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Sample records for papillomavirus cohort study

  1. Quadrivalent Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Effectiveness: A Swedish National Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Incidence of condyloma, or genital warts (GW), is the earliest possible disease outcome to measure when assessing the effectiveness of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination strategies. Efficacy trials that follow prespecified inclusion and exclusion criteria may not be fully generalizable to real-life HPV vaccination programs, which target a broader segment of the population. We assessed GW incidence after on-demand vaccination with quadrivalent HPV vaccine using individual-level data from the entire Swedish population. Methods An open cohort of girls and women aged 10 to 44 years living in Sweden between 2006 and 2010 (N > 2.2 million) was linked to multiple population registers to identify incident GW in relation to HPV vaccination. For vaccine effectiveness, incidence rate ratios of GW were estimated using time-to-event analyses with adjustment for attained age and parental education level, stratifying on age at first vaccination. Results A total of 124 000 girls and women were vaccinated between 2006 and 2010. Girls and women with at least one university-educated parent were 15 times more likely to be vaccinated before age 20 years than girls and women whose parents did not complete high school (relative risk ratio = 15.45, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 14.65 to 16.30). Among those aged older than 20 years, GW rates declined among the unvaccinated, suggesting that HPV vaccines were preferentially used by women at high risk of GW. Vaccination effectiveness was 76% (95% CI = 73% to 79%) among those who received three doses of the vaccine with their first dose before age 20 years. Vaccine effectiveness was highest in girls vaccinated before age 14 years (effectiveness = 93%, 95% CI = 73% to 98%). Conclusions Young age at first vaccination is imperative for maximizing quadrivalent HPV vaccine effectiveness. PMID:23486550

  2. Hypersensitivity reactions to human papillomavirus vaccine in Australian schoolgirls: retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Liew Woei; Crawford, Nigel; Tang, Mimi L K; Buttery, Jim; Royle, Jenny; Gold, Michael; Ziegler, Christine; Quinn, Patrick; Elia, Sonja

    2008-01-01

    Objective To describe the outcomes of clinical evaluation, skin testing, and vaccine challenge in adolescent schoolgirls with suspected hypersensitivity to the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine introduced in Australian schools in 2007. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Two tertiary paediatric allergy centres in Victoria and South Australia, Australia. Participants 35 schoolgirls aged 12 to 18.9 years with suspected hypersensitivity reactions to the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine. Main outcome measures Clinical review and skin prick and intradermal testing with the quadrivalent vaccine and subsequent challenge with the vaccine. Results 35 schoolgirls with suspected hypersensitivity to the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine were notified to the specialised immunisation services in 2007, after more than 380 000 doses had been administered in schools. Of these 35 schoolgirls, 25 agreed to further evaluation. Twenty three (92%) experienced reactions after the first dose. Thirteen (52%) experienced urticaria or angio-oedema, and of these, two experienced anaphylaxis. Thirteen had generalised rash, one with angio-oedema. The median time to reaction was 90 minutes. Nineteen (76%) underwent skin testing with the quadrivalent vaccine: all were skin prick test negative and one was intradermal test positive. Eighteen (72%) were subsequently challenged with the quadrivalent vaccine and three (12%) elected to receive the bivalent vaccine. Seventeen tolerated the challenge and one reported limited urticaria four hours after the vaccine had been administered. Only three of the 25 schoolgirls were found to have probable hypersensitivity to the quadrivalent vaccine. Conclusion True hypersensitivity to the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine in Australian schoolgirls was uncommon and most tolerated subsequent doses. PMID:19050332

  3. Prevalence, Acquisition, and Clearance of Cervical Human Papillomavirus Infection among Women with Normal Cytology: Hawaii Human Papillomavirus Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Marc T.; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; McDuffie, Katharine; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Zhu, Xuemei; Thompson, Pamela J.; Ning, Lily; Killeen, Jeffrey; Kamemoto, Lori; Hernandez, Brenda Y.

    2009-01-01

    Few natural history studies of cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) incidence and duration have been conducted among older women, especially from multiethnic populations. Viral and nonviral determinants of HPV acquisition and clearance were examined among 972 sexually active women, ages 18 to 85 years, recruited from clinics on Oahu, Hawaii, and followed for a mean duration of 15 months (range, 2–56 months). Interviews and cervical cell specimens for cytology and HPV DNA detection by PCR, using the PGMY09/PGMY11 primer system, were obtained at baseline and at 4-month intervals. The prevalence of cervical HPV infection was 25.6% at study entry. A total of 476 incident genotype-specific infections were observed during the follow-up period. The incidence of high-risk (HR) HPV types (9.26 per 1,000 woman-months) was similar to low-risk (LR) HPV types (8.24 per 1,000 woman-months). The most commonly acquired HR-HPV types were HPV-52, HPV-16, and HPV-31; and their incidence was increased significantly with a coexisting cervical HPV infection. Cervical HPV acquisition decreased with age, income, and long-term use of oral contraceptives and increased with number of sexual partners, use of hormonal creams, alcohol drinking, and condom use by a sexual partner. Cohort participants cleared 265 of the 476 incident infections during follow-up. LR-HPV infections cleared more rapidly than did HR-HPV infections (median, 180 days versus 224 days). Clearance times were enhanced among older women and women with multiple infections. Our data suggest several viral and nonviral determinants of cervical HPV acquisition and clearance that might be used in cervical cancer prevention programs. PMID:18974124

  4. Incidence and clearance of oral human papillomavirus infection in men: the HIM cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Kreimer, Aimée R.; Pierce Campbell, Christine M.; Lin, Hui-Yi; Fulp, William; Papenfuss, Mary R.; Abrahamsen, Martha; Hildesheim, Allan; Villa, Luisa L.; Salmerón, Jorge J.; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Giuliano, Anna R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection causes a subset of oropharyngeal cancers. These cancers disproportionately affect men, are increasing in incidence, and have no proven prevention methods. We aimed to establish the natural history of oral HPV infection in men. Methods To estimate incidence and clearance of HPV infections, men residing in Brazil, Mexico, and the USA who were HIV negative and reported no history of anogenital cancer were recruited into the HPV Infection in Men (HIM) cohort study. A subset of the cohort who provided two or more oral rinse-and-gargle samples with valid HPV results and who completed a minimum of 2 weeks of follow-up were included in this analysis. Oral rinse-and-gargle samples and questionnaire data were obtained every 6 months for up to 4 years. Samples were analysed for the presence of oncogenic and non-oncogenic HPV infections by the linear array method. Findings 1626 men aged 18–73 years and with a median follow-up of 12·7 months (IQR 12·1–14·7) were included in the analysis. During the first 12 months of follow-up, 4·4% (95% CI 3·5–5·6; n=115 incident infections) of men acquired an incident oral HPV infection, 1·7% (1·2–2·5; n=53 incident infections) an oral oncogenic HPV infection, and 0·6% (0·3–1·1; n=18 incident infections) an oral HPV 16 infection. Acquisition of oral oncogenic HPV was significantly associated with smoking and not being married or cohabiting, but was similar across countries, age groups, and reported sexual behaviours. Median duration of infection was 6·9 months (95 % CI 6·2–9·3; n=45 cleared infections) for any HPV, 6·3 months (6·0–9·9; n=18 cleared infections) for oncogenic HPV, and 7·3 months (6·0–not estimable; n=5 cleared infections) for HPV 16. Eight of the 18 incident oral HPV 16 infections persisted for two or more study visits. Interpretation Newly acquired oral oncogenic HPV infections in healthy men were rare and most were cleared within 1 year

  5. Human papillomavirus vaccination and social inequality: results from a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Roberts, S A; Brabin, L; Stretch, R; Baxter, D; Elton, P; Kitchener, H; McCann, R

    2011-03-01

    We investigated the effect of social inequalities on the uptake of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination, combining data from a feasibility study conducted in 2007-2008 in 2817 secondary schoolgirls in two UK primary-care trusts, with census and child health records. Uptake was significantly lower in more deprived areas (P<0·001) and in ethnic minority girls (P=0·013). The relatively small proportion of parents who actively refused vaccination by returning a negative consent form were more likely to come from more advantaged areas (P<0·001). Non-responding parents were from more deprived (P<0·001) and ethnic minority (P=0·001) backgrounds. Girls who did not receive HPV vaccination were less likely to have received all their childhood immunizations particularly measles, mumps and rubella (MMR). Different approaches may be needed to maximize HPV vaccine uptake in engaged and non-responding parents, including ethnic-specific approaches for non-responders.

  6. Oral Human Papillomavirus in Youth From the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Farhat, Sepideh; Yao, Tzy-Jyun; Ryder, Mark I; Russell, Jonathan S; Van Dyke, Russell B; Hazra, Rohan; Shiboski, Caroline H

    2016-08-01

    In contrast to high rates of oral human papillomavirus (HPV) found in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults, only 2% of 209 perinatally HIV-infected youth had oral HPV. This rate was similar in HIV-exposed but uninfected youth. No association was found with sexual activity; however, low CD4 counts were associated with oral HPV.

  7. Incidence and clearance of genital human papillomavirus infection in men (HIM): a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Giuliano, Anna R; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Fulp, William; Villa, Luisa L; Lazcano, Eduardo; Papenfuss, Mary R; Abrahamsen, Martha; Salmeron, Jorge; Anic, Gabriella M; Rollison, Dana E; Smith, Danelle

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) cause genital warts and cancers in men. The natural history of HPV infection in men is largely unknown, and that information is needed to inform prevention strategies. The goal in this study was to estimate incidence and clearance of type-specific genital HPV infection in men, and to assess the associated factors. Methods Men (aged 18–70 years), residing in Brazil, Mexico, and the USA, who were HIV negative and reported no history of cancer were recruited from the general population, universities, and organised health-care systems. They were assessed every 6 months for a median follow-up of 27·5 months (18·0–31·2). Specimens from the coronal sulcus, glans penis, shaft, and scrotum were obtained for the assessment of the status of HPV genotypes. Findings In 1159 men, the incidence of a new genital HPV infection was 38·4 per 1000 person months (95% CI 34·3–43·0). Oncogenic HPV infection was significantly associated with having a high number of lifetime female sexual partners (hazard ratio 2·40, 1·38–4·18, for at least 50 partners vs not more than one partner), and number of male anal-sexual partners (2·57, 1·46–4·49, for at least three male partners vs no recent partners). Median duration of HPV infection was 7·52 months (6·80–8·61) for any HPV and 12·19 months (7·16–18·17) for HPV 16. Clearance of oncogenic HPV infection decreased in men with a high number of lifetime female partners (0·49, 0·31–0·76, for at least 50 female partners vs not more than one partner), and in men in Brazil (0·71, 0·56–0·91) and Mexico (0·73, 0·57–0·94) compared with the USA. Clearance of oncogenic HPV was more rapid with increasing age (1·02, 1·01–1·03). Interpretation The data from this study are useful for the development of realistic cost-effectiveness models for male HPV vaccination internationally. Funding National Cancer Institute. PMID:21367446

  8. Human papillomavirus infection and lymphoma incidence using cervical conization as a surrogate marker: a Danish nationwide cohort study.

    PubMed

    Intaraphet, Suthida; Farkas, Dóra Körmendiné; Johannesdottir Schmidt, Sigrun Alba; Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre; Søgaard, Mette

    2017-06-01

    Persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection may promote carcinogenesis by hyperactivation of the immune system. We, therefore, explored the associations between HPV infection and risk of Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma in a nationwide cohort study using conization as a surrogate marker. We identified all Danish women who underwent conization between 1978 and 2011. We computed standardized incidence ratios and 95% confidence intervals for Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma based on national cancer incidence rates. Among 87 435 women who underwent conization, we noted an increased incidence of Hodgkin (standardized incidence ratio 1.48, 95% confidence interval 1.05-2.02) but only a slight increase for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (standardized incidence ratio 1.10, 95% confidence interval 0.97-1.25). As measured by conization, HPV infection is associated with an increased risk of lymphoma. This association may be attributable to a chronic immune activation induced by persistent HPV infection and/or failure of the immune system both to clear HPV infection and to control lymphoma development. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Reproductive and genital health and risk of cervical human papillomavirus infection: results from the Ludwig-McGill cohort study.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Eileen; Ramanakumar, Agnihotram V; El-Zein, Mariam; Silva, Flavia R; Galan, Lenice; Baggio, Maria L; Villa, Luisa L; Franco, Eduardo L

    2016-03-08

    There are inconsistencies in the literature on reproductive and genital health determinants of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, the primary cause of cervical cancer. We examined these factors in the Ludwig-McGill Cohort Study, a longitudinal, repeated-measurements investigation on the natural history of HPV infection. We analyzed a cohort subset of 1867 women with one complete year of follow-up. We calculated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for reproductive and genital health characteristics from questionnaire and laboratory data in relation to 1-year period prevalence of HPV infection. Two outcomes were measured; the first based on phylogenetic grouping of HPV types based on tissue tropism and oncogenicity (Alphapapillomavirus Subgenus 1: species 1, 8, 10 and 13; Subgenus 2: species 5, 6, 7, 9, 11; Subgenus 3: species 3, 4 and 14) and the second based on transient or persistent HPV infections. Lifetime (Subgenus 3 OR = 2.00, CI: 1.23-3.24) and current (Subgenus 3 OR =2.00, CI: 1.15-3.47) condom use and use of contraceptive injections (Subgenus 1 OR = 1.96, CI: 1.22-3.16, Subgenus 2 OR = 1.34, CI: 1.00-1.79) were associated with increased risk of HPV infection. Intrauterine device use was protective (Subgenus 1 OR = 0.48, CI: 0.30-0.75, Subgenus 2 OR = 0.78, CI: 0.62-0.98). These factors were not associated with persistence of HPV infection. Tampon use, previous gynecologic infections and cervical inflammation were associated with an overall increased risk of HPV infection. Cervical HPV infection was associated with reproductive and genital health factors. Further studies are necessary to confirm the low to moderate associations observed.

  10. Individual- and regional-level determinants of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine refusal: the Ontario Grade 8 HPV vaccine cohort study.

    PubMed

    Remes, Olivia; Smith, Leah M; Alvarado-Llano, Beatriz E; Colley, Lindsey; Lévesque, Linda E

    2014-10-08

    Studies on the determinants of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine use have generally focused on individual-level characteristics, despite the potentially important influence of regional-level characteristics. Therefore, we undertook a population-based, retrospective cohort study to identify individual- and regional-level determinants of HPV vaccine refusal (non-receipt) in Ontario's (Canada) Grade 8 HPV Immunization Program. Ontario's administrative health and immunization databases were used to identify girls eligible for free HPV vaccination in 2007-2011 and to ascertain individual-level characteristics of cohort members (socio-demographics, vaccination history, health care utilization, medical history). The social and material characteristics of the girl's region (health unit) were derived from the 2006 Canadian Census. Generalized estimating equations (binomial distribution, logit link) were used to estimate the population-average effects of individual- and regional-level characteristics on HPV vaccine refusal. Our cohort consisted of 144,047 girls, 49.3% of whom refused HPV vaccination. Factors associated with refusal included a previous diagnosis of Down's syndrome (OR = 1.37, 95% CI 1.16-1.63) or autism (OR = 1.60, 95% CI 1.34-1.90), few physician visits (OR = 1.45, 95% CI 1.35-1.55), and previous refusal of mandatory (OR = 2.23, 95% CI 2.07-2.40) and optional (OR = 3.96, 95% CI 3.87-4.05) vaccines. Refusal was highest among the lowest and highest income levels. Finally, a previous diagnosis of obesity and living in an area of high deprivation were associated with lower refusal (OR = 0.87, 95% CI 0.83-0.92 and OR = 0.82 95%, CI 0.79-0.86, respectively). Studies on HPV vaccine determinants should consider regional-level factors. Efforts to increase HPV vaccine acceptance should include vulnerable populations (such as girls of low income) and girls with limited contact with the healthcare system.

  11. Prevalence of Anal Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Types in the Bangkok Men Who Have Sex With Men Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Cranston, Ross D; Althouse, Andrew D; van Griensven, Frits; Janocko, Laura; Curlin, Marcel E; Chaikummao, Supaporn; Chonwattana, Wannee; Siegel, Aaron; Holtz, Timothy H; McGowan, Ian

    2015-12-01

    The quadrivalent human papillomavirus (qHPV) and 9 valent (nHPV) vaccine are licensed for males to prevent anal HPV-associated dysplasia and cancer caused by HPV types 6, 11, 16, and 18 (qHPV) and additional types 33, 35, 45, 52, and 58 (nHPV), respectively. Both conditions are common in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected men who have sex with men (MSM). It is not well documented which anal HPV vaccine types are most prevalent in Southeast Asia. A convenience sample of 400 anal swabs were obtained from 200 HIV-infected and 200 HIV-uninfected sexually active Bangkok MSM Cohort Study participants. After swab collection in PreservCyt (Cytyc Corp, Marlborough, MA), the media was stored at -80°C until processing. DNA was extracted, amplified by polymerase chain reaction, denatured, and then hybridized to probes for 37 HPV types and β-globin. The mean participant age was 25.6 years (range, 18-55 years); the mean CD4 T-cell count was 410 cells/mm in the HIV-infected participants. Among all swab samples, 386 (192 HIV-positive and 194 HIV-negative) had adequate β-globin for HPV genotype testing. Anal HPV type was detected in 44.3% of participants whose samples underwent genotype testing. Both qHPV and nHPV types were more frequently detected in HIV-infected compared with HIV-uninfected (42.2% vs. 23.2% [P < 0.01], 50.0% vs. 24.2% [P < 0.01]), respectively). There were no significant relationships between social behaviors (alcohol use, drug use) or sexual behaviors (number of partners, condom usage, sexual positioning) and anal HPV prevalence. The prevalence of anal vaccine HPV types in Thai MSM was similar to that reported in MSM from Western populations and has a similar distribution by HIV status. Targeting young MSM with vaccination could offer protection against HPV vaccine types.

  12. Human papillomavirus vaccination and risk of autoimmune diseases: A large cohort study of over 2million young girls in France.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Sara; Chaignot, Christophe; Collin, Cédric; Dray-Spira, Rosemary; Weill, Alain; Zureik, Mahmoud

    2017-08-24

    Whether human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination could induce or trigger autoimmune diseases (AID) has been questioned, and potentially contributes to low immunization coverage in France. This study evaluated the association between HPV vaccination and the risk of AID using routinely collected data sources. All girls aged 13-16years between 2008 and 2012, covered by the general health insurance scheme and without history of HPV vaccination or AID, were included and followed using French nationwide databases. Fourteen neurological, rheumatological, haematological, gastrointestinal or endocrine AID, were identified from ICD-10 codes allocated to hospital stays and long-term illnesses or by marker drugs. Their incidence was compared between girls exposed and non-exposed to HPV vaccination, using a Cox model adjusted for inclusion year, geographic area, socio-economic indicators, healthcare use level and other immunizations. Among 2,252,716 girls, 37% received HPV vaccine and 4,096 AID occurred during a mean follow-up time of 33months. The incidence of AID was not increased after exposure to HPV vaccination, except for Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) (incidence rate of 1.4 among exposed [20 cases] versus 0.4 per 100,000 PY among unexposed [23 cases]; adjusted HR: 3.78 [1.79-7.98]). This association persisted across numerous sensitivity analyses and was particularly marked in the first months following vaccination. Under the hypothesis of a causal relationship, this would result in 1-2 GBS cases attributable to HPV vaccine per 100,000 girls vaccinated. Our study provides reassuring results regarding the risk of AID after HPV vaccination, but an apparently increased risk of GBS was detected. Further studies are warranted to confirm this finding. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Bonafide, type-specific human papillomavirus persistence among HIV-positive pregnant women: predictive value for cytological abnormalities, a longitudinal cohort study.

    PubMed

    Meyrelles, Angela Ri; Siqueira, Juliana D; Santos, Pâmela P Dos; Hofer, Cristina B; Luiz, Ronir R; Seuánez, Héctor N; Almeida, Gutemberg; Soares, Marcelo A; Soares, Esmeralda A; Machado, Elizabeth S

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the rate of human papillomavirus (HPV) persistence, associated risk factors, and predictors of cytological alteration outcomes in a cohort of human immunodeficiency virus-infected pregnant women over an 18-month period. HPV was typed through L1 gene sequencing in cervical smears collected during gestation and at 12 months after delivery. Outcomes were defined as nonpersistence (clearance of the HPV in the 2nd sample), re-infection (detection of different types of HPV in the 2 samples), and type-specific HPV persistence (the same HPV type found in both samples). An unfavourable cytological outcome was considered when the second exam showed progression to squamous intraepithelial lesion or high squamous intraepithelial lesion. Ninety patients were studied. HPV DNA persistence occurred in 50% of the cases composed of type-specific persistence (30%) or re-infection (20%). A low CD4+T-cell count at entry was a risk factor for type-specific, re-infection, or HPV DNA persistence. The odds ratio (OR) was almost three times higher in the type-specific group when compared with the re-infection group (OR = 2.8; 95% confidence interval: 0.43-22.79). Our findings show that bonafide (type-specific) HPV persistence is a stronger predictor for the development of cytological abnormalities, highlighting the need for HPV typing as opposed to HPV DNA testing in the clinical setting.

  14. Bonafide, type-specific human papillomavirus persistence among HIV-positive pregnant women: predictive value for cytological abnormalities, a longitudinal cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Meyrelles, Angela RI; Siqueira, Juliana D; dos Santos, Pâmela P; Hofer, Cristina B; Luiz, Ronir R; Seuánez, Héctor N; Almeida, Gutemberg; Soares, Marcelo A; Soares, Esmeralda A; Machado, Elizabeth S

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the rate of human papillomavirus (HPV) persistence, associated risk factors, and predictors of cytological alteration outcomes in a cohort of human immunodeficiency virus-infected pregnant women over an 18-month period. HPV was typed through L1 gene sequencing in cervical smears collected during gestation and at 12 months after delivery. Outcomes were defined as nonpersistence (clearance of the HPV in the 2nd sample), re-infection (detection of different types of HPV in the 2 samples), and type-specific HPV persistence (the same HPV type found in both samples). An unfavourable cytological outcome was considered when the second exam showed progression to squamous intraepithelial lesion or high squamous intraepithelial lesion. Ninety patients were studied. HPV DNA persistence occurred in 50% of the cases composed of type-specific persistence (30%) or re-infection (20%). A low CD4+T-cell count at entry was a risk factor for type-specific, re-infection, or HPV DNA persistence. The odds ratio (OR) was almost three times higher in the type-specific group when compared with the re-infection group (OR = 2.8; 95% confidence interval: 0.43-22.79). Our findings show that bonafide (type-specific) HPV persistence is a stronger predictor for the development of cytological abnormalities, highlighting the need for HPV typing as opposed to HPV DNA testing in the clinical setting. PMID:26872340

  15. The EVVA Cohort Study: Anal and Cervical Type-Specific Human Papillomavirus Prevalence, Persistence, and Cytologic Findings in Women Living With HIV.

    PubMed

    de Pokomandy, Alexandra; Kaufman, Elaina; de Castro, Christina; Mayrand, Marie-Hélène; Burchell, Ann N; Klein, Marina; Charest, Louise; Auger, Manon; Rodrigues-Coutlée, Sophie; Coutlée, François

    2017-08-15

    The risk of anal cancer due to high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) is higher in women living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) than in the general population. We present findings of cervical and anal HPV and cytologic tests at baseline in the EVVA cohort study and HPV persistence data 6 months after baseline. Semiannual visits included questionnaires, chart reviews, cervical/anal cytologic and cervical/anal HPV testing for 2 years. Genotyping for 36 HPV genotypes was performed using the Roche Linear Array HPV genotyping test. A total of 151 women living with HIV were recruited. At baseline, 75% had anal HPV, 51% had anal HR-HPV, 50% had cervical HPV, and 29% had cervical HR-HPV. Anal HPV-16 and HPV-51 were more frequent in women born in Canada (31% and 29%, respectively, compared with ≤16% for other women). Most anal HR-HPV types detected at 6 months (57%-93%) were persistent from baseline. Findings of anal cytologic tests were abnormal for 37% of women. Anal HPV is highly prevalent in women living with HIV, and type distribution varies by place of birth. High-resolution anoscopy was indicated in more than one third of results. As anal cancer is potentially preventable, these important findings need to be considered when selecting the best approach for anal cancer screening programs.

  16. The influence of multiple human papillomavirus types on the risk of genotype-concordant incident infections of the anus and cervix: the Hawaii HPV cohort study.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Marc T; McDuffie, Katharine; Hernandez, Brenda Y; Wilkens, Lynne R; Zhu, Xuemei; Thompson, Pamela J; Killeen, Jeffrey; Kamemoto, Lori; Shvetsov, Yurii B

    2011-02-01

    The influence of multiple human papillomavirus (HPV) types on detection of concordant incident HPV infections of the cervix or anus following infection at the other anatomic site was examined in a cohort of 897 women. Multiple HPV infections at the anus were not significantly associated with subsequent acquisition of a concordant cervical infection, whereas prior coinfections in the cervix increased risk of a new cervical HPV infection. Incident anal HPV infections following concordant cervical HPV infections increased significantly among women with preexisting cervical or anal coinfections. Potential synergy in acquisition of cervical and anal HPV infections has implications for prophylactic vaccine effectiveness.

  17. Incidence of new-onset autoimmune disease in girls and women with pre-existing autoimmune disease after quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccination: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Grönlund, O; Herweijer, E; Sundström, K; Arnheim-Dahlström, L

    2016-12-01

    To assess whether quadrivalent human papillomavirus (qHPV) vaccination is associated with increased incidence of new-onset autoimmune disease in girls and women with pre-existing autoimmune disease. This register-based open cohort study included all girls and women between 10 and 30 years of age in Sweden in 2006-2012 diagnosed with at least one of 49 prespecified autoimmune diseases (n = 70 265). Incidence rate ratios were estimated for new-onset autoimmune disease within 180 days of qHPV vaccination using Poisson regression adjusting for, country of birth, parental country of birth, parental income and parental education. A total of 70 265 girls and women had at least one of the 49 predefined autoimmune diseases; 16% of these individuals received at least one dose of qHPV vaccine. In unvaccinated girls and women, 5428 new-onset autoimmune diseases were observed during 245 807 person-years at a rate of 22.1 (95% CI 21.5-22.7) new events per 1000 person-years. In vaccinated girls and women, there were 124 new events during 7848 person-years at a rate of 15.8 (95% CI 13.2-18.8) per 1000 person-years. There was no increase in the incidence of new-onset autoimmune disease associated with qHPV vaccination during the risk period; on the contrary, we found a slightly reduced risk (incidence rate ratio 0.77, 95% CI 0.65-0.93). In this nationwide study, qHPV vaccination was not associated with increased incidence of new-onset autoimmune disease in girls and women with pre-existing autoimmune disease. © 2016 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  18. Use of a high-risk human papillomavirus DNA test as the primary test in a cervical cancer screening programme: a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Zorzi, M; Del Mistro, A; Farruggio, A; de'Bartolomeis, L; Frayle-Salamanca, H; Baboci, L; Bertazzo, A; Cocco, P; Fedato, C; Gennaro, M; Marchi, N; Penon, M G; Cogo, C; Ferro, A

    2013-09-01

    To present the results of the first 2 years of a human papillomavirus (HPV) test-based screening programme outside the research context. Population-based cohort study. A cervical service screening programme in Italy. Women aged 25-64 years invited to screening from April 2009 to April 2011. Eligible women were invited to undergo an HPV test: those with a negative HPV test went on to the next screening episode; those with a positive HPV went on to triage with a Pap smear. Women with positive cytology (i.e. positive for atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance or worse, ASC-US+) were referred to colposcopy, whereas those with negative cytology were referred to repeat HPV testing 1 year later. Participation rate, positivity at HPV and at triage, referral rate to colposcopy, positive predictive value for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2+ (CIN2+) at colposcopy, and detection rate for CIN2+. Participation increased compared with the previous Pap programme (60.6 versus 43.9%). The HPV positivity rate was 7.0; 39.6% of Pap smears were scored as positive, and therefore 2.8% of the women screened were referred for immediate colposcopy. The compliance of women who scored positive for HPV and negative for Pap for repeat HPV testing at 12 months was 78.6%, and the HPV positivity rate was 56.6%. The overall referral rate to colposcopy was 4.6%. The overall detection rate for CIN2+ was 4.5 versus 1.5% of the Pap programme (25-34 years, 8.2%; 35+ years, 3.6%). Compared with the traditional Pap test, the HPV programme recorded a higher response to invitation and an increased DR for CIN2+. The most critical aspects were the reading of cytology in women that were positive for HPV and the increased workload at colposcopy. © 2013 RCOG.

  19. p16/Ki-67 co-expression associates high risk human papillomavirus persistence and cervical histopathology: a 3-year cohort study in China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lu-Lu; Guo, Hui-Qin; Lei, Xiao-Qin; Qin, Yu; Wu, Ze-Ni; Kang, Le-Ni; Zhang, Xun; Qiao, You-Lin; Chen, Wen

    2016-10-04

    To evaluate the association of p16/Ki-67 co-expression and persistence of high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection as well as cervical abnormalities. We performed a 3-year cohort study among which 2498 Chinese women aged 25 to 65 years were screened by different HPV tests in 2011. 690 women who were positive at any of the tests and a random sample of 164 women with all negative results received colposcopy, cervical specimens for cobas HPV test (Roche diagnostics) were collected before colposcopy; of this group, 737 cervical specimens were collected to perform cobas, Liquid-based cytology, HPV E6 test (Arbor Vita Corporation) and p16/Ki-67 dual staining (Roche diagnostics) in 2014. Colposcopy and biopsies was performed on women with any abnormal result. Compared to women without HR-HPV persistent infection, women in the HR-HPV persistence group had a higher risk of p16/Ki-67 positive, with an adjusted Odds Ratio(OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of 6.29 (4.07-9.72); moreover, adjusted odds ratio for women who had HPV16/18 persistent infection was nearly 4-folder higher than women with other 12 HR-HPV persistent infection (adjusted OR = 17.15, 95% CI: 7.11-41.33 vs adjusted OR = 4.68, 95% CI: 2.89-7.58). Additionally, p16/Ki-67 positivity rate significantly increased with the severity of the cytological and histological abnormalities, and resulted strongly associated with a CIN2+ diagnosis (OR = 16.03, 95% CI: 4.46-57.59). p16/Ki-67 co-expressions associated strongly with HR-HPV persistence, especially with HPV16/18, and the presence of a CIN2+ lesion. Therefore, p16/Ki-67 could be considered as a suitable biomarker for cervical cancer screening, particularly in HPV-based screening programs.

  20. p16/Ki-67 co-expression associates high risk human papillomavirus persistence and cervical histopathology: a 3-year cohort study in China

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lu-Lu; Guo, Hui-Qin; Lei, Xiao-Qin; Qin, Yu; Wu, Ze-Ni; Kang, Le-Ni; Zhang, Xun; Qiao, You-Lin; Chen, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the association of p16/Ki-67 co-expression and persistence of high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection as well as cervical abnormalities. Methods We performed a 3-year cohort study among which 2498 Chinese women aged 25 to 65 years were screened by different HPV tests in 2011. 690 women who were positive at any of the tests and a random sample of 164 women with all negative results received colposcopy, cervical specimens for cobas HPV test (Roche diagnostics) were collected before colposcopy; of this group, 737 cervical specimens were collected to perform cobas, Liquid-based cytology, HPV E6 test (Arbor Vita Corporation) and p16/Ki-67 dual staining (Roche diagnostics) in 2014. Colposcopy and biopsies was performed on women with any abnormal result. Results Compared to women without HR-HPV persistent infection, women in the HR-HPV persistence group had a higher risk of p16/Ki-67 positive, with an adjusted Odds Ratio(OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of 6.29 (4.07-9.72); moreover, adjusted odds ratio for women who had HPV16/18 persistent infection was nearly 4-folder higher than women with other 12 HR-HPV persistent infection (adjusted OR = 17.15, 95% CI: 7.11-41.33 vs adjusted OR = 4.68, 95% CI: 2.89-7.58). Additionally, p16/Ki-67 positivity rate significantly increased with the severity of the cytological and histological abnormalities, and resulted strongly associated with a CIN2+ diagnosis (OR = 16.03, 95% CI: 4.46-57.59). Conclusions p16/Ki-67 co-expressions associated strongly with HR-HPV persistence, especially with HPV16/18, and the presence of a CIN2+ lesion. Therefore, p16/Ki-67 could be considered as a suitable biomarker for cervical cancer screening, particularly in HPV-based screening programs. PMID:27588487

  1. Prospective seroepidemiologic study on the role of Human Papillomavirus and other infections in cervical carcinogenesis: evidence from the EPIC cohort.

    PubMed

    Castellsagué, Xavier; Pawlita, Michael; Roura, Esther; Margall, Núria; Waterboer, Tim; Bosch, F Xavier; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Gonzalez, Carlos Alberto; Dillner, Joakim; Gram, Inger T; Tjønneland, Anne; Munk, Christian; Pala, Valeria; Palli, Domenico; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Barnabas, Ruanne V; Overvad, Kim; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Fagherazzi, Guy; Kaaks, Rudolf; Lukanova, Annekatrin; Steffen, Annika; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Klinaki, Eleni; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Mattiello, Amalia; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As; Peeters, Petra H; Lund, Eiliv; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Quirós, J Ramón; Sánchez, María-José; Navarro, Carmen; Barricarte, Aurelio; Larrañaga, Nerea; Ekström, Johanna; Hortlund, Maria; Lindquist, David; Wareham, Nick; Travis, Ruth C; Rinaldi, Sabina; Tommasino, Massimo; Franceschi, Silvia; Riboli, Elio

    2014-07-15

    To evaluate prospectively the association between serological markers of selected infections, including HPV, and risk of developing cervical cancer (CC) and precancer, we performed a nested case-control study within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study that included 184 cases of invasive CC (ICC), 425 cases of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade 3 or carcinoma in situ (CIS), and 1,218 matched control women. At enrollment participants completed lifestyle questionnaires and provided sera. Subjects were followed-up for a median of 9 years. Immunoassays were used to detect serum antibodies to Human Herpes Virus 2 (HHV-2), Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), Chlamydia pneumoniae, L1 proteins of mucosal and cutaneous HPV types, E6/E7 proteins of HPV16/18, as well as to four polyomaviruses. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) [and 95% confidence intervals (CI)] for CIN3/CIS and ICC risk were respectively: 1.6 (1.2-2.0) and 1.8 (1.1-2.7) for L1 seropositivity to any mucosal HPV type, 1.0 (0.4-2.4) and 7.4 (2.8-19.7) for E6 seropositivity to HPV16/18, 1.3 (0.9-1.9) and 2.3 (1.3-4.1) for CT seropositivity, and 1.4 (1.0-2.0) and 1.5 (0.9-2.6) for HHV-2 seropositivity. The highest OR for ICC was observed for HPV16 E6 seropositivity [OR = 10.2 (3.3-31.1)]. Increasing number of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) was associated with increasing risk. Non-STIs were not associated with CC risk. In conclusion, this large prospective study confirms the important role of HPV and a possible contribution of CT and HHV-2 in cervical carcinogenesis. It further identifies HPV16 E6 seropositivity as the strongest marker to predict ICC well before disease development.

  2. Effect of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination on clinical indicators of sexual behaviour among adolescent girls: the Ontario Grade 8 HPV Vaccine Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Smith, Leah M; Kaufman, Jay S; Strumpf, Erin C; Lévesque, Linda E

    2015-02-03

    Suboptimal human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine coverage in some jurisdictions is partly attributed to fears that vaccination may increase risky sexual behaviour. We assessed the effect of HPV vaccination on clinical indicators of sexual behaviour among adolescent girls in Ontario. Using Ontario's administrative health databases, we identified a population-based cohort of girls in grade 8 in the 2 years before (2005/06 and 2006/07) and after (2007/08 and 2008/09) implementation of Ontario's grade 8 HPV vaccination program. For each girl, we then obtained data on vaccine receipt in grades 8 and 9 and data on indicators of sexual behaviour (pregnancy and non-HPV-related sexually transmitted infections) in grades 10-12. Using a quasi-experimental method known as regression discontinuity, we estimated, for each outcome, the risk difference (RD) and relative risk (RR) attributable to vaccination and to program eligibility. The cohort comprised 260 493 girls, of whom 131 781 were ineligible for the program and 128 712 were eligible. We identified 15 441 (5.9%) cases of pregnancy and sexually transmitted infection and found no evidence that vaccination increased the risk of this composite outcome: RD per 1000 girls -0.61 (95% confidence interval [CI] -10.71 to 9.49) and RR 0.96 (95% CI 0.81 to 1.14). Similarly, we found no discernible effect of program eligibility: RD per 1000 girls -0.25 (95% CI -4.35 to 3.85) and RR 0.99 (95% CI 0.93 to 1.06). The findings were similar when outcomes were assessed separately. We present strong evidence that HPV vaccination does not have any significant effect on clinical indicators of sexual behaviour among adolescent girls. These results suggest that concerns over increased promiscuity following HPV vaccination are unwarranted and should not deter from vaccinating at a young age. © 2015 Canadian Medical Association or its licensors.

  3. Incidence and Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Type Distribution of Genital Warts in a Multinational Cohort of Men: The HPV in Men Study

    PubMed Central

    Anic, Gabriella M.; Lee, Ji–Hyun; Stockwell, Heather; Rollison, Dana E.; Wu, Yougui; Papenfuss, Mary R.; Villa, Luisa L.; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Gage, Christine; Silva, Roberto José C.; Baggio, Maria L.; Quiterio, Manuel; Salmerón, Jorge; Abrahamsen, Martha

    2011-01-01

    Background. Data on the natural history of human papillomavirus (HPV)–related genital warts (GWs) in men are sparse. We described the distribution of HPV types in incident GWs and estimated GW incidence and time from type-specific incident HPV infections to GW detection in a multinational cohort of men aged 18–70 years. Methods. Participants included 2487 men examined for GWs and tested for HPV every 6 months and followed up for a median of 17.9 months. Samples were taken from 112 men with incident GWs to test for HPV DNA by polymerase chain reaction. Results. Incidence of GWs was 2.35 cases per 1000 person-years, with highest incidence among men aged 18–30 years (3.43 cases per 1000 person-years). HPV 6 (43.8%), HPV 11 (10.7%), and HPV 16 (9.8%) were the genotypes most commonly detected in GWs. The 24-month cumulative incidence of GWs among men with incident HPV 6/11 infections was 14.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 7.5%–21.1%). Median time to GW detection was 17.1 months (95% CI, 12.4–19.3 months), with shortest time to detection among men with incident infections with HPV 6/11 only (6.2 months; 95% CI, 5.6–24.2 months). Conclusions. HPV 6/11 plays an important role in GW development, with the highest incidence and shortest time to detection among men with incident HPV 6/11 infection. PMID:22013227

  4. Male circumcision and the incidence and clearance of genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in men: the HPV Infection in men (HIM) cohort study.

    PubMed

    Albero, Ginesa; Castellsagué, Xavier; Lin, Hui-Yi; Fulp, William; Villa, Luisa L; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Papenfuss, Mary; Abrahamsen, Martha; Salmerón, Jorge; Quiterio, Manuel; Nyitray, Alan G; Lu, Beibei; Bosch, F Xavier; Giuliano, Anna R

    2014-02-10

    Reported associations of male circumcision (MC) with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in men have been inconsistent. 4,033 healthy men were examined every six months for a median of 17.5 months. In each study visit, exfoliated cell specimens from the coronal sulcus/glans penis, penile shaft, and scrotum were collected and combined into one sample per person for HPV DNA detection. Samples were tested for 37 HPV types. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the association between MC and the incidence and clearance of HPV infections and specific genotypes. The overall incidence of new HPV infections did not differ by MC status (for any HPV, adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 1.08, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.91-1.27). However, incidence was significantly lower among circumcised versus uncircumcised men for HPV types 58 (p = 0.01), 68 (p < 0.001), 42 (p = 0.01), 61 (p < 0.001), 71 (p < 0.001), 81 (p = 0.04), and IS39 (p = 0.01), and higher for HPV types 39 (p = 0.01) and 51 (p = 0.02). Despite the lack of an overall association in the risk of HPV clearance by MC (for any HPV, aHR 0.95, 95% CI 0.88-1.02), median times to clearance were significantly shorter among circumcised than uncircumcised men for HPV types 33 (p = 0.02) and 64 (p = 0.04), and longer for HPV types 6 (p < 0.001), 16 (p < 0.001), and 51 (p = 0.02). MC is not associated with the incidence and clearance of genital HPV detection, except for certain HPV types. The use of a single combined sample from the penis and scrotum for HPV DNA detection likely limited our ability to identify a true effect of MC at the distal penis.

  5. Papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Félez-Sánchez, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Papillomaviruses (PVs) are a numerous family of small dsDNA viruses infecting virtually all mammals. PVs cause infections without triggering a strong immune response, and natural infection provides only limited protection against reinfection. Most PVs are part and parcel of the skin microbiota. In some cases, infections by certain PVs take diverse clinical presentations from highly productive self-limited warts to invasive cancers. We propose PVs as an excellent model system to study the evolutionary interactions between the immune system and pathogens causing chronic infections: genotypically, PVs are very diverse, with hundreds of different genotypes infecting skin and mucosa; phenotypically, they display extremely broad gradients and trade-offs between key phenotypic traits, namely productivity, immunogenicity, prevalence, oncogenicity and clinical presentation. Public health interventions have been launched to decrease the burden of PV-associated cancers, including massive vaccination against the most oncogenic human PVs, as well as systematic screening for PV chronic anogenital infections. Anti-PVs vaccines elicit protection against infection, induce cross-protection against closely related viruses and result in herd immunity. However, our knowledge on the ecological and intrapatient dynamics of PV infections remains fragmentary. We still need to understand how the novel anthropogenic selection pressures posed by vaccination and screening will affect viral circulation and epidemiology. We present here an overview of PV evolution and the connection between PV genotypes and the phenotypic, clinical manifestations of the diseases they cause. This differential link between viral evolution and the gradient cancer-warts-asymptomatic infections makes PVs a privileged playground for evolutionary medicine research. PMID:25634317

  6. Persistent high-risk human papillomavirus infections and other end-point markers of progressive cervical disease among women prospectively followed up in the New Independent States of the Former Soviet Union and the Latin American Screening study cohorts.

    PubMed

    Syrjänen, Kari; Shabalova, Irena; Naud, Paulo; Kozachenko, Vladimir; Derchain, Sophie; Zakharchenko, Sergej; Roteli-Martins, Cecilia; Nerovjna, Raisa; Longatto-Filho, Adhemar; Kljukina, Ludmila; Tatti, Silvio; Branovskaja, Marina; Hammes, Luciano Serpa; Branca, Margherita; Grunjberga, Valerija; Erzen, Mojca; Sarian, Luis Otavio; Juschenko, Anna; Costa, Silvano; Podistov, Jurij; Syrjänen, Stina

    2009-07-01

    New end points are needed in future human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine efficacy studies that accurately predict disease progression. Potential intermediate end points were analyzed in the combined New Independent States of the Former Soviet Union (NIS) and the Latin American Screening (LAMS) study cohorts. Data files of 2 international screening trials, the NIS (n = 3187) and the LAMS (n = 12,114) study cohorts, were combined, and a subcohort of 1865 (n = 854 and n = 1011 for the NIS and the LAMS, respectively) women prospectively followed up for 19.7 (median, 22.2) months was analyzed for different intermediate end-point markers of disease progression to squamous intraepithelial lesion (SIL), cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 1 and higher (CIN1+), and CIN grade 2 and higher (CIN2+) as terminal events. : Altogether, 131 (7.0%), 90 (4.8%), and 39 (2.1%) cases progressed to SIL, CIN1+, and CIN2+, respectively, progression times being equal in the NIS (11.9, 16.8, and 19.6 months) and LAMS (13.6, 14.1, and 15.4 months) cohorts (P = 0.931, P = 0.335, and P = 0.535). The 2 most powerful end-point markers of disease progression to CIN2+ were high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions based on Papanicolaou test results at 6-month (odds ratio [OR] = 47.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 17.3-128.7) and 12-month (OR = 21.5; 95% CI, 5.1-90.8) follow-up visits, with longitudinal positive and negative predictive values of 42.1% and 98.0% (6 months) and 33.3% and 97.7% (12 months). Of the virological end points, more than 6 months of persistent high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) was the most powerful predictor of progression to CIN1+ (OR = 18.6; 95% CI, 2.5-136.5), with longitudinal positive and negative predictive values of 10.3% and 99.4%, respectively. No additional benefit was obtained using more than 12 months of persistent HR-HPV end point. High-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion based on a Papanicolaou test results at 6- or 12-month follow-up visits was the most powerful

  7. Proteomic Approaches to the Study of Papillomavirus-Host Interactions

    PubMed Central

    White, Elizabeth A.; Howley, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    The identification of interactions between viral and host cellular proteins has provided major insights into papillomavirus research, and these interactions are especially relevant to the role of papillomaviruses in the cancers with which they are associated. Recent advances in mass spectrometry technology and data processing now allow the systematic identification of such interactions. This has led to an improved understanding of the different pathologies associated with the many papillomavirus types, and the diverse nature of these viruses is reflected in the spectrum of interactions with host proteins. Here we review a history of proteomic approaches, particularly as applied to the papillomaviruses, and summarize current techniques. Current proteomic studies on the papillomaviruses use yeast-two-hybrid or affinity purification-mass spectrometry approaches. We detail the advantages and disadvantages of each and describe current examples of papillomavirus proteomic studies, with a particular focus on the HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins. PMID:23217616

  8. The impact of non-financial and financial encouragements on participation in non school-based human papillomavirus vaccination: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Lefevere, Eva; Hens, Niel; De Smet, Frank; Beutels, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Adolescent vaccination coverage under a system of non school-based vaccination is likely to be suboptimal, but might be increased by targeted encouragement campaigns. We analysed the effect on human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination initiation by girls aged 12-18 of two campaigns set up in Flanders (Belgium) in 2007 and 2009: a personal information campaign and a combined personal information and financial incentive campaign. We analysed (objective) data on HPV vaccination behaviour from the National Alliance of Christian Mutualities (NACM), Flanders' largest sickness fund. We used z-scores to compare the monthly proportion of girls initiating HPV vaccination over time between carefully selected intervention and control groups. Separate analyses were done for older and younger girls. Total sample sizes of the intervention (control) groups were 221 (243) for the personal information campaign and 629 (5,322) for the combined personal information and financial incentive campaign. The personal information campaign significantly increased vaccination initiation, with older girls reacting faster. One year after the campaign the percentages of vaccination initiation for the oldest girls were 64.6 and 42.8 % in the intervention and control group, respectively (z = 3.35, p = 0.0008); for the youngest girls the percentages were 78.4 and 68.1 % (z = 1.71, p = 0.09). The combined personal information and financial incentive campaign increased vaccination initiation among certain age groups. One year after the campaign the difference in percentage points for HPV vaccination initiation between intervention and control groups varied between 18.5 % (z = 3.65, p = 0.0002) and 5.1 % (z = 1.12, p = 0.26). Under a non school-based vaccination system, personal information and removing out-of-pocket costs had a significant positive effect on HPV vaccination initiation, although the effect substantially varied in magnitude. Overall, the obtained vaccination rates remained far below those

  9. Prospective comparison of hybrid capture 2 and SPF₁₀-LiPA for carcinogenic human papillomavirus detection and risk prediction of cervical cancer: a population-based cohort study in China.

    PubMed

    Dong, Li; Feng, Rui Mei; Zhang, Li; Xu, Xiao Qian; Zhao, Xue Lian; Wang, Margaret Zhuoer; Qiao, You Lin; Zhao, Fang Hui

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the extent of the cross-reactivity of hybrid capture 2 (HC2) assay and evaluate the potential effect of cross-reactivity on the long-term risk for cervical cancer and precancers. Based on the Shanxi Province Cervical Cancer Screening Study-I (SPOCCS-I) cohort from 2005 to 2014 in Shanxi, China, SPF₁₀-line probe assay (LiPA) was performed in all 598 HC2 positive and 300 random-selected HC2 negative cervical specimens. Ten-year cumulative incidence rate (CIR) of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse (CIN2+) of these two tests was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier methods. Possible human papillomavirus (HPV) types to be cross-reacted by HC2 were also analyzed. The overall agreement between HC2 and SPF₁₀-LiPA for detecting carcinogenic HPV was 73.27%. The highest 10-year cumulative risk of CIN2+ was observed in both HC2 positive and LiPA-carcinogenic HPV positive women (25.70%; 95% confidence interval [CI]=23.55%-27.91%), followed by HC2 positive but LiPA-non-carcinogenic HPV positive women (9.97%; 95% CI=8.57%-11.50%), HC2 negative but LiPA-carcinogenic HPV positive (2.56%; 95% CI=2.44%-2.70%) and HC2 positive but LiPA-HPV negative (1.85%; 95% CI=1.78%-1.92%) women. The proportion of cross-reactivity of HC2 with untargeted carcinogenic types was 8.9%, most of which were attributable to HPV26, 73, 82, 69, 71, 53, 11, 43, and 54. The noticeable high risk of CIN2+ in women infected with cross-reacted non-carcinogenic HPV and low risk in those with miss-to-detective carcinogenic HPV supported an overall good clinical performance of HC2 for a general cervical cancer screening.

  10. [Prevalence of human papillomavirus infection and risk of cervical cancer or precancerous lesions in 15 years follow up: a prospective cohort study].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q; Hu, S Y; Feng, R M; Dong, L; Chen, F; Zhang, X; Pan, Q J; Ma, J F; Shi, S D; Zhao, F H; Qiao, Y L

    2016-10-23

    Objective: To evaluate the 15 years changing trends of prevalence of high risk HPV (HR-HPV) infection and the risks of cervical cancer and precancerous lesions (CIN2+ ) among a Chinese rural population. Methods: The screening cohort with 1 997 women aged 35 to 45 years old was built in 1999 in Xiangyuan County, Shanxi province (SPOCCS-I) and followed up by cytology and HR-HPV testing in the years of 2005, 2010, and 2014. The changes of HR-HPV prevalence and the risks of cervical precancerous lesions with CIN2+ as the endpoints were analyzed during the past 15 years. Results: The detection rates of HPV infection and CIN2+ were 15.7%-22.3% and 1.1%-4.3% for the baseline visit and the other 3 follow-ups, respectively. The cumulative risk of CIN2+ in HR-HPV positive women at baseline was significantly higher than HR-HPV negative women (P<0.01) during the 15-year follow-up. The risk of CIN2+ in the four-times HPV positive group was 40.0%, while the group with four-times negative HPV results was 0.6% (Adjusted RR = 55.0, 95% CI: 11.3 to 268.4). Conclusions: The prevalence of HR-HPV infection and CIN2+ lesions were high in Xiangyuan county during the 15 years. HR-HPV positivity elevated the risk of CIN2+ compared to women whose HR-HPV test was negative. The risks of CIN2+ incidence in 6 years were low among women with negative HR-HPV test. The risk of CIN2+ increased with the numbers of HPV infection events. The screening interval could be extended to 5-6 years.

  11. Sustained Antibody Responses 6 Years Following 1, 2, or 3 Doses of Quadrivalent Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine in Adolescent Fijian Girls, and Subsequent Responses to a Single Dose of Bivalent HPV Vaccine: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Toh, Zheng Quan; Russell, Fiona M; Reyburn, Rita; Fong, James; Tuivaga, Evelyn; Ratu, Tupou; Nguyen, Cattram D; Devi, Rachel; Kama, Mike; Matanitobua, Silivia; Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Garland, Suzanne M; Sinha, Rohit; Frazer, Ian; Tikoduadua, Lisi; Kado, Joseph; Rafai, Eric; Mulholland, Edward K; Licciardi, Paul V

    2017-04-01

    The duration of antibody response following reduced human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine doses has not been determined. We compared the antibody responses in girls previously vaccinated with zero, 1, 2, or 3 doses of quadrivalent HPV vaccine (4vHPV; Gardasil, Merck) 6 years previously. A prospective cohort study was undertaken in 200 Fijian girls 15-19 years of age. Approximately equal numbers of girls from 2 main ethnic groups (Fijians of Indian descent [FID] and Indigenous Fijians [iTaukei]) in Fiji were recruited for each dosage groups. Blood was drawn before and 28 days following a single dose of bivalent HPV vaccine (2vHPV; Cervarix, GlaxoSmithKline). We measured neutralizing antibodies (NAb) against HPV-6, -11, -16, and -18 using the pseudovirion-based neutralization assay. After 6 years (before a dose of 2vHPV was given), the geometric mean NAb titers for all 4 HPV types were not statistically different between 2-dose (2D) and 3-dose (3D) recipients: HPV-6 (3D: 2216 [95% confidence interval {CI},1695-2896]; 2D: 1476 [95% CI, 1019-2137]; P = .07), HPV-11 (3D: 4431 [95% CI, 3396-5783]; 2D: 2951 [95% CI, 1984-4390]; P = .09), HPV-16 (3D: 3373 [95% CI, 2511-4530]; 2D: 3275 [95% CI, 2452-4373]; P = .89); HPV-18 (3D: 628 [95% CI: 445-888]; 2D: 606 [95% CI, 462-862]; P = .89), and were higher in FID than iTaukei girls. Although 1-dose recipients had significantly lower NAb titers than 2-/3-dose recipients, their NAb titers were 5- to 30-fold higher than unvaccinated girls. Post-2vHPV NAb titers against HPV-16 and -18 were not statistically different between girls who received 1, 2, or 3 doses of 4vHPV previously. Two doses of 4vHPV provide similar NAb titers as 3 doses for 6 years, although the clinical significance is unknown. A single dose of 4vHPV elicits antibodies that persisted for at least 6 years, and induced immune memory, suggesting possible protection against HPV vaccine types after a single dose of 4vHPV.

  12. [International cohort studies].

    PubMed

    Ahrens, W; Pigeot, I

    2012-06-01

    Among observational studies, cohort studies, i.e. longitudinal observations of selected population groups, provide the highest possible evidence of a causal association between specific risk factors (exposure) and the occurrence of disease in populations. Besides the fact that many exposures cannot be investigated in experimental designs, cohort studies have the advantage over randomized clinical trials that they are conducted in free living populations and not in restrictive, clinical settings. In this paper we describe the aims and features of international cohorts that have been selected because of their impact, their size or their endpoints. We do not only present the study designs and survey instruments used but we also highlight some of the most important results gained by these studies. Most of these prospective studies investigated common chronic diseases in the elderly, such as cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular or neurodegenerative diseases, osteoporosis and ophthalmologic disorders. Newer cohorts and recent reassessments of existing cohorts almost always include the collection and storage of biological samples. In recent years technological developments allowed the implementation of cutting edge measurement procedures, such as imaging techniques for phenotyping. Finally, we discuss on the one hand whether these designs can be transferred to the German situation and on the other hand to what degree the results obtained from foreign cohorts can be generalized for the German population. We conclude with recommendations for future cohort studies.

  13. Cohort Profile Update: The GAZEL Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Marcel; Leclerc, Annette; Zins, Marie

    2015-02-01

    The original GAZEL cohort was composed of 20 625 employees of the French national gas and electricity companies (15 011 male employees then aged 40 to 50 years and 5614 women between 35 and 50 years old) at its inception in 1989. A Cohort Profile article was published in 2007. By the end of 2013, participants were aged 60-75, and almost all of them retired during follow-up. Accordingly, the main focus of research in the past decade was devoted to the study of the persistent, long-term effects of occupational exposures after retirement; of the transition between professionally active life and retirement; and on determinants of early ageing. Accordingly, in addition to the health, behavioural and social data collected yearly since the beginning of the follow-up, new data were thus collected on cognitive complaints, cognitive and physical functioning, limitations in daily activities, time use and social relationships of retirees. This update presents the main findings of research within the GAZEL Cohort Study during the past 7 years. Any research group, in France or elsewhere, can submit a research proposal to work on the GAZEL cohort. To do this, interested researchers should contact one of the principal investigators of the GAZEL Cohort Study.

  14. Cohort profile: UK Millennium Cohort Study (MCS).

    PubMed

    Connelly, Roxanne; Platt, Lucinda

    2014-12-01

    The UK Millennium Cohort Study (MCS) is an observational, multidisciplinary cohort study that was set up to follow the lives of children born at the turn of the new century. The MCS is nationally representative and 18 552 families (18 827 children) were recruited to the cohort in the first sweep. There have currently been five main sweeps of data collection, at ages 9 months and 3, 5, 7 and 11 years. A further sweep of data collection is planned for age 14 years. A range of health-related data have been collected as well as measures concerning child development, cognitive ability and educational attainment. The data also include a wealth of information describing the social, economic and demographic characteristics of the cohort members and their families. In addition, the MCS data have been linked to administrative data resources including health records. The MCS provides a unique and valuable resource for the analysis of health outcomes and health inequalities. The MCS data are freely available to bona fide researchers under standard access conditions via the UK Data Service (http://ukdataservice.ac.uk) and the MCS website provides detailed information on the study (http://www.cls.ioe.ac.uk/mcs).

  15. Association of the vaginal microbiota with human papillomavirus infection in a Korean twin cohort.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Eun; Lee, Sunghee; Lee, Heetae; Song, Yun-Mi; Lee, Kayoung; Han, Min Ji; Sung, Joohon; Ko, GwangPyo

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most important causative agent of cervical cancers worldwide. However, our understanding of how the vaginal microbiota might be associated with HPV infection is limited. In addition, the influence of human genetic and physiological factors on the vaginal microbiota is unclear. Studies on twins and their families provide the ideal settings to investigate the complicated nature of human microbiota. This study investigated the vaginal microbiota of 68 HPV-infected or uninfected female twins and their families using 454-pyrosequencing analysis targeting the variable region (V2-V3) of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. Analysis of the vaginal microbiota from both premenopausal women and HPV-discordant twins indicated that HPV-positive women had significantly higher microbial diversity with a lower proportion of Lactobacillus spp. than HPV-negative women. Fusobacteria, including Sneathia spp., were identified as a possible microbiological marker associated with HPV infection. The vaginal microbiotas of twin pairs were significantly more similar to each other than to those from unrelated individuals. In addition, there were marked significant differences from those of their mother, possibly due to differences in menopausal status. Postmenopausal women had a lower proportion of Lactobacillus spp. and a significantly higher microbiota diversity. This study indicated that HPV infection was associated with the composition of the vaginal microbiota, which is influenced by multiple host factors such as genetics and menopause. The potential biological markers identified in this study could provide insight into HPV pathogenesis and may represent biological targets for diagnostics.

  16. Risk estimates for persistent high-risk human papillomavirus infections as surrogate endpoints of progressive cervical disease critically depend on reference category: analysis of the combined prospective cohort of the New Independent States of the Former Soviet Union and Latin American Screening studies.

    PubMed

    Syrjänen, K; Shabalova, I; Naud, P; Kozachenko, V; Derchain, S; Zakharchenko, S; Roteli-Martins, C; Nerovjna, R; Longatto-Filho, A; Kljukina, L; Tatti, S; Branovskaja, M; Hammes, L S; Branca, M; Grunjberga, V; Eržen, M; Juschenko, A; Costa, S; Sarian, L; Podistov, J; Syrjänen, S

    2011-06-01

    To make feasible future clinical trials with new-generation human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines, novel virological surrogate endpoints of progressive disease have been proposed, including high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) persistence for six months (6M+) or 12 months (12M+). The risk estimates (relative risks [RRs]) of these 'virological endpoints' are influenced by several variables, not yet validated adequately. We compared the impact of three referent groups: (i) HPV-negative, (ii) HPV-transient, (iii) HPV-mixed outcome on the risk estimates for 6M+ or 12M+ HR-HPV persistence as predictors of progressive disease. Generalized estimating equation models were used to estimate the strength of 6M+ and 12M+ HR-HPV persistence with disease progression to squamous intraepithelial lesions (SILs), cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade 1+, CIN2+, CIN/SIL endpoints, comparing three optional reference categories (i)-(iii) in a prospective sub-cohort of 1865 women from the combined New Independent States of the Former Soviet Union (NIS) and Latin American Screening (LAMS) studies cohort (n = 15,301). The RRs of these viral endpoints as predictors of progressive disease are affected by the length of viral persistence (6M+ or 12M+) and the surrogate endpoint (SIL, CIN1, CIN2, CIN/SIL). Most dramatic is the effect of the referent group used in risk estimates, with the HPV-negative referent group giving the highest and most consistent RRs for both 6M+ and 12M+ viral persistence, irrespective of which surrogate is used. In addition to deciding on whether to use 6M+ or 12M+ persistence criteria, and cytological, histological or combined surrogate endpoints, one should adopt the HPV-negative referent group as the gold standard in all future studies using viral persistence as the surrogate endpoint of progressive disease.

  17. Prognostic value of p16 expression irrespective of human papillomavirus status in patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yuki; Yoshida, Masafumi; Omura, Go; Kobayashi, Kenya; Fujimoto, Chisato; Ando, Mizuo; Sakamoto, Takashi; Asakage, Takahiro; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2015-09-01

    In a previous study, we reported the value of p16 expression and alcohol consumption in oropharyngeal carcinoma in Japan. We now report the clinical significance of human papillomavirus status and p16 expression in oropharyngeal carcinoma in Japan. Over a 9-year period, a retrospective case comparison study of the pathology database was conducted at the University of Tokyo to identify tumor samples of oropharyngeal carcinoma. We performed immunohistochemistry for the p16 protein, in situ hybridization for human papillomavirus-deoxyribonucleic acid and polymerase chain reaction for the human papillomavirus-deoxyribonucleic acid oncogene E6 in oropharyngeal carcinoma in Japanese patients. We evaluated the human papillomavirus status in patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma to determine its prevalence and association with prognosis. We defined human papillomavirus(+) and human papillomavirus(-) oropharyngeal carcinoma cohorts as those with and without polymerase chain reaction for the human papillomavirus-deoxyribonucleic acid oncogene E6 or in situ hybridization-human papillomavirus. In oropharyngeal carcinoma, the prevalences of p16(+)human papillomavirus(+), p16(+)human papillomavirus(-), p16(-)human papillomavirus(+) and p16(-)human papillomavirus(-) were 32% (48/150), 7% (10/150), 2% (3/150) and 59% (89/150), respectively. Low tobacco and alcohol consumption, tonsil or base of tongue localization, but not age, were associated with p16(+)human papillomavirus(+). Low alcohol consumption was associated with p16(+)human papillomavirus(-). There was a significant difference in overall survival between p16(+)human papillomavirus(-) and p16(-)human papillomavirus(-) (P = 0.03). In multivariate Cox regression models, p16 was the independent prognostic factor, regardless of human papillomavirus status. p16 expression was a reliable prognostic biomarker regardless of human papillomavirus status. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved

  18. Association of the Vaginal Microbiota with Human Papillomavirus Infection in a Korean Twin Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Eun; Lee, Sunghee; Lee, Heetae; Song, Yun-Mi; Lee, Kayoung; Han, Min Ji; Sung, Joohon; Ko, GwangPyo

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most important causative agent of cervical cancers worldwide. However, our understanding of how the vaginal microbiota might be associated with HPV infection is limited. In addition, the influence of human genetic and physiological factors on the vaginal microbiota is unclear. Studies on twins and their families provide the ideal settings to investigate the complicated nature of human microbiota. This study investigated the vaginal microbiota of 68 HPV-infected or uninfected female twins and their families using 454-pyrosequencing analysis targeting the variable region (V2–V3) of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. Analysis of the vaginal microbiota from both premenopausal women and HPV-discordant twins indicated that HPV-positive women had significantly higher microbial diversity with a lower proportion of Lactobacillus spp. than HPV-negative women. Fusobacteria, including Sneathia spp., were identified as a possible microbiological marker associated with HPV infection. The vaginal microbiotas of twin pairs were significantly more similar to each other than to those from unrelated individuals. In addition, there were marked significant differences from those of their mother, possibly due to differences in menopausal status. Postmenopausal women had a lower proportion of Lactobacillus spp. and a significantly higher microbiota diversity. This study indicated that HPV infection was associated with the composition of the vaginal microbiota, which is influenced by multiple host factors such as genetics and menopause. The potential biological markers identified in this study could provide insight into HPV pathogenesis and may represent biological targets for diagnostics. PMID:23717441

  19. [Changes in genotype prevalence of human papillomavirus over 10-year follow-up of a cervical cancer screening cohort].

    PubMed

    Dong, L; Hu, S Y; Zhang, Q; Feng, R M; Zhang, L; Zhao, X L; Ma, J F; Shi, S D; Zhang, X; Pan, Q J; Zhang, W H; Qiao, Y L; Zhao, F H

    2017-01-10

    Objective: To evaluate the dynamic variation of genotypes distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) over 10-year follow-up in a cervical cancer screening cohort. Methods: Based on the Shanxi Province Cervical Cancer Screening Studycohort, we detected HPV genotypes on the well-preserved exfoliated cervical cells from women who were tested HPV positive from year 2005 to year 2014 using reverse linear probe hybridization assay. The changes of prevalence of type-specific HPV over time among the overall population were estimated using linear mixed models. The association between the type-specific HPV and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse (CIN2 +) was calculated by linear Chi-square test. Finally, the trends of multiple infections of HPV with the increase of the age were analyzed. Results: During the cervical cancer screening of the overall population from 2005 to 2014, the most common genotypes among the population were HPV16 and 52. The prevalence of HPV16 decreased over time from 4.6% in 2005 to 2.2% in 2010 and 2014 (F=8.125, P<0.001). The prevalence of HPV52 remained pretty stable and HPV33, 51 and 58 slightly decreased then apparently increased. Further stratification analysis by pathological lesions showed the same trend of the HPV prevalence for the histology normal women with the overall population. Of note, for those women with the cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN2 +), the detection rate of HPV16 decreased from 65.22% in 2005 to 41.03% in 2010 and finally to 31.58% in 2014 (χ(2)=4.420, P=0.036) and that of HPV33 substantially increased. No significant variation was found for other types of HPV. Multiple infection rate varied with the growing age of the women. Conclusions: The genotypes prevalence of HPV tended to vary over time during cervical cancer screening in the context of regular screening combining with immediate treatment for those CIN2 + women. HPV16 prevalence significantly decreased over time, which indicated that the

  20. [Melanoma and Human Papillomaviruses: Is There an Outlook for Study?].

    PubMed

    Volgareva, G M; Mikhaylova, I N; Golovina, D A

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the most aggressive human malignant tumors. Its incidence and mortality are growing steadily. Ultraviolet irradiation is the main risk factor for melanoma involved in melanomagenesis. The probability of viral etiology of melanoma has been discussed. Human papillomaviruses (HPV) have been mentioned among candidates for its etiologic agents because some HPV types are the powerful carcinogens causing cervical cancer and other cancers. The review analyses the literature data on the association of melanoma with HPV Several groupsfound HPVin skin melanomas as well as in mucosa; viruses of high oncogenic risk were detected in some cases. For some organs the etiological role of high-risk HPV as inducers of invasive carcinomas is confirmed. These organs require special mention: cervix uteri, vulva, vagina, penis, anal region, and oral cavity. However in the majority of the studies in which viral DNA-positive melanomas were found, testing for viral genome expression was not done while this is the fact of primary importance. HPVare found in normal skin and mucous membranes thus creating justifiable threat of tumor specimen contamination with viral DNA in vivo. There are limited data on aggravation of the disease prognosis in papillomavirus-positive melanomas. However, any systematic observation of a sizeable patient group distinguished by that tumor type has not been performed yet. Viral E6 and E7 oncogenes of high-risk papillomaviruses were shown to be able to transform normal human melanocytes in vitro experiments. Thus, we can assume the presence of the association of melanoma with oncogenic HPV. The clinical significance of this problem is indisputable under the conditions of the steady increase in melanoma incidence and mortality rates in Russia and abroad. The problem requires further study.

  1. High-risk human papillomavirus genotypes distribution in a cohort of HIV-positive women living in Europe: epidemiological implication for vaccination against human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Konopnicki, Deborah; Manigart, Yannick; Gilles, Christine; Barlow, Patricia; De Marchin, Jérome; Feoli, Francesco; Delforge, Marc; Clumeck, Nathan; De Wit, Stéphane

    2016-01-28

    Worldwide, human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 and 18 represents 70% of high-risk (HR) HPV found in cervical cancer. However HIV-positive women are more frequently infected by HRHPV other than HPV 16 or 18 (OHR). We aimed to analyse the HRHPV genotype distribution in a cohort of HIV-positive women and to estimate the potential protection offered by the different HPV vaccines. HRHPV genotypes by PCR and cytology were assessed in cervical samples from 508 HIV-positive women prospectively followed in Brussels. Women characteristics were as follows: African origin (84%), median age 42 years, median CD4 T 555/μl, 89% under combined antiretroviral therapy and 73% with HIVRNA less than 20 copies/ml. HRHPV prevalence was 23% (116/508): 38% had abnormal cytology, 76% carried OHR without HPV 16 or 18 and 11% had concomitant infection by OHR and HPV 16 or 18. The most frequent HRHPV were HPV52 (19.8%), HPV18 (14.6%), HPV31/35/51/58 (12.1% each), HPV56 (9.9%) and HPV16 (9.5%). Less than 30% of women had their HRHPV genotypes included in the bivalent or quadrivalent vaccines against HRHPV 16 and 18; however, 79% had their HRHPV covered by the ninevalent vaccine against HRHPV 16/18/31/33/45/52/58. The HRHPV genotypes distribution found in these women living in Europe with a successfully treated HIV is similar to the one found in Central Africa with HRHPV other than HPV16 or 18 retrieved in 87%. In this population, the bivalent or quadrivalent vaccines could offer protection in only 30% of women; however this protection could be extended up to 80% with the ninevalent vaccine.

  2. Study of the partners of women with human papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Kokelj, F; Baraggino, E; Stinco, G; Wiesenfeld, U

    1993-09-01

    Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases, and it has been identified as a significant risk factor for the development of dysplasia and cancer of the uterine cervix. The possible influence of male HPV lesions on female cervix oncogenesis has not been elucidated so far. In the present study we evaluate the male partners of women with clinical or subclinical HPV infection with particular interest in the clinical features of this infection in both partners. We examined 81 male partners of women affected with human papillomavirus infections. Condylomata acuminata were searched for by visual inspection. Subclinical lesions were searched by 5 power optical magnification lens after application of 5% acetic acid. In men we observed the following percentage of infection: 67% of the partners of women affected with condylomata acuminata, 46% of the partners of women affected with subclinical lesions (acetic acid positive), and 40% of the partners of women with association of HPV and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. Our data stress that very often the partners of women with HPV subclinical infection, especially when associated with CIN, do not present lesions, and consequently primary prevention may be very difficult.

  3. Selection factors in cohort studies

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholson, W.J.

    1985-05-01

    Cohort studies play an important role in the quantitation of cancer risk among occupationally exposed individuals. Properly conducted cohort studies can develop important data on the age, time, and exposure dependence of cancer risk. Such information allows identification of possible selection effects which may be present and allows generalization of risk estimates to other exposure circumstances.

  4. Cohort profile: Shahroud Eye Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Fotouhi, Akbar; Hashemi, Hassan; Shariati, Mohammad; Emamian, Mohammad Hassan; Yazdani, Kamran; Jafarzadehpur, Ebrahim; Koohian, Hassan; Khademi, Mohammad Reza; Hodjatjalali, Kamran; Kheirkhah, Ahmad; Chaman, Reza; Malihi, Sarvenaz; Mirzaii, Mehdi; Khabazkhoob, Mehdi

    2013-10-01

    The Shahroud Eye Cohort Study was set up to determine the prevalence and incidence of visual impairment and major eye conditions in the 40-64-year-old population of Shahroud as a Middle Eastern population. The first phase of the study was conducted in 2009-10. Using random cluster sampling, 6311 Shahroud inhabitants were invited for ophthalmologic examinations; of these, 5190 participants completed phase 1 (participation rate of 82.2%). All participants were interviewed to collect data on participants' demographics, occupation status, socioeconomic status, history of smoking, and medical and ophthalmic history, as well as history of medication, and the quality and duration of their insurance. DNA and plasma samples, as well as four dots of whole blood were collected from participants. Extensive optometric and ophthalmologic examinations were performed for each participant, including lensometry of current glasses, testing near and far visual acuity; determining objective and subjective refraction; eye motility; cycloplegic refraction; colour vision test; slit-lamp biomicroscopy and intraocular pressure measurement; direct and indirect fundoscopy; perimetry test; ocular biometry; corneal topography; lens and fundus photography; and the Schirmer's (1008 participants) and tear breakup time tests (1013 participants). The study data are available for collaborative research at Noor Ophthalmology Research Center, Tehran, Iran.

  5. Health economic evaluation of Human Papillomavirus vaccines in women from Venezuela by a lifetime Markov cohort model.

    PubMed

    Bardach, Ariel Esteban; Garay, Osvaldo Ulises; Calderón, María; Pichón-Riviére, Andrés; Augustovski, Federico; Martí, Sebastián García; Cortiñas, Paula; Gonzalez, Marino; Naranjo, Laura T; Gomez, Jorge Alberto; Caporale, Joaquín Enzo

    2017-02-02

    Cervical cancer (CC) and genital warts (GW) are a significant public health issue in Venezuela. Our objective was to assess the cost-effectiveness of the two available vaccines, bivalent and quadrivalent, against Human Papillomavirus (HPV) in Venezuelan girls in order to inform decision-makers. A previously published Markov cohort model, informed by the best available evidence, was adapted to the Venezuelan context to evaluate the effects of vaccination on health and healthcare costs from the perspective of the healthcare payer in an 11-year-old girls cohort of 264,489. Costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were discounted at 5%. Eight scenarios were analyzed to depict the cost-effectiveness under alternative vaccine prices, exchange rates and dosing schemes. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. Compared to screening only, the bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines were cost-saving in all scenarios, avoiding 2,310 and 2,143 deaths, 4,781 and 4,431 CCs up to 18,459 GW for the quadrivalent vaccine and gaining 4,486 and 4,395 discounted QALYs respectively. For both vaccines, the main determinants of variations in the incremental costs-effectiveness ratio after running deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were transition probabilities, vaccine and cancer-treatment costs and HPV 16 and 18 distribution in CC cases. When comparing vaccines, none of them was consistently more cost-effective than the other. In sensitivity analyses, for these comparisons, the main determinants were GW incidence, the level of cross-protection and, for some scenarios, vaccines costs. Immunization with the bivalent or quadrivalent HPV vaccines showed to be cost-saving or cost-effective in Venezuela, falling below the threshold of one Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita (104,404 VEF) per QALY gained. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses confirmed the robustness of these results.

  6. Treatment of anal human papillomavirus-associated disease: a long term outcome study.

    PubMed

    Nathan, M; Hickey, N; Mayuranathan, L; Vowler, S L; Singh, N

    2008-07-01

    Treatment for human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated anal canal disease has been unsatisfactory. The objective of our study was to determine the treatment outcome in our cohort with anal HPV disease. Overall, 181 patients were evaluated over a median period of 19.1 months (range = 2.8-125.5). Eighty-eight patients (48.6%) with high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) and 82 patients (45.3%) with low-grade AIN underwent treatment. One hundred and forty-one patients (77.9%) received laser ablative treatment as an outpatient procedure. The treatment yielded cure, defined as a disease-free state at 12 months after treatment, in 63.0% (114/181). Median time to cure for the cohort was 31.5 months (95% confidence interval: 23.0-40.0). Treatment outcome showed no evidence of being affected by age, sexual preference, history of smoking or presence of high-grade disease. Median time to cure was significantly affected by a positive HIV status (P = 0.02) and the extent (volume) of the disease (P = 0.01). Contrary to the current view that treatment of HPV-related anal disease is difficult, unrewarding due to recurrences and may lead to substantial morbidity, we demonstrate that effective treatment is possible for both low- and high-grade AIN. These findings should help with the general desire to introduce screening for AIN for at-risk groups.

  7. Human Papillomavirus Vaccination: A Case Study in Translational Science

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Allyson K.; Harris, Antoneicka L.; Jacobson, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Each year 610,000 cases of anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) occur worldwide. HPV vaccination represents a promising opportunity to prevent cancer on a global scale. The vaccine’s story dates back to discoveries in chickens at the beginning of the 20th century with evidence that a cell-free filtrate could transmit the propensity to grow cancers. Later, studies with similarly derived filtrates from mammalian tumors showed that hosts could develop immunity to subsequent exposures. Epidemiologic studies linked cervical cancer to members of a family of viruses that cause papillomatosis and common warts. This led to work with DNA hybridization demonstrating a causal relationship. The formation of virus-like particles (VLPs) from viral capsid proteins led to the development of models for safe and effective vaccines. While much work remains with the acceptance of universal vaccination, the HPV vaccines Gardasil® and Cervarix® thus represent a century of successful translational research. PMID:24841923

  8. Anal human papillomavirus genotype distribution in HIV-infected men who have sex with men by geographical origin, age, and cytological status in a Spanish cohort.

    PubMed

    Torres, Montserrat; González, Cristina; del Romero, Jorge; Viciana, Pompeyo; Ocampo, Antonio; Rodríguez-Fortúnez, Patricia; Masiá, Mar; Blanco, José Ramón; Portilla, Joaquín; Rodríguez, Carmen; Hernández-Novoa, Beatriz; del Amo, Julia; Ortiz, Marta

    2013-11-01

    Knowledge of human papillomavirus (HPV) type distribution in populations at risk for anal cancer is needed. Here, we describe the anal HPV genotype distribution in a large Spanish cohort (Cohort of the Spanish HIV Research Network HPV [CoRIS-HPV]) of HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) according to geographical origin, age, and cytological status. A cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from 1,439 HIV-infected MSM (2007 to 2012) was performed. Anal HPV genotyping was performed using the Linear Array HPV genotyping test. Descriptive analyses of subject characteristics, prevalences, and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were performed. The global prevalences of HPV, high-risk HPV (HR-HPV), and low-risk HPV (LR-HPV) types were 95.8%, 83.0%, and 72.7%, respectively. Among the HR-HPV types, HPV16 was the most common, followed by HPV59, -39, -51, -18, and -52. The prevalence of multiple HR-HPV infections was 58.5%. There were no differences in the crude analyses between Spanish and Latin-American MSM for most HPV types, and a peak in prevalence for most HPV types was seen in patients in their late thirties. Globally and by specific HPV groups, men with abnormal anal cytologies had a higher prevalence of infection than those with normal cytologies. This study has the largest number of HIV-positive MSM with HPV genotype data analyzed according to cytological status as far as we know. The information gained from this study can help with the design of anal cancer prevention strategies in HIV-positive patients.

  9. Anal Human Papillomavirus Genotype Distribution in HIV-Infected Men Who Have Sex with Men by Geographical Origin, Age, and Cytological Status in a Spanish Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Montserrat; González, Cristina; del Romero, Jorge; Viciana, Pompeyo; Ocampo, Antonio; Rodríguez-Fortúnez, Patricia; Masiá, Mar; Blanco, José Ramón; Portilla, Joaquín; Rodríguez, Carmen; Hernández-Novoa, Beatriz; del Amo, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of human papillomavirus (HPV) type distribution in populations at risk for anal cancer is needed. Here, we describe the anal HPV genotype distribution in a large Spanish cohort (Cohort of the Spanish HIV Research Network HPV [CoRIS-HPV]) of HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) according to geographical origin, age, and cytological status. A cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from 1,439 HIV-infected MSM (2007 to 2012) was performed. Anal HPV genotyping was performed using the Linear Array HPV genotyping test. Descriptive analyses of subject characteristics, prevalences, and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were performed. The global prevalences of HPV, high-risk HPV (HR-HPV), and low-risk HPV (LR-HPV) types were 95.8%, 83.0%, and 72.7%, respectively. Among the HR-HPV types, HPV16 was the most common, followed by HPV59, -39, -51, -18, and -52. The prevalence of multiple HR-HPV infections was 58.5%. There were no differences in the crude analyses between Spanish and Latin-American MSM for most HPV types, and a peak in prevalence for most HPV types was seen in patients in their late thirties. Globally and by specific HPV groups, men with abnormal anal cytologies had a higher prevalence of infection than those with normal cytologies. This study has the largest number of HIV-positive MSM with HPV genotype data analyzed according to cytological status as far as we know. The information gained from this study can help with the design of anal cancer prevention strategies in HIV-positive patients. PMID:23966501

  10. Cohort profile: the skin cancer after organ transplant study.

    PubMed

    Madeleine, Margaret M; Johnson, Lisa G; Daling, Janet R; Schwartz, Stephen M; Carter, Joseph J; Berg, Daniel; Nelson, Karen; Davis, Connie L; Galloway, Denise A

    2013-12-01

    The Skin Cancer after Organ Transplant (SCOT) study was designed to investigate the link between genus beta human papillomavirus (HPV) and squamous cell skin cancer (SCSC). We focused on a population receiving immunosuppressive therapy for extended periods, transplant patients, as they are at extremely high risk for developing SCSC. Two complementary projects were conducted in the Seattle area: (i) a retrospective cohort with interview data from 2004 recipients of renal or cardiac transplants between 1995 and 2010 and (ii) a prospective cohort with interview data from 328 people on the transplant waiting lists between 2009 and 2011. Within the retrospective cohort, we developed a nested case-control study (172 cases and 337 control subjects) to assess risk of SCSC associated with markers of HPV in SCSC tumour tissue and eyebrow hair bulb DNA (HPV genotypes) and blood (HPV antibodies). In the prospective cohort, 135 participants had a 1-year post-transplant visit and 71 completed a 2-year post-transplant visit. In both arms of the cohort, we collected samples to assess markers of HPV infection such as acquisition of new types, proportion positive for each type, persistence of types at consecutive visits and number of HPV types detected. In the prospective cohort, we will also examine these HPV markers in relation to levels of cell-mediated immunity. The goal of the SCOT study is to use the data we collected to gain a more complete understanding of the role of immune suppression in HPV kinetics and of genus beta HPV types in SCSC. For more information, please contact the principal investigator through the study website: http://www.fhcrc.org/science/phs/cerc/The_SCOT_Study.html.

  11. Human papillomavirus infects placental trophoblast and Hofbauer cells, but appears not to play a causal role in miscarriage and preterm labor.

    PubMed

    Ambühl, Lea M M; Leonhard, Anne K; Widen Zakhary, Carina; Jørgensen, Annemette; Blaakaer, Jan; Dybkaer, Karen; Baandrup, Ulrik; Uldbjerg, Niels; Sørensen, Suzette

    2017-10-01

    Recently, an association between human papillomavirus infection and both spontaneous abortion and spontaneous preterm delivery was suggested. However, the reported human papillomavirus prevalence in pregnant women varies considerably and reliable conclusions are difficult. We aimed to investigate human papillomavirus infection in placental tissue of a Danish study cohort. Furthermore, we studied the cellular localization of human papillomavirus. In this prospective case-control study, placental tissue was analyzed for human papillomavirus infection by nested PCR in the following four study groups: full-term delivery (n = 103), spontaneous preterm delivery (n = 69), elective abortion (n = 54), and spontaneous abortion (n = 44). Moreover, human papillomavirus cellular target was identified using in situ hybridization. Human papillomavirus prevalence in placental tissue was 8.7% in full-term deliveries, 8.8% in spontaneous preterm deliveries, 10.9% in spontaneous abortions, and 20.4% in elective abortions. Twelve different human papillomavirus types were detected, and placental human papillomavirus infection was associated to a disease history of cervical cancer. Human papillomavirus DNA was identified in trophoblast cells, cells of the placental villi mesenchyme including Hofbauer cells, and in parts of the encasing endometrium. Placental human papillomavirus infections are not likely to constitute a risk factor for spontaneous preterm labor or spontaneous abortions in the Danish population, although an effect of human papillomavirus DNA in placental cells cannot be excluded. © 2017 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  12. Cohort Profile Update: The China Jintan Child Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianghong; Cao, Siyuan; Chen, Zehang; Raine, Adrian; Hanlon, Alexandra; Ai, Yuexian; Zhou, Guoping; Yan, Chonghuai; Leung, Patrick W; McCauley, Linda; Pinto-Martin, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    The China Jintan Child Cohort study began in 2004 with 1656 pre-school participants and a research focus on studying the impact of environmental exposures, such as lead, on children’s neurobehavioural outcomes. This population cohort now includes around 1000 of the original participants, who have been assessed three times over a period of 10 years. Since the original IJE cohort profile publication in 2010, participants have experienced a critical developmental transition from pre-school to school age and then adolescence. The study has also witnessed an increase in breadth and depth of data collection from the original aim of risk assessment. This cohort has added new directions to investigate the mechanisms and protective factors for the relationship between early health factors and child physical and mental health outcomes, with an emphasis on neurobehavioural consequences. The study now encompasses 11 domains, composed of repeated measures of the original variables and new domains of biomarkers, sleep, psychophysiology, neurocognition, personality, peer relationship, mindfulness and family dynamics. Depth of evaluation has increased from parent/teacher report to self/peer report and intergenerational family report. Consequently, the cohort has additional directions to include: (i) classmates of the original cohort participants for peer relationship assessment; and (ii) parental and grandparental measures to assess personality and dynamics within families. We welcome interest in our study and ask investigators to contact the corresponding author for additional information on data acquisition. PMID:26323725

  13. Risk of Vertical Transmission of Human Papillomavirus throughout Pregnancy: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Mi; Park, Joong Shin; Norwitz, Errol R.; Koo, Ja Nam; Oh, Ig Hwan; Park, Jeong Woo; Kim, Sun Min; Kim, Yun Hwan; Park, Chan-Wook; Song, Yong Sang

    2013-01-01

    Objective Much controversy still exists about maternal-to-infant transmission of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, specifically about the magnitude of the risk and the route and timing of such vertical transmission. This prospective cohort study examines the risk of vertical transmission of maternal HPV in each trimester of pregnancy. Study design One hundred fifty three healthy pregnant women were followed longitudinally throughout pregnancy and cervical swabs obtained in each trimester and postpartum for HPV detection. Cord blood, neonatal nasopharyngeal aspirates, and placental biopsies were collected at delivery. DNA isolation, polymerase chain reaction, and hybridization were performed using the GG HPV Genotyping Chip Kit (Goodgene Inc., Seoul, Korea). Detection of HPV in neonates was defined as the presence of HPV DNA in either cord blood or neonatal nasopharyngeal aspirate. Results HPV DNA was detected in 14%(22/153) of healthy women in the first trimester, 18%(22/124) in the second trimester, and 10%(15/153) in the third trimester; 24%(37/153) were positive for HPV DNA on at least one occasion in pregnancy. At birth, 5.2%(8/153) of neonates were HPV DNA positive. Seven of these eight infants were born to HPV-positive mothers. Placental HPV DNA was positive in 3.3%(5/152) of cases, and all five cases were from mothers with at least one HPV-positive test. Detection of HPV DNA in neonates was associated with detection of HPV in mothers during any of the three trimesters of pregnancy. Conclusion HPV DNA was detected at birth in 5.2%(8/153) of neonates born to healthy women, and was associated with the detection of HPV in mothers during any of the three trimesters of pregnancy. PMID:23785495

  14. Natural History of Cutaneous Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infection in Men: The HIM Study

    PubMed Central

    Hampras, Shalaka S.; Giuliano, Anna R.; Lin, Hui-Yi; Fisher, Kate J.; Abrahamsen, Martha E.; Sirak, Bradley A.; Iannacone, Michelle R.; Gheit, Tarik; Tommasino, Massimo; Rollison, Dana E.

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that cutaneous human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is associated with non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). Little is known about the natural history of cutaneous HPV. A sub-cohort of 209 men with no NMSC history, initially enrolled in the HPV infection in men (HIM) study, were followed for a median of 12.6 months. Epidemiological data were collected through self-administered questionnaires. Cutaneous HPV DNA was measured in normal skin swabs (SS) and eyebrow hairs (EB) for 25 and 16 HPV types in genera β and γ, respectively. Any β HPV infection was more prevalent in SS (67.3%) compared to EB (56.5%, p = 0.04). Incidence in SS was higher than 20 per 1,000 person-months for HPV types 4, 5, 23, 38 and 76. Median duration of persistence of β and γ HPV infection was 8.6 and 6.1 months in EB, respectively, and 11.3 months and 6.3 months, in SS, respectively. Older age (>44 years vs. 18-30 years) was significantly associated with prevalent (SS OR = 3.0, 95% CI = 1.2–7.0) and persistent β HPV infection (EB OR = 6.1, 95% CI = 2.6–14.1). History of blistering sunburn was associated with prevalent (OR = 2.8, 95% CI = 1.3–5.8) and persistent (OR = 2.3, 95% CI = 1.2–4.6) β HPV infection in SS. Cutaneous HPV is highly prevalent in men, with age and blistering sunburn being significant risk factors for cutaneous β HPV infection. PMID:25198694

  15. Natural history of cutaneous human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in men: the HIM study.

    PubMed

    Hampras, Shalaka S; Giuliano, Anna R; Lin, Hui-Yi; Fisher, Kate J; Abrahamsen, Martha E; Sirak, Bradley A; Iannacone, Michelle R; Gheit, Tarik; Tommasino, Massimo; Rollison, Dana E

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that cutaneous human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is associated with non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). Little is known about the natural history of cutaneous HPV. A sub-cohort of 209 men with no NMSC history, initially enrolled in the HPV infection in men (HIM) study, were followed for a median of 12.6 months. Epidemiological data were collected through self-administered questionnaires. Cutaneous HPV DNA was measured in normal skin swabs (SS) and eyebrow hairs (EB) for 25 and 16 HPV types in genera β and γ, respectively. Any β HPV infection was more prevalent in SS (67.3%) compared to EB (56.5%, p = 0.04). Incidence in SS was higher than 20 per 1,000 person-months for HPV types 4, 5, 23, 38 and 76. Median duration of persistence of β and γ HPV infection was 8.6 and 6.1 months in EB, respectively, and 11.3 months and 6.3 months, in SS, respectively. Older age (>44 years vs. 18-30 years) was significantly associated with prevalent (SS OR = 3.0, 95% CI = 1.2-7.0) and persistent β HPV infection (EB OR = 6.1, 95% CI = 2.6-14.1). History of blistering sunburn was associated with prevalent (OR = 2.8, 95% CI = 1.3-5.8) and persistent (OR = 2.3, 95% CI = 1.2-4.6) β HPV infection in SS. Cutaneous HPV is highly prevalent in men, with age and blistering sunburn being significant risk factors for cutaneous β HPV infection.

  16. Cohort Profile Update: The 1982 Pelotas (Brazil) Birth Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Horta, Bernardo Lessa; Gigante, Denise P; Gonçalves, Helen; dos Santos Motta, JanainaVieira; Loret de Mola, Christian; Oliveira, Isabel O; Barros, Fernando C; Victora, Cesar G

    2015-04-01

    In this manuscript, we update the profile of the 1982 Pelotas Birth Cohort Study.In 1982, 5914 live births whose families lived in the urban are of Pelotas were enrolled in the cohort. In 2012-13, we tried to locate the whole original cohort; 3701 participants were interviewed who, added to the 325 known deaths, represented a follow-up rate of 68.1%. In contrast to the previous home interviews, in this wave all participants were invited to visit the research clinic to be interviewed and examined. The visit was carried out at a mean age of 30.2 years and mainly focused on four categories of outcomes: (i) mental health; (ii) body composition; (iii) precursors of complex chronic diseases; and (iv) human capital. Requests for collaboration by outside researchers are welcome.

  17. Cohort Profile Update: The 1982 Pelotas (Brazil) Birth Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Horta, Bernardo Lessa; Gigante, Denise P; Gonçalves, Helen; dos Santos Motta, JanainaVieira; Loret de Mola, Christian; Oliveira, Isabel O; Barros, Fernando C; Victora, Cesar G

    2015-01-01

    In this manuscript, we update the profile of the 1982 Pelotas Birth Cohort Study.In 1982, 5914 live births whose families lived in the urban are of Pelotas were enrolled in the cohort. In 2012–13, we tried to locate the whole original cohort; 3701 participants were interviewed who, added to the 325 known deaths, represented a follow-up rate of 68.1%. In contrast to the previous home interviews, in this wave all participants were invited to visit the research clinic to be interviewed and examined. The visit was carried out at a mean age of 30.2 years and mainly focused on four categories of outcomes: (i) mental health; (ii) body composition; (iii) precursors of complex chronic diseases; and (iv) human capital. Requests for collaboration by outside researchers are welcome. PMID:25733577

  18. Cohort profile: the Social Inequality in Cancer (SIC) cohort study.

    PubMed

    Nordahl, Helene; Hvidtfeldt, Ulla Arthur; Diderichsen, Finn; Rod, Naja Hulvej; Osler, Merete; Frederiksen, Birgitte Lidegaard; Prescott, Eva; Tjønneland, Anne; Lange, Theis; Keiding, Niels; Andersen, Per Kragh; Andersen, Ingelise

    2014-12-01

    The Social Inequality in Cancer (SIC) cohort study was established to determine pathways through which socioeconomic position affects morbidity and mortality, in particular common subtypes of cancer. Data from seven well-established cohort studies from Denmark were pooled. Combining these cohorts provided a unique opportunity to generate a large study population with long follow-up and sufficient statistical power to develop and apply new methods for quantification of the two basic mechanisms underlying social inequalities in cancer-mediation and interaction. The SIC cohort included 83 006 participants aged 20-98 years at baseline. A wide range of behavioural and biological risk factors such as smoking, physical inactivity, alcohol intake, hormone replacement therapy, body mass index, blood pressure and serum cholesterol were assessed by self-administered questionnaires, physical examinations and blood samples. All participants were followed up in nationwide demographic and healthcare registries. For those interested in collaboration, further details can be obtained by contacting the Steering Committee at the Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, at inan@sund.ku.dk.

  19. Association between free testosterone levels and anal human papillomavirus types 16/18 infections in a cohort of men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hilary K; Brown, Todd T; Li, Xiuhong; Young, Stephen; Cranston, Ross D; D'Souza, Gypsyamber; Jacobson, Lisa P; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Seaberg, Eric C; Margolick, Joseph B; Jenkins, Frank J; Moran, Matthew G; Chua, Kristofer; Bolan, Robert K; Detels, Roger; Wiley, Dorothy J

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 cause invasive cervical cancer and most invasive anal cancers (IACs). Overall, IAC rates are highest among men who have sex with men (MSM), especially MSM with HIV infection. Testosterone is prescribed for men showing hypogonadism and HIV-related wasting. While there are direct and indirect physiological effects of testosterone in males, its role in anal HPV16/18 infections in men is unknown. Free testosterone (FT) was measured in serum from 340 Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS) participants who were tested for anal HPV16/18-DNA approximately 36 months later. The effect of log10-transformed current FT level on anal HPV16/18 prevalence was modeled using Poisson regression with robust error variance. Multivariate models controlled for other HPV types, cumulative years of exogenous testosterone use, race, age, lifetime number of receptive anal intercourse partnerships, body mass index, tobacco smoking, HIV-infection and CD4+ T-cell counts among HIV-infected, and blood draw timing. Participants were, on average, 60 (+5.4) years of age, White (86%), and HIV-uninfected (56%); Twenty-four percent tested positive for anal HPV16 and/or 18-DNA (HPV16 prevalence=17.1%, HPV18=9.1%). In adjusted analysis, each half-log10 increase of FT was associated with a 1.9-fold (95% Confidence Interval: 1.11, 3.24) higher HPV16/18 prevalence. Additionally, other Group 1 high-risk HPVs were associated with a 1.56-fold (1.03, 2.37) higher HPV16/18 prevalence. Traditional risk factors for HPV16/18 infection (age, tobacco smoking; lifetime number of sexual partners, including the number of receptive anal intercourse partnerships within 24 months preceding HPV testing) were poorly correlated with one another and not statistically significantly associated with higher prevalence of HPV16/18 infection in unadjusted and adjusted analyses. Higher free testosterone was associated with increased HPV16/18 prevalence measured approximately three years later

  20. Association between Free Testosterone Levels and Anal Human Papillomavirus Types 16/18 Infections in a Cohort of Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Hilary K.; Brown, Todd T.; Li, Xiuhong; Young, Stephen; Cranston, Ross D.; D’Souza, Gypsyamber; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Seaberg, Eric C.; Margolick, Joseph B.; Jenkins, Frank J.; Moran, Matthew G.; Chua, Kristofer; Bolan, Robert K.; Detels, Roger; Wiley, Dorothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 cause invasive cervical cancer and most invasive anal cancers (IACs). Overall, IAC rates are highest among men who have sex with men (MSM), especially MSM with HIV infection. Testosterone is prescribed for men showing hypogonadism and HIV-related wasting. While there are direct and indirect physiological effects of testosterone in males, its role in anal HPV16/18 infections in men is unknown. Methods Free testosterone (FT) was measured in serum from 340 Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS) participants who were tested for anal HPV16/18-DNA approximately 36 months later. The effect of log10-transformed current FT level on anal HPV16/18 prevalence was modeled using Poisson regression with robust error variance. Multivariate models controlled for other HPV types, cumulative years of exogenous testosterone use, race, age, lifetime number of receptive anal intercourse partnerships, body mass index, tobacco smoking, HIV-infection and CD4+ T-cell counts among HIV-infected, and blood draw timing. Results Participants were, on average, 60 (+5.4) years of age, White (86%), and HIV-uninfected (56%); Twenty-four percent tested positive for anal HPV16 and/or 18-DNA (HPV16 prevalence=17.1%, HPV18=9.1%). In adjusted analysis, each half-log10 increase of FT was associated with a 1.9-fold (95% Confidence Interval: 1.11, 3.24) higher HPV16/18 prevalence. Additionally, other Group 1 high-risk HPVs were associated with a 1.56-fold (1.03, 2.37) higher HPV16/18 prevalence. Traditional risk factors for HPV16/18 infection (age, tobacco smoking; lifetime number of sexual partners, including the number of receptive anal intercourse partnerships within 24 months preceding HPV testing) were poorly correlated with one another and not statistically significantly associated with higher prevalence of HPV16/18 infection in unadjusted and adjusted analyses. Conclusions Higher free testosterone was associated with increased HPV16/18 prevalence

  1. [Birth cohort studies in China: a review].

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Sun, L; He, X Y; Wang, Y X; Yu, W P

    2017-04-10

    With longer than 100-year experience of development, methods used on birth cohort study have been viewed as having important roles in exploring the probable effects of health and environment exposure both prior to and during the pregnancy in the life circle as infants, children, adolescents, adults, and the elderly. However in China, birth cohort studies started late but with rapid development. Recently, some well-known methods on birth cohort studies were established in mainland China, Hong Kong and Taiwan area. This paper presented an overall review on the progress about birth cohort studies and their prospects, in China.

  2. Role of papillomavirus oncogenes in human cervical cancer: Transgenic animal studies

    SciTech Connect

    Griep, A.E.; Lambert, P.F.

    1994-05-01

    Human papillomaviruses are believed to be etiologic agents for the majority of human cervical carcinoma, a common cancer that is a leading cause of death by cancer among women worldwide. In cervical carcinoma, a subset of papillomaviral genes, namely E6 and E7, are expressed. In vitro tissue culture studies indicate that HPV E6 and E7 are oncogenes, and that their oncogenicity is due in part to their capacity to inactivate cellular tumor suppressor genes. The behavior of E6 and E7 in vitro and the genetic evidence from analysis of human cancers suggest that the E6 and E7 genes play a significant role in the development of cervical cancer. This hypothesis is now being tested using animal models. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge of the oncogenicity of papillomavirus genes that has been generated through their study in transgenic mice. 82 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Incidence of cervical human papillomavirus infection in systemic lupus erythematosus women.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Pinto, C; García-Carrasco, M; Vallejo-Ruiz, V; Méndez-Martínez, S; Taboada-Cole, A; Etchegaray-Morales, I; Muñóz-Guarneros, M; Reyes-Leyva, J; López-Colombo, A

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Our objective was to study the incidence, persistence and clearance of human papillomavirus infection in systemic lupus erythematosus women and assess risk factors for persistence of human papillomavirus infection. Methods We carried out a prospective, observational cohort study of 127 systemic lupus erythematosus women. Patients were evaluated at baseline and at three years. Traditional and systemic lupus erythematosus women-related disease risk factors were collected. Gynaecological evaluations and cervical cytology screening were made. Human papillomavirus detection and genotyping were made by polymerase chain reaction and linear array. Results The cumulative prevalence of human papillomavirus infection increased from 22.8% at baseline to 33.8% at three years; p = < 0.001: 20.1% of patients experienced 43 incident infections. The risk of any human papillomavirus infection was 10.1 per 1000 patient-months. At three years, 47 (88.6%) prevalent infections were cleared. Independent risk factors associated with incident human papillomavirus infection included more lifetime sexual partners (odds ratio = 1.8, 95% confidence interval = 1.11-3.0) and cumulative cyclophosphamide dose (odds ratio = 3.9, 95% confidence interval = 1.2-12.8). Conclusions In systemic lupus erythematosus women, the cumulative prevalence of human papillomavirus infection, including high risk-human papillomavirus and multiple human papillomavirus infections, may increase over time. Most persistent infections were low risk-human papillomavirus. The number of lifetime sexual partners and the cumulative cyclophosphamide dose were independently associated with incident human papillomavirus infection.

  4. Veterans Aging Cohort Study (VACS)

    PubMed Central

    Justice, Amy C.; Dombrowski, Elizabeth; Conigliaro, Joseph; Fultz, Shawn L.; Gibson, Deborah; Madenwald, Tamra; Goulet, Joseph; Simberkoff, Michael; Butt, Adeel A.; Rimland, David; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C.; Gibert, Cynthia L.; Oursler, Kris Ann K.; Brown, Sheldon; Leaf, David A.; Goetz, Matthew B.; Bryant, Kendall

    2010-01-01

    Background The Veterans Aging Cohort Study (VACS) is a study of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected and uninfected patients seen in infectious disease and general medical clinics. VACS includes the earlier 3 and 5 site studies (VACS 3 and VACS 5) as well as the ongoing 8 site study. Objectives We sought to provide background and context for analyses based upon VACS data, including study design and rationale as well as its basic protocol and the baseline characteristics of the enrolled sample. Research Design We undertook a prospectively consented multisite observational study of veterans in care with and without HIV infection. Measures Data were derived from patient and provider self report, telephone interviews, blood and DNA samples, focus groups, and full access to the national VA “paperless” electronic medical record system. Results More than 7200 veterans have been enrolled in at least one of the studies. The 8 site study (VACS) has enrolled 2979 HIV-infected and 3019 HIV-uninfected age–race–site matched comparators and has achieved stratified enrollment targets for race/ethnicity and age and 99% of its total target enrollment as of October 30, 2005. Participants in VACS are similar to other veterans receiving care within the VA. VACS participants are older and more predominantly black than those reported by the Centers for Disease Control. Conclusions VACS has assembled a rich, in-depth, and representative sample of veterans in care with and without HIV infection to conduct longitudinal analyses of questions concerning the association between alcohol use and related comorbid and AIDS-defining conditions. PMID:16849964

  5. Cost-effectiveness of female human papillomavirus vaccination in 179 countries: a PRIME modelling study.

    PubMed

    Jit, Mark; Brisson, Marc; Portnoy, Allison; Hutubessy, Raymond

    2014-07-01

    Introduction of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination in settings with the highest burden of HPV is not universal, partly because of the absence of quantitative estimates of country-specific effects on health and economic costs. We aimed to develop and validate a simple generic model of such effects that could be used and understood in a range of settings with little external support. We developed the Papillomavirus Rapid Interface for Modelling and Economics (PRIME) model to assess cost-effectiveness and health effects of vaccination of girls against HPV before sexual debut in terms of burden of cervical cancer and mortality. PRIME models incidence according to proposed vaccine efficacy against HPV 16/18, vaccine coverage, cervical cancer incidence and mortality, and HPV type distribution. It assumes lifelong vaccine protection and no changes to other screening programmes or vaccine uptake. We validated PRIME against existing reports of HPV vaccination cost-effectiveness, projected outcomes for 179 countries (assuming full vaccination of 12-year-old girls), and outcomes for 71 phase 2 GAVI-eligible countries (using vaccine uptake data from the GAVI Alliance). We assessed differences between countries in terms of cost-effectiveness and health effects. In validation, PRIME reproduced cost-effectiveness conclusions for 24 of 26 countries from 17 published studies, and for all 72 countries in a published study of GAVI-eligible countries. Vaccination of a cohort of 58 million 12-year-old girls in 179 countries prevented 690,000 cases of cervical cancer and 420,000 deaths during their lifetime (mostly in low-income or middle-income countries), at a net cost of US$4 billion. HPV vaccination was very cost effective (with every disability-adjusted life-year averted costing less than the gross domestic product per head) in 156 (87%) of 179 countries. Introduction of the vaccine in countries without national HPV vaccination at present would prevent substantially more cases

  6. Human papillomavirus knowledge, vaccine acceptance, and vaccine series completion among female entertainment and sex workers in Phnom Penh, Cambodia: the Young Women's Health Study.

    PubMed

    Wadhera, Priya; Evans, Jennifer L; Stein, Ellen; Gandhi, Monica; Couture, Marie-Claude; Sansothy, Neth; Sichan, Keo; Maher, Lisa; Kaldor, John; Page, Kimberly; Kien

    2015-10-01

    Human papillomavirus is a common sexually transmitted infection and the causative agent for cervical cancer, a frequently occurring malignant disease among women in developing countries. We assessed human papillomavirus awareness prior to the delivery of a brief information and education intervention, and human papillomavirus vaccine provision to female entertainment and sex workers (N = 220). At baseline, only 23.6% of women had heard of human papillomavirus. Following the educational intervention, 90% answered all the human papillomavirus knowledge questions correctly. Of 192 participants attending the first quarterly cohort visit where vaccine was offered, 149 (78%) were eligible for vaccination; HIV-positive (n = 32) and pregnant (n = 11) women were excluded. Acceptance of vaccine among eligible women was universal, and 79.2% completed the three-dose vaccination series. Women who reported use of amphetamine-type stimulants had significantly and independently lower odds of vaccine completion (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.24; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.08, 0.69). New pregnancies also had an impact on vaccine completion: 5.4% (8/149 5.4%) who started the series had to stop due to new pregnancy. Results demonstrate the effectiveness of a simple education intervention designed to increase human papillomavirus knowledge and the feasibility of successful human papillomavirus vaccine in a population that is often difficult to engage in preventive health care.

  7. Riyadh Mother and Baby Multicenter Cohort Study: The Cohort Profile

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeil, Samia; Alzeidan, Rasmieh; Elawad, Mamoun; Tabassum, Rabeena; Hansoti, Shehnaz; Magzoup, Mohie Edein; Al-Kadri, Hanan; Elsherif, Elham; Al-Mandil, Hazim; Al-Shaikh, Ghadeer; Zakaria, Nasria

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the effects of non-communicable diseases, such as diabetes, hypertension and obesity, on the mother and the infant. Methods A multicentre cohort study was conducted in three hospitals in the city of Riyadh in Saudi Arabia. All Saudi women and their babies who delivered in participating hospitals were eligible for recruitment. Data on socio-demographic characteristics in addition to the maternal and neonatal outcomes of pregnancy were collected. The cohort demographic profile was recorded and the prevalence of maternal conditions including gestational diabetes, pre-gestational diabetes, hypertensive disorders in pregnancy and obesity were estimated. Findings The total number of women who delivered in participating hospitals during the study period was 16,012 of which 14,568 women participated in the study. The mean age of the participants was 29 ± 5.9 years and over 40% were university graduates. Most of the participants were housewives, 70% were high or middle income and 22% were exposed to secondhand smoke. Of the total cohort, 24% were married to a first cousin. More than 68% of the participants were either overweight or obese. The preterm delivery rate was 9%, while 1.5% of the deliveries were postdate. The stillbirth rate was 13/1000 live birth. The prevalence of gestational diabetes was 24% and that of pre-gestational diabetes was 4.3%. The preeclampsia prevalence was 1.1%. The labour induction rate was 15.5% and the cesarean section rate was 25%. Conclusion Pregnant women in Saudi Arabia have a unique demographic profile. The prevalence of obesity and diabetes in pregnancy are among the highest in the world. PMID:26937965

  8. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccination and Adolescent Girls' Knowledge and Sexuality in Western Uganda: A Comparative Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Turiho, Andrew Kampikaho; Muhwezi, Wilson Winston; Okello, Elialilia Sarikiaeli; Tumwesigye, Nazarius Mbona; Banura, Cecil; Katahoire, Anne Ruhweza

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the influence of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination on adolescent girls' knowledge of HPV and HPV vaccine, perception of sexual risk and intentions for sexual debut. This cross-sectional comparative study was conducted in Ibanda and Mbarara districts. Data was collected using a standardized self-administered questionnaire and analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences computer software. Univariate, bivariate, and logistic regression analyses were conducted with significance level set at p < .05. Results showed that HPV vaccination was associated with being knowledgeable (Crude OR: 5.26, CI: 2.32-11.93; p = 0.000). Vaccination against HPV did not predict perception of sexual risk. Knowledge was low (only 87/385 or 22.6% of vaccinated girls were knowledgeable), but predicted perception of a high sexual risk (Adjusted OR: 3.12, CI: 1.37-3.63; p = 0.008). HPV vaccination, knowledge and perceived sexual risk did not predict sexual behaviour intentions. High parental communication was associated with adolescent attitudes that support postponement of sexual debut in both bivariate and multiple regression analyses. In conclusion, findings of this study suggest that HPV vaccination is not likely to encourage adolescent sexual activity. Influence of knowledge on sexual behaviour intentions was not definitively explained. Prospective cohort studies were proposed to address the emerging questions.

  9. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccination and Adolescent Girls' Knowledge and Sexuality in Western Uganda: A Comparative Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Turiho, Andrew Kampikaho

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the influence of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination on adolescent girls’ knowledge of HPV and HPV vaccine, perception of sexual risk and intentions for sexual debut. This cross-sectional comparative study was conducted in Ibanda and Mbarara districts. Data was collected using a standardized self-administered questionnaire and analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences computer software. Univariate, bivariate, and logistic regression analyses were conducted with significance level set at p < .05. Results showed that HPV vaccination was associated with being knowledgeable (Crude OR: 5.26, CI: 2.32–11.93; p = 0.000). Vaccination against HPV did not predict perception of sexual risk. Knowledge was low (only 87/385 or 22.6% of vaccinated girls were knowledgeable), but predicted perception of a high sexual risk (Adjusted OR: 3.12, CI: 1.37–3.63; p = 0.008). HPV vaccination, knowledge and perceived sexual risk did not predict sexual behaviour intentions. High parental communication was associated with adolescent attitudes that support postponement of sexual debut in both bivariate and multiple regression analyses. In conclusion, findings of this study suggest that HPV vaccination is not likely to encourage adolescent sexual activity. Influence of knowledge on sexual behaviour intentions was not definitively explained. Prospective cohort studies were proposed to address the emerging questions. PMID:26327322

  10. Animal papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Rector, Annabel; Van Ranst, Marc

    2013-10-01

    We provide an overview of the host range, taxonomic classification and genomic diversity of animal papillomaviruses. The complete genomes of 112 non-human papillomavirus types, recovered from 54 different host species, are currently available in GenBank. The recent characterizations of reptilian papillomaviruses extend the host range of the Papillomaviridae to include all amniotes. Although the genetically diverse papillomaviruses have a highly conserved genomic lay-out, deviations from this prototypic genome organization are observed in several animal papillomaviruses, and only the core ORFs E1, E2, L2 and L1 are present in all characterized papillomavirus genomes. The discovery of papilloma-polyoma hybrids BPCV1 and BPCV2, containing a papillomaviral late region but an early region encoding typical polyomaviral nonstructural proteins, and the detection of recombination breakpoints between the early and late coding regions of cetacean papillomaviruses, could indicate that early and late gene cassettes of papillomaviruses are relatively independent entities that can be interchanged by recombination. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cohort Profile: The Limache, Chile, birth cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Amigo, Hugo; Bustos, Patricia; Zumelzú, Elinor; Rona, Roberto J

    2014-01-01

    The Limache cohort was set up to assess the programming and life course events hypotheses in relation to cardiovascular risk factors and chronic respiratory conditions, especially asthma, in the context of an unprecedented economic growth in Chile. The cohort was a representative sample of 1232 participants born between 1974 and 1978 in the hospital of Limache. The study includes data collected at birth, during the 1st year of life, at 22 to 28 years (collected between 2000 and 2002) and at 32 to 38 years (collected between 2010 and 2012). The data collected include anthropometric measurements at birth, 1st year of life and in adulthood, socio-economic and demographic data, lifestyle information including smoking, alcohol consumption and food intake, respiratory symptoms, lung function, broncho-reactivity to methacholine and skin prick reaction to eight allergens, measurement of cardiovascular risk factors and information on common mental health, mainly in the most recent study. The principal researchers welcome collaborative projects, especially those that will compare similar data sets in other settings [E-mail: hamigo@med.uchile.cl]. PMID:24366489

  12. Cohort profile: The Limache, Chile, birth cohort study.

    PubMed

    Amigo, Hugo; Bustos, Patricia; Zumelzú, Elinor; Rona, Roberto J

    2014-08-01

    The Limache cohort was set up to assess the programming and life course events hypotheses in relation to cardiovascular risk factors and chronic respiratory conditions, especially asthma, in the context of an unprecedented economic growth in Chile. The cohort was a representative sample of 1232 participants born between 1974 and 1978 in the hospital of Limache. The study includes data collected at birth, during the 1st year of life, at 22 to 28 years (collected between 2000 and 2002) and at 32 to 38 years (collected between 2010 and 2012). The data collected include anthropometric measurements at birth, 1st year of life and in adulthood, socio-economic and demographic data, lifestyle information including smoking, alcohol consumption and food intake, respiratory symptoms, lung function, broncho-reactivity to methacholine and skin prick reaction to eight allergens, measurement of cardiovascular risk factors and information on common mental health, mainly in the most recent study. The principal researchers welcome collaborative projects, especially those that will compare similar data sets in other settings.

  13. Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Coverage Among Girls Before 13 Years: A Birth Year Cohort Analysis of the National Immunization Survey-Teen, 2008-2013.

    PubMed

    Jeyarajah, Jenny; Elam-Evans, Laurie D; Stokley, Shannon; Smith, Philip J; Singleton, James A

    2016-09-01

    Routine human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination is recommended at 11 or 12 years by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. National Immunization Survey-Teen data were analyzed to evaluate, among girls, coverage with one or more doses of HPV vaccination, missed opportunities for HPV vaccination, and potential achievable coverage before 13 years. Results were stratified by birth year cohorts. HPV vaccination coverage before 13 years (≥1 HPV dose) increased from 28.4% for girls born in 1995 to 46.8% for girls born in 2000. Among girls born during 1999-2000 who had not received HPV vaccination before 13 years (57.2%), 80.1% had at least 1 missed opportunity to receive HPV vaccination before 13 years. Opportunities to vaccinate for HPV at age 11 to 12 years are missed. Strategies are needed to decrease these missed opportunities for HPV vaccination. This can be facilitated by the administration of all vaccines recommended for adolescents at the same visit.

  14. Consistent condom use reduces the genital human papillomavirus burden among high-risk men: the HPV infection in men study.

    PubMed

    Pierce Campbell, Christine M; Lin, Hui-Yi; Fulp, William; Papenfuss, Mary R; Salmerón, Jorge J; Quiterio, Manuel M; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Villa, Luisa L; Giuliano, Anna R

    2013-08-01

    Data supporting the efficacy of condoms against human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in males are limited. Therefore, we examined the effect of consistent condom use on genital HPV acquisition and duration of infection. A prospective analysis was conducted within the HPV Infection in Men Study, a multinational HPV cohort study. Men who were recently sexually active (n = 3323) were stratified on the basis of sexual risk behaviors and partnerships. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, type-specific incidence of HPV infection and clearance were modeled for each risk group to assess independent associations with condom use. The risk of HPV acquisition was 2-fold lower among men with no steady sex partner who always used condoms, compared with those who never used condoms (hazard ratio, 0.54), after adjustment for country, age, race, education duration, smoking, alcohol, and number of recent sex partners. The probability of clearing an oncogenic HPV infection was 30% higher among nonmonogamous men who always used condoms with nonsteady sex partners, compared with men who never used condoms (hazard ratio, 1.29), after adjustment for country, age, race, education duration, marital status, smoking, alcohol, and number of recent sex partners. No protective effects of condom use were observed among monogamous men. Condoms should be promoted in combination with HPV vaccination to prevent HPV infection in men.

  15. High-risk human papillomavirus in HIV-infected women undergoing cervical cancer screening in Lilongwe, Malawi: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Deepa; Njala, Joseph; Stocker, Penny; Schooley, Alan; Flores, Martiniano; Tseng, Chi-Hong; Pfaff, Colin; Jansen, Perry; Mitsuyasu, Ronald T.; Hoffman, Risa M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Rates of abnormal visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) and prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) subtypes have not been well characterized in HIV-infected women in Malawi. Methods We performed a prospective cohort study of VIA (N=440) in HIV-infected women ages 25-59, with a nested study of HPV subtypes in first 300 women enrolled. Wilcoxon's Rank-Sum Test was used to compare continuous variables and Fisher's exact test was used to compare categorical variables between women with normal versus abnormal VIA. Results: Of 440 women screened, 9.5% (N=42) had abnormal VIA with 69.0% (N=29) having advanced disease not amenable to cryotherapy. Of 294 women with HPV results, 39% (N=114) of women were positive for high-risk HPV infection. Only lower CD4 count (287 cells/mm3 vs. 339 cells/mm3, p=0.03) and high-risk HPV (66.7% versus 35.6%, p<0.01) were associated with abnormal VIA. The most common high-risk HPV subtypes in women with abnormal VIA were 35 (33.3%), 16 (26.7%), and 58 (23.3%). Conclusion Low CD4 cell count was associated with abnormal VIA and raises the importance of early ART and expanded availability of VIA. HPV vaccines targeting additional non-16/18 high-risk HPV subtypes may have greater protective advantages in countries such as Malawi. PMID:24928579

  16. Papillomaviruses and human disease

    SciTech Connect

    Syrjanen, K.; Gissman, L.; Koss, L.G.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 17 selections. Some of the titles are: Papillomaviruses: particles, genome organization and proteins; Physical state of papillomavirus DNA in tumors; Transforming and regulatory functions of bovine papillomavirus Type 1; and Transcription of papillomavirus genomes.

  17. Ancillary Studies in Determining Human Papillomavirus Status of Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Cantley, Richard L.; Gabrielli, Eleonora; Montebelli, Francesco; Cimbaluk, David; Gattuso, Paolo; Petruzzelli, Guy

    2011-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity and pharynx represents the sixth most common form of malignancy worldwide. A significant proportion of these cases are related to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. In general, HPV-associated SCC is more commonly nonkeratinizing and poorly differentiated, whereas non-HPV-associated SCC is typically keratinizing and moderately differentiated. Nevertheless, significant overlap in morphology is seen between these two forms of SCC. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the utility of ancillary studies in the establishment of HPV status of oropharyngeal SCC, including p16 immunohistochemistry, high-risk HPV in situ hybridization, polymerase chain reaction, and newer HPV detection modalities. PMID:21772959

  18. A study on the predictors of Korean male students' intention to receive human papillomavirus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeong Sil; Park, Seungmi

    2016-11-01

    The objective was to survey the current state of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination and the predictors of vaccination intention among Korean male students of high school (ages 15-19) and university (ages 17-27). Human papillomavirus is a sexually transmitted infectious agent causing uterine cervical, anal, and/or penile cancer and genital warts in males and females. Infection rate of human papillomavirus increases from the age when sexual intercourse first occurs. Therefore, motivation to receive human papillomavirus vaccination is needed to protect infection. Cross-sectional descriptive survey was performed only in male students. They are less aware of human papillomavirus than females, because human papillomavirus vaccination has been targeted on females for preventing cervical cancer in Korea. Data were collected using a self-reporting questionnaire for male high school and university students sampled from a city in Korea. Human papillomavirus vaccine-related knowledge, health beliefs, demographic, and sexual history information variables relating to intentions to vaccinate were assessed. The human papillomavirus vaccination rate was very low and the levels of knowledge and health beliefs were low. The significant predictors that raised the intention of human papillomavirus vaccination were a university student, experience of sexual intercourse and perceiving the benefits of human papillomavirus vaccination. To promote human papillomavirus vaccination, educational programming targeting males should include health beliefs and knowledge, emphasising that vaccination is important to prevent uterine cervical cancer and to role as a preventative measure against common male diseases. Male high school students should be included as a major target population for school human papillomavirus education programmes, as they are at the age of commencing sexual intercourse. In addition, public health policies including human papillomavirus vaccination in the national

  19. A Study of Group Dynamics in Educational Leadership Cohort and Non-Cohort Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenlee, Bobbie J.; Karanxha, Zorka

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine group dynamics of educational leadership students in cohorts and make comparisons with the group dynamics characteristics of non-cohort students. Cohorts have emerged as dynamic and adaptive entities with attendant group dynamic processes that shape collective learning and action. Cohort (n=42) and…

  20. The Finnish Twin Cohort Study: an Update

    PubMed Central

    Kaprio, Jaakko

    2015-01-01

    In 2002 and 2006 review papers have described the Finnish Twin Cohort and studies conducted on these population-based, longitudinal data-sets with extensive follow-up data. Three cohorts have been established, the older twin cohort in the 1970s, and the Finntwin12 and Finntwin16 studies initiated in the 1990s. The present review provides on update on the latest data collections conducted since the previous review. These cover the fourth waves of data collection in the older cohort (twins born before 1958) and Finntwin12 (twins born 1983–1987). The fifth wave of data collection in Finntwin16 (twins born 1975–1979) included also assessments of their spouses/partners. An analysis of mortality in the older cohort from 1975 to 2009 indicates that the mortality of adult twins (as individuals) does not differ from the population at large. Based on the cohorts, many sub-studies with more detailed phenotyping and collection of omics data have been conducted or are in progress. We also contribute to numerous national and international collaborations. PMID:23298696

  1. The effect of intrauterine devices on acquisition and clearance of human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Averbach, Sarah H; Ma, Yifei; Smith-McCune, Karen; Shiboski, Stephen; Moscicki, Anna B

    2017-04-01

    Previous studies have shown a decrease in cervical cancer associated with intrauterine device use. It has been hypothesized that intrauterine device use may alter the natural history of human papillomavirus infections, preempting development of precancerous lesions of the cervix and cervical cancer, but the effect of intrauterine devices on the natural history of human papillomavirus infection and subsequent development of cervical cancer is poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between intrauterine device use and cervical high-risk human papillomavirus acquisition and clearance. This is a prospective cohort study conducted from October 2000 through June 2014 among 676 sexually active young women and girls enrolled from family planning clinics in San Francisco, CA. Data were analyzed using a Cox proportional hazards model, including time-varying indicators of intrauterine device use, and adjusting for fixed and time-dependent predictor variables. A total of 85 women used an intrauterine device at some time during follow-up. Among 14,513 study visits, women reported intrauterine device use at 505 visits. After adjusting for potential behavioral confounders, there was no association between intrauterine device use and human papillomavirus acquisition (hazard ratio, 0.50; 95% confidence interval, 0.20-1.23; P = .13) or clearance of human papillomavirus infection (hazard ratio, 1.44; 95% confidence interval, 0.76-2.72; P = .26). Current intrauterine device use is not associated with acquisition or persistence of human papillomavirus infection. Intrauterine device use is safe among women and girls with human papillomavirus infections and at risk for human papillomavirus acquisition. Intrauterine device use may play a role further downstream in the natural history of cervical cancer by inhibiting the development of precancerous lesions of the cervix in human papillomavirus-infected women, or enhancing clearance of established

  2. Using Organotypic Epithelial Tissue Culture to Study the Human Papillomavirus Life Cycle.

    PubMed

    Lee, Denis; Norby, Kathryn; Hayes, Mitchell; Chiu, Ya-Fang; Sugden, Bill; Lambert, Paul F

    2016-05-06

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are small double-stranded DNA viruses that are associated with greater than 95% of cervical cancers and 20% of head and neck cancers. These cancers arise from persistent infections in which there is continued expression of the HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes, often as a consequence of integration of HPV DNA into the host genome. Such cancers represent "dead ends" for the virus as integration disrupts the viral genome and because the cancers are defective in normal epithelial differentiation, which is required for production of progeny papillomavirus. In order to study the full viral life cycle, from the establishment to maintenance to productive stages, our lab makes use of the organotypic epithelial tissue culture system. This system allows us to mimic the three-dimensional structure of epithelia whose differentiation is tightly linked to the completion of the HPV viral life cycle. In this chapter we describe how various aspects of the HPV life cycle are monitored in raft cultures making use of an immortalized keratinocyte cell line. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  3. Review of Cohort Studies for Mood Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Hong Jin; Baek, Ji Hyun; Ahn, Yong-Min; Kim, Se Joo; Ha, Tae Hyun; Cha, Boseok; Moon, Eunsoo; Kang, Hee-Ju; Ryu, Vin; Cho, Chul-Hyun; Heo, Jung-Yoon; Kim, Kiwon

    2016-01-01

    This paper aimed to review currently available cohort studies of subjects with mood disorders such as major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD). Using the PubMed and KoreaMed databases, we reviewed eight major cohort studies. Most studies recruited participants with MDD and BD separately, so direct comparison of factors associated with diagnostic changes was difficult. Regular and frequent follow-up evaluations utilizing objective mood ratings and standardized evaluation methods in a naturalistic fashion are necessary to determine detailed clinical courses of mood disorders. Further, biological samples should also be collected to incorporate clinical findings in the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. An innovative cohort study that can serve as a platform for translational research for treatment and prevention of mood disorders is critical in determining clinical, psychosocial, neurobiological and genetic factors associated with long-term courses and consequences of mood disorders in Korean patients. PMID:27247592

  4. Multicenter Study of Human Papillomavirus and the Human Papillomavirus Vaccine: Knowledge and Attitudes among People of African Descent

    PubMed Central

    Thurman, Natalie; Halliday, Darron; Butler, Raleigh; Francis, Dorita; Joseph, Madeline; Thompson, Jahzreel; Andraos-Selim, Cecile; Taioli, Emanuela; Hagan, Kourtney L.; Jones, Erin A.; Jones, Jade; Moss, Cierra M.; Smith, Ar'Lena C.; Ashing, Kimlin Tam; Ragin, Camille C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To compare knowledge and attitudes of human papillomavirus (HPV) and the vaccine between different cultures of African descent. Methods. A cross-sectional survey of 555 African-Americans and Afro-Caribbeans residing in the US and the Bahamas (BHM) was conducted. Results. General knowledge about HPV and the HPV vaccine differed between the two countries significantly. Bahamian respondents were less likely to have higher numbers of correct knowledge answers when compared to Americans (Adjusted Odds Ratio [Adj. OR] 0.47, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 0.30–0.75). Older age, regardless of location, was also associated with answering fewer questions correctly (Adj. OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.40–0.92). Attitudes related to HPV vaccination were similar between the US and BHM, but nearly 80% of BHM respondents felt that children should not be able to receive the vaccine without parental consent compared to 57% of American respondents. Conclusions. Grave lack of knowledge, safety and cost concerns, and influence of parental restrictions may negatively impact vaccine uptake among African-American and Afro-Caribbean persons. Interventions to increase the vaccine uptake in the Caribbean must include medical provider and parental involvement. Effective strategies for education and increasing vaccine uptake in BHM are crucial for decreasing cervical cancer burden in the Caribbean. PMID:23956612

  5. Brain-Science Based Cohort Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koizumi, Hideaki

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a number of human cohort studies based on the concept of brain-science and education. These studies assess the potential effects of new technologies on babies, children and adolescents, and test hypotheses drawn from animal and genetic case studies to see if they apply to people. A flood of information, virtual media,…

  6. Brain-Science Based Cohort Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koizumi, Hideaki

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a number of human cohort studies based on the concept of brain-science and education. These studies assess the potential effects of new technologies on babies, children and adolescents, and test hypotheses drawn from animal and genetic case studies to see if they apply to people. A flood of information, virtual media,…

  7. Cohort profile: The Isle of Man Birth Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Goodfellow, Stephanie A; Rolfe, Edna M; Golding, Jean

    2013-10-01

    The Isle of Man is a self-governing British Crown Dependency situated equidistantly from England, Scotland and Ireland. In 1991, its population of ∼75,000 comprised ∼50% indigenous Manx and 50% immigrants, mainly from the surrounding countries. It was invited to join the European Longitudinal Study of Pregnancy and Childhood. The aim of the study was to enrol all pregnant women resident on the Island with an expected date of delivery in the 18-month period of January 1991-June 1992. A total of 1314 livebirths formed the eligible cohort. Questionnaires were completed by mothers and their partners during pregnancy and subsequently at 6 weeks, 6 months, 18 months, 3, 5, 7 and 15/16 years. Hands-on examination of the children occurred at age 7 years, when biological samples were collected. Teachers completed questionnaires at 7 and 15 years; medical records were extracted for the obstetric and childhood periods. Response rates varied from >80% from teachers and children at 15 years to only 23% from partners when their children were aged 7 years. Selected data sets are available to collaborators, although many of the data need funds for further collaboration.

  8. Associations of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes with high-grade cervical neoplasia (CIN2+) in a cohort of women living with HIV in Burkina Faso and South Africa

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objective To describe associations of high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) with high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN2+) in women living with HIV (WLHIV) in Burkina Faso (BF) and South Africa (SA). Methods Prospective cohort of WLHIV attending HIV outpatient clinics and treatment centres. Recruitment was stratified by ART status. Cervical HPV genotyping using INNO-LiPA and histological assessment of 4-quadrant cervical biopsies at enrolment and 16 months later. Results Among women with CIN2+ at baseline, the prevalence of any HR-HPV genotypes included in the bi/quadrivalent (HPV16/18) or nonavalent (HPV16/18/31/35/45/52/58) HPV vaccines ranged from 37% to 90%. HPV58 was most strongly associated with CIN2+ (aOR = 5.40, 95%CI: 2.77–10.53). At 16-months follow-up, persistence of any HR-HPV was strongly associated with incident CIN2+ (aOR = 7.90, 95%CI: 3.11–20.07), as was persistence of HPV16/18 (aOR = 5.25, 95%CI: 2.14–12.91) and the additional HR types in the nonavalent vaccine (aOR = 3.23, 95%CI: 1.23–8.54). Conclusion HR-HPV persistence is very common among African WLHIV and is linked to incident CIN2+. HPV vaccines could prevent between 37–90% of CIN2+ among African WLHIV. PMID:28333966

  9. Anal Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Prevalences and Factors Associated with Abnormal Anal Cytology in HIV-Infected Women in an Urban Cohort from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Luz, Paula M.; Lake, Jordan E.; Levi, José Eduardo; Coutinho, José Ricardo; de Andrade, Angela; Heinke, Thais; Derrico, Mônica; Veloso, Valdilea G.; Friedman, Ruth K.; Grinsztejn, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Identifying factors, including human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes, associated with abnormal anal cytology in HIV-infected women have implications for anal squamous cell cancer (SCC) prevention in HIV-infected women. Anal and cervical samples were collected for cytology, and tested for high-(HR-HPV) and low-risk HPV (LR-HPV) genotypes in a cross-sectional analysis of the IPEC Women's HIV Cohort (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil). Multivariate log-binomial regression models estimated prevalence ratios for factors associated with abnormal anal cytology [≥atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance, (ASC-US)]. Characteristics of the 863 participants included: median age 42 years, 57% non-white, 79% current CD4+ T-cell count >350 cells/mm3, 53% HIV-1 viral load <50 copies/mL, median ART duration 5.8 years. Fifty-one percent of anal specimens contained ≥1 HR-HPV genotype; 31% had abnormal anal cytology [14% ASC-US, 11% low-grade squamous intra-epithelial lesion, (LSIL); 2% atypical squamous cells-cannot exclude high-grade SIL (ASC-H); 4% high-grade SIL/cancer (HSIL+)]. In multivariate analysis, cervical LSIL+, nadir CD4+ T-cell count ≤50 cells/mm3, HIV-1 viral load ≥50 copies/mL, and anal HPV 6, 11, 16, 18, 33, 45, 52, 56, and 58 were associated with ≥anal ASC-US (p<0.05). Abnormal anal cytology and HR-HPV prevalences were high. HIV-infected women with cervical LSIL+, low nadir CD4+ counts, or detectable HIV-1 viral loads should be a particular focus for enhanced anal SCC screening efforts. PMID:25361401

  10. Acceptability of School-Based Health Centers for Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Visits: A Mixed-Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Caitlin E.; Okoloko, Edirin; Ogunbajo, Adedotun; North, Anna; Niccolai, Linda M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Countries with high human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination rates have achieved this success largely through school-based vaccination. Using school-based health centers (SBHCs) in the United States, where HPV vaccine remains underutilized, could improve uptake. In this mixed-methods study, we examined acceptability, facilitators, and…

  11. The human papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Orth, G; Jablonska, S; Breitburd, F; Favre, M; Croissant, O

    1978-01-01

    Recent biochemical and serological studies have shown the existence of at least four distinct types of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) causing benign skin lesions. These viruses show hardly no antigenic relationships; their DNAs differ by their sensitivity to restriction endonucleases, and show little, if any, sequence homology, as detected by molecular hybridization using complementary RNAs transcribed in vitro. Data on the pathogenicity of HPVs are still incomplete but indicate that some types of benign skin lesions (plantar warts, common warts, flat warts) may be preferentially associated with some types of HPV. Most interesting is that epidermodysplasia verruciformis has been found associated with two types of virus, and that malignant conversion of some lesions has been observed in all the patients infected with one of them. This suggests that at least a HPV may have a higher oncogenic potential, as do rabbit (Shope) papillomavirus and bovine alimentary tract papillomavirus. Much remains to be known on human papilloma-viruses and further studies may lead to the characterization of additional types of HPVs, especially in genital condylomata acuminata and laryngeal papillomas whose malignant conversion, although rare, may be observed. Progress in this field has been and remains hampered by the lack of cell culture systems allowing replication of these highly host and tissue specific viruses, and by the widely variable virus content of the different human lesions known to be associated with a papillomavirus. Further studies are warranted by the possible role of these widespread and epitheliotropic viruses in the origin of some carcinomas in man.

  12. Cohort studies in health sciences librarianship

    PubMed Central

    Eldredge, Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    Question: What are the key characteristics of the cohort study design and its varied applications, and how can this research design be utilized in health sciences librarianship? Data Sources: The health, social, behavioral, biological, library, earth, and management sciences literatures were used as sources. Study Selection: All fields except for health sciences librarianship were scanned topically for either well-known or diverse applications of the cohort design. The health sciences library literature available to the author principally for the years 1990 to 2000, supplemented by papers or posters presented at annual meetings of the Medical Library Association. Data Extraction: A narrative review for the health, social, behavioral, biological, earth, and management sciences literatures and a systematic review for health sciences librarianship literature for the years 1990 to 2000, with three exceptions, were conducted. The author conducted principally a manual search of the health sciences librarianship literature for the years 1990 to 2000 as part of this systematic review. Main Results: The cohort design has been applied to answer a wide array of theoretical or practical research questions in the health, social, behavioral, biological, and management sciences. Health sciences librarianship also offers several major applications of the cohort design. Conclusion: The cohort design has great potential for answering research questions in the field of health sciences librarianship, particularly evidence-based librarianship (EBL), although that potential has not been fully explored. PMID:12398244

  13. Observed and Expected Mortality in Cohort Studies.

    PubMed

    Richardson, David B; Keil, Alexander P; Cole, Stephen R; MacLehose, Richard F

    2017-03-15

    Epidemiologists often compare the observed number of deaths in a cohort with the expected number of deaths, obtained by multiplying person-time accrued in the cohort by mortality rates for a reference population (ideally, a reference that represents the mortality rate in the cohort in the absence of exposure). However, if exposure is hazardous (or salutary), this calculation will not consistently estimate the number of deaths expected in the absence of exposure because exposure will have affected the distribution of person-time observed in the study cohort. While problems with interpretation of this standard calculation of expected counts were discussed more than 2 decades ago, these discussions had little impact on epidemiologic practice. The logic of counterfactuals may help clarify this topic as we revisit these issues. In this paper, we describe a simple way to consistently estimate the expected number of deaths in such settings, and we illustrate the approach using data from a cohort study of mortality among underground miners. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. [Population-based study of human papillomavirus infection in high-risk area for cervical cancer in Shanxi Province, China].

    PubMed

    Shen, Yan-hong; Chen, Feng; Huang, Man-ni; Liu, Bin; Wang, Xi-xia; Zhao, Fang-hui; Li, Shu-min; Li, Nan; Wu, Ling-ying; Rong, Shou-de; Zhang, Wen-hua; Ren, Sheng-da; Huang, Rui-de; Qiao, You-lin

    2003-08-01

    To investigate the prevalence of oncogenic type of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and identify the high risk population for conducting immuno/chemoprevention of cervical cancer. All married women aged 30 to 50 with no history of hysterectomy, pelvic radiation and non-pregnant from certain villages of Xiangyuan and Yangcheng County were invited. This study was conducted through two phases. In phase one, subjects sampled the vaginal secretions using the collectors after signing the informed consent. And physicians sampled exfoliated cells from cervix in the phase two. All the specimens were tested with the Hybrid Capture 2 test. The data was managed and analyzed by VFP and SPSS software. There were 9,683 women participated in this study. Local women welcomed this study and population compliance rate was 75.4%. In tested population, we found 2,666 subjects of HPV DNA positive and HPV prevalence was 27.5%. The rates of different age group were 24.5% (30-34 yrs), 27.4% (35-39 yrs), 28.2% (40-44 yrs), 27.4% (45-50 yrs) respectively and had no significant differences (P = 0.604). The rates were slightly increased with the higher education level and had no differences (P = 0.106). The rate in mountain areas was higher than that in half-mountain areas (P = 0.001). The prevalence of HPV infection is indeed high in this region. Local women and health professionals welcome the activities of cervical cancer screening and prevention. It is an emergent task to improve their sanitary condition and prevent them from cervical cancer in these women. A women health cohort is established successfully among high HPV exposed women in rural China. The extensive biologic specimen repository has been successfully established to simultaneously study the etiology, early detection, and immuno/chemoprevention of cervical cancer.

  15. Cohort Survival and Withdrawal Study District Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shainline, Michael

    At the completion of the 1986-87 school year, the Albuquerque (New Mexico) Public Schools (APS) conducted a cohort survival and withdrawal study to follow-up 5,976 students who had begun the ninth grade within the district in 1983-84. Current records were matched with those from the 1983-84 school year to determine whether members of the…

  16. Alcohol consumption and prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection among US men in the HPV in Men (HIM) study.

    PubMed

    Schabath, Matthew B; Thompson, Zachary J; Egan, Kathleen M; Torres, B Nelson; Nguyen, Anthony; Papenfuss, Mary R; Abrahamsen, Martha E; Giuliano, Anna R

    2015-02-01

    Moderate alcohol consumption can impair host defence against viral infections. The objective of this cross-sectional analysis was to assess the association between alcohol intake and prevalent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection among US men enrolled in the HPV in Men (HIM) study using quantitative alcohol intake measured from a Food Frequency Questionnaire. The HIM study is a prospective, multinational study of the natural history of HPV infection. For this report, we restricted our analyses to men from the US cohort (N = 1313). Samples from the corona of glans penis, penile shaft and scrotum were combined for HPV DNA testing. Self-reported alcohol intake was quantified by grams of alcohol intake per day. Multivariable prevalence ratios (mPRs) were used to assess the association between alcohol intake and HPV infections. Prevalent infections were significantly higher among men in the highest quartile of alcohol intake and multivariable models revealed that the highest quartile of alcohol intake was associated with significantly increased risks for any (mPR = 1.13; 95% CI 1.00 to 1.27) HPV types and oncogenic (mPR = 1.35; 95% CI 1.08 to 1.68) HPV types. The fourth quartile of alcohol intake was associated with elevated risks for prevalent HPV infection across all strata of number of sexual partners and among never-smokers and current smokers, but not among former smokers. These results demonstrate that high intake of alcohol is associated with an increased risk for prevalent HPV infections among men. The biological role that alcohol plays in genital HPV infection remains understudied and limited epidemiological data exist, especially among men. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. High-risk human papillomavirus infection involving multiple anatomic sites of the female lower genital tract: a multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction-based study.

    PubMed

    Hui, Yiang; Manna, Pradip; Ou, Joyce J; Kerley, Spencer; Zhang, Cunxian; Sung, C James; Lawrence, W Dwayne; Quddus, M Ruhul

    2015-09-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus infection usually is seen at one anatomic site in an individual. Rarely, infection at multiple anatomic sites of the female lower genital tract in the same individual is encountered either simultaneously and/or at a later date. The current study identifies the various subtypes of high-risk human papillomavirus infection in these scenarios and analyzes the potential significance of these findings. High-risk human papillomavirus infection involving 22 anatomic sites from 7 individuals was identified after institutional review board approval. Residual paraffin-embedded tissue samples were retrieved, and all 15 high-risk human papillomavirus were identified and viral load quantified using multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction-based method. Multiple high-risk human papillomavirus subtypes were identified in 32% of the samples and as many as 5 different subtypes of high-risk human papillomavirus infection in a single anatomic site. In general, each anatomic site has unique combination of viral subtypes, although one individual showed overlapping subtypes in the vagina, cervix, and vulvar samples. Higher viral load and rare subtypes are more frequent in younger patients and in dysplasia compared with carcinoma. Follow-up ranging from 3 to 84 months revealed persistent high-risk human papillomavirus infection in 60% of cases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Papillomaviruses: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Araldi, Rodrigo Pinheiro; Assaf, Suely Muro Reis; Carvalho, Rodrigo Franco de; Carvalho, Márcio Augusto Caldas Rocha de; Souza, Jacqueline Mazzuchelli de; Magnelli, Roberta Fiusa; Módolo, Diego Grando; Roperto, Franco Peppino; Stocco, Rita de Cassia; Beçak, Willy

    2017-01-01

    In the last decades, a group of viruses has received great attention due to its relationship with cancer development and its wide distribution throughout the vertebrates: the papillomaviruses. In this article, we aim to review some of the most relevant reports concerning the use of bovines as an experimental model for studies related to papillomaviruses. Moreover, the obtained data contributes to the development of strategies against the clinical consequences of bovine papillomaviruses (BPV) that have led to drastic hazards to the herds. To overcome the problem, the vaccines that we have been developing involve recombinant DNA technology, aiming at prophylactic and therapeutic procedures. It is important to point out that these strategies can be used as models for innovative procedures against HPV, as this virus is the main causal agent of cervical cancer, the second most fatal cancer in women.

  19. Papillomaviruses: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Araldi, Rodrigo Pinheiro; Assaf, Suely Muro Reis; de Carvalho, Rodrigo Franco; de Carvalho, Márcio Augusto Caldas Rocha; de Souza, Jacqueline Mazzuchelli; Magnelli, Roberta Fiusa; Módolo, Diego Grando; Roperto, Franco Peppino; Stocco, Rita de Cassia; Beçak, Willy

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In the last decades, a group of viruses has received great attention due to its relationship with cancer development and its wide distribution throughout the vertebrates: the papillomaviruses. In this article, we aim to review some of the most relevant reports concerning the use of bovines as an experimental model for studies related to papillomaviruses. Moreover, the obtained data contributes to the development of strategies against the clinical consequences of bovine papillomaviruses (BPV) that have led to drastic hazards to the herds. To overcome the problem, the vaccines that we have been developing involve recombinant DNA technology, aiming at prophylactic and therapeutic procedures. It is important to point out that these strategies can be used as models for innovative procedures against HPV, as this virus is the main causal agent of cervical cancer, the second most fatal cancer in women. PMID:28212457

  20. Factors associated with type-specific persistence of high-risk human papillomavirus infection: A population-based study.

    PubMed

    Stensen, Signe; Kjaer, Susanne K; Jensen, Signe M; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Junge, Jette; Iftner, Thomas; Munk, Christian

    2016-01-15

    Persistent genital infection with high-risk (HR) human papillomavirus (HPV) is a prerequisite for cervical cancer development. The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with type-specific persistence of HR HPV infections. From a population-based cohort of 40,399 women participating in cervical cancer screening established during 2002-2005, we selected all HR HPV-positive women (N = 7,778). During follow-up (2005-2008), we collected cervical samples from these women and tested them for HPV DNA to determine type-specific HR HPV persistence in the interval 1-4.5 years after enrolment. Data on hospitalisations, prescriptions and socioeconomic factors were obtained from nationwide registers. Women with abnormal cytology at baseline or who had undergone conisation during follow-up were excluded. Factors associated with persistence were identified by logistic regression analysis. The overall rate of HR HPV persistence was 31.4%. The risk for persistence was significantly increased among women with a previous episode of genital warts (OR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.04-1.74), current use of oral contraceptives (OR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.13-1.63) or use of systemic glucocorticoids (OR, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.16-3.56). The number of pregnancies or births or use of a hormonal intrauterine device, hormonal therapy or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs was not associated with risk for HR HPV persistence. A history of genital warts and current use of oral contraceptives or systemic glucocorticoids increased the risk, potentially indicating a decreased immune response to HPV infection. These findings suggest that host immune response characteristics are important in HR HPV persistence and consequently in cervical cancer development. © 2015 UICC.

  1. Rates of human papillomavirus vaccine uptake amongst girls five years after introduction of statewide mandate in Virginia.

    PubMed

    Cuff, Ryan D; Buchanan, Tommy; Pelkofski, Elizabeth; Korte, Jeffrey; Modesitt, Susan P; Pierce, Jennifer Young

    2016-06-01

    The Commonwealth of Virginia enacted statewide school-entry human papillomavirus vaccine mandate in 2008 requiring all girls to receive the vaccine before starting the 6th grade. The mandate, one of very few in the country, has been in effect for 5 years. This study assesses the impact that it has had on the rates of human papillomavirus uptake. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the uptake of the human papillomavirus vaccine among girls seeking well-child care 5 years after the introduction of a statewide mandate in Virginia in October 2008. This prospective cohort study used the Clinical Data Repository at the University of Virginia to identify girls 11-12 years old who was seen for well-child care from January to December 2014. Billing and diagnosis codes were used to establish human papillomavirus vaccine administration. Those girls who were identified through the Clinical Data Repository were then contacted by advance letter followed by a representative from the University of Virginia Center for Survey Research who invited the responsible parent or guardian to complete a 50-item telephone questionnaire. Questionnaire results were used to inform objective findings and to assess parental attitudes that were related to human papillomavirus vaccination. Findings were compared against those of Pierce et al (2013), who evaluated human papillomavirus vaccination levels in a similar cohort of patients in 2008, before mandate enactment, to assess relative change attributable to vaccine mandate. Nine hundred eight girls were identified through the Clinical Data Repository; 50.9% of the girls received at least 1 dose of human papillomavirus vaccine. White race and private insurance coverage were found to be associated negatively with human papillomavirus vaccine uptake (relative risk, 0.74 and 0.71; 95% confidence interval, 0.64-0.85 and 0.62-0.81, respectively). Black race and public insurance coverage were found to be associated positively with vaccine

  2. Immunosuppressive cytokine Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is up-regulated in high-grade CIN but not associated with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) at baseline, outcomes of HR-HPV infections or incident CIN in the LAMS cohort.

    PubMed

    Syrjänen, Stina; Naud, Paulo; Sarian, Luis; Derchain, Sophie; Roteli-Martins, Cecilia; Longatto-Filho, Adhemar; Tatti, Silvio; Branca, Margherita; Erzen, Mojca; Hammes, L S; Costa, S; Syrjänen, Kari

    2009-12-01

    Bypassing the local immunological defense reactions in the cervix is one of the prerequisites for human papillomaviruses (HPV) infections to progress to intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). The role of potent immunosuppressive cytokines, e.g., interleukin-10 (IL-10), depressing these local virus-specific immunological responses is incompletely studied. To assess, whether IL-10 expression in cervical HPV lesions has any implications in the outcome of HPV infections or disease progression to CIN. Baseline cervical biopsies from 225 women of the LAMS study sub-cohort were analyzed for IL-10 expression using immunohistochemistry, to assess its associations with CIN grade, and high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) at baseline, as well as in predicting outcomes of HR-HPV infections, and development of incident CIN1+ and CIN2+ in this longitudinal setting. Expression of IL-10 in cervical lesions was up-regulated most often in high-grade CIN, and IL-10 over-expression retained its value as independent predictor of CIN2+ (odds ratio (OR) = 4.92) and CIN3+ (OR = 7.51) also in multivariate model, including HR-HPV and several known covariates of IL-10 expression. Up-regulation was not related to HR-HPV detection, and showed no relationship to HR-HPV viral loads. Using longitudinal predictive indicators (SE, SP, PPV, NPV), IL-10 expression was of no value in predicting (1) the outcomes of HR-HPV infections, or (2) the surrogate endpoints (incident CIN1+, CIN2+) of progressive disease. IL-10 over-expression (along with HR-HPV) was one of the independent covariates of CIN2/3. This immunosuppressive cytokine might play an important role in creating a microenvironment that favors progressive cervical disease and immune evasion by HR-HPV.

  3. Competing-risks regression models in analysis of biomarkers as predictors of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection outcomes and incident CIN in the LAMS cohort.

    PubMed

    Syrjänen, Stina; Longhato-Filho, Adhemar; Sarian, Luis O; Naud, Paulo; Derchain, Sophie; Rottelli-Martins, Cecilia; Tatti, Silvio; Branca, Margherita; Eržen, Mojca; Hammes, Luciano S; Matos, Jean; Gontijo, Renata; Bragança, Joana; Arlindo, Francisco C; Maeda, Mariana Y S; Costa, Silvano; Syrjänen, Kari

    2013-07-01

    To assess the prediction potential of a 5-biomarker panel for detecting high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infections and/or cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) progression. Five biomarkers, lipocalin, plasminogen activator inhibitor-2, p300, interleukin-10, and stratifin, were assessed in cervical biopsies from 225 women of the Latin American Screening Study. Competing-risks regression models were constructed to assess their predictive power for (i) HR-HPV outcomes (negative, transient, or persistent infection) and (ii) CIN outcomes (no progression, incident CIN1, CIN2, or CIN3). p300, LCN2, stratifin were significantly associated with prevalent HR-HPV but lost their significance in multivariate analysis. In the multivariate model, only p300 was an independent predictor of CIN3 (odds ratio=2.63; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-6.61; P=0.039). In univariate competing-risks regression, lipocalin predicted permanent HR-HPV-negative status, but in the multivariate model, IL-10 emerged as a independent predictor of HPV-negative status (subhazard ratio=4.04; 95% confidence interval, 1.81-9.01; P=0.001). The clinical value of the panel in predicting longitudinal outcomes of HR-HPV infection and/or incident CIN is limited.

  4. Human Papillomavirus Genotyping After Denaturation of Specimens for Hybrid Capture 2 Testing: Feasibility Study for the HPV Persistence and Progression Cohort†

    PubMed Central

    LaMere, Brandon J.; Kornegay, Janet; Fetterman, Barbara; Sadorra, Mark; Shieh, Jen; Castle, Philip E.

    2009-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) genotyping could be clinically useful, depending on the results of large, prospective studies like the HPV Persistence and Progression cohort. The cohort is based on genotyping and follow-up of Hybrid Capture-positive women at Kaiser Permanente, Northern California. HPV DNA testing by Hybrid Capture 2 requires denaturation with alkali, possibly damaging the DNA for optimal PCR-based genotyping. A feasibility study was conducted on paired aliquots of anonymized specimens from 100 women with low-grade intraepithelial lesion cytology. Test aliquots were left in denaturant for 10 or 18 hours at 4°C and then neutralized; comparison aliquots were not denatured but diluted to match the timing, temperature, concentration and salt conditions of the treated specimens. The masked aliquots were tested using a commercialized PCR-based assay that detects of 37 HPV genotypes. There was no overall effect of treatment on test positivity or number of types. HPV16 was marginally more likely to be detected in untreated versus treated aliquots (P = 0.09) but HPV45 was marginally more likely to be detected in treated than untreated aliquots (P = 0.07), suggesting that these differences represented chance (intra-test variability). It can be concluded that residual Hybrid Capture-positive specimens can be accurately genotyped by PCR after Hybrid Capture 2 processing. PMID:17673302

  5. Detection of six novel papillomavirus sequences within canine pigmented plaques

    PubMed Central

    Luff, Jennifer A.; Affolter, Verena K.; Yeargan, Bret; Moore, Peter F.

    2013-01-01

    In dogs, papillomaviruses are thought to cause oral and cutaneous papillomas and pigmented plaques. Eight canine papillomaviruses have been fully sequenced to date. Four of these canine papillomaviruses, including Canis familiaris papillomavirus (CPV)-3, CPV-4, CPV-5, and CPV-8, were amplified from pigmented plaques. Given this recent identification of several different canine papillomaviruses within pigmented plaques, it is likely that there are additional papillomavirus sequences that have not been previously identified. The aim of this study was to detect papillomavirus DNA sequences from pigmented plaques and identify potentially novel PV sequences through nucleotide sequence analysis. Polymerase chain reaction was used to amplify DNA sequences of the papillomavirus L1 gene from 27 pigmented plaques. Identification of novel papillomavirus sequences was based upon less than 90% shared DNA homology to any known papillomavirus. Ten different papillomaviruses were detected within the pigmented plaques, including 6 novel PV sequences. CPV-4 was detected within 41% (11/27) of the pigmented plaques, while CPV-5 was identified within 2 pigmented plaques and CPV-3 within a single pigmented plaque. A previously identified novel papillomavirus sequence was identified within 2 pigmented plaques in this study. The remaining 11 pigmented plaques contained 6 papillomavirus DNA sequences that have not been previously reported. These novel PV sequences were most similar to papillomaviruses that have been detected within canine pigmented plaques. PMID:22529129

  6. A cohort mortality study of petrochemical workers

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, S.G.; Schnatter, A.R.

    1983-04-01

    A historical prospective cohort mortality study was conducted for a cohort of 6,588 white male employees of a Texas petrochemical plant because of a suspected increased incidence of malignant brain tumors. Mortality experience from 1941 to 1977 was determined and compared with that of the general U.S. white male population adjusting for age and time period. Overall and cause-specific standardized mortality ratios were calculated for various subgroups of the population defined by length of employment, latency and payroll status. Significant deficits in total cohort mortality were found for all causes of death, all circulatory diseases, all respiratory diseases and all digestive diseases. Although not statistically significant, fewer deaths were observed (O) than expected (E) for all malignant neoplasms. No statistically significant excess of malignant brain tumors was found in the overall plant population (O/E = 12/7.42 = 1.62). A borderline significant excess of brain cancer deaths was found among hourly employees with more than six months' employment based on 10 observed and five expected deaths. This excess was observed to occur among elderly employees (over 55 years) and in later follow-up years (post-1970). Risk did not appear to be related to length of employment. Because of the nature of the problem that prompted this study, the small number of cases involved and the lack of a suspect agent in the plant that could have produced this excess, insufficient evidence was found to conclude that these tumors were occupationally related.

  7. Women's sexual behavior. Population-based study among 65,000 women from four Nordic countries before introduction of human papillomavirus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kirsten Egebjerg; Munk, Christian; Sparen, Par; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Liaw, Kai-Li; Dasbach, Erik; Nygård, Mari; Kjaer, Susanne K

    2011-05-01

    Sexual behavior is of public health interest because of the association with reproductive health and sexually transmitted infections such as human papillomavirus, which is the causal factor of cervical cancer. The aim of the study was to describe patterns in women's sexual behavior in four Nordic countries. Population-based cross-sectional study. Denmark, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden (November 2004-June 2005). A random sample of 18-45-year-old women from the female population in the four participating Nordic countries. The participation rate ranged from 81.3% in Denmark to 54.5% in Iceland. In total, 65 623 women were included. Each participant completed a structured questionnaire containing questions about sociodemographic factors, lifestyle factors and sexual behavior. Age-specific and country-specific descriptive measures of sexual behavior, notably age at first intercourse and lifetime number of partners. In addition, risk factors for having had multiple (>10) sexual partners were examined. Overall, median age at first intercourse was 16, and 30.2% (95% CI: 29.9-30.6) of the participating women reported having had ≥10 partners. There was great variation with birth cohort but limited variation between countries. The main correlates of multiple sexual partners were increasing age at enrollment, a higher alcohol intake and young age at first intercourse. These measurements of sexual behavior before the introduction of national human papillomavirus vaccination programs will form the basis for a comparison with a similar survey performed after vaccination has been introduced. © 2011 The Authors Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica© 2011 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  8. Condom use in prevention of Human Papillomavirus infections and cervical neoplasia: systematic review of longitudinal studies.

    PubMed

    Lam, Janni Uyen Hoa; Rebolj, Matejka; Dugué, Pierre-Antoine; Bonde, Jesper; von Euler-Chelpin, My; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2014-03-01

    Based on cross-sectional studies, the data on protection from Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infections related to using male condoms appear inconsistent. Longitudinal studies are more informative for this purpose. We undertook a systematic review of longitudinal studies on the effectiveness of male condoms in preventing HPV infection and cervical neoplasia. We searched PubMed using MeSH terms for articles published until May 2013. Articles were included if they studied a change in non-immunocompromized women's cervical HPV infection or cervical lesion status along with the frequency of condom use. In total, 384 abstracts were retrieved. Eight studies reported in 10 articles met the inclusion criteria for the final review. Four studies showed a statistically significantly protective effect of consistent condom use on HPV infection and on regression of cervical neoplasia. In the remaining four studies, a protective effect was also observed for these outcomes, although it was not statistically significant. Consistent condom use appears to offer a relatively good protection from HPV infections and associated cervical neoplasia. Advice to use condoms might be used as an additional instrument to prevent unnecessary colposcopies and neoplasia treatments in cervical screening, and to reduce the risk of cervical cancer.

  9. Expression and In Silico Analysis of the Recombinant Bovine Papillomavirus E6 Protein as a Model for Viral Oncoproteins Studies

    PubMed Central

    Mazzuchelli-de-Souza, J.; Carvalho, R. F.; Ruiz, R. M.; Melo, T. C.; Araldi, R. P.; Carvalho, E.; Thompson, C. E.; Sircili, M. P.; Beçak, W.; Stocco, R. C.

    2013-01-01

    Bovine papillomaviruses (BPVs) are recognized as the causal agents of economical relevant diseases in cattle, associated with the development of tumors in skin and mucosa. The oncogenesis process is mainly associated with different viral oncoprotein expressions, which are involved in cell transformation. The expression and characterization of recombinant viral oncoproteins represent an attractive strategy to obtain biotechnological products as antibodies and potential vaccines, Thus, the aim of this work was to clone and express the BPV-1 and BPV-2 E6 recombinant proteins and perform in silico analysis in order to develop a strategy for the systematic study of other papillomaviruses oncoproteins. The results demonstrated that BPV-1 and BPV-2 E6 recombinant proteins were expressed and purified from bacterial system as well as its in silico analysis was performed in order to explore and predict biological characteristics of these proteins. PMID:23878806

  10. Expression and in Silico analysis of the recombinant bovine papillomavirus E6 protein as a model for viral oncoproteins studies.

    PubMed

    Mazzuchelli-de-Souza, J; Carvalho, R F; Ruiz, R M; Melo, T C; Araldi, R P; Carvalho, E; Thompson, C E; Sircili, M P; Beçak, W; Stocco, R C

    2013-01-01

    Bovine papillomaviruses (BPVs) are recognized as the causal agents of economical relevant diseases in cattle, associated with the development of tumors in skin and mucosa. The oncogenesis process is mainly associated with different viral oncoprotein expressions, which are involved in cell transformation. The expression and characterization of recombinant viral oncoproteins represent an attractive strategy to obtain biotechnological products as antibodies and potential vaccines, Thus, the aim of this work was to clone and express the BPV-1 and BPV-2 E6 recombinant proteins and perform in silico analysis in order to develop a strategy for the systematic study of other papillomaviruses oncoproteins. The results demonstrated that BPV-1 and BPV-2 E6 recombinant proteins were expressed and purified from bacterial system as well as its in silico analysis was performed in order to explore and predict biological characteristics of these proteins.

  11. Psychological reactions of adolescent schoolgirls to human papillomavirus vaccination in western Uganda: A comparative cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Turiho, Andrew Kampikaho; Okello, Elialilia S; Muhwezi, Wilson W; Nakasujja, Noeline; Katahoire, Anne R

    2015-07-01

    Schoolgirls in two Ugandan districts were recently vaccinated against human papillomavirus that causes most cervical cancer. This cross-sectional comparative study used mixed research methods to assess influence of human papillomavirus vaccination on adolescents' worrisome thoughts about being vaccinated and psychological distress. Vaccination predicted worrisome thoughts among the recently vaccinated (adjusted odds ratio: 1.65, confidence interval: 1.13-2.41; p = 0.01). Vaccination predicted distress (1.75, confidence interval: 1.09-2.82; p = 0.02), particularly among those recently vaccinated (1.92, confidence interval: 1.27-2.89; p = 0.001) and those who experienced worrisome thoughts (1.80, confidence interval: 1.06-3.07; p = 0.02). Parental communication mitigated distress (0.50, confidence interval: 0.35-0.72; p = 0.000).

  12. Cohort profile: the lidA Cohort Study-a German Cohort Study on Work, Age, Health and Work Participation.

    PubMed

    Hasselhorn, Hans Martin; Peter, Richard; Rauch, Angela; Schröder, Helmut; Swart, Enno; Bender, Stefan; du Prel, Jean-Baptist; Ebener, Melanie; March, Stefanie; Trappmann, Mark; Steinwede, Jacob; Müller, Bernd Hans

    2014-12-01

    The lidA Cohort Study (German Cohort Study on Work, Age, Health and Work Participation) was set up to investigate and follow the effects of work and work context on the physical and psychological health of the ageing workforce in Germany and subsequently on work participation. Cohort participants are initially employed people subject to social security contributions and born in either 1959 (n = 2909) or 1965 (n = 3676). They were personally interviewed in their homes in 2011 and will be visited every 3 years. Data collection comprises socio-demographic data, work and private exposures, work ability, work and work participation attitudes, health, health-related behaviour, personality and attitudinal indicators. Employment biographies are assessed using register data. Subjective health reports and physical strength measures are complemented by health insurance claims data, where permission was given. A conceptual framework has been developed for the lidA Cohort Study within which three confirmatory sub-models assess the interdependencies of work and health considering age, gender and socioeconomic status. The first set of the data will be available to the scientific community by 2015. Access will be given by the Research Data Centre of the German Federal Employment Agency at the Institute for Employment Research (http://fdz.iab.de/en.aspx).

  13. Feline papillomas and papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, J P; Van Ranst, M; Montali, R; Homer, B L; Miller, W H; Rowland, P H; Scott, D W; England, J J; Dunstan, R W; Mikaelian, I; Jenson, A B

    2000-01-01

    Papillomaviruses (PVs) are highly species- and site-specific pathogens of stratified squamous epithelium. Although PV infections in the various Felidae are rarely reported, we identified productive infections in six cat species. PV-induced proliferative skin or mucous membrane lesions were confirmed by immunohistochemical screening for papillomavirus-specific capsid antigens. Seven monoclonal antibodies, each of which reacts with an immunodominant antigenic determinant of the bovine papillomavirus L1 gene product, revealed that feline PV capsid epitopes were conserved to various degrees. This battery of monoclonal antibodies established differential expression patterns among cutaneous and oral PVs of snow leopards and domestic cats, suggesting that they represent distinct viruses. Clinically, the lesions in all species and anatomic sites were locally extensive and frequently multiple. Histologically, the areas of epidermal hyperplasia were flat with a similarity to benign tumors induced by cutaneotropic, carcinogenic PVs in immunosuppressed human patients. Limited restriction endonuclease analyses of viral genomic DNA confirmed the variability among three viral genomes recovered from available frozen tissue. Because most previous PV isolates have been species specific, these studies suggest that at least eight different cat papillomaviruses infect the oral cavity (tentative designations: Asian lion, Panthera leo, P1PV; snow leopard, Panthera uncia, PuPV-1; bobcat, Felis rufus, FrPV; Florida panther, Felis concolor, FcPV; clouded leopard, Neofelis nebulosa, NnPV; and domestic cat, Felis domesticus, FdPV-2) or skin (domestic cat, F. domesticus, FdPV-1; and snow leopard, P. uncia, PuPV-2).

  14. Cutaneous Human Papillomaviruses and Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Skin: Nested Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Faust, Helena; Andersson, Kristin; Luostarinen, Tapio; Gislefoss, Randi E; Dillner, Joakim

    2016-04-01

    Cutaneous human papillomavirus (HPV) types have been associated with non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), including a previous nested case-control study using HPV serology with bacterially derived fusion proteins with the major HPV capsid protein L1 (GST-L1). However, HPV serology using conformationally intact pseudovirions has been shown to correlate better with natural infection. Prospective studies using a more valid marker of infection are therefore warranted. Cancer registry follow-up of large Nordic biobanks identified prediagnostic serum samples from 633 subjects who later developed SCC, 1,990 subjects who developed basal cell carcinoma (BCC). The samples from cases and matched controls were tested for IgG to pseudovirions to 16 different HPV types (3, 5, 6, 11, 15: , 16, 18, 31, 32, 33, 38: , 45, 52, 58, 68, and 76: ) and two polyomaviruses (MCPyV and JCPyV). Baseline seropositivity was not associated with SCC risk, and there were only weak associations with BCC risk [HPV-5 (OR, 1.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0-1.3), HPV-15 (OR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.0-1.4), HPV-38 (OR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.0-1.3), and MCPyV (OR, 1.1; 95% CI, 1.0-1.3)]. Acquisition of HPV-5 seropositivity during follow-up was associated with SCC risk (OR, 3.2; 95% CI, 1.3-7.6). Persistent seropositivity for HPV-15 was weakly associated with BCC (OR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.0-1.9) and HPV-6 antibody persistence was weakly associated with SCC (OR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.0-4.8). Considering the large number of viruses tested, the weak associations found do not support any strong links between studied HPV and NMSC, with the possible exception of HPV-5 seroconversion and SCC. Known alpha and beta papillomaviruses do not appear to be risk factors for NMSC. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(4); 721-4. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Type Distribution in Females with Abnormal Cervical Cytology. A Correlation with Histological Study

    PubMed Central

    Cobo, Fernando; Concha, Ángel; Ortiz, Marta

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine human papillomavirus (HPV) types distribution in cervical preneoplasic lesions in a Southern Spanish population and their relationship between HPV type and grade of histopathological abnormality. Finally, 232 cervical samples from 135 women with previous cytological abnormalities were included in this study. Colposcopy studies and biopsies were performed. Haematoxylin-eosin stained slides were observed and detection of HPV DNA in cervical swabs was carried out with use of a polymerase chain reaction and microarrays technology. The relationship between the presence of HPV infection and diagnostic variables was evaluated. HPV 16 was the most common type followed by HPV 58, 51, 33 and 31. However, the two HPV types targeted in the prophylactic vaccines such as HPV type 16 and 18 were detected in only 37 (21.2%) and 2 (1.1%) cases respectively. Thirty-three (18.9%) of samples were infected with multiple types, the majority of them with two types. In addition, during the follow-up of patients many changes in type distribution were observed. Several studies will be necessary in order to evaluate the HPV type distribution for therapeutically and prophylactic purposes such as vaccine treatment. Also, because of the differences obtained depending of use of various DNA technologies, the performance of some comparative studies of the different methods from detection of HPV would be advisable in a high population of patients and with the most homogeneous conditions possible. PMID:19750125

  16. The Human Papillomavirus Infection in Men Study: Human Papillomavirus Prevalence and Type Distribution among Men Residing in Brazil, Mexico, and the United States

    PubMed Central

    Giuliano, Anna R.; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Villa, Luisa L.; Flores, Roberto; Salmeron, Jorge; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Papenfuss, Mary R.; Abrahamsen, Martha; Jolles, Emily; Nielson, Carrie M.; Baggio, Maria Luisa; Silva, Roberto; Quiterio, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Male sexual behavior influences the rates of cervical dysplasia and invasive cervical cancer, as well as male human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and disease. Unfortunately, little is known regarding male HPV type distribution by age and across countries. In samples combined from the coronal sulcus, glans penis, shaft, and scrotum of 1,160 men from Brazil, Mexico, and the United States, overall HPV prevalence was 65.2%, with 12.0% oncogenic types only, 20.7% nononcogenic types only, 17.8% both oncogenic and nononcogenic, and 14.7% unclassified infections. Multiple HPV types were detected in 25.7% of study participants. HPV prevalence was higher in Brazil (72.3%) than in the United States (61.3%) and Mexico (61.9%). HPV16 (6.5%), HPV51 (5.3%), and HPV59 (5.3%) were the most commonly detected oncogenic infections, and HPV84 (7.7%), HPV62 (7.3%), and HPV6 (6.6%) were the most commonly detected nononcogenic infections. Overall HPV prevalence was not associated with age. However, significant associations with age were observed when specific categories of HPV, nononcogenic, and unclassified HPV infections were considered. Studies of HPV type distribution among a broad age range of men from multiple countries is needed to fill the information gap internationally with respect to our knowledge of HPV infection in men. PMID:18708396

  17. Cohort Profile: Recruitment cohorts in the neuropsychological substudy of the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Becker, James T; Kingsley, Lawrence A; Molsberry, Samantha; Reynolds, Sandra; Aronow, Aaron; Levine, Andrew J; Martin, Eileen; Miller, Eric N; Munro, Cynthia A; Ragin, Ann; Sacktor, Ned; Selnes, Ola A

    2015-01-01

    The Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS) is one of the largest and longest running studies of the natural and treated history of HIV disease. The Neuropsychological (NP) substudy was begun in 1988 following reports of significant adverse neurological consequences of HIV disease, including dementia. The goal was to characterize the neuropsychological deficits among individuals with HIV disease, and track the natural history of the neurological complications over time. There were three distinct MACS recruitment stages that focused on different groups of HIV-infected men, or men at risk for infection. Initially, a subcohort was evaluated semi-annually with NP tests but, beginning in 2005, the entire group of MACS participants have had NP examinations biannually, unless closer follow-up was warranted. The participants complete a battery of NP tests, and are classified as either normal, mildly or severely impaired using the Antinori criteria for HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorder (HAND). Additional behavioural data, including mood state and psychoactive substance use, are recorded as part of the main MACS data collection. The MACS public data set (PDS) has been available since 1994 and includes baseline and 6-monthly follow-up data. Beginning in October 1995, the PDS has been released annually with new releases superseding previous versions. PMID:24771276

  18. How are European birth-cohort studies engaging and consulting with young cohort members?

    PubMed

    Lucas, Patricia J; Allnock, Debra; Jessiman, Tricia

    2013-04-11

    Birth cohort studies, where parents consent for their child to be enrolled in a longitudinal study prior to or soon after birth, are a powerful study design in epidemiology and developmental research. Participation often continues into adulthood. Where participants are enrolled as infants, provision should be made for consent, consultation and involvement in study design as they age. This study aims to audit and describe the extent and types of consultation and engagement currently used in birth cohorts in Europe. Seventy study groups (representing 84 cohorts) were contacted to ask about their practice in engaging and involving study members. Information was gathered from study websites and publications, 15 cohorts provided additional information via email and 17 cohorts were interviewed over the phone. The cohorts identified confirm the growth of this study design, with more than half beginning since 1990, and 4 since 2011. Most studies maintain a website open to the general public, although many are written for the scientific community only. Five studies have web pages specifically for young cohort members and one study provides a dedicated page for fathers. Cohorts send newsletters, cards, and summaries of findings to participants to stay in touch. Six cohorts use Facebook for this purpose. Five cohorts provide feedback opportunities for participants after completing a round of data collection. We know of just 8 cohorts who have a mechanism for consulting with parents and 3 a mechanism for consulting with young people themselves, although these were 'one off' consultations for some groups. Barriers to further consultation with cohort members were: concerns about impact on quality of research, ethical constraints, resource limitations, lack of importance, and previous adverse experiences. Although the children in some of the cohorts are still young (born in the last 10 years) many are old enough to include some element of consultation. Barriers to greater

  19. A phase I study to evaluate a human papillomavirus (HPV) type 18 L1 VLP vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ault, Kevin A; Giuliano, Anna R; Edwards, Robert P; Tamms, Gretchen; Kim, Lee-Lian; Smith, Judith F; Jansen, Kathrin U; Allende, Maria; Taddeo, Frank J; Skulsky, DeeMarie; Barr, Eliav

    2004-08-13

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection can cause genital warts and cervical cancer. HPV types 6 and 11 cause >90% of genital wart cases; HPV16 and 18 cause 70% of cervical cancers. A prophylactic HPV (types 6, 11, 16, 18) L1 virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine may substantially reduce the incidence of these lesions. This report describes the results of a phase I study of the HPV18 component of such a vaccine. Forty women were randomized to receive either HPV18 L1 VLP vaccine or placebo. Anti-HPV18 responses were measured using a competitive radioimmunoassay (cRIA). Tolerability was evaluated using vaccination report cards (VRC). The study showed that the HPV18 L1 VLP vaccine was generally well-tolerated and highly immunogenic. Peak anti-HPV18 geometric mean titers (GMT) in vaccines were 60-fold greater than those observed in women following natural HPV18 infection. Further studies of a multivalent HPV L1 VLP vaccines are warranted.

  20. Association of High Risk Human Papillomavirus and Breast cancer: A UK based Study

    PubMed Central

    Salman, Nadia Aziz; Davies, Giles; Majidy, Farida; Shakir, Fatima; Akinrinade, Hilda; Perumal, Dhayaneethie; Ashrafi, G. Hossein

    2017-01-01

    Infection by human papillomaviruses (HPVs) has been implicated in the aetiology of a variety of cancers. Studies evaluating the presence of HPVs in breast cancer (BC) have generated considerable controversy. To date, most studies have focused on the presence of viral DNA in BC; however there are important gaps in evidencing the role of HPV persistence in the invasiveness of BC. While these studies have been conducted in several countries, none, on the presence and biological activity of high risk (HR) HPV in BC has been done in the UK. Hence, we aimed to investigate these gaps by screening a total of 110 fresh breast tissue specimens from UK patients for the presence of twelve HR-HPV types DNA using PCR and Sanger sequencing. Samples positive for HPV-DNA were screened for viral oncoprotein expression using western blot and dot blot. Data obtained showed the presence of HR-HPVs in 42% of breast tissues of which the viral activity was only confirmed in a number of invasive carcinomas (5/26). This finding, the first to report in the UK, suggests that the selective expression of viral oncoprotein in invasive cases may propose a role for HR-HPVs in the development of some types of BC. PMID:28240743

  1. Human papillomaviruses in colorectal cancers: A case-control study in western patients.

    PubMed

    Vuitton, Lucine; Jaillet, Carine; Jacquin, Elise; Monnien, Franck; Heberle, Marine; Mihai, Maria I; Lassabe, Catherine; Raffoul, Johnny; Puyraveau, Marc; Lakkis, Zaher; Lamfichekh, Najib; Picard, Alain; Prétet, Jean-Luc; Mougin, Christiane; Valmary-Degano, Séverine

    2017-04-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers. As in other cancer locations, the involvement of human papillomaviruses (HPV) has been suggested but remains highly debated with wide differences among reported prevalence of HPV infection in CRCs. To determine the actual prevalence of high risk HPV16 and 18 in a large case-control study. CRC specimens were used for analysis of both tumor and distant healthy tissue. As a non-malignant control group, samples from sigmoid diverticulosis resections were studied. Detection of HPV16 and HPV18 DNA was performed using a real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Ten percent of tumor samples were also randomly subjected to a complete HPV genotyping using the INNO-LiPA technique. 467 samples were analyzed: 217 tumor samples from 210 CRCs, 210 distant healthy tissue samples, and 40 sigmoid samples. HPV18 DNA was never amplified and HPV16 was amplified only three times in tumor tissues with viral loads under or at the limit of quantification. New extraction from the same tumor blocks for these samples revealed no HPV with qPCR and INNO-Lipa assays. With adequate procedures and reliable techniques, no HPV was detected in the largest case-control study so far, bringing more evidence on the absence of involvement of HPV in CRCs. Copyright © 2016 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Born in Guangzhou Cohort Study (BIGCS).

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xiu; Lu, Jin-Hua; He, Jian-Rong; Lam, Kin-Bong Hubert; Shen, Song-Ying; Guo, Yong; Kuang, Ya-Shu; Yuan, Ming-Yang; Qiu, Lan; Chen, Nian-Nian; Lu, Min-Shan; Li, Wei-Dong; Xing, Yan-Fei; Zhou, Feng-Juan; Bartington, Suzanne; Cheng, Kar Keung; Xia, Hui-Min

    2017-04-01

    The Born in Guangzhou Cohort Study (BIGCS) is a large-scale prospective observational study investigating the role of social, biological and environmental influences on pregnancy and child health and development in an urban setting in southern China. Pregnant women who reside in Guangzhou and who attend Guangzhou Women and Children's Medical Center (GWCMC) for antenatal care in early pregnancy (<20 weeks' gestation) are eligible for inclusion. Study recruitment commenced in February 2012, with an overall participation rate of 76.3%. Study recruitment will continue until December 2018 to achieve the target sample size of 30,000 mother-child pairs. At 30 April 2016, a total of 75,422 questionnaires have been collected, while 14,696 live births have occurred with planned follow-up of cohort children until age 18 years. During the same period a total of 1,053,000 biological samples have been collected from participants, including maternal, paternal and infant blood, cord blood, placenta, umbilical cord, and maternal and infant stool samples. The dataset has been enhanced by record linkage to routine health and administrative records. We plan future record linkage to school enrolment and national examination records.

  3. Human papillomavirus infection in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, M O O; Carestiato, F N; Perdigão, P H; Xavier, M P P T; Silva, Kc; Botelho, M O; Oliveira, L H S; Cavalcanti, S M B

    2005-10-01

    There is considerable data to support a central role for human papillomavirus (HPV) in the etiology of cervical cancer. More than a 100 HPV types have been described, and 40 have been isolated from benign and malignant genital lesions. Consequently, there is strong motivation to evaluate HPV testing for cervical cancer screening. Few studies concerning the natural history of HPV infection have been conducted in the state of Rio de Janeiro. We determined the prevalence of HPV types in female genital lesions by using Hybrid Capture Assay (HCA) and we retrospectively analyzed the course of HPV infection. Our sample included 788 women attended at Laboratórios Sérgio Franco. The average age of the participants was 29.6 years. HPV prevalence and cytological diagnosis were determined. The overall prevalence of HPV DNA in the study group was 50.1% (395/788), ranging from 25% (NORMAL) to 100% in high-grade intraepithelial lesions (HSIL). High risk HPV was found in 12% inflammatory, 58.3% HPV, 63.2% LSIL and 100% HSIL. A retrospective analysis of 78 patients showed that 22 presented persistent lesions, 2 had progressive lesions, 4 had regressive lesions, 13 showed latent infections, 18 were transiently infected and 19 were submitted to curative treatment. No cases of cancer were registered in this population, which can afford private medical care and regular follow-up exams. We suggest that HCA be used in specific cases involving persistent and recurrent lesions.

  4. Purification and immunogenicity study of human papillomavirus 58 virus-like particles expressed in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zijun; Tong, Guangjie; Cai, Beibei; Xu, Yihan; Lou, Jueren

    2011-12-01

    Two human papillomavirus (HPV) prophylactic vaccines are currently available in the market: Gardasil and Cervarix. These two vaccines work against tumor high-risk subtypes HPV 16 and HPV 18. However, they do not include other high-risk subtypes such as HPV 58. Epidemiological research in China shows that HPV 58 is a prevalent high-risk subtype, second only to HPV 16 and HPV 18. Thus, for cervical cancer prevention in China, developing a vaccine against HPV 58 is necessary. In this study, HPV 58 virus-like particles (VLPs) were expressed in the Pichia pastoris, and subsequently purified through pretreatment and a three-step purification process consisting of strong cation exchange chromatography, size-exclusion chromatography, and hydroxyapatite chromatography. The highly purified HPV 58 VLPs were confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, electron microscopy, dynamic laser scattering, and ultracentrifugation. The purified VLPs were used to immunize mice to test their ability to induce humoral immunity. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were performed on the sera of the immunized mice and significantly high anti-HPV 58 VLP antibody titers were observed. The immunogenicity study demonstrates that the purified HPV 58 VLPs are HPV vaccine candidates.

  5. Six years genotype distribution of Human Papillomavirus in Calabria Region, Southern Italy: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Galati, Luisa; Peronace, Cinzia; Fiorillo, Maria Teresa; Masciari, Rosanna; Giraldi, Cristina; Nisticò, Salvatore; Minchella, Pasquale; Maiolo, Vincenzo; Barreca, Giorgio Settimo; Marascio, Nadia; Lamberti, Angelo Giuseppe; Giancotti, Aida; Lepore, Maria Gabriella; Greco, Francesca; Mauro, Maria Vittoria; Borelli, Annelisa; Bocchiaro, Giuseppa Lo; Surace, Giovanni; Liberto, Maria Carla; Focà, Alfredo

    2017-01-01

    Although analysis of the Human papillomavirus (HPV) genotype spread in a particular area has a crucial impact on public health and prevention programmes, there is a lack of epidemiological data regarding HPV in the Calabria region of Italy. We therefore update information on HPV age/genotype distribution by retrospectively analysing a cohort of women, with and without cervical lesions, living in Calabria, who underwent HPV DNA testing; moreover, we also evaluated HPV age/genotype distribution in a subset of patients with cervical lesions. Cervical scrape specimens obtained from 9590 women (age range 20-75 years) from January 2010 to December 2015 were tested for HPV DNA. Viral types were genotyped by Linear Array HPV Genotyping® test (Roche, USA) at the Clinical Microbiology Operative Unit of six hospitals located in four provinces of the Calabria region. Cervical scrape specimens were also used to perform Pap smears for cytological analysis in a subset of 405 women; cytological classification of the samples was performed according to the Bethesda classification system. A total of 2974 women (31%) (C.I. 95% 30.09-31.94) were found to be HPV DNA positive for at least one (57.3%) or several (42.7%) HPV genotypes. Of single genotype HPV infections, 46.5% and 36.4 % were classed as high-risk (HR, Group 1) and low-risk (LR, Group 3) respectively, while 16.9% were classed as probably/possibly carcinogenic and 0.2% undetermined risk. Stratified by age, total HPV distribution, showed the highest prevalence within the range 30-39 years (37.2%), while single genotype infection distribution displayed a peak in women from the age range 20-29 years (37.5%). The most common high-risk HPV type was HPV 16 (19.1%), followed by HPV 31 (9.1%). We provide epidemiological data on HPV age/genotype distribution in women living in the Calabria region with or without cytological abnormalities, further to the enhancement of HPV screening/prevention programmes for the local population.

  6. Seroprevalence of Cutaneous Human Papillomaviruses and the Risk of External Genital Lesions in Men: A Nested Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Shams; Rollison, Dana E; Pierce Campbell, Christine M; Waterboer, Tim; Michel, Angelika; Pawlita, Michael; Villa, Luisa L; Lazcano Ponce, Eduardo; Wang, Wei; Borenstein, Amy R; Giuliano, Anna R

    2016-01-01

    A variety of cutaneous human papillomaviruses (HPV) are detectable in genital epithelial lesions in men and non-melanoma skin cancer patients. It remains unclear whether these viruses are associated causally with skin lesions. To date, no study has prospectively examined the association between cutaneous HPV seropositivity and development of external genital lesions (EGLs) in men. To examine the association between seropositivity to cutaneous HPV types and the risk of subsequent development of EGLs. A nested case-control study including 163 incident EGL cases and 352 EGL-free controls in the HPV Infection in Men (HIM) Study cohort was conducted. Cases were ascertained at each of up to 10 biannual clinical visits and verified through biopsy and pathological diagnoses. EGLs were categorized as condyloma, suggestive of condyloma, penile intraepithelial neoplasia (PeIN), and other EGLs. Archived serum specimens collected at baseline were tested for antibodies against 14 cutaneous HPV types (β types (5, 8, 12, 14, 17, 22, 23, 24, 38, and 47), α type 27, γ type 4, μ type 1, and ν type 41) using a GST L1-based multiplex serology assay. Socio-demographic and sexual behavior data were collected through a questionnaire. Using logistic regression, adjusted odds ratios (AOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated. Overall, seropositivity to ≥1 cutaneous HPV type (any-HPV) and ≥1 β types (any-β) was 58.3% and 37.5% among other EGL cases, 71.6% and 46.8% among condyloma, 66.8% and 50.0% among PeIN, and 71.9% and 38.4% among controls, respectively. Type-specific seropositivity was most common for ɤ-HPV 4, μ-HPV 1, and β-HPV 8. No statistically significant association was observed between any-HPV, any-β, and type-specific HPV seropositivity and subsequent development of EGLs across all pathological diagnoses. Overall, seropositivity to cutaneous HPV was common among men; however, it appears that cutaneous HPV is not associated with the development of

  7. Seroprevalence of Cutaneous Human Papillomaviruses and the Risk of External Genital Lesions in Men: A Nested Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Shams; Rollison, Dana E.; Pierce Campbell, Christine M.; Waterboer, Tim; Michel, Angelika; Pawlita, Michael; Villa, Luisa L.; Lazcano Ponce, Eduardo; Wang, Wei; Borenstein, Amy R.; Giuliano, Anna R.

    2016-01-01

    Background A variety of cutaneous human papillomaviruses (HPV) are detectable in genital epithelial lesions in men and non-melanoma skin cancer patients. It remains unclear whether these viruses are associated causally with skin lesions. To date, no study has prospectively examined the association between cutaneous HPV seropositivity and development of external genital lesions (EGLs) in men. Objectives To examine the association between seropositivity to cutaneous HPV types and the risk of subsequent development of EGLs. Methods A nested case-control study including 163 incident EGL cases and 352 EGL-free controls in the HPV Infection in Men (HIM) Study cohort was conducted. Cases were ascertained at each of up to 10 biannual clinical visits and verified through biopsy and pathological diagnoses. EGLs were categorized as condyloma, suggestive of condyloma, penile intraepithelial neoplasia (PeIN), and other EGLs. Archived serum specimens collected at baseline were tested for antibodies against 14 cutaneous HPV types (β types (5, 8, 12, 14, 17, 22, 23, 24, 38, and 47), α type 27, γ type 4, μ type 1, and ν type 41) using a GST L1-based multiplex serology assay. Socio-demographic and sexual behavior data were collected through a questionnaire. Using logistic regression, adjusted odds ratios (AOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated. Results Overall, seropositivity to ≥1 cutaneous HPV type (any-HPV) and ≥1 β types (any-β) was 58.3% and 37.5% among other EGL cases, 71.6% and 46.8% among condyloma, 66.8% and 50.0% among PeIN, and 71.9% and 38.4% among controls, respectively. Type-specific seropositivity was most common for ɤ-HPV 4, μ-HPV 1, and β-HPV 8. No statistically significant association was observed between any-HPV, any-β, and type-specific HPV seropositivity and subsequent development of EGLs across all pathological diagnoses. Conclusions Overall, seropositivity to cutaneous HPV was common among men; however, it appears that cutaneous

  8. Human papillomavirus-16 is integrated in lung carcinomas: a study in Chile

    PubMed Central

    Aguayo, F; Castillo, A; Koriyama, C; Higashi, M; Itoh, T; Capetillo, M; Shuyama, K; Corvalan, A; Eizuru, Y; Akiba, S

    2007-01-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) was detected in 20 (29%) out of 69 lung carcinomas (LCs) in Chile, by PCR and Southern blot, and was more frequently detected in squamous cell carcinoma (SQC) than in adenocarcinomas (46 vs 9%, P=0.001). HPV-16, positive in 11 cases, was the most frequently detected HPV genotype determined by DNA sequencing. HPV-16 E2/E6 ratio, estimated from real-time PCR analysis, was much lower than the unity, suggesting that at least a partial HPV-16 genome was integrated in all but one HPV-16-positive SQCs. The remaining one case was suspected to have only episomal HPV-16. Although the viral load was low in most of the LCs, a case showed the HPV-16 copy number as high as 8479 per nanogram DNA, which was even a few times higher than the minimum viral load of seven cervical carcinomas (observed viral load: 3356–609 392 per nanogram DNA). The expression of the HPV-16/18 E6 protein was found in only two HPV-16-positive SQCs (13%) but not in the case with the highest viral load. Although the viral load was in general very low and HPV E6 expression is none or weak, further studies seem warranted to examine aetiological involvement of high-risk HPV in lung carcinogenesis. PMID:17579626

  9. A qualitative study of women who experience side effects from human papillomavirus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Tina; Andersen, Pernille Tanggaard

    2016-12-01

    In Denmark, vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) is offered to girls and women to prevent cervical cancer. Unfortunately, reporting of possible side effects from vaccination has increased in recent years. Therefore, the present study examine women's experiences of side effects from the HPV vaccine. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with eight HPV-vaccinated Danish women, aged 25-44 years, who experienced side effects from the vaccine. The data were analysed using a narrative methodology. The main reasons for being vaccinated against HPV are fear of cancer and trust in general practitioners (GPs). The women reported feeling stigmatised by GPs and doctors and they felt that these professionals did not acknowledge their symptoms, often assuming that they were due to psychological distress. The lack of acceptance from family and friends had led the women to distance themselves from others and lead a more socially isolated life. The women believed that a diagnosis could validate their symptoms and help others accept their condition. The women felt exceedingly physically and mentally confined in their everyday life, which led them to live a more restricted and solitary life. Since other people tended not to acknowledge their symptoms, the women's illness behaviour was poorly accepted. The women generally distrusted Danish healthcare as they had experienced stigmatisation from physicians and did not trust the evidence for the safety of the vaccine. none TRIAL REGISTRATION: not relevant.

  10. Parents’ views on human papillomavirus vaccination for sexually transmissible infection prevention: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Niccolai, Linda M.; Hansen, Caitlin E.; Credle, Marisol; Ryan, Sheryl A.; Shapiro, Eugene D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmissible infection (STI) in the United States (US) and an important cause of several cancers. Vaccines that prevent HPV infections are now recommended for routine use in adolescents but coverage remains suboptimal in the US. Because they are often promoted as cancer prevention vaccines, little is known about parents’ views on vaccination for prevention of an STI. Methods In this qualitative study, parents and caregivers of children ages 10–18 years completed an in-depth interview. Participants (n = 38) were recruited from an urban hospital-based primary care centre serving a low-income population in the northeastern US during May 2013–February 2014. Interviews were transcribed and coded using a thematic content approach. Results Five major themes emerged with relevance to the topic of HPV vaccination for STI prevention: (1) low awareness of HPV as an STI; (2) favourable opinions about STI prevention messages for vaccination, including at young ages; (3) salience of sexual mode of transmission, given the unpredictability of adolescent sexual behaviour and high rates of other STIs and teen pregnancy; (4) recognition that sexual health is a topic of conversation between adolescents and health care providers; and(5) relevance of personal experience. Conclusions Discussing STI prevention in the context of HPV vaccination appears to be well accepted by urban, low-income minority families. In addition to providing information on cancer prevention, these messages may help to raise awareness, acceptability and uptake of HPV vaccines. PMID:24990400

  11. Model systems to study the life cycle of human papillomaviruses and HPV-associated cancers.

    PubMed

    Chow, Louise T

    2015-04-01

    The prevalent human papillomaviruses (HPVs) infect either cutaneous or mucosal epithelium. Active Infections lead to epithelial hyperprolifeation and are usually cleared in healthy individuals within a year. Persistent infections in the anogenital tracts by certain high-risk genotypes such as HPV-16, HPV-18 and closely related types, can progress to high grade dysplasias and carcinomas in women and men, including cervical, vulva, penile and anal cancers. A significant fraction of the head and neck cancers are also caused by HPV-16. The viral oncogenes responsible for neoplastic conversion are E6 and E7 that disrupt the pathways controlled by the two major tumor suppressor genes, p53 and members of pRB family. Because HPV cannot be propagated in conventional submerged monolayer cell cultures, organotypic epithelial raft cultures that generate a stratified and differentiated epithelium have been used to study the viral life cycle. This article describes several systems to examine aspects of the viral productive phase, along with the advantages and limitations. Animal model systems of HPV carcinogenesis are also briefly described.

  12. Dose-Related Differences in Effectiveness of Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Against Genital Warts: A Nationwide Study of 550,000 Young Girls.

    PubMed

    Blomberg, Maria; Dehlendorff, Christian; Sand, Carsten; Kjaer, Susanne K

    2015-09-01

    Reducing the number of doses in the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination regimen from 3 to 2 could increase coverage rates. In this cohort study, we assessed the risk of genital warts (GWs) according to timing and number of doses of quadrivalent HPV vaccine. From population-based registries, we identified all girls in Denmark born during 1985-1999, for whom information on HPV vaccinations was retrieved. The cohort was followed for GW occurrence during 2006-2012. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were calculated by Poisson regression to determine differences in GW rates by number of vaccine doses. Of the 550,690 girls in the cohort, 361 734 had been vaccinated. Of these, 25.9% had been vaccinated twice and 58.8% 3 times. The risk of GWs decreased significantly with each additional dose of vaccine. For girls who received 2 doses, extension of the interval between doses reduced the incidence of GWs. In comparison with a 2-month interval, the incidence of GWs was reduced by 45% (95% confidence interval [CI], 20%-62%), 55% (95% CI, 35%-69%), and 63% (95% CI, 44%-75%), with an interval of 4, 5, and 6 months, respectively. The IRR of 2 vs 3 doses was close to 1, with an interval of about 6 months between the first 2 doses. With the original vaccine schedule, completion of 3 doses seems to be required to obtain full protection against GWs. A 2-dose regimen may be as effective if the dosing interval is extended to around 6 months, although the long-term effectiveness of this regimen is unknown. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Universal Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Using a Dynamic Bayesian Methodology: The BEST II Study.

    PubMed

    Haeussler, Katrin; Marcellusi, Andrea; Mennini, Francesco Saverio; Favato, Giampiero; Picardo, Mauro; Garganese, Giorgia; Bononi, Marco; Costa, Silvano; Scambia, Giovanni; Zweifel, Peter; Capone, Alessandro; Baio, Gianluca

    2015-12-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) plays a role in the development of benign and malign neoplasms in both sexes. The Italian recommendations for HPV vaccines consider only females. The BEST II study (Bayesian modelling to assess the Effectiveness of a vaccination Strategy to prevent HPV-related diseases) evaluates 1) the cost-effectiveness of immunization strategies targeting universal vaccination compared with cervical cancer screening and female-only vaccination and 2) the economic impact of immunization on various HPV-induced diseases. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether female-only vaccination or universal vaccination is the most cost-effective intervention against HPV. We present a dynamic Bayesian Markov model to investigate transmission dynamics in cohorts of females and males in a follow-up period of 55 years. We assumed that quadrivalent vaccination (against HPV 16, 18, 6, and 11) is available for 12-year-old individuals. The model accounts for the progression of subjects across HPV-induced health states (cervical, vaginal, vulvar, anal, penile, and head/neck cancer as well as anogenital warts). The sexual mixing is modeled on the basis of age-, sex-, and sexual behavioral-specific matrices to obtain the dynamic force of infection. In comparison to cervical cancer screening, universal vaccination results in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of €1,500. When universal immunization is compared with female-only vaccination, it is cost-effective with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of €11,600. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis shows a relatively large amount of parameter uncertainty, which interestingly has, however, no substantial impact on the decision-making process. The intervention being assessed seems to be associated with an attractive cost-effectiveness profile. Universal HPV vaccination is found to be a cost-effective choice when compared with either cervical cancer screening or female-only vaccination within the Italian

  14. Vaccination against Human Papillomavirus in relation to Financial Crisis: The "Evaluation and Education of Greek Female Adolescents on Human Papillomaviruses' Prevention Strategies" ELEFTHERIA Study.

    PubMed

    Mammas, Ioannis N; Theodoridou, Maria; Koutsaftiki, Chryssie; Bertsias, George; Sourvinos, George; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2016-08-01

    In this study we aimed to explore financial and other sociodemographic factors that affect nonvaccination against the human papillomavirus (HPV) in Greece, one of the first European Union countries to introduce the vaccination against HPV into its National Immunization Programme in 2008. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, INTERVENTIONS, AND MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Six hundred thirty-two female adolescents (aged 11-16 years) from Greece completed a pilot cross-sectional questionnaire-based survey (ELEFTHERIA study) from 2008 to 2014. Overall, only 8.9% (56 of 632) of the female adolescents reported that they had received all 3 doses of the HPV vaccination. The HPV vaccination uptake rates increased gradually from 3.2% (3 of 95) in 2008 to 17.1% (14 of 82) in 2011. However, it abruptly decreased to 2.1% (2 of 95) in 2012 and it reached 9.2% (8 of 87) in 2013 and 11.5% (11 of 96) in 2014. The most common factors for nonvaccination included fear of side effects, which decreased (Spearman ρ = -0.860; P = .024) and financial issues, which increased statistically significantly (Spearman ρ = 0.890; P = .012) during the years 2008 to 2014. In our study we addressed the novel topic of the association of financial issues with HPV vaccination compliance and highlighted the urgent need to provide and maintain health insurance coverage to children in Greece, a country in financial crisis. Copyright © 2016 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Performance of the quantitative food frequency questionnaire used in the Brazilian center of the prospective study Natural History of Human Papillomavirus Infection in Men: The HIM Study.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Juliana Araujo; Baggio, Maria Luiza; Giuliano, Anna R; Fisberg, Regina Mara; Marchioni, Dirce Maria Lobo

    2011-07-01

    The Natural History of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infection in Men: The HIM Study is a prospective multicenter cohort study that, among other factors, analyzes participants' diet. A parallel cross-sectional study was designed to evaluate the validity and reproducibility of the quantitative food frequency questionnaire (QFFQ) used in the Brazilian center from the HIM Study. For this, a convenience subsample of 98 men aged 18 to 70 years from the HIM Study in Brazil answered three 54-item QFFQ and three 24-hour recall interviews, with 6-month intervals between them (data collection January to September 2007). A Bland-Altman analysis indicated that the difference between instruments was dependent on the magnitude of the intake for energy and most nutrients included in the validity analysis, with the exception of carbohydrates, fiber, polyunsaturated fat, vitamin C, and vitamin E. The correlation between the QFFQ and the 24-hour recall for the deattenuated and energy-adjusted data ranged from 0.05 (total fat) to 0.57 (calcium). For the energy and nutrients consumption included in the validity analysis, 33.5% of participants on average were correctly classified into quartiles, and the average value of 0.26 for weighted kappa shows a reasonable agreement. The intraclass correlation coefficients for all nutrients were greater than 0.40 in the reproducibility analysis. The QFFQ demonstrated good reproducibility and acceptable validity. The results support the use of this instrument in the HIM Study. Copyright © 2011 American Dietetic Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A study of genotyping for management of human papillomavirus-positive, cytology-negative cervical screening results.

    PubMed

    Schiffman, M; Burk, R D; Boyle, S; Raine-Bennett, T; Katki, H A; Gage, J C; Wentzensen, N; Kornegay, J R; Aldrich, C; Tam, T; Erlich, H; Apple, R; Befano, B; Castle, P E

    2015-01-01

    The effective management of women with human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive, cytology-negative results is critical to the introduction of HPV testing into cervical screening. HPV typing has been recommended for colposcopy triage, but it is not clear which combinations of high-risk HPV types provide clinically useful information. This study included 18,810 women with Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2)-positive, cytology-negative results and who were age ≥30 years from Kaiser Permanente Northern California. The median follow-up was 475 days (interquartile range [IQR], 0 to 1,077 days; maximum, 2,217 days). The baseline specimens from 482 cases of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 or cancer (CIN3+) and 3,517 random HC2-positive noncases were genotyped using 2 PCR-based methods. Using the case-control sampling fractions, the 3-year cumulative risks of CIN3+ were calculated for each individual high-risk HPV type. The 3-year cumulative risk of CIN3+ among all women with HC2-positive, cytology-negative results was 4.6%. HPV16 status conferred the greatest type-specific risk stratification; women with HC2-positive/HPV16-positive results had a 10.6% risk of CIN3+, while women with HC-2 positive/HPV16-negative results had a much lower risk of 2.4%. The next most informative HPV types and their risks in HPV-positive women were HPV33 (5.9%) and HPV18 (5.9%). With regard to the etiologic fraction, 20 of 71 cases of cervical adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) and adenocarcinoma in the cohort were positive for HPV18. HPV16 genotyping provides risk stratification useful for guiding clinical management; the risk among HPV16-positive women clearly exceeds the U.S. consensus risk threshold for immediate colposcopy referral. HPV18 is of particular interest because of its association with difficult-to-detect glandular lesions. There is a less clear clinical value of distinguishing the other high-risk HPV types. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. A Study of Genotyping for Management of Human Papillomavirus-Positive, Cytology-Negative Cervical Screening Results

    PubMed Central

    Burk, R. D.; Boyle, S.; Raine-Bennett, T.; Katki, H. A.; Gage, J. C.; Wentzensen, N.; Kornegay, J. R.; Aldrich, C.; Tam, T.; Erlich, H.; Apple, R.; Befano, B.; Castle, P. E.

    2014-01-01

    The effective management of women with human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive, cytology-negative results is critical to the introduction of HPV testing into cervical screening. HPV typing has been recommended for colposcopy triage, but it is not clear which combinations of high-risk HPV types provide clinically useful information. This study included 18,810 women with Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2)-positive, cytology-negative results and who were age ≥30 years from Kaiser Permanente Northern California. The median follow-up was 475 days (interquartile range [IQR], 0 to 1,077 days; maximum, 2,217 days). The baseline specimens from 482 cases of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 or cancer (CIN3+) and 3,517 random HC2-positive noncases were genotyped using 2 PCR-based methods. Using the case-control sampling fractions, the 3-year cumulative risks of CIN3+ were calculated for each individual high-risk HPV type. The 3-year cumulative risk of CIN3+ among all women with HC2-positive, cytology-negative results was 4.6%. HPV16 status conferred the greatest type-specific risk stratification; women with HC2-positive/HPV16-positive results had a 10.6% risk of CIN3+, while women with HC-2 positive/HPV16-negative results had a much lower risk of 2.4%. The next most informative HPV types and their risks in HPV-positive women were HPV33 (5.9%) and HPV18 (5.9%). With regard to the etiologic fraction, 20 of 71 cases of cervical adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) and adenocarcinoma in the cohort were positive for HPV18. HPV16 genotyping provides risk stratification useful for guiding clinical management; the risk among HPV16-positive women clearly exceeds the U.S. consensus risk threshold for immediate colposcopy referral. HPV18 is of particular interest because of its association with difficult-to-detect glandular lesions. There is a less clear clinical value of distinguishing the other high-risk HPV types. PMID:25339396

  18. Seroprevalence of cutaneous human papillomaviruses (HPVs) among men in the multinational HPV Infection in Men study.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Shams; Pierce Campbell, Christine M; Waterboer, Tim; Rollison, Dana E; Ingles, Donna J; Torres, B Nelson; Michel, Angelika; Sudenga, Staci L; Pawlita, Michael; Villa, Luisa L; Lazcano Ponce, Eduardo; Borenstein, Amy R; Wang, Wei; Giuliano, Anna R

    2016-12-01

    Data on cutaneous human papillomavirus (HPV) seroprevalence are primarily derived from skin cancer case-control studies. Few studies have reported the seroprevalence of cutaneous HPV among healthy men. This study investigated the seroprevalence of cutaneous HPV types and associated risk factors among men residing in Brazil, Mexico and the USA. Six hundred men were randomly selected from the HPV Infection in Men study. Archived serum specimens were tested for antibodies against 14 cutaneous HPV genotypes, β-HPV types (5/8/12/14/17/22/23/24/38/48), α-HPV 27, γ-HPV 4, µ-HPV1 and ν-HPV 41 using a glutathione S-transferase L1-based multiplex serology assay. Risk factor data were collected by a questionnaire. Binomial proportions were used to estimate seroprevalence, and logistic regression to examine factors associated with seropositivity. Overall, 65.4 % of men were seropositive to ≥1 of the 14 cutaneous HPV types, and 39.0 % were positive for ≥1 β-HPV types. Seroprevalence was 8.9, 30.9, 28.6 and 9.4 % for α-HPV 27, γ-HPV 4, µ-HPV 1 and ν-HPV 41, respectively. In multivariate analyses, seropositivity for any cutaneous HPV type was associated with higher education [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 1.75; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.08-2.83], and seropositivity of any β-HPV type was significantly associated with increasing age (AOR 1.72; 95 % CI 1.12-2.63, for men aged 31-44 years vs men aged 18-30 years). Other factors associated with various type-specific cutaneous HPV seropositivity included country, circumcision and lifetime number of male sexual partners. These data indicate that exposure to cutaneous HPV is common. Future studies are needed to assess the role of cutaneous HPV in diseases.

  19. Human papillomavirus in young women with Chlamydia trachomatis infection 7 years after the Australian human papillomavirus vaccination programme: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Chow, Eric P F; Danielewski, Jennifer A; Fehler, Glenda; Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Law, Matthew G; Bradshaw, Catriona S; Garland, Suzanne M; Chen, Marcus Y; Fairley, Christopher K

    2015-11-01

    The national quadrivalent human papillomavirus (4vHPV) vaccination programme was launched in Australia in April, 2007. In this study, we aimed to explore the prevalence of vaccine-targeted human papillomavirus (HPV) types contained in the 4vHPV and nine-valent HPV (9vHPV) vaccines detected in young women diagnosed with chlamydia. In this cross-sectional study, we identified specimens from women aged 25 years or younger who attended the Melbourne Sexual Health Centre (Melbourne, VIC, Australia) diagnosed with chlamydia. We calculated the prevalence of 4vHPV types (6, 11, 16, and 18) and the extra five 9vHPV types (31, 33, 45, 52, and 58 alone) excluding 4vHPV types, stratified by Australian financial year (and according to the prevaccination and postvaccination periods) and self-reported vaccination status, for all women, Australian-born women, Australian-born women aged 21 years and younger, and overseas-born women. We calculated adjusted prevalence ratios using binomial log linear regression. Between July 1, 2004, and June 30, 2014, we included 1202 women. The prevalence of 4vHPV types in Australian-born women decreased during this period (HPV 6 and 11: 2004-05 nine [16%, 95% CI 8-28] of 56 vs 2013-14 one [2%, 0-9] of 57, p<0·0001; HPV 16 and 18: 17 [30%, 19-44] vs two [4%, 0-12], p<0·0001). In Australian-born women aged 21 years and younger, HPV 6 and 11 prevalence remained at 0% for all years after 2008-09, and we detected HPV 16 and 18 in 5% or less of samples for the same period. In unvaccinated Australian-born women, we noted a significant decrease in 4vHPV types from 66 (41%, 95% CI 34-49) of 160 in the prevaccination period (from July 1, 2004, to June 30, 2007) to five (19%, 6-38) of 27 in the postvaccination period (July 1, 2007, to June 30, 2014; p=0·031), but not in the 9vHPV types, excluding 4vHPV (36 [23%, 95% CI 16-30] vs seven [26%, 11-46]; p=0·805). The three-dose vaccination coverage was sufficient for the 4vHPV types to almost disappear in

  20. Previous cervical cytology and high-risk human papillomavirus testing in a cohort of patients with invasive cervical carcinoma in Shandong Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinguo; Peng, Dezhi; Bi, Chunrui; Jiang, Lingbo; Zhao, Dongman; Tian, Xinxin

    2017-01-01

    Background Currently, available data regarding previous cervical cytology and high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) test results to detect invasive cervical cancer are limited and controversial in China. Therefore, this retrospective study in a population of Chinese women with invasive cervical carcinoma aimed to gain further insight into the roles of cytology and hrHPV testing in cervical cancer screening. Methods A total of 1214 cases with a histological diagnosis of invasive cervical cancer were retrieved from the Pathology Database of Jinan KingMed Diagnostics (JKD) over a 5-year period. Previous cytology and hrHPV test results of 469 patients carried out within the year before cancer diagnosis were documented. Results A higher percentage of patients who had undergone prior screening had micro-invasive cervical carcinoma than patients who had no prior screening (25.4% vs. 12.1%, P < 0.001). Of the 469 patients with available prior screening results, 170 had cytology alone, 161 had hrHPV testing alone, and 138 had both cytology and hrHPV testing. There was a significantly lower percentage of hrHPV-positive cases with adenocarcinoma than with squamous cell carcinoma (77.8% vs. 96.4%, P = 0.001). The hrHPV test showed a significantly higher sensitivity than cytology alone (94.4% vs. 85.3%, P = 0.006). The overall sensitivity of the combination of cytology and hrHPV testing (98.6%) was much higher than that of cytology alone (P < 0.001) but only marginally higher than that of hrHPV testing alone (P = 0.058). Conclusions The results revealed that prior cervical screening can detect a significantly larger number of micro-invasive cervical cancers. The hrHPV test can provide a more sensitive and efficient strategy than cytology alone. As the addition of cytology to hrHPV testing can only marginally increase the efficiency of the hrHPV test, hrHPV testing should be used as the primary screening approach, especially in the low-resource settings of China. PMID:28662160

  1. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Human Papillomavirus Infection in 18-Year-Old Women: Baseline Report of a Prospective Study on Human Papillomavirus Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Igidbashian, Sarah; Boveri, Sara; Bottari, Fabio; Vidal Urbinati, Ailyn; Preti, Eleonora; Casadio, Chiara; Landoni, Fabio; Sideri, Mario; Sandri, Maria Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about the epidemiology of human papillomavirus (HPV) in Italy before the age of 25. At the European Institute of Oncology, a prospective observational study on cervical HPV infection in 18-year-old women undergoing quadrivalent HPV vaccination is ongoing. At the first visit before vaccination, all the young women answered an epidemiological questionnaire, and then, the presence of high-risk HPV (hrHPV) was tested. Samples positive for hrHPV were genotyped. Liquid-based cytology was done only to women declaring not to be virgins. Any positivity at cytology or HPV testing was completed with colposcopy and eventually biopsies. Seven hundred and thirty women were enrolled. Two hundred sixty-six women were virgins; 7 (2.6%) of these resulted positive to hrHPV: 1 had HPV16 and CP6108, whereas the other 6 resulted negative at genotyping. Of the 464 nonvirgins, 61 (13.1%) were HPV positive: 19 had HPV16, 4 were positive to HPV18 with other hrHPVs, 25 to other hrHPVs, 7 to low-risk HPV, whereas 13 resulted negative at genotyping. HPV positivity was significantly associated to both smoking and having more than 3 partners. Cervical cytology was negative in 433 cases (93.3%), ASC-US in 10 cases (2.2%), low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion in 20 cases (4.3%), and ASC-H in 1 case (0.2%). No CIN2+ was identified. Overall, we found a low positivity to HPV in this population; however, the rate of HPV positivity was significantly related to smoking and sexual life. The cytology result low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion was more frequent than in the screening population, whereas no CIN2+ was identified, confirming the indication to avoid screening at this age.

  2. Papillomaviruses: Molecular and clinical aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Howley, P.M.; Broker, T.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains nine sections, each consisting of several papers. The section headings are : Papillomaviruses and Human Genital Tract Diseases;Papillomaviruses and Human Cutaneous Diseases, Papillomaviruses and Human Oral and Laryngeal Diseases;Therapeutic Approaches to Papillomavirus Infections;Animal Papillomaviruses;Molecular Biology;Transcription, Replication, and Genome Organization;Epithelial Cell Culture;Papillomavirus Transformation;and Viral Vectors.

  3. Preliminary study of analyzing mucosal human papillomaviruses in cutaneous warts by restriction fragment mass polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Park, So Eun; Ha, Jae Won; Kim, Chul Woo; Kim, Sang Seok

    2017-08-03

    Cutaneous human papillomavirus (HPV) types 1, 2, 4, 7 and 57 are reportedly found in cutaneous warts. However, there are few reports that have investigated the prevalence of mucosal HPV types in cutaneous warts. The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence of mucosal HPV types in patients with cutaneous warts and to determine any association between HPV types and patient characteristics. We analyzed 62 wart samples that were taken from patients who were diagnosed with cutaneous warts, and 30 normal skin samples were used as negative control. We recorded the following characteristics: sex, age, type of warts, duration of warts, number of warts and patient's immune status. A matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS)-based restriction fragment mass polymorphism (RFMP) assay was used for HPV genotyping. Of the total 62 wart samples, 50 samples (81.6%) were positive for HPV genotypes. All of the negative controls (30 samples) using normal skin showed negative reaction. Mucosal HPV types (49 samples, 84.4%) were highly detected, and high- or probable high-risk HPV types (39 samples, 67.2%) were more common than lower risk HPV types (10 samples, 17.2%). A statistically significant association was observed between sex, age, duration of warts and the risk of HPV types. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to use the RFMP assay to analyze cutaneous wart-associated mucosal HPV types. The high prevalence of high-risk and probable high-risk HPV in this study is of great significance. © 2017 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  4. Cost effectiveness of human papillomavirus test of cure after treatment for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia in England: economic analysis from NHS Sentinel Sites Study

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Megan; Lew, Jie-Bin; Walker, Robert; Moss, Sue; Kitchener, Henry; Patnick, Julietta; Canfell, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the cost effectiveness of human papillomavirus testing after treatment for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). Design Economic analysis using a Markov modelling approach to combine cost and epidemiological data from the NHS Sentinel Sites Study with data from previous studies of post-treatment recurrence rates. Setting English NHS Cervical Cancer Screening Programme. Interventions Management guidelines after treatment of CIN involving annual cytology follow-up for 10 years, compared with alternative protocols using the human papillomavirus test to reduce the amount of post-treatment surveillance. Main outcome measures Cases of underlying CIN3+ averted at 10 years and costs per 1000 women treated. Results Model predictions indicated that, at observed levels of compliance with post-treatment recommendations, management with only cytological follow-up would result in 29 residual cases of recurrent CIN3+ by 10 years and would cost £358 222 (€440 426; $574 910) (discounted) per 1000 women treated. Implementation of human papillomavirus test of cure in cytologically negative women according to the sentinel sites protocol would avert an additional 8.4 cases of CIN 3+ and reduce costs by £9388 per 1000 women treated. Conclusions Human papillomavirus test of cure would be more effective and would be cost saving compared with cytology only follow-up. The results of this evaluation support the full scale implementation of human papillomavirus test of cure after treatment of CIN within the NHS Cervical Screening Programme. PMID:23117060

  5. Diversity of human papillomavirus in the anal canal of men: The HIM study

    PubMed Central

    Sichero, Laura; Nyitray, Alan G.; Nunes, Emily Montosa; Nepal, Bal; Ferreira, Silvaneide; Sobrinho, João S.; Baggio, Maria Luiza; Galan, Lenice; Silva, Roberto C.; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Giuliano, Anna R.; Villa, Luisa L.

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are associated with development of anogenital lesions in men. There are no reports describing the distribution of non-alpha HPV types in the anal canal of a sexually diverse men group. The HIM (HPV in Men) Study is a multicenter study of the natural history of HPV infection in Brazil, Mexico and USA. At baseline, 12% of anal canal specimens PCR HPV-positive were not typed by the Roche Linear Array and were considered unclassified. Our goal was characterizing HPVs among these unclassified specimens at baseline and assess associations with participant socio-demographic and behavioral characteristics. Unclassified HPVs were typed by sequencing amplified PGMY09/11 products or cloning of PGMY/GP+ nested amplicons followed by sequencing. Further analysis was conducted using FAP primers. Of men with unclassified HPV at the anal canal, most (89.1%) were men who have sex with women (MSW). Readable sequences were produced for 62.8% of unclassified specimens, of which 75.2% were characterized HPV types. A total of 18, 26, and 3 different α-, β- and γ-HPV types were detected, respectively. Compared to older men (45-70 years), α-HPVs were more commonly detected among young men (18-30 years) whereas β-HPVs were more frequent among mid-adult men (31-44 years). β-HPVs were more common among heterosexual men (85.0%) than non-heterosexual men. β2-HPV types composed all β-HPVs detected among non-heterosexual men. The high prevalence of β-HPV in the anal canal of men who do not report receptive anal sex is suggestive of other forms of transmission that do not involve penile-anal intercourse. PMID:25698660

  6. Knowledge, attitude & practice on human papillomavirus vaccination: A cross-sectional study among healthcare providers

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, P. Cheena; Chawla, Anil; Chaudhary, Seema

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Cervical cancer is a major health problem and a leading cause of death among women in India. Of all the associated risk factors, high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infections being the principal aetiologic agent, two HPV vaccines are in use for the control of cervical cancer. The present study was undertaken to explore the knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) on HPV vaccination among the healthcare providers in India. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 590 healthcare professionals from 232 hospitals and 80 PHCs of nine districts of Delhi-NCR (National Capital Region). A total of 590 (526 female, 64 male) healthcare providers were surveyed. Results: Only 47 per cent of respondents recommended young women to get vaccinated against HPV. Majority of respondents (81%) were found to be aware about the existence of vaccines for cervical cancer prevention. District-wise, highest (88.3%) awareness about the existence of vaccines against HPV was reported from Gautam Budh Nagar and lowest (64%) in Faridabad. Although 86 per cent of gynaecologists were aware about the names of HPV vaccines available in the market, only 27 per cent of paramedical staff had this knowledge. There was a significant difference between the respondents from government and private sectors regarding their awareness about HPV vaccines. Lack of awareness about the principal cause, risk factors and symptoms for cervical cancer and HPV vaccination was significantly (P< 0.05) reported in the respondents from paramedical staff category. Interpretation & conclusions: The findings reinforce continued medical education of healthcare providers, particularly those from the government sector on HPV vaccination for cervical cancer prevention. Public education is also pertinent for a successful HPV vaccination programme in the country. PMID:28361828

  7. Knowledge, attitude & practice on human papillomavirus vaccination: A cross-sectional study among healthcare providers.

    PubMed

    Chawla, P Cheena; Chawla, Anil; Chaudhary, Seema

    2016-11-01

    Cervical cancer is a major health problem and a leading cause of death among women in India. Of all the associated risk factors, high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infections being the principal aetiologic agent, two HPV vaccines are in use for the control of cervical cancer. The present study was undertaken to explore the knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) on HPV vaccination among the healthcare providers in India. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 590 healthcare professionals from 232 hospitals and 80 PHCs of nine districts of Delhi-NCR (National Capital Region). A total of 590 (526 female, 64 male) healthcare providers were surveyed. Only 47 per cent of respondents recommended young women to get vaccinated against HPV. Majority of respondents (81%) were found to be aware about the existence of vaccines for cervical cancer prevention. District-wise, highest (88.3%) awareness about the existence of vaccines against HPV was reported from Gautam Budh Nagar and lowest (64%) in Faridabad. Although 86 per cent of gynaecologists were aware about the names of HPV vaccines available in the market, only 27 per cent of paramedical staff had this knowledge. There was a significant difference between the respondents from government and private sectors regarding their awareness about HPV vaccines. Lack of awareness about the principal cause, risk factors and symptoms for cervical cancer and HPV vaccination was significantly (P< 0.05) reported in the respondents from paramedical staff category. The findings reinforce continued medical education of healthcare providers, particularly those from the government sector on HPV vaccination for cervical cancer prevention. Public education is also pertinent for a successful HPV vaccination programme in the country.

  8. The 2010 Global Proficiency Study of Human Papillomavirus Genotyping in Vaccinology

    PubMed Central

    Eklund, Carina; Forslund, Ola; Wallin, Keng-Ling; Zhou, Tiequn

    2012-01-01

    Accurate and internationally comparable human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA genotyping is essential both for evaluation of HPV vaccines and for effective monitoring and implementation of vaccination programs. The World Health Organization (WHO) HPV Laboratory Network (LabNet) regularly issues international proficiency studies. The 2010 HPV genotyping proficiency panel for HPV vaccinology contained 43 coded samples composed of purified plasmids of 16 HPV types (HPV types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59, 66, and 68a and 68b) and 3 coded extraction controls. Proficient typing was defined as detection in both single and multiple infections of 50 international units (IU) of HPV type 16 (HPV-16) and HPV-18 DNA and 500 genome equivalents (GE) for the other 14 HPV types. Ninety-eight laboratories worldwide submitted a total of 132 data sets. Twenty-four different HPV genotyping assay methods were used, with Linear Array being the most commonly used. Other major assays used were a line blot assay (Inno-LiPa), CLART, type-specific real-time PCR, PCR Luminex, and different microarray assays. Altogether, 72 data sets were proficient for detection of more than 1 type, and only 26 data sets proficiently detected all 16 HPV types. The major oncogenic HPV types, 16 and 18, were proficiently detected in 95.0% (114/120) and 87.0% (94/108) of data sets, respectively. Forty-six data sets reported multiple false-positive results and were considered nonproficient. A trend toward increased sensitivity of assays was seen for the 41 laboratories that participated in both 2008 and 2010. In conclusion, continued global proficiency studies will be required for establishing comparable and reliable HPV genotyping services for vaccinology worldwide. PMID:22535980

  9. Cohort Profile: The Gubbio Population Study

    PubMed Central

    Cirillo, Massimo; Terradura-Vagnarelli, Oscar; Mancini, Mario; Menotti, Alessandro; Zanchetti, Alberto; Laurenzi, Martino

    2014-01-01

    The Gubbio Study is a prospective epidemiological study on the population residing in the city of Gubbio, Italy. Original objectives of the study were the control of hypertension and the role of cellular electrolyte handling in hypertension. Other objectives were added during the 30-year activity of the study. The original target cohort consists of individuals aged ≥ 5 years residing within the medieval walls of the city. To complete family genealogies, individuals residing outside the city were also included. Three active screenings (exams) were conducted. A total of 5376 individuals (response rate 92%) participated in Exam 1 which was performed in 1983–86. Follow-up exams were completed between 1989–92 and 2001–2007. Data categories included demographics, personal and family medical history, lifestyle habits, education, type of work, anthropometry, blood pressure, pulse rate, blood biochemistry, urine biochemistry and special investigations on cellular electrolyte handling. Electrocardiogram, echocardiogram, 24-h ambulatory blood pressure and uroflowmetry were performed in selected subgroups defined by age and/or sex. Data about hospitalizations, mortality and causes of death were collected starting from completion of Exam 1. The study shared the data with other studies. PMID:23543599

  10. The millennium Cohort Study: a 21-year prospective cohort study of 140,000 military personnel.

    PubMed

    Gray, Gregory C; Chesbrough, Karen B; Ryan, Margaret A K; Amoroso, Paul; Boyko, Edward J; Gackstetter, Gary D; Hooper, Tomoko I; Riddle, James R

    2002-06-01

    Does military service, in particular operational deployment, result in a higher risk of chronic illness among military personnel and veterans? The Millennium Cohort Study, the largest Department of Defense prospective cohort study ever conducted, will attempt to answer this question. The probability-based sample of 140,000 military personnel will be surveyed every 3 years during a 21-year period. The first questionnaire, scheduled for release in summer 2001, will be sent to 30,000 veterans who have been deployed to southwest Asia, Bosnia, or Kosovo since August 1997 and 70,000 veterans who have not been deployed to these conflict areas. Twenty thousand new participants will be added to the group in each of the years 2004 and 2007 to complete the study population of 140,000. The participants will have the option of completing the study questionnaire either on the paper copy received in the mail or through the World Wide Web-based version, which is available at www.MillenniumCohort.org. This will be one of the first prospective studies ever to offer such an option. The initial survey instrument will collect data regarding demographic characteristics, self-reported medical conditions and symptoms, and health-related behaviors. Validated instruments will be incorporated to capture self-assessed physical and mental functional status (Short Form for Veterans), psychosocial assessment (Patient Health Questionnaire), and post-traumatic stress disorder (Patient Checklist-17). Information obtained from the survey responses will be linked with other military databases, including data on deployment, occupation, vaccinations, health care utilization, and disability. In addition to revealing changes in veterans' health status over time, the Millennium Cohort Study will serve as a data repository, providing a solid foundation upon which additional epidemiological studies may be constructed.

  11. Human Papillomavirus Antibodies and Future Risk of Anogenital Cancer: A Nested Case-Control Study in the European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition Study

    PubMed Central

    Kreimer, Aimée R.; Brennan, Paul; Lang Kuhs, Krystle A.; Waterboer, Tim; Clifford, Gary; Franceschi, Silvia; Michel, Angelika; Willhauck-Fleckenstein, Martina; Riboli, Elio; Castellsagué, Xavier; Hildesheim, Allan; Fortner, Renée Turzanski; Kaaks, Rudolf; Palli, Domenico; Ljuslinder, Ingrid; Panico, Salvatore; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Mesrine, Sylvie; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Peeters, Petra H.; Cross, Amanda J.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Vineis, Paolo; Larrañaga, Nerea; Pala, Valeria; Sánchez, María-José; Navarro, Carmen; Barricarte, Aurelio; Tumino, Rosario; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas; Boeing, Heiner; Steffen, Annika; Travis, Ruth C.; Quirós, J. Ramón; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Pawlita, Michael; Johansson, Mattias

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 (HPV16) causes cancer at several anatomic sites. In the European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition study, HPV16 E6 seropositivity was present more than 10 years before oropharyngeal cancer diagnosis and was nearly absent in controls. The current study sought to evaluate the extent to which HPV16 E6 antibodies are present before diagnosis of anogenital cancers within the same cohort. Methods Four hundred incident anogenital cancers (273 cervical, 24 anal, 67 vulvar, 12 vaginal, and 24 penile cancers) with prediagnostic blood samples (collected on average 3 and 8 years before diagnosis for cervix and noncervix cancers, respectively) and 718 matched controls were included. Plasma was analyzed for antibodies against HPV16 E6 and multiple other HPV proteins and genotypes and evaluated in relation to risk using unconditional logistic regression. Results HPV16 E6 seropositivity was present in 29.2% of individuals (seven of 24 individuals) who later developed anal cancer compared with 0.6% of controls (four of 718 controls) who remained cancer free (odds ratio [OR], 75.9; 95% CI, 17.9 to 321). HPV16 E6 seropositivity was less common for cancers of the cervix (3.3%), vagina (8.3%), vulva (1.5%), and penis (8.3%). No associations were seen for non–type 16 HPV E6 antibodies, apart from anti-HPV58 E6 and anal cancer (OR, 6.8; 95% CI, 1.4 to 33.1). HPV16 E6 seropositivity tended to increase in blood samples drawn closer in time to cancer diagnosis. Conclusion HPV16 E6 seropositivity is relatively common before diagnosis of anal cancer but rare for other HPV-related anogenital cancers. PMID:25667279

  12. Human papillomavirus infection and oral cancer: a case-control study in Montreal, Canada.

    PubMed

    Pintos, Javier; Black, Martin J; Sadeghi, Nader; Ghadirian, Parviz; Zeitouni, Anthony G; Viscidi, Raphael P; Herrero, Rolando; Coutlée, François; Franco, Eduardo L

    2008-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine the association between human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and risk of developing oral cancer. The investigation followed a hospital-based case-control design. Cases consisted of newly diagnosed patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and oropharynx. Controls were frequency matched to cases on gender, age, and hospital. Subjects were interviewed to elicit information on putative risk factors. Oral exfoliated cells were tested for detection of HPV DNA by the PGMY09/11 polymerase chain reaction protocol. Serum antibodies against HPV 16, 18, and 31 viral capsids were detected using an immunoassay technique. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of oral cancer according to HPV exposure variables. HPV DNA was detected in 19% of cases (14 out of 72), and 5% of controls (six out of 129). Among tonsil-related cancers (palatine tonsil and base of tongue) viral DNA was detected in 43% of cases (nine out of 21). The OR for tonsil-related cancers for high-risk HPV types was 19.32 (95%CI: 2.3-159.5), after adjustment for socio-demographic characteristics, tobacco, and alcohol consumption. The equivalent OR for HPV 16 seropositivity was 31.51 (95%CI: 4.5-219.7). The ORs of non-tonsillar oral cancers for high risk HPV DNA in oral cells and for seropositivity were 2.14 (95%CI: 0.4-13.0) and 3.16 (95%CI: 0.8-13.0), respectively. These results provide evidence supporting a strong causal association between HPV infection and tonsil-related cancers. The evidence for an etiologic link is less clear for non-tonsillar oral cancers.

  13. Cohort profile: the Spanish WORKing life Social Security (WORKss) cohort study

    PubMed Central

    López Gómez, María Andrée; Durán, Xavier; Zaballa, Elena; Sanchez-Niubo, Albert; Delclos, George L; Benavides, Fernando G

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The global economy is changing the labour market and social protection systems in Europe. The effect of both changes on health needs to be monitored in view of an ageing population and the resulting increase in prevalence of chronic health conditions. The Spanish WORKing life Social Security (WORKss) cohort study provides unique longitudinal data to study the impact of labour trajectories and employment conditions on health, in terms of sickness absence, permanent disability and death. Participants The WORKss cohort originated from the Continuous Working Life Sample (CWLS) generated by the General Directorate for the Organization of the Social Security in Spain. The CWLS contains a 4% representative sample of all individuals in contact with the Social Security system. The WORKss cohort exclusively includes individuals with a labour trajectory from 1981 or later. In 2004, the cohort was initiated with 1 022 779 Social Security members: 840 770 (82.2%) contributors and 182 009 (17.8%) beneficiaries aged 16 and older. Findings to date The WORKss cohort includes demographic characteristics, chronological data about employment history, retirement, permanent disability and death. These data make possible the measurement of incidence of permanent disability, the number of potential years of working life lost, and the number of contracts and inactive periods with the Social Security system. The WORKss cohort was linked to temporary sickness absence registries to study medical diagnoses that lead to permanent disability and consequently to an earlier exit from the labour market in unhealthy conditions. Future plans Thanks to its administrative source, the WORKss cohort study will continue follow-up in the coming years, keeping the representativeness of the Spanish population affiliated to the Social Security system. The linkage between the WORKss cohort and temporary sickness absence registries is envisioned to continue. Future plans include the linkage of

  14. The mummy's curse: historical cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Mark R

    2002-01-01

    Objective To examine survival of individuals exposed to the “mummy's curse” reputedly associated with the opening of the tomb of Tutankhamen in Luxor, Egypt, between February 1923 and November 1926. Design Retrospective cohort study. Participants 44 Westerners identified by Howard Carter as present in Egypt at the specified dates, 25 of whom were potentially exposed to the curse. Main outcome measures Length of survival after date of potential exposure. Results In the 25 people exposed to the curse the mean age at death was 70 years (SD 12) compared with 75 (13) in those not exposed (P=0.87 for difference). Survival after the date of exposure was 20.8 (15.2) v 28.9 (13.6) years respectively (P=0.95 for difference). Female sex was a predictor for survival (P=0.02). Conclusions There was no significant association between exposure to the mummy's curse and survival and thus no evidence to support the existence of a mummy's curse. What is already known on this topicThe methods of evidence based medicine have not been used to investigate the reality of the “mummy's curse”The arguments against the curse have been as anecdotal as the contemporary newspapers that reported itWhat this study addsThere was no association between potential exposure to the mummy's curse during the excavation of Tutankamen's tomb and death within 10 yearsNo evidence was found for the existence of a mummy's curse PMID:12493675

  15. Methodological and ethical issues in research using social media: a metamethod of Human Papillomavirus vaccine studies.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, Diana L; Woodworth, Claire F

    2014-12-02

    Online content is a primary source of healthcare information for internet-using adults and a rich resource for health researchers. This paper explores the methodological and ethical issues of engaging in health research using social media. A metamethod was performed on systematically selected studies that used social media as a data source for exploring public awareness and beliefs about Human Papillomaviruses (HPV) and HPV vaccination. Seven electronic databases were searched using a variety of search terms identified for each of three concepts: social media, HPV vaccine, and research method. Abstracts were assessed for eligibility of inclusion; six studies met the eligibility criteria and were subjected to content analysis. A 10-item coding scheme was developed to assess the clarity, congruence and transparency of research design, epistemological and methodological underpinnings and ethical considerations. The designs of the six selected studies were sound, although most studies could have been more transparent about how they built in rigor to ensure the trustworthiness and credibility of findings. Statistical analysis that intended to measure trends and patterns did so without the benefit of randomized sampling and other design elements for ensuring generalizability or reproducibility of findings beyond the specified virtual community. Most researchers did not sufficiently engage virtual users in the research process or consider the risk of privacy incursion. Most studies did not seek ethical approval from an institutional research board or permission from host websites or web service providers. The metamethod exposed missed opportunities for using the dialogical character of social media as well as a lack of attention to the unique ethical issues inherent in operating in a virtual community where social boundaries and issues of public and private are ambiguous. This suggests the need for more self-conscious and ethical research practices when using social media

  16. Evaluating Health Effects of Military Service: The Millennium Cohort Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    important information to the field of preventive medicine and public health, benefiting both military and civilian populations. Previous cohort ... studies , including the Framingham Heart Study and the Nurses’ Cohort Study, have expanded our understanding of causes of heart disease and cancer. The

  17. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    Why get vaccinated?HPV vaccine prevents infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) types that are associated with cause ... at http://www.cdc.gov/hpv. HPV Vaccine (Human Papillomavirus) Information Statement. U.S. Department of Health and ...

  18. HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women HPV (human papillomavirus) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... outside of the body. To Learn More About HPV Human Papillomavirus Vaccine More in For Women Medication ...

  19. Human papillomavirus virus (HPV) genotype- and age-specific analyses of external genital lesions among men in the HPV Infection in Men (HIM) Study.

    PubMed

    Ingles, Donna J; Pierce Campbell, Christine M; Messina, Jane A; Stoler, Mark H; Lin, Hui-Yi; Fulp, William J; Abrahamsen, Martha; Sirak, Bradley A; O'Keefe, Michael T; Papenfuss, Mary; Gage, Christine; Carvalho da Silva, Roberto; Gonzalez Sosa, Rossana; Rojas Juarez, Oscar; Villa, Luisa L; Lazcano Ponce, Eduardo; Giuliano, Anna R

    2015-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes external genital lesions (EGLs) in men, including condyloma and penile intraepithelial neoplasia (PeIN). We sought to determine the incidence of pathologically confirmed EGLs, by lesion type, among men in different age groups and to evaluate the HPV types that were associated with EGL development. HPV Infection in Men (HIM) study participants who contributed ≥2 visits from 2009-2013 were included in the biopsy cohort. Genotyping by an HPV line-probe assay was performed on all pathologically confirmed EGLs. Age-specific analyses were conducted for incident EGLs, with Kaplan-Meier estimation of cumulative incidence. This biopsy cohort included 2754 men (median follow-up duration, 12.4 months [interquartile range, 6.9-19.2 months]). EGLs (n = 377) were pathologically confirmed in 228 men, 198 of whom had incident EGLs. The cumulative incidence of any EGL was highest among men <45 years old and, for condyloma, decreased significantly over time with age. The genotype-specific incidence of EGL varied by pathological diagnoses, with high- and low-risk genotypes found in 15.6% and 73.2% of EGLs, respectively. Condyloma primarily contained HPV 6 or 11. While PeIN lesions primarily contained HPV 16, 1 PeIN III lesion was positive for HPV 6 only. Low- and high-risk HPV genotypes contribute to the EGL burden. Men remain susceptible to HPV-related EGLs throughout the life span, making it necessary to ensure the longevity of immune protection against the most common causative HPV genotypes. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Human Papillomavirus Virus (HPV) Genotype- and Age-Specific Analyses of External Genital Lesions Among Men in the HPV Infection in Men (HIM) Study

    PubMed Central

    Ingles, Donna J.; Pierce Campbell, Christine M.; Messina, Jane A.; Stoler, Mark H.; Lin, Hui-Yi; Fulp, William J.; Abrahamsen, Martha; Sirak, Bradley A.; O'Keefe, Michael T.; Papenfuss, Mary; Gage, Christine; Carvalho da Silva, Roberto; Gonzalez Sosa, Rossana; Rojas Juarez, Oscar; Villa, Luisa L.; Lazcano Ponce, Eduardo; Giuliano, Anna R.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes external genital lesions (EGLs) in men, including condyloma and penile intraepithelial neoplasia (PeIN). We sought to determine the incidence of pathologically confirmed EGLs, by lesion type, among men in different age groups and to evaluate the HPV types that were associated with EGL development. Methods. HPV Infection in Men (HIM) study participants who contributed ≥2 visits from 2009–2013 were included in the biopsy cohort. Genotyping by an HPV line-probe assay was performed on all pathologically confirmed EGLs. Age-specific analyses were conducted for incident EGLs, with Kaplan–Meier estimation of cumulative incidence. Results. This biopsy cohort included 2754 men (median follow-up duration, 12.4 months [interquartile range, 6.9–19.2 months]). EGLs (n = 377) were pathologically confirmed in 228 men, 198 of whom had incident EGLs. The cumulative incidence of any EGL was highest among men <45 years old and, for condyloma, decreased significantly over time with age. The genotype-specific incidence of EGL varied by pathological diagnoses, with high- and low-risk genotypes found in 15.6% and 73.2% of EGLs, respectively. Condyloma primarily contained HPV 6 or 11. While PeIN lesions primarily contained HPV 16, 1 PeIN III lesion was positive for HPV 6 only. Conclusion. Low- and high-risk HPV genotypes contribute to the EGL burden. Men remain susceptible to HPV-related EGLs throughout the life span, making it necessary to ensure the longevity of immune protection against the most common causative HPV genotypes. PMID:25344518

  1. Thiazolidinediones and Parkinson Disease: A Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Connolly, John G; Bykov, Katsiaryna; Gagne, Joshua J

    2015-12-01

    Thiazolidinediones, a class of medications indicated for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, reduce inflammation and have been shown to provide a therapeutic benefit in animal models of Parkinson disease. We examined the association between treatment with thiazolidinediones and the onset of Parkinson disease in older individuals. We performed a cohort study of 29,397 Medicare patients enrolled in state pharmaceutical benefits programs who initiated treatment with thiazolidinediones or sulfonylureas during the years 1997 through 2005 and had no prior diagnosis of Parkinson disease. New users of thiazolidinediones were propensity score matched to new users of sulfonylureas and followed to determine whether they were diagnosed with Parkinson disease. We used Cox proportional hazards models to compare time to diagnosis of Parkinson disease in the propensity score-matched populations. To assess the association with duration of use, we performed several analyses that required longer continuous use of medications. In the primary analysis, thiazolidinedione users had a hazard ratio for a diagnosis of Parkinson disease of 1.09 (95% confidence interval: 0.71, 1.66) when compared with sulfonylurea users. Increasing the duration-of-use requirements to 10 months did not substantially change the association; the hazard ratios ranged from 1.00 (95% confidence interval: 0.49, 2.05) to 1.17 (95% confidence interval: 0.60, 2.25). Thiazolidinedione use was not associated with a longer time to diagnosis of Parkinson disease than was sulfonylurea use, regardless of duration of exposure.

  2. Retrospective Cohort Study of Hydrotherapy in Labor.

    PubMed

    Vanderlaan, Jennifer

    To describe the use of hydrotherapy for pain management in labor. This was a retrospective cohort study. Hospital labor and delivery unit in the Northwestern United States, 2006 through 2013. Women in a nurse-midwifery-managed practice who were eligible to use hydrotherapy during labor. Descriptive statistics were used to report the proportion of participants who initiated and discontinued hydrotherapy and duration of hydrotherapy use. Logistic regression was used to provide adjusted odds ratios for characteristics associated with hydrotherapy use. Of the 327 participants included, 268 (82%) initiated hydrotherapy. Of those, 80 (29.9%) were removed from the water because they met medical exclusion criteria, and 24 (9%) progressed to pharmacologic pain management. The mean duration of tub use was 156.3 minutes (standard deviation = 122.7). Induction of labor was associated with declining the offer of hydrotherapy, and nulliparity was associated with medical removal from hydrotherapy. In a hospital that promoted hydrotherapy for pain management in labor, most women who were eligible initiated hydrotherapy. Hospital staff can estimate demand for hydrotherapy by being aware that hydrotherapy use is associated with nulliparity. Copyright © 2017 AWHONN, the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Digital Distribution of Public Health News Surrounding the Human Papillomavirus Vaccination: A Longitudinal Infodemiology Study.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, L Meghan; Tang, Tang; Ji, Kai; Ulrich-Schad, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    New media changes the dissemination of public health information and misinformation. During a guest appearance on the Today Show, US Representative Michele Bachmann claimed that human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines could cause "mental retardation". The purpose of this study is to explore how new media influences the type of public health information users access, as well as the impact to these platforms after a major controversy. Specifically, this study aims to examine the similarities and differences in the dissemination of news articles related to the HPV vaccination between Google News and Twitter, as well as how the content of news changed after Michele Bachmann's controversial comment. This study used a purposive sampling to draw the first 100 news articles that appeared on Google News and the first 100 articles that appeared on Twitter from August 1-October 31, 2011. Article tone, source, topics, concerns, references, publication date, and interactive features were coded. The intercoder reliability had a total agreement of .90. Results indicate that 44.0% of the articles (88/200) about the HPV vaccination had a positive tone, 32.5% (65/200) maintained a neutral tone, while 23.5% (47/200) presented a negative tone. Protection against diseases 82.0% (164/200), vaccine eligibility for females 75.5% (151/200), and side effects 59.0% (118/200) were the top three topics covered by these articles. Google News and Twitter articles significantly differed in article tone, source, topics, concerns covered, types of sources referenced in the article, and uses of interactive features. Most notably, topic focus changed from public health information towards political conversation after Bachmann's comment. Before the comment, the HPV vaccine news talked more often about vaccine dosing (P<.001), duration (P=.005), vaccine eligibility for females (P=.03), and protection against diseases (P=.04) than did the later pieces. After the controversy, the news topic shifted towards

  4. The Digital Distribution of Public Health News Surrounding the Human Papillomavirus Vaccination: A Longitudinal Infodemiology Study

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Tang; Ji, Kai; Ulrich-Schad, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Background New media changes the dissemination of public health information and misinformation. During a guest appearance on the Today Show, US Representative Michele Bachmann claimed that human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines could cause “mental retardation”. Objective The purpose of this study is to explore how new media influences the type of public health information users access, as well as the impact to these platforms after a major controversy. Specifically, this study aims to examine the similarities and differences in the dissemination of news articles related to the HPV vaccination between Google News and Twitter, as well as how the content of news changed after Michele Bachmann’s controversial comment. Methods This study used a purposive sampling to draw the first 100 news articles that appeared on Google News and the first 100 articles that appeared on Twitter from August 1-October 31, 2011. Article tone, source, topics, concerns, references, publication date, and interactive features were coded. The intercoder reliability had a total agreement of .90. Results Results indicate that 44.0% of the articles (88/200) about the HPV vaccination had a positive tone, 32.5% (65/200) maintained a neutral tone, while 23.5% (47/200) presented a negative tone. Protection against diseases 82.0% (164/200), vaccine eligibility for females 75.5% (151/200), and side effects 59.0% (118/200) were the top three topics covered by these articles. Google News and Twitter articles significantly differed in article tone, source, topics, concerns covered, types of sources referenced in the article, and uses of interactive features. Most notably, topic focus changed from public health information towards political conversation after Bachmann’s comment. Before the comment, the HPV vaccine news talked more often about vaccine dosing (P<.001), duration (P=.005), vaccine eligibility for females (P=.03), and protection against diseases (P=.04) than did the later pieces. After the

  5. Global teaching and training initiatives for emerging cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Jessica K; Santoyo-Vistrain, Rocío; Havelick, David; Cohen, Amy; Kalyesubula, Robert; Ajayi, Ikeoluwapo O; Mattsson, Jens G; Adami, Hans-Olov; Dalal, Shona

    2012-09-01

    A striking disparity exists across the globe, with essentially no large-scale longitudinal studies ongoing in regions that will be significantly affected by the oncoming non-communicable disease epidemic. The successful implementation of cohort studies in most low-resource research environments presents unique challenges that may be aided by coordinated training programs. Leaders of emerging cohort studies attending the First World Cohort Integration Workshop were surveyed about training priorities, unmet needs and potential cross-cohort solutions to these barriers through an electronic pre-workshop questionnaire and focus groups. Cohort studies representing India, Mexico, Nigeria, South Africa, Sweden, Tanzania and Uganda described similar training needs, including on-the-job training, data analysis software instruction, and database and bio-bank management. A lack of funding and protected time for training activities were commonly identified constraints. Proposed solutions include a collaborative cross-cohort teaching platform with web-based content and interactive teaching methods for a range of research personnel. An international network for research mentorship and idea exchange, and modifying the graduate thesis structure were also identified as key initiatives. Cross-cohort integrated educational initiatives will efficiently meet shared needs, catalyze the development of emerging cohorts, speed closure of the global disparity in cohort research, and may fortify scientific capacity development in low-resource settings.

  6. Global teaching and training initiatives for emerging cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    Paulus, Jessica K.; Santoyo-Vistrain, Rocío; Havelick, David; Cohen, Amy; Kalyesubula, Robert; Ajayi, Ikeoluwapo O.; Mattsson, Jens G.; Adami, Hans-Olov; Dalal, Shona

    2015-01-01

    A striking disparity exists across the globe, with essentially no large-scale longitudinal studies ongoing in regions that will be significantly affected by the oncoming non-communicable disease epidemic. The successful implementation of cohort studies in most low-resource research environments presents unique challenges that may be aided by coordinated training programs. Leaders of emerging cohort studies attending the First World Cohort Integration Workshop were surveyed about training priorities, unmet needs and potential cross-cohort solutions to these barriers through an electronic pre-workshop questionnaire and focus groups. Cohort studies representing India, Mexico, Nigeria, South Africa, Sweden, Tanzania and Uganda described similar training needs, including on-the-job training, data analysis software instruction, and database and bio-bank management. A lack of funding and protected time for training activities were commonly identified constraints. Proposed solutions include a collaborative cross-cohort teaching platform with web-based content and interactive teaching methods for a range of research personnel. An international network for research mentorship and idea exchange, and modifying the graduate thesis structure were also identified as key initiatives. Cross-cohort integrated educational initiatives will efficiently meet shared needs, catalyze the development of emerging cohorts, speed closure of the global disparity in cohort research, and may fortify scientific capacity development in low-resource settings. PMID:23856451

  7. Cancerl cells 5. Papillomaviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, B.M.; Brandsma, J.L. ); Taichman, L.B. )

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 30 selections. Some of the titles are: Elements that Control the Transcription of Genital Human Papillomavirus Type 18; Human Paillomavirus Gene Expression; RNA Probes to Analyze Human Papillomavirus Gene Expression in Squamous Papilloma of the Respiratory Tract; Expression of Human Papillomavirus Type-1 E4 Gene Products in Warts; and Underreplication of Human Papillomavirus Type-1 DNA in Cultures of Foreskin Keratinocytes.

  8. Cohort profile: The lidA Cohort Study—a German Cohort Study on Work, Age, Health and Work Participation

    PubMed Central

    Hasselhorn, Hans Martin; Peter, Richard; Rauch, Angela; Schröder, Helmut; Swart, Enno; Bender, Stefan; du Prel, Jean-Baptist; Ebener, Melanie; March, Stefanie; Trappmann, Mark; Steinwede, Jacob; Müller, Bernd Hans

    2014-01-01

    The lidA Cohort Study (German Cohort Study on Work, Age, Health and Work Participation) was set up to investigate and follow the effects of work and work context on the physical and psychological health of the ageing workforce in Germany and subsequently on work participation. Cohort participants are initially employed people subject to social security contributions and born in either 1959 (n = 2909) or 1965 (n = 3676). They were personally interviewed in their homes in 2011 and will be visited every 3 years. Data collection comprises socio-demographic data, work and private exposures, work ability, work and work participation attitudes, health, health-related behaviour, personality and attitudinal indicators. Employment biographies are assessed using register data. Subjective health reports and physical strength measures are complemented by health insurance claims data, where permission was given. A conceptual framework has been developed for the lidA Cohort Study within which three confirmatory sub-models assess the interdependencies of work and health considering age, gender and socioeconomic status. The first set of the data will be available to the scientific community by 2015. Access will be given by the Research Data Centre of the German Federal Employment Agency at the Institute for Employment Research (http://fdz.iab.de/en.aspx). PMID:24618186

  9. Prevalence and genotype distribution of human papillomavirus infection of the cervix in Spain: the CLEOPATRE study.

    PubMed

    Castellsagué, Xavier; Iftner, Thomas; Roura, Esther; Vidart, José Antonio; Kjaer, Susanne K; Bosch, F Xavier; Muñoz, Nubia; Palacios, Santiago; San Martin Rodriguez, Maria; Serradell, Laurence; Torcel-Pagnon, Laurence; Cortes, Javier

    2012-06-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a necessary cause of cervical cancer. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of cervical HPV infection and HPV type-specific distribution among women attending cervical cancer screening in Spain during 2007 and 2008. Women aged 18-65 years were recruited according to an age-stratified sampling method. Liquid-based cervical samples were collected and analyzed for cytology, HPV detection, and genotyping. HPV genotyping was determined using the INNO-LiPA HPV Genotyping Extra Reverse Hybridization Line Probe Assay. Prevalence estimates were age-standardized using 2001 Spanish census data. The present study included 3,261 women. Age-standardized HC2-based HPV prevalence was 14.3% (95% CI, 13.1-15.5) among women aged 18-65 years, and 28.8% (26.6-31.1) among women aged 18-25 years. High-risk HPV types were detected in 12.2% (95% CI, 11.1-13.4) of HPV-tested women, representing 84.0% of HPV-positive samples. Multiple infections were present in 4.1% (95% CI, 3.4-4.8) of HPV-tested women (25.0% of HPV-positive samples). The most common high-risk HPV-types among HPV-tested women were 16 (2.9%), 52 (1.8%), 51 (1.6%), 31 (1.3%), and 66 (1.2%). HPV-type 16 was present in 16.9% of HPV-positive samples. One or more of the HPV vaccine types 6/11/16/18 were detected in 3.8% of HPV-tested women (22.1% of HPV-positive samples). Though not a true population-based survey, this study provides valuable baseline data for future assessment of the impact of current HPV vaccination programs in Spain. The high prevalence of HPV infection among young women may reflect recent changes in sexual behavior.

  10. Distribution of genital wart human papillomavirus genotypes in China: a multi-center study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Lihong; Ci, Puwa; Shi, Jufang; Zhai, Kan; Feng, Xiaoli; Colombara, Danny; Wang, Wei; Qiao, Youlin; Chen, Wen; Wu, Yuping

    2013-10-01

    Although it is understood that low-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes are associated with genital warts, there have been very few published studies reporting the genotype-specific prevalence of HPV among Chinese population. The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence of HPV genotypes in genital warts across China, and thus to evaluate the potential benefit of a quadrivalent HPV vaccine in this population. The tissue samples of a total of 1,005 genital warts cases were collected from seven geographical regions of China. HPV genotypes were analyzed using the general primer PCR and sequence-based typing method. Prevalence differences between sexes, geographical regions and age groups were assessed. The overall prevalence of HPV DNA in genital warts patients was 88.7% (891/1,005). Low-risk genotypes predominated, with a prevalence of 78.1% (785/1,005). The most prevalent genotypes were HPV-6 (41.3%), HPV-11 (37.6%) and HPV-16 (10.4%). Among HPV positive patients, single infections were more frequent (866/891, 97.2%) than co-infections (25/891, 2.8%). Both the overall prevalence of HPV DNA and that of HPV-6/-11/-16 (positive for any of the three types) decreased with age (P-trend = 0.010 and P-trend = 0.025, respectively). The prevalence of HPV-6/-11 (positive for either HPV type) and HPV-16 varied by geographic region (P = 0.003 and P ≤ 0.001, respectively). The prevalence of HPV-16 in female patients between urban and rural areas showed a marginally significant difference (P = 0.05). In sum, the results provide strong evidence that, in China, the most prevalent HPV genotypes in genital warts are HPV-6, HPV-11 and HPV-16. This indicates that a quadrivalent HPV vaccine may decrease the incidence of genital warts in the future. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Validation of the pooled cohort risk score in an Asian population - a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Chia, Yook Chin; Lim, Hooi Min; Ching, Siew Mooi

    2014-11-20

    The Pooled Cohort Risk Equation was introduced by the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and American Heart Association (AHA) 2013 in their Blood Cholesterol Guideline to estimate the 10-year atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk. However, absence of Asian ethnicity in the contemporary cohorts and limited studies to examine the use of the risk score limit the applicability of the equation in an Asian population. This study examines the validity of the pooled cohort risk score in a primary care setting and compares the cardiovascular risk using both the pooled cohort risk score and the Framingham General Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) risk score. This is a 10-year retrospective cohort study of randomly selected patients aged 40-79 years. Baseline demographic data, co-morbidities and cardiovascular (CV) risk parameters were captured from patient records in 1998. Pooled cohort risk score and Framingham General CVD risk score for each patient were computed. All ASCVD events (nonfatal myocardial infarction, coronary heart disease (CHD) death, fatal and nonfatal stroke) occurring from 1998-2007 were recorded. A total of 922 patients were studied. In 1998, mean age was 57.5 ± 8.8 years with 66.7% female. There were 47% diabetic patients and 59.9% patients receiving anti-hypertensive treatment. More than 98% of patients with pooled cohort risk score ≥7.5% had FRS >10%. A total of 45 CVD events occurred, 22 (7.2%) in males and 23 (3.7%) in females. The median pooled cohort risk score for the population was 10.1 (IQR 4.7-20.6) while the actual ASCVD events that occurred was 4.9% (45/922). Our study showed moderate discrimination with AUC of 0.63. There was good calibration with Hosmer-Lemeshow test χ2 = 12.6, P = 0.12. The pooled cohort risk score appears to overestimate CV risk but this apparent over-prediction could be a result of treatment. In the absence of a validated score in an untreated population, the pooled cohort risk score appears to be

  12. Investing in Prospective Cohorts for Etiologic Study of Occupational Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Blair, A.; Hines, C.J.; Thomas, K.W.; Alavanja, M.C.R.; Beane Freeman, L.E.; Hoppin, J.A.; Kamel, F.; Lynch, C.F.; Lubin, J.H.; Silverman, D.T.; Whelan, E.; Zahm, S. H.; Sandler, D. P.

    2015-01-01

    Prospective cohorts have played a major role in understanding the contribution of diet, physical activity, medical conditions, and genes to the development of many diseases, but have not been widely used for occupational exposures. Studies in agriculture are an exception. We draw upon our experience using this design to study agricultural workers to identify conditions that might foster use of prospective cohorts to study other occupational settings. Prospective cohort studies are perceived by many as the strongest epidemiologic design. It allows updating of information on exposure and other factors, collection of biologic samples before disease diagnosis for biomarker studies, assessment of effect modification by genes, lifestyle, and other occupational exposures, and evaluation of a wide range of health outcomes. Increased use of prospective cohorts would be beneficial in identifying hazardous exposures in the workplace. Occupational epidemiologists should seek opportunities to initiate prospective cohorts to investigate high priority, occupational exposures. PMID:25603935

  13. Comparative effectiveness study on human papillomavirus detection methods used in the cervical cancer screening programme

    PubMed Central

    Nygård, Mari; Røysland, Kjetil; Campbell, Suzanne; Dillner, Joakim

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To compare the short-term and long-term effectiveness of human papillomavirus (HPV) tests in Norwegian Cervical Cancer Screening Programme (NCCSP). Design Nationwide register-based prospective follow-up study. Setting In 2005, the NCCSP implemented HPV testing in follow-up of unsatisfactory, atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL) cytology. Participants 19 065 women with repeat cytology and HPV test after unsatisfactory ASC-US or LSIL screening result in 2005–2009. Interventions Through individual registry linkages we observed how women were treated in the regular medical care. Main outcome measures We estimated cumulative incidence of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse (CIN2+) in 6 months and 3 years after repeat cytology and HPV test. Patients diagnosed with CIN2+ in 6 months and 3 years were assessed for initial HPV positivity. Results 5392 had ASC-US/LSIL and 13 673 had normal/unsatisfactory repeat cytology; for HPV detection 4715 used AMPLICOR HPV Test (Roche Diagnostics, Basel, Switzerland), 9162 Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) High-Risk HPV DNA Test (QIAGEN, Gaithersburg, Maryland, USA) and 5188 PreTect HPV-Proofer (NorChip, Klokkarstua, Norway). Among those with ASC-US/LSIL repeat cytology, 3-year risk of CIN2+ was 15-fold in Amplicor/HC2-positives compared with Amplicor/HC2-negatives and sevenfold in Proofer-positives compared with Proofer-negatives; a 3-year risk of CIN2+ was 2.1% (95% CI 0.7% to 3.4%) in Amplicor-negatives and 7.2% (95% CI 5.4% to 8.9%) in Proofer-negatives. Close to 100% of patients with CIN2+ diagnosed within 6 months tested positive to HPV (all methods). Considering all patients diagnosed with CIN2+ in 3-year follow-up, 97% were initially positive in the Amplicor group and more than 94% in the HC2 group, compared with less than 80% in the Proofer group. Conclusions While the long-term evaluation of new screening routines

  14. Cervical cancer treatment costs and cost-effectiveness analysis of human papillomavirus vaccination in Vietnam: a PRIME modeling study.

    PubMed

    Van Minh, Hoang; My, Nguyen Thi Tuyet; Jit, Mark

    2017-05-15

    Cervical cancer is currently the leading cause of cancer mortality among women in South Vietnam and the second leading cause of cancer mortality in North Vietnam. Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination has the potential to substantially decrease this burden. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that a cost-effectiveness analysis of HPV vaccination is conducted before nationwide introduction. The Papillomavirus Rapid Interface for Modeling and Economics (PRIME) model was used to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of HPV vaccine introduction. A costing study based on expert panel discussions, interviews and hospital case note reviews was conducted to explore the cost of cervical cancer care. The cost of cervical cancer treatment ranged from US$368 - 11400 depending on the type of hospital and treatment involved. Under Gavi-negotiated prices of US$4.55, HPV vaccination is likely to be very cost-effective with an incremental cost per disability-adjusted life year (DALY) averted in the range US$780 - 1120. However, under list prices for Cervarix and Gardasil in Vietnam, the incremental cost per DALY averted for HPV vaccination can exceed US$8000. HPV vaccine introduction appears to be economically attractive only if Vietnam is able to procure the vaccine at Gavi prices. This highlights the importance of initiating a nationwide vaccination programme while such prices are still available.

  15. Cohort Profile: The JS High School study (JSHS): a cohort study of Korean adolescents.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dong Phil; Lee, Joo Young; Kim, Hyeon Chang

    2015-05-06

    Major aetiologies of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases begin in childhood and atherosclerotic vascular abnormalities can be observed among children and adolescents. Adolescent cohort studies have important advantages because they can observe earlier changes in vascular structure and function. The purpose of the JS High School study (JSHS) is to identify biomarkers predicting or indicating early structural and functional vascular change in adolescents. The JSHS is a prospective cohort study of a Korean adolescent population. The target population of the JSHS was first-graders (aged 14 to17 years) at a high school of South Korea. Enrolment and baseline examinations were conducted in years 2007, 2010, 2011 and 2012. Among the total eligible population of 1115 students, 1071 (96.1%) participated in the study and completed all baseline examinations. Informed consent forms were obtained from each participant and his/her parent or guardian. Baseline examinations include: questionnaires on demographics, health behaviours, medical history, and depression symptoms; fasting blood analysis; anthropometric measurement; body impedance analysis; blood pressure measurement; radial artery tonometry; bone densitometry; pulmonary function tests; and carotid ultrasonography. Participants enrolled from 2007 through 2012 were re-examined after 30 months of follow-up, and those who enrolled in 2012 were re-examined after 24 months of follow-up. The corresponding author may be contacted for potential collaboration and data access.

  16. Human Alpha and Beta Papillomaviruses Use Different Synonymous Codon Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Cladel, Nancy M.; Bertotto, Alex; Christensen, Neil D.

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses use rare codons relative to their hosts. It has been theorized that this is a mechanism to allow the virus to escape immune surveillance. In the present study we examined the codings of four major genes of 21 human alpha (mucosatropic) viruses and 16 human beta (cutaneous-tropic) viruses. We compared the codon usage of different genes from a given papillomavirus and also the same genes from different papillomaviruses. Our data showed that codon usage was not always uniform between two genes of a given papillomavirus or between the same genes of papillomaviruses from different genera. We speculate as to why this might be and conclude that codon usage in the papillomaviruses may not only play a role in facilitating escape from immune surveillance but may also underlie some of the unanswered questions in the papillomavirus field. PMID:20157772

  17. Human alpha and beta papillomaviruses use different synonymous codon profiles.

    PubMed

    Cladel, Nancy M; Bertotto, Alex; Christensen, Neil D

    2010-06-01

    Human papillomaviruses use rare codons relative to their hosts. It has been theorized that this is a mechanism to allow the virus to escape immune surveillance. In the present study, we examined the codings of four major genes of 21 human alpha (mucosatropic) viruses and 16 human beta (cutaneous-tropic) viruses. We compared the codon usage of different genes from a given papillomavirus and also the same genes from different papillomaviruses. Our data showed that codon usage was not always uniform between two genes of a given papillomavirus or between the same genes of papillomaviruses from different genera. We speculate as to why this might be and conclude that codon usage in the papillomaviruses may not only play a role in facilitating escape from immune surveillance but may also underlie some of the unanswered questions in the papillomavirus field.

  18. What Drives Teacher Engagement: A Study of Different Age Cohorts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guglielmi, Dina; Bruni, Ilaria; Simbula, Silvia; Fraccaroli, Franco; Depolo, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Despite the growing body of research on work engagement, little is known about what drives work engagement among different age cohorts. This study aims to investigate whether engagement varies across age cohorts and examines the job resources that foster teacher engagement. A questionnaire was distributed to 537 teachers who were employed in…

  19. The unseen sample in cohort studies: estimation of its size and effect. Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Hoover, D R; Muñoz, A; Carey, V; Odaka, N; Taylor, J M; Chmiel, J S; Armstrong, J; Vermund, S H

    1991-12-01

    Recruitment of disease-free subjects into cohort studies and measurement of their time from exposure/infection to disease selectively excludes individuals (the unseen sample) who had earlier exposure and who have shorter times to disease. The unseen and observed samples may differ in other characteristics in addition to incubation period and exposure/infection time. For data with known truncation times, we develop non-parametric maximum likelihood estimates of the size, exposure/infection dates and distribution of incubation time in the unseen sample. We provide procedures to estimate and compensate for the biasing effects due to exclusion of the unseen sample in descriptive and survival analysis. We give consistency properties of these estimates and assess variability using bootstrap methods. One can use imputation to derive the above estimates from data with unknown truncation times that have been estimated parametrically. Application is made to an AIDS cohort study of over 5000 homosexual men. Important estimates obtained from this application are the annual seroconversion rates from 1978 to 1983, not otherwise obtainable in this study population.

  20. Design of a long-term follow-up effectiveness, immunogenicity and safety study of women who received the 9-valent human papillomavirus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Luxembourg, Alain; Kjaer, Susanne K; Nygard, Mari; Ellison, Misoo C; Group, Thomas; Marshall, J Brooke; Radley, David; Saah, Alfred

    2017-01-01

    The 9-valent human papillomavirus (HPV) (9vHPV) vaccine targets four HPV types (6/11/16/18) also covered by the quadrivalent HPV (qHPV) vaccine and five additional types (31/33/45/52/58). Vaccine efficacy to prevent HPV infection and disease was established in a Phase III clinical study in women 16-26years of age. A long-term follow-up (LTFU) study has been initiated as an extension of the Phase III clinical study to assess effectiveness of the 9vHPV vaccine up to at least 14years after the start of vaccination. It includes participants from Denmark, Norway and Sweden and uses national health registries from these countries to assess incidence of cervical pre-cancers and cancers due to the 7 oncogenic types in the vaccine (HPV 16/18/31/33/45/52/58). Incidences will be compared to the estimated incidence rate in an unvaccinated cohort of similar age and risk level. This LTFU study uses a unique design: it is an extension of a Phase III clinical study and also has elements of an epidemiological study (i.e., endpoints based on standard clinical practice; surveillance using searches from health registries); it uses a control chart method to determine whether vaccine effectiveness may be waning. Control chart methods which were developed in industrial and manufacturing settings for process and production monitoring, can be used to monitor disease incidence in real-time and promptly detect a decrease in vaccine effectiveness. Experience from this innovative study design may be applicable to other medicinal products when long-term outcomes need to be assessed, there is no control group, or outcomes are rare. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A cohort study of bacteremic pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Guillamet, Cristina Vazquez; Vazquez, Rodrigo; Noe, Jonas; Micek, Scott T.; Kollef, Marin H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bacteremic pneumonia is usually associated with greater mortality. However, risk factors associated with hospital mortality in bacteremic pneumonia are inadequately described. The study was a retrospective cohort study, conducted in Barnes-Jewish Hospital (2008–2015). For purposes of this investigation, antibiotic susceptibility was determined according to ceftriaxone susceptibility, as ceftriaxone represents the antimicrobial agent most frequently recommended for hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia as opposed to nosocomial pneumonia. Two multivariable analyses were planned: the first model included resistance to ceftriaxone as a variable, whereas the second model included the various antibiotic-resistant species (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacteriaceae). In all, 1031 consecutive patients with bacteremic pneumonia (mortality 37.1%) were included. The most common pathogens associated with infection were S aureus (34.1%; methicillin resistance 54.0%), Enterobacteriaceae (28.0%), P aeruginosa (10.6%), anaerobic bacteria (7.3%), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (5.6%). Compared with ceftriaxone-susceptible pathogens (46.8%), ceftriaxone-resistant pathogens (53.2%) were significantly more likely to receive inappropriate initial antibiotic treatment (IIAT) (27.9% vs 7.1%; P < 0.001) and to die during hospitalization (41.5% vs 32.0%; P = 0.001). The first logistic regression analysis identified IIAT with the greatest odds ratio (OR) for mortality (OR 2.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.5–3.2, P < 0.001). Other independent predictors of mortality included age, mechanical ventilation, immune suppression, prior hospitalization, prior antibiotic administration, septic shock, comorbid conditions, and severity of illness. In the second multivariable analysis that included the antibiotic-resistant species, IIAT was still associated with excess mortality, and P aeruginosa infection was

  2. Cohort profile: the Spanish WORKing life Social Security (WORKss) cohort study.

    PubMed

    López Gómez, María Andrée; Durán, Xavier; Zaballa, Elena; Sanchez-Niubo, Albert; Delclos, George L; Benavides, Fernando G

    2016-03-07

    The global economy is changing the labour market and social protection systems in Europe. The effect of both changes on health needs to be monitored in view of an ageing population and the resulting increase in prevalence of chronic health conditions. The Spanish WORKing life Social Security (WORKss) cohort study provides unique longitudinal data to study the impact of labour trajectories and employment conditions on health, in terms of sickness absence, permanent disability and death. The WORKss cohort originated from the Continuous Working Life Sample (CWLS) generated by the General Directorate for the Organization of the Social Security in Spain. The CWLS contains a 4% representative sample of all individuals in contact with the Social Security system. The WORKss cohort exclusively includes individuals with a labour trajectory from 1981 or later. In 2004, the cohort was initiated with 1,022 ,79 Social Security members: 840,770 (82.2%) contributors and 182,009 (17.8%) beneficiaries aged 16 and older. The WORKss cohort includes demographic characteristics, chronological data about employment history, retirement, permanent disability and death. These data make possible the measurement of incidence of permanent disability, the number of potential years of working life lost, and the number of contracts and inactive periods with the Social Security system. The WORKss cohort was linked to temporary sickness absence registries to study medical diagnoses that lead to permanent disability and consequently to an earlier exit from the labour market in unhealthy conditions. Thanks to its administrative source, the WORKss cohort study will continue follow-up in the coming years, keeping the representativeness of the Spanish population affiliated to the Social Security system. The linkage between the WORKss cohort and temporary sickness absence registries is envisioned to continue. Future plans include the linkage of the cohort with mortality registries. Published by the BMJ

  3. Estimation of Error Components in Cohort Studies: A Cross-Cohort Analysis of Dutch Mathematics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keuning, Jos; Hemker, Bas

    2014-01-01

    The data collection of a cohort study requires making many decisions. Each decision may introduce error in the statistical analyses conducted later on. In the present study, a procedure was developed for estimation of the error made due to the composition of the sample, the item selection procedure, and the test equating process. The math results…

  4. Estimation of Error Components in Cohort Studies: A Cross-Cohort Analysis of Dutch Mathematics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keuning, Jos; Hemker, Bas

    2014-01-01

    The data collection of a cohort study requires making many decisions. Each decision may introduce error in the statistical analyses conducted later on. In the present study, a procedure was developed for estimation of the error made due to the composition of the sample, the item selection procedure, and the test equating process. The math results…

  5. Overview of ongoing cohort and dietary studies in the Arctic

    PubMed Central

    Weihe, Pál; Bjerregaard, Peter; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva; Dudarev, Alexey; Halling, Jónrit; Hansen, Solrunn; Muckle, Gina; Nøst, Therese; Odland, Jon Øyvind; Petersen, Maria Skaalum; Rautio, Arja; Veyhe, Anna Sofía; Wennberg, Maria; Bergdahl, Ingvar

    2016-01-01

    This article gives an overview of the ongoing cohort and dietary studies underlying the assessment of population health in the Arctic. The emphasis here is on a description of the material, methods and results or preliminary results for each study. Detailed exposure information is available in an article in this journal, whereas another paper describes the effects associated with contaminant exposure in the Arctic. The cohort descriptions have been arranged geographically, beginning in Norway and moving east to Finland, Sweden, Russia and the other Arctic countries and ultimately to the Faroe Islands. No cohort studies have been reported for Alaska or Iceland. PMID:27974135

  6. Anesthesia and Poliomyelitis: A Matched Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Van Alstine, Luke W; Gunn, Paul W; Schroeder, Darrell R; Hanson, Andrew C; Sorenson, Eric J; Martin, David P

    2016-06-01

    Poliomyelitis is a viral infectious disease caused by 1 of the 3 strains of poliovirus. The World Health Organization launched an eradication campaign in 1988. Although the number of cases of poliomyelitis has drastically declined, eradication has not yet been achieved, and there are a substantial number of survivors of the disease. Survivors of poliomyelitis present a unique set of challenges to the anesthesiologist. The scientific literature regarding the anesthetic management of survivors of poliomyelitis, however, is limited and primarily experiential in nature. Using a retrospective, matched cohort study, we sought to more precisely characterize the anesthetic implications of poliomyelitis and to determine what risks, if any, may be present for patients with a history of the disease. Using the Mayo Clinic Life Sciences System Data Discovery and Query Builder, study subjects were identified as those with a history of paralytic poliomyelitis who had undergone major surgery at Mayo Clinic Rochester between 2005 and 2009. For each case, 2 sex- and age-matched controls that underwent the same surgical procedure during the study period were randomly selected from a pool of possible controls. Medical records were manually interrogated with respect to demographic variables, comorbid conditions, operative and anesthetic course, and postoperative course. We analyzed 100 cases with 2:1 matched controls and found that the peri- and postoperative courses were very similar for both groups of patients. Pain scores, postanesthesia care unit admission, length of postanesthesia care unit stay, intensive care unit admission, length of intensive care unit stay, and initial extubation location were not significantly different between the 2 groups. Looking at pulmonary complications in our primary outcome, there was no significant difference between the 2 groups (17% vs 14% for polio versus control, respectively; conditional logistic regression odds ratio = 1.5; 95% confidence

  7. Molecular and immunohistochemical studies do not support a role for papillomaviruses in canine oral squamous cell carcinoma development.

    PubMed

    Munday, John S; French, Adrienne; Harvey, Catherine J

    2015-05-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) are common neoplasms of dogs and are of unknown cause. Whereas papillomaviruses (PVs) are an established cause of human OSCCs, few studies have investigated canine OSCCs for a PV aetiology. In humans, a PV aetiology can be determined by detecting PV DNA and PV-induced increased p16(CDKN2A) protein (p16) within the OSCC. In this study, PCR, using four different primer sets and p16 immunohistochemistry, was used to evaluate 28 canine OSCCs for a possible PV aetiology. None of the primers amplified PV DNA from any of the OSCCs although four neoplasms contained intense p16 immunostaining. Intense p16 immunostaining would indicate a PV aetiology in a human OSCC but the absence of PV DNA suggests that the increase in p16 was not due to PV infection. Overall the results indicated that PVs are not a significant cause of canine OSCCs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Association Between Cervical Human Papillomavirus Infection and Subsequent HIV Acquisition in Tanzanian and Ugandan Women: A Nested Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Katherine E; Baisley, Kathy; Grosskurth, Heiner; Vallely, Andrew; Kapiga, Saidi; Vandepitte, Judith; Kamali, Anatoli; De Sanjosé, Silvia; Changalucha, John; Hayes, Richard; Watson-Jones, Deborah

    2016-07-01

    This study was performed to analyze the associations between cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquisition, using cervical samples from previous studies in Tanzania and Uganda. A total of 161 adult women who acquired HIV infection during follow-up and 464 individually matched HIV-seronegative controls were selected from 5 cohorts of women working in bars and recreational facilities. Stored cervical samples were tested for 37 HPV genotypes, using a polymerase chain reaction assay (Roche Linear Array genotyping assay). Multivariate matched analysis using conditional logistic regression was performed to evaluate HPV infection, persistence, and clearance as predictors of HIV acquisition. HIV seroconverters were significantly more likely than controls to frequently drink alcohol and to be infected with Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, or herpes simplex virus type 2. There was no evidence of an association between HIV acquisition and any detectable HPV at the visit prior to HIV seroconversion (adjusted odds ratio, 1.02; 95% confidence interval, .66-1.57) or between HIV acquisition and persistent HPV infection (defined as 2 positive HPV genotype-specific test results at least 6 months apart), cleared HPV infection (defined as a positive HPV test result followed by negative HPV genotype-specific test result), or newly acquired HPV infection, compared with HPV-negative women. There was no evidence of association between HPV infection status and subsequent HIV acquisition. These results stand in contrast to other observational studies. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  9. Analysis of longitudinal multivariate outcome data from couples cohort studies: application to HPV transmission dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiangrong; Wang, Mei-Cheng; Gray, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    We consider a specific situation of correlated data where multiple outcomes are repeatedly measured on each member of a couple. Such multivariate longitudinal data from couples may exhibit multi-faceted correlations which can be further complicated if there are polygamous partnerships. An example is data from cohort studies on human papillomavirus (HPV) transmission dynamics in heterosexual couples. HPV is a common sexually transmitted disease with 14 known oncogenic types causing anogenital cancers. The binary outcomes on the multiple types measured in couples over time may introduce inter-type, intra-couple, and temporal correlations. Simple analysis using generalized estimating equations or random effects models lacks interpretability and cannot fully utilize the available information. We developed a hybrid modeling strategy using Markov transition models together with pairwise composite likelihood for analyzing such data. The method can be used to identify risk factors associated with HPV transmission and persistence, estimate difference in risks between male-to-female and female-to-male HPV transmission, compare type-specific transmission risks within couples, and characterize the inter-type and intra-couple associations. Applying the method to HPV couple data collected in a Ugandan male circumcision (MC) trial, we assessed the effect of MC and the role of gender on risks of HPV transmission and persistence. PMID:26195849

  10. Nested case-control studies in cohorts with competing events.

    PubMed

    Wolkewitz, Martin; Cooper, Ben S; Palomar-Martinez, Mercedes; Olaechea-Astigarraga, Pedro; Alvarez-Lerma, Francisco; Schumacher, Martin

    2014-01-01

    In nested case-control studies, incidence density sampling is the time-dependent matching procedure to approximate hazard ratios. The cumulative incidence function can also be estimated if information from the full cohort is used. In the presence of competing events, however, the cumulative incidence function depends on the hazard of the disease of interest and on the competing events hazard. Using hospital-acquired infection as an example (full cohort), we propose a sampling method for nested case-control studies to estimate subdistribution hazard ratios. With further information on the full cohort, the cumulative incidence function for the event of interest can then be estimated as well.

  11. Interactive computer program for optimal designs of longitudinal cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Tekle, Fetene B; Tan, Frans E S; Berger, Martijn P F

    2009-05-01

    Many large scale longitudinal cohort studies have been carried out or are ongoing in different fields of science. Such studies need a careful planning to obtain the desired quality of results with the available resources. In the past, a number of researches have been performed on optimal designs for longitudinal studies. However, there was no computer program yet available to help researchers to plan their longitudinal cohort design in an optimal way. A new interactive computer program for the optimization of designs of longitudinal cohort studies is therefore presented. The computer program helps users to identify the optimal cohort design with an optimal number of repeated measurements per subject and an optimal allocations of time points within a given study period. Further, users can compute the loss in relative efficiencies of any other alternative design compared to the optimal one. The computer program is described and illustrated using a practical example.

  12. Public perceptions of cohort studies and biobanks in Germany.

    PubMed

    Starkbaum, Johannes; Gottweis, Herbert; Gottweis, Ursula; Kleiser, Christina; Linseisen, Jakob; Meisinger, Christa; Kamtsiuris, Panagiotis; Moebus, Susanne; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Börm, Sonja; Wichmann, H-Erich

    2014-04-01

    Cohort studies and biobank projects have led to public discussions in several European countries in the past. In Germany, many medium-sized studies are currently running successfully in terms of respondent rates. However, EU-wide research on general public perceptions of biobanks and cohort studies have shown that Germany is among those countries where people express the highest reluctance for providing body material and other data for research purposes. Because of early efforts of the just-initiated German National Cohort Study, we are able to begin to investigate in greater detail how various groups of people across Germany reflect and discuss the ongoing implementation of cohort studies and biobanking in Germany. Our research is based on 15 focus group discussions in four German regions, as well as on Eurobarometer poll data on biobanking.

  13. [Human papillomaviruses].

    PubMed

    Gross, G

    2003-10-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) infect exclusively the basal cells of the skin and of mucosal epithelia adjacent to the skin such as the mouth, the upper respiratory tract, the lower genital tract and the anal canal. HPV does not lead to a viremia. Basically there are three different types of HPV infection: Clinically visible lesions, subclinical HPV infections and latent HPV infections. Distinct HPV types induce morphologically and prognostically different clinical pictures. The most common HPV associated benign tumor of the skin is the common wart. Infections of the urogenitoanal tract with specific HPV-types are recognised as the most frequent sexually transmitted viral infections. So-called "high-risk" HPV-types (HPV16, 18 and others) are regarded by the world health organisation as important risk-factors for the development of genital cancer (mainly cervical cancer), anal cancer and upper respiratory tract cancer in both genders. Antiviral substances with a specific anti-HPV effect are so far unknown. Conventional therapies of benign skin warts and of mucosal warts are mainly nonspecific. They comprise tissue-destroying therapies such as electrocautery, cryotherapy and laser. In addition cytotoxic substances such as podophyllotoxin and systemic therapy with retinoids are in use. Systemically and topically administered immunotherapies represent a new approach for treatment. Both interferons and particularly the recently developed imiquimod, an interferon-alpha and cytokine-inductor lead to better results and are better tolerated then conventional therapies. HPV-specific vaccines have been developed in the last 5 years and will be used in future for prevention and treatment of benign and malignant HPV-associated tumors of the genitoanal tract in both sexes.

  14. High-risk human papillomavirus is sexually transmitted: evidence from a follow-up study of virgins starting sexual activity (intercourse).

    PubMed

    Kjaer, S K; Chackerian, B; van den Brule, A J; Svare, E I; Paull, G; Walbomers, J M; Schiller, J T; Bock, J E; Sherman, M E; Lowy, D R; Meijer, C L

    2001-02-01

    Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is generally considered to be sexually transmitted. However, nonsexual spread of the virus has also been suggested. The goal of this study was to assess: (a) the role of sexual intercourse in the transmission of HPV; (b) the determinants for seroconversion; and (c) the correlation between HPV DNA, abnormal cervical cytology, and serological response to HPV16. One hundred virgins and 105 monogamous women were randomly selected from a population-based cohort study in Copenhagen, Denmark, in which the women were examined twice with 2-year interval (interview, cervical swabs, Pap smear, blood samples). The presence of HPV DNA was determined by GP5+/6+ primers based HPV-PCR-EIA. HPV 16 virus-like particles (VLP) antibodies were detected by ELISA. All of the virgins were both HPV DNA negative and seronegative to VLP16, except for one woman who was weakly HPV 6 DNA positive. Only those virgins who initiated sexual activity became HPV DNA positive and/or VLP16 positive. The most important determinant of HPV DNA acquisition was the number of partners between the two examinations. The only significant risk factor for HPV 16 VLP seroconversion among women acquiring HPV DNA was HPV type. Our results show that sexual intercourse is important in the transmission of HPV, and that HPV 16 VLP seroconversion and the development of cervical lesions only occur after HPV transmission. Remarkably, no cervical lesions were found in HPV 16 DNA positive women who had seroconverted. Although based on small numbers, this may suggest that the development of antibodies had a protective effect.

  15. Genus beta human papillomaviruses and incidence of basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas of skin: population based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Karagas, Margaret R; Waterboer, Tim; Li, Zhongze; Nelson, Heather H; Michael, Kristina M; Bavinck, Jan Nico Bouwes; Perry, Ann E; Spencer, Steven K; Daling, Janet; Green, Adele C; Pawlita, Michael

    2010-07-08

    To investigate the association between genus beta human papillomaviruses and the incidence of non-melanocytic skin cancer in the general population. Population based case-control study. New Hampshire, USA. 2366 skin cancer cases and controls from the general population aged 25 to 74 years (663 squamous cell carcinoma, 898 basal cell carcinoma, 805 controls), with plasma samples tested for L1 antibodies to 16 genus beta human papillomaviruses by multiplex serology. Odds ratios for squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma associated with seropositivity to beta human papillomaviruses. Squamous cell carcinoma, but not basal cell carcinoma, cases had a higher prevalence of each of the individual beta human papillomaviruses assayed compared with controls. The odds ratios for squamous cell carcinoma increased with the number of beta types positive (odds ratio for one type positive 0.99 (95% confidence interval 0.74 to 1.33); two to three types positive 1.44 (1.03 to 2.01); four to eight types positive 1.51 (1.03 to 2.20); more than eight types positive 1.71 (1.12 to 2.62); P for trend (categorical)<0.001; P for trend (continuous)=0.003). With limited statistical power, the association was stronger among long term users of systemic glucocorticoids (odds ratio 3.21, 1.22 to 8.44) than among non-users (1.23, 0.97 to 1.55). These findings support a relation between genus beta human papillomavirus infection and the incidence of squamous cell carcinoma of the skin in the general population, as well as potential enhancement of risk by immunosuppression.

  16. The clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of primary human papillomavirus cervical screening in England: extended follow-up of the ARTISTIC randomised trial cohort through three screening rounds.

    PubMed

    C Kitchener, Henry; Canfell, Karen; Gilham, Clare; Sargent, Alexandra; Roberts, Chris; Desai, Mina; Peto, Julian

    2014-04-01

    The ARTISTIC (A Randomised Trial In Screening To Improve Cytology) trial originally reported after two rounds of primary cervical screening with human papillomavirus (HPV). Extended follow-up of the randomised trial cohort through a third round could provide valuable insight into the duration of protection of a negative HPV test, which could allow extended screening intervals. If HPV primary screening is to be considered in the national programme, then determining its cost-effectiveness is key, and a detailed economic analysis using ARTISTIC data is needed. (1) To determine the round 3 and cumulative rates of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade 2 or worse (2+) and CIN grade 3 or worse (CIN3+) between the revealed and concealed arms of ARTISTIC after three screening rounds over 6 years. (2) To compare the cumulative incidence of CIN2+ over three screening rounds following negative screening cytology with that following negative baseline HPV. (3) To determine whether or not HPV screening could safely extend the screening interval from 3 to 6 years. (4) To study the potential clinical utility of an increased cut-off of 2 relative light unit/mean control (RLU/Co) for Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) and HPV genotyping in primary cervical screening. (5) To determine the potential impact of HPV vaccination with Cervarix™ in terms of preventing abnormal cytology and CIN2+. (6) To determine the cost-effectiveness of HPV primary screening compared with current practice using cervical cytology in England. The ARTISTIC study cohort was recalled for a third round of screening 3 years after round 2 and 6 years following their enrolment to the study. Both arms of the original trial used a single protocol during round 3. ARTISTIC study cohort undergoing cervical screening in primary care in Greater Manchester, UK. Between July 2007 and September 2009, 8873 women participated in round 3; 6337 had been screened in round 2 and 2536 had not been screened since round 1. All women

  17. Association between sexually transmitted disease and church membership. A retrospective cohort study of two Danish religious minorities

    PubMed Central

    Kørup, Alex Kappel; Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Christensen, René dePont; Johansen, Christoffer; Søndergaard, Jens; Hvidt, Niels Christian

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Studies comprising Danish Seventh-day Adventists (SDAs) and Danish Baptists found that members have a lower risk of chronic diseases including cancer. Explanations have pointed to differences in lifestyle, but detailed aetiology has only been sparsely examined. Our objective was to investigate the incidence of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) among Danish SDAs and Baptists as a proxy for cancers related to sexual behaviour. Methods We followed the Danish Cohort of Religious Societies from 1977 to 2009, and linked it with national registers of all inpatient and outpatient care contacts using the National Patient Register. We compared the incidence of syphilis, gonorrhoea and chlamydia among members of the cohort with the general population. Results The cohort comprised 3119 SDA females, 1856 SDA males, 2056 Baptist females and 1467 Baptist males. For the entire cohort, we expected a total of 32.4 events of STD, and observed only 9. Female SDAs and Baptists aged 20–39 years had significant lower incidence of chlamydia (both p<0.001). Male SDAs and Baptists aged 20–39 years also had significant lower incidence of chlamydia (p<0.01 and p<0.05, respectively). No SDA members were diagnosed with gonorrhoea, when 3.4 events were expected, which, according to Hanley's ‘rule of three’, is a significant difference. No SDA or Baptist was diagnosed with syphilis. Conclusions The cohort shows significant lower incidence of STD, most likely including human papillomavirus, which may partly explain the lower incidence of cancers of the cervix, rectum, anus, head and neck. PMID:27016243

  18. Hyponatremic hypertensive syndrome - a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Devdeep; Sinha, Rajiv; Akhtar, Md Shakil; Saha, Agni Sekhar

    2017-01-01

    AIM To ascertain the frequency of hyponatremic hypertensive syndrome (HHS) in a cohort of children with hypertensive emergency in a tertiary pediatric hospital. METHODS A retrospective review was undertaken among children with hypertensive emergency admitted in our tertiary children hospital between June 2014 and December 2015 with an aim to identify any children with HHS. Three children with HHS were identified during this period. RESULTS The 3 patients with HHS presented with hypertensive emergency. They were initially managed with Labetalol infusion and thereafter switched to oral anti-hypertensives (combination of Nifedipine sustained release, Hydralazine and Beta Blocker). All 3 were diagnosed to have unilateral renal artery stenosis. One child was lost to follow up, whereas the other 2 underwent renal angioplasty which was followed with normalization of blood pressure. CONCLUSION Despite activation of renin angiotensin axis secondary to renal artery stenosis, these groups of children have significant hyponatremia. Renal re-vascularisation produces excellent results in most of them. PMID:28101450

  19. Breastfeeding and Snoring: A Birth Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Brew, Bronwyn K.; Marks, Guy B.; Almqvist, Catarina; Cistulli, Peter A.; Webb, Karen; Marshall, Nathaniel S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between breastfeeding and snoring in childhood. Methods In a cohort of children with a family history of asthma who were recruited antenatally we prospectively recorded data on infant feeding practices throughout the first year of life. Snoring status and witnessed sleep apnea were measured at age 8 years by parent-completed questionnaire. Associations were estimated by logistic regression with, and without, adjustment for sets of confounders designed to exclude biasing effects. Results Habitual snoring was reported in 18.8% of the sample, and witnessed apnea in 2.7%. Any breastfeeding for longer than one month was associated with a reduced risk of habitual snoring at age 8 (adjusted OR 0.48, 95% CI 0.29 to 0.81) and duration of breastfeeding was inversely associated with the prevalence of habitual snoring (adjusted OR 0.79, 95% CI 0.62 to 1.00). Any breastfeeding for longer than 1 month was associated with a lower risk of witnessed sleep apnea (adjusted OR 0.17, 95% CI 0.04 to 0.71). The protective associations were not mediated by BMI, current asthma, atopy or rhinitis at age 8 years. Conclusions Breastfeeding for longer than one month decreases the risk of habitual snoring and witnessed apneas in this cohort of children with a family history of asthma. The underlying mechanism remains unclear but the finding would be consistent with a beneficial effect of the breast in the mouth on oropharyngeal development with consequent protection against upper airway dysfunction causing sleep-disordered breathing. PMID:24416321

  20. Breastfeeding and snoring: a birth cohort study.

    PubMed

    Brew, Bronwyn K; Marks, Guy B; Almqvist, Catarina; Cistulli, Peter A; Webb, Karen; Marshall, Nathaniel S

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between breastfeeding and snoring in childhood. In a cohort of children with a family history of asthma who were recruited antenatally we prospectively recorded data on infant feeding practices throughout the first year of life. Snoring status and witnessed sleep apnea were measured at age 8 years by parent-completed questionnaire. Associations were estimated by logistic regression with, and without, adjustment for sets of confounders designed to exclude biasing effects. Habitual snoring was reported in 18.8% of the sample, and witnessed apnea in 2.7%. Any breastfeeding for longer than one month was associated with a reduced risk of habitual snoring at age 8 (adjusted OR 0.48, 95% CI 0.29 to 0.81) and duration of breastfeeding was inversely associated with the prevalence of habitual snoring (adjusted OR 0.79, 95% CI 0.62 to 1.00). Any breastfeeding for longer than 1 month was associated with a lower risk of witnessed sleep apnea (adjusted OR 0.17, 95% CI 0.04 to 0.71). The protective associations were not mediated by BMI, current asthma, atopy or rhinitis at age 8 years. Breastfeeding for longer than one month decreases the risk of habitual snoring and witnessed apneas in this cohort of children with a family history of asthma. The underlying mechanism remains unclear but the finding would be consistent with a beneficial effect of the breast in the mouth on oropharyngeal development with consequent protection against upper airway dysfunction causing sleep-disordered breathing.

  1. VIRAL LOAD AND SHORT-TERM NATURAL HISTORY OF TYPE-SPECIFIC ONCOGENIC HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS INFECTIONS IN A HIGH-RISK COHORT OF MID-ADULT WOMEN

    PubMed Central

    Winer, Rachel L.; Xi, Long Fu; Shen, Zhenping; Stern, Joshua E.; Newman, Laura; Feng, Qinghua; Hughes, James P.; Koutsky, Laura A.

    2013-01-01

    Oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) viral load may inform the origin of newly detected infections and characterize oncogenic HPV natural history in mid-adult women. From 2007–2011, we enrolled 521 25–65 year old female online daters and followed them triannually with mailed health and sexual behavior questionnaires and kits for self-sampling for PCR-based HPV DNA testing. Samples from oncogenic HPV positive women were selected for type-specific DNA load testing by real-time PCR with adjustment for cellularity. Linear or logistic regression models were used to evaluate relationships between viral levels, health and sexual behavior, and longitudinal oncogenic HPV detection. Type-specific viral levels were borderline significantly higher in oncogenic HPV infections that were prevalent versus newly detected (p=0.092), but levels in newly detected infections were higher than in infections re-detected after intercurrent negativity (p<.001). Recent sex partners were not significantly associated with viral levels. Compared to prevalent infections detected intermittently, the likelihood of persistent (OR=4.31,95%CI:2.20–8.45) or single-time (OR=1.32,95%CI:1.03–1.71) detection increased per 1-unit increase in baseline log10 viral load. Viral load differences between re-detected and newly detected infections suggest a portion of new detections were due to new acquisition, although report of recent new sex partners (a potential marker of new infection) was not predictive of viral load; oncogenic HPV infections in mid-adult women with new partners likely represent a mix of new acquisition and reactivation or intermittent detection of previous infection. Intermittent detection was characterized by low viral levels, suggesting that intermittent detection of persisting oncogenic HPV infection may be of limited clinical significance PMID:24136492

  2. Human papillomavirus molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Harden, Mallory E; Munger, Karl

    Human papillomaviruses are small DNA viruses with a tropism for squamous epithelia. A unique aspect of human papillomavirus molecular biology involves dependence on the differentiation status of the host epithelial cell to complete the viral lifecycle. A small group of these viruses are the etiologic agents of several types of human cancers, including oral and anogenital tract carcinomas. This review focuses on the basic molecular biology of human papillomaviruses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Atypical antipsychotic drugs and pregnancy outcome: a prospective, cohort study.

    PubMed

    Habermann, Frank; Fritzsche, Juliane; Fuhlbrück, Frederike; Wacker, Evelin; Allignol, Arthur; Weber-Schoendorfer, Corinna; Meister, Reinhard; Schaefer, Christof

    2013-08-01

    Women of childbearing age are often affected with psychotic disorders, requiring the use of antipsychotic medication during pregnancy. In the present study, we prospectively followed the pregnancies of 561 women exposed to second-generation antipsychotic agents (SGAs; study cohort) and compared these to 284 pregnant women exposed to first-generation antipsychotic agents (FGAs; comparison cohort I) and to 1122 pregnant women using drugs known as not harmful to the unborn (comparison cohort II). Subjects were enrolled through the Institute's consultation service. Major malformation rates of SGA exposed were higher compared to comparison cohort II (adjusted odds ratio, 2.17; 95% confidence interval, 1.20-3.91), possibly reflecting a detection bias concerning atrial and ventricular septal defects. Postnatal disorders occurred significantly more often in infants prenatally exposed to SGAs (15.6%) and FGAs (21.6%) compared to 4.2% of comparison cohort II. Cumulative incidences of elective terminations of pregnancy were significantly higher in both the study cohort (17%) and comparison cohort I (21%) compared to comparison cohort II (3%), whereas the rates of spontaneous abortions did not differ. The numbers of stillbirths and neonatal deaths were within the reference range. Preterm birth and low birth weight were more common in infants exposed to FGAs. To conclude, our findings did not reveal a major teratogenic risk for SGAs, making the better studied drugs of this group a treatment option during pregnancy. Because neonates exposed to SGAs or FGAs in the last gestational week are at higher risk of postnatal disorders, delivery should be planned in clinics with neonatal intensive care units.

  4. Identification of human papillomavirus in pterygium.

    PubMed

    Hamed-Azzam, Shirin; Edison, Natalia; Briscoe, Daniel; Mukari, Abed; Elmalah, Irit

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the involvement of human papillomavirus in the pathogenesis of primary and recurrent pterygium in northern Israel. A retrospective study examined 100 randomly chosen pterygium specimens with solar elastosis, from 100 patients who underwent pterygium surgery during 2012-2013 at the Emek Medical Center. All the specimens were analysed for evidence of human papillomavirus infection by immunohistochemistry. Human papillomavirus was not detected in any of the 100 pterygia samples by immunohistochemistry. These used samples were taken from 100 patients with mean age of 51.5 years and a primary: recurrent ratio of 8.09:1. We conclude from our study that human papillomavirus infection does not appear to be an important pathogenic factor of pterygium in Israel. © 2015 Emek Medical Center.

  5. Asking about human papillomavirus vaccination and the usefulness of registry validation: a study of young women recruited using Facebook.

    PubMed

    Gunasekaran, Bharathy; Jayasinghe, Yasmin; Brotherton, Julia M L; Fenner, Yeshe; Moore, Elya E; Wark, John D; Fletcher, Ashley; Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Garland, Suzanne M

    2015-02-04

    Australia was the first country to implement a government-funded National Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccination Programme. We assessed HPV vaccine uptake comparing self-reported and Register validated estimates, and the knowledge and attitudes of young women with regards to HPV vaccination post-implementation of the programme. Females, aged 16-25 years living in Victoria, Australia, were recruited using targeted advertising on Facebook from May to September 2010, to complete a web-based questionnaire. Geographic distribution, Indigenous and socio-economic status of the 278 participants were representative of the target population. Overall, 210/278 (76%) had heard of HPV vaccines, with 162/278 (58%) reporting receipt of at least one dose of vaccine, and 54 (19%) unsure. Verification of HPV vaccination status of 142 consenting participants (51%) showed 71% had received at least one dose. Main reasons for vaccination were for protection against HPV infection and cervical cancer (96%) and because it was free (87%), whereas unvaccinated women were uncertain of their eligibility (50%), concerned about adverse reactions (32%), or perceived that vaccination was not needed if they were monogamous (32%). The potential utility of a vaccination register in the context of a national programme is apparent from the large proportion of young women who were unsure of their vaccine status. HPV vaccine knowledge among participants was relatively high suggesting the national programme has successfully communicated to the majority of eligible women, the purpose and limitations of the vaccine. Vigilance is needed to ensure that young women follow through with Pap testing in vaccine eligible cohorts. The ongoing vaccination programme for pre-adolescent girls and boys should communicate to parents that those with one sexual partner can still acquire HPV and that the safety of the vaccine is now well demonstrated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Quadrivalent vaccine-targeted human papillomavirus genotypes in heterosexual men after the Australian female human papillomavirus vaccination programme: a retrospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Chow, Eric P F; Machalek, Dorothy A; Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Danielewski, Jennifer A; Fehler, Glenda; Bradshaw, Catriona S; Garland, Suzanne M; Chen, Marcus Y; Fairley, Christopher K

    2017-01-01

    Australia introduced a national quadrivalent human papillomavirus (4vHPV) vaccination programme for girls and young women in April, 2007. The HPV genotypes targeted by the female vaccine could also affect the protection afforded to heterosexual men. We examined the prevalence of 4vHPV targeted vaccine genotypes and the nine-valent HPV (9vHPV)-targeted vaccines genotypes among sexually active, predominantly unvaccinated heterosexual men from 2004 to 2015. We did a retrospective, observational study of urine and urethral swab specimens from heterosexual men aged 25 years or younger attending the Melbourne Sexual Health Centre between July 1, 2004, and June 30, 2015, who tested positive for Chlamydia trachomatis. We extracted HPV DNA and used the PapType HPV assay to detect 14 high-risk HPV genotypes (16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59, 66, and 68) and two low-risk genotypes (6 and 11). We calculated the prevalence of any HPV genotype, genotypes 6 or 11, genotypes 16 or 18, genotypes in the 4vHPV group (6, 11, 16, or 18), five additional genotypes in the 9vHPV group (31, 33, 45, 52, or 58), and non-vaccine-targeted genotypes (31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 56, 58, 59, 66, or 68). We obtained data between July 1, 2004, and June 30, 2015, and did the data analysis in December, 2015. Of 1764 specimens obtained, we included 1466 in our final analysis (the others were excluded because they had indeterminate results or were duplicates). The prevalence of any HPV genotype and genotypes 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58 did not change from 2004-05 to 2014-15, but we noted reductions in genotypes 6 and 11 (from 12% [95% CI 6-21%], to 3% [1-7%], ptrend=0·008), 16 and 18 (from 13% [95% CI 7-22%] to 3% [1-6%], ptrend<0·0001), and 4vHPV-targeted genotypes (from 22% [95% CI 14-33%] to 6% [3-10%], ptrend<0·0001). Prevalence of non-vaccine-targeted genotypes increased from 16% [95% CI 9-26%] to 22% [17-29%], ptrend<0·0001). In Australian-born men, 4vHPV-targeted genotype prevalence

  7. Evidence and Impact of Human Papillomavirus Latency

    PubMed Central

    Gravitt, Patti E

    2012-01-01

    At present, there is no consensus in the scientific community regarding the ability for human papillomavirus (HPV) infections to establish latency. Based on animal studies, a model of papillomavirus latency has been proposed in which papillomaviruses can be retained in the basal epithelial stem cell pool as latent infections and periodically induced to reactivate when the stem cell divides and one daughter cell is committed to terminal differentiation and induction of the viral life cycle. Tissue resident memory T-cells are hypothesized to control these periodic reactivation episodes and thus limit their duration. In this paper, evidence from human studies consistent with this model of papillomavirus latency is reviewed. Given the strong circumstantial evidence supporting a natural history of HPV infection which includes a immunologically controlled latent state, the longer term implications of HPV latency on a highly infected and aging population may warrant a more serious evaluation. PMID:23341855

  8. Methodological aspects of the 1993 Pelotas (Brazil) Birth Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Victora, Cesar Gomes; Araújo, Cora Luiza Pavin; Menezes, Ana Maria Batista; Hallal, Pedro Curi; Vieira, Maria de Fátima; Neutzling, Marilda Borges; Gonçalves, Helen; Valle, Neiva Cristina; Lima, Rosangela Costa; Anselmi, Luciana; Behague, Dominique; Gigante, Denise Petrucci; Barros, Fernando Celso

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the main methodological aspects of a cohort study, with emphasis on its recent phases, which may be relevant to investigators planning to carry out similar studies. In 1993, a population based study was launched in Pelotas, Southern Brazil. All 5,249 newborns delivered in the city’s hospitals were enrolled, and sub-samples were visited at the ages of one, three and six months and of one and four years. In 2004-5 it was possible to trace 87.5% of the cohort at the age of 10-12 years. Sub-studies are addressing issues related to oral health, psychological development and mental health, body composition, and ethnography. Birth cohort studies are essential for investigating the early determinants of adult disease and nutritional status, yet few such studies are available from low and middle-income countries where these determinants may differ from those documented in more developed settings. PMID:16410981

  9. Bovine and human papillomaviruses: a comparative review.

    PubMed

    Munday, J S

    2014-11-01

    Fifty years ago, inoculation with bovine papillomavirus (BPV) was found to cause mesenchymal tumors of the skin in cattle and horses, as well as tumors of the bladder in cattle. Subsequent to these studies of BPVs, human papillomaviruses (HPVs) were found to cause cervical cancer resulting in intense research into papillomaviruses. During the past 50 years, the ways that HPVs and BPVs cause disease have been investigated, and both HPVs and BPVs have been associated with an increasingly diverse range of diseases. Herein, the biology, oncogenic mechanisms, and diseases associated with BPVs are compared with those of HPVs. As reviewed, there are currently significant differences between BPVs and HPVs. However, research 50 years ago into BPVs formed a prologue for the recognition that papillomaviruses have a significant role in human disease, and it is possible that future research may similarly reveal that BPVs are less different from HPVs than is currently recognized. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Using full-cohort data in nested case-control and case-cohort studies by multiple imputation.

    PubMed

    Keogh, Ruth H; White, Ian R

    2013-10-15

    In many large prospective cohorts, expensive exposure measurements cannot be obtained for all individuals. Exposure-disease association studies are therefore often based on nested case-control or case-cohort studies in which complete information is obtained only for sampled individuals. However, in the full cohort, there may be a large amount of information on cheaply available covariates and possibly a surrogate of the main exposure(s), which typically goes unused. We view the nested case-control or case-cohort study plus the remainder of the cohort as a full-cohort study with missing data. Hence, we propose using multiple imputation (MI) to utilise information in the full cohort when data from the sub-studies are analysed. We use the fully observed data to fit the imputation models. We consider using approximate imputation models and also using rejection sampling to draw imputed values from the true distribution of the missing values given the observed data. Simulation studies show that using MI to utilise full-cohort information in the analysis of nested case-control and case-cohort studies can result in important gains in efficiency, particularly when a surrogate of the main exposure is available in the full cohort. In simulations, this method outperforms counter-matching in nested case-control studies and a weighted analysis for case-cohort studies, both of which use some full-cohort information. Approximate imputation models perform well except when there are interactions or non-linear terms in the outcome model, where imputation using rejection sampling works well.

  11. Vaccination against human papillomavirus

    PubMed Central

    Mello, Claudia Figueiredo

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human papillomavirus infection is common and causes different manifestations. This infection is a public health concern because it has been associated with genital tract malignant diseases among men and women. Currently two vaccines are available to prevent the human papillomavirus infection and its associated diseases. PMID:24488402

  12. Cohort Profile: Sympathetic activity and Ambulatory Blood Pressure in Africans (SABPA) prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Malan, Leoné; Hamer, Mark; Frasure-Smith, Nancy; Steyn, Hendrik S; Malan, Nicolaas T

    2015-01-01

    Adapting to an over-demanding stressful urban environment may exhaust the psychophysiological resources to cope with these demands, and lead to sympathetic nervous system dysfunction. The evidence that an urban-dwelling lifestyle may be detrimental to the cardiometabolic health of Africans motivated the design of the Sympathetic activity and Ambulatory Blood Pressure in African Prospective cohort study. We aimed to determine neural mechanistic pathways involved in emotional distress and vascular remodelling. The baseline sample included 409 teachers representing a bi-ethnic sex cohort from South Africa. The study was conducted in 2008–09 and repeated after 3-year follow-up in 2011–12, with an 87.8% successful follow-up rate. Seasonal changes were avoided and extensive clinical assessments were performed in a well-controlled setting. Data collection included sociodemographics, lifestyle habits, psychosocial battery and genetic analysis, mental stress responses mimicking daily life stress (blood pressure and haemostatic, cardiometabolic, endothelial and stress hormones). Target organ damage was assessed in the brain, heart, kidney, blood vessels and retina. A unique highly phenotyped cohort is presented that can address the role of a hyperactive sympathetic nervous system and neural response pathways contributing to the burden of cardiometabolic diseases in Africans. PMID:25344943

  13. Prevalence of human papillomavirus in Indonesia: a population-based study in three regions

    PubMed Central

    Vet, J N I; de Boer, M A; van den Akker, B E W M; Siregar, B; Lisnawati; Budiningsih, S; Tyasmorowati, D; Moestikaningsih; Cornain, S; Peters, A A W; Fleuren, G J

    2008-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the most common cancer among women in the Indonesian population, yet little is known about the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV). We investigated age-specific prevalence of HPV types and possible risk factors of HPV positivity in a population-based sample of 2686 women, aged 15–70 years, in Jakarta, Tasikmalaya, and Bali, Indonesia. The overall HPV prevalence was 11.4%, age-standardized to the world standard population 11.6%. The most prevalent types found were HPV 52, HPV 16, HPV 18, and HPV 39, respectively, 23.2, 18.0, 16.1, and 11.8% of the high-risk HPV types. In 20.7% of infections, multiple types were involved. Different age-specific prevalence patterns were seen: overall high in Jakarta, and in Tasikmalaya, and declining with age in Bali. The number of marriages was most associated with HPV positivity (OR 1.81 95% CI 1.31–2.51)). Remarkably, in Indonesia HPV 16 and HPV 18 are equally common in the general population, as they are in cervical cancer. HPV 52 was the most prevalent type in the general population, suggesting that this type should be included when prophylactic HPV vaccination is introduced in Indonesia. PMID:18609756

  14. Menstrual Cycle and Detectable Human Papillomavirus in Reproductive-age Women: A Time Series Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Su-Hsun; Brotman, Rebecca M.; Zenilman, Jonathan M.; Gravitt, Patti E.; Cummings, Derek A. T.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Current evidence on the relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA detection and menstrual cycle has been inconsistent. Methods. We included 21 nonoral contraceptive pill (non-OCP) users who self-collected vaginal samples twice per week for 16 weeks. We explored whether variable detection of HPV DNA exhibited cyclic or other structured temporal patterns. We also evaluated relationships between serial HPV prevalence, sexual behavior, and suspected bacterial vaginosis (BV) as defined by Nugent Gram stain score ≥7. Results. During follow-up, any-type HPV prevalence varied between 61.1% and 85.0%. Although not statistically significant, we observed a maximum autocorrelation in serial HPV prevalence lagging 14 days (correlation coefficient [ρ], −0.24). Any-type HPV detection had a periodic behavior, generally repeating every 28.0 days (bootstrapped interquartile range, 22.4–28.0) and peaking around the ovulation time (adjusted odds ratio, 1.96; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06–3.62) as compared to menstruation. We also showed that an increase in any-type HPV prevalence preceded the beginning of a menstrual cycle by 9–12 days. There was no evidence of relationships between HPV prevalence and sexual activity or Nugent score. Conclusions. Serially detected any-type HPV DNA showed a periodic behavior and was likely to peak in the periovulatory phase among non-OCP users. PMID:23885113

  15. Development of a national agreement on human papillomavirus vaccination in Japan: an infodemiology study.

    PubMed

    Nakada, Haruka; Yuji, Koichiro; Tsubokura, Masaharu; Ohsawa, Yukio; Kami, Masahiro

    2014-05-15

    A national agreement on human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination was achieved relatively quickly in Japan as compared to the United States and India. The objective was to identify the role of print and online media references, including references to celebrities or other informants, as factors potentially responsible for the relatively rapid national acceptance of HPV vaccination in Japan. A method of text mining was performed to select keywords, representing the context of the target documents, from articles relevant to the promotion of HPV vaccination appearing in major Japanese newspapers and Web pages between January 2009 and July 2010. The selected keywords were classified as positive, negative, or neutral, and the transition of the frequency of their appearance was analyzed. The number of positive and neutral keywords appearing in newspaper articles increased sharply in early 2010 while the number of negative keywords remained low. The numbers of positive, neutral, and negative keywords appearing in Web pages increased gradually and did not significantly differ by category. Neutral keywords, such as "vaccine" and "prevention," appeared more frequently in newspaper articles, whereas negative keywords, such as "infertility" and "side effect," appeared more frequently in Web pages. The extraction of the positive keyword "signature campaign" suggests that vaccine beneficiaries cooperated with providers in promoting HPV vaccination. The rapid development of a national agreement regarding HPV vaccination in Japan may be primarily attributed to the advocacy of vaccine beneficiaries, supported by advocacy by celebrities and positive reporting by print and online media.

  16. Testing a model for parental acceptance of human papillomavirus vaccine in 9- to 18-year-old girls: a theory-guided study.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Diane; O'Connell, Kathleen A

    2012-12-01

    Gardasil is the first vaccine developed to prevent cervical cancer and other diseases caused by certain types of genital human papillomavirus in females, but little is known about parental acceptance of this vaccine. The purpose of this study was to test a model that predicts intention to vaccinate that includes constructs from the health belief model and the theory of reasoned action. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Japan Diabetic Nephropathy Cohort Study: study design, methods, and implementation.

    PubMed

    Furuichi, Kengo; Shimizu, Miho; Toyama, Tadashi; Koya, Daisuke; Koshino, Yoshitaka; Abe, Hideharu; Mori, Kiyoshi; Satoh, Hiroaki; Imanishi, Masahito; Iwano, Masayuki; Yamauchi, Hiroyuki; Kusano, Eiji; Fujimoto, Shouichi; Suzuki, Yoshiki; Okuda, Seiya; Kitagawa, Kiyoki; Iwata, Yasunori; Kaneko, Shuichi; Nishi, Shinichi; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Ueda, Yoshihiko; Haneda, Masakazu; Makino, Hirofumi; Wada, Takashi

    2013-12-01

    Diabetic nephropathy, leading to end-stage renal disease, has a considerable impact on public health and the social economy. However, there are few national registries of diabetic nephropathy in Japan. The aims of this prospective cohort study are to obtain clinical data and urine samples for revising the clinical staging of diabetic nephropathy, and developing new diagnostic markers for early diabetic nephropathy. The Japanese Society of Nephrology established a nationwide, web-based, and prospective registry system. On the system, there are two basic registries; the Japan Renal Biopsy Registry (JRBR), and the Japan Kidney Disease Registry (JKDR). In addition to the two basic registries, we established a new prospective registry to the system; the Japan Diabetic Nephropathy Cohort Study (JDNCS), which collected physical and laboratory data. We analyzed the data of 321 participants (106 female, 215 male; average age 65 years) in the JDNCS. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure was 130.1 and 72.3 mmHg, respectively. Median estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was 33.3 ml/min/1.73 m(2). Proteinuria was 1.8 g/gCr, and serum levels of albumin were 3.6 g/dl. The majority of the JDNCS patients presented with preserved eGFR and low albuminuria or low eGFR and advanced proteinuria. In the JRBR and JKDR registries, 484 and 125 participants, respectively, were enrolled as having diabetes mellitus. In comparison with the JRBR and JKDR registries, the JDNCS was characterized by diabetic patients presenting with low proteinuria with moderately preserved eGFR. There are few national registries of diabetic nephropathy to evaluate prognosis in Japan. Future analysis of the JDNCS will provide clinical insights into the epidemiology and renal and cardiovascular outcomes of type 2 diabetic patients in Japan.

  18. Anal study in immunocompetent women with human papillomavirus related lower genital tract pathology.

    PubMed

    Donaire, Concepción; Reillo, Marcos; Martínez-Escoriza, Juan C; López-Fernández, José A

    2017-04-01

    To estimate the prevalence of anal dysplasia in immunocompetent women with cervical intraepithelial dysplasia. We did a prospective cohort study, in which we enrolled 166 women with gynecological pathology related to human papilloma virus (HPV) infection. All patients underwent an anal cytology and HPV detection. Statistical analysis with a 95% confidence interval was used for prevalence calculations. A Χ2 test and Fisher's exact one were used to determine differences between groups of qualitative variables. Differences between normally distributed and non-normally distributed groups in quantitative variables were accounted for using Student's t-test or Mann-Whitney's U test, respectively. Out of the 166 patients studied, high risk HPV in the anal canal was detected in 107 (64.46%) cases. The most prevalent genotype observed was non 16/18 high risk HPV, present in 54 (50.47%) patients. There was no a significant association with smoking, use of condom, anal intercourse, or anal benign pathology. However, a significant correlation between the presence of high risk HPV in the anal canal and the antecedent of condylomas was observed (p=0.047) (CI95%: 1.00%-12.58%). Women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade 1 had a significantly increased presence of high risk HPV in the anal canal (p=0.044). Out of the 166 women, 6 (3.61%) had abnormal anal cytology results, and were referred to high-resolution anoscopy. Anal biopsy was performed in these six cases. In 2 patients the biopsy reported low-grade Anal Intraepithelial Neoplasia: 1.20% (0.15%-4.28%). Women with cervical intraepithelial dysplasia have 1.20% prevalence of anal intraepithelial neoplasia, so that it does not seem necessary to screen this population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Studies on the extended Techa river cohort: cancer risk estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Kossenko, M M.; Preston, D L.; Krestinina, L Y.; Degteva, M O.; Startsev, N V.; Thomas, T; Vyushkova, O V.; Anspaugh, L R.; Napier, Bruce A. ); Kozheurov, V P.; Ron, E; Akleyev, A V.

    2001-12-01

    Initial population-based studies of riverside residents were begun in the late 1950s and in 1967 a systematic effort was undertaken to develop a well-defined fixed cohort of Techa river residents, to carry out ongoing mortality and (limited) clinical follow-up of this cohort, and to provide individualized dose estimates for cohort members. Over the past decade, extensive efforts have been made to refine the cohort definition and improve both the follow-up and dosimetry data. Analyses of the Techa river cohort can provide useful quantitative estimates of the effects of low dose rate, chronic external and internal exposures on cancer mortality and incidence and non-cancer mortality rates. These risk estimates complement quantitative risk estimates for acute exposures based on the atomic bomb survivors and chronic exposure risk estimates from worker studies, including Mayak workers and other groups with occupational radiation exposures. As the dosimetry and follow-up are refined it may also be possible to gain useful insights into risks associated with 90Sr exposures.

  20. Cohort profile of the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study at final follow-up.

    PubMed

    Tamakoshi, Akiko; Ozasa, Kotaro; Fujino, Yoshihisa; Suzuki, Koji; Sakata, Kiyomi; Mori, Mitsuru; Kikuchi, Shogo; Iso, Hiroyasu; Sakauchi, Fumio; Motohashi, Yutaka; Tsuji, Ichiro; Nakamura, Yosikazu; Mikami, Haruo; Kurosawa, Michiko; Hoshiyama, Yoshiharu; Tanabe, Naohito; Tamakoshi, Koji; Wakai, Kenji; Tokudome, Shinkan; Hashimoto, Shuji; Wada, Yasuhiko; Kawamura, Takashi; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Miki, Tsuneharu; Date, Chigusa; Kurozawa, Yoichi; Yoshimura, Takesumi; Shibata, Akira; Okamoto, Naoyuki; Shio, Hideo

    2013-01-01

    The Japan Collaborative Cohort Study for Evaluation of Cancer Risk (JACC Study) was established in the late 1980s to evaluate the risk impact of lifestyle factors and levels of serum components on human health. During the 20-year follow-up period, the results of the study have been published in almost 200 original articles in peer-reviewed English-language journals. However, continued follow-up of the study subjects became difficult because of the retirements of principal researchers, city mergers throughout Japan in the year 2000, and reduced funding. Thus, we decided to terminate the JACC Study follow-up at the end of 2009. As a final point of interest, we reviewed the population registry information of survivors. A total of 207 (0.19%) subjects were ineligible, leaving 110 585 eligible participants (46 395 men and 64 190 women). Moreover, errors in coding date of birth and sex were found in 356 (0.32%) and 59 (0.05%) cases, respectively, during routine follow-up and final review. Although such errors were unexpected, their impact is believed to be negligible because of the small numbers relative to the large total study population. Here, we describe the final cohort profile at the end of the JACC Study along with selected characteristics of the participants and their status at the final follow-up. Although follow-up of the JACC Study participants is finished, we will continue to analyze and publish study results.

  1. A clinical research analytics toolkit for cohort study.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yiqin; Zhu, Yu; Sun, Xingzhi; Tao, Ying; Zhang, Shuo; Xu, Linhao; Pan, Yue

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a clinical informatics toolkit that can assist physicians to conduct cohort studies effectively and efficiently. The toolkit has three key features: 1) support of procedures defined in epidemiology, 2) recommendation of statistical methods in data analysis, and 3) automatic generation of research reports. On one hand, our system can help physicians control research quality by leveraging the integrated knowledge of epidemiology and medical statistics; on the other hand, it can improve productivity by reducing the complexities for physicians during their cohort studies.

  2. [Papillomaviruses and human tumors].

    PubMed

    Vonka, V; Hamsíková, E; Sobotková, E; Smahel, M; Kitasato, H; Sainerová, H; Ludvíková, V; Zák, R; Kanka, J; Kolár, Z; Kovarík, J

    2000-12-01

    The report summarizes the main results obtained in the course of our research project. The results of immunological and epidemiological studies provide further proofs that human papillomaviruses (HPV) are the etiological agents in cervical neoplasia. In addition, they raise hopes that immunological methods may be utilized in diagnostics of cervical cancer and for monitoring the clinical course of this disease in the near future. Since the etiological relationship between HPV and cervical carcinoma seems to be proven beyond reasonable doubt, the development of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines has become the dominant of the contemporary HPV reseach. For studying immune reactions against HPV-induced tumours we developed a model of HPV16-transformed rodent cells.

  3. Investing in Prospective Cohorts for Etiologic Study of Occupational Exposures

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prospective cohorts have played a major role in understanding the role of diet, physical activity, medical conditions, and genes in the development of many diseases, but have not been widely used in the study of occupational exposures. Studies in agriculture are an exception. W...

  4. Investing in Prospective Cohorts for Etiologic Study of Occupational Exposures

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prospective cohorts have played a major role in understanding the role of diet, physical activity, medical conditions, and genes in the development of many diseases, but have not been widely used in the study of occupational exposures. Studies in agriculture are an exception. W...

  5. Human papillomavirus genotypes among females in Mexico: a study from the Mexican institute for social security.

    PubMed

    Salcedo, Mauricio; Pina-Sanchez, Patricia; Vallejo-Ruiz, Veronica; Monroy-Garcia, Alberto; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Cortes-Gutierrez, Elva I; Santos-Lopez, Gerardo; Montoya-Fuentes, Hector; Grijalva, Renan; Madrid-Marina, Vicente; Apresa-Garcia, Teresa; Hernandez, Dulce M; Jave-Suarez, Luis F; Romero, Pablo; Poot, Albros; Salgado, Eduardo; Ramos-Gonzalez, Patricia; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Rigoberto; Canton, Juan C; Jimenez-Aranda, Lucio; Parra-Melquiadez, Miriam; Paniagua, Lucero; Mendoza, Monica; Arreola, Hugo; Villegas, Vanesa; Torres-Poveda, Kirvis; Bahena-Roman, Margarita; Gonzalez-Yebra, Beatriz; Taniguchi, Keiko; Rodea, Carlos; Mantilla-Morales, Alejandra; Mora-Garcia, Maria L; Velazquez-Velazquez, Cindy K; Cordova-Uscanga, Candelaria; Peralta, Raul; Lopez-Romero, Ricardo; Marrero, Daniel; Bandala, Cindy; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Furuya, Maria E; Almeida, Eduardo; Galvan, Maria E; Grijalva, Israel

    2014-01-01

    The aetiological relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and cervical cancer (CC) is widely accepted. Our goal was to determine the prevalence of HPV types in Mexican women attending at the Mexican Institute for Social Security from different areas of Mexico. DNAs from 2,956 cervical samples were subjected to HPV genotyping: 1,020 samples with normal cytology, 931 with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LGSIL), 481 with high grade HGSIL and 524 CC. Overall HPV prevalence was 67.1%. A total of 40 HPV types were found; HPV16 was detected in 39.4% of the HPV-positive samples followed by HPV18 at 7.5%, HPV31 at 7.1%, HPV59 at 4.9%, and HPV58 at 3.2%. HPV16 presented the highest prevalence both in women with altered or normal cytology and HPV 18 presented a minor prevalence as reported worldwide. The prevalence ratio (PR) was calculated for the HPV types. The analysis of PR showed that HPV16 presents the highest association with CC, HPV 31, -33, -45, -52 and -58 also demonstrating a high association. The most prevalent HPV types in cervical cancer samples were -16, -18, -31, but it is important to note that we obtained a minor prevalence of HPV18 as reported worldwide, and that HPV58 and -52 also were genotypes with an important prevalence in CC samples. Determination of HPV genotypes is very important in order to evaluate the impact of vaccine introduction and future cervical cancer prevention strategies.

  6. Development of a National Agreement on Human Papillomavirus Vaccination in Japan: An Infodemiology Study

    PubMed Central

    Yuji, Koichiro; Tsubokura, Masaharu; Ohsawa, Yukio; Kami, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Background A national agreement on human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination was achieved relatively quickly in Japan as compared to the United States and India. Objective The objective was to identify the role of print and online media references, including references to celebrities or other informants, as factors potentially responsible for the relatively rapid national acceptance of HPV vaccination in Japan. Methods A method of text mining was performed to select keywords, representing the context of the target documents, from articles relevant to the promotion of HPV vaccination appearing in major Japanese newspapers and Web pages between January 2009 and July 2010. The selected keywords were classified as positive, negative, or neutral, and the transition of the frequency of their appearance was analyzed. Results The number of positive and neutral keywords appearing in newspaper articles increased sharply in early 2010 while the number of negative keywords remained low. The numbers of positive, neutral, and negative keywords appearing in Web pages increased gradually and did not significantly differ by category. Neutral keywords, such as “vaccine” and “prevention,” appeared more frequently in newspaper articles, whereas negative keywords, such as “infertility” and “side effect,” appeared more frequently in Web pages. The extraction of the positive keyword “signature campaign” suggests that vaccine beneficiaries cooperated with providers in promoting HPV vaccination. Conclusions The rapid development of a national agreement regarding HPV vaccination in Japan may be primarily attributed to the advocacy of vaccine beneficiaries, supported by advocacy by celebrities and positive reporting by print and online media. PMID:24834471

  7. A semi-qualitative study of attitudes to vaccinating adolescents against human papillomavirus without parental consent.

    PubMed

    Brabin, Loretta; Roberts, Stephen A; Kitchener, Henry C

    2007-02-09

    The first vaccine to prevent human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer has been licensed, and in future, vaccination may be routinely offered to 10-14 year old girls. HPV is a sexually transmitted virus and some parents may refuse consent for vaccination. Under-16s in the UK have a right to confidential sexual health care without parental consent. We investigated parents' views on making available HPV vaccination to adolescent minors at sexual health clinics without parental consent. This was a semi-qualitative analysis of views of parents of 11-12 year old school children collected as part of a population-based survey of parental attitudes to HPV vaccination in Manchester. Parents were firstly asked if they agreed that a well-informed child should be able to request vaccination at a sexual health clinic without parental consent, and secondly, to provide a reason for this answer. Ethical perspectives on adolescent autonomy provided the framework for descriptive analysis. 307 parents answered the question, and of these, 244 (80%) explained their views. Parents with views consistent with support for adolescent autonomy (n = 99) wanted to encourage responsible behaviour, protect children from ill-informed or bigoted parents, and respected confidentiality and individual rights. In contrast, 97 parents insisted on being involved in decision-making. They emphasised adult responsibility for a child's health and guidance, erosion of parental rights, and respect for cultural and moral values. Other parents (n = 48) wanted clearer legal definitions governing parental rights and responsibilities or hoped for joint decision-making. Parents resistant to adolescent autonomy would be less likely to consent to future HPV vaccination, (67%) than parents supporting this principle (89%; p < 0.001). In the UK, the principle of adolescent autonomy is recognised and logically should include the right to HPV vaccination, but this may concern parents who would otherwise approve

  8. Parents’ Support for School-Entry Requirements for Human Papillomavirus Vaccination: A National Study

    PubMed Central

    Calo, William A.; Gilkey, Melissa B.; Shah, Parth D.; Moss, Jennifer L.; Brewer, Noel T.

    2016-01-01

    Background The number of states proposing school-entry requirements for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination has increased over the last decade. However, data are currently limited regarding parents' support of such laws. We sought to obtain the first national estimates of parents' support of HPV vaccination school-entry requirements. Methods A national sample of 1501 parents of 11- to 17-year-old children completed a web-based survey between November 2014 and January 2015. Analyses used multivariable logistic regression to assess correlates of support for school-entry requirements for HPV vaccination. Results Overall, 21% of parents agreed that laws requiring HPV vaccination for school attendance "are a good idea," and 54% disagreed. If school-entry requirements included opt-out provisions, agreement increased to 57%, and only 21% disagreed. Parents more often agreed with requirements without opt-out provisions if they were Hispanic (OR=1.53, 95% CI: 1.05–2.22), believed HPV vaccine was as or more important than other adolescent vaccines (OR=2.76, 95% CI: 1.98–3.83), or believed HPV vaccine was effective for preventing cervical cancer (OR=2.55, 95% CI: 1.93–3.37). Parents less often agreed if they resided in Midwest states or believed that HPV vaccine was being pushed to make money for drug companies (both p<.05). Conclusion Opt-out provisions almost tripled parents' support for HPV vaccine school-entry requirements. Our findings suggest that race/ethnicity, attitudes about HPV vaccine, and region of residence may influence support for requirements without opt-out provisions. Impact Opt-out provisions greatly increase parent support of school-entry requirements for HPV vaccination but may make them ineffective. PMID:27543621

  9. Parents' Support for School-Entry Requirements for Human Papillomavirus Vaccination: A National Study.

    PubMed

    Calo, William A; Gilkey, Melissa B; Shah, Parth D; Moss, Jennifer L; Brewer, Noel T

    2016-09-01

    The number of states proposing school-entry requirements for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination has increased over the last decade. However, data are currently limited regarding parents' support of such laws. We sought to obtain the first national estimates of parents' support of HPV vaccination school-entry requirements. A national sample of 1,501 parents of 11- to 17-year-old children completed a web-based survey between November 2014 and January 2015. Analyses used multivariable logistic regression to assess correlates of support for school-entry requirements for HPV vaccination. Overall, 21% of parents agreed that laws requiring HPV vaccination for school attendance "are a good idea," and 54% disagreed. If school-entry requirements included opt-out provisions, agreement increased to 57%, and only 21% disagreed. Parents more often agreed with requirements without opt-out provisions if they were Hispanic [OR = 1.53; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.05-2.22], believed HPV vaccine was as or more important than other adolescent vaccines (OR = 2.76; 95% CI, 1.98-3.83), or believed HPV vaccine was effective for preventing cervical cancer (OR = 2.55; 95% CI, 1.93-3.37). Parents less often agreed if they resided in Midwest states or believed that HPV vaccine was being pushed to make money for drug companies (both P < 0.05). Opt-out provisions almost tripled parents' support for HPV vaccine school-entry requirements. Our findings suggest that race/ethnicity, attitudes about HPV vaccine, and region of residence may influence support for requirements without opt-out provisions. Opt-out provisions greatly increase parent support of school-entry requirements for HPV vaccination but may make them ineffective. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(9); 1317-25. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Alzheimer's disease and smoking: bias in cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Debanne, Sara M; Bielefeld, Roger A; Cheruvu, Vinay K; Fritsch, Thomas; Rowland, Douglas Y

    2007-06-01

    The discrepancy between cohort and case-control studies regarding the association between smoking and Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been attributed to the competing risk of early mortality of smokers. A simulation study was conducted to show that the bias favoring smokers acts also on cohort studies. In the model, individuals {grow older} and have smoking habits according to published year-age-gender-specific patterns, with morbidity and mortality according to their demographic and smoking profiles. Those individuals dying of smoking-related causes ("phantoms") remain at risk of AD and of death from other causes. Three scenarios were considered: no association of AD and smoking, increased risk for smokers, and decreased risk for smokers. For each simulation of a cohort study, two incidence density ratios (IDR) were computed: one including the phantoms that developed AD (thus ignoring smoking-related deaths) and another excluding them (thus mimicking real-life studies). For all scenarios, the simulations show that smoking-related death creates a bias, resulting in smokers having an understated risk of AD compared to non-smokers. The speculation that the conflicting results of case-control and cohort studies are solely due to the increased mortality in smokers thus appears unjustified. Other factors must also be considered to explain the discrepancy in results.

  11. Circumcision and sexual behavior: factors independently associated with human papillomavirus detection among men in the HIM study.

    PubMed

    Giuliano, Anna R; Lazcano, Eduardo; Villa, Luisa Lina; Flores, Roberto; Salmeron, Jorge; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Papenfuss, Mary; Abrahamsen, Martha; Baggio, Maria Luiza; Silva, Roberto; Quiterio, Manuel

    2009-03-15

    There is growing interest in understanding human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and related disease among men. To date there have been numerous studies reporting HPV DNA prevalence among men from several different countries, however, few have incorporated multivariable analyses to determine factors independently associated with male HPV detection. The purpose of this study was to assess the factors independently associated with HPV detection in men ages 18-70 years residing in Brazil (n = 343), Mexico (n = 312), and the United States (US) (n = 333). In samples combined from the coronal sulcus, glans penis, shaft, and scrotum, we evaluated factors associated with any, oncogenic, and nononcogenic HPV infections. In multivariable analyses, detection of any HPV infection was significantly associated with reported race of Asian/Pacific Islander, lifetime and recent number of sexual partners, and having sex in the past 3 months. Oncogenic HPV detection was independently associated with lifetime and recent number of sexual partners, and having sex in the past 3 months. NonOncogenic HPV infection was independently associated with lifetime number of sexual partners. Circumcision, assessed by clinical examination, was associated with reduced risk of HPV detection across all categories of HPV evaluated. HPV detection in men in the current study was strongly related to sexual behavior and circumcision status. Interventions such as circumcision may provide a low-cost method to reduce HPV infection.

  12. Genotypic characterisation of human papillomavirus infections among persons living with HIV infection; a case-control study in Kumasi, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Yar, Denis Dekugmen; Salifu, Samson Pandam; Darko, Samuel Nkansah; Annan, Augustina Angelina; Gyimah, Akosua Adumea; Buabeng, Kwame Ohene; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study is to describe the burden of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection among women living with HIV and non-infected women in Ghana. A case-control study was conducted involving 107 women living with HIV aged between 18 and 59 years (cases) and 100 non-HIV-infected apparently healthy women (controls) who were recruited from the Kumasi South Hospital, from July to December, 2014. Cervicovaginal swabs were taken from study participants to characterise 28 high- and low-risk HPV genotypes using a multiplex real-time PCR. The overall mean age for the participants was 40.10 ± 9.76 years. The prevalence of high-risk (hr)-HPV genotypes was significantly higher among the cases than the controls (77.4% vs. 41.6%, P < 0.0001). Overall, HPV 58 and 54 were the most predominant high-risk (18.8%) and low-risk (15.0%) genotypes detected. The two most common hr-HPV genotype isolates were 58 (18.8%) and 35 (15.9%) with 58 being the most prevalent among age group 35-44 years compared with hr-HPV 16, 18, 35 and 45, found predominantly among 18-34 age group. Significant variations exist in HPV genotypes among HIV-infected and uninfected women. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Beta Human Papillomavirus Infection Is Prevalent in Elephantiasis and Exhibits a Productive Phenotype: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Carlson, John Andrew; Rady, Peter; Kadam, Pooja; He, Qin; Simonette, Rebecca; Tyring, Stephen

    2017-06-01

    Elephantiasis is considered a cutaneous region of immune deficiency with cobblestone-like surface caused by a wart-like eruption. Verrucosis is a diffuse human papillomavirus (HPV) infection linked to immunodeficiency disorders. The objective of this study was to examine the prevalence of HPV infection in lymphedema and its pathogenic role in elephantiasis. A retrospective case-control study was performed examining lymphedematous skin and controls of peritumoral normal skin. HPV infection was evaluated at the DNA, protein, and histopathologic levels by polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, and light microscopy, respectively. Overall, 540 HPV DNAs were detected in 120 of 122 cutaneous samples (median 4 HPV DNAs per sample, range 0-9). Compared with controls, no differences existed in type or number of HPVs identified. Instead, a diverse spectrum of HPV-related histopathologies were evident, likely reflecting the multiplicity of HPV genotypes detected. Most notably, increasing histopathologic lymphedema stage significantly correlated with markers of productive HPV infection such as altered keratohyaline granules and HPV L1 capsid expression. Limitations of this study are the absence of normal skin controls not associated with neoplasia or subclinical lymphedema, and lack of assessment of HPV copy number per keratinocyte infected. In conclusion, productive HPV infection, not HPV type or numbers detected, distinguished lymphedematous skin from controls. These findings support the theory that lymphedema creates a region of depressed immunity that permits productive HPV infection, manifested clinically by diffuse papillomatosis, characteristic of elephantiasis.

  14. Papillomavirus E6 oncoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Vande Pol, Scott B.; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J.

    2013-01-01

    Papillomaviruses induce benign and malignant epithelial tumors, and the viral E6 oncoprotein is essential for full transformation. E6 contributes to transformation by associating with cellular proteins, docking on specific acidic LXXLL peptide motifs found on the associated cellular proteins. This review examines insights from recent studies of human and animal E6 proteins that determine the three-dimensional structure of E6 when bound to acidic LXXLL peptides. The structure of E6 is related to recent advances in the purification and identification of E6 associated protein complexes. These E6 protein-complexes, together with other proteins that bind to E6, alter a broad array of biological outcomes including modulation of cell survival, cellular transcription, host cell differentiation, growth factor dependence, DNA damage responses, and cell cycle progression. PMID:23711382

  15. Design and Methodology of the Korean Early Psychosis Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Wan; Lee, Bong Ju; Kim, Jung Jin; Yu, Je-Chun; Lee, Kyu Young; Won, Seung-Hee; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Kang, Shi Hyun

    2017-01-01

    The present study details the rationale and methodology of the Korean Early Psychosis Cohort Study (KEPS), which is a clinical cohort investigation of first episode psychosis patients from a Korean population. The KEPS is a prospective naturalistic observational cohort study that follows the participants for at least 2 years. This study includes patients between 18 and 45 years of age who fulfill the criteria for one of schizophrenia spectrum and other psychotic disorders according to the diagnostic criteria of DSM-5. Early psychosis is defined as first episode patients who received antipsychotic treatment for fewer than 4 consecutive weeks after the onset of illness or stabilized patients in the early stages of the disorder whose duration of illness was less than 2 years from the initiation of antipsychotic treatment. The primary outcome measures are treatment response, remission, recovery, and relapse. Additionally, several laboratory tests are conducted and a variety of objective and subjective psychiatric measures assessing early life trauma, lifestyle pattern, and social and cognitive functioning are administered. This long-term prospective cohort study may contribute to the development of early intervention strategies and the improvement of long-term outcomes in patients with schizophrenia. PMID:28096881

  16. A prospective analysis of smoking and human papillomavirus infection among men in the HPV in Men Study.

    PubMed

    Schabath, Matthew B; Villa, Luisa L; Lin, Hui-Yi; Fulp, William J; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Salmerón, Jorge; Abrahamsen, Martha E; Papenfuss, Mary R; Quiterio, Manuel; Giuliano, Anna R

    2014-05-15

    At present it is unknown whether the higher prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection among smokers in men is attributed to a higher probability of acquiring an infection or because of longer infection persistence. Thus, we investigated the role of smoking on the incidence (acquisition) and clearance (persistence) of genital HPV infections among 4,026 men in the HPV in Men (HIM) Study, a multinational prospective study of the natural history of genital HPV infection in men. Genital HPV infections were grouped by any, oncogenic and nononcogenic HPV infections and smoking status was categorized as current, former and never smokers. The incidence of any, oncogenic and nononcogenic HPV infections was significantly higher among current smokers compared to former and never smokers (p < 0.01). In multivariable analyses adjusting for sexual behavior and potential confounders, when compared to never smokers, current smokers exhibited significantly higher probability of acquiring any [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.23; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02-1.50] and nononcogenic (HR = 1.21; 95% CI 1.00-1.45) infections and a borderline significant probability for oncogenic infections (HR = 1.18; 95% CI 0.98-1.41). Although the median duration of HPV infection was generally longer among current smokers, we found no statistically significant associations in the multivariable analyses. Overall, these results demonstrated that current smoking exhibited the highest incidence and highest probability of acquiring genital HPV infections. © 2013 UICC.

  17. Prevalence of oral and oropharyngeal human papillomavirus in a sample of South African men: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Christy Lana; Richter, Karin Louise; Van der Linde, Mike; Coetsee, Judy; Boy, Sonja Catharina

    2014-03-26

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is well known to be associated with head and neck cancers (HNCs). HPV-associated HNCs are related to sexual behaviour, particularly the lifetime number of oral sex partners, but the epidemiology of oral and oropharyngeal HPV in South African men has not yet been studied. To determine the oral and oropharyngeal HPV strain prevalence and associated factors in a selected male population in Pretoria, South Africa (SA). Male factory workers were recruited. Oral rinse and gargle samples were tested for 37 HPV types using the Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test (Roche Molecular Systems). A questionnaire was used to obtain information regarding age, medical conditions, substance and alcohol use and sexual behaviour. HIV testing was optional. The HPV prevalence was 5.6% among men (N=125) aged 17 - 64 years. High-risk HPV (hrHPV) types 16 and 68 were found in two men. Oral sex seemed to be an uncommon practice in the majority of respondents, but the two respondents with hrHPV did practise oral sex. There was a statistically significant association between HPV infection and an increased number of sexual partners (p=0.027), but not between HPV and substance use, HIV status or clinical mucosal pathology. The prevalence of oral and oropharyngeal HPV was lower than reported in other countries. An association between oral HPV and having multiple sexual partners was found. A larger nationwide study would give a more representative view of the burden of oral and oropharyngeal HPV infection in SA.

  18. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Beliefs About Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccination Among Puerto Rican Mothers and Daughters, 2010: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Le, Yen-Chi L.; Fernández-Espada, Natalie; Calo, William A.; Savas, Lara S.; Vélez, Camille; Aragon, Angela Pattatucci; Colón-López, Vivian

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and cervical cancer can be reduced by increasing vaccination for HPV. Yet vaccination uptake and completion of the 3-dose series remain low among Puerto Rican females. This study explored psychosocial factors associated with HPV vaccination uptake decisions among Puerto Rican mothers and daughters. Methods We conducted 7 focus groups with young women aged 16 to 24 (n = 21) and their mothers (n = 9) to assess knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs related to cervical cancer, HPV, and HPV vaccination. We analyzed the focus group transcripts and identified themes by using a constant comparison method of qualitative data analysis and interpretation, guided by a grounded theory approach. Results The analysis identified several emergent themes related to vaccine uptake: 1) low knowledge about cervical cancer, HPV, and the HPV vaccine; 2) inconsistent beliefs about susceptibility to HPV infection and cervical cancer; 3) vaccine effectiveness; 4) vaccine safety and side effects; 5) concerns that the vaccine promotes sexual disinhibition; and 6) availability of insurance coverage and overall cost of the vaccine. Conclusion Our study found that adolescent girls and young women in Puerto Rico have low levels of knowledge about HPV and cervical cancer, low perceived susceptibility to HPV, and concerns about the safety and efficacy of the vaccine, and these factors may influence uptake and completion of HPV vaccination. Interventions are needed for both mothers and daughters that address these psychosocial factors and increase access to vaccination. PMID:25474384

  19. A prospective analysis of smoking and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection among men in The HPV in Men (HIM) Study

    PubMed Central

    Schabath, Matthew B.; Villa, Luisa L.; Lin, Hui-Yi; Fulp, William J.; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Salmerón, Jorge; Abrahamsen, Martha E.; Papenfuss, Mary R.; Quiterio, Manuel; Giuliano, Anna R.

    2013-01-01

    At present it is unknown whether the higher prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection among smokers in men is attributed to a higher probability of acquiring an infection or because of longer infection persistence. Thus, we investigated the role of smoking on the (acquisition) and clearance (persistence) of genital HPV infections among 4,026 men in The HPV in Men (HIM) Study, a multinational prospective study of the natural history of genital HPV infection in men. Genital HPV infections were grouped any-, oncogenic-, and non-oncogenic HPV infections and smoking status was categorized as current-, former, and never smokers. The incidence of any-, oncogenic-, and non-oncogenic HPV infections was significantly higher among current smokers compared to former- and never smokers (P < 0.01). In multivariable analyses adjusting for sexual behavior and potential confounders, when compared to never smokers, current smokers exhibited significantly higher probability of acquiring any- (Hazard Ratio [HR] = 1.23; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02 – 1.50) and non-oncogenic (HR = 1.21; 95% CI 1.00 – 1.45) infections and a borderline significant probability for oncogenic infections (HR = 1.18; 95% CI 0.98 – 1.41). Although the median duration of HPV infection was generally longer among current smokers, we found no statistically significant associations in the multivariable analyses. Overall, these results demonstrated that current smoking exhibited the highest incidence and highest probability of acquiring genital HPV infections. PMID:24222514

  20. Negative emotions and stigma associated with a human papillomavirus test result: A comparison between human papillomavirus-positive men and women.

    PubMed

    Daley, Ellen M; Vamos, Cheryl A; Wheldon, Christopher W; Kolar, Stephanie K; Baker, Elizabeth A

    2015-08-01

    Human papillomavirus has largely been framed as a women's health issue, and the psychosocial impact of human papillomavirus among men remains unclear. In this study, we found that women infected with human papillomavirus (n = 154) experienced a greater degree of negative emotions and stigma than human papillomavirus-infected men (n = 190). Among women, younger age and less education were associated with greater expression of negative emotions and stigma. Conversely, being single was significantly associated with a greater degree of negative emotions and stigma beliefs among men. These findings suggest the need to re-frame messages that both men and women receive regarding human papillomavirus. © The Author(s) 2013.

  1. Cohort profile: the European Male Ageing Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, David M; Pye, Stephen R; Tajar, Abdelouahid; O'Neill, Terence W; Finn, Joseph D; Boonen, Steven; Bartfai, Gyorgy; Casanueva, Felipe F; Forti, Gianni; Giwercman, Aleksander; Han, Thang S; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T; Kula, Krzysztof; Lean, Michael E J; Pendleton, Neil; Punab, Margus; Silman, Alan J; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Wu, Frederick C W

    2013-04-01

    The European Male Ageing Study (EMAS) was designed to examine the hypothesis that inter-individual and regional variability in symptomatic dysfunctions, alterations in body composition and health outcomes in ageing men can be explained by different rates of decline in anabolic hormones, the most important of which being testosterone. Between 2003 and 2005, 3369 community-dwelling men, aged between 40 and 79 years, were recruited from population-based registers in eight European centres to participate in the baseline survey, with follow-up investigations performed a median of 4.3 years later. Largely, identical questionnaire instruments and clinical investigations were used in both phases to capture contemporaneous data on general health (including cardiovascular diseases and chronic conditions), physical and cognitive functioning, mental health, sexual function, quality of life, bone health, chronic pain, disease biomarkers, hormones (sex hormones and metabolic hormones) and genetic polymorphisms. EMAS actively encourages new collaborations, data sharing for validation studies and participation in genetic study consortia. Potential collaborators should contact the principal investigator (F.C.W.W.) in the first instance.

  2. DRINKING WATER ARSENIC IN UTAH: A COHORT MORTALITY STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The association of drinking water arsenic and mortality outcome was investigated in a cohort of residents from Millard County, Utah. Median drinking water arsenic concentrations for selected study towns ranged from 14 to 166 ppb and were from public and private samples collected ...

  3. The Southern Community Cohort Study: Investigating Health Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Signorello, Lisa B.; Hargreaves, Margaret K.; Blot, William J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Over 73,700 adults age 40–79, nearly 70% African American, were recruited at community health centers across 12 southeastern states; individual characteristics were recorded and biologic specimens collected at baseline for later follow-up. The Southern Community Cohort Study is a unique national resource for assessing determinants of racial/ethnic differentials in diseases. PMID:20173283

  4. DRINKING WATER ARSENIC IN UTAH: A COHORT MORTALITY STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The association of drinking water arsenic and mortality outcome was investigated in a cohort of residents from Millard County, Utah. Median drinking water arsenic concentrations for selected study towns ranged from 14 to 166 ppb and were from public and private samples collected ...

  5. A Phenomenological Study of an Indonesian Cohort Group's Transformative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budiraharjo, Markus

    2013-01-01

    This study was set to investigate how a cohort of ten Indonesian teachers experienced transformations in their teaching professionalism upon receiving an assignment of instructional leadership training to other school leaders. These ten teachers, who came from three different Indonesian Jesuit high schools and one archdiocese-based educational…

  6. Multiple imputation analysis of case-cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Marti, Helena; Chavance, Michel

    2011-06-15

    The usual methods for analyzing case-cohort studies rely on sometimes not fully efficient weighted estimators. Multiple imputation might be a good alternative because it uses all the data available and approximates the maximum partial likelihood estimator. This method is based on the generation of several plausible complete data sets, taking into account uncertainty about missing values. When the imputation model is correctly defined, the multiple imputation estimator is asymptotically unbiased and its variance is correctly estimated. We show that a correct imputation model must be estimated from the fully observed data (cases and controls), using the case status among the explanatory variable. To validate the approach, we analyzed case-cohort studies first with completely simulated data and then with case-cohort data sampled from two real cohorts. The analyses of simulated data showed that, when the imputation model was correct, the multiple imputation estimator was unbiased and efficient. The observed gain in precision ranged from 8 to 37 per cent for phase-1 variables and from 5 to 19 per cent for the phase-2 variable. When the imputation model was misspecified, the multiple imputation estimator was still more efficient than the weighted estimators but it was also slightly biased. The analyses of case-cohort data sampled from complete cohorts showed that even when no strong predictor of the phase-2 variable was available, the multiple imputation was unbiased, as precised as the weighted estimator for the phase-2 variable and slightly more precise than the weighted estimators for the phase-1 variables. However, the multiple imputation estimator was found to be biased when, because of interaction terms, some coefficients of the imputation model had to be estimated from small samples. Multiple imputation is an efficient technique for analyzing case-cohort data. Practically, we suggest building the analysis model using only the case-cohort data and weighted

  7. Perceived employability trajectories: A Swedish cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Törnroos (née Kirves), Kaisa; Bernhard-Oettel, Claudia; Leineweber, Constanze

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: This study identified perceived employability trajectories and their associations with sleeping difficulties and depressive symptoms over time. Methods: The sample was part of the Swedish Longitudinal Survey on Health from 2008 to 2014 (n=4,583). Results: Two stable trajectories (high and low perceived employability over time) and three trajectories with changes (increasing, decreasing, and V-shaped perceived employability over time) were identified. Workers with stable low perceived employability reported more sleeping difficulties and depressive symptoms than those who perceived high or increasing employability. Conclusion: Perceived employability is a rather stable personal resource, which is associated with well-being over time. However, changes in perceived employability do not seem to be echoed in well-being, at least not as immediately as theoretically expected. PMID:28539535

  8. Studies on Early Allergic Sensitization in the Lithuanian Birth Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Dubakiene, Ruta; Rudzeviciene, Odilija; Butiene, Indre; Sezaite, Indre; Petronyte, Malvina; Vaicekauskaite, Dalia; Zvirbliene, Aurelija

    2012-01-01

    Cohort studies are of great importance in defining the mechanism responsible for the development of allergy-associated diseases, such as atopic dermatitis, allergic asthma, and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis. Although these disorders share genetic and environmental risk factors, it is still under debate whether they are linked or develop sequentially along an atopic pathway. The current study was aimed to determine the pattern of allergy sensitization in the Lithuanian birth cohort “Alergemol” (n = 1558) established as a part of the multicenter European birth cohort “EuroPrevall”. Early sensitization to food allergens in the “Alergemol” birth cohort was analysed. The analysis revealed 1.3% and 2.8% of symptomatic-sensitized subjects at 6 and 12 months of age, respectively. The sensitization pattern in response to different allergens in the group of infants with food allergy symptoms was studied using allergological methods in vivo and in vitro. The impact of maternal and environmental risk factors on the early development of food allergy in at 6 and 12 months of age was evaluated. Our data showed that maternal diet, diseases, the use of antibiotics, and tobacco smoke during pregnancy had no significant impact on the early sensitization to food allergens. However, infants of atopic mothers were significantly more often sensitized to egg as compared to the infants of nonatopic mothers. PMID:22606067

  9. Human papillomavirus prevalence and associated factors in women and men in south China: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Feixue; Yin, Kai; Wu, Xin; Lan, Jian; Huang, Shoujie; Sheng, Wei; Zhao, Jun; Su, Yingying; Wang, Ying; Li, Yanping; Li, Rongcheng; Zhang, Jun; Li, Mingqiang; Wu, Ting; Xia, Ningshao

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a cause of many anogenital cancers in women and men; however, there is little research on HPV prevalence and risk factors that includes both women and men from the same population. A total of 4687 participants, including 2378 women and 2309 men aged 18–55 years old from the same community, were enrolled in the study in Liuzhou, China. Exfoliated cells were collected from the participants from different anatomic sites and were tested for 13 oncogenic and 3 non-oncogenic HPV types. The prevalence of any oncogenic HPV type was higher in women than in men (18.7% vs 9.4%, P<0.001), whereas the prevalence of HPV 6 and 11 infection was similar (1.4% vs 1.2%, P=0.6832). HPV 52, 58, 16, 39 and 18 were the five most prevalent types in both sexes. Sexual and hygienic behaviors were associated with HPV infection in both women and men. We found that oncogenic HPV DNA detection is more prevalent in women than in men in China, whereas the prevalence of HPV 6 and 11 is similar in both sexes. The data indicate that the interaction of host and virus might be different among high- and low-risk HPV types. PMID:27876782

  10. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) L1 Serum Antibodies and the Risk of Subsequent Oral HPV Acquisition in Men: The HIM Study.

    PubMed

    Pierce Campbell, Christine M; Viscidi, Raphael P; Torres, B Nelson; Lin, Hui-Yi; Fulp, William; Abrahamsen, Martha; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Villa, Luisa L; Kreimer, Aimée R; Giuliano, Anna R

    2016-07-01

    The role of antibody-mediated immunity in preventing newly acquired oral human papillomavirus (HPV) is not well understood. Among 1618 men participating in the HPV Infection in Men (HIM) Study, we evaluated oral rinses for HPV DNA and baseline sera for HPV-6, -11, -16, and -18 L1 antibodies. Thirty percent of men (486) were seropositive for ≥1 HPV type, and 25 men developed incident oral HPV infection (HPV-6 was detected in 7, HPV-11 in 0, HPV-16 in 17, and HPV-18 in 1). Cox models revealed that men with circulating antibodies to HPV-6, -11, -16, or -18 were not less likely to acquire type-specific oral HPV than men without antibodies (hazard ratio for the risk of acquiring HPV-6, -11, -16, or -18, 1.63; 95% confidence interval, .56-4.76). © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Clustering of Multiple Human Papillomavirus Infections in Women From a Population-Based Study in Guanacaste, Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Franceschi, Silvia; Herrero, Rolando; Schiffman, Mark; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Hildesheim, Allan; Burk, Robert D.; Plummer, Martyn

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate clustering patterns of prevalent infection with multiple human papillomavirus (HPV) types in 8365 nonhysterectomized women from the Guanacaste Study of HPV Natural History. Methods. HPV testing was performed on cervical cells by MY09/M11 L1 degenerate consensus primer polymerase chain reaction method, with dot-blot hybridization for genotyping. Logistic regression was used to model type-specific HPV positivity, adjusted for age, lifetime number of sexual partners, and specific HPV type prevalence. Woman-level random effects were added to represent unobservable risk factors common to all HPV types. Results. The observed-to-expected ratio for infections with 2 types was 1.16 (95% credible interval: 1.11–1.21) and for ≥3 types was 1.04 (95% credible interval: .96–1.13). The tendency of HPV types to cluster increased significantly with the genetic similarity of L1 regions. P value < .01 was observed for 2 HPV pairs: HPV-62 and -81 were found together more, while HPV-51 and -71 were found together less often than expected. Conclusions. We found a small degree of aggregation between any HPV types and lack of clustering between specific carcinogenic types. Our data indirectly provide reassurance on lack of misclassification for the large majority of HPV types in multiple infections detected by the MY09/11 method and genotyped using dot-blot hybridization. PMID:21742837

  12. Discussing a diagnosis of human papillomavirus oropharyngeal cancer with patients: An exploratory qualitative study of health professionals

    PubMed Central

    Dodd, Rachael H.; Marlow, Laura A. V.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background The role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer (SCC) has now been well established. Clinicians' experiences and challenges of talking to patients about HPV have yet to be explored. Methods Fifteen health professionals caring for patients with oropharyngeal SCC were interviewed. Interviews were analyzed thematically. Results Participants expressed mixed views about explaining the causal role of HPV to their patients. Normalizing HPV and emphasizing the positive prognosis associated with it were regarded as key messages to be communicated. Challenging experiences included managing couples in a consultation and patients' concerns about transmitting HPV to their partners. Some participants described limitations to their HPV knowledge and identified the need for further information and training. Conclusion This study identified challenges experienced by health professionals working with patients with oropharyngeal SCC and highlights some key messages to convey to patients. Clinical guidance for health professionals and further information for patients about HPV‐positive oropharyngeal SCC are needed. © 2015 The Authors Head & Neck Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: 394–401, 2016 PMID:25351993

  13. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccination Motivators, Barriers, and Brochure Preferences Among Parents in Multicultural Hawai'i: a Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Dela Cruz, May Rose Isnec; Tsark, Jo Ann Umilani; Chen, John Jiangtian; Albright, Cheryl Lynn; Braun, Kathryn Lenzner

    2016-03-07

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine can prevent cervical and other cancers. Unfortunately, according to the National Immunization Survey-Teen 2014 data, completion of the HPV vaccine was only 38 % for 13- to 17-year-old girls and 31 % for 13- to17-year-old boys in the USA, and prevalence was similar in Hawai'i. Parents' acceptability of the HPV vaccine is critical for the vaccine uptake, and this can be increased by educational materials and interventions. However, HPV materials are not widely distributed in Hawai'i. The purpose of this qualitative study was to identify HPV vaccination barriers, motivators, and brochure preferences among parents of teens in multicultural Hawai'i. Twenty parents were interviewed in person or by telephone. Four major themes emerged: (1) the physician is critical in the decision to vaccinate, (2) parental perception of the child's sexual activity guides the timing of their willingness to vaccinate, (3) HPV health education materials should be provided and discussed by the physician, and (4) parents would prefer an educational brochure that features local faces and testimonials, includes an immunization chart, and addresses barriers to vaccination. These findings informed the development of HPV health education materials tailored to Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in Hawai'i.

  14. The role of media and the Internet on vaccine adverse event reporting: a case study of human papillomavirus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Eberth, Jan M; Kline, Kimberly N; Moskowitz, David A; Montealegre, Jane R; Scheurer, Michael E

    2014-03-01

    This study aimed to determine the temporal association of print media coverage and Internet search activity with adverse events reports associated with the human papillomavirus vaccine Gardasil (HPV4) and the meningitis vaccine Menactra (MNQ) among United States adolescents. We used moderated linear regression to test the relationships between print media reports in top circulating newspapers, Internet search activity, and reports to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) for HPV4 and MNQ during the first 2.5 years after Food and Drug Administration approval. Compared with MNQ, HPV4 had more coverage in the print media and Internet search activity, which corresponded with the frequency of VAERS reports. In February 2007, we observed a spike in print media for HPV4. Although media coverage waned, Internet search activity remained stable and predicted the rise in HPV4-associated VAERS reports. We demonstrate that media coverage and Internet search activity, in particular, may promote increased adverse event reporting. Public health officials who have long recognized the importance of proactive engagement with news media must now consider strategies for meaningful participation in Internet discussions. Copyright © 2014 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Dalfampridine prior authorization program: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Gleason, Patrick P; Phillips, Jill; Fenrick, Beckie A; Delgado-Riley, Ana; Starner, Catherine I

    2013-01-01

    Dalfampridine (Ampyra) is indicated to improve walking in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and was found to be effective in 35%-43% of individuals with MS in clinical trials. Dalfampridine may increase seizure risk, particularly in patients with renal impairment. A U.S. managed care expert consensus panel agreed that patient access to dalfampridine is best managed by a prior authorization (PA) in accordance with the FDA-approved labeling. To ensure safe and appropriate dalfampridine use, a health plan developed and implemented a 2-phase point-of-sale PA program. To evaluate dalfampridine PA review decisions, utilization, and pharmacy expenditures following the implementation of a dalfampridine safety and clinical PA program compared with a group of dalfampridine utilizers unexposed to a PA program. The study utilized retrospective administrative pharmacy claims data from a commercial health plan averaging 1.3 million members per month. The plan implemented a 2-phase dalfampridine safety and effectiveness PA program on August 1, 2010. A comparison group that did not implement the dalfampridine PA program was identified from a commercially insured population with approximately 350,000 members per month. Members in both groups were required to be continuously enrolled from August 1, 2010, through January 31, 2011. A member's earliest paid or rejected claim found from August 1, 2010, through October 31, 2010, was defined as the index claim. Dalfampridine-weighted 30-day supply claims were summed and compared between groups from index date through January 31, 2011. A pharmacy cost avoidance estimate was calculated using the difference in average claims per member from index claim through January 31, 2011, multiplied by dalfampridine wholesale acquisition cost. Overall, dalfampridine utilization was evaluated between the intervention and comparison populations from August 2010 (implementation of PA in intervention group) through December 2011. Linear regression and

  16. Cohort Profile Update: The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).

    PubMed

    Magnus, Per; Birke, Charlotte; Vejrup, Kristine; Haugan, Anita; Alsaker, Elin; Daltveit, Anne Kjersti; Handal, Marte; Haugen, Margaretha; Høiseth, Gudrun; Knudsen, Gun Peggy; Paltiel, Liv; Schreuder, Patricia; Tambs, Kristian; Vold, Line; Stoltenberg, Camilla

    2016-04-01

    This is an update of the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) cohort profile which was published in 2006. Pregnant women attending a routine ultrasound examination were initially invited. The first child was born in October 1999 and the last in July 2009. The participation rate was 41%. The cohort includes more than 114 000 children, 95 000 mothers and 75 000 fathers. About 1900 pairs of twins have been born. There are approximately 16 400 women who participate with more than one pregnancy. Blood samples were obtained from both parents during pregnancy and from mothers and children (umbilical cord) after birth. Samples of DNA, RNA, whole blood, plasma and urine are stored in a biobank. During pregnancy, the mother responded to three questionnaires and the father to one. After birth, questionnaires were sent out when the child was 6 months, 18 months and 3 years old. Several sub-projects have selected participants for in-depth clinical assessment and exposure measures. The purpose of this update is to explain and describe new additions to the data collection, including questionnaires at 5, 7, 8 and 13 years as well as linkages to health registries, and to point to some findings and new areas of research. Further information can be found at [www.fhi.no/moba-en]. Researchers interested in collaboration and access to the data can complete an electronic application available on the MoBa website above. © The Author 2016; all rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.

  17. Diabetes and burns: retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    McCampbell, Beth; Wasif, Nabil; Rabbitts, Angela; Staiano-Coico, Lisa; Yurt, Roger W; Schwartz, Suzanne

    2002-01-01

    Burn injuries are often associated with multisystemic complications, even in otherwise healthy individuals. It is therefore intuitive that for the diabetic patient, the underlying pathophysiologic alterations in vascular supply, peripheral neuropathy, and immune function could have a profoundly devastating impact on patient outcome. The effects of diabetes on morbidity and mortality of the burn-injured patient have not been examined in great detail. The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare clinical outcomes between diabetic and nondiabetic burn patients. We reviewed the charts of 181 diabetic (DM) and 190 nondiabetic (nDM) patients admitted with burns between January 1996 and May 2000, matched by sex and date of admission. Burn cause and size, time to presentation, clinical course, and outcomes were evaluated. Because age was a factor, the analysis was done by three age groups: younger than 18 years, 18 to 65 years, and older than 65 years. Of patients 18 to 65 years, 51% (98/191) were diabetic, whereas 84% (81/96) of those older than 65 and only 4% (3/85) of patients younger than 18 were diabetic. Because of the disproportion in numbers of diabetics compared with nondiabetics in the younger than 18 and older than 65 years-old groups, these patients will not be discussed. Diabetics were more likely to incur scald injury from tub or shower water rather than hot fluid spills (33% DM vs 15% nDM; P < or = 0.01), and have a delayed presentation (45 vs 23%; P = 0.00001). There was no difference in total burn size in all groups. Diabetics in the 18 to 65 years group had a higher rate of full-thickness burns (51 vs 31%; P = 0.025), skin grafts (50 vs 28%; P = 0.01) and burn-related procedures (57 vs 32%; P = 0.001), infections (65 vs 51%; P = 0.05), and longer lengths of stay (23 vs 12 days; P = 0.0001). Although there was no statistically significant difference in incidence of specific infections, the rates of cellulitis, wound infection, urinary tract

  18. [Historical cohort study in the German rubber industry: goals, study design and data collection].

    PubMed

    Birk, T; Weiland, S K; Schumann, J; Person, M; Mundt, K; Keil, U

    1995-01-01

    A historical cohort study is carried out to investigate occupational hazards in the German rubber industry since 1991. We present and discuss the study objectives and study design features such as cohort definition, assessment of occupational exposure and selection of the reference population. Cohort enumeration, assessment of vital status and cause of death ascertainment are described. With approximately 2,800 deaths throughout the observation period 1981 to 1991 it will be possible also to study the occupational etiology of rare diseases.

  19. Cohort profile: the housing regeneration and health study.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Sarah E; Heaven, Martin; Lacey, Arron; Poortinga, Wouter; Dunstan, Frank D; Jones, Kerina H; Palmer, Stephen R; Phillips, Ceri J; Smith, Robert; John, Ann; Davies, Gwyneth A; Lyons, Ronan A

    2014-02-01

    A cohort comprising residents of a housing regeneration and health programme was created from routinely collected data using a system which allows us to anonymously link housing data to individuals and their health. The regeneration programme incorporating four rolling work packages runs from 2009 to 2014. The main intervention cohort we describe here contains the 18 312 residents of 9051 residences at baseline. The cohort will be followed continuously through routine health data (demographics, mortality, hospital admissions and general practitioner records including prescriptions) with periodic updates of housing regeneration intervention data. Here, we describe the baseline data for the primary health outcomes of emergency hospital admissions for cardiovascular and respiratory conditions and injuries for those aged ≥60 years. We will compare the health of residents within the homes before and after the housing regeneration work has taken place, and we will calculate the change in health service costs with use of hospital and General Practitioners (GP) services. We will also use a difference in differences approach to assess changes in comparison with comparator cohorts. These data will be accessible at the end of the study period in 2016. Further information about this study can be obtained from Ronan Lyons; r.a.lyons@swansea.ac.uk.

  20. Cohort Profile: The French Childhood Cancer Survivor Study For Leukaemia (LEA Cohort)

    PubMed Central

    Berbis, Julie; Michel, Gérard; Baruchel, André; Bertrand, Yves; Chastagner, Pascal; Demeocq, François; Kanold, Justyna; Leverger, Guy; Plantaz, Dominique; Poirée, Marilyne; Stephan, Jean-Louis; Auquier, Pascal; Contet, Audrey; Dalle, Jean-Hugues; Ducassou, Stéphane; Gandemer, Virginie; Lutz, Patrick; Sirvent, Nicolas; Tabone, Marie-Dominique; Thouvenin-Doulet, Sandrine

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of the Leucémies de l’Enfant et l’Adolescent (LEA) project (Childhood and Adolescent Leukaemia) is to study the determinants (medical, socioeconomic, behavioural and environmental) of medium- and long-term outcomes of patients treated for childhood acute leukaemia (AL). The LEA study began in 2004 and is based on a French multicentric prospective cohort. Included are children treated for AL since January 1980 (incident and prevalent cases), surviving at month 24 for myeloblastic AL and lymphoblastic AL grafted in first complete remission or at month 48 for lymphoblastic AL not grafted in first complete remission. Information is collected during specific medical visits and notably includes the following data: socioeconomic data, AL history, physical late effects (such as fertility, cardiac function and metabolic syndrome) and quality of life. Data are collected every 2 years until the patient is 20 years old and has had a 10-year follow-up duration from diagnosis or last relapse. Thereafter, assessments are planned every 4 years. In active centres in 2013, eligible patients number more than 3000. The cohort has already included 2385 survivors, with rate of exhaustiveness of almost 80%. Data access can be requested from principal coordinators and must be approved by the steering committee. PMID:24639445

  1. One-to-many propensity score matching in cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Rassen, Jeremy A; Shelat, Abhi A; Myers, Jessica; Glynn, Robert J; Rothman, Kenneth J; Schneeweiss, Sebastian

    2012-05-01

    Among the large number of cohort studies that employ propensity score matching, most match patients 1:1. Increasing the matching ratio is thought to improve precision but may come with a trade-off with respect to bias. To evaluate several methods of propensity score matching in cohort studies through simulation and empirical analyses. We simulated cohorts of 20,000 patients with exposure prevalence of 10%-50%. We simulated five dichotomous and five continuous confounders. We estimated propensity scores and matched using digit-based greedy ("greedy"), pairwise nearest neighbor within a caliper ("nearest neighbor"), and a nearest neighbor approach that sought to balance the scores of the comparison patient above and below that of the treated patient ("balanced nearest neighbor"). We matched at both fixed and variable matching ratios and also evaluated sequential and parallel schemes for the order of formation of 1:n match groups. We then applied this same approach to two cohorts of patients drawn from administrative claims data. Increasing the match ratio beyond 1:1 generally resulted in somewhat higher bias. It also resulted in lower variance with variable ratio matching but higher variance with fixed. The parallel approach generally resulted in higher mean squared error but lower bias than the sequential approach. Variable ratio, parallel, balanced nearest neighbor matching generally yielded the lowest bias and mean squared error. 1:n matching can be used to increase precision in cohort studies. We recommend a variable ratio, parallel, balanced 1:n, nearest neighbor approach that increases precision over 1:1 matching at a small cost in bias. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training at ... of Cancer, 1975-2009, featuring the burden and trends in human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cancers and HPV ...

  3. The Antecedents of Schizophrenia: A Review of Birth Cohort Studies

    PubMed Central

    Welham, Joy; Isohanni, Matti; Jones, Peter; McGrath, John

    2009-01-01

    Background: Birth cohort (BC) studies demonstrate that individuals who develop schizophrenia differ from the general population on a range of developmental indices. The aims of this article were to summarize key findings from BC studies in order to identify areas of convergence and to outline areas requiring further research. Method: We define BC studies as studies based on general population BCs where data are collected prospectively from birth or childhood and which identify schizophrenia or related disorders as an outcome. To identify such studies, we searched various electronic databases using the search parameters (schizo* OR psych*) AND (birth cohort). We also checked the references of relevant articles and previous reviews. Results: We identified 11 BCs from 7 countries that have examined schizophrenia as an outcome in adulthood. There is relatively consistent evidence that, as a group, children who later develop schizophrenia have behavioral disturbances and psychopathology, intellectual and language deficits, and early motor delays. Evidence with respect to alterations in language, educational performance, and physical growth has also been identified in some studies. BC studies have also contributed evidence about a wide range of putative risk factors for schizophrenia. Conclusions: BC studies have provided important, convergent insights into how the developmental trajectory of individuals who develop schizophrenia differs from their peers. The combination of new paradigms and larger cohorts, with the tools of modern epidemiology and biomedical science, is advancing our understanding of the developmental pathways to schizophrenia. PMID:18658128

  4. Bidirectional association between ESRD dialysis and diabetes: National cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Yeh-Wen; Wu, Wen-Shiann; Hsu, Chen-Fang; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Weng, Shih-Feng; Chien, Chih-Chiang

    2017-01-01

    Background Diabetes is associated with development of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) dialysis, but it is not clear whether ESRD dialysis is a risk factor for new-onset diabetes (NODM). Methods Using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, we designed two cohort studies to determine the association between dialysis and diabetes. Analysis 1 estimated the hazard ratios (HR) of ESRD dialysis in 20,585 patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and 82,340 gender- and age- matched controls without diabetes. Analysis 2 estimated the HRs of NODM in 18,489 ESRD patients undergoing dialysis and 73,956 gender- and age- matched controls without ESRD dialysis. The follow-up period was from 2000 to date of endpoint, the date of death, or December 31, 2008. Cox proportional models were used to estimate the relative hazards. Results In analysis 1, the incidence of ESRD dialysis was higher in the T2DM cohort than in the non-diabetes cohort (6.78 vs. 0.61 per 1,000 person-years; HR: 7.97; 95%CI: 7.05–8.00). In analysis 2, the incidence of NODM was higher in the ESRD dialysis cohort than in the without-ESRD dialysis cohort (22.84 vs. 13.99 per 1,000 person-years; HR: 1.40; 95% CI: 1.34–1.47). Conclusions ESRD dialysis and diabetes were bidirectionally associated. The relationship between T2DM and incident ESRD dialysis was much stronger than between ESRD dialysis and NODM. Further studies are needed to determine the mechanism of ESRD dialysis-related NODM. PMID:28296932

  5. A Randomized Intervention Study to Evaluate Whether Electronic Messaging Can Increase Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Completion and Knowledge among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richman, Alice R.; Maddy, LaDonna; Torres, Essie; Goldberg, Ellen J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate an intervention aimed at increasing human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine completion of the 3-dose series and knowledge. Participants: Two hundred sixty-four male and female US college students 18-26 years old who were receiving HPV vaccine dose 1. Methods: Students were randomly assigned to the intervention or control group.…

  6. A Randomized Intervention Study to Evaluate Whether Electronic Messaging Can Increase Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Completion and Knowledge among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richman, Alice R.; Maddy, LaDonna; Torres, Essie; Goldberg, Ellen J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate an intervention aimed at increasing human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine completion of the 3-dose series and knowledge. Participants: Two hundred sixty-four male and female US college students 18-26 years old who were receiving HPV vaccine dose 1. Methods: Students were randomly assigned to the intervention or control group.…

  7. Systematic review of birth cohort studies in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Alasdair; Rudan, Igor

    2011-01-01

    Aim In sub-Saharan Africa, unacceptably high rates of mortality amongst women and children continue to persist. The emergence of research employing new genomic technologies is advancing knowledge on cause of disease. This review aims to identify birth cohort studies conducted in sub-Saharan Africa and to consider their suitability as a platform to support genetic epidemiological studies. Methods A systematic literature review was conducted to identify birth cohort studies in sub-Saharan Africa across the following databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, AFRO and OpenSIGLE. A total of 8110 papers were retrieved. Application of inclusion/exclusion criteria retained only 189 papers, of which 71 met minimum quality criteria and were retained for full text analysis. Results The search revealed 28 birth cohorts: 14 of which collected biological data, 10 collected blood samples and only one study collected DNA for storage. These studies face many methodological challenges: notably, high rates of attrition and lack of funding for several rounds of study follow up. Population-based ‘biobanks’ have emerged as a major approach to harness genomic technologies in health research and yet the sub-Saharan African region still awaits large scale birth cohort biobanks collecting DNA and associated health and lifestyle data. Conclusion Investment in this field, together with related endeavours to foster and develop research capacity for these studies, may lead to an improved understanding of the determinants of intrauterine growth and development, birth outcomes such as prematurity and low birth weight, the links between maternal and infant health, survival of infectious diseases in the first years of life, and response to vaccines and antibiotic treatment. PMID:23198102

  8. [The design of a nationwide cohort study in Germany : the pretest studies of the German National Cohort (GNC)].

    PubMed

    Ahrens, W; Greiser, H; Linseisen, J; Kluttig, A; Schipf, S; Schmidt, B; Günther, K

    2014-11-01

    The German National Cohort (GNC) is the largest population-based cohort study in Germany. Beginning in 2014, a total of 200,000 women and men aged 20-69 years will be examined in 18 study centers. The aim of the study is to investigate the etiology of chronic diseases in relation to lifestyle, genetic, socioeconomic, and environmental factors and to develop appropriate methods for early diagnosis and prevention of diseases such as cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, cancer, diabetes, neurodegenerative/psychiatric diseases, as well as musculoskeletal and infectious diseases. Pretest studies (phase 1 and 2) were conducted to select methods, instruments, and procedures for the main study, to develop standard operating procedures, and to design and test the examination program according to acceptance, expected duration, and feasibility. The pretest studies included testing of interviews, questionnaires, anthropometric measurements, several medical examinations, and the collection of biosamples. In addition, the logistic, technical, and personnel infrastructure for the main study could be established including the study centers, the central infrastructure for data management, processes to coordinate the study, and data protection and quality management concepts. The examination program for the main phase of the GNC was designed and optimized based on the results of the pretest studies. The GNC is a population-based, highly standardized and excellently phenotyped cohort that will be the basis for new strategies for risk assessment and identification, early diagnosis, and prevention of multifactorial diseases.

  9. Comparison of the vaginal microbiota diversity of women with and without human papillomavirus infection: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Gao, Weijiao; Weng, Jinlong; Gao, Yunong; Chen, Xiaochi

    2013-06-10

    The female genital tract is an important bacterial habitat of the human body, and vaginal microbiota plays a crucial role in vaginal health. The alteration of vaginal microbiota affects millions of women annually, and is associated with numerous adverse health outcomes, including human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. However, previous studies have primarily focused on the association between bacterial vaginosis and HPV infection. Little is known about the composition of vaginal microbial communities involved in HPV acquisition. The present study was performed to investigate whether HPV infection was associated with the diversity and composition of vaginal microbiota. A total of 70 healthy women (32 HPV-negative and 38 HPV-positive) with normal cervical cytology were enrolled in this study. Culture-independent polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was used to measure the diversity and composition of vaginal microbiota of all subjects. We found significantly greater biological diversity in the vaginal microbiota of HPV-positive women (p < 0.001). Lactobacillus, including L. gallinarum, L. iners and L. gasseri, was the predominant genus and was detected in all women. No significant difference between HPV-positive and HPV-negative women was found for the frequency of detection of L. gallinarum (p = 0.775) or L. iners (p = 0.717), but L. gasseri was found at a significantly higher frequency in HPV-positive women (p = 0.005). Gardnerella vaginalis was also found at a significantly higher frequency in HPV-positive women (p = 0.031). Dendrograms revealed that vaginal microbiota from the two groups had different profiles. Our study is the first systematic evaluation of an association between vaginal microbiota and HPV infection, and we have demonstrated that compared with HPV-negative women, the bacterial diversity of HPV-positive women is more complex and the composition of vaginal microbiota is different.

  10. Targeted Facebook Advertising is a Novel and Effective Method of Recruiting Participants into a Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Effectiveness Study

    PubMed Central

    Wark, John D; Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Garland, Suzanne M

    2016-01-01

    Background Targeted advertising using social networking sites (SNS) as a recruitment strategy in health research is in its infancy. Objective The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of targeted Facebook advertisements to increase recruitment of unvaccinated women into a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine effectiveness study. Methods Between September 2011 and November 2013, females aged 18 to 25 years, residing in Victoria, Australia, were recruited through Facebook advertisements relating to general women’s health. From November 2013 to June 2015, targeted advertising campaigns were implemented to specifically recruit women who had not received the HPV vaccine. Consenting participants were invited to complete an online questionnaire and those who had ever had sexual intercourse were asked to provide a self-collected vaginal swab. The HPV vaccination status of participants was confirmed from the National HPV Vaccination Program Register (NHVPR). Results The campaign comprised 10 advertisements shown between September 2011 and June 2015 which generated 55,381,637 impressions, yielding 23,714 clicks, at an overall cost of AUD $22,078.85. A total of 919 participants were recruited. A greater proportion of unvaccinated women (50.4%, 131/260) were recruited into the study following targeted advertising, compared with those recruited (19.3%, 127/659) prior to showing the modified advertisement (P<.001). A greater proportion of the total sample completed tertiary education and resided in inner regional Victoria, compared with National population census data (P<.001), but was otherwise representative of the general population. Conclusions Targeted Facebook advertising is a rapid and cost-effective way of recruiting young unvaccinated women into a HPV vaccine effectiveness study. PMID:27450586

  11. Targeted Facebook Advertising is a Novel and Effective Method of Recruiting Participants into a Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Effectiveness Study.

    PubMed

    Subasinghe, Asvini K; Nguyen, Margaret; Wark, John D; Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Garland, Suzanne M

    2016-07-22

    Targeted advertising using social networking sites (SNS) as a recruitment strategy in health research is in its infancy. The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of targeted Facebook advertisements to increase recruitment of unvaccinated women into a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine effectiveness study. Between September 2011 and November 2013, females aged 18 to 25 years, residing in Victoria, Australia, were recruited through Facebook advertisements relating to general women's health. From November 2013 to June 2015, targeted advertising campaigns were implemented to specifically recruit women who had not received the HPV vaccine. Consenting participants were invited to complete an online questionnaire and those who had ever had sexual intercourse were asked to provide a self-collected vaginal swab. The HPV vaccination status of participants was confirmed from the National HPV Vaccination Program Register (NHVPR). The campaign comprised 10 advertisements shown between September 2011 and June 2015 which generated 55,381,637 impressions, yielding 23,714 clicks, at an overall cost of AUD $22,078.85. A total of 919 participants were recruited. A greater proportion of unvaccinated women (50.4%, 131/260) were recruited into the study following targeted advertising, compared with those recruited (19.3%, 127/659) prior to showing the modified advertisement (P<.001). A greater proportion of the total sample completed tertiary education and resided in inner regional Victoria, compared with National population census data (P<.001), but was otherwise representative of the general population. Targeted Facebook advertising is a rapid and cost-effective way of recruiting young unvaccinated women into a HPV vaccine effectiveness study.

  12. Cohort Profile: The Manitoba Follow-up Study (MFUS).

    PubMed

    Tate, Robert B; Cuddy, T Edward; Mathewson, Francis A L

    2015-10-01

    The Manitoba Follow-up Study (MFUS) is Canada's longest running study of cardiovascular disease and ageing. The MFUS cohort consists of 3983 men recruited from the Royal Canadian Air Force at the end of World War II. At entry to the study, 1 July 1948, their mean age was 31 years, with 90% between ages 20 and 39 years. All study members were free of clinical evidence of ischaemic heart disease. The protocol of MFUS was to obtain routine medical examinations from these men at regular intervals over time. The research goal of the study was to examine the role that any abnormalities detected on routine electrocardiograms from apparently healthy men might play in the prediction of subsequent diagnoses of cardiovascular disease. Over the course of 65 years, about 35% of the cohort has documented evidence of ischaemic heart disease. The research focus was expanded in 1996 to explore the roles of physical, mental and social functioning in support of healthy and successful ageing. On 1 July 2013, 429 original cohort members were alive with a mean age of 92 years. Collaborative research with others outside the in-house team is welcomed.

  13. Prevalence of human papillomavirus in women without cervical cancer: a population-based study in Eastern India.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Sankhadeep; Begum, Rakiba; Mazumder Indra, Dipanjana; Mandal, Shyam Sundar; Mondal, Ranajit; Biswas, Jaydip; Dey, Bindu; Panda, Chinmay Kumar; Basu, Partha

    2012-03-01

    Despite the high incidence of cervical cancer, population-based data on prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) are limited in India. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of any HPV type and type-specific prevalence of HPV 16/18 in women without cervical cancer. HPV viral load was measured and correlated with cytologic abnormalities of the cervix. A total of 2501 women between 25 and 65 years of age and without cervical cancer were screened by pap smear cytology. HPV DNA was detected from cervical scrapes by nested polymerase chain reaction. Detection of HPV 16/18 was carried out by polymerase chain reaction using type-specific primers and was confirmed by Southern hybridization. Viral load was determined by absolute real-time polymerase chain reaction. Population prevalence of any HPV was found to be 9.9%. The risk of HPV infection was higher in women aged 25 to 34 years (odds ratio, 1.11), in married women below 20 years of age (odds ratio, 1.80), and in women with parity ≥4 (odds ratio, 1.04). Prevalence of HPV 18 (1.4%) was greater than that of HPV 16 (0.6%) in the overall screened population. High-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion cytology was more frequent in women infected with HPV 16 than in those infected with HPV 18 and other types. A gradual increase in HPV copy numbers was associated with progressive cytologic severity. In this study, HPV prevalence is comparable to HPV prevalence reported by other studies among Indian and Asian women. Although the prevalence of HPV 18 was more than that of HPV 16, type 16 infection was associated with higher oncogenicity.

  14. A large, population-based study of age-related associations between vaginal pH and human papillomavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Vaginal pH is related to genital tract inflammation and changes in the bacterial flora, both suggested cofactors for persistence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. To evaluate the relationship between vaginal pH and HPV, we analyzed data from our large population-based study in Guanacaste, Costa Rica. We examined vaginal pH and the risk of HPV infection, cytological abnormalities, and C. trachomatis infection. Methods Our study included 9,165 women aged 18-97 at enrollment with a total of 28,915 visits (mean length of follow-up = 3.4 years). Generalized estimating equations were used to evaluate the relationship between vaginal pH and HPV infection (both overall and single versus multiple types) and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), the cytomorphic manifestation of HPV infection. The relationship between enrollment vaginal pH and C. trachomatis infection was assessed by logistic regression. Results were stratified by age at visit. Results Detection of HPV was positively associated with vaginal pH, mainly in women < 35 years (p-trend = 0.009 and 0.007 for women aged < 25 and 25-34 years, respectively). Elevated vaginal pH was associated with 30% greater risk of infection with multiple HPV types and with LSIL, predominantly in women younger than 35 and 65+ years of age. Detection of C. trachomatis DNA was associated with increased vaginal pH in women < 25 years (OR 2.2 95% CI 1.0-5.0). Conclusions Our findings suggest a possible association of the cervical microenvironment as a modifier of HPV natural history in the development of cervical precancer and cancer. Future research should include studies of vaginal pH in a more complex assessment of hormonal changes and the cervicovaginal microbiome as they relate to the natural history of cervical neoplasia. PMID:22316377

  15. Predictors of human papillomavirus infection in women undergoing routine cervical cancer screening in Spain: the CLEOPATRE study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a sexually transmitted infection that may lead to development of precancerous and cancerous lesions of the cervix. The aim of the current study was to investigate socio-demographic, lifestyle, and medical factors for potential associations with cervical HPV infection in women undergoing cervical cancer screening in Spain. Methods The CLEOPATRE Spain study enrolled 3 261 women aged 18–65 years attending cervical cancer screening across the 17 Autonomous Communities. Liquid-based cervical samples underwent cytological examination and HPV testing. HPV positivity was determined using the Hybrid Capture II assay, and HPV genotyping was conducted using the INNO-LiPA HPV Genotyping Extra assay. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify putative risk factors for HPV infection. Results A lifetime number of two or more sexual partners, young age (18–25 years), a history of genital warts, and unmarried status were the strongest independent risk factors for HPV infection of any type. Living in an urban community, country of birth other than Spain, low level of education, and current smoking status were also independent risk factors for HPV infection. A weak inverse association between condom use and HPV infection was observed. Unlike monogamous women, women with two or more lifetime sexual partners showed a lower risk of infection if their current partner was circumcised (P for interaction, 0.005) and a higher risk of infection if they were current smokers (P for interaction, 0.01). Conclusion This is the first large-scale, country-wide study exploring risk factors for cervical HPV infection in Spain. The data strongly indicate that variables related to sexual behavior are the main risk factors for HPV infection. In addition, in non-monogamous women, circumcision of the partner is associated with a reduced risk and smoking with an increased risk of HPV infection. PMID:22734435

  16. A qualitative study investigating knowledge and attitudes regarding human papillomavirus (HPV) and the HPV vaccine among parents of immunosuppressed children.

    PubMed

    Seale, Holly; Trung, Linda; Mackie, Fiona E; Kennedy, Sean E; Boros, Christina; Marshall, Helen; Tidswell, Jane; Shaw, Peter J; Montgomery, Kay; MacIntyre, C Raina

    2012-11-19

    Barriers influencing the willingness of parents to vaccinate immunocompetent children include a lack of knowledge about human papillomavirus (HPV) and low perception of risk regarding their child's acquisition of HPV infection. However, it cannot be assumed that the facilitators and barriers of HPV vaccination are the same for parents/guardians of children who are immunocompromised, or who have chronic medical conditions. This study aimed to document the knowledge and attitudes of parents/guardians of immunosuppressed children and adolescents towards HPV infection and the vaccine. A study using qualitative methods which incorporated 27 semi-structured interviews was undertaken with parents/guardians of immunosuppressed children vaccinated against HPV at three hospitals in two states of Australia. Thematic analysis revealed that while participants acknowledged that they had heard of HPV, they did not have a strong sense of what it actually was. The level of concern held about their child acquiring an HPV infection (prior to vaccination) ranged from 'not at all' to 'extremely'. Some believed that their child was at increased risk of developing a severe HPV-related illness because of their underlying condition. The participants supported their child receiving the HPV vaccine, as they did not want to take a risk with a disease that may cause their child to return to hospital for treatment. The majority had little apprehension about the use of the HPV vaccine but expressed some concern that potential adverse effects would be more severe for immunosuppressed children. However, they stressed their belief in the safety of the vaccine and their trust in the child's health team. Our study results show that parents of children with impaired immunity would benefit from further information about the safety of the vaccine and about the important role of the vaccine for boys as well as girls.

  17. Global Improvement in Genotyping of Human Papillomavirus DNA: the 2011 HPV LabNet International Proficiency Study

    PubMed Central

    Eklund, Carina; Forslund, Ola; Wallin, Keng-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Accurate and internationally comparable human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA genotyping is essential for HPV vaccine research and for HPV surveillance. The HPV Laboratory Network (LabNet) has designed international proficiency studies that can be issued regularly and in a reproducible manner. The 2011 HPV genotyping proficiency panel contained 43 coded samples composed of purified plasmids of 16 HPV types (HPV6, -11, -16, -18, -31, -33, -35, -39, -45, -51, -52, -56, -58, -59, -66, -68a, and -68b) and 3 extraction controls. Tests that detected 50 IU of HPV16 and HPV18 and 500 genome equivalents for the other 14 HPV types in both single and multiple infections were considered proficient. Ninety-six laboratories worldwide submitted 134 data sets. Twenty-five different HPV genotyping assay methods were used, including the Linear Array, line blot/INNO-LiPA, PapilloCheck, and PCR Luminex assays. The major oncogenic HPV types, HPV16 and HPV18, were proficiently detected in 97.0% (113/116) and 87.0% (103/118) of the data sets, respectively. In 2011, 51 data sets (39%) were 100% proficient for the detection of at least one HPV type, and 37 data sets (28%) were proficient for all 16 HPV types; this was an improvement over the panel results from the 2008 and 2010 studies, when <25 data sets (23% and 19% for 2008 and 2010, respectively) were fully proficient. The improvement was also evident for the 54 laboratories that had also participated in the previous proficiency studies. In conclusion, a continuing global proficiency program has documented worldwide improvement in the comparability and reliability of HPV genotyping assay performances. PMID:24478473

  18. Human papillomavirus prevalence and type-distribution among women in Zhejiang Province, Southeast China: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Xiang; Fan, Xing-Li; Yu, Yue-Ping; Ji, Lei; Yan, Jie; Sun, Ai-Hua

    2014-12-19

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the main etiological factor for cervical cancer and premalignant lesions of the cervix. The purposes of the present study were to determine the prevalence of type-specific HPV infections and the association of different HPV types with cervical dysplasia among women in Zhejiang province, Southeast China. A total of 15,267 women presenting to a gynaecological outpatient clinic were enrolled in this study. Women were screened for HPV in addition to routine cervical cytology testing. Microarray hybridization and liquid-based cytology tests were used to detect HPV genotypes and cervical cytology, respectively. Based on the population attending a gynaecological outpatient clinic, overall prevalence of any 23 HPV type was 22.8% and multiple HPV infection was found in 4.0% of all the outpatients. HPV prevalence showed bimodal age distribution, with a peak (55.7%) at the ≤20 age group and a second one (35.5%) at >60 age group. In total samples, the five most frequent types were HPV 16 (4.4%), 58 (2.9%), 52 (2.7%), 33 (2.2%) and 11 (1.9%). Overall HPV prevalence increased with the severity of the cytologic result. Analysis through crude odds ratios (ORs) revealed that the cervical lesion risk of HPV-infected women increased to about 26-fold of uninfected women (OR 26.1, 95% CI 22.4 to 30.3). The five most risky HPV types associated with abnormal cytology were HPV 73, 16, 82, 45 and 51. This study provided baseline data on HPV prevalence in women attending a gynecological outpatient clinic in Zhejiang province. Our data will supply guidance for the primary screening and vaccination program for cervical cancer in this area.

  19. Predictors of human papillomavirus infection in women undergoing routine cervical cancer screening in Spain: the CLEOPATRE study.

    PubMed

    Roura, Esther; Iftner, Thomas; Vidart, José Antonio; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; Bosch, F Xavier; Muñoz, Nubia; Palacios, Santiago; Rodriguez, Maria San Martin; Morillo, Carmen; Serradell, Laurence; Torcel-Pagnon, Laurence; Cortes, Javier; Castellsagué, Xavier

    2012-06-26

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a sexually transmitted infection that may lead to development of precancerous and cancerous lesions of the cervix. The aim of the current study was to investigate socio-demographic, lifestyle, and medical factors for potential associations with cervical HPV infection in women undergoing cervical cancer screening in Spain. The CLEOPATRE Spain study enrolled 3 261 women aged 18-65 years attending cervical cancer screening across the 17 Autonomous Communities. Liquid-based cervical samples underwent cytological examination and HPV testing. HPV positivity was determined using the Hybrid Capture II assay, and HPV genotyping was conducted using the INNO-LiPA HPV Genotyping Extra assay. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify putative risk factors for HPV infection. A lifetime number of two or more sexual partners, young age (18-25 years), a history of genital warts, and unmarried status were the strongest independent risk factors for HPV infection of any type. Living in an urban community, country of birth other than Spain, low level of education, and current smoking status were also independent risk factors for HPV infection. A weak inverse association between condom use and HPV infection was observed. Unlike monogamous women, women with two or more lifetime sexual partners showed a lower risk of infection if their current partner was circumcised (P for interaction, 0.005) and a higher risk of infection if they were current smokers (P for interaction, 0.01). This is the first large-scale, country-wide study exploring risk factors for cervical HPV infection in Spain. The data strongly indicate that variables related to sexual behavior are the main risk factors for HPV infection. In addition, in non-monogamous women, circumcision of the partner is associated with a reduced risk and smoking with an increased risk of HPV infection.

  20. Propranolol Reduces Cancer Risk: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ping-Ying; Huang, Wen-Yen; Lin, Cheng-Li; Huang, Tzu-Chuan; Wu, Yi-Ying; Chen, Jia-Hong; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-07-01

    β-Blockers have been reported to exhibit potential anticancer effects in cancer cell lines and animal models. However, clinical studies have yielded inconsistent results regarding cancer outcomes and cancer risk when β-blockers were used. This study investigated the association between propranolol and cancer risk.Between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2011, a patient cohort was extracted from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000, a subset of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. A propranolol cohort (propranolol usage >6 months) and nonpropranolol cohort were matched using a propensity score. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of cancer associated with propranolol treatment.The study sample comprised 24,238 patients. After a 12-year follow-up period, the cumulative incidence for developing cancer was low in the propranolol cohort (HR: 0.75; 95% CI: 0.67-0.85; P < 0.001). Patients with propranolol treatment exhibited significantly lower risks of cancers in head and neck (HR: 0.58; 95% CI: 0.35-0.95), esophagus (HR: 0.35; 95% CI: 0.13-0.96), stomach (HR: 0.54; 95% CI: 0.30-0.98), colon (HR: 0.68; 95% CI: 0.49-0.93), and prostate cancers (HR: 0.52; 95% CI: 0.33-0.83). The protective effect of propranolol for head and neck, stomach, colon, and prostate cancers was most substantial when exposure duration exceeded 1000 days.This study supports the proposition that propranolol can reduce the risk of head and neck, esophagus, stomach, colon, and prostate cancers. Further prospective study is necessary to confirm these findings.

  1. Estimating Acute Air Pollution Health EFFects from Cohort Study Data

    PubMed Central

    Szpiro, Adam A.; Sheppard, Lianne; Adar, Sara D.; Kaufman, Joel D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Traditional studies of short-term air pollution health effects use time series data, while cohort studies generally focus on long-term effects. There is increasing interest in exploiting individual level cohort data to assess short-term health effects in order to understand the mechanisms and time scales of action. We extend semiparametric regression methods used to adjust for unmeasured confounding in time series studies to the cohort setting. Time series methods are not directly applicable since cohort data are typically collected over a prespecified time period and include exposure measurements on days without health observations. Therefore, long-time asymptotics are not appropriate, and it is possible to improve efficiency by exploiting the additional exposure data. We show that flexibility of the semiparametric adjustment model should match the complexity of the trend in the health outcome, in contrast to the time series setting where it suffices to match temporal structure in the exposure. We also demonstrate that pre-adjusting exposures concurrent with the health endpoints using trends in the complete exposure time series results in unbiased health effect estimation and can improve efficiency without additional confounding adjustment. A recently published article found evidence of an association between short-term exposure to ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and retinal arteriolar diameter as measured by retinal photography in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). We reanalyze the data from this article in order to compare the methods described here, and we evaluate our methods in a simulation study based on the MESA data. PMID:24571570

  2. Endometrial cancer and meat consumption: a case-cohort study.

    PubMed

    van Lonkhuijzen, Luc; Kirsh, Victoria A; Kreiger, Nancy; Rohan, Thomas E

    2011-07-01

    Diet plays an important role in the etiology of certain cancers, but there is limited evidence with regard to the association between diet and risk of endometrial cancer. Few prospective studies have investigated meat intake as a potential determinant of endometrial cancer risk. The objective of this study was to examine the association between endometrial cancer risk and total meat, red meat, processed meat, fish, and poultry intake. We conducted a case-cohort analysis within the Canadian Study of Diet, Lifestyle, and Health, a prospective cohort of 73 909 adults (39 614 women). Participants were recruited from 1992 to 1999, predominantly from three Canadian universities. We conducted a linkage with the Ontario Cancer Registry for the years 1992-2007 for the female cohort members, who resided in Ontario at the time of enrollment (n=26 024), to yield data on cancer incidence. The analytic sample was comprised of 107 incident cases and 1830 subcohort members, the latter being an age-stratified sample of the full cohort. A nonsignificant increase in the risk of endometrial cancer was associated with increased consumption of red meat [hazard ratio (HR)=1.62, 95% confidence intervals (CI)=0.86-3.08, for high vs. low intake; P trend=0.13)], processed meat (HR=1.45, 95% CI=0.80-2.61, for high vs. low intake; P trend=0.058), and all meat combined (HR=1.50, 95% CI=0.78-2.89, for high vs. low intake; P trend=0.14). No clear patterns were noted for poultry or fish. The results of this study, although based on a limited number of cases, suggest that relatively high meat intake may be associated with increased risk of endometrial cancer.

  3. Human papillomavirus infection is not related with prostatitis-related symptoms: results from a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Bartoletti, Riccardo; Cai, Tommaso; Meliani, Enrico; Mondaini, Nicola; Meacci, Francesca; Addonisio, Patrizia; Albanese, Sara; Nesi, Gabriella; Mazzoli, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and prostatitis-related symptoms. All young heterosexual patients with prostatitis-related symptoms attending the same Center from January 2005 to December 2010 were eligible for this case-control study. Sexually active asymptomatic men were considered as the control group. All subjects underwent clinical examination, Meares-Stamey test and DNA-HPV test. Patients with prostatitis-related symptoms and asymptomatic men were compared in terms of HPV prevalence. Moreover, multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was performed to determine the association between HPV infection and prostatitis-related symptoms. Overall, 814 out of 2,938 patients (27.7%) and 292 out of 1,081 controls (27.0%) proved positive to HPV. The HPV genotype distribution was as follows: HR-HPV 478 (43.3%), PHR-HPV 77 (6.9%), LR-HPV 187 (16.9%) and PNG-HPV 364 (32.9%). The most common HPV genotypes were: 6, 11, 16, 26, 51, 53 and 81. No difference was found between the two groups in terms of HPV infection (OR 1.03; 95% CI 0.88-1.22; p = 0.66). We noted a statistically significant increase in HPV infection over the period 2005 to 2010 (p < 0.001) in both groups. Moreover, we found a statistically significant increase in HPV 16 frequency from 2005 to 2010 (p = 0.002). This study highlights that prostatitis-like symptoms are unrelated to HPV infection. Secondary, we highlight the high prevalence of asymptomatic HPV infection among young heterosexual men.

  4. Talking about human papillomavirus and cancer: protocol for a patient-centred study to develop scripted consultations

    PubMed Central

    Hendry, Maggie; Pasterfield, Di; Adams, Richard; Evans, Mererid; Fiander, Alison; Robling, Michael; Campbell, Christine; Makin, Matthew; Gollins, Simon; Hiscock, Julia; Nafees, Sadia; Bekkers, Marie-Jet; Rose, Jan; Williams, Olwen; Stanley, Margaret; Wilkinson, Clare

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Persistent infection with sexually transmitted, high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types is the cause of all cervical cancers and some anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers. HPV is an extremely common asymptomatic infection but little known and poorly understood by the public. Patients with HPV-related cancers have new and challenging information needs due to the complex natural history of HPV and the stigma of sexual transmission. They may ask questions that are outside the remit of the traditional cancer consultation, and there is a lack of guidance on how to counsel them. This study aims to fulfil that need by developing and testing cancer site-specific scripted consultations. Methods and analysis A synthesis of findings generated from previous work, a systematic review of information-based interventions for patients with HPV-related cancers, and interviews with cancer clinicians will provide the evidence base underpinning provisional messages. These will be explored in three phases of face-to-face interviews with 75–90 purposively selected patients recruited in cancer clinics to: (1) select and prioritise the most salient messages, (2) phrase the messages appropriately in plain English and, (3) test their acceptability and usefulness. Phases 1 and 2 will draw on card-sorting methods used in website design. In phase three, we will create cancer site-specific versions of the script and test them using cognitive interviewing techniques. Ethics and dissemination The study has received ethical approval. Findings will be published in a peer-reviewed journal. The final product will be cancer-specific scripted consultations, most likely in the form of a two-sided information sheet with the most important messages to be conveyed in a consultation on one side, and frequently asked questions for later reading on the reverse. However, they will also be appropriate and readily adaptable to web-based uses. PMID:27113240

  5. Prevalence and type distribution of human papillomavirus among women older than 18 years in Egypt: a multicenter, observational study.

    PubMed

    Shaltout, Mohamed Fadel; Sallam, Hassan N; AbouSeeda, Maged; Moiety, Fady; Hemeda, Hossam; Ibrahim, Ahmed; Sherbini, Moutaz E L; Rady, Helmy; Gopala, Kusuma; DeAntonio, Rodrigo

    2014-12-01

    Persistent infection with high-risk (HR) human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with premalignant lesions and cervical cancer, the third most common cancer amongst women globally and the second most frequent in Egypt. We studied the prevalence and type distribution of HPV and documented HPV infection awareness and health-related behaviours for HPV infection. This was a multicenter, hospital-based observational study of women ≥18 years of age who attended for a gynaecological examination during October 2010-August 2011. Cervical samples were tested using Linear Array HPV genotyping. Two questionnaires on awareness and health-related behaviour were completed. Four hundred and forty-three women with a mean age of 39.3±14.0 years were included in the analysis. HPV DNA was detected in 10.4% of women; a single HPV-type infection was found in 6.5% and multiple infections in 3.8%. The most prevalent HR types among HPV-positive women were HPV-16 (19.6%) and HPV-31 and HPV-51 (15.2% each); low-risk types included HPV-62 (17.4%) and HPV-84 (10.9%). The prevalence of HPV-18 was low (6.5%). The prevalence of any HR HPV-type was highest in women aged 45-54 years (9.2%). The overall prevalence of HPV in Egypt was 10.4% and was highest (9.2%) amongst women aged 45-54 years. These data provide important reference information for public health authorities considering HPV prevention in Egypt. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Human papillomavirus as prognostic marker with rising prevalence in neck squamous cell carcinoma of unknown primary: A retrospective multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Lea; Boscolo-Rizzo, Paolo; Dal Cin, Elisa; Romeo, Salvatore; Baboci, Lorena; Dyckhoff, Gerhard; Hess, Jochen; Lucena-Porcel, Carlota; Byl, Anne; Becker, Nikolaus; Alemany, Laia; Castellsagué, Xavier; Quer, Miquel; León, Xavier; Wiesenfarth, Manuel; Pawlita, Michael; Holzinger, Dana

    2017-03-01

    Patients with neck squamous cell carcinomas of unknown primary tumour (NSCCUP) present with lymph node metastasis without evidence for a primary tumour. Most patients undergo an aggressive multimodal treatment, which induces severe, potentially unnecessary toxicity. Primary tumours of NSCCUP can be hidden in the oropharynx. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is causally involved in a subgroup of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCC) associated with early lymph node metastasis and good prognosis. Detection of markers for HPV transformation in NSCCUP could allow focussing on the oropharynx in primary tumour search and could be of value for choice and extent of treatment. In a retrospective multicentre study (Germany, Italy and Spain), we analysed metastatic lymph nodes from 180 NSCCUP patients for the presence of HPV DNA, HPV E6*I mRNA and cellular p16(INK4a) overexpression, a surrogate marker for HPV-induced transformation. HPV status, defined as positivity for viral mRNA with at least one additional marker, was correlated with clinical parameters and survival outcome. A substantial proportion (16%) of NSCCUP were HPV-driven, mainly by HPV16 (89%). HPV prevalence increased with year of diagnosis from 9% during 1998-2004 to 23% during 2005-2014 (p = 0.007). HPV-driven NSCCUP had significantly better overall and progression-free survival rates (p ≤ 0.008). Based on this survival benefit, it is contended that HPV RNA status should be included in NSCCUP diagnosis and in therapeutic decision-making. Deintensification of radiation in patients with HPV-driven NSCCUP, while concurrently concentrating on the oropharynx appears to be a promising therapeutic strategy, the efficacy of which should be assessed in prospective trials. To our knowledge, this is the largest study on HPV in NSCCUP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Age impact on human papillomavirus vaccination in France in 2014: A study from the National Health Insurance Database.

    PubMed

    Héquet, Delphine; Pouget, Nicolas; Estevez, Juan-Pablo; Robain, Mathieu; Rouzier, Roman

    2015-11-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main cause of cervical cancer. In France, since March 2007, HPV vaccination has been recommended for girls aged 14, in addition to a catch-up program for girls aged 15 to 23. In October 2012, the target population was changed to 11- to 14-year-old girls. The main objective of the present study was to evaluate the impact of the recommendation change on HPV vaccination coverage and compliance. We conducted a descriptive study of the Échantillon Généraliste des Bénéficiaires (EGB), which is a random 1/97 permanent sample from the French National Health Insurance Database. We focused our analyses on girls aged 11 to 17 years who were covered by the main insurance scheme (which covers 77% of the French population). We included 16,195 girls in this analysis. At the last update of the database (06/15/2014), 42% of 17-year-old girls had been vaccinated, with more than 50% of them having been vaccinated at age 14. Between January 2012 and June 2014, patients were reimbursed for a total of 7698 doses of the HPV vaccine. During the first trimester of 2013, the number of vaccinated 11- to 13-year-old girls increased, growing by more than 20-fold between the last trimester of 2012 (n=8) and the last trimester of 2013 (n=178). Less than 60% of the vaccinated patients received 3 injections. Implementation of the new recommendations was rapid but had only a slight impact on vaccination coverage. Copyright © 2015 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Human Papillomavirus-associated oropharyngeal cancer: an observational study of diagnosis, prevalence and prognosis in a UK population

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The incidence of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) associated oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) is increasing. HPV-associated OPC appear to have better prognosis than HPV-negative OPC. The aim of this study was to robustly determine the prevalence of HPV-positive OPC in an unselected UK population and correlate HPV positivity with clinical outcome. Methods HPV testing by GP5+/6+ PCR, In Situ Hybridisation (ISH) and p16 immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed on 138 OPCs diagnosed in South Wales (UK) between 2001–06. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to correlate HPV status with clinical outcome. Results Using a composite definition of HPV positivity (HPV DNA and p16 overexpression), HPV was detected in 46/83 (55%) samples where DNA quality was assured. Five year overall survival was 75.4% (95% CI: 65.2 to 85.5) in HPV-positives vs 25.3% (95% CI: 14.2 to 36.4) in HPV negatives, corresponding to a 78% reduction in death rate (HR 0.22, p < 0.001). HPV-positives had less locoregional recurrence but second HPV-positive Head and Neck primaries occurred. Poor quality DNA in fixed pathological specimens reduced both HPV prevalence estimates and the prognostic utility of DNA-based HPV testing methods. As a single marker, p16 was least affected by sample quality and correlated well with prognosis, although was not sufficient on its own for accurate HPV prevalence reporting. Conclusions This study highlights the significant burden of OPC associated with HPV infection. HPV positive cases are clinically distinct from other OPC, and are associated with significantly better clinical outcomes. A composite definition of HPV positivity should be used for accurate prevalence reporting and up-front DNA quality assessment is recommended for any DNA-based HPV detection strategy. PMID:23634887

  9. Type-specific human papillomavirus distribution in invasive cervical carcinomas in Paraguay. A study of 432 cases.

    PubMed

    Kasamatsu, Elena; Cubilla, Antonio L; Alemany, Laia; Chaux, Alcides; Tous, Sara; Mendoza, Laura; Paez, Malvina; Klaustermeier, Jo Ellen; Quint, Wim; Lloveras, Belen; de Sanjose, Silvia; Muñoz, Nubia; Bosch, Francisco Xavier

    2012-10-01

    Cervical carcinoma is the most common malignant tumor among woman in Paraguay. Cytological screening programs have not been successful and a plan for human papillomavirus (HPV) based-screening program and/or vaccination is under evaluation. This study aimed to identify the contribution of HPV genotypes in invasive cervical cancer in Paraguay to provide essential background data to guide and assess the introduction and impact of new preventive strategies based on HPV. Four hundred thirty two histologically confirmed cases (1960-2004) were analyzed. HPV detection in paraffin blocks was performed at the Catalan Institute of Oncology using PCR with SPF-10 broad spectrum primers followed by DNA enzyme immunoassay and genotyping with a reverse hybridization line probe analysis. The majority of cases were squamous cell carcinoma (92.8%). Mean patients age was 48 years old. HPV DNA was detected in 73.1% of the cases and single infections were predominant (97.8%). The most common HPV single types were 16, 18, 45, 33, 31, 52, 35, and 39. 73.1% of HPV positive cases had an HPV 16, 18 as single infection. HPV16 was frequent in SCC whereas HPV 18 and 45 were prevalent in glandular tumors. Significant decrease of HPV 16 with age groups (P-trend = 0.022) and increase in other HPV types (P-trend > 0.001) were observed. The potential impact of HPV 16 and 18 for a vaccination program was 73.1%. The study provide a profile of the HPV situation in the country, with robust clinical, pathological and virological data which would permit a better cervical cancer screening and vaccination programs.

  10. Awareness of human papillomavirus and factors associated with intention to obtain HPV vaccination among Korean youth: quasi experimental study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hae Won

    2015-02-21

    This study aimed to determine the awareness among fifth-grade girls and boys of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), cancer, and human papillomavirus (HPV), and to determine the factors associated with intention to obtain the HPV vaccination. A quasi experimental design was employed with Korean fifth-grade students as the subjects for this study (n=117). Prior to providing HPV education, the awareness and health beliefs regarding STDs and cancer prevention were assessed according to gender. After 2 hours of HPV education, gender comparisons were made with respect to the awareness and health beliefs, HPV knowledge, and intention to obtain the HPV vaccination, and the factors associated with that intention. Prior to the 2hours education session, only two boys knew that HPV is a virus. There were significant gender differences with respect to responses to the statements "STD is preventable" (χ(2)=8.76, p=0.013) and "cancer is preventable" (χ(2)=6.37, p=0.041), and concerns about the pain associated with vaccine injection (z=-2.44, p=0.015). After HPV education, there were no significant gender differences in HPV knowledge and intention to obtain the HPV vaccination. Awareness that "HPV vaccine can prevent cervical cancer" was significantly related to intention to obtain the HPV vaccine among both boys and girls. Increased HPV knowledge could positively influence the intention to obtain the HPV vaccination among youth. Thus, HPV education at elementary school would be helpful to make students aware of HPV and the importance of HPV prevention.

  11. Anal human papillomavirus and HIV: An exploratory study among men who have sex with men in Moscow, Russia

    PubMed Central

    Wirtz, AL; Zelaya, CE; Peryshkina, A; McGowan, I; Cranston, RD; Latkin, C; D’Souza, G; Galai, N; Mogilniy, V; Dzhigun, P; Kostetskaya, I; Beyrer, C

    2016-01-01

    Anal human papillomavirus (HPV) is prevalent among men who have sex with men (MSM), but has not been studied in the Russian Federation. HIV seropositive (N=58) and seronegative MSM (N=65) were enrolled in a cross-sectional study in Moscow, Russia, surveyed, and underwent anal cytology and anal HPV genotyping. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify correlates of infection with oncogenic HPV genotypes 16 and/or 18 (HPV 16/18). Some 39.5% of all MSM were infected with at least one anal HPV genotype, 31.7% with HPV16/18, and 11.7% had high grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL). HPV 16/18 was more prevalent among HIV seropositive than seronegative men (41.4% vs. 23.1%; p=0.03). In the final multivariable model, HIV infection was independently associated with HPV 16/18 (AOR:5.08; 95%CI:1.49–17.34), as were migration to/within Russia (AOR:3.18; 95%CI:1.00–10.09) and having 2–4 steady male sex partners in the last year (vs. ≤1 partner; AOR:6.99; 95%CI:1.94–25.24). History of jail/prison and use of incompatible lubricants were marginally associated with HPV 16/18 (p<0.10). Anal HPV 16/18 was prevalent among this sample of Moscow-based MSM and strongly associated with HIV infection. Correlations with mobility and detention in prison/jail, likely reflect behavioural risk and low healthcare access among marginalized populations that limits access to HIV/STI prevention options. Comprehensive prevention options are needed for MSM in Russia and may benefit from inclusion of young men in piloted HPV vaccination programs. PMID:25953132

  12. Cohort profile: the Hawai'i Family Study of Cognition.

    PubMed

    Onoye, Jane M M; Hishinuma, Earl S; McArdle, John J; Zonderman, Alan B; Bumanglag, R Janine; Takeshita, Junji

    2014-12-01

    Intergenerational longitudinal studies over the lifespan provide valuable information for understanding the contexts and dynamic relations among cognition, family and health in adults and the elderly. The Hawai'i Family Study of Cognition (HFSC), initiated in the early 1970s, included a cohort of over 6500 individuals representing over 1800 families of parents and their offspring. The HFSC gathered data on cognitive, personality, biological and other psychosocial variables, and provided novel information on the nature of cognitive abilities, especially on family issues. Some families were reassessed with short-term retesting in the 1970s. A select sample of offspring and their siblings and spouses were re-measured in the 1980s. Decades later, a 40-year follow-up of the original HFSC cohort was facilitated by the availability of contemporary tracking and tracing methods and internet-based testing. A subgroup of the original HFSC participants was re-contacted and retested on contemporary cognitive as well as socio-demographic and health measures. In this paper, we describe the original HFSC cohort and the design and methodology of the re-contact and retest studies of the HFSC, plans for expanding the re-contact and retesting, as well as directions for future research and collaborations. The Principal Investigator may be contacted for more information regarding the application, review and approval process for data access requests from qualified individuals outside the project. © The Author 2014; all rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.

  13. Cohort Profile: The Hawai’i Family Study of Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Onoye, Jane MM; Hishinuma, Earl S; McArdle, John J; Zonderman, Alan B; Takeshita, Junji

    2014-01-01

    Intergenerational longitudinal studies over the lifespan provide valuable information for understanding the contexts and dynamic relations among cognition, family and health in adults and the elderly. The Hawai‘i Family Study of Cognition (HFSC), initiated in the early 1970s, included a cohort of over 6500 individuals representing over 1800 families of parents and their offspring. The HFSC gathered data on cognitive, personality, biological and other psychosocial variables, and provided novel information on the nature of cognitive abilities, especially on family issues. Some families were reassessed with short-term retesting in the 1970s. A select sample of offspring and their siblings and spouses were re-measured in the 1980s. Decades later, a 40-year follow-up of the original HFSC cohort was facilitated by the availability of contemporary tracking and tracing methods and internet-based testing. A subgroup of the original HFSC participants was re-contacted and retested on contemporary cognitive as well as socio-demographic and health measures. In this paper, we describe the original HFSC cohort and the design and methodology of the re-contact and retest studies of the HFSC, plans for expanding the re-contact and retesting, as well as directions for future research and collaborations. The Principal Investigator may be contacted for more information regarding the application, review and approval process for data access requests from qualified individuals outside the project. PMID:24639439

  14. Xenograft Model for Identifying Chemotherapeutic Agents against Papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Pawellek, A.; Hewlett, G.; Kreuter, J.; Rübsamen-Waigmann, H.; Weber, O.

    2001-01-01

    The report describes the establishment and characterization of a mouse xenograft transplantation model for the study of papillomavirus infection of bovine skin. Calf scrotal skin was inoculated with bovine papillomavirus type 2 before grafting it to the dorsum of severe combined immunodeficient mice. The grafted skin contained epidermis, dermis, and a thin layer of fat. After 5 months the induced warts not only showed histological features of papillomavirus infections but also tested positive for viral DNA and papillomavirus capsid antigen. The formation of infectious virions was demonstrated by inoculation of new transplants with crude extract from the induced warts as well as in a cell culture focus assay. Topical application of bromovinyl-2′-deoxyuridine led to a reduction in viral DNA content in the developing wart. This small-animal xenograft model should be useful for characterizing antiviral compounds and providing an understanding of the regulation of papillomavirus infections. PMID:11257010

  15. A mortality cohort study in a north Italian aircraft factory.

    PubMed Central

    Costa, G; Merletti, F; Segnan, N

    1989-01-01

    Mortality in a cohort of 8626 workers employed between 1954 and 1981 in an aircraft manufacturing factory in northern Italy was studied. Total follow up was 132,042 person-years, with 76% accumulated in the age range 15 to 54. Median duration of follow up from the date of first employment was 16 years. Vital status was ascertained for 98.5% of the cohort. Standardised mortality ratios were calculated based on Italian national mortality rates. Altogether 685 deaths occurred (SMR = 85). There was a significant excess of mortality for melanoma (6 cases, SMR = 561). Six deaths certified as due to pleural tumours occurred. No significant excess of mortality was found in specific jobs or work areas. PMID:2818961

  16. Human papillomavirus prevalence and type-distribution in cervical glandular neoplasias: Results from a European multinational epidemiological study.

    PubMed

    Holl, Katsiaryna; Nowakowski, Andrzej M; Powell, Ned; McCluggage, W Glenn; Pirog, Edyta C; Collas De Souza, Sabrina; Tjalma, Wiebren A; Rosenlund, Mats; Fiander, Alison; Castro Sánchez, Maria; Damaskou, Vasileia; Joura, Elmar A; Kirschner, Benny; Koiss, Robert; O'Leary, John; Quint, Wim; Reich, Olaf; Torné, Aureli; Wells, Michael; Rob, Lukas; Kolomiets, Larisa; Molijn, Anco; Savicheva, Alevtina; Shipitsyna, Elena; Rosillon, Dominique; Jenkins, David

    2015-12-15

    Cervical glandular neoplasias (CGN) present a challenge for cervical cancer prevention due to their complex histopathology and difficulties in detecting preinvasive stages with current screening practices. Reports of human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence and type-distribution in CGN vary, providing uncertain evidence to support prophylactic vaccination and HPV screening. This study [108288/108290] assessed HPV prevalence and type-distribution in women diagnosed with cervical adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS, N = 49), adenosquamous carcinoma (ASC, N = 104), and various adenocarcinoma subtypes (ADC, N = 461) from 17 European countries, using centralised pathology review and sensitive HPV testing. The highest HPV-positivity rates were observed in AIS (93.9%), ASC (85.6%), and usual-type ADC (90.4%), with much lower rates in rarer ADC subtypes (clear-cell: 27.6%; serous: 30.4%; endometrioid: 12.9%; gastric-type: 0%). The most common HPV types were restricted to HPV16/18/45, accounting for 98.3% of all HPV-positive ADC. There were variations in HPV prevalence and ADC type-distribution by country. Age at diagnosis differed by ADC subtype, with usual-type diagnosed in younger women (median: 43 years) compared to rarer subtypes (medians between 57 and 66 years). Moreover, HPV-positive ADC cases were younger than HPV-negative ADC. The six years difference in median age for women with AIS compared to those with usual-type ADC suggests that cytological screening for AIS may be suboptimal. Since the great majority of CGN are HPV16/18/45-positive, the incorporation of prophylactic vaccination and HPV testing in cervical cancer screening are important prevention strategies. Our results suggest that special attention should be given to certain rarer ADC subtypes as most appear to be unrelated to HPV. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of UICC.

  17. Human papillomavirus prevalence and type-distribution in women with cervical lesions: a cross-sectional study in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Karunaratne, Kanishka; Ihalagama, Himali; Rohitha, Saman; Molijn, Anco; Gopala, Kusuma; Schmidt, Johannes E; Chen, Jing; Datta, Sanjoy; Mehta, Shailesh

    2014-02-21

    Cervical cancer ranks second among all cancers reported in Sri Lankan women. This study assessed the prevalence and type-distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) among Sri Lankan women with invasive cervical cancer (ICC) and pre-cancerous lesions. 114 women aged 21 years and above, hospitalized in the National Cancer Institute, Sri Lanka with a diagnosis of ICC or cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 2/3 were prospectively enrolled between October 2009 and September 2010 (110430/NCT01221987). The cervical biopsy or excision specimens collected during routine clinical procedures were subjected to histopathological review. DNA was extracted from samples with a confirmed histological diagnosis and was amplified using polymerase chain reaction and HPV DNA was detected using Enzyme Immuno Assay. HPV positive samples were typed using reverse hybridization Line Probe Assay. Of the cervical samples collected, 93.0% (106/114) had a histologically confirmed diagnosis of either ICC (98/106) or CIN 2/3 (8/106). Among all ICC cases, squamous cell carcinoma was diagnosed in the majority of women (81.6% [80/98]). HPV prevalence among ICC cases was 84.7% (83/98). The HPV types most commonly detected in ICC cases with single HPV infection (98.8% [82/83]) were HPV-16 (67.3%) and HPV-18 (9.2%). Infection with multiple HPV types was recorded in a single case (co-infection of HPV-16 and HPV-59). HPV was prevalent in most women with ICC in Sri Lanka; HPV-16 and HPV-18 were the predominantly detected HPV types. An effective prophylactic vaccine against the most prevalent HPV types may help to reduce the burden of ICC disease.

  18. Immunogenicity and safety of a quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Mok, Chi Chiu; Ho, Ling Yin; Fong, Lai Shan; To, Chi Hung

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate the immunogenicity and safety of GARDASIL, a quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Women with SLE aged 18-35 years who had stable disease were recruited to receive GARDASIL vaccination and an equal number of age-matched healthy women were also vaccinated. Seroconversion rates of antibodies to HPV serotypes 6, 11, 16 and 18 at months 7 and 12 and adverse events (AEs) were compared between patients and controls. The rate of disease flares in SLE participants was compared with matched SLE controls. 50 patients with SLE and 50 healthy controls were studied. The mean age and disease duration of the patients was 25.8±3.9 years and 6.6±4.5 years, respectively. At month 12 the seroconversion rates of anti-HPV serotypes 6, 11, 16 and 18 in patients and controls were 82%, 89%, 95%, 76% and 98%, 98%, 98%, 80%, respectively. In patients with SLE there were no significant changes in the titres of anti-dsDNA, complements, anti-C1q and SLE Disease Activity Index scores from baseline to months 2, 7 and 12. There was one mild/moderate SLE flare at months 0-2, two mild/moderate flares at months 3-6 and six mild/moderate and two severe flares at months 7-12. Disease flares in patients with SLE occurred at a similar frequency to that of 50 matched SLE controls (0.22/patient/year vs 0.20/patient/year, p=0.81). Injection site reaction was the commonest AE (5%), and the incidence of AEs was comparable between patients with SLE and controls. The quadrivalent HPV vaccine is well tolerated and reasonably effective in patients with stable SLE and does not induce an increase in lupus activity or flares.

  19. A Smartphone-Based Approach for Triage of Human Papillomavirus-Positive Sub-Saharan African Women: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Urner, Esther; Delavy, Martine; Catarino, Rosa; Viviano, Manuela; Meyer-Hamme, Ulrike; Benski, Anne-Caroline; Jinoro, Jeromine; Heriniainasolo, Josea Lea; Undurraga, Manuela; De Vuyst, Hugo; Combescure, Christophe; Vassilakos, Pierre; Petignat, Patrick

    2017-05-29

    Sub-Saharan African countries are marked by a high incidence of cervical cancer. Madagascar ranks 11th among the countries with the highest cervical cancer incidence worldwide. The aim of the study was to evaluate the performances of digital smartphone-based visual inspection with acetic acid (D-VIA) and Lugol's iodine (D-VILI) for diagnosing cervical precancer and cancer. Human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive women recruited through a cervical screening campaign had D-VIA and D-VILI examinations with endocervical curettage (ECC) and cervical biopsy. Three images were captured for each woman (native, D-VIA, D-VILI) using a smartphone camera. The images were randomly coded and distributed on 2 online databases (Google Forms). The D-VIA form included native and D-VIA images, and the D-VILI form included native and D-VILI images. Pathological cases were defined as cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse (CIN2+). Physicians rated the images as non-pathological or pathological. Using the ECC and cervical biopsy results as references, the sensitivity and specificity of D-VIA and D-VILI examinations for each and all physicians were calculated. Altogether, 15 clinicians assessed 240 images. Sensitivity was higher for the D-VIA interpretations (94.1%; 95% CI 81.6-98.3) than for the D-VILI interpretations (78.8%; 95% CI 54.1-92.1; P=.009). In contrast, the specificity was higher for the D-VILI interpretations (56.4%; 95% CI 38.3-72.9) than for the D-VIA interpretations (50.4%; 95% CI 35.9-64.8; P=.005). Smartphone-based image for triage of HPV-positive women is more accurate for detecting CIN2+ lesions with D-VIA than D-VILI, although with a small loss of specificity.

  20. Human papillomavirus prevalence and type‐distribution in cervical glandular neoplasias: Results from a European multinational epidemiological study

    PubMed Central

    Nowakowski, Andrzej M.; Powell, Ned; McCluggage, W. Glenn; Pirog, Edyta C.; Collas De Souza, Sabrina; Tjalma, Wiebren A.; Rosenlund, Mats; Fiander, Alison; Castro Sánchez, Maria; Damaskou, Vasileia; Joura, Elmar A.; Kirschner, Benny; Koiss, Robert; O'Leary, John; Quint, Wim; Reich, Olaf; Torné, Aureli; Wells, Michael; Rob, Lukas; Kolomiets, Larisa; Molijn, Anco; Savicheva, Alevtina; Shipitsyna, Elena; Rosillon, Dominique; Jenkins, David

    2015-01-01

    Cervical glandular neoplasias (CGN) present a challenge for cervical cancer prevention due to their complex histopathology and difficulties in detecting preinvasive stages with current screening practices. Reports of human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence and type‐distribution in CGN vary, providing uncertain evidence to support prophylactic vaccination and HPV screening. This study [108288/108290] assessed HPV prevalence and type‐distribution in women diagnosed with cervical adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS, N = 49), adenosquamous carcinoma (ASC, N = 104), and various adenocarcinoma subtypes (ADC, N = 461) from 17 European countries, using centralised pathology review and sensitive HPV testing. The highest HPV‐positivity rates were observed in AIS (93.9%), ASC (85.6%), and usual‐type ADC (90.4%), with much lower rates in rarer ADC subtypes (clear‐cell: 27.6%; serous: 30.4%; endometrioid: 12.9%; gastric‐type: 0%). The most common HPV types were restricted to HPV16/18/45, accounting for 98.3% of all HPV‐positive ADC. There were variations in HPV prevalence and ADC type‐distribution by country. Age at diagnosis differed by ADC subtype, with usual‐type diagnosed in younger women (median: 43 years) compared to rarer subtypes (medians between 57 and 66 years). Moreover, HPV‐positive ADC cases were younger than HPV‐negative ADC. The six years difference in median age for women with AIS compared to those with usual‐type ADC suggests that cytological screening for AIS may be suboptimal. Since the great majority of CGN are HPV16/18/45‐positive, the incorporation of prophylactic vaccination and HPV testing in cervical cancer screening are important prevention strategies. Our results suggest that special attention should be given to certain rarer ADC subtypes as most appear to be unrelated to HPV. PMID:26096203

  1. Prevalence of human papillomavirus in tonsil brushings and gargles in cancer-free patients: The SPLIT study.

    PubMed

    Combes, Jean-Damien; Dalstein, Véronique; Gheit, Tarik; Clifford, Gary M; Tommasino, Massimo; Clavel, Christine; Lacau St Guily, Jean; Franceschi, Silvia

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence in the tonsil using extensive ex vivo brushing and gargling in a large age-stratified sample of cancer-free patients. From 2012 to 2016, consecutive patients undergoing tonsillectomy for benign indications in 19 French University Hospitals were invited to participate in the SPLIT study. Immediately after resection, half-tonsils were extensively brushed at the pathology laboratories on the surface epithelium and in tonsil crypts to collect exfoliated cells. In 11 centers, patients aged 15 and over (adults) were also asked to provide gargle samples before surgery. HPV-DNA detection used a very sensitive Luminex technology to evaluate 21 HPV types. Tonsil brushings from 692 patients aged 1-70 years and gargles from 268 adults were tested for HPV. Among adults, overall HPV prevalence was 3.6% in tonsil brushings and 13.1% in gargles and HPV16 prevalence was 2.2% and 4.1%, respectively. Among 139 children, tonsil brushings were positive in two girls (1.4%). Percent agreement in HPV detection in paired tonsil brushings and gargles in adults was 85.8% and positive agreement 9.5%. HPV prevalence in gargles significantly varied by sex (prevalence ratio in men vs women=2.1; 95% confidence interval; 1.1-4.1) and tonsillectomy indication (non-infectious vs. infectious=4.9; 1.4-17.0). HPV infection is infrequent in tonsil brushings of cancer-free children and adults. In contrast, HPV infection in gargles in adults is rather common. Low agreement in paired tonsil brushings and gargles suggests that gargle is not representative of HPV prevalence in the tonsil. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Case-control study of genus-beta human papillomaviruses in plucked eyebrow hairs and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Iannacone, Michelle R; Gheit, Tarik; Pfister, Herbert; Giuliano, Anna R; Messina, Jane L; Fenske, Neil A; Cherpelis, Basil S; Sondak, Vernon K; Roetzheim, Richard G; Silling, Steffi; Pawlita, Michael; Tommasino, Massimo; Rollison, Dana E

    2014-05-01

    Cutaneous human papillomaviruses (HPV) have been reported in cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). We conducted a clinic-based case-control study to investigate the association between genus-beta HPV DNA in eyebrow hairs (EBH) and SCC. EBH from 168 SCC cases and 290 controls were genotyped for genus-beta HPV DNA. SCC tumors from a subset of cases (n = 142) were also genotyped. Viral load was determined in a subset of specimens positive for a single HPV type. Associations with SCC were estimated by odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) adjusted for age and sex using logistic regression. Statistical tests were two-sided. EBH DNA prevalence was greater in cases (87%) than controls (73%) (p < 0.05), and the association with SCC increased with the number of HPV types present, (≥ 4 types vs. HPV-negative: OR = 2.02, 95% CI = 1.07-3.80; p(trend) = 0.02). Type-specific associations were observed between SCC and DNA in EBH for HPV23 (OR = 1.90, 95% CI = 1.10-3.30) and HPV38 (OR = 1.84, 95% CI = 1.04-3.24). Additionally, when compared with the controls, the DNA prevalence in EBH was significantly higher among cases for 11 of the 25 genus-beta types tested, when accounting for DNA for the same HPV type in the tumor (ORs = 3.44-76.50). Compared to controls, the mean viral DNA load in EBH among the selected cases was greater for HPV5, HPV8 and HPV24, but lower for HPV38. SCC cases were more likely than controls to have HPV DNA+ EBH for single and multiple HPV types, providing additional support for the potential role of genus-beta HPV infections in SCC development. © 2013 UICC.

  3. The Korean Gastric Cancer Cohort Study: Study Protocol and Brief Results of a Large-Scale Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Eom, Bang Wool; Kim, Young-Woo; Nam, Byung-Ho; Ryu, Keun Won; Jeong, Hyun-Yong; Park, Young-Kyu; Lee, Young-Joon; Yang, Han-Kwang; Yu, Wansik; Yook, Jeong-Hwan; Song, Geun Am; Youn, Sei-Jin; Kim, Heung Up; Noh, Sung-Hoon; Park, Sung Bae; Yang, Doo-Hyun; Kim, Sung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to establish a large-scale database of patients with gastric cancer to facilitate the development of a national-cancer management system and a comprehensive cancer control policy. Materials and Methods An observational prospective cohort study on gastric cancer was initiated in 2010. A total of 14 cancer centers throughout the country and 152 researchers were involved in this study. Patient enrollment began in January 2011, and data regarding clinicopathological characteristics, life style-related factors, quality of life, as well as diet diaries were collected. Results In total, 4,963 patients were enrolled until December 2014, and approximately 5% of all Korean patients with gastric cancer annually were included. The mean age was 58.2±11.5 years, and 68.2% were men. The number of patients in each stage was as follows: 3,394 patients (68.4%) were in stage IA/B; 514 patients (10.4%), in stage IIA/B; 469 patients (9.5%), in stage IIIA/B/C; and 127 patients (2.6%), in stage IV. Surgical treatment was performed in 3,958 patients (79.8%), endoscopic resection was performed in 700 patients (14.1%), and 167 patients (3.4%) received palliative chemotherapy. The response rate for the questionnaire on the quality of life was 95%; however, diet diaries were only collected for 27% of patients. Conclusions To provide comprehensive information on gastric cancer for patients, physicians, and government officials, a large-scale database of Korean patients with gastric cancer was established. Based on the findings of this cohort study, an effective cancer management system and national cancer control policy could be developed. PMID:27752396

  4. A Cohort Study of Vitamin D Intake and Melanoma Risk

    PubMed Central

    Asgari, Maryam M.; Maruti, Sonia S.; Kushi, Lawrence H.; White, Emily

    2009-01-01

    Data suggest that vitamin D intake may have chemopreventive efficacy against melanoma, but there have been no published epidemiologic studies examining the association between vitamin D intake and melanoma risk in a large prospective cohort. We examined whether dietary and supplemental vitamin D intake was associated with melanoma risk among 68,611 men and women who were participants of the Vitamins and Lifestyle cohort study. Participants reported dietary vitamin D intake over the past year and 10-year use of multivitamin and individual vitamin D supplements on a baseline questionnaire. After follow-up through 2006, 455 incident melanomas were identified through linkage to the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results cancer registry. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for vitamin D intake after adjustment for melanoma risk factors. Compared with the lowest quartile, we did not detect a risk reduction of melanoma in the highest quartiles of dietary vitamin D intake (RR = 1.31, CI = 0.94–1.82), 10-year average supplemental vitamin D intake (RR = 1.13, CI = 0.89–1.43), or combined dietary and supplemental intake (1.05, CI = 0.79–1.40). In this large prospective cohort, we did not find an association between vitamin D intake and melanoma risk. PMID:19194478

  5. A Cohort Study on Meniscal Lesions among Airport Baggage Handlers.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, Sigurd; Brauer, Charlotte; Pedersen, Ellen Bøtker; Alkjær, Tine; Koblauch, Henrik; Simonsen, Erik Bruun; Helweg-Larsen, Karin; Thygesen, Lau Caspar

    2016-01-01

    Meniscal lesions are common and may contribute to the development of knee arthrosis. A few case-control and cross-sectional studies have identified knee-straining work as risk factors for meniscal lesions, but exposure-response relations and the role of specific exposures are uncertain, and previous results may be sensitive to reporting and selection bias. We examined the relation between meniscal lesions and cumulative exposure to heavy lifting in a prospective register-based study with complete follow-up and independent information on exposure and outcome. We established a cohort of unskilled men employed at Copenhagen Airport or in other companies in the metropolitan Copenhagen area from 1990 to 2012 (the Copenhagen Airport Cohort). The cohort at risk included 3,307 airport baggage handlers with heavy lifting and kneeling or squatting work tasks and 63,934 referents with a similar socioeconomic background and less knee-straining work. Baggage handlers lifted suitcases with an average weight of approximately 15 kg, in total approximately five tonnes during a 9-hour workday. The cohort was followed in the National Patient Register and Civil Registration System. The outcome was a first time hospital diagnosis or surgery of a meniscal lesion. Baggage handlers had a higher incidence of meniscal lesions than the referents. Within baggage handlers spline regression showed that the incidence rate ratio was 1.91 (95% confidence interval: 1.29-2.84) after five years as a baggage handler and then decreased slowly to reach unity after approximately 30 years, adjusted for effects of potential confounders. This relation between baggage handling and meniscal lesions was present for work on the apron which involves lifting in a kneeling or squatting position, but not in the baggage hall, which only involves lifting in standing positions. The results support that long-term heavy lifting in a kneeling or squatting position is a risk factor for the development of symptomatic

  6. A Cohort Study on Meniscal Lesions among Airport Baggage Handlers

    PubMed Central

    Mikkelsen, Sigurd; Brauer, Charlotte; Pedersen, Ellen Bøtker; Alkjær, Tine; Koblauch, Henrik; Simonsen, Erik Bruun; Helweg-Larsen, Karin; Thygesen, Lau Caspar

    2016-01-01

    Meniscal lesions are common and may contribute to the development of knee arthrosis. A few case-control and cross-sectional studies have identified knee-straining work as risk factors for meniscal lesions, but exposure-response relations and the role of specific exposures are uncertain, and previous results may be sensitive to reporting and selection bias. We examined the relation between meniscal lesions and cumulative exposure to heavy lifting in a prospective register-based study with complete follow-up and independent information on exposure and outcome. We established a cohort of unskilled men employed at Copenhagen Airport or in other companies in the metropolitan Copenhagen area from 1990 to 2012 (the Copenhagen Airport Cohort). The cohort at risk included 3,307 airport baggage handlers with heavy lifting and kneeling or squatting work tasks and 63,934 referents with a similar socioeconomic background and less knee-straining work. Baggage handlers lifted suitcases with an average weight of approximately 15 kg, in total approximately five tonnes during a 9-hour workday. The cohort was followed in the National Patient Register and Civil Registration System. The outcome was a first time hospital diagnosis or surgery of a meniscal lesion. Baggage handlers had a higher incidence of meniscal lesions than the referents. Within baggage handlers spline regression showed that the incidence rate ratio was 1.91 (95% confidence interval: 1.29–2.84) after five years as a baggage handler and then decreased slowly to reach unity after approximately 30 years, adjusted for effects of potential confounders. This relation between baggage handling and meniscal lesions was present for work on the apron which involves lifting in a kneeling or squatting position, but not in the baggage hall, which only involves lifting in standing positions. The results support that long-term heavy lifting in a kneeling or squatting position is a risk factor for the development of symptomatic

  7. Spatiotemporal study of elderly suicide in Korea by age cohort.

    PubMed

    Joo, Y

    2017-01-01

    This study analyzed the spatiotemporal pattern and spatial diffusion of elderly suicide by age cohort, in Korea. The research investigated the elderly suicide rates of the 232 municipal units in South Korea between 2001 and 2011. The Gi* score, which is a spatially weighted indicator of area attributes, was used to identify hot spots and the spatiotemporal pattern of elderly suicide in the nation during the last 10 years. The spatial Markov matrix and spatial dynamic panel data model were employed to identify and estimate the diffusion effect. The suicide rate among elderly individuals 75 years and older was substantially higher than the rate for those between 65 and 74 years of age; however, the spatial patterns of the suicide clusters were similar between the two groups. From 2001 to 2011, the spatial distribution of elderly suicide hot spots differed each year. For both age cohorts, elderly suicide hot spots developed around the north area of South Korea in 2001 and moved to the mid-east area and the mid-western coastal area over 10 years. The spatial Markov matrix indicates that the change in the suicide rate of one area was affected by the suicide rates of neighbouring areas from the previous year, which suggests that suicide increase in one area inflates a neighbouring area's suicide rate over time. Using a spatial dynamic panel data model, elderly suicide diffusion effects were found to be statistically significant for both age cohorts even after economic and demographic indicators and a time variable are included. For individuals 75 years and older, the diffusion effect appeared to be larger. This study demonstrates that elderly suicide can spread spatially over time in both age cohorts. Thus, it is necessary to design a place-based and age-differentiated intervention policy that precisely considers the spatial diffusion of elderly suicide. Copyright © 2016 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [An ultrastructural study of the cervix epitelium infected with the human papillomavirus types 16 and 18 before and after treatment with contrasting thermo-laser therapy].

    PubMed

    Manykin, A A; Ezhov, V V; Belov, S V; Danileĭko, Iu K; Saliuk, V A; Dymkovets, V P; Gushchina, E A; Lisitsyn, F V

    2014-01-01

    The results of the ultrastructural study of the epithelium of the patient cervix infected by the human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 before and after treatment by contrasting thermo-laser therapy (CTLT) are presented. It was shown in this work that 1.5 and 6 months after treatment HPV DNA was not detected in the biopsy and the smear of the cervix using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In the ultrathin sections, the structure of the epithelial cells from the biopsy after treatment corresponded to norm. There was effective elimination of HPV types 16 and 18 as Induces by CTLT method.

  9. Mysid Population Responses to Resource Limitation Differ from those Predicted by Cohort Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of anthropogenic stressors on animal populations are often evaluated by assembling vital rate responses from isolated cohort studies into a single demographic model. However, models constructed from cohort studies are difficult to translate into ecological predictions be...

  10. Mysid Population Responses to Resource Limitation Differ from those Predicted by Cohort Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of anthropogenic stressors on animal populations are often evaluated by assembling vital rate responses from isolated cohort studies into a single demographic model. However, models constructed from cohort studies are difficult to translate into ecological predictions be...

  11. Drinking water arsenic in Utah: A cohort mortality study.

    PubMed

    Lewis, D R; Southwick, J W; Ouellet-Hellstrom, R; Rench, J; Calderon, R L

    1999-05-01

    The association of drinking water arsenic and mortality outcome was investigated in a cohort of residents from Millard County, Utah. Median drinking water arsenic concentrations for selected study towns ranged from 14 to 166 ppb and were from public and private samples collected and analyzed under the auspices of the State of Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Drinking Water. Cohort members were assembled using historical documents of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Standard mortality ratios (SMRs) were calculated. Using residence history and median drinking water arsenic concentration, a matrix for cumulative arsenic exposure was created. Without regard to specific exposure levels, statistically significant findings include increased mortality from hypertensive heart disease [SMR = 2.20; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.36-3.36], nephritis and nephrosis (SMR = 1.72; CI, 1.13-2.50), and prostate cancer (SMR = 1.45; CI, 1.07-1. 91) among cohort males. Among cohort females, statistically significant increased mortality was found for hypertensive heart disease (SMR = 1.73; CI, 1.11-2.58) and for the category of all other heart disease, which includes pulmonary heart disease, pericarditis, and other diseases of the pericardium (SMR = 1.43; CI, 1.11-1.80). SMR analysis by low, medium, and high arsenic exposure groups hinted at a dose relationship for prostate cancer. Although the SMRs by exposure category were elevated for hypertensive heart disease for both males and females, the increases were not sequential from low to high groups. Because the relationship between health effects and exposure to drinking water arsenic is not well established in U.S. populations, further evaluation of effects in low-exposure populations is warranted.

  12. Drinking water arsenic in Utah: A cohort mortality study.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, D R; Southwick, J W; Ouellet-Hellstrom, R; Rench, J; Calderon, R L

    1999-01-01

    The association of drinking water arsenic and mortality outcome was investigated in a cohort of residents from Millard County, Utah. Median drinking water arsenic concentrations for selected study towns ranged from 14 to 166 ppb and were from public and private samples collected and analyzed under the auspices of the State of Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Drinking Water. Cohort members were assembled using historical documents of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Standard mortality ratios (SMRs) were calculated. Using residence history and median drinking water arsenic concentration, a matrix for cumulative arsenic exposure was created. Without regard to specific exposure levels, statistically significant findings include increased mortality from hypertensive heart disease [SMR = 2.20; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.36-3.36], nephritis and nephrosis (SMR = 1.72; CI, 1.13-2.50), and prostate cancer (SMR = 1.45; CI, 1.07-1. 91) among cohort males. Among cohort females, statistically significant increased mortality was found for hypertensive heart disease (SMR = 1.73; CI, 1.11-2.58) and for the category of all other heart disease, which includes pulmonary heart disease, pericarditis, and other diseases of the pericardium (SMR = 1.43; CI, 1.11-1.80). SMR analysis by low, medium, and high arsenic exposure groups hinted at a dose relationship for prostate cancer. Although the SMRs by exposure category were elevated for hypertensive heart disease for both males and females, the increases were not sequential from low to high groups. Because the relationship between health effects and exposure to drinking water arsenic is not well established in U.S. populations, further evaluation of effects in low-exposure populations is warranted. PMID:10210691

  13. Age, time period, and birth cohort differences in self-esteem: Reexamining a cohort-sequential longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Twenge, Jean M; Carter, Nathan T; Campbell, W Keith

    2016-12-08

    Orth, Trzesniewski, and Robins (2010) concluded that the nationally representative Americans' Changing Lives (ACL) cohort-sequential study demonstrated moderate to large age differences in self-esteem, and no birth cohort (generational) differences in the age trajectory. In a reanalysis of these data using 2 different statistical techniques, we find significant increases in self-esteem that could be attributed to birth cohort or time period. First, hierarchical linear modeling analyses with birth cohort as a continuous variable (vs. the multiple group formulation used by Orth et al.) find that birth cohort has a measurable influence on self-esteem through its interaction with age. Participants born in later years (e.g., 1960) were higher in self-esteem and were more likely to increase in self-esteem as they aged than participants born in earlier years (e.g., 1920). However, the estimated age trajectory up to age 60 is similar in Orth et al.'s results and in the results from our analyses including cohort. Second, comparing ACL respondents of the same age in 1986 versus 2002 (a time-lag design) yields significant birth cohort differences in self-esteem, with 2002 participants of the same age higher in self-esteem than those in 1986. Combined with some previous studies finding significant increases in self-esteem and positive self-views over time, these results suggest that cultural change in the form of cohort and time period cannot be ignored as influences in cross-sectional and longitudinal studies. (PsycINFO Database Record

  14. The role of human papillomavirus in squamous carcinoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Li, Guojun; Sturgis, Erich M

    2006-03-01

    Human papillomavirus type-16 infection is associated with a significant portion of squamous carcinoma of the head and neck, particularly for the oropharynx and for those lacking the other risk factors of tobacco and alcohol. The link between human papillomavirus type-16 and carcinoma of the oropharynx is based on the identification of human papillomavirus type-16 in oropharyngeal tumors and the association of human papillomavirus type-16 with the risk of oropharyngeal cancer estimated in case-control epidemiologic studies. This review highlights the molecular mechanism of human papillomavirus carcinogenesis and the association of human papillomavirus type-16 as a risk factor for squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx as well as recent research efforts utilizing human papillomavirus as a biomarker of clinical outcomes.

  15. Protection against papillomavirus with a polynucleotide vaccine.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, J J; Martinez, D; Jansen, K U; Ellis, R W; Montgomery, D L; Liu, M A

    1996-02-01

    Genital infections with human papillomavirus (HPV) are increasingly recognized as a significant source of human disease; HPV is now implicated in up to 90% of cervical carcinomas. Neutralizing antibodies against papillomaviruses recognize conformational epitopes formed when viral capsid proteins assemble into virions or virus-like particles. Immunization with plasmid DNA encoding the major viral capsid protein L1 was studied as a means of inducing neutralizing antibodies and protection against virus challenge. In a cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV) model, immunization with plasmid DNA encoding L1 elicited conformationally specific neutralizing antibodies and provided immunity against papilloma formation upon challenge with CRPV. Immunization with DNA encoding the capsid protein may provide a means of protecting humans against HPV and would simplify the production of multivalent vaccines by combining plasmids that encode the viral capsid proteins of different strains. This may be of importance given the multiplicity of HPV types capable of causing disease.

  16. The Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Coast Guard Cohort study.

    PubMed

    Rusiecki, Jennifer; Alexander, Melannie; Schwartz, Erica G; Wang, Li; Weems, Laura; Barrett, John; Christenbury, Kate; Johndrow, David; Funk, Renée H; Engel, Lawrence S

    2017-09-12

    Long-term studies of oil spill responders are urgently needed as oil spills continue to occur. To this end, we established the prospective Deepwater Horizon (DWH) Oil Spill Coast Guard Cohort study. DWH oil spill responders (n=8696) and non-responders (n=44 823) who were members of the US Coast Guard (20 April-17 December 2010) were included. This cohort uses both prospective, objective health data from military medical encounters and cross-sectional survey data. Here, we describe the cohort, present adjusted prevalence ratios (PRs) estimating cross-sectional associations between crude oil exposure (none, low/medium, high) and acute physical symptoms, and present adjusted relative risks (RRs) based on longitudinal medical encounter data (2010-2012) for responders/non-responders and responders exposed/not exposed to crude oil. Responders and non-responders in this large cohort (n=53 519) have similar characteristics. Crude oil exposure was reported by >50% of responders. We found statistically significant associations for crude oil exposure with coughing (PRhigh=1.78), shortness of breath (PRhigh=2.30), wheezing (PRhigh=2.32), headaches (PRhigh=1.46), light-headedness/dizziness (PRhigh=1.96), skin rash/itching (PRhigh=1.87), diarrhoea (PRhigh=1.76), stomach pain (PRhigh=1.67), nausea/vomiting (PRhigh=1.48) and painful/burning urination (PRhigh=2.89) during deployment. Longitudinal analyses revealed that responders had elevated RRs for dermal conditions (RR=1.09), as did oil-exposed responders for chronic respiratory conditions (RR=1.32), asthma (RR=1.83) and dermal conditions (RR=1.21). We found positive associations between crude oil exposure and various acute physical symptoms among responders, as well as longer term health effects. This cohort is well positioned to evaluate both short-term and long-term effects of oil spill exposures using both self-reported and clinical health data. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the

  17. Human papillomavirus type 16 DNA detected in pulmonary metastases from a penile squamous cell carcinoma: a case study.

    PubMed

    Lorenzon, Laura; Benevolo, Maria; Visca, Paolo; Venturo, Irene; Filippetti, Massimo; Piro, Francesca Romana; Rollo, Francesca; Vocaturo, Amina

    2013-02-01

    This report describe the case of a patient presenting with pulmonary metastases from a penile cancer, where the presence of the human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 DNA both in the primary tumor and in the distant metastases confirmed the spreading of the disease, ruling out a possible primary lung squamous cell carcinoma. Indeed, according to the findings, the HPV genotyping test might help in the identification of metastatic disease from anogenital malignancies or other HPV-related cancers.

  18. [Human papillomavirus prophylactic vaccine].

    PubMed

    Kawana, Kei

    2012-06-01

    Human papillomavirus causes viral-dependent cancers, including cervical, anal, vulvar, penile, vaginal, and oropharyngeal, and condyloma acuminata. In the last decade, HPV prophylactic vaccine has been developed and spread worldwide after many large-scale clinical studies. These studies demonstrate significant clinical efficacy for prevention of HPV16/18/6/11-related diseases. In particular, prevention of cervical cancer should be the most important role in the world. In Japan, incidence of cervical cancer does not increase, but the peak of age of the patients at 2005 is 25-45 years old and became 20 years younger than that at 1985. The current two HPV vaccines can prevent the infection of HPV16/18 among high-risk HPVs and will provide a significant impact especially on young-age onset cervical cancer. Furthermore, quadrivalent HPV vaccine, Gardasil, has shown population impact that is decrease of patients with condyloma acuminate in several countries. The clinical efficacy seems to be convincing. Here HPV vaccine will be reviewed based on the literatures.

  19. Efficacy, safety, and immunogenicity of the human papillomavirus 16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine in women older than 25 years: 7-year follow-up of the phase 3, double-blind, randomised controlled VIVIANE study.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Cosette M; Skinner, S Rachel; Del Rosario-Raymundo, M Rowena; Garland, Suzanne M; Chatterjee, Archana; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Salmerón, Jorge; McNeil, Shelly; Stapleton, Jack T; Bouchard, Céline; Martens, Mark G; Money, Deborah M; Quek, Swee Chong; Romanowski, Barbara; Vallejos, Carlos S; Ter Harmsel, Bram; Prilepskaya, Vera; Fong, Kah Leng; Kitchener, Henry; Minkina, Galina; Lim, Yong Kuei Timothy; Stoney, Tanya; Chakhtoura, Nahida; Cruickshank, Margaret E; Savicheva, Alevtina; da Silva, Daniel Pereira; Ferguson, Murdo; Molijn, Anco C; Quint, Wim G V; Hardt, Karin; Descamps, Dominique; Suryakiran, Pemmaraju V; Karkada, Naveen; Geeraerts, Brecht; Dubin, Gary; Struyf, Frank

    2016-10-01

    Although the risk of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is greatest in young women, women older than 25 years remain at risk. We present data from the VIVIANE study of the HPV 16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine in adult women after 7 years of follow-up. In this phase 3, double-blind, randomised controlled trial, healthy women older than 25 years were enrolled (age stratified: 26-35 years, 36-45 years, and ≥46 years). Up to 15% in each age stratum had a history of HPV infection or disease. Women were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive HPV 16/18 vaccine or aluminium hydroxide control, with an internet-based system. The primary endpoint was vaccine efficacy against 6-month persistent infection or cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 1 or greater (CIN1+) associated with HPV 16/18. We did analyses in the according-to-protocol cohort for efficacy and total vaccinated cohort. Data for the combined primary endpoint in the according-to-protocol cohort for efficacy were considered significant when the lower limit of the 96·2% CI around the point estimate was greater than 30%. For all other endpoints and cohorts, data were considered significant when the lower limit of the 96·2% CI was greater than 0%. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00294047. The first participant was enrolled on Feb 16, 2006, and the last study visit took place on Jan 29, 2014. 4407 women were in the according-to-protocol cohort for efficacy (n=2209 vaccine, n=2198 control) and 5747 women in the total vaccinated cohort (n=2877 vaccine, n=2870 control). At month 84, in women seronegative for the corresponding HPV type in the according-to-protocol cohort for efficacy, vaccine efficacy against 6-month persistent infection or CIN1+ associated with HPV 16/18 was significant in all age groups combined (90·5%, 96·2% CI 78·6-96·5). Vaccine efficacy against HPV 16/18-related cytological abnormalities (atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance and low-grade squamous

  20. Cohort profile: the Caerphilly health and social needs electronic cohort study (E-CATALyST).

    PubMed

    Fone, David L; Dunstan, Frank; White, James; Kelly, Mark; Farewell, Daniel; John, Gareth; Lyons, Ronan A; Lloyd, Keith

    2013-12-01

    The Caerphilly Health and Social Needs study was established to inform and support collaborative multiagency working on reducing inequalities in health and to investigate neighbourhood influences on mental health. Initially, we collated a robust small-area multiagency dataset of contextual health determinants and outcomes from routine sources and sharing of data between the National Health Service and Caerphilly county borough council. These data were widely used in local joint planning to improve health and reduce health inequalities. Secondly, we carried out a baseline population questionnaire survey, collecting data from 10 892 (60.6%) respondents aged 18-74 years on a wide range of socio-economic, lifestyle, health and housing factors and perceptions of the local neighbourhood, including access to services, social cohesion and neighbourhood quality. We carried out wave 2 of the survey after 7 years with responses from 4558 (50.2%) participants to the same range of questions. We developed the study into an electronic cohort, linking all 17 979 sampled participants aged 18-74 years to mortality and hospital admission records with 10-year follow-up and full recording of migration both within and out of the borough. Readers with an interest in collaborative use of the data should contact Professor David Fone, Principal Investigator.

  1. Cohort Profile: The Japanese Population-based Osteoporosis (JPOS) Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Iki, Masayuki; Tamaki, Junko; Sato, Yuho; Morita, Akemi; Ikeda, Yukihiro; Kajita, Etsuko; Nishino, Harumi; Akiba, Takashi; Matsumoto, Toshio; Kagamimori, Sadanobu; Kagawa, Yoshiko; Yoneshima, Hideo; Matsukura, Tomoharu; Yamagami, Takashi; Kitagawa, Jun

    2015-04-01

    The Japanese Population-based Osteoporosis (JPOS) Cohort Study was launched in 1996 to produce a reference database of areal bone mineral density (aBMD) by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and bone turnover markers in the Japanese female population and to determine risk factors for osteoporotic fractures. At baseline, 3984 women aged 15 to 79 years were randomly selected to provide representative bone status data and aBMD values for the diagnosis of osteoporosis. Follow-up surveys were conducted in 1999, 2002, 2006 and 2011/12 to determine changes in aBMD and identify incident morphometry-confirmed vertebral fractures and clinical fractures. These outcomes were obtained from 2174 women who participated in at least one follow-up survey. JPOS is a unique resource of individual-level bone health information with radiological and biological archives that include DXA images, and serum, plasma and DNA for future analyses with emerging radiological and biological techniques. The JPOS dataset is not freely available, but new collaborations are encouraged. Potential collaborators are invited to contact the Secretary General (M.I.) at the administrative office of the JPOS Study Group.

  2. Early growth in children with coeliac disease: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Kahrs, Christian R; Magnus, Maria C; Stigum, Hein; Lundin, Knut E A; Størdal, Ketil

    2017-06-13

    We aimed to study growth during the first 2 years of life in children later diagnosed with coeliac disease compared with children without, in a time with changing epidemiology and improved diagnostics. A prospective population-based pregnancy cohort study. The nationwide Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. 58 675 children born between 2000 and 2009 with prospectively collected growth data. Coeliac disease was identified through combined data from questionnaires and the Norwegian Patient Register. The differences in height and weight at age 0, 3, 6, 8, 12, 15-18 and 24 months using internally standardised age and gender-specific z-scores. Linear regression and mixed models were used. During a median follow-up of 8.6 years (range 4.6-14.2), 440 children (0.8%) were diagnosed with coeliac disease at a mean age of 4.4 years (range 1.5-8.5). Children with coeliac disease had significantly lower z-scores for height from 12 months (-0.09 standard deviation scores (SDS), 95% CI -0.18 to -0.01) and weight from 15 to 18 months of life (-0.09 SDS, 95% CI -0.18 to -0.01) compared with cohort controls. The longitudinal analysis from 0 to 24 months yielded a significant reduction in height z-score per year (-0.07 SDS, 95% CI -0.13 to -0.01) but not for weight among children with coeliac disease. Excluding children diagnosed before age 2 years gave similar results. This study indicates that growth retardation in children later diagnosed with coeliac disease commonly starts at 12 months of age, and precedes clinical symptoms that usually bring the suspicion of diagnosis. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. Human papillomaviruses and cancer.

    PubMed

    Haedicke, Juliane; Iftner, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are small oncogenic DNA viruses of which more than 200 types have been identified to date. A small subset of these is etiologically linked to the development of anogenital malignancies such as cervical cancer. In addition, recent studies established a causative relationship between these high-risk HPV types and tonsillar and oropharyngeal cancer. Clinical management of cervical cancer and head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) is largely standardized and involves surgical removal of the tumor tissue as well as adjuvant chemoradiation therapy. Notably, the response to therapeutic intervention of HPV-positive HNSCCs has been found to be better as compared to HPV-negative tumors. Although the existing HPV vaccine is solely licensed for the prevention of cervical cancer, it might also have prophylactic potential for the development of high-risk HPV-associated HNSCCs. Another group of viruses, which belongs to the beta-HPV subgroup, has been implicated in nonmelanoma skin cancer, however, the etiology remains to be established. Treatment of HPV-induced nonmelanoma skin cancer is based on local excision. However, topically applied immune-modulating substances represent non-surgical alternatives for the management of smaller cutaneous tumors. In this review we present the current knowledge of the role of HPV in cancer development and discuss clinical management options as well as targets for the development of future intervention therapies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Oncogenic potential of papillomaviruses].

    PubMed

    Váňová, B; Golais, F

    2013-01-01

    Papillomaviruses belong to a group of viruses with double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). These viruses are believed to induce benign as well as malignant tumour growth. Thanks to professor zur Hausen, the connection between the infection by human papillomaviruses (HPV) and cervix cancer was described in detail a few years ago. However, there exist certain types of HPV viruses, in which no association with malignancies was ever demonstrated. Hence, we can divide HPV into "high-risk" (HR) and "low-risk" (LR) group. Our work describes the life cycle of HPV, molecular mechanisms of oncogenesis and aims to compare HR HPV and LR HPV within these terms.

  5. Dairy intake and fecundability in 2 preconception cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Wise, Lauren A; Wesselink, Amelia K; Mikkelsen, Ellen M; Cueto, Heidi; Hahn, Kristen A; Rothman, Kenneth J; Tucker, Katherine L; Sørensen, Henrik Toft; Hatch, Elizabeth E

    2017-01-01

    Animal studies have shown that a high intake of galactose, a breakdown product of lactose, increases ovarian toxicity. Few epidemiologic studies, to our knowledge, have examined the association between dairy intake and fertility, and they have had conflicting findings. We prospectively evaluated dairy intake in relation to fecundability among women who were planning for pregnancy. Data were derived from preconception cohort studies in Denmark (Snart Foraeldre) and North America [PRESTO (Pregnancy Study Online)] in which women completed a validated food-frequency questionnaire 10 d after enrollment. The dietary intake of dairy foods and their constituents was calculated based on reported frequencies, mean serving sizes, and standard recipes for mixed foods. Outcome data were updated every 8 wk for 12 mo or until reported conception. Analyses were restricted to 2426 women attempting pregnancy for ≤6 cycles at study entry. Fecundability ratios (FRs) and 95% CIs were estimated with the use of proportional probabilities regression models adjusted for potential confounders. FRs for total dairy intake (≥18 compared with <7 servings/wk) were 1.37 (95% CI: 1.05, 1.78) among 1126 Snart Foraeldre participants and 1.04 (95% CI: 0.78, 1.38) among 1300 PRESTO participants (pooled FR: 1.11; 95% CI: 0.94, 1.31). The elevated FR for total dairy intake among Snart Foraeldre participants was limited to milk consumption and found only among women aged <30 y. There was no clear association between low- or high-fat dairy intake and fecundability in either cohort. Although there was little evidence of an association between dietary intake of calcium, potassium, magnesium, or vitamin D and fecundability, a greater consumption of phosphorus and lactose was associated with slightly higher fecundability in both cohorts. Associations between dairy intake and fecundability were generally small and inconsistent across cohorts. Our findings do not support the hypotheses that a greater

  6. South Yorkshire Cohort: a 'cohort trials facility' study of health and weight - Protocol for the recruitment phase

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Growing levels of both obesity and chronic disease in the general population pose a major public health problem. In the UK, an innovative 'health and weight' cohort trials facility, the 'South Yorkshire Cohort', is being built in order to provide robust evidence to inform policy, commissioning and clinical decisions in this field. This protocol reports the design of the facility and outlines the recruitment phase methods. Method/Design The South Yorkshire Cohort health and weight study uses the cohort multiple randomised controlled trial design. This design recruits a large observational cohort of patients with the condition(s) of interest which then provides a facility for multiple randomised controlled trials (with large representative samples of participants, long term outcomes as standard, increased comparability between each trial conducted within the cohort and increased efficiency particularly for trials of expensive interventions) as well as ongoing information as to the natural history of the condition and treatment as usual. This study aims to recruit 20,000 participants to the population based South Yorkshire Cohort health and weight research trials facility. Participants are recruited by invitation letters from their General Practitioners. Data is collected using postal and/or online patient self completed Health Questionnaires. NHS numbers will be used to facilitate record linkage and access to routine data. Participants are eligible if they are: aged 16 - 85 years, registered with one of 40 practices in South Yorkshire, provide consent for further contact from the researchers and to have their information used to look at the benefit of health treatments. The first wave of data is being collected during 2010/12 and further waves are planned at 2 - 5 year intervals for the planned 20 year duration of the facility. Discussion The South Yorkshire Cohort combines the strengths of the standard observational, longitudinal cohort study design with

  7. Cohort profile: the Finnish Medication and Alzheimer's disease (MEDALZ) study

    PubMed Central

    Tolppanen, Anna-Maija; Taipale, Heidi; Koponen, Marjaana; Lavikainen, Piia; Tanskanen, Antti; Tiihonen, Jari; Hartikainen, Sirpa

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the Medicine use and Alzheimer's disease (MEDALZ) study is to investigate the changes in medication and healthcare service use among persons with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of medications in this group. This is important, because the number of persons with AD is rapidly growing and even though they are a particularly vulnerable patient group, the number of representative, large-scale studies with adequate follow-up time is limited. Participants MEDALZ contains all residents of Finland who received a clinically verified diagnosis of AD between 2005 and 2011 and were community-dwelling at the time of diagnosis (N=70 719). The diagnosis is based on the National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke and the Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association (NINCS-ADRDA) and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) criteria for Alzheimer's disease. The cohort contains socioeconomic data (education, occupational status and taxable income, 1972–2012) and causes of death (2005–2012), data from the prescription register (1995–2012), the special reimbursement register (1972–2012) and the hospital discharge register (1972–2012). Future updates are planned. The average age was 80.1 years (range 34.5–104.6 years). The majority of cohort (65.2%) was women. Currently, the average length of follow-up after AD diagnosis is 3.1 years and altogether 26 045 (36.8%) persons have died during the follow-up. Findings Altogether 53% of the cohort had used psychotropic drugs within 1 year after AD diagnoses. The initiation rate of for example, benzodiazepines and related drugs and antidepressants began to increase already before AD diagnosis. Future plans We are currently assessing if these, and other commonly used medications are related to adverse events such as death, hip fractures, head injuries and pneumonia. PMID:27412109

  8. Prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus cervical infection in female kidney graft recipients: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Immunosuppressive therapy protects the transplanted organ but predisposes the recipient to chronic infections and malignancies. Transplant patients are at risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cervical cancer resulting from an impaired immune response in the case of primary infection or of reactivation of a latent infection with human papillomavirus of high oncogenic potential (HR-HPV). Methods The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of HR-HPV cervical infections and CIN in 60 female kidney graft recipients of reproductive age in comparison to that in healthy controls. Cervical swabs were analyzed for the presence of HR-HPV DNA. HR-HPV-positive women remained under strict observation and were re-examined after 24 months for the presence of transforming HR-HPV infection by testing for HR-HPV E6/E7 mRNA. All the HR-HPV-positive patients were scheduled for further diagnostic tests including exfoliative cytology, colposcopy and cervical biopsy. Results The prevalence of HR-HPV did not differ significantly between the study group and the healthy controls (18% vs 25%, p = 0.37). There was no correlation between HR-HPV presence and the immunosuppresive regimen, underlying disease, graft function or time interval from transplantation. A higher prevalence of HR-HPV was observed in females who had had ≥2 sexual partners in the past. Among HR-HPV-positive patients, two cases of CIN2+ were diagnosed in each group. In the course of follow-up, transforming HR-HPV infections were detected in two kidney recipients and in one healthy female. Histologic examination confirmed another two cases of CIN2+ developing in the cervical canal. Conclusions Female kidney graft recipients of reproductive age are as exposed to HR-HPV infection as are healthy individuals. Tests detecting the presence of HR-HPV E6/E7 mRNA offer a novel diagnostic opportunity in those patients, especially in those cases where lesions have developed in the cervical canal

  9. Associations Between Exposure to and Expression of Negative Opinions About Human Papillomavirus Vaccines on Social Media: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Leask, Julie; Zhou, Xujuan; Mandl, Kenneth D; Coiera, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Background Groups and individuals that seek to negatively influence public opinion about the safety and value of vaccination are active in online and social media and may influence decision making within some communities. Objective We sought to measure whether exposure to negative opinions about human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines in Twitter communities is associated with the subsequent expression of negative opinions by explicitly measuring potential information exposure over the social structure of Twitter communities. Methods We hypothesized that prior exposure to opinions rejecting the safety or value of HPV vaccines would be associated with an increased risk of posting similar opinions and tested this hypothesis by analyzing temporal sequences of messages posted on Twitter (tweets). The study design was a retrospective analysis of tweets related to HPV vaccines and the social connections between users. Between October 2013 and April 2014, we collected 83,551 English-language tweets that included terms related to HPV vaccines and the 957,865 social connections among 30,621 users posting or reposting the tweets. Tweets were classified as expressing negative or neutral/positive opinions using a machine learning classifier previously trained on a manually labeled sample. Results During the 6-month period, 25.13% (20,994/83,551) of tweets were classified as negative; among the 30,621 users that tweeted about HPV vaccines, 9046 (29.54%) were exposed to a majority of negative tweets. The likelihood of a user posting a negative tweet after exposure to a majority of negative opinions was 37.78% (2780/7361) compared to 10.92% (1234/11,296) for users who were exposed to a majority of positive and neutral tweets corresponding to a relative risk of 3.46 (95% CI 3.25-3.67, P<.001). Conclusions The heterogeneous community structure on Twitter appears to skew the information to which users are exposed in relation to HPV vaccines. We found that among users that tweeted about

  10. Associations Between Exposure to and Expression of Negative Opinions About Human Papillomavirus Vaccines on Social Media: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Adam G; Leask, Julie; Zhou, Xujuan; Mandl, Kenneth D; Coiera, Enrico

    2015-06-10

    Groups and individuals that seek to negatively influence public opinion about the safety and value of vaccination are active in online and social media and may influence decision making within some communities. We sought to measure whether exposure to negative opinions about human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines in Twitter communities is associated with the subsequent expression of negative opinions by explicitly measuring potential information exposure over the social structure of Twitter communities. We hypothesized that prior exposure to opinions rejecting the safety or value of HPV vaccines would be associated with an increased risk of posting similar opinions and tested this hypothesis by analyzing temporal sequences of messages posted on Twitter (tweets). The study design was a retrospective analysis of tweets related to HPV vaccines and the social connections between users. Between October 2013 and April 2014, we collected 83,551 English-language tweets that included terms related to HPV vaccines and the 957,865 social connections among 30,621 users posting or reposting the tweets. Tweets were classified as expressing negative or neutral/positive opinions using a machine learning classifier previously trained on a manually labeled sample. During the 6-month period, 25.13% (20,994/83,551) of tweets were classified as negative; among the 30,621 users that tweeted about HPV vaccines, 9046 (29.54%) were exposed to a majority of negative tweets. The likelihood of a user posting a negative tweet after exposure to a majority of negative opinions was 37.78% (2780/7361) compared to 10.92% (1234/11,296) for users who were exposed to a majority of positive and neutral tweets corresponding to a relative risk of 3.46 (95% CI 3.25-3.67, P<.001). The heterogeneous community structure on Twitter appears to skew the information to which users are exposed in relation to HPV vaccines. We found that among users that tweeted about HPV vaccines, those who were more often exposed to

  11. Human papillomavirus and other genital infections in indigenous women from Paraguay: a cross-sectional analytical study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The incidence of cervical cancer in Paraguay is among the highest in the world, with the human papillomavirus (HPV) being a necessary factor for cervical cancer. Knowledge about HPV infection among indigenous women is limited. This cross-sectional study analyzed the frequency of HPV and other genital infections in indigenous Paraguayan women of the Department of Presidente Hayes. Methods This study included 181 sexually active women without cervical lesions. They belonged to the following ethnicities: Maká (n = 40); Nivaclé (n = 23); Sanapaná (n = 33); Enxet Sur (n = 51) and Toba-Qom (n = 34). The detection of HPV and other gynecological infectious microorganisms was performed by either molecular methods (for Mycoplasma hominis, Ureaplasma urealyticum, Chlamydia trachomatis), gram staining and/or culture (for Gardnerella vaginalis, Candida sp, Trichomonas vaginalis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae), serological methods (for Treponema pallidum, human immunodeficiency virus [HIV]) or cytology (cervical inflammation). Results A high prevalence (41.4%) of women positive for at least one sexually transmitted infection (STI) was found (23.2% any-type HPV, 11.6% T pallidum, 10.5% T vaginalis, 9.9% C trachomatis and 0.6% HIV) with 12.2% having more than one STI. HPV infection was the most frequent, with 16.1% of women positive for high-risk HPV types. There was a statistically significant association observed between any-type HPV and C trachomatis (p = 0.004), which indicates that the detection of one of these agents should suggest the presence of the other. There was no association between any-type HPV and other genital infections or cervical inflammation, suggesting that other mechanism could exist to favor infection with the virus. Conclusion This multidisciplinary work suggests that STIs are frequent, making it necessary to implement control measures and improve diagnosis in order to increase the number of cases detected, especially in

  12. Human papillomavirus in invasive cervical cancer and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2 and 3 in Venezuela: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Lander, Jorge; Cortiñas, Paula; Loureiro, Carmen Luisa; Pujol, Flor Helene; Medina, Francisco; Capote-Negrín, Luis; Bianchi, Gino; García-Barriola, Victoria; Ruiz-Benni, Angela; Avilán-Rovira, José; Acosta, Humberto

    2012-10-01

    This study investigated the distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) types in invasive cervical cancer (ICC), cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2 (CIN2) and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 3 (CIN3) in Venezuela. Paraffin-embedded samples from 329 women from 29 medical centers of the 24 states of Venezuela were analyzed to determine the distribution of HPV types for ICC, CIN2, and CIN3, the prevalence of single and multiple infection, and the association of HPV types with severity of lesion, comparing CIN2 versus CIN3+ (CIN3 and ICC). The samples were analyzed with the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by reverse hybridization for the identification of HPV types. HPV was identified in 95/96 ICC specimens (98.9%), in 142/149 CIN3 (95.3%) and in 78/84 CIN2 samples (92.8%). The most common types for ICC and CIN3 were: HPV16, 18, 31, and 33, and for CIN2 were HPV16, 31, 51, 52, and 18. HPV single infection was found in 82.1% of ICC cases, in 79.4% of CIN2 cases, and in 77.4% of CIN3 cases. HPV16 was identified as a single infection more frequently in women with CIN3+ than in those with CIN2 (68.6% versus 46.7%, P=0.002), and HPV16 or HPV18 types were more prevalent in CIN3+ than in CIN2 (73.4% versus 50%, P=0.0006). this is the first study of the distribution of HPV types in ICC, CIN2, and CIN3 conducted throughout the territory of Venezuela. HPV16 and HPV18 were the most frequent HPV types identified in single and multiple infections in both ICC and CIN3 groups, and are associated with severity of lesion. The knowledge of the distribution of HPV types would allow organization of an HPV-DNA-based screening test, and consideration of the implementation of prophylactic vaccination in Venezuela. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Talking about human papillomavirus and cancer: protocol for a patient-centred study to develop scripted consultations.

    PubMed

    Hendry, Maggie; Pasterfield, Di; Adams, Richard; Evans, Mererid; Fiander, Alison; Robling, Michael; Campbell, Christine; Makin, Matthew; Gollins, Simon; Hiscock, Julia; Nafees, Sadia; Bekkers, Marie-Jet; Rose, Jan; Williams, Olwen; Stanley, Margaret; Wilkinson, Clare

    2016-04-25

    Persistent infection with sexually transmitted, high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types is the cause of all cervical cancers and some anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers. HPV is an extremely common asymptomatic infection but little known and poorly understood by the public. Patients with HPV-related cancers have new and challenging information needs due to the complex natural history of HPV and the stigma of sexual transmission. They may ask questions that are outside the remit of the traditional cancer consultation, and there is a lack of guidance on how to counsel them. This study aims to fulfil that need by developing and testing cancer site-specific scripted consultations. A synthesis of findings generated from previous work, a systematic review of information-based interventions for patients with HPV-related cancers, and interviews with cancer clinicians will provide the evidence base underpinning provisional messages. These will be explored in three phases of face-to-face interviews with 75-90 purposively selected patients recruited in cancer clinics to: (1) select and prioritise the most salient messages, (2) phrase the messages appropriately in plain English and, (3) test their acceptability and usefulness. Phases 1 and 2 will draw on card-sorting methods used in website design. In phase three, we will create cancer site-specific versions of the script and test them using cognitive interviewing techniques. The study has received ethical approval. Findings will be published in a peer-reviewed journal. The final product will be cancer-specific scripted consultations, most likely in the form of a two-sided information sheet with the most important messages to be conveyed in a consultation on one side, and frequently asked questions for later reading on the reverse. However, they will also be appropriate and readily adaptable to web-based uses. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence

  14. Prevalence of human papillomavirus and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia in China: a pooled analysis of 17 population-based studies.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fang-Hui; Lewkowitz, Adam K; Hu, Shang-Ying; Chen, Feng; Li, Long-Yu; Zhang, Qing-Ming; Wu, Rui-Fang; Li, Chang-Qing; Wei, Li-Hui; Xu, Ai-Di; Zhang, Wen-Hua; Pan, Qin-Jing; Zhang, Xun; Belinson, Jerome L; Sellors, John W; Smith, Jennifer S; Qiao, You-Lin; Franceschi, Silvia

    2012-12-15

    High-risk (HR) human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence has been shown to correlate well with cervical cancer incidence rates. Our study aimed to estimate the prevalence of HR-HPV and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) in China and indirectly informs on the cervical cancer burden in the country. A total of 30,207 women from 17 population-based studies throughout China were included. All women received HPV DNA testing (HC2, Qiagen, Gaithersburg, MD), visual inspection with acetic acid and liquid-based cytology. Women positive for any test received colposcopy-directed or four-quadrant biopsies. A total of 29,579 women had HR-HPV testing results, of whom 28,761 had biopsy confirmed (9,019, 31.4%) or assumed (19,742, 68.6%) final diagnosis. Overall crude HR-HPV prevalence was 17.7%. HR-HPV prevalence was similar in rural and urban areas but showed dips in different age groups: at age 25-29 (11.3%) in rural and at age 35-39 (11.3%) in urban women. In rural and urban women, age-standardized CIN2 prevalence was 1.5% [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.4-1.6%] and 0.7% (95% CI: 0.7-0.8%) and CIN3+ prevalence was 1.2% (95% CI: 1.2-1.3%) and 0.6% (95% CI: 0.5-0.7%), respectively. Prevalence of CIN3+ as a percentage of either all women or HR-HPV-positive women steadily increased with age, peaking in 45- to 49-year-old women. High prevalence of HR-HPV and CIN3+ was detected in both rural and urban China. The steady rise of CIN3+ up to the age group of 45-49 is attributable to lack of lesion removal through screening. Our findings document the inadequacy of current screening in China while indirectly raising the possibility that the cervical cancer burden in China is underreported.

  15. Drivers and barriers to acceptance of human-papillomavirus vaccination among young women: a qualitative and quantitative study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a necessary cause of cervical dysplasia and cancer, and of genital warts. Few studies have examined attitudes to HPV vaccination since the introduction of HPV vaccines. We aimed to investigate the reasons for young women's acceptance or rejection of the quadrivalent HPV vaccine after its general availability in Denmark. Method A literature review assessed attitudes towards HPV vaccination and the information was used to identify relevant questions for telephone and focus group interviews with women aged 16-26 who had decided to receive or reject HPV vaccination. 435 women across Denmark were interviewed by telephone. Qualitative interviews were undertaken in focus groups with 33 women living in Odense who had completed the telephone survey. Four focus groups were set up according to age (16-20 and 21-26 years of age) and acceptance/rejection of the vaccine. Results Of 839 women initially contacted by telephone, 794 were included, 411 (49%) said they accepted vaccination but only 201 (24%) had actually received the vaccine and these latter were interviewed. 242 women said they refused vaccination of which 234 were interviewed. Women who were undecided were excluded from the study. Prevention of cervical cancer was the main driver for acceptance of the vaccine, followed by parental encouragement and financial support, personal experience of someone with cancer and recommendation by health-care professionals. The greatest barrier to vaccination was its cost. A lack of information about the benefits of vaccination for sexually active women was also an important barrier and the older participants in particular considered that they were too old to be vaccinated. Knowledge about HPV and its role in the development of cervical cancer and genital warts was poor. Conclusions The difference between intention to be vaccinated and starting vaccination was considerable, and a large proportion of women aged 16-26 did not wish to be

  16. Study design of DIACORE (DIAbetes COhoRtE) – a cohort study of patients with diabetes mellitus type 2

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2) is highly associated with increased risk for chronic kidney disease (CKD), end stage renal disease (ESRD) and cardiovascular morbidity. Epidemiological and genetic studies generate hypotheses for innovative strategies in DM2 management by unravelling novel mechanisms of diabetes complications, which is essential for future intervention trials. We have thus initiated the DIAbetes COhoRtE study (DIACORE). Methods DIACORE is a prospective cohort study aiming to recruit 6000 patients of self-reported Caucasian ethnicity with prevalent DM2 for at least 10 years of follow-up. Study visits are performed in University-based recruiting clinics in Germany using standard operating procedures. All prevalent DM2 patients in outpatient clinics surrounding the recruiting centers are invited to participate. At baseline and at each 2-year follow-up examination, patients are subjected to a core phenotyping protocol. This includes a standardized online questionnaire and physical examination to determine incident micro- and macrovascular DM2 complications, malignancy and hospitalization, with a primary focus on renal events. Confirmatory outcome information is requested from patient records. Blood samples are obtained for a centrally analyzed standard laboratory panel and for biobanking of aliquots of serum, plasma, urine, mRNA and DNA for future scientific use. A subset of the cohort is subjected to extended phenotyping, e.g. sleep apnea screening, skin autofluorescence measurement, non-mydriatic retinal photography and non-invasive determination of arterial stiffness. Discussion DIACORE will enable the prospective evaluation of factors involved in DM2 complication pathogenesis using high-throughput technologies in biosamples and genetic epidemiological studies. PMID:23409726

  17. Criminality and suicide: a longitudinal Swedish cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Stenbacka, M; Romelsjö, A; Jokinen, J

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to investigate whether violent and non-violent offending were related to elevated risk of suicide. We also investigated whether the risk was higher among those with repeated offences and how experiences of substance misuse and suicide attempt modified the relationship. Design A nationwide prospective cohort study. Setting A register study of 48 834 conscripted men in 1969/1970 in Sweden followed up during a 35-year period in official registers. Participants A birth cohort of 48 834 men who were mandatory conscripted for military service in 1969/70 at the age of 18–20 years. Possible confounders were retrieved from psychological assessments at conscription and the cohort was linked to mortality and hospitalisation and crime records from 1970 onwards. Estimates of suicide risks were calculated as HR with 95% CIs using Cox proportional regression analyses with adjustment for potential confounding by family, psychological and behavioural factors including substance use and psychiatric disorders. Results Of the total cohort, 2671 (5.5%) persons died during the follow-up period. Of these, 615 (23%) persons died due to suicide. Non-violent criminality was evident for 29% and violent criminality for 4.7% of all the participants. In the crude model, the violent offenders had nearly five times higher risk (HR=4.69, 3.56 to 6.19) to die from suicide and non-violent criminals had about two times higher risk (HR=2.08, 1.72 to 2.52). In the fully adjusted model, the HRs were still significant for suicide in the non-violent group. Conclusions Experiences of violent or non-violent criminality were associated with increased risk of suicide. Comorbidity with alcohol and substance use and psychiatric disorders modified the risk, but the suicide risk remained significantly elevated for non-violent criminals. It is crucial to identify offenders and especially repeated offenders who also suffer from alcohol or substance misuse and psychiatric illness in

  18. Colorectal cancer risk and dyslipidemia: a case-cohort study nested in an Italian multicentre cohort.

    PubMed

    Agnoli, Claudia; Grioni, Sara; Sieri, Sabina; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Vineis, Paolo; Tumino, Rosario; Giurdanella, Maria Concetta; Pala, Valeria; Mattiello, Amalia; Chiodini, Paolo; Iacoviello, Licia; De Curtis, Amalia; Cattaneo, Leonardo; van Duijnhoven, Fränzel J B; Panico, Salvatore; Krogh, Vittorio

    2014-04-01

    Dyslipidemia is an established risk factor for many diseases, but its effect on colorectal cancer risk is less clear. We investigated the association of colorectal cancer risk with plasma triglycerides, total, HDL, and LDL cholesterol in four Italian EPIC centers. We conducted a case-cohort study on participants recruited to four Italian EPIC centers (Turin, Varese, Naples, and Ragusa; 34,148 subjects). A random subcohort of 850 subjects was obtained and 286 colorectal cancer cases were diagnosed. Triglycerides, total and HDL cholesterol were determined in plasma samples obtained at baseline and stored at -196°C; LDL cholesterol was calculated. Hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI), adjusted for potential confounders, were estimated by Cox regression models using the Prentice method. The highest tertiles of total (HR 1.66, 95%CI 1.12-2.45) and LDL cholesterol (HR 1.87, 95%CI 1.27-2.76) were associated with increased colorectal cancer risk compared to lowest tertiles. Risks were greater for men than women, and for postmenopausal than premenopausal women. Highest tertiles of total and LDL cholesterol were also significantly associated with increased risks of colon cancer, distal colon cancer, and rectal cancer, but not proximal colon cancer. Our findings suggest that high levels of total and LDL cholesterol increase colorectal cancer risk, particularly in men and postmenopausal women. However additional studies are needed to clarify the role of plasma lipids in these cancers, particularly in view of the conflicting findings of previous studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. An Update on Canine, Feline and Bovine Papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Gil da Costa, R M; Peleteiro, M C; Pires, M A; DiMaio, D

    2017-10-01

    Over recent years, a growing number of papillomaviruses have been identified, which cause a wide range of lesions in domestic and wild animals. Papillomavirus-induced lesions may have a great impact on animal health, and some diseases observed in farm animals are associated with significant economic losses. This concise review brings together recent advancements on animal papillomavirus research, providing the scientific community and veterinary practitioners with an update on this rapidly evolving field. Among others, bovine, canine and feline papillomaviruses (BPV, CPV and FcaPV) are most extensively discussed, in view of the recent discovery of new viral types and their worldwide importance for animal health. Feline papillomaviruses 2 is an emerging, highly prevalent pathogen in domestic cats, associated with a subset of malignant skin lesions. Aspects related to cross-species infection by BPV and its environmental co-factors are also addressed. Animal papillomaviruses are also fascinating models for studying molecular and cell biology and have recently inspired some major breakthroughs. Overall, it is clear that additional, international and systematic efforts are needed to clarify which lesions are caused by which viral types and to develop experimental models for studying animal papillomavirus. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. Perinatal mortality in rural China: retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhuochun; Viisainen, Kirsi; Wang, Ying; Hemminki, Elina

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To explore the use of local civil registration data to assess the perinatal mortality in a typical rural county in a less developed province in China, 1999-2000. Design Retrospective cohort study. Pregnancies in a cohort of women followed from registration of pregnancy to outcome of infant seven days after birth. Setting Routine family planning records in 20 rural townships in eastern China. Subjects 3697 pregnancies registered by the local family planning system during 1999. Main outcome measures Abortions, stillbirths, early neonatal mortality, perinatal mortality. Results Only three cases were lost to follow up. The average age of the women at pregnancy was 25.9 years. Three hundred and twelve pregnancies were aborted and 240 ended in miscarriage (total 552, 15%). The perinatal mortality rate was 69 per 1000 births, the rate of stillbirth was 24 per 1000 births, and the early neonatal mortality was 46 per 1000 live births. The early neonatal mortality was 29 in boys and 69 in girls per 1000 live births. The perinatal mortality rate increased notably with parity and was higher in townships having lower income per capita. Conclusions The family planning system at the most local level is a useful data source for studying perinatal mortality in rural China. The perinatal mortality rate in the study county was higher than previously reported for both rural and urban areas in China. The results by parity and sex of the infant raise concern over the impact of the one child policy. PMID:14656839

  1. Cohort profile: the QSkin Sun and Health Study.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Catherine M; Green, Adèle C; Neale, Rachel E; Webb, Penelope M; Cicero, Rebekah A; Jackman, Lea M; O'Brien, Suzanne M; Perry, Susan L; Ranieri, Barbara A; Whiteman, David C

    2012-08-01

    The QSkin Sun and Health Study comprises a cohort of 43 794 men and women aged 40-69 years randomly sampled from the population of Queensland, Australia in 2011. The cohort was established to study the development of skin cancer and melanoma in the population with the highest reported incidence of these diseases in the world. At baseline, besides demographic items and general medical history, information about standard pigmentary characteristics (including hair and eye colour, freckling tendency, tanning ability and propensity to sunburn), past and recent history of sun exposure and sunburns, sun protection behaviours, use of tanning beds and history of skin cancer was collected by self-completed questionnaire. Participants have given their consent for data linkage to the universal national health insurance scheme and for linkage to cancer registries and pathology databases, thus ensuring complete ascertainment of all future skin cancer and melanoma occurrences and medical treatments and other cancer events. Linkage to these registers will occur at predetermined intervals. Approval to access QSkin data can be obtained on application to the study investigators and submission of a formal research plan that has previous approval from the human research ethics committee of the applicant's institution.

  2. A cohort study on mortality and exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, S F; Yen, Y Y; Lan, S J; Hsieh, C C; Lee, C H; Ko, Y C

    1996-01-01

    In 1979, an outbreak of food poisoning ("Yu-Cheng") occurred in Central Taiwan, ROC, involving more than 2000 people. The event was caused by ingestion of rice oil contaminated with polychlorinated derivatives of biphenyls, dibenzofurans, and quaterphenyls. A retrospective cohort study on mortality was undertaken, and possible long-term health effects in the affected individuals were studied. The mortality experience of 1940 victims (929 males, 1011 females) between 1980 and 1991 was compared with the expected numbers, which were calculated from national and local mortality rates. By the end of 1991, 102 deaths were identified, thus producing a standardized mortality ratio (SMR) of overall mortality of 0.99 for males and 1.34 for females. Total cancer mortality was lower than in each comparison group. Mortality from liver diseases was elevated significantly (SMR = 3.22), especially during the first 3 y after the food-poisoning event (SMR = 10.76). Increased clinical severity of polychlorinated biphenyl intoxication was associated with increased mortality from all causes and from liver diseases. In summary, there was a positive association between mortality and intoxication dose, and severe polychlorinated biphenyl poisoning acutely affected mainly the liver. A continued follow-up of this cohort would be valuable in the study of long-term health effects of polychlorinated biphenyl poisoning.

  3. Cohort Profile: TwinsUK and Healthy Ageing Twin Study

    PubMed Central

    Moayyeri, Alireza; Hammond, Christopher J; Valdes, Ana M; Spector, Timothy D

    2013-01-01

    The UK's largest registry of adult twins, or TwinsUK Registry, started in 1992 and encompasses about 12 000 volunteer twins from all over the United Kingdom. More than 70% of the registered twins have filled at least one detailed health questionnaire and about half of them undergone a baseline comprehensive assessment and two follow-up clinical evaluations. The most recent follow-up visit, known as Healthy Ageing Twin Study (HATS), involved 3125 female twins aged >40 years with at least one previous clinical assessment to enable inspection of longitudinal changes in ageing traits and their genetic and environmental components. The study benefits from several state-of-the-art OMICs studies including genome-wide association, next-generation genome and transcriptome sequencing, and epigenetic and metabolomic profiles. This makes our cohort as one of the most deeply phenotyped and genotyped in the world. Several collaborative projects in the field of epidemiology of complex disorders are ongoing in our cohort and interested researchers are encouraged to get in contact for future collaborations. PMID:22253318

  4. High prevalence of high risk human papillomavirus-capsid antibodies in human immunodeficiency virus-seropositive men: a serological study.

    PubMed

    Höpfl, Reinhard; Petter, Anton; Thaler, Petra; Sarcletti, Mario; Widschwendter, Andreas; Zangerle, Robert

    2003-04-30

    Serological study of human papillomavirus (HPV)-antibodies in order to estimate the HPV-prevalence as risk factor for the development of HPV-associated malignancies in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive men. Sera from 168 HIV-positive men and 330 HIV-negative individuals (including 198 controls) were tested using a direct HPV-ELISA specific to HPV-6, -11, -16, -18, -31 and bovine PV-1 L1-virus-like particles. Serological results were correlated with the presence of HPV-associated lesions, the history of other sexually transmitted diseases (STD) and HIV classification groups. In HIV-negative men low risk HPV-antibodies were prevailing and associated with condylomatous warts (25.4%). Strikingly, HIV-positive men were more likely to have antibodies to the high-risk HPV types -16, -18, -31, and low risk antibodies were not increased in a comparable range. Even those HIV-positive heterosexual individuals without any HPV-associated lesions exhibited preferentially antibody responses to the oncogenic HPV-types (cumulative 31.1%). The highest antibody detection rate (88,8%) was observed within the subgroup of nine HIV-positive homosexual men with anogenital warts. Three HIV-positive patients had HPV-associated carcinomas, in all of them HPV-16 antibodies were detected. Drug use and mean CD4-cell counts on the day of serologic testing had no influence on HPV-IgG antibody prevalence, as had prior antiretroviral therapy or clinical category of HIV-disease. High risk HPV-antibodies in HIV-infected and homosexual men suggest a continuous exposure to HPV-proteins throughout the course of their HIV infection, reflecting the known increased risk for anogenital malignancies in these populations. The extensive increase of high risk antibodies (compared to low risk antibodies) in HIV-positive patients cannot be explained by differences in exposure history alone, but suggests defects of the immunological control of oncogenic HPV-types. HPV-serology is economic and can detect

  5. A prospective study of absolute risk and determinants of human papillomavirus incidence among young women in Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background High risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV) are known to be extremely common, sexually transmitted infections, but more information is needed regarding the absolute risks of type-specific HR-HPV infections in the years following sexual debut. Methods We conducted a survival analysis of 3,737 women aged 18–25 from the control group of the Costa Rican Vaccine trial to determine the absolute risks of HR-HPV infections at 12 months, 24 months, and end of follow-up (average of 50.7 months). To corroborate determinants of infection, we used Cox proportional hazards methods to assess associations between demographics and sexual risk behaviors and incident HR-HPV. Results Cumulative incidence for HR-HPV infections was 51.3% at the end of the study period. The most common incident types were HPV52 (15.4%), HPV51 (13.6%), and HPV16 (12.4%). Type-specific cumulative incidence corresponded closely with type-specific prevalences, except that HPV16 was more prevalent than predicted by incidence, suggesting greater persistence. The strongest predictors of incident HR-HPV infections as a group in a multivariate analysis were the expected correlates of sexual behavior of the woman and her partner, such as being single (HR 1.6, 95% CI 1.4-1.8) or divorced/widowed (HR: 2.1, 95% CI: 1.7-2.7), having multiple HPV infections at enrollment (HR: 1.5, 95% CI: 1.3-1.7), and current smoking (HR: 1.2, 95% CI: 1.0-1.3). In women who reported being having only one lifetime sexual partner (being in a monogamous relationship), the strongest predictors of HR-HPV included not living with sex partner (HR: 2.1, 95% CI 1.7-2.5) and age of sex partner (HR: 1.4, 95% CI: 1.0-1.8). Conclusion We confirm the extremely high incidence of HR-HPV in young women, emphasizing the importance of vaccinating young girls before sexual debut. PMID:23834901

  6. [Human papillomavirus infection and its correlates with clinically relevant gynecological and obstetric conditions: A cross-sectional study].

    PubMed

    López-Hernández, Daniel; Beltrán-Lagunes, Luis; Brito-Aranda, Leticia; López-Hernández, Maria de la Luz

    2016-08-05

    To analyze the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and the possible epidemiological association with conditions of clinical relevance in women. A cross-sectional study from Mexico City was conducted from January 2012 to December 2014. HPV molecular detection was performed on cervical samples. Data were analyzed with appropriated statistic tests. A total of 1,604 females (median 47, interquartile range 38-54) were analyzed. Global prevalence of infection for any HPV is 9.91% (95% CI 8.6-11.3). An association between infection with 16-HPV and number of abortions (NA) (OR=1.427; 95% CI 1.091-1.866), by univariate regression model (UVRM) was estimated. Moreover, menarche (OR=1.566; 95% CI 1.079-2.272), NA (OR=1.570; 95% CI 1.106-2.227) and number of pregnancies (NP) (OR=0.461; 95% CI 0.260-0.818) have a direct and inverse association with infection by genotype 18 of HPV, respectively. Also, infection with HR-HPV genotypes has an inverse association with NP (OR=0.791; 95% CI 0.707-0.884) by normal labor (OR=0.867; 95% CI 0.767-0.979) and NA (OR=0.715; 95% CI 0.534-0.959) (UVRM), and a direct association with number of sexual partners (OR=1.082; 95% CI 1.015-1.154). Onset of sexual activity has an inverse association with infection by genotype 16- (UVRM: OR=0.814; 95% CI 0.715-0.926; multinomial regression model (MNRM): OR=0.803; 95% CI 0.702-0.918) and HR-HPV (UVRM: OR=0.933; 95% CI 0.889-0.980, and MNRM: OR=0.912; 95% CI 0.867-0.959), all P values were lower than .03. Prevalence of HPV cervical infection is different according to age and it is associated with several medical conditions of clinical relevance in women. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Retrospective mortality cohort study of Italian workers compensated for silicosis

    PubMed Central

    Marinaccio, A; Scarselli, A; Gorini, G; Chellini, E; Mastrantonio, M; Uccelli, R; Altavista, P; Pirastu, R; Merlo, D F; Nesti, M

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To estimate cause specific mortality in a large cohort of Italian workers compensated for silicosis. Methods The cohort included 14 929 subjects (14 098 men and 831 women) compensated for silicosis between 1946 and 1979, alive on 1 January 1980, and resident in Tuscany (a region of central Italy with 3 547 000 inhabitants). Mortality follow up ranged from 1980 to 1999. Vital status and the causes of death were determined by linkage with the regional mortality registry and with the national mortality database. The cohort mortality rates were compared to the rates of the local reference population. SMRs and their 95% confidence intervals were computed assuming a Poisson distribution of the observed deaths. Specific SMR analyses were performed according to the level of disability, the year of compensation assignment, and the job type. Results A significant excess mortality was observed in male silicotics for cancer of the lung, trachea, and bronchus and cancer of the liver, respiratory diseases (silicosis, asbestosis, antracosilicosis, and other pneumoconiosis), and for tubercolosis. Statistically significant mortality excess was observed in female silicotics for respiratory diseases (specifically silicosis and other pneumoconiosis) and tuberculosis. Analyses for period of compensation assignment showed a twofold increased SMR for biliary tract cancer among female workers and for liver cancer among male workers compensated before 1970. Conclusions The excess mortality from respiratory tract cancers and respiratory tract diseases detected in Italian compensated silicotics are in agreement with previous epidemiological studies. Although the twofold increased risk for liver cancer among males is suggestive of a possible association with silica dust exposure, the finding needs to be confirmed. PMID:16847031

  8. Retrospective mortality cohort study of Italian workers compensated for silicosis.

    PubMed

    Marinaccio, A; Scarselli, A; Gorini, G; Chellini, E; Mastrantonio, M; Uccelli, R; Altavista, P; Pirastu, R; Merlo, D F; Nesti, M

    2006-11-01

    To estimate cause specific mortality in a large cohort of Italian workers compensated for silicosis. The cohort included 14 929 subjects (14,098 men and 831 women) compensated for silicosis between 1946 and 1979, alive on 1 January 1980, and resident in Tuscany (a region of central Italy with 3,547,000 inhabitants). Mortality follow up ranged from 1980 to 1999. Vital status and the causes of death were determined by linkage with the regional mortality registry and with the national mortality database. The cohort mortality rates were compared to the rates of the local reference population. SMRs and their 95% confidence intervals were computed assuming a Poisson distribution of the observed deaths. Specific SMR analyses were performed according to the level of disability, the year of compensation assignment, and the job type. A significant excess mortality was observed in male silicotics for cancer of the lung, trachea, and bronchus and cancer of the liver, respiratory diseases (silicosis, asbestosis, antracosilicosis, and other pneumoconiosis), and for tubercolosis. Statistically significant mortality excess was observed in female silicotics for respiratory diseases (specifically silicosis and other pneumoconiosis) and tuberculosis. Analyses for period of compensation assignment showed a twofold increased SMR for biliary tract cancer among female workers and for liver cancer among male workers compensated before 1970. The excess mortality from respiratory tract cancers and respiratory tract diseases detected in Italian compensated silicotics are in agreement with previous epidemiological studies. Although the twofold increased risk for liver cancer among males is suggestive of a possible association with silica dust exposure, the finding needs to be confirmed.

  9. Outcomes in patients with glenoid labral lesions: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Zughaib, Marc; Robbins, Christopher B; Miller, Bruce S; Gagnier, Joel J

    2016-01-01

    Background/aim For patients presenting with glenoid labral pathologies, there is little information on how operative interventions affect long-term outcomes and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). This study evaluated outcomes in operative and non-operative patients presenting with labral tears versus labral degenerations. Methods Participants completed a pain Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), the Veterans RAND 12-item Health Survey, Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons instrument, Scapular Assistance Test (SAT), Shoulder Activity Level, and Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation at baseline and at 6-month, 12-month and 2-year follow-ups. χ2and Student's t-test were used to test the differences between categorical and continuous variables. Analysis of variance investigated the differences between groups, and linear regression analyses explored the relationship of baseline characteristics with outcome scores. Results After 2 years, the operative cohort (n=68) significantly improved in all measures. The non-operative cohort (n=55) showed significant improvements in all scores except the mental component summary (MCS) and pain VAS. Labral tear patients (n=52) within the operative group (n=28) significantly improved in all measures except MCS. Non-operative labral tear patients (n=24) indicated significant improvements in all measures except MCS, VAS and SAT. Labral degeneration patients (n=71) within the operative group (n=27) significantly improved in all measures except MCS and SAT. Non-operative labral degeneration patients (n=44) indicated significant improvements in all measures except the physical component summary, MCS, VAS and SAT. Conclusion Patients who were surgically treated for labral tears or degenerations had significantly improved outcomes and HRQoL scores after 2 years compared with the non-operative cohort.

  10. Counselling for burnout in Norwegian doctors: one year cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Gude, Tore; Tyssen, Reidar; Aasland, Olaf G

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate levels and predictors of change in dimensions of burnout after an intervention for stressed doctors. Design Cohort study followed by self reported assessment at one year. Setting Norwegian resource centre. Participants 227 doctors participating in counselling intervention, 2003-5. Interventions Counselling (lasting one day (individual) or one week (group based)) aimed at motivating reflection on and acknowledgement of the doctors’ situation and personal needs. Main outcome measures Levels of burnout (Maslach burnout inventory) and predictors of reduction in emotional exhaustion investigated by linear regression. Results 185 doctors (81%, 88 men, 97 women) completed one year follow-up. The mean level of emotional exhaustion (scale 1-5) was significantly reduced from 3.00 (SD 0.94) to 2.53 (SD 0.76) (t=6.76, P<0.001), similar to the level found in a representative sample of 390 Norwegian doctors. Participants had reduced their working hours by 1.6 hours/week (SD 11.4). There was a considerable reduction in the proportion of doctors on full time sick leave, from 35% (63/182) at baseline to 6% (10/182) at follow-up and a parallel increase in the proportion who had undergone psychotherapy, from 20% (36/182) to 53% (97/182). In the whole cohort, reduction in emotional exhaustion was independently associated with reduced number of work hours/week (β=0.17, P=0.03), adjusted for sex, age, and personality dimensions. Among men “satisfaction with the intervention” (β=0.25, P=0.04) independently predicted reduction in emotional exhaustion. Conclusions A short term counselling intervention could contribute to reduction in emotional exhaustion in doctors. This was associated with reduced working hours for the whole cohort and, in men, was predicted by satisfaction with the intervention. PMID:19001492

  11. [Cohort mortality study of workers in an automobile foundry factory].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yu-Yu; Liu, Fu-Ying; Zhang, Min; Lu, Rui; Yao, Hui-Lin; Yang, Qiu-Ling; Chen, Wei-Hong

    2008-10-01

    To understand the major causes of death in automobile foundry workers and investigate casting manipulations hazards to health. A cohort study of 3529 foundry workers registered in one big automobile factory in Shiyan city of China was performed. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were calculated for the main causes of death by using Chinese national mortality rates as reference. The cohort mortality was traced from 1980 to the end of 2005 with an accumulation of 84 999 person-years, revealed 265 deaths. The results of this study showed that the standardized mortality ratio for all subjects was 0.96 (95% CI: 0.85 approximately 1.08), which was very close to that expected on the basis of the China national mortality rates. The SMR increased with age, the SMR became greater than 1 in all groups of age 50 and higher. The results showed that malignant neoplasm (3.43%), accidents (1.16%), cerebro-vascular diseases (1.08%), cardio-vascular diseases (0.79%) were the first four illnesses that threatened workers' life span. Statistically significant mortality of malignant neoplasm (SMR = 7.87), accidents (SMR = 2.70), cardio-vascular diseases (SMR = 2.68) and digestive diseases (SMR = 2.79) were found in the foundry workers. The relative risk of malignant neoplasm for first line workers to assistant workers was 1.99 (P < 0.05). The occupational hazards in foundry factory have harmful impact on the workers' health and life span.

  12. Mortality of intravenous drug users in Rome: a cohort study.

    PubMed Central

    Perucci, C A; Davoli, M; Rapiti, E; Abeni, D D; Forastiere, F

    1991-01-01

    A historical cohort study was carried out in Rome to examine overall and cause-specific mortality among intravenous drug users (IVDUs). A total of 4200 IVDUs (3411 men and 789 women) enrolled in methadone treatment centers between 1980 and 1988 were studied. There were 239 deaths during the follow-up period. The overall SMR was 10.10 in the entire cohort (95% confidence interval, 8.86-11.47), 9.30 in males and 18.07 in females. A large excess of mortality in both sexes was found for infectious, circulatory, respiratory, and digestive diseases as well as for violence, overdose, AIDS, and unknown or ill-defined causes. Tumors and suicide were excessive only in males. Deaths due to drug overdose, violence or trauma, and cirrhosis accounted for 63.6%, AIDS for 7.1%, endocarditis and other bacterial infections for 7.1%, and neoplasms for 3.8% of total mortality. These findings document serious health consequences of drug abuse in Italy. PMID:1656799

  13. Snoring during pregnancy and delivery outcomes: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Louise M; Bullough, Alexandra S; Owusu, Jocelynn T; Tremblay, Kimberley A; Brincat, Cynthia A; Chames, Mark C; Kalbfleisch, John D; Chervin, Ronald D

    2013-11-01

    This cohort study examined the impact of maternal snoring on key delivery outcomes such as mode of delivery, infant birth centile, and small-for-gestational age. Cohort study. A large tertiary medical center. Pregnant women in their third trimester were recruited between March 2007 and December 2010. Women were screened for habitual snoring, as a known marker for sleep disordered breathing. Outcome data were obtained from medical records following delivery and birth centiles were calculated. Of 1,673 women, a total of 35% reported habitual snoring (26% with pregnancy-onset snoring and 9% with chronic snoring). After adjusting for confounders, chronic snoring was associated with small-forgestational age (OR 1.65, 95%CI 1.02-2.66, P = 0.041) and elective cesarean delivery (OR 2.25, 95%CI 1.22-4.18, P = 0.008). Pregnancy-onset snoring was associated with emergency cesarean delivery (OR 1.68, 95%CI 1.22-2.30, P = 0.001). Maternal snoring during pregnancy is a risk factor for adverse delivery outcomes including cesarean delivery and small-for-gestational age. Screening pregnant women for symptoms of SDB may provide an early opportunity to identify women at risk of poor delivery outcomes. IDENTIFIER: NCT01030003.

  14. Determinants of workplace injury among Thai Cohort Study participants

    PubMed Central

    Berecki-Gisolf, Janneke; Tawatsupa, Benjawan; McClure, Roderick; Seubsman, Sam-ang; Sleigh, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To explore individual determinants of workplace injury among Thai workers. Design Cross-sectional analysis of a large national cohort. Setting Thailand. Participants Thai Cohort Study participants who responded to the 2009 follow-up survey were included if they reported doing paid work or being self-employed (n=51 751). Outcome measures Self-reported injury incidence over the past 12 months was calculated. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to test associations between individual determinants and self-reported workplace injury. Results Workplace injuries were reported by 1317 study participants (2.5%); the incidence was 34 (95% CI 32 to 36)/1000 worker-years for men, and 18 (17–20) for women. Among men working ≥41 h and earning <10 000 Baht, the injury rate was four times higher compared with men working <11 h and earning ≥20 001 Baht; differences in injury rates were less pronounced in women. Multivariate modelling showed that working ≥49 h/week (23%) and working for ≤10 000 Bath/month (37%) were associated with workplace injury. The increase in injury risk with increased working hours did not exceed the risk expected from increased exposure. Conclusions Reductions in occupational injury rates could be achieved by limiting working hours to 48/week. Particularly for Thai low wage earners and those with longer workdays, there is a need for effective injury preventive programmes. PMID:23869104

  15. Endometriosis and pregnancy complications: a Danish cohort study.

    PubMed

    Glavind, Maria Tølbøll; Forman, Axel; Arendt, Linn Håkonsen; Nielsen, Karsten; Henriksen, Tine Brink

    2017-01-01

    To study the association between endometriosis and risk of pre-eclampsia, cesarean section, postpartum hemorrhage, preterm birth, and small for gestational age (SGA), in a large Danish birth cohort, while taking fertility treatment into account. Population-based study. Not applicable. A total population of 82,793 singleton pregnancies from the Aarhus Birth Cohort (1989 through 2013); 1,213 women had a diagnosis of endometriosis, affecting 1,719 pregnancies. None. Pre-eclampsia, cesarean section, postpartum hemorrhage, preterm birth, and SGA. Endometriosis was associated with an increased risk of preterm birth (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 1.67, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.37-2.05), with the risk being highest for very preterm birth (AOR 1.91, 95% CI 1.16-3.15). Compared with unaffected women, women with endometriosis also had an increased risk of pre-eclampsia (AOR 1.37, 95% CI 1.06-1.77) and cesarean section (AOR 1.83, 95% CI 1.60-2.09). Assisted reproductive technology did not explain these findings. No association was found between endometriosis and postpartum hemorrhage or SGA. Women with endometriosis were at increased risk of pre-eclampsia, preterm birth, and cesarean section, irrespective of use of assisted reproductive technology. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Outpatient visits by dentists: a nationwide cohort study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chang-Ta; Huang, Shu-Min; Lin, Yu-Wen; Ko, Ming-Chung; Li, Chung-Yi

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a cohort study of 7,760 dentists in Taiwan between 2003 and 2007 to assess the risk of outpatient visit among dentists. Control groups included physicians and other health personnel. Over the 5-yr study period, the dentist cohort made a total of 270,712 outpatient visits, representing an incidence rate of 7,038 visits /10(3) person-years. Compared to physicians, dentists experienced a significantly reduced covariate adjusted rate ratio (ARR) for all-cause visits (ARR=0.59, 95%CI=0.58-0.59), as well as for nearly all other causes, except neoplasm (ARR=1.06, 95%CI=1.02-1.09). Compared to other health personnel, the dentists still experienced a significantly reduced ARR for all causes (ARR=0.70), but had a slightly but significantly increased risk for endocrine/metabolic/immunity (ARR=1.04, 95%CI=1.02-1.05) and mental (ARR=1.04, 95%CI=1.01-1.07) disorders. Although the dentists in Taiwan utilized lesser outpatient visits than did their medical colleagues, they tended to have slightly higher rates of outpatient visits for neoplasm, endocrine/metabolic/immunity disorders, and mental illnesses. Policy makers and hospital administrators must not overlook dentists' potentially unseen health problems. A mandatory periodical physical examination for dentists can seriously be considered.

  17. The Asia pacific cohort studies collaboration: a decade of achievements.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Mark; Huxley, Rachel; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Fang, Xianghua; Kim, Hyeon Chang; Lam, Tai-Hing

    2012-12-01

    The Asia Pacific Cohort Studies Collaboration (APCSC) was established in the late 1990s when there was a distinct shortfall in evidence of the importance of risk factors for cardiovascular disease in Asia. With few exceptions, most notably from Japan, most of the published reports on cardiovascular disease in the last century were from Western countries, and there was uncertainty how far etiological associations found in the West could be assumed to prevail in the East. Against this background, APCSC was set up as a pooling project, combining individual participant data (about 600,000 subjects) from all available leading cohort studies (36 from Asia and 8 from Australasia) in the region, to fill the knowledge gaps. In the past 10 years, APCSC has published 50 peer-reviewed publications of original epidemiological research, primarily concerned with coronary heart disease, stroke, and cancer. This work has established that Western risk factors generally act similarly in Asia and in Australasia, just as they do in other parts of the world. Consequently, strategies to reduce the prevalence of elevated blood pressure, obesity, and smoking are at least as important in Asia as elsewhere- and possibly more important when the vast size of Asia is considered. This article reviews the achievements of APCSC in the past decade, with an emphasis on coronary heart disease.

  18. Personality and cancer survival: the Miyagi cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Nakaya, N; Tsubono, Y; Nishino, Y; Hosokawa, T; Fukudo, S; Shibuya, D; Akizuki, N; Yoshikawa, E; Kobayakawa, M; Fujimori, M; Saito-Nakaya, K; Uchitomi, Y; Tsuji, I

    2005-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that personality plays a role in cancer outcome in a population-based prospective cohort study in Japan. In July 1990, 41 442 residents of Japan completed a short form of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised and a questionnaire on various health habits, and between January 1993 and December 1997, 890 incident cases of cancer were identified among them. These 890 cases were followed up until March 2001, and a total of 356 deaths from all causes was identified among them. Cox proportional-hazards regression was used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) of death according to four score levels on each of four personality subscales (extraversion, neuroticism, psychoticism, and lie), with adjustment for potential confounding factors. Multivariable HRs of deaths from all causes for individuals in the highest score level on each personality subscale compared with those at the lowest level were 1.0 for extraversion (95% CI=0.8–1.4; Trend P=0.73), 1.1 for neuroticism (0.8–1.6; Trend P=0.24), 1.2 for psychoticism (0.9–1.6; Trend P=0.29), and 1.0 for lie (0.7–1.5; Trend P=0.90). The data obtained in this population-based prospective cohort study in Japan do not support the hypothesis that personality is associated with cancer survival. PMID:15900301

  19. Papillomavirus E6 proteins

    PubMed Central

    Howie, Heather L; Katzenellenbogen, Rachel A; Galloway, Denise A

    2009-01-01

    The papillomaviruses are small DNA viruses that encode approximately eight genes, and require the host cell DNA replication machinery for their viral DNA replication. Thus papillomaviruses have evolved strategies to induce host cell DNA synthesis balanced with strategies to protect the cell from unscheduled replication. While the papillomavirus E1 and E2 genes are directly involved in viral replication by binding to and unwinding the origin of replication, the E6 and E7 proteins have auxillary functions that promote proliferation. As a consequence of disrupting the normal checkpoints that regulate cell cycle entry and progression, the E6 and E7 proteins play a key role in the oncogenic properties of human papillomaviruses with a high risk of causing anogenital cancers (HR HPVs). As a consequence, E6 and E7 of HR HPVs are invariably expressed in cervical cancers. This article will focus on the E6 protein and its numerous activities including inactivating p53, blocking apoptosis, activating telomerase, disrupting cell adhesion, polarity and epithelial differentiation, altering transcription and reducing immune recognition. PMID:19081593

  20. Papillomavirus E6 proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Howie, Heather L.; Katzenellenbogen, Rachel A.; Galloway, Denise A.

    2009-02-20

    The papillomaviruses are small DNA viruses that encode approximately eight genes, and require the host cell DNA replication machinery for their viral DNA replication. Thus papillomaviruses have evolved strategies to induce host cell DNA synthesis balanced with strategies to protect the cell from unscheduled replication. While the papillomavirus E1 and E2 genes are directly involved in viral replication by binding to and unwinding the origin of replication, the E6 and E7 proteins have auxillary functions that promote proliferation. As a consequence of disrupting the normal checkpoints that regulate cell cycle entry and progression, the E6 and E7 proteins play a key role in the oncogenic properties of human papillomaviruses with a high risk of causing anogenital cancers (HR HPVs). As a consequence, E6 and E7 of HR HPVs are invariably expressed in cervical cancers. This article will focus on the E6 protein and its numerous activities including inactivating p53, blocking apoptosis, activating telomerase, disrupting cell adhesion, polarity and epithelial differentiation, altering transcription and reducing immune recognition.

  1. Four historic legends in human papillomaviruses research.

    PubMed

    Mammas, Ioannis N; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) infection and HPVs-associated lesions, including skin warts in children and adults and cervical neoplasia in women, have been excessively studied since ancient years. In our article, we present briefly four major researchers from the HPVs pre-vaccination historic period: Hippokrates the Asclepiad, Domenico Antonio Rigoni-Stern, George N. Papanicolaou and Harald zur Hausen.

  2. Human papillomavirus 16 E2-, E6- and E7-specific T-cell responses in children and their mothers who developed incident cervical intraepithelial neoplasia during a 14-year follow-up of the Finnish Family HPV cohort.

    PubMed

    Koskimaa, Hanna-Mari; Paaso, Anna E; Welters, Marij J P; Grénman, Seija E; Syrjänen, Kari J; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; Syrjänen, Stina M

    2014-02-13

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has traditionally been regarded as a sexually transmitted disease (STD), but recent evidence implicates that an infected mother can transmit HPV to her newborn during pregnancy, at delivery, perinatal period or later. Given the lack of any studies on HPV-specific immune responses in children, we conducted HPV16-specific cell-mediated immune (CMI) monitoring of the mother-child pairs with known oral and genital HPV follow-up (FU) data since the delivery. In the Finnish Family HPV Study, 10 out of 331 mothers developed incident cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) during their 14-year FU. Our hypothesis according to the common dogma is that there is no HPV16 specific immune response in offspring of the CIN mother as she/he has not started the sexual life yet. We used overlapping 30-35 mer peptides covering the entire HPV16 E2, E6 and E7 protein sequences. Assays for lymphocyte proliferation capacity, cytokine production and HPV16-specific Foxp3 + CD25 + CD4+ regulatory T-cells were performed. HPV16-specific proliferative T-cell responses were broader in children than in their mothers. Nine of 10 children had responses against both E2 peptide pools compared to only 4 of the 10 mothers. Six of the 10 children and only 2 mothers displayed reactivity to E6 and/or E7. The cytokine levels of IL-2 (p = 0.023) and IL-5 (p = 0.028) induced by all peptide pools, were also higher among children than their mothers. The children of the mothers with incident CIN3 had significantly higher IFN-γ (p = 0.032) and TNF-α (p = 0.008) levels than other children. Our study is the first to show that also children could have HPV-specific immunity. These data indicate that the children have circulating HPV16-specific memory T-cells which might have been induced by previous HPV16 exposure or ongoing HPV 16 infection.

  3. Human papillomavirus 16 E2-, E6- and E7-specific T-cell responses in children and their mothers who developed incident cervical intraepithelial neoplasia during a 14-year follow-up of the Finnish Family HPV cohort

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has traditionally been regarded as a sexually transmitted disease (STD), but recent evidence implicates that an infected mother can transmit HPV to her newborn during pregnancy, at delivery, perinatal period or later. Given the lack of any studies on HPV-specific immune responses in children, we conducted HPV16-specific cell-mediated immune (CMI) monitoring of the mother-child pairs with known oral and genital HPV follow-up (FU) data since the delivery. In the Finnish Family HPV Study, 10 out of 331 mothers developed incident cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) during their 14-year FU. Our hypothesis according to the common dogma is that there is no HPV16 specific immune response in offspring of the CIN mother as she/he has not started the sexual life yet. Methods We used overlapping 30–35 mer peptides covering the entire HPV16 E2, E6 and E7 protein sequences. Assays for lymphocyte proliferation capacity, cytokine production and HPV16-specific Foxp3 + CD25 + CD4+ regulatory T-cells were performed. Results HPV16-specific proliferative T-cell responses were broader in children than in their mothers. Nine of 10 children had responses against both E2 peptide pools compared to only 4 of the 10 mothers. Six of the 10 children and only 2 mothers displayed reactivity to E6 and/or E7. The cytokine levels of IL-2 (p = 0.023) and IL-5 (p = 0.028) induced by all peptide pools, were also higher among children than their mothers. The children of the mothers with incident CIN3 had significantly higher IFN-γ (p = 0.032) and TNF-α (p = 0.008) levels than other children. Conclusions Our study is the first to show that also children could have HPV-specific immunity. These data indicate that the children have circulating HPV16-specific memory T-cells which might have been induced by previous HPV16 exposure or ongoing HPV 16 infection. PMID:24524328

  4. Maternal creatine in pregnancy: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, H; Davies-Tuck, M; Ellery, S J; Grieger, J A; Wallace, E M; Snow, R J; Walker, D W; Clifton, V L

    2016-10-01

    To estimate creatine concentrations in maternal plasma and urine, and establish relationships with maternal characteristics, diet and fetal growth. Retrospective cohort study. Lyell McEwin Hospital, Adelaide, Australia. A biobank of plasma and urine samples collected at 13, 18, 30 and 36 weeks' gestation from 287 pregnant women from a prospective cohort of asthmatic and non-asthmatic women. Creatine was measured by enzymatic analysis. Change in creatine over pregnancy was assessed using the Friedman test. Linear mixed models regression was used to determine associations between maternal factors and diet with creatine across pregnancy and between creatine with indices of fetal growth at birth. Maternal creatine concentrations, associations between maternal factors and creatine and between creatine and fetal growth parameters. Maternal smoking, body mass index, asthma and socio-economic status were positively and parity negatively associated with maternal plasma and/or urine creatine. Maternal urine creatine concentration was positively associated with birthweight centile and birth length. After adjustment, each μmol/l increase in maternal urinary creatine was associated with a 1.23 (95% CI 0.44-2.02) unit increase in birthweight centile and a 0.11-cm (95% CI 0.03-0.2) increase in birth length. Maternal factors and fetal growth measures are associated with maternal plasma and urine creatine concentrations. Maternal creatine is altered by pregnancy; fetal growth measures are associated with maternal creatine concentrations. © 2016 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  5. Birth order and mortality: a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Barclay, Kieron; Kolk, Martin

    2015-04-01

    This study uses Swedish population register data to investigate the relationship between birth order and mortality at ages 30 to 69 for Swedish cohorts born between 1938 and 1960, using a within-family comparison. The main analyses are conducted with discrete-time survival analysis using a within-family comparison, and the estimates are adjusted for age, mother's age at the time of birth, and cohort. Focusing on sibships ranging in size from two to six, we find that mortality risk in adulthood increases with later birth order. The results show that the relative effect of birth order is greater among women than among men. This pattern is consistent for all the major causes of death but is particularly pronounced for mortality attributable to cancers of the respiratory system and to external causes. Further analyses in which we adjust for adult socioeconomic status and adult educational attainment suggest that social pathways only mediate the relationship between birth order and mortality risk in adulthood to a limited degree.

  6. Studies on vaccination against papillomaviruses: a comparison of purified virus, tumour extract and transformed cells in prophylactic vaccination.

    PubMed

    Jarrett, W F; O'Neil, B W; Gaukroger, J M; Laird, H M; Smith, K T; Campo, M S

    1990-05-05

    Calves were vaccinated with two preparations made from one cutaneous fibropapilloma induced by bovine papillomavirus type 2 (BPV-2). One vaccine consisted of homogenised tumour; the other contained purified virus only. Both produced resistance to a heavy challenge infection of BPV-2. One calf in the vaccinated group developed a small tumour and rejected it earlier than the control calves. It would appear likely that the prophylactic immune response was induced by viral structural proteins only and that tumour-specific antigens are unnecessary. Bovine fibroblasts were transformed in vitro by BPV-2 and administered as a vaccine; immunity was not induced.

  7. Dealing with dietary measurement error in nutritional cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Laurence S; Schatzkin, Arthur; Midthune, Douglas; Kipnis, Victor

    2011-07-20

    Dietary measurement error creates serious challenges to reliably discovering new diet-disease associations in nutritional cohort studies. Such error causes substantial underestimation of relative risks and reduction of statistical power for detecting associations. On the basis of data from the Observing Protein and Energy Nutrition Study, we recommend the following approaches to deal with these problems. Regarding data analysis of cohort studies using food-frequency questionnaires, we recommend 1) using energy adjustment for relative risk estimation; 2) reporting estimates adjusted for measurement error along with the usual relative risk estimates, whenever possible (this requires data from a relevant, preferably internal, validation study in which participants report intakes using both the main instrument and a more detailed reference instrument such as a 24-hour recall or multiple-day food record); 3) performing statistical adjustment of relative risks, based on such validation data, if they exist, using univariate (only for energy-adjusted intakes such as densities or residuals) or multivariate regression calibration. We note that whereas unadjusted relative risk estimates are biased toward the null value, statistical significance tests of unadjusted relative risk estimates are approximately valid. Regarding study design, we recommend increasing the sample size to remedy loss of power; however, it is important to understand that this will often be an incomplete solution because the attenuated signal may be too small to distinguish from unmeasured confounding in the model relating disease to reported intake. Future work should be devoted to alleviating the problem of signal attenuation, possibly through the use of improved self-report instruments or by combining dietary biomarkers with self-report instruments.

  8. A Systematic Review of Measures Used in Studies of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine Acceptability

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Jennifer D.; Coronado, Gloria D.; Williams, Rebecca S.; Glenn, Beth; Escoffery, Cam; Fernandez, Maria; Tuff, Raegan A.; Wilson, Katherine M.; Mullen, Patricia Dolan

    2010-01-01

    Background The recent proliferation of studies describing factors associated with HPV vaccine acceptability could inform health care providers in improving vaccine coverage and support future research. This review examined measures of HPV and HPV-vaccine knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and acceptability, described psychometric characteristics, and provided recommendations about their use. Methods A systematic search of Medline, CINAHL, PsychoInfo, and ERIC through May 2008 for English language reports of quantitative data from parents, young adults or adolescents yielded 79 studies. Results The majority of studies were cross-sectional surveys (87%), self-administered (67%), conducted before prophylactic vaccines were publicly available (67%) and utilized convenience samples (65%). Most measured knowledge (80%), general attitudes about HPV vaccination (40%), and willingness to vaccinate one's daughter (26%). Two thirds did not report reliability or validity of measures. The majority did not specify a theoretical framework. Conclusions Use of a theoretical framework, consistent labeling of constructs, more rigorous validation of measures, and testing of measures in more diverse samples are needed to yield measurement instruments that will produce findings to guide practitioners in developing successful community and clinical interventions. PMID:20412875

  9. [The benefit of large-scale cohort studies for health research: the example of the German National Cohort].

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Wolfgang; Jöckel, K-H

    2015-08-01

    The prospective nature of large-scale epidemiological multi-purpose cohort studies with long observation periods facilitates the search for complex causes of diseases, the analysis of the natural history of diseases and the identification of novel pre-clinical markers of disease. The German National Cohort (GNC) is a population-based, highly standardised and in-depth phenotyped cohort. It shall create the basis for new strategies for risk assessment and identification, early diagnosis and prevention of multifactorial diseases. The GNC is the largest population-based cohort study in Germany to date. In the year 2014 the examination of 200,000 women and men aged 20-69 years started in 18 study centers. The study facilitates the investigation of the etiology of chronic diseases in relation to lifestyle, genetic, socioeconomic, psychosocial and environmental factors. By this the GNC creates the basis for the development of methods for early diagnosis and prevention of these diseases. Cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, cancer, diabetes, neurodegenerative/-psychiatric diseases, musculoskeletal and infectious diseases are in focus of this study. Due to its mere size, the study could be characterized as a Big Data project. We deduce that this is not the case.

  10. Opium use and mortality in Golestan Cohort Study: prospective cohort study of 50,000 adults in Iran.

    PubMed

    Khademi, Hooman; Malekzadeh, Reza; Pourshams, Akram; Jafari, Elham; Salahi, Rasool; Semnani, Shahryar; Abaie, Behrooz; Islami, Farhad; Nasseri-Moghaddam, Siavosh; Etemadi, Arash; Byrnes, Graham; Abnet, Christian C; Dawsey, Sanford M; Day, Nicholas E; Pharoah, Paul D; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Kamangar, Farin

    2012-04-17

    To investigate the association between opium use and subsequent risk of death. Prospective cohort study. The Golestan Cohort Study in north-eastern Iran collected detailed validated data on opium use and other exposures at baseline. Participants were enrolled between January 2004 and June 2008 and were followed to May 2011, with a follow-up success rate of over 99%. 50,045 participants aged 40-75 at baseline. Mortality, all cause and major subcategories. 17% (n = 8487) of the participants reported opium use, with a mean duration of 12.7 years. During the follow-up period 2145 deaths were reported. The adjusted hazard ratio for all cause mortality associated with ever use of opium was 1.86 (95% confidence interval 1.68 to 2.06). Opium consumption was significantly associated with increased risks of deaths from several causes including circulatory diseases (hazard ratio 1.81) and cancer (1.61). The strongest associations were seen with deaths from asthma, tuberculosis, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (11.0, 6.22, and 5.44, respectively). After exclusion of people who self prescribed opium after the onset of major chronic illnesses, the associations remained strong with a dose-response relation. Opium users have an increased risk of death from multiple causes compared with non-users. Increased risks were also seen in people who used low amounts of opium for a long period and those who had no major illness before use.

  11. Increases in Condomless Sex in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Kouyos, Roger D; Hasse, Barbara; Calmy, Alexandra; Cavassini, Matthias; Furrer, Hansjakob; Stöckle, Marcel; Vernazza, Pietro L; Bernasconi, Enos; Weber, Rainer; Günthard, Huldrych F; Aubert, V; Battegay, M; Bernasconi, E; Böni, J; Bucher, H C; Burton-Jeangros, C; Calmy, A; Cavassini, M; Dollenmaier, G; Egger, M; Elzi, L; Fehr, J; Fellay, J; Furrer, H; Fux, C A; Gorgievski, M; Günthard, H; Haerry, D; Hasse, B; Hirsch, H H; Hoffmann, M; Hösli, I; Kahlert, C; Kaiser, L; Keiser, O; Klimkait, T; Kouyos, R; Kovari, H; Ledergerber, B; Martinetti, G; de Tejada, B Martinez; Metzner, K; Müller, N; Nadal, D; Nicca, D; Pantaleo, G; Rauch, A; Regenass, S; Rickenbach, M; Rudin, C; Schöni-Affolter, F; Schmid, P; Schüpbach, J; Speck, R; Tarr, P; Trkola, A; Vernazza, P; Weber, R; Yerly, S

    2015-04-01

    Condomless sex is a key driver of sexually transmitted diseases. In this study, we assess the long-term changes (2000-2013) of the occurrence of condomless sex among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals enrolled in the Swiss HIV Cohort study. The frequencies with which HIV-infected individuals reported condomless sex were either stable or only weakly increasing for 2000-2008. For 2008-2013, these rates increased significantly for stable relationships among heterosexuals and men who have sex with men (MSM) and for occasional relationships among MSM. Our results highlight the increasing public health challenge posed by condomless sex and show that condomless sex has been increasing even in the most recent years.

  12. Imputation of incident events in longitudinal cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Howard, George; McClure, Leslie A; Moy, Claudia S; Safford, Monika M; Cushman, Mary; Judd, Suzanne E; Kissela, Brett M; Kleindorfer, Dawn O; Howard, Virginia J; Rhodes, David J; Muntner, Paul; Tiwari, Hemant K

    2011-09-15

    Longitudinal cohort studies normally identify and adjudicate incident events detected during follow-up by retrieving medical records. There are several reasons why the adjudication process may not be successfully completed for a suspected event including the inability to retrieve medical records from hospitals and an insufficient time between the suspected event and data analysis. These "incomplete adjudications" are normally assumed not to be events, an approach which may be associated with loss of precision and introduction of bias. In this article, the authors evaluate the use of multiple imputation methods designed to include incomplete adjudications in analysis. Using data from the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study, 2008-2009, they demonstrate that this approach may increase precision and reduce bias in estimates of the relations between risk factors and incident events.

  13. Relevance of cohort studies for the study of transplant infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Berger, Christoph; Boggian, Katia; Cusini, Alexia; van Delden, Christian; Garzoni, Christian; Hirsch, Hans H; Khanna, Nina; Koller, Michael; Manuel, Oriol; Meylan, Pascal; Nadal, David; Weisser, Maja; Mueller, Nicolas J

    2012-12-01

    The debate on the merits of observational studies as compared with randomized trials is ongoing. We will briefly touch on this subject, and demonstrate the role of cohort studies for the description of infectious disease patterns after transplantation. The potential benefits of cohort studies for the clinical management of patients outside of the expected gain in epidemiological knowledge are reviewed. The newly established Swiss Transplantation Cohort Study and in particular the part focusing on infectious diseases will serve as an illustration. A neglected area of research is the indirect value of large, multicenter cohort studies. These benefits can range from a deepened collaboration to the development of common definitions and guidelines. Unfortunately, very few data exist on the role of such indirect effects on improving quality of patient management. This review postulates an important role for cohort studies, which should not be viewed as inferior but complementary to established research tools, in particular randomized trials. Randomized trials remain the least bias-prone method to establish knowledge regarding the significance of diagnostic or therapeutic measures. Cohort studies have the power to reflect a real-world situation and to pinpoint areas of knowledge as well as of uncertainty. Prerequisite is a prospective design requiring a set of inclusive data coupled with the meticulous insistence on data retrieval and quality.

  14. Potential impact of observational cohort studies in Japan on rheumatoid arthritis research and practice.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Hisashi; Tohma, Shigeto

    2006-01-01

    For better management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, we need information both from well-designed clinical trials, such as randomized controlled trials, and from observational cohorts. Observational cohort study has not been developed in Japanese RA patients; however, two cohorts, IORRA (formerly J-ARAMIS) from 2000 and NinJa by iR-net from 2002, have been established. These two cohorts are an important source not only for better management of Japanese RA patients but also for solutions to a variety of issues concerning RA clinical practice in general. In this minireview, necessities of observational cohort studies are discussed.

  15. Calciphylaxis in peritoneal dialysis patients: a single center cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanchen; Corapi, Kristin M; Luongo, Maria; Thadhani, Ravi; Nigwekar, Sagar U

    2016-01-01

    Background Calciphylaxis is a rare but devastating condition in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Most research in the field of calciphylaxis is focused on hemodialysis (HD) patients; however, data on calciphylaxis incidence, risk factors, and mortality in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients are limited. Methods In this cohort study, we examined data from adult patients who initiated PD for ESRD management at our institute’s PD unit from January 2001 to December 2015. Associations with the development of calciphylaxis were examined for clinical, laboratory, and medication exposures. Incidence of calciphylaxis and mortality in PD patients who developed calciphylaxis were analyzed. Treatments administered to treat calciphylaxis in PD patients were summarized. Results In this cohort of 63 patients, 7 patients developed calciphylaxis (incidence rate: 9.0 per 1,000 patient-years). Median age of PD patients who developed calciphylaxis was 50 years, 57% were white, 71% females, and 71% were previously on HD. Female sex, obesity, HD as a prior dialysis modality, recurrent hypotension, elevated time-averaged serum phosphorous levels, reduced time-averaged serum albumin levels, and warfarin therapy were associated with increased calciphylaxis risk in univariate logistic regression analyses. Intravenous sodium thiosulfate was administered in 57% of PD patients who developed calciphylaxis. One-year mortality in PD patients who developed calciphylaxis was 71% despite multimodal treatment including sodium thiosulfate, hyperbaric oxygen, cinacalcet, and wound debridement. Conclusion Calciphylaxis is a rare but frequently fatal condition in PD patients. Our study provides critical early insights into calciphylaxis incidence, risk factors, and prognosis in PD patients. Sample size and characteristics of patients included in our study limit generalizability to overall PD population and warrant examination in larger independent studies. PMID:27698566

  16. ProCOC: The prostate cancer outcomes cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Umbehr, Martin; Kessler, Thomas M; Sulser, Tullio; Kristiansen, Glen; Probst, Nicole; Steurer, Johann; Bachmann, Lucas M

    2008-01-01

    Background Despite intensive research over the last several decades on prostate cancer, many questions particularly those concerning early diagnosis and the choice of optimal treatment for each individual patient, still remain unanswered. The goal of treating patients with localized prostate cancer is a curative one and includes minimizing adverse effects to preserve an adequate quality of life. Better understanding on how the quality of life is affected depending on the treatment modality would assist patients in deciding which treatment to choose; furthermore, the development of prognostic biomarkers that indicate the future course of the illness is a promising approach with potential and the focus of much attention. These questions can be addressed in the context of a cohort study. Methods/Design This is a prospective, multi-center cohort study within the canton of Zurich, Switzerland. We will include patients with newly diagnosed localized prostate cancer independently of treatment finally chosen. We will acquire clinical data including quality of life and lifestyle, prostate tissue specimen as well as further biological samples (blood and urine) before, during and after treatment for setup of a bio-bank. Assessment of these data and samples in the follow up will be done during routine controls. Study duration will be at least ten years. Influence of treatment on morbidity and mortality, including changes in quality of life, will be identified and an evaluation of biomarkers will be performed. Further we intend to set up a bio-bank containing blood and urine samples providing research of various natures around prostate cancer in the future. Discussion We presume that this study will provide answers to pertinent questions concerning prognosis and outcomes of men with localised prostate cancer. PMID:18559088

  17. How university students view human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination: A cross-sectional study in Jinan, China.

    PubMed

    Zou, Huachun; Wang, Wei; Ma, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yongjie; Zhao, Fanghui; Wang, Shaoming; Zhang, Shaokai; Ma, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The acceptability of HPV vaccination among university students in China is not well understood. Our study was of cross-sectional study design. We collected a questionnaire about socio-demographic characteristics, knowledge of, attitude toward and acceptability of HPV vaccination. A total of 351 students were included in data analyses, among whom 47.6% were males and 70.0% aged 19-21. Only 10.3% had previously heard of HPV and 5.4% HPV vaccine. Male and female students were equally likely to accept HPV vaccine (71.8 vs 69.4%, p = 0.634) and recommend it to sexual partners (73.1 vs 76.7%, p = 0.441). The great majority of students could only afford RMB 300 (USD 50) or less for HPV vaccination. HPV vaccination acceptance was associated with being in year-one (Adjusted odds ratio (AOR)  = 3.78, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.12-6.75), being from a key university (AOR = 1.88, 95%CI: 1.07-3.31), having heard of HPV-related morbidities (AOR = 1.88, 95% CI: 1.05-3.35), being concerned about HPV-related morbidities (AOR = 2.23, 95% CI: 1.16-4.27) and believing the vaccine should be given before first sexual contact (AOR = 2.44, 95% CI: 1.38-4.29). Female students were more likely to anticipate a late uptake of HPV vaccination (p = 0.002). The relatively lower levels of HPV knowledge but higher levels of vaccine acceptance among undergraduates highlighted the need for education on the roles of sexual behaviors in HPV transmission.

  18. How university students view human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination: A cross-sectional study in Jinan, China

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Huachun; Wang, Wei; Ma, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yongjie; Zhao, Fanghui; Wang, Shaoming; Zhang, Shaokai; Ma, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The acceptability of HPV vaccination among university students in China is not well understood. Our study was of cross-sectional study design. We collected a questionnaire about socio-demographic characteristics, knowledge of, attitude toward and acceptability of HPV vaccination. A total of 351 students were included in data analyses, among whom 47.6% were males and 70.0% aged 19–21. Only 10.3% had previously heard of HPV and 5.4% HPV vaccine. Male and female students were equally likely to accept HPV vaccine (71.8 vs 69.4%, p = 0.634) and recommend it to sexual partners (73.1 vs 76.7%, p = 0.441). The great majority of students could only afford RMB 300 (USD 50) or less for HPV vaccination. HPV vaccination acceptance was associated with being in year-one (Adjusted odds ratio (AOR)  = 3.78, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.12–6.75), being from a key university (AOR = 1.88, 95%CI: 1.07–3.31), having heard of HPV-related morbidities (AOR = 1.88, 95% CI: 1.05–3.35), being concerned about HPV-related morbidities (AOR = 2.23, 95% CI: 1.16–4.27) and believing the vaccine should be given before first sexual contact (AOR = 2.44, 95% CI: 1.38–4.29). Female students were more likely to anticipate a late uptake of HPV vaccination (p = 0.002). The relatively lower levels of HPV knowledge but higher levels of vaccine acceptance among undergraduates highlighted the need for education on the roles of sexual behaviors in HPV transmission. PMID:26308701

  19. Human papillomavirus infection and spontaneous abortion: a case-control study performed in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Conde-Ferráez, Laura; Chan May, Alberto de A; Carrillo-Martínez, Jorge R; Ayora-Talavera, Guadalupe; González-Losa, María del Refugio

    2013-10-01

    To investigate if HPV cervical infection is associated with spontaneous abortion in a Mexican population. Case control study including 281 women from two Social Security Hospitals in Merida, Mexico. Cases were women with spontaneous abortion attending for curettage, and controls were pregnant women at term who attended for delivery. HPV molecular detection and typing of HPV 16, 18, 58 and 6/11 was performed on cervical samples, and TORCH serology IgM tests (against T. gondii, CMV, HSV) were performed on cases. Data were analyzed using Chi square, odds ratio and linear regression tests. HPV global prevalence was 19.8% (24.4% in cases and 15.2% in controls). HPV types 16 and 58 were the most frequently detected in both groups. Multiple HPV types concurrent infection were found in 31.4% of typified samples. Amongst cases 27.3% of HPV positive women reported at least one previous pregnancy loss; compared to 17.43% amongst HPV negative women. Nevertheless, HPV was not significantly associated with spontaneous or to repetitive abortion. Cases were 60.2% positive to any TORCH agent, although it was not significantly associated to referred miscarriage history. Spontaneous abortion was associated to a previous pregnancy loss and to women's age older than 35 years old. HPV infection was significantly associated to alcohol intake before pregnancy and to multiple sexual partners. HPV cervical infection was not associated with spontaneous abortion. HPV in spontaneous abortion and other adverse pregnancy outcomes merits further study. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Diversity of Beta-papillomavirus at anogenital and oral anatomic sites of men: The HIM Study

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Emily Montosa; Sudenga, Staci L.; Gheit, Tarik; Tommasino, Massimo; Baggio, Maria Luiza; Ferreira, Silvaneide; Galan, Lenice; Silva, Roberto C.; Pierce Campbell, Christine M.; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Giuliano, Anna R.; Villa, Luisa L.; Sichero, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Summary Our goal was to describe prevalence of β-HPVs at three anatomic sites among 717 men from Brazil, Mexico and US enrolled in the HPV Infection in Men (HIM) Study. β-HPVs were genotyped using Luminex technology. Overall, 77.7%, 54.3% and 29.3% men were positive for any β-HPV at the genitals, anal canal, and oral cavity, respectively. Men from US and Brazil were significantly less likely to have β-HPV at the anal canal than men from Mexico. Older men were more likely to have β-HPV at the anal canal compared to younger men. Prevalence of β-HPV at the oral cavity was significantly associated with country of origin and age. Current smokers were significantly less likely to have β-HPV in the oral cavity than men who never smoked. Lack of associations between β-HPV and sexual behaviors may suggest other routes of contact such as autoinoculation which need to be explored further. PMID:27161202

  1. Human papillomaviruses in epigenetic regulations.

    PubMed

    Durzynska, Julia; Lesniewicz, Krzysztof; Poreba, Elzbieta

    Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs) are double-stranded DNA viruses, that infect epithelial cells and are etiologically involved in the development of human cancer. Today, over 200 types of human papillomaviruses are known. They are divided into low-risk and high-risk HPVs depending on their potential to induce carcinogenesis, driven by two major viral oncoproteins, E6 and E7. By interacting with cellular partners, these proteins are involved in interdependent viral and cell cycles in stratified differentiating epithelium, and concomitantly induce epigenetic changes in infected cells and those undergoing malignant transformation. E6 and E7 oncoproteins interact with and/or modulate expression of many proteins involved in epigenetic regulation, including DNA methyltransferases, histone-modifying enzymes and subunits of chromatin remodeling complexes, thereby influencing host cell transcription program. Furthermore, HPV oncoproteins modulate expression of cellular micro RNAs. Most of these epigenetic actions in a complex dynamic interplay participate in the maintenance of persistent infection, cell transformation, and development of invasive cancer by a considerable deregulation of tumor suppressor and oncogenes. In this study, we have undertaken to discuss a number of studies concerning epigenetic regulations in HPV-dependent cells and to focus on those that have biological relevance to cancer progression. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A comparison of Cox and logistic regression for use in genome-wide association studies of cohort and case-cohort design.

    PubMed

    Staley, James R; Jones, Edmund; Kaptoge, Stephen; Butterworth, Adam S; Sweeting, Michael J; Wood, Angela M; Howson, Joanna M M

    2017-06-01

    Logistic regression is often used instead of Cox regression to analyse genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and disease outcomes with cohort and case-cohort designs, as it is less computationally expensive. Although Cox and logistic regression models have been compared previously in cohort studies, this work does not completely cover the GWAS setting nor extend to the case-cohort study design. Here, we evaluated Cox and logistic regression applied to cohort and case-cohort genetic association studies using simulated data and genetic data from the EPIC-CVD study. In the cohort setting, there was a modest improvement in power to detect SNP-disease associations using Cox regression compared with logistic regression, which increased as the disease incidence increased. In contrast, logistic regression had more power than (Prentice weighted) Cox regression in the case-cohort setting. Logistic regression yielded inflated effect estimates (assuming the hazard ratio is the underlying measure of association) for both study designs, especially for SNPs with greater effect on disease. Given logistic regression is substantially more computationally efficient than Cox regression in both settings, we propose a two-step approach to GWAS in cohort and case-cohort studies. First to analyse all SNPs with logistic regression to identify associated variants below a pre-defined P-value threshold, and second to fit Cox regression (appropriately weighted in case-cohort studies) to those identified SNPs to ensure accurate estimation of association with disease.

  3. Cohort description: The Danish study of Functional Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Dantoft, Thomas Meinertz; Ebstrup, Jeanette Frost; Linneberg, Allan; Skovbjerg, Sine; Madsen, Anja Lykke; Mehlsen, Jesper; Brinth, Louise; Eplov, Lene Falgaard; Carstensen, Tina Wisbech; Schroder, Andreas; Fink, Per Klausen; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Jørgensen, Torben

    2017-01-01

    The Danish study of Functional Disorders (DanFunD) cohort was initiated to outline the epidemiology of functional somatic syndromes (FSS) and is the first larger coordinated epidemiological study focusing exclusively on FSS. FSS are prevalent in all medical settings and can be defined as syndromes that, after appropriate medical assessment, cannot be explained in terms of a conventional medical or surgical disease. FSS are frequent and the clinical importance varies from vague symptoms to extreme disability. No well-described medical explanations exist for FSS, and how to delimit FSS remains a controversial topic. The specific aims with the cohort were to test delimitations of FSS, estimate prevalence and incidence rates, identify risk factors, delimitate the pathogenic pathways, and explore the consequences of FSS. The study population comprises a random sample of 9,656 men and women aged 18–76 years from the general population examined from 2011 to 2015. The survey comprises screening questionnaires for five types of FSS, ie, fibromyalgia, whiplash-associated disorder, multiple chemical sensitivity, irritable bowel syndrome, and chronic fatigue syndrome, and for the unifying diagnostic category of bodily distress syndrome. Additional data included a telephone-based diagnostic interview assessment for FSS, questionnaires on physical and mental health, personality traits, lifestyle, use of health care services and social factors, and a physical examination with measures of cardiorespiratory and morphological fitness, metabolic fitness, neck mobility, heart rate variability, and pain sensitivity. A biobank including serum, plasma, urine, DNA, and microbiome has been established, and central registry data from both responders and nonresponders are similarly available on morbidity, mortality, reimbursement of medicine, heath care use, and social factors. A complete 5-year follow-up is scheduled to take place from year 2017 to 2020, and further reexaminations will be

  4. Descriptive epidemiology of the Multicenter ACL Revision Study (MARS) cohort.

    PubMed

    Wright, Rick W; Huston, Laura J; Spindler, Kurt P; Dunn, Warren R; Haas, Amanda K; Allen, Christina R; Cooper, Daniel E; DeBerardino, Thomas M; Lantz, Brett Brick A; Mann, Barton J; Stuart, Michael J

    2010-10-01

    Revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has worse outcomes than primary reconstructions. Predictors for these worse outcomes are not known. The Multicenter ACL Revision Study (MARS) Group was developed to perform a multisurgeon, multicenter prospective longitudinal study to obtain sufficient subjects to allow multivariable analysis to determine predictors of clinical outcome. To describe the formation of MARS and provide descriptive analysis of patient demographics and clinical features for the initial 460 enrolled patients to date in this prospective cohort. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 2. After training and institutional review board approval, surgeons began enrolling patients undergoing revision ACL reconstruction, recording patient demographics, previous ACL reconstruction methods, intra-articular injuries, and current revision techniques. Enrolled subjects completed a questionnaire consisting of validated patient-based outcome measures. As of April 1, 2009, 87 surgeons have enrolled a total of 460 patients (57% men; median age, 26 years). For 89%, the reconstruction was the first revision. Mode of failure as deemed by the revising surgeon was traumatic (32%), technical (24%), biologic (7%), combination (37%), infection (<1%), and no response (<1%). Previous graft present at the time of injury was 70% autograft, 27% allograft, 2% combination, and 1% unknown. Sixty-two percent were more than 2 years removed from their last reconstruction. Graft choice for revision ACL reconstruction was 45% autograft, 54% allograft, and more than 1% both allograft and autograft. Meniscus and/or chondral damage was found in 90% of patients. The MARS Group has been able to quickly accumulate the largest revision ACL reconstruction cohort reported to date. Traumatic reinjury is deemed by surgeons to be the most common single mode of failure, but a combination of factors represents the most common mode of failure. Allograft graft choice is more common

  5. Acute pancreatitis associated with severe hypertriglyceridaemia; A retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Charlesworth, Annika; Steger, Adrian; Crook, Martin A

    2015-11-01

    Acute Pancreatitis (AP) secondary to hypertriglyceridaemia (HTG) is a rare association of which little is known in the literature. This study investigates patient characteristics and outcomes (reoccurrence and mortality) in those presenting with AP secondary to HTG in one of the largest reported British cohorts. A retrospective observational case note review of all patients treated at our institution between 2004 and 2012. Data are expressed as mean and standard deviation if parametric and as median and range if non-parametric. Full fasting lipid profiles and patient demographics were recorded to elucidate further the cause of the severe hypertriglyceridaemia (>10 mmol/L fasting). There were 784 patients admitted with AP admitted to our institution within the study period. APHTG was present in 18 patients (2.3%). Peak serum triglyceride concentration was 43.9 mmol/L, SD 18.9 mmol/L. Serum amylase activity was 'falsely' low (with raised urine amylase) in about 10% of the patients with acute pancreatitis and hypertriglyceridaemia. 67% of our patients had type 2 diabetes mellitus or impaired glucose tolerance, 28% had a fatty liver and 50% displayed alcohol excess all these conditions are known to be associated with HTG There was a 94.5% reduction in serum triglyceride between presentation and last follow-up visit. There were also no deaths or recurrent episodes of AP during the study period. APHTG was present in 2.3% of patients presenting with AP. The reoccurrence and mortality rates were zero in this cohort. This may in part be due to aggressive serum triglyceride lowering by a multi-disciplinary team. Early clinical recognition is vital to provide targeted treatment and to try and reduce further episodes of AP. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. SECONDARY GASTROINTESTINAL MALIGNANCIES IN CHILDHOOD CANCER SURVIVORS: A COHORT STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Tara O.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Whitton, John; Leisenring, Wendy; Neglia, Joseph; Meadows, Anna; Crotty, Catherine; Rubin, David T.; Diller, Lisa; Inskip, Peter; Smith, Susan A.; Stovall, Marilyn; Constine, Louis S.; Hammond, Sue; Armstrong, Greg T.; Robison, Leslie L.; Nathan, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Childhood cancer survivors develop gastrointestinal malignancies more frequently and at a younger age than the general population, but risk factors for their development have not been well characterized. Objective To determine the risk and associated risk factors for gastrointestinal subsequent malignant neoplasms (SMN) in childhood cancer survivors. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting The Childhood Cancer Survivor Study, a multi-center study of childhood cancer survivors diagnosed between 1970 and 1986. Patients 14,358 survivors of a malignancy diagnosed at < 21 years who had survived for 5 or more years from initial diagnosis. Measurements Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) for gastrointestinal SMN were calculated using age-specific population data. Multivariate Cox regression models identified associations between risk factors and gastrointestinal SMN development. Results At median follow-up of 22.8 years (range: 5.5-30.2), 45 gastrointestinal malignancies were identified. Gastrointestinal SMN risk was 4.6-fold higher in childhood cancer survivors than the general population (95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.5-6.1). Colorectal cancer SIR was 4.2 (95% CI: 2.8-6.3). The highest gastrointestinal SMN risk was associated with abdominal radiation (SIR=11.2, 95% CI: 7.6-16.4). However, survivors not exposed to radiation had a significantly increased risk (SIR=2.4, 95% CI-1.4-3.9). In addition to abdominal radiation, high dose procarbazine (RR=3.2, 95% CI 1.1-9.4) and platinum drugs (RR 7.6, 95% CI: 2.3-25.5) independently increased the gastrointestinal SMN risk. Limitations This cohort has not yet attained an age at which gastrointestinal malignancy risk is greatest. Conclusions Childhood cancer survivors, particularly those exposed to abdominal radiation, are at increased risk for gastrointestinal SMN. These findings suggest that surveillance of at-risk childhood cancer survivors should commence at a younger age than recommended for the general

  7. Risk of incident atrial fibrillation in gout: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seoyoung C; Liu, Jun; Solomon, Daniel H

    2016-08-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia associated with cardiovascular disease and mortality. Recent studies suggest an association between inflammation, hyperuricaemia and AF, but little is known whether gout is associated with AF risk. Using data from a US commercial insurance plan (2004-2013), we conducted a cohort study to evaluate the risk of incident AF in patients with gout versus osteoarthritis. Patients with gout or osteoarthritis were identified with ≥2 diagnoses and ≥1 dispensing for gout or osteoarthritis medications. Incident AF was defined as a new AF diagnosis and a new dispensing for anticoagulants or antiarrhythmics. The risk of incident AF in gout was also compared with the non-gout group. We identified 70 015 patients with gout and 210 045 with osteoarthritis, matched on age, sex and index date. The mean age was 57 years, and 81% were men. Over the mean 2-year follow-up, the incidence rate of AF per 1000 person-years was 7.19 in gout and 5.87 in osteoarthritis. The age, sex and index date-matched HR of AF was 1.23 (95% CI 1.14 to 1.32) in gout versus osteoarthritis. In a multivariable Cox regression, adjusting for age, sex, comorbidities, medications and healthcare usage, the HR of AF in gout was 1.13 (95% CI 1.04 to 1.23). When compared with non-gout, the multivariable HR of AF in gout was also increased (HR 1.21, 95% CI 1.11 to 1.33). In this large population-based cohort study, gout was associated with a modestly increased risk of incident AF compared with osteoarthritis and non-gout after adjusting for other risk factors. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  8. Conserved Features in Papillomavirus and Polyomavirus Capsids

    PubMed Central

    Belnap, David M.; Olson, Norman H.; Cladel, Nancy M.; Newcomb, William W.; Brown, Jay C.; Kreider, John W.; Christensen, Neil D.; Baker, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    Capsids of papilloma and polyoma viruses (papovavirus family) are composed of 72 pentameric capsomeres arranged on a skewed icosahedral lattice (triangulation number of seven, T = 7). Cottontail rabbit papillo mavirus (CRPV) was reported previously to be a T = 7laevo (left-handed) structure, whereas human wart virus, simian virus 40, and murine polyomavirus were shown to be T = 7dextro (right-handed). The CRPV structure determined by cryoelectron microscopy and image reconstruction was similar to previously determined structures of bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV-1) and human papillomavirus type 1 (HPV-1). CRPV capsids were observed in closed (compact) and open (swollen) forms. Both forms have star-shaped capsomeres, as do BPV-1 and HPV-1, but the open CRPV capsids are ~2 nm larger in radius. The lattice hands of all papillomaviruses examined in this study were found to be T = 7dextro. In the region of maximum contact, papillomavirus capsomeres interact in a manner similar to that found in polyomaviruses. Although papilloma and polyoma viruses have differences in capsid size (~60 versus ~50 nm), capsomere morphology (11 to 12 nm star-shaped versus 8 nm barrel-shaped), and intercapsomere interactions (slightly different contacts between capsomeres), papovavirus capsids have a conserved, 72-pentamer, T = 7dextro structure. These features are conserved despite significant differences in amino acid sequences of the major capsid proteins. The conserved features may be a consequence of stable contacts that occur within capsomeres and flexible links that form among capsomeres. PMID:8656427

  9. Investigating the psychological impact of bank robbery: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Maj; Armour, Cherie; Shevlin, Mark; Elklit, Ask

    2014-06-01

    Despite numerous annual bank robberies worldwide, research in the psychological sequelae of bank robberies is sparse and characterized by several limitations. To overcome these limitations we investigated the psychological impact of bank robbery in a cohort study by comparing general levels of traumatization and somatization in employees never exposed to robbery and employees exposed to robbery at different degrees and time-points, while controlling for selected risk factors of posttraumatic distress. Multivariate regression analyses showed that only the acute directly exposed robbery group which had a significantly higher score on general traumatization and somatization compared to the control group whilst controlling for other factors. In conclusion, bank robbery exposure appears to be especially associated with psychological distress in the acute phase and in victims present during the robbery. After the acute phase, other factors appear more important in predicting general traumatization and somatization in bank employees compared to exposure to robbery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Historical cohort study of mortality among chemical researchers

    SciTech Connect

    Maher, K.V.; Defonso, L.R.

    1986-03-01

    This historical cohort study examined mortality among 1,510 white male researchers employed from 1950-1959 who handled chemicals. During 1950-1979, 95 deaths were observed, significantly less than the 173.2 predicted by general population rates (SMR = 55). This was due to deficits in overall cancer deaths (SMR = 66), particularly respiratory cancer (SMR = 28), and reduced mortality from circulatory diseases and accidents. Those who had worked directly with chemicals for more than 5 yr and those who had the most hazardous exposures experienced similar low mortality for all causes, all cancers, and respiratory cancer. Although deaths due to digestive cancer were elevated among those with 1-5 yr of work experience, there was no excess among those working more than 5 yr as would be expected from occupational exposure.

  11. Construction of a Transcription Map for Papillomaviruses using RACE, RNAse Protection and Primer Extension Assays

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohong; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Papillomaviruses are a family of small, non-enveloped DNA tumor viruses. Knowing a complete transcription map from each papillomavirus genome can provide guidance for various papillomavirus studies. This unit provides detailed protocols to construct a transcription map of human papillomavirus type 18. The same approach can be easily adapted to other transcription map studies of any other papillomavirus genotype due to the high degree of conservation in the genome structure, organization and gene expression among papillomaviruses. The focused methods are 5’- and 3’- rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE), which are the techniques commonly used in molecular biology to obtain the full length RNA transcript or to map a transcription start site (TSS) or an RNA polyadenylation (pA) cleavage site. Primer walking RT-PCR is a method for studying splicing junction of RACE products. In addition, RNase protection assay and primer extension are also introduced as alternative methods in the mapping analysis. PMID:26855281

  12. Ten years of progress in the Hokkaido birth cohort study on environment and children's health: cohort profile--updated 2013.

    PubMed

    Kishi, Reiko; Kobayashi, Sachiko; Ikeno, Tamiko; Araki, Atsuko; Miyashita, Chihiro; Itoh, Sachiko; Sasaki, Seiko; Okada, Emiko; Kobayashi, Sumitaka; Kashino, Ikuko; Itoh, Kumiko; Nakajima, Sonomi

    2013-11-01

    The Hokkaido Study on Environment and Children's Health is an ongoing cohort study that began in 2002. The study consists of two prospective birth cohorts, the Sapporo cohort (n = 514) and the Hokkaido large-scale cohort (n = 20,940). The primary goals of this study are to first examine the potential negative effects of perinatal environmental chemical exposures on birth outcomes, including congenital malformations and growth retardation; second, to evaluate the development of allergies, infectious diseases and neurodevelopmental disorders and perform longitudinal observations of the children's physical development to clarify the causal relationship between these outcomes and environmental chemicals; third, to identify individuals genetically susceptible to environmental chemicals; finally, to identify the additive effects of various environmental factors in our daily life, such as secondhand smoke exposure or low folate intake during early pregnancy. In this paper, we introduce our recent progress in the Hokkaido study with a cohort profile updated in 2013. For the last ten years, we followed pregnant women and their offspring, measuring various environmental chemicals, i.e., PCB, OH-PCB and dioxins, PFCs (Perfluorinated Compounds), Organochlorine pesticides, Phthalates, bisphenol A and mercury. We discovered that the concentration of toxic equivalents (TEQ) of dioxin and other specific congeners of PCDF or PCDD have effects on birth weight, infants' neurodevelopment and immune function. There were significant gender differences in these effects; our results suggest that male infants have more susceptibility to those chemical exposures than female infants. Interestingly, we found maternal genetic polymorphisms in AHR, CYP1A1 or GSTs that significantly modified the dioxin concentrations in maternal blood, suggesting different dioxin accumulations in the bodies of individuals with these genotypes, which would lead to different dioxin exposure levels. These genetic

  13. Breast feeding and child behaviour in the Millennium Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Heikkilä, Katriina; Sacker, Amanda; Kelly, Yvonne; Renfrew, Mary J; Quigley, Maria A

    2011-07-01

    To examine whether breast feeding is associated with behavioural development in children aged 5 years. The authors used data from a large, prospective, nationally representative UK cohort, the Millennium Cohort Study. 10 037 mother-child pairs from white ethnic background (9525 term and 512 preterm children) were included in the analyses. Duration of breast feeding (at all or exclusively) was ascertained from parental interview at study baseline, when the children were aged 9 months. Child behaviour was assessed using a parent-completed questionnaire, the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). The authors used logistic regression to investigate the associations of breastfeeding duration with abnormal parent-rated SDQ total and subscores at age 5 in term and preterm children separately. Abnormal SDQ scores were less common in term children (n=1129/9525, 12%) than pre-term (n=78/512, 15%) children. Term children breast fed for 4 months or longer (n=2741/9525, 29%) had lower odds of an abnormal total SDQ score (multivariable-adjusted OR compared with never breastfed children (n=3292/9525, 35%) 0.67, 95% CI: 0.54 to 0.83). This effect was similar for all the SDQ subscores. In preterm children, longer duration of breast feeding was generally associated with lower odds of abnormal SDQ total and subscores but the effect estimates were imprecise. The associations between exclusive breast feeding and abnormal SDQ scores were similar to those of any breast feeding and abnormal SDQ scores. The findings suggest that, at least in term children, longer duration of breast feeding is associated with fewer parent-rated behavioural problems in children aged 5 years.

  14. Seroprevalence and Associated Factors of 9-Valent Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Types among Men in the Multinational HIM Study.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Shams; Pierce Campbell, Christine M; Rollison, Dana E; Wang, Wei; Waterboer, Tim; Michel, Angelika; Pawlita, Michael; Villa, Luisa L; Lazcano Ponce, Eduardo; Borenstein, Amy R; Giuliano, Anna R

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections worldwide. Recently a 9-valent HPV (9vHPV) prophylactic vaccine was licensed. Seroprevalence prior to vaccine dissemination is needed for monitoring vaccine effectiveness over time. Few studies have assessed the seroprevalence of 9vHPV types in men. To investigate the seroprevalence of 9vHPV vaccine types and associated risk factors among men residing in Brazil, Mexico, and the United States. Six hundred men were randomly selected from the HPV Infection in Men (HIM) Study. Archived serum specimens collected at enrollment were tested for antibodies against nine HPV types (6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52 and 58) using a glutathione S-transferase (GST) L1-based multiplex serologic assay. Socio-demographic, lifestyle and sexual behavior data at enrollment were collected through a questionnaire. Binomial proportions were used to estimate seroprevalence and logistic regression was used to examine factors associated with seropositivity of type-specific and grouped (i.e. 9vHPV, high-risk 9vHPV, low risk 9vHPV, and five-additional) HPV types. Overall, 28.3% of men were seropositive for at least one of the 9vHPV vaccine types, 14.0% for at least one of the seven high-risk types (16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52 and 58) and 11.2% for at least one of the five high-risk types (31, 33, 45, 52 and 58) not included in the quadrivalent HPV vaccine, and 17.4% for at least one of the low-risk types (6/11). In multivariate analyses, odds ratios adjusted (AOR) for country of residence, age, marital status, smoking, number of anal sex lifetime partners, compared to men with no anal sex lifetime partners, men with ≥2 partners were more likely to be seropositive for grouped HPV [(9vHPV: AOR 2.52; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.40-4.54), (high-risk 9vHPV: AOR 2.18; 95%CI: 1.05-4.50) and (low-risk 9vHPV: AOR 2.12; 95%CI: 1.12-4.03)], and individual HPV types 6, 16, 33 and 58 with AORs ranging from 2.19 to 7

  15. Seroprevalence and Associated Factors of 9-Valent Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Types among Men in the Multinational HIM Study

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Shams; Pierce Campbell, Christine M.; Rollison, Dana E.; Wang, Wei; Waterboer, Tim; Michel, Angelika; Pawlita, Michael; Villa, Luisa L.; Lazcano Ponce, Eduardo; Borenstein, Amy R.; Giuliano, Anna R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections worldwide. Recently a 9-valent HPV (9vHPV) prophylactic vaccine was licensed. Seroprevalence prior to vaccine dissemination is needed for monitoring vaccine effectiveness over time. Few studies have assessed the seroprevalence of 9vHPV types in men. Objectives To investigate the seroprevalence of 9vHPV vaccine types and associated risk factors among men residing in Brazil, Mexico, and the United States. Methods Six hundred men were randomly selected from the HPV Infection in Men (HIM) Study. Archived serum specimens collected at enrollment were tested for antibodies against nine HPV types (6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52 and 58) using a glutathione S-transferase (GST) L1-based multiplex serologic assay. Socio-demographic, lifestyle and sexual behavior data at enrollment were collected through a questionnaire. Binomial proportions were used to estimate seroprevalence and logistic regression was used to examine factors associated with seropositivity of type-specific and grouped (i.e. 9vHPV, high-risk 9vHPV, low risk 9vHPV, and five-additional) HPV types. Results Overall, 28.3% of men were seropositive for at least one of the 9vHPV vaccine types, 14.0% for at least one of the seven high-risk types (16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52 and 58) and 11.2% for at least one of the five high-risk types (31, 33, 45, 52 and 58) not included in the quadrivalent HPV vaccine, and 17.4% for at least one of the low-risk types (6/11). In multivariate analyses, odds ratios adjusted (AOR) for country of residence, age, marital status, smoking, number of anal sex lifetime partners, compared to men with no anal sex lifetime partners, men with ≥2 partners were more likely to be seropositive for grouped HPV [(9vHPV: AOR 2.52; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.40–4.54), (high-risk 9vHPV: AOR 2.18; 95%CI: 1.05–4.50) and (low-risk 9vHPV: AOR 2.12; 95%CI: 1.12–4.03)], and individual HPV types 6, 16, 33 and

  16. Nested Cohort

    Cancer.gov

    NestedCohort is an R software package for fitting Kaplan-Meier and Cox Models to estimate standardized survival and attributable risks for studies where covariates of interest are observed on only a sample of the cohort.

  17. Cerebral palsy and clinical negligence litigation: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Catherine; Newman, Sally; Impey, Lawrence; Johnson, Ann

    2003-01-01

    To compare the prevalence of criteria suggesting acute intrapartum hypoxia in children with cerebral palsy who have and have not been the subjects of clinical negligence legal claims. Nested cohort study within a geographically defined cohort. The former Oxfordshire Health Authority. Singleton children with cerebral palsy born between 1984 and 1993, excluding cases with a recognised postnatal cause for cerebral palsy. Retrospective review of medical records by blinded observer. Three 'essential' criteria defined by the International Cerebral Palsy Task Force which identify acute intrapartum hypoxia. One-fifth (27/138) of all singleton cerebral palsy children were the subject of a legal claim. The presence of all three criteria was significantly more likely to lead to a legal claim (P < 0.01), but in 74% (20/27) of claims, all three were not fulfilled and 36% (4/11) of those satisfying all three criteria did not claim. At least one of the three criteria was met in 82% (91/111) of the cases where there was no claim. Data on fetal or neonatal arterial blood gases were available in only 57% (78/138). Of the 27 claims, 12 were discontinued, 8 were settled and in 7 the legal process is still pending. The presence of the three essential criteria for acute intrapartum hypoxia did not increase the likelihood of a legal claim being settled. The prevalence of the 'template essential' criteria is high in all cases of cerebral palsy. Although the presence of all three essential criteria was more likely in the claims group, this did not appear to influence the outcome of a claim. It remains to be seen whether the existence of the template leads to change in the pattern of decisions made by the courts.

  18. Dogslife: A cohort study of Labrador Retrievers in the UK.

    PubMed

    Pugh, C A; Bronsvoort, B M de C; Handel, I G; Summers, K M; Clements, D N

    2015-12-01

    Studies of animals that visit primary and secondary veterinary centres dominate companion animal epidemiology. Dogslife is a research initiative that collects data directly from owners about the health and lifestyle of Kennel Club (KC) registered Labrador Retrievers (LR) in the UK. The ultimate aim is to seek associations between canine lifestyle and health. A selection of data from Dogslife regarding the height, weight and lifestyle of 4307 LR up to four years of age is reported here. The majority of the dogs were household pets, living with at least one other pet, in families or households with more than one adult. The dogs typically ate diets of dried food and daily meal frequency decreased as the dogs aged. Working dogs spent more time exercising than pets, and dogs in Wales and Scotland were exercised more than their counterparts in England. Dogs in households with children spent less time exercising than dogs in other types of households. There was considerable variation in height and weight measurements indicative of a highly heterogeneous population. The average male height at the shoulders was 2-3cm taller than the UK breed standard. Dog weights continued to increase between one and four years of age. Those with chocolate coloured coats were heavier than their yellow and black counterparts. Greater dog weight was also associated with dogs whose owners reported restricting their dog's exercise due to where they lived. These findings highlight the utility of wide public engagement in the collation of phenotypic measures, providing a unique insight into the physical development and lifestyle of a cohort of LRs. In combination with concurrently collected data on the health of the cohort, phenotypic data from the Dogslife Project will contribute to understanding the relationship between dog lifestyle and health. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. [Cohort mortality study of dust exposed miners in iron mine].

    PubMed

    Su, Liang-ping; Guan, Hong-yu; Zhao, Li-fan; Zhang, Jian-min; Chen, Wei-hong

    2006-06-01

    To investigate the main diseases jeopardizing the health of the iron miners and to explore the relationship between dust exposure and malignancies as well as other diseases. A retrospective study with a cohort of 7,469 workers employed between January 1, 1972 and December 31, 1974 in Daye Iron Ore Mine Co. in Hubei Province was conducted. Standardized mortality ratio (SMR) was calculated for the main causes of death using Chinese national mortality rates for reference. All subjects were followed up through December 31, 2003 with an accumulation of 199, 108.0 person years. A total of 1,752 workers died. The cumulative mortality was 23.5%. The cancers, cerebrovascular diseases, non-malignant respiratory diseases and cardiovascular diseases were main diseases that threatened workers' life span. The SMR for all subjects was a little higher than expected based on the Chinese national mortality rates. The diseases causing the significantly higher death rate were the nasopharynx cancer, liver cancer, lung cancer, pneumoconiosis and accident with SMR 1.84, 1.51, 1.83, 14.94 and 1.25 respectively. Increased mortality was observed among dust-exposed workers in the cohort. The cumulative mortality from all causes such as stomach cancer, lung cancer, nonmalignant respiratory diseases, cardiovascular diseases and accident in dust exposed workers were significantly increased compared with those in non-exposure workers with RR 1.35, 1.83, 1.61, 2.27, 1.34 and 1.69 respectively. The risk factors especially dust exposure affect the health and lifespan of the iron mine workers.

  20. The Generation R Study: design and cohort update 2012.

    PubMed

    Jaddoe, Vincent W V; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Franco, Oscar H; van der Heijden, Albert J; van Iizendoorn, Marinus H; de Jongste, Johan C; van der Lugt, Aad; Mackenbach, Johan P; Moll, Henriëtte A; Raat, Hein; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Steegers, Eric A P; Tiemeier, Henning; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Verhulst, Frank C; Hofman, Albert

    2012-09-01

    The Generation R Study is a population-based prospective cohort study from fetal life until adulthood. The study is designed to identify early environmental and genetic causes and causal pathways leading to normal and abnormal growth, development and health during fetal life, childhood and adulthood. The study focuses on six areas of research: (1) maternal health; (2) growth and physical development; (3) behavioural and cognitive development; (4) respiratory health and allergies; (5) diseases in childhood; and (6) health and healthcare for children and their parents. Main exposures of interest include environmental, endocrine, genetic and epigenetic, lifestyle related, nutritional and socio-demographic determinants. In total, n = 9,778 mothers with a delivery date from April 2002 until January 2006 were enrolled in the study. Response at baseline was 61 %, and general follow-up rates until the age of 6 years exceed 80 %. Data collection in mothers, fathers and children include questionnaires, detailed physical and ultrasound examinations, behavioural observations, and biological samples. A genome and epigenome wide association screen is available in the participating children. From the age of 5 years, regular detailed hands-on assessments are performed in a dedicated research center including advanced imaging facilities such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Eventually, results forthcoming from the Generation R Study contribute to the development of strategies for optimizing health and healthcare for pregnant women and children.

  1. Cohort Profile: The English Longitudinal Study of Ageing

    PubMed Central

    Steptoe, Andrew; Breeze, Elizabeth; Banks, James; Nazroo, James

    2013-01-01

    The English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) is a panel study of a representative cohort of men and women living in England aged ≥50 years. It was designed as a sister study to the Health and Retirement Study in the USA and is multidisciplinary in orientation, involving the collection of economic, social, psychological, cognitive, health, biological and genetic data. The study commenced in 2002, and the sample has been followed up every 2 years. Data are collected using computer-assisted personal interviews and self-completion questionnaires, with additional nurse visits for the assessment of biomarkers every 4 years. The original sample consisted of 11 391 members ranging in age from 50 to 100 years. ELSA is harmonized with ageing studies in other countries to facilitate international comparisons, and is linked to financial and health registry data. The data set is openly available to researchers and analysts soon after collection (http://www.esds.ac.uk/longitudinal/access/elsa/l5050.asp). PMID:23143611

  2. The Generation R Study: design and cohort update 2017.

    PubMed

    Kooijman, Marjolein N; Kruithof, Claudia J; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Duijts, Liesbeth; Franco, Oscar H; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H; de Jongste, Johan C; Klaver, Caroline C W; van der Lugt, Aad; Mackenbach, Johan P; Moll, Henriëtte A; Peeters, Robin P; Raat, Hein; Rings, Edmond H H M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; van der Schroeff, Marc P; Steegers, Eric A P; Tiemeier, Henning; Uitterlinden, André G; Verhulst, Frank C; Wolvius, Eppo; Felix, Janine F; Jaddoe, Vincent W V

    2016-12-01

    The Generation R Study is a population-based prospective cohort study from fetal life until adulthood. The study is designed to identify early environmental and genetic causes and causal pathways leading to normal and abnormal growth, development and health from fetal life, childhood and young adulthood. This multidisciplinary study focuses on several health outcomes including behaviour and cognition, body composition, eye development, growth, hearing, heart and vascular development, infectious disease and immunity, oral health and facial growth, respiratory health, allergy and skin disorders of children and their parents. Main exposures of interest include environmental, endocrine, genomic (genetic, epigenetic, microbiome), lifestyle related, nutritional and socio-demographic determinants. In total, 9778 mothers with a delivery date from April 2002 until January 2006 were enrolled in the study. Response at baseline was 61%, and general follow-up rates until the age of 10 years were around 80%. Data collection in children and their parents includes questionnaires, interviews, detailed physical and ultrasound examinations, behavioural observations, lung function, Magnetic Resonance Imaging and biological sampling. Genome and epigenome wide association screens are available. Eventually, results from the Generation R Study contribute to the development of strategies for optimizing health and healthcare for pregnant women and children.

  3. Aragon workers’ health study – design and cohort description

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Spain, a Mediterranean country with relatively low rates of coronary heart disease, has a high prevalence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and is experiencing a severe epidemic of overweight/obesity. We designed the Aragon Workers’ Health Study (AWHS) to characterize the factors associated with metabolic abnormalities and subclinical atherosclerosis in a middle aged population in Spain free of clinical cardiovascular disease. The objective of this paper is to describe the study design, aims and baseline characteristics of participants in the AWHS. Methods/Design Longitudinal cohort study based on the annual health exams of 5,400 workers of a car assembly plant in Figueruelas (Zaragoza, Spain). Study participants were recruited during a standardized clinical exam in 2009–2010 (participation rate 95.6%). Study participants will undergo annual clinical exams and laboratory assays, and baseline and triennial collection of biological materials for biobanking and cardiovascular imaging exams (carotid, femoral and abdominal ultrasonography, coronary calcium score, and ankle-arm blood pressure index). Participants will be followed-up for 10 years. Results The average (SD) age, body mass index, and waist circumference were 49.3 (8.7) years, 27.7 (3.6) kg/m2 and 97.2 (9.9) cm, respectively, among males (N = 5,048), and 40.8 (11.6) years, 24.4 (3.8) kg/m2, and 81.9 (9.9) cm, among females (N = 351). The prevalence of overweight, obesity, current smoking, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and diabetes were 55.0, 23.1, 37.1, 40.3, 75.0, and 7.4%, respectively, among males, and 23.7, 8.3, 45.0, 12.1, 59.5, and 0.6%, respectively, among females. In the initial 587 study participants who completed all imaging exams (94.5% male), the prevalence of carotid plaque, femoral plaque, coronary calcium score >1 to 100, and coronary calcium score >100 was 30.3, 56.9, 27.0, and 8.8%, respectively. 67.7% of study participants had at least one plaque in

  4. Aragon workers' health study--design and cohort description.

    PubMed

    Casasnovas, José A; Alcaide, Victor; Civeira, Fernando; Guallar, Eliseo; Ibañez, Borja; Borreguero, Jesús Jiménez; Laclaustra, Martin; León, Montserrat; Peñalvo, José Luis; Ordovás, José M; Pocovi, Miguel; Sanz, Ginés; Fuster, Valentín

    2012-06-19

    Spain, a Mediterranean country with relatively low rates of coronary heart disease, has a high prevalence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and is experiencing a severe epidemic of overweight/obesity. We designed the Aragon Workers' Health Study (AWHS) to characterize the factors associated with metabolic abnormalities and subclinical atherosclerosis in a middle aged population in Spain free of clinical cardiovascular disease. The objective of this paper is to describe the study design, aims and baseline characteristics of participants in the AWHS. Longitudinal cohort study based on the annual health exams of 5,400 workers of a car assembly plant in Figueruelas (Zaragoza, Spain). Study participants were recruited during a standardized clinical exam in 2009-2010 (participation rate 95.6%). Study participants will undergo annual clinical exams and laboratory assays, and baseline and triennial collection of biological materials for biobanking and cardiovascular imaging exams (carotid, femoral and abdominal ultrasonography, coronary calcium score, and ankle-arm blood pressure index). Participants will be followed-up for 10 years. The average (SD) age, body mass index, and waist circumference were 49.3 (8.7) years, 27.7 (3.6) kg/m² and 97.2 (9.9) cm, respectively, among males (N = 5,048), and 40.8 (11.6) years, 24.4 (3.8) kg/m², and 81.9 (9.9) cm, among females (N = 351). The prevalence of overweight, obesity, current smoking, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and diabetes were 55.0, 23.1, 37.1, 40.3, 75.0, and 7.4%, respectively, among males, and 23.7, 8.3, 45.0, 12.1, 59.5, and 0.6%, respectively, among females. In the initial 587 study participants who completed all imaging exams (94.5% male), the prevalence of carotid plaque, femoral plaque, coronary calcium score >1 to 100, and coronary calcium score >100 was 30.3, 56.9, 27.0, and 8.8%, respectively. 67.7% of study participants had at least one plaque in the carotid or femoral arteries

  5. Cutaneous beta human papillomaviruses and the development of male external genital lesions: A case-control study nested within the HIM Study.

    PubMed

    Pierce Campbell, Christine M; Gheit, Tarik; Tommasino, Massimo; Lin, Hui-Yi; Torres, B Nelson; Messina, Jane L; Stoler, Mark H; Rollison, Dana E; Sirak, Bradley A; Abrahamsen, Martha; Carvalho da Silva, Roberto J; Sichero, Laura; Villa, Luisa L; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Giuliano, Anna R

    2016-10-01

    Cutaneous human papillomaviruses (HPVs) increase the risk of non-melanoma skin cancer in sun-exposed skin. We examined the role of beta-HPV in the development of male external genital lesions (EGLs), a sun-unexposed site. In this nested case-control study (67 men with pathologically-confirmed EGLs and 134 controls), exfoliated cells collected from the surface of lesions and normal genital skin 0, 6, and 12 months preceding EGL development were tested for beta-HPV DNA using a type-specific multiplex genotyping assay. Beta-HPV prevalence was estimated and conditional logistic regression was used to evaluate the association with condyloma, the most common EGL. While beta-HPV prevalence among controls remained stable, the prevalence among cases was lowest on the surface of lesion. Detecting beta-HPV on the normal genital skin was not associated with the presence or development of condyloma. Cutaneous beta-HPV does not appear to be contributing to pathogenesis in male genital skin. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Upper alimentary tract papillomas in calves related to papillomavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Winston E.; Venzano, Agustín J.; Craig, María Isabel; Diodati, Julián A.; Funes, Daniel; Elizondo, Ana; Mercado, Elsa; Capellino, Felix; Delgado, Fernando; Blanco-Viera, Javier

    2010-01-01

    This study reports 3 cases of spontaneous papillomavirus infection in 1-week-old calves. Thickening of the omasum and abomasum wall, with acute inflammation, necrosis, ulceration, and neoplastic changes were seen in 1 calf. In the other 2, small papillomas were observed in the omasal mucosa, exhibiting proliferation of the parakeratinized epithelium. Papillomavirus antigens were detected by immunohistochemistry and virus-like particles were seen through electron microscopy. PMID:21037889

  7. Upper alimentary tract papillomas in calves related to papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Morris, Winston E; Venzano, Agustín J; Craig, María Isabel; Diodati, Julián A; Funes, Daniel; Elizondo, Ana; Mercado, Elsa; Capellino, Felix; Delgado, Fernando; Blanco-Viera, Javier

    2010-08-01

    This study reports 3 cases of spontaneous papillomavirus infection in 1-week-old calves. Thickening of the omasum and abomasum wall, with acute inflammation, necrosis, ulceration, and neoplastic changes were seen in 1 calf. In the other 2, small papillomas were observed in the omasal mucosa, exhibiting proliferation of the parakeratinized epithelium. Papillomavirus antigens were detected by immunohistochemistry and virus-like particles were seen through electron microscopy.

  8. Identification of homogeneous and heterogeneous variables in pooled cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xin; Lu, Wenbin; Liu, Mengling

    2015-06-01

    Pooled analyses integrate data from multiple studies and achieve a larger sample size for enhanced statistical power. When heterogeneity exists in variables' effects on the outcome across studies, the simple pooling strategy fails to present a fair and complete picture of the effects of heterogeneous variables. Thus, it is important to investigate the homogeneous and heterogeneous structure of variables in pooled studies. In this article, we consider the pooled cohort studies with time-to-event outcomes and propose a penalized Cox partial likelihood approach with adaptively weighted composite penalties on variables' homogeneous and heterogeneous effects. We show that our method can characterize the variables as having heterogeneous, homogeneous, or null effects, and estimate non-zero effects. The results are readily extended to high-dimensional applications where the number of parameters is larger than the sample size. The proposed selection and estimation procedure can be implemented using the iterative shooting algorithm. We conduct extensive numerical studies to evaluate the performance of our proposed method and demonstrate it using a pooled analysis of gene expression in patients with ovarian cancer. © 2015, The International Biometric Society.

  9. Identification of Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Variables in Pooled Cohort Studies

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xin; Lu, Wenbin; Liu, Mengling

    2016-01-01

    Summary Pooled analyses integrate data from multiple studies and achieve a larger sample size for enhanced statistical power. When heterogeneity exists in variables’ effects on the outcome across studies, the simple pooling strategy fails to present a fair and complete picture of the effects of heterogeneous variables. Thus, it is important to investigate the homogeneous and heterogeneous structure of variables in pooled studies. In this paper, we consider the pooled cohort studies with time-to-event outcomes and propose a penalized Cox partial likelihood approach with adaptively weighted composite penalties on variables’ homogeneous and heterogeneous effects. We show that our method can characterize the variables as having heterogeneous, homogeneous, or null effects, and estimate non-zero effects. The results are readily extended to high-dimensional applications where the number of parameters is larger than the sample size. The proposed selection and estimation procedure can be implemented using the iterative shooting algorithm. We conduct extensive numerical studies to evaluate the performance of our proposed method and demonstrate it using a pooled analysis of gene expression in patients with ovarian cancer. PMID:25732747

  10. Opium use and mortality in Golestan Cohort Study: prospective cohort study of 50 000 adults in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Khademi, Hooman; Pourshams, Akram; Jafari, Elham; Salahi, Rasool; Semnani, Shahryar; Abaie, Behrooz; Islami, Farhad; Nasseri-Moghaddam, Siavosh; Etemadi, Arash; Byrnes, Graham; Abnet, Christian C; Dawsey, Sanford M; Day, Nicholas E; Pharoah, Paul D; Boffetta, Paolo; Kamangar, Farin

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the association between opium use and subsequent risk of death. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting The Golestan Cohort Study in north-eastern Iran collected detailed validated data on opium use and other exposures at baseline. Participants were enrolled between January 2004 and June 2008 and were followed to May 2011, with a follow-up success rate of over 99%. Participants 50 045 participants aged 40-75 at baseline. Main outcomes Mortality, all cause and major subcategories. Results 17% (n=8487) of the participants reported opium use, with a mean duration of 12.7 years. During the follow-up period 2145 deaths were reported. The adjusted hazard ratio for all cause mortality associated with ever use of opium was 1.86 (95% confidence interval 1.68 to 2.06). Opium consumption was significantly associated with increased risks of deaths from several causes including circulatory diseases (hazard ratio 1.81) and cancer (1.61). The strongest associations were seen with deaths from asthma, tuberculosis, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (11.0, 6.22, and 5.44, respectively). After exclusion of people who self prescribed opium after the onset of major chronic illnesses, the associations remained strong with a dose-response relation. Conclusion Opium users have an increased risk of death from multiple causes compared with non-users. Increased risks were also seen in people who used low amounts of opium for a long period and those who had no major illness before use. PMID:22511302

  11. Pain and risk of completed suicide in Japanese men: a population-based cohort study in Japan (Ohsaki Cohort Study).

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Nobutaka; Ohmori-Matsuda, Kaori; Shimazu, Taichi; Sone, Toshimasa; Kakizaki, Masako; Nakaya, Naoki; Kuriyama, Shinichi; Tsuji, Ichiro

    2009-03-01

    Unrelieved pain is a major factor that influences suicide risk among terminally ill patients, but little is known about the relationship between pain and the risk of completed suicide in the general population. We prospectively examined the association between self-reports of pain and subsequent risk of completed suicide in 26,481 men aged 40 to 79 years from the Ohsaki National Health Insurance Cohort study, a population-based, prospective cohort study initiated in 1994. On the basis of a five-item questionnaire on pain, individuals were classified as having no pain, very mild pain, mild pain, or moderate or severe pain. Completed suicide cases were documented from 1995 to 2001. During 131,027 person-years, 64 completed suicides were documented. After adjustment for covariates, the risk for completed suicide was significantly higher in the subjects with more pain. Multivariate hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) relative to the subjects who had no pain were 1.36 (0.67-2.75), 2.11 (1.02-4.33), and 2.93 (1.34-6.42) in the subjects who had very mild pain, mild pain, and moderate or severe pain, respectively (P for trend=0.004). Stratified analysis showed that the positive association between pain and suicide risk was robust in the subjects with good health, low stress, adequate sleep, good physical activity, and no history of chronic diseases. Our results suggest that pain is associated with an increased risk of completed suicide among Japanese men. The association was consistently observed among apparently healthy subjects.

  12. Mumps transmission in social networks: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Hahné, Susan; Schurink, Tessa; Wallinga, Jacco; Kerkhof, Jeroen; van der Sande, Marianne; van Binnendijk, Rob; de Melker, Hester

    2017-01-10

    Mumps emerged among highly vaccinated populations in the Netherlands. This offered a unique opportunity to study mumps virus transmission. In particular the extent to which asymptomatic infections in vaccinated people contribute to ongoing mumps virus transmission is uncertain. Insight into this could help project the future burden of mumps in vaccinated populations. We therefore studied the relative infectiousness of symptomatic and asymptomatic cases. In a cohort study we followed contacts of notified mumps cases (ring 1) and contacts' contacts (ring 2) for 40 days to ascertain symptoms of mumps and social contacts by weekly diaries and questionnaires, and mumps virus infections by taking finger stick dried blood spot specimens (DBS) that were tested for mumps-specific IgG antibodies. Mumps IgG concentrations >1500 RU/ml in a single sample, a four-fold increase in IgG antibody concentration in paired samples, or a positive oral fluid PCR were defined as recent infection. We recruited 99 contacts (40 in ring 1 and 59 in ring 2) of 10 mumps index cases. The median age of participants was 23 years (range 18-57 years), 31 (31%) were male. At study entry, DBS of 4 out of 78 (5%) participants with samples showed serological evidence of recent mumps virus infection. Three of these reported mumps symptoms. Among the 59 participants who provided DBS at the beginning and end of the follow-up period, none had serological evidence of infection during this period. Of 72 participants who provided at least one oral fluid sample, one participant (1%) who also reported mumps symptoms, was found PCR positive. Of all 99 participants, the attack rate of self-reported mumps was 4% (95% CI 1.1-10.0%). Of the 5 laboratory confirmed mumps cases, 1 reported no mumps symptoms (percentage asymptomatic 20% (95% CI 0-71%)). Compared to non-students, students had larger households and more household members who were born after 1980 (p < 0.01 and <0.01, respectively). We demonstrated

  13. Cohort Differences in Cognitive Aging and Terminal Decline in the Seattle Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Gerstorf, Denis; Ram, Nilam; Hoppmann, Christiane; Willis, Sherry L.; Schaie, K. Warner

    2011-01-01

    Life span researchers have long been interested in how and why fundamental aspects of human ontogeny differ between cohorts of people who have lived through different historical epochs. When examined at the same age, later born cohorts are often cognitively and physically fitter than earlier born cohorts. Less is known, however, about cohort differences in the rate of cognitive aging and if, at the very end of life, pervasive mortality-related processes overshadow and minimize cohort differences. We used data on 5 primary mental abilities from the Seattle Longitudinal Study (Schaie, 2005) to compare both age-related and mortality-related changes between earlier born cohorts (1886–1913) and later born cohorts (1914–1948). Our models covary for several individual and cohort differences in central indicators of life expectancy, education, health, and gender. Age-related growth models corroborate and extend earlier findings by documenting level differences at age 70 of up to 0.50 SD and less steep rates of cognitive aging on all abilities between 50 and 80 years of age favoring the later born cohort. In contrast, mortality-related models provide limited support for positive cohort differences. The later born cohort showed steeper mortality-related declines. We discuss possible reasons why often reported positive secular trends in age-related processes may not generalize to the vulnerable segment of the population that is close to death and suggest routes for further inquiry. PMID:21517155

  14. Healthy Skin of Many Animal Species Harbors Papillomaviruses Which Are Closely Related to Their Human Counterparts

    PubMed Central

    Antonsson, Annika; Hansson, Bengt Göran

    2002-01-01

    Papillomaviruses associated with clinical symptoms have been found in many vertebrate species. In this study, we have used an L1 gene consensus PCR test designed to detect a broad spectrum of human skin papillomaviruses to analyze swab samples from healthy skin of 111 animals belonging to 19 vertebrate species. In eight of the species, papillomavirus DNA was found with the following prevalences: chimpanzees, 9 of 11 samples positive; gorillas, 3 of 4; long-tailed macaques, 14 of 16; spider monkeys, 2 of 2; ruffed lemurs, 1 of 2; cows, 6 of 10; European elks, 4 of 4; aurochs, 1 of 1. In total, 53 new putative animal papillomavirus types were found. The results show that skin papillomaviruses can be detected in healthy skin from many different animal species and are sufficiently related genetically to their human counterparts to be identified by a human skin papillomavirus primer set (FAP59 and FAP64). PMID:12438579

  15. Migraine, Headache and the Risk of Depression: Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Rist, Pamela M.; Schürks, Markus; Buring, Julie E.; Kurth, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Background While cross-sectional studies have shown associations between migraine and depression, few studies have been able to evaluate the association between migraine and incident depression. Methods Prospective cohort study among 36,016 women without a history of depression enrolled in the Women’s Health Study who provided information about migraine and headache at baseline. Women were classified as either having non-migraine headache, migraine with aura, migraine without aura, past history of migraine or no history of headache. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the association between migraine and headache status and incident depression. Results At baseline, 5115 women reported a history of non-migraine headache, 1805 reported migraine with aura, 2723 reported migraine without aura and 1896 reported a past history of migraine. During 13.8 mean years of follow-up, 3833 new cases of depression occurred. The adjusted relative risks of incident depression were 1.44 (95% CI: 1.32, 1.56) for non-migraine headache, 1.53 (95% CI: 1.35, 1.74) for migraine with aura, 1.40 (95% CI: 1.25, 1.56) for migraine without aura and 1.56 (95% CI: 1.37, 1.77) for past history of migraine compared to no history of headache. Conclusions Middle-aged women with migraine or non-migraine headache are at increased risk of incident depression. PMID:23588795

  16. Migraine, headache, and the risk of depression: Prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Rist, Pamela M; Schürks, Markus; Buring, Julie E; Kurth, Tobias

    2013-09-01

    While cross-sectional studies have shown associations between migraine and depression, few studies have been able to evaluate the association between migraine and incident depression. A prospective cohort study among 36,016 women without a history of depression enrolled in the Women's Health Study who provided information about migraine and headache at baseline. Women were classified as either having nonmigraine headache, migraine with aura, migraine without aura, past history of migraine or no history of headache. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the association between migraine and headache status and incident depression. At baseline, 5115 women reported a history of nonmigraine headache, 1805 reported migraine with aura, 2723 reported migraine without aura, and 1896 reported a past history of migraine. During 13.8 mean years of follow-up, 3833 new cases of depression occurred. The adjusted relative risks of incident depression were 1.44 (95% CI: 1.32, 1.56) for nonmigraine headache, 1.53 (95% CI: 1.35, 1.74) for migraine with aura, 1.40 (95% CI: 1.25, 1.56) for migraine without aura, and 1.56 (95% CI: 1.37, 1.77) for past history of migraine compared to no history of headache. Middle-aged women with migraine or nonmigraine headache are at increased risk of incident depression. Frequent migraine attacks (weekly or daily) were associated with the highest risk for developing depression.

  17. Infants who drink cows milk: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Binns, Colin W; Graham, Kathleen I; Scott, Jane A; Oddy, Wendy H

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study was to document current practice in an Australia city regarding the introduction of whole cows milk to children under the age of 12 months. A cohort study of mothers and infants, recruited at birth was undertaken in Perth, Australia. A total of 587 mothers were interviewed on seven occasions over a period of 12 months using a structured questionnaire. At each interview infant feeding methods were recorded in detail. At 12 months 453 mothers (78%) remained in the study. In this study the median age of introduction of cows milk was 41.5 weeks, a behaviour that has not changed in the past 8 years. Infants who were given solids earlier than 4 months were more likely to be introduced to cows milk before 12 months (odds ratio (OR) 2.06, confidence interval (CI) 1.4-3.1). Mothers who had a lower score on the IOWA Infant Feeding Attitudes Scale were more likely to give cows milk earlier (OR 1.83, CI 1.21-1.77). Where fathers did not support breastfeeding or were ambivalent infants were more likely to be given cows milk (OR 1.70, CI 1.23-2.58) Despite recommendations that cows milk should not be given before 12 months of age, the majority of infants were given cows milk before this age. This suggests the need for further education programs.

  18. Etiology of atopy in infancy: the KOALA Birth Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Kummeling, Ischa; Thijs, Carel; Penders, John; Snijders, Bianca E P; Stelma, Foekje; Reimerink, Johan; Koopmans, Marion; Dagnelie, Pieter C; Huber, Machteld; Jansen, Margje C J F; de Bie, Rob; van den Brandt, Piet A

    2005-12-01

    The aim of the KOALA Birth Cohort Study in the Netherlands is to identify factors that influence the clinical expression of atopic disease with a main focus on lifestyle (e.g., anthroposophy, vaccinations, antibiotics, dietary habits, breastfeeding and breast milk composition, intestinal microflora composition, infections during the first year of life, and gene-environment interaction). The recruitment of pregnant women started in October 2000. First, participants with 'conventional lifestyles' (n = 2343) were retrieved from an ongoing prospective cohort study (n = 7020) on pregnancy-related pelvic girdle pain. In addition, pregnant women (n = 491) with 'alternative lifestyles' with regard to child rearing practices, dietary habits (organic, vegetarian), vaccination schemes and/or use of antibiotics, were recruited through organic food shops, anthroposophic doctors and midwives, Steiner schools, and dedicated magazines. All participants were enrolled between 14 and 18 wk of gestation and completed an intake questionnaire on family history of atopy and infant care intentions. Documentation of other relevant variables started in the pregnant mother and covered the first and third trimester as well as early childhood by repeated questionnaires at 14-18, 30, and 34 wk of gestation and 3, 7, 12, and 24 months post-partum. A subgroup of participants, including both conventional and alternative lifestyles, was asked to consent to maternal blood sampling, breast milk and a faecal sample of the infant at 1 month post-partum, capillary blood at age 1 yr, venous blood and observation of manifestation of atopic dermatitis during home visits at the age of 2 yr (using the UK working party criteria and the severity scoring of atopic dermatitis index), and buccal swabs for DNA isolation from child-parent trios. From the start, ethical approval and informed consent procedures included gene-environment interaction studies. Follow-up at 3 and 7 months post-partum was completed with

  19. Depletion of CpG Dinucleotides in Papillomaviruses and Polyomaviruses: A Role for Divergent Evolutionary Pressures.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Mohita; Vivekanandan, Perumal

    2015-01-01

    Papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses are small ds-DNA viruses infecting a wide-range of vertebrate hosts. Evidence supporting co-evolution of the virus with the host does not fully explain the evolutionary path of papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses. Studies analyzing CpG dinucleotide frequencies in virus genomes have provided interesting insights on virus evolution. CpG dinucleotide depletion has not been extensively studied among papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses. We sought to analyze the relative abundance of dinucleotides and the relative roles of evolutionary pressures in papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses. We studied 127 full-length sequences from papillomaviruses and 56 full-length sequences from polyomaviruses. We analyzed the relative abundance of dinucleotides, effective codon number (ENC), differences in synonymous codon usage. We examined the association, if any, between the extent of CpG dinucleotide depletion and the evolutionary lineage of the infected host. We also investigated the contribution of mutational pressure and translational selection to the evolution of papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses. All papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses are CpG depleted. Interestingly, the evolutionary lineage of the infected host determines the extent of CpG depletion among papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses. CpG dinucleotide depletion was more pronounced among papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses infecting human and other mammals as compared to those infecting birds. Our findings demonstrate that CpG depletion among papillomaviruses is linked to mutational pressure; while CpG depletion among polyomaviruses is linked to translational selection. We also present evidence that suggests methylation of CpG dinucleotides may explain, at least in part, the depletion of CpG dinucleotides among papillomaviruses but not polyomaviruses. The extent of CpG depletion among papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses is linked to the evolutionary lineage of the infected host. Our

  20. Depletion of CpG Dinucleotides in Papillomaviruses and Polyomaviruses: A Role for Divergent Evolutionary Pressures

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Mohita; Vivekanandan, Perumal

    2015-01-01

    Background Papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses are small ds-DNA viruses infecting a wide-range of vertebrate hosts. Evidence supporting co-evolution of the virus with the host does not fully explain the evolutionary path of papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses. Studies analyzing CpG dinucleotide frequencies in virus genomes have provided interesting insights on virus evolution. CpG dinucleotide depletion has not been extensively studied among papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses. We sought to analyze the relative abundance of dinucleotides and the relative roles of evolutionary pressures in papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses. Methods We studied 127 full-length sequences from papillomaviruses and 56 full-length sequences from polyomaviruses. We analyzed the relative abundance of dinucleotides, effective codon number (ENC), differences in synonymous codon usage. We examined the association, if any, between the extent of CpG dinucleotide depletion and the evolutionary lineage of the infected host. We also investigated the contribution of mutational pressure and translational selection to the evolution of papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses. Results All papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses are CpG depleted. Interestingly, the evolutionary lineage of the infected host determines the extent of CpG depletion among papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses. CpG dinucleotide depletion was more pronounced among papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses infecting human and other mammals as compared to those infecting birds. Our findings demonstrate that CpG depletion among papillomaviruses is linked to mutational pressure; while CpG depletion among polyomaviruses is linked to translational selection. We also present evidence that suggests methylation of CpG dinucleotides may explain, at least in part, the depletion of CpG dinucleotides among papillomaviruses but not polyomaviruses. Conclusions The extent of CpG depletion among papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses is linked to the

  1. University Students' Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Cervical Cancer, Human Papillomavirus, and Human Papillomavirus Vaccines in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koç, Zeliha

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The current descriptive study aimed to determine university students' knowledge and attitudes regarding cervical cancer, human papillomavirus (HPV), and HPV vaccines in Turkey. Participants: A total of 800 students participated. Methods: This study was carried out between September 1, 2012, and October 30, 2012, in 8 female…

  2. University Students' Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Cervical Cancer, Human Papillomavirus, and Human Papillomavirus Vaccines in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koç, Zeliha

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The current descriptive study aimed to determine university students' knowledge and attitudes regarding cervical cancer, human papillomavirus (HPV), and HPV vaccines in Turkey. Participants: A total of 800 students participated. Methods: This study was carried out between September 1, 2012, and October 30, 2012, in 8 female…

  3. Consistency of HLA associations between two independent measles vaccine cohorts: a replication study.

    PubMed

    Ovsyannikova, Inna G; Pankratz, V Shane; Vierkant, Robert A; Jacobson, Robert M; Poland, Gregory A

    2012-03-09

    Associations between HLA genotypes and measles vaccine humoral and cellular immune responses were examined to better understand immunogenetic drivers of vaccine response. Two independent study cohorts of healthy schoolchildren were examined: cohort one, 346 children between 12 and 18 years of age; and cohort two, 388 children between 11 and 19 years of age. All received two age-appropriate doses of measles-containing vaccine. The purpose of this study was to identify and replicate associations between HLA genes and immune responses following measles vaccination found in our first cohort. Associations of comparable magnitudes and with similar p-values were observed between B*3503 (1st cohort p=0.01; 2nd cohort p=0.07), DQA1*0201 (1st cohort p=0.03; 2nd cohort p=0.03), DQB1*0303 (1st cohort p=0.10; 2 cohort p=0.02), DQB1*0602 (1st cohort p=0.07; 2nd cohort p=0.10), and DRB1*0701 (1st cohort p=0.03; 2nd cohort p=0.07) alleles and measles-specific antibody levels. Suggestive, yet consistent, associations were observed between the B7 (1st cohort p=0.01; 2nd cohort p=0.08) supertype and higher measles antibody levels in both cohorts. Also, in both cohorts, the B*0801 and DRB1*0301 alleles, C*0802 and DPA1*0202 alleles, and DRB1*1303 alleles displayed consistent associations with variations in IFN-γ, IL-2 and IL-10 secretion, respectively. This study emphasizes the importance of replicating HLA associations with measles vaccine-induced humoral and cellular immune responses and increases confidence in the results. These data will inform strategies for functional studies and novel vaccine development, including epitope-based measles vaccines. This is the first HLA association replication study with measles vaccine-specific immune responses to date.

  4. Human papillomavirus and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Crosbie, Emma J; Einstein, Mark H; Franceschi, Silvia; Kitchener, Henry C

    2013-09-07

    Cervical cancer is caused by human papillomavirus infection. Most human papillomavirus infection is harmless and clears spontaneously but persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (especially type 16) can cause cancer of the cervix, vulva, vagina, anus, penis, and oropharynx. The virus exclusively infects epithelium and produces new viral particles only in fully mature epithelial cells. Human papillomavirus disrupts normal cell-cycle control, promoting uncontrolled cell division and the accumulation of genetic damage. Two effective prophylactic vaccines composed of human papillomavirus type 16 and 18, and human papillomavirus type 16, 18, 6, and 11 virus-like particles have been introduced in many developed countries as a primary prevention strategy. Human papillomavirus testing is clinically valuable for secondary prevention in triaging low-grade cytology and as a test of cure after treatment. More sensitive than cytology, primary screening by human papillomavirus testing could enable screening intervals to be extended. If these prevention strategies can be implemented in developing countries, many thousands of lives could be saved.

  5. [Network Research on Human Papillomavirus].

    PubMed

    Almeida-Gutiérrez, Eduardo; Paniagua, Ramón; Furuya, María ElenaYuriko

    2015-01-01

    In order to increase the research in important h