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Sample records for parallelizable approximate solvers

  1. Parallelizable approximate solvers for recursions arising in preconditioning

    SciTech Connect

    Shapira, Y.

    1996-12-31

    For the recursions used in the Modified Incomplete LU (MILU) preconditioner, namely, the incomplete decomposition, forward elimination and back substitution processes, a parallelizable approximate solver is presented. The present analysis shows that the solutions of the recursions depend only weakly on their initial conditions and may be interpreted to indicate that the inexact solution is close, in some sense, to the exact one. The method is based on a domain decomposition approach, suitable for parallel implementations with message passing architectures. It requires a fixed number of communication steps per preconditioned iteration, independently of the number of subdomains or the size of the problem. The overlapping subdomains are either cubes (suitable for mesh-connected arrays of processors) or constructed by the data-flow rule of the recursions (suitable for line-connected arrays with possibly SIMD or vector processors). Numerical examples show that, in both cases, the overhead in the number of iterations required for convergence of the preconditioned iteration is small relatively to the speed-up gained.

  2. An approximate Riemann solver for hypervelocity flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Peter A.

    1991-01-01

    We describe an approximate Riemann solver for the computation of hypervelocity flows in which there are strong shocks and viscous interactions. The scheme has three stages, the first of which computes the intermediate states assuming isentropic waves. A second stage, based on the strong shock relations, may then be invoked if the pressure jump across either wave is large. The third stage interpolates the interface state from the two initial states and the intermediate states. The solver is used as part of a finite-volume code and is demonstrated on two test cases. The first is a high Mach number flow over a sphere while the second is a flow over a slender cone with an adiabatic boundary layer. In both cases the solver performs well.

  3. A 3D approximate maximum likelihood localization solver

    SciTech Connect

    2016-09-23

    A robust three-dimensional solver was needed to accurately and efficiently estimate the time sequence of locations of fish tagged with acoustic transmitters and vocalizing marine mammals to describe in sufficient detail the information needed to assess the function of dam-passage design alternatives and support Marine Renewable Energy. An approximate maximum likelihood solver was developed using measurements of time difference of arrival from all hydrophones in receiving arrays on which a transmission was detected. Field experiments demonstrated that the developed solver performed significantly better in tracking efficiency and accuracy than other solvers described in the literature.

  4. Parallel iterative solvers and preconditioners using approximate hierarchical methods

    SciTech Connect

    Grama, A.; Kumar, V.; Sameh, A.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, we report results of the performance, convergence, and accuracy of a parallel GMRES solver for Boundary Element Methods. The solver uses a hierarchical approximate matrix-vector product based on a hybrid Barnes-Hut / Fast Multipole Method. We study the impact of various accuracy parameters on the convergence and show that with minimal loss in accuracy, our solver yields significant speedups. We demonstrate the excellent parallel efficiency and scalability of our solver. The combined speedups from approximation and parallelism represent an improvement of several orders in solution time. We also develop fast and paralellizable preconditioners for this problem. We report on the performance of an inner-outer scheme and a preconditioner based on truncated Green`s function. Experimental results on a 256 processor Cray T3D are presented.

  5. NONLINEAR MULTIGRID SOLVER EXPLOITING AMGe COARSE SPACES WITH APPROXIMATION PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, Max La Cour; Villa, Umberto E.; Engsig-Karup, Allan P.; Vassilevski, Panayot S.

    2016-01-22

    The paper introduces a nonlinear multigrid solver for mixed nite element discretizations based on the Full Approximation Scheme (FAS) and element-based Algebraic Multigrid (AMGe). The main motivation to use FAS for unstruc- tured problems is the guaranteed approximation property of the AMGe coarse spaces that were developed recently at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These give the ability to derive stable and accurate coarse nonlinear discretization problems. The previous attempts (including ones with the original AMGe method, [5, 11]), were less successful due to lack of such good approximation properties of the coarse spaces. With coarse spaces with approximation properties, our FAS approach on un- structured meshes should be as powerful/successful as FAS on geometrically re ned meshes. For comparison, Newton's method and Picard iterations with an inner state-of-the-art linear solver is compared to FAS on a nonlinear saddle point problem with applications to porous media ow. It is demonstrated that FAS is faster than Newton's method and Picard iterations for the experiments considered here. Due to the guaranteed approximation properties of our AMGe, the coarse spaces are very accurate, providing a solver with the potential for mesh-independent convergence on general unstructured meshes.

  6. Approximate Riemann solvers for the cosmic ray magnetohydrodynamical equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudoh, Yuki; Hanawa, Tomoyuki

    2016-11-01

    We analyse the cosmic ray magnetohydrodynamic (CR MHD) equations to improve the numerical simulations. We propose to solve them in the fully conservation form, which is equivalent to the conventional CR MHD equations. In the fully conservation form, the CR energy equation is replaced with the CR `number' conservation, where the CR number density is defined as the three-fourths power of the CR energy density. The former contains an extra source term, while latter does not. An approximate Riemann solver is derived from the CR MHD equations in the fully conservation form. Based on the analysis, we propose a numerical scheme of which solutions satisfy the Rankine-Hugoniot relation at any shock. We demonstrate that it reproduces the Riemann solution derived by Pfrommer et al. for a 1D CR hydrodynamic shock tube problem. We compare the solution with those obtained by solving the CR energy equation. The latter solutions deviate from the Riemann solution seriously, when the CR pressure dominates over the gas pressure in the post-shocked gas. The former solutions converge to the Riemann solution and are of the second-order accuracy in space and time. Our numerical examples include an expansion of high-pressure sphere in a magnetized medium. Fast and slow shocks are sharply resolved in the example. We also discuss possible extension of the CR MHD equations to evaluate the average CR energy.

  7. A 3D approximate maximum likelihood solver for localization of fish implanted with acoustic transmitters

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Z. Daniel; Sun, Yannan; Martinez, Jayson J.; Fu, Tao; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Better understanding of fish behavior is vital for recovery of many endangered species including salmon. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was developed to observe the out-migratory behavior of juvenile salmonids tagged by surgical implantation of acoustic micro-transmitters and to estimate the survival when passing through dams on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. A robust three-dimensional solver was needed to accurately and efficiently estimate the time sequence of locations of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters, to describe in sufficient detail the information needed to assess the function of dam-passage design alternatives. An approximate maximum likelihood solver was developed using measurements of time difference of arrival from all hydrophones in receiving arrays on which a transmission was detected. Field experiments demonstrated that the developed solver performed significantly better in tracking efficiency and accuracy than other solvers described in the literature. PMID:25427517

  8. A 3D approximate maximum likelihood solver for localization of fish implanted with acoustic transmitters

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Z. Daniel; USA, Richland Washington; Sun, Yannan; USA, Richland Washington; Martinez, Jayson J.; USA, Richland Washington; Fu, Tao; USA, Richland Washington; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; USA, Richland Washington; Carlson, Thomas J.; USA, Richland Washington

    2014-11-27

    Better understanding of fish behavior is vital for recovery of many endangered species including salmon. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was developed to observe the out-migratory behavior of juvenile salmonids tagged by surgical implantation of acoustic micro-transmitters and to estimate the survival when passing through dams on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. A robust three-dimensional solver was needed to accurately and efficiently estimate the time sequence of locations of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters, to describe in sufficient detail the information needed to assess the function of dam-passage design alternatives. An approximate maximum likelihood solver was developed using measurements of time difference of arrival from all hydrophones in receiving arrays on which a transmission was detected. Field experiments demonstrated that the developed solver performed significantly better in tracking efficiency and accuracy than other solvers described in the literature.

  9. A 3D approximate maximum likelihood solver for localization of fish implanted with acoustic transmitters.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Z Daniel; Sun, Yannan; Martinez, Jayson J; Fu, Tao; McMichael, Geoffrey A; Carlson, Thomas J

    2014-11-27

    Better understanding of fish behavior is vital for recovery of many endangered species including salmon. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was developed to observe the out-migratory behavior of juvenile salmonids tagged by surgical implantation of acoustic micro-transmitters and to estimate the survival when passing through dams on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. A robust three-dimensional solver was needed to accurately and efficiently estimate the time sequence of locations of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters, to describe in sufficient detail the information needed to assess the function of dam-passage design alternatives. An approximate maximum likelihood solver was developed using measurements of time difference of arrival from all hydrophones in receiving arrays on which a transmission was detected. Field experiments demonstrated that the developed solver performed significantly better in tracking efficiency and accuracy than other solvers described in the literature.

  10. A 3D approximate maximum likelihood solver for localization of fish implanted with acoustic transmitters

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Z. Daniel; USA, Richland Washington; ...

    2014-11-27

    Better understanding of fish behavior is vital for recovery of many endangered species including salmon. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was developed to observe the out-migratory behavior of juvenile salmonids tagged by surgical implantation of acoustic micro-transmitters and to estimate the survival when passing through dams on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. A robust three-dimensional solver was needed to accurately and efficiently estimate the time sequence of locations of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters, to describe in sufficient detail the information needed to assess the function of dam-passage design alternatives. An approximate maximum likelihood solver was developedmore » using measurements of time difference of arrival from all hydrophones in receiving arrays on which a transmission was detected. Field experiments demonstrated that the developed solver performed significantly better in tracking efficiency and accuracy than other solvers described in the literature.« less

  11. Parallelizable adiabatic gate teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakago, Kosuke; Hajdušek, Michal; Nakayama, Shojun; Murao, Mio

    2015-12-01

    To investigate how a temporally ordered gate sequence can be parallelized in adiabatic implementations of quantum computation, we modify adiabatic gate teleportation, a model of quantum computation proposed by Bacon and Flammia [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 120504 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.120504], to a form deterministically simulating parallelized gate teleportation, which is achievable only by postselection. We introduce a twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonian, a Heisenberg-type spin interaction where the coordinates of the second qubit are twisted according to a unitary gate. We develop parallelizable adiabatic gate teleportation (PAGT) where a sequence of unitary gates is performed in a single step of the adiabatic process. In PAGT, numeric calculations suggest the necessary time for the adiabatic evolution implementing a sequence of L unitary gates increases at most as O (L5) . However, we show that it has the interesting property that it can map the temporal order of gates to the spatial order of interactions specified by the final Hamiltonian. Using this property, we present a controlled-PAGT scheme to manipulate the order of gates by a control qubit. In the controlled-PAGT scheme, two differently ordered sequential unitary gates F G and G F are coherently performed depending on the state of a control qubit by simultaneously applying the twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonians implementing unitary gates F and G . We investigate why the twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonian allows PAGT. We show that the twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonian has an ability to perform a transposed unitary gate by just modifying the space ordering of the final Hamiltonian implementing a unitary gate in adiabatic gate teleportation. The dynamics generated by the time-reversed Hamiltonian represented by the transposed unitary gate enables deterministic simulation of a postselected event of parallelized gate teleportation in adiabatic

  12. An approximate Riemann solver for magnetohydrodynamics (that works in more than one dimension)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Kenneth G.

    1994-01-01

    An approximate Riemann solver is developed for the governing equations of ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). The Riemann solver has an eight-wave structure, where seven of the waves are those used in previous work on upwind schemes for MHD, and the eighth wave is related to the divergence of the magnetic field. The structure of the eighth wave is not immediately obvious from the governing equations as they are usually written, but arises from a modification of the equations that is presented in this paper. The addition of the eighth wave allows multidimensional MHD problems to be solved without the use of staggered grids or a projection scheme, one or the other of which was necessary in previous work on upwind schemes for MHD. A test problem made up of a shock tube with rotated initial conditions is solved to show that the two-dimensional code yields answers consistent with the one-dimensional methods developed previously.

  13. Approximate Harten-Lax-van Leer Riemann solvers for relativistic magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignone, Andrea; Bodo, G.; Ugliano, M.

    2012-11-01

    We review a particular class of approximate Riemann solvers in the context of the equations of ideal relativistic magnetohydrodynamics. Commonly prefixed as Harten-Lax-van Leer (HLL), this family of solvers approaches the solution of the Riemann problem by providing suitable guesses to the outermots characteristic speeds, without any prior knowledge of the solution. By requiring consistency with the integral form of the conservation law, a simplified set of jump conditions with a reduced number of characteristic waves may be obtained. The degree of approximation crucially depends on the wave pattern used in prepresnting the Riemann fan arising from the initial discontinuity breakup. In the original HLL scheme, the solution is approximated by collapsing the full characteristic structure into a single average state enclosed by two outermost fast mangnetosonic speeds. On the other hand, HLLC and HLLD improves the accuracy of the solution by restoring the tangential and Alfvén modes therefore leading to a representation of the Riemann fan in terms of 3 and 5 waves, respectively.

  14. Multilayer shallow shelf approximation: Minimisation formulation, finite element solvers and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jouvet, Guillaume

    2015-04-15

    In this paper, a multilayer generalisation of the Shallow Shelf Approximation (SSA) is considered. In this recent hybrid ice flow model, the ice thickness is divided into thin layers, which can spread out, contract and slide over each other in such a way that the velocity profile is layer-wise constant. Like the SSA (1-layer model), the multilayer model can be reformulated as a minimisation problem. However, unlike the SSA, the functional to be minimised involves a new penalisation term for the interlayer jumps of the velocity, which represents the vertical shear stresses induced by interlayer sliding. Taking advantage of this reformulation, numerical solvers developed for the SSA can be naturally extended layer-wise or column-wise. Numerical results show that the column-wise extension of a Newton multigrid solver proves to be robust in the sense that its convergence is barely influenced by the number of layers and the type of ice flow. In addition, the multilayer formulation appears to be naturally better conditioned than the one of the first-order approximation to face the anisotropic conditions of the sliding-dominant ice flow of ISMIP-HOM experiments.

  15. Multilayer shallow shelf approximation: Minimisation formulation, finite element solvers and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouvet, Guillaume

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, a multilayer generalisation of the Shallow Shelf Approximation (SSA) is considered. In this recent hybrid ice flow model, the ice thickness is divided into thin layers, which can spread out, contract and slide over each other in such a way that the velocity profile is layer-wise constant. Like the SSA (1-layer model), the multilayer model can be reformulated as a minimisation problem. However, unlike the SSA, the functional to be minimised involves a new penalisation term for the interlayer jumps of the velocity, which represents the vertical shear stresses induced by interlayer sliding. Taking advantage of this reformulation, numerical solvers developed for the SSA can be naturally extended layer-wise or column-wise. Numerical results show that the column-wise extension of a Newton multigrid solver proves to be robust in the sense that its convergence is barely influenced by the number of layers and the type of ice flow. In addition, the multilayer formulation appears to be naturally better conditioned than the one of the first-order approximation to face the anisotropic conditions of the sliding-dominant ice flow of ISMIP-HOM experiments.

  16. Evaluation of a radiative transfer equation and diffusion approximation hybrid forward solver for fluorescence molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Gorpas, Dimitris; Andersson-Engels, Stefan

    2012-12-01

    The solution of the forward problem in fluorescence molecular imaging strongly influences the successful convergence of the fluorophore reconstruction. The most common approach to meeting this problem has been to apply the diffusion approximation. However, this model is a first-order angular approximation of the radiative transfer equation, and thus is subject to some well-known limitations. This manuscript proposes a methodology that confronts these limitations by applying the radiative transfer equation in spatial regions in which the diffusion approximation gives decreased accuracy. The explicit integro differential equations that formulate this model were solved by applying the Galerkin finite element approximation. The required spatial discretization of the investigated domain was implemented through the Delaunay triangulation, while the azimuthal discretization scheme was used for the angular space. This model has been evaluated on two simulation geometries and the results were compared with results from an independent Monte Carlo method and the radiative transfer equation by calculating the absolute values of the relative errors between these models. The results show that the proposed forward solver can approximate the radiative transfer equation and the Monte Carlo method with better than 95% accuracy, while the accuracy of the diffusion approximation is approximately 10% lower.

  17. Sequentially Optimized Meshfree Approximation as a New Computational Fluid Dynamics Solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Matthew

    This thesis presents the Sequentially Optimized Meshfree Approximation (SOMA) method, a new and powerful Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solver. While standard computational methods can be faster and cheaper that physical experimentation, both in cost and work time, these methods do have some time and user interaction overhead which SOMA eliminates. As a meshfree method which could use adaptive domain refinement methods, SOMA avoids the need for user generated and/or analyzed grids, volumes, and meshes. Incremental building of a feed-forward artificial neural network through machine learning to solve the flow problem significantly reduces user interaction and reduces computational cost. This is done by avoiding the creation and inversion of possibly dense block diagonal matrices and by focusing computational work on regions where the flow changes and ignoring regions where no changes occur.

  18. FELIX-1.0: A finite element solver for the time dependent generator coordinate method with the Gaussian overlap approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Regnier, D.; Verriere, M.; Dubray, N.; Schunck, N.

    2015-11-30

    In this study, we describe the software package FELIX that solves the equations of the time-dependent generator coordinate method (TDGCM) in NN-dimensions (N ≥ 1) under the Gaussian overlap approximation. The numerical resolution is based on the Galerkin finite element discretization of the collective space and the Crank–Nicolson scheme for time integration. The TDGCM solver is implemented entirely in C++. Several additional tools written in C++, Python or bash scripting language are also included for convenience. In this paper, the solver is tested with a series of benchmarks calculations. We also demonstrate the ability of our code to handle a realistic calculation of fission dynamics.

  19. A fast accurate approximation method with multigrid solver for two-dimensional fractional sub-diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xue-lei; Lu, Xin; Ng, Micheal K.; Sun, Hai-Wei

    2016-10-01

    A fast accurate approximation method with multigrid solver is proposed to solve a two-dimensional fractional sub-diffusion equation. Using the finite difference discretization of fractional time derivative, a block lower triangular Toeplitz matrix is obtained where each main diagonal block contains a two-dimensional matrix for the Laplacian operator. Our idea is to make use of the block ɛ-circulant approximation via fast Fourier transforms, so that the resulting task is to solve a block diagonal system, where each diagonal block matrix is the sum of a complex scalar times the identity matrix and a Laplacian matrix. We show that the accuracy of the approximation scheme is of O (ɛ). Because of the special diagonal block structure, we employ the multigrid method to solve the resulting linear systems. The convergence of the multigrid method is studied. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the accuracy of the proposed approximation scheme and the efficiency of the proposed solver.

  20. Divergence-free approximate Riemann solver for the quasi-neutral two-fluid plasma model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amano, Takanobu

    2015-10-01

    A numerical method for the quasi-neutral two-fluid (QNTF) plasma model is described. The basic equations are ion and electron fluid equations and the Maxwell equations without displacement current. The neglect of displacement current is consistent with the assumption of charge neutrality. Therefore, Langmuir waves and electromagnetic waves are eliminated from the system, which is in clear contrast to the fully electromagnetic two-fluid model. It thus reduces to the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations in the long wavelength limit, but the two-fluid effect appearing at ion and electron inertial scales is fully taken into account. It is shown that the basic equations may be rewritten in a form that has formally the same structure as the MHD equations. The total mass, momentum, and energy are all written in the conservative form. A new three-dimensional numerical simulation code has been developed for the QNTF equations. The HLL (Harten-Lax-van Leer) approximate Riemann solver combined with the upwind constrained transport (UCT) scheme is applied. The method was originally developed for MHD [25], but works quite well for the present model as well. The simulation code is able to capture sharp multidimensional discontinuities as well as dispersive waves arising from the two-fluid effect at small scales without producing ∇ ṡ B errors. It is well known that conventional Hall-MHD codes often suffer a numerical stability issue associated with short wavelength whistler waves. On the other hand, since finite electron inertia introduces an upper bound to the phase speed of whistler waves in the present model, our code is free from the issue even without explicit dissipation terms or implicit time integration. Numerical experiments have confirmed that there is no need to resolve characteristic time scales such as plasma frequency or cyclotron frequency for numerical stability. Consequently, the QNTF model offers a better alternative to the Hall-MHD or fully

  1. HLLC-type Riemann solver with approximated two-phase contact for the computation of the Baer-Nunziato two-fluid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lochon, H.; Daude, F.; Galon, P.; Hérard, J.-M.

    2016-12-01

    The computation of compressible two-phase flows with the Baer-Nunziato model is addressed. Only the convective part of the model that exhibits non-conservative products is considered and the source terms of the model that represent the exchange between phases are neglected. Based on the solver proposed by Tokareva & Toro [1], a new HLLC-type Riemann solver is built. The key idea of this new solver lies in an approximation of the two-phase contact discontinuity of the model. Thus the Riemann invariants of the wave are approximated in the "subsonic" case. A major consequence of this approximation is that the resulting solver can deal with any Equation Of State. It also allows to bypass the resolution of a non-linear equation based on those Riemann invariants. We assess the solver and compare it with others on 1D Riemann problems including grid convergence and efficiency studies. The ability of the proposed solver to deal with complex Equations Of State is also investigated. Finally, the different solvers have been compared on challenging 2D test-cases due to the presence of both material interfaces and shock waves: a shock-bubble interaction and underwater explosions. When compared with others, the present solver appears to be accurate, efficient and robust.

  2. A grid-independent approximate Riemann solver with applications to the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, Christopher L.; Van Leer, Bram; Roe, Philip L.

    1991-01-01

    A new two-dimensional approximate Riemann solver has been developed that obtains fluxes on grid faces via wave decomposition. By utilizing information propagation in the velocity-difference directions rather than in the grid-normal directions, this flux function more appropriately interprets and hence more sharply resolves shock and shear waves when they lie oblique to the grid. The model uses five waves to describe the difference in states at a grid face. Two acoustic waves, one shear wave, and one entropy wave propagate in the direction defined by the local velocity difference vector, while the fifth wave is a shear wave that propagates at a right angle to the other four. Test cases presented include a shock reflecting off a wall, a pure shear wave, supersonic flow over an airfoil, and viscous separated airfoil flow. Results using the new model give significantly sharper shock and shear contours than a grid-aligned solver. Navier-Stokes computations over an aifoil show reduced pressure distortions in the separated region as a result of the grid-independent upwinding.

  3. Fast solvers for finite difference approximations for the Stokes and Navier-Stokes equations

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, D.

    1992-01-01

    The authors consider several methods for solving the linear equations arising from finite difference discretizations of the Stokes equations. The pressure equation method presented here for the first time, apparently, and the method, presented by Bramble and Pasciak, are shown to have computational effort that grows slowly with the number of grid points. The methods work with second-order accurate discretizations. Computational results are shown for both the Stokes and incompressible Navier-Stokes at low Reynolds number. The inf-sup conditions resulting from three finite difference approximations of the Stokes equations are proven. These conditions are used to prove that the Schur complement Q[sub h] of the linear system generated by each of these approximations is bounded uniformly away from zero. For the pressure equation method, this guarantees that the conjugate gradient method applied to Q[sub h] converges in a finite number of iterations which is independent of mesh size. The fact that Q[sub h] is bounded below is used to prove convergence estimates for the solutions generated by these finite difference approximations. One of the estimates is for a staggered grid and the estimate of the scheme shows that both the pressure and the velocity parts of the solution are second-order accurate. Iterative methods are compared by the use of the regularized central differencing introduced by Strikwerda. Several finite difference approximations of the Stokes equations by the SOR method are compared and the excellence of the approximations by the regularized central differencing over the other finite difference approximation is mentioned. This difference gives rise to a linear equation with a matrix which is slightly non-symmetric. The convergence of the typical steepest descent method and conjugate gradient method, which is almost as same as the typical conjugate gradient method, applied to slightly non-symmetric positive definite matrices are proven.

  4. Connections in sub-Riemannian geometry of parallelizable distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssef, Nabil L.; Taha, Ebtsam H.

    The notion of a parallelizable distribution has been introduced and investigated. A non-integrable parallelizable distribution carries a natural sub-Riemannian structure. The geometry of this structure has been studied from the bi-viewpoint of absolute parallelism geometry and sub-Riemannian geometry. Two remarkable linear connections have been constructed on a sub-Riemannian parallelizable distribution, namely, the Weitzenböck connection and the sub-Riemannian connection. The obtained results have been applied to two concrete examples: the spheres S3 and S7.

  5. Implementation of the Vanka-type multigrid solver for the finite element approximation of the Navier-Stokes equations on GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Petr; Klement, Vladimír; Oberhuber, Tomáš; Žabka, Vítězslav

    2016-03-01

    We present a complete GPU implementation of a geometric multigrid solver for the numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible flow. The approximate solution is constructed on a two-dimensional unstructured triangular mesh. The problem is discretized by means of the mixed finite element method with semi-implicit timestepping. The linear saddle-point problem arising from the scheme is solved by the geometric multigrid method with a Vanka-type smoother. The parallel solver is based on the red-black coloring of the mesh triangles. We achieved a speed-up of 11 compared to a parallel (4 threads) code based on OpenMP and 19 compared to a sequential code.

  6. Albany/FELIX: a parallel, scalable and robust, finite element, first-order Stokes approximation ice sheet solver built for advanced analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tezaur, I. K.; Perego, M.; Salinger, A. G.; Tuminaro, R. S.; Price, S. F.

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes a new parallel, scalable and robust finite element based solver for the first-order Stokes momentum balance equations for ice flow. The solver, known as Albany/FELIX, is constructed using the component-based approach to building application codes, in which mature, modular libraries developed as a part of the Trilinos project are combined using abstract interfaces and template-based generic programming, resulting in a final code with access to dozens of algorithmic and advanced analysis capabilities. Following an overview of the relevant partial differential equations and boundary conditions, the numerical methods chosen to discretize the ice flow equations are described, along with their implementation. The results of several verification studies of the model accuracy are presented using (1) new test cases for simplified two-dimensional (2-D) versions of the governing equations derived using the method of manufactured solutions, and (2) canonical ice sheet modeling benchmarks. Model accuracy and convergence with respect to mesh resolution are then studied on problems involving a realistic Greenland ice sheet geometry discretized using hexahedral and tetrahedral meshes. Also explored as a part of this study is the effect of vertical mesh resolution on the solution accuracy and solver performance. The robustness and scalability of our solver on these problems is demonstrated. Lastly, we show that good scalability can be achieved by preconditioning the iterative linear solver using a new algebraic multilevel preconditioner, constructed based on the idea of semi-coarsening.

  7. Albany/FELIX: A parallel, scalable and robust, finite element, first-order Stokes approximation ice sheet solver built for advanced analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tezaur, I. K.; Perego, M.; Salinger, A. G.; Tuminaro, R. S.; Price, S. F.

    2015-04-27

    This paper describes a new parallel, scalable and robust finite element based solver for the first-order Stokes momentum balance equations for ice flow. The solver, known as Albany/FELIX, is constructed using the component-based approach to building application codes, in which mature, modular libraries developed as a part of the Trilinos project are combined using abstract interfaces and template-based generic programming, resulting in a final code with access to dozens of algorithmic and advanced analysis capabilities. Following an overview of the relevant partial differential equations and boundary conditions, the numerical methods chosen to discretize the ice flow equations are described, along with their implementation. The results of several verification studies of the model accuracy are presented using (1) new test cases for simplified two-dimensional (2-D) versions of the governing equations derived using the method of manufactured solutions, and (2) canonical ice sheet modeling benchmarks. Model accuracy and convergence with respect to mesh resolution are then studied on problems involving a realistic Greenland ice sheet geometry discretized using hexahedral and tetrahedral meshes. Also explored as a part of this study is the effect of vertical mesh resolution on the solution accuracy and solver performance. The robustness and scalability of our solver on these problems is demonstrated. Lastly, we show that good scalability can be achieved by preconditioning the iterative linear solver using a new algebraic multilevel preconditioner, constructed based on the idea of semi-coarsening.

  8. Albany/FELIX: A parallel, scalable and robust, finite element, first-order Stokes approximation ice sheet solver built for advanced analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Tezaur, I. K.; Perego, M.; Salinger, A. G.; ...

    2015-04-27

    This paper describes a new parallel, scalable and robust finite element based solver for the first-order Stokes momentum balance equations for ice flow. The solver, known as Albany/FELIX, is constructed using the component-based approach to building application codes, in which mature, modular libraries developed as a part of the Trilinos project are combined using abstract interfaces and template-based generic programming, resulting in a final code with access to dozens of algorithmic and advanced analysis capabilities. Following an overview of the relevant partial differential equations and boundary conditions, the numerical methods chosen to discretize the ice flow equations are described, alongmore » with their implementation. The results of several verification studies of the model accuracy are presented using (1) new test cases for simplified two-dimensional (2-D) versions of the governing equations derived using the method of manufactured solutions, and (2) canonical ice sheet modeling benchmarks. Model accuracy and convergence with respect to mesh resolution are then studied on problems involving a realistic Greenland ice sheet geometry discretized using hexahedral and tetrahedral meshes. Also explored as a part of this study is the effect of vertical mesh resolution on the solution accuracy and solver performance. The robustness and scalability of our solver on these problems is demonstrated. Lastly, we show that good scalability can be achieved by preconditioning the iterative linear solver using a new algebraic multilevel preconditioner, constructed based on the idea of semi-coarsening.« less

  9. New parallelizable schemes for integrating the Dissipative Particle Dynamics with Energy conservation.

    PubMed

    Homman, Ahmed-Amine; Maillet, Jean-Bernard; Roussel, Julien; Stoltz, Gabriel

    2016-01-14

    This work presents new parallelizable numerical schemes for the integration of dissipative particle dynamics with energy conservation. So far, no numerical scheme introduced in the literature is able to correctly preserve the energy over long times and give rise to small errors on average properties for moderately small time steps, while being straightforwardly parallelizable. We present in this article two new methods, both straightforwardly parallelizable, allowing to correctly preserve the total energy of the system. We illustrate the accuracy and performance of these new schemes both on equilibrium and nonequilibrium parallel simulations.

  10. Robust and Efficient Riemann Solvers for MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, T.; Kusano, K.

    2008-04-01

    Robust and efficient approximate Riemann solvers for magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are constructed. Particularly, a family of positively conservative Harten-Lax-van Leer (HLL)-type Riemann solvers, the so-called HLLD (`D' denotes Discontinuities), HLLR (`R' denotes Rotational), HLLC (`C' denotes Contact), and HLL solvers, is systematically considered.

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF QUASI-3D NUMERICAL MODEL FOR FLOOD FLOWS USING APPROXIMATE RIEMAN SOLVER AND ITS APPLICATION TO FLOWS IN A CONFLUENCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Shige-Eda, Mirei; Akiyama, Juichiro; Ikeda, Hiroshi

    A quasi-three dimensional numerical model for flood flows was developed. The governing equation with the effect of secondary flow on the momentum equation was used in the model. The velocity profile of secondary flows proposed by Engelund(1974) was used. The model is based on finite volume method using HLL (Harten, Lax and van Leer(1983)) numerical flux, which is one of a Riemann solver. The model is verified against two experimental data of flows in curved channel and in river confluence. It shows that the model can reproduce the complex behavior of the flows with reasonable accuracy.

  12. Hierarchically Parallelized Constrained Nonlinear Solvers with Automated Substructuring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padovan, Joe; Kwang, Abel

    1994-01-01

    This paper develops a parallelizable multilevel multiple constrained nonlinear equation solver. The substructuring process is automated to yield appropriately balanced partitioning of each succeeding level. Due to the generality of the procedure,_sequential, as well as partially and fully parallel environments can be handled. This includes both single and multiprocessor assignment per individual partition. Several benchmark examples are presented. These illustrate the robustness of the procedure as well as its capability to yield significant reductions in memory utilization and calculational effort due both to updating and inversion.

  13. Real-space method for highly parallelizable electronic transport calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Baruch; Seideman, Tamar; Hod, Oded; Kronik, Leeor

    2014-07-01

    We present a real-space method for first-principles nanoscale electronic transport calculations. We use the nonequilibrium Green's function method with density functional theory and implement absorbing boundary conditions (ABCs, also known as complex absorbing potentials, or CAPs) to represent the effects of the semi-infinite leads. In real space, the Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian matrix is highly sparse. As a result, the transport problem parallelizes naturally and can scale favorably with system size, enabling the computation of conductance in relatively large molecular junction models. Our use of ABCs circumvents the demanding task of explicitly calculating the leads' self-energies from surface Green's functions, and is expected to be more accurate than the use of the jellium approximation. In addition, we take advantage of the sparsity in real space to solve efficiently for the Green's function over the entire energy range relevant to low-bias transport. We illustrate the advantages of our method with calculations on several challenging test systems and find good agreement with reference calculation results.

  14. A Comparison of Two Intermediate State HLLC Solvers for Ideal Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurski, K. F.

    2008-04-01

    This paper compares a solver based on the HLLC (Harten-Lax-van Leer-contact wave) approximate nonlinear Riemann solver for gas dynamics for ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) with the HLL, Roe, Linde, and Li solvers. Simulation results are given for three one-dimensional test cases not previously shown in the original paper presenting the smooth HLLC solver for MHD.

  15. Magnetic Field Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilin, Andrew V.

    2006-01-01

    The Magnetic Field Solver computer program calculates the magnetic field generated by a group of collinear, cylindrical axisymmetric electromagnet coils. Given the current flowing in, and the number of turns, axial position, and axial and radial dimensions of each coil, the program calculates matrix coefficients for a finite-difference system of equations that approximates a two-dimensional partial differential equation for the magnetic potential contributed by the coil. The program iteratively solves these finite-difference equations by use of the modified incomplete Cholesky preconditioned-conjugate-gradient method. The total magnetic potential as a function of axial (z) and radial (r) position is then calculated as a sum of the magnetic potentials of the individual coils, using a high-accuracy interpolation scheme. Then the r and z components of the magnetic field as functions of r and z are calculated from the total magnetic potential by use of a high-accuracy finite-difference scheme. Notably, for the finite-difference calculations, the program generates nonuniform two-dimensional computational meshes from nonuniform one-dimensional meshes. Each mesh is generated in such a way as to minimize the numerical error for a benchmark one-dimensional magnetostatic problem.

  16. Solving block linear systems with low-rank off-diagonal blocks is easily parallelizable

    SciTech Connect

    Menkov, V.

    1996-12-31

    An easily and efficiently parallelizable direct method is given for solving a block linear system Bx = y, where B = D + Q is the sum of a non-singular block diagonal matrix D and a matrix Q with low-rank blocks. This implicitly defines a new preconditioning method with an operation count close to the cost of calculating a matrix-vector product Qw for some w, plus at most twice the cost of calculating Qw for some w. When implemented on a parallel machine the processor utilization can be as good as that of those operations. Order estimates are given for the general case, and an implementation is compared to block SSOR preconditioning.

  17. A Fast Poisson Solver with Periodic Boundary Conditions for GPU Clusters in Various Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rattermann, Dale Nicholas

    Fast Poisson solvers using the Fast Fourier Transform on uniform grids are especially suited for parallel implementation, making them appropriate for portability on graphical processing unit (GPU) devices. The goal of the following work was to implement, test, and evaluate a fast Poisson solver for periodic boundary conditions for use on a variety of GPU configurations. The solver used in this research was FLASH, an immersed-boundary-based method, which is well suited for complex, time-dependent geometries, has robust adaptive mesh refinement/de-refinement capabilities to capture evolving flow structures, and has been successfully implemented on conventional, parallel supercomputers. However, these solvers are still computationally costly to employ, and the total solver time is dominated by the solution of the pressure Poisson equation using state-of-the-art multigrid methods. FLASH improves the performance of its multigrid solvers by integrating a parallel FFT solver on a uniform grid during a coarse level. This hybrid solver could then be theoretically improved by replacing the highly-parallelizable FFT solver with one that utilizes GPUs, and, thus, was the motivation for my research. In the present work, the CPU-utilizing parallel FFT solver (PFFT) used in the base version of FLASH for solving the Poisson equation on uniform grids has been modified to enable parallel execution on CUDA-enabled GPU devices. New algorithms have been implemented to replace the Poisson solver that decompose the computational domain and send each new block to a GPU for parallel computation. One-dimensional (1-D) decomposition of the computational domain minimizes the amount of network traffic involved in this bandwidth-intensive computation by limiting the amount of all-to-all communication required between processes. Advanced techniques have been incorporated and implemented in a GPU-centric code design, while allowing end users the flexibility of parameter control at runtime in

  18. Parallel Multigrid Equation Solver

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Mark

    2001-09-07

    Prometheus is a fully parallel multigrid equation solver for matrices that arise in unstructured grid finite element applications. It includes a geometric and an algebraic multigrid method and has solved problems of up to 76 mullion degrees of feedom, problems in linear elasticity on the ASCI blue pacific and ASCI red machines.

  19. A non-conforming 3D spherical harmonic transport solver

    SciTech Connect

    Van Criekingen, S.

    2006-07-01

    A new 3D transport solver for the time-independent Boltzmann transport equation has been developed. This solver is based on the second-order even-parity form of the transport equation. The angular discretization is performed through the expansion of the angular neutron flux in spherical harmonics (PN method). The novelty of this solver is the use of non-conforming finite elements for the spatial discretization. Such elements lead to a discontinuous flux approximation. This interface continuity requirement relaxation property is shared with mixed-dual formulations such as the ones based on Raviart-Thomas finite elements. Encouraging numerical results are presented. (authors)

  20. Scalable solvers and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ribbens, C J

    2000-10-27

    The purpose of this report is to summarize research activities carried out under Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) research subcontract B501073. This contract supported the principal investigator (P1), Dr. Calvin Ribbens, during his sabbatical visit to LLNL from August 1999 through June 2000. Results and conclusions from the work are summarized below in two major sections. The first section covers contributions to the Scalable Linear Solvers and hypre projects in the Center for Applied Scientific Computing (CASC). The second section describes results from collaboration with Patrice Turchi of LLNL's Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate (CMS). A list of publications supported by this subcontract appears at the end of the report.

  1. Implicit Riemann solvers for the Pn equations.

    SciTech Connect

    Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; McClarren, Ryan; Brunner, Thomas A.; Holloway, James Paul

    2005-03-01

    The spherical harmonics (P{sub n}) approximation to the transport equation for time dependent problems has previously been treated using Riemann solvers and explicit time integration. Here we present an implicit time integration method for the P n equations using Riemann solvers. Both first-order and high-resolution spatial discretization schemes are detailed. One facet of the high-resolution scheme is that a system of nonlinear equations must be solved at each time step. This nonlinearity is the result of slope reconstruction techniques necessary to avoid the introduction of artifical extrema in the numerical solution. Results are presented that show auspicious agreement with analytical solutions using time steps well beyond the CFL limit.

  2. A multigrid solver for the semiconductor equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachmann, Bernhard

    1993-01-01

    We present a multigrid solver for the exponential fitting method. The solver is applied to the current continuity equations of semiconductor device simulation in two dimensions. The exponential fitting method is based on a mixed finite element discretization using the lowest-order Raviart-Thomas triangular element. This discretization method yields a good approximation of front layers and guarantees current conservation. The corresponding stiffness matrix is an M-matrix. 'Standard' multigrid solvers, however, cannot be applied to the resulting system, as this is dominated by an unsymmetric part, which is due to the presence of strong convection in part of the domain. To overcome this difficulty, we explore the connection between Raviart-Thomas mixed methods and the nonconforming Crouzeix-Raviart finite element discretization. In this way we can construct nonstandard prolongation and restriction operators using easily computable weighted L(exp 2)-projections based on suitable quadrature rules and the upwind effects of the discretization. The resulting multigrid algorithm shows very good results, even for real-world problems and for locally refined grids.

  3. TH-A-9A-02: BEST IN PHYSICS (THERAPY) - 4D IMRT Planning Using Highly- Parallelizable Particle Swarm Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Modiri, A; Gu, X; Sawant, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We present a particle swarm optimization (PSO)-based 4D IMRT planning technique designed for dynamic MLC tracking delivery to lung tumors. The key idea is to utilize the temporal dimension as an additional degree of freedom rather than a constraint in order to achieve improved sparing of organs at risk (OARs). Methods: The target and normal structures were manually contoured on each of the ten phases of a 4DCT scan acquired from a lung SBRT patient who exhibited 1.5cm tumor motion despite the use of abdominal compression. Corresponding ten IMRT plans were generated using the Eclipse treatment planning system. These plans served as initial guess solutions for the PSO algorithm. Fluence weights were optimized over the entire solution space i.e., 10 phases × 12 beams × 166 control points. The size of the solution space motivated our choice of PSO, which is a highly parallelizable stochastic global optimization technique that is well-suited for such large problems. A summed fluence map was created using an in-house B-spline deformable image registration. Each plan was compared with a corresponding, internal target volume (ITV)-based IMRT plan. Results: The PSO 4D IMRT plan yielded comparable PTV coverage and significantly higher dose—sparing for parallel and serial OARs compared to the ITV-based plan. The dose-sparing achieved via PSO-4DIMRT was: lung Dmean = 28%; lung V20 = 90%; spinal cord Dmax = 23%; esophagus Dmax = 31%; heart Dmax = 51%; heart Dmean = 64%. Conclusion: Truly 4D IMRT that uses the temporal dimension as an additional degree of freedom can achieve significant dose sparing of serial and parallel OARs. Given the large solution space, PSO represents an attractive, parallelizable tool to achieve globally optimal solutions for such problems. This work was supported through funding from the National Institutes of Health and Varian Medical Systems. Amit Sawant has research funding from Varian Medical Systems, VisionRT Ltd. and Elekta.

  4. Sherlock Holmes, Master Problem Solver.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballew, Hunter

    1994-01-01

    Shows the connections between Sherlock Holmes's investigative methods and mathematical problem solving, including observations, characteristics of the problem solver, importance of data, questioning the obvious, learning from experience, learning from errors, and indirect proof. (MKR)

  5. Fast wavelet based sparse approximate inverse preconditioner

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, W.L.

    1996-12-31

    Incomplete LU factorization is a robust preconditioner for both general and PDE problems but unfortunately not easy to parallelize. Recent study of Huckle and Grote and Chow and Saad showed that sparse approximate inverse could be a potential alternative while readily parallelizable. However, for special class of matrix A that comes from elliptic PDE problems, their preconditioners are not optimal in the sense that independent of mesh size. A reason may be that no good sparse approximate inverse exists for the dense inverse matrix. Our observation is that for this kind of matrices, its inverse entries typically have piecewise smooth changes. We can take advantage of this fact and use wavelet compression techniques to construct a better sparse approximate inverse preconditioner. We shall show numerically that our approach is effective for this kind of matrices.

  6. An approximate Riemann solver for thermal and chemical nonequilibrium flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhu, Ramadas K.

    1994-01-01

    Among the many methods available for the determination of inviscid fluxes across a surface of discontinuity, the flux-difference-splitting technique that employs Roe-averaged variables has been used extensively by the CFD community because of its simplicity and its ability to capture shocks exactly. This method, originally developed for perfect gas flows, has since been extended to equilibrium as well as nonequilibrium flows. Determination of the Roe-averaged variables for the case of a perfect gas flow is a simple task; however, for thermal and chemical nonequilibrium flows, some of the variables are not uniquely defined. Methods available in the literature to determine these variables seem to lack sound bases. The present paper describes a simple, yet accurate, method to determine all the variables for nonequilibrium flows in the Roe-average state. The basis for this method is the requirement that the Roe-averaged variables form a consistent set of thermodynamic variables. The present method satisfies the requirement that the square of the speed of sound be positive.

  7. Scalable Parallel Algebraic Multigrid Solvers

    SciTech Connect

    Bank, R; Lu, S; Tong, C; Vassilevski, P

    2005-03-23

    The authors propose a parallel algebraic multilevel algorithm (AMG), which has the novel feature that the subproblem residing in each processor is defined over the entire partition domain, although the vast majority of unknowns for each subproblem are associated with the partition owned by the corresponding processor. This feature ensures that a global coarse description of the problem is contained within each of the subproblems. The advantages of this approach are that interprocessor communication is minimized in the solution process while an optimal order of convergence rate is preserved; and the speed of local subproblem solvers can be maximized using the best existing sequential algebraic solvers.

  8. Full Multigrid Flow Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, Raymond E.; Thomas, James L.; Biedron, Robert T.; Diskin, Boris

    2005-01-01

    FMG3D (full multigrid 3 dimensions) is a pilot computer program that solves equations of fluid flow using a finite difference representation on a structured grid. Infrastructure exists for three dimensions but the current implementation treats only two dimensions. Written in Fortran 90, FMG3D takes advantage of the recursive subroutine feature, dynamic memory allocation, and structured-programming constructs of that language. FMG3D supports multi-block grids with three types of block-to-block interfaces: periodic, C-zero, and C-infinity. For all three types, grid points must match at interfaces. For periodic and C-infinity types, derivatives of grid metrics must be continuous at interfaces. The available equation sets are as follows: scalar elliptic equations, scalar convection equations, and the pressure-Poisson formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations for an incompressible fluid. All the equation sets are implemented with nonzero forcing functions to enable the use of user-specified solutions to assist in verification and validation. The equations are solved with a full multigrid scheme using a full approximation scheme to converge the solution on each succeeding grid level. Restriction to the next coarser mesh uses direct injection for variables and full weighting for residual quantities; prolongation of the coarse grid correction from the coarse mesh to the fine mesh uses bilinear interpolation; and prolongation of the coarse grid solution uses bicubic interpolation.

  9. SU-E-T-22: A Deterministic Solver of the Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck Equation for Dose Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, X; Gao, H; Paganetti, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck equation (BFPE) accurately models the migration of photons/charged particles in tissues. While the Monte Carlo (MC) method is popular for solving BFPE in a statistical manner, we aim to develop a deterministic BFPE solver based on various state-of-art numerical acceleration techniques for rapid and accurate dose calculation. Methods: Our BFPE solver is based on the structured grid that is maximally parallelizable, with the discretization in energy, angle and space, and its cross section coefficients are derived or directly imported from the Geant4 database. The physical processes that are taken into account are Compton scattering, photoelectric effect, pair production for photons, and elastic scattering, ionization and bremsstrahlung for charged particles.While the spatial discretization is based on the diamond scheme, the angular discretization synergizes finite element method (FEM) and spherical harmonics (SH). Thus, SH is used to globally expand the scattering kernel and FFM is used to locally discretize the angular sphere. As a Result, this hybrid method (FEM-SH) is both accurate in dealing with forward-peaking scattering via FEM, and efficient for multi-energy-group computation via SH. In addition, FEM-SH enables the analytical integration in energy variable of delta scattering kernel for elastic scattering with reduced truncation error from the numerical integration based on the classic SH-based multi-energy-group method. Results: The accuracy of the proposed BFPE solver was benchmarked against Geant4 for photon dose calculation. In particular, FEM-SH had improved accuracy compared to FEM, while both were within 2% of the results obtained with Geant4. Conclusion: A deterministic solver of the Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck equation is developed for dose calculation, and benchmarked against Geant4. Xiang Hong and Hao Gao were partially supported by the NSFC (#11405105), the 973 Program (#2015CB856000) and the Shanghai Pujiang

  10. Linear iterative solvers for implicit ODE methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saylor, Paul E.; Skeel, Robert D.

    1990-01-01

    The numerical solution of stiff initial value problems, which lead to the problem of solving large systems of mildly nonlinear equations are considered. For many problems derived from engineering and science, a solution is possible only with methods derived from iterative linear equation solvers. A common approach to solving the nonlinear equations is to employ an approximate solution obtained from an explicit method. The error is examined to determine how it is distributed among the stiff and non-stiff components, which bears on the choice of an iterative method. The conclusion is that error is (roughly) uniformly distributed, a fact that suggests the Chebyshev method (and the accompanying Manteuffel adaptive parameter algorithm). This method is described, also commenting on Richardson's method and its advantages for large problems. Richardson's method and the Chebyshev method with the Mantueffel algorithm are applied to the solution of the nonlinear equations by Newton's method.

  11. Parallelized solvers for heat conduction formulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padovan, Joe; Kwang, Abel

    1991-01-01

    Based on multilevel partitioning, this paper develops a structural parallelizable solution methodology that enables a significant reduction in computational effort and memory requirements for very large scale linear and nonlinear steady and transient thermal (heat conduction) models. Due to the generality of the formulation of the scheme, both finite element and finite difference simulations can be treated. Diverse model topologies can thus be handled, including both simply and multiply connected (branched/perforated) geometries. To verify the methodology, analytical and numerical benchmark trends are verified in both sequential and parallel computer environments.

  12. Benchmarking ICRF Full-wave Solvers for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    R. V. Budny, L. Berry, R. Bilato, P. Bonoli, M. Brambilla, R. J. Dumont, A. Fukuyama, R. Harvey, E. F. Jaeger, K. Indireshkumar, E. Lerche, D. McCune, C. K. Phillips, V. Vdovin, J. Wright, and members of the ITPA-IOS

    2011-01-06

    Abstract Benchmarking of full-wave solvers for ICRF simulations is performed using plasma profiles and equilibria obtained from integrated self-consistent modeling predictions of four ITER plasmas. One is for a high performance baseline (5.3 T, 15 MA) DT H-mode. The others are for half-field, half-current plasmas of interest for the pre-activation phase with bulk plasma ion species being either hydrogen or He4. The predicted profiles are used by six full-wave solver groups to simulate the ICRF electromagnetic fields and heating, and by three of these groups to simulate the current-drive. Approximate agreement is achieved for the predicted heating power for the DT and He4 cases. Factor of two disagreements are found for the cases with second harmonic He3 heating in bulk H cases. Approximate agreement is achieved simulating the ICRF current drive.

  13. Assessment of Linear Finite-Difference Poisson-Boltzmann Solvers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Luo, Ray

    2009-01-01

    CPU time and memory usage are two vital issues that any numerical solvers for the Poisson-Boltzmann equation have to face in biomolecular applications. In this study we systematically analyzed the CPU time and memory usage of five commonly used finite-difference solvers with a large and diversified set of biomolecular structures. Our comparative analysis shows that modified incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient and geometric multigrid are the most efficient in the diversified test set. For the two efficient solvers, our test shows that their CPU times increase approximately linearly with the numbers of grids. Their CPU times also increase almost linearly with the negative logarithm of the convergence criterion at very similar rate. Our comparison further shows that geometric multigrid performs better in the large set of tested biomolecules. However, modified incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient is superior to geometric multigrid in molecular dynamics simulations of tested molecules. We also investigated other significant components in numerical solutions of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. It turns out that the time-limiting step is the free boundary condition setup for the linear systems for the selected proteins if the electrostatic focusing is not used. Thus, development of future numerical solvers for the Poisson-Boltzmann equation should balance all aspects of the numerical procedures in realistic biomolecular applications. PMID:20063271

  14. A Riemann solver for single-phase and two-phase shallow flow models based on relaxation. Relations with Roe and VFRoe solvers

    SciTech Connect

    Pelanti, Marica; Bouchut, Francois; Mangeney, Anne

    2011-02-01

    We present a Riemann solver derived by a relaxation technique for classical single-phase shallow flow equations and for a two-phase shallow flow model describing a mixture of solid granular material and fluid. Our primary interest is the numerical approximation of this two-phase solid/fluid model, whose complexity poses numerical difficulties that cannot be efficiently addressed by existing solvers. In particular, we are concerned with ensuring a robust treatment of dry bed states. The relaxation system used by the proposed solver is formulated by introducing auxiliary variables that replace the momenta in the spatial gradients of the original model systems. The resulting relaxation solver is related to Roe solver in that its Riemann solution for the flow height and relaxation variables is formally computed as Roe's Riemann solution. The relaxation solver has the advantage of a certain degree of freedom in the specification of the wave structure through the choice of the relaxation parameters. This flexibility can be exploited to handle robustly vacuum states, which is a well known difficulty of standard Roe's method, while maintaining Roe's low diffusivity. For the single-phase model positivity of flow height is rigorously preserved. For the two-phase model positivity of volume fractions in general is not ensured, and a suitable restriction on the CFL number might be needed. Nonetheless, numerical experiments suggest that the proposed two-phase flow solver efficiently models wet/dry fronts and vacuum formation for a large range of flow conditions. As a corollary of our study, we show that for single-phase shallow flow equations the relaxation solver is formally equivalent to the VFRoe solver with conservative variables of Gallouet and Masella [T. Gallouet, J.-M. Masella, Un schema de Godunov approche C.R. Acad. Sci. Paris, Serie I, 323 (1996) 77-84]. The relaxation interpretation allows establishing positivity conditions for this VFRoe method.

  15. Finite Element Interface to Linear Solvers

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Alan

    2005-03-18

    Sparse systems of linear equations arise in many engineering applications, including finite elements, finite volumes, and others. The solution of linear systems is often the most computationally intensive portion of the application. Depending on the complexity of problems addressed by the application, there may be no single solver capable of solving all of the linear systems that arise. This motivates the desire to switch an application from one solver librwy to another, depending on the problem being solved. The interfaces provided by solver libraries differ greatly, making it difficult to switch an application code from one library to another. The amount of library-specific code in an application Can be greatly reduced by having an abstraction layer between solver libraries and the application, putting a common "face" on various solver libraries. One such abstraction layer is the Finite Element Interface to Linear Solvers (EEl), which has seen significant use by finite element applications at Sandia National Laboratories and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  16. Parallel Performance of Linear Solvers and Preconditioners

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    MUMPS libraries to identify the combination with the shortest wall clock time for large-scale linear systems. The linear system of equations in this...during initialization. Our results show that for system sizes of less than three million degrees of freedom (DOF), the MUMPS direct solver is 20...solver with various iterative solver – preconditioner combinations. Both solve time and setup time for MUMPS are included. Ideal refers to the solve

  17. Analysis Tools for CFD Multigrid Solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, Raymond E.; Thomas, James L.; Diskin, Boris

    2004-01-01

    Analysis tools are needed to guide the development and evaluate the performance of multigrid solvers for the fluid flow equations. Classical analysis tools, such as local mode analysis, often fail to accurately predict performance. Two-grid analysis tools, herein referred to as Idealized Coarse Grid and Idealized Relaxation iterations, have been developed and evaluated within a pilot multigrid solver. These new tools are applicable to general systems of equations and/or discretizations and point to problem areas within an existing multigrid solver. Idealized Relaxation and Idealized Coarse Grid are applied in developing textbook-efficient multigrid solvers for incompressible stagnation flow problems.

  18. A Wavelet Technique For Multi-grid Solver For Large Linear Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, W.

    In general, large systems of linear equations cannot be solved directly. An iterative solver has to be applied instead. Unfortunately, iterative solvers have a notouriously slow convergence rate, which in the worst case can prevent convergence at all, due to the inavoidable rounding errors. Multi-grid iteration schemes are meant to guarantee a sufficiently high convergence rate, independent from the dimension of the linear system. The idea behind the multi-grid solvers is that the traditional iterative solvers eliminate only the short-wavelength error constituents in the initial guess for the solution. For the elimination of the remaining long-wavelength error constituents a much coarser grid is sufficient. On the coarse grid the dimension of the problem is much smaller so that the elimination can be done by a direct solver. The paper shows that wavelet techniques successfully can be applied for following steps of a multi-grid procedure: · Generation of an approximation of the proplem on a coarse grid from a given approximation on the fine grid. · Restriction of a signal on a fine grid to its approximation on a co grid. · Uplift of a signal from the coarse to the fine grid. The paper starts with a theoretical explanation of the links between wavelets and multi-grid solvers. Based on this investigation the class o operators, which are suitable for a multi-grid solution strategy can be characterized. The numerical efficiency of the approach will be tested for the Planar Stokes problem.

  19. The impact of improved sparse linear solvers on industrial engineering applications

    SciTech Connect

    Heroux, M.; Baddourah, M.; Poole, E.L.; Yang, Chao Wu

    1996-12-31

    There are usually many factors that ultimately determine the quality of computer simulation for engineering applications. Some of the most important are the quality of the analytical model and approximation scheme, the accuracy of the input data and the capability of the computing resources. However, in many engineering applications the characteristics of the sparse linear solver are the key factors in determining how complex a problem a given application code can solve. Therefore, the advent of a dramatically improved solver often brings with it dramatic improvements in our ability to do accurate and cost effective computer simulations. In this presentation we discuss the current status of sparse iterative and direct solvers in several key industrial CFD and structures codes, and show the impact that recent advances in linear solvers have made on both our ability to perform challenging simulations and the cost of those simulations. We also present some of the current challenges we have and the constraints we face in trying to improve these solvers. Finally, we discuss future requirements for sparse linear solvers on high performance architectures and try to indicate the opportunities that exist if we can develop even more improvements in linear solver capabilities.

  20. NITSOL: A Newton iterative solver for nonlinear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pernice, M.; Walker, H.F.

    1996-12-31

    Newton iterative methods, also known as truncated Newton methods, are implementations of Newton`s method in which the linear systems that characterize Newton steps are solved approximately using iterative linear algebra methods. Here, we outline a well-developed Newton iterative algorithm together with a Fortran implementation called NITSOL. The basic algorithm is an inexact Newton method globalized by backtracking, in which each initial trial step is determined by applying an iterative linear solver until an inexact Newton criterion is satisfied. In the implementation, the user can specify inexact Newton criteria in several ways and select an iterative linear solver from among several popular {open_quotes}transpose-free{close_quotes} Krylov subspace methods. Jacobian-vector products used by the Krylov solver can be either evaluated analytically with a user-supplied routine or approximated using finite differences of function values. A flexible interface permits a wide variety of preconditioning strategies and allows the user to define a preconditioner and optionally update it periodically. We give details of these and other features and demonstrate the performance of the implementation on a representative set of test problems.

  1. MACSYMA's symbolic ordinary differential equation solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    The MACSYMA's symbolic ordinary differential equation solver ODE2 is described. The code for this routine is delineated, which is of interest because it is written in top-level MACSYMA language, and may serve as a good example of programming in that language. Other symbolic ordinary differential equation solvers are mentioned.

  2. A spectral Poisson solver for kinetic plasma simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeremley, Daniel; Obberath, Jens; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2011-10-01

    Plasma resonance spectroscopy is a well established plasma diagnostic method, realized in several designs. One of these designs is the multipole resonance probe (MRP). In its idealized - geometrically simplified - version it consists of two dielectrically shielded, hemispherical electrodes to which an RF signal is applied. A numerical tool is under development which is capable of simulating the dynamics of the plasma surrounding the MRP in electrostatic approximation. In this contribution we concentrate on the specialized Poisson solver for that tool. The plasma is represented by an ensemble of point charges. By expanding both the charge density and the potential into spherical harmonics, a largely analytical solution of the Poisson problem can be employed. For a practical implementation, the expansion must be appropriately truncated. With this spectral solver we are able to efficiently solve the Poisson equation in a kinetic plasma simulation without the need of introducing a spatial discretization.

  3. Elliptic Solvers with Adaptive Mesh Refinement on Complex Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Phillip, B.

    2000-07-24

    Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) is a numerical technique for locally tailoring the resolution computational grids. Multilevel algorithms for solving elliptic problems on adaptive grids include the Fast Adaptive Composite grid method (FAC) and its parallel variants (AFAC and AFACx). Theory that confirms the independence of the convergence rates of FAC and AFAC on the number of refinement levels exists under certain ellipticity and approximation property conditions. Similar theory needs to be developed for AFACx. The effectiveness of multigrid-based elliptic solvers such as FAC, AFAC, and AFACx on adaptively refined overlapping grids is not clearly understood. Finally, a non-trivial eye model problem will be solved by combining the power of using overlapping grids for complex moving geometries, AMR, and multilevel elliptic solvers.

  4. Tangent Adjoint Methods In a Higher-Order Space-Time Discontinuous-Galerkin Solver For Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diosady, Laslo; Murman, Scott; Blonigan, Patrick; Garai, Anirban

    2017-01-01

    Presented space-time adjoint solver for turbulent compressible flows. Confirmed failure of traditional sensitivity methods for chaotic flows. Assessed rate of exponential growth of adjoint for practical 3D turbulent simulation. Demonstrated failure of short-window sensitivity approximations.

  5. A robust multilevel simultaneous eigenvalue solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costiner, Sorin; Taasan, Shlomo

    1993-01-01

    Multilevel (ML) algorithms for eigenvalue problems are often faced with several types of difficulties such as: the mixing of approximated eigenvectors by the solution process, the approximation of incomplete clusters of eigenvectors, the poor representation of solution on coarse levels, and the existence of close or equal eigenvalues. Algorithms that do not treat appropriately these difficulties usually fail, or their performance degrades when facing them. These issues motivated the development of a robust adaptive ML algorithm which treats these difficulties, for the calculation of a few eigenvectors and their corresponding eigenvalues. The main techniques used in the new algorithm include: the adaptive completion and separation of the relevant clusters on different levels, the simultaneous treatment of solutions within each cluster, and the robustness tests which monitor the algorithm's efficiency and convergence. The eigenvectors' separation efficiency is based on a new ML projection technique generalizing the Rayleigh Ritz projection, combined with a technique, the backrotations. These separation techniques, when combined with an FMG formulation, in many cases lead to algorithms of O(qN) complexity, for q eigenvectors of size N on the finest level. Previously developed ML algorithms are less focused on the mentioned difficulties. Moreover, algorithms which employ fine level separation techniques are of O(q(sub 2)N) complexity and usually do not overcome all these difficulties. Computational examples are presented where Schrodinger type eigenvalue problems in 2-D and 3-D, having equal and closely clustered eigenvalues, are solved with the efficiency of the Poisson multigrid solver. A second order approximation is obtained in O(qN) work, where the total computational work is equivalent to only a few fine level relaxations per eigenvector.

  6. SUDOKU A STORY & A SOLVER

    SciTech Connect

    GARDNER, P.R.

    2006-04-01

    Sudoku, also known as Number Place, is a logic-based placement puzzle. The aim of the puzzle is to enter a numerical digit from 1 through 9 in each cell of a 9 x 9 grid made up of 3 x 3 subgrids (called ''regions''), starting with various digits given in some cells (the ''givens''). Each row, column, and region must contain only one instance of each numeral. Completing the puzzle requires patience and logical ability. Although first published in a U.S. puzzle magazine in 1979, Sudoku initially caught on in Japan in 1986 and attained international popularity in 2005. Last fall, after noticing Sudoku puzzles in some newspapers and magazines, I attempted a few just to see how hard they were. Of course, the difficulties varied considerably. ''Obviously'' one could use Trial and Error but all the advice was to ''Use Logic''. Thinking to flex, and strengthen, those powers, I began to tackle the puzzles systematically. That is, when I discovered a new tactical rule, I would write it down, eventually generating a list of ten or so, with some having overlap. They served pretty well except for the more difficult puzzles, but even then I managed to develop an additional three rules that covered all of them until I hit the Oregonian puzzle shown. With all of my rules, I could not seem to solve that puzzle. Initially putting my failure down to rapid mental fatigue (being unable to hold a sufficient quantity of information in my mind at one time), I decided to write a program to implement my rules and see what I had failed to notice earlier. The solver, too, failed. That is, my rules were insufficient to solve that particular puzzle. I happened across a book written by a fellow who constructs such puzzles and who claimed that, sometimes, the only tactic left was trial and error. With a trial and error routine implemented, my solver successfully completed the Oregonian puzzle, and has successfully solved every puzzle submitted to it since.

  7. ALPS - A LINEAR PROGRAM SOLVER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viterna, L. A.

    1994-01-01

    Linear programming is a widely-used engineering and management tool. Scheduling, resource allocation, and production planning are all well-known applications of linear programs (LP's). Most LP's are too large to be solved by hand, so over the decades many computer codes for solving LP's have been developed. ALPS, A Linear Program Solver, is a full-featured LP analysis program. ALPS can solve plain linear programs as well as more complicated mixed integer and pure integer programs. ALPS also contains an efficient solution technique for pure binary (0-1 integer) programs. One of the many weaknesses of LP solvers is the lack of interaction with the user. ALPS is a menu-driven program with no special commands or keywords to learn. In addition, ALPS contains a full-screen editor to enter and maintain the LP formulation. These formulations can be written to and read from plain ASCII files for portability. For those less experienced in LP formulation, ALPS contains a problem "parser" which checks the formulation for errors. ALPS creates fully formatted, readable reports that can be sent to a printer or output file. ALPS is written entirely in IBM's APL2/PC product, Version 1.01. The APL2 workspace containing all the ALPS code can be run on any APL2/PC system (AT or 386). On a 32-bit system, this configuration can take advantage of all extended memory. The user can also examine and modify the ALPS code. The APL2 workspace has also been "packed" to be run on any DOS system (without APL2) as a stand-alone "EXE" file, but has limited memory capacity on a 640K system. A numeric coprocessor (80X87) is optional but recommended. The standard distribution medium for ALPS is a 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. IBM, IBM PC and IBM APL2 are registered trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation. MS-DOS is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.

  8. SIERRA framework version 4 : solver services.

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Alan B.

    2005-02-01

    Several SIERRA applications make use of third-party libraries to solve systems of linear and nonlinear equations, and to solve eigenproblems. The classes and interfaces in the SIERRA framework that provide linear system assembly services and access to solver libraries are collectively referred to as solver services. This paper provides an overview of SIERRA's solver services including the design goals that drove the development, and relationships and interactions among the various classes. The process of assembling and manipulating linear systems will be described, as well as access to solution methods and other operations.

  9. ALPS: A Linear Program Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferencz, Donald C.; Viterna, Larry A.

    1991-01-01

    ALPS is a computer program which can be used to solve general linear program (optimization) problems. ALPS was designed for those who have minimal linear programming (LP) knowledge and features a menu-driven scheme to guide the user through the process of creating and solving LP formulations. Once created, the problems can be edited and stored in standard DOS ASCII files to provide portability to various word processors or even other linear programming packages. Unlike many math-oriented LP solvers, ALPS contains an LP parser that reads through the LP formulation and reports several types of errors to the user. ALPS provides a large amount of solution data which is often useful in problem solving. In addition to pure linear programs, ALPS can solve for integer, mixed integer, and binary type problems. Pure linear programs are solved with the revised simplex method. Integer or mixed integer programs are solved initially with the revised simplex, and the completed using the branch-and-bound technique. Binary programs are solved with the method of implicit enumeration. This manual describes how to use ALPS to create, edit, and solve linear programming problems. Instructions for installing ALPS on a PC compatible computer are included in the appendices along with a general introduction to linear programming. A programmers guide is also included for assistance in modifying and maintaining the program.

  10. Approximating the Generalized Voronoi Diagram of Closely Spaced Objects

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, John; Daniel, Eric; Pascucci, Valerio; Bajaj, Chandrajit

    2015-06-22

    We present an algorithm to compute an approximation of the generalized Voronoi diagram (GVD) on arbitrary collections of 2D or 3D geometric objects. In particular, we focus on datasets with closely spaced objects; GVD approximation is expensive and sometimes intractable on these datasets using previous algorithms. With our approach, the GVD can be computed using commodity hardware even on datasets with many, extremely tightly packed objects. Our approach is to subdivide the space with an octree that is represented with an adjacency structure. We then use a novel adaptive distance transform to compute the distance function on octree vertices. The computed distance field is sampled more densely in areas of close object spacing, enabling robust and parallelizable GVD surface generation. We demonstrate our method on a variety of data and show example applications of the GVD in 2D and 3D.

  11. Parallelizing alternating direction implicit solver on GPUs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present a parallel Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) solver on GPUs. Our implementation significantly improves existing implementations in two aspects. First, we address the scalability issue of existing Parallel Cyclic Reduction (PCR) implementations by eliminating their hardware resource con...

  12. A five-wave Harten-Lax-van Leer Riemann solver for relativistic magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignone, A.; Ugliano, M.; Bodo, G.

    2009-03-01

    We present a five-wave Riemann solver for the equations of ideal relativistic magneto-hydrodynamics. Our solver can be regarded as a relativistic extension of the five-wave HLLD Riemann solver initially developed by Miyoshi & Kusano for the equations of ideal magnetohydrodynamics. The solution to the Riemann problem is approximated by a five-wave pattern, comprising two outermost fast shocks, two rotational discontinuities and a contact surface in the middle. The proposed scheme is considerably more elaborate than in the classical case since the normal velocity is no longer constant across the rotational modes. Still, proper closure to the Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions can be attained by solving a non-linear scalar equation in the total pressure variable which, for the chosen configuration, has to be constant over the whole Riemann fan. The accuracy of the new Riemann solver is validated against one-dimensional tests and multidimensional applications. It is shown that our new solver considerably improves over the popular Harten-Lax-van Leer solver or the recently proposed HLLC schemes.

  13. A parallel PCG solver for MODFLOW.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yanhui; Li, Guomin

    2009-01-01

    In order to simulate large-scale ground water flow problems more efficiently with MODFLOW, the OpenMP programming paradigm was used to parallelize the preconditioned conjugate-gradient (PCG) solver with in this study. Incremental parallelization, the significant advantage supported by OpenMP on a shared-memory computer, made the solver transit to a parallel program smoothly one block of code at a time. The parallel PCG solver, suitable for both MODFLOW-2000 and MODFLOW-2005, is verified using an 8-processor computer. Both the impact of compilers and different model domain sizes were considered in the numerical experiments. Based on the timing results, execution times using the parallel PCG solver are typically about 1.40 to 5.31 times faster than those using the serial one. In addition, the simulation results are the exact same as the original PCG solver, because the majority of serial codes were not changed. It is worth noting that this parallelizing approach reduces cost in terms of software maintenance because only a single source PCG solver code needs to be maintained in the MODFLOW source tree.

  14. Improved Stiff ODE Solvers for Combustion CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imren, A.; Haworth, D. C.

    2016-11-01

    Increasingly large chemical mechanisms are needed to predict autoignition, heat release and pollutant emissions in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of in-cylinder processes in compression-ignition engines and other applications. Calculation of chemical source terms usually dominates the computational effort, and several strategies have been proposed to reduce the high computational cost associated with realistic chemistry in CFD. Central to most strategies is a stiff ordinary differential equation (ODE) solver to compute the change in composition due to chemical reactions over a computational time step. Most work to date on stiff ODE solvers for computational combustion has focused on backward differential formula (BDF) methods, and has not explicitly considered the implications of how the stiff ODE solver couples with the CFD algorithm. In this work, a fresh look at stiff ODE solvers is taken that includes how the solver is integrated into a turbulent combustion CFD code, and the advantages of extrapolation-based solvers in this regard are demonstrated. Benefits in CPU time and accuracy are demonstrated for homogeneous systems and compression-ignition engines, for chemical mechanisms that range in size from fewer than 50 to more than 7,000 species.

  15. Inductive ionospheric solver for magnetospheric MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanhamäki, H.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new scheme for solving the ionospheric boundary conditions required in magnetospheric MHD simulations. In contrast to the electrostatic ionospheric solvers currently in use, the new solver takes ionospheric induction into account by solving Faraday's law simultaneously with Ohm's law and current continuity. From the viewpoint of an MHD simulation, the new inductive solver is similar to the electrostatic solvers, as the same input data is used (field-aligned current [FAC] and ionospheric conductances) and similar output is produced (ionospheric electric field). The inductive solver is tested using realistic, databased models of an omega-band and westward traveling surge. Although the tests were performed with local models and MHD simulations require a global ionospheric solution, we may nevertheless conclude that the new solution scheme is feasible also in practice. In the test cases the difference between static and electrodynamic solutions is up to ~10 V km-1 in certain locations, or up to 20-40% of the total electric field. This is in agreement with previous estimates. It should also be noted that if FAC is replaced by the ground magnetic field (or ionospheric equivalent current) in the input data set, exactly the same formalism can be used to construct an inductive version of the KRM method originally developed by Kamide et al. (1981).

  16. New iterative solvers for the NAG Libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Salvini, S.; Shaw, G.

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce the work which has been carried out at NAG Ltd to update the iterative solvers for sparse systems of linear equations, both symmetric and unsymmetric, in the NAG Fortran 77 Library. Our current plans to extend this work and include it in our other numerical libraries in our range are also briefly mentioned. We have added to the Library the new Chapter F11, entirely dedicated to sparse linear algebra. At Mark 17, the F11 Chapter includes sparse iterative solvers, preconditioners, utilities and black-box routines for sparse symmetric (both positive-definite and indefinite) linear systems. Mark 18 will add solvers, preconditioners, utilities and black-boxes for sparse unsymmetric systems: the development of these has already been completed.

  17. Using SPARK as a Solver for Modelica

    SciTech Connect

    Wetter, Michael; Wetter, Michael; Haves, Philip; Moshier, Michael A.; Sowell, Edward F.

    2008-06-30

    Modelica is an object-oriented acausal modeling language that is well positioned to become a de-facto standard for expressing models of complex physical systems. To simulate a model expressed in Modelica, it needs to be translated into executable code. For generating run-time efficient code, such a translation needs to employ algebraic formula manipulations. As the SPARK solver has been shown to be competitive for generating such code but currently cannot be used with the Modelica language, we report in this paper how SPARK's symbolic and numerical algorithms can be implemented in OpenModelica, an open-source implementation of a Modelica modeling and simulation environment. We also report benchmark results that show that for our air flow network simulation benchmark, the SPARK solver is competitive with Dymola, which is believed to provide the best solver for Modelica.

  18. Variants and extensions of a fast direct numerical cauchy-riemann solver, with illustrative applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, E. D.; Lomax, H.

    1977-01-01

    Revised and extended versions of a fast, direct (noniterative) numerical Cauchy-Riemann solver are presented for solving finite difference approximations of first order systems of partial differential equations. Although the difference operators treated are linear and elliptic, one significant application of these extended direct Cauchy-Riemann solvers is in the fast, semidirect (iterative) solution of fluid dynamic problems governed by the nonlinear mixed elliptic-hyperbolic equations of transonic flow. Different versions of the algorithms are derived and the corresponding FORTRAN computer programs for a simple example problem are described and listed. The algorithms are demonstrated to be efficient and accurate.

  19. DG-FDF solver for large eddy simulation of compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sammak, Shervin; Brazell, Michael; Mavriplis, Dimitri; Givi, Peyman

    2016-11-01

    A new computational scheme is developed for large eddy simulation (LES) of compressible turbulent flows with the filtered density function (FDF) subgrid scale closure. This is a hybrid scheme, combining the discontinuous Galerkin (DG) Eulerian solver with a Lagrangian Monte Carlo FDF simulator. The methodology is shown to be suitable for LES, as a larger portion of the resolved energy is captured as the order of spectral approximation increases. Simulations are conducted of both subsonic and supersonic flows. The consistency and the overall performance of the DG-FDF solver are demonstrated, together with its shock capturing capabilities.

  20. Code Verification of the HIGRAD Computational Fluid Dynamics Solver

    SciTech Connect

    Van Buren, Kendra L.; Canfield, Jesse M.; Hemez, Francois M.; Sauer, Jeremy A.

    2012-05-04

    The purpose of this report is to outline code and solution verification activities applied to HIGRAD, a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solver of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, and used to simulate various phenomena such as the propagation of wildfires and atmospheric hydrodynamics. Code verification efforts, as described in this report, are an important first step to establish the credibility of numerical simulations. They provide evidence that the mathematical formulation is properly implemented without significant mistakes that would adversely impact the application of interest. Highly accurate analytical solutions are derived for four code verification test problems that exercise different aspects of the code. These test problems are referred to as: (i) the quiet start, (ii) the passive advection, (iii) the passive diffusion, and (iv) the piston-like problem. These problems are simulated using HIGRAD with different levels of mesh discretization and the numerical solutions are compared to their analytical counterparts. In addition, the rates of convergence are estimated to verify the numerical performance of the solver. The first three test problems produce numerical approximations as expected. The fourth test problem (piston-like) indicates the extent to which the code is able to simulate a 'mild' discontinuity, which is a condition that would typically be better handled by a Lagrangian formulation. The current investigation concludes that the numerical implementation of the solver performs as expected. The quality of solutions is sufficient to provide credible simulations of fluid flows around wind turbines. The main caveat associated to these findings is the low coverage provided by these four problems, and somewhat limited verification activities. A more comprehensive evaluation of HIGRAD may be beneficial for future studies.

  1. Development of a parallel implicit solver of fluid modeling equations for gas discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Chieh-Tsan; Chiu, Yuan-Ming; Hwang, Feng-Nan; Wu, Jong-Shinn

    2011-01-01

    A parallel fully implicit PETSc-based fluid modeling equations solver for simulating gas discharges is developed. Fluid modeling equations include: the neutral species continuity equation, the charged species continuity equation with drift-diffusion approximation for mass fluxes, the electron energy density equation, and Poisson's equation for electrostatic potential. Except for Poisson's equation, all model equations are discretized by the fully implicit backward Euler method as a time integrator, and finite differences with the Scharfetter-Gummel scheme for mass fluxes on the spatial domain. At each time step, the resulting large sparse algebraic nonlinear system is solved by the Newton-Krylov-Schwarz algorithm. A 2D-GEC RF discharge is used as a benchmark to validate our solver by comparing the numerical results with both the published experimental data and the theoretical prediction. The parallel performance of the solver is investigated.

  2. Parallelizable flood fill algorithm and corrective interface tracking approach applied to the simulation of multiple finite size bubbles merging with a free surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafferty, Nathan; Badreddine, Hassan; Niceno, Bojan; Prasser, Horst-Michael

    2015-11-01

    A parallelizable flood fill algorithm is developed for identifying and tracking closed regions of fluids, dispersed phases, in CFD simulations of multiphase flows. It is used in conjunction with a newly developed method, corrective interface tracking, for simulating finite size dispersed bubbly flows in which the bubbles are too small relative to the grid to be simulated accurately with interface tracking techniques and too large relative to the grid for Lagrangian particle tracking techniques. The latter situation arising if local bubble induced turbulence is resolved, or modeled with LES. With corrective interface tracking the governing equations are solved on a static Eulerian grid. A correcting force, derived from empirical correlation based hydrodynamic forces, is applied to the bubble which is then advected using interface tracking techniques. This method results in accurate fluid-gas two-way coupling, bubble shapes, and terminal rise velocities. The flood fill algorithm and corrective interface tracking technique are applied to an air/water simulation of multiple bubbles rising and merging with a free surface. They are then validated against the same simulation performed using only interface tracking with a much finer grid.

  3. Equation solvers for distributed-memory computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storaasli, Olaf O.

    1994-01-01

    A large number of scientific and engineering problems require the rapid solution of large systems of simultaneous equations. The performance of parallel computers in this area now dwarfs traditional vector computers by nearly an order of magnitude. This talk describes the major issues involved in parallel equation solvers with particular emphasis on the Intel Paragon, IBM SP-1 and SP-2 processors.

  4. CASTRO: A NEW COMPRESSIBLE ASTROPHYSICAL SOLVER. III. MULTIGROUP RADIATION HYDRODYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W.; Almgren, A.; Bell, J.; Howell, L.; Burrows, A.; Dolence, J.

    2013-01-15

    We present a formulation for multigroup radiation hydrodynamics that is correct to order O(v/c) using the comoving-frame approach and the flux-limited diffusion approximation. We describe a numerical algorithm for solving the system, implemented in the compressible astrophysics code, CASTRO. CASTRO uses a Eulerian grid with block-structured adaptive mesh refinement based on a nested hierarchy of logically rectangular variable-sized grids with simultaneous refinement in both space and time. In our multigroup radiation solver, the system is split into three parts: one part that couples the radiation and fluid in a hyperbolic subsystem, another part that advects the radiation in frequency space, and a parabolic part that evolves radiation diffusion and source-sink terms. The hyperbolic subsystem and the frequency space advection are solved explicitly with high-order Godunov schemes, whereas the parabolic part is solved implicitly with a first-order backward Euler method. Our multigroup radiation solver works for both neutrino and photon radiation.

  5. Fast linear solver for radiative transport equation with multiple right hand sides in diffuse optical tomography

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Jingfei

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that radiative transfer equation (RTE) provides more accurate tomographic results than its diffusion approximation (DA). However, RTE-based tomographic reconstruction codes have limited applicability in practice due to their high computational cost. In this article, we propose a new efficient method for solving the RTE forward problem with multiple light sources in an all-at-once manner instead of solving it for each source separately. To this end, we introduce here a novel linear solver called block biconjugate gradient stabilized method (block BiCGStab) that makes full use of the shared information between different right hand sides to accelerate solution convergence. Two parallelized block BiCGStab methods are proposed for additional acceleration under limited threads situation. We evaluate the performance of this algorithm with numerical simulation studies involving the Delta-Eddington approximation to the scattering phase function. The results show that the single threading block RTE solver proposed here reduces computation time by a factor of 1.5~3 as compared to the traditional sequential solution method and the parallel block solver by a factor of 1.5 as compared to the traditional parallel sequential method. This block linear solver is, moreover, independent of discretization schemes and preconditioners used; thus further acceleration and higher accuracy can be expected when combined with other existing discretization schemes or preconditioners. PMID:26345531

  6. Fast linear solver for radiative transport equation with multiple right hand sides in diffuse optical tomography.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jingfei; Kim, Hyun K; Hielscher, Andreas H

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that radiative transfer equation (RTE) provides more accurate tomographic results than its diffusion approximation (DA). However, RTE-based tomographic reconstruction codes have limited applicability in practice due to their high computational cost. In this article, we propose a new efficient method for solving the RTE forward problem with multiple light sources in an all-at-once manner instead of solving it for each source separately. To this end, we introduce here a novel linear solver called block biconjugate gradient stabilized method (block BiCGStab) that makes full use of the shared information between different right hand sides to accelerate solution convergence. Two parallelized block BiCGStab methods are proposed for additional acceleration under limited threads situation. We evaluate the performance of this algorithm with numerical simulation studies involving the Delta-Eddington approximation to the scattering phase function. The results show that the single threading block RTE solver proposed here reduces computation time by a factor of 1.5~3 as compared to the traditional sequential solution method and the parallel block solver by a factor of 1.5 as compared to the traditional parallel sequential method. This block linear solver is, moreover, independent of discretization schemes and preconditioners used; thus further acceleration and higher accuracy can be expected when combined with other existing discretization schemes or preconditioners.

  7. Approximation algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Andreas S.; Shmoys, David B.; Williamson, David P.

    1997-01-01

    Increasing global competition, rapidly changing markets, and greater consumer awareness have altered the way in which corporations do business. To become more efficient, many industries have sought to model some operational aspects by gigantic optimization problems. It is not atypical to encounter models that capture 106 separate “yes” or “no” decisions to be made. Although one could, in principle, try all 2106 possible solutions to find the optimal one, such a method would be impractically slow. Unfortunately, for most of these models, no algorithms are known that find optimal solutions with reasonable computation times. Typically, industry must rely on solutions of unguaranteed quality that are constructed in an ad hoc manner. Fortunately, for some of these models there are good approximation algorithms: algorithms that produce solutions quickly that are provably close to optimal. Over the past 6 years, there has been a sequence of major breakthroughs in our understanding of the design of approximation algorithms and of limits to obtaining such performance guarantees; this area has been one of the most flourishing areas of discrete mathematics and theoretical computer science. PMID:9370525

  8. Aleph Field Solver Challenge Problem Results Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Russell; Moore, Stan Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Aleph models continuum electrostatic and steady and transient thermal fields using a finite-element method. Much work has gone into expanding the core solver capability to support enriched modeling consisting of multiple interacting fields, special boundary conditions and two-way interfacial coupling with particles modeled using Aleph's complementary particle-in-cell capability. This report provides quantitative evidence for correct implementation of Aleph's field solver via order- of-convergence assessments on a collection of problems of increasing complexity. It is intended to provide Aleph with a pedigree and to establish a basis for confidence in results for more challenging problems important to Sandia's mission that Aleph was specifically designed to address.

  9. A perspective on unstructured grid flow solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatakrishnan, V.

    1995-01-01

    This survey paper assesses the status of compressible Euler and Navier-Stokes solvers on unstructured grids. Different spatial and temporal discretization options for steady and unsteady flows are discussed. The integration of these components into an overall framework to solve practical problems is addressed. Issues such as grid adaptation, higher order methods, hybrid discretizations and parallel computing are briefly discussed. Finally, some outstanding issues and future research directions are presented.

  10. Domain Decomposition for the SPN Solver MINOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamelot, Erell; Baudron, Anne-Marie; Lautard, Jean-Jacques

    2012-12-01

    In this article we present a domain decomposition method for the mixed SPN equations, discretized with Raviart-Thomas-Nédélec finite elements. This domain decomposition is based on the iterative Schwarz algorithm with Robin interface conditions to handle communications. After having described this method, we give details on how to optimize the convergence. Finally, we give some numerical results computed in a realistic 3D domain. The computations are done with the MINOS solver of the APOLLO3® code.

  11. Domain decomposition for the SPN solver MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Jamelot, Erell; Baudron, Anne-Marie; Lautard, Jean-Jacques

    2012-07-01

    In this article we present a domain decomposition method for the mixed SPN equations, discretized with Raviart-Thomas-Nedelec finite elements. This domain decomposition is based on the iterative Schwarz algorithm with Robin interface conditions to handle communications. After having described this method, we give details on how to optimize the convergence. Finally, we give some numerical results computed in a realistic 3D domain. The computations are done with the MINOS solver of the APOLLO3 (R) code. (authors)

  12. Galerkin CFD solvers for use in a multi-disciplinary suite for modeling advanced flight vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffitt, Nicholas J.

    This work extends existing Galerkin CFD solvers for use in a multi-disciplinary suite. The suite is proposed as a means of modeling advanced flight vehicles, which exhibit strong coupling between aerodynamics, structural dynamics, controls, rigid body motion, propulsion, and heat transfer. Such applications include aeroelastics, aeroacoustics, stability and control, and other highly coupled applications. The suite uses NASA STARS for modeling structural dynamics and heat transfer. Aerodynamics, propulsion, and rigid body dynamics are modeled in one of the five CFD solvers below. Euler2D and Euler3D are Galerkin CFD solvers created at OSU by Cowan (2003). These solvers are capable of modeling compressible inviscid aerodynamics with modal elastics and rigid body motion. This work reorganized these solvers to improve efficiency during editing and at run time. Simple and efficient propulsion models were added, including rocket, turbojet, and scramjet engines. Viscous terms were added to the previous solvers to create NS2D and NS3D. The viscous contributions were demonstrated in the inertial and non-inertial frames. Variable viscosity (Sutherland's equation) and heat transfer boundary conditions were added to both solvers but not verified in this work. Two turbulence models were implemented in NS2D and NS3D: Spalart-Allmarus (SA) model of Deck, et al. (2002) and Menter's SST model (1994). A rotation correction term (Shur, et al., 2000) was added to the production of turbulence. Local time stepping and artificial dissipation were adapted to each model. CFDsol is a Taylor-Galerkin solver with an SA turbulence model. This work improved the time accuracy, far field stability, viscous terms, Sutherland?s equation, and SA model with NS3D as a guideline and added the propulsion models from Euler3D to CFDsol. Simple geometries were demonstrated to utilize current meshing and processing capabilities. Air-breathing hypersonic flight vehicles (AHFVs) represent the ultimate

  13. Component mode synthesis methods applied to 3D heterogeneous core calculations, using the mixed dual finite element solver MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Guerin, P.; Baudron, A. M.; Lautard, J. J.

    2006-07-01

    This paper describes a new technique for determining the pin power in heterogeneous core calculations. It is based on a domain decomposition with overlapping sub-domains and a component mode synthesis technique for the global flux determination. Local basis functions are used to span a discrete space that allows fundamental global mode approximation through a Galerkin technique. Two approaches are given to obtain these local basis functions: in the first one (Component Mode Synthesis method), the first few spatial eigenfunctions are computed on each sub-domain, using periodic boundary conditions. In the second one (Factorized Component Mode Synthesis method), only the fundamental mode is computed, and we use a factorization principle for the flux in order to replace the higher order Eigenmodes. These different local spatial functions are extended to the global domain by defining them as zero outside the sub-domain. These methods are well-fitted for heterogeneous core calculations because the spatial interface modes are taken into account in the domain decomposition. Although these methods could be applied to higher order angular approximations - particularly easily to a SPN approximation - the numerical results we provide are obtained using a diffusion model. We show the methods' accuracy for reactor cores loaded with UOX and MOX assemblies, for which standard reconstruction techniques are known to perform poorly. Furthermore, we show that our methods are highly and easily parallelizable. (authors)

  14. Domain decomposed preconditioners with Krylov subspace methods as subdomain solvers

    SciTech Connect

    Pernice, M.

    1994-12-31

    Domain decomposed preconditioners for nonsymmetric partial differential equations typically require the solution of problems on the subdomains. Most implementations employ exact solvers to obtain these solutions. Consequently work and storage requirements for the subdomain problems grow rapidly with the size of the subdomain problems. Subdomain solves constitute the single largest computational cost of a domain decomposed preconditioner, and improving the efficiency of this phase of the computation will have a significant impact on the performance of the overall method. The small local memory available on the nodes of most message-passing multicomputers motivates consideration of the use of an iterative method for solving subdomain problems. For large-scale systems of equations that are derived from three-dimensional problems, memory considerations alone may dictate the need for using iterative methods for the subdomain problems. In addition to reduced storage requirements, use of an iterative solver on the subdomains allows flexibility in specifying the accuracy of the subdomain solutions. Substantial savings in solution time is possible if the quality of the domain decomposed preconditioner is not degraded too much by relaxing the accuracy of the subdomain solutions. While some work in this direction has been conducted for symmetric problems, similar studies for nonsymmetric problems appear not to have been pursued. This work represents a first step in this direction, and explores the effectiveness of performing subdomain solves using several transpose-free Krylov subspace methods, GMRES, transpose-free QMR, CGS, and a smoothed version of CGS. Depending on the difficulty of the subdomain problem and the convergence tolerance used, a reduction in solution time is possible in addition to the reduced memory requirements. The domain decomposed preconditioner is a Schur complement method in which the interface operators are approximated using interface probing.

  15. High Energy Boundary Conditions for a Cartesian Mesh Euler Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Shishir; Murman, Scott; Aftosmis, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Inlets and exhaust nozzles are common place in the world of flight. Yet, many aerodynamic simulation packages do not provide a method of modelling such high energy boundaries in the flow field. For the purposes of aerodynamic simulation, inlets and exhausts are often fared over and it is assumed that the flow differences resulting from this assumption are minimal. While this is an adequate assumption for the prediction of lift, the lack of a plume behind the aircraft creates an evacuated base region thus effecting both drag and pitching moment values. In addition, the flow in the base region is often mis-predicted resulting in incorrect base drag. In order to accurately predict these quantities, a method for specifying inlet and exhaust conditions needs to be available in aerodynamic simulation packages. A method for a first approximation of a plume without accounting for chemical reactions is added to the Cartesian mesh based aerodynamic simulation package CART3D. The method consists of 3 steps. In the first step, a components approach where each triangle is assigned a component number is used. Here, a method for marking the inlet or exhaust plane triangles as separate components is discussed. In step two, the flow solver is modified to accept a reference state for the components marked inlet or exhaust. In the third step, the flow solver uses these separated components and the reference state to compute the correct flow condition at that triangle. The present method is implemented in the CART3D package which consists of a set of tools for generating a Cartesian volume mesh from a set of component triangulations. The Euler equations are solved on the resulting unstructured Cartesian mesh. The present methods is implemented in this package and its usefulness is demonstrated with two validation cases. A generic missile body is also presented to show the usefulness of the method on a real world geometry.

  16. Updates to the NEQAIR Radiation Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruden, Brett A.; Brandis, Aaron M.

    2014-01-01

    The NEQAIR code is one of the original heritage solvers for radiative heating prediction in aerothermal environments, and is still used today for mission design purposes. This paper discusses the implementation of the first major revision to the NEQAIR code in the last five years, NEQAIR v14.0. The most notable features of NEQAIR v14.0 are the parallelization of the radiation computation, reducing runtimes by about 30×, and the inclusion of mid-wave CO2 infrared radiation.

  17. A finite different field solver for dipole modes

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, E.M.

    1992-08-01

    A finite element field solver for dipole modes in axisymmetric structures has been written. The second-order elements used in this formulation yield accurate mode frequencies with no spurious modes. Quasi-periodic boundaries are included to allow travelling waves in periodic structures. The solver is useful in applications requiring precise frequency calculations such as detuned accelerator structures for linear colliders. Comparisons are made with measurements and with the popular but less accurate field solver URMEL.

  18. Two-Dimensional Ffowcs Williams/Hawkings Equation Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockard, David P.

    2005-01-01

    FWH2D is a Fortran 90 computer program that solves a two-dimensional (2D) version of the equation, derived by J. E. Ffowcs Williams and D. L. Hawkings, for sound generated by turbulent flow. FWH2D was developed especially for estimating noise generated by airflows around such approximately 2D airframe components as slats. The user provides input data on fluctuations of pressure, density, and velocity on some surface. These data are combined with information about the geometry of the surface to calculate histories of thickness and loading terms. These histories are fast-Fourier-transformed into the frequency domain. For each frequency of interest and each observer position specified by the user, kernel functions are integrated over the surface by use of the trapezoidal rule to calculate a pressure signal. The resulting frequency-domain signals are inverse-fast-Fourier-transformed back into the time domain. The output of the code consists of the time- and frequency-domain representations of the pressure signals at the observer positions. Because of its approximate nature, FWH2D overpredicts the noise from a finite-length (3D) component. The advantage of FWH2D is that it requires a fraction of the computation time of a 3D Ffowcs Williams/Hawkings solver.

  19. Computational results for flows over 2-D ramp and 3-D obstacle with an upwind Navier-Stokes solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    1990-01-01

    An implicit, finite-difference, upwind, full Navier-Stokes solver was applied to supersonic/hypersonic flows over two-dimensional ramps and three-dimensional obstacle. Some of the computed results are presented. The numerical scheme used in the study is an implicit, spacially second order accurate, upwind, LU-ADI scheme based on Roe's approximate Reimann solver with MUSCL differencing of Van Leer. An algebraic grid generation scheme based on generalized interpolation scheme was used in generating the grids for the various 2-D and 3-D problems.

  20. Computational results for 2-D and 3-D ramp flows with an upwind Navier-Stokes solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    1991-01-01

    An implicit, finite-difference, upwind, full Navier-Stokes solver was applied to supersonic/hypersonic flows over two-dimensional ramps and three-dimensional obstacle. Some of the computed results are presented. The numerical scheme used in the study is an implicit, spatially second order accurate, upwind, LU-ADI scheme based on Roe's approximate Reimann solver with MUSCL differencing of Van Leer. An algebraic grid generation scheme based on generalized interpolation scheme was used in generating the grids for the various 2-D and 3-D problems.

  1. Numerical simulation of perfect fluid flows around complex 3D configurations by a multidomain solver using the MUSCL approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillen, Ph.; Borrel, M.; Dormieux, M.

    1990-10-01

    A numerical scheme of the MUSCL type used for the numerical simulation of gas flow of different types around complex configurations is described. Approximate Riemann solvers of the Van Leer, Roc, and Osher types, developed for perfect gas flows are used. These solvers have been extended to non-reactive mixtures of two species and real gas flows by Abgrall, Montagne and Vinokur. The architecture of the code, dictated by constraints in geometrical considerations, computational aspects, the specific nature of the flow, and ergonomy, is described.

  2. Detailed analysis of the effects of stencil spatial variations with arbitrary high-order finite-difference Maxwell solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincenti, H.; Vay, J.-L.

    2016-03-01

    Very high order or pseudo-spectral Maxwell solvers are the method of choice to reduce discretization effects (e.g. numerical dispersion) that are inherent to low order Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) schemes. However, due to their large stencils, these solvers are often subject to truncation errors in many electromagnetic simulations. These truncation errors come from non-physical modifications of Maxwell's equations in space that may generate spurious signals affecting the overall accuracy of the simulation results. Such modifications for instance occur when Perfectly Matched Layers (PMLs) are used at simulation domain boundaries to simulate open media. Another example is the use of arbitrary order Maxwell solver with domain decomposition technique that may under some condition involve stencil truncations at subdomain boundaries, resulting in small spurious errors that do eventually build up. In each case, a careful evaluation of the characteristics and magnitude of the errors resulting from these approximations, and their impact at any frequency and angle, requires detailed analytical and numerical studies. To this end, we present a general analytical approach that enables the evaluation of numerical errors of fully three-dimensional arbitrary order finite-difference Maxwell solver, with arbitrary modification of the local stencil in the simulation domain. The analytical model is validated against simulations of domain decomposition technique and PMLs, when these are used with very high-order Maxwell solver, as well as in the infinite order limit of pseudo-spectral solvers. Results confirm that the new analytical approach enables exact predictions in each case. It also confirms that the domain decomposition technique can be used with very high-order Maxwell solvers and a reasonably low number of guard cells with negligible effects on the whole accuracy of the simulation.

  3. Experiences with linear solvers for oil reservoir simulation problems

    SciTech Connect

    Joubert, W.; Janardhan, R.; Biswas, D.; Carey, G.

    1996-12-31

    This talk will focus on practical experiences with iterative linear solver algorithms used in conjunction with Amoco Production Company`s Falcon oil reservoir simulation code. The goal of this study is to determine the best linear solver algorithms for these types of problems. The results of numerical experiments will be presented.

  4. Optimising a parallel conjugate gradient solver

    SciTech Connect

    Field, M.R.

    1996-12-31

    This work arises from the introduction of a parallel iterative solver to a large structural analysis finite element code. The code is called FEX and it was developed at Hitachi`s Mechanical Engineering Laboratory. The FEX package can deal with a large range of structural analysis problems using a large number of finite element techniques. FEX can solve either stress or thermal analysis problems of a range of different types from plane stress to a full three-dimensional model. These problems can consist of a number of different materials which can be modelled by a range of material models. The structure being modelled can have the load applied at either a point or a surface, or by a pressure, a centrifugal force or just gravity. Alternatively a thermal load can be applied with a given initial temperature. The displacement of the structure can be constrained by having a fixed boundary or by prescribing the displacement at a boundary.

  5. Shape reanalysis and sensitivities utilizing preconditioned iterative boundary solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guru Prasad, K.; Kane, J. H.

    1992-01-01

    The computational advantages associated with the utilization of preconditined iterative equation solvers are quantified for the reanalysis of perturbed shapes using continuum structural boundary element analysis (BEA). Both single- and multi-zone three-dimensional problems are examined. Significant reductions in computer time are obtained by making use of previously computed solution vectors and preconditioners in subsequent analyses. The effectiveness of this technique is demonstrated for the computation of shape response sensitivities required in shape optimization. Computer times and accuracies achieved using the preconditioned iterative solvers are compared with those obtained via direct solvers and implicit differentiation of the boundary integral equations. It is concluded that this approach employing preconditioned iterative equation solvers in reanalysis and sensitivity analysis can be competitive with if not superior to those involving direct solvers.

  6. A real-time impurity solver for DMFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyungwon; Aron, Camille; Han, Jong E.; Kotliar, Gabriel

    Dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT) offers a non-perturbative approach to problems with strongly correlated electrons. The method heavily relies on the ability to numerically solve an auxiliary Anderson-type impurity problem. While powerful Matsubara-frequency solvers have been developed over the past two decades to tackle equilibrium situations, the status of real-time impurity solvers that could compete with Matsubara-frequency solvers and be readily generalizable to non-equilibrium situations is still premature. We present a real-time solver which is based on a quantum Master equation description of the dissipative dynamics of the impurity and its exact diagonalization. As a benchmark, we illustrate the strengths of our solver in the context of the equilibrium Mott-insulator transition of the one-band Hubbard model and compare it with iterative perturbation theory (IPT) method. Finally, we discuss its direct application to a nonequilibrium situation.

  7. General purpose nonlinear system solver based on Newton-Krylov method.

    SciTech Connect

    2013-12-01

    KINSOL is part of a software family called SUNDIALS: SUite of Nonlinear and Differential/Algebraic equation Solvers [1]. KINSOL is a general-purpose nonlinear system solver based on Newton-Krylov and fixed-point solver technologies [2].

  8. Comparison of open-source linear programming solvers.

    SciTech Connect

    Gearhart, Jared Lee; Adair, Kristin Lynn; Durfee, Justin David.; Jones, Katherine A.; Martin, Nathaniel; Detry, Richard Joseph

    2013-10-01

    When developing linear programming models, issues such as budget limitations, customer requirements, or licensing may preclude the use of commercial linear programming solvers. In such cases, one option is to use an open-source linear programming solver. A survey of linear programming tools was conducted to identify potential open-source solvers. From this survey, four open-source solvers were tested using a collection of linear programming test problems and the results were compared to IBM ILOG CPLEX Optimizer (CPLEX) [1], an industry standard. The solvers considered were: COIN-OR Linear Programming (CLP) [2], [3], GNU Linear Programming Kit (GLPK) [4], lp_solve [5] and Modular In-core Nonlinear Optimization System (MINOS) [6]. As no open-source solver outperforms CPLEX, this study demonstrates the power of commercial linear programming software. CLP was found to be the top performing open-source solver considered in terms of capability and speed. GLPK also performed well but cannot match the speed of CLP or CPLEX. lp_solve and MINOS were considerably slower and encountered issues when solving several test problems.

  9. A dynamic-solver-consistent minimum action method: With an application to 2D Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Xiaoliang; Yu, Haijun

    2017-02-01

    This paper discusses the necessity and strategy to unify the development of a dynamic solver and a minimum action method (MAM) for a spatially extended system when employing the large deviation principle (LDP) to study the effects of small random perturbations. A dynamic solver is used to approximate the unperturbed system, and a minimum action method is used to approximate the LDP, which corresponds to solving an Euler-Lagrange equation related to but more complicated than the unperturbed system. We will clarify possible inconsistencies induced by independent numerical approximations of the unperturbed system and the LDP, based on which we propose to define both the dynamic solver and the MAM on the same approximation space for spatial discretization. The semi-discrete LDP can then be regarded as the exact LDP of the semi-discrete unperturbed system, which is a finite-dimensional ODE system. We achieve this methodology for the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations using a divergence-free approximation space. The method developed can be used to study the nonlinear instability of wall-bounded parallel shear flows, and be generalized straightforwardly to three-dimensional cases. Numerical experiments are presented.

  10. Neutrino transport in type II supernovae: Boltzmann solver vs. Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Shoichi; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Suzuki, Hideyuki

    1999-04-01

    We have coded a Boltzmann solver based on a finite difference scheme (S_N method) aiming at calculations of neutrino transport in type II supernovae. Close comparison between the Boltzmann solver and a Monte Carlo transport code has been made for realistic atmospheres of post bounce core models under the assumption of a static background. We have also investigated in detail the dependence of the results on the numbers of radial, angular, and energy grid points and the way to discretize the spatial advection term which is used in the Boltzmann solver. A general relativistic calculation has been done for one of the models. We find good overall agreement between the two methods. This gives credibility to both methods which are based on completely different formulations. In particular, the number and energy fluxes and the mean energies of the neutrinos show remarkably good agreement, because these quantities are determined in a region where the angular distribution of the neutrinos is nearly isotropic and they are essentially frozen in later on. On the other hand, because of a relatively small number of angular grid points (which is inevitable due to limitations of the computation time) the Boltzmann solver tends to slightly underestimate the flux factor and the Eddington factor outside the (mean) ``neutrinosphere'' where the angular distribution of the neutrinos becomes highly anisotropic. As a result, the neutrino number (and energy) density is somewhat overestimated in this region. This fact suggests that the Boltzmann solver should be applied to calculations of the neutrino heating in the hot-bubble region with some caution because there might be a tendency to overestimate the energy deposition rate in disadvantageous situations. A comparison shows that this trend is opposite to the results obtained with a multi-group flux-limited diffusion approximation of neutrino transport. Employing three different flux limiters, we find that all of them lead to a significant

  11. Robust large-scale parallel nonlinear solvers for simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Bader, Brett William; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick; Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2005-11-01

    This report documents research to develop robust and efficient solution techniques for solving large-scale systems of nonlinear equations. The most widely used method for solving systems of nonlinear equations is Newton's method. While much research has been devoted to augmenting Newton-based solvers (usually with globalization techniques), little has been devoted to exploring the application of different models. Our research has been directed at evaluating techniques using different models than Newton's method: a lower order model, Broyden's method, and a higher order model, the tensor method. We have developed large-scale versions of each of these models and have demonstrated their use in important applications at Sandia. Broyden's method replaces the Jacobian with an approximation, allowing codes that cannot evaluate a Jacobian or have an inaccurate Jacobian to converge to a solution. Limited-memory methods, which have been successful in optimization, allow us to extend this approach to large-scale problems. We compare the robustness and efficiency of Newton's method, modified Newton's method, Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov method, and our limited-memory Broyden method. Comparisons are carried out for large-scale applications of fluid flow simulations and electronic circuit simulations. Results show that, in cases where the Jacobian was inaccurate or could not be computed, Broyden's method converged in some cases where Newton's method failed to converge. We identify conditions where Broyden's method can be more efficient than Newton's method. We also present modifications to a large-scale tensor method, originally proposed by Bouaricha, for greater efficiency, better robustness, and wider applicability. Tensor methods are an alternative to Newton-based methods and are based on computing a step based on a local quadratic model rather than a linear model. The advantage of Bouaricha's method is that it can use any existing linear solver, which makes it simple to write

  12. GPU accelerated kinetic solvers for rarefied gas dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabelok, Sergey A.; Kolobov, Vladimir I.; Arslanbekov, Robert R.

    2012-11-01

    GPU-acceleration is applied to the Boltzmann solver with adaptive Cartesian mesh in the Unified Flow Solver framework. NVIDIA CUDA technology is used with threads being grouped in thread blocks by points of Korobov sequences in each cell for computing the collision integral and by points in coordinate space for the free-molecular flow stage. GPU-accelerated Boltzmann solver with octree Cartesian mesh has been tested on several computer systems. Speedup of several times for GPU-based code compared to single-core CPU computations on the same machines has been observed.

  13. Development and Application of a Parallel Implicit Solver for Unsteady Viscous Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, P. E.; Visbal, M. R.; Sadayappan, P.

    This work investigates the performance and application of a parallel version of a three-dimensional second-order time accurate Navier-Stokes solver based on an implicit approximate-factorization Beam-Warming algorithm. A systematic incremental approach for parallelizing the serial code was developed which ensures that the parallel version of the code produces identical results to the original serial code. The current parallel scheme decomposes the grid using two-dimensional multipartitioning to evenly distribute the work across multiple processors with parallel communication via Message-Passing Interface (MPI) library. The code's performance has been assessed on three supercomputers: the IBM SP2, IBM SP3 and the Silicon Graphics Origin 2000. The solver is validated for Couette flow, and both steady and unsteady flow over a circular cylinder. Additional applications include both two- and three-dimensional flow over a stationary and a rotationally oscillating circular cylinder. This new solver enables the efficient simulation of large-scale unsteady viscous flows employing grids containing on the order of 107 points using available parallel supercomputers.

  14. A mimetic spectral element solver for the Grad-Shafranov equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palha, A.; Koren, B.; Felici, F.

    2016-07-01

    In this work we present a robust and accurate arbitrary order solver for the fixed-boundary plasma equilibria in toroidally axisymmetric geometries. To achieve this we apply the mimetic spectral element formulation presented in [56] to the solution of the Grad-Shafranov equation. This approach combines a finite volume discretization with the mixed finite element method. In this way the discrete differential operators (∇, ∇×, ∇ṡ) can be represented exactly and metric and all approximation errors are present in the constitutive relations. The result of this formulation is an arbitrary order method even on highly curved meshes. Additionally, the integral of the toroidal current Jϕ is exactly equal to the boundary integral of the poloidal field over the plasma boundary. This property can play an important role in the coupling between equilibrium and transport solvers. The proposed solver is tested on a varied set of plasma cross sections (smooth and with an X-point) and also for a wide range of pressure and toroidal magnetic flux profiles. Equilibria accurate up to machine precision are obtained. Optimal algebraic convergence rates of order p + 1 and geometric convergence rates are shown for Soloviev solutions (including high Shafranov shifts), field-reversed configuration (FRC) solutions and spheromak analytical solutions. The robustness of the method is demonstrated for non-linear test cases, in particular on an equilibrium solution with a pressure pedestal.

  15. Elliptic Solvers for Adaptive Mesh Refinement Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlan, D.J.; Dendy, J.E., Jr.; Shapira, Y.

    1999-06-03

    We are developing multigrid methods that will efficiently solve elliptic problems with anisotropic and discontinuous coefficients on adaptive grids. The final product will be a library that provides for the simplified solution of such problems. This library will directly benefit the efforts of other Laboratory groups. The focus of this work is research on serial and parallel elliptic algorithms and the inclusion of our black-box multigrid techniques into this new setting. The approach applies the Los Alamos object-oriented class libraries that greatly simplify the development of serial and parallel adaptive mesh refinement applications. In the final year of this LDRD, we focused on putting the software together; in particular we completed the final AMR++ library, we wrote tutorials and manuals, and we built example applications. We implemented the Fast Adaptive Composite Grid method as the principal elliptic solver. We presented results at the Overset Grid Conference and other more AMR specific conferences. We worked on optimization of serial and parallel performance and published several papers on the details of this work. Performance remains an important issue and is the subject of continuing research work.

  16. Advanced Multigrid Solvers for Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, Achi

    1999-01-01

    The main objective of this project has been to support the development of multigrid techniques in computational fluid dynamics that can achieve "textbook multigrid efficiency" (TME), which is several orders of magnitude faster than current industrial CFD solvers. Toward that goal we have assembled a detailed table which lists every foreseen kind of computational difficulty for achieving it, together with the possible ways for resolving the difficulty, their current state of development, and references. We have developed several codes to test and demonstrate, in the framework of simple model problems, several approaches for overcoming the most important of the listed difficulties that had not been resolved before. In particular, TME has been demonstrated for incompressible flows on one hand, and for near-sonic flows on the other hand. General approaches were advanced for the relaxation of stagnation points and boundary conditions under various situations. Also, new algebraic multigrid techniques were formed for treating unstructured grid formulations. More details on all these are given below.

  17. A two-dimensional Riemann solver with self-similar sub-structure - Alternative formulation based on least squares projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balsara, Dinshaw S.; Vides, Jeaniffer; Gurski, Katharine; Nkonga, Boniface; Dumbser, Michael; Garain, Sudip; Audit, Edouard

    2016-01-01

    Just as the quality of a one-dimensional approximate Riemann solver is improved by the inclusion of internal sub-structure, the quality of a multidimensional Riemann solver is also similarly improved. Such multidimensional Riemann problems arise when multiple states come together at the vertex of a mesh. The interaction of the resulting one-dimensional Riemann problems gives rise to a strongly-interacting state. We wish to endow this strongly-interacting state with physically-motivated sub-structure. The self-similar formulation of Balsara [16] proves especially useful for this purpose. While that work is based on a Galerkin projection, in this paper we present an analogous self-similar formulation that is based on a different interpretation. In the present formulation, we interpret the shock jumps at the boundary of the strongly-interacting state quite literally. The enforcement of the shock jump conditions is done with a least squares projection (Vides, Nkonga and Audit [67]). With that interpretation, we again show that the multidimensional Riemann solver can be endowed with sub-structure. However, we find that the most efficient implementation arises when we use a flux vector splitting and a least squares projection. An alternative formulation that is based on the full characteristic matrices is also presented. The multidimensional Riemann solvers that are demonstrated here use one-dimensional HLLC Riemann solvers as building blocks. Several stringent test problems drawn from hydrodynamics and MHD are presented to show that the method works. Results from structured and unstructured meshes demonstrate the versatility of our method. The reader is also invited to watch a video introduction to multidimensional Riemann solvers on http://www.nd.edu/ dbalsara/Numerical-PDE-Course.

  18. Performance of NASA Equation Solvers on Computational Mechanics Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storaasli, Olaf O.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the performance of a new family of NASA-developed equation solvers used for large-scale (i.e. 551,705 equations) structural analysis. To minimize computer time and memory, the solvers are divided by application and matrix characteristics (sparse/dense, real/complex, symmetric/nonsymmetric, size: in-core/out of core) and exploit the hardware features of current and future computers. In this paper, the equation solvers, which are written in FORTRAN, and are therefore easily transportable, are shown to be faster than specialized computer library routines utilizing assembly code. Twenty NASA structural benchmark models with NASA solver timings reside on World Wide Web with a challenge to beat them.

  19. Experiences Running a Parallel Answer Set Solver on Blue Gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneidenbach, Lars; Schnor, Bettina; Gebser, Martin; Kaminski, Roland; Kaufmann, Benjamin; Schaub, Torsten

    This paper presents the concept of parallelisation of a solver for Answer Set Programming (ASP). While there already exist some approaches to parallel ASP solving, there was a lack of a parallel version of the powerful clasp solver. We implemented a parallel version of clasp based on message-passing. Experimental results on Blue Gene P/L indicate the potential of such an approach.

  20. Multilevel solvers of first-order system least-squares for Stokes equations

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Chen-Yao G.

    1996-12-31

    Recently, The use of first-order system least squares principle for the approximate solution of Stokes problems has been extensively studied by Cai, Manteuffel, and McCormick. In this paper, we study multilevel solvers of first-order system least-squares method for the generalized Stokes equations based on the velocity-vorticity-pressure formulation in three dimensions. The least-squares functionals is defined to be the sum of the L{sup 2}-norms of the residuals, which is weighted appropriately by the Reynolds number. We develop convergence analysis for additive and multiplicative multilevel methods applied to the resulting discrete equations.

  1. RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS: RENORMALIZED EIGENVECTORS AND FULL WAVE DECOMPOSITION RIEMANN SOLVER

    SciTech Connect

    Anton, Luis; MartI, Jose M; Ibanez, Jose M; Aloy, Miguel A.; Mimica, Petar; Miralles, Juan A.

    2010-05-01

    We obtain renormalized sets of right and left eigenvectors of the flux vector Jacobians of the relativistic MHD equations, which are regular and span a complete basis in any physical state including degenerate ones. The renormalization procedure relies on the characterization of the degeneracy types in terms of the normal and tangential components of the magnetic field to the wave front in the fluid rest frame. Proper expressions of the renormalized eigenvectors in conserved variables are obtained through the corresponding matrix transformations. Our work completes previous analysis that present different sets of right eigenvectors for non-degenerate and degenerate states, and can be seen as a relativistic generalization of earlier work performed in classical MHD. Based on the full wave decomposition (FWD) provided by the renormalized set of eigenvectors in conserved variables, we have also developed a linearized (Roe-type) Riemann solver. Extensive testing against one- and two-dimensional standard numerical problems allows us to conclude that our solver is very robust. When compared with a family of simpler solvers that avoid the knowledge of the full characteristic structure of the equations in the computation of the numerical fluxes, our solver turns out to be less diffusive than HLL and HLLC, and comparable in accuracy to the HLLD solver. The amount of operations needed by the FWD solver makes it less efficient computationally than those of the HLL family in one-dimensional problems. However, its relative efficiency increases in multidimensional simulations.

  2. Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamics: Renormalized Eigenvectors and Full Wave Decomposition Riemann Solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antón, Luis; Miralles, Juan A.; Martí, José M.; Ibáñez, José M.; Aloy, Miguel A.; Mimica, Petar

    2010-05-01

    We obtain renormalized sets of right and left eigenvectors of the flux vector Jacobians of the relativistic MHD equations, which are regular and span a complete basis in any physical state including degenerate ones. The renormalization procedure relies on the characterization of the degeneracy types in terms of the normal and tangential components of the magnetic field to the wave front in the fluid rest frame. Proper expressions of the renormalized eigenvectors in conserved variables are obtained through the corresponding matrix transformations. Our work completes previous analysis that present different sets of right eigenvectors for non-degenerate and degenerate states, and can be seen as a relativistic generalization of earlier work performed in classical MHD. Based on the full wave decomposition (FWD) provided by the renormalized set of eigenvectors in conserved variables, we have also developed a linearized (Roe-type) Riemann solver. Extensive testing against one- and two-dimensional standard numerical problems allows us to conclude that our solver is very robust. When compared with a family of simpler solvers that avoid the knowledge of the full characteristic structure of the equations in the computation of the numerical fluxes, our solver turns out to be less diffusive than HLL and HLLC, and comparable in accuracy to the HLLD solver. The amount of operations needed by the FWD solver makes it less efficient computationally than those of the HLL family in one-dimensional problems. However, its relative efficiency increases in multidimensional simulations.

  3. Benchmarking transport solvers for fracture flow problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olkiewicz, Piotr; Dabrowski, Marcin

    2015-04-01

    Fracture flow may dominate in rocks with low porosity and it can accompany both industrial and natural processes. Typical examples of such processes are natural flows in crystalline rocks and industrial flows in geothermal systems or hydraulic fracturing. Fracture flow provides an important mechanism for transporting mass and energy. For example, geothermal energy is primarily transported by the flow of the heated water or steam rather than by the thermal diffusion. The geometry of the fracture network and the distribution of the mean apertures of individual fractures are the key parameters with regard to the fracture network transmissivity. Transport in fractures can occur through the combination of advection and diffusion processes like in the case of dissolved chemical components. The local distribution of the fracture aperture may play an important role for both flow and transport processes. In this work, we benchmark various numerical solvers for flow and transport processes in a single fracture in 2D and 3D. Fracture aperture distributions are generated by a number of synthetic methods. We examine a single-phase flow of an incompressible viscous Newtonian fluid in the low Reynolds number limit. Periodic boundary conditions are used and a pressure difference is imposed in the background. The velocity field is primarly found using the Stokes equations. We systematically compare the obtained velocity field to the results obtained by solving the Reynolds equation. This allows us to examine the impact of the aperture distribution on the permeability of the medium and the local velocity distribution for two different mathematical descriptions of the fracture flow. Furthermore, we analyse the impact of aperture distribution on the front characteristics such as the standard deviation and the fractal dimension for systems in 2D and 3D.

  4. A Comparative Study of Randomized Constraint Solvers for Random-Symbolic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takaki, Mitsuo; Cavalcanti, Diego; Gheyi, Rohit; Iyoda, Juliano; dAmorim, Marcelo; Prudencio, Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    The complexity of constraints is a major obstacle for constraint-based software verification. Automatic constraint solvers are fundamentally incomplete: input constraints often build on some undecidable theory or some theory the solver does not support. This paper proposes and evaluates several randomized solvers to address this issue. We compare the effectiveness of a symbolic solver (CVC3), a random solver, three hybrid solvers (i.e., mix of random and symbolic), and two heuristic search solvers. We evaluate the solvers on two benchmarks: one consisting of manually generated constraints and another generated with a concolic execution of 8 subjects. In addition to fully decidable constraints, the benchmarks include constraints with non-linear integer arithmetic, integer modulo and division, bitwise arithmetic, and floating-point arithmetic. As expected symbolic solving (in particular, CVC3) subsumes the other solvers for the concolic execution of subjects that only generate decidable constraints. For the remaining subjects the solvers are complementary.

  5. A Comparison of Stiff ODE Solvers for Astrochemical Kinetics Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejad, Lida A. M.

    2005-09-01

    The time dependent chemical rate equations arising from astrochemical kinetics problems are described by a system of stiff ordinary differential equations (ODEs). In this paper, using three astrochemical models of varying physical and computational complexity, and hence different degrees of stiffness, we present a comprehensive performance survey of a set of well-established ODE solver packages from the ODEPACK collection, namely LSODE, LSODES, VODE and VODPK. For completeness, we include results from the GEAR package in one of the test models. The results demonstrate that significant performance improvements can be obtained over GEAR which is still being used by many astrochemists by default. We show that a simple appropriate ordering of the species set results in a substantial improvement in the performance of the tested ODE solvers. The sparsity of the associated Jacobian matrix can be exploited and results using the sparse direct solver routine LSODES show an extensive reduction in CPU time without any loss in accuracy. We compare the performance and the computed abundances of one model with a 175 species set and a reduced set of 88 species, keeping all physical and chemical parameters identical with both sets.We found that the calculated abundances using two different size models agree quite well. However, with no extra computational effort and more reliable results, it is possible for the computation to be many times faster with the larger species set than the reduced set, depending on the use of solvers, the ordering and the chosen options. It is also shown that though a particular solver with certain chosen parameters may have severe difficulty or even fail to complete a run over the required integration time, another solver can easily complete the run with a wider range of control parameters and options. As a result of the superior performance of LSODES for the solution of astrochemical kinetics systems, we have tailor-made a sparse version of the VODE

  6. Quantitative analysis of numerical solvers for oscillatory biomolecular system models

    PubMed Central

    Quo, Chang F; Wang, May D

    2008-01-01

    Background This article provides guidelines for selecting optimal numerical solvers for biomolecular system models. Because various parameters of the same system could have drastically different ranges from 10-15 to 1010, the ODEs can be stiff and ill-conditioned, resulting in non-unique, non-existing, or non-reproducible modeling solutions. Previous studies have not examined in depth how to best select numerical solvers for biomolecular system models, which makes it difficult to experimentally validate the modeling results. To address this problem, we have chosen one of the well-known stiff initial value problems with limit cycle behavior as a test-bed system model. Solving this model, we have illustrated that different answers may result from different numerical solvers. We use MATLAB numerical solvers because they are optimized and widely used by the modeling community. We have also conducted a systematic study of numerical solver performances by using qualitative and quantitative measures such as convergence, accuracy, and computational cost (i.e. in terms of function evaluation, partial derivative, LU decomposition, and "take-off" points). The results show that the modeling solutions can be drastically different using different numerical solvers. Thus, it is important to intelligently select numerical solvers when solving biomolecular system models. Results The classic Belousov-Zhabotinskii (BZ) reaction is described by the Oregonator model and is used as a case study. We report two guidelines in selecting optimal numerical solver(s) for stiff, complex oscillatory systems: (i) for problems with unknown parameters, ode45 is the optimal choice regardless of the relative error tolerance; (ii) for known stiff problems, both ode113 and ode15s are good choices under strict relative tolerance conditions. Conclusions For any given biomolecular model, by building a library of numerical solvers with quantitative performance assessment metric, we show that it is possible

  7. Solving Upwind-Biased Discretizations. 2; Multigrid Solver Using Semicoarsening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Boris

    1999-01-01

    This paper studies a novel multigrid approach to the solution for a second order upwind biased discretization of the convection equation in two dimensions. This approach is based on semi-coarsening and well balanced explicit correction terms added to coarse-grid operators to maintain on coarse-grid the same cross-characteristic interaction as on the target (fine) grid. Colored relaxation schemes are used on all the levels allowing a very efficient parallel implementation. The results of the numerical tests can be summarized as follows: 1) The residual asymptotic convergence rate of the proposed V(0, 2) multigrid cycle is about 3 per cycle. This convergence rate far surpasses the theoretical limit (4/3) predicted for standard multigrid algorithms using full coarsening. The reported efficiency does not deteriorate with increasing the cycle, depth (number of levels) and/or refining the target-grid mesh spacing. 2) The full multi-grid algorithm (FMG) with two V(0, 2) cycles on the target grid and just one V(0, 2) cycle on all the coarse grids always provides an approximate solution with the algebraic error less than the discretization error. Estimates of the total work in the FMG algorithm are ranged between 18 and 30 minimal work units (depending on the target (discretizatioin). Thus, the overall efficiency of the FMG solver closely approaches (if does not achieve) the goal of the textbook multigrid efficiency. 3) A novel approach to deriving a discrete solution approximating the true continuous solution with a relative accuracy given in advance is developed. An adaptive multigrid algorithm (AMA) using comparison of the solutions on two successive target grids to estimate the accuracy of the current target-grid solution is defined. A desired relative accuracy is accepted as an input parameter. The final target grid on which this accuracy can be achieved is chosen automatically in the solution process. the actual relative accuracy of the discrete solution approximation

  8. Euler/Navier-Stokes Solvers Applied to Ducted Fan Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Srivastava, Rakesh

    1997-01-01

    Due to noise considerations, ultra high bypass ducted fans have become a more viable design. These ducted fans typically consist of a rotor stage containing a wide chord fan and a stator stage. One of the concerns for this design is the classical flutter that keeps occurring in various unducted fan blade designs. These flutter are catastrophic and are to be avoided in the flight envelope of the engine. Some numerical investigations by Williams, Cho and Dalton, have suggested that a duct around a propeller makes it more unstable. This needs to be further investigated. In order to design an engine to safely perform a set of desired tasks, accurate information of the stresses on the blade during the entire cycle of blade motion is required. This requirement in turn demands that accurate knowledge of steady and unsteady blade loading be available. Aerodynamic solvers based on unsteady three-dimensional analysis will provide accurate and fast solutions and are best suited for aeroelastic analysis. The Euler solvers capture significant physics of the flowfield and are reasonably fast. An aerodynamic solver Ref. based on Euler equations had been developed under a separate grant from NASA Lewis in the past. Under the current grant, this solver has been modified to calculate the aeroelastic characteristics of unducted and ducted rotors. Even though, the aeroelastic solver based on three-dimensional Euler equations is computationally efficient, it is still very expensive to investigate the effects of multiple stages on the aeroelastic characteristics. In order to investigate the effects of multiple stages, a two-dimensional multi stage aeroelastic solver was also developed under this task, in collaboration with Dr. T. S. R. Reddy of the University of Toledo. Both of these solvers were applied to several test cases and validated against experimental data, where available.

  9. Performance Models for the Spike Banded Linear System Solver

    DOE PAGES

    Manguoglu, Murat; Saied, Faisal; Sameh, Ahmed; ...

    2011-01-01

    With availability of large-scale parallel platforms comprised of tens-of-thousands of processors and beyond, there is significant impetus for the development of scalable parallel sparse linear system solvers and preconditioners. An integral part of this design process is the development of performance models capable of predicting performance and providing accurate cost models for the solvers and preconditioners. There has been some work in the past on characterizing performance of the iterative solvers themselves. In this paper, we investigate the problem of characterizing performance and scalability of banded preconditioners. Recent work has demonstrated the superior convergence properties and robustness of banded preconditioners,more » compared to state-of-the-art ILU family of preconditioners as well as algebraic multigrid preconditioners. Furthermore, when used in conjunction with efficient banded solvers, banded preconditioners are capable of significantly faster time-to-solution. Our banded solver, the Truncated Spike algorithm is specifically designed for parallel performance and tolerance to deep memory hierarchies. Its regular structure is also highly amenable to accurate performance characterization. Using these characteristics, we derive the following results in this paper: (i) we develop parallel formulations of the Truncated Spike solver, (ii) we develop a highly accurate pseudo-analytical parallel performance model for our solver, (iii) we show excellent predication capabilities of our model – based on which we argue the high scalability of our solver. Our pseudo-analytical performance model is based on analytical performance characterization of each phase of our solver. These analytical models are then parameterized using actual runtime information on target platforms. An important consequence of our performance models is that they reveal underlying performance bottlenecks in both serial and parallel formulations. All of our results are validated

  10. The novel high-performance 3-D MT inverse solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruglyakov, Mikhail; Geraskin, Alexey; Kuvshinov, Alexey

    2016-04-01

    We present novel, robust, scalable, and fast 3-D magnetotelluric (MT) inverse solver. The solver is written in multi-language paradigm to make it as efficient, readable and maintainable as possible. Separation of concerns and single responsibility concepts go through implementation of the solver. As a forward modelling engine a modern scalable solver extrEMe, based on contracting integral equation approach, is used. Iterative gradient-type (quasi-Newton) optimization scheme is invoked to search for (regularized) inverse problem solution, and adjoint source approach is used to calculate efficiently the gradient of the misfit. The inverse solver is able to deal with highly detailed and contrasting models, allows for working (separately or jointly) with any type of MT responses, and supports massive parallelization. Moreover, different parallelization strategies implemented in the code allow optimal usage of available computational resources for a given problem statement. To parameterize an inverse domain the so-called mask parameterization is implemented, which means that one can merge any subset of forward modelling cells in order to account for (usually) irregular distribution of observation sites. We report results of 3-D numerical experiments aimed at analysing the robustness, performance and scalability of the code. In particular, our computational experiments carried out at different platforms ranging from modern laptops to HPC Piz Daint (6th supercomputer in the world) demonstrate practically linear scalability of the code up to thousands of nodes.

  11. Adaptive kinetic-fluid solvers for heterogeneous computing architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabelok, Sergey; Arslanbekov, Robert; Kolobov, Vladimir

    2015-12-01

    We show feasibility and benefits of porting an adaptive multi-scale kinetic-fluid code to CPU-GPU systems. Challenges are due to the irregular data access for adaptive Cartesian mesh, vast difference of computational cost between kinetic and fluid cells, and desire to evenly load all CPUs and GPUs during grid adaptation and algorithm refinement. Our Unified Flow Solver (UFS) combines Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) with automatic cell-by-cell selection of kinetic or fluid solvers based on continuum breakdown criteria. Using GPUs enables hybrid simulations of mixed rarefied-continuum flows with a million of Boltzmann cells each having a 24 × 24 × 24 velocity mesh. We describe the implementation of CUDA kernels for three modules in UFS: the direct Boltzmann solver using the discrete velocity method (DVM), the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) solver, and a mesoscopic solver based on the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM), all using adaptive Cartesian mesh. Double digit speedups on single GPU and good scaling for multi-GPUs have been demonstrated.

  12. A robust HLLC-type Riemann solver for strong shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zhijun; Yan, Wei; Yuan, Guangwei

    2016-03-01

    It is well known that for the Eulerian equations the numerical schemes that can accurately capture contact discontinuity usually suffer from some disastrous carbuncle phenomenon, while some more dissipative schemes, such as the HLL scheme, are free from this kind of shock instability. Hybrid schemes to combine a dissipative flux with a less dissipative flux can cure the shock instability, but also may lead to other problems, such as certain arbitrariness of choosing switching parameters or contact interface becoming smeared. In order to overcome these drawbacks, this paper proposes a simple and robust HLLC-type Riemann solver for inviscid, compressible gas flows, which is capable of preserving sharp contact surface and is free from instability. The main work is to construct a HLL-type Riemann solver and a HLLC-type Riemann solver by modifying the shear viscosity of the original HLL and HLLC methods. Both of the two new schemes are positively conservative under some typical wavespeed estimations. Moreover, a linear matrix stability analysis for the proposed schemes is accomplished, which illustrates the HLLC-type solver with shear viscosity is stable whereas the HLL-type solver with vorticity wave is unstable. Our arguments and numerical experiments demonstrate that the inadequate dissipation associated to the shear wave may be a unique reason to cause the instability.

  13. Interpolation and Approximation Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaijser, Sten

    1991-01-01

    Introduced are the basic ideas of interpolation and approximation theory through a combination of theory and exercises written for extramural education at the university level. Topics treated are spline methods, Lagrange interpolation, trigonometric approximation, Fourier series, and polynomial approximation. (MDH)

  14. Two Solvers for Tractable Temporal Constraints with Preferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossi, F.; Khatib,L.; Morris, P.; Morris, R.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A number of reasoning problems involving the manipulation of temporal information can naturally be viewed as implicitly inducing an ordering of potential local decisions involving time on the basis of preferences. Soft temporal constraints problems allow to describe in a natural way scenarios where events happen over time and preferences are associated to event distances and durations. In general, solving soft temporal problems require exponential time in the worst case, but there are interesting subclasses of problems which are polynomially solvable. We describe two solvers based on two different approaches for solving the same tractable subclass. For each solver we present the theoretical results it stands on, a description of the algorithm and some experimental results. The random generator used to build the problems on which tests are performed is also described. Finally, we compare the two solvers highlighting the tradeoff between performance and representational power.

  15. Overset Techniques for Hypersonic Multibody Configurations with the DPLR Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyatt, Andrew James; Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Boger, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Three unit problems in shock-shock/shock-boundary layer interactions are considered in the evaluation overset techniques with the Data Parallel Line Relaxation (DPLR) computational fluid dynamics solver, a three dimensional Navier-Stokes solver . The unit problems considered are those of two stacked hemispherical cylinders (of different diameters and lengths, and at various orientations relative to each other or relative to the nozzle axis) tested in a hypersonic wind tunnel. These problems are taken as representative of a Two-Stage-To-Orbit design. The objective of the present presentation would be to discuss the techniques used to develop suitable overset grid systems and then evaluate their respective solutions by comparing to corresponding point matched grid solutions and experimental data. Both successful and unsuccessful techniques would be discussed. All solutions would be calculated using the DPLR solver and SUGGAR will be used to develop the domain connectivity information.

  16. An evaluation of parallel multigrid as a solver and a preconditioner for singular perturbed problems

    SciTech Connect

    Oosterlee, C.W.; Washio, T.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper we try to achieve h-independent convergence with preconditioned GMRES and BiCGSTAB for 2D singular perturbed equations. Three recently developed multigrid methods are adopted as a preconditioner. They are also used as solution methods in order to compare the performance of the methods as solvers and as preconditioners. Two of the multigrid methods differ only in the transfer operators. One uses standard matrix- dependent prolongation operators from. The second uses {open_quotes}upwind{close_quotes} prolongation operators, developed. Both employ the Galerkin coarse grid approximation and an alternating zebra line Gauss-Seidel smoother. The third method is based on the block LU decomposition of a matrix and on an approximate Schur complement. This multigrid variant is presented in. All three multigrid algorithms are algebraic methods.

  17. Numerical System Solver Developed for the National Cycle Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binder, Michael P.

    1999-01-01

    As part of the National Cycle Program (NCP), a powerful new numerical solver has been developed to support the simulation of aeropropulsion systems. This software uses a hierarchical object-oriented design. It can provide steady-state and time-dependent solutions to nonlinear and even discontinuous problems typically encountered when aircraft and spacecraft propulsion systems are simulated. It also can handle constrained solutions, in which one or more factors may limit the behavior of the engine system. Timedependent simulation capabilities include adaptive time-stepping and synchronization with digital control elements. The NCP solver is playing an important role in making the NCP a flexible, powerful, and reliable simulation package.

  18. Convergence acceleration of an aeroelastic Navier-Stokes solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obayashi, S.; Guruswamy, G.

    1994-01-01

    New capabilities have been added to a Navier-Stokes solver to perform steady-state simulations more efficiently. The flow solver for solving the Navier-Stokes equations is completely rewritten with a combination of the LU-SGS (Lower-Upper factored Symmetric Gauss-Seidel) implicit method and the modified HLLE (Harten-Lax-van Leer-Einfeldt) upwind scheme. A pseudo-time marching method is used for the directly coupled structural equations to improve overall convergence rates for static aeroelastic analysis. Results are demonstrated for transonic flows over rigid and flexible wings.

  19. A Time Dependent Transport Equation Solver

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    Using TWIGL Mesh Spacing ............. 63 11 Initial FEMP2D Flux Using 2X TWIGL Mesh Spacing ........ .. 64 12 Time Dependent Thermal Absorption...energy group, and g = G is the lowest ( thermal ) energy group. ?oo(r, E, t) the coefficient in the P approximation that phys- ically r’iDresents the total...than these MrPs. This suggest that the thermal flux calculations could be suspect. Indeed, both the FEMP2D and FMP2DT calculations showed that the

  20. A Robust Multilevel Simultaneous Eigenvalue Solver

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    same efficiency is obtained for problems in 3-D as for problem in 2-D. In all examples the periodic boundary conditions Schr ~ dinger eigenvalue problem (A...coarse level work on levels 1, 2, took ap- proximately 1/6 of the computer time and on levels 1, 2, 3, approximately 1/4 of the computer time . This is a...eigenvalues. The results of the numerical tests for Schr ~ dinger eigenvalue problems, show that the algorithm achieved the same accuracy, using the same

  1. Intellectual Abilities That Discriminate Good and Poor Problem Solvers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Ruth Ann

    1981-01-01

    This study compared good and poor fourth-grade problem solvers on a battery of 19 "reference" tests for verbal, induction, numerical, word fluency, memory, perceptual speed, and simple visualization abilities. Results suggest verbal, numerical, and especially induction abilities are important to successful mathematical problem solving.…

  2. Time-varying Riemann solvers for conservation laws on networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garavello, Mauro; Piccoli, Benedetto

    We consider a conservation law on a network and generic Riemann solvers at nodes depending on parameters, which can be seen as control functions. Assuming that the parameters have bounded variation as functions of time, we prove existence of solutions to Cauchy problems on the whole network.

  3. Navier-Stokes Solvers and Generalizations for Reacting Flow Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Elman, Howard C

    2013-01-27

    This is an overview of our accomplishments during the final term of this grant (1 September 2008 -- 30 June 2012). These fall mainly into three categories: fast algorithms for linear eigenvalue problems; solution algorithms and modeling methods for partial differential equations with uncertain coefficients; and preconditioning methods and solvers for models of computational fluid dynamics (CFD).

  4. Coordinate Projection-based Solver for ODE with Invariants

    SciTech Connect

    Serban, Radu

    2008-04-08

    CPODES is a general purpose (serial and parallel) solver for systems of ordinary differential equation (ODE) with invariants. It implements a coordinate projection approach using different types of projection (orthogonal or oblique) and one of several methods for the decompositon of the Jacobian of the invariant equations.

  5. Hypersonic simulations using open-source CFD and DSMC solvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casseau, V.; Scanlon, T. J.; John, B.; Emerson, D. R.; Brown, R. E.

    2016-11-01

    Hypersonic hybrid hydrodynamic-molecular gas flow solvers are required to satisfy the two essential requirements of any high-speed reacting code, these being physical accuracy and computational efficiency. The James Weir Fluids Laboratory at the University of Strathclyde is currently developing an open-source hybrid code which will eventually reconcile the direct simulation Monte-Carlo method, making use of the OpenFOAM application called dsmcFoam, and the newly coded open-source two-temperature computational fluid dynamics solver named hy2Foam. In conjunction with employing the CVDV chemistry-vibration model in hy2Foam, novel use is made of the QK rates in a CFD solver. In this paper, further testing is performed, in particular with the CFD solver, to ensure its efficacy before considering more advanced test cases. The hy2Foam and dsmcFoam codes have shown to compare reasonably well, thus providing a useful basis for other codes to compare against.

  6. PSH3D fast Poisson solver for petascale DNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Darren; Dodd, Michael; Ferrante, Antonino

    2016-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) of high Reynolds number, Re >= O (105) , turbulent flows requires computational meshes >= O (1012) grid points, and, thus, the use of petascale supercomputers. DNS often requires the solution of a Helmholtz (or Poisson) equation for pressure, which constitutes the bottleneck of the solver. We have developed a parallel solver of the Helmholtz equation in 3D, PSH3D. The numerical method underlying PSH3D combines a parallel 2D Fast Fourier transform in two spatial directions, and a parallel linear solver in the third direction. For computational meshes up to 81923 grid points, our numerical results show that PSH3D scales up to at least 262k cores of Cray XT5 (Blue Waters). PSH3D has a peak performance 6 × faster than 3D FFT-based methods when used with the 'partial-global' optimization, and for a 81923 mesh solves the Poisson equation in 1 sec using 128k cores. Also, we have verified that the use of PSH3D with the 'partial-global' optimization in our DNS solver does not reduce the accuracy of the numerical solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations.

  7. Thinking Process of Naive Problem Solvers to Solve Mathematical Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mairing, Jackson Pasini

    2017-01-01

    Solving problems is not only a goal of mathematical learning. Students acquire ways of thinking, habits of persistence and curiosity, and confidence in unfamiliar situations by learning to solve problems. In fact, there were students who had difficulty in solving problems. The students were naive problem solvers. This research aimed to describe…

  8. Development of multiphase CFD flow solver in OpenFOAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollins, Chad; Luo, Hong; Dinh, Nam

    2016-11-01

    We are developing a pressure-based multiphase (Eulerian) CFD solver using OpenFOAM with Reynolds-averaged turbulence stress modeling. Our goal is the evaluation and improvement of the current OpenFOAM two-fluid (Eulerian) solver in boiling channels with a motivation to produce a more consistent modeling and numerics treatment. The difficulty lies in the prescense of the many forces and models that are tightly non-linearly coupled in the solver. Therefore, the solver platform will allow not only the modeling, but the tracking as well, of the effects of the individual components (various interfacial forces/heat transfer models) and their interactions. This is essential for the development of a robust and efficient solution method. There has be a lot of work already performed in related areas that generally indicates a lack of robustness of the solution methods. The objective here is therefore to identify and develop remedies for numerical/modeling issues through a systematic approach to verification and validation, taking advantage of the open source nature of OpenFOAM. The presentation will discuss major findings, and suggest strategies for robust and consistent modeling (probably, a more consistent treatment of heat transfer models with two-fluid models in the near-wall cells).

  9. Parallel Solver for H(div) Problems Using Hybridization and AMG

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chak S.; Vassilevski, Panayot S.

    2016-01-15

    In this paper, a scalable parallel solver is proposed for H(div) problems discretized by arbitrary order finite elements on general unstructured meshes. The solver is based on hybridization and algebraic multigrid (AMG). Unlike some previously studied H(div) solvers, the hybridization solver does not require discrete curl and gradient operators as additional input from the user. Instead, only some element information is needed in the construction of the solver. The hybridization results in a H1-equivalent symmetric positive definite system, which is then rescaled and solved by AMG solvers designed for H1 problems. Weak and strong scaling of the method are examined through several numerical tests. Our numerical results show that the proposed solver provides a promising alternative to ADS, a state-of-the-art solver [12], for H(div) problems. In fact, it outperforms ADS for higher order elements.

  10. Approximate flavor symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Rasin, A.

    1994-04-01

    We discuss the idea of approximate flavor symmetries. Relations between approximate flavor symmetries and natural flavor conservation and democracy models is explored. Implications for neutrino physics are also discussed.

  11. Migration of vectorized iterative solvers to distributed memory architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Pommerell, C.; Ruehl, R.

    1994-12-31

    Both necessity and opportunity motivate the use of high-performance computers for iterative linear solvers. Necessity results from the size of the problems being solved-smaller problems are often better handled by direct methods. Opportunity arises from the formulation of the iterative methods in terms of simple linear algebra operations, even if this {open_quote}natural{close_quotes} parallelism is not easy to exploit in irregularly structured sparse matrices and with good preconditioners. As a result, high-performance implementations of iterative solvers have attracted a lot of interest in recent years. Most efforts are geared to vectorize or parallelize the dominating operation-structured or unstructured sparse matrix-vector multiplication, or to increase locality and parallelism by reformulating the algorithm-reducing global synchronization in inner products or local data exchange in preconditioners. Target architectures for iterative solvers currently include mostly vector supercomputers and architectures with one or few optimized (e.g., super-scalar and/or super-pipelined RISC) processors and hierarchical memory systems. More recently, parallel computers with physically distributed memory and a better price/performance ratio have been offered by vendors as a very interesting alternative to vector supercomputers. However, programming comfort on such distributed memory parallel processors (DMPPs) still lags behind. Here the authors are concerned with iterative solvers and their changing computing environment. In particular, they are considering migration from traditional vector supercomputers to DMPPs. Application requirements force one to use flexible and portable libraries. They want to extend the portability of iterative solvers rather than reimplementing everything for each new machine, or even for each new architecture.

  12. Multiscale Universal Interface: A concurrent framework for coupling heterogeneous solvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yu-Hang; Kudo, Shuhei; Bian, Xin; Li, Zhen; Karniadakis, George Em

    2015-09-01

    Concurrently coupled numerical simulations using heterogeneous solvers are powerful tools for modeling multiscale phenomena. However, major modifications to existing codes are often required to enable such simulations, posing significant difficulties in practice. In this paper we present a C++ library, i.e. the Multiscale Universal Interface (MUI), which is capable of facilitating the coupling effort for a wide range of multiscale simulations. The library adopts a header-only form with minimal external dependency and hence can be easily dropped into existing codes. A data sampler concept is introduced, combined with a hybrid dynamic/static typing mechanism, to create an easily customizable framework for solver-independent data interpretation. The library integrates MPI MPMD support and an asynchronous communication protocol to handle inter-solver information exchange irrespective of the solvers' own MPI awareness. Template metaprogramming is heavily employed to simultaneously improve runtime performance and code flexibility. We validated the library by solving three different multiscale problems, which also serve to demonstrate the flexibility of the framework in handling heterogeneous models and solvers. In the first example, a Couette flow was simulated using two concurrently coupled Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of different spatial resolutions. In the second example, we coupled the deterministic SPH method with the stochastic Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) method to study the effect of surface grafting on the hydrodynamics properties on the surface. In the third example, we consider conjugate heat transfer between a solid domain and a fluid domain by coupling the particle-based energy-conserving DPD (eDPD) method with the Finite Element Method (FEM).

  13. Multiscale Universal Interface: A concurrent framework for coupling heterogeneous solvers

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yu-Hang; Kudo, Shuhei; Bian, Xin; Li, Zhen; Karniadakis, George Em

    2015-09-15

    Graphical abstract: - Abstract: Concurrently coupled numerical simulations using heterogeneous solvers are powerful tools for modeling multiscale phenomena. However, major modifications to existing codes are often required to enable such simulations, posing significant difficulties in practice. In this paper we present a C++ library, i.e. the Multiscale Universal Interface (MUI), which is capable of facilitating the coupling effort for a wide range of multiscale simulations. The library adopts a header-only form with minimal external dependency and hence can be easily dropped into existing codes. A data sampler concept is introduced, combined with a hybrid dynamic/static typing mechanism, to create an easily customizable framework for solver-independent data interpretation. The library integrates MPI MPMD support and an asynchronous communication protocol to handle inter-solver information exchange irrespective of the solvers' own MPI awareness. Template metaprogramming is heavily employed to simultaneously improve runtime performance and code flexibility. We validated the library by solving three different multiscale problems, which also serve to demonstrate the flexibility of the framework in handling heterogeneous models and solvers. In the first example, a Couette flow was simulated using two concurrently coupled Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of different spatial resolutions. In the second example, we coupled the deterministic SPH method with the stochastic Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) method to study the effect of surface grafting on the hydrodynamics properties on the surface. In the third example, we consider conjugate heat transfer between a solid domain and a fluid domain by coupling the particle-based energy-conserving DPD (eDPD) method with the Finite Element Method (FEM)

  14. Decision Engines for Software Analysis Using Satisfiability Modulo Theories Solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorner, Nikolaj

    2010-01-01

    The area of software analysis, testing and verification is now undergoing a revolution thanks to the use of automated and scalable support for logical methods. A well-recognized premise is that at the core of software analysis engines is invariably a component using logical formulas for describing states and transformations between system states. The process of using this information for discovering and checking program properties (including such important properties as safety and security) amounts to automatic theorem proving. In particular, theorem provers that directly support common software constructs offer a compelling basis. Such provers are commonly called satisfiability modulo theories (SMT) solvers. Z3 is a state-of-the-art SMT solver. It is developed at Microsoft Research. It can be used to check the satisfiability of logical formulas over one or more theories such as arithmetic, bit-vectors, lists, records and arrays. The talk describes some of the technology behind modern SMT solvers, including the solver Z3. Z3 is currently mainly targeted at solving problems that arise in software analysis and verification. It has been applied to various contexts, such as systems for dynamic symbolic simulation (Pex, SAGE, Vigilante), for program verification and extended static checking (Spec#/Boggie, VCC, HAVOC), for software model checking (Yogi, SLAM), model-based design (FORMULA), security protocol code (F7), program run-time analysis and invariant generation (VS3). We will describe how it integrates support for a variety of theories that arise naturally in the context of the applications. There are several new promising avenues and the talk will touch on some of these and the challenges related to SMT solvers. Proceedings

  15. Solvers for $\\mathcal{O} (N)$ Electronic Structure in the Strong Scaling Limit

    SciTech Connect

    Bock, Nicolas; Challacombe, William M.; Kale, Laxmikant

    2016-01-26

    Here we present a hybrid OpenMP/Charm\\tt++ framework for solving the $\\mathcal{O} (N)$ self-consistent-field eigenvalue problem with parallelism in the strong scaling regime, $P\\gg{N}$, where $P$ is the number of cores, and $N$ is a measure of system size, i.e., the number of matrix rows/columns, basis functions, atoms, molecules, etc. This result is achieved with a nested approach to spectral projection and the sparse approximate matrix multiply [Bock and Challacombe, SIAM J. Sci. Comput., 35 (2013), pp. C72--C98], and involves a recursive, task-parallel algorithm, often employed by generalized $N$-Body solvers, to occlusion and culling of negligible products in the case of matrices with decay. Lastly, employing classic technologies associated with generalized $N$-Body solvers, including overdecomposition, recursive task parallelism, orderings that preserve locality, and persistence-based load balancing, we obtain scaling beyond hundreds of cores per molecule for small water clusters ([H${}_2$O]${}_N$, $N \\in \\{ 30, 90, 150 \\}$, $P/N \\approx \\{ 819, 273, 164 \\}$) and find support for an increasingly strong scalability with increasing system size $N$.

  16. Solvers for $$\\mathcal{O} (N)$$ Electronic Structure in the Strong Scaling Limit

    DOE PAGES

    Bock, Nicolas; Challacombe, William M.; Kale, Laxmikant

    2016-01-26

    Here we present a hybrid OpenMP/Charm\\tt++ framework for solving themore » $$\\mathcal{O} (N)$$ self-consistent-field eigenvalue problem with parallelism in the strong scaling regime, $$P\\gg{N}$$, where $P$ is the number of cores, and $N$ is a measure of system size, i.e., the number of matrix rows/columns, basis functions, atoms, molecules, etc. This result is achieved with a nested approach to spectral projection and the sparse approximate matrix multiply [Bock and Challacombe, SIAM J. Sci. Comput., 35 (2013), pp. C72--C98], and involves a recursive, task-parallel algorithm, often employed by generalized $N$-Body solvers, to occlusion and culling of negligible products in the case of matrices with decay. Lastly, employing classic technologies associated with generalized $N$-Body solvers, including overdecomposition, recursive task parallelism, orderings that preserve locality, and persistence-based load balancing, we obtain scaling beyond hundreds of cores per molecule for small water clusters ([H$${}_2$$O]$${}_N$$, $$N \\in \\{ 30, 90, 150 \\}$$, $$P/N \\approx \\{ 819, 273, 164 \\}$$) and find support for an increasingly strong scalability with increasing system size $N$.« less

  17. A rapid fast ion Fokker-Planck solver for integrated modelling of tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, M.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Johnson, T.; Futtersack, R.; Artaud, J. F.; Dumont, R.; Wolle, B.; Contributors, ITM-TF

    2015-01-01

    The RISK (rapid ion solver for tokamaks) code for simulating the evolution of the distribution function of neutral beam injected ions (NBI) in tokamak plasmas is described. The code has been especially developed for use in integrated modelling frameworks. Within this context, a code needs to be modular, machine independent and fast. RISK fulfils all these conditions. The RISK code solves the bounce averaged Fokker-Planck equation for the species of the injected ions by expanding the distribution function in the eigenfunctions of the collisional pitch angle scattering operator. The velocity dependent coefficient functions are calculated with a finite element solver. Finite orbit width effects are handled by an ad hoc broadening algorithm of the NBI ionization source. In order to assess the validity of the approximations employed in RISK, a comparison with a full orbit following Monte Carlo code is presented. RISK is integrated into the CRONOS transport suite of codes (Artaud et al 2010 Nucl. Fusion 50 043001) and the European integrated modelling (EU-IM) framework (Falchetto et al 2014 Nucl. Fusion 54 043018). The RISK implementation in this platform is discussed and exemplified to show the strength of running simulation codes in a modular and machine independent environment for simulation of fusion plasmas.

  18. Accurate and efficient computation of nonlocal potentials based on Gaussian-sum approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exl, Lukas; Mauser, Norbert J.; Zhang, Yong

    2016-12-01

    We introduce an accurate and efficient method for the numerical evaluation of nonlocal potentials, including the 3D/2D Coulomb, 2D Poisson and 3D dipole-dipole potentials. Our method is based on a Gaussian-sum approximation of the singular convolution kernel combined with a Taylor expansion of the density. Starting from the convolution formulation of the nonlocal potential, for smooth and fast decaying densities, we make a full use of the Fourier pseudospectral (plane wave) approximation of the density and a separable Gaussian-sum approximation of the kernel in an interval where the singularity (the origin) is excluded. The potential is separated into a regular integral and a near-field singular correction integral. The first is computed with the Fourier pseudospectral method, while the latter is well resolved utilizing a low-order Taylor expansion of the density. Both parts are accelerated by fast Fourier transforms (FFT). The method is accurate (14-16 digits), efficient (O (Nlog ⁡ N) complexity), low in storage, easily adaptable to other different kernels, applicable for anisotropic densities and highly parallelizable.

  19. Performance of algebraic multi-grid solvers based on unsmoothed and smoothed aggregation schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, R.

    2001-08-01

    A comparison is made of the performance of two algebraic multi-grid (AMG0 and AMG1) solvers for the solution of discrete, coupled, elliptic field problems. In AMG0, the basis functions for each coarse grid/level approximation (CGA) are obtained directly by unsmoothed aggregation, an appropriate scaling being applied to each CGA to improve consistency. In AMG1 they are assembled using a smoothed aggregation with a constrained energy optimization method providing the smoothing. Although more costly, smoothed basis functions provide a better (more consistent) CGA. Thus, AMG1 might be viewed as a benchmark for the assessment of the simpler AMG0. Selected test problems for D'Arcy flow in pipe networks, Fick diffusion, plane strain elasticity and Navier-Stokes flow (in a Stokes approximation) are used in making the comparison. They are discretized on the basis of both structured and unstructured finite element meshes. The range of discrete equation sets covers both symmetric positive definite systems and systems that may be non-symmetric and/or indefinite. Both global and local mesh refinements to at least one order of resolving power are examined. Some of these include anisotropic refinements involving elements of large aspect ratio; in some hydrodynamics cases, the anisotropy is extreme, with aspect ratios exceeding two orders. As expected, AMG1 delivers typical multi-grid convergence rates, which for all practical purposes are independent of mesh bandwidth. AMG0 rates are slower. They may also be more discernibly mesh-dependent. However, for the range of mesh bandwidths examined, the overall cost effectiveness of the two solvers is remarkably similar when a full convergence to machine accuracy is demanded. Thus, the shorter solution times for AMG1 do not necessarily compensate for the extra time required for its costly grid generation. This depends on the severity of the problem and the demanded level of convergence. For problems requiring few iterations, where grid

  20. Approximation of Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niiniluoto, Ilkka

    2014-03-01

    Approximation of laws is an important theme in the philosophy of science. If we can make sense of the idea that two scientific laws are "close" to each other, then we can also analyze such methodological notions as approximate explanation of laws, approximate reduction of theories, approximate empirical success of theories, and approximate truth of laws. Proposals for measuring the distance between quantitative scientific laws were given in Niiniluoto (1982, 1987). In this paper, these definitions are reconsidered as a response to the interesting critical remarks by Liu (1999).

  1. Padé approximation of the adiabatic electron contribution to the gyrokinetic quasi-neutrality equation in the ORB5 code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanti, E.; Dominski, J.; Brunner, S.; McMillan, B. F.; Villard, L.

    2016-11-01

    This work aims at completing the implementation of a solver for the quasineutrality equation using a Padé approximation in the global gyrokinetic code ORB5. Initially [Dominski, Ph.D. thesis, 2016], the Pade approximation was only implemented for the kinetic electron model. To enable runs with adiabatic or hybrid electron models while using a Pade approximation to the polarization response, the adiabatic response term of the quasi-neutrality equation must be consistently modified. It is shown that the Pade solver is in good agreement with the arbitrary wavelength solver of ORB5 [Dominski, Ph.D. thesis, 2016]. To perform this verification, the linear dispersion relation of an ITG-TEM transition is computed for both solvers and the linear growth rates and frequencies are compared.

  2. Brittle Solvers: Lessons and insights into effective solvers for visco-plasticity in geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiegelman, M. W.; May, D.; Wilson, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    Plasticity/Fracture and rock failure are essential ingredients in geodynamic models as terrestrial rocks do not possess an infinite yield strength. Numerous physical mechanisms have been proposed to limit the strength of rocks, including low temperature plasticity and brittle fracture. While ductile and creep behavior of rocks at depth is largely accepted, the constitutive relations associated with brittle failure, or shear localisation, are more controversial. Nevertheless, there are really only a few macroscopic constitutive laws for visco-plasticity that are regularly used in geodynamics models. Independent of derivation, all of these can be cast as simple effective viscosities which act as stress limiters with different choices for yield surfaces; the most common being a von Mises (constant yield stress) or Drucker-Prager (pressure dependent yield-stress) criterion. The choice of plasticity model, however, can have significant consequences for the degree of non-linearity in a problem and the choice and efficiency of non-linear solvers. Here we describe a series of simplified 2 and 3-D model problems to elucidate several issues associated with obtaining accurate description and solution of visco-plastic problems. We demonstrate that1) Picard/Successive substitution schemes for solution of the non-linear problems can often stall at large values of the non-linear residual, thus producing spurious solutions2) Combined Picard/Newton schemes can be effective for a range of plasticity models, however, they can produce serious convergence problems for strongly pressure dependent plasticity models such as Drucker-Prager.3) Nevertheless, full Drucker-Prager may not be the plasticity model of choice for strong materials as the dynamic pressures produced in these layers can develop pathological behavior with Drucker-Prager, leading to stress strengthening rather than stress weakening behavior.4) In general, for any incompressible Stoke's problem, it is highly advisable to

  3. CASTRO: A NEW COMPRESSIBLE ASTROPHYSICAL SOLVER. II. GRAY RADIATION HYDRODYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W.; Almgren, A.; Bell, J.; Howell, L.; Burrows, A.

    2011-10-01

    We describe the development of a flux-limited gray radiation solver for the compressible astrophysics code, CASTRO. CASTRO uses an Eulerian grid with block-structured adaptive mesh refinement based on a nested hierarchy of logically rectangular variable-sized grids with simultaneous refinement in both space and time. The gray radiation solver is based on a mixed-frame formulation of radiation hydrodynamics. In our approach, the system is split into two parts, one part that couples the radiation and fluid in a hyperbolic subsystem, and another parabolic part that evolves radiation diffusion and source-sink terms. The hyperbolic subsystem is solved explicitly with a high-order Godunov scheme, whereas the parabolic part is solved implicitly with a first-order backward Euler method.

  4. Scalable Out-of-Core Solvers on Xeon Phi Cluster

    SciTech Connect

    D'Azevedo, Ed F; Chan, Ki Shing; Su, Shiquan; Wong, Kwai

    2015-01-01

    This paper documents the implementation of a distributive out-of-core (OOC) solver for performing LU and Cholesky factorizations of a large dense matrix on clusters of many-core programmable co-processors. The out-of- core algorithm combines both the left-looking and right-looking schemes aimed to minimize the movement of data between the CPU host and the co-processor, optimizing data locality as well as computing throughput. The OOC solver is built to align with the format of the ScaLAPACK software library, making it readily portable to any existing codes using ScaLAPACK. A runtime analysis conducted on Beacon (an Intel Xeon plus Intel Xeon Phi cluster which composed of 48 nodes of multi-core CPU and MIC) at the Na- tional Institute for Computational Sciences is presented. Comparison of the performance on the Intel Xeon Phi and GPU clusters are also provided.

  5. Parallel Auxiliary Space AMG Solver for $H(div)$ Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Kolev, Tzanio V.; Vassilevski, Panayot S.

    2012-12-18

    We present a family of scalable preconditioners for matrices arising in the discretization of $H(div)$ problems using the lowest order Raviart--Thomas finite elements. Our approach belongs to the class of “auxiliary space''--based methods and requires only the finite element stiffness matrix plus some minimal additional discretization information about the topology and orientation of mesh entities. Also, we provide a detailed algebraic description of the theory, parallel implementation, and different variants of this parallel auxiliary space divergence solver (ADS) and discuss its relations to the Hiptmair--Xu (HX) auxiliary space decomposition of $H(div)$ [SIAM J. Numer. Anal., 45 (2007), pp. 2483--2509] and to the auxiliary space Maxwell solver AMS [J. Comput. Math., 27 (2009), pp. 604--623]. Finally, an extensive set of numerical experiments demonstrates the robustness and scalability of our implementation on large-scale $H(div)$ problems with large jumps in the material coefficients.

  6. A 3-D upwind Euler solver for unstructured meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Timothy J.

    1991-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite-volume upwind Euler solver is developed for unstructured meshes. The finite-volume scheme solves for solution variables at vertices of the mesh and satisfies the integral conservation law on nonoverlapping polyhedral control volumes surrounding vertices of the mesh. The schene achieves improved solution accuracy by assuming a piecewise linear variation of the solution in each control volume. This improved spatial accuracy hinges heavily upon the calculation of the solution gradient in each control volume given pointwise values of the solution at vertices of the mesh. Several algorithms are discussed for obtaining these gradients. Details concerning implementation procedures and data structures are discussed. Sample calculations for inviscid Euler flow about isolated aircraft wings at subsonic and transonic speeds are compared with established Euler solvers as well as experiment.

  7. Verification and Validation Studies for the LAVA CFD Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moini-Yekta, Shayan; Barad, Michael F; Sozer, Emre; Brehm, Christoph; Housman, Jeffrey A.; Kiris, Cetin C.

    2013-01-01

    The verification and validation of the Launch Ascent and Vehicle Aerodynamics (LAVA) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver is presented. A modern strategy for verification and validation is described incorporating verification tests, validation benchmarks, continuous integration and version control methods for automated testing in a collaborative development environment. The purpose of the approach is to integrate the verification and validation process into the development of the solver and improve productivity. This paper uses the Method of Manufactured Solutions (MMS) for the verification of 2D Euler equations, 3D Navier-Stokes equations as well as turbulence models. A method for systematic refinement of unstructured grids is also presented. Verification using inviscid vortex propagation and flow over a flat plate is highlighted. Simulation results using laminar and turbulent flow past a NACA 0012 airfoil and ONERA M6 wing are validated against experimental and numerical data.

  8. A Nonlinear Modal Aeroelastic Solver for FUN3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, Benjamin D.; Bartels, Robert E.; Biedron, Robert T.; Scott, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    A nonlinear structural solver has been implemented internally within the NASA FUN3D computational fluid dynamics code, allowing for some new aeroelastic capabilities. Using a modal representation of the structure, a set of differential or differential-algebraic equations are derived for general thin structures with geometric nonlinearities. ODEPACK and LAPACK routines are linked with FUN3D, and the nonlinear equations are solved at each CFD time step. The existing predictor-corrector method is retained, whereby the structural solution is updated after mesh deformation. The nonlinear solver is validated using a test case for a flexible aeroshell at transonic, supersonic, and hypersonic flow conditions. Agreement with linear theory is seen for the static aeroelastic solutions at relatively low dynamic pressures, but structural nonlinearities limit deformation amplitudes at high dynamic pressures. No flutter was found at any of the tested trajectory points, though LCO may be possible in the transonic regime.

  9. An Upwind Solver for the National Combustion Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sockol, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    An upwind solver is presented for the unstructured grid National Combustion Code (NCC). The compressible Navier-Stokes equations with time-derivative preconditioning and preconditioned flux-difference splitting of the inviscid terms are used. First order derivatives are computed on cell faces and used to evaluate the shear stresses and heat fluxes. A new flux limiter uses these same first order derivatives in the evaluation of left and right states used in the flux-difference splitting. The k-epsilon turbulence equations are solved with the same second-order method. The new solver has been installed in a recent version of NCC and the resulting code has been tested successfully in 2D on two laminar cases with known solutions and one turbulent case with experimental data.

  10. On improving linear solver performance: a block variant of GMRES

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, A H; Dennis, J M; Jessup, E R

    2004-05-10

    The increasing gap between processor performance and memory access time warrants the re-examination of data movement in iterative linear solver algorithms. For this reason, we explore and establish the feasibility of modifying a standard iterative linear solver algorithm in a manner that reduces the movement of data through memory. In particular, we present an alternative to the restarted GMRES algorithm for solving a single right-hand side linear system Ax = b based on solving the block linear system AX = B. Algorithm performance, i.e. time to solution, is improved by using the matrix A in operations on groups of vectors. Experimental results demonstrate the importance of implementation choices on data movement as well as the effectiveness of the new method on a variety of problems from different application areas.

  11. Parallel CFD Algorithms for Aerodynamical Flow Solvers on Unstructured Meshes. Parts 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Timothy J.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The Advisory Group for Aerospace Research and Development (AGARD) has requested my participation in the lecture series entitled Parallel Computing in Computational Fluid Dynamics to be held at the von Karman Institute in Brussels, Belgium on May 15-19, 1995. In addition, a request has been made from the US Coordinator for AGARD at the Pentagon for NASA Ames to hold a repetition of the lecture series on October 16-20, 1995. I have been asked to be a local coordinator for the Ames event. All AGARD lecture series events have attendance limited to NATO allied countries. A brief of the lecture series is provided in the attached enclosure. Specifically, I have been asked to give two lectures of approximately 75 minutes each on the subject of parallel solution techniques for the fluid flow equations on unstructured meshes. The title of my lectures is "Parallel CFD Algorithms for Aerodynamical Flow Solvers on Unstructured Meshes" (Parts I-II). The contents of these lectures will be largely review in nature and will draw upon previously published work in this area. Topics of my lectures will include: (1) Mesh partitioning algorithms. Recursive techniques based on coordinate bisection, Cuthill-McKee level structures, and spectral bisection. (2) Newton's method for large scale CFD problems. Size and complexity estimates for Newton's method, modifications for insuring global convergence. (3) Techniques for constructing the Jacobian matrix. Analytic and numerical techniques for Jacobian matrix-vector products, constructing the transposed matrix, extensions to optimization and homotopy theories. (4) Iterative solution algorithms. Practical experience with GIVIRES and BICG-STAB matrix solvers. (5) Parallel matrix preconditioning. Incomplete Lower-Upper (ILU) factorization, domain-decomposed ILU, approximate Schur complement strategies.

  12. Boltzmann Solver with Adaptive Mesh in Velocity Space

    SciTech Connect

    Kolobov, Vladimir I.; Arslanbekov, Robert R.; Frolova, Anna A.

    2011-05-20

    We describe the implementation of direct Boltzmann solver with Adaptive Mesh in Velocity Space (AMVS) using quad/octree data structure. The benefits of the AMVS technique are demonstrated for the charged particle transport in weakly ionized plasmas where the collision integral is linear. We also describe the implementation of AMVS for the nonlinear Boltzmann collision integral. Test computations demonstrate both advantages and deficiencies of the current method for calculations of narrow-kernel distributions.

  13. A contribution to the great Riemann solver debate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, James J.

    1992-01-01

    The aims of this paper are threefold: to increase the level of awareness within the shock capturing community to the fact that many Godunov-type methods contain subtle flaws that can cause spurious solutions to be computed; to identify one mechanism that might thwart attempts to produce very high resolution simulations; and to proffer a simple strategy for overcoming the specific failings of individual Riemann solvers.

  14. Menu-Driven Solver Of Linear-Programming Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viterna, L. A.; Ferencz, D.

    1992-01-01

    Program assists inexperienced user in formulating linear-programming problems. A Linear Program Solver (ALPS) computer program is full-featured LP analysis program. Solves plain linear-programming problems as well as more-complicated mixed-integer and pure-integer programs. Also contains efficient technique for solution of purely binary linear-programming problems. Written entirely in IBM's APL2/PC software, Version 1.01. Packed program contains licensed material, property of IBM (copyright 1988, all rights reserved).

  15. A chemical reaction network solver for the astrophysics code NIRVANA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, U.

    2016-02-01

    Context. Chemistry often plays an important role in astrophysical gases. It regulates thermal properties by changing species abundances and via ionization processes. This way, time-dependent cooling mechanisms and other chemistry-related energy sources can have a profound influence on the dynamical evolution of an astrophysical system. Modeling those effects with the underlying chemical kinetics in realistic magneto-gasdynamical simulations provide the basis for a better link to observations. Aims: The present work describes the implementation of a chemical reaction network solver into the magneto-gasdynamical code NIRVANA. For this purpose a multispecies structure is installed, and a new module for evolving the rate equations of chemical kinetics is developed and coupled to the dynamical part of the code. A small chemical network for a hydrogen-helium plasma was constructed including associated thermal processes which is used in test problems. Methods: Evolving a chemical network within time-dependent simulations requires the additional solution of a set of coupled advection-reaction equations for species and gas temperature. Second-order Strang-splitting is used to separate the advection part from the reaction part. The ordinary differential equation (ODE) system representing the reaction part is solved with a fourth-order generalized Runge-Kutta method applicable for stiff systems inherent to astrochemistry. Results: A series of tests was performed in order to check the correctness of numerical and technical implementation. Tests include well-known stiff ODE problems from the mathematical literature in order to confirm accuracy properties of the solver used as well as problems combining gasdynamics and chemistry. Overall, very satisfactory results are achieved. Conclusions: The NIRVANA code is now ready to handle astrochemical processes in time-dependent simulations. An easy-to-use interface allows implementation of complex networks including thermal processes

  16. Scaling Algebraic Multigrid Solvers: On the Road to Exascale

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, A H; Falgout, R D; Gamblin, T; Kolev, T; Schulz, M; Yang, U M

    2010-12-12

    Algebraic Multigrid (AMG) solvers are an essential component of many large-scale scientific simulation codes. Their continued numerical scalability and efficient implementation is critical for preparing these codes for exascale. Our experiences on modern multi-core machines show that significant challenges must be addressed for AMG to perform well on such machines. We discuss our experiences and describe the techniques we have used to overcome scalability challenges for AMG on hybrid architectures in preparation for exascale.

  17. A Survey of Solver-Related Geometry and Meshing Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, James; Daniel, Derick; Gudenkauf, Jared; Hine, David; Sideroff, Chris

    2016-01-01

    There is a concern in the computational fluid dynamics community that mesh generation is a significant bottleneck in the CFD workflow. This is one of several papers that will help set the stage for a moderated panel discussion addressing this issue. Although certain general "rules of thumb" and a priori mesh metrics can be used to ensure that some base level of mesh quality is achieved, inadequate consideration is often given to the type of solver or particular flow regime on which the mesh will be utilized. This paper explores how an analyst may want to think differently about a mesh based on considerations such as if a flow is compressible vs. incompressible or hypersonic vs. subsonic or if the solver is node-centered vs. cell-centered. This paper is a high-level investigation intended to provide general insight into how considering the nature of the solver or flow when performing mesh generation has the potential to increase the accuracy and/or robustness of the solution and drive the mesh generation process to a state where it is no longer a hindrance to the analysis process.

  18. QED multi-dimensional vacuum polarization finite-difference solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carneiro, Pedro; Grismayer, Thomas; Silva, Luís; Fonseca, Ricardo

    2015-11-01

    The Extreme Light Infrastructure (ELI) is expected to deliver peak intensities of 1023 - 1024 W/cm2 allowing to probe nonlinear Quantum Electrodynamics (QED) phenomena in an unprecedented regime. Within the framework of QED, the second order process of photon-photon scattering leads to a set of extended Maxwell's equations [W. Heisenberg and H. Euler, Z. Physik 98, 714] effectively creating nonlinear polarization and magnetization terms that account for the nonlinear response of the vacuum. To model this in a self-consistent way, we present a multi dimensional generalized Maxwell equation finite difference solver with significantly enhanced dispersive properties, which was implemented in the OSIRIS particle-in-cell code [R.A. Fonseca et al. LNCS 2331, pp. 342-351, 2002]. We present a detailed numerical analysis of this electromagnetic solver. As an illustration of the properties of the solver, we explore several examples in extreme conditions. We confirm the theoretical prediction of vacuum birefringence of a pulse propagating in the presence of an intense static background field [arXiv:1301.4918 [quant-ph

  19. Transonic Drag Prediction Using an Unstructured Multigrid Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.; Levy, David W.

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results obtained with the NSU-3D unstructured multigrid solver for the AIAA Drag Prediction Workshop held in Anaheim, CA, June 2001. The test case for the workshop consists of a wing-body configuration at transonic flow conditions. Flow analyses for a complete test matrix of lift coefficient values and Mach numbers at a constant Reynolds number are performed, thus producing a set of drag polars and drag rise curves which are compared with experimental data. Results were obtained independently by both authors using an identical baseline grid and different refined grids. Most cases were run in parallel on commodity cluster-type machines while the largest cases were run on an SGI Origin machine using 128 processors. The objective of this paper is to study the accuracy of the subject unstructured grid solver for predicting drag in the transonic cruise regime, to assess the efficiency of the method in terms of convergence, cpu time, and memory, and to determine the effects of grid resolution on this predictive ability and its computational efficiency. A good predictive ability is demonstrated over a wide range of conditions, although accuracy was found to degrade for cases at higher Mach numbers and lift values where increasing amounts of flow separation occur. The ability to rapidly compute large numbers of cases at varying flow conditions using an unstructured solver on inexpensive clusters of commodity computers is also demonstrated.

  20. Error control of iterative linear solvers for integrated groundwater models.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Matthew F; Bai, Zhaojun; Brush, Charles F; Chung, Francis I; Dogrul, Emin C; Kadir, Tariq N

    2011-01-01

    An open problem that arises when using modern iterative linear solvers, such as the preconditioned conjugate gradient method or Generalized Minimum RESidual (GMRES) method, is how to choose the residual tolerance in the linear solver to be consistent with the tolerance on the solution error. This problem is especially acute for integrated groundwater models, which are implicitly coupled to another model, such as surface water models, and resolve both multiple scales of flow and temporal interaction terms, giving rise to linear systems with variable scaling. This article uses the theory of "forward error bound estimation" to explain the correspondence between the residual error in the preconditioned linear system and the solution error. Using examples of linear systems from models developed by the US Geological Survey and the California State Department of Water Resources, we observe that this error bound guides the choice of a practical measure for controlling the error in linear systems. We implemented a preconditioned GMRES algorithm and benchmarked it against the Successive Over-Relaxation (SOR) method, the most widely known iterative solver for nonsymmetric coefficient matrices. With forward error control, GMRES can easily replace the SOR method in legacy groundwater modeling packages, resulting in the overall simulation speedups as large as 7.74×. This research is expected to broadly impact groundwater modelers through the demonstration of a practical and general approach for setting the residual tolerance in line with the solution error tolerance and presentation of GMRES performance benchmarking results.

  1. Approximate spatial reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, Soumitra

    1988-01-01

    A model for approximate spatial reasoning using fuzzy logic to represent the uncertainty in the environment is presented. Algorithms are developed which can be used to reason about spatial information expressed in the form of approximate linguistic descriptions similar to the kind of spatial information processed by humans. Particular attention is given to static spatial reasoning.

  2. Green Ampt approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, D. A.; Parlange, J.-Y.; Li, L.; Jeng, D.-S.; Crapper, M.

    2005-10-01

    The solution to the Green and Ampt infiltration equation is expressible in terms of the Lambert W-1 function. Approximations for Green and Ampt infiltration are thus derivable from approximations for the W-1 function and vice versa. An infinite family of asymptotic expansions to W-1 is presented. Although these expansions do not converge near the branch point of the W function (corresponds to Green-Ampt infiltration with immediate ponding), a method is presented for approximating W-1 that is exact at the branch point and asymptotically, with interpolation between these limits. Some existing and several new simple and compact yet robust approximations applicable to Green-Ampt infiltration and flux are presented, the most accurate of which has a maximum relative error of 5 × 10 -5%. This error is orders of magnitude lower than any existing analytical approximations.

  3. An AMR capable finite element diffusion solver for ALE hydrocodes [An AMR capable diffusion solver for ALE-AMR

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A. C.; Bailey, D. S.; Kaiser, T. B.; Eder, D. C.; Gunney, B. T. N.; Masters, N. D.; Koniges, A. E.; Anderson, R. W.

    2015-02-01

    Here, we present a novel method for the solution of the diffusion equation on a composite AMR mesh. This approach is suitable for including diffusion based physics modules to hydrocodes that support ALE and AMR capabilities. To illustrate, we proffer our implementations of diffusion based radiation transport and heat conduction in a hydrocode called ALE-AMR. Numerical experiments conducted with the diffusion solver and associated physics packages yield 2nd order convergence in the L2 norm.

  4. Intrinsic Nilpotent Approximation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-01

    RD-A1II58 265 INTRINSIC NILPOTENT APPROXIMATION(U) MASSACHUSETTS INST 1/2 OF TECH CAMBRIDGE LAB FOR INFORMATION AND, DECISION UMCLRSSI SYSTEMS C...TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Intrinsic Nilpotent Approximation Technical Report 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER LIDS-R-1482 7. AUTHOR(.) S...certain infinite-dimensional filtered Lie algebras L by (finite-dimensional) graded nilpotent Lie algebras or g . where x E M, (x,,Z) E T*M/O. It

  5. Anomalous diffraction approximation limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Videen, Gorden; Chýlek, Petr

    It has been reported in a recent article [Liu, C., Jonas, P.R., Saunders, C.P.R., 1996. Accuracy of the anomalous diffraction approximation to light scattering by column-like ice crystals. Atmos. Res., 41, pp. 63-69] that the anomalous diffraction approximation (ADA) accuracy does not depend on particle refractive index, but instead is dependent on the particle size parameter. Since this is at odds with previous research, we thought these results warranted further discussion.

  6. Approximate spatial reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, Soumitra

    1988-01-01

    Much of human reasoning is approximate in nature. Formal models of reasoning traditionally try to be precise and reject the fuzziness of concepts in natural use and replace them with non-fuzzy scientific explicata by a process of precisiation. As an alternate to this approach, it has been suggested that rather than regard human reasoning processes as themselves approximating to some more refined and exact logical process that can be carried out with mathematical precision, the essence and power of human reasoning is in its capability to grasp and use inexact concepts directly. This view is supported by the widespread fuzziness of simple everyday terms (e.g., near tall) and the complexity of ordinary tasks (e.g., cleaning a room). Spatial reasoning is an area where humans consistently reason approximately with demonstrably good results. Consider the case of crossing a traffic intersection. We have only an approximate idea of the locations and speeds of various obstacles (e.g., persons and vehicles), but we nevertheless manage to cross such traffic intersections without any harm. The details of our mental processes which enable us to carry out such intricate tasks in such apparently simple manner are not well understood. However, it is that we try to incorporate such approximate reasoning techniques in our computer systems. Approximate spatial reasoning is very important for intelligent mobile agents (e.g., robots), specially for those operating in uncertain or unknown or dynamic domains.

  7. Approximate kernel competitive learning.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian-Sheng; Zheng, Wei-Shi; Lai, Jian-Huang

    2015-03-01

    Kernel competitive learning has been successfully used to achieve robust clustering. However, kernel competitive learning (KCL) is not scalable for large scale data processing, because (1) it has to calculate and store the full kernel matrix that is too large to be calculated and kept in the memory and (2) it cannot be computed in parallel. In this paper we develop a framework of approximate kernel competitive learning for processing large scale dataset. The proposed framework consists of two parts. First, it derives an approximate kernel competitive learning (AKCL), which learns kernel competitive learning in a subspace via sampling. We provide solid theoretical analysis on why the proposed approximation modelling would work for kernel competitive learning, and furthermore, we show that the computational complexity of AKCL is largely reduced. Second, we propose a pseudo-parallelled approximate kernel competitive learning (PAKCL) based on a set-based kernel competitive learning strategy, which overcomes the obstacle of using parallel programming in kernel competitive learning and significantly accelerates the approximate kernel competitive learning for large scale clustering. The empirical evaluation on publicly available datasets shows that the proposed AKCL and PAKCL can perform comparably as KCL, with a large reduction on computational cost. Also, the proposed methods achieve more effective clustering performance in terms of clustering precision against related approximate clustering approaches.

  8. Robust parallel iterative solvers for linear and least-squares problems, Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Saad, Yousef

    2014-01-16

    The primary goal of this project is to study and develop robust iterative methods for solving linear systems of equations and least squares systems. The focus of the Minnesota team is on algorithms development, robustness issues, and on tests and validation of the methods on realistic problems. 1. The project begun with an investigation on how to practically update a preconditioner obtained from an ILU-type factorization, when the coefficient matrix changes. 2. We investigated strategies to improve robustness in parallel preconditioners in a specific case of a PDE with discontinuous coefficients. 3. We explored ways to adapt standard preconditioners for solving linear systems arising from the Helmholtz equation. These are often difficult linear systems to solve by iterative methods. 4. We have also worked on purely theoretical issues related to the analysis of Krylov subspace methods for linear systems. 5. We developed an effective strategy for performing ILU factorizations for the case when the matrix is highly indefinite. The strategy uses shifting in some optimal way. The method was extended to the solution of Helmholtz equations by using complex shifts, yielding very good results in many cases. 6. We addressed the difficult problem of preconditioning sparse systems of equations on GPUs. 7. A by-product of the above work is a software package consisting of an iterative solver library for GPUs based on CUDA. This was made publicly available. It was the first such library that offers complete iterative solvers for GPUs. 8. We considered another form of ILU which blends coarsening techniques from Multigrid with algebraic multilevel methods. 9. We have released a new version on our parallel solver - called pARMS [new version is version 3]. As part of this we have tested the code in complex settings - including the solution of Maxwell and Helmholtz equations and for a problem of crystal growth.10. As an application of polynomial preconditioning we considered the

  9. A New Robust Solver for Saturated-Unsaturated Richards' Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barajas-Solano, D. A.; Tartakovsky, D. M.

    2012-12-01

    We present a novel approach for the numerical integration of the saturated-unsaturated Richards' equation, a degenerate parabolic partial differential equation that models flow in porous media. The method is based on the mixed (pore pressure-water content) form of RE, written as a set of differential algebraic equations (DAEs) of index-1 for the fully saturated case and index-2 for the partially saturated case. A DAE-based approach allows us to overcome the numerical challenges posed by the degenerate nature of the Richards' equation. The resulting set of DAEs is solved using the stiffly-accurate, single-step, 3-stage implicit Runge-Kutta method Radau IIA, chosen for its favorable accuracy and stability properties, and its ease of implementation. For each time step a nonlinear system of equations on the intermediate Runge-Kutta states of the pore pressure is solved, written so to ensure that the next step pore pressure and water content correspond to one another correctly. The implementation of our approach compares favorably to state-of-the-art DAE-based solvers in both one- and two-dimensional simulations. These solvers use multi-step backward difference formulas together with a pressure-based form of Richards' equation. To the best of our knowledge, our method is the first instance of a successful DAE-based solver that uses the mixed form of Richards' equation. We consider this a promising line of research, with future work to be done on the use of globally convergent methods for the solution of the occurring nonlinear systems of equations.

  10. Application of Aeroelastic Solvers Based on Navier Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Srivastava, Rakesh

    2001-01-01

    The propulsion element of the NASA Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) initiative is directed towards increasing the overall efficiency of current aircraft engines. This effort requires an increase in the efficiency of various components, such as fans, compressors, turbines etc. Improvement in engine efficiency can be accomplished through the use of lighter materials, larger diameter fans and/or higher-pressure ratio compressors. However, each of these has the potential to result in aeroelastic problems such as flutter or forced response. To address the aeroelastic problems, the Structural Dynamics Branch of NASA Glenn has been involved in the development of numerical capabilities for analyzing the aeroelastic stability characteristics and forced response of wide chord fans, multi-stage compressors and turbines. In order to design an engine to safely perform a set of desired tasks, accurate information of the stresses on the blade during the entire cycle of blade motion is required. This requirement in turn demands that accurate knowledge of steady and unsteady blade loading is available. To obtain the steady and unsteady aerodynamic forces for the complex flows around the engine components, for the flow regimes encountered by the rotor, an advanced compressible Navier-Stokes solver is required. A finite volume based Navier-Stokes solver has been developed at Mississippi State University (MSU) for solving the flow field around multistage rotors. The focus of the current research effort, under NASA Cooperative Agreement NCC3- 596 was on developing an aeroelastic analysis code (entitled TURBO-AE) based on the Navier-Stokes solver developed by MSU. The TURBO-AE code has been developed for flutter analysis of turbomachine components and delivered to NASA and its industry partners. The code has been verified. validated and is being applied by NASA Glenn and by aircraft engine manufacturers to analyze the aeroelastic stability characteristics of modem fans, compressors

  11. A Robust Compressible Flow Solver for Studies on Solar Fuel Production in Microwave Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadayon Mousavi, Samaneh; Koelman, Peter; Groen, Pieter Willem; van Dijk, Jan; Epg/ Applied Physics/ Eindhoven University Of Technology Team; Dutch InstituteFundamental Energy Research (Differ) Team

    2016-09-01

    n order to simulate the dissociation of CO2 with H2O admixture by microwave plasma for the production of solar fuels, we need a multicomponent solver that is able to capture the complex nature of the plasma by combining the chemistry, flow, and electromagnetic field. To achieve this goal, first we developed a robust finite volume compressible flow solver in C++. The solver is implemented in the framework of the PLASIMO software and will be used in complete plasma simulations later on. Due to the compressible nature of the solver, it can be used for simulation of dissociation of CO2 with H2O admixture by supersonic expansion in microwave plasmas. A spatially second order version of this solver is able to reveal the vortex flow structure of the plasmas. Capabilities of this solver are presented by benchmarking against well-established analytical and numerical test cases.

  12. A Simple Quantum Integro-Differential Solver (SQuIDS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argüelles Delgado, Carlos A.; Salvado, Jordi; Weaver, Christopher N.

    2015-11-01

    Simple Quantum Integro-Differential Solver (SQuIDS) is a C++ code designed to solve semi-analytically the evolution of a set of density matrices and scalar functions. This is done efficiently by expressing all operators in an SU(N) basis. SQuIDS provides a base class from which users can derive new classes to include new non-trivial terms from the right hand sides of density matrix equations. The code was designed in the context of solving neutrino oscillation problems, but can be applied to any problem that involves solving the quantum evolution of a collection of particles with Hilbert space of dimension up to six.

  13. Evaluating Sparse Linear System Solvers on Scalable Parallel Architectures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    iterations will be necessary to assure sufficient accuracy whenever we do not use a direct method to solve (1.3) or (1.5). The overall SPIKE algorithm...boosting is activated, SPIKE is not used as a direct solver but rather as a preconditioner. In this case outer iterations via a Krylov subspace method ...robustness. Preconditioning aims to improve the robustness of iterative methods by transforming the system into M−1Ax = M−1f, or AM−1(Mx) = f. (3.2

  14. Some fast elliptic solvers on parallel architectures and their complexities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallopoulos, E.; Saad, Youcef

    1989-01-01

    The discretization of separable elliptic partial differential equations leads to linear systems with special block triangular matrices. Several methods are known to solve these systems, the most general of which is the Block Cyclic Reduction (BCR) algorithm which handles equations with nonconsistant coefficients. A method was recently proposed to parallelize and vectorize BCR. Here, the mapping of BCR on distributed memory architectures is discussed, and its complexity is compared with that of other approaches, including the Alternating-Direction method. A fast parallel solver is also described, based on an explicit formula for the solution, which has parallel computational complexity lower than that of parallel BCR.

  15. Some fast elliptic solvers on parallel architectures and their complexities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallopoulos, E.; Saad, Y.

    1989-01-01

    The discretization of separable elliptic partial differential equations leads to linear systems with special block tridiagonal matrices. Several methods are known to solve these systems, the most general of which is the Block Cyclic Reduction (BCR) algorithm which handles equations with nonconstant coefficients. A method was recently proposed to parallelize and vectorize BCR. In this paper, the mapping of BCR on distributed memory architectures is discussed, and its complexity is compared with that of other approaches including the Alternating-Direction method. A fast parallel solver is also described, based on an explicit formula for the solution, which has parallel computational compelxity lower than that of parallel BCR.

  16. High Energy Boundary Conditions for a Cartesian Mesh Euler Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Shishir A.; Murman, Scott M.; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Inlets and exhaust nozzles are often omitted or fared over in aerodynamic simulations of aircraft due to the complexities involving in the modeling of engine details such as complex geometry and flow physics. However, the assumption is often improper as inlet or plume flows have a substantial effect on vehicle aerodynamics. A tool for specifying inlet and exhaust plume conditions through the use of high-energy boundary conditions in an established inviscid flow solver is presented. The effects of the plume on the flow fields near the inlet and plume are discussed.

  17. Preconditioned CG-solvers and finite element grids

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, R.; Selberherr, S.

    1994-12-31

    To extract parasitic capacitances in wiring structures of integrated circuits the authors developed the two- and three-dimensional finite element program SCAP (Smart Capacitance Analysis Program). The program computes the task of the electrostatic field from a solution of Poisson`s equation via finite elements and calculates the energies from which the capacitance matrix is extracted. The unknown potential vector, which has for three-dimensional applications 5000-50000 unknowns, is computed by a ICCG solver. Currently three- and six-node triangular, four- and ten-node tetrahedronal elements are supported.

  18. Algorithms for parallel flow solvers on message passing architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderwijngaart, Rob F.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this project has been to identify and test suitable technologies for implementation of fluid flow solvers -- possibly coupled with structures and heat equation solvers -- on MIMD parallel computers. In the course of this investigation much attention has been paid to efficient domain decomposition strategies for ADI-type algorithms. Multi-partitioning derives its efficiency from the assignment of several blocks of grid points to each processor in the parallel computer. A coarse-grain parallelism is obtained, and a near-perfect load balance results. In uni-partitioning every processor receives responsibility for exactly one block of grid points instead of several. This necessitates fine-grain pipelined program execution in order to obtain a reasonable load balance. Although fine-grain parallelism is less desirable on many systems, especially high-latency networks of workstations, uni-partition methods are still in wide use in production codes for flow problems. Consequently, it remains important to achieve good efficiency with this technique that has essentially been superseded by multi-partitioning for parallel ADI-type algorithms. Another reason for the concentration on improving the performance of pipeline methods is their applicability in other types of flow solver kernels with stronger implied data dependence. Analytical expressions can be derived for the size of the dynamic load imbalance incurred in traditional pipelines. From these it can be determined what is the optimal first-processor retardation that leads to the shortest total completion time for the pipeline process. Theoretical predictions of pipeline performance with and without optimization match experimental observations on the iPSC/860 very well. Analysis of pipeline performance also highlights the effect of uncareful grid partitioning in flow solvers that employ pipeline algorithms. If grid blocks at boundaries are not at least as large in the wall-normal direction as those

  19. Reformulation of the Fourier-Bessel steady state mode solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Robert C.

    2016-09-01

    The Fourier-Bessel resonator state mode solver is reformulated using Maxwell's field coupled curl equations. The matrix generating expressions are greatly simplified as well as a reduction in the number of pre-computed tables making the technique simpler to implement on a desktop computer. The reformulation maintains the theoretical equivalence of the permittivity and permeability and as such structures containing both electric and magnetic properties can be examined. Computation examples are presented for a surface nanoscale axial photonic resonator and hybrid { ε , μ } quasi-crystal resonator.

  20. A high order approximation of hyperbolic conservation laws in networks: Application to one-dimensional blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Lucas O.; Blanco, Pablo J.

    2015-11-01

    We present a methodology for the high order approximation of hyperbolic conservation laws in networks by using the Dumbser-Enaux-Toro solver and exact solvers for the classical Riemann problem at junctions. The proposed strategy can be applied to any hyperbolic system, conservative or non-conservative, and possibly with flux functions containing discontinuous parameters, as long as an exact or approximate Riemann problem solver is available. The methodology is implemented for a one-dimensional blood flow model that considers discontinuous variations of mechanical and geometrical properties of vessels. The achievement of formal order of accuracy, as well as the robustness of the resulting numerical scheme, is verified through the simulation of both, academic tests and physiological flows.

  1. FIESTA 2: Parallelizeable multiloop numerical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. V.; Smirnov, V. A.; Tentyukov, M.

    2011-03-01

    The program FIESTA has been completely rewritten. Now it can be used not only as a tool to evaluate Feynman integrals numerically, but also to expand Feynman integrals automatically in limits of momenta and masses with the use of sector decompositions and Mellin-Barnes representations. Other important improvements to the code are complete parallelization (even to multiple computers), high-precision arithmetics (allowing to calculate integrals which were undoable before), new integrators, Speer sectors as a strategy, the possibility to evaluate more general parametric integrals. Program summaryProgram title:FIESTA 2 Catalogue identifier: AECP_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AECP_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU GPL version 2 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 39 783 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 6 154 515 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Wolfram Mathematica 6.0 (or higher) and C Computer: From a desktop PC to a supercomputer Operating system: Unix, Linux, Windows, Mac OS X Has the code been vectorised or parallelized?: Yes, the code has been parallelized for use on multi-kernel computers as well as clusters via Mathlink over the TCP/IP protocol. The program can work successfully with a single processor, however, it is ready to work in a parallel environment and the use of multi-kernel processor and multi-processor computers significantly speeds up the calculation; on clusters the calculation speed can be improved even further. RAM: Depends on the complexity of the problem Classification: 4.4, 4.12, 5, 6.5 Catalogue identifier of previous version: AECP_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 180 (2009) 735 External routines: QLink [1], Cuba library [2], MPFR [3] Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: The sector decomposition approach to evaluating Feynman integrals falls apart into the sector decomposition itself, where one has to minimize the number of sectors; the pole resolution and epsilon expansion; and the numerical integration of the resulting expression. Solution method: The sector decomposition is based on a new strategy as well as on classical strategies such as Speer sectors. The sector decomposition, pole resolution and epsilon-expansion are performed in Wolfram Mathematica 6.0 or, preferably, 7.0 (enabling parallelization) [4]. The data is stored on hard disk via a special program, QLink [1]. The expression for integration is passed to the C-part of the code, that parses the string and performs the integration by one of the algorithms in the Cuba library package [2]. This part of the evaluation is perfectly parallelized on multi-kernel computers.

  2. Multicriteria approximation through decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, C.; Krumke, S.; Marathe, M.; Phillips, C.; Sundberg, E.

    1998-06-01

    The authors propose a general technique called solution decomposition to devise approximation algorithms with provable performance guarantees. The technique is applicable to a large class of combinatorial optimization problems that can be formulated as integer linear programs. Two key ingredients of their technique involve finding a decomposition of a fractional solution into a convex combination of feasible integral solutions and devising generic approximation algorithms based on calls to such decompositions as oracles. The technique is closely related to randomized rounding. Their method yields as corollaries unified solutions to a number of well studied problems and it provides the first approximation algorithms with provable guarantees for a number of new problems. The particular results obtained in this paper include the following: (1) the authors demonstrate how the technique can be used to provide more understanding of previous results and new algorithms for classical problems such as Multicriteria Spanning Trees, and Suitcase Packing; (2) they also show how the ideas can be extended to apply to multicriteria optimization problems, in which they wish to minimize a certain objective function subject to one or more budget constraints. As corollaries they obtain first non-trivial multicriteria approximation algorithms for problems including the k-Hurdle and the Network Inhibition problems.

  3. Multicriteria approximation through decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, C. |; Krumke, S.; Marathe, M.; Phillips, C.; Sundberg, E. |

    1997-12-01

    The authors propose a general technique called solution decomposition to devise approximation algorithms with provable performance guarantees. The technique is applicable to a large class of combinatorial optimization problems that can be formulated as integer linear programs. Two key ingredients of the technique involve finding a decomposition of a fractional solution into a convex combination of feasible integral solutions and devising generic approximation algorithms based on calls to such decompositions as oracles. The technique is closely related to randomized rounding. The method yields as corollaries unified solutions to a number of well studied problems and it provides the first approximation algorithms with provable guarantees for a number of new problems. The particular results obtained in this paper include the following: (1) The authors demonstrate how the technique can be used to provide more understanding of previous results and new algorithms for classical problems such as Multicriteria Spanning Trees, and Suitcase Packing. (2) They show how the ideas can be extended to apply to multicriteria optimization problems, in which they wish to minimize a certain objective function subject to one or more budget constraints. As corollaries they obtain first non-trivial multicriteria approximation algorithms for problems including the k-Hurdle and the Network Inhibition problems.

  4. On Stochastic Approximation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolff, Hans

    This paper deals with a stochastic process for the approximation of the root of a regression equation. This process was first suggested by Robbins and Monro. The main result here is a necessary and sufficient condition on the iteration coefficients for convergence of the process (convergence with probability one and convergence in the quadratic…

  5. Approximating Integrals Using Probability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maruszewski, Richard F., Jr.; Caudle, Kyle A.

    2005-01-01

    As part of a discussion on Monte Carlo methods, which outlines how to use probability expectations to approximate the value of a definite integral. The purpose of this paper is to elaborate on this technique and then to show several examples using visual basic as a programming tool. It is an interesting method because it combines two branches of…

  6. A simple two-dimensional extension of the HLL Riemann solver for hyperbolic systems of conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vides, Jeaniffer; Nkonga, Boniface; Audit, Edouard

    2015-01-01

    We derive a simple method to numerically approximate the solution of the two-dimensional Riemann problem for gas dynamics, using the literal extension of the well-known HLL formalism as its basis. Essentially, any strategy attempting to extend the three-state HLL Riemann solver to multiple space dimensions will by some means involve a piecewise constant approximation of the complex two-dimensional interaction of waves, and our numerical scheme is not the exception. In order to determine closed form expressions for the involved fluxes, we rely on the equivalence between the consistency condition and the use of Rankine-Hugoniot conditions that hold across the outermost waves. The proposed scheme is carefully designed to simplify its eventual numerical implementation and its advantages are analytically attested. In addition, we show that the proposed solver can be applied to obtain the edge-centered electric fields needed in the constrained transport technique for the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. We present several numerical results for hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics that display the scheme's accuracy and its ability to be applied to various systems of conservation laws.

  7. A massively parallel fractional step solver for incompressible flows

    SciTech Connect

    Houzeaux, G. Vazquez, M. Aubry, R. Cela, J.M.

    2009-09-20

    This paper presents a parallel implementation of fractional solvers for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations using an algebraic approach. Under this framework, predictor-corrector and incremental projection schemes are seen as sub-classes of the same class, making apparent its differences and similarities. An additional advantage of this approach is to set a common basis for a parallelization strategy, which can be extended to other split techniques or to compressible flows. The predictor-corrector scheme consists in solving the momentum equation and a modified 'continuity' equation (namely a simple iteration for the pressure Schur complement) consecutively in order to converge to the monolithic solution, thus avoiding fractional errors. On the other hand, the incremental projection scheme solves only one iteration of the predictor-corrector per time step and adds a correction equation to fulfill the mass conservation. As shown in the paper, these two schemes are very well suited for massively parallel implementation. In fact, when compared with monolithic schemes, simpler solvers and preconditioners can be used to solve the non-symmetric momentum equations (GMRES, Bi-CGSTAB) and to solve the symmetric continuity equation (CG, Deflated CG). This gives good speedup properties of the algorithm. The implementation of the mesh partitioning technique is presented, as well as the parallel performances and speedups for thousands of processors.

  8. Agglomeration Multigrid for an Unstructured-Grid Flow Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frink, Neal; Pandya, Mohagna J.

    2004-01-01

    An agglomeration multigrid scheme has been implemented into the sequential version of the NASA code USM3Dns, tetrahedral cell-centered finite volume Euler/Navier-Stokes flow solver. Efficiency and robustness of the multigrid-enhanced flow solver have been assessed for three configurations assuming an inviscid flow and one configuration assuming a viscous fully turbulent flow. The inviscid studies include a transonic flow over the ONERA M6 wing and a generic business jet with flow-through nacelles and a low subsonic flow over a high-lift trapezoidal wing. The viscous case includes a fully turbulent flow over the RAE 2822 rectangular wing. The multigrid solutions converged with 12%-33% of the Central Processing Unit (CPU) time required by the solutions obtained without multigrid. For all of the inviscid cases, multigrid in conjunction with an explicit time-stepping scheme performed the best with regard to the run time memory and CPU time requirements. However, for the viscous case multigrid had to be used with an implicit backward Euler time-stepping scheme that increased the run time memory requirement by 22% as compared to the run made without multigrid.

  9. Riemann solvers and Alfven waves in black hole magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punsly, Brian; Balsara, Dinshaw; Kim, Jinho; Garain, Sudip

    2016-09-01

    In the magnetosphere of a rotating black hole, an inner Alfven critical surface (IACS) must be crossed by inflowing plasma. Inside the IACS, Alfven waves are inward directed toward the black hole. The majority of the proper volume of the active region of spacetime (the ergosphere) is inside of the IACS. The charge and the totally transverse momentum flux (the momentum flux transverse to both the wave normal and the unperturbed magnetic field) are both determined exclusively by the Alfven polarization. Thus, it is important for numerical simulations of black hole magnetospheres to minimize the dissipation of Alfven waves. Elements of the dissipated wave emerge in adjacent cells regardless of the IACS, there is no mechanism to prevent Alfvenic information from crossing outward. Thus, numerical dissipation can affect how simulated magnetospheres attain the substantial Goldreich-Julian charge density associated with the rotating magnetic field. In order to help minimize dissipation of Alfven waves in relativistic numerical simulations we have formulated a one-dimensional Riemann solver, called HLLI, which incorporates the Alfven discontinuity and the contact discontinuity. We have also formulated a multidimensional Riemann solver, called MuSIC, that enables low dissipation propagation of Alfven waves in multiple dimensions. The importance of higher order schemes in lowering the numerical dissipation of Alfven waves is also catalogued.

  10. Optimizing the Zeldovich approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melott, Adrian L.; Pellman, Todd F.; Shandarin, Sergei F.

    1994-01-01

    We have recently learned that the Zeldovich approximation can be successfully used for a far wider range of gravitational instability scenarios than formerly proposed; we study here how to extend this range. In previous work (Coles, Melott and Shandarin 1993, hereafter CMS) we studied the accuracy of several analytic approximations to gravitational clustering in the mildly nonlinear regime. We found that what we called the 'truncated Zeldovich approximation' (TZA) was better than any other (except in one case the ordinary Zeldovich approximation) over a wide range from linear to mildly nonlinear (sigma approximately 3) regimes. TZA was specified by setting Fourier amplitudes equal to zero for all wavenumbers greater than k(sub nl), where k(sub nl) marks the transition to the nonlinear regime. Here, we study the cross correlation of generalized TZA with a group of n-body simulations for three shapes of window function: sharp k-truncation (as in CMS), a tophat in coordinate space, or a Gaussian. We also study the variation in the crosscorrelation as a function of initial truncation scale within each type. We find that k-truncation, which was so much better than other things tried in CMS, is the worst of these three window shapes. We find that a Gaussian window e(exp(-k(exp 2)/2k(exp 2, sub G))) applied to the initial Fourier amplitudes is the best choice. It produces a greatly improved crosscorrelation in those cases which most needed improvement, e.g. those with more small-scale power in the initial conditions. The optimum choice of kG for the Gaussian window is (a somewhat spectrum-dependent) 1 to 1.5 times k(sub nl). Although all three windows produce similar power spectra and density distribution functions after application of the Zeldovich approximation, the agreement of the phases of the Fourier components with the n-body simulation is better for the Gaussian window. We therefore ascribe the success of the best-choice Gaussian window to its superior treatment

  11. Parareal in time 3D numerical solver for the LWR Benchmark neutron diffusion transient model

    SciTech Connect

    Baudron, Anne-Marie; Riahi, Mohamed Kamel; Salomon, Julien

    2014-12-15

    In this paper we present a time-parallel algorithm for the 3D neutrons calculation of a transient model in a nuclear reactor core. The neutrons calculation consists in numerically solving the time dependent diffusion approximation equation, which is a simplified transport equation. The numerical resolution is done with finite elements method based on a tetrahedral meshing of the computational domain, representing the reactor core, and time discretization is achieved using a θ-scheme. The transient model presents moving control rods during the time of the reaction. Therefore, cross-sections (piecewise constants) are taken into account by interpolations with respect to the velocity of the control rods. The parallelism across the time is achieved by an adequate use of the parareal in time algorithm to the handled problem. This parallel method is a predictor corrector scheme that iteratively combines the use of two kinds of numerical propagators, one coarse and one fine. Our method is made efficient by means of a coarse solver defined with large time step and fixed position control rods model, while the fine propagator is assumed to be a high order numerical approximation of the full model. The parallel implementation of our method provides a good scalability of the algorithm. Numerical results show the efficiency of the parareal method on large light water reactor transient model corresponding to the Langenbuch–Maurer–Werner benchmark.

  12. Applied Routh approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, W. C.

    1978-01-01

    The Routh approximation technique for reducing the complexity of system models was applied in the frequency domain to a 16th order, state variable model of the F100 engine and to a 43d order, transfer function model of a launch vehicle boost pump pressure regulator. The results motivate extending the frequency domain formulation of the Routh method to the time domain in order to handle the state variable formulation directly. The time domain formulation was derived and a characterization that specifies all possible Routh similarity transformations was given. The characterization was computed by solving two eigenvalue-eigenvector problems. The application of the time domain Routh technique to the state variable engine model is described, and some results are given. Additional computational problems are discussed, including an optimization procedure that can improve the approximation accuracy by taking advantage of the transformation characterization.

  13. Topics in Metric Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leeb, William Edward

    This thesis develops effective approximations of certain metrics that occur frequently in pure and applied mathematics. We show that distances that often arise in applications, such as the Earth Mover's Distance between two probability measures, can be approximated by easily computed formulas for a wide variety of ground distances. We develop simple and easily computed characterizations both of norms measuring a function's regularity -- such as the Lipschitz norm -- and of their duals. We are particularly concerned with the tensor product of metric spaces, where the natural notion of regularity is not the Lipschitz condition but the mixed Lipschitz condition. A theme that runs throughout this thesis is that snowflake metrics (metrics raised to a power less than 1) are often better-behaved than ordinary metrics. For example, we show that snowflake metrics on finite spaces can be approximated by the average of tree metrics with a distortion bounded by intrinsic geometric characteristics of the space and not the number of points. Many of the metrics for which we characterize the Lipschitz space and its dual are snowflake metrics. We also present applications of the characterization of certain regularity norms to the problem of recovering a matrix that has been corrupted by noise. We are able to achieve an optimal rate of recovery for certain families of matrices by exploiting the relationship between mixed-variable regularity conditions and the decay of a function's coefficients in a certain orthonormal basis.

  14. An iterative Riemann solver for systems of hyperbolic conservation law s, with application to hyperelastic solid mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Gregory H.

    2003-08-06

    In this paper we present a general iterative method for the solution of the Riemann problem for hyperbolic systems of PDEs. The method is based on the multiple shooting method for free boundary value problems. We demonstrate the method by solving one-dimensional Riemann problems for hyperelastic solid mechanics. Even for conditions representative of routine laboratory conditions and military ballistics, dramatic differences are seen between the exact and approximate Riemann solution. The greatest discrepancy arises from misallocation of energy between compressional and thermal modes by the approximate solver, resulting in nonphysical entropy and temperature estimates. Several pathological conditions arise in common practice, and modifications to the method to handle these are discussed. These include points where genuine nonlinearity is lost, degeneracies, and eigenvector deficiencies that occur upon melting.

  15. A fast solver for systems of reaction-diffusion equations.

    SciTech Connect

    Garbey, M.; Kaper, H. G.; Romanyukha, N.

    2001-04-20

    In this paper we present a fast algorithm for the numerical solution of systems of reaction-diffusion equations, {partial_derivative}{sub t} u + a {center_dot} {del}u = {Delta}u + f(x,t,u), and x element of {Omega} contained in R{sup 3}, t > 0. Here, u is a vector-valued function, u triple bond u(x,t) element of R{sup m} is large, and the corresponding system of ODEs, {partial_derivative}{sub t}u = F(x,t,u), is stiff. Typical examples arise in air pollution studies, where a is the given wind field and the nonlinear function F models the atmospheric chemistry. The time integration of Eq. (1) is best handled by the method of characteristics. The problem is thus reduced to designing for the reaction-diffusion part a fast solver that has good stability properties for the given time step and does not require the computation of the full Jacobi matrix. An operator-splitting technique, even a high-order one, combining a fast nonlinear ODE solver with an efficient solver for the diffusion operator is less effective when the reaction term is stiff. In fact, the classical Strang splitting method may underperform a first-order source splitting method. The algorithm we propose in this paper uses an a posteriori filtering technique to stabilize the computation of the diffusion term. The algorithm parallelizes well, because the solution of the large system of ODEs is done pointwise; however, the integration of the chemistry may lead to load-balancing problems. The Tchebycheff acceleration technique proposed in offers an alternative that complements the approach presented here. To facilitate the presentation, we limit the discussion to domains {Omega} that either admit a regular discretization grid or decompose into subdomains that admit regular discretization grids. We describe the algorithm for one-dimensional domains in Section 2 and for multidimensional domains in Section 3. Section 4 briefly outlines future work.

  16. Approximate option pricing

    SciTech Connect

    Chalasani, P.; Saias, I.; Jha, S.

    1996-04-08

    As increasingly large volumes of sophisticated options (called derivative securities) are traded in world financial markets, determining a fair price for these options has become an important and difficult computational problem. Many valuation codes use the binomial pricing model, in which the stock price is driven by a random walk. In this model, the value of an n-period option on a stock is the expected time-discounted value of the future cash flow on an n-period stock price path. Path-dependent options are particularly difficult to value since the future cash flow depends on the entire stock price path rather than on just the final stock price. Currently such options are approximately priced by Monte carlo methods with error bounds that hold only with high probability and which are reduced by increasing the number of simulation runs. In this paper the authors show that pricing an arbitrary path-dependent option is {number_sign}-P hard. They show that certain types f path-dependent options can be valued exactly in polynomial time. Asian options are path-dependent options that are particularly hard to price, and for these they design deterministic polynomial-time approximate algorithms. They show that the value of a perpetual American put option (which can be computed in constant time) is in many cases a good approximation to the value of an otherwise identical n-period American put option. In contrast to Monte Carlo methods, the algorithms have guaranteed error bounds that are polynormally small (and in some cases exponentially small) in the maturity n. For the error analysis they derive large-deviation results for random walks that may be of independent interest.

  17. Algebraic multigrid preconditioning within parallel finite-element solvers for 3-D electromagnetic modelling problems in geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koldan, Jelena; Puzyrev, Vladimir; de la Puente, Josep; Houzeaux, Guillaume; Cela, José María

    2014-06-01

    We present an elaborate preconditioning scheme for Krylov subspace methods which has been developed to improve the performance and reduce the execution time of parallel node-based finite-element (FE) solvers for 3-D electromagnetic (EM) numerical modelling in exploration geophysics. This new preconditioner is based on algebraic multigrid (AMG) that uses different basic relaxation methods, such as Jacobi, symmetric successive over-relaxation (SSOR) and Gauss-Seidel, as smoothers and the wave front algorithm to create groups, which are used for a coarse-level generation. We have implemented and tested this new preconditioner within our parallel nodal FE solver for 3-D forward problems in EM induction geophysics. We have performed series of experiments for several models with different conductivity structures and characteristics to test the performance of our AMG preconditioning technique when combined with biconjugate gradient stabilized method. The results have shown that, the more challenging the problem is in terms of conductivity contrasts, ratio between the sizes of grid elements and/or frequency, the more benefit is obtained by using this preconditioner. Compared to other preconditioning schemes, such as diagonal, SSOR and truncated approximate inverse, the AMG preconditioner greatly improves the convergence of the iterative solver for all tested models. Also, when it comes to cases in which other preconditioners succeed to converge to a desired precision, AMG is able to considerably reduce the total execution time of the forward-problem code-up to an order of magnitude. Furthermore, the tests have confirmed that our AMG scheme ensures grid-independent rate of convergence, as well as improvement in convergence regardless of how big local mesh refinements are. In addition, AMG is designed to be a black-box preconditioner, which makes it easy to use and combine with different iterative methods. Finally, it has proved to be very practical and efficient in the

  18. Approximate Qualitative Temporal Reasoning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    i.e., their boundaries can be placed in such a way that they coincide with the cell boundaries of the appropriate partition of the time-line. (Think of...respect to some appropriate partition of the time-line. For example, I felt well on Saturday. When I measured my temperature I had a fever on Monday and on...Bittner / Approximate Qualitative Temporal Reasoning 49 [27] I. A. Goralwalla, Y. Leontiev , M. T. Özsu, D. Szafron, and C. Combi. Temporal granularity for

  19. T2CG1, a package of preconditioned conjugate gradient solvers for TOUGH2

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, G.; Pruess, K.; Antunez, E.

    1994-03-01

    Most of the computational work in the numerical simulation of fluid and heat flows in permeable media arises in the solution of large systems of linear equations. The simplest technique for solving such equations is by direct methods. However, because of large storage requirements and accumulation of roundoff errors, the application of direct solution techniques is limited, depending on matrix bandwidth, to systems of a few hundred to at most a few thousand simultaneous equations. T2CG1, a package of preconditioned conjugate gradient solvers, has been added to TOUGH2 to complement its direct solver and significantly increase the size of problems tractable on PCs. T2CG1 includes three different solvers: a Bi-Conjugate Gradient (BCG) solver, a Bi-Conjugate Gradient Squared (BCGS) solver, and a Generalized Minimum Residual (GMRES) solver. Results from six test problems with up to 30,000 equations show that T2CG1 (1) is significantly (and invariably) faster and requires far less memory than the MA28 direct solver, (2) it makes possible the solution of very large three-dimensional problems on PCs, and (3) that the BCGS solver is the fastest of the three in the tested problems. Sample problems are presented related to heat and fluid flow at Yucca Mountain and WIPP, environmental remediation by the Thermal Enhanced Vapor Extraction System, and geothermal resources.

  20. Evaluation of linear solvers for oil reservoir simulation problems. Part 2: The fully implicit case

    SciTech Connect

    Joubert, W.; Janardhan, R.

    1997-12-01

    A previous paper [Joubert/Biswas 1997] contained investigations of linear solver performance for matrices arising from Amoco`s Falcon parallel oil reservoir simulation code using the IMPES formulation (implicit pressure, explicit saturation). In this companion paper, similar issues are explored for linear solvers applied to matrices arising from more difficult fully implicit problems. The results of numerical experiments are given.

  1. GPU accelerated FDTD solver and its application in MRI.

    PubMed

    Chi, J; Liu, F; Jin, J; Mason, D G; Crozier, S

    2010-01-01

    The finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is a popular technique for computational electromagnetics (CEM). The large computational power often required, however, has been a limiting factor for its applications. In this paper, we will present a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based parallel FDTD solver and its successful application to the investigation of a novel B1 shimming scheme for high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The optimized shimming scheme exhibits considerably improved transmit B(1) profiles. The GPU implementation dramatically shortened the runtime of FDTD simulation of electromagnetic field compared with its CPU counterpart. The acceleration in runtime has made such investigation possible, and will pave the way for other studies of large-scale computational electromagnetic problems in modern MRI which were previously impractical.

  2. A Coupled Finite Volume Solver for Incompressible Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moukalled, F.; Darwish, M.

    2008-09-01

    This paper reports on a pressure-based coupled algorithm for the solution of laminar incompressible flow problems. The implicit pressure-velocity coupling is accomplished by deriving a pressure equation in a way similar to a segregated SIMPLE algorithm with the extended set of equations solved simultaneously and having diagonally dominant coefficients. The superiority of the coupled approach over the segregated approach is demonstrated by solving the lid-driven flow in a square cavity problem using both methodologies and comparing their computational costs. Results indicate that the number of iterations needed by the coupled solver is grid independent. Moreover, recorded CPU time values reveal that the coupled approach substantially reduces the computational cost with the reduction rate for the problem solved increasing as the grid size increases and reaching a value as high as 115.

  3. Blade design and analysis using a modified Euler solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, O.; Vandenbraembussche, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    An iterative method for blade design based on Euler solver and described in an earlier paper is used to design compressor and turbine blades providing shock free transonic flows. The method shows a rapid convergence, and indicates how much the flow is sensitive to small modifications of the blade geometry, that the classical iterative use of analysis methods might not be able to define. The relationship between the required Mach number distribution and the resulting geometry is discussed. Examples show how geometrical constraints imposed upon the blade shape can be respected by using free geometrical parameters or by relaxing the required Mach number distribution. The same code is used both for the design of the required geometry and for the off-design calculations. Examples illustrate the difficulty of designing blade shapes with optimal performance also outside of the design point.

  4. Large-scale linear nonparallel support vector machine solver.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yingjie; Ping, Yuan

    2014-02-01

    Twin support vector machines (TWSVMs), as the representative nonparallel hyperplane classifiers, have shown the effectiveness over standard SVMs from some aspects. However, they still have some serious defects restricting their further study and real applications: (1) They have to compute and store the inverse matrices before training, it is intractable for many applications where data appear with a huge number of instances as well as features; (2) TWSVMs lost the sparseness by using a quadratic loss function making the proximal hyperplane close enough to the class itself. This paper proposes a Sparse Linear Nonparallel Support Vector Machine, termed as L1-NPSVM, to deal with large-scale data based on an efficient solver-dual coordinate descent (DCD) method. Both theoretical analysis and experiments indicate that our method is not only suitable for large scale problems, but also performs as good as TWSVMs and SVMs.

  5. Workload Characterization of CFD Applications Using Partial Differential Equation Solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waheed, Abdul; Yan, Jerry; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Workload characterization is used for modeling and evaluating of computing systems at different levels of detail. We present workload characterization for a class of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) applications that solve Partial Differential Equations (PDEs). This workload characterization focuses on three high performance computing platforms: SGI Origin2000, EBM SP-2, a cluster of Intel Pentium Pro bases PCs. We execute extensive measurement-based experiments on these platforms to gather statistics of system resource usage, which results in workload characterization. Our workload characterization approach yields a coarse-grain resource utilization behavior that is being applied for performance modeling and evaluation of distributed high performance metacomputing systems. In addition, this study enhances our understanding of interactions between PDE solver workloads and high performance computing platforms and is useful for tuning these applications.

  6. Extending the QUDA Library with the eigCG Solver

    SciTech Connect

    Strelchenko, Alexei; Stathopoulos, Andreas

    2014-12-12

    While the incremental eigCG algorithm [ 1 ] is included in many LQCD software packages, its realization on GPU micro-architectures was still missing. In this session we report our experi- ence of the eigCG implementation in the QUDA library. In particular, we will focus on how to employ the mixed precision technique to accelerate solutions of large sparse linear systems with multiple right-hand sides on GPUs. Although application of mixed precision techniques is a well-known optimization approach for linear solvers, its utilization for the eigenvector com- puting within eigCG requires special consideration. We will discuss implementation aspects of the mixed precision deflation and illustrate its numerical behavior on the example of the Wilson twisted mass fermion matrix inversions

  7. AN ADAPTIVE PARTICLE-MESH GRAVITY SOLVER FOR ENZO

    SciTech Connect

    Passy, Jean-Claude; Bryan, Greg L.

    2014-11-01

    We describe and implement an adaptive particle-mesh algorithm to solve the Poisson equation for grid-based hydrodynamics codes with nested grids. The algorithm is implemented and extensively tested within the astrophysical code Enzo against the multigrid solver available by default. We find that while both algorithms show similar accuracy for smooth mass distributions, the adaptive particle-mesh algorithm is more accurate for the case of point masses, and is generally less noisy. We also demonstrate that the two-body problem can be solved accurately in a configuration with nested grids. In addition, we discuss the effect of subcycling, and demonstrate that evolving all the levels with the same timestep yields even greater precision.

  8. Performance evaluation of a parallel sparse lattice Boltzmann solver

    SciTech Connect

    Axner, L. Bernsdorf, J. Zeiser, T. Lammers, P. Linxweiler, J. Hoekstra, A.G.

    2008-05-01

    We develop a performance prediction model for a parallelized sparse lattice Boltzmann solver and present performance results for simulations of flow in a variety of complex geometries. A special focus is on partitioning and memory/load balancing strategy for geometries with a high solid fraction and/or complex topology such as porous media, fissured rocks and geometries from medical applications. The topology of the lattice nodes representing the fluid fraction of the computational domain is mapped on a graph. Graph decomposition is performed with both multilevel recursive-bisection and multilevel k-way schemes based on modified Kernighan-Lin and Fiduccia-Mattheyses partitioning algorithms. Performance results and optimization strategies are presented for a variety of platforms, showing a parallel efficiency of almost 80% for the largest problem size. A good agreement between the performance model and experimental results is demonstrated.

  9. Polyurethanes: versatile materials and sustainable problem solvers for today's challenges.

    PubMed

    Engels, Hans-Wilhelm; Pirkl, Hans-Georg; Albers, Reinhard; Albach, Rolf W; Krause, Jens; Hoffmann, Andreas; Casselmann, Holger; Dormish, Jeff

    2013-09-02

    Polyurethanes are the only class of polymers that display thermoplastic, elastomeric, and thermoset behavior depending on their chemical and morphological makeup. In addition to compact polyurethanes, foamed variations in particular are very widespread, and they achieve their targeted properties at very low weights. The simple production of sandwich structures and material composites in a single processing step is a key advantage of polyurethane technology. The requirement of energy and resource efficiency increasingly demands lightweight structures. Polyurethanes can serve this requirement by acting as matrix materials or as flexible adhesives for composites. Polyurethanes are indispensable when it comes to high-quality decorative coatings or maintaining the value of numerous objects. They are extremely adaptable and sustainable problem solvers for today's challenges facing our society, all of which impose special demands on materials.

  10. Progress in developing Poisson-Boltzmann equation solvers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chuan; Li, Lin; Petukh, Marharyta; Alexov, Emil

    2013-01-01

    This review outlines the recent progress made in developing more accurate and efficient solutions to model electrostatics in systems comprised of bio-macromolecules and nano-objects, the last one referring to objects that do not have biological function themselves but nowadays are frequently used in biophysical and medical approaches in conjunction with bio-macromolecules. The problem of modeling macromolecular electrostatics is reviewed from two different angles: as a mathematical task provided the specific definition of the system to be modeled and as a physical problem aiming to better capture the phenomena occurring in the real experiments. In addition, specific attention is paid to methods to extend the capabilities of the existing solvers to model large systems toward applications of calculations of the electrostatic potential and energies in molecular motors, mitochondria complex, photosynthetic machinery and systems involving large nano-objects. PMID:24199185

  11. Accurate derivative evaluation for any Grad–Shafranov solver

    SciTech Connect

    Ricketson, L.F.; Cerfon, A.J.; Rachh, M.; Freidberg, J.P.

    2016-01-15

    We present a numerical scheme that can be combined with any fixed boundary finite element based Poisson or Grad–Shafranov solver to compute the first and second partial derivatives of the solution to these equations with the same order of convergence as the solution itself. At the heart of our scheme is an efficient and accurate computation of the Dirichlet to Neumann map through the evaluation of a singular volume integral and the solution to a Fredholm integral equation of the second kind. Our numerical method is particularly useful for magnetic confinement fusion simulations, since it allows the evaluation of quantities such as the magnetic field, the parallel current density and the magnetic curvature with much higher accuracy than has been previously feasible on the affordable coarse grids that are usually implemented.

  12. A Newton-Krylov solver for fast spin-up of online ocean tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, Keith

    2017-01-01

    We present a Newton-Krylov based solver to efficiently spin up tracers in an online ocean model. We demonstrate that the solver converges, that tracer simulations initialized with the solution from the solver have small drift, and that the solver takes orders of magnitude less computational time than the brute force spin-up approach. To demonstrate the application of the solver, we use it to efficiently spin up the tracer ideal age with respect to the circulation from different time intervals in a long physics run. We then evaluate how the spun-up ideal age tracer depends on the duration of the physics run, i.e., on how equilibrated the circulation is.

  13. High-performance equation solvers and their impact on finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, Eugene L.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Davis, D. Dale, Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The role of equation solvers in modern structural analysis software is described. Direct and iterative equation solvers which exploit vectorization on modern high-performance computer systems are described and compared. The direct solvers are two Cholesky factorization methods. The first method utilizes a novel variable-band data storage format to achieve very high computation rates and the second method uses a sparse data storage format designed to reduce the number of operations. The iterative solvers are preconditioned conjugate gradient methods. Two different preconditioners are included; the first uses a diagonal matrix storage scheme to achieve high computation rates and the second requires a sparse data storage scheme and converges to the solution in fewer iterations that the first. The impact of using all of the equation solvers in a common structural analysis software system is demonstrated by solving several representative structural analysis problems.

  14. A High-Order Direct Solver for Helmholtz Equations with Neumann Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xian-He; Zhuang, Yu

    1997-01-01

    In this study, a compact finite-difference discretization is first developed for Helmholtz equations on rectangular domains. Special treatments are then introduced for Neumann and Neumann-Dirichlet boundary conditions to achieve accuracy and separability. Finally, a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) based technique is used to yield a fast direct solver. Analytical and experimental results show this newly proposed solver is comparable to the conventional second-order elliptic solver when accuracy is not a primary concern, and is significantly faster than that of the conventional solver if a highly accurate solution is required. In addition, this newly proposed fourth order Helmholtz solver is parallel in nature. It is readily available for parallel and distributed computers. The compact scheme introduced in this study is likely extendible for sixth-order accurate algorithms and for more general elliptic equations.

  15. A three-dimensional fast solver for arbitrary vorton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, J.H.; Baty, R.S.

    1994-05-01

    A method which is capable of an efficient calculation of the three-dimensional flow field produced by a large system of vortons (discretized regions of vorticity) is presented in this report. The system of vortons can, in turn, be used to model body surfaces, container boundaries, free-surfaces, plumes, jets, and wakes in unsteady three-dimensional flow fields. This method takes advantage of multipole and local series expansions which enables one to make calculations for interactions between groups of vortons which are in well-separated spatial domains rather than having to consider interactions between every pair of vortons. In this work, series expansions for the vector potential of the vorton system are obtained. From such expansions, the three components of velocity can be obtained explicitly. A Fortran computer code FAST3D has been written to calculate the vector potential and the velocity components at selected points in the flow field. In this code, the evaluation points do not have to coincide with the location of the vortons themselves. Test cases have been run to benchmark the truncation errors and CPU time savings associated with the method. Non-dimensional truncation errors for the magnitudes of the vector potential and velocity fields are on the order of 10{sup {minus}4}and 10{sup {minus}3} respectively. Single precision accuracy produces errors in these quantities of up to 10{sup {minus}5}. For less than 1,000 to 2,000 vortons in the field, there is virtually no CPU time savings with the fast solver. For 100,000 vortons in the flow, the fast solver obtains solutions in 1 % to 10% of the time required for the direct solution technique depending upon the configuration.

  16. Relaxation approximations to second-order traffic flow models by high-resolution schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolos, I.K.; Delis, A.I.; Papageorgiou, M.

    2015-03-10

    A relaxation-type approximation of second-order non-equilibrium traffic models, written in conservation or balance law form, is considered. Using the relaxation approximation, the nonlinear equations are transformed to a semi-linear diagonilizable problem with linear characteristic variables and stiff source terms with the attractive feature that neither Riemann solvers nor characteristic decompositions are in need. In particular, it is only necessary to provide the flux and source term functions and an estimate of the characteristic speeds. To discretize the resulting relaxation system, high-resolution reconstructions in space are considered. Emphasis is given on a fifth-order WENO scheme and its performance. The computations reported demonstrate the simplicity and versatility of relaxation schemes as numerical solvers.

  17. Hierarchical Approximate Bayesian Computation

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Brandon M.; Van Zandt, Trisha

    2013-01-01

    Approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) is a powerful technique for estimating the posterior distribution of a model’s parameters. It is especially important when the model to be fit has no explicit likelihood function, which happens for computational (or simulation-based) models such as those that are popular in cognitive neuroscience and other areas in psychology. However, ABC is usually applied only to models with few parameters. Extending ABC to hierarchical models has been difficult because high-dimensional hierarchical models add computational complexity that conventional ABC cannot accommodate. In this paper we summarize some current approaches for performing hierarchical ABC and introduce a new algorithm called Gibbs ABC. This new algorithm incorporates well-known Bayesian techniques to improve the accuracy and efficiency of the ABC approach for estimation of hierarchical models. We then use the Gibbs ABC algorithm to estimate the parameters of two models of signal detection, one with and one without a tractable likelihood function. PMID:24297436

  18. Countably QC-Approximating Posets

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xuxin; Xu, Luoshan

    2014-01-01

    As a generalization of countably C-approximating posets, the concept of countably QC-approximating posets is introduced. With the countably QC-approximating property, some characterizations of generalized completely distributive lattices and generalized countably approximating posets are given. The main results are as follows: (1) a complete lattice is generalized completely distributive if and only if it is countably QC-approximating and weakly generalized countably approximating; (2) a poset L having countably directed joins is generalized countably approximating if and only if the lattice σc(L)op of all σ-Scott-closed subsets of L is weakly generalized countably approximating. PMID:25165730

  19. Simulation of an Isolated Tiltrotor in Hover with an Unstructured Overset-Grid RANS Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Biedron, Robert T.

    2009-01-01

    An unstructured overset-grid Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solver, FUN3D, is used to simulate an isolated tiltrotor in hover. An overview of the computational method is presented as well as the details of the overset-grid systems. Steady-state computations within a noninertial reference frame define the performance trends of the rotor across a range of the experimental collective settings. Results are presented to show the effects of off-body grid refinement and blade grid refinement. The computed performance and blade loading trends show good agreement with experimental results and previously published structured overset-grid computations. Off-body flow features indicate a significant improvement in the resolution of the first perpendicular blade vortex interaction with background grid refinement across the collective range. Considering experimental data uncertainty and effects of transition, the prediction of figure of merit on the baseline and refined grid is reasonable at the higher collective range- within 3 percent of the measured values. At the lower collective settings, the computed figure of merit is approximately 6 percent lower than the experimental data. A comparison of steady and unsteady results show that with temporal refinement, the dynamic results closely match the steady-state noninertial results which gives confidence in the accuracy of the dynamic overset-grid approach.

  20. A numerical solver for high dimensional transient Fokker-Planck equation in modeling polymeric fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yifei; Kumar, Mrinal

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a tensor decomposition approach combined with Chebyshev spectral differentiation is presented to solve the high dimensional transient Fokker-Planck equations (FPE) arising in the simulation of polymeric fluids via multi-bead-spring (MBS) model. Generalizing the authors' previous work on the stationary FPE, the transient solution is obtained in a single CANDECOMP/PARAFAC decomposition (CPD) form for all times via the alternating least squares algorithm. This is accomplished by treating the temporal dimension in the same manner as all other spatial dimensions, thereby decoupling it from them. As a result, the transient solution is obtained without resorting to expensive time stepping schemes. A new, relaxed approach for imposing the vanishing boundary conditions is proposed, improving the quality of the approximation. The asymptotic behavior of the temporal basis functions is studied. The proposed solver scales very well with the dimensionality of the MBS model. Numerical results for systems up to 14 dimensional state space are successfully obtained on a regular personal computer and compared with the corresponding matrix Riccati differential equation (for linear models) or Monte Carlo simulations (for nonlinear models).

  1. Nonlinear model-order reduction for compressible flow solvers using the Discrete Empirical Interpolation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fosas de Pando, Miguel; Schmid, Peter J.; Sipp, Denis

    2016-11-01

    Nonlinear model reduction for large-scale flows is an essential component in many fluid applications such as flow control, optimization, parameter space exploration and statistical analysis. In this article, we generalize the POD-DEIM method, introduced by Chaturantabut & Sorensen [1], to address nonlocal nonlinearities in the equations without loss of performance or efficiency. The nonlinear terms are represented by nested DEIM-approximations using multiple expansion bases based on the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition. These extensions are imperative, for example, for applications of the POD-DEIM method to large-scale compressible flows. The efficient implementation of the presented model-reduction technique follows our earlier work [2] on linearized and adjoint analyses and takes advantage of the modular structure of our compressible flow solver. The efficacy of the nonlinear model-reduction technique is demonstrated to the flow around an airfoil and its acoustic footprint. We could obtain an accurate and robust low-dimensional model that captures the main features of the full flow.

  2. A New Equation Solver for Modeling Turbulent Flow in Coupled Matrix-Conduit Flow Models.

    PubMed

    Hubinger, Bernhard; Birk, Steffen; Hergarten, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Karst aquifers represent dual flow systems consisting of a highly conductive conduit system embedded in a less permeable rock matrix. Hybrid models iteratively coupling both flow systems generally consume much time, especially because of the nonlinearity of turbulent conduit flow. To reduce calculation times compared to those of existing approaches, a new iterative equation solver for the conduit system is developed based on an approximated Newton-Raphson expression and a Gauß-Seidel or successive over-relaxation scheme with a single iteration step at the innermost level. It is implemented and tested in the research code CAVE but should be easily adaptable to similar models such as the Conduit Flow Process for MODFLOW-2005. It substantially reduces the computational effort as demonstrated by steady-state benchmark scenarios as well as by transient karst genesis simulations. Water balance errors are found to be acceptable in most of the test cases. However, the performance and accuracy may deteriorate under unfavorable conditions such as sudden, strong changes of the flow field at some stages of the karst genesis simulations.

  3. Robust HLLC Riemann solver with weighted average flux scheme for strong shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Don; Lee, Bok Jik; Lee, Hyoung Jin; Jeung, In-Seuck

    2009-11-01

    Many researchers have reported failures of the approximate Riemann solvers in the presence of strong shock. This is believed to be due to perturbation transfer in the transverse direction of shock waves. We propose a simple and clear method to prevent such problems for the Harten-Lax-van Leer contact (HLLC) scheme. By defining a sensing function in the transverse direction of strong shock, the HLLC flux is switched to the Harten-Lax-van Leer (HLL) flux in that direction locally, and the magnitude of the additional dissipation is automatically determined using the HLL scheme. We combine the HLLC and HLL schemes in a single framework using a switching function. High-order accuracy is achieved using a weighted average flux (WAF) scheme, and a method for v-shear treatment is presented. The modified HLLC scheme is named HLLC-HLL. It is tested against a steady normal shock instability problem and Quirk's test problems, and spurious solutions in the strong shock regions are successfully controlled.

  4. The value of continuity: Refined isogeometric analysis and fast direct solvers

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Daniel; Pardo, David; Dalcin, Lisandro; Paszynski, Maciej; Collier, Nathan; Calo, Victor M.

    2016-08-24

    Here, we propose the use of highly continuous finite element spaces interconnected with low continuity hyperplanes to maximize the performance of direct solvers. Starting from a highly continuous Isogeometric Analysis (IGA) discretization, we introduce C0-separators to reduce the interconnection between degrees of freedom in the mesh. By doing so, both the solution time and best approximation errors are simultaneously improved. We call the resulting method “refined Isogeometric Analysis (rIGA)”. To illustrate the impact of the continuity reduction, we analyze the number of Floating Point Operations (FLOPs), computational times, and memory required to solve the linear system obtained by discretizing the Laplace problem with structured meshes and uniform polynomial orders. Theoretical estimates demonstrate that an optimal continuity reduction may decrease the total computational time by a factor between p2 and p3, with pp being the polynomial order of the discretization. Numerical results indicate that our proposed refined isogeometric analysis delivers a speed-up factor proportional to p2. In a 2D mesh with four million elements and p=5, the linear system resulting from rIGA is solved 22 times faster than the one from highly continuous IGA. In a 3D mesh with one million elements and p=3, the linear system is solved 15 times faster for the refined than the maximum continuity isogeometric analysis.

  5. The value of continuity: Refined isogeometric analysis and fast direct solvers

    DOE PAGES

    Garcia, Daniel; Pardo, David; Dalcin, Lisandro; ...

    2016-08-24

    Here, we propose the use of highly continuous finite element spaces interconnected with low continuity hyperplanes to maximize the performance of direct solvers. Starting from a highly continuous Isogeometric Analysis (IGA) discretization, we introduce C0-separators to reduce the interconnection between degrees of freedom in the mesh. By doing so, both the solution time and best approximation errors are simultaneously improved. We call the resulting method “refined Isogeometric Analysis (rIGA)”. To illustrate the impact of the continuity reduction, we analyze the number of Floating Point Operations (FLOPs), computational times, and memory required to solve the linear system obtained by discretizing themore » Laplace problem with structured meshes and uniform polynomial orders. Theoretical estimates demonstrate that an optimal continuity reduction may decrease the total computational time by a factor between p2 and p3, with pp being the polynomial order of the discretization. Numerical results indicate that our proposed refined isogeometric analysis delivers a speed-up factor proportional to p2. In a 2D mesh with four million elements and p=5, the linear system resulting from rIGA is solved 22 times faster than the one from highly continuous IGA. In a 3D mesh with one million elements and p=3, the linear system is solved 15 times faster for the refined than the maximum continuity isogeometric analysis.« less

  6. GORRAM: Introducing accurate operational-speed radiative transfer Monte Carlo solvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buras-Schnell, Robert; Schnell, Franziska; Buras, Allan

    2016-06-01

    We present a new approach for solving the radiative transfer equation in horizontally homogeneous atmospheres. The motivation was to develop a fast yet accurate radiative transfer solver to be used in operational retrieval algorithms for next generation meteorological satellites. The core component is the program GORRAM (Generator Of Really Rapid Accurate Monte-Carlo) which generates solvers individually optimized for the intended task. These solvers consist of a Monte Carlo model capable of path recycling and a representative set of photon paths. Latter is generated using the simulated annealing technique. GORRAM automatically takes advantage of limitations on the variability of the atmosphere. Due to this optimization the number of photon paths necessary for accurate results can be reduced by several orders of magnitude. For the shown example of a forward model intended for an aerosol satellite retrieval, comparison with an exact yet slow solver shows that a precision of better than 1% can be achieved with only 36 photons. The computational time is at least an order of magnitude faster than any other type of radiative transfer solver. Merely the lookup table approach often used in satellite retrieval is faster, but on the other hand suffers from limited accuracy. This makes GORRAM-generated solvers an eligible candidate as forward model in operational-speed retrieval algorithms and data assimilation applications. GORRAM also has the potential to create fast solvers of other integrable equations.

  7. Acceleration of FDTD mode solver by high-performance computing techniques.

    PubMed

    Han, Lin; Xi, Yanping; Huang, Wei-Ping

    2010-06-21

    A two-dimensional (2D) compact finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) mode solver is developed based on wave equation formalism in combination with the matrix pencil method (MPM). The method is validated for calculation of both real guided and complex leaky modes of typical optical waveguides against the bench-mark finite-difference (FD) eigen mode solver. By taking advantage of the inherent parallel nature of the FDTD algorithm, the mode solver is implemented on graphics processing units (GPUs) using the compute unified device architecture (CUDA). It is demonstrated that the high-performance computing technique leads to significant acceleration of the FDTD mode solver with more than 30 times improvement in computational efficiency in comparison with the conventional FDTD mode solver running on CPU of a standard desktop computer. The computational efficiency of the accelerated FDTD method is in the same order of magnitude of the standard finite-difference eigen mode solver and yet require much less memory (e.g., less than 10%). Therefore, the new method may serve as an efficient, accurate and robust tool for mode calculation of optical waveguides even when the conventional eigen value mode solvers are no longer applicable due to memory limitation.

  8. A parallel 3D poisson solver for space charge simulation in cylindrical coordinates.

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, J.; Ostroumov, P. N.; Nolen, J.; Physics

    2008-02-01

    This paper presents the development of a parallel three-dimensional Poisson solver in cylindrical coordinate system for the electrostatic potential of a charged particle beam in a circular tube. The Poisson solver uses Fourier expansions in the longitudinal and azimuthal directions, and Spectral Element discretization in the radial direction. A Dirichlet boundary condition is used on the cylinder wall, a natural boundary condition is used on the cylinder axis and a Dirichlet or periodic boundary condition is used in the longitudinal direction. A parallel 2D domain decomposition was implemented in the (r,{theta}) plane. This solver was incorporated into the parallel code PTRACK for beam dynamics simulations. Detailed benchmark results for the parallel solver and a beam dynamics simulation in a high-intensity proton LINAC are presented. When the transverse beam size is small relative to the aperture of the accelerator line, using the Poisson solver in a Cartesian coordinate system and a Cylindrical coordinate system produced similar results. When the transverse beam size is large or beam center located off-axis, the result from Poisson solver in Cartesian coordinate system is not accurate because different boundary condition used. While using the new solver, we can apply circular boundary condition easily and accurately for beam dynamic simulations in accelerator devices.

  9. Oasis: A high-level/high-performance open source Navier-Stokes solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortensen, Mikael; Valen-Sendstad, Kristian

    2015-03-01

    Oasis is a high-level/high-performance finite element Navier-Stokes solver written from scratch in Python using building blocks from the FEniCS project (fenicsproject.org). The solver is unstructured and targets large-scale applications in complex geometries on massively parallel clusters. Oasis utilizes MPI and interfaces, through FEniCS, to the linear algebra backend PETSc. Oasis advocates a high-level, programmable user interface through the creation of highly flexible Python modules for new problems. Through the high-level Python interface the user is placed in complete control of every aspect of the solver. A version of the solver, that is using piecewise linear elements for both velocity and pressure, is shown to reproduce very well the classical, spectral, turbulent channel simulations of Moser et al. (1999). The computational speed is strongly dominated by the iterative solvers provided by the linear algebra backend, which is arguably the best performance any similar implicit solver using PETSc may hope for. Higher order accuracy is also demonstrated and new solvers may be easily added within the same framework.

  10. Extending the functionalities of Cartesian grid solvers: Viscous effects modeling and MPI parallelization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, David D.

    With the renewed interest in Cartesian gridding methodologies for the ease and speed of gridding complex geometries in addition to the simplicity of the control volumes used in the computations, it has become important to investigate ways of extending the existing Cartesian grid solver functionalities. This includes developing methods of modeling the viscous effects in order to utilize Cartesian grids solvers for accurate drag predictions and addressing the issues related to the distributed memory parallelization of Cartesian solvers. This research presents advances in two areas of interest in Cartesian grid solvers, viscous effects modeling and MPI parallelization. The development of viscous effects modeling using solely Cartesian grids has been hampered by the widely varying control volume sizes associated with the mesh refinement and the cut cells associated with the solid surface. This problem is being addressed by using physically based modeling techniques to update the state vectors of the cut cells and removing them from the finite volume integration scheme. This work is performed on a new Cartesian grid solver, NASCART-GT, with modifications to its cut cell functionality. The development of MPI parallelization addresses issues associated with utilizing Cartesian solvers on distributed memory parallel environments. This work is performed on an existing Cartesian grid solver, CART3D, with modifications to its parallelization methodology.

  11. Bounded fractional diffusion in geological media: Definition and Lagrangian approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Green, Christopher T.; LaBolle, Eric M.; Neupauer, Roseanna M.; Sun, HongGuang

    2016-11-01

    Spatiotemporal fractional-derivative models (FDMs) have been increasingly used to simulate non-Fickian diffusion, but methods have not been available to define boundary conditions for FDMs in bounded domains. This study defines boundary conditions and then develops a Lagrangian solver to approximate bounded, one-dimensional fractional diffusion. Both the zero-value and nonzero-value Dirichlet, Neumann, and mixed Robin boundary conditions are defined, where the sign of Riemann-Liouville fractional derivative (capturing nonzero-value spatial-nonlocal boundary conditions with directional superdiffusion) remains consistent with the sign of the fractional-diffusive flux term in the FDMs. New Lagrangian schemes are then proposed to track solute particles moving in bounded domains, where the solutions are checked against analytical or Eulerian solutions available for simplified FDMs. Numerical experiments show that the particle-tracking algorithm for non-Fickian diffusion differs from Fickian diffusion in relocating the particle position around the reflective boundary, likely due to the nonlocal and nonsymmetric fractional diffusion. For a nonzero-value Neumann or Robin boundary, a source cell with a reflective face can be applied to define the release rate of random-walking particles at the specified flux boundary. Mathematical definitions of physically meaningful nonlocal boundaries combined with bounded Lagrangian solvers in this study may provide the only viable techniques at present to quantify the impact of boundaries on anomalous diffusion, expanding the applicability of FDMs from infinite domains to those with any size and boundary conditions.

  12. A new set of direct and iterative solvers for the TOUGH2 family of codes

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, G.J.

    1995-04-01

    Two new solvers are discussed. LUBAND, the first routine is a direct solver for banded systems and is based on a LU decomposition with partial pivoting and row interchange. BCGSTB, the second routine, is a Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient (PCG) solver with improved speed and convergence characteristics. Bandwidth minimization and gridblock ordering schemes are also introduced into TOUGH2 to improve speed and accuracy. TOUGH2 simulates fluid and heat flows in permeable media and is used for the evaluation of WIPP and TEVES (Thermal Enhanced Vapor Extraction System) that will be used to extract solvents from the Chemical Waste Landfill at Sandia National Laboratories.

  13. Application of an unstructured grid flow solver to planes, trains and automobiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spragle, Gregory S.; Smith, Wayne A.; Yadlin, Yoram

    1993-01-01

    Rampant, an unstructured flow solver developed at Fluent Inc., is used to compute three-dimensional, viscous, turbulent, compressible flow fields within complex solution domains. Rampant is an explicit, finite-volume flow solver capable of computing flow fields using either triangular (2d) or tetrahedral (3d) unstructured grids. Local time stepping, implicit residual smoothing, and multigrid techniques are used to accelerate the convergence of the explicit scheme. The paper describes the Rampant flow solver and presents flow field solutions about a plane, train, and automobile.

  14. An iterative parallel sparse matrix equation solver with application to finite element modeling of electromagnetic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Cwik, T.; Jamnejad, V.; Zuffada, C.

    1994-12-31

    The usefulness of finite element modeling follows from the ability to accurately simulate the geometry and three-dimensional fields on the scale of a fraction of a wavelength. To make this modeling practical for engineering design, it is necessary to integrate the stages of geometry modeling and mesh generation, numerical solution of the fields-a stage heavily dependent on the efficient use of a sparse matrix equation solver, and display of field information. The stages of geometry modeling, mesh generation, and field display are commonly completed using commercially available software packages. Algorithms for the numerical solution of the fields need to be written for the specific class of problems considered. Interior problems, i.e. simulating fields in waveguides and cavities, have been successfully solved using finite element methods. Exterior problems, i.e. simulating fields scattered or radiated from structures, are more difficult to model because of the need to numerically truncate the finite element mesh. To practically compute a solution to exterior problems, the domain must be truncated at some finite surface where the Sommerfeld radiation condition is enforced, either approximately or exactly. Approximate methods attempt to truncate the mesh using only local field information at each grid point, whereas exact methods are global, needing information from the entire mesh boundary. In this work, a method that couples three-dimensional finite element (FE) solutions interior to the bounding surface, with an efficient integral equation (IE) solution that exactly enforces the Sommerfeld radiation condition is developed. The bounding surface is taken to be a surface of revolution (SOR) to greatly reduce computational expense in the IE portion of the modeling.

  15. The Method of Space-time Conservation Element and Solution Element: Development of a New Implicit Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S. C.; Wang, X. Y.; Chow, C. Y.; Himansu, A.

    1995-01-01

    The method of space-time conservation element and solution element is a nontraditional numerical method designed from a physicist's perspective, i.e., its development is based more on physics than numerics. It uses only the simplest approximation techniques and yet is capable of generating nearly perfect solutions for a 2-D shock reflection problem used by Helen Yee and others. In addition to providing an overall view of the new method, we introduce a new concept in the design of implicit schemes, and use it to construct a highly accurate solver for a convection-diffusion equation. It is shown that, in the inviscid case, this new scheme becomes explicit and its amplification factors are identical to those of the Leapfrog scheme. On the other hand, in the pure diffusion case, its principal amplification factor becomes the amplification factor of the Crank-Nicolson scheme.

  16. A generalized Poisson solver for first-principles device simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Bani-Hashemian, Mohammad Hossein; VandeVondele, Joost; Brück, Sascha; Luisier, Mathieu

    2016-01-28

    Electronic structure calculations of atomistic systems based on density functional theory involve solving the Poisson equation. In this paper, we present a plane-wave based algorithm for solving the generalized Poisson equation subject to periodic or homogeneous Neumann conditions on the boundaries of the simulation cell and Dirichlet type conditions imposed at arbitrary subdomains. In this way, source, drain, and gate voltages can be imposed across atomistic models of electronic devices. Dirichlet conditions are enforced as constraints in a variational framework giving rise to a saddle point problem. The resulting system of equations is then solved using a stationary iterative method in which the generalized Poisson operator is preconditioned with the standard Laplace operator. The solver can make use of any sufficiently smooth function modelling the dielectric constant, including density dependent dielectric continuum models. For all the boundary conditions, consistent derivatives are available and molecular dynamics simulations can be performed. The convergence behaviour of the scheme is investigated and its capabilities are demonstrated.

  17. Algorithmic Enhancements to the VULCAN Navier-Stokes Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litton, D. K.; Edwards, J. R.; White, J. A.

    2003-01-01

    VULCAN (Viscous Upwind aLgorithm for Complex flow ANalysis) is a cell centered, finite volume code used to solve high speed flows related to hypersonic vehicles. Two algorithms are presented for expanding the range of applications of the current Navier-Stokes solver implemented in VULCAN. The first addition is a highly implicit approach that uses subiterations to enhance block to block connectivity between adjacent subdomains. The addition of this scheme allows more efficient solution of viscous flows on highly-stretched meshes. The second algorithm addresses the shortcomings associated with density-based schemes by the addition of a time-derivative preconditioning strategy. High speed, compressible flows are typically solved with density based schemes, which show a high level of degradation in accuracy and convergence at low Mach numbers (M less than or equal to 0.1). With the addition of preconditioning and associated modifications to the numerical discretization scheme, the eigenvalues will scale with the local velocity, and the above problems will be eliminated. With these additions, VULCAN now has improved convergence behavior for multi-block, highly-stretched meshes and also can solve the Navier-Stokes equations for very low Mach numbers.

  18. Shared Memory Parallelism for 3D Cartesian Discrete Ordinates Solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustafa, Salli; Dutka-Malen, Ivan; Plagne, Laurent; Ponçot, Angélique; Ramet, Pierre

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the design and the performance of DOMINO, a 3D Cartesian SN solver that implements two nested levels of parallelism (multicore+SIMD) on shared memory computation nodes. DOMINO is written in C++, a multi-paradigm programming language that enables the use of powerful and generic parallel programming tools such as Intel TBB and Eigen. These two libraries allow us to combine multi-thread parallelism with vector operations in an efficient and yet portable way. As a result, DOMINO can exploit the full power of modern multi-core processors and is able to tackle very large simulations, that usually require large HPC clusters, using a single computing node. For example, DOMINO solves a 3D full core PWR eigenvalue problem involving 26 energy groups, 288 angular directions (S16), 46 × 106 spatial cells and 1 × 1012 DoFs within 11 hours on a single 32-core SMP node. This represents a sustained performance of 235 GFlops and 40:74% of the SMP node peak performance for the DOMINO sweep implementation. The very high Flops/Watt ratio of DOMINO makes it a very interesting building block for a future many-nodes nuclear simulation tool.

  19. Incremental planning to control a blackboard-based problem solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durfee, E. H.; Lesser, V. R.

    1987-01-01

    To control problem solving activity, a planner must resolve uncertainty about which specific long-term goals (solutions) to pursue and about which sequences of actions will best achieve those goals. A planner is described that abstracts the problem solving state to recognize possible competing and compatible solutions and to roughly predict the importance and expense of developing these solutions. With this information, the planner plans sequences of problem solving activities that most efficiently resolve its uncertainty about which of the possible solutions to work toward. The planner only details actions for the near future because the results of these actions will influence how (and whether) a plan should be pursued. As problem solving proceeds, the planner adds new details to the plan incrementally, and monitors and repairs the plan to insure it achieves its goals whenever possible. Through experiments, researchers illustrate how these new mechanisms significantly improve problem solving decisions and reduce overall computation. They briefly discuss current research directions, including how these mechanisms can improve a problem solver's real-time response and can enhance cooperation in a distributed problem solving network.

  20. Verification of continuum drift kinetic equation solvers in NIMROD

    SciTech Connect

    Held, E. D.; Ji, J.-Y.; Kruger, S. E.; Belli, E. A.; Lyons, B. C.

    2015-03-15

    Verification of continuum solutions to the electron and ion drift kinetic equations (DKEs) in NIMROD [C. R. Sovinec et al., J. Comp. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)] is demonstrated through comparison with several neoclassical transport codes, most notably NEO [E. A. Belli and J. Candy, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 015015 (2012)]. The DKE solutions use NIMROD's spatial representation, 2D finite-elements in the poloidal plane and a 1D Fourier expansion in toroidal angle. For 2D velocity space, a novel 1D expansion in finite elements is applied for the pitch angle dependence and a collocation grid is used for the normalized speed coordinate. The full, linearized Coulomb collision operator is kept and shown to be important for obtaining quantitative results. Bootstrap currents, parallel ion flows, and radial particle and heat fluxes show quantitative agreement between NIMROD and NEO for a variety of tokamak equilibria. In addition, velocity space distribution function contours for ions and electrons show nearly identical detailed structure and agree quantitatively. A Θ-centered, implicit time discretization and a block-preconditioned, iterative linear algebra solver provide efficient electron and ion DKE solutions that ultimately will be used to obtain closures for NIMROD's evolving fluid model.

  1. New numerical solver for flows at various Mach numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miczek, F.; Röpke, F. K.; Edelmann, P. V. F.

    2015-04-01

    Context. Many problems in stellar astrophysics feature flows at low Mach numbers. Conventional compressible hydrodynamics schemes frequently used in the field have been developed for the transonic regime and exhibit excessive numerical dissipation for these flows. Aims: While schemes were proposed that solve hydrodynamics strictly in the low Mach regime and thus restrict their applicability, we aim at developing a scheme that correctly operates in a wide range of Mach numbers. Methods: Based on an analysis of the asymptotic behavior of the Euler equations in the low Mach limit we propose a novel scheme that is able to maintain a low Mach number flow setup while retaining all effects of compressibility. This is achieved by a suitable modification of the well-known Roe solver. Results: Numerical tests demonstrate the capability of this new scheme to reproduce slow flow structures even in moderate numerical resolution. Conclusions: Our scheme provides a promising approach to a consistent multidimensional hydrodynamical treatment of astrophysical low Mach number problems such as convection, instabilities, and mixing in stellar evolution.

  2. Cooperative solutions coupling a geometry engine and adaptive solver codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickens, Thomas P.

    1995-01-01

    Follow-on work has progressed in using Aero Grid and Paneling System (AGPS), a geometry and visualization system, as a dynamic real time geometry monitor, manipulator, and interrogator for other codes. In particular, AGPS has been successfully coupled with adaptive flow solvers which iterate, refining the grid in areas of interest, and continuing on to a solution. With the coupling to the geometry engine, the new grids represent the actual geometry much more accurately since they are derived directly from the geometry and do not use refits to the first-cut grids. Additional work has been done with design runs where the geometric shape is modified to achieve a desired result. Various constraints are used to point the solution in a reasonable direction which also more closely satisfies the desired results. Concepts and techniques are presented, as well as examples of sample case studies. Issues such as distributed operation of the cooperative codes versus running all codes locally and pre-calculation for performance are discussed. Future directions are considered which will build on these techniques in light of changing computer environments.

  3. Intrusive Method for Uncertainty Quantification in a Multiphase Flow Solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnquist, Brian; Owkes, Mark

    2016-11-01

    Uncertainty quantification (UQ) is a necessary, interesting, and often neglected aspect of fluid flow simulations. To determine the significance of uncertain initial and boundary conditions, a multiphase flow solver is being created which extends a single phase, intrusive, polynomial chaos scheme into multiphase flows. Reliably estimating the impact of input uncertainty on design criteria can help identify and minimize unwanted variability in critical areas, and has the potential to help advance knowledge in atomizing jets, jet engines, pharmaceuticals, and food processing. Use of an intrusive polynomial chaos method has been shown to significantly reduce computational cost over non-intrusive collocation methods such as Monte-Carlo. This method requires transforming the model equations into a weak form through substitution of stochastic (random) variables. Ultimately, the model deploys a stochastic Navier Stokes equation, a stochastic conservative level set approach including reinitialization, as well as stochastic normals and curvature. By implementing these approaches together in one framework, basic problems may be investigated which shed light on model expansion, uncertainty theory, and fluid flow in general. NSF Grant Number 1511325.

  4. A multiblock multigrid three-dimensional Euler equation solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannizzaro, Frank E.; Elmiligui, Alaa; Melson, N. Duane; Vonlavante, E.

    1990-01-01

    Current aerodynamic designs are often quite complex (geometrically). Flexible computational tools are needed for the analysis of a wide range of configurations with both internal and external flows. In the past, geometrically dissimilar configurations required different analysis codes with different grid topologies in each. The duplicity of codes can be avoided with the use of a general multiblock formulation which can handle any grid topology. Rather than hard wiring the grid topology into the program, it is instead dictated by input to the program. In this work, the compressible Euler equations, written in a body-fitted finite-volume formulation, are solved using a pseudo-time-marching approach. Two upwind methods (van Leer's flux-vector-splitting and Roe's flux-differencing) were investigated. Two types of explicit solvers (a two-step predictor-corrector and a modified multistage Runge-Kutta) were used with multigrid acceleration to enhance convergence. A multiblock strategy is used to allow greater geometric flexibility. A report on simple explicit upwind schemes for solving compressible flows is included.

  5. An optimal iterative solver for the Stokes problem

    SciTech Connect

    Wathen, A.; Silvester, D.

    1994-12-31

    Discretisations of the classical Stokes Problem for slow viscous incompressible flow gives rise to systems of equations in matrix form for the velocity u and the pressure p, where the coefficient matrix is symmetric but necessarily indefinite. The square submatrix A is symmetric and positive definite and represents a discrete (vector) Laplacian and the submatrix C may be the zero matrix or more generally will be symmetric positive semi-definite. For `stabilised` discretisations (C {ne} 0) and descretisations which are inherently `stable` (C = 0) and so do not admit spurious pressure components even as the mesh size, h approaches zero, the Schur compliment of the matrix has spectral condition number independent of h (given also that B is bounded). Here the authors will show how this property together with a multigrid preconditioner only for the Laplacian block A yields an optimal solver for the Stokes problem through use of the Minimum Residual iteration. That is, combining Minimum Residual iteration for the matrix equation with a block preconditioner which comprises a small number of multigrid V-cycles for the Laplacian block A together with a simple diagonal scaling block provides an iterative solution procedure for which the computational work grows only linearly with the problem size.

  6. An implicit-explicit flow solver for complex unsteady flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, John Ming-Jey

    2005-12-01

    Current calculations of complex unsteady flows are prohibitively expensive for use in real engineering applications. Typical flow solvers for unsteady integration employ a fully implicit time stepping scheme, in which the equations are solved by an inner iteration. In order to achieve convergence within each physical time step, a substantial number of pseudo-time steps (typically between 30--100, depending on the case) are required. Another unfavorable characteristic of the dual time stepping method is that there are no available error estimates for time accuracy available unless the inner iterations are fully converged, although numerical experiments have demonstrated second order accuracy in time. The approach in this thesis is to construct hybrid type schemes by combining implicit and explicit schemes in a manner that guarantees second order accuracy in time. An initial time accurate ADI step is introduced, followed by a small number of cycles of the dual-time stepping scheme augmented by multigrid. The formal second order accuracy in time should be retained without the need for large numbers of inner iterations. The number of inner iterations required for convergence can thus be reduced while maintaining the same overall error levels. To investigate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme, several pitching airfoil test cases were examined, offering a close look at possible reductions in computational cost by adopting the present approach.

  7. A novel high-order, entropy stable, 3D AMR MHD solver with guaranteed positive pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derigs, Dominik; Winters, Andrew R.; Gassner, Gregor J.; Walch, Stefanie

    2016-07-01

    We describe a high-order numerical magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) solver built upon a novel non-linear entropy stable numerical flux function that supports eight travelling wave solutions. By construction the solver conserves mass, momentum, and energy and is entropy stable. The method is designed to treat the divergence-free constraint on the magnetic field in a similar fashion to a hyperbolic divergence cleaning technique. The solver described herein is especially well-suited for flows involving strong discontinuities. Furthermore, we present a new formulation to guarantee positivity of the pressure. We present the underlying theory and implementation of the new solver into the multi-physics, multi-scale adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) simulation code FLASH (http://flash.uchicago.edu)

  8. Finite difference method accelerated with sparse solvers for structural analysis of the metal-organic complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guda, A. A.; Guda, S. A.; Soldatov, M. A.; Lomachenko, K. A.; Bugaev, A. L.; Lamberti, C.; Gawelda, W.; Bressler, C.; Smolentsev, G.; Soldatov, A. V.; Joly, Y.

    2016-05-01

    Finite difference method (FDM) implemented in the FDMNES software [Phys. Rev. B, 2001, 63, 125120] was revised. Thorough analysis shows, that the calculated diagonal in the FDM matrix consists of about 96% zero elements. Thus a sparse solver would be more suitable for the problem instead of traditional Gaussian elimination for the diagonal neighbourhood. We have tried several iterative sparse solvers and the direct one MUMPS solver with METIS ordering turned out to be the best. Compared to the Gaussian solver present method is up to 40 times faster and allows XANES simulations for complex systems already on personal computers. We show applicability of the software for metal-organic [Fe(bpy)3]2+ complex both for low spin and high spin states populated after laser excitation.

  9. User's Manual for PCSMS (Parallel Complex Sparse Matrix Solver). Version 1.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C. J.

    2000-01-01

    PCSMS (Parallel Complex Sparse Matrix Solver) is a computer code written to make use of the existing real sparse direct solvers to solve complex, sparse matrix linear equations. PCSMS converts complex matrices into real matrices and use real, sparse direct matrix solvers to factor and solve the real matrices. The solution vector is reconverted to complex numbers. Though, this utility is written for Silicon Graphics (SGI) real sparse matrix solution routines, it is general in nature and can be easily modified to work with any real sparse matrix solver. The User's Manual is written to make the user acquainted with the installation and operation of the code. Driver routines are given to aid the users to integrate PCSMS routines in their own codes.

  10. Fault tolerance in an inner-outer solver: A GVR-enabled case study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ziming; Chien, Andrew A.; Teranishi, Keita

    2015-04-18

    Resilience is a major challenge for large-scale systems. It is particularly important for iterative linear solvers, since they take much of the time of many scientific applications. We show that single bit flip errors in the Flexible GMRES iterative linear solver can lead to high computational overhead or even failure to converge to the right answer. Informed by these results, we design and evaluate several strategies for fault tolerance in both inner and outer solvers appropriate across a range of error rates. We implement them, extending Trilinos’ solver library with the Global View Resilience (GVR) programming model, which provides multi-stream snapshots, multi-version data structures with portable and rich error checking/recovery. Lastly, experimental results validate correct execution with low performance overhead under varied error conditions.

  11. Fault tolerance in an inner-outer solver: A GVR-enabled case study

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Ziming; Chien, Andrew A.; Teranishi, Keita

    2015-04-18

    Resilience is a major challenge for large-scale systems. It is particularly important for iterative linear solvers, since they take much of the time of many scientific applications. We show that single bit flip errors in the Flexible GMRES iterative linear solver can lead to high computational overhead or even failure to converge to the right answer. Informed by these results, we design and evaluate several strategies for fault tolerance in both inner and outer solvers appropriate across a range of error rates. We implement them, extending Trilinos’ solver library with the Global View Resilience (GVR) programming model, which provides multi-streammore » snapshots, multi-version data structures with portable and rich error checking/recovery. Lastly, experimental results validate correct execution with low performance overhead under varied error conditions.« less

  12. Cognitive Distance Learning Problem Solver Reduces Search Cost through Learning Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakawa, Hiroshi; Miyamoto, Yuji; Baba, Takayuki; Okada, Hiroyuki

    Our proposed cognitive distance learning problem solver generates sequence of actions from initial state to goal states in problem state space. This problem solver learns cognitive distance (path cost) of arbitrary combination of two states. Action generation at each state is selection of next state that has minimum cognitive distance to the goal, like Q-learning agent. In this paper, first, we show that our proposed method reduces search cost than conventional search method by analytical simulation in spherical state space. Second, we show that an average search cost is more reduced more the prior learning term is long and our problem solver is familiar to the environment, by a computer simulation in a tile world state space. Third, we showed that proposed problem solver is superior to the reinforcement learning techniques when goal is changed by a computer simulation. Forth, we found that our simulation result consist with psychological experimental results.

  13. A new 3D Eikonal solver for accurate traveltimes, take-off angles and amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, Mark; Gesret, Alexandrine

    2013-04-01

    The finite-difference approximation to the eikonal equation was first introduced by J.Vidale in 1988 to propagate first-arrival times throughout a 2D or 3D gridded velocity model. Even today this method is still very attractive from a computational point of view when dealing with large datasets. Among many domains of application, the eikonal solver may be used for 2-D or 3-D depth migration, tomography or microseismicity data analysis. The original 3D method proposed by Vidale in 1990 did exhibit some degree of travel time error that may lead to poor image focusing in migration or inaccurate velocities estimated via tomographic inversion. The method even failed when large and sharp velocity contrasts were encountered. To try and overcome these limitations many authors proposed alternative algorithms, incorporating new finite-difference operators and/or new schemes of implementing the operators to propagate the travel times through the velocity model. If many recently published algorithms for resolving the 3D eikonal equation do yield fairly accurate travel times for most applications, the spatial derivatives of travel times remain very approximate and prevent reliable computation of auxiliary quantities such as take-off angle and amplitude. This limitation is due to the fact that the finite-difference operators locally assume that the wavefront is flat (plane wave). This assumption is in particularly wrong when close to the source where a spherical approximation would be more suitable. To overcome this singularity at the source, some authors proposed an adaptive method that reduces inaccuracies, however, the cost is more algorithmic complexity. The objective of this study is to develop an efficient simple 3D eikonal solver that is able to: overcome the problem of the source singularity, handle velocity models that exhibit strong vertical and horizontal velocity variations, use different grid spacing in x, y and z axis of model. The final goal is of course to

  14. Wavelet-based Poisson solver for use in particle-in-cell simulations.

    PubMed

    Terzić, Balsa; Pogorelov, Ilya V

    2005-06-01

    We report on a successful implementation of a wavelet-based Poisson solver for use in three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. Our method harnesses advantages afforded by the wavelet formulation, such as sparsity of operators and data sets, existence of effective preconditioners, and the ability simultaneously to remove numerical noise and additional compression of relevant data sets. We present and discuss preliminary results relating to the application of the new solver to test problems in accelerator physics and astrophysics.

  15. THE USE OF CLASSICAL LAX-FRIEDRICHS RIEMANN SOLVERS WITH DISCONTINUOUS GALERKIN METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    W. J. RIDER; R. B. LOWRIE

    2001-03-01

    While conducting a von Neumann stability analysis of discontinuous Galerkin methods we found that the standard Lax-Friedrichs (LxF) Riemann solver is unstable for all time-step sizes. A simple modification of the Riemann solver's dissipation returns the method to stability. Furthermore, the method has a smaller truncation error than the corresponding method with an upwind flux for the RK2-DG(1) method. These results are confirmed upon testing.

  16. The development of an intelligent interface to a computational fluid dynamics flow-solver code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Anthony D.

    1988-01-01

    Researchers at NASA Lewis are currently developing an 'intelligent' interface to aid in the development and use of large, computational fluid dynamics flow-solver codes for studying the internal fluid behavior of aerospace propulsion systems. This paper discusses the requirements, design, and implementation of an intelligent interface to Proteus, a general purpose, 3-D, Navier-Stokes flow solver. The interface is called PROTAIS to denote its introduction of artificial intelligence (AI) concepts to the Proteus code.

  17. Avoiding Communication in the Lanczos Bidiagonalization Routine and Associated Least Squares QR Solver

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-12

    Avoiding communication in the Lanczos bidiagonalization routine and associated Least Squares QR solver Erin Carson Electrical Engineering and...Bidiagonalization Routine and Associated Least Squares QR Solver 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...throughout scienti c codes , are often the bottlenecks in application perfor- mance due to a low computation/communication ratio. In this paper we develop

  18. The development of an intelligent interface to a computational fluid dynamics flow-solver code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Anthony D.

    1988-01-01

    Researchers at NASA Lewis are currently developing an 'intelligent' interface to aid in the development and use of large, computational fluid dynamics flow-solver codes for studying the internal fluid behavior of aerospace propulsion systems. This paper discusses the requirements, design, and implementation of an intelligent interface to Proteus, a general purpose, three-dimensional, Navier-Stokes flow solver. The interface is called PROTAIS to denote its introduction of artificial intelligence (AI) concepts to the Proteus code.

  19. Dynamic Linear Solver Selection for Transient Simulations Using Multi-label Classifiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Conference on Computational Science, ICCS 2012 Dynamic linear solver selection for transient simulations using multi-label classifiers Paul R. Eller ...preconditioned linear solver as the output. Email addresses: Paul.R.Eller@usace.army.mil (Paul R. Eller ), Ruth.C.Cheng@usace.army.mil (Jing-Ru C...unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 1524 Paul R. Eller et al. / Procedia

  20. Implementation of a parallel unstructured Euler solver on the CM-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morano, Eric; Mavriplis, D. J.

    1995-01-01

    An efficient unstructured 3D Euler solver is parallelized on a Thinking Machine Corporation Connection Machine 5, distributed memory computer with vectoring capability. In this paper, the single instruction multiple data (SIMD) strategy is employed through the use of the CM Fortran language and the CMSSL scientific library. The performance of the CMSSL mesh partitioner is evaluated and the overall efficiency of the parallel flow solver is discussed.

  1. A 3D Unstructured Mesh Euler Solver Based on the Fourth-Order CESE Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    conservation in space and time without using a one-dimensional Riemann solver, (ii) genuinely multi-dimensional treatment without dimensional splitting (iii...of the original second-order CESE method, including: (i) flux conservation in space and time without using a one-dimensional Riemann solver, (ii...treated in a unified manner. The geometry for a three-dimensional CESE method is more difficult to visualize than the one- and two-dimensional methods

  2. Development of a Flow Solver with Complex Kinetics on the Graphic Processing Units

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-22

    Physics 109, 11 (2011), 113308. [9] Klockner, A., Warburton, T., Bridge, J., and Hesthaven, J. Nodal Discontinuous Galerkin Methods on Graphics...Graphic Processing Units ( GPU ) to model reactive gas mixture with detailed chemical kinetics. The solver incorporates high-order finite volume methods...method. We explored different approaches in implementing a fast kinetics solver on the GPU . The detail of the implementation is discussed in the

  3. Basis Function Approximation of Transonic Aerodynamic Influence Coefficient Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wesley Waisang; Pak, Chan-Gi

    2010-01-01

    A technique for approximating the modal aerodynamic influence coefficients [AIC] matrices by using basis functions has been developed and validated. An application of the resulting approximated modal AIC matrix for a flutter analysis in transonic speed regime has been demonstrated. This methodology can be applied to the unsteady subsonic, transonic and supersonic aerodynamics. The method requires the unsteady aerodynamics in frequency-domain. The flutter solution can be found by the classic methods, such as rational function approximation, k, p-k, p, root-locus et cetera. The unsteady aeroelastic analysis for design optimization using unsteady transonic aerodynamic approximation is being demonstrated using the ZAERO(TradeMark) flutter solver (ZONA Technology Incorporated, Scottsdale, Arizona). The technique presented has been shown to offer consistent flutter speed prediction on an aerostructures test wing [ATW] 2 configuration with negligible loss in precision in transonic speed regime. These results may have practical significance in the analysis of aircraft aeroelastic calculation and could lead to a more efficient design optimization cycle

  4. Basis Function Approximation of Transonic Aerodynamic Influence Coefficient Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wesley W.; Pak, Chan-gi

    2011-01-01

    A technique for approximating the modal aerodynamic influence coefficients matrices by using basis functions has been developed and validated. An application of the resulting approximated modal aerodynamic influence coefficients matrix for a flutter analysis in transonic speed regime has been demonstrated. This methodology can be applied to the unsteady subsonic, transonic, and supersonic aerodynamics. The method requires the unsteady aerodynamics in frequency-domain. The flutter solution can be found by the classic methods, such as rational function approximation, k, p-k, p, root-locus et cetera. The unsteady aeroelastic analysis for design optimization using unsteady transonic aerodynamic approximation is being demonstrated using the ZAERO flutter solver (ZONA Technology Incorporated, Scottsdale, Arizona). The technique presented has been shown to offer consistent flutter speed prediction on an aerostructures test wing 2 configuration with negligible loss in precision in transonic speed regime. These results may have practical significance in the analysis of aircraft aeroelastic calculation and could lead to a more efficient design optimization cycle.

  5. DALI: Derivative Approximation for LIkelihoods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellentin, Elena

    2015-07-01

    DALI (Derivative Approximation for LIkelihoods) is a fast approximation of non-Gaussian likelihoods. It extends the Fisher Matrix in a straightforward way and allows for a wider range of posterior shapes. The code is written in C/C++.

  6. Head and neck 192Ir HDR-brachytherapy dosimetry using a grid-based Boltzmann solver

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Sabine; Kóvacs, George

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To compare dosimetry for head and neck cancer patients, calculated with TG-43 formalism and a commercially available grid-based Boltzmann solver. Material and methods This study included 3D-dosimetry of 49 consecutive brachytherapy head and neck cancer patients, computed by a grid-based Boltzmann solver that takes into account tissue inhomogeneities as well as TG-43 formalism. 3D-treatment planning was carried out by using computed tomography. Results Dosimetric indices D90 and V100 for target volume were about 3% lower (median value) for the grid-based Boltzmann solver relative to TG-43-based computation (p < 0.01). The V150 dose parameter showed 1.6% increase from grid-based Boltzmann solver to TG-43 (p < 0.01). Conclusions Dose differences between results of a grid-based Boltzmann solver and TG-43 formalism for high-dose-rate head and neck brachytherapy patients to the target volume were found. Distinctions in D90 of CTV were low (2.63 Gy for grid-based Boltzmann solver vs. 2.71 Gy TG-43 in mean). In our clinical practice, prescription doses remain unchanged for high-dose-rate head and neck brachytherapy for the time being. PMID:24474973

  7. On the use of finite difference matrix-vector products in Newton-Krylov solvers for implicit climate dynamics with spectral elements

    DOE PAGES

    Woodward, Carol S.; Gardner, David J.; Evans, Katherine J.

    2015-01-01

    Efficient solutions of global climate models require effectively handling disparate length and time scales. Implicit solution approaches allow time integration of the physical system with a step size governed by accuracy of the processes of interest rather than by stability of the fastest time scales present. Implicit approaches, however, require the solution of nonlinear systems within each time step. Usually, a Newton's method is applied to solve these systems. Each iteration of the Newton's method, in turn, requires the solution of a linear model of the nonlinear system. This model employs the Jacobian of the problem-defining nonlinear residual, but thismore » Jacobian can be costly to form. If a Krylov linear solver is used for the solution of the linear system, the action of the Jacobian matrix on a given vector is required. In the case of spectral element methods, the Jacobian is not calculated but only implemented through matrix-vector products. The matrix-vector multiply can also be approximated by a finite difference approximation which may introduce inaccuracy in the overall nonlinear solver. In this paper, we review the advantages and disadvantages of finite difference approximations of these matrix-vector products for climate dynamics within the spectral element shallow water dynamical core of the Community Atmosphere Model.« less

  8. On the use of finite difference matrix-vector products in Newton-Krylov solvers for implicit climate dynamics with spectral elements

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, Carol S.; Gardner, David J.; Evans, Katherine J.

    2015-01-01

    Efficient solutions of global climate models require effectively handling disparate length and time scales. Implicit solution approaches allow time integration of the physical system with a step size governed by accuracy of the processes of interest rather than by stability of the fastest time scales present. Implicit approaches, however, require the solution of nonlinear systems within each time step. Usually, a Newton's method is applied to solve these systems. Each iteration of the Newton's method, in turn, requires the solution of a linear model of the nonlinear system. This model employs the Jacobian of the problem-defining nonlinear residual, but this Jacobian can be costly to form. If a Krylov linear solver is used for the solution of the linear system, the action of the Jacobian matrix on a given vector is required. In the case of spectral element methods, the Jacobian is not calculated but only implemented through matrix-vector products. The matrix-vector multiply can also be approximated by a finite difference approximation which may introduce inaccuracy in the overall nonlinear solver. In this paper, we review the advantages and disadvantages of finite difference approximations of these matrix-vector products for climate dynamics within the spectral element shallow water dynamical core of the Community Atmosphere Model.

  9. Taylor Approximations and Definite Integrals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Sheldon P.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the possibility of approximating the value of a definite integral by approximating the integrand rather than using numerical methods to approximate the value of the definite integral. Particular cases considered include examples where the integral is improper, such as an elliptic integral. (Contains 4 tables and 2 figures.)

  10. A Radiation Transfer Solver for Athena Using Short Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Shane W.; Stone, James M.; Jiang, Yan-Fei

    2012-03-01

    We describe the implementation of a module for the Athena magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code that solves the time-independent, multi-frequency radiative transfer (RT) equation on multidimensional Cartesian simulation domains, including scattering and non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) effects. The module is based on well known and well tested algorithms developed for modeling stellar atmospheres, including the method of short characteristics to solve the RT equation, accelerated Lambda iteration to handle scattering and non-LTE effects, and parallelization via domain decomposition. The module serves several purposes: it can be used to generate spectra and images, to compute a variable Eddington tensor (VET) for full radiation MHD simulations, and to calculate the heating and cooling source terms in the MHD equations in flows where radiation pressure is small compared with gas pressure. For the latter case, the module is combined with the standard MHD integrators using operator splitting: we describe this approach in detail, including a new constraint on the time step for stability due to radiation diffusion modes. Implementation of the VET method for radiation pressure dominated flows is described in a companion paper. We present results from a suite of test problems for both the RT solver itself and for dynamical problems that include radiative heating and cooling. These tests demonstrate that the radiative transfer solution is accurate and confirm that the operator split method is stable, convergent, and efficient for problems of interest. We demonstrate there is no need to adopt ad hoc assumptions of questionable accuracy to solve RT problems in concert with MHD: the computational cost for our general-purpose module for simple (e.g., LTE gray) problems can be comparable to or less than a single time step of Athena's MHD integrators, and only few times more expensive than that for more general (non-LTE) problems.

  11. A RADIATION TRANSFER SOLVER FOR ATHENA USING SHORT CHARACTERISTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Shane W.; Stone, James M.; Jiang Yanfei

    2012-03-01

    We describe the implementation of a module for the Athena magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code that solves the time-independent, multi-frequency radiative transfer (RT) equation on multidimensional Cartesian simulation domains, including scattering and non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) effects. The module is based on well known and well tested algorithms developed for modeling stellar atmospheres, including the method of short characteristics to solve the RT equation, accelerated Lambda iteration to handle scattering and non-LTE effects, and parallelization via domain decomposition. The module serves several purposes: it can be used to generate spectra and images, to compute a variable Eddington tensor (VET) for full radiation MHD simulations, and to calculate the heating and cooling source terms in the MHD equations in flows where radiation pressure is small compared with gas pressure. For the latter case, the module is combined with the standard MHD integrators using operator splitting: we describe this approach in detail, including a new constraint on the time step for stability due to radiation diffusion modes. Implementation of the VET method for radiation pressure dominated flows is described in a companion paper. We present results from a suite of test problems for both the RT solver itself and for dynamical problems that include radiative heating and cooling. These tests demonstrate that the radiative transfer solution is accurate and confirm that the operator split method is stable, convergent, and efficient for problems of interest. We demonstrate there is no need to adopt ad hoc assumptions of questionable accuracy to solve RT problems in concert with MHD: the computational cost for our general-purpose module for simple (e.g., LTE gray) problems can be comparable to or less than a single time step of Athena's MHD integrators, and only few times more expensive than that for more general (non-LTE) problems.

  12. Efficient Parallel Kernel Solvers for Computational Fluid Dynamics Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xian-He

    1997-01-01

    Distributed-memory parallel computers dominate today's parallel computing arena. These machines, such as Intel Paragon, IBM SP2, and Cray Origin2OO, have successfully delivered high performance computing power for solving some of the so-called "grand-challenge" problems. Despite initial success, parallel machines have not been widely accepted in production engineering environments due to the complexity of parallel programming. On a parallel computing system, a task has to be partitioned and distributed appropriately among processors to reduce communication cost and to attain load balance. More importantly, even with careful partitioning and mapping, the performance of an algorithm may still be unsatisfactory, since conventional sequential algorithms may be serial in nature and may not be implemented efficiently on parallel machines. In many cases, new algorithms have to be introduced to increase parallel performance. In order to achieve optimal performance, in addition to partitioning and mapping, a careful performance study should be conducted for a given application to find a good algorithm-machine combination. This process, however, is usually painful and elusive. The goal of this project is to design and develop efficient parallel algorithms for highly accurate Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations and other engineering applications. The work plan is 1) developing highly accurate parallel numerical algorithms, 2) conduct preliminary testing to verify the effectiveness and potential of these algorithms, 3) incorporate newly developed algorithms into actual simulation packages. The work plan has well achieved. Two highly accurate, efficient Poisson solvers have been developed and tested based on two different approaches: (1) Adopting a mathematical geometry which has a better capacity to describe the fluid, (2) Using compact scheme to gain high order accuracy in numerical discretization. The previously developed Parallel Diagonal Dominant (PDD) algorithm

  13. Combining global and local approximations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, Raphael T.

    1991-01-01

    A method based on a linear approximation to a scaling factor, designated the 'global-local approximation' (GLA) method, is presented and shown capable of extending the range of usefulness of derivative-based approximations to a more refined model. The GLA approach refines the conventional scaling factor by means of a linearly varying, rather than constant, scaling factor. The capabilities of the method are demonstrated for a simple beam example with a crude and more refined FEM model.

  14. Combining global and local approximations

    SciTech Connect

    Haftka, R.T. )

    1991-09-01

    A method based on a linear approximation to a scaling factor, designated the 'global-local approximation' (GLA) method, is presented and shown capable of extending the range of usefulness of derivative-based approximations to a more refined model. The GLA approach refines the conventional scaling factor by means of a linearly varying, rather than constant, scaling factor. The capabilities of the method are demonstrated for a simple beam example with a crude and more refined FEM model. 6 refs.

  15. Phenomenological applications of rational approximants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzàlez-Solís, Sergi; Masjuan, Pere

    2016-08-01

    We illustrate the powerfulness of Padé approximants (PAs) as a summation method and explore one of their extensions, the so-called quadratic approximant (QAs), to access both space- and (low-energy) time-like (TL) regions. As an introductory and pedagogical exercise, the function 1 zln(1 + z) is approximated by both kind of approximants. Then, PAs are applied to predict pseudoscalar meson Dalitz decays and to extract Vub from the semileptonic B → πℓνℓ decays. Finally, the π vector form factor in the TL region is explored using QAs.

  16. MODFLOW-2000, The U.S. Geological Survey Modular Ground-Water Model -- GMG Linear Equation Solver Package Documentation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, John D.; Naff, Richard L.

    2004-01-01

    A geometric multigrid solver (GMG), based in the preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm, has been developed for solving systems of equations resulting from applying the cell-centered finite difference algorithm to flow in porous media. This solver has been adapted to the U.S. Geological Survey ground-water flow model MODFLOW-2000. The documentation herein is a description of the solver and the adaptation to MODFLOW-2000.

  17. Application of NASA General-Purpose Solver to Large-Scale Computations in Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Willie R.; Storaasli, Olaf O.

    2004-01-01

    Of several iterative and direct equation solvers evaluated previously for computations in aeroacoustics, the most promising was the NASA-developed General-Purpose Solver (winner of NASA's 1999 software of the year award). This paper presents detailed, single-processor statistics of the performance of this solver, which has been tailored and optimized for large-scale aeroacoustic computations. The statistics, compiled using an SGI ORIGIN 2000 computer with 12 Gb available memory (RAM) and eight available processors, are the central processing unit time, RAM requirements, and solution error. The equation solver is capable of solving 10 thousand complex unknowns in as little as 0.01 sec using 0.02 Gb RAM, and 8.4 million complex unknowns in slightly less than 3 hours using all 12 Gb. This latter solution is the largest aeroacoustics problem solved to date with this technique. The study was unable to detect any noticeable error in the solution, since noise levels predicted from these solution vectors are in excellent agreement with the noise levels computed from the exact solution. The equation solver provides a means for obtaining numerical solutions to aeroacoustics problems in three dimensions.

  18. On the Use of Finite Difference Matrix-Vector Products in Newton-Krylov Solvers for Implicit Climate Dynamics with Spectral Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, David; Woodward, Carol S.; Evans, Katherine J

    2015-01-01

    Efficient solution of global climate models requires effectively handling disparate length and time scales. Implicit solution approaches allow time integration of the physical system with a time step dictated by accuracy of the processes of interest rather than by stability governed by the fastest of the time scales present. Implicit approaches, however, require the solution of nonlinear systems within each time step. Usually, a Newton s method is applied for these systems. Each iteration of the Newton s method, in turn, requires the solution of a linear model of the nonlinear system. This model employs the Jacobian of the problem-defining nonlinear residual, but this Jacobian can be costly to form. If a Krylov linear solver is used for the solution of the linear system, the action of the Jacobian matrix on a given vector is required. In the case of spectral element methods, the Jacobian is not calculated but only implemented through matrix-vector products. The matrix-vector multiply can also be approximated by a finite-difference which may show a loss of accuracy in the overall nonlinear solver. In this paper, we review the advantages and disadvantages of finite-difference approximations of these matrix-vector products for climate dynamics within the spectral-element based shallow-water dynamical-core of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM).

  19. On the computation of the Baer-Nunziato model using ALE formulation with HLL- and HLLC-type solvers towards fluid-structure interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daude, F.; Galon, P.

    2016-01-01

    Computation of compressible two-phase flows with the unsteady compressible Baer-Nunziato model in conjunction with the moving grid approach is discussed in this paper. Both HLL- and HLLC-type Finite-Volume methods are presented and implemented in the context of Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation in a multidimensional framework. The construction of suitable numerical methods is linked to proper approximations of the non-conservative terms on moving grids. The HLL discretization follows global conservation properties such as free-stream preservation and uniform pressure and velocity profiles preservation on moving grids. The HLLC solver initially proposed by Tokareva and Toro [1] for the Baer-Nunziato model is based on an approximate solution of local Riemann problems containing all the characteristic fields present in the exact solution. Both ;subsonic; and ;supersonic; configurations are considered in the construction of the present HLLC solver. In addition, an adaptive 6-wave HLLC scheme is also proposed for computational efficiency. The methods are first assessed on a variety of 1-D Riemann problems including both fixed and moving grids applications. The methods are finally tested on 2-D and 3-D applications: 2-D Riemann problems, a 2-D shock-bubble interaction and finally a 3-D fluid-structure interaction problem with a good agreement with the experiments.

  20. The U.S. Geological Survey Modular Ground-Water Model - PCGN: A Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient Solver with Improved Nonlinear Control

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naff, Richard L.; Banta, Edward R.

    2008-01-01

    The preconditioned conjugate gradient with improved nonlinear control (PCGN) package provides addi-tional means by which the solution of nonlinear ground-water flow problems can be controlled as compared to existing solver packages for MODFLOW. Picard iteration is used to solve nonlinear ground-water flow equations by iteratively solving a linear approximation of the nonlinear equations. The linear solution is provided by means of the preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm where preconditioning is provided by the modi-fied incomplete Cholesky algorithm. The incomplete Cholesky scheme incorporates two levels of fill, 0 and 1, in which the pivots can be modified so that the row sums of the preconditioning matrix and the original matrix are approximately equal. A relaxation factor is used to implement the modified pivots, which determines the degree of modification allowed. The effects of fill level and degree of pivot modification are briefly explored by means of a synthetic, heterogeneous finite-difference matrix; results are reported in the final section of this report. The preconditioned conjugate gradient method is coupled with Picard iteration so as to efficiently solve the nonlinear equations associated with many ground-water flow problems. The description of this coupling of the linear solver with Picard iteration is a primary concern of this document.

  1. Approximating Functions with Exponential Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Sheldon P.

    2005-01-01

    The possibility of approximating a function with a linear combination of exponential functions of the form e[superscript x], e[superscript 2x], ... is considered as a parallel development to the notion of Taylor polynomials which approximate a function with a linear combination of power function terms. The sinusoidal functions sin "x" and cos "x"…

  2. Approximate circuits for increased reliability

    DOEpatents

    Hamlet, Jason R.; Mayo, Jackson R.

    2015-12-22

    Embodiments of the invention describe a Boolean circuit having a voter circuit and a plurality of approximate circuits each based, at least in part, on a reference circuit. The approximate circuits are each to generate one or more output signals based on values of received input signals. The voter circuit is to receive the one or more output signals generated by each of the approximate circuits, and is to output one or more signals corresponding to a majority value of the received signals. At least some of the approximate circuits are to generate an output value different than the reference circuit for one or more input signal values; however, for each possible input signal value, the majority values of the one or more output signals generated by the approximate circuits and received by the voter circuit correspond to output signal result values of the reference circuit.

  3. Approximate circuits for increased reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Hamlet, Jason R.; Mayo, Jackson R.

    2015-08-18

    Embodiments of the invention describe a Boolean circuit having a voter circuit and a plurality of approximate circuits each based, at least in part, on a reference circuit. The approximate circuits are each to generate one or more output signals based on values of received input signals. The voter circuit is to receive the one or more output signals generated by each of the approximate circuits, and is to output one or more signals corresponding to a majority value of the received signals. At least some of the approximate circuits are to generate an output value different than the reference circuit for one or more input signal values; however, for each possible input signal value, the majority values of the one or more output signals generated by the approximate circuits and received by the voter circuit correspond to output signal result values of the reference circuit.

  4. Bounded fractional diffusion in geological media: Definition and Lagrangian approximation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, Yong; Green, Christopher T.; LaBolle, Eric M.; Neupauer, Roseanna M.; Sun, HongGuang

    2016-01-01

    Spatiotemporal Fractional-Derivative Models (FDMs) have been increasingly used to simulate non-Fickian diffusion, but methods have not been available to define boundary conditions for FDMs in bounded domains. This study defines boundary conditions and then develops a Lagrangian solver to approximate bounded, one-dimensional fractional diffusion. Both the zero-value and non-zero-value Dirichlet, Neumann, and mixed Robin boundary conditions are defined, where the sign of Riemann-Liouville fractional derivative (capturing non-zero-value spatial-nonlocal boundary conditions with directional super-diffusion) remains consistent with the sign of the fractional-diffusive flux term in the FDMs. New Lagrangian schemes are then proposed to track solute particles moving in bounded domains, where the solutions are checked against analytical or Eularian solutions available for simplified FDMs. Numerical experiments show that the particle-tracking algorithm for non-Fickian diffusion differs from Fickian diffusion in relocating the particle position around the reflective boundary, likely due to the non-local and non-symmetric fractional diffusion. For a non-zero-value Neumann or Robin boundary, a source cell with a reflective face can be applied to define the release rate of random-walking particles at the specified flux boundary. Mathematical definitions of physically meaningful nonlocal boundaries combined with bounded Lagrangian solvers in this study may provide the only viable techniques at present to quantify the impact of boundaries on anomalous diffusion, expanding the applicability of FDMs from infinite do mains to those with any size and boundary conditions.

  5. Nonequilibrium radiative heating prediction method for aeroassist flowfields with coupling to flowfield solvers. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartung, Lin C.

    1991-01-01

    A method for predicting radiation adsorption and emission coefficients in thermochemical nonequilibrium flows is developed. The method is called the Langley optimized radiative nonequilibrium code (LORAN). It applies the smeared band approximation for molecular radiation to produce moderately detailed results and is intended to fill the gap between detailed but costly prediction methods and very fast but highly approximate methods. The optimization of the method to provide efficient solutions allowing coupling to flowfield solvers is discussed. Representative results are obtained and compared to previous nonequilibrium radiation methods, as well as to ground- and flight-measured data. Reasonable agreement is found in all cases. A multidimensional radiative transport method is also developed for axisymmetric flows. Its predictions for wall radiative flux are 20 to 25 percent lower than those of the tangent slab transport method, as expected, though additional investigation of the symmetry and outflow boundary conditions is indicated. The method was applied to the peak heating condition of the aeroassist flight experiment (AFE) trajectory, with results comparable to predictions from other methods. The LORAN method was also applied in conjunction with the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code LAURA to study the sensitivity of the radiative heating prediction to various models used in nonequilibrium CFD. This study suggests that radiation measurements can provide diagnostic information about the detailed processes occurring in a nonequilibrium flowfield because radiation phenomena are very sensitive to these processes.

  6. An adaptive finite element Moreau-Yosida-based solver for a coupled Cahn-Hilliard/Navier-Stokes system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintermüller, M.; Hinze, M.; Kahle, C.

    2013-02-01

    An adaptive a posteriori error estimator based finite element method for the numerical solution of a coupled Cahn-Hilliard/Navier-Stokes system with a double-obstacle homogenous free (interfacial) energy density is proposed. A semi-implicit Euler scheme for the time-integration is applied which results in a system coupling a quasi-Stokes or Oseen-type problem for the fluid flow to a variational inequality for the concentration and the chemical potential according to the Cahn-Hilliard model [16]. A Moreau-Yosida regularization is employed which relaxes the constraints contained in the variational inequality and, thus, enables semi-smooth Newton solvers with locally superlinear convergence in function space. Moreover, upon discretization this yields a mesh independent method for a fixed relaxation parameter. For the finite dimensional approximation of the concentration and the chemical potential piecewise linear and globally continuous finite elements are used, and for the numerical approximation of the fluid velocity Taylor-Hood finite elements are employed. The paper ends by a report on numerical examples showing the efficiency of the new method.

  7. Proactive monitoring of an onshore wind farm through lidar measurements, SCADA data and a data-driven RANS solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iungo, Giacomo Valerio; Camarri, Simone; Ciri, Umberto; El-Asha, Said; Leonardi, Stefano; Rotea, Mario A.; Santhanagopalan, Vignesh; Viola, Francesco; Zhan, Lu

    2016-11-01

    Site conditions, such as topography and local climate, as well as wind farm layout strongly affect performance of a wind power plant. Therefore, predictions of wake interactions and their effects on power production still remain a great challenge in wind energy. For this study, an onshore wind turbine array was monitored through lidar measurements, SCADA and met-tower data. Power losses due to wake interactions were estimated to be approximately 4% and 2% of the total power production under stable and convective conditions, respectively. This dataset was then leveraged for the calibration of a data driven RANS (DDRANS) solver, which is a compelling tool for prediction of wind turbine wakes and power production. DDRANS is characterized by a computational cost as low as that for engineering wake models, and adequate accuracy achieved through data-driven tuning of the turbulence closure model. DDRANS is based on a parabolic formulation, axisymmetry and boundary layer approximations, which allow achieving low computational costs. The turbulence closure model consists in a mixing length model, which is optimally calibrated with the experimental dataset. Assessment of DDRANS is then performed through lidar and SCADA data for different atmospheric conditions. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under the I/UCRC WindSTAR, NSF Award IIP 1362033.

  8. Cross entropy: a new solver for Markov random field modeling and applications to medical image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jue; Chung, Albert C S

    2005-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel solver, namely cross entropy (CE), into the MRF theory for medical image segmentation. The solver, which is based on the theory of rare event simulation, is general and stochastic. Unlike some popular optimization methods such as belief propagation and graph cuts, CE makes no assumption on the form of objective functions and thus can be applied to any type of MRF models. Furthermore, it achieves higher performance of finding more global optima because of its stochastic property. In addition, it is more efficient than other stochastic methods like simulated annealing. We tested the new solver in 4 series of segmentation experiments on synthetic and clinical, vascular and cerebral images. The experiments show that CE can give more accurate segmentation results.

  9. Wavelet-based Poisson Solver for use in Particle-In-CellSimulations

    SciTech Connect

    Terzic, B.; Mihalcea, D.; Bohn, C.L.; Pogorelov, I.V.

    2005-05-13

    We report on a successful implementation of a wavelet based Poisson solver for use in 3D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. One new aspect of our algorithm is its ability to treat the general(inhomogeneous) Dirichlet boundary conditions (BCs). The solver harnesses advantages afforded by the wavelet formulation, such as sparsity of operators and data sets, existence of effective preconditioners, and the ability simultaneously to remove numerical noise and further compress relevant data sets. Having tested our method as a stand-alone solver on two model problems, we merged it into IMPACT-T to obtain a fully functional serial PIC code. We present and discuss preliminary results of application of the new code to the modeling of the Fermilab/NICADD and AES/JLab photoinjectors.

  10. A Parallel Multigrid Solver for Viscous Flows on Anisotropic Structured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prieto, Manuel; Montero, Ruben S.; Llorente, Ignacio M.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents an efficient parallel multigrid solver for speeding up the computation of a 3-D model that treats the flow of a viscous fluid over a flat plate. The main interest of this simulation lies in exhibiting some basic difficulties that prevent optimal multigrid efficiencies from being achieved. As the computing platform, we have used Coral, a Beowulf-class system based on Intel Pentium processors and equipped with GigaNet cLAN and switched Fast Ethernet networks. Our study not only examines the scalability of the solver but also includes a performance evaluation of Coral where the investigated solver has been used to compare several of its design choices, namely, the interconnection network (GigaNet versus switched Fast-Ethernet) and the node configuration (dual nodes versus single nodes). As a reference, the performance results have been compared with those obtained with the NAS-MG benchmark.

  11. EUPDF: An Eulerian-Based Monte Carlo Probability Density Function (PDF) Solver. User's Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, M. S.

    1998-01-01

    EUPDF is an Eulerian-based Monte Carlo PDF solver developed for application with sprays, combustion, parallel computing and unstructured grids. It is designed to be massively parallel and could easily be coupled with any existing gas-phase flow and spray solvers. The solver accommodates the use of an unstructured mesh with mixed elements of either triangular, quadrilateral, and/or tetrahedral type. The manual provides the user with the coding required to couple the PDF code to any given flow code and a basic understanding of the EUPDF code structure as well as the models involved in the PDF formulation. The source code of EUPDF will be available with the release of the National Combustion Code (NCC) as a complete package.

  12. Parallel performance investigations of an unstructured mesh Navier-Stokes solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri J.

    2000-01-01

    A Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solver based on unstructured mesh techniques for analysis of high-lift configurations is described. The method makes use of an agglomeration multigrid solver for convergence acceleration. Implicit line-smoothing is employed to relieve the stiffness associated with highly stretched meshes. A GMRES technique is also implemented to speed convergence at the expense of additional memory usage. The solver is cache efficient and fully vectorizable, and is parallelized using a two-level hybrid MPI-OpenMP implementation suitable for shared and/or distributed memory architectures, as well as clusters of shared memory machines. Convergence and scalability results are illustrated for various high-lift cases.

  13. Flutter and Forced Response Analyses of Cascades using a Two-Dimensional Linearized Euler Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Srivastava, R.; Mehmed, O.

    1999-01-01

    Flutter and forced response analyses for a cascade of blades in subsonic and transonic flow is presented. The structural model for each blade is a typical section with bending and torsion degrees of freedom. The unsteady aerodynamic forces due to bending and torsion motions. and due to a vortical gust disturbance are obtained by solving unsteady linearized Euler equations. The unsteady linearized equations are obtained by linearizing the unsteady nonlinear equations about the steady flow. The predicted unsteady aerodynamic forces include the effect of steady aerodynamic loading due to airfoil shape, thickness and angle of attack. The aeroelastic equations are solved in the frequency domain by coupling the un- steady aerodynamic forces to the aeroelastic solver MISER. The present unsteady aerodynamic solver showed good correlation with published results for both flutter and forced response predictions. Further improvements are required to use the unsteady aerodynamic solver in a design cycle.

  14. A fast parallel Poisson solver on irregular domains applied to beam dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Adelmann, A. Arbenz, P. Ineichen, Y.

    2010-06-20

    We discuss the scalable parallel solution of the Poisson equation within a Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code for the simulation of electron beams in particle accelerators of irregular shape. The problem is discretized by Finite Differences. Depending on the treatment of the Dirichlet boundary the resulting system of equations is symmetric or 'mildly' nonsymmetric positive definite. In all cases, the system is solved by the preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm with smoothed aggregation (SA) based algebraic multigrid (AMG) preconditioning. We investigate variants of the implementation of SA-AMG that lead to considerable improvements in the execution times. We demonstrate good scalability of the solver on distributed memory parallel processor with up to 2048 processors. We also compare our iterative solver with an FFT-based solver that is more commonly used for applications in beam dynamics.

  15. Parallel multigrid solver of radiative transfer equation for photon transport via graphics processing unit.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hao; Phan, Lan; Lin, Yuting

    2012-09-01

    A graphics processing unit-based parallel multigrid solver for a radiative transfer equation with vacuum boundary condition or reflection boundary condition is presented for heterogeneous media with complex geometry based on two-dimensional triangular meshes or three-dimensional tetrahedral meshes. The computational complexity of this parallel solver is linearly proportional to the degrees of freedom in both angular and spatial variables, while the full multigrid method is utilized to minimize the number of iterations. The overall gain of speed is roughly 30 to 300 fold with respect to our prior multigrid solver, which depends on the underlying regime and the parallelization. The numerical validations are presented with the MATLAB codes at https://sites.google.com/site/rtefastsolver/.

  16. Nonlinear vector eigen-solver and parallel reassembly processing for structural nonlinear vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, D. Y.; Mei, Chuh

    1993-12-01

    In the frequency domain solution of large amplitude nonlinear vibration, two operations are computationally costly. They are: (1) the iterative eigen-solution and (2) the iterative nonlinear matrix reassembly. This study introduces a nonlinear eigen-solver which greatly speeds up the solution procedure by using a combination of vector iteration and nonlinear matrix updating. A feature of this new method is that it avoids repeatedly using a costly eigen-solver or equation solver. This solution procedure has also been engaged in parallel processing to further speed up the computation. Parallel nonlinear matrix reassembly is the main interest in this parallel processing. Force Macro is used in the parallel program on a CRAY-2S supercomputer.

  17. Prediction of ship resistance in head waves using RANS based solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Hafizul; Akimoto, Hiromichi

    2016-07-01

    Maneuverability prediction of ships using CFD has gained high popularity over the years because of its improving accuracy and economics. This paper discusses the estimation of calm water and added resistance properties of a KVLCC2 model using a light and economical RaNS based solver, called SHIP_Motion. The solver solves overset structured mesh using finite volume method. In the calm water test, total drag coefficient, sinkage and trim values were predicted together with mesh dependency analysis and compared with experimental data. For added resistance in head sea, short wave cases were simulated and compared with experimental and other simulation data. Overall the results were well predicted and showed good agreement with comparative data. The paper concludes that it is well possible to predict ship maneuverability characteristics using the present solver, with reasonable accuracy utilizing minimum computational resources and within acceptable time.

  18. dugksFoam: An open source OpenFOAM solver for the Boltzmann model equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lianhua; Chen, Songze; Guo, Zhaoli

    2017-04-01

    A deterministic Boltzmann model equation solver called dugksFoam has been developed in the framework of the open source CFD toolbox OpenFOAM. The solver adopts the discrete unified gas kinetic scheme (Guo et al., 2015) with the Shakhov collision model. It has been validated by simulating several test cases covering different flow regimes including the one dimensional shock tube problem, a two dimensional thermal induced flow and the three dimensional lid-driven cavity flow. The solver features a parallel computing ability based on the velocity space decomposition, which is different from the physical space decomposition based approach provided by the OpenFOAM framework. The two decomposition approaches have been compared in both two and three dimensional cases. The parallel performance improves significantly using the newly implemented approach. A speed up by two orders of magnitudes has been observed using 256 cores on a small cluster.

  19. Numerical Investigation of Vertical Plunging Jet Using a Hybrid Multifluid–VOF Multiphase CFD Solver

    DOE PAGES

    Shonibare, Olabanji Y.; Wardle, Kent E.

    2015-01-01

    A novel hybrid multiphase flow solver has been used to conduct simulations of a vertical plunging liquid jet. This solver combines a multifluid methodology with selective interface sharpening to enable simulation of both the initial jet impingement and the long-time entrained bubble plume phenomena. Models are implemented for variable bubble size capturing and dynamic switching of interface sharpened regions to capture transitions between the initially fully segregated flow types into the dispersed bubbly flow regime. It was found that the solver was able to capture the salient features of the flow phenomena under study and areas for quantitative improvement havemore » been explored and identified. In particular, a population balance approach is employed and detailed calibration of the underlying models with experimental data is required to enable quantitative prediction of bubble size and distribution to capture the transition between segregated and dispersed flow types with greater fidelity.« less

  20. Plasma wave simulation based on versatile FEM solver on Alcator C-mod

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraiwa, S.; Meneghini, O.; Parker, R.; Wallace, G.; Wilson, J.

    2009-11-26

    The finite element method (FEM) has the potential of simulating plasma waves seamlessly from the core to the vacuum and antenna regions. We explored the possibility of using a versatile FEM solver package, COMSOL, for lower hybrid (LH) wave simulation. Special care was paid to boundary conditions to satisfy toroidal symmetry. The non-trivial issue of introducing hot plasma effects was addressed by an iterative algorithm. These techniques are verified both analytically and numerically. In the lower hybrid (LH) grill antenna coupling problem, the FEM solver successfully reproduced the solution that was obtained analytically. Propagation of LH waves on the Alcator C and Alcator C-MOD plasmas was compared with a ray-tracing code, showing good consistency. The approach based on the FEM is computationally less intensive compared to spectral domain solvers, and more suitable for the simulation of larger device such as ITER.

  1. A finite-volume Euler solver for computing rotary-wing aerodynamics on unstructured meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawn, Roger C.; Barth, Timothy J.

    1992-01-01

    An unstructured-grid solver for the unsteady Euler equations has been developed for predicting the aerodynamics of helicopter rotor blades. This flow solver is a finite-volume scheme that computes flow quantities at the vertices of the mesh. Special treatments are used for the flux differencing and boundary conditions in order to compute rotary-wing flowfields, and these are detailed in the paper. The unstructured-grid solver permits adaptive grid refinement in order to improve the resolution of flow features such as shocks, rotor wakes and acoustic waves. These capabilities are demonstrated in the paper. Example calculations are presented for two hovering rotors. In both cases, adaptive-grid refinement is used to resolve high gradients near the rotor surface and also to capture the vortical regions in the rotor wake. The computed results show good agreement with experimental results for surface airloads and wake geometry.

  2. Parallel multigrid solver of radiative transfer equation for photon transport via graphics processing unit

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Lan; Lin, Yuting

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. A graphics processing unit–based parallel multigrid solver for a radiative transfer equation with vacuum boundary condition or reflection boundary condition is presented for heterogeneous media with complex geometry based on two-dimensional triangular meshes or three-dimensional tetrahedral meshes. The computational complexity of this parallel solver is linearly proportional to the degrees of freedom in both angular and spatial variables, while the full multigrid method is utilized to minimize the number of iterations. The overall gain of speed is roughly 30 to 300 fold with respect to our prior multigrid solver, which depends on the underlying regime and the parallelization. The numerical validations are presented with the MATLAB codes at https://sites.google.com/site/rtefastsolver/. PMID:23085905

  3. Approximating subtree distances between phylogenies.

    PubMed

    Bonet, Maria Luisa; St John, Katherine; Mahindru, Ruchi; Amenta, Nina

    2006-10-01

    We give a 5-approximation algorithm to the rooted Subtree-Prune-and-Regraft (rSPR) distance between two phylogenies, which was recently shown to be NP-complete. This paper presents the first approximation result for this important tree distance. The algorithm follows a standard format for tree distances. The novel ideas are in the analysis. In the analysis, the cost of the algorithm uses a "cascading" scheme that accounts for possible wrong moves. This accounting is missing from previous analysis of tree distance approximation algorithms. Further, we show how all algorithms of this type can be implemented in linear time and give experimental results.

  4. Convergence Acceleration of a Navier-Stokes Solver for Efficient Static Aeroelastic Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obayashi, Shigeru; Guruswamy, Guru P.

    1995-01-01

    New capabilities have been developed for a Navier-Stokes solver to perform steady-state simulations more efficiently. The flow solver for solving the Navier-Stokes equations is based on a combination of the lower-upper factored symmetric Gauss-Seidel implicit method and the modified Harten-Lax-van Leer-Einfeldt upwind scheme. A numerically stable and efficient pseudo-time-marching method is also developed for computing steady flows over flexible wings. Results are demonstrated for transonic flows over rigid and flexible wings.

  5. A weakly compressible SPH method based on a low-dissipation Riemann solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Hu, X. Y.; Adams, N. A.

    2017-04-01

    We present a low-dissipation weakly-compressible SPH method for modeling free-surface flows exhibiting violent events such as impact and breaking. The key idea is to modify a Riemann solver which determines the interaction between particles by a simple limiter to decrease the intrinsic numerical dissipation. The modified Riemann solver is also extended for imposing wall boundary conditions. Numerical tests show that the method resolves free-surface flows accurately and produces smooth, accurate pressure fields. The method is compatible with the hydrostatic solution and exhibits considerably less numerical damping of the mechanical energy than previous methods.

  6. A second-order Grad-Shafranov solver with accurate derivative computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshghi, Iraj; Ricketson, Lee; Cerfon, Antoine

    2016-10-01

    We present progress on a fast Grad-Shafranov and Poisson solver that uses the finite element method with linear elements to find equilibria of the electro-magnetic potentials inside tokamaks. The code converges with second-order errors, and we introduce a module which can take derivatives of the potential at no increase in error. Thus, this code can be much faster than most higher-order finite element solvers, while still retaining a sufficiently small error margin in the physically relevant quantities.

  7. Fast methods incorporating direct elliptic solvers for nonlinear applications in fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, E. D.

    1977-01-01

    Semidirect methods are discussed, their present role, as well as some developments for their application in computational fluid dynamics. A semidirect method is a computational scheme that uses a fast, direct, elliptic solver as the driving algorithm for the iterative solution of finite difference equations. Specific subtopics include: (1) direct Cauchy Riemann solvers for first order elliptic equations; (2) application of the semidirect method to the mixed elliptic hyperbolic problem of steady, inviscid transonic flow; and (3) the treatment of interior conditions, such as those on an airfoil or wing, in semidirect methods.

  8. Nearly Interactive Parabolized Navier-Stokes Solver for High Speed Forebody and Inlet Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Thomas J.; Liou, May-Fun; Jones, William H.; Trefny, Charles J.

    2009-01-01

    A system of computer programs is being developed for the preliminary design of high speed inlets and forebodies. The system comprises four functions: geometry definition, flow grid generation, flow solver, and graphics post-processor. The system runs on a dedicated personal computer using the Windows operating system and is controlled by graphical user interfaces written in MATLAB (The Mathworks, Inc.). The flow solver uses the Parabolized Navier-Stokes equations to compute millions of mesh points in several minutes. Sample two-dimensional and three-dimensional calculations are demonstrated in the paper.

  9. An accurate predictor-corrector HOC solver for the two dimensional Riemann problem of gas dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoi, Bidyut B.

    2016-10-01

    The work in the present manuscript is concerned with the simulation of twodimensional (2D) Riemann problem of gas dynamics. We extend our recently developed higher order compact (HOC) method from one-dimensional (1D) to 2D solver and simulate the problem on a square geometry with different initial conditions. The method is fourth order accurate in space and second order accurate in time. We then compare our results with the available benchmark results. The comparison shows an excellent agreement of our results with the existing ones in the literature. Being a finite difference solver, it is quite straight-forward and simple.

  10. Accurate gradient approximation for complex interface problems in 3D by an improved coupling interface method

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Yu-Chen; Chern, I-Liang; Chang, Chien C.

    2014-10-15

    Most elliptic interface solvers become complicated for complex interface problems at those “exceptional points” where there are not enough neighboring interior points for high order interpolation. Such complication increases especially in three dimensions. Usually, the solvers are thus reduced to low order accuracy. In this paper, we classify these exceptional points and propose two recipes to maintain order of accuracy there, aiming at improving the previous coupling interface method [26]. Yet the idea is also applicable to other interface solvers. The main idea is to have at least first order approximations for second order derivatives at those exceptional points. Recipe 1 is to use the finite difference approximation for the second order derivatives at a nearby interior grid point, whenever this is possible. Recipe 2 is to flip domain signatures and introduce a ghost state so that a second-order method can be applied. This ghost state is a smooth extension of the solution at the exceptional point from the other side of the interface. The original state is recovered by a post-processing using nearby states and jump conditions. The choice of recipes is determined by a classification scheme of the exceptional points. The method renders the solution and its gradient uniformly second-order accurate in the entire computed domain. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the second order accuracy of the presently proposed method in approximating the gradients of the original states for some complex interfaces which we had tested previous in two and three dimensions, and a real molecule ( (1D63)) which is double-helix shape and composed of hundreds of atoms.

  11. Dual approximations in optimal control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, W. W.; Ianculescu, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    A dual approximation for the solution to an optimal control problem is analyzed. The differential equation is handled with a Lagrange multiplier while other constraints are treated explicitly. An algorithm for solving the dual problem is presented.

  12. Mathematical algorithms for approximate reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, John H.; Chay, Seung C.; Downs, Mary M.

    1988-01-01

    Most state of the art expert system environments contain a single and often ad hoc strategy for approximate reasoning. Some environments provide facilities to program the approximate reasoning algorithms. However, the next generation of expert systems should have an environment which contain a choice of several mathematical algorithms for approximate reasoning. To meet the need for validatable and verifiable coding, the expert system environment must no longer depend upon ad hoc reasoning techniques but instead must include mathematically rigorous techniques for approximate reasoning. Popular approximate reasoning techniques are reviewed, including: certainty factors, belief measures, Bayesian probabilities, fuzzy logic, and Shafer-Dempster techniques for reasoning. A group of mathematically rigorous algorithms for approximate reasoning are focused on that could form the basis of a next generation expert system environment. These algorithms are based upon the axioms of set theory and probability theory. To separate these algorithms for approximate reasoning various conditions of mutual exclusivity and independence are imposed upon the assertions. Approximate reasoning algorithms presented include: reasoning with statistically independent assertions, reasoning with mutually exclusive assertions, reasoning with assertions that exhibit minimum overlay within the state space, reasoning with assertions that exhibit maximum overlay within the state space (i.e. fuzzy logic), pessimistic reasoning (i.e. worst case analysis), optimistic reasoning (i.e. best case analysis), and reasoning with assertions with absolutely no knowledge of the possible dependency among the assertions. A robust environment for expert system construction should include the two modes of inference: modus ponens and modus tollens. Modus ponens inference is based upon reasoning towards the conclusion in a statement of logical implication, whereas modus tollens inference is based upon reasoning away

  13. Exponential approximations in optimal design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belegundu, A. D.; Rajan, S. D.; Rajgopal, J.

    1990-01-01

    One-point and two-point exponential functions have been developed and proved to be very effective approximations of structural response. The exponential has been compared to the linear, reciprocal and quadratic fit methods. Four test problems in structural analysis have been selected. The use of such approximations is attractive in structural optimization to reduce the numbers of exact analyses which involve computationally expensive finite element analysis.

  14. Approximating random quantum optimization problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, B.; Laumann, C. R.; Läuchli, A. M.; Moessner, R.; Sondhi, S. L.

    2013-06-01

    We report a cluster of results regarding the difficulty of finding approximate ground states to typical instances of the quantum satisfiability problem k-body quantum satisfiability (k-QSAT) on large random graphs. As an approximation strategy, we optimize the solution space over “classical” product states, which in turn introduces a novel autonomous classical optimization problem, PSAT, over a space of continuous degrees of freedom rather than discrete bits. Our central results are (i) the derivation of a set of bounds and approximations in various limits of the problem, several of which we believe may be amenable to a rigorous treatment; (ii) a demonstration that an approximation based on a greedy algorithm borrowed from the study of frustrated magnetism performs well over a wide range in parameter space, and its performance reflects the structure of the solution space of random k-QSAT. Simulated annealing exhibits metastability in similar “hard” regions of parameter space; and (iii) a generalization of belief propagation algorithms introduced for classical problems to the case of continuous spins. This yields both approximate solutions, as well as insights into the free energy “landscape” of the approximation problem, including a so-called dynamical transition near the satisfiability threshold. Taken together, these results allow us to elucidate the phase diagram of random k-QSAT in a two-dimensional energy-density-clause-density space.

  15. Nonadiabatic charged spherical evolution in the postquasistatic approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Rosales, L.; Barreto, W.; Peralta, C.; Rodriguez-Mueller, B.

    2010-10-15

    We apply the postquasistatic approximation, an iterative method for the evolution of self-gravitating spheres of matter, to study the evolution of dissipative and electrically charged distributions in general relativity. The numerical implementation of our approach leads to a solver which is globally second-order convergent. We evolve nonadiabatic distributions assuming an equation of state that accounts for the anisotropy induced by the electric charge. Dissipation is described by streaming-out or diffusion approximations. We match the interior solution, in noncomoving coordinates, with the Vaidya-Reissner-Nordstroem exterior solution. Two models are considered: (i) a Schwarzschild-like shell in the diffusion limit; and (ii) a Schwarzschild-like interior in the free-streaming limit. These toy models tell us something about the nature of the dissipative and electrically charged collapse. Diffusion stabilizes the gravitational collapse producing a spherical shell whose contraction is halted in a short characteristic hydrodynamic time. The streaming-out radiation provides a more efficient mechanism for emission of energy, redistributing the electric charge on the whole sphere, while the distribution collapses indefinitely with a longer hydrodynamic time scale.

  16. A multiscale two-point flux-approximation method

    SciTech Connect

    Møyner, Olav Lie, Knut-Andreas

    2014-10-15

    A large number of multiscale finite-volume methods have been developed over the past decade to compute conservative approximations to multiphase flow problems in heterogeneous porous media. In particular, several iterative and algebraic multiscale frameworks that seek to reduce the fine-scale residual towards machine precision have been presented. Common for all such methods is that they rely on a compatible primal–dual coarse partition, which makes it challenging to extend them to stratigraphic and unstructured grids. Herein, we propose a general idea for how one can formulate multiscale finite-volume methods using only a primal coarse partition. To this end, we use two key ingredients that are computed numerically: (i) elementary functions that correspond to flow solutions used in transmissibility upscaling, and (ii) partition-of-unity functions used to combine elementary functions into basis functions. We exemplify the idea by deriving a multiscale two-point flux-approximation (MsTPFA) method, which is robust with regards to strong heterogeneities in the permeability field and can easily handle general grids with unstructured fine- and coarse-scale connections. The method can easily be adapted to arbitrary levels of coarsening, and can be used both as a standalone solver and as a preconditioner. Several numerical experiments are presented to demonstrate that the MsTPFA method can be used to solve elliptic pressure problems on a wide variety of geological models in a robust and efficient manner.

  17. An approximate viscous shock layer method for calculating the hypersonic flow over blunt-nosed bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grantz, A. C.; Dejarnette, F. R.; Thompson, R. A.

    1989-01-01

    The approximate axisymmetric method presented for accurately calculating the surface and flowfield properties of fully viscous hypersonic flow over blunt-nosed bodies incorporates the turbulence model of Cebeci-Smith (1970) and the equilibrium air tables of Hansen (1959). The method is faster than the parabolized Navier-Stokes or viscous shock layer solvers that it could replace for preliminary design determinations. Surface heat transfer and pressure predictions for the present method are comparable with the more accurate viscous shock layer method as well as flight test and wind tunnel data. A starting solution is not required.

  18. General relativistic corrections to N -body simulations and the Zel'dovich approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidler, Christian; Rampf, Cornelius; Tram, Thomas; Crittenden, Robert; Koyama, Kazuya; Wands, David

    2015-12-01

    The initial conditions for Newtonian N -body simulations are usually generated by applying the Zel'dovich approximation to the initial displacements of the particles using an initial power spectrum of density fluctuations generated by an Einstein-Boltzmann solver. We show that in most gauges the initial displacements generated in this way receive a first-order relativistic correction. We define a new gauge, the N -body gauge, in which this relativistic correction vanishes and show that a conventional Newtonian N -body simulation includes all first-order relativistic contributions (in the absence of radiation) if we identify the coordinates in Newtonian simulations with those in the relativistic N -body gauge.

  19. Development and Implementation of a Newton-BICGSTAB Iterative Solver in the FORMOSA-B BWR Core Simulator Code

    SciTech Connect

    Kastanya, Doddy Yozef Febrian; Turinsky, Paul J.

    2005-05-15

    A Newton-Krylov iterative solver has been developed to reduce the CPU execution time of boiling water reactor (BWR) core simulators implemented in the core simulator part of the Fuel Optimization for Reloads Multiple Objectives by Simulated Annealing for BWR (FORMOSA-B) code, which is an in-core fuel management optimization code for BWRs. This new solver utilizes Newton's method to explicitly treat strong nonlinearities in the problem, replacing the traditionally used nested iterative approach. Newton's method provides the solver with a higher-than-linear convergence rate, assuming that good initial estimates of the unknowns are provided. Within each Newton iteration, an appropriately preconditioned Krylov solver is utilized for solving the linearized system of equations. Taking advantage of the higher convergence rate provided by Newton's method and utilizing an efficient preconditioned Krylov solver, we have developed a Newton-Krylov solver to evaluate the three-dimensional, two-group neutron diffusion equations coupled with a two-phase flow model within a BWR core simulator. Numerical tests on the new solver have shown that speedups ranging from 1.6 to 2.1, with reference to the traditional approach of employing nested iterations to treat the nonlinear feedbacks, can be achieved. However, if a preconditioned Krylov solver is employed to complete the inner iterations of the traditional approach, negligible CPU time differences are noted between the Newton-Krylov and traditional (Krylov) approaches.

  20. 3-Dimensional Marine CSEM Modeling by Employing TDFEM with Parallel Solvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X.; Yang, T.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, parallel fulfillment is developed for forward modeling of the 3-Dimensional controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) by using time-domain finite element method (TDFEM). Recently, a greater attention rises on research of hydrocarbon (HC) reservoir detection mechanism in the seabed. Since China has vast ocean resources, seeking hydrocarbon reservoirs become significant in the national economy. However, traditional methods of seismic exploration shown a crucial obstacle to detect hydrocarbon reservoirs in the seabed with a complex structure, due to relatively high acquisition costs and high-risking exploration. In addition, the development of EM simulations typically requires both a deep knowledge of the computational electromagnetics (CEM) and a proper use of sophisticated techniques and tools from computer science. However, the complexity of large-scale EM simulations often requires large memory because of a large amount of data, or solution time to address problems concerning matrix solvers, function transforms, optimization, etc. The objective of this paper is to present parallelized implementation of the time-domain finite element method for analysis of three-dimensional (3D) marine controlled source electromagnetic problems. Firstly, we established a three-dimensional basic background model according to the seismic data, then electromagnetic simulation of marine CSEM was carried out by using time-domain finite element method, which works on a MPI (Message Passing Interface) platform with exact orientation to allow fast detecting of hydrocarbons targets in ocean environment. To speed up the calculation process, SuperLU of an MPI (Message Passing Interface) version called SuperLU_DIST is employed in this approach. Regarding the representation of three-dimension seabed terrain with sense of reality, the region is discretized into an unstructured mesh rather than a uniform one in order to reduce the number of unknowns. Moreover, high-order Whitney

  1. A Comparison of the Intellectual Abilities of Good and Poor Problem Solvers: An Exploratory Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Ruth Ann

    This study examined a selected sample of fourth-grade students who had been previously identified as good or poor problem solvers. The pupils were compared on variables considered as "reference tests" for Verbal, Induction, Numerical, Word Fluency, Memory, Spatial Visualization, and Perceptual Speed abilities. The data were compiled to…

  2. Implementation of a parallel unstructured Euler solver on shared and distributed memory architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.; Das, Raja; Saltz, Joel; Vermeland, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    An efficient three dimensional unstructured Euler solver is parallelized on a Cray Y-MP C90 shared memory computer and on an Intel Touchstone Delta distributed memory computer. This paper relates the experiences gained and describes the software tools and hardware used in this study. Performance comparisons between two differing architectures are made.

  3. Accelerated iteration schemes for transonic flow calculations using fast poisson solvers. [aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, A.

    1975-01-01

    The use of a fast elliptic solver in combination with relaxation is presented as an effective way to accelerate the convergence of transonic flow calculations, particularly when a marching scheme can be used to treat the supersonic zone in the relaxation process.

  4. A generalized Poisson and Poisson-Boltzmann solver for electrostatic environments.

    PubMed

    Fisicaro, G; Genovese, L; Andreussi, O; Marzari, N; Goedecker, S

    2016-01-07

    The computational study of chemical reactions in complex, wet environments is critical for applications in many fields. It is often essential to study chemical reactions in the presence of applied electrochemical potentials, taking into account the non-trivial electrostatic screening coming from the solvent and the electrolytes. As a consequence, the electrostatic potential has to be found by solving the generalized Poisson and the Poisson-Boltzmann equations for neutral and ionic solutions, respectively. In the present work, solvers for both problems have been developed. A preconditioned conjugate gradient method has been implemented for the solution of the generalized Poisson equation and the linear regime of the Poisson-Boltzmann, allowing to solve iteratively the minimization problem with some ten iterations of the ordinary Poisson equation solver. In addition, a self-consistent procedure enables us to solve the non-linear Poisson-Boltzmann problem. Both solvers exhibit very high accuracy and parallel efficiency and allow for the treatment of periodic, free, and slab boundary conditions. The solver has been integrated into the BigDFT and Quantum-ESPRESSO electronic-structure packages and will be released as an independent program, suitable for integration in other codes.

  5. Flowfield Comparisons from Three Navier-Stokes Solvers for an Axisymmetric Separate Flow Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, L. Danielle; Bridges, James; Khavaran, Abbas

    2002-01-01

    To meet new noise reduction goals, many concepts to enhance mixing in the exhaust jets of turbofan engines are being studied. Accurate steady state flowfield predictions from state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solvers are needed as input to the latest noise prediction codes. The main intent of this paper was to ascertain that similar Navier-Stokes solvers run at different sites would yield comparable results for an axisymmetric two-stream nozzle case. Predictions from the WIND and the NPARC codes are compared to previously reported experimental data and results from the CRAFT Navier-Stokes solver. Similar k-epsilon turbulence models were employed in each solver, and identical computational grids were used. Agreement between experimental data and predictions from each code was generally good for mean values. All three codes underpredict the maximum value of turbulent kinetic energy. The predicted locations of the maximum turbulent kinetic energy were farther downstream than seen in the data. A grid study was conducted using the WIND code, and comments about convergence criteria and grid requirements for CFD solutions to be used as input for noise prediction computations are given. Additionally, noise predictions from the MGBK code, using the CFD results from the CRAFT code, NPARC, and WIND as input are compared to data.

  6. A Riemann solver based on a global existence proof for the Riemann problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutt, P.

    1986-01-01

    Godunov's method and several other methods for computing solutions to the equations of gas dynamics use Riemann solvers to resolve discontinuities at the interface between cells. A new method is proposed here for solving the Riemann problem based on a global existence proof for the solution to the Riemann problem. The method is found to be very reliable and computationally efficient.

  7. MLTE: An LTE Solver for Diatomic Molecules and Atoms above 6,000 Degrees K

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Bresmann, " SOLGASMIX - PV , A Computer Program to Calculate Equilibrium Relationships in Complex Chemical Systems", Oak Ridge National Laboratory Report...34 equilibria solvers for use on mainframe computers have emerged, among them are SOLGASMIX [Ref.l] and CHEMKIN [Ref.6]. To evaluate the free energy of a

  8. Simulation of Unsteady Flows Using an Unstructured Navier-Stokes Solver on Moving and Stationary Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Vatsa, Veer N.; Atkins, Harold L.

    2005-01-01

    We apply an unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) solver for unstructured grids to unsteady flows on moving and stationary grids. Example problems considered are relevant to active flow control and stability and control. Computational results are presented using the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model and are compared to experimental data. The effect of grid and time-step refinement are examined.

  9. VDJSeq-Solver: In Silico V(D)J Recombination Detection Tool

    PubMed Central

    Paciello, Giulia; Acquaviva, Andrea; Pighi, Chiara; Ferrarini, Alberto; Macii, Enrico; Zamo’, Alberto; Ficarra, Elisa

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present VDJSeq-Solver, a methodology and tool to identify clonal lymphocyte populations from paired-end RNA Sequencing reads derived from the sequencing of mRNA neoplastic cells. The tool detects the main clone that characterises the tissue of interest by recognizing the most abundant V(D)J rearrangement among the existing ones in the sample under study. The exact sequence of the clone identified is capable of accounting for the modifications introduced by the enzymatic processes. The proposed tool overcomes limitations of currently available lymphocyte rearrangements recognition methods, working on a single sequence at a time, that are not applicable to high-throughput sequencing data. In this work, VDJSeq-Solver has been applied to correctly detect the main clone and identify its sequence on five Mantle Cell Lymphoma samples; then the tool has been tested on twelve Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma samples. In order to comply with the privacy, ethics and intellectual property policies of the University Hospital and the University of Verona, data is available upon request to supporto.utenti@ateneo.univr.it after signing a mandatory Materials Transfer Agreement. VDJSeq-Solver JAVA/Perl/Bash software implementation is free and available at http://eda.polito.it/VDJSeq-Solver/. PMID:25799103

  10. Parallel FFT-based Poisson Solver for Isolated Three-dimensional Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Budiardja, Reuben D; Cardall, Christian Y

    2011-01-01

    We describe an implementation to solve Poisson's equation for an isolated system on a unigrid mesh using FFTs. The method solves the equation globally on mesh blocks distributed across multiple processes on a distributed-memory parallel computer. Test results to demonstrate the convergence and scaling properties of the implementation are presented. The solver is offered to interested users as the library PSPFFT.

  11. A generalized Poisson and Poisson-Boltzmann solver for electrostatic environments

    SciTech Connect

    Fisicaro, G. Goedecker, S.; Genovese, L.; Andreussi, O.; Marzari, N.

    2016-01-07

    The computational study of chemical reactions in complex, wet environments is critical for applications in many fields. It is often essential to study chemical reactions in the presence of applied electrochemical potentials, taking into account the non-trivial electrostatic screening coming from the solvent and the electrolytes. As a consequence, the electrostatic potential has to be found by solving the generalized Poisson and the Poisson-Boltzmann equations for neutral and ionic solutions, respectively. In the present work, solvers for both problems have been developed. A preconditioned conjugate gradient method has been implemented for the solution of the generalized Poisson equation and the linear regime of the Poisson-Boltzmann, allowing to solve iteratively the minimization problem with some ten iterations of the ordinary Poisson equation solver. In addition, a self-consistent procedure enables us to solve the non-linear Poisson-Boltzmann problem. Both solvers exhibit very high accuracy and parallel efficiency and allow for the treatment of periodic, free, and slab boundary conditions. The solver has been integrated into the BigDFT and Quantum-ESPRESSO electronic-structure packages and will be released as an independent program, suitable for integration in other codes.

  12. New preconditioning strategy for Jacobian-free solvers for variably saturated flows with Richards’ equation

    DOE PAGES

    Lipnikov, Konstantin; Moulton, David; Svyatskiy, Daniil

    2016-04-29

    We develop a new approach for solving the nonlinear Richards’ equation arising in variably saturated flow modeling. The growing complexity of geometric models for simulation of subsurface flows leads to the necessity of using unstructured meshes and advanced discretization methods. Typically, a numerical solution is obtained by first discretizing PDEs and then solving the resulting system of nonlinear discrete equations with a Newton-Raphson-type method. Efficiency and robustness of the existing solvers rely on many factors, including an empiric quality control of intermediate iterates, complexity of the employed discretization method and a customized preconditioner. We propose and analyze a new preconditioningmore » strategy that is based on a stable discretization of the continuum Jacobian. We will show with numerical experiments for challenging problems in subsurface hydrology that this new preconditioner improves convergence of the existing Jacobian-free solvers 3-20 times. Furthermore, we show that the Picard method with this preconditioner becomes a more efficient nonlinear solver than a few widely used Jacobian-free solvers.« less

  13. Fast Time Domain Integral Equation Solvers for Large-Scale Electromagnetic Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-01

    separable and non-separable source expansions. The separable representations will rely on divergence-conforming Nedelec elements defined on geometrically...the work of Ha-Duong/Aboud/ Nedelec , such solvers, when carefully implemented, are stable. Their implementation however is very difficult; moreover

  14. LEOPARD: A grid-based dispersion relation solver for arbitrary gyrotropic distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astfalk, Patrick; Jenko, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Particle velocity distributions measured in collisionless space plasmas often show strong deviations from idealized model distributions. Despite this observational evidence, linear wave analysis in space plasma environments such as the solar wind or Earth's magnetosphere is still mainly carried out using dispersion relation solvers based on Maxwellians or other parametric models. To enable a more realistic analysis, we present the new grid-based kinetic dispersion relation solver LEOPARD (Linear Electromagnetic Oscillations in Plasmas with Arbitrary Rotationally-symmetric Distributions) which no longer requires prescribed model distributions but allows for arbitrary gyrotropic distribution functions. In this work, we discuss the underlying numerical scheme of the code and we show a few exemplary benchmarks. Furthermore, we demonstrate a first application of LEOPARD to ion distribution data obtained from hybrid simulations. In particular, we show that in the saturation stage of the parallel fire hose instability, the deformation of the initial bi-Maxwellian distribution invalidates the use of standard dispersion relation solvers. A linear solver based on bi-Maxwellians predicts further growth even after saturation, while LEOPARD correctly indicates vanishing growth rates. We also discuss how this complies with former studies on the validity of quasilinear theory for the resonant fire hose. In the end, we briefly comment on the role of LEOPARD in directly analyzing spacecraft data, and we refer to an upcoming paper which demonstrates a first application of that kind.

  15. New preconditioning strategy for Jacobian-free solvers for variably saturated flows with Richards' equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipnikov, Konstantin; Moulton, David; Svyatskiy, Daniil

    2016-08-01

    We develop a new approach for solving the nonlinear Richards' equation arising in variably saturated flow modeling. The growing complexity of geometric models for simulation of subsurface flows leads to the necessity of using unstructured meshes and advanced discretization methods. Typically, a numerical solution is obtained by first discretizing PDEs and then solving the resulting system of nonlinear discrete equations with a Newton-Raphson-type method. Efficiency and robustness of the existing solvers rely on many factors, including an empiric quality control of intermediate iterates, complexity of the employed discretization method and a customized preconditioner. We propose and analyze a new preconditioning strategy that is based on a stable discretization of the continuum Jacobian. We will show with numerical experiments for challenging problems in subsurface hydrology that this new preconditioner improves convergence of the existing Jacobian-free solvers 3-20 times. We also show that the Picard method with this preconditioner becomes a more efficient nonlinear solver than a few widely used Jacobian-free solvers.

  16. An Adaptive Flow Solver for Air-Borne Vehicles Undergoing Time-Dependent Motions/Deformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jatinder; Taylor, Stephen

    1997-01-01

    This report describes a concurrent Euler flow solver for flows around complex 3-D bodies. The solver is based on a cell-centered finite volume methodology on 3-D unstructured tetrahedral grids. In this algorithm, spatial discretization for the inviscid convective term is accomplished using an upwind scheme. A localized reconstruction is done for flow variables which is second order accurate. Evolution in time is accomplished using an explicit three-stage Runge-Kutta method which has second order temporal accuracy. This is adapted for concurrent execution using another proven methodology based on concurrent graph abstraction. This solver operates on heterogeneous network architectures. These architectures may include a broad variety of UNIX workstations and PCs running Windows NT, symmetric multiprocessors and distributed-memory multi-computers. The unstructured grid is generated using commercial grid generation tools. The grid is automatically partitioned using a concurrent algorithm based on heat diffusion. This results in memory requirements that are inversely proportional to the number of processors. The solver uses automatic granularity control and resource management techniques both to balance load and communication requirements, and deal with differing memory constraints. These ideas are again based on heat diffusion. Results are subsequently combined for visualization and analysis using commercial CFD tools. Flow simulation results are demonstrated for a constant section wing at subsonic, transonic, and a supersonic case. These results are compared with experimental data and numerical results of other researchers. Performance results are under way for a variety of network topologies.

  17. Mathematical Tasks without Words and Word Problems: Perceptions of Reluctant Problem Solvers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holbert, Sydney Margaret

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative research study used a multiple, holistic case study approach (Yin, 2009) to explore the perceptions of reluctant problem solvers related to mathematical tasks without words and word problems. Participants were given a choice of working a mathematical task without words or a word problem during four problem-solving sessions. Data…

  18. A fast parallel solver for the forward problem in electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Jehl, Markus; Dedner, Andreas; Betcke, Timo; Aristovich, Kirill; Klöfkorn, Robert; Holder, David

    2015-01-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a noninvasive imaging modality, where imperceptible currents are applied to the skin and the resulting surface voltages are measured. It has the potential to distinguish between ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke with a portable and inexpensive device. The image reconstruction relies on an accurate forward model of the experimental setup. Because of the relatively small signal in stroke EIT, the finite-element modeling requires meshes of more than 10 million elements. To study the requirements in the forward modeling in EIT and also to reduce the time for experimental image acquisition, it is necessary to reduce the run time of the forward computation. We show the implementation of a parallel forward solver for EIT using the Dune-Fem C++ library and demonstrate its performance on many CPU's of a computer cluster. For a typical EIT application a direct solver was significantly slower and not an alternative to iterative solvers with multigrid preconditioning. With this new solver, we can compute the forward solutions and the Jacobian matrix of a typical EIT application with 30 electrodes on a 15-million element mesh in less than 15 min. This makes it a valuable tool for simulation studies and EIT applications with high precision requirements. It is freely available for download.

  19. New preconditioning strategy for Jacobian-free solvers for variably saturated flows with Richards’ equation

    SciTech Connect

    Lipnikov, Konstantin; Moulton, David; Svyatskiy, Daniil

    2016-04-29

    We develop a new approach for solving the nonlinear Richards’ equation arising in variably saturated flow modeling. The growing complexity of geometric models for simulation of subsurface flows leads to the necessity of using unstructured meshes and advanced discretization methods. Typically, a numerical solution is obtained by first discretizing PDEs and then solving the resulting system of nonlinear discrete equations with a Newton-Raphson-type method. Efficiency and robustness of the existing solvers rely on many factors, including an empiric quality control of intermediate iterates, complexity of the employed discretization method and a customized preconditioner. We propose and analyze a new preconditioning strategy that is based on a stable discretization of the continuum Jacobian. We will show with numerical experiments for challenging problems in subsurface hydrology that this new preconditioner improves convergence of the existing Jacobian-free solvers 3-20 times. Furthermore, we show that the Picard method with this preconditioner becomes a more efficient nonlinear solver than a few widely used Jacobian-free solvers.

  20. Preconditioned implicit solvers for the Navier-Stokes equations on distributed-memory machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ajmani, Kumud; Liou, Meng-Sing; Dyson, Rodger W.

    1994-01-01

    The GMRES method is parallelized, and combined with local preconditioning to construct an implicit parallel solver to obtain steady-state solutions for the Navier-Stokes equations of fluid flow on distributed-memory machines. The new implicit parallel solver is designed to preserve the convergence rate of the equivalent 'serial' solver. A static domain-decomposition is used to partition the computational domain amongst the available processing nodes of the parallel machine. The SPMD (Single-Program Multiple-Data) programming model is combined with message-passing tools to develop the parallel code on a 32-node Intel Hypercube and a 512-node Intel Delta machine. The implicit parallel solver is validated for internal and external flow problems, and is found to compare identically with flow solutions obtained on a Cray Y-MP/8. A peak computational speed of 2300 MFlops/sec has been achieved on 512 nodes of the Intel Delta machine,k for a problem size of 1024 K equations (256 K grid points).

  1. Large Eddy and Detached Eddy Simulations Using an Unstructured Multigrid Solver

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-08-01

    SOLVER DIMITRI J. MAVRIPLIS ICASE NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, USA JUAN PELAEZ Department of Aerospace Engineering Old Dominion University...computations for 3D high-lift analysis. AIAA Journal of Aircraft, 36(6):987-998, 1999. [2] J. Pelaez , D. J. Mavriplis, and 0. Kandil. Unsteady analysis of

  2. VDJSeq-Solver: in silico V(D)J recombination detection tool.

    PubMed

    Paciello, Giulia; Acquaviva, Andrea; Pighi, Chiara; Ferrarini, Alberto; Macii, Enrico; Zamo', Alberto; Ficarra, Elisa

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present VDJSeq-Solver, a methodology and tool to identify clonal lymphocyte populations from paired-end RNA Sequencing reads derived from the sequencing of mRNA neoplastic cells. The tool detects the main clone that characterises the tissue of interest by recognizing the most abundant V(D)J rearrangement among the existing ones in the sample under study. The exact sequence of the clone identified is capable of accounting for the modifications introduced by the enzymatic processes. The proposed tool overcomes limitations of currently available lymphocyte rearrangements recognition methods, working on a single sequence at a time, that are not applicable to high-throughput sequencing data. In this work, VDJSeq-Solver has been applied to correctly detect the main clone and identify its sequence on five Mantle Cell Lymphoma samples; then the tool has been tested on twelve Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma samples. In order to comply with the privacy, ethics and intellectual property policies of the University Hospital and the University of Verona, data is available upon request to supporto.utenti@ateneo.univr.it after signing a mandatory Materials Transfer Agreement. VDJSeq-Solver JAVA/Perl/Bash software implementation is free and available at http://eda.polito.it/VDJSeq-Solver/.

  3. Determining the Optimal Values of Exponential Smoothing Constants--Does Solver Really Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravinder, Handanhal V.

    2013-01-01

    A key issue in exponential smoothing is the choice of the values of the smoothing constants used. One approach that is becoming increasingly popular in introductory management science and operations management textbooks is the use of Solver, an Excel-based non-linear optimizer, to identify values of the smoothing constants that minimize a measure…

  4. A Tensor-Train accelerated solver for integral equations in complex geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corona, Eduardo; Rahimian, Abtin; Zorin, Denis

    2017-04-01

    We present a framework using the Quantized Tensor Train (QTT) decomposition to accurately and efficiently solve volume and boundary integral equations in three dimensions. We describe how the QTT decomposition can be used as a hierarchical compression and inversion scheme for matrices arising from the discretization of integral equations. For a broad range of problems, computational and storage costs of the inversion scheme are extremely modest O (log ⁡ N) and once the inverse is computed, it can be applied in O (Nlog ⁡ N) . We analyze the QTT ranks for hierarchically low rank matrices and discuss its relationship to commonly used hierarchical compression techniques such as FMM and HSS. We prove that the QTT ranks are bounded for translation-invariant systems and argue that this behavior extends to non-translation invariant volume and boundary integrals. For volume integrals, the QTT decomposition provides an efficient direct solver requiring significantly less memory compared to other fast direct solvers. We present results demonstrating the remarkable performance of the QTT-based solver when applied to both translation and non-translation invariant volume integrals in 3D. For boundary integral equations, we demonstrate that using a QTT decomposition to construct preconditioners for a Krylov subspace method leads to an efficient and robust solver with a small memory footprint. We test the QTT preconditioners in the iterative solution of an exterior elliptic boundary value problem (Laplace) formulated as a boundary integral equation in complex, multiply connected geometries.

  5. Rational approximations for tomographic reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Matthew; Beylkin, Gregory; Monzón, Lucas

    2013-06-01

    We use optimal rational approximations of projection data collected in x-ray tomography to improve image resolution. Under the assumption that the object of interest is described by functions with jump discontinuities, for each projection we construct its rational approximation with a small (near optimal) number of terms for a given accuracy threshold. This allows us to augment the measured data, i.e., double the number of available samples in each projection or, equivalently, extend (double) the domain of their Fourier transform. We also develop a new, fast, polar coordinate Fourier domain algorithm which uses our nonlinear approximation of projection data in a natural way. Using augmented projections of the Shepp-Logan phantom, we provide a comparison between the new algorithm and the standard filtered back-projection algorithm. We demonstrate that the reconstructed image has improved resolution without additional artifacts near sharp transitions in the image.

  6. Gadgets, approximation, and linear programming

    SciTech Connect

    Trevisan, L.; Sudan, M.; Sorkin, G.B.; Williamson, D.P.

    1996-12-31

    We present a linear-programming based method for finding {open_quotes}gadgets{close_quotes}, i.e., combinatorial structures reducing constraints of one optimization problems to constraints of another. A key step in this method is a simple observation which limits the search space to a finite one. Using this new method we present a number of new, computer-constructed gadgets for several different reductions. This method also answers a question posed by on how to prove the optimality of gadgets-we show how LP duality gives such proofs. The new gadgets improve hardness results for MAX CUT and MAX DICUT, showing that approximating these problems to within factors of 60/61 and 44/45 respectively is N P-hard. We also use the gadgets to obtain an improved approximation algorithm for MAX 3SAT which guarantees an approximation ratio of .801. This improves upon the previous best bound of .7704.

  7. Transonic Drag Prediction on a DLR-F6 Transport Configuration Using Unstructured Grid Solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Rausch, E. M.; Frink, N. T.; Mavriplis, D. J.; Rausch, R. D.; Milholen, W. E.

    2004-01-01

    A second international AIAA Drag Prediction Workshop (DPW-II) was organized and held in Orlando Florida on June 21-22, 2003. The primary purpose was to inves- tigate the code-to-code uncertainty. address the sensitivity of the drag prediction to grid size and quantify the uncertainty in predicting nacelle/pylon drag increments at a transonic cruise condition. This paper presents an in-depth analysis of the DPW-II computational results from three state-of-the-art unstructured grid Navier-Stokes flow solvers exercised on similar families of tetrahedral grids. The flow solvers are USM3D - a tetrahedral cell-centered upwind solver. FUN3D - a tetrahedral node-centered upwind solver, and NSU3D - a general element node-centered central-differenced solver. For the wingbody, the total drag predicted for a constant-lift transonic cruise condition showed a decrease in code-to-code variation with grid refinement as expected. For the same flight condition, the wing/body/nacelle/pylon total drag and the nacelle/pylon drag increment predicted showed an increase in code-to-code variation with grid refinement. Although the range in total drag for the wingbody fine grids was only 5 counts, a code-to-code comparison of surface pressures and surface restricted streamlines indicated that the three solvers were not all converging to the same flow solutions- different shock locations and separation patterns were evident. Similarly, the wing/body/nacelle/pylon solutions did not appear to be converging to the same flow solutions. Overall, grid refinement did not consistently improve the correlation with experimental data for either the wingbody or the wing/body/nacelle pylon configuration. Although the absolute values of total drag predicted by two of the solvers for the medium and fine grids did not compare well with the experiment, the incremental drag predictions were within plus or minus 3 counts of the experimental data. The correlation with experimental incremental drag was not

  8. AQUASOL: An efficient solver for the dipolar Poisson–Boltzmann–Langevin equation

    PubMed Central

    Koehl, Patrice; Delarue, Marc

    2010-01-01

    The Poisson–Boltzmann (PB) formalism is among the most popular approaches to modeling the solvation of molecules. It assumes a continuum model for water, leading to a dielectric permittivity that only depends on position in space. In contrast, the dipolar Poisson–Boltzmann–Langevin (DPBL) formalism represents the solvent as a collection of orientable dipoles with nonuniform concentration; this leads to a nonlinear permittivity function that depends both on the position and on the local electric field at that position. The differences in the assumptions underlying these two models lead to significant differences in the equations they generate. The PB equation is a second order, elliptic, nonlinear partial differential equation (PDE). Its response coefficients correspond to the dielectric permittivity and are therefore constant within each subdomain of the system considered (i.e., inside and outside of the molecules considered). While the DPBL equation is also a second order, elliptic, nonlinear PDE, its response coefficients are nonlinear functions of the electrostatic potential. Many solvers have been developed for the PB equation; to our knowledge, none of these can be directly applied to the DPBL equation. The methods they use may adapt to the difference; their implementations however are PBE specific. We adapted the PBE solver originally developed by Holst and Saied [J. Comput. Chem. 16, 337 (1995)] to the problem of solving the DPBL equation. This solver uses a truncated Newton method with a multigrid preconditioner. Numerical evidences suggest that it converges for the DPBL equation and that the convergence is superlinear. It is found however to be slow and greedy in memory requirement for problems commonly encountered in computational biology and computational chemistry. To circumvent these problems, we propose two variants, a quasi-Newton solver based on a simplified, inexact Jacobian and an iterative self-consistent solver that is based directly on

  9. S4 : A free electromagnetic solver for layered periodic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Victor; Fan, Shanhui

    2012-10-01

    We describe S4, a free implementation of the Fourier modal method (FMM), which has also been commonly referred to as rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA), for simulating electromagnetic propagation through 3D structures with 2D periodicity. We detail design aspects that allow S4 to be a flexible platform for these types of simulations. In particular, we highlight the ability to select different FMM formulations, user scripting, and extensibility of program capabilities for eigenmode computations. Program summary Program title: S4 Catalogue identifier: AEMO_v1_0. Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEMO_v1_0..html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License, version 2 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 56910 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 433883 Distribution format: Programming language: C, C++. Computer: Any computer with a Unix-like environment and a C++ compiler. Developed on 2.3 GHz AMD Phenom 9600. Operating system: Any Unix-like environment; developed under MinGW32 on Windows 7. Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Yes. Parallelized using MPI. RAM: Problem dependent (linearly proportional to number of layers and quadratic in number of Fourier components). A single layer calculation with approximately 100 Fourier components uses approximately 10 MB. Classification: 10. Electrostatics and Electromagnetics. External routines: Lua [1] and optionally exploits additional free software packages: FFTW [2], CHOLMOD [3], MPI message-passing interface [4], LAPACK and BLAS linear-algebra software [5], and Kiss FFT [6]. Nature of problem: Time-harmonic electromagnetism in layered bi-periodic structures. Solution method: The Fourier modal method (rigorous coupled wave analysis) and the scattering matrix method. Running time: Problem dependent and highly dependent on quality of the BLAS

  10. Adaptive approximation models in optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Voronin, A.N.

    1995-05-01

    The paper proposes a method for optimization of functions of several variables that substantially reduces the number of objective function evaluations compared to traditional methods. The method is based on the property of iterative refinement of approximation models of the optimand function in approximation domains that contract to the extremum point. It does not require subjective specification of the starting point, step length, or other parameters of the search procedure. The method is designed for efficient optimization of unimodal functions of several (not more than 10-15) variables and can be applied to find the global extremum of polymodal functions and also for optimization of scalarized forms of vector objective functions.

  11. Approximating spatially exclusive invasion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Joshua V.; Binder, Benjamin J.

    2014-05-01

    A number of biological processes, such as invasive plant species and cell migration, are composed of two key mechanisms: motility and reproduction. Due to the spatially exclusive interacting behavior of these processes a cellular automata (CA) model is specified to simulate a one-dimensional invasion process. Three (independence, Poisson, and 2D-Markov chain) approximations are considered that attempt to capture the average behavior of the CA. We show that our 2D-Markov chain approximation accurately predicts the state of the CA for a wide range of motility and reproduction rates.

  12. Heat pipe transient response approximation.

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, R. S.

    2001-01-01

    A simple and concise routine that approximates the response of an alkali metal heat pipe to changes in evaporator heat transfer rate is described. This analytically based routine is compared with data from a cylindrical heat pipe with a crescent-annular wick that undergoes gradual (quasi-steady) transitions through the viscous and condenser boundary heat transfer limits. The sonic heat transfer limit can also be incorporated into this routine for heat pipes with more closely coupled condensers. The advantages and obvious limitations of this approach are discussed. For reference, a source code listing for the approximation appears at the end of this paper.

  13. Second Approximation to Conical Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1950-12-01

    Public Release WRIGHT AIR DEVELOPMENT CENTER AF-WP-(B)-O-29 JUL 53 100 NOTICES ’When Government drawings, specifications, or other data are used V...so that the X, the approximation always depends on the ( "/)th, etc. Here the second approximation, i.e., the terms in C and 62, are computed and...the scheme shown in Fig. 1, the isentropic equations of motion are (cV-X2) +~X~C 6 +- 4= -x- 1 It is assumed that + Ux !E . $O’/ + (8) Introducing Eqs

  14. Large-scale 3D EM modeling with a Block Low-Rank multifrontal direct solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shantsev, Daniil V.; Jaysaval, Piyoosh; de la Kethulle de Ryhove, Sébastien; Amestoy, Patrick R.; Buttari, Alfredo; L'Excellent, Jean-Yves; Mary, Theo

    2017-03-01

    We put forward the idea of using a Block Low-Rank (BLR) multifrontal direct solver to efficiently solve the linear systems of equations arising from a finite-difference discretization of the frequency-domain Maxwell equations for 3D electromagnetic (EM) problems. The solver uses a low-rank representation for the off-diagonal blocks of the intermediate dense matrices arising in the multifrontal method to reduce the computational load. A numerical threshold, the so called BLR threshold, controlling the accuracy of low-rank representations was optimized by balancing errors in the computed EM fields against savings in floating point operations (flops). Simulations were carried out over large-scale 3D resistivity models representing typical scenarios for marine controlled-source EM surveys, and in particular the SEG SEAM model which contains an irregular salt body. The flop count, size of factor matrices and elapsed run time for matrix factorization are reduced dramatically by using BLR representations and can go down to, respectively, 10%, 30% and 40% of their full rank values for our largest system with N = 20.6 million unknowns. The reductions are almost independent of the number of MPI tasks and threads at least up to 90 × 10 = 900 cores. The BLR savings increase for larger systems, which reduces the factorization flop complexity from O( {{N^2}} ) for the full-rank solver to O( {{N^m}} ) with m = 1.4 - 1.6 . The BLR savings are significantly larger for deep-water environments that exclude the highly resistive air layer from the computational domain. A study in a scenario where simulations are required at multiple source locations shows that the BLR solver can become competitive in comparison to iterative solvers as an engine for 3D CSEM Gauss-Newton inversion that requires forward modelling for a few thousand right-hand sides.

  15. A non-hydrostatic pressure distribution solver for the nonlinear shallow water equations over irregular topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aricò, Costanza; Lo Re, Carlo

    2016-12-01

    We extend a recently proposed 2D depth-integrated Finite Volume solver for the nonlinear shallow water equations with non-hydrostatic pressure distribution. The proposed model is aimed at simulating both nonlinear and dispersive shallow water processes. We split the total pressure into its hydrostatic and dynamic components and solve a hydrostatic problem and a non-hydrostatic problem sequentially, in the framework of a fractional time step procedure. The dispersive properties are achieved by incorporating the non-hydrostatic pressure component in the governing equations. The governing equations are the depth-integrated continuity equation and the depth-integrated momentum equations along the x, y and z directions. Unlike the previous non-hydrostatic shallow water solver, in the z momentum equation, we retain both the vertical local and convective acceleration terms. In the former solver, we keep only the local vertical acceleration term. In this paper, we investigate the effects of these convective terms and the possible improvements of the computed solution when these terms are not neglected in the governing equations, especially in strongly nonlinear processes. The presence of the convective terms in the vertical momentum equation leads to a numerical solution procedure, which is quite different from the one of the previous solver, in both the hydrostatic and dynamic steps. We discretize the spatial domain using unstructured triangular meshes satisfying the Generalized Delaunay property. The numerical solver is shock capturing and easily addresses wetting/drying problems, without any additional equation to solve at wet/dry interfaces. We present several numerical applications for challenging flooding processes encountered in practical aspects over irregular topography, including a new set of experiments carried out at the Hydraulics Laboratory of the University of Palermo.

  16. A Fokker-Planck-Landau collision equation solver on two-dimensional velocity grid and its application to particle-in-cell simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, E. S.; Chang, C. S.

    2014-03-15

    An approximate two-dimensional solver of the nonlinear Fokker-Planck-Landau collision operator has been developed using the assumption that the particle probability distribution function is independent of gyroangle in the limit of strong magnetic field. The isotropic one-dimensional scheme developed for nonlinear Fokker-Planck-Landau equation by Buet and Cordier [J. Comput. Phys. 179, 43 (2002)] and for linear Fokker-Planck-Landau equation by Chang and Cooper [J. Comput. Phys. 6, 1 (1970)] have been modified and extended to two-dimensional nonlinear equation. In addition, a method is suggested to apply the new velocity-grid based collision solver to Lagrangian particle-in-cell simulation by adjusting the weights of marker particles and is applied to a five dimensional particle-in-cell code to calculate the neoclassical ion thermal conductivity in a tokamak plasma. Error verifications show practical aspects of the present scheme for both grid-based and particle-based kinetic codes.

  17. Pythagorean Approximations and Continued Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peralta, Javier

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we will show that the Pythagorean approximations of [the square root of] 2 coincide with those achieved in the 16th century by means of continued fractions. Assuming this fact and the known relation that connects the Fibonacci sequence with the golden section, we shall establish a procedure to obtain sequences of rational numbers…

  18. FoSSI: the family of simplified solver interfaces for the rapid development of parallel numerical atmosphere and ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frickenhaus, Stephan; Hiller, Wolfgang; Best, Meike

    The portable software FoSSI is introduced that—in combination with additional free solver software packages—allows for an efficient and scalable parallel solution of large sparse linear equations systems arising in finite element model codes. FoSSI is intended to support rapid model code development, completely hiding the complexity of the underlying solver packages. In particular, the model developer need not be an expert in parallelization and is yet free to switch between different solver packages by simple modifications of the interface call. FoSSI offers an efficient and easy, yet flexible interface to several parallel solvers, most of them available on the web, such as PETSC, AZTEC, MUMPS, PILUT and HYPRE. FoSSI makes use of the concept of handles for vectors, matrices, preconditioners and solvers, that is frequently used in solver libraries. Hence, FoSSI allows for a flexible treatment of several linear equations systems and associated preconditioners at the same time, even in parallel on separate MPI-communicators. The second special feature in FoSSI is the task specifier, being a combination of keywords, each configuring a certain phase in the solver setup. This enables the user to control a solver over one unique subroutine. Furthermore, FoSSI has rather similar features for all solvers, making a fast solver intercomparison or exchange an easy task. FoSSI is a community software, proven in an adaptive 2D-atmosphere model and a 3D-primitive equation ocean model, both formulated in finite elements. The present paper discusses perspectives of an OpenMP-implementation of parallel iterative solvers based on domain decomposition methods. This approach to OpenMP solvers is rather attractive, as the code for domain-local operations of factorization, preconditioning and matrix-vector product can be readily taken from a sequential implementation that is also suitable to be used in an MPI-variant. Code development in this direction is in an advanced state under

  19. A comparative study on low-memory iterative solvers for FFT-based homogenization of periodic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Nachiketa; Vondřejc, Jaroslav; Zeman, Jan

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we assess the performance of four iterative algorithms for solving non-symmetric rank-deficient linear systems arising in the FFT-based homogenization of heterogeneous materials defined by digital images. Our framework is based on the Fourier-Galerkin method with exact and approximate integrations that has recently been shown to generalize the Lippmann-Schwinger setting of the original work by Moulinec and Suquet from 1994. It follows from this variational format that the ensuing system of linear equations can be solved by general-purpose iterative algorithms for symmetric positive-definite systems, such as the Richardson, the Conjugate gradient, and the Chebyshev algorithms, that are compared here to the Eyre-Milton scheme - the most efficient specialized method currently available. Our numerical experiments, carried out for two-dimensional elliptic problems, reveal that the Conjugate gradient algorithm is the most efficient option, while the Eyre-Milton method performs comparably to the Chebyshev semi-iteration. The Richardson algorithm, equivalent to the still widely used original Moulinec-Suquet solver, exhibits the slowest convergence. Besides this, we hope that our study highlights the potential of the well-established techniques of numerical linear algebra to further increase the efficiency of FFT-based homogenization methods.

  20. Notes on Newton-Krylov based Incompressible Flow Projection Solver

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Nourgaliev; Mark Christon; J. Bakosi

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of the present document is to formulate Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov algorithm for approximate projection method used in Hydra-TH code. Hydra-TH is developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) under the auspices of the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light-Water Reactors (CASL) for thermal-hydraulics applications ranging from grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF) to multiphase flow subcooled boiling. Currently, Hydra-TH is based on the semi-implicit projection method, which provides an excellent platform for simulation of transient single-phase thermalhydraulics problems. This algorithm however is not efficient when applied for very slow or steady-state problems, as well as for highly nonlinear multiphase problems relevant to nuclear reactor thermalhydraulics with boiling and condensation. These applications require fully-implicit tightly-coupling algorithms. The major technical contribution of the present report is the formulation of fully-implicit projection algorithm which will fulfill this purpose. This includes the definition of non-linear residuals used for GMRES-based linear iterations, as well as physics-based preconditioning techniques.

  1. High-performance parallel solver for 3D time-dependent Schrodinger equation for large-scale nanosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gainullin, I. K.; Sonkin, M. A.

    2015-03-01

    A parallelized three-dimensional (3D) time-dependent Schrodinger equation (TDSE) solver for one-electron systems is presented in this paper. The TDSE Solver is based on the finite-difference method (FDM) in Cartesian coordinates and uses a simple and explicit leap-frog numerical scheme. The simplicity of the numerical method provides very efficient parallelization and high performance of calculations using Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). For example, calculation of 106 time-steps on the 1000ṡ1000ṡ1000 numerical grid (109 points) takes only 16 hours on 16 Tesla M2090 GPUs. The TDSE Solver demonstrates scalability (parallel efficiency) close to 100% with some limitations on the problem size. The TDSE Solver is validated by calculation of energy eigenstates of the hydrogen atom (13.55 eV) and affinity level of H- ion (0.75 eV). The comparison with other TDSE solvers shows that a GPU-based TDSE Solver is 3 times faster for the problems of the same size and with the same cost of computational resources. The usage of a non-regular Cartesian grid or problem-specific non-Cartesian coordinates increases this benefit up to 10 times. The TDSE Solver was applied to the calculation of the resonant charge transfer (RCT) in nanosystems, including several related physical problems, such as electron capture during H+-H0 collision and electron tunneling between H- ion and thin metallic island film.

  2. Coupling of a compressible vortex particle-mesh method with a near-body compressible discontinuous Galerkin solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmentier, Philippe; Winckelmans, Gregoire; Chatelain, Philippe; Hillewaert, Koen

    2015-11-01

    A hybrid approach, coupling a compressible vortex particle-mesh method (CVPM, also with efficient Poisson solver) and a high order compressible discontinuous Galerkin Eulerian solver, is being developed in order to efficiently simulate flows past bodies; also in the transonic regime. The Eulerian solver is dedicated to capturing the anisotropic flow structures in the near-wall region whereas the CVPM solver is exploited away from the body and in the wake. An overlapping domain decomposition approach is used. The Eulerian solver, which captures the near-body region, also corrects the CVPM solution in that region at every time step. The CVPM solver, which captures the region away from the body and the wake, also provides the outer boundary conditions to the Eulerian solver. Because of the coupling, a boundary element method is also required for consistency. The approach is assessed on typical 2D benchmark cases. Supported by the Fund for Research Training in Industry and Agriculture (F.R.I.A.).

  3. Testing the frozen flow approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchin, Francesco; Matarrese, Sabino; Melott, Adrian L.; Moscardini, Lauro

    1993-01-01

    We investigate the accuracy of the frozen-flow approximation (FFA), recently proposed by Matarrese, et al. (1992), for following the nonlinear evolution of cosmological density fluctuations under gravitational instability. We compare a number of statistics between results of the FFA and n-body simulations, including those used by Melott, Pellman & Shandarin (1993) to test the Zel'dovich approximation. The FFA performs reasonably well in a statistical sense, e.g. in reproducing the counts-in-cell distribution, at small scales, but it does poorly in the crosscorrelation with n-body which means it is generally not moving mass to the right place, especially in models with high small-scale power.

  4. Ab initio dynamical vertex approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galler, Anna; Thunström, Patrik; Gunacker, Patrik; Tomczak, Jan M.; Held, Karsten

    2017-03-01

    Diagrammatic extensions of dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT) such as the dynamical vertex approximation (DΓ A) allow us to include nonlocal correlations beyond DMFT on all length scales and proved their worth for model calculations. Here, we develop and implement an Ab initio DΓ A approach (AbinitioDΓ A ) for electronic structure calculations of materials. The starting point is the two-particle irreducible vertex in the two particle-hole channels which is approximated by the bare nonlocal Coulomb interaction and all local vertex corrections. From this, we calculate the full nonlocal vertex and the nonlocal self-energy through the Bethe-Salpeter equation. The AbinitioDΓ A approach naturally generates all local DMFT correlations and all nonlocal G W contributions, but also further nonlocal correlations beyond: mixed terms of the former two and nonlocal spin fluctuations. We apply this new methodology to the prototypical correlated metal SrVO3.

  5. Potential of the approximation method

    SciTech Connect

    Amano, K.; Maruoka, A.

    1996-12-31

    Developing some techniques for the approximation method, we establish precise versions of the following statements concerning lower bounds for circuits that detect cliques of size s in a graph with m vertices: For 5 {le} s {le} m/4, a monotone circuit computing CLIQUE(m, s) contains at least (1/2)1.8{sup min}({radical}s-1/2,m/(4s)) gates: If a non-monotone circuit computes CLIQUE using a {open_quotes}small{close_quotes} amount of negation, then the circuit contains an exponential number of gates. The former is proved very simply using so called bottleneck counting argument within the framework of approximation, whereas the latter is verified introducing a notion of restricting negation and generalizing the sunflower contraction.

  6. Nonlinear Filtering and Approximation Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    Shwartz), Academic Press (1991). [191 M.Cl. ROUTBAUD, Fiting lindairc par morceaux avec petit bruit d’obserration, These. Universit6 de Provence ( 1990...Kernel System (GKS), Academic Press (1983). 181 H.J. KUSHNER, Probability methods for approximations in stochastic control and for elliptic equations... Academic Press (1977). [9] F. LE GLAND, Time discretization of nonlinear filtering equations, in: 28th. IEEE CDC, Tampa, pp. 2601-2606. IEEE Press (1989

  7. Reliable Function Approximation and Estimation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-16

    Journal on Mathematical Analysis 47 (6), 2015. 4606-4629. (P3) The Sample Complexity of Weighted Sparse Approximation. B. Bah and R. Ward. IEEE...solving systems of quadratic equations. S. Sanghavi, C. White, and R. Ward. Results in Mathematics , 2016. (O5) Relax, no need to round: Integrality of...Theoretical Computer Science. (O6) A unified framework for linear dimensionality reduction in L1. F Krahmer and R Ward. Results in Mathematics , 2014. 1-23

  8. Anatomically accurate high resolution modeling of human whole heart electromechanics: A strongly scalable algebraic multigrid solver method for nonlinear deformation.

    PubMed

    Augustin, Christoph M; Neic, Aurel; Liebmann, Manfred; Prassl, Anton J; Niederer, Steven A; Haase, Gundolf; Plank, Gernot

    2016-01-15

    Electromechanical (EM) models of the heart have been used successfully to study fundamental mechanisms underlying a heart beat in health and disease. However, in all modeling studies reported so far numerous simplifications were made in terms of representing biophysical details of cellular function and its heterogeneity, gross anatomy and tissue microstructure, as well as the bidirectional coupling between electrophysiology (EP) and tissue distension. One limiting factor is the employed spatial discretization methods which are not sufficiently flexible to accommodate complex geometries or resolve heterogeneities, but, even more importantly, the limited efficiency of the prevailing solver techniques which are not sufficiently scalable to deal with the incurring increase in degrees of freedom (DOF) when modeling cardiac electromechanics at high spatio-temporal resolution. This study reports on the development of a novel methodology for solving the nonlinear equation of finite elasticity using human whole organ models of cardiac electromechanics, discretized at a high para-cellular resolution. Three patient-specific, anatomically accurate, whole heart EM models were reconstructed from magnetic resonance (MR) scans at resolutions of 220 μm, 440 μm and 880 μm, yielding meshes of approximately 184.6, 24.4 and 3.7 million tetrahedral elements and 95.9, 13.2 and 2.1 million displacement DOF, respectively. The same mesh was used for discretizing the governing equations of both electrophysiology (EP) and nonlinear elasticity. A novel algebraic multigrid (AMG) preconditioner for an iterative Krylov solver was developed to deal with the resulting computational load. The AMG preconditioner was designed under the primary objective of achieving favorable strong scaling characteristics for both setup and solution runtimes, as this is key for exploiting current high performance computing hardware. Benchmark results using the 220 μm, 440 μm and 880 μm meshes demonstrate

  9. Anatomically accurate high resolution modeling of human whole heart electromechanics: A strongly scalable algebraic multigrid solver method for nonlinear deformation

    PubMed Central

    Augustin, Christoph M.; Neic, Aurel; Liebmann, Manfred; Prassl, Anton J.; Niederer, Steven A.; Haase, Gundolf; Plank, Gernot

    2016-01-01

    Electromechanical (EM) models of the heart have been used successfully to study fundamental mechanisms underlying a heart beat in health and disease. However, in all modeling studies reported so far numerous simplifications were made in terms of representing biophysical details of cellular function and its heterogeneity, gross anatomy and tissue microstructure, as well as the bidirectional coupling between electrophysiology (EP) and tissue distension. One limiting factor is the employed spatial discretization methods which are not sufficiently flexible to accommodate complex geometries or resolve heterogeneities, but, even more importantly, the limited efficiency of the prevailing solver techniques which are not sufficiently scalable to deal with the incurring increase in degrees of freedom (DOF) when modeling cardiac electromechanics at high spatio-temporal resolution. This study reports on the development of a novel methodology for solving the nonlinear equation of finite elasticity using human whole organ models of cardiac electromechanics, discretized at a high para-cellular resolution. Three patient-specific, anatomically accurate, whole heart EM models were reconstructed from magnetic resonance (MR) scans at resolutions of 220 μm, 440 μm and 880 μm, yielding meshes of approximately 184.6, 24.4 and 3.7 million tetrahedral elements and 95.9, 13.2 and 2.1 million displacement DOF, respectively. The same mesh was used for discretizing the governing equations of both electrophysiology (EP) and nonlinear elasticity. A novel algebraic multigrid (AMG) preconditioner for an iterative Krylov solver was developed to deal with the resulting computational load. The AMG preconditioner was designed under the primary objective of achieving favorable strong scaling characteristics for both setup and solution runtimes, as this is key for exploiting current high performance computing hardware. Benchmark results using the 220 μm, 440 μm and 880 μm meshes demonstrate

  10. Null-collision meshless Monte-Carlo—Application to the validation of fast radiative transfer solvers embedded in combustion simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eymet, V.; Poitou, D.; Galtier, M.; El Hafi, M.; Terrée, G.; Fournier, R.

    2013-11-01

    The Monte-Carlo method is often presented as a reference method for radiative transfer simulation when dealing with participating, inhomogeneous media. The reason is that numerical uncertainties are only of a statistical nature and are accurately evaluated by measuring the standard deviation of the Monte Carlo weight. But classical Monte-Carlo algorithms first sample optical thicknesses and then determine absorption or scattering locations by inverting the formal integral definition of optical thickness as an increasing function of path length. This function is only seldom analytically invertible and numerical inversion procedures are required. Most commonly, a volumic grid is introduced and optical properties within each cell are replaced by approximate homogeneous or linear fields. Simulation results are then sensitive to the grid and can no longer be considered as references. We propose a new algorithmic formulation based on the use of null-collisions that eliminate the need for numerical inversion: no volumic grid is required. Benchmark configurations are first considered in order to evaluate the effect of two free parameters: the amount of null-collisions, and the criterion used to decide at which stage a Russian Roulette is used to exit the path tracking process. Then the corresponding algorithm is implemented using a development environment allowing to deal with complex geometries (thanks to computer graphics techniques), leading to a Monte Carlo code that can be easily used for validation of fast radiative transfer solvers embedded in combustion simulators. "Easily" means here that the way the Monte Carlo algorithm deals with both the geometry and the temperature/pressure/concentration fields is independent of the choices made inside the combustion solver: there is no need for the design of a new path-tracking procedure adapted to each new CFD grid. The Monte Carlo simulator is ready for use as soon as combustion specialists provide a localization

  11. Anatomically accurate high resolution modeling of human whole heart electromechanics: A strongly scalable algebraic multigrid solver method for nonlinear deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustin, Christoph M.; Neic, Aurel; Liebmann, Manfred; Prassl, Anton J.; Niederer, Steven A.; Haase, Gundolf; Plank, Gernot

    2016-01-01

    Electromechanical (EM) models of the heart have been used successfully to study fundamental mechanisms underlying a heart beat in health and disease. However, in all modeling studies reported so far numerous simplifications were made in terms of representing biophysical details of cellular function and its heterogeneity, gross anatomy and tissue microstructure, as well as the bidirectional coupling between electrophysiology (EP) and tissue distension. One limiting factor is the employed spatial discretization methods which are not sufficiently flexible to accommodate complex geometries or resolve heterogeneities, but, even more importantly, the limited efficiency of the prevailing solver techniques which is not sufficiently scalable to deal with the incurring increase in degrees of freedom (DOF) when modeling cardiac electromechanics at high spatio-temporal resolution. This study reports on the development of a novel methodology for solving the nonlinear equation of finite elasticity using human whole organ models of cardiac electromechanics, discretized at a high para-cellular resolution. Three patient-specific, anatomically accurate, whole heart EM models were reconstructed from magnetic resonance (MR) scans at resolutions of 220 μm, 440 μm and 880 μm, yielding meshes of approximately 184.6, 24.4 and 3.7 million tetrahedral elements and 95.9, 13.2 and 2.1 million displacement DOF, respectively. The same mesh was used for discretizing the governing equations of both electrophysiology (EP) and nonlinear elasticity. A novel algebraic multigrid (AMG) preconditioner for an iterative Krylov solver was developed to deal with the resulting computational load. The AMG preconditioner was designed under the primary objective of achieving favorable strong scaling characteristics for both setup and solution runtimes, as this is key for exploiting current high performance computing hardware. Benchmark results using the 220 μm, 440 μm and 880 μm meshes demonstrate

  12. Approximate Counting of Graphical Realizations.

    PubMed

    Erdős, Péter L; Kiss, Sándor Z; Miklós, István; Soukup, Lajos

    2015-01-01

    In 1999 Kannan, Tetali and Vempala proposed a MCMC method to uniformly sample all possible realizations of a given graphical degree sequence and conjectured its rapidly mixing nature. Recently their conjecture was proved affirmative for regular graphs (by Cooper, Dyer and Greenhill, 2007), for regular directed graphs (by Greenhill, 2011) and for half-regular bipartite graphs (by Miklós, Erdős and Soukup, 2013). Several heuristics on counting the number of possible realizations exist (via sampling processes), and while they work well in practice, so far no approximation guarantees exist for such an approach. This paper is the first to develop a method for counting realizations with provable approximation guarantee. In fact, we solve a slightly more general problem; besides the graphical degree sequence a small set of forbidden edges is also given. We show that for the general problem (which contains the Greenhill problem and the Miklós, Erdős and Soukup problem as special cases) the derived MCMC process is rapidly mixing. Further, we show that this new problem is self-reducible therefore it provides a fully polynomial randomized approximation scheme (a.k.a. FPRAS) for counting of all realizations.

  13. Approximate Counting of Graphical Realizations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In 1999 Kannan, Tetali and Vempala proposed a MCMC method to uniformly sample all possible realizations of a given graphical degree sequence and conjectured its rapidly mixing nature. Recently their conjecture was proved affirmative for regular graphs (by Cooper, Dyer and Greenhill, 2007), for regular directed graphs (by Greenhill, 2011) and for half-regular bipartite graphs (by Miklós, Erdős and Soukup, 2013). Several heuristics on counting the number of possible realizations exist (via sampling processes), and while they work well in practice, so far no approximation guarantees exist for such an approach. This paper is the first to develop a method for counting realizations with provable approximation guarantee. In fact, we solve a slightly more general problem; besides the graphical degree sequence a small set of forbidden edges is also given. We show that for the general problem (which contains the Greenhill problem and the Miklós, Erdős and Soukup problem as special cases) the derived MCMC process is rapidly mixing. Further, we show that this new problem is self-reducible therefore it provides a fully polynomial randomized approximation scheme (a.k.a. FPRAS) for counting of all realizations. PMID:26161994

  14. Computer Experiments for Function Approximations

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, A; Izmailov, I; Rizzo, S; Wynter, S; Alexandrov, O; Tong, C

    2007-10-15

    This research project falls in the domain of response surface methodology, which seeks cost-effective ways to accurately fit an approximate function to experimental data. Modeling and computer simulation are essential tools in modern science and engineering. A computer simulation can be viewed as a function that receives input from a given parameter space and produces an output. Running the simulation repeatedly amounts to an equivalent number of function evaluations, and for complex models, such function evaluations can be very time-consuming. It is then of paramount importance to intelligently choose a relatively small set of sample points in the parameter space at which to evaluate the given function, and then use this information to construct a surrogate function that is close to the original function and takes little time to evaluate. This study was divided into two parts. The first part consisted of comparing four sampling methods and two function approximation methods in terms of efficiency and accuracy for simple test functions. The sampling methods used were Monte Carlo, Quasi-Random LP{sub {tau}}, Maximin Latin Hypercubes, and Orthogonal-Array-Based Latin Hypercubes. The function approximation methods utilized were Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (MARS) and Support Vector Machines (SVM). The second part of the study concerned adaptive sampling methods with a focus on creating useful sets of sample points specifically for monotonic functions, functions with a single minimum and functions with a bounded first derivative.

  15. Approximate reasoning using terminological models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, John; Vaidya, Nitin

    1992-01-01

    Term Subsumption Systems (TSS) form a knowledge-representation scheme in AI that can express the defining characteristics of concepts through a formal language that has a well-defined semantics and incorporates a reasoning mechanism that can deduce whether one concept subsumes another. However, TSS's have very limited ability to deal with the issue of uncertainty in knowledge bases. The objective of this research is to address issues in combining approximate reasoning with term subsumption systems. To do this, we have extended an existing AI architecture (CLASP) that is built on the top of a term subsumption system (LOOM). First, the assertional component of LOOM has been extended for asserting and representing uncertain propositions. Second, we have extended the pattern matcher of CLASP for plausible rule-based inferences. Third, an approximate reasoning model has been added to facilitate various kinds of approximate reasoning. And finally, the issue of inconsistency in truth values due to inheritance is addressed using justification of those values. This architecture enhances the reasoning capabilities of expert systems by providing support for reasoning under uncertainty using knowledge captured in TSS. Also, as definitional knowledge is explicit and separate from heuristic knowledge for plausible inferences, the maintainability of expert systems could be improved.

  16. Cluster size convergence of the density matrix embedding theory and its dynamical cluster formulation: A study with an auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Bo-Xiao; Kretchmer, Joshua S.; Shi, Hao; Zhang, Shiwei; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the cluster size convergence of the energy and observables using two forms of density matrix embedding theory (DMET): the original cluster form (CDMET) and a new formulation motivated by the dynamical cluster approximation (DCA-DMET). Both methods are applied to the half-filled one- and two-dimensional Hubbard models using a sign-problem free auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo impurity solver, which allows for the treatment of large impurity clusters of up to 100 sites. While CDMET is more accurate at smaller impurity cluster sizes, DCA-DMET exhibits faster asymptotic convergence towards the thermodynamic limit. We use our two formulations to produce new accurate estimates for the energy and local moment of the two-dimensional Hubbard model for U /t =2 ,4 ,6 . These results compare favorably with the best data available in the literature, and help resolve earlier uncertainties in the moment for U /t =2 .

  17. Fermion tunneling beyond semiclassical approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Majhi, Bibhas Ranjan

    2009-02-15

    Applying the Hamilton-Jacobi method beyond the semiclassical approximation prescribed in R. Banerjee and B. R. Majhi, J. High Energy Phys. 06 (2008) 095 for the scalar particle, Hawking radiation as tunneling of the Dirac particle through an event horizon is analyzed. We show that, as before, all quantum corrections in the single particle action are proportional to the usual semiclassical contribution. We also compute the modifications to the Hawking temperature and Bekenstein-Hawking entropy for the Schwarzschild black hole. Finally, the coefficient of the logarithmic correction to entropy is shown to be related with the trace anomaly.

  18. Improved non-approximability results

    SciTech Connect

    Bellare, M.; Sudan, M.

    1994-12-31

    We indicate strong non-approximability factors for central problems: N{sup 1/4} for Max Clique; N{sup 1/10} for Chromatic Number; and 66/65 for Max 3SAT. Underlying the Max Clique result is a proof system in which the verifier examines only three {open_quotes}free bits{close_quotes} to attain an error of 1/2. Underlying the Chromatic Number result is a reduction from Max Clique which is more efficient than previous ones.

  19. Generalized Gradient Approximation Made Simple

    SciTech Connect

    Perdew, J.P.; Burke, K.; Ernzerhof, M.

    1996-10-01

    Generalized gradient approximations (GGA{close_quote}s) for the exchange-correlation energy improve upon the local spin density (LSD) description of atoms, molecules, and solids. We present a simple derivation of a simple GGA, in which all parameters (other than those in LSD) are fundamental constants. Only general features of the detailed construction underlying the Perdew-Wang 1991 (PW91) GGA are invoked. Improvements over PW91 include an accurate description of the linear response of the uniform electron gas, correct behavior under uniform scaling, and a smoother potential. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  20. Approximate transferability in conjugated polyalkenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskandari, Keiamars; Mandado, Marcos; Mosquera, Ricardo A.

    2007-03-01

    QTAIM computed atomic and bond properties, as well as delocalization indices (obtained from electron densities computed at HF, MP2 and B3LYP levels) of several linear and branched conjugated polyalkenes and O- and N-containing conjugated polyenes have been employed to assess approximate transferable CH groups. The values of these properties indicate the effects of the functional group extend to four CH groups, whereas those of the terminal carbon affect up to three carbons. Ternary carbons also modify significantly the properties of atoms in α, β and γ.

  1. Simulation of vortex-induced vibrations of a cylinder using ANSYS CFX rigid body solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izhar, Abubakar; Qureshi, Arshad Hussain; Khushnood, Shahab

    2017-03-01

    This article simulates the vortex-induced oscillations of a rigid circular cylinder with elastic support using the new ANSYS CFX rigid body solver. This solver requires no solid mesh to setup FSI (Fluid Structure Interaction) simulation. The two-way case was setup in CFX only. Specific mass of the cylinder and flow conditions were similar to previous experimental data with mass damping parameter equal to 0.04, specific mass of 1 and Reynolds number of 3800. Two dimensional simulations were setup. Both one-degree-of-freedom and two-degree-of-freedom cases were run and results were obtained for both cases with reasonable accuracy as compared with experimental results. Eight-figure XY trajectory and lock-in behavior were clearly captured. The obtained results were satisfactory.

  2. An assessment of the adaptive unstructured tetrahedral grid, Euler Flow Solver Code FELISA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djomehri, M. Jahed; Erickson, Larry L.

    1994-01-01

    A three-dimensional solution-adaptive Euler flow solver for unstructured tetrahedral meshes is assessed, and the accuracy and efficiency of the method for predicting sonic boom pressure signatures about simple generic models are demonstrated. Comparison of computational and wind tunnel data and enhancement of numerical solutions by means of grid adaptivity are discussed. The mesh generation is based on the advancing front technique. The FELISA code consists of two solvers, the Taylor-Galerkin and the Runge-Kutta-Galerkin schemes, both of which are spacially discretized by the usual Galerkin weighted residual finite-element methods but with different explicit time-marching schemes to steady state. The solution-adaptive grid procedure is based on either remeshing or mesh refinement techniques. An alternative geometry adaptive procedure is also incorporated.

  3. Extending Clause Learning of SAT Solvers with Boolean Gröbner Bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zengler, Christoph; Küchlin, Wolfgang

    We extend clause learning as performed by most modern SAT Solvers by integrating the computation of Boolean Gröbner bases into the conflict learning process. Instead of learning only one clause per conflict, we compute and learn additional binary clauses from a Gröbner basis of the current conflict. We used the Gröbner basis engine of the logic package Redlog contained in the computer algebra system Reduce to extend the SAT solver MiniSAT with Gröbner basis learning. Our approach shows a significant reduction of conflicts and a reduction of restarts and computation time on many hard problems from the SAT 2009 competition.

  4. Courant Number and Mach Number Insensitive CE/SE Euler Solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Sin-Chung

    2005-01-01

    It has been known that the space-time CE/SE method can be used to obtain ID, 2D, and 3D steady and unsteady flow solutions with Mach numbers ranging from 0.0028 to 10. However, it is also known that a CE/SE solution may become overly dissipative when the Mach number is very small. As an initial attempt to remedy this weakness, new 1D Courant number and Mach number insensitive CE/SE Euler solvers are developed using several key concepts underlying the recent successful development of Courant number insensitive CE/SE schemes. Numerical results indicate that the new solvers are capable of resolving crisply a contact discontinuity embedded in a flow with the maximum Mach number = 0.01.

  5. Pulsed plane wave analytic solutions for generic shapes and the validation of Maxwell's equations solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yarrow, Maurice; Vastano, John A.; Lomax, Harvard

    1992-01-01

    Generic shapes are subjected to pulsed plane waves of arbitrary shape. The resulting scattered electromagnetic fields are determined analytically. These fields are then computed efficiently at field locations for which numerically determined EM fields are required. Of particular interest are the pulsed waveform shapes typically utilized by radar systems. The results can be used to validate the accuracy of finite difference time domain Maxwell's equations solvers. A two-dimensional solver which is second- and fourth-order accurate in space and fourth-order accurate in time is examined. Dielectric media properties are modeled by a ramping technique which simplifies the associated gridding of body shapes. The attributes of the ramping technique are evaluated by comparison with the analytic solutions.

  6. Linear optical response of finite systems using multishift linear system solvers

    SciTech Connect

    Hübener, Hannes; Giustino, Feliciano

    2014-07-28

    We discuss the application of multishift linear system solvers to linear-response time-dependent density functional theory. Using this technique the complete frequency-dependent electronic density response of finite systems to an external perturbation can be calculated at the cost of a single solution of a linear system via conjugate gradients. We show that multishift time-dependent density functional theory yields excitation energies and oscillator strengths in perfect agreement with the standard diagonalization of the response matrix (Casida's method), while being computationally advantageous. We present test calculations for benzene, porphin, and chlorophyll molecules. We argue that multishift solvers may find broad applicability in the context of excited-state calculations within density-functional theory and beyond.

  7. Multitasking domain decomposition fast Poisson solvers on the Cray Y-MP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Tony F.; Fatoohi, Rod A.

    1990-01-01

    The results of multitasking implementation of a domain decomposition fast Poisson solver on eight processors of the Cray Y-MP are presented. The object of this research is to study the performance of domain decomposition methods on a Cray supercomputer and to analyze the performance of different multitasking techniques using highly parallel algorithms. Two implementations of multitasking are considered: macrotasking (parallelism at the subroutine level) and microtasking (parallelism at the do-loop level). A conventional FFT-based fast Poisson solver is also multitasked. The results of different implementations are compared and analyzed. A speedup of over 7.4 on the Cray Y-MP running in a dedicated environment is achieved for all cases.

  8. A Massively Parallel Solver for the Mechanical Harmonic Analysis of Accelerator Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    O. Kononenko

    2015-02-17

    ACE3P is a 3D massively parallel simulation suite that developed at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory that can perform coupled electromagnetic, thermal and mechanical study. Effectively utilizing supercomputer resources, ACE3P has become a key simulation tool for particle accelerator R and D. A new frequency domain solver to perform mechanical harmonic response analysis of accelerator components is developed within the existing parallel framework. This solver is designed to determine the frequency response of the mechanical system to external harmonic excitations for time-efficient accurate analysis of the large-scale problems. Coupled with the ACE3P electromagnetic modules, this capability complements a set of multi-physics tools for a comprehensive study of microphonics in superconducting accelerating cavities in order to understand the RF response and feedback requirements for the operational reliability of a particle accelerator. (auth)

  9. Analysis, tuning and comparison of two general sparse solvers for distributed memory computers

    SciTech Connect

    Amestoy, P.R.; Duff, I.S.; L'Excellent, J.-Y.; Li, X.S.

    2000-06-30

    We describe the work performed in the context of a Franco-Berkeley funded project between NERSC-LBNL located in Berkeley (USA) and CERFACS-ENSEEIHT located in Toulouse (France). We discuss both the tuning and performance analysis of two distributed memory sparse solvers (superlu from Berkeley and mumps from Toulouse) on the 512 processor Cray T3E from NERSC (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory). This project gave us the opportunity to improve the algorithms and add new features to the codes. We then quite extensively analyze and compare the two approaches on a set of large problems from real applications. We further explain the main differences in the behavior of the approaches on artificial regular grid problems. As a conclusion to this activity report, we mention a set of parallel sparse solvers on which this type of study should be extended.

  10. AFMPB: An Adaptive Fast Multipole Poisson-Boltzmann Solver for Calculating Electrostatics in Biomolecular Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Benzhuo; Cheng, Xiaolin; Huang, Jingfang; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2010-01-01

    A Fortran program package is introduced for rapid evaluation of the electrostatic potentials and forces in biomolecular systems modeled by the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The numerical solver utilizes a well-conditioned boundary integral equation (BIE) formulation, a node-patch discretization scheme, a Krylov subspace iterative solver package with reverse communication protocols, and an adaptive new version of fast multipole method in which the exponential expansions are used to diagonalize the multipole to local translations. The program and its full description, as well as several closely related libraries and utility tools are available at http://lsec.cc.ac.cn/lubz/afmpb.html and a mirror site at http://mccammon.ucsd.edu/. This paper is a brief summary of the program: the algorithms, the implementation and the usage. PMID:20532187

  11. An unstructured-grid, parallel, projection solver for computing low-speed flows

    SciTech Connect

    Christon, M.A.; Carroll, D.E.

    1998-08-01

    This paper presents an overview of the issues associated with applying a domain-decomposition message-passing paradigm to the parallel implementation of both explicit and semi-implicit projection algorithms. The use of an element-based domain decomposition with an efficient solution strategy for the pressure field is shown to yield a scalable, parallel solution method capable of treating complex flow problems where high-resolution grids are required. In addition, the use of an SSOR or Jacobi preconditioned conjugate gradient solver with an A-conjugate projection reduces the computational time for the solution of the pressure field, and yields parallel efficiencies above 80% for computations with O(250) elements per processor. The parallel projection solver is verified using a series of 2-D and 3-D benchmarks designed to evaluate time-accurate flow solution methods. Finally, the extension of the projection algorithm to reacting flows is demonstrated for a time-dependent vortex-shedding problem.

  12. A GPU-enabled Finite Volume solver for global magnetospheric simulations on unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lani, Andrea; Yalim, Mehmet Sarp; Poedts, Stefaan

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes an ideal Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) solver for global magnetospheric simulations based on a B1 +B0 splitting approach, which has been implemented within the COOLFluiD platform and adapted to run on modern heterogeneous architectures featuring General Purpose Graphical Processing Units (GPGPUs). The code is based on a state-of-the-art Finite Volume discretization for unstructured grids and either explicit or implicit time integration, suitable for both steady and time accurate problems. Innovative object-oriented design and coding techniques mixing C++ and CUDA are discussed. Performance results of the modified code on single and multiple processors are presented and compared with those provided by the original solver.

  13. Compact tunable silicon photonic differential-equation solver for general linear time-invariant systems.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiayang; Cao, Pan; Hu, Xiaofeng; Jiang, Xinhong; Pan, Ting; Yang, Yuxing; Qiu, Ciyuan; Tremblay, Christine; Su, Yikai

    2014-10-20

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate an all-optical temporal differential-equation solver that can be used to solve ordinary differential equations (ODEs) characterizing general linear time-invariant (LTI) systems. The photonic device implemented by an add-drop microring resonator (MRR) with two tunable interferometric couplers is monolithically integrated on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer with a compact footprint of ~60 μm × 120 μm. By thermally tuning the phase shifts along the bus arms of the two interferometric couplers, the proposed device is capable of solving first-order ODEs with two variable coefficients. The operation principle is theoretically analyzed, and system testing of solving ODE with tunable coefficients is carried out for 10-Gb/s optical Gaussian-like pulses. The experimental results verify the effectiveness of the fabricated device as a tunable photonic ODE solver.

  14. Progress Toward Overset-Grid Moving Body Capability for USM3D Unstructured Flow Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandyna, Mohagna J.; Frink, Neal T.; Noack, Ralph W.

    2005-01-01

    A static and dynamic Chimera overset-grid capability is added to an established NASA tetrahedral unstructured parallel Navier-Stokes flow solver, USM3D. Modifications to the solver primarily consist of a few strategic calls to the Donor interpolation Receptor Transaction library (DiRTlib) to facilitate communication of solution information between various grids. The assembly of multiple overlapping grids into a single-zone composite grid is performed by the Structured, Unstructured and Generalized Grid AssembleR (SUGGAR) code. Several test cases are presented to verify the implementation, assess overset-grid solution accuracy and convergence relative to single-grid solutions, and demonstrate the prescribed relative grid motion capability.

  15. Parallel performance of a preconditioned CG solver for unstructured finite element applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shadid, J.N.; Hutchinson, S.A.; Moffat, H.K.

    1994-12-31

    A parallel unstructured finite element (FE) implementation designed for message passing MIMD machines is described. This implementation employs automated problem partitioning algorithms for load balancing unstructured grids, a distributed sparse matrix representation of the global finite element equations and a parallel conjugate gradient (CG) solver. In this paper a number of issues related to the efficient implementation of parallel unstructured mesh applications are presented. These include the differences between structured and unstructured mesh parallel applications, major communication kernels for unstructured CG solvers, automatic mesh partitioning algorithms, and the influence of mesh partitioning metrics on parallel performance. Initial results are presented for example finite element (FE) heat transfer analysis applications on a 1024 processor nCUBE 2 hypercube. Results indicate over 95% scaled efficiencies are obtained for some large problems despite the required unstructured data communication.

  16. Navier-Stokes cascade analysis with a stiff Kappa-Epsilon turbulence solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Jong-Shang; Sockol, Peter M.; Prahl, Joseph M.

    1987-01-01

    The two dimensional, compressible, thin layer Navier-Stokes equations with the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model and the kinetic energy-energy dissipation (k-epsilon) model are solved numerically to simulate the flow through a cascade. The governing equations are solved for the entire flow domain, without the boundary layer assumptions. The stiffness of the k-epsilon equations is discussed. A semi-implicit, Runge-Kutta, time-marching scheme is developed to solve the k-epsilon equations. The impact of the k-epsilon solver on the explicit Runge-Kutta Navier-Stokes solver is discussed. Numerical solutions are presented for two dimensional turbulent flow over a flat plate and a double circular arc cascade and compared with experimental data.

  17. Navier-Stokes cascade analysis with a stiff k-epsilon turbulence solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Jong-Shang; Sockol, Peter M.; Prahl, Joseph M.

    1988-01-01

    The two dimensional, compressible, thin layer Navier-Stokes equations with the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model and the kinetic energy-energy dissipation (k-epsilon) model are solved numerically to simulate the flow through a cascade. The governing equations are solved for the entire flow domain, without the boundary layer assumptions. The stiffness of the k-epsilon equations is discussed. A semi-implicit, Runge-Kutta, time-marching scheme is developed to solve the k-epsilon equations. The impact of the k-epsilon solver on the explicit Runge-Kutta Navier-Stokes solver is discussed. Numerical solutions are presented for two dimensional turbulent flow over a flat plate and a double circular arc cascade and compared with experimental data.

  18. Deterministic conservative solver for the inhomogeneous Fokker-Planck-Landau equation coupled with Poisson equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chenglong; Gamba, Irene M.

    2016-11-01

    We propose a deterministic conservative solver for the inhomogeneous Fokker-Planck-Landau equation coupled with Poisson equation. Through time-splitting scheme, a Vlasov-Poisson (collisionless) problem and a homogeneous Landau (collisional) problem are obtained. These two subproblems can be treated separately. We use operator splitting where the transport dynamics for Runge-Kutta Discontinuous Galerkin (RK-DG) method and the collisional dynamics for homogeneous conservative spectral method are adopted respectively. Since two different numerical schemes are applied separately, we have designed a new conservation correction process such that, after projecting the conservative spectral solution onto the DG mesh, there is no loss of moment consvervation. Parallelization is readily implemented. To verify our solver, numerical experiments on linear and nonlinear Landau damping are provided.

  19. SuperLU{_}DIST: A scalable distributed-memory sparse direct solver for unsymmetric linear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaoye S.; Demmel, James W.

    2002-03-27

    In this paper, we present the main algorithmic features in the software package SuperLU{_}DIST, a distributed-memory sparse direct solver for large sets of linear equations. We give in detail our parallelization strategies, with focus on scalability issues, and demonstrate the parallel performance and scalability on current machines. The solver is based on sparse Gaussian elimination, with an innovative static pivoting strategy proposed earlier by the authors. The main advantage of static pivoting over classical partial pivoting is that it permits a priori determination of data structures and communication pattern for sparse Gaussian elimination, which makes it more scalable on distributed memory machines. Based on this a priori knowledge, we designed highly parallel and scalable algorithms for both LU decomposition and triangular solve and we show that they are suitable for large-scale distributed memory machines.

  20. Applying Reduced Generator Models in the Coarse Solver of Parareal in Time Parallel Power System Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Nan; Dimitrovski, Aleksandar D; Simunovic, Srdjan; Sun, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The development of high-performance computing techniques and platforms has provided many opportunities for real-time or even faster-than-real-time implementation of power system simulations. One approach uses the Parareal in time framework. The Parareal algorithm has shown promising theoretical simulation speedups by temporal decomposing a simulation run into a coarse simulation on the entire simulation interval and fine simulations on sequential sub-intervals linked through the coarse simulation. However, it has been found that the time cost of the coarse solver needs to be reduced to fully exploit the potentials of the Parareal algorithm. This paper studies a Parareal implementation using reduced generator models for the coarse solver and reports the testing results on the IEEE 39-bus system and a 327-generator 2383-bus Polish system model.

  1. Predictions of a Supersonic Jet-in-Crossflow: Comparisons Among CFD Solvers and with Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    data was oriented with the nozzle at y = 0. Hence, the comparisons with CFD results are presented with nozzle on the bottom wall and the jet plume ...The AMRDEC CFD model includes the full Navier-Stokes (FNS) equation set providing an aero-thermo- chemical plume / airframe predictions for unsteady...Predictions of a Supersonic Jet-in-Crossflow: Comparisons Among CFD Solvers and with Experiment by James DeSpirito, Kevin D Kennedy, Clark

  2. Final Technical Report: Global Field Aligned Mesh and Gyrokinetic Field Solver in a Tokamak Edge Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, Julian C.

    2013-05-15

    This project was a collaboration between researchers at the California Institute of Technology and the University of California, Irvine to investigate the utility of a global field-aligned mesh and gyrokinetic field solver for simulations of the tokamak plasma edge region. Mesh generation software from UC Irvine was tested with specific tokamak edge magnetic geometry scenarios and the quality of the meshes and the solutions to the gyrokinetic Poisson equation were evaluated.

  3. A semi-direct solver for compressible 3-dimensional rotational flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S. C.; Adamczyk, J. J.

    1983-01-01

    An iterative procedure is presented for solving steady inviscid 3-D subsonic rotational flow problems. The procedure combines concepts from classical secondary flow theory with an extension to 3-D of a novel semi-direct Cauchy-Riemann solver. It is developed for generalized coordinates and can be exercised using standard finite difference procedures. The stability criterion of the iterative procedure is discussed along with its ability to capture the evolution of inviscid secondary flow in a turning channel.

  4. A semi-direct solver for compressible three-dimensional rotational flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S.-C.; Adamczyk, J. J.

    1983-01-01

    An iterative procedure is presented for solving steady inviscid 3-D subsonic rotational flow problems. The procedure combines concepts from classical secondary flow theory with an extension to 3-D of a novel semi-direct Cauchy-Riemann solver. It is developed for generalized coordinates and can be exercised using standard finite difference procedures. The stability criterion of the iterative procedure is discussed along with its ability to capture the evolution of inviscid secondary flow in a turning channel.

  5. An Efficient Solver of Elasto-plastic Problems in Mechanics Based on TFETI Domain Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čermák, M.; Kozubek, T.; Markopoulos, A.

    2011-09-01

    This paper illustrates how to implement efficiently solvers for elasto-plastic problems. We consider the time step problems formulated by nonlinear variational equations in terms of displacements. To treat nonlinearity and nonsmoothnes we use semismooth Newton method. In each Newton iteration we have to solve linear system of algebraic equations and for its numerical solution we use TFETI domain decomposition method. In our benchmark we demonstrate our approach on von Mises plasticity with isotropic hardening using the return mapping concept.

  6. A Newton-Krylov Solver for Implicit Solution of Hydrodynamics in Core Collapse Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, D R; Swesty, F D; Woodward, C S

    2008-06-12

    This paper describes an implicit approach and nonlinear solver for solution of radiation-hydrodynamic problems in the context of supernovae and proto-neutron star cooling. The robust approach applies Newton-Krylov methods and overcomes the difficulties of discontinuous limiters in the discretized equations and scaling of the equations over wide ranges of physical behavior. We discuss these difficulties, our approach for overcoming them, and numerical results demonstrating accuracy and efficiency of the method.

  7. libmpdata++ 0.1: a library of parallel MPDATA solvers for systems of generalised transport equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaruga, A.; Arabas, S.; Jarecka, D.; Pawlowska, H.; Smolarkiewicz, P. K.; Waruszewski, M.

    2014-11-01

    This paper accompanies first release of libmpdata++, a C++ library implementing the Multidimensional Positive-Definite Advection Transport Algorithm (MPDATA). The library offers basic numerical solvers for systems of generalised transport equations. The solvers are forward-in-time, conservative and non-linearly stable. The libmpdata++ library covers the basic second-order-accurate formulation of MPDATA, its third-order variant, the infinite-gauge option for variable-sign fields and a flux-corrected transport extension to guarantee non-oscillatory solutions. The library is equipped with a non-symmetric variational elliptic solver for implicit evaluation of pressure gradient terms. All solvers offer parallelisation through domain decomposition using shared-memory parallelisation. The paper describes the library programming interface, and serves as a user guide. Supported options are illustrated with benchmarks discussed in the MPDATA literature. Benchmark descriptions include code snippets as well as quantitative representations of simulation results. Examples of applications include: homogeneous transport in one, two and three dimensions in Cartesian and spherical domains; shallow-water system compared with analytical solution (originally derived for a 2-D case); and a buoyant convection problem in an incompressible Boussinesq fluid with interfacial instability. All the examples are implemented out of the library tree. Regardless of the differences in the problem dimensionality, right-hand-side terms, boundary conditions and parallelisation approach, all the examples use the same unmodified library, which is a key goal of libmpdata++ design. The design, based on the principle of separation of concerns, prioritises the user and developer productivity. The libmpdata++ library is implemented in C++, making use of the Blitz++ multi-dimensional array containers, and is released as free/libre and open-source software.

  8. libmpdata++ 1.0: a library of parallel MPDATA solvers for systems of generalised transport equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaruga, A.; Arabas, S.; Jarecka, D.; Pawlowska, H.; Smolarkiewicz, P. K.; Waruszewski, M.

    2015-04-01

    This paper accompanies the first release of libmpdata++, a C++ library implementing the multi-dimensional positive-definite advection transport algorithm (MPDATA) on regular structured grid. The library offers basic numerical solvers for systems of generalised transport equations. The solvers are forward-in-time, conservative and non-linearly stable. The libmpdata++ library covers the basic second-order-accurate formulation of MPDATA, its third-order variant, the infinite-gauge option for variable-sign fields and a flux-corrected transport extension to guarantee non-oscillatory solutions. The library is equipped with a non-symmetric variational elliptic solver for implicit evaluation of pressure gradient terms. All solvers offer parallelisation through domain decomposition using shared-memory parallelisation. The paper describes the library programming interface, and serves as a user guide. Supported options are illustrated with benchmarks discussed in the MPDATA literature. Benchmark descriptions include code snippets as well as quantitative representations of simulation results. Examples of applications include homogeneous transport in one, two and three dimensions in Cartesian and spherical domains; a shallow-water system compared with analytical solution (originally derived for a 2-D case); and a buoyant convection problem in an incompressible Boussinesq fluid with interfacial instability. All the examples are implemented out of the library tree. Regardless of the differences in the problem dimensionality, right-hand-side terms, boundary conditions and parallelisation approach, all the examples use the same unmodified library, which is a key goal of libmpdata++ design. The design, based on the principle of separation of concerns, prioritises the user and developer productivity. The libmpdata++ library is implemented in C++, making use of the Blitz++ multi-dimensional array containers, and is released as free/libre and open-source software.

  9. Hybrid MPI+OpenMP Programming of an Overset CFD Solver and Performance Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djomehri, M. Jahed; Jin, Haoqiang H.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report describes a two level parallelization of a Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) solver with multi-zone overset structured grids. The approach is based on a hybrid MPI+OpenMP programming model suitable for shared memory and clusters of shared memory machines. The performance investigations of the hybrid application on an SGI Origin2000 (O2K) machine is reported using medium and large scale test problems.

  10. Wavelet Approximation in Data Assimilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tangborn, Andrew; Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Estimation of the state of the atmosphere with the Kalman filter remains a distant goal because of high computational cost of evolving the error covariance for both linear and nonlinear systems. Wavelet approximation is presented here as a possible solution that efficiently compresses both global and local covariance information. We demonstrate the compression characteristics on the the error correlation field from a global two-dimensional chemical constituent assimilation, and implement an adaptive wavelet approximation scheme on the assimilation of the one-dimensional Burger's equation. In the former problem, we show that 99%, of the error correlation can be represented by just 3% of the wavelet coefficients, with good representation of localized features. In the Burger's equation assimilation, the discrete linearized equations (tangent linear model) and analysis covariance are projected onto a wavelet basis and truncated to just 6%, of the coefficients. A nearly optimal forecast is achieved and we show that errors due to truncation of the dynamics are no greater than the errors due to covariance truncation.

  11. Laguerre approximation of random foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebscher, André

    2015-09-01

    Stochastic models for the microstructure of foams are valuable tools to study the relations between microstructure characteristics and macroscopic properties. Owing to the physical laws behind the formation of foams, Laguerre tessellations have turned out to be suitable models for foams. Laguerre tessellations are weighted generalizations of Voronoi tessellations, where polyhedral cells are formed through the interaction of weighted generator points. While both share the same topology, the cell curvature of foams allows only an approximation by Laguerre tessellations. This makes the model fitting a challenging task, especially when the preservation of the local topology is required. In this work, we propose an inversion-based approach to fit a Laguerre tessellation model to a foam. The idea is to find a set of generator points whose tessellation best fits the foam's cell system. For this purpose, we transform the model fitting into a minimization problem that can be solved by gradient descent-based optimization. The proposed algorithm restores the generators of a tessellation if it is known to be Laguerre. If, as in the case of foams, no exact solution is possible, an approximative solution is obtained that maintains the local topology.

  12. Three-Dimensional Inverse Transport Solver Based on Compressive Sensing Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuxiong; Wu, Hongchun; Cao, Liangzhi; Zheng, Youqi

    2013-09-01

    According to the direct exposure measurements from flash radiographic image, a compressive sensing-based method for three-dimensional inverse transport problem is presented. The linear absorption coefficients and interface locations of objects are reconstructed directly at the same time. It is always very expensive to obtain enough measurements. With limited measurements, compressive sensing sparse reconstruction technique orthogonal matching pursuit is applied to obtain the sparse coefficients by solving an optimization problem. A three-dimensional inverse transport solver is developed based on a compressive sensing-based technique. There are three features in this solver: (1) AutoCAD is employed as a geometry preprocessor due to its powerful capacity in graphic. (2) The forward projection matrix rather than Gauss matrix is constructed by the visualization tool generator. (3) Fourier transform and Daubechies wavelet transform are adopted to convert an underdetermined system to a well-posed system in the algorithm. Simulations are performed and numerical results in pseudo-sine absorption problem, two-cube problem and two-cylinder problem when using compressive sensing-based solver agree well with the reference value.

  13. Implementation of a fully-balanced periodic tridiagonal solver on a parallel distributed memory architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eidson, T. M.; Erlebacher, G.

    1994-01-01

    While parallel computers offer significant computational performance, it is generally necessary to evaluate several programming strategies. Two programming strategies for a fairly common problem - a periodic tridiagonal solver - are developed and evaluated. Simple model calculations as well as timing results are presented to evaluate the various strategies. The particular tridiagonal solver evaluated is used in many computational fluid dynamic simulation codes. The feature that makes this algorithm unique is that these simulation codes usually require simultaneous solutions for multiple right-hand-sides (RHS) of the system of equations. Each RHS solutions is independent and thus can be computed in parallel. Thus a Gaussian elimination type algorithm can be used in a parallel computation and the more complicated approaches such as cyclic reduction are not required. The two strategies are a transpose strategy and a distributed solver strategy. For the transpose strategy, the data is moved so that a subset of all the RHS problems is solved on each of the several processors. This usually requires significant data movement between processor memories across a network. The second strategy attempts to have the algorithm allow the data across processor boundaries in a chained manner. This usually requires significantly less data movement. An approach to accomplish this second strategy in a near-perfect load-balanced manner is developed. In addition, an algorithm will be shown to directly transform a sequential Gaussian elimination type algorithm into the parallel chained, load-balanced algorithm.

  14. Time-domain solver in curvilinear coordinates for outdoor sound propagation over complex terrain.

    PubMed

    Dragna, Didier; Blanc-Benon, Philippe; Poisson, Franck

    2013-06-01

    The current work aims at developing a linearized Euler equations solver in curvilinear coordinates to account for the effects of topography on sound propagation. In applications for transportation noise, the propagation environment as well as the description of acoustic sources is complex, and time-domain methods have proved their capability to deal with both atmospheric and ground effects. First, equations in curvilinear coordinates are examined. Then time-domain boundary conditions initially proposed for a Cartesian coordinate system are implemented in the curvilinear solver. Two test cases dealing with acoustic scattering by an impedance cylinder in a two-dimensional geometry and by an impedance sphere in a three-dimensional geometry are considered to validate the boundary conditions. Accurate solutions are obtained for both rigid and impedance surfaces. Finally, the solver is used to examine a typical outdoor sound propagation problem. It is shown that it is well-suited to study coupled effects of topography, mixed impedance ground and meteorological conditions.

  15. Parallel satellite orbital situational problems solver for space missions design and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassov, Atanas Marinov

    2016-11-01

    Solving different scientific problems for space applications demands implementation of observations, measurements or realization of active experiments during time intervals in which specific geometric and physical conditions are fulfilled. The solving of situational problems for determination of these time intervals when the satellite instruments work optimally is a very important part of all activities on every stage of preparation and realization of space missions. The elaboration of universal, flexible and robust approach for situation analysis, which is easily portable toward new satellite missions, is significant for reduction of missions' preparation times and costs. Every situation problem could be based on one or more situation conditions. Simultaneously solving different kinds of situation problems based on different number and types of situational conditions, each one of them satisfied on different segments of satellite orbit requires irregular calculations. Three formal approaches are presented. First one is related to situation problems description that allows achieving flexibility in situation problem assembling and presentation in computer memory. The second formal approach is connected with developing of situation problem solver organized as processor that executes specific code for every particular situational condition. The third formal approach is related to solver parallelization utilizing threads and dynamic scheduling based on "pool of threads" abstraction and ensures a good load balance. The developed situation problems solver is intended for incorporation in the frames of multi-physics multi-satellite space mission's design and simulation tools.

  16. AQUAgpusph, a new free 3D SPH solver accelerated with OpenCL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cercos-Pita, J. L.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, AQUAgpusph, a new free Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) software accelerated with OpenCL, is described. The main differences and progress with respect to other existing alternatives are considered. These are the use of the Open Computing Language (OpenCL) framework instead of the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA), the implementation of the most popular boundary conditions, the easy customization of the code to different problems, the extensibility with regard to Python scripts, and the runtime output which allows the tracking of simulations in real time, or a higher frequency in saving some results without a significant performance lost. These modifications are shown to improve the solver speed, the results quality, and allow for a wider areas of application. AQUAgpusph has been designed trying to provide researchers and engineers with a valuable tool to test and apply the SPH method. Three practical applications are discussed in detail. The evolution of a dam break is used to quantify and compare the computational performance and modeling accuracy with the most popular SPH Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) accelerated alternatives. The dynamics of a coupled system, a Tuned Liquid Damper (TLD), is discussed in order to show the integration capabilities of the solver with external dynamics. Finally, the sloshing flow inside a nuclear reactor is simulated in order to show the capabilities of the solver to treat 3-D problems with complex geometries and of industrial interest.

  17. Evaluation of parallel direct sparse linear solvers in electromagnetic geophysical problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puzyrev, Vladimir; Koric, Seid; Wilkin, Scott

    2016-04-01

    High performance computing is absolutely necessary for large-scale geophysical simulations. In order to obtain a realistic image of a geologically complex area, industrial surveys collect vast amounts of data making the computational cost extremely high for the subsequent simulations. A major computational bottleneck of modeling and inversion algorithms is solving the large sparse systems of linear ill-conditioned equations in complex domains with multiple right hand sides. Recently, parallel direct solvers have been successfully applied to multi-source seismic and electromagnetic problems. These methods are robust and exhibit good performance, but often require large amounts of memory and have limited scalability. In this paper, we evaluate modern direct solvers on large-scale modeling examples that previously were considered unachievable with these methods. Performance and scalability tests utilizing up to 65,536 cores on the Blue Waters supercomputer clearly illustrate the robustness, efficiency and competitiveness of direct solvers compared to iterative techniques. Wide use of direct methods utilizing modern parallel architectures will allow modeling tools to accurately support multi-source surveys and 3D data acquisition geometries, thus promoting a more efficient use of the electromagnetic methods in geophysics.

  18. Optimum plane selection for transport-of-intensity-equation-based solvers.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Carranza, J; Falaggis, K; Kozacki, T

    2014-10-20

    Deterministic single beam phase retrieval techniques based on the transport of intensity equation (TIE) use the axial intensity derivative obtained from a series of intensities recorded along the propagation axis as an input to the TIE-based solver. The common belief is that, when reducing the error present in the axial intensity derivative, there will be minimal error in the retrieved phase. Thus, reported optimization schemes of measurement condition focuses on the minimization of error in the axial intensity derivative. As it is shown in this contribution, this assumption is not correct and leads to underestimating the value of plane separation, which increases the phase retrieval errors and sensitivity to noise of the TIE-based measurement system. Therefore, in this paper, a detailed analysis that shows the existence of an optimal separation that minimizes the error in the retrieved phase for a given TIE-based solver is carried out. The developed model is used to derive analytical expressions that provide an optimal plane separation for a given number of planes and level of noise for the case of equidistant plane separation. The obtained results are derived for the widely used Fourier-transform-based TIE solver, but it is shown that they can also be applied to multigrid-based techniques.

  19. Software design of a multi-block, multi-zone, Navier-Stokes solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogels, M. E. S.

    A multi-block flow solver technique broadens the applicability of structured grid approaches to stationary flows about complex geometries. For instance, the compuational flow domain about a wing-section with extended flap and slat cannot be covered by a single structured grid. It can, however, be subdivided into a number of blocks (topologically a cube), and per block a structured grid can be generated. In a multi-zone flow solver, the flow domain is subdivided into zones in which models (and sometimes algorithms) can be chosen. Thus, one has the option to trade off accuracy versus efficiency by choosing the Euler equations in the far field zones and the Navier-Stokes equations in the near-geometry zones. In the present multi-block, multi-zone flow solver (SOLEQS) both techniques have been combined: a zone is the union of one or more blocks. In addition, in a zone not only a model can be chosen, but also a numerical integration scheme.

  20. Coordinate-Space Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov Solvers for Superfluid Fermi Systems in Large Boxes

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, J. C.; Fann, George I; Harrison, Robert J; Nazarewicz, W.; Hill, Judith C; Galindo, Diego A; Jia, Jun

    2012-01-01

    The self-consistent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov problem in large boxes can be solved accurately in the coordinate space with the recently developed solvers HFB-AX (2D) and MADNESS-HFB (3D). This is essential for the description of superfluid Fermi systems with complicated topologies and significant spatial extend, such as fissioning nuclei, weakly-bound nuclei, nuclear matter in the neutron star rust, and ultracold Fermi atoms in elongated traps. The HFB-AX solver based on B-spline techniques uses a hybrid MPI and OpenMP programming model for parallel computation for distributed parallel computation, within a node multi-threaded LAPACK and BLAS libraries are used to further enable parallel calculations of large eigensystems. The MADNESS-HFB solver uses a novel multi-resolution analysis based adaptive pseudo-spectral techniques to enable fully parallel 3D calculations of very large systems. In this work we present benchmark results for HFB-AX and MADNESS-HFB on ultracold trapped fermions.

  1. GPU accelerated solver for nonlinear reaction-diffusion systems. Application to the electrophysiology problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mena, Andres; Ferrero, Jose M.; Rodriguez Matas, Jose F.

    2015-11-01

    Solving the electric activity of the heart possess a big challenge, not only because of the structural complexities inherent to the heart tissue, but also because of the complex electric behaviour of the cardiac cells. The multi-scale nature of the electrophysiology problem makes difficult its numerical solution, requiring temporal and spatial resolutions of 0.1 ms and 0.2 mm respectively for accurate simulations, leading to models with millions degrees of freedom that need to be solved for thousand time steps. Solution of this problem requires the use of algorithms with higher level of parallelism in multi-core platforms. In this regard the newer programmable graphic processing units (GPU) has become a valid alternative due to their tremendous computational horsepower. This paper presents results obtained with a novel electrophysiology simulation software entirely developed in Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA). The software implements fully explicit and semi-implicit solvers for the monodomain model, using operator splitting. Performance is compared with classical multi-core MPI based solvers operating on dedicated high-performance computer clusters. Results obtained with the GPU based solver show enormous potential for this technology with accelerations over 50 × for three-dimensional problems.

  2. Amesos2 and Belos: Direct and Iterative Solvers for Large Sparse Linear Systems

    DOE PAGES

    Bavier, Eric; Hoemmen, Mark; Rajamanickam, Sivasankaran; ...

    2012-01-01

    Solvers for large sparse linear systems come in two categories: direct and iterative. Amesos2, a package in the Trilinos software project, provides direct methods, and Belos, another Trilinos package, provides iterative methods. Amesos2 offers a common interface to many different sparse matrix factorization codes, and can handle any implementation of sparse matrices and vectors, via an easy-to-extend C++ traits interface. It can also factor matrices whose entries have arbitrary “Scalar” type, enabling extended-precision and mixed-precision algorithms. Belos includes many different iterative methods for solving large sparse linear systems and least-squares problems. Unlike competing iterative solver libraries, Belos completely decouples themore » algorithms from the implementations of the underlying linear algebra objects. This lets Belos exploit the latest hardware without changes to the code. Belos favors algorithms that solve higher-level problems, such as multiple simultaneous linear systems and sequences of related linear systems, faster than standard algorithms. The package also supports extended-precision and mixed-precision algorithms. Together, Amesos2 and Belos form a complete suite of sparse linear solvers.« less

  3. Computational Framework for a Fully-Coupled, Collocated-Arrangement Flow Solver Applicable at all Speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Cheng-Nian; Denner, Fabian; van Wachem, Berend

    2015-11-01

    A pressure-based Navier-Stokes solver which is applicable to fluid flow problems of a wide range of speeds is presented. The novel solver is based on collocated variable arrangement and uses a modified Rhie-Chow interpolation method to assure implicit pressure-velocity coupling. A Mach number biased modification to the continuity equation as well as coupling of flow and thermodynamic variables via an energy equation and equation of state enable the simulation of compressible flows belonging to transonic or supersonic Mach number regimes. The flow equation systems are all solved simultaneously, thus guaranteeing strong coupling between pressure and velocity at each iteration step. Shock-capturing is accomplished via nonlinear spatial discretisation schemes which adaptively apply an appropriate blending of first-order upwind and second-order central schemes depending on the local smoothness of the flow field. A selection of standard test problems will be presented to demonstrate the solver's capability of handling incompressible as well as compressible flow fields of vastly different speed regimes on structured as well as unstructured meshes. The authors are grateful for the financial support of Shell.

  4. Use of direct and iterative solvers for estimation of SNP effects in genome-wide selection.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Eduardo da Cruz Gouveia; Sargolzaei, Mehdi; Simianer, Henner; Schenkel, Flávio Schramm; Liu, Zengting; Fries, Luiz Alberto; de Queiroz, Sandra Aidar

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare iterative and direct solvers for estimation of marker effects in genomic selection. One iterative and two direct methods were used: Gauss-Seidel with Residual Update, Cholesky Decomposition and Gentleman-Givens rotations. For resembling different scenarios with respect to number of markers and of genotyped animals, a simulated data set divided into 25 subsets was used. Number of markers ranged from 1,200 to 5,925 and number of animals ranged from 1,200 to 5,865. Methods were also applied to real data comprising 3081 individuals genotyped for 45181 SNPs. Results from simulated data showed that the iterative solver was substantially faster than direct methods for larger numbers of markers. Use of a direct solver may allow for computing (co)variances of SNP effects. When applied to real data, performance of the iterative method varied substantially, depending on the level of ill-conditioning of the coefficient matrix. From results with real data, Gentleman-Givens rotations would be the method of choice in this particular application as it provided an exact solution within a fairly reasonable time frame (less than two hours). It would indeed be the preferred method whenever computer resources allow its use.

  5. Simulating underwater propulsion using an immersed boundary method based open-source solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senturk, Utku; Hemmati, Arman; Smits, Alexander J.

    2016-11-01

    The performance of a newly developed Immersed Boundary Method (IBM) incorporated into a finite volume solver is examined using foam-extend-3.2. IBM uses a discrete forcing approach based on the weighted least squares interpolation to preserve the sharpness of the boundary, which decreases the computational complexity of the problem. Initially, four case studies with gradually increasing complexities are considered to verify the accuracy of the IBM approach. These include the flow past 2D stationary and transversely oscillating cylinders and 3D wake of stationary and pitching flat plates with aspect ratio 1.0 at Re=2000. The primary objective of this study, which is pursued by an ongoing simulation of the wake formed behind a pitching deformable 3D flat plate, is to investigate the underwater locomotion of a fish at Re=10000. The results of the IBM based solver are compared to the experimental results, which suggest that the force computations are accurate in general. Spurious oscillations in the forces are observed for problems with moving bodies which change based on spatial and temporal grid resolutions. Although it still has the full advantage of the main code features, the IBM-based solver in foam-extend-3.2 requires further development to be exploited for complex grids. The work was supported by ONR under MURI Grant N00014-14-1-0533.

  6. An asynchronous solver for systems of ODEs linked by a directed tree structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Small, Scott J.; Jay, Laurent O.; Mantilla, Ricardo; Curtu, Rodica; Cunha, Luciana K.; Fonley, Morgan; Krajewski, Witold F.

    2013-03-01

    This paper documents our development and evaluation of a numerical solver for systems of sparsely linked ordinary differential equations in which the connectivity between equations is determined by a directed tree. These types of systems arise in distributed hydrological models. The numerical solver is based on dense output Runge-Kutta methods that allow for asynchronous integration. A partition of the system is used to distribute the workload among different processes, enabling a parallel implementation that capitalizes on a distributed memory system. Communication between processes is performed asynchronously. We illustrate the solver capabilities by integrating flow transport equations for a ˜17,000 km2 river basin subdivided into 305,000 sub-watersheds that are interconnected by the river network. Numerical experiments for a few models are performed and the runtimes and scalability on our parallel computer are presented. Efficient numerical integrators such as the one demonstrated here bring closer to reality the goal of implementing fully distributed real-time flood forecasting systems supported by physics based hydrological models and high-quality/high-resolution rainfall products.

  7. An Optimized Multicolor Point-Implicit Solver for Unstructured Grid Applications on Graphics Processing Units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zubair, Mohammad; Nielsen, Eric; Luitjens, Justin; Hammond, Dana

    2016-01-01

    In the field of computational fluid dynamics, the Navier-Stokes equations are often solved using an unstructuredgrid approach to accommodate geometric complexity. Implicit solution methodologies for such spatial discretizations generally require frequent solution of large tightly-coupled systems of block-sparse linear equations. The multicolor point-implicit solver used in the current work typically requires a significant fraction of the overall application run time. In this work, an efficient implementation of the solver for graphics processing units is proposed. Several factors present unique challenges to achieving an efficient implementation in this environment. These include the variable amount of parallelism available in different kernel calls, indirect memory access patterns, low arithmetic intensity, and the requirement to support variable block sizes. In this work, the solver is reformulated to use standard sparse and dense Basic Linear Algebra Subprograms (BLAS) functions. However, numerical experiments show that the performance of the BLAS functions available in existing CUDA libraries is suboptimal for matrices representative of those encountered in actual simulations. Instead, optimized versions of these functions are developed. Depending on block size, the new implementations show performance gains of up to 7x over the existing CUDA library functions.

  8. A User's Manual for ROTTILT Solver: Tiltrotor Fountain Flow Field Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadghighi, Hormoz; Rajagopalan, R. Ganesh

    1999-01-01

    A CFD solver has been developed to provide the time averaged details of the fountain flow typical for tiltrotor aircraft in hover. This Navier-Stokes solver, designated as ROTTILT, assumes the 3-D fountain flowfield to be steady and incompressible. The theoretical background is described in this manual. In order to enable the rotor trim solution in the presence of tiltrotor aircraft components such as wing, nacelle, and fuselage, the solver is coupled with a set of trim routines which are highly efficient in CPU and suitable for CFD analysis. The Cartesian grid technique utilized provides the user with a unique capability for insertion or elimination of any components of the bodies considered for a given tiltrotor aircraft configuration. The flowfield associated with either a semi or full-span configuration can be computed through user options in the ROTTILT input file. Full details associated with the numerical solution implemented in ROTTILT and assumptions are presented. A description of input surface mesh topology is provided in the appendices along with a listing of all preprocessor programs. Input variable definitions and default values are provided for the V22 aircraft. Limited predicted results using the coupled ROTTILT/WOPWOP program for the V22 in hover are made and compared with measurement. To visualize the V22 aircraft and predictions, a preprocessor graphics program GNU-PLOT3D was used. This program is described and example graphic results presented.

  9. Customized finite difference Maxwell solver for elimination of numerical Cherenkov instability in EM-PIC code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Peicheng; Li, Fei; Dalichaouch, Thamine; Fiuza, Frederico; Decyk, Viktor; Davidson, Asher; Tableman, Adam; An, Weiming; Tsung, Frank; Fonseca, Ricardo; Lu, Wei; Vieira, Jorge; Silva, Luis; Mori, Warren

    2016-10-01

    we present a finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) Maxwell solver for the particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm, which is customized to effectively eliminate the numerical Cerenkov instability (NCI) which arises when a plasma (neutral or non-neutral) relativistically drifts on a grid when using the PIC algorithm. We control the EM dispersion curve in the direction of the plasma drift of a FDTD Maxwell solver by using a customized higher order finite difference operator for the spatial derivative along the direction of the drift (1& circ; direction). We show that this eliminates the main NCI modes with moderate | k1 | , while keeps additional main NCI modes well outside the range of physical interest with higher | k1 | . These main NCI modes can be easily filtered out along with first spatial aliasing NCI modes which are also at the edge of the fundamental Brillouin zone. The customized solver has the possible advantage of improved parallel scalability because it can be easily partitioned along 1& circ; which typically has many more cells than other directions for the problems of interest.

  10. Finite difference iterative solvers for electroencephalography: serial and parallel performance analysis.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Derek N; George, John S; Ng, Kwong T

    2008-09-01

    Currently the resolution of the head models used in electroencephalography (EEG) studies is limited by the speed of the forward solver. Here, we present a parallel finite difference technique that can reduce the solution time of the governing Poisson equation for a head model. Multiple processors are used to work on the problem simultaneously in order to speed up the solution and provide the memory for solving large problems. The original computational domain is divided into multiple rectangular partitions. Each partition is then assigned to a processor, which is responsible for all the computations and inter-processor communication associated with the nodes in that particular partition. Since the forward solution time is mainly spent on solving the associated matrix equation, it is desirable to find the optimum matrix solver. A detailed comparison of various iterative solvers was performed for both isotropic and anisotropic realistic head models constructed from MRI images. The conjugate gradient (CG) method preconditioned with an advanced geometric multigrid technique was found to provide the best overall performance. For an anisotropic model with 256 x 128 x 256 cells, this technique provides a speedup of 508 on 32 processors over the serial CG solution, with a speedup of 20.1 and 25.3 through multigrid preconditioning and parallelization, respectively.

  11. A GPU-based incompressible Navier-Stokes solver on moving overset grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandar, Dominic D. J.; Sitaraman, Jayanarayanan; Mavriplis, Dimitri J.

    2013-07-01

    In pursuit of obtaining high fidelity solutions to the fluid flow equations in a short span of time, graphics processing units (GPUs) which were originally intended for gaming applications are currently being used to accelerate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes. With a high peak throughput of about 1 TFLOPS on a PC, GPUs seem to be favourable for many high-resolution computations. One such computation that involves a lot of number crunching is computing time accurate flow solutions past moving bodies. The aim of the present paper is thus to discuss the development of a flow solver on unstructured and overset grids and its implementation on GPUs. In its present form, the flow solver solves the incompressible fluid flow equations on unstructured/hybrid/overset grids using a fully implicit projection method. The resulting discretised equations are solved using a matrix-free Krylov solver using several GPU kernels such as gradient, Laplacian and reduction. Some of the simple arithmetic vector calculations are implemented using the CU++: An Object Oriented Framework for Computational Fluid Dynamics Applications using Graphics Processing Units, Journal of Supercomputing, 2013, doi:10.1007/s11227-013-0985-9 approach where GPU kernels are automatically generated at compile time. Results are presented for two- and three-dimensional computations on static and moving grids.

  12. A comparison of SuperLU solvers on the intel MIC architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuncel, Mehmet; Duran, Ahmet; Celebi, M. Serdar; Akaydin, Bora; Topkaya, Figen O.

    2016-10-01

    In many science and engineering applications, problems may result in solving a sparse linear system AX=B. For example, SuperLU_MCDT, a linear solver, was used for the large penta-diagonal matrices for 2D problems and hepta-diagonal matrices for 3D problems, coming from the incompressible blood flow simulation (see [1]). It is important to test the status and potential improvements of state-of-the-art solvers on new technologies. In this work, sequential, multithreaded and distributed versions of SuperLU solvers (see [2]) are examined on the Intel Xeon Phi coprocessors using offload programming model at the EURORA cluster of CINECA in Italy. We consider a portfolio of test matrices containing patterned matrices from UFMM ([3]) and randomly located matrices. This architecture can benefit from high parallelism and large vectors. We find that the sequential SuperLU benefited up to 45 % performance improvement from the offload programming depending on the sparse matrix type and the size of transferred and processed data.

  13. Notes on the ExactPack Implementation of the DSD Rate Stick Solver

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, Ann

    2016-08-01

    It has been shown above that the discretization scheme implemented in the ExactPack solver for the DSD Rate Stick equation is consistent with the Rate Stick PDE. In addition, a stability analysis has provided a CFL condition for a stable time step. Together, consistency and stability imply convergence of the scheme, which is expected to be close to first-order in time and second-order in space. It is understood that the nonlinearity of the underlying PDE will affect this rate somewhat. In the solver I implemented in ExactPack, I used the one-sided boundary condition described above at the outer boundary. In addition, I used 80% of the time step calculated in the stability analysis above. By making these two changes, I was able to implement a solver that calculates the solution without any arbitrary limits placed on the values of the curvature at the boundary. Thus, the calculation is driven directly by the conditions at the boundary as formulated in the DSD theory. The chosen scheme is completely coherent and defensible from a mathematical standpoint.

  14. MGLab3D: An interactive environment for iterative solvers for elliptic PDEs in two and three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Bordner, J.; Saied, F.

    1996-12-31

    GLab3D is an enhancement of an interactive environment (MGLab) for experimenting with iterative solvers and multigrid algorithms. It is implemented in MATLAB. The new version has built-in 3D elliptic pde`s and several iterative methods and preconditioners that were not available in the original version. A sparse direct solver option has also been included. The multigrid solvers have also been extended to 3D. The discretization and pde domains are restricted to standard finite differences on the unit square/cube. The power of this software studies in the fact that no programming is needed to solve, for example, the convection-diffusion equation in 3D with TFQMR and a customized V-cycle preconditioner, for a variety of problem sizes and mesh Reynolds, numbers. In addition to the graphical user interface, some sample drivers are included to show how experiments can be composed using the underlying suite of problems and solvers.

  15. Approximate l-fold cross-validation with Least Squares SVM and Kernel Ridge Regression

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Richard E; Zhang, Hao; Parker, Lynne Edwards; New, Joshua Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Kernel methods have difficulties scaling to large modern data sets. The scalability issues are based on computational and memory requirements for working with a large matrix. These requirements have been addressed over the years by using low-rank kernel approximations or by improving the solvers scalability. However, Least Squares Support VectorMachines (LS-SVM), a popular SVM variant, and Kernel Ridge Regression still have several scalability issues. In particular, the O(n^3) computational complexity for solving a single model, and the overall computational complexity associated with tuning hyperparameters are still major problems. We address these problems by introducing an O(n log n) approximate l-fold cross-validation method that uses a multi-level circulant matrix to approximate the kernel. In addition, we prove our algorithm s computational complexity and present empirical runtimes on data sets with approximately 1 million data points. We also validate our approximate method s effectiveness at selecting hyperparameters on real world and standard benchmark data sets. Lastly, we provide experimental results on using a multi-level circulant kernel approximation to solve LS-SVM problems with hyperparameters selected using our method.

  16. A fast Poisson solver for unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on the half-staggered grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, G. H.; Huang, L. C.; Simon, H.; Tang, W. -P.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, a fast Poisson solver for unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with finite difference methods on the non-uniform, half-staggered grid is presented. To achieve this, new algorithms for diagonalizing a semi-definite pair are developed. Our fast solver can also be extended to the three dimensional case. The motivation and related issues in using this second kind of staggered grid are also discussed. Numerical testing has indicated the effectiveness of this algorithm.

  17. Analytical approximations for spiral waves

    SciTech Connect

    Löber, Jakob Engel, Harald

    2013-12-15

    We propose a non-perturbative attempt to solve the kinematic equations for spiral waves in excitable media. From the eikonal equation for the wave front we derive an implicit analytical relation between rotation frequency Ω and core radius R{sub 0}. For free, rigidly rotating spiral waves our analytical prediction is in good agreement with numerical solutions of the linear eikonal equation not only for very large but also for intermediate and small values of the core radius. An equivalent Ω(R{sub +}) dependence improves the result by Keener and Tyson for spiral waves pinned to a circular defect of radius R{sub +} with Neumann boundaries at the periphery. Simultaneously, analytical approximations for the shape of free and pinned spirals are given. We discuss the reasons why the ansatz fails to correctly describe the dependence of the rotation frequency on the excitability of the medium.

  18. Approximating metal-insulator transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danieli, Carlo; Rayanov, Kristian; Pavlov, Boris; Martin, Gaven; Flach, Sergej

    2015-12-01

    We consider quantum wave propagation in one-dimensional quasiperiodic lattices. We propose an iterative construction of quasiperiodic potentials from sequences of potentials with increasing spatial period. At each finite iteration step, the eigenstates reflect the properties of the limiting quasiperiodic potential properties up to a controlled maximum system size. We then observe approximate Metal-Insulator Transitions (MIT) at the finite iteration steps. We also report evidence on mobility edges, which are at variance to the celebrated Aubry-André model. The dynamics near the MIT shows a critical slowing down of the ballistic group velocity in the metallic phase, similar to the divergence of the localization length in the insulating phase.

  19. Analytical approximations for spiral waves.

    PubMed

    Löber, Jakob; Engel, Harald

    2013-12-01

    We propose a non-perturbative attempt to solve the kinematic equations for spiral waves in excitable media. From the eikonal equation for the wave front we derive an implicit analytical relation between rotation frequency Ω and core radius R(0). For free, rigidly rotating spiral waves our analytical prediction is in good agreement with numerical solutions of the linear eikonal equation not only for very large but also for intermediate and small values of the core radius. An equivalent Ω(R(+)) dependence improves the result by Keener and Tyson for spiral waves pinned to a circular defect of radius R(+) with Neumann boundaries at the periphery. Simultaneously, analytical approximations for the shape of free and pinned spirals are given. We discuss the reasons why the ansatz fails to correctly describe the dependence of the rotation frequency on the excitability of the medium.

  20. Indexing the approximate number system.

    PubMed

    Inglis, Matthew; Gilmore, Camilla

    2014-01-01

    Much recent research attention has focused on understanding individual differences in the approximate number system, a cognitive system believed to underlie human mathematical competence. To date researchers have used four main indices of ANS acuity, and have typically assumed that they measure similar properties. Here we report a study which questions this assumption. We demonstrate that the numerical ratio effect has poor test-retest reliability and that it does not relate to either Weber fractions or accuracy on nonsymbolic comparison tasks. Furthermore, we show that Weber fractions follow a strongly skewed distribution and that they have lower test-retest reliability than a simple accuracy measure. We conclude by arguing that in the future researchers interested in indexing individual differences in ANS acuity should use accuracy figures, not Weber fractions or numerical ratio effects.

  1. Approximate analytic solutions to the NPDD: Short exposure approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Ciara E.; Sheridan, John T.

    2014-04-01

    There have been many attempts to accurately describe the photochemical processes that take places in photopolymer materials. As the models have become more accurate, solving them has become more numerically intensive and more 'opaque'. Recent models incorporate the major photochemical reactions taking place as well as the diffusion effects resulting from the photo-polymerisation process, and have accurately described these processes in a number of different materials. It is our aim to develop accessible mathematical expressions which provide physical insights and simple quantitative predictions of practical value to material designers and users. In this paper, starting with the Non-Local Photo-Polymerisation Driven Diffusion (NPDD) model coupled integro-differential equations, we first simplify these equations and validate the accuracy of the resulting approximate model. This new set of governing equations are then used to produce accurate analytic solutions (polynomials) describing the evolution of the monomer and polymer concentrations, and the grating refractive index modulation, in the case of short low intensity sinusoidal exposures. The physical significance of the results and their consequences for holographic data storage (HDS) are then discussed.

  2. The development of a robust, efficient solver for spectral and spectral-element time discretizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundis, Nathan L.

    This work examines alternative time discretizations for the Euler equations and methods for the robust and efficient solution of these discretizations. Specifically, the time-spectral method (TS), quasi-periodic time-spectral method (BDFTS), and spectral-element method in time (SEMT) are derived and examined in detail. For the two time-spectral based methods, focus is given to expanding these methods for more complicated problems than have been typically solved by other authors, including problems with spectral content in a large number of harmonics, gust response problems, and aeroelastic problems. To solve these more complicated problems, it was necessary to implement the flexible variant of the Generalized Minimal Residual method (FGMRES), utilizing the full second-order accurate spatial Jacobian, complete temporal coupling of the chosen time discretization, and fully-implicit coupling of the aeroelastic equations in the cases where they are needed. The FGMRES solver developed utilizes a block-colored Gauss-Seidel (BCGS) preconditioner augmented by a defect-correction process to increase its effectiveness. Exploration of more efficient preconditioners for the FGMRES solver is an anticipated topic for future work in this field. It was a logical extension to apply this already developed FGMRES solver to the spectral-element method in time, which has some advantages over the spectral methods already discussed. Unlike purely-spectral methods, SEMT allows for bothh- and p-refinement. This property could allow for element clustering around areas of sharp gradients and discontinuities, which in turn could make SEMT more efficient than TS for periodic problems that contain these sharp gradients and would require many time instances to produce a precise solution using the TS method. As such, a preliminary investigation of the SEMT method applied to the Euler equations is conducted and some areas for needed improvement in future work are identified. In this work, it is

  3. Evaluating the performance of the two-phase flow solver interFoam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Suraj S.; Anumolu, Lakshman; Trujillo, Mario F.

    2012-01-01

    The performance of the open source multiphase flow solver, interFoam, is evaluated in this work. The solver is based on a modified volume of fluid (VoF) approach, which incorporates an interfacial compression flux term to mitigate the effects of numerical smearing of the interface. It forms a part of the C + + libraries and utilities of OpenFOAM and is gaining popularity in the multiphase flow research community. However, to the best of our knowledge, the evaluation of this solver is confined to the validation tests of specific interest to the users of the code and the extent of its applicability to a wide range of multiphase flow situations remains to be explored. In this work, we have performed a thorough investigation of the solver performance using a variety of verification and validation test cases, which include (i) verification tests for pure advection (kinematics), (ii) dynamics in the high Weber number limit and (iii) dynamics of surface tension-dominated flows. With respect to (i), the kinematics tests show that the performance of interFoam is generally comparable with the recent algebraic VoF algorithms; however, it is noticeably worse than the geometric reconstruction schemes. For (ii), the simulations of inertia-dominated flows with large density ratios {\\sim }\\mathscr {O}(10^3) yielded excellent agreement with analytical and experimental results. In regime (iii), where surface tension is important, consistency of pressure-surface tension formulation and accuracy of curvature are important, as established by Francois et al (2006 J. Comput. Phys. 213 141-73). Several verification tests were performed along these lines and the main findings are: (a) the algorithm of interFoam ensures a consistent formulation of pressure and surface tension; (b) the curvatures computed by the solver converge to a value slightly (10%) different from the analytical value and a scope for improvement exists in this respect. To reduce the disruptive effects of spurious

  4. A forward-in-time advection scheme and adaptive multilevel flow solver for nearly incompressible atmospheric flow

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, D.E.; Bretherton, S.

    1996-12-01

    This paper presents a new forward-in-time advection method for nearly incompressible flow, MU, and its application to an adaptive multilevel flow solver for atmospheric flows. MU is a modification of Leonard et al.`s UTOPIA scheme. MU, like UTOPIA, is based on third-order accurate semi-Lagrangian multidimensional upwinding for constant velocity flows. for varying velocity fields, MU is a second-order conservative method. MU has greater stability and accuracy than UTOPIA and naturally decomposes into a monotone low-order method and a higher-order accurate correction for use with flux limiting. Its stability and accuracy make it a computationally efficient alternative to current finite-difference advection methods. We present a fully second-order accurate flow solver for the anelastic equations, a prototypical low Mach number flow. The flow solver is based on MU which is used for both momentum and scalar transport equations. This flow solver can also be implemented with any forward-in-time advection scheme. The multilevel flow solver conserves discrete global integrals of advected quantities and includes adaptive mesh refinements. Its second-order accuracy is verified using a nonlinear energy conservation integral for the anelastic equations. For a typical geophysical problem in which the flow is most rapidly varying in a small part of the domain, the multilevel flow solver achieves global accuracy comparable to uniform-resolution simulation for 10% of the computational cost. 36 refs., 10 figs.

  5. A high-order relativistic two-fluid electrodynamic scheme with consistent reconstruction of electromagnetic fields and a multidimensional Riemann solver for electromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balsara, Dinshaw S.; Amano, Takanobu; Garain, Sudip; Kim, Jinho

    2016-08-01

    In various astrophysics settings it is common to have a two-fluid relativistic plasma that interacts with the electromagnetic field. While it is common to ignore the displacement current in the ideal, classical magnetohydrodynamic limit, when the flows become relativistic this approximation is less than absolutely well-justified. In such a situation, it is more natural to consider a positively charged fluid made up of positrons or protons interacting with a negatively charged fluid made up of electrons. The two fluids interact collectively with the full set of Maxwell's equations. As a result, a solution strategy for that coupled system of equations is sought and found here. Our strategy extends to higher orders, providing increasing accuracy. The primary variables in the Maxwell solver are taken to be the facially-collocated components of the electric and magnetic fields. Consistent with such a collocation, three important innovations are reported here. The first two pertain to the Maxwell solver. In our first innovation, the magnetic field within each zone is reconstructed in a divergence-free fashion while the electric field within each zone is reconstructed in a form that is consistent with Gauss' law. In our second innovation, a multidimensionally upwinded strategy is presented which ensures that the magnetic field can be updated via a discrete interpretation of Faraday's law and the electric field can be updated via a discrete interpretation of the generalized Ampere's law. This multidimensional upwinding is achieved via a multidimensional Riemann solver. The multidimensional Riemann solver automatically provides edge-centered electric field components for the Stokes law-based update of the magnetic field. It also provides edge-centered magnetic field components for the Stokes law-based update of the electric field. The update strategy ensures that the electric field is always consistent with Gauss' law and the magnetic field is always divergence-free. This

  6. A high-order relativistic two-fluid electrodynamic scheme with consistent reconstruction of electromagnetic fields and a multidimensional Riemann solver for electromagnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Balsara, Dinshaw S.; Amano, Takanobu; Garain, Sudip; Kim, Jinho

    2016-08-01

    In various astrophysics settings it is common to have a two-fluid relativistic plasma that interacts with the electromagnetic field. While it is common to ignore the displacement current in the ideal, classical magnetohydrodynamic limit, when the flows become relativistic this approximation is less than absolutely well-justified. In such a situation, it is more natural to consider a positively charged fluid made up of positrons or protons interacting with a negatively charged fluid made up of electrons. The two fluids interact collectively with the full set of Maxwell's equations. As a result, a solution strategy for that coupled system of equations is sought and found here. Our strategy extends to higher orders, providing increasing accuracy. The primary variables in the Maxwell solver are taken to be the facially-collocated components of the electric and magnetic fields. Consistent with such a collocation, three important innovations are reported here. The first two pertain to the Maxwell solver. In our first innovation, the magnetic field within each zone is reconstructed in a divergence-free fashion while the electric field within each zone is reconstructed in a form that is consistent with Gauss' law. In our second innovation, a multidimensionally upwinded strategy is presented which ensures that the magnetic field can be updated via a discrete interpretation of Faraday's law and the electric field can be updated via a discrete interpretation of the generalized Ampere's law. This multidimensional upwinding is achieved via a multidimensional Riemann solver. The multidimensional Riemann solver automatically provides edge-centered electric field components for the Stokes law-based update of the magnetic field. It also provides edge-centered magnetic field components for the Stokes law-based update of the electric field. The update strategy ensures that the electric field is always consistent with Gauss' law and the magnetic field is always divergence-free. This

  7. On the scalability of the Albany/FELIX first-order Stokes approximation ice sheet solver for large-scale simulations of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets

    DOE PAGES

    Tezaur, Irina K.; Tuminaro, Raymond S.; Perego, Mauro; ...

    2015-01-01

    We examine the scalability of the recently developed Albany/FELIX finite-element based code for the first-order Stokes momentum balance equations for ice flow. We focus our analysis on the performance of two possible preconditioners for the iterative solution of the sparse linear systems that arise from the discretization of the governing equations: (1) a preconditioner based on the incomplete LU (ILU) factorization, and (2) a recently-developed algebraic multigrid (AMG) preconditioner, constructed using the idea of semi-coarsening. A strong scalability study on a realistic, high resolution Greenland ice sheet problem reveals that, for a given number of processor cores, the AMG preconditionermore » results in faster linear solve times but the ILU preconditioner exhibits better scalability. A weak scalability study is performed on a realistic, moderate resolution Antarctic ice sheet problem, a substantial fraction of which contains floating ice shelves, making it fundamentally different from the Greenland ice sheet problem. Here, we show that as the problem size increases, the performance of the ILU preconditioner deteriorates whereas the AMG preconditioner maintains scalability. This is because the linear systems are extremely ill-conditioned in the presence of floating ice shelves, and the ill-conditioning has a greater negative effect on the ILU preconditioner than on the AMG preconditioner.« less

  8. Multidimensional stochastic approximation Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zablotskiy, Sergey V.; Ivanov, Victor A.; Paul, Wolfgang

    2016-06-01

    Stochastic Approximation Monte Carlo (SAMC) has been established as a mathematically founded powerful flat-histogram Monte Carlo method, used to determine the density of states, g (E ) , of a model system. We show here how it can be generalized for the determination of multidimensional probability distributions (or equivalently densities of states) of macroscopic or mesoscopic variables defined on the space of microstates of a statistical mechanical system. This establishes this method as a systematic way for coarse graining a model system, or, in other words, for performing a renormalization group step on a model. We discuss the formulation of the Kadanoff block spin transformation and the coarse-graining procedure for polymer models in this language. We also apply it to a standard case in the literature of two-dimensional densities of states, where two competing energetic effects are present g (E1,E2) . We show when and why care has to be exercised when obtaining the microcanonical density of states g (E1+E2) from g (E1,E2) .

  9. Femtolensing: Beyond the semiclassical approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulmer, Andrew; Goodman, Jeremy

    1995-01-01

    Femtolensoing is a gravitational lensing effect in which the magnification is a function not only of the position and sizes of the source and lens, but also of the wavelength of light. Femtolensing is the only known effect of 10(exp -13) - 10(exp -16) solar mass) dark-matter objects and may possibly be detectable in cosmological gamma-ray burst spectra. We present a new and efficient algorithm for femtolensing calculation in general potentials. The physical optics results presented here differ at low frequencies from the semiclassical approximation, in which the flux is attributed to a finite number of mutually coherent images. At higher frequencies, our results agree well with the semicalssical predictions. Applying our method to a point-mass lens with external shear, we find complex events that have structure at both large and small spectral resolution. In this way, we show that femtolensing may be observable for lenses up to 10(exp -11) solar mass, much larger than previously believed. Additionally, we discuss the possibility of a search femtolensing of white dwarfs in the Large Magellanic Cloud at optical wavelengths.

  10. Beyond the Tamm-Dancoff approximation for extended systems using exact diagonalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sander, Tobias; Maggio, Emanuele; Kresse, Georg

    2015-07-01

    Linear optical properties can be accurately calculated using the Bethe-Salpeter equation. After introducing a suitable product basis for the electron-hole pairs, the Bethe-Salpeter equation is usually recast into a complex non-Hermitian eigenvalue problem that is difficult to solve using standard eigenvalue solvers. In solid-state physics, it is therefore common practice to neglect the problematic coupling between the positive- and negative-frequency branches, reducing the problem to a Hermitian eigenvalue problem [Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA)]. We use time-inversion symmetry to recast the full problem into a quadratic Hermitian eigenvalue problem, which can be solved routinely using standard eigenvalue solvers even at a finite wave vector q . This allows us to access the importance of the coupling between the positive- and negative-frequency branch for prototypical solids. As a starting point for the Bethe-Salpeter calculations, we use self-consistent Green's-function methods (GW ), making the present scheme entirely ab initio. We calculate the optical spectra of carbon (C), silicon (Si), lithium fluoride (LiF), and the cyclic dimer Li2F2 and discuss why the differences between the TDA and the full solution are tiny. However, at finite momentum transfer q , significant differences between the TDA and our exact treatment are found. The origin of these differences is explained.

  11. EUPDF: Eulerian Monte Carlo Probability Density Function Solver for Applications With Parallel Computing, Unstructured Grids, and Sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, M. S.

    1998-01-01

    The success of any solution methodology used in the study of gas-turbine combustor flows depends a great deal on how well it can model the various complex and rate controlling processes associated with the spray's turbulent transport, mixing, chemical kinetics, evaporation, and spreading rates, as well as convective and radiative heat transfer and other phenomena. The phenomena to be modeled, which are controlled by these processes, often strongly interact with each other at different times and locations. In particular, turbulence plays an important role in determining the rates of mass and heat transfer, chemical reactions, and evaporation in many practical combustion devices. The influence of turbulence in a diffusion flame manifests itself in several forms, ranging from the so-called wrinkled, or stretched, flamelets regime to the distributed combustion regime, depending upon how turbulence interacts with various flame scales. Conventional turbulence models have difficulty treating highly nonlinear reaction rates. A solution procedure based on the composition joint probability density function (PDF) approach holds the promise of modeling various important combustion phenomena relevant to practical combustion devices (such as extinction, blowoff limits, and emissions predictions) because it can account for nonlinear chemical reaction rates without making approximations. In an attempt to advance the state-of-the-art in multidimensional numerical methods, we at the NASA Lewis Research Center extended our previous work on the PDF method to unstructured grids, parallel computing, and sprays. EUPDF, which was developed by M.S. Raju of Nyma, Inc., was designed to be massively parallel and could easily be coupled with any existing gas-phase and/or spray solvers. EUPDF can use an unstructured mesh with mixed triangular, quadrilateral, and/or tetrahedral elements. The application of the PDF method showed favorable results when applied to several supersonic

  12. Climate Solvers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melrose, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    In June 2009 Pamela Melrose was a recipient of a "Premier's Energy Australia Scholarship". Her study tour took her to Scandinavia. This paper is an account of that tour. In her report Pamela argues for the use of authentic studies in science teaching. She cites examples from museums, nature schools and research establishments to…

  13. Problem Solvers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starkman, Neal

    2007-01-01

    US students continue to lag behind the rest of the world in science, technology, engineering, and math--taken together, STEM. Even as the US falls further and further behind other countries in these four critical academic areas, not everyone sees it as a crisis. Fortunately, there are those who do. One organization out front on the issue is,…

  14. AFMPB: An adaptive fast multipole Poisson-Boltzmann solver for calculating electrostatics in biomolecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Benzhuo; Cheng, Xiaolin; Huang, Jingfang; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2010-06-01

    A Fortran program package is introduced for rapid evaluation of the electrostatic potentials and forces in biomolecular systems modeled by the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The numerical solver utilizes a well-conditioned boundary integral equation (BIE) formulation, a node-patch discretization scheme, a Krylov subspace iterative solver package with reverse communication protocols, and an adaptive new version of fast multipole method in which the exponential expansions are used to diagonalize the multipole-to-local translations. The program and its full description, as well as several closely related libraries and utility tools are available at http://lsec.cc.ac.cn/~lubz/afmpb.html and a mirror site at http://mccammon.ucsd.edu/. This paper is a brief summary of the program: the algorithms, the implementation and the usage. Program summaryProgram title: AFMPB: Adaptive fast multipole Poisson-Boltzmann solver Catalogue identifier: AEGB_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEGB_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GPL 2.0 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 453 649 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 8 764 754 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran Computer: Any Operating system: Any RAM: Depends on the size of the discretized biomolecular system Classification: 3 External routines: Pre- and post-processing tools are required for generating the boundary elements and for visualization. Users can use MSMS ( http://www.scripps.edu/~sanner/html/msms_home.html) for pre-processing, and VMD ( http://www.ks.uiuc.edu/Research/vmd/) for visualization. Sub-programs included: An iterative Krylov subspace solvers package from SPARSKIT by Yousef Saad ( http://www-users.cs.umn.edu/~saad/software/SPARSKIT/sparskit.html), and the fast multipole methods subroutines from FMMSuite ( http

  15. Adaptation of the anelastic solver EULAG to high performance computing architectures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wójcik, Damian; Ciżnicki, Miłosz; Kopta, Piotr; Kulczewski, Michał; Kurowski, Krzysztof; Piotrowski, Zbigniew; Rojek, Krzysztof; Rosa, Bogdan; Szustak, Łukasz; Wyrzykowski, Roman

    2014-05-01

    In recent years there has been widespread interest in employing heterogeneous and hybrid supercomputing architectures for geophysical research. Especially promising application for the modern supercomputing architectures is the numerical weather prediction (NWP). Adopting traditional NWP codes to the new machines based on multi- and many-core processors, such as GPUs allows to increase computational efficiency and decrease energy consumption. This offers unique opportunity to develop simulations with finer grid resolutions and computational domains larger than ever before. Further, it enables to extend the range of scales represented in the model so that the accuracy of representation of the simulated atmospheric processes can be improved. Consequently, it allows to improve quality of weather forecasts. Coalition of Polish scientific institutions launched a project aimed at adopting EULAG fluid solver for future high-performance computing platforms. EULAG is currently being implemented as a new dynamical core of COSMO Consortium weather prediction framework. The solver code combines features of a stencil and point wise computations. Its communication scheme consists of both halo exchange subroutines and global reduction functions. Within the project, two main modules of EULAG, namely MPDATA advection and iterative GCR elliptic solver are analyzed and optimized. Relevant techniques have been chosen and applied to accelerate code execution on modern HPC architectures: stencil decomposition, block decomposition (with weighting analysis between computation and communication), reduction of inter-cache communication by partitioning of cores into independent teams, cache reusing and vectorization. Experiments with matching computational domain topology to cluster topology are performed as well. The parallel formulation was extended from pure MPI to hybrid MPI - OpenMP approach. Porting to GPU using CUDA directives is in progress. Preliminary results of performance of the

  16. The a(4) Scheme-A High Order Neutrally Stable CESE Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Sin-Chung

    2009-01-01

    The CESE development is driven by a belief that a solver should (i) enforce conservation laws in both space and time, and (ii) be built from a nondissipative (i.e., neutrally stable) core scheme so that the numerical dissipation can be controlled effectively. To provide a solid foundation for a systematic CESE development of high order schemes, in this paper we describe a new high order (4-5th order) and neutrally stable CESE solver of a 1D advection equation with a constant advection speed a. The space-time stencil of this two-level explicit scheme is formed by one point at the upper time level and two points at the lower time level. Because it is associated with four independent mesh variables (the numerical analogues of the dependent variable and its first, second, and third-order spatial derivatives) and four equations per mesh point, the new scheme is referred to as the a(4) scheme. As in the case of other similar CESE neutrally stable solvers, the a(4) scheme enforces conservation laws in space-time locally and globally, and it has the basic, forward marching, and backward marching forms. Except for a singular case, these forms are equivalent and satisfy a space-time inversion (STI) invariant property which is shared by the advection equation. Based on the concept of STI invariance, a set of algebraic relations is developed and used to prove the a(4) scheme must be neutrally stable when it is stable. Numerically, it has been established that the scheme is stable if the value of the Courant number is less than 1/3

  17. Scalable direct Vlasov solver with discontinuous Galerkin method on unstructured mesh.

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, J.; Ostroumov, P. N.; Mustapha, B.; Nolen, J.

    2010-12-01

    This paper presents the development of parallel direct Vlasov solvers with discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method for beam and plasma simulations in four dimensions. Both physical and velocity spaces are in two dimesions (2P2V) with unstructured mesh. Contrary to the standard particle-in-cell (PIC) approach for kinetic space plasma simulations, i.e., solving Vlasov-Maxwell equations, direct method has been used in this paper. There are several benefits to solving a Vlasov equation directly, such as avoiding noise associated with a finite number of particles and the capability to capture fine structure in the plasma. The most challanging part of a direct Vlasov solver comes from higher dimensions, as the computational cost increases as N{sup 2d}, where d is the dimension of the physical space. Recently, due to the fast development of supercomputers, the possibility has become more realistic. Many efforts have been made to solve Vlasov equations in low dimensions before; now more interest has focused on higher dimensions. Different numerical methods have been tried so far, such as the finite difference method, Fourier Spectral method, finite volume method, and spectral element method. This paper is based on our previous efforts to use the DG method. The DG method has been proven to be very successful in solving Maxwell equations, and this paper is our first effort in applying the DG method to Vlasov equations. DG has shown several advantages, such as local mass matrix, strong stability, and easy parallelization. These are particularly suitable for Vlasov equations. Domain decomposition in high dimensions has been used for parallelization; these include a highly scalable parallel two-dimensional Poisson solver. Benchmark results have been shown and simulation results will be reported.

  18. Application of the FUN3D Unstructured-Grid Navier-Stokes Solver to the 4th AIAA Drag Prediction Workshop Cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Hammond, Dana P.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Pirzadeh, S. Z.; Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2010-01-01

    FUN3D Navier-Stokes solutions were computed for the 4th AIAA Drag Prediction Workshop grid convergence study, downwash study, and Reynolds number study on a set of node-based mixed-element grids. All of the baseline tetrahedral grids were generated with the VGRID (developmental) advancing-layer and advancing-front grid generation software package following the gridding guidelines developed for the workshop. With maximum grid sizes exceeding 100 million nodes, the grid convergence study was particularly challenging for the node-based unstructured grid generators and flow solvers. At the time of the workshop, the super-fine grid with 105 million nodes and 600 million elements was the largest grid known to have been generated using VGRID. FUN3D Version 11.0 has a completely new pre- and post-processing paradigm that has been incorporated directly into the solver and functions entirely in a parallel, distributed memory environment. This feature allowed for practical pre-processing and solution times on the largest unstructured-grid size requested for the workshop. For the constant-lift grid convergence case, the convergence of total drag is approximately second-order on the finest three grids. The variation in total drag between the finest two grids is only 2 counts. At the finest grid levels, only small variations in wing and tail pressure distributions are seen with grid refinement. Similarly, a small wing side-of-body separation also shows little variation at the finest grid levels. Overall, the FUN3D results compare well with the structured-grid code CFL3D. The FUN3D downwash study and Reynolds number study results compare well with the range of results shown in the workshop presentations.

  19. On the Performance of an Algebraic MultigridSolver on Multicore Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, A H; Schulz, M; Yang, U M

    2010-04-29

    Algebraic multigrid (AMG) solvers have proven to be extremely efficient on distributed-memory architectures. However, when executed on modern multicore cluster architectures, we face new challenges that can significantly harm AMG's performance. We discuss our experiences on such an architecture and present a set of techniques that help users to overcome the associated problems, including thread and process pinning and correct memory associations. We have implemented most of the techniques in a MultiCore SUPport library (MCSup), which helps to map OpenMP applications to multicore machines. We present results using both an MPI-only and a hybrid MPI/OpenMP model.

  20. A speciation solver for cement paste modeling and the semismooth Newton method

    SciTech Connect

    Georget, Fabien; Prévost, Jean H.; Vanderbei, Robert J.

    2015-02-15

    The mineral assemblage of a cement paste may vary considerably with its environment. In addition, the water content of a cement paste is relatively low and the ionic strength of the interstitial solution is often high. These conditions are extreme conditions with respect to the common assumptions made in speciation problem. Furthermore the common trial and error algorithm to find the phase assemblage does not provide any guarantee of convergence. We propose a speciation solver based on a semismooth Newton method adapted to the thermodynamic modeling of cement paste. The strong theoretical properties associated with these methods offer practical advantages. Results of numerical experiments indicate that the algorithm is reliable, robust, and efficient.

  1. A Fourier-based elliptic solver for vortical flows with periodic and unbounded directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatelain, Philippe; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2010-04-01

    We present a computationally efficient, adaptive solver for the solution of the Poisson and Helmholtz equation used in flow simulations in domains with combinations of unbounded and periodic directions. The method relies on using FFTs on an extended domain and it is based on the method proposed by Hockney and Eastwood for plasma simulations. The method is well-suited to problems with dynamically growing domains and in particular flow simulations using vortex particle methods. The efficiency of the method is demonstrated in simulations of trailing vortices.

  2. Parallelization of Unsteady Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Unstructured Navier-Stokes Solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwing, Alan M.; Nompelis, Ioannis; Candler, Graham V.

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the implementation of the MPI parallelization in a Navier-Stokes solver using adaptive mesh re nement. Viscous and inviscid test problems are considered for the purpose of benchmarking, as are implicit and explicit time advancement methods. The main test problem for comparison includes e ects from boundary layers and other viscous features and requires a large number of grid points for accurate computation. Ex- perimental validation against double cone experiments in hypersonic ow are shown. The adaptive mesh re nement shows promise for a staple test problem in the hypersonic com- munity. Extension to more advanced techniques for more complicated ows is described.

  3. Efficient and spurious-free integral-equation-based optical waveguide mode solver.

    PubMed

    Hochman, Amit; Leviatan, Yehuda

    2007-10-29

    Modal analysis of waveguides and resonators by integra-lequation formulations can be hindered by the existence of spurious solutions. In this paper, spurious solutions are shown to be eliminated by introduction of a Rayleigh-quotient based matrix singularity measure. Once the spurious solutions are eliminated, the true modes may be determined efficiently and reliably, even in the presence of degeneracy, by an adaptive search algorithm. Analysis examples that demonstrate the efficacy of the method include an elliptical dielectric waveguide, two unequal touching dielectric cylinders, a plasmonic waveguide, and a realistic micro-structured optical fiber. A freely downloadable version of an optical waveguide mode solver based on this article is available.

  4. Performance of the block-Krylov energy group solvers in Jaguar

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, A. M.; Kennedy, R. A.

    2012-07-01

    A new method of coupling the inner and outer iterations for deterministic transport problems is proposed. This method is termed the Multigroup Energy Blocking Method (MEBM) and has been implemented in the deterministic transport solver Jaguar, which is currently under development at KAPL. The method is derived for both fixed-source and eigenvalue problems. The method is then applied to a PWR pin cell model, both in fixed-source mode and eigenvalue mode. The results show that the MEBM improves the convergence of both types of problems when applied to the thermal (up-scattering) groups. (authors)

  5. Numerical Simulations for Insect `Clap and Fling' with Unsteady Incompressible Solver on Dynamic Hybrid Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L. P.; Chang, X. H.; Duan, X. P.; Zhang, H. X.

    For very insect such as tiny wasp Encarsaria Formosa, Weis-Fogh found that the ‘clap-fling’ mechanism of their wings is the main cause for their large lift. In this paper, we simulate the motion numerically and analyze the generation of large lift by the wings with an unsteady incompressible flow solver based on dynamic hybrid mesh. Both one wing flapping and two wings ‘clap and fling’ are considered in the Reynolds number range of 8-128, the difference on flow structures and aerodynamic forces are compared with each other, and then high lift mechanism is analyzed.

  6. Hybrid entropy stable HLL-type Riemann solvers for hyperbolic conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidtmann, Birte; Winters, Andrew R.

    2017-02-01

    It is known that HLL-type schemes are more dissipative than schemes based on characteristic decompositions. However, HLL-type methods offer greater flexibility to large systems of hyperbolic conservation laws because the eigenstructure of the flux Jacobian is not needed. We demonstrate in the present work that several HLL-type Riemann solvers are provably entropy stable. Further, we provide convex combinations of standard dissipation terms to create hybrid HLL-type methods that have less dissipation while retaining entropy stability. The decrease in dissipation is demonstrated for the ideal MHD equations with a numerical example.

  7. iAPBS: a programming interface to Adaptive Poisson-Boltzmann Solver

    SciTech Connect

    Konecny, Robert; Baker, Nathan A.; McCammon, J. A.

    2012-07-26

    The Adaptive Poisson-Boltzmann Solver (APBS) is a state-of-the-art suite for performing Poisson-Boltzmann electrostatic calculations on biomolecules. The iAPBS package provides a modular programmatic interface to the APBS library of electrostatic calculation routines. The iAPBS interface library can be linked with a Fortran or C/C++ program thus making all of the APBS functionality available from within the application. Several application modules for popular molecular dynamics simulation packages -- Amber, NAMD and CHARMM are distributed with iAPBS allowing users of these packages to perform implicit solvent electrostatic calculations with APBS.

  8. A simplified analysis of the multigrid V-cycle as a fast elliptic solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Naomi H.; Taasan, Shlomo

    1988-01-01

    For special model problems, Fourier analysis gives exact convergence rates for the two-grid multigrid cycle and, for more general problems, provides estimates of the two-grid convergence rates via local mode analysis. A method is presented for obtaining mutigrid convergence rate estimates for cycles involving more than two grids (using essentially the same analysis as for the two-grid cycle). For the simple cast of the V-cycle used as a fast Laplace solver on the unit square, the k-grid convergence rate bounds obtained by this method are sharper than the bounds predicted by the variational theory. Both theoretical justification and experimental evidence are presented.

  9. Application of a Scalable, Parallel, Unstructured-Grid-Based Navier-Stokes Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, Paresh

    2001-01-01

    A parallel version of an unstructured-grid based Navier-Stokes solver, USM3Dns, previously developed for efficient operation on a variety of parallel computers, has been enhanced to incorporate upgrades made to the serial version. The resultant parallel code has been extensively tested on a variety of problems of aerospace interest and on two sets of parallel computers to understand and document its characteristics. An innovative grid renumbering construct and use of non-blocking communication are shown to produce superlinear computing performance. Preliminary results from parallelization of a recently introduced "porous surface" boundary condition are also presented.

  10. Scalable Iterative Solvers Applied to 3D Parallel Simulation of Advanced Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Loureiro, A. J.; Aldegunde, M.; Seoane, N.

    2009-08-01

    We have studied the performance of a preconditioned iterative solver to speed up a 3D semiconductor device simulator. Since 3D simulations necessitate large computing resources, the choice of algorithms and their parameters become of utmost importance. This code uses a density gradient drift-diffusion semiconductor transport model based on the finite element method which is one of the most general and complex discretisation techniques. It has been implemented for a distributed memory multiprocessor environment using the Message Passing Interface (MPI) library. We have applied this simulator to a 67 nm effective gate length Si MOSFET.

  11. Proteus-MOC: A 3D deterministic solver incorporating 2D method of characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Marin-Lafleche, A.; Smith, M. A.; Lee, C.

    2013-07-01

    A new transport solution methodology was developed by combining the two-dimensional method of characteristics with the discontinuous Galerkin method for the treatment of the axial variable. The method, which can be applied to arbitrary extruded geometries, was implemented in PROTEUS-MOC and includes parallelization in group, angle, plane, and space using a top level GMRES linear algebra solver. Verification tests were performed to show accuracy and stability of the method with the increased number of angular directions and mesh elements. Good scalability with parallelism in angle and axial planes is displayed. (authors)

  12. Development of a New and Fast Linear Solver for Multi-component Reactive Transport Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, C.; Li, L.; Bao, C.; Hu, X.; Johns, R.; Xu, J.

    2013-12-01

    Reactive transport models (RTM) have been extensively used to understand the coupling between solute transport and (bio) geochemical reactions in complex earth systems. RTM typically involves a large number of primary and secondary species with a complex reaction network in large domains. The computational expenses increase significantly with the number of grid blocks and the number of chemical species. Within both the operator splitting approach (OS) and the global implicit approach (GI) that are commonly used, the steps that involve Newton-Raphson method are typically one of the most time-consuming parts (up to 80% to 90% of CPU times). Under such circumstances, accelerating reactive transport simulation is very essential. In this research, we present a physics-based linear system solution strategy for general reactive transport models with many species. We observed up to five times speed up for the linear solver portion of the simulations in our test cases. Our new linear solver takes advantage of the sparsity of the Jacobian matrix arising from the reaction network. The Jacobian matrix for the speciation problem is typically considered as a dense matrix and solved with a direct method such as Gaussian elimination. For the reactive transport problem, the graph of the local Jacobian matrix has a one-to-one correspondence to the reaction network graph. The Jacobian matrix is commonly sparse and has the same sparsity structure for the same reaction network. We developed a strategy that performs a minimum degree of reordering and symbolic factorization to determine the non-zero pattern at the beginning of the OS and GI simulation. During the speciation calculation in OS, we calculate the L and U factors and solve the triangular matrices according to the non-zero pattern. For GI, our strategy can be applied to inverse the diagonal blocks in the block-Jacobi preconditioner and smoothers of the multigrid preconditioners in iterative solvers. Our strategy is naturally

  13. Towards a Coupled Vortex Particle and Acoustic Boundary Element Solver to Predict the Noise Production of Bio-Inspired Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenhoffer, Nathan; Moored, Keith; Jaworski, Justin

    2016-11-01

    The design of quiet and efficient bio-inspired propulsive concepts requires a rapid, unified computational framework that integrates the coupled fluid dynamics with the noise generation. Such a framework is developed where the fluid motion is modeled with a two-dimensional unsteady boundary element method that includes a vortex-particle wake. The unsteady surface forces from the potential flow solver are then passed to an acoustic boundary element solver to predict the radiated sound in low-Mach-number flows. The use of the boundary element method for both the hydrodynamic and acoustic solvers permits dramatic computational acceleration by application of the fast multiple method. The reduced order of calculations due to the fast multipole method allows for greater spatial resolution of the vortical wake per unit of computational time. The coupled flow-acoustic solver is validated against canonical vortex-sound problems. The capability of the coupled solver is demonstrated by analyzing the performance and noise production of an isolated bio-inspired swimmer and of tandem swimmers.

  14. Accuracy of the water column approximation in numerically simulating propagation of teleseismic PP waves and Rayleigh waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yong; Ni, Sidao; Chu, Risheng; Yao, Huajian

    2016-08-01

    Numerical solvers of wave equations have been widely used to simulate global seismic waves including PP waves for modelling 410/660 km discontinuity and Rayleigh waves for imaging crustal structure. In order to avoid extra computation cost due to ocean water effects, these numerical solvers usually adopt water column approximation, whose accuracy depends on frequency and needs to be investigated quantitatively. In this paper, we describe a unified representation of accurate and approximate forms of the equivalent water column boundary condition as well as the free boundary condition. Then we derive an analytical form of the PP-wave reflection coefficient with the unified boundary condition, and quantify the effects of water column approximation on amplitude and phase shift of the PP waves. We also study the effects of water column approximation on phase velocity dispersion of the fundamental mode Rayleigh wave with a propagation matrix method. We find that with the water column approximation: (1) The error of PP amplitude and phase shift is less than 5 per cent and 9° at periods greater than 25 s for most oceanic regions. But at periods of 15 s or less, PP is inaccurate up to 10 per cent in amplitude and a few seconds in time shift for deep oceans. (2) The error in Rayleigh wave phase velocity is less than 1 per cent at periods greater than 30 s in most oceanic regions, but the error is up to 2 per cent for deep oceans at periods of 20 s or less. This study confirms that the water column approximation is only accurate at long periods and it needs to be improved at shorter periods.

  15. An Extension of the Time-Spectral Method to Overset Solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leffell, Joshua Isaac; Murman, Scott M.; Pulliam, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Relative motion in the Cartesian or overset framework causes certain spatial nodes to move in and out of the physical domain as they are dynamically blanked by moving solid bodies. This poses a problem for the conventional Time-Spectral approach, which expands the solution at every spatial node into a Fourier series spanning the period of motion. The proposed extension to the Time-Spectral method treats unblanked nodes in the conventional manner but expands the solution at dynamically blanked nodes in a basis of barycentric rational polynomials spanning partitions of contiguously defined temporal intervals. Rational polynomials avoid Runge's phenomenon on the equidistant time samples of these sub-periodic intervals. Fourier- and rational polynomial-based differentiation operators are used in tandem to provide a consistent hybrid Time-Spectral overset scheme capable of handling relative motion. The hybrid scheme is tested with a linear model problem and implemented within NASA's OVERFLOW Reynolds-averaged Navier- Stokes (RANS) solver. The hybrid Time-Spectral solver is then applied to inviscid and turbulent RANS cases of plunging and pitching airfoils and compared to time-accurate and experimental data. A limiter was applied in the turbulent case to avoid undershoots in the undamped turbulent eddy viscosity while maintaining accuracy. The hybrid scheme matches the performance of the conventional Time-Spectral method and converges to the time-accurate results with increased temporal resolution.

  16. Framework for a Robust General Purpose Navier-Stokes Solver on Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Cheng-Nian; Denner, Fabian; van Wachem, Berend G. M.

    2016-11-01

    A numerical framework for a pressure-based all-speeds flow solver operating on unstructured meshes, which is robust for a broad range of flow configurations, is proposed. The distinct features of our framework are the full coupling of the momentum and continuity equations as well as the use of an energy equation in conservation form to relate the thermal quantities with the flow field. In order to overcome the well-documented instability occurring while coupling the thermal energy to the remaining flow variables, a multistage iteration cycle has been devised which exhibits excellent convergence behavior without requiring any numerical relaxation parameters. Different spatial schemes for accurate shock resolution as well as complex thermodynamic gas models are also seamlessly incorporated into the framework. The solver is directly applicable to stationary and transient flows in all Mach number regimes (sub-, trans-, supersonic), exhibits strong robustness and accurately predicts flow and thermal variables at all speeds across shocks of different strengths. We present a wide range of results for both steady and transient compressible flows with vastly different Mach numbers and thermodynamic conditions in complex geometries represented by different types of unstructured meshes. The authors are grateful for the financial support provided by Shell.

  17. An efficient implicit unstructured finite volume solver for generalised Newtonian fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalali, Alireza; Sharbatdar, Mahkame; Ollivier-Gooch, Carl

    2016-03-01

    An implicit finite volume solver is developed for the steady-state solution of generalised Newtonian fluids on unstructured meshes in 2D. The pseudo-compressibility technique is employed to couple the continuity and momentum equations by transforming the governing equations into a hyperbolic system. A second-order accurate spatial discretisation is provided by performing a least-squares gradient reconstruction within each control volume of unstructured meshes. A central flux function is used for the convective terms and a solution jump term is added to the averaged component for the viscous terms. Global implicit time-stepping using successive evolution-relaxation is utilised to accelerate the convergence to steady-state solutions. The performance of our flow solver is examined for power-law and Carreau-Yasuda non-Newtonian fluids in different geometries. The effects of model parameters and Reynolds number are studied on the convergence rate and flow features. Our results verify second-order accuracy of the discretisation and also fast and efficient convergence to the steady-state solution for a wide range of flow variables.

  18. A point implicit unstructured grid solver for the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thareja, Rajiv R.; Stewart, James R.; Hassan, Obey; Morgan, Ken; Peraire, Jaime

    1988-01-01

    An upwind finite element technique that uses cell centered quantities and implicit and/or explicit time marching has been developed for computing hypersonic laminar viscous flows using adaptive unstructured triangular grids. A structured grid of quadrilaterals is laid out near the body surface. For inviscid flows the method is stable at Courant numbers of over 100,000. A first order basic scheme and a higher order flux corrected transport (FCT) scheme have been implemented. This technique has been applied to the problem of predicting type III and IV shock wave interactions on a cylinder, with a view of simulating the pressure and heating rate augmentation caused by an impinging shock on the leading edge of a cowl lip of an engine inlet. The predictions of wall pressure and heating rates compare very well with experimental data. The flow features are very distinctly captured with a sequence of adaptively generated grids. The adaptive mesh generator and the upwind Navier-Stokes solver are combined in a set of programs called LARCNESS, an acronym for Langley Adaptive Remeshing Code and Navier-Stokes Solver.

  19. ASTROP2-LE: A Mistuned Aeroelastic Analysis System Based on a Two Dimensional Linearized Euler Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Srivastava, R.; Mehmed, Oral

    2002-01-01

    An aeroelastic analysis system for flutter and forced response analysis of turbomachines based on a two-dimensional linearized unsteady Euler solver has been developed. The ASTROP2 code, an aeroelastic stability analysis program for turbomachinery, was used as a basis for this development. The ASTROP2 code uses strip theory to couple a two dimensional aerodynamic model with a three dimensional structural model. The code was modified to include forced response capability. The formulation was also modified to include aeroelastic analysis with mistuning. A linearized unsteady Euler solver, LINFLX2D is added to model the unsteady aerodynamics in ASTROP2. By calculating the unsteady aerodynamic loads using LINFLX2D, it is possible to include the effects of transonic flow on flutter and forced response in the analysis. The stability is inferred from an eigenvalue analysis. The revised code, ASTROP2-LE for ASTROP2 code using Linearized Euler aerodynamics, is validated by comparing the predictions with those obtained using linear unsteady aerodynamic solutions.

  20. Simulation of three-component fluid flows using the multiphase lattice Boltzmann flux solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Y.; Tang, G. H.; Wang, Y.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we extend the multiphase lattice Boltzmann flux solver, which was proposed in [1] for simulating incompressible flows of binary fluids based on two-component Cahn-Hilliard model, to three-component fluid flows. In the present method, the multiphase lattice Boltzmann flux solver is applied to solve for the flow field and the three-component Cahn-Hilliard model is used to predict the evolution of the interfaces. The proposed method is first validated through the classical problem of simulation of partial spreading of a liquid lens between the other two components. Numerical results of interface shapes and contact angles agree well with theoretical solutions. After that, to further demonstrate the capability of the present method, several numerical examples of three-component fluid flows are presented, including a bubble rising across a fluid-fluid interface, single droplet falling through a fluid-fluid interface, the collision-coalescence of two droplets, and the non-contact collision of two droplets. It is shown that the present method can successfully handle complex interactions among three components.