Science.gov

Sample records for parallel transport track

  1. Time Sequence Diffeomorphic Metric Mapping and Parallel Transport Track Time-Dependent Shape Changes

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Anqi; Albert, Marilyn; Younes, Laurent; Miller, Michael I.

    2009-01-01

    Serial MRI human brain scans have facilitated the detection of brain development and of the earliest signs of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases, monitoring disease progression, and resolving drug effects in clinical trials for preventing or slowing the rate of brain degeneration. To track anatomical shape changes in serial images, we introduce new point-based time sequence large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping (TS-LDDMM) to infer the time flow of within-subject geometric shape changes that carry known observations through a period. Its Euler-Lagrange equation is generalized for anatomies whose shapes are characterized by point sets, such as landmarks, curves, and surfaces. The time-dependent momentum obtained from the TS-LDDMM encodes within-subject shape changes. For the purpose of across-subject shape comparison, we then propose a diffeomorphic analysis framework to translate within-subject deformation in a global template without incorporating across-subject anatomical variations via parallel transport technique. The analysis involves the retraction of the within-subject timedependent momentum along the TS-LDDMM trajectory from each time to the baseline, the translation of the momentum in a global template, and the reconstruction of the TS-LDDMM trajectory starting from the global template. PMID:19041947

  2. Kalman Filter Tracking on Parallel Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerati, Giuseppe; Elmer, Peter; Krutelyov, Slava; Lantz, Steven; Lefebvre, Matthieu; McDermott, Kevin; Riley, Daniel; Tadel, Matevž; Wittich, Peter; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avi

    2016-11-01

    Power density constraints are limiting the performance improvements of modern CPUs. To address this we have seen the introduction of lower-power, multi-core processors such as GPGPU, ARM and Intel MIC. In order to achieve the theoretical performance gains of these processors, it will be necessary to parallelize algorithms to exploit larger numbers of lightweight cores and specialized functions like large vector units. Track finding and fitting is one of the most computationally challenging problems for event reconstruction in particle physics. At the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC), for example, this will be by far the dominant problem. The need for greater parallelism has driven investigations of very different track finding techniques such as Cellular Automata or Hough Transforms. The most common track finding techniques in use today, however, are those based on a Kalman filter approach. Significant experience has been accumulated with these techniques on real tracking detector systems, both in the trigger and offline. They are known to provide high physics performance, are robust, and are in use today at the LHC. Given the utility of the Kalman filter in track finding, we have begun to port these algorithms to parallel architectures, namely Intel Xeon and Xeon Phi. We report here on our progress towards an end-to-end track reconstruction algorithm fully exploiting vectorization and parallelization techniques in a simplified experimental environment.

  3. Kalman Filter Tracking on Parallel Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerati, Giuseppe; Elmer, Peter; Lantz, Steven; McDermott, Kevin; Riley, Dan; Tadel, Matevž; Wittich, Peter; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avi

    2015-12-01

    Power density constraints are limiting the performance improvements of modern CPUs. To address this we have seen the introduction of lower-power, multi-core processors, but the future will be even more exciting. In order to stay within the power density limits but still obtain Moore's Law performance/price gains, it will be necessary to parallelize algorithms to exploit larger numbers of lightweight cores and specialized functions like large vector units. Example technologies today include Intel's Xeon Phi and GPGPUs. Track finding and fitting is one of the most computationally challenging problems for event reconstruction in particle physics. At the High Luminosity LHC, for example, this will be by far the dominant problem. The need for greater parallelism has driven investigations of very different track finding techniques including Cellular Automata or returning to Hough Transform. The most common track finding techniques in use today are however those based on the Kalman Filter [2]. Significant experience has been accumulated with these techniques on real tracking detector systems, both in the trigger and offline. They are known to provide high physics performance, are robust and are exactly those being used today for the design of the tracking system for HL-LHC. Our previous investigations showed that, using optimized data structures, track fitting with Kalman Filter can achieve large speedup both with Intel Xeon and Xeon Phi. We report here our further progress towards an end-to-end track reconstruction algorithm fully exploiting vectorization and parallelization techniques in a realistic simulation setup.

  4. Visualization and Tracking of Parallel CFD Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaziri, Arsi; Kremenetsky, Mark

    1995-01-01

    We describe a system for interactive visualization and tracking of a 3-D unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation on a parallel computer. CM/AVS, a distributed, parallel implementation of a visualization environment (AVS) runs on the CM-5 parallel supercomputer. A CFD solver is run as a CM/AVS module on the CM-5. Data communication between the solver, other parallel visualization modules, and a graphics workstation, which is running AVS, are handled by CM/AVS. Partitioning of the visualization task, between CM-5 and the workstation, can be done interactively in the visual programming environment provided by AVS. Flow solver parameters can also be altered by programmable interactive widgets. This system partially removes the requirement of storing large solution files at frequent time steps, a characteristic of the traditional 'simulate (yields) store (yields) visualize' post-processing approach.

  5. PHACT: Parallel HOG and Correlation Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Waqas; Birch, Philip; Young, Rupert; Chatwin, Chris

    2014-03-01

    Histogram of Oriented Gradients (HOG) based methods for the detection of humans have become one of the most reliable methods of detecting pedestrians with a single passive imaging camera. However, they are not 100 percent reliable. This paper presents an improved tracker for the monitoring of pedestrians within images. The Parallel HOG and Correlation Tracking (PHACT) algorithm utilises self learning to overcome the drifting problem. A detection algorithm that utilises HOG features runs in parallel to an adaptive and stateful correlator. The combination of both acting in a cascade provides a much more robust tracker than the two components separately could produce.

  6. Parallelizing the track-target model for the MIMD machine

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong Xiong, W.; Swietlik, C.

    1992-09-01

    Military Tracking-Target systems are important analysis tools for modelling the major functions of a strategic defense system operating against a ballistic missile threat during a simulated end-to-end scenario. As demands grow for modelling more trajectories with increasing numbers of missile types, so have demands for more processing power. Argonne National Laboratory has developed the parallel version of this Tracking-Target model. The parallel version has exhibited speedups of up to a factor of 6.3 resulting from a shared memory multiprocessor machine. This paper documents a project to implement the Tracking-Target model on a parallel processing environment.

  7. Particle orbit tracking on a parallel computer: Hypertrack

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, B.; Bourianoff, G.; Pilat, F. ); Talman, R. )

    1991-05-01

    A program has been written which performs particle orbit tracking on the Intel iPSC/860 distributed memory parallel computer. The tracking is performed using a thin element approach. A brief description of the structure and performance of the code is presented, along with applications of the code to the analysis of accelerator lattices for the SSC. The concept of ensemble tracking'', i.e. the tracking of ensemble averages of noninteracting particles, such as the emittance, is presented. Preliminary results of such studies will be presented. 2 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Parallel and Portable Monte Carlo Particle Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. R.; Cummings, J. C.; Nolen, S. D.; Keen, N. D.

    1997-08-01

    We have developed a multi-group, Monte Carlo neutron transport code in C++ using object-oriented methods and the Parallel Object-Oriented Methods and Applications (POOMA) class library. This transport code, called MC++, currently computes k and α eigenvalues of the neutron transport equation on a rectilinear computational mesh. It is portable to and runs in parallel on a wide variety of platforms, including MPPs, clustered SMPs, and individual workstations. It contains appropriate classes and abstractions for particle transport and, through the use of POOMA, for portable parallelism. Current capabilities are discussed, along with physics and performance results for several test problems on a variety of hardware, including all three Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) platforms. Current parallel performance indicates the ability to compute α-eigenvalues in seconds or minutes rather than days or weeks. Current and future work on the implementation of a general transport physics framework (TPF) is also described. This TPF employs modern C++ programming techniques to provide simplified user interfaces, generic STL-style programming, and compile-time performance optimization. Physics capabilities of the TPF will be extended to include continuous energy treatments, implicit Monte Carlo algorithms, and a variety of convergence acceleration techniques such as importance combing.

  9. Parallelization of a Monte Carlo particle transport simulation code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjidoukas, P.; Bousis, C.; Emfietzoglou, D.

    2010-05-01

    We have developed a high performance version of the Monte Carlo particle transport simulation code MC4. The original application code, developed in Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) for Microsoft Excel, was first rewritten in the C programming language for improving code portability. Several pseudo-random number generators have been also integrated and studied. The new MC4 version was then parallelized for shared and distributed-memory multiprocessor systems using the Message Passing Interface. Two parallel pseudo-random number generator libraries (SPRNG and DCMT) have been seamlessly integrated. The performance speedup of parallel MC4 has been studied on a variety of parallel computing architectures including an Intel Xeon server with 4 dual-core processors, a Sun cluster consisting of 16 nodes of 2 dual-core AMD Opteron processors and a 200 dual-processor HP cluster. For large problem size, which is limited only by the physical memory of the multiprocessor server, the speedup results are almost linear on all systems. We have validated the parallel implementation against the serial VBA and C implementations using the same random number generator. Our experimental results on the transport and energy loss of electrons in a water medium show that the serial and parallel codes are equivalent in accuracy. The present improvements allow for studying of higher particle energies with the use of more accurate physical models, and improve statistics as more particles tracks can be simulated in low response time.

  10. Tracking Connections: An Exercise about Series and Parallel Resistances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jankovic, Srdjan

    2010-01-01

    Unlike many other topics in basic physics, series and parallel resistances are rarely noticed in the real life of an ordinary individual, making it difficult to design a laboratory activity that can simulate something familiar. The activities described here entail minimal costs and are based on a puzzle-like game of tracking wire connections. A…

  11. Tracking Connections: An Exercise about Series and Parallel Resistances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jankovic, Srdjan

    2010-01-01

    Unlike many other topics in basic physics, series and parallel resistances are rarely noticed in the real life of an ordinary individual, making it difficult to design a laboratory activity that can simulate something familiar. The activities described here entail minimal costs and are based on a puzzle-like game of tracking wire connections. A…

  12. Tracking Connections: An Exercise about Series and Parallel Resistances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankovic, Srdjan

    2010-09-01

    Unlike many other topics in basic physics, series and parallel resistances are rarely noticed in the real life of an ordinary individual, making it difficult to design a laboratory activity that can simulate something familiar. The activities described here entail minimal costs and are based on a puzzle-like game of tracking wire connections. A simple resistor-based device is built by students, which enables them to use a common multimeter to track down wire connections in a set of unmarked wires. A similar approach is sometimes used by electricians to identify wire connections.

  13. Image-based tracking of optically detunable parallel resonant circuits.

    PubMed

    Eggers, Holger; Weiss, Steffen; Boernert, Peter; Boesiger, Peter

    2003-06-01

    In this work strategies for the robust localization of parallel resonant circuits are investigated. These strategies are based on the subtraction of two images, which ideally differ in signal intensity at the positions of the devices only. To modulate their signal amplification, and thereby generate the local variations, the parallel resonant circuits are alternately detuned and retuned during the acquisition. The integration of photodiodes into the devices permits their fast optical switching. Radial and spiral imaging sequences are modified to provide the data for the two images in addition to those for a conventional image in the same acquisition time. The strategies were evaluated by phantom experiments with stationary and moving catheter-borne devices. In particular, rapid detuning and retuning during the sampling of single profiles is shown to lead to a robust localization. Moreover, this strategy eliminates most of the drawbacks usually associated with image-based tracking, such as low temporal resolution. Image-based tracking may thus become a competitive (if not superior) alternative to projection-based tracking of parallel resonant circuits.

  14. An experiment in hurricane track prediction using parallel computing methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Chang G.; Jwo, Jung-Sing; Lakshmivarahan, S.; Dhall, S. K.; Lewis, John M.; Velden, Christopher S.

    1994-01-01

    The barotropic model is used to explore the advantages of parallel processing in deterministic forecasting. We apply this model to the track forecasting of hurricane Elena (1985). In this particular application, solutions to systems of elliptic equations are the essence of the computational mechanics. One set of equations is associated with the decomposition of the wind into irrotational and nondivergent components - this determines the initial nondivergent state. Another set is associated with recovery of the streamfunction from the forecasted vorticity. We demonstrate that direct parallel methods based on accelerated block cyclic reduction (BCR) significantly reduce the computational time required to solve the elliptic equations germane to this decomposition and forecast problem. A 72-h track prediction was made using incremental time steps of 16 min on a network of 3000 grid points nominally separated by 100 km. The prediction took 30 sec on the 8-processor Alliant FX/8 computer. This was a speed-up of 3.7 when compared to the one-processor version. The 72-h prediction of Elena's track was made as the storm moved toward Florida's west coast. Approximately 200 km west of Tampa Bay, Elena executed a dramatic recurvature that ultimately changed its course toward the northwest. Although the barotropic track forecast was unable to capture the hurricane's tight cycloidal looping maneuver, the subsequent northwesterly movement was accurately forecasted as was the location and timing of landfall near Mobile Bay.

  15. Monte Carlo radiation transport¶llelism

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, L. J.; Post, S. E.

    2002-01-01

    This talk summarizes the main aspects of the LANL ASCI Eolus project and its major unclassified code project, MCNP. The MCNP code provide a state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiation transport to approximately 3000 users world-wide. Almost all hardware platforms are supported because we strictly adhere to the FORTRAN-90/95 standard. For parallel processing, MCNP uses a mixture of OpenMp combined with either MPI or PVM (shared and distributed memory). This talk summarizes our experiences on various platforms using MPI with and without OpenMP. These platforms include PC-Windows, Intel-LINUX, BlueMountain, Frost, ASCI-Q and others.

  16. Particle Transport in Parallel-Plate Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Rader, D.J.; Geller, A.S.

    1999-08-01

    A major cause of semiconductor yield degradation is contaminant particles that deposit on wafers while they reside in processing tools during integrated circuit manufacturing. This report presents numerical models for assessing particle transport and deposition in a parallel-plate geometry characteristic of a wide range of single-wafer processing tools: uniform downward flow exiting a perforated-plate showerhead separated by a gap from a circular wafer resting on a parallel susceptor. Particles are assumed to originate either upstream of the showerhead or from a specified position between the plates. The physical mechanisms controlling particle deposition and transport (inertia, diffusion, fluid drag, and external forces) are reviewed, with an emphasis on conditions encountered in semiconductor process tools (i.e., sub-atmospheric pressures and submicron particles). Isothermal flow is assumed, although small temperature differences are allowed to drive particle thermophoresis. Numerical solutions of the flow field are presented which agree with an analytic, creeping-flow expression for Re < 4. Deposition is quantified by use of a particle collection efficiency, which is defined as the fraction of particles in the reactor that deposit on the wafer. Analytic expressions for collection efficiency are presented for the limiting case where external forces control deposition (i.e., neglecting particle diffusion and inertia). Deposition from simultaneous particle diffusion and external forces is analyzed by an Eulerian formulation; for creeping flow and particles released from a planar trap, the analysis yields an analytic, integral expression for particle deposition based on process and particle properties. Deposition from simultaneous particle inertia and external forces is analyzed by a Lagrangian formulation, which can describe inertia-enhanced deposition resulting from particle acceleration in the showerhead. An approximate analytic expression is derived for particle

  17. Tracking moving radar targets with parallel, velocity-tuned filters

    DOEpatents

    Bickel, Douglas L.; Harmony, David W.; Bielek, Timothy P.; Hollowell, Jeff A.; Murray, Margaret S.; Martinez, Ana

    2013-04-30

    Radar data associated with radar illumination of a movable target is processed to monitor motion of the target. A plurality of filter operations are performed in parallel on the radar data so that each filter operation produces target image information. The filter operations are defined to have respectively corresponding velocity ranges that differ from one another. The target image information produced by one of the filter operations represents the target more accurately than the target image information produced by the remainder of the filter operations when a current velocity of the target is within the velocity range associated with the one filter operation. In response to the current velocity of the target being within the velocity range associated with the one filter operation, motion of the target is tracked based on the target image information produced by the one filter operation.

  18. Generalized parallel transport and coordinate transformations in f( R) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dil, Emre

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we study the generalized parallel transport of vectors and generalized coordinate transformations between generalized reference frames described in f( R) gravity. After constructing the generalized parallel transport relations and the generalized transformation laws in f( R) gravity, we discuss the implications of these laws and present the differences between f( R) gravity and Einstein's general relativity. For a constant Ricci scalar case with de Sitter-like behavior for a de Sitter space-time, we find that the parallel transport is invariant under the conformal transformation from general relativity to f( R) gravity. However, for a non-de Sitter space-time, parallel transport differs by an extra field term.

  19. Shift: A Massively Parallel Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Package

    SciTech Connect

    Pandya, Tara M; Johnson, Seth R; Davidson, Gregory G; Evans, Thomas M; Hamilton, Steven P

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the massively-parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport package, Shift, developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It reviews the capabilities, implementation, and parallel performance of this code package. Scaling results demonstrate very good strong and weak scaling behavior of the implemented algorithms. Benchmark results from various reactor problems show that Shift results compare well to other contemporary Monte Carlo codes and experimental results.

  20. Parallel track reconstruction in CMS using the cellular automaton approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funke, D.; Hauth, T.; Innocente, V.; Quast, G.; Sanders, P.; Schieferdecker, D.

    2014-06-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a general-purpose particle detector and comprises the largest silicon-based tracking system built to date with 75 million individual readout channels. The precise reconstruction of particle tracks from this tremendous amount of input channels is a compute-intensive task. The foreseen LHC beam parameters for the next data taking period, starting in 2015, will result in an increase in the number of simultaneous proton-proton interactions and hence the number of particle tracks per event. Due to the stagnating clock frequencies of individual CPU cores, new approaches to particle track reconstruction need to be evaluated in order to cope with this computational challenge. Track finding methods that are based on cellular automata (CA) offer a fast and parallelizable alternative to the well-established Kalman filter-based algorithms. We present a new cellular automaton based track reconstruction, which copes with the complex detector geometry of CMS. We detail the specific design choices made to allow for a high-performance computation on GPU and CPU devices using the OpenCL framework. We conclude by evaluating the physics performance, as well as the computational properties of our implementation on various hardware platforms and show that a significant speedup can be attained by using GPU architectures while achieving a reasonable physics performance at the same time.

  1. Dynamic Load Balancing of Parallel Monte Carlo Transport Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, M; Taylor, J; Procassini, R

    2004-12-22

    The performance of parallel Monte Carlo transport calculations which use both spatial and particle parallelism is increased by dynamically assigning processors to the most worked domains. Since the particle work load varies over the course of the simulation, this algorithm determines each cycle if dynamic load balancing would speed up the calculation. If load balancing is required, a small number of particle communications are initiated in order to achieve load balance. This method has decreased the parallel run time by more than a factor of three for certain criticality calculations.

  2. Local and nonlocal parallel heat transport in general magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego B; Chacon, Luis

    2011-01-01

    A novel approach for the study of parallel transport in magnetized plasmas is presented. The method avoids numerical pollution issues of grid-based formulations and applies to integrable and chaotic magnetic fields with local or nonlocal parallel closures. In weakly chaotic fields, the method gives the fractal structure of the devil's staircase radial temperature profile. In fully chaotic fields, the temperature exhibits self-similar spatiotemporal evolution with a stretched-exponential scaling function for local closures and an algebraically decaying one for nonlocal closures. It is shown that, for both closures, the effective radial heat transport is incompatible with the quasilinear diffusion model.

  3. Parallel heat transport in integrable and chaotic magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego B; Chacon, Luis

    2012-01-01

    The study of transport in magnetized plasmas is a problem of fundamental interest in controlled fusion, space plasmas, and astrophysics research. Three issues make this problem particularly chal- lenging: (i) The extreme anisotropy between the parallel (i.e., along the magnetic field), , and the perpendicular, , conductivities ( / may exceed 1010 in fusion plasmas); (ii) Magnetic field lines chaos which in general complicates (and may preclude) the construction of magnetic field line coordinates; and (iii) Nonlocal parallel transport in the limit of small collisionality. Motivated by these issues, we present a Lagrangian Green s function method to solve the local and non-local parallel transport equation applicable to integrable and chaotic magnetic fields in arbitrary geom- etry. The method avoids by construction the numerical pollution issues of grid-based algorithms. The potential of the approach is demonstrated with nontrivial applications to integrable (magnetic island chain), weakly chaotic (devil s staircase), and fully chaotic magnetic field configurations. For the latter, numerical solutions of the parallel heat transport equation show that the effective radial transport, with local and non-local closures, is non-diffusive, thus casting doubts on the appropriateness of the applicability of quasilinear diffusion descriptions. General conditions for the existence of non-diffusive, multivalued flux-gradient relations in the temperature evolution are derived.

  4. Two degrees of freedom parallel linkageto track solarthermal platforms installed on ships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visa, I.; Cotorcea, A.; Moldovan, M.; Neagoe, M.

    2016-08-01

    Transportation is responsible at global level for one third of the total energy consumption. Solutions to reduce conventional fuel consumption are under research, to improve the systems’ efficiency and to replace the current fossil fuels. There already are several applications, usually onsmall maritime vehicles, using photovoltaic systems to cover the electric energy demand on-board andto support the owners’ commitment towards sustainability. In most cases, these systems are fixed, parallely aligned with the deck; thus, the amount of solar energy received is heavily reduced (down to 50%) as compared to the available irradiance. Large scale, feasible applications require to maximize the energy output of the solar convertors implemented on ships; using solar tracking systems is an obvious path, allowing a gain up to 35...40% in the output energy, as compared to fixed systems. Spatial limitations, continuous movement of the ship and harsh navigation condition are the main barriers in implementation. This paper proposes a solar tracking system with two degrees of freedom, for a solar thermal platform, based on a parallel linkage with sphericaljoints, considered as Multibody System. The analytical model for mobile platform position, pressure angles and a numerical example are given in the paper.

  5. Transport of parallel momentum by collisionless drift wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, P. H.; McDevitt, C. J.; Guercan, Oe. D.; Hahm, T. S.; Naulin, V.

    2008-01-15

    This paper presents a novel, unified approach to the theory of turbulent transport of parallel momentum by collisionless drift waves. The physics of resonant and nonresonant off-diagonal contributions to the momentum flux is emphasized, and collisionless momentum exchange between waves and particles is accounted for. Two related momentum conservation theorems are derived. These relate the resonant particle momentum flux, the wave momentum flux, and the refractive force. A perturbative calculation, in the spirit of Chapman-Enskog theory, is used to obtain the wave momentum flux, which contributes significantly to the residual stress. A general equation for mean k{sub parallel} (parallel}>) is derived and used to develop a generalized theory of symmetry breaking. The resonant particle momentum flux is calculated, and pinch and residual stress effects are identified. The implications of the theory for intrinsic rotation and momentum transport bifurcations are discussed.

  6. CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT IN PARALLEL FRACTURED MEDIA: SUDICKY AND FRIND REVISITED

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper is concerned with a modified, nondimensional form of the parallel fracture, contaminant transport model of Sudicky and Frind (1982). The modifications include the boundary condition at the fracture wall, expressed by a parameter, and the power-law relationship between...

  7. CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT IN PARALLEL FRACTURED MEDIA: SUDICKY AND FRIND REVISITED

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper is concerned with a modified, nondimensional form of the parallel fracture, contaminant transport model of Sudicky and Frind (1982). The modifications include the boundary condition at the fracture wall, expressed by a parameter , and the power-law relationship betwe...

  8. CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT IN PARALLEL FRACTURED MEDIA: SUDICKY AND FRIND REVISITED

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper is concerned with a modified, nondimensional form of the parallel fracture, contaminant transport model of Sudicky and Frind (1982). The modifications include the boundary condition at the fracture wall, expressed by a parameter , and the power-law relationship betwe...

  9. CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT IN PARALLEL FRACTURED MEDIA: SUDICKY AND FRIND REVISITED

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper is concerned with a modified, nondimensional form of the parallel fracture, contaminant transport model of Sudicky and Frind (1982). The modifications include the boundary condition at the fracture wall, expressed by a parameter, and the power-law relationship between...

  10. Multiscale Architectures and Parallel Algorithms for Video Object Tracking

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    than Government procurement does not in any way obligate the U.S. Government. The fact that the Government formulated or supplied the drawings...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Implementation and performance of an extended set of parallel multicore video processing chain of modules were investigated...Processing Elements (SPEs) without any cache but 256 KB of local store memory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 3 N-CET video processing chain

  11. High-resolution reactive transport: A coupled parallel hydrogeochemical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beisman, J. J.; Maxwell, R. M.; Steefel, C. I.; Sitchler, A.; Molins, S.

    2013-12-01

    Subsurface hydrogeochemical systems are an especially complex component of the terrestrial environment and play host to a multitude of interactions. Parameterizations of these interactions are perhaps the least understood component of terrestrial systems, presenting uncertainties in the predictive understanding of biogeochemical cycling and transport. Thorough knowledge of biogeochemical transport processes is critical to the quantification of carbon/nutrient fluxes in the subsurface, and to the development of effective contaminant remediation techniques. Here we present a coupled parallel hydrogeochemical model, ParCrunchFlow, as a tool to further our understanding of governing processes and interactions in natural hydrogeochemical systems. ParCrunchFlow is a coupling of the reactive transport simulator CrunchFlow with the hydrologic model ParFlow. CrunchFlow is a multicomponent reactive flow and transport code that can be used to simulate a range of important processes and environments, including reactive contaminant transport, chemical weathering, carbon sequestration, biogeochemical cycling, and water-rock interaction. ParFlow is a parallel, three-dimensional, variably-saturated, coupled surface-subsurface flow and transport code with the ability to simulate complex topography, geology, and heterogeneity. ParCrunchflow takes advantage of the efficient parallelism built into Parflow, allowing the numerical simulation of reactive transport processes in chemically and physically heterogeneous media at high spatial resolutions. This model provides an ability to further examine the interactions and feedbacks between biogeochemical systems and complex subsurface flow fields. In addition to the details of model construction, results will be presented that show floodplain nutrient cycling and the effects of heterogeneity on small-scale mixing reactions at the Department of Energy's Old Rifle Legacy site.

  12. Measures of effectiveness for BMD mid-course tracking on MIMD massively parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    VanDyke, J.P.; Tomkins, J.L.; Furnish, M.D.

    1995-05-01

    The TRC code, a mid-course tracking code for ballistic missiles, has previously been implemented on a 1024-processor MIMD (Multiple Instruction -- Multiple Data) massively parallel computer. Measures of Effectiveness (MOE) for this algorithm have been developed for this computing environment. The MOE code is run in parallel with the TRC code. Particularly useful MOEs include the number of missed objects (real objects for which the TRC algorithm did not construct a track); of ghost tracks (tracks not corresponding to a real object); of redundant tracks (multiple tracks corresponding to a single real object); and of unresolved objects (multiple objects corresponding to a single track). All of these are expressed as a function of time, and tend to maximize during the time in which real objects are spawned (multiple reentry vehicles per post-boost vehicle). As well, it is possible to measure the track-truth separation as a function of time. A set of calculations is presented illustrating these MOEs as a function of time for a case with 99 post-boost vehicles, each of which spawns 9 reentry vehicles.

  13. New Parallel computing framework for radiation transport codes

    SciTech Connect

    Kostin, M.A.; Mokhov, N.V.; Niita, K.; /JAERI, Tokai

    2010-09-01

    A new parallel computing framework has been developed to use with general-purpose radiation transport codes. The framework was implemented as a C++ module that uses MPI for message passing. The module is significantly independent of radiation transport codes it can be used with, and is connected to the codes by means of a number of interface functions. The framework was integrated with the MARS15 code, and an effort is under way to deploy it in PHITS. Besides the parallel computing functionality, the framework offers a checkpoint facility that allows restarting calculations with a saved checkpoint file. The checkpoint facility can be used in single process calculations as well as in the parallel regime. Several checkpoint files can be merged into one thus combining results of several calculations. The framework also corrects some of the known problems with the scheduling and load balancing found in the original implementations of the parallel computing functionality in MARS15 and PHITS. The framework can be used efficiently on homogeneous systems and networks of workstations, where the interference from the other users is possible.

  14. Parallel radiation transport algorithms and associated architectural requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Morel, J. E.; Baker, R. S.; Warsa, J. S.

    2004-01-01

    The radiation transport equation is a seven-dimensional equation that can be extremely expensive to solve. In general, transport can be expected to completely dominate the memory and CPU time requirements for the ASCI codes. Both traditional iterative transport solution methods and modern Krylov-subspace solution methods require the inversion of a large number of block lower-diagonal matrices. While such inversions are easily done in serial, a high level of sophistication is needed for implementations on massively parallel platforms. Rectangular-mesh methods are well-established and generally quite efficient but unstructured-mesh methods remain a research topic. Nonetheless, considerable progress has been made in unstructured-mesh methods over the last several years. In general, the efficiency of transport solution algorithms are quite sensitive to communication latencies and bandwidth, but there are other significant considerations as well. Some new parallel algorithms have recently been defined that may be significantly better than existing methods for time-dependent problems, but will be significantly less effective for steady-state problems in some circumstances. Transport methods would benefit from a machine architecture with low latencies, high bandwidth, and on the order of one thousand very fast, large-memory processors, as opposed to an architecture that consists of a very large number of slower processors with less memory. In addition, a lightweight operating system is highly desirable.

  15. Analysis of coupled heat and moisture transport on parallel computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koudelka, Tomáš; Krejčí, Tomáš

    2017-07-01

    Coupled analysis of heat and moisture transport in complicated structural elements or in whole structures deserves a special attention because after space discretization, large number of degrees of freedom are needed. This paper describes possible solution of such problems based on domain decomposition methods executed on parallel computers. The Schur complement method is used with respect to nonsymmetric systems of algebraic equations. The method described is an alternative to other methods, e.g. two or more scale homogenization.

  16. A new approach to canal surface with parallel transport frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiṣi, Ilim; Öztürk, Günay

    In the present study, we attend to the canal surfaces with the spine curve γ according to the parallel transport frame in Euclidean 4-space 𝔼4. We give an example of these surfaces and obtain some results about curvature conditions in 𝔼4. Moreover, the visualizations of projections of canal surfaces are presented. Lastly, we give the necessary and sufficient conditions for canal surfaces to become weak superconformal.

  17. Novel Parallel Numerical Methods for Radiation& Neutron Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, P N

    2001-03-06

    In many of the multiphysics simulations performed at LLNL, transport calculations can take up 30 to 50% of the total run time. If Monte Carlo methods are used, the percentage can be as high as 80%. Thus, a significant core competence in the formulation, software implementation, and solution of the numerical problems arising in transport modeling is essential to Laboratory and DOE research. In this project, we worked on developing scalable solution methods for the equations that model the transport of photons and neutrons through materials. Our goal was to reduce the transport solve time in these simulations by means of more advanced numerical methods and their parallel implementations. These methods must be scalable, that is, the time to solution must remain constant as the problem size grows and additional computer resources are used. For iterative methods, scalability requires that (1) the number of iterations to reach convergence is independent of problem size, and (2) that the computational cost grows linearly with problem size. We focused on deterministic approaches to transport, building on our earlier work in which we performed a new, detailed analysis of some existing transport methods and developed new approaches. The Boltzmann equation (the underlying equation to be solved) and various solution methods have been developed over many years. Consequently, many laboratory codes are based on these methods, which are in some cases decades old. For the transport of x-rays through partially ionized plasmas in local thermodynamic equilibrium, the transport equation is coupled to nonlinear diffusion equations for the electron and ion temperatures via the highly nonlinear Planck function. We investigated the suitability of traditional-solution approaches to transport on terascale architectures and also designed new scalable algorithms; in some cases, we investigated hybrid approaches that combined both.

  18. Fast parallel tracking algorithm for the muon detector of the CBM experiment at fair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, A.; Höhne, C.; Kisel, I.; Ososkov, G.

    2010-07-01

    Particle trajectory recognition is an important and challenging task in the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future FAIR accelerator at Darmstadt. The tracking algorithms have to process terabytes of input data produced in particle collisions. Therefore, the speed of the tracking software is extremely important for data analysis. In this contribution, a fast parallel track reconstruction algorithm which uses available features of modern processors is presented. These features comprise a SIMD instruction set (SSE) and multithreading. The first allows one to pack several data items into one register and to operate on all of them in parallel thus achieving more operations per cycle. The second feature enables the routines to exploit all available CPU cores and hardware threads. This parallel version of the tracking algorithm has been compared to the initial serial scalar version which uses a similar approach for tracking. A speed-up factor of 487 was achieved (from 730 to 1.5 ms/event) for a computer with 2 × Intel Core i7 processors at 2.66 GHz.

  19. Time-dependent Perpendicular Transport of Energetic Particles for Different Turbulence Configurations and Parallel Transport Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasuik, J.; Shalchi, A.

    2017-09-01

    Recently, a new theory for the transport of energetic particles across a mean magnetic field was presented. Compared to other nonlinear theories the new approach has the advantage that it provides a full time-dependent description of the transport. Furthermore, a diffusion approximation is no longer part of that theory. The purpose of this paper is to combine this new approach with a time-dependent model for parallel transport and different turbulence configurations in order to explore the parameter regimes for which we get ballistic transport, compound subdiffusion, and normal Markovian diffusion.

  20. A Parallel Finite Set Statistical Simulator for Multi-Target Detection and Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, I.; MacMillan, R.

    2014-09-01

    Finite Set Statistics (FISST) is a powerful Bayesian inference tool for the joint detection, classification and tracking of multi-target environments. FISST is capable of handling phenomena such as clutter, misdetections, and target birth and decay. Implicit within the approach are solutions to the data association and target label-tracking problems. Finally, FISST provides generalized information measures that can be used for sensor allocation across different types of tasks such as: searching for new targets, and classification and tracking of known targets. These FISST capabilities have been demonstrated on several small-scale illustrative examples. However, for implementation in a large-scale system as in the Space Situational Awareness problem, these capabilities require a lot of computational power. In this paper, we implement FISST in a parallel environment for the joint detection and tracking of multi-target systems. In this implementation, false alarms and misdetections will be modeled. Target birth and decay will not be modeled in the present paper. We will demonstrate the success of the method for as many targets as we possibly can in a desktop parallel environment. Performance measures will include: number of targets in the simulation, certainty of detected target tracks, computational time as a function of clutter returns and number of targets, among other factors.

  1. Three-degree-of-freedom parallel manipulator to track the sun for concentrated solar power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashith Shyam, R. B.; Ghosal, A.

    2015-07-01

    In concentrated solar power(CSP) generating stations, incident solar energy is reflected from a large number of mirrors or heliostats to a faraway receiver. In typical CSP installations, the mirror needs to be moved about two axes independently using two actuators in series with the mirror effectively mounted at a single point. A three degree-of-freedom parallel manipulator, namely the 3-RPS parallel manipulator, is proposed to track the sun. The proposed 3-RPS parallel manipulator supports the load of the mirror, structure and wind loading at three points resulting in less deflection, and thus a much larger mirror can be moved with the required tracking accuracy and without increasing the weight of the support structure. The kinematics equations to determine motion of the actuated prismatic joints in the 3-RPS parallel manipulator such that the sun's rays are reflected on to a stationary receiver are developed. Using finite element analysis, it is shown that for same sized mirror, wind loading and maximum deflection requirement, the weight of the support structure is between 15% and 60% less with the 3-RPS parallel manipulator when compared to azimuth-elevation or the target-aligned configurations.

  2. Time-Dependent, Parallel Neutral Particle Transport Code System.

    SciTech Connect

    BAKER, RANDAL S.

    2009-09-10

    Version 00 PARTISN (PARallel, TIme-Dependent SN) is the evolutionary successor to CCC-547/DANTSYS. The PARTISN code package is a modular computer program package designed to solve the time-independent or dependent multigroup discrete ordinates form of the Boltzmann transport equation in several different geometries. The modular construction of the package separates the input processing, the transport equation solving, and the post processing (or edit) functions into distinct code modules: the Input Module, the Solver Module, and the Edit Module, respectively. PARTISN is the evolutionary successor to the DANTSYSTM code system package. The Input and Edit Modules in PARTISN are very similar to those in DANTSYS. However, unlike DANTSYS, the Solver Module in PARTISN contains one, two, and three-dimensional solvers in a single module. In addition to the diamond-differencing method, the Solver Module also has Adaptive Weighted Diamond-Differencing (AWDD), Linear Discontinuous (LD), and Exponential Discontinuous (ED) spatial differencing methods. The spatial mesh may consist of either a standard orthogonal mesh or a block adaptive orthogonal mesh. The Solver Module may be run in parallel for two and three dimensional problems. One can now run 1-D problems in parallel using Energy Domain Decomposition (triggered by Block 5 input keyword npeg>0). EDD can also be used in 2-D/3-D with or without our standard Spatial Domain Decomposition. Both the static (fixed source or eigenvalue) and time-dependent forms of the transport equation are solved in forward or adjoint mode. In addition, PARTISN now has a probabilistic mode for Probability of Initiation (static) and Probability of Survival (dynamic) calculations. Vacuum, reflective, periodic, white, or inhomogeneous boundary conditions are solved. General anisotropic scattering and inhomogeneous sources are permitted. PARTISN solves the transport equation on orthogonal (single level or block-structured AMR) grids in 1-D (slab, two

  3. Final Report - Ferrographic Tracking of Bacterial Transport

    SciTech Connect

    William P. Johnson

    2002-10-10

    The work performed during the past three years has been extremely productive. Ferrographic capture was utilized in analysis of several thousand field samples collected from arrays of multilevel samplers during three intensive field campaigns conducted at two shallow sandy aquifer sites in Oyster, VA. This work has shown resulted in three important conclusions: (1) Ferrographic capture provides unparalleled low quantitation limits for bacterial cell enumeration (Johnson et al., 2000). (2) The high-resolution analyses provided by ferrographic capture allowed observation of increased bacterial removal rates (from groundwater) that corresponded to increased populations of protozoa in the groundwater (Zhang et al., 2001). This novel data allowed determination of bacterial predation rates by protists in the field, a consideration that will be important for successful bioaugmentation strategies. (3) The high-resolution analyses provided by ferrographic capture allowed observation of detachment of indigenous cells in response to breakthrough of injected cells in groundwater (Johnson et al., 2001). The implication of this unique observation is that bacterial transport, specifically bacterial attachment and detachment, may be much more dynamic than has been indicated by short-term laboratory and field studies. Dynamic attachment and detachment of bacteria in groundwater may lead to greatly increased transport distances over long terms relative to what has been indicated by short-term laboratory and field studies.

  4. Particle Tracking Model and Abstraction of Transport Processes

    SciTech Connect

    B. Robinson

    2000-04-07

    The purpose of the transport methodology and component analysis is to provide the numerical methods for simulating radionuclide transport and model setup for transport in the unsaturated zone (UZ) site-scale model. The particle-tracking method of simulating radionuclide transport is incorporated into the FEHM computer code and the resulting changes in the FEHM code are to be submitted to the software configuration management system. This Analysis and Model Report (AMR) outlines the assumptions, design, and testing of a model for calculating radionuclide transport in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain. In addition, methods for determining colloid-facilitated transport parameters are outlined for use in the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) analyses. Concurrently, process-level flow model calculations are being carrier out in a PMR for the unsaturated zone. The computer code TOUGH2 is being used to generate three-dimensional, dual-permeability flow fields, that are supplied to the Performance Assessment group for subsequent transport simulations. These flow fields are converted to input files compatible with the FEHM code, which for this application simulates radionuclide transport using the particle-tracking algorithm outlined in this AMR. Therefore, this AMR establishes the numerical method and demonstrates the use of the model, but the specific breakthrough curves presented do not necessarily represent the behavior of the Yucca Mountain unsaturated zone.

  5. A Parallelization Scheme of the Periodic Signals Tracking Algorithm for Isochronous Mass Spectrometry on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ruijiu; Wang, Meng; Yan, Xinliang; Yang, Qiong; Lam, Yihua; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Yuhu

    We developed a new program by using a parallelization scheme of the periodic signals tracking algorithm for isochronous mass spectrometry on GPUs. The computing time of data analysis can be reduced by a factor of ˜71 and ˜346 by using our new program on Tesla C1060 GPU and Tesla K20c GPU, compared to using old program on Xeon E5540 CPU. We succeed in performing real-time data analysis by using this new program.

  6. Boltzmann Transport Code Update: Parallelization and Integrated Design Updates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinbockel, J. H.; Nealy, J. E.; DeAngelis, G.; Feldman, G. A.; Chokshi, S.

    2003-01-01

    The on going efforts at developing a web site for radiation analysis is expected to result in an increased usage of the High Charge and Energy Transport Code HZETRN. It would be nice to be able to do the requested calculations quickly and efficiently. Therefore the question arose, "Could the implementation of parallel processing speed up the calculations required?" To answer this question two modifications of the HZETRN computer code were created. The first modification selected the shield material of Al(2219) , then polyethylene and then Al(2219). The modified Fortran code was labeled 1SSTRN.F. The second modification considered the shield material of CO2 and Martian regolith. This modified Fortran code was labeled MARSTRN.F.

  7. Plane parallel radiance transport for global illumination in vegetation

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N.; Mobley, C.; Keating, B.; Wu, E.H.

    1997-01-05

    This paper applies plane parallel radiance transport techniques to scattering from vegetation. The leaves, stems, and branches are represented as a volume density of scattering surfaces, depending only on height and the vertical component of the surface normal. Ordinary differential equations are written for the multiply scattered radiance as a function of the height above the ground, with the sky radiance and ground reflectance as boundary conditions. They are solved using a two-pass integration scheme to unify the two-point boundary conditions, and Fourier series for the dependence on the azimuthal angle. The resulting radiance distribution is used to precompute diffuse and specular `ambient` shading tables, as a function of height and surface normal, to be used in rendering, together with a z-buffer shadow algorithm for direct solar illumination.

  8. Nonlinear parallel momentum transport in strong electrostatic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lu Wen, Tiliang; Diamond, P. H.

    2015-05-15

    Most existing theoretical studies of momentum transport focus on calculating the Reynolds stress based on quasilinear theory, without considering the nonlinear momentum flux-〈v{sup ~}{sub r}n{sup ~}u{sup ~}{sub ∥}〉. However, a recent experiment on TORPEX found that the nonlinear toroidal momentum flux induced by blobs makes a significant contribution as compared to the Reynolds stress [Labit et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 032308 (2011)]. In this work, the nonlinear parallel momentum flux in strong electrostatic turbulence is calculated by using a three dimensional Hasegawa-Mima equation, which is relevant for tokamak edge turbulence. It is shown that the nonlinear diffusivity is smaller than the quasilinear diffusivity from Reynolds stress. However, the leading order nonlinear residual stress can be comparable to the quasilinear residual stress, and so may be important to intrinsic rotation in tokamak edge plasmas. A key difference from the quasilinear residual stress is that parallel fluctuation spectrum asymmetry is not required for nonlinear residual stress.

  9. Parameter estimation for fractional transport: A particle-tracking approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Paramita; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Lim, Chae Young

    2009-10-01

    Space-fractional advection-dispersion models provide attractive alternatives to the classical advection-dispersion equation for model applications that exhibit early arrivals and plume skewness. This paper develops a flexible method for estimating the parameters of the fractional transport model on the basis of spatial plume snapshots or temporal breakthrough curve data. A particle-tracking approach provides error bars for the parameter estimates and a general method for model fitting and comparison via optimal weighted least squares. A simple model of concentration variance, based on the particle-tracking approach, identifies the optimal weights.

  10. Validation of the SOLPS Parallel Heat Transport Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canik, J. M.; Briesemeister, A. R.; Lasnier, C. J.; McLean, A. G.; Makowski, M. A.; Leonard, A. W.; Watkins, J. G.

    2014-10-01

    Recent SOLPS 2D fluid plasma/neutrals edge transport simulations have shown a consistent under-prediction of radiated power that when accounted for allows simulations to successfully match high resolution divertor and scrape-off-layer density (ne) and temperature (Te) measurements near detached conditions in DIII-D. The parallel heat transport model has been evaluated in simulations with the upstream ne and Te and divertor heat flux matched to experiments. Simulations of L-mode discharges near detachment onset require either increased carbon sources or hydrogenic recombination radiation to match measured radiative losses. With this increase, the poloidal Te profile shows good agreement with 2D divertor Thomson scattering data, including an extended region with very low Te, which cannot be reproduced without the additional radiative loss. Similar scaling of the radiated power also results in agreement for the Te profile measured in H-mode experiments; however, in this case the plasma data show a poloidally extended region of high ne that is not captured in simulations. Work supported by the US DOE under DE-AC05-00ER22725, DE-FC02-04ER54698 and DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. A parallel implementation of particle tracking with space charge effects on an Intel iPSC/860

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.C.; Bourianoff, G.; Cole, B.; Machida, S.

    1992-08-01

    Particle-tracking simulation is one of the scientific applications that is well-suited to parallel computations. At the Superconducting Super Collider, it has been theoretically and empirically demonstrated that particle tracking on a designed lattice can achieve very high parallel efficiency on a MIMD Intel iPSC/860 machine. The key to such success is the realization that the particles can be tracked independently without considering their interaction. The perfectly parallel nature of particle tracking is broken if the interaction effects between particles are included. The space charge introduces an electromagnetic force that will affect the motion of tracked particles in 3-D space. For accurate modeling of the beam dynamics with space charge effects, one needs to solve three-dimensional Maxwell field equations, usually by a particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm. This will require each particle to communicate with its neighbor grids to compute the momentum changes at each time step. It is expected that the 3-D PIC method will degrade parallel efficiency of particle-tracking implementation on any parallel computer. In this paper, we describe an efficient scheme for implementing particle tracking with space charge effects on an INTEL iPSC/860 machine. Experimental results show that a parallel efficiency of 75% can be obtained.

  12. A parallel implementation of particle tracking with space charge effects on an INTEL iPSC/860

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.; Bourianoff, G.; Cole, B.; Machida, S.

    1993-05-01

    Particle-tracking simulation is one of the scientific applications that is well-suited to parallel computations. At the Superconducting Super Collider, it has been theoretically and empirically demonstrated that particle tracking on a designed lattice can achieve very high parallel efficiency on a MIMD Intel iPSC/860 machine. The key to such success is the realization that the particles can be tracked independently without considering their interaction. The perfectly parallel nature of particle tracking is broken if the interaction effects between particles are included. The space charge introduces an electromagnetic force that will affect the motion of tracked particles in 3-D space. For accurate modeling of the beam dynamics with space charge effects, one needs to solve three-dimensional Maxwell field equations, usually by a particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm. This will require each particle to communicate with its neighbor grids to compute the momentum changes at each time step. It is expected that the 3-D PIC method will degrade parallel efficiency of particle-tracking implementation on any parallel computer. In this paper, we describe an efficient scheme for implementing particle tracking with space charge effects on an INTEL iPSC/860 machine. Experimental results show that a parallel efficiency of 75% can be obtained.

  13. Parallelized Kalman-Filter-Based Reconstruction of Particle Tracks on Many-Core Processors and GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerati, Giuseppe; Elmer, Peter; Krutelyov, Slava; Lantz, Steven; Lefebvre, Matthieu; Masciovecchio, Mario; McDermott, Kevin; Riley, Daniel; Tadel, Matevž; Wittich, Peter; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avi

    2017-08-01

    For over a decade now, physical and energy constraints have limited clock speed improvements in commodity microprocessors. Instead, chipmakers have been pushed into producing lower-power, multi-core processors such as Graphical Processing Units (GPU), ARM CPUs, and Intel MICs. Broad-based efforts from manufacturers and developers have been devoted to making these processors user-friendly enough to perform general computations. However, extracting performance from a larger number of cores, as well as specialized vector or SIMD units, requires special care in algorithm design and code optimization. One of the most computationally challenging problems in high-energy particle experiments is finding and fitting the charged-particle tracks during event reconstruction. This is expected to become by far the dominant problem at the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC), for example. Today the most common track finding methods are those based on the Kalman filter. Experience with Kalman techniques on real tracking detector systems has shown that they are robust and provide high physics performance. This is why they are currently in use at the LHC, both in the trigger and offine. Previously we reported on the significant parallel speedups that resulted from our investigations to adapt Kalman filters to track fitting and track building on Intel Xeon and Xeon Phi. Here, we discuss our progresses toward the understanding of these processors and the new developments to port the Kalman filter to NVIDIA GPUs.

  14. PFLOTRAN: Recent Developments Facilitating Massively-Parallel Reactive Biogeochemical Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, G. E.

    2015-12-01

    With the recent shift towards modeling carbon and nitrogen cycling in support of climate-related initiatives, emphasis has been placed on incorporating increasingly mechanistic biogeochemistry within Earth system models to more accurately predict the response of terrestrial processes to natural and anthropogenic climate cycles. PFLOTRAN is an open-source subsurface code that is specialized for simulating multiphase flow and multicomponent biogeochemical transport on supercomputers. The object-oriented code was designed with modularity in mind and has been coupled with several third-party simulators (e.g. CLM to simulate land surface processes and E4D for coupled hydrogeophysical inversion). Central to PFLOTRAN's capabilities is its ability to simulate tightly-coupled reactive transport processes. This presentation focuses on recent enhancements to the code that enable the solution of large parameterized biogeochemical reaction networks with numerous chemical species. PFLOTRAN's "reaction sandbox" is described, which facilitates the implementation of user-defined reaction networks without the need for a comprehensive understanding of PFLOTRAN software infrastructure. The reaction sandbox is written in modern Fortran (2003-2008) and leverages encapsulation, inheritance, and polymorphism to provide the researcher with a flexible workspace for prototyping reactions within a massively parallel flow and transport simulation framework. As these prototypical reactions mature into well-accepted implementations, they can be incorporated into PFLOTRAN as native biogeochemistry capability. Users of the reaction sandbox are encouraged to upload their source code to PFLOTRAN's main source code repository, including the addition of simple regression tests to better ensure the long-term code compatibility and validity of simulation results.

  15. Left Atrial trajectory impairment in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy disclosed by Geometric Morphometrics and Parallel Transport

    PubMed Central

    Piras, Paolo; Torromeo, Concetta; Re, Federica; Evangelista, Antonietta; Gabriele, Stefano; Esposito, Giuseppe; Nardinocchi, Paola; Teresi, Luciano; Madeo, Andrea; Chialastri, Claudia; Schiariti, Michele; Varano, Valerio; Uguccioni, Massimo; Puddu, Paolo E.

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of full Left Atrium (LA) deformation and whole LA deformational trajectory in time has been poorly investigated and, to the best of our knowledge, seldom discussed in patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy. Therefore, we considered 22 patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) and 46 healthy subjects, investigated them by three–dimensional Speckle Tracking Echocardiography, and studied the derived landmark clouds via Geometric Morphometrics with Parallel Transport. Trajectory shape and trajectory size were different in Controls versus HCM and their classification powers had high AUC (Area Under the Receiving Operator Characteristic Curve) and accuracy. The two trajectories were much different at the transition between LA conduit and booster pump functions. Full shape and deformation analyses with trajectory analysis enabled a straightforward perception of pathophysiological consequences of HCM condition on LA functioning. It might be worthwhile to apply these techniques to look for novel pathophysiological approaches that may better define atrio–ventricular interaction. PMID:27713503

  16. Left Atrial trajectory impairment in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy disclosed by Geometric Morphometrics and Parallel Transport.

    PubMed

    Piras, Paolo; Torromeo, Concetta; Re, Federica; Evangelista, Antonietta; Gabriele, Stefano; Esposito, Giuseppe; Nardinocchi, Paola; Teresi, Luciano; Madeo, Andrea; Chialastri, Claudia; Schiariti, Michele; Varano, Valerio; Uguccioni, Massimo; Puddu, Paolo E

    2016-10-07

    The analysis of full Left Atrium (LA) deformation and whole LA deformational trajectory in time has been poorly investigated and, to the best of our knowledge, seldom discussed in patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy. Therefore, we considered 22 patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) and 46 healthy subjects, investigated them by three-dimensional Speckle Tracking Echocardiography, and studied the derived landmark clouds via Geometric Morphometrics with Parallel Transport. Trajectory shape and trajectory size were different in Controls versus HCM and their classification powers had high AUC (Area Under the Receiving Operator Characteristic Curve) and accuracy. The two trajectories were much different at the transition between LA conduit and booster pump functions. Full shape and deformation analyses with trajectory analysis enabled a straightforward perception of pathophysiological consequences of HCM condition on LA functioning. It might be worthwhile to apply these techniques to look for novel pathophysiological approaches that may better define atrio-ventricular interaction.

  17. Left Atrial trajectory impairment in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy disclosed by Geometric Morphometrics and Parallel Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piras, Paolo; Torromeo, Concetta; Re, Federica; Evangelista, Antonietta; Gabriele, Stefano; Esposito, Giuseppe; Nardinocchi, Paola; Teresi, Luciano; Madeo, Andrea; Chialastri, Claudia; Schiariti, Michele; Varano, Valerio; Uguccioni, Massimo; Puddu, Paolo E.

    2016-10-01

    The analysis of full Left Atrium (LA) deformation and whole LA deformational trajectory in time has been poorly investigated and, to the best of our knowledge, seldom discussed in patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy. Therefore, we considered 22 patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) and 46 healthy subjects, investigated them by three-dimensional Speckle Tracking Echocardiography, and studied the derived landmark clouds via Geometric Morphometrics with Parallel Transport. Trajectory shape and trajectory size were different in Controls versus HCM and their classification powers had high AUC (Area Under the Receiving Operator Characteristic Curve) and accuracy. The two trajectories were much different at the transition between LA conduit and booster pump functions. Full shape and deformation analyses with trajectory analysis enabled a straightforward perception of pathophysiological consequences of HCM condition on LA functioning. It might be worthwhile to apply these techniques to look for novel pathophysiological approaches that may better define atrio-ventricular interaction.

  18. OPTIMIZING COLLAGEN TRANSPORT THROUGH TRACK-ETCHED NANOPORES

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Ericka M.; Ruberti, Jeffrey W.

    2008-01-01

    Polymer transport through nanopores is a potentially powerful tool for separation and organization of molecules in biotechnology applications. Our goal is to produce aligned collagen fibrils by mimicking cell-mediated collagen assembly: driving collagen monomers in solution through the aligned nanopores in track-etched membranes followed by fibrillogenesis at the pore exit. We examined type I atelo-collagen monomer transport in neutral, cold solution through polycarbonate track-etched membranes comprising 80-nm-diameter, 6-μm-long pores at 2% areal fraction. Source concentrations of 1.0, 2.8 and 7.0 mg/ml and pressure differentials of 0, 10 and 20 inH2O were used. Membrane surfaces were hydrophilized via covalent poly(ethylene-glycol) binding to limit solute-membrane interaction. Collagen transport through the nanopores was a non-intuitive process due to the complex behavior of this associating molecule in semi-dilute solution. Nonetheless, a modified open pore model provided reasonable predictions of transport parameters. Transport rates were concentration- and pressure-dependent, with diffusivities across the membrane in semi-dilute solution two-fold those in dilute solution, possibly via cooperative diffusion or polymer entrainment. The most significant enhancement of collagen transport was accomplished by membrane hydrophilization. The highest concentration transported (5.99±2.58 mg/ml) with the highest monomer flux (2.60±0.49 ×103 molecules s-1 pore-1) was observed using 2.8 mg collagen/ml, 10 inH2O and hydrophilic membranes. PMID:21394216

  19. Geometry of matrix product states: Metric, parallel transport, and curvature

    SciTech Connect

    Haegeman, Jutho Verstraete, Frank; Mariën, Michaël; Osborne, Tobias J.

    2014-02-15

    We study the geometric properties of the manifold of states described as (uniform) matrix product states. Due to the parameter redundancy in the matrix product state representation, matrix product states have the mathematical structure of a (principal) fiber bundle. The total space or bundle space corresponds to the parameter space, i.e., the space of tensors associated to every physical site. The base manifold is embedded in Hilbert space and can be given the structure of a Kähler manifold by inducing the Hilbert space metric. Our main interest is in the states living in the tangent space to the base manifold, which have recently been shown to be interesting in relation to time dependence and elementary excitations. By lifting these tangent vectors to the (tangent space) of the bundle space using a well-chosen prescription (a principal bundle connection), we can define and efficiently compute an inverse metric, and introduce differential geometric concepts such as parallel transport (related to the Levi-Civita connection) and the Riemann curvature tensor.

  20. Transport Studies in Parallel Two-Dimensional Electron Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Yasunao

    This thesis presents electron transport studies in GaAs-AlAs double quantum wells (DQW's) where a system of nearby parallel two-dimensional electron gases is formed. It starts from a systematic modeling of the system from a circuit level down to a microscopic quantum mechanical level based on a single electron model. A new concept of "virtual separation of node", in which different circuit nodes represent energies at the Fermi level and at the subband edge of the quantum well, enables the hierarchical modeling of the system, significantly reducing the computation time of the transient analysis. Then, two experiments, done in low temperature, demonstrate physics beyond the above framework. The first experiment shows a sudden charge transfer, when the wells are biased, associated with strong inter-layer Coulomb scattering. The other finds a strong temperature dependence of the resonant tunneling between the two wells in contrast to ordinary electron tunneling process in metal-insulator-metal junctions or semiconductors. It is argued that the electron-electron correlation originating from the small inter-layer electron spacing comparable to the intra-layer electron spacing is responsible for the former and the interaction with the external phonon bath usually neglected at low temperature for the latter. Finally, a couple of possibilities to make device building blocks out of DQW systems are discussed. In particular, a new type of junction, dubbed SD-junction, which consists of an abrupt interface between double- to single-QW interface, is proposed.

  1. A parallel implementation of particle tracking with space charge effects on an Intel iPSC/860. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.C.; Bourianoff, G.; Cole, B.; Machida, S.

    1993-04-01

    Particle-tracking simulation is one of the scientific applications that is well-suited to parallel computations. At the Superconducting Super Collider, it has been theoretically and empirically demonstrated that particle tracking on a designed lattice can achieve very high parallel efficiency on a MIMD Intel iPSC/860 macene. The key to such success is the realization that the particles can be tracked independently without considering their interaction. The perfectly parallel nature of particle tracking is broken if the interaction effects between particles are included. The space charge introduces an electromagnetic force that will affect the motion of tracked particles in 3-D space. For accurate modeling of the beam dynamics with space charge effects, one needs to solve three-dimensional Maxwell field equations, usually by a particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm. This will require each particle to communicate with its neighbor grids to compute the momentum changes at each time step. It is expected that the 3-D PIC method will degrade parallel computer. In this paper, we describe an efficient scheme for implementing particle tracking with space charge effects on an INTEL iPSC/860 machine. Experimental results show that a parallel efficiency of 75% can be obtained.

  2. A parallel implementation of particle tracking with space charge effects on an Intel iPSC/860

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.C.; Bourianoff, G.; Cole, B.; Machida, S.

    1993-04-01

    Particle-tracking simulation is one of the scientific applications that is well-suited to parallel computations. At the Superconducting Super Collider, it has been theoretically and empirically demonstrated that particle tracking on a designed lattice can achieve very high parallel efficiency on a MIMD Intel iPSC/860 macene. The key to such success is the realization that the particles can be tracked independently without considering their interaction. The perfectly parallel nature of particle tracking is broken if the interaction effects between particles are included. The space charge introduces an electromagnetic force that will affect the motion of tracked particles in 3-D space. For accurate modeling of the beam dynamics with space charge effects, one needs to solve three-dimensional Maxwell field equations, usually by a particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm. This will require each particle to communicate with its neighbor grids to compute the momentum changes at each time step. It is expected that the 3-D PIC method will degrade parallel computer. In this paper, we describe an efficient scheme for implementing particle tracking with space charge effects on an INTEL iPSC/860 machine. Experimental results show that a parallel efficiency of 75% can be obtained.

  3. Particle Tracking Model and Abstraction of Transport Processes

    SciTech Connect

    B. Robinson

    2004-10-21

    The purpose of this report is to document the abstraction model being used in total system performance assessment (TSPA) model calculations for radionuclide transport in the unsaturated zone (UZ). The UZ transport abstraction model uses the particle-tracking method that is incorporated into the finite element heat and mass model (FEHM) computer code (Zyvoloski et al. 1997 [DIRS 100615]) to simulate radionuclide transport in the UZ. This report outlines the assumptions, design, and testing of a model for calculating radionuclide transport in the UZ at Yucca Mountain. In addition, methods for determining and inputting transport parameters are outlined for use in the TSPA for license application (LA) analyses. Process-level transport model calculations are documented in another report for the UZ (BSC 2004 [DIRS 164500]). Three-dimensional, dual-permeability flow fields generated to characterize UZ flow (documented by BSC 2004 [DIRS 169861]; DTN: LB03023DSSCP9I.001 [DIRS 163044]) are converted to make them compatible with the FEHM code for use in this abstraction model. This report establishes the numerical method and demonstrates the use of the model that is intended to represent UZ transport in the TSPA-LA. Capability of the UZ barrier for retarding the transport is demonstrated in this report, and by the underlying process model (BSC 2004 [DIRS 164500]). The technical scope, content, and management of this report are described in the planning document ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Transport Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171282]). Deviations from the technical work plan (TWP) are noted within the text of this report, as appropriate. The latest version of this document is being prepared principally to correct parameter values found to be in error due to transcription errors, changes in source data that were not captured in the report, calculation errors, and errors in interpretation of source data.

  4. The application of the parallel track model in community health promotion: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Vatcharavongvan, Pasitpon; Hepworth, Julie; Marley, John

    2013-07-01

    The parallel track model is one of the several models that are used in health promotion programmes that focus on community empowerment. It is unique in that it explicitly incorporates an empowerment approach with a top-down health programme. Since its development in 1999-2000 the model has been used in various health programmes in both developed and developing countries. The aim of this review is to examine the nature and extent of the application of this model and its contribution to promoting health. A review of the literature published between 2000 and 2011 was conducted. Nine results matched the inclusion criteria and revealed that the model has been mostly applied to disadvantaged communities to address health determinants, such as poverty and health literacy. This review found that the model had a positive impact on specific health outcomes such as health literacy and community capacity. We concluded that the parallel track model has the most potential for building capacity for community health promotion and appears to be the least useful for interventions focusing on health behaviour change within a limited time frame. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Particle tracking velocimetry to study two-size bedload transport on steep slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafaye de Micheaux, Hugo; Dudill, Ashley; Ducottet, Christophe; Frey, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Bedload, the part of sediment transport remaining in contact with the bed has been mainly investigated from a fluid perspective. Bedload should also be considered from a granular point of view, and take into account the grain-grain interactions. This paper focuses on particle tracking velocimetry algorithms to better understand bedload transport at the particle scale. Two-size mixtures of spherical glass beads entrained by a shallow turbulent and supercritical water flow were analysed in a quasi-two-dimensional 10 % steep channel with a mobile bed. The coarse particle diameters were 6 or 5 mm and the finer diameters ranged from about 0.7 to 4 mm. Water flow and sediment rates were kept constant at the inlet. After obtaining bed load equilibrium for the coarser particles only, that is, neither bed degradation nor aggradation over sufficiently long time intervals, and a bed slope parallel to the flume slope, finer sediment was introduced. The evolution towards a new equilibrium state was recorded through video acquisition from the side by a high-speed camera. Particle tracking algorithms made it possible to determine the position, velocity and trajectory of a very large number of both coarse and sometimes fine particles over the depth of the bedload layer. This paper will present in detail the algorithms used for detecting and tracking the glass beads, before analysing results on particle velocity distributions and depth profiles as well as results on concentrations and sediment rates.

  6. Transport-Constrained Extensions of Collision and Track Length Estimators for Solutions of Radiative Transport Problems

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Rong; Spanier, Jerome

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we develop novel extensions of collision and track lengh estimators for the complete space-angle solutions of radiative transport problems. We derive the relevant equations, prove that our new estimators are unbiased, and compare their performance with that of more conventional ) estimators. Such comparisons based on numerical solutions of simple one dimensional slab problems indicate the the potential superiority of the new estimators for a wide variety of more general transport problems. PMID:24058206

  7. Transport-constrained extensions of collision and track length estimators for solutions of radiative transport problems

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Rong; Spanier, Jerome

    2013-06-01

    In this paper we develop novel extensions of collision and track length estimators for the complete space-angle solutions of radiative transport problems. We derive the relevant equations, prove that our new estimators are unbiased, and compare their performance with that of more conventional estimators. Such comparisons based on numerical solutions of simple one dimensional slab problems indicate the the potential superiority of the new estimators for a wide variety of more general transport problems.

  8. The optimization of improved mean shift object tracking in embedded multicore DSP parallel system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Li; Zhou, Fugen; Meng, Cai; Hu, Congliang

    2014-11-01

    This paper proposes a more robust and efficient Mean Shift object tracking algorithm which is optimized for embedded multicore DSP Parallel system. Firstly, the RGB image is transformed into HSV image which is robust in many aspects such as lighting changes. Then, the color histogram model is used in the back projection process to generate the color probability distribution. Secondly, the size and position of search window are initialized in the first frame, and Mean Shift algorithm calculates the center position of the target and adjusts the search window automatically both in size and location, according to the result of the previous frame. Finally, since the multicore DSP system is commonly adopted in the embedded application such as seeker and an optical scout system, we implement the proposed algorithm in the TI multicore DSP system to meet the need of large amount computation. For multicore parallel computing, the explicit IPC based multicore framework is designed which outperforms OpenMP standard. Moreover, the parallelisms of 8 functional units and cross path data fetch capability of C66 core are utilized to accelerate the computation of iteration in Mean Shift algorithm. The experimental results show that the algorithm has good performance in complex scenes such as deformation, scale change and occlusion, simultaneously the proposed optimization method can significantly reduce the computation time.

  9. Trajectory tracking control of parallel robots in the presence of joint drive flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ider, S. Kemal; Korkmaz, Ozan

    2009-01-01

    Trajectory tracking control of parallel manipulators is aimed in the presence of flexibility at the joint drives. Joint structural damping is also considered in the dynamic model. The system is first converted into an open-tree structure by disconnecting a sufficient number of unactuated joints. The closed loops are then expressed by constraint equations. It is shown that, in a parallel robot with flexible joint drives, the acceleration level inverse dynamics equations are singular because the control torques do not have an instantaneous effect on the end-effector accelerations due to the elastic media. Eliminating the Lagrange multipliers and the intermediate variables, a fourth-order input-output relation is obtained between the actuator torques and the end-effector position variables. The proposed control law decouples and linearizes the system and achieves asymptotic stability by feedback of positions and velocities of the actuated joints and rotors. As a case study, a three degree of freedom, two legged planar parallel manipulator is simulated to illustrate the performance of the method. The end-effector desired trajectory is chosen such that the kinematic and drive singular positions are avoided.

  10. Exact results for parallel-chain kinetic models of biological transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2001-10-01

    In order to describe the observed behavior of single motor proteins moving along linear molecular tracks, a class of stochastic models is studied which recognizes the possibility of parallel biochemical pathways. Extending the theoretical analysis of Derrida [J. Stat. Phys. 31, 433 (1983)], exact results are derived for the velocity and dispersion of a discrete one-dimensional kinetic model which consists of two parallel chains of N states and M states, respectively, with arbitrary forward and backward rates. Generalizations of this approach for g>2 parallel chains models are briefly sketched. These results and other properties of parallel-chain kinetic models are illustrated by various examples.

  11. Instantaneous high-resolution focus tracking and a vibrometery system using parallel phase shift interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ney, Michael; Safrani, Avner; Abdulhlaim, Ibrahim

    2016-09-01

    High resolution fast focus tracking and vibrometery system based on parallel phase shift polarization interferometry using three detectors is presented. The basic design and algorithm are described, followed by an experimental demonstration showing sub nm resolution of different controlled motion profiles instantaneously monitored at a feedback rate of 100 kHz. The fact that the method does not rely on active optical components, potentially allows extremely high vibration rates to be measured; limited only by the detector bandwidth and sampling rate. In addition, the relatively simple design relies only on standard optical equipment, combined with the simple algorithm, makes the task of setting up a high performance vibrometry system cheap and readily available.

  12. Second order kinetic theory of parallel momentum transport in collisionless drift wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yang; Gao, Zhe; Chen, Jiale

    2016-08-15

    A second order kinetic model for turbulent ion parallel momentum transport is presented. A new nonresonant second order parallel momentum flux term is calculated. The resonant component of the ion parallel electrostatic force is the momentum source, while the nonresonant component of the ion parallel electrostatic force compensates for that of the nonresonant second order parallel momentum flux. The resonant component of the kinetic momentum flux can be divided into three parts, including the pinch term, the diffusive term, and the residual stress. By reassembling the pinch term and the residual stress, the residual stress can be considered as a pinch term of parallel wave-particle resonant velocity, and, therefore, may be called as “resonant velocity pinch” term. Considering the resonant component of the ion parallel electrostatic force is the transfer rate between resonant ions and waves (or, equivalently, nonresonant ions), a conservation equation of the parallel momentum of resonant ions and waves is obtained.

  13. Vasculature segmentation using parallel multi-hypothesis template tracking on heterogeneous platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dong Ping; Howes, Lee

    2013-02-01

    We present a parallel multi-hypothesis template tracking algorithm on heterogeneous platforms using a layered dispatch programming model. The contributions of this work are: an architecture-specific optimised solution for vasculature structure enhancement, an approach to segment the vascular lumen network from volumetric CTA images and a layered dispatch programming model to free the developers from hand-crafting mappings to particularly constrained execution domains on high throughput architecture. This abstraction is demonstrated through a vasculature segmentation application and can also be applied in other real-world applications. Current GPGPU programming models define a grouping concept which may lead to poorly scoped lo­ cal/ shared memory regions and an inconvenient approach to projecting complicated iterations spaces. To improve on this situation, we propose a simpler and more flexible programming model that leads to easier computation projections and hence a more convenient mapping of the same algorithm to a wide range of architectures. We first present an optimised image enhancement solution step- by-step, then solve a separable nonlinear least squares problem using a parallel Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm for template matching, and perform the energy efficiency analysis and performance comparison on a variety of platforms, including multi-core CPUs, discrete GPUs and APUs. We propose and discuss the efficiency of a layered-dispatch programming abstraction for mapping algorithms onto heterogeneous architectures.

  14. Trajectory Tracking of a Planer Parallel Manipulator by Using Computed Force Control Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayram, Atilla

    2017-03-01

    Despite small workspace, parallel manipulators have some advantages over their serial counterparts in terms of higher speed, acceleration, rigidity, accuracy, manufacturing cost and payload. Accordingly, this type of manipulators can be used in many applications such as in high-speed machine tools, tuning machine for feeding, sensitive cutting, assembly and packaging. This paper presents a special type of planar parallel manipulator with three degrees of freedom. It is constructed as a variable geometry truss generally known planar Stewart platform. The reachable and orientation workspaces are obtained for this manipulator. The inverse kinematic analysis is solved for the trajectory tracking according to the redundancy and joint limit avoidance. Then, the dynamics model of the manipulator is established by using Virtual Work method. The simulations are performed to follow the given planar trajectories by using the dynamic equations of the variable geometry truss manipulator and computed force control method. In computed force control method, the feedback gain matrices for PD control are tuned with fixed matrices by trail end error and variable ones by means of optimization with genetic algorithm.

  15. Trajectory Tracking of a Planer Parallel Manipulator by Using Computed Force Control Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayram, Atilla

    2017-03-01

    Despite small workspace, parallel manipulators have some advantages over their serial counterparts in terms of higher speed, acceleration, rigidity, accuracy, manufacturing cost and payload. Accordingly, this type of manipulators can be used in many applications such as in high-speed machine tools, tuning machine for feeding, sensitive cutting, assembly and packaging. This paper presents a special type of planar parallel manipulator with three degrees of freedom. It is constructed as a variable geometry truss generally known planar Stewart platform. The reachable and orientation workspaces are obtained for this manipulator. The inverse kinematic analysis is solved for the trajectory tracking according to the redundancy and joint limit avoidance. Then, the dynamics model of the manipulator is established by using Virtual Work method. The simulations are performed to follow the given planar trajectories by using the dynamic equations of the variable geometry truss manipulator and computed force control method. In computed force control method, the feedback gain matrices for PD control are tuned with fixed matrices by trail end error and variable ones by means of optimization with genetic algorithm.

  16. Radiation-induced reductions in transporter mRNA levels parallel reductions in intestinal sugar transport

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Marjolaine; Neti, Prasad V. S. V.; Kemp, Francis W.; Agrawal, Amit; Attanasio, Alicia; Douard, Véronique; Muduli, Anjali; Azzam, Edouard I.; Norkus, Edward; Brimacombe, Michael; Howell, Roger W.

    2010-01-01

    More than a century ago, ionizing radiation was observed to damage the radiosensitive small intestine. Although a large number of studies has since shown that radiation reduces rates of intestinal digestion and absorption of nutrients, no study has determined whether radiation affects mRNA expression and dietary regulation of nutrient transporters. Since radiation generates free radicals and disrupts DNA replication, we tested the hypotheses that at doses known to reduce sugar absorption, radiation decreases the mRNA abundance of sugar transporters SGLT1 and GLUT5, prevents substrate regulation of sugar transporter expression, and causes reductions in sugar absorption that can be prevented by consumption of the antioxidant vitamin A, previously shown by us to radioprotect the testes. Mice were acutely irradiated with 137Cs gamma rays at doses of 0, 7, 8.5, or 10 Gy over the whole body. Mice were fed with vitamin A-supplemented diet (100× the control diet) for 5 days prior to irradiation after which the diet was continued until death. Intestinal sugar transport was studied at days 2, 5, 8, and 14 postirradiation. By day 8, d-glucose uptake decreased by ∼10–20% and d-fructose uptake by 25–85%. With increasing radiation dose, the quantity of heterogeneous nuclear RNA increased for both transporters, whereas mRNA levels decreased, paralleling reductions in transport. Enterocytes of mice fed the vitamin A supplement had ≥ 6-fold retinol concentrations than those of mice fed control diets, confirming considerable intestinal vitamin A uptake. However, vitamin A supplementation had no effect on clinical or transport parameters and afforded no protection against radiation-induced changes in intestinal sugar transport. Radiation markedly reduced GLUT5 activity and mRNA abundance, but high-d-fructose diets enhanced GLUT5 activity and mRNA expression in both unirradiated and irradiated mice. In conclusion, the effect of radiation may be posttranscriptional, and

  17. Radiation-induced reductions in transporter mRNA levels parallel reductions in intestinal sugar transport.

    PubMed

    Roche, Marjolaine; Neti, Prasad V S V; Kemp, Francis W; Agrawal, Amit; Attanasio, Alicia; Douard, Véronique; Muduli, Anjali; Azzam, Edouard I; Norkus, Edward; Brimacombe, Michael; Howell, Roger W; Ferraris, Ronaldo P

    2010-01-01

    More than a century ago, ionizing radiation was observed to damage the radiosensitive small intestine. Although a large number of studies has since shown that radiation reduces rates of intestinal digestion and absorption of nutrients, no study has determined whether radiation affects mRNA expression and dietary regulation of nutrient transporters. Since radiation generates free radicals and disrupts DNA replication, we tested the hypotheses that at doses known to reduce sugar absorption, radiation decreases the mRNA abundance of sugar transporters SGLT1 and GLUT5, prevents substrate regulation of sugar transporter expression, and causes reductions in sugar absorption that can be prevented by consumption of the antioxidant vitamin A, previously shown by us to radioprotect the testes. Mice were acutely irradiated with (137)Cs gamma rays at doses of 0, 7, 8.5, or 10 Gy over the whole body. Mice were fed with vitamin A-supplemented diet (100x the control diet) for 5 days prior to irradiation after which the diet was continued until death. Intestinal sugar transport was studied at days 2, 5, 8, and 14 postirradiation. By day 8, d-glucose uptake decreased by approximately 10-20% and d-fructose uptake by 25-85%. With increasing radiation dose, the quantity of heterogeneous nuclear RNA increased for both transporters, whereas mRNA levels decreased, paralleling reductions in transport. Enterocytes of mice fed the vitamin A supplement had > or = 6-fold retinol concentrations than those of mice fed control diets, confirming considerable intestinal vitamin A uptake. However, vitamin A supplementation had no effect on clinical or transport parameters and afforded no protection against radiation-induced changes in intestinal sugar transport. Radiation markedly reduced GLUT5 activity and mRNA abundance, but high-d-fructose diets enhanced GLUT5 activity and mRNA expression in both unirradiated and irradiated mice. In conclusion, the effect of radiation may be posttranscriptional

  18. Effects of parallel electron dynamics on plasma blob transport

    SciTech Connect

    Angus, Justin R.; Krasheninnikov, Sergei I.; Umansky, Maxim V.

    2012-08-15

    The 3D effects on sheath connected plasma blobs that result from parallel electron dynamics are studied by allowing for the variation of blob density and potential along the magnetic field line and using collisional Ohm's law to model the parallel current density. The parallel current density from linear sheath theory, typically used in the 2D model, is implemented as parallel boundary conditions. This model includes electrostatic 3D effects, such as resistive drift waves and blob spinning, while retaining all of the fundamental 2D physics of sheath connected plasma blobs. If the growth time of unstable drift waves is comparable to the 2D advection time scale of the blob, then the blob's density gradient will be depleted resulting in a much more diffusive blob with little radial motion. Furthermore, blob profiles that are initially varying along the field line drive the potential to a Boltzmann relation that spins the blob and thereby acts as an addition sink of the 2D potential. Basic dimensionless parameters are presented to estimate the relative importance of these two 3D effects. The deviation of blob dynamics from that predicted by 2D theory in the appropriate limits of these parameters is demonstrated by a direct comparison of 2D and 3D seeded blob simulations.

  19. A portable, parallel, object-oriented Monte Carlo neutron transport code in C++

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.R.; Cummings, J.C.; Nolen, S.D. |

    1997-05-01

    We have developed a multi-group Monte Carlo neutron transport code using C++ and the Parallel Object-Oriented Methods and Applications (POOMA) class library. This transport code, called MC++, currently computes k and {alpha}-eigenvalues and is portable to and runs parallel on a wide variety of platforms, including MPPs, clustered SMPs, and individual workstations. It contains appropriate classes and abstractions for particle transport and, through the use of POOMA, for portable parallelism. Current capabilities of MC++ are discussed, along with physics and performance results on a variety of hardware, including all Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) hardware. Current parallel performance indicates the ability to compute {alpha}-eigenvalues in seconds to minutes rather than hours to days. Future plans and the implementation of a general transport physics framework are also discussed.

  20. Parallel algorithms for semi-Lagrangian transport in global atmospheric circulation models

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, J.B.; Worley, P.H.; Michalakes, J.; Foster, I.T.

    1995-02-01

    Global atmospheric circulation models (GCM) typically have three primary algorithmic components: columnar physics, spectral transform, and semi-Lagrangian transport. In developing parallel implementations, these three components are equally important and can be examined somewhat independently. A two-dimensional horizontal data decomposition of the three-dimensional computational grid leaves all physics computations on processor, and the only efficiency issues arise in load balancing. A recently completed study by the authors of different approaches to parallelizing the spectral transform showed several viable algorithms. Preliminary results of an analogous study of algorithmic alternatives for parallel semi-Lagrangian transport are described here.

  1. Improvements in fast-response flood modeling: desktop parallel computing and domain tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Judi, David R; Mcpherson, Timothy N; Burian, Steven J

    2009-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly important to have the ability to accurately forecast flooding, as flooding accounts for the most losses due to natural disasters in the world and the United States. Flood inundation modeling has been dominated by one-dimensional approaches. These models are computationally efficient and are considered by many engineers to produce reasonably accurate water surface profiles. However, because the profiles estimated in these models must be superimposed on digital elevation data to create a two-dimensional map, the result may be sensitive to the ability of the elevation data to capture relevant features (e.g. dikes/levees, roads, walls, etc...). Moreover, one-dimensional models do not explicitly represent the complex flow processes present in floodplains and urban environments and because two-dimensional models based on the shallow water equations have significantly greater ability to determine flow velocity and direction, the National Research Council (NRC) has recommended that two-dimensional models be used over one-dimensional models for flood inundation studies. This paper has shown that two-dimensional flood modeling computational time can be greatly reduced through the use of Java multithreading on multi-core computers which effectively provides a means for parallel computing on a desktop computer. In addition, this paper has shown that when desktop parallel computing is coupled with a domain tracking algorithm, significant computation time can be eliminated when computations are completed only on inundated cells. The drastic reduction in computational time shown here enhances the ability of two-dimensional flood inundation models to be used as a near-real time flood forecasting tool, engineering, design tool, or planning tool. Perhaps even of greater significance, the reduction in computation time makes the incorporation of risk and uncertainty/ensemble forecasting more feasible for flood inundation modeling (NRC 2000; Sayers et al

  2. Modeling reactive transport with particle tracking and kernel estimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahbaralam, Maryam; Fernandez-Garcia, Daniel; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater reactive transport models are useful to assess and quantify the fate and transport of contaminants in subsurface media and are an essential tool for the analysis of coupled physical, chemical, and biological processes in Earth Systems. Particle Tracking Method (PTM) provides a computationally efficient and adaptable approach to solve the solute transport partial differential equation. On a molecular level, chemical reactions are the result of collisions, combinations, and/or decay of different species. For a well-mixed system, the chem- ical reactions are controlled by the classical thermodynamic rate coefficient. Each of these actions occurs with some probability that is a function of solute concentrations. PTM is based on considering that each particle actually represents a group of molecules. To properly simulate this system, an infinite number of particles is required, which is computationally unfeasible. On the other hand, a finite number of particles lead to a poor-mixed system which is limited by diffusion. Recent works have used this effect to actually model incomplete mix- ing in naturally occurring porous media. In this work, we demonstrate that this effect in most cases should be attributed to a defficient estimation of the concentrations and not to the occurrence of true incomplete mixing processes in porous media. To illustrate this, we show that a Kernel Density Estimation (KDE) of the concentrations can approach the well-mixed solution with a limited number of particles. KDEs provide weighting functions of each particle mass that expands its region of influence, hence providing a wider region for chemical reactions with time. Simulation results show that KDEs are powerful tools to improve state-of-the-art simulations of chemical reactions and indicates that incomplete mixing in diluted systems should be modeled based on alternative conceptual models and not on a limited number of particles.

  3. Pangolin v1.0, a conservative 2-D transport model for large scale parallel calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praga, A.; Cariolle, D.; Giraud, L.

    2014-07-01

    To exploit the possibilities of parallel computers, we designed a large-scale bidimensional atmospheric transport model named Pangolin. As the basis for a future chemistry-transport model, a finite-volume approach was chosen both for mass preservation and to ease parallelization. To overcome the pole restriction on time-steps for a regular latitude-longitude grid, Pangolin uses a quasi-area-preserving reduced latitude-longitude grid. The features of the regular grid are exploited to improve parallel performances and a custom domain decomposition algorithm is presented. To assess the validity of the transport scheme, its results are compared with state-of-the-art models on analytical test cases. Finally, parallel performances are shown in terms of strong scaling and confirm the efficient scalability up to a few hundred of cores.

  4. Experiences with different parallel programming paradigms for Monte Carlo particle transport leads to a portable toolkit for parallel Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, W.R.; Majumdar, A. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Rathkopf, J.A. ); Litvin, M. )

    1993-04-01

    Monte Carlo particle transport is easy to implement on massively parallel computers relative to other methods of transport simulation. This paper describes experiences of implementing a realistic demonstration Monte Carlo code on a variety of parallel architectures. Our pool of tasks'' technique, which allows reproducibility from run to run regardless of the number of processors, is discussed. We present detailed timing studies of simulations performed on the 128 processor BBN-ACI TC2000 and preliminary timing results for the 32 processor Kendall Square Research KSR-1. Given sufficient workload to distribute across many computational nodes, the BBN achieves nearly linear speedup for a large number of nodes. The KSR, with which we have had less experience, performs poorly with more than ten processors. A simple model incorporating known causes of overhead accurately predicts observed behavior. A general-purpose communication and control package to facilitate the implementation of existing Monte Carlo packages is described together with timings on the BBN. This package adds insignificantly to the computational costs of parallel simulations.

  5. Experiences with different parallel programming paradigms for Monte Carlo particle transport leads to a portable toolkit for parallel Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, W.R.; Majumdar, A.; Rathkopf, J.A.; Litvin, M.

    1993-04-01

    Monte Carlo particle transport is easy to implement on massively parallel computers relative to other methods of transport simulation. This paper describes experiences of implementing a realistic demonstration Monte Carlo code on a variety of parallel architectures. Our ``pool of tasks`` technique, which allows reproducibility from run to run regardless of the number of processors, is discussed. We present detailed timing studies of simulations performed on the 128 processor BBN-ACI TC2000 and preliminary timing results for the 32 processor Kendall Square Research KSR-1. Given sufficient workload to distribute across many computational nodes, the BBN achieves nearly linear speedup for a large number of nodes. The KSR, with which we have had less experience, performs poorly with more than ten processors. A simple model incorporating known causes of overhead accurately predicts observed behavior. A general-purpose communication and control package to facilitate the implementation of existing Monte Carlo packages is described together with timings on the BBN. This package adds insignificantly to the computational costs of parallel simulations.

  6. The effect of plasma fluctuations on parallel transport parameters in the SOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havlíčková, E.; Fundamenski, W.; Naulin, V.; Nielsen, A. H.; Wiesen, S.; Horacek, J.; Seidl, J.

    2011-08-01

    The effect of plasma fluctuations due to turbulence at the outboard midplane on parallel transport properties is investigated. Time-dependent fluctuating signals at different radial locations are used to study the effect of signal statistics. Further, a computational analysis of parallel transport in the scrape-off layer (SOL) taking into account these fluctuations is presented. Plasma transport in the SOL along the magnetic field between two targets is calculated by a one-dimensional fluid code in order to estimate the response to transient conditions along the SOL and the attention is given to a comparison of steady-state and time-dependent modelling.

  7. Self-similar flow channel designs for parallel multiscale transport of multiple fluid species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kenneth; Savas, Omer

    2011-11-01

    The need for multiscale fluid transport arises in a number of engineering applications involving fluid delivery or collection over a range of different lengthscales. A ``tree-shaped'' system of flow channels has been an efficient transport solution commonly practiced by biomimetics. There has been much work in optimizing these dendritic flow systems, primarily for cooling applications. However, most designs can be costly to manufacture and limited in scalability. Moreover, most systems are restricted to the transport of a single fluid species. This work explores the feasibility of self-similar flow channel designs to provide parallel multiscale transport of multiple fluid species. The self-similar characteristic of these designs simplifies manufacturing and allows for flexible scalability. Prototypes for the parallel transport of one and two independent fluid species are supported with analytical theory and experimental work. Designs for three and four species are presented as well. Supported by Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP)

  8. Experimental investigation of dynamical coupling between turbulent transport and parallel flows in the JET plasma-boundary region.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, C; Gonçalves, B; Silva, C; Pedrosa, M A; Erents, K; Hron, M; Matthews, G F

    2003-08-08

    The dynamical coupling between turbulent transport and parallel flows has been investigated in the plasma boundary region of the Joint European Torus tokamak. Experimental results show that there is a dynamical relationship between transport and parallel flows. As the size of transport events increases, parallel flows also increase. These results show that turbulent transport can drive parallel flows in the plasma boundary of fusion plasmas. This new type of measurement is an important element to unravel the overall picture connecting radial transport and flows in fusion plasmas.

  9. Supersonic Transport Analysis on the IBM Parallel System SP2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, Antony; Cliff, Susan; Thomas, Scott; Baker, Timothy; Cheng, Wu-Sun

    1995-01-01

    Several studies of supersonic transport (SST) configurations have been undertaken by members of the High Speed Aerodynamics branch at NASA Ames. These computational investigations involved the analysis of shapes to study the sonic boom signatures, aerodynamic performance characteristics, as well as studies of nacelle/airframe integration. A variety of different computer codes were employed including both structured and unstructured codes. The AIRPLANE code has been used extensively in these investigations. This computer code solves the Euler equations for inviscid flow by exploiting an explicit finite volume method on a mesh of tetrahedral cells. AIRPLANE is capable of handling complete aircraft configurations including nacelles and diverters. An example of a generic SST configuration is shown and a comparison of computed and experimental force coefficients is presented. Most of the computations in support of the SST investigations have been run on the YMP and C-90 computers currently installed at NASA Ames. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. Parallel processing implementation for the coupled transport of photons and electrons using OpenMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerner, Edgardo

    2016-05-01

    In this work the use of OpenMP to implement the parallel processing of the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of the coupled transport for photons and electrons is presented. This implementation was carried out using a modified EGSnrc platform which enables the use of the Microsoft Visual Studio 2013 (VS2013) environment, together with the developing tools available in the Intel Parallel Studio XE 2015 (XE2015). The performance study of this new implementation was carried out in a desktop PC with a multi-core CPU, taking as a reference the performance of the original platform. The results were satisfactory, both in terms of scalability as parallelization efficiency.

  11. Electron transport properties of irradiated polyimide thin films in single track regime

    SciTech Connect

    Murugaraj, Pandiyan; Mainwaring, David; Siegele, Rainer

    2009-03-23

    We have prepared a suite of polyimide thin films containing spatially separated one-dimensional conductive-nanowires by ion-beam irradiation exhibiting temperature dependent electrical resistance consistent with thermally activated electron hopping with activation energies about 1 eV arising from localized states spatially distributed along the ion tracks. Dielectric measurements showed the formation of high dielectric constant interphase regions surrounding each ion track generated during the irradiation process, responsible for space-charge accumulation which influences electron transport within the ion tracks. This behavior suggests a role for space-charge effects and dielectric properties in this interphase region in the control of electron transport within single track nanowires.

  12. Tracking the roots of cellulase hyperproduction by the fungus Trichoderma reesei using massively parallel DNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Le Crom, Stéphane; Schackwitz, Wendy; Pennacchio, Len; Magnuson, Jon K.; Culley, David E.; Collett, James R.; Martin, Joel; Druzhinina, Irina S.; Mathis, Hugues; Monot, Frédéric; Seiboth, Bernhard; Cherry, Barbara; Rey, Michael; Berka, Randy; Kubicek, Christian P.; Baker, Scott E.; Margeot, Antoine

    2009-01-01

    Trichoderma reesei (teleomorph Hypocrea jecorina) is the main industrial source of cellulases and hemicellulases harnessed for the hydrolysis of biomass to simple sugars, which can then be converted to biofuels such as ethanol and other chemicals. The highly productive strains in use today were generated by classical mutagenesis. To learn how cellulase production was improved by these techniques, we performed massively parallel sequencing to identify mutations in the genomes of two hyperproducing strains (NG14, and its direct improved descendant, RUT C30). We detected a surprisingly high number of mutagenic events: 223 single nucleotides variants, 15 small deletions or insertions, and 18 larger deletions, leading to the loss of more than 100 kb of genomic DNA. From these events, we report previously undocumented non-synonymous mutations in 43 genes that are mainly involved in nuclear transport, mRNA stability, transcription, secretion/vacuolar targeting, and metabolism. This homogeneity of functional categories suggests that multiple changes are necessary to improve cellulase production and not simply a few clear-cut mutagenic events. Phenotype microarrays show that some of these mutations result in strong changes in the carbon assimilation pattern of the two mutants with respect to the wild-type strain QM6a. Our analysis provides genome-wide insights into the changes induced by classical mutagenesis in a filamentous fungus and suggests areas for the generation of enhanced T. reesei strains for industrial applications such as biofuel production. PMID:19805272

  13. Tracking the roots of cellulase hyperproduction by the fungus Trichoderma reesei using massively parallel DNA sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Le Crom, Stphane; Schackwitz, Wendy; Pennacchiod, Len; Magnuson, Jon K.; Culley, David E.; Collett, James R.; Martin, Joel X.; Druzhinina, Irina S.; Mathis, Hugues; Monot, Frdric; Seiboth, Bernhard; Cherry, Barbara; Rey, Michael; Berka, Randy; Kubicek, Christian P.; Baker, Scott E.; Margeot, Antoine

    2009-09-22

    Trichoderma reesei (teleomorph Hypocrea jecorina) is the main industrial source of cellulases and hemicellulases harnessed for the hydrolysis of biomass to simple sugars, which can then be converted to biofuels, such as ethanol, and other chemicals. The highly productive strains in use today were generated by classical mutagenesis. To learn how cellulase production was improved by these techniques, we performed massively parallel sequencing to identify mutations in the genomes of two hyperproducing strains (NG14, and its direct improved descendant, RUT C30). We detected a surprisingly high number of mutagenic events: 223 single nucleotides variants, 15 small deletions or insertions and 18 larger deletions leading to the loss of more than 100 kb of genomic DNA. From these events we report previously undocumented non-synonymous mutations in 43 genes that are mainly involved in nuclear transport, mRNA stability, transcription, secretion/vacuolar targeting, and metabolism. This homogeneity of functional categories suggests that multiple changes are necessary to improve cellulase production and not simply a few clear-cut mutagenic events. Phenotype microarrays show that some of these mutations result in strong changes in the carbon assimilation pattern of the two mutants with respect to the wild type strain QM6a. Our analysis provides the first genome-wide insights into the changes induced by classical mutagenesis in a filamentous fungus, and suggests new areas for the generation of enhanced T. reesei strains for industrial applications such as biofuel production.

  14. Tracking the roots of cellulase hyperproduction by the fungus Trichoderma reesei using massively parallel DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Le Crom, Stéphane; Schackwitz, Wendy; Pennacchio, Len; Magnuson, Jon K; Culley, David E; Collett, James R; Martin, Joel; Druzhinina, Irina S; Mathis, Hugues; Monot, Frédéric; Seiboth, Bernhard; Cherry, Barbara; Rey, Michael; Berka, Randy; Kubicek, Christian P; Baker, Scott E; Margeot, Antoine

    2009-09-22

    Trichoderma reesei (teleomorph Hypocrea jecorina) is the main industrial source of cellulases and hemicellulases harnessed for the hydrolysis of biomass to simple sugars, which can then be converted to biofuels such as ethanol and other chemicals. The highly productive strains in use today were generated by classical mutagenesis. To learn how cellulase production was improved by these techniques, we performed massively parallel sequencing to identify mutations in the genomes of two hyperproducing strains (NG14, and its direct improved descendant, RUT C30). We detected a surprisingly high number of mutagenic events: 223 single nucleotides variants, 15 small deletions or insertions, and 18 larger deletions, leading to the loss of more than 100 kb of genomic DNA. From these events, we report previously undocumented non-synonymous mutations in 43 genes that are mainly involved in nuclear transport, mRNA stability, transcription, secretion/vacuolar targeting, and metabolism. This homogeneity of functional categories suggests that multiple changes are necessary to improve cellulase production and not simply a few clear-cut mutagenic events. Phenotype microarrays show that some of these mutations result in strong changes in the carbon assimilation pattern of the two mutants with respect to the wild-type strain QM6a. Our analysis provides genome-wide insights into the changes induced by classical mutagenesis in a filamentous fungus and suggests areas for the generation of enhanced T. reesei strains for industrial applications such as biofuel production.

  15. A massively parallel track-finding system for the LEVEL 2 trigger in the CLAS detector at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, D.C. Jr.; Collins, P.; Lemon, S. ); Bonneau, P. )

    1994-02-01

    The track segment finding subsystem of the LEVEL 2 trigger in the CLAS detector has been designed and prototyped. Track segments will be found in the 35,076 wires of the drift chambers using a massively parallel array of 768 Xilinx XC-4005 FPGA's. These FPGA's are located on daughter cards attached to the front-end boards distributed around the detector. Each chip is responsible for finding tracks passing through a 4 x 6 slice of an axial superlayer, and reports two segment found bits, one for each pair of cells. The algorithm used finds segments even when one or two layers or cells along the track is missing (this number is programmable), while being highly resistant to false segments arising from noise hits. Adjacent chips share data to find tracks crossing cell and board boundaries. For maximum speed, fully combinatorial logic is used inside each chip, with the result that all segments in the detector are found within 150 ns. Segment collection boards gather track segments from each axial superlayer and pass them via a high speed link to the segment linking subsystem in an additional 400 ns for typical events. The Xilinx chips are ram-based and therefore reprogrammable, allowing for future upgrades and algorithm enhancements.

  16. Finite-particle tracking reveals submicroscopic-size changes of mitochondria during transport in mitral cell dendrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gennerich, Arne; Schild, Detlev

    2006-03-01

    The mechanisms of molecular motor regulation during bidirectional organelle transport are still uncertain. There is, for instance, the unsettled question of whether opposing motor proteins can be engaged in a tug-of-war. Clearly, any non-synchronous activation of the molecular motors of one cargo can principally lead to changes in the cargo's shape and size; the cargo's size and shape parameters would certainly be observables of such changes. We therefore set out to measure position, shape and size parameters of fluorescent mitochondria (during their transport) in dendrites of cultured neurons using a finite-particle tracking algorithm. Our data clearly show transport-related submicroscopic-size changes of mitochondria. The observed displacements of the mitochondrial front and rear ends are consistent with a model in which microtubule plus- and minus-end-directed motor proteins or motors of the same type but moving along anti-parallel microtubules are often out-of-phase and occasionally engaged in a tug-of-war. Mostly the leading and trailing ends of mitochondria undergo similar characteristic movements but with a substantial time delay between the displacements of both ends, a feature reminiscent of an inchworm-like motility mechanism. More generally, we demonstrate that observing the position, shape and size of actively transported finite objects such as mitochondria can yield information on organelle transport that is generally not accessible by tracking the organelles' centroid alone.

  17. Modeling of Weakly Collisional Parallel Electron Transport for Edge Plasma Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umansky, M. V.; Dimits, A. M.; Joseph, I.; Omotani, J. T.; Rognlien, T. D.

    2014-10-01

    The parallel electron heat transport in a weakly collisional regime can be represented in the framework of the Landau-fluid (LF) model. Practical implementation of LF-based transport models has become possible due to the recent invention of an efficient non- spectral method for the non-local closure operators. Here the implementation of a LF based model for the parallel plasma transport is described, and the model is tested for different collisionality regimes against a Fokker-Plank code. The new method appears to represent weakly collisional parallel electron transport more accurately than the conventional flux-limiter based models; on the other hand it is computationally efficient enough to be used in tokamak edge plasma simulations. Implementation of an LF-based model for the parallel plasma transport in the UEDGE code is described, and applications to realistic divertor simulations are discussed. Work performed for U.S. DoE by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  18. TASEP on parallel tracks: Effects of mobile bottlenecks in fixed segments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Sumit; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2015-07-01

    We study the flux of totally asymmetric simple exclusion processes (TASEPs) on a twin co-axial square tracks. In this biologically motivated model the particles in each track act as mobile bottlenecks against the movement of the particles in the other although the particles are not allowed to move out of their respective tracks. So far as the outer track is concerned, the particles on the inner track act as bottlenecks only over a set of fixed segments of the outer track, in contrast to site-associated and particle-associated quenched randomness in the earlier models of disordered TASEP. In a special limiting situation the movement of particles in the outer track mimic a TASEP with a "point-like" immobile (i.e., quenched) defect where phase segregation of the particles is known to take place. The length of the inner track as well as the strength and number density of the mobile bottlenecks moving on it are the control parameters that determine the nature of spatio-temporal organization of particles on the outer track. Variation of these control parameters allows variation of the width of the phase-coexistence region on the flux-density plane of the outer track. Some of these phenomena are likely to survive even in the future extensions intended for studying traffic-like collective phenomena of polymerase motors on double-stranded DNA.

  19. Coeval emplacement and orogen-parallel transport of gold in oblique convergent orogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upton, Phaedra; Craw, Dave

    2016-12-01

    Varying amounts of gold mineralisation is occurring in all young and active collisional mountain belts. Concurrently, these syn-orogenic hydrothermal deposits are being eroded and transported to form placer deposits. Local extension occurs in convergent orogens, especially oblique orogens, and facilitates emplacement of syn-orogenic gold-bearing deposits with or without associated magmatism. Numerical modelling has shown that extension results from directional variations in movement rates along the rock transport trajectory during convergence, and is most pronounced for highly oblique convergence with strong crustal rheology. On-going uplift during orogenesis exposes gold deposits to erosion, transport, and localised placer concentration. Drainage patterns in variably oblique convergent orogenic belts typically have an orogen-parallel or sub-parallel component; the details of which varies with convergence obliquity and the vagaries of underlying geological controls. This leads to lateral transport of eroded syn-orogenic gold on a range of scales, up to > 100 km. The presence of inherited crustal blocks with contrasting rheology in oblique orogenic collision zones can cause perturbations in drainage patterns, but numerical modelling suggests that orogen-parallel drainage is still a persistent and robust feature. The presence of an inherited block of weak crust enhances the orogen-parallel drainage by imposition of localised subsidence zones elongated along a plate boundary. Evolution and reorientation of orogen-parallel drainage can sever links between gold placer deposits and their syn-orogenic sources. Many of these modelled features of syn-orogenic gold emplacement and varying amounts of orogen-parallel detrital gold transport can be recognised in the Miocene to Recent New Zealand oblique convergent orogen. These processes contribute little gold to major placer goldfields, which require more long-term recycling and placer gold concentration. Most eroded syn

  20. Evaluation of Baltic Sea transport properties using particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dargahi, Bijan; Cvetkovic, Vladimir

    2014-05-01

    Particle tracking model (PTM) is an effective tool for quantifying transport properties of large water bodies such as the Baltic Sea. We have applied PTM to our fully calibrated and validated Baltic Sea 3D hydrodynamic model for a 10-years period (2000-9). One hundred particles were released at a constant rate during an initial 10-days period from all the Baltic Sea sub-basins, the major rivers, and the open boundary in the Arkona Basin. In each basin, the particles were released at two different depths corresponding to the deep water and middle water layers. The objectives of the PTM simulations were to analyse the intra-exchange processes between the Baltic Sea basins and to estimate the arrival times and the paths of particles released from the rivers. The novel contribution of this study is determining the paths and arrival times of deeper water masses rather than the surface masses. Advective and diffusive transport processes in the Bornholm and Arkona basins are both driven by the interacting flows of the northern basins of the Baltic Sea and the North Sea. Particles released from Arkona basin flows northwards along the Stople Channel. The Gotland basins are the major contributors to the exchange process in the Baltic Sea. We find high values of the advection ratio, indicative of a forced advective transport process. The Bay of Gdansk is probably the most vulnerable region in the Baltic Sea. This is despite the fact that the main exchanging basins are the Bornholm Sea and the Easter Gotland Basin. The main reason is the intensive supply of the particles from the northern basins that normally take about 3000 days to reach the Bay of Gdansk. The process maintains a high level of particle concentration (90%) along its coastlines even after the 10-years period. Comparing the particle paths in the Western and Eastern Gotland basins two interesting features were found. Particles travelled in all four directions in the former basin and the middle layer particles

  1. penORNL: a parallel Monte Carlo photon and electron transport package using PENELOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Bekar, Kursat B.; Miller, Thomas Martin; Patton, Bruce W.; Weber, Charles F.

    2015-01-01

    The parallel Monte Carlo photon and electron transport code package penORNL was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to enable advanced scanning electron microscope (SEM) simulations on high-performance computing systems. This paper discusses the implementations, capabilities and parallel performance of the new code package. penORNL uses PENELOPE for its physics calculations and provides all available PENELOPE features to the users, as well as some new features including source definitions specifically developed for SEM simulations, a pulse-height tally capability for detailed simulations of gamma and x-ray detectors, and a modified interaction forcing mechanism to enable accurate energy deposition calculations. The parallel performance of penORNL was extensively tested with several model problems, and very good linear parallel scaling was observed with up to 512 processors. penORNL, along with its new features, will be available for SEM simulations upon completion of the new pulse-height tally implementation.

  2. Fusion and sorting of two parallel trains of droplets using a railroad-like channel network and guiding tracks.

    PubMed

    Xu, Linfeng; Lee, Hun; Panchapakesan, Rajagopal; Oh, Kwang W

    2012-10-21

    We propose a robust droplet fusion and sorting method for two parallel trains of droplets that is relatively insensitive to frequency and phase mismatch. Conventional methods of droplet fusion require an extremely precise control of aqueous/oil flows for perfect frequency matching between two trains of droplets. In this work, by combining our previous two methods (i.e., droplet synchronization using railroad-like channels and manipulation of shape-dependent droplets using guiding tracks), we realized an error-free droplet fusion/sorting device for the two parallel trains of droplets. If droplet pairs are synchronized through a railroad-like channel, they are electrically fused and the fused droplets transit to a middle guiding track to flow in a middle channel; otherwise non-synchronized non-fused droplets will be discarded into the side waste channels by flowing through their own guiding tracks. The simple droplet synchronization, fusion, and sorting technology will have widespread application in droplet-based chemical or biological experiments, where two trains of the chemically or biologically treated or pre-formed droplets yield a train of 100% one-to-one fused droplets at the desired outlet channel by sorting all the non-synchronized non-fused droplets into waste outlets.

  3. Spatial domain-based parallelism in large scale, participating-media, radiative transport applications

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, S.P.; Christon, M.A.

    1996-11-01

    Parallelism for gray participating media radiation heat transfer may be placed in two primary categories: spatial and angular domain-based parallelism. Angular, e.g., ray based, decomposition has received the greatest attention in the open literature for moderate sized applications where the entire geometry may be placed on processor. Angular based decomposition is limited, however, for large scale applications (O(10{sup 6}) to O(10{sup 8}) computational cells) given the memory required to store computational grids of this size on each processor. Therefore, the objective of this work is to examine the application of spatial domain-based parallelism to large scale, three-dimensional, participating-media radiation transport calculations using a massively parallel supercomputer architecture. Both scaled and fixed problem size efficiencies are presented for an application of the Discrete Ordinate method to a three dimensional, non-scattering radiative transport application with nonuniform absorptivity. The data presented shows that the spatial domain-based decomposition paradigm results in some degradation in the parallel efficiency but provides useful speedup for large computational grids.

  4. Massively parallel simulation of flow and transport in variably saturated porous and fractured media

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Zhang, Keni; Pruess, Karsten

    2002-01-15

    This paper describes a massively parallel simulation method and its application for modeling multiphase flow and multicomponent transport in porous and fractured reservoirs. The parallel-computing method has been implemented into the TOUGH2 code and its numerical performance is tested on a Cray T3E-900 and IBM SP. The efficiency and robustness of the parallel-computing algorithm are demonstrated by completing two simulations with more than one million gridblocks, using site-specific data obtained from a site-characterization study. The first application involves the development of a three-dimensional numerical model for flow in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The second application is the study of tracer/radionuclide transport through fracture-matrix rocks for the same site. The parallel-computing technique enhances modeling capabilities by achieving several-orders-of-magnitude speedup for large-scale and high resolution modeling studies. The resulting modeling results provide many new insights into flow and transport processes that could not be obtained from simulations using the single-CPU simulator.

  5. A Novel Algorithm for Solving the Multidimensional Neutron Transport Equation on Massively Parallel Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Azmy, Yousry

    2014-06-10

    We employ the Integral Transport Matrix Method (ITMM) as the kernel of new parallel solution methods for the discrete ordinates approximation of the within-group neutron transport equation. The ITMM abandons the repetitive mesh sweeps of the traditional source iterations (SI) scheme in favor of constructing stored operators that account for the direct coupling factors among all the cells' fluxes and between the cells' and boundary surfaces' fluxes. The main goals of this work are to develop the algorithms that construct these operators and employ them in the solution process, determine the most suitable way to parallelize the entire procedure, and evaluate the behavior and parallel performance of the developed methods with increasing number of processes, P. The fastest observed parallel solution method, Parallel Gauss-Seidel (PGS), was used in a weak scaling comparison with the PARTISN transport code, which uses the source iteration (SI) scheme parallelized with the Koch-baker-Alcouffe (KBA) method. Compared to the state-of-the-art SI-KBA with diffusion synthetic acceleration (DSA), this new method- even without acceleration/preconditioning-is completitive for optically thick problems as P is increased to the tens of thousands range. For the most optically thick cells tested, PGS reduced execution time by an approximate factor of three for problems with more than 130 million computational cells on P = 32,768. Moreover, the SI-DSA execution times's trend rises generally more steeply with increasing P than the PGS trend. Furthermore, the PGS method outperforms SI for the periodic heterogeneous layers (PHL) configuration problems. The PGS method outperforms SI and SI-DSA on as few as P = 16 for PHL problems and reduces execution time by a factor of ten or more for all problems considered with more than 2 million computational cells on P = 4.096.

  6. Massively Parallel, Three-Dimensional Transport Solutions for the k-Eigenvalue Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, Gregory G; Evans, Thomas M; Jarrell, Joshua J; Pandya, Tara M; Slaybaugh, R

    2014-01-01

    We have implemented a new multilevel parallel decomposition in the Denovo dis- crete ordinates radiation transport code. In concert with Krylov subspace iterative solvers, the multilevel decomposition allows concurrency over energy in addition to space-angle, enabling scalability beyond the limits imposed by the traditional KBA space-angle partitioning. Furthermore, a new Arnoldi-based k-eigenvalue solver has been implemented. The added phase-space concurrency combined with the high- performance Krylov and Arnoldi solvers has enabled weak scaling to O(100K) cores on the Jaguar XK6 supercomputer. The multilevel decomposition provides sucient parallelism to scale to exascale computing and beyond.

  7. Lateral charge transport from heavy-ion tracks in integrated circuit chips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoutendyk, J. A.; Schwartz, H. R.; Nevill, L. R.

    1988-01-01

    A 256K DRAM has been used to study the lateral transport of charge (electron-hole pairs) induced by direct ionization from heavy-ion tracks in an IC. The qualitative charge transport has been simulated using a two-dimensional numerical code in cylindrical coordinates. The experimental bit-map data clearly show the manifestation of lateral charge transport in the creation of adjacent multiple-bit errors from a single heavy-ion track. The heavy-ion data further demonstrate the occurrence of multiple-bit errors from single ion tracks with sufficient stopping power. The qualitative numerical simulation results suggest that electric-field-funnel-aided (drift) collection accounts for single error generated by an ion passing through a charge-collecting junction, while multiple errors from a single ion track are due to lateral diffusion of ion-generated charge.

  8. Lateral charge transport from heavy-ion tracks in integrated circuit chips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoutendyk, J. A.; Schwartz, H. R.; Nevill, L. R.

    1988-01-01

    A 256K DRAM has been used to study the lateral transport of charge (electron-hole pairs) induced by direct ionization from heavy-ion tracks in an IC. The qualitative charge transport has been simulated using a two-dimensional numerical code in cylindrical coordinates. The experimental bit-map data clearly show the manifestation of lateral charge transport in the creation of adjacent multiple-bit errors from a single heavy-ion track. The heavy-ion data further demonstrate the occurrence of multiple-bit errors from single ion tracks with sufficient stopping power. The qualitative numerical simulation results suggest that electric-field-funnel-aided (drift) collection accounts for single error generated by an ion passing through a charge-collecting junction, while multiple errors from a single ion track are due to lateral diffusion of ion-generated charge.

  9. A Novel Implementation of Massively Parallel Three Dimensional Monte Carlo Radiation Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, P. B.; Peterson, J. D. L.

    2005-12-01

    The goal of our summer project was to implement the difference formulation for radiation transport into Cosmos++, a multidimensional, massively parallel, magneto hydrodynamics code for astrophysical applications (Peter Anninos - AX). The difference formulation is a new method for Symbolic Implicit Monte Carlo thermal transport (Brooks and Szöke - PAT). Formerly, simultaneous implementation of fully implicit Monte Carlo radiation transport in multiple dimensions on multiple processors had not been convincingly demonstrated. We found that a combination of the difference formulation and the inherent structure of Cosmos++ makes such an implementation both accurate and straightforward. We developed a "nearly nearest neighbor physics" technique to allow each processor to work independently, even with a fully implicit code. This technique coupled with the increased accuracy of an implicit Monte Carlo solution and the efficiency of parallel computing systems allows us to demonstrate the possibility of massively parallel thermal transport. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48

  10. Effect of collisional temperature isotropisation on ELM parallel transport in a tokamak scrape-off layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulette, David; Hirstoaga, Sever A.; Manfredi, Giovanni

    2016-08-01

    We develop a hybrid model to describe the parallel transport in a tokamak scrape-off layer following an edge-localized mode (ELM) event. The parallel dynamics is treated with a kinetic Vlasov-Poisson model, while the evolution of the perpendicular temperature {{T}\\bot} is governed by a fluid equation. The coupling is ensured by isotropising collisions. The model generalises an earlier approach where {{T}\\bot} was constant in space and time (Manfredi et al 2011 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 53 015012). Numerical results show that the main effect comes from electron-electron collisions, which limit the decrease of the parallel electron temperature and increase the potential drop in the Debye sheath in front of the surface. Ion-ion collisions have an almost negligible impact. The net effect is an increased peak power load on the target plates.

  11. Particle tracking approach for transport in three-dimensional discrete fracture networks: Particle tracking in 3-D DFNs

    SciTech Connect

    Makedonska, Nataliia; Painter, Scott L.; Bui, Quan M.; Gable, Carl W.; Karra, Satish

    2015-09-16

    The discrete fracture network (DFN) model is a method to mimic discrete pathways for fluid flow through a fractured low-permeable rock mass, and may be combined with particle tracking simulations to address solute transport. However, experience has shown that it is challenging to obtain accurate transport results in three-dimensional DFNs because of the high computational burden and difficulty in constructing a high-quality unstructured computational mesh on simulated fractures. We present a new particle tracking capability, which is adapted to control volume (Voronoi polygons) flow solutions on unstructured grids (Delaunay triangulations) on three-dimensional DFNs. The locally mass-conserving finite-volume approach eliminates mass balance-related problems during particle tracking. The scalar fluxes calculated for each control volume face by the flow solver are used to reconstruct a Darcy velocity at each control volume centroid. The groundwater velocities can then be continuously interpolated to any point in the domain of interest. The control volumes at fracture intersections are split into four pieces, and the velocity is reconstructed independently on each piece, which results in multiple groundwater velocities at the intersection, one for each fracture on each side of the intersection line. This technique enables detailed particle transport representation through a complex DFN structure. Verified for small DFNs, the new simulation capability enables numerical experiments on advective transport in large DFNs to be performed. As a result, we demonstrate this particle transport approach on a DFN model using parameters similar to those of crystalline rock at a proposed geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, Sweden.

  12. Particle tracking approach for transport in three-dimensional discrete fracture networks: Particle tracking in 3-D DFNs

    DOE PAGES

    Makedonska, Nataliia; Painter, Scott L.; Bui, Quan M.; ...

    2015-09-16

    The discrete fracture network (DFN) model is a method to mimic discrete pathways for fluid flow through a fractured low-permeable rock mass, and may be combined with particle tracking simulations to address solute transport. However, experience has shown that it is challenging to obtain accurate transport results in three-dimensional DFNs because of the high computational burden and difficulty in constructing a high-quality unstructured computational mesh on simulated fractures. We present a new particle tracking capability, which is adapted to control volume (Voronoi polygons) flow solutions on unstructured grids (Delaunay triangulations) on three-dimensional DFNs. The locally mass-conserving finite-volume approach eliminates massmore » balance-related problems during particle tracking. The scalar fluxes calculated for each control volume face by the flow solver are used to reconstruct a Darcy velocity at each control volume centroid. The groundwater velocities can then be continuously interpolated to any point in the domain of interest. The control volumes at fracture intersections are split into four pieces, and the velocity is reconstructed independently on each piece, which results in multiple groundwater velocities at the intersection, one for each fracture on each side of the intersection line. This technique enables detailed particle transport representation through a complex DFN structure. Verified for small DFNs, the new simulation capability enables numerical experiments on advective transport in large DFNs to be performed. As a result, we demonstrate this particle transport approach on a DFN model using parameters similar to those of crystalline rock at a proposed geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, Sweden.« less

  13. Implementation, capabilities, and benchmarking of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Pandya, Tara M.; Johnson, Seth R.; Evans, Thomas M.; Davidson, Gregory G.; Hamilton, Steven P.; Godfrey, Andrew T.

    2015-12-21

    This paper discusses the implementation, capabilities, and validation of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport package developed and maintained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It has been developed to scale well from laptop to small computing clusters to advanced supercomputers. Special features of Shift include hybrid capabilities for variance reduction such as CADIS and FW-CADIS, and advanced parallel decomposition and tally methods optimized for scalability on supercomputing architectures. Shift has been validated and verified against various reactor physics benchmarks and compares well to other state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiation transport codes such as MCNP5, CE KENO-VI, and OpenMC. Some specific benchmarks used for verification and validation include the CASL VERA criticality test suite and several Westinghouse AP1000® problems. These benchmark and scaling studies show promising results.

  14. Implementation, capabilities, and benchmarking of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport code

    DOE PAGES

    Pandya, Tara M.; Johnson, Seth R.; Evans, Thomas M.; ...

    2015-12-21

    This paper discusses the implementation, capabilities, and validation of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport package developed and maintained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It has been developed to scale well from laptop to small computing clusters to advanced supercomputers. Special features of Shift include hybrid capabilities for variance reduction such as CADIS and FW-CADIS, and advanced parallel decomposition and tally methods optimized for scalability on supercomputing architectures. Shift has been validated and verified against various reactor physics benchmarks and compares well to other state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiation transport codes such as MCNP5, CE KENO-VI, and OpenMC. Somemore » specific benchmarks used for verification and validation include the CASL VERA criticality test suite and several Westinghouse AP1000® problems. These benchmark and scaling studies show promising results.« less

  15. A parallelization scheme to simulate reactive transport in the subsurface environment with OGS#IPhreeqc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, W.; Beyer, C.; Fleckenstein, J. H.; Jang, E.; Kolditz, O.; Naumov, D.; Kalbacher, T.

    2015-03-01

    This technical paper presents an efficient and performance-oriented method to model reactive mass transport processes in environmental and geotechnical subsurface systems. The open source scientific software packages OpenGeoSys and IPhreeqc have been coupled, to combine their individual strengths and features to simulate thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical coupled processes in porous and fractured media with simultaneous consideration of aqueous geochemical reactions. Furthermore, a flexible parallelization scheme using MPI (Message Passing Interface) grouping techniques has been implemented, which allows an optimized allocation of computer resources for the node-wise calculation of chemical reactions on the one hand, and the underlying processes such as for groundwater flow or solute transport on the other hand. The coupling interface and parallelization scheme have been tested and verified in terms of precision and performance.

  16. Modeling of momentum transport of axially parallel turbulent flows in rod cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelen, Neele

    Problems and boundary conditions of the turbulent flow in heat exchangers, especially for nuclear fuel elements, are treated using mathematical models. Rod cascade flow and the physical fundamentals of turbulent flows are introduced. It is shown that the momentum transport phenomena can be separated into the radial and azimuthal directions. The geometrical characteristics of rod bundle geometries and a regression analysis are considered. The correlation coefficients for the wall parallel vortex viscosity are determined using a numerical optimization method. The order of magnitude of the secondary flow occurring perpendicularly to the main flow direction are determined to be 1 pct to 2 pct of the average axial velocity. The results obtained with the code VELASCO-BS are superior to those of previous codes. The azimuthal vortex viscosity is the decisive parameter, and secondary flow is not important for wall parallel momentum transport.

  17. Phase controlled swapping effect in electron transport through asymmetric parallel coupled quantum dot system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brogi, Bharat Bhushan; Chand, Shyam; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2015-03-01

    We present a theoretical study of the role of asymmetry and magnetic flux on electronic transport through various configurations of coupled quantum dot system, by using Non-Equilibrium Green Function formalism. Transport properties (Transmission Probability, Current-Voltage Characteristics and Differential Conductance) of the different configurations of coupled quantum dot system have been studied by self-consistent approach, in the presence of on-dot Coulomb interaction. Fano effect, appearing in Transmission probability, has been explored during transition of the system from series to symmetric parallel configuration and in response to the variation in magnetic flux threading the system. The results show Fano peaks for asymmetric and symmetric parallel configurations. By adjusting the magnetic flux, swapping effect in Fano peaks appears due to the exchange of states, which sustains despite strong Coulomb blockade effect. The transmission probability spectrum shows mirror symmetry whenever the sum of two values of magnetic flux threading the system is 2 π.

  18. Stochastic simulation of charged particle transport on the massively parallel processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Earl, James A.

    1988-01-01

    Computations of cosmic-ray transport based upon finite-difference methods are afflicted by instabilities, inaccuracies, and artifacts. To avoid these problems, researchers developed a Monte Carlo formulation which is closely related not only to the finite-difference formulation, but also to the underlying physics of transport phenomena. Implementations of this approach are currently running on the Massively Parallel Processor at Goddard Space Flight Center, whose enormous computing power overcomes the poor statistical accuracy that usually limits the use of stochastic methods. These simulations have progressed to a stage where they provide a useful and realistic picture of solar energetic particle propagation in interplanetary space.

  19. Highly parallel transport recordings on a membrane-on-nanopore chip at single molecule resolution.

    PubMed

    Urban, Michael; Kleefen, Alexander; Mukherjee, Nobina; Seelheim, Patrick; Windschiegl, Barbara; Vor der Brüggen, Marc; Koçer, Armagan; Tampé, Robert

    2014-03-12

    Membrane proteins are prime drug targets as they control the transit of information, ions, and solutes across membranes. Here, we present a membrane-on-nanopore platform to analyze nonelectrogenic channels and transporters that are typically not accessible by electrophysiological methods in a multiplexed manner. The silicon chip contains 250,000 femtoliter cavities, closed by a silicon dioxide top layer with defined nanopores. Lipid vesicles containing membrane proteins of interest are spread onto the nanopore-chip surface. Transport events of ligand-gated channels were recorded at single-molecule resolution by high-parallel fluorescence decoding.

  20. A massively parallel semi-Lagrangian algorithm for solving the transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Manson, Russell; Wang, Dali

    2010-01-01

    The scalar transport equation underpins many models employed in science, engineering, technology and business. Application areas include, but are not restricted to, pollution transport, weather forecasting, video analysis and encoding (the optical flow equation), options and stock pricing (the Black-Scholes equation) and spatially explicit ecological models. Unfortunately finding numerical solutions to this equation which are fast and accurate is not trivial. Moreover, finding such numerical algorithms that can be implemented on high performance computer architectures efficiently is challenging. In this paper the authors describe a massively parallel algorithm for solving the advection portion of the transport equation. We present an approach here which is different to that used in most transport models and which we have tried and tested for various scenarios. The approach employs an intelligent domain decomposition based on the vector field of the system equations and thus automatically partitions the computational domain into algorithmically autonomous regions. The solution of a classic pure advection transport problem is shown to be conservative, monotonic and highly accurate at large time steps. Additionally we demonstrate that the algorithm is highly efficient for high performance computer architectures and thus offers a route towards massively parallel application.

  1. Parallel-burn options for dual-fuel single-stage orbital transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    A parallel-burn version of a single-stage vehicle for transport from the earth to low-earth orbit using two fuels and rocket propulsion is considered. New engine results were incorporated in vehicle performance and design studies. The results indicate that a hydrogen-cooled gas generator cycle engine provides attractive vehicle performance and that there is little incentive for increasing the chamber pressure beyond 27 MPa.

  2. Parallel Monte Carlo Electron and Photon Transport Simulation Code (PMCEPT code)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kum, Oyeon

    2004-11-01

    Simulations for customized cancer radiation treatment planning for each patient are very useful for both patient and doctor. These simulations can be used to find the most effective treatment with the least possible dose to the patient. This typical system, so called ``Doctor by Information Technology", will be useful to provide high quality medical services everywhere. However, the large amount of computing time required by the well-known general purpose Monte Carlo(MC) codes has prevented their use for routine dose distribution calculations for a customized radiation treatment planning. The optimal solution to provide ``accurate" dose distribution within an ``acceptable" time limit is to develop a parallel simulation algorithm on a beowulf PC cluster because it is the most accurate, efficient, and economic. I developed parallel MC electron and photon transport simulation code based on the standard MPI message passing interface. This algorithm solved the main difficulty of the parallel MC simulation (overlapped random number series in the different processors) using multiple random number seeds. The parallel results agreed well with the serial ones. The parallel efficiency approached 100% as was expected.

  3. Tracking the Continuity of Language Comprehension: Computer Mouse Trajectories Suggest Parallel Syntactic Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Thomas A.; Cargill, Sarah A.; Hindy, Nicholas C.; Dale, Rick; Spivey, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Although several theories of online syntactic processing assume the parallel activation of multiple syntactic representations, evidence supporting simultaneous activation has been inconclusive. Here, the continuous and non-ballistic properties of computer mouse movements are exploited, by recording their streaming x, y coordinates to procure…

  4. Tracking the Continuity of Language Comprehension: Computer Mouse Trajectories Suggest Parallel Syntactic Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Thomas A.; Cargill, Sarah A.; Hindy, Nicholas C.; Dale, Rick; Spivey, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Although several theories of online syntactic processing assume the parallel activation of multiple syntactic representations, evidence supporting simultaneous activation has been inconclusive. Here, the continuous and non-ballistic properties of computer mouse movements are exploited, by recording their streaming x, y coordinates to procure…

  5. Ferrographic tracking of bacterial transport in the field at the Narrow Channel focus area, Oyster, VA

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, William P.; Zhang, Pengfei; Fuller, Mark E.; Scheibe, Timothy D. ); Mailloux, Brian J.; Onstott, Tullis C.; Deflaun, Mary F.; Hubbard, Susan; Radtke, Jon; Kovacic, William P.; Holben, William

    2001-01-01

    The first results from an innovative bacterial tracking technique, ferrographic capture, applied to bacterial transport in groundwater are reported in this paper. Ferrographic capture was used to analyze samples during an October 1999 bacterial injection experiment at the Narrow Channel Focus Area of the South Oyster Site, VA. Data obtained using this method showed that the timing of bacterial breakthrough was controlled by physical (hydraulic conductivity) heterogeneity in the vertical dimension, as opposed to variation in sediment surface or aqueous chemical properties. Ferrographic tracking yielded results that compared well with results from other tracking techniques over a concentration range of eight orders of magnitude, and provided a low detection limit relative to most other bacterial tracking techniques. The low detection limit of this method allowed observation of transport of an adhesion-deficient bacterium over distances greater than 20 m in the fine sand aquifer under lying this site.

  6. Membrane Transport Processes Analyzed by a Highly Parallel Nanopore Chip System at Single Protein Resolution.

    PubMed

    Urban, Michael; Vor der Brüggen, Marc; Tampé, Robert

    2016-08-16

    Membrane protein transport on the single protein level still evades detailed analysis, if the substrate translocated is non-electrogenic. Considerable efforts have been made in this field, but techniques enabling automated high-throughput transport analysis in combination with solvent-free lipid bilayer techniques required for the analysis of membrane transporters are rare. This class of transporters however is crucial in cell homeostasis and therefore a key target in drug development and methodologies to gain new insights desperately needed. The here presented manuscript describes the establishment and handling of a novel biochip for the analysis of membrane protein mediated transport processes at single transporter resolution. The biochip is composed of microcavities enclosed by nanopores that is highly parallel in its design and can be produced in industrial grade and quantity. Protein-harboring liposomes can directly be applied to the chip surface forming self-assembled pore-spanning lipid bilayers using SSM-techniques (solid supported lipid membranes). Pore-spanning parts of the membrane are freestanding, providing the interface for substrate translocation into or out of the cavity space, which can be followed by multi-spectral fluorescent readout in real-time. The establishment of standard operating procedures (SOPs) allows the straightforward establishment of protein-harboring lipid bilayers on the chip surface of virtually every membrane protein that can be reconstituted functionally. The sole prerequisite is the establishment of a fluorescent read-out system for non-electrogenic transport substrates. High-content screening applications are accomplishable by the use of automated inverted fluorescent microscopes recording multiple chips in parallel. Large data sets can be analyzed using the freely available custom-designed analysis software. Three-color multi spectral fluorescent read-out furthermore allows for unbiased data discrimination into different

  7. Track recognition in 4 [mu]s by a systolic trigger processor using a parallel Hough transform

    SciTech Connect

    Klefenz, F.; Noffz, K.H.; Conen, W.; Zoz, R.; Kugel, A. . Lehrstuhl fuer Informatik V); Maenner, R. . Lehrstuhl fuer Informatik V Univ. Heidelberg . Interdisziplinaeres Zentrum fuer Wissenschaftliches Rechnen)

    1993-08-01

    A parallel Hough transform processor has been developed that identifies circular particle tracks in a 2D projection of the OPAL jet chamber. The high-speed requirements imposed by the 8 bunch crossing mode of LEP could be fulfilled by computing the starting angle and the radius of curvature for each well defined track in less than 4 [mu]s. The system consists of a Hough transform processor that determines well defined tracks, and a Euler processor that counts their number by applying the Euler relation to the thresholded result of the Hough transform. A prototype of a systolic processor has been built that handles one sector of the jet chamber. It consists of 35 [times] 32 processing elements that were loaded into 21 programmable gate arrays (XILINX). This processor runs at a clock rate of 40 MHz. It has been tested offline with about 1,000 original OPAL events. No deviations from the off-line simulation have been found. A trigger efficiency of 93% has been obtained. The prototype together with the associated drift time measurement unit has been installed at the OPAL detector at LEP and 100k events have been sampled to evaluate the system under detector conditions.

  8. Parallel 4-Dimensional Cellular Automaton Track Finder for the CBM Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akishina, Valentina; Kisel, Ivan

    2016-10-01

    The CBM experiment (FAIR/GSI, Darmstadt, Germany) will focus on the measurement of rare probes at interaction rates up to 10 MHz with data flow of up to 1 TB/s. It requires a novel read-out and data-acquisition concept with self-triggered electronics and free-streaming data. In this case resolving different collisions is not a trivial task and event building must be performed in software online. That requires full online event reconstruction and selection not only in space, but also in time, so-called 4D event building and selection. This is a task of the First-Level Event Selection (FLES). The FLES reconstruction and selection package consists of several modules: track finding, track fitting, short-lived particles finding, event building and event selection. The Cellular Automaton (CA) track finder algorithm was adapted towards time-slice-based reconstruction and included into the CBMROOT framework. In this article, we describe the modification done to the algorithm, as well as the performance of the developed time-based approach.

  9. Nondestructive test to track pollutant transport into landfill liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezzar, A.; Ghomari, F.

    2009-03-01

    Over the last decade, waste disposal has become a particularly sensitive issue in Algeria. New legislation concerning landfill liner design has been adopted. Traditional methods of landfill liner characterization involve soil sampling and chemical analysis, which are costly, destructive and time-consuming. New techniques are currently being investigated that aim to provide nondestructive liner characterisation. This paper details technical aspects associated with electrical conductivity measurements within landfill liners and presents experimental work to show the direct application of electrical techniques to track ionic movement through a sand bentonite liner under chemically induced flow. Samples of sand bentonite were mixed and compacted with NaCl electrolytes at different concentrations. The electrical conductivities of compacted specimens were measured with a two-electrode cell. The effects of frequency and electrolyte concentration on the conductivity measurement were explored. The relationship between the soil electrical conductivity and the NaCl electrolyte concentration in interstitial pore fluid was determined. The conductivity measurements were used to quantify the pore fluid concentration and effective diffusion coefficient of sand bentonite liners. It is concluded here that the electrical conductivity of compacted specimens depends mainly on the salt concentration in the pore fluid, and that this approach could therefore be used to track ionic movement through liners during diffusion.

  10. Transport properties of paired Majorana bound states in a parallel junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Cui; Gong, W. J.; Zheng, Yi-Song

    2013-12-01

    The transport properties of a paired Majorana bound states (MBSs) in a parallel junction are theoretically investigated, by considering the influence of different MBS-lead coupling manners, i.e., left-right asymmetric coupling, upper-down asymmetric coupling, and left-right upper-down asymmetric coupling. The calculation results show that the MBS-lead coupling manners affect the transport properties in a substantial way. For the former two configurations, the shot noise Fano factor in the zero-bias limit is related to the value of the conductance maximum with F0=1+1/2Tmax (conductance G =e/2hT). When both the left-right and upper-down symmetries are broken, such a relation is modified into F0=1-12/T0. These results will be helpful for describing the transport characteristics of the junction with MBSs.

  11. Development of improved analysis of non-local electron parallel heat transport in divertor plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allais, Fabrice; Alouani Bibi, Fathallah; Kim, Chang-Geun; Matte, Jean-Pierre; Stotler, Daren P.

    2004-03-01

    Parallel electron heat transport in divertor plasmas is investigated. Our electron kinetic code "FPI" has been upgraded to take into account the hydrogen's atomic physics, including 30 energy levels in the computation. This required important improvements in the numerical algorithms in order to run the code within a reasonable time and compute the effects of each inelastic process. Their effects on non-local transport and the large enhancement of the effective (i.e. including ionization via excited states) ionization rates in the cold plasma due to nonlocal transport will be presented. A non-local electron heat flow formula [1] has been adapted and implemented in the "UEDGE" code. Simulations using it were compared to runs made with the more traditional flux limited heat diffusion formula. Considerable differences were seen in the temperature profiles. [1] F. Alouani Bibi and J.P. Matte, Phys. Rev. E 66, 066414 (2002)

  12. Scale-Dependent Fracture-Matrix Interactions and Their Impact on Radionuclide Transport: Development of efficient particle-tracking methods

    SciTech Connect

    Rajaram, Harihar; Brutz, Michael; Klein, Dylan R; Mallikamas, Wasin

    2014-09-18

    Matrix Diffusion and Adsorption within a rock matrix are important mechanisms for retarding transport of radionuclides in fractured rock. Due to computational limitations and difficulties in characterizing complex subsurface systems, diffusive exchange between a fracture network and surrounding rock matrix is often modeled using simplified conceptual representations. There is significant uncertainty in “effective” parameters used in these models, such as the “effective matrix diffusivity”. Often, these parameters are estimated by fitting sparse breakthrough data, and estimated values fall outside meaningful ranges, because simplified interpretive models do not consider complex three-dimensional flow. There is limited understanding of the relationship between the effective parameters and rock mass characteristics including network structure and matrix properties. There is also evidence for an apparent scale-dependence in “effective matrix diffusion” coefficients. These observations raise questions on whether fracture-matrix interaction parameters estimated from small-scale tracer tests can be used for predicting radionuclide fate and transport at the scale of DOE field sites. High-resolution three-dimensional Discrete-Fracture-Network-Matrix (DFNM) models based on well-defined local scale transport equations can help to address some of these questions. Due to tremendous advances in computational technology over the last 10 years, DFNM modeling in relatively large domains is now feasible. The overarching objective of our research is to use DFNM modeling to improve fundamental understanding of how effective parameters in conceptual models are related to fracture network structure and matrix properties. An advanced three-dimensional DFNM model is being developed, which combines upscaled particle-tracking algorithms for fracture-matrix interaction and a parallel fracture-network flow simulator. The particle-tracking algorithms allow complexity in flow fields

  13. A Parallel 2D Depth-averaged Hydrodynamic, Sediment Transport and River Morphological Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Numerical models of river morphodynamics have become important tools for understanding process-form relationships in river channels through the computation of hydrodynamics, sediment transport and an evolving river bed morphology. While 2D depth-averaged models do not include vertical variation in velocities, they can provide appropriate hydrodynamic results in shallow water environments. Although 2D models are less computationally expensive than 3D models, computation speed is still a concern in many applications, especially in river morphological applications. This paper presents a new parallel 2D hydrodynamic, sediment transport and bed morphology model, developed using Open source Field Operation And Manipulation (OpenFOAM). The model uses the Message Passing Interface (MPI) for parallel computing. Further development and modification of the model are relatively straightforward to accomplish with the OpenFOAM framework. Thus, developers can focus on scientific questions rather than having to write their own code for numerical schemes or learn the intricacies of a particular coding language. The open source platform also allows others to add on to and improve the base model so that it becomes an evolving, community-based computational resource. Model validation and parallel efficiency evaluation will be presented and discussed.

  14. Analysis of the contribution of sedimentation to bacterial mass transport in a parallel plate flow chamber.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiuyi; Busscher, Henk J; Norde, Willem; Sjollema, Jelmer

    2011-05-01

    In order to investigate bacterium-substratum interactions, understanding of bacterial mass transport is necessary. Comparisons of experimentally observed initial deposition rates with mass transport rates in parallel-plate-flow-chambers (PPFC) predicted by convective-diffusion yielded deposition efficiencies above unity, despite electrostatic repulsion. It is hypothesized that sedimentation is the major mass transport mechanism in a PPFC. The contribution of sedimentation to the mass transport in a PPFC was experimentally investigated by introducing a novel microscopy-based method. First, height-dependent bacterial concentrations were measured at different times and flow rates and used to calculate bacterial sedimentation velocities. For Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 12600, a sedimentation velocity of 240 μm h(-1) was obtained. Therewith, sedimentation appeared as the predominant contribution to mass transport in a PPFC. Also in the current study, deposition efficiencies of S. aureus ATCC 12600 with respect to the Smoluchowski-Levich solution of the convective-diffusion equation were four-to-five fold higher than unity. However, calculation of deposition efficiencies with respect to sedimentation were below unity and decreased from 0.78 to 0.36 when flow rates increased from 0.017 to 0.33 cm(3) s(-1). The proposed analysis of bacterial mass transport processes is simple, does not require additional equipment and yields a more reasonable interpretation of bacterial deposition in a PPFC.

  15. Graphics processing unit parallel accelerated solution of the discrete ordinates for photon transport in biological tissues.

    PubMed

    Peng, Kuan; Gao, Xinbo; Qu, Xiaochao; Ren, Nunu; Chen, Xueli; He, Xiaowei; Wang, Xiaorei; Liang, Jimin; Tian, Jie

    2011-07-20

    As a widely used numerical solution for the radiation transport equation (RTE), the discrete ordinates can predict the propagation of photons through biological tissues more accurately relative to the diffusion equation. The discrete ordinates reduce the RTE to a serial of differential equations that can be solved by source iteration (SI). However, the tremendous time consumption of SI, which is partly caused by the expensive computation of each SI step, limits its applications. In this paper, we present a graphics processing unit (GPU) parallel accelerated SI method for discrete ordinates. Utilizing the calculation independence on the levels of the discrete ordinate equation and spatial element, the proposed method reduces the time cost of each SI step by parallel calculation. The photon reflection at the boundary was calculated based on the results of the last SI step to ensure the calculation independence on the level of the discrete ordinate equation. An element sweeping strategy was proposed to detect the calculation independence on the level of the spatial element. A GPU parallel frame called the compute unified device architecture was employed to carry out the parallel computation. The simulation experiments, which were carried out with a cylindrical phantom and numerical mouse, indicated that the time cost of each SI step can be reduced up to a factor of 228 by the proposed method with a GTX 260 graphics card. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  16. Quantum dots for tracking cellular transport of lectin-functionalized nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Xiaoling; Wang Tao; Wu Bingxian; Chen Jun; Chen Jiyao; Yue Yang; Dai Ning; Chen Hongzhuan Jiang Xinguo

    2008-12-05

    Successful drug delivery by functionalized nanocarriers largely depends on their efficient intracellular transport which has not yet been fully understood. We developed a new tracking technique by encapsulating quantum dots into the core of wheat germ agglutinin-conjugated nanoparticles (WGA-NP) to track cellular transport of functionalized nanocarriers. The resulting nanoparticles showed no changes in particle size, zeta potential or biobinding activity, and the loaded probe presented excellent photostability and tracking ability. Taking advantage of these properties, cellular transport profiles of WGA-NP in Caco-2 cells was demonstrated. The cellular uptake begins with binding of WGA to its receptor at the cell surface. The subsequent endocytosis happened in a cytoskeleton-dependent manner and by means of clathrin and caveolae-mediated mechanisms. After endosome creating, transport occurs to both trans-Golgi and lysosome. Our study provides new evidences for quantum dots as a cellular tracking probe of nanocarriers and helps understand intracellular transport profile of lectin-functionalized nanoparticles.

  17. Transport of secondary electrons and reactive species in ion tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surdutovich, Eugene; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2015-08-01

    The transport of reactive species brought about by ions traversing tissue-like medium is analysed analytically. Secondary electrons ejected by ions are capable of ionizing other molecules; the transport of these generations of electrons is studied using the random walk approximation until these electrons remain ballistic. Then, the distribution of solvated electrons produced as a result of interaction of low-energy electrons with water molecules is obtained. The radial distribution of energy loss by ions and secondary electrons to the medium yields the initial radial dose distribution, which can be used as initial conditions for the predicted shock waves. The formation, diffusion, and chemical evolution of hydroxyl radicals in liquid water are studied as well. COST Action Nano-IBCT: Nano-scale Processes Behind Ion-Beam Cancer Therapy.

  18. Implementation, capabilities, and benchmarking of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, Tara M.; Johnson, Seth R.; Evans, Thomas M.; Davidson, Gregory G.; Hamilton, Steven P.; Godfrey, Andrew T.

    2016-03-01

    This work discusses the implementation, capabilities, and validation of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport package authored at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Shift has been developed to scale well from laptops to small computing clusters to advanced supercomputers and includes features such as support for multiple geometry and physics engines, hybrid capabilities for variance reduction methods such as the Consistent Adjoint-Driven Importance Sampling methodology, advanced parallel decompositions, and tally methods optimized for scalability on supercomputing architectures. The scaling studies presented in this paper demonstrate good weak and strong scaling behavior for the implemented algorithms. Shift has also been validated and verified against various reactor physics benchmarks, including the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors' Virtual Environment for Reactor Analysis criticality test suite and several Westinghouse AP1000® problems presented in this paper. These benchmark results compare well to those from other contemporary Monte Carlo codes such as MCNP5 and KENO.

  19. Parallel-batch scheduling and transportation coordination with waiting time constraint.

    PubMed

    Gong, Hua; Chen, Daheng; Xu, Ke

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses a parallel-batch scheduling problem that incorporates transportation of raw materials or semifinished products before processing with waiting time constraint. The orders located at the different suppliers are transported by some vehicles to a manufacturing facility for further processing. One vehicle can load only one order in one shipment. Each order arriving at the facility must be processed in the limited waiting time. The orders are processed in batches on a parallel-batch machine, where a batch contains several orders and the processing time of the batch is the largest processing time of the orders in it. The goal is to find a schedule to minimize the sum of the total flow time and the production cost. We prove that the general problem is NP-hard in the strong sense. We also demonstrate that the problem with equal processing times on the machine is NP-hard. Furthermore, a dynamic programming algorithm in pseudopolynomial time is provided to prove its ordinarily NP-hardness. An optimal algorithm in polynomial time is presented to solve a special case with equal processing times and equal transportation times for each order.

  20. LUCKY-TD code for solving the time-dependent transport equation with the use of parallel computations

    SciTech Connect

    Moryakov, A. V.

    2016-12-15

    An algorithm for solving the time-dependent transport equation in the P{sub m}S{sub n} group approximation with the use of parallel computations is presented. The algorithm is implemented in the LUCKY-TD code for supercomputers employing the MPI standard for the data exchange between parallel processes.

  1. Solution of the within-group multidimensional discrete ordinates transport equations on massively parallel architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerr, Robert Joseph

    2011-12-01

    The integral transport matrix method (ITMM) has been used as the kernel of new parallel solution methods for the discrete ordinates approximation of the within-group neutron transport equation. The ITMM abandons the repetitive mesh sweeps of the traditional source iterations (SI) scheme in favor of constructing stored operators that account for the direct coupling factors among all the cells and between the cells and boundary surfaces. The main goals of this work were to develop the algorithms that construct these operators and employ them in the solution process, determine the most suitable way to parallelize the entire procedure, and evaluate the behavior and performance of the developed methods for increasing number of processes. This project compares the effectiveness of the ITMM with the SI scheme parallelized with the Koch-Baker-Alcouffe (KBA) method. The primary parallel solution method involves a decomposition of the domain into smaller spatial sub-domains, each with their own transport matrices, and coupled together via interface boundary angular fluxes. Each sub-domain has its own set of ITMM operators and represents an independent transport problem. Multiple iterative parallel solution methods have investigated, including parallel block Jacobi (PBJ), parallel red/black Gauss-Seidel (PGS), and parallel GMRES (PGMRES). The fastest observed parallel solution method, PGS, was used in a weak scaling comparison with the PARTISN code. Compared to the state-of-the-art SI-KBA with diffusion synthetic acceleration (DSA), this new method without acceleration/preconditioning is not competitive for any problem parameters considered. The best comparisons occur for problems that are difficult for SI DSA, namely highly scattering and optically thick. SI DSA execution time curves are generally steeper than the PGS ones. However, until further testing is performed it cannot be concluded that SI DSA does not outperform the ITMM with PGS even on several thousand or tens of

  2. A parallel finite element simulator for ion transport through three-dimensional ion channel systems.

    PubMed

    Tu, Bin; Chen, Minxin; Xie, Yan; Zhang, Linbo; Eisenberg, Bob; Lu, Benzhuo

    2013-09-15

    A parallel finite element simulator, ichannel, is developed for ion transport through three-dimensional ion channel systems that consist of protein and membrane. The coordinates of heavy atoms of the protein are taken from the Protein Data Bank and the membrane is represented as a slab. The simulator contains two components: a parallel adaptive finite element solver for a set of Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) equations that describe the electrodiffusion process of ion transport, and a mesh generation tool chain for ion channel systems, which is an essential component for the finite element computations. The finite element method has advantages in modeling irregular geometries and complex boundary conditions. We have built a tool chain to get the surface and volume mesh for ion channel systems, which consists of a set of mesh generation tools. The adaptive finite element solver in our simulator is implemented using the parallel adaptive finite element package Parallel Hierarchical Grid (PHG) developed by one of the authors, which provides the capability of doing large scale parallel computations with high parallel efficiency and the flexibility of choosing high order elements to achieve high order accuracy. The simulator is applied to a real transmembrane protein, the gramicidin A (gA) channel protein, to calculate the electrostatic potential, ion concentrations and I - V curve, with which both primitive and transformed PNP equations are studied and their numerical performances are compared. To further validate the method, we also apply the simulator to two other ion channel systems, the voltage dependent anion channel (VDAC) and α-Hemolysin (α-HL). The simulation results agree well with Brownian dynamics (BD) simulation results and experimental results. Moreover, because ionic finite size effects can be included in PNP model now, we also perform simulations using a size-modified PNP (SMPNP) model on VDAC and α-HL. It is shown that the size effects in SMPNP can

  3. Pumpless Transport of Low Surface Tension Liquids in Surface Tension Confined (STC) Tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megaridis, Constantine; Schutzius, Thomas; Elsharkawy, Mohamed; Tiwari, Manish

    2012-11-01

    Surfaces with patterned wettability have potential applications in microfluidics, fog capture, pool boiling, etc. With recent fabrication advancements, surfaces with adjacent superhydrophobic and superhydrophilic regions are feasible at a reasonable cost; with properly designed patterns, one can produce microfluidic paths (a.k.a. surface tension confined or STC tracks) where a liquid is confined and transported by surface tension alone. The surface tension of water is relatively high (72 mN/m), as compared with oils (~25 mN/m) and organic solvents (~20 mN/m). This makes the design of STC channels for oils and organic solvents far more difficult. In this study, open STC tracks for pumpless transport of low-surface tension liquids (acetone, ethanol, and hexadecane) on microfluidic chips are fabricated using a large-area, wet-processing technique. Wettable, wax-based, submillimeter-wide tracks are applied by a fountain-pen procedure on superoleophobic, fluoroacrylic carbon nanofiber (CNF) composite coatings. The fabricated anisotropic wetting patterns confine the low-surface tension liquids onto the flow tracks, driving them with meniscus velocities exceeding 3 cm/s. Scaling arguments and Washburn's equation provide estimates of the liquid velocities measured in these tracks, which also act as rails for directional sliding control of mm-sized water droplets. The present facile patterned wettability approach can be extended to deposit micrometer-wide tracks.

  4. Modeling nitrogen transport and transformation in aquifers using a particle-tracking approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Zhengtao; Welty, Claire; Maxwell, Reed M.

    2014-09-01

    We have integrated multispecies biodegradation and geochemical reactions into an existing particle-tracking code to simulate reactive transport in three-dimensional variably saturated media, with a focus on nitrification and denitrification processes. This new numerical model includes reactive air-phase transport so that gases such as N2 and CO2 can be tracked. Although nitrogen biodegradation is the primary problem addressed here, the method presented is also applicable to other reactive multispecies transport problems. We verified the model by comparison with (1) analytical solutions for saturated one- and two-dimensional cases; (2) a finite element model for a one-dimensional unsaturated case; and (3) laboratory observations for a one-dimensional saturated case. Good agreement between the new code and the verification problems is demonstrated. The new model can simulate nitrogen transport and transformation in a heterogeneous permeability field where sharp concentration gradients are present. An example application to nitrogen species biodegradation and transport of a plume emanating from a leaking sewer in a heterogeneous, variably saturated aquifer is presented to illustrate this capability. This example is a novel application of coupling unsaturated/saturated zone transport with nitrogen species biodegradation. The code has the computational advantages of particle-tracking algorithms, including local and global mass conservation and minimal numerical dispersion. We also present new methods for improving particle code efficiency by implementing the concept of tracking surplus/deficit particles and particle recycling in order to control the growth of particle numbers. The new model retains the advantages of the particle tracking approach such as allowing relatively low spatial and temporal resolutions to be used, while incorporating the robustness of grid-based Monod kinetics to simulate biogeochemical reactions.

  5. Alfven wave transport effects in the time evolution of parallel cosmic-ray-modified shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. W.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of the time evolution of plane, cosmic-ray modified shocks with magnetic field parallel to the shock normal, based on the diffusive shock acceleration formalism and including the effects from the finite propagation speed and energy of Alfven waves responsible for controlling the transport of the cosmic rays. The simulations discussed are based on a three-fluid model for the dynamics, but a more complete formalism is laid out for future work. The results of the simulations confirm earlier steady state analyses that found these Alfven transport effects to be potentially important when the upstream Alfven speed and the gas sound speed are comparable, i.e., when the plasma and magnetic pressures are similar. It is also clear, however, that the impact of Alfven transport effects, which tend to slow shock evolution and reduce the time asymptotic cosmic-ray pressure in the shock, is strongly dependent upon uncertain details in the transport models. Both cosmic-ray advection tied to streaming Alfven waves and dissipation of wave energy are important to include in the models. Further, Alfven transport properties on both sides of the shock are also influential.

  6. A Single Switcher Combined Series Parallel Hybrid Envelope Tracking Amplifier for Wideband RF Power Amplifier Applications.

    PubMed

    Anabtawi, Nijad; Ferzli, Rony; Harmanani, Haidar M

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, an improved architecture for RF power amplifier envelope tracking supply modulator is presented. It consists of a single switched mode supply regulator and one linear regulator. The switched mode supply regulator has two outputs, one of which is used in conjunction with the linear regulator to provide a wideband, high efficiency power supply to the RF amplifier, whereas the second output provides a band limited high efficiency supply to the linear regulator. The design offers improved power efficiency, reduced system complexity and area savings since the dual output switched mode regulator requires one inductor and a simple control loop. The design was implemented in 14nm CMOS process and validated with simulations. The supply modulator achieves a peak efficiency of 74% with a 6 dB PAPR 20MHz LTE signal at 29dBm output power.

  7. A Single Switcher Combined Series Parallel Hybrid Envelope Tracking Amplifier for Wideband RF Power Amplifier Applications

    PubMed Central

    Anabtawi, Nijad; Ferzli, Rony; Harmanani, Haidar M.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, an improved architecture for RF power amplifier envelope tracking supply modulator is presented. It consists of a single switched mode supply regulator and one linear regulator. The switched mode supply regulator has two outputs, one of which is used in conjunction with the linear regulator to provide a wideband, high efficiency power supply to the RF amplifier, whereas the second output provides a band limited high efficiency supply to the linear regulator. The design offers improved power efficiency, reduced system complexity and area savings since the dual output switched mode regulator requires one inductor and a simple control loop. The design was implemented in 14nm CMOS process and validated with simulations. The supply modulator achieves a peak efficiency of 74% with a 6 dB PAPR 20MHz LTE signal at 29dBm output power. PMID:28919658

  8. Highly Parallelized Pattern Matching Hardware for Fast Tracking at Hadron Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Citraro, S.; Annovi, A.; Biesuz, N.; Giannetti, P.; Luciano, P.; Nasimi, H.; Piendibene, M.; Sotiropoulou, C.-L.; Volpi, G.

    2016-04-01

    A high-performance “pattern matching” implementation based on the Associative Memory (AM) system is presented. It is designed to solve the real-time hit-to-track association problem for particles produced in high-energy physics experiments at hadron colliders. The processing time of pattern recognition in CPU-based algorithms increases rapidly with the detector occupancy due to the limited computing power and input-output capacity of hardware available on the market. The AM system presented here solves the problem by being able to process even the most complex hadron collider events produced at a rate of 100 kHz with an average latency smaller than 10 μs. The board built for this goal is able to execute 12 petabyte comparisons per second, with peak power consumption below 250 W, uniformly distributed on the large area of the board.

  9. Recent Improvements to the IMPACT-T Parallel Particle TrackingCode

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.; Pogorelov, I.V.; Ryne, R.

    2006-11-16

    The IMPACT-T code is a parallel three-dimensional quasi-static beam dynamics code for modeling high brightness beams in photoinjectors and RF linacs. Developed under the US DOE Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program, it includes several key features including a self-consistent calculation of 3D space-charge forces using a shifted and integrated Green function method, multiple energy bins for beams with large energy spread, and models for treating RF standing wave and traveling wave structures. In this paper, we report on recent improvements to the IMPACT-T code including modeling traveling wave structures, short-range transverse and longitudinal wakefields, and longitudinal coherent synchrotron radiation through bending magnets.

  10. Making Tracks 1.0: Action Researching an Active Transportation Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Daniel; Foran, Andrew; Robinson, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of the first cycle of an action research project. The objective of this action research was to examine the implementation of a school-based active transportation education program (Making Tracks). A two-cycle action research design was employed in which elementary school students' (ages 7-9), middle school…

  11. Making Tracks 1.0: Action Researching an Active Transportation Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Daniel; Foran, Andrew; Robinson, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of the first cycle of an action research project. The objective of this action research was to examine the implementation of a school-based active transportation education program (Making Tracks). A two-cycle action research design was employed in which elementary school students' (ages 7-9), middle school…

  12. Affordable Freight Logistics Transport Information Management Optimisation and Asset Tracking Solution Using Smartphone GPS Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muna, Joseph T.; Prescott, Kevin

    2011-08-01

    Traditionally, freight transport and telematics solutions that exploit the GPS capabilities of in- vehicle devices to provide innovative Location Based Services (LBS) including track and trace transport systems have been the preserve of a select cluster of transport operators and organisations with the financial resources to develop the requisite custom software and hardware on which they are deployed. The average cost of outfitting a typical transport vehicle or truck with the latest Intelligent Transport System (ITS) increases the cost of the vehicle by anything from a couple to several thousand Euros, depending on the complexity and completeness of the solution. Though this does not generally deter large fleet transport owners since they typically get Return on Investment (ROI) based on economies of scale, it presents a barrier for the smaller independent entities that constitute the majority of freight transport operators [1].The North Sea Freight Intelligent Transport Solution (NS FRITS), a project co-funded by the European Commission Interreg IVB North Sea Region Programme, aims to make acquisition of such transport solutions easier for those organisations that cannot afford the expensive, bespoke systems used by their larger competitors.The project addresses transport security threats by developing a system capable of informing major actors along the freight logistics supply chain, of changing circumstances within the region's major transport corridors and between transport modes. The project also addresses issues of freight volumes, inter-modality, congestion and eco-mobility [2].

  13. Parallel computing of a digital hologram and particle searching for microdigital-holographic particle-tracking velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Satake, Shin-ichi; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Kunugi, Tomoaki; Sato, Kazuho; Ito, Tomoyoshi; Yamamoto, Keisuke

    2007-02-01

    We have developed a parallel algorithm for microdigital-holographic particle-tracking velocimetry. The algorithm is used in (1) numerical reconstruction of a particle image computer using a digital hologram, and (2) searching for particles. The numerical reconstruction from the digital hologram makes use of the Fresnel diffraction equation and the FFT (fast Fourier transform),whereas the particle search algorithm looks for local maximum graduation in a reconstruction field represented by a 3D matrix. To achieve high performance computing for both calculations (reconstruction and particle search), two memory partitions are allocated to the 3D matrix. In this matrix, the reconstruction part consists of horizontally placed 2D memory partitions on the x-y plane for the FFT, whereas, the particle search part consists of vertically placed 2D memory partitions set along the z axes.Consequently, the scalability can be obtained for the proportion of processor elements,where the benchmarks are carried out for parallel computation by a SGI Altix machine.

  14. DANTSYS/MPI: a system for 3-D deterministic transport on parallel architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, R.S.; Alcouffe, R.E.

    1996-12-31

    Since 1994, we have been using a data parallel form of our deterministic transport code DANTSYS to perform time-independent fixed source and eigenvalue calculations on the CM-200`s at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Parallelization of the transport sweep is obtained by using a 2-D spatial decomposition which retains the ability to invert the source iteration equation in a single iteration (i.e., the diagonal plane sweep). We have now implemented a message passing version of DANTSYS, referred to as DANTSYS/MPI, on the Cray T3D installed at Los Alamos in 1995. By taking advantage of the SPMD (Single Program, Multiple Data) architecture of the Cray T3D, as well as its low latency communications network, we have managed to achieve grind times (time to solve a single cell in phase space) of less than 10 nanoseconds on the 512 PE (Processing Element) T3D, as opposed to typical grind times of 150-200 nanoseconds on a 2048 PE CM-200, or 300-400 nanoseconds on a single PE of a Cray Y-MP. In addition, we have also parallelized the Diffusion Synthetic Accelerator (DSA) equations which are used to accelerate the convergence of the transport equation. DANTSYS/MPI currently runs on traditional Cray PVP`s and the Cray T3D, and it`s computational kernel (Sweep3D) has been ported to and tested on an array of SGI SMP`s (Symmetric Memory Processors), a network of IBM 590 workstations, an IBM SP2, and the Intel TFLOPs machine at Sandia National Laboratory. This paper describes the implementation of DANTSYS/MPI on the Cray T3D, and presents a simple performance model which accurately predicts the grind time as a function of the number of PE`s and problem size, or scalability. This paper also describes the parallel implementation and performance of the elliptic solver used in DANTSYS/MPI for solving the synthetic acceleration equations.

  15. Conductance and activation energy for electron transport in series and parallel intramolecular circuits.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Liang-Yan; Wu, Ning; Rabitz, Herschel

    2016-11-30

    We investigate electron transport through series and parallel intramolecular circuits in the framework of the multi-level Redfield theory. Based on the assumption of weak monomer-bath couplings, the simulations depict the length and temperature dependence in six types of intramolecular circuits. In the tunneling regime, we find that the intramolecular circuit rule is only valid in the weak monomer coupling limit. In the thermally activated hopping regime, for circuits based on two different molecular units Ma and Mb with distinct activation energies Eact,a > Eact,b, the activation energies of Ma and Mb in series are nearly the same as Eact,a while those in parallel are nearly the same as Eact,b. This study gives a comprehensive description of electron transport through intramolecular circuits from tunneling to thermally activated hopping. We hope that this work can motivate additional studies to design intramolecular circuits based on different types of building blocks, and to explore the corresponding circuit laws and the length and temperature dependence of conductance.

  16. Parallel measurement of conductive and convective thermal transport of micro/nanowires based on Raman mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Man; Li, Changzheng; Wang, Jianmei; Xiao, Xiangheng; Yue, Yanan

    2015-06-01

    Heat conduction and convection are coupled effects in thermal transport of low-dimensional materials especially at micro/nanoscale. However, the parallel measurement is a challenge due to the limitation of characterization pathways. In this work, we report a method to study conductive and convective thermal transport of micro/nanowires simultaneously by using steady-state Joule-heating and Raman mapping. To examine this method, the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) fiber (36 μm in diameter) is characterized and its temperature dependence of thermal properties including thermal conductivity and convection coefficient in ambient air is studied. Preliminary results show that thermal conductivity of the CNTs fiber increases from 26 W/m K to 34 W/m K and convection coefficient decreases from 1143 W/m2 K to 1039 W/m2 K with temperature ranging from 312 to 444 K. The convective heat dissipation to the air could be as high as 60% of the total Joule heating power. Uncertainty analysis is performed to reveal that fitting errors can be further reduced by increasing sampling points along the fiber. This method features a fast/convenient way for parallel measurement of both heat conduction and convection of micro/nanowires which is beneficial to comprehensively understanding the coupled effect of micro/nanoscale heat conduction and convection.

  17. Reactive silica transport in fractured porous media: Analytical solutions for a system of parallel fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianwen

    2012-04-01

    A general analytical solution is derived by using the Laplace transformation to describe transient reactive silica transport in a conceptualized 2-D system involving a set of parallel fractures embedded in an impermeable host rock matrix, taking into account of hydrodynamic dispersion and advection of silica transport along the fractures, molecular diffusion from each fracture to the intervening rock matrix, and dissolution of quartz. A special analytical solution is also developed by ignoring the longitudinal hydrodynamic dispersion term but remaining other conditions the same. The general and special solutions are in the form of a double infinite integral and a single infinite integral, respectively, and can be evaluated using Gauss-Legendre quadrature technique. A simple criterion is developed to determine under what conditions the general analytical solution can be approximated by the special analytical solution. It is proved analytically that the general solution always lags behind the special solution, unless a dimensionless parameter is less than a critical value. Several illustrative calculations are undertaken to demonstrate the effect of fracture spacing, fracture aperture and fluid flow rate on silica transport. The analytical solutions developed here can serve as a benchmark to validate numerical models that simulate reactive mass transport in fractured porous media.

  18. Adaptive finite element simulation of flow and transport applications on parallel computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Benjamin Shelton

    The subject of this work is the adaptive finite element simulation of problems arising in flow and transport applications on parallel computers. Of particular interest are new contributions to adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) in this parallel high-performance context, including novel work on data structures, treatment of constraints in a parallel setting, generality and extensibility via object-oriented programming, and the design/implementation of a flexible software framework. This technology and software capability then enables more robust, reliable treatment of multiscale--multiphysics problems and specific studies of fine scale interaction such as those in biological chemotaxis (Chapter 4) and high-speed shock physics for compressible flows (Chapter 5). The work begins by presenting an overview of key concepts and data structures employed in AMR simulations. Of particular interest is how these concepts are applied in the physics-independent software framework which is developed here and is the basis for all the numerical simulations performed in this work. This open-source software framework has been adopted by a number of researchers in the U.S. and abroad for use in a wide range of applications. The dynamic nature of adaptive simulations pose particular issues for efficient implementation on distributed-memory parallel architectures. Communication cost, computational load balance, and memory requirements must all be considered when developing adaptive software for this class of machines. Specific extensions to the adaptive data structures to enable implementation on parallel computers is therefore considered in detail. The libMesh framework for performing adaptive finite element simulations on parallel computers is developed to provide a concrete implementation of the above ideas. This physics-independent framework is applied to two distinct flow and transport applications classes in the subsequent application studies to illustrate the flexibility of the

  19. Practical Implementation of New Particle Tracking Method to the Real Field of Groundwater Flow and Transport

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Heejun

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In articles published in 2009 and 2010, Suk and Yeh reported the development of an accurate and efficient particle tracking algorithm for simulating a path line under complicated unsteady flow conditions, using a range of elements within finite elements in multidimensions. Here two examples, an aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) example and a landfill leachate migration example, are examined to enhance the practical implementation of the proposed particle tracking method, known as Suk's method, to a real field of groundwater flow and transport. Results obtained by Suk's method are compared with those obtained by Pollock's method. Suk's method produces superior tracking accuracy, which suggests that Suk's method can describe more accurately various advection-dominated transport problems in a real field than existing popular particle tracking methods, such as Pollock's method. To illustrate the wide and practical applicability of Suk's method to random-walk particle tracking (RWPT), the original RWPT has been modified to incorporate Suk's method. Performance of the modified RWPT using Suk's method is compared with the original RWPT scheme by examining the concentration distributions obtained by the modified RWPT and the original RWPT under complicated transient flow systems. PMID:22476629

  20. Practical Implementation of New Particle Tracking Method to the Real Field of Groundwater Flow and Transport.

    PubMed

    Suk, Heejun

    2012-01-01

    In articles published in 2009 and 2010, Suk and Yeh reported the development of an accurate and efficient particle tracking algorithm for simulating a path line under complicated unsteady flow conditions, using a range of elements within finite elements in multidimensions. Here two examples, an aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) example and a landfill leachate migration example, are examined to enhance the practical implementation of the proposed particle tracking method, known as Suk's method, to a real field of groundwater flow and transport. Results obtained by Suk's method are compared with those obtained by Pollock's method. Suk's method produces superior tracking accuracy, which suggests that Suk's method can describe more accurately various advection-dominated transport problems in a real field than existing popular particle tracking methods, such as Pollock's method. To illustrate the wide and practical applicability of Suk's method to random-walk particle tracking (RWPT), the original RWPT has been modified to incorporate Suk's method. Performance of the modified RWPT using Suk's method is compared with the original RWPT scheme by examining the concentration distributions obtained by the modified RWPT and the original RWPT under complicated transient flow systems.

  1. Analysis of pumpless liquid transport on a wettability-patterned track

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Aritra; Brenner, Ken; Chatterjee, Souvick; Sinha Mahapatra, Pallab; Ganguly, Ranjan; Megaridis, Constantine

    2016-11-01

    Pumpless liquid transport can be achieved by tuning curvature of liquid volumes (Laplace pressure) on a diverging superhydrophilic track surrounded by a superhydrophobic background. The liquid, which starts in the form of a deposited droplet, propagates on the track as a well-defined bulge (bulk liquid) followed by a trailing liquid film conforming to the track geometry. In this work, we present a semi-analytical model to explain the trends of observed phenomena as well as the liquid transport dynamics (velocity, acceleration, flow rate) with respect to track geometry, solid wettability contrast, and feed volume. High speed image analysis of the motion of the bulk liquid is performed using a droplet shape tracking algorithm; dominant forces are identified and model predictions are compared with the experimental data. The combination of experimental and analytical tools offers new insight on a problem that is relevant to open-surface microfluidic devices, especially in the point of care (i.e. low cost) technological domain.

  2. Acceleration of low-energy ions at parallel shocks with a focused transport model

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Pingbing; Zhang, Ming; Rassoul, Hamid K.

    2013-03-19

    Here we present a test particle simulation on the injection and acceleration of low-energy suprathermal particles by parallel shocks with a focused transport model. The focused transport equation contains all necessary physics of shock acceleration, but avoids the limitation of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) that requires a small pitch angle anisotropy. This simulation verifies that the particles with speeds of a fraction of to a few times the shock speed can indeed be directly injected and accelerated into the DSA regime by parallel shocks. At higher energies starting from a few times the shock speed, the energy spectrum of accelerated particles is a power law with the same spectral index as the solution of standard DSA theory, although the particles are highly anisotropic in the upstream region. The intensity, however, is different from that predicted by DSA theory, indicating a different level of injection efficiency. It is found that the shock strength, the injection speed, and the intensity of an electric cross-shock potential (CSP) jump can affect the injection efficiency of the low-energy particles. A stronger shock has a higher injection efficiency. In addition, if the speed of injected particles is above a few times the shock speed, the produced power-law spectrum is consistent with the prediction of standard DSA theory in both its intensity and spectrum index with an injection efficiency of 1. CSP can increase the injection efficiency through direct particle reflection back upstream, but it has little effect on the energetic particle acceleration once the speed of injected particles is beyond a few times the shock speed. Finally, this test particle simulation proves that the focused transport theory is an extension of DSA theory with the capability of predicting the efficiency of particle injection.

  3. Acceleration of low-energy ions at parallel shocks with a focused transport model

    DOE PAGES

    Zuo, Pingbing; Zhang, Ming; Rassoul, Hamid K.

    2013-03-19

    Here we present a test particle simulation on the injection and acceleration of low-energy suprathermal particles by parallel shocks with a focused transport model. The focused transport equation contains all necessary physics of shock acceleration, but avoids the limitation of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) that requires a small pitch angle anisotropy. This simulation verifies that the particles with speeds of a fraction of to a few times the shock speed can indeed be directly injected and accelerated into the DSA regime by parallel shocks. At higher energies starting from a few times the shock speed, the energy spectrum of acceleratedmore » particles is a power law with the same spectral index as the solution of standard DSA theory, although the particles are highly anisotropic in the upstream region. The intensity, however, is different from that predicted by DSA theory, indicating a different level of injection efficiency. It is found that the shock strength, the injection speed, and the intensity of an electric cross-shock potential (CSP) jump can affect the injection efficiency of the low-energy particles. A stronger shock has a higher injection efficiency. In addition, if the speed of injected particles is above a few times the shock speed, the produced power-law spectrum is consistent with the prediction of standard DSA theory in both its intensity and spectrum index with an injection efficiency of 1. CSP can increase the injection efficiency through direct particle reflection back upstream, but it has little effect on the energetic particle acceleration once the speed of injected particles is beyond a few times the shock speed. Finally, this test particle simulation proves that the focused transport theory is an extension of DSA theory with the capability of predicting the efficiency of particle injection.« less

  4. Surface tension confined (STC) tracks for capillary-driven transport of low surface tension liquids.

    PubMed

    Schutzius, Thomas M; Elsharkawy, Mohamed; Tiwari, Manish K; Megaridis, Constantine M

    2012-12-21

    Surface tension confined (STC) open tracks for pumpless transport of low-surface tension liquids (e.g., acetone, ethanol, hexadecane) on microfluidic chips are fabricated using a large-area, wet-processing technique. Wettable, paraffin-wax, submillimeter-wide tracks are applied by a fountain-pen procedure on superoleophobic, fluoroacrylic-carbon nanofiber (CNF) composite coatings. The fabricated anisotropic wetting patterns confine the low-surface-tension liquids onto the flow tracks, driving them with meniscus velocities up to 3.1 cm s(-1). Scaling arguments and Washburn's equation provide estimates of the liquid velocities measured in the STC tracks. These tracks are also shown to act as rails for directional sliding control of mm-sized water droplets. The present facile top-down patterned wettability approach can be extended to deposit micrometer-wide tracks, which bear promise for pumpless handling of low-surface tension liquids (e.g., aqueous solutions containing alcohols or surfactants) in lab-on-a-chip type applications or in low power, high-throughput bio-microfluidics for health care applications.

  5. Parallel Monte Carlo transport modeling in the context of a time-dependent, three-dimensional multi-physics code

    SciTech Connect

    Procassini, R.J.

    1997-12-31

    The fine-scale, multi-space resolution that is envisioned for accurate simulations of complex weapons systems in three spatial dimensions implies flop-rate and memory-storage requirements that will only be obtained in the near future through the use of parallel computational techniques. Since the Monte Carlo transport models in these simulations usually stress both of these computational resources, they are prime candidates for parallelization. The MONACO Monte Carlo transport package, which is currently under development at LLNL, will utilize two types of parallelism within the context of a multi-physics design code: decomposition of the spatial domain across processors (spatial parallelism) and distribution of particles in a given spatial subdomain across additional processors (particle parallelism). This implementation of the package will utilize explicit data communication between domains (message passing). Such a parallel implementation of a Monte Carlo transport model will result in non-deterministic communication patterns. The communication of particles between subdomains during a Monte Carlo time step may require a significant level of effort to achieve a high parallel efficiency.

  6. Overview of development and design of MPACT: Michigan parallel characteristics transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Kochunas, B.; Collins, B.; Jabaay, D.; Downar, T. J.; Martin, W. R.

    2013-07-01

    MPACT (Michigan Parallel Characteristics Transport Code) is a new reactor analysis tool. It is being developed by students and research staff at the University of Michigan to be used for an advanced pin-resolved transport capability within VERA (Virtual Environment for Reactor Analysis). VERA is the end-user reactor simulation tool being produced by the Consortium for the Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). The MPACT development project is itself unique for the way it is changing how students do research to achieve the instructional and research goals of an academic institution, while providing immediate value to industry. The MPACT code makes use of modern lean/agile software processes and extensive testing to maintain a level of productivity and quality required by CASL. MPACT's design relies heavily on object-oriented programming concepts and design patterns and is programmed in Fortran 2003. These designs are explained and illustrated as to how they can be readily extended to incorporate new capabilities and research ideas in support of academic research objectives. The transport methods currently implemented in MPACT include the 2-D and 3-D method of characteristics (MOC) and 2-D and 3-D method of collision direction probabilities (CDP). For the cross section resonance treatment, presently the subgroup method and the new embedded self-shielding method (ESSM) are implemented within MPACT. (authors)

  7. Effects of biofilm growth on flow and transport through a glass parallel plate fracture.

    PubMed

    Hill, David D; Sleep, Brent E

    2002-06-01

    The effects of biofilm growth on flow and solute transport through a sandblasted glass parallel plate fracture was investigated. The fracture was inoculated using soil microorganisms. Glucose, oxygen and other nutrients were supplied to support growth. The biomass initially formed discrete clusters attached to the glass surfaces, but over time formed a continuous biofilm. From dye tracer tests conducted during biofilm growth, it was observed that channels and low-permeability zones dominated transport. The hydraulic conductivity of the fracture showed a sigmoidal decrease with time. The hydraulic conductivity was reduced by a factor of 0.033, from 18 to 0.6 cm/s, corresponding to a 72% decrease in the hydraulic aperture, from 500 to 140 microm. In contrast, the mass balance aperture, determined from fluoride tracer tests, remained relatively constant, indicating that the impact of biomass growth on effective fracture porosity was much less than the effect on hydraulic conductivity. Analyses of pre-biofilm tracer tests revealed that both Taylor dispersion and macrodispersion were influencing transport. During biofilm growth, only macrodispersion was dominant. The macrodispersion coefficient alpha(macro) was found to increase logarithmically with hydraulic conductivity reduction.

  8. Smart Transport - A Survey of Tracking Technologies for Cargo Containers and Their Transport Platforms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-01

    addition, the system allows Envirotainer to do online booking with clientele in order to track and better utilize their containers [Ref 25]. D. PAPER...... GMDSS ). With the touch of a button on a Digital Selective Calling (DSC) radio, a distress signal containing the name of the ship, the position, and

  9. Fano effect dominance over Coulomb blockade in transport properties of parallel coupled quantum dot system

    SciTech Connect

    Brogi, Bharat Bhushan Ahluwalia, P. K.; Chand, Shyam

    2015-06-24

    Theoretical study of the Coulomb blockade effect on transport properties (Transmission Probability and I-V characteristics) for varied configuration of coupled quantum dot system has been studied by using Non Equilibrium Green Function(NEGF) formalism and Equation of Motion(EOM) method in the presence of magnetic flux. The self consistent approach and intra-dot Coulomb interaction is being taken into account. As the key parameters of the coupled quantum dot system such as dot-lead coupling, inter-dot tunneling and magnetic flux threading through the system can be tuned, the effect of asymmetry parameter and magnetic flux on this tuning is being explored in Coulomb blockade regime. The presence of the Coulomb blockade due to on-dot Coulomb interaction decreases the width of transmission peak at energy level ε + U and by adjusting the magnetic flux the swapping effect in the Fano peaks in asymmetric and symmetric parallel configuration sustains despite strong Coulomb blockade effect.

  10. An object-oriented implementation of a parallel Monte Carlo code for radiation transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Pedro Duarte; Lani, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes the main features of a state-of-the-art Monte Carlo solver for radiation transport which has been implemented within COOLFluiD, a world-class open source object-oriented platform for scientific simulations. The Monte Carlo code makes use of efficient ray tracing algorithms (for 2D, axisymmetric and 3D arbitrary unstructured meshes) which are described in detail. The solver accuracy is first verified in testcases for which analytical solutions are available, then validated for a space re-entry flight experiment (i.e. FIRE II) for which comparisons against both experiments and reference numerical solutions are provided. Through the flexible design of the physical models, ray tracing and parallelization strategy (fully reusing the mesh decomposition inherited by the fluid simulator), the implementation was made efficient and reusable.

  11. Massively parallel kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of charge carrier transport in organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Kaap, N. J.; Koster, L. J. A.

    2016-02-01

    A parallel, lattice based Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation is developed that runs on a GPGPU board and includes Coulomb like particle-particle interactions. The performance of this computationally expensive problem is improved by modifying the interaction potential due to nearby particle moves, instead of fully recalculating it. This modification is achieved by adding dipole correction terms that represent the particle move. Exact evaluation of these terms is guaranteed by representing all interactions as 32-bit floating numbers, where only the integers between -222 and 222 are used. We validate our method by modelling the charge transport in disordered organic semiconductors, including Coulomb interactions between charges. Performance is mainly governed by the particle density in the simulation volume, and improves for increasing densities. Our method allows calculations on large volumes including particle-particle interactions, which is important in the field of organic semiconductors.

  12. Ac transport properties of electrons in parallel-plate mesoscopic capacitors in series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuen, J.; Wang, J. H.

    2017-10-01

    In a self-consistent manner by taking into account three aspects: the frequency of the bias, geometry of the capacitor (e.g. plate separation) and the Fermi energy of the system, ac transport properties of electrons in parallel-plate mesoscopic capacitor in series under an bias are discussed. The charge density, the internal characteristic potential caused by electrons interaction and the size-dependent mesoscopic capacitance are calculated. Results show that these quantities are complex number with very small finite imaginary part in mesoscopic scale, and the current conservation is satisfied in our numerical calculation. Moreover, when the plate separation is large enough, the mesoscopic capacitance approaches to the geometric capacitance, and the imaginary parts vanish. When the plate separation is small, there are some differences between them.

  13. Semianalytic solution for transport of a two-member decay chain in discrete parallel fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Scott K.

    2013-09-01

    A wide variety of analytic solutions have been developed for 1-D contaminant transport, but to date the author is aware of none modeling a decay chain in parallel discrete fractures in porous media. In this note, the derivation is presented for a two-species first-order decay chain in such an environment, with an arbitrary concentration history specified upgradient, fracture advection, and diffusion into the porous matrix. The solution is presented in brief, followed by corroboration of its numerical implementation against two different existing numerical codes. An appendix contains a detailed derivation of the solution, and a Mathematica notebook that implements it and may be used by practitioners is enclosed as supporting information.

  14. Parallel deterministic transport sweeps of structured and unstructured meshes with overloaded mesh decompositions

    DOE PAGES

    Pautz, Shawn D.; Bailey, Teresa S.

    2016-11-29

    Here, the efficiency of discrete ordinates transport sweeps depends on the scheduling algorithm, the domain decomposition, the problem to be solved, and the computational platform. Sweep scheduling algorithms may be categorized by their approach to several issues. In this paper we examine the strategy of domain overloading for mesh partitioning as one of the components of such algorithms. In particular, we extend the domain overloading strategy, previously defined and analyzed for structured meshes, to the general case of unstructured meshes. We also present computational results for both the structured and unstructured domain overloading cases. We find that an appropriate amountmore » of domain overloading can greatly improve the efficiency of parallel sweeps for both structured and unstructured partitionings of the test problems examined on up to 105 processor cores.« less

  15. Parallel deterministic transport sweeps of structured and unstructured meshes with overloaded mesh decompositions

    SciTech Connect

    Pautz, Shawn D.; Bailey, Teresa S.

    2016-11-29

    Here, the efficiency of discrete ordinates transport sweeps depends on the scheduling algorithm, the domain decomposition, the problem to be solved, and the computational platform. Sweep scheduling algorithms may be categorized by their approach to several issues. In this paper we examine the strategy of domain overloading for mesh partitioning as one of the components of such algorithms. In particular, we extend the domain overloading strategy, previously defined and analyzed for structured meshes, to the general case of unstructured meshes. We also present computational results for both the structured and unstructured domain overloading cases. We find that an appropriate amount of domain overloading can greatly improve the efficiency of parallel sweeps for both structured and unstructured partitionings of the test problems examined on up to 105 processor cores.

  16. Fano effect dominance over Coulomb blockade in transport properties of parallel coupled quantum dot system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brogi, Bharat Bhushan; Chand, Shyam; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2015-06-01

    Theoretical study of the Coulomb blockade effect on transport properties (Transmission Probability and I-V characteristics) for varied configuration of coupled quantum dot system has been studied by using Non Equilibrium Green Function(NEGF) formalism and Equation of Motion(EOM) method in the presence of magnetic flux. The self consistent approach and intra-dot Coulomb interaction is being taken into account. As the key parameters of the coupled quantum dot system such as dot-lead coupling, inter-dot tunneling and magnetic flux threading through the system can be tuned, the effect of asymmetry parameter and magnetic flux on this tuning is being explored in Coulomb blockade regime. The presence of the Coulomb blockade due to on-dot Coulomb interaction decreases the width of transmission peak at energy level ɛ + U and by adjusting the magnetic flux the swapping effect in the Fano peaks in asymmetric and symmetric parallel configuration sustains despite strong Coulomb blockade effect.

  17. Parallel Finite Element Electron-Photon Transport Analysis on 2-D Unstructured Mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Drumm, C.R.

    1999-01-01

    A computer code has been developed to solve the linear Boltzmann transport equation on an unstructured mesh of triangles, from a Pro/E model. An arbitriwy arrangement of distinct material regions is allowed. Energy dependence is handled by solving over an arbitrary number of discrete energy groups. Angular de- pendence is treated by Legendre-polynomial expansion of the particle cross sections and a discrete ordinates treatment of the particle fluence. The resulting linear system is solved in parallel with a preconditioned conjugate-gradients method. The solution method is unique, in that the space-angle dependence is solved si- multaneously, eliminating the need for the usual inner iterations. Electron cross sections are obtained from a Goudsrnit-Saunderson modifed version of the CEPXS code. A one-dimensional version of the code has also been develop@ for testing and development purposes.

  18. A massively parallel method of characteristic neutral particle transport code for GPUs

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, W. R.; Smith, K.; Forget, B.

    2013-07-01

    Over the past 20 years, parallel computing has enabled computers to grow ever larger and more powerful while scientific applications have advanced in sophistication and resolution. This trend is being challenged, however, as the power consumption for conventional parallel computing architectures has risen to unsustainable levels and memory limitations have come to dominate compute performance. Heterogeneous computing platforms, such as Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), are an increasingly popular paradigm for solving these issues. This paper explores the applicability of GPUs for deterministic neutron transport. A 2D method of characteristics (MOC) code - OpenMOC - has been developed with solvers for both shared memory multi-core platforms as well as GPUs. The multi-threading and memory locality methodologies for the GPU solver are presented. Performance results for the 2D C5G7 benchmark demonstrate 25-35 x speedup for MOC on the GPU. The lessons learned from this case study will provide the basis for further exploration of MOC on GPUs as well as design decisions for hardware vendors exploring technologies for the next generation of machines for scientific computing. (authors)

  19. BioFVM: an efficient, parallelized diffusive transport solver for 3-D biological simulations

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffarizadeh, Ahmadreza; Friedman, Samuel H.; Macklin, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Computational models of multicellular systems require solving systems of PDEs for release, uptake, decay and diffusion of multiple substrates in 3D, particularly when incorporating the impact of drugs, growth substrates and signaling factors on cell receptors and subcellular systems biology. Results: We introduce BioFVM, a diffusive transport solver tailored to biological problems. BioFVM can simulate release and uptake of many substrates by cell and bulk sources, diffusion and decay in large 3D domains. It has been parallelized with OpenMP, allowing efficient simulations on desktop workstations or single supercomputer nodes. The code is stable even for large time steps, with linear computational cost scalings. Solutions are first-order accurate in time and second-order accurate in space. The code can be run by itself or as part of a larger simulator. Availability and implementation: BioFVM is written in C ++ with parallelization in OpenMP. It is maintained and available for download at http://BioFVM.MathCancer.org and http://BioFVM.sf.net under the Apache License (v2.0). Contact: paul.macklin@usc.edu. Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26656933

  20. Random walk particle tracking simulations of non-Fickian transport in heterogeneous media

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, G. Tartakovsky, D.M. Dentz, M. Viswanathan, H.; Berkowitz, B.; Robinson, B.A.

    2010-06-01

    Derivations of continuum nonlocal models of non-Fickian (anomalous) transport require assumptions that might limit their applicability. We present a particle-based algorithm, which obviates the need for many of these assumptions by allowing stochastic processes that represent spatial and temporal random increments to be correlated in space and time, be stationary or non-stationary, and to have arbitrary distributions. The approach treats a particle trajectory as a subordinated stochastic process that is described by a set of Langevin equations, which represent a continuous time random walk (CTRW). Convolution-based particle tracking (CBPT) is used to increase the computational efficiency and accuracy of these particle-based simulations. The combined CTRW-CBPT approach enables one to convert any particle tracking legacy code into a simulator capable of handling non-Fickian transport.

  1. Regional Atmospheric Transport Code for Hanford Emission Tracking, Version 2(RATCHET2)

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsdell, James V.; Rishel, Jeremy P.

    2006-07-01

    This manual describes the atmospheric model and computer code for the Atmospheric Transport Module within SAC. The Atmospheric Transport Module, called RATCHET2, calculates the time-integrated air concentration and surface deposition of airborne contaminants to the soil. The RATCHET2 code is an adaptation of the Regional Atmospheric Transport Code for Hanford Emissions Tracking (RATCHET). The original RATCHET code was developed to perform the atmospheric transport for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. Fundamentally, the two sets of codes are identical; no capabilities have been deleted from the original version of RATCHET. Most modifications are generally limited to revision of the run-specification file to streamline the simulation process for SAC.

  2. Analysis of Lagrangian stretching in turbulent channel flow using a database task-parallel particle tracking approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneveau, Charles; Johnson, Perry; Hamilton, Stephen; Burns, Randal

    2016-11-01

    An intrinsic property of turbulent flows is the exponential deformation of fluid elements along Lagrangian paths. The production of enstrophy by vorticity stretching follows from a similar mechanism in the Lagrangian view, though the alignment statistics differ and viscosity prevents unbounded growth. In this paper, the stretching properties of fluid elements and vorticity along Lagrangian paths are studied in a channel flow at Reτ = 1000 and compared with prior, known results from isotropic turbulence. To track Lagrangian paths in a public database containing Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) results, the task-parallel approach previously employed in the isotropic database is extended to the case of flow in a bounded domain. It is shown that above 100 viscous units from the wall, stretching statistics are equal to their isotropic values, in support of the local isotropy hypothesis. Normalized by dissipation rate, the stretching in the buffer layer and below is less efficient due to less favorable alignment statistics. The Cramér function characterizing cumulative Lagrangian stretching statistics shows that overall the channel flow has about half of the stretching per unit dissipation compared with isotropic turbulence. Supported by a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program under Grant No. DGE-1232825, and by National Science Foundation Grants CBET-1507469, ACI-1261715, OCI-1244820 and by JHU IDIES.

  3. Observational Evidence For The Cause Of The `Parallel Track' Phenomenon And Hysteresis Of Spectral Transitions In X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wenfei

    2010-03-01

    RXTE observations of neutron star LMXBs have shown the same kHz QPO frequency or the same X-ray color occurs at different X-ray fluxes in a single source, forming the so-called `parallel track' phenomenon. Hysteresis effect of spectral transitions, which is usually seen in black hole or neutron star soft X-ray transients, corresponds to the special cases of the phenomenon when the X-ray colors transit between two main spectral branches. Our systematic studies of the spectral state transitions seen in bright X-ray binaries with the RXTE/ASM and the Swift/BAT in the past 4-5 years indicates that the rate-of-change of the mass accretion rate dominates over the mass accretion rate itself in causing spectral state transitions, implying the rate-of-change of the mass accretion rate, an indicator of the non-stationary accretion in X-ray binaries, is the cause of both phenomena. Spectral and timing evidence will be provided in the presentation.

  4. Nanoparticle traffic on helical tracks: thermophoretic mass transport through carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Schoen, Philipp A E; Walther, Jens H; Arcidiacono, Salvatore; Poulikakos, Dimos; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2006-09-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrate and quantify thermophoretic motion of solid gold nanoparticles inside carbon nanotubes subject to wall temperature gradients ranging from 0.4 to 25 K/nm. For temperature gradients below 1 K/nm, we find that the particles move "on tracks" in a predictable fashion as they follow unique helical orbits depending on the geometry of the carbon nanotubes. These findings markedly advance our knowledge of mass transport mechanisms relevant to nanoscale applications.

  5. Transport properties of track-etched membranes having variable effective pore-lengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Quoc Hung; Ali, Mubarak; Nasir, Saima; Ensinger, Wolfgang

    2015-12-01

    The transport rate of molecules through polymeric membranes is normally limited because of their micrometer-scale thickness which restricts their suitability for more practical application. To study the effect of effective pore length on the transport behavior, polymer membranes containing cylindrical and asymmetric-shaped nanopores were prepared through a two-step ion track-etching technique. Permeation experiments were performed separately to investigate the transport properties (molecular flux and selectivity) of these track-etched membranes. The permeation data shows that the molecular flux across membranes containing asymmetric nanopores is higher compared to those having cylindrical pores. On the other hand, the cylindrical pore membranes exhibit higher selectivity than asymmetric pores for the permeation of charged molecules across the membrane. Current-voltage (I-V) measurements of single-pore membranes further verify that asymmetric pores exhibit lower resistance for the flow of ions and therefore show higher currents than cylindrical pores. Moreover, unmodified and polyethyleneimine (PEI) modified asymmetric-shaped pore membranes were successfully used for the separation of cationic and anionic analyte molecules from their mixture, respectively. In this study, two distinct effects (pore geometry and pore density, i.e. number of pores cm-2), which mainly influence membrane selectivity and molecular transport rates, were thoroughly investigated in order to optimize the membrane performance. In this context, we believe that membranes with high molecular transport rates could readily find their application in molecular separation and controlled drug delivery processes.

  6. [Key technologies and implementation of the medical equipment road transportation simulation platform based on 6-DOF parallel robots].

    PubMed

    Pei, Yidong; Pei, Baoqing; Li, Hui; Fan, Yubo

    2013-01-01

    In view of the shortage of medical equipment road transportation simulation platform, we put forward a road transportation simulation method based on 6-DOF parallel robots. A 3D road spectrum model was built by the improvement of the harmonic superposition method. The simulation model was then compared with the standard model to verify its performance. Taking the road spectrum as the excitation, we could get the robot motion data to control the parallel robot through the S-shaped linear interpolation of the absolute position. It can simulate the movement of vehicles with different speed under various road conditions efficiently and accurately.

  7. Steady-state and time-dependent modelling of parallel transport in the scrape-off layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havlíčková, E.; Fundamenski, W.; Naulin, V.; Nielsen, A. H.; Zagórski, R.; Seidl, J.; Horáček, J.

    2011-06-01

    The one-dimensional fluid code SOLF1D has been used for modelling of plasma transport in the scrape-off layer (SOL) along magnetic field lines, both in steady state and under transient conditions that arise due to plasma turbulence. The presented work summarizes results of SOLF1D with attention given to transient parallel transport which reveals two distinct time scales due to the transport mechanisms of convection and diffusion. Time-dependent modelling combined with the effect of ballooning shows propagation of particles along the magnetic field line with Mach number up to M ≈ 1 and supersonic transport when plasma-neutral interactions are not present. Asymmetric heat and particle fluxes are analysed for a case with poloidally asymmetric radial outflow (ballooning) and for a radial outflow with parallel momentum (rotation). In addition, parallel damping of the density and electron temperature calculated in SOLF1D is compared with the approximative model used in the turbulence code ESEL both for steady-state and turbulent SOL. Dynamics of the parallel transport are investigated for a simple transient event simulating the propagation of particles and energy to the targets from a blob passing across the flux tube at the outboard midplane and for more complex time-dependent data provided by ESEL.

  8. Feeding the "aneurysm": Orogen-parallel mass transport into Nanga Parbat and the western Himalayan syntaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whipp, David M.; Beaumont, Christopher; Braun, Jean

    2014-06-01

    The Nanga Parbat-Haramosh massif (NPHM; western Himalayan syntaxis) requires an influx of mass exceeding that in the adjacent Himalayan arc to sustain high topography and rapid erosional exhumation rates. What supplies this mass flux and feeds this "tectonic aneurysm?" We show, using a simple 3-D model of oblique orogen convergence, that velocity/strain partitioning results in horizontal orogen-parallel (OP) crustal transport, and the same behavior is inferred for the Himalaya, with OP transport diverting converging crust toward the syntaxis. Model results also show that the OP flow rate decreases in the syntaxis, thereby thickening the crust and forming a structure like the NPHM. The additional crustal thickening, over and above that elsewhere in the Himalayan arc, sustains the rapid exhumation of this "aneurysm." Normally, velocity/strain partitioning would be minimal for the Himalayan arc where the convergence obliquity is no greater than ~40°. However, we show analytically that the Himalayan system can act both as a critical wedge and exhibit strain partitioning if both the detachment beneath the wedge and the bounding rear shear zone, which accommodates OP transport, are very weak. Corresponding numerical results confirm this requirement and demonstrate that a Nanga Parbat-type shortening structure can develop spontaneously if the orogenic wedge and bounding rear shear zone can strain rate soften while active. These results lead us to question whether the position of NPHM aneurysm is localized by river incision, as previously suggested, or by a priori focused tectonic shortening of the crust in the syntaxis region as demonstrated by our models.

  9. A Parallel 3d Model for The Multi-Species Low Energy BeamTransport System of the RIA Prototype ECR Ion Source Venus

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.; Leitner, D.; Todd, D.

    2005-05-16

    The driver linac of the proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) requires a great variety of high intensity, high charge state ion beams. In order to design and to optimize the low energy beamline optics of the RIA front end,we have developed a new parallel three-dimensional model to simulate the low energy, multi-species ion beam formation and transport from the ECR ion source extraction region to the focal plane of the analyzing magnet. A multisection overlapped computational domain has been used to break the original transport system into a number of each subsystem, macro-particle tracking is used to obtain the charge density distribution in this subdomain. The three-dimensional Poisson equation is solved within the subdomain and particle tracking is repeated until the solution converges. Two new Poisson solvers based on a combination of the spectral method and the multigrid method have been developed to solve the Poisson equation in cylindrical coordinates for the beam extraction region and in the Frenet-Serret coordinates for the bending magnet region. Some test examples and initial applications will also be presented.

  10. A combined PHREEQC-2/parallel fracture model for the simulation of laminar/non-laminar flow and contaminant transport with reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masciopinto, Costantino; Volpe, Angela; Palmiotta, Domenico; Cherubini, Claudia

    2010-09-01

    A combination of a parallel fracture model with the PHREEQC-2 geochemical model was developed to simulate sequential flow and chemical transport with reactions in fractured media where both laminar and turbulent flows occur. The integration of non-laminar flow resistances in one model produced relevant effects on water flow velocities, thus improving model prediction capabilities on contaminant transport. The proposed conceptual model consists of 3D rock-blocks, separated by horizontal bedding plane fractures with variable apertures. Particle tracking solved the transport equations for conservative compounds and provided input for PHREEQC-2. For each cluster of contaminant pathways, PHREEQC-2 determined the concentration for mass-transfer, sorption/desorption, ion exchange, mineral dissolution/precipitation and biodegradation, under kinetically controlled reactive processes of equilibrated chemical species. Field tests have been performed for the code verification. As an example, the combined model has been applied to a contaminated fractured aquifer of southern Italy in order to simulate the phenol transport. The code correctly fitted the field available data and also predicted a possible rapid depletion of phenols as a result of an increased biodegradation rate induced by a simulated artificial injection of nitrates, upgradient to the sources.

  11. A combined PHREEQC-2/parallel fracture model for the simulation of laminar/non-laminar flow and contaminant transport with reactions.

    PubMed

    Masciopinto, Costantino; Volpe, Angela; Palmiotta, Domenico; Cherubini, Claudia

    2010-09-20

    A combination of a parallel fracture model with the PHREEQC-2 geochemical model was developed to simulate sequential flow and chemical transport with reactions in fractured media where both laminar and turbulent flows occur. The integration of non-laminar flow resistances in one model produced relevant effects on water flow velocities, thus improving model prediction capabilities on contaminant transport. The proposed conceptual model consists of 3D rock-blocks, separated by horizontal bedding plane fractures with variable apertures. Particle tracking solved the transport equations for conservative compounds and provided input for PHREEQC-2. For each cluster of contaminant pathways, PHREEQC-2 determined the concentration for mass-transfer, sorption/desorption, ion exchange, mineral dissolution/precipitation and biodegradation, under kinetically controlled reactive processes of equilibrated chemical species. Field tests have been performed for the code verification. As an example, the combined model has been applied to a contaminated fractured aquifer of southern Italy in order to simulate the phenol transport. The code correctly fitted the field available data and also predicted a possible rapid depletion of phenols as a result of an increased biodegradation rate induced by a simulated artificial injection of nitrates, upgradient to the sources.

  12. A Many-Task Parallel Approach for Multiscale Simulations of Subsurface Flow and Reactive Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Scheibe, Timothy D.; Yang, Xiaofan; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Agarwal, Khushbu; Chase, Jared M.; Palmer, Bruce J.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2014-12-16

    Continuum-scale models have long been used to study subsurface flow, transport, and reactions but lack the ability to resolve processes that are governed by pore-scale mixing. Recently, pore-scale models, which explicitly resolve individual pores and soil grains, have been developed to more accurately model pore-scale phenomena, particularly reaction processes that are controlled by local mixing. However, pore-scale models are prohibitively expensive for modeling application-scale domains. This motivates the use of a hybrid multiscale approach in which continuum- and pore-scale codes are coupled either hierarchically or concurrently within an overall simulation domain (time and space). This approach is naturally suited to an adaptive, loosely-coupled many-task methodology with three potential levels of concurrency. Each individual code (pore- and continuum-scale) can be implemented in parallel; multiple semi-independent instances of the pore-scale code are required at each time step providing a second level of concurrency; and Monte Carlo simulations of the overall system to represent uncertainty in material property distributions provide a third level of concurrency. We have developed a hybrid multiscale model of a mixing-controlled reaction in a porous medium wherein the reaction occurs only over a limited portion of the domain. Loose, minimally-invasive coupling of pre-existing parallel continuum- and pore-scale codes has been accomplished by an adaptive script-based workflow implemented in the Swift workflow system. We describe here the methods used to create the model system, adaptively control multiple coupled instances of pore- and continuum-scale simulations, and maximize the scalability of the overall system. We present results of numerical experiments conducted on NERSC supercomputing systems; our results demonstrate that loose many-task coupling provides a scalable solution for multiscale subsurface simulations with minimal overhead.

  13. Tracking Quantum-Dot labeled neurotropic factors transport along primary neuronal axons in compartmental microfluidic chambers.

    PubMed

    Gluska, Shani; Chein, Michael; Rotem, Nimrod; Ionescu, Ariel; Perlson, Eran

    2016-01-01

    Neurons are highly polarized cells, with very long axons. Neurotrophic factors like the neuronal growth factor (NGF) are secreted from neuronal targets to promote neuron survival and proper function. These neurotrophic factors must undergo retrograde axonal transport towards the cell body, wherein they initiate signaling pathways important for neurons' various functions and overall health. This process of long-distance axonal signaling is conducted by the dynein motor protein, which transmits signaling endosomes of ligand-receptor complexes retrogradely along microtubule tracks. Here we describe step by step the use of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) compartmentalized microfluidic chambers for tracking axonal transport of trophic factors, with a focus on labeled NGF. We describe in detail how to fabricate the molds, assemble the PDMS platform, plate neurons and image, as well as analyze NGF transport along the axon. This method is useful for studying molecular communication mechanisms within the neuron's different compartments as well as between the neuron and its diverse microenvironments, both in health and under pathological conditions.

  14. Development of an expert system for automatic mesh generation for S(N) particle transport method in parallel environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patchimpattapong, Apisit

    This dissertation develops an expert system for generating an effective spatial mesh distribution for the discrete ordinates particle transport method in a parallel environment. This expert system consists of two main parts: (1) an algorithm for generating an effective mesh distribution in a serial environment, and (2) an algorithm for inference of an effective domain decomposition strategy for parallel computing. The mesh generation algorithm consists of four steps: creation of a geometric model as partitioned into coarse meshes, determination of an approximate flux shape, selection of appropriate differencing schemes, and generation of an effective fine mesh distribution. A geometric model was created using AutoCAD. A parallel code PENFC (Parallel Environment Neutral-Particle First Collision) has been developed to calculate an uncollided flux in a 3-D Cartesian geometry. The appropriate differencing schemes were selected based on the uncollided flux distribution using a least squares methodology. A menu-driven serial code PENXMSH has been developed to generate an effective spatial mesh distribution that preserves problem geometry and physics. The domain decomposition selection process involves evaluation of the four factors that affect parallel performance, which include number of processors and memory available per processor, load balance, granularity, and degree-of-coupling among processors. These factors are used to derive a parallel-performance-index that provides expected performance of a parallel algorithm depending on computing environment and resources. A large index indicates a high granularity algorithm with relatively low coupling among processors. This expert system has been successfully tested within the PENTRAN (Parallel Environment Neutral-Particle Transport) code system for simulating real-life shielding problems: the VENUS-3 experimental facility and the BWR core shroud.

  15. Moist synoptic transport of carbon dioxide along midlatitude storm tracks, transport uncertainty, and implications for carbon dioxide flux estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parazoo, Nicholas C.

    Mass transport along moist isentropic surfaces on baroclinic waves represents an important component of the atmospheric heat engine that operates between the equator and poles. This is also an important vehicle for tracer transport, and is correlated with ecosystem metabolism because large-scale baroclinicity and photosynthesis are both driven seasonally by variations in solar radiation. In this research, I pursue a dynamical framework for explaining atmospheric transport of CO2 by synoptic weather systems at middle and high latitudes. A global model of atmospheric tracer transport, driven by meteorological analysis in combination with a detailed description of surface fluxes, is used to create time varying CO2 distributions in the atmosphere. Simulated mass fluxes of CO2 are then decomposed into a zonal monthly mean component and deviations from the monthly mean in space and time. Mass fluxes of CO2 are described on moist isentropic surfaces to represent frontal transport along storm tracks. Forward simulations suggest that synoptic weather systems transport large amounts of CO2 north and south in northern mid-latitudes, up to 1 PgC month-1 during winter when baroclinic wave activity peaks. During boreal winter when northern plants respire, warm moist air, high in CO2, is swept upward and poleward along the east side of baroclinic waves and injected into the polar vortex, while cold dry air, low in CO 2, that had been transported into the polar vortex earlier in the year is advected equatorward. These synoptic eddies act to strongly reduce seasonality of CO2 in the biologically active mid-latitudes by 50% of that implied by local net ecosystem exchange while correspondingly amplifying seasonality in the Arctic. Transport along stormtracks is correlated with rising, moist, cloudy air, which systematically hides this CO2 transport from satellite observing systems. Meridional fluxes of CO2 are of comparable magnitude as surface exchange of CO2 in mid-latitudes, and

  16. Drive of parallel flows by turbulence and large-scale E × B transverse transport in divertor geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galassi, D.; Tamain, P.; Bufferand, H.; Ciraolo, G.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Baudoin, C.; Colin, C.; Fedorczak, N.; Nace, N.; Serre, E.

    2017-03-01

    The poloidal asymmetries of parallel flows in edge plasmas are investigated by the 3D fluid turbulence code TOKAM3X. A diverted COMPASS-like magnetic equilibrium is used for the simulations. The measurements and simulations of parallel Mach numbers are compared, and exhibit good qualitative agreement. Small-scale turbulent transport is observed to dominate near the low field side midplane, even though it co-exists with significant large-scale cross-field fluxes. Despite the turbulent nature of the plasma in the divertor region, simulations show the low effectiveness of turbulence for the cross-field transport towards the private flux region. Nevertheless, a complex pattern of fluxes associated with the average field components are found to cross the separatrix in the divertor region. Large-scale and small-scale turbulent E× B transport, along with the \

  17. Parallel Algorithms for Monte Carlo Particle Transport Simulation on Exascale Computing Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Paul Kollath

    Monte Carlo particle transport methods are being considered as a viable option for high-fidelity simulation of nuclear reactors. While Monte Carlo methods offer several potential advantages over deterministic methods, there are a number of algorithmic shortcomings that would prevent their immediate adoption for full-core analyses. In this thesis, algorithms are proposed both to ameliorate the degradation in parallel efficiency typically observed for large numbers of processors and to offer a means of decomposing large tally data that will be needed for reactor analysis. A nearest-neighbor fission bank algorithm was proposed and subsequently implemented in the OpenMC Monte Carlo code. A theoretical analysis of the communication pattern shows that the expected cost is O( N ) whereas traditional fission bank algorithms are O(N) at best. The algorithm was tested on two supercomputers, the Intrepid Blue Gene/P and the Titan Cray XK7, and demonstrated nearly linear parallel scaling up to 163,840 processor cores on a full-core benchmark problem. An algorithm for reducing network communication arising from tally reduction was analyzed and implemented in OpenMC. The proposed algorithm groups only particle histories on a single processor into batches for tally purposes---in doing so it prevents all network communication for tallies until the very end of the simulation. The algorithm was tested, again on a full-core benchmark, and shown to reduce network communication substantially. A model was developed to predict the impact of load imbalances on the performance of domain decomposed simulations. The analysis demonstrated that load imbalances in domain decomposed simulations arise from two distinct phenomena: non-uniform particle densities and non-uniform spatial leakage. The dominant performance penalty for domain decomposition was shown to come from these physical effects rather than insufficient network bandwidth or high latency. The model predictions were verified with

  18. Development of Parallel Computing Framework to Enhance Radiation Transport Code Capabilities for Rare Isotope Beam Facility Design

    SciTech Connect

    Kostin, Mikhail; Mokhov, Nikolai; Niita, Koji

    2013-09-25

    A parallel computing framework has been developed to use with general-purpose radiation transport codes. The framework was implemented as a C++ module that uses MPI for message passing. It is intended to be used with older radiation transport codes implemented in Fortran77, Fortran 90 or C. The module is significantly independent of radiation transport codes it can be used with, and is connected to the codes by means of a number of interface functions. The framework was developed and tested in conjunction with the MARS15 code. It is possible to use it with other codes such as PHITS, FLUKA and MCNP after certain adjustments. Besides the parallel computing functionality, the framework offers a checkpoint facility that allows restarting calculations with a saved checkpoint file. The checkpoint facility can be used in single process calculations as well as in the parallel regime. The framework corrects some of the known problems with the scheduling and load balancing found in the original implementations of the parallel computing functionality in MARS15 and PHITS. The framework can be used efficiently on homogeneous systems and networks of workstations, where the interference from the other users is possible.

  19. Microtubule doublets are double-track railways for intraflagellar transport trains.

    PubMed

    Stepanek, Ludek; Pigino, Gaia

    2016-05-06

    The cilium is a large macromolecular machine that is vital for motility, signaling, and sensing in most eukaryotic cells. Its conserved core structure, the axoneme, contains nine microtubule doublets, each comprising a full A-microtubule and an incomplete B-microtubule. However, thus far, the function of this doublet geometry has not been understood. We developed a time-resolved correlative fluorescence and three-dimensional electron microscopy approach to investigate the dynamics of intraflagellar transport (IFT) trains, which carry ciliary building blocks along microtubules during the assembly and disassembly of the cilium. Using this method, we showed that each microtubule doublet is used as a bidirectional double-track railway: Anterograde IFT trains move along B-microtubules, and retrograde trains move along A-microtubules. Thus, the microtubule doublet geometry provides direction-specific rails to coordinate bidirectional transport of ciliary components.

  20. Electrical Transport Through Micro Porous Track Etch Membranes of same Porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Ravish; Kumar, Vijay; Kumar, Dinesh; Chakarvarti, S. K.

    2012-12-01

    Porosity, pore size and thickness of membrane are vital factors to influence the transport phenomena through micro porous track etch membranes (TEMs) and affect the various applications like separations, drug release, flow control, bio-sensing and cell size detection etc. based on transport process. Therefore, a better understanding of transport mechanism through TEMs is required for new applications in various thrust areas like biomedical devices and packaging of foods and drugs. Transport studies of electrolytic solutions of potassium chloride, through porous polycarbonate TEMS having cylindrical pores of size 0.2 μm and 0.4 μm with same porosity of 15%, have been carried out using an electrochemical cell. In this technique, the etched filter is sandwiched between two compartments of cell in such a way that the TEM acts as a membrane separating the cell into two chambers. The two chambers are then filled with electrolyte solution (KCl in distilled water). The current voltage characteristics have been drawn by stepping the voltage ranging 0 to 10 V using Keithley 2400 Series Source Measurement Unit. The results indicate that rate of ion transport through cylindrical pores although is independent of pore size of TEMs of same porosity but there seems to be effect of TEM aperture size exposed to the electrolyte used in conducting cell on ion transport magnitude. From the experimental studies, a large deviation in the conduction through TEMs was observed when compared with theoretical consideration which led to the need for modification in the applicability of simple Ohm's law to the conduction through TEMs. It is found that ion transport increases with increase in area of aperture of TEM but much lower than the expected theoretically value.

  1. Linear Quadratic Tracking Design for a Generic Transport Aircraft with Structural Load Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burken, John J.; Frost, Susan A.; Taylor, Brian R.

    2011-01-01

    When designing control laws for systems with constraints added to the tracking performance, control allocation methods can be utilized. Control allocations methods are used when there are more command inputs than controlled variables. Constraints that require allocators are such task as; surface saturation limits, structural load limits, drag reduction constraints or actuator failures. Most transport aircraft have many actuated surfaces compared to the three controlled variables (such as angle of attack, roll rate & angle of side slip). To distribute the control effort among the redundant set of actuators a fixed mixer approach can be utilized or online control allocation techniques. The benefit of an online allocator is that constraints can be considered in the design whereas the fixed mixer cannot. However, an online control allocator mixer has a disadvantage of not guaranteeing a surface schedule, which can then produce ill defined loads on the aircraft. The load uncertainty and complexity has prevented some controller designs from using advanced allocation techniques. This paper considers actuator redundancy management for a class of over actuated systems with real-time structural load limits using linear quadratic tracking applied to the generic transport model. A roll maneuver example of an artificial load limit constraint is shown and compared to the same no load limitation maneuver.

  2. A first generation dynamic ingress, redistribution and transport model of soil track-in: DIRT.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D L

    2008-12-01

    This work introduces a spatially resolved quantitative model, based on conservation of mass and first order transfer kinetics, for following the transport and redistribution of outdoor soil to, and within, the indoor environment by track-in on footwear. Implementations of the DIRT model examined the influence of room size, rug area and location, shoe size, and mass transfer coefficients for smooth and carpeted floor surfaces using the ratio of mass loading on carpeted to smooth floor surfaces as a performance metric. Results showed that in the limit for large numbers of random steps the dual aspects of deposition to and track-off from the carpets govern this ratio. Using recently obtained experimental measurements, historic transport and distribution parameters, cleaning efficiencies for the different floor surfaces, and indoor dust deposition rates to provide model boundary conditions, DIRT predicts realistic floor surface loadings. The spatio-temporal variability in model predictions agrees with field observations and suggests that floor surface dust loadings are constantly in flux; steady state distributions are hardly, if ever, achieved.

  3. Route planning with transportation network maps: an eye-tracking study.

    PubMed

    Grison, Elise; Gyselinck, Valérie; Burkhardt, Jean-Marie; Wiener, Jan Malte

    2017-09-01

    Planning routes using transportation network maps is a common task that has received little attention in the literature. Here, we present a novel eye-tracking paradigm to investigate psychological processes and mechanisms involved in such a route planning. In the experiment, participants were first presented with an origin and destination pair before we presented them with fictitious public transportation maps. Their task was to find the connecting route that required the minimum number of transfers. Based on participants' gaze behaviour, each trial was split into two phases: (1) the search for origin and destination phase, i.e., the initial phase of the trial until participants gazed at both origin and destination at least once and (2) the route planning and selection phase. Comparisons of other eye-tracking measures between these phases and the time to complete them, which depended on the complexity of the planning task, suggest that these two phases are indeed distinct and supported by different cognitive processes. For example, participants spent more time attending the centre of the map during the initial search phase, before directing their attention to connecting stations, where transitions between lines were possible. Our results provide novel insights into the psychological processes involved in route planning from maps. The findings are discussed in relation to the current theories of route planning.

  4. Fluorescent nanodiamond tracking reveals intraneuronal transport abnormalities induced by brain-disease-related genetic risk factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haziza, Simon; Mohan, Nitin; Loe-Mie, Yann; Lepagnol-Bestel, Aude-Marie; Massou, Sophie; Adam, Marie-Pierre; Le, Xuan Loc; Viard, Julia; Plancon, Christine; Daudin, Rachel; Koebel, Pascale; Dorard, Emilie; Rose, Christiane; Hsieh, Feng-Jen; Wu, Chih-Che; Potier, Brigitte; Herault, Yann; Sala, Carlo; Corvin, Aiden; Allinquant, Bernadette; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Treussart, François; Simonneau, Michel

    2017-05-01

    Brain diseases such as autism and Alzheimer's disease (each inflicting >1% of the world population) involve a large network of genes displaying subtle changes in their expression. Abnormalities in intraneuronal transport have been linked to genetic risk factors found in patients, suggesting the relevance of measuring this key biological process. However, current techniques are not sensitive enough to detect minor abnormalities. Here we report a sensitive method to measure the changes in intraneuronal transport induced by brain-disease-related genetic risk factors using fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs). We show that the high brightness, photostability and absence of cytotoxicity allow FNDs to be tracked inside the branches of dissociated neurons with a spatial resolution of 12 nm and a temporal resolution of 50 ms. As proof of principle, we applied the FND tracking assay on two transgenic mouse lines that mimic the slight changes in protein concentration (∼30%) found in the brains of patients. In both cases, we show that the FND assay is sufficiently sensitive to detect these changes.

  5. Antibody-Conjugated Single Quantum Dot Tracking of Membrane Neurotransmitter Transporters in Primary Neuronal Cultures.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Danielle M; Kovtun, Oleg; Rosenthal, Sandra J

    2017-01-01

    Single particle tracking (SPT) experiments have provided the scientific community with invaluable single-molecule information about the dynamic regulation of individual receptors, transporters, kinases, lipids, and molecular motors. SPT is an alternative to ensemble averaging approaches, where heterogeneous modes of motion might be lost. Quantum dots (QDs) are excellent probes for SPT experiments due to their photostability, high brightness, and size-dependent, narrow emission spectra. In a typical QD-based SPT experiment, QDs are bound to the target of interest and imaged for seconds to minutes via fluorescence video microscopy. Single QD spots in individual frames are then linked to form trajectories that are analyzed to determine their mean square displacement, diffusion coefficient, confinement index, and instantaneous velocity. This chapter describes a generalizable protocol for the single particle tracking of membrane neurotransmitter transporters on cell membranes with either unmodified extracellular antibody probes and secondary antibody-conjugated quantum dots or biotinylated extracellular antibody probes and streptavidin-conjugated quantum dots in primary neuronal cultures. The neuronal cell culture, the biotinylation protocol and the quantum dot labeling procedures, as well as basic data analysis are discussed.

  6. Mitigation of along-track artifacts in unconstrained mass transport models based on GRACE satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditmar, Pavel; Hashemi Farahani, Hassan; Encarnação, João.

    2010-05-01

    The satellite gravity mission GRACE (Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment), which was launched in 2002, offers a unique opportunity to monitor tiny variations of the Earth's gravity and associated mass transport from space. In particular, the redistribution of water in the Earth's system can be traced in this way, which is critical for monitoring key climate indicators such as ice-sheet mass balance, terrestrial water-storage change, sea-level rise, and ocean circulation. Unfortunately, mass transport models based on GRACE data suffer from along-track artifacts. In order to suppress these artifacts, various filtering algorithms are applied to unconstrained GRACE-based models at the post-processing stage. However, any filtering not only suppresses noise but also distorts signals. Therefore, it is important to study the precise origin of the along-track artifacts in an attempt to mitigate them already at the level of unconstrained solutions. We identify two major causes of along-track artifacts: (1) the presence of low-frequency noise in GRACE data and (2) the observation principle of the GRACE satellite mission, which results in a poor sensitivity of the collected inter-satellite ranging data to the East-West gradient of the gravity field. According to our studies, an increased level of noise at low frequencies can be mostly explained by inaccuracies in the estimated orbits of GRACE satellites. To suppress this type of noise, we propose: (i) to use more advanced orbit determination procedures that allow deficiencies of available force models to be mitigated; (ii) to apply proper data weighting in the frequency domain, so that that the influence of frequencies with a large noise level is downweighted. As far as East-West gradients are concerned, we find it important to use the statistically optimal combination of GRACE inter-satellite ranging data with other observations (particularly, absolute positions of GRACE and CHAMP satellites). The added value of each of

  7. Laboratory observations of sediment transport using combined particle image and tracking velocimetry (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Donya; Calantoni, Joseph

    2017-05-01

    Improved understanding of coastal hydrodynamics and morphology will lead to more effective mitigation measures that reduce fatalities and property damage caused by natural disasters such as hurricanes. We investigated sediment transport under oscillatory flow over flat and rippled beds with phase-separated stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). Standard PIV techniques severely limit measurements at the fluid-sediment interface and do not allow for the observation of separate phases in multi-phase flow (e.g. sand grains in water). We have implemented phase-separated Particle Image Velocimetry by adding fluorescent tracer particles to the fluid in order to observe fluid flow and sediment transport simultaneously. While sand grains scatter 532 nm wavelength laser light, the fluorescent particles absorb 532 nm laser light and re-emit light at a wavelength of 584 nm. Optical long-pass filters with a cut-on wavelength of 550 nm were installed on two cameras configured to perform stereoscopic PIV to capture only the light emitted by the fluorescent tracer particles. A third high-speed camera was used to capture the light scattered by the sand grains allowing for sediment particle tracking via particle tracking velocimetry (PTV). Together, these overlapping, simultaneously recorded images provided sediment particle and fluid velocities at high temporal and spatial resolution (100 Hz sampling with 0.8 mm vector spacing for the 2D-3C fluid velocity field). Measurements were made under a wide range of oscillatory flows over flat and rippled sand beds. The set of observations allow for the investigation of the relative importance of pressure gradients and shear stresses on sediment transport.

  8. Development of Improved Analysis of 1-D Non-Local Electron Parallel Heat Transport in Divertor Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang-Geun; Alouani Bibi, Fathallah; Matte, Jean-Pierre; Rognlien, Thomas D.; Stotler, Daren P.

    2003-10-01

    Improved analysis of 1-D non-local electron parallel heat transport in divertor plasmas is investigated. In the divertor of NSTX, as well as in other magnetic confinement devices, there are steep temperature gradients parallel to the direction of the magnetic field, especially near the neutralizer plates. Strong temperature gradients modify the electrons' thermal transport. A recently developed delocalization formula [1] is implemented in the "UEDGE" fluid edge plasma simulation code. UEDGE simulations are performed using this non-local electron heat flow formula (without any external heating source), and are compared to runs made with the more traditional flux limited heat diffusion formula. . [1] F. Alouani Bibi and J.P. Matte, Phys. Rev. E 66, 066414 (2002)

  9. PFLOTRAN User Manual: A Massively Parallel Reactive Flow and Transport Model for Describing Surface and Subsurface Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtner, Peter C.; Hammond, Glenn E.; Lu, Chuan; Karra, Satish; Bisht, Gautam; Andre, Benjamin; Mills, Richard; Kumar, Jitendra

    2015-01-20

    PFLOTRAN solves a system of generally nonlinear partial differential equations describing multi-phase, multicomponent and multiscale reactive flow and transport in porous materials. The code is designed to run on massively parallel computing architectures as well as workstations and laptops (e.g. Hammond et al., 2011). Parallelization is achieved through domain decomposition using the PETSc (Portable Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computation) libraries for the parallelization framework (Balay et al., 1997). PFLOTRAN has been developed from the ground up for parallel scalability and has been run on up to 218 processor cores with problem sizes up to 2 billion degrees of freedom. Written in object oriented Fortran 90, the code requires the latest compilers compatible with Fortran 2003. At the time of this writing this requires gcc 4.7.x, Intel 12.1.x and PGC compilers. As a requirement of running problems with a large number of degrees of freedom, PFLOTRAN allows reading input data that is too large to fit into memory allotted to a single processor core. The current limitation to the problem size PFLOTRAN can handle is the limitation of the HDF5 file format used for parallel IO to 32 bit integers. Noting that 232 = 4; 294; 967; 296, this gives an estimate of the maximum problem size that can be currently run with PFLOTRAN. Hopefully this limitation will be remedied in the near future.

  10. Implementation Strategies for Large-Scale Transport Simulations Using Time Domain Particle Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painter, S.; Cvetkovic, V.; Mancillas, J.; Selroos, J.

    2008-12-01

    Time domain particle tracking is an emerging alternative to the conventional random walk particle tracking algorithm. With time domain particle tracking, particles are moved from node to node on one-dimensional pathways defined by streamlines of the groundwater flow field or by discrete subsurface features. The time to complete each deterministic segment is sampled from residence time distributions that include the effects of advection, longitudinal dispersion, a variety of kinetically controlled retention (sorption) processes, linear transformation, and temporal changes in groundwater velocities and sorption parameters. The simulation results in a set of arrival times at a monitoring location that can be post-processed with a kernel method to construct mass discharge (breakthrough) versus time. Implementation strategies differ for discrete flow (fractured media) systems and continuous porous media systems. The implementation strategy also depends on the scale at which hydraulic property heterogeneity is represented in the supporting flow model. For flow models that explicitly represent discrete features (e.g., discrete fracture networks), the sampling of residence times along segments is conceptually straightforward. For continuous porous media, such sampling needs to be related to the Lagrangian velocity field. Analytical or semi-analytical methods may be used to approximate the Lagrangian segment velocity distributions in aquifers with low-to-moderate variability, thereby capturing transport effects of subgrid velocity variability. If variability in hydraulic properties is large, however, Lagrangian velocity distributions are difficult to characterize and numerical simulations are required; in particular, numerical simulations are likely to be required for estimating the velocity integral scale as a basis for advective segment distributions. Aquifers with evolving heterogeneity scales present additional challenges. Large-scale simulations of radionuclide

  11. Satellite Perspective of Aerosol Intercontinental Transport: From Qualitative Tracking to Quantitative Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Hongbin; Remer, Lorraine A.; Kahn, Ralph A.; Chin, Mian; Zhang, Yan

    2012-01-01

    Evidence of aerosol intercontinental transport (ICT) is both widespread and compelling. Model simulations suggest that ICT could significantly affect regional air quality and climate, but the broad inter-model spread of results underscores a need of constraining model simulations with measurements. Satellites have inherent advantages over in situ measurements to characterize aerosol ICT, because of their spatial and temporal coverage. Significant progress in satellite remote sensing of aerosol properties during the Earth Observing System (EOS) era offers opportunity to increase quantitative characterization and estimates of aerosol ICT, beyond the capability of pre-EOS era satellites that could only qualitatively track aerosol plumes. EOS satellites also observe emission strengths and injection heights of some aerosols, aerosol precursors, and aerosol-related gases, which can help characterize aerosol ICT. After an overview of these advances, we review how the current generation of satellite measurements have been used to (1) characterize the evolution of aerosol plumes (e.g., both horizontal and vertical transport, and properties) on an episodic basis, (2) understand the seasonal and inter-annual variations of aerosol ICT and their control factors, (3) estimate the export and import fluxes of aerosols, and (4) evaluate and constrain model simulations. Substantial effort is needed to further explore an integrated approach using measurements from on-orbit satellites (e.g., A-Train synergy) for observational characterization and model constraint of aerosol intercontinental transport and to develop advanced sensors for future missions.

  12. Effects of model approximations for electron, hole, and photon transport in swift heavy ion tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rymzhanov, R. A.; Medvedev, N. A.; Volkov, A. E.

    2016-12-01

    The event-by-event Monte Carlo code, TREKIS, was recently developed to describe excitation of the electron subsystems of solids in the nanometric vicinity of a trajectory of a nonrelativistic swift heavy ion (SHI) decelerated in the electronic stopping regime. The complex dielectric function (CDF) formalism was applied in the used cross sections to account for collective response of a matter to excitation. Using this model we investigate effects of the basic assumptions on the modeled kinetics of the electronic subsystem which ultimately determine parameters of an excited material in an SHI track. In particular, (a) effects of different momentum dependencies of the CDF on scattering of projectiles on the electron subsystem are investigated. The 'effective one-band' approximation for target electrons produces good coincidence of the calculated electron mean free paths with those obtained in experiments in metals. (b) Effects of collective response of a lattice appeared to dominate in randomization of electron motion. We study how sensitive these effects are to the target temperature. We also compare results of applications of different model forms of (quasi-) elastic cross sections in simulations of the ion track kinetics, e.g. those calculated taking into account optical phonons in the CDF form vs. Mott's atomic cross sections. (c) It is demonstrated that the kinetics of valence holes significantly affects redistribution of the excess electronic energy in the vicinity of an SHI trajectory as well as its conversion into lattice excitation in dielectrics and semiconductors. (d) It is also shown that induced transport of photons originated from radiative decay of core holes brings the excess energy faster and farther away from the track core, however, the amount of this energy is relatively small.

  13. High-speed tracking of intracellular structures: understanding the transport mechanisms in living plant cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Quesada, C.; Joseph, M.; Selva, J.; Farré, A.; Egea, G.; Ludevid, M. D.; Martín-Badosa, E.; Montes-Usategui, M.

    2011-10-01

    Zera® technology offers the possibility to artificially induce the formation of spherical organelles in different kinds of cells. Their large size and high density, compared to the native organelles of the cell, make them good candidates to be used as a handles for the realization of biophysical experiments inside living cells. Furthermore, they present a high signal-to-noise ratio in fluorescence microscopy and small photobleaching. This work focuses mainly on the nature of protein body motion in Nicotiana Benthamiana (tobacco) cells. The high-speed tracking of these structures reveals that they move in a stepwise mode, suggesting that myosin XI motors directly pull these organelles through the cytosol. Our results indicate that these artificially-induced structures are well integrated into the natural processes of the cell so that the technique may be advantageous for the study of the intracellular transport mechanisms. Large forces can be exerted with optical tweezers to mechanically interact with the moving organelles.

  14. Simulating nitrogen transport and transformation through urban riparian zones using a particle-tracking approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Z.; Welty, C.; Gold, A. J.; Groffman, P. M.; Kaushal, S.; Maxwell, R. M.

    2012-12-01

    Nitrate is the most common and mobile form of nitrogen contaminant found in groundwater. Riparian zones, often identified as denitrification hot spots, play an important role in processing nitrate as it moves from uplands to streams through the subsurface. However, in urban areas, where groundwater flow paths may be altered by channel incision, it is not clear how riparian zone denitrification responds to such changes in groundwater flow paths. To quantify the effects of groundwater flow path changes on riparian zone denitrification, we are applying a recently-developed 3D numerical groundwater nitrogen transport model to this problem. Based on an existing particle-tracking code, SLIM-FAST, new components were added using the operator splitting technique to account for biogeochemical reactions. The model was verified with analytical solutions, other numerical codes, and laboratory experimental results. Here we report on application of the model to a hypothetical stream riparian site to evaluate nitrogen transformations under various groundwater flow conditions. The flow field is generated using the 3D groundwater flow code, ParFlow. The particle-tracking code uses the flow field as input and the movement and reactions of the nitrogen species are simulated by the code. Initial model simulation results confirm well-known behavior that as groundwater flow paths pass through DOC-rich riparian zones, higher denitrification rates are obtained. Ongoing simulations are being carried out to quantify the effect of stream downcutting on the denitrification process.

  15. Modeling Bimolecular Reactions and Transport in Porous Media Via Particle Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Ding; David Benson; Amir Paster; Diogo Bolster

    2012-01-01

    We use a particle-tracking method to simulate several one-dimensional bimolecular reactive transport experiments. In this numerical method, the reactants are represented by particles: advection and dispersion dominate the flow, and molecular diffusion dictates, in large part, the reactions. The particle/particle reactions are determined by a combination of two probabilities dictated by the physics of transport and energetics of reaction. The first is that reactant particles occupy the same volume over a short time interval. The second is the conditional probability that two collocated particles favorably transform into a reaction. The first probability is a direct physical representation of the degree of mixing in an advancing displacement front, and as such lacks empirical parameters except for the user-defined number of particles. This number can be determined analytically from concentration autocovariance, if this type of data is available. The simulations compare favorably to two physical experiments. In one, the concentration of product, 1,2-naphthoquinoe-4-aminobenzene (NQAB) from reaction between 1,2-naphthoquinone-4-sulfonic acid (NQS) and aniline (AN), was measured at the outflow of a column filled with glass beads at different times. In the other, the concentration distribution of reactants (CuSO_4 and EDTA^{4-}) and products (CuEDTA^{4-}) were quantified by snapshots of transmitted light through a column packed with cryloite sand. The thermodynamic rate coefficient in the latter experiment was 10^7 times greater than the former experiment, making it essentially instantaneous. When compared to the solution of the advection-dispersion-reaction equation (ADRE) with the well-mixed reaction coefficient, the experiments and the particle-tracking simulations showed on the order of 20% to 40% less overall product, which is attributed to poor mixing. The poor mixing also leads to higher product concentrations on the edges of the mixing zones, which the particle

  16. Modeling bimolecular reactions and transport in porous media via particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Dong; Benson, David A.; Paster, Amir; Bolster, Diogo

    2013-03-01

    We use a particle-tracking method to simulate several one-dimensional bimolecular reactive transport experiments. In our numerical scheme, the reactants are represented by particles: advection and dispersion dominate the flow, and molecular diffusion dictates, in large part, the reactions. The particle/particle reactions are determined by a combination of two probabilities dictated by the physics of transport and energetics of reaction. The first is that reactant particles occupy the same volume over a short time interval. The second is the conditional probability that two collocated particles favorably transform into a reaction. The first probability is a direct physical representation of the degree of mixing in an advancing interface between dissimilar waters, and as such lacks empirical parameters except for the user-defined number of particles. This number can be determined analytically from concentration autocovariance, if this type of data is available. The simulations compare favorably to two physical experiments. In one, the concentration of product, 1,2-naphthoquinoe-4-aminobenzene (NQAB) from reaction between 1,2-naphthoquinone-4-sulfonic acid (NQS) and aniline (AN), was measured at the outflow of a column filled with glass beads at different times. In the other, the concentration distribution of reactants (CuSO and EDTA) and product (CuEDTA) were quantified by snapshots of light transmitted through a column packed with cryolite sand. These snapshots allow us to estimate concentration statistics and calculate the required number of particles. The experiments differ significantly due to a ˜107 difference in thermodynamic rate coefficients, making the latter experiment effectively instantaneous. When compared to the solution of the advection-dispersion-reaction equation (ADRE) with the well-mixed reaction coefficient, the experiments and the particle-tracking simulations showed on the order of 20-40% less overall product, which is attributed to poor mixing

  17. Optimization of diffusion-tensor MR imaging data acquisition parameters for brain fiber tracking using parallel imaging at 3 T.

    PubMed

    Naganawa, Shinji; Koshikawa, Tokiko; Kawai, Hisashi; Fukatsu, Hiroshi; Ishigaki, Takeo; Maruyama, Katsuya; Takizawa, Osamu

    2004-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to optimize the parameters of diffusion-tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT MRI) for brain fiber tracking using a slice thickness of 2 mm, a resolution advantage allowed by the high signal-to-noise ratio at 3 T, combined with an 8-channel phased-array head coil. The b-factor, number of motion probing gradient (MPG) directions, and number of averages were varied, and the results of brain fiber tracking for the pyramidal tract and trigeminal nerve were compared qualitatively and quantitatively. The DT MRI data sufficient for brain fiber tracking in healthy subjects can be obtained in <2 min with a 2-mm slice thickness, 700-s/mm2 b-factor, 6 MPG directions, and no averaging (number of averages=1).

  18. Parallelization and Visual Analysis of Multidimensional Fields: Application to Ozone Production, Destruction, and Transport in Three Dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwan, Karsten; Alyea, Fred; Ribarsky, M. William; Trauner, Mary; Eisenhauer, Greg; Jean, Yves; Gu, Weiming; Wang, Ray; Waldrop, Jeffrey; Schroeder, Beth; Heiner, Jeremy; Kindler, Thomas; Silva, Dilma; Vetter, Jeffrey; Martin, Vernard

    1996-01-01

    The three-dimensional, spectral transport model used in the current project was first successfully integrated over climatological time scales by Dr. Guang Ping Lou for the simulation of atmospheric N2O using the United Kingdom Meteorological Office (UKMO) 4-dimensional, assimilated wind and temperature data set. A non-parallel, FORTRAN version of this integration using a fairly simple N2O chemistry package containing only photo-chemical reactions was used to verify our initial parallel model results. The integrations reproduced the gross features of the observed stratospheric climatological N2O distributions but also simulated the structure of the stratospheric Antarctic vortex and its evolution. Subsequently, Dr. Thomas Kindler, who produced much of the parallel version of our model, enlarged the N2O model chemistry package to include N2O reactions involving O(D-1) and also introduced assimilated wind data from NASA as well as UKMO. Initially, transport calculations without chemistry were run using Carbon-14 as a non-reactive tracer gas with the result that large differences in the transport properties of the two assimilated wind data sets were apparent from the resultant Carbon-14 distributions. Subsequent calculations for N2O, including its chemistry, with the two input winds data sets with verification from UARS satellite observations have refined the transport differences between the two such that the model's steering capabilities could be used to infer the correct climatological vertical velocity fields required to support the N2O observations. During this process, it was also discovered that both the NASA and the UKMO data contained spurious values in some of the higher frequency wave components, leading to incorrect local transport calculations and ultimately affecting the large scale properties of the model's N2O distributions, particularly at tropical latitudes. Subsequent model runs with wind data that had been filtered to remove some of the high

  19. Entropy based primal-dual algorithm for convex and linear cost transportation problems with serial and parallel implementations

    SciTech Connect

    Chabini, I.; Florian, M.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper we present a new class of sequential and parallel algorithms for transportation problems with linear and convex costs. First, we consider a capacitated transportation problem with an entropy type objective function. We show that this problem has some interesting properties, namely that its optimal solution verifies both the non negativity and capacity constraints. Then, we give a new solution method for this problem. The algorithm consists of a sequence of {open_quotes}balancing{close_quotes} iterations on the conservation of flow constraints which may be viewed as a generalization of the well known RAS algorithm for matrix balancing. Then we prove the convergence of this method and extend it to strictly convex and linear cost transportation problems. For differentiable convex costs we develop an adaptation where each projection is an entropy type capacitated transportation problem. For linear costs, we prove a triple equivalence between the entropy projection method, the proximal minimization approach (with our entropy type function) and an entropy barrier method. We give a convergence rate analysis for strongly convex costs and linear objectif functions. We show efficient implementations on both serial and parallel environments. Computational results indicate that this methods yields very encouraging results. We solve large problems with several million variables on a network of transputers and Sun workstations. For the linear case, the serial implementation is compared to some network simplex codes like RELAX and RNET. Computational experiments indicate that this algorithm can outperform both RELAX and RNET. The parallel implementations are analysed using especially a new measure of performance developed by the authors. The results demonstrate that this measure can give more information than the classical measure of speedup. Some unexpected behaviors are reported.

  20. Entropy based primal-dual algorithm for convex and linear cost transportation problems with serial and parallel implementations

    SciTech Connect

    Chabini, I.; Florian, M.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper we present a new class of sequential and parallel algorithms for transportation problems with linear and convex costs. First, we consider a capacitated transportation problem with an entropy type objectif function. We show that this problem has some interesting properties, namely that its optimal solution verifies both the non negativity and capacity constraints. Then, we give a new solution method for this problem. The algorithm consists of a sequence of {open_quotes}balancing{close_quotes} iterations on the conservation of flow constraints which may be viewed as a generalization of the well known RAS algorithm for matrix balancing. Then we prove the convergence of this method and extend it to strictly convex and linear cost transportation problems. For differentiable convex costs we develop an adaptation where each projection is an entropy type capacitated transportation problem. For linear costs, we prove a triple equivalence between the entropy projection method, the proximal minimization approach (with our entropy type function) and an entropy barrier method. We give a convergence rate analysis for strongly convex costs and linear objectif functions. We show efficient implementations on both serial and parallel environments. Computational results indicate that this methods yields very encouraging results. We solve large problems with several million variables on a network of transputers and Sun workstations. For the linear case, the serial implementation is compared to some network simplex codes like RELAX and RNET. Computational experiments indicate that this algorithm can outperform both RELAX and RNET. The parallel implementations are analysed using especially a new measure of performance developed by the authors. The results demonstrate that this measure can give more information than the classical measure of speedup. Some unexpected behaviors are reported.

  1. Parallel multigrid solver of radiative transfer equation for photon transport via graphics processing unit.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hao; Phan, Lan; Lin, Yuting

    2012-09-01

    A graphics processing unit-based parallel multigrid solver for a radiative transfer equation with vacuum boundary condition or reflection boundary condition is presented for heterogeneous media with complex geometry based on two-dimensional triangular meshes or three-dimensional tetrahedral meshes. The computational complexity of this parallel solver is linearly proportional to the degrees of freedom in both angular and spatial variables, while the full multigrid method is utilized to minimize the number of iterations. The overall gain of speed is roughly 30 to 300 fold with respect to our prior multigrid solver, which depends on the underlying regime and the parallelization. The numerical validations are presented with the MATLAB codes at https://sites.google.com/site/rtefastsolver/.

  2. Parallel multigrid solver of radiative transfer equation for photon transport via graphics processing unit

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Lan; Lin, Yuting

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. A graphics processing unit–based parallel multigrid solver for a radiative transfer equation with vacuum boundary condition or reflection boundary condition is presented for heterogeneous media with complex geometry based on two-dimensional triangular meshes or three-dimensional tetrahedral meshes. The computational complexity of this parallel solver is linearly proportional to the degrees of freedom in both angular and spatial variables, while the full multigrid method is utilized to minimize the number of iterations. The overall gain of speed is roughly 30 to 300 fold with respect to our prior multigrid solver, which depends on the underlying regime and the parallelization. The numerical validations are presented with the MATLAB codes at https://sites.google.com/site/rtefastsolver/. PMID:23085905

  3. Nanoparticle transport in heterogeneous porous media with particle tracking numerical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Ngoc H.; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios V.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, transport and retention of nanoparticles that flow in suspension through packed beds with unconsolidated spheres and through consolidated Berea sandstone are numerically explored. The surfaces exhibit electrical charge heterogeneity where particles can deposit blocking the surrounding surface deposition sites. The lattice Boltzmann method with Lagrangian particle tracking are the techniques employed. Four ideal patterns of surface charge heterogeneity are adopted for the packed sphere beds, while a real distribution of charge heterogeneity is determined for the Berea core through micro-CT image segmentation. It is found that particle breakthrough curves do not reach a plateau, unless the pore surfaces are completely saturated. Surface saturation also enhances particle propagation because of the surface blocking mechanism, reducing the effective particle deposition rate. In addition, surface saturation mitigates the effect of the pattern of heterogeneity on particle retention, which might be pronounced when blocking is not taken into account. It is also observed from the case of Berea core that the heterogeneity of the mineralogical surfaces disturbs particle transport depending on the physicochemical properties of the surfaces. Likewise, similarity of the mineralogical surface properties is a prerequisite for the commonly used patch-wise model with Langmuirian blocking to reproduce nanoparticle breakthrough in such porous media.

  4. Argentine ants (Linepithema humile) use adaptable transportation networks to track changes in resource quality.

    PubMed

    Latty, Tanya; Holmes, Michael J; Makinson, James C; Beekman, Madeleine

    2017-02-15

    Transportation networks play a crucial role in human and animal societies. For a transportation network to be efficient, it must have adequate capacity to meet traffic demand. Network design becomes increasingly difficult in situations where traffic demand can change unexpectedly. In humans, network design is often constrained by path dependency because it is difficult to move a road once it is built. A similar issue theoretically faces pheromone-trail-laying social insects; once a trail has been laid, positive feedback makes re-routing difficult because new trails cannot compete with continually reinforced pre-existing trails. In the present study, we examined the response of Argentine ant colonies and their trail networks to variable environments where resources differ in quality and change unexpectedly. We found that Argentine ant colonies effectively tracked changes in food quality such that colonies allocated the highest proportion of foragers to the most rewarding feeder. Ant colonies maximised access to high concentration feeders by building additional trails and routes connecting the nest to the feeder. Trail networks appeared to form via a pruning process in which lower traffic trails were gradually removed from the network. At the same time, we observed several instances where new trails appear to have been built to accommodate a surge in demand. The combination of trail building when traffic demand is high and trail pruning when traffic demand is low results in a demand-driven network formation system that allows ants to monopolise multiple dynamic resources.

  5. Quantum dot single molecule tracking reveals a wide range of diffusive motions of membrane transport proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Jonathan M.; Haggie, Peter M.; Verkman, A. S.

    2009-02-01

    Single particle tracking (SPT) provides information about the microscopic motions of individual particles in live cells. We applied SPT to study the diffusion of membrane transport proteins in cell plasma membranes in which individual proteins are labeled with quantum dots at engineered extracellular epitopes. Software was created to deduce particle diffusive modes from quantum dot trajectories. SPT of aquaporin (AQP) water channels and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channels revealed several types of diffusion. AQP1 was freely mobile in cell membranes, showing rapid, Brownian-type diffusion. The full-length (M1) isoform of AQP4 also diffused rapidly, though the diffusion of a shorter (M23) isoform of AQP4 was highly restricted due to its supermolecular assembly in raft-like orthogonal arrays. CFTR mobility was also highly restricted, in a spring-like potential, due to its tethering to the actin cytoskeleton through PDZ-domain C-terminus interactions. The biological significance of regulated diffusion of membrane transport proteins is a subject of active investigation.

  6. Reactive Transport Modeling of Induced Calcite Precipitation Reaction Fronts in Porous Media Using A Parallel, Fully Coupled, Fully Implicit Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, L.; Huang, H.; Gaston, D.; Redden, G. D.; Fox, D. T.; Fujita, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Inducing mineral precipitation in the subsurface is one potential strategy for immobilizing trace metal and radionuclide contaminants. Generating mineral precipitates in situ can be achieved by manipulating chemical conditions, typically through injection or in situ generation of reactants. How these reactants transport, mix and react within the medium controls the spatial distribution and composition of the resulting mineral phases. Multiple processes, including fluid flow, dispersive/diffusive transport of reactants, biogeochemical reactions and changes in porosity-permeability, are tightly coupled over a number of scales. Numerical modeling can be used to investigate the nonlinear coupling effects of these processes which are quite challenging to explore experimentally. Many subsurface reactive transport simulators employ a de-coupled or operator-splitting approach where transport equations and batch chemistry reactions are solved sequentially. However, such an approach has limited applicability for biogeochemical systems with fast kinetics and strong coupling between chemical reactions and medium properties. A massively parallel, fully coupled, fully implicit Reactive Transport simulator (referred to as “RAT”) based on a parallel multi-physics object-oriented simulation framework (MOOSE) has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory. Within this simulator, systems of transport and reaction equations can be solved simultaneously in a fully coupled, fully implicit manner using the Jacobian Free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) method with additional advanced computing capabilities such as (1) physics-based preconditioning for solution convergence acceleration, (2) massively parallel computing and scalability, and (3) adaptive mesh refinements for 2D and 3D structured and unstructured mesh. The simulator was first tested against analytical solutions, then applied to simulating induced calcium carbonate mineral precipitation in 1D columns and 2D flow cells as analogs

  7. Bedload transport in a formerly glaciated mountain catchment constrained by particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Agnese, A.; Brardinoni, F.; Toro, M.; Mao, L.; Engel, M.; Comiti, F.

    2015-11-01

    In formerly glaciated mountain settings, Pleistocene glaciations are responsible for profound spatial reorganization of the landscape structure. By imposing local channel slope and the degree of hillslope-channel connectivity, glacial macro-forms can exert first-order controls on the downstream strength and continuity of the coarse sediment cascade. To estimate quantitatively these controls we trace bedload transport for 3 years along Strimm Creek, Eastern Italian Alps. Specifically, we monitor the travel distance of 490 PIT-tagged particles (b axis: 23-229 mm; weight: 83-6525 g) at two contrasting sites: Upper Strimm Creek (US; 4 km2), which flows through a fluvially dominated hanging valley, and Lower Strimm Creek (LS; 7.5 km2), located downstream, in a relict glacial trough where it experiences periodic colluvial sediment inputs from lateral tributaries. Tracer positioning within the streambed is periodically tracked in the field with a portable antenna in order to assess progressive travel distances, as well as the extent of the channel active layer, in relation to snowmelt and rainfall-driven peak flows. Interestingly, we show that tracer virtual velocities for selected inter-survey periods are independent of tracer weight at both study sites. Cumulatively, tracers in US have travelled across distances (i.e. inner quartiles) shorter than 2 m, which correspond to over 2 orders of magnitude less than what was observed in LS. These figures translate, after calculations of tracer inter-survey virtual velocities, into estimated bedload volumes equal to about 3 m3 in US and 600 m3 in LS, with most of the transport (75 % in US, and 93 % in LS) occurring during snowmelt. A similar contrast in bedload transport rates, even without considering the additional volumes of material mobilized by mass-wasting processes in LS, testifies the extent to which the glacial imprinting can still affect contemporary sediment transfer, and thus postglacial landscape evolution, in

  8. Regional Atmospheric Transport Code for Hanford Emission Tracking (RATCHET). Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsdell, J.V. Jr.; Simonen, C.A.; Burk, K.W.

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate radiation doses that individuals may have received from operations at the Hanford Site since 1944. This report deals specifically with the atmospheric transport model, Regional Atmospheric Transport Code for Hanford Emission Tracking (RATCHET). RATCHET is a major rework of the MESOILT2 model used in the first phase of the HEDR Project; only the bookkeeping framework escaped major changes. Changes to the code include (1) significant changes in the representation of atmospheric processes and (2) incorporation of Monte Carlo methods for representing uncertainty in input data, model parameters, and coefficients. To a large extent, the revisions to the model are based on recommendations of a peer working group that met in March 1991. Technical bases for other portions of the atmospheric transport model are addressed in two other documents. This report has three major sections: a description of the model, a user`s guide, and a programmer`s guide. These sections discuss RATCHET from three different perspectives. The first provides a technical description of the code with emphasis on details such as the representation of the model domain, the data required by the model, and the equations used to make the model calculations. The technical description is followed by a user`s guide to the model with emphasis on running the code. The user`s guide contains information about the model input and output. The third section is a programmer`s guide to the code. It discusses the hardware and software required to run the code. The programmer`s guide also discusses program structure and each of the program elements.

  9. A parallel multi-domain solution methodology applied to nonlinear thermal transport problems in nuclear fuel pins

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, Bobby; Berrill, Mark A.; Allu, Srikanth; Hamilton, Steven P.; Sampath, Rahul S.; Clarno, Kevin T.; Dilts, Gary A.

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes an efficient and nonlinearly consistent parallel solution methodology for solving coupled nonlinear thermal transport problems that occur in nuclear reactor applications over hundreds of individual 3D physical subdomains. Efficiency is obtained by leveraging knowledge of the physical domains, the physics on individual domains, and the couplings between them for preconditioning within a Jacobian Free Newton Krylov method. Details of the computational infrastructure that enabled this work, namely the open source Advanced Multi-Physics (AMP) package developed by the authors is described. Details of verification and validation experiments, and parallel performance analysis in weak and strong scaling studies demonstrating the achieved efficiency of the algorithm are presented. Furthermore, numerical experiments demonstrate that the preconditioner developed is independent of the number of fuel subdomains in a fuel rod, which is particularly important when simulating different types of fuel rods. Finally, we demonstrate the power of the coupling methodology by considering problems with couplings between surface and volume physics and coupling of nonlinear thermal transport in fuel rods to an external radiation transport code.

  10. A parallel multi-domain solution methodology applied to nonlinear thermal transport problems in nuclear fuel pins

    DOE PAGES

    Philip, Bobby; Berrill, Mark A.; Allu, Srikanth; ...

    2015-01-26

    We describe an efficient and nonlinearly consistent parallel solution methodology for solving coupled nonlinear thermal transport problems that occur in nuclear reactor applications over hundreds of individual 3D physical subdomains. Efficiency is obtained by leveraging knowledge of the physical domains, the physics on individual domains, and the couplings between them for preconditioning within a Jacobian Free Newton Krylov method. Details of the computational infrastructure that enabled this work, namely the open source Advanced Multi-Physics (AMP) package developed by the authors are described. The details of verification and validation experiments, and parallel performance analysis in weak and strong scaling studies demonstratingmore » the achieved efficiency of the algorithm are presented. Moreover, numerical experiments demonstrate that the preconditioner developed is independent of the number of fuel subdomains in a fuel rod, which is particularly important when simulating different types of fuel rods. Finally, we demonstrate the power of the coupling methodology by considering problems with couplings between surface and volume physics and coupling of nonlinear thermal transport in fuel rods to an external radiation transport code.« less

  11. A parallel multi-domain solution methodology applied to nonlinear thermal transport problems in nuclear fuel pins

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, Bobby; Berrill, Mark A.; Allu, Srikanth; Hamilton, Steven P.; Sampath, Rahul S.; Clarno, Kevin T.; Dilts, Gary A.

    2015-01-26

    We describe an efficient and nonlinearly consistent parallel solution methodology for solving coupled nonlinear thermal transport problems that occur in nuclear reactor applications over hundreds of individual 3D physical subdomains. Efficiency is obtained by leveraging knowledge of the physical domains, the physics on individual domains, and the couplings between them for preconditioning within a Jacobian Free Newton Krylov method. Details of the computational infrastructure that enabled this work, namely the open source Advanced Multi-Physics (AMP) package developed by the authors are described. The details of verification and validation experiments, and parallel performance analysis in weak and strong scaling studies demonstrating the achieved efficiency of the algorithm are presented. Moreover, numerical experiments demonstrate that the preconditioner developed is independent of the number of fuel subdomains in a fuel rod, which is particularly important when simulating different types of fuel rods. Finally, we demonstrate the power of the coupling methodology by considering problems with couplings between surface and volume physics and coupling of nonlinear thermal transport in fuel rods to an external radiation transport code.

  12. Qualitative Simulation of Photon Transport in Free Space Based on Monte Carlo Method and Its Parallel Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xueli; Gao, Xinbo; Qu, Xiaochao; Chen, Duofang; Ma, Bin; Wang, Lin; Peng, Kuan; Liang, Jimin; Tian, Jie

    2010-01-01

    During the past decade, Monte Carlo method has obtained wide applications in optical imaging to simulate photon transport process inside tissues. However, this method has not been effectively extended to the simulation of free-space photon transport at present. In this paper, a uniform framework for noncontact optical imaging is proposed based on Monte Carlo method, which consists of the simulation of photon transport both in tissues and in free space. Specifically, the simplification theory of lens system is utilized to model the camera lens equipped in the optical imaging system, and Monte Carlo method is employed to describe the energy transformation from the tissue surface to the CCD camera. Also, the focusing effect of camera lens is considered to establish the relationship of corresponding points between tissue surface and CCD camera. Furthermore, a parallel version of the framework is realized, making the simulation much more convenient and effective. The feasibility of the uniform framework and the effectiveness of the parallel version are demonstrated with a cylindrical phantom based on real experimental results. PMID:20689705

  13. Parallel Monte Carlo Particle Transport and the Quality of Random Number Generators: How Good is Good Enough?

    SciTech Connect

    Procassini, R J; Beck, B R

    2004-12-07

    It might be assumed that use of a ''high-quality'' random number generator (RNG), producing a sequence of ''pseudo random'' numbers with a ''long'' repetition period, is crucial for producing unbiased results in Monte Carlo particle transport simulations. While several theoretical and empirical tests have been devised to check the quality (randomness and period) of an RNG, for many applications it is not clear what level of RNG quality is required to produce unbiased results. This paper explores the issue of RNG quality in the context of parallel, Monte Carlo transport simulations in order to determine how ''good'' is ''good enough''. This study employs the MERCURY Monte Carlo code, which incorporates the CNPRNG library for the generation of pseudo-random numbers via linear congruential generator (LCG) algorithms. The paper outlines the usage of random numbers during parallel MERCURY simulations, and then describes the source and criticality transport simulations which comprise the empirical basis of this study. A series of calculations for each test problem in which the quality of the RNG (period of the LCG) is varied provides the empirical basis for determining the minimum repetition period which may be employed without producing a bias in the mean integrated results.

  14. PARALLEL MEASUREMENT AND MODELING OF TRANSPORT IN THE DARHT II BEAMLINE ON ETA II

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, F W; Raymond, B A; Falabella, S; Lee, B S; Richardson, R A; Weir, J T; Davis, H A; Schultze, M E

    2005-05-31

    To successfully tune the DARHT II transport beamline requires the close coupling of a model of the beam transport and the measurement of the beam observables as the beam conditions and magnet settings are varied. For the ETA II experiment using the DARHT II beamline components this was achieved using the SUICIDE (Simple User Interface Connecting to an Integrated Data Environment) data analysis environment and the FITS (Fully Integrated Transport Simulation) model. The SUICIDE environment has direct access to the experimental beam transport data at acquisition and the FITS predictions of the transport for immediate comparison. The FITS model is coupled into the control system where it can read magnet current settings for real time modeling. We find this integrated coupling is essential for model verification and the successful development of a tuning aid for the efficient convergence on a useable tune. We show the real time comparisons of simulation and experiment and explore the successes and limitations of this close coupled approach.

  15. Changes in storm tracks and energy transports in a warmer climate simulated by the GFDL CM2.1 model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yutian; Ting, Mingfang; Seager, Richard; Huang, Huei-Ping; Cane, Mark A.

    2011-07-01

    Storm tracks play a major role in regulating the precipitation and hydrological cycle in midlatitudes. The changes in the location and amplitude of the storm tracks in response to global warming will have significant impacts on the poleward transport of heat, momentum and moisture and on the hydrological cycle. Recent studies have indicated a poleward shift of the storm tracks and the midlatitude precipitation zone in the warming world that will lead to subtropical drying and higher latitude moistening. This study agrees with this key feature for not only the annual mean but also different seasons and for the zonal mean as well as horizontal structures based on the analysis of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) CM2.1 model simulations. Further analyses show that the meridional sensible and latent heat fluxes associated with the storm tracks shift poleward and intensify in both boreal summer and winter in the late twenty-first century (years 2081-2100) relative to the latter half of the twentieth century (years 1961-2000). The maximum dry Eady growth rate is examined to determine the effect of global warming on the time mean state and associated available potential energy for transient growth. The trend in maximum Eady growth rate is generally consistent with the poleward shift and intensification of the storm tracks in the middle latitudes of both hemispheres in both seasons. However, in the lower troposphere in northern winter, increased meridional eddy transfer within the storm tracks is more associated with increased eddy velocity, stronger correlation between eddy velocity and eddy moist static energy, and longer eddy length scale. The changing characteristics of baroclinic instability are, therefore, needed to explain the storm track response as climate warms. Diagnosis of the latitude-by-latitude energy budget for the current and future climate demonstrates how the coupling between radiative and surface heat fluxes and eddy heat and moisture

  16. Transport of parallel momentum induced by current-symmetry breaking in toroidal plasmas.

    PubMed

    Camenen, Y; Peeters, A G; Angioni, C; Casson, F J; Hornsby, W A; Snodin, A P; Strintzi, D

    2009-03-27

    The symmetry of a physical system strongly impacts on its properties. In toroidal plasmas, the symmetry along a magnetic field line usually constrains the radial flux of parallel momentum to zero in the absence of background flows. By breaking the up-down symmetry of the toroidal currents, this constraint can be relaxed. The parallel asymmetry in the magnetic configuration then leads to an incomplete cancellation of the turbulent momentum flux across a flux surface. The magnitude of the subsequent toroidal rotation increases with the up-down asymmetry and its sign depends on the direction of the toroidal magnetic field and plasma current. Such a mechanism offers new insights in the interpretation and control of the intrinsic toroidal rotation in present day experiments.

  17. Parallel domain decomposition methods in fluid models with Monte Carlo transport

    SciTech Connect

    Alme, H.J.; Rodrigues, G.H.; Zimmerman, G.B.

    1996-12-01

    To examine the domain decomposition code coupled Monte Carlo-finite element calculation, it is important to use a domain decomposition that is suitable for the individual models. We have developed a code that simulates a Monte Carlo calculation ( ) on a massively parallel processor. This code is used to examine the load balancing behavior of three domain decomposition ( ) for a Monte Carlo calculation. Results are presented.

  18. Resolving magnetic field line stochasticity and parallel thermal transport in MHD simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Y.; Callen, J.D.; Hegna, C.C.

    1998-12-31

    Heat transport along braided, or chaotic magnetic field lines is a key to understand the disruptive phase of tokamak operations, both the major disruption and the internal disruption (sawtooth oscillation). Recent sawtooth experimental results in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have inferred that magnetic field line stochasticity in the vicinity of the q = 1 inversion radius plays an important role in rapid changes in the magnetic field structures and resultant thermal transport. In this study, the characteristic Lyapunov exponents and spatial correlation of field line behaviors are calculated to extract the characteristic scale length of the microscopic magnetic field structure (which is important for net radial global transport). These statistical values are used to model the effect of finite thermal transport along magnetic field lines in a physically consistent manner.

  19. Tracking transport and transformation of dissolved organic matter using fluorescence spectroscopy at Rifle vadose zone, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, W.; Wan, J.; Tokunaga, T. K.; Gilbert, B.; Kim, Y.; Williams, K. H.

    2015-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) represents the most mobile and active form of natural organic matter. It plays important roles in terrestrial C transport and biogeochemical cycles. Its reactivity makes it sensitive to seasonal variations and climate change. The objective of this study is to investigate the transport and transformation of DOM by tracking the spatial and seasonal variations of DOM concentrations and characteristics throughout the vadose zone and groundwater within a semi-arid floodplain at Rifle, Colorado. Three sets of vertically stratified pore water samplers were installed along a groundwater flow transect, and allowed collection of temporally resolved pore water samples from different depths. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy was used to trace changes in DOM characteristics. The humification index (HIX) was applied to evaluate variations in humification extent of DOM. EEM analysis identified fulvic-like, humic-like, tryptophan-like and tyrosine-like substances as the major fluorescent components of DOM in pore waters. Tryptophan-like and tyrosine-like compounds are typically considered as the recent microbial by-products, and they showed higher concentrations in the deeper vadose zone in late spring, and decrease from spring to winter. HIX values are smaller within the deeper vadose zone (1.5 ̶ 3.5 m) than in the overlying 1.0 m soil water and underlying groundwater samples (≥ 3.5 m), suggesting that some non- or less-humified DOM (or "fresh" microbial-derived DOM) was transferred during late spring. HIX value at each depth increased continuously from late spring to winter, with rapid humification occurring in late spring to early summer. These results suggest an annual cycle in which less humified soil organic matter is transferred into the deeper vadose zone during snowmelt/rainfall events, and then humified further through microbial transformation.

  20. Influence of the parallel nonlinearity on zonal flows and heat transport in global gyrokinetic particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Jolliet, S.; McMillan, B. F.; Vernay, T.; Villard, L.; Hatzky, R.; Bottino, A.; Angelino, P.

    2009-07-15

    In this paper, the influence of the parallel nonlinearity on zonal flows and heat transport in global particle-in-cell ion-temperature-gradient simulations is studied. Although this term is in theory orders of magnitude smaller than the others, several authors [L. Villard, P. Angelino, A. Bottino et al., Plasma Phys. Contr. Fusion 46, B51 (2004); L. Villard, S. J. Allfrey, A. Bottino et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 172 (2004); J. C. Kniep, J. N. G. Leboeuf, and V. C. Decyck, Comput. Phys. Commun. 164, 98 (2004); J. Candy, R. E. Waltz, S. E. Parker et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 074501 (2006)] found different results on its role. The study is performed using the global gyrokinetic particle-in-cell codes TORB (theta-pinch) [R. Hatzky, T. M. Tran, A. Koenies et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 898 (2002)] and ORB5 (tokamak geometry) [S. Jolliet, A. Bottino, P. Angelino et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 177, 409 (2007)]. In particular, it is demonstrated that the parallel nonlinearity, while important for energy conservation, affects the zonal electric field only if the simulation is noise dominated. When a proper convergence is reached, the influence of parallel nonlinearity on the zonal electric field, if any, is shown to be small for both the cases of decaying and driven turbulence.

  1. Influence of the parallel nonlinearity on zonal flows and heat transport in global gyrokinetic particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolliet, S.; McMillan, B. F.; Vernay, T.; Villard, L.; Hatzky, R.; Bottino, A.; Angelino, P.

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, the influence of the parallel nonlinearity on zonal flows and heat transport in global particle-in-cell ion-temperature-gradient simulations is studied. Although this term is in theory orders of magnitude smaller than the others, several authors [L. Villard, P. Angelino, A. Bottino et al., Plasma Phys. Contr. Fusion 46, B51 (2004); L. Villard, S. J. Allfrey, A. Bottino et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 172 (2004); J. C. Kniep, J. N. G. Leboeuf, and V. C. Decyck, Comput. Phys. Commun. 164, 98 (2004); J. Candy, R. E. Waltz, S. E. Parker et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 074501 (2006)] found different results on its role. The study is performed using the global gyrokinetic particle-in-cell codes TORB (theta-pinch) [R. Hatzky, T. M. Tran, A. Könies et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 898 (2002)] and ORB5 (tokamak geometry) [S. Jolliet, A. Bottino, P. Angelino et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 177, 409 (2007)]. In particular, it is demonstrated that the parallel nonlinearity, while important for energy conservation, affects the zonal electric field only if the simulation is noise dominated. When a proper convergence is reached, the influence of parallel nonlinearity on the zonal electric field, if any, is shown to be small for both the cases of decaying and driven turbulence.

  2. Integrating Geochemical Reactions with a Particle-Tracking Approach to Simulate Nitrogen Transport and Transformation in Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Z.; Welty, C.; Maxwell, R. M.

    2011-12-01

    Lagrangian, particle-tracking models are commonly used to simulate solute advection and dispersion in aquifers. They are computationally efficient and suffer from much less numerical dispersion than grid-based techniques, especially in heterogeneous and advectively-dominated systems. Although particle-tracking models are capable of simulating geochemical reactions, these reactions are often simplified to first-order decay and/or linear, first-order kinetics. Nitrogen transport and transformation in aquifers involves both biodegradation and higher-order geochemical reactions. In order to take advantage of the particle-tracking approach, we have enhanced an existing particle-tracking code SLIM-FAST, to simulate nitrogen transport and transformation in aquifers. The approach we are taking is a hybrid one: the reactive multispecies transport process is operator split into two steps: (1) the physical movement of the particles including the attachment/detachment to solid surfaces, which is modeled by a Lagrangian random-walk algorithm; and (2) multispecies reactions including biodegradation are modeled by coupling multiple Monod equations with other geochemical reactions. The coupled reaction system is solved by an ordinary differential equation solver. In order to solve the coupled system of equations, after step 1, the particles are converted to grid-based concentrations based on the mass and position of the particles, and after step 2 the newly calculated concentration values are mapped back to particles. The enhanced particle-tracking code is capable of simulating subsurface nitrogen transport and transformation in a three-dimensional domain with variably saturated conditions. Potential application of the enhanced code is to simulate subsurface nitrogen loading to the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries. Implementation details, verification results of the enhanced code with one-dimensional analytical solutions and other existing numerical models will be presented in

  3. The conceptual framework of ontogenetic trajectories: parallel transport allows the recognition and visualization of pure deformation patterns.

    PubMed

    Piras, P; Teresi, L; Traversetti, L; Varano, V; Gabriele, S; Kotsakis, T; Raia, P; Puddu, P E; Scalici, M

    2016-05-01

    Ontogeny is usually studied by analyzing a deformation series spanning over juvenile to adult shapes. In geometric morphometrics, this approach implies applying generalized Procrustes analysis coupled with principal component analysis on multiple individuals or multiple species datasets. The trouble with such a procedure is that it mixes intra- and inter-group variation. While MANCOVA models are relevant statistical/mathematical tools to draw inferences about the similarities of trajectories, if one wants to observe and interpret the morphological deformation alone by filtering inter-group variability, a particular tool, namely parallel transport, is necessary. In the context of ontogenetic trajectories, one should firstly perform separate multivariate regressions between shape and size, using regression predictions to estimate within-group deformations relative to the smallest individuals. These deformations are then applied to a common reference (the mean of per-group smallest individuals). The estimation of deformations can be performed on the Riemannian manifold by using sophisticated connection metrics. Nevertheless, parallel transport can be effectively achieved by estimating deformations in the Euclidean space via ordinary Procrustes analysis. This approach proved very useful in comparing ontogenetic trajectories of species presenting large morphological differences at early developmental stages. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Scalable load balancing for massively parallel distributed Monte Carlo particle transport

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, M. J.; Brantley, P. S.; Joy, K. I.

    2013-07-01

    In order to run computer simulations efficiently on massively parallel computers with hundreds of thousands or millions of processors, care must be taken that the calculation is load balanced across the processors. Examining the workload of every processor leads to an unscalable algorithm, with run time at least as large as O(N), where N is the number of processors. We present a scalable load balancing algorithm, with run time 0(log(N)), that involves iterated processor-pair-wise balancing steps, ultimately leading to a globally balanced workload. We demonstrate scalability of the algorithm up to 2 million processors on the Sequoia supercomputer at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. (authors)

  5. The NASA Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System and its impact on spacecraft support in the space transportation system era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smylie, R. E.; Aller, R. O.

    1981-01-01

    The space tracking, data acquisition and communication network systems and capabilities available to NASA are discussed, with emphasis on the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). Scheduled to come into operation in 1983, TDRSS will be the prime support system for communication with the Space Shuttle, Spacelab, and the automated spacecraft to be launched into earth orbit by the Space Transportation System. TDRSS will consist of two specialized data relay satellites in geosynchronous orbit, about 130 deg apart; each TDRSS spacecraft has a three-axis stabilized configuration, with sun-oriented solar panels, and will weigh about 2200 kg at launch. The NASA Spaceflight Tracking and Data Network, currently used to support 30-40 spacecraft per day, is described, and plans for changes in the network are discussed. The 26 antennas of the network will be consolidated into an expanded Deep Space Network, after TDRSS is in operation.

  6. libmpdata++ 0.1: a library of parallel MPDATA solvers for systems of generalised transport equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaruga, A.; Arabas, S.; Jarecka, D.; Pawlowska, H.; Smolarkiewicz, P. K.; Waruszewski, M.

    2014-11-01

    This paper accompanies first release of libmpdata++, a C++ library implementing the Multidimensional Positive-Definite Advection Transport Algorithm (MPDATA). The library offers basic numerical solvers for systems of generalised transport equations. The solvers are forward-in-time, conservative and non-linearly stable. The libmpdata++ library covers the basic second-order-accurate formulation of MPDATA, its third-order variant, the infinite-gauge option for variable-sign fields and a flux-corrected transport extension to guarantee non-oscillatory solutions. The library is equipped with a non-symmetric variational elliptic solver for implicit evaluation of pressure gradient terms. All solvers offer parallelisation through domain decomposition using shared-memory parallelisation. The paper describes the library programming interface, and serves as a user guide. Supported options are illustrated with benchmarks discussed in the MPDATA literature. Benchmark descriptions include code snippets as well as quantitative representations of simulation results. Examples of applications include: homogeneous transport in one, two and three dimensions in Cartesian and spherical domains; shallow-water system compared with analytical solution (originally derived for a 2-D case); and a buoyant convection problem in an incompressible Boussinesq fluid with interfacial instability. All the examples are implemented out of the library tree. Regardless of the differences in the problem dimensionality, right-hand-side terms, boundary conditions and parallelisation approach, all the examples use the same unmodified library, which is a key goal of libmpdata++ design. The design, based on the principle of separation of concerns, prioritises the user and developer productivity. The libmpdata++ library is implemented in C++, making use of the Blitz++ multi-dimensional array containers, and is released as free/libre and open-source software.

  7. libmpdata++ 1.0: a library of parallel MPDATA solvers for systems of generalised transport equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaruga, A.; Arabas, S.; Jarecka, D.; Pawlowska, H.; Smolarkiewicz, P. K.; Waruszewski, M.

    2015-04-01

    This paper accompanies the first release of libmpdata++, a C++ library implementing the multi-dimensional positive-definite advection transport algorithm (MPDATA) on regular structured grid. The library offers basic numerical solvers for systems of generalised transport equations. The solvers are forward-in-time, conservative and non-linearly stable. The libmpdata++ library covers the basic second-order-accurate formulation of MPDATA, its third-order variant, the infinite-gauge option for variable-sign fields and a flux-corrected transport extension to guarantee non-oscillatory solutions. The library is equipped with a non-symmetric variational elliptic solver for implicit evaluation of pressure gradient terms. All solvers offer parallelisation through domain decomposition using shared-memory parallelisation. The paper describes the library programming interface, and serves as a user guide. Supported options are illustrated with benchmarks discussed in the MPDATA literature. Benchmark descriptions include code snippets as well as quantitative representations of simulation results. Examples of applications include homogeneous transport in one, two and three dimensions in Cartesian and spherical domains; a shallow-water system compared with analytical solution (originally derived for a 2-D case); and a buoyant convection problem in an incompressible Boussinesq fluid with interfacial instability. All the examples are implemented out of the library tree. Regardless of the differences in the problem dimensionality, right-hand-side terms, boundary conditions and parallelisation approach, all the examples use the same unmodified library, which is a key goal of libmpdata++ design. The design, based on the principle of separation of concerns, prioritises the user and developer productivity. The libmpdata++ library is implemented in C++, making use of the Blitz++ multi-dimensional array containers, and is released as free/libre and open-source software.

  8. Modeling Bimolecular Reactions and Transport in Porous Media via Particle Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, D.; Benson, D. A.; Paster, A.; Bolster, D.

    2012-12-01

    We use a particle-tracking model to simulate several one-dimensional bi-molecular reactive transport experiments. In this numerical method, the reactants are represented by particles; advection and dispersion dominate the flow of particles, and molecular diffusion dictates, in large part, the reactions. The reactions are determined by a combination of two probabilities; one is that reactant particles occupy the same volume over a short time interval, which is dictated by diffusion; the other is the conditional probability that two collocated particles favorably transform into a reaction. The first probability is a direct physical representation of the degree of mixing in an advancing displacement front, and as such lacks empirical parameters except for the user-defined number of particles. This number is theoretically correlated to the concentration statistics, which can be estimated from concentration autocovariance in the experiment if concentration data is properly collected. The simulations compare favorably to two physical experiments. In one, Raje and Kapoor (2000) [1] measured the product concentrations at the end of a column at different times (the breakthrough curve). In the other, Gramling et al. [2] measured the distribution of reactants and products within a translucent column (snapshots). In addition, one experiment used reactants with a well-mixed thermodynamic rate coefficient 107 times greater than the other. The higher rate can be considered an essentially instantaneous reaction. When compared to the solution of the classical advection-dispersion-reaction equation with the well-mixed reaction coefficient, both experiments showed on the order of 20% to 40% slower reaction attributed to poor mixing. The Lagrangian model in this study accurately simulated the incomplete mixing for both the breakthrough curves [1] and product concentration profile [2]. In addition to model performance, the advantage is the lack of empirical parameters or assumptions

  9. Alfven wave transport effects in the time evolution of parallel cosmic-ray modified shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. W.

    1993-01-01

    Some of the issues associated with a more complete treatment of Alfven transport in cosmic ray shocks are explored qualitatively. The treatment is simplified in some important respects, but some new issues are examined and for the first time a nonlinear, time dependent study of plane cosmic ray mediated shocks with both the entropy producing effects of wave dissipation and effects due to the Alfven wave advection of the cosmic ray relative to the gas is included. Examination of the direct consequences of including the pressure and energy of the Alfven waves in the formalism began.

  10. Toroidal momentum transport in a tokamak caused by symmetry breaking parallel derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, T.; Buchholz, R.; Grosshauser, S. R.; Hornsby, W. A.; Migliano, P.; Peeters, A. G.; Casson, F. J.; Fable, E.

    2013-04-15

    A new mechanism for toroidal momentum transport in a tokamak is investigated using the gyro-kinetic model. First, an analytic model is developed through the use of the ballooning transform. The terms that generate the momentum transport are then connected with the poloidal derivative of the ballooning envelope, which are one order smaller in the normalised Larmor radius, compared with the derivative of the eikonal. The mechanism, therefore, does not introduce an inhomogeneity in the radial direction, in contrast with the effect of profile shearing. Numerical simulations of the linear ion temperature gradient mode with adiabatic electrons, retaining the finite {rho}{sub *} effects in the E Multiplication-Sign B velocity, the drift, and the gyro-average, are presented. The momentum flux is found to be linear in the normalised Larmor radius ({rho}{sub *}) but is, nevertheless, generating a sizeable counter-current rotation. The total momentum flux scales linear with the aspect ratio of the considered magnetic surface, and increases with increasing magnetic shear, safety factor, and density and temperature gradients.

  11. Corrosion Prediction with Parallel Finite Element Modeling for Coupled Hygro-Chemo Transport into Concrete under Chloride-Rich Environment

    PubMed Central

    Na, Okpin; Cai, Xiao-Chuan; Xi, Yunping

    2017-01-01

    The prediction of the chloride-induced corrosion is very important because of the durable life of concrete structure. To simulate more realistic durability performance of concrete structures, complex scientific methods and more accurate material models are needed. In order to predict the robust results of corrosion initiation time and to describe the thin layer from concrete surface to reinforcement, a large number of fine meshes are also used. The purpose of this study is to suggest more realistic physical model regarding coupled hygro-chemo transport and to implement the model with parallel finite element algorithm. Furthermore, microclimate model with environmental humidity and seasonal temperature is adopted. As a result, the prediction model of chloride diffusion under unsaturated condition was developed with parallel algorithms and was applied to the existing bridge to validate the model with multi-boundary condition. As the number of processors increased, the computational time decreased until the number of processors became optimized. Then, the computational time increased because the communication time between the processors increased. The framework of present model can be extended to simulate the multi-species de-icing salts ingress into non-saturated concrete structures in future work. PMID:28772714

  12. Parallelization of the Red-Black Algorithm on Solving the Second-Order PN Transport Equation with the Hybrid Finite Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Yaqi Wang; Cristian Rabiti; Giuseppe Palmiotti

    2011-06-01

    The Red-Black algorithm has been successfully applied on solving the second-order parity transport equation with the PN approximation in angle and the Hybrid Finite Element Method (HFEM) in space, i.e., the Variational Nodal Method (VNM) [1,2,3,4,5]. Any transport solving techniques, including the Red-Black algorithm, need to be parallelized in order to take the advantage of the development of supercomputers with multiple processors for the advanced modeling and simulation. To our knowledge, an attempt [6] was done to parallelize it, but it was devoted only to the z axis plans in three-dimensional calculations. General parallelization of the Red-Black algorithm with the spatial domain decomposition has not been reported in the literature. In this summary, we present our implementation of the parallelization of the Red-Black algorithm and its efficiency results.

  13. Analysis of Massively Parallel Discrete-Ordinates Transport Sweep Algorithms with Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, T S; Falgout, R D

    2008-10-14

    We present theoretical scaling models for a variety of discrete-ordinates sweep algorithms. In these models, we pay particular attention to the way each algorithm handles collisions. A collision is defined as a processor having multiple angles with ready to be swept during one stage of the sweep. The models also take into account how subdomains are assigned to processors and how angles are grouped during the sweep. We describe a data driven algorithm that resolves collisions efficiently during the sweep as well as other algorithms that have been designed to avoid collisions completely. Our models are validated using the ARGES and AMTRAN transport codes. We then use the models to study and predict scaling trends in all of the sweep algorithms.

  14. Run-off studies demonstrate parallel transport behaviour for a marker of poultry fecal contamination and Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Weidhaas, J; Garner, E; Basden, T; Harwood, V J

    2014-08-01

    To determine whether poultry litter marker gene LA35 is correlated with pathogens and fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) in run-off from poultry litter-amended plots. A rainfall simulator with various vegetative filter strip lengths was employed to evaluate the correlation of a microbial source tracking (MST) marker for poultry feces/litter (the 16S rRNA gene of Brevibacterium sp. LA35 [LA35] measured by quantitative PCR) with pathogens and FIB in run-off. LA35 was correlated with Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus spp. and Bacteroidales levels. Salmonella was present at low concentration in litter, but became undetectable by qPCR in run-off. Escherichia coli, LA35 and Staph. aureus exhibited mass-based first flush behaviour in the run-off. Correlation of LA35 with FIB and pathogens in run-off from poultry litter-amended fields suggest comparable transport mechanisms and that LA35 is a useful tracer for harmful bacteria in the environment released from poultry litter. To protect human health, an effective marker for poultry fecal contamination should exhibit similar fate and transport characteristics compared to pathogens. This study is among the first to demonstrate such a relationship in run-off for a MST marker. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. Orogen-parallel mass transport along the arcuate Himalaya into Nanga Parbat and the western Himalayan syntaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whipp, David; Beaumont, Christopher

    2017-04-01

    The Himalayan syntaxes have been the focus of much previous research, in part owing to the extreme rates of rock exhumation observed within the core of the syntaxes, the powerful river systems cutting across them, and the resulting spectacular relief produced. Quaternary rates of rock exhumation in the western Himalayan syntaxis, for example, exceed 10 mm/a. Combined with mountain peak elevations comparable to the central Himalaya, these high rates require a source of rock flux greater than that added to the Himalayan orogenic wedge elsewhere along strike to compensate for rapid denudation. One potential source of mass is along-strike translation of the orogenic wedge toward the western Himalayan syntaxis as a result of strain partitioning across the thrust front. Where convergence across the thrust front is oblique, strain partitioning can partially or completely divert the component of convergence parallel to the frontal thrust into an orogen-parallel velocity in the orogenic wedge. This results in mass being driven along strike into the syntaxis where the convergence obliquity decreases and the crustal mass accumulates. Active faults like the Karakoram Fault and Western Nepal Fault system provide evidence of strain partitioning in the western Himalaya, but the rate of orogen-parallel wedge transport is debated. This rate is central to a test of the viability of strain partitioning as a source of crustal mass into the western Himalayan syntaxis. Preliminary results from 3D numerical geodynamic modelling experiments demonstrate that moderate strain partitioning can be expected in some cases for a geometry similar to the Himalayan arc, though the uplift rate in the model syntaxis as a result of strain partitioning is lower than observed in the western Himalayan syntaxis. We consider a 1600 × 1600 × 80km crustal block corresponding to the western half of the Himalayan arc with pre-defined zones where frictional material strengths can be varied. The two main zones

  16. Development of parallel monte carlo electron and photon transport (PMCEPT) code III: Applications to medical radiation physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kum, Oyeon; Han, Youngyih; Jeong, Hae Sun

    2012-05-01

    Minimizing the differences between dose distributions calculated at the treatment planning stage and those delivered to the patient is an essential requirement for successful radiotheraphy. Accurate calculation of dose distributions in the treatment planning process is important and can be done only by using a Monte Carlo calculation of particle transport. In this paper, we perform a further validation of our previously developed parallel Monte Carlo electron and photon transport (PMCEPT) code [Kum and Lee, J. Korean Phys. Soc. 47, 716 (2005) and Kim and Kum, J. Korean Phys. Soc. 49, 1640 (2006)] for applications to clinical radiation problems. A linear accelerator, Siemens' Primus 6 MV, was modeled and commissioned. A thorough validation includes both small fields, closely related to the intensity modulated radiation treatment (IMRT), and large fields. Two-dimensional comparisons with film measurements were also performed. The PMCEPT results, in general, agreed well with the measured data within a maximum error of about 2%. However, considering the experimental errors, the PMCEPT results can provide the gold standard of dose distributions for radiotherapy. The computing time was also much faster, compared to that needed for experiments, although it is still a bottleneck for direct applications to the daily routine treatment planning procedure.

  17. Electron Beam-Blip Spectroscopic Diagnostics of the Scrape-off-Layer Parallel Transport in C-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osin, Dmitry; Thompson, Matthew; Garate, Eusebio; TAE Team

    2015-11-01

    C-2 is a microscopically stable, high-performance field-reversed configuration (FRC), where high plasma temperatures with significant fast ion population and record lifetimes were achieved by a combination of tangential neutral beam injection, electrically biased plasma guns at the ends and wall conditioning. FRC confinement depends on the properties of both the open and closed field lines, therefore, understanding the electron transport in the scrape-of-layer (SOL) is critical. To study parallel heat conduction in SOL, a high-energy pulsed electron beam (e-beam) was injected on-axis into C-2 to produce a heat pulse, which causes a fast rise and slower decay of the electron temperature, Te, in the SOL. The heat-blip was observed by means of He-jet spectroscopy. A small fraction of the total deposited e-beam energy is necessary to explain the measured Te increase. The electron thermal conductivity along the magnetic field lines can be inferred from the Te decay. Experiments suggest that a high energy e-beam pulse can serve as a direct diagnostic of heat transport in the SOL.

  18. One-dimensional subsurface transport of a nonaqueous phase liquid containing sparingly water soluble organics: A front-tracking model

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, P.A.; Cohen, Y. )

    1991-07-01

    A one-dimensional multiphase mass transport model for the migration of a nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) containing sparingly water soluble organics in the unsaturated soil zone is described. The multiphase NAPL transport (MUNT) model consists of a two-phase immiscible flow model linked to a four-phase chemical transport model. The immiscible flow model incorporates a front-tracking algorithm to determine the front of the invading NAPL as a function of penetration time. The NAPL penetration toward groundwater is shown to be a function of four dimensionless groups: NAPL capillary number, the ratio of the NAPL Reynolds number to the NAPL Froude number, and the ratio of the defending phase to NAPL phase densities and viscosities. Simulations for the migration of organic chemicals show that their concentration in the air and aqueous phases past the front can be significant.

  19. Method and apparatus for routing data in an inter-nodal communications lattice of a massively parallel computer system by routing through transporter nodes

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens; Musselman, Roy Glenn; Peters, Amanda; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Swartz, Brent Allen; Wallenfelt, Brian Paul

    2010-11-16

    A massively parallel computer system contains an inter-nodal communications network of node-to-node links. An automated routing strategy routes packets through one or more intermediate nodes of the network to reach a destination. Some packets are constrained to be routed through respective designated transporter nodes, the automated routing strategy determining a path from a respective source node to a respective transporter node, and from a respective transporter node to a respective destination node. Preferably, the source node chooses a routing policy from among multiple possible choices, and that policy is followed by all intermediate nodes. The use of transporter nodes allows greater flexibility in routing.

  20. Label-Free Tracking of Single Organelle Transportation in Cells with Nanometer Precision Using a Plasmonic Imaging Technique.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yunze; Yu, Hui; Shan, Xiaonan; Wang, Wei; Liu, Xianwei; Wang, Shaopeng; Tao, Nongjian

    2015-06-24

    Imaging and tracking of nano- and micrometer-sized organelles in cells with nanometer precision is crucial for understanding cellular behaviors at the molecular scale. Because of the fast intracellular dynamic processes, the imaging and tracking method must also be fast. In addition, to ensure that the observed dynamics is relevant to the native functions, it is critical to keep the cells under their native states. Here, a plasmonics-based imaging technique is demonstrated for studying the dynamics of organelles in 3D with high localization precision (5 nm) and temporal (10 ms) resolution. The technique is label-free and can track subcellular structures in the native state of the cells. Using the technique, nanometer steps of organelle (e.g., mitochondria) transportation are observed along neurite microtubules in primary neurons, and the 3D structure of neurite microtubule bundles is reconstructed at the nanometer scale from the tracks of the moving organelles. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Mass flux into the Nanga Parbat-Haramosh massif: Orogen-parallel transport, lower crustal flow, or both?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whipp, D. M.; Beaumont, C.; Braun, J.

    2011-12-01

    Relative to most of the Himalaya, the Nanga Parbat-Haramosh massif requires an additional mass flux into its base to balance extreme rates of surface denudation (>10 mm/a) over the last ~2-3 Ma. One proposed source is middle to lower crustal flow into the massif (e.g., Zeitler et al., 2001), which while likely inactive elsewhere along strike, may be sustainable by very rapid surface denudation, a high geothermal gradient, and thermal weakening of rocks beneath the syntaxes. An alternative source is orogen-parallel (OP) transport due to oblique convergence and strain partitioning along the Himalayan arc (e.g., Seeber and Pêcher, 1998). Several observations including (1) predominantly orogen-normal slip on the frontal thrusts deduced from seismic events, (2) OP extension accommodated on orogen-normal structures, and (3) distributed and segmented strike-slip faulting trending parallel to the arc are consistent with strain partitioning and OP mass transport. A key question is can this mechanism supply sufficient mass to the Nanga Parbat syntaxis, or is local channel flow required? We explore mass transport into the western Himalayan syntaxis region using lithospheric-scale 3D mechanical and coupled thermo-mechanical models of an arcuate orogen. The crust is either frictional plastic or power-law viscous, with a constant low viscosity lower crust present in some experiments. Applied velocity boundary conditions are transmitted to the base of the crust by a strong frictional plastic mantle lithosphere, and mantle detachment/subduction drives formation of a bivergent, arcuate orogen. To assess the magnitude of mass transport from strain partitioning, we first explore purely mechanical experiments featuring a 5-km-high Tibet-like plateau above a weak lower crust and with a frictional plastic decollement that dips at 10° beneath the incipient orogen, similar to the Himalayan basal detachment. Preliminary results show gravitational feedback from the plateau drives

  2. Analysis of geometrical and statistical features of Lagrangian stretching in turbulent channel flow using a database task-parallel particle tracking algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Perry L.; Hamilton, Stephen S.; Burns, Randal; Meneveau, Charles

    2017-01-01

    An intrinsic property of turbulent flows is the exponential deformation of fluid elements along Lagrangian paths. The production of enstrophy by vorticity stretching follows from a similar mechanism in the Lagrangian view, though the alignment statistics differ and viscosity prevents unbounded growth. In this paper, the stretching properties of fluid elements and vorticity along Lagrangian paths are studied in a channel flow at Reτ=1000 and compared with prior known results from isotropic turbulence. To track Lagrangian paths in a public database containing direct numerical simulation results, the task-parallel algorithm previously employed in the isotropic database is extended to the case of flow in a bounded domain. It is shown that above 100 viscous units from the wall, stretching statistics are equal to their isotropic values, in support of the local isotropy hypothesis. In the viscous sublayer, these stretching statistics approach values more consistent with an unsteady two-dimensional shear flow, in which exponential stretching no longer occurs. Normalized by dissipation rate, the stretching in the buffer layer and below is less efficient due to less favorable alignment statistics. The Cramér function characterizing cumulative Lagrangian stretching statistics shows that overall the channel flow has about half of the stretching per unit dissipation compared with isotropic turbulence.

  3. Molecular dynamics study of non-equilibrium energy transport from a cylindrical track: Part II. Spike models for sputtering yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bringa, E. M.; Johnson, R. E.; Dutkiewicz, Ł .

    1999-05-01

    Thermal spike models have been used to calculate the yields for electronic sputtering of condensed-gas solids by fast ions. In this paper molecular dynamics (MD) calculations are carried out to describe the evolution of solid Ar and O 2 following the excitation of a cylindrical track in order to test spike models. The calculated sputtering yields were found to depend linearly on the energy deposition per unit path length, d E/d x, at the highest d E/d x. This is in contrast to the spike models and the measured yields for a number of condensed-gas solids which depend quadratically on d E/d x at high d E/d x. In paper I [E.M. Bringa, R.E. Johnson, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 143 (1998) 513] we showed that the evolution of energy from the cylindrical track was, typically, not diffusive, as assumed in the spike models. Here we show that it is the description of the radial transport and the absence of energy transport to the surface, rather than the treatment of the ejection process, that accounts for the difference between the analytic spike models and the MD calculations. Therefore, the quadratic dependence on d E/d x of the measured sputtering yield reflects the nature of the energizing process rather than the energy transport. In this paper we describe the details of the sputtering process and compare the results here for crystalline samples to the earlier results for amorphous solids.

  4. Parallel transport studies of high-Z impurities in the core of Alcator C-Mod plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Reinke, M. L.; Hutchinson, I. H.; Rice, J. E.; Greenwald, M.; Howard, N. T.; Hubbard, A.; Hughes, J. W.; Terry, J. L.; Wolfe, S. M.

    2013-05-15

    Measurements of poloidal variation, ñ{sub z}/, in high-Z impurity density have been made using photodiode arrays sensitive to vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray emission in Alcator C-Mod plasmas. In/out asymmetries in the range of −0.2<0.3 are observed for r/a<0.8, and accumulation on both the high-field side, n{sub z,cos}<0, and low-field side, n{sub z,cos}>0, of a flux surface is found to be well described by a combination of centrifugal, poloidal electric field, and ion-impurity friction effects. Up/down asymmetries, −0.05<0.10, are observed over 0.50 corresponding to accumulation opposite the ion ∇B drift direction. Measurements of the up/down asymmetry of molybdenum are found to disagree with predictions from recent neoclassical theory in the trace limit, n{sub z}Z{sup 2}/n{sub i}≪1. Non-trace levels of impurities are expected to modify the main-ion poloidal flow and thus change friction-driven impurity density asymmetries and impurity poloidal rotation, v{sub θ,z}. Artificially modifying main-ion flow in parallel transport simulations is shown to impact both ñ{sub z}/ and v{sub θ,z}, but simultaneous agreement between measured and predicted up/down and in/out asymmetry as well as impurity poloidal rotation is not possible for these C-Mod data. This link between poloidal flow and poloidal impurity density variation outlines a more stringent test for parallel neoclassical transport theory than has previously been performed. Measurement and computational techniques specific to the study of poloidal impurity asymmetry physics are discussed as well.

  5. Implementation of a cell-wise Block-Gauss-Seidel iterative method for SN transport on a hybrid parallel computer architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Rosa, Massimiliano; Warsa, James S; Perks, Michael

    2010-12-14

    We have implemented a cell-wise, block-Gauss-Seidel (bGS) iterative algorithm, for the solution of the S{sub n} transport equations on the Roadrunner hybrid, parallel computer architecture. A compute node of this massively parallel machine comprises AMD Opteron cores that are linked to a Cell Broadband Engine{trademark} (Cell/B.E.). LAPACK routines have been ported to the Cell/B.E. in order to make use of its parallel Synergistic Processing Elements (SPEs). The bGS algorithm is based on the LU factorization and solution of a linear system that couples the fluxes for all S{sub n} angles and energy groups on a mesh cell. For every cell of a mesh that has been parallel decomposed on the higher-level Opteron processors, a linear system is transferred to the Cell/B.E. and the parallel LAPACK routines are used to compute a solution, which is then transferred back to the Opteron, where the rest of the computations for the S{sub n} transport problem take place. Compared to standard parallel machines, a hundred-fold speedup of the bGS was observed on the hybrid Roadrunner architecture. Numerical experiments with strong and weak parallel scaling demonstrate the bGS method is viable and compares favorably to full parallel sweeps (FPS) on two-dimensional, unstructured meshes when it is applied to optically thick, multi-material problems. As expected, however, it is not as efficient as FPS in optically thin problems.

  6. The Influence of Fleet Variability on Crack Growth Tracking Procedures for Transport/Bomber Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-11-01

    the tracking analysis methodology and software . Recurring or operating costs included data acquisition and processing, equipment maintenance and the...Mission31AWing FV-36 Mison3_WnF- A Mission 3A-1 Wing FV-8 Boin Wichita Crak Gowt mi 3o.n 0 -30=2.-5Program. Wheeler Delay Model -9 Cu 100 101 102 103

  7. Monitoring and tracking the trans-Pacific transport of aerosols using multi-satellite aerosol optical depth composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeger, Aaron R.; Gupta, Pawan; Zavodsky, Bradley T.; McGrath, Kevin M.

    2016-06-01

    The primary goal of this study was to generate a near-real time (NRT) aerosol optical depth (AOD) product capable of providing a comprehensive understanding of the aerosol spatial distribution over the Pacific Ocean, in order to better monitor and track the trans-Pacific transport of aerosols. Therefore, we developed a NRT product that takes advantage of observations from both low-earth orbiting and geostationary satellites. In particular, we utilize AOD products from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) satellites. Then, we combine these AOD products with our own retrieval algorithms developed for the NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-15) and Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) Multi-functional Transport Satellite (MTSAT-2) to generate a NRT daily AOD composite product. We present examples of the daily AOD composite product for a case study of trans-Pacific transport of Asian pollution and dust aerosols in mid-March 2014. Overall, the new product successfully tracks this aerosol plume during its trans-Pacific transport to the west coast of North America as the frequent geostationary observations lead to a greater coverage of cloud-free AOD retrievals equatorward of about 35° N, while the polar-orbiting satellites provide a greater coverage of AOD poleward of 35° N. However, we note several areas across the domain of interest from Asia to North America where the GOES-15 and MTSAT-2 retrieval algorithms can introduce significant uncertainties into the new product.

  8. Monitoring and tracking the trans-Pacific transport of aerosols using multi-satellite aerosol optical depth retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeger, A. R.; Gupta, P.; Zavodsky, B.; McGrath, K. M.

    2015-10-01

    The primary goal of this study was to generate a near-real time (NRT) aerosol optical depth (AOD) product capable of providing a comprehensive understanding of the aerosol spatial distribution over the Pacific Ocean in order to better monitor and track the trans-Pacific transport of aerosols. Therefore, we developed a NRT product that takes advantage of observations from both low-earth orbiting and geostationary satellites. In particular, we utilize AOD products from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) satellites. Then, we combine these AOD products with our own retrieval algorithms developed for the NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-15) and Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) Multi-functional Transport Satellite (MTSAT-2) to generate a NRT daily AOD composite product. We present examples of the daily AOD composite product for a case study of trans-Pacific transport of Asian pollution and dust aerosols in mid-March 2014. Overall, the new product successfully tracks this aerosol plume during its trans-Pacific transport to the west coast of North America. However, we identify several areas across the domain of interest from Asia to North America where the new product can encounter significant uncertainties due to the inclusion of the geostationary AOD retrievals. The uncertainties associated with geostationary AOD retrievals are expected to be minimized after the successful launch of the next-generation advanced NOAA GOES-R and recently launched JMA Himawari satellites. Observations from these advanced satellites will ultimately provide an enhanced understanding of the spatial and temporal distribution of aerosols over the Pacific.

  9. Transport processes through track-etch membrane filters in a reagent delivery cell.

    PubMed

    Rzepka, S; Neidhart, B

    2000-02-01

    A reagent delivery cell with a track-etch membrane filter for on-line dilution of concentrated salt solutions is described. The influence of several system parameters such as concentration of the stock solution, temperature. transmembrane pressure and the dependence on the diffusion coefficients of several salt components on the dilution was evaluated. As an application example, the use of the reagent delivery cell for on-line calibration of an atomic absorption spectrometer was studied. Fluxes through the membrane filter of 10 to 50 nL mm(-2) min(-1) with relative standard deviations of 0.8% within a day and 1.9% from day to day were achieved. The permeation experiments with the track-etch membrane filter for the dilution of aqueous solutions of several chlorides and sodium salts confirm a diffusion process. Flux rates can be estimated mathematically using Fick's first law with an agreement between measured and calculated dilution factors within 86 to 113%.

  10. Parallel pipelining

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, D.D.; Bai, R.; Liao, T.Y.; Huang, A.; Hu, H.H.

    1995-09-01

    In this paper the authors introduce the idea of parallel pipelining for water lubricated transportation of oil (or other viscous material). A parallel system can have major advantages over a single pipe with respect to the cost of maintenance and continuous operation of the system, to the pressure gradients required to restart a stopped system and to the reduction and even elimination of the fouling of pipe walls in continuous operation. The authors show that the action of capillarity in small pipes is more favorable for restart than in large pipes. In a parallel pipeline system, they estimate the number of small pipes needed to deliver the same oil flux as in one larger pipe as N = (R/r){sup {alpha}}, where r and R are the radii of the small and large pipes, respectively, and {alpha} = 4 or 19/7 when the lubricating water flow is laminar or turbulent.

  11. Comparison of Global Navigation Satellite System Devices on Speed Tracking in Road (Tran)SPORT Applications

    PubMed Central

    Supej, Matej; Čuk, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Global Naavigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) are, in addition to being most widely used vehicle navigation method, becoming popular in sport-related tests. There is a lack of knowledge regarding tracking speed using GNSS, therefore the aims of this study were to examine under dynamic conditions: (1) how accurate technologically different GNSS measure speed and (2) how large is latency in speed measurements in real time applications. Five GNSSs were tested. They were fixed to a car's roof-rack: a smart phone, a wrist watch, a handheld device, a professional system for testing vehicles and a high-end Real Time Kinematics (RTK) GNSS. The speed data were recorded and analyzed during rapid acceleration and deceleration as well as at steady speed. The study produced four main findings. Higher frequency and high quality GNSS receivers track speed at least at comparable accuracy to a vehicle speedometer. All GNSS systems measured maximum speed and movement at a constant speed well. Acceleration and deceleration have different level of error at different speeds. Low cost GNSS receivers operating at 1 Hz sampling rate had high latency (up to 2.16 s) and are not appropriate for tracking speed in real time, especially during dynamic movements. PMID:25494349

  12. Comparison of Global Navigation Satellite System Devices on Speed Tracking in Road (Tran)SPORT Applications.

    PubMed

    Supej, Matej; Cuk, Ivan

    2014-12-08

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) are, in addition to being most widely used vehicle navigation method, becoming popular in sport-related tests. There is a lack of knowledge regarding tracking speed using GNSS, therefore the aims of this study were to examine under dynamic conditions: (1) how accurate technologically different GNSS measure speed and (2) how large is latency in speed measurements in real time applications. Five GNSSs were tested. They were fixed to a car's roof-rack: a  smart phone, a wrist watch, a handheld device, a professional system for testing vehicles and a high-end Real Time Kinematics (RTK) GNSS. The speed data were recorded and analyzed during rapid acceleration and deceleration as well as at steady speed. The study produced four main findings. Higher frequency and high quality GNSS receivers track speed at least at comparable accuracy to a vehicle speedometer. All GNSS systems measured maximum speed and movement at a constant speed well. Acceleration and deceleration have different level of error at different speeds. Low cost GNSS receivers operating at 1 Hz sampling rate had high latency (up to 2.16 s) and are not appropriate for tracking speed in real time, especially during dynamic movements.

  13. Single particle tracking reveals biphasic transport during nanorod magnetophoresis through extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Mair, L O; Superfine, R

    2014-06-21

    Magnetic drug targeting has been proposed as a means of efficiently targeting drugs to tumors. However, the extracellular matrix (ECM) remains a significant barrier to long-range magnetophoretic transport through the tumor volume. While ensemble measurements of nanoparticle magnetophoresis have been reported, a single particle level understanding of magnetophoretic transport remains at large. We quantify nanorod magnetophoresis through ECM based on single particle observations. We find that smaller diameter particles achieve larger velocities through ECM despite experiencing smaller magnetic forces. Additionally, two interesting dynamics are elucidated. First, 18 nm diameter nanorods experience bimodal stick-slip motion through ECM during static field magnetophoresis, while similar bimodal transport is not observed for 55 nm nor 200 nm diameter nanorods. Second, smaller particles experience larger deviations in their orientation angle with respect to the magnetic field. This work elucidates important dynamics of nanoparticle transport through complex, porous biomaterials that may go unnoticed during ensemble measurements.

  14. Single Particle Tracking Reveals Biphasic Transport During Nanorod Magnetophoresis Through Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Mair, L.O.; Superfine, R.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic drug targeting has been proposed as a means of efficiently targeting drugs to tumors. However, the extracellular matrix (ECM) remains a significant barrier to long-range magnetophoretic transport through the tumor volume. While ensemble measurements of nanoparticle magnetophoresis have been reported, a single particle level understanding of magnetophoretic transport remains at large. We quantify nanorod magnetophoresis through ECM based on single particle observations. We find that smaller diameter particles achieve larger velocities through ECM despite experiencing smaller magnetic forces. Additionally, two interesting dynamics are elucidated. First, 18 nm diameter nanorods experience bimodal stick-slip motion through ECM during static field magnetophoresis, while similar bimodal transport is not observed for 55 nm nor 200 nm diameter nanorods. Second, smaller particles experience larger deviations in their orientation angle with respect to the magnetic field. This work elucidates important dynamics of nanoparticle transport through complex, porous biomaterials that may go unnoticed during ensemble measurements. PMID:24744160

  15. Development of the 3D Parallel Particle-In-Cell Code IMPACT to Simulate the Ion Beam Transport System of VENUS (Abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.; Leitner, D.; Todd, D.S.; Ryne, R.D.

    2005-03-15

    The superconducting ECR ion source VENUS serves as the prototype injector ion source for the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) driver linac. The RIA driver linac requires a great variety of high charge state ion beams with up to an order of magnitude higher intensity than currently achievable with conventional ECR ion sources. In order to design the beam line optics of the low energy beam line for the RIA front end for the wide parameter range required for the RIA driver accelerator, reliable simulations of the ion beam extraction from the ECR ion source through the ion mass analyzing system are essential. The RIA low energy beam transport line must be able to transport intense beams (up to 10 mA) of light and heavy ions at 30 keV.For this purpose, LBNL is developing the parallel 3D particle-in-cell code IMPACT to simulate the ion beam transport from the ECR extraction aperture through the analyzing section of the low energy transport system. IMPACT, a parallel, particle-in-cell code, is currently used to model the superconducting RF linac section of RIA and is being modified in order to simulate DC beams from the ECR ion source extraction. By using the high performance of parallel supercomputing we will be able to account consistently for the changing space charge in the extraction region and the analyzing section. A progress report and early results in the modeling of the VENUS source will be presented.

  16. Development of the 3D Parallel Particle-In-Cell Code IMPACT to Simulate the Ion Beam Transport System of VENUS (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, J.; Leitner, D.; Todd, D. S.; Ryne, R. D.

    2005-03-01

    The superconducting ECR ion source VENUS serves as the prototype injector ion source for the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) driver linac. The RIA driver linac requires a great variety of high charge state ion beams with up to an order of magnitude higher intensity than currently achievable with conventional ECR ion sources. In order to design the beam line optics of the low energy beam line for the RIA front end for the wide parameter range required for the RIA driver accelerator, reliable simulations of the ion beam extraction from the ECR ion source through the ion mass analyzing system are essential. The RIA low energy beam transport line must be able to transport intense beams (up to 10 mA) of light and heavy ions at 30 keV. For this purpose, LBNL is developing the parallel 3D particle-in-cell code IMPACT to simulate the ion beam transport from the ECR extraction aperture through the analyzing section of the low energy transport system. IMPACT, a parallel, particle-in-cell code, is currently used to model the superconducting RF linac section of RIA and is being modified in order to simulate DC beams from the ECR ion source extraction. By using the high performance of parallel supercomputing we will be able to account consistently for the changing space charge in the extraction region and the analyzing section. A progress report and early results in the modeling of the VENUS source will be presented.

  17. oops!: Open Object-Oriented Parallel Solutions: A C++ Class Library for the Solution of Transport Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuttke, Manfred W.

    2017-04-01

    At LIAG, geothermal energy utilization is the main area were we use numerical models to develop and enhance process understanding and to predict the dynamics of the system under consideration. Other topics include spontaneous underground coal fires and subrosion processes. Although the details make it inconvenient if not impossible to apply a single code implementation to all systems, their investigations go along similar paths: They all depend on the solution of coupled transport equations. We thus saw a need for a modular code system with open access for the various communities to maximize the shared synergistic effects. To this purpose we develop the oops! ( open object-oriented parallel solutions) - toolkit, a C++ class library for the numerical solution of mathematical models of coupled thermal, hydraulic and chemical processes. This is used to develop problem-specific libraries like acme( amendable coal-fire modeling exercise), a class library for the numerical simulation of coal-fires and applications like kobra (Kohlebrand, german for coal-fire), a numerical simulation code for standard coal-fire models. The latest development just started is the SIMBA toolkit for the simulation of geothermal plants. Basic principle of the code system is the provision of data types for the description of space and time dependent data fields, description of terms of partial differential equations (pde), their discretisation and solving methods. Coupling of different processes, described by their particular pde is modeled by an automatic timescale-ordered operator-splitting technique. If in a derived specific application library functionalities of general interest are implemented and have been tested they will be assimilated into the main library. Interfaces to external pre- and post-processing tools are easily implemented. Thus a construction kit which can be arbitrarily amended is formed.

  18. Well-to-Wheels Water Consumption: Tracking the Virtual Flow of Water into Transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampert, D. J.; Elgowainy, A.; Hao, C.

    2015-12-01

    Water and energy resources are fundamental to life on Earth and essential for the production of consumer goods and services in the economy. Energy and water resources are heavily interdependent—energy production consumes water, while water treatment and distribution consume energy. One example of this so-called energy-water nexus is the consumption of water associated with the production of transportation fuels. The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model is an analytical tool that can be used to compare the environmental impacts of different transportation fuels on a consistent basis. In this presentation, the expansion of GREET to perform life cycle water accounting or the "virtual flow" of water into transportation and other energy sectors and the associated implications will be discussed. The results indicate that increased usage of alternative fuels may increase freshwater resource consumption. The increased water consumption must be weighed against the benefits of decreased greenhouse gas and fossil energy consumption. Our analysis highlights the importance of regionality, co-product allocation, and consistent system boundaries when comparing the water intensity of alternative transportation fuel production pathways such as ethanol, biodiesel, compressed natural gas, hydrogen, and electricity with conventional petroleum-based fuels such as diesel and gasoline.

  19. Tracking Seasonal Volatile Transport on Triton and Pluto through the Decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buratti, B. J.; Hicks, M. D.; Bauer, J. M.; Hillier, J.; Banholzer, S.

    2012-12-01

    Because of their substantial obliquity, Pluto and the moons of the outer planets should exhibit seasonal volatile transport on their surfaces. The transport of nitrogen and other gasses can be detected by measuring changes in atmospheric pressure with stellar occultations, by monitoring the rotational light curve, or by direct imaging with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) or adaptive optics. Pluto and Triton have tenuous atmospheres, and the transport of volatiles is associated with both the sublimation of gasses into these atmospheres, and with the changing patterns of frost at the polar caps and elsewhere. The rotational light curve can serve as an approximate description of the distribution of volatiles on a planetary surface, and for Pluto and Triton it can be easily measured with a moderately-sized telescope. Changes in the amplitude or shape of the light curve could indicate volatile transport on these bodies, after all the effects of viewing geometry have been taken into account. Light curves of these two bodies in the absence of any volatile transport can be derived from Voyager images (Triton) or HST images (Pluto) which have been projected to the correct viewing geometry for each epoch. During the past two decades we have been gathering light curves for Triton and Pluto with the 24-inch telescope at Table Mountain Observatory. We have augmented our data with historical measurements that stretch back for several more decades, to cover a substantial fraction of one Plutonian or Neptunian year. The light curve of Triton shows definite intrinsic changes that have been confirmed by HST images (J. Bauer et al., Ap. J. Lett. 723, 2010), while Pluto shows evidence for changes that have also been seen in HST data (M. Buie et al., Astron. J. 139, 2010) Voyager images of Triton show what appears to be a sublimating southern polar cap. In July 2015 the New Horizon Spacecraft will encounter the dwarf planet Pluto to reveal its surface for the first time. Funded by

  20. Modeling of Calcite Precipitation Driven by Bacteria-facilitated Urea Hydrolysis in A Flow Column Using A Fully Coupled, Fully Implicit Parallel Reactive Transport Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, L.; Huang, H.; Gaston, D.; Redden, G. D.

    2009-12-01

    One approach for immobilizing subsurface metal contaminants involves stimulating the in situ production of mineral phases that sequester or isolate contaminants. One example is using calcium carbonate to immobilize strontium. The success of such approaches depends on understanding how various processes of flow, transport, reaction and resulting porosity-permeability change couple in subsurface systems. Reactive transport models are often used for such purpose. Current subsurface reactive transport simulators typically involve a de-coupled solution approach, such as operator-splitting, that solves the transport equations for components and batch chemistry sequentially, which has limited applicability for many biogeochemical processes with fast kinetics and strong medium property-reaction interactions. A massively parallel, fully coupled, fully implicit reactive transport simulator has been developed based on a parallel multi-physics object oriented software environment computing framework (MOOSE) developed at the Idaho National Laboratory. Within this simulator, the system of transport and reaction equations is solved simultaneously in a fully coupled manner using the Jacobian Free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) method with preconditioning. The simulator was applied to model reactive transport in a one-dimensional column where conditions that favor calcium carbonate precipitation are generated by urea hydrolysis that is catalyzed by urease enzyme. Simulation results are compared to both laboratory column experiments and those obtained using the reactive transport simulator STOMP in terms of: the spatial and temporal distributions of precipitates and reaction rates and other major species in the reaction system; the changes in porosity and permeability; and the computing efficiency based on wall clock simulation time.

  1. Note: Reliable and non-contact 6D motion tracking system based on 2D laser scanners for cargo transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Keun; Kim, Kyung-Soo

    2014-10-15

    Maritime transportation demands an accurate measurement system to track the motion of oscillating container boxes in real time. However, it is a challenge to design a sensor system that can provide both reliable and non-contact methods of 6-DOF motion measurements of a remote object for outdoor applications. In the paper, a sensor system based on two 2D laser scanners is proposed for detecting the relative 6-DOF motion of a crane load in real time. Even without implementing a camera, the proposed system can detect the motion of a remote object using four laser beam points. Because it is a laser-based sensor, the system is expected to be highly robust to sea weather conditions.

  2. Anomalous transport effects on the parallel E field in downward auroral current regions of the Earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasperse, John R.; Basu, Bamandas; Lund, Eric J.; Grossbard, Neil

    2011-08-01

    The physical processes that determine the fluid quantities and the self-consistent electric field (E$\\parallel$) parallel to the magnetic field have been an unresolved problem in magnetospheric physics for over 40 years. We review a recently developed kinetic and multimoment fluid theory for inhomogeneous, nonuniformly magnetized plasma with temperature anisotropy in the guiding-center and gyrotropic approximation and apply the theory to solve for the quasi steady state in the long-range potential region of a downward Birkeland current sheet when electrostatic ion cyclotron turbulence is dominant. We find that an electron, bump-on-tail-driven ion cyclotron instability produces the turbulence and that a large enhancement in ∣E$\\parallel$∣ by nearly a factor of 40 occurs when the turbulence is present compared to the case when it is absent. Anomalous momentum transfer (anomalous resistivity) by itself has a very small effect on E$\\parallel$; however, the presence of the turbulence and the anomalous energy transfers (anomalous heating and cooling) that result have a very large effect on the entire solution. In the electron and ion momentum balance equations for E$\\parallel$, the turbulence enhances the magnitude of E$\\parallel$ by reducing the effect of the generalized parallel pressure gradients and thereby enhancing the effect of the mirror forces. A new, nonlinear formula for the current-voltage relationship in downward Birkeland current regions is also given.

  3. Numerical Simulation of Suspended Sediment Transportation Based on Particle Tracking Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, W. W.; Ying, C.; Mu, J. B.

    2017-08-01

    Coastal engineering that carried out on the muddy seabed were always accompanied by diffusion of suspended sediment, and that would impact on the surrounding marine environment. A 2-D tidal flow mathematical model of the Yueqing Bay was established based on the Lagrange particle tracking model, the diffusion of suspended sediment in pile foundation construction process of a new wharf in the Yueqing Bay was simulated through a continuous moving points method, the calculation results were compared with the one calculated by the traditional convection diffusion method, it showed that the results calculated from the two different methods were similar, therefore it proved the suitability of the Lagrange particle tracing model in the suspended sediment diffusion problems.

  4. Intraflagellar transport dynein is autoinhibited by trapping of its mechanical and track-binding elements.

    PubMed

    Toropova, Katerina; Mladenov, Miroslav; Roberts, Anthony J

    2017-05-01

    Cilia are multifunctional organelles that are constructed using intraflagellar transport (IFT) of cargo to and from their tip. It is widely held that the retrograde IFT motor, dynein-2, must be controlled in order to reach the ciliary tip and then unleashed to power the return journey. However, the mechanism is unknown. Here, we systematically define the mechanochemistry of human dynein-2 motors as monomers, dimers, and multimotor assemblies with kinesin-II. Combining these data with insights from single-particle EM, we discover that dynein-2 dimers are intrinsically autoinhibited. Inhibition is mediated by trapping dynein-2's mechanical 'linker' and 'stalk' domains within a novel motor-motor interface. We find that linker-mediated inhibition enables efficient transport of dynein-2 by kinesin-II in vitro. These results suggest a conserved mechanism for autoregulation among dimeric dyneins, which is exploited as a switch for dynein-2's recycling activity during IFT.

  5. Tracking aeolian transport patterns across a mega-nourishment using video imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijnberg, Kathelijne; van der Weerd, Lianne; Hulscher, Suzanne

    2014-05-01

    Coastal dune areas protect the hinterland from flooding. In order to maintain the safety level provided by the dunes, it may be necessary to artificially supply the beach-dune system with sand. How to best design these shore nourishments, amongst others with respect to optimal dune growth on the long-term (decadal scale), is not yet clear. One reason for this is that current models for aeolian transport on beaches appear to have limited predictive capabilities regarding annual onshore sediment supply. These limited capabilities may be attributed to the lack of appropriate input data, for instance on moisture content of the beach surface, or shortcomings in process understanding. However, it may also be argued that for the long-term prediction of onshore aeolian sand supply from the beach to the dunes, we may need to develop some aggregated-scale transport equations, because the detailed input data required for the application of process-scale transport equations may never be available in reality. A first step towards the development of such new concepts for aggregated-scale transport equations is to increase phenomenological insight into the characteristics and number of aeolian transport events that account for the annual volume changes of the foredunes. This requires high-frequency, long-term data sets to capture the only intermittently occurring aeolian transport events. Automated video image collection seems a promising way to collect such data. In the present study we describe the movement (direction and speed) of sand patches and aeolian bed forms across a nourished site, using video imagery, to characterize aeolian transport pathways and their variability in time. The study site is a mega-nourishment (21 Mm3 of sand) that was recently constructed at the Dutch coast. This mega-nourishment, also referred to as the Sand Motor, is a pilot project that may potentially replace current practice of more frequently applying small scale nourishments. The mega

  6. Wrong side of the tracks: the neglected human costs of transporting oil and gas.

    PubMed

    Burton, Lloyd; Stretesky, Paul

    2014-06-14

    The connection between human rights and climate change is most evident when examining carbon dioxide emissions that result from burning fossil fuels (e.g., sea level rise and displaced coastal cultures). However, the transport of fossil fuels also has human rights implications for human rights and climate change. This research focuses on the health and safety risks inflicted on those residents who are adjacent to the railways that ship fossil fuels along the US-Canada transportation corridors. Applying sociological and jurisprudential perspectives, we review the environmental/climate justice literature as it pertains to industrial transport corridors, documenting the forms of heightened risk imposed on those living along these transportation paths. Next, we develop an illustrative case study of Canada's worst rail catastrophe. In so doing, we provide evidence of a decades-long failure of US and Canadian regulators to prevent such disasters. We interpret that disaster through a human rights case law suggesting that States have an affirmative duty to protect their citizens from foreseeable disasters. Based on this analysis, we propose specific rail safety regulatory reforms. We argue that if the US and Canadian governments implement these regulations as required under human rights law, they can more effectively honor their obligations to their citizens who are paying a high human cost for the material benefits associated with increased energy production. Copyright © 2014 Burton and Stretesky. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/), which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

  7. Imaging and Quantitation Techniques for Tracking Cargo along Endosome-to-Golgi Transport Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Pei Zhi Cheryl; Gleeson, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Recent improvements in the resolution of light microscopy, coupled with the development of a range of fluorescent-based probes, have provided new approaches to dissecting membrane domains and the regulation of membrane trafficking. Here, we review these advances, as well as highlight developments in quantitative image analysis and novel unbiased analytical approaches to quantitate protein localization. The application of these approaches to endosomal sorting and endosome-to-Golgi transport is discussed. PMID:24709647

  8. Using DNA-labelled nano- and microparticles to track particle transport in the environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNew, Coy; Wang, Chaozi; Dahlke, Helen; Lyon, Steve; Walter, Todd

    2017-04-01

    By utilizing bio-molecular nanotechnology developed for nano-medicines and drug delivery, we are able to produce DNA-labelled nano- and microparticle tracers for use in a myriad of environmental systems. The use of custom sequenced DNA allows for the fabrication of an enormous number of uniquely labelled tracers with identical transport properties (approximately 1.61 x 1060 unique sequences), each independently quantifiable, that can be applied simultaneously in any hydrologic system. By controlling the fabrication procedure to produce particles of custom size and charge, we are able to tag each size-charge combination uniquely in order to directly probe the effect of these variables on the transport properties of the particles. Here we present our methods for fabrication, extraction, and analysis of the DNA nano- and microparticle tracers, along with results from several successful applications of the tracers, including transport and retention analysis at the lab, continuum, and field scales. To date, our DNA-labelled nano- and microparticle tracers have proved useful in surface and subsurface water applications, soil retention, and even subglacial flow pathways. The range of potential applications continue to prove nearly limitless.

  9. Superconducting transport in single and parallel double InAs quantum dot Josephson junctions with Nb-based superconducting electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Shoji Sailer, Juergen; Deacon, Russell S.; Oiwa, Akira; Shibata, Kenji; Hirakawa, Kazuhiko; Tarucha, Seigo

    2015-11-30

    We report conductance and supercurrent measurements for InAs single and parallel double quantum dot Josephson junctions contacted with Nb or NbTiN superconducting electrodes. Large superconducting gap energy, high critical field, and large switching current are observed, all reflecting the features of Nb-based electrodes. For the parallel double dots, we observe an enhanced supercurrent when both dots are on resonance, which may reflect split Cooper pair tunneling.

  10. Tracking Nitrogen Sources, Transformation, and Transport at a Basin Scale with Complex Plain River Networks.

    PubMed

    Yi, Qitao; Chen, Qiuwen; Hu, Liuming; Shi, Wenqing

    2017-05-16

    This research developed an innovative approach to reveal nitrogen sources, transformation, and transport in large and complex river networks in the Taihu Lake basin using measurement of dual stable isotopes of nitrate. The spatial patterns of δ(15)N corresponded to the urbanization level, and the nitrogen cycle was associated with the hydrological regime at the basin level. During the high flow season of summer, nonpoint sources from fertilizer/soils and atmospheric deposition constituted the highest proportion of the total nitrogen load. The point sources from sewage/manure, with high ammonium concentrations and high δ(15)N and δ(18)O contents in the form of nitrate, accounted for the largest inputs among all sources during the low flow season of winter. Hot spot areas with heavy point source pollution were identified, and the pollutant transport routes were revealed. Nitrification occurred widely during the warm seasons, with decreased δ(18)O values; whereas great potential for denitrification existed during the low flow seasons of autumn and spring. The study showed that point source reduction could have effects over the short-term; however, long-term efforts to substantially control agriculture nonpoint sources are essential to eutrophication alleviation for the receiving lake, which clarifies the relationship between point and nonpoint source control.

  11. Insulin action on glucose transporters through molecular switches, tracks and tethers.

    PubMed

    Zaid, Hilal; Antonescu, Costin N; Randhawa, Varinder K; Klip, Amira

    2008-07-15

    Glucose entry into muscle cells is precisely regulated by insulin, through recruitment of GLUT4 (glucose transporter-4) to the membrane of muscle and fat cells. Work done over more than two decades has contributed to mapping the insulin signalling and GLUT4 vesicle trafficking events underpinning this response. In spite of this intensive scientific research, there are outstanding questions that continue to challenge us today. The present review summarizes the knowledge in the field, with emphasis on the latest breakthroughs in insulin signalling at the level of AS160 (Akt substrate of 160 kDa), TBC1D1 (tre-2/USP6, BUB2, cdc16 domain family member 1) and their target Rab proteins; in vesicle trafficking at the level of vesicle mobilization, tethering, docking and fusion with the membrane; and in the participation of the cytoskeleton to achieve optimal temporal and spatial location of insulin-derived signals and GLUT4 vesicles.

  12. A New Method for Tracking Individual Particles During Bed Load Transport in a Gravel-Bed River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, M.; Marquis, G. A.; Roy, A. G.; Chaire de Recherche Du Canada En Dynamique Fluviale

    2010-12-01

    Many particle tracers (passive or active) have been developed to study gravel movement in rivers. It remains difficult, however, to document resting and moving periods and to know how particles travel from one deposition site to another. Our new tracking method uses the Hobo Pendant G acceleration Data Logger to quantitatively describe the motion of individual particles from the initiation of movement, through the displacement and to the rest, in a natural gravel river. The Hobo measures the acceleration in three dimensions at a chosen temporal frequency. The Hobo was inserted into 11 artificial rocks. The rocks were seeded in Ruisseau Béard, a small gravel-bed river in the Yamaska drainage basin (Québec) where the hydraulics, particle sizes and bed characteristics are well known. The signals recorded during eight floods (Summer and Fall 2008-2009) allowed us to develop an algorithm which classifies the periods of rest and motion. We can differentiate two types of motion: sliding and rolling. The particles can also vibrate while remaining in the same position. The examination of the movement and vibration periods with respect to the hydraulic conditions (discharge, shear stress, stream power) showed that vibration occurred mostly before the rise of hydrograph and allowed us to establish movement threshold and response times. In all cases, particle movements occurred during floods but not always in direct response to increased bed shear stress and stream power. This method offers great potential to track individual particles and to establish a spatiotemporal sequence of the intermittent transport of the particle during a flood and to test theories concerning the resting periods of particles on a gravel bed.

  13. Tracking Intercontinental Dust Transport With Radiogenic Isotopes: Hefei, China to California, Spring 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, J. N.; Cliff, S. S.; Vancuren, R. A.; Perry, K. D.; Depaolo, D. J.

    2006-12-01

    Research over the past decade has highlighted the importance of intercontinental transport and exchange of atmospheric aerosols, including soil-derived dust and industrial pollutants. Far-traveled aerosols can affect air quality, atmospheric radiative forcing and cloud formation and can be an important component in soils. Principal component analysis of elemental data for aerosols collected over California has identified a persistent Asian soil dust component that peaks with Asian dust storm events [1]. Isotopic fingerprinting can provide an additional and potentially more discriminating tool for tracing sources of dust. For example, the naturally variable isotopic compositions of Sr and Nd reflect both the geochemistry of the dust source and its pre- weathering geologic history. Sr and Nd isotopic data and chemical data have been collected for a time series of PM2.5 filter samples from Hefei, China taken from eraly April into early May, 2002. This period encompassed a series of dust storms. The sampling time frame overlapped with the 2002 Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation (ITCT-2K2) experiment along the Pacific coast of North America and inland California. Highs in 87Sr/86Sr in the Hefei time series coincide with peaks in Ca and Si representing peaks in mineral particulate loading resulting from passing dust storms. Mixing diagrams combining isotopic data with chemical data identify several components; a high 87Sr/86Sr component that we identify with mineral dust (loess), and two different low 87Sr/86Sr components (local sources and marine aerosol). Using our measured isotopic composition of the "loess" standard CJ-1 [2] as representative of the pure high 87Sr/86Sr component, we calculate 24 hour average loess particulate concentrations in air which range up to 35 micrograms per cubic meter. Marine aerosol was a major component on at least one of the sampled days. The results for the Hefei samples provide a basis for our isotopic study of

  14. Transport model of chemical secretion process for tracking exocytotic event dynamics using electroanalysis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Tai-Hsi; Fedorov, Andrei G

    2004-08-01

    A unified model is developed to analyze the key features of the chemical secretion process observed in experimental studies of various vesicles with application to electroanalytical measurements of vesicular exocytosis. The intimately coupled dynamics and kinetics are simultaneously resolved based on continuum fluid flow, mass transport, and linear elasticity theories combined with biomembrane mechanics. We report three case studies of exocytosis, including a large electroporated granule of the mast cell, a small and clear synaptic vesicle, and a medium size vesicle in the chromaffin cell. The simulation results for each case are compared with electroanalytical measurements from the literature. The results provide a theoretical ground for defining the rate-controlling step(s) of an exocytotic sequence, allowing interpretation of electroanalysis data. Thus, it provides a tool for theoretical verification of competing hypotheses of what controls/limits messenger release during exocytosis. Simulations show that the pore size, the pore opening velocity, and the swelling dynamics of the granule matrix play the key roles in controlling the messenger release kinetics.

  15. California Surface Wave Tomography from Ambient Seismic Noise: Tracking the Progress of the USArray Transportable Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moschetti, M. P.; Ritzwoller, M. H.; Shapiro, N. M.

    2005-12-01

    We have extended the application of high resolution ambient noise surface wave tomography across all of California by incorporating emerging data from the USArray Transportable Array (TA) component of Earthscope. Ambient seismic noise contains a significant component of Rayleigh wave energy from which the Green function between pairs of stations can be extracted by cross-correlating long noise sequences. Surface wave group velocities are then measured on the estimated Green functions. Early efforts were applied to records from USArray TA stations in Southern California and resulted in the construction of high-resolution short-period (7-18 s) surface wave dispersion maps and the imaging of the principal crustal geological units in Southern California (Shapiro et al., Science, 307, 1615, 2005). As the spatial coverage of the USArray TA in Northern California has improved over the past year, the number of potential receiver pairs and their resulting sampled paths have increased proportionately. We have extended surface wave tomography across California by computing cross-correlations to obtain short period (7-25 s) surface wave group velocity measurements for paths across the state. The majority of the paths in Northern California result from the recent emplacement of USArray TA instruments. Cross-correlations of three month time windows, starting in October 2004 and continuing through September 2005, result in evolving maps of the surface wave group velocities in Northern California. Newly imaged tomographic features are seen to emerge as the resolution improves.

  16. A parallelization scheme to simulate reactive transport in the subsurface environment with OGS#IPhreeqc 5.5.7-3.1.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, W.; Beyer, C.; Fleckenstein, J. H.; Jang, E.; Kolditz, O.; Naumov, D.; Kalbacher, T.

    2015-10-01

    The open-source scientific software packages OpenGeoSys and IPhreeqc have been coupled to set up and simulate thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical coupled processes with simultaneous consideration of aqueous geochemical reactions faster and easier on high-performance computers. In combination with the elaborated and extendable chemical database of IPhreeqc, it will be possible to set up a wide range of multiphysics problems with numerous chemical reactions that are known to influence water quality in porous and fractured media. A flexible parallelization scheme using MPI (Message Passing Interface) grouping techniques has been implemented, which allows an optimized allocation of computer resources for the node-wise calculation of chemical reactions on the one hand and the underlying processes such as for groundwater flow or solute transport on the other. This technical paper presents the implementation, verification, and parallelization scheme of the coupling interface, and discusses its performance and precision.

  17. Gem-1 encodes an SLC16 monocarboxylate transporter-related protein that functions in parallel to the gon-2 TRPM channel during gonad development in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Benedict J; Church, Diane L; Hatzold, Julia; Conradt, Barbara; Lambie, Eric J

    2009-02-01

    The gon-2 gene of Caenorhabditis elegans encodes a TRPM cation channel required for gonadal cell divisions. In this article, we demonstrate that the gonadogenesis defects of gon-2 loss-of-function mutants (including a null allele) can be suppressed by gain-of-function mutations in the gem-1 (gon-2 extragenic modifier) locus. gem-1 encodes a multipass transmembrane protein that is similar to SLC16 family monocarboxylate transporters. Inactivation of gem-1 enhances the gonadogenesis defects of gon-2 hypomorphic mutations, suggesting that these two genes probably act in parallel to promote gonadal cell divisions. GEM-1GFP is expressed within the gonadal precursor cells and localizes to the plasma membrane. Therefore, we propose that GEM-1 acts in parallel to the GON-2 channel to promote cation uptake within the developing gonad.

  18. Tracking Organic Carbon Transport From the Stordalen Mire to Glacial Lake Tornetrask, Abisko, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, M. A.; Hamilton, B. T.; Spry, E.; Johnson, J. E.; Palace, M. W.; McCalley, C. K.; Varner, R. K.; Bothner, W. A.

    2016-12-01

    In subarctic regions, labile organic carbon from thawing permafrost and productivity of terrestrial and aquatic vegetation are sources of carbon to lake sediments. Methane is produced in lake sediments from the decomposition of organic carbon at rates affected by vegetation presence and type as well as sediment temperature. Recent research in the Stordalen Mire in northern Sweden has suggested that labile organic carbon sources in young, shallow lake sediments yield the highest in situ sediment methane concentrations. Ebullition (or bubbling) of this methane is predominantly controlled by seasonal warming. In this project we sampled stream, glacial and post-glacial lake sediments along a drainage transect through the Stordalen Mire into the large glacial Lake Torneträsk. Our results indicate that the highest methane and total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations were observed in lake and stream sediments in the upper 25 centimeters, consistent with previous studies. C/N ratios range from 8 to 32, and suggest that a mix of aquatic and terrestrial vegetation sources dominate the sedimentary record. Although water transport occurs throughout the mire, major depositional centers for sediments and organic carbon occur within the lakes and prohibit young, labile TOC from entering the larger glacial Lake Torneträsk. The lack of an observed sediment fan at the outlet of the Mire to the lake is consistent with this observation. Our results suggest that carbon produced in the mire stays in the mire, allowing methane production to be greater in the mire bound lakes and streams than in the larger adjacent glacial lake.

  19. Highly Reduced Forsterite and Enstatite from Stardust Track 61: Implications for Radial Transport of E Asteroid Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, David R.; Zolensky, M. E.; Le, L.; Weisberg, M. K.; Kimura, M.

    2013-01-01

    The Stardust Mission returned a large fraction of high-temperature, crystalline material that was radially transported from the inner solar system to the Kuiper Belt [1,2]. The mineralogical diversity found in this single cometary collection points to an even greater number of source materials than most primitive chondrites. In particular, the type II olivine found in Wild 2 includes the three distinct Fe/Mn ratios found in the matrix and chondrules of carbonaceous chondrites (CCs) and unequilibrated ordinary chondrites (UOCs) [3]. We also find that low-Ca pyroxene is quite variable (approximately Fs3-29) and is usually indistinguishable from CC, UOC, and EH3 pyroxene as well. However, occasional olivine and pyroxene compositions are found in Wild 2 that are inconsistent with chondrites. The Stardust track 61 terminal particle (TP) is one such example and is the focus of this study. It s highly reduced forsterite and enstatite is consistent only with that in Aubrites, in which FeO is essentially absent from these phases (less than approximately 0.1 wt.% FeO) [4].

  20. Wave-particle interaction in parallel transport of long mean-free-path plasmas along open field magnetic field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zehua; Tang, Xianzhu

    2012-03-01

    A tokamak fusion reactor dumps a large amount of heat and particle flux to the divertor through the scrape-off plasma (SOL). Situation exists either by necessity or through deliberate design that the SOL plasma attains long mean-free-path along large segments of the open field lines. The rapid parallel streaming of electrons requires a large parallel electric field to maintain ambipolarity. The confining effect of the parallel electric field on electrons leads to a trap/passing boundary in the velocity space for electrons. In the normal situation where the upstream electron source populates both the trapped and passing region, a mechanism must exist to produce a flux across the electron trap/passing boundary. In a short mean-free-path plasma, this is provided by collisions. For long mean-free-path plasmas, wave-particle interaction is the primary candidate for detrapping the electrons. Here we present simulation results and a theoretical analysis using a model distribution function of trapped electrons. The dominating electromagnetic plasma instability and the associated collisionless scattering, that produces both particle and energy fluxes across the electron trap/passing boundary in velocity space, are discussed.

  1. FRACFLO: Analytical solutions for two-dimensional transport of a decaying species in a discrete planar fracture and equidistant multiple parallel fractures with rock matrix diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Gureghian, A.B.

    1990-07-01

    Analytical solutions based on the Laplace and Fourier transformation techniques are derived for the transient advective-dispersive transport of a single radionuclide through fractures (two-dimensional analysis) and rock (one-dimensional analysis). The longitudinal dispersion-free solution is also reported. The geometry considered consists of either a single planar fracture (infinite diffusion in the rock) or a system of equidistant parallel fracture planes with uniform aperture (finite diffusion in the rock). The solution assumes that the ground-water flow regime is under steady-state and isothermal conditions, and the streamlines along the direction of flow are parallel. The solution related to the single fracture case was verified by comparing its performance with available results from other works. Two sets of solutions were derived for the multiple parallel fracture case; the first, based on a series approximation, and the second, based on contour integration, were designed to cope efficiently with small and large Fourier numbers, respectively. The general solution requires, in both cases, the evaluation of a single integral, except in the case of the solution based on contour integration, where an additional one is required. This is performed using a Gauss-Legendre quadrature scheme. 34 refs., 65 figs., 77 tabs.

  2. 49 CFR 213.63 - Track surface.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Track surface. 213.63 Section 213.63 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Geometry § 213.63 Track surface. Each owner of the...

  3. 49 CFR 213.63 - Track surface.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Track surface. 213.63 Section 213.63 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Geometry § 213.63 Track surface. (a) Except as...

  4. 49 CFR 213.55 - Track alinement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Track alinement. 213.55 Section 213.55 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Geometry § 213.55 Track alinement. (a) Except as...

  5. 49 CFR 213.63 - Track surface.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Track surface. 213.63 Section 213.63 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Geometry § 213.63 Track surface. Each owner of the...

  6. 49 CFR 213.63 - Track surface.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Track surface. 213.63 Section 213.63 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Geometry § 213.63 Track surface. (a) Except as...

  7. 49 CFR 213.63 - Track surface.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Track surface. 213.63 Section 213.63 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Geometry § 213.63 Track surface. Each owner of the...

  8. 49 CFR 213.55 - Track alinement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Track alinement. 213.55 Section 213.55 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Geometry § 213.55 Track alinement. (a) Except as...

  9. Parallel Regulation of Thyroid Hormone Transporters OATP1c1 and MCT8 During and After Endotoxemia at the Blood-Brain Barrier of Male Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Szabon, Judit; Mohácsik, Petra; Nouriel, Shira S.; Gereben, Balázs; Fekete, Csaba

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that local thyroid hormone (TH) availability changes profoundly in inflammatory conditions due to altered expression of deiodinases that metabolize TH. It is largely unknown, however, how inflammation affects TH availability via the expression of TH transporters. In this study we examined the effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration on two TH transporters that are critically important for brain TH homeostasis, organic anion-transporting polypeptide 1c1 (OATP1c1), and monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8). MRNA levels were studied by in situ hybridization and qPCR as well as protein levels by immunofluorescence in both the rat and mouse forebrain. The mRNA of both transporters decreased robustly in the first 9 hours after LPS injection, specifically in brain blood vessels; OATP1c1 mRNA in astrocytes and MCT8 mRNA in neurons remained unchanged. At 24 and/or 48 hours after LPS administration, OATP1c1 and MCT8 mRNAs increased markedly above control levels in brain vessels. OATP1c1 protein decreased markedly in vessels by 24 hours whereas MCT8 protein levels did not decrease significantly. These changes were highly similar in mice and rats. The data demonstrate that OATP1c1 and MCT8 expression are regulated in a parallel manner during inflammation at the blood-brain barrier of rodents. Given the indispensable role of both transporters in allowing TH access to the brain, the results suggest reduced brain TH uptake during systemic inflammation. PMID:25594699

  10. Parallel regulation of thyroid hormone transporters OATP1c1 and MCT8 during and after endotoxemia at the blood-brain barrier of male rodents.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Gábor; Szabon, Judit; Mohácsik, Petra; Nouriel, Shira S; Gereben, Balázs; Fekete, Csaba; Lechan, Ronald M

    2015-04-01

    There is increasing evidence that local thyroid hormone (TH) availability changes profoundly in inflammatory conditions due to altered expression of deiodinases that metabolize TH. It is largely unknown, however, how inflammation affects TH availability via the expression of TH transporters. In this study we examined the effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration on two TH transporters that are critically important for brain TH homeostasis, organic anion-transporting polypeptide 1c1 (OATP1c1), and monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8). MRNA levels were studied by in situ hybridization and qPCR as well as protein levels by immunofluorescence in both the rat and mouse forebrain. The mRNA of both transporters decreased robustly in the first 9 hours after LPS injection, specifically in brain blood vessels; OATP1c1 mRNA in astrocytes and MCT8 mRNA in neurons remained unchanged. At 24 and/or 48 hours after LPS administration, OATP1c1 and MCT8 mRNAs increased markedly above control levels in brain vessels. OATP1c1 protein decreased markedly in vessels by 24 hours whereas MCT8 protein levels did not decrease significantly. These changes were highly similar in mice and rats. The data demonstrate that OATP1c1 and MCT8 expression are regulated in a parallel manner during inflammation at the blood-brain barrier of rodents. Given the indispensable role of both transporters in allowing TH access to the brain, the results suggest reduced brain TH uptake during systemic inflammation.

  11. Bacterial deposition in a parallel plate and a stagnation point flow chamber: microbial adhesion mechanisms depend on the mass transport conditions.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Dewi P; Busscher, Henk J; van der Mei, Henny C

    2002-02-01

    Deposition onto glass in a parallel plate (PP) and in a stagnation point (SP) flow chamber of Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus, Psychrobacter sp. and Halomonas pacifica, suspended in artificial seawater, was compared in order to determine the influence of methodology on bacterial adhesion mechanisms. The three strains had different cell surface hydrophobicities, with water contact angles on bacterial lawns ranging from 18 to 85 degrees. Bacterial zeta potentials in artificial seawater were essentially zero. The three strains showed different adhesion kinetics and the hydrophilic bacterium H. pacifica had the greatest affinity for hydrophilic glass. On average, initial deposition rates were two- to threefold higher in the SP than in the PP flow chamber, possibly due to the convective fluid flow toward the substratum surface in the SP flow chamber causing more intimate contact between a substratum and a bacterial cell surface than the gentle collisions in the PP flow chamber. The ratios between the experimental deposition rates and theoretically calculated deposition rates based on mass transport equations not only differed among the strains, but were also different for the two flow chambers, indicating different mechanisms under the two modes of mass transport. The efficiencies of deposition were higher in the SP flow chamber than in the PP flow chamber: 62+/-4 and 114+/-28% respectively. Experiments in the SP flow chamber were more reproducible than those in the PP flow chamber, with standard deviations over triplicate runs of 8% in the SP and 23% in the PP flow chamber. This is probably due to better-controlled convective mass transport in the SP flow chamber, as compared with the diffusion-controlled mass transport in the PP flow chamber. In conclusion, this study shows that bacterial adhesion mechanisms depend on the prevailing mass transport conditions in the experimental set-up used, which makes it essential in the design of experiments that a methodology is

  12. Parallel beam dynamics simulation of linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji; Ryne, Robert D.

    2002-01-31

    In this paper we describe parallel particle-in-cell methods for the large scale simulation of beam dynamics in linear accelerators. These techniques have been implemented in the IMPACT (Integrated Map and Particle Accelerator Tracking) code. IMPACT is being used to study the behavior of intense charged particle beams and as a tool for the design of next-generation linear accelerators. As examples, we present applications of the code to the study of emittance exchange in high intensity beams and to the study of beam transport in a proposed accelerator for the development of accelerator-driven waste transmutation technologies.

  13. REACTIVE TRANSPORT MODELING USING A PARALLEL FULLY-COUPLED SIMULATOR BASED ON PRECONDITIONED JACOBIAN-FREE NEWTON-KRYLOV

    SciTech Connect

    Luanjing Guo; Chuan Lu; Hai Huang; Derek R. Gaston

    2012-06-01

    Systems of multicomponent reactive transport in porous media that are large, highly nonlinear, and tightly coupled due to complex nonlinear reactions and strong solution-media interactions are often described by a system of coupled nonlinear partial differential algebraic equations (PDAEs). A preconditioned Jacobian-Free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) solution approach is applied to solve the PDAEs in a fully coupled, fully implicit manner. The advantage of the JFNK method is that it avoids explicitly computing and storing the Jacobian matrix during Newton nonlinear iterations for computational efficiency considerations. This solution approach is also enhanced by physics-based blocking preconditioning and multigrid algorithm for efficient inversion of preconditioners. Based on the solution approach, we have developed a reactive transport simulator named RAT. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the efficiency and massive scalability of the simulator for reactive transport problems involving strong solution-mineral interactions and fast kinetics. It has been applied to study the highly nonlinearly coupled reactive transport system of a promising in situ environmental remediation that involves urea hydrolysis and calcium carbonate precipitation.

  14. Accelerating Monte Carlo simulations of photon transport in a voxelized geometry using a massively parallel graphics processing unit.

    PubMed

    Badal, Andreu; Badano, Aldo

    2009-11-01

    It is a known fact that Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport are computationally intensive and may require long computing times. The authors introduce a new paradigm for the acceleration of Monte Carlo simulations: The use of a graphics processing unit (GPU) as the main computing device instead of a central processing unit (CPU). A GPU-based Monte Carlo code that simulates photon transport in a voxelized geometry with the accurate physics models from PENELOPE has been developed using the CUDATM programming model (NVIDIA Corporation, Santa Clara, CA). An outline of the new code and a sample x-ray imaging simulation with an anthropomorphic phantom are presented. A remarkable 27-fold speed up factor was obtained using a GPU compared to a single core CPU. The reported results show that GPUs are currently a good alternative to CPUs for the simulation of radiation transport. Since the performance of GPUs is currently increasing at a faster pace than that of CPUs, the advantages of GPU-based software are likely to be more pronounced in the future.

  15. Modeling Sediment Transport Using a Lagrangian Particle Tracking Algorithm Coupled with High-Resolution Large Eddy Simulations: a Critical Analysis of Model Limits and Sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, M. H.

    2016-12-01

    Modeling Sediment Transport Using a Lagrangian Particle Tracking Algorithm Coupled with High-Resolution Large Eddy Simulations: a Critical Analysis of Model Limits and Sensitivity Som Dutta1, Paul Fischer2, Marcelo H. Garcia11Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Il, 61801 2Department of Computer Science and Department of MechSE, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Il, 61801 Since the seminal work of Niño and Garcia [1994], one-way coupled Lagrangian particle tracking has been used extensively for modeling sediment transport. Over time, the Lagrangian particle tracking method has been coupled with Eulerian flow simulations, ranging from Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) based models to Detached Eddy Simulations (DES) [Escauriaza and Sotiropoulos, 2011]. Advent of high performance computing (HPC) platforms and faster algorithms have resulted in the work of Dutta et al. [2016], where Lagrangian particle tracking was coupled with high-resolution Large Eddy Simulations (LES) to model the complex and highly non-linear phenomenon of Bulle-Effect at diversions. Despite all the advancements in using Lagrangian particle tracking, there has not been a study that looks in detail at the limits of the model in the context of sediment transport, and also analyzes the sensitivity of the various force formulation in the force balance equation of the particles. Niño and Garcia [1994] did a similar analysis, but the vertical flow velocity distribution was modeled as the log-law. The current study extends the analysis by modeling the flow using high-resolution LES at a Reynolds number comparable to experiments of Niño et al. [1994]. Dutta et al., (2016), Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of flow and bedload transport at an idealized 90-degree diversion: insight into Bulle-Effect, River Flow 2016 - Constantinescu, Garcia & Hanes (Eds), Taylor & Francis Group, London, 101-109. Escauriaza and Sotiropoulos

  16. Parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Treveaven, P.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents an introduction to object-oriented, functional, and logic parallel computing on which the fifth generation of computer systems will be based. Coverage includes concepts for parallel computing languages, a parallel object-oriented system (DOOM) and its language (POOL), an object-oriented multilevel VLSI simulator using POOL, and implementation of lazy functional languages on parallel architectures.

  17. Late Holocene distal mud deposits off the Nakdong delta, SE Korea: evidence for shore-parallel sediment transport in a current-dominated setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Jong-Hwa; Kim, Yuri; Bahk, Jang-Jun; Kim, Young Jun; Kang, Dong-Hyo; Kim, Yong Hoon; Kim, Gil Young; Ryu, Byong-Jae

    2015-12-01

    The distal mud deposits (DMDs) off the Nakdong delta represent a subaqueous delta on the inner continental shelf aligned parallel to the southeast coast of Korea and displaying a clinoform geometry. Hydrographically, the coast is characterized by a micro-tidal regime, the strong Korean Coastal Current (KCC) and the East Korean Warm Current (EKWC). Age models and sedimentary facies related to the clinoform geometries are based on high-resolution chirp subbottom profile data and have provided information on shore-parallel sediment transport and accumulation during the late Holocene sea-level highstand. The highest sedimentation rates (6.19-9.17 cm/year) produced steep foresets in the central DMDs at water depths of 35-50 m. Here, vertical burrows are repeatedly truncated by laminated mud packages displaying erosional surfaces. This region represents the main depocenter of the Nakdong subaqueous delta. The topset sediments of the southern DMD at ~40 m water depth closer to the river mouth show relatively low sedimentation rates (0.01-0.12 cm/year). Here, the muds have a predominantly mottled character. Similarly, the foreset sediments of the northern DMD at ~71-80 m water depth with sedimentation rates of 0.10-2.03 cm/year are also predominantly characterized by mottled muds. The spatial dispersal pattern of the DMDs is consistent with the coast-parallel front between the KCC and EKWC along the southeast Korean coast. In addition, the depocenter of the Nakdong subaqueous delta clinoform is affected by the near-bed turbulence generated by episodic storm events.

  18. Three-Dimensional Transport Modeling for Proton Exchange Membrane(PEM) Fuel Cell with Micro Parallel Flow Field

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Pil Hyong; Han, Sang Seok; Hwang, Sang Soon

    2008-01-01

    Modeling and simulation for heat and mass transport in micro channel are being used extensively in researches and industrial applications to gain better understanding of the fundamental processes and to optimize fuel cell designs before building a prototype for engineering application. In this study, we used a single-phase, fully three dimensional simulation model for PEMFC that can deal with both anode and cathode flow field for examining the micro flow channel with electrochemical reaction. The results show that hydrogen and oxygen were solely supplied to the membrane by diffusion mechanism rather than convection transport, and the higher pressure drop at cathode side is thought to be caused by higher flow rate of oxygen at cathode. And it is found that the amount of water in cathode channel was determined by water formation due to electrochemical reaction plus electro-osmotic mass flux directing toward the cathode side. And it is very important to model the back diffusion and electro-osmotic mass flux accurately since the two flux was closely correlated each other and greatly influenced for determination of ionic conductivity of the membrane which directly affects the performance of fuel cell. PMID:27879774

  19. [Nitrate storage and transport within a typical karst aquifer system in the paralleled ridge-valley of east Sichuan].

    PubMed

    Yang, Ping-Heng; Yuan, Dao-Xian; Ren, You-Rong; Xie, Shi-You; He, Qiu-Fang; Hu, Xiao-Feng

    2012-09-01

    In order to investigate the nitrate storage and transport in the karst aquifer system, the hydrochemical dynamics of Qingmuguan underground river system was monitored online by achieving high-resolution data during storm events and monthly data in normal weather. The principal component analysis was employed to analyze the karst water geochemistry. Results showed that nitrate in Jiangjia spring did not share the same source with soluble iron, manganese and aluminum, and exhibited different geochemical behaviors. Nitrate was derived from land surface and infiltrated together with soil water, which was mainly stored in fissure, pore and solution crack of karst unsaturated zone, whereas soluble iron, manganese and aluminum were derived from soil erosion and directly recharged the underground river through sinkholes and shafts. Nitrate transport in the karst aquifer system could be ideally divided into three phases, including input storage, fast output and re-inputting storage. Under similar external conditions, the karstification intensity of vadose zone was the key factor to determine the dynamics of nitrate concentrations in the groundwater during storm events. Nitrate stored in the karst vadose zone was easily released, which would impair the aquatic ecosystem and pose seriously threats to the local health. Thus, to strengthen the management of ecological system, changing the land-use patterns and scientifically applying fertilizer could effectively make a contribution to controlling mass nutrient input from the surface.

  20. CRUNCH_PARALLEL

    SciTech Connect

    Shumaker, Dana E.; Steefel, Carl I.

    2016-06-21

    The code CRUNCH_PARALLEL is a parallel version of the CRUNCH code. CRUNCH code version 2.0 was previously released by LLNL, (UCRL-CODE-200063). Crunch is a general purpose reactive transport code developed by Carl Steefel and Yabusake (Steefel Yabsaki 1996). The code handles non-isothermal transport and reaction in one, two, and three dimensions. The reaction algorithm is generic in form, handling an arbitrary number of aqueous and surface complexation as well as mineral dissolution/precipitation. A standardized database is used containing thermodynamic and kinetic data. The code includes advective, dispersive, and diffusive transport.

  1. Kalman filter-based fast track reconstruction for charged particles in a Compressed Baryonic Matter experiment using parallel computing on a multicore server at the Laboratory of Information Technologies, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablyazimov, T. O.; Zyzak, M. V.; Ivanov, V. V.; Kisel, P. I.

    2015-05-01

    One of the main goals in the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment (GSI, Germany) is to find parameters of charged particle trajectories. An online full event reconstruction is planned to be carried out in this experiment, thus demanding fast algorithms be developed, which make the most of the capabilities of modern CPU and GPU architectures. This paper presents the results of an analysis of the Kalman filter-based track reconstruction for charged particles implemented by using various code parallelization methods. A multicore server located at the Laboratory of Information Technologies, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (LIT JINR), with two CPU Intel Xeon X5660 processors and a GPU Nvidia GTX 480 video card is used.

  2. Analysis of the contribution of sedimentation to bacterial mass transport in a parallel plate flow chamber: part II: use of fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiuyi; Busscher, Henk J; van der Mei, Henny C; Norde, Willem; Krom, Bastiaan P; Sjollema, Jelmer

    2011-10-15

    Using a new phase-contrast microscopy-based method of analysis, sedimentation has recently been demonstrated to be the major mass transport mechanism of bacteria towards substratum surfaces in a parallel plate flow chamber (J. Li, H.J. Busscher, W. Norde, J. Sjollema, Colloid Surf. B. 84 (2011) 76). Here we describe a novel method for enumerating adhesion of fluorescent bacteria in a parallel plate flow chamber that allows direct imaging of the bacterial distribution along the length of the flow chamber, as caused by sedimentation. Imaging of fluorescence was done using macroscopic bio-optical imaging of the entire flow chamber, including top and bottom plates as well as of the flowing suspension in between. An algorithm is forwarded that allows to separate the fluorescence arising from the suspension and bottom plate and at the same time determines the single cell fluorescence from which the bacterial distribution over the entire bottom plate can be visualized. Enumeration of the numbers of bacteria adhering to the center of the glass bottom plate for a fluorescent Staphylococcus aureus strain was found to coincide with enumerations using phase-contrast microscopy. Moreover, due to the use of macroscopic bio-optical imaging, it was found that the number of adhering staphylococci increases linearly with distance from the inlet of the flow chamber, which could be explained from a simplified mass balance of convection, sedimentation and blocking near the bottom plate of the flow chamber.

  3. Coupled electron-photon radiation transport

    SciTech Connect

    Lorence, L.; Kensek, R.P.; Valdez, G.D.; Drumm, C.R.; Fan, W.C.; Powell, J.L.

    2000-01-17

    Massively-parallel computers allow detailed 3D radiation transport simulations to be performed to analyze the response of complex systems to radiation. This has been recently been demonstrated with the coupled electron-photon Monte Carlo code, ITS. To enable such calculations, the combinatorial geometry capability of ITS was improved. For greater geometrical flexibility, a version of ITS is under development that can track particles in CAD geometries. Deterministic radiation transport codes that utilize an unstructured spatial mesh are also being devised. For electron transport, the authors are investigating second-order forms of the transport equations which, when discretized, yield symmetric positive definite matrices. A novel parallelization strategy, simultaneously solving for spatial and angular unknowns, has been applied to the even- and odd-parity forms of the transport equation on a 2D unstructured spatial mesh. Another second-order form, the self-adjoint angular flux transport equation, also shows promise for electron transport.

  4. Orogen-parallel mass transport along the arcuate Himalayan front into Nanga Parbat and the western Himalayan syntaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whipp, David; Beaumont, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    Along the length of the Himalayan arc, Quaternary rock exhumation rates are highest in the Himalayan syntaxes at the lateral ends of the arc. In the western Himalayan syntaxis, these rates may exceed 10 mm/a over the past 2 Ma, requiring an additional source of crustal mass into this region to maintain the high-elevation topography. We have previously demonstrated that strain partitioning of oblique convergence can produce a significant orogen-parallel mass flux into the syntaxis of a Himalaya-like orogen and balance the rapid rates of surface denudation. However, the magnitude of this orogen parallel mass flux and whether strain is partitioned across the Himalayan thrust front is affected by the strength of the material bounding and within the Himalayan orogenic wedge, the dip angle of the basal detachment and the convergence obliquity angle γ. Strain partitioning is expected for a finite-length Himalaya-like segmented linear orogen with an obliquity of γ = 30 - 40°, but the obliquity angle in the Himalayan arc varies from 0 at the center of the arc to ˜ 40° in the western Himalayan syntaxis region. Thus, the conditions in which strain partitioning will occur may not be met along much of the length of the arc. Though there is clear evidence of strain partitioning in the Himalaya, preliminary results from 3D numerical geodynamic models of an orogen with an arcuate geometry based on the Himalaya suggest strain partitioning does not occur for the same conditions observed in earlier models of segmented linear orogens or orogens with a smaller arc radius. In those models, the proportion of the orogen length with a high obliquity angle was greater, which favors strain partitioning. In numerical experiments of an arcuate Himalayan orogen with weak material (friction angle φ ≤ 5°) at the back of the orogenic wedge, strain partitioning is only observed in the toe of the orogenic wedge (10-15 km from the thrust front) at the western end of the arc, rather than for

  5. The evaluation of the extent of transporting or "tracking" an identifiable ignitable liquid (gasoline) throughout fire scenes during the investigative process.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Andrew; Babrauskas, Vytenis; Holmes, Douglas L; Martin, Cory; Powell, Ray; Riggs, Steve; Young, Lloyd D

    2004-07-01

    Tests have determined that boots or shoes of individuals at a fire scene do not transport sufficient contaminants ("tracking") through the fire scene to produce a positive laboratory result for the presence of gasoline in a fire scene that was not present at the time of the fire. Questions about the validity of forensic laboratory results have been raised on the basis that low-level gasoline residues detected in the laboratory samples could have been the result of transporting the residue by footwear contaminated from the fire scene ("tracking"). The data collected in this study establish that "tracking" does not lead to false-positive laboratory results. Canines trained and experienced in the detection of trace ignitable liquid residues were also utilized in this study. The canine results confirmed that properly trained canines show a higher sensitivity than do standard ASTM laboratory techniques for fire debris analysis. In a few cases, canines responded to contamination, but laboratory testing (which is the definitive indicator) did not produce positive results.

  6. New gauge fields from extension of space time parallel transport of vector spaces to the underlying number systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Benioff, P.

    2011-06-01

    One way of describing gauge theories in physics is to assign a vector space {bar V}{sub x} to each space time point x. For each x the field {psi} takes values {psi}(x) in {bar V}{sub x}. The freedom to choose a basis in each {bar V}{sub x} introduces gauge group operators and their Lie algebra representations to define parallel transformations between vector spaces. This paper is an exploration of the extension of these ideas to include the underlying scalar complex number fields. Here a Hilbert space, {bar H}{sub x}, as an example of {bar V}{sub x}, and a complex number field, {bar C}{sub x}, are associated with each space time point. The freedom to choose a basis in {bar H}{sub x} is expanded to include the freedom to choose complex number fields. This expansion is based on the discovery that there exist representations of complex (and other) number systems that differ by arbitrary scale factors. Compensating changes must be made in the basic field operations so that the relevant axioms are satisfied. This results in the presence of a new real valued gauge field A(x). Inclusion of A(x) into covariant derivatives in Lagrangians results in the description of A(x) as a gauge boson for which mass is optional. The great accuracy of QED suggests that the coupling constant of A(x) to matter fields is very small compared to the fine structure constant. Other physical properties of A(x) are not known at present.

  7. Combining node-centered parallel radiation transport and higher-order multi-material cell-centered hydrodynamics methods in three-temperature radiation hydrodynamics code TRHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sijoy, C. D.; Chaturvedi, S.

    2016-06-01

    Higher-order cell-centered multi-material hydrodynamics (HD) and parallel node-centered radiation transport (RT) schemes are combined self-consistently in three-temperature (3T) radiation hydrodynamics (RHD) code TRHD (Sijoy and Chaturvedi, 2015) developed for the simulation of intense thermal radiation or high-power laser driven RHD. For RT, a node-centered gray model implemented in a popular RHD code MULTI2D (Ramis et al., 2009) is used. This scheme, in principle, can handle RT in both optically thick and thin materials. The RT module has been parallelized using message passing interface (MPI) for parallel computation. Presently, for multi-material HD, we have used a simple and robust closure model in which common strain rates to all materials in a mixed cell is assumed. The closure model has been further generalized to allow different temperatures for the electrons and ions. In addition to this, electron and radiation temperatures are assumed to be in non-equilibrium. Therefore, the thermal relaxation between the electrons and ions and the coupling between the radiation and matter energies are required to be computed self-consistently. This has been achieved by using a node-centered symmetric-semi-implicit (SSI) integration scheme. The electron thermal conduction is calculated using a cell-centered, monotonic, non-linear finite volume scheme (NLFV) suitable for unstructured meshes. In this paper, we have described the details of the 2D, 3T, non-equilibrium, multi-material RHD code developed with a special attention to the coupling of various cell-centered and node-centered formulations along with a suite of validation test problems to demonstrate the accuracy and performance of the algorithms. We also report the parallel performance of RT module. Finally, in order to demonstrate the full capability of the code implementation, we have presented the simulation of laser driven shock propagation in a layered thin foil. The simulation results are found to be in good

  8. Massively parallel multiple interacting continua formulation for modeling flow in fractured porous media using the subsurface reactive flow and transport code PFLOTRAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, J.; Mills, R. T.; Lichtner, P. C.; Hammond, G. E.

    2010-12-01

    Fracture dominated flows occur in numerous subsurface geochemical processes and at many different scales in rock pore structures, micro-fractures, fracture networks and faults. Fractured porous media can be modeled as multiple interacting continua which are connected to each other through transfer terms that capture the flow of mass and energy in response to pressure, temperature and concentration gradients. However, the analysis of large-scale transient problems using the multiple interacting continuum approach presents an algorithmic and computational challenge for problems with very large numbers of degrees of freedom. A generalized dual porosity model based on the Dual Continuum Disconnected Matrix approach has been implemented within a massively parallel multiphysics-multicomponent-multiphase subsurface reactive flow and transport code PFLOTRAN. Developed as part of the Department of Energy's SciDAC-2 program, PFLOTRAN provides subsurface simulation capabilities that can scale from laptops to ultrascale supercomputers, and utilizes the PETSc framework to solve the large, sparse algebraic systems that arises in complex subsurface reactive flow and transport problems. It has been successfully applied to the solution of problems composed of more than two billions degrees of freedom, utilizing up to 131,072 processor cores on Jaguar, the Cray XT5 system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory that is the world’s fastest supercomputer. Building upon the capabilities and computational efficiency of PFLOTRAN, we will present an implementation of the multiple interacting continua formulation for fractured porous media along with an application case study.

  9. A Parallel, Fully Coupled, Fully Implicit Solution to Reactive Transport in Porous Media Using the Preconditioned Jacobian-Free Newton-Krylov Method

    SciTech Connect

    Luanjing Guo; Hai Huang; Derek Gaston; Cody Permann; David Andrs; George Redden; Chuan Lu; Don Fox; Yoshiko Fujita

    2013-03-01

    Modeling large multicomponent reactive transport systems in porous media is particularly challenging when the governing partial differential algebraic equations (PDAEs) are highly nonlinear and tightly coupled due to complex nonlinear reactions and strong solution-media interactions. Here we present a preconditioned Jacobian-Free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) solution approach to solve the governing PDAEs in a fully coupled and fully implicit manner. A well-known advantage of the JFNK method is that it does not require explicitly computing and storing the Jacobian matrix during Newton nonlinear iterations. Our approach further enhances the JFNK method by utilizing physics-based, block preconditioning and a multigrid algorithm for efficient inversion of the preconditioner. This preconditioning strategy accounts for self- and optionally, cross-coupling between primary variables using diagonal and off-diagonal blocks of an approximate Jacobian, respectively. Numerical results are presented demonstrating the efficiency and massive scalability of the solution strategy for reactive transport problems involving strong solution-mineral interactions and fast kinetics. We found that the physics-based, block preconditioner significantly decreases the number of linear iterations, directly reducing computational cost; and the strongly scalable algebraic multigrid algorithm for approximate inversion of the preconditioner leads to excellent parallel scaling performance.

  10. Comparison of Generated Parallel Capillary Arrays to Three-Dimensional Reconstructed Capillary Networks in Modeling Oxygen Transport in Discrete Microvascular Volumes

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Graham M.; Goldman, Daniel; Ellis, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective We compare Reconstructed Microvascular Networks (RMN) to Parallel Capillary Arrays (PCA) under several simulated physiological conditions to determine how the use of different vascular geometry affects oxygen transport solutions. Methods Three discrete networks were reconstructed from intravital video microscopy of rat skeletal muscle (84×168×342 μm, 70×157×268 μm and 65×240×571 μm) and hemodynamic measurements were made in individual capillaries. PCAs were created based on statistical measurements from RMNs. Blood flow and O2 transport models were applied and the resulting solutions for RMN and PCA models were compared under 4 conditions (rest, exercise, ischemia and hypoxia). Results Predicted tissue PO2 was consistently lower in all RMN simulations compared to the paired PCA. PO2 for 3D reconstructions at rest were 28.2±4.8, 28.1±3.5, and 33.0±4.5 mmHg for networks I, II, and III compared to the PCA mean values of 31.2±4.5, 30.6±3.4, and 33.8±4.6 mmHg. Simulated exercise yielded mean tissue PO2 in the RMN of 10.1±5.4, 12.6±5.7, and 19.7±5.7 mmHg compared to 15.3±7.3, 18.8±5.3, and 21.7±6.0 in PCA. Conclusions These findings suggest that volume matched PCA yield different results compared to reconstructed microvascular geometries when applied to O2 transport modeling; the predominant characteristic of this difference being an over estimate of mean tissue PO2. Despite this limitation, PCA models remain important for theoretical studies as they produce PO2 distributions with similar shape and parameter dependence as RMN. PMID:23841679

  11. Method and software for using m-sequences to characterize parallel components of higher-order visual tracking behavior in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Aptekar, Jacob W.; Keles, Mehmet F.; Mongeau, Jean-Michel; Lu, Patrick M.; Frye, Mark A.; Shoemaker, Patrick A.

    2014-01-01

    A moving visual figure may contain first-order signals defined by variation in mean luminance, as well as second-order signals defined by constant mean luminance and variation in luminance envelope, or higher-order signals that cannot be estimated by taking higher moments of the luminance distribution. Separating these properties of a moving figure to experimentally probe the visual subsystems that encode them is technically challenging and has resulted in debated mechanisms of visual object detection by flies. Our prior work took a white noise systems identification approach using a commercially available electronic display system to characterize the spatial variation in the temporal dynamics of two distinct subsystems for first- and higher-order components of visual figure tracking. The method relied on the use of single pixel displacements of two visual stimuli according to two binary maximum length shift register sequences (m-sequences) and cross-correlation of each m-sequence with time-varying flight steering measurements. The resultant spatio-temporal action fields represent temporal impulse responses parameterized by the azimuthal location of the visual figure, one STAF for first-order and another for higher-order components of compound stimuli. Here we review m-sequence and reverse correlation procedures, then describe our application in detail, provide Matlab code, validate the STAFs, and demonstrate the utility and robustness of STAFs by predicting the results of other published experimental procedures. This method has demonstrated how two relatively modest innovations on classical white noise analysis—the inclusion of space as a way to organize response kernels and the use of linear decoupling to measure the response to two channels of visual information simultaneously—could substantially improve our basic understanding of visual processing in the fly. PMID:25400550

  12. Method and software for using m-sequences to characterize parallel components of higher-order visual tracking behavior in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Aptekar, Jacob W; Keles, Mehmet F; Mongeau, Jean-Michel; Lu, Patrick M; Frye, Mark A; Shoemaker, Patrick A

    2014-01-01

    A moving visual figure may contain first-order signals defined by variation in mean luminance, as well as second-order signals defined by constant mean luminance and variation in luminance envelope, or higher-order signals that cannot be estimated by taking higher moments of the luminance distribution. Separating these properties of a moving figure to experimentally probe the visual subsystems that encode them is technically challenging and has resulted in debated mechanisms of visual object detection by flies. Our prior work took a white noise systems identification approach using a commercially available electronic display system to characterize the spatial variation in the temporal dynamics of two distinct subsystems for first- and higher-order components of visual figure tracking. The method relied on the use of single pixel displacements of two visual stimuli according to two binary maximum length shift register sequences (m-sequences) and cross-correlation of each m-sequence with time-varying flight steering measurements. The resultant spatio-temporal action fields represent temporal impulse responses parameterized by the azimuthal location of the visual figure, one STAF for first-order and another for higher-order components of compound stimuli. Here we review m-sequence and reverse correlation procedures, then describe our application in detail, provide Matlab code, validate the STAFs, and demonstrate the utility and robustness of STAFs by predicting the results of other published experimental procedures. This method has demonstrated how two relatively modest innovations on classical white noise analysis--the inclusion of space as a way to organize response kernels and the use of linear decoupling to measure the response to two channels of visual information simultaneously--could substantially improve our basic understanding of visual processing in the fly.

  13. ttm-1 Encodes CDF Transporters That Excrete Zinc from Intestinal Cells of C. elegans and Act in a Parallel Negative Feedback Circuit That Promotes Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Hyun Cheol; Collier, Sara; Deshmukh, Krupa; Guthrie, James; Robertson, J. David; Kornfeld, Kerry

    2013-01-01

    Zinc is an essential metal involved in a wide range of biological processes, and aberrant zinc metabolism is implicated in human diseases. The gastrointestinal tract of animals is a critical site of zinc metabolism that is responsible for dietary zinc uptake and distribution to the body. However, the role of the gastrointestinal tract in zinc excretion remains unclear. Zinc transporters are key regulators of zinc metabolism that mediate the movement of zinc ions across membranes. Here, we identified a comprehensive list of 14 predicted Cation Diffusion Facilitator (CDF) family zinc transporters in Caenorhabditis elegans and demonstrated that zinc is excreted from intestinal cells by one of these CDF proteins, TTM-1B. The ttm-1 locus encodes two transcripts, ttm-1a and ttm-1b, that use different transcription start sites. ttm-1b expression was induced by high levels of zinc specifically in intestinal cells, whereas ttm-1a was not induced by zinc. TTM-1B was localized to the apical plasma membrane of intestinal cells, and analyses of loss-of-function mutant animals indicated that TTM-1B promotes zinc excretion into the intestinal lumen. Zinc excretion mediated by TTM-1B contributes to zinc detoxification. These observations indicate that ttm-1 is a component of a negative feedback circuit, since high levels of cytoplasmic zinc increase ttm-1b transcript levels and TTM-1B protein functions to reduce the level of cytoplasmic zinc. We showed that TTM-1 isoforms function in tandem with CDF-2, which is also induced by high levels of cytoplasmic zinc and reduces cytoplasmic zinc levels by sequestering zinc in lysosome-related organelles. These findings define a parallel negative feedback circuit that promotes zinc homeostasis and advance the understanding of the physiological roles of the gastrointestinal tract in zinc metabolism in animals. PMID:23717214

  14. ttm-1 encodes CDF transporters that excrete zinc from intestinal cells of C. elegans and act in a parallel negative feedback circuit that promotes homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Roh, Hyun Cheol; Collier, Sara; Deshmukh, Krupa; Guthrie, James; Robertson, J David; Kornfeld, Kerry

    2013-05-01

    Zinc is an essential metal involved in a wide range of biological processes, and aberrant zinc metabolism is implicated in human diseases. The gastrointestinal tract of animals is a critical site of zinc metabolism that is responsible for dietary zinc uptake and distribution to the body. However, the role of the gastrointestinal tract in zinc excretion remains unclear. Zinc transporters are key regulators of zinc metabolism that mediate the movement of zinc ions across membranes. Here, we identified a comprehensive list of 14 predicted Cation Diffusion Facilitator (CDF) family zinc transporters in Caenorhabditis elegans and demonstrated that zinc is excreted from intestinal cells by one of these CDF proteins, TTM-1B. The ttm-1 locus encodes two transcripts, ttm-1a and ttm-1b, that use different transcription start sites. ttm-1b expression was induced by high levels of zinc specifically in intestinal cells, whereas ttm-1a was not induced by zinc. TTM-1B was localized to the apical plasma membrane of intestinal cells, and analyses of loss-of-function mutant animals indicated that TTM-1B promotes zinc excretion into the intestinal lumen. Zinc excretion mediated by TTM-1B contributes to zinc detoxification. These observations indicate that ttm-1 is a component of a negative feedback circuit, since high levels of cytoplasmic zinc increase ttm-1b transcript levels and TTM-1B protein functions to reduce the level of cytoplasmic zinc. We showed that TTM-1 isoforms function in tandem with CDF-2, which is also induced by high levels of cytoplasmic zinc and reduces cytoplasmic zinc levels by sequestering zinc in lysosome-related organelles. These findings define a parallel negative feedback circuit that promotes zinc homeostasis and advance the understanding of the physiological roles of the gastrointestinal tract in zinc metabolism in animals.

  15. A comparison of particle-tracking and solute transport methods for simulation of tritium concentrations and groundwater transit times in river water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusyev, M. A.; Abrams, D.; Toews, M. W.; Morgenstern, U.; Stewart, M. K.

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to simulate tritium concentrations and groundwater transit times in river water with particle-tracking (MODPATH) and compare them to solute transport (MT3DMS) simulations. Tritium measurements in river water are valuable for the calibration of particle-tracking and solute transport models as well as for understanding of watershed storage dynamics. In a previous study, we simulated tritium concentrations in river water of the western Lake Taupo catchment (WLTC) using a MODFLOW-MT3DMS model (Gusyev et al., 2013). The model was calibrated to measured tritium in river water at baseflows of the Waihaha, Whanganui, Whareroa, Kuratau, and Omori river catchments of the WLTC. Following from that work we now utilized the same MODFLOW model for the WLTC to calculate the pathways of groundwater particles (and their corresponding tritium concentrations) using steady-state particle tracking MODPATH model. In order to simulate baseflow tritium concentrations with MODPATH, transit time distributions (TTDs) are necessary to understand the lag time between the entry and discharge points of a tracer and are generated for the river networks of the five WLTC outflows. TTDs are used in the convolution integral with an input tritium concentration time series obtained from the precipitation measurements. The resulting MODPATH tritium concentrations yield a very good match to measured tritium concentrations and are similar to the MT3DMS-simulated tritium concentrations, with the greatest variation occurring around the bomb peak. MODPATH and MT3DMS also yield similar mean transit times (MTTs) of groundwater contribution to river baseflows, but the actual shape of the TTDs is strikingly different. While both distributions provide valuable information, the methodologies used to derive the TTDs are fundamentally different and hence must be interpreted differently. With the current MT3DMS model settings, only the methodology used with MODPATH provides the true TTD

  16. Parallel rendering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crockett, Thomas W.

    1995-01-01

    This article provides a broad introduction to the subject of parallel rendering, encompassing both hardware and software systems. The focus is on the underlying concepts and the issues which arise in the design of parallel rendering algorithms and systems. We examine the different types of parallelism and how they can be applied in rendering applications. Concepts from parallel computing, such as data decomposition, task granularity, scalability, and load balancing, are considered in relation to the rendering problem. We also explore concepts from computer graphics, such as coherence and projection, which have a significant impact on the structure of parallel rendering algorithms. Our survey covers a number of practical considerations as well, including the choice of architectural platform, communication and memory requirements, and the problem of image assembly and display. We illustrate the discussion with numerous examples from the parallel rendering literature, representing most of the principal rendering methods currently used in computer graphics.

  17. Parallel computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huberman, Bernardo A.

    1989-11-01

    This paper reviews three different aspects of parallel computation which are useful for physics. The first part deals with special architectures for parallel computing (SIMD and MIMD machines) and their differences, with examples of their uses. The second section discusses the speedup that can be achieved in parallel computation and the constraints generated by the issues of communication and synchrony. The third part describes computation by distributed networks of powerful workstations without global controls and the issues involved in understanding their behavior.

  18. The role of parallel heat transport in the relation between upstream scrape-off layer widths and target heat flux width in H-mode plasmas of NSTX.

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, J W; Boedo, J A; Maingi, R; Soukhanovskii, V A

    2009-01-05

    The physics of parallel heat transport was tested in the Scrape-off Layer (SOL) plasma of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono, et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000) and S. M. Kaye, et al., Nucl. Fusion 45, S168 (2005)] tokamak by comparing the upstream electron temperature (T{sub e}) and density (n{sub e}) profiles measured by the mid-plane reciprocating probe to the heat flux (q{sub {perpendicular}}) profile at the divertor plate measured by an infrared (IR) camera. It is found that electron conduction explains the near SOL width data reasonably well while the far SOL, which is in the sheath limited regime, requires an ion heat flux profile broader than the electron one to be consistent with the experimental data. The measured plasma parameters indicate that the SOL energy transport should be in the conduction-limited regime for R-R{sub sep} (radial distance from the separatrix location) < 2-3 cm. The SOL energy transport should transition to the sheath-limited regime for R-R{sub sep} > 2-3cm. The T{sub e}, n{sub e}, and q{sub {perpendicular}} profiles are better described by an offset exponential function instead of a simple exponential. The conventional relation between mid plane electron temperature decay length ({lambda}{sub Te}) and target heat flux decay length ({lambda}{sub q}) is {lambda}{sub Te} = 7/2{lambda}{sub q}, whereas the newly-derived relation, assuming offset exponential functional forms, implies {lambda}{sub Te} = (2-2.5){lambda}{sub q}. The measured values of {lambda}{sub Te}/{lambda}{sub q} differ from the new prediction by 25-30%. The measured {lambda}{sub q} values in the far SOL (R-R{sub sep} > 2-3cm) are 9-10cm, while the expected values are 2.7 < {lambda}{sub q} < 4.9 cm (for sheath-limited regime). We propose that the ion heat flux profile is substantially broader than the electron heat flux profile as an explanation for this discrepancy in the far SOL.

  19. TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation outline: transport principles, effective solubility; gasoline composition; and field examples (plume diving).
    Presentation conclusions: MTBE transport follows from - phyiscal and chemical properties and hydrology. Field examples show: MTBE plumes > benzene plu...

  20. Transport of Antarctic krill ( Euphausia superba) across the Scotia Sea. Part I: Circulation and particle tracking simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fach, Bettina A.; Klinck, John M.

    2006-06-01

    The Harvard Ocean Prediction System (HOPS) is configured to simulate the circulation of the Scotia Sea and environs. This is part of a study designed to test the hypothesis that Antarctic krill ( Euphausia superba) populations at South Georgia in the eastern Scotia Sea are sustained by import of individuals from upstream regions, such as the western Antarctic Peninsula. Comparison of the simulated circulation fields obtained from HOPS with observations showed good agreement. The surface circulation, particularly through the Drake Passage and across the Scotia Sea, matches observations, with its northeastward flow characterized by three high-speed fronts. Also, the Weddell Sea and the Brazil Current, and their associated transports match observations. In addition, mesoscale variability, an important component of the flow in this region, is found in the simulated circulation and the model is overall well suited to model krill transport. Drifter simulations conducted with HOPS showed that krill spawned in areas coinciding with known krill spawning sites along the west Antarctic Peninsula continental shelf can be entrained into the Southern Antarctic Circumpolar Current Front (SACCF). They are transported across the Scotia Sea to South Georgia in 10 months or less. Drifters originating on the continental shelf of the Weddell Sea can reach South Georgia as well; however, transport from this region averages about 20 months. Additional simulations show that such transport is sensitive to changes in wind stress and the location of the SACCF. The results of this study show that krill populations along the Antarctic Peninsula and the Weddell Sea are possible source populations that can provide krill to the South Georgia population. However, successful transport of krill to South Georgia is shown to depend on a multitude of factors, such as the location of the spawning area and timing of spawning, and variations in the location of the SACCF. Therefore, this study provides

  1. FAST TRACK PAPER: A study of the applicability and divergence of the ray series using a modified transport equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buske, Stefan; Kravtsov, Yury A.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we study an extension of the standard ray-theoretical transport equation. We include a higher-order term of the ray series and obtain a modified frequency-dependent transport equation. This equation is solved analytically and numerically for an elastic 1-D model. The analysis of the results documents that the ray series diverges just at the boundary of applicability of the underlying high-frequency approximation. This implies that taking into account higher-order terms in the ray series neither improves accuracy nor allows a shift of the boundary of its applicability towards lower frequencies.

  2. 49 CFR 213.331 - Track surface.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Track surface. 213.331 Section 213.331... Track surface. (a) For a single deviation in track surface, each owner of the track to which this subpart applies shall maintain the surface of its track within the limits prescribed in the...

  3. 49 CFR 213.331 - Track surface.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Track surface. 213.331 Section 213.331... Track surface. (a) For a single deviation in track surface, each owner of the track to which this subpart applies shall maintain the surface of its track within the limits prescribed in the following...

  4. 49 CFR 213.331 - Track surface.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Track surface. 213.331 Section 213.331... Track surface. (a) For a single deviation in track surface, each owner of the track to which this subpart applies shall maintain the surface of its track within the limits prescribed in the following...

  5. 49 CFR 236.726 - Circuit, track.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Circuit, track. 236.726 Section 236.726 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Circuit, track. An electrical circuit of which the rails of the track form a part. ...

  6. 49 CFR 236.726 - Circuit, track.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Circuit, track. 236.726 Section 236.726 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Circuit, track. An electrical circuit of which the rails of the track form a part. ...

  7. 49 CFR 236.726 - Circuit, track.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Circuit, track. 236.726 Section 236.726 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Circuit, track. An electrical circuit of which the rails of the track form a part. ...

  8. 49 CFR 236.726 - Circuit, track.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Circuit, track. 236.726 Section 236.726 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Circuit, track. An electrical circuit of which the rails of the track form a part. ...

  9. 49 CFR 236.726 - Circuit, track.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Circuit, track. 236.726 Section 236.726 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Circuit, track. An electrical circuit of which the rails of the track form a part. ...

  10. ⁵²Mn production for PET/MRI tracking of human stem cells expressing divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1).

    PubMed

    Lewis, Christina M; Graves, Stephen A; Hernandez, Reinier; Valdovinos, Hector F; Barnhart, Todd E; Cai, Weibo; Meyerand, Mary E; Nickles, Robert J; Suzuki, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing demand for long-term in vivo stem cell imaging for assessing cell therapy techniques and guiding therapeutic decisions. This work develops the production of (52)Mn and establishes proof of concept for the use of divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) as a positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reporter gene for stem cell tracking in the rat brain. (52)Mn was produced via proton irradiation of a natural chromium target. In a comparison of two (52)Mn separation methods, solvent-solvent extraction was preferred over ion exchange chromatography because of reduced chromium impurities and higher (52)Mn recovery. In vitro uptake of Mn-based PET and MRI contrast agents ((52)Mn(2+) and Mn(2+), respectively) was enhanced in DMT1 over-expressing human neural progenitor cells (hNPC-DMT1) compared to wild-type control cells (hNPC-WT). After cell transplantation in the rat striatum, increased uptake of Mn-based contrast agents in grafted hNPC-DMT1 was detected in in vivo manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) and ex vivo PET and autoradiography. These initial studies indicate that this approach holds promise for dual-modality PET/MR tracking of transplanted stem cells in the central nervous system and prompt further investigation into the clinical applicability of this technique.

  11. Map projections for satellite tracking.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    New map projections to be used for plotting successive satellite groundtracks show these tracks as straight lines. The map may be made conformal along any 2 parallels of latitude between the limits of latitude reached by the groundtrack, or the 'tracking limits'. If these parallels are equidistant from the Equator, they may both be made true to scale, and a cylindrical projection results. If these parallels are not equidistant from the Equator, only one may be made true to scale, and a conic projection results. The groundtracks generally have sharp breaks at either tracking limit. If the tracking limit is one of the parallels at which the map is conformal, there is no break in the groundtrack, and the conic projection may approach (but cannot become) an azimuthal projection.-Author

  12. Parallel machines: Parallel machine languages

    SciTech Connect

    Iannucci, R.A. )

    1990-01-01

    This book presents a framework for understanding the tradeoffs between the conventional view and the dataflow view with the objective of discovering the critical hardware structures which must be present in any scalable, general-purpose parallel computer to effectively tolerate latency and synchronization costs. The author presents an approach to scalable general purpose parallel computation. Linguistic Concerns, Compiling Issues, Intermediate Language Issues, and hardware/technological constraints are presented as a combined approach to architectural Develoement. This book presents the notion of a parallel machine language.

  13. Tracking toxaphene in the North American Great Lakes basin. 2. A strong episodic long-range transport event.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianmin; Venkatesh, Srinivasan; Li, Yi-Fan; Cao, Zuohao; Daggupaty, Sreerama

    2005-11-01

    In this paper we examine the modeled daily toxaphene air concentrations from September 9 to 13, 2000, during which air concentration levels were 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than those derived from in situ measurements around the Great Lakes during the same year and during the 1990s. Meteorological conditions revealed that a typical deformation flow system associated with a high-pressure system extending from the east coast of Canada to the southern United States was one of the critical elements that enabled the transport of toxaphene to the Great Lakes. Cloud bands seen on satellite imagery and the rain band predicted by an atmospheric forecast model indicate that the system also delivered warm and humid air from the Gulf of Mexico and the southern United States to the Great Lakes. This resulted in strong wet deposition of toxaphene to the lakes. Substantial increase in the air concentration of toxaphene over the Great Lakes in this short period contributed greatly to raising the annual average daily air concentration for all of 2000. The results suggest that such an episodic event could be a major pathway for atmospheric transport of toxaphene from the southern United States to the Great Lakes.

  14. Ex-vessel neutron dosimetry analysis for westinghouse 4-loop XL pressurized water reactor plant using the RadTrack{sup TM} Code System with the 3D parallel discrete ordinates code RAPTOR-M3G

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Alpan, F. A.; Fischer, G.A.; Fero, A.H.

    2011-07-01

    Traditional two-dimensional (2D)/one-dimensional (1D) SYNTHESIS methodology has been widely used to calculate fast neutron (>1.0 MeV) fluence exposure to reactor pressure vessel in the belt-line region. However, it is expected that this methodology cannot provide accurate fast neutron fluence calculation at elevations far above or below the active core region. A three-dimensional (3D) parallel discrete ordinates calculation for ex-vessel neutron dosimetry on a Westinghouse 4-Loop XL Pressurized Water Reactor has been done. It shows good agreement between the calculated results and measured results. Furthermore, the results show very different fast neutron flux values at some of the former plate locations and elevations above and below an active core than those calculated by a 2D/1D SYNTHESIS method. This indicates that for certain irregular reactor internal structures, where the fast neutron flux has a very strong local effect, it is required to use a 3D transport method to calculate accurate fast neutron exposure. (authors)

  15. Homology, convergence and parallelism.

    PubMed

    Ghiselin, Michael T

    2016-01-05

    Homology is a relation of correspondence between parts of parts of larger wholes. It is used when tracking objects of interest through space and time and in the context of explanatory historical narratives. Homologues can be traced through a genealogical nexus back to a common ancestral precursor. Homology being a transitive relation, homologues remain homologous however much they may come to differ. Analogy is a relationship of correspondence between parts of members of classes having no relationship of common ancestry. Although homology is often treated as an alternative to convergence, the latter is not a kind of correspondence: rather, it is one of a class of processes that also includes divergence and parallelism. These often give rise to misleading appearances (homoplasies). Parallelism can be particularly hard to detect, especially when not accompanied by divergences in some parts of the body. © 2015 The Author(s).

  16. Homology, convergence and parallelism

    PubMed Central

    Ghiselin, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Homology is a relation of correspondence between parts of parts of larger wholes. It is used when tracking objects of interest through space and time and in the context of explanatory historical narratives. Homologues can be traced through a genealogical nexus back to a common ancestral precursor. Homology being a transitive relation, homologues remain homologous however much they may come to differ. Analogy is a relationship of correspondence between parts of members of classes having no relationship of common ancestry. Although homology is often treated as an alternative to convergence, the latter is not a kind of correspondence: rather, it is one of a class of processes that also includes divergence and parallelism. These often give rise to misleading appearances (homoplasies). Parallelism can be particularly hard to detect, especially when not accompanied by divergences in some parts of the body. PMID:26598721

  17. Tracking suspended particle transport via radium isotopes ((226)Ra and (228)Ra) through the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River system.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Richard N; Burnett, William C; Opsahl, Stephen P; Santos, Isaac R; Misra, Sambuddha; Froelich, Philip N

    2013-02-01

    Suspended particles in rivers can carry metals, nutrients, and pollutants downstream which can become bioactive in estuaries and coastal marine waters. In river systems with multiple sources of both suspended particles and contamination sources, it is important to assess the hydrologic conditions under which contaminated particles can be delivered to downstream ecosystems. The Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) River system in the southeastern United States represents an ideal system to study these hydrologic impacts on particle transport through a heavily-impacted river (the Chattahoochee River) and one much less impacted by anthropogenic activities (the Flint River). We demonstrate here the utility of natural radioisotopes as tracers of suspended particles through the ACF system, where particles contaminated with arsenic (As) and antimony (Sb) have been shown to be contributed from coal-fired power plants along the Chattahoochee River, and have elevated concentrations in the surficial sediments of the Apalachicola Bay Delta. Radium isotopes ((228)Ra and (226)Ra) on suspended particles should vary throughout the different geologic provinces of this river system, allowing differentiation of the relative contributions of the Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers to the suspended load delivered to Lake Seminole, the Apalachicola River, and ultimately to Apalachicola Bay. We also use various geochemical proxies ((40)K, organic carbon, and calcium) to assess the relative composition of suspended particles (lithogenic, organic, and carbonate fractions, respectively) under a range of hydrologic conditions. During low (base) flow conditions, the Flint River contributed 70% of the suspended particle load to both the Apalachicola River and the bay, whereas the Chattahoochee River became the dominant source during higher discharge, contributing 80% of the suspended load to the Apalachicola River and 62% of the particles entering the estuary. Neither of these hydrologic

  18. 49 CFR 214.327 - Inaccessible track.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inaccessible track. 214.327 Section 214.327 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD WORKPLACE SAFETY Roadway Worker Protection § 214.327 Inaccessible track...

  19. 49 CFR 214.327 - Inaccessible track.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Inaccessible track. 214.327 Section 214.327 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD WORKPLACE SAFETY Roadway Worker Protection § 214.327 Inaccessible track...

  20. 49 CFR 214.327 - Inaccessible track.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Inaccessible track. 214.327 Section 214.327 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD WORKPLACE SAFETY Roadway Worker Protection § 214.327 Inaccessible track...

  1. 49 CFR 214.327 - Inaccessible track.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Inaccessible track. 214.327 Section 214.327 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD WORKPLACE SAFETY Roadway Worker Protection § 214.327 Inaccessible track...

  2. 49 CFR 214.327 - Inaccessible track.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Inaccessible track. 214.327 Section 214.327 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD WORKPLACE SAFETY Roadway Worker Protection § 214.327 Inaccessible track...

  3. Scalable parallel communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maly, K.; Khanna, S.; Overstreet, C. M.; Mukkamala, R.; Zubair, M.; Sekhar, Y. S.; Foudriat, E. C.

    1992-01-01

    Coarse-grain parallelism in networking (that is, the use of multiple protocol processors running replicated software sending over several physical channels) can be used to provide gigabit communications for a single application. Since parallel network performance is highly dependent on real issues such as hardware properties (e.g., memory speeds and cache hit rates), operating system overhead (e.g., interrupt handling), and protocol performance (e.g., effect of timeouts), we have performed detailed simulations studies of both a bus-based multiprocessor workstation node (based on the Sun Galaxy MP multiprocessor) and a distributed-memory parallel computer node (based on the Touchstone DELTA) to evaluate the behavior of coarse-grain parallelism. Our results indicate: (1) coarse-grain parallelism can deliver multiple 100 Mbps with currently available hardware platforms and existing networking protocols (such as Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) and parallel Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) rings); (2) scale-up is near linear in n, the number of protocol processors, and channels (for small n and up to a few hundred Mbps); and (3) since these results are based on existing hardware without specialized devices (except perhaps for some simple modifications of the FDDI boards), this is a low cost solution to providing multiple 100 Mbps on current machines. In addition, from both the performance analysis and the properties of these architectures, we conclude: (1) multiple processors providing identical services and the use of space division multiplexing for the physical channels can provide better reliability than monolithic approaches (it also provides graceful degradation and low-cost load balancing); (2) coarse-grain parallelism supports running several transport protocols in parallel to provide different types of service (for example, one TCP handles small messages for many users, other TCP's running in parallel provide high bandwidth

  4. Parallelization of KENO-Va Monte Carlo code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramón, Javier; Peña, Jorge

    1995-07-01

    KENO-Va is a code integrated within the SCALE system developed by Oak Ridge that solves the transport equation through the Monte Carlo Method. It is being used at the Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear (CSN) to perform criticality calculations for fuel storage pools and shipping casks. Two parallel versions of the code: one for shared memory machines and other for distributed memory systems using the message-passing interface PVM have been generated. In both versions the neutrons of each generation are tracked in parallel. In order to preserve the reproducibility of the results in both versions, advanced seeds for random numbers were used. The CONVEX C3440 with four processors and shared memory at CSN was used to implement the shared memory version. A FDDI network of 6 HP9000/735 was employed to implement the message-passing version using proprietary PVM. The speedup obtained was 3.6 in both cases.

  5. Using amphibole phenocrysts to track vapor transfer during magma crystallization and transport: An example from Mount St. Helens, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowe, M.C.; Kent, A.J.R.; Thornber, C.R.

    2008-01-01

    In order to evaluate and further constrain models for volatile movement and vapor enrichment of magma stored at shallow levels, amphibole phenocrysts from 2004-2005 Mount St. Helens dacite were analyzed for major and selected trace elements (Li, Cu, Zn, Mn, and REE) and Li isotopes. Several recent studies have examined fluid-mobile trace element abundances in phencryst phases and melt inclusions as a means of tracking volatile movement within subvolcanic magmatic systems, and high Li contents in plagioclase phenocrysts from 1980 and 2004 Mount St. Helens dacites have been interpreted as evidence that shallow magma was fluxed by a Li-bearing vapor phase prior to eruption. In amphibole phenocrysts, Zn and Mn behave compatibly, correlating to FeO* and Al2O3, and show no systematic change with time. In contrast, Li and Cu abundances in amphibole vary by up to 3 orders of magnitude (7.6-1140????g/g and 1.7 to 94????g/g, respectively), and do not generally correlate with either major or trace elements. However, they do correlate moderately well (R2 = 0.54, >> 95% confidence) with each other and show systematic temporal variations that are opposite to those observed for plagioclase, precluding a simple 1-step diffusion model for Li enrichment. We propose a Diffusion-Crystallization Multi-Stage (DCMS) model to explain the temporal variations and co-variations of Li and Cu. In early erupted dacite (October-December 2004) profiles of Li isotopes in conjunction with measured 7Li intensities and core-to-rim increases in Li concentration are characteristic of Li diffusion into the amphiboles, consistent with prior models of plagioclase enrichment. In amphiboles from 2005 dacite, average Li and Cu concentrations are high (??? 260-660????g/g and ??? 29-45????g/g, respectively) and in contrast to amphiboles from earlier-erupted dacite, correlate weakly with Al2O3??wt.%. Amphibole Al2O3 concentrations are an indicator of pressure, with high-Al amphiboles crystallizing at higher

  6. Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vontiesenhausen, G.

    1986-01-01

    A summary of tether transportation is given. Four steps were used over a period of time. First, theoretical engineering feasibility and technology requirements were determined. Then the survivors of that effort went into step two in the analysis of promising candidates. Those survivors went into the third phase which is engineering design and cost benefits. Survivors entered into the demonstration mission definition phase. Transportation studies have covered two kinds of deployments. First, steady state deployment was studied. Like the TSS, it's nearly vertical. It takes a long time to deploy and involves relatively high tether tension. Secondly, dynamic deployment was studied. Deployment started in an almost horizontal direction under a very shallow angle which allows a high deployment rate under very low tension. Momentum transfer here occurs by libration. Specific payloads were used to study tethered transportation benefits. Four transportation concepts were studied with regard to cost benefits. A tethered orbiter deboost from the space station, an OTV boost up from the Space Station, a science platform on a tether with a possible micro-g lab moving in between platform and station, and a tethered boost of payloads fromthe orbiter are the four concepts. These benefits are examined in detail.

  7. An Overview of High-performance Parallel Big Data transfers over multiple network channels with Transport Layer Security (TLS) and TLS plus Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS)

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Chin; Corttrell, R. A.

    2015-05-06

    This Technical Note provides an overview of high-performance parallel Big Data transfers with and without encryption for data in-transit over multiple network channels. It shows that with the parallel approach, it is feasible to carry out high-performance parallel "encrypted" Big Data transfers without serious impact to throughput. But other impacts, e.g. the energy-consumption part should be investigated. It also explains our rationales of using a statistics-based approach for gaining understanding from test results and for improving the system. The presentation is of high-level nature. Nevertheless, at the end we will pose some questions and identify potentially fruitful directions for future work.

  8. Surface Wave Tomography of the Western US From Ambient Seismic Noise: Tracking the EarthScope USArray Transportable Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moschetti, M. P.; Ritzwoller, M. H.

    2006-12-01

    We have extended the application of high resolution ambient noise surface wave tomography across the western United States by incorporating emerging data from the USArray Transportable Array (TA) component of Earthscope. Ambient seismic noise contains a significant component of Rayleigh wave energy from which the Green's function between pairs of stations can be extracted by cross-correlating long noise sequences from up to two years of data. Surface wave group velocities are measured on the estimated Green's functions to provide broadband dispersion curves between station pairs. Earlier efforts were applied to records from USArray TA stations in Southern California and resulted in the construction of high-resolution short-period (7- 18 s) surface wave dispersion maps and the imaging of the principal crustal geological units in Southern California (Shapiro et al., Science, 307, 1615, 2005). As the spatial coverage of the USArray TA in the western US has improved over the past year, we have generated short- to intermediate-period (8-40 s) group velocity maps within the footprint of the USArray TA network. These maps provide the basis to invert for crustal and uppermost mantle shear-wave velocities. While we have constructed group velocity maps for the entire USArray TA footprint, the highest resolutions are observed within California. We present a preliminary model for the thickness and shear-wave speeds of the California crust. To date, the inversions are constrained only by crude a priori information, and our results give estimates of crustal thickness and shear-wave velocity structures. Because the length-scales of resolved features approach 100 km, improved inversions will primarily result from the application of additional local constraints. Better constraints on the inversion, such as information about sediment and crustal thicknesses and other types of data at various scales (as are being used for the construction of the SCEC California 3D Seismic Velocity

  9. 49 CFR 213.359 - Track stiffness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Train Operations at Track Classes 6 and Higher § 213.359 Track stiffness. (a) Track shall have a sufficient vertical strength to withstand the maximum vehicle loads generated at maximum permissible train speeds, cant deficiencies and surface defects. For purposes...

  10. 49 CFR 213.359 - Track stiffness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Train Operations at Track Classes 6 and Higher § 213.359 Track stiffness. (a) Track shall have a sufficient vertical strength to withstand the maximum vehicle loads generated at maximum permissible train speeds, cant deficiencies and surface defects. For purposes...

  11. 49 CFR 213.359 - Track stiffness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Train Operations at Track Classes 6 and Higher § 213.359 Track stiffness. (a) Track shall have a sufficient vertical strength to withstand the maximum vehicle loads generated at maximum permissible train speeds, cant deficiencies and surface defects. For purposes...

  12. 49 CFR 213.359 - Track stiffness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Train Operations at Track Classes 6 and Higher § 213.359 Track stiffness. (a) Track shall have a sufficient vertical strength to withstand the maximum vehicle loads generated at maximum permissible train speeds, cant deficiencies and surface defects. For purposes...

  13. 49 CFR 213.359 - Track stiffness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Train Operations at Track Classes 6 and Higher § 213.359 Track stiffness. (a) Track shall have a sufficient vertical strength to withstand the maximum vehicle loads generated at maximum permissible train speeds, cant deficiencies and surface defects. For...

  14. 49 CFR 213.59 - Elevation of curved track; runoff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Elevation of curved track; runoff. 213.59 Section 213.59 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Geometry § 213.59 Elevation of curved...

  15. 49 CFR 213.59 - Elevation of curved track; runoff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Elevation of curved track; runoff. 213.59 Section 213.59 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Geometry § 213.59 Elevation of curved...

  16. 49 CFR 213.59 - Elevation of curved track; runoff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Elevation of curved track; runoff. 213.59 Section 213.59 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Geometry § 213.59 Elevation of curved...

  17. 49 CFR 213.59 - Elevation of curved track; runoff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Elevation of curved track; runoff. 213.59 Section 213.59 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Geometry § 213.59 Elevation of curved...

  18. 49 CFR 213.59 - Elevation of curved track; runoff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Elevation of curved track; runoff. 213.59 Section 213.59 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Geometry § 213.59 Elevation of...

  19. Transportability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-25

    psi). (g) Maximum axle load (pneumatic tires) - 2,268 kg (5,000 lb). (h) Maximum wheel load (pneumatic tires) - 1,134 kg (2,500 lb). (i...survivability following the shock or vibration environment induced. Vehicles not typically transported with payload such as wreckers, truck tractors ...combination weight rating (GCWR) means the value specified by the manufacturer as the loaded weight of the combination vehicle. (d) Gross axle weight

  20. Transportation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    International (cont.) European Commission – Directorate General for Energy and Transport, Brussels, Belgium Headquarters Netherlands Customs ...100,000 by 2014. As a result of these challenges and due to the increase in intermodal freight traffic, a customer /client relationship has...increase by 50% domestically and 110% internationally by 2016 (CRS, 2007). United Parcel Service (UPS), FedEx, and DHL currently control the package

  1. Simulations of Ground-Water Flow, Transport, Age, and Particle Tracking near York, Nebraska, for a Study of Transport of Anthropogenic and Natural Contaminants (TANC) to Public-Supply Wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Brian R.; Landon, Matthew K.; Kauffman, Leon J.; Hornberger, George Z.

    2008-01-01

    Contamination of public-supply wells has resulted in public-health threats and negative economic effects for communities that must treat contaminated water or find alternative water supplies. To investigate factors controlling vulnerability of public-supply wells to anthropogenic and natural contaminants using consistent and systematic data collected in a variety of principal aquifer settings in the United States, a study of Transport of Anthropogenic and Natural Contaminants to public-supply wells was begun in 2001 as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program. The area simulated by the ground-water flow model described in this report was selected for a study of processes influencing contaminant distribution and transport along the direction of ground-water flow towards a public-supply well in southeastern York, Nebraska. Ground-water flow is simulated for a 60-year period from September 1, 1944, to August 31, 2004. Steady-state conditions are simulated prior to September 1, 1944, and represent conditions prior to use of ground water for irrigation. Irrigation, municipal, and industrial wells were simulated using the Multi-Node Well package of the modular three-dimensional ground-water flow model code, MODFLOW-2000, which allows simulation of flow and solutes through wells that are simulated in multiple nodes or layers. Ground-water flow, age, and transport of selected tracers were simulated using the Ground-Water Transport process of MODFLOW-2000. Simulated ground-water age was compared to interpreted ground-water age in six monitoring wells in the unconfined aquifer. The tracer chlorofluorocarbon-11 was simulated directly using Ground-Water Transport for comparison with concentrations measured in six monitoring wells and one public supply well screened in the upper confined aquifer. Three alternative model simulations indicate that simulation results are highly sensitive to the distribution of multilayer well bores where leakage

  2. Log transport and deposition in incised, channelized, and multithread reaches of a wide mountain river: Tracking experiment during a 20-year flood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyżga, Bartłomiej; Mikuś, Paweł; Zawiejska, Joanna; Ruiz-Villanueva, Virginia; Kaczka, Ryszard J.; Czech, Wiktoria

    2017-02-01

    Distance of large wood transport during floods and conditions for wood deposition in wide mountain rivers are still insufficiently understood. Tracking of logs tagged with radio transmitters was used to investigate differences in depositional conditions and the length of log displacement during a 20-year flood between channel reaches of different morphology in the Czarny Dunajec River, Polish Carpathians. During the rising limb of the flood, logs were placed into the river at three locations: at the beginning of an incised reach, close to the beginning of a channelized reach, and 1 km upstream from the beginning of a wide, multithread reach. The incised, channelized, and multithread reaches retained 12.5%, 33%, and 94% of tagged logs introduced to these reaches, respectively, and of the logs retained in the multithread reach, all were deposited in its upstream half. Significant differences in the length of displacement existed between the logs delivered to the river at the three locations, with logs placed into the river at the beginning of the incised reach moving the longest distance, and those delivered just upstream from the multithread reach moving the shortest distance before deposition. One-fourth of the logs were deposited in a low-flow channel or on a channel margin, one-fifth on the floodplain, and more than half on gravel bars. After the flood, river cross sections with deposited logs and a set of cross sections without any wood deposits were surveyed to collect data for one-dimensional modelling of hydraulic conditions at the flood peak. The cross sections with deposited logs were typified by significantly greater flow width and flow area and by significantly smaller mean flow depth, mean velocity, Froude number, mean bed shear stress, and unit stream power. Principal component analysis of the hydraulic parameters in the analysed cross sections grouped the two types of cross sections in distinct clusters, indicating that multithread cross sections

  3. Remote sensing of water tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trochim, E. D.; Prakash, A.; Kane, D. L.; Romanovsky, V. E.

    2016-03-01

    Water tracks are an intrinsic part of the surficial drainage network in the foothills of the Brooks Range, Alaska. They preferentially transport water off hillslopes and represent the interplay between hydrology, vegetation, geomorphology, and permafrost characteristics. This research on mapping the location of water tracks builds on previous work which demonstrated that different types of water tracks exist due to difference primarily driven by geomorphology. We used a combination method where spectral classifications, texture, and topography were fed into random forests to identify the water track classes. The most accurate distributions were obtained for the organic-rich and wide water track classes. The distinct linear shapes of the water tracks could also be visualized for many of the classes, especially in areas where the water tracks were particularly discrete. The biggest challenges to mapping the water tracks were due to class imbalances and high variability within and overlapping between classes. This research presents a significant step forward in understanding periglacial landscape dynamics.

  4. An investigation into the accuracy, stability and parallel performance of a highly stable explicit technique for stiff reaction-transport PDEs

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, A., LLNL

    1998-02-17

    The numerical simulation of chemically reacting flows is a topic, that has attracted a great deal of current research At the heart of numerical reactive flow simulations are large sets of coupled, nonlinear Partial Differential Equations (PDES). Due to the stiffness that is usually present, explicit time differencing schemes are not used despite their inherent simplicity and efficiency on parallel and vector machines, since these schemes require prohibitively small numerical stepsizes. Implicit time differencing schemes, although possessing good stability characteristics, introduce a great deal of computational overhead necessary to solve the simultaneous algebraic system at each timestep. This thesis examines an algorithm based on a preconditioned time differencing scheme. The algorithm is explicit and permits a large stable time step. An investigation of the algorithm`s accuracy, stability and performance on a parallel architecture is presented

  5. Parallel hierarchical global illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Snell, Quinn O.

    1997-10-08

    Solving the global illumination problem is equivalent to determining the intensity of every wavelength of light in all directions at every point in a given scene. The complexity of the problem has led researchers to use approximation methods for solving the problem on serial computers. Rather than using an approximation method, such as backward ray tracing or radiosity, the authors have chosen to solve the Rendering Equation by direct simulation of light transport from the light sources. This paper presents an algorithm that solves the Rendering Equation to any desired accuracy, and can be run in parallel on distributed memory or shared memory computer systems with excellent scaling properties. It appears superior in both speed and physical correctness to recent published methods involving bidirectional ray tracing or hybrid treatments of diffuse and specular surfaces. Like progressive radiosity methods, it dynamically refines the geometry decomposition where required, but does so without the excessive storage requirements for ray histories. The algorithm, called Photon, produces a scene which converges to the global illumination solution. This amounts to a huge task for a 1997-vintage serial computer, but using the power of a parallel supercomputer significantly reduces the time required to generate a solution. Currently, Photon can be run on most parallel environments from a shared memory multiprocessor to a parallel supercomputer, as well as on clusters of heterogeneous workstations.

  6. Development and parallelization of a direct numerical simulation to study the formation and transport of nanoparticle clusters in a viscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloan, Gregory James

    The direct numerical simulation (DNS) offers the most accurate approach to modeling the behavior of a physical system, but carries an enormous computation cost. There exists a need for an accurate DNS to model the coupled solid-fluid system seen in targeted drug delivery (TDD), nanofluid thermal energy storage (TES), as well as other fields where experiments are necessary, but experiment design may be costly. A parallel DNS can greatly reduce the large computation times required, while providing the same results and functionality of the serial counterpart. A D2Q9 lattice Boltzmann method approach was implemented to solve the fluid phase. The use of domain decomposition with message passing interface (MPI) parallelism resulted in an algorithm that exhibits super-linear scaling in testing, which may be attributed to the caching effect. Decreased performance on a per-node basis for a fixed number of processes confirms this observation. A multiscale approach was implemented to model the behavior of nanoparticles submerged in a viscous fluid, and used to examine the mechanisms that promote or inhibit clustering. Parallelization of this model using a masterworker algorithm with MPI gives less-than-linear speedup for a fixed number of particles and varying number of processes. This is due to the inherent inefficiency of the master-worker approach. Lastly, these separate simulations are combined, and two-way coupling is implemented between the solid and fluid.

  7. Expression of a xanthine permease and phosphate transporter in cultures and field populations of the harmful alga Aureococcus anophagefferens: tracking nutritional deficiency during brown tides.

    PubMed

    Wurch, Louie L; Gobler, Christopher J; Dyhrman, Sonya T

    2014-08-01

    Targeted gene expression using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was employed to track patterns in the expression of genes indicative of nitrogen or phosphorus deficiency in the brown tide-forming alga Aureococcus anophagefferens. During culture experiments, a xanthine/uracil/vitamin C permease (XUV) was upregulated ∼20-fold under nitrogen-deficient conditions relative to a nitrogen-replete control and rapidly returned to nitrogen-replete levels after nitrogen-deficient cells were resupplied with nitrate or ammonium. It was not responsive to phosphorus deficiency. Expression of an inorganic phosphate transporter (PTA3) was enriched ∼10-fold under phosphorus-deficient conditions relative to a phosphorus-replete control, and this signal was rapidly lost upon phosphate resupply. PTA3 was not upregulated by nitrogen deficiency. Natural A. anophagefferens populations from a dense brown tide that occurred in Long Island, NY, in 2009 were assayed for XUV and PTA3 expression and compared with nutrient concentrations over the peak of a bloom. Patterns in XUV expression were consistent with nitrogen-replete growth, never reaching the values observed in N-deficient cultures. PTA3 expression was highest prior to peak bloom stages, reaching expression levels within the range of P-deficient cultures. These data highlight the value of molecular-level assessments of nutrient deficiency and suggest that phosphorus deficiency could play a role in the dynamics of destructive A. anophagefferens blooms. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. 49 CFR 213.13 - Measuring track not under load.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Measuring track not under load. 213.13 Section 213... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS General § 213.13 Measuring track not under load. When unloaded track is measured to determine compliance with requirements of this part, the...

  9. Tracking particles by passing messages between images

    SciTech Connect

    Chertkov, Michael; Kroc, Lukas; Zdeborova, Lenka; Krakala, Florent; Vergassola, M

    2009-01-01

    Methods to extract information from the tracking of mobile objects/particles have broad interest in biological and physical sciences. Techniques based on the simple criterion of proximity in time-consecutive snapshots are useful to identify the trajectories of the particles. However, they become problematic as the motility and/or the density of the particles increases because of the uncertainties on the trajectories that particles have followed during the acquisition time of the images. Here, we report efficient methods for learning parameters of the dynamics of the particles from their positions in time-consecutive images. Our algorithm belongs to the class of message-passing algorithms, also known in computer science, information theory and statistical physics under the name of Belief Propagation (BP). The algorithm is distributed, thus allowing parallel implementation suitable for computations on multiple machines without significant inter-machine overhead. We test our method on the model example of particle tracking in turbulent flows, which is particularly challenging due to the strong transport that those flows produce. Our numerical experiments show that the BP algorithm compares in quality with exact Markov Chain Monte-Carlo algorithms, yet BP is far superior in speed. We also suggest and analyze a random-distance model that provides theoretical justification for BP accuracy. Methods developed here systematically formulate the problem of particle tracking and provide fast and reliable tools for its extensive range of applications.

  10. 49 CFR 236.54 - Minimum length of track circuit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Minimum length of track circuit. 236.54 Section... Instructions: All Systems Track Circuits § 236.54 Minimum length of track circuit. When a track circuit shorter than maximum inner wheelbase of any locomotive or car operated over such track circuit is used for...

  11. 49 CFR 236.54 - Minimum length of track circuit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Minimum length of track circuit. 236.54 Section... Instructions: All Systems Track Circuits § 236.54 Minimum length of track circuit. When a track circuit shorter than maximum inner wheelbase of any locomotive or car operated over such track circuit is used for...

  12. 49 CFR 236.54 - Minimum length of track circuit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Minimum length of track circuit. 236.54 Section... Instructions: All Systems Track Circuits § 236.54 Minimum length of track circuit. When a track circuit shorter than maximum inner wheelbase of any locomotive or car operated over such track circuit is used for...

  13. 49 CFR 236.54 - Minimum length of track circuit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Minimum length of track circuit. 236.54 Section... Instructions: All Systems Track Circuits § 236.54 Minimum length of track circuit. When a track circuit shorter than maximum inner wheelbase of any locomotive or car operated over such track circuit is used for...

  14. 49 CFR 236.54 - Minimum length of track circuit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Minimum length of track circuit. 236.54 Section... Instructions: All Systems Track Circuits § 236.54 Minimum length of track circuit. When a track circuit shorter than maximum inner wheelbase of any locomotive or car operated over such track circuit is used for...

  15. 49 CFR 236.302 - Track circuits and route locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Track circuits and route locking. 236.302 Section 236.302 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Standards § 236.302 Track circuits and route locking. Track circuits and route locking shall be provided and...

  16. 49 CFR 236.302 - Track circuits and route locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Track circuits and route locking. 236.302 Section 236.302 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Standards § 236.302 Track circuits and route locking. Track circuits and route locking shall be provided and...

  17. 49 CFR 236.727 - Circuit, track; coded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Circuit, track; coded. 236.727 Section 236.727 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Circuit, track; coded. A track circuit in which the energy is varied or interrupted periodically. ...

  18. 49 CFR 236.727 - Circuit, track; coded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Circuit, track; coded. 236.727 Section 236.727 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Circuit, track; coded. A track circuit in which the energy is varied or interrupted periodically. ...

  19. 49 CFR 236.727 - Circuit, track; coded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Circuit, track; coded. 236.727 Section 236.727 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Circuit, track; coded. A track circuit in which the energy is varied or interrupted periodically. ...

  20. 49 CFR 236.727 - Circuit, track; coded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Circuit, track; coded. 236.727 Section 236.727 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Circuit, track; coded. A track circuit in which the energy is varied or interrupted periodically. ...

  1. 49 CFR 236.302 - Track circuits and route locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Track circuits and route locking. 236.302 Section 236.302 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Standards § 236.302 Track circuits and route locking. Track circuits and route locking shall be provided and...

  2. 49 CFR 236.727 - Circuit, track; coded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Circuit, track; coded. 236.727 Section 236.727 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Circuit, track; coded. A track circuit in which the energy is varied or interrupted periodically. ...

  3. 49 CFR 236.302 - Track circuits and route locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Track circuits and route locking. 236.302 Section 236.302 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Standards § 236.302 Track circuits and route locking. Track circuits and route locking shall be provided and...

  4. 49 CFR 236.302 - Track circuits and route locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Track circuits and route locking. 236.302 Section 236.302 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Standards § 236.302 Track circuits and route locking. Track circuits and route locking shall be provided and...

  5. 49 CFR 213.311 - Measuring track not under load.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Measuring track not under load. 213.311 Section 213.311 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Higher § 213.311 Measuring track not under load. When unloaded track is measured to determine compliance...

  6. 49 CFR 218.27 - Workers on track other than main track.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 218.27 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD OPERATING PRACTICES Blue Signal Protection of Workers § 218... switch providing access to that track; (b) Each manually operated switch providing access to the track...

  7. 49 CFR 218.27 - Workers on track other than main track.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Section 218.27 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD OPERATING PRACTICES Blue Signal Protection of Workers § 218... switch providing access to that track; (b) Each manually operated switch providing access to the track...

  8. Calculs Monte Carlo en transport d'energie pour le calcul de la dose en radiotherapie sur plateforme graphique hautement parallele

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hissoiny, Sami

    Dose calculation is a central part of treatment planning. The dose calculation must be 1) accurate so that the medical physicists and the radio-oncologists can make a decision based on results close to reality and 2) fast enough to allow a routine use of dose calculation. The compromise between these two factors in opposition gave way to the creation of several dose calculation algorithms, from the most approximate and fast to the most accurate and slow. The most accurate of these algorithms is the Monte Carlo method, since it is based on basic physical principles. Since 2007, a new computing platform gains popularity in the scientific computing community: the graphics processor unit (GPU). The hardware platform exists since before 2007 and certain scientific computations were already carried out on the GPU. Year 2007, on the other hand, marks the arrival of the CUDA programming language which makes it possible to disregard graphic contexts to program the GPU. The GPU is a massively parallel computing platform and is adapted to data parallel algorithms. This thesis aims at knowing how to maximize the use of a graphics processing unit (GPU) to speed up the execution of a Monte Carlo simulation for radiotherapy dose calculation. To answer this question, the GPUMCD platform was developed. GPUMCD implements the simulation of a coupled photon-electron Monte Carlo simulation and is carried out completely on the GPU. The first objective of this thesis is to evaluate this method for a calculation in external radiotherapy. Simple monoenergetic sources and phantoms in layers are used. A comparison with the EGSnrc platform and DPM is carried out. GPUMCD is within a gamma criteria of 2%-2mm against EGSnrc while being at least 1200x faster than EGSnrc and 250x faster than DPM. The second objective consists in the evaluation of the platform for brachytherapy calculation. Complex sources based on the geometry and the energy spectrum of real sources are used inside a TG-43

  9. Scaling and Graphical Transport-Map Analysis of Ambipolar Schottky-Barrier Thin-Film Transistors Based on a Parallel Array of Si Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Dae-Young; Pregl, Sebastian; Park, So Jeong; Baraban, Larysa; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Mikolajick, Thomas; Weber, Walter M

    2015-07-08

    Si nanowire (Si-NW) based thin-film transistors (TFTs) have been considered as a promising candidate for next-generation flexible and wearable electronics as well as sensor applications with high performance. Here, we have fabricated ambipolar Schottky-barrier (SB) TFTs consisting of a parallel array of Si-NWs and performed an in-depth study related to their electrical performance and operation mechanism through several electrical parameters extracted from the channel length scaling based method. Especially, the newly suggested current-voltage (I-V) contour map clearly elucidates the unique operation mechanism of the ambipolar SB-TFTs, governed by Schottky-junction between NiSi2 and Si-NW. Further, it reveals for the first-time in SB based FETs the important internal electrostatic coupling between the channel and externally applied voltages. This work provides helpful information for the realization of practical circuits with ambipolar SB-TFTs that can be transferred to different substrate technologies and applications.

  10. Parallel pivoting combined with parallel reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alaghband, Gita

    1987-01-01

    Parallel algorithms for triangularization of large, sparse, and unsymmetric matrices are presented. The method combines the parallel reduction with a new parallel pivoting technique, control over generations of fill-ins and a check for numerical stability, all done in parallel with the work being distributed over the active processes. The parallel technique uses the compatibility relation between pivots to identify parallel pivot candidates and uses the Markowitz number of pivots to minimize fill-in. This technique is not a preordering of the sparse matrix and is applied dynamically as the decomposition proceeds.

  11. A survey of parallel programming tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Doreen Y.

    1991-01-01

    This survey examines 39 parallel programming tools. Focus is placed on those tool capabilites needed for parallel scientific programming rather than for general computer science. The tools are classified with current and future needs of Numerical Aerodynamic Simulator (NAS) in mind: existing and anticipated NAS supercomputers and workstations; operating systems; programming languages; and applications. They are divided into four categories: suggested acquisitions, tools already brought in; tools worth tracking; and tools eliminated from further consideration at this time.

  12. Derailing Tracking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Susan

    1993-01-01

    Reviews recent research on student achievement, self-concept, and curriculum and instruction showing the ineffectiveness of tracking and ability grouping. Certain court rulings show that tracking violates the equal protection clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. Innovative alternatives include cooperative learning, mastery learning, peer tutoring,…

  13. Beyond Tracking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Percy; And Others

    1992-01-01

    On the surface, educational tracking may seem like a useful tool for allowing students to work at their own pace, and to avoid discouraging competition, but abuses of the tracking idea have arisen through biased placement practices that have denied equal access to education for minority students. The articles in this issue explore a number of…

  14. A parallel algorithm for channel routing on a hypercube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brouwer, Randall; Banerjee, Prithviraj

    1987-01-01

    A new parallel simulated annealing algorithm for channel routing on a P processor hypercube is presented. The basic idea used is to partition a set of tracks equally among processors in the hypercube. In parallel, P/2 pairs of processors perform displacements and exchanges of nets between tracks, compute the changes in cost functions, and accept moves using a parallel annealing criteria. Through the use of a unique distributed data structure, it is possible to minimize message traffic and add versatility and efficiency in a parallel routing tool. The algorithm has been implemented and is being tested on some of the popular channel problems from the literature.

  15. The concurrent emergence and causes of double volcanic hotspot tracks on the Pacific plate.

    PubMed

    Jones, T D; Davies, D R; Campbell, I H; Iaffaldano, G; Yaxley, G; Kramer, S C; Wilson, C R

    2017-05-25

    Mantle plumes are buoyant upwellings of hot rock that transport heat from Earth's core to its surface, generating anomalous regions of volcanism that are not directly associated with plate tectonic processes. The best-studied example is the Hawaiian-Emperor chain, but the emergence of two sub-parallel volcanic tracks along this chain, Loa and Kea, and the systematic geochemical differences between them have remained unexplained. Here we argue that the emergence of these tracks coincides with the appearance of other double volcanic tracks on the Pacific plate and a recent azimuthal change in the motion of the plate. We propose a three-part model that explains the evolution of Hawaiian double-track volcanism: first, mantle flow beneath the rapidly moving Pacific plate strongly tilts the Hawaiian plume and leads to lateral separation between high- and low-pressure melt source regions; second, the recent azimuthal change in Pacific plate motion exposes high- and low-pressure melt products as geographically distinct volcanoes, explaining the simultaneous emergence of double-track volcanism across the Pacific; and finally, secondary pyroxenite, which is formed as eclogite melt reacts with peridotite, dominates the low-pressure melt region beneath Loa-track volcanism, yielding the systematic geochemical differences observed between Loa- and Kea-type lavas. Our results imply that the formation of double-track volcanism is transitory and can be used to identify and place temporal bounds on plate-motion changes.

  16. The concurrent emergence and causes of double volcanic hotspot tracks on the Pacific plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, T. D.; Davies, D. R.; Campbell, I. H.; Iaffaldano, G.; Yaxley, G.; Kramer, S. C.; Wilson, C. R.

    2017-05-01

    Mantle plumes are buoyant upwellings of hot rock that transport heat from Earth’s core to its surface, generating anomalous regions of volcanism that are not directly associated with plate tectonic processes. The best-studied example is the Hawaiian-Emperor chain, but the emergence of two sub-parallel volcanic tracks along this chain, Loa and Kea, and the systematic geochemical differences between them have remained unexplained. Here we argue that the emergence of these tracks coincides with the appearance of other double volcanic tracks on the Pacific plate and a recent azimuthal change in the motion of the plate. We propose a three-part model that explains the evolution of Hawaiian double-track volcanism: first, mantle flow beneath the rapidly moving Pacific plate strongly tilts the Hawaiian plume and leads to lateral separation between high- and low-pressure melt source regions; second, the recent azimuthal change in Pacific plate motion exposes high- and low-pressure melt products as geographically distinct volcanoes, explaining the simultaneous emergence of double-track volcanism across the Pacific; and finally, secondary pyroxenite, which is formed as eclogite melt reacts with peridotite, dominates the low-pressure melt region beneath Loa-track volcanism, yielding the systematic geochemical differences observed between Loa- and Kea-type lavas. Our results imply that the formation of double-track volcanism is transitory and can be used to identify and place temporal bounds on plate-motion changes.

  17. Parallel processing considerations for image recognition tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simske, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    Many image recognition tasks are well-suited to parallel processing. The most obvious example is that many imaging tasks require the analysis of multiple images. From this standpoint, then, parallel processing need be no more complicated than assigning individual images to individual processors. However, there are three less trivial categories of parallel processing that will be considered in this paper: parallel processing (1) by task; (2) by image region; and (3) by meta-algorithm. Parallel processing by task allows the assignment of multiple workflows-as diverse as optical character recognition [OCR], document classification and barcode reading-to parallel pipelines. This can substantially decrease time to completion for the document tasks. For this approach, each parallel pipeline is generally performing a different task. Parallel processing by image region allows a larger imaging task to be sub-divided into a set of parallel pipelines, each performing the same task but on a different data set. This type of image analysis is readily addressed by a map-reduce approach. Examples include document skew detection and multiple face detection and tracking. Finally, parallel processing by meta-algorithm allows different algorithms to be deployed on the same image simultaneously. This approach may result in improved accuracy.

  18. A Deep Penetration Problem Calculation Using AETIUS:An Easy Modeling Discrete Ordinates Transport Code UsIng Unstructured Tetrahedral Mesh, Shared Memory Parallel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KIM, Jong Woon; LEE, Young-Ouk

    2017-09-01

    As computing power gets better and better, computer codes that use a deterministic method seem to be less useful than those using the Monte Carlo method. In addition, users do not like to think about space, angles, and energy discretization for deterministic codes. However, a deterministic method is still powerful in that we can obtain a solution of the flux throughout the problem, particularly as when particles can barely penetrate, such as in a deep penetration problem with small detection volumes. Recently, a new state-of-the-art discrete-ordinates code, ATTILA, was developed and has been widely used in several applications. ATTILA provides the capabilities to solve geometrically complex 3-D transport problems by using an unstructured tetrahedral mesh. Since 2009, we have been developing our own code by benchmarking ATTILA. AETIUS is a discrete ordinates code that uses an unstructured tetrahedral mesh such as ATTILA. For pre- and post- processing, Gmsh is used to generate an unstructured tetrahedral mesh by importing a CAD file (*.step) and visualizing the calculation results of AETIUS. Using a CAD tool, the geometry can be modeled very easily. In this paper, we describe a brief overview of AETIUS and provide numerical results from both AETIUS and a Monte Carlo code, MCNP5, in a deep penetration problem with small detection volumes. The results demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of AETIUS for such calculations.

  19. Special parallel processing workshop

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-01

    This report contains viewgraphs from the Special Parallel Processing Workshop. These viewgraphs deal with topics such as parallel processing performance, message passing, queue structure, and other basic concept detailing with parallel processing.

  20. Rover tracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Tracks made by the Sojourner rover are visible in this image, taken by one of the cameras aboard Sojourner on Sol 3. The tracks represent the rover maneuvering towards the rock dubbed 'Barnacle Bill.' The rover, having exited the lander via the rear ramp, first traveled towards the right portion of the image, and then moved forward towards the left where Barnacle Bill sits. The fact that the rover was making defined tracks indicates that the soil is made up of particles on a micron scale.

    Mars Pathfinder was developed and managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  1. Rover Tracks

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-07-07

    Tracks made by the Sojourner rover are visible in this image, taken by one of the cameras aboard Sojourner on Sol 3. The tracks represent the rover maneuvering towards the rock dubbed "Barnacle Bill." The rover, having exited the lander via the rear ramp, first traveled towards the right portion of the image, and then moved forward towards the left where Barnacle Bill sits. The fact that the rover was making defined tracks indicates that the soil is made up of particles on a micron scale. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00633

  2. The effect of modafinil on the rat dopamine transporter and dopamine receptors D1–D3 paralleling cognitive enhancement in the radial arm maze

    PubMed Central

    Karabacak, Yasemin; Sase, Sunetra; Aher, Yogesh D.; Sase, Ajinkya; Saroja, Sivaprakasam R.; Cicvaric, Ana; Höger, Harald; Berger, Michael; Bakulev, Vasiliy; Sitte, Harald H.; Leban, Johann; Monje, Francisco J.; Lubec, Gert

    2015-01-01

    A series of drugs have been reported to increase memory performance modulating the dopaminergic system and herein modafinil was tested for its working memory (WM) enhancing properties. Reuptake inhibition of dopamine, serotonin (SERT) and norepinephrine (NET) by modafinil was tested. Sixty male Sprague–Dawley rats were divided into six groups (modafinil-treated 1–5–10 mg/kg body weight, trained and untrained and vehicle treated trained and untrained rats; daily injected intraperitoneally for a period of 10 days) and tested in a radial arm maze (RAM), a paradigm for testing spatial WM. Hippocampi were taken 6 h following the last day of training and complexes containing the unphosphorylated or phosphorylated dopamine transporter (DAT-CC and pDAT-CC) and complexes containing the D1–3 dopamine receptor subunits (D1–D3-CC) were determined. Modafinil was binding to the DAT but insignificantly to SERT or NET and dopamine reuptake was blocked specifically (IC50 = 11.11 μM; SERT 1547 μM; NET 182 μM). From day 8 (day 9 for 1 mg/kg body weight) modafinil was decreasing WM errors (WMEs) in the RAM significantly and remarkably at all doses tested as compared to the vehicle controls. WMEs were linked to the D2R-CC and the pDAT-CC. pDAT and D1–D3-CC levels were modulated significantly and modafinil was shown to enhance spatial WM in the rat in a well-documented paradigm at all the three doses and dopamine reuptake inhibition with subsequent modulation of D1–3-CC is proposed as a possible mechanism of action. PMID:26347626

  3. The effect of modafinil on the rat dopamine transporter and dopamine receptors D1-D3 paralleling cognitive enhancement in the radial arm maze.

    PubMed

    Karabacak, Yasemin; Sase, Sunetra; Aher, Yogesh D; Sase, Ajinkya; Saroja, Sivaprakasam R; Cicvaric, Ana; Höger, Harald; Berger, Michael; Bakulev, Vasiliy; Sitte, Harald H; Leban, Johann; Monje, Francisco J; Lubec, Gert

    2015-01-01

    A series of drugs have been reported to increase memory performance modulating the dopaminergic system and herein modafinil was tested for its working memory (WM) enhancing properties. Reuptake inhibition of dopamine, serotonin (SERT) and norepinephrine (NET) by modafinil was tested. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into six groups (modafinil-treated 1-5-10 mg/kg body weight, trained and untrained and vehicle treated trained and untrained rats; daily injected intraperitoneally for a period of 10 days) and tested in a radial arm maze (RAM), a paradigm for testing spatial WM. Hippocampi were taken 6 h following the last day of training and complexes containing the unphosphorylated or phosphorylated dopamine transporter (DAT-CC and pDAT-CC) and complexes containing the D1-3 dopamine receptor subunits (D1-D3-CC) were determined. Modafinil was binding to the DAT but insignificantly to SERT or NET and dopamine reuptake was blocked specifically (IC50 = 11.11 μM; SERT 1547 μM; NET 182 μM). From day 8 (day 9 for 1 mg/kg body weight) modafinil was decreasing WM errors (WMEs) in the RAM significantly and remarkably at all doses tested as compared to the vehicle controls. WMEs were linked to the D2R-CC and the pDAT-CC. pDAT and D1-D3-CC levels were modulated significantly and modafinil was shown to enhance spatial WM in the rat in a well-documented paradigm at all the three doses and dopamine reuptake inhibition with subsequent modulation of D1-3-CC is proposed as a possible mechanism of action.

  4. 2. View of Mainline elevated structure, parallel to Washington Street, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View of Mainline elevated structure, parallel to Washington Street, crossing over the Massachusetts Turnpike and the B&A R.R. tracks - looking North. - Boston Elevated Railway, Elevated Mainline, Washington Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  5. North elevation, looking southeast. Market Street runs parallel to the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North elevation, looking southeast. Market Street runs parallel to the tracks; 63rd street is perpendicular to them. - Market Street Elevated Railway, 63rd Street Station, Intersection of Market & Sixty-third Streets, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  6. TRACKING CODE DEVELOPMENT FOR BEAM DYNAMICS OPTIMIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, L.

    2011-03-28

    Dynamic aperture (DA) optimization with direct particle tracking is a straight forward approach when the computing power is permitted. It can have various realistic errors included and is more close than theoretical estimations. In this approach, a fast and parallel tracking code could be very helpful. In this presentation, we describe an implementation of storage ring particle tracking code TESLA for beam dynamics optimization. It supports MPI based parallel computing and is robust as DA calculation engine. This code has been used in the NSLS-II dynamics optimizations and obtained promising performance.

  7. Parallel Volunteer Learning during Youth Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesmeister, Marilyn K.; Green, Jeremy; Derby, Amy; Bothum, Candi

    2012-01-01

    Lack of time is a hindrance for volunteers to participate in educational opportunities, yet volunteer success in an organization is tied to the orientation and education they receive. Meeting diverse educational needs of volunteers can be a challenge for program managers. Scheduling a Volunteer Learning Track for chaperones that is parallel to a…

  8. Parallel Volunteer Learning during Youth Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesmeister, Marilyn K.; Green, Jeremy; Derby, Amy; Bothum, Candi

    2012-01-01

    Lack of time is a hindrance for volunteers to participate in educational opportunities, yet volunteer success in an organization is tied to the orientation and education they receive. Meeting diverse educational needs of volunteers can be a challenge for program managers. Scheduling a Volunteer Learning Track for chaperones that is parallel to a…

  9. Parallel rendering techniques for massively parallel visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, C.; Krogh, M.; Painter, J.

    1995-07-01

    As the resolution of simulation models increases, scientific visualization algorithms which take advantage of the large memory. and parallelism of Massively Parallel Processors (MPPs) are becoming increasingly important. For large applications rendering on the MPP tends to be preferable to rendering on a graphics workstation due to the MPP`s abundant resources: memory, disk, and numerous processors. The challenge becomes developing algorithms that can exploit these resources while minimizing overhead, typically communication costs. This paper will describe recent efforts in parallel rendering for polygonal primitives as well as parallel volumetric techniques. This paper presents rendering algorithms, developed for massively parallel processors (MPPs), for polygonal, spheres, and volumetric data. The polygon algorithm uses a data parallel approach whereas the sphere and volume render use a MIMD approach. Implementations for these algorithms are presented for the Thinking Ma.chines Corporation CM-5 MPP.

  10. Position tracking and identity tracking are separate systems: Evidence from eye movements.

    PubMed

    Oksama, Lauri; Hyönä, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    How do we track multiple moving objects in our visual environment? Some investigators argue that tracking is based on a parallel mechanism (e.g., Cavanagh & Alvarez, 2005; Pylyshyn, 1989), others argue that tracking contains a serial component (e.g. Holcombe & Chen, 2013; Oksama & Hyönä, 2008). In the present study, we put previous theories into a direct test by registering observers' eye movements when they tracked identical moving targets (the MOT task) or when they tracked distinct object identities (the MIT task). The eye movement technique is a useful tool to study whether overt focal attention is exploited during tracking. We found a qualitative difference between these tasks in terms of eye movements. When the participants tracked only position information (MOT), the observers had a clear preference for keeping their eyes fixed for a rather long time on the same screen position. In contrast, active eye behavior was observed when the observers tracked the identities of moving objects (MIT). The participants updated over four target identities with overt attention shifts. These data suggest that there are two separate systems involved in multiple object tracking. The position tracking system keeps track of the positions of the moving targets in parallel without the need of overt attention shifts in the form of eye movements. On the other hand, the identity tracking system maintains identity-location bindings in a serial fashion by utilizing overt attention shifts. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Linearly exact parallel closures for slab geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Jeong-Young; Held, Eric D.; Jhang, Hogun

    2013-08-01

    Parallel closures are obtained by solving a linearized kinetic equation with a model collision operator using the Fourier transform method. The closures expressed in wave number space are exact for time-dependent linear problems to within the limits of the model collision operator. In the adiabatic, collisionless limit, an inverse Fourier transform is performed to obtain integral (nonlocal) parallel closures in real space; parallel heat flow and viscosity closures for density, temperature, and flow velocity equations replace Braginskii's parallel closure relations, and parallel flow velocity and heat flow closures for density and temperature equations replace Spitzer's parallel transport relations. It is verified that the closures reproduce the exact linear response function of Hammett and Perkins [Phys. Rev. Lett. 64, 3019 (1990)] for Landau damping given a temperature gradient. In contrast to their approximate closures where the vanishing viscosity coefficient numerically gives an exact response, our closures relate the heat flow and nonvanishing viscosity to temperature and flow velocity (gradients).

  12. 49 CFR 213.65 - Combined track alinement and surface deviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Combined track alinement and surface deviations. 213.65 Section 213.65 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Geometry § 213.65...

  13. 49 CFR 213.65 - Combined track alinement and surface deviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Combined track alinement and surface deviations. 213.65 Section 213.65 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Geometry § 213.65...

  14. 49 CFR 214.336 - On-track safety procedures for certain roadway work groups and adjacent tracks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... work groups and adjacent tracks. 214.336 Section 214.336 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... SAFETY Roadway Worker Protection § 214.336 On-track safety procedures for certain roadway work groups and... section, on-track safety is required for each adjacent controlled track when a roadway work group with...

  15. 49 CFR 214.336 - On-track safety procedures for certain roadway work groups and adjacent tracks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... work groups and adjacent tracks. 214.336 Section 214.336 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... SAFETY Roadway Worker Protection § 214.336 On-track safety procedures for certain roadway work groups and... section, on-track safety is required for each adjacent controlled track when a roadway work group with...

  16. TAUOVERSUPERMON: LOW-OVERHEAD ONLINE PARALLEL PERFORMANCE MONITORING

    SciTech Connect

    SOTTILE, MATTHEW JOSEPH; NATARAJ, AROON; MALONY, ALLEN; MORRIS, ALAN; SHENDE, SAMEER

    2007-01-30

    Online or Real-time application performance monitoring allows tracking performance characteristics during execution as opposed to doing so post-mortem. This opens up several possibilities otherwise unavailable such as real-time visualization and application performance steering that can be useful in the context of long-running applications. Two fundamental components that constitute such a performance monitor are the measurement and transport systems. The former captures performance metrics of individual contexts (processes, threads). The latter enables querying the parallel/distributed state from the different contexts and also allows measurement control. As HPC systems grow in size and complexity, the key challenge is to keep the online performance monitor scalable and low overhead while still providing a useful performance reporting capability. We adapt and combine two existing, mature systems - Tuning and Analysis Utility (TAU) and Supermon - to address this problem. Tau performs the measurement while Supermon is used to collect the distributed measurement state. Our experiments show that this novel approach of using a cluster-monitor, Supermon, as the transport for online performance data from Tau leads to very low-overhead application monitoring as well as other beneits unavailable from using a traditional transport such as NFS.

  17. Atomic-Scale Investigation of Latent Fission Tracks in Fluorapatite: Physical Characteristics and Annealing Behavior.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Tracy Anne

    1993-01-01

    A JEOL JEM-2000FX analytical transmission electron microscope, equipped with a cold stage and anticontamination device, has been used to study the physical characteristics and annealing behavior of artificially induced fission tracks in fluorapatite. Near the atomic level, unetched fission tracks are not continuous, but are comprised of segments of extended damage that are separated by gaps of undamaged microstructure. From dark-field transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images, it appears that the crystalline damage around tracks, although intensive, is not extensive. As such, the defect density may be represented by a Gaussian-type distribution function. The disordered nature of the track core and defect distribution geometry supports the Ion-Explosion Theory that has been proposed for track formation. TEM analysis reveals that track width is crystallographically controlled. Parallel to the c-axis, tracks display widths of 5 to 13 nm and hexagonal faceting on the (0001) plane. Tracks perpendicular to the c-axis display widths of 3 to 9 nm and prismatic faceting on the (1000) plane. The track cross-section facets mimic etch-pit morphologies and provide a relative measure of the crystal's surface free energy. A consequence of differential bond strengths and elastic properties in the fluorapatite structure, track-width anisotropy resolves etching- and annealing-rate anisotropy that has been reported for fission tracks in fluorapatite. TEM observation of the behavior of fission tracks in response to electron beam exposure (i.e., radiolytic annealing), and temperature increase (i.e., thermal annealing), yields a physical and a kinetic description of the annealing process. Annealing commences with bulging at the track's tapered ends, followed by detachment of a single sphere. This process is replicated until a critical track radius is encountered at which the track geometry approaches an ideal right cylinder. A sinusoidal boundary develops at the track

  18. Parallel flow diffusion battery

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, Hsu-Chi; Cheng, Yung-Sung

    1984-08-07

    A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

  19. Parallel flow diffusion battery

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, H.C.; Cheng, Y.S.

    1984-01-01

    A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

  20. Users manual for the Chameleon parallel programming tools

    SciTech Connect

    Gropp, W.; Smith, B.

    1993-06-01

    Message passing is a common method for writing programs for distributed-memory parallel computers. Unfortunately, the lack of a standard for message passing has hampered the construction of portable and efficient parallel programs. In an attempt to remedy this problem, a number of groups have developed their own message-passing systems, each with its own strengths and weaknesses. Chameleon is a second-generation system of this type. Rather than replacing these existing systems, Chameleon is meant to supplement them by providing a uniform way to access many of these systems. Chameleon`s goals are to (a) be very lightweight (low over-head), (b) be highly portable, and (c) help standardize program startup and the use of emerging message-passing operations such as collective operations on subsets of processors. Chameleon also provides a way to port programs written using PICL or Intel NX message passing to other systems, including collections of workstations. Chameleon is tracking the Message-Passing Interface (MPI) draft standard and will provide both an MPI implementation and an MPI transport layer. Chameleon provides support for heterogeneous computing by using p4 and PVM. Chameleon`s support for homogeneous computing includes the portable libraries p4, PICL, and PVM and vendor-specific implementation for Intel NX, IBM EUI (SP-1), and Thinking Machines CMMD (CM-5). Support for Ncube and PVM 3.x is also under development.

  1. Parallel processing ITS

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, W.C.; Halbleib, J.A. Sr.

    1996-09-01

    This report provides a users` guide for parallel processing ITS on a UNIX workstation network, a shared-memory multiprocessor or a massively-parallel processor. The parallelized version of ITS is based on a master/slave model with message passing. Parallel issues such as random number generation, load balancing, and communication software are briefly discussed. Timing results for example problems are presented for demonstration purposes.

  2. Introduction to parallel programming

    SciTech Connect

    Brawer, S. )

    1989-01-01

    This book describes parallel programming and all the basic concepts illustrated by examples in a simplified FORTRAN. Concepts covered include: The parallel programming model; The creation of multiple processes; Memory sharing; Scheduling; Data dependencies. In addition, a number of parallelized applications are presented, including a discrete-time, discrete-event simulator, numerical integration, Gaussian elimination, and parallelized versions of the traveling salesman problem and the exploration of a maze.

  3. Parallel simulation today

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David; Fujimoto, Richard

    1992-01-01

    This paper surveys topics that presently define the state of the art in parallel simulation. Included in the tutorial are discussions on new protocols, mathematical performance analysis, time parallelism, hardware support for parallel simulation, load balancing algorithms, and dynamic memory management for optimistic synchronization.

  4. Research in parallel computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortega, James M.; Henderson, Charles

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes work on parallel computations for NASA Grant NAG-1-1529 for the period 1 Jan. - 30 June 1994. Short summaries on highly parallel preconditioners, target-specific parallel reductions, and simulation of delta-cache protocols are provided.

  5. SOFIA tracking image simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Charles R.; Gross, Michael A. K.

    2016-09-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) tracking camera simulator is a component of the Telescope Assembly Simulator (TASim). TASim is a software simulation of the telescope optics, mounting, and control software. Currently in its fifth major version, TASim is relied upon for telescope operator training, mission planning and rehearsal, and mission control and science instrument software development and testing. TASim has recently been extended for hardware-in-the-loop operation in support of telescope and camera hardware development and control and tracking software improvements. All three SOFIA optical tracking cameras are simulated, including the Focal Plane Imager (FPI), which has recently been upgraded to the status of a science instrument that can be used on its own or in parallel with one of the seven infrared science instruments. The simulation includes tracking camera image simulation of starfields based on the UCAC4 catalog at real-time rates of 4-20 frames per second. For its role in training and planning, it is important for the tracker image simulation to provide images with a realistic appearance and response to changes in operating parameters. For its role in tracker software improvements, it is vital to have realistic signal and noise levels and precise star positions. The design of the software simulation for precise subpixel starfield rendering (including radial distortion), realistic point-spread function as a function of focus, tilt, and collimation, and streaking due to telescope motion will be described. The calibration of the simulation for light sensitivity, dark and bias signal, and noise will also be presented

  6. LDV Measurement of Confined Parallel Jet Mixing

    SciTech Connect

    R.F. Kunz; S.W. D'Amico; P.F. Vassallo; M.A. Zaccaria

    2001-01-31

    Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) measurements were taken in a confinement, bounded by two parallel walls, into which issues a row of parallel jets. Two-component measurements were taken of two mean velocity components and three Reynolds stress components. As observed in isolated three dimensional wall bounded jets, the transverse diffusion of the jets is quite large. The data indicate that this rapid mixing process is due to strong secondary flows, transport of large inlet intensities and Reynolds stress anisotropy effects.

  7. Single-quantum-dot tracking reveals altered membrane dynamics of an attention-deficit/hyperactivity-disorder-derived dopamine transporter coding variant.

    PubMed

    Kovtun, Oleg; Sakrikar, Dhananjay; Tomlinson, Ian D; Chang, Jerry C; Arzeta-Ferrer, Xochitl; Blakely, Randy D; Rosenthal, Sandra J

    2015-04-15

    The presynaptic, cocaine- and amphetamine-sensitive dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT, SLC6A3) controls the intensity and duration of synaptic dopamine signals by rapid clearance of DA back into presynaptic nerve terminals. Abnormalities in DAT-mediated DA clearance have been linked to a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders, including addiction, autism, and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Membrane trafficking of DAT appears to be an important, albeit incompletely understood, post-translational regulatory mechanism; its dysregulation has been recently proposed as a potential risk determinant of these disorders. In this study, we demonstrate a link between an ADHD-associated DAT mutation (Arg615Cys, R615C) and variation on DAT transporter cell surface dynamics, a combination only previously studied with ensemble biochemical and optical approaches that featured limited spatiotemporal resolution. Here, we utilize high-affinity, DAT-specific antagonist-conjugated quantum dot (QD) probes to establish the dynamic mobility of wild-type and mutant DATs at the plasma membrane of living cells. Single DAT-QD complex trajectory analysis revealed that the DAT 615C variant exhibited increased membrane mobility relative to DAT 615R, with diffusion rates comparable to those observed after lipid raft disruption. This phenomenon was accompanied by a loss of transporter mobilization triggered by amphetamine, a common component of ADHD medications. Together, our data provides the first dynamic imaging of single DAT proteins, providing new insights into the relationship between surface dynamics and trafficking of both wild-type and disease-associated transporters. Our approach should be generalizable to future studies that explore the possibilities of perturbed surface DAT dynamics that may arise as a consequence of genetic alterations, regulatory changes, and drug use that contribute to the etiology or treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  8. [Falsified medicines in parallel trade].

    PubMed

    Muckenfuß, Heide

    2017-09-13

    The number of falsified medicines on the German market has distinctly increased over the past few years. In particular, stolen pharmaceutical products, a form of falsified medicines, have increasingly been introduced into the legal supply chain via parallel trading. The reasons why parallel trading serves as a gateway for falsified medicines are most likely the complex supply chains and routes of transport. It is hardly possible for national authorities to trace the history of a medicinal product that was bought and sold by several intermediaries in different EU member states. In addition, the heterogeneous outward appearance of imported and relabelled pharmaceutical products facilitates the introduction of illegal products onto the market. Official batch release at the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut offers the possibility of checking some aspects that might provide an indication of a falsified medicine. In some circumstances, this may allow the identification of falsified medicines before they come onto the German market. However, this control is only possible for biomedicinal products that have not received a waiver regarding official batch release. For improved control of parallel trade, better networking among the EU member states would be beneficial. European-wide regulations, e. g., for disclosure of the complete supply chain, would help to minimise the risks of parallel trading and hinder the marketing of falsified medicines.

  9. Parallel, Distributed Scripting with Python

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P J

    2002-05-24

    Parallel computers used to be, for the most part, one-of-a-kind systems which were extremely difficult to program portably. With SMP architectures, the advent of the POSIX thread API and OpenMP gave developers ways to portably exploit on-the-box shared memory parallelism. Since these architectures didn't scale cost-effectively, distributed memory clusters were developed. The associated MPI message passing libraries gave these systems a portable paradigm too. Having programmers effectively use this paradigm is a somewhat different question. Distributed data has to be explicitly transported via the messaging system in order for it to be useful. In high level languages, the MPI library gives access to data distribution routines in C, C++, and FORTRAN. But we need more than that. Many reasonable and common tasks are best done in (or as extensions to) scripting languages. Consider sysadm tools such as password crackers, file purgers, etc ... These are simple to write in a scripting language such as Python (an open source, portable, and freely available interpreter). But these tasks beg to be done in parallel. Consider the a password checker that checks an encrypted password against a 25,000 word dictionary. This can take around 10 seconds in Python (6 seconds in C). It is trivial to parallelize if you can distribute the information and co-ordinate the work.

  10. Initial approach in biomass burning aerosol transport tracking with CALIPSO and MODIS satellites, sunphotometer, and a backscatter lidar system in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landulfo, E.; Lopes, F. J. S.

    2009-09-01

    Nowadays there is an increasing concern about the direct and indirect influence of the aerosols in the Earth's radiative budget. Aerosols from biomass burning activities have been identified as a significant radiative forcing agent. A significant concentration quantity of aerosol particles observed in the atmosphere can be associated with intense anthropogenic biomass burning activity. The CALIPSO satellite and ground-based Lidar systems are indispensable to provide the vertical structure and optical properties of aerosol and clouds on global and local scale, respectively. The Brazilian mid-western region is one of the biggest producers of biomass burning in the whole continent. Aerosols from biomass burning can be transported to distances of hundreds or thousands of kilometers. It has been developed a computational routine to map the CALIPSO overpasses over the whole country in order to retrieve the total coverage taking special attention in the Brazilian AERONET sites. In this context, the measured data from AERONET, CALIPSO and MODIS Satellite and the MSP-Lidar system from Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN) can be used to map the aerosols biomass burning plumes transported from the mid-western to the southeastern region. In total 5 sites were chosen spanning from 0 to 23 South latitude and 46 to 60 West in longitude in coverage during 2007 and we were able to identify such transports during the months of August and September.

  11. Transport and formation processes for fine airborne ash from three recent volcanic eruptions in Alaska: Implications for detection methods and tracking models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinkleff, Peter G.

    Airborne fine volcanic ash was collected during the eruptions of Augustine Volcano in 2006, Pavlof Volcano in 2007, and Redoubt Volcano in 2009 using Davis Rotating Unit for Measurement (DRUM) cascade impactors to observe atmospheric processes acting on ash as an atmospheric particle. During the Redoubt eruption, samples were also collected by Beta Attenuation Mass (BAM-1020) and Environmental Beta Attenuation Mass (EBAM) monitors. BAM-1020s and EBAMs provided real-time mass concentration data; DRUM samplers provided samples for post-eruptive analysis. DRUM samples were retrospectively analyzed for time-resolved mass concentration and chemistry. EBAM and BAM-1020s reported near real-time, time-resolved mass concentrations. Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy was conducted to determine particle size, shape, and composition. Image processing methods were developed to determine particle size distributions and shape factors. Ash occurred as single grains, ash aggregates, and hybrid aggregates. Ash aggregates occurred in plumes from pyroclastic flows and were found in a discrete aerodynamic size range (2.5-1.15 µm). Hybrid ash was common in all samples and likely formed when downward mixing ash mingled with upward mixing sea salt and non-sea salt sulfate. The mass concentration of sulfate did not vary systematically with ash which indicated that the source of sulfate was not necessarily volcanic. Ash size distributions were log-normal. Size distribution plots of ash collected from the same plume at different transport distances showed that longer atmospheric residence times allowed for more aggregation to occur which led to larger but fewer particles in the plume the longer it was transported. Ash transport and dispersion models forecasted ash fall over a broad area, but ash fall was only observed in areas unaffected by topographic barriers. PM10 (particulates ≤ 10 µm in aerodynamic diameter or ØA) ash was detected closer to the volcano

  12. Parallel algorithm development

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, T.F.

    1996-06-01

    Rapid changes in parallel computing technology are causing significant changes in the strategies being used for parallel algorithm development. One approach is simply to write computer code in a standard language like FORTRAN 77 or with the expectation that the compiler will produce executable code that will run in parallel. The alternatives are: (1) to build explicit message passing directly into the source code; or (2) to write source code without explicit reference to message passing or parallelism, but use a general communications library to provide efficient parallel execution. Application of these strategies is illustrated with examples of codes currently under development.

  13. Parallel Atomistic Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    HEFFELFINGER,GRANT S.

    2000-01-18

    Algorithms developed to enable the use of atomistic molecular simulation methods with parallel computers are reviewed. Methods appropriate for bonded as well as non-bonded (and charged) interactions are included. While strategies for obtaining parallel molecular simulations have been developed for the full variety of atomistic simulation methods, molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo have received the most attention. Three main types of parallel molecular dynamics simulations have been developed, the replicated data decomposition, the spatial decomposition, and the force decomposition. For Monte Carlo simulations, parallel algorithms have been developed which can be divided into two categories, those which require a modified Markov chain and those which do not. Parallel algorithms developed for other simulation methods such as Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo, grand canonical molecular dynamics, and Monte Carlo methods for protein structure determination are also reviewed and issues such as how to measure parallel efficiency, especially in the case of parallel Monte Carlo algorithms with modified Markov chains are discussed.

  14. Track-Structure Simulations for Charged Particles

    PubMed Central

    Dingfelder, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Monte-Carlo track-structure simulations provide a detailed and accurate picture of radiation transport of charged particles through condensed matter of biological interest. Liquid water serves as surrogate for soft tissue and is used in most Monte-Carlo track-structure codes. Basic theories of radiation transport and track-structure simulations are discussed and differences to condensed history codes highlighted. Interaction cross sections for electrons, protons, alpha particles, light and heavy ions are required input data for track-structure simulations. Different calculation methods, including the plane-wave Born approximation, the dielectric theory, and semi-empirical approaches are presented using liquid water as a target. Low-energy electron transport and light ion transport are discussed as areas of special interest. PMID:23032889

  15. 14 CFR 437.37 - Tracking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION LICENSING EXPERIMENTAL PERMITS Requirements to Obtain an Experimental Permit Operational Safety Documentation § 437.37 Tracking. An applicant must identify and describe each method or system used to meet...

  16. Particle Tracking-Based Strategies For Simulating Transport in a Transient Groundwater Flow Field at Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, E. H.; Srinivasan, G.; Kang, Q.; Li, C.; Dash, Z.; Kwicklis, E. M.

    2009-12-01

    Developing probabilistic-based calculations of contaminant concentrations over the next 1000 years at Yucca Flat, Nevada Test site, require tremendous computational effort in this highly complex hydrogeologic surface environment. The sources of contamination, underground nuclear tests conducted between 1951 and 1992, not only released radionuclides to the subsurface but also created abrupt, significant changes in rock properties and caused large transients in the measured hydraulic gradients. To efficiently model contaminant migration from these sources we use a particle-based approach within a transient flow field. Here, we present results using two methods; first, an explicit representation of time-varying sources using large numbers of particles introduced at source-specific rates over time, each representing a unique mass of solute. This method provides good results, but is computationally expensive since sensitivity to uncertainty in source term and transport parameters can only be explored with discrete process-model runs. The second method employs a convolution method (PLUMECALC) which can efficiently consider a large number of variations in the source terms and in certain transport parameters with a single process-model run. Implementation of this second approach required extension of the existing methodology to conditions of transient flow. We find very good comparison between the two methods on small test problems and excellent computational advantages when applying the convolution method in the NTS application

  17. A Programming Environment for Parallel Vision Algorithms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-11

    linear parallel speedup. Many appli- cations for the image processing pipeline (including tracking, color histograrmning, feature detection, frame-rate...pure logic. For example, a language based on algebra of real numbers might treat constraints such as "X = Y + Z", "X = Y x Z", and so on as primitives. A...however, time for a more usable version of the language. A front end processor is therefore being written to parse expressions written in an algebraic

  18. 49 CFR 234.271 - Insulated rail joints, bond wires, and track connections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Insulated rail joints, bond wires, and track connections. 234.271 Section 234.271 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued... joints, bond wires, and track connections. Insulated rail joints, bond wires, and track connections shall...

  19. 49 CFR 236.53 - Track circuit feed at grade crossing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Track circuit feed at grade crossing. 236.53 Section 236.53 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Instructions: All Systems Track Circuits § 236.53 Track circuit feed at grade crossing. At grade crossing with...

  20. 49 CFR 236.53 - Track circuit feed at grade crossing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Track circuit feed at grade crossing. 236.53 Section 236.53 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Instructions: All Systems Track Circuits § 236.53 Track circuit feed at grade crossing. At grade crossing with...

  1. 49 CFR 234.271 - Insulated rail joints, bond wires, and track connections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Insulated rail joints, bond wires, and track connections. 234.271 Section 234.271 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued... joints, bond wires, and track connections. Insulated rail joints, bond wires, and track connections...

  2. Adaptive track scheduling to optimize concurrency and vectorization in GeantV

    DOE PAGES

    Apostolakis, J.; Bandieramonte, M.; Bitzes, G.; ...

    2015-05-22

    The GeantV project is focused on the R&D of new particle transport techniques to maximize parallelism on multiple levels, profiting from the use of both SIMD instructions and co-processors for the CPU-intensive calculations specific to this type of applications. In our approach, vectors of tracks belonging to multiple events and matching different locality criteria must be gathered and dispatched to algorithms having vector signatures. While the transport propagates tracks and changes their individual states, data locality becomes harder to maintain. The scheduling policy has to be changed to maintain efficient vectors while keeping an optimal level of concurrency. The modelmore » has complex dynamics requiring tuning the thresholds to switch between the normal regime and special modes, i.e. prioritizing events to allow flushing memory, adding new events in the transport pipeline to boost locality, dynamically adjusting the particle vector size or switching between vector to single track mode when vectorization causes only overhead. Lastly, this work requires a comprehensive study for optimizing these parameters to make the behaviour of the scheduler self-adapting, presenting here its initial results.« less

  3. Adaptive track scheduling to optimize concurrency and vectorization in GeantV

    SciTech Connect

    Apostolakis, J.; Bandieramonte, M.; Bitzes, G.; Brun, R.; Canal, P.; Carminati, F.; Licht, J. C. De Fine; Duhem, L.; Elvira, V. D.; Gheata, A.; Jun, S. Y.; Lima, G.; Novak, M.; Sehgal, R.; Shadura, O.; Wenzel, S.

    2015-05-22

    The GeantV project is focused on the R&D of new particle transport techniques to maximize parallelism on multiple levels, profiting from the use of both SIMD instructions and co-processors for the CPU-intensive calculations specific to this type of applications. In our approach, vectors of tracks belonging to multiple events and matching different locality criteria must be gathered and dispatched to algorithms having vector signatures. While the transport propagates tracks and changes their individual states, data locality becomes harder to maintain. The scheduling policy has to be changed to maintain efficient vectors while keeping an optimal level of concurrency. The model has complex dynamics requiring tuning the thresholds to switch between the normal regime and special modes, i.e. prioritizing events to allow flushing memory, adding new events in the transport pipeline to boost locality, dynamically adjusting the particle vector size or switching between vector to single track mode when vectorization causes only overhead. Lastly, this work requires a comprehensive study for optimizing these parameters to make the behaviour of the scheduler self-adapting, presenting here its initial results.

  4. Adaptive track scheduling to optimize concurrency and vectorization in GeantV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostolakis, J.; Bandieramonte, M.; Bitzes, G.; Brun, R.; Canal, P.; Carminati, F.; De Fine Licht, J. C.; Duhem, L.; Elvira, V. D.; Gheata, A.; Jun, S. Y.; Lima, G.; Novak, M.; Sehgal, R.; Shadura, O.; Wenzel, S.

    2015-05-01

    The GeantV project is focused on the R&D of new particle transport techniques to maximize parallelism on multiple levels, profiting from the use of both SIMD instructions and co-processors for the CPU-intensive calculations specific to this type of applications. In our approach, vectors of tracks belonging to multiple events and matching different locality criteria must be gathered and dispatched to algorithms having vector signatures. While the transport propagates tracks and changes their individual states, data locality becomes harder to maintain. The scheduling policy has to be changed to maintain efficient vectors while keeping an optimal level of concurrency. The model has complex dynamics requiring tuning the thresholds to switch between the normal regime and special modes, i.e. prioritizing events to allow flushing memory, adding new events in the transport pipeline to boost locality, dynamically adjusting the particle vector size or switching between vector to single track mode when vectorization causes only overhead. This work requires a comprehensive study for optimizing these parameters to make the behaviour of the scheduler self-adapting, presenting here its initial results.

  5. Boulder Tracks

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-07-15

    15 July 2004 The arrows in this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) picture point to three boulders that left trails behind them as they rolled down the lower parts of a meteor crater's wall. In two cases, the tracks can be resolved into a series of small depressions, indicating the variable shape of the boulder as it unevenly proceeded down the slope. These features are located near 18.4°N, 120.1°W. The 75 meter scale bar is about 246 feet long. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA06450

  6. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Electronic transport properties of charge-ordered Bi0.4Ca0.6MnO3 film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. Z.; Sun, J. R.; Wang, D. J.; Liang, S.; Wang, J. Z.; Han, Y. N.; Han, B. S.; Shen, B. G.

    2007-11-01

    The electronic transport properties of charge-ordered Bi0.4Ca0.6MnO3 films grown on a (110) SrTiO3 substrate are experimentally studied. Special attention has been paid to the Hall effect around the charge-ordering (CO) transition. The charge carriers are found to be electron-like, and the carrier density n exhibits a significant change upon the CO transition: it is nearly constant above the transition temperature Tco, ~0.36 electrons/Mn, and reduces with decrease of the temperature below Tco following the formula n \\propto \\exp (-E_{\\mathrm {H}}/k_{\\mathrm {B}}T) , with an activation energy EH of ~0.13 eV. In contrast, no obvious signatures of thermal activation for Hall mobility were observed. Meanwhile, it is revealed that magnetic field affects the resistivity by enhancing the carrier mobility of the film in the course of the CO transition.

  7. Parallel digital forensics infrastructure.

    SciTech Connect

    Liebrock, Lorie M.; Duggan, David Patrick

    2009-10-01

    This report documents the architecture and implementation of a Parallel Digital Forensics infrastructure. This infrastructure is necessary for supporting the design, implementation, and testing of new classes of parallel digital forensics tools. Digital Forensics has become extremely difficult with data sets of one terabyte and larger. The only way to overcome the processing time of these large sets is to identify and develop new parallel algorithms for performing the analysis. To support algorithm research, a flexible base infrastructure is required. A candidate architecture for this base infrastructure was designed, instantiated, and tested by this project, in collaboration with New Mexico Tech. Previous infrastructures were not designed and built specifically for the development and testing of parallel algorithms. With the size of forensics data sets only expected to increase significantly, this type of infrastructure support is necessary for continued research in parallel digital forensics. This report documents the implementation of the parallel digital forensics (PDF) infrastructure architecture and implementation.

  8. Boulder Track

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-408, 1 July 2003

    If a boulder rolls down a slope on an uninhabited planet, does it make a sound? While we do not know the sound made by a boulder rolling down a slope in the martian region of Gordii Dorsum, we do know that it made an impression. This full-resolution Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a series of depressions made on a dust-mantled slope as a boulder rolled down it, sometime in the recent past. The boulder track is located just right of center in this picture. The boulder sits at the end of the track. This picture was acquired in May 2003; it is located near 11.2oN, 147.8oW. North is toward the lower left, sunlight illuminates the scene from the right. The picture covers an area only 810 meters (about 886 yards) across.

  9. Languages for parallel architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents mathematical methods for modelling parallel computer architectures, based on the results of ESPRIT's project 415 on computer languages for parallel architectures. Presented are investigations incorporating a wide variety of programming styles, including functional,logic, and object-oriented paradigms. Topics cover include Philips's parallel object-oriented language POOL, lazy-functional languages, the languages IDEAL, K-LEAF, FP2, and Petri-net semantics for the AADL language.

  10. Introduction to Parallel Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    Topology C, Ada, C++, Data-parallel FORTRAN, 2D mesh of node boards, each node FORTRAN-90 (late 1992) board has 1 application processor Devopment Tools ...parallel machines become the wave of the present, tools are increasingly needed to assist programmers in creating parallel tasks and coordinating...their activities. Linda was designed to be such a tool . Linda was designed with three important goals in mind: to be portable, efficient, and easy to use

  11. Parallel Wolff Cluster Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, S.; Ko, S. H.; Coddington, P. D.

    The Wolff single-cluster algorithm is the most efficient method known for Monte Carlo simulation of many spin models. Due to the irregular size, shape and position of the Wolff clusters, this method does not easily lend itself to efficient parallel implementation, so that simulations using this method have thus far been confined to workstations and vector machines. Here we present two parallel implementations of this algorithm, and show that one gives fairly good performance on a MIMD parallel computer.

  12. Application Portable Parallel Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Gary L.; Blech, Richard A.; Quealy, Angela; Townsend, Scott

    1995-01-01

    Application Portable Parallel Library (APPL) computer program is subroutine-based message-passing software library intended to provide consistent interface to variety of multiprocessor computers on market today. Minimizes effort needed to move application program from one computer to another. User develops application program once and then easily moves application program from parallel computer on which created to another parallel computer. ("Parallel computer" also include heterogeneous collection of networked computers). Written in C language with one FORTRAN 77 subroutine for UNIX-based computers and callable from application programs written in C language or FORTRAN 77.

  13. Application Portable Parallel Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Gary L.; Blech, Richard A.; Quealy, Angela; Townsend, Scott

    1995-01-01

    Application Portable Parallel Library (APPL) computer program is subroutine-based message-passing software library intended to provide consistent interface to variety of multiprocessor computers on market today. Minimizes effort needed to move application program from one computer to another. User develops application program once and then easily moves application program from parallel computer on which created to another parallel computer. ("Parallel computer" also include heterogeneous collection of networked computers). Written in C language with one FORTRAN 77 subroutine for UNIX-based computers and callable from application programs written in C language or FORTRAN 77.

  14. PCLIPS: Parallel CLIPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Lawrence O.; Bennett, Bonnie H.; Tello, Ivan

    1994-01-01

    A parallel version of CLIPS 5.1 has been developed to run on Intel Hypercubes. The user interface is the same as that for CLIPS with some added commands to allow for parallel calls. A complete version of CLIPS runs on each node of the hypercube. The system has been instrumented to display the time spent in the match, recognize, and act cycles on each node. Only rule-level parallelism is supported. Parallel commands enable the assertion and retraction of facts to/from remote nodes working memory. Parallel CLIPS was used to implement a knowledge-based command, control, communications, and intelligence (C(sup 3)I) system to demonstrate the fusion of high-level, disparate sources. We discuss the nature of the information fusion problem, our approach, and implementation. Parallel CLIPS has also be used to run several benchmark parallel knowledge bases such as one to set up a cafeteria. Results show from running Parallel CLIPS with parallel knowledge base partitions indicate that significant speed increases, including superlinear in some cases, are possible.

  15. Parallel Algorithms and Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Robey, Robert W.

    2016-06-16

    This is a powerpoint presentation on parallel algorithms and patterns. A parallel algorithm is a well-defined, step-by-step computational procedure that emphasizes concurrency to solve a problem. Examples of problems include: Sorting, searching, optimization, matrix operations. A parallel pattern is a computational step in a sequence of independent, potentially concurrent operations that occurs in diverse scenarios with some frequency. Examples are: Reductions, prefix scans, ghost cell updates. We only touch on parallel patterns in this presentation. It really deserves its own detailed discussion which Gabe Rockefeller would like to develop.

  16. Evolution of the SOFIA tracking control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiebig, Norbert; Jakob, Holger; Pfüller, Enrico; Röser, Hans-Peter; Wiedemann, Manuel; Wolf, Jürgen

    2014-07-01

    The airborne observatory SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy) is undergoing a modernization of its tracking system. This included new, highly sensitive tracking cameras, control computers, filter wheels and other equipment, as well as a major redesign of the control software. The experiences along the migration path from an aged 19" VMbus based control system to the application of modern industrial PCs, from VxWorks real-time operating system to embedded Linux and a state of the art software architecture are presented. Further, the concept is presented to operate the new camera also as a scientific instrument, in parallel to tracking.

  17. Computing association probabilities using parallel Boltzmann machines.

    PubMed

    Iltis, R A; Ting, P Y

    1993-01-01

    A new computational method is presented for solving the data association problem using parallel Boltzmann machines. It is shown that the association probabilities can be computed with arbitrarily small errors if a sufficient number of parallel Boltzmann machines are available. The probability beta(i)(j) that the i th measurement emanated from the jth target can be obtained simply by observing the relative frequency with which neuron v(i,j) in a two-dimensional network is on throughout the layers. Some simple tracking examples comparing the performance of the Boltzmann algorithm to the exact data association solution and with the performance of an alternative parallel method using the Hopfield neural network are also presented.

  18. STS-30 deorbit and reentry ground track

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Rockwell International (RI) supplied artist concept titled 'STS-30 Deorbit and Reentry Track' shows Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, deorbit and reentry ground track. Ground track and map portray OV-104's deorbit over Madagascar, atmospheric reentry maneuvers, approach to the California coast, and landing at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California. the transport trailer of the Payload Environmental Transportation System (PETS). Magellan, destined for unprecedented studies of Venusian topographic features, will be deployed by the crew of NASA's STS-30 mission in April 1989. View provided by KSC with alternate number KSC-88PC-1086.

  19. Tracking the emission and transport of pollution from wildfires using the IASI CO retrievals: analysis of the summer 2007 Greek fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turquety, S.; Hurtmans, D.; Hadji-Lazaro, J.; Coheur, P.-F.; Clerbaux, C.; Josset, D.; Tsamalis, C.

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, we analyze the performance of the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), launched in October 2006 on board METOP-A, for the monitoring of carbon monoxide (CO) during extreme fire events, focusing on the record-breaking fires which devastated thousands of square kilometers of forest in Greece during the last week (23-30) of August 2007. After an assessment of the quality of the profiles retrieved using the Fast Optimal Retrievals on Layers for IASI (FORLI) algorithm, the information provided on fire emissions and subsequent pollution outflow is discussed. Large CO plumes were observed above the Mediterranean Basin and North Africa, with total CO columns exceeding 30×1018 molecules/cm2 and absolute volume mixing ratio up to 22 ppmv. The average root-mean-square (RMS) difference between simulated and observed spectra is close to the estimated radiometric noise level, slightly increasing (by ~14%) in the fresh fire plumes. CO profiles are retrieved with a vertical resolution of about 8 km, with ~1.7 pieces of independent information on the vertical in the region considered and a maximum sensitivity in the free troposphere (~4-5 km). Using the integrated total amount, the increase in CO burden due to these fires is estimated to 0.321 Tg, ~40% of the total annual anthropogenic emissions in Greece. These CO enhancements are in good agreement with the aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieved from the MODIS measurements, highlighting a rapid transport of trace gases and aerosols across the Mediterranean Basin (less than one day). While the coarse vertical resolution will not allow the location of the exact plume height, the large CO enhancements observed in the lower troposphere are consistent with the maximum aerosol backscatter coefficient at ~2 km detected by the CALIPSO lidar in space (CALIOP). This indicates that the general level of transport can be derived (lower, middle or upper troposphere) but that it needs to be accompanied by a

  20. Tracking sources of severe haze episodes and their physicochemical and hygroscopic properties under Asian continental outflow: Long-range transport pollution, postharvest biomass burning, and Asian dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jinsang; Kim, Young J.

    2011-01-01

    Aerosol physicochemical and hygroscopic properties were measured from 12 October to 21 November 2005 at a downwind area of the Asian continental outflow (Gwangju, Korea) to characterize severe haze episodes. Using optically measured elemental carbon (EC) at 660 nm (Opt.EC) and 880 nm (BC) wavelengths and Mie theory, it was estimated that the higher BC/Opt.EC ratio during the cloudy day of the long-range transport (LTP) period was mainly due to EC particle growth from in-cloud processing with secondary aerosols such as sulfate and organic aerosols. Single scattering albedo (SSA) of biomass burning (BB) aerosol increased sharply from 0.89 to 0.94 under a relative humidity >70%, suggesting that organic aerosols emitted from rice straw burning contained high amounts of hydrophilic compounds. The contribution of aerosol water content to the total light extinction coefficient (bext) was determined as 51.4% and 68.4% during the BB and BB + LTP periods, respectively, indicating that the haze episodes were highly enhanced by an increase in aerosol water content. The Asian dust event was characterized by the highest SSA (0.92 ± 0.02), the lowest mass scattering efficiency of fine particles (2.5 ± 1.0 m2 g-1), and the lowest hygroscopic nature (humidity-dependent light scattering enhancement factor, f(80%), which is defined by the ratio of light scattering coefficient at 80% relative humidity to that at dry condition, = ˜1.37). Based on the Ångström exponent (α) values observed at the source region of the Asian continent and the downwind area of South Korea during the BB + LTP period, it was found that the α value of urban aerosols decreased ˜11% for 1-2 days of the transport, probably due to the increase in particle size through water uptake. Increasing rates of surface PM10 mass concentrations at western coastal areas of the South Korean peninsula were in the range 2.4-14.4 μgm-3 h-1 at the beginning of the BB + LTP period (24 October 2005, 0700-2300 LT). Based on

  1. Verification of large-scale rapid transport in the lower thermosphere: Tracking the exhaust plume of STS-107 from launch to the Antarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niciejewski, R.; Skinner, W.; Cooper, M.; Marshall, A.; Meier, R. R.; Stevens, M. H.; Ortland, D.; Wu, Q.

    2011-05-01

    New analysis of the Doppler shift of O2 airglow spectra recorded by the TIMED Doppler Interferometer (TIDI) and the High Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI) have provided conclusive evidence that the shuttle main engine exhaust plume generated in the lower thermosphere by the launch of STS-107 and imaged by the Global Ultraviolet Imager (GUVI) instrument on TIMED was transported to the Antarctic in ˜80 h, supporting a key inference from the initial study by Stevens et al. (2005). These new results were aided by improved knowledge of the effects of instrumental and satellite artifacts imposed on the Doppler spectra. STS-107 launched on 16 January 2003, and the neutral wind near its launch trajectory and nearby volume was sampled within minutes by TIDI. These initial observations suggested that the northernmost end of the shuttle's exhaust plume would move northeast and that the southern end would move southeast, motions that were identified in imagery acquired during the next orbit of TIMED. The direction and magnitude of plume motion inferred from GUVI images obtained 12, 26, and 50 h after launch were again confirmed by TIDI and HRDI. The appearance of the plume over the Antarctic ˜80 h after launch, inferred from earlier work by the appearance of iron ablated from the shuttle's main engines, was consistent with neutral winds measured by the satellite Doppler instruments over the Antarctic. The transport of the plume from the coast of Florida to the Antarctic was aided by the favorable phase and strong amplitude of a 2 day planetary wave of wave number three in the southern hemisphere on 18 January 2003. The existence of the 2 day wave was deduced from zonally averaged and combined TIDI and HRDI neutral wind observations. We conclude that the existence of strong and sustained winds in the MLT, significantly greater than expected from empirical and theoretical models, is indisputable and provides compelling evidence supporting the global-scale nature of

  2. Basolateral membrane H/OH/HCO3 transport in the rat cortical thick ascending limb. Evidence for an electrogenic Na/HCO3 cotransporter in parallel with a Na/H antiporter.

    PubMed Central

    Krapf, R

    1988-01-01

    Mechanisms involved in basolateral H/OH/HCO3 transport in the in vitro microperfused rat cortical thick ascending limb were examined by the microfluorometric determination of cell pH using (2',7')-bis-(carboxyethyl)-(5,6)-carboxyfluorescein. The mean cell pH in this segment perfused with 147 mM sodium and 25 mM HCO3 at pH 7.4 was 7.13 +/- 0.02 (n = 30). Lowering bath HCO3 from 25 to 5 mM (constant PCO2 of 40 mmHg) acidified the cells by 0.31 +/- 0.02 pH units at a rate of 0.56 +/- 0.08 pH units/min. Removal of bath sodium acidified the cells by 0.28 +/- 0.03 pH units at a rate of 0.33 +/- 0.04 pH units/min. The cell acidification was stilbene inhibitable and independent of chloride. There was no effect of bath sodium removal on cell pH in the absence of CO2/HCO3. Depolarization of the basolateral membrane (step increase in bath potassium) independent of the presence of chloride. Cell acidification induced by bath sodium removal persisted when the basolateral membrane was voltage clamped by high potassium/valinomycin. Although these results are consistent with a Na/(HCO3)n greater than 1 cotransporter, a Na/H antiporter was also suggested: 1 mM bath amiloride inhibited the cell pH defense against an acid load (rapid ammonia washout), both in the presence and absence of CO2/HCO3, and inhibited the cell acidification induced by bath sodium reduction from 50 to 0 mM. In conclusion, an electrogenic Na/(HCO3)n greater than 1 cotransporter in parallel with a Na/H antiporter exist on the basolateral membrane of the rat cortical thick ascending limb. PMID:2839547

  3. Xyce parallel electronic simulator design.

    SciTech Connect

    Thornquist, Heidi K.; Rankin, Eric Lamont; Mei, Ting; Schiek, Richard Louis; Keiter, Eric Richard; Russo, Thomas V.

    2010-09-01

    This document is the Xyce Circuit Simulator developer guide. Xyce has been designed from the 'ground up' to be a SPICE-compatible, distributed memory parallel circuit simulator. While it is in many respects a research code, Xyce is intended to be a production simulator. As such, having software quality engineering (SQE) procedures in place to insure a high level of code quality and robustness are essential. Version control, issue tracking customer support, C++ style guildlines and the Xyce release process are all described. The Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator has been under development at Sandia since 1999. Historically, Xyce has mostly been funded by ASC, the original focus of Xyce development has primarily been related to circuits for nuclear weapons. However, this has not been the only focus and it is expected that the project will diversify. Like many ASC projects, Xyce is a group development effort, which involves a number of researchers, engineers, scientists, mathmaticians and computer scientists. In addition to diversity of background, it is to be expected on long term projects for there to be a certain amount of staff turnover, as people move on to different projects. As a result, it is very important that the project maintain high software quality standards. The point of this document is to formally document a number of the software quality practices followed by the Xyce team in one place. Also, it is hoped that this document will be a good source of information for new developers.

  4. Transportation of hazardous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Max

    1994-03-01

    The transportation of hazardous materials has steadily increased through out the past thirty years and will continue to grow through the end of the century. The development of advanced technology to track extremely dangerous shipments and provide immediate electronic load information is essential to both transportation and public safety agencies. Federal, state and local transportation and public safety agencies must have hazardous material transportation information in order to plan, train and equip responders to meet the identified threat. Tracking and identification technology must be consistent within and across state and international borders. The development and implementation of a strategy and technology will require federal, state and private industry coordination and financing.

  5. Tracking system

    SciTech Connect

    Leroy, V. A.; Gaedtke, H. D.

    1985-10-15

    A system of tracking the sun each day of the year with compensation for changes in time of sunrise and time of sunset as well as sun declination on a day to day basis, declination being under control of a crank that makes one revolution per year. The equation of time is under control of a cam that also revolves once a year and resets the clock to reflect solar rather than mean solar time in order to properly follow the sun. The position of sun acquisition and loss are a function of the declination and the time is a function of the clock corrected via the cam for equation of time. Thus, when the declination is reset each day, it sets the position of acquisition and loss while the clock, now set for the change due to the equation of time, determines the time of acquisition and loss.

  6. Parallel and Distributed Computing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-12

    program was devoted to parallel and distributed computing . Support for this part of the program was obtained from the present Army contract and a...Umesh Vazirani. A workshop on parallel and distributed computing was held from May 19 to May 23, 1986 and drew 141 participants. Keywords: Mathematical programming; Protocols; Randomized algorithms. (Author)

  7. Parallel Lisp simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Weening, J.S.

    1988-05-01

    CSIM is a simulator for parallel Lisp, based on a continuation passing interpreter. It models a shared-memory multiprocessor executing programs written in Common Lisp, extended with several primitives for creating and controlling processes. This paper describes the structure of the simulator, measures its performance, and gives an example of its use with a parallel Lisp program.

  8. Parallels in History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mugleston, William F.

    2000-01-01

    Believes that by focusing on the recurrent situations and problems, or parallels, throughout history, students will understand the relevance of history to their own times and lives. Provides suggestions for parallels in history that may be introduced within lectures or as a means to class discussions. (CMK)

  9. The parallel virtual file system for portals.

    SciTech Connect

    Schutt, James Alan

    2004-04-01

    This report presents the result of an effort to re-implement the Parallel Virtual File System (PVFS) using Portals as the transport. This report provides short overviews of PVFS and Portals, and describes the design and implementation of PVFS over Portals. Finally, the results of performance testing of both stock PVFS and PVFS over Portals are presented.

  10. Tracking Soil Organic Carbon Transport to Continental Margin Sediments Using Soil-Specific Hopanoid Biomarkers: a Case Study From the Congo Fan (ODP Site 1075)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, M. P.; Talbot, H. M.; Eniola, O.; Zabel, M.; Wagner, T.

    2007-12-01

    The transport and subsequent deposition of terrestrially derived organic matter into the ocean is an important but poorly constrained aspect of the modern global carbon cycle. In regions associated with large river systems it is likely that the terrestrial input of organic carbon is much more complex than commonly considered and very difficult to trace based on established geochemical proxies. It is therefore important to develop proxies that target the movement and fate of this terrestrial organic material. The identification of bacteriohopanepolyol (BHP) biomarkers unique to soil derived organic carbon (SOC) has enabled the transport of SOC into aquatic sediments to be traced. The extreme recalcitrance of BHPs enables these source specific compounds to be used on recent and ancient sediments to identify periods of high and low SOC input into sediments. BHPs are bacterial membrane compounds with a high degree of structural variability. They are analogous to steroids in eukaryotes and have been identified in over half of all bacteria studied for their presence. BHPs have a wide range of over 40 functional groups on the side chain, with up to 6 functional groups in each structure, and with methylation and unsaturation over 100 total structures have been identified1. During the BHP analysis of a wide range of soils from around the world we consistently measure high levels adenosylhopane, known to originate from purple non-sulphur, nitrogen fixing and ammonia oxidising bacteria and 2-methyl adenosyl hopane (m/z 802)2, from nitrogen fixing bacteria. Only 3 lacustrine sediments with large SOC supply from their catchments areas have been found to contain these markers in a survey of over 40 different non-marine settings. Recent studies on Late Quaternary sediments from the Congo deep sea fan (OPD site 1075, approximately 2 km water depth) provide a strong case to expect markers for SOC3. An initial analysis of the core samples confirms the presence of soil specific BHP

  11. Parallel computing works

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-23

    An account of the Caltech Concurrent Computation Program (C{sup 3}P), a five year project that focused on answering the question: Can parallel computers be used to do large-scale scientific computations '' As the title indicates, the question is answered in the affirmative, by implementing numerous scientific applications on real parallel computers and doing computations that produced new scientific results. In the process of doing so, C{sup 3}P helped design and build several new computers, designed and implemented basic system software, developed algorithms for frequently used mathematical computations on massively parallel machines, devised performance models and measured the performance of many computers, and created a high performance computing facility based exclusively on parallel computers. While the initial focus of C{sup 3}P was the hypercube architecture developed by C. Seitz, many of the methods developed and lessons learned have been applied successfully on other massively parallel architectures.

  12. Massively parallel mathematical sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Montry, G.R.

    1989-01-01

    The Sieve of Eratosthenes is a well-known algorithm for finding all prime numbers in a given subset of integers. A parallel version of the Sieve is described that produces computational speedups over 800 on a hypercube with 1,024 processing elements for problems of fixed size. Computational speedups as high as 980 are achieved when the problem size per processor is fixed. The method of parallelization generalizes to other sieves and will be efficient on any ensemble architecture. We investigate two highly parallel sieves using scattered decomposition and compare their performance on a hypercube multiprocessor. A comparison of different parallelization techniques for the sieve illustrates the trade-offs necessary in the design and implementation of massively parallel algorithms for large ensemble computers.

  13. Totally parallel multilevel algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederickson, Paul O.

    1988-01-01

    Four totally parallel algorithms for the solution of a sparse linear system have common characteristics which become quite apparent when they are implemented on a highly parallel hypercube such as the CM2. These four algorithms are Parallel Superconvergent Multigrid (PSMG) of Frederickson and McBryan, Robust Multigrid (RMG) of Hackbusch, the FFT based Spectral Algorithm, and Parallel Cyclic Reduction. In fact, all four can be formulated as particular cases of the same totally parallel multilevel algorithm, which are referred to as TPMA. In certain cases the spectral radius of TPMA is zero, and it is recognized to be a direct algorithm. In many other cases the spectral radius, although not zero, is small enough that a single iteration per timestep keeps the local error within the required tolerance.

  14. On the Right Track.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bieber, Ed

    1983-01-01

    Suggests thinking of "tracks" as clues and using them as the focus of outdoor activities in the urban environment. Provides 24 examples of possible track activities, including: seeds on the ground (track of a nearby tree), litter (track of a litterbug), and peeling paint (track of weathering forces). (JN)

  15. On the Right Track.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bieber, Ed

    1983-01-01

    Suggests thinking of "tracks" as clues and using them as the focus of outdoor activities in the urban environment. Provides 24 examples of possible track activities, including: seeds on the ground (track of a nearby tree), litter (track of a litterbug), and peeling paint (track of weathering forces). (JN)

  16. Track Construction Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banke, Ron; Di Gennaro, Guy; Ediger, Rick; Garner, Lanny; Hersom, Steve; Miller, Jack; Nemeth, Ron; Petrucelli, Jim; Sierks, Donna; Smith, Don; Swank, Kevin; West, Kevin

    This book establishes guidelines for the construction and maintenance of tracks by providing information for building new tracks or upgrading existing tracks. Subjects covered include running track planning and construction, physical layout, available surfaces, and maintenance. General track requirements and construction specifications are…

  17. Tracking the emission and transport of pollution from wildfires using the IASI CO retrievals: analysis of the summer 2007 Greek fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turquety, S.; Hurtmans, D.; Hadji-Lazaro, J.; Coheur, P.-F.; Clerbaux, C.; Josset, D.; Tsamalis, C.

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, we analyze the performance of the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), launched in October 2006 on board METOP-A, for the monitoring of carbon monoxide (CO) during extreme fire events, focusing on the record-breaking fires which devastated thousands of square kilometers of forest in Greece during the last week (23-30) of August 2007. After an assessment of the quality of the profiles retrieved using the Fast Optimal Retrievals on Layers for IASI (FORLI) algorithm, the information provided on fire emissions and subsequent pollution outflow is discussed. Large CO plumes were observed above the Mediterranean Basin and North Africa, with total CO columns exceeding 24×1018 molecules/cm2 and absolute volume mixing ratios up to 4 ppmv on the 25 August. Up to 30×1018 molecules/cm2 and 22 ppmv in the lower troposphere are retrieved close to the fires above the Peloponnese, but with larger uncertainty. The average root-mean-square (RMS) difference between simulated and observed spectra is close to the estimated radiometric noise level, slightly increasing (by ~14%) in the fresh fire plumes. CO profiles are retrieved with a vertical resolution of about 8 km, with ~1.7 pieces of independent information on the vertical in the region considered and a maximum sensitivity in the free troposphere (~4-5 km). Using the integrated total amount, the increase in CO burden due to these fires is estimated to 0.321 Tg, ~40% of the total annual anthropogenic emissions in Greece. The patterns of these CO enhancements are in good agreement with the aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieved from the MODIS measurements, highlighting a rapid transport of trace gases and aerosols across the Mediterranean Basin (less than one day). While the coarse vertical resolution will not allow the location of the exact plume height, the large CO enhancements observed in the lower troposphere are consistent with the maximum aerosol backscatter coefficient at ~2 km detected by the

  18. Design of a real-time system of moving ship tracking on-board based on FPGA in remote sensing images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tie-jun; Zhang, Shen; Zhou, Guo-qing; Jiang, Chuan-xian

    2015-12-01

    With the broad attention of countries in the areas of sea transportation and trade safety, the requirements of efficiency and accuracy of moving ship tracking are becoming higher. Therefore, a systematic design of moving ship tracking onboard based on FPGA is proposed, which uses the Adaptive Inter Frame Difference (AIFD) method to track a ship with different speed. For the Frame Difference method (FD) is simple but the amount of computation is very large, it is suitable for the use of FPGA to implement in parallel. But Frame Intervals (FIs) of the traditional FD method are fixed, and in remote sensing images, a ship looks very small (depicted by only dozens of pixels) and moves slowly. By applying invariant FIs, the accuracy of FD for moving ship tracking is not satisfactory and the calculation is highly redundant. So we use the adaptation of FD based on adaptive extraction of key frames for moving ship tracking. A FPGA development board of Xilinx Kintex-7 series is used for simulation. The experiments show that compared with the traditional FD method, the proposed one can achieve higher accuracy of moving ship tracking, and can meet the requirement of real-time tracking in high image resolution.

  19. Bilingual parallel programming

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, I.; Overbeek, R.

    1990-01-01

    Numerous experiments have demonstrated that computationally intensive algorithms support adequate parallelism to exploit the potential of large parallel machines. Yet successful parallel implementations of serious applications are rare. The limiting factor is clearly programming technology. None of the approaches to parallel programming that have been proposed to date -- whether parallelizing compilers, language extensions, or new concurrent languages -- seem to adequately address the central problems of portability, expressiveness, efficiency, and compatibility with existing software. In this paper, we advocate an alternative approach to parallel programming based on what we call bilingual programming. We present evidence that this approach provides and effective solution to parallel programming problems. The key idea in bilingual programming is to construct the upper levels of applications in a high-level language while coding selected low-level components in low-level languages. This approach permits the advantages of a high-level notation (expressiveness, elegance, conciseness) to be obtained without the cost in performance normally associated with high-level approaches. In addition, it provides a natural framework for reusing existing code.

  20. The 2nd Symposium on the Frontiers of Massively Parallel Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, Ronnie (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Programming languages, computer graphics, neural networks, massively parallel computers, SIMD architecture, algorithms, digital terrain models, sort computation, simulation of charged particle transport on the massively parallel processor and image processing are among the topics discussed.