically very diverse and are phylogenetically distributed in multiple lineages within genotype 6. Our results suggest that HCV-6 has been main