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Sample records for paragonimiasis

  1. Paragonimiasis.

    PubMed

    Chai, Jong-Yil

    2013-01-01

    Human paragonimiasis is caused by nine species of Paragonimus, namely, P. westermani, P. africanus, P. heterotremus, P. kellicotti, P. mexicanus, P. siamensis, P. skrjabini, P. skrjabini miyazakii, and P. uterobilateralis. Cerebral or spinal involvements are most common in P. westermani, and can also occur in P. skrjabini, P. skrjabini miyazakii, and P. mexicanus. In P. westermani, cerebral paragonimiasis comprises about 45% of all extrapulmonary paragonimiasis cases, and accounts for about 1% of all paragonimiasis patients. In cerebral paragonimiasis, seizure, headache, visual disturbance, and motor and sensory disturbances are the five major clinical symptoms. The most commonly performed diagnostic procedures for cerebral infections are serological tests to detect circulating antibodies or antigens using ELISA or immunoblotting, and radiological examinations, including plain skull x-rays, brain CT, and MR scans. The drug of choice is praziquantel at the dose of 25mg/kg three times daily for 2-3 days. In severe infections, a second set of treatment may be needed. Triclabendazole can be used in P. uterobilateralis, P. mexicanus, and P. skrjabini infections with the dose of 10mg/kg twice a day; however, its efficacy in P. westermani infection, in particular cerebral infections, remains to be elucidated.

  2. [Paragonimiasis].

    PubMed

    Carré, J C; Houmdaophet, S

    1998-12-01

    Paragonimiasis is a helminthic disease of carnivorous animals. Man is infected accidentally. It has a worldwide distribution but is mainly encountered in Southeast Asia, particularly in Korea. Other endemic areas include Africa and South America. Cerebral paragonimiasis is not rare, but pleuropulmonary manifestations are the most prevalent. They include hemoptysis (frequently rusty-colored), unilateral or bilateral pleural effusions, and pulmonary infiltrates or cavities. This constellation of symptoms often mimics those of tuberculosis. Cerebral and lung involvement has recently been investigated by CT-scan and NMR. The diagnosis is based on the identification of parasite eggs in sputum or feces, and on ELISA serology. The treatment of choice is praziquantel.

  3. Cerebral Paragonimiasis.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, I

    1975-01-01

    The first case of cerebral paragonimiasis was reported by Otani in Japan in 1887. This was nine years after Kerbert's discovery of the fluke in the lungs of Bengal tigers and seven years after a human pulmonary infection by the fluke was demonstrated by Baelz and Manson. The first case was a 26-year-old man who had been suffering from cough and hemosputum for one year. The patient developed convulsive seizures with subsequent coma and died. The postmortem examination showed cystic lesions in the right frontal and occipital lobes. An adult fluke was found in the occipital lesion and another was seen in a gross specimen of normal brain tissue around the affected occipital lobe. Two years after Otani's discovery, at autopsy a 29-year-old man with a history of Jacksonian seizure was reported as having cerebral paragonimiasis. Some time later, however, it was confirmed that the case was actually cerebral schistosomiasis japonica. Subsequently, cases of cerebral paragonimiasis were reported. However, the majority of these cases were not confirmed histologically. It was pointed out that some of these early cases were probably not Paragonimus infection. After World War II, reviews as well as case reports were published. Recently, investigations have been reported from Korea, with a clinicla study on 62 cases of cerebral paragonimiasis seen at the Neurology Department of the National Medical Center, Seoul, between 1958 and 1964. In 1971 Higashi described a statistical study on 105 cases of cerebral paragonimiasis that had been treated surgically in Japan.

  4. Cerebral Paragonimiasis.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, I

    1975-01-01

    The first case of cerebral paragonimiasis was reported by Otani in Japan in 1887. This was nine years after Kerbert's discovery of the fluke in the lungs of Bengal tigers and seven years after a human pulmonary infection by the fluke was demonstrated by Baelz and Manson. The first case was a 26-year-old man who had been suffering from cough and hemosputum for one year. The patient developed convulsive seizures with subsequent coma and died. The postmortem examination showed cystic lesions in the right frontal and occipital lobes. An adult fluke was found in the occipital lesion and another was seen in a gross specimen of normal brain tissue around the affected occipital lobe. Two years after Otani's discovery, at autopsy a 29-year-old man with a history of Jacksonian seizure was reported as having cerebral paragonimiasis. Some time later, however, it was confirmed that the case was actually cerebral schistosomiasis japonica. Subsequently, cases of cerebral paragonimiasis were reported. However, the majority of these cases were not confirmed histologically. It was pointed out that some of these early cases were probably not Paragonimus infection. After World War II, reviews as well as case reports were published. Recently, investigations have been reported from Korea, with a clinicla study on 62 cases of cerebral paragonimiasis seen at the Neurology Department of the National Medical Center, Seoul, between 1958 and 1964. In 1971 Higashi described a statistical study on 105 cases of cerebral paragonimiasis that had been treated surgically in Japan. PMID:1095292

  5. Pulmonary Paragonimiasis Mimicking Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Kj; Basu, Arup; Khana, Shilpi; Wattal, Chand

    2015-08-01

    Paragonimiasis is a disease which is frequently misdiagnosed as pulmonary tuberculosis. In the areas where people eat crab/crayfish this disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis to avoid antituberculosis treatment for a non-tubercular condition. We are reporting a case of pulmonary paragonimiasis who had been treated for tuberculosis. PMID:27604443

  6. Paragonimus & paragonimiasis in India

    PubMed Central

    Singh, T. Shantikumar; Sugiyama, Hiromu; Rangsiruji, Achariya

    2012-01-01

    Ever since the discovery of the first indigenous case in 1981, paragonimiasis has gained recognition as a significant food borne parasitic zoonosis in India. The data available on the occurrence of paragonimiasis, until today, may be just the tip of an iceberg as the study areas covered were restricted to Northeast Indian States. Nevertheless, the results of research on paragonimiasis in India have revealed valuable information in epidemiology, life cycle, pathobiology and speciation of Indian Paragonimus. Potamiscus manipurensis, Alcomon superciliosum and Maydelliathelphusa lugubris were identified as the crab hosts of Paragonimus. Paragonimus miyazakii manipurinus n. sub sp., P. hueit’ungensis, P. skrjabini, P. heterotremus, P. compactus, and P. westermani have been described from India. P. heterotremus was found as the causative agent of human paragonimiasis. Ingestion of undercooked crabs and raw crab extract was the major mode of infection. Pulmonary paragonimiasis was the commonest clinical manifestation while pleural effusion and subcutaneous nodules were the common extra-pulmonary forms. Clinico-radiological features of pulmonary paragonimiasis simulated pulmonary tuberculosis. Intradermal test, ELISA and Dot-immunogold filtration assay (DIGFA) were used for diagnosis and epidemiological survey of paragonimiasis. Phylogenitically, Indian Paragonimus species, although nested within the respective clade were distantly related to others within the clade. PMID:22960885

  7. Paragonimiasis: a Japanese perspective.

    PubMed

    Nakamura-Uchiyama, Fukumi; Mukae, Hiroshi; Nawa, Yukifumi

    2002-06-01

    Paragonimiasis has been considered to be a foodborne zoonosis endemic only in limited areas in the world. Recently, however, patients have been seen almost all over the world because of the increase in number of overseas travelers and the popularization of ethnic dishes in developed countries. If paragonimiasis is misdiagnosed as tuberculosis or lung cancer patients suffer from a considerable burden of long-term hospitalization and unnecessary examinations and treatments. Clinicians should always be aware of the possibility of paragonimiasis when patients have pulmonary lesions with eosinophilia and an elevated serum IgE. For the diagnosis, rapid and reliable immunodiagnostic methods are now available. Highly effective drugs are also available for treatment. PMID:12092035

  8. Pulmonary Paragonimiasis Mimicking Tuberculous Pleuritis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jian; Wang, Mao-Yun; Liu, Dan; Zhu, Hui; Yang, Sai; Liang, Bin-Miao; Liang, Zong-An

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary paragonimiasis is a food-borne zoonosis with a wide variety of radiologic findings, which sometimes can be confused with tuberculosis and carcinoma. Therefore, differential diagnosis is always warranted. A 43-year-old male farmer, with productive cough, blood-tinged sputum and chest pain, as well as patchy consolidation and pleural effusions in chest computer tomography, was misdiagnosed of community-acquired pneumonia and tuberculosis. Complete blood cell count, sputum smear and culture, chest computer tomography, thoracoscopy, and biopsy. The diagnosis of pulmonary paragonimiasis was established due to the finding of Charcot–Leyden crystals in the pleural necrosis, and antibodies against Paragonimus westermani in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Paragonimiasis should be considered as a possibility in the differential diagnosis of tuberculosis. Thoracoscopy is an effective and valuable technology that can help make an accurate diagnosis. PMID:27082624

  9. Cerebral paragonimiasis--report of five cases.

    PubMed

    Toyonaga, S; Kurisaka, M; Mori, K; Suzuki, N

    1992-03-01

    Five cases of cerebral paragonimiasis presenting with hemianopsia, convulsion, and gait disturbance are discussed. The cases were all in the chronic stage. The intradermal paragonimiasis reaction, complement fixation, and Ouchterlony tests were not useful for diagnosis. Computed tomography demonstrated calcifications in all cases in sites consistent with the foci of symptoms. Surgical treatment in two cases failed to improve symptoms.

  10. Paragonimiasis in a Child from Assam, India

    PubMed Central

    Das, Partha Pratim; Borah, Amrit Kr; Das, Jayanta Kr

    2016-01-01

    Paragonimiasis or lung fluke infection is one of the neglected tropical parasitic disease which is found worldwide. Several endemic foci have been discovered in the Northeast India. Pulmonary paragonimiasis presenting with haemoptysis is generally mistaken for pulmonary tuberculosis. Herein, we present a case of pulmonary paragonimiasis, which initially presented with haemoptysis and remained undiagnosed for two years. The patient was treated with Praziquantel 25mg/kg thrice daily for two days along with the supportive care. Subsequently, on follow up after three months the patient had improved with no fever and cough. PMID:27190807

  11. A case of cutaneous paragonimiasis presented with minimal pleuritis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, T Shantikumar; Devi, KH Ranjana; Singh, S Rajen; Sugiyama, Hiromu

    2012-01-01

    Clinically, paragonimiasis is broadly classified into pulmonary, pleuropulmonary, and extrapulmonary forms. The common extrapulmonary forms are cerebral and cutaneous paragonimiasis. The cutaneous paragonimiasis is usually presented as a slowly migrating and painless subcutaneous nodule. The correct diagnosis is often difficult or delayed or remained undiagnosed until the nodule becomes enlarged and painful and the cause is investigated. We report here a case of cutaneous paragonimiasis in a male child who presented with mild respiratory symptoms. The diagnosis of paragonimiasis was based on a history of consumption of crabs, positive specific serological test, and blood eosinophilia. The swelling and respiratory symptoms subsided after a prescribed course of praziquantel therapy. PMID:23767026

  12. Three Cases of Paragonimiasis in a Family

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Byeong Seok; Bae, Yun-Jeong; Cho, You Sook; Moon, Hee-Bom

    2009-01-01

    Paragonimiasis typically results from the consumption of raw or improperly cooked crustacea, especially crabs and crayfish. Although previously endemic in Korea, the prevalence of this disease decreased in the early 1970s because of educational campaigns and fewer intermediate hosts as a result of ecological changes. Recently, we were presented with a family where all members were infected with Paragonimus after ingestion of Kejang (= drunken crab). The mother was hospitalized for general myalgia and weakness first, followed by the father, who was hospitalized for dyspnea 2 month later. After the parents were diagnosed with paragonimiasis, we recommended their daughter to visit our hospital for a checkup, because they all had eaten freshwater crabs soaked in soybean sauce. She complained of generalized myalgia, fever, and pleuritic pain, and was also diagnosed with paragonimiasis. Peripheral blood of the 3 patients revealed hypereosinophilia, and computed tomography (CT) scans of their chests showed pleural effusion. The results of antibody tests by ELISA were positive for paragonimiasis. We report here the case series of familial paragonimiasis in a modern urban city, rather than in a typical endemic area. PMID:19724703

  13. A case of chronic cerebral paragonimiasis westermani.

    PubMed

    Kang, S Y; Kim, T K; Kim, T Y; Ha, Y I; Choi, S W; Hong, S J

    2000-09-01

    We report a chronic cerebral paragonimiasis from a 41-year-old Korean man who complains a headache and weakness of left motor neuron components. Magnetic resonance images of the brain revealed conglomerates of multiple ring-like enhancements in temporo-occipital and frontal lobes of the right hemisphere. An intradermal test for paragonimiasis westermani was positive. The patient was born near an endemic area of paragonimiasis and used to eat boiled or grilled freshwater crayfish in his childhood. Nodules in the brain were resected through craniotomies. The eggs of P. westermani were identified pathologically and parasitologically in the calcified necrotic lesions. Examinations on sputum and fecal specimens for the eggs of P. westermani were shown to be negative and a chest radiograph was normal. It is presumed that the brain lesions were formed by P. westermani approximately 30 years ago.

  14. North American Paragonimiasis (Caused by Paragonimus kellicotti) in the Context of Global Paragonimiasis

    PubMed Central

    Procop, Gary W.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Paragonimus species are highly evolved parasites with a complex life cycle that involves at least three different hosts, i.e., snails, crustaceans, and mammals. The adult forms of Paragonimus species reside and mate in the lungs of a variety of permissive mammalian hosts, including humans. Although human paragonimiasis is uncommonly encountered in North America, both autochthonous and imported disease may be encountered. Paragonimus kellicotti, the species endemic to North America, is a well-known pathogen in wild and domestic animals. Five patients with North American paragonimiasis have been reported in the recent medical literature. The biologic, clinical, radiologic, and laboratory features of paragonimiasis are reviewed, with emphasis on North American paragonimiasis whenever possible. PMID:19597007

  15. Laparoscopic excision of intra-abdominal paragonimiasis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun-Young; Kang, Chang-Moo; Choi, Gi-Hong; Yang, Woo-Ick; Sim, Seo-Bo; Kwon, Ji-Eun; Kim, Kyung-Sik; Choi, Jin-Sub; Lee, Woo-Jung; Kim, Byong-Ro

    2007-12-01

    Lung fluke, Paragonimus westermani of Paragonimus species usually are accompanied by a persistent cough, hemoptysis, and chest pain. Extrapulmonary paragonimiasis caused by ectopic parasites in aberrant locations such as the abdominal wall, abdominal organs, and brain has been reported and the most commonly involved extrapulmonary organ is the brain. We present a case of 56-year-old male patient with intra-abdominal paragonimiasis who underwent laparoscopic excision of abdominal granuloma caused by parasite infection. An intra-abdominal mass associated with eosinophilia might be related to parasite infection. A laparoscopic approach is the most appropriate treatment modality in such benign abdominal pathology.

  16. Acute cerebral paragonimiasis presenting as hemorrhagic stroke in a child.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi; Zhu, Gang; Lin, Jiangkai; Wu, Nan; Feng, Hua

    2008-08-01

    A hemorrhagic stroke in children is rarely secondary to cerebral paragonimiasis. We describe a 9-year-old boy in whom an intracerebral hemorrhage was the leading clinical indication of acute cerebral paragonimiasis. He was hospitalized because of a sudden onset of headache, right hemiparesis, and dysarthria. A computed tomography scan revealed an intracerebral hemorrhage in the left parietal lobe. Magnetic resonance angiography did not confirm any vascular abnormalities at the location of the hematoma. Four weeks later, he presented with right hemiparesis again, and fever. A diagnosis of cerebral paragonimiasis was based on repeated magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for paragonimiasis. The patient gradually recovered with praziquantel treatment. Cerebral paragonimiasis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hemorrhagic strokes in children in areas where paragonimiasis is epidemic.

  17. Paragonimiasis in Chinese Children: 58 Cases Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong Zhen; Tang, Lan Fang; Zheng, Xiao Ping; Chen, Zhi Min

    2012-01-01

    Objective To analyze the clinical and radiological features of paragonimiasis in children and raise the awareness of this disease. Methods A total of 58 paragonimiasis patients were reviewed. They were 42 boys and 16 girls aged 2.0 to 15.3 years. Findings Among these patients, 20 were diagnosed in the recent 5 years, 46 with a history of raw water or food ingestion. Except 2 patients without any complaint, the most common features involved the systemic (41, 70.7%) and respiratory systems (43, 74.1%), followed by abdominal, cardiac and nervous systems, with rash and mass. Eosinophilia was noted in 46 (79.3%) patients, granulocytosis in 45 (77.6%), anemia in 14 (24.1%), and thrombocytopenia in 3. Imageology showed pneumonia in 26 (44.8%) patients, pleurisy in 28 (48.3%), hydropericardium in 17 (29.3%), ascites in 16 (27.6%), and celiac lymphadenitis in 13 (22.4%). Besides hepatomegaly and splenomegaly, calcification and multiple lamellar low echogenic areas in the liver were noted, each in one patient. Abnormal brain imaging was noted in 4 of 10 patients. Karyocyte hyperplasia with eosinophilia was noted in all the 19 patients who received bone marrow puncture. Conclusion Paragonimiasis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with multiple organs or system lesions, especially those with eosinophilia, serous cavity effusion, respiratory, cardiac, digestive system, nervous system abnormality, and/or mass. Healthy eating habit is helpful for paragonimiasis prevention. PMID:23430310

  18. [Cerebral paragonimiasis-a report of three cases (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Wada, H; Kinoshita, K; Yokota, A; Matsukado, Y

    1975-12-01

    Paragonimiasis is a benign parasitic disease caused by Paragonimus westermani and endemic in Japan, mostly in south-western area. Although the lung is the primary site of infection, ectopic involvement of the brain is not uncommon. Over 300 cases of cerebral paragonimiasis have been reported since the first case of this disease described by Ohtani in Japan in 1887. The patient with paragonimiasis in the lung and the brain were though to be decreasing because of the introduction of Bithionol treatment (Yokogawa in 1961) and public health instruction. However, about 20 cases of cerebral paragonimiasis have been reported for 10 years past in Kyushu.

  19. A case of cerebral paragonimiasis in Denmark. Case report.

    PubMed

    Møller, A; Settnes, O P; Jensen, N O; Kruse-Larsen, C

    1995-01-01

    A case of cerebral paragonimiasis with severe neurological symptoms is presented. The patient, a 45-year-old woman, recovered completely after resection of a large cyst at the C3 level. The pathogenesis is discussed.

  20. Angiographic findings in 2 children with cerebral paragonimiasis with hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi; Chen, Jingyu; Miao, Hongpin; Li, Fei; Feng, Hua; Zhu, Gang

    2013-05-01

    Hemorrhagic events associated with cerebral paragonimiasis are not rare, especially in children and adolescents; however, angiographic evidence of cerebrovascular involvement has not been reported. The authors describe angiographic abnormalities of the cerebral arteries seen in 2 children in whom cerebral paragonimiasis was associated with hemorrhagic stroke. The patients presented with acute intracerebral and subarachnoid hemorrhage. Angiography revealed a beaded appearance and long segmental narrowing of arteries, consistent with arteritis. In both patients, involved vessels were seen in the area of the hemorrhage. The vascular changes and the hemorrhage, together with new lesions that developed close to the hemorrhage and improved after praziquantel treatment, were attributed to paragonimiasis. Further study of the frequency and mechanism of hemorrhagic cerebrovascular complications associated with cerebral paragonimiasis is needed.

  1. Imaging features of intradural spinal paragonimiasis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, M K; Cho, B M; Yoon, D Y; Nam, E S

    2011-01-01

    Spinal paragonimiasis is a rare form of ectopic infestation caused by Paragonimus westermani. We report a case of pathologically proven intradural paragonimiasis associated with concurrent intracranial involvement. MRI revealed multiple well-defined intradural masses that were markedly hypointense on T2 weighted images and hypointense with a peripheral hyperintense rim on T1 weighted images. Contrast-enhanced T1 weighted images showed slight peripheral rim enhancement. PMID:21415296

  2. Clinics in diagnostic imaging (58). Chronic cerebral paragonimiasis.

    PubMed

    Kaw, G J; Sitoh, Y Y

    2001-02-01

    A 36-year-old Korean man presented with a history of epilepsy. MR imaging of the brain revealed multiple conglomerated round nodules that were hypointense on both T1-and-T2 weighted images. These were located at the left temporal and occipital lobes and had surrounding encephalomalacia. CT scan confirmed the presence of large calcified nodules in the corresponding regions. These imaging findings were typical of chronic cerebral paragonimiasis. The clinical, CT and MR features of cerebral paragonimiasis are reviewed.

  3. [CT findings in "fresh" cerebral paragonimiasis].

    PubMed

    Li, H Z; Xie, F W; Sun, S C

    1992-01-01

    There are few reports on CT findings in "fresh" cerebral paragonimiasis. We have experienced four cases of "fresh" cerebral paragonimiasis examined by CT scan. Three patients were children aged 7, 9, and 14 years, and one was an adult aged 25 years. Three patients were examined by CT scan 2 to 6 months after the onset of high grade fever, convulsion and focal deficit signs, and a patient was examined one month after his progressive visual disturbance. The unique CT findings are multilocular cystic lesions in temporo-occipital or in temporo-parietal lobes with extensive brain edema. Two cases were also associated with "soap-bubble" calcifications. The cysts were more dense than CSF and enhanced by contrast media. The histopathological specimen showed that the eggs of paragonimus were in the abscess cavity, of which the wall was composed with highly vascular gliomesenchymal capsule and numerous cell infiltration. Three patients underwent craniotomy for removal of abscess and decompression. Bitionol were administered and all patients recovered well. We also discussed the differential diagnosis of cerebral parasitic granulomas.

  4. [Surgical treatment of cerebral paragonimiasis miyazakii].

    PubMed

    Soutsu, M; Nishida, S; Nakamura, N; Katakura, K; Kobayashi, A; Araki, K

    1984-06-01

    An operated case of cerebral paragonimiasis miyazakii was reported. A 25-year-old man was admitted to our hospital on Jan. 25, 1982, because of weakness, sensory disorder and focal convulsion of the right upper limb. He complained of slight headache but had no sign of meningeal irritation nor inflammation. CT scan revealed a left parietal low density mass with irregular ring-like contrast enhancement. Left carotid angiogram showed stretched arteries around the mass. Laboratory findings were normal except for eosinophilie (17%). Chest X-P was normal. Operation was performed under diagnosis of glioblastoma on Aug. 6, 1982. The tumor was well-circumscribed and had a firm capsule which containing necrotic substance. The tumor was removed totally and the bone flap was also removed since slight brain swelling was seen. Histologically it proved to be a granuloma and four eggs of helminth were found in the necrotic tissue. Post operative state of the patient was satisfactory and cranioplasty was performed 3 weeks later. On Aug. 31, he began to complain of chest pain, cough and hemosputum, and chest X-P disclosed a nodular shadow in the lower lobe of the right lung. Paragonimiasis was strongly suspected because he had a history of having three fresh-water crabs (Potamon dehaani) 18 months before. But not egg was found in either sputum nor stool. Skin test with paragonimus westermani antigen was highly positive.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Cerebral paragonimiasis mimicking tuberculoma: First case report in India.

    PubMed

    Singh, T Shantikumar; Khamo, V; Sugiyama, H

    2011-01-01

    An 8-year-old male child of Tuensang District, Nagaland, India, attended Civil Hospital, Tuensang, complaining of cough, fever, headache, and inability to move right arm since one month. On clinical suspicion of tubercular meningitis, anti-tubercular therapy was initiated and the patient was referred to the Naga Hospital Authority. A brain computed tomography scan revealed an isodense area with surrounding edema on the left parietal lobe, which was diagnosed as tuberculoma and the anti-tubercular therapy was continued. As there was no sign of clinical improvement on completion of the three-month-ATD regimen, the patient was investigated for paragonimiasis. Laboratory investigations revealed peripheral blood eosinophilia, raised ESR, Paragonimus egg-positive sputum, and positive Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and ID tests for paragonimiasis. The Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) test and Acid Fast Bacilli (AFB) sputum smears were negative. Chest roentgenogram showed no abnormal findings. A final diagnosis of pulmonary paragonimiasis associated with cerebral paragonimiasis was made. The patient responded to praziquantel therapy. Cerebral paragonimiasis is a serious extrapulmonary form of paragonimiasis, sometimes life-threatening, but curable with praziquantel. It should be included in the differential diagnosis of cerebral granulomatous and other space-occupying lesions.

  6. Cerebral paragonimiasis mimicking tuberculoma: First case report in India

    PubMed Central

    Singh, T Shantikumar; Khamo, V; Sugiyama, H

    2011-01-01

    An 8-year-old male child of Tuensang District, Nagaland, India, attended Civil Hospital, Tuensang, complaining of cough, fever, headache, and inability to move right arm since one month. On clinical suspicion of tubercular meningitis, anti-tubercular therapy was initiated and the patient was referred to the Naga Hospital Authority. A brain computed tomography scan revealed an isodense area with surrounding edema on the left parietal lobe, which was diagnosed as tuberculoma and the anti-tubercular therapy was continued. As there was no sign of clinical improvement on completion of the three-month-ATD regimen, the patient was investigated for paragonimiasis. Laboratory investigations revealed peripheral blood eosinophilia, raised ESR, Paragonimus egg-positive sputum, and positive Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and ID tests for paragonimiasis. The Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) test and Acid Fast Bacilli (AFB) sputum smears were negative. Chest roentgenogram showed no abnormal findings. A final diagnosis of pulmonary paragonimiasis associated with cerebral paragonimiasis was made. The patient responded to praziquantel therapy. Cerebral paragonimiasis is a serious extrapulmonary form of paragonimiasis, sometimes life-threatening, but curable with praziquantel. It should be included in the differential diagnosis of cerebral granulomatous and other space-occupying lesions. PMID:23507623

  7. Paragonimiasis in the abdominal cavity and subcutaneous tissue: report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang Ho; Kim, Jong Hun; Moon, Woo Sung; Lee, Min Ro

    2012-12-01

    Paragonimiasis is a parasitic disease caused by the lung fluke, Paragonimus spp. Lung flukes may be found in various organs, such as the brain, peritoneum, subcutaneous tissues, and retroperitoneum, other than the lungs. Abdominal paragonimiasis raises a considerable diagnostic challenge to clinicians, because it is uncommon and may be confused with other abdominopelvic inflammatory diseases, particularly peritoneal tuberculosis, and peritoneal carcinomatosis. Also, subcutaneous paragonimiasis does not easily bring up clinical suspicion, due to its rarity. We herein report 2 cases of abdominal paragonimiasis and 1 case of subcutaneous paragonimiasis in Korea.

  8. Paragonimiasis in the Abdominal Cavity and Subcutaneous Tissue: Report of 3 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang Ho; Kim, Jong Hun; Moon, Woo Sung

    2012-01-01

    Paragonimiasis is a parasitic disease caused by the lung fluke, Paragonimus spp. Lung flukes may be found in various organs, such as the brain, peritoneum, subcutaneous tissues, and retroperitoneum, other than the lungs. Abdominal paragonimiasis raises a considerable diagnostic challenge to clinicians, because it is uncommon and may be confused with other abdominopelvic inflammatory diseases, particularly peritoneal tuberculosis, and peritoneal carcinomatosis. Also, subcutaneous paragonimiasis does not easily bring up clinical suspicion, due to its rarity. We herein report 2 cases of abdominal paragonimiasis and 1 case of subcutaneous paragonimiasis in Korea. PMID:23230333

  9. Paragonimiasis Acquired in the United States: Native and Nonnative Species

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Paragonimiasis is a parasitic lung infection caused by lung flukes of the genus Paragonimus, with most cases reported from Asia and caused by P. westermani following consumption of raw or undercooked crustaceans. With the exception of imported P. westermani cases in immigrants, in travelers returning from areas of disease endemicity, and in clusters of acquired cases following consumption of imported Asian crabs, human paragonimiasis caused by native lung flukes is rarely described in the United States, which has only one indigenous species of lung fluke, Paragonimus kellicotti. Clinicians should inquire about the consumption of raw or undercooked freshwater crabs by immigrants, expatriates, and returning travelers, and the consumption of raw or undercooked crayfish in U.S. freshwater river systems where P. kellicotti is endemic when evaluating patients presenting with unexplained fever, cough, rales, hemoptysis, pleural effusions, and peripheral eosinophilia. Diagnostic evaluation by specific parasitological, radiological, serological, and molecular methods will be required in order to differentiate paragonimiasis from tuberculosis, which is not uncommon in recent Asian immigrants. All cases of imported and locally acquired paragonimiasis will require treatment with oral praziquantel to avoid any potential pulmonary and cerebral complications of paragonimiasis, some of which may require surgical interventions. PMID:23824370

  10. MRI features of pediatric cerebral paragonimiasis in the active stage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin Song; Huan, Yi; Sun, Li Jun; Zhang, Guang Yun; Ge, Ya Li; Zhao, Hai Tao

    2006-04-01

    We retrospectively reviewed the MR images of the brains of six children (age = 5-13 years) who had cerebral paragonimiasis in the early active stage. Diagnosis was based on a positive antibody test enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for paragonimiasis in serum. The most common finding (in five patients) was irregular hemorrhage of various degrees. Moreover, in three cases some multiple irregular lesions with surrounding edema appeared to be conglomerated and aggregated. The rare appearance (in one patient) was a "tunnel sign," which showed the migrating track of the adult worm. In one patient with abscess and minimal hemorrhage, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) showed a heterogeneous high signal of lesions. Other findings included slight (one patient) or marked (one patient) irregular contrast enhancement, and large edematous areas surrounding small centers of hemorrhage (two patients). MR findings of conglomerated lesions with hemorrhage or tunnel sign may help to establish the diagnosis of active-stage cerebral paragonimiasis.

  11. Pulmonary Paragonimiasis Mimicking Tuberculous Pleuritis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jian; Wang, Mao-Yun; Liu, Dan; Zhu, Hui; Yang, Sai; Liang, Bin-Miao; Liang, Zong-An

    2016-04-01

    Pulmonary paragonimiasis is a food-borne zoonosis with a wide variety of radiologic findings, which sometimes can be confused with tuberculosis and carcinoma. Therefore, differential diagnosis is always warranted. A 43-year-old male farmer, with productive cough, blood-tinged sputum and chest pain, as well as patchy consolidation and pleural effusions in chest computer tomography, was misdiagnosed of community-acquired pneumonia and tuberculosis. Complete blood cell count, sputum smear and culture, chest computer tomography, thoracoscopy, and biopsy. The diagnosis of pulmonary paragonimiasis was established due to the finding of Charcot-Leyden crystals in the pleural necrosis, and antibodies against Paragonimus westermani in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Paragonimiasis should be considered as a possibility in the differential diagnosis of tuberculosis. Thoracoscopy is an effective and valuable technology that can help make an accurate diagnosis. PMID:27082624

  12. Paragonimiasis in Sin Ho District, Lai Chau Province, Viet Nam.

    PubMed

    Vien, C V; Phue, N C; Ha, L D; Tuan, L M; Van, N T; Pao, T C; Hoa, L T; Phoung, C T

    1997-01-01

    Forty-four cases of pulmonary paragonimiasis, two also with evidence of cerebral infection, were found in Sin Ho District in Northern Viet Nam. There were 30 males and 14 females, 2-30 years of age. The diagnosis was made by sputum examination. Pet dogs and wild dogs in the area were also found infected and the people often eat roasted crabs.

  13. CT findings of cerebral paragonimiasis in the chronic state.

    PubMed

    Udaka, F; Okuda, B; Okada, M; Tsuji, T; Kameyama, M

    1988-01-01

    The CT findings in 5 patients with cerebral paragonimiasis in the chronic state are presented. The findings were: 1) multiple, densely calcified areas with a variety of round or nodular shapes in the brain, 2) a large low density area surrounding or connecting with the calcified areas, and 3) cortical atrophy and ventricular dilatation. The relation between the CT findings and the previously reported plain skull X-ray findings or neuropathological findings are discussed.

  14. Paragonimiasis in Sin Ho District, Lai Chau Province, Viet Nam.

    PubMed

    Vien, C V; Phue, N C; Ha, L D; Tuan, L M; Van, N T; Pao, T C; Hoa, L T; Phoung, C T

    1997-01-01

    Forty-four cases of pulmonary paragonimiasis, two also with evidence of cerebral infection, were found in Sin Ho District in Northern Viet Nam. There were 30 males and 14 females, 2-30 years of age. The diagnosis was made by sputum examination. Pet dogs and wild dogs in the area were also found infected and the people often eat roasted crabs. PMID:9656347

  15. Current status of Paragonimus and paragonimiasis in Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Calvopiña, Manuel; Romero, Daniel; Castañeda, Byron; Hashiguchi, Yoshihisa; Sugiyama, Hiromu

    2014-01-01

    A review of national and international publications on paragonimiasis in Ecuador, epidemiological records from the Ministry of Public Health and unpublished research data was conducted to summarise the current status of the parasite/disease. The purpose of the review is to educate physicians, policy-makers and health providers on the status of the disease and to stimulate scientific investigators to conduct further research. Paragonimiasis was first diagnosed in Ecuador 94 years ago and it is endemic to both tropical and subtropical regions in 19 of 24 provinces in the Pacific Coast and Amazon regions. Paragonimus mexicanus is the only known species in the country, with the mollusc Aroapyrgus colombiensis and the crabs Moreirocarcinus emarginatus, Hypolobocera chilensis and Hypolobocera aequatorialis being the primary and secondary intermediate hosts, respectively. Recent studies found P. mexicanus metacercariae in Trichodactylus faxoni crabs of the northern Amazon. Chronic pulmonary paragonimiasis is commonly misdiagnosed and treated as tuberculosis and although studies have demonstrated the efficacy of praziquantel and triclabendazole for the treatment of human infections, neither drug is available in Ecuador. Official data recorded from 1978-2007 indicate an annual incidence of 85.5 cases throughout the 19 provinces, with an estimated 17.2% of the population at risk of infection. There are no current data on the incidence/prevalence of infection, nor is there a national control programme. PMID:25410987

  16. Successful treatment of pulmonary paragonimiasis in a German shepherd dog with fenbendazole.

    PubMed

    Saini, Neetu; Ranjan, Rakesh; Singla, L D; Anand, A; Randhawa, C S

    2012-10-01

    Pulmonary paragonimiasis is an important zoonotic disease reported from many parts of the world. It is an endemic problem in human population in north-eastern states of India. There seems no report of pulmonary paragonimiasis in canine population from India. The present case describes first report of pulmonary paragonimiasis in a female dog suggesting possibility of this fluke becoming established in canine population in the country. The dog revealed mild coughing with serous nasal discharge. Faecal sample revealed eggs of Paragonimus spp. Treatment with fenbendazole resulted in marked improvement as revealed by clinical signs and chest radiography.

  17. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonographic findings of hepatic paragonimiasis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qiang; Ling, Wen-Wu; Ma, Lin; Huang, Zi-Xing; Lu, Chang-Li; Luo, Yan

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the features of hepatic paragonimiasis on contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) imaging. METHODS: Fifteen patients with hepatic paragonimiasis who were admitted to our hospital between March 2008 and August 2012 were enrolled to this study. The conventional ultrasound and CEUS examinations were performed with a Philips IU22 scanner with a 1-5-MHz convex transducer. After conventional ultrasound scanning was completed, the CEUS study was performed. Pulse inversion harmonic imaging was used for CEUS. A bolus injection of 2.4 mL of a sulfur hexafluoride-filled microbubble contrast agent (SonoVue) was administered. CEUS features were retrospectively reviewed and correlated with pathological findings. RESULTS: In total, 16 lesions were detected on CEUS. The mean size of the lesions was 4.4 ± 1.6 cm (range, 1.7-6.6 cm). Subcapsular location was found in 12 lesions (75%). All the lesions were hypoechoic. Six lesions (37.5%) were of mixed content, seven (43.8%) were solid with small cystic areas, and the other three (18.8%) were completely solid. Ten lesions (62.5%) were rim enhanced with irregular tract-like nonenhanced internal areas. Transient wedge-shaped hyperenhancement of the surrounding liver parenchyma was seen in seven lesions (43.8%). Areas with hyper- or iso-enhancement in the arterial phase showed contrast wash-out and appeared hypoenhanced in the late phase. The main pathological findings included: (1) coagulative or liquefactive necrosis within the lesion, infiltration of a large number of eosinophils with the formation of chronic eosinophilic abscesses and sporadic distribution of Charcot-Leyden crystals; and (2) hyperplasia of granulomatous and fibrous tissue around the lesion. CONCLUSION: Subcapsular location, hypoechogenicity, rim enhancement and tract-like nonenhanced areas could be seen as the main CEUS features of hepatic paragonimiasis. PMID:23599629

  18. Paragonimiasis in Yongjia County, Zhejiang Province, China: clinical, parasitological and karyotypic studies on Paragonimus westermani.

    PubMed

    Ming-gang, C; Zheng-shan, C; Xiang-yuan, S; Ming-da, L; Blair, D; Shao-hong, C; Yong-nian, Z; Jia-lin, H; Bing-gui, S; Zheng, F

    2001-12-01

    Paragonimiasis in Yongjia County, Zhejiang Province, China, has been of such public health concern that a specialized Institute for Paragonimiasis Control has been established there. The study reported here involved both parasitological research on Paragonimus westermani in the endemic areas and a clinical analysis of 94 cases of paragonimiasis. Eggs were found in sputum, feces and brain tissue in 45 cases. Twenty patients, 19 of whom where children under 10 years of age, showed hepatic injury. Treatment with praziquantel or bithionol had satisfactory results in all cases. Dimensions of the parasite eggs, metacercariae from freshwater crabs and adult flukes suggested that the form of P. westermani in Yongjia is the 'small type': a suggestion supported by karyotypic studies on gonad cells from adult flukes collected from experimentally infected animals as all were found to be diploid. In conclusion, the 'small type' or diploid form of P. westermani is the cause of paragonimiasis pulmonary symptoms in Yongjia.

  19. [Cerebral paragonimiasis with peculiar calcified foci: a case report].

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, K; Koga, T

    1986-04-01

    In Japan more than 400 cases of intracranial invasion of Paragonimus westermani have been reported. In recent years, however, because of the decrease of incidence of parasitic disease, erroneous diagnosis is apt to be made. Peculiar but characteristic calcified cystic lesions in chronic stage of cerebral paragonimiasis were described as "soap bubble appearance" in x-rays by Oh in 1968. We report such a case with calcified lesions of soap bubble appearance in plain x-ray films in the right parieto-occipital region. The patient was a 30-year-old man who had generalized convulsive seizures since childhood. CT scan revealed these lesions to have high density in the margin and relatively low density in the center. Recently some cases of cerebral involvement by Paragonimus miyazakii were reported in Japan. The immunoserological tests are most useful for the diagnosis of paragonimiasis. Bithionol administration is the treatment of choice in acute stage. Calcified lesions with positive serological tests in two years after the onset of cerebral signs should be removed surgically, if possible.

  20. Human paragonimiasis after eating raw or undercooked crayfish --- Missouri, July 2006-September 2010.

    PubMed

    2010-12-10

    Paragonimiasis is a parasitic disease caused by Paragonimus trematodes, commonly known as lung flukes. Humans become infected by eating raw or undercooked crayfish (also known as crawfish and crawdads) or freshwater crabs that harbor the parasites. Paragonimiasis most frequently involves the lungs, but can affect other organs, including the brain and skin. In North America, Paragonimus kellicotti causes infections among dogs, cats, and wild carnivores, but rarely infects humans. Paragonimiasis is not a nationally notifiable condition. In September 2009, physicians from the Washington University School of Medicine (WUSM) in St. Louis published details of three paragonimiasis cases diagnosed since July 2006 in persons who had eaten raw crayfish from rivers in Missouri, prompting the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (MDHSS), CDC, and WUSM to collaborate in paragonimiasis surveillance and prevention. During September 2009-September 2010, six additional cases were diagnosed in Missouri. These nine patients, aged 10-32 years, had fever, cough, pleural effusion, and eosinophilia. All had eaten raw or undercooked crayfish from rivers in Missouri while on canoeing or camping trips within 4 months of illness onset. Health-care providers should consider paragonimiasis when examining patients with unexplained fever, cough, eosinophilia, and pleural effusion or other chest radiographic abnormalities and should ask those patients whether they have eaten raw or undercooked crayfish.

  1. Neuroimaging findings in a woman with brainstem paragonimiasis: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The most serious erratic migration of paragonimiasis is a cerebral paragonimiasis. Infection in the temporal and occipital lobes of the brain has been previously reported in cerebral paragonimiasis. Here, we report a case of chronic brainstem paragonimiasis. Case presentation A 29-year-old Chinese woman presented to our hospital complaining of a sudden onset, three days previously, of double vision and dizziness. A computed tomography scan and diffusion-weighted images looked like an ischemic stroke. However, conglomerates of multiple ring-like enhancements on contrast magnetic resonance imaging, and the characteristic appearance of the ‘tunnel sign’, were found on further examination. Our patient was treated with praziquantel to prevent the spread of the paragonimiasis. She was followed up three months later and showed good recovery. Conclusions Conglomerates of multiple ring-like enhancements on contrast magnetic resonance imaging and the characteristic appearance of the ‘tunnel sign’ were important for the diagnosis of chronic brainstem paragonimiasis. PMID:24499485

  2. [Clinical and radiologic manifestations of larval paragonimiasis in children].

    PubMed

    Perelśhteĭn, N N; Sipukhin, Ia M; Siuzeva, N A; Apukhtina, T P

    1991-01-01

    Investigation of 60 children with acute types and 45 children with latent types of larval paragonimiasis (LP) has revealed various clinical and x-ray manifestations of this disease, spread in the southern Primorski Territory. Three syndromes of this disease were singled out: toxico-allergic, abdominal and pulmonary. X-ray investigation showed characteristic LP symptoms: exudate in the pleural cavity, thickening of the wall, diaphragmatic and interlobular pleura, sometimes--pneumothorax. Pathology of the bronchopulmonary system manifested itself in focal and infiltrative shadows, enhanced and deformed lung markings, and bullous inflation. Diagnosis and differential diagnosis must be based on analysis of clinical and x-ray data and the results of serological reactions.

  3. Pleuropulmonary and abdominal paragonimiasis: CT and ultrasound findings

    PubMed Central

    Shim, S S; Kim, Y; Lee, J K; Lee, J H; Song, D E

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to review radiological images of patients with Paragonimus westermani (PW) that simultaneously involved the chest and abdomen. Methods Our study included four patients with serologically and histopathologically confirmed paragonimiasis. Abdomen CT (n=3) and chest CT (n=3) scans were available, and abdominal wall ultrasonography was performed in all patients. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical, radiological and histopathological findings of these patients. Results The most common abdominal CT findings were ascites and intraperitoneal or abdominal wall nodules. Low-attenuated serpentine lesions of the liver were another common and relatively specific feature. Conclusion Radiologists should consider the possibility of PW when these abdominal CT findings are noted, especially with pleural effusion or subpleural nodules in patients with initial abdominal symptoms. PMID:22457403

  4. [Cerebral paragonimiasis and Bo Sung Sim's hemispherectomy in Korea in 1950s-1960s].

    PubMed

    Park, Jiyoung; Miyagawa, Takuya; Hong, Jeonghwa; Kim, Ockjoo

    2011-06-30

    This paper deals with cerebral paragonimiasis and cerebral hemispherectomy conducted as a treatment of cerebral paragonimiasis by Bo Sung Sim in Korea in 1950s-1960s. He demonstrated that cerebral hemispherectomy could be used for unilateral diffuse cerebral paragonimiasis. Sim learned cerebral hemispherectomy from Dr. L. A. French. at the University of Minnesota from 1955 to 1957 in America. The authors argues that Bo Sung Sim's introduction of cerebral hemispherectomy to Korea was not a simple application of an advanced medical technology, but a complicated and active process in that Sim used the technique to intervene intractable complications from cerebral paragonimiasis such as generalized convulsions, spastic hemiplegia and mental deterioration. Bo Sung Sim, one of the neurosurgeons of the first generation in Korea, was trained in neurology, neuropathology, neuroradiology and animal experiments as well as in neurosurgery at the University of Minnesota. After returning to Korea, Sim faced parasitic diseases, one of the most serious public health problems at that time, which were far different from what he learned in America. As a neurosurgeon, Sim tackled with parasitic diseases of the central nervous system with various diagnostics and therapeutics. In 1950s, more than one million populations suffered from pulmonary paragonimiasis acquired by eating raw crabs or by feeding juice of crushed crayfish for the treatment of measles in Korea. About 26.6 percent of people with paragonimiasis had cerebral paragonimiasis. Before bithionol therapy was introduced in 1962, neurosurgery was the only available treatment to control increased intracranial pressures, intractable epilepsy, paralysis and mental deterioration. Between 1958 to 1962, Bo Sung Sim operated on 24 patients of cerebral paragonimiasis. In two of them, he performed cerebral hemispherectomy to control intractable convulsions when he found diffuse cerebral paragonimiasis and cerebral atrophy at the

  5. Feasibility of laparoscopic major hepatectomy for hepatic paragonimiasis: two case reports

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fei; Zhang, Jingyi; Lei, Chuanfen; Wei, Yonggang; Li, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Though accumulated evidence proved that laparoscopic major hepatectomy was technically feasible, it remains a challenging procedure and is limited to highly specialized centers. Paragonimiasis is one of the most important food-borne parasitic zoonoses caused by the trematode of the genus Paragonimus. Although hepatic paragonimiasis is rare, the previous studies had investigated hepatic paragonimiasis from different perspectives. However, the safety and feasibility of laparoscopic major hepatectomy for hepatic paragonimiasis have not yet been reported in the literature. Methods: We here present 2 cases of hepatic paragonimiasis at the deep parts of the liver with treatment by laparoscopic major hepatectomy. One case is a 32-year-old male patient who was admitted to the hospital due to upper abdominal discomfort without fever for 1 month. The clinical imaging revealed that there was a lesion about 5.9 × 3.7 cm in the boundary of right anterior lobe and right posterior lobe of the liver with rim enhancement and tract-like nonenhanced areas. The other one is a 62-year-old female patient who was referred to the hospital for 1 month of right upper abdominal pain and fever. The ultrasonography showed that there was a huge hypoechoic mass (about 10.8 × 6.3 cm) in middle lobe of the liver with tract-like nonenhanced areas. Both patients were from an endemic area of paragonimiasis and the proportion of eosinophil in the second case was increased. Results: The preoperative diagnosis of the first case was ambiguous and the hepatic paragonimiasis was considered for the second case. The first case underwent laparoscopic extended right posterior lobe hepatectomy and the other case underwent laparoscopic extended left hemihepatectomy. Both operations went very well and the operation times for the 2 cases were 275 minutes and 310 minutes, respectively. The 2 patients’ postoperative recovery was smooth without major postoperative complications

  6. Rapid Identification of Paragonimiasis Foci by Lay Informants in Lao People's Democratic Republic

    PubMed Central

    Odermatt, Peter; Veasna, Duong; Zhang, Wei; Vannavong, Nanthasane; Phrommala, Souraxay; Habe, Shigehisa; Barennes, Hubert; Strobel, Michel

    2009-01-01

    Background Paragonimiasis is a food-borne trematodiasis leading to lung disease. Worldwide, an estimated 21 million people are infected. Foci of ongoing transmission remain often unnoticed. We evaluated a simple questionnaire approach using lay-informants at the village level to identify paragonimiasis foci and suspected paragonimiasis cases. Methodology/Principal Findings The study was carried out in an endemic area of Lao People's Democratic Republic. Leaders of 49 remote villages in northern Vientiane Province were asked to notify suspected paragonimiasis patients using a four-item questionnaire sent through administrative channels: persons responding positively for having chronic cough (more than 3 weeks) and/or blood in sputum with or without fever. We validated the village leaders' reports in ten representative villages with a door-to-door survey. We examined three sputa of suspected patients for the presence of Paragonimus eggs and acid fast bacilli. 91.8% of village leaders participated and notified a total of 220 suspected patients; 76.2% were eventually confirmed; an additional 138 suspected cases were found in the survey. Sensitivity of village leaders' notice for “chronic cough” and “blood in sputum” was 100%; “blood in sputum” alone reached a sensitivity of 85.7%. Significance Our approach led to the identification of three previously unknown foci of transmission. A rapid and simple lay-informant questionnaire approach is a promising low-cost community diagnostic tool of paragonimiasis control programs. PMID:19771150

  7. The return of an old worm: cerebral paragonimiasis presenting with intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Koh, Eun Jung; Kim, Seung-Ki; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Chai, Jong-Yil; Chong, Sangjoon; Park, Sung-Hye; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Phi, Ji Hoon

    2012-11-01

    Paragonimiasis is caused by ingesting crustaceans, which are the intermediate hosts of Paragonimus. The involvement of the brain was a common presentation in Korea decades ago, but it becomes much less frequent in domestic medical practices. We observed a rare case of cerebral paragonimiasis manifesting with intracerebral hemorrhage. A 10-yr-old girl presented with sudden-onset dysarthria, right facial palsy and clumsiness of the right hand. Brain imaging showed acute intracerebral hemorrhage in the left frontal area. An occult vascular malformation or small arteriovenous malformation compressed by the hematoma was initially suspected. The lesion progressed for over 2 months until a delayed surgery was undertaken. Pathologic examination was consistent with cerebral paragonimiasis. After chemotherapy with praziquantel, the patient was monitored without neurological deficits or seizure attacks for 6 months. This case alerts practicing clinicians to the domestic transmission of a forgotten parasitic disease due to environmental changes.

  8. The Return of an Old Worm: Cerebral Paragonimiasis Presenting with Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Eun Jung; Kim, Seung-Ki; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Chai, Jong-Yil; Chong, Sangjoon; Park, Sung-Hye; Cheon, Jung-Eun

    2012-01-01

    Paragonimiasis is caused by ingesting crustaceans, which are the intermediate hosts of Paragonimus. The involvement of the brain was a common presentation in Korea decades ago, but it becomes much less frequent in domestic medical practices. We observed a rare case of cerebral paragonimiasis manifesting with intracerebral hemorrhage. A 10-yr-old girl presented with sudden-onset dysarthria, right facial palsy and clumsiness of the right hand. Brain imaging showed acute intracerebral hemorrhage in the left frontal area. An occult vascular malformation or small arteriovenous malformation compressed by the hematoma was initially suspected. The lesion progressed for over 2 months until a delayed surgery was undertaken. Pathologic examination was consistent with cerebral paragonimiasis. After chemotherapy with praziquantel, the patient was monitored without neurological deficits or seizure attacks for 6 months. This case alerts practicing clinicians to the domestic transmission of a forgotten parasitic disease due to environmental changes. PMID:23166429

  9. Preparation of Colloidal Gold Immunochromatographic Strip for Detection of Paragonimiasis skrjabini

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianwei; Wang, Guangxi; Chen, Wenbi; Chen, Lin; Zhang, Xilin

    2014-01-01

    Background Paragonimiasis is a food-borne trematodiasis, a serious public health issue and a neglected tropical disease. Paragonimus skrjabini is a unique species found in China. Unlike paragonimiasis westermani, it is nearly impossible to make a definitive diagnosis for paragonimiasis skrjabini by finding eggs in sputum or feces. Immunodiagnosis is the best choice to detect paragonimiasis skrjabini. There is an urgent need to develop a novel, rapid and simple immunoassay for large-scale screening patients in endemic areas. Methodology/Principal Findings To develop a rapid, simple immunodiagnostic assay for paragonimiasis, rabbit anti-human IgG was conjugated to colloidal gold particles and used to detect antibodies in the sera of paragonimiasis patients. The synthesis and identification of colloidal gold particles and antibody-colloidal gold conjugates were performed. The size of colloidal gold particles was examined using a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The average diameter of colloidal gold particles was 17.46 nm with a range of 14.32–21.80 nm according to the TEM images. The formation of antibody-colloidal gold conjugates was monitored by UV/Vis spectroscopy. Excretory-secretory (ES) antigen of Paragonimus skrjabini was coated on nitrocellulose membrane as the capture line. Recombinant Staphylococcus protein A was used to prepare the control line. This rapid gold immunochromatographic strip was assembled in regular sequence through different accessories sticked on PVC board. The relative sensitivity and specificity of the strip was 94.4% (51/54) and 94.1% (32/34) respectively using ELISA as the standard method. Its stability and reproducibility were quite excellent after storage of the strip at 4°C for 6 months. Conclusions/Significance Immunochromatographic strip prepared in this study can be used in a rapid one-step immunochromatographic assay, which is instantaneous and convenient. PMID:24643068

  10. Two cases of paragonimiasis westermani diagnosed after eosinophilic pleural effusion-induced hydropneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Yaguchi, Daizo; Ichikawa, Motoshi; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Inoue, Noriko; Shizu, Masato; Imai, Naoyuki

    2016-05-01

    Our hospital is located in the Tono region in the southeastern district of Gifu Prefecture in which there are forests and inhabitants who still hunt and eat game meat. Therefore, boar meat increases the risk of contracting paragonimiasis. We treated two patients who were infected by Paragonimus westermani after eating boar meat. They developed hydropneumothorax in association with eosinophilic pleural effusion. For patients who have pneumothorax with concomitant pleural effusion and eosinophilia in the pleural fluid analysis, it is necessary to take a detailed history, which includes flesh food consumption and travel to an endemic area, and to make a careful examination while taking into consideration parasitic infections such as paragonimiasis. PMID:27516883

  11. Chronic cerebral paragonimiasis combined with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Choo, Juk-Dong; Suh, Bumn-Suk; Lee, Hyun-Sung; Lee, Jong-Soo; Song, Chang-June; Shin, Dae-Whan; Lee, Young-Ha

    2003-11-01

    A 67-year-old Korean woman attended our hospital complaining of a severe headache. A brain computed tomography scan showed conglomerated, high-density, calcified nodules in the left temporo-occipito-parietal area and high-density subarachnoid hemorrhage in the basal cisterns. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain shows multiple conglomerated iso- or low-signal intensity round nodules with peripheral rim enhancement. She underwent craniotomies to clip the aneurysm and remove the calcified masses. Paragonimus westermani eggs were identified in the calcified necrotic lesions. Results of parasitic examinations on the sputum and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for P. westermani were all negative. The patient presented with headache and dizziness that had occurred for more than 30 years. She had not eaten freshwater crayfish or crabs. However, she had sometimes prepared raw crabs for several decades. Overall, this case was diagnosed as chronic cerebral paragonimiasis, in which she may have been infected through the contamination of utensils during the preparation of the second intermediate hosts, combined with a cerebral hemorrhage.

  12. [A case of Paragonimiasis westermani with pleural effusion eight months after migrating subcutaneous induration of the abdominal wall].

    PubMed

    Mizuki, M; Mitoh, K; Miyazaki, E; Tsuda, T

    1992-06-01

    Patients with Paragonimiasis westermani show a typical ring form or nodular shadow on chest X-ray, cough, sputum, and hemosputum. Recently, case reports of Paragonimiasis westermani, accompanied by pneumothorax and pleural effusion, as for Paragonimiasis miyazakii, have been increasing. Paragonimus westermani often causes an ectopic infection in various organs such as the peritoneal cavity, pleural cavity, pericardium, liver, adrenal gland and brain. Cutaneous paragonimiasis is considered one of the typical forms of ectopic infection in its earlier phase, but a few unexpected cases of cutaneous Paragonimiasis westermani have also been reported. A 68-year old man, who had never eaten fresh-water crab or raw sliced meat of wild boar, noticed subcutaneous induration of the abdominal wall. The induration had been gradually moving upwards and to the right from the infraumbilical region for over 20 days, and then disappeared at the right upper lateral abdominal wall. Eight months later, he developed severe pain in the right lower chest, and a chest X-ray showed right pleural effusion. Laboratory examinations revealed eosinophilia (WBC 3940/mm3, eosinophil 9%), elevated ESR, and an elevated serum total IgE level (5517 IU/ml). Ouchterlony's double diffusion test performed with the patient's serum in agarose showed strong bands toward Paragonimus westermani antigen, compared to Paragonimus miyazakii antigen. Immunoelectrophoresis with the patient's serum showed specific bands toward Paragonimus westermani antigen. This patient was finally diagnosed as having Paragonimiasis westermani infection, and he responded to praziquantel administration. The clinical course of this patient appears to be rare in cases of Paragonimiasis westermani infection. The clinical course of this case resembled some cases of Paragonimiasis miyazakii infection.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Two cases of paragonimiasis westermani diagnosed after eosinophilic pleural effusion‐induced hydropneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Ichikawa, Motoshi; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Inoue, Noriko; Shizu, Masato; Imai, Naoyuki

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Our hospital is located in the Tono region in the southeastern district of Gifu Prefecture in which there are forests and inhabitants who still hunt and eat game meat. Therefore, boar meat increases the risk of contracting paragonimiasis. We treated two patients who were infected by Paragonimus westermani after eating boar meat. They developed hydropneumothorax in association with eosinophilic pleural effusion. For patients who have pneumothorax with concomitant pleural effusion and eosinophilia in the pleural fluid analysis, it is necessary to take a detailed history, which includes flesh food consumption and travel to an endemic area, and to make a careful examination while taking into consideration parasitic infections such as paragonimiasis. PMID:27516883

  14. Serological Studies of Neurologic Helminthic Infections in Rural Areas of Southwest Cameroon: Toxocariasis, Cysticercosis and Paragonimiasis

    PubMed Central

    Nkouawa, Agathe; Sako, Yasuhito; Itoh, Sonoyo; Kouojip-Mabou, Alida; Nganou, Christ Nadège; Saijo, Yasuaki; Knapp, Jenny; Yamasaki, Hiroshi; Nakao, Minoru; Nakaya, Kazuhiro; Moyou-Somo, Roger; Ito, Akira

    2010-01-01

    Background Both epilepsy and paragonimiasis had been known to be endemic in Southwest Cameroon. A total of 188 people (168 and 20 with and without symptoms confirmed by clinicians, respectively, 84.6% under 20 years old) were selected on a voluntary basis. Among 14 people (8.3%) with history of epilepsy, only one suffered from paragonimiasis. Therefore, we challenged to check antibody responses to highly specific diagnostic recombinant antigens for two other helminthic diseases, cysticercosis and toxocariasis, expected to be involved in neurological diseases. Soil-transmitted helminthic infections were also examined. Methodology/Principal Findings Fecal samples were collected exclusively from the 168 people. Eggs of Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura and hookworms were found from 56 (33.3%), 72 (42.8%), and 19 (11.3%) persons, respectively. Serology revealed that 61 (36.3%), 25 (14.9%) and 2 (1.2%) of 168 persons showed specific antibody responses to toxocariasis, paragonimiasis and cysticercosis, respectively. By contrast, 20 people without any symptoms as well as additional 20 people from Japan showed no antibody responses. Among the 14 persons with epilepsy, 5 persons were seropositive to the antigen specific to Toxocara, and one of them was simultaneously positive to the antigens of Paragonimus. The fact that 2 children with no history of epilepsy were serologically confirmed to have cysticercosis strongly suggests that serological survey for cysticercosis in children is expected to be useful for early detection of asymptomatic cysticercosis in endemic areas. Conclusions/Significance Among persons surveyed, toxocariasis was more common than paragonimiasis, but cysticercosis was very rare. However, the fact that 2 children were serologically confirmed to have cysticercosis was very important, since it strongly suggests that serology for cysticercosis is useful and feasible for detection of asymptomatic cysticercotic children in endemic areas for the early

  15. Paragonimiasis mimicking chest cancer and abdominal wall metastaisis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, RONGXING; ZHANG, MINJIA; CHENG, NANSHENG; ZHOU, YONG

    2016-01-01

    Typical human paragonimiasis demonstrates an elevated eosinophil count, positive immunoblot, nodular shadows of the lung and pleural thickening with pleural effusion, and these symptoms may be confused with chest cancer. In the present case, a rare case of human paragonimiasis mimicking chest cancer and abdominal wall metastasis is described, the 39-year-old male patient was admitted in our hospital for cough, weight loss 5 kg and a firm mass in right upper abdominal wall. The laboratory test showed unremarkable hematology and biochemistry results. Chest X-ray, Plain computed tomography of the chest and abdomen showed right pleural effusion, several nodules in right lower lung and a mass in the right upper abdominal wall. The initial diagnosis was lung or chest cancer with abdominal wall metastasis, and the abdominal wall mass was resected for the final diagnosis. The biopsy revealed eosinophilic granuloma with Charcot-Leyden crystal formation infiltrated in the muscular fibers. Subsequent to assessment of the antibodies against parasites, the final diagnosis of paragonimiasis was made. PMID:27313691

  16. Distribution and clinical features of Paragonimiasis skrjabini in Three Gorges Reservoir Region.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi-lin; Wang, Ying; Wang, Guang-xi; Chen, Wen-bi; He, Xie; Niu, Hui; Li, Zhen-lian; Chen, Lin; Wang, Li-fang

    2012-12-01

    Paragonimiasis has previously been reported in the Southwest Provinces of China, including Chongqing and Sichuan. The construction of Three Gorges Dam, which was begun in 1994, has resulted in substantial changes to the depth and the flow pattern of the Yangtze River. To investigate epidemiology of the paragonimiasis, 724 people aged 2-49 years were selected and examined for Paragonimus infection by intradermal test (IDT), and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). A survey of eating habits was conducted face-to-face in 5 endemic counties. Freshwater crabs were collected from seven sites in the 5 counties to determine the rate of infection with Paragonimus metacercariae. Additionally, we analyzed 213 case reports from the region dated 2006 to 2009. According to the survey results, the prevalence of Paragonimus skrjabini infection in freshwater crab was 39.65%, and the human infection rates detected by IDT and ELISA were 14.36% (104/724) and 7.46% (54/724), respectively. These results show that the Three Gorges Reservoir is still an area of high paragonimiasis endemicity. The water level of the Yangtze River has risen to 175 m, and the area of water coverage in the region has increased to 1084 km(2). These conditions will favor the growth and expansion of the freshwater crab population.

  17. Distribution and clinical features of Paragonimiasis skrjabini in Three Gorges Reservoir Region.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi-lin; Wang, Ying; Wang, Guang-xi; Chen, Wen-bi; He, Xie; Niu, Hui; Li, Zhen-lian; Chen, Lin; Wang, Li-fang

    2012-12-01

    Paragonimiasis has previously been reported in the Southwest Provinces of China, including Chongqing and Sichuan. The construction of Three Gorges Dam, which was begun in 1994, has resulted in substantial changes to the depth and the flow pattern of the Yangtze River. To investigate epidemiology of the paragonimiasis, 724 people aged 2-49 years were selected and examined for Paragonimus infection by intradermal test (IDT), and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). A survey of eating habits was conducted face-to-face in 5 endemic counties. Freshwater crabs were collected from seven sites in the 5 counties to determine the rate of infection with Paragonimus metacercariae. Additionally, we analyzed 213 case reports from the region dated 2006 to 2009. According to the survey results, the prevalence of Paragonimus skrjabini infection in freshwater crab was 39.65%, and the human infection rates detected by IDT and ELISA were 14.36% (104/724) and 7.46% (54/724), respectively. These results show that the Three Gorges Reservoir is still an area of high paragonimiasis endemicity. The water level of the Yangtze River has risen to 175 m, and the area of water coverage in the region has increased to 1084 km(2). These conditions will favor the growth and expansion of the freshwater crab population. PMID:22814214

  18. A Case of Pulmonary Paragonimiasis with Involvement of the Abdominal Muscle in a 9-Year-Old Girl

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Ah-Rum; Lee, Hae-Ran; Lee, Kwan-Sub; Lee, Sang-Eun

    2011-01-01

    In Korea, many people enjoy eating raw or underkooked freshwater crayfish and crabs which unfortunately may cause paragonimiasis. Here, we describe a case of pulmonary and abdominal paragonimiasis in a 9-year-old girl, who presented with a 1-month history of abdominal pain, especially in the right flank and the right inguinal area, with anorexia. A chest radiograph revealed pleural effusion in both lungs, and her abdominal sonography indicated an inflammatory lesion in the right psoas muscle. Peripheral blood analysis of the patient showed hypereosinophilia (66.0%) and an elevated total serum IgE level (>2,500 IU/ml). The pleural effusion tested by ELISA were also positive for antibodies against paragonimiasis. Her dietary history stated that she had ingested raw freshwater crab, 4 months previously. The diagnosis was pulmonary paragonimiasis accompanied by abdominal muscle involvement. She was improved after 5 cycles of praziquantel treatment and 2 times of pleural effusion drainage. In conclusion, herein, we report a case of pulmonary and abdominal paragonimiasis in a girl who presented with abdominal pain and tenderness in the inguinal area. PMID:22355209

  19. Imaging manifestations and diagnosis of a case of adult cerebral paragonimiasis with the initial symptom of hemorrhagic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Shao, Bei

    2015-01-01

    This study is to investigate the clinical features, neuroimaging and diagnosis of adult cerebral paragonimiasis. One case of patient with cerebral paragonimiasis as retrospectively analyzed in this study. Analysis included medical history, clinical manifestations and neuroimaging. Blood test, body fluid examination, immunological test, stool examination and imaging examination were performed. Many symptoms such as headache, hemiplegia, chest pain, cough, and pleural effusion were detected in the patient. The features of “tunnel-like shape” and “ring-like shape”, the intracranial hemorrhage and edema were shown by CT and MRI imaging. Chest CT examination revealed pleural effusion. Eosinophil count of peripheral blood and pleural effusion increased. Lung fluke ELISA test was positive and anti-parasitic treatment was effective. The typical clinical manifestations of MRI of cerebral paragonimiasis, such as the “tunnel-like shape” and “ring-like shape”, were of high diagnostic value. And, blood eosinophil count examination and paragonimiasis antibody test could also help the diagnosis value. PMID:26309598

  20. Cutaneous paragonimiasis due to triploid Paragonimus westermani presenting as a non-migratory subcutaneous nodule: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Paragonimiasis is a food-borne infection caused by Paragonimus parasites. The lungs and pleura are the primary sites for the infection; however, ectopic infection can occur in other organs such as skin, liver and brain. It is difficult to make a diagnosis of ectopic paragonimiasis due to an ignorance of, and unfamiliarity with the disease. We report the case of a patient with subcutaneous paragonimiasis diagnosed by histopathological analysis and serological testing. Case presentation A 39-year-old Chinese immigrant woman presented with a subcutaneous nodule in her left lower back. The nodule was initially suspected of lipoma and she was followed up on without any treatment. However, it gradually indurated and the nodule was resected surgically. A magnetic resonance imaging scan revealed a polycystic lesion with inhomogeneous low or high intensity on T1- or T2-weighted images, respectively. The rim of the lesion was enhanced after contrast enhancement, but the inside did not show high-signal intensity. A histological analysis of the surgically resected specimen revealed variable-sized tubulo-cystic structures. The cyst wall showed a granulomatous change with scant eosinophilic infiltration. A number of parasite ova were observed in the necrotic tissue inside the cysts, and a parasite body with a presumed oral sucker and reproductive organ was also detected, suggesting a trematode infection. A subsequent serological examination showed a positive reaction of her serum to the Paragonimus westermani antigen. No abnormal findings were found on her chest computed tomography scan. The diagnosis of subcutaneous paragonimiasis caused by Paragonimus westermani was made. Conclusions We report a case presenting only as a non-migratory subcutaneous nodule without any pleuropulmonary lesion, which was initially suspected of lipoma but denied by magnetic resonance imaging scan results. The case was subsequently diagnosed as subcutaneous paragonimiasis from the

  1. [Application of CT and MRI in the Diagnosis of Paragonimiasis in Brain and Spinal Cord].

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Qin, Da-ming

    2015-02-01

    Clinical data of 22 cases with paragonimiasis in brain and spinal cord in the Central Hospital of Enshi Tujia and Miao Autonomous Prefecture during 2003 -2012 were retrospectively analyzed. Twenty-two cases aged from 6 to 17 years old, including 15 males and 7 females, were from the countryside, and had a history of eating raw crabs. CT and MRI showed that all the cases had cerebral lesion, 16 cases had unilateral lesion of cerebral hemisphere, and 6 cases had bilateral hemisphere lesions. There were mainly two kinds of imaging changes: (1) the infarct and low- density edema of large area with focal hemorrhage; (2) annular lesions. Among the 6 cases with intracerebral hematoma, 2 patients received surgical removal, and all the patients were treated with praziquantel, 25 mg/kg each time, 3 times per day, 3 d for a course. This regimen was repeated at a 7-day interval. All the patients were cured and discharged from hospital.

  2. Extra-pulmonary paragonimiasis with unusual arthritis and cutaneous features among a tourist returning from Gabon.

    PubMed

    Malvy, D; Ezzedine, K H; Receveur, M C; Pistone, T; Mercié, P; Longy-Boursier, M

    2006-12-01

    Paragonimiasis is a helminthic disease that affect accidentally man after consumption of raw or poorly cooked crustacean dishes. The clinical feature is represented mainly by pulmonary signs. Extra-pulmonary manifestations including arthritic and skin attempt remain less frequent. The case is described of a young white French woman who become infected with Paragonimus while travelling to Gabon for a tourist trip. Clinical presentation accounted for extensive recurrent pruritic urticarian subcutaneous induration, permanent assymetrical pauciarthritis associated with joint swelling, and marked eosinophilia. Diagnosis was reached using serological testing showing seroconversion for specific antibodies. The patient was cured with a single oral dose of praziquantel. Even if the condition is rare among tourists to endemic zones, it must be considered when hypereosinophilia occurs in the returning traveller and migrant.

  3. Skin test for paragonimiasis among schoolchildren and villagers in Namback District, Luangprabang Province, Lao PDR.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun-Ouk; Min, Duk-Young; Rim, Han-Jong; Youthanavanh, Vonghachack; Daluny, Bouakhasith; Sengdara, Vongsouvan; Virasack, Banouvong; Bounlay, Phommasak

    2008-09-01

    As a part of a broader effort to determine the status of Paragonimus species infection in Lao PDR, an epidemiological survey was conducted on villagers and schoolchildren in Namback District between 2003 and 2005. Among 308 villagers and 633 primary and secondary schoolchildren, 156 villagers and 92 children evidenced a positive reaction on a Paragonimus skin test. Only 4 schoolchildren out of 128 skin test-positive cases had Paragonimus sp. eggs in their sputum, all of which was collected on 1 day. Several types of crabs, which were identified as the second intermediate host of the Paragonimus species, were collected from markets and streams in a paragonimiasis endemic area for the inspection of metacercariae. Among the examined crabs, only "rock crabs" (Indochinamon ou) harbored Paragonimus sp. metacercariae, and it is speculated that the life cycle of Paragonimus sp. was maintained via rock crabs in Namback District, Lao PDR.

  4. Extra-pulmonary paragonimiasis with unusual arthritis and cutaneous features among a tourist returning from Gabon.

    PubMed

    Malvy, D; Ezzedine, K H; Receveur, M C; Pistone, T; Mercié, P; Longy-Boursier, M

    2006-12-01

    Paragonimiasis is a helminthic disease that affect accidentally man after consumption of raw or poorly cooked crustacean dishes. The clinical feature is represented mainly by pulmonary signs. Extra-pulmonary manifestations including arthritic and skin attempt remain less frequent. The case is described of a young white French woman who become infected with Paragonimus while travelling to Gabon for a tourist trip. Clinical presentation accounted for extensive recurrent pruritic urticarian subcutaneous induration, permanent assymetrical pauciarthritis associated with joint swelling, and marked eosinophilia. Diagnosis was reached using serological testing showing seroconversion for specific antibodies. The patient was cured with a single oral dose of praziquantel. Even if the condition is rare among tourists to endemic zones, it must be considered when hypereosinophilia occurs in the returning traveller and migrant. PMID:17098631

  5. Epidemiology, symptoms and treatment of paragonimiasis in Sin Ho district, Lai Chau province, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    De, N V; Cong, L D; Kino, H; Son, D T; Vien, H V

    2000-01-01

    Sin Ho is a district of the northern mountainous province of Lai Chau, Vietnam, where the people have the habit of eating undercooked crabs. A study on paragoniamiasis carried out from 1994 to 1995 with 1,642 persons in this endemic area, showed that the rate of eating raw-crab was 72.5%. Crab examination (Ranguna kimboiensis) showed an infection rate of Paragonimus metacercaria of 98.1%. With 624 stool samples examined by Kato technique, the infection rate of Paragonimus in humans was 6.4%. With 338 sputum samples examined by direct and centrifuge methods, the infection rate of Paragonimus was 7.4%. Most of the patients were children (63.2%). The infection rate of Paragonimus in dogs was 18.2 - 33.3%. Adult worms, collected from the dogs in the field and from the cats in laboratory, were identified as Paragonimus heterotremus. The main symptoms of Paragonimus patients were cough and hemoptysis (92%), discontinuously developed (96%), without fever (94%), chest pain (70%), pleural effusion (26%), neurogical symptoms (8%), eosinophilia (88.9%), nodular ring shadows in the lungs, as shown by chest X-ray examination and more in lower lobe, (76.2%). Paragonimiasis patients were treated by (a) Praziquantel 25 mg/kg/day x 3 days; the cure rate was 68.8%. (b) Praziquantel 50 mg/kg/day x 3 days; the cure rate was 75%. PMID:11414455

  6. Primary rhabdomyosarcoma combined with chronic paragonimiasis in the cerebrum: a necropsy case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, K; Ohtsuki, Y; Ikehara, I; Akagi, T; Murakami, M; Date, I; Bukeo, T; Yagyu, Y

    1986-01-01

    A necropsy case of a primary rhabdomyosarcoma with chronic paragonimiasis in the cerebrum of a 68-year-old man is reported. The clinical data showed a right hemiplegia and dysarthria which became lethal in 6 months even though operation and radiation therapy were performed. Computed tomography revealed a large low-density area associated with the peripheral enhancement in the left basal ganglia, and multiple conglomerated calcified masses in the left temporal and occipital lobes. Biopsied and necropsied materials of the tumor in the basal ganglia was reddish brown in color and histologically was composed of purely mesenchymal derivatives with both embryonal and mature striated muscle cells but neither neuronal nor glial elements. Some of the tumor cells with extending slender cytoplasms showed obvious cross striations at the light and electron microscope levels and immunohistochemical reactivity for myoglobin. All tumor cells were also positive for vimentin, but not for glial fibrillary acidic protein. The clinical and necropsy findings revealed no primary lesion anywhere but in the brain. In addition, numerous dead oval eggs of Paragonimus westermani were found in many cystoid lesions encapsulated by thick connective tissues with calcification and/or ossification. Clinicopathological features of 24 cases of primary rhabdomyosarcoma of the central nervous system reported in the literature are reviewed briefly. The histogenesis of this tumor are discussed together with comments on cerebral paragonimiasis.

  7. A rare case of paragonimiasis miyazakii with lung involvement diagnosed 7 years after infection: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Yatera, Kazuhiro; Hanaka, Minako; Hanaka, Tetsuya; Yamasaki, Kei; Nishida, Chinatsu; Kawanami, Toshinori; Kawanami, Yukiko; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Kanazawa, Tamotsu; Mukae, Hiroshi

    2015-10-01

    We report a rare case of pulmonary paragonimiasis caused by Paragonimus miyazakii that showed pulmonary manifestations and a long-term clinical course after infection. A 45-year-old Japanese male developed cough and dyspnea in 2004 and was diagnosed with eosinophilic pneumonia. He had been treated with low-dose oral corticosteroid for 7 years. He recalled that he had consumed a large amount of raw freshwater crab (Geothelphusa dehaani) several weeks before he had been admitted for the first time, and that had been the only occasion when he had eaten this meat. The patient was referred to our hospital due to persistent hemoptysis, and his chest computed tomography scan showed pulmonary nodules and cavities, and his serum total IgE level was elevated. Bronchoscopy was performed, and ova were detected in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The morphological examination of the ova and immunoserological examination yielded typical findings of P. miyazakii. Treatment with praziquantel improved his chest radiographic findings and a decrease of serum total IgE, as well as the values of immunoserological examination for P. miyazakii. The clinical course of this patient indicated that he had been infected with P. miyazakii for 7 years at least, which is unusual for paragonimiasis miyazakii. PMID:25771073

  8. Simple partial status epilepticus localized by single-photon emission computed tomography subtraction in chronic cerebral paragonimiasis.

    PubMed

    Joo, Eun Yeon; Kim, Jee Hyun; Tae, Woo Suk; Han, Sun Jung; Kim, Seunghwan; Kim, Myoung-Hee; Byun, Hong Sik; Hong, Seung Bong

    2004-10-01

    A patient with chronic cerebral paragonimiasis began to have new motor seizures of the right face manifested by clonic contractions that occurred several hundred times a day, consistent with simple partial status epilepticus. Ictal electroencephalogram discharges started from the left frontal region and then spread to the left hemisphere with left frontal maximum. But clinical seizures were limited to the right face. The frequent partial seizures were controlled by the intravenous infusion of phenytoin. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple conglomerated round nodules with encephalomalacia in the left temporal and occipital lobes. Applying the technique of ictal-interictal single-photo emission computed tomography subtraction, the authors were able to localize the focal ictal-hyperperfusion on left precentral cortex adjacent to the lesions that correspond to the anatomical distribution of left face motor area.

  9. Molecular cloning and characterization of a major egg antigen in Paragonimus westermani and its use in ELISA for the immunodiagnosis of paragonimiasis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Sik; Lee, Jongweon; Kim, Sun Hyun; Yong, Tai-Soon

    2007-03-01

    A recombinant protein of a Paragonimus westermani egg antigen was produced and tested as an antigen for the serologic diagnosis of P. westermani infection. The P. westermani egg antigen gene contains a single open reading frame of 966 base pairs encoding 322 amino acids from 5' methionine to the 3' stop codon. The predicted amino acid sequence of this egg antigen was 40, 38, and was 35% identical to heat shock proteins from Schistosoma japonicum, Schistosoma mansoni, and Taenia saginata. The distribution this antigen was investigated in adult worms by indirect immunofluorescence assay, and found to be distributed in eggs and uteri. The specificity and sensitivity of the recombinant antigen were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using sera from patients infected with different parasites, which included 41 patients with paragonimiasis, and negative controls. The diagnostic positive and negative predictive absorbance value was 0.24 and the sensitivity of ELISA using the recombinant antigen was 90.2%, and its specificity 100%. Our results suggest that the developed recombinant major egg antigen-based ELISA offers a highly sensitive and specific assay for the diagnosis of paragonimiasis.

  10. [Epidemiological observations on the first case of human paragonimiasis and potential intermediate hosts of Paragonimus sp. in Benin].

    PubMed

    Aka, N A; Allabi, A C; Dreyfuss, G; Kinde-Gazard, D; Tawo, L; Rondelaud, D; Bouteille, B; Avodé, G; Anagonou, S Y; Gninafon, M; Massougbodji, A; Dumas, M

    1999-07-01

    Parasitological investigations were carried out for four months in 1998 in two Beninese centres of pneumo-phtisiology (Akpakpa, at Cotonou, and Akron, at Porto-Novo) to detect the patients harbouring eggs of Paragonimus sp. amongst the persons consulting for tuberculosis and showing a broncho-pneumopathy without mycobacteria. Eggs of Paragonimus sp. were detected in the sputum of a single patient out of 369 persons examined (prevalence, 0.2%). This patient had eaten crabs in the months preceding the date of diagnosis. A treatment using praziquantel has improved clinical symptomatology and biological signs found in this patient. These studies have been completed by visiting markets located in the coastal plain of Benin to identify the crabs that were sold and to find metacercariae of Paragonimus sp. Negative results were obtained when 126 Cardisoma armatum ("hole crab") were dissected. In contrast, the dissection of 176 Callinectes marginatus ("swimming crab") was successful, with 5% of crabs harbouring metacercariae of probably Paragonimus sp. Further studies are necessary to confirm these first results and to determine the global prevalence of Paragonimus infection in these definitive and intermediary hosts.

  11. Paragonimus westermani found in the tip of a little finger.

    PubMed

    Sim, Yun Su; Lee, Jin Hwa; Hong, Sung Chul; Chang, Jung Hyun; Kang, So Ra; Yang, Hyun Jong; Sung, Sun Hee

    2010-01-01

    Paragonimiasis is the infestation of lung flukes of the trematode genus Paragonimus. Because the symptoms and radiologic findings of paragonimiasis mimic those of tuberculosis, some patients with paragonimiasis are initially treated for tuberculosis. Although Paragonimus may also reach ectopic sites such as the peritoneum or brain, infection in the skin is rare. To our knowledge, paragonimiasis has not been found in the tip of a finger. We report a case of 39-year-old woman who was belatedly diagnosed as having paragonimiasis with a parasitic migration to the tip of the left little finger after initial misdiagnosis of tubercular serositis.

  12. Detection of multiple species of human Paragonimus from Mexico using morphological data and molecular barcodes.

    PubMed

    López-Caballero, J; Oceguera-Figueroa, A; León-Règagnon, V

    2013-11-01

    Paragonimus mexicanus is the causal agent of human paragonimiasis in several countries of the Americas. It is considered to be the only species of the genus present in Mexico, where it is responsible for human infection. Through the investigation of P. mexicanus specimens from several places throughout Mexico, we provide morphological, molecular and geographical evidence that strongly suggests the presence of at least three species from this genus in Mexico. These results raise questions regarding the diagnosis, treatment, prophylaxis and control of human paragonimiasis in Mexico. We also provide a brief discussion regarding biodiversity inventories and the convenience of providing molecular and morphological information in biodiversity studies.

  13. Serological and molecular tools to detect neurologic parasitic zoonoses in rural Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Nkouawa, Agathe; Sako, Yasuhito; Moyou-Somo, Roger; Ito, Akira

    2011-11-01

    Parasitic helminthiases, such as toxocariasis, cysticercosis and paragonimiasis are a public health threat, since they can affect the brain leading to neurological disorders. Epilepsy and paragonimiasis are common in southwestern Cameroon. We reviewed the literature for studies using antigens to diagnose toxocariasis, cysticercosis, and paragonimiasis. Serology revealed that 61 (36.3%), 26 (15.5%) and 2 (1.2%) of 168 persons examined [78 males (15.2 +/- 8.2 years old), 90 females (12.9 +/- 5.9 years old), 143 persons < 20 years old] had antibody responses to toxocariasis, paragonimiasis and cysticercosis, respectively. Of the 14 people with epilepsy, 5 were seropositive for Toxocara antigens and 1 was positive for both Toxocara and Paragonimus antigens. Two children were serologically confirmed to have cysticercosis. Serologic screening for cysticercosis may be feasible to detect asymptomatic cysticercosis in children in endemic areas leading to early treatment. The causative Paragonimus species was confirmed to be P. africanus by molecular sequencing. Education, screening and confirmation test for these diseases may be needed for control in Cameroon.

  14. Parasitic Diseases as the Cause of Death of Prisoners of War during the Korean War (1950-1953)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    To determine the cause of death of prisoners of war during the Korean War (1950-1953), death certificates or medical records were analyzed. Out of 7,614 deaths, 5,013 (65.8%) were due to infectious diseases. Although dysentery and tuberculosis were the most common infectious diseases, parasitic diseases had caused 14 deaths: paragonimiasis in 5, malaria in 3, amoebiasis in 2, intestinal parasitosis in 2, ascariasis in 1, and schistosomiasis in 1. These results showed that paragonimiasis, malaria, and amoebiasis were the most fatal parasitic diseases during the early 1950s in the Korean Peninsula. Since schistosomiasis is not endemic to Korea, it is likely that the infected private soldier moved from China or Japan to Korea. PMID:25031479

  15. Parasitic diseases as the cause of death of prisoners of war during the Korean War (1950-1953).

    PubMed

    Huh, Sun

    2014-06-01

    To determine the cause of death of prisoners of war during the Korean War (1950-1953), death certificates or medical records were analyzed. Out of 7,614 deaths, 5,013 (65.8%) were due to infectious diseases. Although dysentery and tuberculosis were the most common infectious diseases, parasitic diseases had caused 14 deaths: paragonimiasis in 5, malaria in 3, amoebiasis in 2, intestinal parasitosis in 2, ascariasis in 1, and schistosomiasis in 1. These results showed that paragonimiasis, malaria, and amoebiasis were the most fatal parasitic diseases during the early 1950s in the Korean Peninsula. Since schistosomiasis is not endemic to Korea, it is likely that the infected private soldier moved from China or Japan to Korea.

  16. Active hepatic capsulitis caused by Paragonimus westermani infection.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Michiro; Kamiyama, Takuro; Yano, Takeshi; Nakamura-Uchiyama, Fukumi; Nawa, Yukifumi

    2002-08-01

    Paragonimiasis is an important re-emerging parasitosis in Japan. Although the lungs and pleural cavity are the principal sites affected with the parasite, ectopic infection can occur in unexpected sites such as skin and brain. This case report describes a patient with active hepatic capsulitis due to Paragonimus westermani infection. The patient was successfully treated with praziquantel at the dose of 75 mg/kg/day for 3 days.

  17. Parasitic infections of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Bia, F J; Barry, M

    1986-02-01

    The authors give a comprehensive review of the epidemiology, clinical presentations, diagnosis and current therapy of parasitic infections with CNS manifestations in both the normal and immunocompromised host. These include toxoplasmosis, malaria, amebiasis, neurocystcersosis, hydatid disease, and trichinosis. Additional sections cover disseminated strongyloidiasis, eosinophilic meningitis, visceral and ocular larva migrans, schistosomiasis, and cerebral paragonimiasis. Emphasis is on the neurologic complications of these diseases and their presentations in populations at increased risk for acquiring or reactivating these infections.

  18. Excretory-secretory antigenic components of Paragonimus heterotremus recognized by infected human sera.

    PubMed Central

    Maleewong, W; Wongkham, C; Intapan, P; Pariyanonda, S; Morakote, N

    1992-01-01

    Antigenic components of Paragonimus heterotremus metabolic products were revealed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and immunoblot analysis of sera from patients with P. heterotremus infection, from patients with other illnesses, and from healthy adults. By SDS-PAGE, it was found that the metabolic products comprised more than eight major polypeptides. Immunoblot analysis revealed 11 components which were strongly recognized by paragonimiasis antisera. These antigenic components had molecular masses ranging from less than 12.3 kDa to 144 kDa. One antigenic band of 31.5 kDa was found to give a consistent reaction with paragonimiasis antisera (97% sensitivity). Of the other patient sera, only sera from patients with Fasciola sp. infection reacted with antigenic bands of 56, 38, and 18.5 kDa. The present findings suggest that the 31.5-kDa component is sensitive and specific for the diagnosis of human P. heterotremus paragonimiasis. Images PMID:1500515

  19. [Familial infestation of Paragonimus westermani with peritonitis and pleurisy].

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee Jung; Choi, Young Woo; Kim, Sun Moon; Lee, Tae Hee; Im, Euyi Hyeog; Huh, Kyu Chan; Na, Moon Joon; Kang, Young Woo

    2005-09-01

    Human paragonimiasis was endemic in Korea until the 1960's, and nowadays, the prevalence is decreasing. However, it is still one of the important helminthic diseases. Though it is essentially a pulmonary disorder, it may involve brain, muscle, mesentery, genital tract, pleura, peritoneum, spinal cord, spleen, and liver. We experienced two cases of paragonimiasis in a family who had ingested raw crabs together for 7 months. A 57-year-old female patient was admitted due to abdominal pain, diarrhea and tenesmus for 6 months. And, her 35-year-old son complained of cough, chest discomfort and dyspnea. The definite diagnosis for paragonimiasis could be made by the detection of the egg and adult worm from stool, sputum and involved lesion. Neither an egg or worm was detected. However, they were diagnosed based on the food history, laboratory data including serum eosinophilia, ELISA for specific IgG, pleural and peritoneal fluid examination, radiological findings, and intradermal tests. They were treated with praziquantel and their symptoms improved rapidly over 2 days. Both patients were asymptomatic at a follow-up visit 2 months later.

  20. Paragonimus kellicotti: A Lung Infection in Our Own Backyard

    PubMed Central

    Johannesen, Eric; Nguyen, Van

    2016-01-01

    Paragonimiasis is an infection caused by the lung fluke of the genus Paragonimus. Within the United States, paragonimiasis has been commonly diagnosed in Southeast Asian immigrants infected with the Asian lung fluke Paragonimus westermani. Infections from the North American lung fluke, Paragonimus kellicotti, have been rare, although more infections have been seen in people in the Midwestern United States. A 29-year-old male with a history of pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma presented with hemoptysis. A CT scan showed a mass in the left upper lung lobe. A biopsy showed eosinophils and parasite eggs, some with a recognizable operculum. Further investigation revealed that he takes canoe trips on rivers within Missouri and would eat crayfish caught from these rivers. A blood sample was confirmed positive for Paragonimiasis serologically at the Center for Disease Control. Paragonimus kellicotti is found in rivers within the Mississippi basin. Infection occurs by consuming uncooked or undercooked crawfish. Microscopic identification of parasite eggs has been the gold standard. Serologic tests have been developed to aid in the diagnosis. Patients typically present with fever and hemoptysis. Common CT findings include pleural effusion, a mass, and lymphadenopathy. Awareness of P. kellicotti is important to guide appropriate diagnostic testing and ensuring proper treatment. PMID:27213066

  1. Paragonimus kellicotti: A Lung Infection in Our Own Backyard.

    PubMed

    Johannesen, Eric; Nguyen, Van

    2016-01-01

    Paragonimiasis is an infection caused by the lung fluke of the genus Paragonimus. Within the United States, paragonimiasis has been commonly diagnosed in Southeast Asian immigrants infected with the Asian lung fluke Paragonimus westermani. Infections from the North American lung fluke, Paragonimus kellicotti, have been rare, although more infections have been seen in people in the Midwestern United States. A 29-year-old male with a history of pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma presented with hemoptysis. A CT scan showed a mass in the left upper lung lobe. A biopsy showed eosinophils and parasite eggs, some with a recognizable operculum. Further investigation revealed that he takes canoe trips on rivers within Missouri and would eat crayfish caught from these rivers. A blood sample was confirmed positive for Paragonimiasis serologically at the Center for Disease Control. Paragonimus kellicotti is found in rivers within the Mississippi basin. Infection occurs by consuming uncooked or undercooked crawfish. Microscopic identification of parasite eggs has been the gold standard. Serologic tests have been developed to aid in the diagnosis. Patients typically present with fever and hemoptysis. Common CT findings include pleural effusion, a mass, and lymphadenopathy. Awareness of P. kellicotti is important to guide appropriate diagnostic testing and ensuring proper treatment. PMID:27213066

  2. Analysis of Parasitic Diseases Diagnosed by Tissue Biopsy Specimens at KyungHee Medical Center (1984-2005) in Seoul, Korea

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Jong-Phil; Jiang, Meihua; Lee, Yun-Sik; Kim, Bum-Shik; Kim, Deog-Gon; Park, Yong-Koo

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed parasitic diseases diagnosed by tissue biopsy specimens at KyungHee Medical Center (KMC) from 1984 to 2005. The total number of parasite infection cases was 150 (0.07%) out of the total 211,859 biopsy specimens submitted for histopathological examinations. They consisted of 62 cysticercosis, 23 sparganosis, 16 paragonimiasis, 15 amebiasis, 11 anisakiasis, 11 clonorchiasis, 3 ascariasis, 2 scabies, 2 enterobiasis, 2 trichuriasis, 1 leishmaniasis, 1 taeniasis, and 1 thelaziasis. Out of 62 cysticercosis cases, 55 were detected in subcutaneous tissues or the central nerve system. Eighteen out of 23 sparganosis cases were involved in muscular and subcutaneous tissues. In most anisakiasis cases, the involved organ was the stomach. The lung and the pleura were the most common site of paragonimiasis. The incidence of parasitic diseases during the first 5 years (1984-1988) was the highest of all observed periods. After 1989, similar incidences were shown throughout the period. Whereas cysticercosis was diagnosed in 34 cases during 1984-1988, no case has been diagnosed since 2000. In the case of sparganosis, the chronological incidence was almost uniform throughout the period 1984-2005. Paragonimiasis showed a similar tendency to cysticercosis. In gender and age distribution of parasitic diseases, men showed higher incidence rates than females, and the age groups of the 40s or older indicated higher infection frequencies than other age groups. Therefore, these results are a significant report to appear the tendency of human parasitic disease diagnosed by tissue biopsy in association with parasitosis at KMC in Seoul. PMID:20333293

  3. Analysis of parasitic diseases diagnosed by tissue biopsy specimens at KyungHee Medical Center (1984-2005) in Seoul, Korea.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won-Hyung; Chu, Jong-Phil; Jiang, Meihua; Lee, Yun-Sik; Kim, Bum-Shik; Kim, Deog-Gon; Park, Yong-Koo

    2010-03-01

    We analyzed parasitic diseases diagnosed by tissue biopsy specimens at KyungHee Medical Center (KMC) from 1984 to 2005. The total number of parasite infection cases was 150 (0.07%) out of the total 211,859 biopsy specimens submitted for histopathological examinations. They consisted of 62 cysticercosis, 23 sparganosis, 16 paragonimiasis, 15 amebiasis, 11 anisakiasis, 11 clonorchiasis, 3 ascariasis, 2 scabies, 2 enterobiasis, 2 trichuriasis, 1 leishmaniasis, 1 taeniasis, and 1 thelaziasis. Out of 62 cysticercosis cases, 55 were detected in subcutaneous tissues or the central nerve system. Eighteen out of 23 sparganosis cases were involved in muscular and subcutaneous tissues. In most anisakiasis cases, the involved organ was the stomach. The lung and the pleura were the most common site of paragonimiasis. The incidence of parasitic diseases during the first 5 years (1984-1988) was the highest of all observed periods. After 1989, similar incidences were shown throughout the period. Whereas cysticercosis was diagnosed in 34 cases during 1984-1988, no case has been diagnosed since 2000. In the case of sparganosis, the chronological incidence was almost uniform throughout the period 1984-2005. Paragonimiasis showed a similar tendency to cysticercosis. In gender and age distribution of parasitic diseases, men showed higher incidence rates than females, and the age groups of the 40s or older indicated higher infection frequencies than other age groups. Therefore, these results are a significant report to appear the tendency of human parasitic disease diagnosed by tissue biopsy in association with parasitosis at KMC in Seoul.

  4. Parasitic diseases of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Abdel Razek, Ahmed Abdel Khalek; Watcharakorn, Arvemas; Castillo, Mauricio

    2011-11-01

    This article reviews the characteristic imaging appearances of parasitic diseases of the central nervous system, including cysticercosis, toxoplasmosis, cystic echinococcosis, schistosomiasis, amebiasis, malariasis, sparganosis, paragonimiasis, and American and African trypanosomiases. Routine precontrast and postcontrast MR imaging helps in localization, characterization, delineation of extension, and follow-up of the parasitic lesions. Moreover, recently developed tools, such as diffusion, perfusion, and MR spectroscopy, help to differentiate parasitic diseases of the central nervous system from simulating lesions. Combining imaging findings with geographic prevalence, clinical history, and serologic tests is required for diagnosis of parasitic diseases of the central nervous system.

  5. A Rare Case of Ibuprofen-Induced Eosinophilic Meningitis in a 13-Year-Old Girl

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Sharad; Gupta, Mukesh; Sharma, Deepak; Bansal, Shweta

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic meningoencephalitis is based on clinical manifestations and microscopic identification of eosinophils present in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). It is caused by a variety of helminthic infections with most common being angiostrongyliasis, gnathostomiasis, toxocariasis, cysticercosis, schistosomiasis, baylisascariasis, and paragonimiasis. Many case reports are there in which parasites have been found responsible, but there are rare reports of CSF eosinophilia associated with the use of drugs. We report a case of drug-induced (ibuprofen) eosinophilic meningitis in a healthy female who presented to us with severe headache and improved dramatically after drug withdrawal. PMID:24596473

  6. No Paragonimus in high-risk groups in Côte d'Ivoire, but considerable prevalence of helminths and intestinal protozoon infections

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Paragonimiasis is a neglected tropical disease caused by an infection with lung flukes that is transmitted through the consumption of undercooked crabs. The disease is often confused with tuberculosis. Paragonimiasis is thought to be endemic in south-western Côte d'Ivoire. Methods Two cross-sectional surveys were carried out in the first half of 2009 in patients attending two tuberculosis centres of Abidjan. A third cross-sectional survey was conducted in May 2010 in children of two primary schools in Dabou, where crabs are frequently consumed. Patients with chronic cough provided three sputum samples plus one stool sample. Sputum samples were examined for tuberculosis with an auramine staining technique and for Paragonimus eggs using a concentration technique. Stool samples were subjected to the Ritchie technique. Schoolchildren provided a single stool sample, and samples were subjected to the Kato-Katz and an ether-concentration technique. A pre-tested questionnaire was administered to patients and schoolchildren to investigate food consumption habits. Additionally, between June 2009 and August 2010, shellfish were purchased from markets in Abidjan and Dabou and examined for metacercariae. Results No human case of paragonimiasis was diagnosed. However, trematode infections were seen in 32 of the 272 shellfish examined (11.8%). Questionnaire results revealed that crab and pig meat is well cooked before consumption. Among the 278 patients with complete data records, 62 had tuberculosis, with a higher prevalence in males than females (28.8% vs. 13.9%, χ2 = 8.79, p = 0.003). The prevalence of helminths and intestinal protozoa was 4.6% and 16.9%, respectively. In the school survey, among 166 children with complete data records, the prevalence of helminths and intestinal protozoa was 22.3% and 48.8%, respectively. Boys had significantly higher prevalences of helminths and intestinal protozoa than girls. Hookworm was the predominant helminth species and

  7. Mucocutaneous manifestations of helminth infections: Nematodes.

    PubMed

    Lupi, Omar; Downing, Christopher; Lee, Michael; Pino, Livia; Bravo, Francisco; Giglio, Patricia; Sethi, Aisha; Klaus, Sidney; Sangueza, Omar P; Fuller, Claire; Mendoza, Natalia; Ladizinski, Barry; Woc-Colburn, Laila; Tyring, Stephen K

    2015-12-01

    In the 21st century, despite increased globalization through international travel for business, medical volunteerism, pleasure, and immigration/refugees into the United States, there is little published in the dermatology literature regarding the cutaneous manifestations of helminth infections. Approximately 17% of travelers seek medical care because of cutaneous disorders, many related to infectious etiologies. This review will focus on the cutaneous manifestations of helminth infections and is divided into 2 parts: part I focuses on nematode infections, and part II focuses on trematode and cestode infections. This review highlights the clinical manifestations, transmission, diagnosis, and treatment of helminth infections. Nematodes are roundworms that cause diseases with cutaneous manifestations, such as cutaneous larval migrans, onchocerciasis, filariasis, gnathostomiasis, loiasis, dracunculiasis, strongyloidiasis, ascariasis, streptocerciasis, dirofilariasis, and trichinosis. Tremadotes, also known as flukes, cause schistosomiasis, paragonimiasis, and fascioliasis. Cestodes (tapeworms) are flat, hermaphroditic parasites that cause diseases such as sparganosis, cysticercosis, and echinococcus.

  8. Guillain-Barré Syndrome in a Boy With Lung Fluke Infection: Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cui-Wei; Gao, Feng; Xia, Zhe-Zhi

    2015-08-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome is the most common acute peripheral neuropathy in children in most countries. The cause and pathogenesis of the disease have yet to be clarified. There have been only a few reports of Guillain-Barré syndrome resulting from parasite infections worldwide, no cases of Guillain-Barré syndrome after lung fluke infection have been reported. We report a case of an 8-year-old male patient with Guillain-Barré syndrome after lung fluke infection. The child had a history of consumption of undercooked crabs. He was diagnosed with paragonimiasis. The patient experienced paralysis of and pain in the lower limbs about 3 weeks after symptom onset. Neurologic and electrophysiologic examination findings supported the diagnosis of Guillain-Barré syndrome. Parasitic infections should also be considered when determining which antecedent infection is associated with Guillain-Barré syndrome.

  9. The dwarf river crab Liberonautes latidactylus nanoides Cumberlidge & Sachs, 1989, from Liberia--a new second intermediate host of Paragonimus uterobilateralis.

    PubMed

    Sachs, R; Cumberlidge, N

    1991-03-01

    Large populations of the dwarf river crab Liberonautes latidactylus nanoides Cumberlidge & Sachs, 1989, collected from the St. Paul river at the Haindi/Mauwa focus of paragonimiasis in Liberia were examined for parasitization by the human lung fluke, Paragonimus uterobilateralis. Four specimens out of 763 L. l. nanoides proved to be positive for P. uterobilateralis (0.52%), and each of these specimens contained only 1 metacercaria. The dwarf river crab forms the basis of a seasonal commercial fishery in Liberia, and it is sold for human consumption in rural markets. However, the low levels of parasitization of L. l. nanoides, together with its limited seasonal availability make it doubtful that L. l. nanoides constitutes a public health risk to the rural population of Liberia.

  10. Triclabendazole Sulfoxide Causes Stage-Dependent Embryolethality in Zebrafish and Mouse In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Boix, Nuria; Teixido, Elisabet; Vila-Cejudo, Marta; Ortiz, Pedro; Ibáñez, Elena; Llobet, Juan M.; Barenys, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Background Fascioliasis and paragonimiasis are widespread foodborne trematode diseases, affecting millions of people in more than 75 countries. The treatment of choice for these parasitic diseases is based on triclabendazole, a benzimidazole derivative which has been suggested as a promising drug to treat pregnant women and children. However, at the moment, this drug is not approved for human use in most countries. Its potential adverse effects on embryonic development have been scarcely studied, and it has not been assigned a pregnancy category by the FDA. Thus, to help in the process of risk-benefit decision making upon triclabendazole treatment during pregnancy, a better characterization of its risks during gestation is needed. Methodology The zebrafish embryo test, a preimplantation and a postimplantation rodent whole embryo culture were used to investigate the potential embryotoxicity/teratogenicity of triclabendazole and its first metabolite triclabendazole sulfoxide. Albendazole and albendazole sulfoxide were included as positive controls. Principal Findings Triclabendazole was between 10 and 250 times less potent than albendazole in inducing dysmorphogenic effects in zebrafish or postimplantation rodent embryos, respectively. However, during the preimplantation period, both compounds, triclabendazole and triclabendazole sulfoxide, induced a dose-dependent embryolethal effect after only 24 h of exposure in rodent embryos and zebrafish (lowest observed adverse effect concentrations = 10 μM). Conclusions/Significance In humans, after ingestion of the recommended doses of triclabendazole to treat fascioliasis and paragonimiasis (10 mg/kg), the main compound found in plasma is triclabendazole sulfoxide (maximum concentration 38.6 μM), while triclabendazole concentrations are approximately 30 times lower (1.16 μM). From our results it can be concluded that triclabendazole, at concentrations of the same order of magnitude as the clinically relevant ones, does

  11. History of Human Parasitology

    PubMed Central

    Cox, F. E. G.

    2002-01-01

    Humans are hosts to nearly 300 species of parasitic worms and over 70 species of protozoa, some derived from our primate ancestors and some acquired from the animals we have domesticated or come in contact with during our relatively short history on Earth. Our knowledge of parasitic infections extends into antiquity, and descriptions of parasites and parasitic infections are found in the earliest writings and have been confirmed by the finding of parasites in archaeological material. The systematic study of parasites began with the rejection of the theory of spontaneous generation and the promulgation of the germ theory. Thereafter, the history of human parasitology proceeded along two lines, the discovery of a parasite and its subsequent association with disease and the recognition of a disease and the subsequent discovery that it was caused by a parasite. This review is concerned with the major helminth and protozoan infections of humans: ascariasis, trichinosis, strongyloidiasis, dracunculiasis, lymphatic filariasis, loasis, onchocerciasis, schistosomiasis, cestodiasis, paragonimiasis, clonorchiasis, opisthorchiasis, amoebiasis, giardiasis, African trypanosomiasis, South American trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, malaria, toxoplasmosis, cryptosporidiosis, cyclosporiasis, and microsporidiosis. PMID:12364371

  12. Structural and Immunological Characteristics of a 28-Kilodalton Cruzipain-Like Cysteine Protease of Paragonimus westermani Expressed in the Definitive Host Stage

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Doo-Hee; Chung, Joon-Yong; Chung, Young-Bae; Bahk, Young-Yil; Kang, Shin-Yong; Kong, Yoon; Cho, Seung-Yull

    2000-01-01

    A complete cDNA sequence encoding a 28-kDa cruzipain-like cysteine protease of adult Paragonimus westermani, termed Pw28CCP, was isolated from an adult cDNA library. The cDNA contained a single open reading frame of 975 bp encoding 325 amino acids, which exhibited the structural motif and domain organization characteristic of cysteine proteases of non-cathepsin Bs including a hydrophobic signal sequence, an ERFNIN motif, and essential cysteine residues as well as active sites in the mature catalytic region. Analysis of its phylogenetic position revealed that this novel enzyme belonged to the cruzipain-like cysteine proteases. The sequence of the first 13 amino acids predicted from the mature domain of Pw28CCP was in accord with that determined from the native 28-kDa enzyme purified from the adult worm. Expression of Pw28CCP was observed specifically in juvenile and adult worms, with a location in the intestinal epithelium, suggesting that this enzyme could be secreted and involved in nutrient uptake and immune modulation. The recombinant protein expressed in Escherichia coli was used to assess antigenicity by immunoblotting with sera from patients with active paragonimiasis and from those with other parasitic infections. The resulting sensitivity of 86.2% (56 of 65 samples) and specificity of 98% (147 of 150 samples) suggest its potential as an antigen for use in immunodiagnosis. PMID:11063501

  13. Differential Diagnosis of CNS Angiostrongyliasis: A Short Review

    PubMed Central

    Senthong, Vichai; Chindaprasirt, Jarin

    2013-01-01

    The diagnostic criterion for eosinophilic meningitis (EOM) is the identification of an absolute count of 10 eosinophils per ml or more than 10% of the total white blood cells in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the proper clinical context. The most common cause of EOM is Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection, termed meningitic angiostrongyliasis (MA). Neurognathostomiasis (NG) is the main parasitic disease in the differential diagnosis of meningitic angiostrongyliasis. This short review is based on articles published on Medline between 2000 and 2012 related to EOM. There are three main approaches that can be used to differentiate between MA and NG, involving clinical factors, history of larval exposure, and serological tests. MA patients presented with acute severe headache but without neurological deficit, combined with a history of eating uncooked snails or slugs. NG patients always presented with motor weakness, migratory swelling, radicular pain and had history of eating uncooked poultry or fish. Specific antigenic bands in immunoblot tests are helpful tools to differentiate the two diseases. Other causes of eosinophilic meningitis are neurocysticercosis, cerebral paragonimiasis, Toxoplasma canis, Baylisascaris, tuberculous meningitis, and cryptococcal meningitis. PMID:23901385

  14. Macrophageal/microglial cell activation and cerebral injury induced by excretory-secretory products secreted by Paragonimus westermani.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Chul; Cho, Geum-Sil; Kwon, Jae Hyun; Shin, Myeong Heon; Lim, Ji Hyae; Kim, Won-Ki

    2006-02-01

    Cerebral paragonimiasis causes various neurological disorders including seizures, visual impairment and hemiplegia. The excretory-secretory product (ESP) released by Paragonimus westermani has a cysteine protease activity and plays important roles in its migration in the host tissue and modulation of host immune responses. To gain more insight into the pathogenesis of ESP in the brain, we investigated the inflammatory reaction and cerebral injury following microinjection of ESP into rat striatum. The size of injury was maximally observed 3 days after microinjection of ESP and then declined to control levels as astrocytes have repopulated the injury. ED1-positive monocytes and microglia were confluently found inside the injury. The mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) occurred as early as 9h after ESP injection and then declined to control levels within 1 day. The iNOS inhibitor aminoguanidine largely decreased the expression of iNOS but did not reduce the size of lesion caused by ESP. Interestingly, however, heat inactivation of ESP caused a decrease of injury formation with no altered expression of iNOS. The data indicate that ESP produces brain tissue injury by recruiting activated monocytes/microglia via heat-labile protease activity.

  15. Praziquantel Treatment in Trematode and Cestode Infections: An Update

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Status and emerging issues in the use of praziquantel for treatment of human trematode and cestode infections are briefly reviewed. Since praziquantel was first introduced as a broadspectrum anthelmintic in 1975, innumerable articles describing its successful use in the treatment of the majority of human-infecting trematodes and cestodes have been published. The target trematode and cestode diseases include schistosomiasis, clonorchiasis and opisthorchiasis, paragonimiasis, heterophyidiasis, echinostomiasis, fasciolopsiasis, neodiplostomiasis, gymnophalloidiasis, taeniases, diphyllobothriasis, hymenolepiasis, and cysticercosis. However, Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica infections are refractory to praziquantel, for which triclabendazole, an alternative drug, is necessary. In addition, larval cestode infections, particularly hydatid disease and sparganosis, are not successfully treated by praziquantel. The precise mechanism of action of praziquantel is still poorly understood. There are also emerging problems with praziquantel treatment, which include the appearance of drug resistance in the treatment of Schistosoma mansoni and possibly Schistosoma japonicum, along with allergic or hypersensitivity reactions against praziquantel treatment. To cope with and overcome these problems, combined use of drugs, i.e., praziquantel and other newly introduced compounds such as triclabendazole, artemisinins, and tribendimidine, is being tried. PMID:24265948

  16. Pathology of CNS parasitic infections.

    PubMed

    Pittella, José Eymard Homem

    2013-01-01

    Parasitic infections of the central nervous system (CNS) include two broad categories of infectious organisms: single-celled protozoa and multicellular metazoa. The protozoal infections include malaria, American trypanosomiasis, human African trypanosomiasis, toxoplasmosis, amebiasis, microsporidiasis, and leishmaniasis. The metazoal infections are grouped into flatworms, which include trematoda and cestoda, and roundworms or nematoda. Trematoda infections include schistosomiasis and paragonimiasis. Cestoda infections include cysticercosis, coenurosis, hydatidosis, and sparganosis. Nematoda infections include gnathostomiasis, angiostrongyliasis, toxocariasis, strongyloidiasis, filariasis, baylisascariasis, dracunculiasis, micronemiasis, and lagochilascariasis. The most common route of CNS invasion is through the blood. In some cases, the parasite invades the olfactory neuroepithelium in the nasal mucosa and penetrates the brain via the subarachnoid space or reaches the CNS through neural foramina of the skull base around the cranial nerves or vessels. The neuropathological changes vary greatly, depending on the type and size of the parasite, geographical strain variations in parasitic virulence, immune evasion by the parasite, and differences in host immune response. Congestion of the leptomeninges, cerebral edema, hemorrhage, thrombosis, vasculitis, necrosis, calcification, abscesses, meningeal and perivascular polymorphonuclear and mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate, microglial nodules, gliosis, granulomas, and fibrosis can be found affecting isolated or multiple regions of the CNS, or even diffusely spread. Some infections may be present as an expanding mass lesion. The parasites can be identified by conventional histology, immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, and PCR.

  17. Fifty Years of the Korean Society for Parasitology

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    In 1959, the Korean Society for Parasitology was founded by clinical scientists, specialists of public health, and 5 core parasitologists with experience in American science and medicine. The Society this year celebrates its 50th anniversary. Due to public health importance at the time of foundation, medical parasitology was the main stream for next 3 decades. Domestic problems of niche parasitic diseases, unlisted in 6 tropical diseases of major importance, had been studied by own efforts. To cope with the demand of parasite control, evaluation system for control activity was built up. Control activity against soil-transmitted nematodes, conducted for almost 3 decades, was evaluated as a success. Evaluation of praziquantel efficacy for clonorchiasis, paragonimiasis, and neurocysticercosis, population dynamics of Ascaris lumbricoides infection in a situation of continuous reinfections, diagnostic modalities of antibody tests combined with brain imaging developed for helminthiasis of the central nervous system and researches on intestinal trematodes were achievements in the first 30 years. During the recent 2 decades, science researches, such as cell and molecular biology of parasites and immunology of parasitic infections have been studied especially on parasitic allergens and proteolytic and anti-oxidant enzymes. Experiences of international cooperation for world health have been accumulated and would be expanded in the future. PMID:19885338

  18. Update on Eosinophilic Meningoencephalitis and Its Clinical Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Graeff-Teixeira, Carlos; da Silva, Ana Cristina Arámburu; Yoshimura, Kentaro

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Eosinophilic meningoencephalitis is caused by a variety of helminthic infections. These worm-specific infections are named after the causative worm genera, the most common being angiostrongyliasis, gnathostomiasis, toxocariasis, cysticercosis, schistosomiasis, baylisascariasis, and paragonimiasis. Worm parasites enter an organism through ingestion of contaminated water or an intermediate host and can eventually affect the central nervous system (CNS). These infections are potentially serious events leading to sequelae or death, and diagnosis depends on currently limited molecular methods. Identification of parasites in fluids and tissues is rarely possible, while images and clinical examinations do not lead to a definitive diagnosis. Treatment usually requires the concomitant administration of corticoids and anthelminthic drugs, yet new compounds and their extensive and detailed clinical evaluation are much needed. Eosinophilia in fluids may be detected in other infectious and noninfectious conditions, such as neoplastic disease, drug use, and prosthesis reactions. Thus, distinctive identification of eosinophils in fluids is a necessary component in the etiologic diagnosis of CNS infections. PMID:19366917

  19. Molecular and morphological variation of Paragonimus westermani in Vietnam with records of new second intermediate crab hosts and a new locality in a northern province.

    PubMed

    Doanh, N Pham; Tu, A Luu; Bui, T Dung; Loan, T Ho; Nonaka, Nariaki; Horii, Yoichiro; Blair, David; Nawa, Yukifumi

    2016-10-01

    Paragonimus westermani is one of the most medically important lung flukes and is widely distributed in Asia. It exhibits considerable variation in morphological, genetic and biological features. In central provinces of Vietnam, a high prevalence of metacercariae of this species has been reported from the crab intermediate host, Vietopotamon aluoiense. In this study, we detected P. westermani metacercariae in two additional crab hosts, Donopotamon haii in Quang Tri Province, central Vietnam and Indochinamon tannanti in Yen Bai Province in the north. The latter is a new locality for P. westermani in a northern region of Vietnam where P. heterotremus is the only species currently known to cause human paragonimiasis. Paragonimus westermani metacercariae found in Vietnam showed considerable morphological variation but slight genetic variation based on DNA sequences from the nuclear ribosomal ITS2 region and the mitochondrial 16S gene. Co-infection of the same individual crabs with P. westermani and P. heterotremus and/or some other Paragonimus species was found frequently, suggesting potential for co-infection in humans. The findings of the present study emphasize the need for highly specific molecular and immunodiagnostic methods to differentially diagnose between P. westermani and P. heterotremus infections.

  20. Fifty years of the Korean Society for Parasitology.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seung-Yull

    2009-10-01

    In 1959, the Korean Society for Parasitology was founded by clinical scientists, specialists of public health, and 5 core parasitologists with experience in American science and medicine. The Society this year celebrates its 50th anniversary. Due to public health importance at the time of foundation, medical parasitology was the main stream for next 3 decades. Domestic problems of niche parasitic diseases, unlisted in 6 tropical diseases of major importance, had been studied by own efforts. To cope with the demand of parasite control, evaluation system for control activity was built up. Control activity against soil-transmitted nematodes, conducted for almost 3 decades, was evaluated as a success. Evaluation of praziquantel efficacy for clonorchiasis, paragonimiasis, and neurocysticercosis, population dynamics of Ascaris lumbricoides infection in a situation of continuous reinfections, diagnostic modalities of antibody tests combined with brain imaging developed for helminthiasis of the central nervous system and researches on intestinal trematodes were achievements in the first 30 years. During the recent 2 decades, science researches, such as cell and molecular biology of parasites and immunology of parasitic infections have been studied especially on parasitic allergens and proteolytic and anti-oxidant enzymes. Experiences of international cooperation for world health have been accumulated and would be expanded in the future.

  1. [Travel-associated pneumonias].

    PubMed

    Geerdes-Fenge, H F

    2014-10-01

    Respiratory infections are responsible for up to 11% of febrile infections in travellers or immigrants from tropical and subtropical regions. The main pathogens are the same as in temperate climate zones: Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, influenza viruses, Legionella pneumophila. However, some pulmonary diseases can be attributed to bacterial, parasitic, viral or fungal pathogens that are endemic in tropical and subtropical regions. The most commonly imported infections are malaria, dengue, and tuberculosis. Pulmonary symptoms and eosinophilia in returning travellers and migrants may be caused by several parasitic infections such as Katayama syndrome, Loeffler syndrome, tropical pulmonary eosinophilia, amebiasis, paragonimiasis, echinococcosis, and toxocariasis. In Asia, Tsutsugamushi fever is transmitted by chiggers, spotted fever rickettsiae are transmitted by ticks. Transmission of zoonotic diseases occurs mainly via contact with infected animals or their excretions, human-to-human transmission is generally rare: MERS-CoA (dromedary camels), pulmonary hantavirus infection (rodents), tularemia (rabbits and hares), leptospirosis (rats), Q-fever (sheep and goats), very rarely anthrax (hides of ruminants) and pest (infected rats and wildlife). Inhalation of contaminated dust can cause infections with dimorphic fungi: histoplasmosis (bat guano) and coccidioidomycosis in America and parts of Africa, blastomycosis in America. Some infections can cause symptoms years after a stay in tropical or subtropical regions (melioidosis, tuberculosis, histoplasmosis, schistosomiasis-associated pulmonary hypertension). Noninfectious respiratory diseases caused by inhalation of high amounts of air pollution or toxic dusts may also be considered. PMID:25290923

  2. [Report on the first nationwide survey of the distribution of human parasites in China. 1. Regional distribution of parasite species].

    PubMed

    Yu, S; Xu, L; Jiang, Z; Xu, S; Han, J; Zhu, Y; Chang, J; Lin, J; Xu, F

    1994-01-01

    A nationwide (Taiwan Province not included) survey of the distribution of human parasites in China during 1988-1992 was conducted under the auspices of the Ministry of Public Health, with stratified masses randomly sampling. A total of 2,848 pilot sites in 726 counties with a population of 1,477,742 were surveyed, according to unified standard, unified diagnostic method and control quality. The overall infection rate of parasites was 62. 632%. Among them, the infection rate was over 50% in 17 provinces/autonomous regions/municipalities (P/A/M), over 80% in Hainan, Guangxi, Sichuan, Fujian, Zhejiang and Guizhou, being highest in Hainan (94. 735%). Altogether 56 species were detected. Centrocestus formosanus is reported for the first time at home, Echinochasmus liliputanus and Echinostoma angustitestis are reported for the first time at home and abroad. Echinochasmus fujianensis is a new species. E. histolytica, G. lamblia, A. lumbricoides, whipworm and pinworm were distributed nationwide, while Cysticercus (27 P/A/M), Taenia (27), hookworm (26), Balantidium coli (22), Clonorchis sinensis (22), Paragonimus westermani (21), H. diminuta (21), Echinococcus (18), H. nana (17), Fasciolopsis buski (16), T. spiralis (12) were distributed non-nationwide. A preliminary suggestion on intervention of the common and/or most detrimental parasitic diseases was submitted, including hydatidosis, taeniasis, cysticercosis, clonorchiasis, paragonimiasis, trichinellosis, hookworm disease, ascariasis, trichuriasis and enterobiasis. PMID:7720194

  3. Respiratory infections unique to Asia.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Kenneth W; File, Thomas M

    2008-11-01

    Asia is a highly heterogeneous region with vastly different cultures, social constitutions and populations affected by a wide spectrum of respiratory diseases caused by tropical pathogens. Asian patients with community-acquired pneumonia differ from their Western counterparts in microbiological aetiology, in particular the prominence of Gram-negative organisms, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Burkholderia pseudomallei and Staphylococcus aureus. In addition, the differences in socioeconomic and health-care infrastructures limit the usefulness of Western management guidelines for pneumonia in Asia. The importance of emerging infectious diseases such as severe acute respiratory syndrome and avian influenza infection remain as close concerns for practising respirologists in Asia. Specific infections such as melioidosis, dengue haemorrhagic fever, scrub typhus, leptospirosis, salmonellosis, penicilliosis marneffei, malaria, amoebiasis, paragonimiasis, strongyloidiasis, gnathostomiasis, trinchinellosis, schistosomiasis and echinococcosis occur commonly in Asia and manifest with a prominent respiratory component. Pulmonary eosinophilia, endemic in parts of Asia, could occur with a wide range of tropical infections. Tropical eosinophilia is believed to be a hyper-sensitivity reaction to degenerating microfilariae trapped in the lungs. This article attempts to address the key respiratory issues in these respiratory infections unique to Asia and highlight the important diagnostic and management issues faced by practising respirologists.

  4. Assessment of the diagnostic efficacy of enolase as an indication of active infection of Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hong; Xiao, Di; Song, Lijun; Zhang, Wei; Shen, Shuang; Yin, Xuren; Wang, Jie; Ke, Xuedan; Yu, Chuanxin; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a common zoonoses affecting humans. The atypical clinical symptoms, low morbidity, and low degree of infection impede diagnosis and assessment of epidemics. Detecting circulating antigens from adult worms in patients' body fluids should be diagnostically superior to examining eggs in feces. Herein, the excretory-secretory proteins of adult worms were analyzed by using 2-D protein electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. The Schistosoma japonicum enolase (Sj enolase) was identified as the most abundant excretory-secretory antigen. Purified recombinant Sj enolase was prepared, and specific monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies were raised against it. A sandwich enzyme-linked immunoassay (sandwich ELISA) was established that used the monoclonal antibody as a capture antibody and the polyclonal antibody as a detection antibody. The linear detection range was 0.7-1000 ng/ml (minimum 700 pg/ml). Sj enolase could be detected in the sera of infected rabbits and disappeared rapidly postpraziquantel treatment. The sensitivity and specificity of this sandwich ELISA to detect field serum samples of schistosomiasis were 84.61 and 95.83 %, respectively. The cross-reaction rates for clonorchiasis and paragonimiasis were 3.33 and 5 %, respectively. This ELISA assay was used to test 45 matching sera of schistosomiasis patients before treatment and at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months posttreatment. Among the sera, 88.89 % were positive before treatment. At 3, 6, 9, and 12 months postpraziquantel treatment, 93.33, 97.78, 100, and 100 % tested negative, respectively. Therefore, Sj enolase can be used to indicate active Schistosoma infection, and detecting serum Sj enolase is important for diagnosis and evaluating treatment effect. PMID:26420425

  5. Systems Biology Studies of Adult Paragonimus Lung Flukes Facilitate the Identification of Immunodominant Parasite Antigens

    PubMed Central

    McNulty, Samantha N.; Fischer, Peter U.; Townsend, R. Reid; Curtis, Kurt C.; Weil, Gary J.; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2014-01-01

    Background Paragonimiasis is a food-borne trematode infection acquired by eating raw or undercooked crustaceans. It is a major public health problem in the far East, but it also occurs in South Asia, Africa, and in the Americas. Paragonimus worms cause chronic lung disease with cough, fever and hemoptysis that can be confused with tuberculosis or other non-parasitic diseases. Treatment is straightforward, but diagnosis is often delayed due to a lack of reliable parasitological or serodiagnostic tests. Hence, the purpose of this study was to use a systems biology approach to identify key parasite proteins that may be useful for development of improved diagnostic tests. Methodology/Principal Findings The transcriptome of adult Paragonimus kellicotti was sequenced with Illumina technology. Raw reads were pre-processed and assembled into 78,674 unique transcripts derived from 54,622 genetic loci, and 77,123 unique protein translations were predicted. A total of 2,555 predicted proteins (from 1,863 genetic loci) were verified by mass spectrometric analysis of total worm homogenate, including 63 proteins lacking homology to previously characterized sequences. Parasite proteins encoded by 321 transcripts (227 genetic loci) were reactive with antibodies from infected patients, as demonstrated by immunoaffinity purification and high-resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Serodiagnostic candidates were prioritized based on several criteria, especially low conservation with proteins in other trematodes. Cysteine proteases, MFP6 proteins and myoglobins were abundant among the immunoreactive proteins, and these warrant further study as diagnostic candidates. Conclusions The transcriptome, proteome and immunolome of adult P. kellicotti represent a major advance in the study of Paragonimus species. These data provide a powerful foundation for translational research to develop improved diagnostic tests. Similar integrated approaches may be useful for identifying novel

  6. The mitochondrial genome of Paragonimus westermani (Kerbert, 1878), the Indian isolate of the lung fluke representative of the family Paragonimidae (Trematoda)

    PubMed Central

    Biswal, Devendra K.; Chatterjee, Anupam

    2014-01-01

    -protein coding genes successfully identified tRNA regions for the 24 tRNAs coded in mtDNA and 12 protein coding genes. Bayesian phylogenetic analyses of the concatenated protein coding genes placed P. westermani within the family Opisthorchida. The complete mtDNA sequence of P. westermani is 15,004 base pairs long; the lung fluke is the major etiological agent of paragonimiasis and the first Indian representative for the family Paragonimidae to be fully sequenced that provides important genetic markers for ecological, population and biogeographical studies and molecular diagnostic of digeneans that cause trematodiases. PMID:25165620

  7. Detection of Clonorchis sinensis Circulating Antigen in Sera from Chinese Patients by Immunomagnetic Bead ELISA Based on IgY

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Ge; Wang, Ting; Lu, Shengjun; Liu, Wenqi; Li, Yonglong; Lei, Jiahui

    2014-01-01

    Background Clonorchiasis, caused by Clonorchis sinensis, is widely distributed in Southeast Asia including China. Clonorchiasis is included in control programs of neglected tropical diseases by World Health Organization (WHO) because it is one of the major health problems in most endemic areas. Diagnosis of clonorchiasis plays a key role in the control programs. However, so far, there is no satisfactory method for clonorchiasis because of low sensitivity, poor practicality and high false positivity of available diagnostic tools. Methodology/Principal Findings We developed an immunomagnetic bead enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on IgY (egg yolk immunoglobulin) against cysteine proteinase of C. sinensis for detection of circulating antigen in serum samples of patients infected with C. sinensis. The polyclonal IgY, coated with magnetic beads, was used as a capture antibody and a monoclonal IgG labeled with horseradish peroxidase as a detection antibody in the IgY-based immunomagnetic bead ELISA system (IgY-IMB-ELISA). The results showed that the sensitivity of IgY-IMB-ELISA was 93.3% (14 of 15) in cases of heavy infection (5000 to 9999 eggs per gram feces, i.e, EPG 5000–9999), 86.7% (13 of 15) in cases of moderate infection (EPG 1000–4999) and 75.0% (9 of 12) in cases of light infection (EPG <1000) of clonorchiasis. Together 36 of total 42 (85.7%) serum samples of human clonorchiasis gave a positive reaction. There was a significant correlation between ELISA optical density and egg counts (EPG) with a correlation coefficient of 0.83 in total 42 patients. There were no positive results in patients with trichinosis (n = 10) or cysticercosis (n = 10). Cross-reactivity was 6.7% (2 of 30) with schistosomiasis japonica and 10.0% (3 of 30) with paragonimiasis, respectively. No positive reaction was found in 20 healthy persons. Conclusions Our findings suggest that IgY-IMB-ELISA appears to be a sensitive and specific assay for detection of