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Sample records for paralogous genes radical-induced

  1. The paralogous genes RADICAL-INDUCED CELL DEATH1 and SIMILAR TO RCD ONE1 have partially redundant functions during Arabidopsis development.

    PubMed

    Teotia, Sachin; Lamb, Rebecca S

    2009-09-01

    RADICAL-INDUCED CELL DEATH1 (RCD1) and SIMILAR TO RCD ONE1 (SRO1) are the only two proteins encoded in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genome containing both a putative poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase catalytic domain and a WWE protein-protein interaction domain, although similar proteins have been found in other eukaryotes. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases mediate the attachment of ADP-ribose units from donor NAD(+) molecules to target proteins and have been implicated in a number of processes, including DNA repair, apoptosis, transcription, and chromatin remodeling. We have isolated mutants in both RCD1 and SRO1, rcd1-3 and sro1-1, respectively. rcd1-3 plants display phenotypic defects as reported for previously isolated alleles, most notably reduced stature. In addition, rcd1-3 mutants display a number of additional developmental defects in root architecture and maintenance of reproductive development. While single mutant sro1-1 plants are relatively normal, loss of a single dose of SRO1 in the rcd1-3 background increases the severity of several developmental defects, implying that these genes do share some functions. However, rcd1-3 and sro1-1 mutants behave differently in several developmental events and abiotic stress responses, suggesting that they also have distinct functions. Remarkably, rcd1-3; sro1-1 double mutants display severe defects in embryogenesis and postembryonic development. This study shows that RCD1 and SRO1 are at least partially redundant and that they are essential genes for plant development.

  2. Genes and processed paralogs co-exist in plant mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Cuenca, Argelia; Petersen, Gitte; Seberg, Ole; Jahren, Anne Hoppe

    2012-04-01

    RNA-mediated gene duplication has been proposed to create processed paralogs in the plant mitochondrial genome. A processed paralog may retain signatures left by the maturation process of its RNA precursor, such as intron removal and no need of RNA editing. Whereas it is well documented that an RNA intermediary is involved in the transfer of mitochondrial genes to the nucleus, no direct evidence exists for insertion of processed paralogs in the mitochondria (i.e., processed and un-processed genes have never been found simultaneously in the mitochondrial genome). In this study, we sequenced a region of the mitochondrial gene nad1, and identified a number of taxa were two different copies of the region co-occur in the mitochondria. The two nad1 paralogs differed in their (a) presence or absence of a group II intron, and (b) number of edited sites. Thus, this work provides the first evidence of co-existence of processed paralogs and their precursors within the plant mitochondrial genome. In addition, mapping the presence/absence of the paralogs provides indirect evidence of RNA-mediated gene duplication as an essential process shaping the mitochondrial genome in plants.

  3. Gene conversion homogenizes the CMT1A paralogous repeats.

    PubMed

    Hurles, M E

    2001-01-01

    Non-allelic homologous recombination between paralogous repeats is increasingly being recognized as a major mechanism causing both pathogenic microdeletions and duplications, and structural polymorphism in the human genome. It has recently been shown empirically that gene conversion can homogenize such repeats, resulting in longer stretches of absolute identity that may increase the rate of non-allelic homologous recombination. Here, a statistical test to detect gene conversion between pairs of non-coding sequences is presented. It is shown that the 24 kb Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A paralogous repeats (CMT1A-REPs) exhibit the imprint of gene conversion processes whilst control orthologous sequences do not. In addition, Monte Carlo simulations of the evolutionary divergence of the CMT1A-REPs, incorporating two alternative models for gene conversion, generate repeats that are statistically indistinguishable from the observed repeats. Bounds are placed on the rate of these conversion processes, with central values of 1.3 x 10(-4) and 5.1 x 10(-5) per generation for the alternative models. This evidence presented here suggests that gene conversion may have played an important role in the evolution of the CMT1A-REP paralogous repeats. The rates of these processes are such that it is probable that homogenized CMT1A-REPs are polymorphic within modern populations. Gene conversion processes are similarly likely to play an important role in the evolution of other segmental duplications and may influence the rate of non-allelic homologous recombination between them.

  4. Gene conversion homogenizes the CMT1A paralogous repeats

    PubMed Central

    Hurles, Matthew E

    2001-01-01

    Background Non-allelic homologous recombination between paralogous repeats is increasingly being recognized as a major mechanism causing both pathogenic microdeletions and duplications, and structural polymorphism in the human genome. It has recently been shown empirically that gene conversion can homogenize such repeats, resulting in longer stretches of absolute identity that may increase the rate of non-allelic homologous recombination. Results Here, a statistical test to detect gene conversion between pairs of non-coding sequences is presented. It is shown that the 24 kb Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A paralogous repeats (CMT1A-REPs) exhibit the imprint of gene conversion processes whilst control orthologous sequences do not. In addition, Monte Carlo simulations of the evolutionary divergence of the CMT1A-REPs, incorporating two alternative models for gene conversion, generate repeats that are statistically indistinguishable from the observed repeats. Bounds are placed on the rate of these conversion processes, with central values of 1.3 × 10-4 and 5.1 × 10-5 per generation for the alternative models. Conclusions This evidence presented here suggests that gene conversion may have played an important role in the evolution of the CMT1A-REP paralogous repeats. The rates of these processes are such that it is probable that homogenized CMT1A-REPs are polymorphic within modern populations. Gene conversion processes are similarly likely to play an important role in the evolution of other segmental duplications and may influence the rate of non-allelic homologous recombination between them. PMID:11801183

  5. Human monogenic disease genes have frequently functionally redundant paralogs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Hua; Zhao, Xing-Ming; van Noort, Vera; Bork, Peer

    2013-01-01

    Mendelian disorders are often caused by mutations in genes that are not lethal but induce functional distortions leading to diseases. Here we study the extent of gene duplicates that might compensate genes causing monogenic diseases. We provide evidence for pervasive functional redundancy of human monogenic disease genes (MDs) by duplicates by manifesting 1) genes involved in human genetic disorders are enriched in duplicates and 2) duplicated disease genes tend to have higher functional similarities with their closest paralogs in contrast to duplicated non-disease genes of similar age. We propose that functional compensation by duplication of genes masks the phenotypic effects of deleterious mutations and reduces the probability of purging the defective genes from the human population; this functional compensation could be further enhanced by higher purification selection between disease genes and their duplicates as well as their orthologous counterpart compared to non-disease genes. However, due to the intrinsic expression stochasticity among individuals, the deleterious mutations could still be present as genetic diseases in some subpopulations where the duplicate copies are expressed at low abundances. Consequently the defective genes are linked to genetic disorders while they continue propagating within the population. Our results provide insight into the molecular basis underlying the spreading of duplicated disease genes.

  6. Human Monogenic Disease Genes Have Frequently Functionally Redundant Paralogs

    PubMed Central

    van Noort, Vera; Bork, Peer

    2013-01-01

    Mendelian disorders are often caused by mutations in genes that are not lethal but induce functional distortions leading to diseases. Here we study the extent of gene duplicates that might compensate genes causing monogenic diseases. We provide evidence for pervasive functional redundancy of human monogenic disease genes (MDs) by duplicates by manifesting 1) genes involved in human genetic disorders are enriched in duplicates and 2) duplicated disease genes tend to have higher functional similarities with their closest paralogs in contrast to duplicated non-disease genes of similar age. We propose that functional compensation by duplication of genes masks the phenotypic effects of deleterious mutations and reduces the probability of purging the defective genes from the human population; this functional compensation could be further enhanced by higher purification selection between disease genes and their duplicates as well as their orthologous counterpart compared to non-disease genes. However, due to the intrinsic expression stochasticity among individuals, the deleterious mutations could still be present as genetic diseases in some subpopulations where the duplicate copies are expressed at low abundances. Consequently the defective genes are linked to genetic disorders while they continue propagating within the population. Our results provide insight into the molecular basis underlying the spreading of duplicated disease genes. PMID:23696728

  7. Complex evolution of orthologous and paralogous decarboxylase genes.

    PubMed

    Sáenz-de-Miera, L E; Ayala, F J

    2004-01-01

    The decarboxylases are involved in neurotransmitter synthesis in animals, and in pathways of secondary metabolism in plants. Different decarboxylase proteins are characterized for their different substrate specificities, but are encoded by homologous genes. We study, within a maximum-likelihood framework, the evolutionary relationships among dopa decarboxylase (Ddc), histidine decarboxylase (Hdc) and alpha-methyldopa hypersensitive (amd) in animals, and tryptophan decarboxylase (Wdc) and tyrosine decarboxylase (Ydc) in plants. The evolutionary rates are heterogeneous. There are differences between paralogous genes in the same lineages: 4.13 x 10(-10) nucleotide substitutions per site per year in mammalian Ddc vs. 1.95 in Hdc; between orthologous genes in different lineages, 7.62 in dipteran Ddc vs. 4.13 in mammalian Ddc; and very large temporal variations in some lineages, from 3.7 up to 54.9 in the Drosophila Ddc lineage. Our results are inconsistent with the molecular clock hypothesis.

  8. Phylogenomics: Gene Duplication, Unrecognized Paralogy and Outgroup Choice

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Scott William

    2009-01-01

    Comparative genomics has revealed the ubiquity of gene and genome duplication and subsequent gene loss. In the case of gene duplication and subsequent loss, gene trees can differ from species trees, thus frequent gene duplication poses a challenge for reconstruction of species relationships. Here I address the case of multi-gene sets of putative orthologs that include some unrecognized paralogs due to ancestral gene duplication, and ask how outgroups should best be chosen to reduce the degree of non-species tree (NST) signal. Consideration of expected internal branch lengths supports several conclusions: (i) when a single outgroup is used, the degree of NST signal arising from gene duplication is either independent of outgroup choice, or is minimized by use of a maximally closely related post-duplication (MCRPD) outgroup; (ii) when two outgroups are used, NST signal is minimized by using one MCRPD outgroup, while the position of the second outgroup is of lesser importance; and (iii) when two outgroups are used, the ability to detect gene trees that are inconsistent with known aspects of the species tree is maximized by use of one MCRPD, and is either independent of the position of the second outgroup, or is maximized for a more distantly related second outgroup. Overall, these results generalize the utility of closely-related outgroups for phylogenetic analysis. PMID:19234600

  9. Recessive cancer genes engage in negative genetic interactions with their functional paralogs.

    PubMed

    D'Antonio, Matteo; Guerra, Rosalinda F; Cereda, Matteo; Marchesi, Stefano; Montani, Francesca; Nicassio, Francesco; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; Ciccarelli, Francesca D

    2013-12-26

    Cancer genetic heterogeneity offers a wide repertoire of molecular determinants to be screened as therapeutic targets. Here, we identify potential anticancer targets by exploiting negative genetic interactions between genes with driver loss-of-function mutations (recessive cancer genes) and their functionally redundant paralogs. We identify recessive genes with additional copies and experimentally test our predictions on three paralogous pairs. We confirm digenic negative interactions between two cancer genes (SMARCA4 and CDH1) and their corresponding paralogs (SMARCA2 and CDH3). Furthermore, we identify a trigenic negative interaction between the cancer gene DNMT3A, its functional paralog DNMT3B, and a third gene, DNMT1, which encodes the only other human DNA-methylase domain. Although our study does not exclude other causes of synthetic lethality, it suggests that functionally redundant paralogs of cancer genes could be targets in anticancer therapy.

  10. Gene conversion yields novel gene combinations in paralogs of GOT1 in the copepod Tigriopus californicus.

    PubMed

    Willett, Christopher S

    2013-07-12

    Gene conversion of duplicated genes can slow the divergence of paralogous copies over time but can also result in other interesting evolutionary patterns. Islands of genetic divergence that persist in the face of gene conversion can point to gene regions undergoing selection for new functions. Novel combinations of genetic variation that differ greatly from the original sequence can result from the transfer of genetic variation between paralogous genes by rare gene conversion events. Genetically divergent populations of the copepod Tigriopus californicus provide an excellent model to look at the patterns of divergence among paralogs across multiple independent evolutionary lineages. In this study the evolution of a set of paralogous genes encoding putative aspartate transaminase proteins (called GOT1 here) are examined in populations of the copepod T. californicus. One pair of duplicated genes, GOT1p1 and GOT1p2, has regions of high divergence between the copies in the face of apparent on-going gene conversion. The GOT1p2 gene also has unique haplotypes in two populations that appear to have resulted from a transfer of genetic variation via inter-paralog gene conversion. A second pair of duplicated genes GOT1Sr and GOT1Sd also shows evidence of gene conversion, but this gene conversion does not appear to have maintained each as a functional copy in all populations. The patterns of conservation and sequence divergence across this set of paralogous genes among populations of T. californicus suggest that some interesting evolutionary patterns are occurring at these loci. The results for the GOT1p1/GOT1p2 paralogs illustrate how gene conversion can factor in the creation of a mosaic pattern of regions of high divergence and low divergence. When coupled with rare gene conversion events of divergent regions, this pattern can result in the formation of novel proteins differing substantially from either original protein. The evolutionary patterns across these paralogs show

  11. Gene conversion yields novel gene combinations in paralogs of GOT1 in the copepod Tigriopus californicus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gene conversion of duplicated genes can slow the divergence of paralogous copies over time but can also result in other interesting evolutionary patterns. Islands of genetic divergence that persist in the face of gene conversion can point to gene regions undergoing selection for new functions. Novel combinations of genetic variation that differ greatly from the original sequence can result from the transfer of genetic variation between paralogous genes by rare gene conversion events. Genetically divergent populations of the copepod Tigriopus californicus provide an excellent model to look at the patterns of divergence among paralogs across multiple independent evolutionary lineages. Results In this study the evolution of a set of paralogous genes encoding putative aspartate transaminase proteins (called GOT1 here) are examined in populations of the copepod T. californicus. One pair of duplicated genes, GOT1p1 and GOT1p2, has regions of high divergence between the copies in the face of apparent on-going gene conversion. The GOT1p2 gene also has unique haplotypes in two populations that appear to have resulted from a transfer of genetic variation via inter-paralog gene conversion. A second pair of duplicated genes GOT1Sr and GOT1Sd also shows evidence of gene conversion, but this gene conversion does not appear to have maintained each as a functional copy in all populations. Conclusions The patterns of conservation and sequence divergence across this set of paralogous genes among populations of T. californicus suggest that some interesting evolutionary patterns are occurring at these loci. The results for the GOT1p1/GOT1p2 paralogs illustrate how gene conversion can factor in the creation of a mosaic pattern of regions of high divergence and low divergence. When coupled with rare gene conversion events of divergent regions, this pattern can result in the formation of novel proteins differing substantially from either original protein. The evolutionary

  12. Tissue-Specificity of Gene Expression Diverges Slowly between Orthologs, and Rapidly between Paralogs

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The ortholog conjecture implies that functional similarity between orthologous genes is higher than between paralogs. It has been supported using levels of expression and Gene Ontology term analysis, although the evidence was rather weak and there were also conflicting reports. In this study on 12 species we provide strong evidence of high conservation in tissue-specificity between orthologs, in contrast to low conservation between within-species paralogs. This allows us to shed a new light on the evolution of gene expression patterns. While there have been several studies of the correlation of expression between species, little is known about the evolution of tissue-specificity itself. Ortholog tissue-specificity is strongly conserved between all tetrapod species, with the lowest Pearson correlation between mouse and frog at r = 0.66. Tissue-specificity correlation decreases strongly with divergence time. Paralogs in human show much lower conservation, even for recent Primate-specific paralogs. When both paralogs from ancient whole genome duplication tissue-specific paralogs are tissue-specific, it is often to different tissues, while other tissue-specific paralogs are mostly specific to the same tissue. The same patterns are observed using human or mouse as focal species, and are robust to choices of datasets and of thresholds. Our results support the following model of evolution: in the absence of duplication, tissue-specificity evolves slowly, and tissue-specific genes do not change their main tissue of expression; after small-scale duplication the less expressed paralog loses the ancestral specificity, leading to an immediate difference between paralogs; over time, both paralogs become more broadly expressed, but remain poorly correlated. Finally, there is a small number of paralog pairs which stay tissue-specific with the same main tissue of expression, for at least 300 million years. PMID:28030541

  13. Co-regulation of paralog genes in the three-dimensional chromatin architecture

    PubMed Central

    Ibn-Salem, Jonas; Muro, Enrique M.; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.

    2017-01-01

    Paralog genes arise from gene duplication events during evolution, which often lead to similar proteins that cooperate in common pathways and in protein complexes. Consequently, paralogs show correlation in gene expression whereby the mechanisms of co-regulation remain unclear. In eukaryotes, genes are regulated in part by distal enhancer elements through looping interactions with gene promoters. These looping interactions can be measured by genome-wide chromatin conformation capture (Hi-C) experiments, which revealed self-interacting regions called topologically associating domains (TADs). We hypothesize that paralogs share common regulatory mechanisms to enable coordinated expression according to TADs. To test this hypothesis, we integrated paralogy annotations with human gene expression data in diverse tissues, genome-wide enhancer–promoter associations and Hi-C experiments in human, mouse and dog genomes. We show that paralog gene pairs are enriched for co-localization in the same TAD, share more often common enhancer elements than expected and have increased contact frequencies over large genomic distances. Combined, our results indicate that paralogs share common regulatory mechanisms and cluster not only in the linear genome but also in the three-dimensional chromatin architecture. This enables concerted expression of paralogs over diverse cell-types and indicate evolutionary constraints in functional genome organization. PMID:27634932

  14. Sequence and gene expression evolution of paralogous genes in willows

    PubMed Central

    Harikrishnan, Srilakshmy L.; Pucholt, Pascal; Berlin, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Whole genome duplications (WGD) have had strong impacts on species diversification by triggering evolutionary novelties, however, relatively little is known about the balance between gene loss and forces involved in the retention of duplicated genes originating from a WGD. We analyzed putative Salicoid duplicates in willows, originating from the Salicoid WGD, which took place more than 45 Mya. Contigs were constructed by de novo assembly of RNA-seq data derived from leaves and roots from two genotypes. Among the 48,508 contigs, 3,778 pairs were, based on fourfold synonymous third-codon transversion rates and syntenic positions, predicted to be Salicoid duplicates. Both copies were in most cases expressed in both tissues and 74% were significantly differentially expressed. Mean Ka/Ks was 0.23, suggesting that the Salicoid duplicates are evolving by purifying selection. Gene Ontology enrichment analyses showed that functions related to DNA- and nucleic acid binding were over-represented among the non-differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates, while functions related to biosynthesis and metabolism were over-represented among the differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates. We propose that the differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates are regulatory neo- and/or subfunctionalized, while the non-differentially expressed are dose sensitive, hence, functionally conserved. Multiple evolutionary processes, thus drive the retention of Salicoid duplicates in willows. PMID:26689951

  15. Sequence and gene expression evolution of paralogous genes in willows.

    PubMed

    Harikrishnan, Srilakshmy L; Pucholt, Pascal; Berlin, Sofia

    2015-12-22

    Whole genome duplications (WGD) have had strong impacts on species diversification by triggering evolutionary novelties, however, relatively little is known about the balance between gene loss and forces involved in the retention of duplicated genes originating from a WGD. We analyzed putative Salicoid duplicates in willows, originating from the Salicoid WGD, which took place more than 45 Mya. Contigs were constructed by de novo assembly of RNA-seq data derived from leaves and roots from two genotypes. Among the 48,508 contigs, 3,778 pairs were, based on fourfold synonymous third-codon transversion rates and syntenic positions, predicted to be Salicoid duplicates. Both copies were in most cases expressed in both tissues and 74% were significantly differentially expressed. Mean Ka/Ks was 0.23, suggesting that the Salicoid duplicates are evolving by purifying selection. Gene Ontology enrichment analyses showed that functions related to DNA- and nucleic acid binding were over-represented among the non-differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates, while functions related to biosynthesis and metabolism were over-represented among the differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates. We propose that the differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates are regulatory neo- and/or subfunctionalized, while the non-differentially expressed are dose sensitive, hence, functionally conserved. Multiple evolutionary processes, thus drive the retention of Salicoid duplicates in willows.

  16. Genomic and Population-Level Effects of Gene Conversion in Caenorhabditis Paralogs

    PubMed Central

    Katju, Vaishali; Bergthorsson, Ulfar

    2010-01-01

    Interlocus gene conversion, the nonreciprocal exchange of genetic material between genes, is facilitated by high levels of sequence identity between DNA sequences and has the dual effect of homogenizing intergenic sequences while increasing intragenic variation. Gene conversion can have important consequences for the evolution of paralogs subsequent to gene duplication, as well as result in misinterpretations regarding their evolution. We review the current state of research on gene conversion in paralogs within Caenorhabditis elegans and its congeneric species, including the relative rates of gene conversion, the range of observable conversion tracts, the genomic variables that strongly influence the frequency of gene conversion and its contribution to concerted evolution of multigene families. Additionally, we discuss recent studies that examine the phenotypic and population-genetic effects of interlocus gene conversion between the sex-determination locus fog-2 and its paralog ftr-1 in natural and experimental populations of C. elegans. In light of the limitations of gene conversion detection methods that rely solely on the statistical distribution of identical nucleotides between paralogs, we suggest that analyses of gene conversion in C. elegans take advantage of mutation accumulation experiments and sequencing projects of related Caenorhabditis species. PMID:24710096

  17. Investigating the effect of paralogs on microarray gene-set analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In order to interpret the results obtained from a microarray experiment, researchers often shift focus from analysis of individual differentially expressed genes to analyses of sets of genes. These gene-set analysis (GSA) methods use previously accumulated biological knowledge to group genes into sets and then aim to rank these gene sets in a way that reflects their relative importance in the experimental situation in question. We suspect that the presence of paralogs affects the ability of GSA methods to accurately identify the most important sets of genes for subsequent research. Results We show that paralogs, which typically have high sequence identity and similar molecular functions, also exhibit high correlation in their expression patterns. We investigate this correlation as a potential confounding factor common to current GSA methods using Indygene http://www.cbio.uct.ac.za/indygene, a web tool that reduces a supplied list of genes so that it includes no pairwise paralogy relationships above a specified sequence similarity threshold. We use the tool to reanalyse previously published microarray datasets and determine the potential utility of accounting for the presence of paralogs. Conclusions The Indygene tool efficiently removes paralogy relationships from a given dataset and we found that such a reduction, performed prior to GSA, has the ability to generate significantly different results that often represent novel and plausible biological hypotheses. This was demonstrated for three different GSA approaches when applied to the reanalysis of previously published microarray datasets and suggests that the redundancy and non-independence of paralogs is an important consideration when dealing with GSA methodologies. PMID:21261946

  18. Systematic variation in the pattern of gene paralog retention between the teleost superorders Ostariophysi and Acanthopterygii.

    PubMed

    Garcia de la Serrana, Daniel; Mareco, Edson A; Johnston, Ian A

    2014-04-01

    Teleost fish underwent whole-genome duplication around 450 Ma followed by diploidization and loss of 80-85% of the duplicated genes. To identify a deep signature of this teleost-specific whole-genome duplication (TSGD), we searched for duplicated genes that were systematically and uniquely retained in one or other of the superorders Ostariophysi and Acanthopterygii. TSGD paralogs comprised 17-21% of total gene content. Some 2.6% (510) of TSGD paralogs were present as pairs in the Ostariophysi genomes of Danio rerio (Cypriniformes) and Astyanax mexicanus (Characiformes) but not in species from four orders of Acanthopterygii (Gasterosteiformes, Gasterosteus aculeatus; Tetraodontiformes, Tetraodon nigroviridis; Perciformes, Oreochromis niloticus; and Beloniformes, Oryzias latipes) where a single copy was identified. Similarly, 1.3% (418) of total gene number represented cases where TSGD paralogs pairs were systematically retained in the Acanthopterygian but conserved as a single copy in Ostariophysi genomes. We confirmed the generality of these results by phylogenetic and synteny analysis of 40 randomly selected linage-specific paralogs (LSPs) from each superorder and completed with the transcriptomes of three additional Ostariophysi species (Ictalurus punctatus [Siluriformes], Sinocyclocheilus species [Cypriniformes], and Piaractus mesopotamicus [Characiformes]). No chromosome bias was detected in TSGD paralog retention. Gene ontology (GO) analysis revealed significant enrichment of GO terms relative to the human GO SLIM database for "growth," "Cell differentiation," and "Embryo development" in Ostariophysi and for "Transport," "Signal Transduction," and "Vesicle mediated transport" in Acanthopterygii. The observed patterns of paralog retention are consistent with different diploidization outcomes having contributed to the evolution/diversification of each superorder.

  19. Systematic Variation in the Pattern of Gene Paralog Retention between the Teleost Superorders Ostariophysi and Acanthopterygii

    PubMed Central

    Garcia de la serrana, Daniel; Mareco, Edson A.; Johnston, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    Teleost fish underwent whole-genome duplication around 450 Ma followed by diploidization and loss of 80–85% of the duplicated genes. To identify a deep signature of this teleost-specific whole-genome duplication (TSGD), we searched for duplicated genes that were systematically and uniquely retained in one or other of the superorders Ostariophysi and Acanthopterygii. TSGD paralogs comprised 17–21% of total gene content. Some 2.6% (510) of TSGD paralogs were present as pairs in the Ostariophysi genomes of Danio rerio (Cypriniformes) and Astyanax mexicanus (Characiformes) but not in species from four orders of Acanthopterygii (Gasterosteiformes, Gasterosteus aculeatus; Tetraodontiformes, Tetraodon nigroviridis; Perciformes, Oreochromis niloticus; and Beloniformes, Oryzias latipes) where a single copy was identified. Similarly, 1.3% (418) of total gene number represented cases where TSGD paralogs pairs were systematically retained in the Acanthopterygian but conserved as a single copy in Ostariophysi genomes. We confirmed the generality of these results by phylogenetic and synteny analysis of 40 randomly selected linage-specific paralogs (LSPs) from each superorder and completed with the transcriptomes of three additional Ostariophysi species (Ictalurus punctatus [Siluriformes], Sinocyclocheilus species [Cypriniformes], and Piaractus mesopotamicus [Characiformes]). No chromosome bias was detected in TSGD paralog retention. Gene ontology (GO) analysis revealed significant enrichment of GO terms relative to the human GO SLIM database for “growth,” “Cell differentiation,” and “Embryo development” in Ostariophysi and for “Transport,” “Signal Transduction,” and “Vesicle mediated transport” in Acanthopterygii. The observed patterns of paralog retention are consistent with different diploidization outcomes having contributed to the evolution/diversification of each superorder. PMID:24732281

  20. Paralogous histidine biosynthetic genes: evolutionary analysis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae HIS6 and HIS7 genes.

    PubMed

    Fani, R; Tamburini, E; Mori, E; Lazcano, A; Liò, P; Barberio, C; Casalone, E; Cavalieri, D; Perito, B; Polsinelli, M

    1997-09-15

    The HIS6 gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain YNN282 is able to complement both the S. cerevisiae his6 and the Escherichia coli hisA mutations. The cloning and the nucleotide sequence indicated that this gene encodes a putative phosphoribosyl-5-amino-1-phosphoribosyl-4-imidazolecarboxiamide isomerase (5' Pro-FAR isomerase, EC 5.3.1.16) of 261 amino acids, with a molecular weight of 29,554. The HIS6 gene product shares a significant degree of sequence similarity with the prokaryotic HisA proteins and HisF proteins, and with the C-terminal domain of the S. cerevisiae HIS7 protein (homologous to HisF), indicating that the yeast HIS6 and HIS7 genes are paralogous. Moreover, the HIS6 gene is organized into two homologous modules half the size of the entire gene, typical of all the known prokaryotic hisA and hisF genes. The structure of the yeast HIS6 gene supports the two-step evolutionary model suggested by Fani et al. (J. Mol. Evol. 1994; 38: 489-495) to explain the present-day hisA and hisF genes. According to this idea, the hisF gene originated from the duplication of an ancestral hisA gene which, in turn, was the result of an earlier gene elongation event involving an ancestral module half the size of the extant gene. Results reported in this paper also suggest that these two successive paralogous gene duplications took probably place in the early steps of molecular evolution of the histidine pathway, well before the diversification of the three domains, and that this pathway was one of the metabolic activities of the last common ancestor. The molecular evolution of the yeast HIS6 and HIS7 genes is also discussed.

  1. Paralogous sm22alpha (Tagln) genes map to mouse chromosomes 1 and 9: further evidence for a paralogous relationship.

    PubMed

    Stanier, P; Abu-Hayyeh, S; Murdoch, J N; Eddleston, J; Copp, A J

    1998-07-01

    SM22alpha (TAGLN) is one of the earliest markers of differentiated smooth muscle, being expressed exclusively in the smooth muscle cells of adult tissues and transiently in embryonic skeletal and cardiac tissues. We have identified and mapped the mouse Tagln gene and a closely related gene, Sm22alpha homolog (Tagln2). The chromosomal localization for Tagln was identified by linkage analysis to distal mouse chromosome 9 between D9Mit154 and D9Mit330, closely linked to the anchor locus D9Nds10. The localization of Tagln2 was also determined and was found to map between Fcgr2 and D1Mit149 on distal mouse chromosome 1. This localization is homologous to a region of human 1q21-q25 to which an EST representing human TAGLN2 was previously mapped. The two regions, distal mouse chromosome 1 and proximal mouse chromosome 9, and the human regions with conserved synteny (1q21-q25 and 11q22-qter) are believed to be paralogous, reflecting either conserved remnants of duplicated chromosomes or segments of chromosomes during vertebrate evolution. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  2. Contrasted patterns of selective pressure in three recent paralogous gene pairs in the Medicago genus (L.)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gene duplications are a molecular mechanism potentially mediating generation of functional novelty. However, the probabilities of maintenance and functional divergence of duplicated genes are shaped by selective pressures acting on gene copies immediately after the duplication event. The ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous substitution rates in protein-coding sequences provides a means to investigate selective pressures based on genic sequences. Three molecular signatures can reveal early stages of functional divergence between gene copies: change in the level of purifying selection between paralogous genes, occurrence of positive selection, and transient relaxed purifying selection following gene duplication. We studied three pairs of genes that are known to be involved in an interaction with symbiotic bacteria and were recently duplicated in the history of the Medicago genus (Fabaceae). We sequenced two pairs of polygalacturonase genes (Pg11-Pg3 and Pg11a-Pg11c) and one pair of auxine transporter-like genes (Lax2-Lax4) in 17 species belonging to the Medicago genus, and sought for molecular signatures of differentiation between copies. Results Selective histories revealed by these three signatures of molecular differentiation were found to be markedly different between each pair of paralogs. We found sites under positive selection in the Pg11 paralogs while Pg3 has mainly evolved under purifying selection. The most recent paralogs examined Pg11a and Pg11c, are both undergoing positive selection and might be acquiring new functions. Lax2 and Lax4 paralogs are both under strong purifying selection, but still underwent a temporary relaxation of purifying selection immediately after duplication. Conclusions This study illustrates the variety of selective pressures undergone by duplicated genes and the effect of age of the duplication. We found that relaxation of selective constraints immediately after duplication might promote adaptive divergence. PMID

  3. Evolution of paralogous genes: Reconstruction of genome rearrangements through comparison of multiple genomes within Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Tsuru, Takeshi; Kawai, Mikihiko; Mizutani-Ui, Yoko; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    2006-06-01

    Analysis of evolution of paralogous genes in a genome is central to our understanding of genome evolution. Comparison of closely related bacterial genomes, which has provided clues as to how genome sequences evolve under natural conditions, would help in such an analysis. With species Staphylococcus aureus, whole-genome sequences have been decoded for seven strains. We compared their DNA sequences to detect large genome polymorphisms and to deduce mechanisms of genome rearrangements that have formed each of them. We first compared strains N315 and Mu50, which make one of the most closely related strain pairs, at the single-nucleotide resolution to catalogue all the middle-sized (more than 10 bp) to large genome polymorphisms such as indels and substitutions. These polymorphisms include two paralogous gene sets, one in a tandem paralogue gene cluster for toxins in a genomic island and the other in a ribosomal RNA operon. We also focused on two other tandem paralogue gene clusters and type I restriction-modification (RM) genes on the genomic islands. Then we reconstructed rearrangement events responsible for these polymorphisms, in the paralogous genes and the others, with reference to the other five genomes. For the tandem paralogue gene clusters, we were able to infer sequences for homologous recombination generating the change in the repeat number. These sequences were conserved among the repeated paralogous units likely because of their functional importance. The sequence specificity (S) subunit of type I RM systems showed recombination, likely at the homology of a conserved region, between the two variable regions for sequence specificity. We also noticed novel alleles in the ribosomal RNA operons and suggested a role for illegitimate recombination in their formation. These results revealed importance of recombination involving long conserved sequence in the evolution of paralogous genes in the genome.

  4. The radical induced cell death protein 1 (RCD1) supports transcriptional activation of genes for chloroplast antioxidant enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Hiltscher, Heiko; Rudnik, Radoslaw; Shaikhali, Jehad; Heiber, Isabelle; Mellenthin, Marina; Meirelles Duarte, Iuri; Schuster, Günter; Kahmann, Uwe; Baier, Margarete

    2014-01-01

    The rimb1 (redox imbalanced 1) mutation was mapped to the RCD1 locus (radical-induced cell death 1; At1g32230) demonstrating that a major factor involved in redox-regulation genes for chloroplast antioxidant enzymes and protection against photooxidative stress, RIMB1, is identical to the regulator of disease response reactions and cell death, RCD1. Discovering this link let to our investigation of its regulatory mechanism. We show in yeast that RCD1 can physically interact with the transcription factor Rap2.4a which provides redox-sensitivity to nuclear expression of genes for chloroplast antioxidant enzymes. In the rimb1 (rcd1-6) mutant, a single nucleotide exchange results in a truncated RCD1 protein lacking the transcription factor binding site. Protein-protein interaction between full-length RCD1 and Rap2.4a is supported by H2O2, but not sensitive to the antioxidants dithiotreitol and ascorbate. In combination with transcript abundance analysis in Arabidopsis, it is concluded that RCD1 stabilizes the Rap2.4-dependent redox-regulation of the genes encoding chloroplast antioxidant enzymes in a widely redox-independent manner. Over the years, rcd1-mutant alleles have been described to develop symptoms like chlorosis, lesions along the leaf rims and in the mesophyll and (secondary) induction of extra- and intra-plastidic antioxidant defense mechanisms. All these rcd1 mutant characteristics were observed in rcd1-6 to succeed low activation of the chloroplast antioxidant system and glutathione biosynthesis. We conclude that RCD1 protects plant cells from running into reactive oxygen species (ROS)-triggered programs, such as cell death and activation of pathogen-responsive genes (PR genes) and extra-plastidic antioxidant enzymes, by supporting the induction of the chloroplast antioxidant system. PMID:25295044

  5. Independent Evolutionary Origin of fem Paralogous Genes and Complementary Sex Determination in Hymenopteran Insects

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Vasco; Nissen, Inga; Schmitt, Björn D.; Beye, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The primary signal of sex determination in the honeybee, the complementary sex determiner (csd) gene, evolved from a gene duplication event from an ancestral copy of the fem gene. Recently, other paralogs of the fem gene have been identified in several ant and bumblebee genomes. This discovery and the close phylogenetic relationship of the paralogous gene sequences led to the hypothesis of a single ancestry of the csd genetic system of complementary sex determination in the Hymenopteran insects, in which the fem and csd gene copies evolved as a unit in concert with the mutual transfers of sequences (concerted evolution). Here, we show that the paralogous gene copies evolved repeatedly through independent gene duplication events in the honeybee, bumblebee, and ant lineage. We detected no sequence tracts that would indicate a DNA transfer between the fem and the fem1/csd genes between different ant and bee species. Instead, we found tracts of duplication events in other genomic locations, suggesting that gene duplication was a frequent event in the evolution of these genes. These and other evidences suggest that the fem1/csd gene originated repeatedly through gene duplications in the bumblebee, honeybee, and ant lineages in the last 100 million years. Signatures of concerted evolution were not detectable, implicating that the gene tree based on neutral synonymous sites represents the phylogenetic relationships and origins of the fem and fem1/csd genes. Our results further imply that the fem1 and csd gene in bumblebees, honeybees, and ants are not orthologs, because they originated independently from the fem gene. Hence, the widely shared and conserved complementary sex determination mechanism in Hymenopteran insects is controlled by different genes and molecular processes. These findings highlight the limits of comparative genomics and emphasize the requirement to study gene functions in different species and major hymenopteran lineages. PMID:24743790

  6. Independent evolutionary origin of fem paralogous genes and complementary sex determination in hymenopteran insects.

    PubMed

    Koch, Vasco; Nissen, Inga; Schmitt, Björn D; Beye, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The primary signal of sex determination in the honeybee, the complementary sex determiner (csd) gene, evolved from a gene duplication event from an ancestral copy of the fem gene. Recently, other paralogs of the fem gene have been identified in several ant and bumblebee genomes. This discovery and the close phylogenetic relationship of the paralogous gene sequences led to the hypothesis of a single ancestry of the csd genetic system of complementary sex determination in the Hymenopteran insects, in which the fem and csd gene copies evolved as a unit in concert with the mutual transfers of sequences (concerted evolution). Here, we show that the paralogous gene copies evolved repeatedly through independent gene duplication events in the honeybee, bumblebee, and ant lineage. We detected no sequence tracts that would indicate a DNA transfer between the fem and the fem1/csd genes between different ant and bee species. Instead, we found tracts of duplication events in other genomic locations, suggesting that gene duplication was a frequent event in the evolution of these genes. These and other evidences suggest that the fem1/csd gene originated repeatedly through gene duplications in the bumblebee, honeybee, and ant lineages in the last 100 million years. Signatures of concerted evolution were not detectable, implicating that the gene tree based on neutral synonymous sites represents the phylogenetic relationships and origins of the fem and fem1/csd genes. Our results further imply that the fem1 and csd gene in bumblebees, honeybees, and ants are not orthologs, because they originated independently from the fem gene. Hence, the widely shared and conserved complementary sex determination mechanism in Hymenopteran insects is controlled by different genes and molecular processes. These findings highlight the limits of comparative genomics and emphasize the requirement to study gene functions in different species and major hymenopteran lineages.

  7. Transcriptomic and phenotypic analysis of paralogous spx gene function in Bacillus anthracis Sterne.

    PubMed

    Barendt, Skye; Lee, Hyunwoo; Birch, Cierra; Nakano, Michiko M; Jones, Marcus; Zuber, Peter

    2013-08-01

    Spx of Bacillus subtilis is a redox-sensitive protein, which, under disulfide stress, interacts with RNA polymerase to activate genes required for maintaining thiol homeostasis. Spx orthologs are highly conserved among low %GC Gram-positive bacteria, and often exist in multiple paralogous forms. In this study, we used B. anthracis Sterne, which harbors two paralogous spx genes, spxA1 and spxA2, to examine the phenotypes of spx null mutations and to identify the genes regulated by each Spx paralog. Cells devoid of spxA1 were sensitive to diamide and hydrogen peroxide, while the spxA1 spoxA2 double mutant was hypersensitive to the thiol-specific oxidant, diamide. Bacillus anthracis Sterne strains expressing spxA1DD or spxA2DD alleles encoding protease-resistant products were used in microarray and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) analyses in order to uncover genes under SpxA1, SpxA2, or SpxA1/SpxA2 control. Comparison of transcriptomes identified many genes that were upregulated when either SpxA1DD or SpxA2DD was produced, but several genes were uncovered whose transcript levels increased in only one of the two SpxADD-expression strains, suggesting that each Spx paralog governs a unique regulon. Among genes that were upregulated were those encoding orthologs of proteins that are specifically involved in maintaining intracellular thiol homeostasis or alleviating oxidative stress. Some of these genes have important roles in B. anthracis pathogenesis, and a large number of upregulated hypothetical genes have no homology outside of the B. cereus/thuringiensis group. Microarray and RT-qPCR analyses also unveiled a regulatory link that exists between the two spx paralogous genes. The data indicate that spxA1 and spxA2 are transcriptional regulators involved in relieving disulfide stress but also control a set of genes whose products function in other cellular processes.

  8. Additional duplicated Hox genes in the earthworm: Perionyx excavatus Hox genes consist of eleven paralog groups.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung-Jin; Vallès, Yvonne; Kim, Kyong Min; Ji, Seong Chul; Han, Seock Jung; Park, Soon Cheol

    2012-02-10

    Annelida is a lophotrochozoan phylum whose members have a high degree of diversity in body plan morphology, reproductive strategies and ecological niches among others. Of the two traditional classes pertaining to the phylum Annelida (Polychaete and Clitellata), the structure and function of the Hox genes has not been clearly defined within the Oligochaeta class. Using a PCR-based survey, we were able to identify five new Hox genes from the earthworm Perionyx excavatus: a Hox3 gene (Pex-Hox3b), two Dfd genes (Pex-Lox6 and Pex-Lox18), and two posterior genes (Pex-post1 and -post2a). Our result suggests that the eleven earthworm Hox genes contain at least four paralog groups (PG) that have duplicated. We found the clitellates-diagnostic signature residues and annelid signature motif. Also, we show by semi-quantitative RT-PCR that duplicated Hox gene orthologs are differentially expressed in six different anterior-posterior body regions. These results provide essential data for comparative evolution of the Hox cluster within the Annelida.

  9. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Gene Superfamily in Populus: Organization and Expression Divergence between Paralogous Gene Pairs.

    PubMed

    Tian, Feng-Xia; Zang, Jian-Lei; Wang, Tan; Xie, Yu-Li; Zhang, Jin; Hu, Jian-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) constitute a superfamily of NAD(P)+-dependent enzymes that catalyze the irreversible oxidation of a wide range of reactive aldehydes to their corresponding nontoxic carboxylic acids. ALDHs have been studied in many organisms from bacteria to mammals; however, no systematic analyses incorporating genome organization, gene structure, expression profiles, and cis-acting elements have been conducted in the model tree species Populus trichocarpa thus far. In this study, a comprehensive analysis of the Populus ALDH gene superfamily was performed. A total of 26 Populus ALDH genes were found to be distributed across 12 chromosomes. Genomic organization analysis indicated that purifying selection may have played a pivotal role in the retention and maintenance of PtALDH gene families. The exon-intron organizations of PtALDHs were highly conserved within the same family, suggesting that the members of the same family also may have conserved functionalities. Microarray data and qRT-PCR analysis indicated that most PtALDHs had distinct tissue-specific expression patterns. The specificity of cis-acting elements in the promoter regions of the PtALDHs and the divergence of expression patterns between nine paralogous PtALDH gene pairs suggested that gene duplications may have freed the duplicate genes from the functional constraints. The expression levels of some ALDHs were up- or down-regulated by various abiotic stresses, implying that the products of these genes may be involved in the adaptation of Populus to abiotic stresses. Overall, the data obtained from our investigation contribute to a better understanding of the complexity of the Populus ALDH gene superfamily and provide insights into the function and evolution of ALDH gene families in vascular plants.

  10. Reconstructing the Evolutionary History of Paralogous APETALA1/FRUITFULL-Like Genes in Grasses (Poaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Preston, Jill C.; Kellogg, Elizabeth A.

    2006-01-01

    Gene duplication is an important mechanism for the generation of evolutionary novelty. Paralogous genes that are not silenced may evolve new functions (neofunctionalization) that will alter the developmental outcome of preexisting genetic pathways, partition ancestral functions (subfunctionalization) into divergent developmental modules, or function redundantly. Functional divergence can occur by changes in the spatio-temporal patterns of gene expression and/or by changes in the activities of their protein products. We reconstructed the evolutionary history of two paralogous monocot MADS-box transcription factors, FUL1 and FUL2, and determined the evolution of sequence and gene expression in grass AP1/FUL-like genes. Monocot AP1/FUL-like genes duplicated at the base of Poaceae and codon substitutions occurred under relaxed selection mostly along the branch leading to FUL2. Following the duplication, FUL1 was apparently lost from early diverging taxa, a pattern consistent with major changes in grass floral morphology. Overlapping gene expression patterns in leaves and spikelets indicate that FUL1 and FUL2 probably share some redundant functions, but that FUL2 may have become temporally restricted under partial subfunctionalization to particular stages of floret development. These data have allowed us to reconstruct the history of AP1/FUL-like genes in Poaceae and to hypothesize a role for this gene duplication in the evolution of the grass spikelet. PMID:16816429

  11. Reconstructing the evolutionary history of paralogous APETALA1/FRUITFULL-like genes in grasses (Poaceae).

    PubMed

    Preston, Jill C; Kellogg, Elizabeth A

    2006-09-01

    Gene duplication is an important mechanism for the generation of evolutionary novelty. Paralogous genes that are not silenced may evolve new functions (neofunctionalization) that will alter the developmental outcome of preexisting genetic pathways, partition ancestral functions (subfunctionalization) into divergent developmental modules, or function redundantly. Functional divergence can occur by changes in the spatio-temporal patterns of gene expression and/or by changes in the activities of their protein products. We reconstructed the evolutionary history of two paralogous monocot MADS-box transcription factors, FUL1 and FUL2, and determined the evolution of sequence and gene expression in grass AP1/FUL-like genes. Monocot AP1/FUL-like genes duplicated at the base of Poaceae and codon substitutions occurred under relaxed selection mostly along the branch leading to FUL2. Following the duplication, FUL1 was apparently lost from early diverging taxa, a pattern consistent with major changes in grass floral morphology. Overlapping gene expression patterns in leaves and spikelets indicate that FUL1 and FUL2 probably share some redundant functions, but that FUL2 may have become temporally restricted under partial subfunctionalization to particular stages of floret development. These data have allowed us to reconstruct the history of AP1/FUL-like genes in Poaceae and to hypothesize a role for this gene duplication in the evolution of the grass spikelet.

  12. Characterization of two paralogous myostatin genes and evidence for positive selection in Tibet fish: Gymnocypris przewalskii.

    PubMed

    Tong, Chao; Zhang, Cunfang; Shi, Jianquan; Qi, Hongfang; Zhang, Renyi; Tang, Yongtao; Li, Guogang; Feng, Chenguang; Zhao, Kai

    2015-07-10

    Myostatin (mstn) is an important member of TGF-β superfamily, a muscle growth inhibitor. Though mstn has been identified in many organisms, little is known about this gene in highland fish, Gymnocypris przewalskii endemic to the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. In this study, we first cloned two paralogous mstn genes (mstn1 and mstn2) from G. przewalskii through homologue cloning. The 3D structures of both Mstn proteins varied in the numbers of β-sheets and conformations of α-helices. The branch-site model showed that mstn1 has undergone positive selection, and two positively selected sites (107M and 181T) were located on the random coils of the 3D protein structure. Expression patterns indicated that the mstn1 expressed widely, while the mstn2 only expressed in the muscle and brain. During the early stage of embryo development, the expression levels of both mstn paralogous genes showed different increasing trends. These results suggest that it is diverging in two mstn paralogues of G. przewalskii via specific differences in gene structure, protein structure, selection pressure and gene expression patterns. Taken together, this study provides novel contribution on the research topics of growth related gene function and mechanism of highland fish in extreme aquatic environment on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau.

  13. The differential expression of ribosomal 18S RNA paralog genes from the chaetognath Spadella cephaloptera.

    PubMed

    Barthélémy, Roxane-Marie; Grino, Michel; Pontarotti, Pierre; Casanova, Jean-Paul; Faure, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Chaetognaths constitute a small marine phylum of approximately 120 species. Two classes of both 18S and 28S rRNA gene sequences have been evidenced in this phylum, even though significant intraindividual variation in the sequences of rRNA genes is unusual in animal genomes. These observations led to the hypothesis that this unusual genetic characteristic could play one or more physiological role(s). Using in situ hybridization on the frontal sections of the chaetognath Spadella cephaloptera, we found that the 18S Class I genes are expressed in the whole body, with a strong expression throughout the gut epithelium, whereas the expression of the 18S Class II genes is restricted to the oocytes. Our results could suggest that the paralog products of the 18S Class I genes are probably the "housekeeping" 18S rRNAs, whereas those of class II would only be essential in specific tissues. These results provide support for the idea that each type of 18S paralog is important for specific cellular functions and is under the control of selective factors.

  14. Conserved transcriptional responses to cyanobacterial stressors are mediated by alternate regulation of paralogous genes in Daphnia.

    PubMed

    Asselman, Jana; Pfrender, Michael E; Lopez, Jacqueline A; De Coninck, Dieter I M; Janssen, Colin R; Shaw, Joseph R; De Schamphelaere, Karel A C

    2015-04-01

    Despite a significant increase in genomic data, our knowledge of gene functions and their transcriptional responses to environmental stimuli remains limited. Here, we use the model keystone species Daphnia pulex to study environmental responses of genes in the context of their gene family history to better understand the relationship between genome structure and gene function in response to environmental stimuli. Daphnia were exposed to five different treatments, each consisting of a diet supplemented with one of five cyanobacterial species, and a control treatment consisting of a diet of only green algae. Differential gene expression profiles of Daphnia exposed to each of these five cyanobacterial species showed that genes with known functions are more likely to be shared by different expression profiles, whereas genes specific to the lineage of Daphnia are more likely to be unique to a given expression profile. Furthermore, while only a small number of nonlineage-specific genes were conserved across treatment type, there was a high degree of overlap in expression profiles at the functional level. The conservation of functional responses across the different cyanobacterial treatments can be attributed to the treatment-specific expression of different paralogous genes within the same gene family. Comparison with available gene expression data in the literature suggests differences in nutritional composition in diets with cyanobacterial species compared to diets of green algae as a primary driver for cyanobacterial effects on Daphnia. We conclude that conserved functional responses in Daphnia across different cyanobacterial treatments are mediated through alternate regulation of paralogous gene families. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Extensive Local Gene Duplication and Functional Divergence among Paralogs in Atlantic Salmon

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Ian A.; Ciborowski, Kate L.; Casadei, Elisa; Hazlerigg, David G.; Martin, Sam; Jordan, William C.; Sumner, Seirian

    2014-01-01

    Many organisms can generate alternative phenotypes from the same genome, enabling individuals to exploit diverse and variable environments. A prevailing hypothesis is that such adaptation has been favored by gene duplication events, which generate redundant genomic material that may evolve divergent functions. Vertebrate examples of recent whole-genome duplications are sparse although one example is the salmonids, which have undergone a whole-genome duplication event within the last 100 Myr. The life-cycle of the Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar, depends on the ability to produce alternating phenotypes from the same genome, to facilitate migration and maintain its anadromous life history. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that genome-wide and local gene duplication events have contributed to the salmonid adaptation. We used high-throughput sequencing to characterize the transcriptomes of three key organs involved in regulating migration in S. salar: Brain, pituitary, and olfactory epithelium. We identified over 10,000 undescribed S. salar sequences and designed an analytic workflow to distinguish between paralogs originating from local gene duplication events or from whole-genome duplication events. These data reveal that substantial local gene duplications took place shortly after the whole-genome duplication event. Many of the identified paralog pairs have either diverged in function or become noncoding. Future functional genomics studies will reveal to what extent this rich source of divergence in genetic sequence is likely to have facilitated the evolution of extreme phenotypic plasticity required for an anadromous life-cycle. PMID:24951567

  16. Extensive local gene duplication and functional divergence among paralogs in Atlantic salmon.

    PubMed

    Warren, Ian A; Ciborowski, Kate L; Casadei, Elisa; Hazlerigg, David G; Martin, Sam; Jordan, William C; Sumner, Seirian

    2014-06-19

    Many organisms can generate alternative phenotypes from the same genome, enabling individuals to exploit diverse and variable environments. A prevailing hypothesis is that such adaptation has been favored by gene duplication events, which generate redundant genomic material that may evolve divergent functions. Vertebrate examples of recent whole-genome duplications are sparse although one example is the salmonids, which have undergone a whole-genome duplication event within the last 100 Myr. The life-cycle of the Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar, depends on the ability to produce alternating phenotypes from the same genome, to facilitate migration and maintain its anadromous life history. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that genome-wide and local gene duplication events have contributed to the salmonid adaptation. We used high-throughput sequencing to characterize the transcriptomes of three key organs involved in regulating migration in S. salar: Brain, pituitary, and olfactory epithelium. We identified over 10,000 undescribed S. salar sequences and designed an analytic workflow to distinguish between paralogs originating from local gene duplication events or from whole-genome duplication events. These data reveal that substantial local gene duplications took place shortly after the whole-genome duplication event. Many of the identified paralog pairs have either diverged in function or become noncoding. Future functional genomics studies will reveal to what extent this rich source of divergence in genetic sequence is likely to have facilitated the evolution of extreme phenotypic plasticity required for an anadromous life-cycle.

  17. Deregulation of paralogous 13 HOX genes in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Aquino, Gabriella; Franco, Renato; Sabatino, Rocco; Mantia, Elvira La; Scognamiglio, Giosuè; Collina, Francesca; Longo, Francesco; Ionna, Franco; Losito, Nunzia S; Liguori, Giuseppina; Botti, Gerardo; Cantile, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Many oncogenic drivers related to the pathogenesis of OSCC have identified, but the discovery of new molecular markers for early detection of this cancer, remains one the main goals of clinical research. HOX genes regulate normal embryonic development, cell differentiation and other critical processes in eukaryotic cell life. Several studies have demonstrated that the deregulation of HOX genes play a significant role in cancer development and progression. In this study, we built a prognostic TMA with 119 OSCC samples, representative of deep and superficial part of the tumour, to investigate, the paralogous 13 HOX proteins expression, correlating them with clinicpathological parameters, outcomes and therapy information. Our results show an aberrant expression of HOX A13 and HOX D13 in OSCC pathogenesis and tumour progression. HOX A13 overexpression is related to an OSCC better prognosis (P=0.029) and better therapy response in patients treated with both radiotherapy and chemotherapy (P=0.015). HOX D13 overexpression is inversely related to an overall survival (P=0.004). These data highlight the potential prognostic role of HOX paralogous group 13 genes in OSCC.

  18. No Distinction of Orthology/Paralogy between Human and Chimpanzee Rh Blood Group Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kitano, Takashi; Kim, Choong-Gon; Blancher, Antoine; Saitou, Naruya

    2016-01-01

    On human (Homo sapiens) chromosome 1, there is a tandem duplication encompassing Rh blood group genes (Hosa_RHD and Hosa_RHCE). This duplication occurred in the common ancestor of humans, chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), and gorillas, after splitting from their common ancestor with orangutans. Although several studies have been conducted on ape Rh blood group genes, the clear genome structures of the gene clusters remain unknown. Here, we determined the genome structure of the gene cluster of chimpanzee Rh genes by sequencing five BAC (Bacterial Artificial Chromosome) clones derived from chimpanzees. We characterized three complete loci (Patr_RHα, Patr_RHβ, and Patr_RHγ). In the Patr_RHβ locus, a short version of the gene, which lacked the middle part containing exons 4–8, was observed. The Patr_RHα and Patr_RHβ genes were located on the locations corresponding to Hosa_RHD and Hosa_RHCE, respectively, and Patr_RHγ was in the immediate vicinity of Patr_RHβ. Sequence comparisons revealed high sequence similarity between Patr_RHβ and Hosa_RHCE, while the chimpanzee Rh gene closest to Hosa_RHD was not Patr_RHα but rather Patr_RHγ. The results suggest that rearrangements and gene conversions frequently occurred between these genes and that the classic orthology/paralogy dichotomy no longer holds between human and chimpanzee Rh blood group genes. PMID:26872772

  19. No Distinction of Orthology/Paralogy between Human and Chimpanzee Rh Blood Group Genes.

    PubMed

    Kitano, Takashi; Kim, Choong-Gon; Blancher, Antoine; Saitou, Naruya

    2016-02-12

    On human (Homo sapiens) chromosome 1, there is a tandem duplication encompassing Rh blood group genes (Hosa_RHD and Hosa_RHCE). This duplication occurred in the common ancestor of humans, chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), and gorillas, after splitting from their common ancestor with orangutans. Although several studies have been conducted on ape Rh blood group genes, the clear genome structures of the gene clusters remain unknown. Here, we determined the genome structure of the gene cluster of chimpanzee Rh genes by sequencing five BAC (Bacterial Artificial Chromosome) clones derived from chimpanzees. We characterized three complete loci (Patr_RHα, Patr_RHβ, and Patr_RHγ). In the Patr_RHβ locus, a short version of the gene, which lacked the middle part containing exons 4-8, was observed. The Patr_RHα and Patr_RHβ genes were located on the locations corresponding to Hosa_RHD and Hosa_RHCE, respectively, and Patr_RHγ was in the immediate vicinity of Patr_RHβ. Sequence comparisons revealed high sequence similarity between Patr_RHβ and Hosa_RHCE, while the chimpanzee Rh gene closest to Hosa_RHD was not Patr_RHα but rather Patr_RHγ. The results suggest that rearrangements and gene conversions frequently occurred between these genes and that the classic orthology/paralogy dichotomy no longer holds between human and chimpanzee Rh blood group genes. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  20. Prevalence of intron gain over intron loss in the evolution of paralogous gene families

    PubMed Central

    Babenko, Vladimir N.; Rogozin, Igor B.; Mekhedov, Sergei L.; Koonin, Eugene V.

    2004-01-01

    The mechanisms and evolutionary dynamics of intron insertion and loss in eukaryotic genes remain poorly understood. Reconstruction of parsimonious scenarios of gene structure evolution in paralogous gene families in animals and plants revealed numerous gains and losses of introns. In all analyzed lineages, the number of acquired new introns was substantially greater than the number of lost ancestral introns. This trend held even for lineages in which vertical evolution of genes involved more intron losses than gains, suggesting that gene duplication boosts intron insertion. However, dating gene duplications and the associated intron gains and losses based on the molecular clock assumption showed that very few, if any, introns were gained during the last ∼100 million years of animal and plant evolution, in agreement with previous conclusions reached through analysis of orthologous gene sets. These results are generally compatible with the emerging notion of intensive insertion and loss of introns during transitional epochs in contrast to the relative quiet of the intervening evolutionary spans. PMID:15254274

  1. OrthoParaMap: Distinguishing orthologs from paralogs by integrating comparative genome data and gene phylogenies

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Steven B; Young, Nevin D

    2003-01-01

    Background In eukaryotic genomes, most genes are members of gene families. When comparing genes from two species, therefore, most genes in one species will be homologous to multiple genes in the second. This often makes it difficult to distinguish orthologs (separated through speciation) from paralogs (separated by other types of gene duplication). Combining phylogenetic relationships and genomic position in both genomes helps to distinguish between these scenarios. This kind of comparison can also help to describe how gene families have evolved within a single genome that has undergone polyploidy or other large-scale duplications, as in the case of Arabidopsis thaliana – and probably most plant genomes. Results We describe a suite of programs called OrthoParaMap (OPM) that makes genomic comparisons, identifies syntenic regions, determines whether sets of genes in a gene family are related through speciation or internal chromosomal duplications, maps this information onto phylogenetic trees, and infers internal nodes within the phylogenetic tree that may represent local – as opposed to speciation or segmental – duplication. We describe the application of the software using three examples: the melanoma-associated antigen (MAGE) gene family on the X chromosomes of mouse and human; the 20S proteasome subunit gene family in Arabidopsis, and the major latex protein gene family in Arabidopsis. Conclusion OPM combines comparative genomic positional information and phylogenetic reconstructions to identify which gene duplications are likely to have arisen through internal genomic duplications (such as polyploidy), through speciation, or through local duplications (such as unequal crossing-over). The software is freely available at . PMID:12952558

  2. Identification of pathways, gene networks and paralogous gene families in Daphnia pulex responding to exposure to the toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Asselman, Jana; De Coninck, Dieter IM; Glaholt, Stephen; Colbourne, John K; Janssen, Colin R; Shaw, Joseph R; De Schamphelaere, Karel AC

    2013-01-01

    Although cyanobacteria produce a wide range of natural toxins that impact aquatic organisms, food webs and water quality, the mechanisms of toxicity are still insufficiently understood. Here, we implemented a whole-genome expression microarray to identify pathways, gene networks and paralogous gene families responsive to Microcystis stress in Daphnia pulex. Therefore, neonates of a sensitive isolate were given a diet contaminated with Microcystis to contrast with those given a control diet for sixteen days. The microarray revealed 2247 differentially expressed (DE) genes (7.6% of the array) in response to Microcystis, of which 17% are lineage specific( i.e., these genes have no detectable homology to any other gene in currently available databases) and 49% are gene duplicates (paralogs). We identified four pathways/gene networks and eight paralogous gene families affected by Microcystis. Differential regulation of the ribosome, including 3 paralogous gene families encoding 40S, 60S and mitochondrial ribosomal proteins, suggests an impact of Microcystis on protein synthesis of D. pulex. In addition, differential regulation of the oxidative phosphorylation pathway (including the NADH ubquinone oxidoreductase gene family) and the trypsin paralogous gene family (a major component of the digestive system in D. pulex) could explain why fitness is reduced based on energy budget considerations. PMID:22799445

  3. Identification of paralogous genes of firefly luciferase in the Japanese firefly, Luciola cruciata.

    PubMed

    Oba, Yuichi; Sato, Mitsunori; Ohta, Yuichiro; Inouye, Satoshi

    2006-03-01

    Two homologous genes of firefly luciferase, LcLL1 and LcLL2, were cloned from the Japanese firefly Luciola cruciata, and were expressed and characterized. The gene product of LcLL1 had long-chain fatty acyl-CoA synthetic activity, but not luciferase activity. The other gene product of LcLL2 did not show enzymatic activities of acyl-CoA synthetase and luciferase. RT-PCR analysis showed that the transcript of LcLL1 was abundant in larva but very low in adult, while LcLL2 was expressed in both larva and adult. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that LcLL1 and LcLL2 are paralogous genes of firefly luciferase. Recently, we found that CG6178 in Drosophila melanogaster is an orthologue of firefly luciferase and shows fatty acyl-CoA synthetic activity, but not luciferase activity. These results suggest that firefly luciferase might be evolved from a fatty acyl-CoA synthetase by gene duplication in insects.

  4. Evolutionary history and epigenetic regulation of the three paralogous pax7 genes in rainbow trout

    PubMed Central

    Seiliez, Iban; Froehlich, Jacob Michael; Marandel, Lucie; Gabillard, Jean-Charles; Biga, Peggy R.

    2015-01-01

    The extraordinary muscle growth potential of teleost fish, particular those of the Salmoninae clade, elicits questions about how the relatively highly conserved transcription factors of the myogenic program are regulated. In addition, the pseudotetraploid nature of the salmonid genome adds another layer of regulatory complexity, and this must be reconciled with epigenetic data to better understand how these fish achieve lifelong muscle growth. To this end, we identified three paralogous pax7 genes (pax7a1, pax7a2, and pax7b) in the rainbow trout genome. During in vitro myogenesis, pax7a1 transcripts remain stable, while pax7a2 and pax7b mRNAs increase in abundance, similarly to myogenin mRNAs and in contrast to the expression pattern of the mammalian ortholog. In addition, we profiled the distribution of repressive H3K27me3 and H3K9me3 and permissive H3K4me3 marks during in vitro myogenesis across these loci, finding that pax7a2 expression was associated with decreased H3K27 trimethylation, while pax7b expression was correlated with decreased H3K9me3 and −K27me3. Altogether, these data link the highly unique differential expression of pax7 paralogs with epigenetic histone modifications in a vertebrate species displaying growth divergent from that of mammals and highlight an important divergence in the regulatory mechanisms of pax7 expression among vertebrates. The system described here provides a more comprehensive picture of the combinatorial control mechanisms orchestrating skeletal muscle growth in a salmonid, leading to a better understanding of myogenesis in this species and across Vertebrata more generally. PMID:25487404

  5. Deletion of cdvB paralogous genes of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius impairs cell division.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nuan; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2014-03-01

    The majority of Crenarchaeota utilize the cell division system (Cdv) to divide. This system consists of three highly conserved genes, cdvA, cdvB and cdvC that are organized in an operon. CdvC is homologous to the AAA-type ATPase Vps4, involved in multivesicular body biogenesis in eukaryotes. CdvA is a unique archaeal protein that interacts with the membrane, while CdvB is homologous to the eukaryal Vps24 and forms helical filaments. Most Crenarcheota contain additional CdvB paralogs. In Sulfolobus acidocaldarius these are termed CdvB1-3. We have used a gene inactivation approach to determine the impact of these additional cdvB genes on cell division. Independent deletion mutants of these genes were analyzed for growth and protein localization. One of the deletion strains (ΔcdvB3) showed a severe growth defect on plates and delayed growth on liquid medium. It showed the formation of enlarged cells and a defect in DNA segregation. Since these defects are accompanied with an aberrant localization of CdvA and CdvB, we conclude that CdvB3 fulfills an important accessory role in cell division.

  6. Frequency and character of alternative somatic recombination fates of paralogous genes during T-DNA integration.

    PubMed

    Jelesko, John G; Carter, Kristy; Kinoshita, Yuki; Gruissem, Wilhelm

    2005-09-01

    A synthetic RBCSB gene cluster was transformed into Arabidopsis in order to simultaneously evaluate the frequency and character of somatic illegitimate recombination, homologous recombination, and targeted gene replacement events associated with T-DNA-mediated transformation. The most frequent type of recombination event observed was illegitimate integration of the T-DNA without activation of the silent DeltaRBCS1B: LUC transgene. Sixteen luc(+) (firefly luciferase positive) T1 plants were isolated. Six of these were due to illegitimate recombination events resulting in a gene trapping effect. Nine resulted from homologous recombination between paralogous RBCSB sequences associated with T-DNA integration. The frequency of somatic homologous recombination associated with T-DNA integration was almost 200 times higher than previously reported rates of meiotic homologous recombination with the same genes. The distribution of (somatic homologous) recombination resolution sites generally fits a fractional interval length model. However, a small region adjacent to an indel showed a significant over-representation of resolution sites, suggesting that DNA mismatch recognition may also play an important role in the positioning of somatic resolution sites. The frequency of somatic resolution within exon-2 was significantly different from that previously observed during meiotic recombination.

  7. Recombineering-based dissection of flanking and paralogous Hox gene functions in mouse reproductive tracts

    PubMed Central

    Raines, Anna M.; Adam, Mike; Magella, Bliss; Meyer, Sara E.; Grimes, H. Leighton; Dey, Sudhansu K.; Potter, S. Steven

    2013-01-01

    Hox genes are key regulators of development. In mammals, the study of these genes is greatly confounded by their large number, overlapping functions and interspersed shared enhancers. Here, we describe the use of a novel recombineering strategy to introduce simultaneous frameshift mutations into the flanking Hoxa9, Hoxa10 and Hoxa11 genes, as well as their paralogs on the HoxD cluster. The resulting Hoxa9,10,11 mutant mice displayed dramatic synergistic homeotic transformations of the reproductive tracts, with the uterus anteriorized towards oviduct and the vas deferens anteriorized towards epididymis. The Hoxa9,10,11 mutant mice also provided a genetic setting that allowed the discovery of Hoxd9,10,11 redundant reproductive tract patterning function. Both shared and distinct Hox functions were defined. Hoxd9,10,11 play a crucial role in the regulation of uterine immune function. Non-coding non-polyadenylated RNAs were among the key Hox targets, with dramatic downregulation in mutants. We observed Hox cross-regulation of transcription and splicing. In addition, we observed a surprising anti-dogmatic apparent posteriorization of the uterine epithelium. In caudal regions of the uterus, the normal simple columnar epithelium flanking the lumen was replaced by a pseudostratified transitional epithelium, normally found near the more posterior cervix. These results identify novel molecular functions of Hox genes in the development of the male and female reproductive tracts. PMID:23760953

  8. Repression of motility during fimbrial expression: identification of fourteen mrpJ gene paralogs in Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Melanie M.; Mobley, Harry L.T.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Proteus mirabilis alternates between motile and adherent forms. MrpJ, a transcriptional regulator previously reported to repress motility, is encoded at the 3' end of the mrp fimbrial operon in P. mirabilis. Sequencing of the P. mirabilis genome revealed 14 additional paralogs of mrpJ, ten of which are associated with fimbrial operons. Twelve of these genes, when overexpressed, repressed motility; several distinct patterns of swarming motility were noted. Expression of 10 of the 14 mrpJ paralogs repressed flagellin (FlaA) synthesis. Alignment of the predicted amino acid sequences of MrpJ and its fourteen paralogs revealed a conserved consensus motif (SQQQFSRYE) within the helix-turn-helix domain. Site-directed mutagenesis of these residues coupled with linker insertion mutagenesis of MrpJ confirmed the importance of this domain for repression of motility. Gel shift assays demonstrated that MrpJ and another paralog UcaJ bind directly to the promoter region of the flagellar master regulator flhDC. Thus, P. mirabilis appears to use a related mechanism to inhibit motility during the production of at least ten of its predicted fimbriae. PMID:18630347

  9. Targeted mutagenesis of multiple and paralogous genes in Xenopus laevis using two pairs of transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Sakane, Yuto; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Kashiwagi, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Takashi; Suzuki, Ken-Ichi T

    2014-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) have been extensively used in genome editing in various organisms. In some cases, however, it is difficult to efficiently disrupt both paralogous genes using a single pair of TALENs in Xenopus laevis because of its polyploidy. Here, we report targeted mutagenesis of multiple and paralogous genes using two pairs of TALENs in X. laevis. First, we show simultaneous targeted mutagenesis of three genes, tyrosinase paralogues (tyra and tyrb) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (egfp) by injection of two TALENs pairs in transgenic embryos carrying egfp. Consistent with the high frequency of both severe phenotypic traits, albinism and loss of GFP fluorescence, frameshift mutation rates of tyr paralogues and egfp reached 40-80%. Next, we show early introduction of TALEN-mediated mutagenesis of these target loci during embryogenesis. Finally, we also demonstrate that two different pairs of TALENs can simultaneously introduce mutations to both paralogues encoding histone chaperone with high efficiency. Our results suggest that targeted mutagenesis of multiple genes using TALENs can be applied to analyze the functions of paralogous genes with redundancy in X. laevis.

  10. Assessment of Complement C4 Gene Copy Number Using the Paralog Ratio Test

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Michelle M.A.; Boteva, Lora; Morris, David L.; Zhou, Bi; Wu, Yee Ling; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Yu, Chack Yung; Rioux, John D.; Hollox, Edward J.; Vyse, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    The complement C4 locus is in the class III region of the MHC, and exhibits copy number variation. Complement C4 null alleles have shown association with a number of diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, most studies to date have used protein immunophenotyping and not direct interrogation of the genome to determine C4 null allele status. Moreover, a lack of accurate C4 gene copy number (GCN) estimation and tight linkage disequilibrium across the disease-associated MHC haplotypes has confounded attempts to establish whether or not these associations are causal. We have therefore developed a high through-put paralog ratio test (PRT) in association with two restriction enzyme digest variant ratio tests (REDVRs) to determine total C4 GCN, C4A GCN, and C4B GCN. In the densely genotyped CEU cohort we show that this method is accurate and reproducible when compared to gold standard Southern blot copy number estimation with a discrepancy rate of 9%. We find a broad range of C4 GCNs in the CEU and the 1958 British Birth Cohort populations under study. In addition, SNP-C4 CNV analyses show only moderate levels of correlation and therefore do not support the use of SNP genotypes as proxies for complement C4 GCN. PMID:20506482

  11. Exploiting a Reference Genome in Terms of Duplications: The Network of Paralogs and Single Copy Genes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Sangiovanni, Mara; Vigilante, Alessandra; Chiusano, Maria Luisa

    2013-12-09

    Arabidopsis thaliana became the model organism for plant studies because of its small diploid genome, rapid lifecycle and short adult size. Its genome was the first among plants to be sequenced, becoming the reference in plant genomics. However, the Arabidopsis genome is characterized by an inherently complex organization, since it has undergone ancient whole genome duplications, followed by gene reduction, diploidization events and extended rearrangements, which relocated and split up the retained portions. These events, together with probable chromosome reductions, dramatically increased the genome complexity, limiting its role as a reference. The identification of paralogs and single copy genes within a highly duplicated genome is a prerequisite to understand its organization and evolution and to improve its exploitation in comparative genomics. This is still controversial, even in the widely studied Arabidopsis genome. This is also due to the lack of a reference bioinformatics pipeline that could exhaustively identify paralogs and singleton genes. We describe here a complete computational strategy to detect both duplicated and single copy genes in a genome, discussing all the methodological issues that may strongly affect the results, their quality and their reliability. This approach was used to analyze the organization of Arabidopsis nuclear protein coding genes, and besides classifying computationally defined paralogs into networks and single copy genes into different classes, it unraveled further intriguing aspects concerning the genome annotation and the gene relationships in this reference plant species. Since our results may be useful for comparative genomics and genome functional analyses, we organized a dedicated web interface to make them accessible to the scientific community.

  12. Gene duplication in trypanosomatids - two DED1 paralogs are functionally redundant and differentially expressed during the life cycle.

    PubMed

    Zinoviev, Alexandra; Akum, Yael; Yahav, Tal; Shapira, Michal

    2012-10-01

    DED1/VAS belong to the DEAD-box family of RNA helicases that are associated with translation initiation in higher eukaryotes. Here we report on two DED1/VAS homologs that were identified in the genome of Leishmania. The two paralogs include all the domains that are typical of DEAD-box proteins and a phylogenetic analysis suggests that their duplication predates the branching of DED1 and VAS, which took place along with the appearance of early metazoans. The two Leishmania DED1 paralogs complement a yeast strain that fails to express the endogenous DED1, suggesting that they are responsible for a similar function. This is also supported by RNAi-mediated silencing experiments performed in Trypanosoma brucei. The two proteins are functionally redundant, since defects in protein synthesis and cell growth arrest were observed only when both paralogs were eliminated. A partial stage-specific specialization is observed, as LeishDED1-2 is more abundant in promastigotes, whereas expression of LeishDED1-1 increases in amastigotes. Duplication of an essential gene usually offers a safety net against mutations but in this case it also generated two proteins with stage specific expression. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Orthologs and paralogs of regA, a master cell-type regulatory gene in Volvox carteri.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Leonard; Nishii, Ichiro; Howard, Alicia; Kirk, David; Miller, Stephen M

    2006-07-01

    The multicellular green alga Volvox carteri forma nagariensis has only two cell types: terminally differentiated somatic cells and reproductive cells. The regA gene maintains the terminally differentiated state of the somatic cells, apparently by repressing transcription of genes required for chloroplast biogenesis and thereby preventing cell growth. Because the RegA protein sequence bore no obvious motifs, we are attempting to identify regions of functional importance by searching for strongly conserved domains in RegA orthologs. Here we report the cloning and characterization of regA from the most closely related known taxon, V. carteri f. kawasakiensis. Given the closeness of the relationship between these two formas, their regA genes are surprisingly different: they differ in the number of introns and by several lengthy indels, and they encode proteins that are only 80% identical. We also serendipitously discovered a paralogous gene immediately upstream of each regA locus. The two regA genes, both upstream paralogs and several genes in Chlamydomonas (the closest unicellular relative of Volvox) encode a conserved region (the VARL domain) that contains what appears to be a DNA-binding SAND domain. This discovery has opened up a new avenue for exploring how regA and the terminally differentiated state that it controls evolved.

  14. [Fish growth-hormone genes: functionality evidence of paralogous genes in Levanidov's charr].

    PubMed

    Kamenskaya, D N; Pankova, M V; Atopkin, D M; Brykov, V A

    2015-01-01

    In the genome of most vertebrates growth-hormone gene is presented in a single copy, while in salmonids after one of the duplication events many genes were multiplied, including growth hormone gene. In salmonids, the growth-hormone gene exists as two independently inherited functional paralogues, gh1 and gh2. In this study, we performed a comparative analysis of gh1 and gh2 growth-hormone genes and their adjacent sequences in Levanidov's charr Salvelinus levanidovi to determine their functionality and define the potential differences. We found that both genes have the same gene structure and are composed of six exons (I-VI) and five introns (A, B, C, D, E). However, the respective gene sequences differ in length. A comparison of exons showed that the size of each exon is identical in both paralogues. The overall length of genes differs due to the varying lengths of introns. Coding sequence of both genes contains an open reading frame for 210 amino acids. We identified regulatory elements in the promoter region of both genes: TATA box, A/T-rich regions that contain binding sites for pituitary-specific transcriptional activator Pit-1, and regions responsible for interaction with other transcriptional activators and initiators, in particular hormone receptors. The obtained data indicate that both genes are functional.

  15. Phylogenomics with paralogs

    PubMed Central

    Hellmuth, Marc; Wieseke, Nicolas; Lechner, Marcus; Lenhof, Hans-Peter; Middendorf, Martin; Stadler, Peter F.

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenomics heavily relies on well-curated sequence data sets that comprise, for each gene, exclusively 1:1 orthologos. Paralogs are treated as a dangerous nuisance that has to be detected and removed. We show here that this severe restriction of the data sets is not necessary. Building upon recent advances in mathematical phylogenetics, we demonstrate that gene duplications convey meaningful phylogenetic information and allow the inference of plausible phylogenetic trees, provided orthologs and paralogs can be distinguished with a degree of certainty. Starting from tree-free estimates of orthology, cograph editing can sufficiently reduce the noise to find correct event-annotated gene trees. The information of gene trees can then directly be translated into constraints on the species trees. Although the resolution is very poor for individual gene families, we show that genome-wide data sets are sufficient to generate fully resolved phylogenetic trees, even in the presence of horizontal gene transfer. PMID:25646426

  16. Did Androgen-Binding Protein Paralogs Undergo Neo- and/or Subfunctionalization as the Abp Gene Region Expanded in the Mouse Genome?

    PubMed Central

    Karn, Robert C.; Chung, Amanda G.; Laukaitis, Christina M.

    2014-01-01

    The Androgen-binding protein (Abp) region of the mouse genome contains 30 Abpa genes encoding alpha subunits and 34 Abpbg genes encoding betagamma subunits, their products forming dimers composed of an alpha and a betagamma subunit. We endeavored to determine how many Abp genes are expressed as proteins in tears and saliva, and as transcripts in the exocrine glands producing them. Using standard PCR, we amplified Abp transcripts from cDNA libraries of C57BL/6 mice and found fifteen Abp gene transcripts in the lacrimal gland and five in the submandibular gland. Proteomic analyses identified proteins corresponding to eleven of the lacrimal gland transcripts, all of them different from the three salivary ABPs reported previously. Our qPCR results showed that five of the six transcripts that lacked corresponding proteins are expressed at very low levels compared to those transcripts with proteins. We found 1) no overlap in the repertoires of expressed Abp paralogs in lacrimal gland/tears and salivary glands/saliva; 2) substantial sex-limited expression of lacrimal gland/tear expressed-paralogs in males but no sex-limited expression in females; and 3) that the lacrimal gland/tear expressed-paralogs are found exclusively in ancestral clades 1, 2 and 3 of the five clades described previously while the salivary glands/saliva expressed-paralogs are found only in clade 5. The number of instances of extremely low levels of transcription without corresponding protein production in paralogs specific to tears and saliva suggested the role of subfunctionalization, a derived condition wherein genes that may have been expressed highly in both glands ancestrally were down-regulated subsequent to duplication. Thus, evidence for subfunctionalization can be seen in our data and we argue that the partitioning of paralog expression between lacrimal and salivary glands that we report here occurred as the result of adaptive evolution. PMID:25531410

  17. The spinal muscular atrophy gene region at 5q13.1 has a paralogous chromosomal region at 6p21.3.

    PubMed

    Banyer, J L; Goldwurm, S; Cullen, L; van der Griend, B; Zournazi, A; Smit, D J; Powell, L W; Jazwinska, E C

    1998-03-01

    Paralogous regions are duplicated segments of chromosomal DNA that have been acquired during the evolution of the genome. Subsequent divergent evolution of the genes within paralogous regions can lead to the formation of gene families. Here, we report the identification of a region on Chromosome (Chr) 6 at 6p21.3 that is paralogous with the Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) gene region on Chr 5 at 5q13.1. Partial characterization of this region identified nine sequences all of which are highly homologous to DNA sequences of the SMA gene region at 5q13.1. These sequences include four beta-glucuronidase sequences, two retrotransposon sequences, a novel cDNA, a Sequence Tagged Site (STS), and one that is homologous to exon 9 of the Neuronal Apoptosis Inhibitor Protein (NAIP) gene. The 6p21.3 paralogous SMA region may contain genes that are related to those in the SMA region at 5q13.1; however, a direct association of this region with SMA is unlikely given that no linkage of SMA with Chr 6 has been reported.

  18. Divergent Evolutionary and Expression Patterns between Lineage Specific New Duplicate Genes and Their Parental Paralogs in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Marowsky, Nicholas C.; Fan, Chuanzhu

    2013-01-01

    Gene duplication is an important mechanism for the origination of functional novelties in organisms. We performed a comparative genome analysis to systematically estimate recent lineage specific gene duplication events in Arabidopsis thaliana and further investigate whether and how these new duplicate genes (NDGs) play a functional role in the evolution and adaption of A. thaliana. We accomplished this using syntenic relationship among four closely related species, A. thaliana, A. lyrata, Capsella rubella and Brassica rapa. We identified 100 NDGs, showing clear origination patterns, whose parental genes are located in syntenic regions and/or have clear orthologs in at least one of three outgroup species. All 100 NDGs were transcribed and under functional constraints, while 24% of the NDGs have differential expression patterns compared to their parental genes. We explored the underlying evolutionary forces of these paralogous pairs through conducting neutrality tests with sequence divergence and polymorphism data. Evolution of about 15% of NDGs appeared to be driven by natural selection. Moreover, we found that 3 NDGs not only altered their expression patterns when compared with parental genes, but also evolved under positive selection. We investigated the underlying mechanisms driving the differential expression of NDGs and their parents, and found a number of NDGs had different cis-elements and methylation patterns from their parental genes. Overall, we demonstrated that NDGs acquired divergent cis-elements and methylation patterns and may experience sub-functionalization or neo-functionalization influencing the evolution and adaption of A. thaliana. PMID:24009676

  19. Nonredundant and locus-specific gene repression functions of PRC1 paralog family members in human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    van den Boom, Vincent; Rozenveld-Geugien, Marjan; Bonardi, Francesco; Malanga, Donatella; van Gosliga, Djoke; Heijink, Anne Margriet; Viglietto, Giuseppe; Morrone, Giovanni; Fusetti, Fabrizia; Vellenga, Edo; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2013-03-28

    The Polycomb group (PcG) protein BMI1 is a key factor in regulating hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) and leukemic stem cell self-renewal and functions in the context of the Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1). In humans, each of the 5 subunits of PRC1 has paralog family members of which many reside in PRC1 complexes, likely in a mutually exclusive manner, pointing toward a previously unanticipated complexity of Polycomb-mediated silencing. We used an RNA interference screening approach to test the functionality of these paralogs in human hematopoiesis. Our data demonstrate a lack of redundancy between various paralog family members, suggestive of functional diversification between PcG proteins. By using an in vivo biotinylation tagging approach followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to identify PcG interaction partners, we confirmed the existence of multiple specific PRC1 complexes. We find that CBX2 is a nonredundant CBX paralog vital for HSC and progenitor function that directly regulates the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21, independently of BMI1 that dominantly controls expression of the INK4A/ARF locus. Taken together, our data show that different PRC1 paralog family members have nonredundant and locus-specific gene regulatory activities that are essential for human hematopoiesis.

  20. The mammalian 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase gene family: evidence for concerted evolution of paralogous Oas1 genes in Rodentia and Artiodactyla.

    PubMed

    Perelygin, Andrey A; Zharkikh, Andrey A; Scherbik, Svetlana V; Brinton, Margo A

    2006-10-01

    Multiple 2'-5' oligoadenylate (2-5A) synthetases are important components of innate immunity in mammals. Gene families encoding these proteins have previously been studied mainly in humans and mice. To reconstruct the evolution of this gene family in mammals, a search for additional 2-5A synthetase genes was performed in rat, cattle, pig, and dog. Twelve 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase (Oas) genes were identified in the rat genome, including eight Oas1 genes, two Oas1 pseudogenes, single copies of Oas2 and Oas3, and two Oas-like genes, Oasl1 and Oasl2. Four OAS genes were detected in the pig genome and five OAS genes were found in both the cattle and dog genomes. An OAS3 gene was not found in either the cattle or the pig genome. While two tandemly duplicated OAS-like (OASL) genes were identified in the dog genome, only a single OASL orthologue was found in both the cattle and the pig genomes. The bovine and porcine OASL genes contain premature stop codons and encode truncated proteins, which lack the typical C-terminal double ubiquitin domains. The cDNA sequences of the rat, cattle, pig, and dog OAS genes were amplified, sequenced and compared with each other and with those in the human, mouse, horse, and chicken genomes. Evidence of concerted evolution of paralogous 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase 1 genes was obtained in rodents (Rodentia) and even-toed ungulates (Artiodactyla). Calculations using the nonparametric Kolmogorov-Smirnov test suggested that the homogenization of paralogous OAS1 sequences was due to gene conversion rather than stabilizing selection.

  1. Evolution of plant RNA polymerase IV/V genes: evidence of subneofunctionalization of duplicated NRPD2/NRPE2-like paralogs in Viola (Violaceae)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background DNA-dependent RNA polymerase IV and V (Pol IV and V) are multi-subunit enzymes occurring in plants. The origin of Pol V, specific to angiosperms, from Pol IV, which is present in all land plants, is linked to the duplication of the gene encoding the largest subunit and the subsequent subneofunctionalization of the two paralogs (NRPD1 and NRPE1). Additional duplication of the second-largest subunit, NRPD2/NRPE2, has happened independently in at least some eudicot lineages, but its paralogs are often subject to concerted evolution and gene death and little is known about their evolution nor their affinity with Pol IV and Pol V. Results We sequenced a ~1500 bp NRPD2/E2-like fragment from 18 Viola species, mostly paleopolyploids, and 6 non-Viola Violaceae species. Incongruence between the NRPD2/E2-like gene phylogeny and species phylogeny indicates a first duplication of NRPD2 relatively basally in Violaceae, with subsequent sorting of paralogs in the descendants, followed by a second duplication in the common ancestor of Viola and Allexis. In Viola, the mutation pattern suggested (sub-) neofunctionalization of the two NRPD2/E2-like paralogs, NRPD2/E2-a and NRPD2/E2-b. The dN/dS ratios indicated that a 54 bp region exerted strong positive selection for both paralogs immediately following duplication. This 54 bp region encodes a domain that is involved in the binding of the Nrpd2 subunit with other Pol IV/V subunits, and may be important for correct recognition of subunits specific to Pol IV and Pol V. Across all Viola taxa 73 NRPD2/E2-like sequences were obtained, of which 23 (32%) were putative pseudogenes - all occurring in polyploids. The NRPD2 duplication was conserved in all lineages except the diploid MELVIO clade, in which NRPD2/E2-b was lost, and its allopolyploid derivates from hybridization with the CHAM clade, section Viola and section Melanium, in which NRPD2/E2-a occurred in multiple copies while NRPD2/E2-b paralogs were either absent or

  2. Evolution of plant RNA polymerase IV/V genes: evidence of subneofunctionalization of duplicated NRPD2/NRPE2-like paralogs in Viola (Violaceae).

    PubMed

    Marcussen, Thomas; Oxelman, Bengt; Skog, Anna; Jakobsen, Kjetill S

    2010-02-16

    DNA-dependent RNA polymerase IV and V (Pol IV and V) are multi-subunit enzymes occurring in plants. The origin of Pol V, specific to angiosperms, from Pol IV, which is present in all land plants, is linked to the duplication of the gene encoding the largest subunit and the subsequent subneofunctionalization of the two paralogs (NRPD1 and NRPE1). Additional duplication of the second-largest subunit, NRPD2/NRPE2, has happened independently in at least some eudicot lineages, but its paralogs are often subject to concerted evolution and gene death and little is known about their evolution nor their affinity with Pol IV and Pol V. We sequenced a approximately 1500 bp NRPD2/E2-like fragment from 18 Viola species, mostly paleopolyploids, and 6 non-Viola Violaceae species. Incongruence between the NRPD2/E2-like gene phylogeny and species phylogeny indicates a first duplication of NRPD2 relatively basally in Violaceae, with subsequent sorting of paralogs in the descendants, followed by a second duplication in the common ancestor of Viola and Allexis. In Viola, the mutation pattern suggested (sub-) neofunctionalization of the two NRPD2/E2-like paralogs, NRPD2/E2-a and NRPD2/E2-b. The dN/dS ratios indicated that a 54 bp region exerted strong positive selection for both paralogs immediately following duplication. This 54 bp region encodes a domain that is involved in the binding of the Nrpd2 subunit with other Pol IV/V subunits, and may be important for correct recognition of subunits specific to Pol IV and Pol V. Across all Viola taxa 73 NRPD2/E2-like sequences were obtained, of which 23 (32%) were putative pseudogenes - all occurring in polyploids. The NRPD2 duplication was conserved in all lineages except the diploid MELVIO clade, in which NRPD2/E2-b was lost, and its allopolyploid derivates from hybridization with the CHAM clade, section Viola and section Melanium, in which NRPD2/E2-a occurred in multiple copies while NRPD2/E2-b paralogs were either absent or pseudogenized

  3. An Intronless β-amyrin Synthase Gene is More Efficient in Oleanolic Acid Accumulation than its Paralog in Gentiana straminea

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanling; Zhao, Zhongjuan; Xue, Zheyong; Wang, Long; Cai, Yunfei; Wang, Peng; Wei, Tiandi; Gong, Jing; Liu, Zhenhua; Li, Juan; Li, Shuo; Xiang, Fengning

    2016-01-01

    Paralogous members of the oxidosqualene cyclase (OSC) family encode a diversity of enzymes that are important in triterpenoid biosynthesis. This report describes the isolation of the Gentiana straminea gene GsAS2 that encodes a β-amyrin synthase (βAS) enzyme. Unlike its previously isolated paralog GsAS1, GsAS2 lacks introns. Its predicted protein product was is a 759 residue polypeptide that shares high homology with other known β-amyrin synthases (βASs). Heterologously expressed GsAS2 generates more β-amyrin in yeast than does GsAS1. Constitutive over-expression of GsAS2 resulted in a 5.7 fold increase in oleanolic acid accumulation, while over-expression of GsAS1 led to a 3 fold increase. Additionally, RNAi-directed suppression of GsAS2 and GsAS1 in G. straminea decreased oleonolic acid levels by 65.9% and 21% respectively, indicating that GsAS2 plays a more important role than GsAS1 in oleanolic acid biosynthesis in G. straminea. We uses a docking model to explore the catalytic mechanism of GsAS1/2 and predicted that GsAS2, with its Y560, have higher efficiency than GsAS1 and mutated versions of GsAS2 in β-amyrin produce. When the key residue in GsAS2 was mutagenized, it produced about 41.29% and 71.15% less β-amyrin than native, while the key residue in GsAS1 was mutagenized to that in GsAS2, the mutant produced 38.02% more β-amyrin than native GsAS1. PMID:27624821

  4. An Intronless β-amyrin Synthase Gene is More Efficient in Oleanolic Acid Accumulation than its Paralog in Gentiana straminea.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanling; Zhao, Zhongjuan; Xue, Zheyong; Wang, Long; Cai, Yunfei; Wang, Peng; Wei, Tiandi; Gong, Jing; Liu, Zhenhua; Li, Juan; Li, Shuo; Xiang, Fengning

    2016-09-14

    Paralogous members of the oxidosqualene cyclase (OSC) family encode a diversity of enzymes that are important in triterpenoid biosynthesis. This report describes the isolation of the Gentiana straminea gene GsAS2 that encodes a β-amyrin synthase (βAS) enzyme. Unlike its previously isolated paralog GsAS1, GsAS2 lacks introns. Its predicted protein product was is a 759 residue polypeptide that shares high homology with other known β-amyrin synthases (βASs). Heterologously expressed GsAS2 generates more β-amyrin in yeast than does GsAS1. Constitutive over-expression of GsAS2 resulted in a 5.7 fold increase in oleanolic acid accumulation, while over-expression of GsAS1 led to a 3 fold increase. Additionally, RNAi-directed suppression of GsAS2 and GsAS1 in G. straminea decreased oleonolic acid levels by 65.9% and 21% respectively, indicating that GsAS2 plays a more important role than GsAS1 in oleanolic acid biosynthesis in G. straminea. We uses a docking model to explore the catalytic mechanism of GsAS1/2 and predicted that GsAS2, with its Y560, have higher efficiency than GsAS1 and mutated versions of GsAS2 in β-amyrin produce. When the key residue in GsAS2 was mutagenized, it produced about 41.29% and 71.15% less β-amyrin than native, while the key residue in GsAS1 was mutagenized to that in GsAS2, the mutant produced 38.02% more β-amyrin than native GsAS1.

  5. Lateral gene transfer and ancient paralogy of operons containing redundant copies of tryptophan-pathway genes in Xylella species and in heterocystous cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Gary; Bonner, Carol A; Brettin, Tom; Gottardo, Raphael; Keyhani, Nemat O; Jensen, Roy A

    2003-01-01

    Background Tryptophan-pathway genes that exist within an apparent operon-like organization were evaluated as examples of multi-genic genomic regions that contain phylogenetically incongruous genes and coexist with genes outside the operon that are congruous. A seven-gene cluster in Xylella fastidiosa includes genes encoding the two subunits of anthranilate synthase, an aryl-CoA synthetase, and trpR. A second gene block, present in the Anabaena/Nostoc lineage, but not in other cyanobacteria, contains a near-complete tryptophan operon nested within an apparent supraoperon containing other aromatic-pathway genes. Results The gene block in X. fastidiosa exhibits a sharply delineated low-GC content. This, as well as bias of codon usage and 3:1 dinucleotide analysis, strongly implicates lateral gene transfer (LGT). In contrast, parametric studies and protein tree phylogenies did not support the origination of the Anabaena/Nostoc gene block by LGT. Conclusions Judging from the apparent minimal amelioration, the low-GC gene block in X. fastidiosa probably originated by LGT at a relatively recent time. The surprising inability to pinpoint a donor lineage still leaves room for alternative, albeit less likely, explanations other than LGT. On the other hand, the large Anabaena/Nostoc gene block does not seem to have arisen by LGT. We suggest that the contemporary Anabaena/Nostoc array of divergent paralogs represents an ancient ancestral state of paralog divergence, with extensive streamlining by gene loss occurring in the lineage of descent representing other (unicellular) cyanobacteria. PMID:12620124

  6. Mutations in paralogous Hox genes result in overlapping homeotic transformations of the axial skeleton: evidence for unique and redundant function.

    PubMed

    Horan, G S; Kovàcs, E N; Behringer, R R; Featherstone, M S

    1995-05-01

    Hoxd-4 (previously known as Hox-4.2 and -5.1) is a mouse homeobox-containing gene homologous to the Drosophila homeotic gene Deformed. During embryogenesis, Hoxd-4 is expressed in the presumptive hindbrain and spinal cord, prevertebrae, and other tissues. In the adult, Hoxd-4 transcripts are expressed predominantly in the testis and kidney, and to a lesser extent in intestine and heart. To understand the role of Hoxd-4 during mouse embryogenesis, we generated Hoxd-4 mutant mice. Mice heterozygous or homozygous for the Hoxd-4 mutation exhibit homeotic transformations of the second cervical vertebrae (C2) to the first cervical vertebrae (C1) and malformations of the neural arches of C1 to C3 and of the basioccipital bone. The phenotype was incompletely penetrant and showed variable expressivity on both an F2 hybrid and 129 inbred genetic background. The mutant phenotype was detected in the cartilaginous skeleton of 14.5-day (E14.5) mutant embryos but no apparent differences were detected in the somites of E9.5 mutant embryos, suggesting that the abnormalities develop after E9.5 perhaps during or after resegmentation of the somites to form the prevertebrae. These results suggest that Hoxd-4 plays a role in conferring position information along the anteroposterior axis in the skeleton. The phenotypic similarities and differences between Hoxd-4 and previously reported Hoxa-4 and Hoxb-4 mutant mice suggest that Hox gene paralogs have both redundant and unique functions.

  7. On the Use of Gene Ontology Annotations to Assess Functional Similarity among Orthologs and Paralogs: A Short Report

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Paul D.; Wood, Valerie; Mungall, Christopher J.; Lewis, Suzanna E.; Blake, Judith A.

    2012-01-01

    A recent paper (Nehrt et al., PLoS Comput. Biol. 7:e1002073, 2011) has proposed a metric for the “functional similarity” between two genes that uses only the Gene Ontology (GO) annotations directly derived from published experimental results. Applying this metric, the authors concluded that paralogous genes within the mouse genome or the human genome are more functionally similar on average than orthologous genes between these genomes, an unexpected result with broad implications if true. We suggest, based on both theoretical and empirical considerations, that this proposed metric should not be interpreted as a functional similarity, and therefore cannot be used to support any conclusions about the “ortholog conjecture” (or, more properly, the “ortholog functional conservation hypothesis”). First, we reexamine the case studies presented by Nehrt et al. as examples of orthologs with divergent functions, and come to a very different conclusion: they actually exemplify how GO annotations for orthologous genes provide complementary information about conserved biological functions. We then show that there is a global ascertainment bias in the experiment-based GO annotations for human and mouse genes: particular types of experiments tend to be performed in different model organisms. We conclude that the reported statistical differences in annotations between pairs of orthologous genes do not reflect differences in biological function, but rather complementarity in experimental approaches. Our results underscore two general considerations for researchers proposing novel types of analysis based on the GO: 1) that GO annotations are often incomplete, potentially in a biased manner, and subject to an “open world assumption” (absence of an annotation does not imply absence of a function), and 2) that conclusions drawn from a novel, large-scale GO analysis should whenever possible be supported by careful, in-depth examination of examples, to help ensure the

  8. On the Use of Gene Ontology Annotations to Assess Functional Similarity among Orthologs and Paralogs: A Short Report.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Paul D; Wood, Valerie; Mungall, Christopher J; Lewis, Suzanna E; Blake, Judith A

    2012-01-01

    A recent paper (Nehrt et al., PLoS Comput. Biol. 7:e1002073, 2011) has proposed a metric for the "functional similarity" between two genes that uses only the Gene Ontology (GO) annotations directly derived from published experimental results. Applying this metric, the authors concluded that paralogous genes within the mouse genome or the human genome are more functionally similar on average than orthologous genes between these genomes, an unexpected result with broad implications if true. We suggest, based on both theoretical and empirical considerations, that this proposed metric should not be interpreted as a functional similarity, and therefore cannot be used to support any conclusions about the "ortholog conjecture" (or, more properly, the "ortholog functional conservation hypothesis"). First, we reexamine the case studies presented by Nehrt et al. as examples of orthologs with divergent functions, and come to a very different conclusion: they actually exemplify how GO annotations for orthologous genes provide complementary information about conserved biological functions. We then show that there is a global ascertainment bias in the experiment-based GO annotations for human and mouse genes: particular types of experiments tend to be performed in different model organisms. We conclude that the reported statistical differences in annotations between pairs of orthologous genes do not reflect differences in biological function, but rather complementarity in experimental approaches. Our results underscore two general considerations for researchers proposing novel types of analysis based on the GO: 1) that GO annotations are often incomplete, potentially in a biased manner, and subject to an "open world assumption" (absence of an annotation does not imply absence of a function), and 2) that conclusions drawn from a novel, large-scale GO analysis should whenever possible be supported by careful, in-depth examination of examples, to help ensure the conclusions have a

  9. Gene conversion and DNA sequence polymorphism in the sex-determination gene fog-2 and its paralog ftr-1 in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Rane, Hallie S; Smith, Jessica M; Bergthorsson, Ulfar; Katju, Vaishali

    2010-07-01

    Gene conversion, a form of concerted evolution, bears enormous potential to shape the trajectory of sequence and functional divergence of gene paralogs subsequent to duplication events. fog-2, a sex-determination gene unique to Caenorhabditis elegans and implicated in the origin of hermaphroditism in this species, resulted from the duplication of ftr-1, an upstream gene of unknown function. Synonymous sequence divergence in regions of fog-2 and ftr-1 (excluding recent gene conversion tracts) suggests that the duplication occurred 46 million generations ago. Gene conversion between fog-2 and ftr-1 was previously discovered in experimental fog-2 knockout lines of C. elegans, whereby hermaphroditism was restored in mutant obligately outcrossing male-female populations. We analyzed DNA-sequence variation in fog-2 and ftr-1 within 40 isolates of C. elegans from diverse geographic locations in order to evaluate the contribution of gene conversion to genetic variation in the two gene paralogs. The analysis shows that gene conversion contributes significantly to DNA-sequence diversity in fog-2 and ftr-1 (22% and 34%, respectively) and may have the potential to alter sexual phenotypes in natural populations. A radical amino acid change in a conserved region of the F-box domain of fog-2 was found in natural isolates of C. elegans with significantly lower fecundity. We hypothesize that the lowered fecundity is due to reduced masculinization and less sperm production and that amino acid replacement substitutions and gene conversion in fog-2 may contribute significantly to variation in the degree of inbreeding and outcrossing in natural populations.

  10. Cytochrome P450 and actin genes expressed in Helicoverpa zea and Helicoverpa armigera: paralogy/orthology identification, gene conversion and evolution.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianchun; Berenbaum, May R; Schuler, Mary A

    2002-03-01

    Molecular phylogenetic analysis was conducted using conserved cytoplasmic actin and diversified cytochrome P450 (P450) sequences isolated from Helicoverpa zea and Helicoverpa armigera, two species thought to be closely related based on allozyme analyses. These sequences were compared in turn with published sequences from other insects to gain insight into how different gene families evolve. In Bombyx mori and these Helicoverpa species, cytoplasmic actin genes are present as a pair of tandemly duplicated paralogs with coding sequence identities as high as 95.5% (B. mori), 98.9% (H. zea) and 98.5% (H. armigera) due to recent 5'-polar gene conversions. Phylogeny and interspecies comparisons assign the six actin genes into two orthologous groups: HaA3a/HzA3a/BmA3 and HaA3b/HzA3b/BmA4, which exhibit more similarities between H. zea and H. armigera than between Helicoverpa species and B. mori. Like the actin genes in H. zea, four CYP6B genes exist as two pairs of duplicated paralogs with recent 5'-polar gene conversions. Interspecific comparisons and phylogeny analysis identified three groups of orthologous CYP6B genes: H. zea CYP6B8 or CYP6B28/H. armigera CYP6B7, H. zea CYP6B27/H. armigera CYP6B6, and H. zea CYP6B9/H. armigera CYP6B2/Heliothis virescens CYP6B10. The low degree of divergence in the first two of these groups is comparable to allelic variation within a single species. These orthologous relationships and the high degrees of similarity in both actin and P450 genes strongly indicate that these Helicoverpa species are extremely closely related.

  11. Highly divergent 18S rRNA gene paralogs in a Cryptosporidium genotype from eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus).

    PubMed

    Stenger, Brianna L S; Clark, Mark E; Kváč, Martin; Khan, Eakalak; Giddings, Catherine W; Dyer, Neil W; Schultz, Jessie L; McEvoy, John M

    2015-06-01

    Cryptosporidium is an apicomplexan parasite that causes the disease cryptosporidiosis in humans, livestock, and other vertebrates. Much of the knowledge on Cryptosporidium diversity is derived from 18S rRNA gene (18S rDNA) phylogenies. Eukaryote genomes generally have multiple 18S rDNA copies that evolve in concert, which is necessary for the accurate inference of phylogenetic relationships. However, 18S rDNA copies in some genomes evolve by a birth-and-death process that can result in sequence divergence among copies. Most notably, divergent 18S rDNA paralogs in the apicomplexan Plasmodium share only 89-95% sequence similarity, encode structurally distinct rRNA molecules, and are expressed at different life cycle stages. In the present study, Cryptosporidium 18S rDNA was amplified from 28/72 (38.9%) eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus). Phylogenetic analyses showed the co-occurrence of two 18S rDNA types, Type A and Type B, in 26 chipmunks, and Type B clustered with a sequence previously identified as Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype II. Types A and B had a sister group relationship but shared less than 93% sequence similarity. In contrast, actin and heat shock protein 70 gene sequences were homogeneous in samples with both Types A and B present. It was therefore concluded that Types A and B are divergent 18S rDNA paralogs in Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype II. Substitution patterns in Types A and B were consistent with functionally constrained evolution; however, Type B evolved more rapidly than Type A and had a higher G+C content (46.3% versus 41.0%). Oocysts of Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype II measured 4.17 μm (3.73-5.04 μm) × 3.94 μm (3.50-4.98 μm) with a length-to-width ratio of 1.06 ± 0.06 μm, and infection occurred naturally in the jejunum, cecum, and colon of eastern chipmunks. The findings of this study have implications for the use of 18S rDNA sequences to infer phylogenetic relationships. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Highly divergent 18S rRNA gene paralogs in a Cryptosporidium genotype from eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus)1

    PubMed Central

    Stenger, Brianna L.S.; Clark, Mark E.; Kváč, Martin; Khan, Eakalak; Giddings, Catherine W.; Dyer, Neil W.; Schultz, Jessie L.; McEvoy, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is an apicomplexan parasite that causes the disease cryptosporidiosis in humans, livestock, and other vertebrates. Much of the knowledge on Cryptosporidium diversity is derived from 18S rRNA gene (18S rDNA) phylogenies. Eukaryote genomes generally have multiple 18S rDNA copies that evolve in concert, which is necessary for the accurate inference of phylogenetic relationships. However, 18S rDNA copies in some genomes evolve by a birth-and-death process that can result in sequence divergence among copies. Most notably, divergent 18S rDNA paralogs in the apicomplexan Plasmodium share only 89–95% sequence similarity, encode structurally distinct rRNA molecules, and are expressed at different life cycle stages. In the present study, Cryptosporidium 18S rDNA was amplified from 28/72 (38.9%) eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus). Phylogenetic analyses showed the co-occurrence of two 18S rDNA types, Type A and Type B, in 26 chipmunks, and Type B clustered with a sequence previously identified as Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype II. Types A and B had a sister group relationship but shared less than 93% sequence similarity. In contrast, actin and heat shock protein 70 gene sequences were homogeneous in samples with both Types A and B present. It was therefore concluded that Types A and B are divergent 18S rDNA paralogs in Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype II. Substitution patterns in Types A and B were consistent with functionally constrained evolution; however, Type B evolved more rapidly than Type A and had a higher G+C content (46.3% versus 41.0%). Oocysts of Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype II measured 4.17 μm (3.73–5.04 μm) × 3.94 μm (3.50–4.98 μm) with a length-to-width ratio of 1.06 ± 0.06 μm, and infection occurred naturally in the jejunum, cecum, and colon of eastern chipmunks. The findings of this study have implications for the use of 18S rDNA sequences to infer phylogenetic relationships. PMID:25772204

  13. Independent expression of the two paralogous CCL4 genes in monocytes and B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Honczarenko, Marek; Sloan, Steven R

    2004-01-01

    The CCL4 chemokine is secreted by a variety of cells following stimulation. CCL4 affects several different types of cells that are important for acute inflammatory responses and are critical for the development of specific immune responses to foreign antigens. The human genome contains two genes for the CCL4 chemokine. Although highly homologous, the two genes encode slightly different proteins. We analyzed the mRNA expressed in monocytes and B lymphocytes and found that while monocytes express predominantly one CCL4 gene, known as ACT-2, peripheral blood B lymphocytes express a mixture of ACT-2 and the second CCL4 gene, lymphocyte activating gene-1 ( LAG-1). Although peripheral blood B cells, CD27(-) B cells, and CD27(+) B cells all express a mixture of LAG-1 and ACT-2, the B-cell lines that were studied regulate the two genes independently. RL, SU-DHL-6, and REH cells predominantly express LAG-1. These studies demonstrate that monocytes and B cells utilize different mechanisms to regulate expression of the two CCL4 genes and suggest that the two genes may not have identical activities.

  14. Paralogous origin of the red- and green-sensitive visual pigment genes in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, S; Starmer, W T; Yokoyama, R

    1993-05-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the red-sensitive visual pigment gene, R007Af, in the fish Astyanax fasciatus, from the initiation codon to the stop codon of this gene, including introns, is 1,592 bp, making it the shortest visual pigment gene known in vertebrates. Analysis of this and other homologous sequence data suggests that vertebrates initially had two duplicate genes and that each ancestor of Astyanax, human, and chicken independently duplicated the gene in the process of developing their red-green color vision. Furthermore, many extant red-green colorblind organisms may be explained simply by the failure of achieving very specific nucleotide substitutions at the three codon positions 180, 277, and 285, rather than by the lack of duplicate loci.

  15. Mutations in the paralogous human alpha-globin genes yielding identical hemoglobin variants.

    PubMed

    Moradkhani, Kamran; Préhu, Claude; Old, John; Henderson, Shirley; Balamitsa, Vera; Luo, Hong-Yuan; Poon, Man-Chiu; Chui, David H K; Wajcman, Henri; Patrinos, George P

    2009-06-01

    The human alpha-globin genes are paralogues, sharing a high degree of DNA sequence similarity and producing an identical alpha-globin chain. Over half of the alpha-globin structural variants reported to date are only characterized at the amino acid level. It is likely that a fraction of these variants, with phenotypes differing from one observation to another, may be due to the same mutation but on a different alpha-globin gene. There have been very few previous examples of hemoglobin variants that can be found at both HBA1 and HBA2 genes. Here, we report the results of a systematic multicenter study in a large multiethnic population to identify such variants and to analyze their differences from a functional and evolutionary perspective. We identified 14 different Hb variants resulting from identical mutations on either one of the two human alpha-globin paralogue genes. We also showed that the average percentage of hemoglobin variants due to a HBA2 gene mutation (alpha2) is higher than the percentage of hemoglobin variants due to the same HBA1 gene mutation (alpha1) and that the alpha2/alpha1 ratio varied between variants. These alpha-globin chain variants have most likely occurred via recurrent mutations, gene conversion events, or both. Based on these data, we propose a nomenclature for hemoglobin variants that fall into this category.

  16. Global Transcriptomic Analysis of Targeted Silencing of Two Paralogous ACC Oxidase Genes in Banana

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yan; Kuan, Chi; Chiu, Chien-Hsiang; Chen, Xiao-Jing; Do, Yi-Yin; Huang, Pung-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Among 18 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) oxidase homologous genes existing in the banana genome there are two genes, Mh-ACO1 and Mh-ACO2, that participate in banana fruit ripening. To better understand the physiological functions of Mh-ACO1 and Mh-ACO2, two hairpin-type siRNA expression vectors targeting both the Mh-ACO1 and Mh-ACO2 were constructed and incorporated into the banana genome by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The generation of Mh-ACO1 and Mh-ACO2 RNAi transgenic banana plants was confirmed by Southern blot analysis. To gain insights into the functional diversity and complexity between Mh-ACO1 and Mh-ACO2, transcriptome sequencing of banana fruits using the Illumina next-generation sequencer was performed. A total of 32,093,976 reads, assembled into 88,031 unigenes for 123,617 transcripts were obtained. Significantly enriched Gene Oncology (GO) terms and the number of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) with GO annotation were ‘catalytic activity’ (1327, 56.4%), ‘heme binding’ (65, 2.76%), ‘tetrapyrrole binding’ (66, 2.81%), and ‘oxidoreductase activity’ (287, 12.21%). Real-time RT-PCR was further performed with mRNAs from both peel and pulp of banana fruits in Mh-ACO1 and Mh-ACO2 RNAi transgenic plants. The results showed that expression levels of genes related to ethylene signaling in ripening banana fruits were strongly influenced by the expression of genes associated with ethylene biosynthesis. PMID:27681726

  17. Global Transcriptomic Analysis of Targeted Silencing of Two Paralogous ACC Oxidase Genes in Banana.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yan; Kuan, Chi; Chiu, Chien-Hsiang; Chen, Xiao-Jing; Do, Yi-Yin; Huang, Pung-Ling

    2016-09-26

    Among 18 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) oxidase homologous genes existing in the banana genome there are two genes, Mh-ACO1 and Mh-ACO2, that participate in banana fruit ripening. To better understand the physiological functions of Mh-ACO1 and Mh-ACO2, two hairpin-type siRNA expression vectors targeting both the Mh-ACO1 and Mh-ACO2 were constructed and incorporated into the banana genome by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The generation of Mh-ACO1 and Mh-ACO2 RNAi transgenic banana plants was confirmed by Southern blot analysis. To gain insights into the functional diversity and complexity between Mh-ACO1 and Mh-ACO2, transcriptome sequencing of banana fruits using the Illumina next-generation sequencer was performed. A total of 32,093,976 reads, assembled into 88,031 unigenes for 123,617 transcripts were obtained. Significantly enriched Gene Oncology (GO) terms and the number of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) with GO annotation were 'catalytic activity' (1327, 56.4%), 'heme binding' (65, 2.76%), 'tetrapyrrole binding' (66, 2.81%), and 'oxidoreductase activity' (287, 12.21%). Real-time RT-PCR was further performed with mRNAs from both peel and pulp of banana fruits in Mh-ACO1 and Mh-ACO2 RNAi transgenic plants. The results showed that expression levels of genes related to ethylene signaling in ripening banana fruits were strongly influenced by the expression of genes associated with ethylene biosynthesis.

  18. Alternative polyadenylation in a family of paralogous EPB41 genes generates protein 4.1 diversity.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Laura; Lospitao, Eva; Ruiz-Sáenz, Ana; Alonso, Miguel A; Correas, Isabel

    2017-02-01

    Alternative polyadenylation (APA) is a step in mRNA 3'-end processing that contributes to the complexity of the transcriptome by generating isoforms that differ in either their coding sequence or their 3'-untranslated regions (UTRs). The EPB41 genes, EPB41, EPB41L2, EPB41L3 and EPB41L1, encode an impressively complex array of structural adaptor proteins (designated 4.1R, 4.1G, 4.1B and 4.1N, respectively) by using alternative transcriptional promoters and tissue-specific alternative pre-mRNA splicing. The great variety of 4.1 proteins mainly results from 5'-end and internal processing of the EPB41 pre-mRNAs. Thus, 4.1 proteins can vary in their N-terminal extensions but all contain a highly homologous C-terminal domain (CTD). Here we study a new group of EPB41-related mRNAs that originate by APA and lack the exons encoding the CTD characteristic of prototypical 4.1 proteins, thereby encoding a new type of 4.1 protein. For the EPB41 gene, this type of processing was observed in all 11 human tissues analyzed. Comparative genomic analysis of EPB41 indicates that APA is conserved in various mammals. In addition, we show that APA also functions for the EPB41L2, EPB41L3 and EPB41L1 genes, but in a more restricted manner in the case of the latter 2 than it does for the EPB41 and EPB41L2 genes. Our study shows alternative polyadenylation to be an additional mechanism for the generation of 4.1 protein diversity in the already complex EPB41-related genes. Understanding the diversity of EPB41 RNA processing is essential for a full appreciation of the many 4.1 proteins expressed in normal and pathological tissues.

  19. Novel paralogous gene families with potential function in legume nodules and seeds.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, Kevin A T; Graham, Michelle A; VandenBosch, Kathryn A

    2006-04-01

    Within the plant kingdom, legumes are unusual in their ability to form nitrogen-fixing nodules in symbiosis with certain bacteria in the family Rhizobiaceae (rhizhobia). Genes that are required for signaling between plant and symbiont, and for the development and maintenance of the nodule, were either created de novo or adopted from other plant pathways. Only in recent years have genome-scale sequence data from legumes made it possible to identify large, novel families of genes probably evolved to function in nodulation. Members of these novel families are expressed in seeds or nodules, and are homologous to defense-related proteins. Perhaps the most striking example is a large family (of more than 340 members) of cysteine cluster proteins that have homology to plant defensins.

  20. Molecular Evolution of Receptor-Like Kinase Genes in Hexaploid Wheat. Independent Evolution of Orthologs after Polyploidization and Mechanisms of Local Rearrangements at Paralogous Loci1

    PubMed Central

    Feuillet, Catherine; Penger, Anja; Gellner, Klaus; Mast, Austin; Keller, Beat

    2001-01-01

    Hexaploid wheat is a young polyploid species and represents a good model to study mechanisms of gene evolution after polyploidization. Recent studies at the scale of the whole genome have suggested rapid genomic changes after polyploidization but so far the rearrangements that have occurred in terms of gene content and organization have not been analyzed at the microlevel in wheat. Here, we have isolated members of a receptor kinase (Lrk) gene family in hexaploid and diploid wheat, Aegilops tauschii, and barley (Hordeum vulgare). Phylogenetic analysis has allowed us to establish evolutionary relationships (orthology versus paralogy) between the different members of this gene family in wheat as well as with Lrk genes from barley. It also demonstrated that the sequences of the homoeologous Lrk genes evolved independently after polyploidization. In addition, we found evidence for gene loss during the evolution of wheat and barley. Analysis of large genomic fragments isolated from nonorthologous Lrk loci showed a high conservation of the gene content and gene organization at these loci on the homoeologous group 1 chromosomes of wheat and barley. Finally, sequence comparison of two paralogous fragments of chromosome 1B showed a large number of local events (sequence duplications, deletions, and insertions), which reveal rearrangements and mechanisms for genome enlargement at the microlevel. PMID:11244111

  1. Are solar UV-B- and UV-A-dependent gene expression and metabolite accumulation in Arabidopsis mediated by the stress response regulator RADICAL-INDUCED CELL DEATH1?

    PubMed

    Morales, Luis O; Brosché, Mikael; Vainonen, Julia P; Sipari, Nina; Lindfors, Anders V; Strid, Åke; Aphalo, Pedro J

    2015-05-01

    Wavelengths in the ultraviolet (UV) region of the solar spectrum, UV-B (280-315 nm) and UV-A (315-400 nm), are key environmental signals modifying several aspects of plant physiology. Despite significant advances in the understanding of plant responses to UV-B and the identification of signalling components involved, there is limited information on the molecular mechanisms that control UV-B signalling in plants under natural sunlight. Here, we aimed to corroborate the previous suggested role for RADICAL-INDUCED CELL DEATH1 (RCD1) in UV-B signalling under full spectrum sunlight. Wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana and the rcd1-1 mutant were used in an experimental design outdoors where UV-B and UV-A irradiances were manipulated using plastic films, and gene expression, PYRIDOXINE BIOSYNTHESIS1 (PDX1) accumulation and metabolite profiles were analysed in the leaves. At the level of transcription, RCD1 was not directly involved in the solar UV-B regulation of genes with functions in UV acclimation, hormone signalling and stress-related markers. Furthermore, RCD1 had no role on PDX1 accumulation but modulated the UV-B induction of flavonoid accumulation in leaves of Arabidopsis exposed to solar UV. We conclude that RCD1 does not play an active role in UV-B signalling but rather modulates UV-B responses under full spectrum sunlight. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Characterization of two paralogous StAR genes in a teleost, Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiangguo; Wu, Limin; Xie, Lang; Yang, Shijie; Charkraborty, Tapas; Shi, Hongjuan; Wang, Deshou; Zhou, Linyan

    2014-07-05

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) transports cholesterol, the substrate for steroid synthesis, to the inner membranes of mitochondria. It is well known that estrogen is essential for female sex determination/differentiation in fish. However, no reports showed that the conventional StAR, which was supposed to be essential for estrogen production, was expressed in female gonads during the critical timing of sex determination/differentiation. In this study, two different StAR isoforms, named as StAR1 and StAR2, were characterized from the gonads of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). Phylogenetic and synteny analysis revealed that two StAR genes existed in teleosts, Xenopus and chicken indicating that the duplication event occurred before the divergence of teleosts and tetrapods. Real-time PCR revealed that StAR1 was dominantly expressed in the testis, head kidney and kidney; while StAR2 was expressed exclusively in the gonads. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that StAR1 was expressed in the interrenal cells of the head kidney and Leydig cells of the testis; while StAR2 was expressed in the Leydig cells of the testis and the interstitial cells of the ovary. Ontogenic analysis demonstrated that StAR2 was expressed abundantly from 5 days after hatching (dah) in the somatic cells in XX gonads, whereas in XY gonads, both StARs could be detected from 30 dah until adulthood. Intraperitoneal injection of human chorionic gonadotropin experiments showed that expression of StAR1 and 2 was significantly elevated at 8h and persisted until 24h after injection in the testis. Taken together, our data suggested that StAR1 is likely to be required for cortisol production in the head kidney, and StAR2 is probably involved in estrogen production during early sex differentiation in XX gonads. In contrast, both StARs might be required for androgen production in testes. For the first time, our data demonstrated that two fish StARs might be involved

  3. Functional Diversification after Gene Duplication: Paralog Specific Regions of Structural Disorder and Phosphorylation in p53, p63, and p73

    PubMed Central

    Siltberg-Liberles, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Conformational and functional flexibility promote protein evolvability. High evolvability allows related proteins to functionally diverge and perhaps to neostructuralize. p53 is a multifunctional protein frequently referred to as the Guardian of the Genome–a hub for e.g. incoming and outgoing signals in apoptosis and DNA repair. p53 has been found to be structurally disordered, an extreme form of conformational flexibility. Here, p53, and its paralogs p63 and p73, were studied for further insights into the evolutionary dynamics of structural disorder, secondary structure, and phosphorylation. This study is focused on the post gene duplication phase for the p53 family in vertebrates, but also visits the origin of the protein family and the early domain loss and gain events. Functional divergence, measured by rapid evolutionary dynamics of protein domains, structural properties, and phosphorylation propensity, is inferred across vertebrate p53 proteins, in p63 and p73 from fish, and between the three paralogs. In particular, structurally disordered regions are redistributed among paralogs, but within clades redistribution of structural disorder also appears to be an ongoing process. Despite its deemed importance as the Guardian of the Genome, p53 is indeed a protein with high evolvability as seen not only in rearranged structural disorder, but also in fluctuating domain sequence signatures among lineages. PMID:27003913

  4. Consequences of Lineage-Specific Gene Loss on Functional Evolution of Surviving Paralogs: ALDH1A and Retinoic Acid Signaling in Vertebrate Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Cañestro, Cristian; Catchen, Julian M.; Rodríguez-Marí, Adriana; Yokoi, Hayato; Postlethwait, John H.

    2009-01-01

    Genome duplications increase genetic diversity and may facilitate the evolution of gene subfunctions. Little attention, however, has focused on the evolutionary impact of lineage-specific gene loss. Here, we show that identifying lineage-specific gene loss after genome duplication is important for understanding the evolution of gene subfunctions in surviving paralogs and for improving functional connectivity among human and model organism genomes. We examine the general principles of gene loss following duplication, coupled with expression analysis of the retinaldehyde dehydrogenase Aldh1a gene family during retinoic acid signaling in eye development as a case study. Humans have three ALDH1A genes, but teleosts have just one or two. We used comparative genomics and conserved syntenies to identify loss of ohnologs (paralogs derived from genome duplication) and to clarify uncertain phylogenies. Analysis showed that Aldh1a1 and Aldh1a2 form a clade that is sister to Aldh1a3-related genes. Genome comparisons showed secondarily loss of aldh1a1 in teleosts, revealing that Aldh1a1 is not a tetrapod innovation and that aldh1a3 was recently lost in medaka, making it the first known vertebrate with a single aldh1a gene. Interestingly, results revealed asymmetric distribution of surviving ohnologs between co-orthologous teleost chromosome segments, suggesting that local genome architecture can influence ohnolog survival. We propose a model that reconstructs the chromosomal history of the Aldh1a family in the ancestral vertebrate genome, coupled with the evolution of gene functions in surviving Aldh1a ohnologs after R1, R2, and R3 genome duplications. Results provide evidence for early subfunctionalization and late subfunction-partitioning and suggest a mechanistic model based on altered regulation leading to heterochronic gene expression to explain the acquisition or modification of subfunctions by surviving ohnologs that preserve unaltered ancestral developmental programs in

  5. Positive selection and functional divergence of R2R3-MYB paralogous genes expressed in inflorescence buds of Scutellaria species (Labiatae).

    PubMed

    Huang, Bing-Hong; Pang, Erli; Chen, Yi-Wen; Cao, Huifen; Ruan, Yu; Liao, Pei-Chun

    2015-03-13

    Anthocyanin is the main pigment forming floral diversity. Several transcription factors that regulate the expression of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes belong to the R2R3-MYB family. Here we examined the transcriptomes of inflorescence buds of Scutellaria species (skullcaps), identified the expression R2R3-MYBs, and detected the genetic signatures of positive selection for adaptive divergence across the rapidly evolving skullcaps. In the inflorescence buds, seven R2R3-MYBs were identified. MYB11 and MYB16 were detected to be positively selected. The signature of positive selection on MYB genes indicated that species diversification could be affected by transcriptional regulation, rather than at the translational level. When comparing among the background lineages of Arabidopsis, tomato, rice, and Amborella, heterogeneous evolutionary rates were detected among MYB paralogs, especially between MYB13 and MYB19. Significantly different evolutionary rates were also evidenced by type-I functional divergence between MYB13 and MYB19, and the accelerated evolutionary rates in MYB19, implied the acquisition of novel functions. Another paralogous pair, MYB2/7 and MYB11, revealed significant radical amino acid changes, indicating divergence in the regulation of different anthocyanin-biosynthetic enzymes. Our findings not only showed that Scutellaria R2R3-MYBs are functionally divergent and positively selected, but also indicated the adaptive relevance of regulatory genes in floral diversification.

  6. A novel Giraffidae-specific interspersed repeat with a microsatellite, originally found in an intron of a ruminant paralogous p97bcnt gene.

    PubMed

    Hon-Nami, Koyu; Ueno, Sadao; Endo, Hideki; Nishimura, Hiroyuki; Igarashi, Takashi; David, Lior; Iwashita, Shintaro

    2004-10-13

    The ruminant-specific p97bcnt gene (bcntp97) is a paralogous gene that includes a region derived from a retrotransposable element 1 (RTE-1). The region comprises an exon (RTE-1 exon) encoding 325 amino acids in the middle of the p97bcnt protein. To understand how the bcntp97 paralog evolved, we examined its organization in several ruminants. We found a 700-base pair (bp) insert in the 5' intron of the RTE-1 exon in giraffe bcntp97. This insert is missing in the corresponding regions of bovine and sika deer. Furthermore, the sequence of the insert is interspersed in the genome of giraffe but not bovine and also contains a (GA)n microsatellite. A highly homologous insert harboring significantly different (GA)n microsatellite was detected in the corresponding region of okapi bcntp97. Therefore, the interspersed fragments with (GA)n microsatellite might serve as a marker for tracking how duplicated genes evolve in a family-specific manner.

  7. Gene Content and Function of the Ancestral Chromosome Fusion Site in Human Chromosome 2q13–2q14.1 and Paralogous Regions

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yuxin; Newman, Tera; Linardopoulou, Elena; Trask, Barbara J.

    2002-01-01

    Various portions of the region surrounding the site where two ancestral chromosomes fused to form human chromosome 2 are duplicated elsewhere in the human genome, primarily in subtelomeric and pericentromeric locations. At least 24 potentially functional genes and 16 pseudogenes reside in the 614-kb of sequence surrounding the fusion site and paralogous segments on other chromosomes. By comparing the sequences of genomic copies and transcripts, we show that at least 18 of the genes in these paralogous regions are transcriptionally active. Among these genes are new members of the cobalamin synthetase W domain (CBWD) and forkhead domain FOXD4 gene families. Copies of RPL23A and SNRPA1 on chromosome 2 are retrotransposed-processed pseudogenes that were included in segmental duplications; we find 53 RPL23A pseudogenes in the human genome and map the functional copy of SNRPA1 to 15qter. The draft sequence of the human genome also provides new information on the location and intron–exon structure of functional copies of other 2q-fusion genes (PGM5, retina-specific F379, helicase CHLR1, and acrosin). This study illustrates that the duplication and rearrangement of subtelomeric and pericentromeric regions have functional relevance to human biology; these processes can change gene dosage and/or generate genes with new functions. [Supplemental material is available online at http://www.genome.org. Sequence data reported in this paper have been deposited in GenBank and assigned the following accession nos.: AF452722, AF452723, and AF452724.] PMID:12421752

  8. Zinc Finger Domain of the PRDM9 Gene on Chromosome 1 Exhibits High Diversity in Ruminants but Its Paralog PRDM7 Contains Multiple Disruptive Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ahlawat, Sonika; Sharma, Priyanka; Sharma, Rekha; Arora, Reena; De, Sachinandan

    2016-01-01

    PRDM9 is the sole hybrid sterility gene identified so far in vertebrates. PRDM9 gene encodes a protein with an immensely variable zinc-finger (ZF) domain that determines the site of meiotic recombination hotspots genome-wide. In this study, the terminal ZF domain of PRDM9 on bovine chromosome 1 and its paralog on chromosome 22 were characterized in 225 samples from five ruminant species (cattle, yak, mithun, sheep and goat). We found extraordinary variation in the number of PRDM9 zinc fingers (6 to 12). We sequenced PRDM9 ZF encoding region from 15 individuals (carrying the same ZF number in both copies) and found 43 different ZF domain sequences. Ruminant zinc fingers of PRDM9 were found to be diversifying under positive selection and concerted evolution, specifically at positions involved in defining their DNA-binding specificity, consistent with the reports from other vertebrates such as mice, humans, equids and chimpanzees. ZF-encoding regions of the PRDM7, a paralog of PRDM9 on bovine chromosome 22 and on unknown chromosomes in other studied species were found to contain 84 base repeat units as in PRDM9, but there were multiple disruptive mutations after the first repeat unit. The diversity of the ZFs suggests that PRDM9 may activate recombination hotspots that are largely unique to each ruminant species. PMID:27203728

  9. Zinc Finger Domain of the PRDM9 Gene on Chromosome 1 Exhibits High Diversity in Ruminants but Its Paralog PRDM7 Contains Multiple Disruptive Mutations.

    PubMed

    Ahlawat, Sonika; Sharma, Priyanka; Sharma, Rekha; Arora, Reena; De, Sachinandan

    2016-01-01

    PRDM9 is the sole hybrid sterility gene identified so far in vertebrates. PRDM9 gene encodes a protein with an immensely variable zinc-finger (ZF) domain that determines the site of meiotic recombination hotspots genome-wide. In this study, the terminal ZF domain of PRDM9 on bovine chromosome 1 and its paralog on chromosome 22 were characterized in 225 samples from five ruminant species (cattle, yak, mithun, sheep and goat). We found extraordinary variation in the number of PRDM9 zinc fingers (6 to 12). We sequenced PRDM9 ZF encoding region from 15 individuals (carrying the same ZF number in both copies) and found 43 different ZF domain sequences. Ruminant zinc fingers of PRDM9 were found to be diversifying under positive selection and concerted evolution, specifically at positions involved in defining their DNA-binding specificity, consistent with the reports from other vertebrates such as mice, humans, equids and chimpanzees. ZF-encoding regions of the PRDM7, a paralog of PRDM9 on bovine chromosome 22 and on unknown chromosomes in other studied species were found to contain 84 base repeat units as in PRDM9, but there were multiple disruptive mutations after the first repeat unit. The diversity of the ZFs suggests that PRDM9 may activate recombination hotspots that are largely unique to each ruminant species.

  10. Identification of paralogous HERV-K LTRs on human chromosomes 3, 4, 7 and 11 in regions containing clusters of olfactory receptor genes.

    PubMed

    Nadezhdin, E V; Lebedev, Y B; Glazkova, D V; Bornholdt, D; Arman, I P; Grzeschik, K H; Hunsmann, G; Sverdlov, E D

    2001-07-01

    A locus harboring a human endogenous retroviral LTR (long terminal repeat) was mapped on the short arm of human chromosome 7 (7p22), and its evolutionary history was investigated. Sequences of two human genome fragments that were homologous to the LTR-flanking sequences were found in human genome databases: (1) an LTR-containing DNA fragment from region 3p13 of the human genome, which includes clusters of olfactory receptor genes and pseudogenes; and (2) a fragment of region 21q22.1 lacking LTR sequences. PCR analysis demonstrated that LTRs with highly homologous flanking sequences could be found in the genomes of human, chimp, gorilla, and orangutan, but were absent from the genomes of gibbon and New World monkeys. A PCR assay with a primer set corresponding to the sequence from human Chr 3 allowed us to detect LTR-containing paralogous sequences on human chromosomes 3, 4, 7, and 11. The divergence times for the LTR-flanking sequences on chromosomes 3 and 7, and the paralogous sequence on chromosome 21, were evaluated and used to reconstruct the order of duplication events and retroviral insertions. (1) An initial duplication event that occurred 14-17 Mya and before LTR insertion - produced two loci, one corresponding to that located on Chr 21, while the second was the ancestor of the loci on chromosomes 3 and 7. (2) Insertion of the LTR (most probably as a provirus) into this ancestral locus took place 13 Mya. (3) Duplication of the LTR-containing ancestral locus occurred 11 Mya, forming the paralogous modern loci on Chr 3 and 7.

  11. Annexin A11 (ANXA11) gene structure as the progenitor of paralogous annexins and source of orthologous cDNA isoforms.

    PubMed

    Bances, P; Fernandez, M R; Rodriguez-Garcia, M I; Morgan, R O; Fernandez, M P

    2000-10-01

    The genomic organization of the annexin A11 gene was determined in mouse and human to assess its congruity with other family members and to examine the species variation in alternative splicing patterns. Mouse annexin A11 genomic clones were characterized by restriction analysis, Southern blotting, and DNA sequencing, and the homologous human gene (HGMW-approved gene symbol ANXA11) was deciphered from high-throughput genomic sequence with coanalysis of expressed sequence tags. Exons 6-15 of the tetrad core repeat region differ from annexins A7 and A13 but are spliced identically to other phylogenetic descendents, making annexin A11 the putative primary progenitor of up to nine paralogous human annexins. The 5' regions consist of untranslated exon 1, followed by an extensive intron 1 comprising almost half the total gene length of >40 kb, and additional GC-rich exons 2-5 encoding the proline- and glycine-rich amino-terminus. Distinct cDNA isoforms in cow and human were determined to be unique to each species and hence of dubious general significance for this gene's function. Multiple transcription start sites were revealed by primer extension analysis of the mouse gene, and transfection constructs containing the prospective promoter generated transcriptional activity comparable to that of the SV40 promoter. Internal repetitive elements and vicinal gene markers were mapped for the complete human annexin A11 gene sequence to characterize the surrounding genomic environment. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  12. Evolution of the Actin Gene Family in Testate Lobose Amoebae (Arcellinida) is Characterized by Two Distinct Clades of Paralogs and Recent Independent Expansions

    PubMed Central

    Lahr, Daniel J. G.; Nguyen, Truc B.; Barbero, Erika; Katz, Laura A.

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of actin gene families is characterized by independent expansions and contractions across the eukaryotic tree of life. Here, we assess diversity of actin gene sequences within three lineages of the genus Arcella, a free-living testate (shelled) amoeba in the Arcellinida. We established four clonal lines of two morphospecies, Arcella hemisphaerica and A. vulgaris, and assessed their phylogenetic relationship within the “Amoebozoa” using small subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU-rDNA) genealogy. We determined that the two lines of A. hemisphaerica are identical in SSU-rDNA, while the two A. vulgaris are independent genetic lineages. Furthermore, we characterized multiple actin gene copies from all lineages. Analyses of the resulting sequences reveal numerous diverse actin genes, which differ mostly by synonymous substitutions. We estimate that the actin gene family contains 40–50 paralogous members in each lineage. None of the three independent lineages share the same paralog with another, and divergence between actins reaches 29% in contrast to just 2% in SSU-rDNA. Analyses of effective number of codons (ENC), compositional bias, recombination signatures, and genetic diversity in the context of a gene tree indicate that there are two groups of actins evolving with distinct patterns of molecular evolution. Within these groups, there have been multiple independent expansions of actin genes within each lineage. Together, these data suggest that the two groups are located in different regions of the Arcella genome. Furthermore, we compare the Arcella actin gene family with the relatively well-described gene family in the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum and other members of the Amoebozoa clade. Overall patterns of molecular evolution are similar in Arcella and Dictyostelium. However, the separation of genes in two distinct groups coupled with recent expansion is characteristic of Arcella and might reflect an unusual pattern of gene family evolution in the

  13. ACC oxidase genes expressed in the wood-forming tissues of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) include a pair of nearly identical paralogs (NIPs).

    PubMed

    Yuan, S; Wang, Y; Dean, J F D

    2010-03-15

    1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) oxidase catalyzes the final reaction of the ethylene biosynthetic pathway, converting the unusual cyclic amino acid, ACC, into ethylene. Past studies have shown a possible link between ethylene and compression wood formation in conifers, but the relationship has received no more than modest study at the gene expression level. In this study, a cDNA clone encoding a putative ACC oxidase, PtACO1, was isolated from a cDNA library produced using mRNA from lignifying xylem of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) trunk wood. The cDNA clone comprised an open reading frame of 1461 bp encoding a protein of 333 amino acids. Using PCR amplification techniques, a genomic clone corresponding to PtACO1 was isolated and shown to contain three introns with typical GT/AG boundaries defining the splice junctions. The PtACO1 gene product shared 70% identity with an ACC oxidase from European white birch (Betula pendula), and phylogenetic analyses clearly placed the gene product in the ACC oxidase cluster of the Arabidopsis thaliana 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase superfamily tree. The PtACO1 sequence was used to identify additional ACC oxidase clones from loblolly pine root cDNA libraries characterized as part of an expressed sequence tag (EST) discovery project. The PtACO1 sequence was also used to recover additional paralogous sequences from genomic DNA, one of which (PtACO2) turned out to be >98% identical to PtACO1 in the nucleotide coding sequence, leading to its classification as a "nearly identical paralog" (NIP). Quantitative PCR analyses showed that the expression level of PtACO1-like transcripts varied in different tissues, as well as in response to hormonal treatments and bending. Possible roles for PtACO1 in compression wood formation in loblolly pine and the discovery of its NIP are discussed in light of these results.

  14. Comparison of orthologous and paralogous DNA flanking the wheat high molecular weight glutenin genes: sequence conservation and divergence, transposon distribution, and matrix-attachment regions.

    PubMed

    Anderson, O D; Larka, L; Christoffers, M J; McCue, K F; Gustafson, J P

    2002-04-01

    Extended flanking DNA sequences were characterized for five members of the wheat high molecular weight (HMW) glutenin gene family to understand more of the structure, control, and evolution of these genes. Analysis revealed more sequence conservation among orthologous regions than between paralogous regions, with differences mainly owing to transposition events involving putative retrotransposons and several miniature inverted transposable elements (MITEs). Both gyspy-like long terminal repeat (LTR) and non-LTR retrotransposon sequences are represented in the flanking DNAs. One of the MITEs is a novel class, but another MITE is related to the maize Stowaway family and is widely represented in Triticeae express sequence tags (ESTs). Flanking DNA of the longest sequence, a 20 425-bp fragment including and surrounding the HMW-glutenin Bx7 gene, showed additional cereal gene-like sequences both immediately 5' and 3' to the HMW-glutenin coding region. The transcriptional activities of sequences related to these flanking putative genes and the retrotransposon-related regions were indicated by matches to wheat and other Triticeae ESTs. Predictive analysis of matrix-attachment regions (MARs) of the HMW glutenin and several alpha-, gamma-, and omega-gliadin flanking DNAs indicate potential MARs immediately flanking each of the genes. Matrix binding activity in the predicted regions was confirmed for two of the HMW-glutenin genes.

  15. Genome-Wide Analysis of PHOSPHOLIPID:DIACYLGLYCEROL ACYLTRANSFERASE (PDAT) Genes in Plants Reveals the Eudicot-Wide PDAT Gene Expansion and Altered Selective Pressures Acting on the Core Eudicot PDAT Paralogs1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xue; Peng, Fred Y.; Weselake, Randall J.

    2015-01-01

    PHOSPHOLIPID:DIACYLGLYCEROL ACYLTRANSFERASE (PDAT) is an enzyme that catalyzes the transfer of a fatty acyl moiety from the sn-2 position of a phospholipid to the sn-3-position of sn-1,2-diacylglyerol, thus forming triacylglycerol and a lysophospholipid. Although the importance of PDAT in triacylglycerol biosynthesis has been illustrated in some previous studies, the evolutionary relationship of plant PDATs has not been studied in detail. In this study, we investigated the evolutionary relationship of the PDAT gene family across the green plants using a comparative phylogenetic framework. We found that the PDAT candidate genes are present in all examined green plants, including algae, lowland plants (a moss and a lycophyte), monocots, and eudicots. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the evolutionary division of the PDAT gene family into seven major clades. The separation is supported by the conservation and variation in the gene structure, protein properties, motif patterns, and/or selection constraints. We further demonstrated that there is a eudicot-wide PDAT gene expansion, which appears to have been mainly caused by the eudicot-shared ancient gene duplication and subsequent species-specific segmental duplications. In addition, selection pressure analyses showed that different selection constraints have acted on three core eudicot clades, which might enable paleoduplicated PDAT paralogs to either become nonfunctionalized or develop divergent expression patterns during evolution. Overall, our study provides important insights into the evolution of the plant PDAT gene family and explores the evolutionary mechanism underlying the functional diversification among the core eudicot PDAT paralogs. PMID:25585619

  16. Structure of the human zinc finger protein HIVEP3: molecular cloning, expression, exon-intron structure, and comparison with paralogous genes HIVEP1 and HIVEP2.

    PubMed

    Hicar, M D; Liu, Y; Allen, C E; Wu, L C

    2001-01-01

    Here we report the cloning and characterization of HIVEP3, the newest member in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 enhancer-binding protein family that encodes large zinc finger proteins and regulates transcription via the kappaB enhancer motif. The largest open reading frame of HIVEP3 contains 2406 aa. and is approximately 80% identical to the mouse counterpart. The HIVEP3 gene is located in the chromosomal region 1p34 and is at least 300 kb with 10 exons. RNA studies show that multiple HIVEP3 transcripts are differentially expressed and regulated. Additionally, transcription termination occurs in the ultimate exon, exon 10, or in exon 6. Therefore, HIVEP3 may produce protein isoforms that contain or exclude the carboxyl DNA binding domain and the leucine zipper by alternative RNA splicing and differential polyadenylation. Sequence homologous to HIVEP3 exon 6 is not found in mouse nor are the paralogous genes HIVEP1 and HIVEP2. Zoo-blot analysis suggests that sequences homologous to the human exon 6 are present only in primates and cow. Therefore, a foreign DNA harboring a termination exon likely was inserted into the HIVEP3 locus relatively recently in evolution, resulting in the acquisition of novel gene regulatory mechanisms as well as the generation of structural and functional diversity. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  17. Multiple Genome Comparison within a Bacterial Species Reveals a Unit of Evolution Spanning Two Adjacent Genes in a Tandem Paralog Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Tsuru, Takeshi

    2008-01-01

    It has been assumed that an open reading frame (ORF) represents a unit of gene evolution as well as a unit of gene expression and function. In the present work, we report a case in which a unit comprising the 3′ region of an ORF linked to a downstream intergenic region that is in turn linked to the 5′ region of a downstream ORF has been conserved, and has served as the unit of gene evolution. The genes are tandem paralogous genes from the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, for which more than ten entire genomes have been sequenced. We compared these multiple genome sequences at a locus for the lpl (lipoprotein-like) cluster (encoding lipoprotein homologs presumably related to their host interaction) in the genomic island termed νSaα. A highly conserved nucleotide sequence found within every lpl ORF is likely to provide a site for homologous recombination. Comparison of phylogenies of the 5′-variable region and the 3′-variable region within the same ORF revealed significant incongruence. In contrast, pairs of the 3′-variable region of an ORF and the 5′-variable region of the next downstream ORF gave more congruent phylogenies, with distinct groups of conserved pairs. The intergenic region seemed to have coevolved with the flanking variable regions. Multiple recombination events at the central conserved region appear to have caused various types of rearrangements among strains, shuffling the two variable regions in one ORF, but maintaining a conserved unit comprising the 3′-variable region, the intergenic region, and the 5′-variable region spanning adjacent ORFs. This result has strong impact on our understanding of gene evolution because most gene lineages underwent tandem duplication and then diversified. This work also illustrates the use of multiple genome sequences for high-resolution evolutionary analysis within the same species. PMID:18765438

  18. ZSCAN5B and primate-specific paralogs bind RNA polymerase III genes and extra-TFIIIC (ETC) sites to modulate mitotic progression

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Younguk; Zhang, Huimin; Kazemian, Majid; Troy, Joseph M.; Seward, Christopher; Lu, Xiaochen; Stubbs, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian genomes contain hundreds of genes transcribed by RNA Polymerase III (Pol III), encoding noncoding RNAs and especially the tRNAs specialized to carry specific amino acids to the ribosome for protein synthesis. In addition to this well-known function, tRNAs and their genes (tDNAs) serve a variety of other critical cellular functions. For example, tRNAs and other Pol III transcripts can be cleaved to yield small RNAs with potent regulatory activities. Furthermore, from yeast to mammals, active tDNAs and related “extra-TFIIIC” (ETC) loci provide the DNA scaffolds for the most ancient known mechanism of three-dimensional chromatin architecture. Here we identify the ZSCAN5 TF family - including mammalian ZSCAN5B and its primate-specific paralogs - as proteins that occupy mammalian Pol III promoters and ETC sites. We show that ZSCAN5B binds with high specificity to a conserved subset of Pol III genes in human and mouse. Furthermore, primate-specific ZSCAN5A and ZSCAN5D also bind Pol III genes, although ZSCAN5D preferentially localizes to MIR SINE- and LINE2-associated ETC sites. ZSCAN5 genes are expressed in proliferating cell populations and are cell-cycle regulated, and siRNA knockdown experiments suggested a cooperative role in regulation of mitotic progression. Consistent with this prediction, ZSCAN5A knockdown led to increasing numbers of cells in mitosis and the appearance of cells. Together, these data implicate the role of ZSCAN5 genes in regulation of Pol III genes and nearby Pol II loci, ultimately influencing cell cycle progression and differentiation in a variety of tissues. PMID:27732952

  19. GORDITA (AGL63) is a young paralog of the Arabidopsis thaliana B(sister) MADS box gene ABS (TT16) that has undergone neofunctionalization.

    PubMed

    Erdmann, Robert; Gramzow, Lydia; Melzer, Rainer; Theissen, Günter; Becker, Annette

    2010-09-01

    MIKC-type MADS domain proteins are key regulators of flower development in angiosperms. B(sister) genes constitute a clade with a close relationship to class B floral homeotic genes, and have been conserved for more than 300 million years. The loss-of-function phenotype of the A. thaliana B(sister) gene ABS is mild: mutants show reduced seed coloration and defects in endothelium development. This study focuses on GORDITA (GOA, formerly known as AGL63), the most closely related paralog of ABS in A. thaliana, which is thought to act redundantly with ABS. Phylogenetic trees reveal that the duplication leading to ABS and GOA occurred during diversification of the Brassicaceae, and further analyses show that GOA has evolved under relaxed selection pressure. The knockdown phenotype of GOA suggests a role for this gene in fruit longitudinal growth, while over-expression of GOA results in disorganized floral structure and addition of carpel-like features to sepals. Given the phylogeny and function of other B(sister) genes, our data suggest that GOA has evolved a new function as compared to ABS. Protein analysis reveals that the GOA-specific 'deviant' domain is required for protein dimerization, in contrast to other MIKC-type proteins that require the K domain for dimerization. Moreover, no shared protein interaction partners for ABS and GOA could be identified. Our experiments indicate that modification of a protein domain and a shift in expression pattern can lead to a novel gene function in a relatively short time, and highlight the molecular mechanism by which neofunctionalization following gene duplication can be achieved.

  20. Expression of paralogous SEP-, FUL-, AG- and STK-like MADS-box genes in wild-type and peloric Phalaenopsis flowers

    PubMed Central

    Acri-Nunes-Miranda, Roberta; Mondragón-Palomino, Mariana

    2014-01-01

    The diverse flowers of Orchidaceae are the result of several major morphological transitions, among them the most studied is the differentiation of the inner median tepal into the labellum, a perianth organ key in pollinator attraction. Type A peloria lacking stamens and with ectopic labella in place of inner lateral tepals are useful for testing models on the genes specifying these organs by comparing their patterns of expression between wild-type and peloric flowers. Previous studies focused on DEFICIENS- and GLOBOSA-like MADS-box genes because of their conserved role in perianth and stamen development. The “orchid code” model summarizes this work and shows in Orchidaceae there are four paralogous lineages of DEFICIENS/AP3-like genes differentially expressed in each floral whorl. Experimental tests of this model showed the conserved, higher expression of genes from two specific DEF-like gene lineages is associated with labellum development. The present study tests whether eight MADS-box candidate SEP-, FUL-, AG-, and STK-like genes have been specifically duplicated in the Orchidaceae and are also differentially expressed in association with the distinct flower organs of Phalaenopsis hyb. “Athens.” The gene trees indicate orchid-specific duplications. In a way analogous to what is observed in labellum-specific DEF-like genes, a two-fold increase in the expression of SEP3-like gene PhaMADS7 was measured in the labellum-like inner lateral tepals of peloric flowers. The overlap between SEP3-like and DEF-like genes suggests both are associated with labellum specification and similar positional cues determine their domains of expression. In contrast, the uniform messenger levels of FUL-like genes suggest they are involved in the development of all organs and their expression in the ovary suggests cell differentiation starts before pollination. As previously reported AG-like and STK-like genes are exclusively expressed in gynostemium and ovary, however no

  1. Expression of paralogous SEP-, FUL-, AG- and STK-like MADS-box genes in wild-type and peloric Phalaenopsis flowers.

    PubMed

    Acri-Nunes-Miranda, Roberta; Mondragón-Palomino, Mariana

    2014-01-01

    The diverse flowers of Orchidaceae are the result of several major morphological transitions, among them the most studied is the differentiation of the inner median tepal into the labellum, a perianth organ key in pollinator attraction. Type A peloria lacking stamens and with ectopic labella in place of inner lateral tepals are useful for testing models on the genes specifying these organs by comparing their patterns of expression between wild-type and peloric flowers. Previous studies focused on DEFICIENS- and GLOBOSA-like MADS-box genes because of their conserved role in perianth and stamen development. The "orchid code" model summarizes this work and shows in Orchidaceae there are four paralogous lineages of DEFICIENS/AP3-like genes differentially expressed in each floral whorl. Experimental tests of this model showed the conserved, higher expression of genes from two specific DEF-like gene lineages is associated with labellum development. The present study tests whether eight MADS-box candidate SEP-, FUL-, AG-, and STK-like genes have been specifically duplicated in the Orchidaceae and are also differentially expressed in association with the distinct flower organs of Phalaenopsis hyb. "Athens." The gene trees indicate orchid-specific duplications. In a way analogous to what is observed in labellum-specific DEF-like genes, a two-fold increase in the expression of SEP3-like gene PhaMADS7 was measured in the labellum-like inner lateral tepals of peloric flowers. The overlap between SEP3-like and DEF-like genes suggests both are associated with labellum specification and similar positional cues determine their domains of expression. In contrast, the uniform messenger levels of FUL-like genes suggest they are involved in the development of all organs and their expression in the ovary suggests cell differentiation starts before pollination. As previously reported AG-like and STK-like genes are exclusively expressed in gynostemium and ovary, however no evidence for

  2. Selective expression of two types of 28S rRNA paralogous genes in the chaetognath Spadella cephaloptera.

    PubMed

    Barthélémy, R-M; Casanova, J-P; Grino, M; Faure, E

    2007-09-13

    Significant intra-individual variation in the sequences of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes is highly unusual in animal genomes; however, two classes of both 18S and 28S rRNA gene sequences have been detected in chaetognaths, a small phylum of marine invertebrates. One species, Spadella cephaloptera Busch, 1851, is well-suited to the methods of in situ analysis of gene expression, since it is totally transparent. To test our hypothesis of a possible functional division of the two classes of genes, we carried out in situ hybridization. Our results indicated that 28S class II genes are expressed intensively in the oocytes of chaetognaths. In contrast, hybridization using an heterologous probe of 28S class I genes revealed only a single and relatively weak signal in a distinct area of intestinal cells. Our results suggest that the S. cephaloptera genome contains at least three different types of rRNA 28S genes; however, those which are expressed during housekeeping conditions could not be detected in our experiments.

  3. Similar but not the same: insights into the evolutionary history of paralogous sex-determining genes of the dwarf honey bee Apis florea

    PubMed Central

    Biewer, M; Lechner, S; Hasselmann, M

    2016-01-01

    Studying the fate of duplicated genes provides informative insight into the evolutionary plasticity of biological pathways to which they belong. In the paralogous sex-determining genes complementary sex determiner (csd) and feminizer (fem) of honey bee species (genus Apis), only heterozygous csd initiates female development. Here, the full-length coding sequences of the genes csd and fem of the phylogenetically basal dwarf honey bee Apis florea are characterized. Compared with other Apis species, remarkable evolutionary changes in the formation and localization of a protein-interacting (coiled-coil) motif and in the amino acids coding for the csd characteristic hypervariable region (HVR) are observed. Furthermore, functionally different csd alleles were isolated as genomic fragments from a random population sample. In the predicted potential specifying domain (PSD), a high ratio of πN/πS=1.6 indicated positive selection, whereas signs of balancing selection, commonly found in other Apis species, are missing. Low nucleotide diversity on synonymous and genome-wide, non-coding sites as well as site frequency analyses indicated a strong impact of genetic drift in A. florea, likely linked to its biology. Along the evolutionary trajectory of ~30 million years of csd evolution, episodic diversifying selection seems to have acted differently among distinct Apis branches. Consistently low amino-acid differences within the PSD among pairs of functional heterozygous csd alleles indicate that the HVR is the most important region for determining allele specificity. We propose that in the early history of the lineage-specific fem duplication giving rise to csd in Apis, A. florea csd stands as a remarkable example for the plasticity of initial sex-determining signals. PMID:26153222

  4. Similar but not the same: insights into the evolutionary history of paralogous sex-determining genes of the dwarf honey bee Apis florea.

    PubMed

    Biewer, M; Lechner, S; Hasselmann, M

    2016-01-01

    Studying the fate of duplicated genes provides informative insight into the evolutionary plasticity of biological pathways to which they belong. In the paralogous sex-determining genes complementary sex determiner (csd) and feminizer (fem) of honey bee species (genus Apis), only heterozygous csd initiates female development. Here, the full-length coding sequences of the genes csd and fem of the phylogenetically basal dwarf honey bee Apis florea are characterized. Compared with other Apis species, remarkable evolutionary changes in the formation and localization of a protein-interacting (coiled-coil) motif and in the amino acids coding for the csd characteristic hypervariable region (HVR) are observed. Furthermore, functionally different csd alleles were isolated as genomic fragments from a random population sample. In the predicted potential specifying domain (PSD), a high ratio of πN/πS=1.6 indicated positive selection, whereas signs of balancing selection, commonly found in other Apis species, are missing. Low nucleotide diversity on synonymous and genome-wide, non-coding sites as well as site frequency analyses indicated a strong impact of genetic drift in A. florea, likely linked to its biology. Along the evolutionary trajectory of ~30 million years of csd evolution, episodic diversifying selection seems to have acted differently among distinct Apis branches. Consistently low amino-acid differences within the PSD among pairs of functional heterozygous csd alleles indicate that the HVR is the most important region for determining allele specificity. We propose that in the early history of the lineage-specific fem duplication giving rise to csd in Apis, A. florea csd stands as a remarkable example for the plasticity of initial sex-determining signals.

  5. Genome-wide analysis of PHOSPHOLIPID:DIACYLGLYCEROL ACYLTRANSFERASE (PDAT) genes in plants reveals the eudicot-wide PDAT gene expansion and altered selective pressures acting on the core eudicot PDAT paralogs.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xue; Peng, Fred Y; Weselake, Randall J

    2015-03-01

    PHOSPHOLIPID:DIACYLGLYCEROL ACYLTRANSFERASE (PDAT) is an enzyme that catalyzes the transfer of a fatty acyl moiety from the sn-2 position of a phospholipid to the sn-3-position of sn-1,2-diacylglyerol, thus forming triacylglycerol and a lysophospholipid. Although the importance of PDAT in triacylglycerol biosynthesis has been illustrated in some previous studies, the evolutionary relationship of plant PDATs has not been studied in detail. In this study, we investigated the evolutionary relationship of the PDAT gene family across the green plants using a comparative phylogenetic framework. We found that the PDAT candidate genes are present in all examined green plants, including algae, lowland plants (a moss and a lycophyte), monocots, and eudicots. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the evolutionary division of the PDAT gene family into seven major clades. The separation is supported by the conservation and variation in the gene structure, protein properties, motif patterns, and/or selection constraints. We further demonstrated that there is a eudicot-wide PDAT gene expansion, which appears to have been mainly caused by the eudicot-shared ancient gene duplication and subsequent species-specific segmental duplications. In addition, selection pressure analyses showed that different selection constraints have acted on three core eudicot clades, which might enable paleoduplicated PDAT paralogs to either become nonfunctionalized or develop divergent expression patterns during evolution. Overall, our study provides important insights into the evolution of the plant PDAT gene family and explores the evolutionary mechanism underlying the functional diversification among the core eudicot PDAT paralogs. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Detection of aneuploidies by paralogous sequence quantification

    PubMed Central

    Deutsch, S; Choudhury, U; Merla, G; Howald, C; Sylvan, A; Antonarakis, S

    2004-01-01

    Background: Chromosomal aneuploidies are a common cause of congenital disorders associated with cognitive impairment and multiple dysmorphic features. Pre-natal diagnosis of aneuploidies is most commonly performed by the karyotyping of fetal cells obtained by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling, but this method is labour intensive and requires about 14 days to complete. Methods: We have developed a PCR based method for the detection of targeted chromosome number abnormalities termed paralogous sequence quantification (PSQ), based on the use of paralogous genes. Paralogous sequences have a high degree of sequence identity, but accumulate nucleotide substitutions in a locus specific manner. These sequence differences, which we term paralogous sequence mismatches (PSMs), can be quantified using pyrosequencing technology, to estimate the relative dosage between different chromosomes. We designed 10 assays for the detection of trisomies of chromosomes 13, 18, and 21 and sex chromosome aneuploidies. Results: We evaluated the performance of this method on 175 DNAs, highly enriched for abnormal samples. A correct and unambiguous diagnosis was given for 119 out of 120 aneuploid samples as well as for all the controls. One sample which gave an intermediate value for the chromosome 13 assays could not be diagnosed. Conclusions: Our data suggests that PSQ is a robust, easy to interpret, and easy to set up method for the diagnosis of common aneuploidies, and can be performed in less than 48 h, representing a competitive alternative for widespread use in diagnostic laboratories. PMID:15591276

  7. Functional evolution of a multigene family: orthologous and paralogous pheromone receptor genes in the turnip moth, Agrotis segetum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dan-Dan; Löfstedt, Christer

    2013-01-01

    Lepidopteran pheromone receptors (PRs), for which orthologies are evident among closely related species, provide an intriguing example of gene family evolution in terms of how new functions may arise. However, only a limited number of PRs have been functionally characterized so far and thus evolutionary scenarios suffer from elements of speculation. In this study we investigated the turnip moth Agrotis segetum, in which female moths produce a mixture of chemically related pheromone components that elicit specific responses from receptor cells on male antennae. We cloned nine A. segetum PR genes and the Orco gene by degenerate primer based RT-PCR. The nine PR genes, named as AsegOR1 and AsegOR3-10, fall into four distinct orthologous clusters of known lepidopteran PRs, of which one contains six paralogues. The paralogues are under relaxed selective pressure, contrasting with the purifying selection on other clusters. We identified the receptors AsegOR9, AsegOR4 and AsegOR5, specific for the respective homologous pheromone components (Z)-5-decenyl, (Z)-7-dodecenyl and (Z)-9-tetradecenyl acetates, by two-electrode voltage clamp recording from Xenopus laevis oocytes co-expressing Orco and each PR candidate. These receptors occur in three different orthologous clusters. We also found that the six paralogues with high sequence similarity vary dramatically in ligand selectivity and sensitivity. Different from AsegOR9, AsegOR6 showed a relatively large response to the behavioural antagonist (Z)-5-decenol, and a small response to (Z)-5-decenyl acetate. AsegOR1 was broadly tuned, but most responsive to (Z)-5-decenyl acetate, (Z)-7-dodecenyl acetate and the behavioural antagonist (Z)-8-dodecenyl acetate. AsegOR8 and AsegOR7, which differ from AsegOR6 and AsegOR1 by 7 and 10 aa respectively, showed much lower sensitivities. AsegOR10 showed only small responses to all the tested compounds. These results suggest that new receptors arise through gene duplication, and relaxed

  8. Functional Evolution of a Multigene Family: Orthologous and Paralogous Pheromone Receptor Genes in the Turnip Moth, Agrotis segetum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dan-Dan; Löfstedt, Christer

    2013-01-01

    Lepidopteran pheromone receptors (PRs), for which orthologies are evident among closely related species, provide an intriguing example of gene family evolution in terms of how new functions may arise. However, only a limited number of PRs have been functionally characterized so far and thus evolutionary scenarios suffer from elements of speculation. In this study we investigated the turnip moth Agrotis segetum, in which female moths produce a mixture of chemically related pheromone components that elicit specific responses from receptor cells on male antennae. We cloned nine A. segetum PR genes and the Orco gene by degenerate primer based RT-PCR. The nine PR genes, named as AsegOR1 and AsegOR3-10, fall into four distinct orthologous clusters of known lepidopteran PRs, of which one contains six paralogues. The paralogues are under relaxed selective pressure, contrasting with the purifying selection on other clusters. We identified the receptors AsegOR9, AsegOR4 and AsegOR5, specific for the respective homologous pheromone components (Z)-5-decenyl, (Z)-7-dodecenyl and (Z)-9-tetradecenyl acetates, by two-electrode voltage clamp recording from Xenopus laevis oocytes co-expressing Orco and each PR candidate. These receptors occur in three different orthologous clusters. We also found that the six paralogues with high sequence similarity vary dramatically in ligand selectivity and sensitivity. Different from AsegOR9, AsegOR6 showed a relatively large response to the behavioural antagonist (Z)-5-decenol, and a small response to (Z)-5-decenyl acetate. AsegOR1 was broadly tuned, but most responsive to (Z)-5-decenyl acetate, (Z)-7-dodecenyl acetate and the behavioural antagonist (Z)-8-dodecenyl acetate. AsegOR8 and AsegOR7, which differ from AsegOR6 and AsegOR1 by 7 and 10 aa respectively, showed much lower sensitivities. AsegOR10 showed only small responses to all the tested compounds. These results suggest that new receptors arise through gene duplication, and relaxed

  9. miR-1279, miR-548j, miR-548m, and miR-548d-5p Binding Sites in CDSs of Paralogous and Orthologous PTPN12, MSH6, and ZEB1 Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ivashchenko, Anatoliy T.; Issabekova, Assel S.; Berillo, Olga A.

    2013-01-01

    Only PTPN12, MSH6, and ZEB1 have significant miR-1279 binding sites among paralogous genes of human tyrosine phosphatase family, DNA mismatch repair family, and zinc finger family, respectively. All miRNA binding sites are located within CDSs of studied mRNAs. Nucleotide sequences of hsa-miR-1279 binding sites with mRNAs of human PTPN12, MSH6, and ZEB1 genes encode TKEQYE, EGSSDE, and GEKPYE oligopeptides, respectively. The conservation of miRNA binding sites encoding oligopeptides has been revealed. MRNAs of many paralogs of zinc finger gene family have from 1 to 12 binding sites coding the same GEKPYE hexapeptide. MRNAs of PTPN12, MSH6, and ZEB1 orthologous genes from different animal species have binding sites for hsa-miR-1279 which consist of homologous oligonucleotides encoding similar human oligopeptides TKEQYE, EGSSDE, and GEKPYE. MiR-548j, miR-548m, and miR-548d-5p have homologous binding sites in the mRNA of PTPN12 orthologous genes which encode PRTRSC, TEATDI, and STASAT oligopeptides, respectively. All regions of miRNA are important for binding with the mRNA. PMID:23957009

  10. miR-1279, miR-548j, miR-548m, and miR-548d-5p binding sites in CDSs of paralogous and orthologous PTPN12, MSH6, and ZEB1 Genes.

    PubMed

    Ivashchenko, Anatoliy T; Issabekova, Assel S; Berillo, Olga A

    2013-01-01

    Only PTPN12, MSH6, and ZEB1 have significant miR-1279 binding sites among paralogous genes of human tyrosine phosphatase family, DNA mismatch repair family, and zinc finger family, respectively. All miRNA binding sites are located within CDSs of studied mRNAs. Nucleotide sequences of hsa-miR-1279 binding sites with mRNAs of human PTPN12, MSH6, and ZEB1 genes encode TKEQYE, EGSSDE, and GEKPYE oligopeptides, respectively. The conservation of miRNA binding sites encoding oligopeptides has been revealed. MRNAs of many paralogs of zinc finger gene family have from 1 to 12 binding sites coding the same GEKPYE hexapeptide. MRNAs of PTPN12, MSH6, and ZEB1 orthologous genes from different animal species have binding sites for hsa-miR-1279 which consist of homologous oligonucleotides encoding similar human oligopeptides TKEQYE, EGSSDE, and GEKPYE. MiR-548j, miR-548m, and miR-548d-5p have homologous binding sites in the mRNA of PTPN12 orthologous genes which encode PRTRSC, TEATDI, and STASAT oligopeptides, respectively. All regions of miRNA are important for binding with the mRNA.

  11. Overexpression of lalA, a paralog of labA, is capable of affecting both circadian gene expression and cell growth in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Yasuhito; Nishikawa, Tomoe; Kondo, Takao; Oyama, Tokitaka

    2012-03-23

    In the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus, LabA negatively regulates circadian gene expression under the control of Kai-protein-based clock. Here we conducted a molecular genetic analysis of lalA, a paralog of labA. Although a lalA loss of function mutant did not exhibit any apparent phenotype under our experimental conditions, lalA overexpression inhibited cell growth and decreased cell viability. Moderate lalA overexpression brought about abnormalities in circadian gene expression: reduced amplitude of kaiBC expression rhythm, and altered peak and trough timing of psbAI and kaiA expression rhythms. These results imply that lalA is capable of affecting circadian gene expression and cell growth. Copyright © 2012 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Parsing Myc Paralogs in Oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mathsyaraja, Haritha; Eisenman, Robert N

    2016-01-11

    Myc and its paralog MycN are thought to be functionally redundant, but Myc- and MycN-driven medulloblastomas exhibit distinct phenotypes. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Vo and colleagues (2016) show that this phenotypic difference stems from the preferential ability of Myc, relative to MycN, to bind Miz1 and repress transcription.

  13. Isoform-Level Gene Expression Profiles of Human Y Chromosome Azoospermia Factor Genes and Their X Chromosome Paralogs in the Testicular Tissue of Non-Obstructive Azoospermia Patients.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi Rastegar, Diba; Sharifi Tabar, Mehdi; Alikhani, Mehdi; Parsamatin, Pouria; Sahraneshin Samani, Fazel; Sabbaghian, Marjan; Sadighi Gilani, Mohammad Ali; Mohammad Ahadi, Ali; Mohseni Meybodi, Anahita; Piryaei, Abbas; Ansari-Pour, Naser; Gourabi, Hamid; Baharvand, Hossein; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini

    2015-09-04

    The human Y chromosome has an inevitable role in male fertility because it contains many genes critical for spermatogenesis and the development of the male gonads. Any genetic variation or epigenetic modification affecting the expression pattern of Y chromosome genes may thus lead to male infertility. In this study, we performed isoform-level gene expression profiling of Y chromosome genes within the azoospermia factor (AZF) regions, their X chromosome counterparts, and few autosomal paralogues in testicular biopsies of 12 men with preserved spermatogenesis and 68 men with nonobstructive azoospermia (NOA) (40 Sertoli-cell-only syndrome (SCOS) and 28 premiotic maturation arrest (MA)). This was undertaken using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) at the transcript level and Western blotting (WB) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) at the protein level. We profiled the expression of 41 alternative transcripts encoded by 14 AZFa, AZFb, and AZFc region genes (USP9Y, DDX3Y, XKRY, HSFY1, CYORF15A, CYORF15B, KDM5D, EIF1AY, RPS4Y2, RBMY1A1, PRY, BPY2, DAZ1, and CDY1) as well as their X chromosome homologue transcripts and a few autosomal homologues. Of the 41 transcripts, 18 were significantly down-regulated in men with NOA when compared with those of men with complete spermatogenesis. In contrast, the expression of five transcripts increased significantly in NOA patients. Furthermore, to confirm the qPCR results at the protein level, we performed immunoblotting and IHC experiments (based on 24 commercial and homemade antibodies) that detected 10 AZF-encoded proteins. In addition, their localization in testis cell types and organelles was determined. Interestingly, the two missing proteins, XKRY and CYORF15A, were detected for the first time. Finally, we focused on the expression patterns of the significantly altered genes in 12 MA patients with successful sperm retrieval compared to those of 12 MA patients with failed sperm retrieval to predict the success of sperm retrieval in

  14. Mechanisms of hydroxyl radical-induced contraction of rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianfeng; Li, Wenyan; Liu, Weimin; Altura, Bella T; Altura, Burton M

    2004-09-19

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of hydroxyl radicals (*OH), generated via the Fe2+-mediated Fenton reaction, on isolated rat aortic rings with and without endothelium. In the absence of any vasoactive agent, generation of *OH alone elicited an endothelium-independent contraction in rat aortic rings in a concentration-dependent manner. Hydroxyl radical-induced contractions of denuded rat aortic rings appeared, however, to be slightly stronger than those on intact rat aortic rings. The contractile responses to *OH were neither reversible nor reproducible in the same ring; even small concentrations of *OH radicals resulted in tachyphylaxis. Removal of extracellular calcium ions (Ca2+) or buffering intracellular Ca2+ with 10 microM acetyl methyl ester of bis(o-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N',N',-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA-AM) significantly attenuated the contractile actions of *OH radicals. The presence of 1 microM staurosporine, 1 microM bisindolylmaleimide I, 1 microM Gö6976 [inhibitor of protein kinase C (PKC)], 2 microM PD-980592 (inhibitor of ERK), 10 microM genistein, and 1 microM wortmannin significantly inhibited the contractions induced by *OH. Proadifen (10 microM), on the other hand, significantly potentiated the hydroxyl radical-induced contractions. Exposure of primary cultured aortic smooth muscle cells to *OH produced significant, rapid rises of intracellular free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i). Several, specific antagonists of possible endogenously formed vasoconstrictors did not inhibit or attenuate either hydroxyl radical-induced contractions or the elevation of [Ca2+]i. Our new results suggest that hydroxyl radical-triggered contractions on rat aortic rings are Ca2+-dependent. Several intracellular signal transduction systems seem to play some role in hydroxyl radical-induced vasoconstriction of rat aortic rings.

  15. Sphingolipid base modifying enzymes in sunflower (Helianthus annuus): cloning and characterization of a C4-hydroxylase gene and a new paralogous Δ8-desaturase gene.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Pérez, Antonio J; Martínez-Force, Enrique; Garcés, Rafael; Salas, Joaquín J

    2011-05-15

    Sphingolipids are components of plant cell membranes that participate in the regulation of important physiological processes. Unlike their animal counterparts, plant sphingolipids are characterized by high levels of base C4-hydroxylation. Moreover, desaturation at the Δ8 position predominates over the Δ4 desaturation typically found in animal sphingolipids. These modifications are due to the action of C4-hydroxylases and Δ8-long chain base desaturases, and they are important for complex sphingolipids finally becoming functional. The long chain bases of sunflower sphingolipids have high levels of hydroxylated and unsaturated moieties. Here, a C4-long chain base hydroxylase was functionally characterized in sunflower plant, an enzyme that could complement the sur2Δ mutation when heterologously expressed in this yeast mutant deficient in hydroxylation. This hydroxylase was ubiquitously expressed in sunflower, with the highest levels found in the developing cotyledons. In addition, we identified a new Δ8-long base chain desaturase gene that displays strong homology to a previously reported desaturase gene. This desaturase was also expressed in yeast and was able to change the long chain base composition of the transformed host. We studied the expression of this desaturase and compared it with that of the other isoform described in sunflower. The desaturase form studied in this paper displayed higher expression levels in developing seeds.

  16. Swi/SNF-GCN5-dependent chromatin remodelling determines induced expression of GDH3, one of the paralogous genes responsible for ammonium assimilation and glutamate biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Avendaño, Amaranta; Riego, Lina; DeLuna, Alexander; Aranda, Cristina; Romero, Guillermo; Ishida, Cecilia; Vázquez-Acevedo, Miriam; Rodarte, Beatriz; Recillas-Targa, Félix; Valenzuela, Lourdes; Zonszein, Sergio; González, Alicia

    2005-07-01

    It is accepted that Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome arose from complete duplication of eight ancestral chromosomes; functionally normal ploidy was recovered because of the massive loss of 90% of duplicated genes. There is evidence that indicates that part of this selective conservation of gene pairs is compelling to yeast facultative metabolism. As an example, the duplicated NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase pathway has been maintained because of the differential expression of the paralogous GDH1 and GDH3 genes, and the biochemical specialization of the enzymes they encode. The present work has been aimed to the understanding of the regulatory mechanisms that modulate GDH3 transcriptional activation. Our results show that GDH3 expression is repressed in glucose-grown cultures, as opposed to what has been observed for GDH1, and induced under respiratory conditions, or under stationary phase. Although GDH3 pertains to the nitrogen metabolic network, and its expression is Gln3p-regulated, complete derepression is ultimately determined by the carbon source through the action of the SAGA and SWI/SNF chromatin remodelling complexes. GDH3 carbon-mediated regulation is over-imposed to that exerted by the nitrogen source, highlighting the fact that operation of facultative metabolism requires strict control of enzymes, like Gdh3p, involved in biosynthetic pathways that use tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates.

  17. Whole genome and exome sequencing realignment supports the assignment of KCNJ12, KCNJ17, and KCNJ18 paralogous genes in thyrotoxic periodic paralysis locus: functional characterization of two polymorphic Kir2.6 isoforms.

    PubMed

    Paninka, Rolf M; Mazzotti, Diego R; Kizys, Marina M L; Vidi, Angela C; Rodrigues, Hélio; Silva, Silas P; Kunii, Ilda S; Furuzawa, Gilberto K; Arcisio-Miranda, Manoel; Dias-da-Silva, Magnus R

    2016-08-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has enriched the understanding of the human genome. However, homologous or repetitive sequences shared among genes frequently produce dubious alignments and can puzzle NGS mutation analysis, especially for paralogous potassium channels. Potassium inward rectifier (Kir) channels are important to establish the resting membrane potential and regulating the muscle excitability. Mutations in Kir channels cause disorders affecting the heart and skeletal muscle, such as arrhythmia and periodic paralysis. Recently, a susceptibility muscle channelopathy-thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP)-has been related to Kir2.6 channel (KCNJ18 gene). Due to their high nucleotide sequence homology, variants found in the potassium channels Kir2.6 and Kir2.5 have been mistakenly attributable to Kir2.2 polymorphisms or mutations. We aimed at elucidating nucleotide misalignments by performing realignment of whole exome sequencing (WES) and whole genome sequencing (WGS) reads to specific Kir2.2, Kir2.5, and Kir2.6 cDNA sequences using BWA-MEM/GATK pipeline. WES/WGS reads correctly aligned 26.9/43.2, 37.6/31.0, and 35.4/25.8 % to Kir2.2, Kir2.5, and Kir2.6, respectively. Realignment was able to reduce over 94 % of misalignments. No putative mutations of Kir2.6 were identified for the three TPP patients included in the cohort of 36 healthy controls using either WES or WGS. We also distinguished sequences for a single Kir2.2, a single Kir2.5 sequence, and two Kir2.6 isoforms, which haplotypes were named RRAI and QHEV, based on changes at 39, 40, 56, and 249 residues. Electrophysiology records on both Kir2.6_RRAI and _QHEV showed typical rectifying currents. In our study, the reduction of misalignments allowed the elucidation of paralogous gene sequences and two distinct Kir2.6 haplotypes, and pointed the need for checking the frequency of these polymorphisms in other populations with different genetic background.

  18. The alpha glycerophosphate cycle in Drosophila melanogaster VI. structure and evolution of enzyme paralogs in the genus Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Carmon, Amber; MacIntyre, Ross

    2010-01-01

    The genome sequences of 12 Drosophila species contain 3 paralogs for alpha glycerophosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) and for the mitochondrial alpha glycerophosphate oxidase (GPO). These 2 enzymes participate in the alpha glycerophosphate cycle in the adult thoracic flight muscles. The flight muscle enzymes are encoded by gpdh-1 at 26A2 and gpo-1 at 52C8. In this paper, we show that the GPDH paralogs share the same evolutionarily conserved functional domains and most intron positions, whereas the GPO paralogs share only some of the functional domains of mitochondrial oxidoreductases. The GPO paralogs not expressed in the flight muscles essentially lack introns. GPDH paralogs encoded by gpdh-2 and gpdh-3 and the GPO paralogs encoded by gpo-2 and gpo-3 are expressed only in the testes. Gene trees for the GPDH and GPO paralogs indicate that the genes expressed in the flight muscles are evolving very slowly presumably under strong purifying selection whereas the paralogs expressed in the testes are evolving more rapidly. The concordance between species and gene trees, d(N)/d(S) ratios, phylogenetic analysis by maximum likelihood-based tests, and analyses of radical and conservative substitutions all indicate that the additional GPDH and GPO paralogs are also evolving under purifying selection.

  19. Faster evolving Drosophila paralogs lose expression rate and ubiquity and accumulate more non-synonymous SNPs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Duplicated genes can indefinately persist in genomes if either both copies retain the original function due to dosage benefit (gene conservation), or one of the copies assumes a novel function (neofunctionalization), or both copies become required to perform the function previously accomplished by a single copy (subfunctionalization), or through a combination of these mechanisms. Different models of duplication retention imply different predictions about substitution rates in the coding portion of paralogs and about asymmetry of these rates. Results We analyse sequence evolution asymmetry in paralogs present in 12 Drosophila genomes using the nearest non-duplicated orthologous outgroup as a reference. Those paralogs present in D. melanogaster are analysed in conjunction with the asymmetry of expression rate and ubiquity and of segregating non-synonymous polymorphisms in the same paralogs. Paralogs accumulate substitutions, on average, faster than their nearest singleton orthologs. The distribution of paralogs’ substitution rate asymmetry is overdispersed relative to that of orthologous clades, containing disproportionally more unusually symmetric and unusually asymmetric clades. We show that paralogs are more asymmetric in: a) clades orthologous to highly constrained singleton genes; b) genes with high expression level; c) genes with ubiquitous expression and d) non-tandem duplications. We further demonstrate that, in each asymmetrically evolving pair of paralogs, the faster evolving member of the pair tends to have lower average expression rate, lower expression uniformity and higher frequency of non-synonymous SNPs than its slower evolving counterpart. Conclusions Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that many duplications in Drosophila are retained despite stabilising selection being more relaxed in one of the paralogs than in the other, suggesting a widespread unfinished pseudogenization. This phenomenon is likely to make detection of

  20. Conserved differential expression of paralogous DEFICIENS- and GLOBOSA-like MADS-box genes in the flowers of Orchidaceae: refining the 'orchid code'.

    PubMed

    Mondragón-Palomino, Mariana; Theissen, Günter

    2011-06-01

    In flowering plants, class-B floral homeotic genes encode MADS-domain transcription factors, which are key in the specification of petal and stamen identity, and have two ancient clades: DEF-like and GLO-like genes. Many species have one gene of each clade, but orchids have typically four DEF-like genes, representing ancient gene clades 1, 2, 3 and 4. We tested the 'orchid code', a combinatorial genetic model suggesting that differences between the organs of the orchid perianth (outer tepals, inner lateral tepals and labellum) are generated by the combinatorial differential expression of four DEF-like genes. Our experimental test involves highly sensitive and specific measurements, with qRT-PCR of the expression of DEF- and GLO-like genes from the distantly related Vanilla planifolia and Phragmipedium longifolium, as well as from wild-type and peloric Phalaenopsis hybrid flowers. Our findings support the first 'orchid code' hypothesis, in that absence of clade-3 and -4 gene expression distinguishes the outer tepals from the inner tepals. In contrast to the original hypothesis, however, mRNA of both clade-3 and -4 genes accumulates in wild-type inner lateral tepals and the labellum, and in labellum-like inner lateral tepals of peloric flowers, albeit in different quantities. Our data suggest a revised hypothesis where high levels of clade-1 and -2, and low levels of clade-3 and -4, gene expression specify inner lateral tepals, whereas labellum development requires low levels of clade-1 and -2 expression and high levels of clade-3 and -4 expression.

  1. The effect of paralogous lineages on the application of reconciliation analysis by cophylogeny mapping.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Andrew

    2005-02-01

    Paralogy defines similarity caused by duplication rather than common descent and is well known in the case of paralogous gene copies within a single genome. The term is here extended to paralogous lineages of associates within a single host. The phylogenies of four genera within the Herpesviridae were reconciled with host phylogenies using cophylogenetic mapping. The observed correspondence for each pair of phylogenies was evaluated through randomization of the viral phylogeny and demonstrated to be greater than expected by chance. A simulation study was then carried out to assess the influence of paralogous lineages on the efficacy of reconciliation analysis. Combining viral taxa from different genera that infected common hosts introduced incongruence into the cophylogenies and reduced both the minimum and maximum observed number of codivergence events relative to the initial analysis of orthologous clades. However, at an average sample size this did not alter the fundamental significance of observed correspondence. With smaller sample sizes, the number of orthologous taxa selected at random from the pool of taxa was reduced. False-negative results then increased in proportion from 0.02 to 0.33. These results demonstrated that reconciliation analysis is robust under conditions of paralogy at "normal" sample sizes but is adversely affected by a combination of paralogy and low sample size. Consideration of phylogenies for Papillomavirus, Atadenovirus, and Mastadenovirus suggest that paralogous lineages may be a widespread phenomenon among DNA viruses and that duplication irrespective of host speciation is an important cause of viral diversification.

  2. Identification, Phylogeny, and Function of fabp2 Paralogs in Two Non-Model Teleost Fish Species.

    PubMed

    Kaitetzidou, Elisavet; Chatzifotis, Stavros; Antonopoulou, Efthimia; Sarropoulou, Elena

    2015-10-01

    Intestinal fatty-acid-binding protein (IFABP or FABP2) is a cytosolic transporter of long-chain fatty acids, which is mainly expressed in cells of intestinal tissue. Fatty acids in teleosts are an important source of energy for growth, reproduction, and swimming and a main ingredient in the yolk sac of embryos and larvae. The fabp2 paralogs, fabp2a and fabp2b, were identified for 26 teleost fish species including the paralogs for the two non-model teleost fish species, namely the gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) and the European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax). Despite the high similarity of fabp2 paralogs, as well as the identical organization in four exons, paralogs were mapped to different chromosomes/linkage groups supporting the hypothesis that the identified transcripts are true paralogs originating from a single ancestor gene after genome duplication. This was also confirmed by phylogenetic analysis using fabp2 sequences of 26 teleosts and by synteny analysis carried out with ten teleosts. Differential expression analysis of the gilthead sea bream and European sea bass fabp2 paralogs in the intestine after fasting and refeeding experiment further revealed their altered implication in metabolism. Additional expression studies in seven developmental stages of the two species detected fabp2 paralogs relatively early in the embryonic development as well as possible complementary or separated roles of the paralogs. The identification and characterization of the two fabp2 paralogs will contribute significantly to the understanding of the fabp2 evolution as well as of the divergences in fatty acid metabolism.

  3. The five glucose-6-phosphatase paralogous genes are differentially regulated by insulin alone or combined with high level of amino acids and/or glucose in trout hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Lucie, Marandel; Weiwei, Dai; Stéphane, Panserat; Sandrine, Skiba-Cassy

    2016-04-01

    A recent analysis of the newly sequenced rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) genome suggested that duplicated gluconeogenic g6pc paralogues, fixed in this genome after the salmonid-specific 4th whole genome duplication, may have a role in the setting up of the glucose-intolerant phenotype in this carnivorous species. This should be due to the sub- or neo-functionalization of their regulation. In the present short communication we thus addressed the question of the regulation of these genes by insulin, hormone involved in the glucose homeostasis, and its interaction with glucose and amino acids in vitro. The stimulation of trout hepatocytes with insulin revealed an atypical up-regulation of g6pcb2 ohnologues and confirmed the sub- or neo-functionalization of the five g6pc genes at least at the regulatory level. Intriguingly, when hepatocytes were cultured with high levels of glucose and/or AAs in presence of insulin, most of the g6pc paralogues were up-regulated. It strongly suggested a cross-talk between insulin and nutrients for the regulation of these genes. Moreover these results strengthened the idea that g6pc duplicated genes may significantly contribute to the setting up of the glucose-intolerant phenotype in trout via their atypical regulation by insulin alone or in interaction with nutrients. These findings open new perspectives to better understand in vivo glucose-intolerant phenotype in trout fed a high carbohydrate diet.

  4. Monilophyte mitochondrial rps1 genes carry a unique group II intron that likely originated from an ancient paralog in rpl2.

    PubMed

    Knie, Nils; Grewe, Felix; Knoop, Volker

    2016-09-01

    Intron patterns in plant mitochondrial genomes differ significantly between the major land plant clades. We here report on a new, clade-specific group II intron in the rps1 gene of monilophytes (ferns). This intron, rps1i25g2, is strikingly similar to rpl2i846g2 previously identified in the mitochondrial rpl2 gene of seed plants, ferns, and the lycophyte Phlegmariurus squarrosus Although mitochondrial ribosomal protein genes are frequently subject to endosymbiotic gene transfer among plants, we could retrieve the mitochondrial rps1 gene in a taxonomically wide sampling of 44 monilophyte taxa including basal lineages such as the Ophioglossales, Psilotales, and Marattiales with the only exception being the Equisetales (horsetails). Introns rps1i25g2 and rpl2i846g2 were likewise consistently present with only two exceptions: Intron rps1i25g2 is lost in the genus Ophioglossum and intron rpl2i846g2 is lost in Equisetum bogotense Both intron sequences are moderately affected by RNA editing. The unprecedented primary and secondary structure similarity of rps1i25g2 and rpl2i846g2 suggests an ancient retrotransposition event copying rpl2i846g2 into rps1, for which we suggest a model. Our phylogenetic analysis adding the new rps1 locus to a previous data set is fully congruent with recent insights on monilophyte phylogeny and further supports a sister relationship of Gleicheniales and Hymenophyllales. © 2016 Knie et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  5. Dishevelled Paralogs in Vertebrate Development: Redundant or Distinct?

    PubMed Central

    Gentzel, Marc; Schambony, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    Dishevelled (DVL) proteins are highly conserved in the animal kingdom and are important key players in β-Catenin-dependent and -independent Wnt signaling pathways. Vertebrate genomes typically comprise three DVL genes, DVL1, DVL2, and DVL3. Expression patterns and developmental functions of the three vertebrate DVL proteins however, are only partially redundant in any given species. Moreover, expression and function of DVL isoforms have diverged between different vertebrate species. All DVL proteins share basic functionality in Wnt signal transduction. Additional, paralog-specific interactions and functions combined with context-dependent availability of DVL isoforms may play a central role in defining Wnt signaling specificity and add selectivity toward distinct downstream pathways. In this review, we recapitulate briefly cellular functions of DVL paralogs, their role in vertebrate embryonic development and congenital disease. PMID:28603713

  6. Sequence variation of alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) paralogs in cactophilic Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Matzkin, Luciano M; Eanes, Walter F

    2003-01-01

    This study focuses on the population genetics of alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) in cactophilic Drosophila. Drosophila mojavensis and D. arizonae utilize cactus hosts, and each host contains a characteristic mixture of alcohol compounds. In these Drosophila species there are two functional Adh loci, an adult form (Adh-2) and a larval and ovarian form (Adh-1). Overall, the greater level of variation segregating in D. arizonae than in D. mojavensis suggests a larger population size for D. arizonae. There are markedly different patterns of variation between the paralogs across both species. A 16-bp intron haplotype segregates in both species at Adh-2, apparently the product of an ancient gene conversion event between the paralogs, which suggests that there is selection for the maintenance of the intron structure possibly for the maintenance of pre-mRNA structure. We observe a pattern of variation consistent with adaptive protein evolution in the D. mojavensis lineage at Adh-1, suggesting that the cactus host shift that occurred in the divergence of D. mojavensis from D. arizonae had an effect on the evolution of the larval expressed paralog. Contrary to previous work we estimate a recent time for both the divergence of D. mojavensis and D. arizonae (2.4 +/- 0.7 MY) and the age of the gene duplication (3.95 +/- 0.45 MY). PMID:12586706

  7. Differential domain evolution and complex RNA processing in a family of paralogous EPB41 (protein 4.1) genes facilitates expression of diverse tissue-specific isoforms

    SciTech Connect

    Parra, Marilyn; Gee, Sherry; Chan, Nadine; Ryaboy, Dmitriy; Dubchak, Inna; Narla, Mohandas; Gascard, Philippe D.; Conboy, John G.

    2004-07-15

    The EPB41 (protein 4.1) genes epitomize the resourcefulness of the mammalian genome to encode a complex proteome from a small number of genes. By utilizing alternative transcriptional promoters and tissue-specific alternative pre-mRNA splicing, EPB41, EPB41L2, EPB41L3, and EPB41L1 encode a diverse array of structural adapter proteins. Comparative genomic and transcript analysis of these 140kb-240kb genes indicates several unusual features: differential evolution of highly conserved exons encoding known functional domains, interspersed with unique exons whose size and sequence variations contribute substantially to intergenic diversity: alternative first exons, most of which map far upstream of the coding regions; and complex tissue-specific alternative pre-mRNA splicing that facilitates synthesis of functionally different complements of 4.1 proteins in various cells. Understanding the splicing regulatory networks that control protein 4.1 expression will be critical to a full appreciation of the many roles of 4.1 proteins in normal cell biology and their proposed roles in human cancer.

  8. Identification of critical paralog groups with indispensable roles in the regulation of signaling flow

    PubMed Central

    Modos, Dezso; Brooks, Johanne; Fazekas, David; Ari, Eszter; Vellai, Tibor; Csermely, Peter; Korcsmaros, Tamas; Lenti, Katalin

    2016-01-01

    Extensive cross-talk between signaling pathways is required to integrate the myriad of extracellular signal combinations at the cellular level. Gene duplication events may lead to the emergence of novel functions, leaving groups of similar genes - termed paralogs - in the genome. To distinguish critical paralog groups (CPGs) from other paralogs in human signaling networks, we developed a signaling network-based method using cross-talk annotation and tissue-specific signaling flow analysis. 75 CPGs were found with higher degree, betweenness centrality, closeness, and ‘bowtieness’ when compared to other paralogs or other proteins in the signaling network. CPGs had higher diversity in all these measures, with more varied biological functions and more specific post-transcriptional regulation than non-critical paralog groups (non-CPG). Using TGF-beta, Notch and MAPK pathways as examples, SMAD2/3, NOTCH1/2/3 and MEK3/6-p38 CPGs were found to regulate the signaling flow of their respective pathways. Additionally, CPGs showed a higher mutation rate in both inherited diseases and cancer, and were enriched in drug targets. In conclusion, the results revealed two distinct types of paralog groups in the signaling network: CPGs and non-CPGs. Thus highlighting the importance of CPGs as compared to non-CPGs in drug discovery and disease pathogenesis. PMID:27922122

  9. Identification of critical paralog groups with indispensable roles in the regulation of signaling flow.

    PubMed

    Modos, Dezso; Brooks, Johanne; Fazekas, David; Ari, Eszter; Vellai, Tibor; Csermely, Peter; Korcsmaros, Tamas; Lenti, Katalin

    2016-12-06

    Extensive cross-talk between signaling pathways is required to integrate the myriad of extracellular signal combinations at the cellular level. Gene duplication events may lead to the emergence of novel functions, leaving groups of similar genes - termed paralogs - in the genome. To distinguish critical paralog groups (CPGs) from other paralogs in human signaling networks, we developed a signaling network-based method using cross-talk annotation and tissue-specific signaling flow analysis. 75 CPGs were found with higher degree, betweenness centrality, closeness, and 'bowtieness' when compared to other paralogs or other proteins in the signaling network. CPGs had higher diversity in all these measures, with more varied biological functions and more specific post-transcriptional regulation than non-critical paralog groups (non-CPG). Using TGF-beta, Notch and MAPK pathways as examples, SMAD2/3, NOTCH1/2/3 and MEK3/6-p38 CPGs were found to regulate the signaling flow of their respective pathways. Additionally, CPGs showed a higher mutation rate in both inherited diseases and cancer, and were enriched in drug targets. In conclusion, the results revealed two distinct types of paralog groups in the signaling network: CPGs and non-CPGs. Thus highlighting the importance of CPGs as compared to non-CPGs in drug discovery and disease pathogenesis.

  10. TFAP2 paralogs regulate melanocyte differentiation in parallel with MITF

    PubMed Central

    Loftus, Stacie K.; Liu, Huan; Sompallae, Ramakrishna; Gildea, Derek E.; Santana, Juan F.; Manak, J. Robert; Pavan, William J.; Williams, Trevor; Cornell, Robert A.

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding transcription factor TFAP2A result in pigmentation anomalies in model organisms and premature hair graying in humans. However, the pleiotropic functions of TFAP2A and its redundantly-acting paralogs have made the precise contribution of TFAP2-type activity to melanocyte differentiation unclear. Defining this contribution may help to explain why TFAP2A expression is reduced in advanced-stage melanoma compared to benign nevi. To identify genes with TFAP2A-dependent expression in melanocytes, we profile zebrafish tissue and mouse melanocytes deficient in Tfap2a, and find that expression of a small subset of genes underlying pigmentation phenotypes is TFAP2A-dependent, including Dct, Mc1r, Mlph, and Pmel. We then conduct TFAP2A ChIP-seq in mouse and human melanocytes and find that a much larger subset of pigmentation genes is associated with active regulatory elements bound by TFAP2A. These elements are also frequently bound by MITF, which is considered the “master regulator” of melanocyte development. For example, the promoter of TRPM1 is bound by both TFAP2A and MITF, and we show that the activity of a minimal TRPM1 promoter is lost upon deletion of the TFAP2A binding sites. However, the expression of Trpm1 is not TFAP2A-dependent, implying that additional TFAP2 paralogs function redundantly to drive melanocyte differentiation, which is consistent with previous results from zebrafish. Paralogs Tfap2a and Tfap2b are both expressed in mouse melanocytes, and we show that mouse embryos with Wnt1-Cre-mediated deletion of Tfap2a and Tfap2b in the neural crest almost completely lack melanocytes but retain neural crest-derived sensory ganglia. These results suggest that TFAP2 paralogs, like MITF, are also necessary for induction of the melanocyte lineage. Finally, we observe a genetic interaction between tfap2a and mitfa in zebrafish, but find that artificially elevating expression of tfap2a does not increase levels of melanin in mitfa

  11. TFAP2 paralogs regulate melanocyte differentiation in parallel with MITF.

    PubMed

    Seberg, Hannah E; Van Otterloo, Eric; Loftus, Stacie K; Liu, Huan; Bonde, Greg; Sompallae, Ramakrishna; Gildea, Derek E; Santana, Juan F; Manak, J Robert; Pavan, William J; Williams, Trevor; Cornell, Robert A

    2017-03-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding transcription factor TFAP2A result in pigmentation anomalies in model organisms and premature hair graying in humans. However, the pleiotropic functions of TFAP2A and its redundantly-acting paralogs have made the precise contribution of TFAP2-type activity to melanocyte differentiation unclear. Defining this contribution may help to explain why TFAP2A expression is reduced in advanced-stage melanoma compared to benign nevi. To identify genes with TFAP2A-dependent expression in melanocytes, we profile zebrafish tissue and mouse melanocytes deficient in Tfap2a, and find that expression of a small subset of genes underlying pigmentation phenotypes is TFAP2A-dependent, including Dct, Mc1r, Mlph, and Pmel. We then conduct TFAP2A ChIP-seq in mouse and human melanocytes and find that a much larger subset of pigmentation genes is associated with active regulatory elements bound by TFAP2A. These elements are also frequently bound by MITF, which is considered the "master regulator" of melanocyte development. For example, the promoter of TRPM1 is bound by both TFAP2A and MITF, and we show that the activity of a minimal TRPM1 promoter is lost upon deletion of the TFAP2A binding sites. However, the expression of Trpm1 is not TFAP2A-dependent, implying that additional TFAP2 paralogs function redundantly to drive melanocyte differentiation, which is consistent with previous results from zebrafish. Paralogs Tfap2a and Tfap2b are both expressed in mouse melanocytes, and we show that mouse embryos with Wnt1-Cre-mediated deletion of Tfap2a and Tfap2b in the neural crest almost completely lack melanocytes but retain neural crest-derived sensory ganglia. These results suggest that TFAP2 paralogs, like MITF, are also necessary for induction of the melanocyte lineage. Finally, we observe a genetic interaction between tfap2a and mitfa in zebrafish, but find that artificially elevating expression of tfap2a does not increase levels of melanin in mitfa

  12. Theoretical modeling of hydroxyl-radical-induced lipid peroxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Tejero, Ismael; Gonzalez-Lafont, Angels; Lluch, José M; Eriksson, Leif A

    2007-05-24

    The OH-radical-induced mechanism of lipid peroxidation, involving hydrogen abstraction followed by O2 addition, is explored using the kinetically corrected hybrid density functional MPWB1K in conjunction with the MG3S basis set and a polarized continuum model to mimic the membrane interior. Using a small nonadiene model of linoleic acid, it is found that hydrogen abstraction preferentially occurs at the mono-allylic methylene groups at the ends of the conjugated segment rather than at the central bis-allylic carbon, in disagreement with experimental data. Using a full linoleic acid, however, abstraction is correctly predicted to occur at the central carbon, giving a pentadienyl radical. The Gibbs free energy for abstraction at the central C11 is approximately 8 kcal/mol, compared to 9 kcal/mol at the end points (giving an allyl radical). Subsequent oxygen addition will occur at one of the terminal atoms of the pentadienyl radical fragment, giving a localized peroxy radical and a conjugated butadiene fragment, but is associated with rather high free energy barriers and low exergonicity at the CPCM-MPWB1K/MG3S level. The ZPE-corrected potential energy surfaces obtained without solvent effects, on the other hand, display considerably lower barriers and more exergonic reactions.

  13. Phloroglucinol Attenuates Free Radical-induced Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    So, Mi Jung; Cho, Eun Ju

    2014-01-01

    The protective role of phloroglucinol against oxidative stress and stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS) was investigated in vitro and in cell culture. Phloroglucinol had strong and concentration-dependent radical scavenging effects against nitric oxide (NO), superoxide anions (O2−), and hydroxyl radicals. In this study, free radical generators were used to induce oxidative stress in LLC-PK1 renal epithelial cells. Treatment with phloroglucinol attenuated the oxidative stress induced by peroxyl radicals, NO, O2−, and peroxynitrite. Phloroglucinol also increased cell viability and decreased lipid peroxidation in a concentration-dependent manner. WI-38 human diploid fibroblast cells were used to investigate the protective effect of phloroglucinol against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced SIPS. Phloroglucinol treatment attenuated H2O2-induced SIPS by increasing cell viability and inhibited lipid peroxidation, suggesting that treatment with phloroglucinol should delay the aging process. The present study supports the promising role of phloroglucinol as an antioxidative agent against free radical-induced oxidative stress and SIPS. PMID:25320709

  14. Reverse genetic characterization of two paralogous acetoacetyl CoA thiolase genes in Arabidopsis reveals their importance in plant growth and development.

    PubMed

    Jin, Huanan; Song, Zhihong; Nikolau, Basil J

    2012-06-01

    Acetoacetyl CoA thiolase (AACT, EC 2.3.1.9) catalyzes the condensation of two acetyl CoA molecules to form acetoacetyl CoA. Two AACT-encoding genes, At5g47720 (AACT1) and At5g48230 (AACT2), were functionally identified in the Arabidopsis genome by direct enzymological assays and functional expression in yeast. Promoter::GUS fusion experiments indicated that AACT1 is primarily expressed in the vascular system and AACT2 is highly expressed in root tips, young leaves, top stems and anthers. Characterization of T-DNA insertion mutant alleles at each AACT locus established that AACT2 function is required for embryogenesis and for normal male gamete transmission. In contrast, plants lacking AACT1 function are completely viable and show no apparent growth phenotypes, indicating that AACT1 is functionally redundant with respect to AACT2 function. RNAi lines that express reduced levels of AACT2 show pleiotropic phenotypes, including reduced apical dominance, elongated life span and flowering duration, sterility, dwarfing, reduced seed yield and shorter root length. Microscopic analysis reveals that the reduced stature is caused by a reduction in cell size and fewer cells, and male sterility is caused by loss of the pollen coat and premature degeneration of the tapetal cells. Biochemical analyses established that the roots of AACT2 RNAi plants show quantitative and qualitative alterations in phytosterol profiles. These phenotypes and biochemical alterations are reversed when AACT2 RNAi plants are grown in the presence of mevalonate, which is consistent with the role of AACT2 in generating the bulk of the acetoacetyl CoA precursor required for the cytosol-localized, mevalonate-derived isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway.

  15. Reverse genetic characterization of two paralogous acetoacetyl CoA thiolase genes in Arabidopsis reveals their importance in plant growth and development

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Huanan; Song, Zhihong; Nikolau, Basil J.

    2012-03-31

    Acetoacetyl CoA thiolase (AACT, EC 2.3.1.9) catalyzes the condensation of two acetyl CoA molecules to form acetoacetyl CoA. Two AACT‐encoding genes, At5g47720 (AACT1) and At5g48230 (AACT2), were functionally identified in the Arabidopsis genome by direct enzymological assays and functional expression in yeast. Promoter::GUS fusion experiments indicated that AACT1 is primarily expressed in the vascular system and AACT2 is highly expressed in root tips, young leaves, top stems and anthers. Characterization of T‐DNA insertion mutant alleles at each AACT locus established that AACT2 function is required for embryogenesis and for normal male gamete transmission. In contrast, plants lacking AACT1 function are completely viable and show no apparent growth phenotypes, indicating that AACT1 is functionally redundant with respect to AACT2 function. RNAi lines that express reduced levels of AACT2 show pleiotropic phenotypes, including reduced apical dominance, elongated life span and flowering duration, sterility, dwarfing, reduced seed yield and shorter root length. Microscopic analysis reveals that the reduced stature is caused by a reduction in cell size and fewer cells, and male sterility is caused by loss of the pollen coat and premature degeneration of the tapetal cells. Biochemical analyses established that the roots of AACT2 RNAi plants show quantitative and qualitative alterations in phytosterol profiles. These phenotypes and biochemical alterations are reversed when AACT2 RNAi plants are grown in the presence of mevalonate, which is consistent with the role of AACT2 in generating the bulk of the acetoacetyl CoA precursor required for the cytosol‐localized, mevalonate‐derived isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway.

  16. RPL39L is an example of a recently evolved ribosomal protein paralog that shows highly specific tissue expression patterns and is upregulated in ESCs and HCC tumors.

    PubMed

    Wong, Queenie Wing-Lei; Li, Jia; Ng, Sheng Rong; Lim, Seng Gee; Yang, Henry; Vardy, Leah A

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomal proteins (RPs) have been shown to be able to impart selectivity on the translating ribosome implicating them in gene expression control. Many ribosomal proteins are highly conserved and recently a number of ribosomal protein paralogs have been described in mammals. We examined the expression pattern of RPs in differentiating mouse Embryonic Stem Cells (ESCs), paying particular attention to the RP paralogs. We find the RP paralog Rpl39l is highly expressed in ESC and its expression strongly correlates with hepatocellular carcinoma tumor (HCC) samples with high tumor grading and alpha-fetoprotein level giving it diagnostic potential. We further screen the expression pattern of all RPs and their paralogs across 22 different tissues. We find that the more recently evolved RP paralogs show a much greater level of tissue-specific expression. We propose that these RP paralogs evolved more recently to provide a greater level of gene expression control to higher eukaryotes.

  17. Linkage mapping with paralogs exposes regions of residual tetrasomic inheritance in chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta).

    PubMed

    Waples, R K; Seeb, L W; Seeb, J E

    2016-01-01

    Gene sequence similarity due to shared ancestry after a duplication event, that is paralogy, complicates the assessment of genetic variation, as sequences originating from paralogs can be difficult to distinguish. These confounded sequences are often removed prior to further analyses, leaving the underlying loci uncharacterized. Salmonids have only partially rediploidized subsequent to a whole-genome duplication; residual tetrasomic inheritance has been observed in males. We present a maximum-likelihood-based method to resolve confounded paralogous loci by observing the segregation of alleles in gynogenetic haploid offspring and demonstrate its effectiveness by constructing two linkage maps for chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta), with and without these newly resolved loci. We find that the resolved paralogous loci are not randomly distributed across the genome. A majority are clustered in expanded subtelomeric regions of 14 linkage groups, suggesting a significant fraction of the chum salmon genome may be missed by the exclusion of paralogous loci. Transposable elements have been proposed as drivers of genome evolution and, in salmonids, may have an important role in the rediploidization process by driving differentiation between homeologous chromosomes. Consistent with that hypothesis, we find a reduced fraction of transposable element annotations among paralogous loci, and these loci predominately occur in the genomic regions that lag in the rediploidization process.

  18. Double-stranded RNA interference of a rice PI/GLO paralog, OsMADS2, uncovers its second-whorl-specific function in floral organ patterning.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Kalika; Vijayraghavan, Usha

    2003-12-01

    Unlike many eudicot species, grasses have duplicated PI/GLO-like genes. Functional analysis of one of the rice PI/GLO paralogs, OsMADS2, is reported here. Our data demonstrate its essential role in lodicule development and implicate the second PI/GLO paralog, OsMADS4, to suffice for stamen specification. We provide the first evidence for differential contributions of grass PI/GLO paralogs in patterning second- and third-whorl floral organs.

  19. The Impact of Paralogy on Phylogenomic Studies – A Case Study on Annelid Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Struck, Torsten H.

    2013-01-01

    Phylogenomic studies based on hundreds of genes derived from expressed sequence tags libraries are increasingly used to reveal the phylogeny of taxa. A prerequisite for these studies is the assignment of genes into clusters of orthologous sequences. Sophisticated methods of orthology prediction are used in such analyses, but it is rarely assessed whether paralogous sequences have been erroneously grouped together as orthologous sequences after the prediction, and whether this had an impact on the phylogenetic reconstruction using a super-matrix approach. Herein, I tested the impact of paralogous sequences on the reconstruction of annelid relationships based on phylogenomic datasets. Using single-partition analyses, screening for bootstrap support, blast searches and pruning of sequences in the supermatrix, wrongly assigned paralogous sequences were found in eight partitions and the placement of five taxa (the annelids Owenia, Scoloplos, Sthenelais and Eurythoe and the nemertean Cerebratulus) including the robust bootstrap support could be attributed to the presence of paralogous sequences in two partitions. Excluding these sequences resulted in a different, weaker supported placement for these taxa. Moreover, the analyses revealed that paralogous sequences impacted the reconstruction when only a single taxon represented a previously supported higher taxon such as a polychaete family. One possibility of a priori detection of wrongly assigned paralogous sequences could combine 1) a screening of single-partition analyses based on criteria such as nodal support or internal branch length with 2) blast searches of suspicious cases as presented herein. Also possible are a posteriori approaches in which support for specific clades is investigated by comparing alternative hypotheses based on differences in per-site likelihoods. Increasing the sizes of EST libraries will also decrease the likelihood of wrongly assigned paralogous sequences, and in the case of orthology

  20. The impact of paralogy on phylogenomic studies - a case study on annelid relationships.

    PubMed

    Struck, Torsten H

    2013-01-01

    Phylogenomic studies based on hundreds of genes derived from expressed sequence tags libraries are increasingly used to reveal the phylogeny of taxa. A prerequisite for these studies is the assignment of genes into clusters of orthologous sequences. Sophisticated methods of orthology prediction are used in such analyses, but it is rarely assessed whether paralogous sequences have been erroneously grouped together as orthologous sequences after the prediction, and whether this had an impact on the phylogenetic reconstruction using a super-matrix approach. Herein, I tested the impact of paralogous sequences on the reconstruction of annelid relationships based on phylogenomic datasets. Using single-partition analyses, screening for bootstrap support, blast searches and pruning of sequences in the supermatrix, wrongly assigned paralogous sequences were found in eight partitions and the placement of five taxa (the annelids Owenia, Scoloplos, Sthenelais and Eurythoe and the nemertean Cerebratulus) including the robust bootstrap support could be attributed to the presence of paralogous sequences in two partitions. Excluding these sequences resulted in a different, weaker supported placement for these taxa. Moreover, the analyses revealed that paralogous sequences impacted the reconstruction when only a single taxon represented a previously supported higher taxon such as a polychaete family. One possibility of a priori detection of wrongly assigned paralogous sequences could combine 1) a screening of single-partition analyses based on criteria such as nodal support or internal branch length with 2) blast searches of suspicious cases as presented herein. Also possible are a posteriori approaches in which support for specific clades is investigated by comparing alternative hypotheses based on differences in per-site likelihoods. Increasing the sizes of EST libraries will also decrease the likelihood of wrongly assigned paralogous sequences, and in the case of orthology

  1. To the beat of a different drum: determinants implicated in the asymmetric sequence divergence of Caenorhabditis elegans paralogs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gene duplicates often exhibit asymmetric rates of molecular evolution in their early evolutionary existence. This asymmetry in rates is thought to signify the maintenance of the ancestral function by one copy and the removal of functional constraint on the other copy, enabling it to embark on a novel evolutionary trajectory. Here I focused on a large population of evolutionarily young gene duplicates (KS ≤ 0.14) in the Caenorhabditis elegans genome in order to conduct the first combined analysis of four predictors (evolutionary age, chromosomal location, structural resemblance between duplicates, and duplication span) which may be implicated in the asymmetric sequence divergence of paralogs at the nucleotide and amino acid level. In addition, I investigate if either paralog is equally likely to embark on a trajectory of accelerated sequence evolution or whether the derived paralog is more likely to exhibit faster sequence evolution. Results Three predictors (evolutionary age of duplicates, chromosomal location and duplication span) serve as major determinants of sequence asymmetry between C. elegans paralogs. Paralogs diverge asymmetrically in sequence with increasing evolutionary age, the relocation of one copy to a different chromosome and attenuated duplication spans that likely fail to capture the entire ancestral repertoire of coding sequence and regulatory elements. Furthermore, for paralogs residing on the same chromosome, opposite transcriptional orientation and increased genomic distance do not increase sequence asymmetry between paralogs. For a subset of duplicate pairs wherein the ancestral versus derived paralog could be distinguished, the derived paralogs are more likely to evolve at accelerated rates. Conclusions This genome-wide study of evolutionarily young duplicates stemming primarily from DNA-mediated small-scale duplication events demonstrates that genomic relocation to a new chromosome has important consequences for asymmetric

  2. Differential Selection within the Drosophila Retinal Determination Network and Evidence for Functional Divergence between Paralog Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Rhea R.; Cruickshank, Tami; Kumar, Justin P.

    2011-01-01

    The retinal determination (RD) network in Drosophila comprises fourteen known nuclear proteins that include DNA binding proteins, transcriptional co-activators, kinases and phosphatases. The composition of the network varies considerably throughout the animal kingdom, with the network in several basal insects having fewer members and with vertebrates having potentially significantly higher numbers of retinal determination genes. One important contributing factor for the variation in gene number within the network is gene duplication. For example, ten members of the RD network in Drosophila are derived from duplication events. Here we present an analysis of the coding regions of the five pairs of duplicate genes from within the retinal determination network of several different Drosophila species. We demonstrate that there is differential selection across the coding regions of all RD genes. Additionally, some of the most significant differences in ratios of non-silent to silent site substitutions (dN/dS) between paralog pairs are found within regions that have no ascribed function. Previous structure/function analyses of several duplicate genes have identified areas within one gene that contain novel activities when compared to its paralog. The evolutionary analysis presented here identifies these same areas in the paralogs as being under high levels of relaxed selection. We suggest that sequence divergence between paralogs and selection signatures can be used as a reasonable predictor of functional changes in rapidly evolving motifs. PMID:21210943

  3. Distal substitutions drive divergent DNA specificity among paralogous transcription factors through subdivision of conformational space.

    PubMed

    Hudson, William H; Kossmann, Bradley R; de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S; Chuo, Shih-Wei; Weikum, Emily R; Eick, Geeta N; Thornton, Joseph W; Ivanov, Ivaylo N; Kojetin, Douglas J; Ortlund, Eric A

    2016-01-12

    Many genomes contain families of paralogs--proteins with divergent function that evolved from a common ancestral gene after a duplication event. To understand how paralogous transcription factors evolve divergent DNA specificities, we examined how the glucocorticoid receptor and its paralogs evolved to bind activating response elements [(+)GREs] and negative glucocorticoid response elements (nGREs). We show that binding to nGREs is a property of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) DNA-binding domain (DBD) not shared by other members of the steroid receptor family. Using phylogenetic, structural, biochemical, and molecular dynamics techniques, we show that the ancestral DBD from which GR and its paralogs evolved was capable of binding both nGRE and (+)GRE sequences because of the ancestral DBD's ability to assume multiple DNA-bound conformations. Subsequent amino acid substitutions in duplicated daughter genes selectively restricted protein conformational space, causing this dual DNA-binding specificity to be selectively enhanced in the GR lineage and lost in all others. Key substitutions that determined the receptors' response element-binding specificity were far from the proteins' DNA-binding interface and interacted epistatically to change the DBD's function through DNA-induced allosteric mechanisms. These amino acid substitutions subdivided both the conformational and functional space of the ancestral DBD among the present-day receptors, allowing a paralogous family of transcription factors to control disparate transcriptional programs despite high sequence identity.

  4. Identifying pathogenicity of human variants via paralog-based yeast complementation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Sun, Song; Tan, Guihong; Costanzo, Michael; Hill, David E; Vidal, Marc; Andrews, Brenda J; Boone, Charles; Roth, Frederick P

    2017-05-01

    To better understand the health implications of personal genomes, we now face a largely unmet challenge to identify functional variants within disease-associated genes. Functional variants can be identified by trans-species complementation, e.g., by failure to rescue a yeast strain bearing a mutation in an orthologous human gene. Although orthologous complementation assays are powerful predictors of pathogenic variation, they are available for only a few percent of human disease genes. Here we systematically examine the question of whether complementation assays based on paralogy relationships can expand the number of human disease genes with functional variant detection assays. We tested over 1,000 paralogous human-yeast gene pairs for complementation, yielding 34 complementation relationships, of which 33 (97%) were novel. We found that paralog-based assays identified disease variants with success on par with that of orthology-based assays. Combining all homology-based assay results, we found that complementation can often identify pathogenic variants outside the homologous sequence region, presumably because of global effects on protein folding or stability. Within our search space, paralogy-based complementation more than doubled the number of human disease genes with a yeast-based complementation assay for disease variation.

  5. Orthologs, paralogs and genome comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gogarten, J. P.; Olendzenski, L.

    1999-01-01

    During the past decade, ancient gene duplications were recognized as one of the main forces in the generation of diverse gene families and the creation of new functional capabilities. New tools developed to search data banks for homologous sequences, and an increased availability of reliable three-dimensional structural information led to the recognition that proteins with diverse functions can belong to the same superfamily. Analyses of the evolution of these superfamilies promises to provide insights into early evolution but are complicated by several important evolutionary processes. Horizontal transfer of genes can lead to a vertical spread of innovations among organisms, therefore finding a certain property in some descendants of an ancestor does not guarantee that it was present in that ancestor. Complete or partial gene conversion between duplicated genes can yield phylogenetic trees with several, apparently independent gene duplications, suggesting an often surprising parallelism in the evolution of independent lineages. Additionally, the breakup of domains within a protein and the fusion of domains into multifunctional proteins makes the delineation of superfamilies a task that remains difficult to automate.

  6. Close association between paralogous multiple isomiRs and paralogous/orthologues miRNA sequences implicates dominant sequence selection across various animal species.

    PubMed

    Guo, Li; Zhao, Yang; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Sheng; Chen, Feng

    2013-09-25

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are crucial negative regulators of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Next-generation sequencing technologies have identified a series of miRNA variants (named isomiRs). In this study, paralogous isomiR assemblies (from the miRNA locus) were systematically analyzed based on data acquired from deep sequencing data sets. Evolutionary analysis of paralogous (members in miRNA gene family in a specific species) and orthologues (across different animal species) miRNAs was also performed. The sequence diversity of paralogous isomiRs was found to be similar to the diversity of paralogous and orthologues miRNAs. Additionally, both isomiRs and paralogous/orthologues miRNAs were implicated in 5' and 3' ends (especially 3' ends), nucleotide substitutions, and insertions and deletions. Generally, multiple isomiRs can be produced from a single miRNA locus, but most of them had lower enrichment levels, and only several dominant isomiR sequences were detected. These dominant isomiR groups were always stable, and one of them would be selected as the most abundant miRNA sequence in specific animal species. Some isomiRs might be consistent to miRNA sequences in some species but not the other. Homologous miRNAs were often detected in similar isomiR repertoires, and showed similar expression patterns, while dominant isomiRs showed complex evolutionary patterns from miRNA sequences across the animal kingdom. These results indicate that the phenomenon of multiple isomiRs is not a random event, but rather the result of evolutionary pressures. The existence of multiple isomiRs enables different species to express advantageous sequences in different environments. Thus, dominant sequences emerge in response to functional and evolutionary pressures, allowing an organism to adapt to complex intra- and extra-cellular events. © 2013.

  7. Novel male-biased expression in paralogs of the aphid slimfast nutrient amino acid transporter expansion

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A major goal of molecular evolutionary biology is to understand the fate and consequences of duplicated genes. In this context, aphids are intriguing because the newly sequenced pea aphid genome harbors an extraordinary number of lineage-specific gene duplications relative to other insect genomes. Though many of their duplicated genes may be involved in their complex life cycle, duplications in nutrient amino acid transporters appear to be associated rather with their essential amino acid poor diet and the intracellular symbiosis aphids rely on to compensate for dietary deficits. Past work has shown that some duplicated amino acid transporters are highly expressed in the specialized cells housing the symbionts, including a paralog of an aphid-specific expansion homologous to the Drosophila gene slimfast. Previous data provide evidence that these bacteriocyte-expressed transporters mediate amino acid exchange between aphids and their symbionts. Results We report that some nutrient amino acid transporters show male-biased expression. Male-biased expression characterizes three paralogs in the aphid-specific slimfast expansion, and the male-biased expression is conserved across two aphid species for at least two paralogs. One of the male-biased paralogs has additionally experienced an accelerated rate of non-synonymous substitutions. Conclusions This is the first study to document male-biased slimfast expression. Our data suggest that the male-biased aphid slimfast paralogs diverged from their ancestral function to fill a functional role in males. Furthermore, our results provide evidence that members of the slimfast expansion are maintained in the aphid genome not only for the previously hypothesized role in mediating amino acid exchange between the symbiotic partners, but also for sex-specific roles. PMID:21917168

  8. Differential paralog divergence modulates genome evolution across yeast species

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Bryony; Huang, Mei; Alcantara, Erica; DeSevo, Christopher G.; Pai, Dave A.; Hoang, Margaret L.

    2017-01-01

    Evolutionary outcomes depend not only on the selective forces acting upon a species, but also on the genetic background. However, large timescales and uncertain historical selection pressures can make it difficult to discern such important background differences between species. Experimental evolution is one tool to compare evolutionary potential of known genotypes in a controlled environment. Here we utilized a highly reproducible evolutionary adaptation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to investigate whether experimental evolution of other yeast species would select for similar adaptive mutations. We evolved populations of S. cerevisiae, S. paradoxus, S. mikatae, S. uvarum, and interspecific hybrids between S. uvarum and S. cerevisiae for ~200–500 generations in sulfate-limited continuous culture. Wild-type S. cerevisiae cultures invariably amplify the high affinity sulfate transporter gene, SUL1. However, while amplification of the SUL1 locus was detected in S. paradoxus and S. mikatae populations, S. uvarum cultures instead selected for amplification of the paralog, SUL2. We measured the relative fitness of strains bearing deletions and amplifications of both SUL genes from different species, confirming that, converse to S. cerevisiae, S. uvarum SUL2 contributes more to fitness in sulfate limitation than S. uvarum SUL1. By measuring the fitness and gene expression of chimeric promoter-ORF constructs, we were able to delineate the cause of this differential fitness effect primarily to the promoter of S. uvarum SUL1. Our data show evidence of differential sub-functionalization among the sulfate transporters across Saccharomyces species through recent changes in noncoding sequence. Furthermore, these results show a clear example of how such background differences due to paralog divergence can drive changes in genome evolution. PMID:28196070

  9. Heterogeneous conservation of Dlx paralog co-expression in jawed vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Debiais-Thibaud, Mélanie; Metcalfe, Cushla J; Pollack, Jacob; Germon, Isabelle; Ekker, Marc; Depew, Michael; Laurenti, Patrick; Borday-Birraux, Véronique; Casane, Didier

    2013-01-01

    The Dlx gene family encodes transcription factors involved in the development of a wide variety of morphological innovations that first evolved at the origins of vertebrates or of the jawed vertebrates. This gene family expanded with the two rounds of genome duplications that occurred before jawed vertebrates diversified. It includes at least three bigene pairs sharing conserved regulatory sequences in tetrapods and teleost fish, but has been only partially characterized in chondrichthyans, the third major group of jawed vertebrates. Here we take advantage of developmental and molecular tools applied to the shark Scyliorhinus canicula to fill in the gap and provide an overview of the evolution of the Dlx family in the jawed vertebrates. These results are analyzed in the theoretical framework of the DDC (Duplication-Degeneration-Complementation) model. The genomic organisation of the catshark Dlx genes is similar to that previously described for tetrapods. Conserved non-coding elements identified in bony fish were also identified in catshark Dlx clusters and showed regulatory activity in transgenic zebrafish. Gene expression patterns in the catshark showed that there are some expression sites with high conservation of the expressed paralog(s) and other expression sites with events of paralog sub-functionalization during jawed vertebrate diversification, resulting in a wide variety of evolutionary scenarios within this gene family. Dlx gene expression patterns in the catshark show that there has been little neo-functionalization in Dlx genes over gnathostome evolution. In most cases, one tandem duplication and two rounds of vertebrate genome duplication have led to at least six Dlx coding sequences with redundant expression patterns followed by some instances of paralog sub-functionalization. Regulatory constraints such as shared enhancers, and functional constraints including gene pleiotropy, may have contributed to the evolutionary inertia leading to high

  10. Heterogeneous Conservation of Dlx Paralog Co-Expression in Jawed Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Debiais-Thibaud, Mélanie; Metcalfe, Cushla J.; Pollack, Jacob; Germon, Isabelle; Ekker, Marc; Depew, Michael; Laurenti, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Background The Dlx gene family encodes transcription factors involved in the development of a wide variety of morphological innovations that first evolved at the origins of vertebrates or of the jawed vertebrates. This gene family expanded with the two rounds of genome duplications that occurred before jawed vertebrates diversified. It includes at least three bigene pairs sharing conserved regulatory sequences in tetrapods and teleost fish, but has been only partially characterized in chondrichthyans, the third major group of jawed vertebrates. Here we take advantage of developmental and molecular tools applied to the shark Scyliorhinus canicula to fill in the gap and provide an overview of the evolution of the Dlx family in the jawed vertebrates. These results are analyzed in the theoretical framework of the DDC (Duplication-Degeneration-Complementation) model. Results The genomic organisation of the catshark Dlx genes is similar to that previously described for tetrapods. Conserved non-coding elements identified in bony fish were also identified in catshark Dlx clusters and showed regulatory activity in transgenic zebrafish. Gene expression patterns in the catshark showed that there are some expression sites with high conservation of the expressed paralog(s) and other expression sites with events of paralog sub-functionalization during jawed vertebrate diversification, resulting in a wide variety of evolutionary scenarios within this gene family. Conclusion Dlx gene expression patterns in the catshark show that there has been little neo-functionalization in Dlx genes over gnathostome evolution. In most cases, one tandem duplication and two rounds of vertebrate genome duplication have led to at least six Dlx coding sequences with redundant expression patterns followed by some instances of paralog sub-functionalization. Regulatory constraints such as shared enhancers, and functional constraints including gene pleiotropy, may have contributed to the evolutionary

  11. Distal substitutions drive divergent DNA specificity among paralogous transcription factors through subdivision of conformational space

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, William H.; Kossmann, Bradley R.; de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S.; Chuo, Shih-Wei; Weikum, Emily R.; Thornton, Joseph W.; Ivanov, Ivaylo N.; Kojetin, Douglas J.; Ortlund, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    Many genomes contain families of paralogs—proteins with divergent function that evolved from a common ancestral gene after a duplication event. To understand how paralogous transcription factors evolve divergent DNA specificities, we examined how the glucocorticoid receptor and its paralogs evolved to bind activating response elements [(+)GREs] and negative glucocorticoid response elements (nGREs). We show that binding to nGREs is a property of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) DNA-binding domain (DBD) not shared by other members of the steroid receptor family. Using phylogenetic, structural, biochemical, and molecular dynamics techniques, we show that the ancestral DBD from which GR and its paralogs evolved was capable of binding both nGRE and (+)GRE sequences because of the ancestral DBD’s ability to assume multiple DNA-bound conformations. Subsequent amino acid substitutions in duplicated daughter genes selectively restricted protein conformational space, causing this dual DNA-binding specificity to be selectively enhanced in the GR lineage and lost in all others. Key substitutions that determined the receptors’ response element-binding specificity were far from the proteins’ DNA-binding interface and interacted epistatically to change the DBD’s function through DNA-induced allosteric mechanisms. These amino acid substitutions subdivided both the conformational and functional space of the ancestral DBD among the present-day receptors, allowing a paralogous family of transcription factors to control disparate transcriptional programs despite high sequence identity. PMID:26715749

  12. Approximating the correction of weighted and unweighted orthology and paralogy relations.

    PubMed

    Dondi, Riccardo; Lafond, Manuel; El-Mabrouk, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    Given a gene family, the relations between genes (orthology/paralogy), are represented by a relation graph, where edges connect pairs of orthologous genes and "missing" edges represent paralogs. While a gene tree directly induces a relation graph, the converse is not always true. Indeed, a relation graph is not necessarily "satisfiable", i.e. does not necessarily correspond to a gene tree. And even if that holds, it may not be "consistent", i.e. the tree may not represent a true history in agreement with a species tree. Previous studies have addressed the problem of correcting a relation graph for satisfiability and consistency. Here we consider the weighted version of the problem, where a degree of confidence is assigned to each orthology or paralogy relation. We also consider a maximization variant of the unweighted version of the problem. We provide complexity and algorithmic results for the approximation of the considered problems. We show that minimizing the correction of a weighted graph does not admit a constant factor approximation algorithm assuming the unique game conjecture, and we give an n-approximation algorithm, n being the number of vertices in the graph. We also provide polynomial time approximation schemes for the maximization variant for unweighted graphs. We provided complexity and algorithmic results for variants of the problem of correcting a relation graph for satisfiability and consistency. For the maximization variants we were able to design polynomial time approximation schemes, while for the weighted minimization variants we were able to provide the first inapproximability results.

  13. Computational Identification of the Paralogs and Orthologs of Human Cytochrome P450 Superfamily and the Implication in Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shu-Ting; Xue, Danfeng; Li, Zhi-Ling; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; He, Zhi-Xu; Yang, Yinxue; Yang, Tianxin; Qiu, Jia-Xuan; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2016-06-28

    The human cytochrome P450 (CYP) superfamily consisting of 57 functional genes is the most important group of Phase I drug metabolizing enzymes that oxidize a large number of xenobiotics and endogenous compounds, including therapeutic drugs and environmental toxicants. The CYP superfamily has been shown to expand itself through gene duplication, and some of them become pseudogenes due to gene mutations. Orthologs and paralogs are homologous genes resulting from speciation or duplication, respectively. To explore the evolutionary and functional relationships of human CYPs, we conducted this bioinformatic study to identify their corresponding paralogs, homologs, and orthologs. The functional implications and implications in drug discovery and evolutionary biology were then discussed. GeneCards and Ensembl were used to identify the paralogs of human CYPs. We have used a panel of online databases to identify the orthologs of human CYP genes: NCBI, Ensembl Compara, GeneCards, OMA ("Orthologous MAtrix") Browser, PATHER, TreeFam, EggNOG, and Roundup. The results show that each human CYP has various numbers of paralogs and orthologs using GeneCards and Ensembl. For example, the paralogs of CYP2A6 include CYP2A7, 2A13, 2B6, 2C8, 2C9, 2C18, 2C19, 2D6, 2E1, 2F1, 2J2, 2R1, 2S1, 2U1, and 2W1; CYP11A1 has 6 paralogs including CYP11B1, 11B2, 24A1, 27A1, 27B1, and 27C1; CYP51A1 has only three paralogs: CYP26A1, 26B1, and 26C1; while CYP20A1 has no paralog. The majority of human CYPs are well conserved from plants, amphibians, fishes, or mammals to humans due to their important functions in physiology and xenobiotic disposition. The data from different approaches are also cross-validated and validated when experimental data are available. These findings facilitate our understanding of the evolutionary relationships and functional implications of the human CYP superfamily in drug discovery.

  14. Computational Identification of the Paralogs and Orthologs of Human Cytochrome P450 Superfamily and the Implication in Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Shu-Ting; Xue, Danfeng; Li, Zhi-Ling; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; He, Zhi-Xu; Yang, Yinxue; Yang, Tianxin; Qiu, Jia-Xuan; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    The human cytochrome P450 (CYP) superfamily consisting of 57 functional genes is the most important group of Phase I drug metabolizing enzymes that oxidize a large number of xenobiotics and endogenous compounds, including therapeutic drugs and environmental toxicants. The CYP superfamily has been shown to expand itself through gene duplication, and some of them become pseudogenes due to gene mutations. Orthologs and paralogs are homologous genes resulting from speciation or duplication, respectively. To explore the evolutionary and functional relationships of human CYPs, we conducted this bioinformatic study to identify their corresponding paralogs, homologs, and orthologs. The functional implications and implications in drug discovery and evolutionary biology were then discussed. GeneCards and Ensembl were used to identify the paralogs of human CYPs. We have used a panel of online databases to identify the orthologs of human CYP genes: NCBI, Ensembl Compara, GeneCards, OMA (“Orthologous MAtrix”) Browser, PATHER, TreeFam, EggNOG, and Roundup. The results show that each human CYP has various numbers of paralogs and orthologs using GeneCards and Ensembl. For example, the paralogs of CYP2A6 include CYP2A7, 2A13, 2B6, 2C8, 2C9, 2C18, 2C19, 2D6, 2E1, 2F1, 2J2, 2R1, 2S1, 2U1, and 2W1; CYP11A1 has 6 paralogs including CYP11B1, 11B2, 24A1, 27A1, 27B1, and 27C1; CYP51A1 has only three paralogs: CYP26A1, 26B1, and 26C1; while CYP20A1 has no paralog. The majority of human CYPs are well conserved from plants, amphibians, fishes, or mammals to humans due to their important functions in physiology and xenobiotic disposition. The data from different approaches are also cross-validated and validated when experimental data are available. These findings facilitate our understanding of the evolutionary relationships and functional implications of the human CYP superfamily in drug discovery. PMID:27367670

  15. Radical induced disulfide bond cleavage within peptides via ultraviolet irradiation of an electrospray plume.

    PubMed

    Stinson, Craig A; Xia, Yu

    2013-05-21

    Radical induced disulfide bond cleavage in peptides was demonstrated by ultraviolet (UV) radiation of the electrospray ionization (ESI) plume using a low pressure mercury (LP-Hg) lamp. Tandem mass spectrometry and accurate mass measurements confirmed that the primary reaction products were due to disulfide bond cleavage to form thiol (-SH) and sulfinyl radical (-SO˙). Mechanistic studies showed that the 185 nm emission from a LP-Hg lamp was responsible for UV photolysis of atmospheric O2, which further initiated secondary radical formation and subsequent disulfide bond cleavage by radical attack. The radical induced disulfide bond cleavage was found to be analytically useful in providing rich sequence information for naturally occurring peptides containing intrachain disulfide bonds. The utility of this method was also demonstrated for facile disulfide peptide identification and characterization from protein digests.

  16. Regulation of expression of the paralogous Mlp family in Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaofeng F; Hübner, Anette; Popova, Taissia G; Hagman, Kayla E; Norgard, Michael V

    2003-09-01

    The Mlp (multicopy lipoproteins) family is one of many paralogous protein families in Borrelia burgdorferi. To examine the extent to which the 10 members of the Mlp family in B. burgdorferi strain 297 might be differentially regulated, antibodies specific for each of the Mlps were developed and used to analyze the protein expression profiles of individual Mlps when B. burgdorferi replicated under various cultivation conditions. All of the Mlps were upregulated coordinately when B. burgdorferi was cultivated at either elevated temperature, reduced culture pH, or increased spirochete cell density. Inasmuch as the expression of OspC is influenced by a novel RpoN-RpoS regulatory pathway, similar induction patterns for OspC and the Mlp paralogs prompted an assessment of whether the RpoN-RpoS pathway also was involved in Mlp expression. In contrast to wild-type B. burgdorferi, both RpoN- and RpoS-deficient mutants were unable to upregulate OspC or the Mlp paralogs when grown at lower pH (6.8), indicating that pH-mediated regulation of OspC and Mlp paralogs is dependent on the RpoN-RpoS pathway. However, when RpoN- or RpoS-deficient mutants were shifted from 23 degrees C to 37 degrees C or were cultivated to higher spirochete densities, some induction of the Mlps still occurred, whereas OspC expression was abolished. The combined findings suggest that the Mlp paralogs are coordinately regulated as a family and have an expression profile similar, but not identical, to that of OspC. Although Mlp expression as a family is influenced by the RpoN-RpoS regulatory pathway, there exists at least one additional layer of gene regulation, yet to be elucidated, contributing to Mlp expression in B. burgdorferi.

  17. ß-tubulin Paralogs Provide a Qualitative Test for a Phylogeny of Cyst Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Sabo, A.; Ferris, V. R.

    2004-01-01

    Evolutionary relationships among cyst nematodes based on predicted ß-tubulin amino acid and DNA sequence data were compared with phylogenies inferred from ribosomal DNA (ITS1, 5.8S gene, ITS2). The ß-tubulin amino acid data were highly conserved and not useful for phylogenetic inference at the taxonomic level of genus and species. Phylogenetic trees based on ß-tubulin DNA sequence data were better resolved, but the relationships at lower taxonomic levels could not be inferred with confidence. Sequences from single species often appeared in more than one monophyletic clade, indicating the presence of ß-tubulin paralogs (confirmed by Southern blot analysis). For a subset of taxa, good congruence between the two data sets was revealed by the presence of the same putative ß-tubulin gene paralogs in monophyletic groups on the rDNA tree, corroborating the taxon relationships inferred from ribosomal DNA data. PMID:19262824

  18. Parameters of the proteome evolution from the distribution of sequence identities of paralogous proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Koon-Kiu; Axelsen, Jacob; Maslov, Sergei

    2006-03-01

    The evolution of the full repertoire of proteins encoded in a given genome is driven by gene duplications, deletions and modifications of amino-acid sequences of already existing proteins. The information about relative rates and other intrinsic parameters of these three basic processes is contained in the distribution of sequence identities of pairs of paralogous proteins. We introduced a simple mathematical framework that allows one to extract some of this hidden information. It was then applied to the proteome-wide set of paralogous proteins in H. pylori, E. coli, S. cerevisiae, C. elegans, D. melanogaster and H. sapiens. We estimated the stationary per-gene deletion and duplication rates, the distribution of amino-acid substitution rate of these organisms. The validity of our mathematical framework was further confirmed by numerical simulations of a simple evolutionary model of a fixed-size proteome.

  19. Hypothesis: Paralog Formation from Progenitor Proteins and Paralog Mutagenesis Spur the Rapid Evolution of Telomere Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lustig, Arthur J.

    2016-01-01

    Through elegant studies in fungal cells and complex organisms, we propose a unifying paradigm for the rapid evolution of telomere binding proteins (TBPs) that associate with either (or both) telomeric DNA and telomeric proteins. TBPs protect and regulate telomere structure and function. Four critical factors are involved. First, TBPs that commonly bind to telomeric DNA include the c-Myb binding proteins, OB-fold single-stranded binding proteins, and G-G base paired Hoogsteen structure (G4) binding proteins. Each contributes independently or, in some cases, cooperatively, to provide a minimum level of telomere function. As a result of these minimal requirements and the great abundance of homologs of these motifs in the proteome, DNA telomere-binding activity may be generated more easily than expected. Second, telomere dysfunction gives rise to genome instability, through the elevation of recombination rates, genome ploidy, and the frequency of gene mutations. The formation of paralogs that diverge from their progenitor proteins ultimately can form a high frequency of altered TBPs with altered functions. Third, TBPs that assemble into complexes (e.g., mammalian shelterin) derive benefits from the novel emergent functions. Fourth, a limiting factor in the evolution of TBP complexes is the formation of mutually compatible interaction surfaces amongst the TBPs. These factors may have different degrees of importance in the evolution of different phyla, illustrated by the apparently simpler telomeres in complex plants. Selective pressures that can utilize the mechanisms of paralog formation and mutagenesis to drive TBP evolution along routes dependent on the requisite physiologic changes. PMID:26904098

  20. Nearly Identical Paralogs: Implications for Maize (Zea mays L.) Genome Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Emrich, Scott J.; Li, Li; Wen, Tsui-Jung; Yandeau-Nelson, Marna D.; Fu, Yan; Guo, Ling; Chou, Hui-Hsien; Aluru, Srinivas; Ashlock, Daniel A.; Schnable, Patrick S.

    2007-01-01

    As an ancient segmental tetraploid, the maize (Zea mays L.) genome contains large numbers of paralogs that are expected to have diverged by a minimum of 10% over time. Nearly identical paralogs (NIPs) are defined as paralogous genes that exhibit ≥98% identity. Sequence analyses of the “gene space” of the maize inbred line B73 genome, coupled with wet lab validation, have revealed that, conservatively, at least ∼1% of maize genes have a NIP, a rate substantially higher than that in Arabidopsis. In most instances, both members of maize NIP pairs are expressed and are therefore at least potentially functional. Of evolutionary significance, members of many NIP families also exhibit differential expression. The finding that some families of maize NIPs are closely linked genetically while others are genetically unlinked is consistent with multiple modes of origin. NIPs provide a mechanism for the maize genome to circumvent the inherent limitation that diploid genomes can carry at most two “alleles” per “locus.” As such, NIPs may have played important roles during the evolution and domestication of maize and may contribute to the success of long-term selection experiments in this important crop species. PMID:17110490

  1. Roles of Rad51 paralogs for promoting homologous recombination in Leishmania infantum

    PubMed Central

    Genois, Marie-Michelle; Plourde, Marie; Éthier, Chantal; Roy, Gaétan; Poirier, Guy G.; Ouellette, Marc; Masson, Jean-Yves

    2015-01-01

    To achieve drug resistance Leishmania parasite alters gene copy number by using its repeated sequences widely distributed through the genome. Even though homologous recombination (HR) is ascribed to maintain genome stability, this eukaryote exploits this potent mechanism driven by the Rad51 recombinase to form beneficial extrachromosomal circular amplicons. Here, we provide insights on the formation of these circular amplicons by analyzing the functions of the Rad51 paralogs. We purified three Leishmania infantum Rad51 paralogs homologs (LiRad51-3, LiRad51-4 and LiRad51-6) all of which directly interact with LiRad51. LiRad51-3, LiRad51-4 and LiRad51-6 show differences in DNA binding and annealing capacities. Moreover, it is also noteworthy that LiRad51-3 and LiRad51-4 are able to stimulate Rad51-mediated D-loop formation. In addition, we succeed to inactivate the LiRad51-4 gene and report a decrease of circular amplicons in this mutant. The LiRad51-3 gene was found to be essential for cell viability. Thus, we propose that the LiRad51 paralogs play crucial functions in extrachromosomal circular DNA amplification to circumvent drug actions and preserve survival. PMID:25712090

  2. Robustness of Helicobacter pylori Infection Conferred by Context-Variable Redundancy among Cysteine-Rich Paralogs

    PubMed Central

    Putty, Kalyani; Marcus, Sarah A.; Mittl, Peer R. E.; Bogadi, Lindsey E.; Hunter, Allison M.; Arur, Swathi; Berg, Douglas E.; Sethu, Palaniappan; Kalia, Awdhesh

    2013-01-01

    Deletion of single genes from expanded gene families in bacterial genomes often does not elicit a phenotype thus implying redundancy or functional non-essentiality of paralogous genes. The molecular mechanisms that facilitate evolutionary maintenance of such paralogs despite selective pressures against redundancy remain mostly unexplored. Here, we investigate the evolutionary, genetic, and functional interaction between the Helicobacter pylori cysteine-rich paralogs hcpG and hcpC in the context of H. pylori infection of cultured mammalian cells. We find that in natural H. pylori populations both hcpG and hcpC are maintained by positive selection in a dual genetic relationship that switches from complete redundancy during early infection, whereby ΔhcpC or ΔhcpG mutants themselves show no growth defect but a significant growth defect is seen in the ΔhcpC,ΔhcpG double mutant, to quantitative redundancy during late infection wherein the growth defect of the ΔhcpC mutant is exacerbated in the ΔhcpC,ΔhcpG double mutant although the ΔhcpG mutant itself shows no defect. Moreover, during early infection both hcpG and hcpC are essential for optimal translocation of the H. pylori HspB/GroEL chaperone, but during middle-to-late infection hcpC alone is necessary and sufficient for HspB/GroEL translocation thereby revealing the lack of functional compensation among paralogs. We propose that evolution of context-dependent differences in the nature of genetic redundancy, and function, between hcpG and hcpC may facilitate their maintenance in H. pylori genomes, and confer robustness to H. pylori growth during infection of cultured mammalian cells. PMID:23555707

  3. Evolutionary origins of Hsp90 chaperones and a deep paralogy in their bacterial ancestors.

    PubMed

    Stechmann, Alexandra; Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    The 82-90 kD family of molecular chaperone proteins has homologs in eukaryotes (Hsp90) and many eubacteria (HtpG) but not in Archaebacteria. We used representatives of all four different eukaryotic paralogs (cytosolic, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), chloroplast, mitochondrial) together with numerous eubacterial HtpG proteins for phylogenetic analyses to investigate their evolutionary origins. Our trees confirm that none of the organellar Hsp90s derives from the endosymbionts of early eukaryotes. Contrary to previous suggestions of distant origins through lateral gene transfer (LGT) all eukaryote Hsp90s are related to Gram-positive eubacterial HtpG proteins. The nucleocytosolic, ER and chloroplast Hsp90 paralogs are clearly mutually related. The origin of mitochondrial Hsp90 is more obscure, as these sequences are deeply nested within eubacteria. Our trees also reveal a deep split within eubacteria into a group of mainly long-branching sequences (including the eukaryote mitochondrial Hsp90s) and another group comprising exclusively short-branching HtpG proteins, from which the cytosolic/ER versions probably arose. Both versions are present in several eubacterial phyla, suggesting gene duplication very early in eubacterial evolution and multiple independent losses thereafter. We identified one probable case of LGT within eubacteria. However, multiple losses can simply explain the evolutionary pattern of the eubacterial HtpG paralogs and predominate over LGT. We suggest that the actinobacterial ancestor of eukaryotes harbored genes for both eubacterial HtpG paralogs, as the actinobacterium Streptomyces coelicolor still does; one could have given rise to the mitochondrial Hsp90 and the other, following another duplication event in the ancestral eukaryote, to the cytosolic and ER Hsp90 homologs.

  4. Transcriptomics and Functional Genomics of ROS-Induced Cell Death Regulation by RADICAL-INDUCED CELL DEATH1

    PubMed Central

    Salojärvi, Jarkko; Cui, Fuqiang; Sipari, Nina; Leppälä, Johanna; Lamminmäki, Airi; Tomai, Gloria; Narayanasamy, Shaman; Reddy, Ramesha A.; Keinänen, Markku; Overmyer, Kirk; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko

    2014-01-01

    Plant responses to changes in environmental conditions are mediated by a network of signaling events leading to downstream responses, including changes in gene expression and activation of cell death programs. Arabidopsis thaliana RADICAL-INDUCED CELL DEATH1 (RCD1) has been proposed to regulate plant stress responses by protein-protein interactions with transcription factors. Furthermore, the rcd1 mutant has defective control of cell death in response to apoplastic reactive oxygen species (ROS). Combining transcriptomic and functional genomics approaches we first used microarray analysis in a time series to study changes in gene expression after apoplastic ROS treatment in rcd1. To identify a core set of cell death regulated genes, RCD1-regulated genes were clustered together with other array experiments from plants undergoing cell death or treated with various pathogens, plant hormones or other chemicals. Subsequently, selected rcd1 double mutants were constructed to further define the genetic requirements for the execution of apoplastic ROS induced cell death. Through the genetic analysis we identified WRKY70 and SGT1b as cell death regulators functioning downstream of RCD1 and show that quantitative rather than qualitative differences in gene expression related to cell death appeared to better explain the outcome. Allocation of plant energy to defenses diverts resources from growth. Recently, a plant response termed stress-induced morphogenic response (SIMR) was proposed to regulate the balance between defense and growth. Using a rcd1 double mutant collection we show that SIMR is mostly independent of the classical plant defense signaling pathways and that the redox balance is involved in development of SIMR. PMID:24550736

  5. Characterization of Zebrafish Cardiac and Slow Skeletal Troponin C Paralogs by MD Simulation and ITC.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Charles M; Rayani, Kaveh; Genge, Christine E; Singh, Gurpreet; Liang, Bo; Roller, Janine M; Li, Cindy; Li, Alison Yueh; Tieleman, D Peter; van Petegem, Filip; Tibbits, Glen F

    2016-07-12

    Zebrafish, as a model for teleost fish, have two paralogous troponin C (TnC) genes that are expressed in the heart differentially in response to temperature acclimation. Upon Ca(2+) binding, TnC changes conformation and exposes a hydrophobic patch that interacts with troponin I and initiates cardiac muscle contraction. Teleost-specific TnC paralogs have not yet been functionally characterized. In this study we have modeled the structures of the paralogs using molecular dynamics simulations at 18°C and 28°C and calculated the different Ca(2+)-binding properties between the teleost cardiac (cTnC or TnC1a) and slow-skeletal (ssTnC or TnC1b) paralogs through potential-of-mean-force calculations. These values are compared with thermodynamic binding properties obtained through isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The modeled structures of each of the paralogs are similar at each temperature, with the exception of helix C, which flanks the Ca(2+) binding site; this region is also home to paralog-specific sequence substitutions that we predict have an influence on protein function. The short timescale of the potential-of-mean-force calculation precludes the inclusion of the conformational change on the ΔG of Ca(2+) interaction, whereas the ITC analysis includes the Ca(2+) binding and conformational change of the TnC molecule. ITC analysis has revealed that ssTnC has higher Ca(2+) affinity than cTnC for Ca(2+) overall, whereas each of the paralogs has increased affinity at 28°C compared to 18°C. Microsecond-timescale simulations have calculated that the cTnC paralog transitions from the closed to the open state more readily than the ssTnC paralog, an unfavorable transition that would decrease the ITC-derived Ca(2+) affinity while simultaneously increasing the Ca(2+) sensitivity of the myofilament. We propose that the preferential expression of cTnC at lower temperatures increases myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity by this mechanism, despite the lower Ca(2+) affinity

  6. Influence of Cocoa Flavanols and Procyanidins on Free Radical-induced Human Erythrocyte Hemolysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qin Yan; Schramm, Derek D.; Gross, Heidrun B.; Holt, Roberta R.; Kim, Sun H.; Yamaguchi, Tomoko; Kwik-Uribe, Catherine L.; Keen, Carl L.

    2005-01-01

    Cocoa can be a rich source of antioxidants including the flavan-3-ols, epicatechin and catechin, and their oligomers (procyanidins). While these flavonoids have been reported to reduce the rate of free radical-induced erythrocyte hemolysis in experimental animal models, little is known about their effect on human erythrocyte hemolysis. The major objective of this work was to study the effect of a flavonoid-rich cocoa beverage on the resistance of human erythrocytes to oxidative stress. A second objective was to assess the effects of select purified cocoa flavonoids, epicatechin, catechin, the procyanidin Dimer B2 and one of its major metabolites, 3ʹ-O-methyl epicatechin, on free radical-induced erythrocyte hemolysis in vitro. Peripheral blood was obtained from 8 healthy subjects before and 1, 2, 4 and 8 h after consuming a flavonoid-rich cocoa beverage that provided 0.25 g/kg body weight (BW), 0.375 or 0.50 g/kg BW of cocoa. Plasma flavanol and dimer concentrations were determined for each subject. Erythrocyte hemolysis was evaluated using a controlled peroxidation reaction. Epicatechin, catechin, 3ʹ-O-methyl epicatechin and (-)-epicatechin-(4β > 8)epicatechin (Dimer B2) were detected in the plasma within 1 h after the consumption of the beverage. The susceptibility of erythrocytes to hemolysis was reduced significantly following the consumption of the beverages. The duration of the lag time, which reflects the capacity of cells to buffer free radicals, was increased. Consistent with the above, the purified flavonoids, epicatechin, catechin, Dimer B2 and the metabolite 3ʹ-O-methyl epicatechin, exhibited dose-dependent protection against AAPH-induced erythrocyte hemolysis at concentrations ranging from 2.5 to 20 μM. Erythrocytes from subjects consuming flavonoid-rich cocoa show reduced susceptibility to free radical-induced hemolysis (p < 0.05). PMID:15712596

  7. LEC1-LIKE paralog transcription factor: how to survive extinction and fit in NF-Y protein complex.

    PubMed

    Hilioti, Zoe; Ganopoulos, Ioannis; Bossis, Ioannis; Tsaftaris, Athanasios

    2014-06-15

    Transcription factor function is crucial for eukaryotic systems. The presence of transcription factor families in genomes represents a significant technical challenge for functional studies. To understand their function, we must understand how they evolved and maintained by organisms. Based on genome scale searches for homologs of LEAFY COTYLEDON-LIKE (L1L; AtNF-YB6), NF-YB transcription factor, we report the discovery and annotation of a complete repertoire of thirteen novel genes that belong to the L1L paralogous gene family of Solanum lycopersicum. Gene duplication events within the species resulted in the expansion of the L1L family. Sequence and structure-based phylogenetic analyses revealed two distinct groups of L1Ls in tomato. Natural selection appears to have contributed to the asymmetric evolution of paralogs. Our results point to key differences among SlL1L paralogs in the presence of motifs, structural features, cysteine composition and expression patterns during plant and fruit development. Furthermore, differences in the binding domains of L1L members suggest that some of them evolved new binding specificities. These results reveal dramatic functional diversification of L1L paralogs for their maintenance in tomato genome. Our comprehensive insights on tomato L1L family should provide the basis for further functional and genetic experimentation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Arabidopsis Small Ubiquitin-Like Modifier Paralogs Have Distinct Functions in Development and Defense[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    van den Burg, Harrold A.; Kini, Ramachandra K.; Schuurink, Robert C.; Takken, Frank L.W.

    2010-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications allow dynamic and reversible changes to protein function. In Arabidopsis thaliana, a small gene family encodes paralogs of the small ubiquitin-like posttranslational modifier. We studied the function of these paralogs. Single mutants of the SUM1 and SUM2 paralogs do not exhibit a clear phenotype. However, the corresponding double knockdown mutant revealed that SUM1 and SUM2 are essential for plant development, floral transition, and suppression of salicylic acid (SA)–dependent defense responses. The SUM1 and SUM2 genes are constitutively expressed, but their spatial expression patterns do not overlap. Tight transcriptional regulation of these two SUM genes appears to be important, as overexpression of either wild-type or conjugation-deficient mutants resulted in activation of SA-dependent defense responses, as did the sum1 sum2 knockdown mutant. Interestingly, expression of the paralog SUM3 is strongly and widely induced by SA and by the defense elicitor Flg22, whereas its expression is otherwise low and restricted to a few specific cell types. Loss of SUM3 does not result in an aberrant developmental phenotype except for late flowering, while SUM3 overexpression causes early flowering and activates plant defense. Apparently, SUM3 promotes plant defense downstream of SA, while SUM1 and SUM2 together prevent SA accumulation in noninfected plants. PMID:20525853

  9. Paralogous Vitamin D Receptors in Teleosts: Transition of Nuclear Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Howarth, Deanna L.; Law, Sheran H. W.; Barnes, Benjamin; Hall, Julie M.; Hinton, David E.; Moore, Linda; Maglich, Jodi M.; Moore, John T.; Kullman, Seth W.

    2008-01-01

    The availability of multiple teleost (bony fish) genomes is providing unprecedented opportunities to understand the diversity and function of gene duplication events using comparative genomics. Here we describe the cloning and functional characterization of two novel vitamin D receptor (VDR) paralogs from the freshwater teleost medaka (Oryzias latipes). VDR sequences were identified through mining of the medaka genome database in which gene organization and structure was determined. Two distinct VDR genes were identified in the medaka genome and mapped to defined loci. Each VDR sequence exhibits unique intronic organization and dissimilar 5′ untranslated regions, suggesting they are not isoforms of the same gene locus. Phylogenetic comparison with additional teleosts and mammalian VDR sequences illustrate that two distinct clusters are formed separating aquatic and terrestrial species. Nested within the teleost cluster are two separate clades for VDRα and VDRβ. The topology of teleost VDR sequences is consistent with the notion of paralogous genes arising from a whole genome duplication event prior to teleost radiation. Functional characterization was conducted through the development of VDR expression vectors including Gal4 chimeras containing the yeast Gal4 DNA binding domain fused to the medaka VDR ligand binding domain and full-length protein. The common VDR ligand 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1α,25(OH)2D3] resulted in significant transactivation activity with both the Gal4 and full-length constructs of medaka (m) VDRβ. Comparatively, transactivation of mVDRα with 1α,25(OH)2D3 was highly attenuated, suggesting a functional divergence between these two nuclear receptor paralogs. We additionally demonstrate through coactivator studies that mVDRα is still functional; however, it exhibits a different sensitivity to 1α,25(OH)2D3, compared with VDRβ. These results suggest that in mVDRα and VDRβ have undergone a functional divergence through a process of

  10. Comparing the Statistical Fate of Paralogous and Orthologous Sequences.

    PubMed

    Massip, Florian; Sheinman, Michael; Schbath, Sophie; Arndt, Peter F

    2016-10-01

    For several decades, sequence alignment has been a widely used tool in bioinformatics. For instance, finding homologous sequences with a known function in large databases is used to get insight into the function of nonannotated genomic regions. Very efficient tools like BLAST have been developed to identify and rank possible homologous sequences. To estimate the significance of the homology, the ranking of alignment scores takes a background model for random sequences into account. Using this model we can estimate the probability to find two exactly matching subsequences by chance in two unrelated sequences. For two homologous sequences, the corresponding probability is much higher, which allows us to identify them. Here we focus on the distribution of lengths of exact sequence matches between protein-coding regions of pairs of evolutionarily distant genomes. We show that this distribution exhibits a power-law tail with an exponent [Formula: see text] Developing a simple model of sequence evolution by substitutions and segmental duplications, we show analytically and computationally that paralogous and orthologous gene pairs contribute differently to this distribution. Our model explains the differences observed in the comparison of coding and noncoding parts of genomes, thus providing a better understanding of statistical properties of genomic sequences and their evolution. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  11. Discrimination of the Expression of Paralogous microRNA Precursors That Share the Same Major Mature Form

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Minghua; Wang, Weiping; Zhang, Ping; Xiao, Juanjuan; Wang, Jianguo; Huang, Chaoqun

    2014-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNAs generated from endogenous transcripts that form hairpin structures. The hairpin precursor is processed into two mature miRNAs that form major/minor duplexes. Mature miRNAs regulate gene expression by cleaving mRNA or repressing protein translation. Numerous miRNAs have been discovered via deep sequencing. Many miRNAs are produced from multiple genome sites. These miRNAs are grouped into paralogous families of miRNAs that generate the same major mature form within organisms. Currently, no method of distinguishing the expression of these miRNAs is available. Results In the present study, strategies were developed to discriminate and quantify the expression of paralogous miRNA precursors. First, paralogous miRNA precursors that were differentially expressed in tissues were identified through analysis of the coexpression scores of their major and minor forms based on deep sequencing data. Then the precursors were identified by monitoring the expression of their host gene or minor form using real-time PCR. Finally, precursors were identified by assessing the expression of clusters of miRNA members. These approaches were used to distinguish miR-128-1 and miR-128-2 as well as miR-194-1 and miR-194-2. The mechanism of transcription related to the differential expression of miR-194-1 and miR-194-2 was also investigated. Conclusion This is the first report to distinguish paralogous miRNA copies by analyzing the expression of major-minor pairs, the host gene, and miRNA clusters. Discriminating paralogous precursors can provide useful information for investigating the mechanisms that regulate miRNA gene expression under different physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:24594692

  12. Roles of ATR1 paralogs YMR279c and YOR378w in boron stress tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Bozdag, Gonensin Ozan; Uluisik, Irem; Gulculer, Gulce Sila; Karakaya, Huseyin C.; Koc, Ahmet

    2011-06-17

    Highlights: {yields} ATR1 paralog YMR279c plays role in boron detoxification. {yields} YMR279c overexpression lowers cytoplasmic boron levels. {yields} ATR1 paralog YOR378w has no roles in boron stress response. -- Abstract: Boron is a necessary nutrient for plants and animals, however excess of it causes toxicity. Previously, Atr1 and Arabidopsis Bor1 homolog were identified as the boron efflux pump in yeast, which lower the cytosolic boron concentration and help cells to survive in the presence of toxic amount of boron. In this study, we analyzed ATR1 paralogs, YMR279c and YOR378w, to understand whether they participate in boron stress tolerance in yeast. Even though these genes share homology with ATR1, neither their deletion rendered cells boron sensitive nor their expression was significantly upregulated by boron treatment. However, expression of YMR279, but not YOR378w, from the constitutive GAPDH promoter on a high copy plasmid provided remarkable boron resistance by decreasing intracellular boron levels. Thus our results suggest the presence of a third boron exporter, YMR279c, which functions similar to ATR1 and provides boron resistance in yeast.

  13. Two Rac paralogs regulate polarized growth in the human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Ballou, Elizabeth Ripley; Selvig, Kyla; Narloch, Jessica L.; Nichols, Connie B.; Alspaugh, J. Andrew

    2013-01-01

    A genome wide analysis of the human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii has revealed a number of duplications of highly conserved genes involved in morphogenesis. Previously, we reported that duplicate Cdc42 paralogs provide C. neoformans with niche-specific responses to environmental stresses: Cdc42 is required for thermotolerance, while Cdc420 supports the formation of titan cells. The related Rho-GTPase Rac1 has been shown in C. neoformans var. neoformans to play a major role in filamentation and to share Cdc42/Cdc420 binding partners. Here we report the characterization of a second Rac paralog in C. neoformans, Rac2, and describe its overlapping function with the previously described CnRac, Rac1. Further, we demonstrate that the Rac paralogs play a primary role in polarized growth via the organization of reactive oxygen species and play only a minor role in the organization of actin. Finally, we provide preliminary evidence that pharmacological inhibitors of Rac activity and actin stability have synergistic activity. PMID:23748012

  14. Functional specialization of chordate CDK1 paralogs during oogenic meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Øvrebø, Jan Inge; Campsteijn, Coen; Kourtesis, Ioannis; Hausen, Harald; Raasholm, Martina; Thompson, Eric M

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are central regulators of eukaryotic cell cycle progression. In contrast to interphase CDKs, the mitotic phase CDK1 is the only CDK capable of driving the entire cell cycle and it can do so from yeast to mammals. Interestingly, plants and the marine chordate, Oikopleura dioica, possess paralogs of the highly conserved CDK1 regulator. However, whereas in plants the 2 CDK1 paralogs replace interphase CDK functions, O. dioica has a full complement of interphase CDKs in addition to its 5 odCDK1 paralogs. Here we show specific sub-functionalization of odCDK1 paralogs during oogenesis. Differential spatiotemporal dynamics of the odCDK1a, d and e paralogs and the meiotic polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) and aurora kinase determine the subset of meiotic nuclei in prophase I arrest that will seed growing oocytes and complete meiosis. Whereas we find odCDK1e to be non-essential, knockdown of the odCDK1a paralog resulted in the spawning of non-viable oocytes of reduced size. Knockdown of odCDK1d also resulted in the spawning of non-viable oocytes. In this case, the oocytes were of normal size, but were unable to extrude polar bodies upon exposure to sperm, because they were unable to resume meiosis from prophase I arrest, a classical function of the sole CDK1 during meiosis in other organisms. Thus, we reveal specific sub-functionalization of CDK1 paralogs, during the meiotic oogenic program. PMID:25714331

  15. Properties of Sequence Conservation in Upstream Regulatory and Protein Coding Sequences among Paralogs in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Dale N.; Wiehe, Thomas

    Whole genome duplication (WGD) has catalyzed the formation of new species, genes with novel functions, altered expression patterns, complexified signaling pathways and has provided organisms a level of genetic robustness. We studied the long-term evolution and interrelationships of 5’ upstream regulatory sequences (URSs), protein coding sequences (CDSs) and expression correlations (EC) of duplicated gene pairs in Arabidopsis. Three distinct methods revealed significant evolutionary conservation between paralogous URSs and were highly correlated with microarray-based expression correlation of the respective gene pairs. Positional information on exact matches between sequences unveiled the contribution of micro-chromosomal rearrangements on expression divergence. A three-way rank analysis of URS similarity, CDS divergence and EC uncovered specific gene functional biases. Transcription factor activity was associated with gene pairs exhibiting conserved URSs and divergent CDSs, whereas a broad array of metabolic enzymes was found to be associated with gene pairs showing diverged URSs but conserved CDSs.

  16. Genetic dissection of a TIR-NB-LRR locus from the wild North American grapevine species Muscadinia rotundifolia identifies paralogous genes conferring resistance to major fungal and oomycete pathogens in cultivated grapevine.

    PubMed

    Feechan, Angela; Anderson, Claire; Torregrosa, Laurent; Jermakow, Angelica; Mestre, Pere; Wiedemann-Merdinoglu, Sabine; Merdinoglu, Didier; Walker, Amanda R; Cadle-Davidson, Lance; Reisch, Bruce; Aubourg, Sebastien; Bentahar, Nadia; Shrestha, Bipna; Bouquet, Alain; Adam-Blondon, Anne-Françoise; Thomas, Mark R; Dry, Ian B

    2013-11-01

    The most economically important diseases of grapevine cultivation worldwide are caused by the fungal pathogen powdery mildew (Erysiphe necator syn. Uncinula necator) and the oomycete pathogen downy mildew (Plasmopara viticola). Currently, grapegrowers rely heavily on the use of agrochemicals to minimize the potentially devastating impact of these pathogens on grape yield and quality. The wild North American grapevine species Muscadinia rotundifolia was recognized as early as 1889 to be resistant to both powdery and downy mildew. We have now mapped resistance to these two mildew pathogens in M. rotundifolia to a single locus on chromosome 12 that contains a family of seven TIR-NB-LRR genes. We further demonstrate that two highly homologous (86% amino acid identity) members of this gene family confer strong resistance to these unrelated pathogens following genetic transformation into susceptible Vitis vinifera winegrape cultivars. These two genes, designated resistance to Uncinula necator (MrRUN1) and resistance to Plasmopara viticola (MrRPV1) are the first resistance genes to be cloned from a grapevine species. Both MrRUN1 and MrRPV1 were found to confer resistance to multiple powdery and downy mildew isolates from France, North America and Australia; however, a single powdery mildew isolate collected from the south-eastern region of North America, to which M. rotundifolia is native, was capable of breaking MrRUN1-mediated resistance. Comparisons of gene organization and coding sequences between M. rotundifolia and the cultivated grapevine V. vinifera at the MrRUN1/MrRPV1 locus revealed a high level of synteny, suggesting that the TIR-NB-LRR genes at this locus share a common ancestor. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. UV-Induced Adenine Radicals Induced in DNA A-Tracts: Spectral and Dynamical Characterization.

    PubMed

    Banyasz, Akos; Ketola, Tiia-Maaria; Muñoz-Losa, Aurora; Rishi, Sunny; Adhikary, Amitava; Sevilla, Michael D; Martinez-Fernandez, Lara; Improta, Roberto; Markovitsi, Dimitra

    2016-10-06

    Adenyl radicals generated in DNA single and double strands, (dA)20 and (dA)20·(dT)20, by one- and two-photon ionization by 266 nm laser pulses decay at 600 nm with half-times of 1.0 ± 0.1 and 4 ± 1 ms, respectively. Though ionization initially forms the cation radical, the radicals detected for (dA)20 are quantitatively identified as N6-deprotonated adenyl radicals by their absorption spectrum, which is computed quantum mechanically employing TD-DFT. Theoretical calculations show that deprotonation of the cation radical induces only weak spectral changes, in line with the spectra of the adenyl radical cation and the deprotonated radical trapped in low temperature glasses.

  18. Protective effect of saponins from Argania spinosa against free radical-induced oxidative haemolysis.

    PubMed

    Amzal, H; Alaoui, K; Tok, S; Errachidi, A; Charof, R; Cherrah, Y; Benjouad, A

    2008-07-01

    Saponins from Argania spinosa at a non-haemolytic concentration diminish by 53.2% erythrocyte haemolysis induced by free radicals. 2 mM aspirin and acetaminophen diminish by 75% and 68% , respectively, erythrocyte haemolysis induced by free radicals, while 0.3 microM vitamin E shows no significant antioxidant activity. Interestingly, a combination of 1 mg/l of A. spinosa saponins and vitamin E at 0.3 microM resulted in a 68% level of protection against free radical-induced erythrocyte haemolysis, which may suggest that A. spinosa saponins enhance the antioxidant effect of vitamin E. In contrast, no synergic effect was observed for acetaminophen (2 mM) when in combination with vitamin E (0.3 microM). These results demonstrate the antioxidant properties of saponins from A. spinosa and their ability to potentate the antioxidant effect of vitamin E.

  19. Different Functions of the Paralogs to the N-Terminal Domain of the Orange Carotenoid Protein in the Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 71201[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    López-Igual, Rocío; Wilson, Adjélé; Bourcier de Carbon, Céline; Sutter, Markus; Turmo, Aiko

    2016-01-01

    The photoactive Orange Carotenoid Protein (OCP) is involved in cyanobacterial photoprotection. Its N-terminal domain (NTD) is responsible for interaction with the antenna and induction of excitation energy quenching, while the C-terminal domain is the regulatory domain that senses light and induces photoactivation. In most nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterial strains, there are one to four paralogous genes coding for homologs to the NTD of the OCP. The functions of these proteins are unknown. Here, we study the expression, localization, and function of these genes in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. We show that the four genes present in the genome are expressed in both vegetative cells and heterocysts but do not seem to have an essential role in heterocyst formation. This study establishes that all four Anabaena NTD-like proteins can bind a carotenoid and the different paralogs have distinct functions. Surprisingly, only one paralog (All4941) was able to interact with the antenna and to induce permanent thermal energy dissipation. Two of the other Anabaena paralogs (All3221 and Alr4783) were shown to be very good singlet oxygen quenchers. The fourth paralog (All1123) does not seem to be involved in photoprotection. Structural homology modeling allowed us to propose specific features responsible for the different functions of these soluble carotenoid-binding proteins. PMID:27208286

  20. Paralog-Specific Functions of RPL7A and RPL7B Mediated by Ribosomal Protein or snoRNA Dosage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Ryan J.; Fuchs, Gabriele; Lutz, Sheila; Curcio, M. Joan

    2016-01-01

    Most ribosomal proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are encoded by two paralogs that additively produce the optimal protein level for cell growth. Nonetheless, deleting one paralog of most ribosomal protein gene pairs results in a variety of phenotypes not observed when the other paralog is deleted. To determine whether paralog-specific phenotypes associated with deleting RPL7A or RPL7B stem from distinct functions or different levels of the encoded isoforms, the coding region and introns of one paralog, including an intron-embedded snoRNA (small nucleolar RNA) gene, were exchanged with that of the other paralog. Among mutants harboring a single native or chimeric RPL7 allele, expression from the RPL7A locus exceeded that from the RPL7B locus, and more Rpl7a was expressed from either locus than Rpl7b. Phenotypic differences in tunicamycin sensitivity, ASH1 mRNA localization, and mobility of the Ty1 retrotransposon were strongly correlated with Rpl7 and ribosome levels, but not with the Rpl7 or snoRNA isoform expressed. Although Ty1 RNA is cotranslationally localized, depletion of Rpl7 minimally affected synthesis of Ty1 Gag protein, but strongly influenced Ty1 RNA localization. Unlike the other processes studied, Ty1 cDNA accumulation was influenced by both the level and isoform of Rpl7 or snoRNA expressed. These cellular processes had different minimal threshold values for Rpl7 and ribosome levels, but all were functional when isoforms of either paralog were expressed from the RPL7A locus or both RPL7 loci. This study illustrates the broad range of phenotypes that can result from depleting ribosomes to different levels. PMID:28007835

  1. Microbial Evolution: Xenology (Apparently) Trumps Paralogy.

    PubMed

    Eme, Laura; Doolittle, W Ford

    2016-11-21

    Within-genome gene duplication is generally considered the source of extra copies when higher dosage is required and a starting point for evolution of new function. A new study suggests that horizontal gene transfer can appear to play both roles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. foxl2 and foxl3 are two ancient paralogs that remain fully functional in teleosts.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Berta; Lan-Chow-Wing, Olivier; Rocha, Ana; Zanuy, Silvia; Gómez, Ana

    2013-12-01

    FOXL2 is a forkhead transcription factor involved in mammalian development and regulation of reproduction. Two foxl2 paralogs, foxl2a and foxl2b, have been described in various teleost species and were considered as fish-specific duplicates. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of foxl2a (foxl2) and foxl2b (foxl3) in European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax), together with the identification of these two genes in non-teleost genomes. Phylogenetic and synteny analyses indicate that these paralogs originated from an ancient genome duplication event that happened long before the teleost specific duplication. While foxl2/foxl2a has been maintained in most vertebrate lineages, foxl2b, which we propose to rename as foxl3, was repeatedly lost in tetrapods. Gonadal expression patterns of the sea bass genes point to a strong sexual dimorphism, and the mRNA levels of foxl2 in ovary and foxl3 in testis vary significantly during the reproductive cycle. When overexpressed in cultured ovarian follicular cells, foxl2 and foxl3 produced functional transcription factors able to control the expression of reproduction-related genes. Taken together, these data suggest that Foxl2 may play a conserved role in ovarian maturation, while Foxl3 could be involved in testis physiology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. An enhanced method for sequence walking and paralog mining: TOPO® Vector-Ligation PCR

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Although technological advances allow for the economical acquisition of whole genome sequences, many organisms' genomes remain unsequenced, and fully sequenced genomes may contain gaps. Researchers reliant upon partial genomic or heterologous sequence information require methods for obtaining unknown sequences from loci of interest. Various PCR based techniques are available for sequence walking - i.e., the acquisition of unknown DNA sequence adjacent to known sequence. Many such methods require rigid, elaborate protocols and/or impose narrowly confined options in the choice of restriction enzymes for necessary genomic digests. We describe a new method, TOPO® Vector-Ligation PCR (or TVL-PCR) that innovatively integrates available tools and familiar concepts to offer advantages as a means of both targeted sequence walking and paralog mining. Findings TVL-PCR exploits the ligation efficiency of the pCR®4-TOPO® (Invitrogen, Carlsbad, California) vector system to capture fragments of unknown sequence by creating chimeric molecules containing defined priming sites at both ends. Initially, restriction enzyme-digested genomic DNA is end-repaired to create 3' adenosine overhangs and is then ligated to pCR4-TOPO vectors. The ligation product pool is used directly as a template for nested PCR, using specific primers to target orthologous sequences, or degenerate primers to enable capture of paralogous gene family members. We demonstrated the efficacy of this method by capturing entire coding and partial promoter sequences of several strawberry Superman-like genes. Conclusions TVL-PCR is a convenient and efficient method for DNA sequence walking and paralog mining that is applicable to any organism for which relevant DNA sequence is available as a basis for primer design. PMID:20202219

  4. Human-chimpanzee alignment: ortholog exponentials and paralog power laws.

    PubMed

    Gao, Kun; Miller, Jonathan

    2014-12-01

    Genomic subsequences conserved between closely related species such as human and chimpanzee exhibit an exponential length distribution, in contrast to the algebraic length distribution observed for sequences shared between distantly related genomes. We find that the former exponential can be further decomposed into an exponential component primarily composed of orthologous sequences, and a truncated algebraic component primarily composed of paralogous sequences.

  5. Radical-induced chemistry from VUV photolysis of interstellar ice analogues containing formaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butscher, Teddy; Duvernay, Fabrice; Danger, Grégoire; Chiavassa, Thierry

    2016-09-01

    Surface processes and radical chemistry within interstellar ices are increasingly suspected to play an important role in the formation of complex organic molecules (COMs) observed in several astrophysical regions and cometary environments. We present new laboratory experiments on the low-temperature solid state formation of complex organic molecules - glycolaldehyde, ethylene glycol, and polyoxymethylene - through radical-induced reactivity from VUV photolysis of formaldehyde in water-free and water-dominated ices. Radical reactivity and endogenous formation of COMs were monitored in situ via infrared spectroscopy in the solid state and post photolysis with temperature programmed desorption (TPD) using a quadripole mass spectrometer. We show the ability of free radicals to be stored when formed at low temperature in water-dominated ices, and to react with other radicals or on double bonds of unsaturated molecules when the temperature increases. It experimentally confirms the role of thermal diffusion in radical reactivity. We propose a new pathway for formaldehyde polymerisation induced by HCO radicals that might explain some observations made by the Ptolemy instrument on board the Rosetta lander Philae. In addition, our results seem to indicate that H-atom additions on H2CO proceed preferentially through CH2OH intermediate radicals rather than the CH3O radical.

  6. Formation of fluorescent polydopamine dots from hydroxyl radical-induced degradation of polydopamine nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jia-Hui; Yu, Cheng-Ju; Yang, Ya-Chun; Tseng, Wei-Lung

    2015-06-21

    This study describes the synthesis of fluorescent polydopamine dots (PDs) through hydroxyl radical-induced degradation of polydopamine nanoparticles. The decomposition of polydopamine nanoparticles to fluorescent PDs was confirmed using transmission electron microscopy and dark-field microscopy. The analysis of PDs by using laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry revealed that the PDs consisted of dopamine, 5,6-dihydroxyindole, and trihydroxyindole units. Oligomerization and self-assembly of these units produced a broad adsorption band, resulting in an excitation-wavelength-dependent emission behavior. The maximal fluorescence of PDs appeared at 440 nm with a quantum yield of 1.2%. The coordination between the catechol groups of PDs and ferric ions (Fe(3+)) quenched the fluorescence of PDs; the limit of detection at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 for Fe(3+) was determined to be 0.3 μM. The presence of pyrophosphate switched on the fluorescence of the PD-Fe(3+) complexes. Compared to the other reported methods for sensing Fe(3+), PDs provided simple, low-cost, and reusable detection of Fe(3+).

  7. Endomorphins, endogenous opioid peptides, provide antioxidant defense in the brain against free radical-induced damage.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xin; Yang, Ding-Jian; Cai, Wen-Qing; Zhao, Qian-Yu; Gao, Yan-Feng; Chen, Qiang; Wang, Rui

    2003-11-20

    Oxidative stress has been considered to be a major cause of cellular injuries in a variety of chronic health problems, such as carcinogenesis and neurodegenerative disorders. The brain appears to be more susceptible to oxidative damage than other organs. Therefore, the existence of antioxidants may be essential in brain protective systems. The antioxidative and free radical scavenging effects of endomorphin 1 (EM1) and endomorphin 2 (EM2), endogenous opioid peptides in the brain, have been investigated in vitro. The oxidative damage was initiated by a water-soluble initiator 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane hydrocholoride) (AAPH) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The linoleic acid peroxidation, DNA and protein damage were monitored by formation of hydroperoxides, by plasmid pBR 322 DNA nicking assay and single-cell alkaline electrophoresis, and by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Endomorphins can inhibit lipid peroxidation, DNA strand breakage, and protein fragmentation induced by free radical. Endomorphins also reacted with galvinoxyl radicals in homogeneous solution, and the pseudo-first-order rate constants were determined spectrophotometrically by following the disappearance of galvinoxyl radicals. In all assay systems, EM1 was more potent than EM2 and GSH, a major intracellular water-soluble antioxidant. We propose that endomorphins are one of the protective systems against free radical-induced damage in the brain.

  8. Protective effect of alpha-tocotrienol against free radical-induced impairment of erythrocyte deformability.

    PubMed

    Begum, Aynun Nahar; Terao, Junji

    2002-02-01

    Alpha-tocotrienol (alpha-T3) has been suggested to protect cellular membranes against free radical damage. This study was done to estimate the effect of alpha-T3 on free radical-induced impairment of erythrocyte deformability by comparing it to alpha-tocopherol (alpha-T). An erythrocyte suspension containing 2,2'-azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH) was forced to flow through microchannels with an equivalent diameter of 7 microm for measuring erythrocyte deformability. A higher concentration of AAPH caused a marked decrease in erythrocyte deformability with concomitant increase of membranous lipid peroxidation. Treatment of erythrocytes with alpha-T or alpha-T3 suppressed the impairment of erythrocyte deformability as well as membranous lipid peroxidation and they also increased erythrocyte deformability even in the absence of AAPH. In these cases, the protecting effect of alpha-T3 was significantly higher than that of alpha-T. We emphasize that higher incorporating activity of alpha-T3 into erythrocyte membranes seems to be the most important reason for higher protection against erythrocyte oxidation and impairment its deformability.

  9. Eukaryotic GPN-loop GTPases paralogs use a dimeric assembly reminiscent of archeal GPN.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Béatrice; Beraud, Carole; Meguellati, Sarra; Chen, Shu W; Pellequer, Jean Luc; Armengaud, Jean; Godon, Christian

    2013-02-01

    GTPases are molecular switches that regulate a wide-range of cellular processes. The GPN-loop GTPase (GPN) is a sub-family of P-loop NTPase that evolved from a single gene copy in archaea to triplicate paralog genes in eukaryotes, each having a non-redundant essential function in cell. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, yGPN1 and yGPN2 are involved in sister chromatid cohesion mechanism, whereas nothing is known regarding yGPN3 function. Previous high-throughput experiments suggested that GPN paralogs interaction may occur. In this work, GPN|GPN contact was analyzed in details using TAP-Tag approach, yeast two-hybrid assay, in silico energy computation and site-directed mutagenesis of a conserved Glu residue located at the center of the interaction interface. It is demonstrated that this residue is essential for cell viability. A chromatid cohesion assay revealed that, like yGPN1 and yGPN2, yGPN3 also plays a role in sister chromatid cohesion. These results suggest that all three GPN proteins act at the molecular level in sister chromatid cohesion mechanism as a GPN|GPN complex reminiscent of the homodimeric structure of PAB0955, an archaeal member of GPN-loop GTPase.

  10. Mutational analysis of three bchH paralogs in (bacterio-)chlorophyll biosynthesis in Chlorobaculum tepidum.

    PubMed

    Gomez Maqueo Chew, Aline; Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Bryant, Donald A

    2009-07-01

    The first committed step in the biosynthesis of (bacterio-)chlorophyll is the insertion of Mg2+ into protoporphyrin IX by Mg-chelatase. In all known (B)Chl-synthesizing organisms, Mg-chelatase is encoded by three genes that are homologous to bchH, bchD, and bchI of Rhodobacter spp. The genomes of all sequenced strains of green sulfur bacteria (Chlorobi) encode multiple bchH paralogs, and in the genome of Chlorobaculum tepidum, there are three bchH paralogs, denoted CT1295 (bchT), CT1955 (bchS), and CT1957 (bchH). Cba. tepidum mutants lacking one or two of these paralogs were constructed and characterized. All of the mutants lacking only one of these BchH homologs, as well as bchS bchT and bchH bchT double mutants, which can only produce BchH or BchS, respectively, were viable. However, attempts to construct a bchH bchS double mutant, in which only BchT was functional, were consistently unsuccessful. This result suggested that BchT alone is unable to support the minimal (B)Chl synthesis requirements of cells required for viability. The pigment compositions of the various mutant strains varied significantly. The BChl c content of the bchS mutant was only approximately 10% of that of the wild type, and this mutant excreted large amounts of protoporphyrin IX into the growth medium. The observed differences in BChl c production of the mutant strains were consistent with the hypothesis that the three BchH homologs function in end product regulation and/or substrate channeling of intermediates in the BChl c biosynthetic pathway.

  11. Evolution of the vertebrate genome as reflected in paralogous chromosomal regions in man and the house mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Lundin, L.G. )

    1993-04-01

    Gene constellations on several human chromosomes are interpreted as indications of large regional duplications that took place during evolution of the vertebrate genome. Four groups of paralogous chromosomal regions in man and the house mouse are suggested and are believed to be conserved remnants of the two or three rounds of tetraploidization that are likely to have occurred during evolution of the vertebrates. The phenomenon of differential silencing of genes is described. The importance of conservation of linkage of particular genes is discussed in relation to genetic regulation and cell differentiation. 120 refs., 5 tabs.

  12. Differential expression and accumulation of 14-3-3 paralogs in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and differentiated cells.

    PubMed

    Gojanovich, Aldana D; Bustos, Diego M; Uhart, Marina

    2016-09-01

    The 14-3-3 protein family interacts with more than 2000 different proteins in mammals, as a result of its specific phospho-serine/phospho-threonine binding activity. Seven paralogs are strictly conserved in mammalian species. Here, we show that during adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, the level of each 14-3-3 protein paralog is regulated independently. For instance 14-3-3β, γ, and η protein levels are increased compared to untreated cells. In contrast, 14-3-3ε protein levels decreased after differentiation while others remained constant. In silico analysis of the promoter region of each gene showed differences that explain the results obtained at mRNA and protein levels.

  13. Adhesive Properties of YapV and Paralogous Autotransporter Proteins of Yersinia pestis

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Manoj K. M.; De Masi, Leon; Yue, Min; Galván, Estela M.; Chen, Huaiqing; Wang, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia pestis is the causative agent of plague. This bacterium evolved from an ancestral enteroinvasive Yersinia pseudotuberculosis strain by gene loss and acquisition of new genes, allowing it to use fleas as transmission vectors. Infection frequently leads to a rapidly lethal outcome in humans, a variety of rodents, and cats. This study focuses on the Y. pestis KIM yapV gene and its product, recognized as an autotransporter protein by its typical sequence, outer membrane localization, and amino-terminal surface exposure. Comparison of Yersinia genomes revealed that DNA encoding YapV or each of three individual paralogous proteins (YapK, YapJ, and YapX) was present as a gene or pseudogene in a strain-specific manner and only in Y. pestis and Y. pseudotuberculosis. YapV acted as an adhesin for alveolar epithelial cells and specific extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, as shown with recombinant Escherichia coli, Y. pestis, or purified passenger domains. Like YapV, YapK and YapJ demonstrated adhesive properties, suggesting that their previously related in vivo activity is due to their capacity to modulate binding properties of Y. pestis in its hosts, in conjunction with other adhesins. A differential host-specific type of binding to ECM proteins by YapV, YapK, and YapJ suggested that these proteins participate in broadening the host range of Y. pestis. A phylogenic tree including 36 Y. pestis strains highlighted an association between the gene profile for the four paralogous proteins and the geographic location of the corresponding isolated strains, suggesting an evolutionary adaption of Y. pestis to specific local animal hosts or reservoirs. PMID:25690102

  14. An easy-to-use primer design tool to address paralogous loci and T-DNA insertion sites in the genome of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Huep, Gunnar; Kleinboelting, Nils; Weisshaar, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    More than 90% of the Arabidopsis thaliana genes are members of multigene families. DNA sequence similarities present in such related genes can cause trouble, e.g. when molecularly analysing mutant alleles of these genes. Also, flanking-sequence-tag (FST) based predictions of T-DNA insertion positions are often located within paralogous regions of the genome. In such cases, the prediction of the correct insertion site must include careful sequence analyses on the one hand and a paralog specific primer design for experimental confirmation of the prediction on the other hand. GABI-Kat is a large A. thaliana insertion line resource, which uses in-house confirmation to provide highly reliable access to T-DNA insertion alleles. To offer trustworthy mutant alleles of paralogous loci, we considered multiple insertion site predictions for single FSTs and implemented this 1-to-N relation in our database. The resulting paralogous predictions were addressed experimentally and the correct insertion locus was identified in most cases, including cases in which there were multiple predictions with identical prediction scores. A newly developed primer design tool that takes paralogous regions into account was developed to streamline the confirmation process for paralogs. The tool is suitable for all parts of the genome and is freely available at the GABI-Kat website. Although the tool was initially designed for the analysis of T-DNA insertion mutants, it can be used for any experiment that requires locus-specific primers for the A. thaliana genome. It is easy to use and also able to design amplimers with two genome-specific primers as required for genotyping segregating families of insertion mutants when looking for homozygous offspring. The paralog-aware confirmation process significantly improved the reliability of the insertion site assignment when paralogous regions of the genome were affected. An automatic online primer design tool that incorporates experience from the in

  15. Oxygen radicals induce human endothelial cells to express GMP-140 and bind neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The initial step in extravasation of neutrophils (polymorphonuclear leukocytes [PMNs]) to the extravascular space is adherence to the endothelium. We examined the effect of oxidants on this process by treating human endothelial cells with H2O2, t-butylhydroperoxide, or menadione. This resulted in a surface adhesive for PMN between 1 and 4 h after exposure. The oxidants needed to be present only for a brief period at the initiation of the assay. Adhesion was an endothelial cell- dependent process that did not require an active response from the PMN. The adhesive molecule was not platelet-activating factor, which mediates PMN adherence when endothelial cells are briefly exposed to higher concentrations of H2O2 (Lewis, M. S., R. E. Whatley, P. Cain, T. M. McIntyre, S. M. Prescott, and G. A. Zimmerman. 1988. J. Clin. Invest. 82:2045-2055), nor was it ELAM-1, an adhesive glycoprotein induced by cytokines. Oxidant-induced adhesion did not require protein synthesis, was inhibited by antioxidants, and, when peroxides were the oxidants, was inhibited by intracellular iron chelators. Granule membrane protein-140 (GMP-140) is a membrane-associated glycoprotein that can be translocated from its intracellular storage pool to the surface of endothelial cells where it acts as a ligand for PMN adhesion (Geng, J.-G., M. P. Bevilacqua, K. L. Moore, T. M. McIntyre, S. M. Prescott, J. M. Kim, G. A. Bliss, G. A. Zimmerman, and R. P. McEver. 1990. Nature (Lond). 343:757-760). We found that endothelial cells exposed to oxidants expressed GMP-140 on their surface, and that an mAb against GMP-140 or solubilized GMP-140 completely blocked PMN adherence to oxidant-treated endothelial cells. Thus, exposure of endothelial cells to oxygen radicals induces the prolonged expression of GMP-140 on the cell surface, which results in enhanced PMN adherence. PMID:1704376

  16. NADPH-Cytochrome P450 Reductase: Molecular Cloning and Functional Characterization of Two Paralogs from Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Satiander; Lattoo, Surrinder K.; Dhar, Niha; Razdan, Sumeer; Bhat, Wajid Waheed; Dhar, Rekha S.; Vishwakarma, Ram

    2013-01-01

    Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal, a highly reputed medicinal plant, synthesizes a large array of steroidal lactone triterpenoids called withanolides. Although its chemical profile and pharmacological activities have been studied extensively during the last two decades, limited attempts have been made to decipher the biosynthetic route and identification of key regulatory genes involved in withanolide biosynthesis. Cytochrome P450 reductase is the most imperative redox partner of multiple P450s involved in primary and secondary metabolite biosynthesis. We describe here the cloning and characterization of two paralogs of cytochrome P450 reductase from W. somnifera. The full length paralogs of WsCPR1 and WsCPR2 have open reading frames of 2058 and 2142 bp encoding 685 and 713 amino acid residues, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that grouping of dual CPRs was in accordance with class I and class II of eudicotyledon CPRs. The corresponding coding sequences were expressed in Escherichia coli as glutathione-S-transferase fusion proteins, purified and characterized. Recombinant proteins of both the paralogs were purified with their intact membrane anchor regions and it is hitherto unreported for other CPRs which have been purified from microsomal fraction. Southern blot analysis suggested that two divergent isoforms of CPR exist independently in Withania genome. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that both genes were widely expressed in leaves, stalks, roots, flowers and berries with higher expression level of WsCPR2 in comparison to WsCPR1. Similar to CPRs of other plant species, WsCPR1 was un-inducible while WsCPR2 transcript level increased in a time-dependent manner after elicitor treatments. High performance liquid chromatography of withanolides extracted from elicitor-treated samples showed a significant increase in two of the key withanolides, withanolide A and withaferin A, possibly indicating the role of WsCPR2 in withanolide biosynthesis

  17. NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase: molecular cloning and functional characterization of two paralogs from Withania somnifera (L.) dunal.

    PubMed

    Rana, Satiander; Lattoo, Surrinder K; Dhar, Niha; Razdan, Sumeer; Bhat, Wajid Waheed; Dhar, Rekha S; Vishwakarma, Ram

    2013-01-01

    Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal, a highly reputed medicinal plant, synthesizes a large array of steroidal lactone triterpenoids called withanolides. Although its chemical profile and pharmacological activities have been studied extensively during the last two decades, limited attempts have been made to decipher the biosynthetic route and identification of key regulatory genes involved in withanolide biosynthesis. Cytochrome P450 reductase is the most imperative redox partner of multiple P450s involved in primary and secondary metabolite biosynthesis. We describe here the cloning and characterization of two paralogs of cytochrome P450 reductase from W. somnifera. The full length paralogs of WsCPR1 and WsCPR2 have open reading frames of 2058 and 2142 bp encoding 685 and 713 amino acid residues, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that grouping of dual CPRs was in accordance with class I and class II of eudicotyledon CPRs. The corresponding coding sequences were expressed in Escherichia coli as glutathione-S-transferase fusion proteins, purified and characterized. Recombinant proteins of both the paralogs were purified with their intact membrane anchor regions and it is hitherto unreported for other CPRs which have been purified from microsomal fraction. Southern blot analysis suggested that two divergent isoforms of CPR exist independently in Withania genome. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that both genes were widely expressed in leaves, stalks, roots, flowers and berries with higher expression level of WsCPR2 in comparison to WsCPR1. Similar to CPRs of other plant species, WsCPR1 was un-inducible while WsCPR2 transcript level increased in a time-dependent manner after elicitor treatments. High performance liquid chromatography of withanolides extracted from elicitor-treated samples showed a significant increase in two of the key withanolides, withanolide A and withaferin A, possibly indicating the role of WsCPR2 in withanolide biosynthesis

  18. Structure of the NPr:EIN(Ntr) Complex: Mechanism for Specificity in Paralogous Phosphotransferase Systems.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Madeleine; Stanley, Ann Marie; Wang, Guangshun; Botos, Istvan; Schwieters, Charles D; Buchanan, Susan K; Peterkofsky, Alan; Tjandra, Nico

    2016-12-06

    Paralogous enzymes arise from gene duplication events that confer a novel function, although it is unclear how cross-reaction between the original and duplicate protein interaction network is minimized. We investigated HPr:EI(sugar) and NPr:EI(Ntr), the initial complexes of paralogous phosphorylation cascades involved in sugar import and nitrogen regulation in bacteria, respectively. Although the HPr:EI(sugar) interaction has been well characterized, involving multiple complexes and transient interactions, the exact nature of the NPr:EI(Ntr) complex was unknown. We set out to identify the key features of the interaction by performing binding assays and elucidating the structure of NPr in complex with the phosphorylation domain of EI(Ntr) (EIN(Ntr)), using a hybrid approach involving X-ray, homology, and sparse nuclear magnetic resonance. We found that the overall fold and active-site structure of the two complexes are conserved in order to maintain productive phosphorylation, however, the interface surface potential differs between the two complexes, which prevents cross-reaction.

  19. Structure of the NPr:EINNtr Complex: Mechanism for Specificity in Paralogous Phosphotransferase Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, Madeleine; Stanley, Ann Marie; Wang, Guangshun; Botos, Istvan; Schwieters, Charles D.; Buchanan, Susan K.; Peterkofsky, Alan; Tjandra, Nico

    2016-12-01

    Paralogous enzymes arise from gene duplication events that confer a novel function, although it is unclear how cross-reaction between the original and duplicate protein interaction network is minimized. We investigated HPr:EIsugar and NPr:EINtr, the initial complexes of paralogous phosphorylation cascades involved in sugar import and nitrogen regulation in bacteria, respectively. Although the HPr:EIsugar interaction has been well characterized, involving multiple complexes and transient interactions, the exact nature of the NPr:EINtr complex was unknown. We set out to identify the key features of the interaction by performing binding assays and elucidating the structure of NPr in complex with the phosphorylation domain of EINtr (EINNtr), using a hybrid approach involving X-ray, homology, and sparse nuclear magnetic resonance. We found that the overall fold and active-site structure of the two complexes are conserved in order to maintain productive phosphorylation, however, the interface surface potential differs between the two complexes, which prevents cross-reaction.

  20. Divergence of Gene Body DNA Methylation and Evolution of Plant Duplicate Genes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Marowsky, Nicholas C.; Fan, Chuanzhu

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that gene body DNA methylation is associated with gene expression. However, whether and how deviation of gene body DNA methylation between duplicate genes can influence their divergence remains largely unexplored. Here, we aim to elucidate the potential role of gene body DNA methylation in the fate of duplicate genes. We identified paralogous gene pairs from Arabidopsis and rice (Oryza sativa ssp. japonica) genomes and reprocessed their single-base resolution methylome data. We show that methylation in paralogous genes nonlinearly correlates with several gene properties including exon number/gene length, expression level and mutation rate. Further, we demonstrated that divergence of methylation level and pattern in paralogs indeed positively correlate with their sequence and expression divergences. This result held even after controlling for other confounding factors known to influence the divergence of paralogs. We observed that methylation level divergence might be more relevant to the expression divergence of paralogs than methylation pattern divergence. Finally, we explored the mechanisms that might give rise to the divergence of gene body methylation in paralogs. We found that exonic methylation divergence more closely correlates with expression divergence than intronic methylation divergence. We show that genomic environments (e.g., flanked by transposable elements and repetitive sequences) of paralogs generated by various duplication mechanisms are associated with the methylation divergence of paralogs. Overall, our results suggest that the changes in gene body DNA methylation could provide another avenue for duplicate genes to develop differential expression patterns and undergo different evolutionary fates in plant genomes. PMID:25310342

  1. Parameters of proteome evolution from histograms of amino-acid sequence identities of paralogous proteins

    PubMed Central

    Axelsen, Jacob Bock; Yan, Koon-Kiu; Maslov, Sergei

    2007-01-01

    Background The evolution of the full repertoire of proteins encoded in a given genome is mostly driven by gene duplications, deletions, and sequence modifications of existing proteins. Indirect information about relative rates and other intrinsic parameters of these three basic processes is contained in the proteome-wide distribution of sequence identities of pairs of paralogous proteins. Results We introduce a simple mathematical framework based on a stochastic birth-and-death model that allows one to extract some of this information and apply it to the set of all pairs of paralogous proteins in H. pylori, E. coli, S. cerevisiae, C. elegans, D. melanogaster, and H. sapiens. It was found that the histogram of sequence identities p generated by an all-to-all alignment of all protein sequences encoded in a genome is well fitted with a power-law form ~ p-γ with the value of the exponent γ around 4 for the majority of organisms used in this study. This implies that the intra-protein variability of substitution rates is best described by the Gamma-distribution with the exponent α ≈ 0.33. Different features of the shape of such histograms allow us to quantify the ratio between the genome-wide average deletion/duplication rates and the amino-acid substitution rate. Conclusion We separately measure the short-term ("raw") duplication and deletion rates rdup∗, rdel∗ which include gene copies that will be removed soon after the duplication event and their dramatically reduced long-term counterparts rdup, rdel. High deletion rate among recently duplicated proteins is consistent with a scenario in which they didn't have enough time to significantly change their functional roles and thus are to a large degree disposable. Systematic trends of each of the four duplication/deletion rates with the total number of genes in the genome were analyzed. All but the deletion rate of recent duplicates rdel∗ were shown to systematically increase with Ngenes. Abnormally flat shapes

  2. Reassessing Domain Architecture Evolution of Metazoan Proteins: Major Impact of Errors Caused by Confusing Paralogs and Epaktologs

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Alinda; Bányai, László; Patthy, László

    2011-01-01

    In the accompanying paper (Nagy, Szláma, Szarka, Trexler, Bányai, Patthy, Reassessing Domain Architecture Evolution of Metazoan Proteins: Major Impact of Gene Prediction Errors) we showed that in the case of UniProtKB/TrEMBL, RefSeq, EnsEMBL and NCBI's GNOMON predicted protein sequences of Metazoan species the contribution of erroneous (incomplete, abnormal, mispredicted) sequences to domain architecture (DA) differences of orthologous proteins might be greater than those of true gene rearrangements. Based on these findings, we suggest that earlier genome-scale studies based on comparison of predicted (frequently mispredicted) protein sequences may have led to some erroneous conclusions about the evolution of novel domain architectures of multidomain proteins. In this manuscript we examine the impact of confusing paralogous and epaktologous multidomain proteins (i.e., those that are related only through the independent acquisition of the same domain types) on conclusions drawn about DA evolution of multidomain proteins in Metazoa. To estimate the contribution of this type of error we have used as reference UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot sequences from protein families with well-characterized evolutionary histories. We have used two types of paralogy-group construction procedures and monitored the impact of various parameters on the separation of true paralogs from epaktologs on correctly annotated Swiss-Prot entries of multidomain proteins. Our studies have shown that, although public protein family databases are contaminated with epaktologs, analysis of the structure of sequence similarity networks of multidomain proteins provides an efficient means for the separation of epaktologs and paralogs. We have also demonstrated that contamination of protein families with epaktologs increases the apparent rate of DA change and introduces a bias in DA differences in as much as it increases the proportion of terminal over internal DA differences. We have shown that confusing

  3. SPOCS: software for predicting and visualizing orthology/paralogy relationships among genomes

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Darren S.; Phillips, Aaron R.; Callister, Stephen J.; Conlan, Sean; McCue, Lee Ann

    2013-01-01

    Summary: At the rate that prokaryotic genomes can now be generated, comparative genomics studies require a flexible method for quickly and accurately predicting orthologs among the rapidly changing set of genomes available. SPOCS implements a graph-based ortholog prediction method to generate a simple tab-delimited table of orthologs and in addition, html files that provide a visualization of the predicted ortholog/paralog relationships to which gene/protein expression metadata may be overlaid. Availability and Implementation: A SPOCS web application is freely available at http://cbb.pnnl.gov/portal/tools/spocs.html. Source code for Linux systems is also freely available under an open source license at http://cbb.pnnl.gov/portal/software/spocs.html; the Boost C++ libraries and BLAST are required. Contact: leeann.mccue@pnnl.gov PMID:23956303

  4. SPOCS: software for predicting and visualizing orthology/paralogy relationships among genomes.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Darren S; Phillips, Aaron R; Callister, Stephen J; Conlan, Sean; McCue, Lee Ann

    2013-10-15

    At the rate that prokaryotic genomes can now be generated, comparative genomics studies require a flexible method for quickly and accurately predicting orthologs among the rapidly changing set of genomes available. SPOCS implements a graph-based ortholog prediction method to generate a simple tab-delimited table of orthologs and in addition, html files that provide a visualization of the predicted ortholog/paralog relationships to which gene/protein expression metadata may be overlaid. A SPOCS web application is freely available at http://cbb.pnnl.gov/portal/tools/spocs.html. Source code for Linux systems is also freely available under an open source license at http://cbb.pnnl.gov/portal/software/spocs.html; the Boost C++ libraries and BLAST are required.

  5. Roles of ATR1 paralogs YMR279c and YOR378w in boron stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Bozdag, Gonensin Ozan; Uluisik, Irem; Gulculer, Gulce Sila; Karakaya, Huseyin C; Koc, Ahmet

    2011-06-17

    Boron is a necessary nutrient for plants and animals, however excess of it causes toxicity. Previously, Atr1 and Arabidopsis Bor1 homolog were identified as the boron efflux pump in yeast, which lower the cytosolic boron concentration and help cells to survive in the presence of toxic amount of boron. In this study, we analyzed ATR1 paralogs, YMR279c and YOR378w, to understand whether they participate in boron stress tolerance in yeast. Even though these genes share homology with ATR1, neither their deletion rendered cells boron sensitive nor their expression was significantly upregulated by boron treatment. However, expression of YMR279, but not YOR378w, from the constitutive GAPDH promoter on a high copy plasmid provided remarkable boron resistance by decreasing intracellular boron levels. Thus our results suggest the presence of a third boron exporter, YMR279c, which functions similar to ATR1 and provides boron resistance in yeast.

  6. SPOCS: Software for Predicting and Visualizing Orthology/Paralogy Relationships Among Genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, Darren S.; Phillips, Aaron R.; Callister, Stephen J.; Conlan, Sean; McCue, Lee Ann

    2013-10-15

    At the rate that prokaryotic genomes can now be generated, comparative genomics studies require a flexible method for quickly and accurately predicting orthologs among the rapidly changing set of genomes available. SPOCS implements a graph-based ortholog prediction method to generate a simple tab-delimited table of orthologs and in addition, html files that provide a visualization of the predicted ortholog/paralog relationships to which gene/protein expression metadata may be overlaid. AVAILABILITY AND IMPLEMENTATION: A SPOCS web application is freely available at http://cbb.pnnl.gov/portal/tools/spocs.html. Source code for Linux systems is also freely available under an open source license at http://cbb.pnnl.gov/portal/software/spocs.html; the Boost C++ libraries and BLAST are required.

  7. Functional Promiscuity of Two Divergent Paralogs of Type III Plant Polyketide Synthases1

    PubMed Central

    Pandith, Shahzad A.; Dhar, Niha; Bhat, Wajid Waheed; Kushwaha, Manoj; Gupta, Ajai P.; Shah, Manzoor A.; Vishwakarma, Ram

    2016-01-01

    Plants effectively defend themselves against biotic and abiotic stresses by synthesizing diverse secondary metabolites, including health-protective flavonoids. These display incredible chemical diversity and ubiquitous occurrence and confer impeccable biological and agricultural applications. Chalcone synthase (CHS), a type III plant polyketide synthase, is critical for flavonoid biosynthesis. It catalyzes acyl-coenzyme A thioesters to synthesize naringenin chalcone through a polyketidic intermediate. The functional divergence among the evolutionarily generated members of a gene family is pivotal in driving the chemical diversity. Against this backdrop, this study was aimed to functionally characterize members of the CHS gene family from Rheum emodi, an endangered and endemic high-altitude medicinal herb of northwestern Himalayas. Two full-length cDNAs (1,179 bp each), ReCHS1 and ReCHS2, encoding unique paralogs were isolated and characterized. Heterologous expression and purification in Escherichia coli, bottom-up proteomic characterization, high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry analysis, and enzyme kinetic studies using five different substrates confirmed their catalytic potential. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the existence of higher synonymous mutations in the intronless divergents of ReCHS. ReCHS2 displayed significant enzymatic efficiency (Vmax/Km) with different substrates. There were significant spatial and altitudinal variations in messenger RNA transcript levels of ReCHSs correlating positively with metabolite accumulation. Furthermore, the elicitations in the form of methyl jasmonate, salicylic acid, ultraviolet B light, and wounding, chosen on the basis of identified cis-regulatory promoter elements, presented considerable differences in the transcript profiles of ReCHSs. Taken together, our results demonstrate differential propensities of CHS paralogs in terms of the accumulation of flavonoids and

  8. Mouse fitness measures reveal incomplete functional redundancy of Hox paralogous group 1 proteins

    PubMed Central

    Saffarini, Raed B.; Ramoz, Leda L.; Morrison, Linda C.; Baker, Shambralyn; Laverty, Sean M.; Tvrdik, Petr; Capecchi, Mario R.; Potts, Wayne K.

    2017-01-01

    Here we assess the fitness consequences of the replacement of the Hoxa1 coding region with its paralog Hoxb1 in mice (Mus musculus) residing in semi-natural enclosures. Previously, this Hoxa1B1 swap was reported as resulting in no discernible embryonic or physiological phenotype (i.e., functionally redundant), despite the 51% amino acid sequence differences between these two Hox proteins. Within heterozygous breeding cages no differences in litter size nor deviations from Mendelian genotypic expectations were observed in the outbred progeny; however, within semi-natural population enclosures mice homozygous for the Hoxa1B1 swap were out-reproduced by controls resulting in the mutant allele being only 87.5% as frequent as the control in offspring born within enclosures. Specifically, Hoxa1B1 founders produced only 77.9% as many offspring relative to controls, as measured by homozygous pups, and a 22.1% deficiency of heterozygous offspring was also observed. These data suggest that Hoxa1 and Hoxb1 have diverged in function through either sub- or neo-functionalization and that the HoxA1 and HoxB1 proteins are not mutually interchangeable when expressed from the Hoxa1 locus. The fitness assays conducted under naturalistic conditions in this study have provided an ultimate-level assessment of the postulated equivalence of competing alleles. Characterization of these differences has provided greater understanding of the forces shaping the maintenance and diversifications of Hox genes as well as other paralogous genes. This fitness assay approach can be applied to any genetic manipulation and often provides the most sensitive way to detect functional differences. PMID:28380068

  9. The Bromodomain and Extra-Terminal Domain (BET) Family: Functional Anatomy of BET Paralogous Proteins.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Yasushi

    2016-11-07

    The Bromodomain and Extra-Terminal Domain (BET) family of proteins is characterized by the presence of two tandem bromodomains and an extra-terminal domain. The mammalian BET family of proteins comprises BRD2, BRD3, BRD4, and BRDT, which are encoded by paralogous genes that may have been generated by repeated duplication of an ancestral gene during evolution. Bromodomains that can specifically bind acetylated lysine residues in histones serve as chromatin-targeting modules that decipher the histone acetylation code. BET proteins play a crucial role in regulating gene transcription through epigenetic interactions between bromodomains and acetylated histones during cellular proliferation and differentiation processes. On the other hand, BET proteins have been reported to mediate latent viral infection in host cells and be involved in oncogenesis. Human BRD4 is involved in multiple processes of the DNA virus life cycle, including viral replication, genome maintenance, and gene transcription through interaction with viral proteins. Aberrant BRD4 expression contributes to carcinogenesis by mediating hyperacetylation of the chromatin containing the cell proliferation-promoting genes. BET bromodomain blockade using small-molecule inhibitors gives rise to selective repression of the transcriptional network driven by c-MYC These inhibitors are expected to be potential therapeutic drugs for a wide range of cancers. This review presents an overview of the basic roles of BET proteins and highlights the pathological functions of BET and the recent developments in cancer therapy targeting BET proteins in animal models.

  10. The Bromodomain and Extra-Terminal Domain (BET) Family: Functional Anatomy of BET Paralogous Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    The Bromodomain and Extra-Terminal Domain (BET) family of proteins is characterized by the presence of two tandem bromodomains and an extra-terminal domain. The mammalian BET family of proteins comprises BRD2, BRD3, BRD4, and BRDT, which are encoded by paralogous genes that may have been generated by repeated duplication of an ancestral gene during evolution. Bromodomains that can specifically bind acetylated lysine residues in histones serve as chromatin-targeting modules that decipher the histone acetylation code. BET proteins play a crucial role in regulating gene transcription through epigenetic interactions between bromodomains and acetylated histones during cellular proliferation and differentiation processes. On the other hand, BET proteins have been reported to mediate latent viral infection in host cells and be involved in oncogenesis. Human BRD4 is involved in multiple processes of the DNA virus life cycle, including viral replication, genome maintenance, and gene transcription through interaction with viral proteins. Aberrant BRD4 expression contributes to carcinogenesis by mediating hyperacetylation of the chromatin containing the cell proliferation-promoting genes. BET bromodomain blockade using small-molecule inhibitors gives rise to selective repression of the transcriptional network driven by c-MYC These inhibitors are expected to be potential therapeutic drugs for a wide range of cancers. This review presents an overview of the basic roles of BET proteins and highlights the pathological functions of BET and the recent developments in cancer therapy targeting BET proteins in animal models. PMID:27827996

  11. Expression pattern of two paralogs of the PI/GLO-like locus during Orchis italica (Orchidaceae, Orchidinae) flower development.

    PubMed

    Salemme, Marinella; Sica, Maria; Gaudio, Luciano; Aceto, Serena

    2011-10-01

    The class B MADS-box genes belong to two distinct functional groups: the AP3/DEF-like and the PI/GLO-like sub-families. In orchids, AP3/DEF-like genes are present in four copies, each with a different role in floral organ formation, which is described in the "orchid code" model. Interestingly, the orchid PI/GLO-like genes are present in two copies in Orchidinae, whereas they are described as single copy in the other orchid lineages. The two PI/GLO-like paralogs have site-specific different selective constraints; in addition, they show relaxation of purifying selection when compared to the single-copy lineages. In this study, we present a comparative analysis of the expression patterns of the two PI/GLO-like paralogs, OrcPI and OrcPI2, in floral tissues of Orchis italica in different developmental stages using real-time PCR. The two genes show similar expression profiles in the tissue examined, with differences detectable between immature and mature inflorescence. In all cases, OrcPI2 is expressed at a higher level than OrcPI. Real-time PCR results reveal that the co-expression of the two duplicated loci could have a fully or partially redundant function. The possible evolutionary fate of OrcPI and OrcPI2 is discussed as well as their involvement in ovary development.

  12. Paralog-selective Hsp90 inhibitors define tumor-specific regulation of Her2

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Pallav D.; Yan, Pengrong; Seidler, Paul M.; Patel, Hardik J.; Sun, Weilin; Yang, Chenghua; Que, Nanette S.; Taldone, Tony; Finotti, Paola; Stephani, Ralph A.; Gewirth, Daniel T.; Chiosis, Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    Although the Hsp90 chaperone family, comprised in humans of four paralogs, Hsp90α, Hsp90β, Grp94 and Trap-1, has important roles in malignancy, the contribution of each paralog to the cancer phenotype is poorly understood. This is in large part because reagents to study paralog-specific functions in cancer cells have been unavailable. Here we combine compound library screening with structural and computational analyses to identify purine-based chemical tools that are specific for Hsp90 paralogs. We show that Grp94 selectivity is due to the insertion of these compounds into a new allosteric pocket. We use these tools to demonstrate that cancer cells use individual Hsp90 paralogs to regulate a client protein in a tumor-specific manner and in response to proteome alterations. Finally, we provide new mechanistic evidence explaining why selective Grp94 inhibition is particularly efficacious in certain breast cancers. PMID:23995768

  13. The Ribosomal Protein Rpl22 Controls Ribosome Composition by Directly Repressing Expression of Its Own Paralog, Rpl22l1

    PubMed Central

    O'Leary, Monique N.; Schreiber, Katherine H.; Zhang, Yong; Duc, Anne-Cécile E.; Rao, Shuyun; Hale, J. Scott; Academia, Emmeline C.; Shah, Shreya R.; Morton, John F.; Holstein, Carly A.; Martin, Dan B.; Kaeberlein, Matt; Ladiges, Warren C.; Fink, Pamela J.; MacKay, Vivian L.; Wiest, David L.; Kennedy, Brian K.

    2013-01-01

    Most yeast ribosomal protein genes are duplicated and their characterization has led to hypotheses regarding the existence of specialized ribosomes with different subunit composition or specifically-tailored functions. In yeast, ribosomal protein genes are generally duplicated and evidence has emerged that paralogs might have specific roles. Unlike yeast, most mammalian ribosomal proteins are thought to be encoded by a single gene copy, raising the possibility that heterogenous populations of ribosomes are unique to yeast. Here, we examine the roles of the mammalian Rpl22, finding that Rpl22−/− mice have only subtle phenotypes with no significant translation defects. We find that in the Rpl22−/− mouse there is a compensatory increase in Rpl22-like1 (Rpl22l1) expression and incorporation into ribosomes. Consistent with the hypothesis that either ribosomal protein can support translation, knockdown of Rpl22l1 impairs growth of cells lacking Rpl22. Mechanistically, Rpl22 regulates Rpl22l1 directly by binding to an internal hairpin structure and repressing its expression. We propose that ribosome specificity may exist in mammals, providing evidence that one ribosomal protein can influence composition of the ribosome by regulating its own paralog. PMID:23990801

  14. Mutations in single FT- and TFL1-paralogs of rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) and their impact on flowering time and yield components

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yuan; Hans, Harloff; Christian, Jung; Molina, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) is grown in different geographical regions of the world. It is adapted to different environments by modification of flowering time and requirement for cold. A broad variation exists from very early-flowering spring-type to late-flowering winter cultivars which only flower after exposure to an extended cold period. B. napus is an allopolyploid species which resulted from the hybridization between B. rapa and B. oleracea. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the PEBP-domain genes FLOWERING LOCUS-T (FT) and TERMINAL FLOWER-1 (TFL1) are important integrators of different flowering pathways. Six FT and four TFL1 paralogs have been identified in B. napus. However, their role in flowering time control is unknown. We identified EMS mutants of the B. napus winter-type inbreed line Express 617. In total, 103 mutant alleles have been determined for BnC6FTb, BnC6FTa, and BnTFL1-2 paralogs. We chose three non-sense and 15 missense mutant lines (M3) which were grown in the greenhouse. Although only two out of 6 FT paralogs were mutated, 6 out of 8 BnC6FTb mutant lines flowered later as the control, whereas all five BnC6FTa mutant lines started flowering as the non-mutated parent. Mutations within the BnTFL1-2 paralog had no large effects on flowering time but on yield components. F1 hybrids between BnTFL1-2 mutants and non-mutated parents had increased seed number per pod and total seeds per plant suggesting that heterozygous mutations in a TFL1 paralog may impact heterosis in rapeseed. We demonstrate that single point-mutations in BnFT and BnTFL1 paralogs have effects on flowering time despite the redundancy of the rapeseed genome. Moreover, our results suggest pleiotropic effects of BnTFL1 paralogs beyond the regulation of flowering time. PMID:24987398

  15. Knockout of the abundant Trichomonas vaginalis hydrogenosomal membrane protein TvHMP23 increases hydrogenosome size but induces no compensatory up-regulation of paralogous copies.

    PubMed

    Brás, Xavier Pereira; Zimorski, Verena; Bolte, Kathrin; Maier, Uwe-G; Martin, William F; Gould, Sven B

    2013-05-02

    The Trichomonas vaginalis genome encodes up to 60000 genes, many of which stem from genome duplication events. Paralogous copies thus accompany most T. vaginalis genes, a phenomenon that limits genetic manipulation. We characterized one of the parasite's most abundant hydrogenosomal membrane proteins, TvHMP23, which is phylogenetically distinct from canonical metabolite carriers, and which localizes to the inner hydrogenosomal membrane as shown through sub-organellar fractionation and protease protection assays. Knockout of Tvhmp23 through insertion of the selectable neomycin marker led to a size increase of hydrogenosomes, the first knockout-induced phenotypes reported for Trichomonas, but no growth impairment. The transcriptional response of its four paralogous copies then analyzed revealed that they are not up-regulated, and hence do not compensate for the Tvhmp23 knockout. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Gene duplications in prokaryotes can be associated with environmental adaptation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Gene duplication is a normal evolutionary process. If there is no selective advantage in keeping the duplicated gene, it is usually reduced to a pseudogene and disappears from the genome. However, some paralogs are retained. These gene products are likely to be beneficial to the organism, e.g. in adaptation to new environmental conditions. The aim of our analysis is to investigate the properties of paralog-forming genes in prokaryotes, and to analyse the role of these retained paralogs by relating gene properties to life style of the corresponding prokaryotes. Results Paralogs were identified in a number of prokaryotes, and these paralogs were compared to singletons of persistent orthologs based on functional classification. This showed that the paralogs were associated with for example energy production, cell motility, ion transport, and defence mechanisms. A statistical overrepresentation analysis of gene and protein annotations was based on paralogs of the 200 prokaryotes with the highest fraction of paralog-forming genes. Biclustering of overrepresented gene ontology terms versus species was used to identify clusters of properties associated with clusters of species. The clusters were classified using similarity scores on properties and species to identify interesting clusters, and a subset of clusters were analysed by comparison to literature data. This analysis showed that paralogs often are associated with properties that are important for survival and proliferation of the specific organisms. This includes processes like ion transport, locomotion, chemotaxis and photosynthesis. However, the analysis also showed that the gene ontology terms sometimes were too general, imprecise or even misleading for automatic analysis. Conclusions Properties described by gene ontology terms identified in the overrepresentation analysis are often consistent with individual prokaryote lifestyles and are likely to give a competitive advantage to the organism

  17. Fitness Assays Reveal Incomplete Functional Redundancy of the HoxA1 and HoxB1 Paralogs of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ruff, James S.; Saffarini, Raed B.; Ramoz, Leda L.; Morrison, Linda C.; Baker, Shambralyn; Laverty, Sean M.; Tvrdik, Petr; Potts, Wayne K.

    2015-01-01

    Gene targeting techniques have led to the phenotypic characterization of numerous genes; however, many genes show minimal to no phenotypic consequences when disrupted, despite many having highly conserved sequences. The standard explanation for these findings is functional redundancy. A competing hypothesis is that these genes have important ecological functions in natural environments that are not needed under laboratory settings. Here we discriminate between these hypotheses by competing mice (Mus musculus) whose Hoxb1 gene has been replaced by Hoxa1, its highly conserved paralog, against matched wild-type controls in seminatural enclosures. This Hoxb1A1 swap was reported as a genetic manipulation resulting in no discernible embryonic or physiological phenotype under standard laboratory tests. We observed a transient decline in first litter size for Hoxb1A1 homozygous mice in breeding cages, but their fitness was consistently and more dramatically reduced when competing against controls within seminatural populations. Specifically, males homozygous for the Hoxb1A1 swap acquired 10.6% fewer territories and the frequency of the Hoxb1A1 allele decreased from 0.500 in population founders to 0.419 in their offspring. The decrease in Hoxb1A1 frequency corresponded with a deficiency of both Hoxb1A1 homozygous and heterozygous offspring. These data suggest that Hoxb1 and Hoxa1 are more phenotypically divergent than previously reported and support that sub- and/or neofunctionalization has occurred in these paralogous genes leading to a divergence of gene function and incomplete redundancy. Furthermore, this study highlights the importance of obtaining fitness measures of mutants in ecologically relevant conditions to better understand gene function and evolution. PMID:26447130

  18. Parallel reduction in expression, but no loss of functional constraint, in two opsin paralogs within cave populations of Gammarus minus (Crustacea: Amphipoda).

    PubMed

    Carlini, David B; Satish, Suma; Fong, Daniel W

    2013-04-23

    Gammarus minus, a freshwater amphipod living in the cave and surface streams in the eastern USA, is a premier candidate for studying the evolution of troglomorphic traits such as pigmentation loss, elongated appendages, and reduced eyes. In G. minus, multiple pairs of genetically related, physically proximate cave and surface populations exist which exhibit a high degree of intraspecific morphological divergence. The morphology, ecology, and genetic structure of these sister populations are well characterized, yet the genetic basis of their morphological divergence remains unknown. We used degenerate PCR primers designed to amplify opsin genes within the subphylum Crustacea and discovered two distinct opsin paralogs (average inter-paralog protein divergence ≈ 20%) in the genome of three independently derived pairs of G. minus cave and surface populations. Both opsin paralogs were found to be related to other crustacean middle wavelength sensitive opsins. Low levels of nucleotide sequence variation (< 1% within populations) were detected in both opsin genes, regardless of habitat, and dN/dS ratios did not indicate a relaxation of functional constraint in the cave populations with reduced or absent eyes. Maximum likelihood analyses using codon-based models also did not detect a relaxation of functional constraint in the cave lineages. We quantified expression level of both opsin genes and found that the expression of both paralogs was significantly reduced in all three cave populations relative to their sister surface populations. The concordantly lowered expression level of both opsin genes in cave populations of G. minus compared to sister surface populations, combined with evidence for persistent purifying selection in the cave populations, is consistent with an unspecified pleiotropic function of opsin proteins. Our results indicate that phototransduction proteins such as opsins may have retained their function in cave-adapted organisms because they may play a

  19. Parallel reduction in expression, but no loss of functional constraint, in two opsin paralogs within cave populations of Gammarus minus (Crustacea: Amphipoda)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gammarus minus, a freshwater amphipod living in the cave and surface streams in the eastern USA, is a premier candidate for studying the evolution of troglomorphic traits such as pigmentation loss, elongated appendages, and reduced eyes. In G. minus, multiple pairs of genetically related, physically proximate cave and surface populations exist which exhibit a high degree of intraspecific morphological divergence. The morphology, ecology, and genetic structure of these sister populations are well characterized, yet the genetic basis of their morphological divergence remains unknown. Results We used degenerate PCR primers designed to amplify opsin genes within the subphylum Crustacea and discovered two distinct opsin paralogs (average inter-paralog protein divergence ≈ 20%) in the genome of three independently derived pairs of G. minus cave and surface populations. Both opsin paralogs were found to be related to other crustacean middle wavelength sensitive opsins. Low levels of nucleotide sequence variation (< 1% within populations) were detected in both opsin genes, regardless of habitat, and dN/dS ratios did not indicate a relaxation of functional constraint in the cave populations with reduced or absent eyes. Maximum likelihood analyses using codon-based models also did not detect a relaxation of functional constraint in the cave lineages. We quantified expression level of both opsin genes and found that the expression of both paralogs was significantly reduced in all three cave populations relative to their sister surface populations. Conclusions The concordantly lowered expression level of both opsin genes in cave populations of G. minus compared to sister surface populations, combined with evidence for persistent purifying selection in the cave populations, is consistent with an unspecified pleiotropic function of opsin proteins. Our results indicate that phototransduction proteins such as opsins may have retained their function in cave

  20. Synthesis of methyl-substituted xanthotoxol to clarify prooxidant effect of methyl on radical-induced oxidation of DNA.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Chuan; Song, Zhi-Guang; Liu, Zai-Qun

    2010-06-01

    4-methyl-8-hydroxylpsoralen (MXan) and 4,9-dimethyl-8-hydroxylpsoralen (DMXan) were synthesized in order to clarify the effect of methyl on the antioxidant effectiveness of xanthotoxol (8-hydroxylpsoralen, Xan), which were assessed by bleaching beta-carotene in linoleic acid-Triton emulsion, by interacting with 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) cationic radical (ABTS+), 2,2'-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH), and galvinoxyl radical, and by protecting DNA against the oxidation induced by Cu2+/glutathione (GSH) and 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane hydrochloride) (AAPH). Methyl attaching to xanthotoxol did not affect its ability to protect linoleic acid against autoxidation and to inhibit Cu2+/GSH-induced oxidation DNA, but decreased its ability to scavenge ABTS+ and DPPH, and to protect DNA against AAPH-induced oxidation. Therefore, methyl attenuated the antioxidant effectiveness of xanthotoxol in radical-induced oxidation of DNA. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. OH-radical induced degradation of hydroxybenzoic- and hydroxycinnamic acids and formation of aromatic products—A gamma radiolysis study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimmel, Birgit; Swoboda, Friederike; Solar, Sonja; Reznicek, Gottfried

    2010-12-01

    The OH-radical induced degradation of hydroxybenzoic acids (HBA), hydroxycinnamic acids (HCiA) and methoxylated derivatives, as well as of chlorogenic acid and rosmarinic acid was studied by gamma radiolysis in aerated aqueous solutions. Primary aromatic products resulting from an OH-radical attachment to the ring (hydroxylation), to the position occupied by the methoxyl group (replacement -OCH 3 by -OH) as well as to the propenoic acid side chain of the cinnamic acids (benzaldehyde formations) were analysed by HPLC-UV and LC-ESI-MS. A comparison of the extent of these processes is given for 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, isovanillic acid, syringic acid, cinnamic acid, 4-hydroxycinnamic acid, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, isoferulic acid, chlorogenic acid, and rosmarinic acid. For all cinnamic acids and derivatives benzaldehydes were significant oxidation products. With the release of caffeic acid from chlorogenic acid the cleavage of a phenolic glycoside could be demonstrated. Reaction mechanisms are discussed.

  2. csrR, a Paralog and Direct Target of CsrA, Promotes Legionella pneumophila Resilience in Water.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Zachary D; Yakhnin, Helen; Babitzke, Paul; Swanson, Michele S

    2015-06-09

    Critical to microbial versatility is the capacity to express the cohort of genes that increase fitness in different environments. Legionella pneumophila occupies extensive ecological space that includes diverse protists, pond water, engineered water systems, and mammalian lung macrophages. One mechanism that equips this opportunistic pathogen to adapt to fluctuating conditions is a switch between replicative and transmissive cell types that is controlled by the broadly conserved regulatory protein CsrA. A striking feature of the legionellae surveyed is that each of 14 strains encodes 4 to 7 csrA-like genes, candidate regulators of distinct fitness traits. Here we focus on the one csrA paralog (lpg1593) that, like the canonical csrA, is conserved in all 14 strains surveyed. Phenotypic analysis revealed that long-term survival in tap water is promoted by the lpg1593 locus, which we name csrR (for "CsrA-similar protein for resilience"). As predicted by its GGA motif, csrR mRNA was bound directly by the canonical CsrA protein, as judged by electromobility shift and RNA-footprinting assays. Furthermore, CsrA repressed translation of csrR mRNA in vivo, as determined by analysis of csrR-gfp reporters, csrR mRNA stability in the presence and absence of csrA expression, and mutation of the CsrA binding site identified on the csrR mRNA. Thus, CsrA not only governs the transition from replication to transmission but also represses translation of its paralog csrR when nutrients are available. We propose that, during prolonged starvation, relief of CsrA repression permits CsrR protein to coordinate L. pneumophila's switch to a cell type that is resilient in water supplies. Persistence of L. pneumophila in water systems is a public health risk, and yet there is little understanding of the genetic determinants that equip this opportunistic pathogen to adapt to and survive in natural or engineered water systems. A potent regulator of this pathogen's intracellular life cycle is Csr

  3. Light-dependent chlorophyll f synthase is a highly divergent paralog of PsbA of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ming-Yang; Shen, Gaozhong; Canniffe, Daniel P; Zhao, Chi; Bryant, Donald A

    2016-08-26

    Chlorophyll f (Chl f) permits some cyanobacteria to expand the spectral range for photosynthesis by absorbing far-red light. We used reverse genetics and heterologous expression to identify the enzyme for Chl f synthesis. Null mutants of "super-rogue" psbA4 genes, divergent paralogs of psbA genes encoding the D1 core subunit of photosystem II, abolished Chl f synthesis in two cyanobacteria that grow in far-red light. Heterologous expression of the psbA4 gene, which we rename chlF, enables Chl f biosynthesis in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Because the reaction requires light, Chl f synthase is probably a photo-oxidoreductase that employs catalytically useful Chl a molecules, tyrosine YZ, and plastoquinone (as does photosystem II) but lacks a Mn4Ca1O5 cluster. Introduction of Chl f biosynthesis into crop plants could expand their ability to use solar energy.

  4. Targeted Identification of SUMOylation Sites in Human Proteins Using Affinity Enrichment and Paralog-specific Reporter Ions*

    PubMed Central

    Lamoliatte, Frederic; Bonneil, Eric; Durette, Chantal; Caron-Lizotte, Olivier; Wildemann, Dirk; Zerweck, Johannes; Wenshuk, Holger; Thibault, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Protein modification by small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) modulates the activities of numerous proteins involved in different cellular functions such as gene transcription, cell cycle, and DNA repair. Comprehensive identification of SUMOylated sites is a prerequisite to determine how SUMOylation regulates protein function. However, mapping SUMOylated Lys residues by mass spectrometry (MS) is challenging because of the dynamic nature of this modification, the existence of three functionally distinct human SUMO paralogs, and the large SUMO chain remnant that remains attached to tryptic peptides. To overcome these problems, we created HEK293 cell lines that stably express functional SUMO paralogs with an N-terminal His6-tag and an Arg residue near the C terminus that leave a short five amino acid SUMO remnant upon tryptic digestion. We determined the fragmentation patterns of our short SUMO remnant peptides by collisional activation and electron transfer dissociation using synthetic peptide libraries. Activation using higher energy collisional dissociation on the LTQ-Orbitrap Elite identified SUMO paralog-specific fragment ions and neutral losses of the SUMO remnant with high mass accuracy (< 5 ppm). We exploited these features to detect SUMO modified tryptic peptides in complex cell extracts by correlating mass measurements of precursor and fragment ions using a data independent acquisition method. We also generated bioinformatics tools to retrieve MS/MS spectra containing characteristic fragment ions to the identification of SUMOylated peptide by conventional Mascot database searches. In HEK293 cell extracts, this MS approach uncovered low abundance SUMOylated peptides and 37 SUMO3-modified Lys residues in target proteins, most of which were previously unknown. Interestingly, we identified mixed SUMO-ubiquitin chains with ubiquitylated SUMO proteins (K20 and K32) and SUMOylated ubiquitin (K63), suggesting a complex crosstalk between these two modifications. PMID

  5. The discovery of Foxl2 paralogs in chondrichthyan, coelacanth and tetrapod genomes reveals an ancient duplication in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Geraldo, M T; Valente, G T; Braz, A S K; Martins, C

    2013-07-01

    The Foxl2 (forkhead box L2) gene is an important member of the forkhead domain family, primarily responsible for the development of ovaries during female sex differentiation. The evolutionary studies conducted previously considered the presence of paralog Foxl2 copies only in teleosts. However, to search for possible paralog copies in other groups of vertebrates and ensure that all predicted copies were homolog to the Foxl2 gene, a broad evolutionary analysis was performed, based on the forkhead domain family. A total of 2464 sequences for the forkhead domain were recovered, and subsequently, 64 representative sequences for Foxl2 were used in the evolutionary analysis of this gene. The most important contribution of this study was the discovery of a new subgroup of Foxl2 copies (ortholog to Foxl2B) present in the chondrichthyan Callorhinchus milii, in the coelacanth Latimeria chalumnae, in the avian Taeniopygia guttata and in the marsupial Monodelphis domestica. This new scenario indicates a gene duplication event in an ancestor of gnathostomes. Furthermore, based on the analysis of the syntenic regions of both Foxl2 copies, the duplication event was not exclusive to Foxl2. Moreover, the duplicated copy distribution was shown to be complex across vertebrates, especially in tetrapods, and the results strongly support a loss of this copy in eutherian species. Finally, the scenario observed in this study suggests an update for Foxl2 gene nomenclature, extending the actual suggested teleost naming of Foxl2A and Foxl2B to all vertebrate sequences and contributing to the establishment of a new evolutionary context for the Foxl2 gene.

  6. The discovery of Foxl2 paralogs in chondrichthyan, coelacanth and tetrapod genomes reveals an ancient duplication in vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Geraldo, M T; Valente, G T; Braz, A SK; Martins, C

    2013-01-01

    The Foxl2 (forkhead box L2) gene is an important member of the forkhead domain family, primarily responsible for the development of ovaries during female sex differentiation. The evolutionary studies conducted previously considered the presence of paralog Foxl2 copies only in teleosts. However, to search for possible paralog copies in other groups of vertebrates and ensure that all predicted copies were homolog to the Foxl2 gene, a broad evolutionary analysis was performed, based on the forkhead domain family. A total of 2464 sequences for the forkhead domain were recovered, and subsequently, 64 representative sequences for Foxl2 were used in the evolutionary analysis of this gene. The most important contribution of this study was the discovery of a new subgroup of Foxl2 copies (ortholog to Foxl2B) present in the chondrichthyan Callorhinchus milii, in the coelacanth Latimeria chalumnae, in the avian Taeniopygia guttata and in the marsupial Monodelphis domestica. This new scenario indicates a gene duplication event in an ancestor of gnathostomes. Furthermore, based on the analysis of the syntenic regions of both Foxl2 copies, the duplication event was not exclusive to Foxl2. Moreover, the duplicated copy distribution was shown to be complex across vertebrates, especially in tetrapods, and the results strongly support a loss of this copy in eutherian species. Finally, the scenario observed in this study suggests an update for Foxl2 gene nomenclature, extending the actual suggested teleost naming of Foxl2A and Foxl2B to all vertebrate sequences and contributing to the establishment of a new evolutionary context for the Foxl2 gene. PMID:23549337

  7. Novel insights into RNAi off-target effects using C. elegans paralogs

    PubMed Central

    Rual, Jean-François; Klitgord, Niels; Achaz, Guillaume

    2007-01-01

    Background In the few years since its discovery, RNAi has turned into a very powerful tool for the study of gene function by allowing post-transcriptional gene silencing. The RNAi mechanism, which is based on the introduction of a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) trigger whose sequence is similar to that of the targeted messenger RNA (mRNA), is subject to off-target cross-reaction. Results We use a novel strategy based on phenotypic analysis of paralogs and predict that, in Caenorhabditis elegans, off-target effects occur when an mRNA sequence shares more than 95% identity over 40 nucleotides with the dsRNA. Interestingly, our results suggest that the minimum length necessary of a high-similarity stretch between a dsRNA and its target in order to observe an efficient RNAi effect varies from 30 to 50 nucleotides rather than 22 nucleotides, which is the length of siRNAs in C. elegans. Conclusion Our predictive methods would improve the design of dsRNA and ultimately the use of RNAi as a therapeutic tool upon experimental verification. PMID:17445269

  8. Protein Signatures That Promote Operator Selectivity among Paralog MerR Monovalent Metal Ion Regulators*

    PubMed Central

    Humbert, María V.; Rasia, Rodolfo M.; Checa, Susana K.; Soncini, Fernando C.

    2013-01-01

    Two paralog transcriptional regulators of the MerR family, CueR and GolS, are responsible for monovalent metal ion sensing and resistance in Salmonella enterica. Although similar in sequence and also in their target binding sites, these proteins differ in signal detection and in the set of target genes they control. Recently, we demonstrated that selective promoter recognition depends on the presence of specific bases located at positions 3′ and 3 within the operators they interact with. Here, we identify the amino acid residues within the N-terminal DNA-binding domain of these sensor proteins that are directly involved in operator discrimination. We demonstrate that a methionine residue at position 16 of GolS, absolutely conserved among GolS-like proteins but absent in all CueR-like xenologs, is the key to selectively recognize operators that harbor the distinctive GolS-operator signature, whereas the residue at position 19 finely tunes the regulator/operator interaction. Furthermore, swapping these residues switches the set of genes recognized by these transcription factors. These results indicate that co-evolution of a regulator and its cognate operators within the bacterial cell provides the conditions to avoid cross-recognition and guarantees the proper response to metal injury. PMID:23733186

  9. Molecular characterization of BrMYB28 and BrMYB29 paralogous transcription factors involved in the regulation of aliphatic glucosinolate profiles in Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis.

    PubMed

    Baskar, Venkidasamy; Park, Se Won

    2015-07-01

    Glucosinolates (GSL) are one of the major secondary metabolites of the Brassicaceae family. In the present study, we aim at characterizing the multiple paralogs of aliphatic GSL regulators, such as BrMYB28 and BrMYB29 genes in Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis, by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis in different tissues and at various developmental stages. An overlapping gene expression pattern between the BrMYBs as well as their downstream genes (DSGs) was found at different developmental stages. Among the BrMYB28 and BrMYB29 paralogous genes, the BrMYB28.3 and BrMYB29.1 genes were dominantly expressed in most of the developmental stages, compared to the other paralogs of the BrMYB genes. Furthermore, the differential expression pattern of the BrMYBs was observed under various stress treatments. Interestingly, BrMYB28.2 showed the least expression in most developmental stages, while its expression was remarkably high in different stress conditions. More specifically, the BrMYB28.2, BrMYB28.3, and BrMYB29.1 genes were highly responsive to various abiotic and biotic stresses, further indicating their possible role in stress tolerance. Moreover, the in silico cis motif analysis in the upstream regulatory regions of BrMYBs showed the presence of various putative stress-specific motifs, which further indicated their responsiveness to biotic and abiotic stresses. These observations suggest that the dominantly expressed BrMYBs, both in different developmental stages and under various stress treatments (BrMYB28.3 and BrMYB29.1), may be potential candidate genes for altering the GSL level through genetic modification studies in B. rapa ssp. pekinensis.

  10. Splign: algorithms for computing spliced alignments with identification of paralogs

    PubMed Central

    Kapustin, Yuri; Souvorov, Alexander; Tatusova, Tatiana; Lipman, David

    2008-01-01

    Background The computation of accurate alignments of cDNA sequences against a genome is at the foundation of modern genome annotation pipelines. Several factors such as presence of paralogs, small exons, non-consensus splice signals, sequencing errors and polymorphic sites pose recognized difficulties to existing spliced alignment algorithms. Results We describe a set of algorithms behind a tool called Splign for computing cDNA-to-Genome alignments. The algorithms include a high-performance preliminary alignment, a compartment identification based on a formally defined model of adjacent duplicated regions, and a refined sequence alignment. In a series of tests, Splign has produced more accurate results than other tools commonly used to compute spliced alignments, in a reasonable amount of time. Conclusion Splign's ability to deal with various issues complicating the spliced alignment problem makes it a helpful tool in eukaryotic genome annotation processes and alternative splicing studies. Its performance is enough to align the largest currently available pools of cDNA data such as the human EST set on a moderate-sized computing cluster in a matter of hours. The duplications identification (compartmentization) algorithm can be used independently in other areas such as the study of pseudogenes. Reviewers This article was reviewed by: Steven Salzberg, Arcady Mushegian and Andrey Mironov (nominated by Mikhail Gelfand). PMID:18495041

  11. Mammalian RAD51 paralogs protect nascent DNA at stalled forks and mediate replication restart

    PubMed Central

    Somyajit, Kumar; Saxena, Sneha; Babu, Sharath; Mishra, Anup; Nagaraju, Ganesh

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian RAD51 paralogs are implicated in the repair of collapsed replication forks by homologous recombination. However, their physiological roles in replication fork maintenance prior to fork collapse remain obscure. Here, we report on the role of RAD51 paralogs in short-term replicative stress devoid of DSBs. We show that RAD51 paralogs localize to nascent DNA and common fragile sites upon replication fork stalling. Strikingly, RAD51 paralogs deficient cells exhibit elevated levels of 53BP1 nuclear bodies and increased DSB formation, the latter being attributed to extensive degradation of nascent DNA at stalled forks. RAD51C and XRCC3 promote the restart of stalled replication in an ATP hydrolysis dependent manner by disengaging RAD51 and other RAD51 paralogs from the halted forks. Notably, we find that Fanconi anemia (FA)-like disorder and breast and ovarian cancer patient derived mutations of RAD51C fails to protect replication fork, exhibit under-replicated genomic regions and elevated micro-nucleation. Taken together, RAD51 paralogs prevent degradation of stalled forks and promote the restart of halted replication to avoid replication fork collapse, thereby maintaining genomic integrity and suppressing tumorigenesis. PMID:26354865

  12. One of two major paralogs of AVR-Pita1 is functional in Japanese rice blast isolates.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Mami; Ashizawa, Taketo; Hirayae, Kazuyuki; Moriwaki, Jouji; Sone, Teruo; Sonoda, Ryoichi; Noguchi, Masako Tsujimoto; Nagashima, Susumu; Ishikawa, Kouji; Arai, Michiyoshi

    2010-06-01

    We analyzed the avirulence gene AVR-Pita1 in Japanese rice blast isolates to determine how they gain virulence toward rice cultivars containing the Pita resistance gene. An avirulent isolate, OS99-G-7a (G7a), from a Japanese commercial field contained two paralogs of AVR-Pita1, designated as AVR-Pita1(JA) and AVR-Pita1(JB). Analysis of virulent, independent mutants derived from G7a, a single avirulent progenitor strain, indicated that AVR-Pita1(JA) was functional but AVR-Pita1(JB) was nonfunctional. The most frequent mutation was loss of AVR-Pita1(JA). Analyses of field isolates collected from diverse areas in Japan revealed that most of the AVR-Pita1 genes carried by Japanese isolates were identical to AVR-Pita1(JA) or AVR-Pita1(JB). The relationship between these major paralogs in Japanese isolates and the virulence of the strains carrying them indicate that AVR-Pita1(JA) is functional but AVR-Pita1(JB) is not, as is the case in G7a. Isolates that show virulence toward rice cultivars containing the Pita gene are presumed to have evolved virulence from avirulent origins via loss of AVR-Pita1(JA), except for one case in which virulence resulted from a base substitution. In this study, we discuss the properties and specificities of Japanese rice blasts that relate to virulence against Pita-containing rice. Furthermore, we present a method to amplify AVR-Pita1(JA) and AVR-Pita1(JB) separately and, specifically, to monitor functional AVR-Pita1 in Japan.

  13. Structure–function relationships of two paralogous single-stranded DNA-binding proteins from Streptomyces coelicolor: implication of SsbB in chromosome segregation during sporulation

    PubMed Central

    Paradzik, Tina; Ivic, Nives; Filic, Zelimira; Manjasetty, Babu A.; Herron, Paul; Luic, Marija; Vujaklija, Dusica

    2013-01-01

    The linear chromosome of Streptomyces coelicolor contains two paralogous ssb genes, ssbA and ssbB. Following mutational analysis, we concluded that ssbA is essential, whereas ssbB plays a key role in chromosome segregation during sporulation. In the ssbB mutant, ∼30% of spores lacked DNA. The two ssb genes were expressed differently; in minimal medium, gene expression was prolonged for both genes and significantly upregulated for ssbB. The ssbA gene is transcribed as part of a polycistronic mRNA from two initiation sites, 163 bp and 75 bp upstream of the rpsF translational start codon. The ssbB gene is transcribed as a monocistronic mRNA, from an unusual promoter region, 73 bp upstream of the AUG codon. Distinctive DNA-binding affinities of single-stranded DNA-binding proteins monitored by tryptophan fluorescent quenching and electrophoretic mobility shift were observed. The crystal structure of SsbB at 1.7 Å resolution revealed a common OB-fold, lack of the clamp-like structure conserved in SsbA and previously unpublished S-S bridges between the A/B and C/D subunits. This is the first report of the determination of paralogous single-stranded DNA-binding protein structures from the same organism. Phylogenetic analysis revealed frequent duplication of ssb genes in Actinobacteria, whereas their strong retention suggests that they are involved in important cellular functions. PMID:23393191

  14. Protective effects of Korean mistletoe lectin on radical-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Kim, Boh Kyung; Choi, Mi Jin; Park, Kun Young; Cho, Eun Ju

    2010-01-01

    The radical scavenging effects and protective activities against oxidative stress of Korean mistletoe (Viscum album coloratum) lectin were investigated in vitro and with a cellular system using LLC-PK(1) renal epithelial cells. The Korean mistletoe lectin (KML) showed 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity with an IC(50) value of 42.6 microg/ml. It also exerted nitric oxide (NO), superoxide anion (O(2)(-)), and hydroxyl radical scavenging activities in concentration-dependent manners. These results suggest that KML is a promising antioxidant by scavenging free radicals. Furthermore, under the LLC-PK(1) cellular model, the cells showed declines in viability and increases in lipid peroxidation through oxidative stress induced by sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and pyrogallol, generators of NO and O(2)(-), respectively. However, KML significantly and dose-dependently inhibited cell cytotoxicity and lipid peroxidation. In addition, 3-morpholinosydnonimnie (SIN-1), a generator of peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) formed by simultaneously releases of NO and O(2)(-), caused cytotoxicity, lipid peroxidation, and NO overproduction in the LLC-PK(1) cells while KML ameliorated ONOO(-)-induced oxidative damage. Furthermore, overexpressions of cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible NO synthase induced by SIN-1 were observed, but KML down-regulated the expression levels of both genes. KML also reduced SIN-1-induced nuclear factor kappa B expression and the phosphorylation of inhibitor kappa B alpha in LLC-PK(1) cells. These results indicate that KML has protective activities against oxidative damage induced by free radicals.

  15. Human GW182 Paralogs Are the Central Organizers for RNA-Mediated Control of Transcription.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Jessica A; Li, Liande; Matsui, Masayuki; Chu, Yongjun; Volkov, Oleg; Johnson, Krystal C; Corey, David R

    2017-08-15

    In the cytoplasm, small RNAs can control mammalian translation by regulating the stability of mRNA. In the nucleus, small RNAs can also control transcription and splicing. The mechanisms for RNA-mediated nuclear regulation are not understood and remain controversial, hindering the effective application of nuclear RNAi and investigation of its natural regulatory roles. Here, we reveal that the human GW182 paralogs TNRC6A/B/C are central organizing factors critical to RNA-mediated transcriptional activation. Mass spectrometry of purified nuclear lysates followed by experimental validation demonstrates that TNRC6A interacts with proteins involved in protein degradation, RNAi, the CCR4-NOT complex, the mediator complex, and histone-modifying complexes. Functional analysis implicates TNRC6A, NAT10, MED14, and WDR5 in RNA-mediated transcriptional activation. These findings describe protein complexes capable of bridging RNA-mediated sequence-specific recognition of noncoding RNA transcripts with the regulation of gene transcription. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The unusual S locus of Leavenworthia is composed of two sets of paralogous loci.

    PubMed

    Chantha, Sier-Ching; Herman, Adam C; Castric, Vincent; Vekemans, Xavier; Marande, William; Schoen, Daniel J

    2017-09-14

    The Leavenworthia self-incompatibility locus (S locus) consists of paralogs (Lal2, SCRL) of the canonical Brassicaceae S locus genes (SRK, SCR), and is situated in a genomic position that differs from the ancestral one in the Brassicaceae. Unexpectedly, in a small number of Leavenworthia alabamica plants examined, sequences closely resembling exon 1 of SRK have been found, but the function of these has remained unclear. BAC cloning and expression analyses were employed to characterize these SRK-like sequences. An SRK-positive Bacterial Artificial Chromosome clone was found to contain complete SRK and SCR sequences located close by one another in the derived genomic position of the Leavenworthia S locus, and in place of the more typical Lal2 and SCRL sequences. These sequences are expressed in stigmas and anthers, respectively, and crossing data show that the SRK/SCR haplotype is functional in self-incompatibility. Population surveys indicate that < 5% of Leavenworthia S loci possess such alleles. An ancestral translocation or recombination event involving SRK/SCR and Lal2/SCRL likely occurred, together with neofunctionalization of Lal2/SCRL, and both haplotype groups now function as Leavenworthia S locus alleles. These findings suggest that S locus alleles can have distinctly different evolutionary origins. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  17. Diversification of Transcriptional Regulation Determines Subfunctionalization of Paralogous Branched Chain Aminotransferases in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    González, James; López, Geovani; Argueta, Stefany; Escalera-Fanjul, Ximena; El Hafidi, Mohamed; Campero-Basaldua, Carlos; Strauss, Joseph; Riego-Ruiz, Lina; González, Alicia

    2017-09-14

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae harbors BAT1 and BAT2 paralogous genes encoding branched chain aminotransferases (BCATs), showing opposed expression profiles and physiological role. Accordingly, in primary nitrogen sources such as glutamine, BAT1 expression is induced, supporting Bat1-dependent valine-isoleucine-leucine (VIL) biosynthesis, while BAT2 expression is repressed. Conversely, in the presence of VIL as sole nitrogen source, BAT1 expression is hindered while that of BAT2 is activated resulting in Bat2-dependent VIL catabolism. Presented results confirm that BAT1 expression is determined by transcriptional activation through the action of the Leu3-α-IPM active isoform, and uncovers the existence of a novel α-IPM biosynthetic pathway operating in a put3Δ mutant grown on VIL, through Bat2-Leu2-Leu1 consecutive action. The classic α-IPM biosynthetic route operates in glutamine through the action of the leucine sensitive α-isopropylmalate synthases (α-IPMS). Presented results also show that BAT2 repression in glutamine can be alleviated in an ure2Δ mutant or through Gcn4-dependent transcriptional activation. Thus, when S. cerevisiae is grown on glutamine, VIL biosynthesis is predominant and is preferentially achieved through BAT1, while on VIL as sole nitrogen source, catabolism prevails and is mainly afforded by BAT2. Copyright © 2017, Genetics.

  18. Paralog Re-Emergence: A Novel, Historically Contingent Mechanism in the Evolution of Antimicrobial Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Nichola J.; Cools, Hans J.; Sierotzki, Helge; Shaw, Michael W.; Knogge, Wolfgang; Kelly, Steven L.; Kelly, Diane E.; Fraaije, Bart A.

    2014-01-01

    Evolution of resistance to drugs and pesticides poses a serious threat to human health and agricultural production. CYP51 encodes the target site of azole fungicides, widely used clinically and in agriculture. Azole resistance can evolve due to point mutations or overexpression of CYP51, and previous studies have shown that fungicide-resistant alleles have arisen by de novo mutation. Paralogs CYP51A and CYP51B are found in filamentous ascomycetes, but CYP51A has been lost from multiple lineages. Here, we show that in the barley pathogen Rhynchosporium commune, re-emergence of CYP51A constitutes a novel mechanism for the evolution of resistance to azoles. Pyrosequencing analysis of historical barley leaf samples from a unique long-term experiment from 1892 to 2008 indicates that the majority of the R. commune population lacked CYP51A until 1985, after which the frequency of CYP51A rapidly increased. Functional analysis demonstrates that CYP51A retains the same substrate as CYP51B, but with different transcriptional regulation. Phylogenetic analyses show that the origin of CYP51A far predates azole use, and newly sequenced Rhynchosporium genomes show CYP51A persisting in the R. commune lineage rather than being regained by horizontal gene transfer; therefore, CYP51A re-emergence provides an example of adaptation to novel compounds by selection from standing genetic variation. PMID:24732957

  19. Functional Divergence of Poplar Histidine-Aspartate Kinase HK1 Paralogs in Response to Osmotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Héricourt, François; Chefdor, Françoise; Djeghdir, Inès; Larcher, Mélanie; Lafontaine, Florent; Courdavault, Vincent; Auguin, Daniel; Coste, Franck; Depierreux, Christiane; Tanigawa, Mirai; Maeda, Tatsuya; Glévarec, Gaëlle; Carpin, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Previous works have shown the existence of protein partnerships belonging to a MultiStep Phosphorelay (MSP) in Populus putatively involved in osmosensing. This study is focused on the identification of a histidine-aspartate kinase, HK1b, paralog of HK1a. The characterization of HK1b showed its ability to homo- and hetero-dimerize and to interact with a few Histidine-containing Phosphotransfer (HPt) proteins, suggesting a preferential partnership in poplar MSP linked to drought perception. Furthermore, determinants for interaction specificity between HK1a/1b and HPts were studied by mutagenesis analysis, identifying amino acids involved in this specificity. The HK1b expression analysis in different poplar organs revealed its co-expression with three HPts, reinforcing the hypothesis of partnership participation in the MSP in planta. Moreover, HK1b was shown to act as an osmosensor with kinase activity in a functional complementation assay of an osmosensor deficient yeast strain. These results revealed that HK1b showed a different behaviour for canonical phosphorylation of histidine and aspartate residues. These phosphorylation modularities of canonical amino acids could explain the improved osmosensor performances observed in yeast. As conserved duplicates reflect the selective pressures imposed by the environmental requirements on the species, our results emphasize the importance of HK1 gene duplication in poplar adaptation to drought stress. PMID:27941652

  20. Functional Divergence of Poplar Histidine-Aspartate Kinase HK1 Paralogs in Response to Osmotic Stress.

    PubMed

    Héricourt, François; Chefdor, Françoise; Djeghdir, Inès; Larcher, Mélanie; Lafontaine, Florent; Courdavault, Vincent; Auguin, Daniel; Coste, Franck; Depierreux, Christiane; Tanigawa, Mirai; Maeda, Tatsuya; Glévarec, Gaëlle; Carpin, Sabine

    2016-12-08

    Previous works have shown the existence of protein partnerships belonging to a MultiStep Phosphorelay (MSP) in Populus putatively involved in osmosensing. This study is focused on the identification of a histidine-aspartate kinase, HK1b, paralog of HK1a. The characterization of HK1b showed its ability to homo- and hetero-dimerize and to interact with a few Histidine-containing Phosphotransfer (HPt) proteins, suggesting a preferential partnership in poplar MSP linked to drought perception. Furthermore, determinants for interaction specificity between HK1a/1b and HPts were studied by mutagenesis analysis, identifying amino acids involved in this specificity. The HK1b expression analysis in different poplar organs revealed its co-expression with three HPts, reinforcing the hypothesis of partnership participation in the MSP in planta. Moreover, HK1b was shown to act as an osmosensor with kinase activity in a functional complementation assay of an osmosensor deficient yeast strain. These results revealed that HK1b showed a different behaviour for canonical phosphorylation of histidine and aspartate residues. These phosphorylation modularities of canonical amino acids could explain the improved osmosensor performances observed in yeast. As conserved duplicates reflect the selective pressures imposed by the environmental requirements on the species, our results emphasize the importance of HK1 gene duplication in poplar adaptation to drought stress.

  1. Phylogenetic Analysis of Kindlins Suggests Subfunctionalization of an Ancestral Unduplicated Kindlin into Three Paralogs in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Ammad Aslam; Janke, Axel; Shimokawa, Takashi; Zhang, Hongquan

    2011-01-01

    Kindlin proteins represent a newly discovered family of evolutionarily conserved FERM domain-containing proteins. This family includes three highly conserved proteins: Kindlin-1, Kindlin-2 and Kindlin-3. All three Kindlin proteins are associated with focal adhesions and are involved in integrin activation. The FERM domain of each Kindlin is bipartite and plays a key role in integrin activation. We herein explore for the first time the evolutionary history of these proteins. The phylogeny of the Kindlins suggests a single ancestral Kindlin protein present in even the earliest metazoan ie, hydra. This protein then underwent duplication events in insects and also experienced genome duplication in vertebrates, leading to the Kindlin family. A comparative study of the Kindlin paralogs showed that Kindlin-2 is the slowest evolving protein among the three family members. The analysis of synonymous and non-synonymous substitutions in orthologous Kindlin sequences in different species showed that all three Kindlins have been evolving under the influence of purifying selection. The expression pattern of Kindlins along with phylogenetic studies supports the subfunctionalization model of gene duplication. PMID:21487533

  2. Phylogenetic analysis of kindlins suggests subfunctionalization of an ancestral unduplicated kindlin into three paralogs in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ammad Aslam; Janke, Axel; Shimokawa, Takashi; Zhang, Hongquan

    2011-03-22

    Kindlin proteins represent a newly discovered family of evolutionarily conserved FERM domain-containing proteins. This family includes three highly conserved proteins: Kindlin-1, Kindlin-2 and Kindlin-3. All three Kindlin proteins are associated with focal adhesions and are involved in integrin activation. The FERM domain of each Kindlin is bipartite and plays a key role in integrin activation. We herein explore for the first time the evolutionary history of these proteins. The phylogeny of the Kindlins suggests a single ancestral Kindlin protein present in even the earliest metazoan ie, hydra. This protein then underwent duplication events in insects and also experienced genome duplication in vertebrates, leading to the Kindlin family. A comparative study of the Kindlin paralogs showed that Kindlin-2 is the slowest evolving protein among the three family members. The analysis of synonymous and non-synonymous substitutions in orthologous Kindlin sequences in different species showed that all three Kindlins have been evolving under the influence of purifying selection. The expression pattern of Kindlins along with phylogenetic studies supports the subfunctionalization model of gene duplication.

  3. Nine phenylethanoid glycosides from Magnolia officinalis var. biloba fruits and their protective effects against free radical-induced oxidative damage

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Lanlan; Zhang, Wenhui; Zhou, Gao; Ma, Bingxin; Mo, Qigui; Chen, Yuxin; Wang, Youwei

    2017-01-01

    To systematically study the chemical constituents in Magnolia officinalis var. biloba fruits, nine phenylethanoid glycosides were isolated by solvent extraction, silica gel, and preparative high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Their structures were elucidated by 1D and 2D NMR analyses, including COSY, HMQC and HMBC correlations, and HPLC analysis of sugar residue. Nine phenylethanoid glycosides, namely, magnoloside Ia (1), magnoloside Ic (2), crassifolioside (3), magnoloside Ib (4), magnoloside IIIa (5), magnoloside IVa (6), magnoloside IIa (7), magnoloside IIb (8) and magnoloside Va (9), were first isolated from the n-butanol fraction of Magnolia officinalis var. biloba fruits alcohol extract. Free radical scavenging activities of the nine phenylethanoid glycosides were assessed using the DPPH, ABTS, and superoxide anion radical scavenging assays. Simultaneously, protective effects of all compounds against free radical-induced oxidative damage were evaluated by two different kinds of mitochondrial damage model. The protective effects were assessed by mitochondrial swelling, the formations of malondialdehyde (MDA) and lipid hydroperoxide (LOOH), the activities of catalase (CAT), glutathione reductase (GR) and superoxide dismutase (SOD). All phenylethanoid glycosides showed significant protective effects. PMID:28349971

  4. Protection of Clitoria ternatea flower petal extract against free radical-induced hemolysis and oxidative damage in canine erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Phrueksanan, Wathuwan; Yibchok-anun, Sirinthorn; Adisakwattana, Sirichai

    2014-10-01

    The present study assessed the antioxidant activity and protective ability of Clitoria ternatea flower petal extract (CTE) against in vitro 2,2'-azobis-2-methyl-propanimidamide dihydrochloride (AAPH)-induced hemolysis and oxidative damage of canine erythrocytes. From the phytochemical analysis, CTE contained phenolic compounds, flavonoids, and anthocyanins. In addition, CTE showed antioxidant activity as measured by oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) method and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging assay. CTE (400 µg/ml) remarkably protected erythrocytes against AAPH-induced hemolysis at 4 h of incubation. Moreover, CTE (400 µg/ml) reduced membrane lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl group formation and prevented the reduction of glutathione concentration in AAPH-induced oxidation of erythrocytes. The AAPH-induced morphological alteration of erythrocytes from a smooth discoid to an echinocytic form was effectively protected by CTE. The present results contribute important insights that CTE may have the potential to act as a natural antioxidant to prevent free radical-induced hemolysis, protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation in erythrocytes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Molecular and functional characterization of seven Na+/K+-ATPase β subunit paralogs in Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis Kaup, 1858).

    PubMed

    Armesto, Paula; Infante, Carlos; Cousin, Xavier; Ponce, Marian; Manchado, Manuel

    2015-04-01

    In the present work, seven genes encoding Na(+),K(+)-ATPase (NKA) β-subunits in the teleost Solea senegalensis are described for the first time. Sequence analysis of the predicted polypeptides revealed a high degree of conservation with those of other vertebrate species and maintenance of important motifs involved in structure and function. Phylogenetic analysis clustered the seven genes into four main clades: β1 (atp1b1a and atp1b1b), β2 (atp1b2a and atp1b2b), β3 (atp1b3a and atp1b3b) and β4 (atp1b4). In juveniles, all paralogous transcripts were detected in the nine tissues examined albeit with different expression patterns. The most ubiquitous expressed gene was atp1b1a whereas atp1b1b was mainly detected in osmoregulatory organs (gill, kidney and intestine), and atp1b2a, atp1b2b, atp1b3a, atp1b3b and atp1b4 in brain. An expression analysis in three brain regions and pituitary revealed that β1-type transcripts were more abundant in pituitary than the other β paralogs with slight differences between brain regions. Quantification of mRNA abundance in gills after a salinity challenge showed an activation of atp1b1a and atp1b1b at high salinity water (60 ppt) and atp1b3a and atp1b3b in response to low salinity (5 ppt). Transcriptional analysis during larval development showed specific expression patterns for each paralog. Moreover, no differences in the expression profiles between larvae cultivated at 10 and 35 ppt were observed except for atp1b4 with higher mRNA levels at 10 than 35 ppt at 18 days post hatch. Whole-mount in situ hybridization analysis revealed that atp1b1b was mainly localized in gut, pronephric tubule, gill, otic vesicle, and chordacentrum of newly hatched larvae. All these data suggest distinct roles of NKA β subunits in tissues, during development and osmoregulation with β1 subunits involved in the adaptation to hyperosmotic conditions and β3 subunits to hypoosmotic environments.

  6. Independent regulation of vertebral number and vertebral identity by microRNA-196 paralogs

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Siew Fen Lisa; Agarwal, Vikram; Mansfield, Jennifer H.; Denans, Nicolas; Schwartz, Matthew G.; Prosser, Haydn M.; Pourquié, Olivier; Bartel, David P.; Tabin, Clifford J.; McGlinn, Edwina

    2015-01-01

    The Hox genes play a central role in patterning the embryonic anterior-to-posterior axis. An important function of Hox activity in vertebrates is the specification of different vertebral morphologies, with an additional role in axis elongation emerging. The miR-196 family of microRNAs (miRNAs) are predicted to extensively target Hox 3′ UTRs, although the full extent to which miR-196 regulates Hox expression dynamics and influences mammalian development remains to be elucidated. Here we used an extensive allelic series of mouse knockouts to show that the miR-196 family of miRNAs is essential both for properly patterning vertebral identity at different axial levels and for modulating the total number of vertebrae. All three miR-196 paralogs, 196a1, 196a2, and 196b, act redundantly to pattern the midthoracic region, whereas 196a2 and 196b have an additive role in controlling the number of rib-bearing vertebra and positioning of the sacrum. Independent of this, 196a1, 196a2, and 196b act redundantly to constrain total vertebral number. Loss of miR-196 leads to a collective up-regulation of numerous trunk Hox target genes with a concomitant delay in activation of caudal Hox genes, which are proposed to signal the end of axis extension. Additionally, we identified altered molecular signatures associated with the Wnt, Fgf, and Notch/segmentation pathways and demonstrate that miR-196 has the potential to regulate Wnt activity by multiple mechanisms. By feeding into, and thereby integrating, multiple genetic networks controlling vertebral number and identity, miR-196 is a critical player defining axial formulae. PMID:26283362

  7. Paralogous ALT1 and ALT2 Retention and Diversification Have Generated Catalytically Active and Inactive Aminotransferases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Peñalosa-Ruiz, Georgina; Aranda, Cristina; Ongay-Larios, Laura; Colon, Maritrini; Quezada, Hector; Gonzalez, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    Background Gene duplication and the subsequent divergence of paralogous pairs play a central role in the evolution of novel gene functions. S. cerevisiae possesses two paralogous genes (ALT1/ALT2) which presumably encode alanine aminotransferases. It has been previously shown that Alt1 encodes an alanine aminotransferase, involved in alanine metabolism; however the physiological role of Alt2 is not known. Here we investigate whether ALT2 encodes an active alanine aminotransferase. Principal Findings Our results show that although ALT1 and ALT2 encode 65% identical proteins, only Alt1 displays alanine aminotransferase activity; in contrast ALT2 encodes a catalytically inert protein. ALT1 and ALT2 expression is modulated by Nrg1 and by the intracellular alanine pool. ALT1 is alanine-induced showing a regulatory profile of a gene encoding an enzyme involved in amino acid catabolism, in agreement with the fact that Alt1 is the sole pathway for alanine catabolism present in S. cerevisiae. Conversely, ALT2 expression is alanine-repressed, indicating a role in alanine biosynthesis, although the encoded-protein has no alanine aminotransferase enzymatic activity. In the ancestral-like yeast L. kluyveri, the alanine aminotransferase activity was higher in the presence of alanine than in the presence of ammonium, suggesting that as for ALT1, LkALT1 expression could be alanine-induced. ALT2 retention poses the questions of whether the encoded protein plays a particular function, and if this function was present in the ancestral gene. It could be hypotesized that ALT2 diverged after duplication, through neo-functionalization or that ALT2 function was present in the ancestral gene, with a yet undiscovered function. Conclusions ALT1 and ALT2 divergence has resulted in delegation of alanine aminotransferase activity to Alt1. These genes display opposed regulatory profiles: ALT1 is alanine-induced, while ALT2 is alanine repressed. Both genes are negatively regulated by the Nrg1

  8. csrR, a Paralog and Direct Target of CsrA, Promotes Legionella pneumophila Resilience in Water

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Zachary D.; Yakhnin, Helen; Babitzke, Paul

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Critical to microbial versatility is the capacity to express the cohort of genes that increase fitness in different environments. Legionella pneumophila occupies extensive ecological space that includes diverse protists, pond water, engineered water systems, and mammalian lung macrophages. One mechanism that equips this opportunistic pathogen to adapt to fluctuating conditions is a switch between replicative and transmissive cell types that is controlled by the broadly conserved regulatory protein CsrA. A striking feature of the legionellae surveyed is that each of 14 strains encodes 4 to 7 csrA-like genes, candidate regulators of distinct fitness traits. Here we focus on the one csrA paralog (lpg1593) that, like the canonical csrA, is conserved in all 14 strains surveyed. Phenotypic analysis revealed that long-term survival in tap water is promoted by the lpg1593 locus, which we name csrR (for “CsrA-similar protein for resilience”). As predicted by its GGA motif, csrR mRNA was bound directly by the canonical CsrA protein, as judged by electromobility shift and RNA-footprinting assays. Furthermore, CsrA repressed translation of csrR mRNA in vivo, as determined by analysis of csrR-gfp reporters, csrR mRNA stability in the presence and absence of csrA expression, and mutation of the CsrA binding site identified on the csrR mRNA. Thus, CsrA not only governs the transition from replication to transmission but also represses translation of its paralog csrR when nutrients are available. We propose that, during prolonged starvation, relief of CsrA repression permits CsrR protein to coordinate L. pneumophila’s switch to a cell type that is resilient in water supplies. PMID:26060275

  9. An evolutionary perspective on Elovl5 fatty acid elongase: comparison of Northern pike and duplicated paralogs from Atlantic salmon

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The ability to produce physiologically critical LC-PUFA from dietary fatty acids differs greatly among teleost species, and is dependent on the possession and expression of fatty acyl desaturase and elongase genes. Atlantic salmon, as a result of a recently duplicated genome, have more of these enzymes than other fish. Recent phylogenetic studies show that Northern pike represents the closest extant relative of the preduplicated ancestral salmonid. Here we characterise a pike fatty acyl elongase, elovl5, and compare it to Atlantic salmon elovl5a and elovl5b duplicates. Results Phylogenetic analyses show that Atlantic salmon paralogs are evolving symmetrically, and they have been retained in the genome by purifying selection. Heterologous expression in yeast showed that Northern pike Elovl5 activity is indistinguishable from that of the salmon paralogs, efficiently elongating C18 and C20 substrates. However, in contrast to salmon, pike elovl5 was predominantly expressed in brain with negligible expression in liver and intestine. Conclusions We suggest that the predominant expression of Elovl5b in salmon liver and Elovl5a in salmon intestine is an adaptation, enabled by genome duplication, to a diet rich in terrestrial invertebrates which are relatively poor in LC-PUFA. Pike have retained an ancestral expression profile which supports the maintenance of PUFA in the brain but, due to a highly piscivorous LC-PUFA-rich diet, is not required in liver and intestine. Thus, the characterisation of elovl5 in Northern pike provides insights into the evolutionary divergence of duplicated genes, and the ecological adaptations of salmonids which have enabled colonisation of nutrient poor freshwaters. PMID:23597093

  10. Control of hematopoietic stem cell emergence by antagonistic functions of ribosomal protein paralogs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Duc, Anne-Cécile E; Rao, Shuyun; Sun, Xiao-Li; Bilbee, Alison N; Rhodes, Michele; Li, Qin; Kappes, Dietmar J; Rhodes, Jennifer; Wiest, David L

    2013-02-25

    It remains controversial whether the highly homologous ribosomal protein (RP) paralogs found in lower eukaryotes have distinct functions and this has not been explored in vertebrates. Here we demonstrate that despite ubiquitous expression, the RP paralogs, Rpl22 and Rpl22-like1 (Rpl22l1) play essential, distinct, and antagonistic roles in hematopoietic development. Knockdown of Rpl22 in zebrafish embryos selectively blocks the development of T lineage progenitors after they have seeded the thymus. In contrast, knockdown of the Rpl22 paralog, Rpl22l1, impairs the emergence of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros by abrogating Smad1 expression and the consequent induction of essential transcriptional regulator, Runx1. Indeed, despite the ability of both paralogs to bind smad1 RNA, Rpl22 and Rpl22l1 have opposing effects on Smad1 expression. Accordingly, circumstances that tip the balance of these paralogs in favor of Rpl22 (e.g., Rpl22l1 knockdown or Rpl22 overexpression) result in repression of Smad1 and blockade of HSC emergence.

  11. Rad51 Paralogs Remodel Pre-synaptic Rad51 Filaments to Stimulate Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Martin R.G.; Špírek, Mário; Chaurasiya, Kathy R.; Ward, Jordan D.; Carzaniga, Raffaella; Yu, Xiong; Egelman, Edward H.; Collinson, Lucy M.; Rueda, David; Krejci, Lumir; Boulton, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Repair of DNA double strand breaks by homologous recombination (HR) is initiated by Rad51 filament nucleation on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), which catalyzes strand exchange with homologous duplex DNA. BRCA2 and the Rad51 paralogs are tumor suppressors and critical mediators of Rad51. To gain insight into Rad51 paralog function, we investigated a heterodimeric Rad51 paralog complex, RFS-1/RIP-1, and uncovered the molecular basis by which Rad51 paralogs promote HR. Unlike BRCA2, which nucleates RAD-51-ssDNA filaments, RFS-1/RIP-1 binds and remodels pre-synaptic filaments to a stabilized, “open,” and flexible conformation, in which the ssDNA is more accessible to nuclease digestion and RAD-51 dissociation rate is reduced. Walker box mutations in RFS-1, which abolish filament remodeling, fail to stimulate RAD-51 strand exchange activity, demonstrating that remodeling is essential for RFS-1/RIP-1 function. We propose that Rad51 paralogs stimulate HR by remodeling the Rad51 filament, priming it for strand exchange with the template duplex. PMID:26186187

  12. Rad51 Paralogs Remodel Pre-synaptic Rad51 Filaments to Stimulate Homologous Recombination.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Martin R G; Špírek, Mário; Chaurasiya, Kathy R; Ward, Jordan D; Carzaniga, Raffaella; Yu, Xiong; Egelman, Edward H; Collinson, Lucy M; Rueda, David; Krejci, Lumir; Boulton, Simon J

    2015-07-16

    Repair of DNA double strand breaks by homologous recombination (HR) is initiated by Rad51 filament nucleation on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), which catalyzes strand exchange with homologous duplex DNA. BRCA2 and the Rad51 paralogs are tumor suppressors and critical mediators of Rad51. To gain insight into Rad51 paralog function, we investigated a heterodimeric Rad51 paralog complex, RFS-1/RIP-1, and uncovered the molecular basis by which Rad51 paralogs promote HR. Unlike BRCA2, which nucleates RAD-51-ssDNA filaments, RFS-1/RIP-1 binds and remodels pre-synaptic filaments to a stabilized, "open," and flexible conformation, in which the ssDNA is more accessible to nuclease digestion and RAD-51 dissociation rate is reduced. Walker box mutations in RFS-1, which abolish filament remodeling, fail to stimulate RAD-51 strand exchange activity, demonstrating that remodeling is essential for RFS-1/RIP-1 function. We propose that Rad51 paralogs stimulate HR by remodeling the Rad51 filament, priming it for strand exchange with the template duplex. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Control of hematopoietic stem cell emergence by antagonistic functions of ribosomal protein paralogs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Duc, Anne-Cécile E.; Rao, Shuyun; Sun, Xiao-Li; Bilbee, Alison N.; Rhodes, Michele; Li, Qin; Kappes, Dietmar J.; Rhodes, Jennifer; Wiest, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Summary It remains controversial whether the highly-homologous ribosomal protein (RP) paralogs found in lower eukaryotes have distinct functions and this has not been explored in vertebrates. Here we demonstrate that despite ubiquitous expression, the RP paralogs, Rpl22 and Rpl22-like1 (Rpl22l1) play essential, distinct, and antagonistic roles in hematopoietic development. Knockdown of rpl22 in zebrafish embryos selectively blocks the development of T lineage progenitors after they have seeded the thymus. In contrast, knockdown of the rpl22 paralog, rpl22l1, impairs the emergence of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros by abrogating Smad1 expression and the consequent induction of essential transcriptional regulator, Runx1. Indeed, despite the ability of both paralogs to bind Smad1 RNA, Rpl22 and Rpl22l1 have opposing effects on Smad1 expression. Accordingly, circumstances that tip the balance of these paralogs in favor of Rpl22 (e.g., Rpl22l1 knockdown or Rpl22 overexpression) result in repression of Smad1 and blockade of HSC emergence. PMID:23449473

  14. Genome-wide location analysis reveals distinct transcriptional circuitry by paralogous regulators Foxa1 and Foxa2.

    PubMed

    Bochkis, Irina M; Schug, Jonathan; Ye, Diana Z; Kurinna, Svitlana; Stratton, Sabrina A; Barton, Michelle C; Kaestner, Klaus H

    2012-01-01

    Gene duplication is a powerful driver of evolution. Newly duplicated genes acquire new roles that are relevant to fitness, or they will be lost over time. A potential path to functional relevance is mutation of the coding sequence leading to the acquisition of novel biochemical properties, as analyzed here for the highly homologous paralogs Foxa1 and Foxa2 transcriptional regulators. We determine by genome-wide location analysis (ChIP-Seq) that, although Foxa1 and Foxa2 share a large fraction of binding sites in the liver, each protein also occupies distinct regulatory elements in vivo. Foxa1-only sites are enriched for p53 binding sites and are frequently found near genes important to cell cycle regulation, while Foxa2-restricted sites show only a limited match to the forkhead consensus and are found in genes involved in steroid and lipid metabolism. Thus, Foxa1 and Foxa2, while redundant during development, have evolved divergent roles in the adult liver, ensuring the maintenance of both genes during evolution.

  15. Genome-Wide Location Analysis Reveals Distinct Transcriptional Circuitry by Paralogous Regulators Foxa1 and Foxa2

    PubMed Central

    Bochkis, Irina M.; Schug, Jonathan; Ye, Diana Z.; Kurinna, Svitlana; Stratton, Sabrina A.; Barton, Michelle C.; Kaestner, Klaus H.

    2012-01-01

    Gene duplication is a powerful driver of evolution. Newly duplicated genes acquire new roles that are relevant to fitness, or they will be lost over time. A potential path to functional relevance is mutation of the coding sequence leading to the acquisition of novel biochemical properties, as analyzed here for the highly homologous paralogs Foxa1 and Foxa2 transcriptional regulators. We determine by genome-wide location analysis (ChIP-Seq) that, although Foxa1 and Foxa2 share a large fraction of binding sites in the liver, each protein also occupies distinct regulatory elements in vivo. Foxa1-only sites are enriched for p53 binding sites and are frequently found near genes important to cell cycle regulation, while Foxa2-restricted sites show only a limited match to the forkhead consensus and are found in genes involved in steroid and lipid metabolism. Thus, Foxa1 and Foxa2, while redundant during development, have evolved divergent roles in the adult liver, ensuring the maintenance of both genes during evolution. PMID:22737085

  16. The zebrafish genome encodes the largest vertebrate repertoire of functional aquaporins with dual paralogy and substrate specificities similar to mammals

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    aquaporins with dual paralogy to human isoforms. Our data reveal an early and specific diversification of these integral membrane proteins at the root of the crown-clade of Teleostei. Despite the increase in gene copy number, zebrafish aquaporins mostly retain the substrate specificity characteristic of the tetrapod counterparts. Based upon the integration of phylogenetic, genomic and functional data we propose a new classification for the piscine aquaporin superfamily. PMID:20149227

  17. Determination of the Loss of Function Complement C4 Exon 29 CT Insertion Using a Novel Paralog-Specific Assay in Healthy UK and Spanish Populations

    PubMed Central

    Boteva, Lora; Wu, Yee Ling; Cortes-Hernández, Josefina; Martin, Javier; Vyse, Timothy J.; Fernando, Michelle M. A.

    2011-01-01

    Genetic variants resulting in non-expression of complement C4A and C4B genes are common in healthy European populations and have shown association with a number of diseases, most notably the autoimmune disease, systemic lupus erythematosus. The most frequent cause of a C4 “null” allele, following that of C4 gene copy number variation (CNV), is a non-sense mutation arising from a 2 bp CT insertion into codon 1232 of exon 29. Previous attempts to accurately genotype this polymorphism have not been amenable to high-throughput typing, and have been confounded by failure to account for CNV at this locus, as well as by inability to distinguish between paralogs. We have developed a novel, high-throughput, paralog-specific assay to detect the presence and copy number of this polymorphism. We have genotyped healthy cohorts from the United Kingdom (UK) and Spain. Overall, 30/719 (4.17%) individuals from the UK cohort and 8/449 (1.78%) individuals from the Spanish cohort harboured the CT insertion in a C4A gene. A single Spanish individual possessed a C4B CT insertion. There is weak correlation between the C4 CT insertion and flanking MHC polymorphism. Therefore it is important to note that, as with C4 gene CNV, disease-association due to this variant will be missed by current SNP-based genome-wide association strategies. PMID:21857912

  18. Determination of the loss of function complement C4 exon 29 CT insertion using a novel paralog-specific assay in healthy UK and Spanish populations.

    PubMed

    Boteva, Lora; Wu, Yee Ling; Cortes-Hernández, Josefina; Martin, Javier; Vyse, Timothy J; Fernando, Michelle M A

    2011-01-01

    Genetic variants resulting in non-expression of complement C4A and C4B genes are common in healthy European populations and have shown association with a number of diseases, most notably the autoimmune disease, systemic lupus erythematosus. The most frequent cause of a C4 "null" allele, following that of C4 gene copy number variation (CNV), is a non-sense mutation arising from a 2 bp CT insertion into codon 1232 of exon 29. Previous attempts to accurately genotype this polymorphism have not been amenable to high-throughput typing, and have been confounded by failure to account for CNV at this locus, as well as by inability to distinguish between paralogs. We have developed a novel, high-throughput, paralog-specific assay to detect the presence and copy number of this polymorphism. We have genotyped healthy cohorts from the United Kingdom (UK) and Spain. Overall, 30/719 (4.17%) individuals from the UK cohort and 8/449 (1.78%) individuals from the Spanish cohort harboured the CT insertion in a C4A gene. A single Spanish individual possessed a C4B CT insertion. There is weak correlation between the C4 CT insertion and flanking MHC polymorphism. Therefore it is important to note that, as with C4 gene CNV, disease-association due to this variant will be missed by current SNP-based genome-wide association strategies.

  19. Discrimination of common and unique RNA-binding activities among Fragile X mental retardation protein paralogs.

    PubMed

    Darnell, Jennifer C; Fraser, Claire E; Mostovetsky, Olga; Darnell, Robert B

    2009-09-01

    Fragile X mental retardation is caused by loss-of-function of a single gene encoding FMRP, an RNA-binding protein that harbors three canonical RNA-binding domains, two KH-type and one RGG box. Two autosomal paralogs of FMRP, FXR1P and FXR2P, are similar to FMRP in their overall structure, including the presence of putative RNA-binding domains, but to what extent they provide functional redundancy with FMRP is unclear. Although FMRP has been characterized as a polyribosome-associated regulator of translation, less is known about the functions of FXR1P and FXR2P. For example, FMRP binds intramolecular G-quadruplex and kissing complex RNA (kcRNA) ligands via the RGG box and KH2 domain, respectively, although the RNA ligands of FXR1P and FXR2P are unknown. Here we demonstrate that FXR1P and FXR2P KH2 domains bind kcRNA ligands with the same affinity as the FMRP KH2 domain although other KH domains do not. RNA ligand recognition by this family is highly conserved, as the KH2 domain of the single Drosophila ortholog, dFMRP, also binds kcRNA. kcRNA was able to displace FXR1P and FXR2P from polyribosomes as it does for FMRP, and this displacement was FMRP-independent. This suggests that all three family members recognize the same binding site on RNA mediating their polyribosome association, and that they may be functionally redundant with regard to this aspect of translational control. In contrast, FMRP is unique in its ability to recognize G-quadruplexes, suggesting the FMRP RGG domain may play a non-redundant role in the pathophysiology of the disease.

  20. The cytohesin paralog Sec7 of Dictyostelium discoideum is required for phagocytosis and cell motility

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dictyostelium harbors several paralogous Sec7 genes that encode members of three subfamilies of the Sec7 superfamily of guanine nucleotide exchange factors. One of them is the cytohesin family represented by three members in D. discoideum, SecG, Sec7 and a further protein distinguished by several transmembrane domains. Cytohesins are characterized by a Sec7-PH tandem domain and have roles in cell adhesion and migration. Results We study here Sec7. In vitro its PH domain bound preferentially to phosphatidylinositol 3,4-bisphosphate (PI(3,4)P2), phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PI(3,4,5)P3). When following the distribution of GFP-Sec7 in vivo we observed the protein in the cytosol and at the plasma membrane. Strikingly, when cells formed pseudopods, macropinosomes or phagosomes, GFP-Sec7 was conspicuously absent from areas of the plasma membrane which were involved in these processes. Mutant cells lacking Sec7 exhibited an impaired phagocytosis and showed significantly reduced speed and less persistence during migration. Cellular properties associated with mammalian cytohesins like cell-cell and cell-substratum adhesion were not altered. Proteins with roles in membrane trafficking and signal transduction have been identified as putative interaction partners consistent with the data obtained from mutant analysis. Conclusions Sec7 is a cytosolic component and is associated with the plasma membrane in a pattern distinctly different from the accumulation of PI(3,4,5)P3. Mutant analysis reveals that loss of the protein affects cellular processes that involve membrane flow and the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:23915312

  1. Regulation of gill claudin paralogs by salinity, cortisol and prolactin in Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus).

    PubMed

    Tipsmark, Christian K; Breves, Jason P; Rabeneck, D Brett; Trubitt, Rebecca T; Lerner, Darren T; Grau, E Gordon

    2016-09-01

    In euryhaline teleosts, reorganization of gill tight junctions during salinity acclimation involves dynamic expression of specific claudin (Cldn) paralogs. We identified four transcripts encoding Cldn tight junction proteins in the tilapia gill transcriptome: cldn10c, cldn10e, cldn28a and cldn30. A tissue distribution experiment found cldn10c and cldn10e expression levels in the gill to be 100-fold higher than any other tissues examined. cldn28a and cldn30 levels in the gill were 10-fold greater than levels in other tissues. Expression of these genes in Mozambique tilapia was examined during acclimation to fresh water (FW), seawater (SW), and in response to hormone treatments. Transfer of tilapia from FW to SW elevated cldn10c and cldn10e, while cldn28a and cldn30 were stimulated following transfer from SW to FW. In hypophysectomized tilapia transferred to FW, pituitary extirpation induced reduced expression of cldn10c, cldn10e and cldn28a; these effects were mitigated equally by either prolactin or cortisol replacement. In vitro experiments with gill filaments showed that cortisol stimulated expression of all four cldns examined, suggesting a direct action of cortisol in situ. Our data indicate that elevated cldn10c and cldn10e expression is important during acclimation of tilapia to SW possibly by conferring ion specific paracellular permeability. On the other hand, expression of cldn28a and cldn30 appears to contribute to reorganization of branchial epithelium during FW acclimation. Hormone treatment experiments showed that particular FW- and SW-induced cldns are controlled by cortisol and prolactin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. NLR-Associating Transcription Factor bHLH84 and Its Paralogs Function Redundantly in Plant Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fang; Kapos, Paul; Cheng, Yu Ti; Li, Meng; Zhang, Yuelin; Li, Xin

    2014-01-01

    In plants and animals, nucleotide-binding and leucine-rich repeat domain containing (NLR) immune receptors are utilized to detect the presence or activities of pathogen-derived molecules. However, the mechanisms by which NLR proteins induce defense responses remain unclear. Here, we report the characterization of one basic Helix-loop-Helix (bHLH) type transcription factor (TF), bHLH84, identified from a reverse genetic screen. It functions as a transcriptional activator that enhances the autoimmunity of NLR mutant snc1 (suppressor of npr1-1, constitutive 1) and confers enhanced immunity in wild-type backgrounds when overexpressed. Simultaneously knocking out three closely related bHLH paralogs attenuates RPS4-mediated immunity and partially suppresses the autoimmune phenotypes of snc1, while overexpression of the other two close paralogs also renders strong autoimmunity, suggesting functional redundancy in the gene family. Intriguingly, the autoimmunity conferred by bHLH84 overexpression can be largely suppressed by the loss-of-function snc1-r1 mutation, suggesting that SNC1 is required for its proper function. In planta co-immunoprecipitation revealed interactions between not only bHLH84 and SNC1, but also bHLH84 and RPS4, indicating that bHLH84 associates with these NLRs. Together with previous finding that SNC1 associates with repressor TPR1 to repress negative regulators, we hypothesize that nuclear NLR proteins may interact with both transcriptional repressors and activators during immune responses, enabling potentially faster and more robust transcriptional reprogramming upon pathogen recognition. PMID:25144198

  3. A paralog of the proteinaceous elicitor sm1 affects colonization of maize roots by Trichoderma virens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The biocontrol agent, Trichoderma virens, has the ability to protect plants from pathogens by eliciting plant defense responses, involvement in mycoparasitism, or secreting antagonistic secondary metabolites. SM1, an elicitor of induced systemic resistance (ISR), was found to have three paralogs wi...

  4. The YsrS Paralog DygS Has the Capacity To Activate Expression of the Yersinia enterocolitica Ysa Type III Secretion System.

    PubMed

    Walker, Kimberly A; Griggs, Lauren A; Obrist, Markus; Bode, Addys; Summers, R Patrick; Miller, Virginia L

    2016-06-15

    The Yersinia enterocolitica Ysa type III secretion system (T3SS) is associated with intracellular survival, and, like other characterized T3SSs, it is tightly controlled. Expression of the ysa genes is only detected following growth at low temperatures (26°C) and in high concentrations of sodium chloride (290 mM) in the medium. The YsrSTR phosphorelay (PR) system is required for ysa expression and likely responds to NaCl. During our investigations into the Ysr PR system, we discovered that genes YE3578 and YE3579 are remarkably similar to ysrR and ysrS, respectively, and are probably a consequence of a gene duplication event. The amino acid differences between YE3578 and ysrR are primarily clustered into two short regions. The differences between YE3579 and ysrS are nearly all located in the periplasmic sensing domain; the cytoplasmic domains are 98% identical. We investigated whether these paralogs were capable of activating ysa gene expression. We found that the sensor paralog, named DygS, is capable of compensating for loss of ysrS, but the response regulator paralog, DygR, cannot complement a ysrR gene deletion. In addition, YsrR, but not DygR, interacts with the histidine phosphorelay protein YsrT. Thus, DygS likely activates ysa gene expression in response to a signal other than NaCl and provides an example of a phosphorelay system in which two sensor kinases feed into the same regulatory pathway. All organisms need mechanisms to promote survival in changing environments. Prokaryotic phosphorelay systems are minimally comprised of a histidine kinase (HK) that senses an extracellular stimulus and a response regulator (RR) but can contain three or more proteins. Through gene duplication, a unique hybrid HK was created. We show that, while the hybrid appears to retain all of the phosphorelay functions, it responds to a different signal than the original. Both HKs transmit the signal to the same RR, which activates a promoter that transcribes a set of genes

  5. The YsrS Paralog DygS Has the Capacity To Activate Expression of the Yersinia enterocolitica Ysa Type III Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Griggs, Lauren A.; Obrist, Markus; Bode, Addys; Summers, R. Patrick; Miller, Virginia L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Yersinia enterocolitica Ysa type III secretion system (T3SS) is associated with intracellular survival, and, like other characterized T3SSs, it is tightly controlled. Expression of the ysa genes is only detected following growth at low temperatures (26°C) and in high concentrations of sodium chloride (290 mM) in the medium. The YsrSTR phosphorelay (PR) system is required for ysa expression and likely responds to NaCl. During our investigations into the Ysr PR system, we discovered that genes YE3578 and YE3579 are remarkably similar to ysrR and ysrS, respectively, and are probably a consequence of a gene duplication event. The amino acid differences between YE3578 and ysrR are primarily clustered into two short regions. The differences between YE3579 and ysrS are nearly all located in the periplasmic sensing domain; the cytoplasmic domains are 98% identical. We investigated whether these paralogs were capable of activating ysa gene expression. We found that the sensor paralog, named DygS, is capable of compensating for loss of ysrS, but the response regulator paralog, DygR, cannot complement a ysrR gene deletion. In addition, YsrR, but not DygR, interacts with the histidine phosphorelay protein YsrT. Thus, DygS likely activates ysa gene expression in response to a signal other than NaCl and provides an example of a phosphorelay system in which two sensor kinases feed into the same regulatory pathway. IMPORTANCE All organisms need mechanisms to promote survival in changing environments. Prokaryotic phosphorelay systems are minimally comprised of a histidine kinase (HK) that senses an extracellular stimulus and a response regulator (RR) but can contain three or more proteins. Through gene duplication, a unique hybrid HK was created. We show that, while the hybrid appears to retain all of the phosphorelay functions, it responds to a different signal than the original. Both HKs transmit the signal to the same RR, which activates a promoter that transcribes

  6. Identification of homologous, homoeologous and paralogous sequence variants in an outbreeding allopolyploid species based on comparison with progenitor taxa.

    PubMed

    Hand, Melanie L; Ponting, Rebecca C; Drayton, Michelle C; Lawless, Kahlil A; Cogan, Noel O I; Charles Brummer, E; Sawbridge, Timothy I; Spangenberg, German C; Smith, Kevin F; Forster, John W

    2008-10-01

    The combination of homologous, homoeologous and paralogous classes of sequence variation presents major challenges for SNP discovery in outbreeding allopolyploid species. Previous in vitro gene-associated SNP discovery studies in the allotetraploid forage legume white clover (Trifolium repens L.) were vulnerable to such effects, leading to prohibitive levels of attrition during SNP validation. Identification of T. occidentale and T. pallescens as the putative diploid progenitors of white clover has permitted discrimination of the different sequence variant categories. Amplicons from selected abiotic stress tolerance-related genes were obtained using mapping family parents and individuals from each diploid species. Following cloning, progenitor comparison allowed tentative assignment of individual haplotypes to one or other sub-genome, as well as to gene copies within sub-genomes. A high degree of coincidence and identity between SNPs and HSVs was observed. Close similarity was observed between the genome of T. occidentale and one white clover sub-genome, but the affinity between T. pallescens and the other sub-genome was weaker, suggesting that a currently uncharacterised taxon may be the true second progenitor. Selected validated SNPs were attributed to individual sub-genomes by assignment to and naming of homoeologous linkage groups, providing the basis for improved genetic trait-dissection studies. The approach described in this study is broadly applicable to a range of allopolyploid taxa of equivocal ancestry.

  7. Genetic Polymorphism of Plasmodium vivax msp1p, a Paralog of Merozoite Surface Protein 1, from Worldwide Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Kaneko, Osamu; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Chen, Jun-Hu; Lu, Feng; Chai, Jong-Yil; Takeo, Satoru; Tsuboi, Takafumi; Ayala, Francisco J.; Chen, Yong; Lim, Chae Seung; Han, Eun-Taek

    2011-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax msp1p, a paralog of the candidate vaccine antigen P. vivax merozoite surface protein 1, possesses a signal peptide at its N-terminus and two epidermal growth factor–like domains at its C-terminus with a glycosylphosphatidylinositol attachment site. The msp1p gene locus may have originated by a duplication of the msp1 gene locus in a common ancestor of the analyzed Plasmodium species and lost from P. yoelii, P. berghei, and P. falciparum during their evolutionary history. Full-length sequences of the msp1p gene were generally highly conserved; they had a few amino acid substitutions, one highly polymorphic E/Q-rich region, and a single-to-triple hepta-peptide repeat motif. Twenty-one distinguishable allelic types (A1–A21) of the E/Q-rich region were identified from worldwide isolates. Among them, four types were detected in isolates from South Korea. The length polymorphism of the E/Q-rich region might be useful as a genetic marker for population structure studies in malaria-endemic areas. PMID:21292901

  8. Functional Annotations of Paralogs: A Blessing and a Curse

    PubMed Central

    Zallot, Rémi; Harrison, Katherine J.; Kolaczkowski, Bryan; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Gene duplication followed by mutation is a classic mechanism of neofunctionalization, producing gene families with functional diversity. In some cases, a single point mutation is sufficient to change the substrate specificity and/or the chemistry performed by an enzyme, making it difficult to accurately separate enzymes with identical functions from homologs with different functions. Because sequence similarity is often used as a basis for assigning functional annotations to genes, non-isofunctional gene families pose a great challenge for genome annotation pipelines. Here we describe how integrating evolutionary and functional information such as genome context, phylogeny, metabolic reconstruction and signature motifs may be required to correctly annotate multifunctional families. These integrative analyses can also lead to the discovery of novel gene functions, as hints from specific subgroups can guide the functional characterization of other members of the family. We demonstrate how careful manual curation processes using comparative genomics can disambiguate subgroups within large multifunctional families and discover their functions. We present the COG0720 protein family as a case study. We also discuss strategies to automate this process to improve the accuracy of genome functional annotation pipelines. PMID:27618105

  9. Structural and Binding Properties of Two Paralogous Fatty Acid Binding Proteins of Taenia solium Metacestode

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hyun-Jong; Shin, Joo-Ho; Diaz-Camacho, Sylvia Paz; Nawa, Yukifumi; Kang, Insug; Kong, Yoon

    2012-01-01

    Background Fatty acid (FA) binding proteins (FABPs) of helminths are implicated in acquisition and utilization of host-derived hydrophobic substances, as well as in signaling and cellular interactions. We previously demonstrated that secretory hydrophobic ligand binding proteins (HLBPs) of Taenia solium metacestode (TsM), a causative agent of neurocysticercosis (NC), shuttle FAs in the surrounding host tissues and inwardly transport the FAs across the parasite syncytial membrane. However, the protein molecules responsible for the intracellular trafficking and assimilation of FAs have remained elusive. Methodology/Principal Findings We isolated two novel TsMFABP genes (TsMFABP1 and TsMFABP2), which encoded 133- and 136-amino acid polypeptides with predicted molecular masses of 14.3 and 14.8 kDa, respectively. They shared 45% sequence identity with each other and 15–95% with other related-members. Homology modeling demonstrated a characteristic β-barrel composed of 10 anti-parallel β-strands and two α-helices. TsMFABP2 harbored two additional loops between β-strands two and three, and β-strands six and seven, respectively. TsMFABP1 was secreted into cyst fluid and surrounding environments, whereas TsMFABP2 was intracellularly confined. Partially purified native proteins migrated to 15 kDa with different isoelectric points of 9.2 (TsMFABP1) and 8.4 (TsMFABP2). Both native and recombinant proteins bound to 11-([5-dimethylaminonaphthalene-1-sulfonyl]amino)undecannoic acid, dansyl-DL-α-amino-caprylic acid, cis-parinaric acid and retinol, which were competitively inhibited by oleic acid. TsMFABP1 exhibited high affinity toward FA analogs. TsMFABPs showed weak binding activity to retinol, but TsMFABP2 showed relatively high affinity. Isolation of two distinct genes from an individual genome strongly suggested their paralogous nature. Abundant expression of TsMFABP1 and TsMFABP2 in the canal region of worm matched well with the histological distributions of lipids

  10. The pattern of Phosphate transporter 1 genes evolutionary divergence in Glycine max L.

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Phosphate transporter 1 (PHT1) gene family has crucial roles in phosphate uptake, translocation, remobilization, and optimization of metabolic processes using of Pi. Gene duplications expand the size of gene families, and subfunctionalization of paralog gene pairs is a predominant tendency after gene duplications. To date, experimental evidence for the evolutionary relationships among different paralog gene pairs of a given gene family in soybean is limited. Results All potential Phosphate transporter 1 genes in Glycine max L. (GmPHT1) were systematically analyzed using both bioinformatics and experimentation. The soybean PHT1 genes originated from four distinct ancestors prior to the Gamma WGT and formed 7 paralog gene pairs and a singleton gene. Six of the paralog gene pairs underwent subfunctionalization, and while GmPHT1;4 paralog gene experienced pseudogenization. Examination of long-term evolutionary changes, six GmPHT1 paralog gene pairs diverged at multiple levels, in aspects of spatio-temporal expression patterns and/or quanta, phosphates affinity properties, subcellular localization, and responses to phosphorus stress. Conclusions These characterized divergences occurred in tissue- and/or development-specific modes, or conditional modes. Moreover, they have synergistically shaped the evolutionary rate of GmPHT1 family, as well as maintained phosphorus homeostasis at cells and in the whole plant. PMID:23510338

  11. Conservation of σ28-Dependent Non-Coding RNA Paralogs and Predicted σ54-Dependent Targets in Thermophilic Campylobacter Species

    PubMed Central

    Le, My Thanh; van Veldhuizen, Mart; Porcelli, Ida; Bongaerts, Roy J.; Gaskin, Duncan J. H.; Pearson, Bruce M.; van Vliet, Arnoud H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Assembly of flagella requires strict hierarchical and temporal control via flagellar sigma and anti-sigma factors, regulatory proteins and the assembly complex itself, but to date non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have not been described to regulate genes directly involved in flagellar assembly. In this study we have investigated the possible role of two ncRNA paralogs (CjNC1, CjNC4) in flagellar assembly and gene regulation of the diarrhoeal pathogen Campylobacter jejuni. CjNC1 and CjNC4 are 37/44 nt identical and predicted to target the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) of genes transcribed from the flagellar sigma factor σ54. Orthologs of the σ54-dependent 5' UTRs and ncRNAs are present in the genomes of other thermophilic Campylobacter species, and transcription of CjNC1 and CNC4 is dependent on the flagellar sigma factor σ28. Surprisingly, inactivation and overexpression of CjNC1 and CjNC4 did not affect growth, motility or flagella-associated phenotypes such as autoagglutination. However, CjNC1 and CjNC4 were able to mediate sequence-dependent, but Hfq-independent, partial repression of fluorescence of predicted target 5' UTRs in an Escherichia coli-based GFP reporter gene system. This hints towards a subtle role for the CjNC1 and CjNC4 ncRNAs in post-transcriptional gene regulation in thermophilic Campylobacter species, and suggests that the currently used phenotypic methodologies are insufficiently sensitive to detect such subtle phenotypes. The lack of a role of Hfq in the E. coli GFP-based system indicates that the CjNC1 and CjNC4 ncRNAs may mediate post-transcriptional gene regulation in ways that do not conform to the paradigms obtained from the Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:26512728

  12. Evolution of developmental roles of Pax2/5/8 paralogs after independent duplication in urochordate and vertebrate lineages

    PubMed Central

    Bassham, Susan; Cañestro, Cristian; Postlethwait, John H

    2008-01-01

    Background Gene duplication provides opportunities for lineage diversification and evolution of developmental novelties. Duplicated genes generally either disappear by accumulation of mutations (nonfunctionalization), or are preserved either by the origin of positively selected functions in one or both duplicates (neofunctionalization), or by the partitioning of original gene subfunctions between the duplicates (subfunctionalization). The Pax2/5/8 family of important developmental regulators has undergone parallel expansion among chordate groups. After the divergence of urochordate and vertebrate lineages, two rounds of independent gene duplications resulted in the Pax2, Pax5, and Pax8 genes of most vertebrates (the sister group of the urochordates), and an additional duplication provided the pax2a and pax2b duplicates in teleost fish. Separate from the vertebrate genome expansions, a duplication also created two Pax2/5/8 genes in the common ancestor of ascidian and larvacean urochordates. Results To better understand mechanisms underlying the evolution of duplicated genes, we investigated, in the larvacean urochordate Oikopleura dioica, the embryonic gene expression patterns of Pax2/5/8 paralogs. We compared the larvacean and ascidian expression patterns to infer modular subfunctions present in the single pre-duplication Pax2/5/8 gene of stem urochordates, and we compared vertebrate and urochordate expression to infer the suite of Pax2/5/8 gene subfunctions in the common ancestor of olfactores (vertebrates + urochordates). Expression pattern differences of larvacean and ascidian Pax2/5/8 orthologs in the endostyle, pharynx and hindgut suggest that some ancestral gene functions have been partitioned differently to the duplicates in the two urochordate lineages. Novel expression in the larvacean heart may have resulted from the neofunctionalization of a Pax2/5/8 gene in the urochordates. Expression of larvacean Pax2/5/8 in the endostyle, in sites of epithelial

  13. Gene duplication, population genomics, and species-level differentiation within a tropical mountain shrub.

    PubMed

    Mastretta-Yanes, Alicia; Zamudio, Sergio; Jorgensen, Tove H; Arrigo, Nils; Alvarez, Nadir; Piñero, Daniel; Emerson, Brent C

    2014-09-14

    Gene duplication leads to paralogy, which complicates the de novo assembly of genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) data. The issue of paralogous genes is exacerbated in plants, because they are particularly prone to gene duplication events. Paralogs are normally filtered from GBS data before undertaking population genomics or phylogenetic analyses. However, gene duplication plays an important role in the functional diversification of genes and it can also lead to the formation of postzygotic barriers. Using populations and closely related species of a tropical mountain shrub, we examine 1) the genomic differentiation produced by putative orthologs, and 2) the distribution of recent gene duplication among lineages and geography. We find high differentiation among populations from isolated mountain peaks and species-level differentiation within what is morphologically described as a single species. The inferred distribution of paralogs among populations is congruent with taxonomy and shows that GBS could be used to examine recent gene duplication as a source of genomic differentiation of nonmodel species.

  14. Two proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) paralogs from the tropical sea cucumber (Stichopus monotuberculatus): Molecular characterization and inducible expression with immune challenge.

    PubMed

    Ren, Chunhua; Chen, Ting; Jiang, Xiao; Sun, Hongyan; Qian, Jing; Hu, Chaoqun; Wang, Yanhong

    2016-09-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is a multifunctional protein that widely exists in eukaryotic species. In this study, two PCSK9 paralogs, named StmPCSK9-1 and StmPCSK9-2, were identified from the tropical sea cucumber (Stichopus monotuberculatus). The cDNAs of StmPCSK9-1 and StmPCSK9-2 are 1330 kb and 1508 kb in size, respectively. The open reading frames (ORF) for StmPCSK9-1 and StmPCSK9-2 cDNAs are 1128 and 1167 bp in length, encoding the proteins of 375 and 388 amino acids with the deduced molecular weights of 38.76 and 41.07 kDa, respectively. In accord with other members in PCSK9 family, the two StmPCSK9 paralogs possessed the inhibitor_I9 and peptidase_S8 functional domains, seven active sites, a catalytic triad and two calcium binding sites. For the gene structure, the splicing of the two StmPCSK9 paralogs was relatively conserved. In addition, the mRNA expression of StmPCSK9-1 and StmPCSK9-2 was only detected in the sea cucumber intestine and coelomocytes, and the expression levels of both the two StmPCSK9 paralogs were higher in intestine. Moreover, StmPCSK9-2 was found to be a cytoplasm protein without signal peptide, and show no response to the immune challenge. On the contrary, StmPCSK9-1 was a secreted protein and the transcriptional expression of StmPCSK9-1 was significantly up-regulated by lipopolysaccharides (LPS) treatment and slightly down-regulated by polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid [Poly (I:C)] challenge in in vitro experiments performed in the cultural primary coelomocytes, suggesting that the StmPCSK9-1 may play critical roles in the innate immune defense of sea cucumber, S. monotuberculatus, against bacterial and/or viral infections.

  15. Expression Pattern of Two Paralogs Encoding Cinnamyl Alcohol Dehydrogenases in Arabidopsis. Isolation and Characterization of the Corresponding Mutants1

    PubMed Central

    Sibout, Richard; Eudes, Aymerick; Pollet, Brigitte; Goujon, Thomas; Mila, Isabelle; Granier, Fabienne; Séguin, Armand; Lapierre, Catherine; Jouanin, Lise

    2003-01-01

    Studying Arabidopsis mutants of the phenylpropanoid pathway has unraveled several biosynthetic steps of monolignol synthesis. Most of the genes leading to monolignol synthesis have been characterized recently in this herbaceous plant, except those encoding cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD). We have used the complete sequencing of the Arabidopsis genome to highlight a new view of the complete CAD gene family. Among nine AtCAD genes, we have identified the two distinct paralogs AtCAD-C and AtCAD-D, which share 75% identity and are likely to be involved in lignin biosynthesis in other plants. Northern, semiquantitative restriction fragment-length polymorphism-reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and western analysis revealed that AtCAD-C and AtCAD-D mRNA and protein ratios were organ dependent. Promoter activities of both genes are high in fibers and in xylem bundles. However, AtCAD-C displayed a larger range of sites of expression than AtCAD-D. Arabidopsis null mutants (Atcad-D and Atcad-C) corresponding to both genes were isolated. CAD activities were drastically reduced in both mutants, with a higher impact on sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase activity (6% and 38% of residual sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase activities for Atcad-D and Atcad-C, respectively). Only Atcad-D showed a slight reduction in Klason lignin content and displayed modifications of lignin structure with a significant reduced proportion of conventional S lignin units in both stems and roots, together with the incorporation of sinapaldehyde structures ether linked at Cβ. These results argue for a substantial role of AtCAD-D in lignification, and more specifically in the biosynthesis of sinapyl alcohol, the precursor of S lignin units. PMID:12805615

  16. A theory of utility conditionals: Paralogical reasoning from decision-theoretic leakage.

    PubMed

    Bonnefon, Jean-François

    2009-10-01

    Many "if p, then q" conditionals have decision-theoretic features, such as antecedents or consequents that relate to the utility functions of various agents. These decision-theoretic features leak into reasoning processes, resulting in various paralogical conclusions. The theory of utility conditionals offers a unified account of the various forms that this phenomenon can take. The theory is built on 2 main components: (1) a representational tool (the utility grid), which summarizes in compact form the decision-theoretic features of a conditional, and (2) a set of folk axioms of decision, which reflect reasoners' beliefs about the way most agents make their decisions. Applying the folk axioms to the utility grid of a conditional allows for the systematic prediction of the paralogical conclusions invited by the utility grid's decision-theoretic features. The theory of utility conditionals significantly extends the scope of current theories of conditional inference and moves reasoning research toward a greater integration with decision-making research.

  17. Interactions involving the Rad51 paralogs Rad51C and XRCC3 in human cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiese, Claudia; Collins, David W.; Albala, Joanna S.; Thompson, Larry H.; Kronenberg, Amy; Schild, David; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Homologous recombinational repair of DNA double-strand breaks and crosslinks in human cells is likely to require Rad51 and the five Rad51 paralogs (XRCC2, XRCC3, Rad51B/Rad51L1, Rad51C/Rad51L2 and Rad51D/Rad51L3), as has been shown in chicken and rodent cells. Previously, we reported on the interactions among these proteins using baculovirus and two- and three-hybrid yeast systems. To test for interactions involving XRCC3 and Rad51C, stable human cell lines have been isolated that express (His)6-tagged versions of XRCC3 or Rad51C. Ni2+-binding experiments demonstrate that XRCC3 and Rad51C interact in human cells. In addition, we find that Rad51C, but not XRCC3, interacts directly or indirectly with Rad51B, Rad51D and XRCC2. These results argue that there are at least two complexes of Rad51 paralogs in human cells (Rad51C-XRCC3 and Rad51B-Rad51C-Rad51D-XRCC2), both containing Rad51C. Moreover, Rad51 is not found in these complexes. X-ray treatment did not alter either the level of any Rad51 paralog or the observed interactions between paralogs. However, the endogenous level of Rad51C is moderately elevated in the XRCC3-overexpressing cell line, suggesting that dimerization between these proteins might help stabilize Rad51C.

  18. 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine is not a paralog-specific Hsp90 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shanshan; Street, Timothy O

    2016-12-01

    The molecular chaperone Hsp90 facilitates the folding and modulates activation of diverse substrate proteins. Unlike other heat shock proteins such as Hsp60 and Hsp70, Hsp90 plays critical regulatory roles by maintaining active states of kinases, many of which are overactive in cancer cells. Four Hsp90 paralogs are expressed in eukaryotic cells: Hsp90α/β (in the cytosol), Grp94 (in the endoplasmic reticulum), Trap1 (in mitochondria). Although numerous Hsp90 inhibitors are being tested in cancer clinical trials, little is known about why different Hsp90 inhibitors show specificity among Hsp90 paralogs. The paralog specificity of Hsp90 inhibitors is likely fundamental to inhibitor efficacy and side effects. In hopes of gaining insight into this issue we examined NECA (5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine), which has been claimed to be an example of a highly specific ligand that binds to one paralog, Grp94, but not cytosolic Hsp90. To our surprise we find that NECA inhibits many different Hsp90 proteins (Grp94, Hsp90α, Trap1, yeast Hsp82, bacterial HtpG). NMR experiments demonstrate that NECA can bind to the N-terminal domains of Grp94 and Hsp82. We use ATPase competition experiments to quantify the inhibitory power of NECA for different Hsp90 proteins. This scale: Hsp82 > Hsp90α > HtpG ≈ Grp94 > Trap1, ranks Grp94 as less sensitive to NECA inhibition. Because NECA is primarily used as an adenosine receptor agonist, our results also suggest that cell biological experiments utilizing NECA may have confounding effects from cytosolic Hsp90 inhibition. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  19. Interactions involving the Rad51 paralogs Rad51C and XRCC3 in human cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiese, Claudia; Collins, David W.; Albala, Joanna S.; Thompson, Larry H.; Kronenberg, Amy; Schild, David; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Homologous recombinational repair of DNA double-strand breaks and crosslinks in human cells is likely to require Rad51 and the five Rad51 paralogs (XRCC2, XRCC3, Rad51B/Rad51L1, Rad51C/Rad51L2 and Rad51D/Rad51L3), as has been shown in chicken and rodent cells. Previously, we reported on the interactions among these proteins using baculovirus and two- and three-hybrid yeast systems. To test for interactions involving XRCC3 and Rad51C, stable human cell lines have been isolated that express (His)6-tagged versions of XRCC3 or Rad51C. Ni2+-binding experiments demonstrate that XRCC3 and Rad51C interact in human cells. In addition, we find that Rad51C, but not XRCC3, interacts directly or indirectly with Rad51B, Rad51D and XRCC2. These results argue that there are at least two complexes of Rad51 paralogs in human cells (Rad51C-XRCC3 and Rad51B-Rad51C-Rad51D-XRCC2), both containing Rad51C. Moreover, Rad51 is not found in these complexes. X-ray treatment did not alter either the level of any Rad51 paralog or the observed interactions between paralogs. However, the endogenous level of Rad51C is moderately elevated in the XRCC3-overexpressing cell line, suggesting that dimerization between these proteins might help stabilize Rad51C.

  20. Sequence context for transcription and translation of the Arabidopsis RPL23aA and RPL23aB paralogs.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Kerri B; Degenhardt, Rory F; Bonham-Smith, Peta C

    2011-09-01

    The 80S cytoplasmic ribosome is responsible for translating the transcriptome into the proteome. Demand for ribosome production depends on growth rate, and both the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and ribosomal protein (RP) components must respond coordinately and rapidly to positive and negative growth stimuli to prevent deleterious effects of excess or insufficient subunits. The 81 RPs of the Arabidopsis 80S ribosome are encoded by multigene families that often exhibit overlapping patterns of transcript accumulation; however, only one isoform of each RP family (with the exception of a small number of acidic RPs) assembles into a single ribosome. Here we dissected the regulatory regions (RRs) of both members of the RPL23a family (RPL23aA and RPL23aB) to identify salient cis-acting elements involved in transcriptional, posttranscriptional, and translational regulation of expression. Full length and truncated RRs of RPL23a paralogs were cloned upstream of a GUS reporter gene and expressed in Arabidopsis transgenic plants. High level expression in mitotically active tissues, driven by RPL23aA and RPL23aB RRs, required TATA-box, telo-box, and site II motif elements. First and second introns were found to play a minor role in posttranscriptional regulation of paralogs, and conserved transcript features (e.g., UTR base composition) may be involved in enhancing translational efficiency. Overall, our results indicate that RPL23a expression is governed by a complex network of multiple regulatory layers.

  1. ZINC-INDUCED FACILITATOR-LIKE family in plants: lineage-specific expansion in monocotyledons and conserved genomic and expression features among rice (Oryza sativa) paralogs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Duplications are very common in the evolution of plant genomes, explaining the high number of members in plant gene families. New genes born after duplication can undergo pseudogenization, neofunctionalization or subfunctionalization. Rice is a model for functional genomics research, an important crop for human nutrition and a target for biofortification. Increased zinc and iron content in the rice grain could be achieved by manipulation of metal transporters. Here, we describe the ZINC-INDUCED FACILITATOR-LIKE (ZIFL) gene family in plants, and characterize the genomic structure and expression of rice paralogs, which are highly affected by segmental duplication. Results Sequences of sixty-eight ZIFL genes, from nine plant species, were comparatively analyzed. Although related to MSF_1 proteins, ZIFL protein sequences consistently grouped separately. Specific ZIFL sequence signatures were identified. Monocots harbor a larger number of ZIFL genes in their genomes than dicots, probably a result of a lineage-specific expansion. The rice ZIFL paralogs were named OsZIFL1 to OsZIFL13 and characterized. The genomic organization of the rice ZIFL genes seems to be highly influenced by segmental and tandem duplications and concerted evolution, as rice genome contains five highly similar ZIFL gene pairs. Most rice ZIFL promoters are enriched for the core sequence of the Fe-deficiency-related box IDE1. Gene expression analyses of different plant organs, growth stages and treatments, both from our qPCR data and from microarray databases, revealed that the duplicated ZIFL gene pairs are mostly co-expressed. Transcripts of OsZIFL4, OsZIFL5, OsZIFL7, and OsZIFL12 accumulate in response to Zn-excess and Fe-deficiency in roots, two stresses with partially overlapping responses. Conclusions We suggest that ZIFL genes have different evolutionary histories in monocot and dicot lineages. In rice, concerted evolution affected ZIFL duplicated genes, possibly maintaining similar

  2. Evolutionary Acquisition of Cysteines Determines FOXO Paralog-Specific Redox Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Putker, Marrit; Vos, Harmjan R.; van Dorenmalen, Kim; de Ruiter, Hesther; Duran, Ana G.; Snel, Berend; Burgering, Boudewijn M.T.; Vermeulen, Michiel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Reduction–oxidation (redox) signaling, the translation of an oxidative intracellular environment into a cellular response, is mediated by the reversible oxidation of specific cysteine thiols. The latter can result in disulfide formation between protein hetero- or homodimers that alter protein function until the local cellular redox environment has returned to the basal state. We have previously shown that this mechanism promotes the nuclear localization and activity of the Forkhead Box O4 (FOXO4) transcription factor. Aims: In this study, we sought to investigate whether redox signaling differentially controls the human FOXO3 and FOXO4 paralogs. Results: We present evidence that FOXO3 and FOXO4 have acquired paralog-specific cysteines throughout vertebrate evolution. Using a proteome-wide screen, we identified previously unknown redox-dependent FOXO3 interaction partners. The nuclear import receptors Importin-7 (IPO7) and Importin-8 (IPO8) form a disulfide-dependent heterodimer with FOXO3, which is required for its reactive oxygen species-induced nuclear translocation. FOXO4 does not interact with IPO7 or IPO8. Innovation and Conclusion: IPO7 and IPO8 control the nuclear import of FOXO3, but not FOXO4, in a redox-sensitive and disulfide-dependent manner. Our findings suggest that evolutionary acquisition of cysteines has contributed to regulatory divergence of FOXO paralogs, and that phylogenetic analysis can aid in the identification of cysteines involved in redox signaling. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 15–28. PMID:25069953

  3. Two CDC42 paralogs modulate C. neoformans thermotolerance and morphogenesis under host physiological conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ballou, Elizabeth R.; Nichols, Connie B.; Miglia, Kathleen J; Kozubowski, Lukasz; Alspaugh, J. Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The precise regulation of morphogenesis is a key mechanism by which cells respond to a variety of stresses, including those encountered by microbial pathogens in the host. The polarity protein Cdc42 regulates cellular morphogenesis throughout eukaryotes, and we explore the role of Cdc42 proteins in the host survival of the human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. Uniquely, C. neoformans has two functional Cdc42 paralogs, Cdc42 and Cdc420. Here we investigate the contribution of each paralog to resistance to host stress. In contrast to non-pathogenic model organisms, C. neoformans Cdc42 proteins are not required for viability under non-stress conditions. In the presence of cell stress, strains deleted for either paralog show defects in thermotolerance and morphogenesis, likely as a result of their roles in the organization of actin and septin structures during bud growth and cytokinesis. These proteins act downstream of C. neoformans Ras1 to regulate its morphogenesis subpathway, but not its effects on mating. Cdc42, and not Cdc420, is required for virulence in a murine model of cryptococcosis. The C. neoformans Cdc42 proteins likely perform complementary functions with other Rho-like GTPases to control cell polarity, septin organization, and hyphal transitions that allow survival in the environment and in the host. PMID:20025659

  4. Diversification of Paralogous α-Isopropylmalate Synthases by Modulation of Feedback Control and Hetero-Oligomerization in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Quezada, Héctor; Duhne, Mariana; González, James; Lezama, Mijail; El-Hafidi, Mohammed; Colón, Maritrini; Martínez de la Escalera, Ximena; Flores-Villegas, Mirelle Citlali; Scazzocchio, Claudio; DeLuna, Alexander; González, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Production of α-isopropylmalate (α-IPM) is critical for leucine biosynthesis and for the global control of metabolism. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has two paralogous genes, LEU4 and LEU9, that encode α-IPM synthase (α-IPMS) isozymes. Little is known about the biochemical differences between these two α-IPMS isoenzymes. Here, we show that the Leu4 homodimer is a leucine-sensitive isoform, while the Leu9 homodimer is resistant to such feedback inhibition. The leu4Δ mutant, which expresses only the feedback-resistant Leu9 homodimer, grows slowly with either glucose or ethanol and accumulates elevated pools of leucine; this phenotype is alleviated by the addition of leucine. Transformation of the leu4Δ mutant with a centromeric plasmid carrying LEU4 restored the wild-type phenotype. Bimolecular fluorescent complementation analysis showed that Leu4-Leu9 heterodimeric isozymes are formed in vivo. Purification and kinetic analysis showed that the hetero-oligomeric isozyme has a distinct leucine sensitivity behavior. Determination of α-IPMS activity in ethanol-grown cultures showed that α-IPM biosynthesis and growth under these respiratory conditions depend on the feedback-sensitive Leu4 homodimer. We conclude that retention and further diversification of two yeast α-IPMSs have resulted in a specific regulatory system that controls the leucine–α-IPM biosynthetic pathway by selective feedback sensitivity of homomeric and heterodimeric isoforms. PMID:25841022

  5. Exchanging ligand-binding specificity between a pair of mouse olfactory receptor paralogs reveals odorant recognition principles.

    PubMed

    Baud, Olivia; Yuan, Shuguang; Veya, Luc; Filipek, Slawomir; Vogel, Horst; Pick, Horst

    2015-10-09

    A multi-gene family of ~1000 G protein-coupled olfactory receptors (ORs) constitutes the molecular basis of mammalian olfaction. Due to the lack of structural data its remarkable capacity to detect and discriminate thousands of odorants remains poorly understood on the structural level of the receptor. Using site-directed mutagenesis we transferred ligand specificity between two functionally related ORs and thereby revealed amino acid residues of central importance for odorant recognition and discrimination of the two receptors. By exchanging two of three residues, differing at equivalent positions of the putative odorant binding site between the mouse OR paralogs Olfr73 (mOR-EG) and Olfr74 (mOR-EV), we selectively changed ligand preference but remarkably also signaling activation strength in both ORs. Computer modeling proposed structural details at atomic resolution how the very same odorant molecule might interact with different contact residues to induce different functional responses in two related receptors. Our findings provide a mechanistic explanation of how the olfactory system distinguishes different molecular aspects of a given odorant molecule, and unravel important molecular details of the combinatorial encoding of odorant identity at the OR level.

  6. Exchanging ligand-binding specificity between a pair of mouse olfactory receptor paralogs reveals odorant recognition principles

    PubMed Central

    Baud, Olivia; Yuan, Shuguang; Veya, Luc; Filipek, Slawomir; Vogel, Horst; Pick, Horst

    2015-01-01

    A multi-gene family of ~1000 G protein-coupled olfactory receptors (ORs) constitutes the molecular basis of mammalian olfaction. Due to the lack of structural data its remarkable capacity to detect and discriminate thousands of odorants remains poorly understood on the structural level of the receptor. Using site-directed mutagenesis we transferred ligand specificity between two functionally related ORs and thereby revealed amino acid residues of central importance for odorant recognition and discrimination of the two receptors. By exchanging two of three residues, differing at equivalent positions of the putative odorant binding site between the mouse OR paralogs Olfr73 (mOR-EG) and Olfr74 (mOR-EV), we selectively changed ligand preference but remarkably also signaling activation strength in both ORs. Computer modeling proposed structural details at atomic resolution how the very same odorant molecule might interact with different contact residues to induce different functional responses in two related receptors. Our findings provide a mechanistic explanation of how the olfactory system distinguishes different molecular aspects of a given odorant molecule, and unravel important molecular details of the combinatorial encoding of odorant identity at the OR level. PMID:26449412

  7. AtGEN1 and AtSEND1, two paralogs in Arabidopsis, possess holliday junction resolvase activity.

    PubMed

    Bauknecht, Markus; Kobbe, Daniela

    2014-09-01

    Holliday junctions (HJs) are physical links between homologous DNA molecules that arise as central intermediary structures during homologous recombination and repair in meiotic and somatic cells. It is necessary for these structures to be resolved to ensure correct chromosome segregation and other functions. In eukaryotes, including plants, homologs of a gene called XPG-like endonuclease1 (GEN1) have been identified that process HJs in a manner analogous to the HJ resolvases of phages, archaea, and bacteria. Here, we report that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), a eukaryotic organism, has two functional GEN1 homologs instead of one. Like all known eukaryotic resolvases, AtGEN1 and Arabidopsis single-strand DNA endonuclease1 both belong to class IV of the Rad2/XPG family of nucleases. Their resolvase activity shares the characteristics of the Escherichia coli radiation and UV sensitive C paradigm for resolvases, which involves resolving HJs by symmetrically oriented incisions in two opposing strands. This leads to ligatable products without the need for further processing. The observation that the sequence context influences the cleavage by the enzymes can be interpreted as a hint for the existence of sequence specificity. The two Arabidopsis paralogs differ in their preferred sequences. The precise cleavage positions observed for the resolution of mobile nicked HJs suggest that these cleavage positions are determined by both the substrate structure and the sequence context at the junction point. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Copper brain protein protection against free radical-induced neuronal death: Survival ratio in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Deloncle, Roger; Fauconneau, Bernard; Guillard, Olivier; Delaval, José; Lesage, Gérard; Pineau, Alain

    2017-01-01

    In Creutzfeldt Jakob, Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases, copper metalloproteins such as prion, amyloid protein precursor and α-synuclein are able to protect against free radicals by reduction from cupric Cu(+2) to cupreous Cu(+). In these pathologies, a regional copper (Cu) brain decrease correlated with an iron, zinc or manganese (Mn) increase has previously been observed, leading to local neuronal death and abnormal deposition of these metalloproteins in β-sheet structures. In this study we demonstrate the protective effect of Cu metalloproteins against deleterious free-radical effects. With neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell cultures, we show that bovine brain prion protein in Cu but not Mn form prevents free radical-induced neuronal death. The survival ratio of SH-SY5Y cells has been measured after UV irradiation (free radical production), when the incubating medium is supplemented with bovine brain homogenate in native, Cu or Mn forms. This ratio, about 28% without any addition or with bovine brain protein added in Mn form, increases by as much as 54.73% with addition to the culture medium of native bovine brain protein and by as much as 95.95% if the addition is carried out in cupric form. This protective effect of brain copper protein against free radical-induced neuronal death has been confirmed with Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry Mn and Cu measurement in bovine brain homogenates: respectively lower than detection limit and 9.01μg/g dry weight for native form; lower than detection limit and 825.85μg/g dry weight for Cu-supplemented form and 1.75 and 68.1μg/g dry weight in Mn-supplemented brain homogenate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Biochemical properties of nematode O-acetylserine(thiol)lyase paralogs imply their distinct roles in hydrogen sulfide homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Vozdek, Roman; Hnízda, Aleš; Krijt, Jakub; Será, Leona; Kožich, Viktor

    2013-12-01

    O-Acetylserine(thiol)lyases (OAS-TLs) play a pivotal role in a sulfur assimilation pathway incorporating sulfide into amino acids in microorganisms and plants, however, these enzymes have not been found in the animal kingdom. Interestingly, the genome of the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans contains three expressed genes predicted to encode OAS-TL orthologs (cysl-1-cysl-3), and a related pseudogene (cysl-4); these genes play different roles in resistance to hypoxia, hydrogen sulfide and cyanide. To get an insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms we purified the three recombinant worm OAS-TL proteins, and we determined their enzymatic activities, substrate binding affinities, quaternary structures and the conformations of their active site shapes. We show that the nematode OAS-TL orthologs can bind O-acetylserine and catalyze the canonical reaction although this ligand may more likely serve as a competitive inhibitor to natural substrates instead of being a substrate for sulfur assimilation. In addition, we propose that S-sulfocysteine may be a novel endogenous substrate for these proteins. However, we observed that the three OAS-TL proteins are conformationally different and exhibit distinct substrate specificity. Based on the available evidences we propose the following model: CYSL-1 interacts with EGL-9 and activates HIF-1 that upregulates expression of genes detoxifying sulfide and cyanide, the CYSL-2 acts as a cyanoalanine synthase in the cyanide detoxification pathway and simultaneously produces hydrogen sulfide, while the role of CYSL-3 remains unclear although it exhibits sulfhydrylase activity in vitro. All these data indicate that C. elegans OAS-TL paralogs have distinct cellular functions and may play different roles in maintaining hydrogen sulfide homeostasis.

  10. Gene duplication can impart fragility, not robustness, in the yeast protein interaction network.

    PubMed

    Diss, Guillaume; Gagnon-Arsenault, Isabelle; Dion-Coté, Anne-Marie; Vignaud, Hélène; Ascencio, Diana I; Berger, Caroline M; Landry, Christian R

    2017-02-10

    The maintenance of duplicated genes is thought to protect cells from genetic perturbations, but the molecular basis of this robustness is largely unknown. By measuring the interaction of yeast proteins with their partners in wild-type cells and in cells lacking a paralog, we found that 22 out of 56 paralog pairs compensate for the lost interactions. An equivalent number of pairs exhibit the opposite behavior and require each other's presence for maintaining their interactions. These dependent paralogs generally interact physically, regulate each other's abundance, and derive from ancestral self-interacting proteins. This reveals that gene duplication may actually increase mutational fragility instead of robustness in a large number of cases.

  11. Functional Interplay of Two Paralogs Encoding SWI/SNF Chromatin-Remodeling Accessory Subunits During Caenorhabditis elegans Development.

    PubMed

    Ertl, Iris; Porta-de-la-Riva, Montserrat; Gómez-Orte, Eva; Rubio-Peña, Karinna; Aristizábal-Corrales, David; Cornes, Eric; Fontrodona, Laura; Osteikoetxea, Xabier; Ayuso, Cristina; Askjaer, Peter; Cabello, Juan; Cerón, Julián

    2016-03-01

    SWI/SNF ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes have been related to several cellular processes such as transcription, regulation of chromosomal stability, and DNA repair. The Caenorhabditis elegans gene ham-3 (also known as swsn-2.1) and its paralog swsn-2.2 encode accessory subunits of SWI/SNF complexes. Using RNA interference (RNAi) assays and diverse alleles we investigated whether ham-3 and swsn-2.2 have different functions during C. elegans development since they encode proteins that are probably mutually exclusive in a given SWI/SNF complex. We found that ham-3 and swsn-2.2 display similar functions in vulva specification, germline development, and intestinal cell proliferation, but have distinct roles in embryonic development. Accordingly, we detected functional redundancy in some developmental processes and demonstrated by RNA sequencing of RNAi-treated L4 animals that ham-3 and swsn-2.2 regulate the expression of a common subset of genes but also have specific targets. Cell lineage analyses in the embryo revealed hyper-proliferation of intestinal cells in ham-3 null mutants whereas swsn-2.2 is required for proper cell divisions. Using a proteomic approach, we identified SWSN-2.2-interacting proteins needed for early cell divisions, such as SAO-1 and ATX-2, and also nuclear envelope proteins such as MEL-28. swsn-2.2 mutants phenocopy mel-28 loss-of-function, and we observed that SWSN-2.2 and MEL-28 colocalize in mitotic and meiotic chromosomes. Moreover, we demonstrated that SWSN-2.2 is required for correct chromosome segregation and nuclear reassembly after mitosis including recruitment of MEL-28 to the nuclear periphery.

  12. SP Transcription Factor Paralogs and DNA-Binding Sites Coevolve and Adaptively Converge in Mammals and Birds

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Ken Daigoro; Pollock, David D.

    2012-01-01

    Functional modification of regulatory proteins can affect hundreds of genes throughout the genome, and is therefore thought to be almost universally deleterious. This belief, however, has recently been challenged. A potential example comes from transcription factor SP1, for which statistical evidence indicates that motif preferences were altered in eutherian mammals. Here, we set out to discover possible structural and theoretical explanations, evaluate the role of selection in SP1 evolution, and discover effects on coregulatory proteins. We show that SP1 motif preferences were convergently altered in birds as well as mammals, inducing coevolutionary changes in over 800 regulatory regions. Structural and phylogenic evidence implicates a single causative amino acid replacement at the same SP1 position along both lineages. Furthermore, paralogs SP3 and SP4, which coregulate SP1 target genes through competitive binding to the same sites, have accumulated convergent replacements at the homologous position multiple times during eutherian and bird evolution, presumably to preserve competitive binding. To determine plausibility, we developed and implemented a simple model of transcription factor and binding site coevolution. This model predicts that, in contrast to prevailing beliefs, even small selective benefits per locus can drive concurrent fixation of transcription factor and binding site mutants under a broad range of conditions. Novel binding sites tend to arise de novo, rather than by mutation from ancestral sites, a prediction substantiated by SP1-binding site alignments. Thus, multiple lines of evidence indicate that selection has driven convergent evolution of transcription factors along with their binding sites and coregulatory proteins. PMID:23019068

  13. Functional Interplay of Two Paralogs Encoding SWI/SNF Chromatin-Remodeling Accessory Subunits During Caenorhabditis elegans Development

    PubMed Central

    Ertl, Iris; Porta-de-la-Riva, Montserrat; Gómez-Orte, Eva; Rubio-Peña, Karinna; Aristizábal-Corrales, David; Cornes, Eric; Fontrodona, Laura; Osteikoetxea, Xabier; Ayuso, Cristina; Askjaer, Peter; Cabello, Juan; Cerón, Julián

    2016-01-01

    SWI/SNF ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes have been related to several cellular processes such as transcription, regulation of chromosomal stability, and DNA repair. The Caenorhabditis elegans gene ham-3 (also known as swsn-2.1) and its paralog swsn-2.2 encode accessory subunits of SWI/SNF complexes. Using RNA interference (RNAi) assays and diverse alleles we investigated whether ham-3 and swsn-2.2 have different functions during C. elegans development since they encode proteins that are probably mutually exclusive in a given SWI/SNF complex. We found that ham-3 and swsn-2.2 display similar functions in vulva specification, germline development, and intestinal cell proliferation, but have distinct roles in embryonic development. Accordingly, we detected functional redundancy in some developmental processes and demonstrated by RNA sequencing of RNAi-treated L4 animals that ham-3 and swsn-2.2 regulate the expression of a common subset of genes but also have specific targets. Cell lineage analyses in the embryo revealed hyper-proliferation of intestinal cells in ham-3 null mutants whereas swsn-2.2 is required for proper cell divisions. Using a proteomic approach, we identified SWSN-2.2-interacting proteins needed for early cell divisions, such as SAO-1 and ATX-2, and also nuclear envelope proteins such as MEL-28. swsn-2.2 mutants phenocopy mel-28 loss-of-function, and we observed that SWSN-2.2 and MEL-28 colocalize in mitotic and meiotic chromosomes. Moreover, we demonstrated that SWSN-2.2 is required for correct chromosome segregation and nuclear reassembly after mitosis including recruitment of MEL-28 to the nuclear periphery. PMID:26739451

  14. Paralog-divergent Features May Help Reduce Off-target Effects of Drugs: Hints from Glucagon Subfamily Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sa, Zhining; Zhou, Jingqi; Zou, Yangyun; Su, Zhixi; Gu, Xun

    2017-08-01

    Side effects from targeted drugs remain a serious concern. One reason is the nonselective binding of a drug to unintended proteins such as its paralogs, which are highly homologous in sequences and have similar structures and drug-binding pockets. To identify targetable differences between paralogs, we analyzed two types (type-I and type-II) of functional divergence between two paralogs in the known target protein receptor family G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) at the amino acid level. Paralogous protein receptors in glucagon-like subfamily, glucagon receptor (GCGR) and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R), exhibit divergence in ligands and are clinically validated drug targets for type 2 diabetes. Our data showed that type-II amino acids were significantly enriched in the binding sites of antagonist MK-0893 to GCGR, which had a radical shift in physicochemical properties between GCGR and GLP-1R. We also examined the role of type-I amino acids between GCGR and GLP-1R. The divergent features between GCGR and GLP-1R paralogs may be helpful in their discrimination, thus enabling the identification of binding sites to reduce undesirable side effects and increase the target specificity of drugs. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Dealing with paralogy in RADseq data: in silico detection and single nucleotide polymorphism validation in Robinia pseudoacacia L.

    PubMed

    Verdu, Cindy F; Guichoux, Erwan; Quevauvillers, Samuel; De Thier, Olivier; Laizet, Yec'han; Delcamp, Adline; Gévaudant, Frédéric; Monty, Arnaud; Porté, Annabel J; Lejeune, Philippe; Lassois, Ludivine; Mariette, Stéphanie

    2016-10-01

    The RADseq technology allows researchers to efficiently develop thousands of polymorphic loci across multiple individuals with little or no prior information on the genome. However, many questions remain about the biases inherent to this technology. Notably, sequence misalignments arising from paralogy may affect the development of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers and the estimation of genetic diversity. We evaluated the impact of putative paralog loci on genetic diversity estimation during the development of SNPs from a RADseq dataset for the nonmodel tree species Robinia pseudoacacia L. We sequenced nine genotypes and analyzed the frequency of putative paralogous RAD loci as a function of both the depth of coverage and the mismatch threshold allowed between loci. Putative paralogy was detected in a very variable number of loci, from 1% to more than 20%, with the depth of coverage having a major influence on the result. Putative paralogy artificially increased the observed degree of polymorphism and resulting estimates of diversity. The choice of the depth of coverage also affected diversity estimation and SNP validation: A low threshold decreased the chances of detecting minor alleles while a high threshold increased allelic dropout. SNP validation was better for the low threshold (4×) than for the high threshold (18×) we tested. Using the strategy developed here, we were able to validate more than 80% of the SNPs tested by means of individual genotyping, resulting in a readily usable set of 330 SNPs, suitable for use in population genetics applications.

  16. Identification of paralogous life-cycle stage specific cytoskeletal proteins in the parasite Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Portman, Neil; Gull, Keith

    2014-01-01

    The life cycle of the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei, is characterised by a transition between insect and mammalian hosts representing very different environments that present the parasite with very different challenges. These challenges are met by the expression of life-cycle stage-specific cohorts of proteins, which function in systems such as metabolism and immune evasion. These life-cycle transitions are also accompanied by morphological rearrangements orchestrated by microtubule dynamics and associated proteins of the subpellicular microtubule array. Here we employed a gel-based comparative proteomic technique, Difference Gel Electrophoresis, to identify cytoskeletal proteins that are expressed differentially in mammalian infective and insect form trypanosomes. From this analysis we identified a pair of novel, paralogous proteins, one of which is expressed in the procyclic form and the other in the bloodstream form. We show that these proteins, CAP51 and CAP51V, localise to the subpellicular corset of microtubules and are essential for correct organisation of the cytoskeleton and successful cytokinesis in their respective life cycle stages. We demonstrate for the first time redundancy of function between life-cycle stage specific paralogous sets in the cytoskeleton and reveal modification of cytoskeletal components in situ prior to their removal during differentiation from the bloodstream form to the insect form. These specific results emphasise a more generic concept that the trypanosome genome encodes a cohort of cytoskeletal components that are present in at least two forms with life-cycle stage-specific expression.

  17. Relief of autoinhibition by conformational switch explains enzyme activation by a catalytically dead paralog

    SciTech Connect

    Volkov, Oleg A.; Kinch, Lisa; Ariagno, Carson; Deng, Xiaoyi; Zhong, Shihua; Grishin, Nick; Tomchick, Diana R.; Chen, Zhe; Phillips, Margaret A.

    2016-12-15

    Catalytically inactive enzyme paralogs occur in many genomes. Some regulate their active counterparts but the structural principles of this regulation remain largely unknown. We report X-ray structures ofTrypanosoma brucei S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase alone and in functional complex with its catalytically dead paralogous partner, prozyme. We show monomericTbAdoMetDC is inactive because of autoinhibition by its N-terminal sequence. Heterodimerization with prozyme displaces this sequence from the active site through a complex mechanism involving acis-to-transproline isomerization, reorganization of a β-sheet, and insertion of the N-terminal α-helix into the heterodimer interface, leading to enzyme activation. We propose that the evolution of this intricate regulatory mechanism was facilitated by the acquisition of the dimerization domain, a single step that can in principle account for the divergence of regulatory schemes in the AdoMetDC enzyme family. These studies elucidate an allosteric mechanism in an enzyme and a plausible scheme by which such complex cooperativity evolved.

  18. Mapping proteins in the presence of paralogs using units of coevolution

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We study the problem of mapping proteins between two protein families in the presence of paralogs. This problem occurs as a difficult subproblem in coevolution-based computational approaches for protein-protein interaction prediction. Results Similar to prior approaches, our method is based on the idea that coevolution implies equal rates of sequence evolution among the interacting proteins, and we provide a first attempt to quantify this notion in a formal statistical manner. We call the units that are central to this quantification scheme the units of coevolution. A unit consists of two mapped protein pairs and its score quantifies the coevolution of the pairs. This quantification allows us to provide a maximum likelihood formulation of the paralog mapping problem and to cast it into a binary quadratic programming formulation. Conclusion CUPID, our software tool based on a Lagrangian relaxation of this formulation, makes it, for the first time, possible to compute state-of-the-art quality pairings in a few minutes of runtime. In summary, we suggest a novel alternative to the earlier available approaches, which is statistically sound and computationally feasible. PMID:24564758

  19. HasB, the Serratia marcescens TonB paralog, is specific to HasR.

    PubMed

    Benevides-Matos, Najla; Wandersman, Cécile; Biville, Francis

    2008-01-01

    Serratia marcescens possesses two functional TonB paralogs, TonB(Sm) and HasB, for energizing TonB-dependent transport receptors (TBDT). Previous work had shown that HasB is specific to heme uptake in the natural host and in Escherichia coli expressing the S. marcescens TBDT receptor HasR, whereas the S. marcescens TonB and E. coli TonB proteins function equally well with various TBDT receptors for heme and siderophores. This has raised the question of the target of this specificity. HasB could be specific either to heme TBDT receptors or only to HasR. To resolve this question, we have cloned in E. coli another S. marcescens heme receptor, HemR, and we show here that this receptor is TonB dependent and does not work with HasB. This demonstrates that HasB is not dedicated to heme TBDT receptors but rather forms a specific pair with HasR. This is the first reported case of a specific TonB protein working with only one TBDT receptor in one given species. We discuss the occurrence, possible molecular mechanisms, and selective advantages of such dedicated TonB paralogs.

  20. Relief of autoinhibition by conformational switch explains enzyme activation by a catalytically dead paralog

    PubMed Central

    Volkov, Oleg A; Kinch, Lisa; Ariagno, Carson; Deng, Xiaoyi; Zhong, Shihua; Grishin, Nick; Tomchick, Diana R; Chen, Zhe; Phillips, Margaret A

    2016-01-01

    Catalytically inactive enzyme paralogs occur in many genomes. Some regulate their active counterparts but the structural principles of this regulation remain largely unknown. We report X-ray structures of Trypanosoma brucei S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase alone and in functional complex with its catalytically dead paralogous partner, prozyme. We show monomeric TbAdoMetDC is inactive because of autoinhibition by its N-terminal sequence. Heterodimerization with prozyme displaces this sequence from the active site through a complex mechanism involving a cis-to-trans proline isomerization, reorganization of a β-sheet, and insertion of the N-terminal α-helix into the heterodimer interface, leading to enzyme activation. We propose that the evolution of this intricate regulatory mechanism was facilitated by the acquisition of the dimerization domain, a single step that can in principle account for the divergence of regulatory schemes in the AdoMetDC enzyme family. These studies elucidate an allosteric mechanism in an enzyme and a plausible scheme by which such complex cooperativity evolved. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20198.001 PMID:27977001

  1. In Vitro Antioxidant-Activity Evaluation of Gallic-Acid-Grafted Chitosan Conjugate Synthesized by Free-Radical-Induced Grafting Method.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qiaobin; Wang, Taoran; Zhou, Mingyong; Xue, Jingyi; Luo, Yangchao

    2016-07-27

    The major objective of this work was to develop a green and facile process to prepare gallic acid-chitosan conjugate and comprehensively evaluate the physicochemical properties and biological activities of an as-prepared water-soluble chitosan derivative. A free-radical-induced grafting approach using an ascorbic acid-hydrogen peroxide redox pair was adopted. The obtained conjugate was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, UV-vis, X-ray diffraction, and pKa analysis. The antioxidant activities were evaluated by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6)-sulphonic acid (ABTS), reducing power, and oxygen-radical antioxidant-capacity assays. The results showed that the mass ratio of gallic acid to chitosan played a vital role in determining the grafting degree and ζ potential of the conjugates, with the ratio of 0.5:1 being the optimal ratio that resulted in the highest grafting degree. The antioxidant assays demonstrated that conjugation significantly improved the antioxidant activities, being dramatically higher than that of free chitosan. It was notable that the DPPH- and ABTS-scavenging activities of conjugate at 0.4 mg/mL reached the same level as the free gallic acid at the equivalent concentration. Our study demonstrated a green and facile synthesis approach to preparing a novel water-soluble chitosan derivative that may have promising potentials in the food industry.

  2. Functional characterization of two paralogs that are novel RNA binding proteins influencing mitochondrial transcripts of Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Kafková, Lucie; Ammerman, Michelle L; Faktorová, Drahomíra; Fisk, John C; Zimmer, Sara L; Sobotka, Roman; Read, Laurie K; Lukes, Julius; Hashimi, Hassan

    2012-10-01

    A majority of Trypanosoma brucei proteins have unknown functions, a consequence of its independent evolutionary history within the order Kinetoplastida that allowed for the emergence of several unique biological properties. Among these is RNA editing, needed for expression of mitochondrial-encoded genes. The recently discovered mitochondrial RNA binding complex 1 (MRB1) is composed of proteins with several functions in processing organellar RNA. We characterize two MRB1 subunits, referred to herein as MRB8170 and MRB4160, which are paralogs arisen from a large chromosome duplication occurring only in T. brucei. As with many other MRB1 proteins, both have no recognizable domains, motifs, or orthologs outside the order. We show that they are both novel RNA binding proteins, possibly representing a new class of these proteins. They associate with a similar subset of MRB1 subunits but not directly with each other. We generated cell lines that either individually or simultaneously target the mRNAs encoding both proteins using RNAi. Their dual silencing results in a differential effect on moderately and pan-edited RNAs, suggesting a possible functional separation of the two proteins. Cell growth persists upon RNAi silencing of each protein individually in contrast to the dual knockdown. Yet, their apparent redundancy in terms of cell viability is at odds with the finding that only one of these knockdowns results in the general degradation of pan-edited RNAs. While MRB8170 and MRB4160 share a considerable degree of conservation, our results suggest that their recent sequence divergence has led to them influencing mitochondrial mRNAs to differing degrees.

  3. Collaborative roles of gammaH2AX and the Rad51 paralog Xrcc3 in homologous recombinational repair.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Eiichiro; Zhao, Guang Yu; Kohzaki, Masaoki; Dhar, Pawan Kumar; Kikuchi, Koji; Redon, Christophe; Pilch, Duane R; Bonner, William M; Nakano, Atsushi; Watanabe, Masami; Nakayama, Tatsuo; Takeda, Shunichi; Takami, Yasunari

    2007-03-01

    One of the earliest events in the signal transduction cascade that initiates a DNA damage checkpoint is the phosphorylation on serine 139 of histone H2AX (gammaH2AX) at DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). However, the role of gammaH2AX in DNA repair is poorly understood. To address this question, we generated chicken DT40 cells carrying a serine to alanine mutation at position 139 of H2AX (H2AX(-/S139A)) and examined their DNA repair capacity. H2AX(-/S139A) cells exhibited defective homologous recombinational repair (HR) as manifested by delayed Rad51 focus formation following ionizing radiation (IR) and hypersensitivity to the topoisomerase I inhibitor, camptothecin (CPT), which causes DSBs at replication blockage. Deletion of the Rad51 paralog gene, XRCC3, also delays Rad51 focus formation. To test the interaction of Xrcc3 and gammaH2AX, we disrupted XRCC3 in H2AX(-/S139A) cells. XRCC3(-/-)/H2AX(-/S139A) mutants were not viable, although this synthetic lethality was reversed by inserting a transgene that conditionally expresses wild-type H2AX. Upon repression of the wild-type H2AX transgene, XRCC3(-/-)/H2AX(-/S139A) cells failed to form Rad51 foci and exhibited markedly increased levels of chromosomal aberrations after CPT treatment. These results indicate that H2AX and XRCC3 act in separate arms of a branched pathway to facilitate Rad51 assembly.

  4. An independent genome duplication inferred from Hox paralogs in the American paddlefish--a representative basal ray-finned fish and important comparative reference.

    PubMed

    Crow, Karen D; Smith, Christopher D; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Wagner, Günter P; Amemiya, Chris T

    2012-01-01

    Vertebrates have experienced two rounds of whole-genome duplication (WGD) in the stem lineages of deep nodes within the group and a subsequent duplication event in the stem lineage of the teleosts-a highly diverse group of ray-finned fishes. Here, we present the first full Hox gene sequences for any member of the Acipenseriformes, the American paddlefish, and confirm that an independent WGD occurred in the paddlefish lineage, approximately 42 Ma based on sequences spanning the entire HoxA cluster and eight genes on the HoxD gene cluster. These clusters comprise different HOX loci and maintain conserved synteny relative to bichir, zebrafish, stickleback, and pufferfish, as well as human, mouse, and chick. We also provide a gene genealogy for the duplicated fzd8 gene in paddlefish and present evidence for the first Hox14 gene in any ray-finned fish. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the American paddlefish has an independently duplicated genome. Substitution patterns of the "alpha" paralogs on both the HoxA and HoxD gene clusters suggest transcriptional inactivation consistent with functional diploidization. Further, there are similarities in the pattern of sequence divergence among duplicated Hox genes in paddlefish and teleost lineages, even though they occurred independently approximately 200 Myr apart. We highlight implications on comparative analyses in the study of the "fin-limb transition" as well as gene and genome duplication in bony fishes, which includes all ray-finned fishes as well as the lobe-finned fishes and tetrapod vertebrates.

  5. MglC, a Paralog of Myxococcus xanthus GTPase-Activating Protein MglB, Plays a Divergent Role in Motility Regulation

    PubMed Central

    McLoon, Anna L.; Wuichet, Kristin; Häsler, Michael; Keilberg, Daniela; Szadkowski, Dobromir

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In order to optimize interactions with their environment and one another, bacteria regulate their motility. In the case of the rod-shaped cells of Myxococcus xanthus, regulated motility is essential for social behaviors. M. xanthus moves over surfaces using type IV pilus-dependent motility and gliding motility. These two motility systems are coordinated by a protein module that controls cell polarity and consists of three polarly localized proteins, the small G protein MglA, the cognate MglA GTPase-activating protein MglB, and the response regulator RomR. Cellular reversals are induced by the Frz chemosensory system, and the output response regulator of this system, FrzZ, interfaces with the MglA/MglB/RomR module to invert cell polarity. Using a computational approach, we identify a paralog of MglB, MXAN_5770 (MglC). Genetic epistasis experiments demonstrate that MglC functions in the same pathway as MglA, MglB, RomR, and FrzZ and is important for regulating cellular reversals. Like MglB, MglC localizes to the cell poles asymmetrically and with a large cluster at the lagging pole. Correct polar localization of MglC depends on RomR and MglB. Consistently, MglC interacts directly with MglB and the C-terminal output domain of RomR, and we identified a surface of MglC that is necessary for the interaction with MglB and for MglC function. Together, our findings identify an additional member of the M. xanthus polarity module involved in regulating motility and demonstrate how gene duplication followed by functional divergence can add a layer of control to the complex cellular processes of motility and motility regulation. IMPORTANCE Gene duplication and the subsequent divergence of the duplicated genes are important evolutionary mechanisms for increasing both biological complexity and regulation of biological processes. The bacterium Myxococcus xanthus is a soil bacterium with an unusually large genome that carries out several social processes, including

  6. Whole-Genome Analysis of Gene Conversion Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chih-Hao; Zhang, Yu; Hardison, Ross; Miller, Webb

    Gene conversion events are often overlooked in analyses of genome evolution. In a conversion event, an interval of DNA sequence (not necessarily containing a gene) overwrites a highly similar sequence. The event creates relationships among genomic intervals that can confound attempts to identify orthologs and to transfer functional annotation between genomes. Here we examine 1,112,202 paralogous pairs of human genomic intervals, and detect conversion events in about 13.5% of them. Properties of the putative gene conversions are analyzed, such as the lengths of the paralogous pairs and the spacing between their sources and targets. Our approach is illustrated using conversion events in the beta-globin gene cluster.

  7. Physiology, pharmacology, and therapeutic relevance of urocortins in mammals: ancient CRF paralogs

    PubMed Central

    Fekete, Éva M.; Zorrilla, Eric P.

    2007-01-01

    Urocortins, three paralogs of the stress-related peptide corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) found in bony fish, amphibians, birds and mammals, have unique phylogenies, pharmacologies, and tissue distributions. As a result and despite a structural family resemblance, the natural functions of urocortins and CRF in mammalian homeostatic responses differ substantially. Endogenous urocortins are neither simply counterpoints nor mimics of endogenous CRF action. In their own right, urocortins may be clinically relevant molecules in the pathogenesis or management of many conditions, including congestive heart failure, hypertension, gastrointestinal and inflammatory disorders (irritable bowel syndrome, active gastritis, gastroparesis, rheumatoid arthritis), atopic/allergic disorders (dermatitis, urticaria, asthma), pregnancy and parturition (preeclampsia, spontaneous abortion, onset and maintenance of effective labor), major depression and obesity. Safety trials for intravenous urocortin treatment have already begun for the treatment of congestive heart failure. Further understanding the unique functions of urocortin 1, urocortin 2 and urocortin 3 action may uncover other therapeutic opportunities. PMID:17083971

  8. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) paralog dose governs T cell effector and regulatory functions

    PubMed Central

    Villarino, Alejandro; Laurence, Arian; Robinson, Gertraud W; Bonelli, Michael; Dema, Barbara; Afzali, Behdad; Shih, Han-Yu; Sun, Hong-Wei; Brooks, Stephen R; Hennighausen, Lothar; Kanno, Yuka; O'Shea, John J

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor STAT5 is fundamental to the mammalian immune system. However, the relationship between its two paralogs, STAT5A and STAT5B, and the extent to which they are functionally distinct, remain uncertain. Using mouse models of paralog deficiency, we demonstrate that they are not equivalent for CD4+ 'helper' T cells, the principal orchestrators of adaptive immunity. Instead, we find that STAT5B is dominant for both effector and regulatory (Treg) responses and, therefore, uniquely necessary for immunological tolerance. Comparative analysis of genomic distribution and transcriptomic output confirm that STAT5B has fargreater impact but, surprisingly, the data point towards asymmetric expression (i.e. paralog dose), rather than distinct functional properties, as the key distinguishing feature. Thus, we propose a quantitative model of STAT5 paralog activity whereby relative abundance imposes functional specificity (or dominance) in the face of widespread structural homology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08384.001 PMID:26999798

  9. Helicobacter pylori bab Paralog Distribution and Association with cagA, vacA, and homA/B Genotypes in American and South Korean Clinical Isolates.

    PubMed

    Kim, Aeryun; Servetas, Stephanie L; Kang, Jieun; Kim, Jinmoon; Jang, Sungil; Cha, Ho Jin; Lee, Wan Jin; Kim, June; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Peek, Richard M; Merrell, D Scott; Cha, Jeong-Heon

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori genetic variation is a crucial component of colonization and persistence within the inhospitable niche of the gastric mucosa. As such, numerous H. pylori genes have been shown to vary in terms of presence and genomic location within this pathogen. Among the variable factors, the Bab family of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) has been shown to differ within subsets of strains. To better understand genetic variation among the bab genes and to determine whether this variation differed among isolates obtained from different geographic locations, we characterized the distribution of the Bab family members in 80 American H. pylori clinical isolates (AH) and 80 South Korean H. pylori clinical isolates (KH). Overall, we identified 23 different bab genotypes (19 in AH and 11 in KH), but only 5 occurred in greater than 5 isolates. Regardless of strain origin, a strain in which locus A and locus B were both occupied by a bab gene was the most common (85%); locus C was only occupied in those isolates that carried bab paralog at locus A and B. While the babA/babB/- genotype predominated in the KH (78.8%), no single genotype could account for greater than 40% in the AH collection. In addition to basic genotyping, we also identified associations between bab genotype and well known virulence factors cagA and vacA. Specifically, significant associations between babA at locus A and the cagA EPIYA-ABD motif (P<0.0001) and the vacA s1/i1/m1 allele (P<0.0001) were identified. Log-linear modeling further revealed a three-way association between bab carried at locus A, vacA, and number of OMPs from the HOM family (P<0.002). En masse this study provides a detailed characterization of the bab genotypes from two distinct populations. Our analysis suggests greater variability in the AH, perhaps due to adaptation to a more diverse host population. Furthermore, when considering the presence or absence of both the bab and homA/B paralogs at their given loci and the vac

  10. Helicobacter pylori bab Paralog Distribution and Association with cagA, vacA, and homA/B Genotypes in American and South Korean Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jieun; Kim, Jinmoon; Jang, Sungil; Cha, Ho Jin; Lee, Wan Jin; Kim, June; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Peek, Richard M.; Merrell, D. Scott; Cha, Jeong-Heon

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori genetic variation is a crucial component of colonization and persistence within the inhospitable niche of the gastric mucosa. As such, numerous H. pylori genes have been shown to vary in terms of presence and genomic location within this pathogen. Among the variable factors, the Bab family of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) has been shown to differ within subsets of strains. To better understand genetic variation among the bab genes and to determine whether this variation differed among isolates obtained from different geographic locations, we characterized the distribution of the Bab family members in 80 American H. pylori clinical isolates (AH) and 80 South Korean H. pylori clinical isolates (KH). Overall, we identified 23 different bab genotypes (19 in AH and 11 in KH), but only 5 occurred in greater than 5 isolates. Regardless of strain origin, a strain in which locus A and locus B were both occupied by a bab gene was the most common (85%); locus C was only occupied in those isolates that carried bab paralog at locus A and B. While the babA/babB/- genotype predominated in the KH (78.8%), no single genotype could account for greater than 40% in the AH collection. In addition to basic genotyping, we also identified associations between bab genotype and well known virulence factors cagA and vacA. Specifically, significant associations between babA at locus A and the cagA EPIYA-ABD motif (P<0.0001) and the vacA s1/i1/m1 allele (P<0.0001) were identified. Log-linear modeling further revealed a three-way association between bab carried at locus A, vacA, and number of OMPs from the HOM family (P<0.002). En masse this study provides a detailed characterization of the bab genotypes from two distinct populations. Our analysis suggests greater variability in the AH, perhaps due to adaptation to a more diverse host population. Furthermore, when considering the presence or absence of both the bab and homA/B paralogs at their given loci and the vac

  11. Assessing functional divergence in EF-1alpha and its paralogs in eukaryotes and archaebacteria.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Yuji; Blouin, Christian; Susko, Edward; Roger, Andrew J

    2003-07-15

    A number of methods have recently been published that use phylogenetic information extracted from large multiple sequence alignments to detect sites that have changed properties in related protein families. In this study we use such methods to assess functional divergence between eukaryotic EF-1alpha (eEF-1alpha), archaebacterial EF-1alpha (aEF-1alpha) and two eukaryote-specific EF-1alpha paralogs-eukaryotic release factor 3 (eRF3) and Hsp70 subfamily B suppressor 1 (HBS1). Overall, the evolutionary modes of aEF-1alpha, HBS1 and eRF3 appear to significantly differ from that of eEF-1alpha. However, functionally divergent (FD) sites detected between aEF-1alpha and eEF-1alpha only weakly overlap with sites implicated as putative EF-1beta or aminoacyl-tRNA (aa-tRNA) binding residues in EF-1alpha, as expected based on the shared ancestral primary translational functions of these two orthologs. In contrast, FD sites detected between eEF-1alpha and its paralogs significantly overlap with the putative EF-1beta and/or aa-tRNA binding sites in EF-1alpha. In eRF3 and HBS1, these sites appear to be released from functional constraints, indicating that they bind neither eEF-1beta nor aa-tRNA. These results are consistent with experimental observations that eRF3 does not bind to aa-tRNA, but do not support the 'EF-1alpha-like' function recently proposed for HBS1. We re-assess the available genetic data for HBS1 in light of our analyses, and propose that this protein may function in stop codon-independent peptide release.

  12. Identification and functional characterization of a novel bacterial type asparagine synthetase A: a tRNA synthetase paralog from Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Manhas, Reetika; Tripathi, Pankaj; Khan, Sameena; Sethu Lakshmi, Bhavana; Lal, Shambhu Krishan; Gowri, Venkatraman Subramanian; Sharma, Amit; Madhubala, Rentala

    2014-04-25

    Asparagine is formed by two structurally distinct asparagine synthetases in prokaryotes. One is the ammonia-utilizing asparagine synthetase A (AsnA), and the other is asparagine synthetase B (AsnB) that uses glutamine or ammonia as a nitrogen source. In a previous investigation using sequence-based analysis, we had shown that Leishmania spp. possess asparagine-tRNA synthetase paralog asparagine synthetase A (LdASNA) that is ammonia-dependent. Here, we report the cloning, expression, and kinetic analysis of ASNA from Leishmania donovani. Interestingly, LdASNA was both ammonia- and glutamine-dependent. To study the physiological role of ASNA in Leishmania, gene deletion mutations were attempted via targeted gene replacement. Gene deletion of LdASNA showed a growth delay in mutants. However, chromosomal null mutants of LdASNA could not be obtained as the double transfectant mutants showed aneuploidy. These data suggest that LdASNA is essential for survival of the Leishmania parasite. LdASNA enzyme was recalcitrant toward crystallization so we instead crystallized and solved the atomic structure of its close homolog from Trypanosoma brucei (TbASNA) at 2.2 Å. A very significant conservation in active site residues is observed between TbASNA and Escherichia coli AsnA. It is evident that the absence of an LdASNA homolog from humans and its essentiality for the parasites make LdASNA a novel drug target.

  13. Pathways to Brain Aging and Their Modifiers: Free-Radical-Induced Energetic and Neural Decline in Senescence (FRIENDS) Model - A Mini-Review.

    PubMed

    Raz, Naftali; Daugherty, Ana M

    2017-09-01

    In this mini-review, we survey the extant literature on brain aging, with the emphasis on longitudinal studies of neuroanatomy, including regional brain volumes and white matter microstructure. We assess the impact of vascular, metabolic, and inflammatory risk factors on the trajectories of change in regional brain volumes and white matter properties, as well as the relationships between neuroanatomical and physiological changes and their influence on cognitive performance. We examine these findings in the context of current biological theories of aging and propose the means of integrating noninvasive measures - spectroscopic indices of brain energy metabolism and regional iron deposits - as valuable proxies for elucidating the basic neurobiology of human brain aging. In a brief summary of the recent findings pertaining to age-related changes in the brain structure and their impact on cognition, we discuss the role of vascular, metabolic, and inflammatory risk factors in shaping the trajectories of change. Drawing on the extant biological theories of aging and mindful of the brain's role as a disproportionately voracious energy consumer in mammals, we emphasize the importance of the fundamental bioenergetic mechanisms as drivers of age-related changes in brain structure and function. We sketch out a model that builds on the conceptualization of aging as an expression of cumulative cellular damage inflicted by reactive oxygen species and ensuing declines in energy metabolism. We outline the ways and means of adapting this model, Free-Radical-Induced Energetic and Neural Decline in Senescence (FRIENDS), to human aging and testing it within the constraints of noninvasive neuroimaging. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Effects of MreB paralogs on poly-γ-glutamic acid synthesis and cell morphology in Bacillus amyloliquefaciens.

    PubMed

    Gao, Weixia; Zhang, Zhongxiong; Feng, Jun; Dang, Yulei; Quan, Yufen; Gu, Yanyan; Wang, Shufang; Song, Cunjiang

    2016-09-01

    Actin-like MreB paralogs play important roles in cell shape maintenance, cell wall synthesis and the regulation of the D,L-endopeptidases, CwlO and LytE. The gram-positive bacteria, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens LL3, is a poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) producing strain that contains three MreB paralogs: MreB, Mbl and MreBH. In B. amyloliquefaciens, CwlO and LytE can degrade γ-PGA. In this study, we aimed to test the hypothesis that modulating transcript levels of MreB paralogs would alter the synthesis and degradation of γ-PGA. The results showed that overexpression or inhibition of MreB, Mbl or MreBH had distinct effects on cell morphology and the molecular weight of the γ-PGA products. In fermentation medium, cells of mreB inhibition mutant were 50.2% longer than LL3, and the γ-PGA titer increased by 55.7%. However, changing the expression level of mbl showed only slight effects on the morphology, γ-PGA molecular weight and titer. In the mreBH inhibition mutant, γ-PGA production and its molecular weight increased by 56.7% and 19.4%, respectively. These results confirmed our hypothesis that suppressing the expression of MreB paralogs might reduce γ-PGA degradation, and that improving the cell size could strengthen γ-PGA synthesis. This is the first report of enhanced γ-PGA production via suppression of actin-like MreB paralogs. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Comparative analysis of NBS-LRR genes and their response to Aspergillus flavus in Arachis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hui; Wang, Pengfei; Li, Changsheng; Han, Suoyi; Zhao, Chuanzhi; Xia, Han; Bi, Yuping; Guo, Baozhu; Zhang, Xinyou

    2017-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated that nucleotide-binding site–leucine-rich repeat (NBS–LRR) genes respond to pathogen attack in plants. Characterization of NBS–LRR genes in peanut is not well documented. The newly released whole genome sequences of Arachis duranensis and Arachis ipaënsis have allowed a global analysis of this important gene family in peanut to be conducted. In this study, we identified 393 (AdNBS) and 437 (AiNBS) NBS–LRR genes from A. duranensis and A. ipaënsis, respectively, using bioinformatics approaches. Full-length sequences of 278 AdNBS and 303 AiNBS were identified. Fifty-one orthologous, four AdNBS paralogous, and six AiNBS paralogous gene pairs were predicted. All paralogous gene pairs were located in the same chromosomes, indicating that tandem duplication was the most likely mechanism forming these paralogs. The paralogs mainly underwent purifying selection, but most LRR 8 domains underwent positive selection. More gene clusters were found in A. ipaënsis than in A. duranensis, possibly owing to tandem duplication events occurring more frequently in A. ipaënsis. The expression profile of NBS–LRR genes was different between A. duranensis and A. hypogaea after Aspergillus flavus infection. The up-regulated expression of NBS–LRR in A. duranensis was continuous, while these genes responded to the pathogen temporally in A. hypogaea. PMID:28158222

  16. Nrf2b, Novel Zebrafish Paralog of Oxidant-responsive Transcription Factor NF-E2-related Factor 2 (NRF2)*

    PubMed Central

    Timme-Laragy, Alicia R.; Karchner, Sibel I.; Franks, Diana G.; Jenny, Matthew J.; Harbeitner, Rachel C.; Goldstone, Jared V.; McArthur, Andrew G.; Hahn, Mark E.

    2012-01-01

    NF-E2-related factor 2 (NRF2; also called NFE2L2) and related NRF family members regulate antioxidant defenses by activating gene expression via antioxidant response elements (AREs), but their roles in embryonic development are not well understood. We report here that zebrafish (Danio rerio), an important developmental model species, possesses six nrf genes, including duplicated nrf1 and nrf2 genes. We cloned a novel zebrafish nrf2 paralog, nrf2b. The predicted Nrf2b protein sequence shares several domains with the original Nrf2 (now Nrf2a) but lacks the Neh4 transactivation domain. Zebrafish-human comparisons demonstrate conserved synteny involving nrf2 and hox genes, indicating that nrf2a and nrf2b are co-orthologs of human NRF2. nrf2a and nrf2b displayed distinct patterns of expression during embryonic development; nrf2b was more highly expressed at all stages. Embryos in which Nrf2a expression had been knocked down with morpholino oligonucleotides were more sensitive to tert-butylhydroperoxide but not tert-butylhydroquinone, whereas knockdown of Nrf2b did not affect sensitivity of embryos to either chemical. Gene expression profiling by microarray identified a specific role for Nrf2b as a negative regulator of several genes, including p53, cyclin G1, and heme oxygenase 1, in embryos. Nrf2a and Nrf2b exhibited different mechanisms of cross-talk with the Ahr2 signaling pathway. Together, these results demonstrate distinct roles for nrf2a and nrf2b, consistent with subfunction partitioning, and identify a novel negative regulatory role for Nrf2b during development. The identification of zebrafish nrf2 co-orthologs will facilitate new understanding of the multiple roles of NRF2 in protecting vertebrate embryos from oxidative damage. PMID:22174413

  17. The Paralogous Histone Deacetylases Rpd3 and Rpd31 Play Opposing Roles in Regulating the White-Opaque Switch in the Fungal Pathogen Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jing; Jenull, Sabrina; Tscherner, Michael; Kuchler, Karl

    2016-11-15

    Chromatin modifications affect gene regulation in response to environmental stimuli in numerous biological processes. For example, N-acetyl-glucosamine and CO2 induce a morphogenetic conversion between white (W) and opaque (O) cells in MTL (mating-type locus) homozygous and heterozygous ( A: /α) strains of the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans Here, we identify 8 histone-modifying enzymes playing distinct roles in the regulation of W/O switching in MTL homozygous and heterozygous strains. Most strikingly, genetic removal of the paralogous genes RPD3 and RPD31, both of which encode almost identical orthologues of the yeast histone deacetylase (HDAC) Rpd3, reveals opposing roles in W/O switching of MTL A: /α strains. We show that Rpd3 and Rpd31 functions depend on MTL genotypes. Strikingly, we demonstrate that Rpd3 and Rpd31, which are almost identical except for a divergent C-terminal extension present in Rpd31, exert their functions in distinct regulatory complexes referred to as CaRpd3L and CaRpd31S complexes. Moreover, we identify the Candida orf19.7185 product Ume1, the orthologue of yeast Ume1, as a shared core subunit of CaRpd3L and CaRpd31S. Mechanistically, we show that the opposing roles of Rpd3 and Rpd31 require their deacetylase activities. Importantly, CaRpd3L interacts with the heterodimeric transcriptional repressor A: 1/α2, thus controlling expression of WOR1 encoding the master regulator of W/O switching. Thus, our work provides novel insight about regulation mechanisms of W/O switching in MTL A: /α strains. This is the first example of two highly conserved HDACs exerting opposing regulatory functions in the same process in a eukaryotic cell. RPD3-like histone deacetylases (also called class I HDACs) are conserved from unicellular eukaryotes to mammals. Specifically, the genome of the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, the most frequent cause of invasive fungal infections of high morbidity and mortality, harbors two almost identical

  18. Dynamic Expression of the BabA Adhesin and Its BabB Paralog during Helicobacter pylori Infection in Rhesus Macaques.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Lori M; Gideonsson, Pär; Canfield, Don R; Borén, Thomas; Solnick, Jay V

    2017-06-01

    Most Helicobacter pylori strains express the BabA adhesin, which binds to ABO/Leb blood group antigens on gastric mucin and epithelial cells and is found more commonly in strains that cause peptic ulcers or gastric cancer, rather than asymptomatic infection. We and others have previously reported that in mice, gerbils, and rhesus macaques, expression of babA is lost, either by phase variation or by gene conversion, in which the babB paralog recombines into the babA locus. The functional significance of loss of babA expression is unknown. Here we report that in rhesus monkeys, there is independent selective pressure for loss of babA and for overexpression of BabB, which confers a fitness advantage. Surprisingly, loss of babA by phase variation or gene conversion is not dependent on the capacity of BabA protein to bind Leb, which suggests that it may have other, unrecognized functions. These findings have implications for the role of outer membrane protein diversity in persistent H. pylori infection. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  19. Evaluation of the free-radical-scavenging activity of diclofenac acid on the free-radical-induced haemolysis of human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Tang, You-Zhi; Liu, Zai-Qun

    2006-05-01

    Free-radical-induced peroxidation in-vivo is regarded as the aetiology of some diseases and free-radical-scavenging drugs, also called antioxidants (AH), have been widely used to overcome oxidative stress. An in-vitro experimental method, 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane hydrochloride) (AAPH)-induced haemolysis of human erythrocytes can be applied to assess the free-radical-scavenging activity of a drug. The major objectives of this work were focused on three aspects. Firstly, introduction of the chemical kinetic deduction of free-radical-initiating reaction to AAPH-induced haemolysis of human erythrocytes, by which the number of free radicals trapped by an antioxidant, n, can be obtained after finding the quantitative relationship between the inhibition period (t(inh)) and the concentration of the antioxidant, t(inh) = (n/Ri) [AH]. Ri, the free-radical-initiating rate, was initially confirmed by using alpha-tocopherol (VE) whose n was taken as 2. Secondly, the free-radical-scavenging activity of diclofenac acid (DaH) and its sodium salt (DaNaH) was assessed. It has been found that DaH and DaNaH protect human erythrocytes against AAPH-induced haemolysis dose-dependently. In particular, the n values of DaH and DaNaH (4.96 and 3.60) were much higher than some traditional antioxidants, such as 6-hydroxyl-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid (Trolox, a water-soluble structural analogue of VE, n = 0.30) and L-ascorbic acid (VC, n = 0.25), and L-ascorbyl-6-laurate (VC-12, a lipophilic structural analogue of VC, n = 1.11). Moreover, the free-radical-scavenging activity of lipophilic antioxidants is higher than the corresponding water-soluble species. Thirdly, the free-radical-scavenging activity of mixed antioxidants, VE + DaH, VC-12 + DaH, Trolox + DaNaH and VC + DaNaH, was revealed. The n value of VC, VC-12, VE and Trolox increase in the case of mixed usage with DaH and DaNaH, implying that diclofenac acid can repair the radical of these antioxidants. Thus, a mutual

  20. Origin, duplication and reshuffling of plasmid genes: Insights from Burkholderia vietnamiensis G4 genome.

    PubMed

    Maida, Isabel; Fondi, Marco; Orlandini, Valerio; Emiliani, Giovanni; Papaleo, Maria Cristiana; Perrin, Elena; Fani, Renato

    2014-01-01

    Using a computational pipeline based on similarity networks reconstruction we analysed the 1133 genes of the Burkholderia vietnamiensis (Bv) G4 five plasmids, showing that gene and operon duplication played an important role in shaping the plasmid architecture. Several single/multiple duplications occurring at intra- and/or interplasmids level involving 253 paralogous genes (stand-alone, clustered or operons) were detected. An extensive gene/operon exchange between plasmids and chromosomes was also disclosed. The larger the plasmid, the higher the number and size of paralogous fragments. Many paralogs encoded mobile genetic elements and duplicated very recently, suggesting that the rearrangement of the Bv plastic genome is ongoing. Concerning the "molecular habitat" and the "taxonomical status" (the Preferential Organismal Sharing) of Bv plasmid genes, most of them have been exchanged with other plasmids of bacteria belonging (or phylogenetically very close) to Burkholderia, suggesting that taxonomical proximity of bacterial strains is a crucial issue in plasmid-mediated gene exchange.

  1. Evidence of duplicated Hox genes in the most recent common ancestor of extant scorpions.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Prashant P; Santiago, Marc A; González-Santillán, Edmundo; Monod, Lionel; Wheeler, Ward C

    2015-01-01

    Scorpions (order Scorpiones) are unusual among arthropods, both for the extreme heteronomy of their bauplan and for the high gene family turnover exhibited in their genomes. These phenomena appear to be correlated, as two scorpion species have been shown to possess nearly twice the number of Hox genes present in most arthropods. Segmentally offset anterior expression boundaries of a subset of Hox paralogs have been shown to correspond to transitions in segmental identities in the scorpion posterior tagmata, suggesting that posterior heteronomy in scorpions may have been achieved by neofunctionalization of Hox paralogs. However, both the first scorpion genome sequenced and the developmental genetic data are based on exemplars of Buthidae, one of 19 families of scorpions. It is therefore not known whether Hox paralogy is limited to Buthidae or widespread among scorpions. We surveyed 24 high throughput transcriptomes and the single whole genome available for scorpions, in order to test the prediction that Hox gene duplications are common to the order. We used gene tree parsimony to infer whether the paralogy was consistent with a duplication event in the scorpion common ancestor. Here we show that duplicated Hox genes in non-buthid scorpions occur in six of the ten Hox classes. Gene tree topologies and parsimony-based reconciliation of the gene trees are consistent with a duplication event in the most recent common ancestor of scorpions. These results suggest that a Hox paralogy, and by extension the model of posterior patterning established in a buthid, can be extended to non-Buthidae scorpions.

  2. HELQ promotes RAD51 paralog-dependent repair to avert germ cell attrition and tumourigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Adelman, Carrie A.; Lolo, Rafal L.; Birkbak, Nicolai J.; Murina, Olga; Matsuzaki, Kenichiro; Horejsi, Zuzana; Parmar, Kalindi; Borel, Valérie; Skehel, J. Mark; Stamp, Gordon; D’Andrea, Alan; Sartori, Alessandro A.; Swanton, Charles; Boulton, Simon J.

    2013-01-01

    Repair of interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) requires the coordinate action of the intra-S phase checkpoint and the Fanconi Anemia (FA) pathway, which promote ICL incision, translesion synthesis, and homologous recombination (reviewed in 1,2). Previous studies have implicated the 3′-5′ superfamily 2 helicase HELQ/Hel308 in ICL repair in D. melanogaster (known as Mus301 or Spn-C3) and C. elegans (known as Helq-1 or Hel-3084). While in vitro analysis suggests that HELQ preferentially unwinds synthetic replication fork substrates with 3′ ssDNA overhangs and also disrupts protein/DNA interactions while translocating along DNA5,6, little is known regarding its functions in mammalian organisms. Here we report that HELQ helicase-deficient mice exhibit subfertility, germ cell attrition, ICL sensitivity and tumour predisposition, with HelQ heterozygous mice exhibiting a similar, albeit less severe, phenotype than the null, indicative of haploinsufficiency. We establish that HELQ interacts directly with the RAD51 paralog complex, BCDX2, and functions in parallel to the FA pathway to promote efficient HR at damaged replication forks. Thus, our results reveal a critical role for HELQ in replication-coupled DNA repair, germ cell maintenance and tumour suppression in mammals. PMID:24005329

  3. Urbilaterian origin of paralogous GnRH and corazonin neuropeptide signalling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Shi; Zandawala, Meet; Beets, Isabel; Baytemur, Esra; Slade, Susan E.; Scrivens, James H.; Elphick, Maurice R.

    2016-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is a key regulator of reproductive maturation in humans and other vertebrates. Homologs of GnRH and its cognate receptor have been identified in invertebrates–for example, the adipokinetic hormone (AKH) and corazonin (CRZ) neuropeptide pathways in arthropods. However, the precise evolutionary relationships and origins of these signalling systems remain unknown. Here we have addressed this issue with the first identification of both GnRH-type and CRZ-type signalling systems in a deuterostome–the echinoderm (starfish) Asterias rubens. We have identified a GnRH-like neuropeptide (pQIHYKNPGWGPG-NH2) that specifically activates an A. rubens GnRH-type receptor and a novel neuropeptide (HNTFTMGGQNRWKAG-NH2) that specifically activates an A. rubens CRZ-type receptor. With the discovery of these ligand-receptor pairs, we demonstrate that the vertebrate/deuterostomian GnRH-type and the protostomian AKH systems are orthologous and the origin of a paralogous CRZ-type signalling system can be traced to the common ancestor of the Bilateria (Urbilateria). PMID:27350121

  4. Paralogous radiations of PIN proteins with multiple origins of noncanonical PIN structure.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Tom; Brockington, Samuel F; Rothfels, Carl; Graham, Sean W; Stevenson, Dennis; Kutchan, Toni; Rolf, Megan; Thomas, Philip; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Leyser, Ottoline; Glover, Beverley J; Harrison, C Jill

    2014-08-01

    The plant hormone auxin is a conserved regulator of development which has been implicated in the generation of morphological novelty. PIN-FORMED1 (PIN) auxin efflux carriers are central to auxin function by regulating its distribution. PIN family members have divergent structures and cellular localizations, but the origin and evolutionary significance of this variation is unresolved. To characterize PIN family evolution, we have undertaken phylogenetic and structural analyses with a massive increase in taxon sampling over previous studies. Our phylogeny shows that following the divergence of the bryophyte and lycophyte lineages, two deep duplication events gave rise to three distinct lineages of PIN proteins in euphyllophytes. Subsequent independent radiations within each of these lineages were taxonomically asymmetric, giving rise to at least 21 clades of PIN proteins, of which 15 are revealed here for the first time. Although most PIN protein clades share a conserved canonical structure with a modular central loop domain, a small number of noncanonical clades dispersed across the phylogeny have highly divergent protein structure. We propose that PIN proteins underwent sub- and neofunctionalization with substantial modification to protein structure throughout plant evolution. Our results have important implications for plant evolution as they suggest that structurally divergent PIN proteins that arose in paralogous radiations contributed to the convergent evolution of organ systems in different land plant lineages.

  5. Paralogous Radiations of PIN Proteins with Multiple Origins of Noncanonical PIN Structure

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Tom; Brockington, Samuel F.; Rothfels, Carl; Graham, Sean W.; Stevenson, Dennis; Kutchan, Toni; Rolf, Megan; Thomas, Philip; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Leyser, Ottoline; Glover, Beverley J.; Harrison, C. Jill

    2014-01-01

    The plant hormone auxin is a conserved regulator of development which has been implicated in the generation of morphological novelty. PIN-FORMED1 (PIN) auxin efflux carriers are central to auxin function by regulating its distribution. PIN family members have divergent structures and cellular localizations, but the origin and evolutionary significance of this variation is unresolved. To characterize PIN family evolution, we have undertaken phylogenetic and structural analyses with a massive increase in taxon sampling over previous studies. Our phylogeny shows that following the divergence of the bryophyte and lycophyte lineages, two deep duplication events gave rise to three distinct lineages of PIN proteins in euphyllophytes. Subsequent independent radiations within each of these lineages were taxonomically asymmetric, giving rise to at least 21 clades of PIN proteins, of which 15 are revealed here for the first time. Although most PIN protein clades share a conserved canonical structure with a modular central loop domain, a small number of noncanonical clades dispersed across the phylogeny have highly divergent protein structure. We propose that PIN proteins underwent sub- and neofunctionalization with substantial modification to protein structure throughout plant evolution. Our results have important implications for plant evolution as they suggest that structurally divergent PIN proteins that arose in paralogous radiations contributed to the convergent evolution of organ systems in different land plant lineages. PMID:24758777

  6. Sost and its paralog Sostdc1 coordinate digit number in a Gli3-dependent manner☆

    PubMed Central

    Collette, Nicole M.; Yee, Cristal S.; Murugesh, Deepa; Sebastian, Aimy; Taher, Leila; Gale, Nicholas W.; Economides, Aris N.; Harland, Richard M.; Loots, Gabriela G.

    2013-01-01

    WNT signaling is critical in most aspects of skeletal development and homeostasis, and antagonists of WNT signaling are emerging as key regulatory proteins with great promise as therapeutic agents for bone disorders. Here we show that Sost and its paralog Sostdc1 emerged through ancestral genome duplication and their expression patterns have diverged to delineate non-overlapping domains in most organ systems including musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, nervous, digestive, reproductive and respiratory. In the developing limb, Sost and Sostdc1 display dynamic expression patterns with Sost being restricted to the distal ectoderm and Sostdc1 to the proximal ectoderm and the mesenchyme. While Sostdc1–/– mice lack any obvious limb or skeletal defects, Sost–/– mice recapitulate the hand defects described for Sclerosteosis patients. However, elevated WNT signaling in Sost–/–; Sostdc1–/– mice causes misregulation of SHH signaling, ectopic activation of Sox9 in the digit 1 field and preaxial polydactyly in a Gli1- and Gli3-dependent manner. In addition, we show that the syndactyly documented in Sclerosteosis is present in both Sost–/– and Sost–/–; Sostdc1–/– mice, and is driven by misregulation of Fgf8 in the AER, a region lacking Sost and Sostdc1 expression. This study highlights the complexity of WNT signaling in skeletal biology and disease and emphasizes how redundant mechanism and non-cell autonomous effects can synergize to unveil new intricate phenotypes caused by elevated WNT signaling. PMID:23994639

  7. A Polar and Nucleotide-Dependent Mechanism of Action for RAD51 Paralogs in RAD51 Filament Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Martin R G; Špírek, Mário; Jian Ma, Chu; Carzaniga, Raffaella; Takaki, Tohru; Collinson, Lucy M; Greene, Eric C; Krejci, Lumir; Boulton, Simon J

    2016-12-01

    Central to homologous recombination in eukaryotes is the RAD51 recombinase, which forms helical nucleoprotein filaments on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and catalyzes strand invasion with homologous duplex DNA. Various regulatory proteins assist this reaction including the RAD51 paralogs. We recently discovered that a RAD51 paralog complex from C. elegans, RFS-1/RIP-1, functions predominantly downstream of filament assembly by binding and remodeling RAD-51-ssDNA filaments to a conformation more proficient for strand exchange. Here, we demonstrate that RFS-1/RIP-1 acts by shutting down RAD-51 dissociation from ssDNA. Using stopped-flow experiments, we show that RFS-1/RIP-1 confers this dramatic stabilization by capping the 5' end of RAD-51-ssDNA filaments. Filament end capping propagates a stabilizing effect with a 5'→3' polarity approximately 40 nucleotides along individual filaments. Finally, we discover that filament capping and stabilization are dependent on nucleotide binding, but not hydrolysis by RFS-1/RIP-1. These data define the mechanism of RAD51 filament remodeling by RAD51 paralogs. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Genome-Wide Analysis of Human Disease Alleles Reveals That Their Locations Are Correlated in Paralogous Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yandell, Mark; Moore, Barry; Salas, Fidel; Mungall, Chris; MacBride, Andrew; White, Charles; Reese, Martin G.

    2008-01-01

    The millions of mutations and polymorphisms that occur in human populations are potential predictors of disease, of our reactions to drugs, of predisposition to microbial infections, and of age-related conditions such as impaired brain and cardiovascular functions. However, predicting the phenotypic consequences and eventual clinical significance of a sequence variant is not an easy task. Computational approaches have found perturbation of conserved amino acids to be a useful criterion for identifying variants likely to have phenotypic consequences. To our knowledge, however, no study to date has explored the potential of variants that occur at homologous positions within paralogous human proteins as a means of identifying polymorphisms with likely phenotypic consequences. In order to investigate the potential of this approach, we have assembled a unique collection of known disease-causing variants from OMIM and the Human Genome Mutation Database (HGMD) and used them to identify and characterize pairs of sequence variants that occur at homologous positions within paralogous human proteins. Our analyses demonstrate that the locations of variants are correlated in paralogous proteins. Moreover, if one member of a variant-pair is disease-causing, its partner is likely to be disease-causing as well. Thus, information about variant-pairs can be used to identify potentially disease-causing variants, extend existing procedures for polymorphism prioritization, and provide a suite of candidates for further diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:18989397

  9. Genome-wide analysis of human disease alleles reveals that their locations are correlated in paralogous proteins.

    PubMed

    Yandell, Mark; Moore, Barry; Salas, Fidel; Mungall, Chris; MacBride, Andrew; White, Charles; Reese, Martin G

    2008-11-01

    The millions of mutations and polymorphisms that occur in human populations are potential predictors of disease, of our reactions to drugs, of predisposition to microbial infections, and of age-related conditions such as impaired brain and cardiovascular functions. However, predicting the phenotypic consequences and eventual clinical significance of a sequence variant is not an easy task. Computational approaches have found perturbation of conserved amino acids to be a useful criterion for identifying variants likely to have phenotypic consequences. To our knowledge, however, no study to date has explored the potential of variants that occur at homologous positions within paralogous human proteins as a means of identifying polymorphisms with likely phenotypic consequences. In order to investigate the potential of this approach, we have assembled a unique collection of known disease-causing variants from OMIM and the Human Genome Mutation Database (HGMD) and used them to identify and characterize pairs of sequence variants that occur at homologous positions within paralogous human proteins. Our analyses demonstrate that the locations of variants are correlated in paralogous proteins. Moreover, if one member of a variant-pair is disease-causing, its partner is likely to be disease-causing as well. Thus, information about variant-pairs can be used to identify potentially disease-causing variants, extend existing procedures for polymorphism prioritization, and provide a suite of candidates for further diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.

  10. Nuclear Ribosomal ITS Functional Paralogs Resolve the Phylogenetic Relationships of a Late-Miocene Radiation Cycad Cycas (Cycadaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Long-Qian; Möller, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Cycas is the most widespread and diverse genus among the ancient cycads, but the extant species could be the product of late Miocene rapid radiations. Taxonomic treatments to date for this genus are quite controversial, which makes it difficult to elucidate its evolutionary history. We cloned 161 genomic ITS sequences from 31 species representing all sections of Cycas. The divergent ITS paralogs were examined within each species and identified as putative pseudogenes, recombinants and functional paralogs. Functional paralogs were used to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships with pseudogene sequences as molecular outgroups, since an unambiguous ITS sequence alignment with their closest relatives, the Zamiaceae, is unachievable. A fully resolved and highly supported tree topology was obtained at the section level, with two major clades including six minor clades. The results fully supported the classification scheme proposed by Hill (2004) at the section level, with the minor clades representing his six sections. The two major clades could be recognised as two subgenera. The obtained pattern of phylogenetic relationships, combined with the different seed dispersal capabilities and paleogeography, allowed us to propose a late Miocene rapid radiation of Cycas that might have been promoted by vicariant events associated with the complex topography and orogeny of South China and adjacent regions. In contrast, transoceanic dispersals might have played an important role in the rapid diversification of sect. Cycas, whose members have evolved a spongy layer in their seeds aiding water dispersals. PMID:25635842

  11. Cadmium-induced activation of high osmolarity glycerol pathway through its Sln1 branch is dependent on the MAP kinase kinase kinase Ssk2, but not its paralog Ssk22, in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Linghuo; Cao, Chunlei; Zhang, Lilin; Lin, Wei; Xia, Jing; Xu, Huihui; Zhang, Yan

    2014-12-01

    Cadmium ions disrupt reactive oxygen species/Ca(2+) homeostasis and subsequently elicit cell death and adaptive signaling cascades in eukaryotic cells. Through a functional genomics approach, we have identified deletion mutants of 106 yeast genes, including three MAP kinase genes (HOG1, SLT2, and KSS1), are sensitive to a sublethal concentration of cadmium, and 64 mutants show elevated intracellular cadmium concentrations upon exposure to cadmium. Hog1 is phosphorylated, reaching a peak 30 min after the cadmium treatment. Both Sln1 and Sho1 upstream branches are involved in the cadmium-induced activation of high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway. Cadmium-induced HOG activation is dependent on the MAP kinase kinase kinase Ssk2, but not its paralog Ssk22, in the Sln1 branch.

  12. The Arabidopsis paralogs, PUB46 and PUB48, encoding U-box E3 ubiquitin ligases, are essential for plant response to drought stress.

    PubMed

    Adler, Guy; Konrad, Zvia; Zamir, Lyad; Mishra, Amit Kumar; Raveh, Dina; Bar-Zvi, Dudy

    2017-01-11

    Plants respond to abiotic stress on physiological, biochemical and molecular levels. This includes a global change in their cellular proteome achieved by changes in the pattern of their protein synthesis and degradation. The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is a key player in protein degradation in eukaryotes. Proteins are marked for degradation by the proteasome by coupling short chains of ubiquitin polypeptides in a three-step pathway. The last and regulatory stage is catalyzed by a member of a large family of substrate-specific ubiquitin ligases. We have identified AtPUB46 and AtPUB48-two paralogous genes that encode ubiquitin ligases (E3s)-to have a role in the plant environmental response. The AtPUB46, -47, and -48 appear as tandem gene copies on chromosome 5, and we present a phylogenetic analysis that traces their evolution from an ancestral PUB-ARM gene. Single homozygous T-DNA insertion mutants of AtPUB46 and AtPUB48 displayed hypersensitivity to water stress; this was not observed for similar mutants of AtPUB47. Although the three genes show a similar spatial expression pattern, the steady state levels of their transcripts are differentially affected by abiotic stresses and plant hormones. AtPUB46 and AtPUB48 encode plant U-Box E3s and are involved in the response to water stress. Our data suggest that despite encoding highly homologous proteins, AtPUB46 and AtPUB48 biological activity does not fully overlap.

  13. Paralogs are revealed by proportion of heterozygotes and deviations in read ratios in genotyping-by-sequencing data from natural populations.

    PubMed

    McKinney, Garrett J; Waples, Ryan K; Seeb, Lisa W; Seeb, James E

    2016-10-19

    Whole-genome duplications have occurred in the recent ancestors of many plants, fish, and amphibians, resulting in a pervasiveness of paralogous loci and the potential for both disomic and tetrasomic inheritance in the same genome. Paralogs can be difficult to reliably genotype and are often excluded from genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) analyses; however, removal requires paralogs to be identified which is difficult without a reference genome. We present a method for identifying paralogs in natural populations by combining two properties of duplicated loci: (i) the expected frequency of heterozygotes exceeds that for singleton loci, and (ii) within heterozygotes, observed read ratios for each allele in GBS data will deviate from the 1:1 expected for singleton (diploid) loci. These deviations are often not apparent within individuals, particularly when sequence coverage is low; but, we postulated that summing allele reads for each locus over all heterozygous individuals in a population would provide sufficient power to detect deviations at those loci. We identified paralogous loci in three species: Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) which retains regions with ongoing residual tetrasomy on eight chromosome arms following a recent whole-genome duplication, mountain barberry (Berberis alpina) which has a large proportion of paralogs that arose through an unknown mechanism, and dusky parrotfish (Scarus niger) which has largely rediploidized following an ancient whole-genome duplication. Importantly, this approach only requires the genotype and allele-specific read counts for each individual, information which is readily obtained from most GBS analysis pipelines.

  14. Why the DNA self-depurination mechanism operates in HB-β but not in β-globin paralogs HB-δ, HB-ɛ1, HB-γ1 and HB-γ2.

    PubMed

    Amosova, Olga; Alvarez-Dominguez, Juan R; Fresco, Jacques R

    2015-08-01

    The human β-globin, δ-globin and ɛ-globin genes contain almost identical coding strand sequences centered about codon 6 having potential to form a stem-loop with a 5'GAGG loop. Provided with a sufficiently stable stem, such a structure can self-catalyze depurination of the loop 5'G residue, leading to a potential mutation hotspot. Previously, we showed that such a hotspot exists about codon 6 of β-globin, with by far the highest incidence of mutations across the gene, including those responsible for 6 anemias (notably Sickle Cell Anemia) and β-thalassemias. In contrast, we show here that despite identical loop sequences, there is no mutational hotspot in the δ- or ɛ1-globin potential self-depurination sites, which differ by only one or two base pairs in the stem region from that of the β-globin gene. These differences result in either one or two additional mismatches in the potential 7-base pair-forming stem region, thereby weakening its stability, so that either DNA cruciform extrusion from the duplex is rendered ineffective or the lifetime of the stem-loop becomes too short to permit self-catalysis to occur. Having that same loop sequence, paralogs HB-γ1 and HB-γ2 totally lack stem-forming potential. Hence the absence in δ- and ɛ1-globin genes of a mutational hotspot in what must now be viewed as non-functional homologs of the self-depurination site in β-globin. Such stem-destabilizing variants appeared early among vertebrates and remained conserved among mammals and primates. Thus, this study has revealed conserved sequence determinants of self-catalytic DNA depurination associated with variability of mutation incidence among human β-globin paralogs.

  15. Paralogous Regulators ArsR1 and ArsR2 of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 as a Basis for Arsenic Biosensor Development

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Matilde; Morel, Bertrand; Ramos, Juan L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The remarkable metal resistance of many microorganisms is related to the presence of multiple metal resistance operons. Pseudomonas putida KT2440 can be considered a model for these microorganisms since its arsenic resistance is due to the action of proteins encoded by the two paralogous arsenic resistance operons ARS1 and ARS2. Both operons contain the genes encoding the transcriptional regulators ArsR1 and ArsR2 that control operon expression. We show here that purified ArsR1 and ArsR2 bind the trivalent salt of arsenic (arsenite) with similar affinities (~30 μM), whereas no binding is observed for the pentavalent salt (arsenate). Furthermore, trivalent salts of bismuth and antimony showed binding to both paralogues. The positions of cysteines, found to bind arsenic in other homologues, indicate that ArsR1 and ArsR2 employ different modes of arsenite recognition. Both paralogues are dimeric and possess significant thermal stability. Both proteins were used to construct whole-cell, lacZ-based biosensors. Whereas responses to bismuth were negligible, significant responses were observed for arsenite, arsenate, and antimony. Biosensors based on the P. putida arsB1 arsB2 arsenic efflux pump double mutant were significantly more sensitive than biosensors based on the wild-type strain. This sensitivity enhancement by pump mutation may be a convenient strategy for the construction of other biosensors. A frequent limitation found for other arsenic biosensors was their elevated background signal and interference by inorganic phosphate. The constructed biosensors show no interference by inorganic phosphate, are characterized by a very low background signal, and were found to be suitable to analyze environmental samples. IMPORTANCE Arsenic is at the top of the priority list of hazardous compounds issued by the U.S. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease. The reason for the stunning arsenic resistance of many microorganisms is the existence of paralogous arsenic

  16. Analysis of Transcriptionally Active Gene Clusters of Major Outer Membrane Protein Multigene Family in Ehrlichia canis and E. chaffeensis

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Norio; Rikihisa, Yasuko; Unver, Ahmet

    2001-01-01

    Ehrlichia canis and E. chaffeensis are tick-borne obligatory intramonocytic ehrlichiae that cause febrile systemic illness in humans and dogs, respectively. The current study analyzed the pleomorphic multigene family encoding approximately 30-kDa major outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of E. canis and E. chaffeensis. Upstream from secA and downstream of hypothetical transcriptional regulator, 22 paralogs of the omp gene family were found to be tandemly arranged except for one or two genes with opposite orientations in a 28- and a 27-kb locus in the E. canis and E. chaffeensis genomes, respectively. Each locus consisted of three highly repetitive regions with four nonrepetitive intervening regions. E. canis, in addition, had a 6.9-kb locus which contained a repeat of three tandem paralogs in the 28-kb locus. These total 47 paralogous and orthologous genes encoded OMPs of approximately 30 to 35 kDa consisting of several hypervariable regions alternating with conserved regions. In the 5′-end half of the 27-kb locus or the 28-kb locus of each Ehrlichia species, 14 paralogs were linked by short intergenic spaces ranging from −8 bp (overlapped) to 27 bp, and 8 remaining paralogs in the 3′-end half were connected by longer intergenic spaces ranging from 213 to 632 bp. All 22 paralogs, five unknown genes, and secA in the omp cluster in E. canis were transcriptionally active in the monocyte culture, and the paralogs with short intergenic spaces were cotranscribed with their adjacent genes, including the respective intergenic spaces at both the 5′ and the 3′ sides. Although omp genes are diverse, our results suggest that the gene organization of the clusters and the gene locus are conserved between two species of Ehrlichia to maintain a unique transcriptional mechanism for adaptation to environmental changes common to them. PMID:11254561

  17. Substitution saturation and nuclear paralogs of commonly employed phylogenetic markers in the Caryophyllidea, an unusual group of non-segmented tapeworms (Platyhelminthes).

    PubMed

    Brabec, Jan; Scholz, Tomáš; Králová-Hromadová, Ivica; Bazsalovicsová, Eva; Olson, Peter D

    2012-01-01

    Caryophyllidean cestodes (Platyhelminthes) represent an unusual group of tapeworms lacking serially repeated body parts that potentially diverged from the common ancestor of the Eucestoda prior to the evolution of segmentation. Here we evaluate the utility of two nuclear and two mitochondrial molecular markers (ssrDNA and lsrDNA, nad3 and cox1) for use in circumscribing generic boundaries and estimating interrelationships in the group. We show that these commonly employed markers do not contain sufficient signal to infer well-supported phylogenetic estimates due to substitution saturation. Moreover, we detected multiple trnK+nad3+trnS+trnW+cox1 haplotypes within individuals, indicating a history of gene exchange between the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. The presence of such nuclear paralogs (i.e. numts), to our knowledge described here in cestodes for the first time, together with the results of phylogenetic, saturation and split-decomposition analyses all suggest that finding informative markers for estimating caryophyllidean evolution is unusually problematic in comparison to other major lineages of tapeworms.

  18. Assessing functional divergence in EF-1α and its paralogs in eukaryotes and archaebacteria

    PubMed Central

    Inagaki, Yuji; Blouin, Christian; Susko, Edward; Roger, Andrew J.

    2003-01-01

    A number of methods have recently been published that use phylogenetic information extracted from large multiple sequence alignments to detect sites that have changed properties in related protein families. In this study we use such methods to assess functional divergence between eukaryotic EF-1α (eEF-1α), archaebacterial EF-1α (aEF-1α) and two eukaryote-specific EF-1α paralogs—eukaryotic release factor 3 (eRF3) and Hsp70 subfamily B suppressor 1 (HBS1). Overall, the evolutionary modes of aEF-1α, HBS1 and eRF3 appear to significantly differ from that of eEF-1α. However, functionally divergent (FD) sites detected between aEF-1α and eEF-1α only weakly overlap with sites implicated as putative EF-1β or aminoacyl-tRNA (aa-tRNA) binding residues in EF-1α, as expected based on the shared ancestral primary translational functions of these two orthologs. In contrast, FD sites detected between eEF-1α and its paralogs significantly overlap with the putative EF-1β and/or aa-tRNA binding sites in EF-1α. In eRF3 and HBS1, these sites appear to be released from functional constraints, indicating that they bind neither eEF-1β nor aa-tRNA. These results are consistent with experimental observations that eRF3 does not bind to aa-tRNA, but do not support the ‘EF-1α-like’ function recently proposed for HBS1. We re-assess the available genetic data for HBS1 in light of our analyses, and propose that this protein may function in stop codon-independent peptide release. PMID:12853641

  19. Occurrence and evolution of the paralogous zinc metalloproteases IgA1 protease, ZmpB, ZmpC, and ZmpD in Streptococcus pneumoniae and related commensal species.

    PubMed

    Bek-Thomsen, Malene; Poulsen, Knud; Kilian, Mogens

    2012-01-01

    The distribution, genome location, and evolution of the four paralogous zinc metalloproteases, IgA1 protease, ZmpB, ZmpC, and ZmpD, in Streptococcus pneumoniae and related commensal species were studied by in silico analysis of whole genomes and by activity screening of 154 representatives of 20 species. ZmpB was ubiquitous in the Mitis and Salivarius groups of the genus Streptococcus and in the genera Gemella and Granulicatella, with the exception of a fragmented gene in Streptococcus thermophilus, the only species with a nonhuman habitat. IgA1 protease activity was observed in all members of S. pneumoniae, S. pseudopneumoniae, S. oralis, S. sanguinis, and Gemella haemolysans, was variably present in S. mitis and S. infantis, and absent in S. gordonii, S. parasanguinis, S. cristatus, S. oligofermentans, S. australis, S. peroris, and S. suis. Phylogenetic analysis of 297 zmp sequences and representative housekeeping genes provided evidence for an unprecedented selection for genetic diversification of the iga, zmpB, and zmpD genes in S. pneumoniae and evidence of very frequent intraspecies transfer of entire genes and combination of genes. Presumably due to their adaptation to a commensal lifestyle, largely unaffected by adaptive mucosal immune factors, the corresponding genes in commensal streptococci have remained conserved. The widespread distribution and significant sequence diversity indicate an ancient origin of the zinc metalloproteases predating the emergence of the humanoid species. zmpB, which appears to be the ancestral gene, subsequently duplicated and successfully diversified into distinct functions, is likely to serve an important but yet unknown housekeeping function associated with the human host. The paralogous zinc metalloproteases IgA1 protease, ZmpB, ZmpC, and ZmpD have been identified as crucial for virulence of the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae. This study maps the presence of the corresponding genes and enzyme activities in S

  20. Loss of function of 1-FEH IIb has more impact on post-harvest inulin degradation in Cichorium intybus than copy number variation of its close paralog 1-FEH IIa.

    PubMed

    Dauchot, Nicolas; Raulier, Pierre; Maudoux, Olivier; Notté, Christine; Draye, Xavier; Van Cutsem, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Key Message: The loss of mini-exon 2 in the 1-FEH IIb glycosyl-hydrolase results in a putative non-functional allele. This loss of function has a strong impact on the susceptibility to post-harvest inulin depolymerization. Significant variation of copy number was identified in its close paralog 1-FEH IIa, but no quantitative effect of copy number on carbohydrates-related phenotypes was detected. Inulin polyfructan is the second most abundant storage carbohydrate in flowering plants. After harvest, it is depolymerized by fructan exohydrolases (FEHs) as an adaptive response to end-season cold temperatures. In chicory, the intensity of this depolymerization differs between cultivars but also between individuals within a cultivar. Regarding this phenotypic variability, we recently identified statistically significant associations between inulin degradation and genetic polymorphisms located in three FEHs. We present here new results of a systematic analysis of copy number variation (CNV) in five key members of the chicory (Cichorium intybus) GH32 multigenic family, including three FEH genes and the two inulin biosynthesis genes: 1-SST and 1-FFT. qPCR analysis identified a significant variability of relative copy number only in the 1-FEH IIa gene. However, this CNV had no quantitative effect. Instead, cloning of the full length gDNA of a close paralogous sequence (1-FEH IIb) identified a 1028 bp deletion in lines less susceptible to post-harvest inulin depolymerization. This region comprises a 9 bp mini-exon containing one of the three conserved residues of the active site. This results in a putative non-functional 1-FEH IIb allele and an observed lower inulin depolymerization. Extensive genotyping confirmed that the loss of mini-exon 2 in 1-FEH IIb and the previously identified 47 bp duplication located in the 3'UTR of 1-FEH IIa belong to a single haplotype, both being statistically associated with reduced susceptibility to post-harvest inulin depolymerization

  1. Prognostic values of the miR-17-92 cluster and its paralogs in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ge; Tang, Jian-Qiang; Tian, Mao-Lin; Li, Hui; Wang, Xin; Wu, Tao; Zhu, Jing; Huang, Shan-Jun; Wan, Yuan-Lian

    2012-09-01

    MicroRNAs have been shown to offer great potential in both the diagnosis and prognosis of cancer. Despite the well-established role of the miR-17-92 in cancer formation and progression, the contribution of each individual miRNA remains to be characterized. Thus, we investigated whether deregulation of the miR-17-92 associated with colon cancer prognosis. Expression levels of the miR-17-92 cluster and its paralogs were determined in 48 colon tumor and 48 paired normal tissues by real-time qRT-PCR. Associations with miRNA expression, age, sex, TNM staging, and survival prognosis were evaluated. MiR-17-92 cluster and its paralogs were significantly overexpressed in colon tumor. No significant associations were found between the deregulation of certain miRNAs and the clinical and pathologic characteristics observed in patients. Kaplan-Meier curves demonstrated significantly reduced overall survival in patients expressing high levels of miR-17. In multivariate Cox models, miR-17 overexpression (HR 2.67; P = 0.007) and TNM staging (HR 8.87; P = 0.002) were significantly associated with a risk of death. The miR-17-92 cluster and its paralogs were significantly elevated in patients with colon cancer, and heightened expression of miR-17 was associated with poor survival. Moreover, miR-17 and TNM staging were both identified as significant, but independent, prognostic biomarkers in colon cancer. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. In Vivo Replication of Recombinant Murine Cytomegalovirus Driven by the Paralogous Major Immediate-Early Promoter-Enhancer of Human Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    Grzimek, Natascha K. A.; Podlech, Jürgen; Steffens, Hans-Peter; Holtappels, Rafaela; Schmalz, Susanne; Reddehase, Matthias J.

    1999-01-01

    Transcription of the major immediate-early (MIE) genes of cytomegaloviruses (CMV) is driven by a strong promoter-enhancer (MIEPE) complex. Transactivator proteins encoded by these MIE genes are essential for productive infection. Accordingly, the MIEPE is a crucial control point, and its regulation by activators and repressors is pertinent to virus replication. Since the MIEPE contains multiple regulatory elements, it was reasonable to assume that specific sequence motifs are irreplaceable for specifying the cell-type tropism and replication pattern. Recent work on murine CMV infectivity (A. Angulo, M. Messerle, U. H. Koszinowski, and P. Ghazal, J. Virol. 72:8502–8509, 1998) has documented the proposed enhancing function of the enhancer in that its resection or its replacement by a nonregulatory stuffer sequence resulted in a significant reduction of infectivity, even though replication competence was maintained by a basal activity of the spared authentic MIE promoter. Notably, full capacity for productive in vitro infection of fibroblasts was restored in recombinant viruses by the human CMV enhancer. Using two-color in situ hybridization with MIEPE-specific polynucleotide probes, we demonstrated that a murine CMV recombinant in which the complete murine CMV MIEPE is replaced by the paralogous human CMV core promoter and enhancer (recombinant virus mCMVhMIEPE) retained the potential to replicate in vivo in all tissues relevant to CMV disease. Notably, mCMVhMIEPE was also found to replicate in the liver, a site at which transgenic hCMV MIEPE is silenced. We conclude that productive in vivo infection with murine CMV does not strictly depend on a MIEPE type-specific regulation. PMID:10233967

  3. Species-specific difference in expression and splice-site choice in Inpp5b, an inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase paralogous to the enzyme deficient in Lowe Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bothwell, Susan P; Farber, Leslie W; Hoagland, Adam; Nussbaum, Robert L

    2010-10-01

    The oculocerebrorenal syndrome of Lowe (OCRL; MIM #309000) is an X-linked human disorder characterized by congenital cataracts, mental retardation, and renal proximal tubular dysfunction caused by loss-of-function mutations in the OCRL gene that encodes Ocrl, a type II phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PtdIns4,5P(2)) 5-phosphatase. In contrast, mice with complete loss-of-function of the highly homologous ortholog Ocrl have no detectable renal, ophthalmological, or central nervous system abnormalities. We inferred that the disparate phenotype between Ocrl-deficient humans and mice was likely due to differences in how the two species compensate for loss of the Ocrl enzyme. We therefore turned our attention to Inpp5b, another type II PtdIns4,5P(2) 5-phosphatase encoded by Inpp5b in mice and INPP5B in humans, as potential compensating genes in the two species, because Inpp5b/INPP5B are the most highly conserved paralogs to Ocrl/OCRL in the respective genomes of both species and Inpp5b demonstrates functional overlap with Ocrl in mice in vivo. We used in silico sequence analysis, reverse-transcription PCR, quantitative PCR, and transient transfection assays of promoter function to define splice-site usage and the function of an internal promoter in mouse Inpp5b versus human INPP5B. We found mouse Inpp5b and human INPP5B differ in their transcription, splicing, and primary amino acid sequence. These observations form the foundation for analyzing the functional basis for the difference in how Inpp5b and INPP5B compensate for loss of Ocrl function and, by providing insight into the cellular roles of Ocrl and Inpp5b, aid in the development of a model system in which to study Lowe syndrome.

  4. The Paralogous Histone Deacetylases Rpd3 and Rpd31 Play Opposing Roles in Regulating the White-Opaque Switch in the Fungal Pathogen Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jing; Jenull, Sabrina; Tscherner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chromatin modifications affect gene regulation in response to environmental stimuli in numerous biological processes. For example, N-acetyl-glucosamine and CO2 induce a morphogenetic conversion between white (W) and opaque (O) cells in MTL (mating-type locus) homozygous and heterozygous (a/α) strains of the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans. Here, we identify 8 histone-modifying enzymes playing distinct roles in the regulation of W/O switching in MTL homozygous and heterozygous strains. Most strikingly, genetic removal of the paralogous genes RPD3 and RPD31, both of which encode almost identical orthologues of the yeast histone deacetylase (HDAC) Rpd3, reveals opposing roles in W/O switching of MTLa/α strains. We show that Rpd3 and Rpd31 functions depend on MTL genotypes. Strikingly, we demonstrate that Rpd3 and Rpd31, which are almost identical except for a divergent C-terminal extension present in Rpd31, exert their functions in distinct regulatory complexes referred to as CaRpd3L and CaRpd31S complexes. Moreover, we identify the Candida orf19.7185 product Ume1, the orthologue of yeast Ume1, as a shared core subunit of CaRpd3L and CaRpd31S. Mechanistically, we show that the opposing roles of Rpd3 and Rpd31 require their deacetylase activities. Importantly, CaRpd3L interacts with the heterodimeric transcriptional repressor a1/α2, thus controlling expression of WOR1 encoding the master regulator of W/O switching. Thus, our work provides novel insight about regulation mechanisms of W/O switching in MTLa/α strains. This is the first example of two highly conserved HDACs exerting opposing regulatory functions in the same process in a eukaryotic cell. PMID:27935838

  5. Nuclear receptors, nuclear-receptor factors, and nuclear-receptor-like orphans form a large paralog cluster in Homo sapiens.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Vallvé, S; Palau, J

    1998-06-01

    We studied a human protein paralog cluster formed by 38 nonredundant sequences taken from the Swiss-Prot database and its supplement, TrEMBL. These sequences include nuclear receptors, nuclear-receptor factors and nuclear-receptor-like orphans. Working separately with both the central cysteine-rich DNA-binding domain and the carboxy-terminal ligand-binding domain, we performed multialignment analyses that included drawings of paralog trees. Our results show that the cluster is highly multibranched, with considerable differences in the amino acid sequence in the ligand-binding domain (LBD), and 17 proximal subbranches which are identifiable and fully coincident when independent trees from both domains are compared. We identified the six recently proposed subfamilies as groups of neighboring clusters in the LBD paralog tree. We found similarities of 80%-100% for the N-terminal transactivation domain among mammalian ortholog receptors, as well as some paralog resemblances within diverse subbranches. Our studies suggest that during the evolutionary process, the three domains were assembled in a modular fashion with a nonshuffled modular fusion of the LBD. We used the EMBL server PredictProtein to make secondary-structure predictions for all 38 LBD subsequences. Amino acid residues in the multialigned homologous domains--taking the beginning of helix H3 of the human retinoic acid receptor-gamma as the initial point of reference--were substituted with H or E, which identify residues predicted to be helical or extended, respectively. The result was a secondary structure multialignment with the surprising feature that the prediction follows a canonical pattern of alignable alpha-helices with some short extended elements in between, despite the fact that a number of subsequences resemble each other by less than 25% in terms of the similarity index. We also identified the presence of a binary patterning in all of the predicted helices that were conserved throughout the 38

  6. Paralog-Specific Kinase Inhibition of FGFR4: Adding to the Arsenal of Anti-FGFR Agents.

    PubMed

    Packer, Leisl M; Pollock, Pamela M

    2015-04-01

    In this issue of Cancer Discovery, Hagel and colleagues report the design and the in vitro and in vivo activity of a novel, irreversible, paralog-specific kinase inhibitor of FGFR4, BLU9931. This compound binds covalently to a cysteine residue in the hinge region of FGFR4 but not in FGFR1-3. BLU9931 induces tumor shrinkage in hepatocellular carcinoma models that express a functioning ligand/receptor complex consisting of FGF19/FGFR4/KLB and adds to a growing list of anti-FGFR4 agents.

  7. A Minimal Set of Glycolytic Genes Reveals Strong Redundancies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Central Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Solis-Escalante, Daniel; Kuijpers, Niels G A; Barrajon-Simancas, Nuria; van den Broek, Marcel; Pronk, Jack T; Daran, Jean-Marc; Daran-Lapujade, Pascale

    2015-08-01

    As a result of ancestral whole-genome and small-scale duplication events, the genomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and many eukaryotes still contain a substantial fraction of duplicated genes. In all investigated organisms, metabolic pathways, and more particularly glycolysis, are specifically enriched for functionally redundant paralogs. In ancestors of the Saccharomyces lineage, the duplication of glycolytic genes is purported to have played an important role leading to S. cerevisiae's current lifestyle favoring fermentative metabolism even in the presence of oxygen and characterized by a high glycolytic capacity. In modern S. cerevisiae strains, the 12 glycolytic reactions leading to the biochemical conversion from glucose to ethanol are encoded by 27 paralogs. In order to experimentally explore the physiological role of this genetic redundancy, a yeast strain with a minimal set of 14 paralogs was constructed (the "minimal glycolysis" [MG] strain). Remarkably, a combination of a quantitative systems approach and semiquantitative analysis in a wide array of growth environments revealed the absence of a phenotypic response to the cumulative deletion of 13 glycolytic paralogs. This observation indicates that duplication of glycolytic genes is not a prerequisite for achieving the high glycolytic fluxes and fermentative capacities that are characteristic of S. cerevisiae and essential for many of its industrial applications and argues against gene dosage effects as a means of fixing minor glycolytic paralogs in the yeast genome. The MG strain was carefully designed and constructed to provide a robust prototrophic platform for quantitative studies and has been made available to the scientific community.

  8. Knockout of miR-221 and miR-222 reveals common and specific targets for paralogous miRNAs.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Geon; Lim, Yeong-Hwan; Kim, Nam Joong; Wee, Gabbine; Kim, Young-Kook

    2017-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate the expression of mRNA through sequence-specific binding of the 3' untranslated region (UTR). The seed sequence of miRNAs is the key determinant for target site recognition. Paralogous miRNAs, which share the same seed sequences but differ in their 3' regions, are known to regulate largely overlapping groups of mRNAs. However, no study has analyzed functional differences between paralogous miRNAs with proper experimental methods. In this study, we compared the targets of paralogous miRNAs, miR-221 and miR-222. Using a nuclease-mediated genome engineering technique, we established knockout cell lines for these miRNAs, and precisely analyzed differences in target regulation. We found that miR-221 and miR-222 suppress the previously identified targets, CDKN1B and CDKN1C, differentially. Whereas both miRNAs suppressed CDKN1B, only miR-221 suppressed CDKN1C. From transcriptome analyses, we found that several different target mRNAs were regulated by each of miR-221 and miR-222 independently, although a large number of mRNAs responded commonly to miR-221 and miR-222. This is the first study to compare the mRNA regulations by paralogous miRNAs and illustrate that paralogous miRNAs with the same seed sequence also have difference in target regulation.

  9. Gene-Family Extension Measures and Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Carmi, Gon; Bolshoy, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The existence of multiple copies of genes is a well-known phenomenon. A gene family is a set of sufficiently similar genes, formed by gene duplication. In earlier works conducted on a limited number of completely sequenced and annotated genomes it was found that size of gene family and size of genome are positively correlated. Additionally, it was found that several atypical microbes deviated from the observed general trend. In this study, we reexamined these associations on a larger dataset consisting of 1484 prokaryotic genomes and using several ranking approaches. We applied ranking methods in such a way that genomes with lower numbers of gene copies would have lower rank. Until now only simple ranking methods were used; we applied the Kemeny optimal aggregation approach as well. Regression and correlation analysis were utilized in order to accurately quantify and characterize the relationships between measures of paralog indices and genome size. In addition, boxplot analysis was employed as a method for outlier detection. We found that, in general, all paralog indexes positively correlate with an increase of genome size. As expected, different groups of atypical prokaryotic genomes were found for different types of paralog quantities. Mycoplasmataceae and Halobacteria appeared to be among the most interesting candidates for further research of evolution through gene duplication. PMID:27527218

  10. Gene-Family Extension Measures and Correlations.

    PubMed

    Carmi, Gon; Bolshoy, Alexander

    2016-08-03

    The existence of multiple copies of genes is a well-known phenomenon. A gene family is a set of sufficiently similar genes, formed by gene duplication. In earlier works conducted on a limited number of completely sequenced and annotated genomes it was found that size of gene family and size of genome are positively correlated. Additionally, it was found that several atypical microbes deviated from the observed general trend. In this study, we reexamined these associations on a larger dataset consisting of 1484 prokaryotic genomes and using several ranking approaches. We applied ranking methods in such a way that genomes with lower numbers of gene copies would have lower rank. Until now only simple ranking methods were used; we applied the Kemeny optimal aggregation approach as well. Regression and correlation analysis were utilized in order to accurately quantify and characterize the relationships between measures of paralog indices and genome size. In addition, boxplot analysis was employed as a method for outlier detection. We found that, in general, all paralog indexes positively correlate with an increase of genome size. As expected, different groups of atypical prokaryotic genomes were found for different types of paralog quantities. Mycoplasmataceae and Halobacteria appeared to be among the most interesting candidates for further research of evolution through gene duplication.

  11. Molecular Characterization and Evolution of a Gene Family Encoding Both Female- and Male-Specific Reproductive Proteins in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Sirot, Laura K.; Findlay, Geoffrey D.; Sitnik, Jessica L.; Frasheri, Dorina; Avila, Frank W.; Wolfner, Mariana F.

    2014-01-01

    Gene duplication is an important mechanism for the evolution of new reproductive proteins. However, in most cases, each resulting paralog continues to function within the same sex. To investigate the possibility that seminal fluid proteins arise through duplicates of female reproductive genes that become “co-opted” by males, we screened female reproductive genes in Drosophila melanogaster for cases of duplication in which one of the resulting paralogs produces a protein in males that is transferred to females during mating. We identified a set of three tandemly duplicated genes that encode secreted serine-type endopeptidase homologs, two of which are expressed primarily in the female reproductive tract (RT), whereas the third is expressed specifically in the male RT and encodes a seminal fluid protein. Evolutionary and gene expression analyses across Drosophila species suggest that this family arose from a single-copy gene that was female-specific; after duplication, one paralog evolved male-specific expression. Functional tests of knockdowns of each gene in D. melanogaster show that one female-expressed gene is essential for full fecundity, and both female-expressed genes contribute singly or in combination to a female’s propensity to remate. In contrast, knockdown of the male-expressed paralog had no significant effect on female fecundity or remating. These data are consistent with a model in which members of this gene family exert effects on females by acting on a common, female-expressed target. After duplication and male co-option of one paralog, the evolution of the interacting proteins could have resulted in differential strengths or effects of each paralog. PMID:24682282

  12. Selection of housekeeping genes for gene expression studies in larvae from flatfish using real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Infante, Carlos; Matsuoka, Makoto P; Asensio, Esther; Cañavate, José Pedro; Reith, Michael; Manchado, Manuel

    2008-03-06

    Flatfish metamorphosis involves major physiological and morphological changes. Due to its importance in aquaculture and as a model for developmental studies, some gene expression studies have focused on the understanding of this process using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) technique. Therefore, adequate reference genes for accurate normalization are required. The stability of 12 potential reference genes was examined during larval development in Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) and Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus) to determine the most suitable genes for qRT-PCR analysis. Transcription levels of genes encoding beta-Actin (ACTB), glyceraldehyde-3P-dehydrogenase (GAPDH), annexin A2 (ANXA2), glutathione S-transferase (GST), ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT1), ubiquitin (UBQ), elongation factor 1 alpha (eEF1A1), 18S ribosomal RNA, and the ribosomal proteins S4 (RPS4) and L13a (RPL13a) were quantitated. Two paralogous genes for ACTB were analyzed in each of both flatfish species. In addition, two paralogous genes for GAPDH were studied in Senegalese sole. RPL13a represented non-orthologous genes between both flatfish species. GeNorm and NormFinder analyses for expression stability revealed RPS4, UBQ and eEF1A1 as the most stable genes in Senegalese sole, Atlantic halibut and in a combined analysis. In all cases, paralogous genes exhibited differences in expression stability. This work suggests RPS4, UBQ, and eEF1A1 genes as useful reference genes for accurate normalization in qRT-PCR studies in Senegalese sole and Atlantic halibut larvae. The congruent results between both species in spite of the drastic differences in larval development suggest that selected housekeeping genes (HKGs) could be useful in other flatfish species. However, the finding of paralogous gene copies differentially expressed during development in some HKGs underscores the necessity to identify orthologous genes.

  13. Selection of housekeeping genes for gene expression studies in larvae from flatfish using real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Infante, Carlos; Matsuoka, Makoto P; Asensio, Esther; Cañavate, José Pedro; Reith, Michael; Manchado, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Background Flatfish metamorphosis involves major physiological and morphological changes. Due to its importance in aquaculture and as a model for developmental studies, some gene expression studies have focused on the understanding of this process using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) technique. Therefore, adequate reference genes for accurate normalization are required. Results The stability of 12 potential reference genes was examined during larval development in Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) and Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus) to determine the most suitable genes for qRT-PCR analysis. Transcription levels of genes encoding β-Actin (ACTB), glyceraldehyde-3P-dehydrogenase (GAPDH), annexin A2 (ANXA2), glutathione S-transferase (GST), ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT1), ubiquitin (UBQ), elongation factor 1 alpha (eEF1A1), 18S ribosomal RNA, and the ribosomal proteins S4 (RPS4) and L13a (RPL13a) were quantitated. Two paralogous genes for ACTB were analyzed in each of both flatfish species. In addition, two paralogous genes for GAPDH were studied in Senegalese sole. RPL13a represented non-orthologous genes between both flatfish species. GeNorm and NormFinder analyses for expression stability revealed RPS4, UBQ and eEF1A1 as the most stable genes in Senegalese sole, Atlantic halibut and in a combined analysis. In all cases, paralogous genes exhibited differences in expression stability. Conclusion This work suggests RPS4, UBQ, and eEF1A1 genes as useful reference genes for accurate normalization in qRT-PCR studies in Senegalese sole and Atlantic halibut larvae. The congruent results between both species in spite of the drastic differences in larval development suggest that selected housekeeping genes (HKGs) could be useful in other flatfish species. However, the finding of paralogous gene copies differentially expressed during development in some HKGs underscores the necessity to identify orthologous

  14. Gene structure, regulatory control, and evolution of black widow venom latrotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Bhere, Kanaka Varun; Haney, Robert A.; Ayoub, Nadia A.; Garb, Jessica E.

    2014-01-01

    Black widow venom contains α-latrotoxin, infamous for causing intense pain. Combining 33 kb of Latrodectus hesperus genomic DNA with RNA-Seq, we characterized the α-latrotoxin gene and discovered a paralog, 4.5 kb downstream. Both paralogs exhibit venom gland specific transcription, and may be regulated post-transcriptionally via musashi-like proteins. A 4 kb intron interrupts the α-latrotoxin coding sequence, while a 10 kb intron in the 3′ UTR of the paralog may cause nonsense-mediated decay. Phylogenetic analysis confirms these divergent latrotoxins diversified through recent tandem gene duplications. Thus, latrotoxin genes have more complex structures, regulatory controls, and sequence diversity than previously proposed. PMID:25217831

  15. Structure and Catalysis in the Escherichia coli Hotdog-fold Thioesterase Paralogs YdiI and YbdB

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Herein, the structural determinants for substrate recognition and catalysis in two hotdog-fold thioesterase paralogs, YbdB and YdiI from Escherichia coli, are identified and analyzed to provide insight into the evolution of biological function in the hotdog-fold enzyme superfamily. The X-ray crystal structures of YbdB and YdiI, in complex with inert substrate analogs, determined in this study revealed the locations of the respective thioester substrate binding sites and the identity of the residues positioned for substrate binding and catalysis. The importance of each of these residues was assessed through amino acid replacements followed by steady-state kinetic analyses of the corresponding site-directed mutants. Transient kinetic and solvent 18O-labeling studies were then carried out to provide insight into the role of Glu63 posited to function as the nucleophile or general base in catalysis. Finally, the structure–function–mechanism profiles of the two paralogs, along with that of a more distant homolog, were compared to identify conserved elements of substrate recognition and catalysis, which define the core traits of the hotdog-fold thioesterase family, as well as structural features that are unique to each thioesterase. Founded on the insight gained from this analysis, we conclude that the promiscuity revealed by in vitro substrate activity determinations, and posited to facilitate the evolution of new biological function, is the product of intrinsic plasticity in substrate binding as well as in the catalytic mechanism. PMID:25010423

  16. Crossregulation and Functional Redundancy between the Splicing Regulator PTB and Its Paralogs nPTB and ROD1

    PubMed Central

    Spellman, Rachel; Llorian, Miriam; Smith, Christopher W.J.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Among the targets of the repressive splicing regulator, polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB) is its own pre-mRNA, where PTB-induced exon 11 skipping produces an RNA substrate for nonsense-mediated decay (NMD). To identify additional PTB-regulated alternative splicing events, we used quantitative proteomic analysis of HeLa cells after knockdown of PTB. Apart from loss of PTB, the only change was upregulation of the neuronally restricted nPTB, resulting from decreased skipping of nPTB exon 10, a splicing event that leads to NMD of nPTB mRNA. Compared with knockdown of PTB alone, simultaneous knockdown of PTB and nPTB led to larger changes in alternative splicing of known and newly identified PTB-regulated splicing events. Strikingly, the hematopoietic PTB paralog ROD1 also switched from a nonproductive splicing pathway upon PTB/nPTB knockdown. Our data indicate crossregulation between PTB and its paralogs via nonproductive alternative splicing and a large degree of functional overlap between PTB and nPTB. PMID:17679092

  17. Paralogous Outer Membrane Proteins Mediate Uptake of Different Forms of Iron and Synergistically Govern Virulence in Francisella tularensis tularensis*

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Girija; Sen, Bhaswati; Johnson, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis is a highly infectious bacterium causing acute disease in mammalian hosts. Mechanisms for the acquisition of iron within the iron-limiting host environment are likely to be critical for survival of this intracellular pathogen. FslE (FTT0025) and FupA (FTT0918) are paralogous proteins that are predicted to form β-barrels in the outer membrane of virulent strain Schu S4 and are unique to Francisella species. Previous studies have implicated both FupA, initially identified as a virulence factor and FslE, encoded by the siderophore biosynthetic operon, in iron acquisition. Using single and double mutants, we demonstrated that these paralogs function in concert to promote growth under iron limitation. We used a 55Fe transport assay to demonstrate that FslE is involved in siderophore-mediated ferric iron uptake, whereas FupA facilitates high affinity ferrous iron uptake. Optimal replication within J774A.1 macrophage-like cells required at least one of these uptake systems to be functional. In a mouse model of tularemia, the ΔfupA mutant was attenuated, but the ΔfslE ΔfupA mutant was significantly more attenuated, implying that the two systems of iron acquisition function synergistically to promote virulence. These studies highlight the importance of specific iron acquisition functions, particularly that of ferrous iron, for virulence of F. tularensis in the mammalian host. PMID:22661710

  18. The RAB family GTPase Rab1A from Plasmodium falciparum defines a unique paralog shared by chromalveolates and rhizaria.

    PubMed

    Elias, Marek; Patron, Nicola J; Keeling, Patrick J

    2009-01-01

    The RAB GTPases, which are involved in regulation of endomembrane trafficking, exhibit a complex but incompletely understood evolutionary history. We elucidated the evolution of the RAB1 subfamily ancestrally implicated in the endoplasmic reticulum-to-Golgi traffic. We found that RAB1 paralogs have been generated over the course of eukaryotic evolution, with some duplications coinciding with the advent of major eukaryotic lineages (e.g. Metazoa, haptophytes). We also identified a unique, derived RAB1 paralog, orthologous to the Plasmodium Rab1A, that occurs in stramenopiles, alveolates, and Rhizaria, represented by the chlorarachniophyte Gymnochlora stellata. This finding is consistent with the recently documented existence of a major eukaryotic clade ("SAR") comprising these three lineages. We further found a Rab1A-like protein in the cryptophyte Guillardia theta, but it exhibits unusual features among RAB proteins: absence of a C-terminal prenylation motif and an N-terminal extension with two MSP domains; and its phylogenetic relationships could not be established convincingly due to its divergent nature. Our results nevertheless point to a unique membrane trafficking pathway shared by at least some lineages of chromalveolates and Rhizaria, an insight that has implications towards interpreting the early evolution of eukaryotes and the endomembrane system.

  19. Multimodular Penicillin-Binding Proteins: An Enigmatic Family of Orthologs and Paralogs

    PubMed Central

    Goffin, Colette; Ghuysen, Jean-Marie

    1998-01-01

    protein-protein interaction. The full-size class B PBPs are an assortment of orthologs and paralogs, which prescribe traits as complex as wall expansion and septum formation. PBPs of subclass B1 are unique to gram-positive bacteria. They are not essential, but they represent an important mechanism of resistance to penicillin among the enterococci and staphylococci. Natural evolution and PBP- and β-lactamase-mediated resistance show that the ability of the catalytic centers to adapt their properties to new situations is limitless. Studies of the reaction pathways by using the methods of quantum chemistry suggest that resistance to penicillin is a road of no return. PMID:9841666

  20. Allelic Variation in Paralogs of GDP-l-Galactose Phosphorylase Is a Major Determinant of Vitamin C Concentrations in Apple Fruit1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Mellidou, Ifigeneia; Chagné, David; Laing, William A.; Keulemans, Johan; Davey, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    To identify the genetic factors underlying the regulation of fruit vitamin C (l-ascorbic acid [AsA]) concentrations, quantitative trait loci (QTL) studies were carried out in an F1 progeny derived from a cross between the apple (Malus × domestica) cultivars Telamon and Braeburn over three years. QTL were identified for AsA, glutathione, total antioxidant activity in both flesh and skin tissues, and various quality traits, including flesh browning. Four regions on chromosomes 10, 11, 16, and 17 contained stable fruit AsA-QTL clusters. Mapping of AsA metabolic genes identified colocations between orthologs of GDP-l-galactose phosphorylase (GGP), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), and nucleobase-ascorbate transporter within these QTL clusters. Of particular interest are the three paralogs of MdGGP, which all colocated within AsA-QTL clusters. Allelic variants of MdGGP1 and MdGGP3 derived from the cultivar Braeburn parent were also consistently associated with higher fruit total AsA concentrations both within the mapping population (up to 10-fold) and across a range of commercial apple germplasm (up to 6-fold). Striking differences in the expression of the cv Braeburn MdGGP1 allele between fruit from high- and low-AsA genotypes clearly indicate a key role for MdGGP1 in the regulation of fruit AsA concentrations, and this MdGGP allele-specific single-nucleotide polymorphism marker represents an excellent candidate for directed breeding for enhanced fruit AsA concentrations. Interestingly, colocations were also found between MdDHAR3-3 and a stable QTL for browning in the cv Telamon parent, highlighting links between the redox status of the AsA pool and susceptibility to flesh browning. PMID:23001142

  1. Tetrahymena Pot2 Is a Developmentally Regulated Paralog of Pot1 That Localizes to Chromosome Breakage Sites but Not to Telomeres

    PubMed Central

    Cranert, Stacey; Heyse, Serena; Linger, Benjamin R.; Lescasse, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    Tetrahymena telomeres are protected by a protein complex composed of Pot1, Tpt1, Pat1, and Pat2. Pot1 binds the 3′ overhang and serves multiple roles in telomere maintenance. Here we describe Pot2, a paralog of Pot1 which has evolved a novel function during Tetrahymena sexual reproduction. Pot2 is unnecessary for telomere maintenance during vegetative growth, as the telomere structure is unaffected by POT2 macronuclear gene disruption. Pot2 is expressed only in mated cells, where it accumulates in developing macronuclei around the time of two chromosome processing events: internal eliminated sequence (IES) excision and chromosome breakage. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) demonstrated Pot2 localization to regions of chromosome breakage but not to telomeres or IESs. Pot2 association with chromosome breakage sites (CBSs) occurs slightly before chromosome breakage. Pot2 did not bind CBSs or telomeric DNA in vitro, suggesting that it is recruited to CBSs by another factor. The telomere proteins Pot1, Pat1, and Tpt1 and the IES binding factor Pdd1 fail to colocalize with Pot2. Thus, Pot2 is the first protein found to associate specifically with CBSs. The selective association of Pot2 versus Pdd1 with CBSs or IESs indicates a mechanistic difference between the chromosome processing events at these two sites. Moreover, ChIP revealed that histone marks characteristic of IES processing, H3K9me3 and H3K27me3, are absent from CBSs. Thus, the mechanisms of chromosome breakage and IES excision must be fundamentally different. Our results lead to a model where Pot2 directs chromosome breakage by recruiting telomerase and/or the endonuclease responsible for DNA cleavage to CBSs. PMID:25303953

  2. Differential Bvg Phase-Dependent Regulation and Combinatorial Role in Pathogenesis of Two Bordetella Paralogs, BipA and BcfA▿

    PubMed Central

    Sukumar, Neelima; Mishra, Meenu; Sloan, Gina Parise; Ogi, Tomoo; Deora, Rajendar

    2007-01-01

    To successfully colonize their mammalian hosts, many bacteria produce multiple virulence factors that play essential roles in disease processes and pathogenesis. Some of these molecules are adhesins that allow efficient attachment to host cells, a prerequisite for successful host colonization. Bordetella spp. express a number of proteins which either play a direct role in attachment to the respiratory epithelia or exhibit similarity to known bacterial adhesins. One such recently identified protein is BipA. Despite the similarity of BipA to intimins and invasins, deletion of this protein from B. bronchiseptica did not result in any significant defect in respiratory tract colonization. In this study, we identified an open reading frame in B. bronchiseptica, designated bcfA (encoding BcfA [bordetella colonization factor A]), that is similar to bipA. In contrast to the maximal expression of bipA in the Bvg intermediate (Bvgi) phase, bcfA is expressed at high levels in both the Bvg+ and Bvgi phases. We show here that BvgA and phosphorylated BvgA bind differentially to the bcfA promoter region. Utilizing immunoblot assays, we found that BcfA is localized to the outer membrane and that it is expressed during animal infection. While deletion of either bipA or bcfA did not significantly affect respiratory tract colonization, concomitant deletion of both genes resulted in a defect in colonization of the rat trachea. Our results indicate that the two paralogous proteins have a combinatorial role in mediating efficient respiratory tract colonization. PMID:17351043

  3. Differential Bvg phase-dependent regulation and combinatorial role in pathogenesis of two Bordetella paralogs, BipA and BcfA.

    PubMed

    Sukumar, Neelima; Mishra, Meenu; Sloan, Gina Parise; Ogi, Tomoo; Deora, Rajendar

    2007-05-01

    To successfully colonize their mammalian hosts, many bacteria produce multiple virulence factors that play essential roles in disease processes and pathogenesis. Some of these molecules are adhesins that allow efficient attachment to host cells, a prerequisite for successful host colonization. Bordetella spp. express a number of proteins which either play a direct role in attachment to the respiratory epithelia or exhibit similarity to known bacterial adhesins. One such recently identified protein is BipA. Despite the similarity of BipA to intimins and invasins, deletion of this protein from B. bronchiseptica did not result in any significant defect in respiratory tract colonization. In this study, we identified an open reading frame in B. bronchiseptica, designated bcfA (encoding BcfA [bordetella colonization factor A]), that is similar to bipA. In contrast to the maximal expression of bipA in the Bvg intermediate (Bvg(i)) phase, bcfA is expressed at high levels in both the Bvg(+) and Bvg(i) phases. We show here that BvgA and phosphorylated BvgA bind differentially to the bcfA promoter region. Utilizing immunoblot assays, we found that BcfA is localized to the outer membrane and that it is expressed during animal infection. While deletion of either bipA or bcfA did not significantly affect respiratory tract colonization, concomitant deletion of both genes resulted in a defect in colonization of the rat trachea. Our results indicate that the two paralogous proteins have a combinatorial role in mediating efficient respiratory tract colonization.

  4. The RNA helicase DDX39B and its paralog DDX39A regulate androgen receptor splice variant AR-V7 generation.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Daisuke; Nakao, Shoichi; Nakayama, Kazuhide; Araki, Shinsuke; Nakayama, Yusuke; Aparicio, Samuel; Hara, Takahito; Nakanishi, Atsushi

    2017-01-29

    Mounting evidence suggests that constitutively active androgen receptor (AR) splice variants, typified by AR-V7, are associated with poor prognosis and resistance to androgen deprivation therapy in prostate cancer patients. However, mechanisms governing the generation of AR splice variants are not fully understood. In this study, we aimed to investigate the dynamics of AR splice variant generation using the JDCaP prostate cancer model that expresses AR splice variants under androgen depletion. Microarray analysis of JDCaP xenografts before and after expression of AR splice variants suggested that dysregulation of RNA processing pathways is likely involved in AR splice variant generation. To explore factors contributing to generation of AR-V7 mRNA, we conducted a focused RNA interference screen in AR-V7-positive JDCaP-hr cells using an shRNA library targeting spliceosome-related genes. This screen identified DDX39B as a regulator of AR-V7 mRNA expression. Simultaneous knockdown of DDX39B and its paralog DDX39A drastically and selectively downregulated AR-V7 mRNA expression in multiple AR-V7-positive prostate cancer cell lines. DDX39B was upregulated in relapsed JDCaP xenografts expressing AR splice variants, suggesting its role in expression of AR splice variants. Taken together, our findings offer insight into the mechanisms of AR splice variant generation and identify DDX39 as a potential drug target for the treatment of AR splice variant-positive prostate cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Genes and proteins of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Riley, M

    1998-01-01

    GenProtEC is a database of Escherichia coli genes and their gene products, classified by type of function and physiological role and with citations to the literature for each. Also present are data on sequence similarities among E.coli proteins, representing groups of paralogous genes, with PAM values, percent identity of amino acids, length of alignment and percent aligned. GenProtEC can be accessed at the URL http://www.mbl.edu/html/ecoli.html

  6. Multiple elements controlling the expression of wheat high molecular weight glutenin paralogs.

    PubMed

    Makai, Szabolcs; Éva, Csaba; Tamás, László; Juhász, Angéla

    2015-11-01

    Analysis of gene expression data generated by high-throughput microarray transcript profiling experiments coupled with cis-regulatory elements enrichment study and cluster analysis can be used to define modular gene programs and regulatory networks. Unfortunately, the high molecular weight glutenin subunits of wheat (Triticum aestivum) are more similar than microarray data alone would allow to distinguish between the three homoeologous gene pairs. However, combining complementary DNA (cDNA) expression libraries with microarray data, a co-expressional network was built that highlighted the hidden differences between these highly similar genes. Duplex clusters of cis-regulatory elements were used to focus the co-expressional network of transcription factors to the putative regulatory network of Glu-1 genes. The focused network helped to identify several transcriptional gene programs in the endosperm. Many of these programs demonstrated a conserved temporal pattern across the studied genotypes; however, few others showed variance. Based on this network, transient gene expression assays were performed with mutated promoters to inspect the control of tissue specificity. Results indicated that the interactions of the ABRE│CBF cluster with distal promoter regions may have a dual role in regulation by both recruiting the transcription complex as well as suppressing it in non-endosperm tissue. A putative model of regulation is discussed.

  7. Population-specific differences in gene conversion patterns between human SUZ12 and SUZ12P are indicative of the dynamic nature of interparalog gene conversion.

    PubMed

    Mussotter, Tanja; Bengesser, Kathrin; Högel, Josef; Cooper, David N; Kehrer-Sawatzki, Hildegard

    2014-04-01

    Nonallelic homologous gene conversion (NAHGC) resulting from interparalog recombination without crossover represents an important influence on the evolution of duplicated sequences in the human genome. In 17q11.2, different paralogous sequences mediate large NF1 deletions by nonallelic homologous recombination with crossover (NAHR). Among these paralogs are SUZ12 and its pseudogene SUZ12P which harbour the breakpoints of type-2 (1.2-Mb) NF1 deletions. Such deletions are caused predominantly by mitotic NAHR since somatic mosaicism with normal cells is evident in most patients. Investigating whether SUZ12 and SUZ12P have also been involved in NAHGC, we observed gene conversion tracts between these paralogs in both Africans (AFR) and Europeans (EUR). Since germline type-2 NF1 deletions resulting from meiotic NAHR are very rare, the vast majority of the gene conversion tracts in SUZ12 and SUZ12P are likely to have resulted from mitotic recombination during premeiotic cell divisions of germ cells. A higher number of gene conversion tracts were noted within SUZ12 and SUZ12P in AFR as compared to EUR. Further, the distinctive signature of NAHGC (a high number of SNPs per paralog and a high number of shared SNPs between paralogs), a characteristic of many actively recombining paralogs, was observed in both SUZ12 and SUZ12P but only in AFR and not in EUR. A novel polymorphic 2.3-kb deletion in SUZ12P was identified which exhibited a high allele frequency in EUR. We postulate that this interparalog structural difference, together with low allelic recombination rates, could have caused a reduction in NAHGC between SUZ12 and SUZ12P during human evolution.

  8. Gene Duplication, Population Genomics, and Species-Level Differentiation within a Tropical Mountain Shrub

    PubMed Central

    Mastretta-Yanes, Alicia; Zamudio, Sergio; Jorgensen, Tove H.; Arrigo, Nils; Alvarez, Nadir; Piñero, Daniel; Emerson, Brent C.

    2014-01-01

    Gene duplication leads to paralogy, which complicates the de novo assembly of genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) data. The issue of paralogous genes is exacerbated in plants, because they are particularly prone to gene duplication events. Paralogs are normally filtered from GBS data before undertaking population genomics or phylogenetic analyses. However, gene duplication plays an important role in the functional diversification of genes and it can also lead to the formation of postzygotic barriers. Using populations and closely related species of a tropical mountain shrub, we examine 1) the genomic differentiation produced by putative orthologs, and 2) the distribution of recent gene duplication among lineages and geography. We find high differentiation among populations from isolated mountain peaks and species-level differentiation within what is morphologically described as a single species. The inferred distribution of paralogs among populations is congruent with taxonomy and shows that GBS could be used to examine recent gene duplication as a source of genomic differentiation of nonmodel species. PMID:25223767

  9. Establishing the precise evolutionary history of a gene improves prediction of disease-causing missense mutations

    DOE PAGES

    Adebali, Ogun; Reznik, Alexander O.; Ory, Daniel S.; ...

    2016-02-18

    Here, predicting the phenotypic effects of mutations has become an important application in clinical genetic diagnostics. Computational tools evaluate the behavior of the variant over evolutionary time and assume that variations seen during the course of evolution are probably benign in humans. However, current tools do not take into account orthologous/paralogous relationships. Paralogs have dramatically different roles in Mendelian diseases. For example, whereas inactivating mutations in the NPC1 gene cause the neurodegenerative disorder Niemann-Pick C, inactivating mutations in its paralog NPC1L1 are not disease-causing and, moreover, are implicated in protection from coronary heart disease. Methods: We identified major events inmore » NPC1 evolution and revealed and compared orthologs and paralogs of the human NPC1 gene through phylogenetic and protein sequence analyses. We predicted whether an amino acid substitution affects protein function by reducing the organism s fitness. As a result, removing the paralogs and distant homologs improved the overall performance of categorizing disease-causing and benign amino acid substitutions. In conclusion, the results show that a thorough evolutionary analysis followed by identification of orthologs improves the accuracy in predicting disease-causing missense mutations. We anticipate that this approach will be used as a reference in the interpretation of variants in other genetic diseases as well.« less

  10. Establishing the precise evolutionary history of a gene improves prediction of disease-causing missense mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Adebali, Ogun; Reznik, Alexander O.; Ory, Daniel S.; Zhulin, Igor B.

    2016-02-18

    Here, predicting the phenotypic effects of mutations has become an important application in clinical genetic diagnostics. Computational tools evaluate the behavior of the variant over evolutionary time and assume that variations seen during the course of evolution are probably benign in humans. However, current tools do not take into account orthologous/paralogous relationships. Paralogs have dramatically different roles in Mendelian diseases. For example, whereas inactivating mutations in the NPC1 gene cause the neurodegenerative disorder Niemann-Pick C, inactivating mutations in its paralog NPC1L1 are not disease-causing and, moreover, are implicated in protection from coronary heart disease. Methods: We identified major events in NPC1 evolution and revealed and compared orthologs and paralogs of the human NPC1 gene through phylogenetic and protein sequence analyses. We predicted whether an amino acid substitution affects protein function by reducing the organism s fitness. As a result, removing the paralogs and distant homologs improved the overall performance of categorizing disease-causing and benign amino acid substitutions. In conclusion, the results show that a thorough evolutionary analysis followed by identification of orthologs improves the accuracy in predicting disease-causing missense mutations. We anticipate that this approach will be used as a reference in the interpretation of variants in other genetic diseases as well.

  11. Establishing the precise evolutionary history of a gene improves prediction of disease-causing missense mutations.

    PubMed

    Adebali, Ogun; Reznik, Alexander O; Ory, Daniel S; Zhulin, Igor B

    2016-10-01

    Predicting the phenotypic effects of mutations has become an important application in clinical genetic diagnostics. Computational tools evaluate the behavior of the variant over evolutionary time and assume that variations seen during the course of evolution are probably benign in humans. However, current tools do not take into account orthologous/paralogous relationships. Paralogs have dramatically different roles in Mendelian diseases. For example, whereas inactivating mutations in the NPC1 gene cause the neurodegenerative disorder Niemann-Pick C, inactivating mutations in its paralog NPC1L1 are not disease-causing and, moreover, are implicated in protection from coronary heart disease. We identified major events in NPC1 evolution and revealed and compared orthologs and paralogs of the human NPC1 gene through phylogenetic and protein sequence analyses. We predicted whether an amino acid substitution affects protein function by reducing the organism's fitness. Removing the paralogs and distant homologs improved the overall performance of categorizing disease-causing and benign amino acid substitutions. The results show that a thorough evolutionary analysis followed by identification of orthologs improves the accuracy in predicting disease-causing missense mutations. We anticipate that this approach will be used as a reference in the interpretation of variants in other genetic diseases as well.Genet Med 18 10, 1029-1036.

  12. PAXX, a paralog of XRCC4 and XLF, interacts with Ku to promote DNA double-strand break repair**

    PubMed Central

    Coates, Julia; Jhujh, Satpal; Mehmood, Shahid; Tamura, Naoka; Travers, Jon; Wu, Qian; Draviam, Viji M.; Robinson, Carol V.; Blundell, Tom L.; Jackson, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    XRCC4 and XLF are two structurally-related proteins that function in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Here, we identify human PAXX (PAralog of XRCC4 and XLF; also called C9orf142) as a new XRCC4-superfamily member, and show that its crystal structure resembles that of XRCC4. PAXX interacts directly with the DSB-repair protein Ku and is recruited to DNA-damage sites in cells. Using RNA interference and CRISPR-Cas9 to generate PAXX−/− cells, we demonstrate that PAXX functions with XRCC4 and XLF to mediate DSB repair and cell survival in response to DSB-inducing agents. Finally, we reveal that PAXX promotes Ku-dependent DNA ligation in vitro, and assembly of core non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) factors on damaged chromatin in cells. These findings identify PAXX as a new component of the NHEJ machinery. PMID:25574025

  13. Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi contains two iaaL paralogs, one of which exhibits a variable number of a trinucleotide (TAC) tandem repeat.

    PubMed

    Matas, Isabel M; Pérez-Martínez, Isabel; Quesada, José M; Rodríguez-Herva, José J; Penyalver, Ramón; Ramos, Cayo

    2009-02-01

    In this study, Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi isolates were demonstrated to contain two iaaL paralogs, which are both chromosomally located in most strains. Comparative analysis of iaaL nucleotide sequences amplified from these two paralogs revealed that one paralog, iaaL(Psn), is 100% identical to iaaL from P. savastanoi pv. nerii, while the other paralog, iaaL(Psv), exhibited 93% identity to iaaL from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (iaaL(Pto)). A 3-nucleotide motif (TAC) comprised of 3 to 15 repeats, which remained stable after propagation of the strains in olive plants, was found in iaaL(Psv). Based on the observed nucleotide sequence variations, a restriction fragment length polymorphism assay was developed that allowed differentiation among iaaL(Psn), iaaL(Psv), and iaaL(Pto)(.) In addition, reverse transcriptase PCR on total RNA from P. savastanoi pv. savastanoi strains demonstrated that both iaaL(Psv) and iaaL(Psn) containing 14 or fewer TAC repeats are transcribed. Capillary electrophoresis analysis of PCR-amplified DNA fragments containing the TAC repeats from iaaL(Psv) allowed the differentiation of P. savastanoi pv. savastanoi isolates.

  14. Structure–Activity Relationship in a Purine-Scaffold Compound Series with Selectivity for the Endoplasmic Reticulum Hsp90 Paralog Grp94

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Hardik J.; Patel, Pallav D.; Ochiana, Stefan O.; Yan, Pengrong; Sun, Weilin; Patel, Maulik R.; Shah, Smit K.; Tramentozzi, Elisa; Brooks, James; Bolaender, Alexander; Shrestha, Liza; Stephani, Ralph; Finotti, Paola; Leifer, Cynthia; Li, Zihai; Gewirth, Daniel T.; Taldone, Tony; Chiosis, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Grp94 is involved in the regulation of a restricted number of proteins and represents a potential target in a host of diseases, including cancer, septic shock, autoimmune diseases, chronic inflammatory conditions, diabetes, coronary thrombosis, and stroke. We have recently identified a novel allosteric pocket located in the Grp94 N-terminal binding site that can be used to design ligands with a 2-log selectivity over the other Hsp90 paralogs. Here we perform extensive SAR investigations in this ligand series and rationalize the affinity and paralog selectivity of choice derivatives by molecular modeling. We then use this to design 18c, a derivative with good potency for Grp94 (IC50 = 0.22 μM) and selectivity over other paralogs (>100- and 33-fold for Hsp90α/β and Trap-1, respectively). The paralog selectivity and target-mediated activity of 18c was confirmed in cells through several functional readouts. Compound 18c was also inert when tested against a large panel of kinases. We show that 18c has biological activity in several cellular models of inflammation and cancer and also present here for the first time the in vivo profile of a Grp94 inhibitor. PMID:25901531

  15. Identification and activity of a paralog of cathepsin S from yellow catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco) involved in immune response.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Liu, Xin; Lv, Shuai; Ren, Jinnan; Ke, Fei

    2017-02-01

    Cathepsin S, a papain-like cysteine peptidase, is an important regulator and signaling molecule with diverse biological actions in addition to immune presentation. However, our understanding of its structure and properties remains limited. Herein, a full-length cathepsin Sa from yellow catfish was cloned and named PfCTSSa. It contained 1366 bp, including a 981 bp ORF flanked by a 123 bp 5'-untranslated region (UTR) and a 262 bp 3'-UTR. This ORF encoded a 36.5 kD cysteine protease with the deduced amino acid sequence having a 76% sequence identity with Ictalurus punctatus ctssa. Additionally, PfCTSSa was found to be a paralog of cathepsin S since it generated a new cluster with cathepsin Sa in the phylogenic tree. Furthermore, PfCTSSa was found to contain more N-glycosylation sites than cathepsin S. The recombinant PfCTSSa was overexpressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) and appeared to have the strongest activity at pH 8.5 and 35 °C in a concentration-dependent manner, with activity further affected by metal ions and detergents. Moreover, PfCTSSa mRNA was highly expressed in classic and mucosal immune tissues, although constitutively distributed in all of the examined tissues. Yellow catfish were then challenged with inactivated Aeromonas hydrophila and PfCTSSa was remarkably increased in the head kidney, liver and spleen when compared to the PBS control. Collectively, these results indicate that PfCTSSa is a paralog of cathepsin S and functions in the yellow catfish immune response.

  16. Digenic mutations of human OCRL paralogs in Dent’s disease type 2 associated with Chiari I malformation

    PubMed Central

    Duran, Daniel; Jin, Sheng Chih; DeSpenza, Tyrone; Nelson-Williams, Carol; Cogal, Andrea G; Abrash, Elizabeth W; Harris, Peter C; Lieske, John C; Shimshak, Serena JE; Mane, Shrikant; Bilguvar, Kaya; DiLuna, Michael L; Günel, Murat; Lifton, Richard P; Kahle, Kristopher T

    2016-01-01

    OCRL1 and its paralog INPP5B encode phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphatases that localize to the primary cilium and have roles in ciliogenesis. Mutations in OCRL1 cause the X-linked Dent disease type 2 (DD2; OMIM# 300555), characterized by low-molecular weight proteinuria, hypercalciuria, and the variable presence of cataracts, glaucoma and intellectual disability without structural brain anomalies. Disease-causing mutations in INPP5B have not been described in humans. Here, we report the case of an 11-year-old boy with short stature and an above-average IQ; severe proteinuria, hypercalciuria and osteopenia resulting in a vertebral compression fracture; and Chiari I malformation with cervico-thoracic syringohydromyelia requiring suboccipital decompression. Sequencing revealed a novel, de novo DD2-causing 462 bp deletion disrupting exon 3 of OCRL1 and a maternally inherited, extremely rare (ExAC allele frequency 8.4×10−6) damaging missense mutation in INPP5B (p.A51V). This mutation substitutes an evolutionarily conserved amino acid in the protein’s critical PH domain. In silico analyses of mutation impact predicted by SIFT, PolyPhen2, MetaSVM and CADD algorithms were all highly deleterious. Together, our findings report a novel association of DD2 with Chiari I malformation and syringohydromyelia, and document the effects of digenic mutation of human OCRL paralogs. These findings lend genetic support to the hypothesis that impaired ciliogenesis may contribute to the development of Chiari I malformation, and implicates OCRL-dependent PIP3 metabolism in this mechanism. PMID:28018608

  17. Aberrant expression of posterior HOX genes in well differentiated histotypes of thyroid cancers.

    PubMed

    Cantile, Monica; Scognamiglio, Giosuè; La Sala, Lucia; La Mantia, Elvira; Scaramuzza, Veronica; Valentino, Elena; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Losito, Simona; Pezzullo, Luciano; Chiofalo, Maria Grazia; Fulciniti, Franco; Franco, Renato; Botti, Gerardo

    2013-11-01

    Molecular etiology of thyroid cancers has been widely studied, and several molecular alterations have been identified mainly associated with follicular and papillary histotypes. However, the molecular bases of the complex pathogenesis of thyroid carcinomas remain poorly understood. HOX genes regulate normal embryonic development, cell differentiation and other critical processes in eukaryotic cell life. Several studies have shown that HOX genes play a role in neoplastic transformation of several human tissues. In particular, the genes belonging to HOX paralogous group 13 seem to hold a relevant role in both tumor development and progression. We have identified a significant prognostic role of HOX D13 in pancreatic cancer and we have recently showed the strong and progressive over-expression of HOX C13 in melanoma metastases and deregulation of HOX B13 expression in bladder cancers. In this study we have investigated, by immunohistochemisty and quantitative Real Time PCR, the HOX paralogous group 13 genes/proteins expression in thyroid cancer evolution and progression, also evaluating its ability to discriminate between main histotypes. Our results showed an aberrant expression, both at gene and protein level, of all members belonging to paralogous group 13 (HOX A13, HOX B13, HOX C13 and HOX D13) in adenoma, papillary and follicular thyroid cancers samples. The data suggest a potential role of HOX paralogous group 13 genes in pathogenesis and differential diagnosis of thyroid cancers.

  18. Occurrence and Evolution of the Paralogous Zinc Metalloproteases IgA1 Protease, ZmpB, ZmpC, and ZmpD in Streptococcus pneumoniae and Related Commensal Species

    PubMed Central

    Bek-Thomsen, Malene; Poulsen, Knud; Kilian, Mogens

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The distribution, genome location, and evolution of the four paralogous zinc metalloproteases, IgA1 protease, ZmpB, ZmpC, and ZmpD, in Streptococcus pneumoniae and related commensal species were studied by in silico analysis of whole genomes and by activity screening of 154 representatives of 20 species. ZmpB was ubiquitous in the Mitis and Salivarius groups of the genus Streptococcus and in the genera Gemella and Granulicatella, with the exception of a fragmented gene in Streptococcus thermophilus, the only species with a nonhuman habitat. IgA1 protease activity was observed in all members of S. pneumoniae, S. pseudopneumoniae, S. oralis, S. sanguinis, and Gemella haemolysans, was variably present in S. mitis and S. infantis, and absent in S. gordonii, S. parasanguinis, S. cristatus, S. oligofermentans, S. australis, S. peroris, and S. suis. Phylogenetic analysis of 297 zmp sequences and representative housekeeping genes provided evidence for an unprecedented selection for genetic diversification of the iga, zmpB, and zmpD genes in S. pneumoniae and evidence of very frequent intraspecies transfer of entire genes and combination of genes. Presumably due to their adaptation to a commensal lifestyle, largely unaffected by adaptive mucosal immune factors, the corresponding genes in commensal streptococci have remained conserved. The widespread distribution and significant sequence diversity indicate an ancient origin of the zinc metalloproteases predating the emergence of the humanoid species. zmpB, which appears to be the ancestral gene, subsequently duplicated and successfully diversified into distinct functions, is likely to serve an important but yet unknown housekeeping function associated with the human host. PMID:23033471

  19. Mouse Dux is myotoxic and shares partial functional homology with its human paralog DUX4

    PubMed Central

    Eidahl, Jocelyn O.; Giesige, Carlee R.; Domire, Jacqueline S.; Wallace, Lindsay M.; Fowler, Allison M.; Guckes, Susan M.; Garwick-Coppens, Sara E.; Labhart, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Abstract D4Z4 repeats are present in at least 11 different mammalian species, including humans and mice. Each repeat contains an open reading frame encoding a double homeodomain (DUX) family transcription factor. Aberrant expression of the D4Z4 ORF called DUX4 is associated with the pathogenesis of Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). DUX4 is toxic to numerous cell types of different species, and over-expression caused dysmorphism and developmental arrest in frogs and zebrafish, embryonic lethality in transgenic mice, and lesions in mouse muscle. Because DUX4 is a primate-specific gene, questions have been raised about the biological relevance of over-expressing it in non-primate models, as DUX4 toxicity could be related to non-specific cellular stress induced by over-expressing a DUX family transcription factor in organisms that did not co-evolve its regulated transcriptional networks. We assessed toxic phenotypes of DUX family genes, including DUX4, DUX1, DUX5, DUXA, DUX4-s, Dux-bl and mouse Dux. We found that DUX proteins were not universally toxic, and only the mouse Dux gene caused similar toxic phenotypes as human DUX4. Using RNA-seq, we found that 80% of genes upregulated by Dux were similarly increased in DUX4-expressing cells. Moreover, 43% of Dux-responsive genes contained ChIP-seq binding sites for both Dux and DUX4, and both proteins had similar consensus binding site sequences. These results suggested DUX4 and Dux may regulate some common pathways, and despite diverging from a common progenitor under different selective pressures for millions of years, the two genes maintain partial functional homology. PMID:28173143

  20. Loss of function of 1-FEH IIb has more impact on post-harvest inulin degradation in Cichorium intybus than copy number variation of its close paralog 1-FEH IIa

    PubMed Central

    Dauchot, Nicolas; Raulier, Pierre; Maudoux, Olivier; Notté, Christine; Draye, Xavier; Van Cutsem, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Key Message: The loss of mini-exon 2 in the 1-FEH IIb glycosyl-hydrolase results in a putative non-functional allele. This loss of function has a strong impact on the susceptibility to post-harvest inulin depolymerization. Significant variation of copy number was identified in its close paralog 1-FEH IIa, but no quantitative effect of copy number on carbohydrates-related phenotypes was detected. Inulin polyfructan is the second most abundant storage carbohydrate in flowering plants. After harvest, it is depolymerized by fructan exohydrolases (FEHs) as an adaptive response to end-season cold temperatures. In chicory, the intensity of this depolymerization differs between cultivars but also between individuals within a cultivar. Regarding this phenotypic variability, we recently identified statistically significant associations between inulin degradation and genetic polymorphisms located in three FEHs. We present here new results of a systematic analysis of copy number variation (CNV) in five key members of the chicory (Cichorium intybus) GH32 multigenic family, including three FEH genes and the two inulin biosynthesis genes: 1-SST and 1-FFT. qPCR analysis identified a significant variability of relative copy number only in the 1-FEH IIa gene. However, this CNV had no quantitative effect. Instead, cloning of the full length gDNA of a close paralogous sequence (1-FEH IIb) identified a 1028 bp deletion in lines less susceptible to post-harvest inulin depolymerization. This region comprises a 9 bp mini-exon containing one of the three conserved residues of the active site. This results in a putative non-functional 1-FEH IIb allele and an observed lower inulin depolymerization. Extensive genotyping confirmed that the loss of mini-exon 2 in 1-FEH IIb and the previously identified 47 bp duplication located in the 3′UTR of 1-FEH IIa belong to a single haplotype, both being statistically associated with reduced susceptibility to post-harvest inulin depolymerization

  1. Experimental examination of EFL and MATX eukaryotic horizontal gene transfers: coexistence of mutually exclusive transcripts predates functional rescue.

    PubMed

    Szabová, Jana; Ruzicka, Petr; Verner, Zdenek; Hampl, Vladimír; Lukes, Julius

    2011-08-01

    Many eukaryotic genes do not follow simple vertical inheritance. Elongation factor 1α (EF-1α) and methionine adenosyl transferase (MAT) are enzymes with complicated evolutionary histories and, interestingly, the two cases have several features in common. These essential enzymes occur as two relatively divergent paralogs (EF-1α/EFL, MAT/MATX) that have patchy distributions in eukaryotic lineages that are nearly mutually exclusive. To explain such distributions, we must invoke either multiple eukaryote-to-eukaryote horizontal gene transfers (HGTs) followed by functional replacement or presence of both paralogs in the common ancestor followed by long-term coexistence and differential losses in various eukaryotic lineages. To understand the evolution of these paralogs, we have performed in vivo experiments in Trypanosoma brucei addressing the consequences of long-term coexpression and functional replacement. In the first experiment of its kind, we have demonstrated that EF-1α and MAT can be simultaneously expressed with EFL and MATX, respectively, without affecting the growth of the flagellates. After the endogenous MAT or EF-1α was downregulated by RNA interference, MATX immediately substituted for its paralog, whereas EFL was not able to substitute for EF-1α, leading to mortality. We conclude that MATX is naturally capable of evolving patchy paralog distribution via HGTs and/or long- term coexpression and differential losses. The capability of EFL to spread by HGT is lower and so the patchy distribution of EF-1α/EFL paralogs was probably shaped mainly by deep paralogy followed by long-term coexistence and differential losses.

  2. Functional Conservation and Divergence of daf-22 Paralogs in Pristionchus pacificus Dauer Development.

    PubMed

    Markov, Gabriel V; Meyer, Jan M; Panda, Oishika; Artyukhin, Alexander B; Claaßen, Marc; Witte, Hanh; Schroeder, Frank C; Sommer, Ralf J

    2016-10-01

    Small-molecule signaling in nematode dauer formation has emerged as a major model to study chemical communication in development and evolution. Developmental arrest as nonfeeding and stress-resistant dauer larvae represents the major survival and dispersal strategy. Detailed studies in Caenorhabditis elegans and Pristionchus pacificus revealed that small-molecule communication changes rapidly in evolution resulting in extreme structural diversity of small-molecule compounds. In C. elegans, a blend of ascarosides constitutes the dauer pheromone, whereas the P. pacificus dauer pheromone includes additional paratosides and integrates building blocks from diverse primary metabolic pathways. Despite this complexity of small-molecule structures and functions, little is known about the biosynthesis of small molecules in nematodes outside C. elegans Here, we show that the genes encoding enzymes of the peroxisomal β-oxidation pathway involved in small-molecule biosynthesis evolve rapidly, including gene duplications and domain switching. The thiolase daf-22, the most downstream factor in C. elegans peroxisomal β-oxidation, has duplicated in P. pacificus, resulting in Ppa-daf-22.1, which still contains the sterol-carrier-protein (SCP) domain that was lost in C. elegans daf-22, and Ppa-daf-22.2. Using the CRISPR/Cas9 system, we induced mutations in both P. pacificus daf-22 genes and identified an unexpected complexity of functional conservation and divergence. Under well-fed conditions, ascaroside biosynthesis proceeds exclusively via Ppa-daf-22.1 In contrast, starvation conditions induce Ppa-daf-22.2 activity, resulting in the production of a specific subset of ascarosides. Gene expression studies indicate a reciprocal up-regulation of both Ppa-daf-22 genes, which is, however, independent of starvation. Thus, our study reveals an unexpected functional complexity of dauer development and evolution.

  3. Homology-dependent Gene Silencing in Paramecium

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Françoise; Vayssié, Laurence; Klotz, Catherine; Sperling, Linda; Madeddu, Luisa

    1998-01-01

    Microinjection at high copy number of plasmids containing only the coding region of a gene into the Paramecium somatic macronucleus led to a marked reduction in the expression of the corresponding endogenous gene(s). The silencing effect, which is stably maintained throughout vegetative growth, has been observed for all Paramecium genes examined so far: a single-copy gene (ND7), as well as members of multigene families (centrin genes and trichocyst matrix protein genes) in which all closely related paralogous genes appeared to be affected. This phenomenon may be related to posttranscriptional gene silencing in transgenic plants and quelling in Neurospora and allows the efficient creation of specific mutant phenotypes thus providing a potentially powerful tool to study gene function in Paramecium. For the two multigene families that encode proteins that coassemble to build up complex subcellular structures the analysis presented herein provides the first experimental evidence that the members of these gene families are not functionally redundant. PMID:9529389

  4. OrthoDisease: tracking disease gene orthologs across 100 species.

    PubMed

    Forslund, Kristoffer; Schreiber, Fabian; Thanintorn, Nattaphon; Sonnhammer, Erik L L

    2011-09-01

    Orthology is one of the most important tools available to modern biology, as it allows making inferences from easily studied model systems to much less tractable systems of interest, such as ourselves. This becomes important not least in the study of genetic diseases. We here review work on the orthology of disease-associated genes and also present an updated version of the InParanoid-based disease orthology database and web site OrthoDisease, with 14-fold increased species coverage since the previous version. Using this resource, we survey the taxonomic distribution of orthologs of human genes involved in different disease categories. The hypothesis that paralogs can mask the effect of deleterious mutations predicts that known heritable disease genes should have fewer close paralogs. We found large-scale support for this hypothesis as significantly fewer duplications were observed for disease genes in the OrthoDisease ortholog groups.

  5. Divergent Wnt8a gene expression in teleosts.

    PubMed

    Mwafi, Nesrin; Beretta, Carlo A; Paolini, Alessio; Carl, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of genes in evolutionarily distant but morphologically similar species is of major importance to unravel the changes in genomes over millions of years, which led to gene silencing and functional diversification. We report the analysis of Wnt8a gene expression in the medakafish and provide a detailed comparison to other vertebrates. In all teleosts analyzed there are two paralogous Wnt8a copies. These show largely overlapping expression in the early developing zebrafish embryo, an evolutionarily distant relative of medaka. In contrast to zebrafish, we find that both maternal and zygotic expression of particularly one Wnt8a paralog has diverged in medaka. While Wnt8a1 expression is mostly conserved at early embryonic stages, the expression of Wnt8a2 differs markedly. In addition, both genes are distinctly expressed during organogenesis unlike the zebrafish homologs, which may hint at the emergence of functional diversification of Wnt8a ligands during evolution.

  6. Identification of the FANCI protein, a monoubiquitinated FANCD2 paralog required for DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Smogorzewska, Agata; Matsuoka, Shuhei; Vinciguerra, Patrizia; McDonald, E Robert; Hurov, Kristen E; Luo, Ji; Ballif, Bryan A; Gygi, Steven P; Hofmann, Kay; D'Andrea, Alan D; Elledge, Stephen J

    2007-04-20

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a developmental and cancer-predisposition syndrome caused by mutations in genes controlling DNA interstrand crosslink repair. Several FA proteins form a ubiquitin ligase that controls monoubiquitination of the FANCD2 protein in an ATR-dependent manner. Here we describe the FA protein FANCI, identified as an ATM/ATR kinase substrate required for resistance to mitomycin C. FANCI shares sequence similarity with FANCD2, likely evolving from a common ancestral gene. The FANCI protein associates with FANCD2 and, together, as the FANCI-FANCD2 (ID) complex, localize to chromatin in response to DNA damage. Like FANCD2, FANCI is monoubiquitinated and unexpectedly, ubiquitination of each protein is important for the maintenance of ubiquitin on the other, indicating the existence of a dual ubiquitin-locking mechanism required for ID complex function. Mutation in FANCI is responsible for loss of a functional FA pathway in a patient with Fanconi anemia complementation group I.

  7. Antcin C from Antrodia cinnamomea Protects Liver Cells Against Free Radical-Induced Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis In Vitro and In Vivo through Nrf2-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Gokila Vani, M.; Kumar, K. J. Senthil; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Chien, Shih-Chang; Mau, Jeng-Leun; Chiang, Shen-Shih; Lin, Chin-Chung; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Wang, Sheng-Yang

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the cytoprotective effects of antcin C, a steroid-like compound isolated from Antrodia cinnamaomea against AAPH-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in human hepatic HepG2 cells. Pretreatment with antcin C significantly protects hepatic cells from AAPH-induced cell death through the inhibition of ROS generation. Furthermore, AAPH-induced lipid peroxidation, ALT/AST secretion and GSH depletion was significantly inhibited by antcin C. The antioxidant potential of antcin C was correlated with induction of antioxidant genes including, HO-1, NQO-1, γ-GCLC, and SOD via transcriptional activation of Nrf2. The Nrf2 activation by antcin C is mediated by JNK1/2 and PI3K activation, whereas pharmacologic inhibition of JNK1/2 and PI3K abolished antcin C-induced Nrf2 activity. In addition, AAPH-induced apoptosis was significantly inhibited by antcin C through the down-regulation of pro-apoptotic factors including, Bax, cytochrome c, capase 9, -4, -12, -3, and PARP. In vivo studies also show that antcin C significantly protected mice liver from AAPH-induced hepatic injury as evidenced by reduction in hepatic enzymes in circulation. Further, immunocytochemistry analyses showed that antcin C significantly increased HO-1 and Nrf2 expression in mice liver tissues. These results strongly suggest that antcin C could protect liver cells from oxidative stress and cell death via Nrf2/ARE activation. PMID:24391672

  8. Molecular characterisation of two paralogous SPO11 homologues in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Hartung, F; Puchta, H

    2000-04-01

    The Spo11 protein of yeast has been found to be covalently bound to double-strand breaks in meiosis, demonstrating a unique role of the protein in the formation of these breaks. Homologues of the SPO11 gene have been found in various eukaryotes, indicating that the machinery involved in meiotic recombination is conserved in eukaryotes. Here we report on SPO11 homologues in plants. In contrast to what is known from other eukaryotes, Arabidopsis thaliana carries in its genome at least two SPO11 homologues, AtSPO11-1 and AtSPO11-2. Both genes are not more closely related to each other than to other eukaryotic SPO11 homologues, indicating that they did not arise via a recent duplication event during higher plant evolution. For both genes three different poly-adenylation sites were found. AtSPO11-1 is expressed not only in generative but also to a lesser extent in somatic tissues. We were able to detect in different organs various AtSPO11-1 cDNAs in which introns were differently spliced-a surprising phenomenon also reported for SPO11 homologues in mammals. In the case of AtSPO11-2 we found that the 3' end of the mRNA is overlapping with a mRNA produced by a gene located in inverse orientation next to it. This points to a possible antisense regulation mechanism. Our findings hint to the intriguing possibility that, at least for plants, Spo11-like proteins might have more and possibly other biological functions than originally anticipated for yeast.

  9. A phylogenomic gene cluster resource: The phylogeneticallyinferred groups (PhlGs) database

    SciTech Connect

    Dehal, Paramvir S.; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-08-25

    We present here the PhIGs database, a phylogenomic resource for sequenced genomes. Although many methods exist for clustering gene families, very few attempt to create truly orthologous clusters sharing descent from a single ancestral gene across a range of evolutionary depths. Although these non-phylogenetic gene family clusters have been used broadly for gene annotation, errors are known to be introduced by the artifactual association of slowly evolving paralogs and lack of annotation for those more rapidly evolving. A full phylogenetic framework is necessary for accurate inference of function and for many studies that address pattern and mechanism of the evolution of the genome. The automated generation of evolutionary gene clusters, creation of gene trees, determination of orthology and paralogy relationships, and the correlation of this information with gene annotations, expression information, and genomic context is an important resource to the scientific community.

  10. The predominant polyphenol in the leaves of the resurrection plant Myrothamnus flabellifolius, 3,4,5 tri-O-galloylquinic acid, protects membranes against desiccation and free radical-induced oxidation

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The predominant (>90%) low-molecular-mass polyphenol was isolated from the leaves of the resurrection plant Myrothamnus flabellifolius and identified to be 3,4,5 tri-O-galloylquinic acid using 1H and 13C one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. The structure was confirmed by mass spectrometric analysis. This compound was present at high concentrations, 44% (by weight) in hydrated leaves and 74% (by weight) in dehydrated leaves. Electron microscopy of leaf material fixed with glutaraldehyde and caffeine demonstrated that the polyphenols were localized in large vacuoles in both hydrated and dehydrated leaves. 3,4,5 Tri-O-galloylquinic acid was shown to stabilize an artificial membrane system, liposomes, against desiccation if the polyphenol concentration was between 1 and 2 μg/μg phospholipid. The phase transition of these liposomes observed at 46 °C was markedly diminished by the presence of 3,4,5 tri-O-galloylquinic acid, suggesting that the presence of the polyphenol maintained the membranes in the liquid crystalline phase at physiological temperatures. 3,4,5 Tri-O-galloylquinic acid was also shown to protect linoleic acid against free radical-induced oxidation. PMID:15355309

  11. Chlorella virus pyrimidine dimer glycosylase excises ultraviolet radiation- and hydroxyl radical-induced products 4,6-diamino-5-formamidopyrimidine and 2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine from DNA.

    PubMed

    Jaruga, Pawel; Jabil, Ritche; McCullough, Amanda K; Rodriguez, Henry; Dizdaroglu, Miral; Lloyd, R Stephen

    2002-02-01

    A DNA glycosylase specific for UV radiation-induced pyrimidine dimers has been identified from the Chlorella virus Paramecium Bursaria Chlorella virus-1. This enzyme (Chlorella virus pyrimidine dimer glycosylase [cv-pdg]) exhibits a 41% amino acid identity with endonuclease V from bacteriophage T4 (T4 pyrimidine dimer glycosylase [T4-pdg]), which is also specific for pyrimidine dimers. However, cv-pdg possesses a higher catalytic efficiency and broader substrate specificity than T4-pdg. The latter excises 4,6-diamino-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyAde), a UV radiation- and hydroxyl radical-induced monomeric product of adenine in DNA. Using gas chromatography-isotope-dilution mass spectrometry and y-irradiated DNA, we show in this work that cv-pdg also displays a catalytic activity for excision of FapyAde and, in addition, it excises 2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyGua). Kinetic data show that FapyAde is a better substrate for cv-pdg than FapyGua. On the other hand, cv-pdg possesses a greater efficiency for the extension of FapyAde than T4-pdg. These two enzymes exhibit different substrate specificities despite substantial structural similarities.

  12. Expanding Duplication of Free Fatty Acid Receptor-2 (GPR43) Genes in the Chicken Genome.

    PubMed

    Meslin, Camille; Desert, Colette; Callebaut, Isabelle; Djari, Anis; Klopp, Christophe; Pitel, Frédérique; Leroux, Sophie; Martin, Pascal; Froment, Pascal; Guilbert, Edith; Gondret, Florence; Lagarrigue, Sandrine; Monget, Philippe

    2015-04-24

    Free fatty acid receptors (FFAR) belong to a family of five G-protein coupled receptors that are involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism, so that their loss of function increases the risk of obesity. The aim of this study was to determine the expansion of genes encoding paralogs of FFAR2 in the chicken, considered as a model organism for developmental biology and biomedical research. By estimating the gene copy number using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, genomic DNA resequencing, and RNA sequencing data, we showed the existence of 23 ± 1.5 genes encoding FFAR2 paralogs in the chicken genome. The FFAR2 paralogs shared an identity from 87.2% up to 99%. Extensive gene conversion was responsible for this high degree of sequence similarities between these genes, and this concerned especially the four amino acids known to be critical for ligand binding. Moreover, elevated nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution ratios on some amino acids within or in close-vicinity of the ligand-binding groove suggest that positive selection may have reduced the effective rate of gene conversion in this region, thus contributing to diversify the function of some FFAR2 paralogs. All the FFAR2 paralogs were located on a microchromosome in a same linkage group. FFAR2 genes were expressed in different tissues and cells such as spleen, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, abdominal adipose tissue, intestine, and lung, with the highest rate of expression in testis. Further investigations are needed to determine whether these chicken-specific events along evolution are the consequence of domestication and may play a role in regulating lipid metabolism in this species.

  13. Expanding Duplication of Free Fatty Acid Receptor-2 (GPR43) Genes in the Chicken Genome

    PubMed Central

    Meslin, Camille; Desert, Colette; Callebaut, Isabelle; Djari, Anis; Klopp, Christophe; Pitel, Frédérique; Leroux, Sophie; Martin, Pascal; Froment, Pascal; Guilbert, Edith; Gondret, Florence; Lagarrigue, Sandrine; Monget, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Free fatty acid receptors (FFAR) belong to a family of five G-protein coupled receptors that are involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism, so that their loss of function increases the risk of obesity. The aim of this study was to determine the expansion of genes encoding paralogs of FFAR2 in the chicken, considered as a model organism for developmental biology and biomedical research. By estimating the gene copy number using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, genomic DNA resequencing, and RNA sequencing data, we showed the existence of 23 ± 1.5 genes encoding FFAR2 paralogs in the chicken genome. The FFAR2 paralogs shared an identity from 87.2% up to 99%. Extensive gene conversion was responsible for this high degree of sequence similarities between these genes, and this concerned especially the four amino acids known to be critical for ligand binding. Moreover, elevated nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution ratios on some amino acids within or in close-vicinity of the ligand-binding groove suggest that positive selection may have reduced the effective rate of gene conversion in this region, thus contributing to diversify the function of some FFAR2 paralogs. All the FFAR2 paralogs were located on a microchromosome in a same linkage group. FFAR2 genes were expressed in different tissues and cells such as spleen, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, abdominal adipose tissue, intestine, and lung, with the highest rate of expression in testis. Further investigations are needed to determine whether these chicken-specific events along evolution are the consequence of domestication and may play a role in regulating lipid metabolism in this species. PMID:25912043

  14. Human-specific duplication and mosaic transcripts: the recent paralogous structure of chromosome 22.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Jeffrey A; Yavor, Amy M; Viggiano, Luigi; Misceo, Doriana; Horvath, Juliann E; Archidiacono, Nicoletta; Schwartz, Stuart; Rocchi, Mariano; Eichler, Evan E

    2002-01-01

    In recent decades, comparative chromosomal banding, chromosome painting, and gene-order studies have shown strong conservation of gross chromosome structure and gene order in mammals. However, findings from the human genome sequence suggest an unprecedented degree of recent (<35 million years ago) segmental duplication. This dynamism of segmental duplications has important implications in disease and evolution. Here we present a chromosome-wide view of the structure and evolution of the most highly homologous duplications (> or = 1 kb and > or = 90%) on chromosome 22. Overall, 10.8% (3.7/33.8 Mb) of chromosome 22 is duplicated, with an average sequence identity of 95.4%. To organize the duplications into tractable units, intron-exon structure and well-defined duplication boundaries were used to define 78 duplicated modules (minimally shared evolutionary segments) with 157 copies on chromosome 22. Analysis of these modules provides evidence for the creation or modification of 11 novel transcripts. Comparative FISH analyses of human, chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, and macaque reveal qualitative and quantitative differences in the distribution of these duplications--consistent with their recent origin. Several duplications appear to be human specific, including a approximately 400-kb duplication (99.4%-99.8% sequence identity) that transposed from chromosome 14 to the most proximal pericentromeric region of chromosome 22. Experimental and in silico data further support a pericentromeric gradient of duplications where the most recent duplications transpose adjacent to the centromere. Taken together, these data suggest that segmental duplications have been an ongoing process of primate genome evolution, contributing to recent gene innovation and the dynamic transformation of genome architecture within and among closely related species.

  15. Metazoan Gene Families from Metazome

    DOE Data Explorer

    Metazome is a joint project of the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute and the Center for Integrative Genomics to facilitate comparative genomic studies amongst metazoans. Clusters of orthologous and paralogous genes that represent the modern descendents of ancestral gene sets are constructed at key phylogenetic nodes. These clusters allow easy access to clade specific orthology/paralogy relationships as well as clade specific genes and gene expansions. As of version 2.0.4, Metazome provides access to twenty-four sequenced and annotated metazoan genomes, clustered at nine evolutionarily significant nodes. Where possible, each gene has been annotated with PFAM, KOG, KEGG, and PANTHER assignments, and publicly available annotations from RefSeq, UniProt, Ensembl, and JGI are hyper-linked and searchable. The included organisms (by common name) are: Human, Mouse, Rat, Dog, Opossum, Chicken, Frog, Stickleback, Medaka, Fugu pufferfish; Zebrafish, Seasquirt - savignyi, Seasquirt - intestinalis, Amphioxus, Sea Urchin, Fruitfly, Mosquite, Yellow Fever Mosquito, Silkworm, Red Flour Beetle, Worm, Briggsae Worm, Owl limpet (snail), and Sea anemone. [Copied from Metazome Overview at http://www.metazome.net/Metazome_info.php

  16. Age- and stage-dependent variations of muscle-specific gene expression in brown trout Salmo trutta L.

    PubMed

    Churova, Maria V; Meshcheryakova, Olga V; Ruchev, Mikhail; Nemova, Nina N

    2017-09-01

    This study was conducted to characterize the features of muscle-specific genes expression during development of brown trout Salmo trutta inhabiting the river Krivoy ruchey (Kola Peninsula, Russia). Gene expression levels of myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs - MyoD1 paralogs (MyoD1a, MyoD1b, MyoD1c), Myf5, myogenin), myostatin paralogs (MSTN-1a, MSTN-1b, MSTN-2a), fast skeletal myosin heavy chain (MyHC) were measured in the white muscles of brown trout parr of ages 0+ (under-yearling), 1+ (yearling) and 2+ (two year old) and smolts of age 2+. Multidirectional changes in MyoD1 and MSTN paralogs expression along with myogenin, Myf 5 and MyHC expression levels in white muscles in parr of trout with age were revealed. The expression of MyoD1c, myogenin, MSTN-2a was the highest in 0+ parr and then decreased. MyoD1a/b expression levels didn't differ between age groups. The simultaneous elevation of MyHC, Myf5, MSTN-1a, and MSTN-1b was found in trout yearlings. In smolts, expression levels of MSTN paralogs, MyHC, Myf5, MyoD1a was lower than in parr. But in contrast, the MyoD1c and myogenin mRNA levels was higher in smolts. The study revealed that there are definite patterns in simultaneous muscle-specific genes expression in age groups of parr and smolts. As MyoD and MSTN paralogs expression changed differently in dependence on age and stage, it was suggested that paralogs of the same gene complementarily control myogenesis during development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Two recently duplicated maize NAC transcription factor paralogs are induced in response to Colletotrichum graminicola infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background NAC transcription factors belong to a large family of plant-specific transcription factors with more than 100 family members in monocot and dicot species. To date, the majority of the studied NAC proteins are involved in the response to abiotic stress, to biotic stress and in the regulation of developmental processes. Maize NAC transcription factors involved in the biotic stress response have not yet been identified. Results We have found that two NAC transcription factors, ZmNAC41 and ZmNAC100, are transcriptionally induced both during the initial biotrophic as well as the ensuing necrotrophic colonization of maize leaves by the hemibiotrophic ascomycete fungus C. graminicola. ZmNAC41 transcripts were also induced upon infection with C. graminicola mutants that are defective in host penetration, while the induction of ZmNAC100 did not occur in such interactions. While ZmNAC41 transcripts accumulated specifically in response to jasmonate (JA), ZmNAC100 transcripts were also induced by the salicylic acid analog 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid (INA). To assess the phylogenetic relation of ZmNAC41 and ZmNAC100, we studied the family of maize NAC transcription factors based on the recently annotated B73 genome information. We identified 116 maize NAC transcription factor genes that clustered into 12 clades. ZmNAC41 and ZmNAC100 both belong to clade G and appear to have arisen by a recent gene duplication event. Including four other defence-related NAC transcription factors of maize and functionally characterized Arabidopsis and rice NAC transcription factors, we observed an enrichment of NAC transcription factors involved in host defense regulation in clade G. In silico analyses identified putative binding elements for the defence-induced ERF, Myc2, TGA and WRKY transcription factors in the promoters of four out of the six defence-related maize NAC transcription factors, while one of the analysed maize NAC did not contain any of these potential binding sites

  18. Two recently duplicated maize NAC transcription factor paralogs are induced in response to Colletotrichum graminicola infection.

    PubMed

    Voitsik, Anna-Maria; Muench, Steffen; Deising, Holger B; Voll, Lars M

    2013-05-29

    NAC transcription factors belong to a large family of plant-specific transcription factors with more than 100 family members in monocot and dicot species. To date, the majority of the studied NAC proteins are involved in the response to abiotic stress, to biotic stress and in the regulation of developmental processes. Maize NAC transcription factors involved in the biotic stress response have not yet been identified. We have found that two NAC transcription factors, ZmNAC41 and ZmNAC100, are transcriptionally induced both during the initial biotrophic as well as the ensuing necrotrophic colonization of maize leaves by the hemibiotrophic ascomycete fungus C. graminicola. ZmNAC41 transcripts were also induced upon infection with C. graminicola mutants that are defective in host penetration, while the induction of ZmNAC100 did not occur in such interactions. While ZmNAC41 transcripts accumulated specifically in response to jasmonate (JA), ZmNAC100 transcripts were also induced by the salicylic acid analog 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid (INA).To assess the phylogenetic relation of ZmNAC41 and ZmNAC100, we studied the family of maize NAC transcription factors based on the recently annotated B73 genome information. We identified 116 maize NAC transcription factor genes that clustered into 12 clades. ZmNAC41 and ZmNAC100 both belong to clade G and appear to have arisen by a recent gene duplication event. Including four other defence-related NAC transcription factors of maize and functionally characterized Arabidopsis and rice NAC transcription factors, we observed an enrichment of NAC transcription factors involved in host defense regulation in clade G. In silico analyses identified putative binding elements for the defence-induced ERF, Myc2, TGA and WRKY transcription factors in the promoters of four out of the six defence-related maize NAC transcription factors, while one of the analysed maize NAC did not contain any of these potential binding sites. Our study provides a

  19. The ortholog conjecture is untestable by the current gene ontology but is supported by RNA sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoshu; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2012-01-01

    The ortholog conjecture posits that orthologous genes are functionally more similar than paralogous genes. This conjecture is a cornerstone of phylogenomics and is used daily by both computational and experimental biologists in predicting, interpreting, and understanding gene functions. A recent study, however, challenged the ortholog conjecture on the basis of experimentally derived Gene Ontology (GO) annotations and microarray gene expression data in human and mouse. It instead proposed that the functional similarity of homologous genes is primarily determined by the cellular context in which the genes act, explaining why a greater functional similarity of (within-species) paralogs than (between-species) orthologs was observed. Here we show that GO-based functional similarity between human and mouse orthologs, relative to that between paralogs, has been increasing in the last five years. Further, compared with paralogs, orthologs are less likely to be included in the same study, causing an underestimation in their functional similarity. A close examination of functional studies of homologs with identical protein sequences reveals experimental biases, annotation errors, and homology-based functional inferences that are labeled in GO as experimental. These problems and the temporary nature of the GO-based finding make the current GO inappropriate for testing the ortholog conjecture. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) is known to be superior to microarray for comparing the expressions of different genes or in different species. Our analysis of a large RNA-Seq dataset of multiple tissues from eight mammals and the chicken shows that the expression similarity between orthologs is significantly higher than that between within-species paralogs, supporting the ortholog conjecture and refuting the cellular context hypothesis for gene expression. We conclude that the ortholog conjecture remains largely valid to the extent that it has been tested, but further scrutiny using more and

  20. Case study on the evolution of hetero-oligomer interfaces based on the differences in paralogous proteins

    PubMed Central

    Aoto, Saki; Yura, Kei

    2015-01-01

    We addressed the evolutionary trace of hetero-oligomer interfaces by comparing the structures of paralogous proteins; one of them is a monomer or homo-oligomer and the other is a hetero-oligomer. We found different trends in amino acid conservation pattern and hydrophobicity between homo-oligomer and hetero-oligomer. The degree of amino acid conservation in the interface of homo-oligomer has no obvious difference from that in the surface, whereas the degree of conservation is much higher in the interface of hetero-oligomer. The interface of homo-oligomer has a few very conserved residue positions, whereas the residue conservation in the interface of hetero-oligomer tends to be higher. In addition, the interface of hetero-oligomer has a tendency of being more hydrophobic compared with the one in homo-oligomer. We conjecture that these differences are related to the inherent symmetry in homo-oligomers that cannot exist in hetero-oligomers. Paucity of the structural data precludes statistical tests of these tendencies, yet the trend can be applied to the prediction of the interface of hetero-oligomer. We obtained putative interfaces of the subunits in CPSF (cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor), one of the human pre-mRNA 3′-processing complexes. The locations of predicted interface residues were consistent with the known experimental data. PMID:27493859

  1. NUCKS1 is a novel RAD51AP1 paralog important for homologous recombination and genome stability

    SciTech Connect

    Parplys, Ann C.; Zhao, Weixing; Sharma, Neelam; Groesser, Torsten; Liang, Fengshan; Maranon, David G.; Leung, Stanley G.; Grundt, Kirsten; Dray, Eloïse; Idate, Rupa; Østvold, Anne Carine; Schild, David; Sung, Patrick; Wiese, Claudia

    2015-08-31

    NUCKS1 (nuclear casein kinase and cyclin-dependent kinase substrate 1) is a 27 kD chromosomal, vertebrate-specific protein, for which limited functional data exist. Here, we demonstrate that NUCKS1 shares extensive sequence homology with RAD51AP1 (RAD51 associated protein 1), suggesting that these two proteins are paralogs. Similar to the phenotypic effects of RAD51AP1 knockdown, we find that depletion of NUCKS1 in human cells impairs DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR) and chromosome stability. Depletion of NUCKS1 also results in greatly increased cellular sensitivity to mitomycin C (MMC), and in increased levels of spontaneous and MMC-induced chromatid breaks. NUCKS1 is critical to maintaining wild type HR capacity, and, as observed for a number of proteins involved in the HR pathway, functional loss of NUCKS1 leads to a slow down in DNA replication fork progression with a concomitant increase in the utilization of new replication origins. Interestingly, recombinant NUCKS1 shares the same DNA binding preference as RAD51AP1, but binds to DNA with reduced affinity when compared to RAD51AP1. Finally, our results show that NUCKS1 is a chromatin-associated protein with a role in the DNA damage response and in HR, a DNA repair pathway critical for tumor suppression.

  2. NUCKS1 is a novel RAD51AP1 paralog important for homologous recombination and genome stability

    DOE PAGES

    Parplys, Ann C.; Zhao, Weixing; Sharma, Neelam; ...

    2015-08-31

    NUCKS1 (nuclear casein kinase and cyclin-dependent kinase substrate 1) is a 27 kD chromosomal, vertebrate-specific protein, for which limited functional data exist. Here, we demonstrate that NUCKS1 shares extensive sequence homology with RAD51AP1 (RAD51 associated protein 1), suggesting that these two proteins are paralogs. Similar to the phenotypic effects of RAD51AP1 knockdown, we find that depletion of NUCKS1 in human cells impairs DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR) and chromosome stability. Depletion of NUCKS1 also results in greatly increased cellular sensitivity to mitomycin C (MMC), and in increased levels of spontaneous and MMC-induced chromatid breaks. NUCKS1 is critical to maintainingmore » wild type HR capacity, and, as observed for a number of proteins involved in the HR pathway, functional loss of NUCKS1 leads to a slow down in DNA replication fork progression with a concomitant increase in the utilization of new replication origins. Interestingly, recombinant NUCKS1 shares the same DNA binding preference as RAD51AP1, but binds to DNA with reduced affinity when compared to RAD51AP1. Finally, our results show that NUCKS1 is a chromatin-associated protein with a role in the DNA damage response and in HR, a DNA repair pathway critical for tumor suppression.« less

  3. NUCKS1 is a novel RAD51AP1 paralog important for homologous recombination and genome stability.

    PubMed

    Parplys, Ann C; Zhao, Weixing; Sharma, Neelam; Groesser, Torsten; Liang, Fengshan; Maranon, David G; Leung, Stanley G; Grundt, Kirsten; Dray, Eloïse; Idate, Rupa; Østvold, Anne Carine; Schild, David; Sung, Patrick; Wiese, Claudia

    2015-11-16

    NUCKS1 (nuclear casein kinase and cyclin-dependent kinase substrate 1) is a 27 kD chromosomal, vertebrate-specific protein, for which limited functional data exist. Here, we demonstrate that NUCKS1 shares extensive sequence homology with RAD51AP1 (RAD51 associated protein 1), suggesting that these two proteins are paralogs. Similar to the phenotypic effects of RAD51AP1 knockdown, we find that depletion of NUCKS1 in human cells impairs DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR) and chromosome stability. Depletion of NUCKS1 also results in greatly increased cellular sensitivity to mitomycin C (MMC), and in increased levels of spontaneous and MMC-induced chromatid breaks. NUCKS1 is critical to maintaining wild type HR capacity, and, as observed for a number of proteins involved in the HR pathway, functional loss of NUCKS1 leads to a slow down in DNA replication fork progression with a concomitant increase in the utilization of new replication origins. Interestingly, recombinant NUCKS1 shares the same DNA binding preference as RAD51AP1, but binds to DNA with reduced affinity when compared to RAD51AP1. Our results show that NUCKS1 is a chromatin-associated protein with a role in the DNA damage response and in HR, a DNA repair pathway critical for tumor suppression. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. Regulation of Drosophila Vasa In Vivo through Paralogous Cullin-RING E3 Ligase Specificity Receptors▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kugler, Jan-Michael; Woo, Jae-Sung; Oh, Byung-Ha; Lasko, Paul

    2010-01-01

    In Drosophila species, molecular asymmetries guiding embryonic development are established maternally. Vasa, a DEAD-box RNA helicase, accumulates in the posterior pole plasm, where it is required for embryonic germ cell specification. Maintenance of Vasa at the posterior pole requires the deubiquitinating enzyme Fat facets, which protects Vasa from degradation. Here, we found that Gustavus (Gus) and Fsn, two ubiquitin Cullin-RING E3 ligase specificity receptors, bind to the same motif on Vasa through their paralogous B30.2/SPRY domains. Both Gus and Fsn accumulate in the pole plasm in a Vasa-dependent manner. Posterior Vasa accumulation is precocious in Fsn mutant oocytes; Fsn overexpression reduces ovarian Vasa levels, and embryos from Fsn-overexpressing females form fewer primordial germ cells (PGCs); thus, Fsn destabilizes Vasa. In contrast, endogenous Gus may promote Vasa activity in the pole plasm, as gus females produce embryos with fewer PGCs, and posterior accumulation of Vas is delayed in gus mutant oocytes that also lack one copy of cullin-5. We propose that Fsn- and Gus-containing E3 ligase complexes contribute to establishing a fine-tuned steady state of Vasa ubiquitination that influences the kinetics of posterior Vasa deployment. PMID:20123973

  5. Expression, localization, structural, and functional characterization of pFGE, the paralog of the Calpha-formylglycine-generating enzyme.

    PubMed

    Mariappan, Malaiyalam; Preusser-Kunze, Andrea; Balleininger, Martina; Eiselt, Nicole; Schmidt, Bernhard; Gande, Santosh Lakshmi; Wenzel, Dirk; Dierks, Thomas; von Figura, Kurt

    2005-04-15

    pFGE is the paralog of the formylglycine-generating enzyme (FGE), which catalyzes the oxidation of a specific cysteine to Calpha-formylglycine, the catalytic residue in the active site of sulfatases. The enzymatic activity of sulfatases depends on this posttranslational modification, and the genetic defect of FGE causes multiple sulfatase deficiency. The structural and functional properties of pFGE were analyzed. The comparison with FGE demonstrates that both share a tissue-specific expression pattern and the localization in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. Both are retained in the endoplasmic reticulum by a saturable mechanism. Limited proteolytic cleavage at similar sites indicates that both also share a similar three-dimensional structure. pFGE, however, is lacking the formylglycine-generating activity of FGE. Although overexpression of FGE stimulates the generation of catalytically active sulfatases, overexpression of pFGE has an inhibitory effect. In vitro pFGE interacts with sulfatase-derived peptides but not with FGE. The inhibitory effect of pFGE on the generation of active sulfatases may therefore be caused by a competition of pFGE and FGE for newly synthesized sulfatase polypeptides.

  6. Paralogous chemoreceptors mediate chemotaxis towards protein amino acids and the non-protein amino acid gamma-aminobutyrate (GABA).

    PubMed

    Rico-Jiménez, Miriam; Muñoz-Martínez, Francisco; García-Fontana, Cristina; Fernandez, Matilde; Morel, Bertrand; Ortega, Alvaro; Ramos, Juan Luis; Krell, Tino

    2013-06-01

    The paralogous receptors PctA, PctB and PctC of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were reported to mediate chemotaxis to amino acids, intermediates of amino acid metabolism and chlorinated hydrocarbons. We show that the recombinant ligand binding regions (LBRs) of PctA, PctB and PctC bind 17, 5 and 2 l-amino acids respectively. In addition, PctC-LBR recognized GABA but not any other structurally related compound. l-Gln, one of the three amino acids that is not recognized by PctA-LBR, was the most tightly binding ligand to PctB suggesting that PctB has evolved to mediate chemotaxis primarily towards l-Gln. Bacteria were efficiently attracted to l-Gln and GABA, but mutation of pctB and pctC, respectively, abolished chemoattraction. The physiological relevance of taxis towards GABA is proposed to reside in an interaction with plants. LBRs were predicted to adopt double PDC (PhoQ/DcuS/CitA) like structures and site-directed mutagenesis studies showed that ligands bind to the membrane-distal module. Analytical ultracentrifugation studies have shown that PctA-LBR and PctB-LBR are monomeric in the absence and presence of ligands, which is in contrast to the enterobacterial receptors that require sensor domain dimers for ligand recognition. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. NUCKS1 is a novel RAD51AP1 paralog important for homologous recombination and genome stability

    PubMed Central

    Parplys, Ann C.; Zhao, Weixing; Sharma, Neelam; Groesser, Torsten; Liang, Fengshan; Maranon, David G.; Leung, Stanley G.; Grundt, Kirsten; Dray, Eloïse; Idate, Rupa; Østvold, Anne Carine; Schild, David; Sung, Patrick; Wiese, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    NUCKS1 (nuclear casein kinase and cyclin-dependent kinase substrate 1) is a 27 kD chromosomal, vertebrate-specific protein, for which limited functional data exist. Here, we demonstrate that NUCKS1 shares extensive sequence homology with RAD51AP1 (RAD51 associated protein 1), suggesting that these two proteins are paralogs. Similar to the phenotypic effects of RAD51AP1 knockdown, we find that depletion of NUCKS1 in human cells impairs DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR) and chromosome stability. Depletion of NUCKS1 also results in greatly increased cellular sensitivity to mitomycin C (MMC), and in increased levels of spontaneous and MMC-induced chromatid breaks. NUCKS1 is critical to maintaining wild type HR capacity, and, as observed for a number of proteins involved in the HR pathway, functional loss of NUCKS1 leads to a slow down in DNA replication fork progression with a concomitant increase in the utilization of new replication origins. Interestingly, recombinant NUCKS1 shares the same DNA binding preference as RAD51AP1, but binds to DNA with reduced affinity when compared to RAD51AP1. Our results show that NUCKS1 is a chromatin-associated protein with a role in the DNA damage response and in HR, a DNA repair pathway critical for tumor suppression. PMID:26323318

  8. ZP Domain Proteins in the Abalone Egg Coat Include a Paralog of VERL under Positive Selection That Binds Lysin and 18-kDa Sperm Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Aagaard, Jan E.; Vacquier, Victor D.; MacCoss, Michael J.; Swanson, Willie J.

    2010-01-01

    Identifying fertilization molecules is key to our understanding of reproductive biology, yet only a few examples of interacting sperm and egg proteins are known. One of the best characterized comes from the invertebrate archeogastropod abalone (Haliotis spp.), where sperm lysin mediates passage through the protective egg vitelline envelope (VE) by binding to the VE protein vitelline envelope receptor for lysin (VERL). Rapid adaptive divergence of abalone lysin and VERL are an example of positive selection on interacting fertilization proteins contributing to reproductive isolation. Previously, we characterized a subset of the abalone VE proteins that share a structural feature, the zona pellucida (ZP) domain, which is common to VERL and the egg envelopes of vertebrates. Here, we use additional expressed sequence tag sequencing and shotgun proteomics to characterize this family of proteins in the abalone egg VE. We expand 3-fold the number of known ZP domain proteins present within the VE (now 30 in total) and identify a paralog of VERL (vitelline envelope zona pellucida domain protein [VEZP] 14) that contains a putative lysin-binding motif. We find that, like VERL, the divergence of VEZP14 among abalone species is driven by positive selection on the lysin-binding motif alone and that these paralogous egg VE proteins bind a similar set of sperm proteins including a rapidly evolving 18-kDa paralog of lysin, which may mediate sperm–egg fusion. This work identifies an egg coat paralog of VERL under positive selection and the candidate sperm proteins with which it may interact during abalone fertilization. PMID:19767347

  9. Detecting Functional Divergence after Gene Duplication through Evolutionary Changes in Posttranslational Regulatory Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen Ba, Alex N.; Strome, Bob; Hua, Jun Jie; Desmond, Jonathan; Gagnon-Arsenault, Isabelle; Weiss, Eric L.; Landry, Christian R.; Moses, Alan M.

    2014-01-01

    Gene duplication is an important evolutionary mechanism that can result in functional divergence in paralogs due to neo-functionalization or sub-functionalization. Consistent with functional divergence after gene duplication, recent studies have shown accelerated evolution in retained paralogs. However, little is known in general about the impact of this accelerated evolution on the molecular functions of retained paralogs. For example, do new functions typically involve changes in enzymatic activities, or changes in protein regulation? Here we study the evolution of posttranslational regulation by examining the evolution of important regulatory sequences (short linear motifs) in retained duplicates created by the whole-genome duplication in budding yeast. To do so, we identified short linear motifs whose evolutionary constraint has relaxed after gene duplication with a likelihood-ratio test that can account for heterogeneity in the evolutionary process by using a non-central chi-squared null distribution. We find that short linear motifs are more likely to show changes in evolutionary constraints in retained duplicates compared to single-copy genes. We examine changes in constraints on known regulatory sequences and show that for the Rck1/Rck2, Fkh1/Fkh2, Ace2/Swi5 paralogs, they are associated with previously characterized differences in posttranslational regulation. Finally, we experimentally confirm our prediction that for the Ace2/Swi5 paralogs, Cbk1 regulated localization was lost along the lineage leading to SWI5 after gene duplication. Our analysis suggests that changes in posttranslational regulation mediated by short regulatory motifs systematically contribute to functional divergence after gene duplication. PMID:25474245

  10. Detecting functional divergence after gene duplication through evolutionary changes in posttranslational regulatory sequences.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Ba, Alex N; Strome, Bob; Hua, Jun Jie; Desmond, Jonathan; Gagnon-Arsenault, Isabelle; Weiss, Eric L; Landry, Christian R; Moses, Alan M

    2014-12-01

    Gene duplication is an important evolutionary mechanism that can result in functional divergence in paralogs due to neo-functionalization or sub-functionalization. Consistent with functional divergence after gene duplication, recent studies have shown accelerated evolution in retained paralogs. However, little is known in general about the impact of this accelerated evolution on the molecular functions of retained paralogs. For example, do new functions typically involve changes in enzymatic activities, or changes in protein regulation? Here we study the evolution of posttranslational regulation by examining the evolution of important regulatory sequences (short linear motifs) in retained duplicates created by the whole-genome duplication in budding yeast. To do so, we identified short linear motifs whose evolutionary constraint has relaxed after gene duplication with a likelihood-ratio test that can account for heterogeneity in the evolutionary process by using a non-central chi-squared null distribution. We find that short linear motifs are more likely to show changes in evolutionary constraints in retained duplicates compared to single-copy genes. We examine changes in constraints on known regulatory sequences and show that for the Rck1/Rck2, Fkh1/Fkh2, Ace2/Swi5 paralogs, they are associated with previously characterized differences in posttranslational regulation. Finally, we experimentally confirm our prediction that for the Ace2/Swi5 paralogs, Cbk1 regulated localization was lost along the lineage leading to SWI5 after gene duplication. Our analysis suggests that changes in posttranslational regulation mediated by short regulatory motifs systematically contribute to functional divergence after gene duplication.

  11. A recombinase paralog from the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus enhances SsoRadA ssDNA binding and strand displacement.

    PubMed

    Graham, William J; Haseltine, Cynthia A

    2013-02-15

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a major pathway for the repair of double-strand DNA breaks, a highly deleterious form of DNA damage. The main catalytic protein in HR is the essential RecA-family recombinase, which is conserved across all three domains of life. Eukaryotes and archaea encode varying numbers of proteins paralogous to their main recombinase. Although there is increasing evidence for the functions of some of these paralog proteins, overall their mechanism of action remains largely unclear. Here we present the first biochemical characterization of one of the paralog proteins, SsoRal3, from the crenarchaeaon Sulfolobus solfataricus. The SsoRal3 protein is a ssDNA-dependent ATPase that can catalyze strand invasion at both saturating and subsaturating concentrations. It can bind both ssDNA and dsDNA, but its binding preference is altered by the presence or absence of ATP. Addition of SsoRal3 to SsoRadA nucleoprotein filaments reduces total ATPase activity. Subsaturating concentrations of SsoRal3 increase the ssDNA binding activity of SsoRadA approximately 9-fold and also increase the persistence of SsoRadA catalyzed strand invasion products. Overall, these results suggest that SsoRal3 functions to stabilize the SsoRadA presynaptic filament. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Historical profiling of maize duplicate genes sheds light on the evolution of C4 photosynthesis in grasses.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yao-Ming; Chang, Chia-Lin; Li, Wen-Hsiung; Shih, Arthur Chun-Chieh

    2013-02-01

    C4 plants evolved from C3 plants through a series of complex evolutionary steps. On the basis of the evolution of key C4 enzyme genes, the evolution of C4 photosynthesis has been considered a story of gene/genome duplications and subsequent modifications of gene function. If whole-genome duplication has contributed to the evolution of C4 photosynthesis, other genes should have been duplicated together with these C4 genes. However, which genes were co-duplicated with C4 genes and whether they have also played a role in C4 evolution are largely unknown. In this study, we developed a simple method to characterize the historical profile of the paralogs of a gene by tracing back to the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) of the gene and its paralog(s) and then counting the number of paralogs at each MRCA. We clustered the genes into clusters with similar duplication profiles and inferred their functional enrichments. Applying our method to maize, a familiar C4 plant, we identified many genes that show similar duplication profiles with those of the key C4 enzyme genes and found that the functional preferences of the C4 gene clusters are not only similar to those identified by an experimental approach in a recent study but also highly consistent with the functions required for the C4 photosynthesis evolutionary model proposed by S.F. Sage. Some of these genes might have co-evolved with the key C4 enzyme genes to increase the strength of C4 photosynthesis. Moreover, our results suggested that most key C4 enzyme genes had different origins and have undergone a long evolutionary process before the emergence of C4 grasses (Andropogoneae), consistent with the conclusion proposed by previous authors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Genes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Search MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Genes URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/ ...

  14. Functions of Ceramide Synthase Paralogs YPR114w and YJR116w of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Mallela, Shamroop K; Almeida, Reinaldo; Ejsing, Christer S; Conzelmann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Ceramide is synthesized in yeast by two redundant acyl-CoA dependent synthases, Lag1 and Lac1. In lag1∆ lac1∆ cells, free fatty acids and sphingoid bases are elevated, and ceramides are produced through the redundant alkaline ceramidases Ypc1 and Ydc1, working backwards. Even with all four of these genes deleted, cells are surviving and continue to contain small amounts of complex sphingolipids. Here we show that these residual sphingolipids are not synthesized by YPR114w or YJR116w, proteins of unknown function showing a high degree of homology to Lag1 and Lac1. Indeed, the hextuple lag1∆ lac1∆ ypc1∆ ydc1∆ ypr114w∆ yjr116w∆ mutant still contains ceramides and complex sphingolipids. Yjr116w∆ exhibit an oxygen-dependent hypersensitivity to Cu2+ due to an increased mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a mitochondrially orchestrated programmed cell death in presence of copper, but also a general copper hypersensitivity that cannot be counteracted by the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC). Myriocin efficiently represses the synthesis of sphingoid bases of ypr114w∆, but not its growth. Both yjr116w∆ and ypr114w∆ have fragmented vacuoles and produce less ROS than wild type, before and after diauxic shift. Ypr114w∆/ypr114w∆ have an increased chronological life span. Thus, Yjr116w and Ypr114w are related, but not functionally redundant.

  15. Functional Analysis of Paralogous Thiol-disulfide Oxidoreductases in Streptococcus gordonii*

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Lauren; Ng, Crystal K. W.; Halperin, Scott A.; Lee, Song F.

    2013-01-01

    Disulfide bonds are important for the stability of many extracellular proteins, including bacterial virulence factors. Formation of these bonds is catalyzed by thiol-disulfide oxidoreductases (TDORs). Little is known about their formation in Gram-positive bacteria, particularly among facultative anaerobic Firmicutes, such as streptococci. To investigate disulfide bond formation in Streptococcus gordonii, we identified five putative TDORs from the sequenced genome. Each of the putative TDOR genes was insertionally inactivated with an erythromycin resistance cassette, and the mutants were analyzed for autolysis, extracellular DNA release, biofilm formation, bacteriocin production, and genetic competence. This analysis revealed a single TDOR, SdbA, which exhibited a pleiotropic mutant phenotype. Using an in silico analysis approach, we identified the major autolysin AtlS as a natural substrate of SdbA and showed that SdbA is critical to the formation of a disulfide bond that is required for autolytic activity. Analysis by BLAST search revealed homologs to SdbA in other Gram-positive species. This study provides the first in vivo evidence of an oxidoreductase, SdbA, that affects multiple phenotypes in a Gram-positive bacterium. SdbA shows low sequence homology to previously identified oxidoreductases, suggesting that it may belong to a different class of enzymes. Our results demonstrate that SdbA is required for disulfide bond formation in S. gordonii and indicate that this enzyme may represent a novel type of oxidoreductase in Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:23615907

  16. Functions of Ceramide Synthase Paralogs YPR114w and YJR116w of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Mallela, Shamroop K.; Almeida, Reinaldo; Ejsing, Christer S.; Conzelmann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Ceramide is synthesized in yeast by two redundant acyl-CoA dependent synthases, Lag1 and Lac1. In lag1∆ lac1∆ cells, free fatty acids and sphingoid bases are elevated, and ceramides are produced through the redundant alkaline ceramidases Ypc1 and Ydc1, working backwards. Even with all four of these genes deleted, cells are surviving and continue to contain small amounts of complex sphingolipids. Here we show that these residual sphingolipids are not synthesized by YPR114w or YJR116w, proteins of unknown function showing a high degree of homology to Lag1 and Lac1. Indeed, the hextuple lag1∆ lac1∆ ypc1∆ ydc1∆ ypr114w∆ yjr116w∆ mutant still contains ceramides and complex sphingolipids. Yjr116w∆ exhibit an oxygen-dependent hypersensitivity to Cu2+ due to an increased mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a mitochondrially orchestrated programmed cell death in presence of copper, but also a general copper hypersensitivity that cannot be counteracted by the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC). Myriocin efficiently represses the synthesis of sphingoid bases of ypr114w∆, but not its growth. Both yjr116w∆ and ypr114w∆ have fragmented vacuoles and produce less ROS than wild type, before and after diauxic shift. Ypr114w∆/ypr114w∆ have an increased chronological life span. Thus, Yjr116w and Ypr114w are related, but not functionally redundant. PMID:26752183

  17. A Network of Paralogous Stress Response Transcription Factors in the Human Pathogen Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Merhej, Jawad; Thiebaut, Antonin; Blugeon, Corinne; Pouch, Juliette; Ali Chaouche, Mohammed El Amine; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Le Crom, Stéphane; Lelandais, Gaëlle; Devaux, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    The yeast Candida glabrata has become the second cause of systemic candidemia in humans. However, relatively few genome-wide studies have been conducted in this organism and our knowledge of its transcriptional regulatory network is quite limited. In the present work, we combined genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-seq), transcriptome analyses, and DNA binding motif predictions to describe the regulatory interactions of the seven Yap (Yeast AP1) transcription factors of C. glabrata. We described a transcriptional network containing 255 regulatory interactions and 309 potential target genes. We predicted with high confidence the preferred DNA binding sites for 5 of the 7 CgYaps and showed a strong conservation of the Yap DNA binding properties between S. cerevisiae and C. glabrata. We provided reliable functional annotation for 3 of the 7 Yaps and identified for Yap1 and Yap5 a core regulon which is conserved in S. cerevisiae, C. glabrata, and C. albicans. We uncovered new roles for CgYap7 in the regulation of iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis, for CgYap1 in the regulation of heme biosynthesis and for CgYap5 in the repression of GRX4 in response to iron starvation. These transcription factors define an interconnected transcriptional network at the cross-roads between redox homeostasis, oxygen consumption, and iron metabolism. PMID:27242683

  18. Duplicate Gene Divergence by Changes in MicroRNA Binding Sites in Arabidopsis and Brassica

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sishuo; Adams, Keith L.

    2015-01-01

    Gene duplication provides large numbers of new genes that can lead to the evolution of new functions. Duplicated genes can diverge by changes in sequences, expression patterns, and functions. MicroRNAs play an important role in the regulation of gene expression in many eukaryotes. After duplication, two paralogs may diverge in their microRNA binding sites, which might impact their expression and function. Little is known about conservation and divergence of microRNA binding sites in duplicated genes in plants. We analyzed microRNA binding sites in duplicated genes in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa. We found that duplicates are more often targeted by microRNAs than singletons. The vast majority of duplicated genes in A. thaliana with microRNA binding sites show divergence in those sites between paralogs. Analysis of microRNA binding sites in genes derived from the ancient whole-genome triplication in B. rapa also revealed extensive divergence. Paralog pairs with divergent microRNA binding sites