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Sample records for parameters d90 hr-ctv

  1. Interfractional change of high-risk CTV D90 during image-guided brachytherapy for uterine cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ohkubo, Yu; Ohno, Tatsuya; Noda, Shin-ei; Kubo, Nobuteru; Nakagawa, Akiko; Kawahara, Masahiro; Abe, Takanori; Kiyohara, Hiroki; Wakatsuki, Masaru; Nakano, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate interfractional changes of the minimum dose delivered to 90% of the high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV D90) and D2cc of the bladder and rectum during brachytherapy for uterine cervical cancer patients. A total of 52 patients received external beam radiotherapy and high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT). For each of four ICBT applications, a pelvic CT scan was performed and the HR-CTV was delineated. Retrospectively, these patients were divided into two groups: (i) the standard dose group with 6 Gy to point A in each ICBT, and (ii) the adaptive dose group with a modified dose to point A to cover the HR-CTV with the 6-Gy isodose line as much as possible. The HR-CTV D90 was assessed in every session, and analyzed as interfractional changes. In the standard dose group, the interfractional changes of the HR-CTV D90 showed a linear increase from the first to the third of the four ICBT (average 6.1, 6.6, 7.0 and 7.1 Gy, respectively). In contrast, those of the adaptive dose group remained almost constant (average 7.2, 7.2, 7.3 and 7.4 Gy, respectively). Especially, in the case of a large HR-CTV volume (≥35 cm3) at first ICBT, the total HR-CTV D90 of the adaptive dose group with brachytherapy was significantly higher than that of the standard dose group. There were no significant differences in total D2cc in bladder and rectum between the two groups. Image-guided adaptive brachytherapy based on interfractional tumor volume change improves the dose to the HR-CTV while keeping rectal and bladder doses within acceptable levels. PMID:23732770

  2. Local recurrences in cervical cancer patients in the setting of image-guided brachytherapy: A comparison of spatial dose distribution within a matched-pair analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Maximilian P.; Kirisits, Christian; Nesvacil, Nicole; Dimopoulos, Johannes C.A.; Berger, Daniel; Pötter, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Purpose It has been shown that a cumulative dose of ⩾87 Gy (EQD2) of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and image guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) to the high risk clinical target volume (HR CTV) confer a local control rate >95% in locally advanced cervical cancer. This study examines the dose distribution within the HR CTV and intermediate (IR) CTV in patients with cervical cancer treated with definitive EBRT +/− concomitant chemotherapy and MRI-based IGABT between patients with local recurrence (LR) and patients in continuous complete local remission (CCLR). Material and methods From 1998 to 2010, 265 patients were treated with definitive EBRT +/− concomitant chemotherapy and IGABT. Twenty-four LRs were documented. For the statistical analysis all patients with LR were matched to patients in CCLR from our database according to the following criteria: FIGO stage, histology, lymph node status, tumour size and chemotherapy. DVH parameters (D50, D90, D98, D100) were reported for HR CTV and IR CTV. In order to report the minimum dose in the region where the recurrence occurred, the HR CTV/IR CTV were divided into four quadrants on transversal planes. The minimum dose at the HR CTV/IR CTV contour was measured (within the corresponding quadrant closest to the LR) in the treatment planning system. A mean minimum point dose (MPD) was calculated by averaging these measurements on four consecutive slices at the level of the recurrence for each of the 4 brachytherapy fractions. EQD2 doses were calculated by summation of all BT and external beam therapy fractions. For each matched patient in the control group the measurements were performed on the same quadrant and at the same level. Results Sufficient image data were available for 21 LRs. Eight central failures and 13 non-central failures were observed. The mean D90 and D100 for HR CTV were 77 Gy and 61 Gy for patients with LR and 95 Gy and 71 Gy for patients in CCLR, respectively (p < 0.01). The MPD for HR

  3. Recommendations from gynaecological (GYN) GEC ESTRO working group (II): concepts and terms in 3D image-based treatment planning in cervix cancer brachytherapy-3D dose volume parameters and aspects of 3D image-based anatomy, radiation physics, radiobiology.

    PubMed

    Pötter, Richard; Haie-Meder, Christine; Van Limbergen, Erik; Barillot, Isabelle; De Brabandere, Marisol; Dimopoulos, Johannes; Dumas, Isabelle; Erickson, Beth; Lang, Stefan; Nulens, An; Petrow, Peter; Rownd, Jason; Kirisits, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The second part of the GYN GEC ESTRO working group recommendations is focused on 3D dose-volume parameters for brachytherapy of cervical carcinoma. Methods and parameters have been developed and validated from dosimetric, imaging and clinical experience from different institutions (University of Vienna, IGR Paris, University of Leuven). Cumulative dose volume histograms (DVH) are recommended for evaluation of the complex dose heterogeneity. DVH parameters for GTV, HR CTV and IR CTV are the minimum dose delivered to 90 and 100% of the respective volume: D90, D100. The volume, which is enclosed by 150 or 200% of the prescribed dose (V150, V200), is recommended for overall assessment of high dose volumes. V100 is recommended for quality assessment only within a given treatment schedule. For Organs at Risk (OAR) the minimum dose in the most irradiated tissue volume is recommended for reporting: 0.1, 1, and 2 cm3; optional 5 and 10 cm3. Underlying assumptions are: full dose of external beam therapy in the volume of interest, identical location during fractionated brachytherapy, contiguous volumes and contouring of organ walls for >2 cm3. Dose values are reported as absorbed dose and also taking into account different dose rates. The linear-quadratic radiobiological model-equivalent dose (EQD2)-is applied for brachytherapy and is also used for calculating dose from external beam therapy. This formalism allows systematic assessment within one patient, one centre and comparison between different centres with analysis of dose volume relations for GTV, CTV, and OAR. Recommendations for the transition period from traditional to 3D image-based cervix cancer brachytherapy are formulated. Supplementary data (available in the electronic version of this paper) deals with aspects of 3D imaging, radiation physics, radiation biology, dose at reference points and dimensions and volumes for the GTV and CTV (adding to [Haie-Meder C, Pötter R, Van Limbergen E et al. Recommendations from

  4. Salvage interstitial brachytherapy based on computed tomography for recurrent cervical cancer after radical hysterectomy and adjuvant radiation therapy: case presentations and introduction of the technique

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhong-Shan; Guo, Jie; Zhao, Yang-Zhi; Lin, Xia; Chen, Bin; Zhang, Ming; Li, Jiang-Ming; Ren, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Bing-Ya

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Locally recurring cervical cancer after surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy remains a major therapeutic challenge. This paper presents a new therapeutic technique for such patients: interstitial brachytherapy (BT) guided by real-time three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT). Material and methods Sixteen patients with recurrent cervical cancer after radical surgery and adjuvant external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) were included in this study. These patients underwent high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial BT with free-hand placement of metal needles guided by real-time 3D-CT. Six Gy in 6 fractions were prescribed for the high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV). D90 and D100 for HR-CTV of BT, and the cumulative D2cc for the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid, including previous EBRT and present BT were analyzed. Treatment-related complications and 3-month tumor-response rates were investigated. Results The mean D90 value for HR-CTV was 52.5 ± 3.3 Gy. The cumulative D2cc for the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were 85.6 ± 5.8, 71.6 ± 6.4, and 69.6 ± 5.9 Gy, respectively. The mean number of needles was 6.1 ± 1.5, with an average depth of 3.5 ± 0.9 cm for each application. Interstitial BT was associated with minor complications and passable tumor-response rate. Conclusions Interstitial BT guided by real-time 3D-CT for recurrent cervical cancer results in good dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters. The current technique may be clinically feasible. However, long-term clinical outcomes should be further investigated. PMID:27895683

  5. Dose–volume histogram parameters of high-dose-rate brachytherapy for Stage I–II cervical cancer (≤4cm) arising from a small-sized uterus treated with a point A dose-reduced plan

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Akiko; Ohno, Tatsuya; Noda, Shin-ei; Kubo, Nobuteru; Kuwako, Keiko; Saitoh, Jun-ichi; Nakano, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the rectal dose-sparing effect and tumor control of a point A dose-reduced plan in patients with Stage I–II cervical cancer (≤4 cm) arising from a small-sized uterus. Between October 2008 and August 2011, 19 patients with Stage I–II cervical cancer (≤4 cm) were treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for the pelvis and CT-guided brachytherapy. Seven patients were treated with brachytherapy with standard loading of source-dwell positions and a fraction dose of 6 Gy at point A (conventional brachy-plan). The other 12 patients with a small uterus close to the rectum or small intestine were treated with brachytherapy with a point A dose-reduction to match D2cc of the rectum and <6 Gy as the dose constraint (‘point A dose-reduced plan’) instead of the 6-Gy plan at point A (‘tentative 6-Gy plan’). The total doses from EBRT and brachytherapy were added up and normalized to a biological equivalent dose of 2 Gy per fraction (EQD2). The median doses to the high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) D90 in the conventional brachy-plan, tentative 6-Gy plan and point A dose-reduced plan were 62 GyEQD2, 80 GyEQD2 and 64 GyEQD2, respectively. The median doses of rectal D2cc in the corresponding three plans were 42 GyEQD2, 62 GyEQD2 and 51 GyEQD2, respectively. With a median follow-up period of 35 months, three patients developed Grade-1 late rectal complications and no patients developed local recurrence. Our preliminary results suggested that CT-guided brachytherapy using an individualized point A dose-reduced plan might be useful for reducing late rectal complications while maintaining primary tumor control. PMID:24566721

  6. Dose-volume histogram parameters of high-dose-rate brachytherapy for Stage I-II cervical cancer (≤4cm) arising from a small-sized uterus treated with a point A dose-reduced plan.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Akiko; Ohno, Tatsuya; Noda, Shin-ei; Kubo, Nobuteru; Kuwako, Keiko; Saitoh, Jun-Ichi; Nakano, Takashi

    2014-07-01

    We investigated the rectal dose-sparing effect and tumor control of a point A dose-reduced plan in patients with Stage I-II cervical cancer (≤4 cm) arising from a small-sized uterus. Between October 2008 and August 2011, 19 patients with Stage I-II cervical cancer (≤4 cm) were treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for the pelvis and CT-guided brachytherapy. Seven patients were treated with brachytherapy with standard loading of source-dwell positions and a fraction dose of 6 Gy at point A (conventional brachy-plan). The other 12 patients with a small uterus close to the rectum or small intestine were treated with brachytherapy with a point A dose-reduction to match D2cc of the rectum and <6 Gy as the dose constraint ('point A dose-reduced plan') instead of the 6-Gy plan at point A ('tentative 6-Gy plan'). The total doses from EBRT and brachytherapy were added up and normalized to a biological equivalent dose of 2 Gy per fraction (EQD2). The median doses to the high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) D90 in the conventional brachy-plan, tentative 6-Gy plan and point A dose-reduced plan were 62 GyEQD2, 80 GyEQD2 and 64 GyEQD2, respectively. The median doses of rectal D2cc in the corresponding three plans were 42 GyEQD2, 62 GyEQD2 and 51 GyEQD2, respectively. With a median follow-up period of 35 months, three patients developed Grade-1 late rectal complications and no patients developed local recurrence. Our preliminary results suggested that CT-guided brachytherapy using an individualized point A dose-reduced plan might be useful for reducing late rectal complications while maintaining primary tumor control.

  7. CT based three dimensional dose-volume evaluations for high-dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In this study, high risk clinical target volumes (HR-CTVs) according to GEC-ESTRO guideline were contoured retrospectively based on CT images taken at the time of high-dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) and correlation between clinical outcome and dose of HR-CTV were analyzed. Methods Our study population consists of 51 patients with cervical cancer (Stages IB-IVA) treated with 50 Gy external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) using central shield combined with 2–5 times of 6 Gy HDR-ICBT with or without weekly cisplatin. Dose calculation was based on Manchester system and prescribed dose of 6 Gy were delivered for point A. CT images taken at the time of each HDR-ICBT were reviewed and HR-CTVs were contoured. Doses were converted to the equivalent dose in 2 Gy (EQD2) by applying the linear quadratic model (α/β = 10 Gy). Results Three-year overall survival, Progression-free survival, and local control rate was 82.4%, 85.3% and 91.7%, respectively. Median cumulative dose of HR-CTV D90 was 65.0 Gy (52.7-101.7 Gy). Median length from tandem to the most lateral edge of HR-CTV at the first ICBT was 29.2 mm (range, 18.0-51.9 mm). On univariate analysis, both LCR and PFS was significantly favorable in those patients D90 for HR-CTV was 60 Gy or greater (p = 0.001 and 0.03, respectively). PFS was significantly favorable in those patients maximum length from tandem to edge of HR-CTV at first ICBT was shorter than 3.5 cm (p = 0.042). Conclusion Volume-dose showed a relationship to the clinical outcome in CT based brachytherapy for cervical carcinoma. PMID:24938757

  8. 3D image-based adapted high-dose-rate brachytherapy in cervical cancer with and without interstitial needles: measurement of applicator shift between imaging and dose delivery

    PubMed Central

    Thunberg, Per; With, Anders; Mordhorst, Louise Bohr; Persliden, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Using 3D image-guided adaptive brachytherapy for cervical cancer treatment, it often means that patients are transported and moved during the treatment procedure. The purpose of this study was to determine the intra-fractional longitudinal applicator shift in relation to the high risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) by comparing geometries at imaging and dose delivery for patients with and without needles. Material and methods Measurements were performed in 33 patients (71 fractions), where 25 fractions were without and 46 were with interstitial needles. Gold markers were placed in the lower part of the cervix as a surrogate for HR-CTV, enabling distance measurements between HR-CTV and the ring applicator. Shifts of the applicator relative to the markers were determined using planning computed tomography (CT) images used for planning, and the radiographs obtained at dose delivery. Differences in the physical D90 for HR-CTV due to applicator shifts were simulated individually in the treatment planning system to provide the relative dose variation. Results The maximum distances of the applicator shifts, in relation to the markers, were 3.6 mm (caudal), and –2.5 mm (cranial). There was a significant displacement of –0.7 mm (SD = 0.9 mm) without needles, while with needles there was no significant shift. The relative dose variation showed a significant increase in D90 HR-CTV of 1.6% (SD = 2.6%) when not using needles, and no significant dose variation was found when using needles. Conclusions The results from this study showed that there was a small longitudinal displacement of the ring applicator and a significant difference in displacement between using interstitial needles or not. PMID:28344604

  9. A Dose-Volume Analysis of Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Aided High-Dose-Rate Image-Based Interstitial Brachytherapy for Uterine Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Ken; Yamazaki, Hideya; Takenaka, Tadashi; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Yoshida, Mineo; Furuya, Seiichi; Tanaka, Eiichi; Uegaki, Tadaaki; Kuriyama, Keiko; Matsumoto, Hisanobu; Yamada, Shigetoshi; Ban, Chiaki

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of our novel image-based high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-ISBT) for uterine cervical cancer, we evaluated the dose-volume histogram (DVH) according to the recommendations of the Gynecological GEC-ESTRO Working Group for image-based intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT). Methods and Materials: Between June 2005 and June 2007, 18 previously untreated cervical cancer patients were enrolled. We implanted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-available plastic applicators by our unique ambulatory technique. Total treatment doses were 30-36 Gy (6 Gy per fraction) combined with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Treatment plans were created based on planning computed tomography with MRI as a reference. DVHs of the high-risk clinical target volume (HR CTV), intermediate-risk CTV (IR CTV), and the bladder and rectum were calculated. Dose values were biologically normalized to equivalent doses in 2-Gy fractions (EQD{sub 2}). Results: The median D90 (HR CTV) and D90 (IR CTV) per fraction were 6.8 Gy (range, 5.5-7.5) and 5.4 Gy (range, 4.2-6.3), respectively. The median V100 (HR CTV) and V100 (IR CTV) were 98.4% (range, 83-100) and 81.8% (range, 64-93.8), respectively. When the dose of EBRT was added, the median D90 and D100 of HR CTV were 80.6 Gy (range, 65.5-96.6) and 62.4 Gy (range, 49-83.2). The D{sub 2cc} of the bladder was 62 Gy (range, 51.4-89) and of the rectum was 65.9 Gy (range, 48.9-76). Conclusions: Although the targets were advanced and difficult to treat effectively by ICBT, MRI-aided image-based ISBT showed favorable results for CTV and organs at risk compared with previously reported image-based ICBT results.

  10. Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenjun; Kim, Yusung; Wu, Xiaodong; Song, Qi; Liu, Yunlong; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Sun, Wenqing; Flynn, Ryan T.

    2013-06-01

    In this treatment planning study, the potential benefits of a rotating shield brachytherapy (RSBT) technique based on a partially-shielded electronic brachytherapy source were assessed for treating cervical cancer. Conventional intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT), intracavitary plus supplementary interstitial (IS+ICBT), and RSBT treatment plans for azimuthal emission angles of 180° (RSBT-180) and 45° (RSBT-45) were generated for five patients. For each patient, high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2) (α/β = 10 Gy) was escalated until bladder, rectum, or sigmoid colon tolerance EQD2 values were reached. External beam radiotherapy dose (1.8 Gy × 25) was accounted for, and brachytherapy was assumed to have been delivered in 5 fractions. IS+ICBT provided a greater HR-CTV D90 (minimum EQD2 to the hottest 90%) than ICBT. D90 was greater for RSBT-45 than IS+ICBT for all five patients, and greater for RSBT-180 than IS+ICBT for two patients. When the RSBT-45/180 plan with the lowest HR-CTV D90 that was greater than the D90 the ICBT or IS+ICBT plan was selected, the average (range) of D90 increases for RSBT over ICBT and IS+ICBT were 16.2 (6.3-27.2)and 8.5 (0.03-20.16) Gy, respectively. The average (range) treatment time increase per fraction of RSBT was 34.56 (3.68-70.41) min over ICBT and 34.59 (3.57-70.13) min over IS+ICBT. RSBT can increase D90 over ICBT and IS+ICBT without compromising organ-at-risk sparing. The D90 and treatment time improvements from RSBT depend on the patient and shield emission angle.

  11. Treatment planning study of the 3D dosimetric differences between Co-60 and Ir-192 sources in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for cervix cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hayman, Orla; Muscat, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate whether Co-60 is equivalent to Ir-192 for HDR cervical brachytherapy, through 3D-DVH dose comparisons in standard and optimised plans. Previous studies have only considered 2D dosimetry, point dose comparisons or identical loading. Typical treatment times and economics are considered. Material and methods Plans were produced for eight cervix patients using Co-60 and Ir-192 sources, CT imaging and IU/two-channel-ring applicator (Eckert Ziegler BEBIG). The comparison was made under two conditions: (A) identical dwell positions and loading, prescribed to Point A and (B) optimised source dwells, prescribed to HR-CTV. This provided a direct comparison of inherent differences and residual differences under typical clinical plan optimisation. The DVH (target and OAR), ICRU reference points and isodose distributions were compared. Typical treatment times and source replacement costs were compared. Results Small differences (p < 0.01) in 3D dosimetry exist when using Co-60 compared to Ir-192, prescribed to Point A with identical loading patterns, particularly 3.3% increase in rectum D2cc. No significant difference was observed in this parameter when prescribing to the HR-CTV using dwell-time optimisation. There was no statistically significant difference in D90 between the two isotopes. Co-60 plans delivered consistently higher V150% (mean +4.4%, p = 0.03) and V400% (mean +11.6%, p < 0.01) compared to Ir-192 in optimised plans. Differences in physical source properties were overwhelmed by geometric effects. Conclusions Co-60 may be used as an effective alternative to Ir-192 for HDR cervix brachytherapy, producing similar plans of equivalent D90, but with logistical benefits. There is a small dose increase along the extension of the source axis when using Co-60 compared to Ir-192, leading to small rectal dose increases for identical loading patterns. This can be eliminated by planning optimisation techniques. Such optimisation may also be associated with

  12. Preliminary experience on the implementation of computed tomography (CT)-based image guided brachytherapy (IGBT) of cervical cancer using high-dose-rate (HDR) Cobalt-60 source in University of Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamalludin, Z.; Min, U. N.; Ishak, W. Z. Wan; Malik, R. Abdul

    2016-03-01

    This study presents our preliminary work of the computed tomography (CT) image guided brachytherapy (IGBT) implementation on cervical cancer patients. We developed a protocol in which patients undergo two Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) examinations; a) prior to external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and b) prior to intra-cavitary brachytherapy for tumour identification and delineation during IGBT planning and dosimetry. For each fraction, patients were simulated using CT simulator and images were transferred to the treatment planning system. The HR-CTV, IR-CTV, bladder and rectum were delineated on CT-based contouring for cervical cancer. Plans were optimised to achieve HR-CTV and IR-CTV dose (D90) of total EQD2 80Gy and 60Gy respectively, while limiting the minimum dose to the most irradiated 2cm3 volume (D2cc) of bladder and rectum to total EQD2 90Gy and 75Gy respectively. Data from seven insertions were analysed by comparing the volume-based with traditional point- based doses. Based on our data, there were differences between volume and point doses of HR- CTV, bladder and rectum organs. As the number of patients having the CT-based IGBT increases from day to day in our centre, it is expected that the treatment and dosimetry accuracy will be improved with the implementation.

  13. SU-E-T-23: A Novel Two-Step Optimization Scheme for Tandem and Ovoid (T and O) HDR Brachytherapy Treatment for Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, M; Todor, D; Fields, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To present a novel method allowing fast, true volumetric optimization of T and O HDR treatments and to quantify its benefits. Materials and Methods: 27 CT planning datasets and treatment plans from six consecutive cervical cancer patients treated with 4–5 intracavitary T and O insertions were used. Initial treatment plans were created with a goal of covering high risk (HR)-CTV with D90 > 90% and minimizing D2cc to rectum, bladder and sigmoid with manual optimization, approved and delivered. For the second step, each case was re-planned adding a new structure, created from the 100% prescription isodose line of the manually optimized plan to the existent physician delineated HR-CTV, rectum, bladder and sigmoid. New, more rigorous DVH constraints for the critical OARs were used for the optimization. D90 for the HR-CTV and D2cc for OARs were evaluated in both plans. Results: Two-step optimized plans had consistently smaller D2cc's for all three OARs while preserving good D90s for HR-CTV. On plans with “excellent” CTV coverage, average D90 of 96% (range 91–102), sigmoid D2cc was reduced on average by 37% (range 16–73), bladder by 28% (range 20–47) and rectum by 27% (range 15–45). Similar reductions were obtained on plans with “good” coverage, with an average D90 of 93% (range 90–99). For plans with inferior coverage, average D90 of 81%, an increase in coverage to 87% was achieved concurrently with D2cc reductions of 31%, 18% and 11% for sigmoid, bladder and rectum. Conclusions: A two-step DVH-based optimization can be added with minimal planning time increase, but with the potential of dramatic and systematic reductions of D2cc for OARs and in some cases with concurrent increases in target dose coverage. These single-fraction modifications would be magnified over the course of 4–5 intracavitary insertions and may have real clinical implications in terms of decreasing both acute and late toxicity.

  14. Comparative evaluation of two dose optimization methods for image-guided, highly-conformal, tandem and ovoids cervix brachytherapy planning.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jiyun; Menon, Geetha; Sloboda, Ron

    2013-04-07

    Although the Manchester system is still extensively used to prescribe dose in brachytherapy (BT) for locally advanced cervix cancer, many radiation oncology centers are transitioning to 3D image-guided BT, owing to the excellent anatomy definition offered by modern imaging modalities. As automatic dose optimization is highly desirable for 3D image-based BT, this study comparatively evaluates the performance of two optimization methods used in BT treatment planning--Nelder-Mead simplex (NMS) and simulated annealing (SA)--for a cervix BT computer simulation model incorporating a Manchester-style applicator. Eight model cases were constructed based on anatomical structure data (for high risk-clinical target volume (HR-CTV), bladder, rectum and sigmoid) obtained from measurements on fused MR-CT images for BT patients. D90 and V100 for HR-CTV, D2cc for organs at risk (OARs), dose to point A, conformation index and the sum of dwell times within the tandem and ovoids were calculated for optimized treatment plans designed to treat the HR-CTV in a highly conformal manner. Compared to the NMS algorithm, SA was found to be superior as it could perform optimization starting from a range of initial dwell times, while the performance of NMS was strongly dependent on their initial choice. SA-optimized plans also exhibited lower D2cc to OARs, especially the bladder and sigmoid, and reduced tandem dwell times. For cases with smaller HR-CTV having good separation from adjoining OARs, multiple SA-optimized solutions were found which differed markedly from each other and were associated with different choices for initial dwell times. Finally and importantly, the SA method yielded plans with lower dwell time variability compared with the NMS method.

  15. Comparative evaluation of two dose optimization methods for image-guided, highly-conformal, tandem and ovoids cervix brachytherapy planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jiyun; Menon, Geetha; Sloboda, Ron

    2013-04-01

    Although the Manchester system is still extensively used to prescribe dose in brachytherapy (BT) for locally advanced cervix cancer, many radiation oncology centers are transitioning to 3D image-guided BT, owing to the excellent anatomy definition offered by modern imaging modalities. As automatic dose optimization is highly desirable for 3D image-based BT, this study comparatively evaluates the performance of two optimization methods used in BT treatment planning—Nelder-Mead simplex (NMS) and simulated annealing (SA)—for a cervix BT computer simulation model incorporating a Manchester-style applicator. Eight model cases were constructed based on anatomical structure data (for high risk-clinical target volume (HR-CTV), bladder, rectum and sigmoid) obtained from measurements on fused MR-CT images for BT patients. D90 and V100 for HR-CTV, D2cc for organs at risk (OARs), dose to point A, conformation index and the sum of dwell times within the tandem and ovoids were calculated for optimized treatment plans designed to treat the HR-CTV in a highly conformal manner. Compared to the NMS algorithm, SA was found to be superior as it could perform optimization starting from a range of initial dwell times, while the performance of NMS was strongly dependent on their initial choice. SA-optimized plans also exhibited lower D2cc to OARs, especially the bladder and sigmoid, and reduced tandem dwell times. For cases with smaller HR-CTV having good separation from adjoining OARs, multiple SA-optimized solutions were found which differed markedly from each other and were associated with different choices for initial dwell times. Finally and importantly, the SA method yielded plans with lower dwell time variability compared with the NMS method.

  16. A multicentre comparison of the dosimetric impact of inter- and intra-fractional anatomical variations in fractionated cervix cancer brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Nesvacil, Nicole; Tanderup, Kari; Hellebust, Taran P.; De Leeuw, Astrid; Lang, Stefan; Mohamed, Sandy; Jamema, Swamidas V.; Anderson, Clare; Pötter, Richard; Kirisits, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose To compare the dosimetric impact of organ and target variations relative to the applicator for intracavitary brachytherapy by a multicentre analysis with different application techniques and fractionation schemes. Material and methods DVH data from 363 image/contour sets (120 patients, 6 institutions) were included for 1–6 fractions per patient, with imaging intervals ranging from several hours to ∼20 days. Variations between images acquired within one (intra-application) or between consecutive applicator insertions (inter-application) were evaluated. Dose plans based on a reference MR or CT image series were superimposed onto subsequent image sets and D2cm3 for the bladder, rectum and sigmoid and D90 for HR CTV were recorded. Results For the whole sample, the systematic dosimetric variations for all organs at risk, i.e. mean variations of D2cm3, were found to be minor (<5%), while random variations, i.e. standard deviations were found to be high due to large variations in individual cases. The D2cm3 variations (mean ± 1SD) were 0.6 ± 19.5%, 4.1 ± 21.7% and 1.6 ± 26.8%, for the bladder, rectum and sigmoid. For HR CTV, the variations of D90 were found to be −1.1 ± 13.1% for the whole sample. Grouping of the results by intra- and inter-application variations showed that random uncertainties for bladder and sigmoid were 3–7% larger when re-implanting the applicator for individual fractions. No statistically significant differences between the two groups were detected in dosimetric variations for the HR CTV. Using 20% uncertainty of physical dose for OAR and 10% for HR CTV, the effects on total treatment dose for a 4 fraction HDR schedule at clinically relevant dose levels were found to be 4–8 Gy EQD2 for OAR and 3 Gy EQD2 for HR CTV. Conclusions Substantial variations occur in fractionated cervix cancer BT with higher impact close to clinical threshold levels. The treatment approach has to balance uncertainties for

  17. SU-F-19A-12: Split-Ring Applicator with Interstitial Needle for Improved Volumetric Coverage in HDR Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sherertz, T; Ellis, R; Colussi, V; Mislmani, M; Traughber, B; Herrmann, K; Podder, T

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate volumetric coverage of a Mick Radionuclear titanium Split-Ring applicator (SRA) with/without interstitial needle compared to an intracavitary Vienna applicator (VA), interstitial-intracavitary VA, and intracavitary ring and tandem applicator (RTA). Methods: A 57 year-old female with FIGO stage IIB cervical carcinoma was treated following chemoradiotherapy (45Gy pelvic and 5.4Gy parametrial boost) with highdose- rate (HDR) brachytherapy to 30Gy in 5 fractions using a SRA. A single interstitial needle was placed using the Ellis Interstitial Cap for the final three fractions to increase coverage of left-sided gross residual disease identified on 3T-MRI. High-risk (HR) clinical target volume (CTV) and intermediate-risk (IR) CTV were defined using axial T2-weighted 2D and 3D MRI sequences (Philips PET/MRI unit). Organs-at-risks (OARs) were delineated on CT. Oncentra planning system was used for treatment optimization satisfying GEC-ESTRO guidelines for target coverage and OAR constraints. Retrospectively, treatment plans (additional 20 plans) were simulated using intracavitary SRA (without needle), intracavitary VA (without needle), interstitial-intracavitary VA, and intracavitary RTA with this same patient case. Plans were optimized for each fraction to maintain coverage to HR-CTV. Results: Interstitial-intracavitary SRA achieved the following combined coverage for external radiation and brachytherapy (EQD2): D90 HR-CTV =94.6Gy; Bladder-2cc =88.9Gy; Rectum-2cc =65.1Gy; Sigmoid-2cc =48.9Gy; Left vaginal wall (VW) =103Gy, Right VW =99.2Gy. Interstitial-intracavitary VA was able to achieve identical D90 HR-CTV =94.6Gy, yet Bladder-2cc =91.9Gy (exceeding GEC-ESTRO recommendations of 2cc<90Gy) and Left VW =120.8Gy and Right VW =115.5Gy. Neither the SRA nor VA without interstitial needle could cover HR-CTV adequately without exceeding dose to Bladder-2cc. Conventional RTA was unable to achieve target coverage for the HR-CTV >80Gy without severely

  18. Dose-Volume Histogram Parameters and Local Tumor Control in Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Cervical Cancer Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dimopoulos, Johannes Lang, Stefan; Kirisits, Christian; Fidarova, Elena F.; Berger, Daniel; Georg, Petra; Doerr, Wolfgang; Poetter, Richard

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the value of dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters for predicting local control in magnetic resonance (MR) image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) for patients with cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Our study population consists of 141 patients with cervical cancer (Stages IB-IVA) treated with 45-50 Gy external beam radiotherapy plus four times 7 Gy IGBT with or without cisplatin. Gross tumor volume (GTV), high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV), and intermediate-risk clinical target volume (IRCTV) were contoured, and DVH parameters (minimum dose delivered to 90% of the volume of interest [D90] and D100) were assessed. Doses were converted to the equivalent dose in 2 Gy (EQD2) by applying the linear quadratic model ({alpha}/{beta} = 10 Gy). Groups were defined for patients with or without local recurrence (LR) in the true pelvis for tumor size at diagnosis (GTV at diagnosis [GTVD] of 2-5 cm (Group 1) or greater than 5 cm (Group 2) and for tumor size response at IGBT (HRCTV) of 2-5 cm (Group 2a) or greater than 5 cm (Group 2b). Results: Eighteen LRs were observed. The most important DVH parameters correlated with LR were the D90 and D100 for HRCTV. Mean D90 and D100 values for HRCTV were 86 {+-} 16 and 65 {+-} 10 Gy, respectively. The D90 for HRCTV greater than 87 Gy resulted in an LR incidence of 4% (3 of 68) compared with 20% (15 of 73) for D90 less than 87 Gy. The effect was most pronounced in the tumor group (Group 2b). Conclusions: We showed an increase in local control in IGBT in patients with cervical cancer with the dose delivered, which can be expressed by the D90 and D100 for HRCTV. Local control rates greater than 95% can be achieved if the D90 (EQD2) for HRCTV is 87 Gy or greater.

  19. Dose escalation in brachytherapy for cervical cancer: impact on (or increased need for) MRI-guided plan optimisation

    PubMed Central

    Paton, A M; Chalmers, K E; Coomber, H; Cameron, A L

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess the impact of dose escalation on the proportion of patients requiring MR image-guided optimisation rather than standard Manchester-based CT-guided planning, and the level of escalation achievable. Methods 30 patients with cervical cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy and image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) had MR images acquired at the first fraction of IGBT. Gross tumour volume and high-risk clinical target volume (HR CTV) were contoured and treatment plans retrospectively produced for a range of total 2-Gy equivalent (EQD2) prescription doses from 66 Gyα/β=10 to 90 Gyα/β=10 (HR CTV D90). Standard Manchester system-style plans were produced, prescribed to point A and then optimised where necessary with the aim of delivering at least the prescription dose to the HR CTV D90 while respecting organ-at-risk (OAR) tolerances. Results Increasing the total EQD2 from 66 Gyα/β=10 to 90 Gyα/β=10 increased the number of plans requiring optimisation from 13.3% to 90%. After optimisation, the number of plans achieving the prescription dose ranged from 93.3% (66 Gyα/β=10) to 63.3% (90 Gyα/β=10) with the mean±standard deviation for HR CTV D90 EQD2 from 78.4±12.4 Gyα/β=10 (66 Gyα/β=10) to 94.1±19.9 Gyα/β=10 (90 Gyα/β=10). Conclusion As doses are escalated, the need for non-standard optimised planning increases, while benefits in terms of increased target doses actually achieved diminish. The maximum achievable target dose is ultimately limited by proximity of OARs. Advances in knowledge This work represents a guide for other centres in determining the highest practicable prescription doses while considering patient throughput and maintaining acceptable OAR doses. PMID:23175490

  20. Paddle-based rotating-shield brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yunlong; Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung; Dadkhah, Hossein; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Buatti, John M.; Xu, Weiyu; Wu, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The authors present a novel paddle-based rotating-shield brachytherapy (P-RSBT) method, whose radiation-attenuating shields are formed with a multileaf collimator (MLC), consisting of retractable paddles, to achieve intensity modulation in high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Methods: Five cervical cancer patients using an intrauterine tandem applicator were considered to assess the potential benefit of the P-RSBT method. The P-RSBT source used was a 50 kV electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™). The paddles can be retracted independently to form multiple emission windows around the source for radiation delivery. The MLC was assumed to be rotatable. P-RSBT treatment plans were generated using the asymmetric dose–volume optimization with smoothness control method [Liu et al., Med. Phys. 41(11), 111709 (11pp.) (2014)] with a delivery time constraint, different paddle sizes, and different rotation strides. The number of treatment fractions (fx) was assumed to be five. As brachytherapy is delivered as a boost for cervical cancer, the dose distribution for each case includes the dose from external beam radiotherapy as well, which is 45 Gy in 25 fx. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated until the minimum dose to the hottest 2 cm3 (D2cm3) of either the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached their tolerance doses of 75, 75, and 90 Gy3, respectively, expressed as equivalent doses in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β = 3 Gy). Results: P-RSBT outperformed the two other RSBT delivery techniques, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT) and dynamic-shield RSBT (D-RSBT), with a properly selected paddle size. If the paddle size was angled at 60°, the average D90 increases for the delivery plans by P-RSBT on the five cases, compared to S-RSBT, were 2.2, 8.3, 12.6, 11.9, and 9.1 Gy10, respectively, with delivery times of 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 min/fx. The increases in HR-CTV D90, compared to D-RSBT, were 16.6, 12.9, 7.2, 3.7, and 1.7 Gy10

  1. Model assessment of individual tumor control rate and adverse effects in comparing locally advanced cervical cancer treatment using intracavitary with and without interstitial brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Keyur J; Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Shankar, Viswanathan; Bodner, William; Garg, Madhur; Rivera, Amanda; Tomé, Wolfgang A.; Kalnicki, Shalom

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study assessed the modeled probability of tumor control and organ at risk toxicities in locally advanced cervical cancer in patients treated by external beam radiation plus brachytherapy using intracavitary combined with interstitial brachytherapy (IC/IS) vs. intracavitary brachytherapy (IC) alone. Material and methods Twenty cervical cancer patients with a mean HR-CTV volume of 47.4 cm3 and a mean width of 54 mm were planned with both IC/IS and IC brachytherapy alone. A probit model was utilized to model 3-year (3-yr) local control rate (LC), 3-yr cancer specific survival rate (CSS), and the adverse effect (AE) of the organ at risk by using a modeled data set from multiple institutions. Modeling results were used to estimate the LC, CSS, and AE of the treatments in this study. Results Using the IC/IS technique, an EQD2 increase of 12.3 Gy to D90 (from 76.1 Gy to 88.3 Gy) of HR-CTV is expected to increase 3-yr LC and 3-yr CSS by 12.5%, and 11.0%, respectively. Comparing IC/IS to IC alone, the expected G2+ AE were 7.7% vs. 7.9% for the bladder, and 5.9% vs. 6.8% for the rectum. Conclusions The IC/IS technique improved dose coverage to the HR-CTV without significantly increasing dose to 2 cm3 of the organ at risk (OAR) surrounding it. With different regimens of EBRT combined with BT, IC/IS can be used to increase the probability of LC and CSS, or decrease the risk of AE. PMID:28115959

  2. SU-E-T-525: Dose Volume Histograms (DVH) Analysis and Comparison with ICRU Point Doses in MRI Guided HDR Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Badkul, R; McClinton, C; Kumar, P; Mitchell, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Brachytherapy plays a crucial role in management of cervix cancer. MRI compatible applicators have made it possible to accurately delineate gross-target-volume(GTV) and organs-at-risk(OAR) volumes, as well as directly plan, optimize and adapt dose-distribution for each insertion. We sought to compare DVH of tumor-coverage and OARs to traditional Point-A, ICRU-38 bladder and rectum point-doses for four different planning-techniques. Methods: MRI based 3D-planning was performed on Nucletron-Oncentra-TPS for 3 selected patients with varying tumor-sizes and anatomy. GTV,high-risk-clinical-target-volume(HR-CTV), intermediate-risk-clinical-target-volume(IR-CTV) and OARs: rectum, bladder, sigmoid-colon, vaginal-mucosa were delineated. Three conventionally used techniques: mg-Radium-equivalent(RaEq),equal-dwell-weights(EDW), Medical-College-of-Wisconsin proposed points-optimization (MCWO) and a manual-graphical-optimization(MGO) volume-coverage based technique were applied for each patient. Prescription was 6Gy delivered to point-A in Conventional techniques (RaEq, EDW, MCWO). For MGO, goal was to achieve 90%-coverage (D90) to HR-CTV with prescription-dose. ICRU point doses for rectum and bladder, point-A doses, DVH-doses for HR-CTV-D90,0.1cc-volume(D0.1),1ccvolume( D1),2cc-volume(D2) were collected for all plans and analyzed . Results: Mean D90 for HR-CTV normalized to MGO were 0.89,0.84,0.9,1.0 for EDW, RaEq, MCWO, MGO respectively. Mean point-A doses were 21.7% higher for MGO. Conventional techniques with Point-A prescriptions under covered HR-CTV-D90 by average of 12% as compared to MGO. Rectum, bladder and sigmoid doses were highest in MGO-plans for ICRU points as well as D0.1,D1 and D2 doses. Among conventional-techniques, rectum and bladder ICRU and DVH doses(0.1,1,2cc) were not significantly different (within 7%).Rectum D0.1 provided good estimation of ICRU-rectum-point doses (within 3.9%),rectum D0.1 were higher from 0.8 to 3.9% while bladder D0

  3. Articulatory Parameters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladefoged, Peter

    1980-01-01

    Summarizes the 16 parameters hypothesized to be necessary and sufficient for linguistic phonetic specifications. Suggests seven parameters affecting tongue shapes, three determining the positions of the lips, one controlling the position of the velum, four varying laryngeal actions, and one controlling respiratory activity. (RL)

  4. Supergranular Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udayashankar, Paniveni

    2016-07-01

    I study the complexity of supergranular cells using intensity patterns from Kodaikanal solar observatory. The chaotic and turbulent aspect of the solar supergranulation can be studied by examining the interrelationships amongst the parameters characterizing supergranular cells namely size, horizontal flow field, lifetime and physical dimensions of the cells and the fractal dimension deduced from the size data. The findings are supportive of Kolmogorov's theory of turbulence. The Data consists of visually identified supergranular cells, from which a fractal dimension 'D' for supergranulation is obtained according to the relation P α AD/2 where 'A' is the area and 'P' is the perimeter of the supergranular cells. I find a fractal dimension close to about 1.3 which is consistent with that for isobars and suggests a possible turbulent origin. The cell circularity shows a dependence on the perimeter with a peak around (1.1-1.2) x 105 m. The findings are supportive of Kolmogorov's theory of turbulence.

  5. Adaptive image guided brachytherapy for cervical cancer: A combined MRI-/CT-planning technique with MRI only at first fraction

    PubMed Central

    Nesvacil, Nicole; Pötter, Richard; Sturdza, Alina; Hegazy, Neamat; Federico, Mario; Kirisits, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate and test the feasibility of adaptive 3D image based BT planning for cervix cancer patients in settings with limited access to MRI, using a combination of MRI for the first BT fraction and planning of subsequent fractions on CT. Material and methods For 20 patients treated with EBRT and HDR BT with tandem/ring applicators two sets of treatment plans were compared. Scenario one is based on the “gold standard” with individual MRI-based treatment plans (applicator reconstruction, target contouring and dose optimization) for two BT applications with two fractions each. Scenario two is based on one initial MRI acquisition with an applicator in place for the planning of the two fractions of the first BT application and reuse of the target contour delineated on MRI for subsequent planning of the second application on CT. Transfer of the target from MRI of the first application to the CT of the second one was accomplished by use of an automatic applicator-based image registration procedure. Individual dose optimization of the second BT application was based on the transferred MRI target volume and OAR structures delineated on CT. DVH parameters were calculated for transferred target structures (virtual dose from MRI/CT plan) and CT-based OAR. The quality of the MRI/CT combination method was investigated by evaluating the CT-based dose distributions on MRI-based target and OAR contours of the same application (real dose from MRI/CT plan). Results The mean difference between the MRI based target volumes (HR CTVMRI2) and the structures transferred from MRI to CT (HR CTVCT2) was −1.7 ± 6.6 cm3 (−2.9 ± 20.4%) with a median of −0.7 cm3. The mean difference between the virtual and the real total D90, based on the MRI/CT combination technique was −1.5 ± 4.3 Gy EQD2. This indicates a small systematic underestimation of the real D90. Conclusions A combination of MRI for first fraction and subsequent CT based planning is feasible and easy

  6. Dosimetric Comparison between Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided and Conventional Two-Dimensional Point A-Based Intracavitary Brachytherapy Planning for Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Juan; Yuan, Wei; Wang, Ruihua; Wang, Qiuping; Li, Yi; Xue, Chaofan; Yan, Yanli; Ma, Xiaowei; Tan, Li; Liu, Zi

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to comprehensively compare the 3-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided and conventional 2-dimensional (2D) point A-based intracavitary brachytherapy (BT) planning for cervical cancer with regard to target dose coverage and dosages to adjacent organs-at risk (OARs). Methods A total of 79 patients with cervical cancer were enrolled to receive 2D point A-based BT planning and then immediately to receive 3D planning between October 2011 and April 2013 at the First Hospital Affiliated to Xi’an Jiao Tong University (Xi’an, China). The dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters for gross tumor volume (GTV), high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV), intermediate-risk clinical target volume (IR-CTV) and OARs were compared between the 2D and 3D planning. Results In small tumors, there was no significant difference in most of the DVHs between 2D and 3D planning (all p>0.05). While in big tumors, 3D BT planning significantly increased the DVHs for most of the GTV, HR-CTV and IR-CTV, and some OARs compared with 2D planning (all P<0.05). In 3D planning, DVHs for GTV, HR-CTV, IR-CTV and some OARs were significantly higher in big tumors than in small tumors (all p<0.05). In contrast, in 2D planning, DVHs for almost all of the HR-CTV and IR-CTV were significantly lower in big tumors (all p<0.05). In eccentric tumors, 3D planning significantly increased dose coverage but decreased dosages to OARs compared with 2D planning (p<0.05). In tumors invading adjacent tissues, the target dose coverage in 3D planning was generally significantly higher than in 2D planning (P<0.05); the dosages to the adjacent rectum and bladder were significantly higher but those to sigmoid colon were lower in 3D planning (all P<0.05). Conclusions 3D MRI image-guided BT planning exhibits advantages over 2D planning in a complex way, generally showing advantages for the treatment of cervical cancer except small tumors. PMID:27611853

  7. Multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dadkhah, Hossein; Kim, Yusung; Wu, Xiaodong; Flynn, Ryan T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To present a novel brachytherapy technique, called multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy (H-RSBT), for the precise angular and linear positioning of a partial shield in a curved applicator. H-RSBT mechanically enables the dose delivery using only linear translational motion of the radiation source/shield combination. The previously proposed approach of serial rotating shield brachytherapy (S-RSBT), in which the partial shield is rotated to several angular positions at each source dwell position [W. Yang et al., “Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer,” Phys. Med. Biol. 58, 3931–3941 (2013)], is mechanically challenging to implement in a curved applicator, and H-RSBT is proposed as a feasible solution. Methods: A Henschke-type applicator, designed for an electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™) and a 0.5 mm thick tungsten partial shield with 180° or 45° azimuthal emission angles and 116° asymmetric zenith angle, is proposed. The interior wall of the applicator contains six evenly spaced helical keyways that rigidly define the emission direction of the partial radiation shield as a function of depth in the applicator. The shield contains three uniformly distributed protruding keys on its exterior wall and is attached to the source such that it rotates freely, thus longitudinal translational motion of the source is transferred to rotational motion of the shield. S-RSBT and H-RSBT treatment plans with 180° and 45° azimuthal emission angles were generated for five cervical cancer patients with a diverse range of high-risk target volume (HR-CTV) shapes and applicator positions. For each patient, the total number of emission angles was held nearly constant for S-RSBT and H-RSBT by using dwell positions separated by 5 and 1.7 mm, respectively, and emission directions separated by 22.5° and 60°, respectively. Treatment delivery time and tumor coverage (D90 of HR-CTV) were the two metrics used as the basis for evaluation and

  8. Mapping of dose distribution from IMRT onto MRI-guided high dose rate brachytherapy using deformable image registration for cervical cancer treatments: preliminary study with commercially available software

    PubMed Central

    Huq, M. Saiful; Houser, Chris; Beriwal, Sushil; Michalski, Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    Purpose For patients undergoing external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and brachytherapy, recommendations for target doses and constraints are based on calculation of the equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2) from each phase. At present, the EBRT dose distribution is assumed to be uniform throughout the pelvis. We performed a preliminary study to determine whether deformable dose distribution mapping from the EBRT onto magnetic resonance (MR) images for the brachytherapy would yield differences in doses for organs at risk (OARs) and high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV). Material and methods Nine cervical cancer patients were treated to a total dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), followed by MRI-based 3D high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Retrospectively, the IMRT planning CT images were fused with the MR image for each fraction of brachytherapy using deformable image registration. The deformed IMRT dose onto MR images were converted to EQD2 and compared to the uniform dose assumption. Results For all patients, the EQD2 from the EBRT phase was significantly higher with deformable registration than with the conventional uniform dose distribution assumption. The mean EQD2 ± SD for HR-CTV D90 was 45.7 ± 0.7 Gy vs. 44.3 Gy for deformable vs. uniform dose distribution, respectively (p < 0.001). The dose to 2 cc of the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid was 46.4 ± 1.2 Gy, 46.2 ± 1.0 Gy, and 48.0 ± 2.5 Gy, respectively with deformable dose distribution, and was significantly higher than with uniform dose distribution (43.2 Gy for all OAR, p < 0.001). Conclusions This study reveals that deformed EBRT dose distribution to HR-CTV and OARs in MR images for brachytherapy is technically feasible, and achieves differences compared to a uniform dose distribution. Therefore, the assumption that EBRT contributes the same dose value may need to be carefully investigated further based on deformable image registration. PMID:25097559

  9. SU-E-T-787: Utility of the Two Candidate 192-Ir and 169-Yb HDR Sources for Use with a Novel Direction Modulated Brachytherapy Tandem Applicator for Cervical Cancer Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Safigholi, H; Soliman, A; Song, W; Han, D; Meigooni, A Soleimani

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A novel tungsten alloy shielded, MRI-compatible, direction modulated brachytherapy (DMBT) concept tandem applicator, which enables unprecedented intensity modulation, was used to evaluate treatment plan quality improvement over a conventional tandem. The utility of the 192-Ir and 169-Yb HDR sources, for use with the DMBT applicator, was evaluated. Methods: The total diameter of the DMBT tandem applicator is 6.0 mm, which consists of 5.4-mm diameter tungsten alloy and 0.3 mm thick plastic sheath. The tandem has 6 symmetric peripheral 1.3-mm diameter grooves for the source to travel. MCNPX v.2.6 was used to simulate the 192-Ir and 169-Yb sources inside the DMBT applicator. First, TG-43 source parameters were evaluated. Second, 3D dose matrix with 1 mm3 resolution were imported into an in-house-coded inverse optimization treatment planning program to obtain optimal plans for 19 clinical cases. All plans were compared with the standard tandem and ring plans. Prescription dose was 15.0 Gy. All plans were normalized to receive the same HRCTV D90. Results: Generally, the DMBT tandem (and ring) plans were better than the conventional tandem and ring plans for 192-Ir and 169-Yb HDR sources. The mean data of D2cc for bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were 11.65±2.30 Gy, 7.47±3.05 Gy, and 9.84±2.48 Gy for Ir-192 DMBT tandem, respectively. These data for Yb-169 were 11.67±2.26 Gy, 7.44±3.02 Gy, and 9.83±2.38 Gy, respectively. The HR-CTV D98 and V100 were 16.37±1.86 Gy and 97.37 ± 1.92 Gy for Ir-192 DMBT, respectively. The corresponding values for Yb-169 were 16.43±1.86 Gy, and 97.51 ± 1.91 Gy. Plans with the 169-Yb source generally produced more favorable results where V100 increased by 13.65% while D2cc across all OARs reduced by 0.54% compared with the 192-Ir plans. Conclusion: For the DMBT tandem applicator, 169-Yb source seems to produce more directional beams resulting in increased intensity modulation capacity, thus resulting in more conformal plans.

  10. University Cooperation Platform (UCP) between Christian-Albrechts-University Kiel (Germany) and Chiang Mai University (Thailand): implementation of image-guided gynecological brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Galalae, Razvan; Tharavichitkul, Ekkasit; Wanwilairat, Somsak; Chitapanarux, Imjai; Kimmig, Bernhard; Dunst, Jürgen; Lorvidhaya, Vicharn

    2015-02-01

    Starting in 1999, the University Cooperation Platform (UCP) implemented an exchange program of researchers and clinicians/physicists between the Christian-Albrechts-University Kiel in Germany and Chiang Mai University in Thailand, to initiate a sustainable base for long-term development of image-guided brachytherapy and in general for high-technology radiotherapy in Chiang Mai. A series of UCP protocols, based constructively on each other, were performed and evaluated at intermediate term follow-up. The first protocol, addressing computed tomography (CT)-optimized brachytherapy for advanced cervical cancer (n = 17), showed a significant reduction of D2cc for the bladder and sigmoid (p < 0.001) while maintaining a very high dose in D90 high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) in comparison with standard point-based planning. In addition, after a follow-up of 19 months no tumor relapse was observed. The second UCP protocol, testing the impact of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance (n = 15) in patients with cervical cancer, proved significantly smaller D2cc doses for the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid (p = 0.003, p = 0.015, and p = 0.012), and secured highly curative mean doses in D90 HR-CTV of 99.2 Gy. The acute and late toxicity was excellent without any observed grade 3 or higher morbidity. In the third protocol, the combination of image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) and whole pelvis intensity-modulated external beam radiotherapy (WP-IMRT) (n = 15) reaffirmed the significant reduction of D2cc doses for the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid (p = 0.001 or p < 0.001) along with high equivalent dose at 2 Gy (EQD2) in the HR-CTV, and demonstrated very low acute therapy-related toxicity in absence of grade 3 morbidity. The implementation of transabdominal ultrasound (TAUS) was the focus of the fourth UCP project aiming a more generous potential use of image-guidance on long-term, and enhancing the quality of soft tissue assessment complementary to conventionally planned

  11. University Cooperation Platform (UCP) between Christian-Albrechts-University Kiel (Germany) and Chiang Mai University (Thailand): implementation of image-guided gynecological brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Tharavichitkul, Ekkasit; Wanwilairat, Somsak; Chitapanarux, Imjai; Kimmig, Bernhard; Dunst, Jürgen; Lorvidhaya, Vicharn

    2015-01-01

    Starting in 1999, the University Cooperation Platform (UCP) implemented an exchange program of researchers and clinicians/physicists between the Christian-Albrechts-University Kiel in Germany and Chiang Mai University in Thailand, to initiate a sustainable base for long-term development of image-guided brachytherapy and in general for high-technology radiotherapy in Chiang Mai. A series of UCP protocols, based constructively on each other, were performed and evaluated at intermediate term follow-up. The first protocol, addressing computed tomography (CT)-optimized brachytherapy for advanced cervical cancer (n = 17), showed a significant reduction of D2cc for the bladder and sigmoid (p < 0.001) while maintaining a very high dose in D90 high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) in comparison with standard point-based planning. In addition, after a follow-up of 19 months no tumor relapse was observed. The second UCP protocol, testing the impact of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance (n = 15) in patients with cervical cancer, proved significantly smaller D2cc doses for the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid (p = 0.003, p = 0.015, and p = 0.012), and secured highly curative mean doses in D90 HR-CTV of 99.2 Gy. The acute and late toxicity was excellent without any observed grade 3 or higher morbidity. In the third protocol, the combination of image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) and whole pelvis intensity-modulated external beam radiotherapy (WP-IMRT) (n = 15) reaffirmed the significant reduction of D2cc doses for the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid (p = 0.001 or p < 0.001) along with high equivalent dose at 2 Gy (EQD2) in the HR-CTV, and demonstrated very low acute therapy-related toxicity in absence of grade 3 morbidity. The implementation of transabdominal ultrasound (TAUS) was the focus of the fourth UCP project aiming a more generous potential use of image-guidance on long-term, and enhancing the quality of soft tissue assessment complementary to conventionally planned

  12. Inverse planning for combination of intracavitary and interstitial brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yoshio, Kotaro; Murakami, Naoya; Morota, Madoka; Harada, Ken; Kitaguchi, Mayuka; Yamagishi, Kentaro; Sekii, Shuhei; Takahashi, Kana; Inaba, Koji; Mayahara, Hiroshi; Ito, Yoshinori; Sumi, Minako; Kanazawa, Susumu; Itami, Jun

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to compare three different treatment plans for locally advanced cervical cancer: (i) the inverse-planning simulated annealing (IPSA) plan for combination brachytherapy (BT) of interstitial and intracavitary brachytherapy, (ii) manual optimization based on the Manchester system for combination-BT, and (iii) the conventional Manchester system using only tandem and ovoids. This was a retrospective study of 25 consecutive implants. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) and organs at risk were defined according to the GEC-ESTRO Working Group definitions. A dose of 6 Gy was prescribed. The uniform cost function for dose constraints was applied to all IPSA-generated plans. The coverage of the HR-CTV by IPSA for combination-BT was equivalent to that of manual optimization, and was better than that of the Manchester system using only tandem and ovoids. The mean V100 achieved by IPSA for combination-BT, manual optimization and Manchester was 96 ± 3.7%, 95 ± 5.5% and 80 ± 13.4%, respectively. The mean D100 was 483 ± 80, 487 ± 97 and 335 ± 119 cGy, respectively. The mean D90 was 677 ± 61, 681 ± 88 and 513 ± 150 cGy, respectively. IPSA resulted in significant reductions of the doses to the rectum (IPSA D2cm3: 408 ± 71 cGy vs manual optimization D2cm3: 485 ± 105 cGy; P = 0.03) and the bladder (IPSA D2cm3: 452 ± 60 cGy vs manual optimization D2cm3: 583 ± 113 cGy; P < 0.0001). In conclusion, combination-BT achieved better tumor coverage, and plans using IPSA provided significant sparing of normal tissues without compromising CTV coverage. PMID:23728322

  13. Isobio software: biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histogram from physical dose conversion using linear-quadratic-linear model

    PubMed Central

    Jaikuna, Tanwiwat; Khadsiri, Phatchareewan; Chawapun, Nisa; Saekho, Suwit

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To develop an in-house software program that is able to calculate and generate the biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histogram by physical dose conversion using the linear-quadratic-linear (LQL) model. Material and methods The Isobio software was developed using MATLAB version 2014b to calculate and generate the biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histograms. The physical dose from each voxel in treatment planning was extracted through Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research (CERR), and the accuracy was verified by the differentiation between the dose volume histogram from CERR and the treatment planning system. An equivalent dose in 2 Gy fraction (EQD2) was calculated using biological effective dose (BED) based on the LQL model. The software calculation and the manual calculation were compared for EQD2 verification with pair t-test statistical analysis using IBM SPSS Statistics version 22 (64-bit). Results Two and three-dimensional biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histogram were displayed correctly by the Isobio software. Different physical doses were found between CERR and treatment planning system (TPS) in Oncentra, with 3.33% in high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) determined by D90%, 0.56% in the bladder, 1.74% in the rectum when determined by D2cc, and less than 1% in Pinnacle. The difference in the EQD2 between the software calculation and the manual calculation was not significantly different with 0.00% at p-values 0.820, 0.095, and 0.593 for external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and 0.240, 0.320, and 0.849 for brachytherapy (BT) in HR-CTV, bladder, and rectum, respectively. Conclusions The Isobio software is a feasible tool to generate the biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histogram for treatment plan evaluation in both EBRT and BT. PMID:28344603

  14. Reporting small bowel dose in cervix cancer high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yixiang; Dandekar, Virag; Chu, James C H; Turian, Julius; Bernard, Damian; Kiel, Krystyna

    2016-01-01

    Small bowel (SB) is an organ at risk (OAR) that may potentially develop toxicity after radiotherapy for cervix cancer. However, its dose from brachytherapy (BT) is not systematically reported as in other OARs, even with image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT). This study aims to introduce consideration of quantified objectives for SB in BT plan optimization and to evaluate the feasibility of sparing SB while maintaining adequate target coverage. In all, 13 patients were included in this retrospective study. All patients were treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) 45Gy in 25 fractions followed by high dose rate (HDR)-BT boost of 28Gy in 4 fractions using tandem/ring applicator. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomographic (CT) images were obtained to define the gross tumor volume (GTV), high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) and OARs (rectum, bladder, sigmoid colon, and SB). Treatment plans were generated for each patient using GEC-ESTRO recommendations based on the first CT/MRI. Treatment plans were revised to reduce SB dose when the [Formula: see text] dose to SB was > 5Gy, while maintaining other OAR constraints. For the 7 patients with 2 sets of CT and MRI studies, the interfraction variation of the most exposed SB was analyzed. Plan revisions were done in 6 of 13 cases owing to high [Formula: see text] of SB. An average reduction of 19% in [Formula: see text] was achieved. Meeting SB and other OAR constraints resulted in less than optimal target coverage in 2 patients (D90 of HR-CTV < 77Gyαβ10). The highest interfraction variation was observed for SB at 16 ± 59%, as opposed to 28 ± 27% for rectum and 21 ± 16% for bladder. Prospective reporting of SB dose could provide data required to establish a potential correlation with radiation-induced late complication for SB.

  15. Redefining solubility parameters: the partial solvation parameters.

    PubMed

    Panayiotou, Costas

    2012-03-21

    The present work reconsiders a classical and universally accepted concept of physical chemistry, the solubility parameter. Based on the insight derived from modern quantum chemical calculations, a new definition of solubility parameter is proposed, which overcomes some of the inherent restrictions of the original definition and expands its range of applications. The original single solubility parameter is replaced by four partial solvation parameters reflecting the dispersion, the polar, the acidic and the basic character of the chemical compounds as expressed either in their pure state or in mixtures. Simple rules are adopted for the definition and calculation of these four parameters and their values are tabulated for a variety of common substances. In contrast, however, to the well known Hansen solubility parameters, their design and evaluation does not rely exclusively on the basic rule of "similarity matching" for solubility but it makes also use of the other basic rule of compatibility, namely, the rule of "complementarity matching". This complementarity matching becomes particularly operational with the sound definition of the acidic and basic components of the solvation parameter based on the third σ-moments of the screening charge distributions of the quantum mechanics-based COSMO-RS theory. The new definitions are made in a simple and straightforward manner, thus, preserving the strength and appeal of solubility parameter stemming from its simplicity. The new predictive method has been applied to a variety of solubility data for systems of pharmaceuticals and polymers. The results from quantum mechanics calculations are critically compared with the results from Abraham's acid/base descriptors.

  16. Parameter Plane Design Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    Th usr a toente aninteer a thca sms b esta 1 Fp-ocsing 2. Enter P1 values, lwgt, ldig - > 9 Table I give us proper values. Table 1. PARAMETER TABLE...necessary and identify by block number) In this thesis a control systems analysis package is developed using parameter plane methods. It is an interactive...designer is able to choose values of the parameters which provide a good compromise between cost and dynamic behavior. 20 Distribution Availability of

  17. HYDROGEN ATOM THERMAL PARAMETERS.

    PubMed

    JENSEN, L H; SUNDARALINGAM, M

    1964-09-11

    Isotropic hydrogen atom thermal parameters for N,N'- hexamethylenebispropionamide have been determined. They show a definite trend and vary from approximately the same as the mean thermal parameters for atoms other than hydrogen near the center of the molecule to appreciably greater for atoms near the end. The indicated trend for this compound, along with other results, provides the basis for a possible explanation of the anomolous values that have been obtained for hydrogen atom thermal parameters.

  18. Relations between demographic parameters.

    PubMed

    Demetrius, L

    1979-05-01

    The mean life-expectancy e describes the average prospective life-time of an individual aged zero. This parameter can be explicitly described in terms of the survivorship distribution of the population. The Malthusian parameter r represents the asymptotic growth rate of a population. This parameter can be implicitly expressed in terms of the net-maternity distribution. The parameters e and r incompletely incorporate the age-specific fertility and mortality pattern of a population; distinct populations may have the same growth rate but different net-maternity functions; distinct populations may be characterized by the same mean life expectation but may have different survivorship distributions. This article analyzes a class of parameters called the entropy of a population (Demetrius, 1974a) which distinguishes between net-maternity functions with the same growth rate and also mortality distributions with the same mean life expectation. This class of parameters measures the convexity of the fertility and mortality distributions. This paper analyzes the relations between the entropy parameter and the standard demographic parameters.

  19. Parameter estimating state reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, E. B.

    1976-01-01

    Parameter estimation is considered for systems whose entire state cannot be measured. Linear observers are designed to recover the unmeasured states to a sufficient accuracy to permit the estimation process. There are three distinct dynamics that must be accommodated in the system design: the dynamics of the plant, the dynamics of the observer, and the system updating of the parameter estimation. The latter two are designed to minimize interaction of the involved systems. These techniques are extended to weakly nonlinear systems. The application to a simulation of a space shuttle POGO system test is of particular interest. A nonlinear simulation of the system is developed, observers designed, and the parameters estimated.

  20. MSSM without free parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitano, Ryuichiro; Motono, Ryuji; Nagai, Minoru

    2016-12-01

    It is often argued that the minimal supersymmetric standard model has O (100 ) free parameters, and the generic parameter region is already excluded by the null observation of the flavor and C P -violating processes as well as the constraints from the LHC experiments. This situation naturally leads us to consider the case where all the dangerous soft supersymmetry breaking terms, such as the scalar masses and scalar couplings, are absent, while only the unified gaugino mass term and the μ term are nonvanishing at the grand unification scale. We revisit this simple situation taking into account the observed Higgs boson mass, 125 GeV. Since the gaugino mass and the μ term are fixed in order to explain the Higgs boson and the Z boson masses, there is no free parameter left in this scenario. We find that there are three independent parameter sets that exist including ones which have not been discussed in the literature. We also find that the abundance of the dark matter can be explained by relic gravitinos which are nonthermally produced as decay products of the supersymmetry particles while satisfying constraints from big bang nucleosynthesis. We discuss the effects of the gravity mediation which generically gives a contribution to the soft terms of the order of the gravitino mass. It turns out that a newly found parameter set is preferable to explain the Higgs boson mass as well as the gravitino dark matter while satisfying the constraints from the electric dipole moments of the electron and the nucleon.

  1. Aircraft parameter estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, Kenneth W.

    1987-01-01

    The aircraft parameter estimation problem is used to illustrate the utility of parameter estimation, which applies to many engineering and scientific fields. Maximum likelihood estimation has been used to extract stability and control derivatives from flight data for many years. This paper presents some of the basic concepts of aircraft parameter estimation and briefly surveys the literature in the field. The maximum likelihood estimator is discussed, and the basic concepts of minimization and estimation are examined for a simple simulated aircraft example. The cost functions that are to be minimized during estimation are defined and discussed. Graphic representations of the cost functions are given to illustrate the minimization process. Finally, the basic concepts are generalized, and estimation from flight data is discussed. Some of the major conclusions for the simulated example are also developed for the analysis of flight data from the F-14, highly maneuverable aircraft technology (HiMAT), and space shuttle vehicles.

  2. Target parameter estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hocking, W. K.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of any radar experiment is to determine as much as possible about the entities which scatter the radiation. This review discusses many of the various parameters which can be deduced in a radar experiment, and also critically examines the procedures used to deduce them. Methods for determining the mean wind velocity, the RMS fluctuating velocities, turbulence parameters, and the shapes of the scatterers are considered. Complications with these determinations are discussed. It is seen throughout that a detailed understanding of the shape and cause of the scatterers is important in order to make better determinations of these various quantities. Finally, some other parameters, which are less easily acquired, are considered. For example, it is noted that momentum fluxes due to buoyancy waves and turbulence can be determined, and on occasions radars can be used to determine stratospheric diffusion coefficients and even temperature profiles in the atmosphere.

  3. Games with fuzzy parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messaoud, Deghdak

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, we study the existence of equilibrium in non-cooperative game with fuzzy parameters. We generalize te results of Larbani and Kacher(2008, 2009) in infinite dimentional spaces. The proof is based on the Browder-Fan fixed point theorem.

  4. Phenological Parameters Estimation Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKellip, Rodney D.; Ross, Kenton W.; Spruce, Joseph P.; Smoot, James C.; Ryan, Robert E.; Gasser, Gerald E.; Prados, Donald L.; Vaughan, Ronald D.

    2010-01-01

    The Phenological Parameters Estimation Tool (PPET) is a set of algorithms implemented in MATLAB that estimates key vegetative phenological parameters. For a given year, the PPET software package takes in temporally processed vegetation index data (3D spatio-temporal arrays) generated by the time series product tool (TSPT) and outputs spatial grids (2D arrays) of vegetation phenological parameters. As a precursor to PPET, the TSPT uses quality information for each pixel of each date to remove bad or suspect data, and then interpolates and digitally fills data voids in the time series to produce a continuous, smoothed vegetation index product. During processing, the TSPT displays NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) time series plots and images from the temporally processed pixels. Both the TSPT and PPET currently use moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite multispectral data as a default, but each software package is modifiable and could be used with any high-temporal-rate remote sensing data collection system that is capable of producing vegetation indices. Raw MODIS data from the Aqua and Terra satellites is processed using the TSPT to generate a filtered time series data product. The PPET then uses the TSPT output to generate phenological parameters for desired locations. PPET output data tiles are mosaicked into a Conterminous United States (CONUS) data layer using ERDAS IMAGINE, or equivalent software package. Mosaics of the vegetation phenology data products are then reprojected to the desired map projection using ERDAS IMAGINE

  5. The Parameters of Postmodernism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zurbrugg, Nicholas

    Hypothesizing that the tendency to define postmodern culture negatively derives from overliteral and undercritical responses to European theorists, this book of essays identifies the wide parameters of postmodernism. The book demonstrates that the literary and artistic temper of the postmodern condition in Europe and America cannot adequately be…

  6. Physical Parameter Eclipse Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrielmann, S.

    The tomographic method Physical Parameter Eclipse Mapping is a tool to reconstruct spatial distributions of physical parameters (like temperatures and surface densities) in accretion discs of cataclysmic variables. After summarizing the method, we apply it to multi-colour eclipse light curves of various dwarf novae and nova-likes like VZ Scl, IP Peg in outburst, UU Aqr, V2051 Oph and HT Cas in order to derive the temperatures (and surface densities) in the disc, the white dwarf temperature, the disc size, the effective temperatures and the viscosities. The results allows us to establish or refine a physical model for the accretion disc. Our maps of HT Cas and V 2051Oph, for example, indicate that the (quiescent) disc must be structured into a cool, optically thick inner disc sandwiched by hot, optically thin chromospheres. In addition, the disc of HT Cas must be patchy with a covering factor of about 40% caused by magnetic activity in the disc.

  7. Geoengineering design parameters workshop

    SciTech Connect

    St. John, C.M. and Associates, Grand Junction, CO ); Kim, Kunsoo . Rockwell Hanford Operations)

    1985-12-12

    A one-day workshop on the subject of the geotechnical design parameters, in situ stress and rock mass strength, for a nuclear waste repository in basalt was held in Rapid City, South Dakota, on June 25, 1989. A panel comprised of five widely recognized experts in the field of rock mechanics, met to discuss the state of stress at the Hanford Site and the strength of a basalt rock mass. This report summarizes the discussions that took place and presents a set of final position statements developed collaboratively by the panel and the workshop moderator. The report concludes with a set of specific recommendations for future actions considered necessary to adequately define the in situ stress and the rock mass strength at the Hanford Site and to document the position of the Basalt Waste Isolation Project in respect to these two critical design parameters.

  8. Military display performance parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel D.; Meyer, Frederick

    2012-06-01

    The military display market is analyzed in terms of four of its segments: avionics, vetronics, dismounted soldier, and command and control. Requirements are summarized for a number of technology-driving parameters, to include luminance, night vision imaging system compatibility, gray levels, resolution, dimming range, viewing angle, video capability, altitude, temperature, shock and vibration, etc., for direct-view and virtual-view displays in cockpits and crew stations. Technical specifications are discussed for selected programs.

  9. CELSS engineering parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drysdale, Alan; Sager, John; Wheeler, Ray; Fortson, Russ; Chetirkin, Peter

    1993-01-01

    The most important Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) engineering parameters are, in order of decreasing importance, manpower, mass, and energy. The plant component is a significant contributor to the total system equivalent mass. In this report, a generic plant component is described and the relative equivalent mass and productivity are derived for a number of instances taken from the KSC CELSS Breadboard Project data and literature. Typical specific productivities (edible biomass produced over 10 years divided by system equivalent mass) for closed systems are of the order of 0.2.

  10. NICMOS Defocus parameter test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dashevsky, Ilana

    2007-07-01

    This proposal tests the new NICMOS non-nominal focus positions, which are implemented in the front-end systems and are specified in the Phase II using the CAMERA-FOCUS=DEFOCUS Optional Parameter. The targets from Proposals 9832 and 11063 are used in this Proposal. The GO Proposal 9832 is an example of how GOs may use the new non-nominal focus implementation for detector 3. Proposal 11063 is the NICMOS focus monitor, which will be used to verify the non-nominal focus for all 3 detectors.

  11. Display Parameters and Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadur, Birendra

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * HUMAN FACTORS * Anthropometry * Sensory * Cognitive * Discussions * THE HUMAN VISUAL SYSTEM - CAPABILITIES AND LIMITATIONS * Cornea * Pupil and Iris * Lens * Vitreous Humor * Retina * RODS - NIGHT VISION * CONES - DAY VISION * RODS AND CONES - TWILIGHT VISION * VISUAL PIGMENTS * MACULA * BLOOD * CHOROID COAT * Visual Signal Processing * Pathways to the Brain * Spatial Vision * Temporal Vision * Colour Vision * Colour Blindness * DICHROMATISM * Protanopia * Deuteranopia * Tritanopia * ANOMALOUS TRICHROMATISM * Protanomaly * Deuteranomaly * Tritanomaly * CONE MONOCHROMATISM * ROD MONOCHROMATISM * Using Colour Effectively * COLOUR MIXTURES AND THE CHROMATICITY DIAGRAM * Colour Matching Functions and Chromaticity Co-ordinates * CIE 1931 Colour Space * CIE PRIMARIES * CIE COLOUR MATCHING FUNCTIONS AND CHROMATICITY CO-ORDINATES * METHODS FOR DETERMINING TRISTIMULUS VALUES AND COLOUR CO-ORDINATES * Spectral Power Distribution Method * Filter Method * CIE 1931 CHROMATICITY DIAGRAM * ADDITIVE COLOUR MIXTURE * CIE 1976 Chromaticity Diagram * CIE Uniform Colour Spaces and Colour Difference Formulae * CIELUV OR L*u*v* * CIELAB OR L*a*b* * CIE COLOUR DIFFERENCE FORMULAE * Colour Temperature and CIE Standard Illuminants and source * RADIOMETRIC AND PHOTOMETRIC QUANTITIES * Photopic (Vλ and Scotopic (Vλ') Luminous Efficiency Function * Photometric and Radiometric Flux * Luminous and Radiant Intensities * Incidence: Illuminance and Irradiance * Exitance or Emittance (M) * Luminance and Radiance * ERGONOMIC REQUIREMENTS OF DISPLAYS * ELECTRO-OPTICAL PARAMETERS AND REQUIREMENTS * Contrast and Contrast Ratio * Luminance and Brightness * Colour Contrast and Chromaticity * Glare * Other Aspects of Legibility * SHAPE AND SIZE OF CHARACTERS * DEFECTS AND BLEMISHES * FLICKER AND DISTORTION * ANGLE OF VIEW * Switching Speed * Threshold and Threshold Characteristic * Measurement Techniques For Electro-optical Parameters * RADIOMETRIC

  12. Dosimetric parameters as predictive factors for biochemical control in patients with higher risk prostate cancer treated with Pd-103 and supplemental beam radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Orio, Peter; Wallner, Kent . E-mail: kent.Wallner@med.va.gov; Merrick, Gregory; Herstein, Andrew; Mitsuyama, Paul; Thornton, Ken; Butler, Wayne; Sutlief, Steven

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To analyze the role of dosimetric quality parameters in maximizing cancer eradication in higher risk prostate cancer patients treated with palladium (Pd)-103 and supplemental beam radiation. Methods: One-hundred-seventy-nine patients treated with Pd-103 and supplemental beam radiation, with minimum 2 years follow-up prostate-specific antigen (PSA) values and posttreatment computed tomography scans were analyzed. Dosimetric parameters included the V100 (percent of the postimplant volume covered by the prescription dose), the D90 (the minimum dose that covered 90% of the post implant volume), and the treatment margins (the radial distance between the prostatic edge and the prescription isodose). Treatment margins (TMs) were calculated using premarket software. Results: Freedom from biochemical failure was 79% at 3 years, with 92 of the 179 patients (51%) followed beyond 3 years. In comparing patients who did or did not achieve biochemical control, the most striking differences were in biologic factors of pretreatment PSA and Gleason score. The V100, D90, and average TM all showed nonsignificant trends to higher values in patients with biochemical control. In multivariate analysis of each of the three dosimetric parameters against PSA and Gleason score, TM showed the strongest correlation with biochemical control (p = 0.19). Conclusions: For patients with intermediate and high-risk prostate cancer treated with Pd-103 brachytherapy and external beam radiation, biologic factors (PSA and Gleason score) were the most important determinants of cancer eradication. However, there is a trend to better outcomes among patients with higher quality implant parameters, suggesting that attention to implant quality will maximize the likelihood of cure.

  13. Loss parameter calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, J.M.

    1995-07-01

    Sands and Rees propose an electronic bench measurement of the impulse energy loss of a stored particle bunch to vacuum-chamber components. The components act as the outer conductor of a coaxial line with a thin wire as center conductor. Short pulses are then transmitted through this coaxial system to simulate relativistic particle bunches. Their proposal has since been implemented by several investigators and has become a well-known technique. They derive a first-order approximation to the loss parameter {kappa} for use in these measurements. The purpose of this note is to point out that exact expression for {kappa} is as simple as its first-order approximation and to recommend its use even when {kappa} is small.

  14. Precision cosmological parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fendt, William Ashton, Jr.

    2009-09-01

    methods. These techniques will help in the understanding of new physics contained in current and future data sets as well as benefit the research efforts of the cosmology community. Our idea is to shift the computationally intensive pieces of the parameter estimation framework to a parallel training step. We then provide a machine learning code that uses this training set to learn the relationship between the underlying cosmological parameters and the function we wish to compute. This code is very accurate and simple to evaluate. It can provide incredible speed- ups of parameter estimation codes. For some applications this provides the convenience of obtaining results faster, while in other cases this allows the use of codes that would be impossible to apply in the brute force setting. In this thesis we provide several examples where our method allows more accurate computation of functions important for data analysis than is currently possible. As the techniques developed in this work are very general, there are no doubt a wide array of applications both inside and outside of cosmology. We have already seen this interest as other scientists have presented ideas for using our algorithm to improve their computational work, indicating its importance as modern experiments push forward. In fact, our algorithm will play an important role in the parameter analysis of Planck, the next generation CMB space mission.

  15. Stochastic control system parameter identifiability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, C. H.; Herget, C. J.

    1975-01-01

    The parameter identification problem of general discrete time, nonlinear, multiple input/multiple output dynamic systems with Gaussian white distributed measurement errors is considered. The knowledge of the system parameterization was assumed to be known. Concepts of local parameter identifiability and local constrained maximum likelihood parameter identifiability were established. A set of sufficient conditions for the existence of a region of parameter identifiability was derived. A computation procedure employing interval arithmetic was provided for finding the regions of parameter identifiability. If the vector of the true parameters is locally constrained maximum likelihood (CML) identifiable, then with probability one, the vector of true parameters is a unique maximal point of the maximum likelihood function in the region of parameter identifiability and the constrained maximum likelihood estimation sequence will converge to the vector of true parameters.

  16. A study of parameter identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herget, C. J.; Patterson, R. E., III

    1978-01-01

    A set of definitions for deterministic parameter identification ability were proposed. Deterministic parameter identificability properties are presented based on four system characteristics: direct parameter recoverability, properties of the system transfer function, properties of output distinguishability, and uniqueness properties of a quadratic cost functional. Stochastic parameter identifiability was defined in terms of the existence of an estimation sequence for the unknown parameters which is consistent in probability. Stochastic parameter identifiability properties are presented based on the following characteristics: convergence properties of the maximum likelihood estimate, properties of the joint probability density functions of the observations, and properties of the information matrix.

  17. Computer program for parameter optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glatt, C. R.; Hague, D. S.

    1968-01-01

    Flexible, large scale digital computer program was designed for the solution of a wide range of multivariable parameter optimization problems. The program has the ability to solve constrained optimization problems involving up to one hundred parameters.

  18. Subsurface Geotechnical Parameters Report

    SciTech Connect

    D. Rigby; M. Mrugala; G. Shideler; T. Davidsavor; J. Leem; D. Buesch; Y. Sun; D. Potyondy; M. Christianson

    2003-12-17

    The Yucca Mountain Project is entering a the license application (LA) stage in its mission to develop the nation's first underground nuclear waste repository. After a number of years of gathering data related to site characterization, including activities ranging from laboratory and site investigations, to numerical modeling of processes associated with conditions to be encountered in the future repository, the Project is realigning its activities towards the License Application preparation. At the current stage, the major efforts are directed at translating the results of scientific investigations into sets of data needed to support the design, and to fulfill the licensing requirements and the repository design activities. This document addresses the program need to address specific technical questions so that an assessment can be made about the suitability and adequacy of data to license and construct a repository at the Yucca Mountain Site. In July 2002, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published an Integrated Issue Resolution Status Report (NRC 2002). Included in this report were the Repository Design and Thermal-Mechanical Effects (RDTME) Key Technical Issues (KTI). Geotechnical agreements were formulated to resolve a number of KTI subissues, in particular, RDTME KTIs 3.04, 3.05, 3.07, and 3.19 relate to the physical, thermal and mechanical properties of the host rock (NRC 2002, pp. 2.1.1-28, 2.1.7-10 to 2.1.7-21, A-17, A-18, and A-20). The purpose of the Subsurface Geotechnical Parameters Report is to present an accounting of current geotechnical information that will help resolve KTI subissues and some other project needs. The report analyzes and summarizes available qualified geotechnical data. It evaluates the sufficiency and quality of existing data to support engineering design and performance assessment. In addition, the corroborative data obtained from tests performed by a number of research organizations is presented to reinforce

  19. Parameter Sensitivity in Multivariate Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Bert F., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Interpretation of multivariate models requires knowing how much the fit of the model is impaired by changes in the parameters. The relation of parameter change to loss of goodness of fit can be called parameter sensitivity. Formulas are presented for assessing the sensitivity of multiple regression and principal component weights. (Author/JKS)

  20. Bibliography for aircraft parameter estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, Kenneth W.; Maine, Richard E.

    1986-01-01

    An extensive bibliography in the field of aircraft parameter estimation has been compiled. This list contains definitive works related to most aircraft parameter estimation approaches. Theoretical studies as well as practical applications are included. Many of these publications are pertinent to subjects peripherally related to parameter estimation, such as aircraft maneuver design or instrumentation considerations.

  1. The effect of interobserver differences in post-implant prostate CT image interpretation on dosimetric parameters.

    PubMed

    Han, Ben H; Wallner, Kent; Merrick, Gregory; Badiozamani, Kas; Butler, Wayne

    2003-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify where observers differ in their interpretation of CT scans, and to relate those differences to clinically relevant dosimetric parameters. Twenty unselected patients treated with I-125 or Pd-103 brachytherapy at the Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System (VAPSHCS) in 2001 were studied. Patients were implanted with I-125 (7 patients, 0.87 mCi/source) or Pd-103 (13 patients, 2.54 U/source). The number of I-125 sources implanted ranged from 52 to 78. The number of Pd-103 sources implanted ranged from 58-144. Post-implant 3 mm CT images were imported into a laptop running Varian Variseed and sent to the four physician investigators, who outlined the prostate independently. Investigators were not coached specifically for this study, beyond their having read prior reports regarding prostate volume determinations. There was moderate interobserver variability in CT volume determination, with the standard deviations as a percent of the mean ranging from 9% to 29% (median: 17%). An average of 14% of implants (range: 5%-20%) would have been judged inadequate based on a minimum V100 of 80%, versus 24% of implants (range: 5%-45%) being judged inadequate based on a minimum D90 of 90% of prescription dose. The greatest variability was seen in prostate length (median standard deviation: 0.57 cm), due to vagaries in base and apical localization. However, the prostatic width and thickness also varied substantially between observers, with median standard deviations of 0.24 and 0.32 cm, respectively. Treatment margin variability was greatest at the anterior border, with a median standard deviation of 0.21 cm +/- 0.10. We believe that CT-based dosimetry, while influenced by CT interpretation, still provides useful general dosimetric calculations, that are likely to be reproducible enough to provide clinically useful information between institutions. The V100 and TMs are less influenced by interobserver CT interpretation variability than

  2. Improved Estimates of Thermodynamic Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, D. D.

    1982-01-01

    Techniques refined for estimating heat of vaporization and other parameters from molecular structure. Using parabolic equation with three adjustable parameters, heat of vaporization can be used to estimate boiling point, and vice versa. Boiling points and vapor pressures for some nonpolar liquids were estimated by improved method and compared with previously reported values. Technique for estimating thermodynamic parameters should make it easier for engineers to choose among candidate heat-exchange fluids for thermochemical cycles.

  3. MODFLOW-style parameters in underdetermined parameter estimation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    D'Oria, Marco D.; Fienen, Michael N.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the use of MODFLOW-Style parameters in the numerical codes MODFLOW_2005 and MODFLOW_2005-Adjoint for the definition of variables in the Layer Property Flow package. Parameters are a useful tool to represent aquifer properties in both codes and are the only option available in the adjoint version. Moreover, for overdetermined parameter estimation problems, the parameter approach for model input can make data input easier. We found that if each estimable parameter is defined by one parameter, the codes require a large computational effort and substantial gains in efficiency are achieved by removing logical comparison of character strings that represent the names and types of the parameters. An alternative formulation already available in the current implementation of the code can also alleviate the efficiency degradation due to character comparisons in the special case of distributed parameters defined through multiplication matrices. The authors also hope that lessons learned in analyzing the performance of the MODFLOW family codes will be enlightening to developers of other Fortran implementations of numerical codes.

  4. MODFLOW-Style parameters in underdetermined parameter estimation.

    PubMed

    D'Oria, Marco; Fienen, Michael N

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the use of MODFLOW-Style parameters in the numerical codes MODFLOW_2005 and MODFLOW_2005-Adjoint for the definition of variables in the Layer Property Flow package. Parameters are a useful tool to represent aquifer properties in both codes and are the only option available in the adjoint version. Moreover, for overdetermined parameter estimation problems, the parameter approach for model input can make data input easier. We found that if each estimable parameter is defined by one parameter, the codes require a large computational effort and substantial gains in efficiency are achieved by removing logical comparison of character strings that represent the names and types of the parameters. An alternative formulation already available in the current implementation of the code can also alleviate the efficiency degradation due to character comparisons in the special case of distributed parameters defined through multiplication matrices. The authors also hope that lessons learned in analyzing the performance of the MODFLOW family codes will be enlightening to developers of other Fortran implementations of numerical codes.

  5. MODFLOW-style parameters in underdetermined parameter estimation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    D'Oria, M.; Fienen, M.N.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the use of MODFLOW-Style parameters in the numerical codes MODFLOW-2005 and MODFLOW-2005-Adjoint for the definition of variables in the Layer Property Flow package. Parameters are a useful tool to represent aquifer properties in both codes and are the only option available in the adjoint version. Moreover, for overdetermined parameter estimation problems, the parameter approach for model input can make data input easier. We found that if each estimable parameter is defined by one parameter, the codes require a large computational effort and substantial gains in efficiency are achieved by removing logical comparison of character strings that represent the names and types of the parameters. An alternative formulation already available in the current implementation of the code can also alleviate the efficiency degradation due to character comparisons in the special case of distributed parameters defined through multiplication matrices. The authors also hope that lessons learned in analyzing the performance of the MODFLOW family codes will be enlightening to developers of other Fortran implementations of numerical codes. ?? 2011, National Ground Water Association.

  6. Identified Parameters, Parameters of Interest and Their Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Martin, Ernesto; Gonzalez, Jorge; Tuerlinckx, Francis

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this commentary is to provide some additional results to the interesting and provocative paper of Maris and Bechger ("On Interpreting the Model Parameters for the Three Parameter Logistic Model," this issue). In this article, the authors have three aims. First, the authors distinguish between three fundamental concepts that are…

  7. Parameter estimation in food science.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Kirk D; Mishra, Dharmendra K

    2013-01-01

    Modeling includes two distinct parts, the forward problem and the inverse problem. The forward problem-computing y(t) given known parameters-has received much attention, especially with the explosion of commercial simulation software. What is rarely made clear is that the forward results can be no better than the accuracy of the parameters. Therefore, the inverse problem-estimation of parameters given measured y(t)-is at least as important as the forward problem. However, in the food science literature there has been little attention paid to the accuracy of parameters. The purpose of this article is to summarize the state of the art of parameter estimation in food science, to review some of the common food science models used for parameter estimation (for microbial inactivation and growth, thermal properties, and kinetics), and to suggest a generic method to standardize parameter estimation, thereby making research results more useful. Scaled sensitivity coefficients are introduced and shown to be important in parameter identifiability. Sequential estimation and optimal experimental design are also reviewed as powerful parameter estimation methods that are beginning to be used in the food science literature.

  8. Force-Field Parameter Fitter

    SciTech Connect

    2015-05-27

    ParFit is a flexible and extendable framework and library of classes for fitting force-field parameters to data from high-level ab-initio calculations on the basis of deterministic and stochastic algorithms. Currently, the code is fitting MM3 and Merck force-field parameters but could easily extend to other force-field types.

  9. How many dark energy parameters?

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, Eric V.; Huterer, Dragan

    2005-05-16

    For exploring the physics behind the accelerating universe a crucial question is how much we can learn about the dynamics through next generation cosmological experiments. For example, in defining the dark energy behavior through an effective equation of state, how many parameters can we realistically expect to tightly constrain? Through both general and specific examples (including new parametrizations and principal component analysis) we argue that the answer is 42 - no, wait, two. Cosmological parameter analyses involving a measure of the equation of state value at some epoch (e.g., w_0) and a measure of the change in equation of state (e.g., w') are therefore realistic in projecting dark energy parameter constraints. More elaborate parametrizations could have some uses (e.g., testing for bias or comparison with model features), but do not lead to accurately measured dark energy parameters.

  10. Method for estimating solubility parameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, D. D.; Ingham, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    Semiempirical correlations have been developed between solubility parameters and refractive indices for series of model hydrocarbon compounds and organic polymers. Measurement of intermolecular forces is useful for assessment of material compatibility, glass-transition temperature, and transport properties.

  11. Quantum estimation of unknown parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Vargas, Esteban; Pineda, Carlos; Leyvraz, François; Barberis-Blostein, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    We discuss the problem of finding the best measurement strategy for estimating the value of a quantum system parameter. In general the optimum quantum measurement, in the sense that it maximizes the quantum Fisher information and hence allows one to minimize the estimation error, can only be determined if the value of the parameter is already known. A modification of the quantum Van Trees inequality, which gives a lower bound on the error in the estimation of a random parameter, is proposed. The suggested inequality allows us to assert if a particular quantum measurement, together with an appropriate estimator, is optimal. An adaptive strategy to estimate the value of a parameter, based on our modified inequality, is proposed.

  12. Understanding bibliometric parameters and analysis.

    PubMed

    Choudhri, Asim F; Siddiqui, Adeel; Khan, Nickalus R; Cohen, Harris L

    2015-01-01

    Bibliometric parameters have become an important part of modern assessment of academic productivity. These parameters exist for the purpose of evaluating authors (publication count, citation count, h-index, m-quotient, hc-index, e-index, g-index, i-10 [i-n] index) and journals (impact factor, Eigenfactor, article influence score, SCImago journal rank, source-normalized impact per paper). Although in recent years there has been a proliferation of bibliometric parameters, the true meaning and appropriate use of these parameters is generally not well understood. Effective use of existing and emerging bibliometric tools can aid in assessment of academic productivity, including readiness for promotions and other awards. However, if not properly understood, the data can be misinterpreted and may be subject to manipulation. Familiarity with bibliometric parameters will aid in their effective implementation in the review of authors-whether individuals or groups-and journals, as well as their possible use in the promotions review process, maximizing the effectiveness of bibliometric analysis.

  13. Photovoltaic module parameters acquisition model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cibira, Gabriel; Koščová, Marcela

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents basic procedures for photovoltaic (PV) module parameters acquisition using MATLAB and Simulink modelling. In first step, MATLAB and Simulink theoretical model are set to calculate I-V and P-V characteristics for PV module based on equivalent electrical circuit. Then, limited I-V data string is obtained from examined PV module using standard measurement equipment at standard irradiation and temperature conditions and stated into MATLAB data matrix as a reference model. Next, the theoretical model is optimized to keep-up with the reference model and to learn its basic parameters relations, over sparse data matrix. Finally, PV module parameters are deliverable for acquisition at different realistic irradiation, temperature conditions as well as series resistance. Besides of output power characteristics and efficiency calculation for PV module or system, proposed model validates computing statistical deviation compared to reference model.

  14. Parameter estimation by genetic algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Reese, G.M.

    1993-11-01

    Test/Analysis correlation, or structural identification, is a process of reconciling differences in the structural dynamic models constructed analytically (using the finite element (FE) method) and experimentally (from modal test). This is a methodology for assessing the reliability of the computational model, and is very important in building models of high integrity, which may be used as predictive tools in design. Both the analytic and experimental models evaluate the same quantities: the natural frequencies (or eigenvalues, ({omega}{sub i}), and the mode shapes (or eigenvectors, {var_phi}). In this paper, selected frequencies are reconciled in the two models by modifying physical parameters in the FE model. A variety of parameters may be modified such as the stiffness of a joint member or the thickness of a plate. Engineering judgement is required to identify important frequencies, and to characterize the uncertainty of the model design parameters.

  15. Catalogue of HI PArameters (CHIPA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saponara, J.; Benaglia, P.; Koribalski, B.; Andruchow, I.

    2015-08-01

    The catalogue of HI parameters of galaxies HI (CHIPA) is the natural continuation of the compilation by M.C. Martin in 1998. CHIPA provides the most important parameters of nearby galaxies derived from observations of the neutral Hydrogen line. The catalogue contains information of 1400 galaxies across the sky and different morphological types. Parameters like the optical diameter of the galaxy, the blue magnitude, the distance, morphological type, HI extension are listed among others. Maps of the HI distribution, velocity and velocity dispersion can also be display for some cases. The main objective of this catalogue is to facilitate the bibliographic queries, through searching in a database accessible from the internet that will be available in 2015 (the website is under construction). The database was built using the open source `` mysql (SQL, Structured Query Language, management system relational database) '', while the website was built with ''HTML (Hypertext Markup Language)'' and ''PHP (Hypertext Preprocessor)''.

  16. Beyond two dark energy parameters.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Devdeep; Sullivan, Scott; Joudaki, Shahab; Amblard, Alexandre; Holz, Daniel E; Cooray, Asantha

    2008-06-20

    Our ignorance of dark energy is generally described by a two-parameter equation of state. In these approaches, a particular ad hoc functional form is assumed, and only two independent parameters are incorporated. We propose a model-independent, multiparameter approach to fitting dark energy and show that next-generation surveys will constrain the equation of state in three or more independent redshift bins to better than 10%. Future knowledge of dark energy will surpass two numbers (e.g., [w{0},w{1}] or [w{0},w{a}]), and we propose a more flexible approach to the analysis of present and future data.

  17. Statistical parameters for gloss evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Peiponen, Kai-Erik; Juuti, Mikko

    2006-02-13

    The measurement of minute changes in local gloss has not been presented in international standards due to a lack of suitable glossmeters. The development of a diffractive-element-based glossmeter (DOG) made it possible to detect local variation of gloss from planar and complex-shaped surfaces. Hence, a demand for proper statistical gloss parameters for classifying surface quality by gloss, similar to the standardized surface roughness classification, has become necessary. In this letter, we define statistical gloss parameters and utilize them as an example in the characterization of gloss from metal surface roughness standards by the DOG.

  18. Hubbard parameters for metallic Ce

    SciTech Connect

    Boring, A.M.; Albers, R.C.; Eriksson, O. ); Koelling, D.D. )

    1992-04-27

    We have obtained a phase diagram of the {alpha}{r arrow}{gamma} transition (moment formation) as a function of the {ital U} and {ital J} Kanamori Hubbard parameters. Overlap and hybridization terms are obtained by a tight-binding fit to first-principles band calculations. At the one-electron level we obtain no fundamental change in the interaction energies in going through the {alpha}{r arrow}{gamma} transition region. This is the first model to obtain self-consistent values for the Hubbard parameters in the solid state and they are in reasonable agreement with the experimentally derived values.

  19. Reconstruction of fundamental SUSY parameters

    SciTech Connect

    P. M. Zerwas et al.

    2003-09-25

    We summarize methods and expected accuracies in determining the basic low-energy SUSY parameters from experiments at future e{sup +}e{sup -} linear colliders in the TeV energy range, combined with results from LHC. In a second step we demonstrate how, based on this set of parameters, the fundamental supersymmetric theory can be reconstructed at high scales near the grand unification or Planck scale. These analyses have been carried out for minimal supergravity [confronted with GMSB for comparison], and for a string effective theory.

  20. Parameter extraction and transistor models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rykken, Charles; Meiser, Verena; Turner, Greg; Wang, QI

    1985-01-01

    Using specified mathematical models of the MOSFET device, the optimal values of the model-dependent parameters were extracted from data provided by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Three MOSFET models, all one-dimensional were used. One of the models took into account diffusion (as well as convection) currents. The sensitivity of the models was assessed for variations of the parameters from their optimal values. Lines of future inquiry are suggested on the basis of the behavior of the devices, of the limitations of the proposed models, and of the complexity of the required numerical investigations.

  1. Parameter identification in continuum models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Crowley, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Approximation techniques for use in numerical schemes for estimating spatially varying coefficients in continuum models such as those for Euler-Bernoulli beams are discussed. The techniques are based on quintic spline state approximations and cubic spline parameter approximations. Both theoretical and numerical results are presented.

  2. Evaluation of the Chromium Resonance Parameters Including Resonance Parameter Covariance

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, Luiz C; Derrien, Herve; Guber, Klaus H; Arbanas, Goran; Wiarda, Dorothea

    2011-01-01

    The intent of this work is to report the results and describe the procedures utilized to evaluate the chromium isotopes' cross sections, i.e., (50)Cr, (52)Cr, (53)Cr, and (54)Cr, for criticality safety applications. The evaluations were done in the resolved resonance region using the reduced Reich-Moore R-matrix formalism. The novel aspect of this evaluation is the inclusion of new transmission and capture cross-section measurements performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) for energies below 100 keV and the extension of the (53)Cr energy region. The resonance analysis was performed with the multilevel R-matrix code, SAMMY, which utilizes the generalized least-squares technique based on the Bayes' theory. Complete sets of resonance parameters and resonance parameter covariance matrices (RPCMs) were obtained for each of the chromium isotopes from the SAMMY analysis of the experimental database.

  3. GALAPAGOS: from pixels to parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barden, Marco; Häußler, Boris; Peng, Chien Y.; McIntosh, Daniel H.; Guo, Yicheng

    2012-05-01

    To automate source detection, two-dimensional light profile Sérsic modelling and catalogue compilation in large survey applications, we introduce a new code Galaxy Analysis over Large Areas: Parameter Assessment by GALFITting Objects from SEXTRACTOR (GALAPAGOS). Based on a single set-up, GALAPAGOS can process a complete set of survey images. It detects sources in the data, estimates a local sky background, cuts postage stamp images for all sources, prepares object masks, performs Sérsic fitting including neighbours and compiles all objects in a final output catalogue. For the initial source detection, GALAPAGOS applies SEXTRACTOR, while GALFIT is incorporated for modelling Sérsic profiles. It measures the background sky involved in the Sérsic fitting by means of a flux growth curve. GALAPAGOS determines postage stamp sizes based on SEXTRACTOR shape parameters. In order to obtain precise model parameters, GALAPAGOS incorporates a complex sorting mechanism and makes use of modern CPU's multiplexing capabilities. It combines SEXTRACTOR and GALFIT data in a single output table. When incorporating information from overlapping tiles, GALAPAGOS automatically removes multiple entries from identical sources. GALAPAGOS is programmed in the Interactive Data Language (IDL). We test the stability and the ability to properly recover structural parameters extensively with artificial image simulations. Moreover, we apply GALAPAGOS successfully to the STAGES data set. For one-orbit Hubble Space Telescope data, a single 2.2-GHz CPU processes about 1000 primary sources per 24 h. Note that GALAPAGOS results depend critically on the user-defined parameter set-up. This paper provides useful guidelines to help the user make sensible choices.

  4. Estimating random signal parameters from noisy images with nuisance parameters

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, Meredith Kathryn; Clarkson, Eric; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2008-01-01

    In a pure estimation task, an object of interest is known to be present, and we wish to determine numerical values for parameters that describe the object. This paper compares the theoretical framework, implementation method, and performance of two estimation procedures. We examined the performance of these estimators for tasks such as estimating signal location, signal volume, signal amplitude, or any combination of these parameters. The signal is embedded in a random background to simulate the effect of nuisance parameters. First, we explore the classical Wiener estimator, which operates linearly on the data and minimizes the ensemble mean-squared error. The results of our performance tests indicate that the Wiener estimator can estimate amplitude and shape once a signal has been located, but is fundamentally unable to locate a signal regardless of the quality of the image. Given these new results on the fundamental limitations of Wiener estimation, we extend our methods to include more complex data processing. We introduce and evaluate a scanning-linear estimator that performs impressively for location estimation. The scanning action of the estimator refers to seeking a solution that maximizes a linear metric, thereby requiring a global-extremum search. The linear metric to be optimized can be derived as a special case of maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation when the likelihood is Gaussian and a slowly varying covariance approximation is made. PMID:18545527

  5. SU-E-J-166: Sensitivity of Clinically Relevant Dosimetric Parameters to Contouring Uncertainty During Post Implant Dosimetry of Prostate Permanent Seed Implants

    SciTech Connect

    Mashouf, S; Ravi, A; Morton, G; Song, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: There is a strong evidence relating post-implant dosimetry for permanent seed prostate brachytherpy to local control rates. The delineation of the prostate on CT images, however, represents a challenge as it is difficult to confidently identify the prostate borders from soft tissue surrounding it. This study aims at quantifying the sensitivity of clinically relevant dosimetric parameters to prostate contouring uncertainty. Methods: The post-implant CT images and plans for a cohort of 43 patients, who have received I–125 permanent prostate seed implant in our centre, were exported to MIM Symphony LDR brachytherapy treatment planning system (MIM Software Inc., Cleveland, OH). The prostate contours in post-implant CT images were expanded/contracted uniformly for margins of ±1.00mm, ±2.00mm, ±3.00mm, ±4.00mm and ±5.00mm (±0.01mm). The values for V100 and D90 were extracted from Dose Volume Histograms for each contour and compared. Results: The mean value of V100 and D90 was obtained as 92.3±8.4% and 108.4±12.3% respectively (Rx=145Gy). V100 was reduced by −3.2±1.5%, −7.2±3.0%, −12.8±4.0%, −19.0±4.8%, − 25.5±5.4% for expanded contours of prostate with margins of +1mm, +2mm, +3mm, +4mm, and +5mm, respectively, while it was increased by 1.6±1.2%, 2.4±2.4%, 2.7±3.2%, 2.9±4.2%, 2.9±5.1% for the contracted contours. D90 was reduced by −6.9±3.5%, −14.5±6.1%, −23.8±7.1%, − 33.6±8.5%, −40.6±8.7% and increased by 4.1±2.6%, 6.1±5.0%, 7.2±5.7%, 8.1±7.3% and 8.1±7.3% for the same set of contours. Conclusion: Systematic expansion errors of more than 1mm may likely render a plan sub-optimal. Conversely contraction errors may Result in labeling a plan likely as optimal. The use of MRI images to contour the prostate should results in better delineation of prostate organ which increases the predictive value of post-op plans. Since observers tend to overestimate the prostate volume on CT, compared with MRI, the impact of the

  6. XPI: The Xanadu Parameter Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, N.; Barrett, P.; Oneel, B.; Jacobs, P.

    1992-01-01

    XPI is a table driven parameter interface which greatly simplifies both command driven programs such as BROWSE and XIMAGE as well as stand alone single-task programs. It moves all of the syntax and semantic parsing of commands and parameters out of the users code into common code and externally defined tables. This allows the programmer to concentrate on writing the code unique to the application rather than reinventing the user interface and for external graphical interfaces to interface with no changes to the command driven program. XPI also includes a compatibility library which allows programs written using the IRAF host interface (Mandel and Roll) to use XPI in place of the IRAF host interface.

  7. Identification of driver model parameters.

    PubMed

    Reński, A

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents a driver model, which can be used in a computer simulation of a curved ride of a car. The identification of the driver parameters consisted in a comparison of the results of computer calculations obtained for the driver-vehicle-environment model with different driver data sets with test results of the double lane-change manoeuvre (Standard No. ISO/TR 3888:1975, International Organization for Standardization [ISO], 1975) and the wind gust manoeuvre. The optimisation method allows to choose for each real driver a set of driver model parameters for which the differences between test and calculation results are smallest. The presented driver model can be used in investigating the driver-vehicle control system, which allows to adapt the car construction to the psychophysical characteristics of a driver.

  8. Demographic parameters and natural selection.

    PubMed

    Demetrius, L

    1974-12-01

    This paper introduces two new demographic parameters, the entropy and the reproductive potential of a population. The entropy of a population measures the variability of the contribution of the different age classes to the stationary age distribution. The reproductive potential measures the mean of the contribution of the different age classes to the growth rate. Using a relation between these measures and the Malthusian parameter, it is shown that in a random mating population in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, and under slow selection, the rate of change of entropy is equal to the genetic variance in entropy minus the genetic covariance of entropy and reproductive potential. This result is an analogue of Fisher's fundamental theorem of natural selection.

  9. Parameter-exploring policy gradients.

    PubMed

    Sehnke, Frank; Osendorfer, Christian; Rückstiess, Thomas; Graves, Alex; Peters, Jan; Schmidhuber, Jürgen

    2010-05-01

    We present a model-free reinforcement learning method for partially observable Markov decision problems. Our method estimates a likelihood gradient by sampling directly in parameter space, which leads to lower variance gradient estimates than obtained by regular policy gradient methods. We show that for several complex control tasks, including robust standing with a humanoid robot, this method outperforms well-known algorithms from the fields of standard policy gradients, finite difference methods and population based heuristics. We also show that the improvement is largest when the parameter samples are drawn symmetrically. Lastly we analyse the importance of the individual components of our method by incrementally incorporating them into the other algorithms, and measuring the gain in performance after each step.

  10. Failure probability under parameter uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Gerrard, R; Tsanakas, A

    2011-05-01

    In many problems of risk analysis, failure is equivalent to the event of a random risk factor exceeding a given threshold. Failure probabilities can be controlled if a decisionmaker is able to set the threshold at an appropriate level. This abstract situation applies, for example, to environmental risks with infrastructure controls; to supply chain risks with inventory controls; and to insurance solvency risks with capital controls. However, uncertainty around the distribution of the risk factor implies that parameter error will be present and the measures taken to control failure probabilities may not be effective. We show that parameter uncertainty increases the probability (understood as expected frequency) of failures. For a large class of loss distributions, arising from increasing transformations of location-scale families (including the log-normal, Weibull, and Pareto distributions), the article shows that failure probabilities can be exactly calculated, as they are independent of the true (but unknown) parameters. Hence it is possible to obtain an explicit measure of the effect of parameter uncertainty on failure probability. Failure probability can be controlled in two different ways: (1) by reducing the nominal required failure probability, depending on the size of the available data set, and (2) by modifying of the distribution itself that is used to calculate the risk control. Approach (1) corresponds to a frequentist/regulatory view of probability, while approach (2) is consistent with a Bayesian/personalistic view. We furthermore show that the two approaches are consistent in achieving the required failure probability. Finally, we briefly discuss the effects of data pooling and its systemic risk implications.

  11. Comment on Modified Stokes Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Vine, D.M.; Utku, C.

    2009-01-01

    It is common practice in passive microwave remote sensing (microwave radiometry) to express observables as temperatures and in the case of polarimetric radiometry to use what are called "Modified Stokes Parameters in Brightness Temperature" to describe the scene. However, definitions with slightly different normalization (with and without division by bandwidth) have appeared in the literature. The purpose of this manuscript is to present an analysis to clarify the meaning of terms in the definition and resolve the question of the proper normalization.

  12. GRCop-84 Rolling Parameter Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, William S.; Ellis, David L.

    2008-01-01

    This report is a section of the final report on the GRCop-84 task of the Constellation Program and incorporates the results obtained between October 2000 and September 2005, when the program ended. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has developed a new copper alloy, GRCop-84 (Cu-8 at.% Cr-4 at.% Nb), for rocket engine main combustion chamber components that will improve rocket engine life and performance. This work examines the sensitivity of GRCop-84 mechanical properties to rolling parameters as a means to better define rolling parameters for commercial warm rolling. Experiment variables studied were total reduction, rolling temperature, rolling speed, and post rolling annealing heat treatment. The responses were tensile properties measured at 23 and 500 C, hardness, and creep at three stress-temperature combinations. Understanding these relationships will better define boundaries for a robust commercial warm rolling process. The four processing parameters were varied within limits consistent with typical commercial production processes. Testing revealed that the rolling-related variables selected have a minimal influence on tensile, hardness, and creep properties over the range of values tested. Annealing had the expected result of lowering room temperature hardness and strength while increasing room temperature elongations with 600 C (1112 F) having the most effect. These results indicate that the process conditions to warm roll plate and sheet for these variables can range over wide levels without negatively impacting mechanical properties. Incorporating broader process ranges in future rolling campaigns should lower commercial rolling costs through increased productivity.

  13. IMPULSIVITY PARAMETER FOR SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Fajardo-Mendieta, W. G.; Alvarado-Gómez, J. D.; Calvo-Mozo, B.; Martinez-Oliveros, J. C. E-mail: bcalvom@unal.edu.co E-mail: jalvarad@eso.org

    2016-02-10

    Three phases are typically observed during solar flares: the preflare, impulsive, and decay phases. During the impulsive phase, it is believed that the electrons and other particles are accelerated after the stored energy in the magnetic field is released by reconnection. The impulsivity of a solar flare is a quantifiable property that shows how quickly this initial energy release occurs. It is measured via the impulsivity parameter, which we define as the inverse of the overall duration of the impulsive phase. We take the latter as the raw width of the most prominent nonthermal emission of the flare. We computed this observable over a work sample of 48 M-class events that occurred during the current Solar Cycle 24 by using three different methods. The first method takes into account all of the nonthermal flare emission and gives very accurate results, while the other two just cover fixed energy intervals (30–40 keV and 25–50 keV) and are useful for fast calculations. We propose an alternative way to classify solar flares according to their impulsivity parameter values, defining three different types of impulsivity, namely, high, medium, and low. This system of classification is independent of the manner used to calculated the impulsivity parameter. Lastly, we show the relevance of this tool as a discriminator of different HXR generation processes.

  14. Delayed recombination and cosmic parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Galli, Silvia; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Bean, Rachel; Silk, Joseph

    2008-09-15

    Current cosmological constraints from cosmic microwave background anisotropies are typically derived assuming a standard recombination scheme, however additional resonance and ionizing radiation sources can delay recombination, altering the cosmic ionization history and the cosmological inferences drawn from the cosmic microwave background data. We show that for recent observations of the cosmic microwave background anisotropy, from the Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe satellite mission (WMAP) 5-year survey and from the arcminute cosmology bolometer array receiver experiment, additional resonance radiation is nearly degenerate with variations in the spectral index, n{sub s}, and has a marked effect on uncertainties in constraints on the Hubble constant, age of the universe, curvature and the upper bound on the neutrino mass. When a modified recombination scheme is considered, the redshift of recombination is constrained to z{sub *}=1078{+-}11, with uncertainties in the measurement weaker by 1 order of magnitude than those obtained under the assumption of standard recombination while constraints on the shift parameter are shifted by 1{sigma} to R=1.734{+-}0.028. From the WMAP5 data we obtain the following constraints on the resonance and ionization sources parameters: {epsilon}{sub {alpha}}<0.39 and {epsilon}{sub i}<0.058 at 95% c.l.. Although delayed recombination limits the precision of parameter estimation from the WMAP satellite, we demonstrate that this should not be the case for future, smaller angular scales measurements, such as those by the Planck satellite mission.

  15. [Climatologic parameters and myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Larcan, A; Gilgenkrantz, J M; Stoltz, J F; Lambert, H; Laprevote-Heully, M C; Evrard, D; Kempf, J B; Lambert, J

    1983-01-01

    535 patients admitted to hospital with myocardium infarct which was confirmed in a determined period and within a 80 kilometers radius from a city of the East of France were compared to the meteorological parameters of the day when the infarct occurred and of the day preceding its occurrence. On one hand, climatic parameters were selected: atmospheric pressure, temperature of the air under shelter, relative humidity, wind speed and wind direction, hydrometeors and electrometeors; on the other hand, parameters of solar and planetary activity: daily flare index, AA index, Ap index or daily planetary index, phases of the moon. The analytic study concerning all acute vascular accidents (infarcts and cerebral accidents all together) enabled to us to notice a higher frequency of vascular accidents in various meteorological circumstances: atmospheric pressure lower than 990 mb, temperature lower than 12 degrees, wind of sector North to South-South West, hoar-frost with fog, rain, snow, first quarter of the moon, daily flare index lower than 530, magnetic activity lower than 6. A factorial analysis of correspondence enabled to us to understand the problem better and to determine "an infarct area" in which main meteorological factors appeared: low or decreasing atmospheric pressure, relative or increasing humidity, clear or increasing solar activity, steady magnetic activity; other factors could play an apparently less important role: low temperature, snow, decrease of wind speed, full moon, wind of sector East to North-East, South-South West. Consequently it appeared in that study that the occurrence of myocardium infarct corresponded to a climatic tendency corresponding to cold, bad or deteriorating weather.

  16. The Sequential Parameter Optimization Toolbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartz-Beielstein, Thomas; Lasarczyk, Christian; Preuss, Mike

    The sequential parameter optimization toolbox (SPOT) is one possible implementation of the SPO framework introduced in Chap. 2. It has been successfully applied to numerous heuristics for practical and theoretical optimization problems. We describe the mechanics and interfaces employed by SPOT to enable users to plug in their own algorithms. Furthermore, two case studies are presented to demonstrate how SPOT can be applied in practice, followed by a discussion of alternative metamodels to be plugged into it.We conclude with some general guidelines.

  17. Resonance parameter analysis with SAMMY

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, N.M.; Perey, F.G.

    1988-01-01

    The multilevel R-matrix computer code SAMMY has evolved over the past decade to become an important analysis tool for neutron data. SAMMY uses the Reich-Moore approximation to the multilevel R-matrix and includes an optional logarithmic parameterization of the external R-function. Doppler broadening is simulated either by numerical integration using the Gaussian approximation to the free gas model or by a more rigorous solution of the partial differential equation equivalent to the exact free gas model. Resolution broadening of cross sections and derivatives also has new options that more accurately represent the experimental situation. SAMMY treats constant normalization and some types of backgrounds directly and treats other normalizations and/or backgrounds with the introduction of user-generated partial derivatives. The code uses Bayes' method as an efficient alternative to least squares for fitting experimental data. SAMMY allows virtually any parameter to be varied and outputs values, uncertainties, and covariance matrix for all varied parameters. Versions of SAMMY exist for VAX, FPS, and IBM computers.

  18. Kinetic parameters from thermogravimetric analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    High performance polymeric materials are finding increased use in aerospace applications. Proposed high speed aircraft will require materials to withstand high temperatures in an oxidative atmosphere for long periods of time. It is essential that accurate estimates be made of the performance of these materials at the given conditions of temperature and time. Temperatures of 350 F (177 C) and times of 60,000 to 100,000 hours are anticipated. In order to survey a large number of high performance polymeric materials on a reasonable time scale, some form of accelerated testing must be performed. A knowledge of the rate of a process can be used to predict the lifetime of that process. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) has frequently been used to determine kinetic information for degradation reactions in polymeric materials. Flynn and Wall studied a number of methods for using TGA experiments to determine kinetic information in polymer reactions. Kinetic parameters, such as the apparent activation energy and the frequency factor, can be determined in such experiments. Recently, researchers at the McDonnell Douglas Research Laboratory suggested that a graph of the logarithm of the frequency factor against the apparent activation energy can be used to predict long-term thermo-oxidative stability for polymeric materials. Such a graph has been called a kinetic map. In this study, thermogravimetric analyses were performed in air to study the thermo-oxidative degradation of several high performance polymers and to plot their kinetic parameters on a kinetic map.

  19. Pathway parameter and thermonuclear functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathai, A. M.; Haubold, H. J.

    2008-04-01

    In the theory of thermonuclear reaction rates, analytical evaluation of thermonuclear functions for non-resonant reactions, including cases with cut-off and depletion of the tail of the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution function were considered in a series of papers by Mathai and Haubold [A.M. Mathai, H.J. Haubold, Modern Problems in Nuclear and Neutrino Astrophysics, Akademie-Verlag, Berlin, 1988]. In the present paper we study more general classes of thermonuclear functions by introducing a pathway parameter α, so that when α→1 the thermonuclear functions in the Maxwell-Boltzmannian case are recovered. We will also give interpretations for the pathway parameter α in the case of cut-off and in terms of moments. Non-extensive statistical mechanics, as developed by Tsallis [C. Tsallis, What should a statistical mechanics satisfy to reflect nature? Physica D 193 (2004) 3-34], provides the physical basis for the generalized thermonuclear functions considered in this paper.

  20. Schizophrenia--a parameters' game?

    PubMed

    Radulescu, Anca

    2008-09-07

    Schizophrenia is a severe, currently incurable, relatively common mental condition. Its symptoms are complex and widespread. It structurally and functionally affects cortical and subcortical regions involved in cognitive, emotional and motivational aspects of behavior. Its diagnosis is based on statistical behavior rather than on its actual cause and its treatment is elusive. We elaborate a theoretical paradigm that accounts for some of the most important features of this illness. Our nonlinear mathematical model, built upon recent hypotheses of neural vulnerability and limbic dysregulation, addresses the amygdala-hippocampus-prefrontal interactions and their evolution under perturbation. The dependence of the dynamics on the system's parameters offers an analytical context for the "normality/disease" dichotomy. The concept of bifurcation could be the key to understanding the threshold between these two states. The nonlinearity parameter (Lyapunov number) is responsible in our setup for tuning the limbic vulnerability characteristic to schizophrenia. Studying its effect on the dynamics helps us understand how stressful events and medication can switch the system from a regime of safety to one of instability, and conversely. The approach has potential for pre-symptomatic risk assessments and for long-term predictions.

  1. Measuring neutrino oscillation parameters using $\

    SciTech Connect

    Backhouse, Christopher James

    2011-01-01

    MINOS is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. It consists of two large steel-scintillator tracking calorimeters. The near detector is situated at Fermilab, close to the production point of the NuMI muon-neutrino beam. The far detector is 735 km away, 716m underground in the Soudan mine, Northern Minnesota. The primary purpose of the MINOS experiment is to make precise measurements of the 'atmospheric' neutrino oscillation parameters (Δmatm2 and sin2atm). The oscillation signal consists of an energy-dependent deficit of vμ interactions in the far detector. The near detector is used to characterize the properties of the beam before oscillations develop. The two-detector design allows many potential sources of systematic error in the far detector to be mitigated by the near detector observations. This thesis describes the details of the vμ-disappearance analysis, and presents a new technique to estimate the hadronic energy of neutrino interactions. This estimator achieves a significant improvement in the energy resolution of the neutrino spectrum, and in the sensitivity of the neutrino oscillation fit. The systematic uncertainty on the hadronic energy scale was re-evaluated and found to be comparable to that of the energy estimator previously in use. The best-fit oscillation parameters of the vμ-disappearance analysis, incorporating this new estimator were: Δm2 = 2.32-0.08+0.12 x 10-3 eV2, sin 2 2θ > 0.90 (90% C.L.). A similar analysis, using data from a period of running where the NuMI beam was operated in a configuration producing a predominantly $\\bar{v}$μ beam, yielded somewhat different best-fit parameters Δ$\\bar{m}${sup 2} = (3.36-0.40+0.46(stat.) ± 0.06(syst.)) x 10-3eV2, sin2 2$\\bar{θ}$ = 0.86-0.12_0.11

  2. Noncommutativity Parameter and Composite Fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jellal, Ahmed

    We determine some particular values of the noncommutativity parameter θ and show that the Murthy Shankar approach is in fact a particular case of a more general one. Indeed, using the fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE) experimental data, we give a measurement of θ. This measurement can be obtained by considering some values of the filling factor ν and other ingredients, magnetic field B and electron density ρ. Moreover, it is found that θ can be quantized either fractionally or integrally in terms of the magnetic length l0 and the quantization is exactly what Murthy and Shankar formulated recently for the FQHE. On the other hand, we show that the mapping of the FQHE in terms of the composite fermion basis has a noncommutative geometry nature and therefore there is a more general way than the Murthy Shankar method to do this mapping.

  3. Wearable vital parameters monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caramaliu, Radu Vadim; Vasile, Alexandru; Bacis, Irina

    2015-02-01

    The system we propose monitors body temperature, heart rate and beside this, it tracks if the person who wears it suffers a faint. It uses a digital temperature sensor, a pulse sensor and a gravitational acceleration sensor to monitor the eventual faint or small heights free falls. The system continuously tracks the GPS position when available and stores the last valid data. So, when measuring abnormal vital parameters the module will send an SMS, using the GSM cellular network , with the person's social security number, the last valid GPS position for that person, the heart rate, the body temperature and, where applicable, a valid fall alert or non-valid fall alert. Even though such systems exist, they contain only faint detection or heart rate detection. Usually there is a strong correlation between low/high heart rate and an eventual faint. Combining both features into one system results in a more reliable detection device.

  4. Imaging enhancement by reduction of mask topography induced phase aberrations for horizontal 1D spaces under D90Y illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Last, T.; de Winter, L.; Finders, J.

    2015-10-01

    EUV reticles need to be considered as complex optical elements in the beam path with considerable impact on lithography. Here we present a work flow for absorber optimization by applying a complementary approach of investigating lithographic metrics and mask-topography induced phase aberrations. In the first part this complementary approach is applied to find an optimum thickness of a typical Ta-based absorber for imaging horizontal spaces through pitch. And although an absorber thickness of around 70 nm is found to be preferable for this particular application, the thickness choice leads to conflicting results for the general printability of 10 nm technology node features. Hence we show that a moderate reduction of the absorber thickness can be allowed when the mask bias of these features is optimized appropriately. The moderate thickness reduction already allows for the mitigation of some of the conflicting imaging aspects. In the second part we expand the workflow by analyzing phase aberrations in n & k material space. This phase-based optical property screening shows that an alternative absorber based on materials such as Ni with k higher than Ta show superior best focus and contrast metrics. These alternative absorber embodiments would allow the overall reduction of M3D effects and adverse application dependencies of current Ta-based absorbers due to a combination of thickness reduction and enhancement of absorption.

  5. Stokes' Parameters Compared to Astrophysical Magnetic Turbulence Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forman, Miriam; Wicks, Robert; Oughton, Sean; Horbury, Timothy

    2015-04-01

    Since the divergence of a magnetic field is zero, the Fourier transform of fluctuations δB(k) must be perpendicular to k, so δB(k) has components only in the plane perpendicular to k. When there is also a mean field B, the obvious choice of coordinates to describe δB(k) are the unit vectors tin the directionB x k and p in the direction (Bxk) x k, called the ``toroidal'' and ``poloidal'' directions, respectively. Oughton, et al. (1997) as elucidated by Wicks et al. (2012) showed that the power spectral tensor Pij(k) of magnetic fluctuations is described by four scalar functions of k, multiplying the tensors t:t, p:p, t:p +p:t, and t:p-p:t so that the Hermitian Pij(k) = Tor(k) t:t + Pol(k) p:p + C(k) [t:p +p:t] + i kH(k) [t:p-p:t]. Since the electromagnetic fluctuations δB(k) and δE(k) in a beam of light are also perpendicular to their k, the four scalar functions of magnetic turbulence in astrophysics which scatters cosmic rays and allows their acceleration, are analogs of the Stokes' parameters. Using Chandrasekhar's (1960) notation [I,Q,U,V]: I = Tor + Pol = Tr(Pij(k); Q = Tor-Pol; U = C; we speculate that V corresponds to magnetic helicity kH in turbulence. We are studying projections of Pij(k) observed by spacecraft in the solar wind.

  6. System and method for motor parameter estimation

    DOEpatents

    Luhrs, Bin; Yan, Ting

    2014-03-18

    A system and method for determining unknown values of certain motor parameters includes a motor input device connectable to an electric motor having associated therewith values for known motor parameters and an unknown value of at least one motor parameter. The motor input device includes a processing unit that receives a first input from the electric motor comprising values for the known motor parameters for the electric motor and receive a second input comprising motor data on a plurality of reference motors, including values for motor parameters corresponding to the known motor parameters of the electric motor and values for motor parameters corresponding to the at least one unknown motor parameter value of the electric motor. The processor determines the unknown value of the at least one motor parameter from the first input and the second input and determines a motor management strategy for the electric motor based thereon.

  7. Multispectral vegetative canopy parameter retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borel, Christoph C.; Bunker, David J.

    2011-11-01

    Precision agriculture, forestry and environmental remote sensing are applications uniquely suited to the 8 bands that DigitalGlobe's WorldView-2 provides. At the fine spatial resolution of 0.5 m (panchromatic) and 2 m (multispectral) individual trees can be readily resolved. Recent research [1] has shown that it is possible for hyper-spectral data to invert plant reflectance spectra and estimate nitrogen content, leaf water content, leaf structure, canopy leaf area index and, for sparse canopies, also soil reflectance. The retrieval is based on inverting the SAIL (Scattering by Arbitrary Inclined Leaves) vegetation radiative transfer model for the canopy structure and the reflectance model PROSPECT4/5 for the leaf reflectance. Working on the paper [1] confirmed that a limited number of adjacent bands covering just the visible and near infrared can retrieve the parameters as well, opening up the possibility that this method can be used to analyze multi-spectral WV-2 data. Thus it seems possible to create WV-2 specific inversions using 8 bands and apply them to imagery of various vegetation covered surfaces of agricultural and environmental interest. The capability of retrieving leaf water content and nitrogen content has important applications in determining the health of vegetation, e.g. plant growth status, disease mapping, quantitative drought assessment, nitrogen deficiency, plant vigor, yield, etc.

  8. Structural Design Parameters for Germanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jon; Rogers, Richard; Baker, Eric

    2017-01-01

    The fracture toughness and slow crack growth parameters of germanium supplied as single crystal beams and coarse grain disks were measured. Although germanium is anisotropic (A* 1.7), it is not as anisotropic as SiC, NiAl, or Cu. Thus the fracture toughness was similar on the 100, 110, and 111 planes, however, measurements associated with randomly oriented grinding cracks were 6 to 30 higher. Crack extension in ring loaded disks occurred on the 111 planes due to both the lower fracture energy and the higher stresses on stiff 111 planes. Germanium exhibits a Weibull scale effect, but does not exhibit significant slow crack growth in distilled water. (n 100), implying that design for quasi static loading can be performed with scaled strength statistics. Practical values for engineering design are a fracture toughness of 0.69 0.02 MPam (megapascals per square root meter) and a Weibull modulus of m 6 2. For well ground and reasonable handled coupons, average fracture strength should be greater than 40 megapascals. Aggregate, polycrystalline elastic constants are Epoly 131 gigapascals, vpoly 0.22.

  9. Acoustic metamaterial with negative parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hongwei; Yan, Fei; Gu, Hao; Li, Ying

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we present theoretical results on an acoustic metamaterial beam and a bar that exhibit negative effective mass and negative effective stiffness. A one-dimensional acoustic metamaterial with an array of spring-mass subsystems was fabricated. The frequency of the acoustic one dimensional metamaterial structure has the same form as that of the permittivity in metals due to the plasma oscillation. We also provide a theory to explain the simulation results. And we use the concept of conventional mechanical vibration absorbers to reveal the actual working mechanism of the acoustic metamaterials. We explain the two vibrate modes which are optical mode and acoustic mode in detail. When the incoming elastic wave in the acoustic metamaterials to resonate the integrated spring-mass-damper absorbers to vibrate in their optical mode at frequencies close to but above their local resonance frequencies to create shear forces and bending moments to straighten the beam and stop the wave propagation. Moreover, we explain the negative parameter in acoustic metamaterials.

  10. Deformation parameters influencing prepreg tack

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, K.J.; Seferis, J.C. ); Pelton, T.; Wilhelm, M. )

    1992-01-01

    A compression to tension apparatus and a methodology capable of measuring prepreg tack have been analyzed in detail in order to establish fundamental material and operating characteristics. Both intrinsic and extrinsic parameters influencing prepreg tack were identified and analyzed using commercially available carbon fiber/epoxy prepregs and mechanical testing equipment. Two different factors, (1) contact (or wetting) area of adjacent prepreg plies and (2) viscoelastic properties of the prepreg, were found to control prepreg tack. At low temperatures, contact area was the main deformation controlling step, while at high temperatures, the viscoelastic property of the prepreg was found to be dominant. Both interlaminar and intralaminar deformations were observed depending on the prepreg systems examined as well as the operating conditions of the test. In addition, hold time, hold pressure, loading rate, resin content, and out-time were also found to affect prepreg tack. Energy of separation, which may be viewed as a descriptor of prepreg tack, was observed to increase with increasing hold time, hold pressure, and loading rate. Energy of separation also showed a maximum value at a specific resin content for a specific prepreg system, while it decreased with increasing prepreg out-time due to prepreg surface characteristic change rather than bulk physical aging. Conclusively, it was observed that prepreg tack must be viewed as an extrinsic, bulk, but surface-sensitive, viscoelastic property which depends on material as well as operating conditions.

  11. Dietary verbascoside supplementation in donkeys: effects on milk fatty acid profile during lactation, and serum biochemical parameters and oxidative markers.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, A G; Vizzarri, F; Palazzo, M; Martemucci, G

    2017-03-07

    Various uses of donkeys' milk have been recently proposed for human consumption on the basis of its nutritional characteristics. Improvements in milk fatty acid profile and animal oxidative status can be induced through dietary supplementation of phenolic compounds. The study aimed to evaluate in donkeys the effects of dietary supplementation with verbascoside (VB) on: (i) the fatty acid profile and vitamins A and E contents of milk during a whole lactation, and (ii) blood biochemical parameters and markers of oxidative status of the animals. At foaling, 12 lactating jennies were subdivided into two groups (n 6): control, without VB supplement; VB, receiving a lipid-encapsulated VB supplement. Gross composition, fatty acid profile and vitamins A and E contents in milk were assessed monthly over the 6 months of lactation. Serum total cholesterol, high-density lipoproteins cholesterol and low-density lipoproteins cholesterol, tryglicerides, non-esterified fatty acid, bilirubin, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase, reactive oxygen metabolites, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARs), vitamin A and vitamin E were evaluated at 8 days after foaling (D0) and then at D90, D105 and D120 of lactation. In milk, the VB supplementation decreased the saturated fatty acids (P<0.05) and increased the monounsaturated fatty acids (P<0.05), and vitamins A and E (P<0.01) values. On the serum parameters, the VB supplementation decreased total cholesterol (P<0.01), tryglicerides, bilirubin, ALT and TBARs, and increased (P<0.01) vitamin E. In conclusion, the VB dietary supplementation affects the nutritional quality of donkey's milk with a benefit on the oxidative status and serum lipidic profile of the animals.

  12. On Markov parameters in system identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phan, Minh; Juang, Jer-Nan; Longman, Richard W.

    1991-01-01

    A detailed discussion of Markov parameters in system identification is given. Different forms of input-output representation of linear discrete-time systems are reviewed and discussed. Interpretation of sampled response data as Markov parameters is presented. Relations between the state-space model and particular linear difference models via the Markov parameters are formulated. A generalization of Markov parameters to observer and Kalman filter Markov parameters for system identification is explained. These extended Markov parameters play an important role in providing not only a state-space realization, but also an observer/Kalman filter for the system of interest.

  13. [Dalbavancin: pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters].

    PubMed

    Azanza, José Ramón; Sádaba, Belén; Reis, Joana

    2017-01-01

    Dalbavancin is a new lipoglycopeptide antibiotic whose structure influences its pharmacokinetic profile. It is not absorbed after oral administration and is therefore administered intravenously. It is distributed through intracellular fluid, reaching adequate concentrations in the skin, bone, blister fluid and synovial fluid. Plasma protein binding is very high. Concentrations in brain tissue and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are inadequate. Excretion is through non-microsomal metabolism with inactive metabolites and through the kidneys by glomerular filtration. Dalbavancin is eliminated slowly, as shown by its clearance value and its terminal elimination half-life, which exceeds 300 hours. This means that adequate concentrations of the drug remain in plasma and tissues for a prolonged period and explains the dosing regimen: a first dose of 1g followed 7 days later by a 500mg dose. The pharmacokinetics are linear and show little intra- and interindividual variability. There are no pharmacokinetic interactions. Dose adjustment is not required for patients with mild or moderate renal insufficiency (creatinine clearance ≥ 30 to 79ml/min). Dosage adjustment is not required in patients regularly receiving elective haemodialysis (3 times/week) and the drug can be administered without consideration of haemodialysis times. In patients with chronic renal insufficiency, whose creatinine clearance is < 30ml/min and who are not regularly receiving elective haemodialysis, the recommended dose should be reduced to 750mg per week, followed 1 week later by 375mg. Dosage adjustment does not seem necessary in patients with liver failure or in older patients. There is no information on the most appropriate dosage in children. The pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamics parameter that best describes the effectiveness of dalbavancin is the ratio between the area under the curve and the minimum inhibitory concentration.

  14. Historical Analysis of Aircraft Flight Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, Robert E. (Inventor); Lawrence, Robert E. (Inventor); Chidester, Thomas R. (Inventor); Amidan, Brett G. (Inventor); Prothero, Gary L. (Inventor); Romanowski, Timothy P. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Method and system for analyzing and displaying one or more present flight parameter values (FP(t) of an aircraft in motion at a measurement time t(sub n), and for comparing the present flight parameter value with a selected percentage band, containing historical flight parameter data for similar conditions.

  15. Parameter Estimation using Numerical Merger Waveforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, J. I.; McWilliams, S.; Kelly, B.; Fahey, R.; Arnaud, K.; Baker, J.

    2008-01-01

    Results: Developed parameter estimation model integrating complete waveforms and improved instrumental models. Initial results for equal-mass non-spinning systems indicate moderate improvement in most parameters, significant improvement in some Near-term improvement: a) Improved statistics; b) T-channel; c) Larger parameter space coverage. Combination with other results: a) Higher harmonics; b) Spin precession; c) Instrumental effects.

  16. Understanding Parameter Invariance in Unidimensional IRT Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rupp, Andre A.; Zumbo, Bruno D.

    2006-01-01

    One theoretical feature that makes item response theory (IRT) models those of choice for many psychometric data analysts is parameter invariance, the equality of item and examinee parameters from different examinee populations or measurement conditions. In this article, using the well-known fact that item and examinee parameters are identical only…

  17. Cosmological parameter estimation using Particle Swarm Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, J.; Souradeep, T.

    2014-03-01

    Constraining parameters of a theoretical model from observational data is an important exercise in cosmology. There are many theoretically motivated models, which demand greater number of cosmological parameters than the standard model of cosmology uses, and make the problem of parameter estimation challenging. It is a common practice to employ Bayesian formalism for parameter estimation for which, in general, likelihood surface is probed. For the standard cosmological model with six parameters, likelihood surface is quite smooth and does not have local maxima, and sampling based methods like Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method are quite successful. However, when there are a large number of parameters or the likelihood surface is not smooth, other methods may be more effective. In this paper, we have demonstrated application of another method inspired from artificial intelligence, called Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) for estimating cosmological parameters from Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) data taken from the WMAP satellite.

  18. Parameter Identifiability of Fundamental Pharmacodynamic Models

    PubMed Central

    Janzén, David L. I.; Bergenholm, Linnéa; Jirstrand, Mats; Parkinson, Joanna; Yates, James; Evans, Neil D.; Chappell, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Issues of parameter identifiability of routinely used pharmacodynamics models are considered in this paper. The structural identifiability of 16 commonly applied pharmacodynamic model structures was analyzed analytically, using the input-output approach. Both fixed-effects versions (non-population, no between-subject variability) and mixed-effects versions (population, including between-subject variability) of each model structure were analyzed. All models were found to be structurally globally identifiable under conditions of fixing either one of two particular parameters. Furthermore, an example was constructed to illustrate the importance of sufficient data quality and show that structural identifiability is a prerequisite, but not a guarantee, for successful parameter estimation and practical parameter identifiability. This analysis was performed by generating artificial data of varying quality to a structurally identifiable model with known true parameter values, followed by re-estimation of the parameter values. In addition, to show the benefit of including structural identifiability as part of model development, a case study was performed applying an unidentifiable model to real experimental data. This case study shows how performing such an analysis prior to parameter estimation can improve the parameter estimation process and model performance. Finally, an unidentifiable model was fitted to simulated data using multiple initial parameter values, resulting in highly different estimated uncertainties. This example shows that although the standard errors of the parameter estimates often indicate a structural identifiability issue, reasonably “good” standard errors may sometimes mask unidentifiability issues. PMID:27994553

  19. On Interpreting the Model Parameters for the Three Parameter Logistic Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maris, Gunter; Bechger, Timo

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses two problems relating to the interpretability of the model parameters in the three parameter logistic model. First, it is shown that if the values of the discrimination parameters are all the same, the remaining parameters are nonidentifiable in a nontrivial way that involves not only ability and item difficulty, but also the…

  20. Star Tracker/Mapper: System Design Parameters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-09-01

    AD-A008 554 STAR TRACKER/MAPPER: SYSTEM’DESIGN PARAMETERS F. W. Schenkel Johns Hopkins University Prepared for: Naval Plant Representative Office...APLIJHU TG 1256 4. TITLE (andSubritle) 5. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Star Tracker/Mapper: System Design Parameters 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT...identify by block number) Design parameters Star tracker/mapper Optical sensors Optical trackers Spectral characteristics 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on

  1. Constitutive Parameter Measurement Using Double Ridge Waveguide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    CONSTITUTIVE PARAMETER MEASUREMENT USING DOUBLE RIDGE WAVEGUIDE THESIS Nathan J. Lehman, Captain, USAF AFIT-ENG-13-M-30 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE...copyright protection in the United States. AFIT-ENG-13-M-30 CONSTITUTIVE PARAMETER MEASUREMENT USING DOUBLE RIDGE WAVEGUIDE THESIS Presented to the Faculty...PARAMETER MEASUREMENT USING DOUBLE RIDGE WAVEGUIDE Nathan J. Lehman, B.S.E.E. Captain, USAF Approved: Michael Havrilla, PhD (Chairman) Maj Milo Hyde, PhD

  2. Screening parameters for the relativistic hydrogenic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzini, Fernando; Di Rocco, Héctor O.

    2015-12-01

    We present a Relativistic Screened Hydrogenic Model (RSHM) where the screening parameters depend on the variables (n , l , j) and the parameters (Z , N) . These screening parameters were derived theoretically in a neat form with no use of experimental values nor numerical values from self-consistent codes. The results of the model compare favorably with those obtained by using more sophisticated approaches. For the interested reader, a copy of our code can be requested from the corresponding author.

  3. Investigation of preparation parameters of nanosuspension by top-down media milling to improve the dissolution of poorly water-soluble glyburide.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sachin Kumar; Srinivasan, K K; Gowthamarajan, K; Singare, Dhananjay S; Prakash, Dev; Gaikwad, Narayan Babulal

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study was to identify and optimize formulation and process variables affecting characteristic and scale-up of nanosuspension manufacturing process on bead mill considering industrial perspective. Formulation factors evaluated were ratio of polymer to drug and ratio of surfactant to drug, whereas process parameters were milling time and milling speed. Responses measured in this study include zeta potential and mean particle size d(90). The test revealed that ratio of polymer to drug and milling speed have significant effect on zeta potential whereas milling time and milling speed have significant effect on the particle size distribution of nanosuspension. The X-ray powder diffraction pattern of drug milled at high and low speed reveals no form conversion when compared with unmilled drug. The formulated nanosuspension has shown a faster dissolution profile (98.97% in 10 min), relative to that of raw glyburide (18.17% in 10 min), mainly due to the formation of nanosized particles. The ANOVA test revealed that there was no significant difference in the dissolution profiles of fresh and aged nanosuspension. These results indicate the suitability of formulation procedure for preparation of nanosized poorly water-soluble drug with significantly improved in vitro dissolution rate and thus possibly enhance fast onset of therapeutic drug effect.

  4. Change of coagulation parameters after double plateletpheresis.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Mustafa; Dikmen, Tamer; Sonmez, Mehmet; Akdogan, Elif; Durmus, Ahmet; Omay, Serdar Bedii; Ovali, Ercument

    2007-10-01

    In the previous studies, some authors reported that automated apheresis leads to a hypercoagulable state. We tried to find out changes in coagulation parameters after double plateletpheresis in this study. Forty-five donors were recruited to the study, and coagulation parameters were assessed before and after double plateletpheresis. After double plateletpheresis, fibrinogen, factor V, factor VIII and factor IX were decreased compared with the values before apheresis. Although serum levels of this coagulation parameters are decreasing, they are still in the normal limits. Therefore, we suggest that double plateletpheresis is a safe procedure for healthy volunteers taking into account these coagulation parameters.

  5. Useful Scaling Parameters for the Pulse Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. M.; Kittel, P.; Timmerhaus, K. D.; Radebaugh, R.; Cheng, Pearl L. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A set of eight non-dimensional scaling parameters for use in evaluating the performance of Pulse Tube Refrigerators is presented. The parameters result after scaling the mass, momentum and energy conservation equations for an axisymmetric, two-dimensional system. The physical interpretation of the parameters are described, and their usefulness is outlined for the enthalpy flow tube (open tube of the pulse tube). The scaling parameters allow the experimentalist to characterize three types of transport: enthalpy flow, mass streaming and heat transfer between the gas and the tube. Also reported are the results from a flow visualization experiment in which steady mass streaming in compressible oscillating flow is observed.

  6. On the Interpretation of Scattering Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Jon C.

    1999-01-01

    This short paper is in response to one that appeared in this journal a few years ago [2]. The article was a comment on a previous paper [1], which presented the transformation equations between the standard two-port parameters. The equations were stated to be valid for complex terminations; which are useful when S-parameters are treated. The authors in [2] made some incorrect conclusions concerning the concept of "generalized scattering parameters", and this paper seeks to clarify the somewhat confusing area of generalized scattering parameters.

  7. Quantifying uncertainty in state and parameter estimation.

    PubMed

    Parlitz, Ulrich; Schumann-Bischoff, Jan; Luther, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    Observability of state variables and parameters of a dynamical system from an observed time series is analyzed and quantified by means of the Jacobian matrix of the delay coordinates map. For each state variable and each parameter to be estimated, a measure of uncertainty is introduced depending on the current state and parameter values, which allows us to identify regions in state and parameter space where the specific unknown quantity can(not) be estimated from a given time series. The method is demonstrated using the Ikeda map and the Hindmarsh-Rose model.

  8. Parameter Estimation of Partial Differential Equation Models.

    PubMed

    Xun, Xiaolei; Cao, Jiguo; Mallick, Bani; Carroll, Raymond J; Maity, Arnab

    2013-01-01

    Partial differential equation (PDE) models are commonly used to model complex dynamic systems in applied sciences such as biology and finance. The forms of these PDE models are usually proposed by experts based on their prior knowledge and understanding of the dynamic system. Parameters in PDE models often have interesting scientific interpretations, but their values are often unknown, and need to be estimated from the measurements of the dynamic system in the present of measurement errors. Most PDEs used in practice have no analytic solutions, and can only be solved with numerical methods. Currently, methods for estimating PDE parameters require repeatedly solving PDEs numerically under thousands of candidate parameter values, and thus the computational load is high. In this article, we propose two methods to estimate parameters in PDE models: a parameter cascading method and a Bayesian approach. In both methods, the underlying dynamic process modeled with the PDE model is represented via basis function expansion. For the parameter cascading method, we develop two nested levels of optimization to estimate the PDE parameters. For the Bayesian method, we develop a joint model for data and the PDE, and develop a novel hierarchical model allowing us to employ Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques to make posterior inference. Simulation studies show that the Bayesian method and parameter cascading method are comparable, and both outperform other available methods in terms of estimation accuracy. The two methods are demonstrated by estimating parameters in a PDE model from LIDAR data.

  9. Psychometric Consequences of Subpopulation Item Parameter Drift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins-Manley, Anne Corinne

    2017-01-01

    This study defines subpopulation item parameter drift (SIPD) as a change in item parameters over time that is dependent on subpopulations of examinees, and hypothesizes that the presence of SIPD in anchor items is associated with bias and/or lack of invariance in three psychometric outcomes. Results show that SIPD in anchor items is associated…

  10. Parameters and controlling of plasma chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuji, O.

    1981-01-01

    The parameters involved in plasma polymerization reactions are examined and the use of these parameters in the control of plasma reactions is dicussed. The variables associated with the reaction chamber, electrical discharge form, frequency and electrical source for the development of plasma, and monitoring techniques are addressed.

  11. Control technology development. [distributed parameter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, G.

    1981-01-01

    Static and dynamic control design approaches were developed for distributed parameter systems. A hardware flexible beam facility was constructed to demonstrate and verify the theoretical control concepts. Efforts were made in the area of model order estimation for control systems with uncertain or time varying parameters.

  12. Influence parameters of impact grinding mills

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoeffl, K.; Husemann, K.; Goldacker, H.

    1984-01-01

    Significant parameters for impact grinding mills were investigated. Final particle size was used to evaluate grinding results. Adjustment of the parameters toward increased charge load results in improved efficiency; however, it was not possible to define a single, unified set to optimum grinding conditions.

  13. Two Interpretations of the Discrimination Parameter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuerlinckx, Francis; De Boeck, Paul

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we propose two interpretations for the discrimination parameter in the two-parameter logistic model (2PLM). The interpretations are based on the relation between the 2PLM and two stochastic models. In the first interpretation, the 2PLM is linked to a diffusion model so that the probability of absorption equals the 2PLM. The…

  14. RESEARCH NOTE : Inversion for multiple parameter classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennett, B. L. N.; Sambridge, M.

    1998-10-01

    Many geophysical data, such as the frequencies of the free oscillations of the Earth, depend on more than one type of model parameter. For inverse problems depending on multiple parameter classes, an iterative solution procedure is introduced in which each parameter class can be treated in the same way. This approach has considerable advantages where a large number of parameters are employed, but can still be useful for smaller systems. The iteration by parameter class commences by solving for the direct dependence on a particular parameter class, and at subsequent iterations the cross-dependences between classes are introduced. The update affects only the right-hand side of the equations, and, because the same sets of equations have to be solved at each iteration, an efficient computational implementation can be made. The largest set of equations that has to be solved at a time corresponds to the number of variables in an individual parameter class rather than the full set of parameters, which confers substantial computational benefits for very large problems.

  15. Neutron Resonance Parameters for Cm-242 (Curium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Volume 24 `Neutron Resonance Parameters' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It provides the neutron resonance parameters for the isotope Cm-242 (Curium).

  16. Neutron Resonance Parameters for Np-237 (Neptunium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Volume 24 `Neutron Resonance Parameters' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It provides the neutron resonance parameters for the isotope Np-237 (Neptunium).

  17. Visualization of parameter space for image analysis.

    PubMed

    Pretorius, A Johannes; Bray, Mark-Anthony P; Carpenter, Anne E; Ruddle, Roy A

    2011-12-01

    Image analysis algorithms are often highly parameterized and much human input is needed to optimize parameter settings. This incurs a time cost of up to several days. We analyze and characterize the conventional parameter optimization process for image analysis and formulate user requirements. With this as input, we propose a change in paradigm by optimizing parameters based on parameter sampling and interactive visual exploration. To save time and reduce memory load, users are only involved in the first step--initialization of sampling--and the last step--visual analysis of output. This helps users to more thoroughly explore the parameter space and produce higher quality results. We describe a custom sampling plug-in we developed for CellProfiler--a popular biomedical image analysis framework. Our main focus is the development of an interactive visualization technique that enables users to analyze the relationships between sampled input parameters and corresponding output. We implemented this in a prototype called Paramorama. It provides users with a visual overview of parameters and their sampled values. User-defined areas of interest are presented in a structured way that includes image-based output and a novel layout algorithm. To find optimal parameter settings, users can tag high- and low-quality results to refine their search. We include two case studies to illustrate the utility of this approach.

  18. Estimating nuisance parameters in inverse problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravkin, Aleksandr Y.; van Leeuwen, Tristan

    2012-11-01

    Many inverse problems include nuisance parameters which, while not of direct interest, are required to recover primary parameters. The structure of these problems allows efficient optimization strategies—a well-known example is variable projection, where nonlinear least-squares problems which are linear in some parameters can be very efficiently optimized. In this paper, we extend the idea of projecting out a subset over the variables to a broad class of maximum likelihood and maximum a posteriori likelihood problems with nuisance parameters, such as variance or degrees of freedom (d.o.f.). As a result, we are able to incorporate nuisance parameter estimation into large-scale constrained and unconstrained inverse problem formulations. We apply the approach to a variety of problems, including estimation of unknown variance parameters in the Gaussian model, d.o.f. parameter estimation in the context of robust inverse problems, and automatic calibration. Using numerical examples, we demonstrate improvement in recovery of primary parameters for several large-scale inverse problems. The proposed approach is compatible with a wide variety of algorithms and formulations, and its implementation requires only minor modifications to existing algorithms.

  19. Linking Item Parameters to a Base Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Taehoon; Petersen, Nancy S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper compares three methods of item calibration--concurrent calibration, separate calibration with linking, and fixed item parameter calibration--that are frequently used for linking item parameters to a base scale. Concurrent and separate calibrations were implemented using BILOG-MG. The Stocking and Lord in "Appl Psychol Measure"…

  20. Coordinate transformation by minimizing correlations between parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, M.

    1972-01-01

    This investigation was to determine the transformation parameters (three rotations, three translations and a scale factor) between two Cartesian coordinate systems from sets of coordinates given in both systems. The objective was the determination of well separated transformation parameters with reduced correlations between each other, a problem especially relevant when the sets of coordinates are not well distributed. The above objective is achieved by preliminarily determining the three rotational parameters and the scale factor from the respective direction cosines and chord distances (these being independent of the translation parameters) between the common points, and then computing all the seven parameters from a solution in which the rotations and the scale factor are entered as weighted constraints according to their variances and covariances obtained in the preliminary solutions. Numerical tests involving two geodetic reference systems were performed to evaluate the effectiveness of this approach.

  1. Variable deceleration parameter and dark energy models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishi, Binaya K.

    2016-03-01

    This paper deals with the Bianchi type-III dark energy model and equation of state parameter in a first class of f(R,T) gravity. Here, R and T represents the Ricci scalar and trace of the energy momentum tensor, respectively. The exact solutions of the modified field equations are obtained by using (i) linear relation between expansion scalar and shear scalar, (ii) linear relation between state parameter and skewness parameter and (iii) variable deceleration parameter. To obtain the physically plausible cosmological models, the variable deceleration parameter with the suitable substitution leads to the scale factor of the form a(t) = [sinh(αt)] 1 n, where α and n > 0 are arbitrary constants. It is observed that our models are accelerating for 0 < n < 1 and for n > 1, transition phase from deceleration to acceleration. Further, we have discussed physical properties of the models.

  2. Hyperspectral signature analysis of skin parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, Saurabh; Banerjee, Amit; Garza, Luis; Kang, Sewon; Burlina, Philippe

    2013-02-01

    The temporal analysis of changes in biological skin parameters, including melanosome concentration, collagen concentration and blood oxygenation, may serve as a valuable tool in diagnosing the progression of malignant skin cancers and in understanding the pathophysiology of cancerous tumors. Quantitative knowledge of these parameters can also be useful in applications such as wound assessment, and point-of-care diagnostics, amongst others. We propose an approach to estimate in vivo skin parameters using a forward computational model based on Kubelka-Munk theory and the Fresnel Equations. We use this model to map the skin parameters to their corresponding hyperspectral signature. We then use machine learning based regression to develop an inverse map from hyperspectral signatures to skin parameters. In particular, we employ support vector machine based regression to estimate the in vivo skin parameters given their corresponding hyperspectral signature. We build on our work from SPIE 2012, and validate our methodology on an in vivo dataset. This dataset consists of 241 signatures collected from in vivo hyperspectral imaging of patients of both genders and Caucasian, Asian and African American ethnicities. In addition, we also extend our methodology past the visible region and through the short-wave infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum. We find promising results when comparing the estimated skin parameters to the ground truth, demonstrating good agreement with well-established physiological precepts. This methodology can have potential use in non-invasive skin anomaly detection and for developing minimally invasive pre-screening tools.

  3. Exploiting intrinsic fluctuations to identify model parameters.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Christoph; Sahle, Sven; Pahle, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    Parameterisation of kinetic models plays a central role in computational systems biology. Besides the lack of experimental data of high enough quality, some of the biggest challenges here are identification issues. Model parameters can be structurally non-identifiable because of functional relationships. Noise in measured data is usually considered to be a nuisance for parameter estimation. However, it turns out that intrinsic fluctuations in particle numbers can make parameters identifiable that were previously non-identifiable. The authors present a method to identify model parameters that are structurally non-identifiable in a deterministic framework. The method takes time course recordings of biochemical systems in steady state or transient state as input. Often a functional relationship between parameters presents itself by a one-dimensional manifold in parameter space containing parameter sets of optimal goodness. Although the system's behaviour cannot be distinguished on this manifold in a deterministic framework it might be distinguishable in a stochastic modelling framework. Their method exploits this by using an objective function that includes a measure for fluctuations in particle numbers. They show on three example models, immigration-death, gene expression and Epo-EpoReceptor interaction, that this resolves the non-identifiability even in the case of measurement noise with known amplitude. The method is applied to partially observed recordings of biochemical systems with measurement noise. It is simple to implement and it is usually very fast to compute. This optimisation can be realised in a classical or Bayesian fashion.

  4. Parameter identification of civil engineering structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, J. N.; Sun, C. T.

    1980-01-01

    This paper concerns the development of an identification method required in determining structural parameter variations for systems subjected to an extended exposure to the environment. The concept of structural identifiability of a large scale structural system in the absence of damping is presented. Three criteria are established indicating that a large number of system parameters (the coefficient parameters of the differential equations) can be identified by a few actuators and sensors. An eight-bay-fifteen-story frame structure is used as example. A simple model is employed for analyzing the dynamic response of the frame structure.

  5. Transmission Electron Microscope Measures Lattice Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pike, William T.

    1996-01-01

    Convergent-beam microdiffraction (CBM) in thermionic-emission transmission electron microscope (TEM) is technique for measuring lattice parameters of nanometer-sized specimens of crystalline materials. Lattice parameters determined by use of CBM accurate to within few parts in thousand. Technique developed especially for use in quantifying lattice parameters, and thus strains, in epitaxial mismatched-crystal-lattice multilayer structures in multiple-quantum-well and other advanced semiconductor electronic devices. Ability to determine strains in indivdual layers contributes to understanding of novel electronic behaviors of devices.

  6. Dual Operating Parameter Relationship with Engine Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi. I, Aparna; Ramesh, R.; Kumar, N. Ravi; Charan, G. Shiva

    2016-11-01

    In order to reduce emissions and maximize performance of internal combustion engines, it is important to understand the relationship between operating parameters and performance. Estimation of engine performance under simultaneous variation of operating parameters is not well addressed in literature. In the present work an attempt has been made to develop a relationship between engine performance (brake thermal efficiency) and operating parameters such as load and compression ratio. Experiments were conducted varying load and compression ratio and Brake Thermal Effiency obtained was recorded. The results of the model were validated with the experimental results.

  7. Manifold parameter space and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Atsushi

    2004-11-01

    We review the several features of the new parameter space which we presented in the previous paper, and show the differentiable manifold properties of this parameter space coordinate. Using this parameter coordinate we calculate three Feynman amplitudes of the vacuum polarization with a gluon loop, a quark loop and a ghost loop in QCD and show that the results are perfectly equal to those of the usual calculations by the Feynman parametrization technique in the scheme of the dimensional regularization. Then we try to calculate the anomalous magnetic moment of an on-shell quark in QCD by using the dimensional regularization, our new parametrization and integral method.

  8. ZASPE: Zonal Atmospheric Stellar Parameters Estimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahm, Rafael; Jordan, Andres; Hartman, Joel; Bakos, Gaspar

    2016-07-01

    ZASPE (Zonal Atmospheric Stellar Parameters Estimator) computes the atmospheric stellar parameters (Teff, log(g), [Fe/H] and vsin(i)) from echelle spectra via least squares minimization with a pre-computed library of synthetic spectra. The minimization is performed only in the most sensitive spectral zones to changes in the atmospheric parameters. The uncertainities and covariances computed by ZASPE assume that the principal source of error is the systematic missmatch between the observed spectrum and the sythetic one that produces the best fit. ZASPE requires a grid of synthetic spectra and can use any pre-computed library minor modifications.

  9. Material parameter determination from scattering measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominek, A.; Park, A.; Peters, L., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The electrical, macroscopic performance of isotropic material can generally be described through their constitutive scalar parameters, permittivity and permeability which are symbolically represented by epsilon and mu, respectively. These parameters relate the electric and magnetic flux densities to the electric and magnetic fields through the following relationships: (1) D=epsilonE; and (2) B=muH. It is through these parameters that the interaction of electromagnetic waves with material can be quantized in terms of reflection and transmission coefficients, and propagation and attenuation factors.

  10. Constitutive parameter measurements of lossy materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominek, A.; Park, A.

    1989-01-01

    The electrical constitutive parameters of lossy materials are considered. A discussion of the NRL arch for lossy coatings is presented involving analytical analyses of the reflected field using the geometrical theory of diffraction (GTD) and physical optics (PO). The actual values for these parameters can be obtained through a traditional transmission technique which is examined from an error analysis standpoint. Alternate sample geometries are suggested for this technique to reduce sample tolerance requirements for accurate parameter determination. The performance for one alternate geometry is given.

  11. Guideline for Deciding Physical Parameters for Acrobot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, Atsushi; Watanabe, Ryo

    This paper presents a guideline for deciding physical parameters for the Acrobot, a typical example of two-link underactuated robots. A set of physical parameters for the Acrobot is determined using an evaluation function, which is derived by analyzing the robustness of an existing swing-up controller for the Acrobot. A typical set of physical parameters used in many papers are then evaluated using our evaluation function, and the validity and performance of our proposed guideline are studied with a series of simulations.

  12. Classification of hydrological parameter sensitivity and evaluation of parameter transferability across 431 US MOPEX basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Huiying; Hou, Zhangshuan; Huang, Maoyi; Bao, Jie; Sun, Yu; Tesfa, Teklu; Ruby Leung, L.

    2016-05-01

    The Community Land Model (CLM) represents physical, chemical, and biological processes of the terrestrial ecosystems that interact with climate across a range of spatial and temporal scales. As CLM includes numerous sub-models and associated parameters, the high-dimensional parameter space presents a formidable challenge for quantifying uncertainty and improving Earth system predictions needed to assess environmental changes and risks. This study aims to evaluate the potential of transferring hydrologic model parameters in CLM through sensitivity analyses and classification across watersheds from the Model Parameter Estimation Experiment (MOPEX) in the United States. The sensitivity of CLM-simulated water and energy fluxes to hydrological parameters across 431 MOPEX basins are first examined using an efficient stochastic sampling-based sensitivity analysis approach. Linear, interaction, and high-order nonlinear impacts are all identified via statistical tests and stepwise backward removal parameter screening. The basins are then classified according to their parameter sensitivity patterns (internal attributes), as well as their hydrologic indices/attributes (external hydrologic factors) separately, using Principal component analysis (PCA) and expectation-maximization (EM) - based clustering approach. Similarities and differences among the parameter sensitivity-based classification system (S-Class), the hydrologic indices-based classification (H-Class), and the Koppen climate classification systems (K-Class) are discussed. Within each parameter sensitivity-based classification system (S-Class) with similar parameter sensitivity characteristics, similar inversion modeling setups can be used for parameter calibration, and the parameters and their contribution or significance to water and energy cycling may also be more transferrable. This classification study provides guidance on identifiable parameters, and on parameterization and inverse model design for CLM but the

  13. Fixing the c Parameter in the Three-Parameter Logistic Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Kyung T.

    2012-01-01

    For several decades, the "three-parameter logistic model" (3PLM) has been the dominant choice for practitioners in the field of educational measurement for modeling examinees' response data from multiple-choice (MC) items. Past studies, however, have pointed out that the c-parameter of 3PLM should not be interpreted as a guessing parameter. This…

  14. Sample Size and Item Parameter Estimation Precision When Utilizing the One-Parameter "Rasch" Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Custer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between sample size and item parameter estimation precision when utilizing the one-parameter model. Item parameter estimates are examined relative to "true" values by evaluating the decline in root mean squared deviation (RMSD) and the number of outliers as sample size increases. This occurs across…

  15. Information Conversion, Effective Samples, and Parameter Size

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiaodong; Pittman, Jennifer; Clarke, Bertrand

    2008-01-01

    Consider the relative entropy between a posterior density for a parameter given a sample and a second posterior density for the same parameter, based on a different model and a different data set. Then the relative entropy can be minimized over the second sample to get a virtual sample that would make the second posterior as close as possible to the first in an informational sense. If the first posterior is based on a dependent dataset and the second posterior uses an independence model, the effective inferential power of the dependent sample is transferred into the independent sample by the optimization. Examples of this optimization are presented for models with nuisance parameters, finite mixture models, and models for correlated data. Our approach is also used to choose the effective parameter size in a Bayesian hierarchical model. PMID:19079764

  16. Integral data analysis for resonance parameters determination

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, N.M.; Leal, L.C.; Derrien, H.

    1997-09-01

    Neutron time-of-flight experiments have long been used to determine resonance parameters. Those resonance parameters have then been used in calculations of integral quantities such as Maxwellian averages or resonance integrals, and results of those calculations in turn have been used as a criterion for acceptability of the resonance analysis. However, the calculations were inadequate because covariances on the parameter values were not included in the calculations. In this report an effort to correct for that deficiency is documented: (1) the R-matrix analysis code SAMMY has been modified to include integral quantities of importance, (2) directly within the resonance parameter analysis, and (3) to determine the best fit to both differential (microscopic) and integral (macroscopic) data simultaneously. This modification was implemented because it is expected to have an impact on the intermediate-energy range that is important for criticality safety applications.

  17. Optical components damage parameters database system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yizheng; Li, Xinglan; Jin, Yuquan; Xie, Dongmei; Tang, Dingyong

    2012-10-01

    Optical component is the key to large-scale laser device developed by one of its load capacity is directly related to the device output capacity indicators, load capacity depends on many factors. Through the optical components will damage parameters database load capacity factors of various digital, information technology, for the load capacity of optical components to provide a scientific basis for data support; use of business processes and model-driven approach, the establishment of component damage parameter information model and database systems, system application results that meet the injury test optical components business processes and data management requirements of damage parameters, component parameters of flexible, configurable system is simple, easy to use, improve the efficiency of the optical component damage test.

  18. GTE_TRACEP_DC8 Parameters 7

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-02-18

    ... Parameters:  IR Aerosol Scattering Ratio (1064 nm) Composite Tropospheric Ozone Cross-Sections Tropopause heights ... Scattering Ratio (587 nm) Visible Aerosol Depolarization (1064 nm) SCAR-B Block:  SCAR-B Products ...

  19. Thermodynamic consistency of the interaction parameter formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srikanth, S.; Jacob, K. T.

    1988-04-01

    The apparent contradiction between the exact nature of the interaction parameter formalism as presented by Lupis and Elliott and the inconsistencies discussed recently by Pelton and Bale arise from the truncation of the Maclaurin series in the latter treatment. The truncation removes the exactness of the expression for the logarithm of the activity coefficient of a solute in a multi-component system. The integrals are therefore path dependent. Formulae for integration along paths of constant Xi, or X i/Xj are presented. The expression for In γsolvent given by Pelton and Bale is valid only in the limit that the mole fraction of solvent tends to one. The truncation also destroys the general relations between interaction parameters derived by Lupis and Elliott. For each specific choice of parameters special relationships are obtained between interaction parameters.

  20. Efficient computation of parameter confidence intervals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Patrick C.

    1987-01-01

    An important step in system identification of aircraft is the estimation of stability and control derivatives from flight data along with an assessment of parameter accuracy. When the maximum likelihood estimation technique is used, parameter accuracy is commonly assessed by the Cramer-Rao lower bound. It is known, however, that in some cases the lower bound can be substantially different from the parameter variance. Under these circumstances the Cramer-Rao bounds may be misleading as an accuracy measure. This paper discusses the confidence interval estimation problem based on likelihood ratios, which offers a more general estimate of the error bounds. Four approaches are considered for computing confidence intervals of maximum likelihood parameter estimates. Each approach is applied to real flight data and compared.

  1. Thermophysical parameters of the LBO crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Grechin, Sergei G; Zuev, A V; Fokin, A S; Kokh, Aleksandr E; Moiseev, N V; Popov, Petr A; Sidorov, Aleksei A

    2010-08-27

    The thermophysical parameters (linear thermal expansion coefficients, thermal conductivities, and heat capacity) of the lithium triborate (LBO) crystal are measured and compared with previously published data. (nonlinear-optics phenomena)

  2. Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Foundation parameter study

    SciTech Connect

    Lodde, P.F.

    1980-07-01

    The dynamic failure criterion governing the dimensions of prototype Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Foundations is treated as a variable parameter. The resulting change in foundation dimensions and costs is examined.

  3. Earth Rotation Parameters from DSN VLBI: 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steppe, J. A.; Oliveau, S. H.; Sovers, O. J.

    1994-01-01

    In this report, Earth Rotation Parameter (ERP) estimates ahve been obtained from an analysis of Deep Space Network (DSN) VLBI data that directly aligns its celestial and terrestrial reference frames with those of the International Earth Rotation Service (IERS).

  4. Component temperature versus laser-welding parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, W.H.

    1983-01-01

    Applications have arisen in which the component temperature near a laser weld is critical because of possible damage to the explosive powder adjacent to the member being welded. To evaluate the thermal excursion experienced at the powder cavity wall, a study was conducted using assemblies that had been equipped with 0.05 mm diameter thermocouple wires. The main goal of the study was to determine how changes in the laser welding parameters owuld affect the powder cavity wall temperature. The objective lens-to-work distance, pulse rate, and beam power parameters were varied. The peak temperature varied from 117/sup 0/C to 311/sup 0/C in response to welding parameter changes. The study concluded that by utilizing a selected set of welding parameters, the design requirement of a 160/sup 0/C maximum powder cavity wall temperature could easily be satisfied.

  5. Parameter identification for nonlinear aerodynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, Allan E.

    1990-01-01

    Parameter identification for nonlinear aerodynamic systems is examined. It is presumed that the underlying model can be arranged into an input/output (I/O) differential operator equation of a generic form. The algorithm estimation is especially efficient since the equation error can be integrated exactly given any I/O pair to obtain an algebraic function of the parameters. The algorithm for parameter identification was extended to the order determination problem for linear differential system. The degeneracy in a least squares estimate caused by feedback was addressed. A method of frequency analysis for determining the transfer function G(j omega) from transient I/O data was formulated using complex valued Fourier based modulating functions in contrast with the trigonometric modulating functions for the parameter estimation problem. A simulation result of applying the algorithm is given under noise-free conditions for a system with a low pass transfer function.

  6. Reionization history and CMB parameter estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Dizgah, Azadeh Moradinezhad; Kinney, William H.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y. E-mail: gnedin@fnal.edu

    2013-05-01

    We study how uncertainty in the reionization history of the universe affects estimates of other cosmological parameters from the Cosmic Microwave Background. We analyze WMAP7 data and synthetic Planck-quality data generated using a realistic scenario for the reionization history of the universe obtained from high-resolution numerical simulation. We perform parameter estimation using a simple sudden reionization approximation, and using the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) technique proposed by Mortonson and Hu. We reach two main conclusions: (1) Adopting a simple sudden reionization model does not introduce measurable bias into values for other parameters, indicating that detailed modeling of reionization is not necessary for the purpose of parameter estimation from future CMB data sets such as Planck. (2) PCA analysis does not allow accurate reconstruction of the actual reionization history of the universe in a realistic case.

  7. Organogel formation rationalized by Hansen solubility parameters.

    PubMed

    Raynal, Matthieu; Bouteiller, Laurent

    2011-08-07

    Some organic compounds gelate particular solvents by forming a network of anisotropic fibres. We show that Hansen solubility parameters can be used to predict the range of solvents that are likely to be gelled by any given gelator.

  8. LISA Parameter Estimation using Numerical Merger Waveforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, J. I.; McWilliams, S.; Baker, J.

    2008-01-01

    Coalescing supermassive black holes are expected to provide the strongest sources for gravitational radiation detected by LISA. Recent advances in numerical relativity provide a detailed description of the waveforms of such signals. We present a preliminary study of LISA's sensitivity to waveform parameters using a hybrid numerical/analytic waveform describing the coalescence of two equal-mass, nonspinning black holes. The Synthetic LISA software package is used to simulate the instrument response and the Fisher information matrix method is used to estimate errors in the waveform parameters. Initial results indicate that inclusion of the merger signal can significantly improve the precision of some parameter estimates. For example, the median parameter errors for an ensemble of systems with total redshifted mass of 10(exp 6) deg M solar mass at a redshift of z is approximately 1 were found to decrease by a factor of slightly more than two when the merger was included.

  9. Tropospheric range error parameters: Further studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopfield, H. S.

    1972-01-01

    Improved parameters are presented for predicting the tropospheric effect on electromagnetic range measurements from surface meteorological data. More geographic locations have been added to the earlier list. Parameters are given for computing the dry component of the zenith radio range effect from surface pressure alone with an rms error of 1 to 2 mm, or the total range effect from the dry and wet components of the surface refractivity and a two-part quartic profile model. The new parameters are obtained, as before, from meteorological balloon data but with improved procedures, including the conversion of the geopotential heights of the balloon data to actual or geometric heights before using the data. The revised values of the parameter k (dry component of vertical radio range effect per unit pressure at the surface) show more latitude variation than is accounted for by the variation of g, the acceleration of gravity.

  10. Tropospheric range error parameters: Further studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopfield, H. S.

    1972-01-01

    Improved parameters are presented for predicting the tropospheric effect on electromagnetic range measurements from surface meteorological data. Parameters are given for computing the dry component of the zenith radio range effect from surface pressure alone with an rms error of 1 to 2 mm, or the total range effect from the dry and wet components of the surface refractivity, N, and a two-part quartic profile model. The parameters were obtained from meteorological balloon data with improved procedures, including the conversion of the geopotential heights of the balloon data to actual or geometric heights before using the data. The revised values of the parameter k show more latitude variation than is accounted for by the variation of g. This excess variation of k indicates a small latitude variation in the mean molecular weight of air and yields information about the latitude-varying water vapor content of air.

  11. Project Integration Architecture: Formulation of Semantic Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William Henry

    2005-01-01

    One of several key elements of the Project Integration Architecture (PIA) is the intention to formulate parameter objects which convey meaningful semantic information. In so doing, it is expected that a level of automation can be achieved in the consumption of information content by PIA-consuming clients outside the programmatic boundary of a presenting PIA-wrapped application. This paper discusses the steps that have been recently taken in formulating such semantically-meaningful parameters.

  12. Measurements of thermal parameters of solar modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Górecki, K.; Krac, E.

    2016-04-01

    In the paper the methods of measuring thermal parameters of photovoltaic panels - transient thermal impedance and the absorption factor of light-radiation are presented. The manner of realising these methods is described and the results of measurements of the considered thermal parameters of selected photovoltaic panels are presented. The influence of such selected factors as a type of the investigated panel and its mounting manner on transient thermal impedance of the considered panels is also discussed.

  13. Distillation tray structural parameter study: Phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, J. Ronald

    1991-01-01

    The purpose here is to identify the structural parameters (plate thickness, liquid level, beam size, number of beams, tray diameter, etc.) that affect the structural integrity of distillation trays in distillation columns. Once the sensitivity of the trays' dynamic response to these parameters has been established, the designer will be able to use this information to prepare more accurate specifications for the construction of new trays. Information is given on both static and dynamic analysis, modal response, and tray failure details.

  14. Design Parameters in Multimodal Games for Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Basteris, Angelo; Amirabdollahian, Farshid

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: The repetitive and sometimes mundane nature of conventional rehabilitation therapy provides an ideal opportunity for development of interactive and challenging therapeutic games that have the potential to engage and motivate the players. Certain game design parameters that may encourage patients to actively participate by making the games more enjoyable have been identified. In this article, we describe a formative study in which we designed and evaluated some of these parameters with healthy subjects. Materials and Methods: The “operant conditioning” and “scoring” design parameters were incorporated in a remake of a classic labyrinth game, “Marble Maze.” A group of participants (n=37) played the game twice: Once in the control condition without both modalities and then with either one of the parameters or with both. Measures of game duration and number of fails in the game were recorded along with survey questionnaires to measure player perceptions of intrinsic motivation on the game. Results: Longer playtimes, higher levels of interest/enjoyment, and effort to play the game were recorded with the introduction of these parameters. Conclusions: This study provides an understanding on how game design parameters can be used to motivate and encourage people to play longer. With these positive results, future aims are to test the parameters with stroke patients, providing much clearer insight as to what influences these parameters have on patients undergoing therapy. The ultimate goal is to utilize game design in order to maintain longer therapeutic interaction between a patient and his or her therapy medium. PMID:24761328

  15. Statistical Inference for Data Adaptive Target Parameters.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Alan E; Kherad-Pajouh, Sara; van der Laan, Mark J

    2016-05-01

    Consider one observes n i.i.d. copies of a random variable with a probability distribution that is known to be an element of a particular statistical model. In order to define our statistical target we partition the sample in V equal size sub-samples, and use this partitioning to define V splits in an estimation sample (one of the V subsamples) and corresponding complementary parameter-generating sample. For each of the V parameter-generating samples, we apply an algorithm that maps the sample to a statistical target parameter. We define our sample-split data adaptive statistical target parameter as the average of these V-sample specific target parameters. We present an estimator (and corresponding central limit theorem) of this type of data adaptive target parameter. This general methodology for generating data adaptive target parameters is demonstrated with a number of practical examples that highlight new opportunities for statistical learning from data. This new framework provides a rigorous statistical methodology for both exploratory and confirmatory analysis within the same data. Given that more research is becoming "data-driven", the theory developed within this paper provides a new impetus for a greater involvement of statistical inference into problems that are being increasingly addressed by clever, yet ad hoc pattern finding methods. To suggest such potential, and to verify the predictions of the theory, extensive simulation studies, along with a data analysis based on adaptively determined intervention rules are shown and give insight into how to structure such an approach. The results show that the data adaptive target parameter approach provides a general framework and resulting methodology for data-driven science.

  16. Correlation of Catalytic Rates With Solubility Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Daniel D.; England, Christopher

    1987-01-01

    Catalyst maximizes activity when its solubility parameter equals that of reactive species. Catalytic activities of some binary metal alloys at maximum when alloy compositions correspond to Hildebrand solubility parameters equal to those of reactive atomic species on catalyst. If this suggestive correlation proves to be general, applied to formulation of other mixed-metal catalysts. Also used to identify reactive species in certain catalytic reactions.

  17. Theoretical temperature dependence of solar cell parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, John C. C.

    1986-01-01

    A simple formulation has been derived for the temperature dependence of cell parameters for any solar cell material. Detailed calculations have been performed for high-quality monocrystalline GaAs, Si and Ge cells. Preliminary experimental data for GaAs and Si cells are close to the calculated values. In general, the higher the energy gap of a material, the small is the temperature dependence of its solar cell parameters.

  18. Parameter Estimation of a Spiking Silicon Neuron

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Alexander; Mazurek, Kevin; Mihalaş, Stefan; Niebur, Ernst; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Spiking neuron models are used in a multitude of tasks ranging from understanding neural behavior at its most basic level to neuroprosthetics. Parameter estimation of a single neuron model, such that the model’s output matches that of a biological neuron is an extremely important task. Hand tuning of parameters to obtain such behaviors is a difficult and time consuming process. This is further complicated when the neuron is instantiated in silicon (an attractive medium in which to implement these models) as fabrication imperfections make the task of parameter configuration more complex. In this paper we show two methods to automate the configuration of a silicon (hardware) neuron’s parameters. First, we show how a Maximum Likelihood method can be applied to a leaky integrate and fire silicon neuron with spike induced currents to fit the neuron’s output to desired spike times. We then show how a distance based method which approximates the negative log likelihood of the lognormal distribution can also be used to tune the neuron’s parameters. We conclude that the distance based method is better suited for parameter configuration of silicon neurons due to its superior optimization speed. PMID:23852978

  19. Computational approaches for RNA energy parameter estimation

    PubMed Central

    Andronescu, Mirela; Condon, Anne; Hoos, Holger H.; Mathews, David H.; Murphy, Kevin P.

    2010-01-01

    Methods for efficient and accurate prediction of RNA structure are increasingly valuable, given the current rapid advances in understanding the diverse functions of RNA molecules in the cell. To enhance the accuracy of secondary structure predictions, we developed and refined optimization techniques for the estimation of energy parameters. We build on two previous approaches to RNA free-energy parameter estimation: (1) the Constraint Generation (CG) method, which iteratively generates constraints that enforce known structures to have energies lower than other structures for the same molecule; and (2) the Boltzmann Likelihood (BL) method, which infers a set of RNA free-energy parameters that maximize the conditional likelihood of a set of reference RNA structures. Here, we extend these approaches in two main ways: We propose (1) a max-margin extension of CG, and (2) a novel linear Gaussian Bayesian network that models feature relationships, which effectively makes use of sparse data by sharing statistical strength between parameters. We obtain significant improvements in the accuracy of RNA minimum free-energy pseudoknot-free secondary structure prediction when measured on a comprehensive set of 2518 RNA molecules with reference structures. Our parameters can be used in conjunction with software that predicts RNA secondary structures, RNA hybridization, or ensembles of structures. Our data, software, results, and parameter sets in various formats are freely available at http://www.cs.ubc.ca/labs/beta/Projects/RNA-Params. PMID:20940338

  20. Food allergy: a practice parameter update-2014.

    PubMed

    Sampson, Hugh A; Aceves, Seema; Bock, S Allan; James, John; Jones, Stacie; Lang, David; Nadeau, Kari; Nowak-Wegrzyn, Anna; Oppenheimer, John; Perry, Tamara T; Randolph, Christopher; Sicherer, Scott H; Simon, Ronald A; Vickery, Brian P; Wood, Robert; Bernstein, David; Blessing-Moore, Joann; Khan, David; Lang, David; Nicklas, Richard; Oppenheimer, John; Portnoy, Jay; Randolph, Christopher; Schuller, Diane; Spector, Sheldon; Tilles, Stephen A; Wallace, Dana; Sampson, Hugh A; Aceves, Seema; Bock, S Allan; James, John; Jones, Stacie; Lang, David; Nadeau, Kari; Nowak-Wegrzyn, Anna; Oppenheimer, John; Perry, Tamara T; Randolph, Christopher; Sicherer, Scott H; Simon, Ronald A; Vickery, Brian P; Wood, Robert

    2014-11-01

    This parameter was developed by the Joint Task Force on Practice Parameters, representing the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI); the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (ACAAI); and the Joint Council of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (JCAAI). The AAAAI and the ACAAI have jointly accepted responsibility for establishing "Food Allergy: A practice parameter update-2014." This is a complete and comprehensive document at the current time. The medical environment is a changing one, and not all recommendations will be appropriate for all patients. Because this document incorporated the efforts of many participants, no single individual, including those who served on the Joint Task Force, is authorized to provide an official AAAAI or ACAAI interpretation of these practice parameters. Any request for information about or an interpretation of these practice parameters by the AAAAI or ACAAI should be directed to the Executive Offices of the AAAAI, ACAAI, and JCAAI. These parameters are not designed for use by pharmaceutical companies in drug promotion.

  1. Modeling pattern in collections of parameters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Link, W.A.

    1999-01-01

    Wildlife management is increasingly guided by analyses of large and complex datasets. The description of such datasets often requires a large number of parameters, among which certain patterns might be discernible. For example, one may consider a long-term study producing estimates of annual survival rates; of interest is the question whether these rates have declined through time. Several statistical methods exist for examining pattern in collections of parameters. Here, I argue for the superiority of 'random effects models' in which parameters are regarded as random variables, with distributions governed by 'hyperparameters' describing the patterns of interest. Unfortunately, implementation of random effects models is sometimes difficult. Ultrastructural models, in which the postulated pattern is built into the parameter structure of the original data analysis, are approximations to random effects models. However, this approximation is not completely satisfactory: failure to account for natural variation among parameters can lead to overstatement of the evidence for pattern among parameters. I describe quasi-likelihood methods that can be used to improve the approximation of random effects models by ultrastructural models.

  2. Precision Parameter Estimation and Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandelt, Benjamin D.

    2008-12-01

    I discuss the strategy of ``Acceleration by Parallel Precomputation and Learning'' (AP-PLe) that can vastly accelerate parameter estimation in high-dimensional parameter spaces and costly likelihood functions, using trivially parallel computing to speed up sequential exploration of parameter space. This strategy combines the power of distributed computing with machine learning and Markov-Chain Monte Carlo techniques efficiently to explore a likelihood function, posterior distribution or χ2-surface. This strategy is particularly successful in cases where computing the likelihood is costly and the number of parameters is moderate or large. We apply this technique to two central problems in cosmology: the solution of the cosmological parameter estimation problem with sufficient accuracy for the Planck data using PICo; and the detailed calculation of cosmological helium and hydrogen recombination with RICO. Since the APPLe approach is designed to be able to use massively parallel resources to speed up problems that are inherently serial, we can bring the power of distributed computing to bear on parameter estimation problems. We have demonstrated this with the CosmologyatHome project.

  3. Correlations of linear and nonlinear ultrasound parameters with density and microarchitectural parameters in trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang Il

    2013-11-01

    In the present study, correlations of linear and nonlinear ultrasound parameters (speed of sound, normalized broadband ultrasound attenuation, and nonlinear parameter B/A) with bone mineral density and microarchitectural parameters were investigated in 28 bovine femoral trabecular bone samples in vitro. All three ultrasound parameters exhibited relatively high correlation coefficients with the indexes of bone quantity (bone mineral density and bone volume fraction) and lower correlation coefficients with the remaining microarchitectural parameters. These results suggest that B/A, in addition to speed of sound and attenuation, may have potential as an index for the assessment of bone status and osteoporosis.

  4. Classification of hydrological parameter sensitivity and evaluation of parameter transferability across 431 US MOPEX basins

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Huiying; Hou, Zhangshuan; Huang, Maoyi; Bao, Jie; Sun, Yu; Tesfa, Teklu K.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2016-02-27

    The Community Land Model (CLM) represents physical, chemical, and biological processes of the terrestrial ecosystems that interact with climate across a range of spatial and temporal scales. As CLM includes numerous sub-models and associated parameters, the high-dimensional parameter space presents a formidable challenge for quantifying uncertainty and improving Earth system predictions needed to assess environmental changes and risks. This study aims to evaluate the potential of transferring hydrologic model parameters in CLM through sensitivity analyses and classification across watersheds from the Model Parameter Estimation Experiment (MOPEX) in the United States. The sensitivity of CLM-simulated water and energy fluxes to hydrological parameters across 431 MOPEX basins are first examined using an efficient stochastic sampling-based sensitivity analysis approach. Linear, interaction, and high-order nonlinear impacts are all identified via statistical tests and stepwise backward removal parameter screening. The basins are then classified accordingly to their parameter sensitivity patterns (internal attributes), as well as their hydrologic indices/attributes (external hydrologic factors) separately, using a Principal component analyses (PCA) and expectation-maximization (EM) –based clustering approach. Similarities and differences among the parameter sensitivity-based classification system (S-Class), the hydrologic indices-based classification (H-Class), and the Koppen climate classification systems (K-Class) are discussed. Within each S-class with similar parameter sensitivity characteristics, similar inversion modeling setups can be used for parameter calibration, and the parameters and their contribution or significance to water and energy cycling may also be more transferrable. This classification study provides guidance on identifiable parameters, and on parameterization and inverse model design for CLM but the methodology is applicable to other models

  5. Delineating parameter unidentifiabilities in complex models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Dhruva V.; Anderson, James; Papachristodoulou, Antonis

    2017-03-01

    Scientists use mathematical modeling as a tool for understanding and predicting the properties of complex physical systems. In highly parametrized models there often exist relationships between parameters over which model predictions are identical, or nearly identical. These are known as structural or practical unidentifiabilities, respectively. They are hard to diagnose and make reliable parameter estimation from data impossible. They furthermore imply the existence of an underlying model simplification. We describe a scalable method for detecting unidentifiabilities, as well as the functional relations defining them, for generic models. This allows for model simplification, and appreciation of which parameters (or functions thereof) cannot be estimated from data. Our algorithm can identify features such as redundant mechanisms and fast time-scale subsystems, as well as the regimes in parameter space over which such approximations are valid. We base our algorithm on a quantification of regional parametric sensitivity that we call `multiscale sloppiness'. Traditionally, the link between parametric sensitivity and the conditioning of the parameter estimation problem is made locally, through the Fisher information matrix. This is valid in the regime of infinitesimal measurement uncertainty. We demonstrate the duality between multiscale sloppiness and the geometry of confidence regions surrounding parameter estimates made where measurement uncertainty is non-negligible. Further theoretical relationships are provided linking multiscale sloppiness to the likelihood-ratio test. From this, we show that a local sensitivity analysis (as typically done) is insufficient for determining the reliability of parameter estimation, even with simple (non)linear systems. Our algorithm can provide a tractable alternative. We finally apply our methods to a large-scale, benchmark systems biology model of necrosis factor (NF)-κ B , uncovering unidentifiabilities.

  6. Systematic parameter inference in stochastic mesoscopic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Huan; Yang, Xiu; Li, Zhen; Karniadakis, George Em

    2017-02-01

    We propose a method to efficiently determine the optimal coarse-grained force field in mesoscopic stochastic simulations of Newtonian fluid and polymer melt systems modeled by dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) and energy conserving dissipative particle dynamics (eDPD). The response surfaces of various target properties (viscosity, diffusivity, pressure, etc.) with respect to model parameters are constructed based on the generalized polynomial chaos (gPC) expansion using simulation results on sampling points (e.g., individual parameter sets). To alleviate the computational cost to evaluate the target properties, we employ the compressive sensing method to compute the coefficients of the dominant gPC terms given the prior knowledge that the coefficients are "sparse". The proposed method shows comparable accuracy with the standard probabilistic collocation method (PCM) while it imposes a much weaker restriction on the number of the simulation samples especially for systems with high dimensional parametric space. Fully access to the response surfaces within the confidence range enables us to infer the optimal force parameters given the desirable values of target properties at the macroscopic scale. Moreover, it enables us to investigate the intrinsic relationship between the model parameters, identify possible degeneracies in the parameter space, and optimize the model by eliminating model redundancies. The proposed method provides an efficient alternative approach for constructing mesoscopic models by inferring model parameters to recover target properties of the physics systems (e.g., from experimental measurements), where those force field parameters and formulation cannot be derived from the microscopic level in a straight forward way.

  7. Halo Spin Parameter in Cosmological Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Jieun; Kim, Juhan; Shin, Jihye; Kim, Sungsoo S.; Choi, Yun-Young

    2014-04-01

    Using a cosmological ΛCDM simulation, we analyze the differences between the widely-used spin parameters suggested by Peebles and Bullock. The dimensionless spin parameter λ proposed by Peebles is theoretically well-justified but includes an annoying term, the potential energy, which cannot be directly obtained from observations and is computationally expensive to calculate in numerical simulations. The Bullock's spin parameter λ^' avoids this problem assuming the isothermal density profile of a virialized halo in the Newtonian potential model. However, we find that there exists a substantial discrepancy between λ and λ^' depending on the adopted potential model (Newtonian or Plummer) to calculate the halo total energy and that their redshift evolutions differ to each other significantly. Therefore, we introduce a new spin parameter, λ^{''}, which is simply designed to roughly recover the value of λ but to use the same halo quantities as used in λ^'. If the Plummer potential is adopted, the λ^{''} is related to the Bullock's definition as λ^{''} = 0.80× (1 + z)^{-1/12} λ^'. Hence, the new spin parameter λ^{''} distribution becomes consistent with a log-normal distribution frequently seen for the λ^' while its mean value is much closer to that of λ. On the other hand, in case of the Newtonian potential model, we obtain the relation of λ^{''}=(1+z)^{-1/8}λ^{'}; there is no significant difference at z = 0 as found by others but λ^{'} becomes more overestimated than λ or λ^{''} at higher redshifts. We also investigate the dependence of halo spin parameters on halo mass and redshift. We clearly show that although the λ^' for small-mass halos with M_h < 2× 10^{12} M_odot seems redshift independent after z=1, all the spin parameters explored, on the whole, show a stronger correlation with the increasing halo mass at higher redshifts.

  8. Parameter estimation uncertainty: Comparing apples and apples?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, D.; Yoon, H.; McKenna, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    Given a highly parameterized ground water model in which the conceptual model of the heterogeneity is stochastic, an ensemble of inverse calibrations from multiple starting points (MSP) provides an ensemble of calibrated parameters and follow-on transport predictions. However, the multiple calibrations are computationally expensive. Parameter estimation uncertainty can also be modeled by decomposing the parameterization into a solution space and a null space. From a single calibration (single starting point) a single set of parameters defining the solution space can be extracted. The solution space is held constant while Monte Carlo sampling of the parameter set covering the null space creates an ensemble of the null space parameter set. A recently developed null-space Monte Carlo (NSMC) method combines the calibration solution space parameters with the ensemble of null space parameters, creating sets of calibration-constrained parameters for input to the follow-on transport predictions. Here, we examine the consistency between probabilistic ensembles of parameter estimates and predictions using the MSP calibration and the NSMC approaches. A highly parameterized model of the Culebra dolomite previously developed for the WIPP project in New Mexico is used as the test case. A total of 100 estimated fields are retained from the MSP approach and the ensemble of results defining the model fit to the data, the reproduction of the variogram model and prediction of an advective travel time are compared to the same results obtained using NSMC. We demonstrate that the NSMC fields based on a single calibration model can be significantly constrained by the calibrated solution space and the resulting distribution of advective travel times is biased toward the travel time from the single calibrated field. To overcome this, newly proposed strategies to employ a multiple calibration-constrained NSMC approach (M-NSMC) are evaluated. Comparison of the M-NSMC and MSP methods suggests

  9. Quality Assurance in Endoscopy: Which Parameters?

    PubMed Central

    Denzer, Ulrike W.

    2016-01-01

    Background The verbalisation of quality standards and parameters by medical societies are relevant for qualitative improvement but may also be an instrument to demand more resources for health care or be a unique characteristic. Within the health care system 3 different quality levels can be defined: structure, process and result quality. Methods The current S2k guideline of the German Society for Gastroenterology (quality requirements for gastrointestinal endoscopy) AWMF registry no. 021-022 provides recommendations based on the available evidence for the structure quality (requirements for equipment, human resources) as well as for the process quality (patient preparation, conduct, documentation) and result quality (follow-up of specific endoscopic procedures). Results Based on these recommendations, measurable quality indicators/parameters for the endoscopy have been selected and formulated. General quality parameters for endoscopic examinations are given as well as quality parameters for specific procedures for the preparation, conduct, and follow-up of specific endoscopic interventions. Conclusion Only the regular review of processes and courses by means of defined measurement parameters builds up the basis for corrections based on facts. In addition, the implementation of recommended standards may be an instrument in demanding more resources from the health care system and, therefore, should be embedded as routine. PMID:27588295

  10. Cosmological parameter estimation: impact of CMB aberration

    SciTech Connect

    Catena, Riccardo; Notari, Alessio E-mail: notari@ffn.ub.es

    2013-04-01

    The peculiar motion of an observer with respect to the CMB rest frame induces an apparent deflection of the observed CMB photons, i.e. aberration, and a shift in their frequency, i.e. Doppler effect. Both effects distort the temperature multipoles a{sub lm}'s via a mixing matrix at any l. The common lore when performing a CMB based cosmological parameter estimation is to consider that Doppler affects only the l = 1 multipole, and neglect any other corrections. In this paper we reconsider the validity of this assumption, showing that it is actually not robust when sky cuts are included to model CMB foreground contaminations. Assuming a simple fiducial cosmological model with five parameters, we simulated CMB temperature maps of the sky in a WMAP-like and in a Planck-like experiment and added aberration and Doppler effects to the maps. We then analyzed with a MCMC in a Bayesian framework the maps with and without aberration and Doppler effects in order to assess the ability of reconstructing the parameters of the fiducial model. We find that, depending on the specific realization of the simulated data, the parameters can be biased up to one standard deviation for WMAP and almost two standard deviations for Planck. Therefore we conclude that in general it is not a solid assumption to neglect aberration in a CMB based cosmological parameter estimation.

  11. A Tool for Parameter-space Explorations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murase, Yohsuke; Uchitane, Takeshi; Ito, Nobuyasu

    A software for managing simulation jobs and results, named "OACIS", is presented. It controls a large number of simulation jobs executed in various remote servers, keeps these results in an organized way, and manages the analyses on these results. The software has a web browser front end, and users can submit various jobs to appropriate remote hosts from a web browser easily. After these jobs are finished, all the result files are automatically downloaded from the computational hosts and stored in a traceable way together with the logs of the date, host, and elapsed time of the jobs. Some visualization functions are also provided so that users can easily grasp the overview of the results distributed in a high-dimensional parameter space. Thus, OACIS is especially beneficial for the complex simulation models having many parameters for which a lot of parameter searches are required. By using API of OACIS, it is easy to write a code that automates parameter selection depending on the previous simulation results. A few examples of the automated parameter selection are also demonstrated.

  12. Supersymmetry Parameter Analysis: SPA Convention and Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hinchliffe, I.; et al.

    2005-05-05

    High-precision analyses of supersymmetry parameters aim atreconstructing the fundamental supersymmetric theory and its breakingmechanism. A well defined theoretical framework is needed whenhigher-order corrections are included. We propose such a scheme,Supersymmetry Parameter Analysis SPA, based on a consistent set ofconventions and input parameters. A repository for computer programs isprovided which connect parameters in different schemes and relate theLagrangian parameters to physical observables at LHC and high energy e+e-linear collider experiments, i.e., masses, mixings, decay widths andproduction cross sections for supersymmetric particles. In addition,programs for calculating high-precision low energy observables, thedensity of cold dark matter (CDM) in the universe as well as the crosssections for CDM search experiments are included. The SPA scheme stillrequires extended efforts on both the theoretical and experimental sidebefore data can be evaluated in the future at the level of the desiredprecision. We take here an initial step of testing the SPA scheme byapplying the techniques involved to a specific supersymmetry referencepoint.

  13. Estimating Respiratory Mechanical Parameters during Mechanical Ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Barbini, Paolo

    1982-01-01

    We propose an algorithm for the estimation of the parameters of the mechanical respiratory system. The algorithm is based on non linear regression analysis with a two-compartment respiratory system model. The model used allows us to take account of the non homogeneous properties of the lungs which may cause uneven distribution of ventilation and thus affect the gas exchange in the lungs. The estimation of the parameters of such a model permits the optimization of the type of ventilation to be used in patients undergoing respiratory treatment. This can be done bearing in mind the effects of the mechanical ventilation on venous return as well as the quality of gas exchange. We have valued the performances of the estimation algorithm which is proposed on the basis of the agreement between the data and the model response, of the stability of the parameter estimates and of the standard deviations of the parameters. The parameter estimation algorithm described does not have recourse to the examination of the impedance spectra and is completely independent of the type of ventilator employed.

  14. Determining wave direction using curvature parameters.

    PubMed

    de Queiroz, Eduardo Vitarelli; de Carvalho, João Luiz Baptista

    2016-01-01

    The curvature of the sea wave was tested as a parameter for estimating wave direction in the search for better results in estimates of wave direction in shallow waters, where waves of different sizes, frequencies and directions intersect and it is difficult to characterize. We used numerical simulations of the sea surface to determine wave direction calculated from the curvature of the waves. Using 1000 numerical simulations, the statistical variability of the wave direction was determined. The results showed good performance by the curvature parameter for estimating wave direction. Accuracy in the estimates was improved by including wave slope parameters in addition to curvature. The results indicate that the curvature is a promising technique to estimate wave directions.•In this study, the accuracy and precision of curvature parameters to measure wave direction are analyzed using a model simulation that generates 1000 wave records with directional resolution.•The model allows the simultaneous simulation of time-series wave properties such as sea surface elevation, slope and curvature and they were used to analyze the variability of estimated directions.•The simultaneous acquisition of slope and curvature parameters can contribute to estimates wave direction, thus increasing accuracy and precision of results.

  15. Pumping test evaluation of stream depletion parameters.

    PubMed

    Lough, Hilary K; Hunt, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    Descriptions are given of a pumping test and a corresponding analysis that permit calculation of all five hydrogeological parameters appearing in the Hunt (2003) solution for stream depletion caused by ground water abstraction from a well beside a stream. This solution assumes that flow in the pumped aquifer is horizontal, flow in the overlying aquitard or system of aquitards is vertical, and the free surface in the top aquitard is allowed to draw down. The definition of an aquitard in this paper is any layer with a vertical hydraulic conductivity much lower than the horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the pumped aquifer. These "aquitards" may be reasonably permeable layers but are distinguished from the pumped aquifer by their hydraulic conductivity contrast. The pumping test requires a complete set of drawdown measurements from at least one observation well. This well must be deep enough to penetrate the pumped aquifer, and pumping must continue for a sufficient time to ensure that depleted streamflow becomes a significant portion of the well abstraction rate. Furthermore, two of the five parameters characterize an aquitard that overlies the pumped aquifer, and values for these parameters are seen to be dependent upon the initial water table elevation in the aquitard. The field test analyzed herein used a total of eight observation wells screened in the pumped aquifer, and measurements from these wells gave eight sets of parameters that are used in a sensitivity analysis to determine the relative importance of each parameter in the stream depletion calculations.

  16. Estimating physiological skin parameters from hyperspectral signatures.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Saurabh; Banerjee, Amit; Burlina, Philippe

    2013-05-01

    We describe an approach for estimating human skin parameters, such as melanosome concentration, collagen concentration, oxygen saturation, and blood volume, using hyperspectral radiometric measurements (signatures) obtained from in vivo skin. We use a computational model based on Kubelka-Munk theory and the Fresnel equations. This model forward maps the skin parameters to a corresponding multiband reflectance spectra. Machine-learning-based regression is used to generate the inverse map, and hence estimate skin parameters from hyperspectral signatures. We test our methods using synthetic and in vivo skin signatures obtained in the visible through the short wave infrared domains from 24 patients of both genders and Caucasian, Asian, and African American ethnicities. Performance validation shows promising results: good agreement with the ground truth and well-established physiological precepts. These methods have potential use in the characterization of skin abnormalities and in minimally-invasive prescreening of malignant skin cancers.

  17. Estimating physiological skin parameters from hyperspectral signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, Saurabh; Banerjee, Amit; Burlina, Philippe

    2013-05-01

    We describe an approach for estimating human skin parameters, such as melanosome concentration, collagen concentration, oxygen saturation, and blood volume, using hyperspectral radiometric measurements (signatures) obtained from in vivo skin. We use a computational model based on Kubelka-Munk theory and the Fresnel equations. This model forward maps the skin parameters to a corresponding multiband reflectance spectra. Machine-learning-based regression is used to generate the inverse map, and hence estimate skin parameters from hyperspectral signatures. We test our methods using synthetic and in vivo skin signatures obtained in the visible through the short wave infrared domains from 24 patients of both genders and Caucasian, Asian, and African American ethnicities. Performance validation shows promising results: good agreement with the ground truth and well-established physiological precepts. These methods have potential use in the characterization of skin abnormalities and in minimally-invasive prescreening of malignant skin cancers.

  18. Effect of Burnishing Parameters on Surface Finish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirsat, Uddhav; Ahuja, Basant; Dhuttargaon, Mukund

    2016-06-01

    Burnishing is cold working process in which hard balls are pressed against the surface, resulting in improved surface finish. The surface gets compressed and then plasticized. This is a highly finishing process which is becoming more popular. Surface quality of the product improves its aesthetic appearance. The product made up of aluminum material is subjected to burnishing process during which kerosene is used as a lubricant. In this study factors affecting burnishing process such as burnishing force, speed, feed, work piece diameter and ball diameter are considered as input parameters while surface finish is considered as an output parameter In this study, experiments are designed using 25 factorial design in order to analyze the relationship between input and output parameters. The ANOVA technique and F-test are used for further analysis.

  19. Aquifer parameter estimation from surface resistivity data.

    PubMed

    Niwas, Sri; de Lima, Olivar A L

    2003-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the additional use, other than ground water exploration, of surface geoelectrical sounding data for aquifer hydraulic parameter estimation. In a mesoscopic framework, approximated analytical equations are developed separately for saline and for fresh water saturations. A few existing useful aquifer models, both for clean and shaley sandstones, are discussed in terms of their electrical and hydraulic effects, along with the linkage between the two. These equations are derived for insight and physical understanding of the phenomenon. In a macroscopic scale, a general aquifer model is proposed and analytical relations are derived for meaningful estimation, with a higher level of confidence, of hydraulic parameter from electrical parameters. The physical reasons for two different equations at the macroscopic level are explicitly explained to avoid confusion. Numerical examples from existing literature are reproduced to buttress our viewpoint.

  20. Determination of kinetic parameters for biomass combustion.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, A; Pizarro, C; García, R; Bueno, J L; Lavín, A G

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this work is to provide a wide database of kinetic data for the most common biomass by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermogravimetry (DTG). Due to the characteristic parameters of DTG curves, a two-stage reaction model is proposed and the kinetic parameters obtained from model-based methods with energy activation values for first and second stages in the range 1.75·10(4)-1.55·10(5)J/mol and 1.62·10(4)-2.37·10(5)J/mol, respectively. However, it has been found that Flynn-Wall-Ozawa and Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose model-free methods are not suitable to determine the kinetic parameters of biomass combustion since the assumptions of these two methods were not accomplished in the full range of the combustion process.

  1. Proline puckering parameters for collagen structure simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Di

    2015-03-15

    Collagen is made of triple helices rich in proline residues, and hence is influenced by the conformational motions of prolines. Because the backbone motions of prolines are restricted by the helical structures, the only side chain motion—proline puckering—becomes an influential factor that may affect the stability of collagen structures. In molecular simulations, a proper proline puckering population is desired so to yield valid results of the collagen properties. Here we design the proline puckering parameters in order to yield suitable proline puckering populations as demonstrated in the experimental results. We test these parameters in collagen and the proline dipeptide simulations. Compared with the results of the PDB and the quantum calculations, we propose the proline puckering parameters for the selected collagen model simulations.

  2. On entanglement of light and Stokes parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żukowski, Marek; Laskowski, Wiesław; Wieśniak, Marcin

    2016-08-01

    We present a new approach to Stokes parameters, which enables one to see better non-classical properties of bright quantum light, and of undefined overall photon numbers. The crucial difference is as follows. The standard quantum optical Stokes parameters are averages of differences of intensities of light registered at the two exits of polarization analyzers, and one gets their normalized version by dividing them by the average total intensity. The new ones are averages of the registered normalized Stokes parameters, for the duration of the experiment. That is, we redefine each Stokes observable as the difference of photon number operators at the two exits of a polarizing beam splitter multiplied by the inverse of their sum. The vacuum eigenvalue of the operator is defined a zero. We show that with such an approach one can obtain more sensitive entanglement indicators based on polarization measurements.

  3. Asteroid absolute magnitudes and slope parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedesco, Edward F.

    1991-01-01

    A new listing of absolute magnitudes (H) and slope parameters (G) has been created and published in the Minor Planet Circulars; this same listing will appear in the 1992 Ephemerides of Minor Planets. Unlike previous listings, the values of the current list were derived from fits of data at the V band. All observations were reduced in the same fashion using, where appropriate, a single basis default value of 0.15 for the slope parameter. Distances and phase angles were computed for each observation. The data for 113 asteroids was of sufficiently high quality to permit derivation of their H and G. These improved absolute magnitudes and slope parameters will be used to deduce the most reliable bias-corrected asteroid size-frequency distribution yet made.

  4. Proline puckering parameters for collagen structure simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Di

    2015-03-01

    Collagen is made of triple helices rich in proline residues, and hence is influenced by the conformational motions of prolines. Because the backbone motions of prolines are restricted by the helical structures, the only side chain motion—proline puckering—becomes an influential factor that may affect the stability of collagen structures. In molecular simulations, a proper proline puckering population is desired so to yield valid results of the collagen properties. Here we design the proline puckering parameters in order to yield suitable proline puckering populations as demonstrated in the experimental results. We test these parameters in collagen and the proline dipeptide simulations. Compared with the results of the PDB and the quantum calculations, we propose the proline puckering parameters for the selected collagen model simulations.

  5. Determining Spacecraft Reaction Wheel Friction Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarani, Siamak

    2009-01-01

    Software was developed to characterize the drag in each of the Cassini spacecraft's Reaction Wheel Assemblies (RWAs) to determine the RWA friction parameters. This tool measures the drag torque of RWAs for not only the high spin rates (greater than 250 RPM), but also the low spin rates (less than 250 RPM) where there is a lack of an elastohydrodynamic boundary layer in the bearings. RWA rate and drag torque profiles as functions of time are collected via telemetry once every 4 seconds and once every 8 seconds, respectively. Intermediate processing steps single-out the coast-down regions. A nonlinear model for the drag torque as a function of RWA spin rate is incorporated in order to characterize the low spin rate regime. The tool then uses a nonlinear parameter optimization algorithm based on the Nelder-Mead simplex method to determine the viscous coefficient, the Dahl friction, and the two parameters that account for the low spin-rate behavior.

  6. Technical parameters for specifying imagery requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coan, Paul P.; Dunnette, Sheri J.

    1994-01-01

    Providing visual information acquired from remote events to various operators, researchers, and practitioners has become progressively more important as the application of special skills in alien or hazardous situations increases. To provide an understanding of the technical parameters required to specify imagery, we have identified, defined, and discussed seven salient characteristics of images: spatial resolution, linearity, luminance resolution, spectral discrimination, temporal discrimination, edge definition, and signal-to-noise ratio. We then describe a generalizing imaging system and identified how various parts of the system affect the image data. To emphasize the different applications of imagery, we have constrasted the common television system with the significant parameters of a televisual imaging system for technical applications. Finally, we have established a method by which the required visual information can be specified by describing certain technical parameters which are directly related to the information content of the imagery. This method requires the user to complete a form listing all pertinent data requirements for the imagery.

  7. Band-structure parameters by genetic algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Starrost, F.; Bornholdt, S.; Solterbeck, C.; Schattke, W.

    1996-05-01

    A genetic algorithm has been used to solve a complex multidimensional parameter-fitting problem. We will focus on the parameters of an empirical tight-binding Hamiltonian. The method is used to approximate the electronic energy band structure if energy values are known for a few wave vectors of high symmetry. Compared to the usual manual procedure this method is more accurate and automatic. This approach, based on the extended H{umlt u}ckel theory (EHT), has provided a list of EHT parameters for IV-IV and III-V semiconductors with zinc-blende structure and helped us to find a symmetry in the EHT. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  8. Simulating performance sensitivity of supercomputer job parameters.

    SciTech Connect

    Clearwater, Scott Harvey; Kleban, Stephen David

    2003-03-01

    We report on the use of a supercomputer simulation to study the performance sensitivity to systematic changes in the job parameters of run time, number of CPUs, and interarrival time. We also examine the effect of changes in share allocation and service ratio for job prioritization under a Fair Share queuing Algorithm to see the effect on facility figures of merit. We used log data from the ASCI supercomputer Blue Mountain and the ASCI simulator BIRMinator to perform this study. The key finding is that the performance of the supercomputer is quite sensitive to all the job parameters with the interarrival rate of the jobs being most sensitive at the highest rates and increasing run times the least sensitive job parameter with respect to utilization and rapid turnaround. We also find that this facility is running near its maximum practical utilization. Finally, we show the importance of the use of simulation in understanding the performance sensitivity of a supercomputer.

  9. Discriminative parameter estimation for random walks segmentation.

    PubMed

    Baudin, Pierre-Yves; Goodman, Danny; Kumrnar, Puneet; Azzabou, Noura; Carlier, Pierre G; Paragios, Nikos; Kumar, M Pawan

    2013-01-01

    The Random Walks (RW) algorithm is one of the most efficient and easy-to-use probabilistic segmentation methods. By combining contrast terms with prior terms, it provides accurate segmentations of medical images in a fully automated manner. However, one of the main drawbacks of using the RW algorithm is that its parameters have to be hand-tuned. we propose a novel discriminative learning framework that estimates the parameters using a training dataset. The main challenge we face is that the training samples are not fully supervised. Specifically, they provide a hard segmentation of the images, instead of a probabilistic segmentation. We overcome this challenge by treating the optimal probabilistic segmentation that is compatible with the given hard segmentation as a latent variable. This allows us to employ the latent support vector machine formulation for parameter estimation. We show that our approach significantly outperforms the baseline methods on a challenging dataset consisting of real clinical 3D MRI volumes of skeletal muscles.

  10. Application of Statistically Derived CPAS Parachute Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romero, Leah M.; Ray, Eric S.

    2013-01-01

    The Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) Analysis Team is responsible for determining parachute inflation parameters and dispersions that are ultimately used in verifying system requirements. A model memo is internally released semi-annually documenting parachute inflation and other key parameters reconstructed from flight test data. Dispersion probability distributions published in previous versions of the model memo were uniform because insufficient data were available for determination of statistical based distributions. Uniform distributions do not accurately represent the expected distributions since extreme parameter values are just as likely to occur as the nominal value. CPAS has taken incremental steps to move away from uniform distributions. Model Memo version 9 (MMv9) made the first use of non-uniform dispersions, but only for the reefing cutter timing, for which a large number of sample was available. In order to maximize the utility of the available flight test data, clusters of parachutes were reconstructed individually starting with Model Memo version 10. This allowed for statistical assessment for steady-state drag area (CDS) and parachute inflation parameters such as the canopy fill distance (n), profile shape exponent (expopen), over-inflation factor (C(sub k)), and ramp-down time (t(sub k)) distributions. Built-in MATLAB distributions were applied to the histograms, and parameters such as scale (sigma) and location (mu) were output. Engineering judgment was used to determine the "best fit" distribution based on the test data. Results include normal, log normal, and uniform (where available data remains insufficient) fits of nominal and failure (loss of parachute and skipped stage) cases for all CPAS parachutes. This paper discusses the uniform methodology that was previously used, the process and result of the statistical assessment, how the dispersions were incorporated into Monte Carlo analyses, and the application of the distributions in

  11. Parameter estimate of signal transduction pathways

    PubMed Central

    Arisi, Ivan; Cattaneo, Antonino; Rosato, Vittorio

    2006-01-01

    Background The "inverse" problem is related to the determination of unknown causes on the bases of the observation of their effects. This is the opposite of the corresponding "direct" problem, which relates to the prediction of the effects generated by a complete description of some agencies. The solution of an inverse problem entails the construction of a mathematical model and takes the moves from a number of experimental data. In this respect, inverse problems are often ill-conditioned as the amount of experimental conditions available are often insufficient to unambiguously solve the mathematical model. Several approaches to solving inverse problems are possible, both computational and experimental, some of which are mentioned in this article. In this work, we will describe in details the attempt to solve an inverse problem which arose in the study of an intracellular signaling pathway. Results Using the Genetic Algorithm to find the sub-optimal solution to the optimization problem, we have estimated a set of unknown parameters describing a kinetic model of a signaling pathway in the neuronal cell. The model is composed of mass action ordinary differential equations, where the kinetic parameters describe protein-protein interactions, protein synthesis and degradation. The algorithm has been implemented on a parallel platform. Several potential solutions of the problem have been computed, each solution being a set of model parameters. A sub-set of parameters has been selected on the basis on their small coefficient of variation across the ensemble of solutions. Conclusion Despite the lack of sufficiently reliable and homogeneous experimental data, the genetic algorithm approach has allowed to estimate the approximate value of a number of model parameters in a kinetic model of a signaling pathway: these parameters have been assessed to be relevant for the reproduction of the available experimental data. PMID:17118160

  12. Design parameters of toroidal and bobbin magnetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1973-01-01

    The adoption by NASA of the metric system for dimensioning to replace the long-used English units imposes a requirement on the U.S. transformer designer to convert from the familiar units to the less familiar metric equivalents. Material is presented to assist in that transition in the field of transformer design and fabrication. The conversion data makes it possible for the designer to obtain a fast and close approximation of significant parameters such as size, weight, and temperature rise. Nomographs are included to provide a close approximation for breadboarding purposes. For greater convenience, derivations of some of the parameters are also presented.

  13. Linear Parameter Varying Control for Actuator Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Jong-Yeob; Wu, N. Eva; Belcastro, Christine; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A robust linear parameter varying (LPV) control synthesis is carried out for an HiMAT vehicle subject to loss of control effectiveness. The scheduling parameter is selected to be a function of the estimates of the control effectiveness factors. The estimates are provided on-line by a two-stage Kalman estimator. The inherent conservatism of the LPV design is reducing through the use of a scaling factor on the uncertainty block that represents the estimation errors of the effectiveness factors. Simulations of the controlled system with the on-line estimator show that a superior fault-tolerance can be achieved.

  14. Order parameter fluctuations in the holographic superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plantz, N. W. M.; Stoof, H. T. C.; Vandoren, S.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the effect of order parameter fluctuations in the holographic superconductor. In particular, following an introduction to the concept of intrinsic dynamics and its implementation within holographic models, we compute the intrinsic spectral functions of the order parameter in both the normal and the superconducting phase, using a fully backreacted bulk geometry. We also present a vector-like large-N version of the Ginzburg–Landau model that accurately describes our long-wavelength results in both phases. Our results indicate that the holographic superconductor describes a relativistic multi-component superfluid in the universal regime of the BEC–BCS crossover.

  15. Asymmetry in the reconstructed deceleration parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, Carla; Cárdenas, Víctor H.; Motta, Veronica

    2017-02-01

    We study the orientation dependence of the reconstructed deceleration parameter as a function of redshift. We use the Union 2 and Loss datasets, and the well known preferred axis discussed in the literature, and find the best fit reconstructed deceleration parameter. Our results show that a low redshift transition of the reconstructed q (z) is clearly absent in one direction and amazingly sharp in the opposite one. We discuss the possibility that such behavior can be associated to large scale structures affecting the data.

  16. Fractional Action Cosmology with Variable Order Parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Nabulsi, Rami Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    Fractional action cosmology with variable order parameter was constructed in this paper. Starting from a fractional weighted action which generalizes the fractional actionlike variational approach, a large number of cosmological dynamical equations are obtained depending on the mathematical type of the fractional order parameter. Through this paper, we selected two independent types which result on a number of cosmological scenarios and we discussed their dynamical consequences. It was observed that the present fractional cosmological formalism holds a large family of solutions and offers new features not found in the standard formalism and in many fundamental research papers.

  17. A measuring system for surface roughness parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jinhong; Wang, Yunkai; Zhang, Xianfeng

    2006-11-01

    We designed a measurement and control system which can measure the surface roughness parameters with a Single Chip Micyoco (SCM) as its kernel. It uses an inductive transducer to pick up the data. The instrumental structure and the working principle are also introduced in this paper. The integrated hardware and software systems have been designed and improved. The prototype model was calibrated and the instrumental precision was analysed according to the measured data. In this system the surface roughness parameters can automatically be measured and controlled, such as data processing, determination of the reference line, disposal of the surface profile informations, display and print of the results etc.

  18. Generalized Stokes parameters in phase space.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Serkan

    2010-05-15

    The generalized Stokes parameters (GSP) are studied under the theory of phase space. It is noted that phase-space Stokes parameters can be a useful tool for Wigner distribution function measurements. Electromagnetic Wigner functions are introduced by use of the two-point statistics of GSP. The advantage in the GSP is that they can be measured in terms of the electric correlation matrix (which is a measurable quantity) or they can be measured independently. Hence, the GSP help in finding the polarization and coherence properties of electromagnetic beams. Within this framework, by using the GSP in phase space, the intensity feature of electromagnetic beams in phase space is given, as well.

  19. Reducibility of Matrix Equations Containing Several Parameters.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    AD-AI15 568 AIR FORCE INST OF TECH WRIGHT-PATTERSON AFB OH SCHOO;-ETC EF G 12 1ADA1551 REDUCIBILITY OF MATRIX EQUATIONS CONTAINING SEVERAL...PARAMETERS.E U)CA E UNCLASSIFIED AFIT/GE/RA/81D-1 N P11111111II soonhh Eu;o I. ’Trm * a, ~t- NMI 4 i’- 00Nt. met r~ REDUCIBILITY OF MATRIX EQUATIONS CONTAINING...1 REDUCIBILITY OF MATRIX EQUATIONS CONTAINING SEVERAL PARAMETERS THESIS Presented to the Faculty of the School of Engineering of the Air Force

  20. On identifiability of flexible structure parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, S. M.; Goglia, G. L.

    1983-01-01

    This report investigates the identifiability of modal parameters of flexible structures. Expressions are derived for Cramer-Rao lower bounds for the modal parameters, that is, frequencies, damping ratios and mode shapes or slopes. The optimal initial state, which maximizes the trace of the Fisher information matrix in the absence of persistent input, is obtained. The concepts discussed are applied to a finite-element model of the 122 meter hoop/column antenna. The numerical results show that the identifiability of the structural frequencies is excellent, followed by that of the damping ratios and the mode-slopes.

  1. Optimization for minimum sensitivity to uncertain parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, Jocelyn I.; Adelman, Howard M.; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw

    1994-01-01

    A procedure to design a structure for minimum sensitivity to uncertainties in problem parameters is described. The approach is to minimize directly the sensitivity derivatives of the optimum design with respect to fixed design parameters using a nested optimization procedure. The procedure is demonstrated for the design of a bimetallic beam for minimum weight with insensitivity to uncertainties in structural properties. The beam is modeled with finite elements based on two dimensional beam analysis. A sequential quadratic programming procedure used as the optimizer supplies the Lagrange multipliers that are used to calculate the optimum sensitivity derivatives. The method was perceived to be successful from comparisons of the optimization results with parametric studies.

  2. A three-parameter asteroid taxonomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedesco, Edward F.; Williams, James G.; Matson, Dennis L.; Veeder, Glenn J.; Gradie, Jonathan C.

    1989-01-01

    Broadband U, V, and x photometry together with IRAS asteroid albedos have been used to construct an asteroid classification system. The system is based on three parameters (U-V and v-x color indices and visual geometric albedo), and it is able to place 96 percent of the present sample of 357 asteroids into 11 taxonomic classes. It is noted that all but one of these classes are analogous to those previously found using other classification schemes. The algorithm is shown to account for the observational uncertainties in each of the classification parameters.

  3. Quantum Fluctuations of a Superconductor Order Parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arutyunov, K. Yu; Lehtinen, J. S.

    2016-08-01

    Tunneling I-V characteristics between very narrow titanium nanowires and "massive" superconducting aluminum were measured. The clear trend was observed: the thinner the titanium electrode, the broader the singularity at eV = Δ1(Al) + Δ2(Ti). The phenomenon can be explained by broadening of the gap edge of the quasi-one-dimensional titanium channels due to quantum fluctuations of the order parameter modulus |Δ2|. The range of the nanowire diameters, where the effect is pronounced, correlates with dimensions where the phase fluctuations of the complex superconducting order parameter Δ = |Δ|eiφ, the quantum phase slips, broadening the R(T) dependencies, have been observed.

  4. Noniterative estimation of a nonlinear parameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstroem, A.

    1973-01-01

    An algorithm is described which solves the parameters X = (x1,x2,...,xm) and p in an approximation problem Ax nearly equal to y(p), where the parameter p occurs nonlinearly in y. Instead of linearization methods, which require an approximate value of p to be supplied as a priori information, and which may lead to the finding of local minima, the proposed algorithm finds the global minimum by permitting the use of series expansions of arbitrary order, exploiting an a priori knowledge that the addition of a particular function, corresponding to a new column in A, will not improve the goodness of the approximation.

  5. Pellet impact drilling operational parameters: experimental research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalyov, A. V.; Ryabchikov, S. Ya; Isaev, Ye D.; Aliev, F. R.; Gorbenko, M. V.; Baranova, A. V.

    2015-02-01

    The article deals with the study of particle-impact drilling that is designed to enhance the rate-of-penetration function in hard and tough drilling environments. It contains the experimental results on relation between drilling parameters and drilling efficiency, the experiments being conducted by means of a specially designed laboratory model. To interpret the results properly a high-speed camera was used to capture the pellet motion. These results can be used to choose optimal parameters, as well as to develop enhanced design of ejector pellet impact drill bits.

  6. Fractional Action Cosmology with Variable Order Parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Nabulsi, Rami Ahmad

    2017-04-01

    Fractional action cosmology with variable order parameter was constructed in this paper. Starting from a fractional weighted action which generalizes the fractional actionlike variational approach, a large number of cosmological dynamical equations are obtained depending on the mathematical type of the fractional order parameter. Through this paper, we selected two independent types which result on a number of cosmological scenarios and we discussed their dynamical consequences. It was observed that the present fractional cosmological formalism holds a large family of solutions and offers new features not found in the standard formalism and in many fundamental research papers.

  7. GEODYN- ORBITAL AND GEODETIC PARAMETER ESTIMATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putney, B.

    1994-01-01

    The Orbital and Geodetic Parameter Estimation program, GEODYN, possesses the capability to estimate that set of orbital elements, station positions, measurement biases, and a set of force model parameters such that the orbital tracking data from multiple arcs of multiple satellites best fits the entire set of estimation parameters. The estimation problem can be divided into two parts: the orbit prediction problem, and the parameter estimation problem. GEODYN solves these two problems by employing Cowell's method for integrating the orbit and a Bayesian least squares statistical estimation procedure for parameter estimation. GEODYN has found a wide range of applications including determination of definitive orbits, tracking instrumentation calibration, satellite operational predictions, and geodetic parameter estimation, such as the estimations for global networks of tracking stations. The orbit prediction problem may be briefly described as calculating for some later epoch the new conditions of state for the satellite, given a set of initial conditions of state for some epoch, and the disturbing forces affecting the motion of the satellite. The user is required to supply only the initial conditions of state and GEODYN will provide the forcing function and integrate the equations of motion of the satellite. Additionally, GEODYN performs time and coordinate transformations to insure the continuity of operations. Cowell's method of numerical integration is used to solve the satellite equations of motion and the variational partials for force model parameters which are to be adjusted. This method uses predictor-corrector formulas for the equations of motion and corrector formulas only for the variational partials. The parameter estimation problem is divided into three separate parts: 1) instrument measurement modeling and partial derivative computation, 2) data error correction, and 3) statistical estimation of the parameters. Since all of the measurements modeled by

  8. Experimental determination of terahertz atmospheric absorption parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slocum, David M.; Goyette, Thomas M.; Giles, Robert H.; Nixon, William E.

    2015-05-01

    The terahertz frequency regime is often used as the `chemical fingerprint' region of the electromagnetic spectrum since many molecules exhibit a dense selection of rotational and vibrational transitions. Water is a major component of the atmosphere and since it has a large dipole moment the propagation of terahertz radiation will be dominated by atmospheric effects. This study will present the results of high-­-resolution broadband measurements of the terahertz atmospheric absorption and detail the technique for directly measuring the pressure broadening coefficients, absolute absorption coefficients, line positions, and continuum effects. Differences between these measured parameters and those tabulated in HITRAN will be discussed. Once the water vapor absorption was characterized, the same technique was used to measure the line parameters for methanol, a trace gas of interest within Earth's atmosphere. Methanol has a dense absorption spectrum in the terahertz frequency region and is an important molecule in fields such as environmental monitoring, security, and astrophysics. The data obtained in the present study will be of immediate use for the remote sensing community, as it is uncommon to measure this many independent parameters as well as to measure the absolute absorption of the transitions. Current models rely on tabulated databases of calculated values for the line parameters measured in this study. Differences between the measured data and those in the databases will be highlighted and discussed.

  9. Design parameters for rotating cylindrical filtration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwille, John A.; Mitra, Deepanjan; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2002-01-01

    Rotating cylindrical filtration displays significantly reduced plugging of filter pores and build-up of a cake layer, but the number and range of parameters that can be adjusted complicates the design of these devices. Twelve individual parameters were investigated experimentally by measuring the build-up of particles on the rotating cylindrical filter after a fixed time of operation. The build-up of particles on the filter depends on the rotational speed, the radial filtrate flow, the particle size and the gap width. Other parameters, such as suspension concentration and total flow rate are less important. Of the four mechanisms present in rotating filters to reduce pore plugging and cake build-up, axial shear, rotational shear, centrifugal sedimentation and vortical motion, the evidence suggests rotational shear is the dominant mechanism, although the other mechanisms still play minor roles. The ratio of the shear force acting parallel to the filter surface on a particle to the Stokes drag acting normal to the filter surface on the particle due to the difference between particle motion and filtrate flow can be used as a non-dimensional parameter that predicts the degree of particle build-up on the filter surface for a wide variety of filtration conditions. c2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Putting Parameters in Their Proper Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montrul, Silvina; Yoon, James

    2009-01-01

    Seeing the logical problem of second language acquisition as that of primarily selecting and re-assembling bundles of features anew, Lardiere proposes to dispense with the deductive learning approach and its broad range of consequences subsumed under the concept of parameters. While we agree that feature assembly captures more precisely the…

  11. Local tsunamis and earthquake source parameters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, Eric L.; Dmowska, Renata; Saltzman, Barry

    1999-01-01

    This chapter establishes the relationship among earthquake source parameters and the generation, propagation, and run-up of local tsunamis. In general terms, displacement of the seafloor during the earthquake rupture is modeled using the elastic dislocation theory for which the displacement field is dependent on the slip distribution, fault geometry, and the elastic response and properties of the medium. Specifically, nonlinear long-wave theory governs the propagation and run-up of tsunamis. A parametric study is devised to examine the relative importance of individual earthquake source parameters on local tsunamis, because the physics that describes tsunamis from generation through run-up is complex. Analysis of the source parameters of various tsunamigenic earthquakes have indicated that the details of the earthquake source, namely, nonuniform distribution of slip along the fault plane, have a significant effect on the local tsunami run-up. Numerical methods have been developed to address the realistic bathymetric and shoreline conditions. The accuracy of determining the run-up on shore is directly dependent on the source parameters of the earthquake, which provide the initial conditions used for the hydrodynamic models.

  12. Practice Parameter for Psychiatric Consultation to Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This practice parameter reviews the topic of psychiatric consultation to schools. The review covers the history of school consultation and current consultative models; the process of developing a consultative relationship; school administrative procedures, personnel, and milieu; legal protections for students with mental disabilities; and issues…

  13. Models and parameters for environmental radiological assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C W

    1984-01-01

    This book presents a unified compilation of models and parameters appropriate for assessing the impact of radioactive discharges to the environment. Models examined include those developed for the prediction of atmospheric and hydrologic transport and deposition, for terrestrial and aquatic food-chain bioaccumulation, and for internal and external dosimetry. Chapters have been entered separately into the data base. (ACR)

  14. Seasonal variations of haematological parameters in athletes.

    PubMed

    Banfi, Giuseppe; Lundby, Carsten; Robach, Paul; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    The influence of training and competition workloads is crucial for evaluation of longitudinal haematological data in athletes. There are only a few papers on the variation of haematological parameters during long-lasting periods and, especially, during an entire competitive season. We summarized that some haematological parameters can be influenced by long-term training and competition periods. Haemoglobin (Hb) and haematocrit (Ht) are decreased during the more intense periods of training, throughout the season. In different sport disciplines, the decline of Hb ranges from 3 to 8% during the competition season, while the range of reticulocytes (Ret%) varies from 5 to 21%. Reticulocytes are also decreased after long periods of training and competitions, but their variation is not necessarily associated with that of Hb. The qualitative variations (trend of modifications) of haematological parameters are roughly independent of the sport discipline, but quantitatively (amount of modifications) dependent on sport discipline. The modifications are more evident in cycling, running, swimming than they are in football and rugby. The variations of haematological parameters within the same sport discipline are qualitatively concordant and quantitatively different among separate but consecutive competitive seasons. These findings are described in aerobic and team sports sportsmen. The definition of reliable reference ranges in sportsmen would only be possible by following the best laboratory practices. For antidoping purposes more studies investigating haematological modifications during the season are advisable.

  15. Stokes parameters modulator for birefringent filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dollfus, A.

    1985-01-01

    The Solar Birefringent Filter (Filter Polarisiant Solaire Selectif FPSS) of Meudon Observatory is presently located at the focus of a solar refractor with a 28 cm lens directly pointed at the Sun. It produces a diffraction limited image without instrumental polarization and with a spectral resolution of 46,000 in a field of 6 arc min. diameter. The instrument is calibrated for absolute Doppler velocity measurements and is presently used for quantitative imagery of the radial velocity motions in the photosphere. The short period oscillations are recorded. Work of adapting the instrument for the imagery of the solar surface in the Stokes parameters is discussed. The first polarizer of the birefringent filter, with a reference position angle 0 deg, is associated with a fixed quarter wave plate at +45 deg. A rotating quarter wave plate is set at 0 deg and can be turned by incremented steps of exactly +45 deg. Another quarter wave plate also initially set at 0 deg is simultaneously incremented by -45 deg but only on each even step of the first plate. A complete cycle of increments produces images for each of the 6 parameters I + or - Q, I + or - U and I + or - V. These images are then subtracted by pairs to produce a full image in the three Stokes parameters Q, U and V. With proper retardation tolerance and positioning accuracy of the quarter wave plates, the cross talk between the Stokes parameters was calculated and checked to be minimal.

  16. Multi-Parameter Scattering Sensor and Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Paul S. (Inventor); Fischer, David G. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Methods, detectors and systems detect particles and/or measure particle properties. According to one embodiment, a detector for detecting particles comprises: a sensor for receiving radiation scattered by an ensemble of particles; and a processor for determining a physical parameter for the detector, or an optimal detection angle or a bound for an optimal detection angle, for measuring at least one moment or integrated moment of the ensemble of particles, the physical parameter, or detection angle, or detection angle bound being determined based on one or more of properties (a) and/or (b) and/or (c) and/or (d) or ranges for one or more of properties (a) and/or (b) and/or (c) and/or (d), wherein (a)-(d) are the following: (a) is a wavelength of light incident on the particles, (b) is a count median diameter or other characteristic size parameter of the particle size distribution, (c) is a standard deviation or other characteristic width parameter of the particle size distribution, and (d) is a refractive index of particles.

  17. Online Dynamic Parameter Estimation of Synchronous Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Michael R.

    Traditionally, synchronous machine parameters are determined through an offline characterization procedure. The IEEE 115 standard suggests a variety of mechanical and electrical tests to capture the fundamental characteristics and behaviors of a given machine. These characteristics and behaviors can be used to develop and understand machine models that accurately reflect the machine's performance. To perform such tests, the machine is required to be removed from service. Characterizing a machine offline can result in economic losses due to down time, labor expenses, etc. Such losses may be mitigated by implementing online characterization procedures. Historically, different approaches have been taken to develop methods of calculating a machine's electrical characteristics, without removing the machine from service. Using a machine's input and response data combined with a numerical algorithm, a machine's characteristics can be determined. This thesis explores such characterization methods and strives to compare the IEEE 115 standard for offline characterization with the least squares approximation iterative approach implemented on a 20 h.p. synchronous machine. This least squares estimation method of online parameter estimation shows encouraging results for steady-state parameters, in comparison with steady-state parameters obtained through the IEEE 115 standard.

  18. Dimensionless parameters for lidar performance characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comerón, Adolfo; Agishev, Ravil R.

    2014-10-01

    A set of three dimensionless parameters is proposed to characterize lidar systems. Two of them are based on an asymptotic approximation of the output signal-to-noise ratio as a function of the input optical power reaching the photoreceiver when there is no background radiation. Of these, one is defined as the ratio between the input signal power level coming from a reference range in a reference atmosphere (reference power level) and the input power level that would produce a reference output signal-to-noise ratio if the photoreceiver operated always in signal-shot noise limited regime. The other is defined as the ratio between the reference power level and the input power level for which the signal-induced shot noise power equals the receiver noise power. A third parameter, defined as the ratio between the background optical power at the photoreceiver input and the reference power level, quantifies the effect of background radiation. With these three parameters a good approximation to the output signal-to-noise ratio of the lidar can be calculated as a function of the power reduction with respect to the power reaching the photodetector in the reference situation. These parameters can also be used to compare and rank the performance of different systems.

  19. Five-Parameter Bivariate Probability Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tubbs, J.; Brewer, D.; Smith, O. W.

    1986-01-01

    NASA technical memorandum presents four papers about five-parameter bivariate gamma class of probability distributions. With some overlap of subject matter, papers address different aspects of theories of these distributions and use in forming statistical models of such phenomena as wind gusts. Provides acceptable results for defining constraints in problems designing aircraft and spacecraft to withstand large wind-gust loads.

  20. Resonance Parameter Adjustment Based on Integral Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Sobes, Vladimir; Leal, Luiz; Arbanas, Goran; Forget, Benoit

    2016-06-02

    Our project seeks to allow coupling of differential and integral data evaluation in a continuous-energy framework and to use the generalized linear least-squares (GLLS) methodology in the TSURFER module of the SCALE code package to update the parameters of a resolved resonance region evaluation. We recognize that the GLLS methodology in TSURFER is identical to the mathematical description of a Bayesian update in SAMMY, the SAMINT code was created to use the mathematical machinery of SAMMY to update resolved resonance parameters based on integral data. Traditionally, SAMMY used differential experimental data to adjust nuclear data parameters. Integral experimental data, such as in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments Project, remain a tool for validation of completed nuclear data evaluations. SAMINT extracts information from integral benchmarks to aid the nuclear data evaluation process. Later, integral data can be used to resolve any remaining ambiguity between differential data sets, highlight troublesome energy regions, determine key nuclear data parameters for integral benchmark calculations, and improve the nuclear data covariance matrix evaluation. Moreover, SAMINT is not intended to bias nuclear data toward specific integral experiments but should be used to supplement the evaluation of differential experimental data. Using GLLS ensures proper weight is given to the differential data.

  1. Resonance Parameter Adjustment Based on Integral Experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Sobes, Vladimir; Leal, Luiz; Arbanas, Goran; ...

    2016-06-02

    Our project seeks to allow coupling of differential and integral data evaluation in a continuous-energy framework and to use the generalized linear least-squares (GLLS) methodology in the TSURFER module of the SCALE code package to update the parameters of a resolved resonance region evaluation. We recognize that the GLLS methodology in TSURFER is identical to the mathematical description of a Bayesian update in SAMMY, the SAMINT code was created to use the mathematical machinery of SAMMY to update resolved resonance parameters based on integral data. Traditionally, SAMMY used differential experimental data to adjust nuclear data parameters. Integral experimental data, suchmore » as in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments Project, remain a tool for validation of completed nuclear data evaluations. SAMINT extracts information from integral benchmarks to aid the nuclear data evaluation process. Later, integral data can be used to resolve any remaining ambiguity between differential data sets, highlight troublesome energy regions, determine key nuclear data parameters for integral benchmark calculations, and improve the nuclear data covariance matrix evaluation. Moreover, SAMINT is not intended to bias nuclear data toward specific integral experiments but should be used to supplement the evaluation of differential experimental data. Using GLLS ensures proper weight is given to the differential data.« less

  2. Surface grid generation in a parameter space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samareh-Abolhassani, Jamshid; Stewart, John E.

    1994-07-01

    A robust and efficient technique is discussed for surface-grid generation on a general curvilinear surface. This technique is based on a nonuniform parameter space and allows for the generation of surface grids on highly skewed and nonuniform spaced background surface-grids. This method has been successfully integrated into the GRIDGEN software system.

  3. Surface Grid Generation in a Parameter Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samareh-Abolhassani, Jamshid; Stewart, John E.

    1994-07-01

    A robust and efficient technique is discussed for surface-grid generation on a general curvilinear surface. This technique is based on a non-uniform parameter space and allows for the generation of surface grids on highly skewed and nonuniform spaced background surface-grids. This method has been successfully integrated into the GRIDGEN software system.

  4. Surface grid generation in a parameter space

    SciTech Connect

    Samareh-Abolhassani, J.; Stewart, J.E. )

    1994-07-01

    A robust and efficient technique is discussed for surface-grid generation on a general curvilinear surface. This technique is based on a nonuniform parameter space and allows for the generation of surface grids on highly skewed and nonuniform spaced background surface-grids. This method has been successfully integrated into the GRIDGEN software system. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Surface grid generation in a parameter space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh-Abolhassani, Jamshid; Stewart, John E.

    1994-01-01

    A robust and efficient technique is discussed for surface-grid generation on a general curvilinear surface. This technique is based on a nonuniform parameter space and allows for the generation of surface grids on highly skewed and nonuniform spaced background surface-grids. This method has been successfully integrated into the GRIDGEN software system.

  6. A Handbook of Sound and Vibration Parameters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-09-18

    fixed in space. (Reference 1.) no motion atay node Static Divergence: (See Divergence.) Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA): Statistical energy analysis is...parameters of the circuits come from statistics of the vibrational characteristics of the structure. Statistical energy analysis is uniquely successful

  7. Perturbative quantum gravity with the Immirzi parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, Dario; Speziale, Simone

    2011-06-01

    We study perturbative quantum gravity in the first-order tetrad formalism. The lowest order action corresponds to Einstein-Cartan plus a parity-odd term, and is known in the literature as the Holst action. The coupling constant of the parity-odd term can be identified with the Immirzi parameter γ of loop quantum gravity. We compute the quantum effective action in the one-loop expansion. As in the metric second-order formulation, we find that in the case of pure gravity the theory is on-shell finite, and the running of Newton's constant and the Immirzi parameter is inessential. In the presence of fermions, the situation changes in two fundamental aspects. First, non-renormalizable logarithmic divergences appear, as usual. Second, the Immirzi parameter becomes a priori observable, and we find that it is renormalized by a four-fermion interaction generated by radiative corrections. We compute its beta function and discuss possible implications. The sign of the beta function depends on whether the Immirzi parameter is larger or smaller than one in absolute value, and γ2 = 1 is a UV fixed-point (we work in Euclidean signature). Finally, we find that the Holst action is stable with respect to radiative corrections in the case of minimal coupling, up to higher order non-renormalizable interactions.

  8. Order Parameters for Two-Dimensional Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaatz, Forrest; Bultheel, Adhemar; Egami, Takeshi

    2007-10-01

    We derive methods that explain how to quantify the amount of order in ``ordered'' and ``highly ordered'' porous arrays. Ordered arrays from bee honeycomb and several from the general field of nanoscience are compared. Accurate measures of the order in porous arrays are made using the discrete pair distribution function (PDF) and the Debye-Waller Factor (DWF) from 2-D discrete Fourier transforms calculated from the real-space data using MATLAB routines. An order parameter, OP3, is defined from the PDF to evaluate the total order in a given array such that an ideal network has the value of 1. When we compare PDFs of man-made arrays with that of our honeycomb we find OP3=0.399 for the honeycomb and OP3=0.572 for man's best hexagonal array. The DWF also scales with this order parameter with the least disorder from a computer-generated hexagonal array and the most disorder from a random array. An ideal hexagonal array normalizes a two-dimensional Fourier transform from which a Debye-Waller parameter is derived which describes the disorder in the arrays. An order parameter S, defined by the DWF, takes values from [0, 1] and for the analyzed man-made array is 0.90, while for the honeycomb it is 0.65. This presentation describes methods to quantify the order found in these arrays.

  9. Estimation of Model Parameters for Steerable Needles

    PubMed Central

    Park, Wooram; Reed, Kyle B.; Okamura, Allison M.; Chirikjian, Gregory S.

    2010-01-01

    Flexible needles with bevel tips are being developed as useful tools for minimally invasive surgery and percutaneous therapy. When such a needle is inserted into soft tissue, it bends due to the asymmetric geometry of the bevel tip. This insertion with bending is not completely repeatable. We characterize the deviations in needle tip pose (position and orientation) by performing repeated needle insertions into artificial tissue. The base of the needle is pushed at a constant speed without rotating, and the covariance of the distribution of the needle tip pose is computed from experimental data. We develop the closed-form equations to describe how the covariance varies with different model parameters. We estimate the model parameters by matching the closed-form covariance and the experimentally obtained covariance. In this work, we use a needle model modified from a previously developed model with two noise parameters. The modified needle model uses three noise parameters to better capture the stochastic behavior of the needle insertion. The modified needle model provides an improvement of the covariance error from 26.1% to 6.55%. PMID:21643451

  10. A variable parameter parametric snake method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marouf, A.; Houacine, A.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new approach to parametric snake method by using variable snake parameters. Adopting fixed parameter values for all points of the snake, as usual, constitutes by itself a limitation that leads to poor performances in terms of convergence and tracking properties. A more adapted choice should be the one that allows selection depending on the image region properties as on the contour shape and position. However, such variability is not an easy task in general and a precise method need to be defined to assure contour point dependent tuning at iterations. We were particularly interested in applying this idea to the recently presented parametric method [1]. In the work mentioned, an attraction term is used to improve the convergence of the standard parametric snake without a significant increase in computational load. We show here, that improved performances can ensue from applying variable parameter concepts. For this purpose, the method is first analyzed and then a procedure is developed to assure an automatic variable parameter tuning. The interest of our approach is illustrated through object segmentation results.

  11. Practice Parameter for Psychodynamic Psychotherapy with Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medicus, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    This Practice Parameter describes the principles of psychodynamic psychotherapy with children and is based on clinical consensus and available research evidence. It presents guidelines for the practice of child psychodynamic psychotherapy, including indications and contraindications, the setting, verbal and interactive (play) techniques, work with…

  12. Evolution of Pedostructure Parameters Under Tillage Practices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pedostructure (PS) concept is a physically-based method of soil characterization that defines a soil based on its structure and the relationship between structure and soil water behavior. There are 15 unique pedostructure parameters that define the macropore and micropore soil water behavior fo...

  13. Changing Throwing Pattern: Instruction and Control Parameter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southard, Dan

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of instruction and scaling up a control parameter (velocity of throw) on changes in throwing pattern. Sixty adult female throwers (ages 20-26 years) were randomly placed into one of four practice conditions: (a) scale up on velocity with no instruction, (b) maintain constant velocity with no…

  14. Averaged controllability of parameter dependent conservative semigroups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohéac, Jérôme; Zuazua, Enrique

    2017-02-01

    We consider the problem of averaged controllability for parameter depending (either in a discrete or continuous fashion) control systems, the aim being to find a control, independent of the unknown parameters, so that the average of the states is controlled. We do it in the context of conservative models, both in an abstract setting and also analysing the specific examples of the wave and Schrödinger equations. Our first result is of perturbative nature. Assuming the averaging probability measure to be a small parameter-dependent perturbation (in a sense that we make precise) of an atomic measure given by a Dirac mass corresponding to a specific realisation of the system, we show that the averaged controllability property is achieved whenever the system corresponding to the support of the Dirac is controllable. Similar tools can be employed to obtain averaged versions of the so-called Ingham inequalities. Particular attention is devoted to the 1d wave equation in which the time-periodicity of solutions can be exploited to obtain more precise results, provided the parameters involved satisfy Diophantine conditions ensuring the lack of resonances.

  15. Missing Data and IRT Item Parameter Estimation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMars, Christine

    The situation of nonrandomly missing data has theoretically different implications for item parameter estimation depending on whether joint maximum likelihood or marginal maximum likelihood methods are used in the estimation. The objective of this paper is to illustrate what potentially can happen, under these estimation procedures, when there is…

  16. Vital parameters related low level laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmieri, Beniamino; Capone, Stefania

    2011-08-01

    The first work hypotesis is that biosensors on the patient detecting heart, breath rate and skin parameters, modulate laser radiation to enhance the therapeutic outcome; in the second work hypotesis: biofeedback could be effective, when integrated in the low level laser energy release.

  17. Solar Eruption and Local Magnetic Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeongwoo; Liu, Chang; Jing, Ju; Chae, Jongchul

    2016-11-01

    It is now a common practice to use local magnetic parameters such as magnetic decay index for explaining solar eruptions from active regions, but there can be an alternative view that the global properties of the source region should be counted as a more important factor. We discuss this issue based on Solar Dynamics Observatory observations of the three successive eruptions within 1.5 hr from the NOAA active region 11444 and the magnetic parameters calculated using the nonlinear force-free field model. Two violent eruptions occurred in the regions with relatively high magnetic twist number (0.5-1.5) and high decay index (0.9-1.1) at the nominal height of the filament (12″) and otherwise a mild eruption occurred, which supports the local-parameter paradigm. Our main point is that the time sequence of the eruptions did not go with these parameters. It is argued that an additional factor, in the form of stabilizing force, should operate to determine the onset of the first eruption and temporal behaviors of subsequent eruptions. As supporting evidence, we report that the heating and fast plasma flow continuing for a timescale of an hour was the direct cause for the first eruption and that the unidirectional propagation of the disturbance determined the timing of subsequent eruptions. Both of these factors are associated with the overall magnetic structure rather than local magnetic properties of the active region.

  18. Educational Parameters Revealed from VLE Logging Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Zanden, A. H. W. (Piet); Veen, W. (Wim)

    2007-01-01

    Educational management wants to comprehend the uses of ICT in Education to get a grip on its effects due to the multiple annual investments in the Virtual Learning Environment. In the search to define educational parameters a vast amount of datasets is examined from 289 institutes using Blackboard. The focus is on the three dimensions growth,…

  19. Structural health monitoring using parameter identification methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Pengxiang; Rao, Vittal S.

    2000-06-01

    A structural health monitoring method for determination of damages in structural system is developed using state variable model. A time-domain identification method, the subspace system identification algorithm, is first applied to get a state-space model of the structure. The identified state-space model is then transformed to two special realization forms, for determination of the equation of motion of multiple- degrees-freedom of the structure. The parameters of equation of motion, mass and stiffness matrices or damage indices are used to determine the location and extent of the damage. This method is also extended for the health monitoring of substructural system. Unlike the health monitoring of the whole structure, the health monitoring of substructure uses localized parameter identification which only involves the measurement of substructure parameters. Using this method, the number of unknown parameters and the computational requirement for each identification can be significantly reduced, hence the accuracy of estimation can be improved. Illustrative cases studies using both numerical and experimental structures are presented.

  20. Estimated hydrogeological parameters by artificial neurons network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, H.; Chen, C.; Tan, Y.; Ke, K.

    2009-12-01

    In recent years, many approaches had been developed using artificial neurons network (ANN) model cooperated with Theis analytical solution to estimate the effective hydrological parameters for the homogenous and isotropic porous media, such as Lin and Chen approach [Lin and Chen, 2006] (or called the ANN approach hereafter), PC-ANN approach [Samani et al., 2008]. The above methods assumed a full superimposition of the type curve and the observed drawdown, and tried to use the first time-drawdown data as a match point to make a fine approximation of the effective parameters. However, using the first time-drawdown data or the early time-drawdown data is not always correct for the estimation of the hydrological parameters, especially for heterogeneous and anisotropic aquifers. Therefore, this paper mainly corrected the concept of superimposed plot by modifying the ANN approach and PC-ANN approach, as well as cooperating with Papadopoulos analytical solution, to estimate the transmissivities and storage coefficient for anisotropic, heterogeneous aquifers. The ANN model is trained with 4000 training sets of the well function, and tested with 1000 sets and 300 sets of synthetic time-drawdown generated from homogonous and heterogonous parameters, respectively. In-situ observation data, the time-drawdown at station Shi-Chou of the Chihuahua River alluvial fan, Taiwan, is further adopted to test the applicability and reliability of proposed methods, as well as comparing with Straight-line method and Type-curve method. Results suggested that both of the modified methods had better performance than the original ones. Using late time drawdown to optimize the effective parameters is shown better than using early-time drawdown. Additionally, results indicated that the modified ANN approach is better than the modified PC-ANN approach in terms of precision, while the efficiency of the modified PC-ANN approach is approximately three times better than the modified ANN approach.

  1. Parameter space visualizer: an interactive parameter selection interface for iterative CT reconstruction algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wei; Mueller, Klaus

    2010-02-01

    Previous work indicated that using ordered subsets (OS-SIRT) for iterative CT can optimize the reconstruction performance once optimal settings for parameters such as number of subsets and relaxation factor have been identified. However, recent work also indicated that the optimal settings have dependent relations with regards to the quality of the projection data (such as SNR-level), which are hard to obtain a-priori. In addition, users may also have preferences in trading off between the dependent parameters, such as reconstruction speed and quality, which makes these (independent) parameters even more difficult to determine in an automated manner. Therefore, we devise an effective parameter space navigation interface allowing users to interactively assist parameter selection for iterative CT reconstruction algorithms (here for OS-SIRT). It is based on a 2D scatter plot with six display modes to show different features of the reconstruction results based on the user preferences. It also enables a dynamic visualization by gradual parameter alteration for illustrating the rate of impact of a given parameter constellation. Finally, we note the generality of our approach, which could be applied to assist any parameter selection related systems.

  2. Sensitivity of adjustment to parameter correlations and to response-parameter correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Wagschal, J.J.

    2011-07-01

    The adjusted parameters and response, and their respective posterior uncertainties and correlations, are presented explicitly as functions of all relevant prior correlations for the two parameters, one response case. The dependence of these adjusted entities on the various prior correlations is analyzed and portrayed graphically for various valid correlation combinations on a simple criticality problem. (authors)

  3. Accuracy of Parameter Estimation in Gibbs Sampling under the Two-Parameter Logistic Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Seock-Ho; Cohen, Allan S.

    The accuracy of Gibbs sampling, a Markov chain Monte Carlo procedure, was considered for estimation of item and ability parameters under the two-parameter logistic model. Memory test data were analyzed to illustrate the Gibbs sampling procedure. Simulated data sets were analyzed using Gibbs sampling and the marginal Bayesian method. The marginal…

  4. Which image parameter(s) for the automation of the electron microscope?

    PubMed

    Bonnet, N; Zinzindohoue, P

    1989-03-01

    Experiments on automating the transmission electron microscope rely on the search for minimum variance. This image parameter gives satisfactory results for automatic focusing, astigmatism correction, and beam alignment. We investigate here the different image descriptors that might also be used; we conclude that texture parameters, which are directional, would be better candidates correcting astigmatism and beam tilt.

  5. Effect of the cutter parameters and machining parameters on the interference in gear slicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xinchun; Li, Jia; Lou, Benchao; Shi, Jiang; Yang, Qijun

    2013-11-01

    Current researches have not yet found the effect law of the cutter parameters and machining parameters on the interference in gear slicing, the interference between the cutter and machined gear often happens because the appropriate cutter parameters and machining parameters cannot be set, which reduces the gear machining accuracy. The relative position between the major flank face and edge-sweeping surface, distribution law of the interference area in forming process of edge-sweeping surface, and effect law of relative positions among edge-sweeping surfaces on the interference are studied by graphical analysis. The effect law of the cutter parameters and machining parameters on the interference is found. The effect law shows that the interference in gear slicing can be controlled when the relief angle measured on the top edge and feed of every rotation are chosen respectively larger than 9° and smaller than 0.15 mm/r. An internal helical gear is sliced with the spur slice cutter and the cutter parameters and machining parameters are set based on above the effect law. The machined gear is measured in Gear Measuring Center and the detection result shows that the comprehensive accuracy reaches GB/T Class 7, where some reach GB/T Class 6. The result can meet the gear machining accuracy requirement and shows that the effect law found is valid. The problem of the interference in gear slicing is solved and the gear machining accuracy can be improved.

  6. Parameter estimation for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhanagopalan, Shriram

    With an increase in the demand for lithium based batteries at the rate of about 7% per year, the amount of effort put into improving the performance of these batteries from both experimental and theoretical perspectives is increasing. There exist a number of mathematical models ranging from simple empirical models to complicated physics-based models to describe the processes leading to failure of these cells. The literature is also rife with experimental studies that characterize the various properties of the system in an attempt to improve the performance of lithium ion cells. However, very little has been done to quantify the experimental observations and relate these results to the existing mathematical models. In fact, the best of the physics based models in the literature show as much as 20% discrepancy when compared to experimental data. The reasons for such a big difference include, but are not limited to, numerical complexities involved in extracting parameters from experimental data and inconsistencies in interpreting directly measured values for the parameters. In this work, an attempt has been made to implement simplified models to extract parameter values that accurately characterize the performance of lithium ion cells. The validity of these models under a variety of experimental conditions is verified using a model discrimination procedure. Transport and kinetic properties are estimated using a non-linear estimation procedure. The initial state of charge inside each electrode is also maintained as an unknown parameter, since this value plays a significant role in accurately matching experimental charge/discharge curves with model predictions and is not readily known from experimental data. The second part of the dissertation focuses on parameters that change rapidly with time. For example, in the case of lithium ion batteries used in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) applications, the prediction of the State of Charge (SOC) of the cell under a variety of

  7. Concomitant cervical and transperineal parametrial high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost for locally advanced cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bailleux, Caroline; Falk, Alexander Tuan; Chand-Fouche, Marie-Eve; Gautier, Mathieu; Barranger, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There is no consensus for parametrial boost technic while both transvaginal and transperineal approaches are discussed. A prototype was developed consisting of a perineal template, allowing transperineal needle insertion. This study analyzed acute toxicity of concomitant cervical and transperineal parametrial high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) boost for locally advanced cervical cancer. Material and methods From 01.2011 to 12.2014, 33 patients (pts) presenting a locally advanced cervical cancer with parametrial invasion were treated. After the first course of external beam radiation therapy with cisplatinum, HDRB was performed combining endocavitary and interstitial technique for cervical and parametrial disease. Post-operative delineation (CTV, bladder, rectum, sigmoid) and planification were based on CT-scan/MRI. HDRB was delivered in 3-5 fractions over 2-3 consecutive days. Acute toxicities occurring within 6 months after HDRB were retrospectively reviewed. Results Median age was 56.4 years (27-79). Clinical stages were: T2b = 23 pts (69.7%), T3a = 1 pt (3%), T3b = 6 pts (18.2%), and T4a = 3 pts (9.1%). Median HDRB prescribed dose was 21 Gy (21-27). Median CTVCT (16 pts) and HR-CTVMRI (17 pts) were 52.6 cc (28.5-74.3), 31.9 cc (17.1-58), respectively. Median EQD2αβ10 for D90CTV and D90HR-CTV were 82.9 Gy (78.2-96.5), 84.8 Gy (80.6-91.4), respectively. Median EQD2αβ3 (CT/MRI) for D2cc bladder, rectum and sigmoid were 75.5 Gy (66.6-90.9), 64.4 Gy (51.9-77.4), and 60.4 Gy (50.9-81.1), respectively. Median follow-up was 14 months (ranged 6-51). Among the 24 pts with MFU = 24 months, 2-year LRFS rate, RRFS, and OS were 86.8%, 88.8%, and 94.1%, respectively. The rates of acute genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were 36% (G1 dysuria = 8 pts, G2 infection = 2 pts, G3 infection = 2 pts), and 27% (G1 diarrhea = 9 pts), respectively. One patient presented vaginal bleeding at the time of applicator withdrawal (G3-blood transfusion); no bleeding was

  8. Renal parameter estimates in unrestrained dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rader, R. D.; Stevens, C. M.

    1974-01-01

    A mathematical formulation has been developed to describe the hemodynamic parameters of a conceptualized kidney model. The model was developed by considering regional pressure drops and regional storage capacities within the renal vasculature. Estimation of renal artery compliance, pre- and postglomerular resistance, and glomerular filtration pressure is feasible by considering mean levels and time derivatives of abdominal aortic pressure and renal artery flow. Changes in the smooth muscle tone of the renal vessels induced by exogenous angiotensin amide, acetylcholine, and by the anaesthetic agent halothane were estimated by use of the model. By employing totally implanted telemetry, the technique was applied on unrestrained dogs to measure renal resistive and compliant parameters while the dogs were being subjected to obedience training, to avoidance reaction, and to unrestrained caging.

  9. Compressing measurements in quantum dynamic parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magesan, Easwar; Cooper, Alexandre; Cappellaro, Paola

    2013-12-01

    We present methods that can provide an exponential savings in the resources required to perform dynamic parameter estimation using quantum systems. The key idea is to merge classical compressive sensing techniques with quantum control methods to significantly reduce the number of signal coefficients that are required for reconstruction of time-varying parameters with high fidelity. We show that incoherent measurement bases and, more generally, suitable random measurement matrices can be created by performing simple control sequences on the quantum system. Random measurement matrices satisfying the restricted isometry property can be used efficiently to reconstruct signals that are sparse in any basis. Because many physical processes are approximately sparse in some basis, these methods can benefit a variety of applications such as quantum sensing and magnetometry with nitrogen-vacancy centers.

  10. CosmoSIS: Modular cosmological parameter estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Zuntz, J.; Paterno, M.; Jennings, E.; Rudd, D.; Manzotti, A.; Dodelson, S.; Bridle, S.; Sehrish, S.; Kowalkowski, J.

    2015-06-09

    Cosmological parameter estimation is entering a new era. Large collaborations need to coordinate high-stakes analyses using multiple methods; furthermore such analyses have grown in complexity due to sophisticated models of cosmology and systematic uncertainties. In this paper we argue that modularity is the key to addressing these challenges: calculations should be broken up into interchangeable modular units with inputs and outputs clearly defined. Here we present a new framework for cosmological parameter estimation, CosmoSIS, designed to connect together, share, and advance development of inference tools across the community. We describe the modules already available in CosmoSIS, including CAMB, Planck, cosmic shear calculations, and a suite of samplers. Lastly, we illustrate it using demonstration code that you can run out-of-the-box with the installer available at http://bitbucket.org/joezuntz/cosmosis

  11. Parameter studies for traveling wave coaxial launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, A.Y. . Center for Electromechanics)

    1991-01-01

    The traveling wave coaxial launcher is a complex machine that requires very extensive parameter studies to optimize. Most of previous attempts to realize hypervelocity using coaxial launchers have failed partly due to inadequate analyses. This paper reports the results of very extensive air-core coaxial launcher parameter studies performed using computers. These results and the methodology introduced should help future researchers on this topic. In the course of studying the feasibility of accelerating a 1-kg projectile to 10 km/s with an 18 m air-core multiphase coaxial launcher powered by a rising frequency generator (RFGs), a complete simulation code based on the current filament method was developed. Results from the simulation code indicate rather chaotic behavior of an arbitrary coaxial launcher design. More fundamental studies were then conducted using various computer codes based on the current filament method.

  12. Analysis of Modeling Parameters on Threaded Screws.

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, Miquela S.; Brake, Matthew Robert; Vangoethem, Douglas

    2015-06-01

    Assembled mechanical systems often contain a large number of bolted connections. These bolted connections (joints) are integral aspects of the load path for structural dynamics, and, consequently, are paramount for calculating a structure's stiffness and energy dissipation prop- erties. However, analysts have not found the optimal method to model appropriately these bolted joints. The complexity of the screw geometry cause issues when generating a mesh of the model. This paper will explore different approaches to model a screw-substrate connec- tion. Model parameters such as mesh continuity, node alignment, wedge angles, and thread to body element size ratios are examined. The results of this study will give analysts a better understanding of the influences of these parameters and will aide in finding the optimal method to model bolted connections.

  13. "Cosmological Parameters from Large Scale Structure"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, A. J. S.

    2005-01-01

    This grant has provided primary support for graduate student Mark Neyrinck, and some support for the PI and for colleague Nick Gnedin, who helped co-supervise Neyrinck. This award had two major goals. First, to continue to develop and apply methods for measuring galaxy power spectra on large, linear scales, with a view to constraining cosmological parameters. And second, to begin try to understand galaxy clustering at smaller. nonlinear scales well enough to constrain cosmology from those scales also. Under this grant, the PI and collaborators, notably Max Tegmark. continued to improve their technology for measuring power spectra from galaxy surveys at large, linear scales. and to apply the technology to surveys as the data become available. We believe that our methods are best in the world. These measurements become the foundation from which we and other groups measure cosmological parameters.

  14. Habitable zone dependence on stellar parameter uncertainties

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, Stephen R.

    2014-02-20

    An important property of exoplanetary systems is the extent of the Habitable Zone (HZ), defined as that region where water can exist in a liquid state on the surface of a planet with sufficient atmospheric pressure. Both ground- and space-based observations have revealed a plethora of confirmed exoplanets and exoplanetary candidates, most notably from the Kepler mission using the transit detection technique. Many of these detected planets lie within the predicted HZ of their host star. However, as is the case with the derived properties of the planets themselves, the HZ boundaries depend on how well we understand the host star. Here we quantify the uncertainties of HZ boundaries on the parameter uncertainties of the host star. We examine the distribution of stellar parameter uncertainties from confirmed exoplanet hosts and Kepler candidate hosts and translate these into HZ boundary uncertainties. We apply this to several known systems with an HZ planet to determine the uncertainty in their HZ status.

  15. UPRE method for total variation parameter selection

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlberg, Brendt; Lin, Youzuo

    2008-01-01

    Total Variation (TV) Regularization is an important method for solving a wide variety of inverse problems in image processing. In order to optimize the reconstructed image, it is important to choose the optimal regularization parameter. The Unbiased Predictive Risk Estimator (UPRE) has been shown to give a very good estimate of this parameter for Tikhonov Regularization. In this paper we propose an approach to extend UPRE method to the TV problem. However, applying the extended UPRE is impractical in the case of inverse problems such as de blurring, due to the large scale of the associated linear problem. We also propose an approach to reducing the large scale problem to a small problem, significantly reducing computational requirements while providing a good approximation to the original problem.

  16. Hexagonal boron nitride and water interaction parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yanbin; Wagner, Lucas K.; Aluru, Narayana R.

    2016-04-01

    The study of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) in microfluidic and nanofluidic applications at the atomic level requires accurate force field parameters to describe the water-hBN interaction. In this work, we begin with benchmark quality first principles quantum Monte Carlo calculations on the interaction energy between water and hBN, which are used to validate random phase approximation (RPA) calculations. We then proceed with RPA to derive force field parameters, which are used to simulate water contact angle on bulk hBN, attaining a value within the experimental uncertainties. This paper demonstrates that end-to-end multiscale modeling, starting at detailed many-body quantum mechanics and ending with macroscopic properties, with the approximations controlled along the way, is feasible for these systems.

  17. Determination and analysis of synchronous motor's parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesņajevs, Aleksandrs; Zviedris, Andrejs

    2009-01-01

    In this work the parameters of synchronous machines are analyzed- direct-axis reaction Xad and quadrature-axis reaction Xaq. Methods of calculation in view of magnetic system's and its element's saturation are presented. It is shown that definition of these reactances, using as a basis a two-reaction method, is not correct and connected with work demanding chart analyzing calculations. The new approach to the qualitative and quantitative analysis of synchronous machine's operating modes which is based on consecutive use of the magnetic field's theory is offered, without it with two-reaction parameters Xad and Xaq. This approach is realized by means of a magnetic field's modeling using numerical methods with help of modern computers.

  18. Bayesian parameter estimation for effective field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesolowski, S.; Klco, N.; Furnstahl, R. J.; Phillips, D. R.; Thapaliya, A.

    2016-07-01

    We present procedures based on Bayesian statistics for estimating, from data, the parameters of effective field theories (EFTs). The extraction of low-energy constants (LECs) is guided by theoretical expectations in a quantifiable way through the specification of Bayesian priors. A prior for natural-sized LECs reduces the possibility of overfitting, and leads to a consistent accounting of different sources of uncertainty. A set of diagnostic tools is developed that analyzes the fit and ensures that the priors do not bias the EFT parameter estimation. The procedures are illustrated using representative model problems, including the extraction of LECs for the nucleon-mass expansion in SU(2) chiral perturbation theory from synthetic lattice data.

  19. Supersymmetric parameter space of family symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Velasco-Sevilla, L.

    2008-11-23

    In this talk I have emphasized the effects of considering departures from the minimal flavour violation conditions, in the context of CMSSM-like theories, introduced by boundary conditions at GUT scale from Family Symmetries. In [1] we have shown the results of running these conditions down to EW, where constraints from fermion masses and CKM matrix elements have been used. Only when the expansion parameter in the sdown-squark sector is relatively large it is possible to relax the lower limit from b{yields}s{gamma} on the universal gaugino mass. The expansion parameter associated with the slepton sector needs to be smaller than the analogous in the sdown-squark sector in order to satisfy the bound imposed by the decay of {tau}{yields}{mu}{mu}.

  20. CosmoSIS: Modular cosmological parameter estimation

    DOE PAGES

    Zuntz, J.; Paterno, M.; Jennings, E.; ...

    2015-06-09

    Cosmological parameter estimation is entering a new era. Large collaborations need to coordinate high-stakes analyses using multiple methods; furthermore such analyses have grown in complexity due to sophisticated models of cosmology and systematic uncertainties. In this paper we argue that modularity is the key to addressing these challenges: calculations should be broken up into interchangeable modular units with inputs and outputs clearly defined. Here we present a new framework for cosmological parameter estimation, CosmoSIS, designed to connect together, share, and advance development of inference tools across the community. We describe the modules already available in CosmoSIS, including CAMB, Planck, cosmicmore » shear calculations, and a suite of samplers. Lastly, we illustrate it using demonstration code that you can run out-of-the-box with the installer available at http://bitbucket.org/joezuntz/cosmosis« less

  1. CASIM input parameters for various materials

    SciTech Connect

    Malensek, A.J.; Elwyn, A.J.

    1994-07-14

    During the past year, the computer program CASIM has been placed in a common area from which copies can be obtained by a wide array of users. The impetus for this arrangement was the need to have a standard code that could be maintained and transported to other platforms. In addition, an historical record would be kept of each version as the program evolved. CASIM requires a series of parameters (input by the user) that describe the medium in which the cascade develops. Presently a total of 9 materials can be defined. Occasions arise when one needs to know the properties of materials (elements, compounds, and mixtures) that have not been defined. Because it is desirable to have a uniform set of values for all CASIM users, this note presents a methodology for obtaining the input parameters for an arbitrary material. They are read in by the Subroutine CASIM{underscore}PROG from the user supplied file CASIM.DAT.

  2. NMR parameters in gapped graphene systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crisan, Mircea; Grosu, Ioan; Ţifrea, Ionel

    2016-06-01

    We calculate the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation time and the Knight shift for the case of gapped graphene systems. Our calculations consider both the massive and massless gap scenarios. Both the spin-lattice relaxation time and the Knight shift depend on temperature, chemical potential, and the value of the electronic energy gap. In particular, at the Dirac point, the electronic energy gap has stronger effects on the system nuclear magnetic resonance parameters in the case of the massless gap scenario. Differently, at large values of the chemical potential, both gap scenarios behave in a similar way and the gapped graphene system approaches a Fermi gas from the nuclear magnetic resonance parameters point of view. Our results are important for nuclear magnetic resonance measurements that target the 13C active nuclei in graphene samples.

  3. Rapid Compact Binary Coalescence Parameter Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankow, Chris; Brady, Patrick; O'Shaughnessy, Richard; Ochsner, Evan; Qi, Hong

    2016-03-01

    The first observation run with second generation gravitational-wave observatories will conclude at the beginning of 2016. Given their unprecedented and growing sensitivity, the benefit of prompt and accurate estimation of the orientation and physical parameters of binary coalescences is obvious in its coupling to electromagnetic astrophysics and observations. Popular Bayesian schemes to measure properties of compact object binaries use Markovian sampling to compute the posterior. While very successful, in some cases, convergence is delayed until well after the electromagnetic fluence has subsided thus diminishing the potential science return. With this in mind, we have developed a scheme which is also Bayesian and simply parallelizable across all available computing resources, drastically decreasing convergence time to a few tens of minutes. In this talk, I will emphasize the complementary use of results from low latency gravitational-wave searches to improve computational efficiency and demonstrate the capabilities of our parameter estimation framework with a simulated set of binary compact object coalescences.

  4. Hexagonal boron nitride and water interaction parameters.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yanbin; Wagner, Lucas K; Aluru, Narayana R

    2016-04-28

    The study of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) in microfluidic and nanofluidic applications at the atomic level requires accurate force field parameters to describe the water-hBN interaction. In this work, we begin with benchmark quality first principles quantum Monte Carlo calculations on the interaction energy between water and hBN, which are used to validate random phase approximation (RPA) calculations. We then proceed with RPA to derive force field parameters, which are used to simulate water contact angle on bulk hBN, attaining a value within the experimental uncertainties. This paper demonstrates that end-to-end multiscale modeling, starting at detailed many-body quantum mechanics and ending with macroscopic properties, with the approximations controlled along the way, is feasible for these systems.

  5. Study of Nightitme enhancement of ionospheric parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardar, Nuzhat

    2012-07-01

    In the present work ionospheric electron content (IEC) as well as critical frequency of F2-layer (foF2) data from three locations (low, mid and high) latitudes have been used to study the anomalous nighttime F-region during low to moderate solar activity period i.e. from January 2006 to December 2010. Our results show that at high and mid latitude locations percentage of enhancement with IEC and foF2 is maximum during winter, whereas at low latitude location maximum percentage of enhancement with both the parameters is maximum during equinox. Out of 1176 number of enhancements for IEC, 661 enhancements occurred during pre-midnight hours and 515 occurred during post-midnight hours. Although for foF2 parameter out of 948 enhancements, 457 enhancements occurred during pre-midnight hours and 491 enhancements occurred during post-midnight hours.

  6. Calibrated Hydrothermal Parameters, Barrow, Alaska, 2013

    DOE Data Explorer

    Atchley, Adam; Painter, Scott; Harp, Dylan; Coon, Ethan; Wilson, Cathy; Liljedahl, Anna; Romanovsky, Vladimir

    2015-01-29

    A model-observation-experiment process (ModEx) is used to generate three 1D models of characteristic micro-topographical land-formations, which are capable of simulating present active thaw layer (ALT) from current climate conditions. Each column was used in a coupled calibration to identify moss, peat and mineral soil hydrothermal properties to be used in up-scaled simulations. Observational soil temperature data from a tundra site located near Barrow, AK (Area C) is used to calibrate thermal properties of moss, peat, and sandy loam soil to be used in the multiphysics Advanced Terrestrial Simulator (ATS) models. Simulation results are a list of calibrated hydrothermal parameters for moss, peat, and mineral soil hydrothermal parameters.

  7. Parameter identification and modeling of longitudinal aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aksteter, J. W.; Parks, E. K.; Bach, R. E., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Using a comprehensive flight test database and a parameter identification software program produced at NASA Ames Research Center, a math model of the longitudinal aerodynamics of the Harrier aircraft was formulated. The identification program employed the equation error method using multiple linear regression to estimate the nonlinear parameters. The formulated math model structure adhered closely to aerodynamic and stability/control theory, particularly with regard to compressibility and dynamic manoeuvring. Validation was accomplished by using a three degree-of-freedom nonlinear flight simulator with pilot inputs from flight test data. The simulation models agreed quite well with the measured states. It is important to note that the flight test data used for the validation of the model was not used in the model identification.

  8. Fracture mechanics parameters for small fatigue cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a review of some common small-crack test specimens, the underlying causes of the small-crack effect, and the fracture-mechanics parameters that have been used to correlate or predict their growth behavior. This review concentrates on continuum mechanics concepts and on the nonlinear behavior of small cracks. The paper reviews some stress-intensity factor solutions for small-crack test specimens and develops some simple elastic-plastic J integral and cyclic J integral expressions that include the influence of crack-closure. These parameters were applied to small-crack growth data on two aluminum alloys, and a fatigue life prediction methodology is demonstrated. For these materials, the crack-closure transient from the plastic wake was found to be the major factor in causing the small-crack effect.

  9. Functional diagnostic parameters for arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed

    Rajabi-Jagahrgh, Ehsan; Banerjee, Rupak K

    2015-06-01

    The inability to detect the arteriovenous fistula (AVF) dysfunction in a timely manner under the current surveillance programs, which are based on either diameter (d), flow rate (Q), or pressure (p) measurements, is one of the major challenges of dialysis treatment. Thus, our aim is to introduce new functional diagnostic parameters that can better predict AVF functionality status. Six AVFs were created between the femoral arteries and veins of three pigs, each pig having two AVFs on either limb. Flow fields and pressure drop (Δp) in AVFs were obtained via numerical analysis utilizing the CT scan and Doppler ultrasound data at 2D (D: days), 7D, and 28D postsurgery. The dataset included 16 (two pigs [four AVFs] for three time points, and one pig [two AVFs] for two time points) repeated measurements over time, and the statistical analysis was done using a mixed model. To evaluate the nature of pressure drop-flow relationships in AVFs, the Δp was correlated with the average velocity at proximal artery (v) and also the corresponding scaled velocity (v*) by the curvature ratio of anastomotic segment. Based on these relationships, two new functional diagnostic parameters, including the nonlinear pressure drop coefficient (Cp ; pressure drop divided by dynamic pressure at proximal artery) and the linear resistance index (R; pressure drop divided by velocity at proximal artery), were introduced. The diagnostic parameters that were calculated based on scaled velocity are represented as R* and Cp *. A marginal (P = 0.1) increase in d from 2D (5.4 ± 0.7 mm) to 7D (6.8 ± 0.7 mm), along with a significant increase in Q (2D: 967 ± 273 mL/min; 7D: 1943 ± 273 mL/min), was accompanied by an almost unchanged Δp over this time period (2D: 16.42 ± 4.6 mm Hg; 7D: 16.40 ± 4.6 mm Hg). However, the insignificant increase in d and Q from 7D to 28D (d = 7.8 ± 0.8 mm; Q = 2181 ± 378 mL/min) was accompanied by the elevation in Δp (24.6 ± 6.5 mm Hg). The functional diagnostic

  10. Quantum Fluctuations of a Superconductor Order Parameter.

    PubMed

    Arutyunov, K Yu; Lehtinen, J S

    2016-12-01

    Tunneling I-V characteristics between very narrow titanium nanowires and "massive" superconducting aluminum were measured. The clear trend was observed: the thinner the titanium electrode, the broader the singularity at eV = Δ1(Al) + Δ2(Ti). The phenomenon can be explained by broadening of the gap edge of the quasi-one-dimensional titanium channels due to quantum fluctuations of the order parameter modulus |Δ2|. The range of the nanowire diameters, where the effect is pronounced, correlates with dimensions where the phase fluctuations of the complex superconducting order parameter Δ = |Δ|e(iφ), the quantum phase slips, broadening the R(T) dependencies, have been observed.

  11. Evaluation of the IRT Parameter Invariance Property for the MCAT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelkar, Vinaya; Wightman, Linda F.; Luecht, Richard M.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the viability of the property of parameter invariance for the one-parameter (1P), two-parameter (2P), and three-parameter (3P) item response theory (IRT) models for the Medical College Admissions Tests (MCAT). Invariance of item parameters across different gender, ethnic, and language groups and the…

  12. Aerodynamics as a subway design parameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, D. W.

    1976-01-01

    A parametric sensitivity study has been performed on the system operational energy requirement in order to guide subway design strategy. Aerodynamics can play a dominant or trivial role, depending upon the system characteristics. Optimization of the aerodynamic parameters may not minimize the total operational energy. Isolation of the station box from the tunnel and reduction of the inertial power requirements pay the largest dividends in terms of the operational energy requirement.

  13. Extraction of the Susy and Higgs parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Adam-Bourdarios, Claire

    2010-02-10

    If supersymmetry is discovered by the next generation of collider experiments, it will be crucial to determine its fundamental high-scale parameters. Three scenarios have been recently investigated by the SFitter collaboration : the case where the LHC 'only' measures a light Higgs like signal, the case where SUSY signal are discovered at the LHC, and the dream scenario, where LHC and ILC measurements can be combined.

  14. Parameter estimation techniques for LTP system identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nofrarias Serra, Miquel

    LISA Pathfinder (LPF) is the precursor mission of LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna) and the first step towards gravitational waves detection in space. The main instrument onboard the mission is the LTP (LISA Technology Package) whose scientific goal is to test LISA's drag-free control loop by reaching a differential acceleration noise level between two masses in √ geodesic motion of 3 × 10-14 ms-2 / Hz in the milliHertz band. The mission is not only challenging in terms of technology readiness but also in terms of data analysis. As with any gravitational wave detector, attaining the instrument performance goals will require an extensive noise hunting campaign to measure all contributions with high accuracy. But, opposite to on-ground experiments, LTP characterisation will be only possible by setting parameters via telecommands and getting a selected amount of information through the available telemetry downlink. These two conditions, high accuracy and high reliability, are the main restrictions that the LTP data analysis must overcome. A dedicated object oriented Matlab Toolbox (LTPDA) has been set up by the LTP analysis team for this purpose. Among the different toolbox methods, an essential part for the mission are the parameter estimation tools that will be used for system identification during operations: Linear Least Squares, Non-linear Least Squares and Monte Carlo Markov Chain methods have been implemented as LTPDA methods. The data analysis team has been testing those methods with a series of mock data exercises with the following objectives: to cross-check parameter estimation methods and compare the achievable accuracy for each of them, and to develop the best strategies to describe the physics underlying a complex controlled experiment as the LTP. In this contribution we describe how these methods were tested with simulated LTP-like data to recover the parameters of the model and we report on the latest results of these mock data exercises.

  15. 146 Kepler-Lamost targets fundamental parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yaqian

    2015-08-01

    Accurate stellar fundamental parameters with high precision are important for distinguishing stellar populationand star study.Turn-off stars are in the relatively vital stellar evolution state. Studying turn-off stars can help us to have a more comprehensive understand of the stellar physics.With the help of observation provided by Lamost project, we obtain atmospheric parameters of 146 turn-off stars from LSP3 pipeline. Combined with stellar pulsation data from Kepler, we can get asteroseismic characteristic of stars,such as Δν and νmax.In this paper,we constructed a grid of evolutionary models, with the mass range from 0.8 to 2.5 M⊙ and metallicities Zini = 0.0085, 0.0105, 0.0130, 0.0165, 0.0200, 0.0250, 0.0300, 0.0400 (i.e.[Fe/H] from -0.3 to 0.4dex).All evolutionary tracks were started in the pre-main sequence birth line and ended at the base of Red Giant Branch.Based on the stellar model grid we constructed,as well as Kepler-Lamost observations, we obtained fundamental parameters of 146 around turn-off stars, and found that 112 targets lied in turn-off state or in the Main Sequence,15 targets are subgiant stars and 7 targets have evolved to the red giants stage.Then we use pulsation code(JIG) of Guenther to extract theorical individual frequencies and calculate theorical Δν.Meanwhile we obtained more precise fundamental parameters of these stars.

  16. Beyond six parameters: Extending Λ CDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Valentino, Eleonora; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Silk, Joseph

    2015-12-01

    Cosmological constraints are usually derived under the assumption of a six-parameter Λ CDM theoretical framework or simple one-parameter extensions. In this paper we present, for the first time, cosmological constraints in a significantly extended scenario, varying up to 12 cosmological parameters simultaneously, including the sum of neutrino masses, the neutrino effective number, the dark energy equation of state, the gravitational wave background and the running of the spectral index of primordial perturbations. Using the latest Planck 2015 data release (with polarization), we found no significant indication for extensions to the standard Λ CDM scenario, with the notable exception of the angular power spectrum lensing amplitude, Alens , which is larger than the expected value at more than 2 standard deviations, even when combining the Planck data with BAO and supernovae type Ia external data sets. In our extended cosmological framework, we find that a combined Planck+BAO analysis constrains the value of the rms density fluctuation parameter to σ8=0.781-0.063+0.065 at 95 % C.L., helping to relieve the possible tensions with the CFHTlenS cosmic shear survey. We also find a lower value for the reionization optical depth τ =0.058-0.043+0.040 at 95 % C.L. with respect to the one derived under the assumption of Λ CDM . The scalar spectral index nS is now compatible with a Harrison-Zeldovich spectrum to within 2.5 standard deviations. Combining the Planck data set with the Hubble Space Telescope prior on the Hubble constant provides a value for the equation of state w <-1 at more than 2 standard deviations, while the neutrino effective number is fully compatible with the expectations of the standard three neutrino framework.

  17. Hansen Solubility Parameters for Octahedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-28

    Sci. 2005, 97, 939-945. 40. Cataldo, F. On the Solubility Parameter of C60 and Higher Fullerenes. Fuller. Nanotub . Carbon Nanostruct. 2009, 17, 79-84...First, the cohesive energy for the naphthyl group is calculated by scaling the values for phenyl groups 17 by the number of carbons (10 for...mass of the peripheral carbon atom nearest to each silicon atom actually falls within the cube, so each corner of the cube contains a region that is

  18. Target parameter and error estimation using magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, S. J.; Witten, A. J.; Won, I. J.; Taylor, D.

    The problem of locating and identifying buried unexploded ordnance from magnetometry measurements is addressed within the context of maximum likelihood estimation. In this approach, the magnetostatic theory is used to develop data templates, which represent the modeled magnetic response of a buried ferrous object of arbitrary location, iron content, size, shape, and orientation. It is assumed that these objects are characterized both by a magnetic susceptibility representing their passive response to the earth's magnetic field and by a three-dimensional magnetization vector representing a permanent dipole magnetization. Analytical models were derived for four types of targets: spheres, spherical shells, ellipsoids, and ellipsoidal shells. The models can be used to quantify the Cramer-Rao (error) bounds on the parameter estimates. These bounds give the minimum variance in the estimated parameters as a function of measurement signal-to-noise ratio, spatial sampling, and target characteristics. For cases where analytic expressions for the Cramer-Rao bounds can be derived, these expressions prove quite useful in establishing optimal sampling strategies. Analytic expressions for various Cramer-Rao bounds have been developed for spherical- and spherical shell-type objects. An maximum likelihood estimation algorithm has been developed and tested on data acquired at the Magnetic Test Range at the Naval Explosive Ordnance Disposal Tech Center in Indian Head, Maryland. This algorithm estimates seven target parameters. These parameters are the three Cartesian coordinates (x, y, z) identifying the buried ordnance's location, the three Cartesian components of the permanent dipole magnetization vector, and the equivalent radius of the ordnance assuming it is a passive solid iron sphere.

  19. Parameter Uncertainty for Repository Thermal Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hardin, Ernest; Hadgu, Teklu; Greenberg, Harris; Dupont, Mark

    2015-10-01

    This report is one follow-on to a study of reference geologic disposal design concepts (Hardin et al. 2011a). Based on an analysis of maximum temperatures, that study concluded that certain disposal concepts would require extended decay storage prior to emplacement, or the use of small waste packages, or both. The study used nominal values for thermal properties of host geologic media and engineered materials, demonstrating the need for uncertainty analysis to support the conclusions. This report is a first step that identifies the input parameters of the maximum temperature calculation, surveys published data on measured values, uses an analytical approach to determine which parameters are most important, and performs an example sensitivity analysis. Using results from this first step, temperature calculations planned for FY12 can focus on only the important parameters, and can use the uncertainty ranges reported here. The survey of published information on thermal properties of geologic media and engineered materials, is intended to be sufficient for use in generic calculations to evaluate the feasibility of reference disposal concepts. A full compendium of literature data is beyond the scope of this report. The term “uncertainty” is used here to represent both measurement uncertainty and spatial variability, or variability across host geologic units. For the most important parameters (e.g., buffer thermal conductivity) the extent of literature data surveyed samples these different forms of uncertainty and variability. Finally, this report is intended to be one chapter or section of a larger FY12 deliverable summarizing all the work on design concepts and thermal load management for geologic disposal (M3FT-12SN0804032, due 15Aug2012).

  20. Comparison of Dam Breach Parameter Estimators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    from a large storm in 1975 (CEATI). The dam was constructed of a clay core containing shale. The upstream and downstream fill was homogeneous earth ...Comparison of Dam Breach Parameter Estimators D. Michael Gee1 1 Senior Hydraulic Engineer, Corps of Engineers Hydrologic Engineering...Center, 609 2nd St., Davis, CA 95616; email: michael.gee@usace.army.mil. ABSTRACT Analytical techniques for the estimation of dam breach

  1. Telemetry methods for monitoring physiological parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryer, T. B.; Sandler, H.

    1982-01-01

    The use of telemetry to monitor various physiological functions is discussed. The advantages of the technique and the parameters that it can monitor are assessed, and the main telemetry systems, including pressure telemetry, flow telemetry, and multichannel telemetry, are detailed. Human applications of implanted flow transducers, total implant versus backpack telemetry, the use of power sources and integrated circuits in telemetry, and the future prospects of the technique in hypertension treatment and research are discussed.

  2. Surveillance of industrial processes with correlated parameters

    DOEpatents

    White, Andrew M.; Gross, Kenny C.; Kubic, William L.; Wigeland, Roald A.

    1996-01-01

    A system and method for surveillance of an industrial process. The system and method includes a plurality of sensors monitoring industrial process parameters, devices to convert the sensed data to computer compatible information and a computer which executes computer software directed to analyzing the sensor data to discern statistically reliable alarm conditions. The computer software is executed to remove serial correlation information and then calculate Mahalanobis distribution data to carry out a probability ratio test to determine alarm conditions.

  3. Surveillance of industrial processes with correlated parameters

    DOEpatents

    White, A.M.; Gross, K.C.; Kubic, W.L.; Wigeland, R.A.

    1996-12-17

    A system and method for surveillance of an industrial process are disclosed. The system and method includes a plurality of sensors monitoring industrial process parameters, devices to convert the sensed data to computer compatible information and a computer which executes computer software directed to analyzing the sensor data to discern statistically reliable alarm conditions. The computer software is executed to remove serial correlation information and then calculate Mahalanobis distribution data to carry out a probability ratio test to determine alarm conditions. 10 figs.

  4. CHAMP: Changepoint Detection Using Approximate Model Parameters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    detecting changes in the parameters and mod- els that generate observed data. Commonly cited examples include detecting changes in stock market behavior [4...experimentally verified using artifi- cially generated data and are compared to those of Fearnhead and Liu [5]. 2 Related work Hidden Markov Models ( HMMs ) are...largely the de facto tool of choice when analyzing time series data, but the standard HMM formulation has several undesirable properties. The number of

  5. Operational parameters for the superconducting cavity maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, R. T.; Dick, G. J.; Strayer, D. M.

    1989-05-01

    Tests of the superconducting cavity maser (SCM) ultra-stable frequency source have been made for the first time using a hydrogen maser for a frequency reference. In addition to characterizing the frequency stability, the sensitivity of the output frequency to several crucial parameters was determined for various operating conditions. Based on this determination, the refrigeration and thermal control systems of the SCM were modified. Subsequent tests showed substantially improved performance, especially at the longest averaging times.

  6. Determination of inertial parameters using a dynamometer.

    PubMed

    Son, Jongsang; Ryu, Jeseong; Kim, Jungyoon; Kim, Youngho

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a simple method based on the dynamic equation of motion was introduced to determine the moment of inertia using a commercial dynamometer, and an optimization technique was utilized to estimate inertial parameters with the determined moment of inertia. To evaluate the feasibility of the developed method, three different passive speeds (i.e. 240, 270 and 300°/s) were chosen to confirm whether the moment of inertia values are the same irrespective of angular speeds. Moreover, the estimated inertial parameters (i.e., the mass, center of mass and moment of inertia) of the elbow attachment and the disk-like 3 kg-weight were compared with solutions of uniform square cube and solid disk, respectively. As a result, the values of moments of inertia of the elbow attachment were 0.216 ± 0.017, 0.215 ± 0.016 and 0.216 ± 0.017 kg · m(2) at angular speeds of 240, 270 and 300°/s, respectively. The values of the moment of inertia of both the attachment and weight were 0.821 ± 0.054, 0.823 ± 0.058 and 0.824 ± 0.053 kg · m(2) at angular speeds of 240, 270 and 300°/s, respectively. There were no significant differences among the speeds. The estimated inertial parameters of the attachment or the weight were very similar to the theoretical values. Therefore, it is expected that the developed method has the potential to estimate inertial parameters of a human body segment and to improve the accuracy and reliability of the studies on human dynamics.

  7. Differential interferometric measurement of mirror shape parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Brian

    This project was inspired by the need for a remote method to accurately measure radius of curvature of mirrors tested under the NASA Advanced Mirror System Demonstrator program. Under this program, off axis parabolas (subscale candidates for James Webb Space Telescope optical elements) were tested under cryo-vac conditions. A remote, differential interferometric method is presented for measuring the shape parameters of general aspheric mirrors. The result of measurement is the assignment of best-fit values to a set of parameters that characterize the shape of the surface. If the mirror is nominally a conic of rotation, for example, the measurement yields the radius of curvature and conic constant. The method involves testing the optic in an interferometric center-of-curvature null configuration but can easily be extended to include conjugate null tests. During the measurement, known translational misalignments are introduced and the effects on the optical path length function are measured using a phase-shifting interferometer. Based on the nominal mirror shape, a model function is defined, up to a set of free shape parameters. The mirror shape parameters are regressed, based on the interferometric data, from this model. This differential measurement method works for on- and off-axis mirrors of all shapes and can be applied remotely as long as the mirror is mounted on an actuated stage. Hence, this measurement method would work well in a cryogenic testing situation. We have successfully applied the method to the case of an off-axis parabola with a nominal radius of curvature of 304.8 mm, a diameter of 76.17 mm, and a pupil offset of -89.40 mm.

  8. Operational parameters for the superconducting cavity maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, R. T.; Dick, G. J.; Strayer, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    Tests of the superconducting cavity maser (SCM) ultra-stable frequency source have been made for the first time using a hydrogen maser for a frequency reference. In addition to characterizing the frequency stability, the sensitivity of the output frequency to several crucial parameters was determined for various operating conditions. Based on this determination, the refrigeration and thermal control systems of the SCM were modified. Subsequent tests showed substantially improved performance, especially at the longest averaging times.

  9. What parameters characterize “life”?

    PubMed Central

    Mitaku, Shigeki; Sawada, Ryusuke

    2016-01-01

    “Life” is a particular state of matter, and matter is composed of various molecules. The state corresponding to “life” is ultimately determined by the genome sequence, and this sequence determines the conditions necessary for survival of the organism. In order to elucidate one parameter characterizing the state of “life”, we analyzed the amino acid sequences encoded in the total genomes of 557 prokaryotes and 40 eukaryotes using a membrane protein prediction online tool called SOSUI. SOSUI uses only the physical parameters of the encoded amino acid sequences to make its predictions. The ratio of membrane proteins in a genome predicted by the SOSUI online tool was around 23% for all genomes, indicating that this parameter is controlled by some mechanism in cells. In order to identify the property of genome DNA sequences that is the possible cause of the constant ratio of membrane proteins, we analyzed the nucleotide compositions at codon positions and observed the existence of systematic biases distinct from those expected based on random distribution. We hypothesize that the constant ratio of membrane proteins is the result of random mutations restricted by the systematic biases inherent to nucleotide codon composition. A new approach to the biological sciences based on the holistic analysis of whole genomes is discussed in order to elucidate the principles underlying “life” at the biological system level.

  10. Associations between sleep parameters and food reward.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Jessica; Cadieux, Sébastien; Finlayson, Graham; Blundell, John E; Doucet, Éric

    2015-06-01

    This study examined the effects of acute, isocaloric aerobic and resistance exercise on different sleep parameters, and whether changes in these sleep parameters between sessions were related to next morning food reward. Fourteen men and women (age: 21.9 ± 2.7 years; body mass index: 22.7 ± 1.9 kg m(-) ²) participated in three randomized crossover sessions: aerobic exercise; resistance exercise; and sedentary control. Target exercise energy expenditure was matched at 4 kcal kg(-1) of body weight, and performed at 70% of VO2peak or 70% of 1 repetition-maximal. Sleep was measured (accelerometry) for 22 h following each session. The 'wanting' for visual food cues (validated computer task) was assessed the next morning. There were no differences in sleep parameters and food 'wanting' between conditions. Decreases in sleep duration and earlier wake-times were significantly associated with increased food 'wanting' between sessions (P = 0.001). However, these associations were no longer significant after controlling for elapsed time between wake-time and the food reward task. These findings suggest that shorter sleep durations and earlier wake-times are associated with increased food reward, but these associations are driven by elapsed time between awakening and completion of the food reward task.

  11. Bias in parameter estimation of form errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangchao; Zhang, Hao; He, Xiaoying; Xu, Min

    2014-09-01

    The surface form qualities of precision components are critical to their functionalities. In precision instruments algebraic fitting is usually adopted and the form deviations are assessed in the z direction only, in which case the deviations at steep regions of curved surfaces will be over-weighted, making the fitted results biased and unstable. In this paper the orthogonal distance fitting is performed for curved surfaces and the form errors are measured along the normal vectors of the fitted ideal surfaces. The relative bias of the form error parameters between the vertical assessment and orthogonal assessment are analytically calculated and it is represented as functions of the surface slopes. The parameter bias caused by the non-uniformity of data points can be corrected by weighting, i.e. each data is weighted by the 3D area of the Voronoi cell around the projection point on the fitted surface. Finally numerical experiments are given to compare different fitting methods and definitions of the form error parameters. The proposed definition is demonstrated to show great superiority in terms of stability and unbiasedness.

  12. Visual parameter optimisation for biomedical image processing

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Biomedical image processing methods require users to optimise input parameters to ensure high-quality output. This presents two challenges. First, it is difficult to optimise multiple input parameters for multiple input images. Second, it is difficult to achieve an understanding of underlying algorithms, in particular, relationships between input and output. Results We present a visualisation method that transforms users' ability to understand algorithm behaviour by integrating input and output, and by supporting exploration of their relationships. We discuss its application to a colour deconvolution technique for stained histology images and show how it enabled a domain expert to identify suitable parameter values for the deconvolution of two types of images, and metrics to quantify deconvolution performance. It also enabled a breakthrough in understanding by invalidating an underlying assumption about the algorithm. Conclusions The visualisation method presented here provides analysis capability for multiple inputs and outputs in biomedical image processing that is not supported by previous analysis software. The analysis supported by our method is not feasible with conventional trial-and-error approaches. PMID:26329538

  13. Reproductive Parameters of the Dogo Argentino Bitch

    PubMed Central

    Caffaratti, Marina; González, Griselda; Gorla, Nora; Guendulain, Corina

    2013-01-01

    The Dogo Argentino (DA) is the first and only breed from Argentina recognized worldwide. Although its morphologic features have been well established, its normal reproductive parameters are not clearly known. The aim of this study was to determine the main DA bitch reproductive parameters. One hundred and forty-nine surveys were obtained from breeders from Córdoba province, Argentina: one for each intact DA bitch from 1 to 14 years old. The DA bitch reached puberty at an average of 8.93 months. The mean duration of vulval bleeding found in this study was 11.11 days. The clinical signs characteristic for proestrous-estrous were vulval edema (89.93%), bleeding during the time of mating (32.21%), holding the tail to the side (95.30%), and docility during mating (85.91%). DA bitches had a whelping rate of 84%. Out of 299 pregnancies, 89.30% exhibited a normal parturition, 6.69% presented dystocia, 2.68% needed Cesarean section, and 1.34% aborted. In conclusion, the reproductive parameters of the DA bitch are similar to those identified for other large breeds. DA often showed a prolonged vulval bleeding longer than proestrus. Its high whelping rate, its low incidence of dystocia, and its good maternal ability define the DA as a good reproductive breed with normal reproductive functions. PMID:26464905

  14. Software Computes Tape-Casting Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Henry C., III

    2003-01-01

    Tcast2 is a FORTRAN computer program that accelerates the setup of a process in which a slurry containing metal particles and a polymeric binder is cast, to a thickness regulated by a doctor blade, onto fibers wound on a rotating drum to make a green precursor of a metal-matrix/fiber composite tape. Before Tcast2, setup parameters were determined by trial and error in time-consuming multiple iterations of the process. In Tcast2, the fiber architecture in the final composite is expressed in terms of the lateral distance between fibers and the thickness-wise distance between fibers in adjacent plies. The lateral distance is controlled via the manner of winding. The interply spacing is controlled via the characteristics of the slurry and the doctor-blade height. When a new combination of fibers and slurry is first cast and dried to a green tape, the shrinkage from the wet to the green condition and a few other key parameters of the green tape are measured. These parameters are provided as input to Tcast2, which uses them to compute the doctor-blade height and fiber spacings needed to obtain the desired fiber architecture and fiber volume fraction in the final composite.

  15. On selecting satellite conjunction filter parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfano, Salvatore; Finkleman, David

    2014-06-01

    This paper extends concepts of signal detection theory to predict the performance of conjunction screening techniques and guiding the selection of keepout and screening thresholds. The most efficient way to identify satellites likely to collide is to employ filters to identify orbiting pairs that should not come close enough over a prescribed time period to be considered hazardous. Such pairings can then be eliminated from further computation to accelerate overall processing time. Approximations inherent in filtering techniques include screening using only unperturbed Newtonian two body astrodynamics and uncertainties in orbit elements. Therefore, every filtering process is vulnerable to including objects that are not threats and excluding some that are threats, Type I and Type II errors. The approach in this paper guides selection of the best operating point for the filters suited to a user's tolerance for false alarms and unwarned threats. We demonstrate the approach using three archetypal filters with an initial three-day span, select filter parameters based on performance, and then test those parameters using eight historical snapshots of the space catalog. This work provides a mechanism for selecting filter parameters but the choices depend on the circumstances.

  16. Parameter Estimation of Spacecraft Fuel Slosh Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangadharan, Sathya; Sudermann, James; Marlowe, Andrea; Njengam Charles

    2004-01-01

    Fuel slosh in the upper stages of a spinning spacecraft during launch has been a long standing concern for the success of a space mission. Energy loss through the movement of the liquid fuel in the fuel tank affects the gyroscopic stability of the spacecraft and leads to nutation (wobble) which can cause devastating control issues. The rate at which nutation develops (defined by Nutation Time Constant (NTC can be tedious to calculate and largely inaccurate if done during the early stages of spacecraft design. Pure analytical means of predicting the influence of onboard liquids have generally failed. A strong need exists to identify and model the conditions of resonance between nutation motion and liquid modes and to understand the general characteristics of the liquid motion that causes the problem in spinning spacecraft. A 3-D computerized model of the fuel slosh that accounts for any resonant modes found in the experimental testing will allow for increased accuracy in the overall modeling process. Development of a more accurate model of the fuel slosh currently lies in a more generalized 3-D computerized model incorporating masses, springs and dampers. Parameters describing the model include the inertia tensor of the fuel, spring constants, and damper coefficients. Refinement and understanding the effects of these parameters allow for a more accurate simulation of fuel slosh. The current research will focus on developing models of different complexity and estimating the model parameters that will ultimately provide a more realistic prediction of Nutation Time Constant obtained through simulation.

  17. Neutrino mass implications for muon decay parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Erwin, Rebecca J.; Kile, Jennifer; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael J.; Wang Peng

    2007-02-01

    We use the scale of neutrino mass and naturalness considerations to obtain model-independent expectations for the magnitude of possible contributions to muon decay Michel parameters from new physics above the electroweak symmetry-breaking scale. Focusing on Dirac neutrinos, we obtain a complete basis of dimension four and dimension six effective operators that are invariant under the gauge symmetry of the standard model and that contribute to both muon decay and neutrino mass. We show that - in the absence of fine tuning - the most stringent neutrino-mass naturalness bounds on chirality-changing vector operators relevant to muon decay arise from one-loop operator mixing. The bounds we obtain on their contributions to the Michel parameters are 2 orders of magnitude stronger than bounds previously obtained in the literature. In addition, we analyze the implications of one-loop matching considerations and find that the expectations for the size of various scalar and tensor contributions to the Michel parameters are considerably smaller than derived from previous estimates of two-loop operator mixing. We also show, however, that there exist gauge-invariant operators that generate scalar and tensor contributions to muon decay but whose flavor structure allows them to evade neutrino-mass naturalness bounds. We discuss the implications of our analysis for the interpretation of muon-decay experiments.

  18. The Advanced Photon Source list of parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Bizek, H.M.

    1996-07-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is a third-generation synchrotron radiation source that stores positrons in a storage ring. The choice of positrons as accelerating particles was motivated by the usual reason: to eliminate the degradation of the beam caused by trapping of positively charged dust particles or ions. The third-generation synchrotron radiation sources are designed to have low beam emittance and many straight sections for insertion devices. The parameter list is comprised of three basic systems: the injection system, the storage ring system, and the experimental facilities system. The components of the injection system are listed according to the causal flow of positrons. Below we briefly list the individual components of the injection system, with the names of people responsible for managing these machines in parentheses: the linac system; electron linac-target-positron linac (Marion White); low energy transport line from linac to the PAR (Michael Borland); positron accumulator ring or PAR (Michael Borland); low energy transport line from PAR to injector synchrotron (Michael Borland); injector synchrotron (Stephen Milton); high energy transport line from injector synchrotron to storage ring (Stephen Milton). The storage ring system, managed by Glenn Decker, uses the Chasman-Green lattice. The APS storage ring, 1104 m in circumference, has 40 periodic sectors. Six are used to house hardware and 34 serve as insertion devices. Another 34 beamlines emit radiation from bending magnets. The experimental facilities system`s parameters include parameters for both an undulator and a wiggler.

  19. Reproductive Parameters of the Dogo Argentino Bitch.

    PubMed

    Caffaratti, Marina; González, Griselda; Gorla, Nora; Guendulain, Corina

    2013-01-01

    The Dogo Argentino (DA) is the first and only breed from Argentina recognized worldwide. Although its morphologic features have been well established, its normal reproductive parameters are not clearly known. The aim of this study was to determine the main DA bitch reproductive parameters. One hundred and forty-nine surveys were obtained from breeders from Córdoba province, Argentina: one for each intact DA bitch from 1 to 14 years old. The DA bitch reached puberty at an average of 8.93 months. The mean duration of vulval bleeding found in this study was 11.11 days. The clinical signs characteristic for proestrous-estrous were vulval edema (89.93%), bleeding during the time of mating (32.21%), holding the tail to the side (95.30%), and docility during mating (85.91%). DA bitches had a whelping rate of 84%. Out of 299 pregnancies, 89.30% exhibited a normal parturition, 6.69% presented dystocia, 2.68% needed Cesarean section, and 1.34% aborted. In conclusion, the reproductive parameters of the DA bitch are similar to those identified for other large breeds. DA often showed a prolonged vulval bleeding longer than proestrus. Its high whelping rate, its low incidence of dystocia, and its good maternal ability define the DA as a good reproductive breed with normal reproductive functions.

  20. A New Parameter for Cardiac Efficiency Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borazjani, Iman; Rajan, Navaneetha Krishnan; Song, Zeying; Hoffmann, Kenneth; MacMahon, Eileen; Belohlavek, Marek

    2014-11-01

    Detecting and evaluating a heart with suboptimal pumping efficiency is a significant clinical goal. However, the routine parameters such as ejection fraction, quantified with current non-invasive techniques are not predictive of heart disease prognosis. Furthermore, they only represent left-ventricular (LV) ejection function and not the efficiency, which might be affected before apparent changes in the function. We propose a new parameter, called the hemodynamic efficiency (H-efficiency) and defined as the ratio of the useful to total power, for cardiac efficiency analysis. Our results indicate that the change in the shape/motion of the LV will change the pumping efficiency of the LV even if the ejection fraction is kept constant at 55% (normal value), i.e., H-efficiency can be used for suboptimal cardiac performance diagnosis. To apply H-efficiency on a patient-specific basis, we are developing a system that combines echocardiography (echo) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to provide the 3D pressure and velocity field to directly calculate the H-efficiency parameter. Because the method is based on clinically used 2D echo, which has faster acquisition time and lower cost relative to other imaging techniques, it can have a significant impact on a large number of patients. This work is partly supported by the American Heart Association.

  1. Automated reticulocyte parameters for hereditary spherocytosis screening.

    PubMed

    Lazarova, Elena; Pradier, Olivier; Cotton, Frédéric; Gulbis, Béatrice

    2014-11-01

    The laboratory diagnosis of hereditary spherocytosis (HS) is based on several screening and confirmatory tests; our algorithm includes clinical features, red blood cell morphology analysis and cryohaemolysis test, and, in case of positive screening, sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis as a diagnostic test. Using the UniCel DxH800 (Beckman Coulter) haematology analyser, we investigated automated reticulocyte parameters as HS screening tool, i.e. mean reticulocyte volume (MRV), immature reticulocyte fraction (IRF) and mean sphered cell volume (MSCV). A total of 410 samples were screened. Gel electrophoresis was applied to 159 samples that were positive for the screening tests. A total of 48 patients were diagnosed as HS, and seven were diagnosed as acquired autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AIHA). Some other 31 anaemic conditions were also studied. From the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, both delta (mean cell volume (MCV)-MSCV) and MRV presented an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.98. At the diagnostic cut-off of 100 % sensitivity, MRV showed the best specificity of 88 % and a positive likelihood ratio of 8.7. The parameters IRF, MRV and MSCV discriminated HS not only from controls and other tested pathologies but also from AIHA contrary to the cryohaemolysis test. In conclusion, automated reticulocyte parameters might be helpful for haemolytic anaemia diagnostic orientation even for general laboratories. In combination with cryohaemolysis, they ensure an effective and time-saving screening for HS for more specialised laboratories.

  2. Line Parameters for the Oxygen a Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benner, D. Chris; Devi, V. Malathy; Hoo, Jiajun; Sung, Keeyoon; Hodges, Joseph T.; Long, David A.; Bui, Thinh; Rupasinghe, Priyanka Milinda; Okumura, Mitchio

    2013-06-01

    Simulation of the oxygen A band to a level that is sufficient for accurate studies of the Earth's atmosphere is complex in that not only are Doppler and Lorentz broadening important, but also Dicke narrowing, pressure shifts, line mixing and speed dependence. In addition all of these parameters except the speed dependence require temperature dependence parameters as well. To measure all of the required line parameters with the multispectrum nonlinear least squares fitting technique, spectra were acquired by the Bruker IFS125-HR Fourier Transform Spectrometer at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in combination with various multpass cells, a cavity ring down spectrometer at NIST and a photoacoustic spectrometer at the California Institute of Technology. The combination of the data from these three very different types of spectrometers in a single simultaneous fit of the entire band enables the measurement of all of these quantities. The results to this point will be summarized. D. Chris Benner, C. P. Rinsland, V. M. Devi, M. A. H. Smith, and D. Atkins, JQSRT 1995;53:705-21. Support for the work at William and Mary was provided by JPL and the NIST Greenhouse Gas Measurements and Climate Research Program. Part of the research described in this paper was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under contracts with National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Support for the work at NIST was provided by at the NIST Greenhouse Gas Measurements and Climate Research Program and an Innovations in Measurement Sciences (IMS) award.

  3. Electromagnetic radiation--parameters for risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Israel, M S

    1994-01-01

    The assessment of human exposure to electromagnetic radiation (EMR) under occupational and environmental conditions is one of the most complicated problems of public health science and practice. The problems arise from the very essence of EMR, the conflicting requirements of the measuring instruments, the complexity of electromagnetic waves in the working environment, and the still unknown mechanisms of their biological effects. One of the best ways to develop methods and criteria for exposure assessment of EMR is to determine the electromagnetic field parameters as well as those related to the quantity of energy absorbed by the organism. Definitions have been given mainly regarding tissues' electric and magnetic characteristics, and regarding the energetic parameters of EMR, without description of concrete methods of exposure assessment in different complicated cases of wide-ranging impulsive, non-homogeneous radiation. The best parameters for exposure assessment are the Specific Absorption Rate (SAR), the energetic loading of the human body (the electromagnetic dose W), the time-weighted average (TWA), using time-dependent hygienic norms and standards.

  4. Transmission parameters of vector-borne infections.

    PubMed

    Desenclos, J-C

    2011-11-01

    Vector-borne infections are those for which the agent (virus, bacteria, or parasite) is transmitted from an infected host (animal or human) to another by a hematophagous arthropod (mosquito, tick, lice, and flea). Two parameters quantify the dynamics of a vector-borne infection: (1) the basic reproductive number (R(0)) that is the mean number of secondary infections transmitted from an infectious host by the bite of the vector and (2) the generation interval that explores the speed of occurrence of secondary cases transmitted by the vector from an infectious case. In a population in which some individuals are immune, the parameter of interest is the net reproduction number (R) function of R(0) and the proportion of those immune. For vector-borne infectious agents, R(0) is determined by the number of vectors in contact with a given individual (m), the number of a given vector bites/day on individuals (a), the daily survival rate of the vector (p), the duration of the pathogenic agent's development cycle in the vector (n), the proportion of infected vectors that are really infectious (vector competence) (b), the probability of agent transmission from a viremic individual to the vector for one bite (c) and the host's infectiousness clearance rate (r) with R(0)=(m. a(2). p(n)/-lnp). b. c/r. These parameters are related to geographic and climatic conditions and cannot, therefore, be extrapolated from one situation to another.

  5. Kinetic parameters for source driven systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dulla, S.; Ravetto, P.; Carta, M.; D'Angelo, A.

    2006-07-01

    The definition of the characteristic kinetic parameters of a subcritical source-driven system constitutes an interesting problem in reactor physics with important consequences for practical applications. Consistent and physically meaningful values of the parameters allow to obtain accurate results from kinetic simulation tools and to correctly interpret kinetic experiments. For subcritical systems a preliminary problem arises for the adoption of a suitable weighting function to be used in the projection procedure to derive a point model. The present work illustrates a consistent factorization-projection procedure which leads to the definition of the kinetic parameters in a straightforward manner. The reactivity term is introduced coherently with the generalized perturbation theory applied to the source multiplication factor ks, which is thus given a physical role in the kinetic model. The effective prompt lifetime is introduced on the assumption that a neutron generation can be initiated by both the fission process and the source emission. Results are presented for simplified configurations to fully comprehend the physical features and for a more complicated highly decoupled system treated in transport theory. (authors)

  6. Regularization Parameter Selections via Generalized Information Criterion

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiyun; Li, Runze; Tsai, Chih-Ling

    2009-01-01

    We apply the nonconcave penalized likelihood approach to obtain variable selections as well as shrinkage estimators. This approach relies heavily on the choice of regularization parameter, which controls the model complexity. In this paper, we propose employing the generalized information criterion (GIC), encompassing the commonly used Akaike information criterion (AIC) and Bayesian information criterion (BIC), for selecting the regularization parameter. Our proposal makes a connection between the classical variable selection criteria and the regularization parameter selections for the nonconcave penalized likelihood approaches. We show that the BIC-type selector enables identification of the true model consistently, and the resulting estimator possesses the oracle property in the terminology of Fan and Li (2001). In contrast, however, the AIC-type selector tends to overfit with positive probability. We further show that the AIC-type selector is asymptotically loss efficient, while the BIC-type selector is not. Our simulation results confirm these theoretical findings, and an empirical example is presented. Some technical proofs are given in the online supplementary material. PMID:20676354

  7. Unsaturated flow parameters of municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shi-Jin; Zheng, Qi-Teng; Chen, H X

    2017-01-24

    Leachate pollution/recirculation and landfill gas emission are the major environmental concerns in municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. A good understanding and prediction of MSW unsaturated properties are critical for the design of piping systems and the control of these problems within landfills. This paper reviews the recent studies of unsaturated properties of MSW, including experimental methods, theoretical models and corresponding model parameters. For experimental methods, the sample size is a common and significant limitation and large test apparatuses (e.g., >80cm in diameter) are generally required and valuable. The theoretical models for MSW also have some limitations due to the changes in waste composition and particle size distribution caused by biodegradation. Thus, the available data of intrinsic permeabilities, water retention curves, relative permeabilities and anisotropy of MSW were summarized to investigate the influences of porosity, waste composition and particle size distribution. A series of estimation methods were subsequently proposed to determine the parameters of water retention curve like θLm, θLr, nv and α. The other parameters such as the pore connectivity term (l) and the degree of anisotropy (k) were significantly lacking data, thus only their relationships with porosity were proposed. The results show that it is possible to define the second order effects caused by variations in porosity, waste composition and particle size distribution. However, the estimation methods still need more experimental data for improvement, especially their dependence on waste composition and particle size distribution.

  8. Technical aspects of the integration of three-dimensional treatment planning dose parameters (GEC-ESTRO Working Group) into pre-implant planning for LDR gynecological interstitial brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Chi, A; Gao, M; Nguyen, N P; Albuquerque, K

    2009-06-01

    This study investigates the technical feasibility of pre-implant image-based treatment planning for LDR GYN interstitial brachytherapy(IB) based on the GEC-ESTRO guidelines. Initially, a virtual plan is generated based on the prescription dose and GEC-ESTRO defined OAR dose constraints with a pre-implant CT. After the actual implant, a regular diagnostic CT was obtained and fused with our pre-implant scan/initial treatment plan in our planning software. The Flexi-needle position changes, and treatment plan modifications were made if needed. Dose values were normalized to equivalent doses in 2 Gy fractions (LQED 2 Gy) derived from the linear-quadratic model with alpha/beta of 3 for late responding tissues and alpha/beta of 10 for early responding tissues. D(90) to the CTV, which was gross tumor (GTV) at the time of brachytherapy with a margin to count for microscopic disease, was 84.7 +/- 4.9% of the prescribed dose. The OAR doses were evaluated by D(2cc) (EBRT+IB). Mean D(2cc) values (LQED(2Gy)) for the rectum, bladder, sigmoid, and small bowel were the following: 63.7 +/- 8.4 Gy, 61.2 +/- 6.9 Gy, 48.0 +/- 3.5 Gy, and 49.9 +/- 4.2 Gy. This study confirms the feasibility of applying the GEC-ESTRO recommended dose parameters in pre-implant CT-based treatment planning in GYN IB. In the process, this pre-implant technique also demonstrates a good approximation of the target volume dose coverage, and doses to the OARs.

  9. On the optimal parameter and noise identification on the basis of three parameter probability distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakšić, Nikola

    2015-03-01

    The optimality of the procedure of parameter identification is scrutinized in this paper. It was shown, with the relations between the mathematical theory of function approximation, three parameter probability distributions, which can adjust their shape, and the maximum-likelihood method, that the optimal expression of the distance between measured data and model fitting it can be established by using the three parameter probability distributions on the basis of iteration procedure, where the noise contained in the measured signal is extracted as well. The iterative method for optimal system/model parameter identification is presented and tested by the numerical experimentation. Four types of noise added to the simple single-degree-of-freedom system response are considered: Gauss, Cauchy, Laplace and Uniform. The method performs well for the noise types at relatively high noise content in the signal.

  10. Linear Parameter Varying Control Synthesis for Actuator Failure, Based on Estimated Parameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Jong-Yeob; Wu, N. Eva; Belcastro, Christine

    2002-01-01

    The design of a linear parameter varying (LPV) controller for an aircraft at actuator failure cases is presented. The controller synthesis for actuator failure cases is formulated into linear matrix inequality (LMI) optimizations based on an estimated failure parameter with pre-defined estimation error bounds. The inherent conservatism of an LPV control synthesis methodology is reduced using a scaling factor on the uncertainty block which represents estimated parameter uncertainties. The fault parameter is estimated using the two-stage Kalman filter. The simulation results of the designed LPV controller for a HiMXT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) vehicle with the on-line estimator show that the desired performance and robustness objectives are achieved for actuator failure cases.

  11. Sensitivity of posterior parameter correlations and response parameter correlations to prior response uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Wagschal, J. J.

    2012-07-01

    The two parameters one response model of the generalized linear least squares parameter adjustment methodology was used in order to analyze the procedure of improving cross sections agreement with integral experimental results. Two extreme adjustment cases were considered. One case is using extremely accurate measured integral responses, such as k{sub eff} of Godiva or Jezebel for instance. The other one is modifying only one parameter, for instance the modification of {nu}-bar in ENDF/B-VII, in order to improve agreement of calculated responses with corresponding integral measurements results. In both cases new posterior parameters correlations are generated. The conclusion is that it is not advised to use integral measurements information in the evaluation process of a general purpose nuclear data file. (authors)

  12. Correlations Between the Ligand Electrochemical Parameter, EL(L) and the Hammett Substituent Parameter Sigma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-25

    AD-A260 299 OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH Contract N00014-91-J-1910 R & T Code 4131025 Technical Report #51 Correlations Between the Ligand ...COVERED January 25, 1993 Technical - June 1991 to July 1992 4 TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS Correlations Between the Ligand Electrochemical...Ontario, Canada, M3J 1P3. Correlations Between the Ligand Electrochemical Parameter. ET (D and the Hammett Substituent Param~eter. a. By Hitoshi

  13. Estimation of Parameters in Latent Class Models with Constraints on the Parameters.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    the item parameters. Let us briefly review the elements of latent class models. The reader desiring a thorough introduction can consult Lazarsfeld and...parameters, including most of the models which have been proposed to date. The latent distance model of Lazarsfeld and Henry (1968) and the quasi...Psychometrika, 1964, 29, 115-129. Lazarsfeld , P.F., and Henry, N.W. Latent structure analysis. Boston: Houghton-Mifflin, 1968. L6. - 29 References continued

  14. [Morbidity parameters in mining industry workers of Southern Urals].

    PubMed

    Askarova, Z F; Askarov, R A

    2009-01-01

    The authors presented parameters of transitory disablement morbidity, occupational morbidity for workers in two mining enterprises (Bashkortostan Republic), calculated integral parameter of disablement.

  15. Classification of hydrological parameter sensitivity and evaluation of parameter transferability across 431 US MOPEX basins

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Huiying; Hou, Zhangshuan; Huang, Maoyi; Bao, Jie; Sun, Yu; Tesfa, Teklu; Ruby Leung, L.

    2016-05-01

    Effective uncertainty quantification approaches are needed to identify important parameters or factors that affect complex Earth system models that composed of multi-phase multi-component phenomena and multiple biogeophysical-biogeochemical processes. In this study, the impacts of 10 hydrologic parameters in Community Land Model (CLM) simulations of runoff and latent heat flux in a watershed are evaluated. Simple residual statistics, the Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient, and log mean square error are used as alternative measures of the deviations between the simulated and field observed values. The effects of the input parameters on the deviations are evaluated quantitatively using analysis of variance (ANOVA) based on the generalized linear model (GLM), and using generalized cross validation (GCV) based on the multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS) model. These analyses 1) help identify how to adjust parameter values and therefore the calibration of the CLM parameters and to improve the model’s simulations, and 2) can approximately predict the model calibration performance. The convergence behavior of the sensitivity analysis with number of sampling points for both ANOVA and GCV is also examined relative to different combinations of input parameters and output response variables and their metrics.

  16. Conversion from constitutive parameters to dispersive transmission line parameters for multi-band metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozturk, Yusuf; Egemen Yilmaz, Asim; Ozbay, Ekmel

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we explain an approach including conversion from constitutive parameters to dispersive transmission line parameters using the double-band DNG (double-negative) properties of the circular type fishnet metamaterials. After designing the metamaterial structure, the numerical calculations and the composite right/left-handed (CRLH) modeling of circular-type metamaterials are realized in free space. Detailed dispersion characteristics give us the opportunity to explain the true behavior of the inclusions during the analysis stage. By combining the results coming from the standard retrieval procedure with the conventional CRLH theory, we calculate the actual values of the transmission line parameters for all frequency regimes. The constitutive parameters of an equivalent CRLH transmission line are derived and shown to be negative values. It is shown that the constitutive parameters present the same behavior for all negative refractive index regimes. The double-negative properties and the phase advance/lag behavior of metamaterials are observed based on the dispersive transmission line parameters.

  17. Summary of the DREAM8 Parameter Estimation Challenge: Toward Parameter Identification for Whole-Cell Models

    PubMed Central

    Karr, Jonathan R.; Williams, Alex H.; Zucker, Jeremy D.; Raue, Andreas; Steiert, Bernhard; Timmer, Jens; Kreutz, Clemens; Wilkinson, Simon; Allgood, Brandon A.; Bot, Brian M.; Hoff, Bruce R.; Kellen, Michael R.; Covert, Markus W.; Stolovitzky, Gustavo A.; Meyer, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Whole-cell models that explicitly represent all cellular components at the molecular level have the potential to predict phenotype from genotype. However, even for simple bacteria, whole-cell models will contain thousands of parameters, many of which are poorly characterized or unknown. New algorithms are needed to estimate these parameters and enable researchers to build increasingly comprehensive models. We organized the Dialogue for Reverse Engineering Assessments and Methods (DREAM) 8 Whole-Cell Parameter Estimation Challenge to develop new parameter estimation algorithms for whole-cell models. We asked participants to identify a subset of parameters of a whole-cell model given the model’s structure and in silico “experimental” data. Here we describe the challenge, the best performing methods, and new insights into the identifiability of whole-cell models. We also describe several valuable lessons we learned toward improving future challenges. Going forward, we believe that collaborative efforts supported by inexpensive cloud computing have the potential to solve whole-cell model parameter estimation. PMID:26020786

  18. Optimal design criteria - prediction vs. parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldl, Helmut

    2014-05-01

    G-optimality is a popular design criterion for optimal prediction, it tries to minimize the kriging variance over the whole design region. A G-optimal design minimizes the maximum variance of all predicted values. If we use kriging methods for prediction it is self-evident to use the kriging variance as a measure of uncertainty for the estimates. Though the computation of the kriging variance and even more the computation of the empirical kriging variance is computationally very costly and finding the maximum kriging variance in high-dimensional regions can be time demanding such that we cannot really find the G-optimal design with nowadays available computer equipment in practice. We cannot always avoid this problem by using space-filling designs because small designs that minimize the empirical kriging variance are often non-space-filling. D-optimality is the design criterion related to parameter estimation. A D-optimal design maximizes the determinant of the information matrix of the estimates. D-optimality in terms of trend parameter estimation and D-optimality in terms of covariance parameter estimation yield basically different designs. The Pareto frontier of these two competing determinant criteria corresponds with designs that perform well under both criteria. Under certain conditions searching the G-optimal design on the above Pareto frontier yields almost as good results as searching the G-optimal design in the whole design region. In doing so the maximum of the empirical kriging variance has to be computed only a few times though. The method is demonstrated by means of a computer simulation experiment based on data provided by the Belgian institute Management Unit of the North Sea Mathematical Models (MUMM) that describe the evolution of inorganic and organic carbon and nutrients, phytoplankton, bacteria and zooplankton in the Southern Bight of the North Sea.

  19. Influence of meteorological parameters on air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gioda, Adriana; Ventura, Luciana; Lima, Igor; Luna, Aderval

    2013-04-01

    The physical characterization representative of ambient air particle concentrations is becoming a topic of great interest for urban air quality monitoring and human exposure assessment. Human exposure to particulate matter of less than 2.5 µm in diameter (PM2.5) can result in a variety of adverse health impacts, including reduced lung function and premature mortality. Numerous studies have shown that fine airborne inhalable particulate matter particles (PM2.5) are more dangerous to human health than coarse particles, e.g. PM10. This study investigates meteorological parameter impacts on PM2.5 concentrations in the atmosphere of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Samples were collected during 24 h every six days using a high-volume sampler from six sites in the metropolitan area of Rio de Janeiro from January to December 2011. The particles mass was determined by Gravimetry. Meteorological parameters were obtained from automatic stations near the sampling sites. The average PM2.5 concentrations ranged from 9 to 32 µg/m3 for all sites, exceeding the suggested annual limit of WHO (10 µg/m3). The relationship between the effects of temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction and particle concentration was examined using a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) for the different sites and seasons. The results for each sampling point and season presented different principal component numbers, varying from 2 to 4, and extremely different relationships with the parameters. This clearly shows that changes in meteorological conditions exert a marked influence on air quality.

  20. Measuring Structural Parameters Through Stacking Galaxy Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yubin; Zheng, Xian Zhong; Gu, Qiu-Sheng; Wang, Yi-Peng; Wen, Zhang Zheng; Guo, Kexin; An, Fang Xia

    2016-12-01

    It remains challenging to detect the low surface brightness structures of faint high-z galaxies, which are key to understanding the structural evolution of galaxies. The technique of image stacking allows us to measure the averaged light profile beneath the detection limit and probe the extended structure of a group of galaxies. We carry out simulations to examine the recovery of the averaged surface brightness profile through stacking model Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys images of a set of galaxies as functions of the Sérsic index (n), effective radius (R e) and axis ratio (AR). The Sérsic profile best fitting the radial profile of the stacked image is taken as the recovered profile, in comparison with the intrinsic mean profile of the model galaxies. Our results show that, in general, the structural parameters of the mean profile can be properly determined through stacking, though systematic biases need to be corrected when spreads of R e and AR are counted. We find that the Sérsic index is slightly overestimated and R e is underestimated at {AR}\\lt 0.5 because the stacked image appears to be more compact due to the presence of inclined galaxies; the spread of R e biases the stacked profile to have a higher Sérsic index. We stress that the measurements of structural parameters through stacking should take these biases into account. We estimate the biases in the recovered structural parameters from stacks of galaxies when the samples have distributions of {R}{{e}}, AR and n seen in local galaxies.

  1. Reliability of parameter estimation in respirometric models.

    PubMed

    Checchi, Nicola; Marsili-Libelli, Stefano

    2005-09-01

    When modelling a biochemical system, the fact that model parameters cannot be estimated exactly stimulates the definition of tests for checking unreliable estimates and design better experiments. The method applied in this paper is a further development from Marsili-Libelli et al. [2003. Confidence regions of estimated parameters for ecological systems. Ecol. Model. 165, 127-146.] and is based on the confidence regions computed with the Fisher or the Hessian matrix. It detects the influence of the curvature, representing the distortion of the model response due to its nonlinear structure. If the test is passed then the estimation can be considered reliable, in the sense that the optimisation search has reached a point on the error surface where the effect of nonlinearities is negligible. The test is used here for an assessment of respirometric model calibration, i.e. checking the experimental design and estimation reliability, with an application to real-life data in the ASM context. Only dissolved oxygen measurements have been considered, because this is a very popular experimental set-up in wastewater modelling. The estimation of a two-step nitrification model using batch respirometric data is considered, showing that the initial amount of ammonium-N and the number of data play a crucial role in obtaining reliable estimates. From this basic application other results are derived, such as the estimation of the combined yield factor and of the second step parameters, based on a modified kinetics and a specific nitrite experiment. Finally, guidelines for designing reliable experiments are provided.

  2. TDR method for determine IC's parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timoshenkov, V.; Rodionov, D.; Khlybov, A.

    2016-12-01

    Frequency domain simulation is a widely used approach for determine integrated circuits parameters. This approach can be found in most of software tools used in IC industry. Time domain simulation approach shows intensive usage last years due to some advantages. In particular it applicable for analysis of nonlinear and nonstationary systems where frequency domain is inapplicable. Resolution of time domain systems allow see heterogeneities on distance 1mm, determine it parameters and properties. Authors used approach based on detecting reflected signals from heterogeneities - time domain reflectometry (TDR). Field effect transistor technology scaling up to 30-60nm gate length and 10nm gate dielectric, heterojunction bi-polar transistors with 10-30nm base width allows fabricate digital IC's with 20GHz clock frequency and RF-IC's with tens GHz bandwidth. Such devices and operation speed suppose transit signal by use microwave lines. There are local heterogeneities can be found inside of the signal path due to connections between different parts of signal lines (stripe line-RF-connector pin, stripe line - IC package pin). These heterogeneities distort signals that cause bandwidth decrease for RF-devices. Time domain research methods of transmission and reflected signals give the opportunities to determine heterogeneities, it properties, parameters and built up equivalent circuits. Experimental results are provided and show possibility for inductance and capacitance measurement up to 25GHz. Measurements contains result of signal path research on IC and printed circuit board (PCB) used for 12GHz RF chips. Also dielectric constant versus frequency was measured up to 35GHz.

  3. Photon Interaction Parameters for Some Borate Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, Nisha; Kaur, Updesh; Singh, Tejbir; Sharma, J. K.; Singh, Parjit S.

    2010-11-06

    Some photon interaction parameters of dosimetric interest such as mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic number, electron density and KERMA relative to air have been computed in the wide energy range from 1 keV to 100 GeV for some borate glasses viz. barium-lead borate, bismuth-borate, calcium-strontium borate, lead borate and zinc-borate glass. It has been observed that lead borate glass and barium-lead borate glass have maximum values of mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number and KERMA relative to air. Hence, these borate glasses are suitable as gamma ray shielding material, packing of radioactive sources etc.

  4. Saliva parameters and erosive wear in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Zwier, N; Huysmans, M C D N J M; Jager, D H J; Ruben, J; Bronkhorst, E M; Truin, G J

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between several parameters of saliva and erosive wear in adolescents. (Un-)stimulated saliva was collected from 88 adolescents with erosion and 49 controls (age 16 ± 1 years). Flow rate, pH and buffer capacity were determined immediately. Total protein content, carbonic anhydrase VI, amylase, albumin, calcium, phosphate, urea, sodium, chloride and potassium were measured at a later time. Unstimulated flow rate was found to be significantly lower in subjects with erosive wear (p = 0.016). The chloride concentration in unstimulated saliva was found to be significantly higher in the erosion group (p = 0.019).

  5. [Modern approaches to periodontal microcirculatory parameters assessment].

    PubMed

    Krechina, E K; Smirnova, T N

    2017-01-01

    The article presents comprehensive functional study of periodontal tissues in 62 patients aged 20-45 with periodontal disease by laser Doppler flowmetry, Doppler ultrasound and computer capillaroscopy. All patients were divided into 5 groups depending on the severity of inflammation in the periodontium (chronic gingivitis, light, moderate and severe chronic periodontal disease). The relationship between microcirculatory indexes was evaluated by Pearson Product Moment Correlation or PPMC. The study shows high correlation between blood flow velocity measurement, diameter of microvessels and oxygen saturation in periodontal tissues that establish a direct relationship between studied parameters.

  6. Design parameters for wearable optical imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akin, Ata; Kim, Sanghyun; Pourrezaei, Kambiz; Chance, Britton; Nioka, Shoko

    2001-06-01

    This paper summarizes the design steps that are followed during the development of the portable optical imager for breast cancer screening. The design steps considered the parameters such as total power consumption versus battery weight and size, speed of data acquisition versus cost and complexity of the design (functionality), graphical display versus operating system choice. We have used a single board computer system that uses Windows CE as the real time operating system. This choice was preferred since our graphical display requirements can only be carried out with the CE environment's GUI kernels.

  7. Microwave remote sensing of hydrologic parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.

    1977-01-01

    A perspective on the implementation of microwave sensors in future airborne and spaceborne observations of hydrologic parameters is presented. The rationale is based on a review of the status and future trends of active (radar) and passive (radiometer) microwave research as applied to the remote sensing of soil moisture content, snowpack water equivalent, freeze/thaw boundaries, lake ice thickness, surface water area, and the specification of watershed runoff coefficients. Analyses and observations based on data acquired from ground based, airborne and spaceborne platforms, and an evaluation of advantages and limitations of microwave sensors are included.

  8. Attitude Estimation Using Modified Rodrigues Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crassidis, John L.; Markley, F. Landis

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, a Kalman filter formulation for attitude estimation is derived using the Modified Rodrigues Parameters. The extended Kalman filter uses a gyro-based model for attitude propagation. Two solutions are developed for the sensitivity matrix in the Kalman filter. One is based upon an additive error approach, and the other is based upon a multiplicative error approach. It is shown that the two solutions are in fact equivalent. The Kalman filter is then used to estimate the attitude of a simulated spacecraft. Results indicate that then new algorithm produces accurate attitude estimates by determining actual gyro biases.

  9. Parameters influencing zeolite incorporation in PDMS membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Vankelecom, I.F.J.; Scheppers, E.; Heus, R.; Uytterhoeven, J.B. )

    1994-11-24

    The incorporation of several types of zeolite in PDMS membranes is studied, by measuring the tensile strength, xylene sorption, and density of the membranes. The zeolite is shown to be involved in the cross-linking of the membrane. The interaction between the PDMS matrix and the zeolites results in reinforced membranes in the case of zeolite Y. The parameters influencing the dispersion of the zeolite in the membrane are investigated, as well as several aspects of the preparation method. Finally, the idea of cross-linking is applied to explain the results of water/ethanol pervaporation. 25 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Satellite remote sensing of meteorological parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chahine, M. T.

    1983-01-01

    Recent advances in remote atmospheric sensing are briefly reviewed, with particular attention given to vertical temperature and humidity profiles, cloud structure, and wind. Present capabilities and projections of future improvements in accuracy and resolution are given for the Microwave Sounding Unit, High Resolution Infrared Sounder, Defence Meteorological Satellite Project, and VISSR Atmospheric Sounder. It is noted that future sounding systems will require (1) high spectral resolution; (2) multispectral observations of the atmosphere and the surface in order to correct for most of the geophysical processes contaminating the outgoing radiance; and (3) a control algorithm capable of using information from multispectral channels to identify those parameters that have errors larger than a specified value.

  11. Epizootiologic parameters for plague in Kazakhstan.

    PubMed

    Begon, Michael

    2006-02-01

    Reliable estimates are lacking of key epizootiologic parameters for plague caused by Yersinia pestis infection in its natural reservoirs. We report results of a 3-year longitudinal study of plague dynamics in populations of a maintenance host, the great gerbil (Rhombomys opimus), in 2 populations in Kazakhstan. Serologic results suggest a mid-summer peak in the abundance of infectious hosts and possible transmission from the reservoir to humans. Decrease in antibody titer to an undetectable level showed no seasonal pattern. Our findings did not support the use of the nitroblue-tetrazolium test characterization of plague-infected hosts. Y. pestis infection reduced survival of otherwise asymptomatic hosts.

  12. Epizootiologic Parameters for Plague in Kazakhstan

    PubMed Central

    Klassovskiy, Nikolay; Ageyev, Vladimir; Suleimenov, Bakhtiar; Atshabar, Bakhyt; Bennett, Malcolm

    2006-01-01

    Reliable estimates are lacking of key epizootiologic parameters for plague caused by Yersinia pestis infection in its natural reservoirs. We report results of a 3-year longitudinal study of plague dynamics in populations of a maintenance host, the great gerbil (Rhombomys opimus), in 2 populations in Kazakhstan. Serologic results suggest a mid-summer peak in the abundance of infectious hosts and possible transmission from the reservoir to humans. Decrease in antibody titer to an undetectable level showed no seasonal pattern. Our findings did not support the use of the nitroblue-tetrazolium test characterization of plague-infected hosts. Y. pestis infection reduced survival of otherwise asymptomatic hosts. PMID:16494753

  13. Renormalization group running of neutrino parameters.

    PubMed

    Ohlsson, Tommy; Zhou, Shun

    2014-10-17

    Neutrinos are the most elusive particles in our Universe. They have masses at least one million times smaller than the electron mass, carry no electric charge and very weakly interact with other particles, meaning that they are rarely captured in terrestrial detectors. Tremendous efforts in the past two decades have revealed that neutrinos can transform from one type to another as a consequence of neutrino oscillations--a quantum mechanical effect over macroscopic distances--yet the origin of neutrino masses remains puzzling. The physical evolution of neutrino parameters with respect to energy scale may help elucidate the mechanism for their mass generation.

  14. Parameter-Free Spatial and Stream Mining

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    2 ≈ 0.276 and the amplitude 10This parameter is also related to the Hurst exponent . 158 Chapter 12. Patterns on a single stream 0 50 100 150 200 − 50...to the exponent α. This fact and how to estimate Vl are what the reader needs to keep in mind. —- 12.3 Proposed method In this section we introduce...α̂ is the self-similarity exponent (−1 < α < 0, closer to zero the more bursty the series). A large value of |ρα|, at least across several scales

  15. Lunar Variation of Several Ionospheric Parameters.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-30

    ALBERCA , J 0 CARDUS, E GALDON AFOSR-79-0114 UNCLASSIFIED SCIENTIFIC-Z EOARD-TR-212 ML 111a 11m I.8 II1JIL2 111.6__II MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART...X4 SCIENTIFIC REPORT No 2 LUNAR VARIATION OF SEVERAL IONOSPHERIC PARAMETERS L. F. Alberca S. I. J. 0. Card6s 5.1. * E. Gald6n S.I1. * LLCTE... Alberca , e.I. J.O. Cardds, s.1. E. Gald6n, 8., OBSERVATORIO DEL EBR0 IONOSPHERIC SECTION ROQUETES (Tarragona) Spain THE RESEARCH REPORTED IN THIS

  16. HUBBLE PARAMETER MEASUREMENT CONSTRAINTS ON DARK ENERGY

    SciTech Connect

    Farooq, Omer; Mania, Data; Ratra, Bharat E-mail: mania@phys.ksu.edu

    2013-02-20

    We use 21 Hubble parameter versus redshift data points from Simon et al., Gaztanaga et al., Stern et al., and Moresco et al. to place constraints on model parameters of constant and time-evolving dark energy cosmologies. The inclusion of the eight new measurements results in H(z) constraints more restrictive than those derived by Chen and Ratra. These constraints are now almost as restrictive as those that follow from current Type Ia supernova (SNIa) apparent magnitude versus redshift data, which now more carefully account for systematic uncertainties. This is a remarkable result. We emphasize, however, that SNIa data have been studied for a longer time than the H(z) data, possibly resulting in a better estimate of potential systematic errors in the SNIa case. A joint analysis of the H(z), baryon acoustic oscillation peak length scale, and SNIa data favors a spatially flat cosmological model currently dominated by a time-independent cosmological constant but does not exclude slowly evolving dark energy.

  17. Cryogenic masers. [frequency stability and design parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berlinsky, A. J.; Hardy, W. N.

    1982-01-01

    Various factors affecting the frequency stability of hydrogen masers are described and related to maser design parameters. The long-term frequency stability of a hydrogen maser is limited by the mechanical stability of the cavity, and the magnitudes of the wall relaxation, spin exchange, and recombination rates which affect the Q of the line. Magnetic resonance studies of hydrogen atoms at temperatures below 1 K and in containers coated with liquid helium films demonstrated that cryogenic masers may allow substantial improvements in all of these parameters. In particular the thermal expansion coefficients of most materials are negligible at 1 K. Spin exchange broadening is three orders of magnitude smaller at 1 K than at room temperature, and the recombination and wall relaxation rates are negligible at 0.52 K where the frequency shift due to the 4 He-coated walls of the container has a broad minimum as a function of temperature. Other advantages of the helium-cooled maser result from the high purity, homogeneity, and resilence of helium-film-coated walls and the natural compatibility of the apparatus with helium-cooled amplifiers.

  18. Hemoglobin parameters from diffuse reflectance data.

    PubMed

    Mourant, Judith R; Marina, Oana C; Hebert, Tiffany M; Kaur, Gurpreet; Smith, Harriet O

    2014-03-01

    Tissue vasculature is altered when cancer develops. Consequently, noninvasive methods of monitoring blood vessel size, density, and oxygenation would be valuable. Simple spectroscopy employing fiber optic probes to measure backscattering can potentially determine hemoglobin parameters. However, heterogeneity of blood distribution, the dependence of the tissue-volume-sampled on scattering and absorption, and the potential compression of tissue all hinder the accurate determination of hemoglobin parameters. We address each of these issues. A simple derivation of a correction factor for the absorption coefficient, μa, is presented. This correction factor depends not only on the vessel size, as others have shown, but also on the density of blood vessels. Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine the dependence of an effective pathlength of light through tissue which is parameterized as a ninth-order polynomial function of μa. The hemoglobin bands of backscattering spectra of cervical tissue are fit using these expressions to obtain effective blood vessel size and density, tissue hemoglobin concentration, and oxygenation. Hemoglobin concentration and vessel density were found to depend on the pressure applied during in vivo acquisition of the spectra. It is also shown that determined vessel size depends on the blood hemoglobin concentration used.

  19. Parameter Studies for the VISTA Spacecraft Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, C D

    2000-11-21

    The baseline design for the VISTA spacecraft concept employs a diode-pumped solid-state laser (DPSSL) driver. This type of driver is now under development at LLNL and elsewhere as an extension of the mature solid-state (glass) laser technology developed for terrestrial applications of inertial confinement fusion (ICF). A DPSSL is repratable up to at least 30 Hz, and has an efficiency soon to be experimentally verified of at least 10%. By using a detailed systems code including the essential physics of a DPSSL, we have run parameter studies for the baseline roundtrip (RT) to Mars with a 100-ton payload. We describe the results of these studies as a function of the optimized (minimum) RT flight duration. We also demonstrate why DT fuel gives the best performance, although DD, D3He, or even antimatter can be used, and why DT-ignited DD is probably the fuel most preferred. We also describe the overall power flow, showing where the fusion energy is ultimately utilized, and estimate the variation in performance to the planets dictated by variations in target gain and other parameters.

  20. Chronic boron exposure and human semen parameters.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Wendie A; Xun, Lin; Jia, Juan; Kennedy, Nola; Elashoff, David A; Ping, Liu

    2010-04-01

    Boron found as borates in soil, food, and water has important industrial and medical applications. A panel reviewing NTP reproductive toxicants identified boric acid as high priority for occupational studies to determine safe versus adverse reproductive effects. To address this, we collected boron exposure/dose measures in workplace inhalable dust, dietary food/fluids, blood, semen, and urine from boron workers and two comparison worker groups (n=192) over three months and determined correlations between boron and semen parameters (total sperm count, sperm concentration, motility, morphology, DNA breakage, apoptosis and aneuploidy). Blood boron averaged 499.2 ppb for boron workers, 96.1 and 47.9 ppb for workers from high and low environmental boron areas (p<0.0001). Boron concentrated in seminal fluid. No significant correlations were found between blood or urine boron and adverse semen parameters. Exposures did not reach those causing adverse effects published in animal toxicology work but exceeded those previously published for boron occupational groups.

  1. Hurdles in bacteriophage therapy: deconstructing the parameters.

    PubMed

    Tsonos, Jessica; Vandenheuvel, Dieter; Briers, Yves; De Greve, Henri; Hernalsteens, Jean-Pierre; Lavigne, Rob

    2014-07-16

    Bacterial infections in animals impact our food production, leading to economic losses due to food rejection and the need for preventive and curative measures. Since the onset of the antibiotic era, the rise of antibiotic-resistant pathogens is causing scares in health care and food producing facilities worldwide. In the search of new therapeutics, re-evaluation of bacteriophage (phage) therapy, using naturally occurring bacterial viruses to tackle infections, is gaining interest. Many studies report about phage therapy success, showing the value and power of these natural viruses. Although phages carry some interesting traits and their basic biology is now well understood, this review argues that phage therapy has not revealed all of its secrets and many parameters remain understudied, making the outcome of phage therapy highly variable depending on the disease incidence. These difficulties include poorly understood mechanisms of phage penetration and distribution throughout the body, the variable expression and accessibility of phage receptors on the bacterial host in in vivo conditions and the unusual (non-linear) phage pharmacokinetics. These parameters are not easily measured in realistic in vivo settings, but are nevertheless important hurdles to overcome the high variability of phage therapy trials. This critical approach is in accordance with Goethe's statement; "Difficulties increase the nearer we get to the goal". However, since the importance of the goal itself also rises, both difficulties and goal justify the need for additional in depth research in this domain.

  2. Remarkable analytic relations among greybody parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elia, Davide; Pezzuto, S.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we derive and discuss several implications of the analytic form of a modified blackbody, also called greybody, which is widely used in Astrophysics, and in particular in the study of star formation in the far-infrared/submillimetre domain. The research in this area has been greatly improved thanks to recent observations taken with the Herschel satellite, so that it became important to clarify the sense of the greybody approximation, to suggest possible further uses, and to delimit its intervals of validity. First, we discuss the position of the greybody peak, making difference between the optically thin and thick regimes. Second, we analyse the behaviour of bolometric quantities as a function of the different greybody parameters. The ratio between the bolometric luminosity and the mass of a source, the ratio between the so-called `submillimetre luminosity' and the bolometric one, and the bolometric temperature are observables used to characterize the evolutionary stage of a source, and it is of primary importance to have analytic equations describing the dependence of such quantities on the greybody parameters. Here we discuss all these aspects, providing analytic relations, illustrating particular cases, and providing graphical examples. Some equations reported here are well known in Astrophysics, but are often spread over different publications. Some of them, instead, are brand new and represent a novelty in Astrophysics literature. Finally, we indicate an alternative way to obtain, under some conditions, the greybody temperature and dust emissivity index directly from an observing spectral energy distribution, avoiding a best-fitting procedure.

  3. Vibroacoustic test plan evaluation: Parameter variation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahle, C. V.; Gongloef, H. R.

    1976-01-01

    Statistical decision models are shown to provide a viable method of evaluating the cost effectiveness of alternate vibroacoustic test plans and the associated test levels. The methodology developed provides a major step toward the development of a realistic tool to quantitatively tailor test programs to specific payloads. Testing is considered at the no test, component, subassembly, or system level of assembly. Component redundancy and partial loss of flight data are considered. Most and probabilistic costs are considered, and incipient failures resulting from ground tests are treated. Optimums defining both component and assembly test levels are indicated for the modified test plans considered. modeling simplifications must be considered in interpreting the results relative to a particular payload. New parameters introduced were a no test option, flight by flight failure probabilities, and a cost to design components for higher vibration requirements. Parameters varied were the shuttle payload bay internal acoustic environment, the STS launch cost, the component retest/repair cost, and the amount of redundancy in the housekeeping section of the payload reliability model.

  4. Dimensionless Parameter Scaling of Diesel Engine Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, David R.; Filipi, Zoran

    1996-11-01

    Combustion in a modern heavy-duty Diesel engine with direct radial fuel injection typically takes place in a short nearly-cylindrical volume at a rate determined by turbulent mixing. Simple dimensionless-parameter scaling laws for turbulent gas-phase mixing and heat transfer have been shown to be effective for a variety of (oxidizer) flow and (fuel) injection conditions within a cylindrical geometry (Edwards et al., AIChE J., Vol. 31, 516 [1985].) (Breidenthal et al., JFM, Vol. 219, 531 [1990].) (Dowling et al., AIAA J. Thermophys. & HT, Vol. 4, 504 [1990].). These studies were driven by chemical laser applications emphasizing long cylinders and sidewall injection. The current investigation seeks to determine the applicability of dimensionless parameter scaling to the instantaneous in-cylinder fuel burning rate in a multi-cylinder Diesel engine typical of Class VIII trucks. Comparisons are made between scaled and unscaled fuel burning rate, as inferred from time-resolved in-cylinder pressure measurements, across the test engine's normal operating range. This research is supported by the US Army Tank-Automotive Research, Development, and Engineering Center.

  5. Uncertainty relation based on unbiased parameter estimations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Liang-Liang; Song, Yong-Shun; Qiao, Cong-Feng; Yu, Sixia; Chen, Zeng-Bing

    2017-02-01

    Heisenberg's uncertainty relation has been extensively studied in spirit of its well-known original form, in which the inaccuracy measures used exhibit some controversial properties and don't conform with quantum metrology, where the measurement precision is well defined in terms of estimation theory. In this paper, we treat the joint measurement of incompatible observables as a parameter estimation problem, i.e., estimating the parameters characterizing the statistics of the incompatible observables. Our crucial observation is that, in a sequential measurement scenario, the bias induced by the first unbiased measurement in the subsequent measurement can be eradicated by the information acquired, allowing one to extract unbiased information of the second measurement of an incompatible observable. In terms of Fisher information we propose a kind of information comparison measure and explore various types of trade-offs between the information gains and measurement precisions, which interpret the uncertainty relation as surplus variance trade-off over individual perfect measurements instead of a constraint on extracting complete information of incompatible observables.

  6. An empirical study of scanner system parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landgrebe, D.; Biehl, L.; Simmons, W.

    1976-01-01

    The selection of the current combination of parametric values (instantaneous field of view, number and location of spectral bands, signal-to-noise ratio, etc.) of a multispectral scanner is a complex problem due to the strong interrelationship these parameters have with one another. The study was done with the proposed scanner known as Thematic Mapper in mind. Since an adequate theoretical procedure for this problem has apparently not yet been devised, an empirical simulation approach was used with candidate parameter values selected by the heuristic means. The results obtained using a conventional maximum likelihood pixel classifier suggest that although the classification accuracy declines slightly as the IFOV is decreased this is more than made up by an improved mensuration accuracy. Further, the use of a classifier involving both spatial and spectral features shows a very substantial tendency to resist degradation as the signal-to-noise ratio is decreased. And finally, further evidence is provided of the importance of having at least one spectral band in each of the major available portions of the optical spectrum.

  7. A PARAMETER STUDY FOR BAROCLINIC VORTEX AMPLIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Raettig, Natalie; Klahr, Hubert; Lyra, Wladimir E-mail: klahr@mpia.de

    2013-03-10

    Recent studies have shown that baroclinic vortex amplification is strongly dependent on certain factors, namely, the global entropy gradient, the efficiency of thermal diffusion and/or relaxation as well as numerical resolution. We conduct a comprehensive study of a broad range and combination of various entropy gradients, thermal diffusion and thermal relaxation timescales via local shearing sheet simulations covering the parameter space relevant for protoplanetary disks. We measure the Reynolds stresses as a function of our control parameters and see that there is angular momentum transport even for entropy gradients as low as {beta} = -dln s/dln r = 1/2. Values we expect in protoplanetary disks are between {beta} = 0.5-2.0 The amplification-rate of the perturbations, {Gamma}, appears to be proportional to {beta}{sup 2} and thus proportional to the square of the Brunt-Vaeisaelae frequency ({Gamma}{proportional_to}{beta}{sup 2}{proportional_to}N {sup 2}). The saturation level of Reynolds stresses, on the other hand, seems to be proportional to {beta}{sup 1/2}. This highlights the importance of baroclinic effects even for the low entropy gradients expected in protoplanetary disks.

  8. Disposable falling sensors to monitor atmospheric parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoldo, S.; Lucianaz, C.; Allegretti, M.; Perona, G.

    2016-10-01

    Detailed studies and researches about clouds and precipitations characterization are considered to play a key role in weather and strong events prediction. Most monitoring instruments perform indirect monitoring operation, sensing the parameters from a remote position and not being directly inside the phenomenon. A feasibility analysis of a set of disposable sensors is presented. The very light sensors are planned to be dropped by a plane or a UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) in the atmosphere and are designed to dynamically behave as very light particles similar to raindrops in their fluctuations and falling through the atmosphere. In order to realize sensing probes with a similar fluid-dynamic behavior of drops, the weight, the size and the surface properties of the probes should be carefully designed. An estimated size of the order of many centimeters and a total weight of less than 15 g is needed. Consequently particular attention has to be paid in designing electronic boards and in the choice of integrated measurement sensors as well as the transmitter. Minimum power consumption should be also guaranteed, in order to assure the proper working during the fluctuating and falling time. Sensors installed on the sensing probe will measure different atmospheric parameters (e.g. humidity, temperature, pressure, acceleration) with a sampling interval of the order of some milliseconds. All data are then sent to a receiver located on the ground and can then be stored and post processed for further analysis.

  9. Effects of model deficiencies on parameter estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasselman, T. K.

    1988-01-01

    Reliable structural dynamic models will be required as a basis for deriving the reduced-order plant models used in control systems for large space structures. Ground vibration testing and model verification will play an important role in the development of these models; however, fundamental differences between the space environment and earth environment, as well as variations in structural properties due to as-built conditions, will make on-orbit identification essential. The efficiency, and perhaps even the success, of on-orbit identification will depend on having a valid model of the structure. It is envisioned that the identification process will primarily involve parametric methods. Given a correct model, a variety of estimation algorithms may be used to estimate parameter values. This paper explores the effects of modeling errors and model deficiencies on parameter estimation by reviewing previous case histories. The effects depend at least to some extent on the estimation algorithm being used. Bayesian estimation was used in the case histories presented here. It is therefore conceivable that the behavior of an estimation algorithm might be useful in detecting and possibly even diagnosing deficiencies. In practice, the task is complicated by the presence of systematic errors in experimental procedures and data processing and in the use of the estimation procedures themselves.

  10. Line Narrowing Parameter Measurement by Modulation Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dharamsi, Amin N.

    1998-01-01

    Accurate Characterization of Oxygen A-Band Line Parameters by Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy with tunable diode lasers is an ongoing research at Old Dominion University, under sponsorship from NASA Langley research Center. The work proposed here will be undertaken under the guidance of Dr. William Chu and Dr. Lamont Poole of the Aerosol Research Branch at NASA Langley-Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. The research was started about two years ago and utilizes wavelength modulation absorption spectroscopy with higher harmonic detection, a technique that we developed at Old Dominion University, to obtain the absorption line characteristics of the Oxygen A-band rovibronic lines. Accurate characterization of this absorption band is needed for processing of data that will be obtained in experiments such as the NASA Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III) as part of the US Mission to Planet Earth. The research work for Summer Fellowship undertook a measurement of the Dicke line-narrowing parameters of the Oxygen A-Band lines by using wavelength modulation spectroscopy. Our previous theoretical results had indicated that such a measurement could be done sensitively and in a convenient fashion by using this type of spectroscopy. In particular, theoretical results had indicated that the signal magnitude would depend on pressure in a manner that was very sensitive to the narrowing parameter. One of the major tasks undertaken during the summer of 1998 was to establish experimentally that these theoretical predictions were correct. This was done successfully and the results of the work are being prepared for publication. Experimental Results were obtained in which the magnitude of the signal was measured as a function of pressure, for various harmonic detection orders (N = 1, 2, 3, 4, 5). A comparison with theoretical results was made, and it was shown that the agreement between theory and experiment was very good. More importantly, however, it was shown

  11. Relationship between Cole-Cole model parameters and spectral decomposition parameters derived from SIP data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigand, M.; Kemna, A.

    2016-06-01

    Spectral induced polarization (SIP) data are commonly analysed using phenomenological models. Among these models the Cole-Cole (CC) model is the most popular choice to describe the strength and frequency dependence of distinct polarization peaks in the data. More flexibility regarding the shape of the spectrum is provided by decomposition schemes. Here the spectral response is decomposed into individual responses of a chosen elementary relaxation model, mathematically acting as kernel in the involved integral, based on a broad range of relaxation times. A frequently used kernel function is the Debye model, but also the CC model with some other a priorly specified frequency dispersion (e.g. Warburg model) has been proposed as kernel in the decomposition. The different decomposition approaches in use, also including conductivity and resistivity formulations, pose the question to which degree the integral spectral parameters typically derived from the obtained relaxation time distribution are biased by the approach itself. Based on synthetic SIP data sampled from an ideal CC response, we here investigate how the two most important integral output parameters deviate from the corresponding CC input parameters. We find that the total chargeability may be underestimated by up to 80 per cent and the mean relaxation time may be off by up to three orders of magnitude relative to the original values, depending on the frequency dispersion of the analysed spectrum and the proximity of its peak to the frequency range limits considered in the decomposition. We conclude that a quantitative comparison of SIP parameters across different studies, or the adoption of parameter relationships from other studies, for example when transferring laboratory results to the field, is only possible on the basis of a consistent spectral analysis procedure. This is particularly important when comparing effective CC parameters with spectral parameters derived from decomposition results.

  12. Coordinated Parameter Identification Technique for the Inertial Parameters of Non-Cooperative Target

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Xin; Zhang, Teng; Wu, Yaofa; Zhang, Pihui; Zhang, Jiawei; Li, Shuai; Yue, Xiaokui; Yuan, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Space operations will be the main space missions in the future. This paper focuses on the precise operations for non-cooperative target, and researches of coordinated parameter identification (CPI) which allows the motion of multi-joints. The contents of this paper are organized: (1) Summarize the inertial parameters identification techniques which have been conducted now, and the technique based on momentum conservation is selected for reliability and realizability; (2) Elaborate the basic principles and primary algorithm of coordinated parameter identification, and analyze some special problems in calculation (3) Numerical simulation of coordinated identification technique by an case study on non-cooperative target of spacecraft mounting dual-arm with six joints is done. The results show that the coordinated parameter identification technique could get all the inertial parameters of the target in 3D by one-time identification, and does not need special configuration or driven joints, moreover the results are highly precise and save much more time than traditional ones. PMID:27116187

  13. Improved group contribution parameter set for the application of solubility parameters to melt extrusion.

    PubMed

    Just, Susann; Sievert, Frank; Thommes, Markus; Breitkreutz, Jörg

    2013-11-01

    Hot-melt extrusion is gaining importance for the production of amorphous solid solutions; in parallel, predictive tools for estimating drug solubility in polymers are increasingly demanded. The Hansen solubility parameter (SP) approach is well acknowledged for its predictive power of the miscibility of liquids as well as the solubility of some amorphous solids in liquid solvents. By solely using the molecular structure, group contribution (GC) methods allow the calculation of Hansen SPs. The GC parameter sets available were derived from liquids and polymers which conflicts with the object of prediction, the solubility of solid drugs. The present study takes a step from the liquid based SPs toward their application to solid solutes. On the basis of published experimental Hansen SPs of solid drugs and excipients only, a new GC parameter set was developed. In comparison with established parameter sets by van Krevelen/Hoftyzer, Beerbower/Hansen, Breitkreutz and Stefanis/Panayiotou, the new GC parameter set provides the highest overall predictive power for solubility experiments (correlation coefficient r = -0.87 to -0.91) as well as for literature data on melt extrudates and casted films (r = -0.78 to -0.96).

  14. Relationship among Corneal Biomechanics, Anterior Segment Parameters, and Geometric Corneal Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Çevik, Sadık Görkem; Akova-Budak, Berna; Tok-Çevik, Mediha

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the relationship between corneal biomechanical parameters, anterior segment parameters, and geometric corneal parameters in a healthy Caucasian group. Methods. This retrospective study included the healthy eyes with best corrected visual acuity of at least 20/40 of 122 Caucasian subjects. The anterior segment parameters and geometric corneal parameters such as corneal volume, central corneal thickness, horizontal and vertical corneal radii, anterior and posterior steep, and flat keratometric values were measured with a Scheimpflug camera. The biomechanical properties were measured with Ocular Response Analyzer. Results. One hundred and twenty-two healthy Caucasian subjects (67 males, 55 females) with a mean age of 45.32 ± 20.23 were enrolled. Both corneal hysteresis and corneal resistance factor were positively correlated with CCT (r = 0.529, p < 0.001; r = 0.638, p < 0.001) and CV (r = 0.635, p < 0.001; r = 0.579, p < 0.001) and negatively correlated with age (r = −0.373, p < 0.001; r = −0.249, p < 0.001). Both in age-gender and multivariate models, CH and CRF had statistically significant negative association with the posterior steep K value. Conclusions. CH and CRF are negatively correlated with posterior steep and average posterior K values. PMID:27847644

  15. Climate Control of Photosynthetic Parameters across Biomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, S.; Yi, C.

    2011-12-01

    Meteorological tower networks measure net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2, which is a balance between ecosystem respiration (Reco) and gross primary production (GPP). For understanding the mechanistic response of CO2 exchange to climate factors at process-level, it's necessary to separate NEE into its two components. A light-response analysis model (Ruimy, et al., 1995) has proved to be an efficient tool for this purpose. Principal light-response parameters-apparent quantum yield (α), photosynthetic capacity (Fmax) and ecosystem respiration (Reco) are important for modeling of CO2 exchange from regional scale to global domains using remote sensing. A major challenge lies in understanding how those parameters vary across biomes under different climatic conditions. So far, few large-sample studies have been conducted on this purpose. In our study, we partition seasonal NEE into photosynthesis and ecosystem respiration of 247 unique fluxnet sites, which represents over 900 site-years. Our results indicate that: (1) apparent quantum yield (α) of deciduous broadleaf forests and mixed forests is sensitive to seasonal temperature; (2) photosynthetic capacity (Fmax) of deciduous forests and evergreen broadleaf forests is controlled by Bowen Ratio; and (3) Ecosystem respiration of evergreen needle forests and mixed forests is controlled by temperature, while evergreen broadleaf forests controlled by Bowen Ratio. Our results also demonstrate that some relationships between photosynthetic parameters and climate controls are latitude dependent. Ecosystem respiration of croplands and deciduous broadleaf forests in high latitudes shows better temperature correlations than that in low latitudes; apparent quantum yield (α) of evergreen needle forests only display temperature control in latitudes above 40N. On biome-scale average, the magnitudes of photosynthetic capacity are categorized into two groups: (1) with high value (from 31.96 to 37.13 umol m-2s-1) of croplands

  16. The Role of Parameters in Phonology: A Critical Account.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desrochers, Richard

    1998-01-01

    Questions empirical and heuristic value of parameters in most uses to elucidate relationship between markedness theory and parameters. Shows approaches labeled Principles and Parameters are reformulation of markedness theory; PP reformulation may be less adequate than former models of MT; function of parameters in current phonological literature…

  17. Parameters of human discomfort in warm environments

    SciTech Connect

    Berglund, L.G.; Cunningham, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    The relationship between thermoregulatory responses during exposure to warm and hot environments and the associated subjective perceptions, e.g., comfort, thermal sensation, etc., have been studied by numerous investigators over a considerable span of time, i.e., roughly 50 years. Skin temperature, mean body temperature, sweating, and percent of skin wettedness have been shown to have a role in comfort, thermal sensation, and perception of skin moisture. This paper reviews studies concerned with the physical and physiological parameters relative to these subjective responses and their level of magnitude, with primary emphasis on warm discomfort and skin moisture. The review indicates that, while utilizing different methodologies for quantification of skin moisture under a wide range of ambient conditions and experimental protocols, the relationship between skin wettedness and discomfort or unpleasantness is consistent and experimentally supported.

  18. Virtual Laboratories in Physics with Autogenerated Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimov, M. A.; Monakhov, V. V.; Kozhedub, A. V.

    2015-09-01

    The paper is devoted to a virtual laboratory system, which in particular can be used to test knowledge through research. The participant can prefer which tools to operate and what actions should be taken. For the most of the tasks, there are copious ways to obtain the correct solution. One of the most important features of the system that distinguish this one among other simulation packages and educational systems is the pseudo-random physical parameter generation technique. The technique supports constraints and relationships between variables. As a result, it provides correctness and equal complexity of the generated task. The system can be very complex and is highly customizable by internal script system executed on server-side. The system is used as a part of distolymp Learning Management System with about 40 thousand participants per year.

  19. Noncoherent sampling technique for communications parameter estimations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Y. T.; Choi, H. J.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents a method of noncoherent demodulation of the PSK signal for signal distortion analysis at the RF interface. The received RF signal is downconverted and noncoherently sampled for further off-line processing. Any mismatch in phase and frequency is then compensated for by the software using the estimation techniques to extract the baseband waveform, which is needed in measuring various signal parameters. In this way, various kinds of modulated signals can be treated uniformly, independent of modulation format, and additional distortions introduced by the receiver or the hardware measurement instruments can thus be eliminated. Quantization errors incurred by digital sampling and ensuing software manipulations are analyzed and related numerical results are presented also.

  20. Parameter monitoring compensation system and method

    DOEpatents

    Barkman, W.E.; Babelay, E.F.; DeMint, P.D.; Hebble, T.L.; Igou, R.E.; Williams, R.R.; Klages, E.J.; Rasnick, W.H.

    1995-02-07

    A compensation system is described for a computer-controlled machining apparatus having a controller and including a cutting tool and a workpiece holder which are movable relative to one another along a preprogrammed path during a machining operation. It utilizes sensors for gathering information at a preselected stage of a machining operation relating to an actual condition. The controller compares the actual condition to a condition which the program presumes to exist at the preselected stage and alters the program in accordance with detected variations between the actual condition and the assumed condition. Such conditions may be related to process parameters, such as a position, dimension or shape of the cutting tool or workpiece or an environmental temperature associated with the machining operation, and such sensors may be a contact or a non-contact type of sensor or a temperature transducer. 7 figs.

  1. Optimal filtration of the atmospheric parameters profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuev, V. E.; Glazov, G. N.; Igonin, G. M.

    1986-01-01

    The idea of optimal Marcovian filtration of fluctuating profiles from lidar signals is developed but as applied to a double-frequency sounding which allows the use of large cross sections of elastic scattering and correct separation of the contributions due to aerosol and Rayleigh scatterings from the total lidar return. The filtration efficiency is shown under different conditions of sounding using a computer model. The accuracy of restituted profiles (temperature, pressure, density) is determined by the elements of a posteriori matrix K. The results obtained allow the determination of the lidar power required for providing the necessary accuracy of restitution of the atmospheric parameter profiles at chosen wavelengths of sounding in the ultraviolet and visible range.

  2. Optimal parameters of leader development in lightning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrov, N. I.; Petrova, G. N.

    1991-01-01

    The dependences between the different parameters of a leader in lightning are obtained theoretically. The physical mechanism of the instability leading to the formation of the streamer zone is proposed. The instability has the wave nature and is caused by the self-influence effects of the space charge. Using a stability condition of the leader propagation, a dependence is obtained between the current across the leader head and its velocity of motion. The dependence of the streamer zone length on the gap length is also obtained. It is shown that the streamer zone length is saturated with the increasing of the gap length. A comparison between the obtained dependences and the experimental data is presented.

  3. On firework blasts and qualitative parameter dependency

    PubMed Central

    Zohdi, T. I.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a mathematical model is developed to qualitatively simulate the progressive time-evolution of a blast from a simple firework. Estimates are made for the blast radius that one can expect for a given amount of detonation energy and pyrotechnic display material. The model balances the released energy from the initial blast pulse with the subsequent kinetic energy and then computes the trajectory of the material under the influence of the drag from the surrounding air, gravity and possible buoyancy. Under certain simplifying assumptions, the model can be solved for analytically. The solution serves as a guide to identifying key parameters that control the evolving blast envelope. Three-dimensional examples are given. PMID:26997903

  4. Advanced rotorcraft control using parameter optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vansteenwyk, Brett; Ly, Uy-Loi

    1991-01-01

    A reliable algorithm for the evaluation of a quadratic performance index and its gradients with respect to the controller design parameters is presented. The algorithm is part of a design algorithm for an optimal linear dynamic output feedback controller that minimizes a finite time quadratic performance index. The numerical scheme is particularly robust when it is applied to the control law synthesis for systems with densely packed modes and where there is a high likelihood of encountering degeneracies in the closed loop eigensystem. This approach through the use of a accurate Pade series approximation does not require the closed loop system matrix to be diagonalizable. The algorithm has been included in a control design package for optimal robust low order controllers. Usefulness of the proposed numerical algorithm has been demonstrated using numerous practical design cases where degeneracies occur frequently in the closed loop system under an arbitrary controller design initialization and during the numerical search.

  5. Control Parameter Description of Eukaryotic Chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Amselem, Gabriel; Bae, Albert; Theves, Mathias; Beta, Carsten

    2013-03-01

    The chemotaxis of eukaryotic cells depends both on the average concentration of the chemoattractant and on the steepness of its gradient. For the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, we test quantitatively the prediction by Ueda and Shibata [ Biophys. J. 93 11 (2007)] that the efficacy of chemotaxis depends on a single control parameter only, namely, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), determined by the stochastic fluctuations of (i) the binding of the chemoattractant molecule to the transmembrane receptor and (ii) the intracellular activation of the effector of the signaling cascade. For SNR 1, the theory captures the experimental findings well, while for larger SNR noise sources further downstream in the signaling pathway need to be taken into account. Supported by Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft SFB 937 and Max Planck Society.

  6. Control Parameter Description of Eukaryotic Chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amselem, Gabriel; Theves, Matthias; Bae, Albert; Beta, Carsten; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2012-09-01

    The chemotaxis of eukaryotic cells depends both on the average concentration of the chemoattractant and on the steepness of its gradient. For the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, we test quantitatively the prediction by Ueda and Shibata [Biophys. J.BIOJAU0006-3495 93, 11 (2007)10.1529/biophysj.106.100263] that the efficacy of chemotaxis depends on a single control parameter only, namely, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), determined by the stochastic fluctuations of (i) the binding of the chemoattractant molecule to the transmembrane receptor and (ii) the intracellular activation of the effector of the signaling cascade. For SNR ≲1, the theory captures the experimental findings well, while for larger SNR noise sources further downstream in the signaling pathway need to be taken into account.

  7. Determination of dose distributions and parameter sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.; Farris, W.T.; Simpson, J.C.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contribution of different radionuclides and exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 005) examined the contributions of numerous parameters to the uncertainty distribution of doses calculated for environmental exposures and accumulation in foods. This study builds on the work initiated in the first scoping study of iodine in cow's milk and the third scoping study, which added additional pathways. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to thyroid dose of infants from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and (8) ingestion of cows' milk from Feeding Regime 1 as described in Calculation 001.

  8. Streamer parameters and breakdown in CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeger, M.; Avaheden, J.; Pancheshnyi, S.; Votteler, T.

    2017-01-01

    CO2 is a promising gas for the replacement of SF6 in high-voltage transmission and distribution networks due to its lower environmental impact. The insulation properties of CO2 are, therefore, of great interest. For this, the properties of streamers are important, since they determine the initial discharge propagation and possibly the transition to a leader. The present experimental investigation addresses the streamer inception and propagation at ambient temperature in the pressure range 0.05-0.5 MPa at both polarities. Streamer parameters, namely the stability field, radius and velocity, were deduced in uniform and in strongly non-uniform background fields. The measured breakdown fields can then be understood by streamer propagation and streamer-to-leader transition.

  9. Parameter monitoring compensation system and method

    DOEpatents

    Barkman, William E.; Babelay, Edwin F.; DeMint, Paul D.; Hebble, Thomas L.; Igou, Richard E.; Williams, Richard R.; Klages, Edward J.; Rasnick, William H.

    1995-01-01

    A compensation system for a computer-controlled machining apparatus having a controller and including a cutting tool and a workpiece holder which are movable relative to one another along preprogrammed path during a machining operation utilizes sensors for gathering information at a preselected stage of a machining operation relating to an actual condition. The controller compares the actual condition to a condition which the program presumes to exist at the preselected stage and alters the program in accordance with detected variations between the actual condition and the assumed condition. Such conditions may be related to process parameters, such as a position, dimension or shape of the cutting tool or workpiece or an environmental temperature associated with the machining operation, and such sensors may be a contact or a non-contact type of sensor or a temperature transducer.

  10. Rho resonance parameters from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Dehua; Alexandru, Andrei; Molina, Raquel; Döring, Michael

    2016-08-01

    We perform a high-precision calculation of the phase shifts for $\\pi$-$\\pi$ scattering in the I = 1, J = 1 channel in the elastic region using elongated lattices with two mass-degenerate quark favors ($N_f = 2$). We extract the $\\rho$ resonance parameters using a Breit-Wigner fit at two different quark masses, corresponding to $m_{\\pi} = 226$MeV and $m_{\\pi} = 315$MeV, and perform an extrapolation to the physical point. The extrapolation is based on a unitarized chiral perturbation theory model that describes well the phase-shifts around the resonance for both quark masses. We find that the extrapolated value, $m_{\\rho} = 720(1)(15)$MeV, is significantly lower that the physical rho mass and we argue that this shift could be due to the absence of the strange quark in our calculation.

  11. Model parameters for simulation of physiological lipids

    PubMed Central

    McGlinchey, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Coarse grain simulation of proteins in their physiological membrane environment can offer insight across timescales, but requires a comprehensive force field. Parameters are explored for multicomponent bilayers composed of unsaturated lipids DOPC and DOPE, mixed‐chain saturation POPC and POPE, and anionic lipids found in bacteria: POPG and cardiolipin. A nonbond representation obtained from multiscale force matching is adapted for these lipids and combined with an improved bonding description of cholesterol. Equilibrating the area per lipid yields robust bilayer simulations and properties for common lipid mixtures with the exception of pure DOPE, which has a known tendency to form nonlamellar phase. The models maintain consistency with an existing lipid–protein interaction model, making the force field of general utility for studying membrane proteins in physiologically representative bilayers. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26864972

  12. Distributed parameter statics of magnetic catheters.

    PubMed

    Tunay, Ilker

    2011-01-01

    We discuss how to use special Cosserat rod theory for deriving distributed-parameter static equilibrium equations of magnetic catheters. These medical devices are used for minimally-invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and can be operated remotely or controlled by automated algorithms. The magnetic material can be lumped in rigid segments or distributed in flexible segments. The position vector of the cross-section centroid and quaternion representation of an orthonormal triad are selected as DOF. The strain energy for transversely isotropic, hyperelastic rods is augmented with the mechanical potential energy of the magnetic field and a penalty term to enforce the quaternion unity constraint. Numerical solution is found by 1D finite elements. Material properties of polymer tubes in extension, bending and twist are determined by mechanical and magnetic experiments. Software experiments with commercial FEM software indicate that the computational effort with the proposed method is at least one order of magnitude less than standard 3D FEM.

  13. Constant-parameter capture-recapture models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brownie, C.; Hines, J.E.; Nichols, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Jolly (1982, Biometrics 38, 301-321) presented modifications of the Jolly-Seber model for capture-recapture data, which assume constant survival and/or capture rates. Where appropriate, because of the reduced number of parameters, these models lead to more efficient estimators than the Jolly-Seber model. The tests to compare models given by Jolly do not make complete use of the data, and we present here the appropriate modifications, and also indicate how to carry out goodness-of-fit tests which utilize individual capture history information. We also describe analogous models for the case where young and adult animals are tagged. The availability of computer programs to perform the analysis is noted, and examples are given using output from these programs.

  14. Moose models with vanishing S parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Casalbuoni, R.; De Curtis, S.; Dominici, D.

    2004-09-01

    In the linear moose framework, which naturally emerges in deconstruction models, we show that there is a unique solution for the vanishing of the S parameter at the lowest order in the weak interactions. We consider an effective gauge theory based on K SU(2) gauge groups, K+1 chiral fields, and electroweak groups SU(2){sub L} and U(1){sub Y} at the ends of the chain of the moose. S vanishes when a link in the moose chain is cut. As a consequence one has to introduce a dynamical nonlocal field connecting the two ends of the moose. Then the model acquires an additional custodial symmetry which protects this result. We examine also the possibility of a strong suppression of S through an exponential behavior of the link couplings as suggested by the Randall Sundrum metric.

  15. Nonsingular Attitude Filtering Using Modified Rodrigues Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlgaard, Christopher D.; Schaub, Hanspeter

    2009-10-01

    A method to estimate the general rigid body attitude using a minimal modified Rodrigues parameters (MRP) coordinate set is presented. The singularity avoidance technique is based on the stereographic projection properties of the MRP set, and makes use of a simple mapping relationship between MRP representations. Previous work has used the MRP duality to avoid singular attitude descriptions but has ignored the associated covariance transformation. This article presents a mapping to transform the state covariance matrix between these two representations as the attitude description is mapped between the two possible MRP sets. Second-order covariance transformations suitable for divided difference filtering are also provided. The MRP filter formulation based on extended Kalman filtering and divided difference filtering is compared with a standard multiplicative quaternion Kalman filter in an example problem.

  16. Effect of electroconvulsive therapy on hematological parameters.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, S; Chadda, R K; Rusia, U; Jain, N

    2001-11-30

    Although a complete blood count is part of the evaluation before the use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), there are no known hematological contraindications for the procedure. A preliminary study was done on 31 randomly selected psychiatric patients (chronic schizophrenia, n=10; acute depression, n=8; acute mania, n=6; acute psychosis, n=6; delusional disorder, n=1) receiving ECT to study its hematological effects. Blood samples were drawn just before and 0, 1 and 2 h after ECT. Hemoglobin (Hb%), total and differential leukocyte count (TLC and DLC), red blood cell (RBC) count, mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) and platelet count were measured on a fully automated hematology analyzer (Sysmex K-1000). Significant changes were found in TLC, percentage of polymorphs and lymphocytes, and Hb%. Changes in other parameters were not statistically significant. More such studies are needed to substantiate these observations and to understand the mechanism and implication of these effects.

  17. Parameter identification for free flight rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granot, R.; Sylman, Y.

    1982-08-01

    The accuracy of a rocket weapon system is largely determined by the accuracy with which the mean impact point can be predicted. The prediction procedure involves a preflight trajectory computation, which is based on the values of the measured meteorological variables, the physical characteristics of the system (launcher and rocket), and the location of the target. Granot and Sylman (1981) have discussed the advantages of using for the computation an optimization technique which deals with device-measured quantities. The present investigation considers the feasibility of a conduction of direct measurements about the burnout velocity region as a means for parameter reduction in a free flight rocket model. Attention is given to a mathematical model, effective forces, aspects of instrumentation, the calibration procedure, a calibration algorithm, and a data reduction method.

  18. Parameters Identification for Motorcycle Simulator's Platform Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehaoua, L.; Arioui, H.

    2008-06-01

    This paper presents the dynamics modeling and parameters identification of a motorcycle simulator's platform. This model begins with some suppositions which consider that the leg dynamics can be neglected with respect to the mobile platform one. The objectif is to synthesis a simplified control scheme, adapted to driving simulation application, minimising dealys and without loss of tracking performance. Electronic system of platform actuation is described. It's based on a CAN BUS communication which offers a large transmission robustness and error handling. Despite some disadvanteges, we adapted a control solution which overcome these inconvenients and preserve the quality of tracking trajectory. A bref description of the simulator's platform is given and results are shown and justified according to our specifications.

  19. Average deployments versus missile and defender parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1991-03-01

    This report evaluates the average number of reentry vehicles (RVs) that could be deployed successfully as a function of missile burn time, RV deployment times, and the number of space-based interceptors (SBIs) in defensive constellations. Leakage estimates of boost-phase kinetic-energy defenses as functions of launch parameters and defensive constellation size agree with integral predictions of near-exact calculations for constellation sizing. The calculations discussed here test more detailed aspects of the interaction. They indicate that SBIs can efficiently remove about 50% of the RVs from a heavy missile attack. The next 30% can removed with two-fold less effectiveness. The next 10% could double constellation sizes. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  20. The coronal parameters of local Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinucci, A.; Tortosa, A.; NuSTAR AGN Physics Working Group

    2016-05-01

    One of the open problems for AGN is the nature of the primary X-ray emission: It is likely due to Comptonization of soft UV photons, but the optical depth and temperature of the emitting corona were largely unknown before the launch of the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR). It is the first focusing hard X-ray telescope on orbit, ∼ 100 times more sensitive in the 10-79 keV band compared to previous observatories, enabling the study of AGN at high energies with high precision. We present and discuss the results on the hot corona parameters of active galactic nuclei that have been recently measured with NuSTAR (often in coordination with XMM-Newton, Suzaku, or wift) with unprecedented accuracy, in a number of local Seyfert galaxies.

  1. The coronal parameters of local Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinucci, A.

    2015-07-01

    One of the open problems for AGN is the nature of the primary X-ray emission: it is likely due to Comptonization of soft UV photons, but the optical depth and temperature of the emitting corona were largely unknown before the launch of NuSTAR. The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) is the first focusing X-ray telescope on orbit, ˜ 100 times more sensitive in the 10-80 keV band compared to previous observatories, enabling the study of AGN at high energies with high precision. We will present and discuss the results on the hot corona parameters of Active Galactic Nuclei that have been recently measured with NuSTAR (often in coordination with XMM-Newton or Suzaku) with unprecedented accuracy, in a number of local Seyfert galaxies.

  2. New approaches to estimation of magnetotelluric parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Egbert, G.D.

    1991-01-01

    Fully efficient robust data processing procedures were developed and tested for single station and remote reference magnetotelluric (Mr) data. Substantial progress was made on development, testing and comparison of optimal procedures for single station data. A principal finding of this phase of the research was that the simplest robust procedures can be more heavily biased by noise in the (input) magnetic fields, than standard least squares estimates. To deal with this difficulty we developed a robust processing scheme which combined the regression M-estimate with coherence presorting. This hybrid approach greatly improves impedance estimates, particularly in the low signal-to-noise conditions often encountered in the dead band'' (0.1--0.0 hz). The methods, and the results of comparisons of various single station estimators are described in detail. Progress was made on developing methods for estimating static distortion parameters, and for testing hypotheses about the underlying dimensionality of the geological section.

  3. Aquarius Third Stokes Parameter Measurements: Initial Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Utku, Cuneyt; Vine, David M Le; Abraham, S.; Piepmeier, J.

    2012-01-01

    The Aquarius/SAC-D observatory was launched on June 10, 2011 and the Aquarius instrument has been collecting data continuously since late August. One of the unique features of the L-band radiometers comprising Aquarius is the presence of a polarimetric channel to measure the third Stokes parameter. The purpose is to provide a measure of Faraday rotation, which can be important for remote sensing at L-band, especially in the case of remote sensing of salinity which requires high precision. Initial results are presented here showing a reasonable agreement between retrieved and modeled Faraday rotation and also the "noisy" behavior at land-water boundaries and other mixed scenes predicted by theory.

  4. Effects of process parameters on hydrothermal carbonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, Md. Helal

    In recent years there has been increased research activity in renewable energy, especially upgrading widely available lignicellulosic biomass, in a bid to counter the increasing environmental concerns related with the use of fossil fuels. Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC), also known as wet torrefaction or hot water pretreatment, is a process for pretreatment of diverse lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks, where biomass is treated under subcritical water conditions in short contact time to produce high-value products. The products of this process are: a solid mass characterized as biochar/biocoal/biocarbon, which is homogeneous, energy dense, and hydrophobic; a liquid stream composed of five and six carbon sugars, various organic acids, and 5-HMF; and a gaseous stream, mainly CO2. A number of process parameters are considered important for the extensive application of the HTC process. Primarily, reaction temperature determines the characteristics of the products. In the solid product, the oxygen carbon ratio decreases with increasing reaction temperature and as a result, HTC biochar has the similar characteristics to low rank coal. However, liquid and gaseous stream compositions are largely correlated with the residence time. Biomass particle size can also limit the reaction kinetics due to the mass transfer effect. Recycling of process water can help to minimize the utility consumption and reduce the waste treatment cost as a result of less environmental impact. Loblolly pine was treated in hot compressed water at 200 °C, 230 °C, and 260 °C with 5:1 water:biomass mass ratio to investigate the effects of process parameters on HTC. The solid product were characterized by their mass yields, higher heating values (HHV), and equilibrium moisture content (EMC), while the liquid were characterized by their total organic carbon content and pH value.

  5. Parameter estimation in tree graph metabolic networks

    PubMed Central

    Stigter, Hans; Gomez Roldan, Maria Victoria; van Eeuwijk, Fred; Hall, Robert D.; Groenenboom, Marian; Molenaar, Jaap J.

    2016-01-01

    We study the glycosylation processes that convert initially toxic substrates to nutritionally valuable metabolites in the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) seedlings. To estimate the reaction rates we use ordinary differential equations (ODEs) to model the enzyme kinetics. A popular choice is to use a system of linear ODEs with constant kinetic rates or to use Michaelis–Menten kinetics. In reality, the catalytic rates, which are affected among other factors by kinetic constants and enzyme concentrations, are changing in time and with the approaches just mentioned, this phenomenon cannot be described. Another problem is that, in general these kinetic coefficients are not always identifiable. A third problem is that, it is not precisely known which enzymes are catalyzing the observed glycosylation processes. With several hundred potential gene candidates, experimental validation using purified target proteins is expensive and time consuming. We aim at reducing this task via mathematical modeling to allow for the pre-selection of most potential gene candidates. In this article we discuss a fast and relatively simple approach to estimate time varying kinetic rates, with three favorable properties: firstly, it allows for identifiable estimation of time dependent parameters in networks with a tree-like structure. Secondly, it is relatively fast compared to usually applied methods that estimate the model derivatives together with the network parameters. Thirdly, by combining the metabolite concentration data with a corresponding microarray data, it can help in detecting the genes related to the enzymatic processes. By comparing the estimated time dynamics of the catalytic rates with time series gene expression data we may assess potential candidate genes behind enzymatic reactions. As an example, we show how to apply this method to select prominent glycosyltransferase genes in tomato seedlings. PMID:27688960

  6. Interval Estimation of Seismic Hazard Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlecka-Sikora, Beata; Lasocki, Stanislaw

    2017-03-01

    The paper considers Poisson temporal occurrence of earthquakes and presents a way to integrate uncertainties of the estimates of mean activity rate and magnitude cumulative distribution function in the interval estimation of the most widely used seismic hazard functions, such as the exceedance probability and the mean return period. The proposed algorithm can be used either when the Gutenberg-Richter model of magnitude distribution is accepted or when the nonparametric estimation is in use. When the Gutenberg-Richter model of magnitude distribution is used the interval estimation of its parameters is based on the asymptotic normality of the maximum likelihood estimator. When the nonparametric kernel estimation of magnitude distribution is used, we propose the iterated bias corrected and accelerated method for interval estimation based on the smoothed bootstrap and second-order bootstrap samples. The changes resulted from the integrated approach in the interval estimation of the seismic hazard functions with respect to the approach, which neglects the uncertainty of the mean activity rate estimates have been studied using Monte Carlo simulations and two real dataset examples. The results indicate that the uncertainty of mean activity rate affects significantly the interval estimates of hazard functions only when the product of activity rate and the time period, for which the hazard is estimated, is no more than 5.0. When this product becomes greater than 5.0, the impact of the uncertainty of cumulative distribution function of magnitude dominates the impact of the uncertainty of mean activity rate in the aggregated uncertainty of the hazard functions. Following, the interval estimates with and without inclusion of the uncertainty of mean activity rate converge. The presented algorithm is generic and can be applied also to capture the propagation of uncertainty of estimates, which are parameters of a multiparameter function, onto this function.

  7. Resonance parameter measurements and analysis of gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Leinweber, G.; Barry, D. P.; Trbovich, M. J.; Burke, J. A.; Drindak, N. J.; Knox, H. D.; Ballad, R. V.; Block, R. C.; Danon, Y.; Severnyak, L. I.

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of the present work is to measure the neutron cross sections of gadolinium accurately. Gd has the highest thermal absorption cross section of any natural element. Therefore it is an important element for thermal reactor applications Neutron capture and transmission measurements were performed by the time-of-flight technique at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst. (RPI) LINAC facility using metallic and liquid Gd samples. The liquid samples were isotopically-enriched in either {sup 155}Gd or {sup 157}Gd. The capture measurements were made at the 25-m flight station with a sodium iodide detector, and the transmission measurements were performed at 15- and 25-m flight stations with {sup 6}Li glass scintillation detectors. The multilevel R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY was used to extract resonance parameters. The results of the thermal region analysis are significant. Resonance parameters for the low energy doublet, at 0.025 and 0.032 eV, are presented. The thermal (2200 m/s) capture cross section of {sup 157}Gd has been measured to be 11% smaller than that calculated from ENDF/B-VI updated through release 8. Thermal capture cross sections and capture resonance integrals for each isotope as well as elemental gadolinium are presented. In the epithermal region, natural metal samples were measured in capture and transmission. Neutron interaction data up to 300 eV have been analyzed. Substantial improvement to the understanding of gadolinium cross sections is presented, particularly above 180 eV where the ENDF resolved region for {sup 155}Gd ends. (authors)

  8. Earth rotation parameters from satellite techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaller, Daniela; Beutler, Gerhard; Jäggi, Adrian; Meindl, Michael; Dach, Rolf; Sosnica, Krzysztof; Baumann, Christian

    2013-04-01

    It has been demonstrated since several years that satellite techniques are capable of determining Earth Rotation Parameters (ERPs) with a daily or even sub-daily resolution. Especially Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) with their huge amount of observations can determine time series of polar motion (PM) and length of day (LOD) rather well. But also SLR with its spherical satellites whose orbital motions are easy to model and that allow long orbital arc lengths can deliver valuable contributions to Earth rotation. We analyze GNSS solutions (using GPS and GLONASS) and SLR solutions (using LAGEOS) regarding their potential of estimating polar motion and LOD with daily and subdaily temporal resolution. A steadily improving modeling applied in the analysis of space-geodetic data aims at improved time series of geodetic parameters, e.g., the ERPs. The Earth's gravity field and especially its temporal variations are one point of interest for an improved modeling for satellite techniques. For modeling the short-periodic gravity field variations induced by mass variations in the atmosphere and the oceans the GRACE science team provides the Atmosphere and Ocean Dealiasing (AOD) products. They contain 6-hourly gravity fields of the atmosphere and the oceans. We apply these corrections in the analysis of satellite-geodetic data and show the impact on the estimated ERPs. It is well known that the degree-2 coefficients of the Earth's gravity field are correlated with polar motion and LOD. We show to what extent temporal variations in the degree-2 coefficients are influencing the ERP estimates.

  9. Vocal Parameters of Elderly Female Choir Singers

    PubMed Central

    Aquino, Fernanda Salvatico de; Ferreira, Léslie Piccolotto

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Due to increased life expectancy among the population, studying the vocal parameters of the elderly is key to promoting vocal health in old age. Objective This study aims to analyze the profile of the extension of speech of elderly female choristers, according to age group. Method The study counted on the participation of 25 elderly female choristers from the Choir of Messianic Church of São Paulo, with ages varying between 63 and 82 years, and an average of 71 years (standard deviation of 5.22). The elders were divided into two groups: G1 aged 63 to 71 years and G2 aged 72 to 82. We asked that each participant count from 20 to 30 in weak, medium, strong, and very strong intensities. Their speech was registered by the software Vocalgrama that allows the evaluation of the profile of speech range. We then submitted the parameters of frequency and intensity to descriptive analysis, both in minimum and maximum levels, and range of spoken voice. Results The average of minimum and maximum frequencies were respectively 134.82–349.96 Hz for G1 and 137.28–348.59 Hz for G2; the average for minimum and maximum intensities were respectively 40.28–95.50 dB for G1 and 40.63–94.35 dB for G2; the vocal range used in speech was 215.14 Hz for G1 and 211.30 Hz for G2. Conclusion The minimum and maximum frequencies, maximum intensity, and vocal range presented differences in favor of the younger elder group. PMID:26722341

  10. Relativity Parameters Determined from Lunar Laser Ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Newhall, X. X.; Dickey, J. O.

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of 24 years of lunar laser ranging data is used to test the principle of equivalence, geodetic precession, the PPN parameters beta and gamma, and G/G. Recent data can be fitted with a rms scatter of 3 cm. (a) Using the Nordtvedt effect to test the principle of equivalence, it is found that the Moon and Earth accelerate alike in the Sun's field. The relative accelerations match to within 5 x 10(exp -13) . This limit, combined with an independent determination of y from planetary time delay, gives beta. Including the uncertainty due to compositional differences, the parameter beta differs from unity by no more than 0.0014; and, if the weak equivalence principle is satisfied, the difference is no more than 0.0006. (b) Geodetic precession matches its expected 19.2 marc sec/yr rate within 0.7%. This corresponds to a 1% test of gamma. (c) Apart from the Nordtvedt effect, beta and gamma can be tested from their influence on the lunar orbit. It is argued theoretically that the linear combination 0.8(beta) + 1.4(gamma) can be tested at the 1% level of accuracy. For solutions using numerically derived partial derivatives, higher sensitivity is found. Both 6 and y match the values of general relativity to within 0.005, and the linear combination beta+ gamma matches to within 0,003, but caution is advised due to the lack of theoretical understanding of these sensitivities. (d) No evidence for a changing gravitational constant is found, with absolute value of G/G less than or equal to 8 x lO(exp -12)/yr. There is significant sensitivity to G/G through solar perturbations on the lunar orbit.

  11. Estimating soil hydraulic parameters from transient flow experiments in a centrifuge using parameter optimization technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simunek, J.; Nimmo, J.R.

    2005-01-01

    A modified version of the Hydrus software package that can directly or inversely simulate water flow in a transient centrifugal field is presented. The inverse solver for parameter estimation of the soil hydraulic parameters is then applied to multirotation transient flow experiments in a centrifuge. Using time-variable water contents measured at a sequence of several rotation speeds, soil hydraulic properties were successfully estimated by numerical inversion of transient experiments. The inverse method was then evaluated by comparing estimated soil hydraulic properties with those determined independently using an equilibrium analysis. The optimized soil hydraulic properties compared well with those determined using equilibrium analysis and steady state experiment. Multirotation experiments in a centrifuge not only offer significant time savings by accelerating time but also provide significantly more information for the parameter estimation procedure compared to multistep outflow experiments in a gravitational field. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. Design parameters and source terms: Volume 1, Design parameters: Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-10-01

    The Design Parameters and Source Terms Document was prepared in accordance with DOE request and to provide data for the environmental impact study to be performed in the future for the Deaf Smith County, Texas site for a nuclear waste repository in salt. This document updates a previous unpublished report by Stearns Catalytic Corporation (SCC), entitled ''Design Parameters and Source Terms for a Two-Phase Repository in Salt,'' 1985, to the level of the Site Characterization Plan - Conceptual Design Report. The previous unpublished SCC Study identifies the data needs for the Environmental Assessment effort for seven possible Salt Repository sites.

  13. Planck 2015 results. XIII. Cosmological parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chiang, H. C.; Chluba, J.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Farhang, M.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Gauthier, C.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Giusarma, E.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hamann, J.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huang, Z.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marchini, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martinelli, M.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.-B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Millea, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rouillé d'Orfeuil, B.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Said, N.; Salvatelli, V.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Serra, P.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Spinelli, M.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents cosmological results based on full-mission Planck observations of temperature and polarization anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. Our results are in very good agreement with the 2013 analysis of the Planck nominal-mission temperature data, but with increased precision. The temperature and polarization power spectra are consistent with the standard spatially-flat 6-parameter ΛCDM cosmology with a power-law spectrum of adiabatic scalar perturbations (denoted "base ΛCDM" in this paper). From the Planck temperature data combined with Planck lensing, for this cosmology we find a Hubble constant, H0 = (67.8 ± 0.9) km s-1Mpc-1, a matter density parameter Ωm = 0.308 ± 0.012, and a tilted scalar spectral index with ns = 0.968 ± 0.006, consistent with the 2013 analysis. Note that in this abstract we quote 68% confidence limits on measured parameters and 95% upper limits on other parameters. We present the first results of polarization measurements with the Low Frequency Instrument at large angular scales. Combined with the Planck temperature and lensing data, these measurements give a reionization optical depth of τ = 0.066 ± 0.016, corresponding to a reionization redshift of z_re=8.8+1.7-1.4. These results are consistent with those from WMAP polarization measurements cleaned for dust emission using 353-GHz polarization maps from the High Frequency Instrument. We find no evidence for any departure from base ΛCDM in the neutrino sector of the theory; for example, combining Planck observations with other astrophysical data we find Neff = 3.15 ± 0.23 for the effective number of relativistic degrees of freedom, consistent with the value Neff = 3.046 of the Standard Model of particle physics. The sum of neutrino masses is constrained to ∑ mν < 0.23 eV. The spatial curvature of our Universe is found to be very close to zero, with | ΩK | < 0.005. Adding a tensor component as a single-parameter extension to base

  14. Improvement of hydrological model calibration by selecting multiple parameter ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiaofeng; Liu, Shuguang; Cai, Yi; Li, Xinjian; Jiang, Yangming

    2017-01-01

    The parameters of hydrological models are usually calibrated to achieve good performance, owing to the highly non-linear problem of hydrology process modelling. However, parameter calibration efficiency has a direct relation with parameter range. Furthermore, parameter range selection is affected by probability distribution of parameter values, parameter sensitivity, and correlation. A newly proposed method is employed to determine the optimal combination of multi-parameter ranges for improving the calibration of hydrological models. At first, the probability distribution was specified for each parameter of the model based on genetic algorithm (GA) calibration. Then, several ranges were selected for each parameter according to the corresponding probability distribution, and subsequently the optimal range was determined by comparing the model results calibrated with the different selected ranges. Next, parameter correlation and sensibility were evaluated by quantifying two indexes, RC Y, X and SE, which can be used to coordinate with the negatively correlated parameters to specify the optimal combination of ranges of all parameters for calibrating models. It is shown from the investigation that the probability distribution of calibrated values of any particular parameter in a Xinanjiang model approaches a normal or exponential distribution. The multi-parameter optimal range selection method is superior to the single-parameter one for calibrating hydrological models with multiple parameters. The combination of optimal ranges of all parameters is not the optimum inasmuch as some parameters have negative effects on other parameters. The application of the proposed methodology gives rise to an increase of 0.01 in minimum Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (ENS) compared with that of the pure GA method. The rising of minimum ENS with little change of the maximum may shrink the range of the possible solutions, which can effectively reduce uncertainty of the model performance.

  15. Hyperspectral Technique for Detecting Soil Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garfagnoli, F.; Ciampalini, A.; Moretti, S.; Chiarantini, L.

    2011-12-01

    In satellite and airborne remote sensing, hyperspectral technique has become a very powerful tool, due to the possibility of rapidly realizing chemical/mineralogical maps of the studied areas. Many studies are trying to customize the algorithms to identify several geo-physical soil properties. The specific objective of this study is to investigate those soil characteristics, such as clay mineral content, influencing degradation processes (soil erosion and shallow landslides), by means of correlation analysis, in order to examine the possibility of predicting the selected property using high-resolution reflectance spectra and images. The study area is located in the Mugello basin, about 30 km north of Firenze (Tuscany, Italy). Agriculturally suitable terrains are assigned mainly to annual crops, marginally to olive groves, vineyards and orchards. Soils mostly belong to Regosols and Cambisols orders. An ASD FieldSpec spectroradiometer was used to obtain reflectance spectra from about 80 dried, crushed and sieved samples under controlled laboratory conditions. Samples were collected simultaneously with the flight of SIM.GA hyperspectral camera from Selex Galileo, over an area of about 5 km2 and their positions were recorded with a differential GPS. The quantitative determination of clay minerals content was performed by means of XRD and Rietveld refinement. Different chemometric techniques were preliminarily tested to correlate mineralogical records with reflectance data. A one component partial least squares regression model yielded a preliminary R2 value of 0.65. A slightly better result was achieved by plotting the absorption peak depth at 2210 versus total clay content (band-depth analysis). The complete SIM.GA hyperspectral geocoded row dataset, with an approximate pixel resolution of 0.6 m (VNIR) and 1.2 m (SWIR), was firstly transformed into at sensor radiance values, by applying calibration coefficients and parameters from laboratory measurements to non

  16. Pulsatility Index as a Diagnostic Parameter of Reciprocating Wall Shear Stress Parameters in Physiological Pulsating Waveforms.

    PubMed

    Avrahami, Idit; Kersh, Dikla; Liberzon, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Arterial wall shear stress (WSS) parameters are widely used for prediction of the initiation and development of atherosclerosis and arterial pathologies. Traditional clinical evaluation of arterial condition relies on correlations of WSS parameters with average flow rate (Q) and heart rate (HR) measurements. We show that for pulsating flow waveforms in a straight tube with flow reversals that lead to significant reciprocating WSS, the measurements of HR and Q are not sufficient for prediction of WSS parameters. Therefore, we suggest adding a third quantity-known as the pulsatility index (PI)-which is defined as the peak-to-peak flow rate amplitude normalized by Q. We examine several pulsating flow waveforms with and without flow reversals using a simulation of a Womersley model in a straight rigid tube and validate the simulations through experimental study using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The results indicate that clinically relevant WSS parameters such as the percentage of negative WSS (P[%]), oscillating shear index (OSI) and the ratio of minimum to maximum shear stress rates (min/max), are better predicted when the PI is used in conjunction with HR and Q. Therefore, we propose to use PI as an additional and essential diagnostic quantity for improved predictability of the reciprocating WSS.

  17. Pulsatility Index as a Diagnostic Parameter of Reciprocating Wall Shear Stress Parameters in Physiological Pulsating Waveforms

    PubMed Central

    Avrahami, Idit; Kersh, Dikla

    2016-01-01

    Arterial wall shear stress (WSS) parameters are widely used for prediction of the initiation and development of atherosclerosis and arterial pathologies. Traditional clinical evaluation of arterial condition relies on correlations of WSS parameters with average flow rate (Q) and heart rate (HR) measurements. We show that for pulsating flow waveforms in a straight tube with flow reversals that lead to significant reciprocating WSS, the measurements of HR and Q are not sufficient for prediction of WSS parameters. Therefore, we suggest adding a third quantity—known as the pulsatility index (PI)—which is defined as the peak-to-peak flow rate amplitude normalized by Q. We examine several pulsating flow waveforms with and without flow reversals using a simulation of a Womersley model in a straight rigid tube and validate the simulations through experimental study using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The results indicate that clinically relevant WSS parameters such as the percentage of negative WSS (P[%]), oscillating shear index (OSI) and the ratio of minimum to maximum shear stress rates (min/max), are better predicted when the PI is used in conjunction with HR and Q. Therefore, we propose to use PI as an additional and essential diagnostic quantity for improved predictability of the reciprocating WSS. PMID:27893801

  18. On compactness of admissible parameter sets: Convergence and stability in inverse problems for distributed parameter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Iles, D. W.

    1986-01-01

    A series of numerical examples is reported and several algorithms compared for estimation of coefficients in differential equation models. Unconstrained, constrained and Tikhonov regularization methods are tested for their behavior with regard to both convergence (of approximation methods for the states and parameters) and stability (continuity of the estimates with respect to perturbations in the data or observed states).

  19. Variation of Parameters in Differential Equations (A Variation in Making Sense of Variation of Parameters)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Terry; Rai, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    The method of variation of parameters can be found in most undergraduate textbooks on differential equations. The method leads to solutions of the non-homogeneous equation of the form y = u[subscript 1]y[subscript 1] + u[subscript 2]y[subscript 2], a sum of function products using solutions to the homogeneous equation y[subscript 1] and…

  20. Clinical and laboratory parameters of pleural tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rashid, M M; Ghose, A; Islam, M B; Amin, R; Rahman, R; Faiz, M A

    2010-04-01

    This prospective observational clinical study was done to find out the clinical and laboratory parameters of pleural tuberculosis patients, to find out a sensitive and specific tool for diagnosis and to see the effectively of a standard anti-TB regime Isoniazide, Rifampicine, Pyrazinamide, Ethambutol, (2HRZE/4HR) for treatment of pleural tuberculosis in an adult medicine unit, department of Medicine, Chittagong Medical College Hospital, Chittagong, Bangladesh. A series of total thirty-three consecutive pleural tuberculosis patients admitted in that unit over a period of 6 months were enrolled. All thirty-three pleural tuberculosis patients were observed for their demographic and clinical parameters and undergone some relevant investigations like complete blood count, Mantoux test, pleural fluid study and pleural histopathological study. Later on, they were put on anti-tuberculosis therapy without steroid and followed their response after one month. All patients of pleural tuberculosis presented in this medicine unit had fever and cough associated with chest pain (87.9%), dysnoea (42.4%), haemoptysis (9.1%), weight loss (84.4%), anorexia (90.9%). Age of presentation was 34.1+/-16.2 years and of them, 60.7% patients were below 30. Mean Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR) was 97.04 mm in 1st hour and 57.6% cases had ESR more than 100. 63.6% had Mantoux Test (MT) positive (>10 mm). Only 6.1% had hemorrhagic effusion and others had straw colored fluid. Mean pleural fluid protein is 5.9 gram/L and sugar 65.7 mg/dl. No Acid Fast Bacilli (AFB) was seen on microscopy in pleural fluid. Pleural biopsy revealed 54.5% granulomatous lesion with or without caseation and another 24.2% shows chronic inflammation. Seventy seven percentage (77%) patients were attended follow-up clinic after 1 month and all patients (100%) were improved with this anti-TB therapy. Of the total patient treated with anti TB drug, 53.5% had no pleural effusion, other had minimum effusion. Only 6

  1. Investigation of hemorheological parameters in periodontal diseases.

    PubMed

    Seringec, Nurten; Guncu, Guliz; Arihan, Okan; Avcu, Nihal; Dikmenoglu, Neslihan

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal diseases are frequently associated with cardiovascular diseases (CVD). On the other hand, occurrence of CVD has also been related with increased blood viscosity. This study was planned to investigate four main hemorheological parameters contributing to blood viscosity - hematocrit, erythrocyte deformability, erythrocyte aggregation and plasma viscosity - and also some biochemical parameters (hs-CRP, fibrinogen, globulin etc.) in patients with periodontal disease. We hypothesized that poor periodontal health would be associated with deterioration of hemorheological properties. According to periodontal health status, subjects were divided into three groups as control (healthy), with plaque induced gingivitis and with chronic periodontitis. All groups included 15 males who had not received periodontal therapy in the last six months before the study, were non-smokers, had no systemic diseases and were not on any medication. Erythrocyte deformability and erythrocyte aggregation were measured with laser-assisted optical rotational cell analyzer (LORCA). Plasma viscosity was measured by a cone-plate viscometer. Data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U Test and Spearman Correlation Coefficient. Plasma viscosity (1.36 ± 0.01 mPa.s in the control group and 1.43 ± 0.02 mPa.s in the chronic periodontitis group, P <  0.01), erythrocyte aggregation tendency (aggregation index, amplitude and t½ were 58.82 ± 1.78% , 20.22 ± 0.40 au, 2.80 ± 0.25 s respectively in the control group, and 67.05 ± 1.47% , 22.19 ± 0.50 au, 1.84 ± 0.15 s in the chronic periodontitis group, P <  0.01), hs-CRP, fibrinogen and globulin levels were significantly higher, whereas HDL level was significantly lower in the chronic periodontitis group (P <  0.05) compared to the control group. All of these conditions may contribute to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality observed in people with periodontal disease, via increasing blood viscosity.

  2. Poincaré dodecahedral space parameter estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roukema, B. F.; Buliński, Z.; Gaudin, N. E.

    2008-12-01

    Context: Several studies have proposed that the preferred model of the comoving spatial 3-hypersurface of the Universe may be a Poincaré dodecahedral space (PDS) rather than a simply connected, infinite, flat space. Aims: Here, we aim to improve the surface of last scattering (SLS) optimal cross-correlation method and apply this to observational data and simulations. Methods: For a given “generalised” PDS orientation, we analytically derive the formulae required to exclude points on the sky that cannot be members of close SLS-SLS cross-pairs. These enable more efficient pair selection without sacrificing the uniformity of the underlying selection process. For a sufficiently small matched circle size α and a fixed number of randomly placed points selected for a cross-correlation estimate, the calculation time is decreased and the number of pairs per separation bin is increased. Using this faster method, and including the smallest separation bin when testing correlations, (i) we recalculate Monte Carlo Markov Chains (MCMC) on the five-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) data; and (ii) we seek PDS solutions in a small number of Gaussian random fluctuation (GRF) simulations in order to further explore the statistical significance of the PDS hypothesis. Results: For 5° < α < 60^circ, a calculation speed-up of 3-10 is obtained. (i) The best estimates of the PDS parameters for the five-year WMAP data are similar to those for the three-year data; (ii) comparison of the optimal solutions found by the MCMC chains in the observational map to those found in the simulated maps yields a slightly stronger rejection of the simply connected model using α rather than the twist angle φ. The best estimate of α implies that, given a large-scale auto-correlation as weak as that observed, the PDS-like cross-correlation signal in the WMAP data is expected with a probability of less than about 10%. The expected distribution of φ from the GRF simulations is not

  3. Experimental Determination of the Multiplicity Deadtime Parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Menaa, N.; Croft, S.; Kane, S.C.; Philips, S.; Villani, M.; Evans, L.G.

    2008-07-01

    Definition, extraction, and application of dead-time parameters, in correlated neutron counting, are long standing, thorny issues. Traditionally, dead-time corrections have been estimated on the assumption of a simple paralyzing model, arising from the action of the discriminator in the charged amplifiers connected to the {sup 3}He proportional counters, using a fixed dead-time. Various schemes exist to apply the paralysable model to the multiplicity shift register histogram data. In principle, several methods could be used to estimate the dead-time parameter. The approach which is most widely applied involves measuring a series of Cf-252 sources spanning a wide dynamic range of counting rates. Ratios between the Singles, Doubles and Triples rates which ought to be independent of fissile mass are extracted. The dead-time is chosen so as to achieve the best independence in the ratios, characteristic of the fissioning system, over the counting range. These measurements can be quite laborious to conduct; require a set of Cf-252 sources matched in construction and isotopic composition; require long counts to achieve the requisite precision and involve a good deal of numerical analysis to interpret. In this work we present a simpler scheme which produces comparable values in a way that is easier to implement. In essence we place a near random neutron source, such as may be realized using Am/Li {alpha}-n sources, in the cavity and record the multiplicity histograms as one would for an assay. The variance to mean-squared is narrower than for a random counting experiment, however, as a result of the dead-time losses. A simple formula exists allowing the deadtime to be extracted from this measurement. In this paper, we present results for the traditional approach, the proposed approach and also a variation based on adjusting the total event rate by adding Am/Li sources to a single Cf-252 source fixed in position for the case of a pair of Passive Scrap Multiplicity Counters

  4. Effects of Polymer Parameters on Drag Reduction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safieddine, Abbas Mohammad

    The effects of polymer parameters on fluid drag reduction using polyethylene oxide (PEO), polyacrylamide (PAM), guar gum (GG) and hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC) were investigated. Due to the unavailability of high molecular weight (MW) water-soluble polymers having narrow molecular weight distribution (MWD), an aqueous preparative size exclusion chromatography (SEC) system capable of fractionating over wide MW ranges was constructed. An online low shear viscometer, coupled to the SEC, measured the instantaneous intrinsic viscosity of the eluting polymer solution and, therefore, served as a MW detector since Mark-Houwink "K" and "a" values for all four polymers were known. With the aid of the viscometer, the SEC system was calibrated. The preparative nature of the chromatography system allowed the collection of large volumes of nearly monodisperse fractions (MWD < 1.1) of high MW polymers. Depending on the polymer investigated, the MW of the fractions varied, but ranged between 2 times 10 ^5 and 8 times 10 ^6 daltons. Also, the preparative SEC approach allowed drag reduction (DR) experiments using well-characterized, narrowly dispersed polymer solutions under controlled tube flow conditions. Correlations of drag reduction performance with primary polymer parameters (i.e., concentration, intrinsic viscosity ((eta)), volume fraction (c(eta)), number of chain links (N), and combinations thereof) were used to test the validity of several theoretical DR models. Walsh's energy model, as well as the Deborah argument, did not completely account for drag reduction behavior under all experimental conditions. Within each of the flexible or rigid polymer groups, the extensional viscosity model was successful in correlating c(eta) N with DR under all turbulent conditions. However, it failed to account for the differences in chemical structure between the two polymer groups. However, when the cellulosic repeat unit was used instead of the carbon-carbon bond as the chain link for

  5. Identifiability of altimetry-based rating curve parameters in function of river morphological parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris, Adrien; André Garambois, Pierre; Calmant, Stéphane; Paiva, Rodrigo; Walter, Collischonn; Santos da Silva, Joecila; Medeiros Moreira, Daniel; Bonnet, Marie-Paule; Seyler, Frédérique; Monnier, Jérôme

    2016-04-01

    Estimating river discharge for ungauged river reaches from satellite measurements is not straightforward given the nonlinearity of flow behavior with respect to measurable and non measurable hydraulic parameters. As a matter of facts, current satellite datasets do not give access to key parameters such as river bed topography and roughness. A unique set of almost one thousand altimetry-based rating curves was built by fit of ENVISAT and Jason-2 water stages with discharges obtained from the MGB-IPH rainfall-runoff model in the Amazon basin. These rated discharges were successfully validated towards simulated discharges (Ens = 0.70) and in-situ discharges (Ens = 0.71) and are not mission-dependent. The rating curve writes Q = a(Z-Z0)b*sqrt(S), with Z the water surface elevation and S its slope gained from satellite altimetry, a and b power law coefficient and exponent and Z0 the river bed elevation such as Q(Z0) = 0. For several river reaches in the Amazon basin where ADCP measurements are available, the Z0 values are fairly well validated with a relative error lower than 10%. The present contribution aims at relating the identifiability and the physical meaning of a, b and Z0given various hydraulic and geomorphologic conditions. Synthetic river bathymetries sampling a wide range of rivers and inflow discharges are used to perform twin experiments. A shallow water model is run for generating synthetic satellite observations, and then rating curve parameters are determined for each river section thanks to a MCMC algorithm. Thanks to twin experiments, it is shown that rating curve formulation with water surface slope, i.e. closer from Manning equation form, improves parameter identifiability. The compensation between parameters is limited, especially for reaches with little water surface variability. Rating curve parameters are analyzed for riffle and pools for small to large rivers, different river slopes and cross section shapes. It is shown that the river bed

  6. Hydrological Parameter Estimation (HYPE) System for Bayesian Exploration of Parameter Sensitivities in an Arctic Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, D.; Bolton, W. R.; Endalamaw, A. M.; Young, J. M.; Hinzman, L. D.

    2014-12-01

    As part of a study on how vegetation water use and permafrost dynamics impact stream flow in the boreal forest discontinuous permafrost zone, a Bayesian modeling framework has been developed to assess the effect of parameter uncertainties in an integrated vegetation water use and simple, first-order, non-linear hydrological model. Composed of a front-end Bayes driver and a backend interactive hydrological model, the system is meant to facilitate rapid execution of seasonal simulations driven by hundreds to thousands of parameter variations to analyze the sensitivity of the system to a varying parameter space in order to derive more effective parameterizations for larger-scale simulations. The backend modeling component provides an Application Programming Interface (API) for introducing parameters in the form of constant or time-varying scalars or spatially distributed grids. In this work, we describe the basic structure of the flexible, object-oriented modeling system and test its performance against collected basin data from headwater catchments of varying permafrost extent and ecosystem structure (deciduous versus coniferous vegetation). We will also analyze model and sub-model (evaporation, transpiration, precipitation and streamflow) sensitivity to parameters through application of the system to two catchment basins of the Caribou-Poker Creeks Research Watershed (CPCRW) located in Interior Alaska. The C2 basin is a mostly permafrost-free, south facing catchment dominated by deciduous vegetation. The C3 basin is underlain by more than 50% permafrost and is dominated by coniferous vegetation. The ultimate goal of the modeling system is to improve parameterizations in mesoscale hydrologic models, and application of the HYPE system to the well-instrumented CPCRW provides a valuable opportunity for experimentation.

  7. CVD parameter study using strategy of experimentation

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.E.

    1984-07-01

    An experimental design strategy was used to determine the operating characteristics of an apparatus for forming tungsten-rhenium (W-Re) alloys by chemical vapor deposition. The metal deposits were made at 650/sup 0/C by the hydrogen reduction of a 10 percent rhenium hexafluoride and 90 percent gas mixture at 0.66 to 4.00 kPa (5 to 30 torr). Hydrogen flow rates ranged from 550 to 2770 ..mu..mol/s and mixed metal fluoride flows ranged from 41 to 130 ..mu..mol/s. An operating point was sought that would produce a high strength alloy, so the deposition results were fit by least squares regression to second order response equations. Seven properties were measured: deposition rate, average composition, maximum composition, minimum composition, sample standard deviation of the composition, microhardness as a measure of the amount of A15 phase, and as-deposited surface quality. A set of operating parameters was determined that was predicted to yield a 23 w/o Re alloy with an 1100 DPH (diamond pyramid hardness) microhardness.

  8. Cell Forces and Cytoskeletal Order Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Discher, Dennis

    2012-02-01

    Nematic, Smectic and Isotropic Order parameters have found wide-spread use in characterizing all manner of soft matter systems, but have not yet been applied to characterize and understand the structures within living cells, particularly cytoskeletal structures. Several examples will be used to illustrate the utility of such analyses, ranging from experiments on stem cells attached to or in various elastic matrices to embryonic heart tissue and simulations of membrane cytoskeletons under all manner of stressing. Recently developed theory will be shown to apply in general with account of cell contractility, matrix elasticity and dimensionality as well as cell shape and a newly defined ``cytoskeletal polarizability.'' The latter property of cells is likely different between different cell types due to different amounts of key cytoskeletal components with some types of stem cells being more polarizable than others. Evidence of coupling to the nucleus as a viscoelastic inclusion will also be presented. [4pt] References: (1) P. Dalhaimer, D.E. Discher, T. Lubensky. Crosslinked actin networks exhibit liquid crystal elastomer behavior, including soft-mode elasticity. Nature Physics 3: 354-360 (2007). (2) A. Zemel, F.Rehfeldt, A.E.X. Brown, D.E. Discher, and S.A. Safran. Optimal matrix rigidity in the self-polarization of stem cells. Nature Physics 6: 468 - 473 (2010).

  9. Determining the Tsallis parameter via maximum entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conroy, J. M.; Miller, H. G.

    2015-05-01

    The nonextensive entropic measure proposed by Tsallis [C. Tsallis, J. Stat. Phys. 52, 479 (1988), 10.1007/BF01016429] introduces a parameter, q , which is not defined but rather must be determined. The value of q is typically determined from a piece of data and then fixed over the range of interest. On the other hand, from a phenomenological viewpoint, there are instances in which q cannot be treated as a constant. We present two distinct approaches for determining q depending on the form of the equations of constraint for the particular system. In the first case the equations of constraint for the operator O ̂ can be written as Tr (FqO ̂)=C , where C may be an explicit function of the distribution function F . We show that in this case one can solve an equivalent maxent problem which yields q as a function of the corresponding Lagrange multiplier. As an illustration the exact solution of the static generalized Fokker-Planck equation (GFPE) is obtained from maxent with the Tsallis enropy. As in the case where C is a constant, if q is treated as a variable within the maxent framework the entropic measure is maximized trivially for all values of q . Therefore q must be determined from existing data. In the second case an additional equation of constraint exists which cannot be brought into the above form. In this case the additional equation of constraint may be used to determine the fixed value of q .

  10. The parameter space of windy convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goluskin, David

    2016-11-01

    In horizontally periodic Rayleigh-Bénard convection at large Rayleigh numbers (Ra), wavenumber-zero horizontal winds can arise spontaneously and dramatically alter the flow. The resulting "windy convection" has been observed in 2D domains and horizontally anisotropic 3D domains. As Ra is raised, the fraction of total kinetic energy contained in the wind approaches 100%. Vertical heat transport is greatly depressed by the wind and grows very slowly (if at all) as Ra is raised. Two different types of windy convection have been observed at different Prandtl numbers (Pr). At smaller Pr, heat is vertically convected almost exclusively during discrete bursts that are separated by long quiescent phases. At larger Pr, convective transport remains significant at all times. Convection can thus be identified as either windy or non-windy, and windy states can be either bursting or non-bursting. The regions of the Ra-Pr parameter plane in which each type of convection can occur remain poorly understood, as do transitions between these regions. This talk will summarize the phenomenon of windy convection in 2D and 3D and present a preliminary exploration of the Ra-Pr plane in the 2D case. Partially supported by NSF award DMS-1515161.

  11. Constraining cosmological parameter with SN Ia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indra Putri, A. N.; Wulandari, H. R. Tri

    2016-11-01

    A type I supemovae (SN Ia) is an exploding white dwarf, whose mass exceeds Chandrasekar limit (1.44 solar mass). If a white dwarf is in a binary system, it may accrete matter from the companion, resulting in an excess mass that cannot be balanced by the pressure of degenerated electrons in the core. SNe Ia are highly luminous objects, that they are visible from very high distances. After some corrections (stretch (s), colour (c), K-corrections, etc.), the variations in the light curves of SNe Ia can be suppressed to be no more than 10%. Their high luminosity and almost uniform intrinsic brightness at the peak light, i.e. MB ∼ -19, make SNe Ia ideal standard candle. Because of their visibility from large distances, SNe Ia can be employed as a cosmological measuring tool. It was analysis of SNe Ia data that indicated for the first time, that the universe is not only expanding, but also accelerating. This work analyzed a compilation of SNe Ia data to determine several cosmological parameters (H0, Ωm, Ωa, and w). It can be concluded from the analysis, that our universe is a flat, dark energy dominated universe, and that the cosmological constant A is a suitable candidate for dark energy.

  12. Voice parameters in children with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Moura, Carla Pinto; Cunha, Luís Miguel; Vilarinho, Helena; Cunha, Maria João; Freitas, Diamantino; Palha, Miguel; Pueschel, Siegfried M; Pais-Clemente, M

    2008-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most frequent chromosomal disorder. Commonly, individuals with DS have difficulties with speech and show an unusual quality in the voice. Their phenotypic characteristics include general hypotonia and maxillary hypoplasia with relative macroglossia, and these contribute to particular acoustic alterations. Subjective perceptual and acoustic assessments of the voice (Praat-4.1 software) were performed in 66 children with DS, 36 boys and 30 girls, aged 3 to 8 years. These data were compared with those of an age-matched group of children from the general population. Perceptual evaluations showed significant differences in the group of children with DS. The voice of children with DS presented a lower fundamental frequency (F(0)) with elevated dispersion. The conjunction of frequencies for formants (F(1) and F(2)) revealed a decreased distinction between the vowels, reflecting the loss of articulatory processing. The DS vocalic anatomical functional ratio represents the main distinctive parameter between the two groups studied, and it may be useful in conducting assessments.

  13. Molecular Parameters of Hyperthermia for Radiosensitization

    PubMed Central

    Pandita, Tej K.; Pandita, Shruti; Bhaumik, Sukesh R.

    2011-01-01

    Hyperthermia is a potent sensitizer of cell killing by ionizing radiation (IR), however, the precise mechanism of heat-induced cell death is not yet clear. Radiosensitization can be attributed to the fact that heat is a pleiotropic damaging agent, affecting multiple cell components to varying degrees by altering protein structures, thus influencing the DNA damage response. Hyperthermia alone induces several steps associated with IR signaling in cells. For example, hyperthermia enhances ATM kinase activity and increases cellular ATM autophosphorylation. This prior activation of ATM or other components of the IR-induced signaling pathway by heat interferes with the normal IR-induced signaling required for chromosomal DNA double-strand break repair, thus resulting in increased cell killing post irradiation. Hyperthermia also induces heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) synthesis and enhances telomerase activity. HSP70 expression is associated with radioresistance. Inactivation of HSP70 and telomerase increases residual DNA DSBs post IR exposure, which correlates with increased cell killing, supporting the role of HSP70 and telomerase in IR-induced DNA damage repair. Thus, hyperthermia influences several molecular parameters involved in sensitizing tumor cells to radiation and can enhance the potential of targeted radiotherapy. PMID:19883367

  14. Optimal diabatic states based on solvation parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alguire, Ethan; Subotnik, Joseph E.

    2012-11-01

    A new method for obtaining diabatic electronic states of a molecular system in a condensed environment is proposed and evaluated. This technique, which we denote as Edmiston-Ruedenberg (ER)-ɛ diabatization, forms diabatic states as a linear combination of adiabatic states by minimizing an approximation to the total coupling between states in a medium with temperature T and with a characteristic Pekar factor C. ER-ɛ diabatization represents an improvement upon previous localized diabatization methods for two reasons: first, it is sensitive to the energy separation between adiabatic states, thus accounting for fluctuations in energy and effectively preventing over-mixing. Second, it responds to the strength of system-solvent interactions via parameters for the dielectric constant and temperature of the medium, which is physically reasonable. Here, we apply the ER-ɛ technique to both intramolecular and intermolecular excitation energy transfer systems. We find that ER-ɛ diabatic states satisfy three important properties: (1) they have small derivative couplings everywhere; (2) they have small diabatic couplings at avoided crossings, and (3) they have negligible diabatic couplings everywhere else. As such, ER-ɛ states are good candidates for so-called "optimal diabatic states."

  15. Hormonal and seminal parameters in infertile men.

    PubMed

    Bruno, B; Francavilla, S; Properzi, G; Martini, M; Fabbrini, A

    1986-01-01

    500 infertile patients (250 with and 250 without left side varicocele) and 33 fertile men were evaluated as far as seminal parameters and the hormonal status were concerned. Sperm motility was constantly lower in infertile patients also when infertile group was compared to fertile one with the same sperm density. Serum testosterone levels were lower in infertile groups when compared to fertile men, and this confirms the existence of an androgenic deficit as a common finding in infertility associated or not to varicocele. FSH and LH increased (p less than 0.001) when sperm density dropped to less than 5 X 10(6) spermatozoa/ml. A negative correlation was found between both gonadotropins and sperm count (p less than 0.001), also after exclusion of azoo- and oligozoospermic (less than 5 X 10(6) spermatozoa/ml) patients (p less than 0.01). Gonadotropins were moreover tightly correlated between each other (p less than 0.001). Our data suggest that both gonadotropins are tightly tuned with sperm output and thus with the spermatogenic potential.

  16. Back propagation parameter analysis on multiprocessors

    SciTech Connect

    Cerf, G.; Mokry, R.; Weintraub, J.

    1988-09-01

    In order to develop systems of artificial neural networks which can be scaled up to perform practical tasks such as pattern recognition or speech processing, the use of powerful computing tools is essential. Multiprocessors are becoming increasingly popular in the simulation and study of large networks, as the inherent parallelism of many neural architectures and learning algorithms lends itself quite naturally to implementation on concurrent processors. In this study, a multiprocessor system based on the Inmos transputer has been used to examine the stability and convergence rates of the back propagation algorithm as a function of changes in parameters such as activation values, number of hidden units, learning rate, momentum, and initial weight and bias configurations. The Victor V32 is a prototype low-cost message-passing multiprocessor system, designed and implemented by the Victor project in the Microsystems and VLSI group at the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center. A sample topology for the system is 32 nodes in a fixed 4 x 8 mesh. A host processor interfaced to a PC AT and connected to one of the corners of the mesh provides screen and disc I/O. Each of the 32 nodes consists of an INMOS T414 transputer and 4 Megabytes of local memory. Four high-speed (20 Mbits/sec) serial links provide communication among the nodes.

  17. Virus detection and quantification using electrical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Mahmoud Al; Mustafa, Farah; Ali, Lizna M.; Rizvi, Tahir A.

    2014-10-01

    Here we identify and quantitate two similar viruses, human and feline immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and FIV), suspended in a liquid medium without labeling, using a semiconductor technique. The virus count was estimated by calculating the impurities inside a defined volume by observing the change in electrical parameters. Empirically, the virus count was similar to the absolute value of the ratio of the change of the virus suspension dopant concentration relative to the mock dopant over the change in virus suspension Debye volume relative to mock Debye volume. The virus type was identified by constructing a concentration-mobility relationship which is unique for each kind of virus, allowing for a fast (within minutes) and label-free virus quantification and identification. For validation, the HIV and FIV virus preparations were further quantified by a biochemical technique and the results obtained by both approaches corroborated well. We further demonstrate that the electrical technique could be applied to accurately measure and characterize silica nanoparticles that resemble the virus particles in size. Based on these results, we anticipate our present approach to be a starting point towards establishing the foundation for label-free electrical-based identification and quantification of an unlimited number of viruses and other nano-sized particles.

  18. Parameters and abundances in luminous stars

    SciTech Connect

    Earle Luck, R.

    2014-06-01

    Parameters and abundances for 451 stars of spectral types F, G, and K of luminosity classes I and II have been derived. Absolute magnitudes and E(B – V) have been derived for the warmer stars in order to investigate the galactic abundance gradient. The value found here: d[Fe/H]/dR ∼ –0.06 dex kpc{sup –1}, agrees well with previous determinations. Stellar evolution indicators have also been investigated with the derived C/O ratios indicating that standard CN processing has been operating. Perhaps the most surprising result found in these supposedly relatively young intermediate-mass stars is that both [O/Fe] and [C/Fe] show a correlation with [Fe/H] much the same as found in older populations. While the stars were selected based on luminosity class, there does exist a significant [Fe/H] range in the sample. The likely explanation of this is that there is a significant range in age in the sample; that is, some of the sample are low-mass red-giant stars with types that place them within the selection criteria.

  19. Bayesian AVO inversion with consistent angle parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chao; Zhang, Jinmiao; Zhu, Zhenyu

    2017-04-01

    Amplitude versus offset (AVO) inversion has been extensively used in seismic exploration. Many different elastic parameters can be inverted by incorporating corresponding reflection coefficient approximations. Although efforts have been made to improve the accuracy of AVO inversions for years, there is still one problem that has long been ignored. In most methods, the angle in the approximation and the angle used in seismic angle gather extractions are not the same one. This inconsistency leads to inaccurate inversion results. In this paper, a Bayesian AVO inversion method with consistent angles is proposed to solve the problem and improve inversion accuracy. Firstly, a linearized P-wave reflection coefficient approximation with consistent angles is derived based on angle replacements. The equivalent form of the approximation in terms moduli and density is derived so that moduli can be inverted for reservoir characterization. Then, by convoluting it with seismic wavelets as the forward solver, a probabilistic prestack seismic inversion method with consistent angles is presented in a Bayesian scheme. The synthetic test proves that the accuracy of this method is higher than the traditional one. The real data example shows that the inversion result fits better with well log interpretation data, which verifies the feasibility of the proposed method.

  20. A new expanded solubility parameter approach.

    PubMed

    Stefanis, Emmanuel; Panayiotou, Costas

    2012-04-15

    The partial or Hansen solubility parameters (HSP) are important properties of the various substances and very useful tools for the selection of their solvents or the prediction of their behaviour in numerous applications. Their design and evaluation relies on the basic rule of "similarity matching" for solubility. The present work attempts to enhance the capacity of HSPs by incorporating into their evaluation the other basic rule of solubility, namely, the rule of "complementarity matching". This is done in a simple and straightforward manner by splitting the hydrogen bonding HSP into its acidic or proton donor component and its basic or proton acceptor one. The splitting is based on the third σ-moments of the screening charge distributions or sigma profiles of the quantum-mechanics based COSMO-RS theory. The whole development and application does not involve any sophisticated calculations or any strong specific background. The new method has been applied to a variety of solubility data for systems of pharmaceutical interest in order to verify the significant improvement over the classical HSP approach. The application of the new method requires, of course, the knowledge of the HSPs. For this reason, in Appendix A is presented an updated version of a robust and reliable group-contribution method for the calculation of the HSPs. The key features of this combined tool are critically discussed.

  1. Virus detection and quantification using electrical parameters

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Mahmoud Al; Mustafa, Farah; Ali, Lizna M.; Rizvi, Tahir A.

    2014-01-01

    Here we identify and quantitate two similar viruses, human and feline immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and FIV), suspended in a liquid medium without labeling, using a semiconductor technique. The virus count was estimated by calculating the impurities inside a defined volume by observing the change in electrical parameters. Empirically, the virus count was similar to the absolute value of the ratio of the change of the virus suspension dopant concentration relative to the mock dopant over the change in virus suspension Debye volume relative to mock Debye volume. The virus type was identified by constructing a concentration-mobility relationship which is unique for each kind of virus, allowing for a fast (within minutes) and label-free virus quantification and identification. For validation, the HIV and FIV virus preparations were further quantified by a biochemical technique and the results obtained by both approaches corroborated well. We further demonstrate that the electrical technique could be applied to accurately measure and characterize silica nanoparticles that resemble the virus particles in size. Based on these results, we anticipate our present approach to be a starting point towards establishing the foundation for label-free electrical-based identification and quantification of an unlimited number of viruses and other nano-sized particles. PMID:25355078

  2. ANALYSIS OF BIOMECHANICAL PARAMETERS IN COLONIC ANASTOMOSIS

    PubMed Central

    IWANAGA, Tiago Cavalcanti; AGUIAR, José Lamartine de Andrade; MARTINS-FILHO, Euclides Dias; KREIMER, Flávio; SILVA-FILHO, Fernando Luiz; de ALBUQUERQUE, Amanda Vasconcelos

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The use of measures in colonic anastomoses to prevent dehiscences is of great medical interest. Sugarcane molasses, which has adequate tolerability and compatibility in vivo, has not yet been tested for this purpose. Aim: To analyze the biomechanical parameters of colonic suture in rats undergoing colectomy, using sugarcane molasses polysaccharide as tape or gel. Methods: 45 Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus albinus) were randomized into three groups of 15 animals: irrigation of enteric sutures with 0.9% saline solution; application of sugarcane molasses polysaccharide as tape; and sugarcane molasses polysaccharide as gel. The rats underwent colon ressection, with subsequent reanastomosis using polypropylene suture; they were treated according to their respective groups. Five rats from each group were evaluated at different times after the procedure: 30, 90 and 180 days postoperatively. The following variables were evaluated: maximum rupture force, modulus of elasticity and specific deformation of maximum force. Results: The biomechanical variables among the scheduled times and treatment groups were statistically calculated. The characteristics of maximum rupture force and modulus of elasticity of the specimens remained identical, regardless of treatment with saline, polysaccharide gel or tape, and treatment time. However, it was found that the specific deformation of maximum force of the intestinal wall was higher after 180 days in the group treated with sugarcane polysaccharide gel (p=0.09). Conclusion: Compared to control, it was detected greater elasticity of the intestinal wall in mice treated with sugarcane polysaccharide gel, without changing other biomechanical characteristics, regardless of type or time of treatment. PMID:27438033

  3. R-matrix parameters in reactor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, R.N.

    1992-01-01

    The key role of the resonance phenomena in reactor applications manifests through the self-shielding effect. The basic issue involves the application of the microscopic cross sections in the macroscopic reactor lattices consisting of many nuclides that exhibit resonance behavior. To preserve the fidelity of such a effect requires the accurate calculations of the cross sections and the neutron flux in great detail. This clearly not possible without viable resonance data. Recently released ENDF/B VI resonance data in the resolved range especially reflect the dramatic improvement in two important areas; namely, the significant extension of the resolved resonance ranges accompanied by the availability of the R-matrix parameters of the Reich-Moore type. Aside from the obvious increase in computing time required for the significantly greater number of resonances, the main concern is the compatibility of the Riech-Moore representation to the existing reactor processing codes which, until now, are based on the traditional cross section formalisms. This purpose of this paper is to summarize our recent efforts to facilitate implementation of the proposed methods into the production codes at ANL.

  4. PHYSICAL PARAMETERS OF STANDARD AND BLOWOUT JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Pucci, Stefano; Romoli, Marco; Poletto, Giannina; Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2013-10-10

    The X-ray Telescope on board the Hinode mission revealed the occurrence, in polar coronal holes, of much more numerous jets than previously indicated by the Yohkoh/Soft X-ray Telescope. These plasma ejections can be of two types, depending on whether they fit the standard reconnection scenario for coronal jets or if they include a blowout-like eruption. In this work, we analyze two jets, one standard and one blowout, that have been observed by the Hinode and STEREO experiments. We aim to infer differences in the physical parameters that correspond to the different morphologies of the events. To this end, we adopt spectroscopic techniques and determine the profiles of the plasma temperature, density, and outflow speed versus time and position along the jets. The blowout jet has a higher outflow speed, a marginally higher temperature, and is rooted in a stronger magnetic field region than the standard event. Our data provide evidence for recursively occurring reconnection episodes within both the standard and the blowout jet, pointing either to bursty reconnection or to reconnection occurring at different locations over the jet lifetimes. We make a crude estimate of the energy budget of the two jets and show how energy is partitioned among different forms. Also, we show that the magnetic energy that feeds the blowout jet is a factor of 10 higher than the magnetic energy that fuels the standard event.

  5. Developing population pharmacokinetic parameters for high-dose methotrexate therapy: implication of correlations among developed parameters for individual parameter estimation using the Bayesian least-squares method.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masahiro; Fukuoka, Noriyasu; Takeuchi, Toshiki; Yamaguchi, Kazunori; Motoki, Takahiro; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Kosaka, Shinji; Houchi, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    Bayesian estimation enables the individual pharmacokinetic parameters of the medication administrated to be estimated using only a few blood concentrations. Due to wide inter-individual variability in the pharmacokinetics of methotrexate (MTX), the concentration of MTX needs to be frequently determined during high-dose MTX therapy in order to prevent toxic adverse events. To apply the benefits of Bayesian estimation to cases treated with this therapy, we attempted to develop an estimation method using the Bayesian least-squares method, which is commonly used for therapeutic monitoring in a clinical setting. Because this method hypothesizes independency among population pharmacokinetic parameters, we focused on correlations among population pharmacokinetic parameters used to estimate individual parameters. A two-compartment model adequately described the observed concentration of MTX. The individual pharmacokinetic parameters of MTX were estimated in 57 cases using the maximum likelihood method. Among the available parameters accounting for a 2-compartment model, V1, k10, k12, and k21 were found to be the combination showing the weakest correlations, which indicated that this combination was best suited to the Bayesian least-squares method. Using this combination of population pharmacokinetic parameters, Bayesian estimation provided an accurate estimation of individual parameters. In addition, we demonstrated that the degree of correlation among population pharmacokinetic parameters used in the estimation affected the precision of the estimates. This result highlights the necessity of assessing correlations among the population pharmacokinetic parameters used in the Bayesian least-squares method.

  6. Study of Dill's B parameter measurement of EUV resist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Yoko; Harada, Tetsuo; Watanabe, Takeo; Kinoshita, Hiroo

    2015-03-01

    Our group previously explored methods for measuring simulation parameter for advanced chemically amplified (CA) resists, including development parameters [1]. Dill's C parameter [2-3] , acid diffusion length generated from PAG [4], and de-protection reaction parameters [5-6]. We performed simulations of EUV resists using these parameters, the results of which allowed us to examine the conditions for reducing LER and improving resolution. This paper discusses a method for measuring the Dill's B parameter, which had been difficult to measure with conventional methods. We also confirmed that enhancing the resist polymer's EUV light absorption is effective in improving the sensitivity of the CA resist.

  7. Dynamics in the Parameter Space of a Neuron Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulo, C. Rech

    2012-06-01

    Some two-dimensional parameter-space diagrams are numerically obtained by considering the largest Lyapunov exponent for a four-dimensional thirteen-parameter Hindmarsh—Rose neuron model. Several different parameter planes are considered, and it is shown that depending on the combination of parameters, a typical scenario can be preserved: for some choice of two parameters, the parameter plane presents a comb-shaped chaotic region embedded in a large periodic region. It is also shown that there exist regions close to these comb-shaped chaotic regions, separated by the comb teeth, organizing themselves in period-adding bifurcation cascades.

  8. Isolating parameter sensitivity in reach scale transient storage modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmadel, Noah M.; Neilson, Bethany T.; Heavilin, Justin E.; Wörman, Anders

    2016-03-01

    Parameter sensitivity analyses, although necessary to assess identifiability, may not lead to an increased understanding or accurate representation of transient storage processes when associated parameter sensitivities are muted. Reducing the number of uncertain calibration parameters through field-based measurements may allow for more realistic representations and improved predictive capabilities of reach scale stream solute transport. Using a two-zone transient storage model, we examined the spatial detail necessary to set parameters describing hydraulic characteristics and isolate the sensitivity of the parameters associated with transient storage processes. We represented uncertain parameter distributions as triangular fuzzy numbers and used closed form statistical moment solutions to express parameter sensitivity thus avoiding copious model simulations. These solutions also allowed for the direct incorporation of different levels of spatial information regarding hydraulic characteristics. To establish a baseline for comparison, we performed a sensitivity analysis considering all model parameters as uncertain. Next, we set hydraulic parameters as the reach averages, leaving the transient storage parameters as uncertain, and repeated the analysis. Lastly, we incorporated high resolution hydraulic information assessed from aerial imagery to examine whether more spatial detail was necessary to isolate the sensitivity of transient storage parameters. We found that a reach-average hydraulic representation, as opposed to using detailed spatial information, was sufficient to highlight transient storage parameter sensitivity and provide more information regarding the potential identifiability of these parameters.

  9. Determining extreme parameter correlation in ground water models.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, M.C.; Osterby, O.

    2003-01-01

    In ground water flow system models with hydraulic-head observations but without significant imposed or observed flows, extreme parameter correlation generally exists. As a result, hydraulic conductivity and recharge parameters cannot be uniquely estimated. In complicated problems, such correlation can go undetected even by experienced modelers. Extreme parameter correlation can be detected using parameter correlation coefficients, but their utility depends on the presence of sufficient, but not excessive, numerical imprecision of the sensitivities, such as round-off error. This work investigates the information that can be obtained from parameter correlation coefficients in the presence of different levels of numerical imprecision, and compares it to the information provided by an alternative method called the singular value decomposition (SVD). Results suggest that (1) calculated correlation coefficients with absolute values that round to 1.00 were good indicators of extreme parameter correlation, but smaller values were not necessarily good indicators of lack of correlation and resulting unique parameter estimates; (2) the SVD may be more difficult to interpret than parameter correlation coefficients, but it required sensitivities that were one to two significant digits less accurate than those that required using parameter correlation coefficients; and (3) both the SVD and parameter correlation coefficients identified extremely correlated parameters better when the parameters were more equally sensitive. When the statistical measures fail, parameter correlation can be identified only by the tedious process of executing regression using different sets of starting values, or, in some circumstances, through graphs of the objective function.

  10. Estimation of high altitude Martian dust parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabari, Jayesh; Bhalodi, Pinali

    2016-07-01

    Dust devils are known to occur near the Martian surface mostly during the mid of Southern hemisphere summer and they play vital role in deciding background dust opacity in the atmosphere. The second source of high altitude Martian dust could be due to the secondary ejecta caused by impacts on Martian Moons, Phobos and Deimos. Also, the surfaces of the Moons are charged positively due to ultraviolet rays from the Sun and negatively due to space plasma currents. Such surface charging may cause fine grains to be levitated, which can easily escape the Moons. It is expected that the escaping dust form dust rings within the orbits of the Moons and therefore also around the Mars. One more possible source of high altitude Martian dust is interplanetary in nature. Due to continuous supply of the dust from various sources and also due to a kind of feedback mechanism existing between the ring or tori and the sources, the dust rings or tori can sustain over a period of time. Recently, very high altitude dust at about 1000 km has been found by MAVEN mission and it is expected that the dust may be concentrated at about 150 to 500 km. However, it is mystery how dust has reached to such high altitudes. Estimation of dust parameters before-hand is necessary to design an instrument for the detection of high altitude Martian dust from a future orbiter. In this work, we have studied the dust supply rate responsible primarily for the formation of dust ring or tori, the life time of dust particles around the Mars, the dust number density as well as the effect of solar radiation pressure and Martian oblateness on dust dynamics. The results presented in this paper may be useful to space scientists for understanding the scenario and designing an orbiter based instrument to measure the dust surrounding the Mars for solving the mystery. The further work is underway.

  11. Reconstructing contact network parameters from viral phylogenies

    PubMed Central

    McCloskey, Rosemary M.; Liang, Richard H.; Poon, Art F.Y.

    2016-01-01

    Models of the spread of disease in a population often make the simplifying assumption that the population is homogeneously mixed, or is divided into homogeneously mixed compartments. However, human populations have complex structures formed by social contacts, which can have a significant influence on the rate of epidemic spread. Contact network models capture this structure by explicitly representing each contact which could possibly lead to a transmission. We developed a method based on approximate Bayesian computation (ABC), a likelihood-free inference strategy, for estimating structural parameters of the contact network underlying an observed viral phylogeny. The method combines adaptive sequential Monte Carlo for ABC, Gillespie simulation for propagating epidemics though networks, and a kernel-based tree similarity score. We used the method to fit the Barabási-Albert network model to simulated transmission trees, and also applied it to viral phylogenies estimated from ten published HIV sequence datasets. This model incorporates a feature called preferential attachment (PA), whereby individuals with more existing contacts accumulate new contacts at a higher rate. On simulated data, we found that the strength of PA and the number of infected nodes in the network can often be accurately estimated. On the other hand, the mean degree of the network, as well as the total number of nodes, was not estimable with ABC. We observed sub-linear PA power in all datasets, as well as higher PA power in networks of injection drug users. These results underscore the importance of considering contact structures when performing phylodynamic inference. Our method offers the potential to quantitatively investigate the contact network structure underlying viral epidemics. PMID:27818787

  12. Orbital Parameters for Two Young Spectroscopic Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnath, Nicole

    I report orbital parameters for two low-mass, pre-main sequence spectroscopic binaries VSB 111 and VSB 126. These systems were originally identified as single-lined on the basis of visible-light spectral observations. High-resolution, infrared spectra were obtained to detect absorption lines of the secondary stars and measure radial velocities of both components in the systems. The combination of the visible and infrared observations of VSB 111 leads to a period of 902.1+/-0.9 days, an eccentricity of 0.788+/-0.008, and a mass ratio of 0.52+/-0.05. VSB 126 has a period of 12.9244+/-0.0002 days, an eccentricity of 0.18+/-0.02, and a mass ratio of 0.29+/-0.02. Visible-light photometry using the 0.8-m telescope at Lowell Observatory provided rotation periods for the primary stars in both systems, 3.74+/-0.02 days for VSB 111 and 5.71+/-0.07 days for VSB 126. Based on the vsini values, the primary rotation periods, and estimates for the primary radii, I find inclinations for the primary-star rotation axes, 42+47 -16° for VSB 111 and 54+36-29° for VSB 126, and compare these to the inclination angle of the binary orbits, iorb = 36+/-4° for VSB 111 and i orb = 45+/-4° for VSB 126, estimated from the orbital solutions. Both binaries are located in the young, star- forming cluster NGC 2264 with a complex and clumpy gas and dust structure at a distance of ~800 pc. The center-of-mass velocities of the two systems are consistent with distinct CO clouds within NGC 2264.

  13. Retrieval of atmospheric parameters from GOMOS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyrölä, E.; Tamminen, J.; Sofieva, V.; Bertaux, J. L.; Hauchecorne, A.; Dalaudier, F.; Fussen, D.; Vanhellemont, F.; Fanton D'Andon, O.; Barrot, G.; Guirlet, M.; Mangin, A.; Blanot, L.; Fehr, T.; Saavedra de Miguel, L.; Fraisse, R.

    2010-12-01

    The Global Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars (GOMOS) instrument on board the European Space Agency's ENVISAT satellite measures attenuation of stellar light in occultation geometry. Daytime measurements also record scattered solar light from the atmosphere. The wavelength regions are the ultraviolet-visible band 248-690 nm and two infrared bands at 755-774 nm and at 926-954 nm. From UV-Visible and IR spectra the vertical profiles of O3, NO2, NO3, H2O, O2 and aerosols can be retrieved. In addition there are two 1 kHz photometers at blue 473-527 nm and red 646-698 nm. Photometer data are used to correct spectrometer measurements for scintillations and to retrieve high resolution temperature profiles as well as gravity wave and turbulence parameters. Measurements cover altitude region 5-150 km. Atmospherically valid data are obtained in 15-100 km. In this paper we present an overview of the GOMOS retrieval algorithms for stellar occultation measurements. The low signal-to-noise ratio and the refractive effects due to the point source nature of stars have been important drivers in the development of GOMOS retrieval algorithms. We present first the Level 1b algorithms that are used to correct instrument related disturbances in the spectrometer and photometer measurements The Level 2 algorithms deal with the retrieval of vertical profiles of atmospheric gaseous constituents, aerosols and high resolution temperature. We divide the presentation into correction for refractive effects, high resolution temperature retrieval and spectral/vertical inversion. The paper also includes discussion about the GOMOS algorithm development, expected improvements, access to GOMOS data and alternative retrieval approaches.

  14. Retrieval of atmospheric parameters from GOMOS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyrölä, E.; Tamminen, J.; Sofieva, V.; Bertaux, J. L.; Hauchecorne, A.; Dalaudier, F.; Fussen, D.; Vanhellemont, F.; Fanton D'Andon, O.; Barrot, G.; Guirlet, M.; Mangin, A.; Blanot, L.; Fehr, T.; Saavedra de Miguel, L.; Fraisse, R.

    2010-04-01

    The Global Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars (GOMOS) instrument on board the European Space Agency's ENVISAT satellite measures attenuation of stellar light in occultation geometry. Daytime measurements also record scattered solar light from the atmosphere. The wavelength regions are the ultraviolet-visible band 248-690 nm and two infrared bands at 755-774 nm and at 926-954 nm. From UV-Visible and IR spectra the vertical profiles of O3, NO2, NO3, H2O, O2 and aerosols can be retrieved. In addition there are two 1 kHz photometers at blue 473-527 nm and red 646-698 nm. Photometer data are used to correct spectrometer measurements for scintillations and to retrieve high resolution temperature profiles as well as gravity wave and turbulence parameters. Measurements cover altitude region 5-150 km. Atmospherically valid data are obtained in 15-100 km. In this paper we present an overview of the GOMOS retrieval algorithms for stellar occultation measurements. The low signal-to-noise ratio and the refractive effects due to the point source nature of stars have been important drivers in the development of GOMOS retrieval algorithms. We present first the Level 1b algorithms that are used to correct instrument related disturbances in the spectrometer and photometer measurements The Level 2 algorithms deal with the retrieval of vertical profiles of atmospheric gaseous constituents, aerosols and high resolution temperature. We divide the presentation into correction for refractive effects, high resolution temperature retrieval and spectral/vertical inversion. The paper also includes discussion about the GOMOS algorithm development, expected improvements, access to GOMOS data and alternative retrieval approaches.

  15. Quenching parameter in a holographic thermal QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Binoy Krishna; Arya, Bhaskar

    2017-01-01

    We have calculated the quenching parameter, q ˆ in a model-independent way using the gauge-gravity duality. In earlier calculations, the geometry in the gravity side at finite temperature was usually taken as the pure AdS black hole metric for which the dual gauge theory becomes conformally invariant unlike QCD. Therefore we use a metric which incorporates the fundamental quarks by embedding the coincident D7 branes in the Klebanov-Tseytlin background and a finite temperature is switched on by inserting a black hole into the background, known as OKS-BH metric. Further inclusion of an additional UV cap to the metric prepares the dual gauge theory to run similar to thermal QCD. Moreover q ˆ is usually defined in the literature from the Glauber model perturbative QCD evaluation of the Wilson loop, which has no reasons to hold if the coupling is large and is thus against the main idea of gauge-gravity duality. Thus we use an appropriate definition of q ˆ : q ˆ L- = 1 /L2, where L is the separation for which the Wilson loop is equal to some specific value. The above two refinements cause q ˆ to vary with the temperature as T4 always and to depend linearly on the light-cone time L- with an additional (1 /L-) correction term in the short-distance limit whereas in the long-distance limit, q ˆ depends only linearly on L- with no correction term. These observations agree with other holographic calculations directly or indirectly.

  16. Treatment of Locally Advanced Vaginal Cancer With Radiochemotherapy and Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy: Dose-Volume Parameters and First Clinical Results

    SciTech Connect

    Dimopoulos, Johannes C.A.; Schmid, Maximilian P.; Fidarova, Elena; Berger, Daniel; Kirisits, Christian; Poetter, Richard

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical feasibility of magnetic resonance image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) for patients with locally advanced vaginal cancer and to report treatment outcomes. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with vaginal cancer were treated with external beam radiotherapy (45-50.4 Gy) plus IGABT with or without chemotherapy. Distribution of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages among patients were as follows: 4 patients had Stage II cancer, 5 patients had Stage III cancer, and 4 patients had Stage IV cancer. The concept of IGABT as developed for cervix cancer was transferred and adapted for vaginal cancer, with corresponding treatment planning and reporting. Doses were converted to the equivalent dose in 2 Gy, applying the linear quadratic model ({alpha}/{beta} = 10 Gy for tumor; {alpha}/{beta} = 3 for organs at risk). Endpoints studied were gross tumor volume (GTV), dose-volume parameters for high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV), and organs at risk, local control (LC), adverse side effects, and survival. Results: The mean GTV ({+-} 1 standard deviation) at diagnosis was 45.3 ({+-}30) cm{sup 3}, and the mean GTV at brachytherapy was 10 ({+-}14) cm{sup 3}. The mean D90 for the HRCTV was 86 ({+-}13) Gy. The mean D2cc for bladder, urethra, rectum, and sigmoid colon were 80 ({+-}20) Gy, 76 ({+-}16) Gy, 70 ({+-}9) Gy, and 60 ({+-}9) Gy, respectively. After a median follow-up of 43 months (range, 19-87 months), one local recurrence and two distant metastases cases were observed. Actuarial LC and overall survival rates at 3 years were 92% and 85%. One patient with Stage IVA and 1 patient with Stage III disease experienced fistulas (one vesicovaginal, one rectovaginal), and 1 patient developed periurethral necrosis. Conclusions: The concept of IGABT, originally developed for treating cervix cancer, appears to be applicable to vaginal cancer treatment with only minor adaptations. Dose-volume parameters for HRCTV and

  17. Observation model and parameter partials for the JPL VLBI parameter estimation software MASTERFIT-1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovers, O. J.; Fanselow, J. L.

    1987-01-01

    This report is a revision of the document of the same title (1986), dated August 1, which it supersedes. Model changes during 1986 and 1987 included corrections for antenna feed rotation, refraction in modelling antenna axis offsets, and an option to employ improved values of the semiannual and annual nutation amplitudes. Partial derivatives of the observables with respect to an additional parameter (surface temperature) are now available. New versions of two figures representing the geometric delay are incorporated. The expressions for the partial derivatives with respect to the nutation parameters have been corrected to include contributions from the dependence of UTI on nutation. The authors hope to publish revisions of this document in the future, as modeling improvements warrant.

  18. A Modified Rodrigues Parameter-based Nonlinear Observer Design for Spacecraft Gyroscope Parameters Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Kilyuk; Jo, Sujang; Bang, Hyochoong

    This paper presents a modified Rodrigues parameter (MRP)-based nonlinear observer design to estimate bias, scale factor and misalignment of gyroscope measurements. A Lyapunov stability analysis is carried out for the nonlinear observer. Simulation is performed and results are presented illustrating the performance of the proposed nonlinear observer under the condition of persistent excitation maneuver. In addition, a comparison between the nonlinear observer and alignment Kalman filter (AKF) is made to highlight favorable features of the nonlinear observer.

  19. Bayesian approach to decompression sickness model parameter estimation.

    PubMed

    Howle, L E; Weber, P W; Nichols, J M

    2017-03-01

    We examine both maximum likelihood and Bayesian approaches for estimating probabilistic decompression sickness model parameters. Maximum likelihood estimation treats parameters as fixed values and determines the best estimate through repeated trials, whereas the Bayesian approach treats parameters as random variables and determines the parameter probability distributions. We would ultimately like to know the probability that a parameter lies in a certain range rather than simply make statements about the repeatability of our estimator. Although both represent powerful methods of inference, for models with complex or multi-peaked likelihoods, maximum likelihood parameter estimates can prove more difficult to interpret than the estimates of the parameter distributions provided by the Bayesian approach. For models of decompression sickness, we show that while these two estimation methods are complementary, the credible intervals generated by the Bayesian approach are more naturally suited to quantifying uncertainty in the model parameters.

  20. What are the associated parameters and temporal coverage?

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-12-08

    ... Parameters BDS Filtered Radiances, Detector Values, Instr. Engineering Parameters CERES-NEWS-CCCM ... Effective Pressure, Temperature, optical depth, IWP/LWP, particle size, IR Emissivity in PC/Tau bins similar to ISCCP-D2 product ...

  1. Evaluation of Control Parameters for the Activated Sludge Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stall, T. Ray; Sherrard, Josephy H.

    1978-01-01

    An evaluation of the use of the parameters currently being used to design and operate the activated sludge process is presented. The advantages and disadvantages for the use of each parameter are discussed. (MR)

  2. An enhancement to the NA4 gear vibration diagnostic parameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Harry J.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Zakrajsek, James J.

    1994-01-01

    A new vibration diagnostic parameter for health monitoring of gears, NA4*, is proposed and tested. A recently developed gear vibration diagnostic parameter NA4 outperformed other fault detection methods at indicating the start and initial progression of damage. However, in some cases, as the damage progressed, the sensitivity of the NA4 and FM4 parameters tended to decrease and no longer indicated damage. A new parameter, NA4* was developed by enhancing NA4 to improve the trending of the parameter. This allows for the indication of damage both at initiation and also as the damage progresses. The NA4* parameter was verified and compared to the NA4 and FM4 parameters using experimental data from single mesh spur and spiral bevel gear fatigue rigs. The primary failure mode for the test cases was naturally occurring tooth surface pitting. The NA4* parameter is shown to be a more robust indicator of damage.

  3. Hansen solubility parameters for polyethylene glycols by inverse gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Adamska, Katarzyna; Voelkel, Adam

    2006-11-03

    Inverse gas chromatography (IGC) has been applied to determine solubility parameter and its components for nonionic surfactants--polyethylene glycols (PEG) of different molecular weight. Flory-Huggins interaction parameter (chi) and solubility parameter (delta(2)) were calculated according to DiPaola-Baranyi and Guillet method from experimentally collected retention data for the series of carefully selected test solutes. The Hansen's three-dimensional solubility parameters concept was applied to determine components (delta(d), delta(p), delta(h)) of corrected solubility parameter (delta(T)). The molecular weight and temperature of measurement influence the solubility parameter data, estimated from the slope, intercept and total solubility parameter. The solubility parameters calculated from the intercept are lower than those calculated from the slope. Temperature and structural dependences of the entopic factor (chi(S)) are presented and discussed.

  4. Parameter space of experimental chaotic circuits with high-precision control parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sousa, Francisco F. G.; Rubinger, Rero M.; Sartorelli, José C.; Albuquerque, Holokx A.; Baptista, Murilo S.

    2016-08-01

    We report high-resolution measurements that experimentally confirm a spiral cascade structure and a scaling relationship of shrimps in the Chua's circuit. Circuits constructed using this component allow for a comprehensive characterization of the circuit behaviors through high resolution parameter spaces. To illustrate the power of our technological development for the creation and the study of chaotic circuits, we constructed a Chua circuit and study its high resolution parameter space. The reliability and stability of the designed component allowed us to obtain data for long periods of time (˜21 weeks), a data set from which an accurate estimation of Lyapunov exponents for the circuit characterization was possible. Moreover, this data, rigorously characterized by the Lyapunov exponents, allows us to reassure experimentally that the shrimps, stable islands embedded in a domain of chaos in the parameter spaces, can be observed in the laboratory. Finally, we confirm that their sizes decay exponentially with the period of the attractor, a result expected to be found in maps of the quadratic family.

  5. Image Texture Dependence Upon Sensing and Calculation Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionova, N. V.

    2013-08-01

    This paper analyzes various parameters influence on the textural properties of digital remote sensing images using the statistical method of texture description (grey-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM)). The parameters may be grouped to external (primary) parameters determined by surface and sensor characteristics (radar frequency, polarization, speckle filtering, spatial and radiometric resolution of the sensor, multispectral (MS) band, etc.), and internal (secondary) parameters determined by the texture calculation algorithm.SAR, MS and panchromatic images are used for illustration.

  6. Parameter identification for an abstract Cauchy problem by quasilinearization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, Dennis W.; Burns, John A.; Cliff, Eugene M.

    1989-01-01

    A parameter identification problem is considered in the context of a linear abstract Cauchy problem with a parameter-dependent evolution operator. Conditions are investigated under which the gradient of the state with respect to a parameter possesses smoothness properties which lead to local convergence of an estimation algorithm based on quasi-linearization. Numerical results are presented concerning estimation of unknown parameters in delay-differential equations.

  7. Planning Robot-Control Parameters With Qualitative Reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Stephen F.

    1993-01-01

    Qualitative-reasoning planning algorithm helps to determine quantitative parameters controlling motion of robot. Algorithm regarded as performing search in multidimensional space of control parameters from starting point to goal region in which desired result of robotic manipulation achieved. Makes use of directed graph representing qualitative physical equations describing task, and interacts, at each sampling period, with history of quantitative control parameters and sensory data, to narrow search for reliable values of quantitative control parameters.

  8. Sensitivity analysis of textural parameters for vertebroplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tack, Gye Rae; Lee, Seung Y.; Shin, Kyu-Chul; Lee, Sung J.

    2002-05-01

    Vertebroplasty is one of the newest surgical approaches for the treatment of the osteoporotic spine. Recent studies have shown that it is a minimally invasive, safe, promising procedure for patients with osteoporotic fractures while providing structural reinforcement of the osteoporotic vertebrae as well as immediate pain relief. However, treatment failures due to excessive bone cement injection have been reported as one of complications. It is believed that control of bone cement volume seems to be one of the most critical factors in preventing complications. We believed that an optimal bone cement volume could be assessed based on CT data of a patient. Gray-level run length analysis was used to extract textural information of the trabecular. At initial stage of the project, four indices were used to represent the textural information: mean width of intertrabecular space, mean width of trabecular, area of intertrabecular space, and area of trabecular. Finally, the area of intertrabecular space was selected as a parameter to estimate an optimal bone cement volume and it was found that there was a strong linear relationship between these 2 variables (correlation coefficient = 0.9433, standard deviation = 0.0246). In this study, we examined several factors affecting overall procedures. The threshold level, the radius of rolling ball and the size of region of interest were selected for the sensitivity analysis. As the level of threshold varied with 9, 10, and 11, the correlation coefficient varied from 0.9123 to 0.9534. As the radius of rolling ball varied with 45, 50, and 55, the correlation coefficient varied from 0.9265 to 0.9730. As the size of region of interest varied with 58 x 58, 64 x 64, and 70 x 70, the correlation coefficient varied from 0.9685 to 0.9468. Finally, we found that strong correlation between actual bone cement volume (Y) and the area (X) of the intertrabecular space calculated from the binary image and the linear equation Y = 0.001722 X - 2

  9. Geometrical parameters of E+S pairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampazzo, Roberto; Sulentic, Jack W.

    1990-01-01

    Local environmental conditions (i.e., density and angular momentum properties of protogalactic clouds) are thought to be factors affecting the ultimate morphology of a galaxy. The existence of significant numbers of mixed morphology (E/SO+S) pairs of galaxies would represent a direct challenge to this idea unless all early-type components are formed by mergers. The authors wished to isolate candidate E+S pairs for detailed study. The authors have observed 22 pairs of mixed morphology galaxies (containing at least one early-type component) selected from a catalog of Sulentic (1988: unpublished) based upon the ESO sky survey. The observed sample and relevant morphological and interaction characteristics are summarized in tabular form. The authors report the relevant geometrical properties of the galaxies in another table. They list the maximum values measured for the ellipticity and the a(4)/a shape parameter together with the total measured twisting along the profile beyond the seeing disk (they set an inner limit of 3 arcsed). An asterisk indicates objects in which a(4)/a is neither predominantly boxy nor disky. They found a large number of true mixed pairs with 13/22 E+S pairs in the present sample. The remaining objects include 5 disk pairs (composed of SO and S members) and 3 early-type pairs comprising E and SO members. They estimate that between 25 and 50 percent of the pairs in any complete sample will be of the E+S type. This suggests that 100 to 200 such pairs exist on the sky brighter than m sub pg = 16.0. They found no global evidence for a difference between E members of this sample and those in more general samples (e.g., Bender et al. 1989). In particular, they found that about 30 percent of the early-type galaxies cannot be classified either predominantly boxy or disky because the a(4)/a profile shows both of these features at a comparable level or does not show any significant trend. Isophotal twisting is observed with a range and distribution

  10. EMODnet Physical Parameters (EMODNet PP) Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novellino, A.; Schaap, D.; Manzella, G. M. R.; Pouliquen, S.; Gorringe, P.

    2012-04-01

    In December 2007 the European Parliament and Council adopted a common text for the Marine Strategy Framework Directive which aims to achieve environmentally healthy marine waters by 2020. This Directive includes an initiative for an overarching European Marine Observation and Data Network (EMODNet). During the one-year consultation phase that followed the release of the EU Green Paper on a Future Maritime Policy for the European Union, stakeholders gave an overwhelming positive response. Facilitating access to high quality marine data will resolve difficulties and stimulate an expansion of value-added public and commercial services, lay the foundations for sound governance and reduce uncertainties on human impact on the planet as well as of forecasts relating to the future state of the marine environment. Better and linked marine data will have an immediate impact on the planning of environmental policy and mitigation measures, and will also facilitate impact assessments and scientific work. The overall objectives of the EMODnet Physical Parameters (EMODNet PP) preparatory action is to provide access to archived and near real-time data on physical conditions in Europe's seas and oceans by means of a dedicated Pilot Portal and to determine how well the data meet the needs of users from industry, public authorities and scientists. The latter implicates that it is also an objective to identify data gaps and arguments why these gaps should be filled in future monitoring. This project will contribute towards the definition of an operational European Marine Observation and Data Network (EMODnet). This is done done by: 1. providing through a portal: a. access to marine data from measurement stations and ferryboxes. Both near real-time and archived data of time series are to be made available. b. metadata for these data sets using EMODnet/INSPIRE standards. c. metadata maps and overviews for whole sea-basins showing the availability of data and monitoring intensity of that

  11. [Influence of photosynthetic parameters on leaf longevity].

    PubMed

    Vasfilov, S P

    2015-01-01

    Higher plants show a wide range of leaf lifespan (LL) variability. LL is calculated as a sum of functional LL(f) (corresponding to the time of active photosynthesis and CO2 accumulation in the leaf) and nonfunctional LL(n) (the time of photosynthetic activity absence). For evergreen species of boreal zones, LL(n) corresponds to the period of winter rest. Photosynthetic potential of leaf (PPL), interpreted as the maximum possible amount of CO2 that can be fixed during its life, can be estimated on the basis of maximum photosynthesis rate (P(a)) dynamics during LL(f); the maximum (P(a max)) being achieved in mature leaf. Photosynthetic potential depends on LL(f) more strongly than on P(a max). The PPL/LL(f) ratio is indicative of the rate of PPL realization over leaf lifespan. As LL(f) shows strong positive correlation with LL, the latter parameter can also characterize the rate of PPL realization. Long LL(f) in evergreen species provides higher PPL, which is advantageous by comparison with deciduous ones. In evergreen species, the PPL itself is realized slower than in deciduous ones. The increase in LL(f) and LL is accompanied by the increase in leaf constructional cost (LCC(a)) as well as the decrease in photosynthesis rate. At that, photosynthesis rate per unit of dry weight (P(m)) decreases much faster than that per unit of leaf area (P(a)). Apparently, when considering dry leaf weight, the apoplast share seems to be much higher in long-living leaves of evergreen species than in short-living leaves of deciduous species. The leaf payback (LP) may be stabilized by unidirectional shifts in PPL and LCC(a). Species with short/long LL(f) and high/low PPL realization rate are typical for early/late succession stages and for habitats with the environmental conditions favorable/adverse for photosynthesis and growth. If the conditions for photosynthesis and growth are favorable, high PPL realization rate provides advantage in competition. The PPL realization rate is

  12. Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian Parameter Estimation in Item Response Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lord, Frederic M.

    There are currently three main approaches to parameter estimation in item response theory (IRT): (1) joint maximum likelihood, exemplified by LOGIST, yielding maximum likelihood estimates; (2) marginal maximum likelihood, exemplified by BILOG, yielding maximum likelihood estimates of item parameters (ability parameters can be estimated…

  13. [Input impedance for studying hydraulic parameters of the vessel system].

    PubMed

    Naumov, A Iu; Sheptutsolov, K V; Balashov, S A; Mel'kumiants, A M

    2001-03-01

    Vascular input impedance can be used as an effective tool in estimating hydraulic parameters of arterial bed. These parameters may be interpreted as hydraulic resistance, elastance and inertance of particular sites of the arterial system. There is no significant difference between these parameters and those obtained through a direct measurement.

  14. Influence of Item Parameter Errors in Test Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hambleton, Ronald K.; And Others

    Item response theory (IRT) model parameter estimates have considerable merit and open up new directions for test development, but misleading results are often obtained because of errors in the item parameter estimates. The problem of the effects of item parameter estimation errors on the test development process is discussed, and the seriousness…

  15. 40 CFR 761.389 - Testing parameter requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Testing parameter requirements. 761... Under § 761.79(d)(4) § 761.389 Testing parameter requirements. There are no restrictions on the variable testing parameters described in this section which may be used in the validation study....

  16. 40 CFR 761.389 - Testing parameter requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Testing parameter requirements. 761... Under § 761.79(d)(4) § 761.389 Testing parameter requirements. There are no restrictions on the variable testing parameters described in this section which may be used in the validation study....

  17. Advancing sensitivity analysis to precisely characterize temporal parameter dominance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guse, Björn; Pfannerstill, Matthias; Strauch, Michael; Reusser, Dominik; Lüdtke, Stefan; Volk, Martin; Gupta, Hoshin; Fohrer, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    Parameter sensitivity analysis is a strategy for detecting dominant model parameters. A temporal sensitivity analysis calculates daily sensitivities of model parameters. This allows a precise characterization of temporal patterns of parameter dominance and an identification of the related discharge conditions. To achieve this goal, the diagnostic information as derived from the temporal parameter sensitivity is advanced by including discharge information in three steps. In a first step, the temporal dynamics are analyzed by means of daily time series of parameter sensitivities. As sensitivity analysis method, we used the Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test (FAST) applied directly onto the modelled discharge. Next, the daily sensitivities are analyzed in combination with the flow duration curve (FDC). Through this step, we determine whether high sensitivities of model parameters are related to specific discharges. Finally, parameter sensitivities are separately analyzed for five segments of the FDC and presented as monthly averaged sensitivities. In this way, seasonal patterns of dominant model parameter are provided for each FDC segment. For this methodical approach, we used two contrasting catchments (upland and lowland catchment) to illustrate how parameter dominances change seasonally in different catchments. For all of the FDC segments, the groundwater parameters are dominant in the lowland catchment, while in the upland catchment the controlling parameters change seasonally between parameters from different runoff components. The three methodical steps lead to clear temporal patterns, which represent the typical characteristics of the study catchments. Our methodical approach thus provides a clear idea of how the hydrological dynamics are controlled by model parameters for certain discharge magnitudes during the year. Overall, these three methodical steps precisely characterize model parameters and improve the understanding of process dynamics in hydrological

  18. Effect of the Guessing Parameter on the Estimation of the Item Discrimination and Difficulty Parameters When Three-Parameter Logistic Model Is Assumed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samejima, Fumiko

    Item analysis data fitting the normal ogive model were simulated in order to investigate the problems encountered when applying the three-parameter logistic model. Binary item tests containing 10 and 35 items were created, and Monte Carlo methods simulated the responses of 2,000 and 500 examinees. Item parameters were obtained using Logist 5.…

  19. Extended S-parameters for imperfect test ports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, J.; Wollensack, M.; Ruefenacht, J.; Zeier, M.

    2015-02-01

    Reflection and transmission of microwaves in coaxial devices are usually described by S-parameters. The current definition of S-parameters requires that the reference plane is in a section of ideal wave guide. Due to this, tremendous effort is necessary to facilitate the dissemination of standards, for the comparison of measurement values and for cascading devices. These processes can be simplified by extending the definition of S-parameters to reference planes in sections of non-ideal wave guide, e.g. in connectors. Extended S-parameters can be approximated with conventional simulation programs. Practical experiments show that extended S-parameters can be compared and cascaded without effort.

  20. Parameter adaptation in a simplified pulse-coupled neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szekely, Geza; Lindblad, Thomas

    1999-03-01

    In a general purpose pulse coupled neural network (PCNN) algorithm the following parameters are used: 2 weight matrices, 3 time constants, 3 normalization factors and 2 further parameters. In a given application, one has to determine the near optimal parameter set to achieve the desired goal. Here a simplified PCNN is described which contains a parameter fitting part, in the least squares sense. Given input and a desired output image, the program is able to determine the optimal value of a selected PCNN parameter. This method can be extended to more general PCNN algorithms, because partial derivatives are not required for the fitting. Only the sum of squares of the differences is used.

  1. Parameter extraction of solar cells using particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Meiying; Wang, Xiaodong; Xu, Yousheng

    2009-05-01

    In this article, particle swarm optimization (PSO) was applied to extract the solar cell parameters from illuminated current-voltage characteristics. The performance of the PSO was compared with the genetic algorithms (GAs) for the single and double diode models. Based on synthetic and experimental current-voltage data, it has been confirmed that the proposed method can obtain higher parameter precision with better computational efficiency than the GA method. Compared with conventional gradient-based methods, even without a good initial guess, the PSO method can obtain the parameters of solar cells as close as possible to the practical parameters only based on a broad range specified for each of the parameters.

  2. Advances in parameter estimation techniques applied to flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maben, Egbert; Zimmerman, David C.

    1994-01-01

    In this work, various parameter estimation techniques are investigated in the context of structural system identification utilizing distributed parameter models and 'measured' time-domain data. Distributed parameter models are formulated using the PDEMOD software developed by Taylor. Enhancements made to PDEMOD for this work include the following: (1) a Wittrick-Williams based root solving algorithm; (2) a time simulation capability; and (3) various parameter estimation algorithms. The parameter estimations schemes will be contrasted using the NASA Mini-Mast as the focus structure.

  3. Acceptable Tolerances for Matching Icing Similarity Parameters in Scaling Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, David N.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews past work and presents new data to evaluate how changes in similarity parameters affect ice shapes and how closely scale values of the parameters should match reference values. Experimental ice shapes presented are from tests by various researchers in the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel. The parameters reviewed are the modified inertia parameter (which determines the stagnation collection efficiency), accumulation parameter, freezing fraction, Reynolds number, and Weber number. It was demonstrated that a good match of scale and reference ice shapes could sometimes be achieved even when values of the modified inertia parameter did not match precisely. Consequently, there can be some flexibility in setting scale droplet size, which is the test condition determined from the modified inertia parameter. A recommended guideline is that the modified inertia parameter be chosen so that the scale stagnation collection efficiency is within 10 percent of the reference value. The scale accumulation parameter and freezing fraction should also be within 10 percent of their reference values. The Weber number based on droplet size and water properties appears to be a more important scaling parameter than one based on model size and air properties. Scale values of both the Reynolds and Weber numbers need to be in the range of 60 to 160 percent of the corresponding reference values. The effects of variations in other similarity parameters have yet to be established.

  4. Visual exploration of parameter influence on phylogenetic trees.

    PubMed

    Hess, Martin; Bremm, Sebastian; Weissgraeber, Stephanie; Hamacher, Kay; Goesele, Michael; Wiemeyer, Josef; von Landesberger, Tatiana

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary relationships between organisms are frequently derived as phylogenetic trees inferred from multiple sequence alignments (MSAs). The MSA parameter space is exponentially large, so tens of thousands of potential trees can emerge for each dataset. A proposed visual-analytics approach can reveal the parameters' impact on the trees. Given input trees created with different parameter settings, it hierarchically clusters the trees according to their structural similarity. The most important clusters of similar trees are shown together with their parameters. This view offers interactive parameter exploration and automatic identification of relevant parameters. Biologists applied this approach to real data of 16S ribosomal RNA and protein sequences of ion channels. It revealed which parameters affected the tree structures. This led to a more reliable selection of the best trees.

  5. Reconstruction of biofilm images: combining local and global structural parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Resat, Haluk; Renslow, Ryan S.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-10-20

    Digitized images can be used for quantitative comparison of biofilms grown under different conditions. Using biofilm image reconstruction, it was previously found that biofilms with a completely different look can have nearly identical structural parameters and that the most commonly utilized global structural parameters were not sufficient to uniquely define these biofilms. Here, additional local and global parameters are introduced to show that these parameters considerably increase the reliability of the image reconstruction process. Assessment using human evaluators indicated that the correct identification rate of the reconstructed images increased from 50% to 72% with the introduction of the new parameters into the reconstruction procedure. An expanded set of parameters especially improved the identification of biofilm structures with internal orientational features and of structures in which colony sizes and spatial locations varied. Hence, the newly introduced structural parameter sets helped to better classify the biofilms by incorporating finer local structural details into the reconstruction process.

  6. A Comparative Study of Distribution System Parameter Estimation Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yannan; Williams, Tess L.; Gourisetti, Sri Nikhil Gup

    2016-07-17

    In this paper, we compare two parameter estimation methods for distribution systems: residual sensitivity analysis and state-vector augmentation with a Kalman filter. These two methods were originally proposed for transmission systems, and are still the most commonly used methods for parameter estimation. Distribution systems have much lower measurement redundancy than transmission systems. Therefore, estimating parameters is much more difficult. To increase the robustness of parameter estimation, the two methods are applied with combined measurement snapshots (measurement sets taken at different points in time), so that the redundancy for computing the parameter values is increased. The advantages and disadvantages of both methods are discussed. The results of this paper show that state-vector augmentation is a better approach for parameter estimation in distribution systems. Simulation studies are done on a modified version of IEEE 13-Node Test Feeder with varying levels of measurement noise and non-zero error in the other system model parameters.

  7. Some properties of a 5-parameter bivariate probability distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tubbs, J. D.; Brewer, D. W.; Smith, O. E.

    1983-01-01

    A five-parameter bivariate gamma distribution having two shape parameters, two location parameters and a correlation parameter was developed. This more general bivariate gamma distribution reduces to the known four-parameter distribution. The five-parameter distribution gives a better fit to the gust data. The statistical properties of this general bivariate gamma distribution and a hypothesis test were investigated. Although these developments have come too late in the Shuttle program to be used directly as design criteria for ascent wind gust loads, the new wind gust model has helped to explain the wind profile conditions which cause large dynamic loads. Other potential applications of the newly developed five-parameter bivariate gamma distribution are in the areas of reliability theory, signal noise, and vibration mechanics.

  8. Design parameters and source terms: Volume 1, Design parameters: Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-01

    The Design Parameters and Source Terms Document was prepared in accordance with DOE request and to provide data for the environmental impact study to be performed in the future for the Deaf Smith County, Texas site for a nuclear waste repository in salt. This document updates a previous unpublished report to the level of the Site Characterization Plan - Conceptual Design Report, SCP-CDR. The previous unpublished SCC Study identified the data needs for the Environmental Assessment effort for seven possible salt repository sites.

  9. Observation model and parameter partials for the JPL VLBI parameter estimation software MODEST, 19 94

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovers, O. J.; Jacobs, C. S.

    1994-01-01

    This report is a revision of the document Observation Model and Parameter Partials for the JPL VLBI Parameter Estimation Software 'MODEST'---1991, dated August 1, 1991. It supersedes that document and its four previous versions (1983, 1985, 1986, and 1987). A number of aspects of the very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) model were improved from 1991 to 1994. Treatment of tidal effects is extended to model the effects of ocean tides on universal time and polar motion (UTPM), including a default model for nearly diurnal and semidiurnal ocean tidal UTPM variations, and partial derivatives for all (solid and ocean) tidal UTPM amplitudes. The time-honored 'K(sub 1) correction' for solid earth tides has been extended to include analogous frequency-dependent response of five tidal components. Partials of ocean loading amplitudes are now supplied. The Zhu-Mathews-Oceans-Anisotropy (ZMOA) 1990-2 and Kinoshita-Souchay models of nutation are now two of the modeling choices to replace the increasingly inadequate 1980 International Astronomical Union (IAU) nutation series. A rudimentary model of antenna thermal expansion is provided. Two more troposphere mapping functions have been added to the repertoire. Finally, corrections among VLBI observations via the model of Treuhaft and lanyi improve modeling of the dynamic troposphere. A number of minor misprints in Rev. 4 have been corrected.

  10. 95Mo nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of molybdenum hexacarbonyl from density functional theory: appraisal of computational and geometrical parameters.

    PubMed

    Cuny, Jérôme; Sykina, Kateryna; Fontaine, Bruno; Le Pollès, Laurent; Pickard, Chris J; Gautier, Régis

    2011-11-21

    Solid-state (95)Mo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) properties of molybdenum hexacarbonyl have been computed using density functional theory (DFT) based methods. Both quadrupolar coupling and chemical shift parameters were evaluated and compared with parameters of high precision determined using single-crystal (95)Mo NMR experiments. Within a molecular approach, the effects of major computational parameters, i.e. basis set, exchange-correlation functional, treatment of relativity, have been evaluated. Except for the isotropic parameter of both chemical shift and chemical shielding, computed NMR parameters are more sensitive to geometrical variations than computational details. Relativistic effects do not play a crucial part in the calculations of such parameters for the 4d transition metal, in particular isotropic chemical shift. Periodic DFT calculations were tackled to measure the influence of neighbouring molecules on the crystal structure. These effects have to be taken into account to compute accurate solid-state (95)Mo NMR parameters even for such an inorganic molecular compound.

  11. Effect of correlated observation error on parameters, predictions, and uncertainty

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tiedeman, Claire R.; Green, Christopher T.

    2013-01-01

    Correlations among observation errors are typically omitted when calculating observation weights for model calibration by inverse methods. We explore the effects of omitting these correlations on estimates of parameters, predictions, and uncertainties. First, we develop a new analytical expression for the difference in parameter variance estimated with and without error correlations for a simple one-parameter two-observation inverse model. Results indicate that omitting error correlations from both the weight matrix and the variance calculation can either increase or decrease the parameter variance, depending on the values of error correlation (ρ) and the ratio of dimensionless scaled sensitivities (rdss). For small ρ, the difference in variance is always small, but for large ρ, the difference varies widely depending on the sign and magnitude of rdss. Next, we consider a groundwater reactive transport model of denitrification with four parameters and correlated geochemical observation errors that are computed by an error-propagation approach that is new for hydrogeologic studies. We compare parameter estimates, predictions, and uncertainties obtained with and without the error correlations. Omitting the correlations modestly to substantially changes parameter estimates, and causes both increases and decreases of parameter variances, consistent with the analytical expression. Differences in predictions for the models calibrated with and without error correlations can be greater than parameter differences when both are considered relative to their respective confidence intervals. These results indicate that including observation error correlations in weighting for nonlinear regression can have important effects on parameter estimates, predictions, and their respective uncertainties.

  12. Parameter estimation of hydrologic models using data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaheil, Y. H.

    2005-12-01

    The uncertainties associated with the modeling of hydrologic systems sometimes demand that data should be incorporated in an on-line fashion in order to understand the behavior of the system. This paper represents a Bayesian strategy to estimate parameters for hydrologic models in an iterative mode. The paper presents a modified technique called localized Bayesian recursive estimation (LoBaRE) that efficiently identifies the optimum parameter region, avoiding convergence to a single best parameter set. The LoBaRE methodology is tested for parameter estimation for two different types of models: a support vector machine (SVM) model for predicting soil moisture, and the Sacramento Soil Moisture Accounting (SAC-SMA) model for estimating streamflow. The SAC-SMA model has 13 parameters that must be determined. The SVM model has three parameters. Bayesian inference is used to estimate the best parameter set in an iterative fashion. This is done by narrowing the sampling space by imposing uncertainty bounds on the posterior best parameter set and/or updating the "parent" bounds based on their fitness. The new approach results in fast convergence towards the optimal parameter set using minimum training/calibration data and evaluation of fewer parameter sets. The efficacy of the localized methodology is also compared with the previously used Bayesian recursive estimation (BaRE) algorithm.

  13. Uncertainty in dual permeability model parameters for structured soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, B.; Mohanty, B. P.; McGuire, J. T.

    2012-01-01

    Successful application of dual permeability models (DPM) to predict contaminant transport is contingent upon measured or inversely estimated soil hydraulic and solute transport parameters. The difficulty in unique identification of parameters for the additional macropore- and matrix-macropore interface regions, and knowledge about requisite experimental data for DPM has not been resolved to date. Therefore, this study quantifies uncertainty in dual permeability model parameters of experimental soil columns with different macropore distributions (single macropore, and low- and high-density multiple macropores). Uncertainty evaluation is conducted using adaptive Markov chain Monte Carlo (AMCMC) and conventional Metropolis-Hastings (MH) algorithms while assuming 10 out of 17 parameters to be uncertain or random. Results indicate that AMCMC resolves parameter correlations and exhibits fast convergence for all DPM parameters while MH displays large posterior correlations for various parameters. This study demonstrates that the choice of parameter sampling algorithms is paramount in obtaining unique DPM parameters when information on covariance structure is lacking, or else additional information on parameter correlations must be supplied to resolve the problem of equifinality of DPM parameters. This study also highlights the placement and significance of matrix-macropore interface in flow experiments of soil columns with different macropore densities. Histograms for certain soil hydraulic parameters display tri-modal characteristics implying that macropores are drained first followed by the interface region and then by pores of the matrix domain in drainage experiments. Results indicate that hydraulic properties and behavior of the matrix-macropore interface is not only a function of saturated hydraulic conductivity of the macroporematrix interface (Ksa) and macropore tortuosity (lf) but also of other parameters of the matrix and macropore domains.

  14. Concurrently adjusting interrelated control parameters to achieve optimal engine performance

    DOEpatents

    Jiang, Li; Lee, Donghoon; Yilmaz, Hakan; Stefanopoulou, Anna

    2015-12-01

    Methods and systems for real-time engine control optimization are provided. A value of an engine performance variable is determined, a value of a first operating condition and a value of a second operating condition of a vehicle engine are detected, and initial values for a first engine control parameter and a second engine control parameter are determined based on the detected first operating condition and the detected second operating condition. The initial values for the first engine control parameter and the second engine control parameter are adjusted based on the determined value of the engine performance variable to cause the engine performance variable to approach a target engine performance variable. In order to cause the engine performance variable to approach the target engine performance variable, adjusting the initial value for the first engine control parameter necessitates a corresponding adjustment of the initial value for the second engine control parameter.

  15. Obtaining and estimating kinetic parameters from the literature.

    PubMed

    Neves, Susana R

    2011-09-13

    This Teaching Resource provides lecture notes, slides, and a student assignment for a lecture on strategies for the development of mathematical models. Many biological processes can be represented mathematically as systems of ordinary differential equations (ODEs). Simulations with these mathematical models can provide mechanistic insight into the underlying biology of the system. A prerequisite for running simulations, however, is the identification of kinetic parameters that correspond closely with the biological reality. This lecture presents an overview of the steps required for the development of kinetic ODE models and describes experimental methods that can yield kinetic parameters and concentrations of reactants, which are essential for the development of kinetic models. Strategies are provided to extract necessary parameters from published data. The homework assignment requires students to find parameters appropriate for a well-studied biological regulatory system, convert these parameters into appropriate units, and interpret how different values of these parameters may lead to different biological behaviors.

  16. Inferring Indel Parameters using a Simulation-based Approach

    PubMed Central

    Levy Karin, Eli; Rabin, Avigayel; Ashkenazy, Haim; Shkedy, Dafna; Avram, Oren; Cartwright, Reed A.; Pupko, Tal

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we present a novel methodology to infer indel parameters from multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) based on simulations. Our algorithm searches for the set of evolutionary parameters describing indel dynamics which best fits a given input MSA. In each step of the search, we use parametric bootstraps and the Mahalanobis distance to estimate how well a proposed set of parameters fits input data. Using simulations, we demonstrate that our methodology can accurately infer the indel parameters for a large variety of plausible settings. Moreover, using our methodology, we show that indel parameters substantially vary between three genomic data sets: Mammals, bacteria, and retroviruses. Finally, we demonstrate how our methodology can be used to simulate MSAs based on indel parameters inferred from real data sets. PMID:26537226

  17. Identifying Suitable Degradation Parameters for Individual-Based Prognostics

    SciTech Connect

    Coble, Jamie B.; Hines, Wes

    2012-09-30

    The ultimate goal of most prognostic systems is accurate prediction of the remaining useful life of individual systems or components based on their use and performance. Traditionally, individual-based prognostic methods use a measure of degradation to make lifetime estimates. Degradation measures may include sensed measurements, such as temperature or vibration level, or inferred measurements, such as model residuals or physics-based model predictions. Often, it is beneficial to combine several measures of degradation into a single parameter. Parameter features such as trendability, monotonicity, and prognosability can be used to compare candidate prognostic parameters to determine which is most useful for individual-based prognosis. By quantifying these features for a given parameter, the metrics can be used with any traditional optimization technique to identify an appropriate parameter. This parameter may be used with a parametric extrapolation model to make prognostic estimates for an individual unit. The proposed methods are illustrated with an application to simulated turbofan engine data.

  18. Selection of solubility parameters for characterization of pharmaceutical excipients.

    PubMed

    Adamska, Katarzyna; Voelkel, Adam; Héberger, Károly

    2007-11-09

    The solubility parameter (delta(2)), corrected solubility parameter (delta(T)) and its components (delta(d), delta(p), delta(h)) were determined for series of pharmaceutical excipients by using inverse gas chromatography (IGC). Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied for the selection of the solubility parameters which assure the complete characterization of examined materials. Application of PCA suggests that complete description of examined materials is achieved with four solubility parameters, i.e. delta(2) and Hansen solubility parameters (delta(d), delta(p), delta(h)). Selection of the excipients through PCA of their solubility parameters data can be used for prediction of their behavior in a multi-component system, e.g. for selection of the best materials to form stable pharmaceutical liquid mixtures or stable coating formulation.

  19. Using Entropy for Parameter Analysis of Evolutionary Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smit, Selmar K.; Eiben, Agoston E.

    Evolutionary algorithms (EA) form a rich class of stochastic search methods that share the basic principles of incrementally improving the quality of a set of candidate solutions by means of variation and selection (Eiben and Smith 2003, De Jong 2006). Such variation and selection operators often require parameters to be specified. Finding a good set of parameter values is a nontrivial problem in itself. Furthermore, some EA parameters are more relevant than others in the sense that choosing different values for them affects EA performance more than for the other parameters. In this chapter we explain the notion of entropy and discuss how entropy can disclose important information about EA parameters, in particular, about their relevance. We describe an algorithm that is able to estimate the entropy of EA parameters and we present a case study, based on extensive experimentation, to demonstrate the usefulness of this approach and some interesting insights that are gained.

  20. Sample size planning for longitudinal models: accuracy in parameter estimation for polynomial change parameters.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Ken; Rausch, Joseph R

    2011-12-01

    Longitudinal studies are necessary to examine individual change over time, with group status often being an important variable in explaining some individual differences in change. Although sample size planning for longitudinal studies has focused on statistical power, recent calls for effect sizes and their corresponding confidence intervals underscore the importance of obtaining sufficiently accurate estimates of group differences in change. We derived expressions that allow researchers to plan sample size to achieve the desired confidence interval width for group differences in change for orthogonal polynomial change parameters. The approaches developed provide the expected confidence interval width to be sufficiently narrow, with an extension that allows some specified degree of assurance (e.g., 99%) that the confidence interval will be sufficiently narrow. We make computer routines freely available, so that the methods developed can be used by researchers immediately.