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Sample records for parallel computing architectures

  1. Parallel Architecture For Robotics Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, Amir; Bejczy, Antal K.

    1990-01-01

    Universal Real-Time Robotic Controller and Simulator (URRCS) is highly parallel computing architecture for control and simulation of robot motion. Result of extensive algorithmic study of different kinematic and dynamic computational problems arising in control and simulation of robot motion. Study led to development of class of efficient parallel algorithms for these problems. Represents algorithmically specialized architecture, in sense capable of exploiting common properties of this class of parallel algorithms. System with both MIMD and SIMD capabilities. Regarded as processor attached to bus of external host processor, as part of bus memory.

  2. Computer architecture and parallel processing

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, K.; Faye, A.

    1984-01-01

    The book is intended as a text to support two semesters of courses in computer architecture at the college senior and graduate levels. There are excellent problems for students at the end of each chapter. The authors have divided the use of computers into the following four levels of sophistication: data processing, information processing, knowledge processing, and intelligence processing.

  3. Electromagnetic Physics Models for Parallel Computing Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amadio, G.; Ananya, A.; Apostolakis, J.; Aurora, A.; Bandieramonte, M.; Bhattacharyya, A.; Bianchini, C.; Brun, R.; Canal, P.; Carminati, F.; Duhem, L.; Elvira, D.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Goulas, I.; Iope, R.; Jun, S. Y.; Lima, G.; Mohanty, A.; Nikitina, T.; Novak, M.; Pokorski, W.; Ribon, A.; Seghal, R.; Shadura, O.; Vallecorsa, S.; Wenzel, S.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-10-01

    The recent emergence of hardware architectures characterized by many-core or accelerated processors has opened new opportunities for concurrent programming models taking advantage of both SIMD and SIMT architectures. GeantV, a next generation detector simulation, has been designed to exploit both the vector capability of mainstream CPUs and multi-threading capabilities of coprocessors including NVidia GPUs and Intel Xeon Phi. The characteristics of these architectures are very different in terms of the vectorization depth and type of parallelization needed to achieve optimal performance. In this paper we describe implementation of electromagnetic physics models developed for parallel computing architectures as a part of the GeantV project. Results of preliminary performance evaluation and physics validation are presented as well.

  4. Electromagnetic physics models for parallel computing architectures

    DOE PAGES

    Amadio, G.; Ananya, A.; Apostolakis, J.; ...

    2016-11-21

    The recent emergence of hardware architectures characterized by many-core or accelerated processors has opened new opportunities for concurrent programming models taking advantage of both SIMD and SIMT architectures. GeantV, a next generation detector simulation, has been designed to exploit both the vector capability of mainstream CPUs and multi-threading capabilities of coprocessors including NVidia GPUs and Intel Xeon Phi. The characteristics of these architectures are very different in terms of the vectorization depth and type of parallelization needed to achieve optimal performance. In this paper we describe implementation of electromagnetic physics models developed for parallel computing architectures as a part ofmore » the GeantV project. Finally, the results of preliminary performance evaluation and physics validation are presented as well.« less

  5. Electromagnetic physics models for parallel computing architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Amadio, G.; Ananya, A.; Apostolakis, J.; Aurora, A.; Bandieramonte, M.; Bhattacharyya, A.; Bianchini, C.; Brun, R.; Canal, P.; Carminati, F.; Duhem, L.; Elvira, D.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Goulas, I.; Iope, R.; Jun, S. Y.; Lima, G.; Mohanty, A.; Nikitina, T.; Novak, M.; Pokorski, W.; Ribon, A.; Seghal, R.; Shadura, O.; Vallecorsa, S.; Wenzel, S.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-11-21

    The recent emergence of hardware architectures characterized by many-core or accelerated processors has opened new opportunities for concurrent programming models taking advantage of both SIMD and SIMT architectures. GeantV, a next generation detector simulation, has been designed to exploit both the vector capability of mainstream CPUs and multi-threading capabilities of coprocessors including NVidia GPUs and Intel Xeon Phi. The characteristics of these architectures are very different in terms of the vectorization depth and type of parallelization needed to achieve optimal performance. In this paper we describe implementation of electromagnetic physics models developed for parallel computing architectures as a part of the GeantV project. Finally, the results of preliminary performance evaluation and physics validation are presented as well.

  6. Parallel architectures for computing cyclic convolutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, C.-S.; Reed, I. S.; Truong, T. K.

    1983-01-01

    In the paper two parallel architectural structures are developed to compute one-dimensional cyclic convolutions. The first structure is based on the Chinese remainder theorem and Kung's pipelined array. The second structure is a direct mapping from the mathematical definition of a cyclic convolution to a computational architecture. To compute a d-point cyclic convolution the first structure needs d/2 inner product cells, while the second structure and Kung's linear array require d cells. However, to compute a cyclic convolution, the second structure requires less time than both the first structure and Kung's linear array. Another application of the second structure is to multiply a Toeplitz matrix by a vector. A table is listed to compare these two structures and Kung's linear array. Both structures are simple and regular and are therefore suitable for VLSI implementation.

  7. Parallel architectures for computing cyclic convolutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, C.-S.; Reed, I. S.; Truong, T. K.

    1983-01-01

    In the paper two parallel architectural structures are developed to compute one-dimensional cyclic convolutions. The first structure is based on the Chinese remainder theorem and Kung's pipelined array. The second structure is a direct mapping from the mathematical definition of a cyclic convolution to a computational architecture. To compute a d-point cyclic convolution the first structure needs d/2 inner product cells, while the second structure and Kung's linear array require d cells. However, to compute a cyclic convolution, the second structure requires less time than both the first structure and Kung's linear array. Another application of the second structure is to multiply a Toeplitz matrix by a vector. A table is listed to compare these two structures and Kung's linear array. Both structures are simple and regular and are therefore suitable for VLSI implementation.

  8. Software development strategies for parallel computer architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, Ralf; Cooper, W. Anthony; Beniston, Martin; Gengler, Marc; Merazzi, Silvio

    1991-09-01

    As pragmatic users of high performance supercomputers, we believe that nowadays parallel computer architectures with disturbed memories are not yet mature to be used by a wide range of application engineers. A big effort should be made to bring these very promising computers closer to the users. One major flaw of massively parallel machines is that the programmer has to take care himself of the data flow which is often different on different parallel computers. To overcome this problem, we propose that data structures be standardized. The data base then can become an integrated part of the system and the data flow for a given algorithm can be easily prescribed. Fixing data structures forces the computer manufacturer to rather adapt his machine to user's demands and not, as it happens now, the user has to adapt to the innovative computer science approach of the computer manufacturer. In this paper, we present data standards chosen for our ASTRID programming platform for research scientist and engineers, as well as a plasma physics application which won the Cray Gigaflop Performance Awards 1989 and 1990 and which was succesfully ported on an INTEL iPSC/2 hypercube.

  9. Highly parallel computer architecture for robotic computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, Amir (Inventor); Bejczy, Anta K. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    In a computer having a large number of single instruction multiple data (SIMD) processors, each of the SIMD processors has two sets of three individual processor elements controlled by a master control unit and interconnected among a plurality of register file units where data is stored. The register files input and output data in synchronism with a minor cycle clock under control of two slave control units controlling the register file units connected to respective ones of the two sets of processor elements. Depending upon which ones of the register file units are enabled to store or transmit data during a particular minor clock cycle, the processor elements within an SIMD processor are connected in rings or in pipeline arrays, and may exchange data with the internal bus or with neighboring SIMD processors through interface units controlled by respective ones of the two slave control units.

  10. A Simple Physical Optics Algorithm Perfect for Parallel Computing Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbriale, W. A.; Cwik, T.

    1994-01-01

    A reflector antenna computer program based upon a simple discreet approximation of the radiation integral has proven to be extremely easy to adapt to the parallel computing architecture of the modest number of large-gain computing elements such as are used in the Intel iPSC and Touchstone Delta parallel machines.

  11. A Simple Physical Optics Algorithm Perfect for Parallel Computing Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbriale, W. A.; Cwik, T.

    1994-01-01

    A reflector antenna computer program based upon a simple discreet approximation of the radiation integral has proven to be extremely easy to adapt to the parallel computing architecture of the modest number of large-gain computing elements such as are used in the Intel iPSC and Touchstone Delta parallel machines.

  12. Nonlinear hierarchical substructural parallelism and computer architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padovan, Joe

    1989-01-01

    Computer architecture is investigated in conjunction with the algorithmic structures of nonlinear finite-element analysis. To help set the stage for this goal, the development is undertaken by considering the wide-ranging needs associated with the analysis of rolling tires which possess the full range of kinematic, material and boundary condition induced nonlinearity in addition to gross and local cord-matrix material properties.

  13. Parallel algorithms and architecture for computation of manipulator forward dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, Amir; Bejczy, Antal K.

    1989-01-01

    Parallel computation of manipulator forward dynamics is investigated. Considering three classes of algorithms for the solution of the problem, that is, the O(n), the O(n exp 2), and the O(n exp 3) algorithms, parallelism in the problem is analyzed. It is shown that the problem belongs to the class of NC and that the time and processors bounds are of O(log2/2n) and O(n exp 4), respectively. However, the fastest stable parallel algorithms achieve the computation time of O(n) and can be derived by parallelization of the O(n exp 3) serial algorithms. Parallel computation of the O(n exp 3) algorithms requires the development of parallel algorithms for a set of fundamentally different problems, that is, the Newton-Euler formulation, the computation of the inertia matrix, decomposition of the symmetric, positive definite matrix, and the solution of triangular systems. Parallel algorithms for this set of problems are developed which can be efficiently implemented on a unique architecture, a triangular array of n(n+2)/2 processors with a simple nearest-neighbor interconnection. This architecture is particularly suitable for VLSI and WSI implementations. The developed parallel algorithm, compared to the best serial O(n) algorithm, achieves an asymptotic speedup of more than two orders-of-magnitude in the computation the forward dynamics.

  14. Panel on future directions in parallel computer architecture

    SciTech Connect

    VanTilborg, A.M. )

    1989-06-01

    One of the program highlights of the 15th Annual International Symposium on Computer Architecture, held May 30 - June 2, 1988 in Honolulu, was a panel session on future directions in parallel computer architecture. The panel was organized and chaired by the author, and was comprised of Prof. Jack Dennis (NASA Ames Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science), Prof. H.T. Kung (Carnegie Mellon), and Dr. Burton Smith (Tera Computer Company). The objective of the panel was to identify the likely trajectory of future parallel computer system progress, particularly from the sandpoint of marketplace acceptance. Approximately 250 attendees participated in the session, in which each panelist began with a ten minute viewgraph explanation of his views, followed by an open and sometimes lively exchange with the audience and fellow panelists. The session ran for ninety minutes.

  15. Parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Treveaven, P.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents an introduction to object-oriented, functional, and logic parallel computing on which the fifth generation of computer systems will be based. Coverage includes concepts for parallel computing languages, a parallel object-oriented system (DOOM) and its language (POOL), an object-oriented multilevel VLSI simulator using POOL, and implementation of lazy functional languages on parallel architectures.

  16. Parallel computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huberman, Bernardo A.

    1989-11-01

    This paper reviews three different aspects of parallel computation which are useful for physics. The first part deals with special architectures for parallel computing (SIMD and MIMD machines) and their differences, with examples of their uses. The second section discusses the speedup that can be achieved in parallel computation and the constraints generated by the issues of communication and synchrony. The third part describes computation by distributed networks of powerful workstations without global controls and the issues involved in understanding their behavior.

  17. High performance parallel architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.E. )

    1989-09-01

    In this paper the author describes current high performance parallel computer architectures. A taxonomy is presented to show computer architecture from the user programmer's point-of-view. The effects of the taxonomy upon the programming model are described. Some current architectures are described with respect to the taxonomy. Finally, some predictions about future systems are presented. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Parallel computer architecture. (Latest citations from INSPEC - the database for Physics, Electronics, and Computing). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the development and performance analysis of parallel architecture in image processing and computing. Cost and performance evaluations of multiple processor systems are described. Applications are described, including supercomputer design, database management, computer communication systems, and robot control. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  19. Languages for parallel architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents mathematical methods for modelling parallel computer architectures, based on the results of ESPRIT's project 415 on computer languages for parallel architectures. Presented are investigations incorporating a wide variety of programming styles, including functional,logic, and object-oriented paradigms. Topics cover include Philips's parallel object-oriented language POOL, lazy-functional languages, the languages IDEAL, K-LEAF, FP2, and Petri-net semantics for the AADL language.

  20. Parallel processing architecture for computing inverse differential kinematic equations of the PUMA arm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsia, T. C.; Lu, G. Z.; Han, W. H.

    1987-01-01

    In advanced robot control problems, on-line computation of inverse Jacobian solution is frequently required. Parallel processing architecture is an effective way to reduce computation time. A parallel processing architecture is developed for the inverse Jacobian (inverse differential kinematic equation) of the PUMA arm. The proposed pipeline/parallel algorithm can be inplemented on an IC chip using systolic linear arrays. This implementation requires 27 processing cells and 25 time units. Computation time is thus significantly reduced.

  1. Analysis of multigrid methods on massively parallel computers: Architectural implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matheson, Lesley R.; Tarjan, Robert E.

    1993-01-01

    We study the potential performance of multigrid algorithms running on massively parallel computers with the intent of discovering whether presently envisioned machines will provide an efficient platform for such algorithms. We consider the domain parallel version of the standard V cycle algorithm on model problems, discretized using finite difference techniques in two and three dimensions on block structured grids of size 10(exp 6) and 10(exp 9), respectively. Our models of parallel computation were developed to reflect the computing characteristics of the current generation of massively parallel multicomputers. These models are based on an interconnection network of 256 to 16,384 message passing, 'workstation size' processors executing in an SPMD mode. The first model accomplishes interprocessor communications through a multistage permutation network. The communication cost is a logarithmic function which is similar to the costs in a variety of different topologies. The second model allows single stage communication costs only. Both models were designed with information provided by machine developers and utilize implementation derived parameters. With the medium grain parallelism of the current generation and the high fixed cost of an interprocessor communication, our analysis suggests an efficient implementation requires the machine to support the efficient transmission of long messages, (up to 1000 words) or the high initiation cost of a communication must be significantly reduced through an alternative optimization technique. Furthermore, with variable length message capability, our analysis suggests the low diameter multistage networks provide little or no advantage over a simple single stage communications network.

  2. RRAM-based parallel computing architecture using k-nearest neighbor classification for pattern recognition.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuning; Kang, Jinfeng; Wang, Xinan

    2017-03-24

    Resistive switching memory (RRAM) is considered as one of the most promising devices for parallel computing solutions that may overcome the von Neumann bottleneck of today's electronic systems. However, the existing RRAM-based parallel computing architectures suffer from practical problems such as device variations and extra computing circuits. In this work, we propose a novel parallel computing architecture for pattern recognition by implementing k-nearest neighbor classification on metal-oxide RRAM crossbar arrays. Metal-oxide RRAM with gradual RESET behaviors is chosen as both the storage and computing components. The proposed architecture is tested by the MNIST database. High speed (~100 ns per example) and high recognition accuracy (97.05%) are obtained. The influence of several non-ideal device properties is also discussed, and it turns out that the proposed architecture shows great tolerance to device variations. This work paves a new way to achieve RRAM-based parallel computing hardware systems with high performance.

  3. The hypercluster: A parallel processing test-bed architecture for computational mechanics applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blech, Richard A.

    1987-01-01

    The development of numerical methods and software tools for parallel processors can be aided through the use of a hardware test-bed. The test-bed architecture must be flexible enough to support investigations into architecture-algorithm interactions. One way to implement a test-bed is to use a commercial parallel processor. Unfortunately, most commercial parallel processors are fixed in their interconnection and/or processor architecture. In this paper, we describe a modified n cube architecture, called the hypercluster, which is a superset of many other processor and interconnection architectures. The hypercluster is intended to support research into parallel processing of computational fluid and structural mechanics problems which may require a number of different architectural configurations. An example of how a typical partial differential equation solution algorithm maps on to the hypercluster is given.

  4. A Framework to Simulate Semiconductor Devices Using Parallel Computer Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Gaurav; Singh, Mandeep; Bulusu, Anand; Trivedi, Gaurav

    2016-10-01

    Device simulations have become an integral part of semiconductor technology to address many issues (short channel effects, narrow width effects, hot-electron effect) as it goes into nano regime, helping us to continue further with the Moore's Law. TCAD provides a simulation environment to design and develop novel devices, thus a leap forward to study their electrical behaviour in advance. In this paper, a parallel 2D simulator for semiconductor devices using Discontinuous Galerkin Finite Element Method (DG-FEM) is presented. Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method is used to discretize essential device equations and later these equations are analyzed by using a suitable methodology to find the solution. DG method is characterized to provide more accurate solution as it efficiently conserve the flux and easily handles complex geometries. OpenMP is used to parallelize solution of device equations on manycore processors and a speed of 1.4x is achieved during assembly process of discretization. This study is important for more accurate analysis of novel devices (such as FinFET, GAAFET etc.) on a parallel computing platform and will help us to develop a parallel device simulator which will be able to address this issue efficiently. A case study of PN junction diode is presented to show the effectiveness of proposed approach.

  5. Final Report: Super Instruction Architecture for Scalable Parallel Computations

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, Beverly Ann; Bartlett, Rodney; Deumens, Erik

    2013-12-23

    The most advanced methods for reliable and accurate computation of the electronic structure of molecular and nano systems are the coupled-cluster techniques. These high-accuracy methods help us to understand, for example, how biological enzymes operate and contribute to the design of new organic explosives. The ACES III software provides a modern, high-performance implementation of these methods optimized for high performance parallel computer systems, ranging from small clusters typical in individual research groups, through larger clusters available in campus and regional computer centers, all the way to high-end petascale systems at national labs, including exploiting GPUs if available. This project enhanced the ACESIII software package and used it to study interesting scientific problems.

  6. Architecture-Adaptive Computing Environment: A Tool for Teaching Parallel Programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorband, John E.; Aburdene, Maurice F.

    2002-01-01

    Recently, networked and cluster computation have become very popular. This paper is an introduction to a new C based parallel language for architecture-adaptive programming, aCe C. The primary purpose of aCe (Architecture-adaptive Computing Environment) is to encourage programmers to implement applications on parallel architectures by providing them the assurance that future architectures will be able to run their applications with a minimum of modification. A secondary purpose is to encourage computer architects to develop new types of architectures by providing an easily implemented software development environment and a library of test applications. This new language should be an ideal tool to teach parallel programming. In this paper, we will focus on some fundamental features of aCe C.

  7. Parallel language constructs for tensor product computations on loosely coupled architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehrotra, Piyush; Vanrosendale, John

    1989-01-01

    Distributed memory architectures offer high levels of performance and flexibility, but have proven awkard to program. Current languages for nonshared memory architectures provide a relatively low level programming environment, and are poorly suited to modular programming, and to the construction of libraries. A set of language primitives designed to allow the specification of parallel numerical algorithms at a higher level is described. Tensor product array computations are focused on along with a simple but important class of numerical algorithms. The problem of programming 1-D kernal routines is focused on first, such as parallel tridiagonal solvers, and then how such parallel kernels can be combined to form parallel tensor product algorithms is examined.

  8. Special purpose parallel computer architecture for real-time control and simulation in robotic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, Amir (Inventor); Bejczy, Antal K. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    This is a real-time robotic controller and simulator which is a MIMD-SIMD parallel architecture for interfacing with an external host computer and providing a high degree of parallelism in computations for robotic control and simulation. It includes a host processor for receiving instructions from the external host computer and for transmitting answers to the external host computer. There are a plurality of SIMD microprocessors, each SIMD processor being a SIMD parallel processor capable of exploiting fine grain parallelism and further being able to operate asynchronously to form a MIMD architecture. Each SIMD processor comprises a SIMD architecture capable of performing two matrix-vector operations in parallel while fully exploiting parallelism in each operation. There is a system bus connecting the host processor to the plurality of SIMD microprocessors and a common clock providing a continuous sequence of clock pulses. There is also a ring structure interconnecting the plurality of SIMD microprocessors and connected to the clock for providing the clock pulses to the SIMD microprocessors and for providing a path for the flow of data and instructions between the SIMD microprocessors. The host processor includes logic for controlling the RRCS by interpreting instructions sent by the external host computer, decomposing the instructions into a series of computations to be performed by the SIMD microprocessors, using the system bus to distribute associated data among the SIMD microprocessors, and initiating activity of the SIMD microprocessors to perform the computations on the data by procedure call.

  9. Parallel architectures for vision

    SciTech Connect

    Maresca, M. ); Lavin, M.A. ); Li, H. )

    1988-08-01

    Vision computing involves the execution of a large number of operations on large sets of structured data. Sequential computers cannot achieve the speed required by most of the current applications and therefore parallel architectural solutions have to be explored. In this paper the authors examine the options that drive the design of a vision oriented computer, starting with the analysis of the basic vision computation and communication requirements. They briefly review the classical taxonomy for parallel computers, based on the multiplicity of the instruction and data stream, and apply a recently proposed criterion, the degree of autonomy of each processor, to further classify fine-grain SIMD massively parallel computers. They identify three types of processor autonomy, namely operation autonomy, addressing autonomy, and connection autonomy. For each type they give the basic definitions and show some examples. They focus on the concept of connection autonomy, which they believe is a key point in the development of massively parallel architectures for vision. They show two examples of parallel computers featuring different types of connection autonomy - the Connection Machine and the Polymorphic-Torus - and compare their cost and benefit.

  10. RRAM-based parallel computing architecture using k-nearest neighbor classification for pattern recognition

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuning; Kang, Jinfeng; Wang, Xinan

    2017-01-01

    Resistive switching memory (RRAM) is considered as one of the most promising devices for parallel computing solutions that may overcome the von Neumann bottleneck of today’s electronic systems. However, the existing RRAM-based parallel computing architectures suffer from practical problems such as device variations and extra computing circuits. In this work, we propose a novel parallel computing architecture for pattern recognition by implementing k-nearest neighbor classification on metal-oxide RRAM crossbar arrays. Metal-oxide RRAM with gradual RESET behaviors is chosen as both the storage and computing components. The proposed architecture is tested by the MNIST database. High speed (~100 ns per example) and high recognition accuracy (97.05%) are obtained. The influence of several non-ideal device properties is also discussed, and it turns out that the proposed architecture shows great tolerance to device variations. This work paves a new way to achieve RRAM-based parallel computing hardware systems with high performance. PMID:28338069

  11. RRAM-based parallel computing architecture using k-nearest neighbor classification for pattern recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yuning; Kang, Jinfeng; Wang, Xinan

    2017-03-01

    Resistive switching memory (RRAM) is considered as one of the most promising devices for parallel computing solutions that may overcome the von Neumann bottleneck of today’s electronic systems. However, the existing RRAM-based parallel computing architectures suffer from practical problems such as device variations and extra computing circuits. In this work, we propose a novel parallel computing architecture for pattern recognition by implementing k-nearest neighbor classification on metal-oxide RRAM crossbar arrays. Metal-oxide RRAM with gradual RESET behaviors is chosen as both the storage and computing components. The proposed architecture is tested by the MNIST database. High speed (~100 ns per example) and high recognition accuracy (97.05%) are obtained. The influence of several non-ideal device properties is also discussed, and it turns out that the proposed architecture shows great tolerance to device variations. This work paves a new way to achieve RRAM-based parallel computing hardware systems with high performance.

  12. A learnable parallel processing architecture towards unity of memory and computing

    PubMed Central

    Li, H.; Gao, B.; Chen, Z.; Zhao, Y.; Huang, P.; Ye, H.; Liu, L.; Liu, X.; Kang, J.

    2015-01-01

    Developing energy-efficient parallel information processing systems beyond von Neumann architecture is a long-standing goal of modern information technologies. The widely used von Neumann computer architecture separates memory and computing units, which leads to energy-hungry data movement when computers work. In order to meet the need of efficient information processing for the data-driven applications such as big data and Internet of Things, an energy-efficient processing architecture beyond von Neumann is critical for the information society. Here we show a non-von Neumann architecture built of resistive switching (RS) devices named “iMemComp”, where memory and logic are unified with single-type devices. Leveraging nonvolatile nature and structural parallelism of crossbar RS arrays, we have equipped “iMemComp” with capabilities of computing in parallel and learning user-defined logic functions for large-scale information processing tasks. Such architecture eliminates the energy-hungry data movement in von Neumann computers. Compared with contemporary silicon technology, adder circuits based on “iMemComp” can improve the speed by 76.8% and the power dissipation by 60.3%, together with a 700 times aggressive reduction in the circuit area. PMID:26271243

  13. A learnable parallel processing architecture towards unity of memory and computing.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Gao, B; Chen, Z; Zhao, Y; Huang, P; Ye, H; Liu, L; Liu, X; Kang, J

    2015-08-14

    Developing energy-efficient parallel information processing systems beyond von Neumann architecture is a long-standing goal of modern information technologies. The widely used von Neumann computer architecture separates memory and computing units, which leads to energy-hungry data movement when computers work. In order to meet the need of efficient information processing for the data-driven applications such as big data and Internet of Things, an energy-efficient processing architecture beyond von Neumann is critical for the information society. Here we show a non-von Neumann architecture built of resistive switching (RS) devices named "iMemComp", where memory and logic are unified with single-type devices. Leveraging nonvolatile nature and structural parallelism of crossbar RS arrays, we have equipped "iMemComp" with capabilities of computing in parallel and learning user-defined logic functions for large-scale information processing tasks. Such architecture eliminates the energy-hungry data movement in von Neumann computers. Compared with contemporary silicon technology, adder circuits based on "iMemComp" can improve the speed by 76.8% and the power dissipation by 60.3%, together with a 700 times aggressive reduction in the circuit area.

  14. A learnable parallel processing architecture towards unity of memory and computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Gao, B.; Chen, Z.; Zhao, Y.; Huang, P.; Ye, H.; Liu, L.; Liu, X.; Kang, J.

    2015-08-01

    Developing energy-efficient parallel information processing systems beyond von Neumann architecture is a long-standing goal of modern information technologies. The widely used von Neumann computer architecture separates memory and computing units, which leads to energy-hungry data movement when computers work. In order to meet the need of efficient information processing for the data-driven applications such as big data and Internet of Things, an energy-efficient processing architecture beyond von Neumann is critical for the information society. Here we show a non-von Neumann architecture built of resistive switching (RS) devices named “iMemComp”, where memory and logic are unified with single-type devices. Leveraging nonvolatile nature and structural parallelism of crossbar RS arrays, we have equipped “iMemComp” with capabilities of computing in parallel and learning user-defined logic functions for large-scale information processing tasks. Such architecture eliminates the energy-hungry data movement in von Neumann computers. Compared with contemporary silicon technology, adder circuits based on “iMemComp” can improve the speed by 76.8% and the power dissipation by 60.3%, together with a 700 times aggressive reduction in the circuit area.

  15. An architecture for a wafer-scale-implemented MIMD parallel computer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chiajiu.

    1988-01-01

    In this dissertation, a general-purpose parallel computer architecture is proposed and studied. The proposed architecture, called the modified mesh-connected parallel computer (MMCPC) is obtained by enhancing a mesh-connected parallel computer with row buses and column buses. The MMCPC is a multiple instruction multiple data parallel machine. Because of the regular structure and distributed control mechanisms, the MMCPC is suitable for VLSI or WSI implementation. The bus structure of the MMCPC lends itself to configurability and fault tolerance. The MMCPC can be logically configured as a number of different parallel computer topologies. The MMCPC can tolerate as many faulty PE's, located randomly, as there are available spares, resulting in 100% redundancy utilization. The performance of the MMCPC was analyzed by applying a generalized stochastic Petri net graph to the MMCPC. The GSPN performance modeling results show a need for a new processing element (PE). A new PE architecture, able to handle data processing and message passing concurrently, is proposed and the silicon overhead is estimated in comparison with transputer-like PE's. Based upon the proposed PE, optimum sizes of the MMCPC for different program structures are derived. Two routing algorithms for the MMCPC were proposed and studied. Routing analysis was carried out through simulation. The simulation results show that the dynamic routing algorithm out performs the deterministic routing algorithm.

  16. Parallelizing Navier-Stokes Computations on a Variety of Architectural Platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jayasimha, D. N.; Hayder, M. E.; Pillay, S. K.

    1997-01-01

    We study the computational, communication, and scalability characteristics of a Computational Fluid Dynamics application, which solves the time accurate flow field of a jet using the compressible Navier-Stokes equations, on a variety of parallel architectural platforms. The platforms chosen for this study are a cluster of workstations (the LACE experimental testbed at NASA Lewis), a shared memory multiprocessor (the Cray YMP), distributed memory multiprocessors with different topologies-the IBM SP and the Cray T3D. We investigate the impact of various networks, connecting the cluster of workstations, on the performance of the application and the overheads induced by popular message passing libraries used for parallelization. The work also highlights the importance of matching the memory bandwidth to the processor speed for good single processor performance. By studying the performance of an application on a variety of architectures, we are able to point out the strengths and weaknesses of each of the example computing platforms.

  17. An Evaluation of Architectural Platforms for Parallel Navier-Stokes Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jayasimha, D. N.; Hayder, M. E.; Pillay, S. K.

    1996-01-01

    We study the computational, communication, and scalability characteristics of a computational fluid dynamics application, which solves the time accurate flow field of a jet using the compressible Navier-Stokes equations, on a variety of parallel architecture platforms. The platforms chosen for this study are a cluster of workstations (the LACE experimental testbed at NASA Lewis), a shared memory multiprocessor (the Cray YMP), and distributed memory multiprocessors with different topologies - the IBM SP and the Cray T3D. We investigate the impact of various networks connecting the cluster of workstations on the performance of the application and the overheads induced by popular message passing libraries used for parallelization. The work also highlights the importance of matching the memory bandwidth to the processor speed for good single processor performance. By studying the performance of an application on a variety of architectures, we are able to point out the strengths and weaknesses of each of the example computing platforms.

  18. Parallel Subconvolution Filtering Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Andrew A.

    2003-01-01

    These architectures are based on methods of vector processing and the discrete-Fourier-transform/inverse-discrete- Fourier-transform (DFT-IDFT) overlap-and-save method, combined with time-block separation of digital filters into frequency-domain subfilters implemented by use of sub-convolutions. The parallel-processing method implemented in these architectures enables the use of relatively small DFT-IDFT pairs, while filter tap lengths are theoretically unlimited. The size of a DFT-IDFT pair is determined by the desired reduction in processing rate, rather than on the order of the filter that one seeks to implement. The emphasis in this report is on those aspects of the underlying theory and design rules that promote computational efficiency, parallel processing at reduced data rates, and simplification of the designs of very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuits needed to implement high-order filters and correlators.

  19. A single user efficiency measure for evaluation of parallel or pipeline computer architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. P.

    1978-01-01

    A precise statement of the relationship between sequential computation at one rate, parallel or pipeline computation at a much higher rate, the data movement rate between levels of memory, the fraction of inherently sequential operations or data that must be processed sequentially, the fraction of data to be moved that cannot be overlapped with computation, and the relative computational complexity of the algorithms for the two processes, scalar and vector, was developed. The relationship should be applied to the multirate processes that obtain in the employment of various new or proposed computer architectures for computational aerodynamics. The relationship, an efficiency measure that the single user of the computer system perceives, argues strongly in favor of separating scalar and vector processes, sometimes referred to as loosely coupled processes, to achieve optimum use of hardware.

  20. Benchmarking massively parallel architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Lubeck, O.; Moore, J.; Simmons, M.; Wasserman, H.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to summarize some initial experiences related to measuring the performance of massively parallel processors (MPPs) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Actually, the range of MPP architectures the authors have used is rather limited, being confined mostly to the Thinking Machines Corporation (TMC) Connection Machine CM-2 and CM-5. Some very preliminary work has been carried out on the Kendall Square KSR-1, and efforts related to other machines, such as the Intel Paragon and the soon-to-be-released CRAY T3D are planned. This paper will concentrate more on methodology rather than discuss specific architectural strengths and weaknesses; the latter is expected to be the subject of future reports. MPP benchmarking is a field in critical need of structure and definition. As the authors have stated previously, such machines have enormous potential, and there is certainly a dire need for orders of magnitude computational power over current supercomputers. However, performance reports for MPPs must emphasize actual sustainable performance from real applications in a careful, responsible manner. Such has not always been the case. A recent paper has described in some detail, the problem of potentially misleading performance reporting in the parallel scientific computing field. Thus, in this paper, the authors briefly offer a few general ideas on MPP performance analysis.

  1. Parallel computing works

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-23

    An account of the Caltech Concurrent Computation Program (C{sup 3}P), a five year project that focused on answering the question: Can parallel computers be used to do large-scale scientific computations '' As the title indicates, the question is answered in the affirmative, by implementing numerous scientific applications on real parallel computers and doing computations that produced new scientific results. In the process of doing so, C{sup 3}P helped design and build several new computers, designed and implemented basic system software, developed algorithms for frequently used mathematical computations on massively parallel machines, devised performance models and measured the performance of many computers, and created a high performance computing facility based exclusively on parallel computers. While the initial focus of C{sup 3}P was the hypercube architecture developed by C. Seitz, many of the methods developed and lessons learned have been applied successfully on other massively parallel architectures.

  2. Highly parallel computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, Peter J.; Tichy, Walter F.

    1990-01-01

    Among the highly parallel computing architectures required for advanced scientific computation, those designated 'MIMD' and 'SIMD' have yielded the best results to date. The present development status evaluation of such architectures shown neither to have attained a decisive advantage in most near-homogeneous problems' treatment; in the cases of problems involving numerous dissimilar parts, however, such currently speculative architectures as 'neural networks' or 'data flow' machines may be entailed. Data flow computers are the most practical form of MIMD fine-grained parallel computers yet conceived; they automatically solve the problem of assigning virtual processors to the real processors in the machine.

  3. Architecture Adaptive Computing Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorband, John E.

    2006-01-01

    Architecture Adaptive Computing Environment (aCe) is a software system that includes a language, compiler, and run-time library for parallel computing. aCe was developed to enable programmers to write programs, more easily than was previously possible, for a variety of parallel computing architectures. Heretofore, it has been perceived to be difficult to write parallel programs for parallel computers and more difficult to port the programs to different parallel computing architectures. In contrast, aCe is supportable on all high-performance computing architectures. Currently, it is supported on LINUX clusters. aCe uses parallel programming constructs that facilitate writing of parallel programs. Such constructs were used in single-instruction/multiple-data (SIMD) programming languages of the 1980s, including Parallel Pascal, Parallel Forth, C*, *LISP, and MasPar MPL. In aCe, these constructs are extended and implemented for both SIMD and multiple- instruction/multiple-data (MIMD) architectures. Two new constructs incorporated in aCe are those of (1) scalar and virtual variables and (2) pre-computed paths. The scalar-and-virtual-variables construct increases flexibility in optimizing memory utilization in various architectures. The pre-computed-paths construct enables the compiler to pre-compute part of a communication operation once, rather than computing it every time the communication operation is performed.

  4. HTMT-class Latency Tolerant Parallel Architecture for Petaflops Scale Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Thomas; Bergman, Larry

    2000-01-01

    Computational Aero Sciences and other numeric intensive computation disciplines demand computing throughputs substantially greater than the Teraflops scale systems only now becoming available. The related fields of fluids, structures, thermal, combustion, and dynamic controls are among the interdisciplinary areas that in combination with sufficient resolution and advanced adaptive techniques may force performance requirements towards Petaflops. This will be especially true for compute intensive models such as Navier-Stokes are or when such system models are only part of a larger design optimization computation involving many design points. Yet recent experience with conventional MPP configurations comprising commodity processing and memory components has shown that larger scale frequently results in higher programming difficulty and lower system efficiency. While important advances in system software and algorithms techniques have had some impact on efficiency and programmability for certain classes of problems, in general it is unlikely that software alone will resolve the challenges to higher scalability. As in the past, future generations of high-end computers may require a combination of hardware architecture and system software advances to enable efficient operation at a Petaflops level. The NASA led HTMT project has engaged the talents of a broad interdisciplinary team to develop a new strategy in high-end system architecture to deliver petaflops scale computing in the 2004/5 timeframe. The Hybrid-Technology, MultiThreaded parallel computer architecture incorporates several advanced technologies in combination with an innovative dynamic adaptive scheduling mechanism to provide unprecedented performance and efficiency within practical constraints of cost, complexity, and power consumption. The emerging superconductor Rapid Single Flux Quantum electronics can operate at 100 GHz (the record is 770 GHz) and one percent of the power required by convention

  5. HTMT-class Latency Tolerant Parallel Architecture for Petaflops Scale Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Thomas; Bergman, Larry

    2000-01-01

    Computational Aero Sciences and other numeric intensive computation disciplines demand computing throughputs substantially greater than the Teraflops scale systems only now becoming available. The related fields of fluids, structures, thermal, combustion, and dynamic controls are among the interdisciplinary areas that in combination with sufficient resolution and advanced adaptive techniques may force performance requirements towards Petaflops. This will be especially true for compute intensive models such as Navier-Stokes are or when such system models are only part of a larger design optimization computation involving many design points. Yet recent experience with conventional MPP configurations comprising commodity processing and memory components has shown that larger scale frequently results in higher programming difficulty and lower system efficiency. While important advances in system software and algorithms techniques have had some impact on efficiency and programmability for certain classes of problems, in general it is unlikely that software alone will resolve the challenges to higher scalability. As in the past, future generations of high-end computers may require a combination of hardware architecture and system software advances to enable efficient operation at a Petaflops level. The NASA led HTMT project has engaged the talents of a broad interdisciplinary team to develop a new strategy in high-end system architecture to deliver petaflops scale computing in the 2004/5 timeframe. The Hybrid-Technology, MultiThreaded parallel computer architecture incorporates several advanced technologies in combination with an innovative dynamic adaptive scheduling mechanism to provide unprecedented performance and efficiency within practical constraints of cost, complexity, and power consumption. The emerging superconductor Rapid Single Flux Quantum electronics can operate at 100 GHz (the record is 770 GHz) and one percent of the power required by convention

  6. A VLSI Architecture for Output Probability Computations of HMM-Based Recognition Systems with Store-Based Block Parallel Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Masatoshi; Takagi, Kazuyoshi; Takagi, Naofumi

    In this paper, a fast and memory-efficient VLSI architecture for output probability computations of continuous Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) is presented. These computations are the most time-consuming part of HMM-based recognition systems. High-speed VLSI architectures with small registers and low-power dissipation are required for the development of mobile embedded systems with capable human interfaces. We demonstrate store-based block parallel processing (StoreBPP) for output probability computations and present a VLSI architecture that supports it. When the number of HMM states is adequate for accurate recognition, compared with conventional stream-based block parallel processing (StreamBPP) architectures, the proposed architecture requires fewer registers and processing elements and less processing time. The processing elements used in the StreamBPP architecture are identical to those used in the StoreBPP architecture. From a VLSI architectural viewpoint, a comparison shows the efficiency of the proposed architecture through efficient use of registers for storing input feature vectors and intermediate results during computation.

  7. Algorithmically Specialized Parallel Architecture For Robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, Amir; Bejczy, Antal K.

    1991-01-01

    Computing system called Robot Mathematics Processor (RMP) contains large number of processor elements (PE's) connected in various parallel and serial combinations reconfigurable via software. Special-purpose architecture designed for solving diverse computational problems in robot control, simulation, trajectory generation, workspace analysis, and like. System an MIMD-SIMD parallel architecture capable of exploiting parallelism in different forms and at several computational levels. Major advantage lies in design of cells, which provides flexibility and reconfigurability superior to previous SIMD processors.

  8. Highly parallel computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, Peter J.; Tichy, Walter F.

    1990-01-01

    Highly parallel computing architectures are the only means to achieve the computation rates demanded by advanced scientific problems. A decade of research has demonstrated the feasibility of such machines and current research focuses on which architectures designated as multiple instruction multiple datastream (MIMD) and single instruction multiple datastream (SIMD) have produced the best results to date; neither shows a decisive advantage for most near-homogeneous scientific problems. For scientific problems with many dissimilar parts, more speculative architectures such as neural networks or data flow may be needed.

  9. A Parallel Implementation of a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Method on Graphics Hardware Using the Compute Unified Device Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Wong Unhong; Wong Honcheng; Tang Zesheng

    2010-05-21

    The smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), which is a class of meshfree particle methods (MPMs), has a wide range of applications from micro-scale to macro-scale as well as from discrete systems to continuum systems. Graphics hardware, originally designed for computer graphics, now provide unprecedented computational power for scientific computation. Particle system needs a huge amount of computations in physical simulation. In this paper, an efficient parallel implementation of a SPH method on graphics hardware using the Compute Unified Device Architecture is developed for fluid simulation. Comparing to the corresponding CPU implementation, our experimental results show that the new approach allows significant speedups of fluid simulation through handling huge amount of computations in parallel on graphics hardware.

  10. A VLSI Architecture with Multiple Fast Store-Based Block Parallel Processing for Output Probability and Likelihood Score Computations in HMM-Based Isolated Word Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Shimazaki, Ryo; Yamamoto, Masatoshi; Takagi, Kazuyoshi; Takagi, Naofumi

    This paper presents a memory-efficient VLSI architecture for output probability computations (OPCs) of continuous hidden Markov models (HMMs) and likelihood score computations (LSCs). These computations are the most time consuming part of HMM-based isolated word recognition systems. We demonstrate multiple fast store-based block parallel processing (MultipleFastStoreBPP) for OPCs and LSCs and present a VLSI architecture that supports it. Compared with conventional fast store-based block parallel processing (FastStoreBPP) and stream-based block parallel processing (StreamBPP) architectures, the proposed architecture requires fewer registers and less processing time. The processing elements (PEs) used in the FastStoreBPP and StreamBPP architectures are identical to those used in the MultipleFastStoreBPP architecture. From a VLSI architectural viewpoint, a comparison shows that the proposed architecture is an improvement over the others, through efficient use of PEs and registers for storing input feature vectors.

  11. Time-dependent density-functional theory in massively parallel computer architectures: the OCTOPUS project.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Xavier; Alberdi-Rodriguez, Joseba; Strubbe, David A; Oliveira, Micael J T; Nogueira, Fernando; Castro, Alberto; Muguerza, Javier; Arruabarrena, Agustin; Louie, Steven G; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Rubio, Angel; Marques, Miguel A L

    2012-06-13

    Octopus is a general-purpose density-functional theory (DFT) code, with a particular emphasis on the time-dependent version of DFT (TDDFT). In this paper we present the ongoing efforts to achieve the parallelization of octopus. We focus on the real-time variant of TDDFT, where the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equations are directly propagated in time. This approach has great potential for execution in massively parallel systems such as modern supercomputers with thousands of processors and graphics processing units (GPUs). For harvesting the potential of conventional supercomputers, the main strategy is a multi-level parallelization scheme that combines the inherent scalability of real-time TDDFT with a real-space grid domain-partitioning approach. A scalable Poisson solver is critical for the efficiency of this scheme. For GPUs, we show how using blocks of Kohn-Sham states provides the required level of data parallelism and that this strategy is also applicable for code optimization on standard processors. Our results show that real-time TDDFT, as implemented in octopus, can be the method of choice for studying the excited states of large molecular systems in modern parallel architectures.

  12. Time-dependent density-functional theory in massively parallel computer architectures: the octopus project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Xavier; Alberdi-Rodriguez, Joseba; Strubbe, David A.; Oliveira, Micael J. T.; Nogueira, Fernando; Castro, Alberto; Muguerza, Javier; Arruabarrena, Agustin; Louie, Steven G.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Rubio, Angel; Marques, Miguel A. L.

    2012-06-01

    Octopus is a general-purpose density-functional theory (DFT) code, with a particular emphasis on the time-dependent version of DFT (TDDFT). In this paper we present the ongoing efforts to achieve the parallelization of octopus. We focus on the real-time variant of TDDFT, where the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equations are directly propagated in time. This approach has great potential for execution in massively parallel systems such as modern supercomputers with thousands of processors and graphics processing units (GPUs). For harvesting the potential of conventional supercomputers, the main strategy is a multi-level parallelization scheme that combines the inherent scalability of real-time TDDFT with a real-space grid domain-partitioning approach. A scalable Poisson solver is critical for the efficiency of this scheme. For GPUs, we show how using blocks of Kohn-Sham states provides the required level of data parallelism and that this strategy is also applicable for code optimization on standard processors. Our results show that real-time TDDFT, as implemented in octopus, can be the method of choice for studying the excited states of large molecular systems in modern parallel architectures.

  13. Delta: An object-oriented finite element code architecture for massively parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Weatherby, J.R.; Schutt, J.A.; Peery, J.S.; Hogan, R.E.

    1996-02-01

    Delta is an object-oriented code architecture based on the finite element method which enables simulation of a wide range of engineering mechanics problems in a parallel processing environment. Written in C{sup ++}, Delta is a natural framework for algorithm development and for research involving coupling of mechanics from different Engineering Science disciplines. To enhance flexibility and encourage code reuse, the architecture provides a clean separation of the major aspects of finite element programming. Spatial discretization, temporal discretization, and the solution of linear and nonlinear systems of equations are each implemented separately, independent from the governing field equations. Other attractive features of the Delta architecture include support for constitutive models with internal variables, reusable ``matrix-free`` equation solvers, and support for region-to-region variations in the governing equations and the active degrees of freedom. A demonstration code built from the Delta architecture has been used in two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulations involving dynamic and quasi-static solid mechanics, transient and steady heat transport, and flow in porous media.

  14. Bipartite memory network architectures for parallel processing

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.; Kale, L.V. . Dept. of Computer Science)

    1990-01-01

    Parallel architectures are boradly classified as either shared memory or distributed memory architectures. In this paper, the authors propose a third family of architectures, called bipartite memory network architectures. In this architecture, processors and memory modules constitute a bipartite graph, where each processor is allowed to access a small subset of the memory modules, and each memory module allows access from a small set of processors. The architecture is particularly suitable for computations requiring dynamic load balancing. The authors explore the properties of this architecture by examining the Perfect Difference set based topology for the graph. Extensions of this topology are also suggested.

  15. Architectures for reasoning in parallel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Lawrence O.

    1989-01-01

    The research conducted has dealt with rule-based expert systems. The algorithms that may lead to effective parallelization of them were investigated. Both the forward and backward chained control paradigms were investigated in the course of this work. The best computer architecture for the developed and investigated algorithms has been researched. Two experimental vehicles were developed to facilitate this research. They are Backpac, a parallel backward chained rule-based reasoning system and Datapac, a parallel forward chained rule-based reasoning system. Both systems have been written in Multilisp, a version of Lisp which contains the parallel construct, future. Applying the future function to a function causes the function to become a task parallel to the spawning task. Additionally, Backpac and Datapac have been run on several disparate parallel processors. The machines are an Encore Multimax with 10 processors, the Concert Multiprocessor with 64 processors, and a 32 processor BBN GP1000. Both the Concert and the GP1000 are switch-based machines. The Multimax has all its processors hung off a common bus. All are shared memory machines, but have different schemes for sharing the memory and different locales for the shared memory. The main results of the investigations come from experiments on the 10 processor Encore and the Concert with partitions of 32 or less processors. Additionally, experiments have been run with a stripped down version of EMYCIN.

  16. Playable Serious Games for Studying and Programming Computational STEM and Informatics Applications of Distributed and Parallel Computer Architectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amenyo, John-Thones

    2012-01-01

    Carefully engineered playable games can serve as vehicles for students and practitioners to learn and explore the programming of advanced computer architectures to execute applications, such as high performance computing (HPC) and complex, inter-networked, distributed systems. The article presents families of playable games that are grounded in…

  17. Playable Serious Games for Studying and Programming Computational STEM and Informatics Applications of Distributed and Parallel Computer Architectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amenyo, John-Thones

    2012-01-01

    Carefully engineered playable games can serve as vehicles for students and practitioners to learn and explore the programming of advanced computer architectures to execute applications, such as high performance computing (HPC) and complex, inter-networked, distributed systems. The article presents families of playable games that are grounded in…

  18. Parallel Architectures and Algorithms for Image Understanding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-17

    A 11. TITLE (Include Security Classification) -. Parallel Architectures.’and Algorithms for Image Understanding Final Thchnical Report 12. PERSONAL...AUTHOR(S) R. Nevatia and V.K. Prasanna-Kumar 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 113b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF REPORT (Year, Month, Day) 15. PAGE COUNT Final Technical...identified. A generic parallel model.. of computation employing electro optical d vices is developed. Parallel techniques for image computations are

  19. Dynamic adaptive parallel architecture integrates advanced technologies for petaflops-scale computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, Thomas L.

    2000-11-01

    Teraflops-scale computing systems are becoming available to an increasingly broad range of users as the performance of the constituent processing elements increases and their relative cost (e.g. per Mflops) decreases. To the original DOE ASCI Red machine has been added the ASCI Blue systems and additional 1 Teraflops commercial systems at key national centers. Clusters of low cost PCs employing COTS network technologies (e.g. Beowulf-class systems) will make peak Teraflops performance available for less than 2M in the near future for certain classes of well behaved problems. Future larger systems include the Japanese Earth Simulator with a peak performance of 40 Teraflops and three larger ASCI systems anticipated to provide peak performance of 10, 30, and 100 Teraflops culminating in 2005. These systems use existing or near term conventional technologies and architectures with some specialized integration logic and networking. While the peak performance goals can be satisfied through this strategy over the next decade, two major challenges confront the high performance computing community: (1) how to aggressively accelerate performance to the operational regime beyond a Petaflops, and (2) how to achieve high efficiency for a wide range of applications. The Hybrid Technology Multithreaded (HTMT) computer is under development by an interdisciplinary team of investigators to address both problems through an innovative combination of advanced technologies and dynamic adaptive architecture. This paper describes the strategy embodied by the HTMT architecture and discusses the key factors that may enable it to achieve two to three orders of magnitude performance with respect to today's largest systems at a cost and power consumption of only a factor of two to three times those same present day systems.

  20. Parallel Navier-Stokes computations on shared and distributed memory architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayder, M. Ehtesham; Jayasimha, D. N.; Pillay, Sasi Kumar

    1995-01-01

    We study a high order finite difference scheme to solve the time accurate flow field of a jet using the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. As part of our ongoing efforts, we have implemented our numerical model on three parallel computing platforms to study the computational, communication, and scalability characteristics. The platforms chosen for this study are a cluster of workstations connected through fast networks (the LACE experimental testbed at NASA Lewis), a shared memory multiprocessor (the Cray YMP), and a distributed memory multiprocessor (the IBM SPI). Our focus in this study is on the LACE testbed. We present some results for the Cray YMP and the IBM SP1 mainly for comparison purposes. On the LACE testbed, we study: (1) the communication characteristics of Ethernet, FDDI, and the ALLNODE networks and (2) the overheads induced by the PVM message passing library used for parallelizing the application. We demonstrate that clustering of workstations is effective and has the potential to be computationally competitive with supercomputers at a fraction of the cost.

  1. Implementation of a blade element UH-60 helicopter simulation on a parallel computer architecture in real-time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moxon, Bruce C.; Green, John A.

    1990-01-01

    A high-performance platform for development of real-time helicopter flight simulations based on a simulation development and analysis platform combining a parallel simulation development and analysis environment with a scalable multiprocessor computer system is described. Simulation functional decomposition is covered, including the sequencing and data dependency of simulation modules and simulation functional mapping to multiple processors. The multiprocessor-based implementation of a blade-element simulation of the UH-60 helicopter is presented, and a prototype developed for a TC2000 computer is generalized in order to arrive at a portable multiprocessor software architecture. It is pointed out that the proposed approach coupled with a pilot's station creates a setting in which simulation engineers, computer scientists, and pilots can work together in the design and evaluation of advanced real-time helicopter simulations.

  2. Compute unified device architecture (CUDA)-based parallelization of WRF Kessler cloud microphysics scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielikainen, Jarno; Huang, Bormin; Wang, Jun; Allen Huang, H.-L.; Goldberg, Mitchell D.

    2013-03-01

    In recent years, graphics processing units (GPUs) have emerged as a low-cost, low-power and a very high performance alternative to conventional central processing units (CPUs). The latest GPUs offer a speedup of two-to-three orders of magnitude over CPU for various science and engineering applications. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is the latest-generation numerical weather prediction model. It has been designed to serve both operational forecasting and atmospheric research needs. It proves useful for a broad spectrum of applications for domain scales ranging from meters to hundreds of kilometers. WRF computes an approximate solution to the differential equations which govern the air motion of the whole atmosphere. Kessler microphysics module in WRF is a simple warm cloud scheme that includes water vapor, cloud water and rain. Microphysics processes which are modeled are rain production, fall and evaporation. The accretion and auto-conversion of cloud water processes are also included along with the production of cloud water from condensation. In this paper, we develop an efficient WRF Kessler microphysics scheme which runs on Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) using the NVIDIA Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA). The GPU-based implementation of Kessler microphysics scheme achieves a significant speedup of 70× over its CPU based single-threaded counterpart. When a 4 GPU system is used, we achieve an overall speedup of 132× as compared to the single thread CPU version.

  3. Parallel Computing in SCALE

    SciTech Connect

    DeHart, Mark D; Williams, Mark L; Bowman, Stephen M

    2010-01-01

    The SCALE computational architecture has remained basically the same since its inception 30 years ago, although constituent modules and capabilities have changed significantly. This SCALE concept was intended to provide a framework whereby independent codes can be linked to provide a more comprehensive capability than possible with the individual programs - allowing flexibility to address a wide variety of applications. However, the current system was designed originally for mainframe computers with a single CPU and with significantly less memory than today's personal computers. It has been recognized that the present SCALE computation system could be restructured to take advantage of modern hardware and software capabilities, while retaining many of the modular features of the present system. Preliminary work is being done to define specifications and capabilities for a more advanced computational architecture. This paper describes the state of current SCALE development activities and plans for future development. With the release of SCALE 6.1 in 2010, a new phase of evolutionary development will be available to SCALE users within the TRITON and NEWT modules. The SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation) code system developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides a comprehensive and integrated package of codes and nuclear data for a wide range of applications in criticality safety, reactor physics, shielding, isotopic depletion and decay, and sensitivity/uncertainty (S/U) analysis. Over the last three years, since the release of version 5.1 in 2006, several important new codes have been introduced within SCALE, and significant advances applied to existing codes. Many of these new features became available with the release of SCALE 6.0 in early 2009. However, beginning with SCALE 6.1, a first generation of parallel computing is being introduced. In addition to near-term improvements, a plan for longer term SCALE enhancement

  4. DFT-Based Electronic Structure Calculations on Hybrid and Massively Parallel Computer Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Emil; Hodak, Miroslav; Lu, Wenchang; Bernholc, Jerry

    2014-03-01

    The latest generation of supercomputers is capable of multi-petaflop peak performance, achieved by using thousands of multi-core CPU's and often coupled with thousands of GPU's. However, efficient utilization of this computing power for electronic structure calculations presents significant challenges. We describe adaptations of the Real-Space Multigrid (RMG) code that enable it to scale well to thousands of nodes. A hybrid technique that uses one MPI process per node, rather than on per core was adopted with OpenMP and POSIX threads used for intra-node parallelization. This reduces the number of MPI process's by an order of magnitude or more and improves individual node memory utilization. GPU accelerators are also becoming common and are capable of extremely high performance for vector workloads. However, they typically have much lower scalar performance than CPU's, so achieving good performance requires that the workload is carefully partitioned and data transfer between CPU and GPU is optimized. We have used a hybrid approach utilizing MPI/OpenMP/POSIX threads and GPU accelerators to reach excellent scaling to over 100,000 cores on a Cray XE6 platform as well as a factor of three performance improvement when using a Cray XK7 system with CPU-GPU nodes.

  5. Parallel Algorithms for Monte Carlo Particle Transport Simulation on Exascale Computing Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Paul Kollath

    Monte Carlo particle transport methods are being considered as a viable option for high-fidelity simulation of nuclear reactors. While Monte Carlo methods offer several potential advantages over deterministic methods, there are a number of algorithmic shortcomings that would prevent their immediate adoption for full-core analyses. In this thesis, algorithms are proposed both to ameliorate the degradation in parallel efficiency typically observed for large numbers of processors and to offer a means of decomposing large tally data that will be needed for reactor analysis. A nearest-neighbor fission bank algorithm was proposed and subsequently implemented in the OpenMC Monte Carlo code. A theoretical analysis of the communication pattern shows that the expected cost is O( N ) whereas traditional fission bank algorithms are O(N) at best. The algorithm was tested on two supercomputers, the Intrepid Blue Gene/P and the Titan Cray XK7, and demonstrated nearly linear parallel scaling up to 163,840 processor cores on a full-core benchmark problem. An algorithm for reducing network communication arising from tally reduction was analyzed and implemented in OpenMC. The proposed algorithm groups only particle histories on a single processor into batches for tally purposes---in doing so it prevents all network communication for tallies until the very end of the simulation. The algorithm was tested, again on a full-core benchmark, and shown to reduce network communication substantially. A model was developed to predict the impact of load imbalances on the performance of domain decomposed simulations. The analysis demonstrated that load imbalances in domain decomposed simulations arise from two distinct phenomena: non-uniform particle densities and non-uniform spatial leakage. The dominant performance penalty for domain decomposition was shown to come from these physical effects rather than insufficient network bandwidth or high latency. The model predictions were verified with

  6. Parallel Logic Programming Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-01

    cooperation in distributed problem solving. IEEE Transactions on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics, SMC-l(1), 61-70. 33. Tanenbaum, A. S. (1988). Structured ... Computer Organization, Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall. 34. Tanenbaum, A. S. (1988). Computer Networks. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall. 35

  7. Exploring Hardware-Based Primitives to Enhance Parallel Security Monitoring in a Novel Computing Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    2003. 23. IBM. How to Secure an Insecure OS. Technical report, IBM Corp., 2002. 24. Intel. LaGrande Technlogy Architectural Overview. Technology...and Ezzat A. Dabbish. “Digital Rights Management in a 3G Mobile Phone and Beyond”. DRM’03. October 2003. 40. Molina, Jesus and William Arbaugh

  8. High Performance Parallel Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Ghazawi, Tarek; Kaewpijit, Sinthop

    1998-01-01

    Traditional remote sensing instruments are multispectral, where observations are collected at a few different spectral bands. Recently, many hyperspectral instruments, that can collect observations at hundreds of bands, have been operational. Furthermore, there have been ongoing research efforts on ultraspectral instruments that can produce observations at thousands of spectral bands. While these remote sensing technology developments hold great promise for new findings in the area of Earth and space science, they present many challenges. These include the need for faster processing of such increased data volumes, and methods for data reduction. Dimension Reduction is a spectral transformation, aimed at concentrating the vital information and discarding redundant data. One such transformation, which is widely used in remote sensing, is the Principal Components Analysis (PCA). This report summarizes our progress on the development of a parallel PCA and its implementation on two Beowulf cluster configuration; one with fast Ethernet switch and the other with a Myrinet interconnection. Details of the implementation and performance results, for typical sets of multispectral and hyperspectral NASA remote sensing data, are presented and analyzed based on the algorithm requirements and the underlying machine configuration. It will be shown that the PCA application is quite challenging and hard to scale on Ethernet-based clusters. However, the measurements also show that a high- performance interconnection network, such as Myrinet, better matches the high communication demand of PCA and can lead to a more efficient PCA execution.

  9. High Performance Parallel Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Ghazawi, Tarek; Kaewpijit, Sinthop

    1998-01-01

    Traditional remote sensing instruments are multispectral, where observations are collected at a few different spectral bands. Recently, many hyperspectral instruments, that can collect observations at hundreds of bands, have been operational. Furthermore, there have been ongoing research efforts on ultraspectral instruments that can produce observations at thousands of spectral bands. While these remote sensing technology developments hold great promise for new findings in the area of Earth and space science, they present many challenges. These include the need for faster processing of such increased data volumes, and methods for data reduction. Dimension Reduction is a spectral transformation, aimed at concentrating the vital information and discarding redundant data. One such transformation, which is widely used in remote sensing, is the Principal Components Analysis (PCA). This report summarizes our progress on the development of a parallel PCA and its implementation on two Beowulf cluster configuration; one with fast Ethernet switch and the other with a Myrinet interconnection. Details of the implementation and performance results, for typical sets of multispectral and hyperspectral NASA remote sensing data, are presented and analyzed based on the algorithm requirements and the underlying machine configuration. It will be shown that the PCA application is quite challenging and hard to scale on Ethernet-based clusters. However, the measurements also show that a high- performance interconnection network, such as Myrinet, better matches the high communication demand of PCA and can lead to a more efficient PCA execution.

  10. Massively parallel processor computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, L. W. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus for processing multidimensional data with strong spatial characteristics, such as raw image data, characterized by a large number of parallel data streams in an ordered array is described. It comprises a large number (e.g., 16,384 in a 128 x 128 array) of parallel processing elements operating simultaneously and independently on single bit slices of a corresponding array of incoming data streams under control of a single set of instructions. Each of the processing elements comprises a bidirectional data bus in communication with a register for storing single bit slices together with a random access memory unit and associated circuitry, including a binary counter/shift register device, for performing logical and arithmetical computations on the bit slices, and an I/O unit for interfacing the bidirectional data bus with the data stream source. The massively parallel processor architecture enables very high speed processing of large amounts of ordered parallel data, including spatial translation by shifting or sliding of bits vertically or horizontally to neighboring processing elements.

  11. A parallel-pipeline architecture of the fast polynomial transform for computing a two-dimensional cyclic convolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, T. K.; Liu, K. Y.; Reed, I. S.

    1983-01-01

    It is pointed out that the two-dimensional cyclic convolution is a useful tool for many two-dimensional digital signal processing applications. Two important applications are related to spaceborne high-resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR) processing and image processing. Nussbaumer and Quandalle (1978) showed that a radix-2 polynomial transform analogous to the conventional radix-2 FFT algorithm can be used to compute a two-dimensional cyclic convolution. On the basis of results reported by Arambepola and Rayner (1979), a radix-2 polynomial transform can be defined to compute a multidimensional cyclic convolution. Truong et al. (1981) used the considered ideas together with the Chinese Theorem to further reduce the complexity of the radix-2 fast polynomial transform (FPT). Reed et al. (1981) demonstrated that such a new FPT algorithm is significantly faster than the FFT algorithm for computing a two-dimensional convolution. In the present investigation, a parallel-pipeline architecture is considered for implementing the FPT developed by Truong et al.

  12. Pi: A Parallel Architecture Interface for Multi-Model Execution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    Directory Schemes for Cache Coherence. In The 15th Annual Interna- tional Symposium on Computer Architecture. IEEE Computer Society and ACM, June 1988. [3...Annual International Symposium on Computer Architecture. IEEE Computer Society and ACM, June 1986. [5] Arvind and Rishiyur S. Nikhil. A Dataflow...Overview, 1987. [9] Roberto Bisiani and Alessandro Forin. Multilanguage Parallel Programming of Heterogeneous Machines. IEEE Transactions on Computers

  13. Survey of new vector computers: The CRAY 1S from CRAY research; the CYBER 205 from CDC and the parallel computer from ICL - architecture and programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentzsch, W.

    1982-01-01

    Problems which can arise with vector and parallel computers are discussed in a user oriented context. Emphasis is placed on the algorithms used and the programming techniques adopted. Three recently developed supercomputers are examined and typical application examples are given in CRAY FORTRAN, CYBER 205 FORTRAN and DAP (distributed array processor) FORTRAN. The systems performance is compared. The addition of parts of two N x N arrays is considered. The influence of the architecture on the algorithms and programming language is demonstrated. Numerical analysis of magnetohydrodynamic differential equations by an explicit difference method is illustrated, showing very good results for all three systems. The prognosis for supercomputer development is assessed.

  14. Neptune: An astrophysical smooth particle hydrodynamics code for massively parallel computer architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandalski, Stou

    Smooth particle hydrodynamics is an efficient method for modeling the dynamics of fluids. It is commonly used to simulate astrophysical processes such as binary mergers. We present a newly developed GPU accelerated smooth particle hydrodynamics code for astrophysical simulations. The code is named neptune after the Roman god of water. It is written in OpenMP parallelized C++ and OpenCL and includes octree based hydrodynamic and gravitational acceleration. The design relies on object-oriented methodologies in order to provide a flexible and modular framework that can be easily extended and modified by the user. Several pre-built scenarios for simulating collisions of polytropes and black-hole accretion are provided. The code is released under the MIT Open Source license and publicly available at http://code.google.com/p/neptune-sph/.

  15. Highly Parallel Computing Architectures by using Arrays of Quantum-dot Cellular Automata (QCA): Opportunities, Challenges, and Recent Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, Amir; Toomarian, Benny N.

    2000-01-01

    -based architectures for highly parallel and systolic computation of signal/image processing applications, such as FFT and Wavelet and Wlash-Hadamard Transforms.

  16. Highly Parallel Computing Architectures by using Arrays of Quantum-dot Cellular Automata (QCA): Opportunities, Challenges, and Recent Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, Amir; Toomarian, Benny N.

    2000-01-01

    -based architectures for highly parallel and systolic computation of signal/image processing applications, such as FFT and Wavelet and Wlash-Hadamard Transforms.

  17. An overview of the activities of the OECD/NEA Task Force on adapting computer codes in nuclear applications to parallel architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, B.L.; Sartori, E.

    1997-06-01

    Subsequent to the introduction of High Performance Computing in the developed countries, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) created the Task Force on Adapting Computer Codes in Nuclear Applications to Parallel Architectures (under the guidance of the Nuclear Science Committee`s Working Party on Advanced Computing) to study the growth area in supercomputing and its applicability to the nuclear community`s computer codes. The result has been four years of investigation for the Task Force in different subject fields - deterministic and Monte Carlo radiation transport, computational mechanics and fluid dynamics, nuclear safety, atmospheric models and waste management.

  18. The science of computing - Parallel computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    Although parallel computation architectures have been known for computers since the 1920s, it was only in the 1970s that microelectronic components technologies advanced to the point where it became feasible to incorporate multiple processors in one machine. Concommitantly, the development of algorithms for parallel processing also lagged due to hardware limitations. The speed of computing with solid-state chips is limited by gate switching delays. The physical limit implies that a 1 Gflop operational speed is the maximum for sequential processors. A computer recently introduced features a 'hypercube' architecture with 128 processors connected in networks at 5, 6 or 7 points per grid, depending on the design choice. Its computing speed rivals that of supercomputers, but at a fraction of the cost. The added speed with less hardware is due to parallel processing, which utilizes algorithms representing different parts of an equation that can be broken into simpler statements and processed simultaneously. Present, highly developed computer languages like FORTRAN, PASCAL, COBOL, etc., rely on sequential instructions. Thus, increased emphasis will now be directed at parallel processing algorithms to exploit the new architectures.

  19. Research in parallel computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortega, James M.; Henderson, Charles

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes work on parallel computations for NASA Grant NAG-1-1529 for the period 1 Jan. - 30 June 1994. Short summaries on highly parallel preconditioners, target-specific parallel reductions, and simulation of delta-cache protocols are provided.

  20. Parallel and Distributed Computing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-12

    program was devoted to parallel and distributed computing . Support for this part of the program was obtained from the present Army contract and a...Umesh Vazirani. A workshop on parallel and distributed computing was held from May 19 to May 23, 1986 and drew 141 participants. Keywords: Mathematical programming; Protocols; Randomized algorithms. (Author)

  1. Implementation of a cell-wise Block-Gauss-Seidel iterative method for SN transport on a hybrid parallel computer architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Rosa, Massimiliano; Warsa, James S; Perks, Michael

    2010-12-14

    We have implemented a cell-wise, block-Gauss-Seidel (bGS) iterative algorithm, for the solution of the S{sub n} transport equations on the Roadrunner hybrid, parallel computer architecture. A compute node of this massively parallel machine comprises AMD Opteron cores that are linked to a Cell Broadband Engine{trademark} (Cell/B.E.). LAPACK routines have been ported to the Cell/B.E. in order to make use of its parallel Synergistic Processing Elements (SPEs). The bGS algorithm is based on the LU factorization and solution of a linear system that couples the fluxes for all S{sub n} angles and energy groups on a mesh cell. For every cell of a mesh that has been parallel decomposed on the higher-level Opteron processors, a linear system is transferred to the Cell/B.E. and the parallel LAPACK routines are used to compute a solution, which is then transferred back to the Opteron, where the rest of the computations for the S{sub n} transport problem take place. Compared to standard parallel machines, a hundred-fold speedup of the bGS was observed on the hybrid Roadrunner architecture. Numerical experiments with strong and weak parallel scaling demonstrate the bGS method is viable and compares favorably to full parallel sweeps (FPS) on two-dimensional, unstructured meshes when it is applied to optically thick, multi-material problems. As expected, however, it is not as efficient as FPS in optically thin problems.

  2. A task-based parallelism and vectorized approach to 3D Method of Characteristics (MOC) reactor simulation for high performance computing architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tramm, John R.; Gunow, Geoffrey; He, Tim; Smith, Kord S.; Forget, Benoit; Siegel, Andrew R.

    2016-05-01

    In this study we present and analyze a formulation of the 3D Method of Characteristics (MOC) technique applied to the simulation of full core nuclear reactors. Key features of the algorithm include a task-based parallelism model that allows independent MOC tracks to be assigned to threads dynamically, ensuring load balancing, and a wide vectorizable inner loop that takes advantage of modern SIMD computer architectures. The algorithm is implemented in a set of highly optimized proxy applications in order to investigate its performance characteristics on CPU, GPU, and Intel Xeon Phi architectures. Speed, power, and hardware cost efficiencies are compared. Additionally, performance bottlenecks are identified for each architecture in order to determine the prospects for continued scalability of the algorithm on next generation HPC architectures.

  3. Parallel Architectures and Parallel Algorithms for Integrated Vision Systems. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhary, Alok Nidhi

    1989-01-01

    Computer vision is regarded as one of the most complex and computationally intensive problems. An integrated vision system (IVS) is a system that uses vision algorithms from all levels of processing to perform for a high level application (e.g., object recognition). An IVS normally involves algorithms from low level, intermediate level, and high level vision. Designing parallel architectures for vision systems is of tremendous interest to researchers. Several issues are addressed in parallel architectures and parallel algorithms for integrated vision systems.

  4. Parallel Architectures for Planetary Exploration Requirements (PAPER)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cezzar, Ruknet; Sen, Ranjan K.

    1989-01-01

    The Parallel Architectures for Planetary Exploration Requirements (PAPER) project is essentially research oriented towards technology insertion issues for NASA's unmanned planetary probes. It was initiated to complement and augment the long-term efforts for space exploration with particular reference to NASA/LaRC's (NASA Langley Research Center) research needs for planetary exploration missions of the mid and late 1990s. The requirements for space missions as given in the somewhat dated Advanced Information Processing Systems (AIPS) requirements document are contrasted with the new requirements from JPL/Caltech involving sensor data capture and scene analysis. It is shown that more stringent requirements have arisen as a result of technological advancements. Two possible architectures, the AIPS Proof of Concept (POC) configuration and the MAX Fault-tolerant dataflow multiprocessor, were evaluated. The main observation was that the AIPS design is biased towards fault tolerance and may not be an ideal architecture for planetary and deep space probes due to high cost and complexity. The MAX concepts appears to be a promising candidate, except that more detailed information is required. The feasibility for adding neural computation capability to this architecture needs to be studied. Key impact issues for architectural design of computing systems meant for planetary missions were also identified.

  5. Parallel machine architecture and compiler design facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuck, David J.; Yew, Pen-Chung; Padua, David; Sameh, Ahmed; Veidenbaum, Alex

    1990-01-01

    The objective is to provide an integrated simulation environment for studying and evaluating various issues in designing parallel systems, including machine architectures, parallelizing compiler techniques, and parallel algorithms. The status of Delta project (which objective is to provide a facility to allow rapid prototyping of parallelized compilers that can target toward different machine architectures) is summarized. Included are the surveys of the program manipulation tools developed, the environmental software supporting Delta, and the compiler research projects in which Delta has played a role.

  6. Parallel architectures for iterative methods on adaptive, block structured grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gannon, D.; Vanrosendale, J.

    1983-01-01

    A parallel computer architecture well suited to the solution of partial differential equations in complicated geometries is proposed. Algorithms for partial differential equations contain a great deal of parallelism. But this parallelism can be difficult to exploit, particularly on complex problems. One approach to extraction of this parallelism is the use of special purpose architectures tuned to a given problem class. The architecture proposed here is tuned to boundary value problems on complex domains. An adaptive elliptic algorithm which maps effectively onto the proposed architecture is considered in detail. Two levels of parallelism are exploited by the proposed architecture. First, by making use of the freedom one has in grid generation, one can construct grids which are locally regular, permitting a one to one mapping of grids to systolic style processor arrays, at least over small regions. All local parallelism can be extracted by this approach. Second, though there may be a regular global structure to the grids constructed, there will be parallelism at this level. One approach to finding and exploiting this parallelism is to use an architecture having a number of processor clusters connected by a switching network. The use of such a network creates a highly flexible architecture which automatically configures to the problem being solved.

  7. Parallel Processing for Computational Continuum Dynamics,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    Instruction stream, Multiple Data stream ( MIMD ). An example of a machine of this type is the HEP HIOO computer manu- factured by the Denelcor...parallel architecture in general and for the HEP H1O00 computer in partic- ular. The approach is a step-by-step procedure based on a progression from the...Element Processor) by Denelcor has MIMD architecture. The HEP computer is designed to combine from one up to 16 Process Execu- tion Modules (PEM’s

  8. Parallel computer methods for eigenvalue extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akl, Fred

    1988-01-01

    A new numerical algorithm for the solution of large-order eigenproblems typically encountered in linear elastic finite element systems is presented. The architecture of parallel processing is used in the algorithm to achieve increased speed and efficiency of calculations. The algorithm is based on the frontal technique for the solution of linear simultaneous equations and the modified subspace eigenanalysis method for the solution of the eigenproblem. The advantages of this new algorithm in parallel computer architecture are discussed.

  9. Parallel algorithms and architectures for the manipulator inertia matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Amin-Javaheri, M.

    1989-01-01

    Several parallel algorithms and architectures to compute the manipulator inertia matrix in real time are proposed. An O(N) and an O(log{sub 2}N) parallel algorithm based upon recursive computation of the inertial parameters of sets of composite rigid bodies are formulated. One- and two-dimensional systolic architectures are presented to implement the O(N) parallel algorithm. A cube architecture is employed to implement the diagonal element of the inertia matrix in O(log{sub 2}N) time and the upper off-diagonal elements in O(N) time. The resulting K{sub 1}O(N) + K{sub 2}O(log{sub 2}N) parallel algorithm is more efficient for a cube network implementation. All the architectural configurations are based upon a VLSI Robotics Processor exploiting fine-grain parallelism. In evaluation all the architectural configurations, significant performance parameters such as I/O time and idle time due to processor synchronization as well as CPU utilization and on-chip memory size are fully included. The O(N) and O(log{sub 2}N) parallel algorithms adhere to the precedence relationships among the processors. In order to achieve a higher speedup factor; however, parallel algorithms in conjunction with Non-Strict Computational Models are devised to relax interprocess precedence, and as a result, to decrease the effective computational delays. The effectiveness of the Non-strict Computational Algorithms is verified by computer simulations, based on a PUMA 560 robot manipulator. It is demonstrated that a combination of parallel algorithms and architectures results in a very effective approach to achieve real-time response for computing the manipulator inertia matrix.

  10. Kalman Filter Tracking on Parallel Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerati, Giuseppe; Elmer, Peter; Krutelyov, Slava; Lantz, Steven; Lefebvre, Matthieu; McDermott, Kevin; Riley, Daniel; Tadel, Matevž; Wittich, Peter; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avi

    2016-11-01

    Power density constraints are limiting the performance improvements of modern CPUs. To address this we have seen the introduction of lower-power, multi-core processors such as GPGPU, ARM and Intel MIC. In order to achieve the theoretical performance gains of these processors, it will be necessary to parallelize algorithms to exploit larger numbers of lightweight cores and specialized functions like large vector units. Track finding and fitting is one of the most computationally challenging problems for event reconstruction in particle physics. At the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC), for example, this will be by far the dominant problem. The need for greater parallelism has driven investigations of very different track finding techniques such as Cellular Automata or Hough Transforms. The most common track finding techniques in use today, however, are those based on a Kalman filter approach. Significant experience has been accumulated with these techniques on real tracking detector systems, both in the trigger and offline. They are known to provide high physics performance, are robust, and are in use today at the LHC. Given the utility of the Kalman filter in track finding, we have begun to port these algorithms to parallel architectures, namely Intel Xeon and Xeon Phi. We report here on our progress towards an end-to-end track reconstruction algorithm fully exploiting vectorization and parallelization techniques in a simplified experimental environment.

  11. VLSI and computer architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Shankar, R.; Fernandez, E.B. )

    1989-01-01

    This book provides a sense of realism concerning the potential of actual design principles and techniques for computer systems implemented in VLSI. With the knowledge gained from this book, the reader will be better able to understand and utilize the architectures that have been produced by the use of these techniques. Topics covered include Superconductive electronics, Multiprocessing, and Object-oriented architectures.

  12. Dynamic Load Balancing for Computational Plasticity on Parallel Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pramono, Eddy; Simon, Horst

    1994-01-01

    The simulation of the computational plasticity on a complex structure remains a formidable computational task, especially when a highly nonlinear, complex material model was used. It appears that the computational requirements for a such problem can only be satisfied by massively parallel architectures. In order to effectively harness the tremendous computational power provided by such architectures, it is imperative to investigate and to study the algorithmic and implementation issues pertaining to dynamic load balancing for computational plasticity on a highly parallel, distributed-memory, multiple-instruction, multiple-data computers. This paper will measure the effectiveness of the algorithms developed in handling the dynamic load balancing.

  13. Mapping robust parallel multigrid algorithms to scalable memory architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Overman, Andrea; Vanrosendale, John

    1993-01-01

    The convergence rate of standard multigrid algorithms degenerates on problems with stretched grids or anisotropic operators. The usual cure for this is the use of line or plane relaxation. However, multigrid algorithms based on line and plane relaxation have limited and awkward parallelism and are quite difficult to map effectively to highly parallel architectures. Newer multigrid algorithms that overcome anisotropy through the use of multiple coarse grids rather than line relaxation are better suited to massively parallel architectures because they require only simple point-relaxation smoothers. The parallel implementation of a V-cycle multiple semi-coarsened grid (MSG) algorithm or distributed-memory architectures such as the Intel iPSC/860 and Paragon computers is addressed. The MSG algorithms provide two levels of parallelism: parallelism within the relaxation or interpolation on each grid and across the grids on each multigrid level. Both levels of parallelism must be exploited to map these algorithms effectively to parallel architectures. A mapping of an MSG algorithm to distributed-memory architectures that demonstrate how both levels of parallelism can be exploited is described. The results is a robust and effective multigrid algorithm for distributed-memory machines.

  14. Parallel Computing in Optimization.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    include : Heller [1978] and Sameh [1977] (surveys of algorithms), Duff [1983], Fong and Jordan [1977]. Jordan [1979]. and Rodrigue [1982] (all mainly...constrained concave function by partition of feasible domain", Mathematics of Operations Research 8, pp. A. Sameh [1977, "Numerical parallel algorithms...a survey", in High Speed Computer and Algorithm Organization, D. Kuck, D. Lawrie, and A. Sameh , eds., Academic Press, pp. 207-228. 1,. J. Siegel

  15. Fast Parallel Computation Of Manipulator Inverse Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, Amir; Bejczy, Antal K.

    1991-01-01

    Method for fast parallel computation of inverse dynamics problem, essential for real-time dynamic control and simulation of robot manipulators, undergoing development. Enables exploitation of high degree of parallelism and, achievement of significant computational efficiency, while minimizing various communication and synchronization overheads as well as complexity of required computer architecture. Universal real-time robotic controller and simulator (URRCS) consists of internal host processor and several SIMD processors with ring topology. Architecture modular and expandable: more SIMD processors added to match size of problem. Operate asynchronously and in MIMD fashion.

  16. Northeast Parallel Architectures Center (NPAC) at Syracuse University

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    report . 5.2 Software Tools The development of software tools to guide or aid the user of parallel and/or distributed computing systems is a high...Algorithms in Computational Geometry Research area: Computational Geometry Architecture: Connection Machine Principle Investigator: Seoung-Jun Oh...Syracuse University Computational Geometry is concerned with the design and analysis of computational algorithms for solving geometry problems. There are

  17. ASP: a parallel computing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lea, R. M.

    1990-09-01

    ASP modules constitute the basis of a parallel computing technology platform for the rapid development of a broad range of numeric and symbolic information processing systems. Based on off-the-shelf general-purpose hardware and software modules ASP technology is intended to increase productivity in the development (and competitiveness in the marketing) of cost-effective low-MIMD/high-SIMD Massively Parallel Processor (MPPs). The paper discusses ASP module philosophy and demonstrates how ASP modules can satisfy the market algorithmic architectural and engineering requirements of such MPPs. In particular two specific ASP modules based on VLSI and WSI technologies are studied as case examples of ASP technology the latter reporting 1 TOPS/fl3 1 GOPS/W and 1 MOPS/$ as ball-park figures-of-merit of cost-effectiveness.

  18. Multigrid on massively parallel architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Falgout, R D; Jones, J E

    1999-09-17

    The scalable implementation of multigrid methods for machines with several thousands of processors is investigated. Parallel performance models are presented for three different structured-grid multigrid algorithms, and a description is given of how these models can be used to guide implementation. Potential pitfalls are illustrated when moving from moderate-sized parallelism to large-scale parallelism, and results are given from existing multigrid codes to support the discussion. Finally, the use of mixed programming models is investigated for multigrid codes on clusters of SMPs.

  19. Overview of a distributed parallel architecture for speech understanding

    SciTech Connect

    Bronson, E.C.; Siegel, L.J.

    1982-01-01

    The complexity of the speech understanding task requires extensive computation. To improve the processing speed, methods are explored by which tasks involved in speech understanding can be structured for execution on a parallel processing system. An architecture is described in which a speech understanding system is decomposed into a series of distributed processing computation stations. 24 references.

  20. Parallel algorithms for mapping pipelined and parallel computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.

    1988-01-01

    Many computational problems in image processing, signal processing, and scientific computing are naturally structured for either pipelined or parallel computation. When mapping such problems onto a parallel architecture it is often necessary to aggregate an obvious problem decomposition. Even in this context the general mapping problem is known to be computationally intractable, but recent advances have been made in identifying classes of problems and architectures for which optimal solutions can be found in polynomial time. Among these, the mapping of pipelined or parallel computations onto linear array, shared memory, and host-satellite systems figures prominently. This paper extends that work first by showing how to improve existing serial mapping algorithms. These improvements have significantly lower time and space complexities: in one case a published O(nm sup 3) time algorithm for mapping m modules onto n processors is reduced to an O(nm log m) time complexity, and its space requirements reduced from O(nm sup 2) to O(m). Run time complexity is further reduced with parallel mapping algorithms based on these improvements, which run on the architecture for which they create the mappings.

  1. Dynamic Architecture Computer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    of Engineering of the Air Force Institute of Tecnology Air University In Partial Fulfillment of Master of Science in Electrical Engineering Accession...architecture. The review assured that this study did not duplicate previous studies and provided the background information for this study. 4 Analysis of...a dynamic architecture computer based on the information obtained from the analysis outlined in the steps above. Analysis of Results. This concluding

  2. Parallel processing for scientific computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkhatib, Hasan S.

    1991-01-01

    The main contribution of the effort in the last two years is the introduction of the MOPPS system. After doing extensive literature search, we introduced the system which is described next. MOPPS employs a new solution to the problem of managing programs which solve scientific and engineering applications on a distributed processing environment. Autonomous computers cooperate efficiently in solving large scientific problems with this solution. MOPPS has the advantage of not assuming the presence of any particular network topology or configuration, computer architecture, or operating system. It imposes little overhead on network and processor resources while efficiently managing programs concurrently. The core of MOPPS is an intelligent program manager that builds a knowledge base of the execution performance of the parallel programs it is managing under various conditions. The manager applies this knowledge to improve the performance of future runs. The program manager learns from experience.

  3. Template Matching on Parallel Architectures,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-01

    memory. The processors run asynchronously. Thus according to Hynn’s categories the Butterfl . is a MIMD machine. The processors of the Butterfly are...Generalized Butterfly Architecture This section describes timings for pattern matching on the generalized Butterfl .. Ihe implementations on the Butterfly...these algorithms. Thus the best implementation of the techniques on the generalized Butterfl % are the same as the implementation on the real Butterfly

  4. Parallel Computational Protein Design

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yichao; Donald, Bruce R.; Zeng, Jianyang

    2016-01-01

    Computational structure-based protein design (CSPD) is an important problem in computational biology, which aims to design or improve a prescribed protein function based on a protein structure template. It provides a practical tool for real-world protein engineering applications. A popular CSPD method that guarantees to find the global minimum energy solution (GMEC) is to combine both dead-end elimination (DEE) and A* tree search algorithms. However, in this framework, the A* search algorithm can run in exponential time in the worst case, which may become the computation bottleneck of large-scale computational protein design process. To address this issue, we extend and add a new module to the OSPREY program that was previously developed in the Donald lab [1] to implement a GPU-based massively parallel A* algorithm for improving protein design pipeline. By exploiting the modern GPU computational framework and optimizing the computation of the heuristic function for A* search, our new program, called gOSPREY, can provide up to four orders of magnitude speedups in large protein design cases with a small memory overhead comparing to the traditional A* search algorithm implementation, while still guaranteeing the optimality. In addition, gOSPREY can be configured to run in a bounded-memory mode to tackle the problems in which the conformation space is too large and the global optimal solution cannot be computed previously. Furthermore, the GPU-based A* algorithm implemented in the gOSPREY program can be combined with the state-of-the-art rotamer pruning algorithms such as iMinDEE [2] and DEEPer [3] to also consider continuous backbone and side-chain flexibility. PMID:27914056

  5. A Parallel Rendering Algorithm for MIMD Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crockett, Thomas W.; Orloff, Tobias

    1991-01-01

    Applications such as animation and scientific visualization demand high performance rendering of complex three dimensional scenes. To deliver the necessary rendering rates, highly parallel hardware architectures are required. The challenge is then to design algorithms and software which effectively use the hardware parallelism. A rendering algorithm targeted to distributed memory MIMD architectures is described. For maximum performance, the algorithm exploits both object-level and pixel-level parallelism. The behavior of the algorithm is examined both analytically and experimentally. Its performance for large numbers of processors is found to be limited primarily by communication overheads. An experimental implementation for the Intel iPSC/860 shows increasing performance from 1 to 128 processors across a wide range of scene complexities. It is shown that minimal modifications to the algorithm will adapt it for use on shared memory architectures as well.

  6. Optimal expression evaluation for data parallel architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, John R.; Schreiber, Robert

    1991-01-01

    A data parallel machine represents an array or other composits data structure by allocating one processor per data item. A pointwise operation can be performed between two such arrays in unit time, provided their corresponding elements are allocated in the same processors. If the arrays are not aligned in this fashion, the cost of moving one or both of them is part of the cost of operation. The choice of where to perform the operation then affects this cost. If an expression with several operands is to be evaluated, there may be many choices of where to perform the intermediate operations. An efficient algorithm is given to find the minimum cost way to evaluate an expression, for several different data parallel architectures. The algorithm applies to any architecture in which the metric describing the cost of moving an array has a property called robustness. This encompasses most of the common data parallel communication architectures, including meshes of arbitrary dimension and hypercubes.

  7. Optimal expression evaluation for data parallel architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, J. R.; Schreiber, R.

    1990-01-01

    A data parallel machine represents an array or other composite data structure by allocating one processor per data item. A pointwise operation can be performed between two such arrays in unit time, provided their corresponding elements are allocated in the same processors. If the arrays are not aligned in this fashion, the cost of moving one or both of them is part of the cost of operation. The choice of where to perform the operation then affects this cost. If an expression with several operands is to be evaluated, there may be many choices of where to perform the intermediate operations. An efficient algorithm is given to find the minimum cost way to evaluate an expression, for several different data parallel architectures. The algorithm applies to any architecture in which the metric describing the cost of moving an array has a property called robustness. This encompasses most of the common data parallel communication architectures, including meshes of arbitrary dimension and hypercubes.

  8. Optimal expression evaluation for data parallel architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, John R.; Schreiber, Robert

    1991-01-01

    A data parallel machine represents an array or other composits data structure by allocating one processor per data item. A pointwise operation can be performed between two such arrays in unit time, provided their corresponding elements are allocated in the same processors. If the arrays are not aligned in this fashion, the cost of moving one or both of them is part of the cost of operation. The choice of where to perform the operation then affects this cost. If an expression with several operands is to be evaluated, there may be many choices of where to perform the intermediate operations. An efficient algorithm is given to find the minimum cost way to evaluate an expression, for several different data parallel architectures. The algorithm applies to any architecture in which the metric describing the cost of moving an array has a property called robustness. This encompasses most of the common data parallel communication architectures, including meshes of arbitrary dimension and hypercubes.

  9. Optimal expression evaluation for data parallel architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, J. R.; Schreiber, R.

    1990-01-01

    A data parallel machine represents an array or other composite data structure by allocating one processor per data item. A pointwise operation can be performed between two such arrays in unit time, provided their corresponding elements are allocated in the same processors. If the arrays are not aligned in this fashion, the cost of moving one or both of them is part of the cost of operation. The choice of where to perform the operation then affects this cost. If an expression with several operands is to be evaluated, there may be many choices of where to perform the intermediate operations. An efficient algorithm is given to find the minimum cost way to evaluate an expression, for several different data parallel architectures. The algorithm applies to any architecture in which the metric describing the cost of moving an array has a property called robustness. This encompasses most of the common data parallel communication architectures, including meshes of arbitrary dimension and hypercubes.

  10. Parallel Computing Strategies for Irregular Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Oliker, Leonid; Shan, Hongzhang; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Parallel computing promises several orders of magnitude increase in our ability to solve realistic computationally-intensive problems, but relies on their efficient mapping and execution on large-scale multiprocessor architectures. Unfortunately, many important applications are irregular and dynamic in nature, making their effective parallel implementation a daunting task. Moreover, with the proliferation of parallel architectures and programming paradigms, the typical scientist is faced with a plethora of questions that must be answered in order to obtain an acceptable parallel implementation of the solution algorithm. In this paper, we consider three representative irregular applications: unstructured remeshing, sparse matrix computations, and N-body problems, and parallelize them using various popular programming paradigms on a wide spectrum of computer platforms ranging from state-of-the-art supercomputers to PC clusters. We present the underlying problems, the solution algorithms, and the parallel implementation strategies. Smart load-balancing, partitioning, and ordering techniques are used to enhance parallel performance. Overall results demonstrate the complexity of efficiently parallelizing irregular algorithms.

  11. Some fast elliptic solvers on parallel architectures and their complexities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallopoulos, E.; Saad, Youcef

    1989-01-01

    The discretization of separable elliptic partial differential equations leads to linear systems with special block triangular matrices. Several methods are known to solve these systems, the most general of which is the Block Cyclic Reduction (BCR) algorithm which handles equations with nonconsistant coefficients. A method was recently proposed to parallelize and vectorize BCR. Here, the mapping of BCR on distributed memory architectures is discussed, and its complexity is compared with that of other approaches, including the Alternating-Direction method. A fast parallel solver is also described, based on an explicit formula for the solution, which has parallel computational complexity lower than that of parallel BCR.

  12. Some fast elliptic solvers on parallel architectures and their complexities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallopoulos, E.; Saad, Y.

    1989-01-01

    The discretization of separable elliptic partial differential equations leads to linear systems with special block tridiagonal matrices. Several methods are known to solve these systems, the most general of which is the Block Cyclic Reduction (BCR) algorithm which handles equations with nonconstant coefficients. A method was recently proposed to parallelize and vectorize BCR. In this paper, the mapping of BCR on distributed memory architectures is discussed, and its complexity is compared with that of other approaches including the Alternating-Direction method. A fast parallel solver is also described, based on an explicit formula for the solution, which has parallel computational compelxity lower than that of parallel BCR.

  13. Capital Architecture: Situating symbolism parallel to architectural methods and technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daoud, Bassam

    Capital Architecture is a symbol of a nation's global presence and the cultural and social focal point of its inhabitants. Since the advent of High-Modernism in Western cities, and subsequently decolonised capitals, civic architecture no longer seems to be strictly grounded in the philosophy that national buildings shape the legacy of government and the way a nation is regarded through its built environment. Amidst an exceedingly globalized architectural practice and with the growing concern of key heritage foundations over the shortcomings of international modernism in representing its immediate socio-cultural context, the contextualization of public architecture within its sociological, cultural and economic framework in capital cities became the key denominator of this thesis. Civic architecture in capital cities is essential to confront the challenges of symbolizing a nation and demonstrating the legitimacy of the government'. In today's dominantly secular Western societies, governmental architecture, especially where the seat of political power lies, is the ultimate form of architectural expression in conveying a sense of identity and underlining a nation's status. Departing with these convictions, this thesis investigates the embodied symbolic power, the representative capacity, and the inherent permanence in contemporary architecture, and in its modes of production. Through a vast study on Modern architectural ideals and heritage -- in parallel to methodologies -- the thesis stimulates the future of large scale governmental building practices and aims to identify and index the key constituents that may respond to the lack representation in civic architecture in capital cities.

  14. A Computing Platform for Parallel Sparse Matrix Computations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-05

    infiniband. Each node contains 24 cores. This parallel computing platform has been used by my research group in the early stages of developing large...sparse linear system and symmetric eigenvalue problem solvers (ARO grant W911NF-07-R-0003-04) that are suitable for parallel architectures containing...hundreds of multicore nodes (thousands of cores). Once our parallel solvers obtain the correct solutions, and perform properly on this 8-node platform

  15. Combinatorial parallel and scientific computing.

    SciTech Connect

    Pinar, Ali; Hendrickson, Bruce Alan

    2005-04-01

    Combinatorial algorithms have long played a pivotal enabling role in many applications of parallel computing. Graph algorithms in particular arise in load balancing, scheduling, mapping and many other aspects of the parallelization of irregular applications. These are still active research areas, mostly due to evolving computational techniques and rapidly changing computational platforms. But the relationship between parallel computing and discrete algorithms is much richer than the mere use of graph algorithms to support the parallelization of traditional scientific computations. Important, emerging areas of science are fundamentally discrete, and they are increasingly reliant on the power of parallel computing. Examples include computational biology, scientific data mining, and network analysis. These applications are changing the relationship between discrete algorithms and parallel computing. In addition to their traditional role as enablers of high performance, combinatorial algorithms are now customers for parallel computing. New parallelization techniques for combinatorial algorithms need to be developed to support these nontraditional scientific approaches. This chapter will describe some of the many areas of intersection between discrete algorithms and parallel scientific computing. Due to space limitations, this chapter is not a comprehensive survey, but rather an introduction to a diverse set of techniques and applications with a particular emphasis on work presented at the Eleventh SIAM Conference on Parallel Processing for Scientific Computing. Some topics highly relevant to this chapter (e.g. load balancing) are addressed elsewhere in this book, and so we will not discuss them here.

  16. The effects of parallel processing architectures on discrete event simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cave, William; Slatt, Edward; Wassmer, Robert E.

    2005-05-01

    As systems become more complex, particularly those containing embedded decision algorithms, mathematical modeling presents a rigid framework that often impedes representation to a sufficient level of detail. Using discrete event simulation, one can build models that more closely represent physical reality, with actual algorithms incorporated in the simulations. Higher levels of detail increase simulation run time. Hardware designers have succeeded in producing parallel and distributed processor computers with theoretical speeds well into the teraflop range. However, the practical use of these machines on all but some very special problems is extremely limited. The inability to use this power is due to great difficulties encountered when trying to translate real world problems into software that makes effective use of highly parallel machines. This paper addresses the application of parallel processing to simulations of real world systems of varying inherent parallelism. It provides a brief background in modeling and simulation validity and describes a parameter that can be used in discrete event simulation to vary opportunities for parallel processing at the expense of absolute time synchronization and is constrained by validity. It focuses on the effects of model architecture, run-time software architecture, and parallel processor architecture on speed, while providing an environment where modelers can achieve sufficient model accuracy to produce valid simulation results. It describes an approach to simulation development that captures subject area expert knowledge to leverage inherent parallelism in systems in the following ways: * Data structures are separated from instructions to track which instruction sets share what data. This is used to determine independence and thus the potential for concurrent processing at run-time. * Model connectivity (independence) can be inspected visually to determine if the inherent parallelism of a physical system is properly

  17. Grundy: Parallel Processor Architecture Makes Programming Easy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Robert J.

    1985-12-01

    Grundy, an architecture for parallel processing, facilitates the use of high-level languages. In Grundy, several thousand simple processors are dispersed throughout the address space and the concept of machine state is replaced by an invokation frame, a data structure of local variables, program counter, and pointers to superprocesses (parents), subprocesses (children), and concurrent processes (siblings). Each instruction execution consists of five phases. An instruction is fetched, the instruction is decoded, the sources are fetched, the operation is performed, and the destination is written. This breakdown of operations is easily pipelinable. The instruction format of Grundy is completely orthogonal, so Grundy machine code consists of a set of register transfer control bits. The process state pointers are used to collect unused resources such as processors and memory. Joseph Mahon[1] found that as the degree of physical parallelism increases, throughput, including overhead, increases even if extra overhead is needed to split logical processes. As stack pointer, accumulators, and index registers facilitate using high-level languages on conventional computers, pointers to parents, children, and siblings simplify the use of a run-time operating system. The ability to ignore the physical structure of a large number of simple processors supports the use of structured programming. A very simple processor cell allows the replication of approximately 16 32-bit processors on a single Very Large Scale Integration chip. (2M lambda[2]) A bootstrapper and Input/Output channels can be hardwired (using ROM cells and pseudo-processor cells) into a 100 chip computer that is expected to have over 500 procesors, 500K memory, and a network supporting up to 64 concurrent messages between 1000 nodes. These sizes are merely typical and not limits.

  18. Data Communication in Parallel Architectures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    proposed by Sameh 1141. (D) Two- and Three-Dimensional Mesh Connected arrays. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional arrays are popular among partial...Dept Computer Science. Vale University, 1985 14 A.H. Sameh , Solving the Linear Least Squares Problem on a Linear Array of Processors. Pur- due

  19. On the parallelization approaches for Intel MIC architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassov, E.; Gurov, T.; Karaivanova, A.; Ivanovska, S.; Durchova, M.; Dimitrov, D.

    2016-10-01

    The Intel MIC architecture is one of the main processor architectures used for the production of computational accelerators. Increasing energy and cost-effciency of accelerators is one important option for building new HPC systems. However, the effective use of accelerators requires careful optimization on all stages of the algorithm and use of appropriate parallelization approaches. In the domain of statistical methods the quasi-Monte Carlo methods present distinct challenges when thousands of computational cores are to be involved in a computation. In this paper we describe in detail and study the performance of algorithms for generating some popular low-discrepancy sequences, aimed at devices with Intel MIC architecture. By leveraging the powerful vector instructions of the Intel MIC architecture to process many coordinates of the sequences in parallel, we obtain fast implementations that can be plugged-in in any parallel quasi-Monte Carlo computation. We present extensive numerical and timing results that demonstrate the benefit of our algorithms and their parallel effciency. The effects of using hyperthreading are also studied. The generation routines are provided under the GPL.

  20. Modelling parallel programs and multiprocessor architectures with AXE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yan, Jerry C.; Fineman, Charles E.

    1991-01-01

    AXE, An Experimental Environment for Parallel Systems, was designed to model and simulate for parallel systems at the process level. It provides an integrated environment for specifying computation models, multiprocessor architectures, data collection, and performance visualization. AXE is being used at NASA-Ames for developing resource management strategies, parallel problem formulation, multiprocessor architectures, and operating system issues related to the High Performance Computing and Communications Program. AXE's simple, structured user-interface enables the user to model parallel programs and machines precisely and efficiently. Its quick turn-around time keeps the user interested and productive. AXE models multicomputers. The user may easily modify various architectural parameters including the number of sites, connection topologies, and overhead for operating system activities. Parallel computations in AXE are represented as collections of autonomous computing objects known as players. Their use and behavior is described. Performance data of the multiprocessor model can be observed on a color screen. These include CPU and message routing bottlenecks, and the dynamic status of the software.

  1. Which parallel finite element algorithm for which architecture and which problem?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhat, Charbel

    1990-01-01

    Some of the parallel computational strategies are reviewed, and their adequacy assessed for a given architecture and a given problem. The performance of both extreme parallel hardware technologies on real-life structural problems is also reported.

  2. Electro-Optic Computing Architectures. Volume I

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-02-01

    The objective of the Electro - Optic Computing Architecture (EOCA) program was to develop multi-function electro - optic interfaces and optical...interconnect units to enhance the performance of parallel processor systems and form the building blocks for future electro - optic computing architectures...Specifically, three multi-function interface modules were targeted for development - an Electro - Optic Interface (EOI), an Optical Interconnection Unit (OW

  3. Parallel Architectures for Planetary Exploration Requirements (PAPER)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cezzar, Ruknet

    1993-01-01

    The project's main contributions have been in the area of student support. Throughout the project, at least one, in some cases two, undergraduate students have been supported. By working with the project, these students gained valuable knowledge involving the scientific research project, including the not-so-pleasant reporting requirements to the funding agencies. The other important contribution was towards the establishment of a graduate program in computer science at Hampton University. Primarily, the PAPER project has served as the main research basis in seeking funds from other agencies, such as the National Science Foundation, for establishing a research infrastructure in the department. In technical areas, especially in the first phase, we believe the trip to Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and gathering together all the pertinent information involving experimental computer architectures aimed for planetary explorations was very helpful. Indeed, if this effort is to be revived in the future due to congressional funding for planetary explorations, say an unmanned mission to Mars, our interim report will be an important starting point. In other technical areas, our simulator has pinpointed and highlighted several important performance issues related to the design of operating system kernels for MIMD machines. In particular, the critical issue of how the kernel itself will run in parallel on a multiple-processor system has been addressed through the various ready list organization and access policies. In the area of neural computing, our main contribution was an introductory tutorial package to familiarize the researchers at NASA with this new and promising field zone axes (20). Finally, we have introduced the notion of reversibility in programming systems which may find applications in various areas of space research.

  4. Introduction to Parallel Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    Topology C, Ada, C++, Data-parallel FORTRAN, 2D mesh of node boards, each node FORTRAN-90 (late 1992) board has 1 application processor Devopment Tools ...parallel machines become the wave of the present, tools are increasingly needed to assist programmers in creating parallel tasks and coordinating...their activities. Linda was designed to be such a tool . Linda was designed with three important goals in mind: to be portable, efficient, and easy to use

  5. Modular, Parallel Pulse-Shaping Filter Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Andrew A.

    2003-01-01

    Novel architectures based on parallel subconvolution frequency-domain filtering methods have been developed for modular processing rate reduction of discrete-time pulse-shaping filters. Such pulse-shaping is desirable and often necessary to obtain bandwidth efficiency in very-high-rate wireless communications systems. In principle, this processing could be implemented in very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuits. Whereas other approaches to digital pulse-shaping are based primarily on time-domain processing concepts, the theory and design rules of the architectures presented here are founded on frequency-domain processing that has advantages in certain systems.

  6. Super and parallel computers and their impact on civil engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Kamat, M.P.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on the use of supercomputers in civil engineering. Topics considered at the conference included solving nonlinear equations on a hypercube, a custom architectured parallel processing system, distributed data processing, algorithms, computer architecture, parallel processing, vector processing, computerized simulation, and cost benefit analysis.

  7. Cross-fertilization between connectionist networks and highly parallel architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnden, John; Srinivas, Kankanahalli

    1989-01-01

    The theoretical and practical connections between connectionist schemes such as neural-network computers and traditional symbolic processing architectures involving a high degree of parallelism are explored, reviewing the results of recent investigations. Topics addressed include data flow, data structure, and control flow; conventional pointers; associative addressing; hashing and reduced representations; the problem of binding values to variables; and levels of parallelism. It is concluded that connectionism is more closely related to traditional computer science and technology than is generally admitted; more cooperation between followers of the two approaches is recommended.

  8. Interfacing Computer Aided Parallelization and Performance Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jost, Gabriele; Jin, Haoqiang; Labarta, Jesus; Gimenez, Judit; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    When porting sequential applications to parallel computer architectures, the program developer will typically go through several cycles of source code optimization and performance analysis. We have started a project to develop an environment where the user can jointly navigate through program structure and performance data information in order to make efficient optimization decisions. In a prototype implementation we have interfaced the CAPO computer aided parallelization tool with the Paraver performance analysis tool. We describe both tools and their interface and give an example for how the interface helps within the program development cycle of a benchmark code.

  9. Opportunities in computational mechanics: Advances in parallel computing

    SciTech Connect

    Lesar, R.A.

    1999-02-01

    In this paper, the authors will discuss recent advances in computing power and the prospects for using these new capabilities for studying plasticity and failure. They will first review the new capabilities made available with parallel computing. They will discuss how these machines perform and how well their architecture might work on materials issues. Finally, they will give some estimates on the size of problems possible using these computers.

  10. Problem size, parallel architecture and optimal speedup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.; Willard, Frank H.

    1987-01-01

    The communication and synchronization overhead inherent in parallel processing can lead to situations where adding processors to the solution method actually increases execution time. Problem type, problem size, and architecture type all affect the optimal number of processors to employ. The numerical solution of an elliptic partial differential equation is examined in order to study the relationship between problem size and architecture. The equation's domain is discretized into n sup 2 grid points which are divided into partitions and mapped onto the individual processor memories. The relationships between grid size, stencil type, partitioning strategy, processor execution time, and communication network type are analytically quantified. In so doing, the optimal number of processors was determined to assign to the solution, and identified (1) the smallest grid size which fully benefits from using all available processors, (2) the leverage on performance given by increasing processor speed or communication network speed, and (3) the suitability of various architectures for large numerical problems.

  11. Optimal expression evaluation for data parallel architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, John R.; Schreiber, Robert

    1990-01-01

    A data parallel machine represents an array or other composite data structure by allocating one processor (at least conceptually) per data item. A pointwise operation can be performed between two such arrays in unit time, provided their corresponding elements are allocated in the same processors. If the arrays are not aligned in this fashion, the cost of moving one or both of them is part of the cost of the operation. The choice of where to perform the operation then affects this cost. If an expression with several operands is to be evaluated, there may be many choices of where to perform the intermediate operations. An efficient algorithm is given to find the minimum-cost way to evaluate an expression, for several different data parallel architectures. This algorithm applies to any architecture in which the metric describing the cost of moving an array is robust. This encompasses most of the common data parallel communication architectures, including meshes of arbitrary dimension and hypercubes. Remarks are made on several variations of the problem, some of which are solved and some of which remain open.

  12. PISCES: An environment for parallel scientific computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, T. W.

    1985-01-01

    The parallel implementation of scientific computing environment (PISCES) is a project to provide high-level programming environments for parallel MIMD computers. Pisces 1, the first of these environments, is a FORTRAN 77 based environment which runs under the UNIX operating system. The Pisces 1 user programs in Pisces FORTRAN, an extension of FORTRAN 77 for parallel processing. The major emphasis in the Pisces 1 design is in providing a carefully specified virtual machine that defines the run-time environment within which Pisces FORTRAN programs are executed. Each implementation then provides the same virtual machine, regardless of differences in the underlying architecture. The design is intended to be portable to a variety of architectures. Currently Pisces 1 is implemented on a network of Apollo workstations and on a DEC VAX uniprocessor via simulation of the task level parallelism. An implementation for the Flexible Computing Corp. FLEX/32 is under construction. An introduction to the Pisces 1 virtual computer and the FORTRAN 77 extensions is presented. An example of an algorithm for the iterative solution of a system of equations is given. The most notable features of the design are the provision for several granularities of parallelism in programs and the provision of a window mechanism for distributed access to large arrays of data.

  13. NETRA: A parallel architecture for integrated vision systems. 1: Architecture and organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhary, Alok N.; Patel, Janak H.; Ahuja, Narendra

    1989-01-01

    Computer vision is regarded as one of the most complex and computationally intensive problems. An integrated vision system (IVS) is considered to be a system that uses vision algorithms from all levels of processing for a high level application (such as object recognition). A model of computation is presented for parallel processing for an IVS. Using the model, desired features and capabilities of a parallel architecture suitable for IVSs are derived. Then a multiprocessor architecture (called NETRA) is presented. This architecture is highly flexible without the use of complex interconnection schemes. The topology of NETRA is recursively defined and hence is easily scalable from small to large systems. Homogeneity of NETRA permits fault tolerance and graceful degradation under faults. It is a recursively defined tree-type hierarchical architecture where each of the leaf nodes consists of a cluster of processors connected with a programmable crossbar with selective broadcast capability to provide for desired flexibility. A qualitative evaluation of NETRA is presented. Then general schemes are described to map parallel algorithms onto NETRA. Algorithms are classified according to their communication requirements for parallel processing. An extensive analysis of inter-cluster communication strategies in NETRA is presented, and parameters affecting performance of parallel algorithms when mapped on NETRA are discussed. Finally, a methodology to evaluate performance of algorithms on NETRA is described.

  14. Computer architecture evaluation for structural dynamics computations: Project summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Standley, Hilda M.

    1989-01-01

    The intent of the proposed effort is the examination of the impact of the elements of parallel architectures on the performance realized in a parallel computation. To this end, three major projects are developed: a language for the expression of high level parallelism, a statistical technique for the synthesis of multicomputer interconnection networks based upon performance prediction, and a queueing model for the analysis of shared memory hierarchies.

  15. A novel parallel architecture for real-time image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Junhong; Zhang, Tianxu; Zhong, Sheng; Chen, Xujun

    2009-10-01

    A novel DSP/FPGA-based parallel architecture for real-time image processing is presented in this paper, DSPs are the main processing unit and FPGAs are used to be logic units for image interface protocol, image processing, image display, synchronization communication portocol of DSPs and DSP's reprogramming interface of 422/485. The presented architecture is composed of two modules: the preprocessing module and the processing module, and the latter is extendable for better performance. Modules are connected by LINK communication port, whose LVDS protocol has the ability of anti-jamming. And DSP's programs can be updated easily by 422/485 with PC's serial port. Analysis and experiments result shows that the prototype with the proposed parallel architecture has many promising charactersitics such as powerful computing capability, broad data transfer bandwidth, and is easy to be extended and updated.

  16. The Ensembl Computing Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Cuff, James A.; Coates, Guy M.P.; Cutts, Tim J.R.; Rae, Mark

    2004-01-01

    Ensembl is a software project to automatically annotate large eukaryotic genomes and release them freely into the public domain. The project currently automatically annotates 10 complete genomes. This makes very large demands on compute resources, due to the vast number of sequence comparisons that need to be executed. To circumvent the financial outlay often associated with classical supercomputing environments, farms of multiple, lower-cost machines have now become the norm and have been deployed successfully with this project. The architecture and design of farms containing hundreds of compute nodes is complex and nontrivial to implement. This study will define and explain some of the essential elements to consider when designing such systems. Server architecture and network infrastructure are discussed with a particular emphasis on solutions that worked and those that did not (often with fairly spectacular consequences). The aim of the study is to give the reader, who may be implementing a large-scale biocompute project, an insight into some of the pitfalls that may be waiting ahead. PMID:15123594

  17. Impact of Parallel Computing on Large Scale Aeroelastic Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Aeroelasticity is computationally one of the most intensive fields in aerospace engineering. Though over the last three decades the computational speed of supercomputers have substantially increased, they are still inadequate for large scale aeroelastic computations using high fidelity flow and structural equations. In addition to reaching a saturation in computational speed because of changes in economics, computer manufactures are stopping the manufacturing of mainframe type supercomputers. This has led computational aeroelasticians to face the gigantic task of finding alternate approaches for fulfilling their needs. The alternate path to over come speed and availability limitations of mainframe type supercomputers is to use parallel computers. During this decade several different architectures have evolved. In FY92 the US Government started the High Performance Computing and Communication (HPCC) program. As a participant in this program NASA developed several parallel computational tools for aeroelastic applications. This talk describes the impact of those application tools on high fidelity based multidisciplinary analysis.

  18. High-speed parallel-processing networks for advanced architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, D.R.

    1988-06-01

    This paper describes various parallel-processing architecture networks that are candidates for eventual airborne use. An attempt at projecting which type of network is suitable or optimum for specific metafunction or stand-alone applications is made. However, specific algorithms will need to be developed and bench marks executed before firm conclusions can be drawn. Also, a conceptual projection of how these processors can be built in small, flyable units through the use of wafer-scale integration is offered. The use of the PAVE PILLAR system architecture to provide system level support for these tightly coupled networks is described. The author concludes that: (1) extremely high processing speeds implemented in flyable hardware is possible through parallel-processing networks if development programs are pursued; (2) dramatic speed enhancements through parallel processing requires an excellent match between the algorithm and computer-network architecture; (3) matching several high speed parallel oriented algorithms across the aircraft system to a limited set of hardware modules may be the most cost-effective approach to achieving speed enhancements; and (4) software-development tools and improved operating systems will need to be developed to support efficient parallel-processor use.

  19. Rectilinear partitioning of irregular data parallel computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.

    1991-01-01

    New mapping algorithms for domain oriented data-parallel computations, where the workload is distributed irregularly throughout the domain, but exhibits localized communication patterns are described. Researchers consider the problem of partitioning the domain for parallel processing in such a way that the workload on the most heavily loaded processor is minimized, subject to the constraint that the partition be perfectly rectilinear. Rectilinear partitions are useful on architectures that have a fast local mesh network. Discussed here is an improved algorithm for finding the optimal partitioning in one dimension, new algorithms for partitioning in two dimensions, and optimal partitioning in three dimensions. The application of these algorithms to real problems are discussed.

  20. The 2nd Symposium on the Frontiers of Massively Parallel Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, Ronnie (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Programming languages, computer graphics, neural networks, massively parallel computers, SIMD architecture, algorithms, digital terrain models, sort computation, simulation of charged particle transport on the massively parallel processor and image processing are among the topics discussed.

  1. Parallel PDE-Based Simulations Using the Common Component Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    McInnes, Lois C.; Allan, Benjamin A.; Armstrong, Robert; Benson, Steven J.; Bernholdt, David E.; Dahlgren, Tamara L.; Diachin, Lori; Krishnan, Manoj Kumar; Kohl, James A.; Larson, J. Walter; Lefantzi, Sophia; Nieplocha, Jarek; Norris, Boyana; Parker, Steven G.; Ray, Jaideep; Zhou, Shujia

    2006-03-05

    Summary. The complexity of parallel PDE-based simulations continues to increase as multimodel, multiphysics, and multi-institutional projects become widespread. A goal of componentbased software engineering in such large-scale simulations is to help manage this complexity by enabling better interoperability among various codes that have been independently developed by different groups. The Common Component Architecture (CCA) Forum is defining a component architecture specification to address the challenges of high-performance scientific computing. In addition, several execution frameworks, supporting infrastructure, and generalpurpose components are being developed. Furthermore, this group is collaborating with others in the high-performance computing community to design suites of domain-specific component interface specifications and underlying implementations. This chapter discusses recent work on leveraging these CCA efforts in parallel PDE-based simulations involving accelerator design, climate modeling, combustion, and accidental fires and explosions. We explain how component technology helps to address the different challenges posed by each of these applications, and we highlight how component interfaces built on existing parallel toolkits facilitate the reuse of software for parallel mesh manipulation, discretization, linear algebra, integration, optimization, and parallel data redistribution. We also present performance data to demonstrate the suitability of this approach, and we discuss strategies for applying component technologies to both new and existing applications.

  2. Parallel multi-computers and artificial intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Uhr, L.

    1986-01-01

    This book examines the present state and future direction of multicomputer parallel architectures for artificial intelligence research and development of artificial intelligence applications. The book provides a survey of the large variety of parallel architectures, describing the current state of the art and suggesting promising architectures to produce artificial intelligence systems such as intelligence systems such as intelligent robots. This book integrates artificial intelligence and parallel processing research areas and discusses parallel processing from the viewpoint of artificial intelligence.

  3. Review of parallel computing methods and tools for FPGA technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieszewski, Radosław; Linczuk, Maciej; Pozniak, Krzysztof; Romaniuk, Ryszard

    2013-10-01

    Parallel computing is emerging as an important area of research in computer architectures and software systems. Many algorithms can be greatly accelerated using parallel computing techniques. Specialized parallel computer architectures are used for accelerating speci c tasks. High-Energy Physics Experiments measuring systems often use FPGAs for ne-grained computation. FPGA combines many bene ts of both software and ASIC implementations. Like software, the mapped circuit is exible, and can be recon gured over the lifetime of the system. FPGAs therefore have the potential to achieve far greater performance than software as a result of bypassing the fetch-decode-execute operations of traditional processors, and possibly exploiting a greater level of parallelism. Creating parallel programs implemented in FPGAs is not trivial. This paper presents existing methods and tools for ne-grained computation implemented in FPGA using Behavioral Description and High Level Programming Languages.

  4. Time dependent processing in a parallel pipeline architecture.

    PubMed

    Biddiscombe, John; Geveci, Berk; Martin, Ken; Moreland, Kenneth; Thompson, David

    2007-01-01

    Pipeline architectures provide a versatile and efficient mechanism for constructing visualizations, and they have been implemented in numerous libraries and applications over the past two decades. In addition to allowing developers and users to freely combine algorithms, visualization pipelines have proven to work well when streaming data and scale well on parallel distributed-memory computers. However, current pipeline visualization frameworks have a critical flaw: they are unable to manage time varying data. As data flows through the pipeline, each algorithm has access to only a single snapshot in time of the data. This prevents the implementation of algorithms that do any temporal processing such as particle tracing; plotting over time; or interpolation, fitting, or smoothing of time series data. As data acquisition technology improves, as simulation time-integration techniques become more complex, and as simulations save less frequently and regularly, the ability to analyze the time-behavior of data becomes more important. This paper describes a modification to the traditional pipeline architecture that allows it to accommodate temporal algorithms. Furthermore, the architecture allows temporal algorithms to be used in conjunction with algorithms expecting a single time snapshot, thus simplifying software design and allowing adoption into existing pipeline frameworks. Our architecture also continues to work well in parallel distributed-memory environments. We demonstrate our architecture by modifying the popular VTK framework and exposing the functionality to the ParaView application. We use this framework to apply time-dependent algorithms on large data with a parallel cluster computer and thereby exercise a functionality that previously did not exist.

  5. On evaluating parallel computer systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, George B., III; Brown, Robert L.; Denning, Peter J.

    1985-01-01

    A workshop was held in an attempt to program real problems on the MIT Static Data Flow Machine. Most of the architecture of the machine was specified but some parts were incomplete. The main purpose for the workshop was to explore principles for the evaluation of computer systems employing new architectures. Principles explored were: (1) evaluation must be an integral, ongoing part of a project to develop a computer of radically new architecture; (2) the evaluation should seek to measure the usability of the system as well as its performance; (3) users from the application domains must be an integral part of the evaluation process; and (4) evaluation results should be fed back into the design process. It is concluded that the general organizational principles are achievable in practice from this workshop.

  6. A Massively Parallel Adaptive Fast Multipole Method on Heterogeneous Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Lashuk, Ilya; Chandramowlishwaran, Aparna; Langston, Harper; Nguyen, Tuan-Anh; Sampath, Rahul S; Shringarpure, Aashay; Vuduc, Richard; Ying, Lexing; Zorin, Denis; Biros, George

    2012-01-01

    We describe a parallel fast multipole method (FMM) for highly nonuniform distributions of particles. We employ both distributed memory parallelism (via MPI) and shared memory parallelism (via OpenMP and GPU acceleration) to rapidly evaluate two-body nonoscillatory potentials in three dimensions on heterogeneous high performance computing architectures. We have performed scalability tests with up to 30 billion particles on 196,608 cores on the AMD/CRAY-based Jaguar system at ORNL. On a GPU-enabled system (NSF's Keeneland at Georgia Tech/ORNL), we observed 30x speedup over a single core CPU and 7x speedup over a multicore CPU implementation. By combining GPUs with MPI, we achieve less than 10 ns/particle and six digits of accuracy for a run with 48 million nonuniformly distributed particles on 192 GPUs.

  7. Application of parallelized software architecture to an autonomous ground vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakya, Rahul; Wright, Adam; Shin, Young Ho; Momin, Orko; Petkovsek, Steven; Wortman, Paul; Gautam, Prasanna; Norton, Adam

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents improvements made to Q, an autonomous ground vehicle designed to participate in the Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition (IGVC). For the 2010 IGVC, Q was upgraded with a new parallelized software architecture and a new vision processor. Improvements were made to the power system reducing the number of batteries required for operation from six to one. In previous years, a single state machine was used to execute the bulk of processing activities including sensor interfacing, data processing, path planning, navigation algorithms and motor control. This inefficient approach led to poor software performance and made it difficult to maintain or modify. For IGVC 2010, the team implemented a modular parallel architecture using the National Instruments (NI) LabVIEW programming language. The new architecture divides all the necessary tasks - motor control, navigation, sensor data collection, etc. into well-organized components that execute in parallel, providing considerable flexibility and facilitating efficient use of processing power. Computer vision is used to detect white lines on the ground and determine their location relative to the robot. With the new vision processor and some optimization of the image processing algorithm used last year, two frames can be acquired and processed in 70ms. With all these improvements, Q placed 2nd in the autonomous challenge.

  8. CFD Research, Parallel Computation and Aerodynamic Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, James S.

    1995-01-01

    During the last five years, CFD has matured substantially. Pure CFD research remains to be done, but much of the focus has shifted to integration of CFD into the design process. The work under these cooperative agreements reflects this trend. The recent work, and work which is planned, is designed to enhance the competitiveness of the US aerospace industry. CFD and optimization approaches are being developed and tested, so that the industry can better choose which methods to adopt in their design processes. The range of computer architectures has been dramatically broadened, as the assumption that only huge vector supercomputers could be useful has faded. Today, researchers and industry can trade off time, cost, and availability, choosing vector supercomputers, scalable parallel architectures, networked workstations, or heterogenous combinations of these to complete required computations efficiently.

  9. Computational electromagnetics and parallel dense matrix computations

    SciTech Connect

    Forsman, K.; Kettunen, L.; Gropp, W.; Levine, D.

    1995-06-01

    We present computational results using CORAL, a parallel, three-dimensional, nonlinear magnetostatic code based on a volume integral equation formulation. A key feature of CORAL is the ability to solve, in parallel, the large, dense systems of linear equations that are inherent in the use of integral equation methods. Using the Chameleon and PSLES libraries ensures portability and access to the latest linear algebra solution technology.

  10. Computational electromagnetics and parallel dense matrix computations

    SciTech Connect

    Forsman, K.; Kettunen, L.; Gropp, W.

    1995-12-01

    We present computational results using CORAL, a parallel, three-dimensional, nonlinear magnetostatic code based on a volume integral equation formulation. A key feature of CORAL is the ability to solve, in parallel, the large, dense systems of linear equations that are inherent in the use of integral equation methods. Using the Chameleon and PSLES libraries ensures portability and access to the latest linear algebra solution technology.

  11. Merlin - Massively parallel heterogeneous computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wittie, Larry; Maples, Creve

    1989-01-01

    Hardware and software for Merlin, a new kind of massively parallel computing system, are described. Eight computers are linked as a 300-MIPS prototype to develop system software for a larger Merlin network with 16 to 64 nodes, totaling 600 to 3000 MIPS. These working prototypes help refine a mapped reflective memory technique that offers a new, very general way of linking many types of computer to form supercomputers. Processors share data selectively and rapidly on a word-by-word basis. Fast firmware virtual circuits are reconfigured to match topological needs of individual application programs. Merlin's low-latency memory-sharing interfaces solve many problems in the design of high-performance computing systems. The Merlin prototypes are intended to run parallel programs for scientific applications and to determine hardware and software needs for a future Teraflops Merlin network.

  12. Merlin - Massively parallel heterogeneous computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wittie, Larry; Maples, Creve

    1989-01-01

    Hardware and software for Merlin, a new kind of massively parallel computing system, are described. Eight computers are linked as a 300-MIPS prototype to develop system software for a larger Merlin network with 16 to 64 nodes, totaling 600 to 3000 MIPS. These working prototypes help refine a mapped reflective memory technique that offers a new, very general way of linking many types of computer to form supercomputers. Processors share data selectively and rapidly on a word-by-word basis. Fast firmware virtual circuits are reconfigured to match topological needs of individual application programs. Merlin's low-latency memory-sharing interfaces solve many problems in the design of high-performance computing systems. The Merlin prototypes are intended to run parallel programs for scientific applications and to determine hardware and software needs for a future Teraflops Merlin network.

  13. Layered Architecture for Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, N. Cody; Van Meter, Rodney; Fowler, Austin G.; McMahon, Peter L.; Kim, Jungsang; Ladd, Thaddeus D.; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2012-07-01

    We develop a layered quantum-computer architecture, which is a systematic framework for tackling the individual challenges of developing a quantum computer while constructing a cohesive device design. We discuss many of the prominent techniques for implementing circuit-model quantum computing and introduce several new methods, with an emphasis on employing surface-code quantum error correction. In doing so, we propose a new quantum-computer architecture based on optical control of quantum dots. The time scales of physical-hardware operations and logical, error-corrected quantum gates differ by several orders of magnitude. By dividing functionality into layers, we can design and analyze subsystems independently, demonstrating the value of our layered architectural approach. Using this concrete hardware platform, we provide resource analysis for executing fault-tolerant quantum algorithms for integer factoring and quantum simulation, finding that the quantum-dot architecture we study could solve such problems on the time scale of days.

  14. Computing architecture for autonomous microgrids

    DOEpatents

    Goldsmith, Steven Y.

    2015-09-29

    A computing architecture that facilitates autonomously controlling operations of a microgrid is described herein. A microgrid network includes numerous computing devices that execute intelligent agents, each of which is assigned to a particular entity (load, source, storage device, or switch) in the microgrid. The intelligent agents can execute in accordance with predefined protocols to collectively perform computations that facilitate uninterrupted control of the .

  15. Computing contingency statistics in parallel.

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Janine Camille; Thompson, David; Pebay, Philippe Pierre

    2010-09-01

    Statistical analysis is typically used to reduce the dimensionality of and infer meaning from data. A key challenge of any statistical analysis package aimed at large-scale, distributed data is to address the orthogonal issues of parallel scalability and numerical stability. Many statistical techniques, e.g., descriptive statistics or principal component analysis, are based on moments and co-moments and, using robust online update formulas, can be computed in an embarrassingly parallel manner, amenable to a map-reduce style implementation. In this paper we focus on contingency tables, through which numerous derived statistics such as joint and marginal probability, point-wise mutual information, information entropy, and {chi}{sup 2} independence statistics can be directly obtained. However, contingency tables can become large as data size increases, requiring a correspondingly large amount of communication between processors. This potential increase in communication prevents optimal parallel speedup and is the main difference with moment-based statistics where the amount of inter-processor communication is independent of data size. Here we present the design trade-offs which we made to implement the computation of contingency tables in parallel.We also study the parallel speedup and scalability properties of our open source implementation. In particular, we observe optimal speed-up and scalability when the contingency statistics are used in their appropriate context, namely, when the data input is not quasi-diffuse.

  16. Advanced high-performance computer system architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradov, V. I.

    2007-02-01

    Convergence of computer systems and communication technologies are moving to switched high-performance modular system architectures on the basis of high-speed switched interconnections. Multi-core processors become more perspective way to high-performance system, and traditional parallel bus system architectures (VME/VXI, cPCI/PXI) are moving to new higher speed serial switched interconnections. Fundamentals in system architecture development are compact modular component strategy, low-power processor, new serial high-speed interface chips on the board, and high-speed switched fabric for SAN architectures. Overview of advanced modular concepts and new international standards for development high-performance embedded and compact modular systems for real-time applications are described.

  17. Kalman Filter Tracking on Parallel Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerati, Giuseppe; Elmer, Peter; Lantz, Steven; McDermott, Kevin; Riley, Dan; Tadel, Matevž; Wittich, Peter; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avi

    2015-12-01

    Power density constraints are limiting the performance improvements of modern CPUs. To address this we have seen the introduction of lower-power, multi-core processors, but the future will be even more exciting. In order to stay within the power density limits but still obtain Moore's Law performance/price gains, it will be necessary to parallelize algorithms to exploit larger numbers of lightweight cores and specialized functions like large vector units. Example technologies today include Intel's Xeon Phi and GPGPUs. Track finding and fitting is one of the most computationally challenging problems for event reconstruction in particle physics. At the High Luminosity LHC, for example, this will be by far the dominant problem. The need for greater parallelism has driven investigations of very different track finding techniques including Cellular Automata or returning to Hough Transform. The most common track finding techniques in use today are however those based on the Kalman Filter [2]. Significant experience has been accumulated with these techniques on real tracking detector systems, both in the trigger and offline. They are known to provide high physics performance, are robust and are exactly those being used today for the design of the tracking system for HL-LHC. Our previous investigations showed that, using optimized data structures, track fitting with Kalman Filter can achieve large speedup both with Intel Xeon and Xeon Phi. We report here our further progress towards an end-to-end track reconstruction algorithm fully exploiting vectorization and parallelization techniques in a realistic simulation setup.

  18. Visualizing Parallel Computer System Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malony, Allen D.; Reed, Daniel A.

    1988-01-01

    Parallel computer systems are among the most complex of man's creations, making satisfactory performance characterization difficult. Despite this complexity, there are strong, indeed, almost irresistible, incentives to quantify parallel system performance using a single metric. The fallacy lies in succumbing to such temptations. A complete performance characterization requires not only an analysis of the system's constituent levels, it also requires both static and dynamic characterizations. Static or average behavior analysis may mask transients that dramatically alter system performance. Although the human visual system is remarkedly adept at interpreting and identifying anomalies in false color data, the importance of dynamic, visual scientific data presentation has only recently been recognized Large, complex parallel system pose equally vexing performance interpretation problems. Data from hardware and software performance monitors must be presented in ways that emphasize important events while eluding irrelevant details. Design approaches and tools for performance visualization are the subject of this paper.

  19. High Performance Parallel Computational Nanotechnology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saini, Subhash; Craw, James M. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    At a recent press conference, NASA Administrator Dan Goldin encouraged NASA Ames Research Center to take a lead role in promoting research and development of advanced, high-performance computer technology, including nanotechnology. Manufacturers of leading-edge microprocessors currently perform large-scale simulations in the design and verification of semiconductor devices and microprocessors. Recently, the need for this intensive simulation and modeling analysis has greatly increased, due in part to the ever-increasing complexity of these devices, as well as the lessons of experiences such as the Pentium fiasco. Simulation, modeling, testing, and validation will be even more important for designing molecular computers because of the complex specification of millions of atoms, thousands of assembly steps, as well as the simulation and modeling needed to ensure reliable, robust and efficient fabrication of the molecular devices. The software for this capacity does not exist today, but it can be extrapolated from the software currently used in molecular modeling for other applications: semi-empirical methods, ab initio methods, self-consistent field methods, Hartree-Fock methods, molecular mechanics; and simulation methods for diamondoid structures. In as much as it seems clear that the application of such methods in nanotechnology will require powerful, highly powerful systems, this talk will discuss techniques and issues for performing these types of computations on parallel systems. We will describe system design issues (memory, I/O, mass storage, operating system requirements, special user interface issues, interconnects, bandwidths, and programming languages) involved in parallel methods for scalable classical, semiclassical, quantum, molecular mechanics, and continuum models; molecular nanotechnology computer-aided designs (NanoCAD) techniques; visualization using virtual reality techniques of structural models and assembly sequences; software required to

  20. High Performance Parallel Computational Nanotechnology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saini, Subhash; Craw, James M. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    At a recent press conference, NASA Administrator Dan Goldin encouraged NASA Ames Research Center to take a lead role in promoting research and development of advanced, high-performance computer technology, including nanotechnology. Manufacturers of leading-edge microprocessors currently perform large-scale simulations in the design and verification of semiconductor devices and microprocessors. Recently, the need for this intensive simulation and modeling analysis has greatly increased, due in part to the ever-increasing complexity of these devices, as well as the lessons of experiences such as the Pentium fiasco. Simulation, modeling, testing, and validation will be even more important for designing molecular computers because of the complex specification of millions of atoms, thousands of assembly steps, as well as the simulation and modeling needed to ensure reliable, robust and efficient fabrication of the molecular devices. The software for this capacity does not exist today, but it can be extrapolated from the software currently used in molecular modeling for other applications: semi-empirical methods, ab initio methods, self-consistent field methods, Hartree-Fock methods, molecular mechanics; and simulation methods for diamondoid structures. In as much as it seems clear that the application of such methods in nanotechnology will require powerful, highly powerful systems, this talk will discuss techniques and issues for performing these types of computations on parallel systems. We will describe system design issues (memory, I/O, mass storage, operating system requirements, special user interface issues, interconnects, bandwidths, and programming languages) involved in parallel methods for scalable classical, semiclassical, quantum, molecular mechanics, and continuum models; molecular nanotechnology computer-aided designs (NanoCAD) techniques; visualization using virtual reality techniques of structural models and assembly sequences; software required to

  1. Parallel distributed computing using Python

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalcin, Lisandro D.; Paz, Rodrigo R.; Kler, Pablo A.; Cosimo, Alejandro

    2011-09-01

    This work presents two software components aimed to relieve the costs of accessing high-performance parallel computing resources within a Python programming environment: MPI for Python and PETSc for Python. MPI for Python is a general-purpose Python package that provides bindings for the Message Passing Interface (MPI) standard using any back-end MPI implementation. Its facilities allow parallel Python programs to easily exploit multiple processors using the message passing paradigm. PETSc for Python provides access to the Portable, Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computation (PETSc) libraries. Its facilities allow sequential and parallel Python applications to exploit state of the art algorithms and data structures readily available in PETSc for the solution of large-scale problems in science and engineering. MPI for Python and PETSc for Python are fully integrated to PETSc-FEM, an MPI and PETSc based parallel, multiphysics, finite elements code developed at CIMEC laboratory. This software infrastructure supports research activities related to simulation of fluid flows with applications ranging from the design of microfluidic devices for biochemical analysis to modeling of large-scale stream/aquifer interactions.

  2. Highly parallel reconfigurable computer architecture for robotic computation having plural processor cells each having right and left ensembles of plural processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, Amir (Inventor); Bejczy, Antal K. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    In a computer having a large number of single-instruction multiple data (SIMD) processors, each of the SIMD processors has two sets of three individual processor elements controlled by a master control unit and interconnected among a plurality of register file units where data is stored. The register files input and output data in synchronism with a minor cycle clock under control of two slave control units controlling the register file units connected to respective ones of the two sets of processor elements. Depending upon which ones of the register file units are enabled to store or transmit data during a particular minor clock cycle, the processor elements within an SIMD processor are connected in rings or in pipeline arrays, and may exchange data with the internal bus or with neighboring SIMD processors through interface units controlled by respective ones of the two slave control units.

  3. Parallel processing for scientific computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkhatib, Hasan S.

    1995-01-01

    The scope of this project dealt with the investigation of the requirements to support distributed computing of scientific computations over a cluster of cooperative workstations. Various experiments on computations for the solution of simultaneous linear equations were performed in the early phase of the project to gain experience in the general nature and requirements of scientific applications. A specification of a distributed integrated computing environment, DICE, based on a distributed shared memory communication paradigm has been developed and evaluated. The distributed shared memory model facilitates porting existing parallel algorithms that have been designed for shared memory multiprocessor systems to the new environment. The potential of this new environment is to provide supercomputing capability through the utilization of the aggregate power of workstations cooperating in a cluster interconnected via a local area network. Workstations, generally, do not have the computing power to tackle complex scientific applications, making them primarily useful for visualization, data reduction, and filtering as far as complex scientific applications are concerned. There is a tremendous amount of computing power that is left unused in a network of workstations. Very often a workstation is simply sitting idle on a desk. A set of tools can be developed to take advantage of this potential computing power to create a platform suitable for large scientific computations. The integration of several workstations into a logical cluster of distributed, cooperative, computing stations presents an alternative to shared memory multiprocessor systems. In this project we designed and evaluated such a system.

  4. A biconjugate gradient type algorithm on massively parallel architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, Roland W.; Hochbruck, Marlis

    1991-01-01

    The biconjugate gradient (BCG) method is the natural generalization of the classical conjugate gradient algorithm for Hermitian positive definite matrices to general non-Hermitian linear systems. Unfortunately, the original BCG algorithm is susceptible to possible breakdowns and numerical instabilities. Recently, Freund and Nachtigal have proposed a novel BCG type approach, the quasi-minimal residual method (QMR), which overcomes the problems of BCG. Here, an implementation is presented of QMR based on an s-step version of the nonsymmetric look-ahead Lanczos algorithm. The main feature of the s-step Lanczos algorithm is that, in general, all inner products, except for one, can be computed in parallel at the end of each block; this is unlike the other standard Lanczos process where inner products are generated sequentially. The resulting implementation of QMR is particularly attractive on massively parallel SIMD architectures, such as the Connection Machine.

  5. Programming parallel architectures - The BLAZE family of languages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehrotra, Piyush

    1989-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the various approaches to programming multiprocessor architectures that are currently being explored. It is argued that two of these approaches, interactive programming environments and functional parallel languages, are particularly attractive, since they remove much of the burden of exploiting parallel architectures from the user. This paper also describes recent work in the design of parallel languages. Research on languages for both shared and nonshared memory multiprocessors is described.

  6. Architecture and data processing alternatives for the TSE computer. Volume 3: Execution of a parallel counting algorithm using array logic (Tse) devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalfe, A. G.; Bodenheimer, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    A parallel algorithm for counting the number of logic-l elements in a binary array or image developed during preliminary investigation of the Tse concept is described. The counting algorithm is implemented using a basic combinational structure. Modifications which improve the efficiency of the basic structure are also presented. A programmable Tse computer structure is proposed, along with a hardware control unit, Tse instruction set, and software program for execution of the counting algorithm. Finally, a comparison is made between the different structures in terms of their more important characteristics.

  7. Performance of the Wavelet Decomposition on Massively Parallel Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Ghazawi, Tarek A.; LeMoigne, Jacqueline; Zukor, Dorothy (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Traditionally, Fourier Transforms have been utilized for performing signal analysis and representation. But although it is straightforward to reconstruct a signal from its Fourier transform, no local description of the signal is included in its Fourier representation. To alleviate this problem, Windowed Fourier transforms and then wavelet transforms have been introduced, and it has been proven that wavelets give a better localization than traditional Fourier transforms, as well as a better division of the time- or space-frequency plane than Windowed Fourier transforms. Because of these properties and after the development of several fast algorithms for computing the wavelet representation of any signal, in particular the Multi-Resolution Analysis (MRA) developed by Mallat, wavelet transforms have increasingly been applied to signal analysis problems, especially real-life problems, in which speed is critical. In this paper we present and compare efficient wavelet decomposition algorithms on different parallel architectures. We report and analyze experimental measurements, using NASA remotely sensed images. Results show that our algorithms achieve significant performance gains on current high performance parallel systems, and meet scientific applications and multimedia requirements. The extensive performance measurements collected over a number of high-performance computer systems have revealed important architectural characteristics of these systems, in relation to the processing demands of the wavelet decomposition of digital images.

  8. Software Defined Radio with Parallelized Software Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckler, Greg

    2013-01-01

    This software implements software-defined radio procession over multi-core, multi-CPU systems in a way that maximizes the use of CPU resources in the system. The software treats each processing step in either a communications or navigation modulator or demodulator system as an independent, threaded block. Each threaded block is defined with a programmable number of input or output buffers; these buffers are implemented using POSIX pipes. In addition, each threaded block is assigned a unique thread upon block installation. A modulator or demodulator system is built by assembly of the threaded blocks into a flow graph, which assembles the processing blocks to accomplish the desired signal processing. This software architecture allows the software to scale effortlessly between single CPU/single-core computers or multi-CPU/multi-core computers without recompilation. NASA spaceflight and ground communications systems currently rely exclusively on ASICs or FPGAs. This software allows low- and medium-bandwidth (100 bps to .50 Mbps) software defined radios to be designed and implemented solely in C/C++ software, while lowering development costs and facilitating reuse and extensibility.

  9. Software Defined Radio with Parallelized Software Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckler, Greg

    2013-01-01

    This software implements software-defined radio procession over multicore, multi-CPU systems in a way that maximizes the use of CPU resources in the system. The software treats each processing step in either a communications or navigation modulator or demodulator system as an independent, threaded block. Each threaded block is defined with a programmable number of input or output buffers; these buffers are implemented using POSIX pipes. In addition, each threaded block is assigned a unique thread upon block installation. A modulator or demodulator system is built by assembly of the threaded blocks into a flow graph, which assembles the processing blocks to accomplish the desired signal processing. This software architecture allows the software to scale effortlessly between single CPU/single-core computers or multi-CPU/multi-core computers without recompilation. NASA spaceflight and ground communications systems currently rely exclusively on ASICs or FPGAs. This software allows low- and medium-bandwidth (100 bps to approx.50 Mbps) software defined radios to be designed and implemented solely in C/C++ software, while lowering development costs and facilitating reuse and extensibility.

  10. Fluid dynamics parallel computer development at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, James C.; Zang, Thomas A.; Dwoyer, Douglas L.

    1987-01-01

    To accomplish more detailed simulations of highly complex flows, such as the transition to turbulence, fluid dynamics research requires computers much more powerful than any available today. Only parallel processing on multiple-processor computers offers hope for achieving the required effective speeds. Looking ahead to the use of these machines, the fluid dynamicist faces three issues: algorithm development for near-term parallel computers, architecture development for future computer power increases, and assessment of possible advantages of special purpose designs. Two projects at NASA Langley address these issues. Software development and algorithm exploration is being done on the FLEX/32 Parallel Processing Research Computer. New architecture features are being explored in the special purpose hardware design of the Navier-Stokes Computer. These projects are complementary and are producing promising results.

  11. Fluid dynamics parallel computer development at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, James C.; Zang, Thomas A.; Dwoyer, Douglas L.

    1987-01-01

    To accomplish more detailed simulations of highly complex flows, such as the transition to turbulence, fluid dynamics research requires computers much more powerful than any available today. Only parallel processing on multiple-processor computers offers hope for achieving the required effective speeds. Looking ahead to the use of these machines, the fluid dynamicist faces three issues: algorithm development for near-term parallel computers, architecture development for future computer power increases, and assessment of possible advantages of special purpose designs. Two projects at NASA Langley address these issues. Software development and algorithm exploration is being done on the FLEX/32 Parallel Processing Research Computer. New architecture features are being explored in the special purpose hardware design of the Navier-Stokes Computer. These projects are complementary and are producing promising results.

  12. Design of a massively parallel computer using bit serial processing elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aburdene, Maurice F.; Khouri, Kamal S.; Piatt, Jason E.; Zheng, Jianqing

    1995-01-01

    A 1-bit serial processor designed for a parallel computer architecture is described. This processor is used to develop a massively parallel computational engine, with a single instruction-multiple data (SIMD) architecture. The computer is simulated and tested to verify its operation and to measure its performance for further development.

  13. Parallel computation of Gaussian processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preuss, R.; von Toussaint, U.

    2017-06-01

    Within the Bayesian framework we utilize Gaussian processes for parametric studies of long running computer codes. Since the simulations are expensive it is necessary to exploit the computational budget in the best possible manner. Employing the sum over variances - being indicators for the quality of the fit - as the utility function we established an optimized and automated sequential parameter selection procedure. However, often it is also desirable to utilize the parallel running capabilities of present computer technology and abandon the sequential parameter selection for a faster overall turn-around time (wall-clock time). The paper proposes to achieve this by marginalizing over the expected outcomes at optimized test points in order to set up a pool of starting values for batch execution.

  14. A distributed parallel storage architecture and its potential application within EOSDIS

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, W.E.; Tierney, B.; Feuquay, J.; Butzer, T.

    1995-01-01

    We describe the architecture, implementation, use, and potential use of a scale, high-performance, distributed-parallel data storage system developed in the ARPA funded MAGIC gigabit testbed. A collection of wide area distributed disk servers operate in parallel to provide logical block level access to large data sets. Operated primarily as a network-based cache, the architecture supports cooperation among independently owned resources to provide fast, large-scale, on-demand storage to support data handling, simulation, and computation.

  15. A distributed parallel storage architecture and its potential application within EOSDIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, William E.; Tierney, Brian; Feuquay, Jay; Butzer, Tony

    1994-01-01

    We describe the architecture, implementation, use of a scalable, high performance, distributed-parallel data storage system developed in the ARPA funded MAGIC gigabit testbed. A collection of wide area distributed disk servers operate in parallel to provide logical block level access to large data sets. Operated primarily as a network-based cache, the architecture supports cooperation among independently owned resources to provide fast, large-scale, on-demand storage to support data handling, simulation, and computation.

  16. Savannah River Site computing architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-29

    A computing architecture is a framework for making decisions about the implementation of computer technology and the supporting infrastructure. Because of the size, diversity, and amount of resources dedicated to computing at the Savannah River Site (SRS), there must be an overall strategic plan that can be followed by the thousands of site personnel who make decisions daily that directly affect the SRS computing environment and impact the site's production and business systems. This plan must address the following requirements: There must be SRS-wide standards for procurement or development of computing systems (hardware and software). The site computing organizations must develop systems that end users find easy to use. Systems must be put in place to support the primary function of site information workers. The developers of computer systems must be given tools that automate and speed up the development of information systems and applications based on computer technology. This document describes a proposal for a site-wide computing architecture that addresses the above requirements. In summary, this architecture is standards-based data-driven, and workstation-oriented with larger systems being utilized for the delivery of needed information to users in a client-server relationship.

  17. Savannah River Site computing architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-29

    A computing architecture is a framework for making decisions about the implementation of computer technology and the supporting infrastructure. Because of the size, diversity, and amount of resources dedicated to computing at the Savannah River Site (SRS), there must be an overall strategic plan that can be followed by the thousands of site personnel who make decisions daily that directly affect the SRS computing environment and impact the site`s production and business systems. This plan must address the following requirements: There must be SRS-wide standards for procurement or development of computing systems (hardware and software). The site computing organizations must develop systems that end users find easy to use. Systems must be put in place to support the primary function of site information workers. The developers of computer systems must be given tools that automate and speed up the development of information systems and applications based on computer technology. This document describes a proposal for a site-wide computing architecture that addresses the above requirements. In summary, this architecture is standards-based data-driven, and workstation-oriented with larger systems being utilized for the delivery of needed information to users in a client-server relationship.

  18. Optoelectronic parallel-matching architecture: architecture description, performance estimation, and prototype demonstration.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, K; Nitta, K; Ogura, Y; Tanida, J; Ichioka, Y

    2001-01-10

    We propose an optoelectronic parallel-matching architecture (PMA) that provides powerful processing capabilities in global processing compared with conventional parallel-computing architectures. The PMA is composed of a global processor called a parallel-matching (PM) module and multiple processing elements (PE's). The PM module is implemented by a large-fan-out free-space optical interconnection and a PM smart-pixel array (PM-SPA). In the proposed architecture, by means of the PM module each PE can monitor the other PE's by use of several kinds of global data matching as well as interprocessor communication. Theoretical evaluation of the performance shows that the proposed PMA provides tremendous improvement in global processing. A prototype demonstrator of the PM module is constructed on the basis of state-of-the-art optoelectronic devices and a diffractive optical element. The prototype is assumed for use in a multiple-processor system composed of 4 x 4 PE's that are completely connected through bit-serial optical communication channels. The PM-SPA is emulated by a complex programmable device and a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor photodetector array. On the prototype demonstrator the fundamental operations of the PM module were verified at 15 MHz.

  19. Efficient tree codes on SIMD computer architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Kevin M.

    1996-11-01

    This paper describes changes made to a previous implementation of an N -body tree code developed for a fine-grained, SIMD computer architecture. These changes include (1) switching from a balanced binary tree to a balanced oct tree, (2) addition of quadrupole corrections, and (3) having the particles search the tree in groups rather than individually. An algorithm for limiting errors is also discussed. In aggregate, these changes have led to a performance increase of over a factor of 10 compared to the previous code. For problems several times larger than the processor array, the code now achieves performance levels of ~ 1 Gflop on the Maspar MP-2 or roughly 20% of the quoted peak performance of this machine. This percentage is competitive with other parallel implementations of tree codes on MIMD architectures. This is significant, considering the low relative cost of SIMD architectures.

  20. Computer Electromagnetics and Supercomputer Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cwik, Tom

    1993-01-01

    The dramatic increase in performance over the last decade for microporcessor computations is compared with that for the supercomputer computations. This performance, the projected performance, and a number of other issues such as cost and the inherent pysical limitations in curent supercomputer technology have naturally led to parallel supercomputers and ensemble of interconnected microprocessors.

  1. Trajectory optimization using parallel shooting method on parallel computer

    SciTech Connect

    Wirthman, D.J.; Park, S.Y.; Vadali, S.R.

    1995-03-01

    The efficiency of a parallel shooting method on a parallel computer for solving a variety of optimal control guidance problems is studied. Several examples are considered to demonstrate that a speedup of nearly 7 to 1 is achieved with the use of 16 processors. It is suggested that further improvements in performance can be achieved by parallelizing in the state domain. 10 refs.

  2. Parallelized reliability estimation of reconfigurable computer networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.; Das, Subhendu; Palumbo, Dan

    1990-01-01

    A parallelized system, ASSURE, for computing the reliability of embedded avionics flight control systems which are able to reconfigure themselves in the event of failure is described. ASSURE accepts a grammar that describes a reliability semi-Markov state-space. From this it creates a parallel program that simultaneously generates and analyzes the state-space, placing upper and lower bounds on the probability of system failure. ASSURE is implemented on a 32-node Intel iPSC/860, and has achieved high processor efficiencies on real problems. Through a combination of improved algorithms, exploitation of parallelism, and use of an advanced microprocessor architecture, ASSURE has reduced the execution time on substantial problems by a factor of one thousand over previous workstation implementations. Furthermore, ASSURE's parallel execution rate on the iPSC/860 is an order of magnitude faster than its serial execution rate on a Cray-2 supercomputer. While dynamic load balancing is necessary for ASSURE's good performance, it is needed only infrequently; the particular method of load balancing used does not substantially affect performance.

  3. Programming parallel architectures: The BLAZE family of languages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehrotra, Piyush

    1988-01-01

    Programming multiprocessor architectures is a critical research issue. An overview is given of the various approaches to programming these architectures that are currently being explored. It is argued that two of these approaches, interactive programming environments and functional parallel languages, are particularly attractive since they remove much of the burden of exploiting parallel architectures from the user. Also described is recent work by the author in the design of parallel languages. Research on languages for both shared and nonshared memory multiprocessors is described, as well as the relations of this work to other current language research projects.

  4. Parallel Proximity Detection for Computer Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinman, Jeffrey S. (Inventor); Wieland, Frederick P. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention discloses a system for performing proximity detection in computer simulations on parallel processing architectures utilizing a distribution list which includes movers and sensor coverages which check in and out of grids. Each mover maintains a list of sensors that detect the mover's motion as the mover and sensor coverages check in and out of the grids. Fuzzy grids are included by fuzzy resolution parameters to allow movers and sensor coverages to check in and out of grids without computing exact grid crossings. The movers check in and out of grids while moving sensors periodically inform the grids of their coverage. In addition, a lookahead function is also included for providing a generalized capability without making any limiting assumptions about the particular application to which it is applied. The lookahead function is initiated so that risk-free synchronization strategies never roll back grid events. The lookahead function adds fixed delays as events are scheduled for objects on other nodes.

  5. Parallel Proximity Detection for Computer Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinman, Jeffrey S. (Inventor); Wieland, Frederick P. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention discloses a system for performing proximity detection in computer simulations on parallel processing architectures utilizing a distribution list which includes movers and sensor coverages which check in and out of grids. Each mover maintains a list of sensors that detect the mover's motion as the mover and sensor coverages check in and out of the grids. Fuzzy grids are includes by fuzzy resolution parameters to allow movers and sensor coverages to check in and out of grids without computing exact grid crossings. The movers check in and out of grids while moving sensors periodically inform the grids of their coverage. In addition, a lookahead function is also included for providing a generalized capability without making any limiting assumptions about the particular application to which it is applied. The lookahead function is initiated so that risk-free synchronization strategies never roll back grid events. The lookahead function adds fixed delays as events are scheduled for objects on other nodes.

  6. Parallel Pascal - An extended Pascal for parallel computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, A. P.

    1984-01-01

    Parallel Pascal is an extended version of the conventional serial Pascal programming language which includes a convenient syntax for specifying array operations. It is upward compatible with standard Pascal and involves only a small number of carefully chosen new features. Parallel Pascal was developed to reduce the semantic gap between standard Pascal and a large range of highly parallel computers. Two important design goals of Parallel Pascal were efficiency and portability. Portability is particularly difficult to achieve since different parallel computers frequently have very different capabilities.

  7. Parallel Pascal - An extended Pascal for parallel computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, A. P.

    1984-01-01

    Parallel Pascal is an extended version of the conventional serial Pascal programming language which includes a convenient syntax for specifying array operations. It is upward compatible with standard Pascal and involves only a small number of carefully chosen new features. Parallel Pascal was developed to reduce the semantic gap between standard Pascal and a large range of highly parallel computers. Two important design goals of Parallel Pascal were efficiency and portability. Portability is particularly difficult to achieve since different parallel computers frequently have very different capabilities.

  8. Parallel computing in enterprise modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsby, Michael E.; Armstrong, Robert C.; Shneider, Max S.; Vanderveen, Keith; Ray, Jaideep; Heath, Zach; Allan, Benjamin A.

    2008-08-01

    This report presents the results of our efforts to apply high-performance computing to entity-based simulations with a multi-use plugin for parallel computing. We use the term 'Entity-based simulation' to describe a class of simulation which includes both discrete event simulation and agent based simulation. What simulations of this class share, and what differs from more traditional models, is that the result sought is emergent from a large number of contributing entities. Logistic, economic and social simulations are members of this class where things or people are organized or self-organize to produce a solution. Entity-based problems never have an a priori ergodic principle that will greatly simplify calculations. Because the results of entity-based simulations can only be realized at scale, scalable computing is de rigueur for large problems. Having said that, the absence of a spatial organizing principal makes the decomposition of the problem onto processors problematic. In addition, practitioners in this domain commonly use the Java programming language which presents its own problems in a high-performance setting. The plugin we have developed, called the Parallel Particle Data Model, overcomes both of these obstacles and is now being used by two Sandia frameworks: the Decision Analysis Center, and the Seldon social simulation facility. While the ability to engage U.S.-sized problems is now available to the Decision Analysis Center, this plugin is central to the success of Seldon. Because Seldon relies on computationally intensive cognitive sub-models, this work is necessary to achieve the scale necessary for realistic results. With the recent upheavals in the financial markets, and the inscrutability of terrorist activity, this simulation domain will likely need a capability with ever greater fidelity. High-performance computing will play an important part in enabling that greater fidelity.

  9. Parallel computing for probabilistic fatigue analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sues, Robert H.; Lua, Yuan J.; Smith, Mark D.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the results of Phase I research to investigate the most effective parallel processing software strategies and hardware configurations for probabilistic structural analysis. We investigate the efficiency of both shared and distributed-memory architectures via a probabilistic fatigue life analysis problem. We also present a parallel programming approach, the virtual shared-memory paradigm, that is applicable across both types of hardware. Using this approach, problems can be solved on a variety of parallel configurations, including networks of single or multiprocessor workstations. We conclude that it is possible to effectively parallelize probabilistic fatigue analysis codes; however, special strategies will be needed to achieve large-scale parallelism to keep large number of processors busy and to treat problems with the large memory requirements encountered in practice. We also conclude that distributed-memory architecture is preferable to shared-memory for achieving large scale parallelism; however, in the future, the currently emerging hybrid-memory architectures will likely be optimal.

  10. Specialized computer architectures for computational aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, D. K.

    1978-01-01

    In recent years, computational fluid dynamics has made significant progress in modelling aerodynamic phenomena. Currently, one of the major barriers to future development lies in the compute-intensive nature of the numerical formulations and the relative high cost of performing these computations on commercially available general purpose computers, a cost high with respect to dollar expenditure and/or elapsed time. Today's computing technology will support a program designed to create specialized computing facilities to be dedicated to the important problems of computational aerodynamics. One of the still unresolved questions is the organization of the computing components in such a facility. The characteristics of fluid dynamic problems which will have significant impact on the choice of computer architecture for a specialized facility are reviewed.

  11. Specialized computer architectures for computational aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, D. K.

    1978-01-01

    In recent years, computational fluid dynamics has made significant progress in modelling aerodynamic phenomena. Currently, one of the major barriers to future development lies in the compute-intensive nature of the numerical formulations and the relative high cost of performing these computations on commercially available general purpose computers, a cost high with respect to dollar expenditure and/or elapsed time. Today's computing technology will support a program designed to create specialized computing facilities to be dedicated to the important problems of computational aerodynamics. One of the still unresolved questions is the organization of the computing components in such a facility. The characteristics of fluid dynamic problems which will have significant impact on the choice of computer architecture for a specialized facility are reviewed.

  12. Parallel Environment for Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabakin, Frank; Diaz, Bruno Julia

    2009-03-01

    To facilitate numerical study of noise and decoherence in QC algorithms,and of the efficacy of error correction schemes, we have developed a Fortran 90 quantum computer simulator with parallel processing capabilities. It permits rapid evaluation of quantum algorithms for a large number of qubits and for various ``noise'' scenarios. State vectors are distributed over many processors, to employ a large number of qubits. Parallel processing is implemented by the Message-Passing Interface protocol. A description of how to spread the wave function components over many processors, along with how to efficiently describe the action of general one- and two-qubit operators on these state vectors will be delineated.Grover's search and Shor's factoring algorithms with noise will be discussed as examples. A major feature of this work is that concurrent versions of the algorithms can be evaluated with each version subject to diverse noise effects, corresponding to solving a stochastic Schrodinger equation. The density matrix for the ensemble of such noise cases is constructed using parallel distribution methods to evaluate its associated entropy. Applications of this powerful tool is made to delineate the stability and correction of QC processes using Hamiltonian based dynamics.

  13. Wireless Computing Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    mechanisms are relevant to a broad spectrum of applications , but are particularly important to data broadcast in wireless distributed computing...significantly improve applications where reliable data broadcast is required. For example, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) may use Rainbow to distribute ...68-74. 8. Dean, J., Ghemawat, S., “ MapReduce : simplified data processing on large clusters ”, Communications of the ACM, 51, 1, 2008, pp. 107-113

  14. Wireless Computing Architecture II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    responsible for running computation tasks as well as storing HDFS data blocks. This arrangement is consistent with that of Amazon Elastic MapReduce clusters ...unpredictable application demands and large data sets. For example, application demands may change in response to sudden weather shifts or ―surprise...comparing TCP throughput distributions for model-generated traces against those for actual traces randomly sampled from field data . Our modeling

  15. Computing architecture for telerobots in earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejczy, A. K.; Dotson, R. S.; Szakaly, Z.

    1987-01-01

    Based on generic operational and computational requirements associated with the control of telerobots in earth orbit, a multibus-based distributed but integrated computing architecture is proposed. An experimental system of that kind under development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is briefly described. It uses Intel Multibus I at both control station and remote robot (telerobot) computing nodes. An essential element within each multibus is a Unified (or Universal) Computer Control Subsystem (UCCS) for telerobot and control station motor components. The two multibus-based computing nodes can be linked by parallel or high speed serial links for real-time data transmission and for closing the real-time bilateral (force-reflecting) control loop between telerobot and control station. The experimental system is briefly commented, followed by a brief discussion of future development plans and possibilities.

  16. VLSI Architectures for Computing DFT's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, T. K.; Chang, J. J.; Hsu, I. S.; Reed, I. S.; Pei, D. Y.

    1986-01-01

    Simplifications result from use of residue Fermat number systems. System of finite arithmetic over residue Fermat number systems enables calculation of discrete Fourier transform (DFT) of series of complex numbers with reduced number of multiplications. Computer architectures based on approach suitable for design of very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuits for computing DFT's. General approach not limited to DFT's; Applicable to decoding of error-correcting codes and other transform calculations. System readily implemented in VLSI.

  17. Computer Architecture's Changing Role in Rebooting Computing

    DOE PAGES

    DeBenedictis, Erik P.

    2017-04-26

    In this paper, Windows 95 started the Wintel era, in which Microsoft Windows running on Intel x86 microprocessors dominated the computer industry and changed the world. Retaining the x86 instruction set across many generations let users buy new and more capable microprocessors without having to buy software to work with new architectures.

  18. PEM-PCA: A Parallel Expectation-Maximization PCA Face Recognition Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Rujirakul, Kanokmon; Arnonkijpanich, Banchar

    2014-01-01

    Principal component analysis or PCA has been traditionally used as one of the feature extraction techniques in face recognition systems yielding high accuracy when requiring a small number of features. However, the covariance matrix and eigenvalue decomposition stages cause high computational complexity, especially for a large database. Thus, this research presents an alternative approach utilizing an Expectation-Maximization algorithm to reduce the determinant matrix manipulation resulting in the reduction of the stages' complexity. To improve the computational time, a novel parallel architecture was employed to utilize the benefits of parallelization of matrix computation during feature extraction and classification stages including parallel preprocessing, and their combinations, so-called a Parallel Expectation-Maximization PCA architecture. Comparing to a traditional PCA and its derivatives, the results indicate lower complexity with an insignificant difference in recognition precision leading to high speed face recognition systems, that is, the speed-up over nine and three times over PCA and Parallel PCA. PMID:24955405

  19. Parallel Computing for Brain Simulation.

    PubMed

    Pastur-Romay, L A; Porto-Pazos, A B; Cedron, F; Pazos, A

    2017-01-01

    The human brain is the most complex system in the known universe, it is therefore one of the greatest mysteries. It provides human beings with extraordinary abilities. However, until now it has not been understood yet how and why most of these abilities are produced. For decades, researchers have been trying to make computers reproduce these abilities, focusing on both understanding the nervous system and, on processing data in a more efficient way than before. Their aim is to make computers process information similarly to the brain. Important technological developments and vast multidisciplinary projects have allowed creating the first simulation with a number of neurons similar to that of a human brain. This paper presents an up-to-date review about the main research projects that are trying to simulate and/or emulate the human brain. They employ different types of computational models using parallel computing: digital models, analog models and hybrid models. This review includes the current applications of these works, as well as future trends. It is focused on various works that look for advanced progress in Neuroscience and still others which seek new discoveries in Computer Science (neuromorphic hardware, machine learning techniques). Their most outstanding characteristics are summarized and the latest advances and future plans are presented. In addition, this review points out the importance of considering not only neurons: Computational models of the brain should also include glial cells, given the proven importance of astrocytes in information processing. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Parallel computing techniques for rotorcraft aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekici, Kivanc

    The modification of unsteady three-dimensional Navier-Stokes codes for application on massively parallel and distributed computing environments is investigated. The Euler/Navier-Stokes code TURNS (Transonic Unsteady Rotor Navier-Stokes) was chosen as a test bed because of its wide use by universities and industry. For the efficient implementation of TURNS on parallel computing systems, two algorithmic changes are developed. First, main modifications to the implicit operator, Lower-Upper Symmetric Gauss Seidel (LU-SGS) originally used in TURNS, is performed. Second, application of an inexact Newton method, coupled with a Krylov subspace iterative method (Newton-Krylov method) is carried out. Both techniques have been tried previously for the Euler equations mode of the code. In this work, we have extended the methods to the Navier-Stokes mode. Several new implicit operators were tried because of convergence problems of traditional operators with the high cell aspect ratio (CAR) grids needed for viscous calculations on structured grids. Promising results for both Euler and Navier-Stokes cases are presented for these operators. For the efficient implementation of Newton-Krylov methods to the Navier-Stokes mode of TURNS, efficient preconditioners must be used. The parallel implicit operators used in the previous step are employed as preconditioners and the results are compared. The Message Passing Interface (MPI) protocol has been used because of its portability to various parallel architectures. It should be noted that the proposed methodology is general and can be applied to several other CFD codes (e.g. OVERFLOW).

  1. Hypergraph partitioning implementation for parallelizing matrix-vector multiplication using CUDA GPU-based parallel computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murni, Bustamam, A.; Ernastuti, Handhika, T.; Kerami, D.

    2017-07-01

    Calculation of the matrix-vector multiplication in the real-world problems often involves large matrix with arbitrary size. Therefore, parallelization is needed to speed up the calculation process that usually takes a long time. Graph partitioning techniques that have been discussed in the previous studies cannot be used to complete the parallelized calculation of matrix-vector multiplication with arbitrary size. This is due to the assumption of graph partitioning techniques that can only solve the square and symmetric matrix. Hypergraph partitioning techniques will overcome the shortcomings of the graph partitioning technique. This paper addresses the efficient parallelization of matrix-vector multiplication through hypergraph partitioning techniques using CUDA GPU-based parallel computing. CUDA (compute unified device architecture) is a parallel computing platform and programming model that was created by NVIDIA and implemented by the GPU (graphics processing unit).

  2. Parallel Computing Using Web Servers and "Servlets".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo, Alfred; Bloor, Chris; Choi, Y. K.

    2000-01-01

    Describes parallel computing and presents inexpensive ways to implement a virtual parallel computer with multiple Web servers. Highlights include performance measurement of parallel systems; models for using Java and intranet technology including single server, multiple clients and multiple servers, single client; and a comparison of CGI (common…

  3. Broadcasting a message in a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Berg, Jeremy E.; Faraj, Ahmad A.

    2011-08-02

    Methods, systems, and products are disclosed for broadcasting a message in a parallel computer. The parallel computer includes a plurality of compute nodes connected together using a data communications network. The data communications network optimized for point to point data communications and is characterized by at least two dimensions. The compute nodes are organized into at least one operational group of compute nodes for collective parallel operations of the parallel computer. One compute node of the operational group assigned to be a logical root. Broadcasting a message in a parallel computer includes: establishing a Hamiltonian path along all of the compute nodes in at least one plane of the data communications network and in the operational group; and broadcasting, by the logical root to the remaining compute nodes, the logical root's message along the established Hamiltonian path.

  4. Implementation of a parallel unstructured Euler solver on shared and distributed memory architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.; Das, Raja; Saltz, Joel; Vermeland, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    An efficient three dimensional unstructured Euler solver is parallelized on a Cray Y-MP C90 shared memory computer and on an Intel Touchstone Delta distributed memory computer. This paper relates the experiences gained and describes the software tools and hardware used in this study. Performance comparisons between two differing architectures are made.

  5. CFD research, parallel computation and aerodynamic optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, James S.

    1995-01-01

    Over five years of research in Computational Fluid Dynamics and its applications are covered in this report. Using CFD as an established tool, aerodynamic optimization on parallel architectures is explored. The objective of this work is to provide better tools to vehicle designers. Submarine design requires accurate force and moment calculations in flow with thick boundary layers and large separated vortices. Low noise production is critical, so flow into the propulsor region must be predicted accurately. The High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) has been the subject of recent work. This vehicle is to be a passenger vehicle with the capability of cutting overseas flight times by more than half. A successful design must surpass the performance of comparable planes. Fuel economy, other operational costs, environmental impact, and range must all be improved substantially. For all these reasons, improved design tools are required, and these tools must eventually integrate optimization, external aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, heat transfer and other disciplines.

  6. SIAM Conference on Parallel Processing for Scientific Computing - March 12-14, 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Kolata, William G.

    2008-09-08

    The themes of the 2008 conference included, but were not limited to: Programming languages, models, and compilation techniques; The transition to ubiquitous multicore/manycore processors; Scientific computing on special-purpose processors (Cell, GPUs, etc.); Architecture-aware algorithms; From scalable algorithms to scalable software; Tools for software development and performance evaluation; Global perspectives on HPC; Parallel computing in industry; Distributed/grid computing; Fault tolerance; Parallel visualization and large scale data management; and The future of parallel architectures.

  7. High Performance Computing and Visualization Infrastructure for Simultaneous Parallel Computing and Parallel Visualization Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-11-09

    are summarized in an article submitted to Journal of Computational Physics [1]. Bibliography : [1] C. Ngo and W. Huang, A study on moving mesh...computing, numerical analysis, scientific computing, scientific visualization, computational fluid dynamics, computational chemistry, computational...involving simultaneous parallel computing and parallel visualization: unstructured meshing, scientific visualization, computational fluid dynamics

  8. Parallel computation of invariant measures

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, J.; Liu, Y.

    1995-12-01

    A parallel numerical algorithm for computing invariant measures is presented. Let I{sup N} {triple_bond} [0,1]{sup N} be the unit N-cube in R N and let S : I{sup N}{r_arrow} I{sup N} be a nonsingular transformation, that is, S is Borel-measurable and m(A) = 0 implies m(S{sup -1}(A)) = 0, where m is the Lebesgue measure. The motivation of this study is the parallel computation of an absolutely continuous invariant measure {mu} under S, that is, {mu} {much_lt} m and {mu}(A) = {mu}(S{sup -1}(A)) for all Borel sets A {contained_in} I{sup N}. It is well-known that an absolutely continuous finite invariant measure {mu} can be obtained by computing a fixed density of the Frobenius-Perron operator Ps: L{sup 1} (I{sup N}) {r_arrow} L{sup 1}(I{sup N}) associated with S which is defined by (1) {integral}{sub A} P{sub S}fdm = {integral}{sub s-1(A)} fdm, {forall}f {element_of} L{sup 1} (I{sup N}). Using any suitable discretization scheme, the infinite dimensional eigenvector problem P{sub S}f = f in L{sup 1}(I{sup N}) can be approximated by an algebraic eigenvector problem P{sub l}f{sub l} = f{sub l} in {gradient}{sub l}, where P{sub l} is a finite approximation of P{sub s} associated with a finite element subspace {gradient}{sub l} of L{sup l} (I{sup N}) {intersection} L{sup {infinity}} (I{sup N}). It has been shown that for P{sub l} arising from Galerkin`s projection principle or the Markov finite approximation principle, there always exists a eigenvector f{sub l} to P{sub l}, and that a sequence of normalized eigenvectors (f{sub l}) converges to the density of an absolutely continuous probability invariant measure {mu} for a class of piecewise C{sup 2} expanding maps of I{sup N} under which the existence of {mu} is guaranteed by Gora-Boyarsky`s theorem which is reduced to Lasota-Yorke`s thoerem when N = 1.

  9. A parallel Jacobson-Oksman optimization algorithm. [parallel processing (computers)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straeter, T. A.; Markos, A. T.

    1975-01-01

    A gradient-dependent optimization technique which exploits the vector-streaming or parallel-computing capabilities of some modern computers is presented. The algorithm, derived by assuming that the function to be minimized is homogeneous, is a modification of the Jacobson-Oksman serial minimization method. In addition to describing the algorithm, conditions insuring the convergence of the iterates of the algorithm and the results of numerical experiments on a group of sample test functions are presented. The results of these experiments indicate that this algorithm will solve optimization problems in less computing time than conventional serial methods on machines having vector-streaming or parallel-computing capabilities.

  10. Evaluation of fault-tolerant parallel-processor architectures over long space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sally C.

    1989-01-01

    The impact of a five year space mission environment on fault-tolerant parallel processor architectures is examined. The target application is a Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) satellite requiring 256 parallel processors to provide the computation throughput. The reliability requirements are that the system still be operational after five years with .99 probability and that the probability of system failure during one-half hour of full operation be less than 10(-7). The fault tolerance features an architecture must possess to meet these reliability requirements are presented, many potential architectures are briefly evaluated, and one candidate architecture, the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory's Fault-Tolerant Parallel Processor (FTPP) is evaluated in detail. A methodology for designing a preliminary system configuration to meet the reliability and performance requirements of the mission is then presented and demonstrated by designing an FTPP configuration.

  11. Parallel computational fluid dynamics - Implementations and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Horst D. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The present volume on parallel CFD discusses implementations on parallel machines, numerical algorithms for parallel CFD, and performance evaluation and computer science issues. Attention is given to a parallel algorithm for compressible flows through rotor-stator combinations, a massively parallel Euler solver for unstructured grids, a fast scheme to analyze 3D disk airflow on a parallel computer, and a block implicit multigrid solution of the Euler equations. Topics addressed include a 3D ADI algorithm on distributed memory multiprocessors, clustered element-by-element computations for fluid flow, hypercube FFT and the Fourier pseudospectral method, and an investigation of parallel iterative algorithms for CFD. Also discussed are fluid dynamics using interface methods on parallel processors, sorting for particle flow simulation on the connection machine, a large grain mapping method, and efforts toward a Teraflops capability for CFD.

  12. Implementing clips on a parallel computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Gary

    1987-01-01

    The C language integrated production system (CLIPS) is a forward chaining rule based language to provide training and delivery for expert systems. Conceptually, rule based languages have great potential for benefiting from the inherent parallelism of the algorithms that they employ. During each cycle of execution, a knowledge base of information is compared against a set of rules to determine if any rules are applicable. Parallelism also can be employed for use with multiple cooperating expert systems. To investigate the potential benefits of using a parallel computer to speed up the comparison of facts to rules in expert systems, a parallel version of CLIPS was developed for the FLEX/32, a large grain parallel computer. The FLEX implementation takes a macroscopic approach in achieving parallelism by splitting whole sets of rules among several processors rather than by splitting the components of an individual rule among processors. The parallel CLIPS prototype demonstrates the potential advantages of integrating expert system tools with parallel computers.

  13. Wavelet-Based DFT calculations on Massively Parallel Hybrid Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genovese, Luigi

    2011-03-01

    In this contribution, we present an implementation of a full DFT code that can run on massively parallel hybrid CPU-GPU clusters. Our implementation is based on modern GPU architectures which support double-precision floating-point numbers. This DFT code, named BigDFT, is delivered within the GNU-GPL license either in a stand-alone version or integrated in the ABINIT software package. Hybrid BigDFT routines were initially ported with NVidia's CUDA language, and recently more functionalities have been added with new routines writeen within Kronos' OpenCL standard. The formalism of this code is based on Daubechies wavelets, which is a systematic real-space based basis set. As we will see in the presentation, the properties of this basis set are well suited for an extension on a GPU-accelerated environment. In addition to focusing on the implementation of the operators of the BigDFT code, this presentation also relies of the usage of the GPU resources in a complex code with different kinds of operations. A discussion on the interest of present and expected performances of Hybrid architectures computation in the framework of electronic structure calculations is also adressed.

  14. Low complexity 1D IDCT for 16-bit parallel architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bivolarski, Lazar

    2007-09-01

    This paper shows that using the Loeffler, Ligtenberg, and Moschytz factorization of 8-point IDCT [2] one-dimensional (1-D) algorithm as a fast approximation of the Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) and using only 16 bit numbers, it is possible to create in an IEEE 1180-1990 compliant and multiplierless algorithm with low computational complexity. This algorithm as characterized by its structure is efficiently implemented on parallel high performance architectures as well as due to its low complexity is sufficient for wide range of other architectures. Additional constraint on this work was the requirement of compliance with the existing MPEG standards. The hardware implementation complexity and low resources where also part of the design criteria for this algorithm. This implementation is also compliant with the precision requirements described in MPEG IDCT precision specification ISO/IEC 23002-1. Complexity analysis is performed as an extension to the simple measure of shifts and adds for the multiplierless algorithm as additional operations are included in the complexity measure to better describe the actual transform implementation complexity.

  15. Template based parallel checkpointing in a massively parallel computer system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens; Inglett, Todd Alan

    2009-01-13

    A method and apparatus for a template based parallel checkpoint save for a massively parallel super computer system using a parallel variation of the rsync protocol, and network broadcast. In preferred embodiments, the checkpoint data for each node is compared to a template checkpoint file that resides in the storage and that was previously produced. Embodiments herein greatly decrease the amount of data that must be transmitted and stored for faster checkpointing and increased efficiency of the computer system. Embodiments are directed to a parallel computer system with nodes arranged in a cluster with a high speed interconnect that can perform broadcast communication. The checkpoint contains a set of actual small data blocks with their corresponding checksums from all nodes in the system. The data blocks may be compressed using conventional non-lossy data compression algorithms to further reduce the overall checkpoint size.

  16. Partitioning problems in parallel, pipelined and distributed computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokhari, S.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of optimally assigning the modules of a parallel program over the processors of a multiple computer system is addressed. A Sum-Bottleneck path algorithm is developed that permits the efficient solution of many variants of this problem under some constraints on the structure of the partitions. In particular, the following problems are solved optimally for a single-host, multiple satellite system: partitioning multiple chain structured parallel programs, multiple arbitrarily structured serial programs and single tree structured parallel programs. In addition, the problems of partitioning chain structured parallel programs across chain connected systems and across shared memory (or shared bus) systems are also solved under certain constraints. All solutions for parallel programs are equally applicable to pipelined programs. These results extend prior research in this area by explicitly taking concurrency into account and permit the efficient utilization of multiple computer architectures for a wide range of problems of practical interest.

  17. Partitioning problems in parallel, pipelined, and distributed computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokhari, Shahid H.

    1988-01-01

    The problem of optimally assigning the modules of a parallel program over the processors of a multiple-computer system is addressed. A sum-bottleneck path algorithm is developed that permits the efficient solution of many variants of this problem under some constraints on the structure of the partitions. In particular, the following problems are solved optimally for a single-host, multiple-satellite system: partitioning multiple chain-structured parallel programs, multiple arbitrarily structured serial programs, and single-tree structured parallel programs. In addition, the problem of partitioning chain-structured parallel programs across chain-connected systems is solved under certain constraints. All solutions for parallel programs are equally applicable to pipelined programs. These results extend prior research in this area by explicitly taking concurrency into account and permit the efficient utilization of multiple-computer architectures for a wide range of problems of practical interest.

  18. Parallel machine architecture for production rule systems

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Jr., John D.; Butler, Philip L.

    1989-01-01

    A parallel processing system for production rule programs utilizes a host processor for storing production rule right hand sides (RHS) and a plurality of rule processors for storing left hand sides (LHS). The rule processors operate in parallel in the recognize phase of the system recognize -Act Cycle to match their respective LHS's against a stored list of working memory elements (WME) in order to find a self consistent set of WME's. The list of WME is dynamically varied during the Act phase of the system in which the host executes or fires rule RHS's for those rules for which a self-consistent set has been found by the rule processors. The host transmits instructions for creating or deleting working memory elements as dictated by the rule firings until the rule processors are unable to find any further self-consistent working memory element sets at which time the production rule system is halted.

  19. A parallel-pipelined architecture for a multi carrier demodulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwatra, S. C.; Jamali, M. M.; Eugene, Linus P.

    1991-03-01

    Analog devices have been used for processing the information on board the satellites. Presently, digital devices are being used because they are economical and flexible as compared to their analog counterparts. Several schemes of digital transmission can be used depending on the data rate requirement of the user. An economical scheme of transmission for small earth stations uses single channel per carrier/frequency division multiple access (SCPC/FDMA) on the uplink and time division multiplexing (TDM) on the downlink. This is a typical communication service offered to low data rate users in commercial mass market. These channels usually pertain to either voice or data transmission. An efficient digital demodulator architecture is provided for a large number of law data rate users. A demodulator primarily consists of carrier, clock, and data recovery modules. This design uses principles of parallel processing, pipelining, and time sharing schemes to process large numbers of voice or data channels. It maintains the optimum throughput which is derived from the designed architecture and from the use of high speed components. The design is optimized for reduced power and area requirements. This is essential for satellite applications. The design is also flexible in processing a group of a varying number of channels. The algorithms that are used are verified by the use of a computer aided software engineering (CASE) tool called the Block Oriented System Simulator. The data flow, control circuitry, and interface of the hardware design is simulated in C language. Also, a multiprocessor approach is provided to map, model, and simulate the demodulation algorithms mainly from a speed view point. A hypercude based architecture implementation is provided for such a scheme of operation. The hypercube structure and the demodulation models on hypercubes are simulated in Ada.

  20. Parallelization of ARC3D with Computer-Aided Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Haoqiang; Hribar, Michelle; Yan, Jerry; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A series of efforts have been devoted to investigating methods of porting and parallelizing applications quickly and efficiently for new architectures, such as the SCSI Origin 2000 and Cray T3E. This report presents the parallelization of a CFD application, ARC3D, using the computer-aided tools, Cesspools. Steps of parallelizing this code and requirements of achieving better performance are discussed. The generated parallel version has achieved reasonably well performance, for example, having a speedup of 30 for 36 Cray T3E processors. However, this performance could not be obtained without modification of the original serial code. It is suggested that in many cases improving serial code and performing necessary code transformations are important parts for the automated parallelization process although user intervention in many of these parts are still necessary. Nevertheless, development and improvement of useful software tools, such as Cesspools, can help trim down many tedious parallelization details and improve the processing efficiency.

  1. VLTI fringe tracking real time computer architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abuter, Roberto; di Lieto, Nicola; Schmid, Christian

    2012-07-01

    Fringe tracking is a CPU intensive real time application. Rates of up to 1 KHz are needed to be able to freeze the atmosphere; in addition, each available baseline must be tracked independently. To be able to overcome the CPU performance limits, VLTI 1st generation trackers PRIMA fringe sensor unit (FSU) and FINITO were implemented in a distributed architecture separating the sensor from the controller. A side effect of this design was that the control loop delay increases as the system runs asynchronously causing an increase of the phase RMS value. This is in conflict with the objective of stabilizing the fringes with the smallest possible phase RMS. VLTI 2nd generation trackers (GRAVITY 6 and ESO 2GFT) currently being designed, will operate with up to six baselines and need to achieve phase RMS values smaller than 200 [nm]. This paper will present the computer architecture of the first generation trackers. Using simulations carried out in the PRIMA testbed, the induction of phase RMS by additional pure delays of the control loop will be precisely quantify. Afterwards, using the current architecture as reference, expected values of pure delays will be estimated for a six baselines tracker. Finally, an in order to overcome this problem, a new design that exploits the inherent parallelism of the multiples baselines and integrates the sensor and the controller in a single computer will be briefly proposed.

  2. Reservoir Thermal Recover Simulation on Parallel Computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baoyan; Ma, Yuanle

    The rapid development of parallel computers has provided a hardware background for massive refine reservoir simulation. However, the lack of parallel reservoir simulation software has blocked the application of parallel computers on reservoir simulation. Although a variety of parallel methods have been studied and applied to black oil, compositional, and chemical model numerical simulations, there has been limited parallel software available for reservoir simulation. Especially, the parallelization study of reservoir thermal recovery simulation has not been fully carried out, because of the complexity of its models and algorithms. The authors make use of the message passing interface (MPI) standard communication library, the domain decomposition method, the block Jacobi iteration algorithm, and the dynamic memory allocation technique to parallelize their serial thermal recovery simulation software NUMSIP, which is being used in petroleum industry in China. The parallel software PNUMSIP was tested on both IBM SP2 and Dawn 1000A distributed-memory parallel computers. The experiment results show that the parallelization of I/O has great effects on the efficiency of parallel software PNUMSIP; the data communication bandwidth is also an important factor, which has an influence on software efficiency. Keywords: domain decomposition method, block Jacobi iteration algorithm, reservoir thermal recovery simulation, distributed-memory parallel computer

  3. Sequential and Parallel Matrix Computations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-01

    Theory" published by the American Math Society. (C) Jointly with A. Sameh of University of Illinois, a parallel algorithm for the single-input pole...an M.Sc. thesis at Northern Illinois University by Ava Chun and, the results were compared with parallel Q-R algorithm of Sameh and Kuck and the

  4. Research in Parallel Algorithms and Software for Computational Aerosciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domel, Neal D.

    1996-01-01

    Phase 1 is complete for the development of a computational fluid dynamics CFD) parallel code with automatic grid generation and adaptation for the Euler analysis of flow over complex geometries. SPLITFLOW, an unstructured Cartesian grid code developed at Lockheed Martin Tactical Aircraft Systems, has been modified for a distributed memory/massively parallel computing environment. The parallel code is operational on an SGI network, Cray J90 and C90 vector machines, SGI Power Challenge, and Cray T3D and IBM SP2 massively parallel machines. Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM) is the message passing protocol for portability to various architectures. A domain decomposition technique was developed which enforces dynamic load balancing to improve solution speed and memory requirements. A host/node algorithm distributes the tasks. The solver parallelizes very well, and scales with the number of processors. Partially parallelized and non-parallelized tasks consume most of the wall clock time in a very fine grain environment. Timing comparisons on a Cray C90 demonstrate that Parallel SPLITFLOW runs 2.4 times faster on 8 processors than its non-parallel counterpart autotasked over 8 processors.

  5. Research in Parallel Algorithms and Software for Computational Aerosciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domel, Neal D.

    1996-01-01

    Phase I is complete for the development of a Computational Fluid Dynamics parallel code with automatic grid generation and adaptation for the Euler analysis of flow over complex geometries. SPLITFLOW, an unstructured Cartesian grid code developed at Lockheed Martin Tactical Aircraft Systems, has been modified for a distributed memory/massively parallel computing environment. The parallel code is operational on an SGI network, Cray J90 and C90 vector machines, SGI Power Challenge, and Cray T3D and IBM SP2 massively parallel machines. Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM) is the message passing protocol for portability to various architectures. A domain decomposition technique was developed which enforces dynamic load balancing to improve solution speed and memory requirements. A host/node algorithm distributes the tasks. The solver parallelizes very well, and scales with the number of processors. Partially parallelized and non-parallelized tasks consume most of the wall clock time in a very fine grain environment. Timing comparisons on a Cray C90 demonstrate that Parallel SPLITFLOW runs 2.4 times faster on 8 processors than its non-parallel counterpart autotasked over 8 processors.

  6. Remarks on parallel computations in MATLAB environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opalska, Katarzyna; Opalski, Leszek

    2013-10-01

    The paper attempts to summarize author's investigation of parallel computation capability of MATLAB environment in solving large ordinary differential equations (ODEs). Two MATLAB versions were tested and two parallelization techniques: one used multiple processors-cores, the other - CUDA compatible Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). A set of parameterized test problems was specially designed to expose different capabilities/limitations of the different variants of the parallel computation environment tested. Presented results illustrate clearly the superiority of the newer MATLAB version and, elapsed time advantage of GPU-parallelized computations for large dimensionality problems over the multiple processor-cores (with speed-up factor strongly dependent on the problem structure).

  7. Parallel computations and control of adaptive structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, K. C.; Alvin, Kenneth F.; Belvin, W. Keith; Chong, K. P. (Editor); Liu, S. C. (Editor); Li, J. C. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The equations of motion for structures with adaptive elements for vibration control are presented for parallel computations to be used as a software package for real-time control of flexible space structures. A brief introduction of the state-of-the-art parallel computational capability is also presented. Time marching strategies are developed for an effective use of massive parallel mapping, partitioning, and the necessary arithmetic operations. An example is offered for the simulation of control-structure interaction on a parallel computer and the impact of the approach presented for applications in other disciplines than aerospace industry is assessed.

  8. Data-parallel algorithms for image computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlotto, Mark J.

    1990-11-01

    Data-parallel algorithms for image computing on the Connection Machine are described. After a brief review of some basic programming concepts in *Lip, a parallel extension of Common Lisp, data-parallel programming paradigms based on a local (diffusion-like) model of computation, the scan model of computation, a general interprocessor communications model, and a region-based model are introduced. Algorithms for connected component labeling, distance transformation, Voronoi diagrams, finding minimum cost paths, local means, shape-from-shading, hidden surface calculations, affine transformation, oblique parallel projection, and spatial operations over regions are presented. An new algorithm for interpolating irregularly spaced data via Voronoi diagrams is also described.

  9. Solving the Cauchy-Riemann equations on parallel computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fatoohi, Raad A.; Grosch, Chester E.

    1987-01-01

    Discussed is the implementation of a single algorithm on three parallel-vector computers. The algorithm is a relaxation scheme for the solution of the Cauchy-Riemann equations; a set of coupled first order partial differential equations. The computers were chosen so as to encompass a variety of architectures. They are: the MPP, and SIMD machine with 16K bit serial processors; FLEX/32, an MIMD machine with 20 processors; and CRAY/2, an MIMD machine with four vector processors. The machine architectures are briefly described. The implementation of the algorithm is discussed in relation to these architectures and measures of the performance on each machine are given. Simple performance models are used to describe the performance. These models highlight the bottlenecks and limiting factors for this algorithm on these architectures. Conclusions are presented.

  10. Malleable architecture generator for FPGA computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokhale, Maya; Kaba, James; Marks, Aaron; Kim, Jang

    1996-10-01

    The malleable architecture generator (MARGE) is a tool set that translates high-level parallel C to configuration bit streams for field-programmable logic based computing systems. MARGE creates an application-specific instruction set and generates the custom hardware components required to perform exactly those computations specified by the C program. In contrast to traditional fixed-instruction processors, MARGE's dynamic instruction set creation provides for efficient use of hardware resources. MARGE processes intermediate code in which each operation is annotated by the bit lengths of the operands. Each basic block (sequence of straight line code) is mapped into a single custom instruction which contains all the operations and logic inherent in the block. A synthesis phase maps the operations comprising the instructions into register transfer level structural components and control logic which have been optimized to exploit functional parallelism and function unit reuse. As a final stage, commercial technology-specific tools are used to generate configuration bit streams for the desired target hardware. Technology- specific pre-placed, pre-routed macro blocks are utilized to implement as much of the hardware as possible. MARGE currently supports the Xilinx-based Splash-2 reconfigurable accelerator and National Semiconductor's CLAy-based parallel accelerator, MAPA. The MARGE approach has been demonstrated on systolic applications such as DNA sequence comparison.

  11. A parallel VLSI architecture for a digital filter of arbitrary length using Fermat number transforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, T. K.; Reed, I. S.; Yeh, C. S.; Shao, H. M.

    1982-01-01

    A parallel architecture for computation of the linear convolution of two sequences of arbitrary lengths using the Fermat number transform (FNT) is described. In particular a pipeline structure is designed to compute a 128-point FNT. In this FNT, only additions and bit rotations are required. A standard barrel shifter circuit is modified so that it performs the required bit rotation operation. The overlap-save method is generalized for the FNT to compute a linear convolution of arbitrary length. A parallel architecture is developed to realize this type of overlap-save method using one FNT and several inverse FNTs of 128 points. The generalized overlap save method alleviates the usual dynamic range limitation in FNTs of long transform lengths. Its architecture is regular, simple, and expandable, and therefore naturally suitable for VLSI implementation.

  12. Parallel reservoir computing using optical amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Vandoorne, Kristof; Dambre, Joni; Verstraeten, David; Schrauwen, Benjamin; Bienstman, Peter

    2011-09-01

    Reservoir computing (RC), a computational paradigm inspired on neural systems, has become increasingly popular in recent years for solving a variety of complex recognition and classification problems. Thus far, most implementations have been software-based, limiting their speed and power efficiency. Integrated photonics offers the potential for a fast, power efficient and massively parallel hardware implementation. We have previously proposed a network of coupled semiconductor optical amplifiers as an interesting test case for such a hardware implementation. In this paper, we investigate the important design parameters and the consequences of process variations through simulations. We use an isolated word recognition task with babble noise to evaluate the performance of the photonic reservoirs with respect to traditional software reservoir implementations, which are based on leaky hyperbolic tangent functions. Our results show that the use of coherent light in a well-tuned reservoir architecture offers significant performance benefits. The most important design parameters are the delay and the phase shift in the system's physical connections. With optimized values for these parameters, coherent semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) reservoirs can achieve better results than traditional simulated reservoirs. We also show that process variations hardly degrade the performance, but amplifier noise can be detrimental. This effect must therefore be taken into account when designing SOA-based RC implementations.

  13. Performance Evaluation of Parallel Algorithms and Architectures in Concurrent Multiprocessor Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    encountered in the IN for each shared memory access. If hot spots [25) occur often during the execution of a program such a delay will have a...SIGMETRICS ConL., Banff , Alberta, 1987. [101 Kerola, T., H. Schwetman, "Monit: A Performance Monitoring Tool for Parallel and Pseudo-Parallel Programs...Hwang (ed.), IEEE Comp. Soc., 1984. [231 Perron, R., and C. Mundie, "The Architecture of the Alliant FX/8 Computer," Digest of Papers, Compcon, Spring 86

  14. Massively Parallel Solution of Poisson Equation on Coarse Grain MIMD Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, A.; Weinberger, D.; Roosta, R.; Gulati, S.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper a new algorithm, designated as Fast Invariant Imbedding algorithm, for solution of Poisson equation on vector and massively parallel MIMD architectures is presented. This algorithm achieves the same optimal computational efficiency as other Fast Poisson solvers while offering a much better structure for vector and parallel implementation. Our implementation on the Intel Delta and Paragon shows that a speedup of over two orders of magnitude can be achieved even for moderate size problems.

  15. Performance variability of highly parallel architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, William T.C.; Ryan, Clint

    2003-05-01

    The design and evaluation of high performance computers has concentrated on increasing computational speed for applications. This performance is often measured on a well configured dedicated system to show the best case. In the real environment, resources are not always dedicated to a single task, and systems run tasks that may influence each other, so run times vary, sometimes to an unreasonably large extent. This paper explores the amount of variation seen across four large distributed memory systems in a systematic manner. It then analyzes the causes for the variations seen and discusses what can be done to decrease the variation without impacting performance.

  16. Image Processing Using a Parallel Architecture.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    Computer," Byte, 3: 14-25 (December 1978). McGraw-Hill, 1985 24. Trussell, H. Joel . "Processing of X-ray Images," Proceedings of the IEEE, 69: 615-627...Services Electronics Program contract N00014-79-C-0424 (AD-085-846). 107 Therrien , Charles W. et al. "A Multiprocessor System for Simulation of

  17. The parallel I/O architecture of the High Performance Storage System (HPSS)

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, R.W.; Coyne, R.A.

    1995-02-01

    Rapid improvements in computational science, processing capability, main memory sizes, data collection devices, multimedia capabilities and integration of enterprise data are producing very large datasets (10s-100s of gigabytes to terabytes). This rapid growth of data has resulted in a serious imbalance in I/O and storage system performance and functionality. One promising approach to restoring balanced I/O and storage system performance is use of parallel data transfer techniques for client access to storage, device-to-device transfers, and remote file transfers. This paper describes the parallel I/O architecture and mechanisms, Parallel Transport Protocol, parallel FIP, and parallel client Application Programming Interface (API) used by the High Performance Storage System (HPSS). Parallel storage integration issues with a local parallel file system are also discussed.

  18. Cell-based hardware architecture for full-parallel generation algorithm of digital holograms.

    PubMed

    Seo, Young-Ho; Choi, Hyun-Jun; Yoo, Ji-Sang; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2011-04-25

    This paper proposes a new hardware architecture to speed-up the digital hologram calculation by parallel computation. To realize it, we modify the computer-generated hologram (CGH) equation and propose a cell-based very large scale integrated circuit architecture. We induce a new equation to calculate the horizontal or vertical hologram pixel values in parallel, after finding the calculation regularity in the horizontal or vertical direction from the basic CGH equation. We also propose the architecture of the computer-generated hologram cell consisting of an initial parameter calculator and update-phase calculators based on the equation, and then implement them in hardware. Modifying the equation could simplify the hardware, and approximating the cosine function could optimize the hardware. In addition, we show the hardware architecture to parallelize the calculation in the horizontal direction by extending computer-generated holograms. In the experiments, we analyze hardware resource usage and the performance-capability characteristics of the look-up table used in the computer-generated hologram cell. These analyses make it possible to select the amount of hardware to the precision of the results. Here, we used the platform from our previous work for the computer-generated hologram kernel and the structure of the processor.

  19. New computer architectures as tools for ecological thought.

    PubMed

    Villa, F

    1992-06-01

    Recent achievements of computer science provide unrivaled power for the advancement of ecology. This power is not merely computational: parallel computers, having hierarchical organization as their architectural principle, also provide metaphors for understanding complex systems. In this sense they might play for a science of ecological complexity a role like equilibrium-based metaphors had in the development of dynamic systems ecology. Parallel computers provide this opportunity through an informational view of ecological reality and multilevel modelling paradigms. Spatial and individual-oriented models allow application and full understanding of the new metaphors in the ecological context.

  20. IPython: components for interactive and parallel computing across disciplines. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, F.; Bussonnier, M.; Frederic, J. D.; Froehle, B. M.; Granger, B. E.; Ivanov, P.; Kluyver, T.; Patterson, E.; Ragan-Kelley, B.; Sailer, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Scientific computing is an inherently exploratory activity that requires constantly cycling between code, data and results, each time adjusting the computations as new insights and questions arise. To support such a workflow, good interactive environments are critical. The IPython project (http://ipython.org) provides a rich architecture for interactive computing with: 1. Terminal-based and graphical interactive consoles. 2. A web-based Notebook system with support for code, text, mathematical expressions, inline plots and other rich media. 3. Easy to use, high performance tools for parallel computing. Despite its roots in Python, the IPython architecture is designed in a language-agnostic way to facilitate interactive computing in any language. This allows users to mix Python with Julia, R, Octave, Ruby, Perl, Bash and more, as well as to develop native clients in other languages that reuse the IPython clients. In this talk, I will show how IPython supports all stages in the lifecycle of a scientific idea: 1. Individual exploration. 2. Collaborative development. 3. Production runs with parallel resources. 4. Publication. 5. Education. In particular, the IPython Notebook provides an environment for "literate computing" with a tight integration of narrative and computation (including parallel computing). These Notebooks are stored in a JSON-based document format that provides an "executable paper": notebooks can be version controlled, exported to HTML or PDF for publication, and used for teaching.

  1. Direct-execution parallel architecture for the Advanced Continuous Simulation Language (ACSL)

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, C.C.; Owen, J.E.

    1988-05-01

    A direct-execution parallel architecture for the Advanced Continuous Simulation Language (ACSL) is presented which overcomes the traditional disadvantages of simulations executed on a digital computer. The incorporation of parallel processing allows the mapping of simulations into a digital computer to be done in the same inherently parallel manner as they are currently mapped onto an analog computer. The direct-execution format maximizes the efficiency of the executed code since the need for a high level language compiler is eliminated. Resolution is greatly increased over that which is available with an analog computer without the sacrifice in execution speed normally expected with digitial computer simulations. Although this report covers all aspects of the new architecture, key emphasis is placed on the processing element configuration and the microprogramming of the ACLS constructs. The execution times for all ACLS constructs are computed using a model of a processing element based on the AMD 29000 CPU and the AMD 29027 FPU. The increase in execution speed provided by parallel processing is exemplified by comparing the derived execution times of two ACSL programs with the execution times for the same programs executed on a similar sequential architecture.

  2. A direct-execution parallel architecture for the Advanced Continuous Simulation Language (ACSL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, Chester C.; Owen, Jeffrey E.

    1988-01-01

    A direct-execution parallel architecture for the Advanced Continuous Simulation Language (ACSL) is presented which overcomes the traditional disadvantages of simulations executed on a digital computer. The incorporation of parallel processing allows the mapping of simulations into a digital computer to be done in the same inherently parallel manner as they are currently mapped onto an analog computer. The direct-execution format maximizes the efficiency of the executed code since the need for a high level language compiler is eliminated. Resolution is greatly increased over that which is available with an analog computer without the sacrifice in execution speed normally expected with digitial computer simulations. Although this report covers all aspects of the new architecture, key emphasis is placed on the processing element configuration and the microprogramming of the ACLS constructs. The execution times for all ACLS constructs are computed using a model of a processing element based on the AMD 29000 CPU and the AMD 29027 FPU. The increase in execution speed provided by parallel processing is exemplified by comparing the derived execution times of two ACSL programs with the execution times for the same programs executed on a similar sequential architecture.

  3. Construction Morphology and the Parallel Architecture of Grammar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booij, Geert; Audring, Jenny

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a systematic exposition of how the basic ideas of Construction Grammar (CxG) (Goldberg, 2006) and the Parallel Architecture (PA) of grammar (Jackendoff, 2002]) provide the framework for a proper account of morphological phenomena, in particular word formation. This framework is referred to as Construction Morphology (CxM). As…

  4. Solution of partial differential equations on vector and parallel computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortega, J. M.; Voigt, R. G.

    1985-01-01

    The present status of numerical methods for partial differential equations on vector and parallel computers was reviewed. The relevant aspects of these computers are discussed and a brief review of their development is included, with particular attention paid to those characteristics that influence algorithm selection. Both direct and iterative methods are given for elliptic equations as well as explicit and implicit methods for initial boundary value problems. The intent is to point out attractive methods as well as areas where this class of computer architecture cannot be fully utilized because of either hardware restrictions or the lack of adequate algorithms. Application areas utilizing these computers are briefly discussed.

  5. Parallel and Distributed Computing Combinatorial Algorithms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    FUPNDKC %2,•, PARALLEL AND DISTRIBUTED COMPUTING COMBINATORIAL ALGORITHMS 6. AUTHOR(S) 2304/DS F49620-92-J-0125 DR. LEIGHTON 7 PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME...on several problems involving parallel and distributed computing and combinatorial optimization. This research is reported in the numerous papers that...network decom- position. In Proceedings of the Eleventh Annual ACM Symposium on Principles of Distributed Computing , August 1992. [15] B. Awerbuch, B

  6. Molecular dynamics on hypercube parallel computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, W.

    1991-03-01

    The implementation of molecular dynamics on parallel computers is described, with particular reference to hypercube computers. Three particular algorithms are described: replicated data (RD); systolic loop (SLS-G), and parallelised link-cells (PLC), all of which have good load balancing. The performance characteristics of each algorithm and the factors affecting their scaling properties are discussed. The article is pedagogic in intent, to introduce a novice to the main aspects of parallel computing in molecular dynamics.

  7. Fast semivariogram computation using FPGA architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagadapati, Yamuna; Shirvaikar, Mukul; Dong, Xuanliang

    2015-02-01

    The semivariogram is a statistical measure of the spatial distribution of data and is based on Markov Random Fields (MRFs). Semivariogram analysis is a computationally intensive algorithm that has typically seen applications in the geosciences and remote sensing areas. Recently, applications in the area of medical imaging have been investigated, resulting in the need for efficient real time implementation of the algorithm. The semivariogram is a plot of semivariances for different lag distances between pixels. A semi-variance, γ(h), is defined as the half of the expected squared differences of pixel values between any two data locations with a lag distance of h. Due to the need to examine each pair of pixels in the image or sub-image being processed, the base algorithm complexity for an image window with n pixels is O(n2). Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) are an attractive solution for such demanding applications due to their parallel processing capability. FPGAs also tend to operate at relatively modest clock rates measured in a few hundreds of megahertz, but they can perform tens of thousands of calculations per clock cycle while operating in the low range of power. This paper presents a technique for the fast computation of the semivariogram using two custom FPGA architectures. The design consists of several modules dedicated to the constituent computational tasks. A modular architecture approach is chosen to allow for replication of processing units. This allows for high throughput due to concurrent processing of pixel pairs. The current implementation is focused on isotropic semivariogram computations only. Anisotropic semivariogram implementation is anticipated to be an extension of the current architecture, ostensibly based on refinements to the current modules. The algorithm is benchmarked using VHDL on a Xilinx XUPV5-LX110T development Kit, which utilizes the Virtex5 FPGA. Medical image data from MRI scans are utilized for the experiments

  8. The flight telerobotic servicer: From functional architecture to computer architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumia, Ronald; Fiala, John

    1989-01-01

    After a brief tutorial on the NASA/National Bureau of Standards Standard Reference Model for Telerobot Control System Architecture (NASREM) functional architecture, the approach to its implementation is shown. First, interfaces must be defined which are capable of supporting the known algorithms. This is illustrated by considering the interfaces required for the SERVO level of the NASREM functional architecture. After interface definition, the specific computer architecture for the implementation must be determined. This choice is obviously technology dependent. An example illustrating one possible mapping of the NASREM functional architecture to a particular set of computers which implements it is shown. The result of choosing the NASREM functional architecture is that it provides a technology independent paradigm which can be mapped into a technology dependent implementation capable of evolving with technology in the laboratory and in space.

  9. A Parallel Quantum Computer Simulator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    The unique principles of quantum mechanics may one day enable computers to perform operations that would be impossible on a classical computer...Although no one knows whether it will be possible to build a large-scale, functional, and stable quantum computer, researchers can study quantum- mechanical

  10. Sequential and Parallel Matrix Computations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    value decomposition and learnt square solutions, Numer. Math. 14 (1970), 403-420. 22o J. Greer and A. Sameh , On certain parallel Toeplitz linear system...Zur Stabilitatsfrag bei Matrizen-EigenweCe-Problemn, Z. Angun. Hath. Phys. (1956). 473-500. 36. D. L. Slotnick and A. H. Sameh , Numerical calculation

  11. New architecture of fast parallel multiplier using fast parallel counter with FPA (first partial product addition)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Mike M.; Cho, Byung Lok

    2001-11-01

    In this paper, we proposed a new First Partial product Addition (FPA) architecture with new compressor (or parallel counter) to CSA tree built in the process of adding partial product for improving speed in the fast parallel multiplier to improve the speed of calculating partial product by about 20% compared with existing parallel counter using full Adder. The new circuit reduces the CLA bit finding final sum by N/2 using the novel FPA architecture. A 5.14ns of multiplication speed of the 16X16 multiplier is obtained using 0.25um CMOS technology. The architecture of the multiplier is easily opted for pipeline design and demonstrates high speed performance.

  12. Concurrent extensions to the FORTRAN language for parallel programming of computational fluid dynamics algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, Cindy Lou

    1986-01-01

    Experiments were conducted at NASA Ames Research Center to define multi-tasking software requirements for multiple-instruction, multiple-data stream (MIMD) computer architectures. The focus was on specifying solutions for algorithms in the field of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The program objectives were to allow researchers to produce usable parallel application software as soon as possible after acquiring MIMD computer equipment, to provide researchers with an easy-to-learn and easy-to-use parallel software language which could be implemented on several different MIMD machines, and to enable researchers to list preferred design specifications for future MIMD computer architectures. Analysis of CFD algorithms indicated that extensions of an existing programming language, adaptable to new computer architectures, provided the best solution to meeting program objectives. The CoFORTRAN Language was written in response to these objectives and to provide researchers a means to experiment with parallel software solutions to CFD algorithms on machines with parallel architectures.

  13. Collectively loading an application in a parallel computer

    SciTech Connect

    Aho, Michael E.; Attinella, John E.; Gooding, Thomas M.; Miller, Samuel J.; Mundy, Michael B.

    2016-01-05

    Collectively loading an application in a parallel computer, the parallel computer comprising a plurality of compute nodes, including: identifying, by a parallel computer control system, a subset of compute nodes in the parallel computer to execute a job; selecting, by the parallel computer control system, one of the subset of compute nodes in the parallel computer as a job leader compute node; retrieving, by the job leader compute node from computer memory, an application for executing the job; and broadcasting, by the job leader to the subset of compute nodes in the parallel computer, the application for executing the job.

  14. Parallel VLSI architecture emulation and the organization of APSA/MPP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odonnell, John T.

    1987-01-01

    The Applicative Programming System Architecture (APSA) combines an applicative language interpreter with a novel parallel computer architecture that is well suited for Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) implementation. The Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) can simulate VLSI circuits by allocating one processing element in its square array to an area on a square VLSI chip. As long as there are not too many long data paths, the MPP can simulate a VLSI clock cycle very rapidly. The APSA circuit contains a binary tree with a few long paths and many short ones. A skewed H-tree layout allows every processing element to simulate a leaf cell and up to four tree nodes, with no loss in parallelism. Emulation of a key APSA algorithm on the MPP resulted in performance 16,000 times faster than a Vax. This speed will make it possible for the APSA language interpreter to run fast enough to support research in parallel list processing algorithms.

  15. Savannah River Site computing architecture migration guide

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-30

    The SRS Computing Architecture is a vision statement for site computing which enumerates the strategies which will guide SRS computing efforts for the 1990s. Each strategy is supported by a number of feature statements which clarify the strategy by providing additional detail. Since it is a strategic planning document, the Architecture has sitewide applicability and endorsement but does not attempt to specify implementation details. It does, however, specify that a document will be developed to guide the migration from the current site environment to that envisioned by the new architecture. The goal of this document, the SRS Computing Architecture Migration Guide, is to identify specific strategic and tactical tasks which would have to be completed to fully implement the architectural vision for site computing as well as a recommended sequence and timeframe for addressing these tasks. It takes into account the expected availability of technology, the existing installed base, and interdependencies among architectural components and objectives.

  16. Interconnections For Stacked Parallel Computer Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johannesson, Richard T.

    1996-01-01

    Concept for interconnecting modules in parallel computers leads to cheaper, smaller, lighter, lower-power computing systems for aerospace, industrial, business, and consumer applications. Computer modules stacked and interconnected in various configurations. Connections among stacks controlled by switching within gateways and/or by addresses on buses.

  17. Parallel computer graphics algorithms for the Connection Machine

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    Many of the classes of computer graphics algorithms and polygon storage schemes can be adapted for parallel execution on various parallel architectures. The connection machine is one such architecture that should be thought of as a multiprocessor grid that can be reconfigured into standard 2-dimensional mesh and n-dimensional hypercube architectures. The classes of algorithms considered in this paper are SPLINES; POLYGON STORAGE; TRIANGULARIZATION; and SYMBOLIC INPUT. The target Connection Machine (hearafter designated as CM) for the algorithms of this paper has 8192 physical processors. Each physical processor has 8 kilobytes of local memory plus an arithmetic-logic unit. All processors can communicate with any other processor through a router. Thus this CM has a shared memory of 64 megabytes when used as a standard multiprocessor (MIMD) architecture. In addition, the CM interconnection structure can simulate a 2-dimensional mesh and n-dimensional hypercube (SIMD) architecture with the mesh being the default architecture. The front end for the CM is a Symbolics and the high level language is LISP or FORTRAN.

  18. Parallel computation with the spectral element method

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Hong

    1995-12-01

    Spectral element models for the shallow water equations and the Navier-Stokes equations have been successfully implemented on a data parallel supercomputer, the Connection Machine model CM-5. The nonstaggered grid formulations for both models are described, which are shown to be especially efficient in data parallel computing environment.

  19. Parallel unstructured grid generation for computational aerosciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shephard, Mark S.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this research project is to develop efficient parallel automatic grid generation procedures for use in computational aerosciences. This effort is focused on a parallel version of the Finite Octree grid generator. Progress made during the first six months is reported.

  20. Direct kinematics solution architectures for industrial robot manipulators: Bit-serial versus parallel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J.; Kim, K.

    1991-01-01

    A Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) architecture for robot direct kinematic computation suitable for industrial robot manipulators was investigated. The Denavit-Hartenberg transformations are reviewed to exploit a proper processing element, namely an augmented CORDIC. Specifically, two distinct implementations are elaborated on, such as the bit-serial and parallel. Performance of each scheme is analyzed with respect to the time to compute one location of the end-effector of a 6-links manipulator, and the number of transistors required.

  1. Parallel, Asynchronous Executive (PAX): System concepts, facilities, and architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. H.

    1983-01-01

    The Parallel, Asynchronous Executive (PAX) is a software operating system simulation that allows many computers to work on a single problem at the same time. PAX is currently implemented on a UNIVAC 1100/42 computer system. Independent UNIVAC runstreams are used to simulate independent computers. Data are shared among independent UNIVAC runstreams through shared mass-storage files. PAX has achieved the following: (1) applied several computing processes simultaneously to a single, logically unified problem; (2) resolved most parallel processor conflicts by careful work assignment; (3) resolved by means of worker requests to PAX all conflicts not resolved by work assignment; (4) provided fault isolation and recovery mechanisms to meet the problems of an actual parallel, asynchronous processing machine. Additionally, one real-life problem has been constructed for the PAX environment. This is CASPER, a collection of aerodynamic and structural dynamic problem simulation routines. CASPER is not discussed in this report except to provide examples of parallel-processing techniques.

  2. Libraries and Development Environments for Monte Carlo Simulations of Lattice Gauge Theories on Parallel Computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, K. M.; Jayewardena, C.; Rehmann, R.

    We describe the library lgtlib, and lgttool, the corresponding development environment for Monte Carlo simulations of lattice gauge theory on multiprocessor vector computers with shared memory. We explain why distributed memory parallel processor (DMPP) architectures are particularly appealing for compute-intensive scientific applications, and introduce the design of a general application and program development environment system for scientific applications on DMPP architectures.

  3. Massively Parallel Computing: A Sandia Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Dosanjh, Sudip S.; Greenberg, David S.; Hendrickson, Bruce; Heroux, Michael A.; Plimpton, Steve J.; Tomkins, James L.; Womble, David E.

    1999-05-06

    The computing power available to scientists and engineers has increased dramatically in the past decade, due in part to progress in making massively parallel computing practical and available. The expectation for these machines has been great. The reality is that progress has been slower than expected. Nevertheless, massively parallel computing is beginning to realize its potential for enabling significant break-throughs in science and engineering. This paper provides a perspective on the state of the field, colored by the authors' experiences using large scale parallel machines at Sandia National Laboratories. We address trends in hardware, system software and algorithms, and we also offer our view of the forces shaping the parallel computing industry.

  4. A study on the GPU based parallel computation of a projection image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyunjeong; Han, Miseon; Kim, Jeongtae

    2017-05-01

    Fast computation of projection images is crucial in many applications such as medical image reconstruction and light field image processing. To do that, parallelization of the computation and efficient implementation of the computation using a parallel processor such as GPGPU (General-Purpose computing on Graphics Processing Units) is essential. In this research, we investigate methods for parallel computation of projection images and efficient implementation of the methods using CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture). We also study how to efficiently use the memory of GPU for the parallel processing.

  5. A parallel 3-D discrete wavelet transform architecture using pipelined lifting scheme approach for video coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegde, Ganapathi; Vaya, Pukhraj

    2013-10-01

    This article presents a parallel architecture for 3-D discrete wavelet transform (3-DDWT). The proposed design is based on the 1-D pipelined lifting scheme. The architecture is fully scalable beyond the present coherent Daubechies filter bank (9, 7). This 3-DDWT architecture has advantages such as no group of pictures restriction and reduced memory referencing. It offers low power consumption, low latency and high throughput. The computing technique is based on the concept that lifting scheme minimises the storage requirement. The application specific integrated circuit implementation of the proposed architecture is done by synthesising it using 65 nm Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company standard cell library. It offers a speed of 486 MHz with a power consumption of 2.56 mW. This architecture is suitable for real-time video compression even with large frame dimensions.

  6. A Parallel Saturation Algorithm on Shared Memory Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ezekiel, Jonathan; Siminiceanu

    2007-01-01

    Symbolic state-space generators are notoriously hard to parallelize. However, the Saturation algorithm implemented in the SMART verification tool differs from other sequential symbolic state-space generators in that it exploits the locality of ring events in asynchronous system models. This paper explores whether event locality can be utilized to efficiently parallelize Saturation on shared-memory architectures. Conceptually, we propose to parallelize the ring of events within a decision diagram node, which is technically realized via a thread pool. We discuss the challenges involved in our parallel design and conduct experimental studies on its prototypical implementation. On a dual-processor dual core PC, our studies show speed-ups for several example models, e.g., of up to 50% for a Kanban model, when compared to running our algorithm only on a single core.

  7. Computing NLTE Opacities -- Node Level Parallel Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Holladay, Daniel

    2015-09-11

    Presentation. The goal: to produce a robust library capable of computing reasonably accurate opacities inline with the assumption of LTE relaxed (non-LTE). Near term: demonstrate acceleration of non-LTE opacity computation. Far term (if funded): connect to application codes with in-line capability and compute opacities. Study science problems. Use efficient algorithms that expose many levels of parallelism and utilize good memory access patterns for use on advanced architectures. Portability to multiple types of hardware including multicore processors, manycore processors such as KNL, GPUs, etc. Easily coupled to radiation hydrodynamics and thermal radiative transfer codes.

  8. Beyond the Renderer: Software Architecture for Parallel Graphics and Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crockett, Thomas W.

    1996-01-01

    As numerous implementations have demonstrated, software-based parallel rendering is an effective way to obtain the needed computational power for a variety of challenging applications in computer graphics and scientific visualization. To fully realize their potential, however, parallel renderers need to be integrated into a complete environment for generating, manipulating, and delivering visual data. We examine the structure and components of such an environment, including the programming and user interfaces, rendering engines, and image delivery systems. We consider some of the constraints imposed by real-world applications and discuss the problems and issues involved in bringing parallel rendering out of the lab and into production.

  9. Fault Tolerant Statistical Signal Processing Algorithms for Parallel Architectures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    AD-fi57 393 FAULT TOLERANT STATISTICAL SIGNAL PROCESSING ALGORITHMS i/i FOR PARALLEL ARCH U) JOHNS HOPKINS UNIV BALTIMORE MD DEPT OF ELECTRICAL...COVERED * ’ Fault Tolerant Statistical Signal Processing Technical A l g o r i t h m s f o r P a r a l l e l A r c h i t e c t u r e s a ._ P E R F O R M I...Identify by block number) , Fault Tolerance, Signal Processing, Parallel Architecture 0 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on reveree side It neceseary and identify by

  10. Fast combinatorial optimization with parallel digital computers.

    PubMed

    Kakeya, H; Okabe, Y

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm which realizes fast search for the solutions of combinatorial optimization problems with parallel digital computers.With the standard weight matrices designed for combinatorial optimization, many iterations are required before convergence to a quasioptimal solution even when many digital processors can be used in parallel. By removing the components of the eingenvectors with eminent negative eigenvalues of the weight matrix, the proposed algorithm avoids oscillation and realizes energy reduction under synchronous discrete dynamics, which enables parallel digital computers to obtain quasi-optimal solutions with much less time than the conventional algorithm.

  11. Parallel hypergraph partitioning for scientific computing.

    SciTech Connect

    Heaphy, Robert; Devine, Karen Dragon; Catalyurek, Umit; Bisseling, Robert; Hendrickson, Bruce Alan; Boman, Erik Gunnar

    2005-07-01

    Graph partitioning is often used for load balancing in parallel computing, but it is known that hypergraph partitioning has several advantages. First, hypergraphs more accurately model communication volume, and second, they are more expressive and can better represent nonsymmetric problems. Hypergraph partitioning is particularly suited to parallel sparse matrix-vector multiplication, a common kernel in scientific computing. We present a parallel software package for hypergraph (and sparse matrix) partitioning developed at Sandia National Labs. The algorithm is a variation on multilevel partitioning. Our parallel implementation is novel in that it uses a two-dimensional data distribution among processors. We present empirical results that show our parallel implementation achieves good speedup on several large problems (up to 33 million nonzeros) with up to 64 processors on a Linux cluster.

  12. A Parallel Trade Study Architecture for Design Optimization of Complex Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hongman; Mullins, James; Ragon, Scott; Soremekun, Grant; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw

    2005-01-01

    Design of a successful product requires evaluating many design alternatives in a limited design cycle time. This can be achieved through leveraging design space exploration tools and available computing resources on the network. This paper presents a parallel trade study architecture to integrate trade study clients and computing resources on a network using Web services. The parallel trade study solution is demonstrated to accelerate design of experiments, genetic algorithm optimization, and a cost as an independent variable (CAIV) study for a space system application.

  13. Parallel Modem Architectures for High-Data-Rate Space Modems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satorius, E.

    2014-08-01

    Existing software-defined radios (SDRs) for space are limited in data volume by several factors, including bandwidth, space-qualified analog-to-digital converter (ADC) technology, and processor throughput, e.g., the throughput of a space-qualified field-programmable gate array (FPGA). In an attempt to further improve the throughput of space-based SDRs and to fully exploit the newer and more capable space-qualified technology (ADCs, FPGAs), we are evaluating parallel transmitter/receiver architectures for space SDRs. These architectures would improve data volume for both deep-space and particularly proximity (e.g., relay) links. In this article, designs for FPGA implementation of a high-rate parallel modem are presented as well as both fixed- and floating-point simulated performance results based on a functional design that is suitable for FPGA implementation.

  14. A massively parallel architecture for self-organizing feature maps.

    PubMed

    Porrmann, M; Witkowski, U; Ruckert, U

    2003-01-01

    A hardware accelerator for self-organizing feature maps is presented. We have developed a massively parallel architecture that, on the one hand, allows a resource-efficient implementation of small or medium-sized maps for embedded applications, requiring only small areas of silicon. On the other hand, large maps can be simulated with systems that consist of several integrated circuits that work in parallel. Apart from the learning and recall of self-organizing feature maps, the hardware accelerates data pre- and postprocessing. For the verification of our architectural concepts in a real-world environment, we have implemented an ASIC that is integrated into our heterogeneous multiprocessor system for neural applications. The performance of our system is analyzed for various simulation parameters. Additionally, the performance that can be achieved with future microelectronic technologies is estimated.

  15. Adaptive Explicitly Parallel Instruction Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-12-16

    1993. [17] James F. Blinn. Jim Blinn’s corner: Fugue for MMX. IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, 17(2):88– 93, March/April 1997. Makes several...processors. IEEE Transactions on Computers, C-29(4):308–316, April 1980. [22] Doug Burger and James R. Goodman. Guest editors introduction: Billion...sequencing and scheduling: A survey. Ann. Discrete Mathematics, 5:287–326, 1979. [58] C. Ebeling D. C. Green and P. Franklin . RaPiD – reconfigurable

  16. Performance analysis of parallel branch and bound search with the hypercube architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mraz, Richard T.

    1987-01-01

    With the availability of commercial parallel computers, researchers are examining new classes of problems which might benefit from parallel computing. This paper presents results of an investigation of the class of search intensive problems. The specific problem discussed is the Least-Cost Branch and Bound search method of deadline job scheduling. The object-oriented design methodology was used to map the problem into a parallel solution. While the initial design was good for a prototype, the best performance resulted from fine-tuning the algorithm for a specific computer. The experiments analyze the computation time, the speed up over a VAX 11/785, and the load balance of the problem when using loosely coupled multiprocessor system based on the hypercube architecture.

  17. Traffic simulations on parallel computers using domain decomposition techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hanebutte, U.R.; Tentner, A.M.

    1995-12-31

    Large scale simulations of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) can only be achieved by using the computing resources offered by parallel computing architectures. Domain decomposition techniques are proposed which allow the performance of traffic simulations with the standard simulation package TRAF-NETSIM on a 128 nodes IBM SPx parallel supercomputer as well as on a cluster of SUN workstations. Whilst this particular parallel implementation is based on NETSIM, a microscopic traffic simulation model, the presented strategy is applicable to a broad class of traffic simulations. An outer iteration loop must be introduced in order to converge to a global solution. A performance study that utilizes a scalable test network that consist of square-grids is presented, which addresses the performance penalty introduced by the additional iteration loop.

  18. Computer-Aided Parallelizer and Optimizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Haoqiang

    2011-01-01

    The Computer-Aided Parallelizer and Optimizer (CAPO) automates the insertion of compiler directives (see figure) to facilitate parallel processing on Shared Memory Parallel (SMP) machines. While CAPO currently is integrated seamlessly into CAPTools (developed at the University of Greenwich, now marketed as ParaWise), CAPO was independently developed at Ames Research Center as one of the components for the Legacy Code Modernization (LCM) project. The current version takes serial FORTRAN programs, performs interprocedural data dependence analysis, and generates OpenMP directives. Due to the widely supported OpenMP standard, the generated OpenMP codes have the potential to run on a wide range of SMP machines. CAPO relies on accurate interprocedural data dependence information currently provided by CAPTools. Compiler directives are generated through identification of parallel loops in the outermost level, construction of parallel regions around parallel loops and optimization of parallel regions, and insertion of directives with automatic identification of private, reduction, induction, and shared variables. Attempts also have been made to identify potential pipeline parallelism (implemented with point-to-point synchronization). Although directives are generated automatically, user interaction with the tool is still important for producing good parallel codes. A comprehensive graphical user interface is included for users to interact with the parallelization process.

  19. Middleware in Modern High Performance Computing System Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Engelmann, Christian; Ong, Hong Hoe; Scott, Stephen L

    2007-01-01

    A recent trend in modern high performance computing (HPC) system architectures employs ''lean'' compute nodes running a lightweight operating system (OS). Certain parts of the OS as well as other system software services are moved to service nodes in order to increase performance and scalability. This paper examines the impact of this HPC system architecture trend on HPC ''middleware'' software solutions, which traditionally equip HPC systems with advanced features, such as parallel and distributed programming models, appropriate system resource management mechanisms, remote application steering and user interaction techniques. Since the approach of keeping the compute node software stack small and simple is orthogonal to the middleware concept of adding missing OS features between OS and application, the role and architecture of middleware in modern HPC systems needs to be revisited. The result is a paradigm shift in HPC middleware design, where single middleware services are moved to service nodes, while runtime environments (RTEs) continue to reside on compute nodes.

  20. Computational Biology, Advanced Scientific Computing, and Emerging Computational Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    2007-06-27

    This CRADA was established at the start of FY02 with $200 K from IBM and matching funds from DOE to support post-doctoral fellows in collaborative research between International Business Machines and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to explore effective use of emerging petascale computational architectures for the solution of computational biology problems. 'No cost' extensions of the CRADA were negotiated with IBM for FY03 and FY04.

  1. Parallel Algorithms for Computer Vision

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-01

    Tikhonov and V. Y. Arsenin . Solutions of Ill - posed Problems . W.H.Winston, Washington, D.C., 1977 . [661 V. Torre... Ill - posed problems in early vision. Proceedings of the IEEE, 76:869-889, 1988. [4] J. Besag. Spatial interaction and the statistical analysis of lattice...Cooperative computation of stereo disparity. Science, 194:283-287, 1976. [50] J. Marroquin, S. Mitter, and T. Poggio. Probabilistic solution of ill - posed

  2. Graph Partitioning Models for Parallel Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, B.; Kolda, T.G.

    1999-03-02

    Calculations can naturally be described as graphs in which vertices represent computation and edges reflect data dependencies. By partitioning the vertices of a graph, the calculation can be divided among processors of a parallel computer. However, the standard methodology for graph partitioning minimizes the wrong metric and lacks expressibility. We survey several recently proposed alternatives and discuss their relative merits.

  3. Computational performance of a smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation for shared-memory parallel computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiura, Daisuke; Furuichi, Mikito; Sakaguchi, Hide

    2015-09-01

    The computational performance of a smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulation is investigated for three types of current shared-memory parallel computer devices: many integrated core (MIC) processors, graphics processing units (GPUs), and multi-core CPUs. We are especially interested in efficient shared-memory allocation methods for each chipset, because the efficient data access patterns differ between compute unified device architecture (CUDA) programming for GPUs and OpenMP programming for MIC processors and multi-core CPUs. We first introduce several parallel implementation techniques for the SPH code, and then examine these on our target computer architectures to determine the most effective algorithms for each processor unit. In addition, we evaluate the effective computing performance and power efficiency of the SPH simulation on each architecture, as these are critical metrics for overall performance in a multi-device environment. In our benchmark test, the GPU is found to produce the best arithmetic performance as a standalone device unit, and gives the most efficient power consumption. The multi-core CPU obtains the most effective computing performance. The computational speed of the MIC processor on Xeon Phi approached that of two Xeon CPUs. This indicates that using MICs is an attractive choice for existing SPH codes on multi-core CPUs parallelized by OpenMP, as it gains computational acceleration without the need for significant changes to the source code.

  4. Fast Parallel Matrix and GCD Computations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    complex analysis , Vol. 2, John Wiley & Sons, 1977 0. Ibarra, S. Moran and L.E. Rosier, A note on the parallel complexity of computing che rank of order n...be computed in parallel time O(log 2n) for such a field. They also show that this is true if F is a subfield of C and one is allowed to use complex ...identity and multistep integer- preserving Gaussian elimination, Mlath. Comp. 22(1968), S65-$78. W. Baur, V. Strassen, The computational complexity of

  5. Implementation of the DPM Monte Carlo code on a parallel architecture for treatment planning applications.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Neelam; Bose, Abhijit; Chetty, Indrin J

    2004-09-01

    We have parallelized the Dose Planning Method (DPM), a Monte Carlo code optimized for radiotherapy class problems, on distributed-memory processor architectures using the Message Passing Interface (MPI). Parallelization has been investigated on a variety of parallel computing architectures at the University of Michigan-Center for Advanced Computing, with respect to efficiency and speedup as a function of the number of processors. We have integrated the parallel pseudo random number generator from the Scalable Parallel Pseudo-Random Number Generator (SPRNG) library to run with the parallel DPM. The Intel cluster consisting of 800 MHz Intel Pentium III processor shows an almost linear speedup up to 32 processors for simulating 1 x 10(8) or more particles. The speedup results are nearly linear on an Athlon cluster (up to 24 processors based on availability) which consists of 1.8 GHz+ Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) Athlon processors on increasing the problem size up to 8 x 10(8) histories. For a smaller number of histories (1 x 10(8)) the reduction of efficiency with the Athlon cluster (down to 83.9% with 24 processors) occurs because the processing time required to simulate 1 x 10(8) histories is less than the time associated with interprocessor communication. A similar trend was seen with the Opteron Cluster (consisting of 1400 MHz, 64-bit AMD Opteron processors) on increasing the problem size. Because of the 64-bit architecture Opteron processors are capable of storing and processing instructions at a faster rate and hence are faster as compared to the 32-bit Athlon processors. We have validated our implementation with an in-phantom dose calculation study using a parallel pencil monoenergetic electron beam of 20 MeV energy. The phantom consists of layers of water, lung, bone, aluminum, and titanium. The agreement in the central axis depth dose curves and profiles at different depths shows that the serial and parallel codes are equivalent in accuracy.

  6. Link failure detection in a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Blocksome, Michael A.; Megerian, Mark G.; Smith, Brian E.

    2010-11-09

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for link failure detection in a parallel computer including compute nodes connected in a rectangular mesh network, each pair of adjacent compute nodes in the rectangular mesh network connected together using a pair of links, that includes: assigning each compute node to either a first group or a second group such that adjacent compute nodes in the rectangular mesh network are assigned to different groups; sending, by each of the compute nodes assigned to the first group, a first test message to each adjacent compute node assigned to the second group; determining, by each of the compute nodes assigned to the second group, whether the first test message was received from each adjacent compute node assigned to the first group; and notifying a user, by each of the compute nodes assigned to the second group, whether the first test message was received.

  7. Internode data communications in a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Miller, Douglas R; Parker, Jeffrey J; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2014-02-11

    Internode data communications in a parallel computer that includes compute nodes that each include main memory and a messaging unit, the messaging unit including computer memory and coupling compute nodes for data communications, in which, for each compute node at compute node boot time: a messaging unit allocates, in the messaging unit's computer memory, a predefined number of message buffers, each message buffer associated with a process to be initialized on the compute node; receives, prior to initialization of a particular process on the compute node, a data communications message intended for the particular process; and stores the data communications message in the message buffer associated with the particular process. Upon initialization of the particular process, the process establishes a messaging buffer in main memory of the compute node and copies the data communications message from the message buffer of the messaging unit into the message buffer of main memory.

  8. Internode data communications in a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Blocksome, Michael A.; Miller, Douglas R.; Parker, Jeffrey J.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.

    2013-09-03

    Internode data communications in a parallel computer that includes compute nodes that each include main memory and a messaging unit, the messaging unit including computer memory and coupling compute nodes for data communications, in which, for each compute node at compute node boot time: a messaging unit allocates, in the messaging unit's computer memory, a predefined number of message buffers, each message buffer associated with a process to be initialized on the compute node; receives, prior to initialization of a particular process on the compute node, a data communications message intended for the particular process; and stores the data communications message in the message buffer associated with the particular process. Upon initialization of the particular process, the process establishes a messaging buffer in main memory of the compute node and copies the data communications message from the message buffer of the messaging unit into the message buffer of main memory.

  9. Locating hardware faults in a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Megerian, Mark G.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.

    2010-04-13

    Locating hardware faults in a parallel computer, including defining within a tree network of the parallel computer two or more sets of non-overlapping test levels of compute nodes of the network that together include all the data communications links of the network, each non-overlapping test level comprising two or more adjacent tiers of the tree; defining test cells within each non-overlapping test level, each test cell comprising a subtree of the tree including a subtree root compute node and all descendant compute nodes of the subtree root compute node within a non-overlapping test level; performing, separately on each set of non-overlapping test levels, an uplink test on all test cells in a set of non-overlapping test levels; and performing, separately from the uplink tests and separately on each set of non-overlapping test levels, a downlink test on all test cells in a set of non-overlapping test levels.

  10. Methodology of modeling and measuring computer architectures for plasma simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, L. P. T.

    1977-01-01

    A brief introduction to plasma simulation using computers and the difficulties on currently available computers is given. Through the use of an analyzing and measuring methodology - SARA, the control flow and data flow of a particle simulation model REM2-1/2D are exemplified. After recursive refinements the total execution time may be greatly shortened and a fully parallel data flow can be obtained. From this data flow, a matched computer architecture or organization could be configured to achieve the computation bound of an application problem. A sequential type simulation model, an array/pipeline type simulation model, and a fully parallel simulation model of a code REM2-1/2D are proposed and analyzed. This methodology can be applied to other application problems which have implicitly parallel nature.

  11. Methodology of modeling and measuring computer architectures for plasma simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, L. P. T.

    1977-01-01

    A brief introduction to plasma simulation using computers and the difficulties on currently available computers is given. Through the use of an analyzing and measuring methodology - SARA, the control flow and data flow of a particle simulation model REM2-1/2D are exemplified. After recursive refinements the total execution time may be greatly shortened and a fully parallel data flow can be obtained. From this data flow, a matched computer architecture or organization could be configured to achieve the computation bound of an application problem. A sequential type simulation model, an array/pipeline type simulation model, and a fully parallel simulation model of a code REM2-1/2D are proposed and analyzed. This methodology can be applied to other application problems which have implicitly parallel nature.

  12. A Simple Physical Optics Algorithm Perfect for Parallel Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbriale, W. A.; Cwik, T.

    1993-01-01

    One of the simplest reflector antenna computer programs is based upon a discrete approximation of the radiation integral. This calculation replaces the actual reflector surface with a triangular facet representation so that the reflector resembles a geodesic dome. The Physical Optics (PO) current is assumed to be constant in magnitude and phase over each facet so the radiation integral is reduced to a simple summation. This program has proven to be surprisingly robust and useful for the analysis of arbitrary reflectors, particularly when the near-field is desired and surface derivatives are not known. Because of its simplicity, the algorithm has proven to be extremely easy to adapt to the parallel computing architecture of a modest number of large-grain computing elements such as are used in the Intel iPSC and Touchstone Delta parallel machines.

  13. A Simple Physical Optics Algorithm Perfect for Parallel Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbriale, W. A.; Cwik, T.

    1993-01-01

    One of the simplest reflector antenna computer programs is based upon a discrete approximation of the radiation integral. This calculation replaces the actual reflector surface with a triangular facet representation so that the reflector resembles a geodesic dome. The Physical Optics (PO) current is assumed to be constant in magnitude and phase over each facet so the radiation integral is reduced to a simple summation. This program has proven to be surprisingly robust and useful for the analysis of arbitrary reflectors, particularly when the near-field is desired and surface derivatives are not known. Because of its simplicity, the algorithm has proven to be extremely easy to adapt to the parallel computing architecture of a modest number of large-grain computing elements such as are used in the Intel iPSC and Touchstone Delta parallel machines.

  14. Fast Parallel Computation Of Multibody Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, Amir; Kwan, Gregory L.; Bagherzadeh, Nader

    1996-01-01

    Constraint-force algorithm fast, efficient, parallel-computation algorithm for solving forward dynamics problem of multibody system like robot arm or vehicle. Solves problem in minimum time proportional to log(N) by use of optimal number of processors proportional to N, where N is number of dynamical degrees of freedom: in this sense, constraint-force algorithm both time-optimal and processor-optimal parallel-processing algorithm.

  15. Instant well-log inversion with a parallel computer

    SciTech Connect

    Kimminau, S.J.; Trivedi, H.

    1993-08-01

    Well-log analysis requires several vectors of input data to be inverted with a physical model that produces more vectors of output data. The problem is inherently suited to either vectorization or parallelization. PLATO (parallel log analysis, timely output) is a research prototype system that uses a parallel architecture computer with memory-mapped graphics to invert vector data and display the result rapidly. By combining this high-performance computing and display system with a graphical user interface, the analyst can interact with the system in real time'' and can visualize the result of changing parameters on up to 1,000 levels of computed volumes and reconstructed logs. It is expected that such instant'' inversion will remove the main disadvantages frequently cited for simultaneous analysis methods, namely difficulty in assessing sensitivity to different parameters and slow output response. Although the prototype system uses highly specific features of a parallel processor, a subsequent version has been implemented on a conventional (Serial) workstation with less performance but adequate functionality to preserve the apparently instant response. PLATO demonstrates the feasibility of petroleum computing applications combining an intuitive graphical interface, high-performance computing of physical models, and real-time output graphics.

  16. Efficient parallel architecture for highly coupled real-time linear system applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, Chester C.; Homaifar, Abdollah; Barua, Soumavo

    1988-01-01

    A systematic procedure is developed for exploiting the parallel constructs of computation in a highly coupled, linear system application. An overall top-down design approach is adopted. Differential equations governing the application under consideration are partitioned into subtasks on the basis of a data flow analysis. The interconnected task units constitute a task graph which has to be computed in every update interval. Multiprocessing concepts utilizing parallel integration algorithms are then applied for efficient task graph execution. A simple scheduling routine is developed to handle task allocation while in the multiprocessor mode. Results of simulation and scheduling are compared on the basis of standard performance indices. Processor timing diagrams are developed on the basis of program output accruing to an optimal set of processors. Basic architectural attributes for implementing the system are discussed together with suggestions for processing element design. Emphasis is placed on flexible architectures capable of accommodating widely varying application specifics.

  17. Accelerating Astronomy & Astrophysics in the New Era of Parallel Computing: GPUs, Phi and Cloud Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Eric B.; Dindar, Saleh; Peters, Jorg

    2015-08-01

    The realism of astrophysical simulations and statistical analyses of astronomical data are set by the available computational resources. Thus, astronomers and astrophysicists are constantly pushing the limits of computational capabilities. For decades, astronomers benefited from massive improvements in computational power that were driven primarily by increasing clock speeds and required relatively little attention to details of the computational hardware. For nearly a decade, increases in computational capabilities have come primarily from increasing the degree of parallelism, rather than increasing clock speeds. Further increases in computational capabilities will likely be led by many-core architectures such as Graphical Processing Units (GPUs) and Intel Xeon Phi. Successfully harnessing these new architectures, requires significantly more understanding of the hardware architecture, cache hierarchy, compiler capabilities and network network characteristics.I will provide an astronomer's overview of the opportunities and challenges provided by modern many-core architectures and elastic cloud computing. The primary goal is to help an astronomical audience understand what types of problems are likely to yield more than order of magnitude speed-ups and which problems are unlikely to parallelize sufficiently efficiently to be worth the development time and/or costs.I will draw on my experience leading a team in developing the Swarm-NG library for parallel integration of large ensembles of small n-body systems on GPUs, as well as several smaller software projects. I will share lessons learned from collaborating with computer scientists, including both technical and soft skills. Finally, I will discuss the challenges of training the next generation of astronomers to be proficient in this new era of high-performance computing, drawing on experience teaching a graduate class on High-Performance Scientific Computing for Astrophysics and organizing a 2014 advanced summer

  18. Reconfigurable Parallel Computer Architectures for Space Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-07

    manifold”, “harness”, and “assembly” interchangeably, though the latter term will also be used to refer otherwise to aggregations of components...Hypertransport pairs. Although serial data transfers up to 3Gbps have been measured in short length LVDS lines, speeds of 600 to 800 Mbps are commonly...incremental data value test saves different numbers in different memory positions. Commonly, it is used to tag each memory position with the value of its

  19. Wing-Body Aeroelasticity on Parallel Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.; Byun, Chansup

    1996-01-01

    This article presents a procedure for computing the aeroelasticity of wing-body configurations on multiple-instruction, multiple-data parallel computers. In this procedure, fluids are modeled using Euler equations discretized by a finite difference method, and structures are modeled using finite element equations. The procedure is designed in such a way that each discipline can be developed and maintained independently by using a domain decomposition approach. A parallel integration scheme is used to compute aeroelastic responses by solving the coupled fluid and structural equations concurrently while keeping modularity of each discipline. The present procedure is validated by computing the aeroelastic response of a wing and comparing with experiment. Aeroelastic computations are illustrated for a high speed civil transport type wing-body configuration.

  20. Parallel processing for computer vision and display

    SciTech Connect

    Dew, P.M. . Dept. of Computer Studies); Earnshaw, R.A. ); Heywood, T.R. )

    1989-01-01

    The widespread availability of high performance computers has led to an increased awareness of the importance of visualization techniques particularly in engineering and science. However, many visualization tasks involve processing large amounts of data or manipulating complex computer models of 3D objects. For example, in the field of computer aided engineering it is often necessary to display an edit solid object (see Plate 1) which can take many minutes even on the fastest serial processors. Another example of a computationally intensive problem, this time from computer vision, is the recognition of objects in a 3D scene from a stereo image pair. To perform visualization tasks of this type in real and reasonable time it is necessary to exploit the advances in parallel processing that have taken place over the last decade. This book uniquely provides a collection of papers from leading visualization researchers with a common interest in the application and exploitation of parallel processing techniques.

  1. Fault-tolerant computer architecture based on INMOS transputer processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, Jorge L.

    1987-01-01

    Redundant processing was used for several years in mission flight systems. In these systems, more than one processor performs the same task at the same time but only one processor is actually in real use. A fault-tolerance computer architecture based on the features provided by INMOS Transputers is presented. The Transputer architecture provides several communication links that allow data and command communication with other Transputers without the use of a bus. Additionally the Transputer allows the use of parallel processing to increase the system speed considerably. The processor architecture consists of three processors working in parallel keeping all the processors at the same operational level but only one processor is in real control of the process. The design allows each Transputer to perform a test to the other two Transputers and report the operating condition of the neighboring processors. A graphic display was developed to facilitate the identification of any problem by the user.

  2. Parallel optical interconnects: implementation of optoelectronics in multiprocessor architectures.

    PubMed

    Frietman, E E; van Nifterick, W; Dekker, L; Jongeling, T J

    1990-03-10

    Performance and efficiency of multiple processor computers depend strongly on the network that interconnects the distinct collaborating processors. Constrained connectivity forces much of the potential computing speed to be used to compensate for the limitation in connections. The availability of a multiple parallel I/O connections allows full unrestricted connectivity and is an essential prerequisite for an interprocessor network that is able to meet the ever growing communication demands. This paper emphasizes the design, building and application of an electrooptic communication system [EOCS]. The EOCS uses dedicated free space multiple data distributors and integrated optically writable inputbuffer arrays with fully parallel access.

  3. Toward a science of parallel computation

    SciTech Connect

    Worlton, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    The evolution of parallel processing over the past several decades can be viewed as the development of a new scientific discipline. Parallel processing has been, and is, undergoing the same evolutionary stages that are common to the development of scientific disciplines in general: exploration, focusing, and maturity. That parallel processing is not yet a science can readily be appreciated by its lack of some of the characteristics typical of mature sciences, such as prescriptive terminology, comprehensive taxonomies, and authoritative fundamental principles. A great deal of outstanding work has been done and the field is experiencing the beginnings of its ''focusing'' phase, i.e., support is being concentrated in a set of the more promising approaches selected from among the larger set of exploratory projects. However, the possible set of parallel-processing concepts is so extensive that exploratory work will probably continue for one or two more decades. In the meantime, the growing maturity of the field will be reflected in the increasing clarity and precision of the terminology, the development of systematic classification of the domain of discourse, the development of basic principles, and the growing number of commercial products that are the outcome of the research and development projects on which support is being focused. In this paper we develop some generalizations of taxonomies and use basic principles to draw conclusions about the extensibility of parallel processor architectures. 7 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Parallel computing using a Lagrangian formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, May-Fun; Loh, Ching Yuen

    1991-01-01

    A new Lagrangian formulation of the Euler equation is adopted for the calculation of 2-D supersonic steady flow. The Lagrangian formulation represents the inherent parallelism of the flow field better than the common Eulerian formulation and offers a competitive alternative on parallel computers. The implementation of the Lagrangian formulation on the Thinking Machines Corporation CM-2 Computer is described. The program uses a finite volume, first-order Godunov scheme and exhibits high accuracy in dealing with multidimensional discontinuities (slip-line and shock). By using this formulation, a better than six times speed-up was achieved on a 8192-processor CM-2 over a single processor of a CRAY-2.

  5. Full tensor gravity gradiometry data inversion: Performance analysis of parallel computing algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Zhen-Long; Wei, Xiao-Hui; Huang, Da-Nian; Sun, Xu

    2015-09-01

    We apply reweighted inversion focusing to full tensor gravity gradiometry data using message-passing interface (MPI) and compute unified device architecture (CUDA) parallel computing algorithms, and then combine MPI with CUDA to formulate a hybrid algorithm. Parallel computing performance metrics are introduced to analyze and compare the performance of the algorithms. We summarize the rules for the performance evaluation of parallel algorithms. We use model and real data from the Vinton salt dome to test the algorithms. We find good match between model and real density data, and verify the high efficiency and feasibility of parallel computing algorithms in the inversion of full tensor gravity gradiometry data.

  6. Lazy sliding window implementation of the bilateral filter on parallel architectures.

    PubMed

    Bronstein, Michael M

    2011-06-01

    Bilateral filter is one of the state-of-the-art methods for noise reduction in images. The plausible visual result the filter produces makes it a common choice for image and video processing applications, yet, its high computational complexity makes a real-time implementation a challenging task. Presented here is a parallel version of the bilateral filter using a lazy sliding window, suitable for SIMD-type architectures.

  7. Design of a real-time wind turbine simulator using a custom parallel architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, John A.; Gluck, R.; Sridhar, S.

    1995-01-01

    The design of a new parallel-processing digital simulator is described. The new simulator has been developed specifically for analysis of wind energy systems in real time. The new processor has been named: the Wind Energy System Time-domain simulator, version 3 (WEST-3). Like previous WEST versions, WEST-3 performs many computations in parallel. The modules in WEST-3 are pure digital processors, however. These digital processors can be programmed individually and operated in concert to achieve real-time simulation of wind turbine systems. Because of this programmability, WEST-3 is very much more flexible and general than its two predecessors. The design features of WEST-3 are described to show how the system produces high-speed solutions of nonlinear time-domain equations. WEST-3 has two very fast Computational Units (CU's) that use minicomputer technology plus special architectural features that make them many times faster than a microcomputer. These CU's are needed to perform the complex computations associated with the wind turbine rotor system in real time. The parallel architecture of the CU causes several tasks to be done in each cycle, including an IO operation and the combination of a multiply, add, and store. The WEST-3 simulator can be expanded at any time for additional computational power. This is possible because the CU's interfaced to each other and to other portions of the simulation using special serial buses. These buses can be 'patched' together in essentially any configuration (in a manner very similar to the programming methods used in analog computation) to balance the input/ output requirements. CU's can be added in any number to share a given computational load. This flexible bus feature is very different from many other parallel processors which usually have a throughput limit because of rigid bus architecture.

  8. Efficiently modeling neural networks on massively parallel computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farber, Robert M.

    1993-01-01

    Neural networks are a very useful tool for analyzing and modeling complex real world systems. Applying neural network simulations to real world problems generally involves large amounts of data and massive amounts of computation. To efficiently handle the computational requirements of large problems, we have implemented at Los Alamos a highly efficient neural network compiler for serial computers, vector computers, vector parallel computers, and fine grain SIMD computers such as the CM-2 connection machine. This paper describes the mapping used by the compiler to implement feed-forward backpropagation neural networks for a SIMD (Single Instruction Multiple Data) architecture parallel computer. Thinking Machines Corporation has benchmarked our code at 1.3 billion interconnects per second (approximately 3 gigaflops) on a 64,000 processor CM-2 connection machine (Singer 1990). This mapping is applicable to other SIMD computers and can be implemented on MIMD computers such as the CM-5 connection machine. Our mapping has virtually no communications overhead with the exception of the communications required for a global summation across the processors (which has a sub-linear runtime growth on the order of O(log(number of processors)). We can efficiently model very large neural networks which have many neurons and interconnects and our mapping can extend to arbitrarily large networks (within memory limitations) by merging the memory space of separate processors with fast adjacent processor interprocessor communications. This paper will consider the simulation of only feed forward neural network although this method is extendable to recurrent networks.

  9. High performance parallel computing of flows in complex geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gicquel, Laurent Y. M.; Gourdain, N.; Boussuge, J.-F.; Deniau, H.; Staffelbach, G.; Wolf, P.; Poinsot, Thierry

    2011-02-01

    Efficient numerical tools taking advantage of the ever increasing power of high-performance computers, become key elements in the fields of energy supply and transportation, not only from a purely scientific point of view, but also at the design stage in industry. Indeed, flow phenomena that occur in or around the industrial applications such as gas turbines or aircraft are still not mastered. In fact, most Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) predictions produced today focus on reduced or simplified versions of the real systems and are usually solved with a steady state assumption. This article shows how recent developments of CFD codes and parallel computer architectures can help overcoming this barrier. With this new environment, new scientific and technological challenges can be addressed provided that thousands of computing cores are efficiently used in parallel. Strategies of modern flow solvers are discussed with particular emphases on mesh-partitioning, load balancing and communication. These concepts are used in two CFD codes developed by CERFACS: a multi-block structured code dedicated to aircrafts and turbo-machinery as well as an unstructured code for gas turbine flow predictions. Leading edge computations obtained with these high-end massively parallel CFD codes are illustrated and discussed in the context of aircrafts, turbo-machinery and gas turbine applications. Finally, future developments of CFD and high-end computers are proposed to provide leading edge tools and end applications with strong industrial implications at the design stage of the next generation of aircraft and gas turbines.

  10. Construction Morphology and the Parallel Architecture of Grammar.

    PubMed

    Booij, Geert; Audring, Jenny

    2015-11-24

    This article presents a systematic exposition of how the basic ideas of Construction Grammar (CxG) (Goldberg, ) and the Parallel Architecture (PA) of grammar (Jackendoff, ) provide the framework for a proper account of morphological phenomena, in particular word formation. This framework is referred to as Construction Morphology (CxM). As to the implications of CxM for the architecture of grammar, the article provides evidence against a split between lexicon and grammar, in line with CxG. In addition, it shows that the PA approach makes it possible to be explicit about what happens on which level of the grammar, and thus to give an insightful account of interface phenomena. These interface phenomena appear to require that various types of information are accessible simultaneously, and it is argued that constructional schemas have the right format for expressing these mutual dependencies between different types of information.

  11. Electro-Optic Computing Architectures: Volume II. Components and System Design and Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-02-01

    The objective of the Electro - Optic Computing Architecture (EOCA) program was to develop multi-function electro - optic interfaces and optical...interconnect units to enhance the performance of parallel processor systems and form the building blocks for future electro - optic computing architectures...Specifically, three multi-function interface modules were targeted for development - an Electro - Optic Interface (EOI), an Optical Interconnection Unit

  12. Endpoint-based parallel data processing in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael E; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2014-02-11

    Endpoint-based parallel data processing in a parallel active messaging interface ('PAMI') of a parallel computer, the PAMI composed of data communications endpoints, each endpoint including a specification of data communications parameters for a thread of execution on a compute node, including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the compute nodes coupled for data communications through the PAMI, including establishing a data communications geometry, the geometry specifying, for tasks representing processes of execution of the parallel application, a set of endpoints that are used in collective operations of the PAMI including a plurality of endpoints for one of the tasks; receiving in endpoints of the geometry an instruction for a collective operation; and executing the instruction for a collective opeartion through the endpoints in dependence upon the geometry, including dividing data communications operations among the plurality of endpoints for one of the tasks.

  13. Endpoint-based parallel data processing in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Blocksome, Michael A.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.

    2014-08-12

    Endpoint-based parallel data processing in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI composed of data communications endpoints, each endpoint including a specification of data communications parameters for a thread of execution on a compute node, including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the compute nodes coupled for data communications through the PAMI, including establishing a data communications geometry, the geometry specifying, for tasks representing processes of execution of the parallel application, a set of endpoints that are used in collective operations of the PAMI including a plurality of endpoints for one of the tasks; receiving in endpoints of the geometry an instruction for a collective operation; and executing the instruction for a collective operation through the endpoints in dependence upon the geometry, including dividing data communications operations among the plurality of endpoints for one of the tasks.

  14. Computational Architecture For Control Of Remote Manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szakaly, Zoltan F.

    1989-01-01

    Synchronization done by hardware to reduce software overhead. Computing resources located at both master-arm node and slave-arm node. This architecture provides for effective control while reducing computational burden on host computer and reducing and balancing load on communication channel.

  15. Parallel k-means++ for Multiple Shared-Memory Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Mackey, Patrick S.; Lewis, Robert R.

    2016-09-22

    In recent years k-means++ has become a popular initialization technique for improved k-means clustering. To date, most of the work done to improve its performance has involved parallelizing algorithms that are only approximations of k-means++. In this paper we present a parallelization of the exact k-means++ algorithm, with a proof of its correctness. We develop implementations for three distinct shared-memory architectures: multicore CPU, high performance GPU, and the massively multithreaded Cray XMT platform. We demonstrate the scalability of the algorithm on each platform. In addition we present a visual approach for showing which platform performed k-means++ the fastest for varying data sizes.

  16. A nanoliter-scale nucleic acid processor with parallel architecture.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jong Wook; Studer, Vincent; Hang, Giao; Anderson, W French; Quake, Stephen R

    2004-04-01

    The purification of nucleic acids from microbial and mammalian cells is a crucial step in many biological and medical applications. We have developed microfluidic chips for automated nucleic acid purification from small numbers of bacterial or mammalian cells. All processes, such as cell isolation, cell lysis, DNA or mRNA purification, and recovery, were carried out on a single microfluidic chip in nanoliter volumes without any pre- or postsample treatment. Measurable amounts of mRNA were extracted in an automated fashion from as little as a single mammalian cell and recovered from the chip. These microfluidic chips are capable of processing different samples in parallel, thereby illustrating how highly parallel microfluidic architectures can be constructed to perform integrated batch-processing functionalities for biological and medical applications.

  17. Analysis of Parallel Burn Without Crossfeed TSTO RLV Architectures and Comparison to Parallel Burn With Crossfeed and Series Burn Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Garrett; Phillips, Alan

    2002-01-01

    There are currently three dominant TSTO class architectures. These are Series Burn (SB), Parallel Burn with crossfeed (PBw/cf), and Parallel Burn without crossfeed (PBncf). The goal of this study was to determine what factors uniquely affect PBncf architectures, how each of these factors interact, and to determine from a performance perspective whether a PBncf vehicle could be competitive with a PBw/cf or SB vehicle using equivalent technology and assumptions. In all cases, performance was evaluated on a relative basis for a fixed payload and mission by comparing gross and dry vehicle masses of a closed vehicle. Propellant combinations studied were LOX: LH2 propelled orbiter and booster (HH) and LOX: Kerosene booster with LOX: LH2 orbiter (KH). The study conclusions were: 1) a PBncf orbiter should be throttled as deeply as possible after launch until the staging point. 2) a detailed structural model is essential to accurate architecture analysis and evaluation. 3) a PBncf TSTO architecture is feasible for systems that stage at mach 7. 3a) HH architectures can achieve a mass growth relative to PBw/cf of < 20%. 3b) KH architectures can achieve a mass growth relative to Series Burn of < 20%. 4) center of gravity (CG) control will be a major issue for a PBncf vehicle, due to the low orbiter specific thrust to weight ratio and to the position of the orbiter required to align the nozzle heights at liftoff. 5 ) thrust to weight ratios of 1.3 at liftoff and between 1.0 and 0.9 when staging at mach 7 appear to be close to ideal for PBncf vehicles. 6) performance for all vehicles studied is better when staged at mach 7 instead of mach 5. The study showed that a Series Burn architecture has the lowest gross mass for HH cases, and has the lowest dry mass for KH cases. The potential disadvantages of SB are the required use of an air-start for the orbiter engines and potential CG control issues. A Parallel Burn with crossfeed architecture solves both these problems, but the

  18. Measuring performance of parallel computers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, F.

    1994-07-01

    Performance Measurement - the authors have developed a taxonomy of parallel algorithms based on data motion and example applications have been coded for each class of the taxonomy. Computational benchmark kernels have been extracted for several applications, and detailed measurements have been performed. Algorithms for Massively Parallel SIMD machines - measurement results and computational experiences indicate that top performance will be achieved by `iteration` type algorithms running on massively parallel SIMD machines. Reformulation as iteration may entail unorthodox approaches based on probabilistic methods. The authors have developed such methods for some applications. Here they discuss their approach to performance measurement, describe the taxonomy and measurements which have been made, and report on some general conclusions which can be drawn from the results of the measurements.

  19. Computing association probabilities using parallel Boltzmann machines.

    PubMed

    Iltis, R A; Ting, P Y

    1993-01-01

    A new computational method is presented for solving the data association problem using parallel Boltzmann machines. It is shown that the association probabilities can be computed with arbitrarily small errors if a sufficient number of parallel Boltzmann machines are available. The probability beta(i)(j) that the i th measurement emanated from the jth target can be obtained simply by observing the relative frequency with which neuron v(i,j) in a two-dimensional network is on throughout the layers. Some simple tracking examples comparing the performance of the Boltzmann algorithm to the exact data association solution and with the performance of an alternative parallel method using the Hopfield neural network are also presented.

  20. Probabilistic structural mechanics research for parallel processing computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sues, Robert H.; Chen, Heh-Chyun; Twisdale, Lawrence A.; Martin, William R.

    1991-01-01

    Aerospace structures and spacecraft are a complex assemblage of structural components that are subjected to a variety of complex, cyclic, and transient loading conditions. Significant modeling uncertainties are present in these structures, in addition to the inherent randomness of material properties and loads. To properly account for these uncertainties in evaluating and assessing the reliability of these components and structures, probabilistic structural mechanics (PSM) procedures must be used. Much research has focused on basic theory development and the development of approximate analytic solution methods in random vibrations and structural reliability. Practical application of PSM methods was hampered by their computationally intense nature. Solution of PSM problems requires repeated analyses of structures that are often large, and exhibit nonlinear and/or dynamic response behavior. These methods are all inherently parallel and ideally suited to implementation on parallel processing computers. New hardware architectures and innovative control software and solution methodologies are needed to make solution of large scale PSM problems practical.

  1. User-microprogrammable, local host computer with low-level parallelism

    SciTech Connect

    Tomita, S.; Shibayama, K.; Kitamura, T.; Nakata, T.; Hagiwara, H.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the architecture of a dynamically microprogrammable computer with low-level parallelism, called QA-2, which is designed as a high-performance, local host computer for laboratory use. The architectural principle of the QA-2 is the marriage of high-speed, parallel processing capability offered by four powerful arithmetic and logic units (ALUS) with architectural flexibility provided by large scale, dynamic user-microprogramming. By changing its writable control storage dynamically, the QA-2 can be tailored to a wide spectrum of research-oriented applications covering high-level language processing and real-time processing. 11 references.

  2. Parallel peak pruning for scalable SMP contour tree computation

    DOE PAGES

    Carr, Hamish A.; Weber, Gunther H.; Sewell, Christopher M.; ...

    2017-03-09

    As data sets grow to exascale, automated data analysis and visualisation are increasingly important, to intermediate human understanding and to reduce demands on disk storage via in situ analysis. Trends in architecture of high performance computing systems necessitate analysis algorithms to make effective use of combinations of massively multicore and distributed systems. One of the principal analytic tools is the contour tree, which analyses relationships between contours to identify features of more than local importance. Unfortunately, the predominant algorithms for computing the contour tree are explicitly serial, and founded on serial metaphors, which has limited the scalability of this formmore » of analysis. While there is some work on distributed contour tree computation, and separately on hybrid GPU-CPU computation, there is no efficient algorithm with strong formal guarantees on performance allied with fast practical performance. Here in this paper, we report the first shared SMP algorithm for fully parallel contour tree computation, withfor-mal guarantees of O(lgnlgt) parallel steps and O(n lgn) work, and implementations with up to 10x parallel speed up in OpenMP and up to 50x speed up in NVIDIA Thrust.« less

  3. Designing a meta-level architecture in Java for adaptive parallelism by mobile software agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominic, Stephen Victor

    Adaptive parallelism refers to a parallel computation that runs on a pool of processors that may join or withdraw from a running computation. In this dissertation, a functional system of agents and agent behaviors for adaptive parallelism is developed. Software agents have the properties of robustness and have capacity for fault-tolerance. Adaptation and fault-tolerance emerge from the interaction of self-directed autonomous software agents for a parallel computation application. The multi-agent system can be considered an object-oriented system with a higher-level architectural component, i.e., a meta level for agent behavior. The meta-level object architecture is based on patterns of behavior and communication for mobile agents, which are developed to support cooperative problem solving in a distributed-heterogeneous computing environment. Although parallel processing is a suggested application domain for mobile agents implemented in the Java language, the development of robust agent behaviors implemented in an efficient manner is an active research area. Performance characteristics for three versions of a pattern recognition problem are used to demonstrate a linear speed-up with efficiency that is compared to research using a traditional client-server protocol in the C language. The best ideas from existing approaches to adaptive parallelism are used to create a single general-purpose paradigm that overcomes problems associated with nodefailure, the use of a single-centralized or shared resource, requirements for clients to actively join a computation, and a variety of other limitations that are associated with existing systems. The multi-agent system, and experiments, show how adaptation and parallelism can be exploited by a meta-architecture for a distributed-scientific application that is of particular interest to design of signal-processing ground stations. To a large extent the framework separates concern for algorithmic design from concern for where and

  4. Heterogeneous computer architecture for embedded real-time image interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinger, Jeremy A.

    1993-10-01

    A heterogeneous parallel-processing computer architecture is being developed for embedded real-time interpretation of images and other data collected from sensors on mobile platforms. The Advanced Target Cueing and Recognition Engine (ATCURE) architecture includes specialized subsystems for input/output, image processing, numeric processing, and symbolic processing. Different specialization is provided for each subsystem to exploit distinctive demands for data storage, data representation, mixes of operations, and program control structures. The characteristics of each subsystem are described, with the Image Processing Subsystem (IPS) used to illustrate how the design is driven by careful analysis of current and projected computational requirements from many applications. These considerations led to a programming model for the Image Processing Subsystem in which images and their subsets are the fundamental unit of data. The processor implementation incorporates a scalable synchronous pipeline of processing elements that eliminates many of the bottlenecks found in MIMD and SIMD architectures.

  5. A computer architecture for intelligent machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefebvre, D. R.; Saridis, G. N.

    1991-01-01

    The Theory of Intelligent Machines proposes a hierarchical organization for the functions of an autonomous robot based on the Principle of Increasing Precision With Decreasing Intelligence. An analytic formulation of this theory using information-theoretic measures of uncertainty for each level of the intelligent machine has been developed in recent years. A computer architecture that implements the lower two levels of the intelligent machine is presented. The architecture supports an event-driven programming paradigm that is independent of the underlying computer architecture and operating system. Details of Execution Level controllers for motion and vision systems are addressed, as well as the Petri net transducer software used to implement Coordination Level functions. Extensions to UNIX and VxWorks operating systems which enable the development of a heterogeneous, distributed application are described. A case study illustrates how this computer architecture integrates real-time and higher-level control of manipulator and vision systems.

  6. A computer architecture for intelligent machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefebvre, D. R.; Saridis, G. N.

    1992-01-01

    The theory of intelligent machines proposes a hierarchical organization for the functions of an autonomous robot based on the principle of increasing precision with decreasing intelligence. An analytic formulation of this theory using information-theoretic measures of uncertainty for each level of the intelligent machine has been developed. The authors present a computer architecture that implements the lower two levels of the intelligent machine. The architecture supports an event-driven programming paradigm that is independent of the underlying computer architecture and operating system. Execution-level controllers for motion and vision systems are briefly addressed, as well as the Petri net transducer software used to implement coordination-level functions. A case study illustrates how this computer architecture integrates real-time and higher-level control of manipulator and vision systems.

  7. Parallel radiation transport algorithms and associated architectural requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Morel, J. E.; Baker, R. S.; Warsa, J. S.

    2004-01-01

    The radiation transport equation is a seven-dimensional equation that can be extremely expensive to solve. In general, transport can be expected to completely dominate the memory and CPU time requirements for the ASCI codes. Both traditional iterative transport solution methods and modern Krylov-subspace solution methods require the inversion of a large number of block lower-diagonal matrices. While such inversions are easily done in serial, a high level of sophistication is needed for implementations on massively parallel platforms. Rectangular-mesh methods are well-established and generally quite efficient but unstructured-mesh methods remain a research topic. Nonetheless, considerable progress has been made in unstructured-mesh methods over the last several years. In general, the efficiency of transport solution algorithms are quite sensitive to communication latencies and bandwidth, but there are other significant considerations as well. Some new parallel algorithms have recently been defined that may be significantly better than existing methods for time-dependent problems, but will be significantly less effective for steady-state problems in some circumstances. Transport methods would benefit from a machine architecture with low latencies, high bandwidth, and on the order of one thousand very fast, large-memory processors, as opposed to an architecture that consists of a very large number of slower processors with less memory. In addition, a lightweight operating system is highly desirable.

  8. An improved spectral graph partitioning algorithm for mapping parallel computations

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, B.; Leland, R.

    1992-09-01

    Efficient use of a distributed memory parallel computer requires that the computational load be balanced across processors in a way that minimizes interprocessor communication. We present a new domain mapping algorithm that extends recent work in which ideas from spectral graph theory have been applied to this problem. Our generalization of spectral graph bisection involves a novel use of multiple eigenvectors to allow for division of a computation into four or eight parts at each stage of a recursive decomposition. The resulting method is suitable for scientific computations like irregular finite elements or differences performed on hypercube or mesh architecture machines. Experimental results confirm that the new method provides better decompositions arrived at more economically and robustly than with previous spectral methods. We have also improved upon the known spectral lower bound for graph bisection.

  9. A Component Architecture for High-Performance Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Bernholdt, D E; Elwasif, W R; Kohl, J A; Epperly, T G W

    2003-01-21

    The Common Component Architecture (CCA) provides a means for developers to manage the complexity of large-scale scientific software systems and to move toward a ''plug and play'' environment for high-performance computing. The CCA model allows for a direct connection between components within the same process to maintain performance on inter-component calls. It is neutral with respect to parallelism, allowing components to use whatever means they desire to communicate within their parallel ''cohort.'' We will discuss in detail the importance of performance in the design of the CCA and will analyze the performance costs associated with features of the CCA.

  10. Unsteady flow simulation on a parallel computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faden, M.; Pokorny, S.; Engel, K.

    For the simulation of the flow through compressor stages, an interactive flow simulation system is set up on an MIMD-type parallel computer. An explicit scheme is used in order to resolve the time-dependent interaction between the blades. The 2D Navier-Stokes equations are transformed into their general moving coordinates. The parallelization of the solver is based on the idea of domain decomposition. Results are presented for a problem of fixed size (4096 grid nodes for the Hakkinen case).

  11. Fast, parallel implementation of particle filtering on the GPU architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelencsér-Horváth, Anna; Tornai, Gábor János; Horváth, András; Cserey, György

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we introduce a modified cellular particle filter (CPF) which we mapped on a graphics processing unit (GPU) architecture. We developed this filter adaptation using a state-of-the art CPF technique. Mapping this filter realization on a highly parallel architecture entailed a shift in the logical representation of the particles. In this process, the original two-dimensional organization is reordered as a one-dimensional ring topology. We proposed a proof-of-concept measurement on two models with an NVIDIA Fermi architecture GPU. This design achieved a 411- μs kernel time per state and a 77-ms global running time for all states for 16,384 particles with a 256 neighbourhood size on a sequence of 24 states for a bearing-only tracking model. For a commonly used benchmark model at the same configuration, we achieved a 266- μs kernel time per state and a 124-ms global running time for all 100 states. Kernel time includes random number generation on the GPU with curand. These results attest to the effective and fast use of the particle filter in high-dimensional, real-time applications.

  12. Semi-automatic process partitioning for parallel computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koelbel, Charles; Mehrotra, Piyush; Vanrosendale, John

    1988-01-01

    On current multiprocessor architectures one must carefully distribute data in memory in order to achieve high performance. Process partitioning is the operation of rewriting an algorithm as a collection of tasks, each operating primarily on its own portion of the data, to carry out the computation in parallel. A semi-automatic approach to process partitioning is considered in which the compiler, guided by advice from the user, automatically transforms programs into such an interacting task system. This approach is illustrated with a picture processing example written in BLAZE, which is transformed into a task system maximizing locality of memory reference.

  13. Intranode data communications in a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Miller, Douglas R; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2013-07-23

    Intranode data communications in a parallel computer that includes compute nodes configured to execute processes, where the data communications include: allocating, upon initialization of a first process of a compute node, a region of shared memory; establishing, by the first process, a predefined number of message buffers, each message buffer associated with a process to be initialized on the compute node; sending, to a second process on the same compute node, a data communications message without determining whether the second process has been initialized, including storing the data communications message in the message buffer of the second process; and upon initialization of the second process: retrieving, by the second process, a pointer to the second process's message buffer; and retrieving, by the second process from the second process's message buffer in dependence upon the pointer, the data communications message sent by the first process.

  14. Intranode data communications in a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Miller, Douglas R; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2014-01-07

    Intranode data communications in a parallel computer that includes compute nodes configured to execute processes, where the data communications include: allocating, upon initialization of a first process of a computer node, a region of shared memory; establishing, by the first process, a predefined number of message buffers, each message buffer associated with a process to be initialized on the compute node; sending, to a second process on the same compute node, a data communications message without determining whether the second process has been initialized, including storing the data communications message in the message buffer of the second process; and upon initialization of the second process: retrieving, by the second process, a pointer to the second process's message buffer; and retrieving, by the second process from the second process's message buffer in dependence upon the pointer, the data communications message sent by the first process.

  15. Parallel computing in atmospheric chemistry models

    SciTech Connect

    Rotman, D.

    1996-02-01

    Studies of atmospheric chemistry are of high scientific interest, involve computations that are complex and intense, and require enormous amounts of I/O. Current supercomputer computational capabilities are limiting the studies of stratospheric and tropospheric chemistry and will certainly not be able to handle the upcoming coupled chemistry/climate models. To enable such calculations, the authors have developed a computing framework that allows computations on a wide range of computational platforms, including massively parallel machines. Because of the fast paced changes in this field, the modeling framework and scientific modules have been developed to be highly portable and efficient. Here, the authors present the important features of the framework and focus on the atmospheric chemistry module, named IMPACT, and its capabilities. Applications of IMPACT to aircraft studies will be presented.

  16. Orthogonal topography in the parallel input architecture of songbird HVC.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Kevin C; Wu, Wei; Bertram, Richard; Hyson, Richard L; Johnson, Frank

    2017-06-15

    Neural activity within the cortical premotor nucleus HVC (acronym is name) encodes the learned songs of adult male zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata). HVC activity is driven and/or modulated by a group of five afferent nuclei (the Medial Magnocellular nucleus of the Anterior Nidopallium, MMAN; Nucleus Interface, NIf; nucleus Avalanche, Av; the Robust nucleus of the Arcopallium, RA; the Uvaeform nucleus, Uva). While earlier evidence suggested that HVC receives a uniformly distributed and nontopographic pattern of afferent input, recent evidence suggests this view is incorrect (Basista et al., ). Here, we used a double-labeling strategy (varying both the distance between and the axial orientation of dual tracer injections into HVC) to reveal a massively parallel and in some cases topographic pattern of afferent input. Afferent neurons target only one rostral or caudal location within medial or lateral HVC, and each HVC location receives convergent input from each afferent nucleus in parallel. Quantifying the distributions of single-labeled cells revealed an orthogonal topography in the organization of afferent input from MMAN and NIf, two cortical nuclei necessary for song learning. MMAN input is organized across the lateral-medial axis whereas NIf input is organized across the rostral-caudal axis. To the extent that HVC activity is influenced by afferent input during the learning, perception, or production of song, functional models of HVC activity may need revision to account for the parallel input architecture of HVC, along with the orthogonal input topography of MMAN and NIf. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Parallel processing architecture for H.264 deblocking filter on multi-core platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Durga P.; Sonachalam, Sekar; Kunchamwar, Mangesh K.; Gunupudi, Nageswara Rao

    2012-03-01

    Massively parallel computing (multi-core) chips offer outstanding new solutions that satisfy the increasing demand for high resolution and high quality video compression technologies such as H.264. Such solutions not only provide exceptional quality but also efficiency, low power, and low latency, previously unattainable in software based designs. While custom hardware and Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) technologies may achieve lowlatency, low power, and real-time performance in some consumer devices, many applications require a flexible and scalable software-defined solution. The deblocking filter in H.264 encoder/decoder poses difficult implementation challenges because of heavy data dependencies and the conditional nature of the computations. Deblocking filter implementations tend to be fixed and difficult to reconfigure for different needs. The ability to scale up for higher quality requirements such as 10-bit pixel depth or a 4:2:2 chroma format often reduces the throughput of a parallel architecture designed for lower feature set. A scalable architecture for deblocking filtering, created with a massively parallel processor based solution, means that the same encoder or decoder will be deployed in a variety of applications, at different video resolutions, for different power requirements, and at higher bit-depths and better color sub sampling patterns like YUV, 4:2:2, or 4:4:4 formats. Low power, software-defined encoders/decoders may be implemented using a massively parallel processor array, like that found in HyperX technology, with 100 or more cores and distributed memory. The large number of processor elements allows the silicon device to operate more efficiently than conventional DSP or CPU technology. This software programing model for massively parallel processors offers a flexible implementation and a power efficiency close to that of ASIC solutions. This work describes a scalable parallel architecture for an H.264 compliant deblocking

  18. Switching from Computer to Microcomputer Architecture Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolanakis, Dimosthenis E.; Kotsis, Konstantinos T.; Laopoulos, Theodore

    2010-01-01

    In the last decades, the technological and scientific evolution of the computing discipline has been widely affecting research in software engineering education, which nowadays advocates more enlightened and liberal ideas. This article reviews cross-disciplinary research on a computer architecture class in consideration of its switching to…

  19. Switching from Computer to Microcomputer Architecture Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolanakis, Dimosthenis E.; Kotsis, Konstantinos T.; Laopoulos, Theodore

    2010-01-01

    In the last decades, the technological and scientific evolution of the computing discipline has been widely affecting research in software engineering education, which nowadays advocates more enlightened and liberal ideas. This article reviews cross-disciplinary research on a computer architecture class in consideration of its switching to…

  20. THE COMPUTER AND THE ARCHITECTURAL PROFESSION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HAVILAND, DAVID S.

    THE ROLE OF ADVANCING TECHNOLOGY IN THE FIELD OF ARCHITECTURE IS DISCUSSED IN THIS REPORT. PROBLEMS IN COMMUNICATION AND THE DESIGN PROCESS ARE IDENTIFIED. ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES OF COMPUTERS ARE MENTIONED IN RELATION TO MAN AND MACHINE INTERACTION. PRESENT AND FUTURE IMPLICATIONS OF COMPUTER USAGE ARE IDENTIFIED AND DISCUSSED WITH RESPECT…

  1. LIBRA: A high-performance balanced computer architecture for Prolog

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Four reduced-instruction-set computer (RISC) architectures for Prolog are presented: the Simple Abstract Machine (SAM), the Logic Programming Windowed RISC I (LOW RISC I), the LOW RISC II, and the Logical Inference Balanced RISC Architecture (LIBRA). An informal methodology for the semantic-based design of computer architectures relates the design of each architecture to its predecessor. The suitability of each architecture for Prolog is evaluated using macro expansions for each WAM instruction, from which execution speed, code density, memory usage, branch frequency, standard logical inferences per second, benchmark logical inferences per second and the semantic gap of each architecture relative to Prolog are calculated. The final design, the LIBRA, is 2.3 times as fast as the Berkeley PLM without interleaved memory, and 15 times as fast with eight-way instruction and data memory interleaving, reaching an estimated execution speed of 7.5 million standard logical inferences per second. The LIBRA's performance is due to parallelized tag and data operations, pipelining, reduced branch frequency, and complex single-cycle instructions.

  2. Parallel Computation of the Jacobian Matrix for Nonlinear Equation Solvers Using MATLAB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, Geoffrey K.; Nguyen, Duc T.; Newman, Brett A.

    2017-01-01

    Demonstrating speedup for parallel code on a multicore shared memory PC can be challenging in MATLAB due to underlying parallel operations that are often opaque to the user. This can limit potential for improvement of serial code even for the so-called embarrassingly parallel applications. One such application is the computation of the Jacobian matrix inherent to most nonlinear equation solvers. Computation of this matrix represents the primary bottleneck in nonlinear solver speed such that commercial finite element (FE) and multi-body-dynamic (MBD) codes attempt to minimize computations. A timing study using MATLAB's Parallel Computing Toolbox was performed for numerical computation of the Jacobian. Several approaches for implementing parallel code were investigated while only the single program multiple data (spmd) method using composite objects provided positive results. Parallel code speedup is demonstrated but the goal of linear speedup through the addition of processors was not achieved due to PC architecture.

  3. Synchronizing compute node time bases in a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Dong; Faraj, Daniel A; Gooding, Thomas M; Heidelberger, Philip

    2014-12-30

    Synchronizing time bases in a parallel computer that includes compute nodes organized for data communications in a tree network, where one compute node is designated as a root, and, for each compute node: calculating data transmission latency from the root to the compute node; configuring a thread as a pulse waiter; initializing a wakeup unit; and performing a local barrier operation; upon each node completing the local barrier operation, entering, by all compute nodes, a global barrier operation; upon all nodes entering the global barrier operation, sending, to all the compute nodes, a pulse signal; and for each compute node upon receiving the pulse signal: waking, by the wakeup unit, the pulse waiter; setting a time base for the compute node equal to the data transmission latency between the root node and the compute node; and exiting the global barrier operation.

  4. Synchronizing compute node time bases in a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Dong; Faraj, Daniel A; Gooding, Thomas M; Heidelberger, Philip

    2015-01-27

    Synchronizing time bases in a parallel computer that includes compute nodes organized for data communications in a tree network, where one compute node is designated as a root, and, for each compute node: calculating data transmission latency from the root to the compute node; configuring a thread as a pulse waiter; initializing a wakeup unit; and performing a local barrier operation; upon each node completing the local barrier operation, entering, by all compute nodes, a global barrier operation; upon all nodes entering the global barrier operation, sending, to all the compute nodes, a pulse signal; and for each compute node upon receiving the pulse signal: waking, by the wakeup unit, the pulse waiter; setting a time base for the compute node equal to the data transmission latency between the root node and the compute node; and exiting the global barrier operation.

  5. Parallel software support for computational structural mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Harry F.

    1987-01-01

    The application of the parallel programming methodology known as the Force was conducted. Two application issues were addressed. The first involves the efficiency of the implementation and its completeness in terms of satisfying the needs of other researchers implementing parallel algorithms. Support for, and interaction with, other Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM) researchers using the Force was the main issue, but some independent investigation of the Barrier construct, which is extremely important to overall performance, was also undertaken. Another efficiency issue which was addressed was that of relaxing the strong synchronization condition imposed on the self-scheduled parallel DO loop. The Force was extended by the addition of logical conditions to the cases of a parallel case construct and by the inclusion of a self-scheduled version of this construct. The second issue involved applying the Force to the parallelization of finite element codes such as those found in the NICE/SPAR testbed system. One of the more difficult problems encountered is the determination of what information in COMMON blocks is actually used outside of a subroutine and when a subroutine uses a COMMON block merely as scratch storage for internal temporary results.

  6. Numerical computation on massively parallel hypercubes. [Connection machine

    SciTech Connect

    McBryan, O.A.

    1986-01-01

    We describe numerical computations on the Connection Machine, a massively parallel hypercube architecture with 65,536 single-bit processors and 32 Mbytes of memory. A parallel extension of COMMON LISP, provides access to the processors and network. The rich software environment is further enhanced by a powerful virtual processor capability, which extends the degree of fine-grained parallelism beyond 1,000,000. We briefly describe the hardware and indicate the principal features of the parallel programming environment. We then present implementations of SOR, multigrid and pre-conditioned conjugate gradient algorithms for solving partial differential equations on the Connection Machine. Despite the lack of floating point hardware, computation rates above 100 megaflops have been achieved in PDE solution. Virtual processors prove to be a real advantage, easing the effort of software development while improving system performance significantly. The software development effort is also facilitated by the fact that hypercube communications prove to be fast and essentially independent of distance. 29 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Efficient Parallel Engineering Computing on Linux Workstations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lou, John Z.

    2010-01-01

    A C software module has been developed that creates lightweight processes (LWPs) dynamically to achieve parallel computing performance in a variety of engineering simulation and analysis applications to support NASA and DoD project tasks. The required interface between the module and the application it supports is simple, minimal and almost completely transparent to the user applications, and it can achieve nearly ideal computing speed-up on multi-CPU engineering workstations of all operating system platforms. The module can be integrated into an existing application (C, C++, Fortran and others) either as part of a compiled module or as a dynamically linked library (DLL).

  8. Seismic imaging on massively parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Ober, C.C.; Oldfield, R.A.; Womble, D.E.; Mosher, C.C.

    1997-07-01

    A key to reducing the risks and costs associated with oil and gas exploration is the fast, accurate imaging of complex geologies, such as salt domes in the Gulf of Mexico and overthrust regions in US onshore regions. Pre-stack depth migration generally yields the most accurate images, and one approach to this is to solve the scalar-wave equation using finite differences. Current industry computational capabilities are insufficient for the application of finite-difference, 3-D, prestack, depth-migration algorithms. High performance computers and state-of-the-art algorithms and software are required to meet this need. As part of an ongoing ACTI project funded by the US Department of Energy, the authors have developed a finite-difference, 3-D prestack, depth-migration code for massively parallel computer systems. The goal of this work is to demonstrate that massively parallel computers (thousands of processors) can be used efficiently for seismic imaging, and that sufficient computing power exists (or soon will exist) to make finite-difference, prestack, depth migration practical for oil and gas exploration.

  9. Use Computer-Aided Tools to Parallelize Large CFD Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, H.; Frumkin, M.; Yan, J.

    2000-01-01

    Porting applications to high performance parallel computers is always a challenging task. It is time consuming and costly. With rapid progressing in hardware architectures and increasing complexity of real applications in recent years, the problem becomes even more sever. Today, scalability and high performance are mostly involving handwritten parallel programs using message-passing libraries (e.g. MPI). However, this process is very difficult and often error-prone. The recent reemergence of shared memory parallel (SMP) architectures, such as the cache coherent Non-Uniform Memory Access (ccNUMA) architecture used in the SGI Origin 2000, show good prospects for scaling beyond hundreds of processors. Programming on an SMP is simplified by working in a globally accessible address space. The user can supply compiler directives, such as OpenMP, to parallelize the code. As an industry standard for portable implementation of parallel programs for SMPs, OpenMP is a set of compiler directives and callable runtime library routines that extend Fortran, C and C++ to express shared memory parallelism. It promises an incremental path for parallel conversion of existing software, as well as scalability and performance for a complete rewrite or an entirely new development. Perhaps the main disadvantage of programming with directives is that inserted directives may not necessarily enhance performance. In the worst cases, it can create erroneous results. While vendors have provided tools to perform error-checking and profiling, automation in directive insertion is very limited and often failed on large programs, primarily due to the lack of a thorough enough data dependence analysis. To overcome the deficiency, we have developed a toolkit, CAPO, to automatically insert OpenMP directives in Fortran programs and apply certain degrees of optimization. CAPO is aimed at taking advantage of detailed inter-procedural dependence analysis provided by CAPTools, developed by the University of

  10. Use Computer-Aided Tools to Parallelize Large CFD Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, H.; Frumkin, M.; Yan, J.

    2000-01-01

    Porting applications to high performance parallel computers is always a challenging task. It is time consuming and costly. With rapid progressing in hardware architectures and increasing complexity of real applications in recent years, the problem becomes even more sever. Today, scalability and high performance are mostly involving handwritten parallel programs using message-passing libraries (e.g. MPI). However, this process is very difficult and often error-prone. The recent reemergence of shared memory parallel (SMP) architectures, such as the cache coherent Non-Uniform Memory Access (ccNUMA) architecture used in the SGI Origin 2000, show good prospects for scaling beyond hundreds of processors. Programming on an SMP is simplified by working in a globally accessible address space. The user can supply compiler directives, such as OpenMP, to parallelize the code. As an industry standard for portable implementation of parallel programs for SMPs, OpenMP is a set of compiler directives and callable runtime library routines that extend Fortran, C and C++ to express shared memory parallelism. It promises an incremental path for parallel conversion of existing software, as well as scalability and performance for a complete rewrite or an entirely new development. Perhaps the main disadvantage of programming with directives is that inserted directives may not necessarily enhance performance. In the worst cases, it can create erroneous results. While vendors have provided tools to perform error-checking and profiling, automation in directive insertion is very limited and often failed on large programs, primarily due to the lack of a thorough enough data dependence analysis. To overcome the deficiency, we have developed a toolkit, CAPO, to automatically insert OpenMP directives in Fortran programs and apply certain degrees of optimization. CAPO is aimed at taking advantage of detailed inter-procedural dependence analysis provided by CAPTools, developed by the University of

  11. Evaluation of leading scalar and vector architectures for scientific computations

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Horst D.; Oliker, Leonid; Canning, Andrew; Carter, Jonathan; Ethier, Stephane; Shalf, John

    2004-04-20

    The growing gap between sustained and peak performance for scientific applications is a well-known problem in high performance computing. The recent development of parallel vector systems offers the potential to reduce this gap for many computational science codes and deliver a substantial increase in computing capabilities. This project examines the performance of the cacheless vector Earth Simulator (ES) and compares it to superscalar cache-based IBM Power3 system. Results demonstrate that the ES is significantly faster than the Power3 architecture, highlighting the tremendous potential advantage of the ES for numerical simulation. However, vectorization of a particle-in-cell application (GTC) greatly increased the memory footprint preventing loop-level parallelism and limiting scalability potential.

  12. MiniGhost : a miniapp for exploring boundary exchange strategies using stencil computations in scientific parallel computing.

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, Richard Frederick; Heroux, Michael Allen; Vaughan, Courtenay Thomas

    2012-04-01

    A broad range of scientific computation involves the use of difference stencils. In a parallel computing environment, this computation is typically implemented by decomposing the spacial domain, inducing a 'halo exchange' of process-owned boundary data. This approach adheres to the Bulk Synchronous Parallel (BSP) model. Because commonly available architectures provide strong inter-node bandwidth relative to latency costs, many codes 'bulk up' these messages by aggregating data into a message as a means of reducing the number of messages. A renewed focus on non-traditional architectures and architecture features provides new opportunities for exploring alternatives to this programming approach. In this report we describe miniGhost, a 'miniapp' designed for exploration of the capabilities of current as well as emerging and future architectures within the context of these sorts of applications. MiniGhost joins the suite of miniapps developed as part of the Mantevo project.

  13. Parallel Computational Environment for Substructure Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendy, Atef S.; Patnaik, Surya N.; Hopkins, Dale A.; Berke, Laszlo

    1995-01-01

    Design optimization of large structural systems can be attempted through a substructure strategy when convergence difficulties are encountered. When this strategy is used, the large structure is divided into several smaller substructures and a subproblem is defined for each substructure. The solution of the large optimization problem can be obtained iteratively through repeated solutions of the modest subproblems. Substructure strategies, in sequential as well as in parallel computational modes on a Cray YMP multiprocessor computer, have been incorporated in the optimization test bed CometBoards. CometBoards is an acronym for Comparative Evaluation Test Bed of Optimization and Analysis Routines for Design of Structures. Three issues, intensive computation, convergence of the iterative process, and analytically superior optimum, were addressed in the implementation of substructure optimization into CometBoards. Coupling between subproblems as well as local and global constraint grouping are essential for convergence of the iterative process. The substructure strategy can produce an analytically superior optimum different from what can be obtained by regular optimization. For the problems solved, substructure optimization in a parallel computational mode made effective use of all assigned processors.

  14. Efficient solid state NMR powder simulations using SMP and MPP parallel computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Jørgen Holm; Farnan, Ian

    2003-04-01

    Methods for parallel simulation of solid state NMR powder spectra are presented for both shared and distributed memory parallel supercomputers. For shared memory architectures the performance of simulation programs implementing the OpenMP application programming interface is evaluated. It is demonstrated that the design of correct and efficient shared memory parallel programs is difficult as the performance depends on data locality and cache memory effects. The distributed memory parallel programming model is examined for simulation programs using the MPI message passing interface. The results reveal that both shared and distributed memory parallel computation are very efficient with an almost perfect application speedup and may be applied to the most advanced powder simulations.

  15. Hardware architecture for full analytical Fraunhofer computer-generated holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Zhi-Yong; Xu, Zong-Xi; Xiong, Yi; Chen, Biao; Dai, Hui-Min; Jiang, Shao-Ji; Dong, Jian-Wen

    2015-09-01

    Hardware architecture of parallel computation is proposed for generating Fraunhofer computer-generated holograms (CGHs). A pipeline-based integrated circuit architecture is realized by employing the modified Fraunhofer analytical formulism, which is large scale and enables all components to be concurrently operated. The architecture of the CGH contains five modules to calculate initial parameters of amplitude, amplitude compensation, phases, and phase compensation, respectively. The precalculator of amplitude is fully adopted considering the "reusable design" concept. Each complex operation type (such as square arithmetic) is reused only once by means of a multichannel selector. The implemented hardware calculates an 800×600 pixels hologram in parallel using 39,319 logic elements, 21,074 registers, and 12,651 memory bits in an Altera field-programmable gate array environment with stable operation at 50 MHz. Experimental results demonstrate that the quality of the images reconstructed from the hardware-generated hologram can be comparable to that of a software implementation. Moreover, the calculation speed is approximately 100 times faster than that of a personal computer with an Intel i5-3230M 2.6 GHz CPU for a triangular object.

  16. Architectural Implications of Cloud Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-24

    Mellon University Final Thoughts 1 Cloud Computing is in essence an economic model • It is a different way to acquire and manage IT resources...Cloud (EC2): http://aws.amazon.com/ec2/ • Amazon Simple Storage Solution (S3): http://aws.amazon.com/s3/ • Eucalyptus Systems: http

  17. Computational chaos in massively parallel neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barhen, Jacob; Gulati, Sandeep

    1989-01-01

    A fundamental issue which directly impacts the scalability of current theoretical neural network models to massively parallel embodiments, in both software as well as hardware, is the inherent and unavoidable concurrent asynchronicity of emerging fine-grained computational ensembles and the possible emergence of chaotic manifestations. Previous analyses attributed dynamical instability to the topology of the interconnection matrix, to parasitic components or to propagation delays. However, researchers have observed the existence of emergent computational chaos in a concurrently asynchronous framework, independent of the network topology. Researcher present a methodology enabling the effective asynchronous operation of large-scale neural networks. Necessary and sufficient conditions guaranteeing concurrent asynchronous convergence are established in terms of contracting operators. Lyapunov exponents are computed formally to characterize the underlying nonlinear dynamics. Simulation results are presented to illustrate network convergence to the correct results, even in the presence of large delays.

  18. Can a Quantum Computer Run the von Neumann Architecture?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hines, P.

    At the core of nearly every modern computer is a central processing unit running the von Neumann architecture. This computer architecture gives computationally universal machines, and non-trivial control structures arise naturally, leading to high-level programming constructs.

  19. An Expert Assistant for Computer Aided Parallelization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jost, Gabriele; Chun, Robert; Jin, Haoqiang; Labarta, Jesus; Gimenez, Judit

    2004-01-01

    The prototype implementation of an expert system was developed to assist the user in the computer aided parallelization process. The system interfaces to tools for automatic parallelization and performance analysis. By fusing static program structure information and dynamic performance analysis data the expert system can help the user to filter, correlate, and interpret the data gathered by the existing tools. Sections of the code that show poor performance and require further attention are rapidly identified and suggestions for improvements are presented to the user. In this paper we describe the components of the expert system and discuss its interface to the existing tools. We present a case study to demonstrate the successful use in full scale scientific applications.

  20. Computation and parallel implementation for early vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gualtieri, J. Anthony

    1990-01-01

    The problem of early vision is to transform one or more retinal illuminance images-pixel arrays-to image representations built out of such primitive visual features such as edges, regions, disparities, and clusters. These transformed representations form the input to later vision stages that perform higher level vision tasks including matching and recognition. Researchers developed algorithms for: (1) edge finding in the scale space formulation; (2) correlation methods for computing matches between pairs of images; and (3) clustering of data by neural networks. These algorithms are formulated for parallel implementation of SIMD machines, such as the Massively Parallel Processor, a 128 x 128 array processor with 1024 bits of local memory per processor. For some cases, researchers can show speedups of three orders of magnitude over serial implementations.

  1. Algorithms for parallel flow solvers on message passing architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderwijngaart, Rob F.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this project has been to identify and test suitable technologies for implementation of fluid flow solvers -- possibly coupled with structures and heat equation solvers -- on MIMD parallel computers. In the course of this investigation much attention has been paid to efficient domain decomposition strategies for ADI-type algorithms. Multi-partitioning derives its efficiency from the assignment of several blocks of grid points to each processor in the parallel computer. A coarse-grain parallelism is obtained, and a near-perfect load balance results. In uni-partitioning every processor receives responsibility for exactly one block of grid points instead of several. This necessitates fine-grain pipelined program execution in order to obtain a reasonable load balance. Although fine-grain parallelism is less desirable on many systems, especially high-latency networks of workstations, uni-partition methods are still in wide use in production codes for flow problems. Consequently, it remains important to achieve good efficiency with this technique that has essentially been superseded by multi-partitioning for parallel ADI-type algorithms. Another reason for the concentration on improving the performance of pipeline methods is their applicability in other types of flow solver kernels with stronger implied data dependence. Analytical expressions can be derived for the size of the dynamic load imbalance incurred in traditional pipelines. From these it can be determined what is the optimal first-processor retardation that leads to the shortest total completion time for the pipeline process. Theoretical predictions of pipeline performance with and without optimization match experimental observations on the iPSC/860 very well. Analysis of pipeline performance also highlights the effect of uncareful grid partitioning in flow solvers that employ pipeline algorithms. If grid blocks at boundaries are not at least as large in the wall-normal direction as those

  2. Performance evaluation of the SX-6 vector architecture forscientific computations

    SciTech Connect

    Oliker, Leonid; Canning, Andrew; Carter, Jonathan Carter; Shalf,John; Skinner, David; Ethier, Stephane; Biswas, Rupak; Djomehri,Jahed; Van der Wijngaart, Rob

    2005-01-01

    The growing gap between sustained and peak performance for scientific applications is a well-known problem in high performance computing. The recent development of parallel vector systems offers the potential to reduce this gap for many computational science codes and deliver a substantial increase in computing capabilities. This paper examines the intranode performance of the NEC SX-6 vector processor, and compares it against the cache-based IBMPower3 and Power4 superscalar architectures, across a number of key scientific computing areas. First, we present the performance of a microbenchmark suite that examines many low-level machine characteristics. Next, we study the behavior of the NAS Parallel Benchmarks. Finally, we evaluate the performance of several scientific computing codes. Overall results demonstrate that the SX-6 achieves high performance on a large fraction of our application suite and often significantly outperforms the cache-based architectures. However, certain classes of applications are not easily amenable to vectorization and would require extensive algorithm and implementation reengineering to utilize the SX-6 effectively.

  3. Architectures for parallel DSP-based adaptive optics feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Daniel F.

    1999-11-01

    We have developed a digital image processing system for real-time digital image processing feedback control of adaptive optics systems and simulation of optical image processing algorithms. The system uses multi-computer architecture to capture data from an imaging device such as a charge coupled device camera, process the image data, and control a spatial light-modulator, typically a liquid crystal modulator or a micro-electro mechanical system. The system is a Windows NT Pentium-based system combined with a commercial off-the-shelf peripheral component interconnect bus multi-processor system. The multi-processor is based on the Analog Devices super Harvard architecture computer (SHARC) processor, and field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). The SHARCs provide a scalable reconfigurable C language-based digital signal processing (DSP) development environment. The FPGAs are typically used as reprogrammable interface controllers designed to integrate several off-the- shelf and custom imagers and light modulators into the system. The FPGAs can also be used in concert with the SHARCs for implementation of application-specific high-speed DSP algorithms.

  4. The fermilab central computing facility architectural model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholls, J.

    1989-12-01

    The goal of the current Central Computing Upgrade at Fermilab is to create a computing enviroment that maximizes total productivity, particularly for high energy physics analysis. The Computing Department and the Next Computer Acquisition Committee decided upon a model which includes five components: an interactive front-end, a LargeScale Scientific Computer (LSSC, a mainframe computing engine), a microprocessor farm system, a file server, and workstations. With the exception of the file server, all segments of this model are currently in production: a VAX/VMS cluster interactive front-end, an Amdahl VM computing engine, ACP farms, and (primary) VMS workstations. This paper will discuss the implemetation of the Fermilab Central Computing Facility Architectural Model. Implications for Code Management in such a heterogeneous environment, including issues such as modularity and centrality, will be considered. Special emphasis will be placed on connectivity and communications between the front-end, LSSC, and workstations, as practiced at Fermilab.

  5. Performance of parallel computers for spectral atmospheric models

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, I.T.; Toonen, B.; Worley, P.H.

    1995-06-01

    Massively parallel processing (MPP) computer systems use high-speed interconnection networks to link hundreds or thousands of RISC microprocessors. With each microprocessor having a peak performance of 100 Mflops/sec or more, there is at least the possibility of achieving very high performance. However, the question of exactly how to achieve this performance remains unanswered. MPP systems and vector multiprocessors require very different coding styles. Different MPP systems have widely varying architectures and performance characteristics. For most problems, a range of different parallel algorithms is possible, again with varying performance characteristics. In this paper, we provide a detailed, fair evaluation of MPP performance for a weather and climate modeling application. Using a specially designed spectral transform code, we study performance on three different MPP systems: Intel Paragon, IBM SP2, and Cray T3D. We take great care to control for performance differences due to varying algorithmic characteristics. The results yield insights into MPP performance characteristics, parallel spectral transform algorithms, and coding style for MPP systems. We conclude that it is possible to construct parallel models that achieve multi-Gflop/sec performance on a range of MPPs if the models are constructed to allow run-time selection of appropriate algorithms.

  6. FFT Computation with Systolic Arrays, A New Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boriakoff, Valentin

    1994-01-01

    The use of the Cooley-Tukey algorithm for computing the l-d FFT lends itself to a particular matrix factorization which suggests direct implementation by linearly-connected systolic arrays. Here we present a new systolic architecture that embodies this algorithm. This implementation requires a smaller number of processors and a smaller number of memory cells than other recent implementations, as well as having all the advantages of systolic arrays. For the implementation of the decimation-in-frequency case, word-serial data input allows continuous real-time operation without the need of a serial-to-parallel conversion device. No control or data stream switching is necessary. Computer simulation of this architecture was done in the context of a 1024 point DFT with a fixed point processor, and CMOS processor implementation has started.

  7. Signal processing applications of massively parallel charge domain computing devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, Amir (Inventor); Barhen, Jacob (Inventor); Toomarian, Nikzad (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is embodied in a charge coupled device (CCD)/charge injection device (CID) architecture capable of performing a Fourier transform by simultaneous matrix vector multiplication (MVM) operations in respective plural CCD/CID arrays in parallel in O(1) steps. For example, in one embodiment, a first CCD/CID array stores charge packets representing a first matrix operator based upon permutations of a Hartley transform and computes the Fourier transform of an incoming vector. A second CCD/CID array stores charge packets representing a second matrix operator based upon different permutations of a Hartley transform and computes the Fourier transform of an incoming vector. The incoming vector is applied to the inputs of the two CCD/CID arrays simultaneously, and the real and imaginary parts of the Fourier transform are produced simultaneously in the time required to perform a single MVM operation in a CCD/CID array.

  8. Hypercluster - Parallel processing for computational mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blech, Richard A.

    1988-01-01

    An account is given of the development status, performance capabilities and implications for further development of NASA-Lewis' testbed 'hypercluster' parallel computer network, in which multiple processors communicate through a shared memory. Processors have local as well as shared memory; the hypercluster is expanded in the same manner as the hypercube, with processor clusters replacing the normal single processor node. The NASA-Lewis machine has three nodes with a vector personality and one node with a scalar personality. Each of the vector nodes uses four board-level vector processors, while the scalar node uses four general-purpose microcomputer boards.

  9. Associative Networks on a Massively Parallel Computer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-10-01

    Q I; 11"_ QL 11111 --.25 111.4 111 3 .6 11. MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS-1963-A .9 "* ’ - - . S % .’- . ’’ ." ".d...8217 14. TITLE (end Subtitle) L TYPE OF REPORT A PERIOD COVERED Associative Networks on a Massively Parallel Technical paper Computer S . PERFORMING OG...REPORT NUMBER . AUTHOR( s ) 4. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(&) Gary Jackoway AFOSR-83-0205 . PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 0. PROGRAM ENT. PROJECT

  10. Parallel Processing for Computational Continuum Dynamics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-10

    F49620-84-C-0111In I PARALLEL PROCESSING FOR COMPUTATIONAL CONTINUUM DYNAMICS: A FINAL REPORT Accession For Joseph F. McGrath DTIc TAB KMS Fusion, Inc...Uiarmouncod 0P . . B O X 1 5 6 7 J u s t tic a t io - --- - - Ann Arbor, MI 48106 A v ar_ _ la b il it¥ C o d e a 10 May 1985 nF , Final Report ... REPORT (Yr., Mo. a) 15 PAGE COUNT * Final IFROM 5S4i..4r.5 .. Mar. 10 May 1985 42 * 16. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTATION 17. COSATI CODES IB. SUBJECT TERMS

  11. Parallel algorithm for computing points on a computation front hyperplane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnov, M. M.

    2015-01-01

    A parallel algorithm for computing points on a computation front hyperplane is described. This task arises in the computation of a quantity defined on a multidimensional rectangular domain. Three-dimensional domains are usually discussed, but the material is given in the general form when the number of measurements is at least two. When the values of a quantity at different points are internally independent (which is frequently the case), the corresponding computations are independent as well and can be performed in parallel. However, if there are internal dependences (as, for example, in the Gauss-Seidel method for systems of linear equations), then the order of scanning points of the domain is an important issue. A conventional approach in this case is to form a computation front hyperplane (a usual plane in the three-dimensional case and a line in the two-dimensional case) that moves linearly across the domain at a certain angle. At every step in the course of motion of this hyperplane, its intersection points with the domain can be treated independently and, hence, in parallel, but the steps themselves are executed sequentially. At different steps, the intersection of the hyperplane with the entire domain can have a rather complex geometry and the search for all points of the domain lying on the hyperplane at a given step is a nontrivial problem. This problem (i.e., the computation of the coordinates of points lying in the intersection of the domain with the hyperplane at a given step in the course of hyperplane motion) is addressed below. The computations over the points of the hyperplane can be executed in parallel.

  12. Utilizing parallel optimization in computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkolaras, Michael

    1998-12-01

    General problems of interest in computational fluid dynamics are investigated by means of optimization. Specifically, in the first part of the dissertation, a method of optimal incremental function approximation is developed for the adaptive solution of differential equations. Various concepts and ideas utilized by numerical techniques employed in computational mechanics and artificial neural networks (e.g. function approximation and error minimization, variational principles and weighted residuals, and adaptive grid optimization) are combined to formulate the proposed method. The basis functions and associated coefficients of a series expansion, representing the solution, are optimally selected by a parallel direct search technique at each step of the algorithm according to appropriate criteria; the solution is built sequentially. In this manner, the proposed method is adaptive in nature, although a grid is neither built nor adapted in the traditional sense using a-posteriori error estimates. Variational principles are utilized for the definition of the objective function to be extremized in the associated optimization problems, ensuring that the problem is well-posed. Complicated data structures and expensive remeshing algorithms and systems solvers are avoided. Computational efficiency is increased by using low-order basis functions and concurrent computing. Numerical results and convergence rates are reported for a range of steady-state problems, including linear and nonlinear differential equations associated with general boundary conditions, and illustrate the potential of the proposed method. Fluid dynamics applications are emphasized. Conclusions are drawn by discussing the method's limitations, advantages, and possible extensions. The second part of the dissertation is concerned with the optimization of the viscous-inviscid-interaction (VII) mechanism in an airfoil flow analysis code. The VII mechanism is based on the concept of a transpiration velocity

  13. Parameters that affect parallel processing for computational electromagnetic simulation codes on high performance computing clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Hongsik

    What is the impact of multicore and associated advanced technologies on computational software for science? Most researchers and students have multicore laptops or desktops for their research and they need computing power to run computational software packages. Computing power was initially derived from Central Processing Unit (CPU) clock speed. That changed when increases in clock speed became constrained by power requirements. Chip manufacturers turned to multicore CPU architectures and associated technological advancements to create the CPUs for the future. Most software applications benefited by the increased computing power the same way that increases in clock speed helped applications run faster. However, for Computational ElectroMagnetics (CEM) software developers, this change was not an obvious benefit - it appeared to be a detriment. Developers were challenged to find a way to correctly utilize the advancements in hardware so that their codes could benefit. The solution was parallelization and this dissertation details the investigation to address these challenges. Prior to multicore CPUs, advanced computer technologies were compared with the performance using benchmark software and the metric was FLoting-point Operations Per Seconds (FLOPS) which indicates system performance for scientific applications that make heavy use of floating-point calculations. Is FLOPS an effective metric for parallelized CEM simulation tools on new multicore system? Parallel CEM software needs to be benchmarked not only by FLOPS but also by the performance of other parameters related to type and utilization of the hardware, such as CPU, Random Access Memory (RAM), hard disk, network, etc. The codes need to be optimized for more than just FLOPs and new parameters must be included in benchmarking. In this dissertation, the parallel CEM software named High Order Basis Based Integral Equation Solver (HOBBIES) is introduced. This code was developed to address the needs of the

  14. Evaluation of Visual Computer Simulator for Computer Architecture Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imai, Yoshiro; Imai, Masatoshi; Moritoh, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents trial evaluation of a visual computer simulator in 2009-2011, which has been developed to play some roles of both instruction facility and learning tool simultaneously. And it illustrates an example of Computer Architecture education for University students and usage of e-Learning tool for Assembly Programming in order to…

  15. Iterative algorithms for large sparse linear systems on parallel computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, L. M.

    1982-01-01

    Algorithms for assembling in parallel the sparse system of linear equations that result from finite difference or finite element discretizations of elliptic partial differential equations, such as those that arise in structural engineering are developed. Parallel linear stationary iterative algorithms and parallel preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithms are developed for solving these systems. In addition, a model for comparing parallel algorithms on array architectures is developed and results of this model for the algorithms are given.

  16. Optimal dynamic remapping of parallel computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.; Reynolds, Paul F., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    A large class of computations are characterized by a sequence of phases, with phase changes occurring unpredictably. The decision problem was considered regarding the remapping of workload to processors in a parallel computation when the utility of remapping and the future behavior of the workload is uncertain, and phases exhibit stable execution requirements during a given phase, but requirements may change radically between phases. For these problems a workload assignment generated for one phase may hinder performance during the next phase. This problem is treated formally for a probabilistic model of computation with at most two phases. The fundamental problem of balancing the expected remapping performance gain against the delay cost was addressed. Stochastic dynamic programming is used to show that the remapping decision policy minimizing the expected running time of the computation has an extremely simple structure. Because the gain may not be predictable, the performance of a heuristic policy that does not require estimnation of the gain is examined. The heuristic method's feasibility is demonstrated by its use on an adaptive fluid dynamics code on a multiprocessor. The results suggest that except in extreme cases, the remapping decision problem is essentially that of dynamically determining whether gain can be achieved by remapping after a phase change. The results also suggest that this heuristic is applicable to computations with more than two phases.

  17. Fast parallel Markov clustering in bioinformatics using massively parallel computing on GPU with CUDA and ELLPACK-R sparse format.

    PubMed

    Bustamam, Alhadi; Burrage, Kevin; Hamilton, Nicholas A

    2012-01-01

    Markov clustering (MCL) is becoming a key algorithm within bioinformatics for determining clusters in networks. However,with increasing vast amount of data on biological networks, performance and scalability issues are becoming a critical limiting factor in applications. Meanwhile, GPU computing, which uses CUDA tool for implementing a massively parallel computing environment in the GPU card, is becoming a very powerful, efficient, and low-cost option to achieve substantial performance gains over CPU approaches. The use of on-chip memory on the GPU is efficiently lowering the latency time, thus, circumventing a major issue in other parallel computing environments, such as MPI. We introduce a very fast Markov clustering algorithm using CUDA (CUDA-MCL) to perform parallel sparse matrix-matrix computations and parallel sparse Markov matrix normalizations, which are at the heart of MCL. We utilized ELLPACK-R sparse format to allow the effective and fine-grain massively parallel processing to cope with the sparse nature of interaction networks data sets in bioinformatics applications. As the results show, CUDA-MCL is significantly faster than the original MCL running on CPU. Thus, large-scale parallel computation on off-the-shelf desktop-machines, that were previously only possible on supercomputing architectures, can significantly change the way bioinformaticians and biologists deal with their data.

  18. Optimized data communications in a parallel computer

    SciTech Connect

    Faraj, Daniel A.

    2014-08-19

    A parallel computer includes nodes that include a network adapter that couples the node in a point-to-point network and supports communications in opposite directions of each dimension. Optimized communications include: receiving, by a network adapter of a receiving compute node, a packet--from a source direction--that specifies a destination node and deposit hints. Each hint is associated with a direction within which the packet is to be deposited. If a hint indicates the packet to be deposited in the opposite direction: the adapter delivers the packet to an application on the receiving node; forwards the packet to a next node in the opposite direction if the receiving node is not the destination; and forwards the packet to a node in a direction of a subsequent dimension if the hints indicate that the packet is to be deposited in the direction of the subsequent dimension.

  19. Optimized data communications in a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Faraj, Daniel A

    2014-10-21

    A parallel computer includes nodes that include a network adapter that couples the node in a point-to-point network and supports communications in opposite directions of each dimension. Optimized communications include: receiving, by a network adapter of a receiving compute node, a packet--from a source direction--that specifies a destination node and deposit hints. Each hint is associated with a direction within which the packet is to be deposited. If a hint indicates the packet to be deposited in the opposite direction: the adapter delivers the packet to an application on the receiving node; forwards the packet to a next node in the opposite direction if the receiving node is not the destination; and forwards the packet to a node in a direction of a subsequent dimension if the hints indicate that the packet is to be deposited in the direction of the subsequent dimension.

  20. ATCA for Machines-- Advanced Telecommunications Computing Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, R.S.; /SLAC

    2008-04-22

    The Advanced Telecommunications Computing Architecture is a new industry open standard for electronics instrument modules and shelves being evaluated for the International Linear Collider (ILC). It is the first industrial standard designed for High Availability (HA). ILC availability simulations have shown clearly that the capabilities of ATCA are needed in order to achieve acceptable integrated luminosity. The ATCA architecture looks attractive for beam instruments and detector applications as well. This paper provides an overview of ongoing R&D including application of HA principles to power electronics systems.

  1. Implementing a computing architecture with WISDOM

    SciTech Connect

    Zebrowski, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    Over the past two years, the Savannah River Site (SRS) work force has expanded by more than 6000 employees. This large influx of personnel, in conjunction with the limited office space, has resulted in an overcrowding problem on site. To alleviate some of the overcrowding, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) has been in the process of leasing space from several office buildings within Aiken, SC. Brookhaven, the latest off-site office building to be leased, is the starting point for a new direction in office automation which will eventually spread throughout SRS. The computing architecture in place at Brookhaven was designed to adhere to the SRS computer architecture guidelines as published by the WSRC Computer Architecture Standards Team (CAST). At the heart of the Brookhaven implementation is a Workstation Integration System for DOS, OS/2 and Macintosh (WISDOM). The key features of the WISDOM system include: it's utilization of a Local Area Network (LAN), it's Graphical User Interface (GUI), it's cross-platform capability, it's portable user interface, and the installation program. To begin, I will give an overview of the network architecture, then discuss WISDOM in detail, mention some platform integration problems that need to be addressed and conclude with a summary of the user benefits that WISDOM provides.

  2. Implementing a computing architecture with WISDOM

    SciTech Connect

    Zebrowski, J.R.

    1991-12-31

    Over the past two years, the Savannah River Site (SRS) work force has expanded by more than 6000 employees. This large influx of personnel, in conjunction with the limited office space, has resulted in an overcrowding problem on site. To alleviate some of the overcrowding, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) has been in the process of leasing space from several office buildings within Aiken, SC. Brookhaven, the latest off-site office building to be leased, is the starting point for a new direction in office automation which will eventually spread throughout SRS. The computing architecture in place at Brookhaven was designed to adhere to the SRS computer architecture guidelines as published by the WSRC Computer Architecture Standards Team (CAST). At the heart of the Brookhaven implementation is a Workstation Integration System for DOS, OS/2 and Macintosh (WISDOM). The key features of the WISDOM system include: it`s utilization of a Local Area Network (LAN), it`s Graphical User Interface (GUI), it`s cross-platform capability, it`s portable user interface, and the installation program. To begin, I will give an overview of the network architecture, then discuss WISDOM in detail, mention some platform integration problems that need to be addressed and conclude with a summary of the user benefits that WISDOM provides.

  3. Computer graphics in architecture and engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, D. P.

    1975-01-01

    The present status of the application of computer graphics to the building profession or architecture and its relationship to other scientific and technical areas were discussed. It was explained that, due to the fragmented nature of architecture and building activities (in contrast to the aerospace industry), a comprehensive, economic utilization of computer graphics in this area is not practical and its true potential cannot now be realized due to the present inability of architects and structural, mechanical, and site engineers to rely on a common data base. Future emphasis will therefore have to be placed on a vertical integration of the construction process and effective use of a three-dimensional data base, rather than on waiting for any technological breakthrough in interactive computing.

  4. Data Parallel Bin-Based Indexing for Answering Queries on Multi-Core Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Gosink, Luke; Wu, Kesheng; Bethel, E. Wes; Owens, John D.; Joy, Kenneth I.

    2009-06-02

    The multi-core trend in CPUs and general purpose graphics processing units (GPUs) offers new opportunities for the database community. The increase of cores at exponential rates is likely to affect virtually every server and client in the coming decade, and presents database management systems with a huge, compelling disruption that will radically change how processing is done. This paper presents a new parallel indexing data structure for answering queries that takes full advantage of the increasing thread-level parallelism emerging in multi-core architectures. In our approach, our Data Parallel Bin-based Index Strategy (DP-BIS) first bins the base data, and then partitions and stores the values in each bin as a separate, bin-based data cluster. In answering a query, the procedures for examining the bin numbers and the bin-based data clusters offer the maximum possible level of concurrency; each record is evaluated by a single thread and all threads are processed simultaneously in parallel. We implement and demonstrate the effectiveness of DP-BIS on two multi-core architectures: a multi-core CPU and a GPU. The concurrency afforded by DP-BIS allows us to fully utilize the thread-level parallelism provided by each architecture--for example, our GPU-based DP-BIS implementation simultaneously evaluates over 12,000 records with an equivalent number of concurrently executing threads. In comparing DP-BIS's performance across these architectures, we show that the GPU-based DP-BIS implementation requires significantly less computation time to answer a query than the CPU-based implementation. We also demonstrate in our analysis that DP-BIS provides better overall performance than the commonly utilized CPU and GPU-based projection index. Finally, due to data encoding, we show that DP-BIS accesses significantly smaller amounts of data than index strategies that operate solely on a column's base data; this smaller data footprint is critical for parallel processors that possess

  5. Simple, parallel virtual machines for extreme computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chokoufe Nejad, Bijan; Ohl, Thorsten; Reuter, Jürgen

    2015-11-01

    We introduce a virtual machine (VM) written in a numerically fast language like Fortran or C for evaluating very large expressions. We discuss the general concept of how to perform computations in terms of a VM and present specifically a VM that is able to compute tree-level cross sections for any number of external legs, given the corresponding byte-code from the optimal matrix element generator, O'MEGA. Furthermore, this approach allows to formulate the parallel computation of a single phase space point in a simple and obvious way. We analyze hereby the scaling behavior with multiple threads as well as the benefits and drawbacks that are introduced with this method. Our implementation of a VM can run faster than the corresponding native, compiled code for certain processes and compilers, especially for very high multiplicities, and has in general runtimes in the same order of magnitude. By avoiding the tedious compile and link steps, which may fail for source code files of gigabyte sizes, new processes or complex higher order corrections that are currently out of reach could be evaluated with a VM given enough computing power.

  6. OS friendly microprocessor architecture: Hardware level computer security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungwirth, Patrick; La Fratta, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    We present an introduction to the patented OS Friendly Microprocessor Architecture (OSFA) and hardware level computer security. Conventional microprocessors have not tried to balance hardware performance and OS performance at the same time. Conventional microprocessors have depended on the Operating System for computer security and information assurance. The goal of the OS Friendly Architecture is to provide a high performance and secure microprocessor and OS system. We are interested in cyber security, information technology (IT), and SCADA control professionals reviewing the hardware level security features. The OS Friendly Architecture is a switched set of cache memory banks in a pipeline configuration. For light-weight threads, the memory pipeline configuration provides near instantaneous context switching times. The pipelining and parallelism provided by the cache memory pipeline provides for background cache read and write operations while the microprocessor's execution pipeline is running instructions. The cache bank selection controllers provide arbitration to prevent the memory pipeline and microprocessor's execution pipeline from accessing the same cache bank at the same time. This separation allows the cache memory pages to transfer to and from level 1 (L1) caching while the microprocessor pipeline is executing instructions. Computer security operations are implemented in hardware. By extending Unix file permissions bits to each cache memory bank and memory address, the OSFA provides hardware level computer security.

  7. A Component Architecture for High-Performance Scientific Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Bernholdt, D E; Allan, B A; Armstrong, R; Bertrand, F; Chiu, K; Dahlgren, T L; Damevski, K; Elwasif, W R; Epperly, T W; Govindaraju, M; Katz, D S; Kohl, J A; Krishnan, M; Kumfert, G; Larson, J W; Lefantzi, S; Lewis, M J; Malony, A D; McInnes, L C; Nieplocha, J; Norris, B; Parker, S G; Ray, J; Shende, S; Windus, T L; Zhou, S

    2004-12-14

    The Common Component Architecture (CCA) provides a means for software developers to manage the complexity of large-scale scientific simulations and to move toward a plug-and-play environment for high-performance computing. In the scientific computing context, component models also promote collaboration using independently developed software, thereby allowing particular individuals or groups to focus on the aspects of greatest interest to them. The CCA supports parallel and distributed computing as well as local high-performance connections between components in a language-independent manner. The design places minimal requirements on components and thus facilitates the integration of existing code into the CCA environment. The CCA model imposes minimal overhead to minimize the impact on application performance. The focus on high performance distinguishes the CCA from most other component models. The CCA is being applied within an increasing range of disciplines, including combustion research, global climate simulation, and computational chemistry.

  8. A Component Architecture for High-Performance Scientific Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Bernholdt, David E; Allan, Benjamin A; Armstrong, Robert C; Bertrand, Felipe; Chiu, Kenneth; Dahlgren, Tamara L; Damevski, Kostadin; Elwasif, Wael R; Epperly, Thomas G; Govindaraju, Madhusudhan; Katz, Daniel S; Kohl, James A; Krishnan, Manoj Kumar; Kumfert, Gary K; Larson, J Walter; Lefantzi, Sophia; Lewis, Michael J; Malony, Allen D; McInnes, Lois C; Nieplocha, Jarek; Norris, Boyana; Parker, Steven G; Ray, Jaideep; Shende, Sameer; Windus, Theresa L; Zhou, Shujia

    2006-07-03

    The Common Component Architecture (CCA) provides a means for software developers to manage the complexity of large-scale scientific simulations and to move toward a plug-and-play environment for high-performance computing. In the scientific computing context, component models also promote collaboration using independently developed software, thereby allowing particular individuals or groups to focus on the aspects of greatest interest to them. The CCA supports parallel and distributed computing as well as local high-performance connections between components in a language-independent manner. The design places minimal requirements on components and thus facilitates the integration of existing code into the CCA environment. The CCA model imposes minimal overhead to minimize the impact on application performance. The focus on high performance distinguishes the CCA from most other component models. The CCA is being applied within an increasing range of disciplines, including combustion research, global climate simulation, and computational chemistry.

  9. A Computational Fluid Dynamics Algorithm on a Massively Parallel Computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jespersen, Dennis C.; Levit, Creon

    1989-01-01

    The discipline of computational fluid dynamics is demanding ever-increasing computational power to deal with complex fluid flow problems. We investigate the performance of a finite-difference computational fluid dynamics algorithm on a massively parallel computer, the Connection Machine. Of special interest is an implicit time-stepping algorithm; to obtain maximum performance from the Connection Machine, it is necessary to use a nonstandard algorithm to solve the linear systems that arise in the implicit algorithm. We find that the Connection Machine ran achieve very high computation rates on both explicit and implicit algorithms. The performance of the Connection Machine puts it in the same class as today's most powerful conventional supercomputers.

  10. A multimodal parallel architecture: A cognitive framework for multimodal interactions.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Human communication is naturally multimodal, and substantial focus has examined the semantic correspondences in speech-gesture and text-image relationships. However, visual narratives, like those in comics, provide an interesting challenge to multimodal communication because the words and/or images can guide the overall meaning, and both modalities can appear in complicated "grammatical" sequences: sentences use a syntactic structure and sequential images use a narrative structure. These dual structures create complexity beyond those typically addressed by theories of multimodality where only a single form uses combinatorial structure, and also poses challenges for models of the linguistic system that focus on single modalities. This paper outlines a broad theoretical framework for multimodal interactions by expanding on Jackendoff's (2002) parallel architecture for language. Multimodal interactions are characterized in terms of their component cognitive structures: whether a particular modality (verbal, bodily, visual) is present, whether it uses a grammatical structure (syntax, narrative), and whether it "dominates" the semantics of the overall expression. Altogether, this approach integrates multimodal interactions into an existing framework of language and cognition, and characterizes interactions between varying complexity in the verbal, bodily, and graphic domains. The resulting theoretical model presents an expanded consideration of the boundaries of the "linguistic" system and its involvement in multimodal interactions, with a framework that can benefit research on corpus analyses, experimentation, and the educational benefits of multimodality. Copyright © 2015.

  11. Progress in Computational Aeroelasticity Using High Fidelity Flow and Structural Equations on Parallel Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.; Byun, Chansup; VanDalsem, William (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Aeroelasticity which involves strong coupling of fluids, structures and controls is an important element in designing an aircraft. Computational aeroelasticity using low fidelity methods such as the linear aerodynamic flow equations coupled with the modal structural equations are well advanced. Though these low fidelity approaches are computationally less intensive, they are not adequate for the analysis of modern aircraft such as High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) and Advanced Subsonic Transport (AST) which can experience complex flow/structure interactions. HSCT can experience vortex induced aeroelastic oscillations whereas AST can experience transonic buffet associated structural oscillations. Both aircraft may experience a dip in the flutter speed at the transonic regime. For accurate aeroelastic computations at these complex fluid/structure interaction situations, high fidelity equations such as the Navier-Stokes for fluids and the finite-elements for structures are needed. Computations using these high fidelity equations require large computational resources both in memory and speed. Current conventional supercomputers have reached their limitations both in memory and speed. As a result, parallel computers have evolved to overcome the limitations of conventional computers. This paper will address the transition that is taking place in computational aeroelasticity from conventional computers to parallel computers. The paper will address special techniques needed to take advantage of the architecture of new parallel computers. Results will be illustrated from computations made on iPSC/860 and IBM SP2 computer by using ENASERO code that directly couples the Euler/Navier-Stokes flow equations with high resolution finite-element structural equations.

  12. Optimizing transformations of stencil operations for parallel cache-based architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Bassetti, F.; Davis, K.

    1999-06-28

    This paper describes a new technique for optimizing serial and parallel stencil- and stencil-like operations for cache-based architectures. This technique takes advantage of the semantic knowledge implicity in stencil-like computations. The technique is implemented as a source-to-source program transformation; because of its specificity it could not be expected of a conventional compiler. Empirical results demonstrate a uniform factor of two speedup. The experiments clearly show the benefits of this technique to be a consequence, as intended, of the reduction in cache misses. The test codes are based on a 5-point stencil obtained by the discretization of the Poisson equation and applied to a two-dimensional uniform grid using the Jacobi method as an iterative solver. Results are presented for a 1-D tiling for a single processor, and in parallel using 1-D data partition. For the parallel case both blocking and non-blocking communication are tested. The same scheme of experiments has bee n performed for the 2-D tiling case. However, for the parallel case the 2-D partitioning is not discussed here, so the parallel case handled for 2-D is 2-D tiling with 1-D data partitioning.

  13. Parallel eigenanalysis of finite element models in a completely connected architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akl, F. A.; Morel, M. R.

    1989-01-01

    A parallel algorithm is presented for the solution of the generalized eigenproblem in linear elastic finite element analysis, (K)(phi) = (M)(phi)(omega), where (K) and (M) are of order N, and (omega) is order of q. The concurrent solution of the eigenproblem is based on the multifrontal/modified subspace method and is achieved in a completely connected parallel architecture in which each processor is allowed to communicate with all other processors. The algorithm was successfully implemented on a tightly coupled multiple-instruction multiple-data parallel processing machine, Cray X-MP. A finite element model is divided into m domains each of which is assumed to process n elements. Each domain is then assigned to a processor or to a logical processor (task) if the number of domains exceeds the number of physical processors. The macrotasking library routines are used in mapping each domain to a user task. Computational speed-up and efficiency are used to determine the effectiveness of the algorithm. The effect of the number of domains, the number of degrees-of-freedom located along the global fronts and the dimension of the subspace on the performance of the algorithm are investigated. A parallel finite element dynamic analysis program, p-feda, is documented and the performance of its subroutines in parallel environment is analyzed.

  14. Problems Related to Parallelization of CFD Algorithms on GPU, Multi-GPU and Hybrid Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biazewicz, Marek; Kurowski, Krzysztof; Ludwiczak, Bogdan; Napieraia, Krystyna

    2010-09-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is one of the branches of fluid mechanics, which uses numerical methods and algorithms to solve and analyze fluid flows. CFD is used in various domains, such as oil and gas reservoir uncertainty analysis, aerodynamic body shapes optimization (e.g. planes, cars, ships, sport helmets, skis), natural phenomena analysis, numerical simulation for weather forecasting or realistic visualizations. CFD problem is very complex and needs a lot of computational power to obtain the results in a reasonable time. We have implemented a parallel application for two-dimensional CFD simulation with a free surface approximation (MAC method) using new hardware architectures, in particular multi-GPU and hybrid computing environments. For this purpose we decided to use NVIDIA graphic cards with CUDA environment due to its simplicity of programming and good computations performance. We used finite difference discretization of Navier-Stokes equations, where fluid is propagated over an Eulerian Grid. In this model, the behavior of the fluid inside the cell depends only on the properties of local, surrounding cells, therefore it is well suited for the GPU-based architecture. In this paper we demonstrate how to use efficiently the computing power of GPUs for CFD. Additionally, we present some best practices to help users analyze and improve the performance of CFD applications executed on GPU. Finally, we discuss various challenges around the multi-GPU implementation on the example of matrix multiplication.

  15. Examining the architecture of cellular computing through a comparative study with a computer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Degeng; Gribskov, Michael

    2005-06-22

    The computer and the cell both use information embedded in simple coding, the binary software code and the quadruple genomic code, respectively, to support system operations. A comparative examination of their system architecture as well as their information storage and utilization schemes is performed. On top of the code, both systems display a modular, multi-layered architecture, which, in the case of a computer, arises from human engineering efforts through a combination of hardware implementation and software abstraction. Using the computer as a reference system, a simplistic mapping of the architectural components between the two is easily detected. This comparison also reveals that a cell abolishes the software-hardware barrier through genomic encoding for the constituents of the biochemical network, a cell's "hardware" equivalent to the computer central processing unit (CPU). The information loading (gene expression) process acts as a major determinant of the encoded constituent's abundance, which, in turn, often determines the "bandwidth" of a biochemical pathway. Cellular processes are implemented in biochemical pathways in parallel manners. In a computer, on the other hand, the software provides only instructions and data for the CPU. A process represents just sequentially ordered actions by the CPU and only virtual parallelism can be implemented through CPU time-sharing. Whereas process management in a computer may simply mean job scheduling, coordinating pathway bandwidth through the gene expression machinery represents a major process management scheme in a cell. In summary, a cell can be viewed as a super-parallel computer, which computes through controlled hardware composition. While we have, at best, a very fragmented understanding of cellular operation, we have a thorough understanding of the computer throughout the engineering process. The potential utilization of this knowledge to the benefit of systems biology is discussed.

  16. A Testbed of Parallel Kernels for Computer Science Research

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, David; Demmel, James; Ibrahim, Khaled; Kaiser, Alex; Koniges, Alice; Madduri, Kamesh; Shalf, John; Strohmaier, Erich; Williams, Samuel

    2010-04-30

    For several decades, computer scientists have sought guidance on how to evolve architectures, languages, and programming models for optimal performance, efficiency, and productivity. Unfortunately, this guidance is most often taken from the existing software/hardware ecosystem. Architects attempt to provide micro-architectural solutions to improve performance on fixed binaries. Researchers tweak compilers to improve code generation for existing architectures and implementations, and they may invent new programming models for fixed processor and memory architectures and computational algorithms. In today's rapidly evolving world of on-chip parallelism, these isolated and iterative improvements to performance may miss superior solutions in the same way gradient descent optimization techniques may get stuck in local minima. In an initial study, we have developed an alternate approach that, rather than starting with an existing hardware/software solution laced with hidden assumptions, defines the computational problems of interest and invites architects, researchers and programmers to implement novel hardware/ software co-designed solutions. Our work builds on the previous ideas of computational dwarfs, motifs, and parallel patterns by selecting a representative set of essential problems for which we provide: An algorithmic description; scalable problem definition; illustrative reference implementations; verification schemes. For simplicity, we focus initially on the computational problems of interest to the scientific computing community but proclaim the methodology (and perhaps a subset of the problems) as applicable to other communities. We intend to broaden the coverage of this problem space through stronger community involvement. Previous work has established a broad categorization of numerical methods of interest to the scientific computing, in the spirit of the NAS Benchmarks, which pioneered the basic idea of a 'pencil and paper benchmark' in the 1990s. The

  17. QCMPI: A parallel environment for quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabakin, Frank; Juliá-Díaz, Bruno

    2009-06-01

    QCMPI is a quantum computer (QC) simulation package written in Fortran 90 with parallel processing capabilities. It is an accessible research tool that permits rapid evaluation of quantum algorithms for a large number of qubits and for various "noise" scenarios. The prime motivation for developing QCMPI is to facilitate numerical examination of not only how QC algorithms work, but also to include noise, decoherence, and attenuation effects and to evaluate the efficacy of error correction schemes. The present work builds on an earlier Mathematica code QDENSITY, which is mainly a pedagogic tool. In that earlier work, although the density matrix formulation was featured, the description using state vectors was also provided. In QCMPI, the stress is on state vectors, in order to employ a large number of qubits. The parallel processing feature is implemented by using the Message-Passing Interface (MPI) protocol. A description of how to spread the wave function components over many processors is provided, along with how to efficiently describe the action of general one- and two-qubit operators on these state vectors. These operators include the standard Pauli, Hadamard, CNOT and CPHASE gates and also Quantum Fourier transformation. These operators make up the actions needed in QC. Codes for Grover's search and Shor's factoring algorithms are provided as examples. A major feature of this work is that concurrent versions of the algorithms can be evaluated with each version subject to alternate noise effects, which corresponds to the idea of solving a stochastic Schrödinger equation. The density matrix for the ensemble of such noise cases is constructed using parallel distribution methods to evaluate its eigenvalues and associated entropy. Potential applications of this powerful tool include studies of the stability and correction of QC processes using Hamiltonian based dynamics. Program summaryProgram title: QCMPI Catalogue identifier: AECS_v1_0 Program summary URL

  18. Integration of nanoscale memristor synapses in neuromorphic computing architectures.

    PubMed

    Indiveri, Giacomo; Linares-Barranco, Bernabé; Legenstein, Robert; Deligeorgis, George; Prodromakis, Themistoklis

    2013-09-27

    Conventional neuro-computing architectures and artificial neural networks have often been developed with no or loose connections to neuroscience. As a consequence, they have largely ignored key features of biological neural processing systems, such as their extremely low-power consumption features or their ability to carry out robust and efficient computation using massively parallel arrays of limited precision, highly variable, and unreliable components. Recent developments in nano-technologies are making available extremely compact and low power, but also variable and unreliable solid-state devices that can potentially extend the offerings of availing CMOS technologies. In particular, memristors are regarded as a promising solution for modeling key features of biological synapses due to their nanoscale dimensions, their capacity to store multiple bits of information per element and the low energy required to write distinct states. In this paper, we first review the neuro- and neuromorphic computing approaches that can best exploit the properties of memristor and scale devices, and then propose a novel hybrid memristor-CMOS neuromorphic circuit which represents a radical departure from conventional neuro-computing approaches, as it uses memristors to directly emulate the biophysics and temporal dynamics of real synapses. We point out the differences between the use of memristors in conventional neuro-computing architectures and the hybrid memristor-CMOS circuit proposed, and argue how this circuit represents an ideal building block for implementing brain-inspired probabilistic computing paradigms that are robust to variability and fault tolerant by design.

  19. Integration of nanoscale memristor synapses in neuromorphic computing architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indiveri, Giacomo; Linares-Barranco, Bernabé; Legenstein, Robert; Deligeorgis, George; Prodromakis, Themistoklis

    2013-09-01

    Conventional neuro-computing architectures and artificial neural networks have often been developed with no or loose connections to neuroscience. As a consequence, they have largely ignored key features of biological neural processing systems, such as their extremely low-power consumption features or their ability to carry out robust and efficient computation using massively parallel arrays of limited precision, highly variable, and unreliable components. Recent developments in nano-technologies are making available extremely compact and low power, but also variable and unreliable solid-state devices that can potentially extend the offerings of availing CMOS technologies. In particular, memristors are regarded as a promising solution for modeling key features of biological synapses due to their nanoscale dimensions, their capacity to store multiple bits of information per element and the low energy required to write distinct states. In this paper, we first review the neuro- and neuromorphic computing approaches that can best exploit the properties of memristor and scale devices, and then propose a novel hybrid memristor-CMOS neuromorphic circuit which represents a radical departure from conventional neuro-computing approaches, as it uses memristors to directly emulate the biophysics and temporal dynamics of real synapses. We point out the differences between the use of memristors in conventional neuro-computing architectures and the hybrid memristor-CMOS circuit proposed, and argue how this circuit represents an ideal building block for implementing brain-inspired probabilistic computing paradigms that are robust to variability and fault tolerant by design.

  20. Parallel computing for simultaneous iterative tomographic imaging by graphics processing units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bello-Maldonado, Pedro D.; López, Ricardo; Rogers, Colleen; Jin, Yuanwei; Lu, Enyue

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of accelerating inversion algorithms for nonlinear acoustic tomographic imaging by parallel computing on graphics processing units (GPUs). Nonlinear inversion algorithms for tomographic imaging often rely on iterative algorithms for solving an inverse problem, thus computationally intensive. We study the simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT) for the multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) tomography algorithm which enables parallel computations of the grid points as well as the parallel execution of multiple source excitation. Using graphics processing units (GPUs) and the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) programming model an overall improvement of 26.33x was achieved when combining both approaches compared with sequential algorithms. Furthermore we propose an adaptive iterative relaxation factor and the use of non-uniform weights to improve the overall convergence of the algorithm. Using these techniques, fast computations can be performed in parallel without the loss of image quality during the reconstruction process.

  1. Optimization of a parallel hole collimator/CdZnTe gamma-camera architecture for scintimammography

    SciTech Connect

    Robert, Charlotte; Montemont, Guillaume; Rebuffel, Veronique; Verger, Loieck; Buvat, Irene

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: Small field-of-view CdZnTe (CZT) gamma cameras are increasingly studied for breast lesion detection to complement mammography or ultrasonographic findings. However, in classical collimation configurations, they remain limited by the trade-off between spatial resolution and sensitivity. The HiSens architecture was proposed to overcome these limitations. Using an accurate 3D localization of the interactions inside the detector, this architecture leads to a gain in sensitivity without loss in spatial resolution. In this article, the relevance of the HiSens architecture for planar scintimammography is studied. Methods: A detective quantum efficiency (DQE) computation method is developed and used to optimize the dimensioning of a parallel hole collimator dedicated to scintimammography. Based on the DQE curves, the impact of the collimator-to-detector distance is studied. Two algorithms are proposed to combine data acquired with different collimator-to-detector distances. Results: It is shown that CZT detector virtual pixelization increases system sensitivity by 3.3 while preserving a standard LEHR spatial resolution. The introduction of a gap between the CZT detector and the collimator is useful to modulate the DQE curve shape. The combination of data acquired using different gaps in the image formation process leads to enhanced restoration of the frequency content of the images, resulting in image contrast and spatial resolution improvements. Conclusions: Acquisition duration or injected activity could be markedly reduced if the HiSens architecture with an appropriate collimator-detector gap were used.

  2. Roadmap to the SRS computing architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.

    1994-07-05

    This document outlines the major steps that must be taken by the Savannah River Site (SRS) to migrate the SRS information technology (IT) environment to the new architecture described in the Savannah River Site Computing Architecture. This document proposes an IT environment that is {open_quotes}...standards-based, data-driven, and workstation-oriented, with larger systems being utilized for the delivery of needed information to users in a client-server relationship.{close_quotes} Achieving this vision will require many substantial changes in the computing applications, systems, and supporting infrastructure at the site. This document consists of a set of roadmaps which provide explanations of the necessary changes for IT at the site and describes the milestones that must be completed to finish the migration.

  3. Algorithms versus architectures for computational chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, H.; Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The algorithms employed are computationally intensive and, as a result, increased performance (both algorithmic and architectural) is required to improve accuracy and to treat larger molecular systems. Several benchmark quantum chemistry codes are examined on a variety of architectures. While these codes are only a small portion of a typical quantum chemistry library, they illustrate many of the computationally intensive kernels and data manipulation requirements of some applications. Furthermore, understanding the performance of the existing algorithm on present and proposed supercomputers serves as a guide for future programs and algorithm development. The algorithms investigated are: (1) a sparse symmetric matrix vector product; (2) a four index integral transformation; and (3) the calculation of diatomic two electron Slater integrals. The vectorization strategies are examined for these algorithms for both the Cyber 205 and Cray XMP. In addition, multiprocessor implementations of the algorithms are looked at on the Cray XMP and on the MIT static data flow machine proposed by DENNIS.

  4. Novel Highly Parallel and Systolic Architectures Using Quantum Dot-Based Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, Amir; Toomarian, Benny N.; Spotnitz, Matthew

    1997-01-01

    VLSI technology has made possible the integration of massive number of components (processors, memory, etc.) into a single chip. In VLSI design, memory and processing power are relatively cheap and the main emphasis of the design is on reducing the overall interconnection complexity since data routing costs dominate the power, time, and area required to implement a computation. Communication is costly because wires occupy the most space on a circuit and it can also degrade clock time. In fact, much of the complexity (and hence the cost) of VLSI design results from minimization of data routing. The main difficulty in VLSI routing is due to the fact that crossing of the lines carrying data, instruction, control, etc. is not possible in a plane. Thus, in order to meet this constraint, the VLSI design aims at keeping the architecture highly regular with local and short interconnection. As a result, while the high level of integration has opened the way for massively parallel computation, practical and full exploitation of such a capability in many applications of interest has been hindered by the constraints on interconnection pattern. More precisely. the use of only localized communication significantly simplifies the design of interconnection architecture but at the expense of somewhat restricted class of applications. For example, there are currently commercially available products integrating; hundreds of simple processor elements within a single chip. However, the lack of adequate interconnection pattern among these processing elements make them inefficient for exploiting a large degree of parallelism in many applications.

  5. Broadcasting a message in a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J; Faraj, Ahmad A

    2013-04-16

    Methods, systems, and products are disclosed for broadcasting a message in a parallel computer that includes: transmitting, by the logical root to all of the nodes directly connected to the logical root, a message; and for each node except the logical root: receiving the message; if that node is the physical root, then transmitting the message to all of the child nodes except the child node from which the message was received; if that node received the message from a parent node and if that node is not a leaf node, then transmitting the message to all of the child nodes; and if that node received the message from a child node and if that node is not the physical root, then transmitting the message to all of the child nodes except the child node from which the message was received and transmitting the message to the parent node.

  6. Broadcasting a message in a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J; Faraj, Daniel A

    2014-11-18

    Methods, systems, and products are disclosed for broadcasting a message in a parallel computer that includes: transmitting, by the logical root to all of the nodes directly connected to the logical root, a message; and for each node except the logical root: receiving the message; if that node is the physical root, then transmitting the message to all of the child nodes except the child node from which the message was received; if that node received the message from a parent node and if that node is not a leaf node, then transmitting the message to all of the child nodes; and if that node received the message from a child node and if that node is not the physical root, then transmitting the message to all of the child nodes except the child node from which the message was received and transmitting the message to the parent node.

  7. Broadcasting collective operation contributions throughout a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Faraj, Ahmad [Rochester, MN

    2012-02-21

    Methods, systems, and products are disclosed for broadcasting collective operation contributions throughout a parallel computer. The parallel computer includes a plurality of compute nodes connected together through a data communications network. Each compute node has a plurality of processors for use in collective parallel operations on the parallel computer. Broadcasting collective operation contributions throughout a parallel computer according to embodiments of the present invention includes: transmitting, by each processor on each compute node, that processor's collective operation contribution to the other processors on that compute node using intra-node communications; and transmitting on a designated network link, by each processor on each compute node according to a serial processor transmission sequence, that processor's collective operation contribution to the other processors on the other compute nodes using inter-node communications.

  8. The parallel I/O architecture of the high performance storage system (HPSS). Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, R.W.; Coyne, R.A.

    1995-04-01

    Datasets up to terabyte size and petabyte capacities have created a serious imbalance between I/O and storage system performance and system functionality. One promising approach is the use of parallel data transfer techniques for client access to storage, peripheral-to-peripheral transfers, and remote file transfers. This paper describes the parallel I/O architecture and mechanisms, Parallel Transport Protocol (PTP), parallel FTP, and parallel client Application Programming Interface (API) used by the High Performance Storage System (HPSS). Parallel storage integration issues with a local parallel file system are also discussed.

  9. Architecture of the parallel hierarchical network for fast image recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timchenko, Leonid; Wójcik, Waldemar; Kokriatskaia, Natalia; Kutaev, Yuriy; Ivasyuk, Igor; Kotyra, Andrzej; Smailova, Saule

    2016-09-01

    Multistage integration of visual information in the brain allows humans to respond quickly to most significant stimuli while maintaining their ability to recognize small details in the image. Implementation of this principle in technical systems can lead to more efficient processing procedures. The multistage approach to image processing includes main types of cortical multistage convergence. The input images are mapped into a flexible hierarchy that reflects complexity of image data. Procedures of the temporal image decomposition and hierarchy formation are described in mathematical expressions. The multistage system highlights spatial regularities, which are passed through a number of transformational levels to generate a coded representation of the image that encapsulates a structure on different hierarchical levels in the image. At each processing stage a single output result is computed to allow a quick response of the system. The result is presented as an activity pattern, which can be compared with previously computed patterns on the basis of the closest match. With regard to the forecasting method, its idea lies in the following. In the results synchronization block, network-processed data arrive to the database where a sample of most correlated data is drawn using service parameters of the parallel-hierarchical network.

  10. Architectural requirements for the Red Storm computing system.

    SciTech Connect

    Camp, William J.; Tomkins, James Lee

    2003-10-01

    This report is based on the Statement of Work (SOW) describing the various requirements for delivering 3 new supercomputer system to Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) as part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) program. This system is named Red Storm and will be a distributed memory, massively parallel processor (MPP) machine built primarily out of commodity parts. The requirements presented here distill extensive architectural and design experience accumulated over a decade and a half of research, development and production operation of similar machines at Sandia. Red Storm will have an unusually high bandwidth, low latency interconnect, specially designed hardware and software reliability features, a light weight kernel compute node operating system and the ability to rapidly switch major sections of the machine between classified and unclassified computing environments. Particular attention has been paid to architectural balance in the design of Red Storm, and it is therefore expected to achieve an atypically high fraction of its peak speed of 41 TeraOPS on real scientific computing applications. In addition, Red Storm is designed to be upgradeable to many times this initial peak capability while still retaining appropriate balance in key design dimensions. Installation of the Red Storm computer system at Sandia's New Mexico site is planned for 2004, and it is expected that the system will be operated for a minimum of five years following installation.

  11. PCG: A software package for the iterative solution of linear systems on scalar, vector and parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Joubert, W.; Carey, G.F.

    1994-12-31

    A great need exists for high performance numerical software libraries transportable across parallel machines. This talk concerns the PCG package, which solves systems of linear equations by iterative methods on parallel computers. The features of the package are discussed, as well as techniques used to obtain high performance as well as transportability across architectures. Representative numerical results are presented for several machines including the Connection Machine CM-5, Intel Paragon and Cray T3D parallel computers.

  12. Parallel CE/SE Computations via Domain Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Himansu, Ananda; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Wang, Xiao-Yen; Chang, Sin-Chung

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the parallelization strategy and achieved parallel efficiency of an explicit time-marching algorithm for solving conservation laws. The Space-Time Conservation Element and Solution Element (CE/SE) algorithm for solving the 2D and 3D Euler equations is parallelized with the aid of domain decomposition. The parallel efficiency of the resultant algorithm on a Silicon Graphics Origin 2000 parallel computer is checked.

  13. Nonlinear Memory Capacity of Parallel Time-Delay Reservoir Computers in the Processing of Multidimensional Signals.

    PubMed

    Grigoryeva, Lyudmila; Henriques, Julie; Larger, Laurent; Ortega, Juan-Pablo

    2016-07-01

    This letter addresses the reservoir design problem in the context of delay-based reservoir computers for multidimensional input signals, parallel architectures, and real-time multitasking. First, an approximating reservoir model is presented in those frameworks that provides an explicit functional link between the reservoir architecture and its performance in the execution of a specific task. Second, the inference properties of the ridge regression estimator in the multivariate context are used to assess the impact of finite sample training on the decrease of the reservoir capacity. Finally, an empirical study is conducted that shows the adequacy of the theoretical results with the empirical performances exhibited by various reservoir architectures in the execution of several nonlinear tasks with multidimensional inputs. Our results confirm the robustness properties of the parallel reservoir architecture with respect to task misspecification and parameter choice already documented in the literature.

  14. Aerodynamic optimization studies on advanced architecture computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chawla, Kalpana

    1995-01-01

    The approach to carrying out multi-discipline aerospace design studies in the future, especially in massively parallel computing environments, comprises of choosing (1) suitable solvers to compute solutions to equations characterizing a discipline, and (2) efficient optimization methods. In addition, for aerodynamic optimization problems, (3) smart methodologies must be selected to modify the surface shape. In this research effort, a 'direct' optimization method is implemented on the Cray C-90 to improve aerodynamic design. It is coupled with an existing implicit Navier-Stokes solver, OVERFLOW, to compute flow solutions. The optimization method is chosen such that it can accomodate multi-discipline optimization in future computations. In the work , however, only single discipline aerodynamic optimization will be included.

  15. Design and implementation of a multi-sensor fusion algorithm on a hypercube computer architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Glover, C.W.

    1989-01-01

    A multi-sensor integration (MSI) algorithm written for sequential single processor computer architecture has been transformed into a concurrent algorithm and implemented in parallel on a multi-processor hypercube computer architecture. This paper will present the philosophy and methodologies used in the decomposition of the sequential MSI algorithm, and its transformation into a parallel MSI algorithm. The parallel MSI algorithm was implemented on a NCUBE{trademark} hypercube computer. The performance of the parallel MSI algorithm has been measured and compared against its sequential counterpart by running test case scenarios through a simulation program. The simulation program allows the user to define the trajectories of all players in the scenarios, and to pick the sensor suites of the players and their operating characteristics.

  16. Real-time synthetic aperture sonar imaging using a parallel architecture.

    PubMed

    Riyait, V S; Lawlor, M A; Adams, A E; Hinton, O; Sharif, B

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a parallel architecture that has been developed to perform real-time synthetic aperture sonar imaging as part of the Acoustical Imaging Development (ACID) project. The project has successfully developed a synthetic aperture sonar system for producing high resolution images of the sea floor and that has been tested during a series of sea trials in May 1993 off the south coast of France. This paper describes the synthetic aperture processing system developed by the University of Newcastle upon Tyne and its use of transputer modules and associated devices in order to obtain real-time imaging performance, the software structure of the processing system and the load balancing techniques that have been developed in order to provide efficient processing. The use of a parallel distributed architecture has also allowed a processing system that can readily be extended to deliver greater computational power in the future. Images produced by the synthetic aperture processor from data collected from around the Toulon coastal region are presented. These images highlight the improvement in azimuth resolution that can be obtained from synthetic aperture processing over conventional sidescan sonars.

  17. Parallel CFD design on network-based computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, Samson

    1995-01-01

    Combining multiple engineering workstations into a network-based heterogeneous parallel computer allows application of aerodynamic optimization with advanced computational fluid dynamics codes, which can be computationally expensive on mainframe supercomputers. This paper introduces a nonlinear quasi-Newton optimizer designed for this network-based heterogeneous parallel computing environment utilizing a software called Parallel Virtual Machine. This paper will introduce the methodology behind coupling a Parabolized Navier-Stokes flow solver to the nonlinear optimizer. This parallel optimization package is applied to reduce the wave drag of a body of revolution and a wing/body configuration with results of 5% to 6% drag reduction.

  18. CFD Optimization on Network-Based Parallel Computer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, Samson H.; VanDalsem, William (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Combining multiple engineering workstations into a network-based heterogeneous parallel computer allows application of aerodynamic optimization with advance computational fluid dynamics codes, which is computationally expensive in mainframe supercomputer. This paper introduces a nonlinear quasi-Newton optimizer designed for this network-based heterogeneous parallel computer on a software called Parallel Virtual Machine. This paper will introduce the methodology behind coupling a Parabolized Navier-Stokes flow solver to the nonlinear optimizer. This parallel optimization package has been applied to reduce the wave drag of a body of revolution and a wing/body configuration with results of 5% to 6% drag reduction.

  19. Parallel CFD design on network-based computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, Samson

    1995-01-01

    Combining multiple engineering workstations into a network-based heterogeneous parallel computer allows application of aerodynamic optimization with advanced computational fluid dynamics codes, which can be computationally expensive on mainframe supercomputers. This paper introduces a nonlinear quasi-Newton optimizer designed for this network-based heterogeneous parallel computing environment utilizing a software called Parallel Virtual Machine. This paper will introduce the methodology behind coupling a Parabolized Navier-Stokes flow solver to the nonlinear optimizer. This parallel optimization package is applied to reduce the wave drag of a body of revolution and a wing/body configuration with results of 5% to 6% drag reduction.

  20. CFD Optimization on Network-Based Parallel Computer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, Samson H.; Holst, Terry L. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Combining multiple engineering workstations into a network-based heterogeneous parallel computer allows application of aerodynamic optimization with advance computational fluid dynamics codes, which is computationally expensive in mainframe supercomputer. This paper introduces a nonlinear quasi-Newton optimizer designed for this network-based heterogeneous parallel computer on a software called Parallel Virtual Machine. This paper will introduce the methodology behind coupling a Parabolized Navier-Stokes flow solver to the nonlinear optimizer. This parallel optimization package has been applied to reduce the wave drag of a body of revolution and a wing/body configuration with results of 5% to 6% drag reduction.

  1. Review of An Introduction to Parallel and Vector Scientific Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, David H.; Lefton, Lew

    2006-06-30

    the publication of the book An Introduction to Parallel and Vector Scientic Computing, written by Ronald W. Shonkwiler and Lew Lefton, both of the Georgia Institute of Technology. They have taken the bull by the horns and produced a book that appears to be entirely satisfactory as an introductory textbook for use in such a course. It is also of interest to the much broader community of researchers who are already in the field, laboring day by day to improve the power and performance of their numerical simulations. The book is organized into 11 chapters, plus an appendix. The first three chapters describe the basics of system architecture including vector, parallel and distributed memory systems, the details of task dependence and synchronization, and the various programming models currently in use - threads, MPI and OpenMP. Chapters four through nine provide a competent introduction to floating-point arithmetic, numerical error and numerical linear algebra. Some of the topics presented include Gaussian elimination, LU decomposition, tridiagonal systems, Givens rotations, QR decompositions, Gauss-Seidel iterations and Householder transformations. Chapters 10 and 11 introduce Monte Carlo methods and schemes for discrete optimization such as genetic algorithms.

  2. Developing a Distributed Computing Architecture at Arizona State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armann, Neil; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Development of Arizona State University's computing architecture, designed to ensure that all new distributed computing pieces will work together, is described. Aspects discussed include the business rationale, the general architectural approach, characteristics and objectives of the architecture, specific services, and impact on the university…

  3. Developing a Distributed Computing Architecture at Arizona State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armann, Neil; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Development of Arizona State University's computing architecture, designed to ensure that all new distributed computing pieces will work together, is described. Aspects discussed include the business rationale, the general architectural approach, characteristics and objectives of the architecture, specific services, and impact on the university…

  4. A Computational Architecture for Programmable Automation Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Russell H.; Korein, James U.; Maier, Georg E.; Durfee, Lawrence F.

    1987-03-01

    This short paper describes recent work at the IBM T. J. Watson Research Center directed at developing a highly flexible computational architecture for research on sensor-based programmable automation. The system described here has been designed with a focus on dynamic configurability, layered user inter-faces and incorporation of sensor-based real time operations into new commands. It is these features which distinguish it from earlier work. The system is cur-rently being implemented at IBM for research purposes and internal use and is an outgrowth of programmable automation research which has been ongoing since 1972 [e.g., 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6] .

  5. Frances: A Tool for Understanding Computer Architecture and Assembly Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sondag, Tyler; Pokorny, Kian L.; Rajan, Hridesh

    2012-01-01

    Students in all areas of computing require knowledge of the computing device including software implementation at the machine level. Several courses in computer science curricula address these low-level details such as computer architecture and assembly languages. For such courses, there are advantages to studying real architectures instead of…

  6. Frances: A Tool for Understanding Computer Architecture and Assembly Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sondag, Tyler; Pokorny, Kian L.; Rajan, Hridesh

    2012-01-01

    Students in all areas of computing require knowledge of the computing device including software implementation at the machine level. Several courses in computer science curricula address these low-level details such as computer architecture and assembly languages. For such courses, there are advantages to studying real architectures instead of…

  7. [Design and study of parallel computing environment of Monte Carlo simulation for particle therapy planning using a public cloud-computing infrastructure].

    PubMed

    Yokohama, Noriya

    2013-07-01

    This report was aimed at structuring the design of architectures and studying performance measurement of a parallel computing environment using a Monte Carlo simulation for particle therapy using a high performance computing (HPC) instance within a public cloud-computing infrastructure. Performance measurements showed an approximately 28 times faster speed than seen with single-thread architecture, combined with improved stability. A study of methods of optimizing the system operations also indicated lower cost.

  8. Architectural Adaptability in Parallel Programming via Control Abstraction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    Technical Report 359 January 1991 Abstract Parallel programming involves finding the potential parallelism in an application, choos - ing an...during the development of this paper. 34 References [Albert et ai, 1988] Eugene Albert, Kathleen Knobe, Joan D. Lukas, and Guy L. Steele, Jr

  9. Performance Evaluation in Network-Based Parallel Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dezhgosha, Kamyar

    1996-01-01

    Network-based parallel computing is emerging as a cost-effective alternative for solving many problems which require use of supercomputers or massively parallel computers. The primary objective of this project has been to conduct experimental research on performance evaluation for clustered parallel computing. First, a testbed was established by augmenting our existing SUNSPARCs' network with PVM (Parallel Virtual Machine) which is a software system for linking clusters of machines. Second, a set of three basic applications were selected. The applications consist of a parallel search, a parallel sort, a parallel matrix multiplication. These application programs were implemented in C programming language under PVM. Third, we conducted performance evaluation under various configurations and problem sizes. Alternative parallel computing models and workload allocations for application programs were explored. The performance metric was limited to elapsed time or response time which in the context of parallel computing can be expressed in terms of speedup. The results reveal that the overhead of communication latency between processes in many cases is the restricting factor to performance. That is, coarse-grain parallelism which requires less frequent communication between processes will result in higher performance in network-based computing. Finally, we are in the final stages of installing an Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) switch and four ATM interfaces (each 155 Mbps) which will allow us to extend our study to newer applications, performance metrics, and configurations.

  10. Performance Evaluation in Network-Based Parallel Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dezhgosha, Kamyar

    1996-01-01

    Network-based parallel computing is emerging as a cost-effective alternative for solving many problems which require use of supercomputers or massively parallel computers. The primary objective of this project has been to conduct experimental research on performance evaluation for clustered parallel computing. First, a testbed was established by augmenting our existing SUNSPARCs' network with PVM (Parallel Virtual Machine) which is a software system for linking clusters of machines. Second, a set of three basic applications were selected. The applications consist of a parallel search, a parallel sort, a parallel matrix multiplication. These application programs were implemented in C programming language under PVM. Third, we conducted performance evaluation under various configurations and problem sizes. Alternative parallel computing models and workload allocations for application programs were explored. The performance metric was limited to elapsed time or response time which in the context of parallel computing can be expressed in terms of speedup. The results reveal that the overhead of communication latency between processes in many cases is the restricting factor to performance. That is, coarse-grain parallelism which requires less frequent communication between processes will result in higher performance in network-based computing. Finally, we are in the final stages of installing an Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) switch and four ATM interfaces (each 155 Mbps) which will allow us to extend our study to newer applications, performance metrics, and configurations.

  11. Syntactic Change in the Parallel Architecture: The Case of Parasitic Gaps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culicover, Peter W.

    2017-01-01

    In Jackendoff's Parallel Architecture, the well-formed expressions of a language are licensed by correspondences between phonology, syntax, and conceptual structure. I show how this architecture can be used to make sense of the existence of parasitic gap constructions. A parasitic gap is one that is rendered acceptable because of the presence of…

  12. Computing Architecture for the ngVLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Jeffrey S.; Glendenning, Brian; Hiriart, R.

    2017-01-01

    Computing challenges for the Next Generation Very Large Array (ngVLA) are not always the ones that first come to mind. Current design concepts have visibility data rates which allow the permanent storage of the raw visibility data, and although challenging, the calibration and imaging processing for the ngVLA is not beyond the capabilities of existing systems (let alone those that will exist when ngVLA construction is completed). Design goals include a system that supports a wide range of PI-driven projects, end to end data management, and the production of science ready data products. This should be accomplished while minimizing the operating costs of an array consisting of hundreds of elements distributed over an area of nearly 100,000 km2. We discuss a proposed architecture of the computing system, design constraints for a detailed design, and some possible design choices and their implications.

  13. Quantum computation architecture using optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Weitenberg, Christof; Kuhr, Stefan; Moelmer, Klaus; Sherson, Jacob F.

    2011-09-15

    We present a complete architecture for scalable quantum computation with ultracold atoms in optical lattices using optical tweezers focused to the size of a lattice spacing. We discuss three different two-qubit gates based on local collisional interactions. The gates between arbitrary qubits require the transport of atoms to neighboring sites. We numerically optimize the nonadiabatic transport of the atoms through the lattice and the intensity ramps of the optical tweezer in order to maximize the gate fidelities. We find overall gate times of a few 100 {mu}s, while keeping the error probability due to vibrational excitations and spontaneous scattering below 10{sup -3}. The requirements on the positioning error and intensity noise of the optical tweezer and the magnetic field stability are analyzed and we show that atoms in optical lattices could meet the requirements for fault-tolerant scalable quantum computing.

  14. Data communications in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2013-11-12

    Data communications in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer composed of compute nodes that execute a parallel application, each compute node including application processors that execute the parallel application and at least one management processor dedicated to gathering information regarding data communications. The PAMI is composed of data communications endpoints, each endpoint composed of a specification of data communications parameters for a thread of execution on a compute node, including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the compute nodes and the endpoints coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through data communications resources. Embodiments function by gathering call site statistics describing data communications resulting from execution of data communications instructions and identifying in dependence upon the call cite statistics a data communications algorithm for use in executing a data communications instruction at a call site in the parallel application.

  15. Some computational challenges of developing efficient parallel algorithms for data-dependent computations in thermal-hydraulics supercomputer applications

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, S.B.

    1992-01-01

    The Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC), which features a two- fluid treatment of thermal-hydraulics, is designed to model transients in water reactors and related facilities. One of the major computational costs associated with TRAC and similar codes is calculating constitutive coefficients. Although the formulations for these coefficients are local the costs are flow-regime- or data-dependent; i.e., the computations needed for a given spatial node often vary widely as a function of time. Consequently, poor load balancing will degrade efficiency on either vector or data parallel architectures when the data are organized according to spatial location. Unfortunately, a general automatic solution to the load-balancing problem associated with data-dependent computations is not yet available for massively parallel architectures. This document discusses why developers algorithms, such as a neural net representation, that do not exhibit algorithms, such as a neural net representation, that do not exhibit load-balancing problems.

  16. Access and visualization using clusters and other parallel computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, D. S.; Bergou, A.; Berriman, B.; Block, G.; Collier, J.; Curkendall, D.; Good, J.; Husman, L.; Jacob, J.; Laity, A.; Li, P.; Miller, C.; Plesea, L.; Prince, T.; Siegel, H.; Williams, R.

    2003-01-01

    JPL's Parallel Applications Technologies Group has been exploring the issues of data access and visualization of very large data sets over the past 10 years. this work has used a number of types of parallel computers, and today includes the use of commodity clusters. This talk will highlight some of the applications and tools we have developed, including how they use parallel computing resources, and specifically how we are using modern clusters.

  17. Advances in Domain Mapping of Massively Parallel Scientific Computations

    SciTech Connect

    Leland, Robert W.; Hendrickson, Bruce A.

    2015-10-01

    One of the most important concerns in parallel computing is the proper distribution of workload across processors. For most scientific applications on massively parallel machines, the best approach to this distribution is to employ data parallelism; that is, to break the datastructures supporting a computation into pieces and then to assign those pieces to different processors. Collectively, these partitioning and assignment tasks comprise the domain mapping problem.

  18. Access and visualization using clusters and other parallel computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, D. S.; Bergou, A.; Berriman, B.; Block, G.; Collier, J.; Curkendall, D.; Good, J.; Husman, L.; Jacob, J.; Laity, A.; hide

    2003-01-01

    JPL's Parallel Applications Technologies Group has been exploring the issues of data access and visualization of very large data sets over the past 10 years. this work has used a number of types of parallel computers, and today includes the use of commodity clusters. This talk will highlight some of the applications and tools we have developed, including how they use parallel computing resources, and specifically how we are using modern clusters.

  19. Parallel architecture for labeling, segmentation, and lexical processing in speech understanding

    SciTech Connect

    Bronson, E.C.; Siegel, L.J.

    1983-01-01

    Speech understanding is a complex task which requires extensive computation. To increase the processing speed, a speech understanding system is decomposed into tasks which can be performed by a series of distributed processing subsystems. An architecture to perform labeling, segmentation, and lexical processing is described. Using a parametric characterization of the speech signal, this system divides an utterance into labeled homogeneous regions. The system then performs dictionary lookups based on all probable labelings and segmentations in order to generate a complete set of word hypotheses. Using realistic assumptions from existing speech understanding systems, a statistical model of speech input, and simulations of the speech processing algorithms, the attributes of the parallel system to perform labeling, segmentation, and lexical processing for real-time speech understanding are derived. 36 references.

  20. A data-driven parallel execution model and architecture for logic programs

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, Chien-Chao.

    1989-01-01

    Logic Programming has come to prominence in recent years after the decision of the Japanese Fifth Generation Project to adopt it as the kernel language. A significant number of research projects are attempting to implement different schemes to exploit the inherent parallelism in logic programs. Data flow architectural model has been found to attractive for parallel execution of logic programs. In this research, five dataflow execution models available in literature, have been critically reviewed. The primary aim of the critical review was to establish a set of design issues critical to efficient execution. Based on the established design issues, the abstract date - driven machine model, names LogDf, is developed for parallel execution of logic programs. The execution scheme supports OR - parallelism, Restricted AND parallelism and stream parallelism. Multiple binding environments are represented using stream of streams structure (S-stream). Eager evaluation is performed by passing binding environment between subgoal literals as S-streams, which are formed using non-strict constructors. The hierarchical multi-level stream structure provides a logical framework for distributing the streams to enhance parallelism in production/consumption as well as control of parallelism. The scheme for compiling the dataflow graphs, developed in this thesis, eliminates the necessity of any operand matching unit in the underlying dynamic dataflow architecture. In this thesis, an architecture for the abstract machine LogDf is also provided and the performance evaluation of this model is based on this architecture.

  1. Reverse Computation for Rollback-based Fault Tolerance in Large Parallel Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Perumalla, Kalyan S; Park, Alfred J

    2013-01-01

    Reverse computation is presented here as an important future direction in addressing the challenge of fault tolerant execution on very large cluster platforms for parallel computing. As the scale of parallel jobs increases, traditional checkpointing approaches suffer scalability problems ranging from computational slowdowns to high congestion at the persistent stores for checkpoints. Reverse computation can overcome such problems and is also better suited for parallel computing on newer architectures with smaller, cheaper or energy-efficient memories and file systems. Initial evidence for the feasibility of reverse computation in large systems is presented with detailed performance data from a particle simulation scaling to 65,536 processor cores and 950 accelerators (GPUs). Reverse computation is observed to deliver very large gains relative to checkpointing schemes when nodes rely on their host processors/memory to tolerate faults at their accelerators. A comparison between reverse computation and checkpointing with measurements such as cache miss ratios, TLB misses and memory usage indicates that reverse computation is hard to ignore as a future alternative to be pursued in emerging architectures.

  2. Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing: Future Programming Models

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Guang, R.

    2008-07-24

    The mission of the pmodel center project is to develop software technology to support scalable parallel programming models for terascale systems. The goal of the specific UD subproject is in the context developing an efficient and robust methodology and tools for HPC programming. More specifically, the focus is on developing new programming models which facilitate programmers in porting their application onto parallel high performance computing systems. During the course of the research in the past 5 years, the landscape of microprocessor chip architecture has witnessed a fundamental change – the emergence of multi-core/many-core chip architecture appear to become the mainstream technology and will have a major impact to for future generation parallel machines. The programming model for shared-address space machines is becoming critical to such multi-core architectures. Our research highlight is the in-depth study of proposed fine-grain parallelism/multithreading support on such future generation multi-core architectures. Our research has demonstrated the significant impact such fine-grain multithreading model can have on the productivity of parallel programming models and their efficient implementation.

  3. Experimental free-space optical network for massively parallel computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, S.; Kajita, M.; Kasahara, K.; Kubota, K.; Kurihara, K.; Redmond, I.; Schenfeld, E.; Suzaki, T.

    1996-03-01

    A free-space optical interconnection scheme is described for massively parallel processors based on the interconnection-cached network architecture. The optical network operates in a circuit-switching mode. Combined with a packet-switching operation among the circuit-switched optical channels, a high-bandwidth, low-latency network for massively parallel processing results. The design and assembly of a 64-channel experimental prototype is discussed, and operational results are presented.

  4. The Design and Evaluation of "CAPTools"--A Computer Aided Parallelization Toolkit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yan, Jerry; Frumkin, Michael; Hribar, Michelle; Jin, Haoqiang; Waheed, Abdul; Johnson, Steve; Cross, Jark; Evans, Emyr; Ierotheou, Constantinos; Leggett, Pete; hide

    1998-01-01

    Writing applications for high performance computers is a challenging task. Although writing code by hand still offers the best performance, it is extremely costly and often not very portable. The Computer Aided Parallelization Tools (CAPTools) are a toolkit designed to help automate the mapping of sequential FORTRAN scientific applications onto multiprocessors. CAPTools consists of the following major components: an inter-procedural dependence analysis module that incorporates user knowledge; a 'self-propagating' data partitioning module driven via user guidance; an execution control mask generation and optimization module for the user to fine tune parallel processing of individual partitions; a program transformation/restructuring facility for source code clean up and optimization; a set of browsers through which the user interacts with CAPTools at each stage of the parallelization process; and a code generator supporting multiple programming paradigms on various multiprocessors. Besides describing the rationale behind the architecture of CAPTools, the parallelization process is illustrated via case studies involving structured and unstructured meshes. The programming process and the performance of the generated parallel programs are compared against other programming alternatives based on the NAS Parallel Benchmarks, ARC3D and other scientific applications. Based on these results, a discussion on the feasibility of constructing architectural independent parallel applications is presented.

  5. On combining computational differentiation and toolkits for parallel scientific computing.

    SciTech Connect

    Bischof, C. H.; Buecker, H. M.; Hovland, P. D.

    2000-06-08

    Automatic differentiation is a powerful technique for evaluating derivatives of functions given in the form of a high-level programming language such as Fortran, C, or C++. The program is treated as a potentially very long sequence of elementary statements to which the chain rule of differential calculus is applied over and over again. Combining automatic differentiation and the organizational structure of toolkits for parallel scientific computing provides a mechanism for evaluating derivatives by exploiting mathematical insight on a higher level. In these toolkits, algorithmic structures such as BLAS-like operations, linear and nonlinear solvers, or integrators for ordinary differential equations can be identified by their standardized interfaces and recognized as high-level mathematical objects rather than as a sequence of elementary statements. In this note, the differentiation of a linear solver with respect to some parameter vector is taken as an example. Mathematical insight is used to reformulate this problem into the solution of multiple linear systems that share the same coefficient matrix but differ in their right-hand sides. The experiments reported here use ADIC, a tool for the automatic differentiation of C programs, and PETSC, an object-oriented toolkit for the parallel solution of scientific problems modeled by partial differential equations.

  6. Modern hardware architectures accelerate porous media flow computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulczewski, Michal; Kurowski, Krzysztof; Kierzynka, Michal; Dohnalik, Marek; Kaczmarczyk, Jan; Borujeni, Ali Takbiri

    2012-05-01

    Investigation of rock properties, porosity and permeability particularly, which determines transport media characteristic, is crucial to reservoir engineering. Nowadays, micro-tomography (micro-CT) methods allow to obtain vast of petro-physical properties. The micro-CT method facilitates visualization of pores structures and acquisition of total porosity factor, determined by sticking together 2D slices of scanned rock and applying proper absorption cut-off point. Proper segmentation of pores representation in 3D is important to solve the permeability of porous media. This factor is recently determined by the means of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), a popular method to analyze problems related to fluid flows, taking advantage of numerical methods and constantly growing computing powers. The recent advent of novel multi-, many-core and graphics processing unit (GPU) hardware architectures allows scientists to benefit even more from parallel processing and built-in new features. The high level of parallel scalability offers both, the time-to-solution decrease and greater accuracy - top factors in reservoir engineering. This paper aims to present research results related to fluid flow simulations, particularly solving the total porosity and permeability of porous media, taking advantage of modern hardware architectures. In our approach total porosity is calculated by the means of general-purpose computing on multiple GPUs. This application sticks together 2D slices of scanned rock and by the means of a marching tetrahedra algorithm, creates a 3D representation of pores and calculates the total porosity. Experimental results are compared with data obtained via other popular methods, including Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), helium porosity and nitrogen permeability tests. Then CFD simulations are performed on a large-scale high performance hardware architecture to solve the flow and permeability of porous media. In our experiments we used Lattice Boltzmann

  7. Novel Architectures and Devices for Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waugh, Frederick Rogers

    1995-01-01

    This thesis explores some of the more unusual architectures and devices being considered today as the basis for information processing, emphasizing architectures that are highly parallel and devices that are extremely small compared to current standards. The first part of this thesis theoretically and numerically analyzes analog electronic neural networks in which competition within neuron clusters leads to pattern classification and feature extraction abilities. Global stability theorems, derived using a Liapunov approach, provide general guidelines for network design and operation. The theorems state that with continuous-time updating, competitive networks converge only to fixed points, while with discrete -time, parallel updating, they converge to either fixed points or period-two limit cycles. A stability criterion guarantees that discrete-time networks converge only to fixed points when a quantity related to the neuron gain, or transfer function slope, is sufficiently small. A set of analytical phase diagrams for competitive associative memories is derived using a combination of statistical mechanics and nonlinear dynamics. The diagrams classify attractor types as a function of pattern storage fraction and neuron gain. Numerical tests agree well with the diagrams. Analog annealing, a technique for improving network performance by reducing neuron gain, is shown to improve performance in an analog associative memory by dramatically reducing the number of fixed points. The number of fixed points decreases exponentially with network size with a scaling exponent that decreases with neuron gain. Numerical data based on fixed-point counts in small networks support the results. The second part of this thesis discusses low-temperature tunneling measurements at zero magnetic field through double and triple quantum dots with adjustable inter-dot coupling, fabricated in a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure. The devices have capacitances so small that the charging energy of

  8. Parallel architectures for image processing; Proceedings of the Meeting, Santa Clara, CA, Feb. 14, 15, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, J.; Harrison, C.G.

    1990-01-01

    The present conference discusses topics in the fields of VLSI-based and real-time image-processing systems, parallel architectures for image processing, image-processing algorithms, and image processing on the basis of artificial neural networks. Attention is given to a fixed-point VLSI architecture for high-speed image reconstruction, an orthogonal multiprocessor for image processing with neural networks, massively parallel processors in real-time applications, the use of the adiabatic approximation as a tool in image estimation, parallel algorithms for contour-extraction and coding, and a parallel architecture for multidimensional image processing. Also discussed are concurrent image-processing on hypercube multicomputers, neural-network simulation on a reduced-mesh-of-trees organization, and a goal-seeking neural net for recall and recognition.

  9. Parallel image computation in clusters with task-distributor.

    PubMed

    Baun, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Distributed systems, especially clusters, can be used to execute ray tracing tasks in parallel for speeding up the image computation. Because ray tracing is a computational expensive and memory consuming task, ray tracing can also be used to benchmark clusters. This paper introduces task-distributor, a free software solution for the parallel execution of ray tracing tasks in distributed systems. The ray tracing solution used for this work is the Persistence Of Vision Raytracer (POV-Ray). Task-distributor does not require any modification of the POV-Ray source code or the installation of an additional message passing library like the Message Passing Interface or Parallel Virtual Machine to allow parallel image computation, in contrast to various other projects. By analyzing the runtime of the sequential and parallel program parts of task-distributor, it becomes clear how the problem size and available hardware resources influence the scaling of the parallel application.

  10. Quantum perceptron over a field and neural network architecture selection in a quantum computer.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Adenilton José; Ludermir, Teresa Bernarda; de Oliveira, Wilson Rosa

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we propose a quantum neural network named quantum perceptron over a field (QPF). Quantum computers are not yet a reality and the models and algorithms proposed in this work cannot be simulated in actual (or classical) computers. QPF is a direct generalization of a classical perceptron and solves some drawbacks found in previous models of quantum perceptrons. We also present a learning algorithm named Superposition based Architecture Learning algorithm (SAL) that optimizes the neural network weights and architectures. SAL searches for the best architecture in a finite set of neural network architectures with linear time over the number of patterns in the training set. SAL is the first learning algorithm to determine neural network architectures in polynomial time. This speedup is obtained by the use of quantum parallelism and a non-linear quantum operator. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A High Performance COTS Based Computer Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patte, Mathieu; Grimoldi, Raoul; Trautner, Roland

    2014-08-01

    Using Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) electronic components for space applications is a long standing idea. Indeed the difference in processing performance and energy efficiency between radiation hardened components and COTS components is so important that COTS components are very attractive for use in mass and power constrained systems. However using COTS components in space is not straightforward as one must account with the effects of the space environment on the COTS components behavior. In the frame of the ESA funded activity called High Performance COTS Based Computer, Airbus Defense and Space and its subcontractor OHB CGS have developed and prototyped a versatile COTS based architecture for high performance processing. The rest of the paper is organized as follows: in a first section we will start by recapitulating the interests and constraints of using COTS components for space applications; then we will briefly describe existing fault mitigation architectures and present our solution for fault mitigation based on a component called the SmartIO; in the last part of the paper we will describe the prototyping activities executed during the HiP CBC project.

  12. Distributing an executable job load file to compute nodes in a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Gooding, Thomas M.

    2016-09-13

    Distributing an executable job load file to compute nodes in a parallel computer, the parallel computer comprising a plurality of compute nodes, including: determining, by a compute node in the parallel computer, whether the compute node is participating in a job; determining, by the compute node in the parallel computer, whether a descendant compute node is participating in the job; responsive to determining that the compute node is participating in the job or that the descendant compute node is participating in the job, communicating, by the compute node to a parent compute node, an identification of a data communications link over which the compute node receives data from the parent compute node; constructing a class route for the job, wherein the class route identifies all compute nodes participating in the job; and broadcasting the executable load file for the job along the class route for the job.

  13. Distributing an executable job load file to compute nodes in a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Gooding, Thomas M.

    2016-08-09

    Distributing an executable job load file to compute nodes in a parallel computer, the parallel computer comprising a plurality of compute nodes, including: determining, by a compute node in the parallel computer, whether the compute node is participating in a job; determining, by the compute node in the parallel computer, whether a descendant compute node is participating in the job; responsive to determining that the compute node is participating in the job or that the descendant compute node is participating in the job, communicating, by the compute node to a parent compute node, an identification of a data communications link over which the compute node receives data from the parent compute node; constructing a class route for the job, wherein the class route identifies all compute nodes participating in the job; and broadcasting the executable load file for the job along the class route for the job.

  14. Data communications in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2013-10-29

    Data communications in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the parallel computer including a plurality of compute nodes that execute a parallel application, the PAMI composed of data communications endpoints, each endpoint including a specification of data communications parameters for a thread of execution on a compute node, including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the compute nodes and the endpoints coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through data communications resources, including receiving in an origin endpoint of the PAMI a data communications instruction, the instruction characterized by an instruction type, the instruction specifying a transmission of transfer data from the origin endpoint to a target endpoint and transmitting, in accordance with the instruction type, the transfer data from the origin endpoint to the target endpoint.

  15. Data communications in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2014-02-11

    Data communications in a parallel active messaging interface ('PAMI') or a parallel computer, the parallel computer including a plurality of compute nodes that execute a parallel application, the PAMI composed of data communications endpoints, each endpoint including a specification of data communications parameters for a thread of execution of a compute node, including specification of a client, a context, and a task, the compute nodes and the endpoints coupled for data communications instruction, the instruction characterized by instruction type, the instruction specifying a transmission of transfer data from the origin endpoint to a target endpoint and transmitting, in accordance witht the instruction type, the transfer data from the origin endpoin to the target endpoint.

  16. A scheme of optical interconnection for super high speed parallel computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Youju; Lv, Yi; Liu, Jiang; Dang, Mingrui

    2004-11-01

    An optical cross connection network which adopts coarse wavelength division multiplexing (CWDM) and data packet is introduced. It can be used to realize communication between multi-CPU and multi-MEM in parallel computing system. It provides an effective way to upgrade the capability of parallel computer by combining optical wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) and data packet switching technology. CWDM used in network construction, optical cross connection (OXC) based on optical switch arrays, and data packet format used in network construction were analyzed. We have also done the optimizing analysis of the number of optical switches needed in different scales of network in this paper. The architecture of the optical interconnection for 8 wavelength channels and 128 bits parallel transmission has been researched. Finally, a parallel transmission system with 4 nodes, 8 channels per node, has been designed.

  17. Evaluating the performance of the particle finite element method in parallel architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimenez, Juan M.; Nigro, Norberto M.; Idelsohn, Sergio R.

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a high performance implementation for the particle-mesh based method called particle finite element method two (PFEM-2). It consists of a material derivative based formulation of the equations with a hybrid spatial discretization which uses an Eulerian mesh and Lagrangian particles. The main aim of PFEM-2 is to solve transport equations as fast as possible keeping some level of accuracy. The method was found to be competitive with classical Eulerian alternatives for these targets, even in their range of optimal application. To evaluate the goodness of the method with large simulations, it is imperative to use of parallel environments. Parallel strategies for Finite Element Method have been widely studied and many libraries can be used to solve Eulerian stages of PFEM-2. However, Lagrangian stages, such as streamline integration, must be developed considering the parallel strategy selected. The main drawback of PFEM-2 is the large amount of memory needed, which limits its application to large problems with only one computer. Therefore, a distributed-memory implementation is urgently needed. Unlike a shared-memory approach, using domain decomposition the memory is automatically isolated, thus avoiding race conditions; however new issues appear due to data distribution over the processes. Thus, a domain decomposition strategy for both particle and mesh is adopted, which minimizes the communication between processes. Finally, performance analysis running over multicore and multinode architectures are presented. The Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy number used influences the efficiency of the parallelization and, in some cases, a weighted partitioning can be used to improve the speed-up. However the total cputime for cases presented is lower than that obtained when using classical Eulerian strategies.

  18. Development of Message Passing Routines for High Performance Parallel Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, Edward K.

    2004-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) calculations require a great deal of computing power for completing the detailed computations involved. In an effort shorten the time it takes to complete such calculations they are implemented on a parallel computer. In the case of a parallel computer some sort of message passing structure must be used to communicate between the computers because, unlike a single machine, each computer in a parallel computing cluster does not have access to all the data or run all the parts of the total program. Thus, message passing is used to divide up the data and send instructions to each machine. The nature of my work this summer involves programming the "message passing" aspect of the parallel computer. I am working on modifying an existing program, which was written with OpenMP, and does not use a multi-machine parallel computing structure, to work with Message Passing Interface (MPI) routines. The actual code is being written in the FORTRAN 90 programming language. My goal is to write a parameterized message passing structure that could be used for a variety of individual applications and implement it on Silicon Graphics Incorporated s (SGI) IRIX operating system. With this new parameterized structure engineers would be able to speed up computations for a wide variety of purposes without having to use larger and more expensive computing equipment from another division or another NASA center.

  19. Development of Message Passing Routines for High Performance Parallel Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, Edward K.

    2004-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) calculations require a great deal of computing power for completing the detailed computations involved. In an effort shorten the time it takes to complete such calculations they are implemented on a parallel computer. In the case of a parallel computer some sort of message passing structure must be used to communicate between the computers because, unlike a single machine, each computer in a parallel computing cluster does not have access to all the data or run all the parts of the total program. Thus, message passing is used to divide up the data and send instructions to each machine. The nature of my work this summer involves programming the "message passing" aspect of the parallel computer. I am working on modifying an existing program, which was written with OpenMP, and does not use a multi-machine parallel computing structure, to work with Message Passing Interface (MPI) routines. The actual code is being written in the FORTRAN 90 programming language. My goal is to write a parameterized message passing structure that could be used for a variety of individual applications and implement it on Silicon Graphics Incorporated s (SGI) IRIX operating system. With this new parameterized structure engineers would be able to speed up computations for a wide variety of purposes without having to use larger and more expensive computing equipment from another division or another NASA center.

  20. Massively parallel I/O: Building an infrastructure for parallel computing

    SciTech Connect

    Womble, D.E.; Greenberg, D.S.

    1997-04-01

    The solution of Grand Challenge Problems will require computations that are too large to fit in the memories of even the largest machines. Inevitably, new designs of I/O systems will be necessary to support them. This report describes the work in investigating I/O subsystems for massively parallel computers. Specifically, the authors investigated out-of-core algorithms for common scientific calculations present several theoretical results. They also describe several approaches to parallel I/O, including partitioned secondary storage and choreographed I/O, and the implications of each to massively parallel computing.

  1. Symplectic molecular dynamics simulations on specially designed parallel computers.

    PubMed

    Borstnik, Urban; Janezic, Dusanka

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a computer program for molecular dynamics (MD) simulation that implements the Split Integration Symplectic Method (SISM) and is designed to run on specialized parallel computers. The MD integration is performed by the SISM, which analytically treats high-frequency vibrational motion and thus enables the use of longer simulation time steps. The low-frequency motion is treated numerically on specially designed parallel computers, which decreases the computational time of each simulation time step. The combination of these approaches means that less time is required and fewer steps are needed and so enables fast MD simulations. We study the computational performance of MD simulation of molecular systems on specialized computers and provide a comparison to standard personal computers. The combination of the SISM with two specialized parallel computers is an effective way to increase the speed of MD simulations up to 16-fold over a single PC processor.

  2. A scalable parallel black oil simulator on distributed memory parallel computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kun; Liu, Hui; Chen, Zhangxin

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents our work on developing a parallel black oil simulator for distributed memory computers based on our in-house parallel platform. The parallel simulator is designed to overcome the performance issues of common simulators that are implemented for personal computers and workstations. The finite difference method is applied to discretize the black oil model. In addition, some advanced techniques are employed to strengthen the robustness and parallel scalability of the simulator, including an inexact Newton method, matrix decoupling methods, and algebraic multigrid methods. A new multi-stage preconditioner is proposed to accelerate the solution of linear systems from the Newton methods. Numerical experiments show that our simulator is scalable and efficient, and is capable of simulating extremely large-scale black oil problems with tens of millions of grid blocks using thousands of MPI processes on parallel computers.

  3. Case Studies of Software Development Tools for Parallel Architectures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    67 PIE ...surveyed (descriptions of these, and all other tools mentioned in this report are provided in appendix B): GARDEN FIELD PIE Prometheus Faust CODE...PARALLEL SOFTWARE ENGINEERING PROBLEMS Tool Spec Design Co A1g. Par Dam Part Load Comp Cam Debug Reuse Nu Test Se Eval Dist Bal RefI /Test Procs PIE X X

  4. Parallel optical interconnects - Implementation of optoelectronics in multiprocessor architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frietman, E. E. E.; Dekker, L.; van Nifterick, W.; Jongeling, T. J. M.

    1990-03-01

    Optoelectronic logic element circuitries are described which can be used for the implementation of a wide variety of interconnection schemes. Particular attention is given to the design, construction, and application of an electrooptic communication system (EOCS) using dedicated free space multiple data distributors and integrated optically writable input buffer arrays with fully parallel access. Some experimental results obtained on the complete EOCS are presented.

  5. Algorithms for parallel and vector computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortega, James M.

    1995-01-01

    This is a final report on work performed under NASA grant NAG-1-1112-FOP during the period March, 1990 through February 1995. Four major topics are covered: (1) solution of nonlinear poisson-type equations; (2) parallel reduced system conjugate gradient method; (3) orderings for conjugate gradient preconditioners, and (4) SOR as a preconditioner.

  6. Dynamic traffic assignment on parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, K.; Frye, R.; Jakob, R.; Rickert, M.; Stretz, P.

    1998-12-01

    The authors describe part of the current framework of the TRANSIMS traffic research project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. It includes parallel implementations of a route planner and a microscopic traffic simulation model. They present performance figures and results of an offline load-balancing scheme used in one of the iterative re-planning runs required for dynamic route assignment.

  7. Exploiting Thread-Level and Instruction-Level Parallelism to Cluster Mass Spectrometry Data using Multicore Architectures

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Fahad; Hoffert, Jason D.; Pisitkun, Trairak; Knepper, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Modern mass spectrometers can produce large numbers of peptide spectra from complex biological samples in a short time. A substantial amount of redundancy is observed in these data sets from peptides that may get selected multiple times in Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) experiments. A large number of spectra do not get mapped to specific peptide sequences due to low signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio of the spectra from these machines. Clustering is one way to mitigate the problems of these complex mass spectrometry data sets. Recently we presented a graph theoretic framework, known as CAMS, for clustering of large-scale mass spectrometry data. CAMS utilized a novel metric to exploit the spatial patterns in the mass spectrometry peaks which allowed highly accurate clustering results. However, comparison of each spectrum with every other spectrum makes the clustering problem computationally inefficient. In this paper we present a parallel algorithm, called P-CAMS, that uses thread-level and instruction-level parallelism on multicore architectures to substantially decrease running times. P-CAMS relies on intelligent matrix completion to reduce the number of comparisons, threads to run on each core and Single Instruction Multiple Data (SIMD) paradigm inside each thread to exploit massive parallelism on multicore architectures. A carefully crafted load-balanced scheme that uses spatial locations of the mass spectrometry peaks mapped to nearest level cache and core allows super-linear speedups. We study the scalability of the algorithm with a wide variety of mass spectrometry data and variation in architecture specific parameters. The results show that SIMD style data parallelism combined with thread-level parallelism for multicore architectures is a powerful combination that allows substantial reduction in runtimes even for all-to-all comparison algorithms. The quality assessment is performed using real-world data set and is shown to be consistent

  8. Performance issues for engineering analysis on MIMD parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, H.E.; Vaughan, C.T.; Gardner, D.R.

    1994-08-01

    We discuss how engineering analysts can obtain greater computational resolution in a more timely manner from applications codes running on MIMD parallel computers. Both processor speed and memory capacity are important to achieving better performance than a serial vector supercomputer. To obtain good performance, a parallel applications code must be scalable. In addition, the aspect ratios of the subdomains in the decomposition of the simulation domain onto the parallel computer should be of order 1. We demonstrate these conclusions using simulations conducted with the PCTH shock wave physics code running on a Cray Y-MP, a 1024-node nCUBE 2, and an 1840-node Paragon.

  9. An Efficient Objective Analysis System for Parallel Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stobie, J.

    1999-01-01

    A new atmospheric objective analysis system designed for parallel computers will be described. The system can produce a global analysis (on a 1 X 1 lat-lon grid with 18 levels of heights and winds and 10 levels of moisture) using 120,000 observations in 17 minutes on 32 CPUs (SGI Origin 2000). No special parallel code is needed (e.g. MPI or multitasking) and the 32 CPUs do not have to be on the same platform. The system is totally portable and can run on several different architectures at once. In addition, the system can easily scale up to 100 or more CPUS. This will allow for much higher resolution and significant increases in input data. The system scales linearly as the number of observations and the number of grid points. The cost overhead in going from 1 to 32 CPUs is 18%. In addition, the analysis results are identical regardless of the number of processors used. This system has all the characteristics of optimal interpolation, combining detailed instrument and first guess error statistics to produce the best estimate of the atmospheric state. Static tests with a 2 X 2.5 resolution version of this system showed it's analysis increments are comparable to the latest NASA operational system including maintenance of mass-wind balance. Results from several months of cycling test in the Goddard EOS Data Assimilation System (GEOS DAS) show this new analysis retains the same level of agreement between the first guess and observations (O-F statistics) as the current operational system.

  10. An Efficient Objective Analysis System for Parallel Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stobie, James G.

    1999-01-01

    A new objective analysis system designed for parallel computers will be described. The system can produce a global analysis (on a 2 x 2.5 lat-lon grid with 20 levels of heights and winds and 10 levels of moisture) using 120,000 observations in less than 3 minutes on 32 CPUs (SGI Origin 2000). No special parallel code is needed (e.g. MPI or multitasking) and the 32 CPUs do not have to be on the same platform. The system Ls totally portable and can run on -several different architectures at once. In addition, the system can easily scale up to 100 or more CPUS. This will allow for much higher resolution and significant increases in input data. The system scales linearly as the number of observations and the number of grid points. The cost overhead in going from I to 32 CPus is 18%. in addition, the analysis results are identical regardless of the number of processors used. T'his system has all the characteristics of optimal interpolation, combining detailed instrument and first guess error statistics to produce the best estimate of the atmospheric state. It also includes a new quality control (buddy check) system. Static tests with the system showed it's analysis increments are comparable to the latest NASA operational system including maintenance of mass-wind balance. Results from a 2-month cycling test in the Goddard EOS Data Assimilation System (GEOS DAS) show this new analysis retains the same level of agreement between the first guess and observations (0-F statistics) throughout the entire two months.

  11. Medical image denoising via optimal implementation of non-local means on hybrid parallel architecture.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuan-Anh; Nakib, Amir; Nguyen, Huy-Nam

    2016-06-01

    The Non-local means denoising filter has been established as gold standard for image denoising problem in general and particularly in medical imaging due to its efficiency. However, its computation time limited its applications in real world application, especially in medical imaging. In this paper, a distributed version on parallel hybrid architecture is proposed to solve the computation time problem and a new method to compute the filters' coefficients is also proposed, where we focused on the implementation and the enhancement of filters' parameters via taking the neighborhood of the current voxel more accurately into account. In terms of implementation, our key contribution consists in reducing the number of shared memory accesses. The different tests of the proposed method were performed on the brain-web database for different levels of noise. Performances and the sensitivity were quantified in terms of speedup, peak signal to noise ratio, execution time, the number of floating point operations. The obtained results demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method. Moreover, the implementation is compared to that of other techniques, recently published in the literature.

  12. NETRA: A parallel architecture for integrated vision systems 2: Algorithms and performance evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhary, Alok N.; Patel, Janak H.; Ahuja, Narendra

    1989-01-01

    In part 1 architecture of NETRA is presented. A performance evaluation of NETRA using several common vision algorithms is also presented. Performance of algorithms when they are mapped on one cluster is described. It is shown that SIMD, MIMD, and systolic algorithms can be easily mapped onto processor clusters, and almost linear speedups are possible. For some algorithms, analytical performance results are compared with implementation performance results. It is observed that the analysis is very accurate. Performance analysis of parallel algorithms when mapped across clusters is presented. Mappings across clusters illustrate the importance and use of shared as well as distributed memory in achieving high performance. The parameters for evaluation are derived from the characteristics of the parallel algorithms, and these parameters are used to evaluate the alternative communication strategies in NETRA. Furthermore, the effect of communication interference from other processors in the system on the execution of an algorithm is studied. Using the analysis, performance of many algorithms with different characteristics is presented. It is observed that if communication speeds are matched with the computation speeds, good speedups are possible when algorithms are mapped across clusters.

  13. Implementation and analysis of a Navier-Stokes algorithm on parallel computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fatoohi, Raad A.; Grosch, Chester E.

    1988-01-01

    The results of the implementation of a Navier-Stokes algorithm on three parallel/vector computers are presented. The object of this research is to determine how well, or poorly, a single numerical algorithm would map onto three different architectures. The algorithm is a compact difference scheme for the solution of the incompressible, two-dimensional, time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations. The computers were chosen so as to encompass a variety of architectures. They are the following: the MPP, an SIMD machine with 16K bit serial processors; Flex/32, an MIMD machine with 20 processors; and Cray/2. The implementation of the algorithm is discussed in relation to these architectures and measures of the performance on each machine are given. The basic comparison is among SIMD instruction parallelism on the MPP, MIMD process parallelism on the Flex/32, and vectorization of a serial code on the Cray/2. Simple performance models are used to describe the performance. These models highlight the bottlenecks and limiting factors for this algorithm on these architectures. Finally, conclusions are presented.

  14. Parallel implementation of high-speed, phase diverse atmospheric turbulence compensation method on a neural network-based architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrasmith, William W.; Sullivan, Sean F.

    2008-04-01

    Phase diversity imaging methods work well in removing atmospheric turbulence and some system effects from predominantly near-field imaging systems. However, phase diversity approaches can be computationally intensive and slow. We present a recently adapted, high-speed phase diversity method using a conventional, software-based neural network paradigm. This phase-diversity method has the advantage of eliminating many time consuming, computationally heavy calculations and directly estimates the optical transfer function from the entrance pupil phases or phase differences. Additionally, this method is more accurate than conventional Zernike-based, phase diversity approaches and lends itself to implementation on parallel software or hardware architectures. We use computer simulation to demonstrate how this high-speed, phase diverse imaging method can be implemented on a parallel, highspeed, neural network-based architecture-specifically the Cellular Neural Network (CNN). The CNN architecture was chosen as a representative, neural network-based processing environment because 1) the CNN can be implemented in 2-D or 3-D processing schemes, 2) it can be implemented in hardware or software, 3) recent 2-D implementations of CNN technology have shown a 3 orders of magnitude superiority in speed, area, or power over equivalent digital representations, and 4) a complete development environment exists. We also provide a short discussion on processing speed.

  15. Multiscale Architectures and Parallel Algorithms for Video Object Tracking

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    than Government procurement does not in any way obligate the U.S. Government. The fact that the Government formulated or supplied the drawings...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Implementation and performance of an extended set of parallel multicore video processing chain of modules were investigated...Processing Elements (SPEs) without any cache but 256 KB of local store memory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 3 N-CET video processing chain

  16. Parallel AFSA algorithm accelerating based on MIC architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Junhao; Xiao, Hong; Huang, Yifan; Li, Yongzhao; Xu, Yuanrui

    2017-05-01

    Analysis AFSA past for solving the traveling salesman problem, the algorithm efficiency is often a big problem, and the algorithm processing method, it does not fully responsive to the characteristics of the traveling salesman problem to deal with, and therefore proposes a parallel join improved AFSA process. The simulation with the current TSP known optimal solutions were analyzed, the results showed that the AFSA iterations improved less, on the MIC cards doubled operating efficiency, efficiency significantly.

  17. A portable implementation of ARPACK for distributed memory parallel architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Maschhoff, K.J.; Sorensen, D.C.

    1996-12-31

    ARPACK is a package of Fortran 77 subroutines which implement the Implicitly Restarted Arnoldi Method used for solving large sparse eigenvalue problems. A parallel implementation of ARPACK is presented which is portable across a wide range of distributed memory platforms and requires minimal changes to the serial code. The communication layers used for message passing are the Basic Linear Algebra Communication Subprograms (BLACS) developed for the ScaLAPACK project and Message Passing Interface(MPI).

  18. Evaluation of Parallel Architectures for BM/C3 Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-01

    23,24,25;36,37,38; ... ; 57,58,59; **% section for one operand instructions neg 3,4,5; 5,6,8; 0 EOF Input Program File Example: loop: move ari, ard add arid, ari...10 Figure 2.5 Sam ple processor files .......................................................... 12 Figure 2.5 (cont’d) Sam ple...data files ............................................................... 13 Figure 3.1 A 16x16 Butterfly Parallel Processor with 8 switches

  19. Mathematical model partitioning and packing for parallel computer calculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arpasi, Dale J.; Milner, Edward J.

    1986-01-01

    This paper deals with the development of multiprocessor simulations from a serial set of ordinary differential equations describing a physical system. The identification of computational parallelism within the model equations is discussed. A technique is presented for identifying this parallelism and for partitioning the equations for parallel solution on a multiprocessor. Next, an algorithm which packs the equations into a minimum number of processors is described. The results of applying the packing algorithm to a turboshaft engine model are presented.

  20. Mathematical model partitioning and packing for parallel computer calculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arpasi, Dale J.; Milner, Edward J.

    1986-01-01

    This paper deals with the development of multiprocessor simulations from a serial set of ordinary differential equations describing a physical system. The identification of computational parallelism within the model equations is discussed. A technique is presented for identifying this parallelism and for partitioning the equations for parallel solution on a multiprocessor. Next, an algorithm which packs the equations into a minimum number of processors is described. The results of applying the packing algorithm to a turboshaft engine model are presented.

  1. Numerical characterization of nonlinear dynamical systems using parallel computing: The role of GPUS approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazanaro, Filipe I.; Soriano, Diogo C.; Suyama, Ricardo; Madrid, Marconi K.; Oliveira, José Raimundo de; Muñoz, Ignacio Bravo; Attux, Romis

    2016-08-01

    The characterization of nonlinear dynamical systems and their attractors in terms of invariant measures, basins of attractions and the structure of their vector fields usually outlines a task strongly related to the underlying computational cost. In this work, the practical aspects related to the use of parallel computing - specially the use of Graphics Processing Units (GPUS) and of the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) - are reviewed and discussed in the context of nonlinear dynamical systems characterization. In this work such characterization is performed by obtaining both local and global Lyapunov exponents for the classical forced Duffing oscillator. The local divergence measure was employed by the computation of the Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCSS), revealing the general organization of the flow according to the obtained separatrices, while the global Lyapunov exponents were used to characterize the attractors obtained under one or more bifurcation parameters. These simulation sets also illustrate the required computation time and speedup gains provided by different parallel computing strategies, justifying the employment and the relevance of GPUS and CUDA in such extensive numerical approach. Finally, more than simply providing an overview supported by a representative set of simulations, this work also aims to be a unified introduction to the use of the mentioned parallel computing tools in the context of nonlinear dynamical systems, providing codes and examples to be executed in MATLAB and using the CUDA environment, something that is usually fragmented in different scientific communities and restricted to specialists on parallel computing strategies.

  2. Analysis of Parallel Burn, No-Crossfeed TSTO RLV Architectures and Comparison to Parallel Burn with Crossfeed and Series Burn Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Garrett; Philips, Alan

    2003-01-01

    Three dominant Two Stage To Orbit (TSTO) class architectures were studied: Series Burn (SB), Parallel Bum with crossfeed (PBw/cf), and Parallel Burn, no-crossfeed (PBncf). The study goal was to determine what factors uniquely affect PBncf architectures, how each of these factors interact, and to determine from a performance perspective whether a PBncf vehicle could be competitive with a PBw/cf or a SB vehicle using equivalent technology and assumptions. In all cases, performance was evaluated on a relative basis for a fixed payload and mission by comparing gross and dry vehicle masses of a closed vehicle. Propellant combinations studied were LOX: LH2 propelled booster and orbiter (HH) and LOX: Kerosene booster with LOX: LH2 orbiter (KH). The study observations were: 1) A PBncf orbiter should be throttled as deeply as possible after launch until the staging point. 2) A PBncf TSTO architecture is feasible for systems that stage at mach 7. 2a) HH architectures can achieve a mass growth relative to PBw/cf of <20%. 2b) KH architectures can achieve a mass growth relative to Series Burn of <20%. 3) Center of gravity (CG) control will be a major issue for a PBncf vehicle, due to the low orbiter specific thrust to weight ratio and to the position of the orbiter required to align the nozzle heights at liftoff. 4) Thrust to weight ratios of 1.3 at liftoff and between 1.0 and 0.9 when staging at mach 7 appear to be close to ideal for PBncf vehicles. 5) Performance for HH vehicles was better when staged at mach 7 instead of mach 5. The study suggests possible methods to maximize performance of PBncf vehicle architectures in order to meet mission design requirements.

  3. QCD on the Massively Parallel Computer AP1000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akemi, K.; Fujisaki, M.; Okuda, M.; Tago, Y.; Hashimoto, T.; Hioki, S.; Miyamura, O.; Takaishi, T.; Nakamura, A.; de Forcrand, Ph.; Hege, C.; Stamatescu, I. O.

    We present the QCD-TARO program of calculations which uses the parallel computer AP1000 of Fujitsu. We discuss the results on scaling, correlation times and hadronic spectrum, some aspects of the implementation and the future prospects.

  4. Performance Analysis of Multilevel Parallel Applications on Shared Memory Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jost, Gabriele; Jin, Haoqiang; Labarta, Jesus; Gimenez, Judit; Caubet, Jordi; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we describe how to apply powerful performance analysis techniques to understand the behavior of multilevel parallel applications. We use the Paraver/OMPItrace performance analysis system for our study. This system consists of two major components: The OMPItrace dynamic instrumentation mechanism, which allows the tracing of processes and threads and the Paraver graphical user interface for inspection and analyses of the generated traces. We describe how to use the system to conduct a detailed comparative study of a benchmark code implemented in five different programming paradigms applicable for shared memory

  5. Locating and computing in parallel all the simple roots of special functions using PVM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plagianakos, V. P.; Nousis, N. K.; Vrahatis, M. N.

    2001-08-01

    An algorithm is proposed for locating and computing in parallel and with certainty all the simple roots of any twice continuously differentiable function in any specific interval. To compute with certainty all the roots, the proposed method is heavily based on the knowledge of the total number of roots within the given interval. To obtain this information we use results from topological degree theory and, in particular, the Kronecker-Picard approach. This theory gives a formula for the computation of the total number of roots of a system of equations within a given region, which can be computed in parallel. With this tool in hand, we construct a parallel procedure for the localization and isolation of all the roots by dividing the given region successively and applying the above formula to these subregions until the final domains contain at the most one root. The subregions with no roots are discarded, while for the rest a modification of the well-known bisection method is employed for the computation of the contained root. The new aspect of the present contribution is that the computation of the total number of zeros using the Kronecker-Picard integral as well as the localization and computation of all the roots is performed in parallel using the parallel virtual machine (PVM). PVM is an integrated set of software tools and libraries that emulates a general-purpose, flexible, heterogeneous concurrent computing framework on interconnected computers of varied architectures. The proposed algorithm has large granularity and low synchronization, and is robust. It has been implemented and tested and our experience is that it can massively compute with certainty all the roots in a certain interval. Performance information from massive computations related to a recently proposed conjecture due to Elbert (this issue, J. Comput. Appl. Math. 133 (2001) 65-83) is reported.

  6. Large-scale data-flow computer for parallel signal processing

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, F.S.; Ito, M.R.

    1982-01-01

    The authors describe a proposed data-driven, parallel computing machine for signal processing applications in which program codes are often executed repeatedly. This dataflow computer (DFC) consists of a large number of processing modules (PM) operating asynchronously; multiple concurrent activations of a single procedure could be supported by each PM without replication of codes. The architectural design emphasizes simplicity of system operations, modularity, speed and feasibility with current technology. Performance studies are carried out via software simulations. Results show some insights to the basic organization and the various modes of computation, the speed-ups and robustness of the design are also tested with the variations of several system parameters. 4 references.

  7. Parallel Computation for Developing Nonlinear Control Procedures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    optimal and subcptimal control systems. The early ’crk in the area cf zara :-eter :ientification can be attributed to Nyquist [i and 3ode [27 in which...line in an adaptive fashion . It should be emnhasized that the goal of this chapter is tz .evelo.p algorith--ms hich possess a high degree of -zrzale.ism...control in an adaptive fashion . Note that the major goal is to utilize these parallel algorithms in an explicit adaptive controller of the type shown in

  8. Serial multiplier arrays for parallel computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winters, Kel

    1990-01-01

    Arrays of systolic serial-parallel multiplier elements are proposed as an alternative to conventional SIMD mesh serial adder arrays for applications that are multiplication intensive and require few stored operands. The design and operation of a number of multiplier and array configurations featuring locality of connection, modularity, and regularity of structure are discussed. A design methodology combining top-down and bottom-up techniques is described to facilitate development of custom high-performance CMOS multiplier element arrays as well as rapid synthesis of simulation models and semicustom prototype CMOS components. Finally, a differential version of NORA dynamic circuits requiring a single-phase uncomplemented clock signal introduced for this application.

  9. Automatically Parallelizing Legacy Binary Code for Multicore Architectures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    Division Sensors Directorate //Signature// TODD A. KASTLE Chief, Aerospace Components & Subsystems Technology Division Sensors...algorithm in the worst case. Kavitha and Mathew [KM07] gave a slightly better variant. Recently, Ajwani, Friedrich and Meyer [AFM08] present a...Symposium on Algorithms and Computation (ISAAC). Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 4835:464–475, 2007. [AFM08] D. Ajwani, T. Friedrich, and U. Meyer . An

  10. Climate Ocean Modeling on Parallel Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, P.; Cheng, B. N.; Chao, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Ocean modeling plays an important role in both understanding the current climatic conditions and predicting future climate change. However, modeling the ocean circulation at various spatial and temporal scales is a very challenging computational task.

  11. Geocomputation over Hybrid Computer Architecture and Systems: Prior Works and On-going Initiatives at UARK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, X.

    2015-12-01

    As NSF indicated - "Theory and experimentation have for centuries been regarded as two fundamental pillars of science. It is now widely recognized that computational and data-enabled science forms a critical third pillar." Geocomputation is the third pillar of GIScience and geosciences. With the exponential growth of geodata, the challenge of scalable and high performance computing for big data analytics become urgent because many research activities are constrained by the inability of software or tool that even could not complete the computation process. Heterogeneous geodata integration and analytics obviously magnify the complexity and operational time frame. Many large-scale geospatial problems may be not processable at all if the computer system does not have sufficient memory or computational power. Emerging computer architectures, such as Intel's Many Integrated Core (MIC) Architecture and Graphics Processing Unit (GPU), and advanced computing technologies provide promising solutions to employ massive parallelism and hardware resources to achieve scalability and high performance for data intensive computing over large spatiotemporal and social media data. Exploring novel algorithms and deploying the solutions in massively parallel computing environment to achieve the capability for scalable data processing and analytics over large-scale, complex, and heterogeneous geodata with consistent quality and high-performance has been the central theme of our research team in the Department of Geosciences at the University of Arkansas (UARK). New multi-core architectures combined with application accelerators hold the promise to achieve scalability and high performance by exploiting task and data levels of parallelism that are not supported by the conventional computing systems. Such a parallel or distributed computing environment is particularly suitable for large-scale geocomputation over big data as proved by our prior works, while the potential of such advanced

  12. Parallel hardware architecture for JPEG-LS based on domain decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, S.; Wang, Z.; Klaiber, M.; Wahl, S.; Wroblewski, M.; Simon, S.

    2012-10-01

    JPEG-LS has a large number of different and independent context sets that provide the opportunity for par-allelism. As JPEG-LS, many of the lossless image compression standards have "adaptive" error modeling as the core part. This, however, leads to data dependency loops of the compression scheme such that a parallel compression of neighboring pixels is not possible. In this paper, a hardware architecture is proposed in order to achieve parallelism in the JPEG-LS compression. In the adaptive part of the algorithm, the context update and error modeling of a pixel belonging to a context number depends on the previous pixel having the same context number. On the other hand, the probability for two successive pixels to be in different contexts is only 17%. Thus storage is required for the intermediary pixels of the same context. In this architecture, a buffer mechanism is built to exploit the parallelism regardless of the adaptive characteristics. Despite the introduced architectural parallelism, the resulting JPEG-LS codec is fully compatible with the ISO/IEC 14495-1 JPEG-LS standard. A design for such a hardware system is provided here and simulated in FPGA which is also compared with a sequential pipelined architecture of JPEG-LS implemented in FPGA. The final design makes it possible to be applied with a streaming image sensor and does not require storing the entire image before compression. Thus it is capable of lossless compression of input images in real-time embedded systems.

  13. Use of parallel computing in mass processing of laser data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Będkowski, J.; Bratuś, R.; Prochaska, M.; Rzonca, A.

    2015-12-01

    The first part of the paper includes a description of the rules used to generate the algorithm needed for the purpose of parallel computing and also discusses the origins of the idea of research on the use of graphics processors in large scale processing of laser scanning data. The next part of the paper includes the results of an efficiency assessment performed for an array of different processing options, all of which were substantially accelerated with parallel computing. The processing options were divided into the generation of orthophotos using point clouds, coloring of point clouds, transformations, and the generation of a regular grid, as well as advanced processes such as the detection of planes and edges, point cloud classification, and the analysis of data for the purpose of quality control. Most algorithms had to be formulated from scratch in the context of the requirements of parallel computing. A few of the algorithms were based on existing technology developed by the Dephos Software Company and then adapted to parallel computing in the course of this research study. Processing time was determined for each process employed for a typical quantity of data processed, which helped confirm the high efficiency of the solutions proposed and the applicability of parallel computing to the processing of laser scanning data. The high efficiency of parallel computing yields new opportunities in the creation and organization of processing methods for laser scanning data.

  14. A Reliable Distributed Computing System Architecture for Planetary Rover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jingping, C.; Yunde, J.

    Computing system is one of the most important parts in planetary rover Computing system is crucial to the rover function capability and survival probability When the planetary rover executes some tasks it needs to react to the events in time and to tolerant the faults cause by the environment or itself To meet the requirements the planetary rover computing system architecture should be reactive high reliable adaptable consistent and extendible This paper introduces reliable distributed computing system architecture for planetary rover This architecture integrates the new ideas and technologies of hardware architecture software architecture network architecture fault tolerant technology and the intelligent control system architecture The planetary computing system architecture defines three dimensions of fault containment regions the channel dimension the lane dimension and the integrity dimension The whole computing system has three channels The channels provide the main fault containment regions for system hardware It is the ultimate line of defense of a single physical fault The lanes are the secondary fault containment regions for physical faults It can be used to improve the capability for fault diagnosis within a channel and can improve the coverage with respect to design faults through hardware and software diversity It also can be used as backups for each others to improve the availability and can improve the computing capability The integrity dimension provides faults containment region for software design Its purpose

  15. An Efficient Cloud Computing-Based Architecture for Freight System Application in China Railway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Baopeng; Zhang, Ning; Li, Honghui; Liu, Feng; Miao, Kai

    Cloud computing is a new network computing paradigm of distributed application environment. It utilizes the computing resource and storage resource to dynamically provide on-demand service for users. The distribution and parallel characters of cloud computing can leverage the railway freight system. We implement a cloud computing-based architecture for freight system application, which explores the Tashi and Hadoop for virtual resource management and MapReduce-based search technology. We propose the semantic model and setup configuration parameter by experiment, and develop the prototype system for freight search and tracking.

  16. Programming Probabilistic Structural Analysis for Parallel Processing Computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sues, Robert H.; Chen, Heh-Chyun; Twisdale, Lawrence A.; Chamis, Christos C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    1991-01-01

    The ultimate goal of this research program is to make Probabilistic Structural Analysis (PSA) computationally efficient and hence practical for the design environment by achieving large scale parallelism. The paper identifies the multiple levels of parallelism in PSA, identifies methodologies for exploiting this parallelism, describes the development of a parallel stochastic finite element code, and presents results of two example applications. It is demonstrated that speeds within five percent of those theoretically possible can be achieved. A special-purpose numerical technique, the stochastic preconditioned conjugate gradient method, is also presented and demonstrated to be extremely efficient for certain classes of PSA problems.

  17. Parallel Computing for Probabilistic Response Analysis of High Temperature Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sues, R. H.; Lua, Y. J.; Smith, M. D.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this Phase I research was to establish the required software and hardware strategies to achieve large scale parallelism in solving PCM problems. To meet this objective, several investigations were conducted. First, we identified the multiple levels of parallelism in PCM and the computational strategies to exploit these parallelisms. Next, several software and hardware efficiency investigations were conducted. These involved the use of three different parallel programming paradigms and solution of two example problems on both a shared-memory multiprocessor and a distributed-memory network of workstations.

  18. Parallel aeroelastic computations for wing and wing-body configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byun, Chansup

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop computationally efficient methods for solving fluid-structural interaction problems by directly coupling finite difference Euler/Navier-Stokes equations for fluids and finite element dynamics equations for structures on parallel computers. This capability will significantly impact many aerospace projects of national importance such as Advanced Subsonic Civil Transport (ASCT), where the structural stability margin becomes very critical at the transonic region. This research effort will have direct impact on the High Performance Computing and Communication (HPCC) Program of NASA in the area of parallel computing.

  19. History Matching in Parallel Computational Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Bryant; Sanjay Srinivasan; Alvaro Barrera; Sharad Yadav

    2004-08-31

    In the probabilistic approach for history matching, the information from the dynamic data is merged with the prior geologic information in order to generate permeability models consistent with the observed dynamic data as well as the prior geology. The relationship between dynamic response data and reservoir attributes may vary in different regions of the reservoir due to spatial variations in reservoir attributes, fluid properties, well configuration, flow constrains on wells etc. This implies probabilistic approach should then update different regions of the reservoir in different ways. This necessitates delineation of multiple reservoir domains in order to increase the accuracy of the approach. The research focuses on a probabilistic approach to integrate dynamic data that ensures consistency between reservoir models developed from one stage to the next. The algorithm relies on efficient parameterization of the dynamic data integration problem and permits rapid assessment of the updated reservoir model at each stage. The report also outlines various domain decomposition schemes from the perspective of increasing the accuracy of probabilistic approach of history matching. Research progress in three important areas of the project are discussed: {lg_bullet}Validation and testing the probabilistic approach to incorporating production data in reservoir models. {lg_bullet}Development of a robust scheme for identifying reservoir regions that will result in a more robust parameterization of the history matching process. {lg_bullet}Testing commercial simulators for parallel capability and development of a parallel algorithm for history matching.

  20. Implementation of linear-scaling plane wave density functional theory on parallel computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skylaris, Chris-Kriton; Haynes, Peter D.; Mostofi, Arash A.; Payne, Mike C.

    We describe the algorithms we have developed for linear-scaling plane wave density functional calculations on parallel computers as implemented in the onetep program. We outline how onetep achieves plane wave accuracy with a computational cost which increases only linearly with the number of atoms by optimising directly the single-particle density matrix expressed in a psinc basis set. We describe in detail the novel algorithms we have developed for computing with the psinc basis set the quantities needed in the evaluation and optimisation of the total energy within our approach. For our parallel computations we use the general Message Passing Interface (MPI) library of subroutines to exchange data between processors. Accordingly, we have developed efficient schemes for distributing data and computational load to processors in a balanced manner. We describe these schemes in detail and in relation to our algorithms for computations with a psinc basis. Results of tests on different materials show that onetep is an efficient parallel code that should be able to take advantage of a wide range of parallel computer architectures.